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Sample records for affecting normal cells

  1. Anabolic androgens affect the competitive interactions in cell migration and adhesion between normal mouse urothelial cells and urothelial carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Ping; Hsieh, Teng-Fu; Chen, Chi-Cheng; Hung, Xiao-Fan; Yu, Ai-Lin; Chang, Chawnshang; Shyr, Chih-Rong

    2014-09-26

    The urothelium is constantly rebuilt by normal urothelial cells to regenerate damaged tissues caused by stimuli in urine. However, the urothelial carcinoma cells expand the territory by aberrant growth of tumor cells, which migrate and occupy the damaged tissues to spread outside and disrupt the normal cells and organized tissues and form a tumor. Therefore, the interaction between normal urothelial cells and urothelial carcinoma cells affect the initiation and progression of urothelial tumors if normal urothelial cells fail to migrate and adhere to the damages sites to regenerate the tissues. Here, comparing normal murine urothelial cells with murine urothelial carcinoma cells (MBT-2), we found that normal cells had less migration ability than carcinoma cells. And in our co-culture system we found that carcinoma cells had propensity migrating toward normal urothelial cells and carcinoma cells had more advantages to adhere than normal cells. To reverse this condition, we used anabolic androgen, dihyrotestosterone (DHT) to treat normal cells and found that DHT treatment increased the migration ability of normal urothelial cells toward carcinoma cells and the adhesion capacity in competition with carcinoma cells. This study provides the base of a novel therapeutic approach by using anabolic hormone-enforced normal urothelial cells to regenerate the damage urothelium and defend against the occupancy of carcinoma cells to thwart cancer development and recurrence.

  2. Evaluation of normalized energy recovery (NER) in microbial fuel cells affected by reactor dimensions and substrates.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Li; Ge, Zheng; Kelly, Patrick; Zhang, Fei; He, Zhen

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to provide an initial evaluation of normalized energy recovery (NER - a new parameter for presenting energy performance) in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) through investigation of the effects of reactor dimensions and anode substrates. Although the larger-size MFCs generally have lower maximum power densities, their maximum NER is comparable to that of the smaller MFCs at the same anolyte flow rate. The mixed messages obtained from the MFC size tests suggest that MFCs can be further scaled up without decreasing energy recovery under certain conditions. The low-strength substrates seem to be more suitable for MFC treatment of wastewater, in terms of both energy recovery and organic removal. However, because the MFCs could not achieve the maximum NER and the maximum organic removal efficiency at the same time, one must determine a major goal for MFCs treating wastewater between energy recovery and contaminant removal.

  3. Histone deacetylase inhibitor abexinostat affects chromatin organization and gene transcription in normal B cells and in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Markozashvili, Diana; Pichugin, Andrei; Barat, Ana; Camara-Clayette, Valerie; Vasilyeva, Natalia V; Lelièvre, Hélène; Kraus-Berthier, Laurence; Depil, Stéphane; Ribrag, Vincent; Vassetzky, Yegor

    2016-04-15

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a rare lymphoma caused by the t(11:14) juxtaposing the cyclin D1 (CCND1) locus on chromosome 11 and the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) locus on chromosome 14. Several new treatments are proposed for MCL, including histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi). We have studied gene expression and chromatin organization in the translocated 11q13 locus in MCL cells as compared to lymphoblastoid cell lines as well as the effect of HDACi abexinostat on chromatin organization and gene expression in the 11q13 locus. We have identified a cluster of genes overexpressed in the translocation region on chromosome 11 in MCL cells. Abexinostat provokes a genome-wide disaggregation of heterochromatin. The genes upregulated after the t(11;14) translocation react to the HDACi treatment by increasing their expression, but their gene promoters do not show significant alterations in H3K9Ac and H3K9me2 levels in abexinostat-treated cells.

  4. Normal Untreated Jurkat Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. The objective of the research was to define a way to differentiate between effects due to microgravity and those due to possible stress from non-optimal spaceflight conditions. These Jurkat cells, a human acute T-cell leukemia was obtained to evaluate three types of potential experimental stressors: a) Temperature elevation; b) Serum starvation; and c) Centrifugal force. The data from previous spaceflight experiments showed that actin filaments and cell shape are significantly different for the control. These normal cells serve as the baseline for future spaceflight experiments.

  5. JNK pathway inhibition selectively primes pancreatic cancer stem cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis without affecting the physiology of normal tissue resident stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Rhea, P. Robyn; Kettlun, Claudia; Heinemann, Mitja L.; Ruetering, Jennifer; Vykoukal, Jody; Alt, Eckhard

    2016-01-01

    Objective Successful treatment of solid cancers mandates targeting cancer stem cells (CSC) without impact on the physiology of normal tissue resident stem cells. C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling has been shown to be of importance in cancer. We test whether JNK inhibition would sensitize pancreatic CSCs to induction of apoptosis via low-dose TNFα-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Design Effects of JNK inhibition (JNKi) were evaluated in vitro in functional assays, through mRNA and protein expression analysis, and in in vivo mouse studies. CSCs were enriched in anoikis-resistant spheroid culture and analyzed accordingly. Results We confirmed that the JNK pathway is an important regulatory pathway in pancreatic cancer stem cells and further found that JNK inhibition downregulates the decoy receptor DcR1 through IL-8 signaling while upregulating pro-apoptotic death receptors DR4/5, thereby sensitizing cells - even with acquired TRAIL-resistance - to apoptosis induction. Treatment of orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenografts with either gemcitabine, JNKi or TRAIL alone for 4 weeks showed only modest effects compared to control, while the combination of JNKi and TRAIL resulted in significantly lower tumor burden (69%; p < 0.04), reduced numbers of circulating tumor cells, and less distant metastatic events, without affecting the general health of the animals. Conclusions The combination of JNKi and TRAIL significantly impacts on CSCs, but leaves regular tissue-resident stem cells unaffected – even under hypoxic stress conditions. This concept of selective treatment of pancreatic CSCs warrants further evaluation. PMID:26840266

  6. Senescence-Associated Molecular and Epigenetic Alterations in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Cultures from Amniotic Fluid of Normal and Fetus-Affected Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Savickienė, Jūratė; Baronaitė, Sandra; Zentelytė, Aistė; Treigytė, Gražina

    2016-01-01

    Human amniotic-fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AF-MSCs) are interesting for their multilineage differentiation potential and wide range of therapeutic applications due to the ease of culture expansion. However, MSCs undergo replicative senescence. So far, the molecular mechanisms that underlie fetal diseases and cell senescence are still poorly understood. Here, we analyzed senescence-associated morphologic, molecular, and epigenetic characteristics during propagation of MSCs derived from AF of normal and fetus-affected pregnancy. AF-MSCs cultures from both cell sources displayed quite similar morphology and expression of specific cell surface (CD44, CD90, and CD105) and stemness (Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, and Rex1) markers but had interindividual variability in proliferation capability and time to reach senescence. Within passages 4 and 8, senescent cultures exhibited typical morphological features, senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, increased levels of p16, and decreased levels of miR-17 and miR-21 but showed differential expression of p21, p53, and ATM dependently on the onset of cell senescence. These differences correlated with changes in the level of chromatin modifiers (DNMT1 and HDAC1) and polycomb group proteins (EZH2, SUZ12, and BMI1) paralleling with changes in the expression of repressive histone marks (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3) and stemness markers (Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, and Rex1). Therefore epigenetic factors are important for AF-MSCs senescence process that may be related with individuality of donor or a fetus malignancy status. PMID:27803714

  7. Cell proliferation in normal epidermis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, G.D.; McCullough, J.L.; Ross, P.

    1984-06-01

    A detailed examination of cell proliferation kinetics in normal human epidermis is presented. Using tritiated thymidine with autoradiographic techniques, proliferative and differentiated cell kinetics are defined and interrelated. The proliferative compartment of normal epidermis has a cell cycle duration (Tc) of 311 h derived from 3 components: the germinative labeling index (LI), the duration of DNA synthesis (ts), and the growth fraction (GF). The germinative LI is 2.7% +/- 1.2 and ts is 14 h, the latter obtained from a composite fraction of labeled mitoses curve obtained from 11 normal subjects. The GF obtained from the literature and from human skin xenografts to nude mice is estimated to be 60%. Normal-appearing epidermis from patients with psoriasis appears to have a higher proliferation rate. The mean LI is 4.2% +/- 0.9, approximately 50% greater than in normal epidermis. Absolute cell kinetic values for this tissue, however, cannot yet be calculated for lack of other information on ts and GF. A kinetic model for epidermal cell renewal in normal epidermis is described that interrelates the rate of birth/entry, transit, and/or loss of keratinocytes in the 3 epidermal compartments: proliferative, viable differentiated (stratum malpighii), and stratum corneum. Expected kinetic homeostasis in the epidermis is confirmed by the very similar ''turnover'' rates in each of the compartments that are, respectively, 1246, 1417, and 1490 cells/day/mm2 surface area. The mean epidermal turnover time of the entire tissue is 39 days. The Tc of 311 h in normal cells in 8-fold longer than the psoriatic Tc of 36 h and is necessary for understanding the hyperproliferative pathophysiologic process in psoriasis.

  8. The normal Langerhans cell and the LCH cell.

    PubMed

    Chu, T; Jaffe, R

    1994-09-01

    The epidermal Langerhans cell is the bone marrow-derived dendritic, antigen-presenting cell of the skin. It is characterised by a unique intracytoplasmic organelle--the Birbeck granule--and constitutively expresses class II MHC molecules and the CD1a glycoprotein. The Langerhans cell represents one of the most potent antigen-presenting cells of the body, and fulfils an important role in detecting foreign antigen entering the body through the skin and in immune surveillance. The distribution of Langerhans cells is restricted to the skin, lymph nodes, bronchial mucosa and thymus. The discovery by Nézelof in 1973 that the lesional cells in the disease then called 'Histiocytosis X' contained Birbeck granules established the close relationship between the Langerhans cell and this disease and led ultimately to the adoption of the name Langerhans cell histiocytosis to replace the older term. The LCH cell expresses the phenotype of a Langerhans cell apparently 'fixed' at an early stage of cell activation. The LCH cell is, however, functionally defective in antigen presentation, and the tissue distribution of the disease--affecting bone, skin, lymph node, lung, liver, spleen, CNS, gastro-intestinal tract and bone marrow--is quite different from the normal distribution of the Langerhans cell. Studies are now under way throughout the world to investigate the relationship between the normal Langerhans cell and the LCH cell. Specifically we need to identify whether the LCH cell is a cell arrested at a specific time in normal Langerhans cell ontogeny or if it represents a response to a biological insult to the mature Langerhans cell or its precursors. PMID:7521202

  9. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-17 differently affects Langerhans cell distribution and activation in an innovative three-dimensional model of normal human skin.

    PubMed

    Prignano, Francesca; Arnaboldi, Francesca; Cornaghi, Laura; Landoni, Federica; Tripo, Lara; Preis, Franz William Baruffaldi; Donetti, Elena

    2015-02-01

    Among the several cytokines involved in the psoriasis pathogenesis, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-17 play a central role. Many biomolecular steps remain unknown due to difficulty to obtain psoriatic models. To investigate the effect of TNF-alpha and IL-17 on the ultrastructure, immunophenotype, and number of epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs), human skin explants (n=7) were cultured air-liquid interface in a Transwell system. Four different conditions were used: medium alone (control), medium added with 100 ng/ml TNF-alpha or 50 ng/ml IL-17 or a combination of both cytokines. Samples were harvested 24 and 48 h after cytokine addition and were frozen. Samples harvested at 24h were also processed for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). By immunofluorescence analysis with anti-human Langerin antibody (three experiments/sample) we calculated the percentage of LCs/mm(2) of living epidermis after 24 and 48 h of incubation (considering control as 100%). At 24h LC number was significantly higher in samples treated with both cytokines (216.71+15.10%; p<0.001) and in TNF-alpha (125.74+26.24%; p<0.05). No differences were observed in IL-17-treated samples (100.14+38.42%). After 48 h, the number of epidermal Langerin-positive cells in IL-17- and TNF-alpha treated samples slightly decreased (94.99+36.79% and 101.37+23% vs. their controls, respectively). With the combination of both cytokines epidermal LCs strongly decreased (120+13.36%). By TEM, upon TNF-alpha stimulus LCs appeared with few organelles, mostly mitochondria, lysosomes, and scattered peripherical BGs. Upon IL-17 stimulus, LCs showed a cytoplasm with many mitochondria and numerous BGs close to the perinuclear space and Golgi apparatus, but also at the periphery, at the beginning of the dendrites. The addition of both cytokines did not affect LC ultrastructure. Our study showed that IL-17 induced significant changes in LC ultrastructure, while the combination of both cytokines seems to

  10. Telomerase deficiency affects normal brain functions in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehoon; Jo, Yong Sang; Sung, Young Hoon; Hwang, In Koo; Kim, Hyuk; Kim, Song-Yi; Yi, Sun Shin; Choi, June-Seek; Sun, Woong; Seong, Je Kyung; Lee, Han-Woong

    2010-02-01

    Telomerase maintains telomere structures and chromosome stability, and it is essential for preserving the characteristics of stem and progenitor cells. In the brain, the hippocampus and the olfactory bulbs are continuously supplied with neural stem and progenitor cells that are required for adult neurogenesis throughout the life. Therefore, we examined whether telomerase plays important roles in maintaining normal brain functions in vivo. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) expression was observed in the hippocampus, the olfactory bulbs, and the cerebellum, but the telomerase RNA component (TERC) was not detected in hippocampus and olfactory bulbs. Interestingly, TERT-deficient mice exhibited significantly altered anxiety-like behaviors and abnormal olfaction measuring the functions of the hippocampus and the olfactory bulbs, respectively. However, the cerebellum-dependent behavior was not changed in these mutant mice. These results suggest that TERT is constitutively expressed in the hippocampus and the olfactory bulbs, and that it is important for regulating normal brain functions. PMID:19685288

  11. Coupling Immunodeficiency factors to a normal cell system growing conjointly with tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra; Witten, Tarynn M.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we modify Witten's conjoint normal-tumor cell model in order to incorporate the presence of a simple immune system. We first examine the behavior of normal and tumor cells when tumor cells interact with surrounding normal cells. We then extend our model and add the effects of a simple immune system, immune-suppression factors and immune-chemotherapeutics agents. The evolution of the system variables is investigated via computer simulation. We show that the evolution of normal and tumor cells population is significantly affected by the choice of drug or immunodeficiency.

  12. [Telomere Recombination in Normal Mammalian Cells].

    PubMed

    Zhdanova, N S; Rubtsov, N B

    2016-01-01

    Two mechanisms of telomere length maintenance are known to date. The first includes the use of a special enzymatic telomerase complex to solve the problems that arise during the replication of linear DNA in a normal diploid and part of tumor cells. Alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), which is based on the homologous recombination of telomere DNA, represents the second mechanism. Until recently, ALT was assumed to be expressed only in 15-20% of tumors lacking active telomerase and, together with telomerase reactivation represented one of two possibilities to overcome the replicative senescence observed in somatic mammalian cells due to aging or during cell culturing in vitro. Previously described sporadic cases of combinations of the two mechanisms of telomere length maintenance in several cell lines in vitro were attributed to the experimental design rather than to a real biological phenomenon, since active cellular division without active telomerase was considered to be the "gold standard" of ALT. The present review describes the morphological and functional reorganizations of mammalian telomeres observed with ALT activation, as well as recently observed,and well-documented cases of combinations between ALT-like and telomerase-dependent mechanisms in mammalian cells. The possible role of telomere recombination in telomerase-dependent cells is discussed.

  13. Normal and affectively ill mothers' beliefs about their children.

    PubMed

    Kochanska, G; Radke-Yarrow, M; Kuczynski, L; Friedman, S L

    1987-07-01

    Normal, unipolar, and bipolar depressed women were studied to determine whether depressive cognitive schemas extend to the perception of one's own child. Depressed and well mothers reported equal satisfaction with their children, but the depressed group was less satisfied with the children's socioaffective than their cognitive development. The depressed mothers experienced a greater degree of helplessness regarding their children, and were more likely to feel that outcomes of child development were determined by uncontrollable factors.

  14. COMPARATIVE STUDIES UPON CANCER CELLS AND NORMAL CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Robert A.

    1913-01-01

    1. In primary cultures sarcoma cells exhibit a much greater activity than do normal connective tissue cells grown from the adult blood vessel; there is a shorter latent period, ameboid phenomena are more marked, and cell multiplication proceeds more rapidly. 2. In secondary cultures sarcoma cells are less active than in primary cultures; connective tissue cells, on the other hand, show a markedly accelerated growth. 3. Connective tissue cells are more easily propagated over long periods in vitro than are sarcoma cells; they multiply actively in cultures more than three months old. 4. The method of tissue cultivation is well adapted to the study of normal and pathological cell division; the nuclear changes are easily discernible in the living cell as division proceeds, and staining methods may be applied to verify observations upon the unstained structures. 5. Atypical mitoses of several kinds are found in cultures of sarcoma cells but are not seen in growths of connective tissue. 6. The time required for division in rat connective tissue cells kept at body temperature (38° C.) varies within relatively narrow limits (twenty to fifty minutes); sarcoma cells, on the contrary, exhibit marked variations and several hours may be required. 7. In studies upon living cells amitotic division has not been observed in either normal or tumor tissue. Evidences of nuclear budding, however, with the formation of cells containing several nuclei of irregular size have been noted.3 The development of a cell with two nuclei from a mononuclear cell by mitotic division of the nucleus without division of the cytoplasm has also been observed. PMID:19867661

  15. Human Normal Bronchial Epithelial Cells: A Novel In Vitro Cell Model for Toxicity Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haiyan; Xia, Bo; Liu, Hongya; Li, Jie; Lin, Shaolin; Li, Tiyuan; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Human normal cell-based systems are needed for drug discovery and toxicity evaluation. hTERT or viral genes transduced human cells are currently widely used for these studies, while these cells exhibited abnormal differentiation potential or response to biological and chemical signals. In this study, we established human normal bronchial epithelial cells (HNBEC) using a defined primary epithelial cell culture medium without transduction of exogenous genes. This system may involve decreased IL-1 signaling and enhanced Wnt signaling in cells. Our data demonstrated that HNBEC exhibited a normal diploid karyotype. They formed well-defined spheres in matrigel 3D culture while cancer cells (HeLa) formed disorganized aggregates. HNBEC cells possessed a normal cellular response to DNA damage and did not induce tumor formation in vivo by xenograft assays. Importantly, we assessed the potential of these cells in toxicity evaluation of the common occupational toxicants that may affect human respiratory system. Our results demonstrated that HNBEC cells are more sensitive to exposure of 10~20 nm-sized SiO2, Cr(VI) and B(a)P compared to 16HBE cells (a SV40-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells). This study provides a novel in vitro human cells-based model for toxicity evaluation, may also be facilitating studies in basic cell biology, cancer biology and drug discovery. PMID:25861018

  16. Mesenchymal precursor cells in the blood of normal individuals.

    PubMed

    Zvaifler, N J; Marinova-Mutafchieva, L; Adams, G; Edwards, C J; Moss, J; Burger, J A; Maini, R N

    2000-01-01

    STATEMENT OF FINDINGS: Mesenchymal precursor cells found in the blood (BMPCs) of normal persons adhere to plastic and glass and proliferate logarithmically in DMEM-20% fetal calf serum (FCS) without growth factors. They form cells with fibroblast-like and stromal morphology, which is not affected by eliminating CD34, CD3, or CD14 cells. Osteogenic supplements (dexamethasone, ascorbic acid, and beta-glycerophosphate) added to the culture inhibited fibroblast formation, and BMPCs assumed the cuboidal shape of osteoblasts. After 5 days in supplemented medium, the elutriated cells displayed alkaline phosphatase (AP), and the addition of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)2 (1 ng) doubled AP production (P < 0.04). Two weeks later, 30% of the cells were very large and reacted with anti-osteocalcin antibody. The same cultures also contained sudanophlic adipocytes and multinucleated giant cells that stained for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and vitronectin receptors. Cultured BMPCs immunostain with antibodies to vimentin, type I collagen, and BMP receptors, heterodimeric structures expressed on mesenchymal lineage cells. In addition, BMPCs stain with anti-CD105 (endoglin), a putative marker for bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). PMID:11056678

  17. Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, M.J.; Weaver, V.M.

    1998-12-08

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying {beta}{sub 1} integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive. 14 figs.

  18. Restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, Mina J.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    1998-01-01

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying .beta..sub.1 integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive.

  19. Method for distinguishing normal and transformed cells using G1 kinase inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Crissman, H.A.; Gadbois, D.M.; Tobey, R.A.; Bradbury, E.M.

    1993-02-09

    A G[sub 1] phase kinase inhibitor is applied in a low concentration to a population of normal and transformed mammalian cells. The concentration of G[sub 1] phase kinase inhibitor is selected to reversibly arrest normal mammalian cells in the G[sub 1] cell cycle without arresting growth of transformed cells. The transformed cells may then be selectively identified and/or cloned for research or diagnostic purposes. The transformed cells may also be selectively killed by therapeutic agents that do not affect normal cells in the G[sub 1] phase, suggesting that such G[sub 1] phase kinase inhibitors may form an effective adjuvant for use with chemotherapeutic agents in cancer therapy for optimizing the killing dose of chemotherapeutic agents while minimizing undesirable side effects on normal cells.

  20. Method for distinguishing normal and transformed cells using G1 kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Crissman, H.A.; Gadbois, D.M.; Tobey, R.A.; Bradbury, E.M.

    1991-12-31

    A G{sub 1} phase kinase inhibitor is applied in a low concentration to a population of normal and transformed mammalian cells. The concentration of G{sub 1} phase kinase inhibitor is selected to reversibly arrest normal mammalian cells in the G{sub 1} cell cycle without arresting growth of transformed cells. The transformed cells may then be selectively identified and/or cloned for research or diagnostic purposes. The transformed cells may also be selectively killed by therapeutic agents that do not affect normal cells in the G{sub 1} phase, suggesting that such G{sub 1} phase kinase inhibitors may form an effective adjuvant for use with chemotherapeutic agents in cancer therapy for optimizing the killing dose of chemotherapeutic agents while minimizing undesirable side effects on normal cells.

  1. Method for distinguishing normal and transformed cells using G1 kinase inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Crissman, Harry A.; Gadbois, Donna M.; Tobey, Robert A.; Bradbury, E. Morton

    1993-01-01

    A G.sub.1 phase kinase inhibitor is applied in a low concentration to a population of normal and transformed mammalian cells. The concentration of G.sub.1 phase kinase inhibitor is selected to reversibly arrest normal mammalian cells in the G.sub.1 cell cycle without arresting growth of transformed cells. The transformed cells may then be selectively identified and/or cloned for research or diagnostic purposes. The transformed cells may also be selectively killed by therapeutic agents that do not affect normal cells in the G.sub.1 phase, suggesting that such G.sub.1 phase kinase inhibitors may form an effective adjuvant for use with chemotherapeutic agents in cancer therapy for optimizing the killing dose of chemotherapeutic agents while minimizing undesirable side effects on normal cells.

  2. Positive and negative affect recognition in schizophrenia: a comparison with substance abuse and normal control subjects.

    PubMed

    Bell, M; Bryson, G; Lysaker, P

    1997-11-14

    This study had three aims: to compare a schizophrenia sample (n = 50) with a substance abuse (n = 25) and normal sample (n = 81) on affect recognition; to compare differences in their performance between positive and negative affect recognition; and to introduce a new videotape method of stimulus presentation. Subjects were asked to identify the predominant affect depicted in 21 5-10-s vignettes containing three trials of seven affect states. Results demonstrate significant group differences: normal subjects scored in the normal or mild range, substance abuse (s/a) subjects scored in the mild and moderate ranges, and the schizophrenia sample scored predominantly in the moderate to severe ranges. Accuracies were 92.3% for the normal sample, 77.2 for the s/a sample and 64.8 for the schizophrenia sample. Response dispersions were 97.6% for the schizophrenia group, 69% for the s/a sample and 38% in the normal sample. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed a group by type of affect interaction with schizophrenia subjects showing far greater differential impairment on negative affect recognition. Difficulty of item did not contribute to this difference. Test-retest reliability at 5 months for this new method was r = 0.76, and stability of categorization was very high over 5 months (weighted kappa = 0.93). These affect recognition deficits in schizophrenia are discussed as they relate to lateralization of brain function, high EE families, social skills impairment and implications for rehabilitation services. PMID:9463840

  3. RPE Cell and Sheet Properties in Normal and Diseased Eyes.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Alia; Bhatia, Shagun K; Mazzitello, Karina I; Chrenek, Micah A; Zhang, Qing; Boatright, Jeffrey H; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Jiang, Yi; Nickerson, John M

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) morphology found spatial differences in density: a high density of cells in the macula, decreasing peripherally. Because the RPE sheet is not perfectly regular, we anticipate that there will be differences between conditions and when and where damage is most likely to begin. The purpose of this study is to establish relationships among RPE morphometrics in age, cell location, and disease of normal human and AMD eyes that highlight irregularities reflecting damage. Cadaveric eyes from 11 normal and 3 age-related macular degeneration (AMD) human donors ranging from 29 to 82 years of age were used. Borders of RPE cells were identified with phalloidin. RPE segmentation and analysis were conducted with CellProfiler. Exploration of spatial point patterns was conducted using the "spatstat" package of R. In the normal human eye, with increasing age, cell size increased, and cells lost their regular hexagonal shape. Cell density was higher in the macula versus periphery. AMD resulted in greater variability in size and shape of the RPE cell. Spatial point analysis revealed an ordered distribution of cells in normal and high spatial disorder in AMD eyes. Morphometrics of the RPE cell readily discriminate among young vs. old and normal vs. diseased in the human eye. The normal RPE sheet is organized in a regular array of cells, but AMD exhibited strong spatial irregularity. These findings reflect on the robust recovery of the RPE sheet after wounding and the circumstances under which it cannot recover. PMID:26427486

  4. Roberts syndrome with normal cell division.

    PubMed

    Keppen, L D; Gollin, S M; Seibert, J J; Sisken, J E

    1991-01-01

    Roberts-SC phocomelia syndrome (RS) is an autosomal recessive disorder of symmetric limb defects, craniofacial abnormalities, pre- and postnatal growth retardation, and mental retardation. Patients with RS have been reported to have premature separation of heterochromatin of many chromosomes and abnormalities in the cell-division cycle. We report an infant whose clinical and radiologic findings resemble those of RS but who lacks the cytogenetic and cell division abnormalities reported in RS. This patient may represent a variant of RS or a new syndrome.

  5. Normalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuevas, Eduardo J.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses cornerstone of Montessori theory, normalization, which asserts that if a child is placed in an optimum prepared environment where inner impulses match external opportunities, the undeviated self emerges, a being totally in harmony with its surroundings. Makes distinctions regarding normalization, normalized, and normality, indicating how…

  6. Ethanol Extract of Hedyotis diffusa Willd Affects Immune Responses in Normal Balb/c Mice In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yu-Jui; Lin, Jing-Pin; Hsiao, Yung-Ting; Chou, Guan-Ling; Tsai, Yu-Hsiang; Chiang, Su-Yin; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-01-01

    Numerous clinical anticancer drugs are obtained from natural plants and Hedyotis diffusa Willd (EEHDW) has been used as a major component in Traditional Chinese medicine formulas since a long time. Ethanol extracts of EEHDW have been shown to possess various biological activities including anticancer function in vitro. Our earlier studies have shown that EEHDW affects immune responses in WEHI-3-generated leukemia mice, but EEHDW has not been reported to affect immune responses in a normal mouse model. Herein, we investigated whether EEHDW could affect immune responses on normal murine cells in vivo. Normal BALB/c mice were orally treated with or without EEHDW at 0, 16, 32, and 64 mg/kg or 32 mg/kg by i.p. for 3 weeks, then were weighed, and blood, liver and spleen samples were collected for further experiments. Results indicated that EEHDW did not significantly affect body and liver weight but significantly increased the spleen weight by i.p. treatment when compared to control groups. Flow cytometric assays indicated that EEHDW promoted CD11b levels at 16, 32 and 64 mg/kg oral treatment, CD19 levels at 16, 32, 64 mg/kg oral treatment and i.p. treatment, and Mac-3 levels at 16, 32 and 64 mg/kg oral treatment, however, it did not significantly affect the levels of CD3. Oral treatment with 16 and 32 mg/kg of EEHDW significantly decreased macrophage phagocytosis from PBMC; 32 mg/kg of EEHDW by i.p. treatment significantly increased phagocytosis activity of macrophages obtain from the peritoneal cavity. EEHDW at 32 mg/kg by i.p. treatment led to an increase of NK cell activities compared to oil control groups. EEHDW at 32 mg/kg of EEHDW by i.p. treatment increased B- and T-cell proliferation. Based on these observations, EEHDW seems to have promoted immune responses in this murine model. PMID:26130790

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species in Normal and Tumor Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian; Spitz, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in determining the fate of normal stem cells. Low levels of ROS are required for stem cells to maintain quiescence and self-renewal. Increases in ROS production cause stem cell proliferation/differentiation, senescence, and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, leading to their exhaustion. Therefore, the production of ROS in stem cells is tightly regulated to ensure that they have the ability to maintain tissue homeostasis and repair damaged tissues for the life span of an organism. In this chapter, we discuss how the production of ROS in normal stem cells is regulated by various intrinsic and extrinsic factors and how the fate of these cells is altered by the dysregulation of ROS production under various pathological conditions. In addition, the implications of the aberrant production of ROS by tumor stem cells for tumor progression and treatment are also discussed. PMID:24974178

  8. Metformin selectively affects human glioblastoma tumor-initiating cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Würth, Roberto; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Gatti, Monica; Bajetto, Adirana; Corsaro, Alessandro; Parodi, Alessia; Sirito, Rodolfo; Massollo, Michela; Marini, Cecilia; Zona, Gianluigi; Fenoglio, Daniela; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Filaci, Gilberto; Daga, Antonio; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cell theory postulates that a small population of tumor-initiating cells is responsible for the development, progression and recurrence of several malignancies, including glioblastoma. In this perspective, tumor-initiating cells represent the most relevant target to obtain effective cancer treatment. Metformin, a first-line drug for type II diabetes, was reported to possess anticancer properties affecting the survival of cancer stem cells in breast cancer models. We report that metformin treatment reduced the proliferation rate of tumor-initiating cell-enriched cultures isolated from four human glioblastomas. Metformin also impairs tumor-initiating cell spherogenesis, indicating a direct effect on self-renewal mechanisms. Interestingly, analyzing by FACS the antiproliferative effects of metformin on CD133-expressing subpopulation, a component of glioblastoma cancer stem cells, a higher reduction of proliferation was observed as compared with CD133-negative cells, suggesting a certain degree of cancer stem cell selectivity in its effects. In fact, glioblastoma cell differentiation strongly reduced sensitivity to metformin treatment. Metformin effects in tumor-initiating cell-enriched cultures were associated with a powerful inhibition of Akt-dependent cell survival pathway, while this pathway was not affected in differentiated cells. The specificity of metformin antiproliferative effects toward glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells was confirmed by the lack of significant inhibition of normal human stem cells (umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells) in vitro proliferation after metformin exposure. Altogether, these data clearly suggest that metformin exerts antiproliferative activity on glioblastoma cells, showing a higher specificity toward tumor-initiating cells, and that the inhibition of Akt pathway may represent a possible intracellular target of this effect. PMID:23255107

  9. ABSENCE OF SCLEROSTIN ADVERSELY AFFECTS B CELL SURVIVAL

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Corey J.; Rueda, Randell; McLelland, Bryce; Collette, Nicole M.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Manilay, Jennifer O.

    2012-01-01

    Increased osteoblast activity in sclerostin-knockout (Sost−/−) mice results in generalized hyperostosis and bones with small bone marrow cavities due to hyperactive mineralizing osteoblast populations. Hematopoietic cell fate decisions are dependent on their local microenvironment, which contains osteoblast and stromal cell populations that support both hematopoietic stem cell quiescence and facilitate B cell development. In this study, we investigated whether high bone mass environments affect B cell development via the utilization of Sost−/− mice, a model of sclerosteosis. We found the bone marrow of Sost−/− mice to be specifically depleted of B cells, due to elevated apoptosis at all B cell developmental stages. In contrast, B cell function in the spleen was normal. Sost expression analysis confirmed that Sost is primarily expressed in osteocytes and is not expressed in any hematopoietic lineage, which indicated that the B cell defects in Sost−/− mice are non-cell autonomous and this was confirmed by transplantation of wildtype (WT) bone marrow into lethally irradiated Sost−/− recipients. WT→Sost−/− chimeras displayed a reduction in B cells, whereas reciprocal Sost−/−→WT chimeras did not, supporting the idea that the Sost−/− bone environment cannot fully support normal B cell development. Expression of the pre-B cell growth stimulating factor, Cxcl12, was significantly lower in bone marrow stromal cells of Sost−/− mice while the Wnt target genes Lef-1 and Ccnd1 remained unchanged in B cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate a novel role for Sost in the regulation of bone marrow environments that support B cells. PMID:22434688

  10. Patterns of plasminogen activator production in cultured normal embryonic cells

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Cultured normal low-passage embryo fibroblasts, from a number of species, and two untransformed clones of a Balb/3T3 line elaborate increasing amounts of plasminogen activator (PA) as they approach confluence; the low-passage cells then lose this PA activity after reaching confluence, while the 3T3 cells retain it indefinitely. Even at their peaks, however, the PA activities of the low-passage cells remain well below those of the corresponding virally or spontaneously transformed cells. The PA increases in normal cells are probably a result of PA production rather than of adsorption of secreted PA to the cell surface, or of changes in cell-associated protease inhibitors. The elaboration of PA by normal cells is dependent upon their metabolic activity, such that the level of serum supplementation and the growth phase of the culture directly influence the level of cell-associated PA observed. In addition, there may be a component of serum which exerts a negative control on PA production and which is not an acid-labile protease inhibitor. PMID:21193

  11. Stem cells in normal mammary gland and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Yin, Xin; Ma, Tao; Lu, Jun

    2010-04-01

    The mammary gland is a structurally dynamic organ that undergoes dramatic alterations with age, menstrual cycle, and reproductive status. Mammary gland stem cells, the minor cell population within the mature organ, are thought to have multiple functions in regulating mammary gland development, tissue maintenance, major growth, and structural remodeling. In addition, accumulative evidence suggests that breast cancers are initiated and maintained by a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell features (called cancer stem cells). A variety of methods have been developed to identify and characterize mammary stem cells, and several signal transduction pathways have been identified to be essential for the self-renewal and differentiation of mammary gland stem cells. Understanding the origin of breast cancer stem cells, their relationship to breast cancer development, and the differences between normal and cancer stem cells may lead to novel approaches to breast cancer diagnosis, prevention, and treatment.

  12. Isolation and identification of normal killer cells from Syrian hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Matveeva, V.A.; Klyuchareva, T.E.

    1986-09-01

    This paper gives data on isolation of normal killer cells from the blood and various tissues of Syrian hamsters in a Percoll density gradient and their identification on the basis of morphologic criteria and cytotoxic activity (CTA). CTA of the isolated cells was studied in the cytotoxic test with target cells of a human MOLT-4 thymoma cell labeled with /sup 51/Cr. Isolation of large granular lymphocytes from blood, spleen, and bone marrow of Syrian hamsters in Percoll density gradient is shown in the results of five experiments used for cells of each type.

  13. Preparing normal tissue cells for space flight experiments.

    PubMed

    Koch, Claudia; Kohn, Florian P M; Bauer, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Deterioration of health is a problem in modern space flight business. In order to develop countermeasures, research has been done on human bodies and also on single cells. Relevant experiments on human cells in vitro are feasible when microgravity is simulated by devices such as the Random Positioning Machine or generated for a short time during parabolic flights. However, they become difficult in regard to performance and interpretation when long-term experiments are designed that need a prolonged stay on the International Space Station (ISS). One huge problem is the transport of living cells from a laboratory on Earth to the ISS. For this reason, mainly rapidly growing, rather robust human cells such as cancer cells, embryonic cells, or progenitor cells have been investigated on the ISS up to now. Moreover, better knowledge on the behavior of normal mature cells, which mimic the in vivo situation, is strongly desirable. One solution to the problem could be the use of redifferentiable cells, which grow rapidly and behave like cancer cells in plain medium, but are reprogrammed to normal cells when substances like retinoic acid are added. A list of cells capable of redifferentiation is provided, together with names of suitable drugs, in this review.

  14. Dendrites of rod bipolar cells sprout in normal aging retina

    PubMed Central

    Liets, Lauren C.; Eliasieh, Kasra; van der List, Deborah A.; Chalupa, Leo M.

    2006-01-01

    The aging nervous system is known to manifest a variety of degenerative and regressive events. Here we report the unexpected growth of dendrites in the retinas of normal old mice. The dendrites of many rod bipolar cells in aging mice were observed to extend well beyond their normal strata within the outer plexiform layer to innervate the outer nuclear layer where they appeared to form contacts with the spherules of rod photoreceptors. Such dendritic sprouting increased with age and was evident at all retinal eccentricities. These results provide evidence of retinal plasticity associated with normal aging. PMID:16880381

  15. Normal myogenic cells from newborn mice restore normal histology to degenerating muscles of the mdx mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.E.; Hoffman, E.P.; Partridge, T.A. )

    1990-12-01

    Dystrophin deficiency in skeletal muscle of the x-linked dystrophic (mdx) mouse can be partially remedied by implantation of normal muscle precursor cells (mpc). However, it is difficult to determine whether this biochemical rescue results in any improvement in the structure or function of the treated muscle, because the vigorous regeneration of mdx muscle more than compensates for the degeneration. By using x-ray irradiation to prevent mpc proliferation, it is possible to study loss of mdx muscle fibers without the complicating effect of simultaneous fiber regeneration. Thus, improvements in fiber survival resulting from any potential therapy can be detected easily. Here, we have implanted normal mpc, obtained from newborn mice, into such preirradiated mdx muscles, finding that it is far more extensively permeated and replaced by implanted mpc than is nonirradiated mdx muscle; this is evident both from analysis of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase isoenzyme markers and from immunoblots and immunostaining of dystrophin in the treated muscles. Incorporation of normal mpc markedly reduces the loss of muscle fibers and the deterioration of muscle structure which otherwise occurs in irradiated mdx muscles. Surprisingly, the regenerated fibers are largely peripherally nucleated, whereas regenerated mouse skeletal muscle fibers are normally centrally nucleated. We attribute this regeneration of apparently normal muscle to the tendency of newborn mouse mpc to recapitulate their neonatal ontogeny, even when grafted into 3-wk-old degenerating muscle.

  16. Normal and Leukemic Stem Cell Niches: Insights and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Schepers, Koen; Campbell, Timothy B.; Passegué, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) rely on instructive cues from the bone marrow (BM) niche to maintain their quiescence and adapt blood production to the organism’s needs. Alterations in the BM niche are commonly observed in blood malignancies and directly contribute to the aberrant function of disease-initiating leukemic stem cells (LSC). Here, we review recent insights into the cellular and molecular determinants of the normal HSC niche and describe how genetic changes in stromal cells and leukemia-induced BM niche remodeling contribute to blood malignancies. Moreover, we discuss how these findings can be applied to non cell-autonomous therapies targeting the LSC niche. PMID:25748932

  17. Effect of hypertonicity and X radiation on DNA synthesis in normal and ataxia-telangiectasia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, R.B.; Young, B.R.

    1982-12-01

    Normal human cells and cells from patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) were exposed to culture medium made hypertonic by raising the NaCl concentration. The rate of DNA synthesis in both types of cells was depressed as a function of increasing hypertonicity. When cells of both types were exposed to X radiation and incubated in hypertonic medium, DNA synthesis appeared to be more radioresistant than in cells incubated in normal medium. Velocity sedimentation analysis showed that this was due to a hypertonicity-induced inhibition of replicon initiation, which is the same process affected by X radiation, indicating that the two treatments were not additive. After a 5-hr incubation in hypertonic medium, there was a new steady state of replicon initiation and elongation similar to that existing in cells grown in normal medium, except that fewer replicons were participating. At this time DNA synthesis in each type of cell had a characteristic response to radiation, i.e., radiosenstivie in normal cells and radioresistant in A-T cells. These results suggest that radioresistant DNA synthesis in A-T cells is not due to increased condensation of chromatin.

  18. A study of structural differences between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells using FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Daping; Xu, Fangcheng; Yu, Qiang; Fang, Tingting; Xia, Junjun; Li, Seruo; Wang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Since liver cancer seriously threatens human health, it is very urgent to explore an effective method for diagnosing liver cancer early. In this study, we investigated the structure differences of IR spectra between neoplastic liver cells and normal liver cells. The major differences of absorption bands were observed between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells, the values of A2955/A2921, A1744/A1082, A1640/A1535, H1121/H1020 might be potentially useful factors for distinguishing liver cancer cells from normal liver cells. Curve fitting also provided some important information on structural differences between malignant and normal liver cancer cells. Furthermore, IR spectra combined with hierarchical cluster analysis could make a distinction between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells. The present results provided enough cell basis for diagnosis of liver cancer by FTIR spectroscopy, suggesting FTIR spectroscopy may be a potentially useful tool for liver cancer diagnosis.

  19. Associations between the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) and affect, loneliness and intelligence in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Lucht, Michael J; Barnow, Sven; Sonnenfeld, Christine; Rosenberger, Albert; Grabe, Hans Joergen; Schroeder, Winnie; Völzke, Henry; Freyberger, Harald J; Herrmann, Falko H; Kroemer, Heyo; Rosskopf, Dieter

    2009-08-01

    Associations of oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) variants and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have been reported in earlier studies; in one of the studies associations with IQ and daily living skills were found additionally. Variations of the oxytocin receptor gene might also regulate affect, attachment and separation beyond the diagnostic borders of autism. We tested hypotheses of associations between positive and negative affects and social and emotional loneliness (285 adults), IQ (117 adolescents) and polymorphisms of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR rs53576, rs2254298 and rs2228485) in normal subjects. Individuals with the oxytocin OXTR rs53576 A/A genotype showed lower positive affect scores (F=5.532, df=1; p=0.019). This effect was restricted to males (F=13.098, df=1; p=0.00047). Haplotypes constructed with the three markers were associated with positive affect (p=0.0012), negative affect (p<0.0001) and emotional loneliness (p<0.0001). Non-verbal intelligence was significantly reduced in rs53576 A/A adolescents (T=2.247, p=0.027). Our findings support a role for the oxytocin receptor haplotypes in the generation of affectivity, emotional loneliness and IQ. PMID:19376182

  20. Rejection of normal and neoplastic hemopoietic cells by lethally irradiated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Afifi, M.S.H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of rejection of normal and neoplastic hemopoietic cells by lethally irradiated mice, in part by investigating the hypothesis that two or more cell types are involved in recognition and rejection of hemopoietic cells. Interferon (IFN) was used as a tool for investigating such mechanisms. IFN alpha/beta stimulated the rejection of normal hemopoietic marrow cell grafts in Fl hybrid and in allogeneic host mice but did not affect the growth of cells in syngeneic mice. IFN alpha/beta was effective in hosts pretreated with silica but not in hosts pretreated with cyclophosphamide (Cy) or with anti-asialoGMI serum. Rabbit anti-IFN alpha/beta, but not anti-IFN gamma, serum inhibited genetic resistance to bone marrow cells. These results indicated that IFN alpha/beta was acting indirectly during the rejection of normal hemopoietic cells. It is proposed that four events occur in succession: a host cell recognizes the hemopoietic histocompatibility (Hh) antigens expressed on the surface of incompatible stem cells; this recognition leads to secretion of IFN; IFN activates natural killer (NK) cells; NK cells lyse donor stem cells. Silica interrupts one or both of the first two events. i.e., recognition and/or interrupts one or both of the first two events, i.e. recognition and/or IGN secretion.

  1. A Dominant-Negative Isoform of IKAROS Expands Primitive Normal Human Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Philip A.; Knapp, David J.H.F.; Kannan, Nagarajan; Miller, Paul H.; Babovic, Sonja; Bulaeva, Elizabeth; Aghaeepour, Nima; Rabu, Gabrielle; Rostamirad, Shabnam; Shih, Kingsley; Wei, Lisa; Eaves, Connie J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Disrupted IKAROS activity is a recurrent feature of some human leukemias, but effects on normal human hematopoietic cells are largely unknown. Here, we used lentivirally mediated expression of a dominant-negative isoform of IKAROS (IK6) to block normal IKAROS activity in primitive human cord blood cells and their progeny. This produced a marked (10-fold) increase in serially transplantable multipotent IK6+ cells as well as increased outputs of normally differentiating B cells and granulocytes in transplanted immunodeficient mice, without producing leukemia. Accompanying T/natural killer (NK) cell outputs were unaltered, and erythroid and platelet production was reduced. Mechanistically, IK6 specifically increased human granulopoietic progenitor sensitivity to two growth factors and activated CREB and its targets (c-FOS and Cyclin B1). In more primitive human cells, IK6 prematurely initiated a B cell transcriptional program without affecting the hematopoietic stem cell-associated gene expression profile. Some of these effects were species specific, thus identifying novel roles of IKAROS in regulating normal human hematopoietic cells. PMID:25418728

  2. Immortalization of human normal and NF1 neurofibroma Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Chang, Lung-Ji; Neubauer, Debbie R; Muir, David F; Wallace, Margaret R

    2016-10-01

    Neurofibromas, which are benign Schwann cell tumors, are the hallmark feature in the autosomal dominant condition neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) and are associated with biallelic loss of NF1 gene function. There is a need for effective therapies for neurofibromas, particularly the larger, plexiform neurofibromas. Tissue culture is an important tool for research. However, it is difficult to derive enriched human Schwann cell cultures, and most enter replicative senescence after 6-10 passages, impeding cell-based research in NF1. Through exogenous expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase and murine cyclin-dependent kinase (mCdk4), normal (NF1 wild-type), neurofibroma-derived Schwann cells heterozygous for NF1 mutation, and neurofibroma-derived Schwann cells homozygous for NF1 mutation were immortalized, including some matched samples from the same NF1 patient. Initial experiments employed retroviral vectors, while subsequent work utilized lentiviral vectors carrying these genes because of improved efficiency. Expression of both transgenes was required for immortalization. Molecular and immunohistochemical analysis indicated that these cell lines are of Schwann cell lineage and have a range of phenotypes, many of which are consistent with their primary cultures. This is the first report of immortalization and detailed characterization of multiple human NF1 normal nerve and neurofibroma-derived Schwann cell lines, which will be highly useful research tools to study NF1 and other Schwann tumor biology and conditions. PMID:27617404

  3. Pathway-specific differences between tumor cell lines and normal and tumor tissue cells

    PubMed Central

    Ertel, Adam; Verghese, Arun; Byers, Stephen W; Ochs, Michael; Tozeren, Aydin

    2006-01-01

    Background Cell lines are used in experimental investigation of cancer but their capacity to represent tumor cells has yet to be quantified. The aim of the study was to identify significant alterations in pathway usage in cell lines in comparison with normal and tumor tissue. Methods This study utilized a pathway-specific enrichment analysis of publicly accessible microarray data and quantified the gene expression differences between cell lines, tumor, and normal tissue cells for six different tissue types. KEGG pathways that are significantly different between cell lines and tumors, cell lines and normal tissues and tumor and normal tissue were identified through enrichment tests on gene lists obtained using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM). Results Cellular pathways that were significantly upregulated in cell lines compared to tumor cells and normal cells of the same tissue type included ATP synthesis, cell communication, cell cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, purine, pyrimidine and pyruvate metabolism, and proteasome. Results on metabolic pathways suggested an increase in the velocity nucleotide metabolism and RNA production. Pathways that were downregulated in cell lines compared to tumor and normal tissue included cell communication, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and ECM-receptor interaction. Only a fraction of the significantly altered genes in tumor-to-normal comparison had similar expressions in cancer cell lines and tumor cells. These genes were tissue-specific and were distributed sparsely among multiple pathways. Conclusion Significantly altered genes in tumors compared to normal tissue were largely tissue specific. Among these genes downregulation was a major trend. In contrast, cell lines contained large sets of significantly upregulated genes that were common to multiple tissue types. Pathway upregulation in cell lines was most pronounced over metabolic pathways including cell nucleotide metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation. Signaling

  4. Proprioceptive neuropathy affects normalization of the H-reflex by exercise after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ollivier-Lanvin, Karen; Keeler, Benjamin E.; Siegfried, Rachel; Houlé, John D.; Lemay, Michel A.

    2009-01-01

    The H-reflex habituates at relatively low frequency (10 Hz) stimulation in the intact spinal cord, but loss of descending inhibition resulting from spinal cord transection reduces this habituation. There is a return towards a normal pattern of low-frequency habituation in the reflex activity with cycling exercise of the affected hind limbs. This implies that repetitive passive stretching of the muscles in spinalized animals and the accompanying stimulation of large (Group I and II) proprioceptive fibers has modulatory effects on spinal cord reflexes after injury. To test this hypothesis, we induced pyridoxine neurotoxicity that preferentially affects large dorsal root ganglia neurons in intact and spinalized rats. Pyridoxine or saline injections were given twice daily (IP) for 6 weeks and half of the spinalized animals were subjected to cycling exercise during that period. After 6 weeks, the tibial nerve was stimulated electrically and recordings of M and H waves were made from interosseous muscles of the hind paw. Results show that pyridoxine treatment completely eliminated the H-reflex in spinal intact animals. In contrast, transection paired with pyridoxine treatment resulted in a reduction of the frequency-dependent habituation of the H-reflex that was not affected by exercise. These results indicate that normal Group I and II afferent input is critical to achieve exercise-based reversal of hyper-reflexia of the H-reflex after spinal cord injury. PMID:19913536

  5. Optical Properties of Human Cancer and Normal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, Christopher; Sun, Nan; Johnson, Jeffrey; Stack, Sharon; Tanner, Carol; Ruggiero, Steven

    2014-03-01

    We have investigated the optical properties of human oral and ovarian cancer and normal cells. Specifically, we have measured the absolute optical extinction for both whole cells and intra-cellular material in aqueous suspension. Measurements were conducted over a wavelength range of 250 to 1000nm with 1 nm resolution using Light Transmission Spectroscopy (LTS). This provides both the absolute extinction of materials under study and, with Mie inversion, the absolute number of particles of a given diameter as a function of diameter in the range of 1 to 3000 nm. Our preliminary studies show significant differences in both the extinction and particle size distributions associated with cancer versus normal cells, which appear to be correlated with differences in the particle size distribution in the range of ~ 50 to 250 nm.

  6. High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2007-11-07

    We report the results of the first high power tests of single-cell traveling-wave and standing-wave structures. These tests are part of an experimental and theoretical study of rf breakdown in normal conducting structures at 11.4 GHz. The goal of this study is to determine the gradient potential of normal-conducting rf-powered particle beam accelerators. The test setup consists of reusable mode converters and short test structures and is powered by SLAC's XL-4 klystron. This setup was created for economical testing of different cell geometries, cell materials and preparation techniques with short turn-around time. The mode launchers and structures were manufactured at SLAC and KEK and tested in the SLAC Klystron Test Lab.

  7. Relationship of mercury to cognitive, affective and perceptual motor functioning in a normal sample in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Sine, L.F.

    1983-01-01

    Although the effects of toxic levels of mercury have been well documented, the effects of subclinical levels of mercury on normal populations have generally not been studied. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the impact of mercury risk factors on cognition, affect, psychopathology, and known mercury-related symptoms in a normal sample in Hawaii exposed to subclinical although elevated levels of elemental mercury through inhalation associated with volcanic activity and of methylmercury mostly through ingestion of large ocean species fish. The following summarizes the findings and conclusions of the study: 1) a four week test-retest reliability using 41 of the subjects showed that the 41 measures used in the study exhibited an average correlation of .78. Using all 413 subjects, the average internal consistency measured by Cronbach's ..cap alpha.. was .82 for the 17 affect, psychopathology, and symptom measures; 2) nine mercury source variables were used to predict the amount of total mercury in hair. Interestingly, none of the source variables predicted hair total mercury; 3) the source variables in addition to hair total mercury and statistical control variables were used to predict the twenty-two functioning variables in the four domains cited above with a relative absence of relationships noted. This finding indicates that the normal population in Hawaii appears not to be at risk; and 4) one historical mercury source variable, reported fish intake when young, related to six functioning variables - the psychopathology measures of Somatization, Obsessive-Compulsive and Anxiety as well as the Sensory, Affect and Mental symptoms - with Beta weights in the .15 to .20 range. The implications of the findings were discussed and suggestions offered for future research especially with respect to specific high risk subgroups.

  8. Chromosomal Aberrations in Normal and AT Cells Exposed to High Dose of Low Dose Rate Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Shigematsu, N.; Kawaguchi, O.; Liu, C.; Furusawa, Y.; Hirayama, R.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F.

    2011-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a human autosomally recessive syndrome characterized by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectases, immune dysfunction, and genomic instability, and high rate of cancer incidence. A-T cell lines are abnormally sensitive to agents that induce DNA double strand breaks, including ionizing radiation. The diverse clinical features in individuals affected by A-T and the complex cellular phenotypes are all linked to the functional inactivation of a single gene (AT mutated). It is well known that cells deficient in ATM show increased yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations after high-dose-rate irradiation, but, less is known on how cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation. It has been shown that AT cells contain a large number of unrejoined breaks after both low-dose-rate irradiation and high-dose-rate irradiation, however sensitivity for chromosomal aberrations at low-dose-rate are less often studied. To study how AT cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation, we exposed confluent normal and AT fibroblast cells to up to 3 Gy of gamma-irradiation at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/day and analyzed chromosomal aberrations in G0 using fusion PCC (Premature Chromosomal Condensation) technique. Giemsa staining showed that 1 Gy induces around 0.36 unrejoined fragments per cell in normal cells and around 1.35 fragments in AT cells, whereas 3Gy induces around 0.65 fragments in normal cells and around 3.3 fragments in AT cells. This result indicates that AT cells can rejoin breaks less effectively in G0 phase of the cell cycle? compared to normal cells. We also analyzed chromosomal exchanges in normal and AT cells after exposure to 3 Gy of low-dose-rate rays using a combination of G0 PCC and FISH techniques. Misrejoining was detected in the AT cells only? When cells irradiated with 3 Gy were subcultured and G2 chromosomal aberrations were analyzed using calyculin-A induced PCC technique, the yield of unrejoined breaks decreased in both normal and AT

  9. Claspin promotes normal replication fork rates in human cells.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Eva; Helleday, Thomas; Caldecott, Keith W

    2008-06-01

    The S phase-specific adaptor protein Claspin mediates the checkpoint response to replication stress by facilitating phosphorylation of Chk1 by ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR). Evidence suggests that these components of the ATR pathway also play a critical role during physiological S phase. Chk1 is required for high rates of global replication fork progression, and Claspin interacts with the replication machinery and might therefore monitor normal DNA replication. Here, we have used DNA fiber labeling to investigate, for the first time, whether human Claspin is required for high rates of replication fork progression during normal S phase. We report that Claspin-depleted HeLa and HCT116 cells display levels of replication fork slowing similar to those observed in Chk1-depleted cells. This was also true in primary human 1BR3 fibroblasts, albeit to a lesser extent, suggesting that Claspin is a universal requirement for high replication fork rates in human cells. Interestingly, Claspin-depleted cells retained significant levels of Chk1 phosphorylation at both Ser317 and Ser345, raising the possibility that Claspin function during normal fork progression may extend beyond facilitating phosphorylation of either individual residue. Consistent with this possibility, depletion of Chk1 and Claspin together doubled the percentage of very slow forks, compared with depletion of either protein alone.

  10. Diatom-Derived Polyunsaturated Aldehydes Activate Cell Death in Human Cancer Cell Lines but Not Normal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Clementina; Braca, Alessandra; Ercolesi, Elena; Romano, Giovanna; Palumbo, Anna; Casotti, Raffaella; Francone, Maria; Ianora, Adrianna

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms are an important class of unicellular algae that produce bioactive polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) that induce abortions or malformations in the offspring of invertebrates exposed to them during gestation. Here we compare the effects of the PUAs 2-trans,4-trans-decadienal (DD), 2-trans,4-trans-octadienal (OD) and 2-trans,4-trans-heptadienal (HD) on the adenocarcinoma cell lines lung A549 and colon COLO 205, and the normal lung/brunch epithelial BEAS-2B cell line. Using the viability MTT/Trypan blue assays, we show that PUAs have a toxic effect on both A549 and COLO 205 tumor cells but not BEAS-2B normal cells. DD was the strongest of the three PUAs tested, at all time-intervals considered, but HD was as strong as DD after 48 h. OD was the least active of the three PUAs. The effect of the three PUAs was somewhat stronger for A549 cells. We therefore studied the death signaling pathway activated in A549 showing that cells treated with DD activated Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 (TNFR1) and Fas Associated Death Domain (FADD) leading to necroptosis via caspase-3 without activating the survival pathway Receptor-Interacting Protein (RIP). The TNFR1/FADD/caspase pathway was also observed with OD, but only after 48 h. This was the only PUA that activated RIP, consistent with the finding that OD causes less damage to the cell compared to DD and HD. In contrast, cells treated with HD activated the Fas/FADD/caspase pathway. This is the first report that PUAs activate an extrinsic apoptotic machinery in contrast to other anticancer drugs that promote an intrinsic death pathway, without affecting the viability of normal cells from the same tissue type. These findings have interesting implications also from the ecological viewpoint considering that HD is one of the most common PUAs produced by diatoms. PMID:24992192

  11. Cdk4 deficiency inhibits skin tumor development but does not affect normal keratinocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; LaCava, Margaret; Moons, David S; Kiyokawa, Hiroaki; Conti, Claudio J

    2002-08-01

    Most human tumors have mutations that result in deregulation of the cdk4/cyclin-Ink4-Rb pathway. Overexpression of D-type cyclins or cdk4 and inactivation of Ink4 inhibitors are common in human tumors. Conversely, lack of cyclin D1 expression results in significant reduction in mouse skin and mammary tumor development. However, complete elimination of tumor development was not observed in these models, suggesting that other cyclin/cdk complexes play an important role in tumorigenesis. Here we described the effects of cdk4 deficiency on mouse skin proliferation and tumor development. Cdk4 deficiency resulted in a 98% reduction in the number of tumors generated through the two-stage carcinogenesis model. The absence of cdk4 did not affect normal keratinocyte proliferation and both wild-type and cdk4 knockout epidermis are equally affected after topical treatment with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), resulting in epidermal hyperplasia. In similar fashion, cdk4 knockout keratinocytes proliferated well in an in vivo model of wound-induced proliferation. Biochemical studies in mouse epidermis showed that cdk6 activity increased twofold in cdk4-deficient mice compared to wild-type siblings. These results suggest that therapeutic approaches to inhibit cdk4 activity could provide a target to inhibit tumor development with minimal or no effect in normal tissue.

  12. cdk4 Deficiency Inhibits Skin Tumor Development but Does Not Affect Normal Keratinocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.; Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; LaCava, Margaret; Moons, David S.; Kiyokawa, Hiroaki; Conti, Claudio J.

    2002-01-01

    Most human tumors have mutations that result in deregulation of the cdk4/cyclin-Ink4-Rb pathway. Overexpression of D-type cyclins or cdk4 and inactivation of Ink4 inhibitors are common in human tumors. Conversely, lack of cyclin D1 expression results in significant reduction in mouse skin and mammary tumor development. However, complete elimination of tumor development was not observed in these models, suggesting that other cyclin/cdk complexes play an important role in tumorigenesis. Here we described the effects of cdk4 deficiency on mouse skin proliferation and tumor development. Cdk4 deficiency resulted in a 98% reduction in the number of tumors generated through the two-stage carcinogenesis model. The absence of cdk4 did not affect normal keratinocyte proliferation and both wild-type and cdk4 knockout epidermis are equally affected after topical treatment with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), resulting in epidermal hyperplasia. In similar fashion, cdk4 knockout keratinocytes proliferated well in an in vivo model of wound-induced proliferation. Biochemical studies in mouse epidermis showed that cdk6 activity increased twofold in cdk4-deficient mice compared to wild-type siblings. These results suggest that therapeutic approaches to inhibit cdk4 activity could provide a target to inhibit tumor development with minimal or no effect in normal tissue. PMID:12163365

  13. Oxidative stress and hypoxia in normal and leukemic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Testa, Ugo; Labbaye, Catherine; Castelli, Germana; Pelosi, Elvira

    2016-07-01

    The main hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) functions, self-renewal and differentiation, are finely regulated by both intrinsic mechanisms such as transcriptional and epigenetic regulators and extrinsic signals originating in the bone marrow microenvironment (HSC niche) or in the body (humoral mediators). The interaction between regulatory signals and cellular metabolism is an emerging area. Several metabolic pathways function differently in HSCs compared with progenitors and differentiated cells. Hypoxia, acting through hypoxia-inducing factors, has emerged as a key regulator of stem cell biology and acts by maintaining HSC quiescence and a condition of metabolic dormancy based on anaerobic glycolytic energetic metabolism, with consequent low production reactive oxygen species (ROS) and high antioxidant defense. Hematopoietic cell differentiation is accompanied by changes in oxidative metabolism (decrease of anaerobic glycolysis and increase of oxidative phosphorylation) and increased levels of ROS. Leukemic stem cells, defined as the cells that initiate and maintain the leukemic process, show peculiar metabolic properties in that they are more dependent on oxidative respiration than on glycolysis and are more sensitive to oxidative stress than normal HSCs. Several mitochondrial abnormalities have been described in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, explaining the shift to aerobic glycolysis observed in these cells and offering the unique opportunity for therapeutic metabolic targeting. Finally, frequent mutations of the mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenase-2 (IDH2) enzyme are observed in AML cells, in which the mutated enzyme acts as an oncogenic driver and can be targeted using specific inhibitors under clinical evaluation with promising results. PMID:27179622

  14. Survivin inhibitor YM155 suppresses gastric cancer xenograft growth in mice without affecting normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Lin, Jia Cheng; Ding, Yan Fei; Zhu, Liming; Ye, Jing; Tu, Shui Ping

    2016-01-01

    Survivin overexpression is associated with poor prognosis of human gastric cancer, and is a target for gastric cancer therapy. YM155 is originally identified as a specific inhibitor of survivin. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of YM155 on human gastric cancer. Our results showed that YM155 treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation, reduced colony formation and induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, YM155 treatment significantly decreased survivin expression without affecting XIAP expression and increased the cleavage of apoptosis-associated proteins caspase 3, 7, 8, 9. YM155 significantly inhibited sphere formation of gastric cancer cells, suppressed expansion and growth of the formed spheres (cancer stem cell-like cells, CSCs) and downregulated the protein levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, Cyclin D1 and CD44 in gastric cancer cells. YM155 infusion at 5 mg/kg/day for 7 days markedly inhibited growth of gastric cancer xenograft in a nude mouse model. Immunohistochemistry staining and Western Blot showed that YM155 treatment inhibited expression of survivin and CD44, induced apoptosis and reduced CD44+ CSCs in xenograft tumor tissues in vivo. No obvious pathological changes were observed in organs (e.g. heart, liver, lung and kidney) in YM155-treated mice. Our results demonstrated that YM155 inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis, reduces cancer stem cell expansion, and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in gastric cancer cells. Our results elucidate a new mechanism by which YM155 inhibits gastric cancer growth by inhibition of CSCs. YM155 may be a promising agent for gastric cancer treatment. PMID:26771139

  15. Physical parameters affecting living cells in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langbein, Dieter

    The question is posed: Why does a living cell react to the absence of gravity? What sensors may it have? Does it note pressure, sedimentation, convection, or other parameters? If somewhere in a liquid volume sodium ions are replaced by potassium ions, the density of the liquid changes locally: the heavier regions sink, the lighter regions rise. This may contribute to species transport, to the metabolism. Under microgravity this mechanism is strongly reduced. On the other hand, other reasons for convection like thermal and solutal interface convection are left. Do they affect species transport? Another important effect of gravity is the hydrostatic pressure. On the macroscopic side, the pressure between our head and feet changes by 0.35 atmospheres. On the microscopic level the hydrostatic pressure on the upper half of a cell membrane is lower than on the lower half. This, by affecting the ion transport through the membrane, may change the surrounding electric potential. It has been suggested to be one of the reasons for graviperception. Following the discussion of these and other effects possibly important in life sciences in space, an order of magnitude analysis of the residual accelerations tolerable during experiments in materials sciences is outlined. In the field of life sciences only rough estimates are available at present.

  16. Polyphenol oxidase affects normal nodule development in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.)

    PubMed Central

    Webb, K. Judith; Cookson, Alan; Allison, Gordon; Sullivan, Michael L.; Winters, Ana L.

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) may have multiple functions in tissues depending on its cellular or tissue localization. Here we use PPO RNAi transformants of red clover (Trifolium pratense) to determine the role PPO plays in normal development of plants, and especially in N2-fixing nodules. In red clover, PPO was not essential for either growth or nodule production, or for nodule function in plants grown under optimal, N-free conditions. However, absence of PPO resulted in a more reduced environment in all tissues, as measured by redox potential, and caused subtle developmental changes in nodules. Leaves and, to a lesser extent nodules, lacking PPO tended to accumulate phenolic compounds. A comparison of nodules of two representative contrasting clones by microscopy revealed that nodules lacking PPO were morphologically and anatomically subtly altered, and that phenolics accumulated in different cells and tissues. Developing nodules lacking PPO were longer, and there were more cell layers within the squashed cell layer (SCL), but the walls of these cells were less thickened and the cells were less squashed. Within the N2-fixing zone, bacteroids appeared more granular and were less tightly packed together, and were similar to developmentally compromised bacteroids elicited by catalase mutant rhizobia reported elsewhere. PMID:25566275

  17. CDK2 differentially controls normal cell senescence and cancer cell proliferation upon exposure to reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Chae Young; Lee, Seung-Min; Park, Sung Sup; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} differently adjusted senescence and proliferation in normal and cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exposure transiently decreased PCNA levels in normal cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exposure transiently increased CDK2 activity in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p21{sup Cip1} is likely dispensable when H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces senescence in normal cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suggestively, CDK2 and PCNA play critical roles in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell fate decision. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species modulate cell fate in a context-dependent manner. Sublethal doses of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decreased the level of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in normal cells (including primary human dermal fibroblasts and IMR-90 cells) without affecting cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) activity, leading to cell cycle arrest and subsequent senescence. In contrast, exposure of cancer cells (such as HeLa and MCF7 cells) to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased CDK2 activity with no accompanying change in the PCNA level, leading to cell proliferation. A CDK2 inhibitor, CVT-313, prevented H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cancer cell proliferation. These results support the notion that the cyclin/CDK2/p21{sup Cip1}/PCNA complex plays an important role as a regulator of cell fate decisions.

  18. Cell migration in the normal and pathological postnatal mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Canoll, Peter; Goldman, James E.

    2009-01-01

    In the developing brain, cell migration is a crucial process for structural organization, and is therefore highly regulated to allow the correct formation of complex networks, wiring neurons, and glia. In the early postnatal brain, late developmental processes such as the production and migration of astrocyte and oligodendrocyte progenitors still occur. Although the brain is completely formed and structured few weeks after birth, it maintains a degree of plasticity throughout life, including axonal remodeling, synaptogenesis, but also neural cell birth, migration and integration. The subventricular zone (SVZ) and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus (DG) are the two main neurogenic niches in the adult brain. Neural stem cells reside in these structures and produce progenitors that migrate toward their ultimate location: the olfactory bulb and granular cell layer of the DG respectively. The aim of this review is to synthesize the increasing information concerning the organization, regulation and function of cell migration in a mature brain. In a normal brain, protein involved in cell-cell or cell-matrix interactions together with secreted proteins acting as chemoattractant or chemorepellant play key roles in the regulation of neural progenitor cell migration. In addition, recent data suggest that gliomas arise from the transformation of neural stem cells or progenitor cells and that glioma cell infiltration recapitulates key aspects of glial progenitor migration. Thus, we will consider glioma migration in the context of progenitor migration. Finally, many observations show that brain lesions and neurological diseases trigger neural stem/progenitor cell activation and migration towards altered structures. The factors involved in such cell migration/recruitment are just beginning to be understood. Inflammation which has long been considered as thoroughly disastrous for brain repair is now known to produce some positive effects on stem/progenitor cell recruitment via

  19. Prostate-Specific Natural Health Products (Dietary Supplements) Radiosensitize Normal Prostate Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Yasmin; Schoenherr, Diane; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific health products (dietary supplements) are taken by cancer patients to alleviate the symptoms linked with poor prostate health. However, the effect of these agents on evidence-based radiotherapy practice is poorly understood. The present study aimed to determine whether dietary supplements radiosensitized normal prostate or prostate cancer cell lines. Methods and Materials: Three well-known prostate-specific dietary supplements were purchased from commercial sources available to patients (Trinovin, Provelex, and Prostate Rx). The cells used in the study included normal prostate lines (RWPE-1 and PWR-1E), prostate tumor lines (PC3, DU145, and LNCaP), and a normal nonprostate line (HaCaT). Supplement toxicity was assessed using cell proliferation assays [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] and cellular radiosensitivity using conventional clonogenic assays (0.5-4Gy). Cell cycle kinetics were assessed using the bromodeoxyuridine/propidium iodide pulse-labeling technique, apoptosis by scoring caspase-3 activation, and DNA repair by assessing gammaH2AX. Results: The cell growth and radiosensitivity of the malignant PC3, DU145, and LNcaP cells were not affected by any of the dietary prostate supplements (Provelex [2mug/mL], Trinovin [10mug/mL], and Prostate Rx [50 mug/mL]). However, both Trinovin (10mug/mL) and Prostate Rx (6mug/mL) inhibited the growth rate of the normal prostate cell lines. Prostate Rx increased cellular radiosensitivity of RWPE-1 cells through the inhibition of DNA repair. Conclusion: The use of prostate-specific dietary supplements should be discouraged during radiotherapy owing to the preferential radiosensitization of normal prostate cells.

  20. Effect of 2% Chlorhexidine Digluconate on the Bond Strength to Normal versus Caries-Affected Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Paula C. P.; Pashley, David H.; Tjäderhane, Leo; Breschi, Lorenzo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; de Goes, Mario Fernando; Wang, Linda; Carrilho, Marcela R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY This study evaluated the effect of 2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) used as a therapeutic primer on the long-term bond strengths of two etch-and-rinse adhesives to normal (ND) and caries-affected (CAD) dentin. Forty extracted human molars with coronal carious lesions, surrounded by normal dentin, were selected for this study. Flat surfaces of two types of dentin (i.e. ND and CAD) were prepared with a water-cooled high speed diamond disc, and then acid-etched, rinsed and air-dried. In control groups, dentin was re-hydrated with distilled water, blot-dried and bonded with a three-step (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose-MP) or a two-step (Single Bond 2-SB) etch-and-rinse adhesive. In experimental groups, dentin was re-hydrated with 2% CHX (60 s), blot-dried and bonded with the same adhesives. Resin composite build-ups were made. Specimens were prepared for microtensile bond testing in accordance with the non-trimming technique and then tested either immediately or after 6-month storage in artificial saliva. Data were analyzed by ANOVA/Bonferroni tests (α = 0.05). CHX did not affect the immediate bond strength to ND or CAD (p>0.05). CHX treatment significantly lowered the loss of bond strength after 6 months seen in control bonds for ND (p<0.05), but it did not alter the bond strength of CAD (p>0.05). Application of MP on CHX-treated ND or CAD produced bonds that did not change over 6 months of storage. PMID:19363971

  1. Production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and change of cell viability induced by atmospheric pressure plasma in normal and cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ja Kim, Sun; Min Joh, Hea; Chung, T. H.

    2013-10-01

    The effects of atmospheric pressure plasma jet on cancer cells (human lung carcinoma cells) and normal cells (embryonic kidney cells and bronchial epithelial cells) were investigated. Using a detection dye, the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was found to be increased in plasma-treated cells compared to non-treated and gas flow-treated cells. A significant overproduction of ROS and a reduction in cell viability were induced by plasma exposure on cancer cells. Normal cells were observed to be less affected by the plasma-mediated ROS, and cell viability was less changed. The selective effect on cancer and normal cells provides a promising prospect of cold plasma as a cancer therapy.

