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Sample records for affecting normal tissues

  1. Survivin inhibitor YM155 suppresses gastric cancer xenograft growth in mice without affecting normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Lin, Jia Cheng; Ding, Yan Fei; Zhu, Liming; Ye, Jing; Tu, Shui Ping

    2016-01-01

    Survivin overexpression is associated with poor prognosis of human gastric cancer, and is a target for gastric cancer therapy. YM155 is originally identified as a specific inhibitor of survivin. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of YM155 on human gastric cancer. Our results showed that YM155 treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation, reduced colony formation and induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, YM155 treatment significantly decreased survivin expression without affecting XIAP expression and increased the cleavage of apoptosis-associated proteins caspase 3, 7, 8, 9. YM155 significantly inhibited sphere formation of gastric cancer cells, suppressed expansion and growth of the formed spheres (cancer stem cell-like cells, CSCs) and downregulated the protein levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, Cyclin D1 and CD44 in gastric cancer cells. YM155 infusion at 5 mg/kg/day for 7 days markedly inhibited growth of gastric cancer xenograft in a nude mouse model. Immunohistochemistry staining and Western Blot showed that YM155 treatment inhibited expression of survivin and CD44, induced apoptosis and reduced CD44+ CSCs in xenograft tumor tissues in vivo. No obvious pathological changes were observed in organs (e.g. heart, liver, lung and kidney) in YM155-treated mice. Our results demonstrated that YM155 inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis, reduces cancer stem cell expansion, and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in gastric cancer cells. Our results elucidate a new mechanism by which YM155 inhibits gastric cancer growth by inhibition of CSCs. YM155 may be a promising agent for gastric cancer treatment. PMID:26771139

  2. Amifostine Induces Antioxidant Enzymatic Activities in Normal Tissues and a Transplantable Tumor That Can Affect Radiation Response

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, David J. Murley, Jeffrey S.; Kataoka, Yasushi; Baker, Kenneth L.; Kunnavakkam, Rangesh; Coleman, Mitchell C.; Spitz, Douglas R.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether amifostine can induce elevated manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in murine tissues and a transplantable SA-NH tumor, resulting in a delayed tumor cell radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: SA-NH tumor-bearing C3H mice were treated with a single 400 mg/kg or three daily 50 mg/kg doses of amifostine administered intraperitoneally. At selected time intervals after the last injection, the heart, liver, lung, pancreas, small intestine, spleen, and SA-NH tumor were removed and analyzed for SOD2, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) enzymatic activity. The effect of elevated SOD2 enzymatic activity on the radiation response of SA-NH cells was determined. Results: SOD2 activity was significantly elevated in selected tissues and a tumor 24 h after amifostine treatment. Catalase and GPx activities remained unchanged except for significant elevations in the spleen. GPx was also elevated in the pancreas. SA-NH tumor cells exhibited a twofold elevation in SOD2 activity and a 27% elevation in radiation resistance. Amifostine administered in three daily fractions of 50 mg/kg each also resulted in significant elevations of these antioxidant enzymes. Conclusions: Amifostine can induce a delayed radioprotective effect that correlates with elevated levels of SOD2 activity in SA-NH tumor. If limited to normal tissues, this delayed radioprotective effect offers an additional potential for overall radiation protection. However, amifostine-induced elevation of SOD2 activity in tumors could have an unanticipated deleterious effect on tumor responses to fractionated radiation therapy, given that the radioprotector is administered daily just before each 2-Gy fractionated dose.

  3. JNK pathway inhibition selectively primes pancreatic cancer stem cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis without affecting the physiology of normal tissue resident stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Rhea, P. Robyn; Kettlun, Claudia; Heinemann, Mitja L.; Ruetering, Jennifer; Vykoukal, Jody; Alt, Eckhard

    2016-01-01

    Objective Successful treatment of solid cancers mandates targeting cancer stem cells (CSC) without impact on the physiology of normal tissue resident stem cells. C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling has been shown to be of importance in cancer. We test whether JNK inhibition would sensitize pancreatic CSCs to induction of apoptosis via low-dose TNFα-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Design Effects of JNK inhibition (JNKi) were evaluated in vitro in functional assays, through mRNA and protein expression analysis, and in in vivo mouse studies. CSCs were enriched in anoikis-resistant spheroid culture and analyzed accordingly. Results We confirmed that the JNK pathway is an important regulatory pathway in pancreatic cancer stem cells and further found that JNK inhibition downregulates the decoy receptor DcR1 through IL-8 signaling while upregulating pro-apoptotic death receptors DR4/5, thereby sensitizing cells - even with acquired TRAIL-resistance - to apoptosis induction. Treatment of orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenografts with either gemcitabine, JNKi or TRAIL alone for 4 weeks showed only modest effects compared to control, while the combination of JNKi and TRAIL resulted in significantly lower tumor burden (69%; p < 0.04), reduced numbers of circulating tumor cells, and less distant metastatic events, without affecting the general health of the animals. Conclusions The combination of JNKi and TRAIL significantly impacts on CSCs, but leaves regular tissue-resident stem cells unaffected – even under hypoxic stress conditions. This concept of selective treatment of pancreatic CSCs warrants further evaluation. PMID:26840266

  4. Cultured normal mammalian tissue and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey L. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Normal mammalian tissue and the culturing process has been developed for the three groups of organ, structural and blood tissue. The cells are grown in vitro under microgravity culture conditions and form three dimensional cell aggregates with normal cell function. The microgravity culture conditions may be microgravity or simulated microgravity created in a horizontal rotating wall culture vessel.

  5. Effects of pions on normal tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Tokita, N.

    1981-01-01

    Verification of the uniform biological effectiveness of pion beams of various dimensions produced at LAMPF has been made using cultured mammalian cells and mouse jejunum. Normal tissue radiobiology studies at LAMPF are reviewed with regard to biological beam characterization for the therapy program and the current status of acute and late effect studies on rodents. (ACR)

  6. Differentiating cancerous from normal breast tissue by redox imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, He N.; Tchou, Julia; Feng, Min; Zhao, Huaqing; Li, Lin Z.

    2015-02-01

    Abnormal metabolism can be a hallmark of cancer occurring early before detectable histological changes and may serve as an early detection biomarker. The current gold standard to establish breast cancer (BC) diagnosis is histological examination of biopsy. Previously we have found that pre-cancer and cancer tissues in animal models displayed abnormal mitochondrial redox state. Our technique of quantitatively measuring the mitochondrial redox state has the potential to be implemented as an early detection tool for cancer and may provide prognostic value. We therefore in this present study, investigated the feasibility of quantifying the redox state of tumor samples from 16 BC patients. Tumor tissue aliquots were collected from both normal and cancerous tissue from the affected cancer-bearing breasts of 16 female patients (5 TNBC, 9 ER+, 2 ER+/Her2+) shortly after surgical resection. All specimens were snap-frozen with liquid nitrogen on site and scanned later with the Chance redox scanner, i.e., the 3D cryogenic NADH/oxidized flavoprotein (Fp) fluorescence imager. Our preliminary results showed that both NADH and Fp (including FAD, i.e., flavin adenine dinucleotide) signals in the cancerous tissues roughly tripled to quadrupled those in the normal tissues (p<0.05) and the redox ratio Fp/(NADH+Fp) was about 27% higher in the cancerous tissues than in the normal ones (p<0.05). Our findings suggest that the redox state could differentiate between cancer and non-cancer breast tissues in human patients and this novel redox scanning procedure may assist in tissue diagnosis in freshly procured biopsy samples prior to tissue fixation. We are in the process of evaluating the prognostic value of the redox imaging indices for BC.

  7. Do no harm--normal tissue effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, E. J.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation therapy confers enormous benefits that must be balanced against the possibilities for harm including late toxicity in normal tissues and radiation-induced second malignancies. A small percentage of patients experience severe late complications. The question is, do these late sequelae occur randomly, or are they confined to individuals who are genetically predisposed to radiosensitivity. Experiments with knockout mice and with patients demonstrate that individuals heterozygous for a number of genes appear to be radiosensitive. If radiosensitive patients were identified prospectively by genetic analysis, they could be spared the trauma of late sequelae. Several large studies have shown a statistically significant excess of radiation-induced malignancies in radiotherapy patients. Most second cancers are carcinomas, developing in the lining cells of the body often remote from the treatment site. Radiation-induced sarcomas appear only in the heavily irradiated areas. These are small in number but appear with a very high relative risk.

  8. DNA Double-Strand Break Rejoining in Complex Normal Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebe, Claudia E.; Kuehne, Martin; Fricke, Andreas

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: The clinical radiation responses of different organs vary widely and likely depend on the intrinsic radiosensitivities of their different cell populations. Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most deleterious form of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation, and the cells' capacity to rejoin radiation-induced DSBs is known to affect their intrinsic radiosensitivity. To date, only little is known about the induction and processing of radiation-induced DSBs in complex normal tissues. Using an in vivo model with repair-proficient mice, the highly sensitive {gamma}H2AX immunofluorescence was established to investigate whether differences in DSB rejoining could account for the substantial differences in clinical radiosensitivity observed among normal tissues. Methods and Materials: After whole body irradiation of C57BL/6 mice (0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy), the formation and rejoining of DSBs was analyzed by enumerating {gamma}H2AX foci in various organs representative of both early-responding (small intestine) and late-responding (lung, brain, heart, kidney) tissues. Results: The linear dose correlation observed in all analyzed tissues indicated that {gamma}H2AX immunofluorescence allows for the accurate quantification of DSBs in complex organs. Strikingly, the various normal tissues exhibited identical kinetics for {gamma}H2AX foci loss, despite their clearly different clinical radiation responses. Conclusion: The identical kinetics of DSB rejoining measured in different organs suggest that tissue-specific differences in radiation responses are independent of DSB rejoining. This finding emphasizes the fundamental role of DSB repair in maintaining genomic integrity, thereby contributing to cellular viability and functionality and, thus, tissue homeostasis.

  9. Optimizing Normal Tissue Sparing in Ion Therapy Using Calculated Isoeffective Dose for Ion Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Remmes, Nicholas B.; Herman, Michael G.; Kruse, Jon J.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate how the selection of ion type affects the calculated isoeffective dose to the surrounding normal tissue as a function of both normal tissue and target tissue {alpha}/{beta} ratios. Methods and Materials: A microdosimetric biologic dose model was incorporated into a Geant4 simulation of parallel opposed beams of protons, helium, lithium, beryllium, carbon, and neon ions. The beams were constructed to give a homogeneous isoeffective dose to a volume in the center of a water phantom for target tissues covering a range of cobalt equivalent {alpha}/{beta} ratios of 1-20 Gy. Concomitant normal tissue isoeffective doses in the plateau of the ion beam were then compared for different ions across the range of normal tissue and target tissue radiosensitivities for a fixed isoeffective dose to the target tissue. Results: The ion type yielding the optimal normal tissue sparing was highly dependent on the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of both the normal and the target tissue. For carbon ions, the calculated isoeffective dose to normal tissue at a 5-cm depth varied by almost a factor of 5, depending on the {alpha}/{beta} ratios of the normal and target tissue. This ranges from a factor of 2 less than the isoeffective dose of a similar proton treatment to a factor of 2 greater. Conclusions: No single ion is optimal for all treatment scenarios. The heavier ions are superior in cases in which the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of the target tissue is low and the {alpha}/{beta} ratio of normal tissue is high, and protons are superior in the opposite circumstances. Lithium and beryllium appear to offer dose advantages similar to carbon, with a considerably lower normal tissue dose when the {alpha}/{beta} ratio in the target tissue is high and the {alpha}/{beta} ratio in the normal tissue is low.

  10. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues.

    PubMed

    Djomehri, Sabra I; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S H; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P

    2015-01-01

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095 mg/cc, bone: 570-1415 mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340 mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590 mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220 mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450 mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740 mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770 mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations. PMID:25856386

  11. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues

    DOE PAGES

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W.; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S. H.; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P.; Aikawa, Elena

    2015-04-09

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-raymore » fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095mg/cc, bone: 570-1415mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations.« less

  12. Mineral Density Volume Gradients in Normal and Diseased Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W.; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S. H.; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095mg/cc, bone: 570-1415mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations. PMID:25856386

  13. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Djomehri, Sabra I.; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W.; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S. H.; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P.; Aikawa, Elena

    2015-04-09

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095mg/cc, bone: 570-1415mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations.

  14. Factors Affecting Ice Nucleation in Plant Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, Edward N.; Davis, Glen A.; Anderson, Jeffrey A.

    1985-01-01

    Factors affecting the ice nucleation temperature of plants and plant tissues were examined. The mass of a sample had a marked effect on ice nucleation temperature. Small tissue samples supercooled to −10°C and were not accurate predictors of the nucleation temperature of intact plants in either laboratory or field experiments. This effect was not unique to plant tissues and was observed in autoclaved and control soil samples. Ice nucleation temperatures of bean, corn, cotton, and soybean seedlings were influenced by the length of subzero exposure, presence of ice nucleation active bacteria, and leaf surface wetness. The number of factors influencing ice nucleation temperature suggested that predicting the freezing behavior of plants in the field will be complex. PMID:16664524

  15. Imaging for assessment of radiation-induced normal tissue effects

    PubMed Central

    Jeraj, Robert; Cao, Yue; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Hahn, Carol; Marks, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Imaging can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal tissue effects. Identifying an early sign of normal tissue damage with imaging would have the potential to predict organ dysfunction, thereby allowing re-optimization of treatment strategies based upon individual patients’ risks and benefits. Early detection with non-invasive imaging may enable interventions to mitigate therapy-associated injury prior to its clinical manifestation. Further, successive imaging may provide an objective assessment of the impact of such mitigation therapies. However, many problems make application of imaging to normal tissue assessment challenging, and further work is required to establish imaging biomarkers as surrogate endpoints of clinical outcome. The performance of clinical trials where normal tissue injury is a clearly defined endpoint would greatly aid in realization of these goals. PMID:20171509

  16. Class III β-tubulin in normal and cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Marisa; Karki, Roshan; Spennato, Manuela; Pandya, Deep; He, Shiquan; Andreoli, Mirko; Fiedler, Paul; Ferlini, Cristiano

    2015-06-01

    Microtubules are polymeric structures composed of tubulin subunits. Each subunit consists of a heterodimer of α- and β-tubulin. At least seven β-tubulin isotypes, or classes, have been identified in human cells, and constitutive isotype expression appears to be tissue specific. Class III β-tubulin (βIII-tubulin) expression is normally confined to testes and tissues derived from neural cristae. However, its expression can be induced in other tissues, both normal and neoplastic, subjected to a toxic microenvironment characterized by hypoxia and poor nutrient supply. In this review, we will summarize the mechanisms underlying βIII-tubulin constitutive and induced expression. We will also illustrate its capacity to serve as a biomarker of neural commitment in normal tissues and as a pure prognostic biomarker in cancer patients.

  17. Mechanisms of injury to normal tissue after radiotherapy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Hubenak, Justin R.; Zhang, Qixu; Branch, Cynthia D.; Kronowitz, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The benefits of radiotherapy (RT) for cancer have been well documented for many years. However, even with targeted radiation delivery, many patients treated with radiation develop adverse effects. The purpose of this review was to analyze the current research into the biological basis of RT-induced normal tissue damage. Methods The PubMed and EMBASE databases were reviewed for articles on adverse effects of RT on normal tissue published from January 2005 through May 2012. Subsequently, abstracts of these articles were reviewed to identify articles with information relevant to the biological basis of RT-induced DNA damage and DNA repair. In addition, reference lists of the articles identified by the database search were reviewed, and referenced articles that seemed relevant were reviewed with no limitations on publication date. Results The database searches yielded 1751 publications. Of these, 1729 were eliminated because they did not address fundamental biology or were duplicates. A total of 22 articles were included. These articles revealed that many adverse effects are driven by chronic oxidative stress that affects the nuclear function of DNA repair mechanisms. Among normal cells undergoing replication, cells in S phase are most radioresistant because of overexpression of DNA repair enzymes, while cells in M phase are especially radiosensitive. Cancer cells exhibit increased radiosensitivity due to a breakdown in cell cycle checkpoints and repair mechanisms, and this increased radiosensitivity leads to accumulation of irreparable DNA lesions and cell death. Irradiated cells have an indirect effect on the cell cycle and survival of co-cultured non-irradiated cells. Method of irradiation and linear energy transfer to cancer cells versus bystander cells is shown to have an effect on cell survival, both cancerous and healthy. Conclusions RT-induced increases in reactive oxygen species in irradiated cells may signal healthy cells by increasing metabolic

  18. Electrical impedance characterization of normal and cancerous human hepatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Laufer, Shlomi; Ivorra, Antoni; Reuter, Victor E; Rubinsky, Boris; Solomon, Stephen B

    2010-07-01

    The four-electrode method was used to measure the ex vivo complex electrical impedance of tissues from 14 hepatic tumors and the surrounding normal liver from six patients. Measurements were done in the frequency range 1-400 kHz. It was found that the conductivity of the tumor tissue was much higher than that of the normal liver tissue in this frequency range (from 0.14 +/- 0.06 S m(-1) versus 0.03 +/- 0.01 S m(-1) at 1 kHz to 0.25 +/- 0.06 S m(-1) versus 0.15 +/- 0.03 S m(-1) at 400 kHz). The Cole-Cole models were estimated from the experimental data and the four parameters (rho(0), rho(infinity), alpha, f(c)) were obtained using a least-squares fit algorithm. The Cole-Cole parameters for the cancerous and normal liver are 9 +/- 4 Omega m(-1), 2.2 +/- 0.7 Omega m(-1), 0.5 +/- 0.2, 140 +/- 103 kHz and 50 +/- 28 Omega m(-1), 3.2 +/- 0.6 Omega m(-1), 0.64 +/- 0.04, 10 +/- 7 kHz, respectively. These data can contribute to developing bioelectric applications for tissue diagnostics and in tissue treatment planning with electrical fields such as radiofrequency tissue ablation, electrochemotherapy and gene therapy with reversible electroporation, nanoscale pulsing and irreversible electroporation.

  19. Argonaute Family Protein Expression in Normal Tissue and Cancer Entities

    PubMed Central

    Bruckmann, Astrid; Hauptmann, Judith; Deutzmann, Rainer; Meister, Gunter; Bosserhoff, Anja Katrin

    2016-01-01

    The members of the Argonaute (AGO) protein family are key players in miRNA-guided gene silencing. They enable the interaction between small RNAs and their respective target mRNA(s) and support the catalytic destruction of the gene transcript or recruit additional proteins for downstream gene silencing. The human AGO family consists of four AGO proteins (AGO1-AGO4), but only AGO2 harbors nuclease activity. In this study, we characterized the expression of the four AGO proteins in cancer cell lines and normal tissues with a new mass spectrometry approach called AGO-APP (AGO Affinity Purification by Peptides). In all analyzed normal tissues, AGO1 and AGO2 were most prominent, but marked tissue-specific differences were identified. Furthermore, considerable changes during development were observed by comparing fetal and adult tissues. We also identified decreased overall AGO expression in melanoma derived cell lines compared to other tumor cell lines and normal tissues, with the largest differences in AGO2 expression. The experiments described in this study suggest that reduced amounts of AGO proteins, as key players in miRNA processing, have impact on several cellular processes. Deregulated miRNA expression has been attributed to chromosomal aberrations, promoter regulation and it is known to have a major impact on tumor development and progression. Our findings will further increase our basic understanding of the molecular basis of miRNA processing and its relevance for disease. PMID:27518285

  20. Optimal fractionation in radiotherapy with multiple normal tissues.

    PubMed

    Saberian, Fatemeh; Ghate, Archis; Kim, Minsun

    2016-06-01

    The goal in radiotherapy is to maximize the biological effect (BE) of radiation on the tumour while limiting its toxic effects on healthy anatomies. Treatment is administered over several sessions to give the normal tissue time to recover as it has better damage-repair capabilities than tumour cells. This is termed fractionation. A key problem in radiotherapy involves finding an optimal number of treatment sessions (fractions) and the corresponding dosing schedule. A major limitation of existing mathematically rigorous work on this problem is that it includes only a single normal tissue. Since essentially no anatomical region of interest includes only one normal tissue, these models may incorrectly identify the optimal number of fractions and the corresponding dosing schedule. We present a formulation of the optimal fractionation problem that includes multiple normal tissues. Our model can tackle any combination of maximum dose, mean dose and dose-volume type constraints for serial and parallel normal tissues as this is characteristic of most treatment protocols. We also allow for a spatially heterogeneous dose distribution within each normal tissue. Furthermore, we do not a priori assume that the doses are invariant across fractions. Finally, our model uses a spatially optimized treatment plan as input and hence can be seamlessly combined with any treatment planning system. Our formulation is a mixed-integer, non-convex, quadratically constrained quadratic programming problem. In order to simplify this computationally challenging problem without loss of optimality, we establish sufficient conditions under which equal-dosage or single-dosage fractionation is optimal. Based on the prevalent estimates of tumour and normal tissue model parameters, these conditions are expected to hold in many types of commonly studied tumours, such as those similar to head-and-neck and prostate cancers. This motivates a simple reformulation of our problem that leads to a closed

  1. Optimal fractionation in radiotherapy with multiple normal tissues.

    PubMed

    Saberian, Fatemeh; Ghate, Archis; Kim, Minsun

    2016-06-01

    The goal in radiotherapy is to maximize the biological effect (BE) of radiation on the tumour while limiting its toxic effects on healthy anatomies. Treatment is administered over several sessions to give the normal tissue time to recover as it has better damage-repair capabilities than tumour cells. This is termed fractionation. A key problem in radiotherapy involves finding an optimal number of treatment sessions (fractions) and the corresponding dosing schedule. A major limitation of existing mathematically rigorous work on this problem is that it includes only a single normal tissue. Since essentially no anatomical region of interest includes only one normal tissue, these models may incorrectly identify the optimal number of fractions and the corresponding dosing schedule. We present a formulation of the optimal fractionation problem that includes multiple normal tissues. Our model can tackle any combination of maximum dose, mean dose and dose-volume type constraints for serial and parallel normal tissues as this is characteristic of most treatment protocols. We also allow for a spatially heterogeneous dose distribution within each normal tissue. Furthermore, we do not a priori assume that the doses are invariant across fractions. Finally, our model uses a spatially optimized treatment plan as input and hence can be seamlessly combined with any treatment planning system. Our formulation is a mixed-integer, non-convex, quadratically constrained quadratic programming problem. In order to simplify this computationally challenging problem without loss of optimality, we establish sufficient conditions under which equal-dosage or single-dosage fractionation is optimal. Based on the prevalent estimates of tumour and normal tissue model parameters, these conditions are expected to hold in many types of commonly studied tumours, such as those similar to head-and-neck and prostate cancers. This motivates a simple reformulation of our problem that leads to a closed

  2. Photoacoustic spectroscopic differences between normal and malignant thyroid tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Xie, Wengming; Li, Hui

    2012-12-01

    The thyroid is one of the main endocrine glands of human body, which plays a crucial role in the body's metabolism. Thyroid cancer mortality ranks only second to ovarian cancer in endocrine cancer. Routine diagnostic methods of thyroid diseases in present clinic exist misdiagnosis and missed diagnosis to varying degrees. Those lead to miss the best period of cancer treatment--early. Photoacoustic spectroscopy technology is a new tool, which provides an effective and noninvasive way for biomedical materials research, being highly sensitive and without sample pretreatment. In this paper, we use photoacoustic spectroscopy technology (PAST) to detect the absorption spectrum between normal and malignant thyroid tissues. The result shows that the photoacoustic spectroscopy technology (PAST) could differentiate malignant thyroid tissue from normal thyroid tissue very well. This technique combined with routine diagnostic methods has the potential to increase the diagnostic accuracy in clinical thyroid cancer diagnosis.

  3. The affect of tissue depth variation on craniofacial reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, John M; Ward, Richard E

    2007-10-25

    We examined the affect of tissue depth variation on the reconstruction of facial form, through the application of the American method, utilizing published tissue depth measurements for emaciated, normal, and obese faces. In this preliminary study, three reconstructions were created on reproductions of the same skull for each set of tissue depth measurements. The resulting morphological variation was measured quantitatively using the anthropometric craniofacial variability index (CVI). This method employs 16 standard craniofacial anthropometric measurements and the results reflect "pattern variation" or facial harmony. We report no appreciable variation in the quantitative measure of the pattern facial form obtained from the three different sets of tissue depths. Facial similarity was assessed qualitatively utilizing surveys of photographs of the three reconstructions. Surveys indicated that subjects frequently perceived the reconstructions as representing different individuals. This disagreement indicates that size of the face may blind observers to similarities in facial form. This research is significant because it illustrates the confounding effect that normal human variation contributes in the successful recognition of individuals from a representational three-dimensional facial reconstruction. Research results suggest that successful identification could be increased if multiple reconstructions were created which reflect a wide range of possible outcomes for facial form. The creation of multiple facial images, from a single skull, will be facilitated as computerized versions of facial reconstruction are further developed and refined. PMID:17353107

  4. Classification of normal and cancerous lung tissues by electrical impendence tomography.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jianling; Yue, Shihong; Chen, Jun; Wang, Huaxiang

    2014-01-01

    Biological tissue impedance spectroscopy can provide rich physiological and pathological information by measuring the variation of the complex impedance of biological tissues under various frequencies of driven current. Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) technique can measure the impedance spectroscopy of biological tissue in medical field. Before application, a key problem must be solved on how to generally distinguish normal tissues from the cancerous in terms of measurable EIT data. In this paper, the impedance spectroscopy characteristics of human lung tissue are studied. On the basis of the measured data of 109 lung cancer patients, Cole-Cole Circle radius (CCCR) and the complex modulus are extracted. In terms of the two characteristics, 71.6% and 66.4% samples of cancerous and normal tissues can be correctly classified, respectively. Furthermore, two characteristics of the measured EIT data of each patient consist of a two-dimensional vector and all such vectors comprise a set of vectors. When classifying the vector set, the rate of correctly partitioning normal and cancerous tissues can be raised to 78.2%. The main factors to affect the classification results on normal and cancerous tissues are generally analyzed. The proposed method will play an important role in further working out an efficient and feasible diagnostic method for potential lung cancer patients, and provide theoretical basis and reference data for electrical impedance tomography technology in monitoring pulmonary function.

  5. Diffusion optical spectroscopy of cancerous and normal prostate tissues in time-resolved and frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kenneth J.; Pu, Yang; Chen, Jun

    2014-03-01

    It is well-known that light transport can be well described using Maxwell's electromagnetic theory. In biological tissue, the scattering particles cause the interaction of scattered waves from neighboring particles. Since such interaction cannot be ignored, multiple scattering occurs. The theoretical solution of multiple scattering is complicated. A suitable description is that the wavelike behavior of light is ignored and the transport of an individual photon is considered to be absorbed or scattered. This is known as the Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) theory. Analytical solutions to the RTE that explicitly describes photon migration can be obtained by introducing some proper approximations. One of the most popular models used in the field of tissue optics is the Diffusion Approximation (DA). In this study, we report on the results of our initial study of optical properties of ex vivo normal and cancerous prostate tissues and how tissue parameters affect the near infrared light transporting in the two types of tissues. The time-resolved transport of light is simulated as an impulse isotropic point source of energy within a homogeneous unbounded medium with different absorption and scattering properties of cancerous and normal prostate tissues. Light source is also modulated sinusoidally to yield a varied fluence rate in frequency domain at a distant observation point within the cancerous and normal prostate tissues. Due to difference of the absorption and scattering coefficients between cancerous and normal tissues, the expansion of light pulse, intensity, phase are found to be different.

  6. Tolerance of Normal Tissues to Ion Beam Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habrand, Jean-Louis; Datchary, Jean; Pommier, Pascal; Bolle, Stéphanie; Feuvret, Loïc; Ghorbel, Ismael; Dendale, Remi

    This review from the radiation oncology literature provides tolerance doses of normal tissues, mainly late responding. It reports toxicity data for main organs based on the experience with photons, and similar data for various modes of ion beam therapy (protons, light ions, single or multifractionated). Although these data can help compare toxicity of both types of radiations, it should be remembered that clinical historical series are generally not strictly comparable.

  7. Radio frequency needle hyperthermia of normal and cancerous animal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalhav, Arieh; Ramon, J.; Goldwasser, Benad; Nativ, Ofer; Cherniack, Ramy; Zajdel, Liliana

    1994-12-01

    Capacitative radio frequency (RF) was met with little success when used to treat human cancer. Conductive rf needle hyperthermia (RFNH) is used successfully for human tissue ablation in neurosurgery, cardiology, and recently in urology. RFNH ablates tissue by causing thermal damage limited to the vicinity of the rf needle. We conducted a series of studies to evaluate the effect of RFNH on cancerous and normal tissue. RFNH was applied to normal porcine livers during open surgery. Liver function tests were elevated two days post treatment, then returned to normal. Pigs were sequentially sacrificed. RFNH induced lesions were found to be maximal in size on days 2 - 4 post treatment and later became smaller as liver regenerated. Phase 2 included mice bearing two subcutaneous murine bladder tumors (MBT2). The rf needle was inserted into both tumors of each mouse, but rf current was applied to one tumor only. Energies of 3 to 7.5 watts were applied for 30 seconds to 5 minutes using a 0.02 inch needle. Mice were sacrificed 0, 1, and 3 days after treatment. Necrotic lesions 0.5 - 1.2 cm in diameter were found within the treated tumors. In phase 3, mice bearing a single 8 - 18 mm subcutaneous tumor were treated by RFNH aiming for complete tumor destruction. All control mice died of huge tumors within 31 days. Treated mice were alive with no signs of tumor when sacrificed 60 days after treatment. In phase 3 RFNH is capable of complete tumor eradication with little damage to surrounding normal tissue. It may have clinical applications for percutaneous endoscopic and laparoscopic treatment of tumors.

  8. Autofluorescence spectroscopy of normal and pathological tissues of the bladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A'Amar, Ousama M.; Guillemin, Francois H.; Begorre, Henri; Yvroud, Edouard

    1997-12-01

    Autofluorescence spectra of normal and pathological mucosa of the bladder were measured in vivo in five patients using 410 nm excitation light and ex vivo in five samples, within 30 minutes after removal, using both 364 and 400 nm excitation lights. Inflammatory and angiodysplasia post-radiotherapy lesions, and papilloma were differentiated from normal mucosa by the low autofluorescence intensity and the shape of spectra. The autofluorescence intensity ratio, at a common emission peak (515 - 520 nm) induced by 410 nm and 1 mW excitation light, between normal mucosa and pathological tissues for each patient was variable. A minimum of 5 and a maximum of 22.5 were observed. The autofluorescence intensity for certain inflammatory post-radiotherapy lesions was null. Furthermore, due to high absorption of hemoglobin, spectra of angiodysplasia post-radiotherapy lesions were characterized by two peaks at about 555 and 600 nm. The measured autofluorescence spectra in samples caused by two excitation wavelengths (360 & 400 nm) and 1 mW light power showed similar structures to in vivo results. Though, a NADH peak appeared in variable intensities in spectra of both normal and pathological tissues at the excitation light of 364 nm. In certain lesions, this emission was highly attenuated.

  9. Cross-tissue Analysis of Gene and Protein Expression in Normal and Cancer Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kosti, Idit; Jain, Nishant; Aran, Dvir; Butte, Atul J; Sirota, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology describes the translation of genetic information from mRNA to protein, but does not specify the quantitation or timing of this process across the genome. We have analyzed protein and gene expression in a diverse set of human tissues. To study concordance and discordance of gene and protein expression, we integrated mass spectrometry data from the Human Proteome Map project and RNA-Seq measurements from the Genotype-Tissue Expression project. We analyzed 16,561 genes and the corresponding proteins in 14 tissue types across nearly 200 samples. A comprehensive tissue- and gene-specific analysis revealed that across the 14 tissues, correlation between mRNA and protein expression was positive and ranged from 0.36 to 0.5. We also identified 1,012 genes whose RNA and protein expression was correlated across all the tissues and examined genes and proteins that were concordantly and discordantly expressed for each tissue of interest. We extended our analysis to look for genes and proteins that were differentially correlated in cancer compared to normal tissues, showing higher levels of correlation in normal tissues. Finally, we explored the implications of these findings in the context of biomarker and drug target discovery. PMID:27142790

  10. Cross-tissue Analysis of Gene and Protein Expression in Normal and Cancer Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kosti, Idit; Jain, Nishant; Aran, Dvir; Butte, Atul J; Sirota, Marina

    2016-05-04

    The central dogma of molecular biology describes the translation of genetic information from mRNA to protein, but does not specify the quantitation or timing of this process across the genome. We have analyzed protein and gene expression in a diverse set of human tissues. To study concordance and discordance of gene and protein expression, we integrated mass spectrometry data from the Human Proteome Map project and RNA-Seq measurements from the Genotype-Tissue Expression project. We analyzed 16,561 genes and the corresponding proteins in 14 tissue types across nearly 200 samples. A comprehensive tissue- and gene-specific analysis revealed that across the 14 tissues, correlation between mRNA and protein expression was positive and ranged from 0.36 to 0.5. We also identified 1,012 genes whose RNA and protein expression was correlated across all the tissues and examined genes and proteins that were concordantly and discordantly expressed for each tissue of interest. We extended our analysis to look for genes and proteins that were differentially correlated in cancer compared to normal tissues, showing higher levels of correlation in normal tissues. Finally, we explored the implications of these findings in the context of biomarker and drug target discovery.

  11. Discrimination of premalignant lesions and cancer tissues from normal gastric tissues using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shuwen; Chen, Changshui; Mao, Hua; Jin, Shaoqin

    2013-06-01

    The feasibility of early detection of gastric cancer using near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy (RS) by distinguishing premalignant lesions (adenomatous polyp, n=27) and cancer tissues (adenocarcinoma, n=33) from normal gastric tissues (n=45) is evaluated. Significant differences in Raman spectra are observed among the normal, adenomatous polyp, and adenocarcinoma gastric tissues at 936, 1003, 1032, 1174, 1208, 1323, 1335, 1450, and 1655 cm-1. Diverse statistical methods are employed to develop effective diagnostic algorithms for classifying the Raman spectra of different types of ex vivo gastric tissues, including principal component analysis (PCA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and naive Bayesian classifier (NBC) techniques. Compared with PCA-LDA algorithms, PCA-NBC techniques together with leave-one-out, cross-validation method provide better discriminative results of normal, adenomatous polyp, and adenocarcinoma gastric tissues, resulting in superior sensitivities of 96.3%, 96.9%, and 96.9%, and specificities of 93%, 100%, and 95.2%, respectively. Therefore, NIR RS associated with multivariate statistical algorithms has the potential for early diagnosis of gastric premalignant lesions and cancer tissues in molecular level.

  12. Toward Signaling-Driven Biomarkers Immune to Normal Tissue Contamination.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, John C; Rusay, Matthew; Shan, Roger; Kelton, Conor; Gaykalova, Daria A; Fertig, Elana J; Califano, Joseph A; Ochs, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to discover a minimally invasive pathway-specific biomarker that is immune to normal cell mRNA contamination for diagnosing head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Using Elsevier's MedScan natural language processing component of the Pathway Studio software and the TRANSFAC database, we produced a curated set of genes regulated by the signaling networks driving the development of HNSCC. The network and its gene targets provided prior probabilities for gene expression, which guided our CoGAPS matrix factorization algorithm to isolate patterns related to HNSCC signaling activity from a microarray-based study. Using patterns that distinguished normal from tumor samples, we identified a reduced set of genes to analyze with Top Scoring Pair in order to produce a potential biomarker for HNSCC. Our proposed biomarker comprises targets of the transcription factor (TF) HIF1A and the FOXO family of TFs coupled with genes that show remarkable stability across all normal tissues. Based on validation with novel data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), measured by RNAseq, and bootstrap sampling, the biomarker for normal vs. tumor has an accuracy of 0.77, a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.54, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.82. PMID:26884679

  13. Toward Signaling-Driven Biomarkers Immune to Normal Tissue Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Stansfield, John C.; Rusay, Matthew; Shan, Roger; Kelton, Conor; Gaykalova, Daria A.; Fertig, Elana J.; Califano, Joseph A.; Ochs, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to discover a minimally invasive pathway-specific biomarker that is immune to normal cell mRNA contamination for diagnosing head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Using Elsevier’s MedScan natural language processing component of the Pathway Studio software and the TRANSFAC database, we produced a curated set of genes regulated by the signaling networks driving the development of HNSCC. The network and its gene targets provided prior probabilities for gene expression, which guided our CoGAPS matrix factorization algorithm to isolate patterns related to HNSCC signaling activity from a microarray-based study. Using patterns that distinguished normal from tumor samples, we identified a reduced set of genes to analyze with Top Scoring Pair in order to produce a potential biomarker for HNSCC. Our proposed biomarker comprises targets of the transcription factor (TF) HIF1A and the FOXO family of TFs coupled with genes that show remarkable stability across all normal tissues. Based on validation with novel data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), measured by RNAseq, and bootstrap sampling, the biomarker for normal vs. tumor has an accuracy of 0.77, a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.54, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.82. PMID:26884679

  14. Photoacoustic monitoring of tumor and normal tissue response to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Laurie J.; Seshadri, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a recognized characteristic of tumors that influences efficacy of radiotherapy (RT). Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a relatively new imaging technique that exploits the optical characteristics of hemoglobin to provide information on tissue oxygenation. In the present study, PAI based measures of tumor oxygen saturation (%sO2) were compared to oxygen-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of longitudinal relaxation rate (R1 = 1/T1) and ex-vivo histology in patient derived xenograft (PDX) models of head and neck cancer. PAI was utilized to assess early changes (24 h) in %sO2 following RT and chemoRT (CRT) and to assess changes in salivary gland hemodynamics following radiation. A significant increase in tumor %sO2 and R1 was observed following oxygen inhalation. Good spatial correlation was observed between PAI, MRI and histology. An early increase in %sO2 after RT and CRT detected by PAI was associated with significant tumor growth inhibition. Twenty four hours after RT, PAI also detected loss of hemodynamic response to gustatory stimulation in murine salivary gland tissue suggestive of radiation-induced vascular damage. Our observations illustrate the utility of PAI in detecting tumor and normal tissue hemodynamic response to radiation in head and neck cancers. PMID:26883660

  15. Trace elemental correlation study in malignant and normal breast tissue by PIXE technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, G. J. Naga; Sarita, P.; Kumar, M. Ravi; Murty, G. A. V. Ramana; Reddy, B. Seetharami; Lakshminarayana, S.; Vijayan, V.; Lakshmi, P. V. B. Rama; Gavarasana, Satyanarayana; Reddy, S. Bhuloka

    2006-06-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission technique was used to study the variations in trace elemental concentrations between normal and malignant human breast tissue specimens and to understand the effects of altered homeostasis of these elements in the etiology of breast cancer. A 3 MeV proton beam was used to excite the biological samples of normal and malignant breast tissues. The elements Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb and Sr were identified and their relative concentrations were estimated. Almost all the elements were found to be elevated (p < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed-ranks test) in the cancerous tissues when compared with normal tissues. The excess levels of trace elements observed in the cancerous breast tissues could either be a cause or a consequence of breast cancer. Regarding their role in the initiation or promotion of breast cancer, one possible interpretation is that the elevated levels of Cu, Fe and Cr could have led to the formation of free radicals or other reactive oxygen species (ROS) that adversely affect DNA thereby causing breast cancer, which is mainly attributed to genetic abnormalities. Moreover, since Cu and Fe are required for angiogenesis, elevated concentrations of these elements are likely to promote breast cancer by increasing the blood supply for tumor growth. On the other hand elevated concentrations of elements in breast cancer tissues might also be a consequence of the cancer. This can be understood in terms of the biochemical and histological differences between normal and cancerous breast tissues. Tumors, characterized by unregulated multiplication of cells, need an ever-increasing supply of essential nutrients including trace elements. This probably results in an increased vascularity of malignant tissues, which in turn leads to enhancement of elemental concentrations in tumors.

  16. Biobanking of Fresh-Frozen Human Adenocarcinomatous and Normal Colon Tissues: Which Parameters Influence RNA Quality?

    PubMed

    Galissier, Thibaut; Schneider, Christophe; Nasri, Saviz; Kanagaratnam, Lukshe; Fichel, Caroline; Coquelet, Christelle; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Kianmanesh, Reza; Bellon, Georges; Dedieu, Stéphane; Marchal Bressenot, Aude; Boulagnon-Rombi, Camille

    2016-01-01

    Medical research projects become increasingly dependent on biobanked tissue of high quality because the reliability of gene expression is affected by the quality of extracted RNA. Hence, the present study aimed to determine if clinical, surgical, histological, and molecular parameters influence RNA quality of normal and tumoral frozen colonic tissues. RNA Quality Index (RQI) was evaluated on 241 adenocarcinomas and 115 matched normal frozen colon tissues collected between October 2006 and December 2012. RQI results were compared to patients' age and sex, tumor site, kind of surgery, anastomosis failure, adenocarcinoma type and grade, tumor cell percentage, necrosis extent, HIF-1α and cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry, and BRAF, KRAS and microsatellites status. The RQI was significantly higher in colon cancer tissue than in matched normal tissue. RQI from left-sided colonic cancers was significantly higher than RQI from right-sided cancers. The RNA quality was not affected by ischemia and storage duration. According to histological control, 7.9% of the samples were unsatisfactory because of inadequate sampling. Biobanked tumoral tissues with RQI ≥5 had lower malignant cells to stromal cells ratio than samples with RQI <5 (p <0.05). Cellularity, necrosis extent and mucinous component did not influence RQI results. Cleaved caspase-3 and HIF-1α immunolabelling were not correlated to RQI. BRAF, KRAS and microsatellites molecular status did not influence RNA quality. Multivariate analysis revealed that the tumor location, the surgical approach (laparoscopy versus open colectomy) and the occurrence of anastomotic leakage were the only parameters influencing significantly RQI results of tumor samples. We failed to identify parameter influencing RQI of normal colon samples. These data suggest that RNA quality of colonic adenocarcinoma biospecimens is determined by clinical and surgical parameters. More attention should be paid during the biobanking procedure of

  17. Biobanking of Fresh-Frozen Human Adenocarcinomatous and Normal Colon Tissues: Which Parameters Influence RNA Quality?

    PubMed Central

    Galissier, Thibaut; Schneider, Christophe; Nasri, Saviz; Kanagaratnam, Lukshe; Fichel, Caroline; Coquelet, Christelle; Diebold, Marie-Danièle; Kianmanesh, Reza; Bellon, Georges; Dedieu, Stéphane; Marchal Bressenot, Aude

    2016-01-01

    Medical research projects become increasingly dependent on biobanked tissue of high quality because the reliability of gene expression is affected by the quality of extracted RNA. Hence, the present study aimed to determine if clinical, surgical, histological, and molecular parameters influence RNA quality of normal and tumoral frozen colonic tissues. RNA Quality Index (RQI) was evaluated on 241 adenocarcinomas and 115 matched normal frozen colon tissues collected between October 2006 and December 2012. RQI results were compared to patients’ age and sex, tumor site, kind of surgery, anastomosis failure, adenocarcinoma type and grade, tumor cell percentage, necrosis extent, HIF-1α and cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry, and BRAF, KRAS and microsatellites status. The RQI was significantly higher in colon cancer tissue than in matched normal tissue. RQI from left-sided colonic cancers was significantly higher than RQI from right-sided cancers. The RNA quality was not affected by ischemia and storage duration. According to histological control, 7.9% of the samples were unsatisfactory because of inadequate sampling. Biobanked tumoral tissues with RQI ≥5 had lower malignant cells to stromal cells ratio than samples with RQI <5 (p <0.05). Cellularity, necrosis extent and mucinous component did not influence RQI results. Cleaved caspase-3 and HIF-1α immunolabelling were not correlated to RQI. BRAF, KRAS and microsatellites molecular status did not influence RNA quality. Multivariate analysis revealed that the tumor location, the surgical approach (laparoscopy versus open colectomy) and the occurrence of anastomotic leakage were the only parameters influencing significantly RQI results of tumor samples. We failed to identify parameter influencing RQI of normal colon samples. These data suggest that RNA quality of colonic adenocarcinoma biospecimens is determined by clinical and surgical parameters. More attention should be paid during the biobanking procedure of

  18. Statistical Validation of Normal Tissue Complication Probability Models

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Chengjian; Schaaf, Arjen van der; Veld, Aart A. van't; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Schilstra, Cornelis

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the applicability and value of double cross-validation and permutation tests as established statistical approaches in the validation of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models. Methods and Materials: A penalized regression method, LASSO (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator), was used to build NTCP models for xerostomia after radiation therapy treatment of head-and-neck cancer. Model assessment was based on the likelihood function and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Results: Repeated double cross-validation showed the uncertainty and instability of the NTCP models and indicated that the statistical significance of model performance can be obtained by permutation testing. Conclusion: Repeated double cross-validation and permutation tests are recommended to validate NTCP models before clinical use.

  19. Therapeutic Magnets Do Not Affect Tissue Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Kathleen B.; Merrick, Mark A.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.; Swez, John A.

    2001-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: Manufacturers of commercially available "therapeutic" magnets claim that these magnets cause physiologic thermal effects that promote tissue healing. We conducted this study to determine if skin or intramuscular temperatures differed among magnet, sham, and control treatments during 60 minutes of application to the quadriceps muscle. DESIGN AND SETTING: A 3 x 3 mixed-model, factorial design with repeated measures on both independent variables was used. The first independent variable, application duration, had 3 random levels (20, 40, and 60 minutes). The second independent variable, treatment, had 3 fixed levels (magnet, sham, and control). The dependent variable was tissue temperature ( degrees C). Measurement depth served as a control variable, with 2 levels: skin and 1 cm below the fat layer. Data were collected in a thermoneutral laboratory setting and analyzed using a repeated-measures analysis of variance. SUBJECTS: The study included 13 healthy student volunteers (8 men, 5 women; age, 20.5 +/- 0.9 years; height, 176.8 +/- 10.4 cm; weight, 73.8 +/- 11.8 kg; anterior thigh skinfold thickness, 16.9 +/- 6.5 mm). MEASUREMENTS: Temperatures were measured at 30-second intervals using surface and implantable thermocouples. Temperature data at 20, 40, and 60 minutes were used for analysis. Each subject received all 3 treatments on different days. RESULTS: Neither skin nor intramuscular temperatures were different across the 3 treatments at any time. For both skin and intramuscular temperatures, a statistically significant but not clinically meaningful temperature increase (less than 1 degrees C), was observed over time within treatments, but this increase was similar in all treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS: No meaningful thermal effect was observed with any treatment over time, and treatments did not differ from each other. We conclude that flexible therapeutic magnets were not effective for increasing skin or deep temperatures, contradicting one of the

  20. Therapeutic Magnets Do Not Affect Tissue Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Kathleen B.; Ingersoll, Christopher D.; Swez, John A.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: Manufacturers of commercially available “therapeutic” magnets claim that these magnets cause physiologic thermal effects that promote tissue healing. We conducted this study to determine if skin or intramuscular temperatures differed among magnet, sham, and control treatments during 60 minutes of application to the quadriceps muscle. Design and Setting: A 3 × 3 mixed-model, factorial design with repeated measures on both independent variables was used. The first independent variable, application duration, had 3 random levels (20, 40, and 60 minutes). The second independent variable, treatment, had 3 fixed levels (magnet, sham, and control). The dependent variable was tissue temperature (°C). Measurement depth served as a control variable, with 2 levels: skin and 1 cm below the fat layer. Data were collected in a thermoneutral laboratory setting and analyzed using a repeated-measures analysis of variance. Subjects: The study included 13 healthy student volunteers (8 men, 5 women; age, 20.5 ± 0.9 years; height, 176.8 ± 10.4 cm; weight, 73.8 ± 11.8 kg; anterior thigh skinfold thickness, 16.9 ± 6.5 mm). Measurements: Temperatures were measured at 30-second intervals using surface and implantable thermocouples. Temperature data at 20, 40, and 60 minutes were used for analysis. Each subject received all 3 treatments on different days. Results: Neither skin nor intramuscular temperatures were different across the 3 treatments at any time. For both skin and intramuscular temperatures, a statistically significant but not clinically meaningful temperature increase (less than 1°C), was observed over time within treatments, but this increase was similar in all treatment groups. Conclusions: No meaningful thermal effect was observed with any treatment over time, and treatments did not differ from each other. We conclude that flexible therapeutic magnets were not effective for increasing skin or deep temperatures, contradicting one of the fundamental claims

  1. CONDITIONS GOVERNING THE GROWTH OF DISPLACED NORMAL TISSUE.

    PubMed

    Craster, C V

    1912-10-01

    We are unwilling to draw any very definite conclusions from the experiments, partly because they show a survival of implanted skin of so much shorter duration than that which seems to occur in the case of spontaneous implantation cysts, and partly because the method of reëxposing the submerged grafts is rather a crude way of testing their vitality. Nevertheless, the following points seem clear: 1. The repeated transplantation of a piece of skin from one animal to another confers no exceptional power of growth upon that skin. 2. The repeated implantation of skin into one animal decreases, if anything, its receptivity for such grafts. 3. The burial of skin in the interior of the body causes, after a time, a change in the skin of such a nature that it cannot resume its normal function as an external covering tissue, even when its circulation \\ is well maintained and it is buried in the body of the same animal. The experiments do not determine how long the cells of the skin actually remain alive, and indeed it is conceivable that the mere maceration of the protective horny layer puts the skin, when reëxposed, into the position of a moist tissue, such as the intestinal mucosa, so that it readily dries up and succumbs. Nor do the experiments throw any light upon the possible existence of cytolytic substances in the circulating fluids, although, naturally, the idea of such an action has always been present in our minds in observing the gradual loss of vitality in the transplanted tissues.

  2. Large animal normal tissue tolerance with boron neutron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, P.R.; Swartz, C.D. ); Kraft, S.L. ); Briebenow, M.L. ); DeHaan, C.E.

    1994-03-30

    Normal tissue tolerance of boron neutron capture irradiation using borocaptate sodium (NA[sub 2]B[sub 12]H[sub 11]SH) in an epithermal neutron beam was studied. Large retriever-type dogs were used and the irradiations were performed by single dose, 5 [times] 10 dorsal portal. Fourteen dogs were irradiated with the epithermal neutron beam alone and 35 dogs were irradiated following intravenous administration of borocaptate sodium. Total body irradiation effect could be seen from the decreased leukocytes and platelets following irradiation. Most values returned to normal within 40 days postirradiation. Severe dermal necrosis occurred in animals given 15 Gy epithermal neutrons alone and in animals irradiated to a total peak physical dose greater than 64 Gy in animals following borocaptate sodium infusion. Lethal brain necrosis was seen in animals receiving between 27 and 39 Gy. Lethal brain necrosis occurred at 22-36 weeks postirradiation. A total peak physical dose of approximately 27 Gy and blood-boron concentrations of 25-50 ppm resulted in abnormal magnetic resonance imaging results in 6 months postexamination. Seven of eight of these animals remained normal and the lesions were not detected at the 12-month postirradiation examination. The bimodal therapy presents a complex challenge in attempting to achieve dose response assays. The resultant total radiation dose is a composite of low and high LET components. The short track length of the boron fission fragments and the geometric effect of the vessels causes much of the intravascular dose to miss the presumed critical target of the endothelial cells. The results indicate a large dose-sparing effect from the boron capture reactions within the blood. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Comparative study of trace elements in normal and cancerous colorectal tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoriadis, G.C.; Apostolidis, N.S.; Romanos, A.N.; Paradellis, T.P.

    1983-08-01

    Quantitative study of the Zn, Cu, K, Rb, Mn, Pb and Ni trace elements by the x-ray fluorescence method in normal and cancerous tissue samples, obtained from 18 patients suffering from cancer of the colon and rectum, shows that cancerous tissues exhibit statistically higher K, Rb, and Cu concentration than corresponding normal tissues. There are evidences that also Ni and Pb are elevated in cancerous tissues. Finally Zn and Mn do not show any appreciable difference in normal and cancerous tissues.

  4. Genomic Changes in Normal Breast Tissue in Women at Normal Risk or at High Risk for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Danforth, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic breast cancer develops through the accumulation of molecular abnormalities in normal breast tissue, resulting from exposure to estrogens and other carcinogens beginning at adolescence and continuing throughout life. These molecular changes may take a variety of forms, including numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities, epigenetic changes, and gene expression alterations. To characterize these abnormalities, a review of the literature has been conducted to define the molecular changes in each of the above major genomic categories in normal breast tissue considered to be either at normal risk or at high risk for sporadic breast cancer. This review indicates that normal risk breast tissues (such as reduction mammoplasty) contain evidence of early breast carcinogenesis including loss of heterozygosity, DNA methylation of tumor suppressor and other genes, and telomere shortening. In normal tissues at high risk for breast cancer (such as normal breast tissue adjacent to breast cancer or the contralateral breast), these changes persist, and are increased and accompanied by aneuploidy, increased genomic instability, a wide range of gene expression differences, development of large cancerized fields, and increased proliferation. These changes are consistent with early and long-standing exposure to carcinogens, especially estrogens. A model for the breast carcinogenic pathway in normal risk and high-risk breast tissues is proposed. These findings should clarify our understanding of breast carcinogenesis in normal breast tissue and promote development of improved methods for risk assessment and breast cancer prevention in women. PMID:27559297

  5. Genomic Changes in Normal Breast Tissue in Women at Normal Risk or at High Risk for Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Danforth, David N

    2016-01-01

    Sporadic breast cancer develops through the accumulation of molecular abnormalities in normal breast tissue, resulting from exposure to estrogens and other carcinogens beginning at adolescence and continuing throughout life. These molecular changes may take a variety of forms, including numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities, epigenetic changes, and gene expression alterations. To characterize these abnormalities, a review of the literature has been conducted to define the molecular changes in each of the above major genomic categories in normal breast tissue considered to be either at normal risk or at high risk for sporadic breast cancer. This review indicates that normal risk breast tissues (such as reduction mammoplasty) contain evidence of early breast carcinogenesis including loss of heterozygosity, DNA methylation of tumor suppressor and other genes, and telomere shortening. In normal tissues at high risk for breast cancer (such as normal breast tissue adjacent to breast cancer or the contralateral breast), these changes persist, and are increased and accompanied by aneuploidy, increased genomic instability, a wide range of gene expression differences, development of large cancerized fields, and increased proliferation. These changes are consistent with early and long-standing exposure to carcinogens, especially estrogens. A model for the breast carcinogenic pathway in normal risk and high-risk breast tissues is proposed. These findings should clarify our understanding of breast carcinogenesis in normal breast tissue and promote development of improved methods for risk assessment and breast cancer prevention in women. PMID:27559297

  6. High and Low LET Radiation Differentially Induce Normal Tissue Damage Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Niemantsverdriet, Maarten; Goethem, Marc-Jan van; Bron, Reinier; Hogewerf, Wytse; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Luijk, Peter van; Coppes, Robert P.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy using high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation is aimed at efficiently killing tumor cells while minimizing dose (biological effective) to normal tissues to prevent toxicity. It is well established that high LET radiation results in lower cell survival per absorbed dose than low LET radiation. However, whether various mechanisms involved in the development of normal tissue damage may be regulated differentially is not known. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate whether two actions related to normal tissue toxicity, p53-induced apoptosis and expression of the profibrotic gene PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor 1), are differentially induced by high and low LET radiation. Methods and Materials: Cells were irradiated with high LET carbon ions or low LET photons. Cell survival assays were performed, profibrotic PAI-1 expression was monitored by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and apoptosis was assayed by annexin V staining. Activation of p53 by phosphorylation at serine 315 and serine 37 was monitored by Western blotting. Transfections of plasmids expressing p53 mutated at serines 315 and 37 were used to test the requirement of these residues for apoptosis and expression of PAI-1. Results: As expected, cell survival was lower and induction of apoptosis was higher in high -LET irradiated cells. Interestingly, induction of the profibrotic PAI-1 gene was similar with high and low LET radiation. In agreement with this finding, phosphorylation of p53 at serine 315 involved in PAI-1 expression was similar with high and low LET radiation, whereas phosphorylation of p53 at serine 37, involved in apoptosis induction, was much higher after high LET irradiation. Conclusions: Our results indicate that diverse mechanisms involved in the development of normal tissue damage may be differentially affected by high and low LET radiation. This may have consequences for the development and manifestation of normal tissue damage.

  7. Raman Spectroscopy Studies of Normal and Burned Biological Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarnani, Faranak; Maass, David; Idris, Ahamed; Glosser, Robert

    2011-03-01

    Burn injuries are a significant medical problem, and need to be treated quickly and precisely. Burned skin needs to be removed early, within hours (less than 24 hrs) of injury, when the margins of the burn are still hard to define. Studies show that treating and excising burn wounds soon after the injury prevents the wound from becoming deeper, reduces the release of proinflammatory mediators, and reduces or prevents the systemic inflammatory reaction syndrome. Also, removing burned skin prepares the affected region for skin grafting. Raman spectroscopy could be used as an objective diagnostic method that will assist burn surgeons in removing burned skin precisely. As a first step in developing a diagnostic tool, we present Raman spectroscopy information from normal and burned ex vivo rat skin, and a comparison of our findings. Raman spectroscopy is explored for its specificity and sensitivity.

  8. Anabolic androgens affect the competitive interactions in cell migration and adhesion between normal mouse urothelial cells and urothelial carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Ping; Hsieh, Teng-Fu; Chen, Chi-Cheng; Hung, Xiao-Fan; Yu, Ai-Lin; Chang, Chawnshang; Shyr, Chih-Rong

    2014-09-26

    The urothelium is constantly rebuilt by normal urothelial cells to regenerate damaged tissues caused by stimuli in urine. However, the urothelial carcinoma cells expand the territory by aberrant growth of tumor cells, which migrate and occupy the damaged tissues to spread outside and disrupt the normal cells and organized tissues and form a tumor. Therefore, the interaction between normal urothelial cells and urothelial carcinoma cells affect the initiation and progression of urothelial tumors if normal urothelial cells fail to migrate and adhere to the damages sites to regenerate the tissues. Here, comparing normal murine urothelial cells with murine urothelial carcinoma cells (MBT-2), we found that normal cells had less migration ability than carcinoma cells. And in our co-culture system we found that carcinoma cells had propensity migrating toward normal urothelial cells and carcinoma cells had more advantages to adhere than normal cells. To reverse this condition, we used anabolic androgen, dihyrotestosterone (DHT) to treat normal cells and found that DHT treatment increased the migration ability of normal urothelial cells toward carcinoma cells and the adhesion capacity in competition with carcinoma cells. This study provides the base of a novel therapeutic approach by using anabolic hormone-enforced normal urothelial cells to regenerate the damage urothelium and defend against the occupancy of carcinoma cells to thwart cancer development and recurrence.

  9. A radiation damage repair model for normal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, Mike

    2008-07-01

    A cellular Monte Carlo model describing radiation damage and repair in normal epithelial tissues is presented. The deliberately simplified model includes cell cycling, cell motility and radiation damage response (cell cycle arrest and cell death) only. Results demonstrate that the model produces a stable equilibrium system for mean cell cycle times in the range 24-96 h. Simulated irradiation of these stable equilibrium systems produced a range of responses that are shown to be consistent with experimental and clinical observation, including (i) re-epithelialization of radiation-induced lesions by a mixture of cell migration into the wound and repopulation at the periphery; (ii) observed radiosensitivity that is quantitatively consistent with both rate of induction of irreparable DNA lesions and, independently, with the observed acute oral and pharyngeal mucosal reactions to radiotherapy; (iii) an observed time between irradiation and maximum toxicity that is consistent with experimental data for skin; (iv) quantitatively accurate predictions of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity; (v) Gomperzian repopulation for very small lesions (~2000 cells) and (vi) a linear rate of re-epithelialization of 5-10 µm h-1 for large lesions (>15 000 cells).