  2. The mechanism of necroptosis in normal and cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fulda, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death is a basic cellular process that is critical to maintain tissue homeostasis. Besides apoptosis, necroptosis has more recently been discovered as another form of regulated cell death. Necroptosis plays a pivotal role during normal development and has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of human diseases. The control of necroptosis by defined signal transduction pathways offers the opportunity to target this cellular process for therapeutic purposes. For example, in cancer necroptosis is often impaired during tumorigenesis and can be engaged by targeted pharmacological approaches. Further insights into the signaling networks involved in the regulation of necroptosis will likely have important implications for the exploitation of this form of programmed cell death for the diagnosis or treatment of many diseases. PMID:24025353

  3. WWP2 is required for normal cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byeong Hyeok; Che, Xun; Chen, Changyan; Lu, Luo; Dai, Wei

    2015-09-01

    WWP2 is a ubiquitin E3 ligase belonging to the Nedd4-like family. Given that WWP2 target proteins including PTEN that are crucial for regulating cell proliferation or suppressing tumorigenesis, we have asked whether WWP2 plays a role in controlling cell cycle progression. Here we report that WWP2 is necessary for normal cell cycle progression as its silencing significantly reduces the cell proliferation rate. We have identified that an isoform of WWP2 (WWP2-V4) is highly expressed in the M phase of the cell cycle. Silencing of WWP2 accelerates the turnover of cyclin E, which is accompanied by increased levels of phospho-histone H3 (p-H3) and cyclin B. Moreover, silencing of WWP2 results in compromised phosphorylation of Akt(S473), a residue whose phosphorylation is tightly associated with the activation of the kinase. Combined, these results strongly suggest that WWP2 is an important component in regulating the Akt signaling cascade, as well as cell cycle progression. PMID:26622940

  4. WWP2 is required for normal cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byeong Hyeok; Che, Xun; Chen, Changyan; Lu, Luo; Dai, Wei

    2015-01-01

    WWP2 is a ubiquitin E3 ligase belonging to the Nedd4-like family. Given that WWP2 target proteins including PTEN that are crucial for regulating cell proliferation or suppressing tumorigenesis, we have asked whether WWP2 plays a role in controlling cell cycle progression. Here we report that WWP2 is necessary for normal cell cycle progression as its silencing significantly reduces the cell proliferation rate. We have identified that an isoform of WWP2 (WWP2-V4) is highly expressed in the M phase of the cell cycle. Silencing of WWP2 accelerates the turnover of cyclin E, which is accompanied by increased levels of phospho-histone H3 (p-H3) and cyclin B. Moreover, silencing of WWP2 results in compromised phosphorylation of AktS473, a residue whose phosphorylation is tightly associated with the activation of the kinase. Combined, these results strongly suggest that WWP2 is an important component in regulating the Akt signaling cascade, as well as cell cycle progression. PMID:26622940

  5. Methylmalonic and propionic acidemias: lipid profiles of normal and affected human skin fibroblasts incubated with [1-14C]propionate.

    PubMed

    Giudici, T A; Chen, R G; Oizumi, J; Shaw, K N; Ng, W G; Donnell, G N

    1986-06-01

    Normal human skin fibroblasts and those from methylmalonic acidemia and propionic acidemia patients were grown in culture. Following incubation with [1-14C]propionate, the major lipid classes in the cells were separated by thin layer chromatography and isolated fractions analyzed by radio gas chromatography for the presence of odd-numbered long-chain fatty acids; the pattern of even-numbered long-chain fatty acids was obtained also. Normal fibroblasts incorporated a small percentage of propionate into odd-numbered fatty acids which were present in all lipids studied. The abnormal cells incorporated a larger amount while maintaining the characteristic ratios of odd-numbered fatty acids found in the normal line. Most of the radioactivity was associated with phospholipids which are the predominant constituents of cell membranes. A characteristic C15/C17 ratio was found for different phospholipids and the triglyceride fraction; pentadecanoic acid was the principal odd-numbered fatty acid utilized in the assembly of complex lipids. Compared to even-numbered long-chain fatty acids the absolute amount of odd-numbered fatty acids was low (1-2%), even in affected cells. An unusual polar lipid fraction was isolated in the course of the study. In the normal cell it contained several unlabeled eicosanoids which were missing from the same fraction of both affected cell lines.

  6. Cas Proteins in Normal and Pathological Cell Growth Control

    PubMed Central

    Tikhmyanova, Nadezhda; Little, Joy L.; Golemis, Erica A.

    2009-01-01

    Proteins of the CAS (Crk-Associated Substrate) family (BCAR1/p130Cas, NEDD9/HEF1/Cas-L, EFS/SIN and CASS4/HEPL) are integral players in normal and pathological cell biology. CAS proteins act as scaffolds to regulate protein complexes controlling migration and chemotaxis, apoptosis, cell cycle, and differentiation, and have more recently been linked to a role in progenitor cell function. Reflecting these complex functions, over-expression of CAS proteins has now been strongly linked to poor prognosis and increased metastasis in cancer, as well as resistance to first-line chemotherapeutics in multiple tumor types including breast and lung cancers, glioblastoma, and melanoma. Further, CAS proteins have also been linked to additional pathological conditions including inflammatory disorders, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, as well as developmental defects. This review will explore the roles of the CAS proteins in normal and pathological states in the context of the many mechanistic insights into CAS protein function that have emerged in the past decade. PMID:19937461

  7. Micronized fibres affect in vitro fermentation under normal buffered and osmotic stress conditions using porcine inocula.

    PubMed

    Aumiller, T; Mosenthin, R; Rink, F; Hartung, K; Weiss, E

    2015-12-01

    In this in vitro study, the modified Hohenheim gas test was used to determine fermentation activity and bacterial composition of pig's faecal microbial inoculum, when fermenting a standard pig diet with varying levels of crude protein (CP; 20, 24 and 28% CP), and supplemented with one of three fibre sources manufactured by micronization treatment. These were wheat envelopes (MWE), pea fibre (MPF) and lupine fibre (MLF). For comparison, inulin was used. As intestinal bacteria have to cope with varying osmotic conditions in their ecosystem, fermentation was performed under normal buffered and osmotic stress conditions. After 24 h of fermentation, total gas production and ammonia production were measured. In addition, the effect of MWE and inulin on short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production and numbers of total eubacteria, Lactobacillus spp., Bifidobacterium spp., Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcus spp., Clostridium cluster XIVa and Clostridium cluster IV, were determined using quantitative real-time PCR. Under normal buffered conditions, supplementation of MWE resulted in increased (p < 0.05) SCFA, acetic, propionic and valerianic acid production at CP levels of 20 and 28%. There was an increase (p < 0.05) in ammonia production for the micronized supplements, and for MWE an increased (p < 0.05) branched-chain proportion was observed, possibly due to higher availability of protein for fermentation which was released during the micronization process. Osmotic stress conditions reduced (p < 0.05) total gas as well as total SCFA, acetic and propionic acid production for all treatments, while cell counts were increased (p < 0.05) for Bifidobacterium spp., Enterococcus spp. and Lactobacillus spp. Under normal buffered conditions in combination with 24 and 28% CP levels, lactobacilli were increased for MWE, compared to inulin (p < 0.05). In conclusion, micronized supplements such as MWE may beneficially modulate pigs' intestinal microbiota by increasing SCFA production in

  8. Brain imaging of cognitively normal individuals with 2 parents affected by late-onset AD

    PubMed Central

    Murray, John; Tsui, Wai H.; Spector, Nicole; Goldowsky, Alexander; Williams, Schantel; Osorio, Ricardo; McHugh, Pauline; Glodzik, Lidia; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; de Leon, Mony J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This brain imaging study examines whether cognitively normal (NL) individuals with 2 parents affected by late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) show evidence of more extensive Alzheimer disease pathology compared with those who have a single parent affected by LOAD. Methods: Fifty-two NL individuals received MRI, 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (PiB)-PET, and 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG)-PET. These included 4 demographically balanced groups (n = 13/group, aged 32–72 years, 60% female, 30% APOE ε4 carriers) of NL individuals with maternal (FHm), paternal (FHp), and maternal and paternal (FHmp) family history of LOAD, and with negative family history (FH−). Statistical parametric mapping, voxel-based morphometry, and z-score mapping were used to compare MRI gray matter volumes (GMVs), partial volume–corrected PiB retention, and FDG metabolism across FH groups and vs FH−. Results: NL FHmp showed more severe abnormalities in all 3 biomarkers vs the other groups regarding the number of regions affected and magnitude of impairment. PiB retention and hypometabolism were most pronounced in FHmp, intermediate in FHm, and lowest in FHp and FH−. GMV reductions were highest in FHmp and intermediate in FHm and FHp vs FH−. In all FH+ groups, amyloid-β deposition exceeded GMV loss and hypometabolism exceeded GMV loss (p < 0.001), while amyloid-β deposition exceeded hypometabolism in FHmp and FHp but not in FHm. Conclusions: These biomarker findings show a “LOAD parent-dose effect” in NL individuals several years, if not decades, before possible clinical symptoms. PMID:24523481

  9. Restoration of the normal Clara cell phenotype after chronic allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Felix D; Quintar, Amado A; Leimgruber, Carolina; García, Luciana; Uribe Echevarría, Elisa M; Torres, Alicia I; Maldonado, Cristina A

    2013-01-01

    Bronchiolar Clara cells play a critical role in lung homoeostasis. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of chronic allergy on these cells and the efficacy of budesonide (BUD) and montelukast (MK) in restoring their typical phenotypes after ovalbumin-induced chronic allergy in mice. Chronic allergy induced extensive bronchiolar Alcian blue-periodic acid-Schiff (AB/PAS)-positive metaplasia. In addition, cells accumulated numerous big electron-lucent granules negative for Clara cell main secretory protein (CC16), and consequently, CC16 was significantly reduced in bronchoalveolar lavage. A concomitant reduction in SP-D and CYP2E1 content was observed. The phenotypic changes induced by allergy were pharmacologically reversed by both treatments; MK was more efficient than BUD in doing so. MK decreased AB/PAS reactivity to control levels whereas they remained persistently elevated after BUD. Moreover, most non-ciliated cells recovered their normal morphology after MK, whereas for BUD normal cells coexisted with ‘transitional’ cells that contained remnant mucous granules and stained strongly for CC16 and SP-D. Glucocorticoids were also less able to reduce inflammatory infiltration and maintained higher percentage of neutrophils, which may have contributed to prolonged mucin expression. These results show that chronic allergy-induced mucous metaplasia of Clara cells affects their defensive mechanisms. However, anti-inflammatory treatments were able to re-establish the normal phenotype of Clara cell, with MK being more efficient at restoring a normal profile than BUD. This study highlights the role of epithelial cells in lung injuries and their contribution to anti-inflammatory therapies. PMID:23998365

  10. Progesterone Upregulates Gene Expression in Normal Human Thyroid Follicular Cells.

    PubMed

    Bertoni, Ana Paula Santin; Brum, Ilma Simoni; Hillebrand, Ana Caroline; Furlanetto, Tania Weber

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer and thyroid nodules are more prevalent in women than men, so female sex hormones may have an etiological role in these conditions. There are no data about direct effects of progesterone on thyroid cells, so the aim of the present study was to evaluate progesterone effects in the sodium-iodide symporter NIS, thyroglobulin TG, thyroperoxidase TPO, and KI-67 genes expression, in normal thyroid follicular cells, derived from human tissue. NIS, TG, TPO, and KI-67 mRNA expression increased significantly after TSH 20 μUI/mL, respectively: 2.08 times, P < 0.0001; 2.39 times, P = 0.01; 1.58 times, P = 0.0003; and 1.87 times, P < 0.0001. In thyroid cells treated with 20 μUI/mL TSH plus 10 nM progesterone, RNA expression of NIS, TG, and KI-67 genes increased, respectively: 1.78 times, P < 0.0001; 1.75 times, P = 0.037; and 1.95 times, P < 0.0001, and TPO mRNA expression also increased, though not significantly (1.77 times, P = 0.069). These effects were abolished by mifepristone, an antagonist of progesterone receptor, suggesting that genes involved in thyroid cell function and proliferation are upregulated by progesterone. This work provides evidence that progesterone has a direct effect on thyroid cells, upregulating genes involved in thyroid function and growth. PMID:26089899

  11. Progesterone Upregulates Gene Expression in Normal Human Thyroid Follicular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bertoni, Ana Paula Santin; Brum, Ilma Simoni; Hillebrand, Ana Caroline; Furlanetto, Tania Weber

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer and thyroid nodules are more prevalent in women than men, so female sex hormones may have an etiological role in these conditions. There are no data about direct effects of progesterone on thyroid cells, so the aim of the present study was to evaluate progesterone effects in the sodium-iodide symporter NIS, thyroglobulin TG, thyroperoxidase TPO, and KI-67 genes expression, in normal thyroid follicular cells, derived from human tissue. NIS, TG, TPO, and KI-67 mRNA expression increased significantly after TSH 20 μUI/mL, respectively: 2.08 times, P < 0.0001; 2.39 times, P = 0.01; 1.58 times, P = 0.0003; and 1.87 times, P < 0.0001. In thyroid cells treated with 20 μUI/mL TSH plus 10 nM progesterone, RNA expression of NIS, TG, and KI-67 genes increased, respectively: 1.78 times, P < 0.0001; 1.75 times, P = 0.037; and 1.95 times, P < 0.0001, and TPO mRNA expression also increased, though not significantly (1.77 times, P = 0.069). These effects were abolished by mifepristone, an antagonist of progesterone receptor, suggesting that genes involved in thyroid cell function and proliferation are upregulated by progesterone. This work provides evidence that progesterone has a direct effect on thyroid cells, upregulating genes involved in thyroid function and growth. PMID:26089899

  12. RF Breakdown in Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Nantista, C.D.; Tantawi, S.G.; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2006-02-22

    Operating accelerating gradient in normal conducting accelerating structures is often limited by rf breakdown. The limit depends on multiple parameters, including input rf power, rf circuit, cavity shape and material. Experimental and theoretical study of the effects of these parameters on the breakdown limit in full scale structures is difficult and costly. We use 11.4 GHz single-cell traveling wave and standing wave accelerating structures for experiments and modeling of rf breakdown behavior. These test structures are designed so that the electromagnetic fields in one cell mimic the fields in prototype multicell structures for the X-band linear collider. Fields elsewhere in the test structures are significantly lower than that of the single cell. The setup uses matched mode converters that launch the circular TM{sub 01} mode into short test structures. The test structures are connected to the mode launchers with vacuum rf flanges. This setup allows economic testing of different cell geometries, cell materials and preparation techniques with short turn-around time. Simple 2D geometry of the test structures simplifies modeling of the breakdown currents and their thermal effects.

  13. Existence of Neural Crest-Derived Progenitor Cells in Normal and Fuchs Endothelial Dystrophy Corneal Endothelium.

    PubMed

    Katikireddy, Kishore Reddy; Schmedt, Thore; Price, Marianne O; Price, Francis W; Jurkunas, Ula V

    2016-10-01

    Human corneal endothelial cells are derived from neural crest and because of postmitotic arrest lack competence to repair cell loss from trauma, aging, and degenerative disorders such as Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD). Herein, we identified a rapidly proliferating subpopulation of cells from the corneal endothelium of adult normal and FECD donors that exhibited features of neural crest-derived progenitor (NCDP) cells by showing absence of senescence with passaging, propensity to form spheres, and increased colony forming efficacy compared with the primary cells. The collective expression of stem cell-related genes SOX2, OCT4, LGR5, TP63 (p63), as well as neural crest marker genes PSIP1 (p75(NTR)), PAX3, SOX9, AP2B1 (AP-2β), and NES, generated a phenotypic footprint of endothelial NCDPs. NCDPs displayed multipotency by differentiating into microtubule-associated protein 2, β-III tubulin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein positive neurons and into p75(NTR)-positive human corneal endothelial cells that exhibited transendothelial resistance of functional endothelium. In conclusion, we found that mitotically incompetent ocular tissue cells contain adult NCDPs that exhibit a profile of transcription factors regulating multipotency and neural crest progenitor characteristics. Identification of normal NCDPs in FECD-affected endothelium holds promise for potential autologous cell therapies. PMID:27639969

  14. Pulmonary clearance and phagocytic cell response to normal pharyngeal flora.

    PubMed

    Onofrio, J M; Shulkin, A N; Heidbrink, P J; Toews, G B; Pierce, A K

    1981-02-01

    Because human lungs are repetitively inoculated with the normal bacterial flora of the pharynx, we determined the pulmonary clearance of representative species after aerosol inoculation of a murine model, and characterized the phagocytic cell response by bronchoalveolar lavage. Viable bacteria remaining in the lungs at 1, 2, and 4 h were: Streptococcus sanguis, 24%, 8%, and 1%; Streptococcus salivarius, 49%, 24%, and 5%; Neisseria catarrhalis, 69%, 49%, and 22%. Clearance of Streptococcus sanguis was associated with a twofold increase in alveolar macrophages (p less than 0.05); Streptococcus salivarius evoked a doubling of alveolar macrophages and a 20-fold rise in granulocytes (p less than 0.05); the response to Neisseria catarrhalis was a 400-fold increase in granulocytes (p less than 0.05). Thus, normal pharyngeal organisms are cleared rapidly from the lung by a dual phagocytic cell system. It is speculated that bacteria-phagocyte interaction allows the possibility of lung injury from proteolytic enzymes released from either set of phagocytes.

  15. Induction of angiogenesis by normal and malignant plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Hose, Dirk; Moreaux, Jérôme; Meissner, Tobias; Seckinger, Anja; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Benner, Axel; Mahtouk, Karène; Hillengass, Jens; Rème, Thierry; De Vos, John; Hundemer, Michael; Condomines, Maud; Bertsch, Uta; Rossi, Jean-François; Jauch, Anna; Klein, Bernard; Möhler, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    Abundant bone marrow angiogenesis is present in almost all myeloma patients requiring therapy and correlated to treatment response and survival. We assessed the expression of 402 angiogenesis-associated genes by Affymetrix DNA microarrays in 466 samples, including CD138-purified myeloma cells (MMCs) from 300 previously untreated patients, in vivo microcirculation by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and in vitro angiogenesis (AngioKit-assay). Normal bone marrow plasma cells (BMPCs) express a median of 39 proangiogenic (eg, VEGFA, ADM, IGF-1) and 28 antiangiogenic genes (eg, TIMP1, TIMP2). Supernatants of BMPCs unlike those of memory B cells induce angiogenesis in vitro. MMCs do not show a significantly higher median number of expressed proangiogenic (45) or antiangiogenic (31) genes, but 97% of MMC samples aberrantly express at least one of the angiogenic factors HGF, IL-15, ANG, APRIL, CTGF, or TGFA. Supernatants of MMCs and human myeloma cell lines induce significantly higher in vitro angiogenesis compared with BMPCs. In conclusion, BMPCs express a surplus of proangiogenic over antiangiogenic genes transmitting to the ability to induce in vitro angiogenesis. Aberrant expression of proangiogenic and down-regulation of antiangiogenic genes by MMCs further increases the angiogenic stimulus, together leading to bone marrow angiogenesis at various degrees in all myeloma patients.

  16. The role of growth of normal and preneoplastic cell populations for tumor promotion in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Schulte-Hermann, R.; Schuppler, J.; Timmermann-Trosiener, I.; Ohde, G.; Bursch, W.; Berger, H.

    1983-01-01

    A number of different compounds, including phenobarbital, hypolipidemic drugs such as clofibrate and nafenopin, the sex steroids progesterone, cyproterone acetate, estradiol and mestranol, chlorinated hydrocarbons such as DDT, hexachlorocyclohexane, and TCDD and the antioxidant butylhydroxytoluene, appears to promote the development of liver tumors from previously induced initiated cells. The mechanisms of tumor promotion by several representative prototypes of these compounds were studied in rat liver in vivo. All liver tumor promoters mentioned above stimulate growth of normal liver. The growth response is due to cellular hypertrophy and/or increased rate of DNA (and cell) replication and/or decreased rate of cell death. Hepatocytes in foci or islands of altered cells (putatively preneoplastic) show higher rates of replication than normal liver cells; various different liver tumor promoters cause a further increase of proliferation of focal cells. The increased proliferative activity is found in different island phenotypes and thus seems to be a useful marker of the putative preneoplastic state. The focal cells respond to several factors limiting proliferation in normal liver, suggesting that they are not autonomous with respect to growth control. Early preneoplastic foci grow slowly without promotion, despite the relatively high rates of cell replication. Thus their cells seem to have a much shorter life-time than normal hepatocytes or to undergo reversion to the normal phenotype. Promoters seem to accelerate island enlargement by increasing cell replication and delaying cell death or remodeling. Thus, tumor promoters enhance the manifestation of the proliferation advantage of the putative initiated cell population. In addition, promoters cause increases in the number of detectable islands. This can partially be explained by enlargement of existing islands, but phenotypic changes that would enhance the probability of detection of remodelling islands and growth

  17. Substrate properties affect collective cell motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegoraro, Adrian; Guo, Ming; Ehrlicher, Allen; Weitz, David

    2013-03-01

    When cells move collectively, cooperative motion, which is characterized by long range correlations in cell movement, is necessary for migration. This collective cell motion is influenced by cell-cell interactions as well as by cell-substrate coupling. Furthermore, on soft substrates it is possible for cells to mechanically couple over long distances through the substrate itself. By changing the properties of the substrate, it is possible to decouple some of these contributions and better understand the role they play in collective cell motion. We vary both the substrate stiffness and adhesion protein concentration and find changes in the collective cell motion of the cells despite only small differences in total cell density and average cell size in the confluent layers. We test these changes on polyacrylamide and PDMS substrates as well as on structured substrates made of PDMS posts that prevent mechanical coupling through the substrate while still allowing stiffness to be varied.

  18. Laser Light Induced Photosensitization Of Lymphomas Cells And Normal Bone Marrow Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Pervaiz, Shazib; Nealon, Don G.; VanderMeulen, David L.

    1988-06-01

    Dye mediated, laser light induced photosensitization was tested in an in vitro model for its efficacy in eliminating the contaminating tumor cells for ex vivo autologous bone marrow purging. Daudi and U-937 cells (3 x 106/ml) in RPMI-1640 supplemented with 0.25% human albumin were mixed with 20 µg/ml and 25 µg/ml of MC-540, respectively. These cell-dye mixtures were then exposed to 514 nm argon laser light. Identical treatment was given to the normal bone marrow cells. Viability was determined by the trypan blue exclusion method. Results show that at 31.2 J/cm2 irradiation, 99.9999% Daudi cells were killed while 87% of the normal bone marrow cells survived. No regrowth of Daudi cells was observed for 30 days in culture. However, a light dose of 93.6 J/cm2 was required to obtain 99.999% U-937 cell kill with 80% normal bone marrow cell survival. Mixing of irradiated bone marrow cells with an equal number of lymphoma cells did not interfere with the photodynamic killing of lymphoma cells. Exposure of cells to low doses of recombinant interferon-alpha prior to photodynamic therapy increased the viability of lymphoma cells.

  19. CYCLOSPORIN A AFFECTS THE PROLIFERATION PROCESS IN NORMAL HUMAN DERMAL FIBROBLASTS.

    PubMed

    Janikowska, Grazyna; Janikowsk, Tomasz; Pyka, Alina; Wilczok, Adam; Mazurek, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Cyclosporin A is an immunosuppressant drug that is used not only in solid transplant rejection, but also in moderate and severe forms of psoriasis, pyoderma, lupus or arthritis. Serious side effects of the drug such as skin cancer or gingival hyperplasia probably start with the latent proliferation process. Little is known about the influence of cyclosporin A on molecular signaling in epidermal tissue. Thus, the aim of this study was to estimate the influence of cyclosporin A on the process of proliferation in normal human dermal fibroblasts. Fibroblasts were cultured in a liquid growth medium in standard conditions. Cyclosporin A was added to the culture after the confluence state. Survival and proliferation tests on human dermal fibroblast cells were performed. Total RNA was extracted from fibroblasts, based on which cDNA and cRNA were synthesized. The obtained cRNA was hybridized with the expression microarray HGU-133A_2.0. Statistical analysis of 2734 mRNAs was performed by the use of GeneSpring 13.0 software and only results with p < 0.05 were accepted. Analysis of variance with Tukey post hoc test with Benjamini-Hochberg correction for all three (8, 24, 48 h) culture stages (with and without cyclosporin A) was performed to lower the number of statistically significant results from 679 to 66, and less. Between statistically and biologically significant mRNAs down-regulated were EGRJ, BUBIB, MKI67, CDK1, TTK, E2F8, TPX2, however, the INSIG1, FOSL1, HMOX1 were up-regulated. The experiment data revealed that cyclosporin A up-regulated FOSL1 in the first 24 h, afterwards down-regulating its expression. The HMOX1 gene was up-regulated in the first stage of the experiment (CsA 8 h), however, after the next 16 h of culture time its expression was down-regulated (CsA 24 h), to finally increased in the later time period. The results indicate that cyclosporin A had a significant effect on proliferation in normal human dermal fibroblasts through the changes in the

  20. Endothelial cell metabolism in normal and diseased vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Eelen, Guy; de Zeeuw, Pauline; Simons, Michael; Carmeliet, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Higher organisms rely on a closed cardiovascular circulatory system with blood vessels supplying vital nutrients and oxygen to distant tissues. Not surprisingly, vascular pathologies rank among the most life-threatening diseases. At the crux of most of these vascular pathologies are (dysfunctional) endothelial cells (ECs), the cells lining the blood vessel lumen. ECs display the remarkable capability to switch rapidly from a quiescent state to a highly migratory and proliferative state during vessel sprouting. This angiogenic switch has long been considered to be dictated by angiogenic growth factors (eg vascular endothelial growth factor; VEGF) and other signals (eg Notch) alone, but recent findings show that it is also driven by a metabolic switch in ECs. Furthermore, these changes in metabolism may even override signals inducing vessel sprouting. Here, we review how EC metabolism differs between the normal and dysfunctional/diseased vasculature and how it relates to or impacts the metabolism of other cell types contributing to the pathology. We focus on the biology of ECs in tumor blood vessel and diabetic ECs in atherosclerosis as examples of the role of endothelial metabolism in key pathological processes. Finally, current as well as unexplored ‘EC metabolism’-centric therapeutic avenues are discussed. PMID:25814684

  1. RPE cell surface proteins in normal and dystrophic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, V.M.; Hall, M.O.

    1986-02-01

    Membrane-bound proteins in plasma membrane enriched fractions from cultured rat RPE were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Membrane proteins were characterized on three increasingly specific levels. Total protein was visualized by silver staining. A maximum of 102 separate proteins were counted in silver-stained gels. Glycoproteins were labeled with 3H-glucosamine or 3H-fucose and detected by autoradiography. Thirty-eight fucose-labeled and 61-71 glucosamine-labeled proteins were identified. All of the fucose-labeled proteins were labeled with glucosamine-derived radioactivity. Proteins exposed at the cell surface were labeled by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination prior to preparation of membranes for two-dimensional analysis. Forty separate 125I-labeled surface proteins were resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis/autoradiography. Comparison with the glycoprotein map showed that a number of these surface labeled proteins were glycoproteins. Two-dimensional maps of total protein, fucose-labeled, and glucosamine-labeled glycoproteins, and 125I-labeled surface proteins of membranes from dystrophic (RCS rdy-p+) and normal (Long Evans or RCS rdy+p+) RPE were compared. No differences in the total protein or surface-labeled proteins were observed. However, the results suggest that a 183K glycoprotein is more heavily glycosylated with glucosamine and fucose in normal RPE membranes as compared to membranes from dystrophic RPE.

  2. Cell membrane fatty acid composition differs between normal and malignant cell lines.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xialong; Riordan, Neil H; Riordan, Hugh D; Mikirova, Nina; Jackson, James; González, Michael J; Miranda-Massari, Jorge R; Mora, Edna; Trinidad Castillo, Waleska

    2004-06-01

    Twenty-eight fatty acids (C8:0 to C24:l n-9) were measured by gas chromatography in four normal cell lines (C3H / 10T1 / 2, CCD-18Co, CCD-25SK and CCD-37Lu) and seven cancer cell lines (C-41, Caov-3, LS-180, PC-3, SK-MEL-28, SK-MES-1 and U-87 MG). Results show differences in the content and proportions of fatty acids when comparing cancer cell lines with their normal counterparts. Cancer cell lines showed lower C20: 4 n-6, C24:1 n-9, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA's) and ratios of C20:4 n-6 to C20:5 n-3 and C16:0 to C18:1 n-9 and stearic to oleic (SA/OA) than their normal counterparts. All cancer cell lines had SA/OA ratios lower than 7.0 while normal cell lines had ratios greater than 0.7 (p<0.05). In addition, the ratios of total saturated fatty acids (SFA) to PUFA'S and the concentration of C18:1 n-9, C18:2 n-6, C20:5 n-3 were higher in cancer cell lines as compared to normal cell lines. A positive correlation was detected between C16:0 and longer SFA'S (r = +0.511, p<0.05) in normal cell lines whereas a negative correlation (r=0.608, p<0.05) was obtained for malignant cell lines. Moreover, cancerous cell lines exhibited a particular desaturation defect and an abnormal incorporation of C18:2 n-6 and C20-4 n-6 fatty acids. PMID:15377057

  3. Normal Development and Function of T Cells in Proline Rich 7 (Prr7) Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hrdinka, Matous; Sudan, Kritika; Just, Sissy; Drobek, Ales; Stepanek, Ondrej; Schlüter, Dirk; Reinhold, Dirk; Jordan, Bryen A.; Gintschel, Patricia; Schraven, Burkhart; Kreutz, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAPs) are important organisers for the transduction of immunoreceptor-mediated signals. Prr7 is a TRAP that regulates T cell receptor (TCR) signalling and potently induces cell death when overexpressed in human Jurkat T cells. Whether endogenous Prr7 has a similar functional role is currently unknown. To address this issue, we analysed the development and function of the immune system in Prr7 knockout mice. We found that loss of Prr7 partially impairs development of single positive CD4+ T cells in the thymus but has no effect on the development of other T cell subpopulations, B cells, NK cells, or NKT cells. Moreover, Prr7 does not affect the TCR signalling pathway as T cells derived from Prr7 knockout and wild-type animals and stimulated in vitro express the same levels of the activation marker CD69, and retain their ability to proliferate and activate induced cell death programs. Importantly, Prr7 knockout mice retained the capacity to mount a protective immune response when challenged with Listeria monocytogenes infection in vivo. In addition, T cell effector functions (activation, migration, and reactivation) were normal following induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in Prr7 knockout mice. Collectively, our work shows that loss of Prr7 does not result in a major immune system phenotype and suggests that Prr7 has a dispensable function for TCR signalling. PMID:27657535

  4. Survival of tumor and normal cells upon targeting with electron-emitting radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Rajon, Didier; Bolch, Wesley E.; Howell, Roger W.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown that the mean absorbed dose to a tissue element may not be a suitable quantity for correlating with the biological response of cells in that tissue element. Cell survival can depend strongly on the distribution of radioactivity at the cellular and multicellular levels. Furthermore, when cellular absorbed doses are examined, the cross-dose from neighbor cells can be less radiotoxic than the self-dose component. To better understand how the nonuniformity of activity among cells can affect the dose response, a computer model of a 3D tissue culture was previously constructed and showed that activity distribution among cells is significantly more relevant than the mean absorbed dose for low-energy-electron emitters. The present work greatly expands upon those findings. Methods: In the present study, we used this same computer model but restricted the number of labeled cells to a fraction of the whole cell population (50%, 10%, and 1%, respectively). The labeled cells were randomly distributed among the whole cell population. Results: While the activity distribution is an important factor in determining the tissue response for low-energy-electron emitters, the fraction of labeled cells has an even more pronounced effect on survival response. For all electron energies studied, reducing the percentage of cells labeled significantly increases the surviving fraction of the whole population. Conclusions: This study provides abundant information on killing tumor and normal cells under some conditions relevant to targeted radionuclide therapy of isolated tumor cells and micrometastases. The percentage of cells labeled, activity distribution among the labeled cells, and electron energy play key roles in determining their response. Most importantly, and not previously demonstrated, lognormal activity distributions can have a profound impact on the response of the tumor cells even when the radionuclide emits high-energy electrons.

  5. Tricellulin deficiency affects tight junction architecture and cochlear hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Gowri; Lee, Sue I.; Yousaf, Rizwan; Edelmann, Stephanie E.; Trincot, Claire; Van Itallie, Christina M.; Sinha, Ghanshyam P.; Rafeeq, Maria; Jones, Sherri M.; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Anderson, James M.; Forge, Andrew; Frolenkov, Gregory I.; Riazuddin, Saima

    2013-01-01

    The two compositionally distinct extracellular cochlear fluids, endolymph and perilymph, are separated by tight junctions that outline the scala media and reticular lamina. Mutations in TRIC (also known as MARVELD2), which encodes a tricellular tight junction protein known as tricellulin, lead to nonsyndromic hearing loss (DFNB49). We generated a knockin mouse that carries a mutation orthologous to the TRIC coding mutation linked to DFNB49 hearing loss in humans. Tricellulin was absent from the tricellular junctions in the inner ear epithelia of the mutant animals, which developed rapidly progressing hearing loss accompanied by loss of mechanosensory cochlear hair cells, while the endocochlear potential and paracellular permeability of a biotin-based tracer in the stria vascularis were unaltered. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy revealed disruption of the strands of intramembrane particles connecting bicellular and tricellular junctions in the inner ear epithelia of tricellulin-deficient mice. These ultrastructural changes may selectively affect the paracellular permeability of ions or small molecules, resulting in a toxic microenvironment for cochlear hair cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, hair cell loss was rescued in tricellulin-deficient mice when generation of normal endolymph was inhibited by a concomitant deletion of the transcription factor, Pou3f4. Finally, comprehensive phenotypic screening showed a broader pathological phenotype in the mutant mice, which highlights the non-redundant roles played by tricellulin. PMID:23979167

  6. Altered mesenchymal niche cells impede generation of normal hematopoietic progenitor cells in leukemic bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Lim, M; Pang, Y; Ma, S; Hao, S; Shi, H; Zheng, Y; Hua, C; Gu, X; Yang, F; Yuan, W; Cheng, T

    2016-01-01

    Degeneration of normal hematopoietic cells is a shared feature of malignant diseases in the hematopoietic system. Previous studies have shown the exhaustion of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) in leukemic marrow, whereas hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) remain functional upon relocation to non-leukemic marrow. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms, especially the specific niche components that are responsible for the degeneration of HPCs, are unknown. In this study, we focused on murine bone mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and their supporting function for normal hematopoietic cells in Notch1-induced acute T-cell lymphocytic leukemia (T-ALL) mice. We demonstrate that the proliferative capability and differentiation potential of T-ALL MSCs were impaired due to accelerated cellular senescence. RNA-seq analysis revealed significant transcriptional alterations in leukemic MSCs. After co-cultured with the MSCs from T-ALL mice, a specific inhibitory effect on HPCs was defined, whereas in vivo repopulating potential of normal HSCs was not compromised. Furthermore, osteoprotegerin was identified as a cytokine to improve the function of T-ALL MSCs and to enhance normal HPC output via the p38/ERK pathway. Therefore, this study reveals a novel cellular mechanism underlying the inhibition of HPC generation in T-ALL. Leukemic MSCs may serve as a cellular target for improving normal hematopoietic regeneration therapeutically.

  7. Presenting Thin Media Models Affects Women's Choice of Diet or Normal Snacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krahe, Barbara; Krause, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Our study explored the influence of thin- versus normal-size media models and of self-reported restrained eating behavior on women's observed snacking behavior. Fifty female undergraduates saw a set of advertisements for beauty products showing either thin or computer-altered normal-size female models, allegedly as part of a study on effective…

  8. Ruta 6 selectively induces cell death in brain cancer cells but proliferation in normal peripheral blood lymphocytes: A novel treatment for human brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Sen; Multani, Asha S; Banerji, Pratip; Banerji, Prasanta

    2003-10-01

    Although conventional chemotherapies are used to treat patients with malignancies, damage to normal cells is problematic. Blood-forming bone marrow cells are the most adversely affected. It is therefore necessary to find alternative agents that can kill cancer cells but have minimal effects on normal cells. We investigated the brain cancer cell-killing activity of a homeopathic medicine, Ruta, isolated from a plant, Ruta graveolens. We treated human brain cancer and HL-60 leukemia cells, normal B-lymphoid cells, and murine melanoma cells in vitro with different concentrations of Ruta in combination with Ca3(PO4)2. Fifteen patients diagnosed with intracranial tumors were treated with Ruta 6 and Ca3(PO4)2. Of these 15 patients, 6 of the 7 glioma patients showed complete regression of tumors. Normal human blood lymphocytes, B-lymphoid cells, and brain cancer cells treated with Ruta in vitro were examined for telomere dynamics, mitotic catastrophe, and apoptosis to understand the possible mechanism of cell-killing, using conventional and molecular cytogenetic techniques. Both in vivo and in vitro results showed induction of survival-signaling pathways in normal lymphocytes and induction of death-signaling pathways in brain cancer cells. Cancer cell death was initiated by telomere erosion and completed through mitotic catastrophe events. We propose that Ruta in combination with Ca3(PO4)2 could be used for effective treatment of brain cancers, particularly glioma.

  9. Docosahexaenoic Acid Sensitizes Leukemia Lymphocytes to Barasertib and Everolimus by ROS-dependent Mechanism Without Affecting the Level of ROS and Viability of Normal Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhelev, Zhivko; Ivanova, Donika; Lazarova, Desislava; Aoki, Ichio; Bakalova, Rumiana; Saga, Tsuneo

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was: (i) to investigate the possibility of sensitizing leukemia lymphocytes to anticancer drugs using docosahexaenoic acid (DHA); (ii) to find combinations with synergistic cytotoxic effect on leukemia lymphocytes, without or with only very low cytotoxicity towards normal lymphocytes; (iii) and to clarify the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the induction of apoptosis and cytotoxicity by such combinations. The study covered 15 anticancer drugs, conventional and new-generation. Well-expressed synergistic cytotoxic effects were observed after treatment of leukemia lymphocytes (Jurkat) with DHA in combination with: barasertib, lonafarnib, everolimus, and palbociclib. We selected two synergistic combinations, DHA with everolimus or barasertib, and investigated their effects on viability of normal lymphocytes, as well as on the production of ROS and induction of apoptosis in both cell lines (leukemia and normal). At the selected concentrations, DHA, everolimus and barasertib (applied separately) were cytotoxic towards leukemia lymphocytes, but not normal lymphocytes. In leukemia cells, the cytotoxicity of combinations was accompanied by strong induction of apoptosis and production of ROS. In normal lymphocytes, drugs alone and in combination with DHA did not affect the level of ROS and did not induce apoptosis. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to report synergistic ROS-dependent cytotoxicity between DHA and new-generation anticancer drugs, such as everolimus and barasertib, that is cancer cell-specific (particularly for acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells Jurkat). These combinations are harmless to normal lymphocytes and do not induce abnormal production of ROS in these cells. The data suggest that DHA could be used as a supplementary component in anticancer chemotherapy, allowing therapeutic doses of everolimus and barasertib to be reduced, minimizing their side-effects. PMID:27069145

  10. Cell of origin associated classification of B-cell malignancies by gene signatures of the normal B-cell hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Hans Erik; Bergkvist, Kim Steve; Schmitz, Alexander; Kjeldsen, Malene Krag; Hansen, Steen Møller; Gaihede, Michael; Nørgaard, Martin Agge; Bæch, John; Grønholdt, Marie-Louise; Jensen, Frank Svendsen; Johansen, Preben; Bødker, Julie Støve; Bøgsted, Martin; Dybkær, Karen

    2014-06-01

    Recent findings have suggested biological classification of B-cell malignancies as exemplified by the "activated B-cell-like" (ABC), the "germinal-center B-cell-like" (GCB) and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and "recurrent translocation and cyclin D" (TC) classification of multiple myeloma. Biological classification of B-cell derived cancers may be refined by a direct and systematic strategy where identification and characterization of normal B-cell differentiation subsets are used to define the cancer cell of origin phenotype. Here we propose a strategy combining multiparametric flow cytometry, global gene expression profiling and biostatistical modeling to generate B-cell subset specific gene signatures from sorted normal human immature, naive, germinal centrocytes and centroblasts, post-germinal memory B-cells, plasmablasts and plasma cells from available lymphoid tissues including lymph nodes, tonsils, thymus, peripheral blood and bone marrow. This strategy will provide an accurate image of the stage of differentiation, which prospectively can be used to classify any B-cell malignancy and eventually purify tumor cells. This report briefly describes the current models of the normal B-cell subset differentiation in multiple tissues and the pathogenesis of malignancies originating from the normal germinal B-cell hierarchy. PMID:23998255

  11. Desmosomal component expression in normal, dysplastic, and oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Nagamani; Gist, Julie; Smith, Tyler; Tylka, Daniel; Trogdon, Gavin; Wahl, James K

    2010-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (oral SCC) is the most common oral cancer in the U.S., affecting nearly 30,000 Americans each year. Despite recent advances in detection and treatment, there has been little improvement in the five-year survival rate for this devastating disease. Oral cancer may be preceded by premalignant disease that appears histologically as dysplasia. Identification of molecular markers for cellular change would assist in determining the risk of dysplasia progressing to oral squamous cell carcinoma. The goal of this study was to determine if any correlation exists between histological diagnosed dysplasia and OSCC lesions and altered expression of desmosomal cell-cell adhesion molecules in the oral epithelium. Our data showed that oral SCC tissue samples showed decreased immunoreactivity of both desmoplakin and plakophilin-1 proteins compared to normal oral epithelium. Furthermore, significant decrease in desmoplakin immunoreactivity was observed in dysplastic tissue compared to normal oral epithelium. In contrast, the level of desmoglein-1 staining was unchanged between samples however desmoglein-1 was found localized to cell borders in oral SCC samples. These data suggest that changes in expression of desmoplakin and plakophilin-1 may prove to be a useful marker for changes in tissue morphology and provide a tool for identifying pre-neoplastic lesions of the oral cavity. PMID:20585603

  12. Use of ImageJ software for histomorphometric evaluation of normal and severely affected canine ear canals.

    PubMed

    Zur, Gila; Klement, Eyal

    2015-10-01

    Morphological studies comparing normal and diseased ear canals use primarily subjective scoring. The aim of this study was to compare normal and severely affected ears in dogs with objective measurements using ImageJ software. Ear canals were harvested from cadavers with normal ears and from dogs that underwent total ear canal ablation for unresolved otitis. Histopathology samples from ear canals were evaluated by semi-quantitative scoring and also by using ImageJ-software for histomorphometric measurements. The normal ears were compared to the severely affected ears using the 2 methods. The 2 methods were significantly (P < 0.0001) correlated for epidermal hyperplasia, ceruminous gland dilation, and hyperplasia and tissue inflammation, which were significantly greater in the severely affected ears (P < 0.0001). This study demonstrated that there is a very high correlation between the 2 methods for the most markedly affected components of otitis externa and that ImageJ software can be efficiently used to measure and evaluate ear canal histomorphometry.

  13. Preliminary study of spectral features of normal and malignant cell cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atif, M.; Farooq, W. A.; Siddiqui, Maqsood A.; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.

    2016-04-01

    In this study the fluorescence emission spectra of normal and malignant cell cultures were recorded at an excitation wavelength of 290 nm, corresponding to the higher fluorescence intensity at 350 nm (due to tryptophan) of three malignant cells and normal cells. Similarly, Stokes shift spectra were recorded for normal and malignant cell cultures with a shift, Δλ, of 70 nm. The Stokes shift shows the existence of discriminating features between normal and carcinoma cell lines due to the higher concentration of phenylalanine and tryptophan in carcinoma cell lines which are completely absent in normal cell lines. Hence, both the emission spectra and the Stokes shift spectra showed considerably different spectral features between the normal and malignant cells. The preliminary studies indicate the potential application of fluorescence spectroscopy for cancer detection using the spectral features of biofluorophores.

  14. Raman Spectroscopy of DNA Packaging in Individual Human Sperm Cells distinguishes Normal from Abnormal Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huser, T; Orme, C; Hollars, C; Corzett, M; Balhorn, R

    2009-03-09

    Healthy human males produce sperm cells of which about 25-40% have abnormal head shapes. Increases in the percentage of sperm exhibiting aberrant sperm head morphologies have been correlated with male infertility, and biochemical studies of pooled sperm have suggested that sperm with abnormal shape may contain DNA that has not been properly repackaged by protamine during spermatid development. We have used micro-Raman spectroscopy to obtain Raman spectra from individual human sperm cells and examined how differences in the Raman spectra of sperm chromatin correlate with cell shape. We show that Raman spectra of individual sperm cells contain vibrational marker modes that can be used to assess the efficiency of DNA-packaging for each cell. Raman spectra obtained from sperm cells with normal shape provide evidence that DNA in these sperm is very efficiently packaged. We find, however, that the relative protein content per cell and DNA packaging efficiencies are distributed over a relatively wide range for sperm cells with both normal and abnormal shape. These findings indicate that single cell Raman spectroscopy should be a valuable tool in assessing the quality of sperm cells for in-vitro fertilization.

  15. Treatment parameters affecting the response of normal brain to photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qun; Chopp, Michael; Dereski, Mary O.; Wilson, Brian C.; Patterson, Michael S.; Kessel, David; Heads, Larry; Hetzel, Fred W.

    1993-06-01

    Different aspects of photodynamic therapy in normal rat brain tissue have been studied, in an effort to understand and improve the dosimetry of this new modality in treatment of brain tumors. dosimetry parameters, including light energy dose, fluence rate and beam size, and drug dosage were studied. PDT induced lesion depth in brain was measured as a biological endpoint. Effective attenuation depth and absolute light fluence rate distribution under superficial irradiation were measured using invasive optical probes. Photosensitizer uptake was quantified using HPLC analysis. The results indicate that normal brain have a high intrinsic sensitivity to PDT treatment, based on the estimated photodynamic threshold.

  16. Mitogen-stimulated phospholipid synthesis in normal and immune-deficient human B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, M.M.; Yokoyama, W.M.; Ashman, R.F.

    1986-04-15

    Eight patients with common variable panhypogammaglobulinemia were shown in the in vitro Ig biosynthesis assay to have defective B cell responses to pokeweed mitogen (PWM). Phospholipid synthesis was assessed in the B cell plus monocyte fraction (MB) and irradiated T cells (T*) of patients and paired normal controls. Cell populations were studied separately and in the four possible combinations (1:1), with and without PWM, to reveal the effect of cell interactions. At 16 to 20 hr the mean stimulation index (SI) +/- standard error for MB cells alone was 1.01 +/- 0.02 for eight patients and 0.99 +/- 0.02 for the paired normals; the T* cell SI was 1.25 +/- 0.04 for patients and 1.28 +/- 0.05 for normals. Combinations of normal MB cells with normal T* cells showed significantly higher SI when compared with the combinations of normal MB cells with patient T* cells (p less than 0.005). However, the combination of patient MB cells with patient T* cells and the combination of patient MB cells with normal T* cells were not significantly different in SI (0.05 less than p less than 0.1). Isolation of patient and normal B cells, T* cells, and monocytes after the choline pulse showed that patient B cells gave a higher SI with normal T* help than with patient T* help. Of greatest interest is the finding that patient B cells that were defective in PWM-stimulated Ig production nevertheless showed a phospholipid synthesis response to PWM in the normal range, suggesting that the maturation defect in these B cells occurs later than the phospholipid synthesis acceleration step, or on a different pathway.

  17. Aging and insulin signaling differentially control normal and tumorous germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kao, Shih-Han; Tseng, Chen-Yuan; Wan, Chih-Ling; Su, Yu-Han; Hsieh, Chang-Che; Pi, Haiwei; Hsu, Hwei-Jan

    2015-02-01

    Aging influences stem cells, but the processes involved remain unclear. Insulin signaling, which controls cellular nutrient sensing and organismal aging, regulates the G2 phase of Drosophila female germ line stem cell (GSC) division cycle in response to diet; furthermore, this signaling pathway is attenuated with age. The role of insulin signaling in GSCs as organisms age, however, is also unclear. Here, we report that aging results in the accumulation of tumorous GSCs, accompanied by a decline in GSC number and proliferation rate. Intriguingly, GSC loss with age is hastened by either accelerating (through eliminating expression of Myt1, a cell cycle inhibitory regulator) or delaying (through mutation of insulin receptor (dinR) GSC division, implying that disrupted cell cycle progression and insulin signaling contribute to age-dependent GSC loss. As flies age, DNA damage accumulates in GSCs, and the S phase of the GSC cell cycle is prolonged. In addition, GSC tumors (which escape the normal stem cell regulatory microenvironment, known as the niche) still respond to aging in a similar manner to normal GSCs, suggesting that niche signals are not required for GSCs to sense or respond to aging. Finally, we show that GSCs from mated and unmated females behave similarly, indicating that female GSC-male communication does not affect GSCs with age. Our results indicate the differential effects of aging and diet mediated by insulin signaling on the stem cell division cycle, highlight the complexity of the regulation of stem cell aging, and describe a link between ovarian cancer and aging.

  18. Aging and insulin signaling differentially control normal and tumorous germline stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Shih-Han; Tseng, Chen-Yuan; Wan, Chih-Ling; Su, Yu-Han; Hsieh, Chang-Che; Pi, Haiwei; Hsu, Hwei-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aging influences stem cells, but the processes involved remain unclear. Insulin signaling, which controls cellular nutrient sensing and organismal aging, regulates the G2 phase of Drosophila female germ line stem cell (GSC) division cycle in response to diet; furthermore, this signaling pathway is attenuated with age. The role of insulin signaling in GSCs as organisms age, however, is also unclear. Here, we report that aging results in the accumulation of tumorous GSCs, accompanied by a decline in GSC number and proliferation rate. Intriguingly, GSC loss with age is hastened by either accelerating (through eliminating expression of Myt1, a cell cycle inhibitory regulator) or delaying (through mutation of insulin receptor (dinR) GSC division, implying that disrupted cell cycle progression and insulin signaling contribute to age-dependent GSC loss. As flies age, DNA damage accumulates in GSCs, and the S phase of the GSC cell cycle is prolonged. In addition, GSC tumors (which escape the normal stem cell regulatory microenvironment, known as the niche) still respond to aging in a similar manner to normal GSCs, suggesting that niche signals are not required for GSCs to sense or respond to aging. Finally, we show that GSCs from mated and unmated females behave similarly, indicating that female GSC–male communication does not affect GSCs with age. Our results indicate the differential effects of aging and diet mediated by insulin signaling on the stem cell division cycle, highlight the complexity of the regulation of stem cell aging, and describe a link between ovarian cancer and aging. PMID:25470527

  19. Polyphenol oxidase affects normal nodule development in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) may have multiple functions in tissues, depending on its cellular or tissue localization. We used PPO RNAi transformants of red clover (Trifolium pratense) to determine the role PPO plays in normal development of plants, and especially in nitrogen-fixing nodules. In red clov...

  20. Factors Affecting the Normalization of CALL in Chinese Senior High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Bi; Puakpong, Nattaya; Lian, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    With the development of Information Technology, increasing attention has been paid to Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL). Meanwhile, increasing enthusiasm is seen for English learning and teaching in China. Yet, few research studies have focused on the normalization of CALL in ethnically diverse areas. In response to this research gap,…

  1. Evaluating the genomic and sequence integrity of human ES cell lines; comparison to normal genomes.

    PubMed

    Funk, Walter D; Labat, Ivan; Sampathkumar, Janani; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Rosler, Elen; Steiger, Daniel; Sheibani, Nadia; Caillier, Stacy; Stache-Crain, Birgit; Johnson, Julie A; Meisner, Lorraine; Lacher, Markus D; Chapman, Karen B; Park, Myung Jin; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Drmanac, Rade; West, Michael D

    2012-03-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) is a common chromosomal alteration that can occur during in vitro cultivation of human cells and can be accompanied by the accumulation of mutations in coding region sequences. We describe here a systematic application of current molecular technologies to provide a detailed understanding of genomic and sequence profiles of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines that were derived under GMP-compliant conditions. We first examined the overall chromosomal integrity using cytogenetic techniques to determine chromosome count, and to detect the presence of cytogenetically aberrant cells in the culture (mosaicism). Assays of copy number variation, using both microarray and sequence-based analyses, provide a detailed view genomic variation in these lines and shows that in early passage cultures of these lines, the size range and distribution of CNVs are entirely consistent with those seen in the genomes of normal individuals. Similarly, genome sequencing shows variation within these lines that is completely within the range seen in normal genomes. Important gene classes, such as tumor suppressors and genetic disease genes, do not display overtly disruptive mutations that could affect the overall safety of cell-based therapeutics. Complete sequence also allows the analysis of important transplantation antigens, such as ABO and HLA types. The combined application of cytogenetic and molecular technologies provides a detailed understanding of genomic and sequence profiles of GMP produced ES lines for potential use as therapeutic agents. PMID:22265736

  2. Tumor Cell Response to Synchrotron Microbeam Radiation Therapy Differs Markedly From Cells in Normal Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Anderson, Robin L.; Rothkamm, Kai; Restall, Christina M.; Cann, Leonie; Ruwanpura, Saleela; Meachem, Sarah; Yagi, Naoto; Svalbe, Imants; Lewis, Robert A.; Williams, Bryan R.G.; Rogers, Peter A.W.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) can be effective at destroying tumors in animal models while causing very little damage to normal tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular processes behind this observation of potential clinical importance. Methods and Materials: MRT was performed using a lattice of 25 {mu}m-wide, planar, polychromatic, kilovoltage X-ray microbeams, with 200-{mu}m peak separation. Inoculated EMT-6.5 tumor and normal mouse skin tissues were harvested at defined intervals post-MRT. Immunohistochemical detection of {gamma}-H2AX allowed precise localization of irradiated cells, which were also assessed for proliferation and apoptosis. Results: MRT significantly reduced tumor cell proliferation by 24 h post-irradiation (p = 0.002). An unexpected finding was that within 24 h of MRT, peak and valley irradiated zones were indistinguishable in tumors because of extensive cell migration between the zones. This was not seen in MRT-treated normal skin, which appeared to undergo a coordinated repair response. MRT elicited an increase in median survival times of EMT-6.5 and 67NR tumor-inoculated mice similar to that achieved with conventional radiotherapy, while causing markedly less normal tissue damage. Conclusions: This study provides evidence of a differential response at a cellular level between normal and tumor tissues after synchrotron MRT.

  3. Exploring long-term protection of normal human fibroblasts and epithelial cells from chemotherapy in cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Apontes, Pasha; Leontieva, Olga V.; Demidenko, Zoya N.; Li, Fengzhi; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.

    2011-01-01

    Killing of proliferating normal cells limits chemotherapy of cancer. Several strategies to selectively protect normal cells were previously suggested. Here we further explored the protection of normal cells from cell cycle-specific chemotherapeutic agents such as mitotic inhibitors (MI). We focused on a long-term cell recovery (rather than on a short-term cell survival) after a 3-day exposure to MI (paclitaxel and nocodazole). In three normal human cell types (RPE, NKE, WI-38t cells) but not in cancer cells with mutant p53, pre-treatment with nutlin-3a, a non-genotoxic inducer of wt p53, caused G1 and/or G2 arrest, thus preventing lethal mitotic arrest caused by MI and allowing normal cells to recover after removal of MI. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of the nutrient-sensing mTOR pathway, potentiated the protective effect of nutlin-3a in normal cells. Also, a combination of rapamycin and metformin, an anti-diabetic drug, induced G1 and G2 arrest selectively in normal cells and thereby protected them from MI. A combination of metformin and rapamycin also protected normal cells in low glucose conditions, whereas in contrast it was cytotoxic for cancer cells. Based on these data and the analysis of the literature, we suggest that a rational combination of metformin and rapamycin can potentiate chemotherapy with mitotic inhibitors against cancer, while protecting normal cells, thus further increasing the therapeutic window. PMID:21447859

  4. Mechanical differences of sickle cell trait (SCT) and normal red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Cachia, Mark A; Ge, Ji; Xu, Zhensong; Wang, Chen; Sun, Yu

    2015-08-01

    Sickle cell trait (SCT) is a condition in which an individual inherits one sickle hemoglobin gene (HbS) and one normal beta hemoglobin gene (HbA). It has been hypothesized that under extreme physical stress, the compromised mechanical properties of the red blood cells (RBCs) may be the underlying mechanism of clinical complications of sickle cell trait individuals. However, whether sickle cell trait (SCT) should be treated as physiologically normal remains controversial. In this work, the mechanical properties (i.e., shear modulus and viscosity) of individual RBCs were quantified using a microsystem capable of precisely controlling the oxygen level of RBCs' microenvironment. Individual RBCs were deformed under shear stress. After the release of shear stress, the dynamic cell recovery process was captured and analyzed to extract the mechanical properties of single RBCs. The results demonstrate that RBCs from sickle cell trait individuals are inherently stiffer and more viscous than normal RBCs from healthy donors, but oxygen level variations do not alter their mechanical properties or morphology.

  5. Proliferation and apoptosis in malignant and normal cells in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Stokke, T.; Holte, H.; Smedshammer, L.; Smeland, E. B.; Kaalhus, O.; Steen, H. B.

    1998-01-01

    We have examined apoptosis and proliferation in lymph node cell suspensions from patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma using flow cytometry. A method was developed which allowed estimation of the fractions of apoptotic cells and cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle simultaneously with tumour-characteristic light chain expression. Analysis of the tumour S-phase fraction and the tumour apoptotic fraction in lymph node cell suspensions from 95 B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients revealed a non-normal distribution for both parameters. The median fraction of apoptotic tumour cells was 1.1% (25 percentiles 0.5%, 2.7%). In the same samples, the median fraction of apoptotic normal cells was higher than for the tumour cells (1.9%; 25 percentiles 0.7%, 4.0%; P = 0.03). The median fraction of tumour cells in S-phase was 1.4% (25 percentiles 0.8%, 4.8%), the median fraction of normal cells in S-phase was significantly lower than for the tumour cells (1.0%; 25 percentiles 0.6%, 1.9%; P = 0.004). When the number of cases was plotted against the logarithm of the S-phase fraction of the tumour cells, a distribution with two Gaussian peaks was needed to fit the data. One peak was centred around an S-phase fraction of 0.9%; the other was centred around 7%. These peaks were separated by a valley at approximately 3%, indicating that the S-phase fraction in NHL can be classified as 'low' (< 3%) or 'high' (> 3%), independent of the median S-phase fraction. The apoptotic fractions were log-normally distributed. The median apoptotic fraction was higher (1.5%) in the 'high' S-phase group than in the 'low' S-phase group (0.8%; P = 0.02). However, there was no significant correlation between the two parameters (P > 0.05). PMID:9667654

  6. How does cancer cell metabolism affect tumor migration and invasion?

    PubMed

    Han, Tianyu; Kang, De; Ji, Daokun; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhan, Weihua; Fu, Minggui; Xin, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jian-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis is the major cause of cancer-associated death. Accordingly, identification of the regulatory mechanisms that control whether or not tumor cells become "directed walkers" is a crucial issue of cancer research. The deregulation of cell migration during cancer progression determines the capacity of tumor cells to escape from the primary tumors and invade adjacent tissues to finally form metastases. The ability to switch from a predominantly oxidative metabolism to glycolysis and the production of lactate even when oxygen is plentiful is a key characteristic of cancer cells. This metabolic switch, known as the Warburg effect, was first described in 1920s, and affected not only tumor cell growth but also tumor cell migration. In this review, we will focus on the recent studies on how cancer cell metabolism affects tumor cell migration and invasion. Understanding the new aspects on molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways controlling tumor cell migration is critical for development of therapeutic strategies for cancer patients.

  7. PCR quantitation of fetal cells in maternal blood in normal and aneuploid pregnancies.

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, D W; Williams, J M; Sullivan, L M; Hanson, F W; Klinger, K W; Shuber, A P

    1997-01-01

    Fetal cells in maternal blood are a noninvasive source of fetal genetic material for prenatal diagnosis. We determined the number of fetal-cell DNA equivalents present in maternal whole-blood samples to deduce whether this number is affected by fetal karyotype. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 199 women carrying chromosomally normal fetuses and from 31 women with male aneuploid fetuses. Male fetal-cell DNA-equivalent quantitation was determined by PCR amplification of a Y chromosome-specific sequence and was compared with PCR product amplified from known concentrations of male DNA run simultaneously. The mean number of male fetal-cell DNA equivalents detected in 16-ml blood samples from 90 women bearing a 46,XY fetus was 19 (range 0-91). The mean number of male fetal-cell DNA equivalents detected in 109 women bearing a 46,XX fetus was 2 (range 0-24). The mean number of male fetal-cell DNA equivalents detected when the fetus was male compared with when the fetus was female was highly significant (P = .0001). More fetal cells were detected in maternal blood when the fetus was aneuploid. The mean number of male fetal-cell DNA equivalents detected when the fetal karyotype was 47,XY,+21 was 110 (range 0.1-650), which was significantly higher than the number of male fetal-cell DNA equivalents detected in 46,XY fetuses (P = .0001). Feto-maternal transfusion of nucleated cells appears to be influenced by fetal karyotype. The sixfold elevation of fetal cells observed in maternal blood when the fetus had trisomy 21 indicates that noninvasive cytogenetic diagnosis of trisomy 21 should be feasible. Images Figure 2 PMID:9382092

  8. CDDO-Me Protects Normal Lung and Breast Epithelial Cells but Not Cancer Cells from Radiation

    PubMed Central

    El-Ashmawy, Mariam; Delgado, Oliver; Cardentey, Agnelio; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2014-01-01

    Although radiation therapy is commonly used for treatment for many human diseases including cancer, ionizing radiation produces reactive oxygen species that can damage both cancer and healthy cells. Synthetic triterpenoids, including CDDO-Me, act as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant modulators primarily by inducing the transcription factor Nrf2 to activate downstream genes containing antioxidant response elements (AREs). In the present series of experiments, we determined if CDDO-Me can be used as a radioprotector in normal non-cancerous human lung and breast epithelial cells, in comparison to lung and breast cancer cell lines. A panel of normal non-cancerous, partially cancer progressed, and cancer cell lines from both lung and breast tissue was exposed to gamma radiation with and without pre-treatment with CDDO-Me. CDDO-Me was an effective radioprotector when given ∼18 hours before radiation in epithelial cells (average dose modifying factor (DMF) = 1.3), and Nrf2 function was necessary for CDDO-Me to exert these radioprotective effects. CDDO-Me did not protect cancer lines tested from radiation-induced cytotoxicity, nor did it protect experimentally transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) with progressive oncogenic manipulations. CDDO-Me also protected human lymphocytes against radiation-induced DNA damage. A therapeutic window exists in which CDDO-Me protects normal cells from radiation by activating the Nrf2 pathway, but does not protect experimentally transformed or cancer cell lines. This suggests that use of this oral available, non-toxic class of drug can protect non-cancerous healthy cells during radiotherapy, resulting in better outcomes and less toxicity for patients. PMID:25536195

  9. CDDO-Me protects normal lung and breast epithelial cells but not cancer cells from radiation.

    PubMed

    El-Ashmawy, Mariam; Delgado, Oliver; Cardentey, Agnelio; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2014-01-01

    Although radiation therapy is commonly used for treatment for many human diseases including cancer, ionizing radiation produces reactive oxygen species that can damage both cancer and healthy cells. Synthetic triterpenoids, including CDDO-Me, act as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant modulators primarily by inducing the transcription factor Nrf2 to activate downstream genes containing antioxidant response elements (AREs). In the present series of experiments, we determined if CDDO-Me can be used as a radioprotector in normal non-cancerous human lung and breast epithelial cells, in comparison to lung and breast cancer cell lines. A panel of normal non-cancerous, partially cancer progressed, and cancer cell lines from both lung and breast tissue was exposed to gamma radiation with and without pre-treatment with CDDO-Me. CDDO-Me was an effective radioprotector when given ∼18 hours before radiation in epithelial cells (average dose modifying factor (DMF) = 1.3), and Nrf2 function was necessary for CDDO-Me to exert these radioprotective effects. CDDO-Me did not protect cancer lines tested from radiation-induced cytotoxicity, nor did it protect experimentally transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) with progressive oncogenic manipulations. CDDO-Me also protected human lymphocytes against radiation-induced DNA damage. A therapeutic window exists in which CDDO-Me protects normal cells from radiation by activating the Nrf2 pathway, but does not protect experimentally transformed or cancer cell lines. This suggests that use of this oral available, non-toxic class of drug can protect non-cancerous healthy cells during radiotherapy, resulting in better outcomes and less toxicity for patients.

  10. Green tea polyphenol causes differential oxidative environments in tumor versus normal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Hsu, Stephen; Lewis, Jill; Wataha, John; Dickinson, Douglas; Singh, Baldev; Bollag, Wendy B; Lockwood, Petra; Ueta, Eisaku; Osaki, Tokio; Schuster, George

    2003-10-01

    Green tea polyphenols (GTPPs) are considered beneficial to human health, especially as chemopreventive agents. Recently, cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) were identified in tumor and certain normal cell cultures incubated with high concentrations of the most abundant GTPP, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). If EGCG also provokes the production of ROS in normal epithelial cells, it may preclude the topical use of EGCG at higher doses. The current study examined the oxidative status of normal epithelial, normal salivary gland, and oral carcinoma cells treated with EGCG, using ROS measurement and catalase and superoxide dismutase activity assays. The results demonstrated that high concentrations of EGCG induced oxidative stress only in tumor cells. In contrast, EGCG reduced ROS in normal cells to background levels. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and 5-bromodeoxyuridine incorporation data were also compared between the two oral carcinoma cell lines treated by EGCG, which suggest that a difference in the levels of endogenous catalase activity may play an important role in reducing oxidative stress provoked by EGCG in tumor cells. It is concluded that pathways activated by GTPPs or EGCG in normal epithelial versus tumor cells create different oxidative environments, favoring either normal cell survival or tumor cell destruction. This finding may lead to applications of naturally occurring polyphenols to enhance the effectiveness of chemo/radiation therapy to promote cancer cell death while protecting normal cells.

  11. [Increase in cell metabolism in normal, diploid human glial cells in stationary cell cultures induced by meclofenoxate].

    PubMed

    Ludwig-Festl, M; Gräter, B; Bayreuther, K

    1983-01-01

    Quantitative biochemical studies were undertaken in order to examine the influence of the accumulation of lipofuscin in secondary lysosomes on cell metabolic activities of normal diploid human glia cells in a stationary cell culture system. Glia cells accumulate lipofuscin as a function of the duration of the stationary cultivation in vitro. The accumulation of lipofuscin can be decreased by the long-term treatment with the pharmacon meclofenoxate (centrophenoxine, Helfergin). Concomitant with the reduction of the accumulated lipofuscin, meclofenoxate-treated glia cells show enhanced rates of RNA synthesis, protein synthesis and glucose uptake. Most likely, in meclofenoxate-treated normal diploid human glia cells in vitro, the utilisation of glucose is shifted from glycolysis to the pentose phosphate pathway. The data suggest that the meclofenoxate-induced reduction of lipofuscin accumulation has a positive effect on cell metabolic functions and causes a delay of the cellular aging of the human glia cells in vitro.

  12. Posture and Gender Differentially Affect Heart Rate Variability of Symptomatic Mitral Valve Prolapse and Normal Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chien-Jung; Chen, Ya-Chu; Lee, Chih-Hsien; Yang, Ing-Fang; Yang, Ten-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart rate variability (HRV) has been shown to be a useful measure of autonomic activity in healthy and mitral valve prolapsed (MVP) subjects. However, the effects of posture and gender on HRV in symptomatic MVP and normal adults had not been elucidated in Taiwan. Methods A total of 118 MVP patients (7 males, 39 ± 7 years old; and 111 females, 42 ± 13 years old) and 148 healthy control (54 males, 28 ± 4 years old; and 94 females, 26 ± 6 years old) were investigated. The diagnosis of MVP was confirmed by cross-sectional echocardiography. A locally developed Taiwanese machine was used to record the HRV parameters for MVP and control groups in three stationary positions. Thereafter, the HRV time-domain parameters, and the frequency-domain parameters derived from fast Fourier transform or autoregressive methods were analyzed. Results The MVP group showed a decrease in time domain parameters and obtunded postural effects on frequency domain parameters moreso than the control group. Though the parasympathetic tone was dominant in female (higher RMSSD, nHF and lower nLF vs. male), the sympathetic outflow was higher in MVP female (lower SDNN, NN50 and higher nLF vs. normal female). While the parasympathetic activity was lower in male, sympathetic outflow was dominant in MVP male (lower nHF and higher nLF vs. normal male). Conclusions Both MVP female and male subjects had elevated levels of sympathetic outflow. The obtunded postural effects on frequency domain measures testified to the autonomic dysregulation of MVP subjects. PMID:27471360

  13. Ethyl Pyruvate Combats Human Leukemia Cells but Spares Normal Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, Susanne; Bigl, Marina; Buchold, Martin; Thieme, Rene; Wichmann, Gunnar; Dehghani, Faramarz

    2016-01-01

    Ethyl pyruvate, a known ROS scavenger and anti-inflammatory drug was found to combat leukemia cells. Tumor cell killing was achieved by concerted action of necrosis/apoptosis induction, ATP depletion, and inhibition of glycolytic and para-glycolytic enzymes. Ethyl lactate was less harmful to leukemia cells but was found to arrest cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. Both, ethyl pyruvate and ethyl lactate were identified as new inhibitors of GSK-3β. Despite the strong effect of ethyl pyruvate on leukemia cells, human cognate blood cells were only marginally affected. The data were compiled by immune blotting, flow cytometry, enzyme activity assay and gene array analysis. Our results inform new mechanisms of ethyl pyruvate-induced cell death, offering thereby a new treatment regime with a high therapeutic window for leukemic tumors. PMID:27579985

  14. Ethyl Pyruvate Combats Human Leukemia Cells but Spares Normal Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Birkenmeier, Gerd; Hemdan, Nasr Y A; Kurz, Susanne; Bigl, Marina; Pieroh, Philipp; Debebe, Tewodros; Buchold, Martin; Thieme, Rene; Wichmann, Gunnar; Dehghani, Faramarz

    2016-01-01

    Ethyl pyruvate, a known ROS scavenger and anti-inflammatory drug was found to combat leukemia cells. Tumor cell killing was achieved by concerted action of necrosis/apoptosis induction, ATP depletion, and inhibition of glycolytic and para-glycolytic enzymes. Ethyl lactate was less harmful to leukemia cells but was found to arrest cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. Both, ethyl pyruvate and ethyl lactate were identified as new inhibitors of GSK-3β. Despite the strong effect of ethyl pyruvate on leukemia cells, human cognate blood cells were only marginally affected. The data were compiled by immune blotting, flow cytometry, enzyme activity assay and gene array analysis. Our results inform new mechanisms of ethyl pyruvate-induced cell death, offering thereby a new treatment regime with a high therapeutic window for leukemic tumors. PMID:27579985

  15. The sertolian epithelium in the testis of men affected by 'Sertoli-cell-only syndrome'.

    PubMed

    Tedde, G; Montella, A; Fiocca, D; Delrio, A N

    1993-01-01

    Because of the architectural complexity of the seminiferous epithelium, the Sertoli cell is extremely difficult to study. The individual cellular constituents of the tubular wall are intimately associated with one another; especially Sertoli cells and germinal cells are tightly connected. As implied by the name, Sertoli-cell-only syndrome (SCOS) is characterized by the presence of only Sertoli cells in the seminiferous tubule. The absence of germinal cells makes this condition ideal for the morphological study of Sertoli cell. Testicular biopsy specimens of subjects affected by SCOS were studied under light and electron microscopy. The Sertoli cells appeared to be morphologically normal, except for their shape, that appears to be columnar as result of the complete absence of the germinal cells. The cellular outlines were irregular, particularly at the base, but the cytoplasm contained normal organelles and inclusions. The presence of both pale and dark elements was evident. These differences in staining reflect the variability in concentration of glycogen particles and intermediate microfilaments in the cytoplasm. In spite of these differences between Sertoli cells in SCOS and those in normal subjects, SCOS represents a satisfactory model for the morphological and functional analysis of the Sertoli cells. PMID:7694556

  16. Method for restoration of normal phenotype in cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Bissell, Mina J.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2000-01-01

    A method for reversing expression of malignant phenotype in cancer cells is described. The method comprises applying .beta..sub.1 integrin function-blocking antibody to the cells. The method can be used to assess the progress of cancer therapy. Human breast epithelial cells were shown to be particularly responsive.

  17. Simulation of normal, carrier and affected controls for large-scale genotyping of cattle for factor XI deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyaya, P N; Jha, M; Muraleedharan, P; Gupta, R R; Rathod, R N; Mehta, H H; Khoda, V K

    2006-01-01

    An insertion mutation within exon 12 of the factor XI gene has been described in Holstein cattle. This has opened the prospect for large-scale screening of cattle using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique for the rapid identification of heterozygous animals. To facilitate such a screening process, the mutant and normal alleles of factor XI gene, represented by 244- and 320-bp PCR amplified fragments, were individually cloned in Escherichia coli using a multicopy plasmid cloning vehicle to generate pFXI-N and pFXI-M, respectively. The authenticity of the inserts was confirmed by nucleotide sequencing. A nested PCR method was developed, by which PCR amplicons generated from primers with annealing sites on the recombinant plasmids and by flanking the insert were used as templates for amplification of the diagnostic products using factor XI gene-specific primers. An equimolar mixture of both PCR amplicons, originating from pFXI-N and pFXI-M, constituted the carrier control while the individual amplicons were the affected and normal controls. The controls were used as references for in-gel comparison to screen a population of 307 cattle and 259 water buffaloes; the frequency of the mutant allele was found to be 0. No DNA size standards were required in this study. The simulated control DNA samples representing normal, carrier and affected cattle have the potential to help in large-scale screening of a cattle population for individuals that are carriers or affected by factor XI deficiency.

  18. Reelin Proteolysis Affects Signaling Related to Normal Synapse Function and Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Lussier, April L; Weeber, Edwin J; Rebeck, G William

    2016-01-01

    Reelin is a neurodevelopmental protein important in adult synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. Recent evidence points to the importance for Reelin proteolysis in normal signaling and in cognitive function. Support for the dysfunction of Reelin proteolysis in neurodegeneration and cognitive dysfunction comes from postmortem analysis of Alzheimer's diseases (AD) tissues including cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), showing that levels of Reelin fragments are altered in AD compared to control. Potential key proteases involved in Reelin proteolysis have recently been defined, identifying processes that could be altered in neurodegeneration. Introduction of full-length Reelin and its proteolytic fragments into several mouse models of neurodegeneration and neuropsychiatric disorders quickly promote learning and memory. These findings support a role for Reelin in learning and memory and suggest further understanding of these processes are important to harness the potential of this pathway in treating cognitive symptoms in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27065802

  19. Reelin Proteolysis Affects Signaling Related to Normal Synapse Function and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lussier, April L.; Weeber, Edwin J.; Rebeck, G. William

    2016-01-01

    Reelin is a neurodevelopmental protein important in adult synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. Recent evidence points to the importance for Reelin proteolysis in normal signaling and in cognitive function. Support for the dysfunction of Reelin proteolysis in neurodegeneration and cognitive dysfunction comes from postmortem analysis of Alzheimer’s diseases (AD) tissues including cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), showing that levels of Reelin fragments are altered in AD compared to control. Potential key proteases involved in Reelin proteolysis have recently been defined, identifying processes that could be altered in neurodegeneration. Introduction of full-length Reelin and its proteolytic fragments into several mouse models of neurodegeneration and neuropsychiatric disorders quickly promote learning and memory. These findings support a role for Reelin in learning and memory and suggest further understanding of these processes are important to harness the potential of this pathway in treating cognitive symptoms in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27065802

  20. Bladder cancer cells secrete while normal bladder cells express but do not secrete AGR2.

    PubMed

    Ho, Melissa E; Quek, Sue-Ing; True, Lawrence D; Seiler, Roland; Fleischmann, Achim; Bagryanova, Lora; Kim, Sara R; Chia, David; Goodglick, Lee; Shimizu, Yoshiko; Rosser, Charles J; Gao, Yuqian; Liu, Alvin Y

    2016-03-29

    Anterior gradient 2 (AGR2) is a cancer-associated secreted protein found predominantly in adenocarcinomas. Given its ubiquity in solid tumors, cancer-secreted AGR2 could be a useful biomarker in urine or blood for early detection. However, normal organs express and might also secrete AGR2, which would impact its utility as a cancer biomarker. Uniform AGR2 expression is found in the normal bladder urothelium. Little AGR2 is secreted by the urothelial cells as no measurable amounts could be detected in urine. The urinary proteomes of healthy people contain no listing for AGR2. Likewise, the blood proteomes of healthy people also contain no significant peptide counts for AGR2 suggesting little urothelial secretion into capillaries of the lamina propria. Expression of AGR2 is lost in urothelial carcinoma, with only 25% of primary tumors observed to retain AGR2 expression in a cohort of lymph node-positive cases. AGR2 is secreted by the urothelial carcinoma cells as urinary AGR2 was measured in the voided urine of 25% of the cases analyzed in a cohort of cancer vs. non-cancer patients. The fraction of AGR2-positive urine samples was consistent with the fraction of urothelial carcinoma that stained positive for AGR2. Since cancer cells secrete AGR2 while normal cells do not, its measurement in body fluids could be used to indicate tumor presence. Furthermore, AGR2 has also been found on the cell surface of cancer cells. Taken together, secretion and cell surface localization of AGR2 are characteristic of cancer, while expression of AGR2 by itself is not. PMID:26894971

  1. Bladder cancer cells secrete while normal bladder cells express but do not secrete AGR2

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Melissa E.; Quek, Sue-Ing; True, Lawrence D.; Seiler, Roland; Fleischmann, Achim; Bagryanova, Lora; Kim, Sara R.; Chia, David; Goodglick, Lee; Shimizu, Yoshiko; Rosser, Charles J.; Gao, Yuqian; Liu, Alvin Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anterior gradient 2 (AGR2) is a cancer-associated secreted protein found predominantly in adenocarcinomas. Given its ubiquity in solid tumors, cancer-secreted AGR2 could be a useful biomarker in urine or blood for early detection. However, normal organs express and might also secrete AGR2, which would impact its utility as a cancer biomarker. Uniform AGR2 expression is found in the normal bladder urothelium. Little AGR2 is secreted by the urothelial cells as no measurable amounts could be detected in urine. The urinary proteomes of healthy people contain no listing for AGR2. Likewise, the blood proteomes of healthy people also contain no significant peptide counts for AGR2 suggesting little urothelial secretion into capillaries of the lamina propria. Expression of AGR2 is lost in urothelial carcinoma, with only 25% of primary tumors observed to retain AGR2 expression in a cohort of lymph node-positive cases. AGR2 is secreted by the urothelial carcinoma cells as urinary AGR2 was measured in the voided urine of 25% of the cases analyzed in a cohort of cancer vs. non-cancer patients. The fraction of AGR2-positive urine samples was consistent with the fraction of urothelial carcinoma that stained positive for AGR2. Since cancer cells secrete AGR2 while normal cells do not, its measurement in body fluids could be used to indicate tumor presence. Furthermore, AGR2 has also been found on the cell surface of cancer cells. Taken together, secretion and cell surface localization of AGR2 are characteristic of cancer, while expression of AGR2 by itself is not. PMID:26894971

  2. On the origin of intrinsic matrix of acellular extrinsic fiber cementum: studies on growing cementum pearls of normal and bisphosphonate-affected guinea pig molars.

    PubMed

    Jayawardena, Chantha K; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Watanabae, Eiko; Takano, Yoshiro

    2002-06-01

    Cementum pearls (CPs) belong to a type of acellular extrinsic fiber cementum (AEFC) that form on the maturing enamel of guinea pig molars. This study aimed to elucidate the forming process of intrinsic matrix of AEFC using the CPs of normal and bisphosphonate-affected guinea pig molars as experimental models. A group of guinea pigs were subjected to continuous administration of 1-hydroxyethylidene-1,1-bisphosphonate (HEBP) for 2 wk to inhibit mineralization of growing CPs. Fenestration of the enamel organ and migration of periodontal cells on to the exposed surface of maturing enamel appeared to be unaffected by HEBP, whereas de novo formation as well as growth of pre-existing CPs did not proceed under the same conditions. Immunoreactions for osteopontin were located exclusively on the mineralized matrix of preformed CPs, implying the absence of additional deposition or accumulation of putative intrinsic cementum matrix on the affected CPs, where the propagation of mineral phase had been arrested. In both normal and HEBP-treated groups, distinct enzymatic reactions for alkaline phosphatase appeared on the cells of the periodontal ligament associated closely with the sites of CP formation, and along the mineralization front of CPs. These observations suggest that the mineralization process per se plays a central role in the deposition of AEFC matrix and that alkaline phosphatase of periodontal cells penetrating through the enamel organ to the maturing enamel surface plays a key role in the mineralization process of CPs. PMID:12120713

  3. Microarray-based understanding of normal and malignant plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    De Vos, John; Hose, Dirk; Rème, Thierry; Tarte, Karin; Moreaux, Jérôme; Mahtouk, Karéne; Jourdan, Michel; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Rossi, Jean-François; Cremer, Friedrich W.; Klein, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Plasma cells develop from B-lymphocytes following stimulation by antigen and express a genetic program aimed at the synthesis of immunoglobulins. This program includes the induction of genes coding for transcription factors such as PRDM1 and XBP1, cell-surface molecules such as CD138/syndecan-1 and for the unfolded protein response (UPR). We review how the microarray technology has recently contributed to the understanding of the biology of this rare but essential cell population and its transformation into pre-malignant and malignant plasma cells. PMID:16623766

  4. Quantitation of Haemopoietic Cells from Normal and Leukaemic RFM Mice Using an In Vivo Colony Assay

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, M. Y.

    1974-01-01

    The conventional diffusion chamber (CDC) as described by Benestad (1970) had been modified to assay the colony forming capacity of RFM bone marrow and spleen cells in agar diffusion chambers (ADCs). The colonies are morphologically identical to those formed by the CFUc in agar culture in vitro and have an incidence of approximately 1 in 103 normal nucleated bone marrow cells, and 1 in 104 nucleated spleen cells. Comparison of the growth of normal bone marrow cells in CDCs and in ADCs suggests that cell proliferation in diffusion chambers may result from the same precursor cell as detected by colony formation in agar culture in vitro. This proposal is supported by the suicide of approximately 46% of the ADC colony precursor cells following incubation with 3H-labelled thymidine. Colony formation by haemopoietic cells taken from leukaemic mice appears to be due to the proliferation of a remaining normal cell population alone, while the leukaemic cells in the inoculum form a background of uniformly distributed blast cells. In the case of leukaemic cell culture, there are differences in the results from CDCs and ADCs, and data from colonies in leukaemic ADC cultures are similar to those from normal ADC colonies. These comparisons imply that the ADC technique may be used to monitor the functional capacity of normal bone marrow, by its ability to form colonies, during the development of leukaemia. A humoral effect of a leukaemic environment on the growth of normal bone marrow cells in ADCs has also been detected. PMID:4534200

  5. Normal Adult Aging and the Contextual Influences Affecting Speech and Meaningful Sound Perception

    PubMed Central

    Aydelott, Jennifer; Leech, Robert; Crinion, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    It is widely accepted that hearing loss increases markedly with age, beginning in the fourth decade ISO 7029 (2000). Age-related hearing loss is typified by high-frequency threshold elevation and associated reductions in speech perception because speech sounds, especially consonants, become inaudible. Nevertheless, older adults often report additional and progressive difficulties in the perception and comprehension of speech, often highlighted in adverse listening conditions that exceed those reported by younger adults with a similar degree of high-frequency hearing loss (Dubno, Dirks, & Morgan) leading to communication difficulties and social isolation (Weinstein & Ventry). Some of the age-related decline in speech perception can be accounted for by peripheral sensory problems but cognitive aging can also be a contributing factor. In this article, we review findings from the psycholinguistic literature predominantly over the last four years and present a pilot study illustrating how normal age-related changes in cognition and the linguistic context can influence speech-processing difficulties in older adults. For significant progress in understanding and improving the auditory performance of aging listeners to be made, we discuss how future research will have to be much more specific not only about which interactions between auditory and cognitive abilities are critical but also how they are modulated in the brain. PMID:21307006

  6. Vasomotor tone does not affect perfusion heterogeneity and gas exchange in normal primate lungs during normoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenny, R. W.; Robertson, H. T.; Hlastala, M. P.

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether vasoregulation is an important cause of pulmonary perfusion heterogeneity, we measured regional blood flow and gas exchange before and after giving prostacyclin (PGI(2)) to baboons. Four animals were anesthetized with ketamine and mechanically ventilated. Fluorescent microspheres were used to mark regional perfusion before and after PGI(2) infusion. The lungs were subsequently excised, dried inflated, and diced into approximately 2-cm(3) pieces (n = 1,208-1,629 per animal) with the spatial coordinates recorded for each piece. Blood flow to each piece was determined for each condition from the fluorescent signals. Blood flow heterogeneity did not change with PGI(2) infusion. Two other measures of spatial blood flow distribution, the fractal dimension and the spatial correlation, did not change with PGI(2) infusion. Alveolar-arterial O(2) differences did not change with PGI(2) infusion. We conclude that, in normal primate lungs during normoxia, vasomotor tone is not a significant cause of perfusion heterogeneity. Despite the heterogeneous distribution of blood flow, active regulation of regional perfusion is not required for efficient gas exchange.

  7. Normal adult aging and the contextual influences affecting speech and meaningful sound perception.

    PubMed

    Aydelott, Jennifer; Leech, Robert; Crinion, Jennifer

    2010-12-01

    It is widely accepted that hearing loss increases markedly with age, beginning in the fourth decade ISO 7029 (2000). Age-related hearing loss is typified by high-frequency threshold elevation and associated reductions in speech perception because speech sounds, especially consonants, become inaudible. Nevertheless, older adults often report additional and progressive difficulties in the perception and comprehension of speech, often highlighted in adverse listening conditions that exceed those reported by younger adults with a similar degree of high-frequency hearing loss (Dubno, Dirks, & Morgan) leading to communication difficulties and social isolation (Weinstein & Ventry). Some of the age-related decline in speech perception can be accounted for by peripheral sensory problems but cognitive aging can also be a contributing factor. In this article, we review findings from the psycholinguistic literature predominantly over the last four years and present a pilot study illustrating how normal age-related changes in cognition and the linguistic context can influence speech-processing difficulties in older adults. For significant progress in understanding and improving the auditory performance of aging listeners to be made, we discuss how future research will have to be much more specific not only about which interactions between auditory and cognitive abilities are critical but also how they are modulated in the brain. PMID:21307006

  8. Visual Contextual Effects of Orientation, Contrast, Flicker, and Luminance: All Are Affected by Normal Aging

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Bao N.; McKendrick, Allison M.

    2016-01-01

    The perception of a visual stimulus can be markedly altered by spatial interactions between the stimulus and its surround. For example, a grating stimulus appears lower in contrast when surrounded by a similar pattern of higher contrast: a phenomenon known as surround suppression of perceived contrast. Such center–surround interactions in visual perception are numerous and arise from both cortical and pre-cortical neural circuitry. For example, perceptual surround suppression of luminance and flicker are predominantly mediated pre-cortically, whereas contrast and orientation suppression have strong cortical contributions. Here, we compare the perception of older and younger observers on a battery of tasks designed to assess such visual contextual effects. For all visual dimensions tested (luminance, flicker, contrast, and orientation), on average the older adults showed greater suppression of central targets than the younger adult group. The increase in suppression was consistent in magnitude across all tasks, suggesting that normal aging produces a generalized, non-specific alteration to contextual processing in vision. PMID:27148047

  9. Unique epigenetic influence of H2AX phosphorylation and H3K56 acetylation on normal stem cell radioresponses

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Keith M.; Misri, Sandeep; Meyer, Barbara; Raj, Suyash; Zobel, Cheri L.; Sleckman, Barry P.; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Sharma, Girdhar G.

    2016-01-01

    Normal tissue injury resulting from cancer radiotherapy is often associated with diminished regenerative capacity. We examined the relative radiosensitivity of normal stem cell populations compared with non–stem cells within several radiosensitive tissue niches and culture models. We found that these stem cells are highly radiosensitive, in contrast to their isogenic differentiated progeny. Of interest, they also exhibited a uniquely attenuated DNA damage response (DDR) and muted DNA repair. Whereas stem cells exhibit reduced ATM activation and ionizing radiation–induced foci, they display apoptotic pannuclear H2AX-S139 phosphorylation (γH2AX), indicating unique radioresponses. We also observed persistent phosphorylation of H2AX-Y142 along the DNA breaks in stem cells, which promotes apoptosis while inhibiting DDR signaling. In addition, down-regulation of constitutively elevated histone-3 lysine-56 acetylation (H3K56ac) in stem cells significantly decreased their radiosensitivity, restored DDR function, and increased survival, signifying its role as a key contributor to stem cell radiosensitivity. These results establish that unique epigenetic landscapes affect cellular heterogeneity in radiosensitivity and demonstrate the nonubiquitous nature of radiation responses. We thus elucidate novel epigenetic rheostats that promote ionizing radiation hypersensitivity in various normal stem cell populations, identifying potential molecular targets for pharmacological radioprotection of stem cells and hopefully improving the efficacy of future cancer treatment. PMID:26941327

  10. Aging affects mechanical properties and lubricin/PRG4 gene expression in normal ligaments.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Gail M; Lemmex, Devin B; Ono, Yohei; Beach, Cara J; Reno, Carol R; Hart, David A; Lo, Ian K Y

    2015-09-18

    Age-related changes in ligament properties may have clinical implications for injuries in the mature athlete. Previous preclinical models documented mechanical and biochemical changes in ligaments with aging. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aging on ligament properties (mechanical, molecular, biochemical) by comparing medial collateral ligaments (MCLs) from 1-year-old and 3-year-old rabbits. The MCLs underwent mechanical (n=7, 1-year-old; n=7, 3-year-old), molecular (n=8, 1-year-old; n=6, 3-year-old), collagen and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content (n=8, 1-year-old; n=6, 3-year-old) and water content (n=8, 1-year-old; n=5, 3-year-old) assessments. Mechanical assessments evaluated total creep strain, failure strain, ultimate tensile strength and modulus. Molecular assessments using RT-qPCR evaluated gene expression for collagens, proteoglycans, hormone receptors, and matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors. While total creep strain and ultimate tensile strength were not affected by aging, failure strain was increased and modulus was decreased comparing MCLs from 3-year-old rabbits to those from 1-year-old rabbits. The mRNA expression levels for lubricin/proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 increased with aging; whereas, the mRNA expression levels for estrogen receptor and matrix metalloproteinase-1 decreased with aging. Collagen and GAG content assays and water content assessments did not demonstrate any age-related changes. The increased failure strain and decreased modulus with aging may have implications for increased susceptibility to ligament damage/injury with aging. Lubricin/PRG4 gene expression was affected by aging and its speculated role in ligament function may be related to interfascicular lubrication, which in turn may lead to altered mechanical function with aging and increases in potential for injury.

  11. Overexpression of neurofilament H disrupts normal cell structure and function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szebenyi, Gyorgyi; Smith, George M.; Li, Ping; Brady, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    Studying exogenously expressed tagged proteins in live cells has become a standard technique for evaluating protein distribution and function. Typically, expression levels of experimentally introduced proteins are not regulated, and high levels are often preferred to facilitate detection. However, overexpression of many proteins leads to mislocalization and pathologies. Therefore, for normative studies, moderate levels of expression may be more suitable. To understand better the dynamics of intermediate filament formation, transport, and stability in a healthy, living cell, we inserted neurofilament heavy chain (NFH)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion constructs in adenoviral vectors with tetracycline (tet)-regulated promoters. This system allows for turning on or off the synthesis of NFH-GFP at a selected time, for a defined period, in a dose-dependent manner. We used this inducible system for live cell imaging of changes in filament structure and cell shape, motility, and transport associated with increasing NFH-GFP expression. Cells with low to intermediate levels of NFH-GFP were structurally and functionally similar to neighboring, nonexpressing cells. In contrast, overexpression led to pathological alterations in both filament organization and cell function. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. PMCA activity and membrane tubulin affect deformability of erythrocytes from normal and hypertensive human subjects.

    PubMed

    Monesterolo, Noelia E; Nigra, Ayelen D; Campetelli, Alexis N; Santander, Verónica S; Rivelli, Juan F; Arce, Carlos A; Casale, Cesar H

    2015-11-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated formation of a complex between acetylated tubulin and brain plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA), and the effect of the lipid environment on structure of this complex and on PMCA activity. Deformability of erythrocytes from hypertensive human subjects was reduced by an increase in membrane tubulin content. In the present study, we examined the regulation of PMCA activity by tubulin in normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes, and the effect of exogenously added diacylglycerol (DAG) and phosphatidic acid (PA) on erythrocyte deformability. Some of the key findings were that: (i) PMCA was associated with tubulin in normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes, (ii) PMCA enzyme activity was directly correlated with erythrocyte deformability, and (iii) when tubulin was present in the erythrocyte membrane, treatment with DAG or PA led to increased deformability and associated PMCA activity. Taken together, our findings indicate that PMCA activity is involved in deformability of both normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes. This rheological property of erythrocytes is affected by acetylated tubulin and its lipid environment because both regulate PMCA activity.

  13. Cell surface glycopeptides from human intestinal epithelial cell lines derived from normal colon and colon adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Youakim, A.; Herscovics, A.

    1985-11-01

    The cell surface glycopeptides from an epithelial cell line (CCL 239) derived from normal human colon were compared with those from three cell lines (HCT-8R, HCT-15, and CaCo-2) derived independently from human colonic adenocarcinomas. Cells were incubated with D-(2-TH)mannose or L-(5,6-TH)fucose for 24 h and treated with trypsin to release cell surface components which were then digested exhaustively with Pronase and fractionated on Bio-Gel P-6 before and after treatment with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H. The most noticeable difference between the labeled glycopeptides from the tumor and CCL 239 cells was the presence in the former of an endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H-resistant high molecular weight glycopeptide fraction which was eluted in the void volume of Bio-Gel P-6. This fraction was obtained with both labeled mannose and fucose as precursors. However, acid hydrolysis of this fraction obtained after incubation with (2-TH)mannose revealed that as much as 60-90% of the radioactivity was recovered as fucose. Analysis of the total glycopeptides (cell surface and cell pellet) obtained after incubation with (2-TH)mannose showed that from 40-45% of the radioactivity in the tumor cells and less than 10% of the radioactivity in the CCL 239 cells was recovered as fucose. After incubation of the HCT-8R cells with D-(1,6-TH)glucosamine and L-(1- UC)fucose, strong acid hydrolysis of the labeled glycopeptide fraction excluded from Bio-Gel P-6 produced TH-labeled N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine.

  14. Prelamin A processing, accumulation and distribution in normal cells and laminopathy disorders

    PubMed Central

    Casasola, Andrea; Scalzo, David; Nandakumar, Vivek; Halow, Jessica; Recillas-Targa, Félix; Groudine, Mark; Rincón-Arano, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lamin A is part of a complex structural meshwork located beneath the nuclear envelope and is involved in both structural support and the regulation of gene expression. Lamin A is initially expressed as prelamin A, which contains an extended carboxyl terminus that undergoes a series of post-translational modifications and subsequent cleavage by the endopeptidase ZMPSTE24 to generate lamin A. To facilitate investigations of the role of this cleavage in normal and disease states, we developed a monoclonal antibody (PL-1C7) that specifically recognizes prelamin A at the intact ZMPSTE24 cleavage site, ensuring prelamin A detection exclusively. Importantly, PL-1C7 can be used to determine prelamin A localization and accumulation in cells where lamin A is highly expressed without the use of exogenous fusion proteins. Our results show that unlike mature lamin A, prelamin A accumulates as discrete and localized foci at the nuclear periphery. Furthermore, whereas treatment with farnesylation inhibitors of cells overexpressing a GFP-prelamin A fusion protein results in the formation of large nucleoplasmic clumps, these aggregates are not observed upon similar treatment of cells expressing endogenous prelamin A or in cells lacking ZMPSTE24 expression and/or activity. Finally, we show that specific laminopathy-associated mutations exhibit both positive and negative effects on prelamin A accumulation, indicating that these mutations affect prelamin A processing efficiency in different manners. PMID:26900797

  15. Gas density does not affect pulmonary acoustic transmission in normal men.

    PubMed

    Mahagnah, M; Gavriely, N

    1995-03-01

    Fremitus, the transmission of sound and vibration from the mouth to the chest wall, has long been used clinically to examine the pulmonary system. Recently, modern technology has become available to measure the acoustic transfer function (TF) and transit times (TT) of the pulmonary system. Because sound speed is inversely proportional to the square root of gas density in free gas, but not in porous media, we measured the effect of air and Heliox (80% He-20% O2) breathing on pulmonary sound transmission in six healthy subjects to investigate the mechanism of sound transmission. Wide-band noise (75-2,000 Hz) was "injected" into the mouth and picked up over the trachea and chest wall. The averaged power spectra, TF, phase, and coherence were calculated using a fast Fourier transform-based algorithm. The phase data were used to calculate TT as a function of frequency. TF was found to consist of a low-pass filter property with essentially flat transmitted energy to 300 Hz and exponential decline to 600 Hz at the anterior right upper lobe (CR) and flat transmission to 100 Hz with exponential decline to 150 Hz at the right posterior base (BR). TF was not affected by breathing Heliox. The average TT values, calculated from the slopes of the averaged phase, were 1.5 +/- 0.5 ms for trachea to CR and 5.2 +/- 0.5 ms for trachea to BR transmission during air breathing. During Heliox breathing, the values of TT were 1.5 +/- 0.5 ms and 4.9 +/- 0.5 ms from the trachea to CR and from the trachea to BR locations, respectively. These results suggest that sound transmission in the respiratory system is dominated by wave propagation through the parenchymal porous structure. PMID:7775338

  16. FTIR characterization of animal lung cells: normal and precancerous modified e10 cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zezell, D. M.; Pereira, T. M.; Mennecier, G.; Bachmann, L.; Govone, A. B.; Dagli, M. L. Z.

    2012-06-01

    The chemical carcinogens from tobacco are related to over 90% of lung cancers around the world. The risk of death of this kind of cancer is high because the diagnosis usually is made only in advanced stages. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new diagnostic methods for detecting the lung cancer in earlier stages. The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) can offer high sensibility and accuracy to detect the minimal chemical changes into the biological sample. The aim of this study is to evaluate the differences on infrared spectra between normal lung cells and precancerous lung cells transformed by NNK. Non-cancerous lung cell line e10 (ATCC) and NNK-transformed e10 cell lines were maintained in complete culture medium (1:1 mixture of Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium and Ham's F12 [DMEM/Ham's F12], supplemented with 100 ng/ml cholera enterotoxin, 10 lg/ml insulin, 0.5 lg/ml. hydrocortisol, 20 ng/ml epidermal growth factor, and 5% horse serum. The cultures were maintained in alcohol 70%. The infrared spectra were acquired on ATR-FTIR Nicolet 6700 spectrophotometer at 4 cm-1 resolution, 30 scans, in the 1800-900 cm-1 spectral range. Each sample had 3 spectra recorded, 30 infrared spectra were obtained from each cell line. The second derivate of spectra indicates that there are displacement in 1646 cm-1 (amine I) and 1255 cm-1(DNA), allowing the possibility to differentiate the two king of cells, with accuracy of 89,9%. These preliminary results indicate that ATR-FTIR is useful to differentiate normal e10 lung cells from precancerous e10 transformed by NNK.

  17. Mapping of corticotropic cells in the normal human pituitary.

    PubMed

    Trouillas, J; Guigard, M P; Fonlupt, P; Souchier, C; Girod, C

    1996-05-01

    We accomplished the first mapping of corticotropic cells in the whole human adult pituitary. Corticotropic cells were identified by immunocytochemistry (ICC) and quantified by image analysis on 12 pituitaries obtained from people who had died suddenly. An overall view of each pituitary was given by 15-21 sections (mean 18 sections) at 300-micron intervals on six slides. Each section was systematically treated by indirect immunoperoxidase using an anti-ACTH[17-39] polyclonal antiserum. All the measures were done with a x 6.3 objective lens, each field (0. 5 mm2) being considered as the unit area. The mean pituitary density (surface of labeled cells/total surface) of corticotropic cells (9.5 +/- 3.0% per 0. 5 mm2) is significantly higher in men (11.5 +/- 5.1%) than in women (7.0 +/- 1.3%). This difference is due to an inverse relationship between the corticotropic cell density and the weight of the pituitary, which is higher in women than in men. The mean diameter of corticotropic cells is 14.9 micron and their total number per pituitary is approximately 10(7) cells. We confirmed that the spatial distribution of corticotropic cells is nonuniform: they are mainly distributed in the anteromedian part of the anterior lobe. In addition, our results demonstrated that the inferior part of the pituitary contained three times more corticotropic cells than the superior part (mean density 18.0% vs 6.0%) and the anterior part twice as many as the posterior part (mean density 12.3% vs 6.8%). On the horizontal plane, the pituitary was divided into eight zones, in which the mean of area was 2.5-21.0%. The maximal cell density may reach 40-60%. The use of this map should help the pathologist to recognize if there is corticotropic hyperplasia in a small pituitary fragment surgically removed from a patient with Cushing's disease. On the basis of this study, we put forward some criteria for diagnosing corticotropic hyperplasia. PMID:8627004

  18. B-cell receptor signalling and its crosstalk with other pathways in normal and malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Seda, Vaclav; Mraz, Marek

    2015-03-01

    The physiology of B cells is intimately connected with the function of their B-cell receptor (BCR). B-cell lymphomas frequently (dys)regulate BCR signalling and thus take advantage of this pre-existing pathway for B-cell proliferation and survival. This has recently been underscored by clinical trials demonstrating that small molecules (fosfamatinib, ibrutinib, idelalisib) inhibiting BCR-associated kinases (SYK, BTK, PI3K) have an encouraging clinical effect. Here we describe the current knowledge of the specific aspects of BCR signalling in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and normal B cells. Multiple factors can contribute to BCR pathway (dys)regulation in these malignancies and the activation of 'chronic' or 'tonic' BCR signalling. In lymphoma B cells, the balance of initiation, amplitude and duration of BCR activation can be influenced by a specific immunoglobulin structure, the expression and mutations of adaptor molecules (like GAB1, BLNK, GRB2, CARD11), the activity of kinases (like LYN, SYK, PI3K) or phosphatases (like SHIP-1, SHP-1 and PTEN) and levels of microRNAs. We also discuss the crosstalk of BCR with other signalling pathways (NF-κB, adhesion through integrins, migration and chemokine signalling) to emphasise that the 'BCR inhibitors' target multiple pathways interconnected with BCR, which might explain some of their clinical activity.

  19. NMDA receptors on zebrafish Mauthner cells require CaMKII-α for normal development.

    PubMed

    Roy, Birbickram; Ferdous, Jannatul; Ali, Declan W

    2015-02-01

    Calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase 2 (CaMKII) is a multifunctional protein that is highly enriched in the synapse. It plays important roles in neuronal functions such as synaptic plasticity, synaptogenesis, and neural development. Gene duplication in zebrafish has resulted in the occurrence of seven CaMKII genes (camk2a, camk2b1, camk2b2, camk2g1, camk2g2, camk2d1, and camk2d2) that are developmentally expressed. In this study, we used single cell, real-time quantitative PCR to investigate the expression of CaMKII genes in individual Mauthner cells (M-cells) of 2 days post fertilization (dpf) zebrafish embryos. We found that out of seven different CaMKII genes, only the mRNA for CaMKII-α was expressed in the M-cell at detectable levels, while all other isoforms were undetectable. Morpholino knockdown of CaMKII-α had no significant effect on AMPA synaptic currents (mEPSCs) but decreased the amplitude of NMDA mEPSCs. NMDA events exhibited a biexponential decay with τfast ≈ 30 ms and τslow ≈ 300 ms. Knockdown of CaMKII-α specifically reduced the amplitude of the slow component of the NMDA-mediated currents (mEPSCs), without affecting the fast component, the frequency, or the kinetics of the mEPSCs. Immunolabelling of the M-cell showed increased dendritic arborizations in the morphants compared with controls, and knockdown of CaMKII-α altered locomotor behaviors of touch responses. These results suggest that CaMKII-α is present in embryonic M-cells and that it plays a role in the normal development of excitatory synapses. Our findings pave the way for determining the function of specific CaMKII isoforms during the early stages of M-cell development.

  20. Mutations in Coliphage P1 Affecting Host Cell Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Jean Tweedy; Walker, Donald H.

    1980-01-01

    A total of 103 amber mutants of coliphage P1 were tested for lysis of nonpermissive cells. Of these, 83 caused cell lysis at the normal lysis time and have defects in particle morphogenesis. Five amber mutants, with mutations in the same gene (gene 2), caused premature lysis and may have a defect in a lysis regulator. Fifteen amber mutants were unable to cause cell lysis. Artificially lysed cells infected with five of these mutants produced viable phage particles, and phage particles were seen in thin sections of unlysed, infected cells. However, phage production by these mutants was not continued after the normal lysis time. We conclude that the defect of these five mutants is in a lysis function. The five mutations were found to be in the same gene (designated gene 17). The remaining 10 amber mutants, whose mutations were found to be in the same gene (gene 10), were also unable to cause cell lysis. They differed from those in gene 17 in that no viable phage particles were produced from artificially lysed cells, and no phage particles were seen in thin sections of unlysed, infected cells. We conclude that the gene 10 mutants cannot synthesize late proteins, and it is possible that gene 10 may code for a regulator of late gene expression for P1. Images PMID:16789200

  1. Asiaticoside enhances normal human skin cell migration, attachment and growth in vitro wound healing model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Hyun; Kim, Hye-Lee; Lee, Mi Hee; You, Kyung Eun; Kwon, Byeong-Ju; Seo, Hyok Jin; Park, Jong-Chul

    2012-10-15

    Wound healing proceeds through a complex collaborative process involving many types of cells. Keratinocytes and fibroblasts of epidermal and dermal layers of the skin play prominent roles in this process. Asiaticoside, an active component of Centella asiatica, is known for beneficial effects on keloid and hypertrophic scar. However, the effects of this compound on normal human skin cells are not well known. Using in vitro systems, we observed the effects of asiaticoside on normal human skin cell behaviors related to healing. In a wound closure seeding model, asiaticoside increased migration rates of skin cells. By observing the numbers of cells attached and the area occupied by the cells, we concluded that asiaticoside also enhanced the initial skin cell adhesion. In cell proliferation assays, asiaticoside induced an increase in the number of normal human dermal fibroblasts. In conclusion, asiaticoside promotes skin cell behaviors involved in wound healing; and as a bioactive component of an artificial skin, may have therapeutic value.

  2. The cell-cycle dependence of the spectra of proliferating normal and neoplastic single cells using confocal resonance Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boydston-White, Susie; Liu, Cheng-Hui; Alfano, Robert R.

    2013-03-01

    Confocal resonance Raman (RR) spectra were collected from single proliferating cells and analyzed to detect spectral patterns that are cell-cycle dependent, as a consequence of cellular proliferation — normal or abnormal. The cells' biochemical age at each time point was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining to identify the presence or absence of cellular components that appear and/or disappear as the cells proceed through the cell-cycle. The RR spectra were collected and compared for each time point as the cells proceeded through the cell cycle to determine what spectral vibrational patterns are cell-cycle dependent. In this study, the question is whether the cell-cycle dependent RR spectral patterns of the vibrational modes observed in proliferating normal and neoplastic single cells are due to a state of cancer or are simply the consequences of the cells' changing internal biochemistry due to the process of cellular proliferation --- normal or abnormal.

  3. Loss of all 3 Extended Synaptotagmins does not affect normal mouse development, viability or fertility.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Michel G; Moss, Tom

    2016-09-01

    The extended synaptotagmins, E-Syt1, 2 and 3, are multiple C2 domain membrane proteins that are tethered to the endoplasmic reticulum and interact in a calcium dependent manner with plasma membrane phospholipids to form endoplasmic reticulum - plasma membrane junctions. These junctions have been implicated in the exchange of phospholipids between the 2 organelles. The E-Syts have further been implicated in receptor signaling and endocytosis and can interact directly with fibroblast growth factor and other cell surface receptors. Despite these multiple functions, the search for a requirement in vivo has been elusive. Most recently, we found that the genes for E-Syt2 and 3 could be inactivated without effect on mouse development, viability, fertility or morphology. We have now created insertion and deletion mutations in the last of the mouse E-Syt genes. We show that E-Syt1 is specifically expressed throughout the embryonic skeleton during the early stages of chrondrogenesis in a pattern quite distinct from that of E-Syt2 or 3. Despite this, E-Syt1 is also not required for mouse development and propagation. We further show that even the combined inactivation of all 3 E-Syt genes has no effect on mouse viability or fertility in the laboratory. However, this inactivation induces an enhancement in the expression of the genes encoding Orp5/8, Orai1, STIM1 and TMEM110, endoplasmic reticulum - plasma membrane junction proteins that potentially could compensate for E-Syt loss. Given the multiple functions suggested for the E-Syts and their evolutionary conservation, our unexpected findings suggest that they may only provide a survival advantage under specific conditions that have as yet to be identified.

  4. Loss of all 3 Extended Synaptotagmins does not affect normal mouse development, viability or fertility

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Michel G.; Moss, Tom

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The extended synaptotagmins, E-Syt1, 2 and 3, are multiple C2 domain membrane proteins that are tethered to the endoplasmic reticulum and interact in a calcium dependent manner with plasma membrane phospholipids to form endoplasmic reticulum - plasma membrane junctions. These junctions have been implicated in the exchange of phospholipids between the 2 organelles. The E-Syts have further been implicated in receptor signaling and endocytosis and can interact directly with fibroblast growth factor and other cell surface receptors. Despite these multiple functions, the search for a requirement in vivo has been elusive. Most recently, we found that the genes for E-Syt2 and 3 could be inactivated without effect on mouse development, viability, fertility or morphology. We have now created insertion and deletion mutations in the last of the mouse E-Syt genes. We show that E-Syt1 is specifically expressed throughout the embryonic skeleton during the early stages of chrondrogenesis in a pattern quite distinct from that of E-Syt2 or 3. Despite this, E-Syt1 is also not required for mouse development and propagation. We further show that even the combined inactivation of all 3 E-Syt genes has no effect on mouse viability or fertility in the laboratory. However, this inactivation induces an enhancement in the expression of the genes encoding Orp5/8, Orai1, STIM1 and TMEM110, endoplasmic reticulum - plasma membrane junction proteins that potentially could compensate for E-Syt loss. Given the multiple functions suggested for the E-Syts and their evolutionary conservation, our unexpected findings suggest that they may only provide a survival advantage under specific conditions that have as yet to be identified. PMID:27399837

  5. Estradiol differently affects melanin synthesis of malignant and normal melanocytes: a relationship with clock and clock-controlled genes.

    PubMed

    Poletini, Maristela Oliveira; de Assis, Leonardo Vinicius Monteiro; Moraes, Maria Nathalia; Castrucci, Ana Maria de Lauro

    2016-10-01

    Melanin production within melanocytes is regulated, among others, by estradiol, whose effects on melanogenesis are still not completely elucidated. Here we show that although 10(-7) M 17β-estradiol (E2) increased tyrosinase mRNA levels in B16-F10 malignant melanocytes, there was a transient decrease and abolishment of the temporal variation of melanin content. Both parameters were much higher in the malignant than in normal Melan-a cells. Considering that silencing clock machinery in human melanocytes increases melanogenesis, we investigated clock gene expression in those cell lines. Except for Melan-a Bmal1 and B16-F10 Per2 expression of control cells, Per1, Per2, and Bmal1 expression increased independently of cell type or E2 treatment after 24 h. However, melanoma cells showed a marked increase in Per1 and Bma11 expression in response to E2 at the same time points, what may rule out E2 as a synchronizer agent since the expression of those genes were not in antiphase. Next, we investigated the expression of Xpa, a clock-controlled gene, which in Melan-a cells, peaked at 18 h, and E2 treatment shifted this peak to 24 h, whereas B16-F10 Xpa expression peaked at 24 h in both control and E2 group, and it was higher compared to Melan-a cells in both groups. Therefore, malignant and normal melanocytes display profound differences on core elements of the local clock, and how they respond to E2, what is most probably determinant of the differences seen on melanin synthesis and Tyrosinase and Xpa expression. Understanding these processes at the molecular level could bring new strategies to treat melanoma. PMID:27535239

  6. Human cells and cell membrane molecular models are affected in vitro by chlorpromazine.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Villena, Fernando; Sotomayor, Carlos P; Bolognin, Silvia; Zatta, Paolo

    2008-06-01

    This study presents evidence that chlorpromazine (CPZ) affects human cells and cell membrane molecular models. Human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells incubated with 0.1 mM CPZ suffered a decrease of cell viability. On the other hand, phase contrast microscopy observations of human erythrocytes indicated that they underwent a morphological alteration as 1 microM CPZ changed their discoid normal shape to stomatocytes, and to hemolysis with 1 mM CPZ. X-ray diffraction experiments performed on dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) bilayers, classes of the major phospholipids present in the outer and inner sides of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively showed that CPZ disordered the polar head and acyl chain regions of both DMPC and DMPE, where these interactions were stronger with DMPC bilayers. Fluorescence spectroscopy on DMPC LUV at 18 degrees C confirmed these results. In fact, the assays showed that CPZ induced a significant reduction of their generalized polarization (GP) and anisotropy (r) values, indicative of enhanced disorder at the polar head and acyl chain regions of the DMPC lipid bilayer. PMID:18372093

  7. Biophysical characterization of hematopoietic cells from normal and leukemic sources with distinct primitiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Youhua; Fung, Tsz-Kan; Wan, Haixia; Wang, Kaiqun; Leung, Anskar Y. H.; Sun, Dong

    2011-08-01

    This letter reported the biophysical characterization of immunophenotypically distinct hematopoietic cells from normal and leukemic sources, through manipulation with optical tweezers at single cell level. The results show that the percentage of cells that are stretchable and their deformability are significantly higher in the more primitive cell populations. This study provides the evidence that normal and leukemic hematopoietic cell populations with distinct primitiveness exhibit differential biophysical properties. These findings raise a hypothesis that the high deformability may be related to the unique functions and activities of primitive hematopoietic cells.

  8. 2-D Model for Normal and Sickle Cell Blood Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekleab, Yonatan; Harris, Wesley

    2011-11-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disorder that alters the red blood cell (RBC) structure and function such that hemoglobin (Hb) cannot effectively bind and release oxygen. Previous computational models have been designed to study the microcirculation for insight into blood disorders such as SCD. Our novel 2-D computational model represents a fast, time efficient method developed to analyze flow dynamics, O2 diffusion, and cell deformation in the microcirculation. The model uses a finite difference, Crank-Nicholson scheme to compute the flow and O2 concentration, and the level set computational method to advect the RBC membrane on a staggered grid. Several sets of initial and boundary conditions were tested. Simulation data indicate a few parameters to be significant in the perturbation of the blood flow and O2 concentration profiles. Specifically, the Hill coefficient, arterial O2 partial pressure, O2 partial pressure at 50% Hb saturation, and cell membrane stiffness are significant factors. Results were found to be consistent with those of Le Floch [2010] and Secomb [2006].

  9. Regulation of heme metabolism in normal and sideroblastic bone marrow cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Ibraham, N.G.; Lutton, J.D.; Hoffman, R.; Levere, R.D.

    1985-05-01

    Heme metabolism was examined in developing in vitro erythroid colonies (CFUE) and in bone marrow samples taken directly from four normal donors and four patients with sideroblastic anemia. Maximum activities of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase (ALAS), ALA dehydratase (ALAD), and /sup 14/C-ALA incorporation into heme were achieved in normal marrow CFUE after 8 days of culture, whereas heme oxygenase progressively decreased to low levels of activity during the same period. Assays on nucleated bone marrow cells taken directly from patients revealed that ALAS activity was considerably reduced in idiopathic sideroblastic anemia (IASA) and X-linked sideroblastic anemia (X-SA) bone marrow specimens, whereas the activity increased more than twofold (normal levels) when cells were assayed from 8-day CFUE. In all cases, ALAD activity appeared to be within normal levels. Measurement of heme synthesis revealed that normal levels of /sup 14/C-ALA incorporation into heme were achieved in IASA cells but were reduced in X-SA cells. In marked contrast to levels in normal cells, heme oxygenase was found to be significantly elevated (two- to fourfold) in bone marrow cells taken directly from patients with IASA and X-SA. Results from this study demonstrate that IASA and X-SA bone marrow cells have disturbances in ALAS and heme metabolism, and that erythropoiesis (CFUE) can be restored to normal levels when cells are cultured in methylcellulose.

  10. Wt p53 impairs response to chemotherapy: make lemonade to spare normal cells

    PubMed Central

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.

    2012-01-01

    As published recently in Cancer Cell, p53 impairs the apoptotic response to chemotherapy and clinical outcome in breast cancer. I discuss that, while treating tumors lacking wt p53, this phenomenon can be exploited to protect normal cells from chemotherapy because all normal cells have wt p53. Also, several therapeutic paradigms can be reassessed, including the role of cellular senescence in cancer therapy. PMID:22802145

  11. The effect of laser activation of 5,10,15,20-tetra-sulphophenyl-porphyrin loaded in K562 cells and human normal mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Carolina; Neagu, Monica; Manda, Gina; Ion, Rodica-Mariana; Iordăchescu, Dana Iord

    2004-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a relatively new type of treatment in cancer, based on a photosensitizer, visible light and molecular oxygen. Reactive oxygen species are generated, causing tumor cells death by apoptosis or necrosis. Significant nowadays research efforts are focused on finding new photosensitizers with antineoplastic activity and an acceptable toxicological profile. Although consistent information exists regarding PDT in solid tumors, relatively few data are available for PDT of blood cancers. Therefore, we carried out a comparative study on lymphoblastic K562 cells and human normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) treated at a density of 2 x 10(5) cells/mL with 5,10,15,20-tetra-sulphophenyl-porphyrin (TSPP) and then irradiated with He-Ne laser light (lamda = 632.8 nm). The following cell functions were investigated: viability, multiplication, RNA synthesis, total RNA levels and apoptosis. After irradiation, the viability of TSPP-loaded tumor cells decrease, the multiplication rate and the total RNA level are drastically reduced and cells undergo apoptosis. TSPP alone loaded into cells but not activated by irradiation, does not affect these cell parameters. Human normal PBMC subjected to TSPP loading and laser-irradiation develop a different cellular response, their viability and proliferative capacity not being altered by experimental PDT. Accordingly, it appears that TSPP is a non-aggressive compound for cellular physiology and becomes cytotoxic only by irradiation; moreover laser-activated TSPP affects only cells that have a tumoral pattern.

  12. Dietary guidance normalizes large intestinal endocrine cell densities in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mazzawi, T; Hausken, T; Gundersen, D; El-Salhy, M

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: To determine the large intestinal endocrine cell types affected following dietary guidance in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Subjects/Methods: The study included 13 IBS patients and 13 control subjects. The patients received three sessions of individualized dietary guidance. Both the control subjects and the patients were scheduled for colonoscopies at baseline and again for the patients at 3–9 months after dietary guidance. Biopsy samples were taken from the colon and rectum and were immunostained for all types of large intestinal endocrine cells. The endocrine cells were quantified using computerized image analysis. Results: The daily total consumption (mean±s.e.m. values) of fruits and vegetables rich in FODMAPs (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols) decreased significantly from 16.2±5.3 g before receiving dietary guidance to 9.2±3.2 g after receiving dietary guidance (P=0.02). In the total colon, the densities of serotonin cells were 46.8±8.9, 10.5±2.1 and 22.6±3.2 cells/mm2 in control subjects and in IBS patients before and after receiving dietary guidance, respectively (P=0.007); the corresponding densities of peptide YY cells were 11.6±1.8, 10.8±1.7 and 16.8±2.1 cells/mm2, respectively (P=0.06). The cell densities for both serotonin and peptide YY did not change significantly in the rectum. The densities of somatostatin cells in the rectum were 13.5±3.0, 13.2±3.0, and 22.3±3.2 cells/mm2 for control subjects and for IBS patients before and after receiving dietary guidance, respectively (P=0.01). Conclusions: The densities of the large intestinal endocrine cells tend to normalize following dietary guidance that may have contributed to the improvement of the patients with IBS symptoms. PMID:26603880

  13. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affects tissue specific stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Yuriko; Doi, Hanako; Ono, Yusuke; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Kitajima, Michio; Miura, Kiyonori; Li, Tao-Sheng; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Postmenopausal disorders are frequently observed in various organs, but their relationship with estrogen deficiency and mechanisms remain unclear. As tissue-specific stem cells have been found to express estrogen receptors, we examined the hypothesis that estrogen deficiency impairs stem cells, which consequently contributes to postmenopausal disorders. Six-week-old C57BL/6 female mice were ovariectomized, following which they received 17β-estradiol replacement or vehicle (control). Sham-operated mice were used as healthy controls. All mice were killed for evaluation 2 months after treatments. Compared with the healthy control, ovariectomy significantly decreased uterine weight, which was partially recovered by 17β-estradiol replacement. Ovariectomy significantly increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, but impaired their capacity to grow mixed cell-type colonies in vitro. Estrogen replacement further increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, without significantly affecting colony growth in vitro. The number of CD105-positive mesenchymal stem cells in bone marrow also significantly decreased after ovariectomy, but completely recovered following estrogen replacement. Otherwise, neither ovariectomy nor estrogen replacement changed the number of Pax7-positive satellite cells, which are a skeletal muscle-type stem cell. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affected tissue-specific stem cells, suggesting a likely and direct relationship with postmenopausal disorders. PMID:26245252

  14. How does metabolism affect cell death in cancer?

    PubMed

    Villa, Elodie; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland

    2016-07-01

    In cancer research, identifying a specificity of tumor cells compared with 'normal' proliferating cells for targeted therapy is often considered the Holy Grail for researchers and clinicians. Although diverse in origin, most cancer cells share characteristics including the ability to escape cell death mechanisms and the utilization of different methods of energy production. In the current paradigm, aerobic glycolysis is considered the central metabolic characteristic of cancer cells (Warburg effect). However, recent data indicate that cancer cells also show significant changes in other metabolic pathways. Indeed, it was recently suggested that Kreb's cycle, pentose phosphate pathway intermediates, and essential and nonessential amino acids have key roles. Renewed interest in the fact that cancer cells have to reprogram their metabolism in order to proliferate or resist treatment must take into consideration the ability of tumor cells to adapt their metabolism to the local microenvironment (low oxygen, low nutrients). This variety of metabolic sources might be either a strength, resulting in infinite possibilities for adaptation and increased ability to resist chemotherapy-induced death, or a weakness that could be targeted to kill cancer cells. Here, we discuss recent insights showing how energetic metabolism may regulate cell death and how this might be relevant for cancer treatment.

  15. Cytochrome P450 differences in normal and imposex-affected female whelk Buccinum undatum from the open North Sea.

    PubMed

    Santos, M M; ten Hallers-Tjabbes, C C; Vieira, N; Boon, J P; Porte, C

    2002-01-01

    Normal and imposex-affected female Buccinum undatum were sampled from the open North Sea at three locations, one with low, and two with high shipping densities. Cytochrome P450 components and P450 aromatase activity were determined in the microsomal fractions isolated from pooled digestive gland/gonads. Cytochrome P450 aromatase activity was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in normal females collected in the low shipping density area (1,325 +/- 295 fmol/h/mg protein) than levels from imposex animals from a high shipping density area (620 +/- 287 fmol/h/mg protein). A negative correlation was found between aromatase activity and organotin body burden (r = -0.99). Levels of CYP450, cytochrome b5 and NADPH cytochrome c reductase activity did not show differences among groups. This is the first field evidence of depressed aromatase activity in imposex affected females, although additional research under laboratory controlled conditions is required to fully understand the mechanisms underlying the development of imposex in this species.

  16. [Profiles of DNA methylation in normal and cancer cells].

    PubMed

    Weber, Michaël

    2008-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the epigenetic mark DNA methylation is found exclusively at cytosine residues in the CpG islands of genes, transposons and intergenic DNA. Among functional roles, DNA methylation is essential for mammalian embryonic development, and is classically thought to function by stably silencing promoter activity. However, until recently, understanding of the distribution of cytosine methylation in the whole genome - and hence, identification of its targets - was very limited. High-throughput methodologies, including methylated DNA immunoprecipitation, have recently revealed genome-wide mapping of DNA methylation, and provided new and unexpected data. Clearly DNA methylation is selectively associated with some key promoters- and is not a prerequisite for promoter inactivation, since strong CpG island promoters are mostly unmethylated, even when inactive. Most germline-specific genes are methylated and permanently silenced in somatic cells, suggesting a role of this mark in maintaining somatic cellular identity. These large scale studies will also help understanding the deregulation of DNA methylation associated with cancer, among which unmethylation of germinal cells genes, and recent observtion of large hypomethylated regions in tumoral specimens. The next challenge will be to understand if these methylation changes occur randomly, or more likely are specified by oncogenes or linked to environmental pressure. PMID:18789220

  17. Ultrasonic differentiation of normal versus malignant breast epithelial cells in monolayer cultures

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Timothy E.; Goodrich, Jeffrey B.; Ambrose, Brady J.; Patel, Hemang; Kwon, Soonjo; Pearson, Lee H.

    2010-01-01

    Normal and malignant mammary epithelial cells were studied using laboratory measurements, wavelet analysis, and numerical simulations of monolayer cell cultures to determine whether microscopic breast cancer can be detected in vitro with high-frequency ultrasound. Pulse-echo waveforms were acquired by immersing a broadband, unfocused 50-MHz transducer in the growth media of cell culture well plates and collecting the first reflection from the well bottoms. The simulations included a multilayer pulse-reflection model and a model of two-dimensional arrays of spherical cells and nuclei. The results show that normal and malignant cells produce time-domain signals and spectral features that are significantly different. PMID:21110531

  18. Differentiation of normal and cultured preneoplastic tracheal epithellal cells in rats: importance of epithelial mesenchymal interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Terzaghi, M.; Klein-Szanto, A.J.P.

    1980-11-01

    Changes in the dependence on mesenchymal tissues for survival and differentiation in inbred F344 female rats were investigated in tracheal epithelial cells exposed to 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Fresh suspensions of normal tracheal epithelium or cultured preneoplastic cells were inoculated into isolated organ segments (trachea, esophagus, bladder, or small intestine) or into Dacron containers that were then implanted subdermally into isogenic recipients. At various times after cell inoculation and implantation, tissues were removed for histologic evaluation. Normal cells inoculated into frozen-thawed trachea, esophagus, bladder, and intestine yielded a regular mucociliary epithelium. Normal cell inocula did not, however, survive in trachea previously heated (100/sup 0/C), fixed in ethanol, or digested with collagenese; nor did normal cells survive in Dacron containers unless tracheal fibroblasts plus epithelial cells were inoculated together. DMBA- and TPA-exposed cell populations with increased growth capacity in vitro survived and differentiated on all of the above substrates. For survival and differentiation in vivo, preneoplastic cells appeared to have less stringent substrate requirements than did normal cells. Application of the described techniques to the study of changes occurring early in the development of neoplastic disease is discussed.

  19. Tracking of Normal and Malignant Progenitor Cell Cycle Transit in a Defined Niche

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, Gabriel; Lennon, Kathleen M.; Delos Santos, Nathaniel P.; Lambert-Fliszar, Florence; Riso, Gennarina L.; Lazzari, Elisa; Marra, Marco A.; Morris, Sheldon; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Jamieson, Catriona H. M.

    2016-01-01

    While implicated in therapeutic resistance, malignant progenitor cell cycle kinetics have been difficult to quantify in real-time. We developed an efficient lentiviral bicistronic fluorescent, ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator reporter (Fucci2BL) to image live single progenitors on a defined niche coupled with cell cycle gene expression analysis. We have identified key differences in cell cycle regulatory gene expression and transit times between normal and chronic myeloid leukemia progenitors that may inform cancer stem cell eradication strategies. PMID:27041210

  20. Complex relationship between TCTP, microtubules and actin microfilaments regulates cell shape in normal and cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bazile, Franck; Pascal, Aude; Arnal, Isabelle; Le Clainche, Christophe; Chesnel, Franck; Kubiak, Jacek Z.

    2009-01-01

    Translationally Controlled Tumor-associated Protein (TCTP) is a ubiquitous and highly conserved protein implicated in cancers. Here we demonstrate that interactions of TCTP with microtubules (MTs) are functionally important but indirect, and we reveal novel interaction of TCTP with the actin cytoskeleton. Firstly, immunofluorescence in Xenopus XL2 cells revealed cytoplasmic fibers stained with TCTP but not with tubulin antibodies, as well as MT-free of TCTP. Furthermore, TCTP localized to a subset of actin-rich fibers in migrating cells. Secondly XlTCTP did not affect in vitro assembly/disassembly of MTs, and lacked MT binding affinity both in pull-down assays and in cell-free extracts. Although TCTP also failed to bind to purified F-actin, it associated with microfilaments in cell-free extracts. Thirdly, TCTP concentrated in mitotic spindle did not colocalize with MTs, and was easily dissociated from these structures except at the poles. Finally, RNAi knockdown of TCTP in XL2 and HeLa cells provoked drastic, MT-dependent, shape change. These data show that although TCTP interacts with MTs it does not behave as classic MT Associated Protein (MAP). Our evidence for an association of TCTP with F-actin structures, and for an involvement in cell shape regulation, implicates this protein in integrating cytoskeletal interations both in interphase and mitosis providing a new avenue to fully understand the role of TCTP. PMID:19168579

  1. Induction of autoantibody-producing cells after the coculture of haptenated and normal human mononuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Pisko, E J; Foster, S L; Turner, R A

    1981-10-01

    The coculture of normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBL) and autologous mononuclear leukocytes coupled to the trinitrophenyl (TNP) hapten (TNP-PBL) was found to induce a polyclonal activation of antibody-producing cells. The polyclonal activation of antibody-producing cells was demonstrated by detecting the induction of cells producing antibody to sheep red blood cells using a complement-dependent, direct, hemolytic plaque-forming cell (PFC) assay. A ratio of four normal to one haptenated mononuclear leukocyte was found to be optimal for inducing the polyclonal activation of antibody-producing cell in these cultures. The plaque-forming cells assay in these experiments utilized monolayers of indicator red cells. Further evidence for the polyclonal induction of antibody-producing cells by TNP-PBL was provided by demonstrating PFC on monolayers of not only sheep red blood cells, but also autologous human red cells, bromelain-treated autologous red cells, TNP-coupled human and sheep red cells, and human autologous red cells coupled to human heat-aggregated IgG with chromic chloride. Thus cells secreting antibody to TNP, human red cells, and human IgG were induced. Anti-IgG and anti-human red cell-producing cells were first detected on Day 2 of culture and were still present on Day 9. Mononuclear leukocytes altered by chemical haptenation polyclonally stimulate normal mononuclear leukocytes to become antibody-producing cells. This polyclonal stimulation of antibody-producing cells includes cells producing antibodies to human IgG and human autologous red blood cells suggesting that autoantibody-producing cells are induced.

  2. Affective responses to increasing levels of exercise intensity in normal-weight, overweight, and obese middle-aged women.

    PubMed

    Ekkekakis, Panteleimon; Lind, Erik; Vazou, Spiridoula

    2010-01-01

    At least 60 min of daily physical activity (PA) are recommended for weight control, a target achieved by only 3% of obese (OB) women. The purposes of this study were to examine (i) the affective responses of normal-weight (NW), overweight (OW), and OB middle-aged sedentary women to exercise of increasing intensity and (ii) the relationship of affective responses to self-efficacy and social physique anxiety. The women participated in a graded treadmill protocol to volitional exhaustion while providing ratings of pleasure-displeasure and perceived activation each minute. The Activation Deactivation Adjective Check List (AD ACL) was also completed before and after exercise. The affective responses of NW and OW women did not differ. However OB women gave lower pleasure ratings during the incremental protocol and reported lower Energy scores immediately after the protocol. Social physique anxiety, but not self-efficacy, was inversely related to pleasure and energy. The lower levels of pleasure and energy experienced by OB than nonobese women could account in part for their dramatically low levels of PA participation. Modifying the cognitive antecedents of social physique anxiety might be a useful intervention strategy.

  3. Glycosaminoglycan metabolism and cytokine release in normal and otosclerotic human bone cells interleukin-1 treated.

    PubMed

    Bodo, M; Carinci, P; Venti, G; Giammarioli, M; Donti, E; Stabellini, G; Paludetti, G; Becchetti, E

    1997-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), normal components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), and the glycosidases, that degrade them, play a key role in the bone remodelling process. The effects of interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) on GAG metabolism in normal and otosclerotic human bone cells as well as its capacity to modulate IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 secretion in both populations was analyzed. The amount of radiolabeled GAGs was lower in otosclerotic than in normal bone cells. IL-1 alpha reduced newly synthesized cellular and extracellular GAGs in normal cells, but only those of the cellular compartment in otosclerotic bone cells. It depressed heparan sulphate (HS) more in normal cells and chondroitin sulphate (CS) more in otosclerotic bone cells. The HA/total sulphated GAG ratio was shifted in favour of the latter in otosclerotic cells, whereas the opposite effect was seen after IL-1 alpha treatment. There was little difference in the beta-D-glucuronidase levels of the normal and pathological cells, while beta-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase was significantly increased in otosclerotic bone cells. As the activity of neither enzyme was modified by treatment with IL-1 alpha, the cytokine seems to exert its influences on GAG synthesis rather than on the degradation process. IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 secretion was markedly higher in otosclerotic cells. IL-1 alpha modulated the secretion of each interleukin differently, thus resulting in a cytokine cascade that may act in autocrine/paracrine manner on target cells. The authors suggest that changes in the cytokine network may have a specific, yet still unknown, role during normal and pathological osteogenesis.

  4. Chromosome Aberrations in Normal and Ataxia-Telangiectasia Cells Exposed to Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Ito, H.; Liu, C.; Shigematsu, N.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Although cells derived from Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT) patients are known to exhibit abnormal responses to ionizing radiations, its underlying mechanism still remains unclear. Previously, the authors reported that at the same gamma-irradiation dose AT cells show higher frequencies of misrepair and deletions compared to normal human fibroblast cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of heavy ions beams on chromosomal aberrations in normal and AT cells. Normal and AT fibroblast cells arrested at G0/G1 phase were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays, 490 MeV/u Silicon (LET 55 keV/m), 500 MeV/u Iron (LET 185 keV/m) and 200 MeV/u Iron (LET 440 keV/m) particles, and then cells were allowed to repair for 24 hours at 37 degrees before subculture. Calyculin-A induced PCC method was employed to collect G2/M chromosomes and whole DNA probes 1 and 3 were used to analyze chromosomal aberrations such as color-junctions, deletions, simple exchanges (incomplete and reciprocal exanges) and complex-type exchanges. The percentages of aberrant cells were higher when normal and AT cells were exposed to heavy ions compared to X-rays, and had a tendency to increase with increasing LET up to 185 keV/m and then decreased at 440 keV/m. When the frequency of color-junctions per cell was compared after X-ray exposure, AT cells had around three times higher frequency of color-junctions (mis-rejoining) than normal cells. However, at 185 keV/m there was no difference in the frequency of color-junctions between two cell lines. It was also found that the frequency of simple exchanges per cell was almost constant in AT cells regardless LET levels, but it was LET dependent for normal cells. Interestingly, the frequency of simple exchanges was higher for AT cells when it was compared at 185 keV/m but AT cells had more complex-type exchanges at the same LET levels. Heavy ions are more efficient in inducing chromosome aberrations in normal and AT cells compared to X-rays, and the aberration types

  5. Activated T cells induce expression of B7/BB1 on normal or leukemic B cells through a CD40-dependent signal

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Cognate interactions between antigen-presenting B and T cells play crucial roles in immunologic responses. T cells that have been activated via the crosslinking of CD3 are able to induce B cell proliferation and immunoglobulin secretion in a major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted and contact-dependent manner. We find that such activated human CD4+ T cells, but not control Ig- treated T cells, may induce normal or leukemic B cells to express B7/BB1 and significantly higher levels of CD54 intercellular adhesion molecule 1 via a process that also requires direct cell-cell contact. To discern what cell surface molecule(s) may be responsible for signalling B cells to express B7/BB1, we added various monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for T or B cell accessory molecules or control mAbs to cocultures of alpha-CD3-activated T cells and resting B cells. We find that only alpha-CD40 mAbs can significantly inhibit the increased expression of B7/BB1, suggesting that the ligand for CD40 expressed on activated T cells may be an important inducer of B7/BB1 expression. Subsequent experiments in fact demonstrate that alpha-CD40 mAbs, but not control mAbs, induce changes in B cell phenotype similar to those induced by activated T cells when the mAbs are presented on Fc gamma RII (CDw32)-expressing L cells. These phenotypic changes have significant effects on B cell function. Whereas chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B cells normally are very poor stimulators in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLRs), CLL-B cells preactivated via CD40 crosslinking are significantly better presenters of alloantigen, affecting up to 30-fold-greater stimulation of T cell proliferation than that induced by control treated or nontreated CLL-B cells. Similarly, the MLR of T cells stimulated by allogeneic nonleukemic B cells can be enhanced significantly if the stimulator B cells are preactivated via CD40 crosslinking. The enhanced MLR generated by such preactivated B cells may be inhibited

  6. Analysis of differential protein expression in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.; Chubb, C.; Huberman, E.; Giometti, C.S.

    1997-07-01

    High resolution two dimensional get electrophoresis (2DE) and database analysis was used to establish protein expression patterns for cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells and thirteen breast cancer cell lines. The Human Breast Epithelial Cell database contains the 2DE protein patterns, including relative protein abundances, for each cell line, plus a composite pattern that contains all the common and specifically expressed proteins from all the cell lines. Significant differences in protein expression, both qualitative and quantitative, were observed not only between normal cells and tumor cells, but also among the tumor cell lines. Eight percent of the consistently detected proteins were found in significantly (P < 0.001) variable levels among the cell lines. Using a combination of immunostaining, comigration with purified protein, subcellular fractionation, and amino-terminal protein sequencing, we identified a subset of the differentially expressed proteins. These identified proteins include the cytoskeletal proteins actin, tubulin, vimentin, and cytokeratins. The cell lines can be classified into four distinct groups based on their intermediate filament protein profile. We also identified heat shock proteins; hsp27, hsp60, and hsp70 varied in abundance and in some cases in the relative phosphorylation levels among the cell lines. Finally, we identified IMP dehydrogenase in each of the cell lines, and found the levels of this enzyme in the tumor cell lines elevated 2- to 20-fold relative to the levels in normal cells.

  7. Sensitivity to radiation of human normal, hyperthyroid, and neoplastic thyroid epithelial cells in primary culture

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.C.; Hiraoka, T.; Kopecky, K.J.; Nakamura, N.; Jones, M.P.; Ito, T.; Clifton, K.H.

    1987-07-01

    Samples of thyroid tissue removed surgically from 63 patients were cultured in vitro and exposed to X irradiation to investigate the radiosensitivities of various types of thyroid epithelial cells. A total of 76 samples were obtained, including neoplastic cells from patients with papillary carcinoma (PC) or follicular adenoma (FA), cells from hyperthyroidism (HY) patients, and normal cells from the surgical margins of PC and FA patients. Culturing of the cells was performed in a manner which has been shown to yield a predominance of epithelial cells. Results of colony formation assays indicated that cells from HY and FA patients were the least radiosensitive: when adjusted to the overall geometric mean plating efficiency of 5.5%, the average mean lethal dose Do was 97.6 cGy for HY cells and 96.7 and 94.3 cGy, respectively for neoplastic and normal cells from FA patients. Cells from PC patients were more radiosensitive, normal cells having an adjusted average Do of 85.0 cGy and PC cells a significantly lower average Do of 74.4 cGy. After allowing for this variation by cell type, in vitro radiosensitivity was not significantly related to age at surgery or sex. These results suggest that malignant thyroid cells may be especially radiosensitive.

  8. Identification of a subset of normal B cells with a Burkitt's lymphoma (BL)-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gregory, C D; Tursz, T; Edwards, C F; Tetaud, C; Talbot, M; Caillou, B; Rickinson, A B; Lipinski, M

    1987-07-01

    Fresh biopsy cells from cases of Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) display a homogeneous cell surface phenotype. The cells were found to be reactive with the pan B cell marker B1, and consistently co-expressed the BL-associated glycolipid antigen, BLA, and the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen, CALLA, but lacked the B cell "activation" antigens characteristically expressed on EB virus-transformed normal B cells. Microscopic and cell sorter analysis of cells isolated from a series of fresh normal tonsils have identified a subpopulation of normal B cells carrying the same cell surface markers. That BLA and CALLA could be co-expressed on individual B cells was demonstrated by two-color immunofluorescence (IF) of tonsils in suspension, and immunoperoxidase (IP) staining of serial tonsil sections. These BLA+, CALLA+, "activation" antigen- cells were further characterized as B1+, sIgM+, sIgD-, C3d/EB virus receptor+ and were susceptible to virus-induced transformation in vitro. IF studies on Percoll-fractionated tonsillar cell populations and direct examination of IP-stained tonsil semi-thin sections indicated that the BLA+, CALLA+ cells were localized in germinal centers. Their morphological characteristics matched those of BL cells, and their location within germinal centers was consistent both with the known phenotype of germinal center tonsillar B cells and with the description of BL as a proliferation of centroblasts. We suggest that this population of tonsillar germinal center B cells provides the normal counterpart of BL tumor cells. PMID:2953817

  9. Expression of membrane glycoproteins in normal keratinocytes and squamous carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Rayter, Z. ); McIlhinney, R. ); Gusterson, B. )

    1989-08-01

    Con A acceptor glycoproteins were analyzed by 2D-PAGE and {sup 125}I-Con A overlay in three squamous carcinoma cell lines and compared with those in the simian virus (SV40)-transformed keratinocyte cell line SVK-14 and in normal keratinocytes. The majority of the glycoproteins identified by this technique were expressed at similar levels in all of the cells examined, independent of the culture conditions used. A cell surface glycoprotein gp34 was increased in the tumor cells compared with normal keratinocytes and expression varied with the culture density. Another glycoprotein, gp21, was found to be increased in expression in normal keratinocytes and stratified hyperconfluent cultures of squamous carcinoma cell lines. This paper describes the potential of this technique to identify membrane glycoproteins which may be expressed as a function of proliferation or differentiation.

  10. Passive microrheology of normal and cancer cells after ML7 treatment by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyapunova, Elena; Nikituk, Alexander; Bayandin, Yuriy; Naimark, Oleg; Rianna, Carmela; Radmacher, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical properties of living cancer and normal thyroidal cells were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cell mechanics was compared before and after treatment with ML7, which is known to reduce myosin activity and induce softening of cell structures. We recorded force curves with extended dwell time of 6 seconds in contact at maximum forces from 500 pN to 1 nN. Data were analyzed within different frameworks: Hertz fit was applied in order to evaluate differences in Young's moduli among cell types and conditions, while the fluctuations of the cantilever in contact with cells were analyzed with both conventional algorithms (probability density function and power spectral density) and multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). We found that cancer cells were softer than normal cells and ML7 had a substantial softening effect on normal cells, but only a marginal one on cancer cells. Moreover, we observed that all recorded signals for normal and cancer cells were monofractal with small differences between their scaling parameters. Finally, the applicability of wavelet-based methods of data analysis for the discrimination of different cell types is discussed.

  11. Ubiquitous Expression of MAKORIN-2 in Normal and Malignant Hematopoietic Cells and Its Growth Promoting Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, King Yiu; Chan, Kathy Yuen Yee; Tsang, Kam Sze; Chen, Yang Chao; Kung, Hsiang-fu; Ng, Pak Cheung; Li, Chi Kong; Leung, Kam Tong; Li, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Makorin-2 (MKRN2) is a highly conserved protein and yet its functions are largely unknown. We investigated the expression levels of MKRN2 and RAF1 in normal and malignant hematopoietic cells, and leukemia cell lines. We also attempted to delineate the role of MKRN2 in umbilical cord blood CD34+ stem/progenitor cells and K562 cell line by over-expression and inhibition of MKRN2 through lentivirus transduction and shRNA nucleofection, respectively. Our results provided the first evidence on the ubiquitous expression of MKRN2 in normal hematopoietic cells, embryonic stem cell lines, primary leukemia and leukemic cell lines of myeloid, lymphoid, erythroid and megakaryocytic lineages. The expression levels of MKRN2 were generally higher in primary leukemia samples compared with those in age-matched normal BM cells. In all leukemia subtypes, there was no significant correlation between expression levels of MKRN2 and RAF1. sh-MKRN2-silenced CD34+ cells had a significantly lower proliferation capacity and decreased levels of the early stem/progenitor subpopulation (CFU-GEMM) compared with control cultures. Over-expression of MKRN2 in K562 cells increased cell proliferation. Our results indicated possible roles of MKRN2 in normal and malignant hematopoiesis. PMID:24675897

  12. Differential sensitivity of normal and cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells to epinephrine.

    PubMed

    Goncz, K K; Feeney, L; Gruenert, D C

    1999-09-01

    1. Exposure to epinephrine has been shown to have a range of effects on cells and tissues. A recent study suggested that the proliferative ability of CF epithelial cells, exposed to high concentrations of epinephrine (200 - 300 microM), was reduced when compared to that of normal cells. This approach could potentially provide a means to effectively separate cells with functional cyclic AMP-dependent Cl-ion transport from those defective in this pathway. 2. The sensitivity to killing by epinephrine is reported here for four different CF cell lines, three normal cell lines, and two CF epithelial cell lines complemented with wild-type (wt) CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) cDNA. 3. While each cell line exhibited varying sensitivity to 200 microM epinephrine, no predictable pattern was observed between the expression of wt-CFTR and cell survival following epinephrine exposure. Overall, normal cell lines did exhibit a greater resistance to epinephrine-induced cell death although, the most resistant cell line was derived from CF tracheal epithelium (SigmaCFTE29o-). 4. The expression of exogenous wt-CFTR increased the survival of one cell line (CFDEo-) when compared to the parent line, but in another complemented line, survival was reduced. 5. These findings suggest that while epinephrine induces cell killing, it is not consistently effective for preferential selection of normal over CF cells. Although CFTR may play a role in the mechanism(s) of epinephrine killing, other factors such as cell density, proliferative ability, cell type origin and phenotype are involved.