  10. Extensive Hidden Genomic Mosaicism Revealed in Normal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Vattathil, Selina; Scheet, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Genomic mosaicism arising from post-zygotic mutation has recently been demonstrated to occur in normal tissue of individuals ascertained with varied phenotypes, indicating that detectable mosaicism may be less an exception than a rule in the general population. A challenge to comprehensive cataloging of mosaic mutations and their consequences is the presence of heterogeneous mixtures of cells, rendering low-frequency clones difficult to discern. Here we applied a computational method using estimated haplotypes to characterize mosaic megabase-scale structural mutations in 31,100 GWA study subjects. We provide in silico validation of 293 previously identified somatic mutations and identify an additional 794 novel mutations, most of which exist at lower aberrant cell fractions than have been demonstrated in previous surveys. These mutations occurred across the genome but in a nonrandom manner, and several chromosomes and loci showed unusual levels of mutation. Our analysis supports recent findings about the relationship between clonal mosaicism and old age. Finally, our results, in which we demonstrate a nearly 3-fold higher rate of clonal mosaicism, suggest that SNP-based population surveys of mosaic structural mutations should be conducted with haplotypes for optimal discovery. PMID:26942289

  11. FGF receptor antagonism does not affect adipose tissue development in nutritionally induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Scroyen, Ilse; Vranckx, Christine; Lijnen, Henri Roger

    2014-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-FGF receptor (FGFR) system plays a role in angiogenesis and maintenance of vascular integrity, but its potential role in adipose tissue related angiogenesis and development is still unknown. Administration of SSR, a low molecular weight inhibitor of multiple FGFRs, did not significantly affect body weight nor weight of subcutaneous or gonadal (GON) fat, as compared with pair-fed control mice. Adipocyte hypertrophy and reduced adipocyte density were only observed in GON adipose tissues of treated mice. Adipose tissue angiogenesis was not affected by SSR treatment, as normalized blood vessel density was comparable in adipose tissues of both groups. Blocking the FGF-FGFR system in vivo does not markedly affect adipose tissue development in mice with nutritionally induced obesity.

  12. Radiosensitization by nicotinamide in tumors and normal tissues: the importance of tissue oxygenation status

    SciTech Connect

    Horsman, M.R.; Hansen, P.V.; Overgaard, J.

    1989-05-01

    Nicotinamide induced radiosensitization of tumors has been suggested to be a consequence of a reduction in tumor hypoxia. We have investigated the possibility that nicotinamide may produce significant radiosensitization in a normal tissue in which the radiation response is also influenced by hypoxia. The normal tissue studied was testis and radiation damage was assessed by measuring survival of spermatogonial stem cells. The radiosensitizing action of nicotinamide in testis was compared to that observed in a C3H mammary carcinoma when assayed by both regrowth delay and local tumor control. Our results show that nicotinamide (1000 mg/kg; i.p.) enhanced radiation damage in both tissue types when the radiation was given up to at least 3 hr after drug injection. Enhancement ratios obtained when the drug and radiation were separated by a 1 hr time interval were between 1.1 to 1.2 for the testis and 1.0 to 1.5 for the tumor. The results suggest that nicotinamide will produce radiosensitization in testis, but the effect is small and less than that observed in tumors.

  13. THE PRESENCE OF ENDOGENOUS PYROGEN IN NORMAL RABBIT TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Snell, E. S.; Atkins, Elisha

    1965-01-01

    Saline extracts of homogenized, uninfected, rabbit tissues produced febrile responses when injected intravenously into rabbits. Extracts of muscle, lung, and heart evoked fevers that were similar to those induced by leucocyte pyrogen; extracts of spleen, liver, and kidney caused more sustained fevers. The minimal pyrogenic dose appeared to be between 1.5 and 3 gm wet weight of tissue. Evidence is presented that neither Gram-negative bacterial endotoxin nor polymorphonuclear leucocytes (circulating or sequestered in the tissues) can be implicated as the source of pyrogen in tissue extracts. It seems likely, therefore, that a pyrogenic material of truly endogenous origin is widely distributed in tissues. Tissue pyrogen appears to be a large molecule which is relatively resistant to treatment with acid but not with alkali. Possible pathological roles for this endogenous agent (or agents) are briefly indicated. PMID:14319400

  14. Differentiation of normal and cancerous lung tissues by multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Li, Feng-Chieh; Wu, Ruei-Jhih; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Lin, Wei-Chou; Lin, Sung-Jan; So, Peter T. C.; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2009-07-01

    We utilize multiphoton microscopy for the label-free diagnosis of noncancerous, lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), and lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tissues from humans. Our results show that the combination of second-harmonic generation (SHG) and multiphoton excited autofluorescence (MAF) signals may be used to acquire morphological and quantitative information in discriminating cancerous from noncancerous lung tissues. Specifically, noncancerous lung tissues are largely fibrotic in structure, while cancerous specimens are composed primarily of tumor masses. Quantitative ratiometric analysis using MAF to SHG index (MAFSI) shows that the average MAFSI for noncancerous and LAC lung tissue pairs are 0.55+/-0.23 and 0.87+/-0.15, respectively. In comparison, the MAFSIs for the noncancerous and SCC tissue pairs are 0.50+/-0.12 and 0.72+/-0.13, respectively. Our study shows that nonlinear optical microscopy can assist in differentiating and diagnosing pulmonary cancer from noncancerous tissues.

  15. Analysis of CUL-5 expression in breast epithelial cells, breast cancer cell lines, normal tissues and tumor tissues

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Michael J; Longo, Kenneth A; Karathanasis, George A; Shope, David M; Mandernach, Craig J; Leong, Jason R; Hicks, Alfred; Pherson, Kenneth; Husain, Amyna

    2003-01-01

    Background The chromosomal location of CUL-5 (11q 22-23) is associated with LOH in breast cancer, suggesting that CUL-5 may be a tumor suppressor. The purpose of this research was to determine if there is differential expression of CUL-5 in breast epithelial cells versus breast cancer cell lines, and normal human tissues versus human tumors. The expression of CUL-5 in breast epithelial cells (HMEC, MCF-10A), and breast cancer cells (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) was examined using RT-PCR, Northern blot analysis, and Western blot analysis. The expression of mRNA for other CUL family members (CUL-1, -2, -3, -4A, and -4B) in these cells was evaluated by RT-PCR. A normal human tissue expression array and a cancer profiling array were used to examine CUL-5 expression in normal human tissues and matched normal tissues versus tumor tissues, respectively. Results CUL-5 is expressed at the mRNA and protein levels by breast epithelial cells (HMEC, MCF-10A) and breast cancer cells (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231). These cells also express mRNA for other CUL family members. The normal human tissue expression array revealed that CUL-5 is widely expressed. The cancer profiling array revealed that 82% (41/50) of the breast cancers demonstrated a decrease in CUL-5 expression versus the matched normal tissue. For the 50 cases of matched breast tissue there was a statistically significant ~2.2 fold decreased expression of CUL-5 in tumor tissue versus normal tissue (P < 0.0001). Conclusions The data demonstrate no apparent decrease in CUL-5 expression in the breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231) versus the breast epithelial cells (HMEC, MCF-10A). The decrease in CUL-5 expression in breast tumor tissue versus matched normal tissue supports the hypothesis that decreased expression of CUL-5 may play a role in breast tumorigenesis. PMID:14641918

  16. Nondestructive quantification of permeability of hyperosmotic agent in normal and tumor tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Honglian; Guo, Zhouyi; Zeng, Changchun; Wang, Like; He, Yonghong; Liu, Songhao

    2008-12-01

    Noninvasive tumor imaging could lead to the early detection and timely treatment of cancer. Previous investigations have suggested that optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an ideal diagnostic tool distinguishing normal tissues from tumor tissues based on structural imaging because of the high resolution. In the study, the capability of OCT for functional imaging of normal and tumor tissues based on time and depth resolved quantification of the permeability of biomolecules through these tissues is investigated. An OCT system at 830 nm central wavelength was used in this study. Diffusion of 20% aqueous solution of glucose was monitored and quantified in normal stomach tissues and tumor tissues using OCT. The orthotopic graft model of gastric cancer in nude mice was used. Permeability coefficients were calculated as a function of time and tissue depth. The permeability coefficient was (9.44+/-0.42) ×10-6 cm/s in normal stomach tissues and (5.32+/-0.17)×10-5 cm/s in tumor tissues. The tumor tissues had a higher permeability coefficient compared to normal tissues. From the experimental results, it is found that the accurate and sensitive assessment of the permeability coefficients of normal and tumor tissues offer an effective OCT image method for clinical diagnosis and detection of tumor tissues.

  17. Differentiation of normal and cancerous lung tissues by multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Li, Feng-Chieh; Wu, Ruei-Jr; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Lin, Wei-Chou; Lin, Sung-Jan; So, Peter T. C.; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-02-01

    In this work, we utilized multiphoton microscopy for the label-free diagnosis of non-cancerous, lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), and lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tissues from human. Our results show that the combination of second harmonic generation (SHG) and multiphoton excited autofluorescence (MAF) signals may be used to acquire morphological and quantitative information in discriminating cancerous from non-cancerous lung tissues. Specifically, non-cancerous lung tissues are largely fibrotic in structure while cancerous specimens are composed primarily of tumor masses. Quantitative ratiometric analysis using MAF to SHG index (MAFSI or SAAID) shows that the average MAFSI for noncancerous and LAC lung tissue pairs are 0.55 +/-0.23 and 0.87+/-0.15 respectively. In comparison, the MAFSIs for the noncancerous and SCC tissue pairs are 0.50+/-0.12 and 0.72+/-0.13 respectively. Intrinsic fluorescence ratio (FAD/NADH) of SCC and non-cancerous tissues are 0.40+/-0.05 and 0.53+/-0.05 respectively, the redox ratio of SCC diminishes significantly, indicating that increased cellular metabolic activity. Our study shows that nonlinear optical microscopy can assist in differentiating and diagnosing pulmonary cancer from non-cancerous tissues. With additional development, multiphoton microscopy may be used for the clinical diagnosis of lung cancers.

  18. Quantitative analysis of p53 expression in human normal and cancer tissue microarray with global normalization method

    PubMed Central

    Idikio, Halliday A

    2011-01-01

    Tissue microarray based immunohistochemical staining and proteomics are important tools to create and validate clinically relevant cancer biomarkers. Immunohistochemical stains using formalin-fixed tissue microarray sections for protein expression are scored manually and semi-quantitatively. Digital image analysis methods remove some of the drawbacks of manual scoring but may need other methods such as normalization to provide across the board utility. In the present study, quantitative proteomics-based global normalization method was used to evaluate its utility in the analysis of p53 protein expression in mixed human normal and cancer tissue microarray. Global normalization used the mean or median of β-actin to calculate ratios of individual core stain intensities, then log transformed the ratios, calculate a mean or median and subtracted the value from the log of ratios. In the absence of global normalization of p53 protein expression, 44% (42 of 95) of tissue cores were positive using the median of intensity values and 40% (38 of 95) using the mean of intensities as cut-off points. With global normalization, p53 positive cores changed to 20% (19 of 95) when using median of intensities and 15.8%(15 of 95) when the mean of intensities were used. In conclusion, the global normalization method helped to define positive p53 staining in the tissue microarray set used. The method used helped to define clear cut-off points and confirmed all negatively stained tissue cores. Such normalization methods should help to better define clinically useful biomarkers. PMID:21738821

  19. Trace element load in cancer and normal lung tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubala-Kukuś , A.; Braziewicz, J.; Banaś , D.; Majewska, U.; Góź Dź , S.; Urbaniak, A.

    1999-04-01

    Samples of malignant and benign human lung tissues were analysed by two complementary methods, i.e., particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TRXRF). The concentration of trace elements of P, S, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, Sr, Hg and Pb was determined in squamous cancer of lung tissue from 65 people and in the benign lung tumour tissue from 5 people. Several elements shows enhancement in cancerous lung tissue of women in comparison to men, i.e., titanium show maximum enhancement by 48% followed by Cr (20%) and Mn (36%). At the same time trace element concentration of Sr and Pb are declaimed by 30% and 20% in women population. Physical basis of used analytical methods, experimental set-up and the procedure of sample preparation are described.

  20. Fluorescence lifetime of normal, benign, and malignant thyroid tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandao, Mariana; Iwakura, Ricardo; Basilio, Fagne; Haleplian, Kaique; Ito, Amando; de Freitas, Luiz Carlos Conti; Bachmann, Luciano

    2015-06-01

    Fine-needle aspiration cytology is the standard technique to diagnose thyroid pathologies. However, this method results in a high percentage of inconclusive and false negatives. The use of time-resolved fluorescence techniques to detect biochemical composition and tissue structure alterations could help to develop a portable, minimally invasive, and nondestructive method to assist during surgical procedures. This study aimed to use fluorescence lifetimes to differentiate healthy and benign tissues from malignant thyroid tissue. The thyroid tissue was excited at 298-300 nm and the fluorescence decay registered at 340 and 450 nm. We observed fluorescence lifetimes at 340 nm emission of 0.80±0.26 and 3.94±0.47 ns for healthy tissue; 0.90±0.24 and 4.05±0.46 ns for benign lesions; and 1.21±0.14 and 4.63±0.25 ns for malignant lesions. For 450 nm emissions, we obtain lifetimes of 0.25±0.18 and 3.99±0.39 ns for healthy tissue, 0.24±0.17 and 4.20±0.48 ns for benign lesions, 0.33±0.32 and 4.55±0.55 ns for malignant lesions. Employing analysis of variance, we differentiate malignant lesions from benign and healthy tissues. In addition, we use quadratic discriminant analysis to distinguish malignant from benign and healthy tissues with an accuracy of 76.1%, sensitivity of 74.7%, and specificity of 83.3%. These results indicate that time-resolved fluorescence can assist medical evaluation of thyroid pathologies during surgeries.

  1. Sarcoglycans in the normal and pathological breast tissue of humans: an immunohistochemical and molecular study.

    PubMed

    Arco, Alba; Favaloro, Angelo; Gioffrè, Mara; Santoro, Giuseppe; Speciale, Francesco; Vermiglio, Giovanna; Cutroneo, Giuseppina

    2012-01-01

    The sarcoglycan complex, consisting of α-, β-, γ-, δ- and ε-sarcoglycans, is a multimember transmembrane system providing a mechanosignaling connection from the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. Whereas the expression of α- and γ-sarcoglycan is restricted to striated muscle, other sarcoglycans are widely expressed. Although many studies have investigated sarcoglycans in all muscle types, insufficient data are available on the distribution of the sarcoglycan complex in nonmuscle tissue. On this basis, we used immunohistochemical and RT-PCR techniques to study preliminarily the sarcoglycans in normal glandular breast tissue (which has never been studied in the literature on these proteins) to verify the effective wider distribution of this complex. Moreover, to understand the role of sarcoglycans, we also tested samples obtained from patients affected by fibrocystic mastopathy and breast fibroadenoma. Our data showed, for the first time, that all sarcoglycans are always detectable in all normal samples both in epithelial and myoepithelial cells; in pathological breast tissue, all sarcoglycans appeared severely reduced. These data demonstrated that all sarcoglycans, not only β-, δ-, and ε-sarcoglycans, have a wider distribution, implying a new unknown role for these proteins. Moreover, in breast diseases, sarcoglycans containing cadherin domain homologs could provoke a loss of strong adhesion between epithelial cells, permitting and facilitating the degeneration of these benign breast tumors into malignant tumors. Consequently, sarcoglycans could play an important and intriguing role in many breast diseases and in particular in tumor progression from benign to malignant.

  2. Telomerase deficiency affects normal brain functions in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehoon; Jo, Yong Sang; Sung, Young Hoon; Hwang, In Koo; Kim, Hyuk; Kim, Song-Yi; Yi, Sun Shin; Choi, June-Seek; Sun, Woong; Seong, Je Kyung; Lee, Han-Woong

    2010-02-01

    Telomerase maintains telomere structures and chromosome stability, and it is essential for preserving the characteristics of stem and progenitor cells. In the brain, the hippocampus and the olfactory bulbs are continuously supplied with neural stem and progenitor cells that are required for adult neurogenesis throughout the life. Therefore, we examined whether telomerase plays important roles in maintaining normal brain functions in vivo. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) expression was observed in the hippocampus, the olfactory bulbs, and the cerebellum, but the telomerase RNA component (TERC) was not detected in hippocampus and olfactory bulbs. Interestingly, TERT-deficient mice exhibited significantly altered anxiety-like behaviors and abnormal olfaction measuring the functions of the hippocampus and the olfactory bulbs, respectively. However, the cerebellum-dependent behavior was not changed in these mutant mice. These results suggest that TERT is constitutively expressed in the hippocampus and the olfactory bulbs, and that it is important for regulating normal brain functions. PMID:19685288

  3. Normal and affectively ill mothers' beliefs about their children.

    PubMed

    Kochanska, G; Radke-Yarrow, M; Kuczynski, L; Friedman, S L

    1987-07-01

    Normal, unipolar, and bipolar depressed women were studied to determine whether depressive cognitive schemas extend to the perception of one's own child. Depressed and well mothers reported equal satisfaction with their children, but the depressed group was less satisfied with the children's socioaffective than their cognitive development. The depressed mothers experienced a greater degree of helplessness regarding their children, and were more likely to feel that outcomes of child development were determined by uncontrollable factors.

  4. Three-Dimensional Tissue Models of Normal and Diseased Skin

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Mark W.; Alt-Holland, Addy; Egles, Christophe; Garlick, Jonathan A.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade, the development of in vitro, human, three-dimensional (3D) tissue models, known as human skin equivalents (HSEs), has furthered understanding of epidermal cell biology and provided novel experimental systems. Signaling pathways that mediate the linkage between growth and differentiation function optimally when cells are spatially organized to display the architectural features seen in vivo, but are uncoupled and lost in two-dimensional culture systems. HSEs consist of a stratified squamous epithelium grown at an air-liquid interface on a collagen matrix populated with dermal fibroblasts. These 3D tissues demonstrate in vivo–like epithelial differentiation and morphology, and rates of cell division, similar to those found in human skin. This unit describes fabrication of HSEs, allowing the generation of human tissues that mimic the morphology, differentiation, and growth of human skin, as well as disease processes of cancer and wound re-epithelialization, providing powerful new tools for the study of diseases in humans. PMID:19085986

  5. Genome-wide quantification of rare somatic mutations in normal human tissues using massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Margaret L; Kinde, Isaac; Tomasetti, Cristian; McMahon, K Wyatt; Rosenquist, Thomas A; Grollman, Arthur P; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Papadopoulos, Nickolas

    2016-08-30

    We present the bottleneck sequencing system (BotSeqS), a next-generation sequencing method that simultaneously quantifies rare somatic point mutations across the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. BotSeqS combines molecular barcoding with a simple dilution step immediately before library amplification. We use BotSeqS to show age- and tissue-dependent accumulations of rare mutations and demonstrate that somatic mutational burden in normal human tissues can vary by several orders of magnitude, depending on biologic and environmental factors. We further show major differences between the mutational patterns of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes in normal tissues. Lastly, the mutation spectra of normal tissues were different from each other, but similar to those of the cancers that arose in them. This technology can provide insights into the number and nature of genetic alterations in normal tissues and can be used to address a variety of fundamental questions about the genomes of diseased tissues.

  6. Genome-wide quantification of rare somatic mutations in normal human tissues using massively parallel sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Margaret L.; Kinde, Isaac; Tomasetti, Cristian; McMahon, K. Wyatt; Rosenquist, Thomas A.; Grollman, Arthur P.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Papadopoulos, Nickolas

    2016-01-01

    We present the bottleneck sequencing system (BotSeqS), a next-generation sequencing method that simultaneously quantifies rare somatic point mutations across the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. BotSeqS combines molecular barcoding with a simple dilution step immediately before library amplification. We use BotSeqS to show age- and tissue-dependent accumulations of rare mutations and demonstrate that somatic mutational burden in normal human tissues can vary by several orders of magnitude, depending on biologic and environmental factors. We further show major differences between the mutational patterns of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes in normal tissues. Lastly, the mutation spectra of normal tissues were different from each other, but similar to those of the cancers that arose in them. This technology can provide insights into the number and nature of genetic alterations in normal tissues and can be used to address a variety of fundamental questions about the genomes of diseased tissues. PMID:27528664

  7. Divergent viral presentation among human tumors and adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Wendl, Michael C.; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Wylie, Kristine; Ye, Kai; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Xie, Mingchao; Wu, Song; Niu, Beifang; Grubb, Robert; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Gay, Hiram; Chen, Ken; Rader, Janet S.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    We applied a newly developed bioinformatics system called VirusScan to investigate the viral basis of 6,813 human tumors and 559 adjacent normal samples across 23 cancer types and identified 505 virus positive samples with distinctive, organ system- and cancer type-specific distributions. We found that herpes viruses (e.g., subtypes HHV4, HHV5, and HHV6) that are highly prevalent across cancers of the digestive tract showed significantly higher abundances in tumor versus adjacent normal samples, supporting their association with these cancers. We also found three HPV16-positive samples in brain lower grade glioma (LGG). Further, recurrent HBV integration at the KMT2B locus is present in three liver tumors, but absent in their matched adjacent normal samples, indicating that viral integration induced host driver genetic alterations are required on top of viral oncogene expression for initiation and progression of liver hepatocellular carcinoma. Notably, viral integrations were found in many genes, including novel recurrent HPV integrations at PTPN13 in cervical cancer. Finally, we observed a set of HHV4 and HBV variants strongly associated with ethnic groups, likely due to viral sequence evolution under environmental influences. These findings provide important new insights into viral roles of tumor initiation and progression and potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:27339696

  8. Detection and Quantitation of Octopine in Normal Plant Tissue and in Crown Gall Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Roosevelt; Guderian, Ronald H.; Eden, Francine; Chilton, Mary-Dell; Gordon, Milton P.; Nester, Eugene W.

    1974-01-01

    Octopine has been detected in normal tobacco leaf and stem tissue, normal sunflower stem tissue, pinto bean leaves, and normal tobacco callus tissue in culture. Octopine was identified in extracts by means of electrophoresis and chromatography in several solvent systems. Tobacco and sunflower tumor lines induced by various strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens were found to contain from 1 to 240 times as much octopine as the normal plant tissues examined. Several strains of A. tumefaciens produce undifferentiated tobacco tumors containing high levels of octopine, but produce undifferentiated sunflower tumors containing normal levels of octopine and high levels of arginine. Further, strain CGIC of A. tumefaciens produces in tobacco an undifferentiated tumor which contains high levels of octopine and a teratoma which contains normal levels of octopine. This evidence shows that there is no consistent relationship between the causative strain of A. tumefaciens and the octopine content of the resulting crown gall tumor. PMID:16592142

  9. Discrimination between normal breast tissue and tumor tissue using CdTe series detector developed for photon-counting mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Chizuru; Ihori, Akiko; Yamakawa, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Okada, Masahiro; Kato, Misa; Nakajima, Ai; Kodera, Yoshie

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new mammography system using a cadmium telluride (CdTe) series photon-counting detector, having high absorption efficiency over a wide energy range. In a previous study, we showed that the use of high X-ray energy in digital mammography is useful from the viewpoint of exposure dose and image quality. In addition, the CdTe series detector can acquire X-ray spectrum information following transmission through a subject. This study focused on the tissue composition identified using spectral information obtained by a new photon-counting detector. Normal breast tissue consists entirely of adipose and glandular tissues. However, it is very difficult to find tumor tissue in the region of glandular tissue via a conventional mammogram, especially in dense breast because the attenuation coefficients of glandular tissue and tumor tissue are very close. As a fundamental examination, we considered a simulation phantom and showed the difference between normal breast tissue and tumor tissue of various thicknesses in a three-dimensional (3D) scatter plot. We were able to discriminate between both types of tissues. In addition, there was a tendency for the distribution to depend on the thickness of the tumor tissue. Thinner tumor tissues were shown to be closer in appearance to normal breast tissue. This study also demonstrated that the difference between these tissues could be made obvious by using a CdTe series detector. We believe that this differentiation is important, and therefore, expect this technology to be applied to new tumor detection systems in the future.

  10. Autofluorescence of normal and neoplastic human brain tissue: an aid for intraoperative delineation of tumor resection margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottiroli, Giovanni F.; Croce, Anna C.; Locatelli, Donata; Nano, Rosanna; Giombelli, Ermanno; Messina, Alberto; Benericetti, Eugenio

    1998-01-01

    Light-induced autofluorescence measurements were made on normal and tumor brain tissues to assess their spectroscopic properties and to verify the potential of this parameter for an intraoperative delineation of tumor resection margins. Spectrofluorometric analysis was performed both at the microscope on tissue sections from surgical resection, and on patients affected by glioblastoma, during surgical operation. Significant differences in autofluorescence emission properties were found between normal and tumor tissues in both ex vivo and in vivo measurements, indicating that the lesion can be distinguished from the informal surrounding tissues by the signal amplitude and the spectral shape. The non-invasiveness of the technique opens interesting prospects for improving the efficacy of neurosurgical operation, by allowing an intraoperative delimitation of tumor resection margins.

  11. FTIR microscopic comparative study on normal, premalignant, and malignant tissues of human intenstine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordechai, Shaul; Argov, Shmuel; Salman, Ahmad O.; Cohen, Beny; Ramesh, Jagannathan; Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Goldstein, Jed; Sinelnikov, Igor

    2000-07-01

    Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) employs a unique approach to optical diagnosis of tissue pathology based on the characteristic molecular vibrational spectra of the tissue. The architectural changes in the cellular and sub-cellular levels developing in abnormal tissue, including a majority of cancer forms, manifest themselves in different optical signatures, which can be detected in infrared spectroscopy. The biological systems we have studied include normal, premalignant (polyp) and malignant human colonic tissues from three patients. Our method is based on microscopic infrared study (FTIR-microscopy) of thin tissue specimens and a direct comparison with normal histopathological analysis, which serves as a `gold' reference. The normal intestine tissue has a stronger absorption than polyp and cancerous types over a wide region in all three cases. The detailed analysis showed that there is a significant decrease in total phosphate and creatine contents for polyp and cancerous tissue types in comparison to the controls.

  12. TRANSPORTER POLYMORPHISMS AFFECT NORMAL PHYSIOLOGY, DISEASES, AND PHARMACOTHERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Sissung, Tristan M.; Troutman, Sarah M.; Campbell, Tessa J; Pressler, Heather M.; Sung, Hyeyoung; Bates, Susan E.; Figg, William D.

    2014-01-01

    Drug transporters mediate the movement of endobiotics and xenobiotics across biological membranes in multiple organs and in most tissues. As such, they are involved in physiology, development of disease, drug pharmacokinetics, and ultimately the clinical response to myriad medications. Genetic variants in transporters cause population-specific differences in drug transport and are responsible for considerable inter-individual variation in physiology and pharmacotherapy. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad overview of how inherited variants in transporters are associated with disease etiology, disease state, and the pharmacological treatment of diseases. Given that there are thousands of published papers related to the interplay between transporter genetics and medicine, this review will provide examples that exemplify the broader focus of the literature. PMID:22284781

  13. Human cancers overexpress genes that are specific to a variety of normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lotem, Joseph; Netanely, Dvir; Domany, Eytan; Sachs, Leo

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed gene expression data from three different kinds of samples: normal human tissues, human cancer cell lines, and leukemic cells from lymphoid and myeloid leukemia pediatric patients. We have searched for genes that are overexpressed in human cancer and also show specific patterns of tissue-dependent expression in normal tissues. Using the expression data of the normal tissues, we identified 4,346 genes with a high variability of expression and clustered these genes according to their relative expression level. Of 91 stable clusters obtained, 24 clusters included genes preferentially expressed either only in hematopoietic tissues or in hematopoietic and one to two other tissues; 28 clusters included genes preferentially expressed in various nonhematopoietic tissues such as neuronal, testis, liver, kidney, muscle, lung, pancreas, and placenta. Analysis of the expression levels of these two groups of genes in the human cancer cell lines and leukemias identified genes that were highly expressed in cancer cells but not in their normal counterparts and, thus, were overexpressed in the cancers. The different cancer cell lines and leukemias varied in the number and identity of these overexpressed genes. The results indicate that many genes that are overexpressed in human cancer cells are specific to a variety of normal tissues, including normal tissues other than those from which the cancer originated. It is suggested that this general property of cancer cells plays a major role in determining the behavior of the cancers, including their metastatic potential. PMID:16339305

  14. Leg tissue mass composition affects tibial acceleration response following impact.

    PubMed

    Schinkel-Ivy, Alison; Burkhart, Timothy A; Andrews, David M

    2012-02-01

    To date, there has not been a direct examination of the effect that tissue composition (lean mass/muscle, fat mass, bone mineral content) differences between males and females has on how the tibia responds to impacts similar to those seen during running. To evaluate this, controlled heel impacts were imparted to 36 participants (6 M and 6 F in each of low, medium and high percent body fat [BF] groups) using a human pendulum. A skin-mounted accelerometer medial to the tibial tuberosity was used to determine the tibial response parameters (peak acceleration, acceleration slope and time to peak acceleration). There were no consistent effects of BF or specific tissue masses on the un-normalized tibial response parameters. However, females experienced 25% greater peak acceleration than males. When normalized to lean mass, wobbling mass, and bone mineral content, females experienced 50%, 62% and 70% greater peak acceleration, respectively, per gram of tissue than males. Higher magnitudes of lean mass and bone mass significantly contributed to decreased acceleration responses in general.

  15. Normal tissue radioprotection by amifostine via Warburg-type effects.

    PubMed

    Koukourakis, Michael I; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Zois, Christos E; Kalamida, Dimitra; Pouliliou, Stamatia; Karagounis, Ilias V; Yeh, Tzu-Lan; Abboud, Martine I; Claridge, Timothy D W; Schofield, Christopher J; Sivridis, Efthimios; Simopoulos, Costantinos; Tokmakidis, Savvas P; Harris, Adrian L

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of Amifostine (WR-2721) mediated radioprotection is poorly understood. The effects of amifostine on human basal metabolism, mouse liver metabolism and on normal and tumor hepatic cells were studied. Indirect calorimetric canopy tests showed significant reductions in oxygen consumption and of carbon dioxide emission in cancer patients receiving amifostine. Glucose levels significantly decreased and lactate levels increased in patient venous blood. Although amifostine in vitro did not inhibit the activity of the prolyl-hydroxylase PHD2, experiments with mouse liver showed that on a short timescale WR-1065 induced expression of the Hypoxia Inducible Factor HIF1α, lactate dehydrogenase LDH5, glucose transporter GLUT2, phosphorylated pyruvate dehydrogenase pPDH and PDH-kinase. This effect was confirmed on normal mouse NCTC hepatocytes, but not on hepatoma cells. A sharp reduction of acetyl-CoA and ATP levels in NCTC cells indicated reduced mitochondrial usage of pyruvate. Transient changes of mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species ROS production were evident. Amifostine selectively protects NCTC cells against radiation, whilst HepG2 neoplastic cells are sensitized. The radiation protection was correlates with HIF levels. These findings shed new light on the mechanism of amifostine cytoprotection and encourage clinical research with this agent for the treatment of primary and metastatic liver cancer. PMID:27507219

  16. Preparing normal tissue cells for space flight experiments.

    PubMed

    Koch, Claudia; Kohn, Florian P M; Bauer, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Deterioration of health is a problem in modern space flight business. In order to develop countermeasures, research has been done on human bodies and also on single cells. Relevant experiments on human cells in vitro are feasible when microgravity is simulated by devices such as the Random Positioning Machine or generated for a short time during parabolic flights. However, they become difficult in regard to performance and interpretation when long-term experiments are designed that need a prolonged stay on the International Space Station (ISS). One huge problem is the transport of living cells from a laboratory on Earth to the ISS. For this reason, mainly rapidly growing, rather robust human cells such as cancer cells, embryonic cells, or progenitor cells have been investigated on the ISS up to now. Moreover, better knowledge on the behavior of normal mature cells, which mimic the in vivo situation, is strongly desirable. One solution to the problem could be the use of redifferentiable cells, which grow rapidly and behave like cancer cells in plain medium, but are reprogrammed to normal cells when substances like retinoic acid are added. A list of cells capable of redifferentiation is provided, together with names of suitable drugs, in this review.

  17. Normal tissue radioprotection by amifostine via Warburg-type effects

    PubMed Central

    Koukourakis, Michael I.; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Zois, Christos E.; Kalamida, Dimitra; Pouliliou, Stamatia; Karagounis, Ilias V.; Yeh, Tzu-Lan; Abboud, Martine I.; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Sivridis, Efthimios; Simopoulos, Costantinos; Tokmakidis, Savvas P.; Harris, Adrian L.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of Amifostine (WR-2721) mediated radioprotection is poorly understood. The effects of amifostine on human basal metabolism, mouse liver metabolism and on normal and tumor hepatic cells were studied. Indirect calorimetric canopy tests showed significant reductions in oxygen consumption and of carbon dioxide emission in cancer patients receiving amifostine. Glucose levels significantly decreased and lactate levels increased in patient venous blood. Although amifostine in vitro did not inhibit the activity of the prolyl-hydroxylase PHD2, experiments with mouse liver showed that on a short timescale WR-1065 induced expression of the Hypoxia Inducible Factor HIF1α, lactate dehydrogenase LDH5, glucose transporter GLUT2, phosphorylated pyruvate dehydrogenase pPDH and PDH-kinase. This effect was confirmed on normal mouse NCTC hepatocytes, but not on hepatoma cells. A sharp reduction of acetyl-CoA and ATP levels in NCTC cells indicated reduced mitochondrial usage of pyruvate. Transient changes of mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species ROS production were evident. Amifostine selectively protects NCTC cells against radiation, whilst HepG2 neoplastic cells are sensitized. The radiation protection was correlates with HIF levels. These findings shed new light on the mechanism of amifostine cytoprotection and encourage clinical research with this agent for the treatment of primary and metastatic liver cancer. PMID:27507219

  18. Pathway-specific differences between tumor cell lines and normal and tumor tissue cells

    PubMed Central

    Ertel, Adam; Verghese, Arun; Byers, Stephen W; Ochs, Michael; Tozeren, Aydin

    2006-01-01

    Background Cell lines are used in experimental investigation of cancer but their capacity to represent tumor cells has yet to be quantified. The aim of the study was to identify significant alterations in pathway usage in cell lines in comparison with normal and tumor tissue. Methods This study utilized a pathway-specific enrichment analysis of publicly accessible microarray data and quantified the gene expression differences between cell lines, tumor, and normal tissue cells for six different tissue types. KEGG pathways that are significantly different between cell lines and tumors, cell lines and normal tissues and tumor and normal tissue were identified through enrichment tests on gene lists obtained using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM). Results Cellular pathways that were significantly upregulated in cell lines compared to tumor cells and normal cells of the same tissue type included ATP synthesis, cell communication, cell cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, purine, pyrimidine and pyruvate metabolism, and proteasome. Results on metabolic pathways suggested an increase in the velocity nucleotide metabolism and RNA production. Pathways that were downregulated in cell lines compared to tumor and normal tissue included cell communication, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and ECM-receptor interaction. Only a fraction of the significantly altered genes in tumor-to-normal comparison had similar expressions in cancer cell lines and tumor cells. These genes were tissue-specific and were distributed sparsely among multiple pathways. Conclusion Significantly altered genes in tumors compared to normal tissue were largely tissue specific. Among these genes downregulation was a major trend. In contrast, cell lines contained large sets of significantly upregulated genes that were common to multiple tissue types. Pathway upregulation in cell lines was most pronounced over metabolic pathways including cell nucleotide metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation. Signaling

  19. Raman spectra of normal and cancerous mouse mammary gland tissue using near infrared excitation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Vaman; Serhatkulu, G. K.; Dai, H.; Shukla, N.; Weber, R.; Thakur, J. S.; Freeman, D. C.; Pandya, A. K.; Auner, G. W.; Naik, R.; Miller, R. F.; Cao, A.; Klein, M. D.; Rabah, R.

    2006-03-01

    Raman spectra of normal mammary gland tissues, malignant mammary gland tumors, and lymph nodes have been recorded using fresh tissue from mice. Tumors were induced in mice by subcutaneously injecting 4T1 BALB/c mammary tumor (a highly malignant) cell line. The Raman spectra were collected using the same tissues that were examined by histopathology for determining the cancerous/normal state of the tissue. Differences in various peak intensities, peak shifts and peak ratios were analyzed to determine the Raman spectral features that differentiate mammary gland tumors from non-tumorous tissue. Tissues that were confirmed by pathology as cancerous (tumors) show several distinctive features in the Raman spectra compared to the spectra of the normal tissues. For example, the cancerous tissues show Raman peaks at 621, 642, 1004, 1032, 1175 and 1208 cm-1 that are assignable to amino acids containing aromatic side-chains such as phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine. Further, the cancerous tissues show a greatly reduced level of phospholipids compared to the normal tissues. The Raman spectral regions that are sensitive to pathologic alteration in the tissue will be discussed.

  20. Cdk4 deficiency inhibits skin tumor development but does not affect normal keratinocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; LaCava, Margaret; Moons, David S; Kiyokawa, Hiroaki; Conti, Claudio J

    2002-08-01

    Most human tumors have mutations that result in deregulation of the cdk4/cyclin-Ink4-Rb pathway. Overexpression of D-type cyclins or cdk4 and inactivation of Ink4 inhibitors are common in human tumors. Conversely, lack of cyclin D1 expression results in significant reduction in mouse skin and mammary tumor development. However, complete elimination of tumor development was not observed in these models, suggesting that other cyclin/cdk complexes play an important role in tumorigenesis. Here we described the effects of cdk4 deficiency on mouse skin proliferation and tumor development. Cdk4 deficiency resulted in a 98% reduction in the number of tumors generated through the two-stage carcinogenesis model. The absence of cdk4 did not affect normal keratinocyte proliferation and both wild-type and cdk4 knockout epidermis are equally affected after topical treatment with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), resulting in epidermal hyperplasia. In similar fashion, cdk4 knockout keratinocytes proliferated well in an in vivo model of wound-induced proliferation. Biochemical studies in mouse epidermis showed that cdk6 activity increased twofold in cdk4-deficient mice compared to wild-type siblings. These results suggest that therapeutic approaches to inhibit cdk4 activity could provide a target to inhibit tumor development with minimal or no effect in normal tissue.

  1. cdk4 Deficiency Inhibits Skin Tumor Development but Does Not Affect Normal Keratinocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.; Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; LaCava, Margaret; Moons, David S.; Kiyokawa, Hiroaki; Conti, Claudio J.

    2002-01-01

    Most human tumors have mutations that result in deregulation of the cdk4/cyclin-Ink4-Rb pathway. Overexpression of D-type cyclins or cdk4 and inactivation of Ink4 inhibitors are common in human tumors. Conversely, lack of cyclin D1 expression results in significant reduction in mouse skin and mammary tumor development. However, complete elimination of tumor development was not observed in these models, suggesting that other cyclin/cdk complexes play an important role in tumorigenesis. Here we described the effects of cdk4 deficiency on mouse skin proliferation and tumor development. Cdk4 deficiency resulted in a 98% reduction in the number of tumors generated through the two-stage carcinogenesis model. The absence of cdk4 did not affect normal keratinocyte proliferation and both wild-type and cdk4 knockout epidermis are equally affected after topical treatment with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), resulting in epidermal hyperplasia. In similar fashion, cdk4 knockout keratinocytes proliferated well in an in vivo model of wound-induced proliferation. Biochemical studies in mouse epidermis showed that cdk6 activity increased twofold in cdk4-deficient mice compared to wild-type siblings. These results suggest that therapeutic approaches to inhibit cdk4 activity could provide a target to inhibit tumor development with minimal or no effect in normal tissue. PMID:12163365

  2. A review: CNS effects and normal tissue tolerance in dogs.

    PubMed

    Gavin, P R; Kraft, S L; Huiskamp, R; Coderre, J A

    1997-05-01

    Large animal studies have been utilized to define tolerance of normal brain to irradiation and verify treatment planning programs with two recently installed epithermal neutron beams. The normal brain tolerance studies utilized two biological endpoints, magnetic resonance visible damage only and neurologic signs progressing to death. The studies focused on defining the proton RBE for the contaminant fast neutrons, and from nitrogen capture of thermal neutrons and boron capture reaction biologic effect. The proton RBE was approximately 3.0 to 6.7, depending on whether a dose reduction factor for the low gamma dose rate was employed. The microscopic distribution of the boron compounds, coupled with the extremely short length of the fission fragments from thermal neutron capture by 10B yields an observed biologic effect much less than would be expected from such high LET irradiation. This observed biologic effect, which is a product of the microdistribution of the boron atom and the relative biologic effect of the fission fragments has been termed compound factor. The compound factor was based on the calculated physical dose from the fission fragment in blood based on measured blood 10B concentration. The approximate compound factor for BSH was studied at the two institutions and it ranged from 0.27 to 0.55, depending on the site and the endpoint chosen. The mean compound factor for BPA was only studied at one site and was found to be 1.1 for both endpoints. The increase in the compound factor for BPA is in keeping with previous calculations based on the differences in compound distribution. Results of these studies has helped the initiation of phase I and phase II clinical trials at Brook haven National Laboratory and the planned European clinical trials at Petten, The Netherlands.

  3. Optical characterization of pancreatic normal and tumor tissues with double integrating sphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiris, Tugba; Akbulut, Saadet; Kiris, Aysenur; Gucin, Zuhal; Karatepe, Oguzhan; Bölükbasi Ates, Gamze; Tabakoǧlu, Haşim Özgür

    2015-03-01

    In order to develop minimally invasive, fast and precise diagnostic and therapeutic methods in medicine by using optical methods, first step is to examine how the light propagates, scatters and transmitted through medium. So as to find out appropriate wavelengths, it is required to correctly determine the optical properties of tissues. The aim of this study is to measure the optical properties of both cancerous and normal ex-vivo pancreatic tissues. Results will be compared to detect how cancerous and normal tissues respond to different wavelengths. Double-integrating-sphere system and computational technique inverse adding doubling method (IAD) were used in the study. Absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of normal and cancerous pancreatic tissues have been measured within the range of 500-650 nm. Statistical significant differences between cancerous and normal tissues have been obtained at 550 nm and 630 nm for absorption coefficients. On the other hand; there were no statistical difference found for scattering coefficients at any wavelength.

  4. Normalization of periodontal tissues in osteopetrotic mib mutant rats, treated with CSF-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtowicz, A.; Yamauchi, M.; Sotowski, R.; Ostrowski, K.

    1998-01-01

    The osteopetrotic mib mutation in rats causes defects in the skeletal bone tissue in young animals. These defects, i.e. slow bone remodelling, changes in both crystallinity and mineral content, are transient and undergo normalization, even without any treatment in 6-wk-old animals. Treatment with CSF-1 (colony stimulating factor-1) accelerates the normalization process in skeletal bones. The periodontal tissues around the apices of incisors show abnormalities caused by the slow remodelling process of the mandible bone tissue, the deficiency of osteoclasts and their abnormal morphology, as well as the disorganization of periodontal ligament fibres. In contrast to the skeletal tissues, these abnormalities would not undergo spontaneous normalization. Under treatment with colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1), the primitive bone trabeculae of mandible are resorbed and the normalization of the number of osteoclasts and their cytology occurs. The organization of the periodontal ligament fibres is partially restored, resembling the histological structure of the normal one.

  5. Raman spectroscopy of normal oral buccal mucosa tissues: study on intact and incised biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Atul; Singh, S. P.; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Krishna, C. Murali

    2011-12-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is one of among the top 10 malignancies. Optical spectroscopy, including Raman, is being actively pursued as alternative/adjunct for cancer diagnosis. Earlier studies have demonstrated the feasibility of classifying normal, premalignant, and malignant oral ex vivo tissues. Spectral features showed predominance of lipids and proteins in normal and cancer conditions, respectively, which were attributed to membrane lipids and surface proteins. In view of recent developments in deep tissue Raman spectroscopy, we have recorded Raman spectra from superior and inferior surfaces of 10 normal oral tissues on intact, as well as incised, biopsies after separation of epithelium from connective tissue. Spectral variations and similarities among different groups were explored by unsupervised (principal component analysis) and supervised (linear discriminant analysis, factorial discriminant analysis) methodologies. Clusters of spectra from superior and inferior surfaces of intact tissues show a high overlap; whereas spectra from separated epithelium and connective tissue sections yielded clear clusters, though they also overlap on clusters of intact tissues. Spectra of all four groups of normal tissues gave exclusive clusters when tested against malignant spectra. Thus, this study demonstrates that spectra recorded from the superior surface of an intact tissue may have contributions from deeper layers but has no bearing from the classification of a malignant tissues point of view.

  6. Absorbance Differentiation of Burned and Normal Tissue by the Addition of Glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chuan-I.; de Pedro, Hector; Zarnani, Faranak; Idris, Ahamed; Glosser, R.

    2012-03-01

    Minimizing the removal of healthy/recoverable tissue would significantly increase the chances of the patients' survival. The purpose is to be able to optically differentiate between burned and normal tissue with the addition of glycerol. Under normal conditions (without glycerol), the absorption coefficient is large, which means there is a large amount of absorption in the tissue. Glycerol decreases the absorption coefficient by reducing the cell size as well as providing a more uniform index of refraction in the interstitial environment. A lower overall absorption will reveal absorption peaks specific to the differentiation of the tissue. Results will be presented on the day of the conference.

  7. Is NAA reduction in normal contralateral cerebral tissue in stroke patients dependent on underlying risk factors?

    PubMed Central

    Walker, P M; Salem, D Ben; Giroud, M; Brunotte, F

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose This retrospective study investigated the dependence of N‐acetyl aspartate (NAA) ratios on risk factors for cerebral vasculopathy such as sex, age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, carotid stenosis, and dyslipidaemia, which may have affected brain vessels and induced metabolic brain abnormalities prior to stroke. We hypothesise that in stroke patients metabolic alterations in the apparently normal contralateral brain are dependent on the presence or not of such risk factors. Methods Fifty nine patients (31 male, 28 female: 58.8±16.1 years old) with cortical middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory infarction were included. Long echo time chemical shift imaging spectroscopy was carried out on a Siemens 1.5 T Magnetom Vision scanner using a multi‐voxel PRESS technique. Metabolite ratios (NAA/choline, NAA/creatine, lactate/choline, etc) were studied using uni‐ and multivariate analyses with respect to common risk factors. The influence of age, stroke lesion size, and time since stroke was studied using a linear regression approach. Results Age, sex, and hypertension all appeared to individually influence metabolite ratios, although only hypertension was significant after multivariate analysis. In both basal ganglia and periventricular white matter regions in apparently normal contralateral brain, the NAA/choline ratio was significantly lower in hypertensive (1.37±0.16 and 1.50±0.19, respectively) than in normotensive patients (1.72±0.19 and 1.85±0.15, respectively). Conclusions Regarding MCA infarction, contralateral tissue remote from the lesion behaves abnormally in the presence of hypertension, the NAA ratios in hypertensive patients being significantly lower. These data suggest that hypertension may compromise the use of contralateral tissue data as a reference for comparison with ischaemic tissue. PMID:16614018

  8. Origin and quantification of differences between normal and tumor tissues observed by terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-09-01

    The origin of the differences in the refractive index observed between normal and tumor tissues using terahertz spectroscopy has been described quantitatively. To estimate water content differences in tissues, we prepared fresh and paraffin-embedded samples from rats. An approximately 5% increase of water content in tumor tissues was calculated from terahertz time domain spectroscopy measurements compared to normal tissues. A greater than 15% increase in percentage of cell nuclei per unit area in tumor tissues was observed by hematoxylin and eosin stained samples, which generates a higher refractive index of biological components other than water. Both high water content and high cell density resulted in higher refractive index by approximately 0.05 in tumor tissues. It is predicted that terahertz spectroscopy can also be used to detect brain tumors in human tissue due to the same underlying mechanism as in rats.

  9. Extrapolation of Normal Tissue Complication Probability for Different Fractionations in Liver Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tai An; Erickson, Beth; Li, X. Allen

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: The ability to predict normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) is essential for NTCP-based treatment planning. The purpose of this work is to estimate the Lyman NTCP model parameters for liver irradiation from published clinical data of different fractionation regimens. A new expression of normalized total dose (NTD) is proposed to convert NTCP data between different treatment schemes. Method and Materials: The NTCP data of radiation- induced liver disease (RILD) from external beam radiation therapy for primary liver cancer patients were selected for analysis. The data were collected from 4 institutions for tumor sizes in the range of of 8-10 cm. The dose per fraction ranged from 1.5 Gy to 6 Gy. A modified linear-quadratic model with two components corresponding to radiosensitive and radioresistant cells in the normal liver tissue was proposed to understand the new NTD formalism. Results: There are five parameters in the model: TD{sub 50}, m, n, {alpha}/{beta} and f. With two parameters n and {alpha}/{beta} fixed to be 1.0 and 2.0 Gy, respectively, the extracted parameters from the fitting are TD{sub 50}(1) = 40.3 {+-} 8.4Gy, m =0.36 {+-} 0.09, f = 0.156 {+-} 0.074 Gy and TD{sub 50}(1) = 23.9 {+-} 5.3Gy, m = 0.41 {+-} 0.15, f = 0.0 {+-} 0.04 Gy for patients with liver cirrhosis scores of Child-Pugh A and Child-Pugh B, respectively. The fitting results showed that the liver cirrhosis score significantly affects fractional dose dependence of NTD. Conclusion: The Lyman parameters generated presently and the new form of NTD may be used to predict NTCP for treatment planning of innovative liver irradiation with different fractionations, such as hypofractioned stereotactic body radiation therapy.

  10. Molecular Portrait of the Normal Human Breast Tissue and Its Influence on Breast Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Margan, Madalin Marius; Jitariu, Andreea Adriana; Nica, Cristian; Raica, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Normal human breast tissue consists of epithelial and nonepithelial cells with different molecular profiles and differentiation grades. This molecular heterogeneity is known to yield abnormal clones that may contribute to the development of breast carcinomas. Stem cells that are found in developing and mature breast tissue are either positive or negative for cytokeratin 19 depending on their subtype. These cells are able to generate carcinogenesis along with mature cells. However, scientific data remains controversial regarding the monoclonal or polyclonal origin of breast carcinomas. The majority of breast carcinomas originate from epithelial cells that normally express BRCA1. The consecutive loss of the BRCA1 gene leads to various abnormalities in epithelial cells. Normal breast epithelial cells also express hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1α and HIF-2α that are associated with a high metastatic rate and a poor prognosis for malignant lesions. The nuclear expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in normal human breast tissue is maintained in malignant tissue as well. Several controversies regarding the ability of ER and PR status to predict breast cancer outcome remain. Both ER and PR act as modulators of cell activity in normal human breast tissue. Ki-67 positivity is strongly correlated with tumor grade although its specific role in applied therapy requires further studies. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) oncoprotein is less expressed in normal human breast specimens but is highly expressed in certain malignant lesions of the breast. Unlike HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor expression is similar in both normal and malignant tissues. Molecular heterogeneity is not only found in breast carcinomas but also in normal breast tissue. Therefore, the molecular mapping of normal human breast tissue might represent a key research area to fully elucidate the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:27382385

  11. Molecular Portrait of the Normal Human Breast Tissue and Its Influence on Breast Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Margan, Madalin Marius; Jitariu, Andreea Adriana; Cimpean, Anca Maria; Nica, Cristian; Raica, Marius

    2016-06-01

    Normal human breast tissue consists of epithelial and nonepithelial cells with different molecular profiles and differentiation grades. This molecular heterogeneity is known to yield abnormal clones that may contribute to the development of breast carcinomas. Stem cells that are found in developing and mature breast tissue are either positive or negative for cytokeratin 19 depending on their subtype. These cells are able to generate carcinogenesis along with mature cells. However, scientific data remains controversial regarding the monoclonal or polyclonal origin of breast carcinomas. The majority of breast carcinomas originate from epithelial cells that normally express BRCA1. The consecutive loss of the BRCA1 gene leads to various abnormalities in epithelial cells. Normal breast epithelial cells also express hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1α and HIF-2α that are associated with a high metastatic rate and a poor prognosis for malignant lesions. The nuclear expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) in normal human breast tissue is maintained in malignant tissue as well. Several controversies regarding the ability of ER and PR status to predict breast cancer outcome remain. Both ER and PR act as modulators of cell activity in normal human breast tissue. Ki-67 positivity is strongly correlated with tumor grade although its specific role in applied therapy requires further studies. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) oncoprotein is less expressed in normal human breast specimens but is highly expressed in certain malignant lesions of the breast. Unlike HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor expression is similar in both normal and malignant tissues. Molecular heterogeneity is not only found in breast carcinomas but also in normal breast tissue. Therefore, the molecular mapping of normal human breast tissue might represent a key research area to fully elucidate the mechanisms of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:27382385

  12. Raman spectroscopy in the study of normal and pathological tissue structure and of prosthetic material biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoluzza, Alessandro; Fagnano, C.; Tinti, A.; Mancini, S.; Caramazza, R.; Marchetti, P. G.; Maggi, G.

    1993-06-01

    Vibrational Raman spectroscopy has proven to be a powerful tool for biomedical applications such as the molecular characterization of normal and pathological tissues as well as the evaluation of prosthetic material bicompatibility. This work deals with the applications of Raman spectroscopy to the study of ocular tissues (lens, cornea, vitreous humour), the respective prosthetic biomaterials, bone tissue, and the main biomaterials used in the prosthetic surgery of bone. In particular the Raman spectra of the cornea in different conditions, of vitreous humour, and of pathological bone are reported and discussed. The Raman spectrum of air dried cornea suggests that the tissue is made up almost entirely of collagen. The spectra of normal and pathological bone tissues indicate that pathological bone has a more minor phosphate content than normal bone and some modifications are also observed for the amide III components. Moreover, the Raman spectrum of an arthroplastic bone before defatting suggests a substitution of phosphate with carbonate ions.

  13. Polyphenol oxidase affects normal nodule development in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) may have multiple functions in tissues, depending on its cellular or tissue localization. We used PPO RNAi transformants of red clover (Trifolium pratense) to determine the role PPO plays in normal development of plants, and especially in nitrogen-fixing nodules. In red clov...

  14. SU-E-T-168: Evaluation of Normal Tissue Damage in Head and Neck Cancer Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, H; Zhang, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate normal tissue toxicity in patients with head and neck cancer by calculating average survival fraction (SF) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for normal tissue cells. Methods: 20 patients with head and neck cancer were included in this study. IMRT plans were generated using EclipseTM treatment planning system by dosimetrist following clinical radiotherapy treatment guidelines. The average SF for three different normal tissue cells of each concerned structure can be calculated from dose spectrum acquired from differential dose volume histogram (DVH) using linear quadratic model. The three types of normal tissues include radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant that represents 70%, 50% and 30% survival fractions, respectively, for a 2-Gy open field. Finally, EUDs for three types of normal tissue of each structure were calculated from average SF. Results: The EUDs of the brainstem, spinal cord, parotid glands, brachial plexus and etc were calculated. Our analysis indicated that the brainstem can absorb as much as 14.3% of prescription dose to the tumor if the cell line is radiosensitive. In addition, as much as 16.1% and 18.3% of prescription dose were absorbed by the brainstem for moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant cells, respectively. For the spinal cord, the EUDs reached up to 27.6%, 35.0% and 42.9% of prescribed dose for the three types of radiosensitivities respectively. Three types of normal cells for parotid glands can get up to 65.6%, 71.2% and 78.4% of prescription dose, respectively. The maximum EUDs of brachial plexsus were calculated as 75.4%, 76.4% and 76.7% of prescription for three types of normal cell lines. Conclusion: The results indicated that EUD can be used to quantify and evaluate the radiation damage to surrounding normal tissues. Large variation of normal tissue EUDs may come from variation of target volumes and radiation beam orientations among the patients.

  15. Does UV irradiation affect polymer properties relevant to tissue engineering?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischbach, Claudia; Tessmar, Jörg; Lucke, Andrea; Schnell, Edith; Schmeer, Georg; Blunk, Torsten; Göpferich, Achim

    2001-10-01

    For most tissue engineering approaches aiming at the repair or generation of living tissues the interaction of cells and polymeric biomaterials is of paramount importance. Prior to contact with cells or tissues, biomaterials have to be sterilized. However, many sterilization procedures such as steam autoclave or heat sterilization are known to strongly affect polymer properties. UV irradiation is used as an alternative sterilization method in many tissue engineering laboratories on a routine basis, however, potential alterations of polymer properties have not been extensively considered. In this study we investigated the effects of UV irradiation on spin-cast films made from biodegradable poly( D, L-lactic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol)-monomethyl ether diblock copolymers (Me.PEG-PLA) which have recently been developed for controlled cell-biomaterial interaction. After 2 h of UV irradiation, which is sufficient for sterilization, no alterations in cell adhesion to polymer films were detected, as demonstrated with 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. This correlated with unchanged film topography and molecular weight distribution. However, extended UV irradiation for 5-24 h elicited drastic responses regarding Me.PEG-PLA polymer properties and interactions with biological elements: Large increases in unspecific protein adsorption and subsequent cell adhesion were observed. Changes in polymer surface properties could be correlated with the observed alterations in cell/protein-polymer interactions. Atomic force microscopy analysis of polymer films revealed a marked "smoothing" of the polymer surface after UV irradiation. Investigations using GPC, 1H-NMR, mass spectrometry, and a PEG-specific colorimetric assay demonstrated that polymer film composition was time-dependently affected by exposure to UV irradiation, i.e., that large amounts of PEG were lost from the copolymer surface. The data indicate that sterilization using UV irradiation for 2 h is an appropriate technique for the

  16. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affects tissue specific stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Yuriko; Doi, Hanako; Ono, Yusuke; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Kitajima, Michio; Miura, Kiyonori; Li, Tao-Sheng; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Postmenopausal disorders are frequently observed in various organs, but their relationship with estrogen deficiency and mechanisms remain unclear. As tissue-specific stem cells have been found to express estrogen receptors, we examined the hypothesis that estrogen deficiency impairs stem cells, which consequently contributes to postmenopausal disorders. Six-week-old C57BL/6 female mice were ovariectomized, following which they received 17β-estradiol replacement or vehicle (control). Sham-operated mice were used as healthy controls. All mice were killed for evaluation 2 months after treatments. Compared with the healthy control, ovariectomy significantly decreased uterine weight, which was partially recovered by 17β-estradiol replacement. Ovariectomy significantly increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, but impaired their capacity to grow mixed cell-type colonies in vitro. Estrogen replacement further increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, without significantly affecting colony growth in vitro. The number of CD105-positive mesenchymal stem cells in bone marrow also significantly decreased after ovariectomy, but completely recovered following estrogen replacement. Otherwise, neither ovariectomy nor estrogen replacement changed the number of Pax7-positive satellite cells, which are a skeletal muscle-type stem cell. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affected tissue-specific stem cells, suggesting a likely and direct relationship with postmenopausal disorders. PMID:26245252

  17. Effects of internal low-dose irradiation from 131I on gene expression in normal tissues in Balb/c mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the global gene expression response of normal tissues following internal low absorbed dose irradiation of 131I. Methods Balb/c mice were intravenously injected with 13 to 260 kBq of 131I and euthanized 24 h after injection. Kidneys, liver, lungs, and spleen were surgically removed. The absorbed dose to the tissues was 0.1 to 9.7 mGy. Total RNA was extracted, and Illumina MouseRef-8 Whole-Genome Expression BeadChips (Illumina, Inc., San Diego, California, USA) were used to compare the gene expression of the irradiated tissues to that of non-irradiated controls. The Benjamini-Hochberg method was used to determine differentially expressed transcripts and control for false discovery rate. Only transcripts with a modulation of 1.5-fold or higher, either positively or negatively regulated, were included in the analysis. Results The number of transcripts affected ranged from 260 in the kidney cortex to 857 in the lungs. The majority of the affected transcripts were specific for the different absorbed doses delivered, and few transcripts were shared between the different tissues investigated. The response of the transcripts affected at all dose levels was generally found to be independent of dose, and only a few transcripts showed increasing or decreasing regulation with increasing absorbed dose. Few biological processes were affected at all absorbed dose levels studied or in all tissues studied. The types of biological processes affected were clearly tissue-dependent. Immune response was the only biological process affected in all tissues, and processes affected in more than three tissues were primarily associated with the response to stimuli and metabolism. Conclusion Despite the low absorbed doses delivered to the tissues investigated, a surprisingly strong response was observed. Affected biological processes were primarily associated with the normal function of the tissues, and only small deviations from the normal

  18. Expression of the human ETS-2 oncogene in normal fetal tissues and in the brain of a fetus with trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Baffico, M; Perroni, L; Rasore-Quartino, A; Scartezzini, P

    1989-10-01

    The expression of the ETS-2 proto-oncogene, located on chromosome 21, in normal fetal tissues and in neural tissue of a fetus affected by Down syndrome has been investigated. The results show that the ETS-2 proto-oncogene is expressed in almost all the tissues examined and that it is transcribed at constant levels in neural tissue between the 13th and 24th weeks. ETS-2 expression appeared to be slightly increased in Down syndrome brain compared with that of normal controls of the same gestational age.

  19. Expression of the human ETS-2 oncogene in normal fetal tissues and in the brain of a fetus with trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Baffico, M; Perroni, L; Rasore-Quartino, A; Scartezzini, P

    1989-10-01

    The expression of the ETS-2 proto-oncogene, located on chromosome 21, in normal fetal tissues and in neural tissue of a fetus affected by Down syndrome has been investigated. The results show that the ETS-2 proto-oncogene is expressed in almost all the tissues examined and that it is transcribed at constant levels in neural tissue between the 13th and 24th weeks. ETS-2 expression appeared to be slightly increased in Down syndrome brain compared with that of normal controls of the same gestational age. PMID:2529204

  20. Short- and Mid-term Effects of Irreversible Electroporation on Normal Renal Tissue: An Animal Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wendler, J. J. Porsch, M.; Huehne, S.; Baumunk, D.; Buhtz, P.; Fischbach, F.; Pech, M.; Mahnkopf, D.; Kropf, S.; Roessner, A.; Ricke, J.; Schostak, M.; Liehr, U.-B.

    2013-04-15

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel nonthermal tissue ablation technique by high current application leading to apoptosis without affecting extracellular matrix. Previous results of renal IRE shall be supplemented by functional MRI and differentiated histological analysis of renal parenchyma in a chronic treatment setting. Three swine were treated with two to three multifocal percutaneous IRE of the right kidney. MRI was performed before, 30 min (immediate-term), 7 days (short-term), and 28 days (mid-term) after IRE. A statistical analysis of the lesion surrounded renal parenchyma intensities was made to analyze functional differences depending on renal part, side and posttreatment time. Histological follow-up of cortex and medulla was performed after 28 days. A total of eight ablations were created. MRI showed no collateral damage of surrounded tissue. The highest visual contrast between lesions and normal parenchyma was obtained by T2-HR-SPIR-TSE-w sequence of DCE-MRI. Ablation zones showed inhomogeneous necroses with small perifocal edema in the short-term and sharp delimitable scars in the mid-term. MRI showed no significant differences between adjoined renal parenchyma around ablations and parenchyma of untreated kidney. Histological analysis demonstrated complete destruction of cortical glomeruli and tubules, while collecting ducts, renal calyxes, and pelvis of medulla were preserved. Adjoined kidney parenchyma around IRE lesions showed no qualitative differences to normal parenchyma of untreated kidney. This porcine IRE study reveals a multifocal renal ablation, while protecting surrounded renal parenchyma and collecting system over a mid-term period. That offers prevention of renal function ablating centrally located or multifocal renal masses.

  1. Distribution of trace elements in normal and diseased mouse ileum and kidney tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, B. J.; McArdle, H.; Danks, D. M.; Legge, G. J. F.

    1991-03-01

    A proton microprobe has been utilised to determine the distribution and relative concentration of Cu, Fe and Zn in 10 day old normal and brindled mouse small intestine and kidney tissues. High Cu levels were measured in the brindled mutant ileum and kidney tissues confirming previous whole tissue results. In the ileum, peripheral concentrations of both Fe and Cu in normal and mutant villi tips were observed. Ratios of X-ray yields from outer villus tip to inner villus tip irradiated areas were taken and compared for mutant and normal mice after normalising to the bremsstrahlung yield in each case. The ratio of outer to inner Fe concentrations in the epithelium were shown to be higher than normal in the diseased tissue. In the kidney, the high Cu concentration in the mutant tissue was found to be localised to within certain regions in the proximal tubule in the nephron. Accurate determination of the Cu distribution in the small intestine and kidney tissues of the mutant mouse will provide further information on where the defective reabsorption of Cu is occurring, and may contribute to a better understanding of the homologous human condition.

  2. Use of ImageJ software for histomorphometric evaluation of normal and severely affected canine ear canals.

    PubMed

    Zur, Gila; Klement, Eyal

    2015-10-01

    Morphological studies comparing normal and diseased ear canals use primarily subjective scoring. The aim of this study was to compare normal and severely affected ears in dogs with objective measurements using ImageJ software. Ear canals were harvested from cadavers with normal ears and from dogs that underwent total ear canal ablation for unresolved otitis. Histopathology samples from ear canals were evaluated by semi-quantitative scoring and also by using ImageJ-software for histomorphometric measurements. The normal ears were compared to the severely affected ears using the 2 methods. The 2 methods were significantly (P < 0.0001) correlated for epidermal hyperplasia, ceruminous gland dilation, and hyperplasia and tissue inflammation, which were significantly greater in the severely affected ears (P < 0.0001). This study demonstrated that there is a very high correlation between the 2 methods for the most markedly affected components of otitis externa and that ImageJ software can be efficiently used to measure and evaluate ear canal histomorphometry.

  3. Improved normal tissue protection by proton and X-ray microchannels compared to homogeneous field irradiation.

    PubMed

    Girst, S; Marx, C; Bräuer-Krisch, E; Bravin, A; Bartzsch, S; Oelfke, U; Greubel, C; Reindl, J; Siebenwirth, C; Zlobinskaya, O; Multhoff, G; Dollinger, G; Schmid, T E; Wilkens, J J

    2015-09-01

    The risk of developing normal tissue injuries often limits the radiation dose that can be applied to the tumour in radiation therapy. Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT), a spatially fractionated photon radiotherapy is currently tested at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) to improve normal tissue protection. MRT utilizes an array of microscopically thin and nearly parallel X-ray beams that are generated by a synchrotron. At the ion microprobe SNAKE in Munich focused proton microbeams ("proton microchannels") are studied to improve normal tissue protection. Here, we comparatively investigate microbeam/microchannel irradiations with sub-millimetre X-ray versus proton beams to minimize the risk of normal tissue damage in a human skin model, in vitro. Skin tissues were irradiated with a mean dose of 2 Gy over the irradiated area either with parallel synchrotron-generated X-ray beams at the ESRF or with 20 MeV protons at SNAKE using four different irradiation modes: homogeneous field, parallel lines and microchannel applications using two different channel sizes. Normal tissue viability as determined in an MTT test was significantly higher after proton or X-ray microchannel irradiation compared to a homogeneous field irradiation. In line with these findings genetic damage, as determined by the measurement of micronuclei in keratinocytes, was significantly reduced after proton or X-ray microchannel compared to a homogeneous field irradiation. Our data show that skin irradiation using either X-ray or proton microchannels maintain a higher cell viability and DNA integrity compared to a homogeneous irradiation, and thus might improve normal tissue protection after radiation therapy.

  4. Radioprotection by Macerated Extract of Nigella sativa in Normal Tissues of Fibrosarcoma Bearing Mice.

    PubMed

    Velho-Pereira, Reelma; Kumar, A; Pandey, B N; Mishra, K P; Jagtap, Aarti G

    2012-09-01

    The current study was undertaken to study the effect of a macerated extract of Nigella sativa seeds in normal as well as in tumour bearing mice against gamma radiation-induced cellular damage to normal tissues. This was done to mimic the clinical setting where in, normal tissues of cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy are exposed to the deleterious effects of radiation. The protection of cellular DNA was analysed in peripheral blood leucocytes of whole body irradiated mice following pretreatment with macerated extract of Nigella sativa seeds (100 mg/kg), using alkaline comet assay, and also estimating biochemical and blood parameters such as levels of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and protein oxidation in organs such as spleen, liver, brain and intestine haemoglobin and total leucocyte count, respectively. The results showed that the macerated extract of Nigella sativa seeds protected the liver, spleen, brain and intestines both in normal as well as tumour bearing mice. This study concludes that macerated extract of Nigella sativa seeds has protective effects against radiation-induced damage and biochemical alterations which could be attributed to the ability to scavenge free radicals and its antioxidant properties. Hence macerated extract of Nigella sativa seeds, could be used in combination with radiation to protect against oxidative stress in normal tissues and improving the quality of life of cancer patients by mitigating unwanted side effects of radiation in normal tissues.

  5. Radioprotection by Macerated Extract of Nigella sativa in Normal Tissues of Fibrosarcoma Bearing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Velho-Pereira, Reelma; Kumar, A.; Pandey, B. N.; Mishra, K. P.; Jagtap, Aarti G.

    2012-01-01

    The current study was undertaken to study the effect of a macerated extract of Nigella sativa seeds in normal as well as in tumour bearing mice against gamma radiation-induced cellular damage to normal tissues. This was done to mimic the clinical setting where in, normal tissues of cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy are exposed to the deleterious effects of radiation. The protection of cellular DNA was analysed in peripheral blood leucocytes of whole body irradiated mice following pretreatment with macerated extract of Nigella sativa seeds (100 mg/kg), using alkaline comet assay, and also estimating biochemical and blood parameters such as levels of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and protein oxidation in organs such as spleen, liver, brain and intestine haemoglobin and total leucocyte count, respectively. The results showed that the macerated extract of Nigella sativa seeds protected the liver, spleen, brain and intestines both in normal as well as tumour bearing mice. This study concludes that macerated extract of Nigella sativa seeds has protective effects against radiation-induced damage and biochemical alterations which could be attributed to the ability to scavenge free radicals and its antioxidant properties. Hence macerated extract of Nigella sativa seeds, could be used in combination with radiation to protect against oxidative stress in normal tissues and improving the quality of life of cancer patients by mitigating unwanted side effects of radiation in normal tissues. PMID:23716868

  6. Mechanisms of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity and implications for future clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Jenrow, Kenneth A.; Brown, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    To summarize current knowledge regarding mechanisms of radiation-induced normal tissue injury and medical countermeasures available to reduce its severity. Advances in radiation delivery using megavoltage and intensity-modulated radiation therapy have permitted delivery of higher doses of radiation to well-defined tumor target tissues. Injury to critical normal tissues and organs, however, poses substantial risks in the curative treatment of cancers, especially when radiation is administered in combination with chemotherapy. The principal pathogenesis is initiated by depletion of tissue stem cells and progenitor cells and damage to vascular endothelial microvessels. Emerging concepts of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity suggest that the recovery and repopulation of stromal stem cells remain chronically impaired by long-lived free radicals, reactive oxygen species, and pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines resulting in progressive damage after radiation exposure. Better understanding the mechanisms mediating interactions among excessive generation of reactive oxygen species, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and activated macrophages, and role of bone marrow-derived progenitor and stem cells may provide novel insight on the pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury of tissues. Further understanding the molecular signaling pathways of cytokines and chemokines would reveal novel targets for protecting or mitigating radiation injury of tissues and organs. PMID:25324981

  7. Alteration of proliferation and apoptotic markers in normal and premalignant tissue associated with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ananthanarayanan, Vijayalakshmi; Deaton, Ryan J; Yang, Ximing J; Pins, Michael R; Gann, Peter H

    2006-01-01

    Background Molecular markers identifying alterations in proliferation and apoptotic pathways could be particularly important in characterizing high-risk normal or pre-neoplastic tissue. We evaluated the following markers: Ki67, Minichromosome Maintenance Protein-2 (Mcm-2), activated caspase-3 (a-casp3) and Bcl-2 to determine if they showed differential expression across progressive degrees of intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer in the prostate. To identify field effects, we also evaluated whether high-risk expression patterns in normal tissue were more common in prostates containing cancer compared to those without cancer (supernormal), and in histologically normal glands adjacent to a cancer focus as opposed to equivalent glands that were more distant. Methods The aforementioned markers were studied in 13 radical prostatectomy (RP) and 6 cystoprostatectomy (CP) specimens. Tissue compartments representing normal, low grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (LGPIN), high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), as well as different grades of cancer were mapped on H&E slides and adjacent sections were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Normal glands within 1 mm distance of a tumor focus and glands beyond 5 mm were considered "near" and "far", respectively. Randomly selected nuclei and 40 × fields were scored by a single observer; basal and luminal epithelial layers were scored separately. Results Both Ki-67 and Mcm-2 showed an upward trend from normal tissue through HGPIN and cancer with a shift in proliferation from basal to luminal compartment. Activated caspase-3 showed a significant decrease in HGPIN and cancer compartments. Supernormal glands had significantly lower proliferation indices and higher a-casp3 expression compared to normal glands. "Near" normal glands had higher Mcm-2 indices compared to "far" glands; however, they also had higher a-casp3 expression. Bcl-2, which varied minimally in normal tissue, did not show any trend across

  8. Static jaw collimation settings to minimize radiation dose to normal brain tissue during stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Eun Young; Zhang Xin; Yan Yulong; Sharma, Sunil; Penagaricano, Jose; Moros, Eduardo; Corry, Peter

    2012-01-01

    At University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is performed by using a linear accelerator with an add-on micromultileaf collimator (mMLC). In our clinical setting, static jaws are automatically adapted to the furthest edge of the mMLC-defined segments with 2-mm (X jaw) and 5-mm (Y jaw) margin and the same jaw values are applied for all beam angles in the treatment planning system. This additional field gap between the static jaws and the mMLC allows additional radiation dose to normal brain tissue. Because a radiosurgery procedure consists of a single high dose to the planning target volume (PTV), reduction of unnecessary dose to normal brain tissue near the PTV is important, particularly for pediatric patients whose brains are still developing or when a critical organ, such as the optic chiasm, is near the PTV. The purpose of this study was to minimize dose to normal brain tissue by allowing minimal static jaw margin around the mMLC-defined fields and different static jaw values for each beam angle or arc. Dose output factors were measured with various static jaw margins and the results were compared with calculated doses in the treatment planning system. Ten patient plans were randomly selected and recalculated with zero static jaw margins without changing other parameters. Changes of PTV coverage, mean dose to predefined normal brain tissue volume adjacent to PTV, and monitor units were compared. It was found that the dose output percentage difference varied from 4.9-1.3% for the maximum static jaw opening vs. static jaw with zero margins. The mean dose to normal brain tissue at risk adjacent to the PTV was reduced by an average of 1.9%, with negligible PTV coverage loss. This dose reduction strategy may be meaningful in terms of late effects of radiation, particularly in pediatric patients. This study generated clinical knowledge and tools to consistently minimize dose to normal brain tissue.

  9. Positive and negative affect recognition in schizophrenia: a comparison with substance abuse and normal control subjects.

    PubMed

    Bell, M; Bryson, G; Lysaker, P

    1997-11-14

    This study had three aims: to compare a schizophrenia sample (n = 50) with a substance abuse (n = 25) and normal sample (n = 81) on affect recognition; to compare differences in their performance between positive and negative affect recognition; and to introduce a new videotape method of stimulus presentation. Subjects were asked to identify the predominant affect depicted in 21 5-10-s vignettes containing three trials of seven affect states. Results demonstrate significant group differences: normal subjects scored in the normal or mild range, substance abuse (s/a) subjects scored in the mild and moderate ranges, and the schizophrenia sample scored predominantly in the moderate to severe ranges. Accuracies were 92.3% for the normal sample, 77.2 for the s/a sample and 64.8 for the schizophrenia sample. Response dispersions were 97.6% for the schizophrenia group, 69% for the s/a sample and 38% in the normal sample. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed a group by type of affect interaction with schizophrenia subjects showing far greater differential impairment on negative affect recognition. Difficulty of item did not contribute to this difference. Test-retest reliability at 5 months for this new method was r = 0.76, and stability of categorization was very high over 5 months (weighted kappa = 0.93). These affect recognition deficits in schizophrenia are discussed as they relate to lateralization of brain function, high EE families, social skills impairment and implications for rehabilitation services. PMID:9463840

  10. Variability of glutathione S-transferase isoenzyme patterns in matched normal and cancer human breast tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, M K; Engqvist-Goldstein, A; Montali, J A; Wheatley, J B; Schmidt, D E; Kauvar, L M

    1994-01-01

    The determination of GST levels in blood has been proposed to a marker of tumour burden in general, whereas level of the P1 isoenzyme has been identified as a prognostic factor for breast-cancer patients receiving no adjuvant chemotherapy. Particular glutathione S-transferase (GST) isoenzymes differ in their substrate specificity, however, and their presence or absence might therefore account for the resistance of tumours to particular chemotherapeutic drugs, as already established for cultured cell lines. Determination of the GST isoenzyme profile of a cancer tissue could have prognostic value in the selection of treatment if the levels of expression/activity show a degree of variation comparable with that exhibited by actual patient responses. Using reversed-phase h.p.l.c. to quantify affinity-isolated GSTs, we have analysed full isoenzyme profiles in the first large sample of matched normal and cancer human tissues (18 breast-cancer patients). In no patients did the tumour tissues express any isoenzymes that were not found in normal breast tissue. In addition to the GSTs, another enzyme, identified as enoyl-CoA isomerase, was regularly found in breast tissue cytosol following elution from a hexyl-glutathione affinity column. In most cases, the average level of GST was substantially elevated in the cancer tissues above the levels in normal breast tissue from the same patient. Furthermore, the relative levels of the isoenzymes were substantially more variable in the cancer samples than in the normal breast tissue, providing a plausible mechanism for the well established variable response to treatment. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:7818489

  11. detrimentally affects tissue regeneration of Red Sea corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, Rael; Fine, Maoz

    2014-09-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) from rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is threatening the future of coral reef ecosystems. Mounting experimental evidence suggests that OA negatively impacts fundamental life functions of scleractinian corals, including growth and sexual reproduction. Although regeneration is regarded as a chief life function in scleractinian corals and essential to maintain the colony's integrity, the effect of OA on regeneration processes has not yet been investigated. To evaluate the effects of OA on regeneration, the common Indo-Pacific corals Porites sp., Favia favus, Acropora eurystoma, and Stylophora pistillata were inflicted with lesions (314-350 mm2, depending on species) and incubated in different pCO2: (1) ambient seawater (400 µatm, pH 8.1), (2) intermediate (1,800 µatm, pH 7.6), and (3) high (4,000 µatm, pH 7.3) for extended periods of time (60-120 d). While all coral species after 60 d had significantly higher tissue regeneration in ambient conditions as compared to the intermediate and high treatments, reduction in regeneration rate was more pronounced in the slow-growing massive Porites sp. and F. favus than the relatively fast-growing, branching S. pistillata and A. eurystoma. This coincided with reduced tissue biomass of Porites sp., F. favus, and A. eurystoma in higher pCO2, but not in S. pistillata. Porites sp., F. favus, and S. pistillata also experienced a decrease in Symbiodinium density in higher pCO2, while in A. eurystoma there was no change. We hypothesize that a lowered regenerative capacity under elevated pCO2 may be related to resource trade-offs, energy cost of acid/base regulation, and/or decrease in total energy budget. This is the first study to demonstrate that elevated pCO2 could have a compounding influence on coral regeneration following injury, potentially affecting the capacity of reef corals to recover following physical disturbance.

  12. Factors affecting visibility of a target tissue in histologic sections.

    PubMed

    McGavin, M D

    2014-01-01

    The objective of histologic techniques is to stain the subject with high specificity and high visibility. Visibility depends on the microscope's resolution and contrast and on the microscopist's skill at optimizing the microscope's image. It also depends on histotechnological factors, which include specificity and differentiation of the stain, density of background staining (particularly in silver stains), innate color, and grayscale contrasts of the dyes in the stains and color and density of the counterstain. If contrast is not optimal, the image should be evaluated on the basis of 2 types of contrast-color and grayscale. Complementary colors have maximum color contrast, and the color triangle is useful in the selection of a suitable counterstain. Grayscale contrast is a function of the density of a stain. If dyes capable of staining the target and backgrounds tissue do not have optimal color contrast, the only method of increasing contrast is to change the grayscale value of one of the stains, usually the counterstain. Colors can have a subconscious effect on a viewer. Depending on whether they are aesthetically pleasing, they may influence the rigor of and time spent on the histopathologic examination. Maximizing the specificity of stains such as hematoxylin, eosin, trichrome, and Luxol fast blue (LFB) depends on optimal differentiation. In differentiation of counterstains such as methylene blue in the Ziehl-Neelsen stain, its recommended density is conveniently expressed as a grayscale value. Independent evaluation of color and grayscale contrasts is very helpful in determining the cause of low contrast in an image. This review discusses aspects of the histotechnique affecting the visibility of tissue components.

  13. Differential expression of the urokinase receptor (CD87) in arthritic and normal synovial tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Szekanecz, Z; Haines, G K; Koch, A E

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR; CD87) exhibits a possible pathogenic role in rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. METHODS: A semiquantitative, indirect immunoperoxidase histochemical analysis was performed on frozen synovial tissue sections. The recently characterised monoclonal antibody 10G7 recognising transfectants bearing u-PAR was used. Synovial tissue was obtained from 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 10 patients with osteoarthritis, and four normal subjects. RESULTS: u-PAR was expressed on 70-90% of synovial tissue lining cells and subsynovial, interstitial macrophages from the arthritis patients, but only on a few myeloid cells from the normal subjects. It was also present on more endothelial cells from the rheumatoid and osteoarthritis patients, than from normal synovial tissue. CONCLUSIONS: Plasminogen activators are important in joint destruction underlying arthritis. The up-regulated expression of u-PAR in diseased versus normal synovial tissue suggests a role for this antigen in the inflammatory and angiogenic mechanisms underlying rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Images PMID:9215148

  14. Differentiation of cancerous and normal brain tissue using label free fluorescence and Stokes shift spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Wang, Leana; Liu, Cheng-hui; He, Yong; Yu, Xinguang; Cheng, Gangge; Wang, Peng; Shu, Cheng; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    In this report, optical biopsy was applied to diagnose human brain cancer in vitro for the identification of brain cancer from normal tissues by native fluorescence and Stokes shift spectra (SSS). 77 brain specimens including three types of human brain tissues (normal, glioma and brain metastasis of lung cancers) were studied. In order to observe spectral changes of fluorophores via fluorescence, the selected excitation wavelength of UV at 300 and 340 nm for emission spectra and a different Stokes Shift spectra with intervals Δλ = 40 nm were measured. The fluorescence spectra and SSS from multiple key native molecular markers, such as tryptophan, collagen, NADH, alanine, ceroid and lipofuscin were observed in normal and diseased brain tissues. Two diagnostic criteria were established based on the ratios of the peak intensities and peak position in both fluorescence and SSS spectra. It was observed that the ratio of the spectral peak intensity of tryptophan (340 nm) to NADH (440 nm) increased in glioma, meningioma (benign), malignant meninges tumor, and brain metastasis of lung cancer tissues in comparison with normal tissues. The ratio of the SS spectral peak (Δλ = 40 nm) intensities from 292 nm to 366 nm had risen similarly in all grades of tumors.

  15. Clinical observations of early and late normal tissue injury in patients receiving fast neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ornitz, R.D.; Bradley, E.W.; Mossman, K.L.; Fender, F.M.; Schell, M.C.; Rogers, C.C.

    1980-03-01

    This communication describes early and late normal tissue effects in 177 patients treated totally or in part by 15 MeV neutrons from the Naval Research Laboratory Cyclotron in Washington, D.C. between October 1973 and December 1976. Late normal tissue reactions were found to be greater than would be expected from careful observation of the early clinical responses to neutron treatment. Neutron prescriptions must be written based on the late effect tolerance level experience which is being accumulated at several neutron therapy facilities.

  16. Tumor Cell Response to Synchrotron Microbeam Radiation Therapy Differs Markedly From Cells in Normal Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Anderson, Robin L.; Rothkamm, Kai; Restall, Christina M.; Cann, Leonie; Ruwanpura, Saleela; Meachem, Sarah; Yagi, Naoto; Svalbe, Imants; Lewis, Robert A.; Williams, Bryan R.G.; Rogers, Peter A.W.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) can be effective at destroying tumors in animal models while causing very little damage to normal tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular processes behind this observation of potential clinical importance. Methods and Materials: MRT was performed using a lattice of 25 {mu}m-wide, planar, polychromatic, kilovoltage X-ray microbeams, with 200-{mu}m peak separation. Inoculated EMT-6.5 tumor and normal mouse skin tissues were harvested at defined intervals post-MRT. Immunohistochemical detection of {gamma}-H2AX allowed precise localization of irradiated cells, which were also assessed for proliferation and apoptosis. Results: MRT significantly reduced tumor cell proliferation by 24 h post-irradiation (p = 0.002). An unexpected finding was that within 24 h of MRT, peak and valley irradiated zones were indistinguishable in tumors because of extensive cell migration between the zones. This was not seen in MRT-treated normal skin, which appeared to undergo a coordinated repair response. MRT elicited an increase in median survival times of EMT-6.5 and 67NR tumor-inoculated mice similar to that achieved with conventional radiotherapy, while causing markedly less normal tissue damage. Conclusions: This study provides evidence of a differential response at a cellular level between normal and tumor tissues after synchrotron MRT.

  17. Survivin expression in breast lobular carcinoma: correlations with normal breast tissue and clinicomorphological parameters.

    PubMed

    Adamkov, Marian; Výbohová, Desanka; Horáček, Jaroslav; Kovalská, Mária; Furjelová, Martina

    2013-06-01

    The antiapoptotic protein survivin is rarely expressed in normal adult differentiated tissues, but it is often detected in their malignant counterparts. Immunohistochemically, we evaluated survivin expression in 19 cases of normal breast tissue and 64 cases of lobular breast carcinoma. The intensity of staining, percentage of labeled cells and subcellular location of survivin were assessed. We analyzed the quantitative differences of survivin expression between normal breast tissue and carcinomas. We also correlated survivin expression pattern in carcinomas with clinicomorphological parameters such as age of patients, grade, stage and size of primary tumor, lymph node metastasis, vascular invasion as well as estrogen and progesterone status. Survivin was detected in 10/19 cases of normal breast tissue (52.6%) and in 55/64 cases of lobular breast carcinoma (86%). The statistical analysis confirmed significant correlations between the assessed parameters in normal breast and lobular carcinoma. Furthermore, the expression of estrogen correlated significantly with the subcellular localization and intensity of survivin in carcinoma. However, no significant correlation was shown with regard to other clinicomorphological parameters. Our results suggest that survivin may be a valuable diagnostic marker, as well as a new independent prognostic parameter, in lobular breast carcinoma. Finally, our data support the hypothesis that lobular and ductal breast carcinomas seem to be different clinicomorphological entities.

  18. Probability-based differential normalized fluorescence bivariate analysis for the classification of tissue autofluorescence spectra.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gufeng; Platz, Charles P; Geng, M Lei

    2006-05-01

    Differential normalized fluorescence (DNF) is an efficient and effective method for the differentiation of normal and cancerous tissue fluorescence spectra. The diagnostic features are extracted from the difference between the averaged cancerous and averaged normal tissue spectra and used as indices in tissue classification. In this paper, a new method, probability-based DNF bivariate analysis, is introduced based on the univariate DNF method. Two differentiation features are used concurrently in the new method to achieve better classification accuracy. The probability of each sample belonging to a disease state is determined with Bayes decision theory. This probability approach classifies the tissue spectra according to disease states and provides uncertainty information on classification. With a data set of 57 colonic tissue sites, probability-based DNF bivariate analysis is demonstrated to improve the accuracy of cancer diagnosis. The bivariate DNF analysis only requires the collection of a few data points across the entire emission spectrum and has the potential of improving data acquisition speed in tissue imaging.

  19. Immunohistochemical study of tissue factor expression in normal intestine and idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    More, L; Sim, R; Hudson, M; Dhillon, A P; Pounder, R; Wakefield, A J

    1993-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate the localisation of tissue factor expression in normal and inflamed intestine. METHODS--Serial cryostat sections of tissue taken from patients with Crohn's disease (n = 8), ulcerative colitis (n = 5), and from controls (n = 5) were stained with haematoxylin and eosin and immunostained for tissue factor, collagen type IV, fibrinogen and platelet glycoprotein IIIa. RESULTS--In control tissues tissue factor was present as a continuous layer along the epithelial basal lamina: sections from controls did not immunostain for fibrinogen or platelets. In non-ulcerated inflamed mucosa, tissue factor staining intensified in cases of Crohn's disease and was associated with fibrin deposition. Staining for tissue factor was either patchy or absent in cases of ulcerative colitis and there was no fibrin deposition. This change accompanied the early destruction of the epithelial basal lamina in ulcerative colitis that was not seen in Crohn's disease. In both diseases tissue factor expression in severely inflamed and ulcerated mucosa was present on lamina propria macrophages and vascular endothelium and was associated with fibrin or platelet thrombi. In three of eight cases of Crohn's disease tissue factor expression and thrombi were evident in areas of submucosal vasculitis. These were not seen in adjacent normal vessels. CONCLUSIONS--These observations are consistent with a tissue factor haemostatic barrier in the intestine: this barrier seems to be incomplete or defective in ulcerative colitis. Tissue factor expression by macrophages and endothelial cells may be important, particularly in the microvascular thrombosis and induration which are characteristic of Crohn's disease. Images PMID:8408693

  20. Comparable Low-Level Mosaicism in Affected and Non Affected Tissue of a Complex CDH Patient

    PubMed Central

    Veenma, Danielle; Beurskens, Niels; Douben, Hannie; Eussen, Bert; Noomen, Petra; Govaerts, Lutgarde; Grijseels, Els; Lequin, Maarten; de Krijger, Ronald; Tibboel, Dick; de Klein, Annelies; Van Opstal, Dian

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the detailed clinical and cytogenetic analysis of a prenatally detected complex Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) patient with a mosaic unbalanced translocation (5;12). High-resolution whole genome SNP array confirmed a low-level mosaicism (20%) in uncultured cells, underlining the value of array technology for identification studies. Subsequently, targeted Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization in postmortem collected tissues demonstrated a similar low-level mosaicism, independently of the affected status of the tissue. Thus, a higher incidence of the genetic aberration in affected organs as lung and diaphragm cannot explain the severe phenotype of this complex CDH patient. Comparison with other described chromosome 5p and 12p anomalies indicated that half of the features presented in our patient (including the diaphragm defect) could be attributed to both chromosomal areas. In contrast, a few features such as the palpebral downslant, the broad nasal bridge, the micrognathia, microcephaly, abnormal dermatoglyphics and IUGR better fitted the 5p associated syndromes only. This study underlines the fact that low-level mosaicism can be associated with severe birth defects including CDH. The contribution of mosaicism to human diseases and specifically to congenital anomalies and spontaneous abortions becomes more and more accepted, although its phenotypic consequences are poorly described phenomena leading to counseling issues. Therefore, thorough follow–up of mosaic aberrations such as presented here is indicated in order to provide genetic counselors a more evidence based prediction of fetal prognosis in the future. PMID:21203572

  1. Is Bone Tissue Really Affected by Swimming? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Bruton, Alejandro; Gónzalez-Agüero, Alejandro; Gómez-Cabello, Alba; Casajús, José A.; Vicente-Rodríguez, Germán

    2013-01-01

    Background Swimming, a sport practiced in hypogravity, has sometimes been associated with decreased bone mass. Aim This systematic review aims to summarize and update present knowledge about the effects of swimming on bone mass, structure and metabolism in order to ascertain the effects of this sport on bone tissue. Methods A literature search was conducted up to April 2013. A total of 64 studies focusing on swimmers bone mass, structure and metabolism met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Results It has been generally observed that swimmers present lower bone mineral density than athletes who practise high impact sports and similar values when compared to sedentary controls. However, swimmers have a higher bone turnover than controls resulting in a different structure which in turn results in higher resistance to fracture indexes. Nevertheless, swimming may become highly beneficial regarding bone mass in later stages of life. Conclusion Swimming does not seem to negatively affect bone mass, although it may not be one of the best sports to be practised in order to increase this parameter, due to the hypogravity and lack of impact characteristic of this sport. Most of the studies included in this review showed similar bone mineral density values in swimmers and sedentary controls. However, swimmers present a higher bone turnover than sedentary controls that may result in a stronger structure and consequently in a stronger bone. PMID:23950908

  2. Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, Hiram A.; Barthold, H. Joseph; O'Meara, Elizabeth; Bosch, Walter R.; El Naqa, Issam; Al-Lozi, Rawan; Rosenthal, Seth A.; Lawton, Colleen; Lee, W. Robert; Sandler, Howard; Zietman, Anthony; Myerson, Robert; Dawson, Laura A.; Willett, Christopher; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Ryu, Janice; and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

  3. Differential expression of cytochrome P450 enzymes in normal and tumor tissues from childhood rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Molina-Ortiz, Dora; Camacho-Carranza, Rafael; González-Zamora, José Francisco; Shalkow-Kalincovstein, Jaime; Cárdenas-Cardós, Rocío; Ností-Palacios, Rosario; Vences-Mejía, Araceli

    2014-01-01

    Intratumoral expression of genes encoding Cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP) might play a critical role not only in cancer development but also in the metabolism of anticancer drugs. The purpose of this study was to compare the mRNA expression patterns of seven representative CYPs in paired tumor and normal tissue of child patients with rabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Using real time quantitative RT-PCR, the gene expression pattern of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2E1, CYP2W1, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5 were analyzed in tumor and adjacent non-tumor tissues from 13 child RMS patients. Protein concentration of CYPs was determined using Western blot. The expression levels were tested for correlation with the clinical and pathological data of the patients. Our data showed that the expression levels of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 were negligible. Elevated expression of CYP1B1 mRNA and protein was detected in most RMS tumors and adjacent normal tissues. Most cancerous samples exhibit higher levels of both CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 compared with normal tissue samples. Expression of CYP2E1 mRNA was found to be significantly higher in tumor tissue, however no relation was found with protein levels. CYP2W1 mRNA and/or protein are mainly expressed in tumors. In conclusion, we defined the CYP gene expression profile in tumor and paired normal tissue of child patients with RMS. The overexpression of CYP2W1, CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 in tumor tissues suggests that they may be involved in RMS chemoresistance; furthermore, they may be exploited for the localized activation of anticancer prodrugs.

  4. Differential expression of cytochrome P450 enzymes in normal and tumor tissues from childhood rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Molina-Ortiz, Dora; Camacho-Carranza, Rafael; González-Zamora, José Francisco; Shalkow-Kalincovstein, Jaime; Cárdenas-Cardós, Rocío; Ností-Palacios, Rosario; Vences-Mejía, Araceli

    2014-01-01

    Intratumoral expression of genes encoding Cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP) might play a critical role not only in cancer development but also in the metabolism of anticancer drugs. The purpose of this study was to compare the mRNA expression patterns of seven representative CYPs in paired tumor and normal tissue of child patients with rabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Using real time quantitative RT-PCR, the gene expression pattern of CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2E1, CYP2W1, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5 were analyzed in tumor and adjacent non-tumor tissues from 13 child RMS patients. Protein concentration of CYPs was determined using Western blot. The expression levels were tested for correlation with the clinical and pathological data of the patients. Our data showed that the expression levels of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 were negligible. Elevated expression of CYP1B1 mRNA and protein was detected in most RMS tumors and adjacent normal tissues. Most cancerous samples exhibit higher levels of both CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 compared with normal tissue samples. Expression of CYP2E1 mRNA was found to be significantly higher in tumor tissue, however no relation was found with protein levels. CYP2W1 mRNA and/or protein are mainly expressed in tumors. In conclusion, we defined the CYP gene expression profile in tumor and paired normal tissue of child patients with RMS. The overexpression of CYP2W1, CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 in tumor tissues suggests that they may be involved in RMS chemoresistance; furthermore, they may be exploited for the localized activation of anticancer prodrugs. PMID:24699256

  5. Reliability of Quantitative Ultrasonic Assessment of Normal-Tissue Toxicity in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Emi J.; Chen Hao; Torres, Mylin; Andic, Fundagul; Liu Haoyang; Chen Zhengjia; Sun, Xiaoyan; Curran, Walter J.; Liu Tian

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: We have recently reported that ultrasound imaging, together with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC), can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicity. This study's purpose is to evaluate the reliability of our quantitative ultrasound technology in assessing acute and late normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy. Method and Materials: Our ultrasound technique analyzes radiofrequency echo signals and provides quantitative measures of dermal, hypodermal, and glandular tissue toxicities. To facilitate easy clinical implementation, we further refined this technique by developing a semiautomatic ultrasound-based toxicity assessment tool (UBTAT). Seventy-two ultrasound studies of 26 patients (720 images) were analyzed. Images of 8 patients were evaluated for acute toxicity (<6 months postradiotherapy) and those of 18 patients were evaluated for late toxicity ({>=}6 months postradiotherapy). All patients were treated according to a standard radiotherapy protocol. To assess intraobserver reliability, one observer analyzed 720 images in UBTAT and then repeated the analysis 3 months later. To assess interobserver reliability, three observers (two radiation oncologists and one ultrasound expert) each analyzed 720 images in UBTAT. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate intra- and interobserver reliability. Ultrasound assessment and clinical evaluation were also compared. Results: Intraobserver ICC was 0.89 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.96 for glandular tissue toxicity. Interobserver ICC was 0.78 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.94 for glandular tissue toxicity. Statistical analysis found significant changes in dermal (p < 0.0001), hypodermal (p = 0.0027), and glandular tissue (p < 0.0001) assessments in the acute toxicity group. Ultrasound measurements correlated with clinical Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scores of patients

  6. XMS: Cross-Platform Normalization Method for Multimodal Mass Spectrometric Tissue Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golf, Ottmar; Muirhead, Laura J.; Speller, Abigail; Balog, Júlia; Abbassi-Ghadi, Nima; Kumar, Sacheen; Mróz, Anna; Veselkov, Kirill; Takáts, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a proof of concept cross-platform normalization approach to convert raw mass spectra acquired by distinct desorption ionization methods and/or instrumental setups to cross-platform normalized analyte profiles. The initial step of the workflow is database driven peak annotation followed by summarization of peak intensities of different ions from the same molecule. The resulting compound-intensity spectra are adjusted to a method-independent intensity scale by using predetermined, compound-specific normalization factors. The method is based on the assumption that distinct MS-based platforms capture a similar set of chemical species in a biological sample, though these species may exhibit platform-specific molecular ion intensity distribution patterns. The method was validated on two sample sets of (1) porcine tissue analyzed by laser desorption ionization (LDI), desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), and rapid evaporative ionization mass spectrometric (REIMS) in combination with Fourier transformation-based mass spectrometry; and (2) healthy/cancerous colorectal tissue analyzed by DESI and REIMS with the latter being combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We demonstrate the capacity of our method to reduce MS-platform specific variation resulting in (1) high inter-platform concordance coefficients of analyte intensities; (2) clear principal component based clustering of analyte profiles according to histological tissue types, irrespective of the used desorption ionization technique or mass spectrometer; and (3) accurate "blind" classification of histologic tissue types using cross-platform normalized analyte profiles.

  7. Analysis of IMP3 expression in normal and neoplastic human pituitary tissues.

    PubMed

    Righi, Alberto; Zhang, Shuya; Jin, Long; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Kovacs, Kalman; Kovacs, Gabor; Goth, Miklos I; Korbonits, Marta; Lloyd, Ricardo V

    2010-03-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 3 (IMP3) is an oncofetal protein highly expressed in fetal tissue and malignant tumors but rarely found in adult benign tissues. In various tumors, IMP3 expression is correlated with increased tumor aggressiveness and reduced overall survival. To our knowledge, IMP3 expression has not been investigated in pituitary tumors. We analyzed the immunohistochemical expression of IMP3 in five normal pituitary tissues and 75 pituitary tumors (64 adenomas and 11 carcinomas) to determine if specific tumor types expressed IMP3 and if there were differences in IMP3 expression between adenomas and carcinomas. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that IMP3 was positive in four (80%) normal pituitaries with focal stain in a subset of normal anterior pituitary cells. IMP3 was expressed in 31% (20/64) of adenomas and in 36% (4/11) of carcinomas. A slightly higher level of IMP3 expression was observed in PRL-GH-TSH adenomas compared to the other types of pituitary adenomas. Expression of IMP3 was not significantly higher in carcinomas than in adenomas (p = 0.737). RT-PCR and Western Blotting supported the heterogeneous expression of IMP3. These results indicate that IMP3 is expressed both in normal and in neoplastic pituitary gland tissues without significant differences in expression levels in pituitary carcinomas. PMID:19898970

  8. Classification of normal and malignant human gastric mucosa tissue with confocal Raman microspectroscopy and wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yaogai; Shen, Aiguo; Jiang, Tao; Ai, Yong; Hu, Jiming

    2008-02-01

    Thirty-two samples from the human gastric mucosa tissue, including 13 normal and 19 malignant tissue samples were measured by confocal Raman microspectroscopy. The low signal-to-background ratio spectra from human gastric mucosa tissues were obtained by this technique without any sample preparation. Raman spectral interferences include a broad featureless sloping background due to fluorescence and noise. They mask most Raman spectral feature and lead to problems with precision and quantitation of the original spectral information. A preprocessed algorithm based on wavelet analysis was used to reduce noise and eliminate background/baseline of Raman spectra. Comparing preprocessed spectra of malignant gastric mucosa tissues with those of counterpart normal ones, there were obvious spectral changes, including intensity increase at ˜1156 cm -1 and intensity decrease at ˜1587 cm -1. The quantitative criterion based upon the intensity ratio of the ˜1156 and ˜1587 cm -1 was extracted for classification of the normal and malignant gastric mucosa tissue samples. This could result in a new diagnostic method, which would assist the early diagnosis of gastric cancer.

  9. Normalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuevas, Eduardo J.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses cornerstone of Montessori theory, normalization, which asserts that if a child is placed in an optimum prepared environment where inner impulses match external opportunities, the undeviated self emerges, a being totally in harmony with its surroundings. Makes distinctions regarding normalization, normalized, and normality, indicating how…

  10. General properties of different models used to predict normal tissue complications due to radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kuperman, V. Y.

    2008-11-15

    In the current study the author analyzes general properties of three different models used to predict normal tissue complications due to radiation: (1) Surviving fraction of normal cells in the framework of the linear quadratic (LQ) equation for cell kill, (2) the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model for normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and (3) generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD). For all considered cases the author assumes fixed average dose to an organ of interest. The author's goal is to establish whether maximizing dose uniformity in the irradiated normal tissues is radiobiologically beneficial. Assuming that NTCP increases with increasing overall cell kill, it is shown that NTCP in the LQ model is maximized for uniform dose. Conversely, NTCP in the LKB and gEUD models is always smaller for a uniform dose to a normal organ than that for a spatially varying dose if parameter n in these models is small (i.e., n<1). The derived conflicting properties of the considered models indicate the need for more studies before these models can be utilized clinically for plan evaluation and/or optimization of dose distributions. It is suggested that partial-volume irradiation can be used to establish the validity of the considered models.

  11. Gene expression profiling of normal thyroid tissue from patients with thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Melaccio, Assunta; Di Meo, Giovanna; Trino, Stefania; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Saltarella, Ilaria; Lamanuzzi, Aurelia; Morano, Annalisa; Gurrado, Angela; Pasculli, Alessandro; Lastilla, Gaetano; Musto, Pellegrino; Reale, Antonia; Dammacco, Franco; Vacca, Angelo; Testini, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression profiling (GEP) of normal thyroid tissue from 43 patients with thyroid carcinoma, 6 with thyroid adenoma, 42 with multinodular goiter, and 6 with Graves-Basedow disease was carried out with the aim of achieving a better understanding of the genetic mechanisms underlying the role of normal cells surrounding the tumor in the thyroid cancer progression. Unsupervised and supervised analyses were performed to compare samples from neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases. GEP and subsequent RT-PCR analysis identified 28 differentially expressed genes. Functional assessment revealed that they are involved in tumorigenesis and cancer progression. The distinct GEP is likely to reflect the onset and/or progression of thyroid cancer, its molecular classification, and the identification of new potential prognostic factors, thus allowing to pinpoint selective gene targets with the aim of realizing more precise preoperative diagnostic procedures and novel therapeutic approaches. STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE This study is focused on the gene expression profiling analysis followed by RT-PCR of normal thyroid tissues from patients with neoplastic and non-neoplastic thyroid diseases. Twenty-eight genes were found to be differentially expressed in normal cells surrounding the tumor in the thyroid cancer. The genes dysregulated in normal tissue samples from patients with thyroid tumors may represent new molecular markers, useful for their diagnostic, prognostic and possibly therapeutic implications. PMID:27105534

  12. Gene expression profiling of normal thyroid tissue from patients with thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ria, Roberto; Simeon, Vittorio; Melaccio, Assunta; Di Meo, Giovanna; Trino, Stefania; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Saltarella, Ilaria; Lamanuzzi, Aurelia; Morano, Annalisa; Gurrado, Angela; Pasculli, Alessandro; Lastilla, Gaetano; Musto, Pellegrino; Reale, Antonia; Dammacco, Franco; Vacca, Angelo; Testini, Mario

    2016-05-17

    Gene expression profiling (GEP) of normal thyroid tissue from 43 patients with thyroid carcinoma, 6 with thyroid adenoma, 42 with multinodular goiter, and 6 with Graves-Basedow disease was carried out with the aim of achieving a better understanding of the genetic mechanisms underlying the role of normal cells surrounding the tumor in the thyroid cancer progression. Unsupervised and supervised analyses were performed to compare samples from neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases. GEP and subsequent RT-PCR analysis identified 28 differentially expressed genes. Functional assessment revealed that they are involved in tumorigenesis and cancer progression. The distinct GEP is likely to reflect the onset and/or progression of thyroid cancer, its molecular classification, and the identification of new potential prognostic factors, thus allowing to pinpoint selective gene targets with the aim of realizing more precise preoperative diagnostic procedures and novel therapeutic approaches.This study is focused on the gene expression profiling analysis followed by RT-PCR of normal thyroid tissues from patients with neoplastic and non-neoplastic thyroid diseases. Twenty-eight genes were found to be differentially expressed in normal cells surrounding the tumor in the thyroid cancer. The genes dysregulated in normal tissue samples from patients with thyroid tumors may represent new molecular markers, useful for their diagnostic, prognostic and possibly therapeutic implications.

  13. Gene expression profiling of normal thyroid tissue from patients with thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ria, Roberto; Simeon, Vittorio; Melaccio, Assunta; Di Meo, Giovanna; Trino, Stefania; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Saltarella, Ilaria; Lamanuzzi, Aurelia; Morano, Annalisa; Gurrado, Angela; Pasculli, Alessandro; Lastilla, Gaetano; Musto, Pellegrino; Reale, Antonia; Dammacco, Franco; Vacca, Angelo; Testini, Mario

    2016-05-17

    Gene expression profiling (GEP) of normal thyroid tissue from 43 patients with thyroid carcinoma, 6 with thyroid adenoma, 42 with multinodular goiter, and 6 with Graves-Basedow disease was carried out with the aim of achieving a better understanding of the genetic mechanisms underlying the role of normal cells surrounding the tumor in the thyroid cancer progression. Unsupervised and supervised analyses were performed to compare samples from neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases. GEP and subsequent RT-PCR analysis identified 28 differentially expressed genes. Functional assessment revealed that they are involved in tumorigenesis and cancer progression. The distinct GEP is likely to reflect the onset and/or progression of thyroid cancer, its molecular classification, and the identification of new potential prognostic factors, thus allowing to pinpoint selective gene targets with the aim of realizing more precise preoperative diagnostic procedures and novel therapeutic approaches.This study is focused on the gene expression profiling analysis followed by RT-PCR of normal thyroid tissues from patients with neoplastic and non-neoplastic thyroid diseases. Twenty-eight genes were found to be differentially expressed in normal cells surrounding the tumor in the thyroid cancer. The genes dysregulated in normal tissue samples from patients with thyroid tumors may represent new molecular markers, useful for their diagnostic, prognostic and possibly therapeutic implications. PMID:27105534

  14. Immunohistochemical expression of tenascin in normal stomach tissue, gastric carcinomas and gastric carcinoma in lymph nodes.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Y.; Mori, M.; Kajiyama, K.; Haraguchi, Y.; Sasaki, O.; Sugimachi, K.

    1995-01-01

    The immunohistochemical expression of tenascin was examined in the normal adult mucosa of the stomach, primary tumours and lymph node metastases of gastric cancer patients. In normal gastric tissue tenascin was expressed in the muscularis mucosae, muscularis propria and vessel walls, however it was not expressed in either the mucosal connective tissue or the stromal tissue in the submucosal layer. In gastric cancer, tenascin was expressed in 35 of 85 primary tumours, and in 8 of 25 metastases in lymph nodes. Tenascin was located in the fibrous stroma surrounding foci of cancer. The expression of tenascin in the primary tumour did not correlate with the depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis or prognosis. Tenascin appears during the process of either malignant transformation or tumour progression in gastric cancer, and the positive expression of tenascin may be useful as a stromal marker for the early detection of gastric cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:7541237

  15. Tissue normalizing capacity as a key determinant of carcinogenesis: an in silico simulation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenhu

    2015-03-01

    A perturbed microenvironment is at the core of carcinogenesis. Here, we used a 2D cellular automata model to simulate how cancers are generated in epithelial tissue. We applied several mathematical rules to simulate tissue renewal and surrounding cell control. Under the simulation, we showed that the average value of surrounding normal cells could be an indicator for the tissue normalizing capacity (TNC). Further, we found the incidence of carcinogenesis correlated inversely with the TNC. Interestingly, we also found that multi-round mutagenesis could gradually disturb the TNC when compared to one-round mutagenesis: cancer incidence increased significantly compared to one-round mutagenesis. Our model suggests that the genetic alterations (mutations) by themselves were not sufficient to initiate cancer. The perturbation of TNC could be a key process leading to carcinogenesis.

  16. Time resolved optical biopsy spectroscopy of normal, benign and malignant tissues from NADH and FAD changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masilamani, V.; Das, B. B.; Secor, J.; AlSalhi, M.; Amer, S. B.; Farhat, K.; Rabah, D.; Alfano, R. R.

    2012-01-01

    Histo pathological examination is the gold standard to discriminate between benign and malignant growth of tissue. But this is invasive and stressful. Hence many non invasive imaging techniques, such as CT, MRI, PET, etc are employed, each having certain advantages and disadvantages. In this context optical biopsy is a newly emerging technique, since it employs non-ionizing radiation like light or laser, which could be shined directly or launched through optical fiber to reach any part of the body. This paper reports results of time resolved emission spectra of 24 excised tissue sample (normal control=12; benign=4; malignant=8) of breast and prostate, employing a 390nm, 100 fs, Ti-Sapphire laser pulses. The fluorescence decay times were measured using streak camera and fitted for single and bi- exponential decays with reliability of 97%. Our results show the distinct difference between normal, benign and malignant tissues attributed changes of NADH and FAD levels.

  17. Immunohistochemical Study of Expression of Sohlh1 and Sohlh2 in Normal Adult Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Liu, Ruihua; Su, Zhongxue; Zhang, Yuecun; Zhang, Wenfang; Liu, Xinyu; Wang, Fuwu; Guo, Yuji; Li, Chuangang; Hao, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The expression pattern of Sohlh1 (spermatogenesis and oogenesis specific basic helix-loop-helix 1) and Sohlh2 in mice has been reported in previous studies. Sohlh1 and Sohlh2 are specifically expressed in spermatogonia, prespermatogonia in male mice and oocytes of primordial and primary follicles in female mice. In this report, we studied the expression pattern of Sohlh1 and Sohlh2 in human adult tissues. Immunohistochemical staining of Sohlh1 and Sohlh2 was performed in 5 samples of normal ovaries and testes, respectively. The results revealed that Sohlh genes are not only expressed in oocytes and spermatogonia, but also in granular cells, theca cells, Sertoli cells and Leydig cells, and in smooth muscles of blood vessel walls. To further investigate the expression of Sohlh genes in other adult human tissues, we collected representative normal adult tissues developed from three embryonic germ layers. Compared with the expression in mice, Sohlhs exhibited a much more extensive expression pattern in human tissues. Sohlhs were detected in testis, ovary and epithelia developed from embryonic endoderm, ectoderm and tissues developed from embryonic mesoderm. Sohlh signals were found in spermatogonia, Sertoli cells and also Leydig cells in testis, while in ovary, the expression was mainly in oocytes of primordial and primary follicles, granular cells and theca cells of secondary follicles. Compared with Sohlh2, the expression of Sohlh1 was stronger and more extensive. Our study explored the expression of Sohlh genes in human tissues and might provide insights for functional studies of Sohlh genes. PMID:26375665

  18. Differences in leucocyte-endothelium interactions between normal and adenocarcinoma bearing tissues in response to radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, N. Z.; Ross, B. A.; Gulledge, C.; Klitzman, B.; Dodge, R.; Dewhirst, M. W.

    1994-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that the interaction between leucocytes and endothelial cells in tumour tissues is greatly diminished compared with normal tissues under several induced inflammatory conditions. Radiation has been reported to cause release of inflammatory mediators and to promote neutrophil adhesions to cultured endothelial monolayers. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that radiation would cause increased leucocyte rolling and adhesion in both tumour and normal tissues. We examined these two parameters in response to 6 Gy of gamma-radiation in mammary adenocarcinomas implanted into rat skinfold window chambers as well as normal (i.e. non-tumour-bearing) preparations. Leucocyte rolling and adhesion were measured in terms of flux of rolling leucocytes (F(rolling)) and density of adhering leucocytes (D(adhering)) in microvessels. F(rolling) and D(adhering) were measured in two groups of preparations: irradiated and control. In normal preparations, F(rolling) and D(adhering) were both increased significantly by radiation. In contrast, in adenocarcinoma-bearing preparations, F(rolling) and D(adhering) were either unchanged (in the tumour centre) or reduced (in tumour periphery and the normal tissue surrounding the tumour) by radiation. Radiation did not cause changes in haemodynamics in these preparations, thus the observed changes in leucocyte rolling and adhesion could not be accounted for by haemodynamic factors. These results indicate that: (1) in normal preparations, radiation could cause inflammation as manifested by increased leucocyte rolling and adhesion; and (2) in tumour-bearing preparations, radiation caused changes in the vascular surface properties such that they became less adhesive to leucocytes. Such differences in radiation response may have important implications for radiation therapy and provide new insights into the unique features of tumours. Images Figure 2 PMID:8180019

  19. Evaluation of algorithm methods for fluorescence spectra of cancerous and normal human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Wang, Wubao; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    The paper focus on the various algorithms on to unravel the fluorescence spectra by unmixing methods to identify cancerous and normal human tissues from the measured fluorescence spectroscopy. The biochemical or morphologic changes that cause fluorescence spectra variations would appear earlier than the histological approach; therefore, fluorescence spectroscopy holds a great promise as clinical tool for diagnosing early stage of carcinomas and other deceases for in vivo use. The method can further identify tissue biomarkers by decomposing the spectral contributions of different fluorescent molecules of interest. In this work, we investigate the performance of blind source un-mixing methods (backward model) and spectral fitting approaches (forward model) in decomposing the contributions of key fluorescent molecules from the tissue mixture background when certain selected excitation wavelength is applied. Pairs of adenocarcinoma as well as normal tissues confirmed by pathologist were excited by selective wavelength of 340 nm. The emission spectra of resected fresh tissue were used to evaluate the relative changes of collagen, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), and Flavin by various spectral un-mixing methods. Two categories of algorithms: forward methods and Blind Source Separation [such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA), and Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF)] will be introduced and evaluated. The purpose of the spectral analysis is to discard the redundant information which conceals the difference between these two types of tissues, but keep their diagnostically significance. The facts predicted by different methods were compared to the gold standard of histopathology. The results indicate that these key fluorophores within tissue, e.g. tryptophan, collagen, and NADH, and flavin, show differences of relative contents of fluorophores among different types of human cancer and normal tissues. The

  20. Stem cell origin differently affects bone tissue engineering strategies

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli-Belmonte, Monica; Teti, Gabriella; Salvatore, Viviana; Focaroli, Stefano; Orciani, Monia; Dicarlo, Manuela; Fini, Milena; Orsini, Giovanna; Di Primio, Roberto; Falconi, Mirella

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering approaches are encouraging for the improvement of conventional bone grafting technique drawbacks. Thanks to their self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation ability, stem cells are one of the major actors in tissue engineering approaches, and among these adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold a great promise for regenerative medicine strategies. Bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) are the first- identified and well-recognized stem cell population used in bone tissue engineering. Nevertheless, several factors hamper BM-MSC clinical application and subsequently, new stem cell sources have been investigated for these purposes. The fruitful selection and combination of tissue engineered scaffold, progenitor cells, and physiologic signaling molecules allowed the surgeon to reconstruct the missing natural tissue. On the basis of these considerations, we analyzed the capability of two different scaffolds, planned for osteochondral tissue regeneration, to modulate differentiation of adult stem cells of dissimilar local sources (i.e., periodontal ligament, maxillary periosteum) as well as adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), in view of possible craniofacial tissue engineering strategies. We demonstrated that cells are differently committed toward the osteoblastic phenotype and therefore, taking into account their specific features, they could be intriguing cell sources in different stem cell-based bone/periodontal tissue regeneration approaches. PMID:26441682

  1. Identification and Characterization of MicroRNAs in Normal Equine Tissues by Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-Chul; Lee, Seung-Woo; Ryu, Doug-Young; Cui, Feng-Ji; Bhak, Jong; Kim, Yongbaek

    2014-01-01

    The role of microRNAs (miRNAs) as a post-transcriptional gene regulator has been elucidated in a broad range of organisms including domestic animals. Characterization of miRNAs in normal tissues is an important step to investigate the functions of miRNAs in various physiological and pathological conditions. Using Illumina Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology, we identified a total of 292 known and 329 novel miRNAs in normal horse tissues including skeletal muscle, colon and liver. Distinct sets of miRNAs were differentially expressed in a tissue-specific manner. The miRNA genes were distributed across all the chromosomes except chromosomes 29 and 31 in the horse reference genome. In some chromosomes, multiple miRNAs were clustered and considered to be polycistronic transcript. A base composition analysis showed that equine miRNAs had a higher frequency of A+U than G+C. Furthermore, U tended to be more frequent at the 5′ end of miRNA sequences. This is the first experimental study that identifies and characterizes the global miRNA expression profile in normal horse tissues. The present study enriches the horse miRNA database and provides useful information for further research dissecting biological functions of miRNAs in horse. PMID:24695583

  2. Differentially Expressed miRNAs in Tumor, Adjacent, and Normal Tissues of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fei; Li, Rui; Chen, Zhenzhu; Shen, Yanting; Lu, Jiafeng; Xie, Xueying; Ge, Qinyu

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the major type of lung cancer. The aim of this study was to characterize the expression profiles of miRNAs in adenocarcinoma (AC), one major subtype of NSCLC. In this study, the miRNAs were detected in normal, adjacent, and tumor tissues by next-generation sequencing. Then the expression levels of differential miRNAs were quantified by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). In the results, 259, 401, and 389 miRNAs were detected in tumor, adjacent, and normal tissues of pooled AC samples, respectively. In addition, for the first time we have found that miR-21-5p and miR-196a-5p were gradually upregulated from normal to adjacent to tumor tissues; miR-218-5p was gradually downregulated with 2-fold or greater change in AC tissues. These 3 miRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. Lastly, we predicted target genes of these 3 miRNAs and enriched the potential functions and regulatory pathways. The aberrant miR-21-5p, miR-196a-5p, and miR-218-5p may become biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma. This research may be useful for lung adenocarcinoma diagnosis and the study of pathology in lung cancer. PMID:27247934

  3. Label-free discrimination of normal and pulmonary cancer tissues using multiphoton fluorescence ratiometric microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Wu, Ruei-Jr; Lin, Sung-Jan; Chen, Yang-Fang; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2010-07-01

    We performed multiphoton excited autofluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy for the distinction of normal, lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) specimens. In addition to morphological distinction, we derived quantitative metrics of cellular redox ratios for cancer discrimination. Specifically, the redox ratios of paired normal/SCC and normal/LAC specimens were found to be 0.53±0.05/0.41±0.06 and 0.56±0.02/0.35±0.06, respectively. The lower redox ratios in cancer specimens, indicating an increase in metabolic activity. These results show that the combination of morphological multiphoton imaging along with redox ratio indices can be used for the discrimination of normal and pulmonary cancer tissues.