  13. Effect of normal endometrial stroma on growth and differentiation in Ishikawa endometrial adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Julia T; Lessey, Bruce A; Seppälä, Markku; Kaufman, David G

    2002-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is characterized by alterations in the stromal cells and the supporting extracellular matrix in addition to the intrinsic alterations of the malignant epithelial cells. We have developed a cell culture model that demonstrates the role of stromal cells in the regulation of proliferation, hormone responsiveness, and differentiation of an endometrial adenocarcinoma cell line (Ishikawa). Conditioned medium (CM) was collected from normal primary human endometrial stromal cells grown on plastic or within the basement membrane extract, Matrigel. The CM produced by stromal cells cultured in contact with Matrigel markedly inhibited Ishikawa cell proliferation compared with CM from stromal cells cultured on plastic. Ishikawa cell proliferation varied with steroid hormone treatment in the presence of CM from stromal cells embedded in Matrigel. When the Ishikawa cells were placed in coculture in contact with stromal cells in Matrigel, production of a differentiated epithelial secretory product, glycodelin, was induced. Gene expression of stromal cell hormone receptors, growth factors, and integrins was analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR in the presence of Matrigel to determine the potential factors involved in stromal regulatory function. These combined studies imply that the phenotype of the Ishikawa cells can be induced to differentiate to more closely resemble normal endometrial epithelium by reintroduction of stromal factors and appropriate extracellular matrix. Additionally, the study shows that basement membrane proteins influence the regulatory function of stromal cells as they mediate epithelial cell growth.

  14. Micro-Raman spectroscopy Detects Individual Neoplastic and Normal Hematopoietic Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, J W; Taylor, D; Zwerdling, T; Lane, S M; Ihara, K; Huser, T

    2005-01-18

    Current methods for identifying neoplastic cells and discerning them from their normal counterparts are often non-specific, slow, biologically perturbing, or a combination, thereof. Here, we show that single-cell micro-Raman spectroscopy averts these shortcomings and can be used to discriminate between unfixed normal human lymphocytes and transformed Jurkat and Raji lymphocyte cell lines based on their biomolecular Raman signatures. We demonstrate that single-cell Raman spectra provide a highly reproducible biomolecular fingerprint of each cell type. Characteristic peaks, mostly due to different DNA and protein concentrations, allow for discerning normal lymphocytes from transformed lymphocytes with high confidence (p << 0.05). Spectra are also compared and analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) to demonstrate that normal and transformed cells form distinct clusters that can be defined using just two principal components. The method is shown to have a sensitivity of 98.3% for cancer detection, with 97.2% of the cells being correctly classified as belonging to the normal or transformed type. These results demonstrate the potential application of confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy as a clinical tool for single cell cancer detection based on intrinsic biomolecular signatures, therefore eliminating the need for exogenous fluorescent labeling.

  15. Taxonomy of breast cancer based on normal cell phenotype predicts outcome

    PubMed Central

    Santagata, Sandro; Thakkar, Ankita; Ergonul, Ayse; Wang, Bin; Woo, Terri; Hu, Rong; Harrell, J. Chuck; McNamara, George; Schwede, Matthew; Culhane, Aedin C.; Kindelberger, David; Rodig, Scott; Richardson, Andrea; Schnitt, Stuart J.; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Ince, Tan A.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate classification is essential for understanding the pathophysiology of a disease and can inform therapeutic choices. For hematopoietic malignancies, a classification scheme based on the phenotypic similarity between tumor cells and normal cells has been successfully used to define tumor subtypes; however, use of normal cell types as a reference by which to classify solid tumors has not been widely emulated, in part due to more limited understanding of epithelial cell differentiation compared with hematopoiesis. To provide a better definition of the subtypes of epithelial cells comprising the breast epithelium, we performed a systematic analysis of a large set of breast epithelial markers in more than 15,000 normal breast cells, which identified 11 differentiation states for normal luminal cells. We then applied information from this analysis to classify human breast tumors based on normal cell types into 4 major subtypes, HR0–HR3, which were differentiated by vitamin D, androgen, and estrogen hormone receptor (HR) expression. Examination of 3,157 human breast tumors revealed that these HR subtypes were distinct from the current classification scheme, which is based on estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Patient outcomes were best when tumors expressed all 3 hormone receptors (subtype HR3) and worst when they expressed none of the receptors (subtype HR0). Together, these data provide an ontological classification scheme associated with patient survival differences and provides actionable insights for treating breast tumors. PMID:24463450

  16. Progesterone facilitates chromosome instability (aneuploidy) in p53 null normal mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goepfert, T. M.; McCarthy, M.; Kittrell, F. S.; Stephens, C.; Ullrich, R. L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Medina, D.

    2000-01-01

    Mammary epithelial cells from p53 null mice have been shown recently to exhibit an increased risk for tumor development. Hormonal stimulation markedly increased tumor development in p53 null mammary cells. Here we demonstrate that mammary tumors arising in p53 null mammary cells are highly aneuploid, with greater than 70% of the tumor cells containing altered chromosome number and a mean chromosome number of 56. Normal mammary cells of p53 null genotype and aged less than 14 wk do not exhibit aneuploidy in primary cell culture. Significantly, the hormone progesterone, but not estrogen, increases the incidence of aneuploidy in morphologically normal p53 null mammary epithelial cells. Such cells exhibited 40% aneuploidy and a mean chromosome number of 54. The increase in aneuploidy measured in p53 null tumor cells or hormonally stimulated normal p53 null cells was not accompanied by centrosome amplification. These results suggest that normal levels of progesterone can facilitate chromosomal instability in the absence of the tumor suppressor gene, p53. The results support the emerging hypothesis based both on human epidemiological and animal model studies that progesterone markedly enhances mammary tumorigenesis.

  17. Deletion of the huntingtin proline-rich region does not significantly affect normal huntingtin function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Neveklovska, Michelle; Clabough, Erin B. D.; Steffan, Joan S.; Zeitlin, Scott O.

    2012-01-01

    The N-terminus of Huntingtin, the protein encoded by the Huntington’s disease gene, contains a stretch of polyglutamine residues that is expanded in Huntington’s disease. The polyglutamine stretch is flanked by two conserved protein domains in vertebrates: an N1-17 domain, and a proline-rich region (PRR). The PRR can modulate the structure of the adjacent polyglutamine stretch, and is a binding site for several interacting proteins. To determine the role of the PRR in Huntingtin function, we have generated a knock-in allele of the mouse Huntington’s disease gene homolog that expresses full-length normal huntingtin lacking the PRR. Mice that are homozygous for the huntingtin PRR deletion are born at the normal Mendelian frequency, suggesting that the PRR is not required for essential huntingtin functions during embryonic development. Moreover, adult homozygous mutants did not exhibit any significant differences from wild-type controls in general motor function and motor learning. However, 18 month-old male, but not female, homozygous PRR deletion mutants exhibited deficits in the Morris water task, suggesting that age-dependent spatial learning and memory may be affected in a sex-specific fashion by the huntingtin PRR deletion. PMID:22956985

  18. Dynamic cell adhesion and viscoelastic signatures distinguish normal from malignant human mammary cells using quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tiean; Marx, Kenneth A; Dewilde, Abiche H; McIntosh, Donna; Braunhut, Susan J

    2012-02-01

    During transformation of a normal cell to a cell capable of forming a cancerous growth, cellular morphology, the cytoskeleton, and focal contacts undergo significant changes. These changes should be capable of being characterized via real-time monitoring of the dynamic cell adhesion process and viscoelastic properties of cells. Here, we describe use of the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to distinguish the dynamic cell adhesion signatures of human normal (HMEC) versus malignant (MCF-7) mammary epithelial cells. The significantly reduced QCM responses (changes in frequency [Δf] and motional resistance ΔR) of MCF-7 cells compared with those of HMECs mirror the cancer cells' morphological features as observed via optical microscope. We analyzed the initial 2-h cell adhesion kinetics, suggesting cell-cell cooperativity for HMECs and no or weak cell-cell interactions for MCF-7 cells. We propose that changes of the ΔR/Δf ratio, which we term the cell viscoelastic index (CVI), reflect the establishment of cytoskeleton structure and dynamic viscoelastic properties of living cells. The CVI decreases significantly on initiation of cell to surface interactions as cells establish their cytoskeletal structures. During the cell adhesion process, MCF-7 cells were consistently softer, exhibiting up to a 2.5-fold smaller CVI when compared with HMECs.

  19. High-LET Radiation Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Normal and Ataxia Telangiectasia Fibroblast Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Tetsuya; George, Ms Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Ito, Hisao; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Uno, Takashi

    We investigated the effects of heavy ions beams on chromosomal aberrations in normal and AT cells. Normal and AT fibroblast cells arrested at G0/G1 phase were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays, 490 MeV/u Silicon (LET 55 keV/micron), 500 MeV/u Iron (LET 185 keV/micron) and 200 MeV/u Iron (LET 440 keV/micron) particles, and then cells were allowed to repair for 24 hours at 37 degrees before subculture. Calyculin-A induced PCC method was employed to collect G2/M chromosomes and whole DNA probes 1 and 3 were used to analyze chromosomal aberrations such as color-junctions, deletions, simple exchanges (incomplete and reciprocal exchanges) and complex-type exchanges. The percentages of aberrant cells were higher when normal and AT cells were exposed to heavy ions compared to X-rays, and had a tendency to increase with increasing LET up to 185 keV/micron and then decreased at 440 keV/micron. When the frequency of color-junctions per cell was compared after X-ray exposure, AT cells had around three times higher frequency of color-junctions (mis-rejoining) than normal cells. However, at 185 keV/micron there was no difference in the frequency of color-junctions between two cell lines. It was also found that the frequency of simple exchanges per cell was almost constant in AT cells regardless LET levels, but it was LET dependent for normal cells. Interestingly, the frequency of simple exchanges was higher for normal fibroblast cells when it was compared at 185 keV/micron, but AT cells had more complex-type exchanges at the same LET levels. Heavy ions are more efficient in inducing chromosome aberrations in normal and AT cells compared to X-rays, and the aberration types between normal and AT fibroblast appeared different probably due to difference in the ATM gene function.

  20. Analysis of CUL-5 expression in breast epithelial cells, breast cancer cell lines, normal tissues and tumor tissues

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Michael J; Longo, Kenneth A; Karathanasis, George A; Shope, David M; Mandernach, Craig J; Leong, Jason R; Hicks, Alfred; Pherson, Kenneth; Husain, Amyna

    2003-01-01

    Background The chromosomal location of CUL-5 (11q 22-23) is associated with LOH in breast cancer, suggesting that CUL-5 may be a tumor suppressor. The purpose of this research was to determine if there is differential expression of CUL-5 in breast epithelial cells versus breast cancer cell lines, and normal human tissues versus human tumors. The expression of CUL-5 in breast epithelial cells (HMEC, MCF-10A), and breast cancer cells (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) was examined using RT-PCR, Northern blot analysis, and Western blot analysis. The expression of mRNA for other CUL family members (CUL-1, -2, -3, -4A, and -4B) in these cells was evaluated by RT-PCR. A normal human tissue expression array and a cancer profiling array were used to examine CUL-5 expression in normal human tissues and matched normal tissues versus tumor tissues, respectively. Results CUL-5 is expressed at the mRNA and protein levels by breast epithelial cells (HMEC, MCF-10A) and breast cancer cells (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231). These cells also express mRNA for other CUL family members. The normal human tissue expression array revealed that CUL-5 is widely expressed. The cancer profiling array revealed that 82% (41/50) of the breast cancers demonstrated a decrease in CUL-5 expression versus the matched normal tissue. For the 50 cases of matched breast tissue there was a statistically significant ~2.2 fold decreased expression of CUL-5 in tumor tissue versus normal tissue (P < 0.0001). Conclusions The data demonstrate no apparent decrease in CUL-5 expression in the breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) versus the breast epithelial cells (HMEC, MCF-10A). The decrease in CUL-5 expression in breast tumor tissue versus matched normal tissue supports the hypothesis that decreased expression of CUL-5 may play a role in breast tumorigenesis. PMID:14641918

  1. Bone Marrow Cells in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Create a Proinflammatory Microenvironment Influencing Normal Hematopoietic Differentiation Fates

    PubMed Central

    Vilchis-Ordoñez, Armando; Contreras-Quiroz, Adriana; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa; Reyes-López, Alfonso; Quintela-Nuñez del Prado, Henry Martin; Venegas-Vázquez, Jorge; Mayani, Hector; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney; López-Martínez, Briceida; Pelayo, Rosana

    2015-01-01

    B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) is a serious public health problem in the pediatric population worldwide, contributing to 85% of deaths from childhood cancers. Understanding the biology of the disease is crucial for its clinical management and the development of therapeutic strategies. In line with that observed in other malignancies, chronic inflammation may contribute to a tumor microenvironment resulting in the damage of normal processes, concomitant to development and maintenance of neoplastic cells. We report here that hematopoietic cells from bone marrow B-ALL have the ability to produce proinflammatory and growth factors, including TNFα, IL-1β, IL-12, and GM-CSF that stimulate proliferation and differentiation of normal stem and progenitor cells. Our findings suggest an apparently distinct CD13+CD33+ population of leukemic cells contributing to a proinflammatory microenvironment that may be detrimental to long-term normal hematopoiesis within B-ALL bone marrow. PMID:26090405

  2. Characteristics of mast cells in normal bladder, bacterial cystitis and interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Christmas, T J; Rode, J

    1991-11-01

    An analysis was made of the numbers and characteristics of mast cells in lateral bladder wall biopsies from 22 patients with interstitial cystitis, 6 with bacterial cystitis and 8 normal controls, using toluidine blue stains and computerised video image analysis techniques. A significantly greater number of mast cells were found within the detrusor muscle in interstitial cystitis than in bacterial cystitis or normal controls. Within the urothelium and submucosa, mast cell numbers were significantly greater than in normal controls in both interstitial and bacterial cystitis. In interstitial cystitis mast cells were significantly larger within the detrusor than in the urothelium/submucosa and they appeared to degranulate predominantly within the superficial layers. Differential staining techniques, using long and short toluidine blue stains, failed to reveal statistically significant evidence of mast cell heterogeneity within the bladder wall in interstitial cystitis.

  3. Length of FMR1 repeat alleles within the normal range does not substantially affect the risk of early menopause

    PubMed Central

    Ruth, Katherine S.; Bennett, Claire E.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Weedon, Michael N.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Murray, Anna

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Is the length of FMR1 repeat alleles within the normal range associated with the risk of early menopause? SUMMARY ANSWER The length of repeat alleles within the normal range does not substantially affect risk of early menopause. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY There is a strong, well-established relationship between length of premutation FMR1 alleles and age at menopause, suggesting that this relationship could continue into the normal range. Within the normal range, there is conflicting evidence; differences in ovarian reserve have been identified with FMR1 repeat allele length, but a recent population-based study did not find any association with age at menopause as a quantitative trait. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION We analysed cross-sectional baseline survey data collected at recruitment from 2004 to 2010 from a population-based, prospective epidemiological cohort study of >110 000 women to investigate whether repeat allele length was associated with early menopause. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHOD We included 4333 women from the Breakthrough Generations Study (BGS), of whom 2118 were early menopause cases (menopause under 46 years) and 2215 were controls. We analysed the relationship between length of FMR1 alleles and early menopause using logistic regression with allele length as continuous and categorical variables. We also conducted analyses with the outcome age at menopause as a quantitative trait as well as appropriate sensitivity and exploratory analyses. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE There was no association of the shorter or longer FMR1 allele or their combined genotype with the clinically relevant end point of early menopause in our main analysis. Likewise, there were no associations with age at menopause as a quantitative trait in our secondary analysis. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION Women with homozygous alleles in the normal range may have undetected FMR1 premutation alleles, although there was no evidence to suggest this. We

  4. Biomechanical analysis of cancerous and normal cells based on bulge generation in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Chang; Park, Sang-Jin; Park, Je-Kyun

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a new biomechanical analysis method for discrimination between cancerous and normal cells through compression by poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane deflection in a microfluidic device. When a cell is compressed, cellular membrane will expand and then small bulges will appear on the peripheral cell membrane beyond the allowable strain. It is well known that the amount of F-actin in cancer cells is less than that of normal cells and bulges occur at the sites where cytoskeleton becomes detached from the membrane bilayer. Accordingly, we have demonstrated the difference of the bulge generation between breast cancer cells (MCF7) and normal cells (MCF10A). After excessive deformation, the bulges generated in MCF7 cells were not evenly distributed on the cell periphery. Contrary to this, the bulges of MCF10A cells showed an even distribution. In addition, the morphologies of bulges of MCF7 and MCF10A cells looked swollen protrusion and tubular protrusion, respectively. Peripheral strains at the moment of the bulge generation were also 72% in MCF7 and 46% in MCF10A. The results show that the bulge generation can be correlated with the cytoskeleton quantity inside the cell, providing the first step of a new biomechanical approach. PMID:18810292

  5. Substrate flexibility regulates growth and apoptosis of normal but not transformed cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. B.; Dembo, M.; Wang, Y. L.

    2000-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of oncogenic transformation is anchorage-independent growth (27). Here we demonstrate that responses to substrate rigidity play a major role in distinguishing the growth behavior of normal cells from that of transformed cells. We cultured normal or H-ras-transformed NIH 3T3 cells on flexible collagen-coated polyacrylamide substrates with similar chemical properties but different rigidity. Compared with cells cultured on stiff substrates, nontransformed cells on flexible substrates showed a decrease in the rate of DNA synthesis and an increase in the rate of apoptosis. These responses on flexible substrates are coupled to decreases in cell spreading area and traction forces. In contrast, transformed cells maintained their growth and apoptotic characteristics regardless of substrate flexibility. The responses in cell spreading area and traction forces to substrate flexibility were similarly diminished. Our results suggest that normal cells are capable of probing substrate rigidity and that proper mechanical feedback is required for regulating cell shape, cell growth, and survival. The loss of this response can explain the unregulated growth of transformed cells.

  6. Rosmarinic Acid and Melissa officinalis Extracts Differently Affect Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramanauskiene, Kristina; Raudonis, Raimondas

    2016-01-01

    Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) has many biological effects but especially important is its neuroprotective activity. The aim of the study is to produce different extracts of Melissa officinalis and analyse their chemical composition and biological properties on rat glioblastoma C6 cells. Results revealed that rosmarinic acid (RA) is the predominant compound of lemon balm extracts. RA has cytotoxic effect on glioblastoma cells (LC50 290.5 μM after the incubation of 24 h and LC50 171.3 μM after 48 h). RA at concentration 80–130 μM suppresses the cell proliferation and has an antioxidant effect. 200 μM and higher concentrations of RA have a prooxidant effect and initiate cell death through necrosis. The aqueous extract of lemon balm is also enriched in phenolic compounds: protocatechuic, caftaric, caffeic, ferulic, and cichoric acids and flavonoid luteolin-7-glucoside. This extract at concentrations 50 μM–200 μM RA has cytotoxic activity and initiates cell death through apoptosis. Extracts prepared with 70% ethanol contain the biggest amount of active compounds. These extracts have the highest cytotoxic activity on glioblastoma cells. They initiate generation of intracellular ROS and cell death through apoptosis and necrosis. Our data suggest that differently prepared lemon balm extracts differently affect glioblastoma cells and can be used as neuroprotective agents in several therapeutic strategies.

  7. Rosmarinic Acid and Melissa officinalis Extracts Differently Affect Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramanauskiene, Kristina; Raudonis, Raimondas

    2016-01-01

    Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.) has many biological effects but especially important is its neuroprotective activity. The aim of the study is to produce different extracts of Melissa officinalis and analyse their chemical composition and biological properties on rat glioblastoma C6 cells. Results revealed that rosmarinic acid (RA) is the predominant compound of lemon balm extracts. RA has cytotoxic effect on glioblastoma cells (LC50 290.5 μM after the incubation of 24 h and LC50 171.3 μM after 48 h). RA at concentration 80–130 μM suppresses the cell proliferation and has an antioxidant effect. 200 μM and higher concentrations of RA have a prooxidant effect and initiate cell death through necrosis. The aqueous extract of lemon balm is also enriched in phenolic compounds: protocatechuic, caftaric, caffeic, ferulic, and cichoric acids and flavonoid luteolin-7-glucoside. This extract at concentrations 50 μM–200 μM RA has cytotoxic activity and initiates cell death through apoptosis. Extracts prepared with 70% ethanol contain the biggest amount of active compounds. These extracts have the highest cytotoxic activity on glioblastoma cells. They initiate generation of intracellular ROS and cell death through apoptosis and necrosis. Our data suggest that differently prepared lemon balm extracts differently affect glioblastoma cells and can be used as neuroprotective agents in several therapeutic strategies. PMID:27688825

  8. Distinct p53 genomic binding patterns in normal and cancer-derived human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Botcheva K.; McCorkle S. R.; McCombie W. R.; Dunn J. J.; Anderson C. W.

    2011-12-15

    We report here genome-wide analysis of the tumor suppressor p53 binding sites in normal human cells. 743 high-confidence ChIP-seq peaks representing putative genomic binding sites were identified in normal IMR90 fibroblasts using a reference chromatin sample. More than 40% were located within 2 kb of a transcription start site (TSS), a distribution similar to that documented for individually studied, functional p53 binding sites and, to date, not observed by previous p53 genome-wide studies. Nearly half of the high-confidence binding sites in the IMR90 cells reside in CpG islands, in marked contrast to sites reported in cancer-derived cells. The distinct genomic features of the IMR90 binding sites do not reflect a distinct preference for specific sequences, since the de novo developed p53 motif based on our study is similar to those reported by genome-wide studies of cancer cells. More likely, the different chromatin landscape in normal, compared with cancer-derived cells, influences p53 binding via modulating availability of the sites. We compared the IMR90 ChIPseq peaks to the recently published IMR90 methylome1 and demonstrated that they are enriched at hypomethylated DNA. Our study represents the first genome-wide, de novo mapping of p53 binding sites in normal human cells and reveals that p53 binding sites reside in distinct genomic landscapes in normal and cancer-derived human cells.

  9. Discrimination Between Cervical Cancer Cells and Normal Cervical Cells Based on Longitudinal Elasticity Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xueqin; Zhong, Yunxin; Ye, Ting; Wang, Dajing; Mao, Bingwei

    2015-12-01

    The mechanical properties of cells are considered promising biomarkers for the early diagnosis of cancer. Recently, atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation technology has been utilized for the examination of cell cortex mechanics in order to distinguish malignant cells from normal cells. However, few attempts to evaluate the biomechanical properties of cells have focused on the quantification of the non-homogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cellular structures. In the present study, we applied a variation of the method of Carl and Schillers to investigate the differences between longitudinal elasticity of human cervical squamous carcinoma cells (CaSki) and normal cervical epithelial cells (CRL2614) using AFM. The results reveal a three-layer heterogeneous structure in the probing volume of both cell types studied. CaSki cells exhibited a lower whole-cell stiffness and a softer nuclei zone compared to the normal counterpart cells. Moreover, a better differentiated cytoskeleton was found in the inner cytoplasm/nuclei zone of the normal CRL2614 cells, whereas a deeper cytoskeletal distribution was observed in the probing volume of the cancerous counterparts. The sensitive cortical panel of CaSki cells, with a modulus of 0.35~0.47 kPa, was located at 237~225 nm; in normal cells, the elasticity was 1.20~1.32 kPa at 113~128 nm. The present improved method may be validated using the conventional Hertz-Sneddon method, which is widely reported in the literature. In conclusion, our results enable the quantification of the heterogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cancer cells, in particular the correlation with the corresponding depth. Preliminary results indicate that our method may potentially be applied to improve the detection of cancerous cells and provide insights into the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:26666911

  10. Discrimination Between Cervical Cancer Cells and Normal Cervical Cells Based on Longitudinal Elasticity Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xueqin; Zhong, Yunxin; Ye, Ting; Wang, Dajing; Mao, Bingwei

    2015-12-01

    The mechanical properties of cells are considered promising biomarkers for the early diagnosis of cancer. Recently, atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation technology has been utilized for the examination of cell cortex mechanics in order to distinguish malignant cells from normal cells. However, few attempts to evaluate the biomechanical properties of cells have focused on the quantification of the non-homogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cellular structures. In the present study, we applied a variation of the method of Carl and Schillers to investigate the differences between longitudinal elasticity of human cervical squamous carcinoma cells (CaSki) and normal cervical epithelial cells (CRL2614) using AFM. The results reveal a three-layer heterogeneous structure in the probing volume of both cell types studied. CaSki cells exhibited a lower whole-cell stiffness and a softer nuclei zone compared to the normal counterpart cells. Moreover, a better differentiated cytoskeleton was found in the inner cytoplasm/nuclei zone of the normal CRL2614 cells, whereas a deeper cytoskeletal distribution was observed in the probing volume of the cancerous counterparts. The sensitive cortical panel of CaSki cells, with a modulus of 0.35~0.47 kPa, was located at 237~225 nm; in normal cells, the elasticity was 1.20~1.32 kPa at 113~128 nm. The present improved method may be validated using the conventional Hertz-Sneddon method, which is widely reported in the literature. In conclusion, our results enable the quantification of the heterogeneous longitudinal elasticity of cancer cells, in particular the correlation with the corresponding depth. Preliminary results indicate that our method may potentially be applied to improve the detection of cancerous cells and provide insights into the pathophysiology of the disease.

  11. Amber mutation affecting the length of Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Salas, E; Vicente, M

    1980-01-01

    An amber mutation in a newly found gene (wee) of Escherichia coli has been isolated from strain OV-2, which harbors a temperature-sensitive suppressor. At 42 degrees C cells of the mutant, OV-25, increased in mass and deoxyribonucleic acid content and divided at normal rates, compared with the wild type under the same growth conditions. Total cell length increased under the restrictive conditions, although at a slightly lower rate. Values of mean cell length and cell volume, contrary to what would be expected from the increment in the rate of increase in particles, mass, and deoxyribonucleic acid, became at 42 degrees C smaller than those found in the wild type. A parallel increase in protein content per length and cell density and a loss of viability were found to occur after four generations at the restrictive temperature. The behavior of strain OV-25 in the absence of the wee gene product could be interpreted in terms of either a faulty regulation of the elongation processes or their abnormal coordination with the cell cycle. The genetic location of the wee gene has been found to be at 83.5 min on the E. coli genetic map. PMID:7000749

  12. Substrate elasticity affects bovine satellite cell activation kinetics in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lapin, M R; Gonzalez, J M; Johnson, S E

    2013-05-01

    Satellite cells support efficient postnatal skeletal muscle hypertrophy through fusion into the adjacent muscle fiber. Nuclear contribution allows for maintenance of the fiber myonuclear domain and proficient transcription of myogenic genes. Niche growth factors affect satellite cell biology; however, the interplay between fiber elasticity and microenvironment proteins remains largely unknown. The objective of the experiment was to examine the effects of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and surface elasticity on bovine satellite cell (BSC) activation kinetics in vitro. Young's elastic modulus was calculated for the semimembranosus (SM) and LM muscles of young bulls (5 d; n = 8) and adult cows (27 mo; n = 4) cattle. Results indicate that LM elasticity decreased (P < 0.05) with age; no difference in Young's modulus for the SM was noted. Bovine satellite cells were seeded atop polyacrylamide bioscaffolds with surface elasticities that mimic young bull and adult cow LM or traditional cultureware. Cells were maintained in low-serum media supplemented with 5 ng/mL HGF or vehicle only for 24 or 48 h. Activation was evaluated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunocytochemistry. Results indicate that BSC maintained on rigid surfaces were activated at 24 h and refractive to HGF supplementation. By contrast, fewer (P < 0.05) BSC had exited quiescence after 24 h of culture on surfaces reflective of either young bull (8.1 ± 1.7 kPa) or adult cow (14.6 ± 1.6 kPa) LM. Supplementation with HGF promoted activation of BSC cultured on bioscaffolds as measured by an increase (P < 0.05) in PCNA immunopositive cells. Culture on pliant surfaces affected neither activation kinetics nor numbers of Paired box 7 (Pax7) immunopositive muscle stem cells (P > 0.05). However, with increasing surface elasticity, an increase (P < 0.05) in the numbers of muscle progenitors was observed. These results confirm that biophysical and biochemical signals regulate BSC activation.

  13. Cytochemically demonstrable B-glucuronidase activity in normal and neoplastic human lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Machin, G A; Halper, J P; Knowles, D M

    1980-12-01

    Mononuclear cell suspensions were prepared from 40 normal peripheral blood and lymphoid tissue specimens and 42 neoplastic specimens obtained from patients with malignant lymphoma and lymphocytic leukemia. These suspensions were analyzed for la antigens, surface immunoglobulin (Slg), sheep erythrocyte (E) rosette formation and, in some instances, acid alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase (ANAE) activity. The results of these studies were correlated with the expression of cytochemically demonstrable BG activity. The percentage of BG+ lymphocytes was found to be comparable, within 10%, to the percentage of E+ (T) cells in the majority of normal, non-neoplastic peripheral blood, tonsil, spleen, and lymph node specimens examined. Occasionally, the percentage of E+ cells exceeded the percentage of BG+ cells by 20% or more, suggesting the presence of an E+BG- T cell subpopulation. BG+ B lymphocytes were only demonstrated in 1 of 40 non-neoplastic lymphoid specimens. The neoplastic B cells in each of 14 B cell (la+Slg+E-) lymphomas were BG-. However, a variable proportion of the neoplastic cells isolated from 6 cases of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and neoplastic plasma cells isolated from 7 cases of multiple myeloma expressed BG activity. Thus, it appears that both normal and neoplastic BG- and BG+ B lymphocyte populations exist; the latter may be related to a state of activation or a stage of B cell differentiation. The neoplastic cells isolated from 4 T cell (la-Slg-E+) malignancies were BG+ while those isolated from 3 T cell malignancies were BG-. The variable expression of BG activity by T cell malignancies may be related to T cell differentiation. Investigation of BG expression by T cell derived malignancies may prove useful in sorting out T cell phenotypes. PMID:7437515

  14. Propagation of oestrogen receptor-positive and oestrogen-responsive normal human breast cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Fridriksdottir, Agla J.; Kim, Jiyoung; Villadsen, René; Klitgaard, Marie Christine; Hopkinson, Branden M.; Petersen, Ole William; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Investigating the susceptibility of oestrogen receptor-positive (ERpos) normal human breast epithelial cells (HBECs) for clinical purposes or basic research awaits a proficient cell-based assay. Here we set out to identify markers for isolating ERpos cells and to expand what appear to be post-mitotic primary cells into exponentially growing cultures. We report a robust technique for isolating ERpos HBECs from reduction mammoplasties by FACS using two cell surface markers, CD166 and CD117, and an intracellular cytokeratin marker, Ks20.8, for further tracking single cells in culture. We show that ERpos HBECs are released from growth restraint by small molecule inhibitors of TGFβ signalling, and that growth is augmented further in response to oestrogen. Importantly, ER signalling is functionally active in ERpos cells in extended culture. These findings open a new avenue of experimentation with normal ERpos HBECs and provide a basis for understanding the evolution of human breast cancer. PMID:26564780

  15. Restoration of "normal" membrane function in CLL cells by patients' serum.

    PubMed

    Lewis, C M; Pegrum, G D

    1977-02-01

    Direct labelling of cell surface protein with 125I has enabled measurements to be made of lymphocyte membrane turnover. In CLL cells this is evidently much retarded in comparison with normal lymphocytes and it was thought that slow replacement of cell surface proteins might be responsible both for lack of membrane mobility and poor immunological responses. Serum from CLL patients has been found to enhance viability of the leukaemic cells in culture and the interaction of these serum factors with the CLL cell membrane gives rise to rapid replacement of surface proteins. Thus the rate of membrane turnover in vivo would be comparable with that of normal lymphocytes. Lack of cell-surface mobility and poor membrane biosynthesis can not be held responsible for poor immunological activity in vivo and it is suggested that autoimmune antibodies binding to the surface of CLL cells may spatially inhibit activation by ligands.

  16. In vitro metabolism study of normal and tumor cells when exposed to red LED light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolbovskaya, Olga V.; Khairullin, Radik M.; Saenko, Yuri V.; Krasnikova, Ekaterina S.; Krasnikov, Aleksandr V.; Fomin, Aleksandr A.; Skaptsov, Aleksandr A.

    2016-04-01

    This work presents the results of studying the mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular ROS, peculiarities of the cell cycle of cancer cells HCT-116 and the normal line of CHO cells when exposed to the red LED light with a wavelength range of 0.620-0.680 μm. A dose-dependent increase in mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular ROS concentration in cancer cells HCT-116 was established. In normal CHO cell line a dose-dependent reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and dose-dependent increase in intracellular ROS occur. It has been shown that the sensitivity of the studied cell lines to the red light depends on the stage of the cell cycle.

  17. Two New Faces of Amifostine: Protector from DNA Damage in Normal Cells and Inhibitor of DNA Repair in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Falk, Martin; Komůrková, Denisa; Falková, Iva; Bačíková, Alena; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Pagáčová, Eva; Štefančíková, Lenka; Weiterová, Lenka; Angelis, Karel J; Kozubek, Stanislav; Dušek, Ladislav; Galbavý, Štefan

    2016-04-14

    Amifostine protects normal cells from DNA damage induction by ionizing radiation or chemotherapeutics, whereas cancer cells typically remain uninfluenced. While confirming this phenomenon, we have revealed by comet assay and currently the most sensitive method of DNA double strand break (DSB) quantification (based on γH2AX/53BP1 high-resolution immunofluorescence microscopy) that amifostine treatment supports DSB repair in γ-irradiated normal NHDF fibroblasts but alters it in MCF7 carcinoma cells. These effects follow from the significantly lower activity of alkaline phosphatase measured in MCF7 cells and their supernatants as compared with NHDF fibroblasts. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry confirmed that the amifostine conversion to WR-1065 was significantly more intensive in normal NHDF cells than in tumor MCF cells. In conclusion, due to common differences between normal and cancer cells in their abilities to convert amifostine to its active metabolite WR-1065, amifostine may not only protect in multiple ways normal cells from radiation-induced DNA damage but also make cancer cells suffer from DSB repair alteration. PMID:26978566

  18. Normal and cancer stem cells of the human female reproductive system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The female reproductive system (FRS) has a great capacity for regeneration. The existence of somatic stem cells (SSC) that are likely to reside in distinct tissue compartments of the FRS is anticipated. Normal SSC are capable of regenerating themselves, produce a progeny of cells that differentiate and maintain tissue architecture and functional characteristics, and respond to homeostatic controls. Among those SSC of the FRS that have been identified are: a) undifferentiated cells capable of differentiating into thecal cells and synthesizing hormones upon transplantation, b) ovarian surface epithelium stem cells, mitotically responsive to ovulation, c) uterine endometrial and myometrial cells, as clonogenic epithelial and stromal cells, and d) epithelial and mesenchymal cells with self-renewal capacity and multipotential from cervical tissues. Importantly, these cells are believed to significantly contribute to the development of different pathologies and tumors of the FRS. It is now widely accepted that cancer stem cells (CSC) are at the origin of many tumors. They are capable of regenerating themselves, produce a progeny that will differentiate aberrantly and do not respond adequately to homeostatic controls. Several cell surface antigens such as CD44, CD117, CD133 and MYD88 have been used to isolate ovarian cancer stem cells. Clonogenic epithelial and stromal endometrial and myometrial cells have been found in normal and cancer tissues, as side population, label-retaining cells, and CD146/PDGF-R beta-positive cells with stem-like features. In summary, here we describe a number of studies supporting the existence of somatic stem cells in the normal tissues and cancer stem cells in tumors of the human female reproductive system. PMID:23782518

  19. Cavitary lung cancer lined with normal bronchial epithelium and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Goto, Taichiro; Maeshima, Arafumi; Oyamada, Yoshitaka; Kato, Ryoichi

    2011-01-01

    Reports of cavitary lung cancer are not uncommon, and the cavity generally contains either dilated bronchi or cancer cells. Recently, we encountered a surgical case of cavitary lung cancer whose cavity tended to enlarge during long-term follow-up, and was found to be lined with normal bronchial epithelium and adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:21980325

  20. Deep sequencing as a probe of normal stem cell fate and preneoplasia in human epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    Using deep sequencing technology, methods based on the sporadic acquisition of somatic DNA mutations in human tissues have been used to trace the clonal evolution of progenitor cells in diseased states. However, the potential of these approaches to explore cell fate behavior of normal tissues and the initiation of preneoplasia remain underexploited. Focusing on the results of a recent deep sequencing study of eyelid epidermis, we show that the quantitative analysis of mutant clone size provides a general method to resolve the pattern of normal stem cell fate and to detect and characterize the mutational signature of rare field transformations in human tissues, with implications for the early detection of preneoplasia. PMID:26699486

  1. Differentiation of normal and leukemic cells by 2D light scattering label-free static cytometry.

    PubMed

    Xie, Linyan; Liu, Qiao; Shao, Changshun; Su, Xuantao

    2016-09-19

    Two-dimensional (2D) light scattering patterns of single microspheres, normal granulocytes and leukemic cells are obtained by label-free static cytometry. Statistical results of experimental 2D light scattering patterns obtained from standard microspheres with a mean diameter of 4.19 μm agree well with theoretical simulations. High accuracy rates (greater than 92%) for label-free differentiation of normal granulocytes and leukemic cells, both the acute and chronic leukemic cells, are achieved by analyzing the 2D light scattering patterns. Our label-free static cytometry is promising for leukemia screening in clinics. PMID:27661908

  2. Mesenchymal progenitor cell markers in human articular cartilage: normal distribution and changes in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Grogan, Shawn P; Miyaki, Shigeru; Asahara, Hiroshi; D'Lima, Darryl D; Lotz, Martin K

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Recent findings suggest that articular cartilage contains mesenchymal progenitor cells. The aim of this study was to examine the distribution of stem cell markers (Notch-1, Stro-1 and VCAM-1) and of molecules that modulate progenitor differentiation (Notch-1 and Sox9) in normal adult human articular cartilage and in osteoarthritis (OA) cartilage. Methods Expression of the markers was analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and flow cytometry. Hoechst 33342 dye was used to identify and sort the cartilage side population (SP). Multilineage differentiation assays including chondrogenesis, osteogenesis and adipogenesis were performed on SP and non-SP (NSP) cells. Results A surprisingly high number (>45%) of cells were positive for Notch-1, Stro-1 and VCAM-1 throughout normal cartilage. Expression of these markers was higher in the superficial zone (SZ) of normal cartilage as compared to the middle zone (MZ) and deep zone (DZ). Non-fibrillated OA cartilage SZ showed reduced Notch-1 and Sox9 staining frequency, while Notch-1, Stro-1 and VCAM-1 positive cells were increased in the MZ. Most cells in OA clusters were positive for each molecule tested. The frequency of SP cells in cartilage was 0.14 ± 0.05% and no difference was found between normal and OA. SP cells displayed chondrogenic and osteogenic but not adipogenic differentiation potential. Conclusions These results show a surprisingly high number of cells that express putative progenitor cell markers in human cartilage. In contrast, the percentage of SP cells is much lower and within the range of expected stem cell frequency. Thus, markers such as Notch-1, Stro-1 or VCAM-1 may not be useful to identify progenitors in cartilage. Instead, their increased expression in OA cartilage implicates involvement in the abnormal cell activation and differentiation process characteristic of OA. PMID:19500336

  3. Surface-emitting superconductor laser spectroscopy for characterizing normal and sickled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gourley, P.L.; Meissner, K.E.; Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Gourley, M.F.

    1995-02-01

    We have developed a new intracavity laser technique that uses a living or a fixed cell as an integral component of the laser. The cells are placed on an AlGaAs/GaAs surface-emitting semiconductor wafer and covered with a glass dielectric mirror to form a laser resonator. In this arrangement, the cells serve as optical waveguides (or lens elements) to confine (or focus) light generated in the resonator by the semiconductor. Because of the high transparency, the cells aid the lasing process to generate laser light. This ultra sensitive laser provides a novel imaging/spectroscopic technique for histologic examination which we demonstrate with normal and sickled human red blood cells. Extremely high contrast microscopic images of the cells are observed near 830-850 nm. These images correspond to electromagnetic modes of cell structures and are sensitive to shape of the cell. Using a high resolution spectrometer, we resolve the light emitted from these images into very narrow spectral peaks associated with the lasing modes. Analysis of the spectra reveals that the distribution of peaks is quite different for normal and sickled red blood cells. This technique, in a more developed form, may be useful for the rapid analysis of other kinds of normal and abnormal cells.

  4. Molecular discrimination of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma from actinic keratosis and normal skin.

    PubMed

    Ra, Seong Hui; Li, Xinmin; Binder, Scott

    2011-07-01

    Actinic keratosis is widely believed to be a neoplastic lesion and a precursor to invasive squamous cell carcinoma. However, there has been some debate as to whether actinic keratosis is in fact actually squamous cell carcinoma and should be treated as such. As the clinical management and prognosis of patients is widely held to be different for each of these lesions, our goal was to identify unique gene signatures using DNA microarrays to discriminate among normal skin, actinic keratosis, and squamous cell carcinoma, and examine the molecular pathways of carcinogenesis involved in the progression from normal skin to squamous cell carcinoma. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded blocks of skin: five normal skins (pooled), six actinic keratoses, and six squamous cell carcinomas were retrieved. The RNA was extracted and amplified. The labeled targets were hybridized to the Affymetrix human U133plus2.0 array and the acquisition and initial quantification of array images were performed using the GCOS (Affymetrix). The subsequent data analyses were performed using DNA-Chip Analyzer and Partek Genomic Suite 6.4. Significant differential gene expression (>2 fold change, P<0.05) was seen with 382 differentially expressed genes between squamous cell carcinoma and normal skin, 423 differentially expressed genes between actinic keratosis and normal skin, and 9 differentially expressed genes between actinic keratosis and squamous cell carcinoma. The differentially expressed genes offer the possibility of using DNA microarrays as a molecular diagnostic tool to distinguish between normal skin, actinic keratosis, and squamous cell carcinoma. In addition, the differentially expressed genes and their molecular pathways could be potentially used as prognostic markers or targets for future therapeutic innovations. PMID:21743436

  5. Comparative immunohistochemical study of normal, hyperplastic and neoplastic C cells of the rat thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Martín-Lacave, I; Rojas, F; Bernabé, R; Utrilla, J C; Fernández-Santos, J M; De Miguel, M; Conde, E

    2002-09-01

    In rats, the frequency of spontaneous C-cell tumours is very high and is both age and gender dependent. The three specific stages of neoplastic progression can be distinguished into diffuse C-cell hyperplasia, focal C-cell hyperplasia and bona fide C-cell tumours. Based on this hypothetical model of human medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), we carried out an immunohistochemical study using different markers (calcitonin, calcitonin gene-related peptide, somatostatin and chromogranin) to verify the existence of any relationship between their expression and the successive steps of tumour development. We found a characteristic immunohistochemical staining pattern, particularly for calcitonin and somatostatin, which distinguishes C-cell tumours from both normal and hyperplastic C cells, with no differences related to the gender of the animals under study. Specifically, a considerable heterogeneity in calcitonin expression was only displayed by C-cell carcinomas, being less pronounced in C-cell adenomas. As for somatostatin, this regulatory peptide was found only in a minority of calcitonin-positive cells in normal and hyperplastic glands. However, in some C-cell adenomas and most C-cell carcinomas nearly all calcitonin-positive cells also coexpressed somatostatin. We conclude that rat C-cell neoplasms constitute a very particular tumour entity which shares many but not all immunohistochemical features with human MTC.

  6. Expression pattern of FCRL (FREB, FcRX) in normal and neoplastic human B cells.

    PubMed

    Masir, Noraidah; Jones, Margaret; Pozzobon, Michela; Marafioti, Teresa; Volkova, Olga Y; Mechetina, Ludmila V; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Natkunam, Yasodha; Taranin, Alexander V; Mason, David Y

    2004-11-01

    FCRL (also known as FREB and FcRX) is a recently described member of the family of Fc receptors for immunoglobulin G (IgG). In the present study we analysed its expression in normal and neoplastic lymphoid tissue using immunohistochemical techniques. FCRL was preferentially expressed in a proportion of germinal centre cells and, more weakly, in mantle zone B cells. In addition, strong labelling was observed in marginal zone B cells in the spleen, representing one of the few markers for this cell type. The majority of cases of small B-cell lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and lymphocyte predominance Hodgkin's disease were positive for FCRL. However, the number of positive cells varied widely, and in consequence we could not define a cut-off that distinguished subsets of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Our results also showed that FCRL tended to be negative in T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma and in classical Hodgkin's disease. FCRL may therefore represent a novel marker for normal B cells (e.g. splenic marginal zone cells) and may also be useful as a potential marker of B-cell neoplasms. PMID:15491296

  7. Control of Viremia Enables Acquisition of Resting Memory B Cells with Age and Normalization of Activated B Cell Phenotypes in HIV-Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Muema, Daniel M.; Macharia, Gladys N.; Hassan, Amin S.; Mwaringa, Shalton M.; Fegan, Greg W.; Berkley, James A.; Urban, Britta C.

    2015-01-01

    HIV affects the function of all lymphocyte populations, including B cells. Phenotypic and functional defects of B cells in HIV-infected adults have been well characterized, but defects in children have not been studied to the same extent. We determined the proportion of B cell subsets and frequencies of Ag-specific memory B cells in peripheral blood from HIV-infected children and healthy controls, using flow cytometry and B cell ELISPOT, respectively. In addition, we measured the quantities and avidities of plasma Abs against various Ags by ELISA. We also determined plasma levels of BAFF and expression of BAFF receptors on B cells. Children with high HIV viremia had increased proportions of activated mature B cells, tissue-like memory B cells and plasmablasts, and low proportions of naive B cells when compared with community controls and children with low HIV viremia, similar to adults infected with HIV. HIV-infected groups had lower proportions of resting memory B cells than did community controls. Notably, high HIV viremia prevented the age-dependent accumulation of class-switched resting memory B cells. HIV-infected children, regardless of the level of viremia, showed lower quantities and avidities of IgG and lower frequencies of memory B cells against Expanded Program on Immunization vaccines. The HIV-infected children had an altered BAFF profile that could have affected their B cell compartment. Therefore, B cell defects in HIV-infected children are similar to those seen in HIV-infected adults. However, control of HIV viremia is associated with normalization of activated B cell subsets and allows age-dependent accumulation of resting memory B cells. PMID:26116511

  8. Control of Viremia Enables Acquisition of Resting Memory B Cells with Age and Normalization of Activated B Cell Phenotypes in HIV-Infected Children.

    PubMed

    Muema, Daniel M; Macharia, Gladys N; Hassan, Amin S; Mwaringa, Shalton M; Fegan, Greg W; Berkley, James A; Nduati, Eunice W; Urban, Britta C

    2015-08-01

    HIV affects the function of all lymphocyte populations, including B cells. Phenotypic and functional defects of B cells in HIV-infected adults have been well characterized, but defects in children have not been studied to the same extent. We determined the proportion of B cell subsets and frequencies of Ag-specific memory B cells in peripheral blood from HIV-infected children and healthy controls, using flow cytometry and B cell ELISPOT, respectively. In addition, we measured the quantities and avidities of plasma Abs against various Ags by ELISA. We also determined plasma levels of BAFF and expression of BAFF receptors on B cells. Children with high HIV viremia had increased proportions of activated mature B cells, tissue-like memory B cells and plasmablasts, and low proportions of naive B cells when compared with community controls and children with low HIV viremia, similar to adults infected with HIV. HIV-infected groups had lower proportions of resting memory B cells than did community controls. Notably, high HIV viremia prevented the age-dependent accumulation of class-switched resting memory B cells. HIV-infected children, regardless of the level of viremia, showed lower quantities and avidities of IgG and lower frequencies of memory B cells against Expanded Program on Immunization vaccines. The HIV-infected children had an altered BAFF profile that could have affected their B cell compartment. Therefore, B cell defects in HIV-infected children are similar to those seen in HIV-infected adults. However, control of HIV viremia is associated with normalization of activated B cell subsets and allows age-dependent accumulation of resting memory B cells.

  9. Factors affecting white cell content in platelet concentrates.

    PubMed

    Champion, A B; Carmen, R A

    1985-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the factors affecting white cell content in platelet concentrates. White cell yields can be reduced 50 percent by stopping platelet-rich plasma expression when the interface is 1 cm from the top of the blood bag as compared to stopping expression when the interface reaches the top of the bag. Further reductions can be achieved by careful handling during transfer of units from the centrifuge cups to expressors (after the first spin) and by carefully balancing units against each other to ensure proper rotor balance during the first spin. Following these suggestions, blood banks should be able to produce platelet concentrates with white cell yields between 2 and 6 X 10(7) and with platelet yields between 7.5 and 8 X 10(10). Transfusion of this product may reduce febrile reactions and lower the incidence of alloimmunizations. PMID:4024231

  10. Noggin 1 overexpression in retinal progenitors affects bipolar cell generation.

    PubMed

    Messina, Andrea; Bridi, Simone; Bozza, Angela; Bozzi, Yuri; Baudet, Marie-Laure; Casarosa, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Waves of Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) and their antagonists are present during initial eye development, but their possible roles in retinogenesis are still unknown. We have recently shown that noggin 1, a BMP antagonist, renders pluripotent cells able to differentiate into retinal precursors, and might be involved in the maintenance of retinal structures in the adult vertebrate eye. Here, we report that noggin 1, differently from noggin 2 and noggin 4, is expressed during all phases of Xenopus laevis retinal development. Gain-of-function experiments by electroporation in the optic vesicle show that overexpression of noggin 1 significantly decreases the number of bipolar cells in the inner nuclear layer of the retina, without significantly affecting the generation of the other retinal cell types. Our data suggest that BMP signaling could be involved in the differentiation of retinal progenitors into specific retinal subtypes during late phases of vertebrate retinal development. PMID:27389985

  11. ALDH isozymes downregulation affects cell growth, cell motility and gene expression in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreb, Jan S; Baker, Henry V; Chang, Lung-Ji; Amaya, Maria; Lopez, M Cecilia; Ostmark, Blanca; Chou, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Background Aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 are highly expressed in non small cell lung cancer. Neither the mechanisms nor the biologic significance for such over expression have been studied. Methods We have employed oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze changes in gene profiles in A549 lung cancer cell line in which ALDH activity was reduced by up to 95% using lentiviral mediated expression of siRNA against both isozymes (Lenti 1+3). Stringent analysis methods were used to identify gene expression patterns that are specific to the knock down of ALDH activity and significantly different in comparison to wild type A549 cells (WT) or cells similarly transduced with green fluorescent protein (GFP) siRNA. Results We confirmed significant and specific down regulation of ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 in Lenti 1+3 cells and in comparison to 12 other ALDH genes detected. The results of the microarray analysis were validated by real time RT-PCR on RNA obtained from Lenti 1+3 or WT cells treated with ALDH activity inhibitors. Detailed functional analysis was performed on 101 genes that were significantly different (P < 0.001) and their expression changed by ≥ 2 folds in the Lenti 1+3 group versus the control groups. There were 75 down regulated and 26 up regulated genes. Protein binding, organ development, signal transduction, transcription, lipid metabolism, and cell migration and adhesion were among the most affected pathways. Conclusion These molecular effects of the ALDH knock-down are associated with in vitro functional changes in the proliferation and motility of these cells and demonstrate the significance of ALDH enzymes in cell homeostasis with a potentially significant impact on the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:19025616

  12. Characterization of proteins and RNAs present on polysomes from normal and heat shocked Drosophila cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, M.M.; Bruederle, L.P.

    1987-05-01

    Translational regulation in heat shocked Drosophila cells is characterized by a shutdown in translation of normal cell mRNA and selective translation of mRNAs coding for heat shock polypeptides. They have characterized the sedimentation profiles and macromolecular compositions of ribosomes and polysomes in normal and heat shocked cells in order to implicate factors responsible for the changes in regulation of translation in heat shocked cells. Sucrose gradient analysis of polysome sedimentation carried out under physiological salt conditions confirms the previously reported decrease in polysomes and increase in 80s monosomes in heat shock. The size of the 40s and 60s subunit peaks and the levels of /sup 35/S-methionyl-tRNA associated with the 43s preinitiation complex do not change significantly in heat shock. Titration of specific mRNA levels across the gradients shows that normal cell mRNAs accumulate in the 40 to 80s region of heat shock profiles while heat shock mRNAs are distributed on heat shock polysomes. Analysis of proteins present on the gradients shows a 46 kD protein is present on polysomes from normal cells and polymerized into the insoluble cytoskeleton in heat shocked cells. The rearrangement of the insoluble cytoskeleton follows the same time course as changes in translation regulation in induction and recovery from heat shock and is accompanied by phosphorylation of the 46 kD polypeptide.

  13. Novel in situ normal streaming potential device for characterizing electrostatic properties of confluent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandrangi, P.; Jreij, P.; Rajapaksa, T. E.; Bansal, N.; Lo, D. D.; Rodgers, V. G. J.

    2012-07-01

    The characteristics of transport across confluent cell monolayers may often be attributed to its electrostatic properties. While tangential streaming potential is often used to quantify these electrostatic properties, this method is not effective for transport normal to the apical cell surface where the charge properties along the basolateral sides may be important (i.e., confluent cells with leaky tight junctions). In addition, even when cells have a uniform charge distribution, the shear stress generated by the conventional tangential flow device may dislodge cells from their confluent state. Here we introduce a novel streaming potential measurement device to characterize the normal electrostatic properties of confluent cells. The streaming potential device encompasses a 24 mm cell-seeded Transwell® with two AgCl electrodes on either side of the cell-seeded Transwell. Phosphate buffered saline is pressurized transversal to the Transwell and the resultant pressure gradient induces a potential difference. Confluent monolayers of HEK and EA926 cells are used as examples. The corresponding zeta potential of the cell-membrane configuration is calculated using the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski equation and the zeta potential of the confluent cell layer is deconvolved from the overall measurements. For these test models, the zeta potential is consistent with that determined using a commercial dispersed-cell device. This novel streaming potential device provides a simple, easy, and cost-effective methodology to determine the normal zeta potential of confluent cells cultured on Transwell systems while keeping the cells intact. Furthermore, its versatility allows periodic measurements of properties of the same cell culture during transient studies.

  14. D-glucuronyl C5-epimerase cell type specifically affects angiogenesis pathway in different prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Eugenia E; Prudnikova, Tatiana Y; Zabarovsky, Eugene R; Kashuba, Vladimir I; Grigorieva, Elvira V

    2014-04-01

    D-glucuronyl C5-epimerase (GLCE) is involved in breast and lung carcinogenesis as a potential tumor suppressor gene, acting through inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and invasion/metastasis pathways. However, in prostate tumors, increased GLCE expression is associated with advanced disease, suggesting versatile effects of GLCE in different cancers. To investigate further the potential cancer-promoting effect of GLCE in prostate cancer, GLCE was ectopically re-expressed in morphologically different LNCaP and PC3 prostate cancer cells. Transcriptional profiles of normal PNT2 prostate cells, LNCaP, PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cells, and GLCE-expressing LNCaP and PC3 cells were determined. Comparative analysis revealed the genes whose expression was changed in prostate cancer cells compared with normal PNT2 cells, and those differently expressed between the cancer cell lines (ACTA2, IL6, SERPINE1, TAGLN, SEMA3A, and CDH2). GLCE re-expression influenced mainly angiogenesis-involved genes (ANGPT1, SERPINE1, IGF1, PDGFB, TNF, IL8, TEK, IFNA1, and IFNB1) but in a cell type-specific manner (from basic deregulation of angiogenesis in LNCaP cells to significant activation in PC3 cells). Invasion/metastasis pathway was also affected (MMP1, MMP2, MMP9, S100A4, ITGA1, ITGB3, ERBB2, and FAS). The obtained results suggest activation of angiogenesis as a main molecular mechanism of pro-oncogenic effect of GLCE in prostate cancer. GLCE up-regulation plus expression pattern of a panel of six genes, discriminating morphologically different prostate cancer cell sub-types, is suggested as a potential marker of aggressive prostate cancer.

  15. Culture materials affect ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    LaIuppa, J A; McAdams, T A; Papoutsakis, E T; Miller, W M

    1997-09-01

    Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic cells is important for applications such as cancer treatment, gene therapy, and transfusion medicine. While cell culture systems are widely used to evaluate the biocompatibility of materials for implantation, the ability of materials to support proliferation of primary human cells in cultures for reinfusion into patients has not been addressed. We screened a variety of commercially available polymer (15 types), metal (four types), and glass substrates for their ability to support expansion of hematopoietic cells when cultured under conditions that would be encountered in a clinical setting. Cultures of peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cells and mononuclear cells (MNC) were evaluated for expansion of total cells and colony-forming unit-granulocyte monocyte (CFU-GM; progenitors committed to the granulocyte and/or monocyte lineage). Human hematopoietic cultures in serum-free medium were found to be extremely sensitive to the substrate material. The only materials tested that supported expansion at or near the levels of polystyrene were tissue culture polystyrene, Teflon perfluoroalkoxy, Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene, cellulose acetate, titanium, new polycarbonate, and new polymethylpentene. MNC were less sensitive to the substrate materials than the primitive CD34+ progenitors, although similar trends were seen for expansion of the two cell populations on the substrates tested. CFU-GM expansion was more sensitive to substrate materials than was total cell expansion. The detrimental effects of a number of the materials on hematopoietic cultures appear to be caused by protein adsorption and/or leaching of toxins. Factors such as cleaning, sterilization, and reuse significantly affected the performance of some materials as culture substrates. We also used PB CD34+ cell cultures to examine the biocompatibility of gas-permeable cell culture and blood storage bags and several types of tubing commonly used with biomedical equipment

  16. Amifostine Induces Antioxidant Enzymatic Activities in Normal Tissues and a Transplantable Tumor That Can Affect Radiation Response

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, David J. Murley, Jeffrey S.; Kataoka, Yasushi; Baker, Kenneth L.; Kunnavakkam, Rangesh; Coleman, Mitchell C.; Spitz, Douglas R.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether amifostine can induce elevated manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in murine tissues and a transplantable SA-NH tumor, resulting in a delayed tumor cell radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: SA-NH tumor-bearing C3H mice were treated with a single 400 mg/kg or three daily 50 mg/kg doses of amifostine administered intraperitoneally. At selected time intervals after the last injection, the heart, liver, lung, pancreas, small intestine, spleen, and SA-NH tumor were removed and analyzed for SOD2, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) enzymatic activity. The effect of elevated SOD2 enzymatic activity on the radiation response of SA-NH cells was determined. Results: SOD2 activity was significantly elevated in selected tissues and a tumor 24 h after amifostine treatment. Catalase and GPx activities remained unchanged except for significant elevations in the spleen. GPx was also elevated in the pancreas. SA-NH tumor cells exhibited a twofold elevation in SOD2 activity and a 27% elevation in radiation resistance. Amifostine administered in three daily fractions of 50 mg/kg each also resulted in significant elevations of these antioxidant enzymes. Conclusions: Amifostine can induce a delayed radioprotective effect that correlates with elevated levels of SOD2 activity in SA-NH tumor. If limited to normal tissues, this delayed radioprotective effect offers an additional potential for overall radiation protection. However, amifostine-induced elevation of SOD2 activity in tumors could have an unanticipated deleterious effect on tumor responses to fractionated radiation therapy, given that the radioprotector is administered daily just before each 2-Gy fractionated dose.

  17. Difference in cellular mechanics of cancer and normal cervical cells as seen with the AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Igor; Iyer, Swaminathan; Subba-Rao, Venkatesh; Woodworth, Craig

    2006-03-01

    Oncogenically transformed cells differ from their normal counter parts in many aspects, including organization and the amount of cytoskeleton. Consequently it is natural to expect to see the difference in cellular mechanics. Here we will present the study of such differences by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in-vitro. So far the present research is the first study of mechanics of cervical cells, and the third comparative study of differences between mechanics of cancer and normal cells down with the help of AFM. Using a micron size silica ball as the AFM probe, we presumably do not overstress the cell surface as it can be in the case of the sharp AFM tip, and consequently, we may use the classical Hertz model. In contrast to the reported previously studies (bladder and fibroblast cells), we found that oncogenically transformed cervical cells are more rigid than the normal cells. The reason for such difference will be discussed. To demonstrate the complexity of the problem, we study cell mechanics in detail. The Young's modulus of rigidity clearly shows two separate regions of rigidity depending on the depth of the probe penetration. There may be two alternative explanations of the difference in rigidity of this top layer: it is either the cell membrane layer or detected long-range (presumably steric) forces due to the molecular ``brush'' of glycocalyx molecules. Experiments and modal calculations will be presented to choose between these two possibilities.

  18. Electrically excitable normal rat kidney fibroblasts: A new model system for cell-semiconductor hybrids.

    PubMed

    Parak, W J; Domke, J; George, M; Kardinal, A; Radmacher, M; Gaub, H E; de Roos, A D; Theuvenet, A P; Wiegand, G; Sackmann, E; Behrends, J C

    1999-03-01

    In testing various designs of cell-semiconductor hybrids, the choice of a suitable type of electrically excitable cell is crucial. Here normal rat kidney (NRK) fibroblasts are presented as a cell line, easily maintained in culture, that may substitute for heart or nerve cells in many experiments. Like heart muscle cells, NRK fibroblasts form electrically coupled confluent cell layers, in which propagating action potentials are spontaneously generated. These, however, are not associated with mechanical disturbances. Here we compare heart muscle cells and NRK fibroblasts with respect to action potential waveform, morphology, and substrate adhesion profile, using the whole-cell variant of the patch-clamp technique, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM), respectively. Our results clearly demonstrate that NRK fibroblasts should provide a highly suitable test system for investigating the signal transfer between electrically excitable cells and extracellular detectors, available at a minimum cost and effort for the experimenters. PMID:10049346

  19. Changes in the functional characteristics of tumor and normal cells after treatment with extracts of white dead-nettle

    PubMed Central

    Veleva, Ralitsa; Petkova, Bela; Moskova-Doumanova, Veselina; Doumanov, Jordan; Dimitrova, Milena; Koleva, Petya; Mladenova, Kirilka; Petrova, Svetla; Yordanova, Zhenya; Kapchina-Toteva, Veneta; Topouzova-Hristova, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    Lamium album L. is a perennial herb widely used in folk medicine. It possesses a wide spectrum of therapeutic activities (anti-inflammatory, astringent, antiseptic, antibiotic, antispasmodic, antioxidant and anti-proliferative). Preservation of medicinal plant could be done by in vitro propagation to avoid depletion from their natural habitat. It is important to know whether extracts from L. album plants grown in vitro possess similar properties as extracts from plants grown in vivo. For these reasons, it is important to examine changes in the composition of secondary metabolites during in vitro cultivation of the plant and how they affect the biological activity. We used A549 human cancer cell line and normal kidney epithelial cells MDCKII (Madin–Darby canine kidney cells II) as controls in assessing the anti-cancer effect of plant extracts. To elucidate changes in some key functional characteristics, adhesion test, MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2-5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide), transepithelial resistance (TER), immunofluorescence staining and trypan blue exclusion test were performed. Methanol and chloroform extracts of in vivo and in vitro propagated plants affected differently cancerous and non-cancerous cells. The most pronounced differences were observed in the morphological analysis and in the cell adhesive properties. We also detected suppressed epithelial transmembrane electrical resistance of MDCK II cells, by treatment with plant extracts, compared to non-treated MDCK II cells. A549 cells did not polarize under the same conditions. Altered organization of actin filaments in both cell types were noticed suggesting that extracts from L. album L. change TER and actin filaments, and somehow may block cell mechanisms, leading to the polarization of MDCK II cells. PMID:26019631

  20. Hyperthermia and thermal tolerance in normal and ataxia telangiectasia human cell strains

    SciTech Connect

    Raaphorst, G.P.; Azzam, E.I.

    1983-06-01

    Three normal human fibroblast strains, two human ataxia telangiectasia heterozygote cell strains, and two human ataxia telangiectasia homozygote cell strains were studied for their thermal responses between 41.0 and 46.0/sup 0/. The heat sensitivities of all cell strains were comparable, and all cell strains were relatively heat resistant compared to Chinese hamster cells. Both normal and ataxia telangiectasia human cells developed thermal tolerance during heating at temperatures less than or equal to 43/sup 0/ and during incubation at 37/sup 0/ after acute heating at 45.0/sup 0/. For survival measured down to the 5 to 10% level, heat survival curves for all seven human cell strains lacked shoulders, indicating the inability of such cells to accumulate sublethal heat damage. Analysis of the cell survival curve data by the method of Arrhenius showed that the thermal inactivation energies for human cells were 127 and 230 kcal/mol above and below the break at 43.5/sup 0/, respectively, and are about the same as for Chinese hamster cells and other animal cells, implying similar mechanisms of heat inactivation. Patients with AT are very radiosensitive, making radiotherapy in such patients difficult. Hyperthermia may provide an alternate means for cancer therapy in such patients.

  1. Cerebral blood flow and red cell delivery in normal subjects and in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, R.L.; Roth, J.G.; Woody, D.C. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was determined in 77 normal females and 53 normal males of different ages and in 26 men and 45 women with multiple sclerosis by the inhalation of radioactive Xe133 method. In the normal subjects the CBF was relatively high in the teens and fell, at first rapidly and then slowly in both sexes with age. During adult life the flow in females was significantly higher than in males. The delivery of packed red cells (RCD) was determined by multiplying the CBF by the percentage concentration of red cells (HCT). The RCD for both sexes was nearly the same. In the patients with multiple sclerosis there occurred a progressive generalized decrease in CBF and in RCD with age which was significantly greater than observed in normal subjects. The rate of decrease in CBF and RCD correlated directly with the rate of progress of the disease.

  2. Belimumab Reduces Autoantibodies, Normalizes Low Complement, and Reduces Select B-Cell Populations in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    STOHL, WILLIAM; HIEPE, FALK; LATINIS, KEVIN M.; THOMAS, MATHEW; SCHEINBERG, MORTON A.; CLARKE, ANN; ARANOW, CYNTHIA; WELLBORNE, FRANK R.; ABUD-MENDOZA, CARLOS; HOUGH, DOUGLAS R.; PINEDA, LILIA; MIGONE, THI-SAU; ZHONG, Z. JOHN; FREIMUTH, WILLIAM W.; CHATHAM, W. WINN

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of the B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS)-specific inhibitor belimumab on immunologic biomarkers, including B- and T-cell populations, and maintenance of antibody titers to prior vaccines in autoantibody-positive systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Methods Pooled data from two phase 3 trials—BLISS-52 and -76—comparing belimumab 1 or 10 mg/kg vs placebo (each plus standard SLE therapy) were analyzed for changes in autoantibodies, immunoglobulin (Ig), and complement (C); BLISS-76 patients were analyzed for changes in B- and T-cell populations, and effects on prior vaccine-induced antibody levels. Results Belimumab-treated patients experienced significant sustained reductions in IgG and autoantibodies, and improvement in C3/C4, resulting in greater positive-to-negative conversion rates for IgG anti–double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA), anti-Smith, anticardiolipin, and antiribosomal P autoantibodies, and normalization of hypergammaglobulinemia and low C3/C4. Belimumab-treated patients experienced significant decreases in naïve and activated B cells, as well as plasma cells, whereas memory B cells and T-cell populations did not decrease. Belimumab did not substantially affect pre-existing antipneumococcal or antitetanus antibody levels. Post-hoc analysis showed greater reductions in SLE disease activity and the risk of severe flares in patients treated with belimumab 10 mg/kg (P ≤ 0.01) who were anti-dsDNA positive with low C3/C4 at baseline. Normalization of C3 or anti-dsDNA by 8 weeks, irrespective of therapy, was predictive of a reduced risk of severe flare over 52 weeks. Conclusion Belimumab appears to promote normalization of serologic activity and reduce BLyS-dependent B-cell subsets in serologically and clinically active SLE. Greater serologic activity may predict a better treatment response to belimumab. PMID:22275291

  3. Disruption of glucocorticoid signaling in chondrocytes delays metaphyseal fracture healing but does not affect normal cartilage and bone development

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Jinwen; Henneicke, Holger; Zhang, Yaqing; Stoner, Shihani; Cheng, Tegan L.; Schindeler, Aaron; Chen, Di; Tuckermann, Jan; Cooper, Mark S.; Seibel, Markus J.; Zhou, Hong

    2014-01-01

    States of glucocorticoid excess are associated with defects in chondrocyte function. Most prominently there is a reduction in linear growth but delayed healing of fractures that require endochondral ossification to also occur. In contrast, little is known about the role of endogenous glucocorticoids in chondrocyte function. As glucocorticoids exert their cellular actions through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), we aimed to elucidate the role of endogenous glucocorticoids in chondrocyte function in vivo through characterization of tamoxifen-inducible chondrocyte-specific GR knockout (chGRKO) mice in which the GR was deleted at various post-natal ages. Knee joint architecture, cartilage structure, growth plates, intervertebral discs, long bone length and bone micro-architecture were similar in chGRKO and control mice at all ages. Analysis of fracture healing in chGRKO and control mice demonstrated that in metaphyseal fractures, chGRKO mice formed a larger cartilaginous callus at 1 and 2 week post-surgery, as well as a smaller amount of well-mineralized bony callus at the fracture site 4 week post-surgery, when compared to control mice. In contrast, chondrocyte-specific GR knockout did not affect diaphyseal fracture healing. We conclude that endogenous GC signaling in chondrocytes plays an important role during metaphyseal fracture healing but is not essential for normal long bone growth. PMID:25193158

  4. Effects of simplified ethanol-wet bonding technique on immediate bond strength with normal versus caries-affected dentin

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Sharma, Ritu; Miglani, Sanjay; Bhasin, Saranjit Singh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the use of simplified ethanol-wet bonding (EWB) technique improved the immediate microtensile bond strength (μTBS) between resin composite and caries-affected dentin (CAD). Materials and Methods: Twenty-four extracted carious human permanent molars were sectioned to expose the carious lesion. The carious dentin was excavated until CAD was exposed. The samples were divided into two groups: water-wet bonding with Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose and a simplified EWB (three 100% ethanol applications for 30 s each), followed by application of an experimental hydrophobic primer and restoration. The samples were vertically sectioned to produce 1 mm × 1 mm thick slabs. The normal dentin (ND) slabs and CAD slabs were identified and were subjected to μTBS evaluation. Slabs from four teeth (two from each group) were evaluated under microscope. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Holm–Sidak test at P < 0.05. Results: EWB improved the μTBS in ND but not in CAD group. The dentinal tubules in CAD group showed sclerotic activity with minimal or no hybrid layer. Conclusions: Simplified ethanol bonding does not improve the bond strength in CAD.