  4. Isolation of alpha 1-protease inhibitor from human normal and malignant ovarian tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Bagdasarian, A; Wheeler, J; Stewart, G J; Ahmed, S S; Colman, R W

    1981-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are associated with normal and neoplastic tissues. Therefore protease inhibitors might also be involved in the control of cell function. alpha 1-protease antigen and antitryptic activity have been found in normal and neoplastic human ovarian homogenate. The inhibitor has been localized to ovarian stromal cells or tumor cells by immunoperoxidase staining. The protein was purified to apparent homogeneity as judged by alkaline gel and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel electrophoresis. Immunochemical studies revealed antigenic similarity of plasma alpha 1-protease inhibitor by double immunodiffusion and similar mobility on immunoelectrophoresis and two-dimensional electroimmunodiffusion. The molecular weight was similar to that described for plasma alpha 1-protease inhibitor: 60,000 by gel filtration and 53,500 by SDS electrophoresis. Furthermore, the phenotypic pattern as determined by acid starch gel electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation was PiMM, which is the predominant genetic variant in normal plasma alpha 1-protease inhibitor. An inhibitor ws isolated and purified from an ovarian carcinoma that exhibited functional, immunochemical, and physical similarity to the normal ovarian alpha 1-protease inhibitor. alpha 1-protease inhibitor from normal and malignant ovaries competitively inhibited bovine pancreatic trypsin at incubation times of 5 min at 30 degrees C. Inhibition constant (Ki) values were calculated at 0.67 and 0.51 inhibitory units, respectively. The alpha 1-protease inhibitor in malignant cells may be a factor in the control of proliferation in this tissue. Since ovulation is in part a proteolytic event, the alpha 1-protease inhibitor in ovarian cells may play a role in the control of this specialized tissue. Persistance of this protein in malignant ovarian tissue may be a vestige of its differentiated origin. Images PMID:6161137

  5. Treatment parameters affecting the response of normal brain to photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qun; Chopp, Michael; Dereski, Mary O.; Wilson, Brian C.; Patterson, Michael S.; Kessel, David; Heads, Larry; Hetzel, Fred W.

    1993-06-01

    Different aspects of photodynamic therapy in normal rat brain tissue have been studied, in an effort to understand and improve the dosimetry of this new modality in treatment of brain tumors. dosimetry parameters, including light energy dose, fluence rate and beam size, and drug dosage were studied. PDT induced lesion depth in brain was measured as a biological endpoint. Effective attenuation depth and absolute light fluence rate distribution under superficial irradiation were measured using invasive optical probes. Photosensitizer uptake was quantified using HPLC analysis. The results indicate that normal brain have a high intrinsic sensitivity to PDT treatment, based on the estimated photodynamic threshold.

  6. Accumulation of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Normal Tissues After Fractionated Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebe, Claudia E.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: There is increasing evidence that genetic factors regulating the recognition and/or repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are responsible for differences in radiosensitivity among patients. Genetically defined DSB repair capacities are supposed to determine patients' individual susceptibility to develop adverse normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. In a preclinical murine model, we analyzed the impact of different DSB repair capacities on the cumulative DNA damage in normal tissues during the course of fractionated irradiation. Material and Methods: Different strains of mice with defined genetic backgrounds (SCID{sup -/-} homozygous, ATM{sup -/-} homozygous, ATM{sup +/-}heterozygous, and ATM{sup +/+}wild-type mice) were subjected to single (2 Gy) or fractionated irradiation (5 x 2 Gy). By enumerating gammaH2AX foci, the formation and rejoining of DSBs were analyzed in organs representative of both early-responding (small intestine) and late-responding tissues (lung, kidney, and heart). Results: In repair-deficient SCID{sup -/-} and ATM{sup -/-}homozygous mice, large proportions of radiation-induced DSBs remained unrepaired after each fraction, leading to the pronounced accumulation of residual DNA damage after fractionated irradiation, similarly visible in early- and late-responding tissues. The slight DSB repair impairment of ATM{sup +/-}heterozygous mice was not detectable after single-dose irradiation but resulted in a significant increase in unrepaired DSBs during the fractionated irradiation scheme. Conclusions: Radiation-induced DSBs accumulate similarly in acute- and late-responding tissues during fractionated irradiation, whereas the whole extent of residual DNA damage depends decisively on the underlying genetically defined DSB repair capacity. Moreover, our data indicate that even minor impairments in DSB repair lead to exceeding DNA damage accumulation during fractionated irradiation and thus may have a significant impact on normal

  7. Stem Cell Therapies for the Treatment of Radiation-Induced Normal Tissue Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Benderitter, Marc; Caviggioli, Fabio; Chapel, Alain; Coppes, Robert P.; Guha, Chandan; Klinger, Marco; Malard, Olivier; Stewart, Fiona; Tamarat, Radia; Luijk, Peter Van

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Targeted irradiation is an effective cancer therapy but damage inflicted to normal tissues surrounding the tumor may cause severe complications. While certain pharmacologic strategies can temper the adverse effects of irradiation, stem cell therapies provide unique opportunities for restoring functionality to the irradiated tissue bed. Recent Advances: Preclinical studies presented in this review provide encouraging proof of concept regarding the therapeutic potential of stem cells for treating the adverse side effects associated with radiotherapy in different organs. Early-stage clinical data for radiation-induced lung, bone, and skin complications are promising and highlight the importance of selecting the appropriate stem cell type to stimulate tissue regeneration. Critical Issues: While therapeutic efficacy has been demonstrated in a variety of animal models and human trials, a range of additional concerns regarding stem cell transplantation for ameliorating radiation-induced normal tissue sequelae remain. Safety issues regarding teratoma formation, disease progression, and genomic stability along with technical issues impacting disease targeting, immunorejection, and clinical scale-up are factors bearing on the eventual translation of stem cell therapies into routine clinical practice. Future Directions: Follow-up studies will need to identify the best possible stem cell types for the treatment of early and late radiation-induced normal tissue injury. Additional work should seek to optimize cellular dosing regimes, identify the best routes of administration, elucidate optimal transplantation windows for introducing cells into more receptive host tissues, and improve immune tolerance for longer-term engrafted cell survival into the irradiated microenvironment. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21: 338–355. PMID:24147585

  8. Cardiovascular abnormalities with normal blood pressure in tissue kallikrein-deficient mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneton, Pierre; Bloch-Faure, May; Hagege, Albert A.; Ruetten, Hartmut; Huang, Wei; Bergaya, Sonia; Ceiler, Debbie; Gehring, Doris; Martins, Isabelle; Salmon, Georges; Boulanger, Chantal M.; Nussberger, Jürg; Crozatier, Bertrand; Gasc, Jean-Marie; Heudes, Didier; Bruneval, Patrick; Doetschman, Tom; Ménard, Joël; Alhenc-Gelas, François

    2001-02-01

    Tissue kallikrein is a serine protease thought to be involved in the generation of bioactive peptide kinins in many organs like the kidneys, colon, salivary glands, pancreas, and blood vessels. Low renal synthesis and urinary excretion of tissue kallikrein have been repeatedly linked to hypertension in animals and humans, but the exact role of the protease in cardiovascular function has not been established largely because of the lack of specific inhibitors. This study demonstrates that mice lacking tissue kallikrein are unable to generate significant levels of kinins in most tissues and develop cardiovascular abnormalities early in adulthood despite normal blood pressure. The heart exhibits septum and posterior wall thinning and a tendency to dilatation resulting in reduced left ventricular mass. Cardiac function estimated in vivo and in vitro is decreased both under basal conditions and in response to βadrenergic stimulation. Furthermore, flow-induced vasodilatation is impaired in isolated perfused carotid arteries, which express, like the heart, low levels of the protease. These data show that tissue kallikrein is the main kinin-generating enzyme in vivo and that a functional kallikrein-kinin system is necessary for normal cardiac and arterial function in the mouse. They suggest that the kallikrein-kinin system could be involved in the development or progression of cardiovascular diseases.

  9. Metabolic imaging in microregions of tumors and normal tissues with bioluminescence and photon counting

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Klieser, W.; Walenta, S.; Paschen, W.; Kallinowski, F.; Vaupel, P.

    1988-08-03

    A method has been developed for metabolic imaging on a microscopic level in tumors, tumor spheroids, and normal tissues. The technique makes it possible to determine the spatial distribution of glucose, lactate, and ATP in absolute terms at similar locations within tissues or cell aggregates. The substrate distributions are registered in serial cryostat sections from tissue cryobiopsies or from frozen spheroids with the use of bioluminescence reactions. The light emission is measured directly by a special imaging photon counting system enabling on-line image analysis. The technique has been applied to human breast cancer xenografts, to spheroids originating from a human colon adenocarcinoma, and to skeletal rat muscle. Preliminary data obtained indicate that heterogeneities in the substrate distributions measured are much more pronounced in tumors than in normal tissue. There was no obvious correlation among the three quantities measured at similar locations within the tissues. The distribution of ATP corresponded well with the histological structure of larger spheroids; values were low in the necrotic center and high in the viable rim of these cell aggregates.

  10. Static jaw collimation settings to minimize radiation dose to normal brain tissue during stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Han, Eun Young; Zhang, Xin; Yan, Yulong; Sharma, Sunil; Penagaricano, Jose; Moros, Eduardo; Corry, Peter

    2012-01-01

    At the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is performed by using a linear accelerator with an add-on micromultileaf collimator (mMLC). In our clinical setting, static jaws are automatically adapted to the furthest edge of the mMLC-defined segments with 2-mm (X jaw) and 5-mm (Y jaw) margin and the same jaw values are applied for all beam angles in the treatment planning system. This additional field gap between the static jaws and the mMLC allows additional radiation dose to normal brain tissue. Because a radiosurgery procedure consists of a single high dose to the planning target volume (PTV), reduction of unnecessary dose to normal brain tissue near the PTV is important, particularly for pediatric patients whose brains are still developing or when a critical organ, such as the optic chiasm, is near the PTV. The purpose of this study was to minimize dose to normal brain tissue by allowing minimal static jaw margin around the mMLC-defined fields and different static jaw values for each beam angle or arc. Dose output factors were measured with various static jaw margins and the results were compared with calculated doses in the treatment planning system. Ten patient plans were randomly selected and recalculated with zero static jaw margins without changing other parameters. Changes of PTV coverage, mean dose to predefined normal brain tissue volume adjacent to PTV, and monitor units were compared. It was found that the dose output percentage difference varied from 4.9-1.3% for the maximum static jaw opening vs. static jaw with zero margins. The mean dose to normal brain tissue at risk adjacent to the PTV was reduced by an average of 1.9%, with negligible PTV coverage loss. This dose reduction strategy may be meaningful in terms of late effects of radiation, particularly in pediatric patients. This study generated clinical knowledge and tools to consistently minimize dose to normal brain tissue.

  11. Normal Tissue Anatomy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: Contouring Variability and its Impact on Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Mary; Demiroz, Candan; Vineberg, Karen A.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Balter, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Although variability in target delineation has been studied in head and neck cancer, variability in normal tissue delineation has not. This study evaluated the variability of organ at risk (OAR) delineation and the resulting impact on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plan optimization. Methods and Materials An expert panel of three radiation oncologists jointly delineated OARs, including the parotid and submandibular glands (SM), pharyngeal constrictors (PC), larynx, and glottis (GL), in 10 patients with advanced oropharynx cancer in 3 contouring sessions, spaced at least 1 week apart. Contour variability and uncertainty, as well as their dosimetric impact on IMRT planning for each case, were assessed. Results The mean difference in total volume for each OAR was 1cm3 (σ 0.5). Mean fractional overlap was 0.7 (σ 0.1), and was highest (0.8) for the larynx and bilateral SMs and parotids, and lowest (0.5) for the PC. There were considerable spatial differences in contours, with the ipsilateral parotid and PC displaying the most variability (0.9 cm), which was most prominent in cases where tumors obliterated fat planes. Both SMs and the glottis had the smallest differences (0.5 cm). The mean difference in OAR dose was 0.9 Gy (range 0.6-1.1, σ0.1), with the smallest difference for the GL and largest for both SMs and the larynx. Conclusions Despite substantial difference in OAR contours, optimization was barely affected, with a 0.9 Gy mean difference between optimizations, suggesting relative insensitivity of dose distributions for IMRT of oropharynx cancer to the extent of OARs. PMID:22583602

  12. Pregnancy affects cellular activity, but not tissue mechanical properties, in the healing rabbit medial collateral ligament.

    PubMed

    Hart, D A; Reno, C; Frank, C B; Shrive, N G

    2000-05-01

    Recently, evidence has been accumulating that ligament and joint laxity is altered in women and rabbits during pregnancy. Furthermore, many female adolescents injure ligaments through participation in athletics and other activities. Therefore, to determine whether pregnancy has different effects on the injured and uninjured medial collateral ligament of the rabbit knee, we investigated cellular changes (mRNA levels) and alterations in tissue properties (biomechanics) accompanying pregnancy in animals with the medial collateral ligament injured during adolescence and bred for their primigravid pregnancy as young adults. Assessment of mRNA levels for matrix molecules, matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, growth factors and sex hormone receptors, inflammatory cytokines, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2 by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that pregnancy had different impacts on scar and uninjured tissue for six of 15 genes assessed. A pregnancy-associated increase in laxity of the medial collateral ligament was observed for rabbits in the uninjured primigravida group; however, no increase was observed for injured rabbits during pregnancy. The injured ligament was already significantly more lax than the normal counterpart, and pregnancy did not lead to additional laxity or prevent the normal decline in laxity as the scar matured in nonpregnant animals. These results indicate that the impact of pregnancy on laxity and cell activity of the medial collateral ligament is dependent on whether the ligament is uninjured or injured. Pregnancy had no significant effect on structural (stiffness and failure load), material (stress at failure and Young's modulus), or viscoelastic (cyclic and static relaxation) properties of tissue from uninjured or injured medial collateral ligament. Therefore, the properties of the healing ligament were not adversely affected during pregnancy in this

  13. Improving normal tissue complication probability models: the need to adopt a "data-pooling" culture.

    PubMed

    Deasy, Joseph O; Bentzen, Søren M; Jackson, Andrew; Ten Haken, Randall K; Yorke, Ellen D; Constine, Louis S; Sharma, Ashish; Marks, Lawrence B

    2010-03-01

    Clinical studies of the dependence of normal tissue response on dose-volume factors are often confusingly inconsistent, as the QUANTEC reviews demonstrate. A key opportunity to accelerate progress is to begin storing high-quality datasets in repositories. Using available technology, multiple repositories could be conveniently queried, without divulging protected health information, to identify relevant sources of data for further analysis. After obtaining institutional approvals, data could then be pooled, greatly enhancing the capability to construct predictive models that are more widely applicable and better powered to accurately identify key predictive factors (whether dosimetric, image-based, clinical, socioeconomic, or biological). Data pooling has already been carried out effectively in a few normal tissue complication probability studies and should become a common strategy.

  14. IMPROVING NORMAL TISSUE COMPLICATION PROBABILITY MODELS: THE NEED TO ADOPT A “DATA-POOLING” CULTURE

    PubMed Central

    Deasy, Joseph O.; Bentzen, Søren M.; Jackson, Andrew; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Yorke, Ellen D.; Constine, Louis S.; Sharma, Ashish; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical studies of the dependence of normal tissue response on dose-volume factors are often confusingly inconsistent, as the QUANTEC reviews demonstrate. A key opportunity to accelerate progress is to begin storing high-quality datasets in repositories. Using available technology, multiple repositories could be conveniently queried, without divulging protected health information, to identify relevant sources of data for further analysis. After obtaining institutional approvals, data could then be pooled, greatly enhancing the capability to construct predictive models that are more widely applicable and better powered to accurately identify key predictive factors (whether dosimetric, image-based, clinical, socioeconomic, or biological). Data pooling has already been carried out effectively in a few normal tissue complication probability studies and should become a common strategy. PMID:20171511

  15. Quantitative radiation dose-response relationships for normal tissues in man - I. Gustatory tissues response during photon and neutron radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mossman, K.L.

    1982-08-01

    Quantitative radiation dose-response curves for normal gustatory tissue in man were studied. Taste function, expressed as taste loss, was evaluated in 84 patients who were given either photon or neutron radiotherapy for tumors in the head and neck region. Patients were treated to average tumor doses of 6600 cGy (photon) or 2200 cGy intervals for photon patients and 320-cGy intervals for neutron patients during radiotherapy. The dose-response curves for photons and neutrons were analyzed by fitting a four-parameter logistic equation to the data. Photon and neutron curves differed principally in their relative position along the dose axis. Comparison of the dose-response curves were made by determination of RBE. At 320 cGy, the lowest neutron dose at which taste measurements were made, RBE = 5.7. If this RBE is correct, then the therapeutic gain factor may be equal to or less than 1, indicating no biological advantage in using neutrons over photons for this normal tissue. These studies suggest measurements of taste function and evaluation of dose-response relationships may also be useful in quantitatively evaluating the efficacy of chemical modifiers of radiation response such as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers and radioprotectors.

  16. Preparation of normal and ischemic myocardial tissue for scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, M

    1982-01-01

    Normal and ischemic myocardium was prepared by slicing and cryofracture techniques for examination with the SEM. The tissues were dehydrated in ethanol and Freon 113 (slicing method) or were cryofractured in Freon 113 cooled with liquid nitrogen, followed by critical point drying and coating with gold and palladium. Some osmicated tissue pieces were treated with thiocarbohydrazide for examination without metal coating. Some hearts were infiltrated with silver particles and were examined with backscattered electron imaging technique (BSI). The cryofractured tissue provided the most useful and consistent surface features of the cell organelles with a minimum of mechanical disorder compared to other methods. Although the myocardium prepared by slicing method revealed the interior of the cells, it contained several frayed edges and loose myofibrils making interpretation of the ischemic myocardium difficult. The normal cells exhibited myofibrils covered by transverse tubules at the level of Z bands as confirmed by BSI using silver particles as an extracellular tracer and numerous oval to elongated mitochondria located between the myofibrils. An extensive network of tubules (sarcoplasmic reticulum) over the sarcomeres and nuclei were observed. The changes observed by SEM in the ischemic hearts were consistent with those seen in TEM. With prolonged coronary ligation the changes became obvious. The T-tubules were often broken and nuclei were distorted. The myofibrils were disorganized and formed homogeneous bands. These SEM studies suggest that myocardium prepared by cryofracture technique yields information on normal and ischemic cell structure consistent with data obtained by TEM. PMID:7167767

  17. Healing following implantation of periodontitis affected roots into bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Karring, T; Nyman, S; Lindhe, J

    1980-04-01

    The aim of the present experiment was to study whether new connective tissue attachment can occur to root surfaces which have been exposed to the oral environment and subsequently implanted into bone tissue. Twelve teeth in three beagle dogs were subjected to progressive periodontal breakdown to half the root length by placing cotton floss ligatures around the neck of the teeth. Following crown resection and root hemisection, the teeth were root filled and the roots thoroughly scaled and planed. Each root was extracted and implanted into bone cavities prepared in edentolous areas of the jaws in such a way that epithelial migration into the wound and bacterial infection were prevented during healing. Root implantation and sacrifice of the animals were scheduled to allow for observation periods of 1, 2 and 3 months. The results demonstrated that new connective tissue attachment did not occur to root surfaces which had been exposed to the oral environment, but healing was characterized by repair phenomena, i.e. mainly root resorption and ankylosis. In those areas of the roots where periodontal ligament tissue was preserved following tooth extraction, a functionally oriented attachment apparatus was reformed. The results indicate that in addition to apical migration of junctional epithelium and regrowth of subgingival plaque, the type of cells which repopulate the wound area may jeopardize new connective tissue attachment.

  18. Normal Echocardiographic Measurements in a Korean Population Study: Part II. Doppler and Tissue Doppler Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin-Oh; Shin, Mi-Seung; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Jung, Hae Ok; Park, Jeong Rang; Sohn, Il Suk; Kim, Hyungseop; Park, Seong-Mi; Yoo, Nam Jin; Choi, Jung Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Lee, Mi-Rae; Park, Jin-Sun; Shim, Chi Young; Kim, Dae-Hee; Shin, Dae-Hee; Shin, Gil Ja; Shin, Sung Hee; Kim, Kye Hun; Park, Jae-Hyeong; Lee, Sang Yeub; Kim, Woo-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemodynamic and functional evaluation with Doppler and tissue Doppler study as a part of comprehensive echocardiography is essential but normal reference values have never been reported from Korean normal population especially according to age and sex. Methods Using Normal echOcaRdiographic Measurements in a KoreAn popuLation study subjects, we obtained normal reference values for Doppler and tissue Doppler echocardiography including tricuspid annular velocities according to current guidelines and compared values according to gender and age groups. Results Mitral early diastolic (E) and late diastolic (A) velocity as well as E/A ratio were significantly higher in women compared to those in men. Conversely, mitral peak systolic and late diastolic annular velocity in both septal and lateral mitral annulus were significantly lower in women compared to those in men. However, there were no significant differences in both septal and lateral mitral early diastolic annular (e') velocity between men and women. In both men and women, mitral E velocity and its deceleration time as well as both E/A and E/e' ratio considerably increased with age. There were no significant differences in tricuspid inflow velocities and tricuspid lateral annular velocities between men and women except e' velocity, which was significantly higher in women compared to that in men. However, changes in both tricuspid inflow and lateral annular velocities according to age were similar to those in mitral velocities. Conclusion Since there were significant differences in Doppler and tissue Doppler echocardiographic variables between men and women and changes according to age were even more considerable in both gender groups, normal Doppler echocardiographic values should be differentially applied based on age and sex. PMID:27358707

  19. Reliability of quantitative ultrasonic assessment of normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Emi J.; Chen, Hao; Torres, Mylin; Andic, Fundagul; Liu, Hao-Yang; Chen, Zhengjia; Sun, Xiaoyan; Curran, Walter J; Liu, Tian

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We have recently reported that ultrasound imaging, together with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC), can provide quantitative assessment of radiation-induced normal-tissue toxicity. This study’s purpose is to evaluate the reliability of our quantitative ultrasound technology in assessing acute and late normal-tissue toxicity in breast cancer radiotherapy. Method and Materials Our ultrasound technique analyzes radio-frequency echo signals and provides quantitative measures of dermal, hypodermal, and glandular-tissue toxicities. To facilitate easy clinical implementation, we further refined this technique by developing a semi-automatic ultrasound-based toxicity assessment tool (UBTAT). Seventy-two ultrasound studies of 26 patients (720 images) were analyzed. Images of 8 patients were evaluated for acute toxicity (<6 months post radiotherapy) and those of 18 patients were evaluated for late toxicity (≥6 months post radiotherapy). All patients were treated according to a standard radiotherapy protocol. To assess intra-observer reliability, one observer analyzed 720 images in UBTAT and then repeated the analysis 3 months later. To assess inter-observer reliability, three observers (two radiation oncologists and one ultrasound expert) each analyzed 720 images in UBTAT. An intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate intra- and inter-observer reliability. Ultrasound assessment and clinical evaluation were also compared. Results Intra-observer ICC was 0.89 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.96 for glandular-tissue toxicity. Inter-observer ICC was 0.78 for dermal toxicity, 0.74 for hypodermal toxicity, and 0.94 for glandular-tissue toxicity. Statistical analysis found significant changes in dermal (p < 0.0001), hypodermal (p=0.0027), and glandular-tissue (p < 0.0001) assessments in the acute toxicity group. Ultrasound measurements correlated with clinical RTOG toxicity scores of patients in the late toxicity group

  20. Hole Burning Imaging Studies of Cancerous and Analogous Normal Ovarian Tissues Utilizing Organelle Specific Dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, Satoshi

    2004-01-01

    Presented in this dissertation is the successful demonstration that nonphotochemical hole burning (NPWB) imaging can be used to study in vitro tissue cellular systems for discerning differences in cellular ultrastructures due to cancer development. This has been accomplished with the surgically removed cancerous ovarian and analogous normal peritoneal tissues from the same patient and the application of a fluorescent mitochondrion specific dye, Molecular Probe MitoFluor Far Red 680 (MF680), commonly known as rhodamine 800, that has been proven to exhibit efficient NPHB. From the results presented in Chapters 4 and 5 , and Appendix B, the following conclusions were made: (1) fluorescence excitation spectra of MF680 and confocal microscopy images of thin sliced tissues incubated with MF680 confirm the site-specificity of the probe molecules in the cellular systems. (2) Tunneling parameters, {lambda}{sub 0} and σΛ, as well as the standard hole burning parameters (namely, γ and S), have been determined for the tissue samples by hole growth kinetics (HGK) analyses. Unlike the preliminary cultured cell studies, these parameters have not shown the ability to distinguish tissue cellular matrices surrounding the chromophores. (3) Effects of an external electric (Stark) field on the nonphotochemical holes have been used to determine the changes in permanent dipole moment (fΔμ) for MF680 in tissue samples when burn laser polarization is parallel to the Stark field. Differences are detected between fΔμs in the two tissue samples, with the cancerous tissue exhibiting a more pronounced change (1.35-fold increase) in permanent dipole moment change relative to the normal analogs. It is speculated that the difference may be related to differences in mitochondrial membrane potentials in these tissue samples. (4) In the HGK mode, hole burning imaging (HBI) of cells adhered to coverslips and cooled to liquid helium temperatures in the complete absence of

  1. Radioprotection of normal tissues in tumor-bearing mice by troxerutin.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Dharmendra Kumar; Salvi, Veena Prakash; Krishnan Nair, Cherupally Krishnan

    2004-06-01

    The flavanoid derivative troxerutin, used clinically for treating venous disorders, protected biomembranes and cellular DNA against the deleterious effects of gamma-radiation. The peroxidation of lipids (measured as thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances, or TBARS) in rat liver microsomal and mitochondrial membranes resulting from gamma-irradiation up to doses of 500 Gy in vitro was prevented by 0.2 mM troxerutin. The administration of troxerutin (175 mg/kg body weight) to tumor-bearing mice by ip one hour prior to 4 Gy whole-body gamma-irradiation significantly decreased the radiation-induced peroxidation of lipids in tissues such as liver and spleen, but there was no reduction of lipid peroxidation in tumor. The effect of troxerutin in gamma-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in different tissues of tumor-bearing mice was studied by comet assay. The administration of troxerutin to tumor-bearing animals protected cellular DNA against radiation-induced strand breaks. This was evidenced from decreases in comet tail length, tail moment, and percent of DNA in the tails in cells of normal tissues such as blood leukocytes and bone marrow, and these parameters were not altered in cells of fibrosarcoma tumor. The results revealed that troxerutin could preferentially protect normal tissues against radiation-induced damages in tumor-bearing animals.

  2. Distinctive Glycerophospholipid Profiles of Human Seminoma and Adjacent Normal Tissues by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterson, Timothy A.; Dill, Allison L.; Eberlin, Livia S.; Mattarozzi, Monica; Cheng, Liang; Beck, Stephen D. W.; Bianchi, Federica; Cooks, R. Graham

    2011-08-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) has been successfully used to discriminate between normal and cancerous human tissue from different anatomical sites. On the basis of this, DESI-MS imaging was used to characterize human seminoma and adjacent normal tissue. Seminoma and adjacent normal paired human tissue sections (40 tissues) from 15 patients undergoing radical orchiectomy were flash frozen in liquid nitrogen and sectioned to 15 μm thickness and thaw mounted to glass slides. The entire sample was two-dimensionally analyzed by the charged solvent spray to form a molecular image of the biological tissue. DESI-MS images were compared with formalin-fixed, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained slides of the same material. Increased signal intensity was detected for two seminolipids [seminolipid (16:0/16:0) and seminolipid (30:0)] in the normal tubule testis tissue; these compounds were undetectable in seminoma tissue, as well as from the surrounding fat, muscle, and blood vessels. A glycerophosphoinositol [PI(18:0/20:4)] was also found at increased intensity in the normal testes tubule tissue when compared with seminoma tissue. Ascorbic acid (i.e., vitamin C) was found at increased amounts in seminoma tissue when compared with normal tissue. DESI-MS analysis was successfully used to visualize the location of several types of molecules across human seminoma and normal tissues. Discrimination between seminoma and adjacent normal testes tubules was achieved on the basis of the spatial distributions and varying intensities of particular lipid species as well as ascorbic acid. The increased presence of ascorbic acid within seminoma compared with normal seminiferous tubules was previously unknown.

  3. Heat transfer normal to paired arterioles and venules embedded in perfused tissue during hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Charny, C K; Levin, R L

    1988-11-01

    A numerical model of the heat transer normal to an arteriole-venule pair embedded in muscle tissue has been constructed. Anatomical data describing the blood vessel size, spacing, and density have been incorporated into the model. This model computes temperatures along the vessel walls as well as the temperature throughout the tissue which comprises an infinitely long Krogh cylinder around the vessel pair. Tissue temperatures were computed in the steady-state under resting conditions, while transient calculations were made under hyperthermic conditions. Results show that for both large- (1st generation) and medium-sized (5th generation) vessel pairs, the mean tissue temperature within the tissue cylinder is not equal to the mean of the arteriole and venule blood temperatures under both steady-state and transient conditions. The numerical data were reduced so that a comparison could be made with the predictions of a simple two-dimensional superposition of line sources and sinks presented by Baish et al. This comparison reveals that the superposition model accurately describes the heat transfer effects during hyperthermia, permitting subsequent incorporation of this theory into a realistic three-dimensional model of heat transfer in a whole limb during hyperthermia. PMID:3205012

  4. Normalization of Postinfarct Biomechanics Using a Novel Tissue-Engineered Angiogenic Construct

    PubMed Central

    Atluri, Pavan; Trubelja, Alen; Fairman, Alexander S.; Hsiao, Philip; MacArthur, John W.; Cohen, Jeffrey E.; Shudo, Yasuhiro; Frederick, John R.; Woo, Y. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background Cell-mediated angiogenic therapy for ischemic heart disease has had disappointing results. The lack of clinical translatability may be secondary to cell death and systemic dispersion with cell injection. We propose a novel tissue-engineered therapy, whereby extracellular matrix scaffold seeded with endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) can overcome these limitations using an environment in which the cells can thrive, enabling an insult-free myocardial cell delivery to normalize myocardial biomechanics. Methods and Results EPCs were isolated from the long bones of Wistar rat bone marrow. The cells were cultured for 7 days in media or seeded at a density of 5×106 cells/cm2 on a collagen/vitronectin matrix. Seeded EPCs underwent ex vivo modification with stromal cell–derived factor-1α (100 ng/mL) to potentiate angiogenic properties and enhance paracrine qualities before construct formation. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal imaging confirmed EPC–matrix adhesion. In vitro vasculogenic potential was assessed by quantifying EPC cell migration and vascular differentiation. There was a marked increase in vasculogenesis in vitro as measured by angiogenesis assay (8 versus 0 vessels/hpf; P=0.004). The construct was then implanted onto ischemic myocardium in a rat model of acute myocardial infarction. Confocal microscopy demonstrated a significant migration of EPCs from the construct to the myocardium, suggesting a direct angiogenic effect. Myocardial biomechanical properties were uniaxially quantified by elastic modulus at 5% to 20% strain. Myocardial elasticity normalized after implant of our tissue-engineered construct (239 kPa versus normal=193, P=0.1; versus infarct=304 kPa, P=0.01). Conclusions We demonstrate restoration and normalization of post–myocardial infarction ventricular biomechanics after therapy with an angiogenic tissue-engineered EPC construct. PMID:24030426

  5. Specific and non-specific folate binding protein in normal and malignant human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Corrocher, R.; De Sandre, G.; Ambrosetti, A.; Pachor, M. L.; Bambara, L. M.; Hoffbrand, A. V.

    1978-01-01

    Binding of tritiated folic acid by supernatants prepared from extracts of normal and leukaemic leucocytes, normal mucosa, and malignant tumours from different parts of the gastrointestinal tract has been measured using Sephadex-gel filtration and albumin-coated charcoal techniques. Non-specific binding (measured by Sephadex G-75 gel filtration) was almost invariably greater than specific binding measured by albumin-coated charcoal separation of bound and unbound folate. In nine normal leucocyte extracts, binding measured by Sephadex G-75 filtration ranged from 1·3 to 18·2 (mean 8·2) pg/mg protein and by albumin-coated charcoal from 1·0 to 14·8 (mean 6·7) pg/mg protein. Raised specific binding was found in the extracts from leucocytes of eight of 14 patients with chronic granulocytic leukaemia, in four substantially so (389, 121, 108, 59·7 pg/mg protein), but was only marginally increased in one of eight cases of acute myeloid leukaemia and in two of five cases of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Binding was normal in the extracts of all three cases of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia tested. Among the tissues of the gastrointestinal tract binding was greatest by the duodenal mucosa and liver. Extracts of carcinoma of the stomach and colon bound greater amounts of 3H-folic acid than the corresponding normal mucosal extracts but the differences were not large. Sephadex G-200 gel chromatography showed more than one binding peak in the extracts of liver and duodenum but only one peak in the other tissues of the gastrointestinal tract, and only one peak, of molecular weight either about 50 000 or over 200 000, in the leucocyte extracts. PMID:670421

  6. Histological observations in the Hawaiian reef coral, Porites compressa, affected by Porites bleaching with tissue loss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sudek, M.; Work, T.M.; Aeby, G.S.; Davy, S.K.

    2012-01-01

    The scleractinian finger coral Porites compressa is affected by the coral disease Porites bleaching with tissue loss (PBTL). This disease initially manifests as bleaching of the coenenchyme (tissue between polyps) while the polyps remain brown with eventual tissue loss and subsequent algal overgrowth of the bare skeleton. Histopathological investigation showed a loss of symbiont and melanin-containing granular cells which was more pronounced in the coenenchyme than the polyps. Cell counts confirmed a 65% reduction in symbiont density. Tissue loss was due to tissue fragmentation and necrosis in affected areas. In addition, a reduction in putative bacterial aggregate densities was found in diseased samples but no potential pathogens were observed.

  7. Histological observations in the Hawaiian reef coral, Porites compressa, affected by Porites bleaching with tissue loss.

    PubMed

    Sudek, M; Work, T M; Aeby, G S; Davy, S K

    2012-10-01

    The scleractinian finger coral Porites compressa is affected by the coral disease Porites bleaching with tissue loss (PBTL). This disease initially manifests as bleaching of the coenenchyme (tissue between polyps) while the polyps remain brown with eventual tissue loss and subsequent algal overgrowth of the bare skeleton. Histopathological investigation showed a loss of symbiont and melanin-containing granular cells which was more pronounced in the coenenchyme than the polyps. Cell counts confirmed a 65% reduction in symbiont density. Tissue loss was due to tissue fragmentation and necrosis in affected areas. In addition, a reduction in putative bacterial aggregate densities was found in diseased samples but no potential pathogens were observed.

  8. Normal tissues toxicities triggered by combined anti-angiogenic and radiation therapies: hurdles might be ahead

    PubMed Central

    Mangoni, M; Vozenin, M-C; Biti, G; Deutsch, E

    2012-01-01

    Background: Combined-modality therapy is a promising approach to improve the therapeutic index of radiotherapy. However, these improvements could come at the cost of increased toxicities. Clinical trials evaluating anti-tumour efficacy of bevacizumab combined with radiotherapy have encountered unexpected side effects. This study is the first systematic evaluation of normal tissue toxicity triggered by anti-angiogenic agents combined with radiation therapy in mice. Methods: Effect of a mouse anti-VEGF antibody was monitored on acute toxicity studying radiation-induced intestinal ulceration (12 Gy TBI); on subacute toxicity using a model of oral mucositis (16.5 Gy); on late radiation injuries by monitoring lung fibrosis (bleomycin and 19 Gy). Results: Combination of irradiation with anti-VEGF antibody enhanced intestinal damages with severe epithelial ulcerations, had no adverse impact on oral mucositis and dramatically worsened the fibrotic picture induced by bleomycin and irradiation to the lung. Interpretation: These reports bring to light the important questions about safety and underscore the need for appropriate preclinical modelling of the impact on normal tissues of novel drug–radiation regimens. Our findings also highlight the complexity of anti-VEGF action, which could in defined conditions exert tissue-specific protection. The findings indicate that the combination of targeted drugs with radiotherapy should be approached with caution. PMID:22691970

  9. Influence of nanoparticles accumulation on optical properties of human normal and cancerous liver tissue in vitro estimated by OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fang; Wei, Huajiang; Ye, Xiangping; Hu, Kun; Wu, Guoyong; Yang, Hongqin; He, Yonghong; Xie, Shusen; Guo, Zhouyi

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the potential use of nanoparticles as contrast agents by using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in liver tissue was demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles (average size of 25 and 70 nm), were studied in human normal and cancerous liver tissues in vitro, respectively. Each sample was monitored with SD-OCT functional imaging for 240 min. Continuous OCT monitoring showed that, after application of gold nanoparticles, the OCT signal intensities of normal liver and cancerous liver tissue both increase with time, and the larger nanoparticles tend to produce a greater signal enhancement in the same type of tissue. The results show that the values of attenuation coefficients have significant differences between normal liver tissue and cancerous liver tissue. In addition, 25 nm gold nanoparticles allow higher penetration depth than 70 nm gold nanoparticles in liver tissues.

  10. MO-D-BRF-01: Pediatric Treatment Planning II: The PENTEC Report On Normal Tissue Complications

    SciTech Connect

    Constine, L; Hodgson, D; Bentzen, S

    2014-06-15

    With advances in multimodality therapy, childhood cancer cure rates approach 80%. However, both radiotherapy and chemotherapy may cause debilitating or even fatal ‘late effects’ that are critical to understand, mitigate, or prevent. QUANTEC identified the uncertainties relating to side-effects of adult treatments, but this is more complicated for children in whom a mosaic of tissues develops at different rates and temporal sequences. Childhood cancer survivors have long life expectancy and may develop treatmentinduced secondary cancers and severe organ/tissue injury decades after treatment. Collaborative long-term observational studies and clinical research programs for survivors of pediatric and adolescent cancer provide some dose-response data for follow-up periods exceeding 40 years. Data analysis is challenging due to the influence of both therapeutic and developmental variables. PENTEC is a group of radiation oncologists, pediatric oncologists, subsepcialty physicians, medical physicists, biomathematic modelers/statisticians, and epidemiologists charged with conducting a critical synthesis of existing literature aiming to: critically analyze radiation dose-volume effects on normal tissue tolerances as a function of age/development in pediatric cancer patients in order to inform treatment planning and improve outcomes for survivors; describe relevant physics issues specific to pediatric radiotherapy; propose dose-volumeoutcome reporting standards to improve the knowledge base to inform future treatment guidelines. PENTEC has developed guidelines for systematic literature reviews, data extraction tolls and data analysis. This education session will discuss:1. Special considerations for normal tissue radiation response of children/adolescents, e.g. the interplay between development and radiotherapy effects.2. Epidemiology of organ/tissue injuries and secondary cancers.3. Exploration of dose-response differences between children and adults4. Methodology for

  11. Immunohistochemical distribution of type IV collagenase in normal, benign, and malignant breast tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Monteagudo, C.; Merino, M. J.; San-Juan, J.; Liotta, L. A.; Stetler-Stevenson, W. G.

    1990-01-01

    Production of type IV collagenase by tumor cells has been linked to their metastatic potential in several experimental models. A possible role for this enzyme in basement membrane type IV collagen turnover has also been suggested. Two recently developed affinity-purified, monospecific antibodies directed against the amino terminus (H1), or an internal active site domain (metal binding region [MBR]) of human type IV collagenase, were employed in the avidin-biotin-immunoperoxidase technique in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast tissue samples from 55 patients. Intense cytoplasmic immunostaining of myoepithelial cells was found in normal and hyperplastic tissue, and discontinuous staining was noted in intraductal carcinomas. Luminal epithelial cells were negative or weakly positive in large- or medium-sized ducts but reacted frequently in normal terminal ducts and hyperplastic lesions. Epithelial cells in intraductal carcinomas exhibited immunoreactivity in 20 of 23 cases. Invasive carcinomas were positive in 36 of 40 cases, and metastatic cells in lymph nodes stained in 10 of 12 cases. These results support a role for type IV collagenase in the basement membrane remodeling of normal breast. Our findings suggest that myoepithelial cells play a pivotal role in this enzymatic activity. The high percentage of positive cells in invasive carcinomas and the strong immunoreactivity of lymph node metastases support the role of the enzyme in tumor invasion and metastasis and suggest that tumor cells are the essential source of the enzyme in these processes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2156430

  12. Hyperspectral microscopic analysis of normal, benign and carcinoma microarray tissue sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggioni, Mauro; Davis, Gustave L.; Warner, Frederick J.; Geshwind, Frank B.; Coppi, Andreas C.; DeVerse, Richard A.; Coifman, Ronald R.

    2006-02-01

    We apply a unique micro-optoelectromechanical tuned light source and new algorithms to the hyper-spectral microscopic analysis of human colon biopsies. The tuned light prototype (Plain Sight Systems Inc.) transmits any combination of light frequencies, range 440nm 700nm, trans-illuminating H and E stained tissue sections of normal (N), benign adenoma (B) and malignant carcinoma (M) colon biopsies, through a Nikon Biophot microscope. Hyper-spectral photomicrographs, randomly collected 400X magnication, are obtained with a CCD camera (Sensovation) from 59 different patient biopsies (20 N, 19 B, 20 M) mounted as a microarray on a single glass slide. The spectra of each pixel are normalized and analyzed to discriminate among tissue features: gland nuclei, gland cytoplasm and lamina propria/lumens. Spectral features permit the automatic extraction of 3298 nuclei with classification as N, B or M. When nuclei are extracted from each of the 59 biopsies the average classification among N, B and M nuclei is 97.1%; classification of the biopsies, based on the average nuclei classification, is 100%. However, when the nuclei are extracted from a subset of biopsies, and the prediction is made on nuclei in the remaining biopsies, there is a marked decrement in performance to 60% across the 3 classes. Similarly the biopsy classification drops to 54%. In spite of these classification differences, which we believe are due to instrument and biopsy normalization issues, hyper-spectral analysis has the potential to achieve diagnostic efficiency needed for objective microscopic diagnosis.

  13. Gene Expression Profile Analysis as a Prognostic Indicator of Normal Tissue Response to Simulated Space Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Story, Michael; Stivers, David N.

    2004-01-01

    This project was funded as a pilot project to determine the feasibility of using gene expression profiles to characterize the response of human cells to exposure to particulate radiations such as those encountered in the spaceflight environment. We proposed to use microarray technology to examine the gene expression patterns of a bank of well-characterized human fibroblast cell cultures. These fibroblast cultures were derived from breast or head and neck cancer patients who exhibited normal, minimal, or severe normal tissue reactions following low LET radiation exposure via radiotherapy. Furthermore, determination of SF2 values from fibroblasts cultured from these individuals were predictive of risk for severe late reactions. We hypothesized that by determining the expression of thousands of genes we could identify gene expression patterns that reflect how normal tissues respond to high Z and energy (HZE) particles, that is, that there are molecular signatures for HZE exposures. We also hypothesized that individuals who are intrinsically radiosensitive may elicit a unique response. Because this was funded as a pilot project we focused our initial studies on logistics and appropriate experimental design, and then to test our hypothesis that there is a unique molecular response to specific particles, in this case C and Fe, for primary human skin fibroblasts.

  14. Polyphenol oxidase affects normal nodule development in red clover (Trifolium pratense L.)

    PubMed Central

    Webb, K. Judith; Cookson, Alan; Allison, Gordon; Sullivan, Michael L.; Winters, Ana L.

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) may have multiple functions in tissues depending on its cellular or tissue localization. Here we use PPO RNAi transformants of red clover (Trifolium pratense) to determine the role PPO plays in normal development of plants, and especially in N2-fixing nodules. In red clover, PPO was not essential for either growth or nodule production, or for nodule function in plants grown under optimal, N-free conditions. However, absence of PPO resulted in a more reduced environment in all tissues, as measured by redox potential, and caused subtle developmental changes in nodules. Leaves and, to a lesser extent nodules, lacking PPO tended to accumulate phenolic compounds. A comparison of nodules of two representative contrasting clones by microscopy revealed that nodules lacking PPO were morphologically and anatomically subtly altered, and that phenolics accumulated in different cells and tissues. Developing nodules lacking PPO were longer, and there were more cell layers within the squashed cell layer (SCL), but the walls of these cells were less thickened and the cells were less squashed. Within the N2-fixing zone, bacteroids appeared more granular and were less tightly packed together, and were similar to developmentally compromised bacteroids elicited by catalase mutant rhizobia reported elsewhere. PMID:25566275

  15. High-risk human papilloma virus in archival tissues of oral pathosis and normal oral mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Dhanapal, Raghu; Ranganathan, K.; Kondaiah, Paturu; Devi, R. Uma; Joshua, Elizabeth; Saraswathi, T. R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Oral cancer ranks third among all cancers in the Indian population. Human papilloma virus (HPV) plays a significant role in oral carcinogenesis. Population-based subtype variations are present in the HPV prevalence. This study gives an emphasis on the parameters to be considered in formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissues for polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based research work. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional study on archival paraffin-embedded tissue samples of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), epithelial dysplasia, and normal oral mucosa surrounding impacted tooth was amplified by PCR for the E6 gene of HPV type 16 and E1 gene of HPV type 18. Results: HPV 18 was positive in three OSCC cases. There was no statistically significant association of the positivity of HPV with the age, gender or habit. The HPV positive patients had a tobacco habit and were of a younger age group. Conclusion: The presence of HPV in carcinomatous tissue highlights the possible role of HPV in carcinogenesis and archival paraffin embedded tissue specimen can be used for this analysis. Recent studies on genomic analyses have highlighted that the HPV positive tumors are a separate subgroup based on genomic sequencing. The results of a larger retrospective study will help further in our understanding of the role of HPV in carcinogenesis, this study could form the baseline for such follow-up studies. PMID:26097346

  16. Fully unsupervised inter-individual IR spectral histology of paraffinized tissue sections of normal colon.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Nguyet Que; Jeannesson, Pierre; Groh, Audrey; Piot, Olivier; Guenot, Dominique; Gobinet, Cyril

    2016-05-01

    In label-free Fourier-transform infrared histology, spectral images are individually recorded from tissue sections, pre-processed and clustered. Each single resulting color-coded image is annotated by a pathologist to obtain the best possible match with tissue structures revealed after Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. However, the main limitations of this approach are the empirical choice of the number of clusters in unsupervised classification, and the marked color heterogeneity between the clustered spectral images. Here, using normal murine and human colon tissues, we developed an automatic multi-image spectral histology to simultaneously analyze a set of spectral images (8 images mice samples and 72 images human ones). This procedure consisted of a joint Extended Multiplicative Signal Correction (EMSC) to numerically deparaffinize the tissue sections, followed by an automated joint K-Means (KM) clustering using the hierarchical double application of Pakhira-Bandyopadhyay-Maulik (PBM) validity index. Using this procedure, the main murine and human colon histological structures were correctly identified at both the intra- and the inter-individual levels, especially the crypts, secreted mucus, lamina propria and submucosa. Here, we show that batched multi-image spectral histology procedure is insensitive to the reference spectrum but highly sensitive to the paraffin model of joint EMSC. In conclusion, combining joint EMSC and joint KM clustering by double PBM application allows to achieve objective and automated batched multi-image spectral histology. PMID:26872124

  17. Fully unsupervised inter-individual IR spectral histology of paraffinized tissue sections of normal colon.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Nguyet Que; Jeannesson, Pierre; Groh, Audrey; Piot, Olivier; Guenot, Dominique; Gobinet, Cyril

    2016-05-01

    In label-free Fourier-transform infrared histology, spectral images are individually recorded from tissue sections, pre-processed and clustered. Each single resulting color-coded image is annotated by a pathologist to obtain the best possible match with tissue structures revealed after Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. However, the main limitations of this approach are the empirical choice of the number of clusters in unsupervised classification, and the marked color heterogeneity between the clustered spectral images. Here, using normal murine and human colon tissues, we developed an automatic multi-image spectral histology to simultaneously analyze a set of spectral images (8 images mice samples and 72 images human ones). This procedure consisted of a joint Extended Multiplicative Signal Correction (EMSC) to numerically deparaffinize the tissue sections, followed by an automated joint K-Means (KM) clustering using the hierarchical double application of Pakhira-Bandyopadhyay-Maulik (PBM) validity index. Using this procedure, the main murine and human colon histological structures were correctly identified at both the intra- and the inter-individual levels, especially the crypts, secreted mucus, lamina propria and submucosa. Here, we show that batched multi-image spectral histology procedure is insensitive to the reference spectrum but highly sensitive to the paraffin model of joint EMSC. In conclusion, combining joint EMSC and joint KM clustering by double PBM application allows to achieve objective and automated batched multi-image spectral histology.

  18. Fibrochondrogenic potential of synoviocytes from osteoarthritic and normal joints cultured as tensioned bioscaffolds for meniscal tissue engineering in dogs.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Jennifer J; Bobe, Gerd; Duesterdieck-Zellmer, Katja F

    2014-01-01

    Meniscal tears are a common cause of stifle lameness in dogs. Use of autologous synoviocytes from the affected stifle is an attractive cell source for tissue engineering replacement fibrocartilage. However, the diseased state of these cells may impede in vitro fibrocartilage formation. Synoviocytes from 12 osteoarthritic ("oaTSB") and 6 normal joints ("nTSB") were cultured as tensioned bioscaffolds and compared for their ability to synthesize fibrocartilage sheets. Gene expression of collagens type I and II were higher and expression of interleukin-6 was lower in oaTSB versus nTSB. Compared with nTSB, oaTSB had more glycosaminoglycan and alpha smooth muscle staining and less collagen I and II staining on histologic analysis, whereas collagen and glycosaminoglycan quantities were similar. In conclusion, osteoarthritic joint-origin synoviocytes can produce extracellular matrix components of meniscal fibrocartilage at similar levels to normal joint-origin synoviocytes, which makes them a potential cell source for canine meniscal tissue engineering. PMID:25289180

  19. Fibrochondrogenic potential of synoviocytes from osteoarthritic and normal joints cultured as tensioned bioscaffolds for meniscal tissue engineering in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Bobe, Gerd; Duesterdieck-Zellmer, Katja F.

    2014-01-01

    Meniscal tears are a common cause of stifle lameness in dogs. Use of autologous synoviocytes from the affected stifle is an attractive cell source for tissue engineering replacement fibrocartilage. However, the diseased state of these cells may impede in vitro fibrocartilage formation. Synoviocytes from 12 osteoarthritic (“oaTSB”) and 6 normal joints (“nTSB”) were cultured as tensioned bioscaffolds and compared for their ability to synthesize fibrocartilage sheets. Gene expression of collagens type I and II were higher and expression of interleukin-6 was lower in oaTSB versus nTSB. Compared with nTSB, oaTSB had more glycosaminoglycan and alpha smooth muscle staining and less collagen I and II staining on histologic analysis, whereas collagen and glycosaminoglycan quantities were similar. In conclusion, osteoarthritic joint—origin synoviocytes can produce extracellular matrix components of meniscal fibrocartilage at similar levels to normal joint—origin synoviocytes, which makes them a potential cell source for canine meniscal tissue engineering. PMID:25289180

  20. Classification of breast masses and normal tissues in digital tomosynthesis mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jun; Chan, Heang-Ping; Zhang, Yiheng; Sahiner, Berkman; Zhou, Chuan; Ge, Jun; Wu, Yi-Ta; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.

    2008-03-01

    Digital tomosynthesis mammography (DTM) can provide quasi-3D structural information of the breast by reconstructing the breast volume from projection views (PV) acquired in a limited angular range. Our purpose is to design an effective classifier to distinguish breast masses from normal tissues in DTMs. A data set of 100 DTM cases collected with a GE first generation prototype DTM system at the Massachusetts General Hospital was used. We reconstructed the DTMs using a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART). Mass candidates were identified by 3D gradient field analysis. Three approaches to distinguish breast masses from normal tissues were evaluated. In the 3D approach, we extracted morphological and run-length statistics texture features from DTM slices as input to a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier. In the 2D approach, the raw input PVs were first preprocessed with a Laplacian pyramid multi-resolution enhancement scheme. A mass candidate was then forward-projected to the preprocessed PVs in order to determine the corresponding regions of interest (ROIs). Spatial gray-level dependence (SGLD) texture features were extracted from each ROI and averaged over 11 PVs. An LDA classifier was designed to distinguish the masses from normal tissues. In the combined approach, the LDA scores from the 3D and 2D approaches were averaged to generate a mass likelihood score for each candidate. The A z values were 0.87+/-0.02, 0.86+/-0.02, and 0.91+/-0.02 for the 3D, 2D, and combined approaches, respectively. The difference between the A z values of the 3D and 2D approaches did not achieve statistical significance. The performance of the combined approach was significantly (p<0.05) better than either the 3D or 2D approach alone. The combined classifier will be useful for false-positive reduction in computerized mass detection in DTM.

  1. A System for Continual Quality Improvement of Normal Tissue Delineation for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Breunig, Jennifer; Hernandez, Sophy; Lin, Jeffrey; Alsager, Stacy; Dumstorf, Christine; Price, Jennifer; Steber, Jennifer; Garza, Richard; Nagda, Suneel; Melian, Edward; Emami, Bahman; Roeske, John C.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To implement the 'plan-do-check-act' (PDCA) cycle for the continual quality improvement of normal tissue contours used for radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: The CT scans of patients treated for tumors of the brain, head and neck, thorax, pancreas and prostate were selected for this study. For each scan, a radiation oncologist and a diagnostic radiologist, outlined the normal tissues ('gold' contours) using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) guidelines. A total of 30 organs were delineated. Independently, 5 board-certified dosimetrists and 1 trainee then outlined the same organs. Metrics used to compare the agreement between the dosimetrists' contours and the gold contours included the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), and a penalty function using distance to agreement. Based on these scores, dosimetrists were re-trained on those organs in which they did not receive a passing score, and they were subsequently re-tested. Results: Passing scores were achieved on 19 of 30 organs evaluated. These scores were correlated to organ volume. For organ volumes <8 cc, the average DSC was 0.61 vs organ volumes {>=}8 cc, for which the average DSC was 0.91 (P=.005). Normal tissues that had the lowest scores included the lenses, optic nerves, chiasm, cochlea, and esophagus. Of the 11 organs that were considered for re-testing, 10 showed improvement in the average score, and statistically significant improvement was noted in more than half of these organs after education and re-assessment. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate the feasibility of applying the PDCA cycle to assess competence in the delineation of individual organs, and to identify areas for improvement. With testing, guidance, and re-evaluation, contouring consistency can be obtained across multiple dosimetrists. Our expectation is that continual quality improvement using the PDCA approach will ensure more accurate treatments and dose assessment in radiotherapy

  2. Viruslike particles in the tissues of normal and gamma-irradiated Drosophila melanogaster.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miquel, J.; Bensch, K. G.; Philpott, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    A new finding of viruslike particles in the salivary and accessory glands, muscles, and nerves of normal and gamma-irradiated Drosophila melanogaster is discussed. In morphology and size, the particles seemed identical to those described in earlier reports. On the basis of the available results, it cannot be affirmed that these particles infect only dividing cells, since they are found in all the Drosophila tissues so far examined. Their relation to the aging process is felt to be an interesting subject for further study.

  3. The significance of paired astrocyte nuclei in normal human nervous tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Pittella, J E; Brasileiro-Filho, G

    1987-01-01

    A quantitative study of astrocytes was carried out in 80 microscopic fields and the number of paired nuclei in 100 consecutive astrocytes of the temporo-occipital gyrus cortex was determined in 13 patients with no cerebral or liver disease. No significant correlation was found between astrocyte number and the percentage of paired nuclei. When studies on astrocytes in hepatic encephalopathy, liver cirrhosis and hepatosplenic schistosomiasis are taken into consideration it is suggested that these cells are in continuous variable renewal in normal adult human nervous tissue, as occurs in other animal species. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3654344

  4. Analysis of normal and diseased liver tissue using auto-fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Jia, Chunde; Lin, Junxiu; Kang, Youping

    2003-12-01

    In this paper, laser induced human serum Raman spectra of liver cancer are measured. The spectra differences in serum from normal people and liver cancer patients are analyzed. For the typical spectrum of normal serum, there are three sharp Raman peaks and relative intensity of Raman peaks excited by 514.5 nm is higher than that excited by 488.0 nm. However, for the Raman spectrum of liver cancer serum there are no peaks or very weak Raman peaks at the same positions. Results from more than two hundred case measurements show that clinical diagnostic accuracy is 92.86%. And then, the liver fibrosis and liver cirrhosis are studied applying the technology of LIF. To liver cirrhosis, the shape of Raman peak is similar to normal and fluorescence spectrum is similar to that of liver cancer from statistic data. The experiment indicates that there is notable fluorescence difference between the abnormal and normal liver tissue and have blue shift in fluorescence peak. These results have important reference values to explore the method of laser spectrum diagnosis.

  5. Mycorrhizal fungi affect root stele tissue in grasses.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R. M.; Hetrick, B. A. D.; Wilson, G. W. T.; Environmental Research; Northern Iowa Univ.; Kansas State Univ.

    1997-01-01

    Although arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis was initially believed to have little or no impact on root morphology, we now recognize that subtle changes do occur and that these changes may be of considerable consequence to host growth and nutrition, as well as functional growth strategy. In examining the stele and root diameters of C3 and C4 grasses, C4 grasses were demonstrated to have a significantly larger proportion of their fibrous roots occupied by stele tissue than do C3 grasses. In fact, functional growth strategy (C3 versus C4) was observed to be a relatively good predictor of stele area. Mycorrhizal fungi also influenced the amount of stele tissue, but the effect was not the same for both C3 and C4 grasses. The stele area of all C4 grasses except for Sorghastrum nutans was greater in the presence of mycorrhizal colonization. Among the C3 grasses, only Bromus inermis showed a significant increase, although Elymus cinereus and Lolium perenne displayed significant decreases in response to arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization. Changes in the stele area of the plant species were closely related to their responsiveness to mycorrhizal symbiosis and might in part explain both beneficial and detrimental responses of plants to mycorrhizae. An increase in stele circumference induced by mycorrhizae would allow for greater uptake and passage of water and nutrients to the vascular cylinder, and growth depressions could be a direct outcome of reduced stele circumference. Thus, differences in stele circumference represent a possible mechanism for mycorrhizal impacts on host plants. These findings indicate that structural differences among grasses are related to different functional capabilities and further emphasize the need for better integration of comparative anatomy and morphology procedures in the study of mycorrhizal symbiosis.