  5. Effects of simplified ethanol-wet bonding technique on immediate bond strength with normal versus caries-affected dentin

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Sharma, Ritu; Miglani, Sanjay; Bhasin, Saranjit Singh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the use of simplified ethanol-wet bonding (EWB) technique improved the immediate microtensile bond strength (μTBS) between resin composite and caries-affected dentin (CAD). Materials and Methods: Twenty-four extracted carious human permanent molars were sectioned to expose the carious lesion. The carious dentin was excavated until CAD was exposed. The samples were divided into two groups: water-wet bonding with Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose and a simplified EWB (three 100% ethanol applications for 30 s each), followed by application of an experimental hydrophobic primer and restoration. The samples were vertically sectioned to produce 1 mm × 1 mm thick slabs. The normal dentin (ND) slabs and CAD slabs were identified and were subjected to μTBS evaluation. Slabs from four teeth (two from each group) were evaluated under microscope. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Holm–Sidak test at P < 0.05. Results: EWB improved the μTBS in ND but not in CAD group. The dentinal tubules in CAD group showed sclerotic activity with minimal or no hybrid layer. Conclusions: Simplified ethanol bonding does not improve the bond strength in CAD. PMID:27656059

  6. Stages of Cell Cannibalism--Entosis--in Normal Human Keratinocyte Culture.

    PubMed

    Garanina, A S; Khashba, L A; Onishchenko, G E

    2015-11-01

    Entosis is a type of cell cannibalism during which one cell penetrates into another cell and usually dies inside it. Researchers mainly pay attention to initial and final stages of entosis. Besides, tumor cells in suspension are the primary object of studies. In the present study, we investigated morphological changes of both cells-participants of entosis during this process. The substrate-dependent culture of human normal keratinocytes HaCaT was chosen for the work. A combination of light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy was used to prove that one cell was completely surrounded by the plasma membrane of another cell. We investigated such "cell-in-cell" structures and described the structural and functional changes of both cells during entosis. The outer cell nucleus localization and shape were changed. Gradual degradation of the inner cell nucleus and of the junctions between the inner and the outer cells was revealed. Moreover, repeated redistribution of the outer cell membrane organelles (Golgi apparatus, lysosomes, mitochondria, and autophagosomes), rearrangement of its cytoskeleton, and change in the lysosomal, autophagosomal, and mitochondrial state in both entotic cells were observed during entosis. On the basis of these data, we divided entosis into five stages that make it possible to systematize description of this type of cell death. PMID:26615438

  7. Formation of bipolar spindles with two centrosomes in tetraploid cells established from normal human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Susumu; Seyama, Atsushi

    2012-09-01

    Tetraploid cells with unstable chromosomes frequently arise as an early step in tumorigenesis and lead to the formation of aneuploid cells. The mechanisms responsible for the chromosome instability of polyploid cells are not fully understood, although the supernumerary centrosomes in polyploid cells have been considered the major cause of chromosomal instability. The aim of this study was to examine the integrity of mitotic spindles and centrosomes in proliferative polyploid cells established from normal human fibroblasts. TIG-1 human fibroblasts were treated with demecolcine (DC) for 4 days to induce polyploidy, and the change in DNA content was monitored. Localization of centrosomes and mitotic spindles in polyploid mitotic cells was examined by immunohistochemistry and laser scanning cytometry. TIG-1 cells treated with DC became almost completely tetraploid at 2 weeks after treatment and grew at the same rate as untreated diploid cells. Most mitotic cells with 8C DNA content had only two centrosomes with bipolar spindles in established tetraploid cells, although they had four or more centrosomes with multipolar spindles at 3 days after DC treatment. The frequency of aneuploid cells increased as established tetraploid cells were propagated. These results indicate that tetraploid cells that form bipolar spindles with two centrosomes in mitosis can proliferate as diploid cells. These cells may serve as a useful model for studying the chromosome instability of polyploid cells. PMID:22696268

  8. Surface modification of microparticles causes differential uptake responses in normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiño, Tania; Soriano, Jorge; Barrios, Lleonard; Ibáñez, Elena; Nogués, Carme

    2015-06-01

    The use of micro- and nanodevices as multifunctional systems for biomedical applications has experienced an exponential growth during the past decades. Although a large number of studies have focused on the design and fabrication of new micro- and nanosystems capable of developing multiple functions, a deeper understanding of their interaction with cells is required. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of different microparticle surfaces on their interaction with normal and tumoral human breast epithelial cell lines. For this, AlexaFluor488 IgG functionalized polystyrene microparticles (3 μm) were coated with Polyethyleneimine (PEI) at two different molecular weights, 25 and 750 kDa. The effect of microparticle surface properties on cytotoxicity, cellular uptake and endocytic pathways were assessed for both normal and tumoral cell lines. Results showed a differential response between the two cell lines regarding uptake efficiency and mechanisms of endocytosis, highlighting the potential role of microparticle surface tunning for specific cell targeting.

  9. Melanopsin, photosensitive ganglion cells, and seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Roecklein, Kathryn A; Wong, Patricia M; Miller, Megan A; Donofry, Shannon D; Kamarck, Marissa L; Brainard, George C

    2013-03-01

    In two recent reports, melanopsin gene variations were associated with seasonal affective disorder (SAD), and in changes in the timing of sleep and activity in healthy individuals. New studies have deepened our understanding of the retinohypothalamic tract, which translates environmental light received by the retina into neural signals sent to a set of nonvisual nuclei in the brain that are responsible for functions other than sight including circadian, neuroendocrine and neurobehavioral regulation. Because this pathway mediates seasonal changes in physiology, behavior, and mood, individual variations in the pathway may explain why approximately 1-2% of the North American population develops mood disorders with a seasonal pattern (i.e., Major Depressive and Bipolar Disorders with a seasonal pattern, also known as seasonal affective disorder/SAD). Components of depression including mood changes, sleep patterns, appetite, and cognitive performance can be affected by the biological and behavioral responses to light. Specifically, variations in the gene sequence for the retinal photopigment, melanopsin, may be responsible for significant increased risk for mood disorders with a seasonal pattern, and may do so by leading to changes in activity and sleep timing in winter. The retinal sensitivity of SAD is hypothesized to be decreased compared to controls, and that further decrements in winter light levels may combine to trigger depression in winter. Here we outline steps for new research to address the possible role of melanopsin in seasonal affective disorder including chromatic pupillometry designed to measure the sensitivity of melanopsin containing retinal ganglion cells.

  10. Fuel cell system logic for differentiating between rapid and normal shutdown commands

    DOEpatents

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2000-01-01

    A method of controlling the operation of a fuel cell system wherein each shutdown command for the system is subjected to decision logic which determines whether the command should be a normal shutdown command or rapid shutdown command. If the logic determines that the shutdown command should be a normal shutdown command, then the system is shutdown in a normal step-by-step process in which the hydrogen stream is consumed within the system. If the logic determines that the shutdown command should be a rapid shutdown command, the hydrogen stream is removed from the system either by dumping to atmosphere or routing to storage.

  11. Histone deacetylase inhibition impairs normal intestinal cell proliferation and promotes specific gene expression.

    PubMed

    Roostaee, Alireza; Guezguez, Amel; Beauséjour, Marco; Simoneau, Aline; Vachon, Pierre H; Levy, Emile; Beaulieu, Jean-François

    2015-11-01

    Mechanisms that maintain proliferation and delay cell differentiation in the intestinal crypt are not yet fully understood. We have previously shown the implication of histone methylation in the regulation of enterocytic differentiation. In this study, we investigated the role of histone deacetylation as an important epigenetic mechanism that controls proliferation and differentiation of intestinal cells using the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA) on the proliferation and differentiation of human and mouse intestinal cells. Treatment of newly confluent Caco-2/15 cells with SAHA resulted in growth arrest, increased histone acetylation and up-regulation of the expression of intestine-specific genes such as those encoding sucrase-isomaltase, villin and the ion exchanger SLC26A3. Although SAHA has been recently used in clinical trials for cancer treatment, its effect on normal intestinal cells has not been documented. Analyses of small and large intestines of mice treated with SAHA revealed a repression of crypt cell proliferation and a higher expression of sucrase-isomaltase in both segments compared to control mice. Expression of SLC26A3 was also significantly up-regulated in the colons of mice after SAHA administration. Finally, SAHA was also found to strongly inhibit normal human intestinal crypt cell proliferation in vitro. These results demonstrate the important implication of epigenetic mechanisms such as histone acetylation/deacetylation in the regulation of normal intestinal cell fate and proliferation.

  12. MicroRNAs in B-cells: from normal differentiation to treatment of malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Sara Correia; Laursen, Maria Bach; Bødker, Julie Støve; Kjeldsen, Malene Krag; Falgreen, Steffen; Schmitz, Alexander; Bøgsted, Martin; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Dybkaer, Karen

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that play important post-transcriptional regulatory roles in a wide range of biological processes. They are fundamental to the normal development of cells, and evidence suggests that the deregulation of specific miRNAs is involved in malignant transformation due to their function as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. We know that miRNAs are involved in the development of normal B-cells and that different B-cell subsets express specific miRNA profiles according to their degree of differentiation. B-cell-derived malignancies contain transcription signatures reminiscent of their cell of origin. Therefore, we believe that normal and malignant B-cells share features of regulatory networks controlling differentiation and the ability to respond to treatment. The involvement of miRNAs in these processes makes them good biomarker candidates. B-cell malignancies are highly prevalent, and the poor overall survival of patients with these malignancies demands an improvement in stratification according to prognosis and therapy response, wherein we believe miRNAs may be of great importance. We have critically reviewed the literature, and here we sum up the findings of miRNA studies in hematological cancers, from the development and progression of the disease to the response to treatment, with a particular emphasis on B-cell malignancies. PMID:25622103

  13. Identification of Genes Required for Normal Pheromone-Induced Cell Polarization in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chenevert, J.; Valtz, N.; Herskowitz, I.

    1994-01-01

    In response to mating pheromones, cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae adopt a polarized ``shmoo'' morphology, in which the cytoskeleton and proteins involved in mating are localized to a cell-surface projection. This polarization is presumed to reflect the oriented morphogenesis that occurs between mating partners to facilitate cell and nuclear fusion. To identify genes involved in pheromone-induced cell polarization, we have isolated mutants defective in mating to an enfeebled partner and studied a subset of these mutants. The 34 mutants of interest are proficient for pheromone production, arrest in response to pheromone, mate to wild-type strains, and exhibit normal cell polarity during vegetative growth. The mutants were divided into classes based on their morphological responses to mating pheromone. One class is unable to localize cell-surface growth in response to mating factor and instead enlarges in a uniform manner. These mutants harbor special alleles of genes required for cell polarization during vegetative growth, BEM1 and CDC24. Another class of mutants forms bilobed, peanut-like shapes when treated with pheromone and defines two genes, PEA1 and PEA2. PEA1 is identical to SPA2. A third class forms normally shaped but tiny shmoos and defines the gene TNY1. A final group of mutants exhibits apparently normal shmoo morphology. The nature of their mating defect is yet to be determined. We discuss the possible roles of these gene products in establishing cell polarity during mating. PMID:8013906

  14. Low calcium culture condition induces mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in normal human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Murakami, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Hiroaki; Okano, Teruo

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Normal human epidermal keratinocytes serially cultured under low calcium concentration were cytokeratin and vimentin double positive cells. {yields} The human keratinocytes expressed some epithelial stem/progenitor cell makers, mesenchymal cell markers, and markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. {yields} Mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in the keratinocytes was suppressed under high-calcium condition. -- Abstract: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important cellular phenomenon in organ developments, cancer invasions, and wound healing, and many types of transformed cell lines are used for investigating for molecular mechanisms of EMT. However, there are few reports for EMT in normal human epithelial cells, which are non-transformed or non-immortalized cells, in vitro. Therefore, normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) serially cultured in low-calcium concentration medium (LCM) were used for investigating relations between differentiation and proliferation and mesenchymal-like phenotype in the present study, since long-term cultivation of NHEK is achieved in LCM. Interestingly, NHEK serially cultured in LCM consisted essentially of cytokeratin-vimentin double positive cells (98%), although the NHEK exhibited differentiation under high-calcium culture condition with 3T3 feeder layer. The vimentin expression was suppressed under high-calcium condition. These results may indicate the importance of mesenchymal-like phenotype for serially cultivation of NHEK in vitro.

  15. Radiosensitivity of hepatoma cell lines and human normal liver cell lines exposed to 12C6+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, X.; Yang, J.; Li, W.; Guo, C.; Dang, B.; Wang, J.; Zhou, L.; Wei, W.; Gao, Q.

    AIM To investigate the radiosensitivity of hepatoma cell lines and human normal liver cell lines METHODS Accelerated carbon ions by heavy ion research facility in Lanzhou HIRFL have high LET We employed it to study the radiosensitivity of hepatoma cell lines SMMC-7721 and human normal liver cell lines L02 using premature chromosome condensation technique PCC Cell survive was documented by a colony assay Chromatid breaks were measured by counting the number of chromatid breaks and isochromatid breaks immediately after prematurely chromosome condensed by Calyculin-A RESULTS The survival curve of the two cell lines presented a good linear relationship and the survival fraction of L02 is higher than that of SMMC-7721 Additionally the two types of G 2 phase chromosome breaks chromatid breaks and isochromatid breaks of L02 are lower than that of SMMC-7721 CONCLUSION Human normal liver cell line have high radioresistance than that of hepatoma cell line It imply that it is less damage to normal organs when radiotherapy to hepatoma

  16. Circus movements in dissociated cells in normal and hybrid frog embryos.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K E; Adelman, M R

    1981-06-01

    Circus movements, involving circumferential rotation of a hyaline cytoplasmic blister and endoplasmic flow, occur in EDTA-dissociated gastrula stage Rana pipiens embryos. Such cell movements occur in very few cells taken from pre-gastrula stage embryos. During gastrulation, there is a progressive increase in the proportion of a population of cells that is engaged in circus movements. Circus movements do not occur in dividing cells. Individual cells in culture, as well as small clusters of cells in vitro, are jostled about in an apparently aimless fashion over short distances by circus movements, although the translocation of masses of cells over long distances is substantially greater than the translocation of isolated cells. In an early gastrula stage normal embryo, cells from around the site of blastopore invagination are most active in circus movements. Cells taken from different stages of arrested hybrid embryos show variable depression in the formation of rotating hyaline blebs. Aggregates of cells from arrested hybrid embryos are also relatively immobile in culture. The morphogenetic significance of circus movements in normal embryos and gastrula-arrest hybrid embryos is discussed.

  17. RELATION BETWEEN WATER PERMEABILITY AND INTEGRITY OF SULFHYDRYL GROUPS IN MALIGNANT AND NORMAL CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Belkin, Morris; Hardy, Walter G.

    1961-01-01

    When malignant cells, animal and human, were exposed in vitro to solutions of heavy metals or other selected compounds, three types of cell blebs were produced: (1) acentric blebs, arising from one side of the cell, e. g., by chlormerodrin, meralluride sodium, mercuric chloride; (2) symmetrical blebs; which completely enveloped the cell, e. g., by strong silver protein, auric chloride, p-chloromercuribenzoate; (3) scallop blebs, numerous small spherical elevations which completely covered the cell, e.g., by N-ethyl-maleimide, trivalent arsenicals, iodoacetamide. As indicated by vital stains and morphologic appearance, the blebs arose in healthy cells. They also can be made to appear in vivo in ascites tumor cells by intraperitoneal administration of a blebbing agent. All the bleb-producing chemicals have the property of reacting with protein-sulfhydryl groups by alkylation, oxidation or mercaptide formation. The three bleb types have been induced in 8 mouse and 2 rat ascites tumor cells; in 4 human and 1 mouse malignant cell lines; and in 3 normal cell lines grown in tissue culture. In contrast, cells from normal solid tissues of liver, lung, spleen, kidney, testis and brain from mouse, rat and rabbit failed to produce blebs. A possible interpretation for these observations is presented. PMID:19866586

  18. PARP Inhibitors in Clinical Use Induce Genomic Instability in Normal Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Shuhei; Murphy, Conleth G.; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Jasin, Maria; Moynahan, Mary Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are the first proteins involved in cellular DNA repair pathways to be targeted by specific inhibitors for clinical benefit. Tumors harboring genetic defects in homologous recombination (HR), a DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway, are hypersensitive to PARP inhibitors (PARPi). Early phase clinical trials with PARPi have been promising in patients with advanced BRCA1 or BRCA2-associated breast, ovary and prostate cancer and have led to limited approval for treatment of BRCA-deficient ovary cancer. Unlike HR-defective cells, HR-proficient cells manifest very low cytotoxicity when exposed to PARPi, although they mount a DNA damage response. However, the genotoxic effects on normal human cells when agents including PARPi disturb proficient cellular repair processes have not been substantially investigated. We quantified cytogenetic alterations of human cells, including primary lymphoid cells and non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic epithelial cell lines, exposed to PARPi at clinically relevant doses by both sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assays and chromosome spreading. As expected, both olaparib and veliparib effectively inhibited poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR), and caused marked hypersensitivity in HR-deficient cells. Significant dose-dependent increases in SCEs were observed in normal and non-tumorigenic cells with minimal residual PAR activity. Clinically relevant doses of the FDA-approved olaparib led to a marked increase of SCEs (5-10-fold) and chromatid aberrations (2-6-fold). Furthermore, olaparib potentiated SCE induction by cisplatin in normal human cells. Our data have important implications for therapies with regard to sustained genotoxicity to normal cells. Genomic instability arising from PARPi warrants consideration, especially if these agents will be used in people with early stage cancers, in prevention strategies or for non-oncologic indications. PMID:27428646

  19. Functional Prestin Transduction of Immature Outer Hair Cells from Normal and Prestin-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Anping; Wooltorton, Julian R.A.; Palmer, Donna J.; Ng, Philip; Pereira, Fred A.; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2008-01-01

    Prestin is a membrane protein in the outer hair cell (OHC) that has been shown to be essential for electromotility. OHCs from prestin-null mice do not express prestin, do not have a nonlinear capacitance (the electrical signature of electromotility), and are smaller in size than wild-type OHCs. We sought to determine whether prestin-null OHCs can be transduced to incorporate functional prestin protein in a normal fashion. A recombinant helper-dependent adenovirus expressing prestin and green fluorescent protein (HDAd–prestin–GFP) was created and tested in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK cells). Transduced HEK cells demonstrated membrane expression of prestin and nonlinear capacitance. HDAd–prestin–GFP was then applied to cochlear sensory epithelium explants harvested from wild-type and prestin-null mice at postnatal days 2–3, the age at which native prestin is just beginning to become functional in wild-type mice. At postnatal days 4–5, we investigated transduced OHCs for (1) their prestin expression pattern as revealed by immunofluorescence; (2) their cell surface area as measured by linear capacitance; and (3) their prestin function as indicated by nonlinear capacitance. HDAd–prestin–GFP efficiently transduced OHCs of both genotypes and prestin protein localized to the plasma membrane. Whole-cell voltage clamp studies revealed a nonlinear capacitance in transduced wild-type and prestin-null OHCs, but not in non-transduced cells of either genotype. Prestin transduction did not increase the linear capacitance (cell surface area) for either genotype. In peak nonlinear capacitance, voltage at peak nonlinear capacitance, charge density of the nonlinear capacitance, and shape of the voltage-capacitance curves, the transduced cells of the two genotypes resembled each other and previously reported data from adult wild-type mouse OHCs. Thus, prestin introduced into prestin-deficient OHCs segregates normally to the cell membrane and generates a normal

  20. Comparison of proteoglycans synthesized by porcine normal and polycystic renal tubular epithelial cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Beavan, L.A.; Carone, F.A.; Nakamura, S.; Jones, J.K.; Reindel, J.F.; Price, R.G. )

    1991-02-01

    Newly synthesized porcine tubular epithelial cell proteoglycans were labeled in vitro with Na2(35S)SO4. At the beginning of the labeling period (24 h) (35S) sulfate incorporated into macromolecules was measured following PD-10 chromatography. There was a significant reduction in the amount of 35S-labeled macromolecules isolated from polycystic cells compared to that from normal cells. The distribution of recovered radiolabeled material among the medium, cell surface, and intracellular fractions was similar for both normal and polycystic cells. Analysis of the proteoglycans in polycystic cells demonstrated that 86 and 73% of 35S-labeled macromolecules were of the heparan sulfate type in polycystic and normal cells, respectively. The remainder was chondroitin sulfate. Proteoglycans were characterized using DEAE-Sephacel ion-exchange chromatography, chondroitinase ABC, heparitinase, and nitrous acid digestion followed by Sepharose CL-4B gel permeation chromatography. The majority of radiolabeled material in the medium, cell surface, and intracellular fractions eluted between 0.35 and 0.39 M NaCl. However, a second peak (peak II) that eluted at 0.25 M NaCl was found in the medium from polycystic cells. This peak accounted for 27% of the total macromolecules secreted into the medium. Proteoglycans in the major peak were susceptible to nitrous acid and chondroitinase ABC digestion. A similar proportion of peak II was degraded by chondroitinase ABC. However, the remainder was only slightly susceptible to treatment with nitrous acid or heparitase. In normal cells a small amount of material eluted at a similar low charge; the proteoglycans were the same as those found in the major peak and appeared as a shoulder on this peak.

  1. PARP Inhibitors in Clinical Use Induce Genomic Instability in Normal Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shuhei; Murphy, Conleth G; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Jasin, Maria; Moynahan, Mary Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are the first proteins involved in cellular DNA repair pathways to be targeted by specific inhibitors for clinical benefit. Tumors harboring genetic defects in homologous recombination (HR), a DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway, are hypersensitive to PARP inhibitors (PARPi). Early phase clinical trials with PARPi have been promising in patients with advanced BRCA1 or BRCA2-associated breast, ovary and prostate cancer and have led to limited approval for treatment of BRCA-deficient ovary cancer. Unlike HR-defective cells, HR-proficient cells manifest very low cytotoxicity when exposed to PARPi, although they mount a DNA damage response. However, the genotoxic effects on normal human cells when agents including PARPi disturb proficient cellular repair processes have not been substantially investigated. We quantified cytogenetic alterations of human cells, including primary lymphoid cells and non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic epithelial cell lines, exposed to PARPi at clinically relevant doses by both sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assays and chromosome spreading. As expected, both olaparib and veliparib effectively inhibited poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR), and caused marked hypersensitivity in HR-deficient cells. Significant dose-dependent increases in SCEs were observed in normal and non-tumorigenic cells with minimal residual PAR activity. Clinically relevant doses of the FDA-approved olaparib led to a marked increase of SCEs (5-10-fold) and chromatid aberrations (2-6-fold). Furthermore, olaparib potentiated SCE induction by cisplatin in normal human cells. Our data have important implications for therapies with regard to sustained genotoxicity to normal cells. Genomic instability arising from PARPi warrants consideration, especially if these agents will be used in people with early stage cancers, in prevention strategies or for non-oncologic indications. PMID:27428646

  2. Nanomechanical clues from morphologically normal cervical squamous cells could improve cervical cancer screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Li; Feng, Jiantao; Sun, Quanmei; Liu, Jing; Hua, Wenda; Li, Jing; Ao, Zhuo; You, Ke; Guo, Yanli; Liao, Fulong; Zhang, Youyi; Guo, Hongyan; Han, Jinsong; Xiong, Guangwu; Zhang, Lufang; Han, Dong

    2015-09-01

    Applying an atomic force microscope, we performed a nanomechanical analysis of morphologically normal cervical squamous cells (MNSCs) which are commonly used in cervical screening. Results showed that nanomechanical parameters of MNSCs correlate well with cervical malignancy, and may have potential in cancer screening to provide early diagnosis.Applying an atomic force microscope, we performed a nanomechanical analysis of morphologically normal cervical squamous cells (MNSCs) which are commonly used in cervical screening. Results showed that nanomechanical parameters of MNSCs correlate well with cervical malignancy, and may have potential in cancer screening to provide early diagnosis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03662c

  3. Normal adrenal glands in small cell lung carcinoma: CT-guided biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Pagani, J.J.

    1983-05-01

    Twenty-four small cell lung carcinoma patients with morphologically normal adrenal glands by computed tomographic (CT) criteria underwent percutaneous thin-needle biopsy of their adrenal glands. Of 43 glands biopsied, 29 had adequate cellular material for interpretation. Five (17%) of the 29 glands were positive for metastases; the rest had negative biopsies. This series indicates an approximate 17% false-negative diagnosis rate by CT when staging the adrenal glands in patients with small cell lung carcinoma. It also demonstrates the utility of percutaneous needle biopsy as an investigational tool to further evaluate normal-sized adrenal glands in the oncologic patient.

  4. Radiation effects in silicon and gallium arsenide solar cells using isotropic and normally incident radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Downing, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    Several types of silicon and gallium arsenide solar cells were irradiated with protons with energies between 50 keV and 10 MeV at both normal and isotropic incidence. Damage coefficients for maximum power relative to 10 MeV were derived for these cells for both cases of omni-directional and normal incidence. The damage coefficients for the silicon cells were found to be somewhat lower than those quoted in the Solar Cell Radiation Handbook. These values were used to compute omni-directional damage coefficients suitable for solar cells protected by coverglasses of practical thickness, which in turn were used to compute solar cell degradation in two proton-dominated orbits. In spite of the difference in the low energy proton damage coefficients, the difference between the handbook prediction and the prediction using the newly derived values was negligible. Damage coefficients for GaAs solar cells for short circuit current, open circuit voltage, and maximum power were also computed relative to 10 MeV protons. They were used to predict cell degradation in the same two orbits and in a 5600 nmi orbit. Results show the performance of the GaAs solar cells in these orbits to be superior to that of the Si cells.

  5. FOXP1 Expression in Normal and Neoplastic Erythroid and Myeloid Cells.

    PubMed

    Lovrić, Eva; Pavlov, Katarina Horvat; Korać, Petra; Dominis, Mara

    2015-09-01

    FOXP1 protein was firstly analyzed in normal tissues, and afterwards in different tumor tissues, mainly carcinoma and lymphoma. In B-cell malignancies, its role was well explored; its expression was shown to be connected with disease prognosis in certain B-non Hodgkin lymphomas. In this study, 16 bone marrow trephine samples from patients with no hematopoietic malignancies and 10 samples from peripheral blood of healthy individuals were immunostained with anti-FOXP1 antibody. Positive cells in bone marrows were not only lymphocytes, but also cells that are immunohistochemically positive for glycophorin C or myeloperoxidase. Peripheral blood samples showed no other positive cells, but small round lymphocytes. Additionally 60 samples from patients with myeloid lineage neoplasms were analyzed. 25 samples from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and 35 patients with myeloproliferative disease (MPD) were double immunostained with anti-FOXP1/anti-glycophorin C and anti-FOXP1/anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies. FOXP1 was found to be expressed in 22 cases of MDS and in none of MPD cases. Its expression in MDS was observed mostly in myeloperoxidase positive cells in contrast to gylcophorin C positive cells. Only two cases revealed both myeloperoxidase positive cells and gylcophorin C positive cells expressing FOXP1 transcription factor. Our results show that FOXP1 is present in normal cells of erythroid and myeloid linages and thus suggest its possible role in development of all hematopoetic cells as well as possible involvement in neoplasm development of myeloid disorders. PMID:26898077

  6. A single-molecule force spectroscopy study of the interactions between lectins and carbohydrates on cancer and normal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weidong; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Wang, Hongda

    2013-03-01

    The interaction forces between carbohydrates and lectins were investigated by single-molecule force spectroscopy on both cancer and normal cells. The binding kinetics was also studied, which shows that the carbohydrate-lectin complex on cancer cells is less stable than that on normal cells.The interaction forces between carbohydrates and lectins were investigated by single-molecule force spectroscopy on both cancer and normal cells. The binding kinetics was also studied, which shows that the carbohydrate-lectin complex on cancer cells is less stable than that on normal cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00553d

  7. Genome rearrangement affects RNA virus adaptability on prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Pesko, Kendra; Voigt, Emily A.; Swick, Adam; Morley, Valerie J.; Timm, Collin; Yin, John; Turner, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Gene order is often highly conserved within taxonomic groups, such that organisms with rearranged genomes tend to be less fit than wild type gene orders, and suggesting natural selection favors genome architectures that maximize fitness. But it is unclear whether rearranged genomes hinder adaptability: capacity to evolutionarily improve in a new environment. Negative-sense non-segmented RNA viruses (order Mononegavirales) have specific genome architecture: 3′ UTR – core protein genes – envelope protein genes – RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase gene – 5′ UTR. To test how genome architecture affects RNA virus evolution, we examined vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) variants with the nucleocapsid (N) gene moved sequentially downstream in the genome. Because RNA polymerase stuttering in VSV replication causes greater mRNA production in upstream genes, N gene translocation toward the 5′ end leads to stepwise decreases in N transcription, viral replication and progeny production, and also impacts the activation of type 1 interferon mediated antiviral responses. We evolved VSV gene-order variants in two prostate cancer cell lines: LNCap cells deficient in innate immune response to viral infection, and PC-3 cells that mount an IFN stimulated anti-viral response to infection. We observed that gene order affects phenotypic adaptability (reproductive growth; viral suppression of immune function), especially on PC-3 cells that strongly select against virus infection. Overall, populations derived from the least-fit ancestor (most-altered N position architecture) adapted fastest, consistent with theory predicting populations with low initial fitness should improve faster in evolutionary time. Also, we observed correlated responses to selection, where viruses improved across both hosts, rather than suffer fitness trade-offs on unselected hosts. Whole genomics revealed multiple mutations in evolved variants, some of which were conserved across selective environments for a

  8. Nuclear nano-morphology markers of histologically normal cells detect the "field effect" of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bista, Rajan K; Wang, Pin; Bhargava, Rohit; Uttam, Shikhar; Hartman, Douglas J; Brand, Randall E; Liu, Yang

    2012-08-01

    Accurate detection of breast malignancy from histologically normal cells ("field effect") has significant clinical implications in a broad base of breast cancer management, such as high-risk lesion management, personalized risk assessment, breast tumor recurrence, and tumor margin management. More accurate and clinically applicable tools to detect markers characteristic of breast cancer "field effect" that are able to guide the clinical management are urgently needed. We have recently developed a novel optical microscope, spatial-domain low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy, which extracts the nanoscale structural characteristics of cell nuclei (i.e., nuclear nano-morphology markers), using standard histology slides. In this proof-of-concept study, we present the use of these highly sensitive nuclear nano-morphology markers to identify breast malignancy from histologically normal cells. We investigated the nano-morphology markers from 154 patients with a broad spectrum of breast pathology entities, including normal breast tissue, non-proliferative benign lesions, proliferative lesions (without and with atypia), "malignant-adjacent" normal tissue, and invasive carcinoma. Our results show that the nuclear nano-morphology markers of "malignant-adjacent" normal tissue can detect the presence of invasive breast carcinoma with high accuracy and do not reflect normal aging. Further, we found that a progressive change in nuclear nano-morphology markers that parallel breast cancer risk, suggesting its potential use for risk stratification. These novel nano-morphology markers that detect breast cancerous changes from nanoscale structural characteristics of histologically normal cells could potentially benefit the diagnosis, risk assessment, prognosis, prevention, and treatment of breast cancer.

  9. Dielectric spectroscopy of normal and malignant human lung cells at ultra-high frequencies.

    PubMed

    Egot-Lemaire, S; Pijanka, J; Sulé-Suso, J; Semenov, S

    2009-04-21

    Microwave techniques for biomedical applications aimed at cancer treatment or diagnosis, either by imaging or spectroscopy, are promising. Their use relies on knowledge of the dielectric properties of tissues, especially on a detectable difference between malignant and normal tissues. As most studies investigated the dielectric properties of ex vivo tissues, there is a need for better biophysical understanding of human tissues in their living state. As an essential component of tissues, cells represent valuable objects of analysis. The approach developed in this study is an investigation at cell level. Its aim was to compare human lung normal and malignant cells by dielectric spectroscopy in the beginning of the microwave range, where such information is of substantial biomedical importance. These cells were embedded in small and low-conductivity agarose hydrogels and laid on an open-ended coaxial probe connected to a vector network analyser operated from 200 MHz to 2 GHz. The comparison between normal and malignant cells was drawn using the variation of measured dielectric properties and fitting the measurements using the Maxwell-Wagner equation. Both methods revealed slight differences between the two cell lines, which were statistically significant regarding conductivities of composite gels and cells. PMID:19321925

  10. Expression profile of undifferentiated cell transcription factor 1 in normal and cancerous human epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Mouallif, Mustapha; Albert, Adelin; Zeddou, Mustapha; Ennaji, My Mustapha; Delvenne, Philippe; Guenin, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Undifferentiated cell Transcription Factor 1 (UTF1) is a chromatin-bound protein involved in stem cell differentiation. It was initially reported to be restricted to stem cells or germinal tissues. However, recent work suggests that UTF1 is also expressed in somatic cells and that its expression may increase during carcinogenesis. To further clarify the expression profile of UTF1, we evaluated UTF1 expression levels immunohistochemically in eight normal human epithelia (from breast, prostate, endometrium, bladder, colon, oesophagus, lung and kidney) and their corresponding tumours as well as in several epithelial cell lines. We showed UTF1 staining in normal and tumour epithelial tissues, but with varying intensities according to the tissue location. In vitro analyses also revealed that UTF1 is expressed in somatic epithelial cell lines even in the absence of Oct4A and Sox2, its two main known regulators. The comparison of UTF1 levels in normal and tumoral tissues revealed significant overexpression in endometrial and prostatic adenocarcinomas, whereas lower intensity of the staining was observed in renal and colic tumours, suggesting a potential tissue-specific function of UTF1. Altogether, these results highlight a potential dual role for UTF1, acting either as an oncogene or as a tumour suppressor depending on the tissue. These findings also question its role as a specific marker for stem cells. PMID:24738751

  11. Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Driven Alpha Fetoprotein Expression to Promote Malignant Behaviors of Normal Liver Cells and Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mingyue; Lu, Yan; Li, Wei; Guo, Junli; Dong, Xu; Lin, Bo; Chen, Yi; Xie, Xieju; Li, Mengsen

    2016-01-01

    Background: The infection of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is closely associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC), HBV-X protein(HBx) is able to induce expression of alpha-fetoprotein(AFP) in normal liver cells, and AFP harbors a function to promote malignant transformation of normal liver cells, but the role AFP playing in malignant behaviors of HCC cells is still unclear. Methods: Fifty-six liver tissue samples were collected from the clinical patients through hepatectomy(include normal liver tissues, HBV-related hepatitis liver tissues and HBV-related HCC tissues), and diagnosis of these tissues by pathology section, expression of AFP, Ras and CXCR4 were evidenced by immunohisochemical staining and Western blotting; The proliferation of human normal liver cells line L-02 cells and human hepatoma cells line, HLE cells(non AFP-producing) were performed by MTT method; Repaired capacity of L-02 and HLE cells were compared by wound healing assay; Migration and invasion of these cells were analyzed by Transwell chamber assay; HBx expressed vectors(pcDNA3.1-HBx) were constructed and transfected into L-02 and HLE cells, effects of pcDNA3.1-HBx on the malignant behaviors were also detected by MTT, Transwell chamber assay and the expression of AFP, Ras and CXCR4 were evidenced by Western blotting. Results: we found that expression of AFP, Ras and CXCR4 in HBV-related HCC and lymph nodes metastasis tissues were significantly elevated compared with HBV-related HCC, non metastasis tissues and HBV-related hepatitis tissues; Expression of AFP, Ras and CXCR4 in HBV-related hepatitis tissues were significantly enhanced compared with normal liver tissues; The growth ratio, migratory and invasive ability, expression of AFP, Ras and CXCR4 of the cells were outstanding promoted while L-02 and HLE cells were transfected with pcDNA3.1-HBx vectors. The proliferation ratio, migration and invasion ability, and expression of Ras and CXCR4 were significantly inhibited while

  12. The development of hepatic stellate cells in normal and abnormal human fetuses – an immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Christine K C; Pereira, Tamara N; Pozniak, Katarzyna N; Ramsing, Mette; Vogel, Ida; Ramm, Grant A

    2015-01-01

    The precise embryological origin and development of hepatic stellate cells is not established. Animal studies and observations on human fetuses suggest that they derive from posterior mesodermal cells that migrate via the septum transversum and developing diaphragm to form submesothelial cells beneath the liver capsule, which give rise to mesenchymal cells including hepatic stellate cells. However, it is unclear if these are similar to hepatic stellate cells in adults or if this is the only source of stellate cells. We have studied hepatic stellate cells by immunohistochemistry, in developing human liver from autopsies of fetuses with and without malformations and growth restriction, using cellular Retinol Binding Protein-1 (cRBP-1), Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), and α-Smooth Muscle Actin (αSMA) antibodies, to identify factors that influence their development. We found that hepatic stellate cells expressing cRBP-1 are present from the end of the first trimester of gestation and reduce in density throughout gestation. They appear abnormally formed and variably reduced in number in fetuses with abnormal mesothelial Wilms Tumor 1 (WT1) function, diaphragmatic hernia and in ectopic liver nodules without mesothelium. Stellate cells showed similarities to intravascular cells and their presence in a fetus with diaphragm agenesis suggests they may be derived from circulating stem cells. Our observations suggest circulating stem cells as well as mesothelium can give rise to hepatic stellate cells, and that they require normal mesothelial function for their development. PMID:26265759

  13. A monoclonal antibody reactive with normal and leukemic human myeloid progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J D; Linch, D; Sabbath, K; Larcom, P; Schlossman, S F

    1984-01-01

    Anti-MY9 is an IgG2b murine monoclonal antibody selected for reactivity with immature normal human myeloid cells. The MY9 antigen is expressed by blasts, promyelocytes and myelocytes in the bone marrow, and by monocytes in the peripheral blood. Erythrocytes, lymphocytes and platelets are MY9 negative. All myeloid colony-forming cells (CFU-GM), a fraction of erythroid burst-forming cells (BFU-E) and multipotent progenitors (CFU-GEMM) are MY9 positive. This antigen is further expressed by the leukemic cells of a majority of patients with AML and myeloid CML-BC. Leukemic stem cells (leukemic colony-forming cells, L-CFC) from most patients tested were also MY9 positive. In contrast, MY9 was not detected on lymphocytic leukemias. Anti-MY9 may be a valuable reagent for the purification of hematopoietic colony-forming cells and for the diagnosis of myeloid-lineage leukemias.

  14. Fingerprinting Breast Cancer vs. Normal Mammary Cells by Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jingjing; Sinues, Pablo Martinez-Lozano; Hollmén, Maija; Li, Xue; Detmar, Michael; Zenobi, Renato

    2014-06-01

    There is increasing interest in the development of noninvasive diagnostic methods for early cancer detection, to improve the survival rate and quality of life of cancer patients. Identification of volatile metabolic compounds may provide an approach for noninvasive early diagnosis of malignant diseases. Here we analyzed the volatile metabolic signature of human breast cancer cell lines versus normal human mammary cells. Volatile compounds in the headspace of conditioned culture medium were directly fingerprinted by secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The mass spectra were subsequently treated statistically to identify discriminating features between normal vs. cancerous cell types. We were able to classify different samples by using feature selection followed by principal component analysis (PCA). Additionally, high-resolution mass spectrometry allowed us to propose their chemical structures for some of the most discriminating molecules. We conclude that cancerous cells can release a characteristic odor whose constituents may be used as disease markers.

  15. Iodine Affects Differentiation and Migration Process in Trophoblastic Cells.

    PubMed

    Olivo-Vidal, Zendy Evelyn; Rodríguez, Roció Coutiño; Arroyo-Helguera, Omar

    2016-02-01

    Iodine deficiency is associated with oxidative stress increase and preeclampsia during gestation, suggesting that iodine concentration plays an important role in the normal placenta physiology. The question raised is to analyze the effect of iodine deficiency on oxidative stress, viability, differentiation, and migration process and changes in the expression of differentiation and migration markers. Iodine deprivation was done using potassium perchlorate (KCLO4) to block sodium iodide symporter (NIS) transporter and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid DIDS to inhibit pendrine (PEN) transport for 3-48 h. Then trophoblast cells were treated with low iodine doses of 5-500 μM and high iodine doses of 100-5000 μM. Oxidative stress, viability, and human chorionic gonadotropin (hGC) were measured by colorimetric methods. Migration throphoblast cells were evaluated by both wound healing and Boyden chamber assays. Changes in mRNA expression were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. Iodine deprivation induces a significant increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS), viability, and migration process vs control cells. We found a significant overregulation in the mRNA's peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-gamma), Snail, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) mRNA's in cells deprived of iodine, as well as a down glial cell missing-1 (GCM-1) regulation, hGC, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A), and E-cadherin mRNA expression. The expression of hypoxic induction factor alpha (HIFα) mRNA does not change with iodine deprivation. In cells deprived of iodine, supplementing low iodine doses (5-500 μM) does not induce any significant changes in viability. However, ROS and migration process were decreased, although we found an increased human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) secretion as a differentiation marker. In addition, we found that PPAR-gamma, Snail, and MPP-9 mRNAs expression are downregulated with low iodine doses, in contrast with GCM-1, PAPP

  16. Iron affects the structure of cell membrane molecular models.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Martínez, F; Cárdenas, H; Grzyb, J; Strzałka, K

    2005-03-01

    The effects of Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) on molecular models of biomembranes were investigated. These consisted of bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and of dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), classes of phospholipids located in the outer and inner moieties of cell membranes, respectively. X-ray studies showed that very low concentrations of Fe(3+) affected DMPC organization and 10(-3)M induced a total loss of its multilamellar periodic stacking. Experiments carried out with Fe(2+) on DMPC showed weaker effects than those induced by Fe(3+) ions. Similar experiments were performed on DMPE bilayers. Fe(3+) from 10(-7)M up to 10(-4)M had practically no effect on DMPE structure. However, 10(-3)M Fe(3+) induced a deep perturbation of the multilamellar structure of DMPE. However, 10(-3)M Fe(2+) had no effect on DMPE organization practically. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements also revealed different effects of Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) on the phase transition and other thermal properties of the examined lipids. In conclusion, the results obtained indicate that iron ions interact with phospholipid bilayers perturbing their structures. These findings are consistent with the observation that iron ions change cell membrane fluidity and, therefore, affect its functions. PMID:15752465

  17. Differential metabolism of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and estrogen conjugates by normal or malignant AXC/SSh rat prostate cells and effects of these steroid conjugates on cancer cell proliferation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Huot, R I; Shain, S A

    1988-06-01

    Normal AXC/SSh rat ventral prostate and clonally derived AXC/SSh rat prostate cancer cells were evaluated for ability to metabolize estrone sulfate (E1S), estrone glucuronide (E1G), or dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS). Both normal and malignant prostate cells converted E1S to estrone. Neither normal nor malignant prostate cells had significant ability to metabolize DHEAS to DHEA, indicating differential specificity of prostate sulfatases(s) for estrogen and androgen sulfates. Both normal and neoplastic prostate cells possess beta-glucuronidase which hydrolyzed E1G to estrone. To assess potential physiologic consequences of these enzymatic activities, we determined the effect of steroid conjugates on in vitro proliferation of selected clonal lines of AXC/SSh rat prostate cancer cells. DHEAS, 10(-6) to 10(-9) M in decade intervals, did not affect in vitro proliferation of AXC/SSh prostate cancer cells; however, 10(-5) M DHEAS decreased in vitro proliferation of these cells. Neither E1S nor E1G, 10(-5) to 10(-9) M in decade intervals, affected in vitro proliferation of AXC/SSh prostate cancer cells. These findings suggest that low residual levels of steroid conjugates, which are not removed by charcoal stripping of serum, do not affect demonstrated in vitro androgen modulation of AXC/SSh rat prostate cancer cell proliferation (Cancer Res. 46, 3775-3781, 1986).

  18. Mesenchymal Stem and Progenitor Cells in Normal and Dysplastic Hematopoiesis—Masters of Survival and Clonality?

    PubMed Central

    Pleyer, Lisa; Valent, Peter; Greil, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are malignant hematopoietic stem cell disorders that have the capacity to progress to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Accumulating evidence suggests that the altered bone marrow (BM) microenvironment in general, and in particular the components of the stem cell niche, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and their progeny, play a pivotal role in the evolution and propagation of MDS. We here present an overview of the role of MSCs in the pathogenesis of MDS, with emphasis on cellular interactions in the BM microenvironment and related stem cell niche concepts. MSCs have potent immunomodulatory capacities and communicate with diverse immune cells, but also interact with various other cellular components of the microenvironment as well as with normal and leukemic stem and progenitor cells. Moreover, compared to normal MSCs, MSCs in MDS and AML often exhibit altered gene expression profiles, an aberrant phenotype, and abnormal functional properties. These alterations supposedly contribute to the “reprogramming” of the stem cell niche into a disease-permissive microenvironment where an altered immune system, abnormal stem cell niche interactions, and an impaired growth control lead to disease progression. The current article also reviews molecular targets that play a role in such cellular interactions and possibilities to interfere with abnormal stem cell niche interactions by using specific targeted drugs. PMID:27355944

  19. Mesenchymal Stem and Progenitor Cells in Normal and Dysplastic Hematopoiesis-Masters of Survival and Clonality?

    PubMed

    Pleyer, Lisa; Valent, Peter; Greil, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are malignant hematopoietic stem cell disorders that have the capacity to progress to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Accumulating evidence suggests that the altered bone marrow (BM) microenvironment in general, and in particular the components of the stem cell niche, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and their progeny, play a pivotal role in the evolution and propagation of MDS. We here present an overview of the role of MSCs in the pathogenesis of MDS, with emphasis on cellular interactions in the BM microenvironment and related stem cell niche concepts. MSCs have potent immunomodulatory capacities and communicate with diverse immune cells, but also interact with various other cellular components of the microenvironment as well as with normal and leukemic stem and progenitor cells. Moreover, compared to normal MSCs, MSCs in MDS and AML often exhibit altered gene expression profiles, an aberrant phenotype, and abnormal functional properties. These alterations supposedly contribute to the "reprogramming" of the stem cell niche into a disease-permissive microenvironment where an altered immune system, abnormal stem cell niche interactions, and an impaired growth control lead to disease progression. The current article also reviews molecular targets that play a role in such cellular interactions and possibilities to interfere with abnormal stem cell niche interactions by using specific targeted drugs. PMID:27355944

  20. Anti-galactose antibodies do not bind to normal human red cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, M.M.B.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigated the possibility that senescent cell IgG might have an anti-galactose (anti-gal) specificity as suggested by others. Anti-gal was isolated from normal human serum with ..cap alpha.. melibiose-agarose. The assays used were hemagglutination, rosetting, phagocytosis, and /sup 125/I protein A binding assay, immunoblotting, and glycine/HCL, pH 2.3, versus sugar elutions. Results revealed binding of anti-gal to rabbit but not human RBC. Immunoblotting of anti-gal revealed labeling of approx.29 bands in rabbit red cell membranes and no labeling of autologous human red cell membranes. The authors attempted to inhibit binding of anti-gal with various sugars. Melibiose caused enhancement rather than inhibition of agglutination when used at concentrations reported by previous investigators to cause inhibition. Neither ..cap alpha.. melibiose or galactose caused inhibition of phagocytosis of senescent cells. Senescent cell IgG was not displaced from freshly isolated old red cells by incubation with melibiose or galactose as determined by an /sup 125/I protein A binding assay. The authors were also unable to elute IgG from stored red cells with galactose. The authors conclude that senescent cell IgG does not have an anti-galactose specificity. The authors were unable to demonstrate an anti-gal antibody to normal human red cells.

  1. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to the cystic fibrosis gene inhibits anion transport in normal cultured sweat duct cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sorscher, E.J.; Kirk, K.L.; Weaver, M.L.; Jilling, T.; Blalock, J.E.; LeBoeuf, R.D. )

    1991-09-01

    The authors have tested the hypothesis that the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene product, called the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), mediates anion transport in normal human sweat duct cells. Sweat duct cells in primary culture were treated with oligodeoxynucleotides that were antisense to the CFTR gene transcript in order to block the expression of the wild-type CFTR. Anion transport in CFTR transcript antisense-treated cells was then assessed with a halide-specific dye, 6-methoxy-N-(3-sulfopropryl)quinolinium, and fluorescent digital imaging microscopy to monitor halide influx and efflux from single sweat duct cells. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment for 24 hr virtually abolished Cl{sup {minus}} transport in sweat duct cells compared with untreated cells or control cells treated with sense oligodeoxynucleotides. Br{sup {minus}} uptake into sweat duct cells was also blocked after a 24-hr CFTR transcript antisense treatments, but not after treatments for only 4 hr. Lower concentrations of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides were less effective at inhibiting Cl{sup {minus}} transport. These results indicate that oligodeoxynucleotides that are antisense to CFTR transcript inhibit sweat duct Cl{sup {minus}} permeability in both a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. This approach provides evidence that inhibition of the expression of the wild-type CFTR gene in a normal, untransfected epithelial cell results in an inhibition of Cl{sup {minus}} permeability.

  2. Cellular differentiation hierarchies in normal and culture-adapted human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Enver, Tariq; Soneji, Shamit; Joshi, Chirag; Brown, John; Iborra, Francisco; Orntoft, Torben; Thykjaer, Thomas; Maltby, Edna; Smith, Kath; Abu Dawud, Raed; Jones, Mark; Matin, Maryam; Gokhale, Paul; Draper, Jonathan; Andrews, Peter W

    2005-11-01

    Human embryonic stem cell (HESC) lines vary in their characteristics and behaviour not only because they are derived from genetically outbred populations, but also because they may undergo progressive adaptation upon long-term culture in vitro. Such adaptation may reflect selection of variants with altered propensity for survival and retention of an undifferentiated phenotype. Elucidating the mechanisms involved will be important for understanding normal self-renewal and commitment to differentiation and for validating the safety of HESC-based therapy. We have investigated this process of adaptation at the cellular and molecular levels through a comparison of early passage (normal) and late passage (adapted) sublines of a single HESC line, H7. To account for spontaneous differentiation that occurs in HESC cultures, we sorted cells for SSEA3, which marks undifferentiated HESC. We show that the gene expression programmes of the adapted cells partially reflected their aberrant karyotype, but also resulted from a failure in X-inactivation, emphasizing the importance in adaptation of karyotypically silent epigenetic changes. On the basis of growth potential, ability to re-initiate ES cultures and global transcription profiles, we propose a cellular differentiation hierarchy for maintenance cultures of HESC: normal SSEA3+ cells represent pluripotent stem cells. Normal SSEA3- cells have exited this compartment, but retain multilineage differentiation potential. However, adapted SSEA3+ and SSEA3- cells co-segregate within the stem cell territory, implying that adaptation reflects an alteration in the balance between self-renewal and differentiation. As this balance is also an essential feature of cancer, the mechanisms of culture adaptation may mirror those of oncogenesis and tumour progression. PMID:16159889

  3. Sub-cellular force microscopy in single normal and cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Babahosseini, H.; Carmichael, B.; Strobl, J.S.; Mahmoodi, S.N.; Agah, M.

    2015-08-07

    This work investigates the biomechanical properties of sub-cellular structures of breast cells using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure where the Generalized Maxwell model is applied to experimental data from AFM stress-relaxation tests to extract the elastic modulus, the apparent viscosity, and the relaxation time of sub-cellular structures. The triple-layered modeling results allow for determination and comparison of the biomechanical properties of the three major sub-cellular structures between normal and cancerous cells: the up plasma membrane/actin cortex, the mid cytoplasm/nucleus, and the low nuclear/integrin sub-domains. The results reveal that the sub-domains become stiffer and significantly more viscous with depth, regardless of cell type. In addition, there is a decreasing trend in the average elastic modulus and apparent viscosity of the all corresponding sub-cellular structures from normal to cancerous cells, which becomes most remarkable in the deeper sub-domain. The presented modeling in this work constitutes a unique AFM-based experimental framework to study the biomechanics of sub-cellular structures. - Highlights: • The cells are modeled as a triple-layered structure using Generalized Maxwell model. • The sub-domains include membrane/cortex, cytoplasm/nucleus, and nuclear/integrin. • Biomechanics of corresponding sub-domains are compared among normal and cancer cells. • Viscoelasticity of sub-domains show a decreasing trend from normal to cancer cells. • The decreasing trend becomes most significant in the deeper sub-domain.

  4. Spectral Cytopathology of Cervical Samples: Detecting Cellular Abnormalities in Cytologically Normal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Jennifer M.; Bird, Benjamin; Papamarkakis, Kostas; Miljković, Miloš; Bedrossian, Kristi; Laver, Nora; Diem, Max

    2010-01-01

    Aim Spectral Cytopathology (SCP) is a novel spectroscopic method for objective and unsupervised classification of individual exfoliated cells. The limitations of conventional cytopathology are well-recognized within the pathology community. In SCP, cellular differentiation is made by observing molecular changes in the nucleus and the cytoplasm, which may or may not produce morphological changes detectable by conventional cytopathology. This proof of concept study demonstrates SCP’s potential as an enhancing tool for cytopathologists by aiding in the accurate and reproducible diagnosis of cells in all states of disease. Method Infrared spectra are collected from cervical cells deposited onto reflectively coated glass slides. Each cell has a corresponding infrared spectrum that describes its unique biochemical composition. Spectral data are processed and analyzed by an unsupervised chemometric algorithm, Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Results In this blind study, cervical samples are classified by analyzing the spectra of morphologically normal looking squamous cells from normal samples and samples diagnosed by conventional cytopathology with low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL). SCP discriminated cytopathological diagnoses amongst twelve different cervical samples with a high degree of specificity and sensitivity. SCP also correlated two samples with abnormal spectral changes: these samples had a normal cytopathological diagnosis but had a history of abnormal cervical cytology. The spectral changes observed in the morphologically normal looking cells are most likely due to an infection with human papillomavirus, HPV. HPV DNA testing was conducted on five additional samples, and SCP accurately differentiated these samples by their HPV status. Conclusions SCP tracks biochemical variations in cells that are consistent with the onset of disease. HPV has been implicated as the cause of these changes detected spectroscopically. SCP does not depend on

  5. Soluble CD14 is essential for lipopolysaccharide-dependent activation of human intestinal mast cells from macroscopically normal as well as Crohn's disease tissue.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Sibylle A; Zacheja, Steffi; Schäffer, Michael; Feilhauer, Katharina; Bischoff, Stephan C; Lorentz, Axel

    2014-10-01

    Mast cells are now considered sentinels in immunity. Given their location underneath the gastrointestinal barrier, mast cells are entrusted with the task of tolerating commensal microorganisms and eliminating potential pathogens in the gut microbiota. The aim of our study was to analyse the responsiveness of mast cells isolated from macroscopically normal and Crohn's disease-affected intestine to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To determine the LPS-mediated signalling, human intestinal mast cells were treated with LPS alone or in combination with soluble CD14 due to their lack of surface CD14 expression. LPS alone failed to stimulate cytokine expression in human intestinal mast cells from both macroscopically normal and Crohn's disease tissue. Upon administration of LPS and soluble CD14, there was a dose- and time-dependent induction of cytokine and chemokine expression. Moreover, CXCL8 and interleukin-1β protein expression was induced in response to activation with LPS plus soluble CD14. Expression of cytokines and chemokines was at similar levels in mast cells from macroscopically normal and Crohn's disease-affected intestine after LPS/soluble CD14 treatment. In conclusion, human intestinal mast cells appear to tolerate LPS per se. The LPS-mediated activation in mast cells may be provoked by soluble CD14 distributed by other LPS-triggered cells at the gastrointestinal barrier.

  6. Cell death during the postnatal morphogenesis of the normal rabbit kidney and in experimental renal polycystosis.

    PubMed Central

    García-Porrero, J A; Ojeda, J L; Hurlé, J M

    1978-01-01

    We have studied, by means of optic and electron microscopy, the normal and abnormal cell death that takes place during the postnatal morphogenesis of rabbit kidney, and in the experimental renal polycystosis produced by methylprednisolone acetate. In the normal kidney intertubular cell death can be observed during the first 20 days of the postnatal development. However, cell death in the normal metanephric blastema is a very rare event. In the polycystic kidney numerous dead cells can be seen between the third and forty eighth days after injection. The topography and morphology of the dead cells depend on the stage in the evolution of the disease. In the 'stage of renal immaturity', dying and dead cells are present in the nephrogenic tissue, in the dilating collecting tubules and in the intertubular spaces. In this stage the cellular pathology is essentially nuclear. In the stage of tubular cysts, the dead cells are mostly located in the walls of cysts, with some dead cells, but mostly cellular debris in their lumina. At this stage the cellular pathology is basically cytoplasmic. The dead cells are eventually digested by what appear to be phagocytes of tubular epithelial origin. It is suggested that cell death is an important factor in the evolution of the lesions of renal polycystosis induced by corticosteroids, and probably in the initiation of the pathological process as well. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 PMID:670065

  7. Ethanolic Extracts of California Mugwort (Artemisia douglasiana Besser) Are Cytotoxic against Normal and Cancerous Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Somaweera, Himali; Lai, Gary C.; Blackeye, Rachel; Littlejohn, Beverly; Kirksey, Justine; Aguirre, Richard M.; LaPena, Vince; Pasqua, Anna; Hintz, Mary McCarthy

    2013-01-01

    California mugwort (Artemisia douglasiana Besser) is used by many tribes throughout California to treat a variety of conditions, including colds, allergies, and pain. California mugwort is also utilized as women’s medicine. Its use is on the rise outside of Native communities, often without the guidance of a traditional healer or experienced herbalist. Because it has been shown to have antiproliferative activity against plant and animal cells, we investigated whether California mugwort extracts have an effect on normal human cells as well as estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and estrogen receptor negative (ER−) human breast cancer cells. Ethanolic and aqueous extracts of A. douglasiana leaves were tested for cytotoxicity against unstimulated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC), as well as against an ER+ human breast cancer cell line (BT-474) and an ER− human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231). An ethanolic leaf extract killed hPBMC, BT-474, and MDA-MB-231 cells with IC50 values of 23.6 ± 0.3, 27 ± 5, and 37 ± 4 μg/ml, respectively. An aqueous extract killed hPBMC with an IC50 value of 60 ± 10 μg/ml, but had no effect on the two cancer cell lines at concentrations up to 100 μg/ml. The results of this study indicate that the cytotoxicity of California mugwort extends to normal human cells, as well as cancerous cells. Therefore, until further is known about the safety of this medicine, caution should be taken when consuming extracts of California mugwort, whether as a tincture or as a tea. PMID:24073389

  8. Positive and negative aggregation responses to cultured human tumor cell lines among different normal individuals.

    PubMed

    Bastida, E; Ordinas, A; Jamieson, G A

    1982-01-01

    Platelets from approximately 50% (7/16) of normal individuals have been shown to have greater sensitivity to aggregation induced by critical threshold concentrations of three human tumor cell lines. These results may have implications for the genetics and epidemiology of human neoplastic disease.

  9. Comparative evaluation of cancer stem cell markers in normal pancreas and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vizio, Barbara; Mauri, Francesco A; Prati, Adriana; Trivedi, Pritesh; Giacobino, Alice; Novarino, Anna; Satolli, Maria Antonietta; Ciuffreda, Libero; Camandona, Michele; Gasparri, Guido; Bellone, Graziella

    2012-01-01

    Chemoresistance and self-renewal of cancer stem cells (CSC), found in many tumors including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), are believed to underlie tumor mass regrowth. The distribution of cells carrying the putative stem-cell markers CD133, Nestin, Notch1-4, Jagged1 and 2, ABCG2 and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH1) was assessed immunohistochemically using PDAC and normal pancreas tissue microarrays. The immunoreactivity was semi-quantitatively graded against the normal pancreas and was correlated with the differentiation grade and disease stage. No statistical significant differences were found between normal pancreas and PDAC in the expression of Nestin, Notch1, 3 and 4, ABCG2 or ALDH1. Notch2 and Jagged1 and 2 expression were increased in PDAC. CD133-positive cells were above-normal in PDAC, but the difference was not statistically significant. Nestin, Notch1-4, Jagged1, ABCG2 and ALDH1 immunostaining scores were not correlated with tumor grade or disease stage. CD133 and Notch2 expression was significantly inversely correlated with tumor grade, but not disease stage. Notch3 immunostaining positively correlated with tumor stage, but not with differentiation grade. Jagged2 protein expression correlated inversely with disease stage, but not with tumor grade. From the clinical standpoint, improved delineation of the tumor CSC signature, putatively responsible for tumor initiation and recurrence after initial response to chemotherapy, may offer novel therapeutic targets for this highly lethal cancer.

  10. Ghrelin modulates testicular germ cells apoptosis and proliferation in adult normal rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kheradmand, Arash; Dezfoulian, Omid; Alirezaei, Masoud; Rasoulian, Bahram

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spermatogenesis is closely associated with the balance between germ cells proliferation and apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Numerous studies have documented the direct action of ghrelin in the modulation of apoptosis in different cell types. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ghrelin may be considered as a modulator of spermatogenesis in normal adult rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ghrelin may be potentially implicated for abnormal spermatogenesis in some testicular germ cell tumors. -- Abstract: Under normal condition in the most mammals, spermatogenesis is closely associated with the balance between germ cells proliferation and apoptosis. The present study was designed to determine the effects of ghrelin treatment on in vivo quality and quantity expression of apoptosis and proliferation specific indices in rat testicular germ cells. Twenty eight adult normal rats were subdivided into equal control and treatment groups. Treatment group received 3 nmol of ghrelin as subcutaneous injection for 30 consecutive days or vehicle to the control animals. The rats from each group (n = 7) were killed on days 10 and 30 and their testes were taken for immunocytochemical evaluation and caspase-3 assay. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that the accumulations of Bax and PCNA peptides are generally more prominent in spermatocytes and spermatogonia of both groups. Likewise, the mean percentage of immunoreactive spermatocytes against Bax increased (P < 0.01) in the ghrelin-treated group on day 10, while despite of 30% increment in the Bax level of spermatocytes in the treated rats on day 30, however, it was not statistically significant. During the experimental period, only a few spermatogonia represented Bax expression and the changes of Bax immunolabling cells were negligible upon ghrelin treatment. Likewise, there were immunostaining cells against Bcl-2 in each germ cell neither in the control nor in the treated animals. In fact

  11. Normal Cellular Prion Protein Protects against Manganese-induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptotic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Christopher J.; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Saetveit, Nathan J.; Houk, Robert. S.; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2012-01-01

    The normal prion protein is abundantly expressed in the CNS, but its biological function remains unclear. The prion protein has octapeptide repeat regions that bind to several divalent metals, suggesting that the prion proteins may alter the toxic effect of environmental neurotoxic metals. In the present study, we systematically examined whether prion protein modifies the neurotoxicity of manganese (Mn) by comparing the effect of Mn on mouse neural cells expressing prion protein (PrPC -cells) and prion-knockout (PrPKO -cells). Exposure to Mn (10 μM-1 mM) for 24 hr produced a dose-dependent cytotoxic response in both PrPC -cells and PrPKO -cells. Interestingly, PrPC -cells (EC50 117.6μM) were more resistant to Mn-induced cytotoxicity, as compared to PrPKO -cells (EC50 59.9μM), suggesting a protective role for PrPC against Mn neurotoxicity. Analysis of intracellular Mn levels showed less Mn accumulation in PrPC -cells as compared to PrPKO -cells. Furthermore, Mn-induced mitochondrial depolarization and ROS generation were significantly attenuated in PrPC -cells as compared to PrPKO -cells. Measurement of antioxidant status revealed similar basal levels of glutathione (GSH) in PrPC -cells and PrPKO -cells; however, Mn treatment caused greater depletion of GSH in PrPKO -cells. Mn-induced mitochondrial depolarization and ROS production were followed by time- and dose-dependent activation of the apoptotic cell death cascade involving caspase-9 and -3. Notably, DNA fragmentation induced by both Mn treatment and oxidative stress-inducer hydrogen peroxide (100μM) was significantly suppressed in PrPC -cells as compared to PrPKO -cells. Together, these results demonstrate that prion protein interferes with divalent metal Mn uptake and protects against Mn-induced oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death. PMID:17483122

  12. Comparison of stress-induced PRINS gene expression in normal human keratinocytes and HaCaT cells.

    PubMed

    Bari, Lilla; Bacsa, Sarolta; Sonkoly, Eniko; Bata-Csörgo, Zsuzsanna; Kemény, Lajos; Dobozy, Attila; Széll, Márta

    2011-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects approximately 2-4% of the population. We recently described a novel non-coding RNA, psoriasis susceptibility related RNA gene induced by stress (PRINS), that was overexpressed in non-lesional psoriatic epidermis, and its expression was induced by various stress factors such as serum starvation, contact inhibition, ultraviolet (UV)-B irradiation, viral infection and translational inhibition in HaCaT cells. In the present work we set out to compare the stress and microbial agent-induced PRINS expression in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs) and HaCaT cells. Since nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is involved in the cellular stress response, we sought to explore whether there is a connection between the NF-κB and PRINS-mediated signal transduction pathways in NHKs and HaCaT cells. We found that the PRINS expression responded differentially to various stress signals and microbial agents in HaCaT cells and in NHKs: after translational inhibition and UV-B treatment, similar induction of PRINS expression occurred with different time courses while after microbial agent treatment, the PRINS expression was significantly induced in HaCaT cells, whereas we could not detect similar changes in NHKs. To explore whether the known NF-κB abnormalities in HaCaT cells could be related to this differential PRINS expression, we silenced the PRINS gene expression with small interfering RNA (siRNA) in both HaCaT cells and in NHKs and monitored NF-κB signal transduction after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. Silencing of PRINS had no effect on LPS-induced NF-κB activity either in HaCaT cells or in NHKs. Our results indicate that PRINS probably affects keratinocytes functions independently of NF-κB signalling. PMID:21750967

  13. The Magea gene cluster regulates male germ cell apoptosis without affecting the fertility in mice.

    PubMed

    Hou, Siyuan; Xian, Li; Shi, Peiliang; Li, Chaojun; Lin, Zhaoyu; Gao, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    While apoptosis is essential for male germ cell development, improper activation of apoptosis in the testis can affect spermatogenesis and cause reproduction defects. Members of the MAGE-A (melanoma antigen family A) gene family are frequently clustered in mammalian genomes and are exclusively expressed in the testes of normal animals but abnormally activated in a wide variety of cancers. We investigated the potential roles of these genes in spermatogenesis by generating a mouse model with a 210-kb genomic deletion encompassing six members of the Magea gene cluster (Magea1, Magea2, Magea3, Magea5, Magea6 and Magea8). Male mice carrying the deletion displayed smaller testes from 2 months old with a marked increase in apoptotic germ cells in the first wave of spermatogenesis. Furthermore, we found that Magea genes prevented stress-induced spermatogenic apoptosis after N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) treatment during the adult stage. Mechanistically, deletion of the Magea gene cluster resulted in a dramatic increase in apoptotic germ cells, predominantly spermatocytes, with activation of p53 and induction of Bax in the testes. These observations demonstrate that the Magea genes are crucial in maintaining normal testicular size and protecting germ cells from excessive apoptosis under genotoxic stress. PMID:27226137

  14. The Magea gene cluster regulates male germ cell apoptosis without affecting the fertility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Siyuan; Xian, Li; Shi, Peiliang; Li, Chaojun; Lin, Zhaoyu; Gao, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    While apoptosis is essential for male germ cell development, improper activation of apoptosis in the testis can affect spermatogenesis and cause reproduction defects. Members of the MAGE-A (melanoma antigen family A) gene family are frequently clustered in mammalian genomes and are exclusively expressed in the testes of normal animals but abnormally activated in a wide variety of cancers. We investigated the potential roles of these genes in spermatogenesis by generating a mouse model with a 210-kb genomic deletion encompassing six members of the Magea gene cluster (Magea1, Magea2, Magea3, Magea5, Magea6 and Magea8). Male mice carrying the deletion displayed smaller testes from 2 months old with a marked increase in apoptotic germ cells in the first wave of spermatogenesis. Furthermore, we found that Magea genes prevented stress-induced spermatogenic apoptosis after N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) treatment during the adult stage. Mechanistically, deletion of the Magea gene cluster resulted in a dramatic increase in apoptotic germ cells, predominantly spermatocytes, with activation of p53 and induction of Bax in the testes. These observations demonstrate that the Magea genes are crucial in maintaining normal testicular size and protecting germ cells from excessive apoptosis under genotoxic stress. PMID:27226137

  15. Leptin and Adiponectin Modulate the Self-renewal of Normal Human Breast Epithelial Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Esper, Raymond M; Dame, Michael; McClintock, Shannon; Holt, Peter R; Dannenberg, Andrew J; Wicha, Max S; Brenner, Dean E

    2015-12-01

    Multiple mechanisms are likely to account for the link between obesity and increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Two adipokines, leptin and adiponectin, are of particular interest due to their opposing biologic functions and associations with breast cancer risk. In the current study, we investigated the effects of leptin and adiponectin on normal breast epithelial stem cells. Levels of leptin in human adipose explant-derived conditioned media positively correlated with the size of the normal breast stem cell pool. In contrast, an inverse relationship was found for adiponectin. Moreover, a strong linear relationship was observed between the leptin/adiponectin ratio in adipose conditioned media and breast stem cell self-renewal. Consistent with these findings, exogenous leptin stimulated whereas adiponectin suppressed breast stem cell self-renewal. In addition to local in-breast effects, circulating factors, including leptin and adiponectin, may contribute to the link between obesity and breast cancer. Increased levels of leptin and reduced amounts of adiponectin were found in serum from obese compared with age-matched lean postmenopausal women. Interestingly, serum from obese women increased stem cell self-renewal by 30% compared with only 7% for lean control serum. Taken together, these data suggest a plausible explanation for the obesity-driven increase in postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Leptin and adiponectin may function as both endocrine and paracrine/juxtacrine factors to modulate the size of the normal stem cell pool. Interventions that disrupt this axis and thereby normalize breast stem cell self-renewal could reduce the risk of breast cancer.

  16. The furano norclerodane diterpenoid disobulbin-D induces apoptosis in normal human liver L-02 cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Min; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Ruan, Jinlan; Tan, Xinqi; Liu, Jin; Wang, Cuifen; Zha, Xiao Ming; Zhang, Luyong

    2012-09-01

    Disobulbin-D (DBD), a hepatotoxic furano norclerodane diterpenoid, was isolated by bio-guided fractionation from the rhizome of Dioscorea bulbifera L. In working toward elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanisms of DBD toxicity, we treated normal human liver cell line L-02 cells with DBD in vitro and evaluated its toxicity in terms of cell viability, morphologic changes, induction of apoptosis/necrosis, and caspase 3 activity. The viability of L-02 cells was inhibited by DBD in a concentration and time-dependent manner. Apoptosis was supported by the Annexin V and propidium iodide assay, Hoechst 33258 staining, and the occurrence of a sub-G(1) peak. DBD can cause an increase in caspase 3 activity, and pretreatment with Ac-DEVD-CHO blocked cell death and attenuated the apoptosis, showing that DBD-induced L-02 cell apoptosis is caspase 3-dependent. These results suggest that the effects of DBD on the growth of normal human liver L-02 cells may be due to its induction of cell apoptosis, which may also explain the toxicity observed in the plants containing furano clerodane diterpenoids. PMID:21211949

  17. Comparison of gene expression profiling between malignant and normal plasma cells with oligonucleotide arrays.

    PubMed

    De Vos, John; Thykjaer, Thomas; Tarte, Karin; Ensslen, Matthias; Raynaud, Pierre; Requirand, Guilhem; Pellet, Florence; Pantesco, Véronique; Rème, Thierry; Jourdan, Michel; Rossi, Jean-François; Ørntoft, Torben; Klein, Bernard

    2002-10-01

    The DNA microarray technology enables the identification of the large number of genes involved in the complex deregulation of cell homeostasis taking place in cancer. Using Affymetrix microarrays, we have compared the gene expression profiles of highly purified malignant plasma cells from nine patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and eight myeloma cell lines to those of highly purified nonmalignant plasma cells (eight samples) obtained by in vitro differentiation of peripheral blood B cells. Two unsupervised clustering algorithms classified these 25 samples into two distinct clusters: a malignant plasma cell cluster and a normal plasma cell cluster. Two hundred and fifty genes were significantly up-regulated and 159 down-regulated in malignant plasma samples compared to normal plasma samples. For some of these genes, an overexpression or downregulation of the encoded protein was confirmed (cyclin D1, c-myc, BMI-1, cystatin c, SPARC, RB). Two genes overexpressed in myeloma cells (ABL and cystathionine beta synthase) code for enzymes that could be a therapeutic target with specific drugs. These data provide a new insight into the understanding of myeloma disease and prefigure that the development of DNA microarray could help to develop an 'à la carte' treatment in cancer disease.

  18. Estrogen Receptor-Positive Proliferating Cells in the Normal and Precancerous Breast

    PubMed Central

    Shoker, Balvinder S.; Jarvis, Christine; Clarke, Robert B.; Anderson, Elizabeth; Hewlett, Joanne; Davies, Michael P. A.; Sibson, D. Ross; Sloane, John P.

    1999-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that epithelial cell expression of the estrogen receptor (ER) and that of the proliferation-associated marker Ki-67 are almost mutually exclusive in the normal premenopausal human breast but that coexpression frequently occurs in estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancers. This coexpression may indicate disordered expression of ER in the cell cycle or failure to suppress division of ER+ cells and could be important in neoplastic transformation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether in situ proliferations known to be associated with different levels of risk for developing breast cancer contain these coexpressing cells and, if so, the stage at which they occur. We found that ER+ proliferating cells were rare in premenopausal lobules but increased with age in the normal breast. There was no difference in nonlesional tissue between cancerous and noncancerous breasts. The percentage of dual-expressing cells was significantly increased, however, in all of the in situ proliferations and correlated positively with the level of risk of developing breast cancer. We suggest that development of at least some human breast cancers is associated with increasing failure to down-regulate ER as cells enter the cycle or to suppress division of ER+ cells. The mechanism may involve the loss of a tumor suppresser gene. PMID:10595909

  19. Investigating the backscattering characteristics of individual normal and cancerous cells based on experimentally determined three-dimensional refractive index distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Wei-Chen; Su, Jing-Wei; Chang, Chih-Chiang; Sung, Kung-Bin

    2012-12-01

    The progression of epithelial dysplasia is accompanied by changes of sub-cellular structures which alter light scattering, particularly backscattering, properties of epithelial cells. In this study, we quantified the refractive index (RI) distributions of normal and cancerous epithelial cells of skin and oral cavity using digital holographic microtomography and investigated the backscattering characteristics of the cells using finite-difference time-domain simulations. The results show that cancerous cells present higher average values of nuclear and nucleolar RI and a higher standard deviation of cytoplasmic RI than normal cells. Both the total scattering and backscattering cross-sections of the cancerous cells are significantly higher than those of the normal cells.