  6. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for distinguishing between normal and malignant human gastric tissue.

    PubMed

    Colagar, Abasalt Hosseinzadeh; Chaichi, Mohammad Javad; Khadjvand, Tahereh

    2011-09-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy can be considered to be a fast and non-invasive tool for distinguishing between normal and cancerous cells and tissues without the need for laborious and invasive sampling procedures. Gastric samples from four patients (age, 65±2 years) were analysed. Samples were obtained from the organs removed during gastrectomy and then classified as normal or cancerous. Classification was based on histopathological examinations at our institution. Formalin-fixed sections of gastric tissue were analysed by FTIR-microspectroscopy. To characterize differences between sections of normal and cancerous tissue, specific regions of the spectra were analysed to study variations in the levels of metabolites. To distinguish between two conditions (normal and cancerous), changes in the relative intensity of bands in the range 600-4000 cm⁻¹ were analysed. A FTIR spectral map of the bands in the region 2800-3100 cm⁻¹ and 900-1800 cm⁻¹ were created to analyse pathological changes in tissues. The limited data available showed that normal gastric tissue had stronger absorption than cancerous tissue over a wide region in the four patients. There was a significant decrease in total biomolecular components for cancerous tissue compared with normal tissue.

  7. Associations between the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) and affect, loneliness and intelligence in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Lucht, Michael J; Barnow, Sven; Sonnenfeld, Christine; Rosenberger, Albert; Grabe, Hans Joergen; Schroeder, Winnie; Völzke, Henry; Freyberger, Harald J; Herrmann, Falko H; Kroemer, Heyo; Rosskopf, Dieter

    2009-08-01

    Associations of oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) variants and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have been reported in earlier studies; in one of the studies associations with IQ and daily living skills were found additionally. Variations of the oxytocin receptor gene might also regulate affect, attachment and separation beyond the diagnostic borders of autism. We tested hypotheses of associations between positive and negative affects and social and emotional loneliness (285 adults), IQ (117 adolescents) and polymorphisms of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR rs53576, rs2254298 and rs2228485) in normal subjects. Individuals with the oxytocin OXTR rs53576 A/A genotype showed lower positive affect scores (F=5.532, df=1; p=0.019). This effect was restricted to males (F=13.098, df=1; p=0.00047). Haplotypes constructed with the three markers were associated with positive affect (p=0.0012), negative affect (p<0.0001) and emotional loneliness (p<0.0001). Non-verbal intelligence was significantly reduced in rs53576 A/A adolescents (T=2.247, p=0.027). Our findings support a role for the oxytocin receptor haplotypes in the generation of affectivity, emotional loneliness and IQ. PMID:19376182

  8. Novel antioxidants are not toxic to normal tissues but effectively kill cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Aladedunye, Felix; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Li, Dongping; Thomas, James; Kovalchuk, Olga; Przybylski, Roman

    2013-10-01

    Free radicals are formed as a result of cellular processes and play a key role in predisposition to and development of numerous diseases and of premature aging. Recently, we reported the syntheses of a number of novel phenolic antioxidants for possible application in food industry. In the present study, analyses of the cellular processes and molecular gene expression effects of some of the novel antioxidants in normal human tissues and in cancer cells were undertaken. Results indicated that whereas the examined antioxidants showed no effects on morphology and gene expression of normal human oral and gingival epithelial tissues, they exerted a profound cell killing effect on breast cancer cells, including on chemotherapy-resistant breast cancer cells and on oral squamous carcinoma cells. Among the tested antioxidants, N-decyl-N-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) propanamide and N-decyl-N-(3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) propanamide were the most promising, with excellent potential for cancer treatment. Moreover, our gene expression databases can be used as a roadmap for future analysis of mechanisms of antioxidant action.

  9. Near-infrared spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for distinguishing between normal and malignant colorectal tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Lin, Zan; Mo, Lin; Wu, Tong; Tan, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Cancer diagnosis is one of the most important tasks of biomedical research and has become the main objective of medical investigations. The present paper proposed an analytical strategy for distinguishing between normal and malignant colorectal tissues by combining the use of near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy with chemometrics. The successive projection algorithm-linear discriminant analysis (SPA-LDA) was used to seek a reduced subset of variables/wavenumbers and build a diagnostic model of LDA. For comparison, the partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) based on full-spectrum classification was also used as the reference. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used for a preliminary analysis. A total of 186 spectra from 20 patients with partial colorectal resection were collected and divided into three subsets for training, optimizing, and testing the model. The results showed that, compared to PLS-DA, SPA-LDA provided more parsimonious model using only three wavenumbers/variables (4065, 4173, and 5758 cm(-1)) to achieve the sensitivity of 84.6%, 92.3%, and 92.3% for the training, validation, and test sets, respectively, and the specificity of 100% for each subset. It indicated that the combination of NIR spectroscopy and SPA-LDA algorithm can serve as a potential tool for distinguishing between normal and malignant colorectal tissues. PMID:25654106

  10. Different expression of protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunits in normal and neoplastic thyroid tissues.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Stefano; Vaira, Valentina; Del Gobbo, Alessandro; Vicentini, Leonardo; Bosari, Silvano; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Mantovani, Giovanna; Spada, Anna; Lania, Andrea G

    2015-04-01

    The four regulatory subunits (R1A, R1B, R2A, R2B) of protein kinase A (PKA) are differentially expressed in several cancer cell lines and exert distinct roles in both cell growth and cell differentiation control. Mutations of the PRKAR1A gene have been found in patients with Carney complex and in a minority of sporadic anaplastic thyroid carcinomas. The aim of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the expression of different PKA regulatory subunits in benign and non benign human thyroid tumours and to correlate their expression with clinical phenotype. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated a significant increase in PRKAR2B expression in both differentiated and undifferentiated (anaplastic) thyroid tumors in comparison with normal thyroid tissues. Conversely, a significant increase in PRKAR1A expression was only demonstrated in undifferentiated thyroid carcinomas in comparison with normal thyroid tissue and differentiated thyroid tumors. In thyroid cancers without lymph nodal metastases PRKAR1A expression was higher in tumours of more than 2 cm in size (T2 and T3) compared to smaller ones (T1). In conclusion, our data shows that an increased PRKAR1A expression is associated with aggressive and undifferentiated thyroid tumors. PMID:25393625

  11. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, N. R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development.

  12. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, N.R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development. PMID:26887292

  13. SU-D-18A-04: Quantifying the Ability of Tumor Tracking to Spare Normal Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, A; Buzurovic, I; Hurwitz, M; Williams, C; Lewis, J; Mishra, P; Seco, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Tumor tracking allows for smaller tissue volumes to be treated, potentially reducing normal tissue damage. However, tumor tracking is a more complex treatment and has little benefit in some scenarios. Here we quantify the benefit of tumor tracking for a range of patients by estimating the dose of radiation to organs at risk and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for both standard and tracking treatment plans. This comparison is performed using both patient 4DCT data and extended Cardiac-Torso (XCAT) digital phantoms. Methods: We use 4DCT data for 10 patients. Additionally, we generate digital phantoms with motion derived from measured patient long tumor trajectories to compare standard and tracking treatment plans. The standard treatment is based on the average intensity projection (AIP) of 4DCT images taken over a breath cycle. The tracking treatment is based on doses calculated on images representing the anatomy at each time point. It is assumed that there are no errors in tracking the target. The NTCP values are calculated based on RTOG guidelines. Results: The mean reduction in the mean dose delivered was 5.5% to the lungs (from 7.3 Gy to 6.9 Gy) and 4.0% to the heart (from 12.5 Gy to 12.0 Gy). The mean reduction in the max dose delivered was 13% to the spinal cord (from 27.6 Gy to 24.0 Gy), 2.5% to the carina (from 31.7 Gy to 30.9 Gy), and 15% to the esophagus (from 69.6 Gy to 58.9 Gy). The mean reduction in the probability of 2nd degree radiation pneumonitis (RP) was 8.7% (3.1% to 2.8%) and the mean reduction in the effective volume was 6.8% (10.8% to 10.2%). Conclusions: Tumor tracking has the potential to reduce irradiation of organs at risk, and consequentially reduce the normal tissue complication probability. The benefits vary based on the clinical scenario. This study is supported by Varian Medical Systems, Inc.

  14. Quantification of telomerase activity in normal oral mucosal tissue and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Arpita; Naikmasur, Venkatesh G.; Sattur, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: The role of telomeres and telomerase in oral cancer is an area of much recent interest. The understanding of the role of telomere biology, the end replication problem leading to genomic instability and the reactivation of telomerase, is absolutely critical to our understanding of oral cancer, and more so, to our ability of early diagnosis and developing novel therapies and cancer prevention approaches. The aim of the present study was to quantify telomerase activity (TA) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and normal oral mucosa and assess the role of telomerase as diagnostic and prognostic marker of oral malignancy. Materials and Methods: We quantified TA in 45 patients with OSCC and 20 normal oral mucosal specimens using polymerase chain reaction-based telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay and compared it with the clinical status and grade of malignancy. Results: TA was detected in 89% of malignant and 5% of normal oral mucosal tissue. The TA levels ranged from 0.28 to 6.91 (mean 2.05, standard deviation [SD] 1.33) in OSCC and 0.21 to 1.09 (mean 0.54, SD 0.27) in normal oral mucosa. There was no relationship between TA levels and clinical stages, site of the lesion, history of adverse habits, or sex of the patient. However, under the WHO classification, there were significant differences (P < 0.00) between Grades I, II, and III. Furthermore, increasing age of the patient significantly correlated with TA. Interpretation and Conclusion: The results of the present study indicate that activation of TA is frequent in OSCC. Statistically significant difference in quantified telomerase levels of OSCC and normal oral mucosa (P < 0.00) demonstrates the significant clinical usefulness of telomerase activation as a valuable marker for diagnosis while significant correlation of TA with grades of malignancy indicates its effectiveness as marker for prognosis of OSCC.

  15. Proprioceptive neuropathy affects normalization of the H-reflex by exercise after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ollivier-Lanvin, Karen; Keeler, Benjamin E.; Siegfried, Rachel; Houlé, John D.; Lemay, Michel A.

    2009-01-01

    The H-reflex habituates at relatively low frequency (10 Hz) stimulation in the intact spinal cord, but loss of descending inhibition resulting from spinal cord transection reduces this habituation. There is a return towards a normal pattern of low-frequency habituation in the reflex activity with cycling exercise of the affected hind limbs. This implies that repetitive passive stretching of the muscles in spinalized animals and the accompanying stimulation of large (Group I and II) proprioceptive fibers has modulatory effects on spinal cord reflexes after injury. To test this hypothesis, we induced pyridoxine neurotoxicity that preferentially affects large dorsal root ganglia neurons in intact and spinalized rats. Pyridoxine or saline injections were given twice daily (IP) for 6 weeks and half of the spinalized animals were subjected to cycling exercise during that period. After 6 weeks, the tibial nerve was stimulated electrically and recordings of M and H waves were made from interosseous muscles of the hind paw. Results show that pyridoxine treatment completely eliminated the H-reflex in spinal intact animals. In contrast, transection paired with pyridoxine treatment resulted in a reduction of the frequency-dependent habituation of the H-reflex that was not affected by exercise. These results indicate that normal Group I and II afferent input is critical to achieve exercise-based reversal of hyper-reflexia of the H-reflex after spinal cord injury. PMID:19913536

  16. Accurate Accumulation of Dose for Improved Understanding of Radiation Effects in Normal Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffray, David A.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Brock, Kristy K.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Tome, W.A.

    2010-03-01

    The actual distribution of radiation dose accumulated in normal tissues over the complete course of radiation therapy is, in general, poorly quantified. Differences in the patient anatomy between planning and treatment can occur gradually (e.g., tumor regression, resolution of edema) or relatively rapidly (e.g., bladder filling, breathing motion) and these undermine the accuracy of the planned dose distribution. Current efforts to maximize the therapeutic ratio require models that relate the true accumulated dose to clinical outcome. The needed accuracy can only be achieved through the development of robust methods that track the accumulation of dose within the various tissues in the body. Specific needs include the development of segmentation methods, tissue-mapping algorithms, uncertainty estimation, optimal schedules for image-based monitoring, and the development of informatics tools to support subsequent analysis. These developments will not only improve radiation outcomes modeling but will address the technical demands of the adaptive radiotherapy paradigm. The next 5 years need to see academia and industry bring these tools into the hands of the clinician and the clinical scientist.

  17. Expression of c-kit protein in cancer vs. normal breast tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jazayeri, Seyed Nematollah; Nateghi, Jamal

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study There are at least four main signal transduction pathways within human cells which are activated by interaction of an extracellular ligand with its corresponding receptors. One of them is activation of protein kinase. Actually, any of these proteins at any level of the signaling cascade in a human cell can undergo mutation and cause irregular cellular proliferation and finally result in cancer. C-kit is alternatively called stem cell factor receptor (SCFR) or CD117. It appears that lack of c-kit expression accompanies progression of some tumors, e.g. lung, breast, GIST. The aim of this study was to evaluate C-kit protein expression level within cancer cases. Material and methods Sixty specimens of breast cancer and 60 non-cancerous breast tissue specimens were evaluated by IHC for C-kit presentation. We used positive GIST slides as controls. Epi-info ver 6.04 (CDC, WHO) was used for analysis. Results C-kit was negative in all breast cancer specimens. C-kit was negative in 47 (78%) of 60 non-cancerous breast tissue specimens, but was positive in 13 (22%) of them (p < 0.0001). Conclusions There is a reduction in C-kit expression with malignant transformation of breast epithelium. C-kit is believed to play a role in breast carcinogenesis. However, we should follow patients with normal or benign breast tissue to indicate any correlation between C-kit presentation and breast cancer development. PMID:23788899

  18. Marginal B-6 intake affects protein synthesis in rat tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, D.A.; Kretsch, M.J.; Young, L.A.; Jansen, G.R.

    1986-03-05

    The role of vitamin B-6 in amino acid metabolism suggests that inadequate B-6 intake may impair protein synthesis. To test this hypothesis, 30 male rats (initially 227 g) were fed AIN76A diets that contained control, marginal or devoid levels of B-6 (5.8, 1.2 or 0.1 mg B-6/kg diet, by analysis) ad libitum for 9 weeks. Protein synthesis rates (PSRs) were measured in liver, kidney and calf muscle using a flooding dose of /sup 3/H-phenylalanine. Marginal and control groups ate and gained weight at similar rates. The marginal diet did not elevate xanthurenic acid (XA) excretion following a tryptophan load. However, marginal B-6 intake did depress liver PSR by 29% (2182 vs 1549 mg/day, P<.05), liver wet weight by 15% (19.0 vs 16.1 g, P<.05) and muscle PSR by 23% (3.0 vs 2.3%/day, P<.10). Unexpectedly, marginal B-6 intake increased PSR in kidney 47% (90 vs 132 mg/day, P<.05). The devoid diet, which increased XA excretion following a tryptophan load by more than 3-fold, depressed PSRs 56% in liver and 31% in muscle. However, the devoid diet decreased food intake by 40% (25.0 vs 15.0 g/day); therefore effects of devoid B-6 intake on PSRs may have been confounded by deficits in protein-energy intake in devoid vs control groups. These data demonstrate that marginal B-6 intake alters protein synthesis in tissues of the rat.

  19. Utility of Normal Tissue-to-Tumor {alpha}/{beta} Ratio When Evaluating Isodoses of Isoeffective Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, Hiram A.; Jin Jianyue; Chang, Albert J.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To achieve a better understanding of the effect of the number of fractions on normal tissue sparing for equivalent tumor control in radiation therapy plans by using equivalent biologically effective dose (BED) isoeffect calculations. Methods and Materials: The simple linear quadratic (LQ) model was assumed to be valid up to 10 Gy per fraction. Using the model, we formulated a well-known mathematical equality for the tumor prescription dose and probed and solved a second mathematical problem for normal tissue isoeffect. That is, for a given arbitrary relative isodose distribution (treatment plan in percentages), 2 isoeffective tumor treatment regimens (N fractions of the dose D and n fractions of the dose d) were denoted, which resulted in the same BED (corresponding to 100% prescription isodose). Given these situations, the LQ model was further exploited to mathematically establish a unique relative isodose level, z (%), for the same arbitrary treatment plan, where the BED to normal tissues was also isoeffective for both fractionation regimens. Results: For the previously stated problem, the relative isodose level z (%), where the BEDs to the normal tissue were also equal, was defined by the normal tissue {alpha}/{beta} ratio divided by the tumor {alpha}/{beta} times 100%. Fewer fractions offers a therapeutic advantage for those portions of the normal tissue located outside the isodose surface, z, whereas more fractions offer a therapeutic advantage for those portions of the normal tissue within the isodose surface, z. Conclusions: Relative isodose-based treatment plan evaluations may be useful for comparing isoeffective tumor regimens in terms of normal tissue effects. Regions of tissues that would benefit from hypofractionation or standard fractionation can be identified.

  20. Elastic moduli of normal and pathological human breast tissues: an inversion-technique-based investigation of 169 samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samani, Abbas; Zubovits, Judit; Plewes, Donald

    2007-03-01

    Understanding and quantifying the mechanical properties of breast tissues has been a subject of interest for the past two decades. This has been motivated in part by interest in modelling soft tissue response for surgery planning and virtual-reality-based surgical training. Interpreting elastography images for diagnostic purposes also requires a sound understanding of normal and pathological tissue mechanical properties. Reliable data on tissue elastic properties are very limited and those which are available tend to be inconsistent, in part as a result of measurement methodology. We have developed specialized techniques to measure tissue elasticity of breast normal tissues and tumour specimens and applied them to 169 fresh ex vivo breast tissue samples including fat and fibroglandular tissue as well as a range of benign and malignant breast tumour types. Results show that, under small deformation conditions, the elastic modulus of normal breast fat and fibroglandular tissues are similar while fibroadenomas were approximately twice the stiffness. Fibrocystic disease and malignant tumours exhibited a 3-6-fold increased stiffness with high-grade invasive ductal carcinoma exhibiting up to a 13-fold increase in stiffness compared to fibrogalndular tissue. A statistical analysis showed that differences between the elastic modulus of the majority of those tissues were statistically significant. Implications for the specificity advantages of elastography are reviewed.

  1. Destruction of rat mammary tumor and normal tissue microcirculation by hematoporphyrin derivative photoradiation observed in vivo in sandwich observation chambers.

    PubMed

    Star, W M; Marijnissen, H P; van den Berg-Blok, A E; Versteeg, J A; Franken, K A; Reinhold, H S

    1986-05-01

    The effect of hematoporphyrin derivative photoradiation on tumor and normal tissue microcirculation was studied microscopically in vivo on rats with mammary carcinomas transplanted into subcutis in transparent observation chambers. One day after i.p. injection of hematoporphyrin derivative (15 mg/kg), chambers were exposed to red light (632 +/- 2 nm, eight light dose values, 0 to 270 J/cm2). After an initial blanching (ischemia) of the tumor accompanied by apparent vasoconstriction, reperfusion was observed with a slowing down of the tumor circulation, vasodilatation, and eventually a complete stasis, together with diffuse hemorrhages and subsequent necrosis. Besides, in large normal tissue vessels, platelet aggregates were observed, but no hemorrhage. Tumor regrowth occurred unless the tumor circulation and the adjacent normal tissue circulation were both destroyed. Tumor cell viability after treatment was assessed by transplanting the tumor from the chamber into the flank of the same animal. Even after a combined porphyrin and light dose 4 times the lethal dose for all tissues in the chamber, five of five transplanted tumors did regrow. This leads to the conclusion that, in our model system, tumor cell death after photoradiation occurs secondary to destruction of the microcirculation. In order to obtain additional information on normal tissue damage, rat ears were also irradiated. For the same light dose, the biological effect was only slightly larger than that of the normal tissue in the observation chambers, even though the measured ratio of porphyrin concentrations in ears and normal tissue in the chambers (subcutis) was about six.

  2. The measurement of intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity in human tumours and normal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawton, Patricia Ann

    Human tumour and normal cell radiosensitivity are thought to be important factors determining the response of tumour and normal tissues to radiotherapy, respectively. Clonogenic assays are the standard method for measuring radiosensitivity but they are of limited applicability for clinical use with fresh human tumours. The main aim of this work was to evaluate the Adhesive Tumour Cell Culture System (ATCCS), as a method for measuring the radiosensitivity of human tumours. A soft agar clonogenic assay, the modified Courtenay-Mills assay, was used as a standard to compare with the ATCCS. The demonstration that fibroblast contamination could occur with both assay methods led to the investigation of a new technique for removing unwanted fibroblasts from tumour cell suspensions and to the use of a multiwell assay for measuring fibroblast radiosensitivity. Established tumour cell lines were used to validate and optimise the ATCCS. Success rates with human tumour biopsy specimens were initially poor with both assay methods but further modifications led to success rates of ~70%. In a comparison of the modified Courtenay-Mills assay and the ATCCS there was close agreement between the measurements of surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) for established tumour cell lines but with primary tumour cultures the SF2 values were significantly lower in the ATCCS. The main limitations of the ATCCS for clinical use were inter-experimental variability and fibroblast contamination. Using antibody-coated magnetic beads as a method for removing fibroblasts from tumour cell suspensions, some selectivity for fibroblasts was shown, but the specificity was too low for this method to be of value in its current form. The multiwell assay was found to be a satisfactory method for measuring fibroblast radiosensitivity although inter-experimental variability may limit its clinical use as a predictive test for normal tissue damage in patients.

  3. Normal-appearing brain tissue analysis in radiologically isolated syndrome using 3 T MRI.

    PubMed

    Labiano-Fontcuberta, Andrés; Mato-Abad, Virginia; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Ginés, María Luisa; Aladro, Yolanda; Ayuso, Lucía; Domingo-Santos, Ángela; Benito-León, Julián

    2016-07-01

    To date, it remains largely unknown whether there is in radiologically isolated syndrome (RIS) brain damage beyond visible T2 white matter lesions. We used single- voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging (3 T MRI) to analyze normal-appearing brain tissue regions in 18 RIS patients and 18 matched healthy controls. T2-hyperintense lesion volumes and structural brain volumes were also measured. The absolute metabolite concentrations and ratios of total N-acetylaspartate+N-acetylaspartyl glutamate (NAA), choline-containing compounds, myoinositol, and glutamine-glutamate complex to creatine were calculated. Spectral analysis was performed by LCModel. Voxelwise morphometry analysis was performed to localize regions of brain tissue showing significant changes of fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity. Compared with healthy controls, RIS patients did not show any significant differences in either the absolute concentration of NAA or NAA/Cr ratio in mid-parietal gray matter. A trend toward lower NAA concentrations (-3.35%) was observed among RIS patients with high risk for conversion to multiple sclerosis. No differences in the other metabolites or their ratios were observed. RIS patients showed lower fractional anisotropy only in clusters overlapping lesional areas, namely in the cingulate gyrus bilaterally and the frontal lobe subgyral bilaterally (P < 0.001). Normalized brain and cortical volumes were significantly lower in RIS patients than in controls (P = 0.01 and P = 0.03, respectively). Our results suggest that in RIS, global brain and cortical atrophy are not primarily driven by significant occult microstructural normal appearing brain damage. Longitudinal MRI studies are needed to better understand the pathological processes underlying this novel entity. PMID:27399108

  4. Relationship of mercury to cognitive, affective and perceptual motor functioning in a normal sample in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Sine, L.F.

    1983-01-01

    Although the effects of toxic levels of mercury have been well documented, the effects of subclinical levels of mercury on normal populations have generally not been studied. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the impact of mercury risk factors on cognition, affect, psychopathology, and known mercury-related symptoms in a normal sample in Hawaii exposed to subclinical although elevated levels of elemental mercury through inhalation associated with volcanic activity and of methylmercury mostly through ingestion of large ocean species fish. The following summarizes the findings and conclusions of the study: 1) a four week test-retest reliability using 41 of the subjects showed that the 41 measures used in the study exhibited an average correlation of .78. Using all 413 subjects, the average internal consistency measured by Cronbach's ..cap alpha.. was .82 for the 17 affect, psychopathology, and symptom measures; 2) nine mercury source variables were used to predict the amount of total mercury in hair. Interestingly, none of the source variables predicted hair total mercury; 3) the source variables in addition to hair total mercury and statistical control variables were used to predict the twenty-two functioning variables in the four domains cited above with a relative absence of relationships noted. This finding indicates that the normal population in Hawaii appears not to be at risk; and 4) one historical mercury source variable, reported fish intake when young, related to six functioning variables - the psychopathology measures of Somatization, Obsessive-Compulsive and Anxiety as well as the Sensory, Affect and Mental symptoms - with Beta weights in the .15 to .20 range. The implications of the findings were discussed and suggestions offered for future research especially with respect to specific high risk subgroups.

  5. Connective Tissue Growth Factor Is Required for Normal Follicle Development and Ovulation

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Takashi; Kim, Jaeyeon; Li, Qinglei; Lydon, John P.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Lyons, Karen M.

    2011-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a cysteine-rich protein the synthesis and secretion of which are hypothesized to be selectively regulated by activins and other members of the TGF-β superfamily. To investigate the in vivo roles of CTGF in female reproduction, we generated Ctgf ovarian and uterine conditional knockout (cKO) mice. Ctgf cKO mice exhibit severe subfertility and multiple reproductive defects including disrupted follicle development, decreased ovulation rates, increased numbers of corpus luteum, and smaller but functionally normal uterine horns. Steroidogenesis is disrupted in the Ctgf cKO mice, leading to increased levels of serum progesterone. We show that disrupted follicle development is accompanied by a significant increase in granulosa cell apoptosis. Moreover, despite normal cumulus expansion, Ctgf cKO mice exhibit a significant decrease in oocytes ovulated, likely due to impaired ovulatory process. During analyses of mRNA expression, we discovered that Ctgf cKO granulosa cells show gene expression changes similar to our previously reported granulosa cell-specific knockouts of activin and Smad4, the common TGF-β family intracellular signaling protein. We also discovered a significant down-regulation of Adamts1, a progesterone-regulated gene that is critical for the remodeling of extracellular matrix surrounding granulosa cells of preovulatory follicles. These findings demonstrate that CTGF is a downstream mediator in TGF-β and progesterone signaling cascades and is necessary for normal follicle development and ovulation. PMID:21868453

  6. Fractionation in normal tissues: the (α/β)eff concept can account for dose heterogeneity and volume effects.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Aswin L; Nahum, Alan E

    2013-10-01

    The simple Linear-Quadratic (LQ)-based Withers iso-effect formula (WIF) is widely used in external-beam radiotherapy to derive a new tumour dose prescription such that there is normal-tissue (NT) iso-effect when changing the fraction size and/or number. However, as conventionally applied, the WIF is invalid unless the normal-tissue response is solely determined by the tumour dose. We propose a generalized WIF (gWIF) which retains the tumour prescription dose, but replaces the intrinsic fractionation sensitivity measure (α/β) by a new concept, the normal-tissue effective fractionation sensitivity, [Formula: see text], which takes into account both the dose heterogeneity in, and the volume effect of, the late-responding normal-tissue in question. Closed-form analytical expressions for [Formula: see text] ensuring exact normal-tissue iso-effect are derived for: (i) uniform dose, and (ii) arbitrary dose distributions with volume-effect parameter n = 1 from the normal-tissue dose-volume histogram. For arbitrary dose distributions and arbitrary n, a numerical solution for [Formula: see text] exhibits a weak dependence on the number of fractions. As n is increased, [Formula: see text] increases from its intrinsic value at n = 0 (100% serial normal-tissue) to values close to or even exceeding the tumour (α/β) at n = 1 (100% parallel normal-tissue), with the highest values of [Formula: see text] corresponding to the most conformal dose distributions. Applications of this new concept to inverse planning and to highly conformal modalities are discussed, as is the effect of possible deviations from LQ behaviour at large fraction sizes. PMID:24029492

  7. Reelin Proteolysis Affects Signaling Related to Normal Synapse Function and Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Lussier, April L; Weeber, Edwin J; Rebeck, G William

    2016-01-01

    Reelin is a neurodevelopmental protein important in adult synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. Recent evidence points to the importance for Reelin proteolysis in normal signaling and in cognitive function. Support for the dysfunction of Reelin proteolysis in neurodegeneration and cognitive dysfunction comes from postmortem analysis of Alzheimer's diseases (AD) tissues including cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), showing that levels of Reelin fragments are altered in AD compared to control. Potential key proteases involved in Reelin proteolysis have recently been defined, identifying processes that could be altered in neurodegeneration. Introduction of full-length Reelin and its proteolytic fragments into several mouse models of neurodegeneration and neuropsychiatric disorders quickly promote learning and memory. These findings support a role for Reelin in learning and memory and suggest further understanding of these processes are important to harness the potential of this pathway in treating cognitive symptoms in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27065802

  8. Reelin Proteolysis Affects Signaling Related to Normal Synapse Function and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lussier, April L.; Weeber, Edwin J.; Rebeck, G. William

    2016-01-01

    Reelin is a neurodevelopmental protein important in adult synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. Recent evidence points to the importance for Reelin proteolysis in normal signaling and in cognitive function. Support for the dysfunction of Reelin proteolysis in neurodegeneration and cognitive dysfunction comes from postmortem analysis of Alzheimer’s diseases (AD) tissues including cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), showing that levels of Reelin fragments are altered in AD compared to control. Potential key proteases involved in Reelin proteolysis have recently been defined, identifying processes that could be altered in neurodegeneration. Introduction of full-length Reelin and its proteolytic fragments into several mouse models of neurodegeneration and neuropsychiatric disorders quickly promote learning and memory. These findings support a role for Reelin in learning and memory and suggest further understanding of these processes are important to harness the potential of this pathway in treating cognitive symptoms in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27065802

  9. Terahertz absorption and reflection imaging of carcinoma-affected colon tissues embedded in paraffin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahaia, Faustino; Kasalynas, Irmantas; Venckevicius, Rimvydas; Seliuta, Dalius; Valusis, Gintaras; Urbanowicz, Andrzej; Molis, Gediminas; Carneiro, Fatima; Carvalho Silva, Catia D.; Granja, Pedro L.

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, dehydrated human colon tissues embedded in paraffin were studied at THz frequency. A compact THz imaging system with high numerical aperture optics was developed for the analysis of adenocarcinoma-affected colon sections, in transmission and reflection geometry. A comprehensive analysis of the THz images revealed a contrast up to 23% between the neoplastic and control tissues. Absorption and reflection THz images demonstrated the possibility to distinguish adenocarcinoma-affected areas even without water in the tissue, as the main contrast mechanism in THz measurements has been observed to be water absorption in in vivo or freshly excised tissues. The present results corroborate with previous histologic findings in the same tissues, and confirm that the contrast prevails even in dehydrated tissues.

  10. Modeling the response of normal and ischemic cardiac tissue to electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Sunil Mani

    Heart disease, the leading cause of death worldwide, is often caused by ventricular fibrillation. A common treatment for this lethal arrhythmia is defibrillation: a strong electrical shock that resets the heart to its normal rhythm. To design better defibrillators, we need a better understanding of both fibrillation and defibrillation. Fundamental mysteries remain regarding the mechanism of how the heart responds to a shock, particularly anodal shocks and the resultant hyperpolarization. Virtual anodes play critical roles in defibrillation, and one cannot build better defibrillators until these mechanisms are understood. We are using mathematical modeling to numerically simulate observed phenomena, and are exploring fundamental mechanisms responsible for the heart's electrical behavior. Such simulations clarify mechanisms and identify key parameters. We investigate how systolic tissue responds to an anodal shock and how refractory tissue reacts to hyperpolarization by studying the dip in the anodal strength-interval curve. This dip is due to electrotonic interaction between regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization following a shock. The dominance of the electrotonic mechanism over calcium interactions implies the importance of the spatial distribution of virtual electrodes. We also investigate the response of localized ischemic tissue to an anodal shock by modeling a regional elevation of extracellular potassium concentration. This heterogeneity leads to action potential instability, 2:1 conduction block (alternans), and reflection-like reentry at the boarder of the normal and ischemic regions. This kind of reflection (reentry) occurs due to the delay between proximal and distal segments to re-excite the proximal segment. Our numerical simulations are based on the bidomain model, the state-of-the-art mathematical description of how cardiac tissue responds to shocks. The dynamic LuoRudy model describes the active properties of the membrane. To model ischemia

  11. The determination of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes in normal human muscle and other tissues

    PubMed Central

    Emery, A. E. H.

    1967-01-01

    1. A technique has been developed, based on preferential inhibition by urea, for determining the amounts and proportions of the M and H sub-units of lactate dehydrogenase (referred to as LDH-M and LDH-H respectively) in human tissues, including muscle. 2. There was good agreement between the results obtained with urea inhibition and those obtained with starch-gel electrophoresis. 3. With increasing age there was a significant decrease in the total amount of lactate dehydrogenase and the amount of LDH-M in skeletal muscle. This could not be accounted for by the replacement of functioning muscle tissue by fibrous connective tissue. 4. The proportion of LDH-M was less in certain muscles (e.g. soleus and extra-ocular) than in other muscles (e.g. gastrocnemius and rectus abdominis). 5. The proportions of LDH-M and LDH-H did not differ significantly in different superficial limb muscles and were not significantly affected by either age or sex. 6. Specimens of muscle from 86 different individuals (all Europeans) have been subjected to electrophoresis, but no variants of lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes have been found. PMID:5584002

  12. Comparison of human colorectal normal tissue with cancerous tissue autofluorescence image by optical sectioning with a confocal laser-scanning microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Sheng; Chia, Teck-Chee; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Diong, Cheong Hoong; Tang, Choong Leong; Choen, Francis S.; Krishnan, Shankar M.

    2003-10-01

    We investigated normal and cancerous human colorectal tissues (fresh thick biopsy specimens) using Olympus Confocal laser scanning biological microscope (FV300). The different layers of autofluorescence images of the specimen were captured by 488 nm laser scanning and sectioning. Optical sectioning can be performed in the vertical plane. Laser scanning can be performed in the horizontal plane. By comparing the autofluorescence image of the normal colorectal tissue with cancerous tissue, the structures of the optical sectioning image layer were found to be significantly different. We have also obtained fibrous autofluorescence image inside tissue specimen. Our investigation may help provide some useful insight to other autofluorescence research studies like laser induced autofluorescence spectra of human colorectal tissue study as a diagnosis technique for clinical application.

  13. Rectification of pulsatile stress on soft tissues: a mechanism for normal-pressure hydrocephalus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalikop, Shreyas; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2011-11-01

    Hydrocephalus is a pathological condition of the brain that occurs when cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulates excessively in the brain cavities, resulting in compression of the brain parenchyma. Counter-intuitively, normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) does not show elevated pressure differences across the compressed parenchyma. We investigate the effects of nonlinear tissue mechanics and periodic driving in this system. The latter is due to the cardiac cycle, which provides significant intracranial pressure and volume flow rate fluctuations. Nonlinear rectification of the periodic driving within a model of fluid flow in poroelastic material can lead to compression or expansion of the parenchyma, and this effect does not rely on changes in the mean intracranial pressure. The rectification effects can occur gradually over several days, in agreement with clinical studies of NPH.

  14. Expression of the retinoblastoma protein is regulated in normal human tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Cordon-Cardo, C.; Richon, V. M.

    1994-01-01

    The nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the retinoblastoma gene (pRB) appears to play a central role in control of cell division and differentiation. It is generally accepted that pRB is ubiquitously expressed. We investigated the expression of pRB in normal human tissues using immunochemical techniques to determine the expression of pRB in specific cell types. Maturing cells, both proliferating and nonproliferating, rather than their progenitors possess the highest levels of pRB. Cells of stratified epithelia, such as those from cervix, display strong immunostaining in the nondividing maturing suprabasal layer, whereas basal cells showed low to undetectable levels of pRB. Similar patterns of expression were observed in simple epithelia and hematopoietic cells contained within distinguishable proliferating compartments and in germ cell development. These studies are crucial to our understanding of processes involved in control of differentiation (tumorigenesis) as well as tumor progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8129035

  15. Impact of Statistical Learning Methods on the Predictive Power of Multivariate Normal Tissue Complication Probability Models

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Chengjian; Schaaf, Arjen van der; Schilstra, Cornelis; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Veld, Aart A. van't

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To study the impact of different statistical learning methods on the prediction performance of multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models. Methods and Materials: In this study, three learning methods, stepwise selection, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO), and Bayesian model averaging (BMA), were used to build NTCP models of xerostomia following radiotherapy treatment for head and neck cancer. Performance of each learning method was evaluated by a repeated cross-validation scheme in order to obtain a fair comparison among methods. Results: It was found that the LASSO and BMA methods produced models with significantly better predictive power than that of the stepwise selection method. Furthermore, the LASSO method yields an easily interpretable model as the stepwise method does, in contrast to the less intuitive BMA method. Conclusions: The commonly used stepwise selection method, which is simple to execute, may be insufficient for NTCP modeling. The LASSO method is recommended.

  16. Differentiating fibroadenoma and ductal carcinoma in situ from normal breast tissue by multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Yuting; Wu, Yan; Lian, Yuane; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Fibroadenoma (FA) is the most common benign tumor of the female breast and several studies have reported that women with it have increased risk of breast cancer. While the ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a very early form of breast cancer. Thus, early detections of FA and DCIS are critical for improving breast tumor outcome and survival. In this paper, we use multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to obtain the high-contrast images of fresh, unfixed, unstained human breast specimens (normal breast tissue, FA and DCIS). Our results show that MPM has the ability to identify the characteristics of FA and DCIS including changes of duct architecture and collagen morphology. These results are consistent with the histological results. With the advancement of MPM, the technique has potential ability to serve as a real-time noninvasive imaging tool for early detection of breast tumor.

  17. Expression of splice variants of mts1 gene in normal and neoplastic human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Ambartsumyan, N.S. |; Grigorian, M.S.; Lukanidin, E.M.

    1995-09-01

    Data on cloning of cDNA corresponding to human mts1 gene transcripts are presented. By comparing nucleotide sequences of the genomic DNA clone and cDNA of mts1, it was shown that human osteosarcoma OHS cells contain two alternative splice variants of mts1 transcripts. Alternative splicing occurs in the 5{prime}-untranslated region of the mts1 pre-mRNA. Both splice variants, hu-mts1 and hu-mts1(var), demonstrate similar stability in the cells, and each contains one open reading frame for the MTS1 protein. However, the two types of transcripts are translated with different effectiveness. The level of transcription of mts1 splice variants in different normal and neoplastic tissues and cell lines varies significantly. The role of alternative splicing as the mechanism responsible for posttranscriptional regulation of mts1 gene expression is discussed. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Pleomorphic adenoma of the breast should be excised with a cuff of normal tissue.

    PubMed

    John, Biku J; Griffiths, Carl; Ebbs, Steven R

    2007-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma is a benign tumor found rarely in the breast but commonly in the salivary gland. Unlike the salivary gland variant management guidelines are poorly defined in the breast. We describe the first case of pleomorphic adenoma of the breast that has recurred for the second time following previous surgical excisions, and review the available literature. Due to the risk of recurrence and malignant transformation, we recommend complete excision of the lesion with a cuff of normal tissue, as is the practice in the salivary gland. Clinicians should be aware of the condition, as preoperative diagnosis will facilitate adequate surgery. Patients should be informed about the risk of recurrence. We recommend follow-up for at least a period of 5 years with yearly clinical examinations.

  19. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Brent S.; Aydogan, Bulent; Liang, Yun; Yeginer, Mete; Hasselle, Michael D.; Dandekar, Virag; Bafana, Rounak; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Mundt, Arno J.; Roeske, John C.; Mell, Loren K.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that increased pelvic bone marrow (BM) irradiation is associated with increased hematologic toxicity (HT) in cervical cancer patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy and to develop a normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for HT. Methods and Materials: We tested associations between hematologic nadirs during chemoradiotherapy and the volume of BM receiving {>=}10 and 20 Gy (V{sub 10} and V{sub 20}) using a previously developed linear regression model. The validation cohort consisted of 44 cervical cancer patients treated with concurrent cisplatin and pelvic radiotherapy. Subsequently, these data were pooled with data from 37 identically treated patients from a previous study, forming a cohort of 81 patients for normal tissue complication probability analysis. Generalized linear modeling was used to test associations between hematologic nadirs and dosimetric parameters, adjusting for body mass index. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to derive optimal dosimetric planning constraints. Results: In the validation cohort, significant negative correlations were observed between white blood cell count nadir and V{sub 10} (regression coefficient ({beta}) = -0.060, p = 0.009) and V{sub 20} ({beta} = -0.044, p = 0.010). In the combined cohort, the (adjusted) {beta} estimates for log (white blood cell) vs. V{sub 10} and V{sub 20} were as follows: -0.022 (p = 0.025) and -0.021 (p = 0.002), respectively. Patients with V{sub 10} {>=} 95% were more likely to experience Grade {>=}3 leukopenia (68.8% vs. 24.6%, p < 0.001) than were patients with V{sub 20} > 76% (57.7% vs. 21.8%, p = 0.001). Conclusions: These findings support the hypothesis that HT increases with increasing pelvic BM volume irradiated. Efforts to maintain V{sub 10} < 95% and V{sub 20} < 76% may reduce HT.

  20. Radiobiological Determination of Dose Escalation and Normal Tissue Toxicity in Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Samantha; Partridge, Mike; Carrington, Rhys; Hurt, Chris; Crosby, Thomas; Hawkins, Maria A.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the trade-off in tumor coverage and organ-at-risk sparing when applying dose escalation for concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of mid-esophageal cancer, using radiobiological modeling to estimate local control and normal tissue toxicity. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with mid-esophageal cancer were selected from the SCOPE1 database (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials number 47718479), with a mean planning target volume (PTV) of 327 cm{sup 3}. A boost volume, PTV2 (GTV + 0.5 cm margin), was created. Radiobiological modeling of tumor control probability (TCP) estimated the dose required for a clinically significant (+20%) increase in local control as 62.5 Gy/25 fractions. A RapidArc (RA) plan with a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) to PTV2 (RA{sub 62.5}) was compared to a standard dose plan of 50 Gy/25 fractions (RA{sub 50}). Dose-volume metrics and estimates of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for heart and lungs were compared. Results: Clinically acceptable dose escalation was feasible for 16 of 21 patients, with significant gains (>18%) in tumor control from 38.2% (RA{sub 50}) to 56.3% (RA{sub 62.5}), and only a small increase in predicted toxicity: median heart NTCP 4.4% (RA{sub 50}) versus 5.6% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001 and median lung NTCP 6.5% (RA{sub 50}) versus 7.5% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001. Conclusions: Dose escalation to the GTV to improve local control is possible when overlap between PTV and organ-at-risk (<8% heart volume and <2.5% lung volume overlap for this study) generates only negligible increase in lung or heart toxicity. These predictions from radiobiological modeling should be tested in future clinical trials.

  1. Cytological and molecular detection of Leishmania infantum in different tissues of clinically normal and sick cats.

    PubMed

    Chatzis, Manolis K; Andreadou, Margarita; Leontides, Leonidas; Kasabalis, Dimitrios; Mylonakis, Mathios; Koutinas, Alexandros F; Rallis, Timoleon; Ikonomopoulos, John; Saridomichelakis, Manolis N

    2014-05-28

    Natural infection of domestic cats by Leishmania infantum (synonym: L. chagasi) has been demonstrated in several European, Latin American, and Asian countries, and the estimated prevalence of infection, based mainly on blood PCR, ranges from 0.3% up to 60.6%. In this study we aimed to: (a) estimate the prevalence of the infection by L. infantum in clinically normal cats (group A; n=50) and in cats with various clinical signs (group B; n=50), living in an endemic region, by both cytological examination of four different tissues (lymph node, skin, bone marrow, and conjunctiva) and by PCR in four different tissues (blood, skin biopsies, bone marrow, and conjunctiva); (b) compare the diagnostic sensitivity of the above methods and evaluate for possible associations between their results; and (c) investigate the possible associations between infection by L. infantum and signalment, living conditions, season of sampling, and health status of the cats. The prevalence of the infection in the study population was 41% and did not differ (P=0.839) between group A (42%) and B (40%) cats. Lymph node, skin, bone marrow and conjunctiva cytology was always negative. Therefore, the diagnosis of the infection was based only on PCR in blood, skin biopsy, bone marrow and conjunctiva, which was positive in 13%, 18.2%, 16% and 3.1% of the cats, respectively. PCR was positive in only one of the four tissues in 80.5% of the infected cats. The results differed (P=0.014) among the four tissues and were less frequently positive in conjunctiva compared to skin biopsies and bone marrow (P=0.007 for both comparisons), thus highlighting the need for multiple tissue PCR testing in order to minimize false-negative results. More PCR-positive cats were found when sampling was performed during the period of sandfly activity (odds ratio: 2.44; P=0.022). Also, in group B cats, the likelihood of PCR-positivity was higher (odds ratio: 3.93; P=0.042) among those presenting at least one systemic clinical

  2. SU-E-J-212: MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Assessment of Tumor and Normal Brain Tissue Responses of Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma Treated by Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, P; Park, P; Li, H; Zhu, X; Mahajan, A; Grosshans, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can measure molecular mobility at the cellular level, quantified by the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). DTI may also reveal axonal fiber directional information in the white matter, quantified by the fractional anisotropy (FA). Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) is a rare brain tumor that occurs in children and young adults. Proton therapy (PT) is increasingly used in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors including JPA. However, the response of both tumors and normal tissues to PT is currently under investigation. We report tumor and normal brain tissue responses for a pediatric case of JPA treated with PT assessed using DTI. Methods: A ten year old male with JPA of the left thalamus received passive scattered PT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in 28 fractions. Post PT, the patient has been followed up in seven years. At each follow up, MRI imaging including DTI was performed to assess response. MR images were registered to the treatment planning CT and the GTV mapped onto each MRI. The GTV contour was then mirrored to the right side of brain through the patient’s middle line to represent normal brain tissue. ADC and FA were measured within the ROIs. Results: Proton therapy can completely spare contra lateral brain while the target volume received full prescribed dose. From a series of MRI ADC images before and after PT at different follow ups, the enhancement corresponding to GTV had nearly disappeared more than 2 years after PT. Both ADC and FA demonstrate that contralateral normal brain tissue were not affect by PT and the tumor volume reverted to normal ADC and FA values. Conclusion: DTI allowed quantitative evaluation of tumor and normal brain tissue responses to PT. Further study in a larger cohort is warranted.

  3. Automatic segmentation of histological structures in normal and neoplastic mammary gland tissue sections

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Deschamps, Thomas; Idica, Adam K.; Malladi, Ravi; Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos

    2003-01-18

    In this paper we present a scheme for real time segmentation of histological structures in microscopic images of normal and neoplastic mammary gland sections. Paraffin embedded or frozen tissue blocks are sliced, and sections are stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). The sections are then imaged using conventional bright field microscopy. The background of the images is corrected by arithmetic manipulation using a ''phantom.'' Then we use the fast marching method with a speed function that depends on the brightness gradient of the image to obtain a preliminary approximation to the boundaries of the structures of interest within a region of interest (ROI) of the entire section manually selected by the user. We use the result of the fast marching method as the initial condition for the level set motion equation. We run this last method for a few steps and obtain the final result of the segmentation. These results can be connected from section to section to build a three-dimensional reconstruction of the entire tissue block that we are studying.

  4. [Normal connective tissue in penis and its changes in patients with erectile dysfunction and Peyronie's disease].

    PubMed

    Neĭmark, A I; Klimachev, V V; Gerval'd, V Ia; Bobrov, I P; Avdalian, A M; Muzalevskaia, N I; Gerval'd, I V; Aliev, R T; Kazymov, M A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the connective tissue of penis in normal individuals and in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) and Peyronie's disease (PD) using computer methods of image analysis. Penis tissues were obtained from 20 males aged 20-40 years who died in accidents, penis biopsies were taken from 23 patients with ED and 9 patients with PD (average age: 51 +/- 11.5 years). In both groups of patients, the volumetric fraction of collagen fibers in the tunica albuginea and corpora cavernosa was increased, while that one of elastic fibers was decreased. At the same time, the changes of elastic fibers were noted: the fibers become thinner and formed "rods". The reduction of the amplitude and the wavelength in the collagen fibers of the tunica albuginea in patients with ED and the presence of fibrous plaques in corpora cavernosa in in patients with PD were registered. The methods of computer image analysis may improve the morphologic diagnosis of ED and PD.

  5. Automatic segementation of histological structures in normal and neoplastic mammary gland tissue sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Deschamps, Thomas; Idica, Adam; Malladi, Ravikanth; Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos

    2003-07-01

    In this paper we present a scheme for real time segmentation of histological structures in microscopic images of normal and neoplastic mammary gland sections. Paraffin embedded or frozen tissue blocks are sliced, and sections are stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). The sections are then imaged using conventional bright field microscopy. The background of the images is corrected by arithmetic manipulation using a "phantom." Then we use the fast marching method with a speed function that depends on the brightness gradient of the image to obtain a preliminary approximation to the boundaries of the structures of interest within a region of interest (ROI) of the entire section manually selected by the user. We use the result of the fast marching method as the initial condition for the level set motion equation. We run this last method for a few steps and obtain the final result of the segmentation. These results can be connected from section to section to build a three-dimensional reconstruction of the entire tissue block that we are studying.

  6. Quantitative changes of collagen in human normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma using nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiqiang; Wu, Yan; Lian, Yuane; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) imaging of collagen plays a key role in noninvasive diagnosis of human tissue. During the experiment, we observed an interesting phenomenon which two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signal of collagen in human invasive ductal carcinoma of breast tissue becomes much weaker than the normal breast tissue, but the second harmonic generation (SHG) signal of collagen does not get an obvious change . In order to explain the phenomena,this paper emphasizes on the intensity of TPEF and SHG signal from collagen in human invasive ductal carcinoma of breast tissues and normal breast tissue. Further, we respectively obtain the intensity spectral information from collagen in the above two tissues with all parameter unaltered. Our quantitative results show that the intensity of TPEF from collagen in human invasive ductal carcinoma of breast tissue is much lower than the intensity of TPEF from collagen in normal breast tissue. According to the theoretic analysis, it was concluded that the intensity of TPEF declined due to the reduction of the quantum yield when the collagen was intruded by cancer cells. However, the invasion of cancer cells has no effect on decisive factor of SHG. Our theoretical analysis brings more detailed information about intensity of SHG and TPEF from collagen in the above two tissues.

  7. Observations on Diseased Pigs with High Sulfate Intake and Normal Tissue Copper Levels

    PubMed Central

    Jericho, K. W. F.; Strausz, K. I.; Martin, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    Disease in a large pig herd reared intensively and kept on sulfate-rich drinking water is described. It is the first report of diseased progeny of sows with high sulfate intake. Results of two surveys are presented, one for water with sulfate in excess of 2000 ppm and one for water with less than 1000 ppm. The management practices are described in detail. Disease of Survey I was manifested by high morbidity and mortality (50% of 600) in piglets, incoordination in piglets and some adult stock and osteopathy in piglets and weaners. In Survey II disease was less severe and restricted to piglets. Detailed histopathological studies revealed myelin deficiency in brain and spinal cord of sows and piglets, interferred endochondreal ossification of long bones of piglets and weaners, fatty changes of livers and interstitial nephritis in piglets and weaners. The changes in the nervous tissue were considered due to delayed fixation as tissue was only immersed in fixative and not perfused with it immediately after death. Similar changes have been described for pigs deficient in copper. Copper content of tissue and body fluids of pigs of this study were normal, as were the serum inorganic phosphate and total calcium levels. The bone changes observed have also been reported for rats given dextran sulfate injections, for pigs on experimental low-copper sulfate-enriched diet and for pigs reported low in copper and fed a diet supplemented with sulfide. The cause of the locomotor disturbance and mortality in piglets was not established. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7. PMID:4270430

  8. In vivo quantitative imaging of normal and cancerous breast tissue using broadband diffuse optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Jiang, Shudong; Li, Zhongze; diFlorio-Alexander, Roberta M.; Barth, Richard J.; Kaufman, Peter A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: A NIR tomography system that combines frequency domain (FD) and continuous wave (CW) measurements was used to image normal and malignant breast tissues. Methods: FD acquisitions were confined to wavelengths less than 850 nm because of detector limitations, whereas light from longer wavelengths (up to 948 nm) was measured in CW mode with CCD-coupled spectrometer detection. The two data sets were combined and processed in a single spectrally constrained reconstruction to map concentrations of hemoglobin, water, and lipid, as well as scattering parameters in the breast. Results: Chromophore concentrations were imaged in the breasts of nine asymptomatic volunteers to evaluate their intrasubject and intersubject variability. Normal subject data showed physiologically expected trends. Images from three cancer patients indicate that the added CW data is critical to recovering the expected increases in water and decreases in lipid content within malignancies. Contrasts of 1.5 to twofold in hemoglobin and water values were found in cancers. Conclusions:In vivo breast imaging with instrumentation that combines FD and CW NIR data acquisition in a single spectral reconstruction produces more accurate hemoglobin, water, and lipid results relative to FD data alone. PMID:20831079

  9. Estimate of normal tissue damage in treatment planning for stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Benassi, M; Begnozzi, L; Gentile, F P; Chiatti, L; Carpino, S

    1993-10-01

    A personal computer (PC) system was developed to perform treatment planning for radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy. These techniques of irradiation of the brain may be accomplished with a linear accelerator by performing several non-coplanar arcs of a highly collimated beam focused at a fixed point. The PC system allows the acquisition, reconstruction and the visualization of the target volume from CT or MR images, and then it permits to calculate a three-dimensional (3-D) dose distribution due to small photon beams and to visualize it. The software calculates not only total dose distribution, administered fractionated or in single fraction, but also the NTD2 (normalized total dose) predicted to have a biological effect equivalent to the single irradiation. The choice of the best technique is supported by the dose volume histograms (DVH) calculation and by an estimate of complication probability to the brain normal tissue (NTCP). The algorithm for NTCP calculation is based on two models: the linear quadratic and the logistic. A comparison of three different dose calculations for a typical cerebral target volume is presented to demonstrate the system performances.

  10. Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Response and Normal Tissue Regeneration After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy to Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Stinauer, Michelle A.; Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To characterize changes in standardized uptake value (SUV) in positron emission tomography (PET) scans and determine the pace of normal tissue regeneration after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for solid tumor liver metastases. Methods and Materials: We reviewed records of patients with liver metastases treated with SBRT to {>=}40 Gy in 3-5 fractions. Evaluable patients had pretreatment PET and {>=}1 post-treatment PET. Each PET/CT scan was fused to the planning computed tomography (CT) scan. The maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}) for each lesion and the total liver volume were measured on each PET/CT scan. Maximum SUV levels before and after SBRT were recorded. Results: Twenty-seven patients with 35 treated liver lesions were studied. The median follow-up was 15.7 months (range, 1.5-38.4 mo), with 5 PET scans per patient (range, 2-14). Exponential decay curve fitting (r=0.97) showed that SUV{sub max} declined to a plateau of 3.1 for controlled lesions at 5 months after SBRT. The estimated SUV{sub max} decay half-time was 2.0 months. The SUV{sub max} in controlled lesions fluctuated up to 4.2 during follow-up and later declined; this level is close to 2 standard deviations above the mean normal liver SUV{sub max} (4.01). A failure cutoff of SUV{sub max} {>=}6 is twice the calculated plateau SUV{sub max} of controlled lesions. Parenchymal liver volume decreased by 20% at 3-6 months and regenerated to a new baseline level approximately 10% below the pretreatment level at 12 months. Conclusions: Maximum SUV decreases over the first months after SBRT to plateau at 3.1, similar to the median SUV{sub max} of normal livers. Transient moderate increases in SUV{sub max} may be observed after SBRT. We propose a cutoff SUV{sub max} {>=}6, twice the baseline normal liver SUV{sub max}, to score local failure by PET criteria. Post-SBRT values between 4 and 6 would be suspicious for local tumor persistence or recurrence. The volume of normal liver reached nadir 3

  11. Extraction of RNA from archival tissues and measurement of thrombospondin-1 mRNA in normal, dysplastic, and malignant oral tissues.

    PubMed

    Macluskey, M; Baillie, R; Morrow, H; Schor, S L; Schor, A M

    2006-04-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein implicated in the regulation of angiogenesis and tumour development. Our objectives were to ascertain the quantity and quality of RNA extracted from archival, formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded, oral tissues and their application in measuring the concentrations of TSP-1 mRNA in these tissues. We compared three techniques of isolation of RNA as well as related experimental variables. TSP-1 mRNA was measured in specimens of normal, dysplastic, and malignant oral tissues by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RNA suitable for analysis by real-time RT-PCR was obtained by the three techniques tested, although the yield varied depending on the protocol used (range 0.2-3.6 microg/mm(3)). The mean (S.D.) concentrations of TSP-1 mRNA relative to 18S were 21.1 (7.2) in normal oral tissues (n=9), 11.0 (8.2) in dysplastic tissue (n=8) and 7.3 (5.3) in carcinomatous tissue (n=17). The difference between normal and carcinomatous specimens was significant (p=0.01). This reduction in expression of TSP-1 mRNA from normal to dysplasia to carcinoma may favour the angiogenic drive that accompanies the development of oral tumours.

  12. Desferal (DFO) induced Ga-67 washout from normal tissue, tumor and abscess in experimental animals

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, Z.H.; Som, P.; Atkins, H.L.; Brill, A.B.

    1980-01-01

    In the experimental animal, desferal (DFO) given intravenously washes out Ga-67 from all tissues. This effect is not uniform: blood activity is reduced very markedly, while liver activity is less affected. Maximal effect of DFO occurs if given close to the Ga-67 injection. When the time interval between the two is increased, the absolute amount of Ga-67 excreted in the urine in excess of the spontaneous excretion is reduced. Administration of DFO does not effect Ga-67 gastrointestinal excretion. In three animal tumor models (EMT-6 sarcoma in Balb/c mice, spontaneous adenocarcinoma in mice, and spontaneous adenocarcinoma in the rabbit) and in sterile abscess-bearing rats, the administration of DFO 24 hrs after Ga-67-citrate improves significantly the target-to-nontarget ratio. Animals given 50 mg/kg DFO I.V. after Ga-67 citrate showed a significant reduction in the whole-body activity as seen in a one-week follow up.

  13. The Expression and Function of Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides in Normal Tissues and in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Obaidat, Amanda; Roth, Megan; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) are members of the SLCO gene superfamily of proteins. The 11 human OATPs are classified in 6 families and subfamilies on the basis of their amino acid sequence similarities. OATPs are expressed in several epithelial tissues throughout the body and transport mainly amphipathic molecules with molecular weights of more than 300 kDa. Members of the OATP1 and OATP2 families are functionally the best-characterized OATPs. Among these are the multispecific OATP1A2, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, and OATP2B1. They transport various endo- and xenobiotics, including hormones and their conjugates as well as numerous drugs such as several anticancer agents. Recent reports demonstrate that some OATPs are up- or downregulated in several cancers and that OATP expression might affect cancer development. On the basis of the findings summarized in this review, we propose that OATPs could be valuable targets for anticancer therapy. PMID:21854228

  14. Altered expression of Lewis blood group and related antigens in fetal, normal adult and malignant tissues of the uterine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Inoue, M; Nakayama, M; Tanizawa, O

    1990-01-01

    The expression of the Lewis blood group and its related antigens in fetal, normal adult and malignant tissues of the uterine endometrium was examined immunohistochemically using a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies with specificities for Lewis-a (La), Sialyl Lewis-a (SLa), Lewis-b (Lb), Lewis-X (LX), Sialyl Lewis-X (SLX) and Lewis-Y (LY) antigens. La, SLa and SLX having one fucose residue were detected in a small number of fetal tissues, while Lb and LY having two fucose residues were found in most cases. In the adult endometrium, expression of Lb and LY was considerably lower than those in fetal tissues, although expression of La and SLa was not different between these two tissues. Expression of LX and SLX was pronounced in adult when compared with fetal tissues. Malignant endometrial glands expressed La, SLa, Lb and LY, extensively, while LX and SLX were expressed less than in normal tissues. Lb and LY can thus be considered oncofetal antigens, extensively expressed in fetal and malignant tissues but not in normal adult tissues. Expression of Lb and LY was greater than that of La and SLA in carcinoma; an increase in the activity of fucose transferase might be associated with malignant transformation in the uterine endometrium.

  15. Effect of 2% Chlorhexidine Digluconate on the Bond Strength to Normal versus Caries-Affected Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Paula C. P.; Pashley, David H.; Tjäderhane, Leo; Breschi, Lorenzo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; de Goes, Mario Fernando; Wang, Linda; Carrilho, Marcela R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY This study evaluated the effect of 2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) used as a therapeutic primer on the long-term bond strengths of two etch-and-rinse adhesives to normal (ND) and caries-affected (CAD) dentin. Forty extracted human molars with coronal carious lesions, surrounded by normal dentin, were selected for this study. Flat surfaces of two types of dentin (i.e. ND and CAD) were prepared with a water-cooled high speed diamond disc, and then acid-etched, rinsed and air-dried. In control groups, dentin was re-hydrated with distilled water, blot-dried and bonded with a three-step (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose-MP) or a two-step (Single Bond 2-SB) etch-and-rinse adhesive. In experimental groups, dentin was re-hydrated with 2% CHX (60 s), blot-dried and bonded with the same adhesives. Resin composite build-ups were made. Specimens were prepared for microtensile bond testing in accordance with the non-trimming technique and then tested either immediately or after 6-month storage in artificial saliva. Data were analyzed by ANOVA/Bonferroni tests (α = 0.05). CHX did not affect the immediate bond strength to ND or CAD (p>0.05). CHX treatment significantly lowered the loss of bond strength after 6 months seen in control bonds for ND (p<0.05), but it did not alter the bond strength of CAD (p>0.05). Application of MP on CHX-treated ND or CAD produced bonds that did not change over 6 months of storage. PMID:19363971

  16. Electroporation-assisted penetration of zinc oxide nanoparticles in ex vivo normal and cancerous human colon tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L. P.; Wu, G. Y.; Wei, H. J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Yang, H. Q.; He, Y. H.; Xie, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we presented the research of the penetration of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) (30 and 90 nm), and electroporation (EP) assisted penetration of the ZnO NPs in the human normal colon (NC) and adenomatous colon (AC) tissues studied with optical coherence tomography (OCT) and diffuse reflectance (DR) measurement. The results have shown that the attenuation coefficient of colon tissue after the application of 30 or 90 nm ZnO NPs alone decreased approximately by 28% and 14% for NC tissue, 35% and 22% for AC tissue, respectively; while the attenuation coefficient of colon tissue after combined application of 30 or 90 nm ZnO NPs/EP decreased approximately by 46% and 30% for NC tissue, and 53% and 42% for AC tissue, respectively. The results illustrate EP can significantly increase the penetration of ZnO NPs in the colon tissue, especially in AC tissue. Through the analysis of attenuation coefficient and reflectance intensity of the colon tissue, we find that the accumulation of the ZnO NPs in the colon tissue greatly influenced the tissue optical properties.

  17. Modeling of dose to tumor and normal tissue from intraperitoneal radioimmunotherapy with alpha and beta emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Roeske, J.C.; Chen, G.T.; Atcher, R.W.; Pelizzari, C.A.; Rotmensch, J.; Haraf, D.; Montag, A.; Weichselbaum, R.R. )

    1990-12-01

    Dose distributions for normal and tumor tissues from intraperitoneally administered radiolabeled antibodies have been calculated for 90-Yttrium (90Y), 131-Iodine (131I), and 211-Astatine (211At). The dose calculations use data on the activity of intraperitoneal fluid administered, the percent injected dose/gm uptake by tumor, biological half life, and a model for diffusion of antibody/radionuclide complex into peritoneal tissues. Calculations are performed for planar and hemispherical tumor shapes, ranging in size to establish the influence of geometry on dose distribution. Calculations for tumor geometry obtained from biopsies are also performed. When the activity is concentrated on or near the tumor surface, the maximum dose to a planar tumor for a 20 mci administration of 90Y is approximately 60 Gy, and falls rapidly to 50% of this value within 1 mm. However, for a hemispherical tumor, the dose is a maximum of 26 Gy, with an average of approximately 20 Gy. The surface dose from 131I (130 mci) is 240 Gy, and diminishes to 20 Gy in .05 cm in the planar case, whereas a hemispherical tumor receives a dose of 90 Gy over a large fraction of the volume, with the distal portions receiving 40 Gy. The surface dose for an administration of 70 mci of 211 At is 450 Gy and decreases to 50% of this value in 30 microns. Both surface geometry and tumor size are important determinants in the heterogeneity of tumor dose, as are the dose administered, antibody uptake, biodistribution, and residence time factors. These initial studies suggest that the size of disease which may be effectively treated is much less than the range of the particle emitted by radiolabeled antibodies. Furthermore, therapy is ultimately limited by the degree to which the antibody/radionuclide complex can diffuse and permeate the tumor.

  18. Heterogeneous nuclear expression of the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein in normal and neoplastic human tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Gambacorta, M.; Flenghi, L.; Fagioli, M.; Pileri, S.; Leoncini, L.; Bigerna, B.; Pacini, R.; Tanci, L. N.; Pasqualucci, L.; Ascani, S.; Mencarelli, A.; Liso, A.; Pelicci, P. G.; Falini, B.

    1996-01-01

    The RING-finger promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is the product of the PML gene that fuses with the retinoic acid receptor-alpha gene in the t(15; 17) translocation of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Wild-type PML localizes in the nucleus with a typical speckled pattern that is a consequence of the concentration of the protein within discrete subnuclear domains known as nuclear bodies. Delocalization of PML from nuclear bodies has been documented in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and suggested to contribute to leukemogenesis. In an attempt to get new insights into the function of the wild-type PML protein and to investigate whether it displays an altered expression pattern in neoplasms other than acute promyelocytic leukemia, we stained a large number of normal and neoplastic human tissues with a new murine monoclonal antibody (PG-M3) directed against the amino-terminal region of PML. As the PG-M3 epitope is partially resistant to fixatives, only cells that overexpress PML are detected by the antibody in microwave-heated paraffin sections. Among normal tissues, PML was characteristically up-regulated in activated epithelioid histiocytes and fibroblasts in a variety of pathological conditions, columnar epithelium in small active thyroid follicles, well differentiated foamy cells in the center of sebaceous glands, and hypersecretory endometria (Arias-Stella). Interferons, the PML of which is a primary target gene, and estrogens are likely to represent some of the cytokines and/or hormones that may be involved in the up-regulation of PML under these circumstances. In keeping with this concept, we found that PML is frequently overexpressed in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells of Hodgkin's disease, a tumor of cytokine-producing cells. Among solid tumors, overexpression of PML was frequently found in carcinomas of larynx and thyroid (papillary), epithelial thymomas, and Kaposi's sarcoma, whereas carcinomas of the lung, thyroid (follicular), breast, and colon were

  19. Monitoring of permeability of different analytes in human normal and cancerous bladder tissues in vitro using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Bingsong; Deng, Xiaoyuan; Wei, Huajiang; Wu, Guoyong; Guo, Zhouyi; Yang, Hongqin; He, Yonghong; Xie, Shusen

    2014-12-01

    We report our preliminary results on quantification of glucose and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) diffusion in normal and cancerous human bladder tissues in vitro by using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The permeability coefficients (PCs) of a 30% aqueous solution of glucose are found to be (7.92 +/- 0.81) × 10-6 cm s-1 and (1.19 +/- 0.13) × 10-5 cm s-1 in normal and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. The PCs of 50% DMSO are calculated to be (8.99 +/- 0.93) × 10-6 cm s-1 and (1.43 +/- 0.17) × 10-5 cm s-1 in normal and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. The obtained results show a statistically significant difference in permeability of normal and cancerous tissue and indicate that the PC of 50% DMSO is about 1.13-and 1.21-fold higher than that of 30% glucose in normal bladder and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. Thus, the quantitative measurements with the help of PCs from OCT images can be a potentially powerful method for bladder cancer detection.

  20. Monitoring of permeability of different analytes in human normal and cancerous bladder tissues in vitro using optical coherence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bingsong Lei; Xiaoyuan Deng; Huajiang Wei; Zhouyi Guo; Guoyong Wu; Hongqin Yang; Shusen Xie; Yonghong He

    2014-12-31

    We report our preliminary results on quantification of glucose and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) diffusion in normal and cancerous human bladder tissues in vitro by using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The permeability coefficients (PCs) of a 30% aqueous solution of glucose are found to be (7.92 ± 0.81) × 10{sup -6} cm s{sup -1} and (1.19 ± 0.13) × 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} in normal and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. The PCs of 50% DMSO are calculated to be (8.99 ± 0.93) × 10{sup -6} cm s{sup -1} and (1.43 ± 0.17) × 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} in normal and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. The obtained results show a statistically significant difference in permeability of normal and cancerous tissue and indicate that the PC of 50% DMSO is about 1.13-and 1.21-fold higher than that of 30% glucose in normal bladder and cancerous bladder tissues, respectively. Thus, the quantitative measurements with the help of PCs from OCT images can be a potentially powerful method for bladder cancer detection. (optical coherence tomography)

  1. Comparative proteomic analysis of normal and tumor stromal cells by tissue on chip based mass spectrometry (toc-MS)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In carcinoma tissues, genetic and metabolic changes not only occur at the tumor cell level, but also in the surrounding stroma. This carcinoma-reactive stromal tissue is heterogeneous and consists e.g. of non-epithelial cells such as fibroblasts or fibrocytes, inflammatory cells and vasculature-related cells, which promote carcinoma growth and progression of carcinomas. Nevertheless, there is just little knowledge about the proteomic changes from normal connective tissue to tumor stroma. In the present study, we acquired and analysed specific protein patterns of small stromal sections surrounding head and neck cell complexes in comparison to normal subepithelial connective tissue. To gain defined stromal areas we used laser-based tissue microdissection. Because these stromal areas are limited in size we established the highly sensitive 'tissue on chip based mass spectrometry' (toc-MS). Therefore, the dissected areas were directly transferred to chromatographic arrays and the proteomic profiles were subsequently analysed with mass spectrometry. At least 100 cells were needed for an adequate spectrum. The locating of differentially expressed proteins enables a precise separation of normal and tumor stroma. The newly described toc-MS technology allows an initial insight into proteomic differences between small numbers of exactly defined cells from normal and tumor stroma. PMID:20205871

  2. Large animal normal tissue tolerance using an epithermal neutron beam and borocaptate sodium.

    PubMed

    Gavin, P R; Huiskamp, R; Wheeler, F J; Kraft, S L; DeHaan, C E

    1993-01-01

    Irradiation of the canine head following intravenous Na2B12H11SH (BSH) administration has provided useful information concerning the tolerance of skin and brain to the resultant complex form of irradiation. The effect of the boron capture reaction in skin and brain has provided estimates of the influence of the microscopic dosimetry involved. Dogs irradiated with the epithermal beam alone provided valuable insight into the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the fast neutron component (> 10 keV) of the epithermal beam. When compared with literature values for X-rays for the occurrence of skin necrosis in dogs, an RBE of 4.5 was derived. Previous pharmacokinetic data concerning the distribution of Na2B12H11SH (BSH) to blood and brain has been used to obtain input parameters for computer models of the microvasculature of the brain. Monte Carlo computer models were used to simulate the microscopic distribution of BSH in the normal brain. The term compound factor describes the product of the microscopic boron fission fragment dose hitting the nucleus and the relative biologic effectiveness divided by the macroscopic equilibrium dose of the boron reaction in the tissue of interest. The computed compound factor for Na2B12H11SH (BSH) in normal brain was 0.37. This factor agreed very well with the value of 0.32 obtained for the brain necrosis with the dog irradiations. The compound factor for the dog's skin was experimentally derived from the dog experiments and was equal to 0.5.

  3. Brain imaging of cognitively normal individuals with 2 parents affected by late-onset AD

    PubMed Central

    Murray, John; Tsui, Wai H.; Spector, Nicole; Goldowsky, Alexander; Williams, Schantel; Osorio, Ricardo; McHugh, Pauline; Glodzik, Lidia; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; de Leon, Mony J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This brain imaging study examines whether cognitively normal (NL) individuals with 2 parents affected by late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) show evidence of more extensive Alzheimer disease pathology compared with those who have a single parent affected by LOAD. Methods: Fifty-two NL individuals received MRI, 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (PiB)-PET, and 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG)-PET. These included 4 demographically balanced groups (n = 13/group, aged 32–72 years, 60% female, 30% APOE ε4 carriers) of NL individuals with maternal (FHm), paternal (FHp), and maternal and paternal (FHmp) family history of LOAD, and with negative family history (FH−). Statistical parametric mapping, voxel-based morphometry, and z-score mapping were used to compare MRI gray matter volumes (GMVs), partial volume–corrected PiB retention, and FDG metabolism across FH groups and vs FH−. Results: NL FHmp showed more severe abnormalities in all 3 biomarkers vs the other groups regarding the number of regions affected and magnitude of impairment. PiB retention and hypometabolism were most pronounced in FHmp, intermediate in FHm, and lowest in FHp and FH−. GMV reductions were highest in FHmp and intermediate in FHm and FHp vs FH−. In all FH+ groups, amyloid-β deposition exceeded GMV loss and hypometabolism exceeded GMV loss (p < 0.001), while amyloid-β deposition exceeded hypometabolism in FHmp and FHp but not in FHm. Conclusions: These biomarker findings show a “LOAD parent-dose effect” in NL individuals several years, if not decades, before possible clinical symptoms. PMID:24523481

  4. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Broncho-epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H

    2006-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human broncho-epithelial (HBE) tissue-like assemblies (3D HBE TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (wtPIV3 JS) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infections with both viruses. Therefore, TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host's immune system.

  5. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Lung Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H.; Deatly, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesenchymal tissue-like assemblies (3D hLEM TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infection with the virus. Therefore, we assert TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host s immune system.

  6. Despite Normal Arteriogenic and Angiogenic Responses, Hindlimb Perfusion Recovery and Necrotic and Fibro-Adipose Tissue Clearance Are Impaired in MMP9 Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Meisner, Joshua K.; Annex, Brian H.; Price, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The relative contributions of arteriogenesis, angiogenesis, and ischemic muscle tissue composition toward reperfusion after arterial occlusion are largely unknown. Differential loss of bone marrow-derived cell (BMC) matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), which has been implicated in all of these processes, was used to assess the relative contributions of these processes during limb reperfusion. Methods: We compared collateral growth (arteriogenesis), capillary growth (angiogenesis), and ischemic muscle tissue composition after femoral artery ligation in FVB/NJ mice that had been reconstituted with bone marrow from wild-type or MMP9−/− mice. Results: Laser Doppler perfusion imaging confirmed decreased reperfusion capacity in mice with BMC-specific loss of MMP9; however, collateral arteriogenesis was not affected. Furthermore, when accounting for the fact that muscle tissue composition changes markedly with ischemia (i.e. necrotic, fibro-adipose, and regenerating tissue regions are present), angiogenesis was also unaffected. Instead, BMC-specific loss of MMP9 caused an increase in the proportion of necrotic and fibro-adipose tissue, which showed the strongest correlation with poor perfusion recovery. Similarly, the reciprocal loss of MMP9 from non-BMCs showed similar deficits in perfusion and tissue composition without affecting arteriogenesis. Conclusions: By concurrently analyzing arteriogenesis, angiogenesis, and ischemic tissue composition, we determined that the loss of BMC or non- BMC derived MMP9 impairs necrotic and fibro-adipose tissue clearance after femoral artery ligation, despite normal arteriogenic and angiogenic vascular growth. These findings imply that therapeutic revascularization strategies for treating PAD may benefit from additionally targeting necrotic tissue clearance and/or skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:24582703

  7. Quantitative Analyses of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC): An Introduction to the Scientific Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Bentzen, Soren M.; Constine, Louis S.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Eisbruch, Avi; Jackson, Andrew; Marks, Lawrence B.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Yorke, Ellen D.

    2010-03-01

    Advances in dose-volume/outcome (or normal tissue complication probability, NTCP) modeling since the seminal Emami paper from 1991 are reviewed. There has been some progress with an increasing number of studies on large patient samples with three-dimensional dosimetry. Nevertheless, NTCP models are not ideal. Issues related to the grading of side effects, selection of appropriate statistical methods, testing of internal and external model validity, and quantification of predictive power and statistical uncertainty, all limit the usefulness of much of the published literature. Synthesis (meta-analysis) of data from multiple studies is often impossible because of suboptimal primary analysis, insufficient reporting and variations in the models and predictors analyzed. Clinical limitations to the current knowledge base include the need for more data on the effect of patient-related cofactors, interactions between dose distribution and cytotoxic or molecular targeted agents, and the effect of dose fractions and overall treatment time in relation to nonuniform dose distributions. Research priorities for the next 5-10 years are proposed.

  8. 3D Normal Human Neural Progenitor Tissue-Like Assemblies: A Model of Persistent VZV Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection, establishes latency in multiple ganglionic neurons, and can reactivate to cause zoster. Live attenuated VZV vaccines are available; however, they can also establish latent infections and reactivate. Studies of VZV latency have been limited to the analyses of human ganglia removed at autopsy, as the virus is strictly a human pathogen. Recently, terminally differentiated human neurons have received much attention as a means to study the interaction between VZV and human neurons; however, the short life-span of these cells in culture has limited their application. Herein, we describe the construction of a model of normal human neural progenitor cells (NHNP) in tissue-like assemblies (TLAs), which can be successfully maintained for at least 180 days in three-dimensional (3D) culture, and exhibit an expression profile similar to that of human trigeminal ganglia. Infection of NHNP TLAs with cell-free VZV resulted in a persistent infection that was maintained for three months, during which the virus genome remained stable. Immediate-early, early and late VZV genes were transcribed, and low-levels of infectious VZV were recurrently detected in the culture supernatant. Our data suggest that NHNP TLAs are an effective system to investigate long-term interactions of VZV with complex assemblies of human neuronal cells.

  9. Study of the response of osteogenic sarcoma and adjacent normal tissues to radiation. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Gaitan-Yanguas, M.

    1981-05-01

    An analysis is made of the surgical specimens of 18 patients with hystologically-proven osteosarcoma who were treated with radiation as the first treatment, and submitted 6 months later to amputation (2 patients had only a second biopsy). Plotting of dose and treatment time against persistence or sterilization of the tumor shows that there is an intermediate zone that extends from 3200 to 5000 rad in 10 days to 8000 to 10,000 rad in 60 to 70 days, inside which the tumor may or may not be destroyed. All cases located above this zone were sterilized; and all those under it showed persistence of viable tumor cells. A similar correlation is made in 47 irradiated patients of the secondary reactions of normal skin and soft tissues surrounding the tumor. An intermediate zone also exists above which all reactions were severe, in some cases reaching necrosis; below this zone, all reactions were mild. When treatment time was longer than 45 days, reactions were only moderate.

  10. Evolving Clinical Cancer Radiotherapy: Concerns Regarding Normal Tissue Protection and Quality Assurance

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy, which is one of three major cancer treatment methods in modern medicine, has continued to develop for a long period, more than a century. The development of radiotherapy means allowing the administration of higher doses to tumors to improve tumor control rates while minimizing the radiation doses absorbed by surrounding normal tissues through which radiation passes for administration to tumors, thereby reducing or removing the incidence of side effects. Such development of radiotherapy was accomplished by the development of clinical radiation oncology, the development of computers and machine engineering, the introduction of cutting-edge imaging technology, a deepened understanding of biological studies on the effects of radiation on human bodies, and the development of quality assurance (QA) programs in medical physics. The development of radiotherapy over the last two decades has been quite dazzling. Due to continuous improvements in cancer treatment, the average five-year survival rate of cancer patients has been close to 70%. The increases in cancer patients’ complete cure rates and survival periods are making patients’ quality of life during or after treatment a vitally important issue. Radiotherapy is implemented in approximately 1/3 to 2/3s of all cancer patients; and has improved the quality of life of cancer patients in the present age. Over the last century, as a noninvasive treatment, radiotherapy has unceasingly enhanced complete tumor cure rates and the side effects of radiotherapy have been gradually decreasing, resulting in a tremendous improvement in the quality of life of cancer patients. PMID:26908993

  11. Protection of normal tissue against late radiation injury by WR-2721. [/sup 60/Co; rats

    SciTech Connect

    Utley, J.F.; Quinn, C.A.; White, F.C.; Seaver, N.A.; Bloor, C.M.

    1981-02-01

    The ability of WR-2721 to protect against late radiation damage has been studied in skin, muscle, and vascular tissues of rats. Animals treated with and without WR-2721 received irradiation to the left hind limb; representative groups were killed at intervals ranging from 72 h to 6 months. Comparison of all drug-treated and non-drug-treated animals showed significant protection (P = less than or equal to 0.05). The time pattern of injury in non-drug-treated rats was biphasic, with significant damage occurring at 72 h and 1 week, returning to normal between 1 and 3 months, but showing significant late damage at 6 months (P = less than or equal to 0.001). Again, this injury pattern did not appear in WR-2721-treated rats. Thus the ability of WR-2721 to protect against acute and chronic radiation injury in vessels, skin, and muscle indicates that an increased therapeutic gain can be expected when this drug is used in clinical radiation therapy.

  12. Micro electrical impedance spectroscopy on a needle for ex vivo discrimination between human normal and cancer renal tissues.

    PubMed

    Yun, Joho; Kim, Hyeon Woo; Park, Yangkyu; Cha, Jung-Joon; Lee, Jeong Zoo; Shin, Dong Gil; Lee, Jong-Hyun

    2016-05-01

    The ex-vivo discrimination between human normal and cancer renal tissues was confirmed using μEoN (micro electrical impedance spectroscopy-on-a-needle) by measuring and comparing the electrical impedances in the frequency domain. To quantify the extent of discrimination between dissimilar tissues and to determine the optimal frequency at which the discrimination capability is at a maximum, discrimination index (DI) was employed for both magnitude and phase. The highest values of DI for the magnitude and phase were 5.15 at 1 MHz and 3.57 at 1 kHz, respectively. The mean magnitude and phase measured at the optimal frequency for normal tissues were 5013.40 ± 94.39 Ω and -68.54 ± 0.72°, respectively; those for cancer tissues were 4165.19 ± 70.32 Ω and -64.10 ± 0.52°, respectively. A statistically significant difference (p< 0.05) between the two tissues was observed at all the investigated frequencies. To extract the electrical properties (resistance and capacitance) of these bio-tissues through curve fitting with experimental results, an equivalent circuit was proposed based on the μEoN structure on the condition that the μEoN was immersed in the bio-tissues. The average and standard deviation of the extracted resistance and capacitance for the normal tissues were 6.22 ± 0.24 kΩ and 280.21 ± 32.25 pF, respectively, and those for the cancer tissues were 5.45 ± 0.22 kΩ and 376.32 ± 34.14 pF, respectively. The electrical impedance was higher in the normal tissues compared with the cancer tissues. The μEoN could clearly discriminate between normal and cancer tissues by comparing the results at the optimal frequency (magnitude and phase) and those of the curve fitting (extracted resistance and capacitance).

  13. The detection of Alcelaphine herpesvirus-1 DNA by in situ hybridization of tissues from rabbits affected with malignant catarrhal fever.

    PubMed

    Bridgen, A; Munro, R; Reid, H W

    1992-05-01

    Tissue sections and cultured lymphocytes from rabbits clinically affected following experimental infection with Alcelaphine herpesvirus-1 (AHV-1) were assessed for the presence of viral DNA by in situ hybridization with the cloned major HindII repeat sequence of this virus. Small numbers of virus-infected cells were consistently detected only in submandibular lymph nodes, while other tissues showed no evidence of viral DNA. Virus titration in culture suggested that there were higher titres of virus in the lymph nodes, spleen and lung of infected animals than in the kidney or peripheral blood lymphocytes and confirmed the low level of virus in these animals. Substantially more viral DNA was detected by in situ hybridization in lymphocytes following at least 24 h of culture, suggesting that viral replication is normally repressed by the host.

  14. Aging affects mechanical properties and lubricin/PRG4 gene expression in normal ligaments.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Gail M; Lemmex, Devin B; Ono, Yohei; Beach, Cara J; Reno, Carol R; Hart, David A; Lo, Ian K Y

    2015-09-18

    Age-related changes in ligament properties may have clinical implications for injuries in the mature athlete. Previous preclinical models documented mechanical and biochemical changes in ligaments with aging. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aging on ligament properties (mechanical, molecular, biochemical) by comparing medial collateral ligaments (MCLs) from 1-year-old and 3-year-old rabbits. The MCLs underwent mechanical (n=7, 1-year-old; n=7, 3-year-old), molecular (n=8, 1-year-old; n=6, 3-year-old), collagen and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content (n=8, 1-year-old; n=6, 3-year-old) and water content (n=8, 1-year-old; n=5, 3-year-old) assessments. Mechanical assessments evaluated total creep strain, failure strain, ultimate tensile strength and modulus. Molecular assessments using RT-qPCR evaluated gene expression for collagens, proteoglycans, hormone receptors, and matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors. While total creep strain and ultimate tensile strength were not affected by aging, failure strain was increased and modulus was decreased comparing MCLs from 3-year-old rabbits to those from 1-year-old rabbits. The mRNA expression levels for lubricin/proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 increased with aging; whereas, the mRNA expression levels for estrogen receptor and matrix metalloproteinase-1 decreased with aging. Collagen and GAG content assays and water content assessments did not demonstrate any age-related changes. The increased failure strain and decreased modulus with aging may have implications for increased susceptibility to ligament damage/injury with aging. Lubricin/PRG4 gene expression was affected by aging and its speculated role in ligament function may be related to interfascicular lubrication, which in turn may lead to altered mechanical function with aging and increases in potential for injury.

  15. Multivariate statistical analysis of Raman spectra to distinguish normal, tumor, lymph nodes and mastitis in mouse mammary tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, H.; Thakur, J. S.; Serhatkulu, G. K.; Pandya, A. K.; Auner, G. W.; Naik, R.; Freeman, D. C.; Naik, V. M.; Cao, A.; Klein, M. D.; Rabah, R.

    2006-03-01

    Raman spectra ( > 680) of normal mammary gland, malignant mammary gland tumors, and lymph node tissues from mice injected with 4T1 tumor cells have been recorded using 785 nm excitation laser. The state of the tissues was confirmed by standard pathological tests. The multivariate statistical analysis methods (principle component analysis and discriminant functional analysis) have been used to categorize the Raman spectra. The statistical algorithms based on the Raman spectral peak heights, clearly separated tissues into six distinct classes, including mastitis, which is clearly separated from normal and tumor. This study suggests that the Raman spectroscopy can possibly perform a real-time analysis of the human mammary tissues for the detection of cancer.

  16. SU-E-T-573: Normal Tissue Dose Effect of Prescription Isodose Level Selection in Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q; Lei, Y; Zheng, D; Zhu, X; Wahl, A; Lin, C; Zhou, S; Zhen, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate dose fall-off in normal tissue for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) cases planned with different prescription isodose levels (IDLs), by calculating the dose dropping speed (DDS) in normal tissue on plans computed with both Pencil Beam (PB) and Monte-Carlo (MC) algorithms. Methods: The DDS was calculated on 32 plans for 8 lung SBRT patients. For each patient, 4 dynamic conformal arc plans were individually optimized for prescription isodose levels (IDL) ranging from 60% to 90% of the maximum dose with 10% increments to conformally cover the PTV. Eighty non-overlapping rind structures each of 1mm thickness were created layer by layer from each PTV surface. The average dose in each rind was calculated and fitted with a double exponential function (DEF) of the distance from the PTV surface, which models the steep- and moderate-slope portions of the average dose curve in normal tissue. The parameter characterizing the steep portion of the average dose curve in the DEF quantifies the DDS in the immediate normal tissue receiving high dose. Provided that the prescription dose covers the whole PTV, a greater DDS indicates better normal tissue sparing. The DDS were compared among plans with different prescription IDLs, for plans computed with both PB and MC algorithms. Results: For all patients, the DDS was found to be the lowest for 90% prescription IDL and reached a highest plateau region for 60% or 70% prescription. The trend was the same for both PB and MC plans. Conclusion: Among the range of prescription IDLs accepted by lung SBRT RTOG protocols, prescriptions to 60% and 70% IDLs were found to provide best normal tissue sparing.

  17. CYCLOSPORIN A AFFECTS THE PROLIFERATION PROCESS IN NORMAL HUMAN DERMAL FIBROBLASTS.

    PubMed

    Janikowska, Grazyna; Janikowsk, Tomasz; Pyka, Alina; Wilczok, Adam; Mazurek, Urszula

    2016-01-01

    Cyclosporin A is an immunosuppressant drug that is used not only in solid transplant rejection, but also in moderate and severe forms of psoriasis, pyoderma, lupus or arthritis. Serious side effects of the drug such as skin cancer or gingival hyperplasia probably start with the latent proliferation process. Little is known about the influence of cyclosporin A on molecular signaling in epidermal tissue. Thus, the aim of this study was to estimate the influence of cyclosporin A on the process of proliferation in normal human dermal fibroblasts. Fibroblasts were cultured in a liquid growth medium in standard conditions. Cyclosporin A was added to the culture after the confluence state. Survival and proliferation tests on human dermal fibroblast cells were performed. Total RNA was extracted from fibroblasts, based on which cDNA and cRNA were synthesized. The obtained cRNA was hybridized with the expression microarray HGU-133A_2.0. Statistical analysis of 2734 mRNAs was performed by the use of GeneSpring 13.0 software and only results with p < 0.05 were accepted. Analysis of variance with Tukey post hoc test with Benjamini-Hochberg correction for all three (8, 24, 48 h) culture stages (with and without cyclosporin A) was performed to lower the number of statistically significant results from 679 to 66, and less. Between statistically and biologically significant mRNAs down-regulated were EGRJ, BUBIB, MKI67, CDK1, TTK, E2F8, TPX2, however, the INSIG1, FOSL1, HMOX1 were up-regulated. The experiment data revealed that cyclosporin A up-regulated FOSL1 in the first 24 h, afterwards down-regulating its expression. The HMOX1 gene was up-regulated in the first stage of the experiment (CsA 8 h), however, after the next 16 h of culture time its expression was down-regulated (CsA 24 h), to finally increased in the later time period. The results indicate that cyclosporin A had a significant effect on proliferation in normal human dermal fibroblasts through the changes in the

  18. Adverse event reporting and developments in radiation biology after normal tissue injury: International Atomic Energy Agency consultation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yuhchyau . E-mail: Yuhchyau_chen@urmc.rochester.edu; Trotti, Andy; Coleman, C. Norman; Machtay, Mitchell; Mirimanoff, Rene O.; Hay, John; O'Brien, Peter C.; El-Gueddari, Brahim; Salvajoli, Joao V.; Jeremic, Branislav

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Recent research has enhanced our understanding of radiation injury at the molecular-cellular and tissue levels; significant strides have occurred in standardization of adverse event reporting in clinical trials. In response, the International Atomic Energy Agency, through its Division of Human Health and its section for Applied Radiation Biology and Radiotherapy, organized a consultation meeting in Atlanta (October 2, 2004) to discuss developments in radiobiology, normal tissue reactions, and adverse event reporting. Methods and Materials: Representatives from cooperative groups of African Radiation Oncology Group, Curriculo Radioterapeutica Ibero Latino Americana, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, and Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group held the meeting discussion. Results: Representatives of major radiotherapy groups/organizations and prominent leaders in radiotherapy discussed current understanding of normal tissue radiobiologic effects, the design and implementation of future clinical and translational projects for normal tissue injury, and the standardization of adverse-event reporting worldwide. Conclusions: The consensus was to adopt NCI comprehensive adverse event reporting terminology and grading system (CTCAE v3.0) as the new standard for all cooperative group trials. Future plans included the implementation of coordinated research projects focusing on normal tissue biomarkers and data collection methods.

  19. Normal Liver Tissue Density Dose Response in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, Christopher C.; Stinauer, Michelle A.; Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Miften, Moyed

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the temporal dose response of normal liver tissue for patients with liver metastases treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-nine noncontrast follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans of 34 patients who received SBRT between 2004 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed at a median of 8 months post-SBRT (range, 0.7-36 months). SBRT-induced normal liver tissue density changes in follow-up CT scans were evaluated at 2, 6, 10, 15, and 27 months. The dose distributions from planning CTs were mapped to follow-up CTs to relate the mean Hounsfield unit change ({Delta}HU) to dose received over the range 0-55 Gy in 3-5 fractions. An absolute density change of 7 HU was considered a significant radiographic change in normal liver tissue. Results: Increasing radiation dose was linearly correlated with lower post-SBRT liver tissue density (slope, -0.65 {Delta}HU/5 Gy). The threshold for significant change (-7 {Delta}HU) was observed in the range of 30-35 Gy. This effect did not vary significantly over the time intervals evaluated. Conclusions: SBRT induces a dose-dependent and relatively time-independent hypodense radiation reaction within normal liver tissue that is characterized by a decrease of >7 HU in liver density for doses >30-35 Gy.

  20. Fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy of tissue autofluorescence in normal and diseased colon measured ex vivo using a fiber-optic probe

    PubMed Central

    Coda, Sergio; Thompson, Alex J.; Kennedy, Gordon T.; Roche, Kim L.; Ayaru, Lakshmana; Bansi, Devinder S.; Stamp, Gordon W.; Thillainayagam, Andrew V.; French, Paul M. W.; Dunsby, Chris

    2014-01-01

    We present an ex vivo study of temporally and spectrally resolved autofluorescence in a total of 47 endoscopic excision biopsy/resection specimens from colon, using pulsed excitation laser sources operating at wavelengths of 375 nm and 435 nm. A paired analysis of normal and neoplastic (adenomatous polyp) tissue specimens obtained from the same patient yielded a significant difference in the mean spectrally averaged autofluorescence lifetime −570 ± 740 ps (p = 0.021, n = 12). We also investigated the fluorescence signature of non-neoplastic polyps (n = 6) and inflammatory bowel disease (n = 4) compared to normal tissue in a small number of specimens. PMID:24575345

  1. Differential expression of the Na+/I− symporter protein in thyroid cancer and adjacent normal and nodular goiter tissues

    PubMed Central

    WANG, SHASHA; LIANG, JUN; LIN, YANSONG; YAO, RUYONG

    2013-01-01

    The ability of differentiated thyroid cancer and adjacent thyroid cells to concentrate iodine is dependent on their expression of a functional NA+/I− symporter (NIS). Thyroid cancer is insensitive to 131I treatment if the thyroid cells lack the ability to concentrate iodide. Thus, in this study, we aimed to determine whether the NIS protein was differentially expressed in thyroid cancer and various surrounding tissues. We recruited 114 cases of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and divided them into two groups: 60 patients of 9 males and 51 females with a mean age of 49.55 years who had PTC with surrounding nodular goiter tissue (simplified as GNG), and 54 patients of 8 males and 46 females with a mean age of 45.78 years who had PTC with surrounding normal tissue (Gnormal) after total or near total thyroidectomy. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue sections were prepared for immunohistochemical staining of the NIS protein and semi-quantitative analysis. The NIS protein was expressed in the basolateral membrane of the normal epithelium, while PTC and nodular goiter cells expressed NIS in the cytoplasm and basolateral membrane. The expression levels of the NIS protein were higher in the adjacent normal tissues compared with those of the surrounding nodular goiter tissues (P=0.002) and expression levels of the NIS protein were higher in PTC tissues compared with the surrounding nodular goiter tissues (P=0.008). The data from this study indicate that cancer-surrounding tissues may play a significant role in mediating the sensitivity of PTC patients to radioactive iodine treatment. PMID:23255951

  2. Characterizing the genetic basis of methylome diversity in histologically normal human lung tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jianxin; Marconett, Crystal N.; Duan, Jubao; Hyland, Paula L.; Li, Peng; Wang, Zhaoming; Wheeler, William; Zhou, Beiyun; Campan, Mihaela; Lee, Diane S.; Huang, Jing; Zhou, Weiyin; Triche, Tim; Amundadottir, Laufey; Warner, Andrew; Hutchinson, Amy; Chen, Po-Han; Chung, Brian S.I.; Pesatori, Angela C.; Consonni, Dario; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Bergen, Andrew W.; Freedman, Mathew; Siegmund, Kimberly D.; Berman, Benjamin P.; Borok, Zea; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Tucker, Margaret A.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Laird-Offringa, Ite A.; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The genetic regulation of the human epigenome is not fully appreciated. Here we describe the effects of genetic variants on the DNA methylome in human lung based on methylation-quantitative trait loci (meQTL) analyses. We report 34,304 cis- and 585 trans-meQTLs, a genetic-epigenetic interaction of surprising magnitude, including a regulatory hotspot. These findings are replicated in both breast and kidney tissues and show distinct patterns: cis-meQTLs mostly localize to CpG sites outside of genes, promoters, and CpG islands (CGIs), while trans-meQTLs are over-represented in promoter CGIs. meQTL SNPs are enriched in CTCF binding sites, DNaseI hypersensitivity regions and histone marks. Importantly, 4 of the 5 established lung cancer risk loci in European ancestry are cis-meQTLs and, in aggregate, cis-meQTLs are enriched for lung cancer risk in a genome-wide analysis of 11,587 subjects. Thus, inherited genetic variation may affect lung carcinogenesis by regulating the human methylome. PMID:24572595

  3. Radiobiological influence of megavoltage electron pulses of ultra-high pulse dose rate on normal tissue cells.

    PubMed

    Laschinsky, Lydia; Karsch, Leonhard; Leßmann, Elisabeth; Oppelt, Melanie; Pawelke, Jörg; Richter, Christian; Schürer, Michael; Beyreuther, Elke

    2016-08-01

    Regarding the long-term goal to develop and establish laser-based particle accelerators for a future radiotherapeutic treatment of cancer, the radiobiological consequences of the characteristic short intense particle pulses with ultra-high peak dose rate, but low repetition rate of laser-driven beams have to be investigated. This work presents in vitro experiments performed at the radiation source ELBE (Electron Linac for beams with high Brilliance and low Emittance). This accelerator delivered 20-MeV electron pulses with ultra-high pulse dose rate of 10(10) Gy/min either at the low pulse frequency analogue to previous cell experiments with laser-driven electrons or at high frequency for minimizing the prolonged dose delivery and to perform comparison irradiation with a quasi-continuous electron beam analogue to a clinically used linear accelerator. The influence of the different electron beam pulse structures on the radiobiological response of the normal tissue cell line 184A1 and two primary fibroblasts was investigated regarding clonogenic survival and the number of DNA double-strand breaks that remain 24 h after irradiation. Thereby, no considerable differences in radiation response were revealed both for biological endpoints and for all probed cell cultures. These results provide evidence that the radiobiological effectiveness of the pulsed electron beams is not affected by the ultra-high pulse dose rates alone. PMID:27193178

  4. Evaluation of normal tissue exposure in patients receiving radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer based on RTOG 0848

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Ted C.; Slater, Jerry M.; Mifflin, Rachel; Nookala, Prashanth; Grove, Roger; Ly, Anh M.; Patyal, Baldev; Slater, Jerry D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy. Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is utilized in many cases to improve locoregional control; however, toxicities associated with radiation can be significant given the location of the pancreas. RTOG 0848 seeks to evaluate chemoradiation using either intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or 3D conformal photon radiotherapy (3DCRT) modalities as an adjuvant treatment. The purpose of this study is to quantify the dosimetric changes seen when using IMRT or 3D CRT photon modalities, as well as proton radiotherapy, in patients receiving CRT for cancer of the pancreas treated per RTOG 0848 guidelines. Materials Ten patients with pancreatic head adenocarcinoma treated between 2010 and 2013 were evaluated in this study. All patients were simulated with contrast-enhanced CT imaging. Separate treatment plans using IMRT and 3DCRT as well as proton radiotherapy were created for each patient. All planning volumes were created per RTOG 0848 protocol. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were calculated and analyzed in order to compare plans between the three modalities. The organs at risk (OAR) evaluated in this study are the kidneys, liver, small bowel, and spinal cord. Results There was no difference between the IMRT and 3DCRT plans in dose delivered to the kidneys, liver, or bowel. The proton radiotherapy plans were found to deliver lower mean total kidney doses, mean liver doses, and liver D1/3 compared to the IMRT plans. The proton plans also gave less mean liver dose, liver D1/3, bowel V15, and bowel V50 in comparison to the 3DCRT. Conclusions For patients receiving radiotherapy per ongoing RTOG 0848 for pancreatic cancer, there was no significant difference in normal tissue sparing between IMRT and 3DCRT treatment planning. Therefore, the choice between the two modalities should not be a confounding factor in this study. The proton plans also demonstrated improved OAR sparing compared to both IMRT and 3DCRT treatment

  5. Mechanistic simulation of normal-tissue damage in radiotherapy—implications for dose-volume analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowska, Eva; Baker, Colin; Nahum, Alan

    2010-04-01

    A radiobiologically based 3D model of normal tissue has been developed in which complications are generated when 'irradiated'. The aim is to provide insight into the connection between dose-distribution characteristics, different organ architectures and complication rates beyond that obtainable with simple DVH-based analytical NTCP models. In this model the organ consists of a large number of functional subunits (FSUs), populated by stem cells which are killed according to the LQ model. A complication is triggered if the density of FSUs in any 'critical functioning volume' (CFV) falls below some threshold. The (fractional) CFV determines the organ architecture and can be varied continuously from small (series-like behaviour) to large (parallel-like). A key feature of the model is its ability to account for the spatial dependence of dose distributions. Simulations were carried out to investigate correlations between dose-volume parameters and the incidence of 'complications' using different pseudo-clinical dose distributions. Correlations between dose-volume parameters and outcome depended on characteristics of the dose distributions and on organ architecture. As anticipated, the mean dose and V20 correlated most strongly with outcome for a parallel organ, and the maximum dose for a serial organ. Interestingly better correlation was obtained between the 3D computer model and the LKB model with dose distributions typical for serial organs than with those typical for parallel organs. This work links the results of dose-volume analyses to dataset characteristics typical for serial and parallel organs and it may help investigators interpret the results from clinical studies.

  6. Initial plasma disappearance and tissue uptake of 131I-albumin in normal rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Bent-Hansen, L. )

    1991-05-01

    The simultaneous plasma disappearance curves of 131I-albumin and 125I-fibrinogen were recorded in normal rabbits for 1 hr. Using fibrinogen as a plasma reference, the disappearance curves of albumin were shown to contain two separate phases of efflux: one fast from zero to 10 min. comprising 8% of the total tracer; and one slow appearing in the interval of 10 to 60 min. containing another 9% of the tracer. Total albumin escape was analyzed to yield an initial slope of 0.024 {plus minus} 0.004 min-1, corresponding to a wholebody unidirectional albumin clearance (Cl(0)) of 0.090 {plus minus} 0.009 ml(min{asterisk}100 g)-1. The distribution of efflux was assessed by biopsy uptakes using the same tracers in spleen, kidney, heart, lung, liver, intestine, skin, muscle, and brain. The disappearance curve generally reflects a biphasic pattern of uptake in peripheral tissue, predominantly by muscle and lung. The rapid phase has contributions from the fast near equilibration of liver, and intestine and skin are significant codeterminants of the slow phase. Due to their low body masses highly perfused organs such as kidney, spleen, and heart have little influence on the plasma disappearance. In accordance, the Cl(0) determined for the wholebody was higher than initial clearances found in skin (0.053 ml(min{asterisk}100 g)-1) and muscle (0.054 ml(min{asterisk}100 g)-1), but much lower than those found in the highly perfused organs. The initial (unidirectional) rates of peripheral albumin transfer demonstrated, ranged from 10 to 30 times higher than estimates of lymphatic return, suggesting that transcapillary albumin exchange is mediated by high-rate bidirectional diffusion. The rapid decrease of net albumin exchange rates suggests a second, highly significant barrier located within the interstitial matrix, which restricts plasma escape and reduces plasma to lymph albumin transport.

  7. Validation of Normal Tissue Complication Probability Predictions in Individual Patient: Late Rectal Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Semenenko, Vladimir A.; Tarima, Sergey S.; Devisetty, Kiran; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Liauw, Stanley L.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To perform validation of risk predictions for late rectal toxicity (LRT) in prostate cancer obtained using a new approach to synthesize published normal tissue complication data. Methods and Materials: A published study survey was performed to identify the dose-response relationships for LRT derived from nonoverlapping patient populations. To avoid mixing models based on different symptoms, the emphasis was placed on rectal bleeding. The selected models were used to compute the risk estimates of grade 2+ and grade 3+ LRT for an independent validation cohort composed of 269 prostate cancer patients with known toxicity outcomes. Risk estimates from single studies were combined to produce consolidated risk estimates. An agreement between the actuarial toxicity incidence 3 years after radiation therapy completion and single-study or consolidated risk estimates was evaluated using the concordance correlation coefficient. Goodness of fit for the consolidated risk estimates was assessed using the Hosmer-Lemeshow test. Results: A total of 16 studies of grade 2+ and 5 studies of grade 3+ LRT met the inclusion criteria. The consolidated risk estimates of grade 2+ and 3+ LRT were constructed using 3 studies each. For grade 2+ LRT, the concordance correlation coefficient for the consolidated risk estimates was 0.537 compared with 0.431 for the best-fit single study. For grade 3+ LRT, the concordance correlation coefficient for the consolidated risk estimates was 0.477 compared with 0.448 for the best-fit single study. No evidence was found for a lack of fit for the consolidated risk estimates using the Hosmer-Lemeshow test (P=.531 and P=.397 for grade 2+ and 3+ LRT, respectively). Conclusions: In a large cohort of prostate cancer patients, selected sets of consolidated risk estimates were found to be more accurate predictors of LRT than risk estimates derived from any single study.

  8. Multivariate Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Heart Valve Dysfunction in Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Cella, Laura; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Conson, Manuel; D’Avino, Vittoria; Salvatore, Marco; Pacelli, Roberto

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To establish a multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for radiation-induced asymptomatic heart valvular defects (RVD). Methods and Materials: Fifty-six patients treated with sequential chemoradiation therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) were retrospectively reviewed for RVD events. Clinical information along with whole heart, cardiac chambers, and lung dose distribution parameters was collected, and the correlations to RVD were analyzed by means of Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (Rs). For the selection of the model order and parameters for NTCP modeling, a multivariate logistic regression method using resampling techniques (bootstrapping) was applied. Model performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results: When we analyzed the whole heart, a 3-variable NTCP model including the maximum dose, whole heart volume, and lung volume was shown to be the optimal predictive model for RVD (Rs = 0.573, P<.001, AUC = 0.83). When we analyzed the cardiac chambers individually, for the left atrium and for the left ventricle, an NTCP model based on 3 variables including the percentage volume exceeding 30 Gy (V30), cardiac chamber volume, and lung volume was selected as the most predictive model (Rs = 0.539, P<.001, AUC = 0.83; and Rs = 0.557, P<.001, AUC = 0.82, respectively). The NTCP values increase as heart maximum dose or cardiac chambers V30 increase. They also increase with larger volumes of the heart or cardiac chambers and decrease when lung volume is larger. Conclusions: We propose logistic NTCP models for RVD considering not only heart irradiation dose but also the combined effects of lung and heart volumes. Our study establishes the statistical evidence of the indirect effect of lung size on radio-induced heart toxicity.

  9. Experiment K-7-29: Connective Tissue Studies. Part 1; Rat Skin, Normal and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailas, A. C.; Grindeland, R.; Ashman, R.; Choy, V.; Durnova, G.; Graf, B.; Griffith, P.; Kaplansky, A. S.; Kolis, S.; Martinez, D.; Rao, J. S.; Rayford, A. R.; Reddy, B. R.; Sears, J.; Thielke, R.; Ulm, M.; Vanderby, R.

    1994-01-01

    The skin repair studies started to be problematic for the following reasons: (1) It was very difficult to locate the wound and many lesions were not of the same dimensions. A considerable amount of time was devoted to the identification of the wound using polarized light. We understand that this experiment was added on to the overall project. Marking of the wound site and standard dimensions should be recommended for the next flight experiment. (2) The tissue was frozen, therefore thawing and fixation caused problems with some of the immunocytochemical staining for obtaining better special resolution with light microscopy image processing. Despite these problems, we were unable to detect any significant qualitative differences for the following wound markers: (1) Collagen Type 3, (2) Hematotoxylin and Eosin, and (3) Macrophage Factor 13. All protein markers were isolated from rat sources and antibodies prepared and tested for cross reactivity with other molecules at the University of Wisconsin Hybridoma Facility. However, rat skin from the non lesioned site 'normal' showed interesting biochemical results. Skin was prepared for the following measurements: (1) DNA content, (2) Collagen content by hydroxyproline, and (3) uronic acid content and estimation of ground substance. The results indicated there was a non-significant increase (10%) in the DNA concentration of skin from flight animals. However, the data expressed as a ratio DNA/Collagen estimates the cell or nuclear density that supports a given quantity of collagen showed a dramatic increase in the flight group (33%). This means flight conditions may have slowed down collagen secretion and/or increased cell proliferation in adult rat skin. Further biochemical tests are being done to determine the crosslinking of elastin which will enhance the insight to assessing changes in skin turnover.

  10. Volume effects of late term normal tissue toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonta, Dacian Viorel

    Modeling of volume effects for treatment toxicity is paramount for optimization of radiation therapy. This thesis proposes a new model for calculating volume effects in gastro-intestinal and genito-urinary normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) following radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma. The radiobiological and the pathological basis for this model and its relationship to other models are detailed. A review of the radiobiological experiments and published clinical data identified salient features and specific properties a biologically adequate model has to conform to. The new model was fit to a set of actual clinical data. In order to verify the goodness of fit, two established NTCP models and a non-NTCP measure for complication risk were fitted to the same clinical data. The method of fit for the model parameters was maximum likelihood estimation. Within the framework of the maximum likelihood approach I estimated the parameter uncertainties for each complication prediction model. The quality-of-fit was determined using the Aikaike Information Criterion. Based on the model that provided the best fit, I identified the volume effects for both types of toxicities. Computer-based bootstrap resampling of the original dataset was used to estimate the bias and variance for the fitted parameter values. Computer simulation was also used to estimate the population size that generates a specific uncertainty level (3%) in the value of predicted complication probability. The same method was used to estimate the size of the patient population needed for accurate choice of the model underlying the NTCP. The results indicate that, depending on the number of parameters of a specific NTCP model, 100 (for two parameter models) and 500 patients (for three parameter models) are needed for accurate parameter fit. Correlation of complication occurrence in patients was also investigated. The results suggest that complication outcomes are correlated in a patient, although

  11. Regulation of lysyl oxidase mRNA in dermal fibroblasts from normal donors and patients with inherited connective tissue disorders.

    PubMed

    Yeowell, H N; Marshall, M K; Walker, L C; Ha, V; Pinnell, S R

    1994-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LO) is an extracellular copper-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the initial reaction in the formation of lysine or hydroxylysine-derived crosslinks during collagen biosynthesis. We have isolated a cDNA for human LO from skin fibroblast poly(A+)RNA by PCR using primers based on the recently published sequence of human LO. This cDNA probe detects a major mRNA of 4.2 kb on Northern blots of RNA from normal fibroblasts. The level of LO mRNA was not significantly affected by cell density or by ascorbate treatment. Treatment of skin fibroblasts with hydralazine (50 microM), which increases the mRNAs for both the alpha and the beta subunits of prolyl hydroxylase (PH) and the mRNAs for lysyl hydroxylase, also increased LO mRNA by fourfold over a 72-h time course. In contrast, hydralazine dramatically decreased the mRNAs for alpha 1(I) collagen. Administration of minoxidil (500 microM), which specifically decreases LH activity without affecting PH activity or collagen biosynthesis in skin fibroblasts, stimulated the level of LO mRNA. Neither the administration of penicillamine (100 microM), which interferes with collagen cross-linking, nor the administration of beta-aminopropionitrile, which is a strong irreversible inhibitor of LO, to fibroblasts significantly changed the levels of LO mRNA over a 72-h time course. However, bleomycin (0.6 microgram/ml) significantly decreased the 4.2-kb LO mRNA in contrast to the levels of the alpha 1(I) collagen mRNAs, which were unchanged. No significant change was observed in the steady-state levels of LO mRNAs in fibroblasts isolated from patients with certain connective tissue disorders, including Marfan syndrome, Menkes disease, cutis laxa, and pseudoxanthoma elasticum. PMID:7508709

  12. Short-term oleoyl-estrone treatment affects capacity to manage lipids in rat adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Anna; Noé, Véronique; Ciudad, Carlos J; Romero, M Mar; Remesar, Xavier; Esteve, Montserrat

    2007-01-01

    Background Short-term OE (oleoyl-estrone) treatment causes significant decreases in rat weight mainly due to adipose tissue loss. The aim of this work was to determine if OE treatment affects the expression of genes that regulate lipid metabolism in white adipose tissue. Results Gene expression in adipose tissue from female treated rats (48 hours) was analysed by hybridization to cDNA arrays and levels of specific mRNAs were determined by real-time PCR. Treatment with OE decreased the expression of 232 genes and up-regulated 75 other genes in mesenteric white adipose tissue. The use of real-time PCR validate that, in mesenteric white adipose tissue, mRNA levels for Lipoprotein Lipase (LPL) were decreased by 52%, those of Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS) by 95%, those of Hormone Sensible Lipase (HSL) by 32%, those of Acetyl CoA Carboxylase (ACC) by 92%, those of Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1b (CPT1b) by 45%, and those of Fatty Acid Transport Protein 1 (FATP1) and Adipocyte Fatty Acid Binding Protein (FABP4) by 52% and 49%, respectively. Conversely, Tumour Necrosis Factor (TNFα) values showed overexpression (198%). Conclusion Short-term treatment with OE affects adipose tissue capacity to extract fatty acids from lipoproteins and to deal with fatty acid transport and metabolism. PMID:17725831

  13. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging with virtual touch tissue quantification: measurements of normal breast tissue and dependence on the degree of pre-compression.

    PubMed

    Wojcinski, Sebastian; Brandhorst, Kathrin; Sadigh, Gelareh; Hillemanns, Peter; Degenhardt, Friedrich

    2013-12-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (ARFI) with Virtual Touch tissue quantification (VTTQ) enables the determination of shear wave velocity in meters per second (m/s). We investigated shear wave velocity in normal breast tissue and analyzed the influence of the degree of pre-compression on the measurements. In repeated measurements and with normal pre-compression, the mean shear wave velocity in breast parenchyma was significantly higher than that in breast adipose tissue (3.33 ± 1.18 m/s vs. 2.90 ± 1.10 m/s; p < 0.001; 712 measurements in 89 patients). Furthermore, we found a significant positive correlation between degree of pre-compression and velocity measurements. Shear wave velocities with low, moderate and high pre-compression were 1.89, 3.18 and 4.39 m/s in parenchyma, compared with 1.46, 2.55 and 3.64 m/s in adipose tissue, respectively (p < 0.001; 360 measurements in 60 patients). VTTQ of breast tissue is a feasible method with high accuracy; however, the degree of pre-compression applied may significantly influence the measurements.

  14. [Can fruits and vegetables be used as substitute phantoms for normal human brain tissues in magnetic resonance imaging?].

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Daisuke; Ushioda, Yuichi; Sasaki, Ayaka; Sakurai, Yuki; Nagahama, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Manami; Sugimori, Hiroyuki; Sakata, Motomichi

    2013-10-01

    Various custom-made phantoms designed to optimize magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences have been created and subsequently reported in JSRT. However, custom-made phantoms that correctly match the T1-value and T2-values of human brain tissue (gray matter and white matter) cannot be made easily or quickly. The aim of this project was to search for alternative materials, such as fruits and vegetables, for optimizing MRI sequences. The following eight fruits and vegetables were investigated: apple, tomato, melon, apple mango (Mangifera indica), banana, avocado, peach, and eggplant. Their potential was studied for use in modeling phantoms of normal human brain tissues. MRI (T1- and T2-weighted sequences) was performed on the human brain and the fruits and vegetables using various concentrations of contrast medium (gadolinium) in the same size tubes as the custom-made phantom. The authors compared the signal intensity (SI) in human brain tissue (gray matter and white matter) with that of the fruits and the custom-made phantom. The T1 and T2 values were measured for banana tissue and compared with those for human brain tissue in the literature. Our results indicated that banana tissue is similar to human brain tissue (both gray matter and white matter). Banana tissue can thus be employed as an alternative phantom for the human brain for the purpose of MRI.

  15. Correction of electrode polarization contributions to the dielectric properties of normal and cancerous breast tissues at audio/radiofrequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneman, M. R.; Kosempa, M.; Gregory, W. D.; Gregory, C. W.; Marx, J. J.; Mikkelson, W.; Tjoe, J.; Raicu, V.

    2007-11-01

    Spurious contributions from electrode polarization (EP) are a major nuisance in dielectric measurements of biological tissues and hamper accurate determination of tissue properties in the audio/radiofrequencies. Various electrode geometries and/or treatments have been employed traditionally to reduce EP contributions, although none succeeded to completely remove EP from measurements on tissues for all practical frequency ranges. A method of correction for contributions of EP to the dielectric properties of tissues is proposed. The method is based on modeling the electrode impedance with suitable functions and on the observation that certain parameters are only dependent on electrodes properties and can thus be determined separately. The method is tested on various samples with known properties, and its usefulness is demonstrated with samples of normal and cancerous human female breast tissue. It is observed that the dielectric properties of the tissues over the frequency range 40 Hz-100 MHz are significantly different among different types of breast tissue. This observation is used further to demonstrate that, by scanning the tip of the measuring dielectric probe (with modest spatial resolution) across a sample of excised breast tissue, significant variations in the electrical properties are detected at a position where a tumor is located. This study shows that dielectric spectroscopy has the potential to offer a viable alternative to the current methods for detection of breast cancer in vivo.