  20. Adipocyte differentiation influences the proliferation and migration of normal and tumoral breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Creydt, Virginia Pistone; Sacca, Paula Alejandra; Tesone, Amelia Julieta; Vidal, Luciano; Calvo, Juan Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Stromal tissue regulates the development and differentiation of breast epithelial cells, with adipocytes being the main stromal cell type. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of adipocyte differentiation on proliferation and migration, as well as to assess the activity of heparanase and metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), in normal (NMuMG) and tumoral (LM3) murine breast epithelial cells. NMuMG and LM3 cells were grown on irradiated 3T3-L1 cells (stromal support, SS) at various degrees of differentiation [preadipocytes (preA), poorly differentiated adipocytes (pDA) and mature adipocytes (MA)] and/or were incubated in the presence of conditioned medium (CM) derived from each of these three types of differentiated cells. Cells grown on a plastic support or in fresh medium served as the controls. Cell proliferation was measured with a commercial colorimetric kit, and the motility of the epithelial cells was evaluated by means of a wound-healing assay. Heparanase activity was assessed by quantifying heparin degradation, and the expression of MMP-9 was determined using Western blotting. The results indicate that cell proliferation was increased after 24 and 48 h in the NMuMG and LM3 cells grown on preA, pDA and MA SS. In the NMuMG cells cultured on SS in the presence of all three types of CM, proliferation was enhanced. LM3 cell migration was increased in the presence of all three types of CM and in cells grown on preA SS. Heparanase activity was increased in the NMuMG cells incubated with all three types of CM, and in the LM3 cells incubated with the CM from pDA and MA. Both the NMuMG and LM3 cell lines presented basal expression of MMP-9; however, a significant increase in MMP-9 expression was observed in the LM3 cells incubated with each of the three types of CM. In conclusion, adipocyte differentiation influences normal and tumoral breast epithelial cell proliferation and migration. Heparanase and MMP-9 appear to be involved in this regulation. The

  1. Involvement of ERK-Nrf-2 signaling in ionizing radiation induced cell death in normal and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Raghavendra S; Checker, Rahul; Sharma, Deepak; Sandur, Santosh K; Sainis, Krishna B

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged oxidative stress favors tumorigenic environment and inflammation. Oxidative stress may trigger redox adaptation mechanism(s) in tumor cells but not normal cells. This may increase levels of intracellular antioxidants and establish a new redox homeostasis. Nrf-2, a master regulator of battery of antioxidant genes is constitutively activated in many tumor cells. Here we show that, murine T cell lymphoma EL-4 cells show constitutive and inducible radioresistance via activation of Nrf-2/ERK pathway. EL-4 cells contained lower levels of ROS than their normal counterpart murine splenic lymphocytes. In response to radiation, the thiol redox circuits, GSH and thioredoxin were modified in EL-4 cells. Pharmacological inhibitors of ERK and Nrf-2 significantly enhanced radiosensitivity and reduced clonogenic potential of EL-4 cells. Unirradiated lymphoma cells showed nuclear accumulation of Nrf-2, upregulation of its dependent genes and protein levels. Interestingly, MEK inhibitor abrogated its nuclear translocation suggesting role of ERK in basal and radiation induced Nrf-2 activation in tumor cells. Double knockdown of ERK and Nrf-2 resulted in higher sensitivity to radiation induced cell death as compared to individual knockdown cells. Importantly, NF-kB which is reported to be constitutively active in many tumors was not present at basal levels in EL-4 cells and its inhibition did not influence radiosensitivity of EL-4 cells. Thus our results reveal that, tumor cells which are subjected to heightened oxidative stress employ master regulator cellular redox homeostasis Nrf-2 for prevention of radiation induced cell death. Our study reveals the molecular basis of tumor radioresistance and highlights role of Nrf-2 and ERK.

  2. Gossypol with methyltestosterone and ethinylestradiol male does not affect rat spermatogonial stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cui, G; Zheng, W; Sun, Y; Zhang, Q; Deng, X; Chen, X

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether administration of the regimen of gossypol at 12 mg/kg/day combined with methyltestosterone at 20 mg/kg/day and ethinylestradiol at 100 microg/kg/day for a long term of twenty-four weeks could affect the existence and differentiation of rat spermatogonial stem cell. This was assessed by conducting TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling detection, spermatogonial stem cell transplantation and fertility recovery evaluation. Our results showed that spontaneous apoptosis was observed in normal rats' testes from the control group with an apoptotic index (AI) average of 10.24+/-1.52. In the regimen-treated group, the predominant apoptotic cells were spermatocytes and spermatids in the seminiferous tubules. Spermatogonia were not apoptotic (AI averaged 113.42+/-13.24). Two to three months after transplantation of spermatogonial stem cells isolated from regimen-treated rats into recipient nude mice, elongated rat spermatids were identified in the seminiferous tubules of recipient nude mice. Six weeks after withdrawal of the administration, fertility of the regimen-treated rats was recovered compared with that of the control group. The number of litters produced by females mated with regimen-treated males averaged 9.88+/-0.166 matched 10.30+/-0.171 of control group and the litters of the first generation appeared to be normal. These results indicated that the administration of this regimen did not affect the existence and differentiation potential of spermatogonial stem cells of the regimen-treated rats.

  3. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Impairs Normal Intestinal Cell Proliferation and Promotes Specific Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Roostaee, Alireza; Guezguez, Amel; Beauséjour, Marco; Simoneau, Aline; Vachon, Pierre H.; Levy, Emile

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mechanisms that maintain proliferation and delay cell differentiation in the intestinal crypt are not yet fully understood. We have previously shown the implication of histone methylation in the regulation of enterocytic differentiation. In this study, we investigated the role of histone deacetylation as an important epigenetic mechanism that controls proliferation and differentiation of intestinal cells using the histone deacetylase inhibitor suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA) on the proliferation and differentiation of human and mouse intestinal cells. Treatment of newly confluent Caco‐2/15 cells with SAHA resulted in growth arrest, increased histone acetylation and up‐regulation of the expression of intestine‐specific genes such as those encoding sucrase‐isomaltase, villin and the ion exchanger SLC26A3. Although SAHA has been recently used in clinical trials for cancer treatment, its effect on normal intestinal cells has not been documented. Analyses of small and large intestines of mice treated with SAHA revealed a repression of crypt cell proliferation and a higher expression of sucrase‐isomaltase in both segments compared to control mice. Expression of SLC26A3 was also significantly up‐regulated in the colons of mice after SAHA administration. Finally, SAHA was also found to strongly inhibit normal human intestinal crypt cell proliferation in vitro. These results demonstrate the important implication of epigenetic mechanisms such as histone acetylation/deacetylation in the regulation of normal intestinal cell fate and proliferation. J. Cell. Biochem. 116: 2695–2708, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26129821

  4. Recruitment of Bone Marrow-Derived Valve Interstitial Cells is a Normal Homeostatic Process

    PubMed Central

    Hajdu, Zoltan; Romeo, Stephen J.; Fleming, Paul A.; Markwald, Roger R.; Visconti, Richard P.; Drake, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in understanding of the maintenance of the cardiac valves during normal cardiac function and response to injury have lead to several novel findings, including that there is contribution of extra-cardiac cells to the major cellular population of the valve: the valve interstitial cell (VIC). While suggested to occur in human heart studies, we have been able to experimentally demonstrate, using a mouse model, that cells of bone marrow hematopoietic stem cell origin engraft into the valves and synthesize collagen type I. Based on these initial findings, we sought to further characterize this cell population in terms of its similarity to VICs and begin to elucidate its contribution to valve homeostasis. To accomplish this, chimeric mice whose bone marrow was repopulated with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expressing total nucleated bone marrow cells were used to establish a profile of EGFP+ valve cells in terms of their expression of hematopoietic antigens, progenitor markers, fibroblast- and myofibroblast-related molecules, as well as their distribution within the valves. Using this profile, we show that normal (non-irradiated, non-transplanted) mice have BM-derived cell populations that exhibit identical morphology and phenotype to those observed in transplanted mice. Collectively, our findings establish that the engraftment of bone marrow-derived cells occurs as part of normal valve homeostasis. Further, our efforts demonstrate that the use of myeloablative irradiation, which is commonly employed in studies involving bone marrow transplantation, does not elicit changes in the bone marrow-derived VIC phenotype in recipient mice. PMID:21871458

  5. Effects of anti-NKG2A antibody administration on leukemia and normal hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Loredana; Urbani, Elena; André, Pascale; Mancusi, Antonella; Tosti, Antonella; Topini, Fabiana; Bléry, Mathieu; Animobono, Lucia; Romagné, François; Wagtmann, Nicolai; Velardi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells are key cells of the innate immune system. Natural killer cell receptor repertoires are diversified by a stochastic expression of killer-cell-immunoglobulin-like receptors and lectin-like receptors such as NKG2 receptors. All individuals harbor a subset of natural killer cells expressing NKG2A, the inhibitory checkpoint receptor for HLA-E. Most neoplastic and normal hematopoietic cells express HLA-E, the inhibitory ligand of NKG2A. A novel anti-human NKG2A antibody induced tumor cell death, suggesting that the antibody could be useful in the treatment of cancers expressing HLA-E. We found that immunodeficient mice, co-infused with human primary leukemia or Epstein-Barr virus cell lines and NKG2A+ natural killer cells, pre-treated with anti-human NKG2A, were rescued from disease progression. Human NKG2A+ natural killer cells reconstituted in immunodeficient mice after transplantation of human CD34+ cells. These natural killer cells are able to kill engrafted human primary leukemia or Epstein-Barr virus cell lines by lysis after intraperitoneal administration of anti-human NKG2A. Thus, this anti-NKG2A may exploit the anti-leukemic action of the wave of NKG2A+ natural killer cells recovering after hematopoietic stem cell transplants or adoptive therapy with natural killer cell infusions from matched or mismatched family donors after chemotherapy for acute leukemia, without the need to search for a natural killer cell alloreactive donor. PMID:26721894

  6. Rhamnolipids elicit the same cytotoxic sensitivity between cancer cell and normal cell by reducing surface tension of culture medium.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lifang; Shen, Chong; Long, Xuwei; Zhang, Guoliang; Meng, Qin

    2014-12-01

    Biosurfactant rhamnolipids have been claimed to show biological activities of inhibiting the proliferation of cancer cells. In this study, the cytotoxicity of rhamnolipids was examined on four cancer cells (HepG2, Caco-2, Hela, MCF-7 cells) and two normal cells (HK-2 cell, primary hepatocyte). Interestingly, both cancer cells and normal cells exhibited similar sensitivities to the addition of rhamnolipids in culture medium, and the cytotoxicity was largely attenuated by the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS) in culture medium. In correlation of the mono-/di-rhamnolipid cytotoxicity with the surface tension of culture medium, it was found that rhamnolipids triggered cytotoxicity whenever the surface tension of culture medium decreased below 41 mN/m irrespective of the FBS content in culture medium, cell line, or rhamnolipid congener. Similarly, each chemical surfactant (Tween-80, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate) could cause cytotoxicity on HepG2 cells whenever its addition made the surface tension under 41 mN/m in culture medium with or without the presence of FBS. It seems that rhamnolipids, like chemical surfactants, exhibited cytotoxicity by reducing the surface tension of culture medium rather than by changing its specific molecular structure, which had no selection on tumor cells. This study could offer helps to correct the misleading biological activity of rhamnolipids and to avoid the possible large wastes of time and expenses on developing the applications in antitumor drugs.

  7. Simple method for the preparation of single cell suspensions from normal and tumorous rat colonic mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Perret, V; Lev, R; Pigman, W

    1977-01-01

    Viable single cell suspensions from rat colonic epithelium were obtained by using phosphate buffered saline containing 0-2 M mannitol. The method, which requires no prior enzyme treatment, provides undamaged cells in high yield within one hour. The procedure was also applied to neoplastic rat colonic tissue, which was induced by repeated intrarectal infusion of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. Comparison between normal and neoplastic cells has shown that the latter have a higher nucleus: cytoplasm ratio and a higher metabolic activity. Images Figure PMID:873323

  8. The red cell mass-arterial oxygen relationship in normal man

    PubMed Central

    Weil, John V.; Jamieson, Gail; Brown, Donald W.; Grover, Robert F.

    1968-01-01

    The normal relationship between red cell mass measured, with 51chromium-labeled red cells, and arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) over the range from 97.3 to 83.4% was examined by studying 73 normal men residing at sea level and altitudes of 1600 and 3100 m. A simple, linear relationship between SaO2 and red cell mass was found over the entire range (r = - 0.7524, P < 0.001). In contrast, a correlation between red cell mass and arterial O2 tension was found only over the lower half of the range of O2 tensions where SaO2 was also decreased (r = - 0.7731, P < 0.005). This suggested that O2 saturation rather than tension is the more important determinant of the erythropoietic response to chronic hypoxia. If this response is regulated by tissue O2 tension, then it will be influenced by O2 transport, which, in turn, is a function of blood flow and arterial O2 content, and hence SaO2. In nine patients with chronic obstructive airway disease the relationship between red cell mass and SaO2 was also determined and was found to be steeper than in the normal subjects (P < 0.05). Images PMID:5658592

  9. Expression of nuclear membrane proteins in normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic thyroid epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jieying; Kondo, Tetsuo; Yamane, Tetsu; Nakazawa, Tadao; Oish, Naoki; Mochizuki, Kunio; Katoh, Ryohei

    2015-10-01

    Emerin, lamin A/C, lamin B, and lamin-associated polypeptide 2 (LAP2) are nuclear membrane proteins that play an important role in maintaining nuclear structure and coordinating cell activity. We studied the expression and significance of nuclear membrane proteins in neoplastic thyroid cells by immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and real-time PCR. In papillary carcinomas (PCs), the nuclear proteins most frequently expressed at high levels were emerin (82 % positive), lamin A/C (64 %), and LAP2 (82 %). Follicular carcinomas (FCs) most frequently expressed lamin B, while none of the undifferentiated carcinomas (UCs) showed strong expression of emerin or lamin A/C. In all medullary carcinomas (MCs), intermediate to high levels of expression of lamin A/C and LAP2 were found. By RT-PCR analysis, messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of all nuclear membrane proteins except emerin was higher in PC than in normal tissue. Real-time PCR analysis showed that mRNA expression of nuclear membrane protein varied between cell lines. Our findings suggest that expression of nuclear membrane proteins may be related to follicular function in normal and hyperplastic follicles, and we hypothesize that they are also involved in the proliferation and differentiation of neoplastic thyroid cells. We suggest that they reflect the biological nature and/or function of normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic thyroid cells and may have some value in diagnosing thyroid tumors.

  10. Lysyl oxidase-like 2 promotes migration in noninvasive breast cancer cells but not in normal breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hollosi, Peter; Yakushiji, Jana K; Fong, Keith S K; Csiszar, Katalin; Fong, Sheri F T

    2009-07-15

    A growing number of studies indicate the importance of the lysyl oxidase family in the promotion of epithelial neoplasms towards their more aggressive forms. However, the role of individual family members in carcinoma progression has yet to be ascertained. In this study, we analyzed LOXL2 expression in malignantly transformed MCF-7 and normal MCF-10A mammary epithelial cell line clones stably transduced with LOXL2 in vitro, and in normal and cancerous breast tissue samples in vivo. We found LOXL2 to be catalytically active in both MCF-7 and MCF-10 clones. LOXL2 overexpression promoted a more mesenchymal morphology in both cell types, but LOXL2-induced increase in migratory ability could only be established in MCF-7 clones. We demonstrated altered localization of the LOXL2 protein in breast cancer tissue compared to normal mammary tissue, and altered localization and processing of LOXL2 protein in breast cancer cell lines compared to normal cell lines, which may allow LOXL2 to interact with different intra and extracellular components during tumor progression. Results support the role of LOXL2 in selectively promoting a metastatic phenotype in breast tumor cells. Additional data suggest epigenetic molecular mechanisms in tumor specific regulation of LOXL2 expression that could be explored as a molecular target in the prevention of breast cancer progression.

  11. Analgesic exposure in pregnant rats affects fetal germ cell development with inter-generational reproductive consequences

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Afshan; van den Driesche, Sander; Wang, Yili; McKinnell, Chris; Macpherson, Sheila; Eddie, Sharon L.; Kinnell, Hazel; Hurtado-Gonzalez, Pablo; Chambers, Tom J.; Stevenson, Kerrie; Wolfinger, Elke; Hrabalkova, Lenka; Calarrao, Ana; Bayne, Rosey AL; Hagen, Casper P.; Mitchell, Rod T.; Anderson, Richard A.; Sharpe, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Analgesics which affect prostaglandin (PG) pathways are used by most pregnant women. As germ cells (GC) undergo developmental and epigenetic changes in fetal life and are PG targets, we investigated if exposure of pregnant rats to analgesics (indomethacin or acetaminophen) affected GC development and reproductive function in resulting offspring (F1) or in the F2 generation. Exposure to either analgesic reduced F1 fetal GC number in both sexes and altered the tempo of fetal GC development sex-dependently, with delayed meiotic entry in oogonia but accelerated GC differentiation in males. These effects persisted in adult F1 females as reduced ovarian and litter size, whereas F1 males recovered normal GC numbers and fertility by adulthood. F2 offspring deriving from an analgesic-exposed F1 parent also exhibited sex-specific changes. F2 males exhibited normal reproductive development whereas F2 females had smaller ovaries and reduced follicle numbers during puberty/adulthood; as similar changes were found for F2 offspring of analgesic-exposed F1 fathers or mothers, we interpret this as potentially indicating an analgesic-induced change to GC in F1. Assuming our results are translatable to humans, they raise concerns that analgesic use in pregnancy could potentially affect fertility of resulting daughters and grand-daughters. PMID:26813099

  12. The effect of replacement of methionine by homocystine on survival of malignant and normal adult mammalian cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Halpern, B C; Clark, B R; Hardy, D N; Halpern, R M; Smith, R A

    1974-04-01

    In tissue cultures of normal adult and malignant mammalian cells, homocystine has been substituted for methionine in a medium rich in folic acid and cyanocobalamin. Normal adult cells thrive. Three highly malignant cell types from three different species, including man, die.

  13. Comparison study of distinguishing cancerous and normal prostate epithelial cells by confocal and polarization diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenhuan; Lu, Jun Qing; Yang, Li V.; Sa, Yu; Feng, Yuanming; Ding, Junhua; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Accurate classification of malignant cells from benign ones can significantly enhance cancer diagnosis and prognosis by detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). We have investigated two approaches of quantitative morphology and polarization diffraction imaging on two prostate cell types to evaluate their feasibility as single-cell assay methods toward CTC detection after cell enrichment. The two cell types have been measured by a confocal imaging method to obtain their three-dimensional morphology parameters and by a polarization diffraction imaging flow cytometry (p-DIFC) method to obtain image texture parameters. The support vector machine algorithm was applied to examine the accuracy of cell classification with the morphology and diffraction image parameters. Despite larger mean values of cell and nuclear sizes of the cancerous prostate cells than the normal ones, it has been shown that the morphologic parameters cannot serve as effective classifiers. In contrast, accurate classification of the two prostate cell types can be achieved with high classification accuracies on measured data acquired separately in three measurements. These results provide strong evidence that the p-DIFC method has the potential to yield morphology-related "fingerprints" for accurate and label-free classification of the two prostate cell types.

  14. Cold atmospheric plasma jet-generated RONS and their selective effects on normal and carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.

    2016-01-01

    Cold atmospheric helium plasma jets were fabricated and utilized for plasma–cell interactions. The effect of operating parameters and jet design on the generation of specific reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) within cells and cellular response were investigated. It was found that plasma treatment induced the overproduction of RONS in various cancer cell lines selectively. The plasma under a relatively low applied voltage induced the detachment of cells, a reduction in cell viability, and apoptosis, while the plasma under higher applied voltage led to cellular necrosis in our case. To determine whether plasma-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation occurs through interfering with mitochondria-related cellular response, we examined the plasma effects on ROS generation in both parental A549 cells and A549 ρ0 cells. It was observed that cancer cells were more susceptible to plasma-induced RONS (especially nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2−) radicals) than normal cells, and consequently, plasma induced apoptotic cell responses mainly in cancer cells. PMID:26838306

  15. Cold atmospheric plasma jet-generated RONS and their selective effects on normal and carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T H

    2016-01-01

    Cold atmospheric helium plasma jets were fabricated and utilized for plasma-cell interactions. The effect of operating parameters and jet design on the generation of specific reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) within cells and cellular response were investigated. It was found that plasma treatment induced the overproduction of RONS in various cancer cell lines selectively. The plasma under a relatively low applied voltage induced the detachment of cells, a reduction in cell viability, and apoptosis, while the plasma under higher applied voltage led to cellular necrosis in our case. To determine whether plasma-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation occurs through interfering with mitochondria-related cellular response, we examined the plasma effects on ROS generation in both parental A549 cells and A549 ρ(0) cells. It was observed that cancer cells were more susceptible to plasma-induced RONS (especially nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2(-)) radicals) than normal cells, and consequently, plasma induced apoptotic cell responses mainly in cancer cells.

  16. In situ visualisation of immunoglobulin genes in normal and malignant lymphoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, C; Telhada, M; do Carmo-Fonseca, M; Parreira, L

    1995-01-01

    Aims—To directly visualise immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy (H) and light chain genes (κ and λ) in metaphase chromosomes and interphase nuclei of normal and malignant lymphocytes using small genomic probes targeted to intragenic sequences. Methods—Cytogenetic preparations from phytohaemagglutinin stimulated lymphocytes, B-chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) cells, and a B-prolymphocytic leukaemia (B-PLL) cell line, containing a t(11;14), were hybridised in situ using biotin or digoxigenin labelled plasmid probes. The κ genes were visualised with a combination of probes for the Cκ, Jκ, Vκ1, and Vκ2 segments, the λ genes with a probe containing the Jλ2-Cλ2, Jλ3-Cλ3 segments and the H genes with a probe for Cλ2. Hybridisation sites were visualised using appropriate fluorochrome conjugates and images were analysed by digital microscopy. Results—In both normal and malignant lymphoid cells, the κ and λ genes were visualised as a single dot signal, whereas the H λ genes were resolved as either two or three separate signals per chromatid in metaphase chromosomes or per allele in interphase nuclei. In the malignant PLL cells, double hybridisation experiments with a painting library specific for the chromosome 11 showed that the λ region was retained in the translocated chromosome, with an in situ resolution pattern similar to that of the normal allele. Conclusions—This study shows that a high resolution in situ analysis of the three Ig loci can be efficiently performed with small size genomic probes on both normal and malignant lymphoid cells. Such an approach offers a flexible tool for the molecular characterisations of these loci on chromosomes and individual neoplastic cells. Images PMID:16695998

  17. Stimulation of the proliferation of human normal esophageal epithelial cells by fumonisin B1 and its mechanism

    PubMed Central

    WANG, SHAO-KANG; WANG, TING-TING; HUANG, GUI-LING; SHI, RUO-FU; YANG, LI-GANG; SUN, GUI-JU

    2014-01-01

    Previous epidemiological studies have demonstrated a correlation between fumonisin B1 (FB1) and human esophageal cancer in China, Iran and South Africa. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of FB1 on the proliferation, cell-cycle and apoptosis of normal human esophageal epithelial cells (HEECs) and to explore the molecular mechanisms of these effects. The proliferation of HEECs treated with FB1 was assessed using a colorimetric assay, while analyses of the cell cycle and apoptosis were performed using flow cytometry and the measurement of the protein expressions of genes associated with the cell cycle was conducted using western blotting. The results showed that FB1 stimulated the proliferation of HEECs, decreased the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase and reduced apoptosis. The western blotting results showed that FB1 significantly increased the protein expression of cyclin D1 and significantly decreased the protein expression of cyclin E, p21 and p27. The results indicated that FB1 stimulated the proliferation of HEECs by affecting the cell cycle and apoptosis. This mechanism was associated with changes in cyclin D1, cyclin E, p21 and p27 expression. PMID:24348764

  18. Therapeutic effects of normal cells on ABCD1 deficient cells in vitro and hematopoietic cell transplantation in the X-ALD mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takeshi; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Shinnoh, Nobue; Kikuchi, Hitoshi; Osoegawa, Manabu; Ochi, Hirofumi; Kira, Jun-Ichi; Furuya, Hirokazu

    2004-03-15

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is accepted as an efficient therapy for X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD). To clarify the mechanisms of this treatment, we examined the effects of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in an ATP-binding cassette, subfamily D, member 1 (ABCD1) knock out mice and co-culture of ALD patient fibroblasts with normal cells. We treated ABCD1 knock out mice with HCT using lacZ-transgenic mice as donors, which enabled us to detect donor-derived cells. We also examined the effects of co-culturing a normal microglia cell line (N9) with ALD fibroblasts. beta-Galactosidase (beta-GAL) activity was higher in spleen, lung and kidney than in liver, brain and spinal cord of the recipient ABCD1 knock out mice. HCT reduced the accumulation of very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) in those tissues. The reduction of the VLCFA ratio was significant in spleen and lung; tissues with higher beta-GAL activity. ABCD1 was detectable in spleen from HCT mice. Co-culture of ALD fibroblasts with normal fibroblast cells reduced VLCFA accumulation in ALD cells. This effect was not observed when the cells were co-cultured while separated by a filter membrane. Our data suggest that supplying normal cells for ABCD1 knockout mouse by HCT corrects metabolic abnormalities in ALD tissues through a cell-mediated process. The correction requires direct cell-to-cell contact for recovering normal cell function.

  19. Encephalitogenic potential of myelin basic protein-specific T cells isolated from normal rhesus macaques.

    PubMed Central

    MeinL, E.; Hoch, R. M.; Dornmair, K.; de Waal Malefyt, R.; Bontrop, R. E.; Jonker, M.; Lassmann, H.; Hohlfeld, R.; Wekerle, H.; 't Hart, B. A.

    1997-01-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP)-specific T cells are implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and are targets of selective immunotherapies. However, autoantigen-specific T cells can also be isolated from healthy individuals. Their functional potential is unknown and obviously cannot be tested in humans. We approached this question in a closely related primate species, the rhesus monkey. CD4+ T cell lines specific for MBP were isolated from normal rhesus monkeys using the same primary limiting dilution technique that is now widely used to generate human autoreactive T cell clones in vitro. Three different epitopes were recognized by three rhesus T cell lines isolated from three different monkeys. Upon activation, all lines produced interferon-gamma, interleukin-2, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor but neither interleukin-4 nor transforming growth factor-beta. The MBP-specific T cells were injected intravenously without adjuvant into the nonirradiated autologous monkey. One of the three rhesus monkeys developed an encephalomyelitis with a pleocytosis in the spinal fluid and perivascular infiltrates in the leptomeninges, spinal nerve roots and cerebral cortex. The data demonstrate that the normal immune repertoire of a primate species contains MBP-specific CD4+ T cells that are able to induce an autoimmune encephalomyelitis upon transfer into the nonirradiated autologous recipient. Images Figure 3 PMID:9033260

  20. Goblet cells of the normal human bulbar conjunctiva and their assessment by impression cytology sampling.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Michael J

    2012-07-01

    Goblet cells of the conjunctiva are the main source of mucus for the ocular surface. The objectives of this review are to consider the goblet cells as assessed by various histological, cytological and electron microscopy methods, and to assess the consistency of published reports (over more than 25 years) of goblet cell density (GCD) from impression cytology specimens from nominally healthy human subjects. Reported GCD values have been notably variable, with a range from 24 to 2226 cells/mm² for average values. Data analysis suggests that a high density of goblet cells should be expected for the healthy human conjunctiva, with a tendency toward higher values in samples taken from normally covered locations (inferior and superior bulbar conjunctiva) of the open eye (at 973 +/- 789 cells/ mm²) than in samples taken from exposed (interpalpebral) locations (at 427 +/- 376 cells/mm²). No obvious change in GCD was found with respect to age, perhaps because the variability of the data did not allow detection of any age-related decline in GCD. Analyses of published data from 33 other sources indicated a trend for GCD to be lower than normal across a spectrum of ocular surface diseases.

  1. Automated counting of morphologically normal red blood cells by using digital holographic microscopy and statistical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Inkyu; Yi, Faliu

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we overview a method to automatically count morphologically normal red blood cells (RBCs) by using off-axis digital holographic microscopy and statistical methods. Three kinds of RBC are used as training and testing data. All of the RBC phase images are obtained with digital holographic microscopy (DHM) that is robust to transparent or semitransparent biological cells. For the determination of morphologically normal RBCs, the RBC's phase images are first segmented with marker-controlled watershed transform algorithm. Multiple features are extracted from the segmented cells. Moreover, the statistical method of Hotelling's T-square test is conducted to show that the 3D features from 3D imaging method can improve the discrimination performance for counting of normal shapes of RBCs. Finally, the classifier is designed by using statistical Bayesian algorithm and the misclassification rates are measured with leave-one-out technique. Experimental results show the feasibility of the classification method for calculating the percentage of each typical normal RBC shape.

  2. Differential Uptake Of Benzoporphyrin Derivative (BPD) By Leukemic Versus Normal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David; Julia G.; Levy

    1989-06-01

    Spectrofluorometric and FACS (Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting) analyses were employed to determine 1) the maximal fluorescence excitation and emission peaks characteristic of BPD, benzoporphyrin derivative, 2) which structural analogue of BPD, BPD-monoacid ring A (BPD-MA), BPD-monoacid ring B (BPD-MB), BPD-diacid ring A (BPD-DA) or BPD-diacid ring B (BPD-DB) fluoresced to the greatest extent in the presence of leukemic cells and 3) to determine whether substantive differences existed in the uptake of BPD by human or murine leukemic versus normal human or murine mononuclear cells. Spectrofluorometric analysis revealed that the maximal fluorescence excitation peak of BPD (BPD-diacid ring A) was situated at 420 nm with a less prominent peak at 356 nm. Fluorescence emission scans, in which 420 nm was used as the excitation wavelength, revealed a single prominent fluorescence peak at 690 nm. FACS analysis revealed that negligible differences in fluorescence existed between leukemic cells incubated with BPD-MA, BPD-MB, BPD-DA, or BPD-DB upon excitation with visible light (488nm). However, subsequent to uv excitation cells incubated with BPD-MA fluoresced to the greatest extent followed by BPD-MB, BPD-DA, and BPD-DB respectively. Pronounced differences in red fluorescence were consistently observed between leukemic cells (HL60, K562, and L1210) and normal human or murine bone marrow cells incubated with BPD-MA. These observed differences in BPD-mediated fluorescence provide the rationale for sorting leukemic from normal cells via FACS and may constitute a novel method for extra-corporeal purging of remission marrow in autologous bone marrow transplantation.

  3. Stem Cell Therapies for the Treatment of Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Benderitter, Marc; Caviggioli, Fabio; Chapel, Alain; Coppes, Robert P.; Guha, Chandan; Klinger, Marco; Malard, Olivier; Stewart, Fiona; Tamarat, Radia; Luijk, Peter Van

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Targeted irradiation is an effective cancer therapy but damage inflicted to normal tissues surrounding the tumor may cause severe complications. While certain pharmacologic strategies can temper the adverse effects of irradiation, stem cell therapies provide unique opportunities for restoring functionality to the irradiated tissue bed. Recent Advances: Preclinical studies presented in this review provide encouraging proof of concept regarding the therapeutic potential of stem cells for treating the adverse side effects associated with radiotherapy in different organs. Early-stage clinical data for radiation-induced lung, bone, and skin complications are promising and highlight the importance of selecting the appropriate stem cell type to stimulate tissue regeneration. Critical Issues: While therapeutic efficacy has been demonstrated in a variety of animal models and human trials, a range of additional concerns regarding stem cell transplantation for ameliorating radiation-induced normal tissue sequelae remain. Safety issues regarding teratoma formation, disease progression, and genomic stability along with technical issues impacting disease targeting, immunorejection, and clinical scale-up are factors bearing on the eventual translation of stem cell therapies into routine clinical practice. Future Directions: Follow-up studies will need to identify the best possible stem cell types for the treatment of early and late radiation-induced normal tissue injury. Additional work should seek to optimize cellular dosing regimes, identify the best routes of administration, elucidate optimal transplantation windows for introducing cells into more receptive host tissues, and improve immune tolerance for longer-term engrafted cell survival into the irradiated microenvironment. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21: 338–355. PMID:24147585

  4. Pervasive supply of therapeutic lysosomal enzymes in the CNS of normal and Krabbe-affected non-human primates by intracerebral lentiviral gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Meneghini, Vasco; Lattanzi, Annalisa; Tiradani, Luigi; Bravo, Gabriele; Morena, Francesco; Sanvito, Francesca; Calabria, Andrea; Bringas, John; Fisher-Perkins, Jeanne M; Dufour, Jason P; Baker, Kate C; Doglioni, Claudio; Montini, Eugenio; Bunnell, Bruce A; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Martino, Sabata; Naldini, Luigi; Gritti, Angela

    2016-05-02

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) and globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD or Krabbe disease) are severe neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) caused by arylsulfatase A (ARSA) and galactosylceramidase (GALC) deficiency, respectively. Our previous studies established lentiviral gene therapy (GT) as a rapid and effective intervention to provide pervasive supply of therapeutic lysosomal enzymes in CNS tissues of MLD and GLD mice. Here, we investigated whether this strategy is similarly effective in juvenile non-human primates (NHP). To provide proof of principle for tolerability and biological efficacy of the strategy, we established a comprehensive study in normal NHP delivering a clinically relevant lentiviral vector encoding for the human ARSA transgene. Then, we injected a lentiviral vector coding for the human GALC transgene in Krabbe-affected rhesus macaques, evaluating for the first time the therapeutic potential of lentiviral GT in this unique LSD model. We showed favorable safety profile and consistent pattern of LV transduction and enzyme biodistribution in the two models, supporting the robustness of the proposed GT platform. We documented moderate inflammation at the injection sites, mild immune response to vector particles in few treated animals, no indication of immune response against transgenic products, and no molecular evidence of insertional genotoxicity. Efficient gene transfer in neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes close to the injection sites resulted in robust production and extensive spreading of transgenic enzymes in the whole CNS and in CSF, leading to supraphysiological ARSA activity in normal NHP and close to physiological GALC activity in the Krabbe NHP, in which biological efficacy was associated with preliminary indication of therapeutic benefit. These results support the rationale for the clinical translation of intracerebral lentiviral GT to address CNS pathology in MLD, GLD, and other neurodegenerative LSD.

  5. Pervasive supply of therapeutic lysosomal enzymes in the CNS of normal and Krabbe-affected non-human primates by intracerebral lentiviral gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Meneghini, Vasco; Lattanzi, Annalisa; Tiradani, Luigi; Bravo, Gabriele; Morena, Francesco; Sanvito, Francesca; Calabria, Andrea; Bringas, John; Fisher-Perkins, Jeanne M; Dufour, Jason P; Baker, Kate C; Doglioni, Claudio; Montini, Eugenio; Bunnell, Bruce A; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Martino, Sabata; Naldini, Luigi; Gritti, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) and globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD or Krabbe disease) are severe neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) caused by arylsulfatase A (ARSA) and galactosylceramidase (GALC) deficiency, respectively. Our previous studies established lentiviral gene therapy (GT) as a rapid and effective intervention to provide pervasive supply of therapeutic lysosomal enzymes in CNS tissues of MLD and GLD mice. Here, we investigated whether this strategy is similarly effective in juvenile non-human primates (NHP). To provide proof of principle for tolerability and biological efficacy of the strategy, we established a comprehensive study in normal NHP delivering a clinically relevant lentiviral vector encoding for the human ARSA transgene. Then, we injected a lentiviral vector coding for the human GALC transgene in Krabbe-affected rhesus macaques, evaluating for the first time the therapeutic potential of lentiviral GT in this unique LSD model. We showed favorable safety profile and consistent pattern of LV transduction and enzyme biodistribution in the two models, supporting the robustness of the proposed GT platform. We documented moderate inflammation at the injection sites, mild immune response to vector particles in few treated animals, no indication of immune response against transgenic products, and no molecular evidence of insertional genotoxicity. Efficient gene transfer in neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes close to the injection sites resulted in robust production and extensive spreading of transgenic enzymes in the whole CNS and in CSF, leading to supraphysiological ARSA activity in normal NHP and close to physiological GALC activity in the Krabbe NHP, in which biological efficacy was associated with preliminary indication of therapeutic benefit. These results support the rationale for the clinical translation of intracerebral lentiviral GT to address CNS pathology in MLD, GLD, and other neurodegenerative LSD. PMID

  6. Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2011-11-04

    We report the results of ongoing high power tests of single-cell standing wave structures. These tests are part of an experimental and theoretical study of rf breakdown in normal conducting structures at 11.4 GHz. The goal of this study is to determine the maximum gradient possibilities for normal-conducting rf powered particle beam accelerators. The test setup consists of reusable mode launchers and short test structures powered by SLACs XL-4 klystron. The mode launchers and structures were manufactured at SLAC and KEK and tested at the SLAC klystron test laboratory.

  7. Different Inhibitory Effect and Mechanism of Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles on Normal Cells and Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yingchao; Li, Shipu; Cao, Xianying; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Youfa; Yin, Yixia; Qiu, Tong; Dai, Honglian; Wang, Xinyu

    2014-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP), similar to inorganic phase in bones, shows good biocompatibility and bioactivity as bone defect repairing material. Recently, nanoscaled HAP shows the special properties differing from bulk HAP in physics, chemistry and biology. This paper demonstrates that HAP nanoparticle (nHAP) possesses the ability for inhibiting cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, after treatment with nHAP for 3 days, proliferation of human cancer cells are inhibited by more than 65% and by less than 30% for human normal cells. In vivo, injection of nHAP in transplanted tumor results in significant reduction (about 50%) of tumor size. The anticancer effect of nHAP is mainly attributed to high amount by endocytosis in cancer cells and inhibition on protein synthesis in cells. The abundant nHAP internalized in cancer cells around endoplasmic reticulum may inhibit the protein synthesis by decreasing the binding of mRNA to ribosome due to its high adsorption capacity for ribosome and arrest cell cycle in G0/G1 phase. nHAP shows no ROS-involved cytotoxicity and low cytotoxicity to normal cells. These results strongly suggest that nHAP can inhibit cancer cell proliferation and have a potential application in cancer treatment.

  8. Different Inhibitory Effect and Mechanism of Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles on Normal Cells and Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yingchao; Li, Shipu; Cao, Xianying; Yuan, Lin; Wang, Youfa; Yin, Yixia; Qiu, Tong; Dai, Honglian; Wang, Xinyu

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP), similar to inorganic phase in bones, shows good biocompatibility and bioactivity as bone defect repairing material. Recently, nanoscaled HAP shows the special properties differing from bulk HAP in physics, chemistry and biology. This paper demonstrates that HAP nanoparticle (nHAP) possesses the ability for inhibiting cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, after treatment with nHAP for 3 days, proliferation of human cancer cells are inhibited by more than 65% and by less than 30% for human normal cells. In vivo, injection of nHAP in transplanted tumor results in significant reduction (about 50%) of tumor size. The anticancer effect of nHAP is mainly attributed to high amount by endocytosis in cancer cells and inhibition on protein synthesis in cells. The abundant nHAP internalized in cancer cells around endoplasmic reticulum may inhibit the protein synthesis by decreasing the binding of mRNA to ribosome due to its high adsorption capacity for ribosome and arrest cell cycle in G0/G1 phase. nHAP shows no ROS-involved cytotoxicity and low cytotoxicity to normal cells. These results strongly suggest that nHAP can inhibit cancer cell proliferation and have a potential application in cancer treatment. PMID:25409543

  9. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of the human cell cycle identifies genes differentially regulated in normal and cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Joseph, Ziv; Siegfried, Zahava; Brandeis, Michael; Brors, Benedikt; Lu, Yong; Eils, Roland; Dynlacht, Brian D.; Simon, Itamar

    2008-01-01

    Characterization of the transcriptional regulatory network of the normal cell cycle is essential for understanding the perturbations that lead to cancer. However, the complete set of cycling genes in primary cells has not yet been identified. Here, we report the results of genome-wide expression profiling experiments on synchronized primary human foreskin fibroblasts across the cell cycle. Using a combined experimental and computational approach to deconvolve measured expression values into “single-cell” expression profiles, we were able to overcome the limitations inherent in synchronizing nontransformed mammalian cells. This allowed us to identify 480 periodically expressed genes in primary human foreskin fibroblasts. Analysis of the reconstructed primary cell profiles and comparison with published expression datasets from synchronized transformed cells reveals a large number of genes that cycle exclusively in primary cells. This conclusion was supported by both bioinformatic analysis and experiments performed on other cell types. We suggest that this approach will help pinpoint genetic elements contributing to normal cell growth and cellular transformation. PMID:18195366

  10. Inhibition of autoantigen expression by (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (the major constituent of green tea) in normal human cells.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Stephen; Dickinson, Douglas P; Qin, Haiyan; Lapp, Carol; Lapp, David; Borke, James; Walsh, Douglas S; Bollag, Wendy B; Stöppler, Hubert; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Osaki, Tokio; Schuster, George

    2005-11-01

    Autoimmune disorders, characterized by inflammation and apoptosis of target cells leading to tissue destruction, are mediated in part by autoantibodies against normal cellular components (autoantigens) that may be overexpressed. For example, antibodies against the autoantigens SS-A/Ro and SS-B/La are primary markers for systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome. Recently, studies in animals demonstrated that green tea consumption may reduce the severity of some autoimmune disorders, but the mechanism is unclear. Herein, we sought to determine whether the most abundant green tea polyphenol, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), affects autoantigen expression in human cells. Cultures of pooled normal human primary epidermal keratinocytes and of an immortalized human salivary acinar cell line were incubated with 100 microM EGCG (a physiologically achievable level for topical application or oral administration) for various time periods and then analyzed by cDNA microarray analysis, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting for expression of several major autoantigen candidates. EGCG inhibited the transcription and translation of major autoantigens, including SS-B/La, SS-A/Ro, coilin, DNA topoisomerase I, and alpha-fodrin. These findings, taken together with green tea's anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic effects, suggest that green tea polyphenols could serve as an important component in novel approaches to combat autoimmune disorders in humans. PMID:16046615

  11. Inhibition of autoantigen expression by (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (the major constituent of green tea) in normal human cells.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Stephen; Dickinson, Douglas P; Qin, Haiyan; Lapp, Carol; Lapp, David; Borke, James; Walsh, Douglas S; Bollag, Wendy B; Stöppler, Hubert; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Osaki, Tokio; Schuster, George

    2005-11-01

    Autoimmune disorders, characterized by inflammation and apoptosis of target cells leading to tissue destruction, are mediated in part by autoantibodies against normal cellular components (autoantigens) that may be overexpressed. For example, antibodies against the autoantigens SS-A/Ro and SS-B/La are primary markers for systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome. Recently, studies in animals demonstrated that green tea consumption may reduce the severity of some autoimmune disorders, but the mechanism is unclear. Herein, we sought to determine whether the most abundant green tea polyphenol, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), affects autoantigen expression in human cells. Cultures of pooled normal human primary epidermal keratinocytes and of an immortalized human salivary acinar cell line were incubated with 100 microM EGCG (a physiologically achievable level for topical application or oral administration) for various time periods and then analyzed by cDNA microarray analysis, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting for expression of several major autoantigen candidates. EGCG inhibited the transcription and translation of major autoantigens, including SS-B/La, SS-A/Ro, coilin, DNA topoisomerase I, and alpha-fodrin. These findings, taken together with green tea's anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic effects, suggest that green tea polyphenols could serve as an important component in novel approaches to combat autoimmune disorders in humans.

  12. AFM stiffness nanotomography of normal, metaplastic and dysplastic human esophageal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, A.; Staunton, J. R.; Nandakumar, V.; Banyai, N.; Davies, P. C. W.; Ros, R.

    2011-02-01

    The mechanical stiffness of individual cells is important in tissue homeostasis, cell growth, division and motility, and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in the initiation of cancer. In this work, a normal squamous cell line (EPC2) and metaplastic (CP-A) as well as dysplastic (CP-D) Barrett's Esophagus columnar cell lines are studied as a model of pre-neoplastic progression in the human esophagus. We used the combination of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with a scanning confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope to study the mechanical properties of single adherent cells. Sixty four force indentation curves were taken over the nucleus of each cell in an 8 × 8 grid pattern. Analyzing the force indentation curves, indentation depth-dependent Young's moduli were found for all cell lines. Stiffness tomograms demonstrate distinct differences between the mechanical properties of the studied cell lines. Comparing the stiffness for indentation forces of 1 nN, most probable Young's moduli were calculated to 4.7 kPa for EPC2 (n = 18 cells), 3.1 kPa for CP-A (n = 10) and 2.6 kPa for CP-D (n = 19). We also tested the influence of nuclei and nucleoli staining organic dyes on the mechanical properties of the cells. For stained EPC2 cells (n = 5), significant stiffening was found (9.9 kPa), while CP-A cells (n = 5) showed no clear trend (2.9 kPa) and a slight softening was observed (2.1 kPa) in the case of CP-D cells (n = 16). Some force-indentation curves show non-monotonic discontinuities with segments of negative slope, resembling a sawtooth pattern. We found the incidence of these 'breakthrough events' to be highest in the dysplastic CP-D cells, intermediate in the metaplastic CP-A cells and lowest in the normal EPC2 cells. This observation suggests that the microscopic explanation for the increased compliance of cancerous and pre-cancerous cells may lie in their susceptibility to 'crumble and yield' rather than their ability to 'bend and flex'.

  13. In vitro photodynamic effect of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines on melanoma skin cancer and healthy normal skin cells.

    PubMed

    Maduray, K; Odhav, B; Nyokong, T

    2012-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a medical treatment that uses an inactive dye/drug and lasers as a light source to activate the dye/drug to produce a toxic form of oxygen that destroys the cancer cells. This study aimed at investigating the cytotoxic effects of different concentrations of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines in its inactive and active state (laser induced) on melanoma skin cancer cells, healthy normal skin fibroblast and keratinocyte cells. Experimentally, 3 × 10⁴ cells/ml were seeded in 24-well plates before treatment with different concentrations of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines. After 2h, cells were irradiated with a light dose of 4.5 J/cm². Post-irradiated cells were incubated for 24h before cell viability was measured using the CellTiter-Blue Viability Assay. Results showed that aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines at high concentrations were cytotoxic to melanoma cells in the absence of laser activation. In the presence of laser activation of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines at a concentration of 40 μg/ml decreased cell viability of melanoma cells to 45%, fibroblasts to 78% and keratinocytes to 73%. At this photosensitizing concentration of aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines the efficacy of the treatment light dose 4.5 J/cm² and the cell death mechanism induced by photoactivated aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines was evaluated. A light dose of 4.5 J/cm² was more efficient in killing a higher number of melanoma cells and a lower number of fibroblast and keratinocyte cells than the other light doses of 2.5 J/cm², 7.5 J/cm² and 10.5 J/cm². Apoptosis features such as blebbing, nucleus condensation, nucleus fragmentation and the formation of apoptotic bodies were seen in the photodynamic therapy treated melanoma skin cancer cells. This in vitro photodynamic therapy study concludes that using aluminum tetrasulfophthalocyanines at a photosensitizing concentration of 40 μg/ml in combination with a laser dose of 4.5 J/cm² was potentially lethal

  14. Power source effects of soft plasma jet and the differential response of skin cancer and normal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Nathaniel; Dobrynin, Danil; Fridman, Alexander; Choi, Eun Ha

    2014-10-01

    The effects of pulsed power direct current energy sources were compared using an indirect discharge plasma jet applied to treat cancerous and normal skin cells. Two power supplies with different voltage and current profiles were compared and optimized through the measurement of physical parameters and evaluated through the treatment of skin cells using an atmospheric pressure nitrogen gas plasma jet. Plasma density and temperature, power output, gas output temperature, and reactive species production were measured. Cell morphology, viability, and ROS generation were investigated using staining. A differential response has been shown between the normal and cancerous cell lines. The cancer cells viability reduced while normal cells did not over the same treatment time.

  15. New common variants affecting susceptibility to basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Simon N; Sulem, Patrick; Masson, Gisli; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jakobsdottir, Margret; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Scherer, Dominique; Hemminki, Kari; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Soriano, Virtudes; Juberias, Pablo; Saez, Berta; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Fuentelsaz, Victoria; Corredera, Cristina; Grasa, Matilde; Höiom, Veronica; Lindblom, Annika; Bonenkamp, Johannes J; van Rossum, Michelle M; Aben, Katja K H; de Vries, Esther; Santinami, Mario; Di Mauro, Maria G; Maurichi, Andrea; Wendt, Judith; Hochleitner, Pia; Pehamberger, Hubert; Gudmundsson, Julius; Magnusdottir, Droplaug N; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Holm, Hilma; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Frigge, Michael L; Blondal, Thorarinn; Saemundsdottir, Jona; Bjarnason, Hjördis; Kristjansson, Kristleifur; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Okamoto, Ichiro; Rivoltini, Licia; Rodolfo, Monica; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Hansson, Johan; Nagore, Eduardo; Mayordomo, José I; Kumar, Rajiv; Karagas, Margaret R; Nelson, Heather H; Gulcher, Jeffrey R; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Olafsson, Jon H; Kong, Augustine; Stefansson, Kari

    2009-08-01

    In a follow-up to our previously reported genome-wide association study of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), we describe here several new susceptibility variants. SNP rs11170164, encoding a G138E substitution in the keratin 5 (KRT5) gene, affects risk of BCC (OR = 1.35, P = 2.1 x 10(-9)). A variant at 9p21 near CDKN2A and CDKN2B also confers susceptibility to BCC (rs2151280[C]; OR = 1.19, P = 6.9 x 10(-9)), as does rs157935[T] at 7q32 near the imprinted gene KLF14 (OR = 1.23, P = 5.7 x 10(-10)). The effect of rs157935[T] is dependent on the parental origin of the risk allele. None of these variants were found to be associated with melanoma or fair-pigmentation traits. A melanoma- and pigmentation-associated variant in the SLC45A2 gene, L374F, is associated with risk of both BCC and squamous cell carcinoma. Finally, we report conclusive evidence that rs401681[C] in the TERT-CLPTM1L locus confers susceptibility to BCC but protects against melanoma. PMID:19578363

  16. Optimal haematocrit in subjects with normal haemoglobin genotype (HbAA), sickle cell trait (HbAS), and homozygous sickle cell disease (HbSS).

    PubMed

    Bowers, A S; Pepple, D J; Reid, H L

    2011-01-01

    The determination of an optimal haematocrit (H0) has important clinical implications if such a level can be attained, and more importantly, maintained. This is defined as a haematocrit level, above or below which oxygen delivery is deleteriously affected. This study is designed to determine an optimal haematocrit in normal (AA), sickle cell trait (AS) and sickle cell disease (SS) subjects. Twenty-seven apparently healthy subjects having normal haemoglobin genotype, 24 with sickle cell trait and 42 with homozygous sickle cell disease were recruited into the study. Whole blood viscosity (WBV) was measured by a Wells Brookfield Cone and Plate Viscometer at a shear rate of 230 sec-1. Haematocrit was determined by an AC.Tron Coulter Counter. The optimal haematocrit was calculated as the inverse of a constant, K, which was derived from the haematocrit and viscosity data. Our findings showed that the H0 varied significantly among the 3 haemoglobin genotypes, in the order AA vs SS and AS vs SS. Additionally, the data indicated an increased H0 in subjects with sickle cell trait, suggesting a possible impairment in oxygen delivery in these individuals.

  17. The role of the basal stem cell of the human breast in normal development and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Jose; Russo, Irma H.

    2011-01-01

    MCF-10F a spontaneously immortalized ERα negative human breast epithelial cell line derived from breast tissues containing Lobules type 1, is able to form normal ductal structures in a tridimensional collagen matrix system. MCF-10F cells that are Estrogen-transformed [trMCF cells] progressively express phenotypes of in vitro cell transformation, including colony formation in agar methocel, and loss of the ductulogenic capacity. Further selection of these trMCF cells for invasiveness in a Matrigel invasion system identified cells [bcMCF] that formed tumors in severe combined immunodeficient [SCID] mice. The cell lines derived from those tumors [caMCF] were poorly differentiated ERα, PR and ERBB2 negative adenocarcinomas. These characteristics are similar to the human basal cell-like carcinomas. This in vitro in vivo model demonstrates the importance of the basal cell type as a stem cell that reconstitute the branching pattern of the breast and that is also target of a carcinogenic insult leading to transformation and cancer. PMID:21901623

  18. Role and regulation of CD1d in normal and pathological B cells

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Mohammed S.; Karadimitris, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    CD1d is a non-polymorphic, MHC class I-like molecule, which presents phosphoand glycosphingo-lipid antigens to a subset of CD1d-restricted T cells called invariant NKT (iNKT) cells. This CD1d-iNKT cell axis regulates nearly all aspects of both the innate and adaptive immune response. Expression of CD1d on B cells is suggestive of the ability of these cells to present antigen to and form cognate interactions with iNKT cells. Herein we summarise key evidence regarding the role and regulation of CD1d in normal B cells and in humoral immunity. We then extend the discussion to B cell disorders, with emphasis on autoimmune disease, viral infection and neoplastic transformation of B lineage cells, where CD1d expression can be altered as a mechanism of immune evasion, and can have both diagnostic and prognostic importance. Finally we highlight current and future therapeutic strategies that aim to target the CD1d-iNKT axis in B cells. PMID:25381357

  19. Normal stroma suppresses cancer cell proliferation via mechanosensitive regulation of JMJD1a-mediated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kaukonen, Riina; Mai, Anja; Georgiadou, Maria; Saari, Markku; De Franceschi, Nicola; Betz, Timo; Sihto, Harri; Ventelä, Sami; Elo, Laura; Jokitalo, Eija; Westermarck, Jukka; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Joensuu, Heikki; Grenman, Reidar; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Tissue homeostasis is dependent on the controlled localization of specific cell types and the correct composition of the extracellular stroma. While the role of the cancer stroma in tumour progression has been well characterized, the specific contribution of the matrix itself is unknown. Furthermore, the mechanisms enabling normal—not cancer—stroma to provide tumour-suppressive signals and act as an antitumorigenic barrier are poorly understood. Here we show that extracellular matrix (ECM) generated by normal fibroblasts (NFs) is softer than the CAF matrix, and its physical and structural features regulate cancer cell proliferation. We find that normal ECM triggers downregulation and nuclear exit of the histone demethylase JMJD1a resulting in the epigenetic growth restriction of carcinoma cells. Interestingly, JMJD1a positively regulates transcription of many target genes, including YAP/TAZ (WWTR1), and therefore gene expression in a stiffness-dependent manner. Thus, normal stromal restricts cancer cell proliferation through JMJD1a-dependent modulation of gene expression. PMID:27488962

  20. Beta-Cell ARNT Is Required for Normal Glucose Tolerance in Murine Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Sue Mei; Cha, Kuan Minn; Karunatillake, Ayesha; Stokes, Rebecca A.; Cheng, Kim; McLean, Mark; Cheung, N. W.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Gunton, Jenny E.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Insulin secretion increases in normal pregnancy to meet increasing demands. Inability to increase beta-cell function results in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We have previously shown that the expression of the transcription factor ARNT (Aryl-hydrocarbon Receptor Nuclear Translocator) is reduced in the islets of humans with type 2 diabetes. Mice with a beta-cell specific deletion of ARNT (β-ARNT mice) have impaired glucose tolerance secondary to defective insulin secretion. We hypothesised that ARNT is required to increase beta-cell function during pregnancy, and that β-ARNT mice would be unable to compensate for the beta-cell stress of pregnancy. The aims of this study were to investigate the mechanisms of ARNT regulation of beta-cell function and glucose tolerance in pregnancy. Methods β-ARNT females were mated with floxed control (FC) males and FC females with β-ARNT males. Results During pregnancy, β-ARNT mice had a marked deterioration in glucose tolerance secondary to defective insulin secretion. There was impaired beta-cell proliferation in late pregnancy, associated with decreased protein and mRNA levels of the islet cell-cycle regulator cyclinD2. There was also reduced expression of Irs2 and G6PI. In contrast, in control mice, pregnancy was associated with a 2.1-fold increase in ARNT protein and a 1.6-fold increase in cyclinD2 protein, and with increased beta-cell proliferation. Conclusions Islet ARNT increases in normal murine pregnancy and beta-cell ARNT is required for cyclinD2 induction and increased beta-cell proliferation in pregnancy. PMID:24204824

  1. Sensitivity of gastric adenocarcinoma and normal cell lines against combined or conjugated antimetabolites.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, Jürgen; Struller, Florian; Küper, Markus; Hack, Anita; Königsrainer, Alfred; Schott, Timm C

    2013-04-01

    The in-vitro growth inhibition of cancer and normal cell lines caused by mixed or covalently linked antimetabolites should clarify whether the conjugation of antimetabolites influences cell sensitivity and growth inhibition in a manner that differs from an equimolar mixture of the same antimetabolites or not. Growth inhibition of the human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines 23132/87 and MKN-45 in comparison with normal gastric intestinal CCL-241 and the dermal fibroblast cell line NHDF was evaluated using CASY technology. The cell lines were incubated with an equimolar mixture of 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (5FdU)+3'-C-ethynylcytidine (ECyd) or the covalently linked duplex drug 5FdU(5'→5')ECyd. The drug and metabolites of the assays and medium were determined semiquantitatively using high-performance liquid chromatography. The sensitivity of cancer and nonmalignant cell lines was clearly different against the duplex drug. A measure of 0.65 µmol/l 5FdU(5'→5')ECyd, for example, reduced the growth of MKN-45 or 23132/87 gastric cancer cells from 100% on day 0 to about 50 or 20% on day 10, respectively. However, under the same conditions, the growth of the nonmalignant NHDF and CCL-241 cell lines was not markedly inhibited. The cytostatic activity of the duplex drug is based on the active metabolites in and outside the cell formed by the degradation of 5FdU(5'→5')ECyd. The sensitivity of cell lines against the duplex drug depended on its ability to metabolize the duplex drug. 5FdU(5'→5')ECyd should be more advantageous for specific and efficient polychemotherapy of gastric cancer than the corresponding equimolar mixture of 5FdU+ECyd or a standard combination regime of single drugs.

  2. Interleukin-induced increase in Ia expression by normal mouse B cells

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The constitutive culture supernatant (SN) of the macrophage tumor line P388D1 (P388 SN) and the concanavalin A (Con A)-induced culture supernatant of the T cell hybridoma FS6-14.13 (FS6 Con A SN) were shown to contain nonspecific factors capable of inducing increased Ia expression by normal resting B cells in a dose-dependent manner. In six consecutive experiments the relative increase in Ia expression induced by P388 SN was 4.9 +/- 0.9, with FS6 Con A SN 10.7 +/- 1.5, and with a combination of both preparations 13.0 +/- 1.7. This increase in Ia expression was observed to occur in virtually all the B cells, reaching maximum levels within 24 h of culture. The interleukin-induced increase in B cell Ia expression occurred in the absence of ancillary signals provided by ligand-receptor Ig cross-linking and despite the fact that virtually all the control B cells, cultured in the absence of factors, remained in G0. These results suggest that functional receptors for at least some interleukins are expressed on normal resting B cells and their effects can be manifest in the absence of additional activating signals. The increased Ia expression induced by the nonspecific factor preparations was shown to be correlated with enhanced antigen- presenting capacity by the B cells to T cell hybridomas. The nature of the interleukins responsible for these effects remains to be definitively determined, however, the activity of FS6 Con A SN was shown to correlate with B cell growth factor activity and increased B cell Ia expression was not observed using interleukin 2 (IL-2) or interferon-gamma, prepared by recombinant DNA technology. PMID:6432933

  3. A theoretical look at gravity in the human cell: its role in normal cell division as well as neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, J I

    1992-01-01

    Explaining the ultimate expression of life with fundamental physical law is the proposition dealt with in this paper. Normal cell division, as well as cancer, are analyzed and scrutinized in terms of Jacobson resonance, cyclotron resonance, the quantum Hall effect and the piezoelectric effect. The underpinning concept is based in the unification and connection of gravity to biological systems.

  4. Aluminum fluoride affects the structure and functions of cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Norris, B; Villena, F; Cuevas, F; Sotomayor, P; Zatta, P

    2004-06-01

    No useful biological function for aluminum has been found. To the contrary, it might play an important role in several pathologies, which could be related to its interactions with cell membranes. On the other hand, fluoride is a normal component of body fluids, soft tissues, bones and teeth. Its sodium salt is frequently added to drinking water to prevent dental caries. However, large doses cause severe pathological alterations. In view of the toxicity of Al(3+) and F(-) ions, it was thought of interest to explore the damaging effects that AlF(3) might induce in cell membranes. With this aim, it was incubated with human erythrocytes, which were examined by phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy, and molecular models of biomembranes. The latter consisted of large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and bilayers of DMPC and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) which were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. In order to understand the effects of AlF(3) on ion transport (principally sodium and chloride) we used the isolated toad skin to which electrophysiological measurements were applied. It was found that AlF(3) altered the shape of erythrocytes inducing the formation of echinocytes. This effect was explained by X-ray diffraction which revealed that AlF(3) perturbed the structure of DMPC, class of lipids located in the outer monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane. This result was confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy on DMPC LUV. The biphasic (stimulatory followed by inhibitory) effects on the isolated skin suggested changes in apical Cl(-) secretion and moderate ATPase inactivation. PMID:15110101

  5. Acute toxicity of silver and carbon nanoaerosols to normal and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jeannet, Natalie; Fierz, Martin; Schneider, Sarah; Künzi, Lisa; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Burtscher, Heinz; Geiser, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of engineered nanoparticles (NP) poses a still unknown risk. Individuals with chronic lung diseases are expected to be more vulnerable to adverse effects of NP than normal subjects, due to altered respiratory structures and functions. Realistic and dose-controlled aerosol exposures were performed using the deposition chamber NACIVT. Well-differentiated normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) human bronchial epithelia (HBE) with established air-liquid interface and the human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B were exposed to spark-generated silver and carbon nanoaerosols (20 nm diameter) at three different doses. Necrotic and apoptotic cell death, pro-inflammatory response, epithelial function and morphology were assessed within 24 h after aerosol exposure. NP exposure resulted in significantly higher necrosis in CF than normal HBE and BEAS-2B cells. Before and after NP treatment, CF HBE had higher caspase-3 activity and secreted more IL-6 and MCP-1 than normal HBE. Differentiated HBE had higher baseline secretion of IL-8 and less caspase-3 activity and MCP-1 secretion compared to BEAS-2B cells. These biomarkers increased moderately in response to NP exposure, except for MCP-1, which was reduced in HBE after AgNP treatment. No functional and structural alterations of the epithelia were observed in response to NP exposure. Significant differences between cell models suggest that more than one and fully differentiated HBE should be used in future toxicity studies of NP in vitro. Our findings support epidemiologic evidence that subjects with chronic airway diseases are more vulnerable to adverse effects of particulate air pollution. Thus, this sub-population needs to be included in nano-toxicity studies. PMID:26011645

  6. Acute toxicity of silver and carbon nanoaerosols to normal and cystic fibrosis human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jeannet, Natalie; Fierz, Martin; Schneider, Sarah; Künzi, Lisa; Baumlin, Nathalie; Salathe, Matthias; Burtscher, Heinz; Geiser, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of engineered nanoparticles (NP) poses a still unknown risk. Individuals with chronic lung diseases are expected to be more vulnerable to adverse effects of NP than normal subjects, due to altered respiratory structures and functions. Realistic and dose-controlled aerosol exposures were performed using the deposition chamber NACIVT. Well-differentiated normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) human bronchial epithelia (HBE) with established air-liquid interface and the human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B were exposed to spark-generated silver and carbon nanoaerosols (20 nm diameter) at three different doses. Necrotic and apoptotic cell death, pro-inflammatory response, epithelial function and morphology were assessed within 24 h after aerosol exposure. NP exposure resulted in significantly higher necrosis in CF than normal HBE and BEAS-2B cells. Before and after NP treatment, CF HBE had higher caspase-3 activity and secreted more IL-6 and MCP-1 than normal HBE. Differentiated HBE had higher baseline secretion of IL-8 and less caspase-3 activity and MCP-1 secretion compared to BEAS-2B cells. These biomarkers increased moderately in response to NP exposure, except for MCP-1, which was reduced in HBE after AgNP treatment. No functional and structural alterations of the epithelia were observed in response to NP exposure. Significant differences between cell models suggest that more than one and fully differentiated HBE should be used in future toxicity studies of NP in vitro. Our findings support epidemiologic evidence that subjects with chronic airway diseases are more vulnerable to adverse effects of particulate air pollution. Thus, this sub-population needs to be included in nano-toxicity studies.

  7. Signaling pathways regulating aromatase and cyclooxygenases in normal and malignant breast cells.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jeanette A; Petrel, Trevor A; Brueggemeier, Robert W

    2002-02-01

    Aromatase (estrogen synthase) is the cytochrome P450 enzyme complex that converts C(19) androgens to C(18) estrogens. Aromatase activity has been demonstrated in breast tissue in vitro, and expression of aromatase is highest in or near breast tumor sites. Thus, local regulation of aromatase by both endogenous factors as well as exogenous medicinal agents will influence the levels of estrogen available for breast cancer growth. The prostaglandin PGE(2) increases intracellular cAMP levels and stimulates estrogen biosynthesis, and our recent studies have shown a strong linear association between CYP19 expression and the sum of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in breast cancer specimens. Knowledge of the signaling pathways that regulate the expression and enzyme activity of aromatase and cyclooxygenases (COXs) in stromal and epithelial breast cells will aid in understanding the interrelationships of these two enzyme systems and potentially identify novel targets for regulation. The effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta), and tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA) on aromatase and COXs were studied in primary cultures of normal human adipose stromal cells and in cell cultures of normal immortalized human breast epithelial cells MCF-10F, estrogen-responsive human breast cancer cells MCF-7, and estrogen-unresponsive human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. Levels of the constitutive COX isozyme, COX-1, were not altered by the various treatments in the cell systems studied. In breast adenocarcinoma cells, EGF and TGFbeta did not alter COX-2 levels at 24h, while TPA induced COX-2 levels by 75% in MDA-MB-231 cells. EGF and TPA in MCF-7 cells significantly increased aromatase activity while TGFbeta did not. In contrast to MCF-7 cells, TGFbeta and TPA significantly increased activity in MDA-MB-231 cells, while only a modest increase with EGF was observed. Untreated normal adipose stromal cells exhibited

  8. Oriented cell division affects the global stress and cell packing geometry of a monolayer under stretch.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Liu, Yang; Zheng, Zhaoliang

    2016-02-01

    Cell division plays a vital role in tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, and the division plane is crucial for cell fate. For isolated cells, extensive studies show that the orientation of divisions is sensitive to cell shape and the direction of extrinsic mechanical forces. However, it is poorly understood that how the cell divides within a cell monolayer and how the local stress change, due to the division, affects the global stress of epithelial monolayers. Here, we use the vertex dynamics models to investigate the effects of division orientation on the configurations and mechanics of a cell monolayer under stretch. We examine three scenarios of the divisions: dividing along the stretch axis, dividing along the geometric long axis of cells, and dividing at a random angle. It is found that the division along the long cell axis can induce the minimal energy difference, and the global stress of the monolayer after stretch releases more rapidly in this case. Moreover, the long-axis division can result in more random cell orientations and more isotropic cell shapes within the monolayer, comparing with other two cases. This study helps understand the division orientation of cells within a monolayer under mechanical stimuli, and may shed light on linking individual cell's behaviors to the global mechanics and patterns of tissues. PMID:26774292

  9. Oriented cell division affects the global stress and cell packing geometry of a monolayer under stretch.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Liu, Yang; Zheng, Zhaoliang

    2016-02-01

    Cell division plays a vital role in tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, and the division plane is crucial for cell fate. For isolated cells, extensive studies show that the orientation of divisions is sensitive to cell shape and the direction of extrinsic mechanical forces. However, it is poorly understood that how the cell divides within a cell monolayer and how the local stress change, due to the division, affects the global stress of epithelial monolayers. Here, we use the vertex dynamics models to investigate the effects of division orientation on the configurations and mechanics of a cell monolayer under stretch. We examine three scenarios of the divisions: dividing along the stretch axis, dividing along the geometric long axis of cells, and dividing at a random angle. It is found that the division along the long cell axis can induce the minimal energy difference, and the global stress of the monolayer after stretch releases more rapidly in this case. Moreover, the long-axis division can result in more random cell orientations and more isotropic cell shapes within the monolayer, comparing with other two cases. This study helps understand the division orientation of cells within a monolayer under mechanical stimuli, and may shed light on linking individual cell's behaviors to the global mechanics and patterns of tissues.

  10. The Fate of a Normal Human Cell Traversed by a Single Charged Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, C.; Zahnreich, S.; Kraft, D.; Friedrich, T.; Voss, K.-O.; Durante, M.; Ritter, S.

    2012-09-01

    The long-term ``fate'' of normal human cells after single hits of charged particles is one of the oldest unsolved issues in radiation protection and cellular radiobiology. Using a high-precision heavy-ion microbeam we could target normal human fibroblasts with exactly one or five carbon ions and measured the early cytogenetic damage and the late behaviour using single-cell cloning. Around 70% of the first cycle cells presented visible aberrations in mFISH after a single ion traversal, and about 5% of the cells were still able to form colonies. In one third of selected high-proliferative colonies we observed clonal (radiation-induced) aberrations. Terminal differentiation and markers of senescence (PCNA, p16) in the descendants of cells traversed by one carbon ion occurred earlier than in controls, but no evidence of radiation-induced chromosomal instability was found. We conclude that cells surviving single-ion traversal, often carrying clonal chromosome aberrations, undergo accelerated senescence but maintain chromosomal stability.

  11. The fate of a normal human cell traversed by a single charged particle.

    PubMed

    Fournier, C; Zahnreich, S; Kraft, D; Friedrich, T; Voss, K O; Durante, M; Ritter, S

    2012-01-01

    The long-term "fate" of normal human cells after single hits of charged particles is one of the oldest unsolved issues in radiation protection and cellular radiobiology. Using a high-precision heavy-ion microbeam we could target normal human fibroblasts with exactly one or five carbon ions and measured the early cytogenetic damage and the late behaviour using single-cell cloning. Around 70% of the first cycle cells presented visible aberrations in mFISH after a single ion traversal, and about 5% of the cells were still able to form colonies. In one third of selected high-proliferative colonies we observed clonal (radiation-induced) aberrations. Terminal differentiation and markers of senescence (PCNA, p16) in the descendants of cells traversed by one carbon ion occurred earlier than in controls, but no evidence of radiation-induced chromosomal instability was found. We conclude that cells surviving single-ion traversal, often carrying clonal chromosome aberrations, undergo accelerated senescence but maintain chromosomal stability. PMID:22966418

  12. The normal breast microenvironment of premenopausal women differentially influences the behavior of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Breast cancer studies frequently focus on the role of the tumor microenvironment in the promotion of cancer; however, the influence of the normal breast microenvironment on cancer cells remains relatively unknown. To investigate the role of the normal breast microenvironment on breast cancer cell tumorigenicity, we examined whether extracellular matrix molecules (ECM) derived from premenopausal African-American (AA) or Caucasian-American (CAU) breast tissue would affect the tumorigenicity of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We chose these two populations because of the well documented predisposition of AA women to develop aggressive, highly metastatic breast cancer compared to CAU women. Methods The effects of primary breast fibroblasts on tumorigenicity were analyzed via real-time PCR arrays and mouse xenograft models. Whole breast ECM was isolated, analyzed via zymography, and its effects on breast cancer cell aggressiveness were tested in vitro via soft agar and invasion assays, and in vivo via xenograft models. Breast ECM and hormone metabolites were analyzed via mass spectrometry. Results Mouse mammary glands humanized with premenopausal CAU fibroblasts and injected with primary breast cancer cells developed significantly larger tumors compared to AA humanized glands. Examination of 164 ECM molecules and cytokines from CAU-derived fibroblasts demonstrated a differentially regulated set of ECM proteins and increased cytokine expression. Whole breast ECM was isolated; invasion and soft agar assays demonstrated that estrogen receptor (ER)-, progesterone receptor (PR)/PR- cells were significantly more aggressive when in contact with AA ECM, as were ER+/PR+ cells with CAU ECM. Using zymography, protease activity was comparatively upregulated in CAU ECM. In xenograft models, CAU ECM significantly increased the tumorigenicity of ER+/PR+ cells and enhanced metastases. Mass spectrometry analysis of ECM proteins showed that only 1,759 of approximately 8

  13. Analysis of cell surface carbohydrate expression patterns in normal and tumorigenic human breast cell lines using lectin arrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siyuan; Zheng, Ting; Shortreed, Michael R; Alexander, Caroline; Smith, Lloyd M

    2007-08-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates play important roles in a wide variety of biological processes including cell adhesion, fertilization, differentiation, development, and tumor cell metastasis. Lectins are proteins of nonimmune origin which recognize and bind to specific carbohydrate structural epitopes. We have recently described the development and use of lectin arrays as tools for the elucidation of the carbohydrate structures expressed on cell surfaces. In the present work this technology is employed for the characterization of differences in carbohydrate expression patterns on normal and tumorigenic human breast cell lines, as well as on sublines differing in their tendency to "home" to different tissues during metastasis. Significant differences were observed, including changes that correlate with metastatic potential as well as with tissue-specific homing of metastatic cells.