  16. Quantifying Unnecessary Normal Tissue Complication Risks due to Suboptimal Planning: A Secondary Study of RTOG 0126

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Kevin L.; Schmidt, Rachel; Moiseenko, Vitali; Olsen, Lindsey A.; Tan, Jun; Xiao, Ying; Galvin, James; Pugh, Stephanie; Seider, Michael J.; Dicker, Adam P.; Bosch, Walter; Michalski, Jeff; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the frequency and clinical severity of quality deficiencies in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0126 protocol. Methods and Materials: A total of 219 IMRT patients from the high-dose arm (79.2 Gy) of RTOG 0126 were analyzed. To quantify plan quality, we used established knowledge-based methods for patient-specific dose-volume histogram (DVH) prediction of organs at risk and a Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model for grade ≥2 rectal complications to convert DVHs into normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs). The LKB model was validated by fitting dose-response parameters relative to observed toxicities. The 90th percentile (22 of 219) of plans with the lowest excess risk (difference between clinical and model-predicted NTCP) were used to create a model for the presumed best practices in the protocol (pDVH{sub 0126,top10%}). Applying the resultant model to the entire sample enabled comparisons between DVHs that patients could have received to DVHs they actually received. Excess risk quantified the clinical impact of suboptimal planning. Accuracy of pDVH predictions was validated by replanning 30 of 219 patients (13.7%), including equal numbers of presumed “high-quality,” “low-quality,” and randomly sampled plans. NTCP-predicted toxicities were compared to adverse events on protocol. Results: Existing models showed that bladder-sparing variations were less prevalent than rectum quality variations and that increased rectal sparing was not correlated with target metrics (dose received by 98% and 2% of the PTV, respectively). Observed toxicities were consistent with current LKB parameters. Converting DVH and pDVH{sub 0126,top10%} to rectal NTCPs, we observed 94 of 219 patients (42.9%) with ≥5% excess risk, 20 of 219 patients (9.1%) with ≥10% excess risk, and 2 of 219 patients (0.9%) with ≥15% excess risk. Replanning demonstrated the

  17. Expression profiles of inhibitor of growth protein 2 in normal and cancer tissues: An immunohistochemical screening analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuang; Yang, Xue-Feng; Gou, Wen-Feng; Lu, Hang; Li, Hua; Zhu, Zhi-Tu; Sun, Hong-Zhi; Zheng, Hua-Chuan

    2016-02-01

    Inhibitor of growth protein 2 (ING2) has an important role in the regulation of chromatin remodeling, cell proliferation, cell‑cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis. The present study performed an immunohistochemical analysis for expression profiling of ING2 protein in an array of tissues comprising normal mouse and human tissues, as well as human hepatocellular (n=62), renal clear cell (n=62), pancreatic (n=62), esophageal squamous cell (n=45), cervical squamous cell (n=31), breast (n=144), gastric (n=196), colorectal (n=96), ovarian (n=208), endometrial (n=96) and lung (n=192) carcinoma tissues. In mouse tissues, ING2 was detected in the nuclei and cytoplasm of the glandular epithelium of breast, hepatocytes, intestine, bronchium and alveoli, as well as the squamous epithelium of skin and glomeruli, and in myocardial cells, while it was located in the cytoplasm of renal tubules and striated muscle cells. ING2 protein was scattered in the brain and spleen. In human tissues, ING2 protein was principally distributed in the cytoplasm, while in it was present in the cytoplasm and nuclei in the stomach, intestine, cervix, endometrium trachea, breast and pancreas. The nuclear location of ING2 in the stomach was more prominent than that in the cytoplasm. High ING2 immunoreactivity was detected in the tongue, stomach, skin, pancreas, cervix and breast, whereas weakly in the brain stem, thymus, thyroid, lung, striated muscle, testis, bladder and ovary. In total, 617 out of 1,194 of the tested cancer tissues (51.7%) were ING2-positive. In most cases, ING2 expression was found to be restricted to the cytoplasm of all cancer tissues, while in certain cancer types, including renal clear cell, ovarian and colorectal carcinoma, it was occasionally present in the nuclei. Among the cancer tissues examined, ING2 was most frequently expressed in breast cancer (67.4%) and gynecological cancer types, including ovarian cancer (61.5%) and endometrial cancer (57.3%). Compared with

  18. Expression profiles of inhibitor of growth protein 2 in normal and cancer tissues: An immunohistochemical screening analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuang; Yang, Xue-Feng; Gou, Wen-Feng; Lu, Hang; Li, Hua; Zhu, Zhi-Tu; Sun, Hong-Zhi; Zheng, Hua-Chuan

    2016-02-01

    Inhibitor of growth protein 2 (ING2) has an important role in the regulation of chromatin remodeling, cell proliferation, cell‑cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis. The present study performed an immunohistochemical analysis for expression profiling of ING2 protein in an array of tissues comprising normal mouse and human tissues, as well as human hepatocellular (n=62), renal clear cell (n=62), pancreatic (n=62), esophageal squamous cell (n=45), cervical squamous cell (n=31), breast (n=144), gastric (n=196), colorectal (n=96), ovarian (n=208), endometrial (n=96) and lung (n=192) carcinoma tissues. In mouse tissues, ING2 was detected in the nuclei and cytoplasm of the glandular epithelium of breast, hepatocytes, intestine, bronchium and alveoli, as well as the squamous epithelium of skin and glomeruli, and in myocardial cells, while it was located in the cytoplasm of renal tubules and striated muscle cells. ING2 protein was scattered in the brain and spleen. In human tissues, ING2 protein was principally distributed in the cytoplasm, while in it was present in the cytoplasm and nuclei in the stomach, intestine, cervix, endometrium trachea, breast and pancreas. The nuclear location of ING2 in the stomach was more prominent than that in the cytoplasm. High ING2 immunoreactivity was detected in the tongue, stomach, skin, pancreas, cervix and breast, whereas weakly in the brain stem, thymus, thyroid, lung, striated muscle, testis, bladder and ovary. In total, 617 out of 1,194 of the tested cancer tissues (51.7%) were ING2-positive. In most cases, ING2 expression was found to be restricted to the cytoplasm of all cancer tissues, while in certain cancer types, including renal clear cell, ovarian and colorectal carcinoma, it was occasionally present in the nuclei. Among the cancer tissues examined, ING2 was most frequently expressed in breast cancer (67.4%) and gynecological cancer types, including ovarian cancer (61.5%) and endometrial cancer (57.3%). Compared with

  19. Presenting Thin Media Models Affects Women's Choice of Diet or Normal Snacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krahe, Barbara; Krause, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Our study explored the influence of thin- versus normal-size media models and of self-reported restrained eating behavior on women's observed snacking behavior. Fifty female undergraduates saw a set of advertisements for beauty products showing either thin or computer-altered normal-size female models, allegedly as part of a study on effective…

  20. Process-induced extracellular matrix alterations affect the mechanisms of soft tissue repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hui; Sandor, Maryellen; Lombardi, Jared

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrices derived from animal tissues for human tissue repairs are processed by various methods of physical, chemical, or enzymatic decellularization, viral inactivation, and terminal sterilization. The mechanisms of action in tissue repair vary among bioscaffolds and are suggested to be associated with process-induced extracellular matrix modifications. We compared three non-cross-linked, commercially available extracellular matrix scaffolds (Strattice, Veritas, and XenMatrix), and correlated extracellular matrix alterations to in vivo biological responses upon implantation in non-human primates. Structural evaluation showed significant differences in retaining native tissue extracellular matrix histology and ultrastructural features among bioscaffolds. Tissue processing may cause both the condensation of collagen fibers and fragmentation or separation of collagen bundles. Calorimetric analysis showed significant differences in the stability of bioscaffolds. The intrinsic denaturation temperature was measured to be 51°C, 38°C, and 44°C for Strattice, Veritas, and XenMatrix, respectively, demonstrating more extracellular matrix modifications in the Veritas and XenMatrix scaffolds. Consequently, the susceptibility to collagenase degradation was increased in Veritas and XenMatrix when compared to their respective source tissues. Using a non-human primate model, three bioscaffolds were found to elicit different biological responses, have distinct mechanisms of action, and yield various outcomes of tissue repair. Strattice permitted cell repopulation and was remodeled over 6 months. Veritas was unstable at body temperature, resulting in rapid absorption with moderate inflammation. XenMatrix caused severe inflammation and sustained immune reactions. This study demonstrates that extracellular matrix alterations significantly affect biological responses in soft tissue repair and regeneration. The data offer useful insights into the rational design of

  1. Refrigeration and freezing of porcine tissue does not affect the retardation of fragment simulating projectiles.

    PubMed

    Breeze, J; Carr, D J; Mabbott, A; Beckett, S; Clasper, J C

    2015-05-01

    Explosively propelled fragments are the most common cause of injury to UK service personnel in modern conflicts. Numerical injury models to simulate such injuries utilise algorithms based upon gelatin and animal tissue testing but data is limited on many fragment simulating projectiles and these simulants cannot represent human anatomy. Testing with post mortem specimens may overcome this limitation but no information exists about how post mortem tissue changes and storage conditions in humans or animals may affect projectile penetration. Two chisel nosed cylinders (0.49 g and 1.10 g) and a 0.51 g (5 mm) sphere were fired into three groups of porcine tissue (fresh, refrigerated and frozen then refrigerated) and compared to 20% gelatin. Depth of projectile penetration was ascertained with the assistance of computed tomography and kinetic energy absorption by tissues measured using Doppler radar and high speed photography. No difference in depth of penetration was found between porcine tissue stored in the different manners compared with 20% gelatin by impact velocities less than 100 m/s. Insufficient numbers of projectiles were retained in tissue at higher velocities for statistical analysis to be undertaken. Energy absorbed per millimetre of tissue ranged between 0.42 and 0.98 J/mm for different porcine tissue despite differing storage. This pilot study would suggest that the effect of refrigerating or freezing porcine tissue followed by thawing has no effect on its ability to retard these projectiles. Further research is required to ascertain if these results occur at greater velocities and for other types of projectile. PMID:25882156

  2. Refrigeration and freezing of porcine tissue does not affect the retardation of fragment simulating projectiles.

    PubMed

    Breeze, J; Carr, D J; Mabbott, A; Beckett, S; Clasper, J C

    2015-05-01

    Explosively propelled fragments are the most common cause of injury to UK service personnel in modern conflicts. Numerical injury models to simulate such injuries utilise algorithms based upon gelatin and animal tissue testing but data is limited on many fragment simulating projectiles and these simulants cannot represent human anatomy. Testing with post mortem specimens may overcome this limitation but no information exists about how post mortem tissue changes and storage conditions in humans or animals may affect projectile penetration. Two chisel nosed cylinders (0.49 g and 1.10 g) and a 0.51 g (5 mm) sphere were fired into three groups of porcine tissue (fresh, refrigerated and frozen then refrigerated) and compared to 20% gelatin. Depth of projectile penetration was ascertained with the assistance of computed tomography and kinetic energy absorption by tissues measured using Doppler radar and high speed photography. No difference in depth of penetration was found between porcine tissue stored in the different manners compared with 20% gelatin by impact velocities less than 100 m/s. Insufficient numbers of projectiles were retained in tissue at higher velocities for statistical analysis to be undertaken. Energy absorbed per millimetre of tissue ranged between 0.42 and 0.98 J/mm for different porcine tissue despite differing storage. This pilot study would suggest that the effect of refrigerating or freezing porcine tissue followed by thawing has no effect on its ability to retard these projectiles. Further research is required to ascertain if these results occur at greater velocities and for other types of projectile.

  3. Intra-operative on-line discrimination of kidney cancer from normal tissue by IR ATR spectroscopy of extracellular fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urboniene, V.; Velicka, M.; Ceponkus, J.; Pucetaite, M.; Jankevicius, F.; Sablinskas, V.; Steiner, G.

    2016-03-01

    Determination of cancerous and normal kidney tissues during partial, simple or radical nephrectomy surgery was performed by using differences in the IR absorption spectra of extracellular fluid taken from the corresponding tissue areas. The samples were prepared by stamping of the kidney tissue on ATR diamond crystal. The spectral measurements were performed directly in the OR during surgery for 58 patients. It was found that intensities of characteristic spectral bands of glycogen (880-1200 cm-1) in extracellular fluid are sensitive to the type of the tissue and can be used as spectral markers of tumours. Characteristic spectral band of lactic acid (1730 cm-1) - product of the anaerobic glycolysis, taking place in the cancer cells is not suitable for use as a spectral marker of cancerous tissue, since it overlaps with the band of carbonyl stretch in phospholipids and fatty acids. Results of hierarchical cluster analysis of the spectra show that the spectra of healthy and tumour tissue films can be reliably separated into two groups. On the other hand, possibility to differentiate between tumours of different types and grades remains in question. While the fluid from highly malignant G3 tumour tissue contains highly pronounced glycogen spectral bands and can be well separated from benign and G1 tumours by principal component analysis, the variations between spectra from sample to sample prevent from obtaining conclusive results about the grouping between different tumour types and grades. The proposed method is instant and can be used in situ and even in vivo.

  4. Alternative promoter usage and mRNA splicing pathways for parathyroid hormone-related protein in normal tissues and tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Southby, J.; O'Keeffe, L. M.; Martin, T. J.; Gillespie, M. T.

    1995-01-01

    The parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) gene consists of nine exons and allows the production of multiple PTHrP mRNA species via the use of three promoters and 5' and 3' alternative splicing; as a result of 3' alternative splicing one of three protein isoforms may be produced. This organisation has potential for tissue-specific splicing patterns. We examined PTHrP mRNA expression and splicing patterns in a series of tumours and normal tissues, using the sensitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. Use of promoter 3 and mRNA specifying the 141 amino acid PTHrP isoform were detected in all samples. Transcripts encoding the 139 amino acid isoform were detected in all but two samples. Use of promoters 1 and 2 was less widespread as was detection of mRNA encoding the 173 amino acid isoform. While different PTHrP splicing patterns were observed between tumours, no tissue- or tumour-specific transcripts were detected. In comparing normal and tumour tissue from the same patient, an increase in the number of promoters utilised was observed in the tumour tissue. Furthermore, mRNA for the PTH/PTHrP receptor was detected in all samples, thus the PTHrP produced by these tumours may potentially act in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. Images Figure 2 PMID:7669584

  5. Identification of the boundary between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma during breast-conserving surgery using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Tongxin; Nie, Yuting; Lian, Yuane; Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    Breast-conserving surgery has become an important way of surgical treatment for breast cancer worldwide nowadays. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has the ability to noninvasively visualize tissue architectures at the cellular level using intrinsic fluorescent molecules in biological tissues without the need for fluorescent dye. In this study, MPM is used to image the microstructures of terminal duct lobular unit (TDLU), invasive ductal carcinoma and the boundary region between normal and cancerous breast tissues. Our study demonstrates that MPM has the ability to not only reveal the morphological changes of the cuboidal epithelium, basement membrane and interlobular stroma but also identify the boundary between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma, which correspond well to the Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E) images. Predictably, MPM can monitor surgical margins in real time and provide considerable accuracy for resection of breast cancerous tissues intraoperatively. With the development of miniature, real-time MPM imaging technology, MPM should have great application prospects during breast-conserving surgery.

  6. The effects of hyperthermia on normal mesenchymal tissues. Application of a histologic grading system

    SciTech Connect

    Meshorer, A.; Prionas, S.D.; Fajardo, L.F.; Meyer, J.L.; Hahn, G.M.; Martinez, A.A.

    1983-06-01

    The alterations produced by radiofrequency-induced hyperthermia of 42 to 48 degrees C for 30 minutes were studied in the subcutaneous adipose tissue and skeletal muscle of swine. Acute lesions (18 to 24 hours) included edema, hemorrhage, necrosis (predominantly of myocytes) and granulocytic exudate in fat or muscle. The most important chronic lesion (28 to 31 days) was fibrosis replacing either tissue. There was a histiolymphocytic exudate with foreign-body giant cells around large lipid vacuoles. Muscle necrosis persisted and there was variable myocyte regeneration. Several specimens showed deep necrosis and abscesses. A grading system was developed to quantitate independently acute and chronic damage in each tissue. Acute lesions were usually less severe and extensive than chronic ones, without obvious dose response. Chronic lesions showed clearly a dose response, which began at 43 degrees C and increased with temperature. The latter appear to be reliable indicators of hyperthermic damage in deep soft tissues.

  7. Quantitative Profiling of Human Renal UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and Glucuronidation Activity: A Comparison of Normal and Tumoral Kidney Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Margaillan, Guillaume; Rouleau, Michèle; Fallon, John K.; Caron, Patrick; Villeneuve, Lyne; Turcotte, Véronique; Smith, Philip C.; Joy, Melanie S.

    2015-01-01

    Renal metabolism by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes is central to the clearance of many drugs. However, significant discrepancies about the relative abundance and activity of individual UGT enzymes in the normal kidney prevail among reports, whereas glucuronidation in tumoral kidney has not been examined. In this study, we performed an extensive profiling of glucuronidation metabolism in normal (n = 12) and tumor (n = 14) kidneys using targeted mass spectrometry quantification of human UGTs. We then correlated UGT protein concentrations with mRNA levels assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and with conjugation activity for the major renal UGTs. Beyond the wide interindividual variability in expression levels observed among kidney samples, UGT1A9, UGT2B7, and UGT1A6 are the most abundant renal UGTs in both normal and tumoral tissues based on protein quantification. In normal kidney tissues, only UGT1A9 protein levels correlated with mRNA levels, whereas UGT1A6, UGT1A9, and UGT2B7 quantification correlated significantly with their mRNA levels in tumor kidneys. Data support that posttranscriptional regulation of UGT2B7 and UGT1A6 expression is modulating glucuronidation in the kidney. Importantly, our study reveals a significant decreased glucuronidation capacity of neoplastic kidneys versus normal kidneys that is paralleled by drastically reduced UGT1A9 and UGT2B7 mRNA and protein expression. UGT2B7 activity is the most repressed in tumors relative to normal tissues, with a 96-fold decrease in zidovudine metabolism, whereas propofol and sorafenib glucuronidation is decreased by 7.6- and 5.2-fold, respectively. Findings demonstrate that renal drug metabolism is predominantly mediated by UGT1A9 and UGT2B7 and is greatly reduced in kidney tumors. PMID:25650382

  8. Gene Expression Profiling of Multiple Leiomyomata Uteri and Matched Normal Tissue from a Single Patient

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrova, Irina K.; Richer, Jennifer K.; Rudolph, Michael C.; Spoelstra, Nicole S.; Reno, Elaine M.; Medina, Theresa M.; Bradford, Andrew P.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify differentially expressed genes between fibroid and adjacent normal myometrium in an identical hormonal and genetic background. Design Array analysis of 3 leiomyomata and matched adjacent normal myometrium in a single patient. Setting University of Colorado Hospital. Patient(s) A single female undergoing medically indicated hysterectomy for symptomatic fibroids. Interventions(s) mRNA isolation and microarray analysis, reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Main Outcome Measure(s) Changes in mRNA and protein levels in leiomyomata and matched normal myometrium. Result(s) Expression of 197 genes was increased and 619 decreased, significantly by at least 2 fold, in leiomyomata relative to normal myometrium. Expression profiles between tumors were similar and normal myometrial samples showed minimal variation. Changes in, and variation of, expression of selected genes were confirmed in additional normal and leiomyoma samples from multiple patients. Conclusion(s) Analysis of multiple tumors from a single patient confirmed changes in expression of genes described in previous, apparently disparate, studies and identified novel targets. Gene expression profiles in leiomyomata are consistent with increased activation of mitogenic pathways and inhibition of apoptosis. Down-regulation of genes implicated in invasion and metastasis, of cancers, was observed in fibroids. This expression pattern may underlie the benign nature of uterine leiomyomata and may aid in the differential diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma. PMID:18672237

  9. Recent progress in defining mechanisms and potential targets for prevention of normal tissue injury after radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Anscher, Mitchell S. . E-mail: anscher@radonc.duke.edu; Chen, Liguang; Rabbani, Zahid; Kang Song; Larrier, Nicole; Huang Hong; Samulski, Thaddeus V.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Brizel, David M.; Folz, Rodney J.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2005-05-01

    The ability to optimize treatments for cancer on the basis of relative risks for normal tissue injury has important implications in oncology, because higher doses of radiation might, in some diseases, improve both local control and survival. To achieve this goal, a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for radiation-induced toxicity will be essential. Recent research has demonstrated that ionizing radiation triggers a series of genetic and molecular events, which might lead to chronic persistent alterations in the microenvironment and an aberrant wound-healing response. Disrupted epithelial-stromal cell communication might also be important. With the application of a better understanding of fundamental biology to clinical practice, new approaches to treating and preventing normal tissue injury can focus on correcting these disturbed molecular processes.

  10. Signaling Proteins Are Represented in Tissue Fluid/Lymph from Soft Tissues of Normal Human Legs at Concentrations Different from Serum

    PubMed Central

    Zaleska, Marzanna; Durlik, Marek; Miller, Norman E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: The mobile intercellular fluid flowing to and in the lymphatics contains filtered plasma products and substances synthesized and excreted by tissue cells. Among them are signaling proteins such as cytokines, chemokines, enzymes, and growth factors. They act locally in autocrine and paracrine systems regulating cell metabolism, proliferation, and formation of the ground matrix. They play an immunoregulatory role in infections, wound healing, and tumor cell growth. Methods and Results: In this study we measured the concentration of selected cytokines, chemokines, tissue enzymes, and growth factors in tissue fluid/lymph drained from normal human leg soft tissues. Legs exposed to infections and trauma often result in development of lymphedema. Lymph was drained from superficial calf lymphatics using microsurgical techniques. Our studies showed generally higher concentrations of cytokines, chemokines, enzymes, and growth factors in lymph than in serum. The total protein L/S ratio was 0.22, whereas that of various lymph signaling proteins ranged between 1 and 10. Conclusions: This indicates that in addition to proteins filtered from blood, local cells contribute to lymph concentration by own production, depending on the actual cell requirement. Moreover, there were major individual differences of lymph levels with simultaneous stable serum levels. This suggests existence of a local autonomous regulatory humoral mechanism in tissues, not reflected in serum. PMID:24364843

  11. Foraging at wastewater treatment works affects brown adipose tissue fatty acid profiles in banana bats

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kate; van Aswegen, Sunet; Schoeman, M. Corrie; Claassens, Sarina; Jansen van Rensburg, Peet; Naidoo, Samantha; Vosloo, Dalene

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this study we tested the hypothesis that the decrease in habitat quality at wastewater treatment works (WWTW), such as limited prey diversity and exposure to the toxic cocktail of pollutants, affect fatty acid profiles of interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBrAT) in bats. Further, the antioxidant capacity of oxidative tissues such as pectoral and cardiac muscle may not be adequate to protect those tissues against reactive molecules resulting from polyunsaturated fatty acid auto-oxidation in the WWTW bats. Bats were sampled at two urban WWTW, and two unpolluted reference sites in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Brown adipose tissue (BrAT) mass was lower in WWTW bats than in reference site bats. We found lower levels of saturated phospholipid fatty acids and higher levels of mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids in WWTW bats than in reference site bats, while C18 desaturation and n-6 to n-3 ratios were higher in the WWTW bats. This was not associated with high lipid peroxidation levels in pectoral and cardiac muscle. Combined, these results indicate that WWTW bats rely on iBrAT as an energy source, and opportunistic foraging on abundant, pollutant-tolerant prey may change fatty acid profiles in their tissue, with possible effects on mitochondrial functioning, torpor and energy usage. PMID:26740572

  12. Ceramide metabolism is affected by obesity and diabetes in human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Błachnio-Zabielska, A U; Pułka, M; Baranowski, M; Nikołajuk, A; Zabielski, P; Górska, M; Górski, J

    2012-02-01

    Ceramide is involved in development of insulin resistance. However, there are no data on ceramide metabolism in human adipose tissue. The aim of our study was to examine sphingolipid metabolism in fat tissue from obese nondiabetic (n = 11), obese diabetic (n = 11), and lean nondiabetic (n = 8) subjects. The content of ceramide (Cer), dihydroceramide (dhCer), sphingosine (SPH), sphinganine (SPA), sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P; pmol/mg of protein), the expression (mRNA) and activity of key enzymes responsible for Cer metabolism: serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), neutral and acidic sphingomyelinase (nSMase and aSMase, respectively), and neutral and acidic ceramidase (nCDase and aCDase, respectively) were examined in human adipose tissue. The contents of SPA and Cer were significantly lower whereas the content of dhCer was higher in both obese groups than the respective values in the lean subjects. The expression of examined enzymes was elevated in both obese groups. The SPT and CDases activity increased whereas aSMase activity deceased in both obese groups. We have found correlation between adipose tissue Cer content and plasma adiponectin concentration (r = 0.69, P < 0.001) and negative correlation between total Cer content and HOMA-IR index (homeostasis model of insulin resistance) (r = -0.67, P < 0.001). We have found that both obesity and diabetes affected pathways of sphingolipid metabolism in the adipose tissue.

  13. Silencing Egr1 Attenuates Radiation-induced Apoptosis in Normal Tissues while Killing Cancer Cells and Delaying Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Diana Yi; Jacobs, Keith M; Hallahan, Dennis E; Thotala, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity reduces the therapeutic index of radiotherapy and decreases the quality of life for cancer survivors. Apoptosis is a key element of the radiation response in normal tissues like the hippocampus and small intestine, resulting in neurocognitive disorders and intestinal malabsorption. The Early Growth Response 1 (Egr1) transcription factor mediates radiation-induced apoptosis by activating the transcription of pro-apoptosis genes in response to ionizing radiation (IR). Therefore, we hypothesized that the genetic abrogation of Egr1 and the pharmacological inhibition of its transcriptional activity could attenuate radiation-induced apoptosis in normal tissues. We demonstrated that Egr1 null mice had less apoptosis in the hippocampus and intestine following irradiation as compared to their wild-type littermates. A similar result was achieved using Mithramycin A (MMA) to prevent binding of Egr1 to target promoters in the mouse intestine. Egr1 expression using shRNA dampened apoptosis and enhanced the clonogenic survival of irradiated HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells and IEC6 intestinal epithelial cells. Mechanistically, these events involved an abrogation of p53 induction by IR and an increase in the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax expression. In contrast, targeted silencing of Egr1 in two cancer cell lines (GL261 glioma cells, HCT116 colorectal cancer cells) was not radioprotective, since it reduced their growth while also sensitizing them to radiation-induced death. Further, Egr1 depletion delayed the growth of heterotopically implanted GL261 and HCT116 tumors. These results support the potential of silencing Egr1 in order to minimize the normal tissue complications associated with radiotherapy while enhancing tumor control. PMID:26206332

  14. Electromagnetic spectroscopy of normal breast tissue specimens obtained from reduction surgeries: comparison of optical and microwave properties.

    PubMed

    Lazebnik, Mariya; Zhu, Changfang; Palmer, Gregory M; Harter, Josephine; Sewall, Sarah; Ramanujam, Nirmala; Hagness, Susan C

    2008-10-01

    Techniques utilizing electromagnetic energy at microwave and optical frequencies have been shown to be promising for breast cancer detection and diagnosis. Since different biophysical mechanisms are exploited at these frequencies to discriminate between healthy and diseased tissue, combining these two modalities may result in a more powerful approach for breast cancer detection and diagnosis. Toward this end, we performed microwave dielectric spectroscopy and optical diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements at the same sites on freshly excised normal breast tissues obtained from reduction surgeries at the University of Wisconsin Hospital, using microwave and optical probes with very similar sensing volumes. We found that the microwave dielectric constant and effective conductivity are correlated with tissue composition across the entire measurement frequency range (|r| approximately 0.5-0.6, p<0.01) and that the optical absorption coefficient at 460 nm and optical scattering coefficient are correlated with tissue composition (|r| approximately 0.4-0.6, p<0.02). Finally, we found that the optical absorption coefficient at 460 nm is correlated with the microwave dielectric constant and effective conductivity (r=-0.55, p<0.01). Our results suggest that combining optical and microwave modalities for analyzing breast tissue samples may serve as a crosscheck and provide complementary information about tissue composition.

  15. Nutritional and exercise interventions variably affect estrogen receptor expression in the adipose tissue of male rats.

    PubMed

    Metz, Lore; Gerbaix, Maude; Masgrau, Aurélie; Guillet, Christelle; Walrand, Stéphane; Boisseau, Nathalie; Boirie, Yves; Courteix, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Energy-dense food consumption and lack of physical activity are implicated in the development of the current obesity epidemic. The role of estrogen in adiposity and fuel partitioning is mediated mainly though the estrogen receptor α (ERα) isoform. We hypothesized that nutritional adaptation and exercise training, either individually or combined, could impact ERα expression in adipose tissue relative to glucose tolerance. Seventy-two Wistar rats were submitted to a high-fat, high-sucrose (HF-HS) diet for 16weeks. The first phase of our study was to investigate the effect of an HF-HS diet on whole-body glucose tolerance, as well as on body composition and ERα expression in different adipose tissues. Second, we investigated the effect of switching to a well-balanced diet, with or without exercise training for 8 weeks, on those same parameters. After the first part of this study, HF-HS-fed rats were fatter (8%) than control rats. Despite a decrease in glucose tolerance, ERα expression in adipose tissues was not significantly altered by an HF-HS diet. The return to a well-balanced diet significantly increased ERα expression in perirenal and epididymal adipose tissue, but there was no effect of diet or exercise training on whole-body glucose tolerance. The present findings suggest that diet is a powerful modulator of ERα expression in adipose tissue, as nutritional modulation after an HF-HS diet strongly affects ERα expression, particularly in perirenal and epididymal adipose tissue. However, ERα expression in adipose tissue does not appear to be associated with whole-body glucose tolerance. PMID:26923515

  16. Picrosirius red staining: a useful tool to appraise collagen networks in normal and pathological tissues.

    PubMed

    Lattouf, Raed; Younes, Ronald; Lutomski, Didier; Naaman, Nada; Godeau, Gaston; Senni, Karim; Changotade, Sylvie

    2014-10-01

    Specific staining of the extracellular matrix components is especially helpful in studying tissue remodeling, particularly in the case of connective tissue pathologies. As developed by Junqueira and colleagues in 1979, specific staining by Picrosirius red is one of the most important stains to study collagen networks in different tissues. Under polarized light, collagen bundles appear green, red or yellow, and are easily differentiated from the black background, thus allowing for quantitative morphometric analysis. As Junqueira and colleagues point out, many studies use color staining to differentiate collagen bundles and to specify collagen types, yet other studies report that polarized colors only reflect fiber thickness and packing. Using a simple histological example, our study illustrates the inability of Picrosirius red staining to differentiate collagen types, since the absorbed amount of polarized light by this dye strictly depends on the orientation of the collagen bundles.

  17. Picrosirius red staining: a useful tool to appraise collagen networks in normal and pathological tissues.

    PubMed

    Lattouf, Raed; Younes, Ronald; Lutomski, Didier; Naaman, Nada; Godeau, Gaston; Senni, Karim; Changotade, Sylvie

    2014-10-01

    Specific staining of the extracellular matrix components is especially helpful in studying tissue remodeling, particularly in the case of connective tissue pathologies. As developed by Junqueira and colleagues in 1979, specific staining by Picrosirius red is one of the most important stains to study collagen networks in different tissues. Under polarized light, collagen bundles appear green, red or yellow, and are easily differentiated from the black background, thus allowing for quantitative morphometric analysis. As Junqueira and colleagues point out, many studies use color staining to differentiate collagen bundles and to specify collagen types, yet other studies report that polarized colors only reflect fiber thickness and packing. Using a simple histological example, our study illustrates the inability of Picrosirius red staining to differentiate collagen types, since the absorbed amount of polarized light by this dye strictly depends on the orientation of the collagen bundles. PMID:25023614

  18. Normal and Fibrotic Rat Livers Demonstrate Shear Strain Softening and Compression Stiffening: A Model for Soft Tissue Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Perepelyuk, Maryna; Chin, LiKang; Cao, Xuan; van Oosten, Anne; Shenoy, Vivek B; Janmey, Paul A; Wells, Rebecca G

    2016-01-01

    Tissues including liver stiffen and acquire more extracellular matrix with fibrosis. The relationship between matrix content and stiffness, however, is non-linear, and stiffness is only one component of tissue mechanics. The mechanical response of tissues such as liver to physiological stresses is not well described, and models of tissue mechanics are limited. To better understand the mechanics of the normal and fibrotic rat liver, we carried out a series of studies using parallel plate rheometry, measuring the response to compressive, extensional, and shear strains. We found that the shear storage and loss moduli G' and G" and the apparent Young's moduli measured by uniaxial strain orthogonal to the shear direction increased markedly with both progressive fibrosis and increasing compression, that livers shear strain softened, and that significant increases in shear modulus with compressional stress occurred within a range consistent with increased sinusoidal pressures in liver disease. Proteoglycan content and integrin-matrix interactions were significant determinants of liver mechanics, particularly in compression. We propose a new non-linear constitutive model of the liver. A key feature of this model is that, while it assumes overall liver incompressibility, it takes into account water flow and solid phase compressibility. In sum, we report a detailed study of non-linear liver mechanics under physiological strains in the normal state, early fibrosis, and late fibrosis. We propose a constitutive model that captures compression stiffening, tension softening, and shear softening, and can be understood in terms of the cellular and matrix components of the liver.

  19. Normal and Fibrotic Rat Livers Demonstrate Shear Strain Softening and Compression Stiffening: A Model for Soft Tissue Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xuan; van Oosten, Anne; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Janmey, Paul A.; Wells, Rebecca G.

    2016-01-01

    Tissues including liver stiffen and acquire more extracellular matrix with fibrosis. The relationship between matrix content and stiffness, however, is non-linear, and stiffness is only one component of tissue mechanics. The mechanical response of tissues such as liver to physiological stresses is not well described, and models of tissue mechanics are limited. To better understand the mechanics of the normal and fibrotic rat liver, we carried out a series of studies using parallel plate rheometry, measuring the response to compressive, extensional, and shear strains. We found that the shear storage and loss moduli G’ and G” and the apparent Young's moduli measured by uniaxial strain orthogonal to the shear direction increased markedly with both progressive fibrosis and increasing compression, that livers shear strain softened, and that significant increases in shear modulus with compressional stress occurred within a range consistent with increased sinusoidal pressures in liver disease. Proteoglycan content and integrin-matrix interactions were significant determinants of liver mechanics, particularly in compression. We propose a new non-linear constitutive model of the liver. A key feature of this model is that, while it assumes overall liver incompressibility, it takes into account water flow and solid phase compressibility. In sum, we report a detailed study of non-linear liver mechanics under physiological strains in the normal state, early fibrosis, and late fibrosis. We propose a constitutive model that captures compression stiffening, tension softening, and shear softening, and can be understood in terms of the cellular and matrix components of the liver. PMID:26735954

  20. Factors Affecting the Normalization of CALL in Chinese Senior High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Bi; Puakpong, Nattaya; Lian, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    With the development of Information Technology, increasing attention has been paid to Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL). Meanwhile, increasing enthusiasm is seen for English learning and teaching in China. Yet, few research studies have focused on the normalization of CALL in ethnically diverse areas. In response to this research gap,…

  1. Next-generation transcriptome sequencing of the premenopausal breast epithelium using specimens from a normal human breast tissue bank

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Our efforts to prevent and treat breast cancer are significantly impeded by a lack of knowledge of the biology and developmental genetics of the normal mammary gland. In order to provide the specimens that will facilitate such an understanding, The Susan G. Komen for the Cure Tissue Bank at the IU Simon Cancer Center (KTB) was established. The KTB is, to our knowledge, the only biorepository in the world prospectively established to collect normal, healthy breast tissue from volunteer donors. As a first initiative toward a molecular understanding of the biology and developmental genetics of the normal mammary gland, the effect of the menstrual cycle and hormonal contraceptives on DNA expression in the normal breast epithelium was examined. Methods Using normal breast tissue from 20 premenopausal donors to KTB, the changes in the mRNA of the normal breast epithelium as a function of phase of the menstrual cycle and hormonal contraception were assayed using next-generation whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq). Results In total, 255 genes representing 1.4% of all genes were deemed to have statistically significant differential expression between the two phases of the menstrual cycle. The overwhelming majority (221; 87%) of the genes have higher expression during the luteal phase. These data provide important insights into the processes occurring during each phase of the menstrual cycle. There was only a single gene significantly differentially expressed when comparing the epithelium of women using hormonal contraception to those in the luteal phase. Conclusions We have taken advantage of a unique research resource, the KTB, to complete the first-ever next-generation transcriptome sequencing of the epithelial compartment of 20 normal human breast specimens. This work has produced a comprehensive catalog of the differences in the expression of protein-coding genes as a function of the phase of the menstrual cycle. These data constitute the beginning of

  2. Identification of Reference Genes for RT-qPCR Data Normalization in Cannabis sativa Stem Tissues.

    PubMed

    Mangeot-Peter, Lauralie; Legay, Sylvain; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Esposito, Sergio; Guerriero, Gea

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression profiling via quantitative real-time PCR is a robust technique widely used in the life sciences to compare gene expression patterns in, e.g., different tissues, growth conditions, or after specific treatments. In the field of plant science, real-time PCR is the gold standard to study the dynamics of gene expression and is used to validate the results generated with high throughput techniques, e.g., RNA-Seq. An accurate relative quantification of gene expression relies on the identification of appropriate reference genes, that need to be determined for each experimental set-up used and plant tissue studied. Here, we identify suitable reference genes for expression profiling in stems of textile hemp (Cannabis sativa L.), whose tissues (isolated bast fibres and core) are characterized by remarkable differences in cell wall composition. We additionally validate the reference genes by analysing the expression of putative candidates involved in the non-oxidative phase of the pentose phosphate pathway and in the first step of the shikimate pathway. The goal is to describe the possible regulation pattern of some genes involved in the provision of the precursors needed for lignin biosynthesis in the different hemp stem tissues. The results here shown are useful to design future studies focused on gene expression analyses in hemp. PMID:27649158

  3. Identification of Reference Genes for RT-qPCR Data Normalization in Cannabis sativa Stem Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Mangeot-Peter, Lauralie; Legay, Sylvain; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Esposito, Sergio; Guerriero, Gea

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression profiling via quantitative real-time PCR is a robust technique widely used in the life sciences to compare gene expression patterns in, e.g., different tissues, growth conditions, or after specific treatments. In the field of plant science, real-time PCR is the gold standard to study the dynamics of gene expression and is used to validate the results generated with high throughput techniques, e.g., RNA-Seq. An accurate relative quantification of gene expression relies on the identification of appropriate reference genes, that need to be determined for each experimental set-up used and plant tissue studied. Here, we identify suitable reference genes for expression profiling in stems of textile hemp (Cannabis sativa L.), whose tissues (isolated bast fibres and core) are characterized by remarkable differences in cell wall composition. We additionally validate the reference genes by analysing the expression of putative candidates involved in the non-oxidative phase of the pentose phosphate pathway and in the first step of the shikimate pathway. The goal is to describe the possible regulation pattern of some genes involved in the provision of the precursors needed for lignin biosynthesis in the different hemp stem tissues. The results here shown are useful to design future studies focused on gene expression analyses in hemp. PMID:27649158

  4. Identification of Reference Genes for RT-qPCR Data Normalization in Cannabis sativa Stem Tissues.

    PubMed

    Mangeot-Peter, Lauralie; Legay, Sylvain; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Esposito, Sergio; Guerriero, Gea

    2016-09-15

    Gene expression profiling via quantitative real-time PCR is a robust technique widely used in the life sciences to compare gene expression patterns in, e.g., different tissues, growth conditions, or after specific treatments. In the field of plant science, real-time PCR is the gold standard to study the dynamics of gene expression and is used to validate the results generated with high throughput techniques, e.g., RNA-Seq. An accurate relative quantification of gene expression relies on the identification of appropriate reference genes, that need to be determined for each experimental set-up used and plant tissue studied. Here, we identify suitable reference genes for expression profiling in stems of textile hemp (Cannabis sativa L.), whose tissues (isolated bast fibres and core) are characterized by remarkable differences in cell wall composition. We additionally validate the reference genes by analysing the expression of putative candidates involved in the non-oxidative phase of the pentose phosphate pathway and in the first step of the shikimate pathway. The goal is to describe the possible regulation pattern of some genes involved in the provision of the precursors needed for lignin biosynthesis in the different hemp stem tissues. The results here shown are useful to design future studies focused on gene expression analyses in hemp.

  5. Tuning sensitivity of CAR to EGFR density limits recognition of normal tissue while maintaining potent anti-tumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Hillary G.; Hurton, Lenka V.; Najjar, Amer; Rushworth, David; Ang, Sonny; Olivares, Simon; Mi, Tiejuan; Switzer, Kirsten; Singh, Harjeet; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A.; Heimberger, Amy B.; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2015-01-01

    Many tumors over express tumor-associated antigens relative to normal tissue, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). This limits targeting by human T cells modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) due to potential for deleterious recognition of normal cells. We sought to generate CAR+ T cells capable of distinguishing malignant from normal cells based on the disparate density of EGFR expression by generating two CARs from monoclonal antibodies which differ in affinity. T cells with low affinity Nimo-CAR selectively targeted cells over-expressing EGFR, but exhibited diminished effector function as the density of EGFR decreased. In contrast, the activation of T cells bearing high affinity Cetux-CAR was not impacted by the density of EGFR. In summary, we describe the generation of CARs able to tune T-cell activity to the level of EGFR expression in which a CAR with reduced affinity enabled T cells to distinguish malignant from non-malignant cells. PMID:26330164

  6. Prepubertal tamoxifen treatment affects development of heifer reproductive tissues and related signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Al Naib, A; Tucker, H L M; Xie, G; Keisler, D H; Bartol, F F; Rhoads, R P; Akers, R M; Rhoads, M L

    2016-07-01

    Prepubertal exposure of the developing ovaries and reproductive tract (RT) to estrogen or xenoestrogens can have acute and long-term consequences that compromise the reproductive performance of cattle. This research examined effects of the selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen (TAM) on gene and protein abundance in prepubertal ovaries and RT, with a particular focus on signaling pathways that affect morphology. Tamoxifen was administered to Holstein heifer calves (n=8) daily (0.3mg/kg subcutaneously) from 28 to 120 d of age, when tissues were collected. Control calves (n=7) received an equal volume of excipient. Weight, gross measurements, and samples of reproductive tissues were collected, and protein and mRNA were extracted from snap-frozen samples of vagina, cervix, uterus, oviduct, ovary, and liver. Neither estradiol nor insulin-like growth factor I (IGFI) concentrations in the serum were affected by TAM treatment. Tamoxifen treatment reduced ovarian weight independently from effects on antral follicle populations, as there was no difference in visible antral follicle numbers on the day of collection. Estrogen receptor α (ESR1) and β (ESR2) mRNA, ESR1 protein, IGFI, progesterone receptor, total growth hormone receptor, WNT4, WNT5A, and WNT7A mRNA, in addition to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphorylated MAPK proteins were affected differently depending on the tissue examined. However, neither IGFI receptor mRNA nor protein abundance were affected by TAM treatment. Results indicate that reproductive development in prepubertal Holstein heifer calves is TAM-sensitive, and that bovine RT and ovarian development are supported, in part, by estrogen receptor-dependent mechanisms during the period studied here. Potential long-term consequences of such developmental disruption remain to be defined. PMID:27085397

  7. Soluble CD14 is essential for lipopolysaccharide-dependent activation of human intestinal mast cells from macroscopically normal as well as Crohn's disease tissue.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Sibylle A; Zacheja, Steffi; Schäffer, Michael; Feilhauer, Katharina; Bischoff, Stephan C; Lorentz, Axel

    2014-10-01

    Mast cells are now considered sentinels in immunity. Given their location underneath the gastrointestinal barrier, mast cells are entrusted with the task of tolerating commensal microorganisms and eliminating potential pathogens in the gut microbiota. The aim of our study was to analyse the responsiveness of mast cells isolated from macroscopically normal and Crohn's disease-affected intestine to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To determine the LPS-mediated signalling, human intestinal mast cells were treated with LPS alone or in combination with soluble CD14 due to their lack of surface CD14 expression. LPS alone failed to stimulate cytokine expression in human intestinal mast cells from both macroscopically normal and Crohn's disease tissue. Upon administration of LPS and soluble CD14, there was a dose- and time-dependent induction of cytokine and chemokine expression. Moreover, CXCL8 and interleukin-1β protein expression was induced in response to activation with LPS plus soluble CD14. Expression of cytokines and chemokines was at similar levels in mast cells from macroscopically normal and Crohn's disease-affected intestine after LPS/soluble CD14 treatment. In conclusion, human intestinal mast cells appear to tolerate LPS per se. The LPS-mediated activation in mast cells may be provoked by soluble CD14 distributed by other LPS-triggered cells at the gastrointestinal barrier.

  8. Autofluorescence spectroscopy of normal and malignant tissues: both in-vivo and ex-vivo measurements in the upper aero-digestive tract and lung tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A'Amar, Ousama M.; Lignon, Dominique; Menard, O.; Begorre, Henri; Guillemin, Francois H.; Yvroud, Edouard

    1996-04-01

    A spectroscopic system with flexible three optical fiber sensor had been developed to study tissue fluorescence for a clinical use. Autofluorescence spectra at 413 nm and 10 mW excitation light power from different tissues in oral cavity had been measured in vivo in 25 subjects. The correlation coefficient in spectral shape between individual spectra and the mean emission spectrum of each site was about 0.9 and fluorescence intensity variation ranged between 20% and 45% according to the examined site. The variation in fluorescence intensity of the main emission wavelength at about 520 nm between spectra of the lower part of tongue, gingiva, lips, floor of cavity, cheek and palate was not statistically significant. But the spectrum of the upper part of tongue had been characterized by an additional peak around 635 nm. Otherwise, autofluorescence spectra at 410 nm and 0.5 mW excitation light power of 8 carcinoma of buccal and lung tissues were measured. The fluorescence ratio at 520 emission peak between normal tissue and carcinoma was evaluated at a maximum value of 13 for a lung cancer (ex vivo measurement) and a minimum of 3.3 for a cancer of the oro-pharynx (in vivo measurement). On the other hand, a fluorescence peak at 635 nm had characterized the carcinoma of the floor of cavity and the upper part of tongue.

  9. Electrotransfer of gene encoding endostatin into normal and neoplastic mouse tissues: inhibition of primary tumor growth and metastatic spread.

    PubMed

    Cichoń, Tomasz; Jamrozy, Laura; Glogowska, Joanna; Missol-Kolka, Ewa; Szala, Stanisław

    2002-09-01

    Electroporation-mediated gene transfer relies upon direct delivery of plasmids into cells permeabilized by electric fields, a method more efficient than transfer using nonviral vectors, although neither approaches the transfer efficiency of viral vectors. Here we studied electrotransfer of a gene encoding an angiogenesis inhibitor (endostatin) into primary tumors and muscle tissues, which would serve as a site of synthesis and secretion into the bloodstream of a therapeutic antimetastatic protein with systemic effects. Optimum electroporation conditions (voltage, number and duration of impulses, separation of caliper electrodes) were first established to maximize expression of a reporter gene transferred into murine Renca kidney carcinoma, B16(F10) melanoma, or skeletal muscle tissues. In neoplastic tissues, electrotransfer of plasmid DNA was far more efficient than electroporation with lipoplexes, but no differences between naked DNA and lipoplexes were found in case of electroporated muscles. We then studied the electrotransfer of plasmid DNA carrying the endostatin gene into pre-established experimental Renca tumors. A significant inhibition of tumor growth was observed in animals electroporated with this construct. Electrotransfer of the endostatin gene into muscle tissues resulted in reduced numbers of experimental B16(F10) metastases in the lungs. This study clearly shows that electroporation may be used to efficiently transfer antiangiogenic genes into both normal and neoplastic tissues. PMID:12189527

  10. Bone mineralization: from tissue to crystal in normal and pathological contexts.

    PubMed

    Bala, Y; Farlay, D; Boivin, G

    2013-08-01

    Bone is a complex and structured material; its mechanical behavior results from an interaction between the properties of each level of its structural hierarchy. The degree of mineralization of bone (bone density measured at tissue level) and the characteristics of the mineral deposited (apatite crystals) are major determinants of bone strength. Bone remodeling activity acts as a regulator of the degree of mineralization and of the distribution of mineral at the tissue level, directly impacting bone mechanical properties. Recent findings have highlighted the need to understand the underlying process occurring at the nanostructure level that may be independent of bone remodeling itself. A more global comprehension of bone qualities will need further works designed to characterize what are the consequences on whole bone strength of changes at nano- or microstructure levels relative to each other.

  11. Soft-tissue facial characteristics of attractive Chinese men compared to normal men

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Feng; Li, Junfang; He, Hong; Huang, Na; Tang, Youchao; Wang, Yuanqing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the facial characteristics of attractive Chinese men with those of reference men. Materials and Methods: The three-dimensional coordinates of 50 facial landmarks were collected in 40 healthy reference men and in 40 “attractive” men, soft tissue facial angles, distances, areas, and volumes were computed and compared using analysis of variance. Results: When compared with reference men, attractive men shared several similar facial characteristics: relatively large forehead, reduced mandible, and rounded face. They had a more acute soft tissue profile, an increased upper facial width and middle facial depth, larger mouth, and more voluminous lips than reference men. Conclusions: Attractive men had several facial characteristics suggesting babyness. Nonetheless, each group of men was characterized by a different development of these features. Esthetic reference values can be a useful tool for clinicians, but should always consider the characteristics of individual faces. PMID:26221357

  12. Evolution of normal and neoplastic tissue stem cells: progress after Robert Hooke.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Irving

    2015-10-19

    The appearance of stem cells coincides with the transition from single-celled organisms to metazoans. Stem cells are capable of self-renewal as well as differentiation. Each tissue is maintained by self-renewing tissue-specific stem cells. The accumulation of mutations that lead to preleukaemia are in the blood-forming stem cell, while the transition to leukaemia stem cells occurs in the clone at a progenitor stage. All leukaemia and cancer cells escape being removed by scavenger macrophages by expressing the 'don't eat me' signal CD47. Blocking antibodies to CD47 are therapeutics for all cancers, and are currently being tested in clinical trials in the US and UK. PMID:26416675

  13. Evolution of normal and neoplastic tissue stem cells: progress after Robert Hooke.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Irving

    2015-10-19

    The appearance of stem cells coincides with the transition from single-celled organisms to metazoans. Stem cells are capable of self-renewal as well as differentiation. Each tissue is maintained by self-renewing tissue-specific stem cells. The accumulation of mutations that lead to preleukaemia are in the blood-forming stem cell, while the transition to leukaemia stem cells occurs in the clone at a progenitor stage. All leukaemia and cancer cells escape being removed by scavenger macrophages by expressing the 'don't eat me' signal CD47. Blocking antibodies to CD47 are therapeutics for all cancers, and are currently being tested in clinical trials in the US and UK.

  14. Evolution of normal and neoplastic tissue stem cells: progress after Robert Hooke

    PubMed Central

    Weissman, Irving

    2015-01-01

    The appearance of stem cells coincides with the transition from single-celled organisms to metazoans. Stem cells are capable of self-renewal as well as differentiation. Each tissue is maintained by self-renewing tissue-specific stem cells. The accumulation of mutations that lead to preleukaemia are in the blood-forming stem cell, while the transition to leukaemia stem cells occurs in the clone at a progenitor stage. All leukaemia and cancer cells escape being removed by scavenger macrophages by expressing the 'don't eat me' signal CD47. Blocking antibodies to CD47 are therapeutics for all cancers, and are currently being tested in clinical trials in the US and UK. PMID:26416675

  15. LDRD Progress Report: Radioimmunotherapy using oxide nanoparticles: Radionuclide contaiment and mitigation of normal tissue toxicity.

    SciTech Connect

    Rondinone, Adam Justin; Dai, Sheng; Mirzadeh, Saed; Kennel, Steve J

    2005-10-01

    Radionuclides with specific emission properties can be incorporated into metal-chalcogenide and metal-oxide nanoparticles. Coupled to antibodies, these conjugates could be injected into the bloodstream to target and destroy non-solid tumors or target organs for radioimaging. In the first year of this project, two types of radioactive nanoparticles, CdTe: {sup 125m}Te and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}: {sup 170}Tm were synthesized and coupled to antibodies specific to murine epithelial lung tissue. The nanoparticles successfully target the lung tissue in vivo. Some leaching of the radioisotope was observed. The coming year will explore other types of nanoparticles (other crystal chemistries) in order to minimize leaching.

  16. ''Normal'' tissues from humans exposed to radium contain an alteration in the c-mos locus

    SciTech Connect

    Huberman, E.; Schlenker, R.A.; Hardwick, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    The structures of a number of human proto-oncogenes from persons with internal systemic exposure to radium were analyzed by restriction enzyme digestion and southern blotting of their DNA. Two extra c-mos Eco R1 restriction-fragment-length bands of 5.0 kb and 5.5 kb were found in tissue DNA from six of seven individuals. The extra c-mos bands were detected in DNA from many, but not all, of the tissues of the individuals exposed to radium. Our results suggest that the c-mos restriction-fragment-length alterations (RFLA) found in individuals exposed to radium were induced rather than inherited, are epigenetic in origin, and most likely result from changes in the methylation of bases surrounding the single exon of the c-mos proto-oncogene. 7 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Fourier analysis of human soft tissue facial shape: sex differences in normal adults.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Schmitz, J H; Miani, A; Taroni, G

    1995-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in human facial form involves both size and shape variations of the soft tissue structures. These variations are conventionally appreciated using linear and angular measurements, as well as ratios, taken from photographs or radiographs. Unfortunately this metric approach provides adequate quantitative information about size only, eluding the problems of shape definition. Mathematical methods such as the Fourier series allow a correct quantitative analysis of shape and of its changes. A method for the reconstruction of outlines starting from selected landmarks and for their Fourier analysis has been developed, and applied to analyse sex differences in shape of the soft tissue facial contour in a group of healthy young adults. When standardised for size, no sex differences were found between both cosine and sine coefficients of the Fourier series expansion. This shape similarity was largely overwhelmed by the very evident size differences and it could be measured only using the proper mathematical methods. PMID:8586558

  18. Characterization of human arterial tissue affected by atherosclerosis using multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baria, Enrico; Cicchi, Riccardo; Rotellini, Matteo; Nesi, Gabriella; Massi, Daniela; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a widespread cardiovascular disease caused by the deposition of lipids (such as cholesterol and triglycerides) on the inner arterial wall. The rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque, resulting in a thrombus, is one of the leading causes of death in the Western World. Preventive assessment of plaque vulnerability is therefore extremely important and can be performed by studying collagen organization and lipid composition in atherosclerotic arterial tissues. Routinely used diagnostic methods, such as histopathological examination, are limited to morphological analysis of the examined tissues, whereas an exhaustive characterization requires immune-histochemical examination and a morpho-functional approach. Instead, a label-free and non-invasive alternative is provided by nonlinear microscopy. In this study, we combined SHG and FLIM microscopy in order to characterize collagen organization and lipids in human carotid ex vivo tissues affected by atherosclerosis. SHG and TPF images, acquired from different regions within atherosclerotic plaques, were processed through image pattern analysis methods (FFT, GLCM). The resulting information on collagen and cholesterol distribution and anisotropy, combined with collagen and lipids fluorescence lifetime measured from FLIM images, allowed characterization of carotid samples and discrimination of different tissue regions. The presented method can be applied for automated classification of atherosclerotic lesions and plaque vulnerability. Moreover, it lays the foundation for a potential in vivo diagnostic tool to be used in clinical setting.

  19. A new trichrome staining method: its practice and application in normal tissues.

    PubMed

    Raica, M; Mederle, O; Raţ, G

    1998-01-01

    A new trichrome staining method is presented. The staining solution contains: chromotrope RH, lissamine green SF, phosphomolibdic acid and acetic acid in aquous solution. The steps of the technique are described, insisting on the staining solution and dehydration. The authors revealed the staining properties of the method in different tissue and organs. The importance of the method for the histological study and its possible applications in pathology is discussed.

  20. Automated characterization of normal and pathologic lung tissue by topological texture analysis of multidetector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, H. F.; Fink, C.; Becker, C.; Reiser, M.

    2007-03-01

    Reliable and accurate methods for objective quantitative assessment of parenchymal alterations in the lung are necessary for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of pulmonary diseases. Two major types of alterations are pulmonary emphysema and fibrosis, emphysema being characterized by abnormal enlargement of the air spaces distal to the terminal, nonrespiratory bronchiole, accompanied by destructive changes of the alveolar walls. The main characteristic of fibrosis is coursening of the interstitial fibers and compaction of the pulmonary tissue. With the ability to display anatomy free from superimposing structures and greater visual clarity, Multi-Detector-CT has shown to be more sensitive than the chest radiograph in identifying alterations of lung parenchyma. In automated evaluation of pulmonary CT-scans, quantitative image processing techniques are applied for objective evaluation of the data. A number of methods have been proposed in the past, most of which utilize simple densitometric tissue features based on the mean X-ray attenuation coefficients expressed in terms of Hounsfield Units [HU]. Due to partial volume effects, most of the density-based methodologies tend to fail, namely in cases, where emphysema and fibrosis occur within narrow spatial limits. In this study, we propose a methodology based upon the topological assessment of graylevel distribution in the 3D image data of lung tissue which provides a way of improving quantitative CT evaluation. Results are compared to the more established density-based methods.

  1. Tissue residues of some sulphonamides in normal and Eimeria stiedai infected rabbits.

    PubMed

    Atta, A H; el-Zeni; Samia, A

    1999-07-01

    Tissue residues of sulphadiazine (SDZ), sulphadimidine (SDD) and sulphquinoxaline (SQ) were studied in healthy and E. stiedai infected rabbits following oral administration of 0.5 g/l drinking water for 5 days. The solid-phase extraction and HPLC was used to determine the concentration of the three sulphonamides in a single tissue sample. SDZ was detected in the liver and kidney in concentrations below the tolerance levels at day 5 and no residues could be detected at day 7 after drug withdrawal. SDD and SQ were detected in all of the tested organs of healthy rabbits up to day 5, where the highest concentration was reported in the liver (0.08 +/- 0.02 and 0.09 +/- 0.02 g/g respectively). In infected rabbits, the three sulphonamides were detected up to day 7 in concentrations higher than the tolerance limits (> 0.1 g/g) in the liver and kidney and lower levels in other tissues. A withdrawal period of 4 days for SDZ and 5 days for SDD and SQ in healthy rabbits and 7 days for SDZ and 8 days for SDD and SQ in E. stiedai infected rabbits is suggested. PMID:10481374

  2. DNA methylation signatures of the AIRE promoter in thymic epithelial cells, thymomas and normal tissues.

    PubMed

    Kont, Vivian; Murumägi, Astrid; Tykocinski, Lars-Oliver; Kinkel, Sarah A; Webster, Kylie E; Kisand, Kai; Tserel, Liina; Pihlap, Maire; Ströbel, Philipp; Scott, Hamish S; Marx, Alexander; Kyewski, Bruno; Peterson, Pärt

    2011-12-01

    Mutations in the AIRE gene cause autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), which is associated with autoimmunity towards several peripheral organs. The AIRE protein is almost exclusively expressed in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTEC) and CpG methylation in the promoter of the AIRE gene has been suggested to control its tissue-specific expression pattern. We found that in human AIRE-positive medullary and AIRE-negative cortical epithelium, the AIRE promoter is hypomethylated, whereas in thymocytes, the promoter had high level of CpG methylation. Likewise, in mouse mTECs the AIRE promoter was uniformly hypomethylated. In the same vein, the AIRE promoter was hypomethylated in AIRE-negative thymic epithelial tumors (thymomas) and in several peripheral tissues. Our data are compatible with the notion that promoter hypomethylation is necessary but not sufficient for tissue-specific regulation of the AIRE gene. In contrast, a positive correlation between AIRE expression and histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation, an active chromatin mark, was found in the AIRE promoter in human and mouse TECs.

  3. A mechanistic description of radiation-induced damage to normal tissue and its healing kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanin, Leonid; Zaider, Marco

    2013-02-01

    We introduce a novel mechanistic model of the yield of tissue damage at the end of radiation treatment and of the subsequent healing kinetics. We find explicit expressions for the total number of functional proliferating cells as well as doomed (functional but non-proliferating) cells as a function of time post treatment. This leads to the possibility of estimating—for any given cohort of patients undergoing radiation therapy—the probability distribution of those kinetic parameters (e.g. proliferation rates) that determine times to injury onset and ensuing resolution. The model is suitable for tissues with simple duplication organization, meaning that functionally competent cells are also responsible for tissue renewal or regeneration following injury. An extension of the model to arbitrary temporal patterns of dose rate is presented. To illustrate the practical utility of the model, as well as its limitations, we apply it to data on the time course of urethral toxicity following fractionated radiation treatment and brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

  4. Effects of a Mediterranean Diet Intervention on Anti- and Pro-Inflammatory Eicosanoids, Epithelial Proliferation, and Nuclear Morphology in Biopsies of Normal Colon Tissue.