  14. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy method to differentiate between normal and cancerous breast cells.

    PubMed

    Lane, Randy; See, Seong S

    2012-09-01

    Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) is used to find the structural differences between cancerous breast cells (MCF-7 line) and normal breast cells (MCF-12F line). Gold nanoparticles were prepared and the hydrodynamic diameter of the gold nanoparticles found to be 38.45 nm. The Gold nanoparticles were exposed to both MCF-7 and MCF-12F cells from lower to higher concentrations. Spectroscopic studies founds nanoparticles were within the cells, and increasing the nanoparticles concentration inside the cells also resulted in sharper IR peaks as a result of localized surface Plasmon resonance. Asymmetric and symmetric stretching and bending vibrations between phosphate, COO-, CH2 groups were found to give negative shifts in wavenumbers and a decrease in peak intensities when going from noncancerous to cancerous cells. Cellular proteins produced peak assignments at the 1542 and 1644 cm(-1) wavenumbers which were attributed to the amide I and amide II bands of the polypeptide bond of proteins. Significant changes were found in the peak intensities between the cell lines in the spectrum range from 2854-2956 cm(-1). Results show that the concentration range of gold nanoparticles used in this research showed no significant changes in cell viability in either cell line. Therefore, we believe ATR-FTIR and gold nanotechnology can be at the forefront of cancer diagnosis for some time to come.

  15. Evaluation of Glucose Uptake in Normal and Cancer Cell Lines by Positron Emission Tomography.

    PubMed

    Maddalena, Francesca; Lettini, Giacomo; Gallicchio, Rosj; Sisinni, Lorenza; Simeon, Vittorio; Nardelli, Anna; Venetucci, Angela Assunta; Storto, Giovanni; Landriscina, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    To date, there is no definitive demonstration of the utility of positron emission tomography (PET) in studying glucose metabolism in cultured cell lines. Thus, this study was designed to compare PET to more standardized methods for the quantitative assessment of glucose uptake in nontransformed and transformed living cells and to validate PET for metabolic studies in vitro. Human colon and breast carcinoma cell lines and mouse embryo fibroblasts were evaluated for [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([(18)F]FDG) uptake by PET and autoradiography and 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) incorporation by colorimetric assay and analyzed for the radiotoxic effects of [(18)F]FDG and the expression levels of glucose transporters. Indeed, [(18)F]FDG incorporation on PET was comparable to [(18)F]FDG uptake by autoradiography and 2-DG incorporation by colorimetric assay, although radiotracer-based methods exhibited more pronounced differences between individual cell lines. As expected, these data correlated with glucose transporters 1 to 4 and hexokinase II expression in tumor cell lines and mouse fibroblasts. Notably, [(18)F]FDG incorporation resulted in low apoptotic rates, with fibroblasts being slightly more sensitive to radiotracer-induced cell death. The quantitative analysis of [(18)F]FDG uptake in living cells by PET represents a valuable and reproducible method to study tumor cell metabolism in vitro, being representative of the differences in the molecular profile of normal and tumor cell lines.

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Differential Proteome Expression in Bladder Cancer vs. Normal Bladder Cells Using SILAC Method

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ganglong; Xu, Zhipeng; Lu, Wei; Li, Xiang; Sun, Chengwen; Guo, Jia; Xue, Peng; Guan, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The best way to increase patient survival rate is to identify patients who are likely to progress to muscle-invasive or metastatic disease upfront and treat them more aggressively. The human cell lines HCV29 (normal bladder epithelia), KK47 (low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, NMIBC), and YTS1 (metastatic bladder cancer) have been widely used in studies of molecular mechanisms and cell signaling during bladder cancer (BC) progression. However, little attention has been paid to global quantitative proteome analysis of these three cell lines. We labeled HCV29, KK47, and YTS1 cells by the SILAC method using three stable isotopes each of arginine and lysine. Labeled proteins were analyzed by 2D ultrahigh-resolution liquid chromatography LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Among 3721 unique identified and annotated proteins in KK47 and YTS1 cells, 36 were significantly upregulated and 74 were significantly downregulated with >95% confidence. Differential expression of these proteins was confirmed by western blotting, quantitative RT-PCR, and cell staining with specific antibodies. Gene ontology (GO) term and pathway analysis indicated that the differentially regulated proteins were involved in DNA replication and molecular transport, cell growth and proliferation, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, and cell death and survival. These proteins and the advanced proteome techniques described here will be useful for further elucidation of molecular mechanisms in BC and other types of cancer. PMID:26230496

  17. Role of growth factors in the growth of normal and transformed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lokeshwar, V.B.

    1989-01-01

    Growth factors play an important role in the growth of normal cells. However, their untimely and/or excess production leads to neoplastic transformation. The role of growth factors in the growth of normal cells was studied by investigating the mechanism of transmodulation of the cell surface EGF receptor number by protamine. Protamine increased the EGF stimulated mitogenic response in Swiss mouse 3T3 cells and A431 cells by increasing the number of functionally active EGF receptors. Protamine also increased EGF receptor number in plasma membranes and solubilized membranes. This was evidenced by an increase in both {sup 125}I-EGF-EGF-receptor complex and EGF stimulated phosphorylation of the EGF receptor. The solubilized EGF receptor was retained on a protamine-agarose gel indicating that protamine might increase EGF receptor number by directly activating cryptic EGF receptors in the plasma membranes. The role of growth factors in neoplastic transformation was studied by investigating the role of the oncogene v-sis in the growth of Simian sarcoma virus (SSV) transformed cells. The product of the oncogene v-sis is 94% homologous to the B chain of PDGF. This study found that (i) v-sis gene product is synthesized as a 32 kDa unglycosylated monomer which is glycosylated, dimerized and proteolytically processed into p36, p72, p68, p58, p44 and p27 mol. wt. species respectively. (ii) p36, p72, p68 and p58 are very likely formed in the endoplasmic reticulum and/or Golgi complex. A fraction of newly synthesized p72, p68 and p58 is degraded intracellularly at a fast rate. (iii) p44 is a secretory product which remains tightly associated with the cell surface. p44 is recaptured by the cells through interaction with cell surface PDGF receptors and degraded into p27. (iv) During long term cultures p44 is extracellularly cleaved into a 27 kDa product.

  18. Hair cell and supporting cell density and distribution in the normal and regenerating posterior crista ampullaris of the pigeon.

    PubMed

    Kevetter, G A; Blumberg, K R; Correia, M J

    2000-12-01

    The numbers of supporting cells and the numbers and types of hair cells in three distinct longitudinal regions through the posterior canal cristae of control and streptomycin-treated pigeons were determined using stereological techniques. For control cristae, type I (3758) and type II (3517) hair cells occurred in approximately equal numbers. However, the proportions varied in different longitudinal zones: Zone I (peripheral region) had four times more type II hair cells (2083) than type I (483), while Zone II (intermediate region) had almost seven times more type I (2517) than type II (367) hair cells and Zone III (central region) had relatively equal numbers of type I (758) and type II (1067) hair cells. Novel findings included the following: (1) immediately after the post-injection sequence (PIS) of streptomycin, there was a significant reduction in both hair cells (-93%) and supporting cells (-45%); (2) by 70 days after the PIS, the population of type I hair cells returned to control values (however, the normal complement of complex calyces took 1 year to recover); (3) during the first 143 days after the PIS, the number of type I and type II hair cells across all zones returned linearly with about the same slope (46 and 43 cells per day, respectively), although the rate of return differed significantly in different zones; (4) there was a massive overproduction of hair cells (+150%) and supporting cells (+120%) during the first 5 months of recovery; and (5) during the first year after the PIS, both hair cells and supporting cells increased and their increases in numbers were correlated (r = 0.88, P < 0.01). Knowledge of the sequence and numbers of regenerating hair cells may help elucidate common modes of cell survival, recovery, and compensation from neural insult.

  19. Nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) expression in histologically normal margins of oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Itoiz, María E.; Guiñazú, Natalia; Piccini, Daniel; Gea, Susana; López-de Blanc, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    The activity of Nitric Oxide Synthase 2 (NOS2) was found in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) but not in normal mucosa. Molecular changes associated to early carcinogenesis have been found in mucosa near carcinomas, which is considered a model to study field cancerization. The aim of the present study is to analyze NOS2 expression at the histologically normal margins of OSCC. Study Design: Eleven biopsy specimens of OSCC containing histologically normal margins (HNM) were analyzed. Ten biopsies of normal oral mucosa were used as controls. The activity of NOS2 was determined by immunohistochemistry. Salivary nitrate and nitrite as well as tobacco and alcohol consumption were also analyzed. The Chi-squared test was applied. Results: Six out of the eleven HNM from carcinoma samples showed positive NOS2 activity whereas all the control group samples yielded negative (p=0.005). No statistically significant association between enzyme expression and tobacco and/or alcohol consumption and salivary nitrate and nitrite was found. Conclusions: NOS2 expression would be an additional evidence of alterations that may occur in a state of field cancerization before the appearance of potentially malignant morphological changes. Key words:Field cancerization, oral squamous cell carcinoma, Nitric Oxide Synthase 2 (NOS2), malignity markers. PMID:24316703

  20. Distinguishing normal cells from cancer cells via lysosome-targetable pH biomarkers with benzo[a]phenoxazine skeleton.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yan-Hua; Li, Xiao-Jun; Sun, Ru; Xu, Yu-Jie; Ge, Jian-Feng

    2016-08-24

    In this paper, the design of a lysosome-targetable pH probe that has a fluorescent OFF (pH = 4) to ON (pH = 5-6) response is described to identify lysosomes in normal cells. The mechanism of photoinduced electron transfer with a fluorophore-based reaction (FBR-PET) was proposed. Benzo[a]phenoxazines with electro-donating aryl groups were selected, its (2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)imino-, (2-hydroxyphenyl)imino- and (2-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenyl)- imino-derivatives (probes 1a-c) were prepared and their optical responses towards pH were evaluated; their fluorescence pH titration experiments gave regularly changes with the increasing electro-donating abilities at the linked aryl groups, the (2-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenyl)iminobenzo[a]phenoxazine (probe 1c) exhibited a nearly OFF-ON response at 580-800 nm. All probes were reversible, and they showed excellent selectivity toward the proton over other competitive species. Fluorescence confocal images were performed with HeLa, KB cancer cells and V79 normal cells, probes 1a-c are all lysosome-targetable pH probes, and benzo[a]phenoxazine with (2-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenyl)imino-group (probe 1c) has potential applications in selective differentiation of normal cells from cancer cells. PMID:27497010

  1. Distinguishing normal cells from cancer cells via lysosome-targetable pH biomarkers with benzo[a]phenoxazine skeleton.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yan-Hua; Li, Xiao-Jun; Sun, Ru; Xu, Yu-Jie; Ge, Jian-Feng

    2016-08-24

    In this paper, the design of a lysosome-targetable pH probe that has a fluorescent OFF (pH = 4) to ON (pH = 5-6) response is described to identify lysosomes in normal cells. The mechanism of photoinduced electron transfer with a fluorophore-based reaction (FBR-PET) was proposed. Benzo[a]phenoxazines with electro-donating aryl groups were selected, its (2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)imino-, (2-hydroxyphenyl)imino- and (2-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenyl)- imino-derivatives (probes 1a-c) were prepared and their optical responses towards pH were evaluated; their fluorescence pH titration experiments gave regularly changes with the increasing electro-donating abilities at the linked aryl groups, the (2-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenyl)iminobenzo[a]phenoxazine (probe 1c) exhibited a nearly OFF-ON response at 580-800 nm. All probes were reversible, and they showed excellent selectivity toward the proton over other competitive species. Fluorescence confocal images were performed with HeLa, KB cancer cells and V79 normal cells, probes 1a-c are all lysosome-targetable pH probes, and benzo[a]phenoxazine with (2-hydroxy-5-methoxyphenyl)imino-group (probe 1c) has potential applications in selective differentiation of normal cells from cancer cells.

  2. HMGA1 silencing restores normal stem cell characteristics in colon cancer stem cells by increasing p53 levels

    PubMed Central

    Puca, Francesca; Colamaio, Marianna; Federico, Antonella; Gemei, Marica; Tosti, Nadia; Bastos, André Uchimura; Vecchio, Luigi Del; Pece, Salvatore; Battista, Sabrina; Fusco, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    High-mobility group A1 (HMGA1) proteins are architectural chromatinic proteins, abundantly expressed during embryogenesis and in most cancer tissues, but expressed at low levels or absent in normal adult tissues. Several studies have demonstrated that HMGA1 proteins play a causal role in neoplastic cell transformation. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of these proteins in the control of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which have emerged as a preferred target in cancer therapy, because of their role in cancer recurrence. We observed that HMGA1 is overexpressed in colon tumour stem cell (CTSC) lines compared to normal and colon cancer tissues. We demonstrated that HMGA1 silencing in CTSCs increases stem cell quiescence and reduces self-renewal and sphere-forming efficiency (SFE). The latter, together with the upregulation and asymmetric distribution of NUMB, is indicative of the recovery of an asymmetric division pattern, typical of normal stem cells. We further found that HMGA1 transcriptionally regulates p53, which is known to control the balance between symmetric and asymmetric divisions in CSCs. Therefore, our data indicate a critical role for HMGA1 in regulating both self-renewal and the symmetric/asymmetric division ratio in CSCs, suggesting that blocking HMGA1 function may be an effective anti-cancer therapy. PMID:24833610

  3. Selenoprotein P Inhibits Radiation-Induced Late Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation and Normal Cell Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Eckers, Jaimee C.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Xiao, Wusheng; Sarsour, Ehab H.; Goswami, Prabhat C.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation is a common mode of cancer therapy whose outcome is often limited because of normal tissue toxicity. We have shown previously that the accumulation of radiation-induced late reactive oxygen species (ROS) precedes cell death, suggesting that metabolic oxidative stress could regulate cellular radiation response. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether selenoprotein P (SEPP1), a major supplier of selenium to tissues and an antioxidant, regulates late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated normal human fibroblasts (NHFs). Methods and Materials: Flow cytometry analysis of cell viability, cell cycle phase distribution, and dihydroethidium oxidation, along with clonogenic assays, were used to measure oxidative stress and toxicity. Human antioxidant mechanisms array and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were used to measure gene expression during late ROS accumulation in irradiated NHFs. Sodium selenite addition and SEPP1 overexpression were used to determine the causality of SEPP1 regulating late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated NHFs. Results: Irradiated NHFs showed late ROS accumulation (4.5-fold increase from control; P<.05) that occurs after activation of the cell cycle checkpoint pathways and precedes cell death. The mRNA levels of CuZn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxiredoxin 3, and thioredoxin reductase 1 increased approximately 2- to 3-fold, whereas mRNA levels of cold shock domain containing E1 and SEPP1 increased more than 6-fold (P<.05). The addition of sodium selenite before the radiation treatment suppressed toxicity (45%; P<.05). SEPP1 overexpression suppressed radiation-induced late ROS accumulation (35%; P<.05) and protected NHFs from radiation-induced toxicity (58%; P<.05). Conclusion: SEPP1 mitigates radiation-induced late ROS accumulation and normal cell injury.

  4. "Per cell" normalization method for mRNA measurement by quantitative PCR and microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Jun; Aisaki, Ken-ichi; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Nakatsu, Noriyuki; Ono, Atsushi; Kodama, Yukio; Nagao, Taku

    2006-01-01

    Background Transcriptome data from quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) and DNA microarrays are typically obtained from a fixed amount of RNA collected per sample. Therefore, variations in tissue cellularity and RNA yield across samples in an experimental series compromise accurate determination of the absolute level of each mRNA species per cell in any sample. Since mRNAs are copied from genomic DNA, the simplest way to express mRNA level would be as copy number per template DNA, or more practically, as copy number per cell. Results Here we report a method (designated the "Percellome" method) for normalizing the expression of mRNA values in biological samples. It provides a "per cell" readout in mRNA copy number and is applicable to both quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) and DNA microarray studies. The genomic DNA content of each sample homogenate was measured from a small aliquot to derive the number of cells in the sample. A cocktail of five external spike RNAs admixed in a dose-graded manner (dose-graded spike cocktail; GSC) was prepared and added to each homogenate in proportion to its DNA content. In this way, the spike mRNAs represented absolute copy numbers per cell in the sample. The signals from the five spike mRNAs were used as a dose-response standard curve for each sample, enabling us to convert all the signals measured to copy numbers per cell in an expression profile-independent manner. A series of samples was measured by Q-PCR and Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays using this Percellome method, and the results showed up to 90 % concordance. Conclusion Percellome data can be compared directly among samples and among different studies, and between different platforms, without further normalization. Therefore, "percellome" normalization can serve as a standard method for exchanging and comparing data across different platforms and among different laboratories. PMID:16571132

  5. Human tracheobronchial basal cells. Normal versus remodeling/repairing phenotypes in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Moumita; Ahmad, Shama; Jian, Abhilasha; Li, Bilan; Smith, Russell W; Helm, Karen M; Seibold, Max A; Groshong, Steven D; White, Carl W; Reynolds, Susan D

    2013-12-01

    Human tracheobronchial epithelial (TBE) basal cells (BCs) function as progenitors in normal tissue. However, mechanistic studies are typically performed in vitro and frequently use BCs recovered from patients who die of nonrespiratory disease. It is not known whether the cadaveric epithelium (1) is undergoing homeostatic remodeling and/or repair, or (2) yields BC clones that represent homeostatic processes identified in tissue. We sought to compare the phenotype of TBE-BCs with that of BCs cultured under optimal clone-forming conditions. TBE pathology was evaluated using quantitative histomorphometry. The cultured BC phenotype was determined by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis. Clone organization and cell phenotype were determined by immunostaining. The cadaveric TBE is 20% normal. In these regions, BCs are keratin (K)-5(+) and tetraspanin CD151(+), and demonstrate a low mitotic index. In contrast, 80% of the cadaveric TBE exhibits homeostatic remodeling/repair processes. In these regions, BCs are K5(+)/K14(+), and a subset expresses tissue factor (TF). Passage 1 TBE cells are BCs that are K5(+)/TF(+), and half coexpress CD151. Optimal clone formation conditions use an irradiated NIH3T3 fibroblast feeder layer (American Type Culture Collection, Frederick, MD) and serum-supplemented Epicult-B medium (Stemcell Technologies, La Jolla, CA). The TF(+)/CD151(-) BC subpopulation is the most clonogenic BC subtype, and is enriched with K14(+) cells. TF(+)/CD151(-) BCs generate clones containing BCs that are K5(+)/Trp63(+), but K14(-)/CD151(-). TF(+) cells are limited to the clone edge. In conclusion, clonogenic human TBE BCs (1) exhibit a molecular phenotype that is a composite of the normal and remodeling/reparative BC phenotypes observed in tissue, and (2) generate organoid clones that contain phenotypically distinct BC subpopulations.

  6. Tubulin perturbation leads to unexpected cell wall modifications and affects stomatal behaviour in Populus.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Prashant S; Hu, Hao; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Maloney, Victoria J; Xiao, Hui; Xue, Liang-Jiao; Chung, Jeng-Der; Johnson, Virgil E; Zhu, Yingying; Peter, Gary F; Hahn, Michael G; Mansfield, Shawn D; Harding, Scott A; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2015-10-01

    Cortical microtubules are integral to plant morphogenesis, cell wall synthesis, and stomatal behaviour, presumably by governing cellulose microfibril orientation. Genetic manipulation of tubulins often leads to abnormal plant development, making it difficult to probe additional roles of cortical microtubules in cell wall biogenesis. Here, it is shown that expressing post-translational C-terminal modification mimics of α-tubulin altered cell wall characteristics and guard cell dynamics in transgenic Populus tremula x alba that otherwise appear normal. 35S promoter-driven transgene expression was high in leaves but unusually low in xylem, suggesting high levels of tubulin transgene expression were not tolerated in wood-forming tissues during regeneration of transformants. Cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin contents were unaffected in transgenic wood, but expression of cell wall-modifying enzymes, and extractability of lignin-bound pectin and xylan polysaccharides were increased in developing xylem. The results suggest that pectin and xylan polysaccharides deposited early during cell wall biogenesis are more sensitive to subtle tubulin perturbation than cellulose and matrix polysaccharides deposited later. Tubulin perturbation also affected guard cell behaviour, delaying drought-induced stomatal closure as well as light-induced stomatal opening in leaves. Pectins have been shown to confer cell wall flexibility critical for reversible stomatal movement, and results presented here are consistent with microtubule involvement in this process. Taken together, the data show the value of growth-compatible tubulin perturbations for discerning microtubule functions, and add to the growing body of evidence for microtubule involvement in non-cellulosic polysaccharide assembly during cell wall biogenesis.

  7. Tubulin perturbation leads to unexpected cell wall modifications and affects stomatal behaviour in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, Prashant S.; Hu, Hao; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Maloney, Victoria J.; Xiao, Hui; Xue, Liang-Jiao; Chung, Jeng-Der; Johnson, Virgil E.; Zhu, Yingying; Peter, Gary F.; Hahn, Michael G.; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Harding, Scott A.; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2015-01-01

    Cortical microtubules are integral to plant morphogenesis, cell wall synthesis, and stomatal behaviour, presumably by governing cellulose microfibril orientation. Genetic manipulation of tubulins often leads to abnormal plant development, making it difficult to probe additional roles of cortical microtubules in cell wall biogenesis. Here, it is shown that expressing post-translational C-terminal modification mimics of α-tubulin altered cell wall characteristics and guard cell dynamics in transgenic Populus tremula x alba that otherwise appear normal. 35S promoter-driven transgene expression was high in leaves but unusually low in xylem, suggesting high levels of tubulin transgene expression were not tolerated in wood-forming tissues during regeneration of transformants. Cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin contents were unaffected in transgenic wood, but expression of cell wall-modifying enzymes, and extractability of lignin-bound pectin and xylan polysaccharides were increased in developing xylem. The results suggest that pectin and xylan polysaccharides deposited early during cell wall biogenesis are more sensitive to subtle tubulin perturbation than cellulose and matrix polysaccharides deposited later. Tubulin perturbation also affected guard cell behaviour, delaying drought-induced stomatal closure as well as light-induced stomatal opening in leaves. Pectins have been shown to confer cell wall flexibility critical for reversible stomatal movement, and results presented here are consistent with microtubule involvement in this process. Taken together, the data show the value of growth-compatible tubulin perturbations for discerning microtubule functions, and add to the growing body of evidence for microtubule involvement in non-cellulosic polysaccharide assembly during cell wall biogenesis. PMID:26246616

  8. Prostate stromal cell proteomics analysis discriminates normal from tumour reactive stromal phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Jason P.; Spary, Lisa K.; Mason, Malcolm D.; Tabi, Zsuzsanna; Brewis, Ian A.; Clayton, Aled

    2016-01-01

    Changes within interstitial stromal compartments often accompany carcinogenesis, and this is true of prostate cancer. Typically, the tissue becomes populated by myofibroblasts that can promote progression. Not all myofibroblasts exhibit the same negative influence, however, and identifying the aggressive form of myofibroblast may provide useful information at diagnosis. A means of molecularly defining such myofibroblasts is unknown. We compared protein profiles of normal and diseased stroma isolated from prostate cancer patients to identify discriminating hallmarks of disease-associated stroma. We included the stimulation of normal stromal cells with known myofibroblast inducers namely soluble TGFβ and exosome-associated-TGFβ and compared the function and protein profiles arising. In all 6-patients examined, diseased stroma exhibited a pro-angiogenic influence on endothelial cells, generating large multicellular vessel-like structures. Identical structures were apparent following stimulation of normal stroma with exosomes (5/6 patients), but TGFβ-stimulation generated a non-angiogenic stroma. Proteomics highlighted disease-related cytoskeleton alterations such as elevated Transgelin (TAGLN). Many of these were also changed following TGFβ or exosome stimulation and did not well discriminate the nature of the stimulus. Soluble TGFβ, however triggered differential expression of proteins related to mitochondrial function including voltage dependent ion channels VDAC1 and 2, and this was not found in the other stromal types studied. Surprisingly, Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ALDH1A1), a stem-cell associated protein was detected in normal stromal cells and found to decrease in disease. In summary, we have discovered a set of proteins that contribute to defining disease-associated myofibroblasts, and emphasise the similarity between exosome-generated myofibroblasts and those naturally arising in situ. PMID:26934553

  9. Erythrokinetics: quantitative measurements of red cell production and destruction in normal subjects and patients with anemia.

    PubMed

    Giblett, Eloise R; Coleman, Daniel H; Pirzio-Biroli, Giacomo; Donohue, Dennis M; Motulsky, Arno G; Finch, Clement A

    2016-03-17

    To study erythropoiesis and anemia, one must have a firm foundation of indices that accurately measure red blood cell production and destruction. This paper, authored by hematology legends Arno G. Motulsky and Clement A. Finch, provides that foundation. Using methods that would not be approved in today's environment, the authors studied a cohort of normal healthy patients and an equal number of patients with different forms of anemia. The results confirm a reciprocal model of red cell production and destruction, show that anemia can be the result of either underproduction (a regenerative anemia or ineffective erythropoiesis) or increased destruction, and define parameters for distinguishing these 2 possibilities that are still widely used today.

  10. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectromicroscopic characterization of stem-like cell populations in human esophageal normal and adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zhao, R; Quaroni, L; Casson, A G

    2010-01-01

    We have tested an approach to identify putative cancer stem cells that involves measurement of the infrared absorption spectrum of individual cells in an aqueous environment, and their subsequent classification using multivariate data analysis techniques. Two primary esophageal cell lines were characterized: the immortalized normal esophageal epithelial cell line, Het-1A, and the esophageal adenocarcinoma cell line, OE33. In addition, we also evaluated spheroids, reflecting stem-like cell populations, which were derived from each parent cell line when grown in serum-free media. As differences in cell size appeared to be a strong discriminating factor, a correction needs to be performed to allow a reliable classification based on infrared absorption spectra. We demonstrated that stem-like cells derived from Het-1A could easily be discriminated on the basis of absorbance differences in the 1000-1200 cm(-1) spectral interval, whereas this was not possible for OE33. Furthermore, we found that changes due to aging of OE33 cells in culture dominated the infrared absorption spectra and somewhat limited the potential of this approach to identify stem-like cell populations using this in vitro model system.

  11. Response to hypogravity of normal in vitro cultured follicular cells from thyroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meli, Antonella; Perrella, Giuseppina; Curcio, Francesco; Saverio, F.; Impiombato, Ambesi

    Aim of this investigation is the study of molecular modifications occurring in differentiated mammalian cells exposed to gravitational changes. The test system chosen is a well characterized clone of differentiated, normal thyroid follicular cells (FRTL5) in long-term culture. As a follow-up to our recent experiment performed during the MASER-7 sounding rocket mission, flown for European Space Agency by Swedish Space Corporation in May 1996, we evaluated FRTL5 cells responses to Thyroid Stimulating Hormone dependent cAMP production under acute hypogravity conditions obtained in a fast rotating clinostat. Following this approach, we evaluated the FRTL5 cells response to TSH under microgravity conditions in order to optimize experimental tools and strategies in preparation to, and in between real flight missions.

  12. Light trapping for emission from a photovoltaic cell under normally incident monochromatic illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Yasuhiko Iizuka, Hideo; Mizuno, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Kazuo; Ichikawa, Tadashi; Ito, Hiroshi; Kajino, Tsutomu; Ichiki, Akihisa; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi

    2014-09-28

    We have theoretically demonstrated a new light-trapping mechanism to reduce emission from a photovoltaic (PV) cell used for a monochromatic light source, which improves limiting conversion efficiency determined by the detailed balance. A multilayered bandpass filter formed on the surface of a PV cell has been found to prevent the light generated inside by radiative recombination from escaping the cell, resulting in a remarkable decrease of the effective solid angle for the emission. We have clarified a guide to design a suitable configuration of the bandpass filter and achieved significant reduction of the emission. The resultant gain in monochromatic conversion efficiency in the radiative limit due to the optimally designed 18-layerd bandpass filters is as high as 6% under normally incident 1064 nm illumination of 10 mW/cm²~ 1 kW/cm², compared with the efficiency for the perfect anti-reflection treatment to the surface of a conventional solar cell.

  13. Target cell-dependent normalization of transmitter release at neocortical synapses.

    PubMed

    Koester, Helmut J; Johnston, Daniel

    2005-05-01

    The efficacy and short-term modification of neocortical synaptic connections vary with the type of target neuron. We investigated presynaptic Ca2+ and release probability at single synaptic contacts between pairs of neurons in layer 2/3 of the rat neocortex. The amplitude of Ca2+ signals in boutons of pyramids contacting bitufted or multipolar interneurons or other pyramids was dependent on the target cell type. Optical quantal analysis at single synaptic contacts suggested that release probabilities are also target cell-specific. Both the Ca2+ signal and the release probability of different boutons of a pyramid contacting the same target cell varied little. We propose that the mechanisms that regulate the functional properties of boutons of a pyramid normalize the presynaptic Ca2+ influx and release probability for all those boutons that innervate the same target cell.

  14. Fluorescence Characteristics and Lifetime Images of Photosensitizers of Talaporfin Sodium and Sodium Pheophorbide a in Normal and Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Kamlesh; Yamamoto, Kazuhito; Furuya, Kazunari; Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Li, Liming; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime images of talaporfin sodium and sodium-pheophorbide a, which can be regarded as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy, were measured in normal and cancer cells. The reduction of the fluorescence intensity by photoirradiation was observed for both photosensitizers in both cells, but the quenching rate was much faster in cancer cells than in normal cells. These results are explained in terms of the excessive generation of reactive oxygen species via photoexcitation of these photosensitizers in cancer cells. The fluorescence lifetimes of both photosensitizers in cancer cells are different from those in normal cells, which originates from the different intracellular environments around the photosensitizers between normal and cancer cells. PMID:25993516

  15. Novel antioxidants are not toxic to normal tissues but effectively kill cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Aladedunye, Felix; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Li, Dongping; Thomas, James; Kovalchuk, Olga; Przybylski, Roman

    2013-10-01

    Free radicals are formed as a result of cellular processes and play a key role in predisposition to and development of numerous diseases and of premature aging. Recently, we reported the syntheses of a number of novel phenolic antioxidants for possible application in food industry. In the present study, analyses of the cellular processes and molecular gene expression effects of some of the novel antioxidants in normal human tissues and in cancer cells were undertaken. Results indicated that whereas the examined antioxidants showed no effects on morphology and gene expression of normal human oral and gingival epithelial tissues, they exerted a profound cell killing effect on breast cancer cells, including on chemotherapy-resistant breast cancer cells and on oral squamous carcinoma cells. Among the tested antioxidants, N-decyl-N-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) propanamide and N-decyl-N-(3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) propanamide were the most promising, with excellent potential for cancer treatment. Moreover, our gene expression databases can be used as a roadmap for future analysis of mechanisms of antioxidant action.

  16. Optical and Nanoparticle Analysis of Normal and Cancer Cells by Light Transmission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deatsch, Alison; Sun, Nan; Johnson, Jeffery; Stack, Sharon; Szajko, John; Sander, Christopher; Rebuyon, Roland; Easton, Judah; Tanner, Carol; Ruggiero, Steven

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated the optical properties of human oral and ovarian cancer and normal cells. Specifically, we have measured the absolute optical extinction for intra-cellular material (lysates) in aqueous suspension. Measurements were conducted over a wavelength range of 250 to 1000 nm with 1 nm resolution using Light Transmission Spectroscopy (LTS). This provides both the absolute extinction of materials under study and, with Mie inversion, the absolute number of particles of a given diameter as a function of diameter in the range of 1 to 3000 nm. Our preliminary studies show significant differences in both the extinction and particle size distributions associated with cancer versus normal cells, which appear to be correlated with differences in the particle size distribution in the range of approximately 50 to 250 nm. Especially significant is a clearly higher density of particles at about 100 nm and smaller for normal cells. Department of Physics, Harper Cancer Research Institute, and the Office of Research at the University of Notre Dame.

  17. Low glucose microenvironment of normal kidney cells stabilizes a subset of messengers involved in angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    de Laplanche, Elodie; Boudria, Asma; Dacheux, Estelle; Vincent, Anne; Gadot, Nicolas; Assade, Fouzia; Le Corf, Katy; Leroy, Xavier; Mège Lechevallier, Florence; Eymin, Béatrice; Dalla Venezia, Nicole; Simonnet, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As glucose is a mandatory nutrient for cell proliferation and renewal, it is suspected that glucose microenvironment is sensed by all cell types to regulate angiogenesis. Several glucose‐sensing components have been partially described to respond to high glucose levels. However, little is known about the response to low glucose. Here, we used well‐differentiated isolated normal rat renal tubules under normal oxygenation conditions to assess the angiogenic response to low glucose. In apparent paradox, but confirming observations made separately in other models, high glucose but also low glucose increased mRNA level of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA). A subset of mRNAs including hypoxia‐inducible factor 1A (HIF1A), angiopoietin receptor (TIE‐2), and VEGF receptor 2 (FLK1) were similarly glucose‐sensitive and responded to low glucose by increased stability independently of HIF1A and HIF2A proteins. These results contribute to gain some insights as to how normal cells response to low glucose may play a role in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25602014

  18. Human cytokine responses induced by Gram-positive cell walls of normal intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Chen, T; Isomäki, P; Rimpiläinen, M; Toivanen, P

    1999-01-01

    The normal microbiota plays an important role in the health of the host, but little is known of how the human immune system recognizes and responds to Gram-positive indigenous bacteria. We have investigated cytokine responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to Gram-positive cell walls (CW) derived from four common intestinal indigenous bacteria, Eubacterium aerofaciens (Eu.a.), Eubacterium limosum(Eu.l.), Lactobacillus casei(L.c.), and Lactobacillus fermentum (L.f.). Our results indicate that Gram-positive CW of the normal intestinal microbiota can induce cytokine responses of the human PBMC. The profile, level and kinetics of these responses are similar to those induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or CW derived from a pathogen, Streptococcus pyogenes (S.p.). Bacterial CW are capable of inducing production of a proinflammatory cytokine, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and an anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, but not that of IL-4 or interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). Monocytes are the main cell population in PBMC to produce TNF-α and IL-10. Induction of cytokine secretion is serum-dependent; both CD14-dependent and -independent pathways are involved. These findings suggest that the human cytokine responses induced by Gram-positive CW of the normal intestinal microbiota are similar to those induced by LPS or Gram-positive CW of the pathogens. PMID:10540188

  19. Factors affecting the cryosurvival of mouse two-cell embryos.

    PubMed

    Critser, J K; Arneson, B W; Aaker, D V; Huse-Benda, A R; Ball, G D

    1988-01-01

    A series of 4 experiments was conducted to examine factors affecting the survival of frozen-thawed 2-cell mouse embryos. Rapid addition of 1.5 M-DMSO (20 min equilibration at 25 degrees C) and immediate, rapid removal using 0.5 M-sucrose did not alter the frequency (mean +/- s.e.m.) of blastocyst development in vitro when compared to untreated controls (90.5 +/- 2.7% vs 95.3 +/- 2.8%). There was an interaction between the temperature at which slow cooling was terminated and thawing rate. Termination of slow cooling (-0.3 degrees C/min) at -40 degrees C with subsequent rapid thawing (approximately 1500 degrees C/min) resulted in a lower frequency of blastocyst development than did termination of slow cooling at -80 degrees C with subsequent slow thawing (+8 degrees C/min) (36.8 +/- 5.6% vs 63.9 +/- 5.7%). When slow cooling was terminated between -40 and -60 degrees C, higher survival rates were achieved with rapid thawing. When slow cooling was terminated below -60 degrees C, higher survival rates were obtained with slow thawing rates. In these comparisons absolute survival rates were highest among embryos cooled below -60 degrees C and thawed slowly. However, when slow cooling was terminated at -32 degrees C, with subsequent rapid warming, survival rates were not different from those obtained when embryos were cooled to -80 degrees C and thawed slowly (52.4 +/- 9.5%, 59.5 +/- 8.6%). These results suggest that optimal cryosurvival rates may be obtained from 2-cell mouse embryos by a rapid or slow thawing procedure, as has been found for mouse preimplantation embryos at later stages.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Normal and neoplastic urothelial stem cells: getting to the root of the problem

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Philip Levy; Kurtova, Antonina; Chan, Keith Syson

    2012-01-01

    Most epithelial tissues contain self-renewing stem cells that mature into downstream progenies with increasingly limited differentiation potential. It is not surprising that cancers arising from such hierarchically organized epithelial tissues retain features of cellular differentiation. Accumulating evidence suggests that the urothelium of the urinary bladder is a hierarchically organized tissue, containing tissue-specific stem cells that are important for both normal homeostasis and injury response. The phenotypic and functional properties of cancer stem cells (CSCs; also known as tumour-initiating cells) from bladder cancer tissue have been studied in detail. Urothelial CSCs are not isolated by a ‘one-marker-fits-all’ approach; instead, various cell surface marker combinations (possibly reflecting the cell-of-origin) are used to isolate CSCs from distinct differentiation subtypes of urothelial carcinomas. Additional CSC markers, including cytokeratin 14 (CK14), aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 family, member A1 (ALDH1A1), and tumour protein 63 (p63), have revealed prognostic value for urothelial carcinomas. Signalling pathways involved in normal stem cell self-renewal and differentiation are implicated in the malignant transformation of different subsets of urothelial carcinomas. Early expansion of primitive CK14+ cells—driven by genetic pathways such as STAT3—can lead to the development of carcinoma in situ, and CSC-enriched urothelial carcinomas are associated with poor clinical outcomes. Given that bladder CSCs are the proposed root of malignancy and drivers of cancer initiation and progression for urothelial carcinomas, these cells are ideal targets for anticancer therapies. PMID:22890301

  1. Enzymes of creatine biosynthesis, arginine and methionine metabolism in normal and malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Bera, Soumen; Wallimann, Theo; Ray, Subhankar; Ray, Manju

    2008-12-01

    The creatine/creatine kinase system decreases drastically in sarcoma. In the present study, an investigation of catalytic activities, western blot and mRNA expression unambiguously demonstrates the prominent expression of the creatine-synthesizing enzymes l-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase and N-guanidinoacetate methyltransferase in sarcoma, Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and Sarcoma 180 cells, whereas both enzymes were virtually undetectable in normal muscle. Compared to that of normal animals, these enzymes remained unaffected in the kidney or liver of sarcoma-bearing mice. High activity and expression of mitochondrial arginase II in sarcoma indicated increased ornithine formation. Slightly or moderately higher levels of ornithine, guanidinoacetate and creatinine were observed in sarcoma compared to muscle. Despite the intrinsically low level of creatine in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and Sarcoma 180 cells, these cells could significantly take up and release creatine, suggesting a functional creatine transport, as verified by measuring mRNA levels of creatine transporter. Transcript levels of arginase II, ornithine-decarboxylase, S-adenosyl-homocysteine hydrolase and methionine-synthase were significantly upregulated in sarcoma and in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and Sarcoma 180 cells. Overall, the enzymes related to creatine and arginine/methionine metabolism were found to be significantly upregulated in malignant cells. However, the low levels of creatine kinase in the same malignant cells do not appear to be sufficient for the building up of an effective creatine/phosphocreatine pool. Instead of supporting creatine biosynthesis, l-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase and N-guanidinoacetate methyltransferase appear to be geared to support cancer cell metabolism in the direction of polyamine and methionine synthesis because both these compounds are in high demand in proliferating cancer cells.

  2. ADAMTS-1 Is Found in the Nuclei of Normal and Tumoral Breast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Suély V.; Lima, Maíra A.; Cella, Nathalie; Jaeger, Ruy G.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins secreted in the extracellular matrix microenvironment (ECM) by tumor cells are involved in cell adhesion, motility, intercellular communication and invasion. The tumor microenvironment is expansively modified and remodeled by proteases, resulting in important changes in both cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions and in the generation of new signals from the cell surface. Metalloproteinases belonging to the ADAMTS (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs) family have been implicated in tissue remodeling events observed in cancer development, growth and progression. Here we investigated the subcellular localization of ADAMTS-1 in normal-like (MCF10-A) and tumoral (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231) human breast cells. ADAMTS-1 is a secreted protease found in the extracellular matrix. However, in this study we show for the first time that ADAMTS-1 is also present in the nuclei and nucleoli of the three mammary cell lines studied here. Our findings indicate that ADAMTS-1 has proteolytic functions in the nucleus through its interaction with aggrecan substrate. PMID:27764205

  3. The interaction of normal lymphocytes and cells from lymphoid cell lines (LCL)

    PubMed Central

    Ling, N. R.; Steel, C. M.; Wallin, Josephine; Hardy, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    The cytotoxic properties of human lymphocytes activated in mixed cell cultures with allogeneic lymphocytes or LCL cells have been investigated. Both activation and cytotoxic reactions could be obtained with almost pure populations of lymphocytes. No supernatant factors appeared to be involved. Human thymocytes and blood lymphocytes from pigs, guinea-pigs or rabbits were ineffective. Fibroblasts from human skin were not effective activators of human blood lymphocytes. There were marked differences in the susceptibility of various target cells to the cytotoxic reaction which could not be accounted for by any known antigenic classification. Various LCL cells were shown to lack cytotoxic potential under a variety of experimental conditions and, by this criterion, lacked immunological competence. It is suggested that the growth of abnormal lymphoid cells in vivo may be prevented by the cytotoxic mechanism described. PMID:4854906

  4. Expression of Ki-67 in normal oral epithelium, leukoplakic oral epithelium and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Birajdar, Smita Shrishail; Radhika, MB; Paremala, K; Sudhakara, M; Soumya, M; Gadivan, Mohsin

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objective: To demonstrate the presence, location and pattern of cell proliferation in different histological grades of oral epithelial dysplasia (OED), oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and normal oral epithelium (NOE) using an antibody directed against the Ki-67 antigen and its intensity of staining evaluated respectively. Materials and Methods: A total number of 100 archival paraffin embedded blocks obtained from Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology were studied. The case details were retrieved which consisted of histopathologically diagnosed cases of OSCC (n = 20), low risk OED (n = 30), high risk OED (n = 30) and normal appearing mucosa (n = 20) were taken as standard for comparison. Ki-67 immunostaining was detected. Ki-67 positive cells were counted in the five random high power fields in each case. Results: Ki-67 labeling Index (LI) was restricted to the basal and parabasal layers of the normal oral epithelium irrespective of age, sex and site whereas it was seen in the basal, suprabasal and spinous layers in OED. Ki-67 LI is increased in high risk cases than the low risk cases of OED. Ki-67 positive cells in OSCC were located in the periphery of the tumor nests than the center, where frequent mitoses were observed. Conclusion: The architectural alteration evaluated by Ki-67 antibody in proliferating cell distribution in the layers of epithelial dysplasias may provide useful information to evaluate the grading of OED. Ki-67 LI increased in high risk cases than low risk cases of OED. This study showed that over expression of Ki-67 antigen between well-differentiated and poorly differentiated OSCC was in accordance with histologic grade of malignancy but not in accordance with moderately differentiated OSCC. PMID:25328294

  5. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells affect the cell cycle arrest effect of genotoxic agents on acute lymphocytic leukemia cells via p21 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiran; Hu, Kaimin; Hu, Yongxian; Liu, Lizhen; Wang, Binsheng; Huang, He

    2014-09-01

    The effect of bone marrow microenvironment on the cell cycle of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. In this study, we found that in normal condition, bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) had no significant effect on the cell cycle and apoptosis of ALL; in the condition when the cell cycle of ALL was blocked by genotoxic agents, BM-MSCs could increase the S-phase cell ratio and decrease the G2/M phase ratio of ALL. Besides, BM-MSCs could protect ALL cells from drug-induced apoptosis. Then, we proved that BM-MSCs affect the cell cycle arrest effect of genotoxic agents on ALL cells via p21 down-regulation. Moreover, our results indicated that activation of Wnt/β-catenin and Erk pathways might be involved in the BM-MSC-induced down-regulation of p21 in ALL cells. Targeting microenvironment-related signaling pathway may therefore be a potential novel approach for ALL therapy.

  6. Dysregulation of CD30+ T cells by leukemia impairs isotype switching in normal B cells

    PubMed Central

    Cerutti, Andrea; Kim, Edmund C.; Shah, Shefali; Schattner, Elaine J.; Zan, Hong; Schaffer, András; Casali, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is associated with impaired immunoglobulin (Ig) class-switching from IgM to IgG and IgA, a defect that leads to recurrent infections. When activated in the presence of leukemic CLL B cells, T cells rapidly up-regulate CD30 through an OX40 ligand and interleukin 4 (IL-4)–dependent mechanism. These leukemia-induced CD30+ T cells inhibit CD40 ligand (CD40L)-mediated Sµ→Sγ and Sµ→Sα class-switch DNA recombination (CSR) by engaging CD30 ligand (CD30L), a molecule that interferes with the assembly of the CD40–tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor (TRAF) complex in nonmalignant IgD+ B cells. In addition, engagement of T cell CD30 by CD30L on neoplastic CLL B cells down-regulates the CD3-induced expression of CD40L. These findings indicate that, in CLL, abnormal CD30-CD30L interaction impairs IgG and IgA production by interfering with the CD40-mediated differentiation of nonmalignant B cells. PMID:11175813

  7. The role of mast cells in histologically "normal" appendices following emergency appendectomy in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhongbo; Esebua, Magda; Layfield, Lester

    2016-10-01

    Fifteen percent to 25% of appendices resected for a preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis have no neutrophilic infiltration, thus histologically "normal." The discrepancy between clinical presentation and the lack of definite morphologic changes is confounding. It has been indicated that mast cells may play a role in the pathogenesis of the appendicitis-like pain in patients with histologically negative appendices (HNAs). To investigate whether mast cell density (MCD) is increased in pediatric HNAs, we retrieved 50 appendectomy cases (30 HNA and 20 control, ages 2 days-18 years) in our institute in the last 10 years. All cases were stained with mast cell tryptase by immunohistochemistry, and MCD (count/high-power field) was measured in mucosa, submucosa, muscularis, and serosa. Mast cells had the greatest density in the mucosa, followed by the submucosa, in all appendices. MCDs in all 4 layers were significantly higher in HNAs than in the normal controls (mucosa: 46±9 vs 26±11, P<.01; submucosa: 18±5 vs 11±5, P<.01; muscularis: 6±3 vs 4±2, P<.01; serosa: 6±2 vs 4±2, P<.01). This result suggests that mast cells play an important role in pathogenesis of HNA cases. In clinical practice, pathologists may order immunohistochemical stains for mast cells in cases with no classic histologic findings of acute appendicitis following emergency appendectomy. If increased MCD is noted, the case may be reported as "appendicitis with increased mast cells." This assures surgeons that the appendectomy is the correct treatment and it is not necessary to look for other causes of acute abdomen. This is especially important in children. PMID:27649944

  8. Effects of X-irradiation and sodium butyrate on cell-cycle traverse on normal and radiosensitive lymphoblastoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.; Anderson, C.O.; Watson, J.V.

    1985-10-01

    We have used a multi-parameter flow-cytometric technique to analyse changes in cell-cycle phase distribution (early and late G1, S and G2+M phases) for normal and X-ray-sensitive (ataxia-telangiectasia, A-T) lymphoblastoid cells exposed to X-irradiation and sodium butyrate (either alone or in combination). Sodium butyrate, an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, is a useful pharmacological tool for determining the proposed role of a histone acetylation-based chromatin surveillance system in controlling cell-cycle responses to DNA damage. We report that X-irradiated A-T cells (acute doses up to 1.5 Gy) demonstrate deficiencies in the capacity to traverse G1 and G2+M phases, although we can find no evidence of the specific involvement of a sodium butyrate-sensitive process in normal cells or abnormalities in the responses of A-T cells to the drug. We conclude that abnormal cellular control of G1 transition in A-T may be the basis of disturbed cellular differentiation in vivo, particularly in non-proliferating tissues under conditions of accumulated environmental or spontaneous DNA damage.

  9. Accumulation of distinct prelamin A variants in human diploid fibroblasts differentially affects cell homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Candelario, Jose; Borrego, Stacey; Reddy, Sita; Comai, Lucio

    2011-02-01

    Lamin A is a component of the nuclear lamina that plays a major role in the structural organization and function of the nucleus. Lamin A is synthesized as a prelamin A precursor which undergoes four sequential post-translational modifications to generate mature lamin A. Significantly, a large number of point mutations in the LMNA gene cause a range of distinct human disorders collectively known as laminopathies. The mechanisms by which mutations in lamin A affect cell function and cause disease are unclear. Interestingly, recent studies have suggested that alterations in the normal lamin A pathway can contribute to cellular dysfunction. Specifically, we and others have shown, at the cellular level, that in the absence of mutations or altered splicing events, increased expression of wild-type prelamin A results in a growth defective phenotype that resembles that of cells expressing the mutant form of lamin A, termed progerin, associated with Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS). Remarkably, the phenotypes of cells expressing elevated levels of wild-type prelamin A can be reversed by either treatment with farnesyltransferase inhibitors or overexpression of ZMPSTE24, a critical prelamin A processing enzyme, suggesting that minor increases in the steady-state levels of one or more prelamin A intermediates is sufficient to induce cellular toxicity. Here, to investigate the molecular basis of the lamin A pathway toxicity, we characterized the phenotypic changes occurring in cells expressing distinct prelamin A variants mimicking specific prelamin A processing intermediates. This analysis demonstrates that distinct prelamin A variants differentially affect cell growth, nuclear membrane morphology, nuclear distribution of lamin A and the fundamental process of transcription. Expression of prelamin A variants that are constitutively farnesylated induced the formation of lamin A aggregates and dramatic changes in nuclear membrane morphology, which led to reduced

  10. A novel immortalized human endometrial stromal cell line with normal progestational response.

    PubMed

    Krikun, Graciela; Mor, Gil; Alvero, Ayesha; Guller, Seth; Schatz, Frederick; Sapi, Eva; Rahman, Mizanur; Caze, Rebeca; Qumsiyeh, Mazin; Lockwood, Charles J

    2004-05-01

    Obtaining primary human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs) for in vitro studies is limited by the scarcity of adequate human material and the inability to passage these cells in culture for long periods. Immortalization of these cells would greatly facilitate studies; however, the process of immortalization often results in abnormal karyotypes and aberrant functional characteristics. To meet this need, we have introduced telomerase into cultured HESCs to prevent the normal shortening of telomeres observed in adult somatic cells during mitosis. We have now developed and analyzed a newly immortalized HESC line that contains no clonal chromosomal structural or numerical abnormalities. In addition, when compared with the primary unpassaged parent cells, the new cell line displayed similar biochemical endpoints after treatment with ovarian steroids. Classical decidualization response to estradiol plus medroxyprogesterone acetate were seen in both morphologically, and progestin was seen to induce or regulate the expression of IGF binding protein-1, fibronectin, prolactin, tissue factor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and Fas/Fas ligand. In summary, an immortalized HESC line has been developed that is karyotypically, morphologically, and phenotypically similar to the primary parent cells, and it is a powerful and consistent resource for in vitro work.

  11. An imidazole functionalized pentameric thiophene displays different staining patterns in normal and malignant cells

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, Karin; Appelqvist, Hanna; Cieślar-Pobuda, Artur; Bäck, Marcus; Kågedal, Bertil; Jonasson, Jon A.; Los, Marek J.; Nilsson, K. Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular tools for fluorescent imaging of cells and their components are vital for understanding the function and activity of cells. Here, we report an imidazole functionalized pentameric oligothiophene, p-HTIm, that can be utilized for fluorescent imaging of cells. p-HTIm fluorescence in normal cells appeared in a peripheral punctate pattern partially co-localized with lysosomes, whereas a one-sided perinuclear Golgi associated localization of the dye was observed in malignant cells. The uptake of p-HTIm was temperature dependent and the intracellular target was reached within 1 h after staining. The ability of p-HTIm to stain cells was reduced when the imidazole side chain was chemically altered, verifying that specific imidazole side-chain functionalities are necessary for achieving the observed cellular staining. Our findings confirm that properly functionalized oligothiophenes can be utilized as fluorescent tools for vital staining of cells and that the selectivity toward distinct intracellular targets are highly dependent on the side-chain functionalities along the conjugated thiophene backbone. PMID:26501054

  12. Transfection of normal human bronchial epithelial cells with the bcl-2 oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.H.; Kenyon, K.D.; Tesfaigzi, J.

    1995-12-01

    In vitro, studies examining the transformation of virus-immortalized human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells after exposure to chemical and physical carcinogens have contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the development of lung cancer. Virus-immortalized HBE cells have been used because of both the limited life span of normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells in culture (approximately 30-35 population doublins) and their resistance to in vitro malignant transformation. For example, human papillomavirus (HPV)-immortalized HBE cells have been used to study the genetic changes that occur after exposure to {alpha}-particles in vitro. Although this model may prove to be useful for studying the 18% or less of bronchogenic carcinomas found to contain HPV sequences, it is not an appropriate model for studying the majority of lung epithelial malignancies in which HPV DNA is not detected. This view is supported by the fact that HPV-immortalized cell lines commonly exhibit aneuploidy. This results of this study suggest that: (1) NHBE cells can be transiently transfected with the pCMV{Beta} vector; and (2) the antibiotic hygromycin-resistant transfected cells.

  13. Particle irradiation induces FGF2 expression in normal human lens cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Bjornstad K, A.; Chang, E.; McNamara, M.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Lin, S. P.; Aragon, G.; Polansky, J. R.; Lui, G. M.; Blakely, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Particle Irradiation Induces FGF2 Expression in Normal Human Lens Cells. Particle radiations, including both proton and helium-ion beams, have been used to successfully treat choroidal melanoma, but with the complication of radiation-induced cataract. We have investigated a role for radiation-induced changes in the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) gene expression as part of the mechanism(s) underlying lens cell injury associated with cataract. Normal human lens epithelial (HLE) cells were cultured in vitro on extracellular matrix (ECM) originated from bovine corneal endothelial cells. This study reports evidence for rapid but transient induction of FGF2 transcripts, an increase of between 5- and 8-fold, within 0.5 h after exposure to particle radiation, followed by another wave of increased transcription at 2-3 h postirradiation. Immunofluorescence results confirm the enhanced levels of FGF2 protein rapidly after exposure to protons or helium ions, followed by another wave of increased activity unique to helium at 6 h postirradiation. This second wave of increased immunoreactivity was not observed in the proton-irradiated samples. Total FGF2 protein analysis after helium-ion exposures shows induced expression of three FGF2 isoforms, with an increase of up to 2-fold in the 18-kDa low-molecular-weight species. Studies of the effects of protons on individual FGF2 protein isoforms are in progress. Several mechanisms involving a role for FGF2 in radiation-induced cataract are discussed.

  14. Effective Alu Repeat Based RT-Qpcr Normalization in Cancer Cell Perturbation Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Rihani, Ali; Van Maerken, Tom; Pattyn, Filip; Van Peer, Gert; Beckers, Anneleen; De Brouwer, Sara; Kumps, Candy; Mets, Evelien; Van der Meulen, Joni; Rondou, Pieter; Leonelli, Carina; Mestdagh, Pieter; Speleman, Frank; Vandesompele, Jo

    2013-01-01

    Background Measuring messenger RNA (mRNA) levels using the reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is common practice in many laboratories. A specific set of mRNAs as internal control reference genes is considered as the preferred strategy to normalize RT-qPCR data. Proper selection of reference genes is a critical issue, especially in cancer cells that are subjected to different in vitro manipulations. These manipulations may result in dramatic alterations in gene expression levels, even of assumed reference genes. In this study, we evaluated the expression levels of 11 commonly used reference genes as internal controls for normalization of 19 experiments that include neuroblastoma, T-ALL, melanoma, breast cancer, non small cell lung cancer (NSCL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, and cervical cancer cell lines subjected to various perturbations. Results The geNorm algorithm in the software package qbase+ was used to rank the candidate reference genes according to their expression stability. We observed that the stability of most of the candidate reference genes varies greatly in perturbation experiments. Expressed Alu repeats show relatively stable expression regardless of experimental condition. These Alu repeats are ranked among the best reference assays in all perturbation experiments and display acceptable average expression stability values (M<0.5). Conclusions We propose the use of Alu repeats as a reference assay when performing cancer cell perturbation experiments. PMID:23977142

  15. Polycythemia vera. The in vitro response of normal and abnormal stem cell lines to erythropoietin.

    PubMed Central

    Prchal, J F; Adamson, J W; Murphy, S; Steinmann, L; Fialkow, P J

    1978-01-01

    Bone marrow cells from two glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) heterozygotes with polycythemia vera were cultured to determine whether progenitors which wre not of the polycythemia vera clone were present, and, if present, which cell lines contributed to the increase in erythroid colonies observed in response to added erythropoietin (ESF). To accomplish this, the G-6-PD isoenzyme activity of individual erythroid colonies was determined. All of the erythroid colonies analyzed in cultures without added ESF, contained the G-6-PD isoenzyme type characteristic of the abnormal clone. With higher ESF concentrations in the culture, however, there was an increase in the colonies that were not of the polycythemia vera clone. Analysis of the ratio of the various types of colonies indicated that normal and polycythemia vera cells are capable of responding to ESF in vitro. In selected patients, this technique permits analysis of the ratios of normal to abnormal cells during the course of the disease, in response to therapy and during late complications, such as myelofibrosis or leukemic transformation. PMID:659576

  16. Metformin selectively affects human glioblastoma tumor-initiating cell viability: A role for metformin-induced inhibition of Akt.

    PubMed

    Würth, Roberto; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Gatti, Monica; Bajetto, Adirano; Corsaro, Alessandro; Parodi, Alessia; Sirito, Rodolfo; Massollo, Michela; Marini, Cecilia; Zona, Gianluigi; Fenoglio, Daniela; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Filaci, Gilberto; Daga, Antonio; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cell theory postulates that a small population of tumor-initiating cells is responsible for the development, progression and recurrence of several malignancies, including glioblastoma. In this perspective, tumor-initiating cells represent the most relevant target to obtain effective cancer treatment. Metformin, a first-line drug for type II diabetes, was reported to possess anticancer properties affecting the survival of cancer stem cells in breast cancer models. We report that metformin treatment reduced the proliferation rate of tumor-initiating cell-enriched cultures isolated from four human glioblastomas. Metformin also impairs tumor-initiating cell spherogenesis, indicating a direct effect on self-renewal mechanisms. Interestingly, analyzing by FACS the antiproliferative effects of metformin on CD133-expressing subpopulation, a component of glioblastoma cancer stem cells, a higher reduction of proliferation was observed as compared with CD133-negative cells, suggesting a certain degree of cancer stem cell selectivity in its effects. In fact, glioblastoma cell differentiation strongly reduced sensitivity to metformin treatment. Metformin effects in tumor-initiating cell-enriched cultures were associated with a powerful inhibition of Akt-dependent cell survival pathway, while this pathway was not affected in differentiated cells. The specificity of metformin antiproliferative effects toward glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells was confirmed by the lack of significant inhibition of normal human stem cells (umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells) in vitro proliferation after metformin exposure. Altogether, these data clearly suggest that metformin exerts antiproliferative activity on glioblastoma cells, showing a higher specificity toward tumor-initiating cells, and that the inhibition of Akt pathway may represent a possible intracellular target of this effect.

  17. The response of normal and ataxia-telangiectasia cells to bleomycin: relationships between chromosome damage, cell cycle delay and cell killing.

    PubMed

    Zampetti-Bosseler, F; Scott, D

    1985-08-01

    In agreement with our earlier observation (Scott and Zampetti-Bosseler, 1982) on X-irradiated normal and ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) fibroblasts, we now report that after bleomycin or neocarzinostatin treatment also, A-T cells exhibit less G2 delay than normal cells. We confirm that A-T cells sustain more chromosome damage and lethality than normal cells after bleomycin. These observations support the hypothesis (Painter and Young, 1980) that A-T cells are defective in the recognition of certain lesions which normally lead to delays in progression through the cell cycle, during which they are repaired, and which, if unrepaired, lead to cell-lethal chromosome damage. However, we find that after bleomycin, as opposed to X-rays, the contribution of this type of lesion to cell death is minimal. The predominant lesions leading to cell death after bleomycin are not manifested at chromosome aberrations and do not lead to G2 delay or DNA-synthesis inhibition. A-T cells are defective in the recognition and/or repair of both types of lesion.

  18. Dietary amylose-amylopectin starch content affects glucose and lipid metabolism in adipocytes of normal and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kabir, M; Rizkalla, S W; Champ, M; Luo, J; Boillot, J; Bruzzo, F; Slama, G

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the chronic consumption of two starches, characterized by different glycemic indices and amylose-amylopectin content, on glucose metabolism in rat epididymal adipocytes. The two chosen starches were from mung bean (32% amylose) and cornstarch (0.5% amylose). The alpha-amylase digestibility was higher for the waxy cornstarch than that of the mung bean starch (60 +/- 4 vs. 45 +/- 3%, mean +/- SEM, respectively). The glycemic index of the waxy cornstarch diet (575 g starch /kg diet) was higher than that of the mung bean starch diet (107 +/- 7 vs. 67 +/- 5%, P < 0.01) when measured in vivo in two groups of normal rats (n = 9). In a subsequent study, normal and diabetic (streptozotocin-injected on d 2 of life) male Sprague-Dawley rats (18 per group) consumed a diet containing 575 g starch/kg diet as either waxy cornstarch or mung bean starch. After 3 wk, food intake, epididymal fat pad weights, and plasma glucose, insulin and triglyceride concentrations did not differ between diet groups. Adipocyte diameter was smaller in rats that consumed mung bean starch compared with those that consumed the waxy cornstarch diet (P < 0.01). The mung bean diet increased maximal insulin-stimulated 14C-glucose oxidation (% of basal values, P < 0. 05). In contrast, incorporation of 14C-glucose into total lipids was significantly lower in rats that consumed the mung bean diet (P < 0. 05). We conclude that in both normal and diabetic rats, the chronic replacement of a high glycemic index starch by a low glycemic index one in a mixed diet increases insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation, decreases glucose incorporation into total lipids and decreases epididymal adipocyte diameter. Thus, the type of starch mixed into the diet has important metabolic consequences at the cellular level in both normal and diabetic rats.

  19. How did the Elimination of the Earnings Test above the Normal Retirement Age affect Retirement Expectations?1

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, Pierre-Carl

    2010-01-01

    We look at the effect of the 2000 repeal of the earnings test above the normal retirement age on retirement expectations of workers in the Health and Retirement Study, aged 51 to 61 in 1992. For men, we find that those whose marginal wage rate increased when the earnings test was repealed, had the largest increase in the probability to work full-time past normal retirement age. We do not find significant evidence of effects of the repeal of the earnings test on the probability to work past age 62 or the expected claiming age. On the other hand, for those reaching the normal retirement age, deviations between the age at which Social Security benefits are actually claimed and the previously reported expected age are more negative in 2000 than in 1998. Since our calculations show that the tax introduced by the earnings test was small when accounting for actuarial benefit adjustments and differential mortality, our results suggest that although male workers form expectations in a way consistent with forward-looking behavior, they misperceive the complicated rules of the earnings test. Results for females suggest similar patterns but estimates are imprecise. PMID:21037938

  20. PKH26 Staining Defines Distinct Subsets of Normal Human Colon Epithelial Cells at Different Maturation Stages

    PubMed Central

    Pastò, Anna; Marchesi, Maddalena; Diamantini, Adamo; Frasson, Chiara; Curtarello, Matteo; Lago, Claudia; Pilotto, Giorgia; Parenti, Anna Rosita; Esposito, Giovanni; Agostini, Marco; Nitti, Donato; Amadori, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim Colon crypts are characterized by a hierarchy of cells distributed along the crypt axis. Aim of this paper was to develop an in vitro system for separation of epithelial cell subsets in different maturation stages from normal human colon. Methodology and Major Findings Dissociated colonic epithelial cells were stained with PKH26, which allows identification of distinct populations based on their proliferation rate, and cultured in vitro in the absence of serum. The cytofluorimetric expression of CK20, Msi-1 and Lgr5 was studied. The mRNA levels of several stemness-associated genes were also compared in cultured cell populations and in three colon crypt populations isolated by microdissection. A PKHpos population survived in culture and formed spheroids; this population included subsets with slow (PKHhigh) and rapid (PKHlow) replicative rates. Molecular analysis revealed higher mRNA levels of both Msi-1 and Lgr-5 in PKHhigh cells; by cytofluorimetric analysis, Msi-1+/Lgr5+ cells were only found within PKHhigh cells, whereas Msi-1+/Lgr5− cells were also observed in the PKHlow population. As judged by qRT-PCR analysis, the expression of several stemness-associated markers (Bmi-1, EphB2, EpCAM, ALDH1) was highly enriched in Msi-1+/Lgr5+ cells. While CK20 expression was mainly found in PKHlow and PKHneg cells, a small PKHhigh subset co-expressed both CK20 and Msi-1, but not Lgr5; cells with these properties also expressed Mucin, and could be identified in vivo in colon crypts. These results mirrored those found in cells isolated from different crypt portions by microdissection, and based on proliferation rates and marker expression they allowed to define several subsets at different maturation stages: PKHhigh/Lgr5+/Msi-1+/CK20−, PKHhigh/Lgr5−/Msi-1+/CK20+, PKHlow/Lgr5−/Msi-1+/Ck20−, and PKHlow/Lgr5−/Msi-1−/CK20+ cells. Conclusions Our data show the possibility of deriving in vitro, without any selection strategy, several distinct cell

  1. Differential effects of serine proteases on the migration of normal and tumor cells: implications for tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Elzer, Kirsten L; Heitzman, Deborah A; Chernin, Mitchell I; Novak, Josef F

    2008-12-01

    The supporting role of proteases in tumor progression and invasion is well known; however, the use of proteases as therapeutic agents has also been demonstrated. In this article, the authors report on the differential effects of exogenous serine proteases on the motility of tumor and normal cells. The treatment of normal and tumor cells with a single dose of pancreatic serine proteases, trypsin (TR) and chymotrypsin (CH), leads to a concentration-dependent response by cells, first accelerating and then slowing mobility. Tumor cells are 10 to 20 times more sensitive to exogenous TR/CH, suggesting that a single dose of proteases may cause discordant movements of normal and tumor cells within the tumor environment. The inhibitory effects of TR on cell motility are contradicted by thrombin (TH), particularly in the regulation of normal cells' migration. The purpose of this investigation was to ascertain the role of protease-activated receptors (PARs) in terms of normal and tumor cell motility. Duplicate treatments with proteases resulted in diminished mobility of both normal and tumor cells. Repeated application of TR and TH in 1-hour treatment intervals initially desensitizes cell surface PARs. However, cell surface PARs reappear regardless of subsequent protease treatments in both normal and tumor cells. The resensitization process is retarded in tumor cells when compared with normal cells. This is evidenced by lower expression of PARs as well as by their relocalization at the tumor cell surfaces. Under these conditions, normal cells remain responsive to exogenous proteases in terms of cell motility. Exogenous proteases do not modulate motility of repeatedly stimulated tumor cells, and consequently, the migration of tumor cells appears disconnected from the PAR signaling pathways. The use of activating peptides in lieu of the cognate proteases for a given PAR system indicated that proteases may act through additional targets not regulated by PAR signaling. We

  2. A Network Biology Approach Identifies Molecular Cross-Talk between Normal Prostate Epithelial and Prostate Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trevino, Victor; Cassese, Alberto; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Herbert, John; Antzack, Philipp; Clarke, Kim; Davies, Nicholas; Rahman, Ayesha; Campbell, Moray J.; Bicknell, Roy; Vannucci, Marina; Falciani, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The advent of functional genomics has enabled the genome-wide characterization of the molecular state of cells and tissues, virtually at every level of biological organization. The difficulty in organizing and mining this unprecedented amount of information has stimulated the development of computational methods designed to infer the underlying structure of regulatory networks from observational data. These important developments had a profound impact in biological sciences since they triggered the development of a novel data-driven investigative approach. In cancer research, this strategy has been particularly successful. It has contributed to the identification of novel biomarkers, to a better characterization of disease heterogeneity and to a more in depth understanding of cancer pathophysiology. However, so far these approaches have not explicitly addressed the challenge of identifying networks representing the interaction of different cell types in a complex tissue. Since these interactions represent an essential part of the biology of both diseased and healthy tissues, it is of paramount importance that this challenge is addressed. Here we report the definition of a network reverse engineering strategy designed to infer directional signals linking adjacent cell types within a complex tissue. The application of this inference strategy to prostate cancer genome-wide expression profiling data validated the approach and revealed that normal epithelial cells exert an anti-tumour activity on prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, by using a Bayesian hierarchical model integrating genetics and gene expression data and combining this with survival analysis, we show that the expression of putative cell communication genes related to focal adhesion and secretion is affected by epistatic gene copy number variation and it is predictive of patient survival. Ultimately, this study represents a generalizable approach to the challenge of deciphering cell communication

  3. A Network Biology Approach Identifies Molecular Cross-Talk between Normal Prostate Epithelial and Prostate Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Victor; Cassese, Alberto; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Herbert, John; Antzack, Philipp; Clarke, Kim; Davies, Nicholas; Rahman, Ayesha; Campbell, Moray J; Guindani, Michele; Bicknell, Roy; Vannucci, Marina; Falciani, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The advent of functional genomics has enabled the genome-wide characterization of the molecular state of cells and tissues, virtually at every level of biological organization. The difficulty in organizing and mining this unprecedented amount of information has stimulated the development of computational methods designed to infer the underlying structure of regulatory networks from observational data. These important developments had a profound impact in biological sciences since they triggered the development of a novel data-driven investigative approach. In cancer research, this strategy has been particularly successful. It has contributed to the identification of novel biomarkers, to a better characterization of disease heterogeneity and to a more in depth understanding of cancer pathophysiology. However, so far these approaches have not explicitly addressed the challenge of identifying networks representing the interaction of different cell types in a complex tissue. Since these interactions represent an essential part of the biology of both diseased and healthy tissues, it is of paramount importance that this challenge is addressed. Here we report the definition of a network reverse engineering strategy designed to infer directional signals linking adjacent cell types within a complex tissue. The application of this inference strategy to prostate cancer genome-wide expression profiling data validated the approach and revealed that normal epithelial cells exert an anti-tumour activity on prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, by using a Bayesian hierarchical model integrating genetics and gene expression data and combining this with survival analysis, we show that the expression of putative cell communication genes related to focal adhesion and secretion is affected by epistatic gene copy number variation and it is predictive of patient survival. Ultimately, this study represents a generalizable approach to the challenge of deciphering cell communication networks

  4. A Network Biology Approach Identifies Molecular Cross-Talk between Normal Prostate Epithelial and Prostate Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Victor; Cassese, Alberto; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Herbert, John; Antzack, Philipp; Clarke, Kim; Davies, Nicholas; Rahman, Ayesha; Campbell, Moray J; Guindani, Michele; Bicknell, Roy; Vannucci, Marina; Falciani, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The advent of functional genomics has enabled the genome-wide characterization of the molecular state of cells and tissues, virtually at every level of biological organization. The difficulty in organizing and mining this unprecedented amount of information has stimulated the development of computational methods designed to infer the underlying structure of regulatory networks from observational data. These important developments had a profound impact in biological sciences since they triggered the development of a novel data-driven investigative approach. In cancer research, this strategy has been particularly successful. It has contributed to the identification of novel biomarkers, to a better characterization of disease heterogeneity and to a more in depth understanding of cancer pathophysiology. However, so far these approaches have not explicitly addressed the challenge of identifying networks representing the interaction of different cell types in a complex tissue. Since these interactions represent an essential part of the biology of both diseased and healthy tissues, it is of paramount importance that this challenge is addressed. Here we report the definition of a network reverse engineering strategy designed to infer directional signals linking adjacent cell types within a complex tissue. The application of this inference strategy to prostate cancer genome-wide expression profiling data validated the approach and revealed that normal epithelial cells exert an anti-tumour activity on prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, by using a Bayesian hierarchical model integrating genetics and gene expression data and combining this with survival analysis, we show that the expression of putative cell communication genes related to focal adhesion and secretion is affected by epistatic gene copy number variation and it is predictive of patient survival. Ultimately, this study represents a generalizable approach to the challenge of deciphering cell communication networks

  5. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and leukemic GRSL cells.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Okazaki, Susumu; Ueoka, Ryuichi

    2013-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations for the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and thymus-derived leukemic GRSL cells in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15K and 1 atm) to investigate changes in membrane properties induced by canceration. The model membranes used in our calculations for normal and leukemic thymocytes comprised 23 and 25 kinds of lipids, respectively, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. The mole fractions of the lipids adopted here were based on previously published experimental values. Our calculations clearly showed that the membrane area was increased in leukemic cells, and that the isothermal area compressibility of the leukemic plasma membranes was double that of normal cells. The calculated membranes of leukemic cells were thus considerably bulkier and softer in the lateral direction compared with those of normal cells. The tilt angle of the cholesterol and the conformation of the phospholipid fatty acid tails both showed a lower level of order in leukemic cell membranes compared with normal cell membranes. The lateral radial distribution function of the lipids also showed a more disordered structure in leukemic cell membranes than in normal cell membranes. These observations all show that, for the present thymocytes, the lateral structure of the membrane is considerably disordered by canceration. Furthermore, the calculated lateral self-diffusion coefficient of the lipid molecules in leukemic cell membranes was almost double that in normal cell membranes. The calculated rotational and wobbling autocorrelation functions also indicated that the molecular motion of the lipids was enhanced in leukemic cell membranes. Thus, here we have demonstrated that the membranes of thymocyte leukemic cells are more disordered and more fluid than normal cell membranes.

  6. [EXPRESSION OF THE LIGHT CHAINS OF IMMUNOGLOBULINS IN NORMAL B-CELLS AND SOME B-CELL LYMPHOMAS].

    PubMed

    Khudoleeva, O A; Vorobjev, I A

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative method of determining the level of expression of immunoglobulin light chains on uncompensated data was suggested and used to examine disorders in light chain expression in various B-cell tumors. The average level of expression of the lambda isotype was 4 times higher than the level of expression of kappa isotype. The level of surface and cytoplasmic expression of LC IG varied within wide limits for different people, but there was a high degree of correlation between the levels of expression of kappa and lambda isotypes LC IG as well as between expression of the surface and cytoplasmic forms of each in isotype the same individual. In the majority of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas correlation between the expression of LC IG on the surface and in the cytoplasm of the cells was diminished. Expression of LC IG in CLL was significantly reduced on the surface of the cells and to a lesser extent--in the cytoplasm. In the case of marginal zone cell lymphoma, LC IG expression level was reduced on the surface of circulating cells and to a lesser extent--in the cytoplasm. In the case of mantle cell lymphoma and DLBCL, expression level of LC IG on the cell surface and in the cytoplasm was the same as in normal B-cells. However, in some cases DLBCL, no LC IG was expressed both on the surface and in the cytoplasm. PMID:26863766

  7. Aldehyde dehydrogenases inhibition eradicates leukemia stem cells while sparing normal progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Venton, G; Pérez-Alea, M; Baier, C; Fournet, G; Quash, G; Labiad, Y; Martin, G; Sanderson, F; Poullin, P; Suchon, P; Farnault, L; Nguyen, C; Brunet, C; Ceylan, I; Costello, R T

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) achieve complete remission (CR) after standard induction chemotherapy. However, the majority subsequently relapse and die of the disease. A leukemia stem cell (LSC) paradigm has been invoked to explain this failure of CR to reliably translate into cure. Indeed, LSCs are highly enriched in CD34+CD38− leukemic cells that exhibit positive aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDH+) on flow cytometry, these LSCs are resistant to currently existing treatments in AML such as cytarabine and anthracycline that, at the cost of great toxicity on normal cells, are highly active against the leukemic bulk, but spare the LSCs responsible for relapse. To try to combat the LSC population selectively, a well-characterized ALDH inhibitor by the trivial name of dimethyl ampal thiolester (DIMATE) was assessed on sorted CD34+CD38− subpopulations from AML patients and healthy patients. ALDH activity and cell viability were monitored by flow cytometry. From enzyme kinetic studies DIMATE is an active enzyme-dependent, competitive, irreversible inhibitor of ALDH1. On cells in culture, DIMATE is a powerful inhibitor of ALDHs 1 and 3, has a major cytotoxic activity on human AML cell lines. Moreover, DIMATE is highly active against leukemic populations enriched in LSCs, but, unlike conventional chemotherapy, DIMATE is not toxic for healthy hematopoietic stem cells which retained, after treatment, their self-renewing and multi-lineage differentiation capacity in immunodeficient mice, xenografted with human leukemic cells. DIMATE eradicates specifically human AML cells and spares healthy mouse hematologic cells. PMID:27611922

  8. Aldehyde dehydrogenases inhibition eradicates leukemia stem cells while sparing normal progenitors.

    PubMed

    Venton, G; Pérez-Alea, M; Baier, C; Fournet, G; Quash, G; Labiad, Y; Martin, G; Sanderson, F; Poullin, P; Suchon, P; Farnault, L; Nguyen, C; Brunet, C; Ceylan, I; Costello, R T

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) achieve complete remission (CR) after standard induction chemotherapy. However, the majority subsequently relapse and die of the disease. A leukemia stem cell (LSC) paradigm has been invoked to explain this failure of CR to reliably translate into cure. Indeed, LSCs are highly enriched in CD34+CD38- leukemic cells that exhibit positive aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDH+) on flow cytometry, these LSCs are resistant to currently existing treatments in AML such as cytarabine and anthracycline that, at the cost of great toxicity on normal cells, are highly active against the leukemic bulk, but spare the LSCs responsible for relapse. To try to combat the LSC population selectively, a well-characterized ALDH inhibitor by the trivial name of dimethyl ampal thiolester (DIMATE) was assessed on sorted CD34+CD38- subpopulations from AML patients and healthy patients. ALDH activity and cell viability were monitored by flow cytometry. From enzyme kinetic studies DIMATE is an active enzyme-dependent, competitive, irreversible inhibitor of ALDH1. On cells in culture, DIMATE is a powerful inhibitor of ALDHs 1 and 3, has a major cytotoxic activity on human AML cell lines. Moreover, DIMATE is highly active against leukemic populations enriched in LSCs, but, unlike conventional chemotherapy, DIMATE is not toxic for healthy hematopoietic stem cells which retained, after treatment, their self-renewing and multi-lineage differentiation capacity in immunodeficient mice, xenografted with human leukemic cells. DIMATE eradicates specifically human AML cells and spares healthy mouse hematologic cells. PMID:27611922

  9. Low cost microfluidic cell culture array using normally closed valves for cytotoxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Pasirayi, Godfrey; Scott, Simon M; Islam, Meez; O'Hare, Liam; Bateson, Simon; Ali, Zulfiqur

    2014-11-01

    A reusable low cost microfluidic cell culture array device (MCCAD) integrated with a six output concentration gradient generator (cGG) and 4×6 arrays of microchamber elements, addressed by a series of row and columnar pneumatically actuated normally closed (NC) microvalves was fabricated for cell-based screening of chemotherapeutic compounds. The poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) device consists of three layers: fluidic, control and membrane which are held by surface contact and made leak-proof by clamping pressure. The NC valves are actuated by a thick PDMS membrane that was created by a novel method based on the self-assembly of PDMS pre-polymer molecules over a denser calcium chloride solution. The membrane actuated the valves reliably and particulates such as alumina particles (3 µm) and MCF-7 cells (20-24 µm) (2×10(5) cells/mL) were flowed through the valves without causing blockage or leakage and consequently avoiding contamination of the different cell culture elements. The MCCAD was cast and assembled in a standard laboratory without specialist equipment and demonstrated for performing quantitative cell-based cytotoxicity assays of pyocyanine on human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells and assessed for toxic effect on human hepatocyte carcinoma (HepG2) cells as an indicator for liver injury. Then, the MCCAD was demonstrated for sequential drug combinatorial screening involving gradient generation of paclitaxel doses followed by treatment with aspirin doses on the viability of MCF-7 cells. The interaction between paclitaxel and aspirin was evaluated by using the Bliss independence predictive model and results showed reasonable agreement with the model. A robust, portable, easily fabricated and low cost device is therefore shown to conveniently carry out culturing of multiple cell lines for high throughput screening of anti-cancer compounds using minimal reagents. PMID:25127624

  10. The interleukin-6 receptor alpha-chain (CD126) is expressed by neoplastic but not normal plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Rawstron, A C; Fenton, J A; Ashcroft, J; English, A; Jones, R A; Richards, S J; Pratt, G; Owen, R; Davies, F E; Child, J A; Jack, A S; Morgan, G

    2000-12-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is reported to be central to the pathogenesis of myeloma, inducing proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis in neoplastic plasma cells. Therefore, abrogating IL-6 signaling is of therapeutic interest, particularly with the development of humanized anti-IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) antibodies. The use of such antibodies clinically requires an understanding of IL-6R expression on neoplastic cells, particularly in the cycling fraction. IL-6R expression levels were determined on plasma cells from patients with myeloma (n = 93) and with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) or plasmacytoma (n = 66) and compared with the levels found on normal plasma cells (n = 11). In addition, 4-color flow cytometry was used to assess the differential expression by stage of differentiation and cell cycle status of the neoplastic plasma cells. IL-6R alpha chain (CD126) was not detectable in normal plasma cells, but was expressed in approximately 90% of patients with myeloma. In all groups, the expression levels showed a normal distribution. In patients with MGUS or plasmacytoma, neoplastic plasma cells expressed significantly higher levels of CD126 compared with phenotypically normal plasma cells from the same marrow. VLA-5(-) "immature" plasma cells showed the highest levels of CD126 expression, but "mature" VLA-5(+) myeloma plasma cells also overexpressed CD126 when compared with normal subjects. This study demonstrates that CD126 expression is restricted to neoplastic plasma cells, with little or no detectable expression by normal cells. Stromal cells in the bone marrow microenvironment do not induce the overexpression because neoplastic cells express higher levels of CD126 than normal plasma cells from the same bone marrow in individuals with MGUS. (Blood. 2000;96:3880-3886)

  11. Brk/PTK6 signaling in normal and cancer cell models.

    PubMed

    Ostrander, Julie H; Daniel, Andrea R; Lange, Carol A

    2010-12-01

    Breast tumor kinase (Brk), also termed PTK6, is known to function in cell-type and context-dependent processes governing normal differentiation. However, in tumors in which Brk is overexpressed, this unusual soluble tyrosine kinase is emerging as a mediator of cancer cell phenotypes, including increased proliferation, survival, and migration. Nuclear and cytoplasmic substrates phosphorylated by Brk include a collection of regulatory RNA-binding proteins, adaptor molecules that link Brk to signaling pathways generally associated with the activation of growth factor receptors, and Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STAT) molecules that are direct regulators of gene expression. Understanding Brk-dependent regulation of these key signaling pathways and how they influence cancer cell behavior is predicted to inform the development of improved 'targeted' cancer therapies and may provide insight into ways to avoid chemo-resistance to established treatments.

  12. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling in normal lung epithelial cells confers resistance to ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Anna; Zagurovskaya, Marianna; Gupta, Seema; Shareef, Mohammed M.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Ahmed, Mansoor M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To address the functional role of radiation-induced TGF-β signaling in normal epithelial background, we selected spontaneously immortalized lung epithelial cell line derived from the normal lung tissue of dominant-negative mutant of TGF-β RII (ΔRII) transgenic mouse that expressed conditionally ΔRII under the control of metallothionein promoter (MT-1) and assessed it's impact on radio-sensitivity. Method and Materials Spontaneously immortalized lung epithelial cell culture (SILECC) was established and all analyses were performed within 50 passages. Colony-forming and TUNEL assays were used to assess the clonogenic inhibition and apoptosis respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to assess the kinetics of p21, bax and RII proteins. TGF-β responsive promoter activity was measured using dual-luciferase reporter assay. Results Exposure to ZnSO4 inhibited TGF-β signaling induced either by recombinant TGF-β1 or ionizing radiation. SILECC treated either with ZnSO4 or neutralizing antibody against TGF-β showed a significant increase in radio-resistance when compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, the expression of the ΔRII inhibited the radiation-induced up-regulation of the TGF-β effector gene p21waf1/cip1.. Conclusions Our findings imply that inhibition of radiation-induced TGF-β signaling via abrogation of RII function enhances radio-resistance of the normal lung epithelial cells, and this can be directly attributed to the loss of TGF-β signaling function. PMID:17448872

  13. Single-molecule analysis of combinatorial epigenomic states in normal and tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Patrick J.; Cipriany, Benjamin R.; Wallin, Christopher B.; Ju, Chan Yang; Szeto, Kylan; Hagarman, James A.; Benitez, Jaime J.; Craighead, Harold G.; Soloway, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Proper placement of epigenetic marks on DNA and histones is fundamental to normal development, and perturbations contribute to a variety of disease states. Combinations of marks act together to control gene expression; therefore, detecting their colocalization is important, but because of technical challenges, such measurements are rarely reported. Instead, measurements of epigenetic marks are typically performed one at a time in a population of cells, and their colocalization is inferred by association. Here, we describe a single-molecule analytical approach that can perform direct detection of multiple epigenetic marks simultaneously and use it to identify mechanisms coordinating placement of three gene silencing marks, trimethylated histone H3 lysine 9, lysine 27 (H3K9me3, H3K27me3), and cytosine methylation (mC), in the normal and cancer genome. We show that H3K9me3 and mC are present together on individual chromatin fragments in mouse embryonic stem cells and that half of the H3K9me3 marks require mC for their placement. In contrast, mC and H3K27me3 coincidence is rare, and in fact, mC antagonizes H3K27me3 in both embryonic stem cells and primary mouse fibroblasts, indicating this antagonism is shared among primary cells. However, upon immortalization or tumorigenic transformation of mouse fibroblasts, mC is required for complete H3K27me3 placement. Importantly, in human promyelocytic cells, H3K27me3 is also dependent on mC. Because aberrant placement of gene silencing marks at tumor suppressor genes contributes to tumor progression, the improper dependency of H3K27me3 by mC in immortalized cells is likely to be fundamental to cancer. Our platform can enable other studies involving coordination of epigenetic marks and leverage efforts to discover disease biomarkers and epigenome-modifying drugs. PMID:23610441

  14. Single-molecule analysis of combinatorial epigenomic states in normal and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Patrick J; Cipriany, Benjamin R; Wallin, Christopher B; Ju, Chan Yang; Szeto, Kylan; Hagarman, James A; Benitez, Jaime J; Craighead, Harold G; Soloway, Paul D

    2013-05-01

    Proper placement of epigenetic marks on DNA and histones is fundamental to normal development, and perturbations contribute to a variety of disease states. Combinations of marks act together to control gene expression; therefore, detecting their colocalization is important, but because of technical challenges, such measurements are rarely reported. Instead, measurements of epigenetic marks are typically performed one at a time in a population of cells, and their colocalization is inferred by association. Here, we describe a single-molecule analytical approach that can perform direct detection of multiple epigenetic marks simultaneously and use it to identify mechanisms coordinating placement of three gene silencing marks, trimethylated histone H3 lysine 9, lysine 27 (H3K9me3, H3K27me3), and cytosine methylation (mC), in the normal and cancer genome. We show that H3K9me3 and mC are present together on individual chromatin fragments in mouse embryonic stem cells and that half of the H3K9me3 marks require mC for their placement. In contrast, mC and H3K27me3 coincidence is rare, and in fact, mC antagonizes H3K27me3 in both embryonic stem cells and primary mouse fibroblasts, indicating this antagonism is shared among primary cells. However, upon immortalization or tumorigenic transformation of mouse fibroblasts, mC is required for complete H3K27me3 placement. Importantly, in human promyelocytic cells, H3K27me3 is also dependent on mC. Because aberrant placement of gene silencing marks at tumor suppressor genes contributes to tumor progression, the improper dependency of H3K27me3 by mC in immortalized cells is likely to be fundamental to cancer. Our platform can enable other studies involving coordination of epigenetic marks and leverage efforts to discover disease biomarkers and epigenome-modifying drugs.

  15. Normal human serum contains a natural IgM antibody cytotoxic for human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ollert, M W; David, K; Schmitt, C; Hauenschild, A; Bredehorst, R; Erttmann, R; Vogel, C W

    1996-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is characterized by the second highest spontaneous regression of any human malignant disorder, a phenomenon that remains to be elucidated. In this study, a survey of 94 normal human adult sera revealed a considerable natural humoral cytotoxicity against human NB cell lines in approximately one-third of the tested sera of both genders. Specific cell killing by these sera was in the range of 40% to 95%. Serum cytotoxicity was dependent on an intact classical pathway of complement. By several lines of evidence, IgM antibodies were identified as the cytotoxic factor in the sera. Further analyses revealed that a 260-kDa protein was recognized by natural IgM of cytotoxic sera in Western blots of NB cell extracts. The antigen was expressed on the surface of seven human NB cell lines but not on human melanoma or other control tumor cell lines derived from kidney, pancreas, colon, bone, skeletal muscle, lymphatic system, and bone marrow. Furthermore, no reactivity was observed with normal human fibroblasts, melanocytes, and epidermal keratinocytes. The antigen was expressed in vivo as detected by immunohistochemistry in both the tumor of a NB patient and NB tumors established in nude rats from human NB cell lines. Most interestingly, the IgM anti-NB antibody was absent from the sera of 11 human NB patients with active disease. The anti-NB IgM also could not be detected in tumor tissue obtained from a NB patient. Collectively, our data suggest the existence of a natural humoral immunological tumor defense mechanism, which could account for the in vivo phenomenon of spontaneous NB tumor regression. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8633097

  16. Comparative assessment of button cells using a normalized index for potential pollution by heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Merino, Luis; Jiménez-Hernández, Maria Emilia; de la Losa, Almudena; Huerta-Muñoz, Virginia

    2015-09-01

    Many household batteries worldwide still end up in landfills or are incinerated due to inefficient collection and recycling schemes. Toxic heavy metals from improperly discarded button cells pose a serious risk to human health and the environment, as they can pollute air, soil and water. This paper analyses a series of button cells selected from batteries available on the retail market, and compares their polluting potential. A total of 64 batteries were subjected to chemical analyses of 19 elements - including metals and metalloids - , and energy density measurements. The samples were from four different brands of each of the four most common button cell technologies (alkaline, zinc-air, silver oxide and lithium). An energy-normalized index - the Weighted Potential Pollution Index (WPPI) - was proposed to compare the polluting potential of the different batteries. The higher the battery WPPI score, the greater the content in toxic elements and the lower the energy output. The results of the chemical composition and energy density varied depending on the construction technology of the button cells. However, significant differences in both variables were also found when comparing different brands within the same technology. The differences in WPPI values confirmed the existence of a significant margin to reduce the environmental impact of discarded button cells simply by avoiding the most polluting options. The choice of the battery with the most favourable WPPI produced a reduction in potential pollution of 3-53% for silver oxide batteries, 4-39% for alkaline, 20-28% for zinc-air and 12-26% for lithium. Comparative potential pollution could be assessed when selecting batteries using an energy-normalized index such as WPPI to reduce the environmental impact of improperly disposed button cells. PMID:25933290

  17. Comparative assessment of button cells using a normalized index for potential pollution by heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Merino, Luis; Jiménez-Hernández, Maria Emilia; de la Losa, Almudena; Huerta-Muñoz, Virginia

    2015-09-01

    Many household batteries worldwide still end up in landfills or are incinerated due to inefficient collection and recycling schemes. Toxic heavy metals from improperly discarded button cells pose a serious risk to human health and the environment, as they can pollute air, soil and water. This paper analyses a series of button cells selected from batteries available on the retail market, and compares their polluting potential. A total of 64 batteries were subjected to chemical analyses of 19 elements - including metals and metalloids - , and energy density measurements. The samples were from four different brands of each of the four most common button cell technologies (alkaline, zinc-air, silver oxide and lithium). An energy-normalized index - the Weighted Potential Pollution Index (WPPI) - was proposed to compare the polluting potential of the different batteries. The higher the battery WPPI score, the greater the content in toxic elements and the lower the energy output. The results of the chemical composition and energy density varied depending on the construction technology of the button cells. However, significant differences in both variables were also found when comparing different brands within the same technology. The differences in WPPI values confirmed the existence of a significant margin to reduce the environmental impact of discarded button cells simply by avoiding the most polluting options. The choice of the battery with the most favourable WPPI produced a reduction in potential pollution of 3-53% for silver oxide batteries, 4-39% for alkaline, 20-28% for zinc-air and 12-26% for lithium. Comparative potential pollution could be assessed when selecting batteries using an energy-normalized index such as WPPI to reduce the environmental impact of improperly disposed button cells.

  18. Bacillus subtilis α-Phosphoglucomutase Is Required for Normal Cell Morphology and Biofilm Formation†

    PubMed Central

    Lazarevic, Vladimir; Soldo, Blazenka; Médico, Noël; Pooley, Harold; Bron, Sierd; Karamata, Dimitri

    2005-01-01

    Mutations designated gtaC and gtaE that affect α-phosphoglucomutase activity required for interconversion of glucose 6-phosphate and α-glucose 1-phosphate were mapped to the Bacillus subtilis pgcA (yhxB) gene. Backcrossing of the two mutations into the 168 reference strain was accompanied by impaired α-phosphoglucomutase activity in the soluble cell extract fraction, altered colony and cell morphology, and resistance to phages φ29 and ρ11. Altered cell morphology, reversible by additional magnesium ions, may be correlated with a deficiency in the membrane glycolipid. The deficiency in biofilm formation in gtaC and gtaE mutants may be attributed to an inability to synthesize UDP-glucose, an important intermediate in a number of cell envelope biosynthetic processes. PMID:15640167

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi cytosolic alkaline antigens (FI) induce polyclonal activation in murine normal B cells.

    PubMed

    Montes, C L; Vottero-Cima, E; Gruppi, A

    1996-08-01

    Several reports have described polyclonal activation in mice acutely infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. The aim of this work was to analyse the participation of one T. cruzi antigenic fraction in this immunological event. The antigen selected was FI, an antigenic fraction of pI 7-9 obtained from T. cruzi cytosol separated by isoelectricfocusing. FI is constituted by molecules with molecular weights of around 60 and 20 KDa. The authors assayed the ability of this antigenic fraction to induce polyclonal activation of spleen mononuclear cells from normal (NSMC) BALB/c mice. NSMC showed a marked lymphoproliferative response measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation after 3 days of culture in presence of FI. The values reached by FI-stimulated cells were 10 times higher than the controls (non-stimulated cells). This effect was dose-dependent. Furthermore, the authors observed that a purified T-cell population in the presence of adherent cells was unaffected by FI. Additionally, in a culture of NSMC, FI stimulated the proliferation of B cells as observed by the increase of the percentage of B220+ cells determined by FACS using FITC-conjugated anti-mouse B220. The authors noticed that the percentage of B220+Ly1+(CD5) populations in the presence of FI did not change with respect to the control (non-stimulated cells), indicating that FI expanded both conventional and CD5+ B cells. The isotypic pattern of the antibodies produced after 6 days of culture of NSMC in the presence of FI was predominantly IgM, which reacted with highly conserved antigens such as actin, myosin, myoglobin, thyroglobulin and carbonic anhydrase, but did not react with FI. A slight increase of IgG1 and IgG3 with respect to the control was observed but no changes on the levels of IgG2 was noticed. These results indicate that FI promotes activation, proliferation and differentiation in antibody-secreting cells of normal murine B lymphocytes.

  20. Microencapsulation of human cells: its effects on growth of normal and tumour cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Shimi, S. M.; Hopwood, D.; Newman, E. L.; Cuschieri, A.

    1991-01-01

    The growth kinetics of established human colorectal tumour cell lines (HT29, HT115 and COLO 320DM) and human diploid fibroblasts (Flow 2002) were studied in conventional culture and in microcapsules formed from alginate-poly(L-lysine)-alginate membranes. The tumour lines grew rapidly in microcapsules but, in the case of the substrate-adherent lines HT29 and HT115, only after a prolonged lag phase. This phase was reduced by serial passage in microcapsules. The anchorage-independent line COLO 320DM showed no lengthening in lag phase. Microencapsulated fibroblasts underwent negligible growth but remained viable. Some evidence for functional differentiation (microvilli, cell-cell junctions) of the tumour line HT115 within the microcapsules was observed. We conclude that the use of microcapsules provides an alternative system with some advantages for the study of human cancer and its metastases in vitro. Images Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:2039691

  1. Human skin fibroblast stromelysin: structure, glycosylation, substrate specificity, and differential expression in normal and tumorigenic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, S.M.; Collier, I.E.; Kronberger, A.; Eisen, A.Z.; Marmer, B.L.; Grant, G.A.; Bauer, E.A.; Goldberg, G.I.

    1987-10-01

    The authors have purified and determined the complete primary structure of human stromelysin, a secreted metalloprotease with a wide range of substrate specificities. Human stromelysin is synthesized in a preproenzyme form with a calculated size of 53,977 Da and a 17-amino acid long signal peptide. Prostromelysin is secreted in two forms, with apparent molecular masses on NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE of 60 and 57 kDa. Human stromelysin is capable of degrading proteoglycan, fibronectin, laminin, and type IV collagen but not interstitial type I collagen. The enzyme is not capable of activating purified human fibroblast procollagenase. Analysis of its primary structure shows that stromelysin is in all likelihood the human analog of rat transin, which is an oncogene transformation-induced protease. The pattern of enzyme expression in normal and tumorigenic cells revealed that human skin fibroblasts in vitro secrete stromelysin constitutively. Human fetal lung fibroblasts transformed with simian virus 40, human bronchial epithelial cells transformed with the ras oncogene, fibrosarcoma cells (HT-1080), and a melanoma cell strain (A 2058), do not express this protease nor can the enzyme be induced in these cells by treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. The data indicate that the expression and the possible involvement of secreted metalloproteases in tumorigenesis result from a specific interaction between the transforming factor and the target cell, which may vary in different species.

  2. Role of polypeptide growth factors in phenotypic transformation of normal rat kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    van Zoelen, E.J.J.; van Oostwaard, T.M.J.; de Laat, S.W.

    1988-01-05

    A serum-free assay has been established for studying the role of polypeptide growth factors in inducing loss of density-dependent inhibition of growth of normal rat kidney (NRK) cells. The process has been characterized by measuring the time course of (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into confluent, quiescent NRK cultures stimulated by defined polypeptide growth factors, in combination with cell counting studies, increases in DNA content, and cell cycle analysis by means of a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. It is shown that none of the growth factors tested is able to induce loss of density-dependent inhibition of growth by itself, but strong synergism was observed when combinations of growth factors were tested. None of the above factors was found to be essential, however, since any combination of three of the above four growth factors strongly induced the process. Strong parallels were observed between the growth factor requirements for inducing loss of density-dependent inhibition of growth under serum-free conditions and the requirements for induction of anchorage-independent proliferation under growth factor-defined assay conditions. This indicates that most likely the same cellular processes underlie these two aspects of phenotypic transformation, although data indicate that anchorage-independent proliferation may be a more restricted property of phenotypic transformation than loss of density dependence of proliferation. It is concluded that phenotypic transformation of NRK cells does not require specific polypeptide growth factors, but reflects the ability of these cells to respond to multiple growth factors.

  3. Performance of a 1.3 GHZ Normal-Conducting 5-Cell Standing-Wave Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Faya; Adolphsen, Chris; Wang, Juwen; /SLAC

    2008-11-12

    A 5-cell, normal-conducting, 1.3 GHz, standing-wave (SW) cavity was built as a prototype capture accelerator for the ILC positron source. Although the ILC uses predominantly superconducting cavities, the capture cavity location in both a high radiation environment and a solenoidal magnetic field requires it to be normal conducting. With the relatively high duty ILC beam pulses (1 msec at 5 Hz) and the high gradient required for efficient positron capture (15 MV/m), achieving adequate cavity cooling to prevent significant detuning is challenging. This paper presents the operational performance of this cavity including the processing history, characteristics of the breakdown events and the acceleration gradient witnessed by a single bunch at different injection times for different rf pulse lengths.

  4. Phosphatidylethanolamine Is Required for Normal Cell Morphology and Cytokinesis in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe▿

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jun; Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Gulis, Galina; Hinz, Haylee; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Marcus, Stevan

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the contributions of phosphatidylethanolamine to the growth and morphogenesis of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we have characterized three predicted genes in this organism, designated psd1, psd2, and psd3, encoding phosphatidylserine decarboxylases, which catalyze the conversion of phosphatidylserine to phosphatidylethanolamine in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. S. pombe mutants carrying deletions in any one or two psd genes are viable in complex rich medium and synthetic defined minimal medium. However, mutants carrying deletions in all three psd genes (psd1-3Δ mutants) grow slowly in rich medium and are inviable in minimal medium, indicating that the psd1 to psd3 gene products share overlapping essential cellular functions. Supplementation of growth media with ethanolamine, which can be converted to phosphatidylethanolamine by the Kennedy pathway, restores growth to psd1-3Δ cells in minimal medium, indicating that phosphatidylethanolamine is essential for S. pombe cell growth. psd1-3Δ cells produce lower levels of phosphatidylethanolamine than wild-type cells, even in medium supplemented with ethanolamine, indicating that the Kennedy pathway can only partially compensate for the loss of phosphatidylserine decarboxylase activity in S. pombe. psd1-3Δ cells appear morphologically indistinguishable from wild-type S. pombe cells in medium supplemented with ethanolamine, but when cultured in nonsupplemented medium, they produce high frequencies of abnormally shaped cells as well as cells exhibiting severe septation defects, including multiple, mispositioned, deformed, and misoriented septa. Our results demonstrate that phosphatidylethanolamine is essential for cell growth and for normal cytokinesis and cellular morphogenesis in S. pombe, and they illustrate the usefulness of this model eukaryote for investigating potentially conserved biological and molecular functions of phosphatidylethanolamine. PMID:19286980

  5. Normal T-Cell Turnover in Sooty Mangabeys Harboring Active Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Lisa A.; Lewin, Sharon R.; Zhang, Linqi; Gettie, Agegnehu; Luckay, Amara; Martin, Louis N.; Skulsky, Eva; Ho, David D.; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia; Marx, Preston A.

    2000-01-01

    Sooty mangabeys naturally infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) remain healthy though they harbor viral loads comparable to those in rhesus macaques that progress to AIDS. To assess the immunologic basis of disease resistance in mangabeys, we compared the effect of SIV infection on T-cell regeneration in both monkey species. Measurement of the proliferation marker Ki-67 by flow cytometry showed that mangabeys harbored proliferating T cells at a level of 3 to 4% in peripheral blood irrespective of their infection status. In contrast, rhesus macaques demonstrated a naturally high fraction of proliferating T cells (7%) that increased two- to threefold following SIV infection. Ki-67+ T cells were predominantly CD45RA−, indicating increased proliferation of memory cells in macaques. Quantitation of an episomal DNA product of T-cell receptor α rearrangement (termed α1 circle) showed that the concentration of recent thymic emigrants in blood decreased with age over a 2-log unit range in both monkey species, consistent with age-related thymic involution. SIV infection caused a limited decrease of α1 circle numbers in mangabeys as well as in macaques. Dilution of α1 circles by T-cell proliferation likely contributed to this decrease, since α1 circle numbers and Ki-67+ fractions correlated negatively. These findings are compatible with immune exhaustion mediated by abnormal T-cell proliferation, rather than with early thymic failure, in SIV-infected macaques. Normal T-cell turnover in SIV-infected mangabeys provides an explanation for the long-term maintenance of a functional immune system in these hosts. PMID:10627531

  6. Epigenetic regulation of normal human mammary cell type-specific miRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Vrba, Lukas; Garbe, James C.; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2011-08-26

    Epigenetic mechanisms are important regulators of cell type–specific genes, including miRNAs. In order to identify cell type-specific miRNAs regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, we undertook a global analysis of miRNA expression and epigenetic states in three isogenic pairs of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and human mammary fibroblasts (HMF), which represent two differentiated cell types typically present within a given organ, each with a distinct phenotype and a distinct epigenotype. While miRNA expression and epigenetic states showed strong interindividual concordance within a given cell type, almost 10% of the expressed miRNA showed a cell type–specific pattern of expression that was linked to the epigenetic state of their promoter. The tissue-specific miRNA genes were epigenetically repressed in nonexpressing cells by DNA methylation (38%) and H3K27me3 (58%), with only a small set of miRNAs (21%) showing a dual epigenetic repression where both DNA methylation and H3K27me3 were present at their promoters, such as MIR10A and MIR10B. Individual miRNA clusters of closely related miRNA gene families can each display cell type–specific repression by the same or complementary epigenetic mechanisms, such as the MIR200 family, and MIR205, where fibroblasts repress MIR200C/141 by DNA methylation, MIR200A/200B/429 by H3K27me3, and MIR205 by both DNA methylation and H3K27me3. Since deregulation of many of the epigenetically regulated miRNAs that we identified have been linked to disease processes such as cancer, it is predicted that compromise of the epigenetic control mechanisms is important for this process. Overall, these results highlight the importance of epigenetic regulation in the control of normal cell type–specific miRNA expression.

  7. A bcl-xS adenovirus selectively induces apoptosis in transformed cells compared to normal mammary cells.

    PubMed

    Sumantran, V N; Lee, D S; Woods Ignatoski, K M; Ethier, S P; Wicha, M S

    2000-01-01

    Oncogenes which drive the cell cycle, such as c-myc, can sensitize cells to apoptosis. This suggests the possibility that the expression of genes such as bcl-2 or bcl-xL is required to inhibit apoptosis induced by oncogene expression. We hypothesized that inhibition of Bcl-2/Bcl-xL by the pro-apoptotic Bcl-xS protein, would result in selective induction of apoptosis in mammary carcinoma cells compared to their nontransformed counterparts. Therefore, we compared the effects of Bcl-xS expression delivered by a bcl-xS adenovirus (bcl-xS-Adv) vector, on viability and apoptosis of nontransformed versus transformed mammary epithelial cells. We report that c-myc-transformed murine mammary cells are extremely sensitive to apoptosis induced by the bcl-xS adenovirus (bcl-xS-Adv) vector, whereas immortalized, nontransformed murine mammary cells are relatively resistant to apoptosis induced by this vector. Likewise, human mammary epithelial cells transduced with c-erbB-2 were more sensitive to apoptosis induced by the bcl-xS vector than the nontransformed parental cells. Similar results were obtained when we tested the effects of bcl-xS adenoviral infection on primary normal human mammary epithelial cells and SUM-190 PT cells, (a c-erbB-2 over-expressing human mammary carcinoma cell line) grown on Matrigel. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that inhibition of Bcl-2/Bcl-xL can result in selective killing of cancer cells compared to their nontransformed counterparts.

  8. Hypoxia primes human normal prostate epithelial cells and cancer cell lines for the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Panchanathan, Ravichandran; Liu, Hongzhu; Choubey, Divaker

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which hypoxia contributes to prostatic chronic inflammation (PCI) remain largely unknown. Because hypoxia stimulates the transcriptional activity of NF-κB, which “primes” cells for inflammasome activation by inducing the expression of NLRP3 or AIM2 receptor and pro-IL-1β, we investigated whether hypoxia could activate the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome in human normal prostate epithelial cells (PrECs) and cancer cell lines. Here we report that hypoxia (1% O2) treatment of PrECs, prostate cell lines, and a macrophage cell line (THP-1) increased the levels of NLRP3, AIM2, and pro-IL-1β. Further, hypoxia in cells potentiated activation of the NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome activity. Notably, hypoxia “primed” cells for NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome activation through stimulation of the NF-κB activity. Our observations support the idea that hypoxia in human prostatic tumors contributes to PCI, in part, by priming cells for the activation of NLRP3 and AIM2 inflammasome. PMID:27058421

  9. PMC42, a breast progenitor cancer cell line, has normal-like mRNA and microRNA transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Git, Anna; Spiteri, Inmaculada; Blenkiron, Cherie; Dunning, Mark J; Pole, Jessica CM; Chin, Suet-Feung; Wang, Yanzhong; Smith, James; Livesey, Frederick J; Caldas, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The use of cultured cell lines as model systems for normal tissue is limited by the molecular alterations accompanying the immortalisation process, including changes in the mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) repertoire. Therefore, identification of cell lines with normal-like expression profiles is of paramount importance in studies of normal gene regulation. Methods The mRNA and miRNA expression profiles of several breast cell lines of cancerous or normal origin were measured using printed slide arrays, Luminex bead arrays, and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results We demonstrate that the mRNA expression profiles of two breast cell lines are similar to that of normal breast tissue: HB4a, immortalised normal breast epithelium, and PMC42, a breast cancer cell line that retains progenitor pluripotency allowing in-culture differentiation to both secretory and myoepithelial fates. In contrast, only PMC42 exhibits a normal-like miRNA expression profile. We identified a group of miRNAs that are highly expressed in normal breast tissue and PMC42 but are lost in all other cancerous and normal-origin breast cell lines and observed a similar loss in immortalised lymphoblastoid cell lines compared with healthy uncultured B cells. Moreover, like tumour suppressor genes, these miRNAs are lost in a variety of tumours. We show that the mechanism leading to the loss of these miRNAs in breast cancer cell lines has genomic, transcriptional, and post-transcriptional components. Conclusion We propose that, despite its neoplastic origin, PMC42 is an excellent molecular model for normal breast epithelium, providing a unique tool to study breast differentiation and the function of key miRNAs that are typically lost in cancer. PMID:18588681

  10. Cytogenetic analysis of somatic and germinal cells from 38,XX/38,XY phenotypically normal boars.

    PubMed

    Barasc, Harmonie; Ferchaud, Stéphane; Mary, Nicolas; Cucchi, Marie Adélaïde; Lucena, Amalia Naranjo; Letron, Isabelle Raymond; Calgaro, Anne; Bonnet, Nathalie; Dudez, Anne Marie; Yerle, Martine; Ducos, Alain; Pinton, Alain

    2014-01-15

    Many chromosomal abnormalities have been reported to date in pigs. Most of them have been balanced structural rearrangements, especially reciprocal translocations. A few cases of XY/XX chimerism have also been diagnosed within the national systematic chromosomal control program of young purebred boars carried out in France. Until now, this kind of chromosomal abnormality has been mainly reported in intersex individuals. We investigated 38,XY/38,XX boars presenting apparently normal phenotypes to evaluate the potential effects of this particular chromosomal constitution on their reproductive performance. To do this, we analyzed (1) the chromosomal constitution of cells from different organs in one boar; (2) the aneuploidy rates for chromosomes X, Y, and 13 in sperm nuclei sampled from seven XY/XX boars. 2n = 38,XX cells were identified in different nonhematopoietic tissues including testis (frequency, <8%). Similar aneuploidy rates were observed in the sperm nuclei of XY/XX and normal individuals (controls). Altogether, these results suggest that the presence of XX cells had no or only a very limited effect on the reproduction abilities of the analyzed boars.

  11. Automated selection of regions of interest for intensity-based FRET analysis of transferrin endocytic trafficking in normal vs. cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Talati, Ronak; Vanderpoel, Andrew; Eladdadi, Amina; Anderson, Kate; Abe, Ken; Barroso, Margarida

    2014-03-15

    The overexpression of certain membrane-bound receptors is a hallmark of cancer progression and it has been suggested to affect the organization, activation, recycling and down-regulation of receptor-ligand complexes in human cancer cells. Thus, comparing receptor trafficking pathways in normal vs. cancer cells requires the ability to image cells expressing dramatically different receptor expression levels. Here, we have presented a significant technical advance to the analysis and processing of images collected using intensity based Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) confocal microscopy. An automated Image J macro was developed to select region of interests (ROI) based on intensity and statistical-based thresholds within cellular images with reduced FRET signal. Furthermore, SSMD (strictly standardized mean differences), a statistical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) evaluation parameter, was used to validate the quality of FRET analysis, in particular of ROI database selection. The Image J ROI selection macro together with SSMD as an evaluation parameter of SNR levels, were used to investigate the endocytic recycling of Tfn-TFR complexes at nanometer range resolution in human normal vs. breast cancer cells expressing significantly different levels of endogenous TFR. Here, the FRET-based assay demonstrates that Tfn-TFR complexes in normal epithelial vs. breast cancer cells show a significantly different E% behavior during their endocytic recycling pathway. Since E% is a relative measure of distance, we propose that these changes in E% levels represent conformational changes in Tfn-TFR complexes during endocytic pathway. Thus, our results indicate that Tfn-TFR complexes undergo different conformational changes in normal vs. cancer cells, indicating that the organization of Tfn-TFR complexes at the nanometer range is significantly altered during the endocytic recycling pathway in cancer cells. In summary, improvements in the automated selection of FRET ROI datasets

  12. Quantification of telomerase activity in normal oral mucosal tissue and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Arpita; Naikmasur, Venkatesh G.; Sattur, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: The role of telomeres and telomerase in oral cancer is an area of much recent interest. The understanding of the role of telomere biology, the end replication problem leading to genomic instability and the reactivation of telomerase, is absolutely critical to our understanding of oral cancer, and more so, to our ability of early diagnosis and developing novel therapies and cancer prevention approaches. The aim of the present study was to quantify telomerase activity (TA) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and normal oral mucosa and assess the role of telomerase as diagnostic and prognostic marker of oral malignancy. Materials and Methods: We quantified TA in 45 patients with OSCC and 20 normal oral mucosal specimens using polymerase chain reaction-based telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay and compared it with the clinical status and grade of malignancy. Results: TA was detected in 89% of malignant and 5% of normal oral mucosal tissue. The TA levels ranged from 0.28 to 6.91 (mean 2.05, standard deviation [SD] 1.33) in OSCC and 0.21 to 1.09 (mean 0.54, SD 0.27) in normal oral mucosa. There was no relationship between TA levels and clinical stages, site of the lesion, history of adverse habits, or sex of the patient. However, under the WHO classification, there were significant differences (P < 0.00) between Grades I, II, and III. Furthermore, increasing age of the patient significantly correlated with TA. Interpretation and Conclusion: The results of the present study indicate that activation of TA is frequent in OSCC. Statistically significant difference in quantified telomerase levels of OSCC and normal oral mucosa (P < 0.00) demonstrates the significant clinical usefulness of telomerase activation as a valuable marker for diagnosis while significant correlation of TA with grades of malignancy indicates its effectiveness as marker for prognosis of OSCC.

  13. Gene Expression Pattern of Cells From Inflamed and Normal Areas of Osteoarthritis Synovial Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Cécile; Dubuc, Jean-Emile; Montell, Eulàlia; Vergés, Josep; Munaut, Carine; Noël, Agnès; Henrotin, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the gene expression patterns of synovial cells from inflamed or normal/reactive areas of synovial membrane obtained from the same patient with osteoarthritis (OA). Methods At the time of total knee replacement, synovial tissues were obtained from 12 patients with knee OA. The inflammation status of the synovial membrane was characterized according to macroscopic criteria and classified as normal/reactive or inflamed. Biopsy samples were cultured separately for 7 days. Microarray gene expression profiling was performed on normal/reactive and inflamed areas. Western blot and immunohistochemistry were used to confirm the identified genes that were differentially expressed. Results We identified 896 genes that were differentially expressed between normal/reactive and inflamed areas. The key pathways were related to inflammation, cartilage metabolism, Wnt signaling, and angiogenesis. In the inflammation network, the genes TREM1 and S100A9 were strongly up-regulated. The genes MMP3, MMP9, CTSH (cathepsin H), and CTSS (cathepsin S) were significantly up-regulated in the cartilage catabolism pathway, while the most up-regulated anabolism enzyme gene was HAS1. In the Wnt signaling pathway, the genes for Wnt-5a and low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 5 were up-regulated, while the gene FZD2 and the gene for Dkk-3 were down-regulated. Finally, STC1, which codes for a protein involved in angiogenesis, was identified as the most up-regulated gene in inflamed compared with normal/reactive areas. Conclusion This study is the first to identify different expression patterns between 2 areas of the synovial membrane from the same patient. These differences concern several key pathways involved in OA pathogenesis. This analysis also provides information regarding new genes and proteins as potential targets of treatment. PMID:24757147

  14. Three-dimensional counting of morphologically normal human red blood cells via digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Faliu; Moon, Inkyu; Lee, Yeon H.

    2015-01-01

    Counting morphologically normal cells in human red blood cells (RBCs) is extremely beneficial in the health care field. We propose a three-dimensional (3-D) classification method of automatically determining the morphologically normal RBCs in the phase image of multiple human RBCs that are obtained by off-axis digital holographic microscopy (DHM). The RBC holograms are first recorded by DHM, and then the phase images of multiple RBCs are reconstructed by a computational numerical algorithm. To design the classifier, the three typical RBC shapes, which are stomatocyte, discocyte, and echinocyte, are used for training and testing. Nonmain or abnormal RBC shapes different from the three normal shapes are defined as the fourth category. Ten features, including projected surface area, average phase value, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, perimeter, mean corpuscular hemoglobin surface density, circularity, mean phase of center part, sphericity coefficient, elongation, and pallor, are extracted from each RBC after segmenting the reconstructed phase images by using a watershed transform algorithm. Moreover, four additional properties, such as projected surface area, perimeter, average phase value, and elongation, are measured from the inner part of each cell, which can give significant information beyond the previous 10 features for the separation of the RBC groups; these are verified in the experiment by the statistical method of Hotelling's T-square test. We also apply the principal component analysis algorithm to reduce the dimension number of variables and establish the Gaussian mixture densities using the projected data with the first eight principal components. Consequently, the Gaussian mixtures are used to design the discriminant functions based on Bayesian decision theory. To improve the performance of the Bayes classifier and the accuracy of estimation of its error rate, the leaving-one-out technique is applied. Experimental results show that the proposed method can

  15. Cognitive enhancing treatment with a PPARγ agonist normalizes dentate granule cell presynaptic function in Tg2576 APP mice.

    PubMed

    Nenov, Miroslav N; Laezza, Fernanda; Haidacher, Sigmund J; Zhao, Yingxin; Sadygov, Rovshan G; Starkey, Jonathan M; Spratt, Heidi; Luxon, Bruce A; Dineley, Kelly T; Denner, Larry

    2014-01-15

    Hippocampal network hyperexcitability is considered an early indicator of Alzheimer's disease (AD) memory impairment. Some AD mouse models exhibit similar network phenotypes. In this study we focused on dentate gyrus (DG) granule cell spontaneous and evoked properties in 9-month-old Tg2576 mice that model AD amyloidosis and cognitive deficits. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we found that Tg2576 DG granule cells exhibited spontaneous EPSCs that were higher in frequency but not amplitude compared with wild-type mice, suggesting hyperactivity of DG granule cells via a presynaptic mechanism. Further support of a presynaptic mechanism was revealed by increased I-O relationships and probability of release in Tg2576 DG granule cells. Since we and others have shown that activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) axis improves hippocampal cognition in mouse models for AD as well as benefitting memory performance in some humans with early AD, we investigated how PPARγ agonism affected synaptic activity in Tg2576 DG. We found that PPARγ agonism normalized the I-O relationship of evoked EPSCs, frequency of spontaneous EPSCs, and probability of release that, in turn, correlated with selective expression of DG proteins essential for presynaptic SNARE function that are altered in patients with AD. These findings provide evidence that DG principal cells may contribute to early AD hippocampal network hyperexcitability via a presynaptic mechanism, and that hippocampal cognitive enhancement via PPARγ activation occurs through regulation of presynaptic vesicular proteins critical for proper glutamatergic neurotransmitter release, synaptic transmission, and short-term plasticity.

  16. Neoplasms with schwannian differentiation express transcription factors known to regulate normal schwann cell development.

    PubMed

    Pytel, Peter; Karrison, Theodore; Can Gong; Tonsgard, James H; Krausz, Thomas; Montag, Anthony G

    2010-12-01

    A number of transcription factors have been identified as important in guiding normal Schwann cell development. This study used immunohistochemistry on tissue arrays to assess the expression of some of these transcription factors (Sox5, Sox9, Sox10, AP-2α, Pax7, and FoxD3) on 76 schwannomas, 105 neurofibromas, and 34 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). Sox9 and Sox10 were found to be widely expressed in all tumor types. FoxD3 reactivity was stronger and more frequently found in schwannomas and MPNSTs than neurofibromas. AP-2α was positive in 31% to 49% of all tumors, but strong reactivity was limited to MPNSTs and schwannomas. Pax7 and Sox5 expression was restricted to subsets of MPNSTs. Statistical analysis showed significant differences between the 3 tumor types in the expression of these markers. No differences were found in the analyzed tumor subgroups, including schwannomas of different sites, schwannomas with or without NF2 association, neurofibromas of different types, or sporadic versus NF1-associated MPNSTs. These results suggest that the transcription factors that guide normal Schwann cell development also play a role in the biology of neoplastic cells with Schwannian differentiation. FoxD3, AP-2α, Pax7, and Sox5 are upregulated in MPNSTs compared with neurofibromas and may be markers of malignant transformation. Screening the expression of FoxD3, Sox9, and Sox10 on 23 cases of other spindle-cell proliferations that may be considered in the differential diagnosis of MPNST, including synovial sarcoma and spindle cell melanoma, suggests that these 3 are helpful markers of Schwannian differentiation in the context of diagnosing MPNSTs.

  17. Caspase-3 expression in normal oral epithelium, oral submucous fibrosis and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Veeravarmal, Veeran; Austin, Ravi David; Siddavaram, Nagini; Thiruneelakandan, Sambanthan; Nassar, Mohamed Hanifa Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Context: The epithelium atrophy, as the oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) progresses, is believed to be an after effect of stromal fibrosis, hyalinization, decrease in vascularity and cellularity and is considered as “ischemic atrophy.” Due to hypoxia, caspase-3 get activation and subsequent decrease in viable cell count can occur. Aims and Objectives: To determine caspase-3 expression in various grades of OSMF and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) to find out whether upregulation of apoptosis is responsible for the epithelial changes in OSMF. Subjects and Methods: The control tissue (15 samples from normal oral mucosa) and study group comprising 97 cases of OSMF of different grades and OSCC associated with OSMF were stained with caspase-3 antibody, and the percentage of positive cells was calculated using ImageJ software. Statistical Analysis: The results obtained were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's honest significance difference test and Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: There was a nuclear expression of caspase-3 in basal and parabasal layers of normal epithelium. There was cytoplasmic expression of caspase-3 in OSMF without dysplasia, total absence of caspase-3 expression in dysplastic epithelium and in majority cases of OSCC. The caspase-3 percentage was increased in OSMF (0%–53%) when compared with OSCC (0%–8%). The statistical comparison of caspase-3 among normal, OSMF and OSCC patients revealed significant correlation (P < 0.00010). The comparison within different grades of OSMF and between dysplastic and nondysplastic epithelium OSMF also showed significance (P < 0.019). Conclusions: The decreased expression of caspase-3 in disease progression reflects its role in the malignant transformation. PMID:27721610

  18. Scribble is required for normal epithelial cell–cell contacts and lumen morphogenesis in the mammalian lung

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Laura L.; Schnatwinkel, Carsten; Hazelwood, Lee; Chessum, Lauren; Paudyal, Anju; Hilton, Helen; Romero, M. Rosario; Wilde, Jonathan; Bogani, Debora; Sanderson, Jeremy; Formstone, Caroline; Murdoch, Jennifer N.; Niswander, Lee A.; Greenfield, Andy; Dean, Charlotte H.

    2013-01-01

    During lung development, proper epithelial cell arrangements are critical for the formation of an arborized network of tubes. Each tube requires a lumen, the diameter of which must be tightly regulated to enable optimal lung function. Lung branching and lumen morphogenesis require close epithelial cell–cell contacts that are maintained as a result of adherens junctions, tight junctions and by intact apical–basal (A/B) polarity. However, the molecular mechanisms that maintain epithelial cohesion and lumen diameter in the mammalian lung are unknown. Here we show that Scribble, a protein implicated in planar cell polarity (PCP) signalling, is necessary for normal lung morphogenesis. Lungs of the Scrib mouse mutant Circletail (Crc) are abnormally shaped with fewer airways, and these airways often lack a visible, ‘open’ lumen. Mechanistically we show that Scrib genetically interacts with the core PCP gene Vangl2 in the developing lung and that the distribution of PCP pathway proteins and Rho mediated cytoskeletal modification is perturbed in ScribCrc/Crc lungs. However A/B polarity, which is disrupted in Drosophila Scrib mutants, is largely unaffected. Notably, we find that Scrib mediates functions not attributed to other PCP proteins in the lung. Specifically, Scrib localises to both adherens and tight junctions of lung epithelia and knockdown of Scrib in lung explants and organotypic cultures leads to reduced cohesion of lung epithelial cells. Live imaging of Scrib knockdown lungs shows that Scrib does not affect bud bifurcation, as previously shown for the PCP protein Celsr1, but is required to maintain epithelial cohesion. To understand the mechanism leading to reduced cell–cell association, we show that Scrib associates with β-catenin in embryonic lung and the sub-cellular distribution of adherens and tight junction proteins is perturbed in mutant lung epithelia. Our data reveal that Scrib is required for normal lung epithelial organisation and lumen

  19. The myoepithelial cell: its role in normal mammary glands and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sopel, M

    2010-02-01

    Mammary gland epithelium is composed of an inner layer of secretory cells (luminal) and an outer layer of myoepithelial cells (MEC) bordering the basal lamina which separates the epithelial layer from the extracellular matrix. Mature MECs morphologically resemble smooth muscle cells; however, they exhibit features typical for epithelial cells, such as the presence of specific cytokeratin filaments. During lactation, secretory cells synthesize milk components, which are collected in alveoli and duct lumen, and transported to the nipple as a result of MEC contraction. Although the induction of MEC contraction results from oxytocin action, also other, still unknown auto/paracrine mechanisms participate in the regulation of this process. As well as milk ejection, MECs are involved in mammary gland morphogenesis in all developmental stages, modulating proliferation and differentiation of luminal cells. They take part in the formation of extracellular matrix, synthesizing its components and secreting proteinases and their inhibitors. In addition, MECs are regarded as natural cancer suppressors, stabilizing the normal structure of the mammary gland, they secrete suppressor proteins (e.g. maspin) limiting cancer growth, invasiveness, and neoangiogenesis. The majority of malignant breast cancers are derived from luminal cells, whereas neoplasms of MEC origin are the most seldom and usually benign form of breast tumours. MECs are markedly resistant to malignant transformation and they are able to suppress the transformation of neighboring luminal cells. Therefore, a deeper insight into the role of MECs in the physiology and pathology of mammary glands would allow a better understanding of cancerogenesis mechanisms and possible application of specific MEC markers in the diagnosis and therapy of breast cancer.

  20. The influence of aqueous extracts of selected Potentilla species on normal human colon cells.

    PubMed

    Tomczyk, Michał; Paduch, Roman; Wiater, Adrian; Pleszczyńska, Małgorzata; Kandefer-Szerszeń, Martyna; Szczodrak, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Potentilla L. (Rosaceae) species have been used in traditional medicine in Asia, Europe and Northern America. This study analyzed the biological activity of aqueous extracts of Potentilla species (Rosaceae): Dasiphora fruticosa (syn. P. fruticosa), P. norvegica, P. pensylvanica, P. thuringiaca, P. crantzii and P. nepalensis. The activities were tested using MTT, NR and DPPH assays on normal human colon epithelium (CCD 841 CoTr) and colon myofibroblast (CCD-18Co) cells. Moreover, cell morphology using the May-Grünwald-Giemsa method, IL-6 by ELISA, and nitric oxide (NO) analysis with the Griess method in culture supernatants were performed after 24 h. Extracts were tested at dose levels between 25 and 250 microg/mL. For ELISA, 15 microg/mL was chosen. All extracts suppressed the metabolism of myofibroblasts, while epithelial cells' mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity decreased after incubation with extracts. All extracts showed a free radical scavenging (DPPH) effect in a concentration-dependent manner. The most potent was the extract from D. fruticosa, while the least action was observed for P. thuringiaca. Potentilla extracts stimulated, IL-6 production in tested cells but the level of the cytokine was found to decrease in epithelial cells. Pre-incubation of cells with LPS resulted in increased IL-6 secretion. Modulation of NO production after extract addition and cell pre-incubation with LPS was also observed. Potentilla extracts may be interesting natural factors modulating the main features of cells forming the colon wall, and thus may be potentially useful in the prophylaxis or healing of colon disorders. PMID:23757943

  1. Thermal diffusivity measurements in the photoacoustic open-cell configuration using simple signal normalization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderas-López, J. A.; Mandelis, A.

    2001-09-01

    A generalized model for the open photoacoustic cell configuration (OPC) technique, involving one-dimensional heat diffusion across two layers, is presented. The analytical results are particularly suitable for applications with dielectric solids, such as polymers and resins. Two effective normalization procedures for simple and reliable measurement of the thermal diffusivity of this kind of materials using an OPC are also presented. The thermal diffusivity of three different materials (a dental resin, an epoxy resin, and a polymer foil) was measured and excellent agreement was obtained with some values reported in the literature. 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Short-term fasting affects luteinizing hormone secretory dynamics but not reproductive function in normal-weight sedentary women.

    PubMed

    Olson, B R; Cartledge, T; Sebring, N; Defensor, R; Nieman, L

    1995-04-01

    Acute food withdrawal reversibly inhibits the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in men and in rhesus monkeys, and it produces defects in LH pulsatility in normal-weight women. However, the clinical effect of short-term nutritional deprivation on the reproductive axis of normally cycling women has not been evaluated. Thus we studied the effect of a 3-day fast during the midfollicular phase on menstrual cycle length, gonadotropin secretory patterns, follicular development, and ovulation. After a baseline ovulatory cycle, 12 women within 15% of ideal body weight were randomized to be fed (n = 7) or fasted (n = 10) on cycle days 7 to 9. Five of the women repeated the study and received the alternate diet. Endocrine and metabolic parameters of fasting and reproductive physiology were measured on cycle days 6 to 12. Fasted physiology was demonstrated by characteristic alterations in growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor I, TSH, and T3 levels. During fed cycles, the number of LH pulses remained constant on cycle days 6, 9 and 11, whereas mean LH levels, LH area under the curve, and LH pulse amplitude increased significantly over this time (all P < 0.05). In contrast, fasted cycles were marked by a significant decrease in the number of LH pulses on the last day of the fast (cycle day 9, P < 0.05) and by a lack of increase over time of mean LH values, LH area under the curve, and LH pulse amplitude. Follicle development, as assessed by daily ultrasound examination and estradiol measurements, was similar in all cycles and was followed by ovulation in all women; follicular and luteal phase lengths of fasted and fed cycles were similar. We conclude that the alterations in LH secretory dynamics that occur during a 3-day fast are not sufficient to perturb follicle development and cycle lengths in normal-weight sedentary women. The resilience of the reproductive axis in these healthy women contrasts with the sensitivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis to acute

  3. Primary cilia mechanics affects cell mechanosensation: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Khayyeri, Hanifeh; Barreto, Sara; Lacroix, Damien

    2015-08-21

    Primary cilia (PC) are mechanical cell structures linked to the cytoskeleton and are central to how cells sense biomechanical signals from their environment. However, it is unclear exactly how PC mechanics influences cell mechanosensation. In this study we investigate how the PC mechanical characteristics are involved in the mechanotransduction process whereby cilium deflection under fluid flow induces strains on the internal cell components that regulate the cell׳s mechanosensitive response. Our investigation employs a computational approach in which a finite element model of a cell consisting of a nucleus, cytoplasm, cortex, microtubules, actin bundles and a primary cilium was used together with a finite element representation of a flow chamber. Fluid-structure interaction analysis was performed by simulating perfusion flow of 1mm/s on the cell model. Simulations of cells with different PC mechanical characteristics, showed that the length and the stiffness of PC are responsible for the transmission of mechanical stimuli to the cytoskeleton. Fluid flow deflects the cilium, with the highest strains found at the base of the PC and in the cytoplasm. The PC deflection created further strains on the cell nucleus but did not influence microtubules and actin bundles significantly. Our results indicate that PC deflection under fluid flow stimulation transmits mechanical strain primarily to other essential organelles in the cytoplasm, such as the Golgi complex, that regulate cells' mechanoresponse. The simulations further suggest that cell mechanosensitivity can be altered by targeting PC length and rigidity.

  4. Interaction of alpha T3-1 cells with lactotropes and somatotropes of normal pituitary in vitro.

    PubMed

    Andries, M; Vande Vijver, V; Tilemans, D; Bert, C; Denef, C

    1995-03-01

    A pituitary cell population of 14-day-old female rats, containing lactotropes and somatotropes but deprived of gonadotropes, was prepared by unit gravity sedimentation through a serum albumin gradient and allowed to reaggregate either as such or after mixing this population with cells of the gonadotropic alpha T3-1 cell line. In a perifusion system gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) had no effect on prolactin (PRL) and growth hormone (GH) release in the former aggregates but stimulated PRL release in the latter. In the alpha T3-1 cell-containing aggregates GnRH showed a biphasic effect on GH release: inhibition during exposure to GnRH followed by a rebound secretion upon removal of the peptide. The aggregation capacity of alpha T3-1 cells with the normal pituitary cells was demonstrated by using an alpha T3-1 cell clone stably transfected with the reporter gene beta-galactosidase. Perifusion of the gonadotrope-deprived aggregates with medium conditioned by alpha T3-1 cell provoked a rapid stimulation of PRL release and a biphasic effect on GH release. Medium conditioned by the corticotropic cell line AtT20 also stimulated PRL release but had no concomitant effect on GH release. Medium conditioned by alpha T3-1 cells, when added for 40 h to aggregates of 14-day-old rat pituitary, provoked an increase in the number of 3H-thymidine (3H-T)-labelled lactotropes and a decreased in the number of 3H-T-labelled somatotropes. The conditioned medium was concentrated on Sep-Pak C18 and ultrafiltrated through an Amicon membrane with 3-kD molecular weight cut-off and the retained molecules separated by reversed-phase HPLC. The material stimulating 3H-T labelling of lactotropes eluted from the column with a different retention time than material inhibiting 3H-T labelling of somatotropes, suggesting that the effect on lactotropes is mediated by (a) molecule(s) different from that affecting somatotropes. The effects of alpha T3-1 cells and their secretion products on lactotropes

  5. Proteomic analysis of ubiquitinated proteins in normal hepatocyte cell line Chang liver cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Fengwei; Lu, Lifang; Cai, Yun; Wang, Jinglan; Xie, Yunfei; Wang, Lin; Gong, Yanhua; Xu, Bing-E; Wu, Jun; Luo, Ying; Qiang, Boqin; Yuan, Jiangang; Sun, Xiaoqing; Peng, Xiaozhong

    2008-07-01

    Post-translational modification by ubiquitin (Ub) and Ub-like modifiers is one of the most important mechanisms regulating a wide range of cellular processes in eukaryotes. Through mediating 26S proteasome-dependent degradation of substrates, the covalent modification of proteins by multiple Ub (ubiquitination) can regulate many different cellular functions such as transcription, antigen processing, signal transduction and cell cycle. To better understand ubiquitination and its functions, proteomic approaches have been developed to purify and identify more protein substrates. The S5a subunit of the 26S proteasome binds to poly-Ub chains containing four or more Ub. In this study, immobilized GST-S5a fusion protein was used to affinity-purify ubiquitinated proteins from Chang liver cells. The purified proteins were then identified with multi-dimensional LC combined with MS/MS. Eighty-three potential ubiquitination substrates were identified. From these proteins, 19 potential ubiquitination sites on 17 potential substrates were determined. These potential ubiquitination substrates are mainly related to important cellular functions including metabolism, translation and transcription. Our results provide helpful information for further understanding of the relationship between ubiquitination machinery and different cell functions.

  6. Oxidative processes in red blood cells from normal and diabetic individuals.

    PubMed

    Bryszewska, M; Zavodnik, I B; Niekurzak, A; Szosland, K

    1995-10-01

    The oxidation processes in normal and diabetic erythrocytes after cell exposure to H2O2 and t-butyl hydroperoxide, as well as the effect of malondialdehyde (a stable end product of lipid peroxidation) on erythrocyte membrane structure and stability were studied. The malondialdehyde level began to increase only after oxidation of most of the red blood cell glutathione by peroxides. The activation energy of malondialdehyde was 53 +/- 7 kj/mol. Sodium azide inhibited the oxidation processes induced by t-butyl hydroperoxide. The modification of erythrocytes by malondialdehyde decreased the fluidity of the membrane lipid bilayer measured by fluorescence anisotropy and increased the osmotic stability of the cells. The level of endogenous thiobarbituric acid-reactive species was higher and antioxidative activity was lower in diabetic cells. It seems likely that oxidation processes and accumulation of malondialdehyde can contribute directly to changes in the properties of ¿diabetic¿ red blood cells and may cause the development of long-term complications. PMID:8673018

  7. Exact, time-independent estimation of clone size distributions in normal and mutated cells.

    PubMed

    Roshan, A; Jones, P H; Greenman, C D

    2014-10-01

    Biological tools such as genetic lineage tracing, three-dimensional confocal microscopy and next-generation DNA sequencing are providing new ways to quantify the distribution of clones of normal and mutated cells. Understanding population-wide clone size distributions in vivo is complicated by multiple cell types within observed tissues, and overlapping birth and death processes. This has led to the increased need for mathematically informed models to understand their biological significance. Standard approaches usually require knowledge of clonal age. We show that modelling on clone size independent of time is an alternative method that offers certain analytical advantages; it can help parametrize these models, and obtain distributions for counts of mutated or proliferating cells, for example. When applied to a general birth-death process common in epithelial progenitors, this takes the form of a gambler's ruin problem, the solution of which relates to counting Motzkin lattice paths. Applying this approach to mutational processes, alternative, exact, formulations of classic Luria-Delbrück-type problems emerge. This approach can be extended beyond neutral models of mutant clonal evolution. Applications of these approaches are twofold. First, we resolve the probability of progenitor cells generating proliferating or differentiating progeny in clonal lineage tracing experiments in vivo or cell culture assays where clone age is not known. Second, we model mutation frequency distributions that deep sequencing of subclonal samples produce.

  8. Human papilloma virus DNAs immortalize normal human mammary epithelial cells and reduce their growth factor requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Band, V.; Zajchowski, D.; Kulesa, V.; Sager, R. )

    1990-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are most commonly associated with cervical carcinoma in patients and induce immortalization of human keratinocytes in culture. HPV has not been associated with breast cancer. This report describes the immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (76N) by plasmid pHPV18 or pHPV16, each containing the linearized viral genome. Transfectants were grown continuously for more than 60 passages, whereas 76N cells senesce after 18-20 passages. The transfectants also differ from 76N cells in cloning in a completely defined medium called D2 and growing a minimally supplemented defined medium (D3) containing epidermal growth factor. All transfectant tested contain integrated HPV DNA, express HPV RNA, and produce HPV E7 protein. HPV transfectants do not form tumors in a nude mouse assay. It is concluded that products of the HPV genome induce immortalization of human breast epithelial cells and reduce their growth factor requirements. This result raises the possibility that HPV might be involved in breast cancer. Furthermore, other tissue-specific primary epithelial cells that are presently difficult to grown and investigate may also be immortalized by HPV.

  9. Epidermal Notch1 recruits RORγ+ group 3 innate lymphoid cells to orchestrate normal skin repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Hodgkinson, Tom; Gothard, Elizabeth J.; Boroumand, Soulmaz; Lamb, Rebecca; Cummins, Ian; Narang, Priyanka; Sawtell, Amy; Coles, Jenny; Leonov, German; Reboldi, Andrea; Buckley, Christopher D.; Cupedo, Tom; Siebel, Christian; Bayat, Ardeshir; Coles, Mark C.; Ambler, Carrie A.

    2016-01-01

    Notch has a well-defined role in controlling cell fate decisions in the embryo and the adult epidermis and immune systems, yet emerging evidence suggests Notch also directs non-cell-autonomous signalling in adult tissues. Here, we show that Notch1 works as a damage response signal. Epidermal Notch induces recruitment of immune cell subsets including RORγ+ ILC3s into wounded dermis; RORγ+ ILC3s are potent sources of IL17F in wounds and control immunological and epidermal cell responses. Mice deficient for RORγ+ ILC3s heal wounds poorly resulting from delayed epidermal proliferation and macrophage recruitment in a CCL3-dependent process. Notch1 upregulates TNFα and the ILC3 recruitment chemokines CCL20 and CXCL13. TNFα, as a Notch1 effector, directs ILC3 localization and rates of wound healing. Altogether these findings suggest that Notch is a key stress/injury signal in skin epithelium driving innate immune cell recruitment and normal skin tissue repair. PMID:27099134

  10. Epidermal Notch1 recruits RORγ(+) group 3 innate lymphoid cells to orchestrate normal skin repair.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Hodgkinson, Tom; Gothard, Elizabeth J; Boroumand, Soulmaz; Lamb, Rebecca; Cummins, Ian; Narang, Priyanka; Sawtell, Amy; Coles, Jenny; Leonov, German; Reboldi, Andrea; Buckley, Christopher D; Cupedo, Tom; Siebel, Christian; Bayat, Ardeshir; Coles, Mark C; Ambler, Carrie A

    2016-01-01

    Notch has a well-defined role in controlling cell fate decisions in the embryo and the adult epidermis and immune systems, yet emerging evidence suggests Notch also directs non-cell-autonomous signalling in adult tissues. Here, we show that Notch1 works as a damage response signal. Epidermal Notch induces recruitment of immune cell subsets including RORγ(+) ILC3s into wounded dermis; RORγ(+) ILC3s are potent sources of IL17F in wounds and control immunological and epidermal cell responses. Mice deficient for RORγ(+) ILC3s heal wounds poorly resulting from delayed epidermal proliferation and macrophage recruitment in a CCL3-dependent process. Notch1 upregulates TNFα and the ILC3 recruitment chemokines CCL20 and CXCL13. TNFα, as a Notch1 effector, directs ILC3 localization and rates of wound healing. Altogether these findings suggest that Notch is a key stress/injury signal in skin epithelium driving innate immune cell recruitment and normal skin tissue repair. PMID:27099134

  11. Protein tyrosine phosphatase of liver regeneration-1 is required for normal timing of cell cycle progression during liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Ye, Diana Z; Li, Zhaoyu; Teta-Bissett, Monica; Peng, Yong; Taub, Rebecca; Greenbaum, Linda E; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2015-01-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase of liver regeneration-1 (Prl-1) is an immediate-early gene that is significantly induced during liver regeneration. Several in vitro studies have suggested that Prl-1 is important for the regulation of cell cycle progression. To evaluate its function in liver regeneration, we ablated the Prl-1 gene specifically in mouse hepatocytes using the Cre-loxP system. Prl-1 mutant mice (Prl-1(loxP/loxP);AlfpCre) appeared normal and fertile. Liver size and metabolic function in Prl-1 mutants were comparable to controls, indicating that Prl-1 is dispensable for liver development, postnatal growth, and hepatocyte differentiation. Mutant mice demonstrated a delay in DNA synthesis after 70% partial hepatectomy, although ultimate liver mass restoration was not affected. At 40 h posthepatectomy, reduced protein levels of the cell cycle regulators cyclin E, cyclin A2, cyclin B1, and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 were observed in Prl-1 mutant liver. Investigation of the major signaling pathways involved in liver regeneration demonstrated that phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 were significantly reduced at 40 h posthepatectomy in Prl-1 mutants. Taken together, this study provides evidence that Prl-1 is required for proper timing of liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy. Prl-1 promotes G1/S progression via modulating expression of several cell cycle regulators through activation of the AKT and STAT3 signaling pathway.

  12. Protein tyrosine phosphatase of liver regeneration-1 is required for normal timing of cell cycle progression during liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yang; Ye, Diana Z.; Li, Zhaoyu; Teta-Bissett, Monica; Peng, Yong; Taub, Rebecca; Greenbaum, Linda E.

    2014-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase of liver regeneration-1 (Prl-1) is an immediate-early gene that is significantly induced during liver regeneration. Several in vitro studies have suggested that Prl-1 is important for the regulation of cell cycle progression. To evaluate its function in liver regeneration, we ablated the Prl-1 gene specifically in mouse hepatocytes using the Cre-loxP system. Prl-1 mutant mice (Prl-1loxP/loxP;AlfpCre) appeared normal and fertile. Liver size and metabolic function in Prl-1 mutants were comparable to controls, indicating that Prl-1 is dispensable for liver development, postnatal growth, and hepatocyte differentiation. Mutant mice demonstrated a delay in DNA synthesis after 70% partial hepatectomy, although ultimate liver mass restoration was not affected. At 40 h posthepatectomy, reduced protein levels of the cell cycle regulators cyclin E, cyclin A2, cyclin B1, and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 were observed in Prl-1 mutant liver. Investigation of the major signaling pathways involved in liver regeneration demonstrated that phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 were significantly reduced at 40 h posthepatectomy in Prl-1 mutants. Taken together, this study provides evidence that Prl-1 is required for proper timing of liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy. Prl-1 promotes G1/S progression via modulating expression of several cell cycle regulators through activation of the AKT and STAT3 signaling pathway. PMID:25377314

  13. Resveratrol: Antioxidant activity and induction of fetal hemoglobin in erythroid cells from