    PubMed

    Djuric, Zora; Turgeon, D Kim; Ren, Jianwei; Neilson, Andrew; Plegue, Missy; Waters, Ian G; Chan, Alexander; Askew, Leah M; Ruffin, Mack T; Sen, Ananda; Brenner, Dean E

    2015-01-01

    This randomized trial evaluated the effects of intervention with either a Healthy Eating or a Mediterranean diet on colon biomarkers in 120 healthy individuals at increased colon cancer risk. The hypothesis was that eicosanoids and markers of proliferation would be favorably affected by the Mediterranean diet. Colon epithelial biopsy tissues and blood samples were obtained at baseline and after 6 mo of intervention. Colonic eicosanoid concentrations were evaluated by HPLC-MS-MS, and measures of epithelial proliferation and nuclear morphology were evaluated by image analysis of biopsy sections. There was little change in proinflammatory eicosanoids and in plasma cytokine concentrations with either dietary intervention. There was, however, a 50% increase in colonic prostaglandin E3 (PGE3), which is formed from eicosapentanoic acid, in the Mediterranean arm. Unlike PGE2, PGE3, was not significantly affected by regular use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs at baseline, and normal weight subjects had significantly higher colon PGE3 than overweight or obese subjects. Increased proliferation in the colon at baseline, by Ki67 labeling, was associated with morphological features that defined smaller nuclei in the epithelial cells, lower colon leukotriene concentrations and higher plasma cytokine concentrations. Dietary intervention had little effect on measures of epithelial proliferation or of nuclear morphology. The increase in PGE3 with a Mediterranean diet indicates that in normal colon, diet might affect protective pathways to a greater extent than proinflammatory and proliferative pathways. Hence, biomarkers from cancer models might not be relevant in a true prevention setting.

  5. Comparison of 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities in the microsomal fractions of hyperplastic, malignant and normal human prostatic tissues.

    PubMed

    Hudson, R W

    1984-04-01

    The conversion of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) to 3 alpha-androstanediol (3 alpha-adiol) was studied using the microsomal fractions of 15 hyperplastic, 5 malignant and 6 normal human prostatis tissues. Standard assay conditions were: 0.2 microM DHT, 1.0 mM NADPH, 1.0 mM NADH, 2.0 mM EDTA and the microsomal fractions equivalent to 200 mg of prostatic tissue, in 0.1 M MES buffer, pH 6.5. Under the conditions of this assay, the back-conversion of 3 alpha-adiol to DHT or the conversion of DHT to androstanediol were negligible. Optimum enzyme activity was achieved under standard assay conditions. In the absence of EDTA: enzyme activity was 65% of the standard assay; activity was diminished further by 2 mM Ca2+ and virtually eliminated by 2 mM Mg2+ or 2 microM Zn2+. Activity in the absence of either NADPH or NADH was only 50% of the activities seen in the presence of both cofactors. The pH optimum of the enzyme was between 6.0 and 6.5. The apparent Km values of the enzymes in hyperplastic, malignant and normal tissues were 0.03, 0.02 and 0.03 microM, respectively. The Vmax values for these tissues were 6.0 +/- 2.1, 1.6 +/- 0.5 and 14.0 +/- 3.0 pmol/mg protein/20 min incubation, respectively. The results of these experiments offer further explanation for the differences in DHT and 3 alpha-adiol levels seen in the 3 prostatic tissues.

  6. Use of high-throughput protein array for profiling of differentially expressed proteins in normal and malignant breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Hudelist, Gernot; Pacher-Zavisin, Margit; Singer, Christian F; Holper, Tina; Kubista, Ernst; Schreiber, Martin; Manavi, Mahmood; Bilban, Martin; Czerwenka, Klaus

    2004-08-01

    cDNA arrays provide a powerful tool to identify gene expression pattern that are potentially associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. However, genes work at the protein level and, since the transcriptional activity of a gene does not necessarily reflect cellular protein expression, the identification and quantification of proteins is essential for the understanding of molecular events leading to malignant transformation. We have therefore employed a high-throughput protein microarray system which contains 378 well-characterized monoclonal antibodies in order to compare the gene expression pattern of malignant and adjacent normal breast tissue in a patient with primary breast cancer. Using this technique, we have identified a number of proteins that show increased expression levels in malignant breast tissues such as casein kinase Ie, p53, annexin XI, CDC25C, eIF-4E and MAP kinase 7. The expression of other proteins, such as the multifunctional regulator 14-3-3e was found to be decreased in malignant breast tissue, whereas the majority of proteins remained unchanged when compared to the corresponding non-malignant samples. The protein expression pattern was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, in which antibodies against 8 representative proteins known to be involved in carcinogenesis were employed in paraffin-embedded normal and malignant tissue sections deriving from the same patient. In each case, the results obtained by IHC matched the data obtained by antibody microarray system. Taken together, we have described for the first time a tumor cell specificity protein expression pattern by use of a novel commercially available antibody microarray system. We have thus demonstrated the feasibility of high-throughput protein arrays in the proteomic analysis of human breast tissue. We hypothesize that the use of protein arrays will not only increase our understanding of the molecular events, but could prove useful in evaluating prognosis and in determining optimal

  7. A Protocol for the Comprehensive Flow Cytometric Analysis of Immune Cells in Normal and Inflamed Murine Non-Lymphoid Tissues.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yen-Rei A; O'Koren, Emily G; Hotten, Danielle F; Kan, Matthew J; Kopin, David; Nelson, Erik R; Que, Loretta; Gunn, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry is used extensively to examine immune cells in non-lymphoid tissues. However, a method of flow cytometric analysis that is both comprehensive and widely applicable has not been described. We developed a protocol for the flow cytometric analysis of non-lymphoid tissues, including methods of tissue preparation, a 10-fluorochrome panel for cell staining, and a standardized gating strategy, that allows the simultaneous identification and quantification of all major immune cell types in a variety of normal and inflamed non-lymphoid tissues. We demonstrate that our basic protocol minimizes cell loss, reliably distinguishes macrophages from dendritic cells (DC), and identifies all major granulocytic and mononuclear phagocytic cell types. This protocol is able to accurately quantify 11 distinct immune cell types, including T cells, B cells, NK cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, inflammatory monocytes, resident monocytes, alveolar macrophages, resident/interstitial macrophages, CD11b- DC, and CD11b+ DC, in normal lung, heart, liver, kidney, intestine, skin, eyes, and mammary gland. We also characterized the expression patterns of several commonly used myeloid and macrophage markers. This basic protocol can be expanded to identify additional cell types such as mast cells, basophils, and plasmacytoid DC, or perform detailed phenotyping of specific cell types. In examining models of primary and metastatic mammary tumors, this protocol allowed the identification of several distinct tumor associated macrophage phenotypes, the appearance of which was highly specific to individual tumor cell lines. This protocol provides a valuable tool to examine immune cell repertoires and follow immune responses in a wide variety of tissues and experimental conditions.

  8. A Protocol for the Comprehensive Flow Cytometric Analysis of Immune Cells in Normal and Inflamed Murine Non-Lymphoid Tissues.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yen-Rei A; O'Koren, Emily G; Hotten, Danielle F; Kan, Matthew J; Kopin, David; Nelson, Erik R; Que, Loretta; Gunn, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Flow cytometry is used extensively to examine immune cells in non-lymphoid tissues. However, a method of flow cytometric analysis that is both comprehensive and widely applicable has not been described. We developed a protocol for the flow cytometric analysis of non-lymphoid tissues, including methods of tissue preparation, a 10-fluorochrome panel for cell staining, and a standardized gating strategy, that allows the simultaneous identification and quantification of all major immune cell types in a variety of normal and inflamed non-lymphoid tissues. We demonstrate that our basic protocol minimizes cell loss, reliably distinguishes macrophages from dendritic cells (DC), and identifies all major granulocytic and mononuclear phagocytic cell types. This protocol is able to accurately quantify 11 distinct immune cell types, including T cells, B cells, NK cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, inflammatory monocytes, resident monocytes, alveolar macrophages, resident/interstitial macrophages, CD11b- DC, and CD11b+ DC, in normal lung, heart, liver, kidney, intestine, skin, eyes, and mammary gland. We also characterized the expression patterns of several commonly used myeloid and macrophage markers. This basic protocol can be expanded to identify additional cell types such as mast cells, basophils, and plasmacytoid DC, or perform detailed phenotyping of specific cell types. In examining models of primary and metastatic mammary tumors, this protocol allowed the identification of several distinct tumor associated macrophage phenotypes, the appearance of which was highly specific to individual tumor cell lines. This protocol provides a valuable tool to examine immune cell repertoires and follow immune responses in a wide variety of tissues and experimental conditions. PMID:26938654

  9. From The Cover: Reconstruction of functionally normal and malignant human breast tissues in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Chavarria, Tony; Wu, Min; Magrane, Greg; Gray, Joe W.; Carey, Loucinda; Richardson, Andrea; Weinberg, Robert A.

    2004-04-01

    The study of normal breast epithelial morphogenesis and carcinogenesis in vivo has largely used rodent models. Efforts at studying mammary morphogenesis and cancer with xenotransplanted human epithelial cells have failed to recapitulate the full extent of development seen in the human breast. We have developed an orthotopic xenograft model in which both the stromal and epithelial components of the reconstructed mammary gland are of human origin. Genetic modification of human stromal cells before the implantation of ostensibly normal human mammary epithelial cells resulted in the outgrowth of benign and malignant lesions. This experimental model allows for studies of human epithelial morphogenesis and differentiation in vivo and underscores the critical role of heterotypic interactions in human breast development and carcinogenesis.

  10. Increased FOXP3 expression in tumour-associated tissues of horses affected with equine sarcoid disease.

    PubMed

    Mählmann, K; Hamza, E; Marti, E; Dolf, G; Klukowska, J; Gerber, V; Koch, C

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that regulatory T cells (Tregs) are associated with disease severity and progression in papilloma virus induced neoplasia. Bovine papilloma virus (BPV) is recognised as the most important aetiological factor in equine sarcoid (ES) disease. The aim of this study was to compare expression levels of Treg markers and associated cytokines in tissue samples of ES-affected equids with skin samples of healthy control horses. Eleven ES-affected, and 12 healthy horses were included in the study. Expression levels of forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3), interleukin 10 (IL10), interleukin 4 (IL4) and interferon gamma (IFNG) mRNA in lesional and tumour-distant samples from ES-affected horses, as well as in dermal samples of healthy control horses were measured using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Expression levels were compared between lesional and tumour-distant as well as between tumour-distant and control samples. Furthermore, BPV-1 E5 DNA in samples of ES-affected horses was quantified using quantitative PCR, and possible associations of viral load, disease severity and gene expression levels were evaluated. Expression levels of FOXP3, IL10 and IFNG mRNA and BPV-1 E5 copy numbers were significantly increased in lesional compared to tumour-distant samples. There was no difference in FOXP3 and cytokine expression in tumour-distant samples from ES- compared with control horses. In tumour-distant samples viral load was positively correlated with IL10 expression and severity score. The increased expression of Treg markers in tumour-associated tissues of ES-affected equids indicates a local, Treg-induced immune suppression.

  11. Micronized fibres affect in vitro fermentation under normal buffered and osmotic stress conditions using porcine inocula.

    PubMed

    Aumiller, T; Mosenthin, R; Rink, F; Hartung, K; Weiss, E

    2015-12-01

    In this in vitro study, the modified Hohenheim gas test was used to determine fermentation activity and bacterial composition of pig's faecal microbial inoculum, when fermenting a standard pig diet with varying levels of crude protein (CP; 20, 24 and 28% CP), and supplemented with one of three fibre sources manufactured by micronization treatment. These were wheat envelopes (MWE), pea fibre (MPF) and lupine fibre (MLF). For comparison, inulin was used. As intestinal bacteria have to cope with varying osmotic conditions in their ecosystem, fermentation was performed under normal buffered and osmotic stress conditions. After 24 h of fermentation, total gas production and ammonia production were measured. In addition, the effect of MWE and inulin on short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production and numbers of total eubacteria, Lactobacillus spp., Bifidobacterium spp., Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcus spp., Clostridium cluster XIVa and Clostridium cluster IV, were determined using quantitative real-time PCR. Under normal buffered conditions, supplementation of MWE resulted in increased (p < 0.05) SCFA, acetic, propionic and valerianic acid production at CP levels of 20 and 28%. There was an increase (p < 0.05) in ammonia production for the micronized supplements, and for MWE an increased (p < 0.05) branched-chain proportion was observed, possibly due to higher availability of protein for fermentation which was released during the micronization process. Osmotic stress conditions reduced (p < 0.05) total gas as well as total SCFA, acetic and propionic acid production for all treatments, while cell counts were increased (p < 0.05) for Bifidobacterium spp., Enterococcus spp. and Lactobacillus spp. Under normal buffered conditions in combination with 24 and 28% CP levels, lactobacilli were increased for MWE, compared to inulin (p < 0.05). In conclusion, micronized supplements such as MWE may beneficially modulate pigs' intestinal microbiota by increasing SCFA production in

  12. Posture and Gender Differentially Affect Heart Rate Variability of Symptomatic Mitral Valve Prolapse and Normal Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chien-Jung; Chen, Ya-Chu; Lee, Chih-Hsien; Yang, Ing-Fang; Yang, Ten-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart rate variability (HRV) has been shown to be a useful measure of autonomic activity in healthy and mitral valve prolapsed (MVP) subjects. However, the effects of posture and gender on HRV in symptomatic MVP and normal adults had not been elucidated in Taiwan. Methods A total of 118 MVP patients (7 males, 39 ± 7 years old; and 111 females, 42 ± 13 years old) and 148 healthy control (54 males, 28 ± 4 years old; and 94 females, 26 ± 6 years old) were investigated. The diagnosis of MVP was confirmed by cross-sectional echocardiography. A locally developed Taiwanese machine was used to record the HRV parameters for MVP and control groups in three stationary positions. Thereafter, the HRV time-domain parameters, and the frequency-domain parameters derived from fast Fourier transform or autoregressive methods were analyzed. Results The MVP group showed a decrease in time domain parameters and obtunded postural effects on frequency domain parameters moreso than the control group. Though the parasympathetic tone was dominant in female (higher RMSSD, nHF and lower nLF vs. male), the sympathetic outflow was higher in MVP female (lower SDNN, NN50 and higher nLF vs. normal female). While the parasympathetic activity was lower in male, sympathetic outflow was dominant in MVP male (lower nHF and higher nLF vs. normal male). Conclusions Both MVP female and male subjects had elevated levels of sympathetic outflow. The obtunded postural effects on frequency domain measures testified to the autonomic dysregulation of MVP subjects. PMID:27471360

  13. Optical properties of normal and thermally coagulated chicken liver tissue measured ex-vivo with diffuse reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafeez-Ullah; Atif, M.; Firdous, S.; Mehmood, M. S.; Hamza, M. Y.; Imran, M.; Hussain, G.; Ikram, M.

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of the present study is to determine the optical properties of normal and thermally coagulated chicken liver at 720, 740, 770, 810, 825 and 840 nm wavelengths of laser irradiation. So, we were able to evaluate these optical properties (absorption and scattering coefficients) with ex-vivo study using Kubelka Munk Model (KMM) from the radial dependence of the diffuse reflectance with femtosecond pulsed laser in near IR region. These coefficients were significantly increased with coagulation. The penetration depths of the diffused light have been reported to a maximum value of 8.12 ± 0.36 mm in normal liver and 2.49 ± 0.17 mm in coagulated liver at 840 nm showing increasing behavior towards IR region. The Monte Carlo simulation was used to check the theoretical validation of measured optical properties of the tissue that showed a good match with our experimental results. We believe that these differences in optical properties will be helpful for the understanding arid optimal use of laser applications in medicine and differential diagnosis of tissues by using different optical methods. Especially for the investigation of biological tissue for photodynamic therapy (PDT), the knowledge of the specific optical properties and their thermo-induced changes is important.

  14. Characterization of MMP-9 gene from a normalized cDNA library of kidney tissue of yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco).

    PubMed

    Ke, Fei; Wang, Yun; Hong, Jun; Xu, Chen; Chen, Huan; Zhou, Shuai-Bang

    2015-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), one of members of the MMP family, is important for the cleaving of structural extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and involved in inflammatory processes. In this study, MMP-9 cDNA was isolated and characterized from a normalized cDNA library of kidney tissue of yellow catfish (designated as YcMMP-9). The complete sequence of YcMMP-9 cDNA consisted of 2561 nucleotides. The open reading frame potentially encoded a protein of 685 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of approximately 77.182 kDa. Amino acid sequence of YcMMP-9 have typical characteristics of MMP-9 family and showed highest identity (85.3%) to channel catfish MMP-9. The YcMMP-9 genomic DNA contains 13 exons and 12 introns. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that YcMMP-9 mRNA was constitutively expressed in all examined tissues in normal fish with high expression in head kidney, trunk kidney, blood, and spleen. However, expression of YcMMP-9 mRNA was induced by Aeromonas hydrophila stimulation, especially in these four tissues mentioned above. It indicated that YcMMP-9 was involved in innate immune responses against bacterial infection. PMID:25910849

  15. Periodontal implications of orthodontic treatment in adults with reduced or normal periodontal tissues versus those of adolescents.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R L; Leggott, P J; Quinn, R S; Eakle, W S; Chambers, D

    1989-09-01

    This longitudinal study monitored periodontal status in 20 adults and 20 adolescents undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. Ten adults had generalized periodontitis and received periodontal treatment, including periodontal surgery, before orthodontic treatment. They also received periodontal maintenance at 3-month intervals during orthodontic treatment. The other 10 adults had normal periodontal tissues. Neither these latter adults nor the adolescents received periodontal maintenance during orthodontic treatment. Periodontal status was determined (1) at six standard sites before fixed appliances were placed (baseline), (2) at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months after appliances had been placed, and (3) 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after appliances had been removed. At each of these visits, these sites were assessed for plaque index, gingival index, bleeding tendency, and pocket depth. Loss of attachment between baseline and 3 months after appliances were removed and tooth loss were also determined. Complete data were obtained for 15 adolescents and 14 adults. During orthodontic treatment the adolescent group showed significantly more (p less than 0.05) periodontal inflammation and supragingival plaque than the adults; after appliances were removed, this pattern was no longer statistically significant. For loss of attachment, there were no significant differences among adolescents, adults with normal periodontal tissues, or adults with reduced but healthy periodontal tissues who had undergone treatment for periodontal disease. For tooth loss, three nonstudy site teeth with pockets deeper than 6 mm and/or furcation involvements were lost because of periodontal abscesses in the adult group treated for periodontal disease. PMID:2773862

  16. Comparison of gene expression profiles in aortic dissection and normal human aortic tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Yu, Cuntao; Chang, Qian; Luo, Xinjin; Qiu, Juntao; Liu, Shen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the gene expression profiles in aortic dissection (AD) and healthy human aortic tissue samples by DNA microarray analysis in order to screen the differential genes. In total, five AD and four healthy aortic specimens were selected; the total RNA was extracted and reverse transcribed into cDNA and in vitro transcribed into aRNA, followed by microarray hybridization for analysis. Thereafter, the transcription levels of six differential genes, myosin light chain kinase (MYLK), polycystin 1, transient receptor potential channel interacting (PKD-1), myosin heavy chain 11 (MYH11), superoxide dismutase 3, extracellular (SOD3), filamin A (FLNA), and transgelin (TAGLN), screened from the expression profiles were quantitatively verified. Compared with the healthy aortic specimens, a total of 1,661 genes in the AD group demonstrated more than 2-fold differential expression, of which 997 genes were upregulated and 664 genes were downregulated. Thereafter, six AD-associated genes that showed downregulation in the microarray assay were selected for quantitatively verifying the gene transcription level using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), which confirmed their downregulation compared with the healthy aortic tissue genes; of the six genes, the expression levels of MYLK, PKD-1, MYH11, SOD3 and TAGLN were significantly downregulated (P<0.05), while the expression of FLNA was not significantly downregulated (P>0.05). Thus, whole genome microarray may be used to screen differentially expressed genes between AD and healthy aortic tissues. When used in combination with RT-qPCR validation, this method may provide novel strategies for investigating AD. PMID:27699008

  17. Comparison of gene expression profiles in aortic dissection and normal human aortic tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Yu, Cuntao; Chang, Qian; Luo, Xinjin; Qiu, Juntao; Liu, Shen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the gene expression profiles in aortic dissection (AD) and healthy human aortic tissue samples by DNA microarray analysis in order to screen the differential genes. In total, five AD and four healthy aortic specimens were selected; the total RNA was extracted and reverse transcribed into cDNA and in vitro transcribed into aRNA, followed by microarray hybridization for analysis. Thereafter, the transcription levels of six differential genes, myosin light chain kinase (MYLK), polycystin 1, transient receptor potential channel interacting (PKD-1), myosin heavy chain 11 (MYH11), superoxide dismutase 3, extracellular (SOD3), filamin A (FLNA), and transgelin (TAGLN), screened from the expression profiles were quantitatively verified. Compared with the healthy aortic specimens, a total of 1,661 genes in the AD group demonstrated more than 2-fold differential expression, of which 997 genes were upregulated and 664 genes were downregulated. Thereafter, six AD-associated genes that showed downregulation in the microarray assay were selected for quantitatively verifying the gene transcription level using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), which confirmed their downregulation compared with the healthy aortic tissue genes; of the six genes, the expression levels of MYLK, PKD-1, MYH11, SOD3 and TAGLN were significantly downregulated (P<0.05), while the expression of FLNA was not significantly downregulated (P>0.05). Thus, whole genome microarray may be used to screen differentially expressed genes between AD and healthy aortic tissues. When used in combination with RT-qPCR validation, this method may provide novel strategies for investigating AD.

  18. Mechanical property and tissue mineral density differences among severely suppressed bone turnover (SSBT) patients, osteoporotic patients, and normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Tjhia, Crystal K; Odvina, Clarita V; Rao, D Sudhaker; Stover, Susan M; Wang, Xiang; Fyhrie, David P

    2011-12-01

    Pathogenesis of atypical fractures in patients on long term bisphosphonate therapy is poorly understood, and the type, the manner in which they occur and the fracture sites are quite different from the usual osteoporotic fractures. We hypothesized that the tissue-level mechanical properties and mean degree of mineralization of the iliac bone would differ among 1) patients with atypical fractures and severely suppressed bone turnover (SSBT) associated with long-term bisphosphonate therapy, 2) age-matched, treatment-naïve osteoporotic patients with vertebral fracture, 3) age-matched normals and 4) young normals. Large differences in tissue-level mechanical properties and/or mineralization among these groups could help explain the underlying mechanism(s) for the occurrence of typical osteoporotic and the atypical femoral shaft fractures. Elastic modulus, contact hardness, plastic deformation resistance, and tissue mineral densities of cortical and trabecular bone regions of 55 iliac bone biopsies--12 SSBT patients (SSBT; aged 49-77), 11 age-matched untreated osteoporotic patients with vertebral fracture (Osteoporotic), 12 age-matched subjects without bone fracture (Age-Matched Normal), and 20 younger subjects without bone fracture (Young Normal)--were measured using nanoindentation and quantitative backscattered electron microscopy. For cortical bone nanoindentation properties, only plastic deformation resistance was different among the groups (p<0.05), with greater resistance to plastic deformation in the SSBT group compared to all other groups. For trabecular bone, all nanoindentation properties and mineral density of the trabecular bone were different among the groups (p<0.05). The SSBT group had greater plastic deformation resistance and harder trabecular bone compared to the other three groups, stiffer bone compared to the Osteoporotic and Young Normal groups, and a trend of higher mineral density compared to the Age-Matched Normal and Osteoporotic groups. Lower

  19. Basement membrane protein distribution in LYVE-1-immunoreactive lymphatic vessels of normal tissues and ovarian carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Vainionpää, Noora; Bützow, Ralf; Hukkanen, Mika; Jackson, David G; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Sakai, Lynn Y; Virtanen, Ismo

    2007-05-01

    The endothelial cells of blood vessels assemble basement membranes that play a role in vessel formation, maintenance and function, and in the migration of inflammatory cells. However, little is known about the distribution of basement membrane constituents in lymphatic vessels. We studied the distribution of basement membrane proteins in lymphatic vessels of normal human skin, digestive tract, ovary and, as an example of tumours with abundant lymphatics, ovarian carcinomas. Basement membrane proteins were localized by immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies, whereas lymphatic capillaries were detected with antibodies to the lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor-1, LYVE-1. In skin and ovary, fibrillar immunoreactivity for the laminin alpha4, beta1, beta2 and gamma1 chains, type IV and XVIII collagens and nidogen-1 was found in the basement membrane region of the lymphatic endothelium, whereas also heterogeneous reactivity for the laminin alpha5 chain was detected in the digestive tract. Among ovarian carcinomas, intratumoural lymphatic vessels were found especially in endometrioid carcinomas. In addition to the laminin alpha4, beta1, beta2 and gamma1 chains, type IV and XVIII collagens and nidogen-1, carcinoma lymphatics showed immunoreactivity for the laminin alpha5 chain and Lutheran glycoprotein, a receptor for the laminin alpha5 chain. In normal lymphatic capillaries, the presence of primarily alpha4 chain laminins may therefore compromise the formation of endothelial basement membrane, as these truncated laminins lack one of the three arms required for efficient network assembly. The localization of basement membrane proteins adjacent to lymphatic endothelia suggests a role for these proteins in lymphatic vessels. The distribution of the laminin alpha5 chain and Lutheran glycoprotein proposes a difference between normal and carcinoma lymphatic capillaries.

  20. Early detection of colorectal cancer relapse by infrared spectroscopy in ``normal'' anastomosis tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Ahmad; Sebbag, Gilbert; Argov, Shmuel; Mordechai, Shaul; Sahu, Ranjit K.

    2015-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most aggressive cancers usually occurring in people above the age of 50 years. In the United States, colorectal cancer is the third most diagnosed cancer. The American Cancer Society has estimated 96,830 new cases of colon cancer and 40,000 new cases of rectal cancer in 2014 in the United States. According to the literature, up to 55% of colorectal cancer patients experience a recurrence within five years from the time of surgery. Relapse of colorectal cancer has a deep influence on the quality of patient life. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy has been widely used in medicine. It is a noninvasive, nondestructive technique that can detect changes in cells and tissues that are caused by different disorders, such as cancer. Abnormalities in the colonic crypts, which are not detectable using standard histopathological methods, could be determined using IR spectroscopic methods. The IR measurements were performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded colorectal tissues from eight patients (one control, four local recurrences, three distant recurrences). A total of 128 crypts were measured. Our results showed the possibility of differentiating among control, local, and distant recurrence crypts with more than a 92% success rate using spectra measured from the crypts' middle sites.

  1. The effect of retinol on the hyperthermal response of normal tissue in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, M.A.; Marigold, J.C.; Hume, S.P.

    1983-07-01

    The effect of prior administration of retinol, a membrane labilizer, on the in vivo hyperthermal response of lysosomes was investigated in the mouse spleen using a quantitative histochemical assay for the lysosomal enzyme acid phosphatase. A dose of retinol which had no effect when given alone enhanced the thermal response of the lysosome, causing an increase in lysosomal membrane permeability. In contrast, the same dose of retinol had no effect on the gross hyperthermal response of mouse intestine; a tissue which is relatively susceptible to hyperthermia. Thermal damage to intestine was assayed directly by crypt loss 1 day after treatment or assessed as thermal enhancement of X-ray damage by counting crypt microcolonies 4 days after a combined heat and X-ray treatment. Thus, although the hyperthermal response of the lysosome could be enhanced by the administration of retinol, thermal damage at a gross tissue level appeared to be unaffected, suggesting that lysosomal membrane injury is unlikely to be a primary event in hyperthermal cell killing.

  2. Effect of retinol on the hyperthermal response of normal tissue in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, M.A.; Marigold, J.C.L.; Hume, S.P.

    1983-07-01

    The effect of prior administration of retinol, a membrane labilizer, on the in vivo hyperthermal response of lysosomes was investigated in the mouse spleen using a quantitative histochemical assay for the lysosomal enzyme acid phosphatase. A dose of retinol which had no effect when given alone enhanced the thermal response of the lysosome, causing an increase in lysosomal membrane permeability. In contrast, the same dose of retinol had no effect on the gross hyperthermal response of mouse intestine; a tissue which is relatively susceptible to hyperthermia. Thermal damage to intestine was assayed directly by crypt loss 1 day after treatment or assessed as thermal enhancement of x-ray damage by counting crypt microcolonies 4 days after a combined heat and x-ray treatment. Thus, although the hyperthermal response of the lysosome could be enhanced by the administration of retinol, thermal damage at a gross tissue level appeared to be unaffected, suggesting that lysosomal membrane injury is unlikely to be a primary event in hyperthermal cell killing.

  3. Extracellular Vesicles from Metastatic Rat Prostate Tumors Prime the Normal Prostate Tissue to Facilitate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Hägglöf, Christina; Thysell, Elin; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Lundholm, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are responsible for tumor-promoting effects. However, if tumor EVs also prepare the tumor-bearing organ for subsequent tumor growth, and if this effect is different in low and high malignant tumors is not thoroughly explored. Here we used orthotopic rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumors to compare the role of EVs from fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu (MLL) tumors with EVs from more indolent and non-metastatic Dunning G (G) tumors. Prostate tissue pre-conditioned with MLL-EVs in vivo facilitated G tumor establishment compared to G-EVs. MLL-EVs increased prostate epithelial proliferation and macrophage infiltration into the prostate compared to G-EVs. Both types of EVs increased macrophage endocytosis and the mRNA expression of genes associated with M2 polarization in vitro, with MLL-EVs giving the most pronounced effects. MLL-EVs also altered the mRNA expression of growth factors and cytokines in primary rat prostate fibroblasts compared to G-EVs, suggesting fibroblast activation. Our findings propose that EVs from metastatic tumors have the ability to prime the prostate tissue and enhance tumor growth to a higher extent than EVs from non-metastatic tumors. Identifying these differences could lead to novel therapeutic targets and potential prognostic markers for prostate cancer. PMID:27550147

  4. Extracellular Vesicles from Metastatic Rat Prostate Tumors Prime the Normal Prostate Tissue to Facilitate Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Hägglöf, Christina; Thysell, Elin; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Lundholm, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are responsible for tumor-promoting effects. However, if tumor EVs also prepare the tumor-bearing organ for subsequent tumor growth, and if this effect is different in low and high malignant tumors is not thoroughly explored. Here we used orthotopic rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumors to compare the role of EVs from fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu (MLL) tumors with EVs from more indolent and non-metastatic Dunning G (G) tumors. Prostate tissue pre-conditioned with MLL-EVs in vivo facilitated G tumor establishment compared to G-EVs. MLL-EVs increased prostate epithelial proliferation and macrophage infiltration into the prostate compared to G-EVs. Both types of EVs increased macrophage endocytosis and the mRNA expression of genes associated with M2 polarization in vitro, with MLL-EVs giving the most pronounced effects. MLL-EVs also altered the mRNA expression of growth factors and cytokines in primary rat prostate fibroblasts compared to G-EVs, suggesting fibroblast activation. Our findings propose that EVs from metastatic tumors have the ability to prime the prostate tissue and enhance tumor growth to a higher extent than EVs from non-metastatic tumors. Identifying these differences could lead to novel therapeutic targets and potential prognostic markers for prostate cancer. PMID:27550147

  5. Simulation of normal, carrier and affected controls for large-scale genotyping of cattle for factor XI deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyaya, P N; Jha, M; Muraleedharan, P; Gupta, R R; Rathod, R N; Mehta, H H; Khoda, V K

    2006-01-01

    An insertion mutation within exon 12 of the factor XI gene has been described in Holstein cattle. This has opened the prospect for large-scale screening of cattle using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique for the rapid identification of heterozygous animals. To facilitate such a screening process, the mutant and normal alleles of factor XI gene, represented by 244- and 320-bp PCR amplified fragments, were individually cloned in Escherichia coli using a multicopy plasmid cloning vehicle to generate pFXI-N and pFXI-M, respectively. The authenticity of the inserts was confirmed by nucleotide sequencing. A nested PCR method was developed, by which PCR amplicons generated from primers with annealing sites on the recombinant plasmids and by flanking the insert were used as templates for amplification of the diagnostic products using factor XI gene-specific primers. An equimolar mixture of both PCR amplicons, originating from pFXI-N and pFXI-M, constituted the carrier control while the individual amplicons were the affected and normal controls. The controls were used as references for in-gel comparison to screen a population of 307 cattle and 259 water buffaloes; the frequency of the mutant allele was found to be 0. No DNA size standards were required in this study. The simulated control DNA samples representing normal, carrier and affected cattle have the potential to help in large-scale screening of a cattle population for individuals that are carriers or affected by factor XI deficiency.

  6. Evaluation of normalized energy recovery (NER) in microbial fuel cells affected by reactor dimensions and substrates.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Li; Ge, Zheng; Kelly, Patrick; Zhang, Fei; He, Zhen

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to provide an initial evaluation of normalized energy recovery (NER - a new parameter for presenting energy performance) in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) through investigation of the effects of reactor dimensions and anode substrates. Although the larger-size MFCs generally have lower maximum power densities, their maximum NER is comparable to that of the smaller MFCs at the same anolyte flow rate. The mixed messages obtained from the MFC size tests suggest that MFCs can be further scaled up without decreasing energy recovery under certain conditions. The low-strength substrates seem to be more suitable for MFC treatment of wastewater, in terms of both energy recovery and organic removal. However, because the MFCs could not achieve the maximum NER and the maximum organic removal efficiency at the same time, one must determine a major goal for MFCs treating wastewater between energy recovery and contaminant removal.

  7. Ethanol Extract of Hedyotis diffusa Willd Affects Immune Responses in Normal Balb/c Mice In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yu-Jui; Lin, Jing-Pin; Hsiao, Yung-Ting; Chou, Guan-Ling; Tsai, Yu-Hsiang; Chiang, Su-Yin; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-01-01

    Numerous clinical anticancer drugs are obtained from natural plants and Hedyotis diffusa Willd (EEHDW) has been used as a major component in Traditional Chinese medicine formulas since a long time. Ethanol extracts of EEHDW have been shown to possess various biological activities including anticancer function in vitro. Our earlier studies have shown that EEHDW affects immune responses in WEHI-3-generated leukemia mice, but EEHDW has not been reported to affect immune responses in a normal mouse model. Herein, we investigated whether EEHDW could affect immune responses on normal murine cells in vivo. Normal BALB/c mice were orally treated with or without EEHDW at 0, 16, 32, and 64 mg/kg or 32 mg/kg by i.p. for 3 weeks, then were weighed, and blood, liver and spleen samples were collected for further experiments. Results indicated that EEHDW did not significantly affect body and liver weight but significantly increased the spleen weight by i.p. treatment when compared to control groups. Flow cytometric assays indicated that EEHDW promoted CD11b levels at 16, 32 and 64 mg/kg oral treatment, CD19 levels at 16, 32, 64 mg/kg oral treatment and i.p. treatment, and Mac-3 levels at 16, 32 and 64 mg/kg oral treatment, however, it did not significantly affect the levels of CD3. Oral treatment with 16 and 32 mg/kg of EEHDW significantly decreased macrophage phagocytosis from PBMC; 32 mg/kg of EEHDW by i.p. treatment significantly increased phagocytosis activity of macrophages obtain from the peritoneal cavity. EEHDW at 32 mg/kg by i.p. treatment led to an increase of NK cell activities compared to oil control groups. EEHDW at 32 mg/kg of EEHDW by i.p. treatment increased B- and T-cell proliferation. Based on these observations, EEHDW seems to have promoted immune responses in this murine model. PMID:26130790

  8. Normal and abnormal tissue identification system and method for medical images such as digital mammograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heine, John J. (Inventor); Clarke, Laurence P. (Inventor); Deans, Stanley R. (Inventor); Stauduhar, Richard Paul (Inventor); Cullers, David Kent (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A system and method for analyzing a medical image to determine whether an abnormality is present, for example, in digital mammograms, includes the application of a wavelet expansion to a raw image to obtain subspace images of varying resolution. At least one subspace image is selected that has a resolution commensurate with a desired predetermined detection resolution range. A functional form of a probability distribution function is determined for each selected subspace image, and an optimal statistical normal image region test is determined for each selected subspace image. A threshold level for the probability distribution function is established from the optimal statistical normal image region test for each selected subspace image. A region size comprising at least one sector is defined, and an output image is created that includes a combination of all regions for each selected subspace image. Each region has a first value when the region intensity level is above the threshold and a second value when the region intensity level is below the threshold. This permits the localization of a potential abnormality within the image.

  9. A resource of ribosomal RNA-depleted RNA-Seq data from different normal adult and fetal human tissues.

    PubMed

    Choy, Jocelyn Y H; Boon, Priscilla L S; Bertin, Nicolas; Fullwood, Melissa J

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression is the most fundamental level at which the genotype leads to the phenotype of the organism. Enabled by ultra-high-throughput next-generation DNA sequencing, RNA-Seq involves shotgun sequencing of fragmented RNA transcripts by next-generation sequencing followed by in silico assembly, and is rapidly becoming the most popular method for gene expression analysis. Poly[A]+ RNA-Seq analyses of normal human adult tissue samples such as Illumina's Human BodyMap 2.0 Project and the RNA-Seq atlas have provided a useful global resource and framework for comparisons with diseased tissues such as cancer. However, these analyses have failed to provide information on poly[A]-RNA, which is abundant in our cells. The most recent advances in RNA-Seq analyses use ribosomal RNA-depletion to provide information on both poly[A]+ and poly[A]-RNA. In this paper, we describe the use of Illumina's HiSeq 2000 to generate high quality rRNA-depleted RNA-Seq datasets from human fetal and adult tissues. The datasets reported here will be useful in understanding the different expression profiles in different tissues.

  10. Normal formation of a vertebrate body plan and loss of tissue maintenance in the absence of ezh2.

    PubMed

    San, Bilge; Chrispijn, Naomi D; Wittkopp, Nadine; van Heeringen, Simon J; Lagendijk, Anne K; Aben, Marco; Bakkers, Jeroen; Ketting, René F; Kamminga, Leonie M

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are transcriptional repressors of numerous genes, many of which regulate cell cycle progression or developmental processes. We used zebrafish to study Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), the PcG protein responsible for placing the transcriptional repressive H3K27me3 mark. We identified a nonsense mutant of ezh2 and generated maternal zygotic (MZ) ezh2 mutant embryos. In contrast to knockout mice for PcG proteins, MZezh2 mutant embryos gastrulate seemingly normal, but die around 2 days post fertilization displaying pleiotropic phenotypes. Expression analyses indicated that genes important for early development are not turned off properly, revealing a regulatory role for Ezh2 during zygotic gene expression. In addition, we suggest that Ezh2 regulates maternal mRNA loading of zygotes. Analyses of tissues arising later in development, such as heart, liver, and pancreas, indicated that Ezh2 is required for maintenance of differentiated cell fates. Our data imply that the primary role of Ezh2 is to maintain tissues after tissue specification. Furthermore, our work indicates that Ezh2 is essential to sustain tissue integrity and to set up proper maternal mRNA contribution, and presents a novel and powerful tool to study how PcG proteins contribute to early vertebrate development.

  11. Normal formation of a vertebrate body plan and loss of tissue maintenance in the absence of ezh2

    PubMed Central

    San, Bilge; Chrispijn, Naomi D.; Wittkopp, Nadine; van Heeringen, Simon J.; Lagendijk, Anne K.; Aben, Marco; Bakkers, Jeroen; Ketting, René F.; Kamminga, Leonie M.

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are transcriptional repressors of numerous genes, many of which regulate cell cycle progression or developmental processes. We used zebrafish to study Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), the PcG protein responsible for placing the transcriptional repressive H3K27me3 mark. We identified a nonsense mutant of ezh2 and generated maternal zygotic (MZ) ezh2 mutant embryos. In contrast to knockout mice for PcG proteins, MZezh2 mutant embryos gastrulate seemingly normal, but die around 2 days post fertilization displaying pleiotropic phenotypes. Expression analyses indicated that genes important for early development are not turned off properly, revealing a regulatory role for Ezh2 during zygotic gene expression. In addition, we suggest that Ezh2 regulates maternal mRNA loading of zygotes. Analyses of tissues arising later in development, such as heart, liver, and pancreas, indicated that Ezh2 is required for maintenance of differentiated cell fates. Our data imply that the primary role of Ezh2 is to maintain tissues after tissue specification. Furthermore, our work indicates that Ezh2 is essential to sustain tissue integrity and to set up proper maternal mRNA contribution, and presents a novel and powerful tool to study how PcG proteins contribute to early vertebrate development. PMID:27145952

  12. Measurement of pressure-displacement kinetics of hemoglobin in normal breast tissue with near-infrared spectral imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Shudong; Pogue, Brian W.; Laughney, Ashley M.; Kogel, Christine A.; Paulsen, Keith D

    2009-04-01

    Applying localized external displacement to the breast surface can change the interstitial fluid pressure such that regional transient microvascular changes occur in oxygenation and vascular volume. Imaging these dynamic responses over time, while different pressures are applied, could provide selective temporal contrast for cancer relative to the surrounding normal breast. In order to investigate this possibility in normal breast tissue, a near-infrared spectral tomography system was developed that can simultaneously acquire data at three wavelengths with a 15 s time resolution per scan. The system was tested first with heterogeneous blood phantoms. Changes in regional blood concentrations were found to be linearly related to recovered mean hemoglobin concentration (HbT) values (R{sup 2}=0.9). In a series of volunteer breast imaging exams, data from 17 asymptomatic subjects were acquired under increasing and decreasing breast compression. Calculations show that a 10 mm displacement applied to the breast results in surface pressures in the range of 0-55 kPa depending on breast density. The recovered human data indicate that HbT was reduced under compression and the normalized change was significantly correlated to the applied pressure with a p value of 0.005. The maximum HbT decreases in breast tissue were associated with body mass index (BMI), which is a surrogate indicator of breast density. No statistically valid correlations were found between the applied pressure and the changes in tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) or water percentage (H2O) across the range of BMI values studied.

  13. Individualized Radical Radiotherapy of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Based on Normal Tissue Dose Constraints: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Baardwijk, Angela van Bosmans, Geert; Boersma, Liesbeth; Wanders, Stofferinus; Dekker, Andre; Dingemans, Anne Marie C.; Bootsma, Gerben; Geraedts, Wiel; Pitz, Cordula; Simons, Jean; Lambin, Philippe; Ruysscher, Dirk de

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence is a major problem after (chemo-)radiation for non-small-cell lung cancer. We hypothesized that for each individual patient, the highest therapeutic ratio could be achieved by increasing total tumor dose (TTD) to the limits of normal tissues, delivered within 5 weeks. We report first results of a prospective feasibility trial. Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight patients with medically inoperable or locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, World Health Organization performance score of 0-1, and reasonable lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second > 50%) were analyzed. All patients underwent irradiation using an individualized prescribed TTD based on normal tissue dose constraints (mean lung dose, 19 Gy; maximal spinal cord dose, 54 Gy) up to a maximal TTD of 79.2 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions twice daily. No concurrent chemoradiation was administered. Toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events criteria. An {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan was performed to evaluate (metabolic) response 3 months after treatment. Results: Mean delivered dose was 63.0 {+-} 9.8 Gy. The TTD was most often limited by the mean lung dose (32.1%) or spinal cord (28.6%). Acute toxicity generally was mild; only 1 patient experienced Grade 3 cough and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 dysphagia. One patient (3.6%) died of pneumonitis. For late toxicity, 2 patients (7.7%) had Grade 3 cough or dyspnea; none had severe dysphagia. Complete metabolic response was obtained in 44% (11 of 26 patients). With a median follow-up of 13 months, median overall survival was 19.6 months, with a 1-year survival rate of 57.1%. Conclusions: Individualized maximal tolerable dose irradiation based on normal tissue dose constraints is feasible, and initial results are promising.

  14. ChIP-seq in steatohepatitis and normal liver tissue identifies candidate disease mechanisms related to progression to cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Steatohepatitis occurs in alcoholic liver disease and may progress to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Its molecular pathogenesis is to a large degree unknown. Histone modifications play a key role in transcriptional regulations as marks for silencing and activation of gene expression and as marks for functional elements. Many transcription factors (TFs) are crucial for the control of the genes involved in metabolism, and abnormality in their function may lead to disease. Methods We performed ChIP-seq of the histone modifications H3K4me1, H3K4me3 and H3K27ac and a candidate transcription factor (USF1) in liver tissue from patients with steatohepatitis and normal livers and correlated results to mRNA-expression and genotypes. Results We found several regions that are differentially enriched for histone modifications between disease and normal tissue, and qRT-PCR results indicated that the expression of the tested genes strongly correlated with differential enrichment of histone modifications but is independent of USF1 enrichment. By gene ontology analysis of differentially modified genes we found many disease associated genes, some of which had previously been implicated in the etiology of steatohepatitis. Importantly, the genes associated to the strongest histone peaks in the patient were over-represented in cancer specific pathways suggesting that the tissue was on a path to develop to cancer, a common complication to the disease. We also found several novel SNPs and GWAS catalogue SNPs that are candidates to be functional and therefore needs further study. Conclusion In summary we find that analysis of chromatin features in tissue samples provides insight into disease mechanisms. PMID:24206787

  15. Selection of Suitable Reference Genes for Quantitative Real-Time PCR Normalization in Three Types of Rat Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wan-Xia; Fan, Jie; Ma, Jing; Rao, Yi-Song; Zhang, Li; Yan, You-E

    2016-06-22

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is the most classical technique in the field of gene expression study. This method requires an appropriate reference gene to normalize mRNA levels. In this study, the expression stability of four frequently-used reference genes in epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT), inguinal beige adipose tissue (iBeAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT) from obese and lean rats were evaluated by geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper. Based on the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) guidelines, the two most stable reference genes were recommended in each type of adipose tissue. Two target genes were applied to test the stability of the reference genes. The geNorm and NormFinder results revealed that GAPDH and 36B4 exhibited the highest expression stabilities in eWAT, while 36B4 and β-actin had the highest expression stabilities in iBeAT and BAT. According to the results of the BestKeeper analysis, 36B4 was the most stable gene in eWAT, iBeAT and BAT, in terms of the coefficient of variance. In terms of the coefficient of correlation, GAPDH, 36B4 and β-actin were the most stable genes in eWAT, iBeAT and BAT, respectively. Additionally, expected results and statistical significance were obtained using a combination of two suitable reference genes for data normalization. In conclusion, 36B4 and GAPDH, in combination, are the best reference genes for eWAT, while 36B4 and β-actin are two most suitable reference genes for both iBeAT and BAT. We recommend using these reference genes accordingly.

  16. Selection of Suitable Reference Genes for Quantitative Real-Time PCR Normalization in Three Types of Rat Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wan-Xia; Fan, Jie; Ma, Jing; Rao, Yi-Song; Zhang, Li; Yan, You-E

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is the most classical technique in the field of gene expression study. This method requires an appropriate reference gene to normalize mRNA levels. In this study, the expression stability of four frequently-used reference genes in epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT), inguinal beige adipose tissue (iBeAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT) from obese and lean rats were evaluated by geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper. Based on the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) guidelines, the two most stable reference genes were recommended in each type of adipose tissue. Two target genes were applied to test the stability of the reference genes. The geNorm and NormFinder results revealed that GAPDH and 36B4 exhibited the highest expression stabilities in eWAT, while 36B4 and β-actin had the highest expression stabilities in iBeAT and BAT. According to the results of the BestKeeper analysis, 36B4 was the most stable gene in eWAT, iBeAT and BAT, in terms of the coefficient of variance. In terms of the coefficient of correlation, GAPDH, 36B4 and β-actin were the most stable genes in eWAT, iBeAT and BAT, respectively. Additionally, expected results and statistical significance were obtained using a combination of two suitable reference genes for data normalization. In conclusion, 36B4 and GAPDH, in combination, are the best reference genes for eWAT, while 36B4 and β-actin are two most suitable reference genes for both iBeAT and BAT. We recommend using these reference genes accordingly. PMID:27338366

  17. Selection of Suitable Reference Genes for Quantitative Real-Time PCR Normalization in Three Types of Rat Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wan-Xia; Fan, Jie; Ma, Jing; Rao, Yi-Song; Zhang, Li; Yan, You-E

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is the most classical technique in the field of gene expression study. This method requires an appropriate reference gene to normalize mRNA levels. In this study, the expression stability of four frequently-used reference genes in epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT), inguinal beige adipose tissue (iBeAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT) from obese and lean rats were evaluated by geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper. Based on the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) guidelines, the two most stable reference genes were recommended in each type of adipose tissue. Two target genes were applied to test the stability of the reference genes. The geNorm and NormFinder results revealed that GAPDH and 36B4 exhibited the highest expression stabilities in eWAT, while 36B4 and β-actin had the highest expression stabilities in iBeAT and BAT. According to the results of the BestKeeper analysis, 36B4 was the most stable gene in eWAT, iBeAT and BAT, in terms of the coefficient of variance. In terms of the coefficient of correlation, GAPDH, 36B4 and β-actin were the most stable genes in eWAT, iBeAT and BAT, respectively. Additionally, expected results and statistical significance were obtained using a combination of two suitable reference genes for data normalization. In conclusion, 36B4 and GAPDH, in combination, are the best reference genes for eWAT, while 36B4 and β-actin are two most suitable reference genes for both iBeAT and BAT. We recommend using these reference genes accordingly. PMID:27338366

  18. Filtrating colorectal cancer associated genes by integrated analyses of global DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation in cancer and normal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Gao, Fei; Xia, Yudong; Tang, Yi; Zhao, Wei; Jin, Congcong; Luo, Huijuan; Wang, Junwen; Li, Qingshu; Wang, Yalan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine patterning across the tumor genome was considered as a hallmark of cancer development and progression. However, locus-specific difference of hydroxymethylation between colorectal cancer and normal tissue is unknown. In this study, we performed a newly developed method, HMST-seq, to profile 726 aberrant methylated loci and 689 aberrant hydroxymethylated loci synchronously in genome wide of colorectal cancers, majority of which presented higher methylation or lower hydroxymethylationin than in normal group. Besides, abnormal hydroxymethylated modification was more frequently occur at proximal regions close to TSSs and TSSs regions than abnormal methylation. Subsequently, we screened four genes (ALOX15, GHRHR, TFPI2 and TKTL1) with aberrant methylation and aberrant hydroxymethylation at some genome position by functional enrichment analysis as candidate genes associated with colorectal cancer. Our results may allow us to select differentially epigenetically modified target genes implicated in colorectal cancer tumorigenesis. PMID:27546520

  19. Segmenting nonenhancing brain tumors from normal tissues in magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher-Heath, Lynn M.; Hall, Lawrence O.; Goldgof, Dmitry B.

    1998-06-01

    Tumor segmentation from magnetic resonance (MR) images aids in tumor treatment by tracking the progress of tumor growth and/or shrinkage. In this paper we present an automatic segmentation method which separates non-enhancing brain tumors from healthy tissues in MR images. The MR feature images used for the segmentation consist of three weighted images (T1, T2 and proton density) for each axial slice through the head. An initial segmentation is computed using an unsupervised clustering algorithm. Then, integrated domain knowledge and image processing techniques contribute to the final tumor segmentation. The system was trained on two patient volumes and preliminary testing has shown successful tumor segmentations on four patient volumes.

  20. Elemental analysis of tissue pellets for the differentiation of epidermal lesion and normal skin by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Youngmin; Han, Jung Hyun; Shin, Sungho; Kim, Yong-Chul; Jeong, Sungho

    2016-01-01

    By laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of epidermal lesion and dermis tissue pellets of hairless mouse, it is shown that Ca intensity in the epidermal lesion is higher than that in dermis, whereas Na and K intensities have an opposite tendency. It is demonstrated that epidermal lesion and normal dermis can be differentiated with high selectivity either by univariate or multivariate analysis of LIBS spectra with an intensity ratio difference by factor of 8 or classification accuracy over 0.995, respectively. PMID:27231610

  1. Physicochemical properties and structural changes in vegetative tissues as affected by a direct current electrical field.

    PubMed

    Zvitov, R; Nussinovitch, A

    2001-01-01

    Cylindrical pieces of potato, sweet potato, kohlrabi, radish, and pear were interposed between a pair of electrodes, and a direct current was applied. A special custom-made apparatus enabled the use of differently shaped electrodes. The electrical field was applied for 1 min at 40 V/cm and caused a reduction in specimen weight by a minimal value of 2.7% of initial weight in sweet potato to a maximum 38.4% in pear. The affected area of the tissue resembled the shape of the electrode. Pores were produced in the tissue (from the anode side), possibly promoting slow release of minerals and other cell components from the contracted specimens. From the cathode side, cell "sealing" could be observed. Weight loss was dependent on the mechanical properties of the nontreated vegetative tissue specimens. After confirmation that all samples pass through induced electrical shrinkage, further work, executed only on potato, demonstrated that after electrical treatment the samples were less brown (higher L values). In addition, a dependence of weight loss on current intensity, electrode diameter, and surface ratio between the electrode and specimen was shown. The reduction in weight loss could be useful for initial drying of vegetative materials. Indirect proof of a decrease in enzyme activity as a result of electrical field application could be beneficial in replacing traditional methods for browning prevention. PMID:11735447

  2. Obesity And Laboratory Diets Affects Tissue Malondialdehyde (MDA) Levels In Obese Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Parimal; Scott, Joseph; Holley, Andy; Hakkak, Reza

    2010-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the interaction of obesity and laboratory diets on tissue malondialdehyde levels in rats. Female Zucker obese and lean rats were maintained on either regular grain-based diet or purified casein diet for two weeks, orally gavaged at day 50 with 65 mg/kg DMBA and sacrificed 24 hrs later. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured in blood and harvested tissues. Data were recorded as mean ± SEM and analyzed statistically. Results show that the obese group on purified casein diet had reduction of MDA levels in the brain, duodenum, liver, lung and kidney tissues as compared to lean group, p <0.05. Obese group on grain-based diet showed significant increase in MDA levels only in the duodenum, p <0.05. We conclude that dietary intervention differentially affects the oxidative markers in obese rats. It appears that purified casein diets were more effective than grain-based diet in reduction of oxidative stress in obese rats.

  3. Isolation and genome-wide expression and methylation characterization of CD31+ cells from normal and malignant human prostate tissue

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Dan; Deeb, Kristin K.; Ma, Yingyu; Morrison, Carl D.; Liu, Song; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are an important component involved in the angiogenesis. Little is known about the global gene expression and epigenetic regulation in tumor endothelial cells. The identification of gene expression and epigenetic difference between human prostate tumor-derived endothelial cells (TdECs) and those in normal tissues may uncover unique biological features of TdEC and facilitate the discovery of new anti-angiogenic targets. We established a method for isolation of CD31+ endothelial cells from malignant and normal prostate tissues obtained at prostatectomy. TdECs and normal-derived ECs (NdECs) showed >90% enrichment in primary culture and demonstrated microvascular endothelial cell characteristics such as cobblestone morphology in monolayer culture, diI-acetyl-LDL uptake and capillary-tube like formation in Matrigel®. In vitro primary cultures of ECs maintained expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor, intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. We then conducted a pilot study of transcriptome and methylome analysis of TdECs and matched NdECs from patients with prostate cancer. We observed a wide spectrum of differences in gene expression and methylation patterns in endothelial cells, between malignant and normal prostate tissues. Array-based expression and methylation data were validated by qRT-PCR and bisulfite DNA pyrosequencing. Further analysis of transcriptome and methylome data revealed a number of differentially expressed genes with loci whose methylation change is accompanied by an inverse change in gene expression. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of isolation of ECs from histologically normal prostate and prostate cancer via CD31+ selection. The data, although preliminary, indicates that there exist widespread differences in methylation and transcription between TdECs and NdECs. Interestingly, only a small

  4. Isolation and genome-wide expression and methylation characterization of CD31+ cells from normal and malignant human prostate tissue.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Dan; Deeb, Kristin K; Ma, Yingyu; Morrison, Carl D; Liu, Song; Johnson, Candace S; Trump, Donald L

    2013-09-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are an important component involved in the angiogenesis. Little is known about the global gene expression and epigenetic regulation in tumor endothelial cells. The identification of gene expression and epigenetic difference between human prostate tumor-derived endothelial cells (TdECs) and those in normal tissues may uncover unique biological features of TdEC and facilitate the discovery of new anti-angiogenic targets. We established a method for isolation of CD31+ endothelial cells from malignant and normal prostate tissue obtained at prostatectomy. TdECs and normal-derived ECs (NdECs) showed >90% enrichment in primary culture and demonstrated microvascular endothelial cell characteristics such as cobblestone morphology in monolayer culture, diI-acetyl-LDL uptake and capillary-tube like formation in Matrigel®. In vitro primary cultures of ECs maintained expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor, intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. We then conducted a pilot study of transcriptome and methylome analysis of TdECs and matched NdECs from patients with prostate cancer. We observed a wide spectrum of differences in gene expression and methylation patterns in endothelial cells, between malignant and normal prostate tissues. Array-based expression and methylation data were validated by qRT-PCR and bisulfite DNA pyrosequencing. Further analysis of transcriptome and methylome data revealed a number of differentially expressed genes with loci whose methylation change is accompanied by an inverse change in gene expression. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of isolation of ECs from histologically normal prostate and prostate cancer via CD31+ selection. The data, although preliminary, indicates that there exist widespread differences in methylation and transcription between TdECs and NdECs. Interestingly, only a small proportion

  5. Biology of MET: a double life between normal tissue repair and tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    MNNG HOS transforming gene (MET) is a class IV receptor tyrosine kinase, expressed on the surface of epithelial cells. The interaction with the hepatocyte grow factor (HGF) induces MET dimerization and the activation of multiple intracellular pathways leading to cell proliferation, anti-apoptosis, morphogenic differentiation, motility, invasion, and angiogenesis. Knock out mice have demonstrated that MET is necessary for normal embryogenesis including the formation of striate muscles, liver and trophoblastic structures. The overexpression of MET and HGF are common in solid tumors and contribute to determine their growth. Indeed, MET has been cloned as a transforming gene from a chemically induced human osteosarcoma cell line and therefore is considered a proto-oncogene. Germline MET mutations are characteristic of hereditary papillary kidney cancers and MET amplification is observed in tumors including lung and gastric adenocarcinomas. The inhibition of MET signaling is the target for specific drugs that are raising exciting expectation for medical treatment of cancer. PMID:25992381

  6. Distinguishing human normal or cancerous esophagus tissue ex vivo using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N. R.; Chen, G. N.; Wu, S. S.; Chen, R.

    2014-02-01

    Application of multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to clinical cancer research has greatly developed over the last few years. In this paper, we mainly focus on two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) for investigating esophageal cancer. We chiefly discuss the SHG/TPEF image and spectral characteristics of normal and cancerous esophagus submucosa with the combined multi-channel imaging mode and Lambda mode of a multiphoton microscope (LSM 510 META). Great differences can be detected, such as collagen content and morphology, glandular-shaped cancer cells, TPEF/SHG intensity ratio, and so on, which demonstrate that the multiphoton imaging technique has the potential ability for minimally-invasive early cancer diagnosis.

  7. A large-scale study of the ultrawideband microwave dielectric properties of normal, benign and malignant breast tissues obtained from cancer surgeries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazebnik, Mariya; Popovic, Dijana; McCartney, Leah; Watkins, Cynthia B.; Lindstrom, Mary J.; Harter, Josephine; Sewall, Sarah; Ogilvie, Travis; Magliocco, Anthony; Breslin, Tara M.; Temple, Walley; Mew, Daphne; Booske, John H.; Okoniewski, Michal; Hagness, Susan C.

    2007-10-01

    The development of microwave breast cancer detection and treatment techniques has been driven by reports of substantial contrast in the dielectric properties of malignant and normal breast tissues. However, definitive knowledge of the dielectric properties of normal and diseased breast tissues at microwave frequencies has been limited by gaps and discrepancies across previously published studies. To address these issues, we conducted a large-scale study to experimentally determine the ultrawideband microwave dielectric properties of a variety of normal, malignant and benign breast tissues, measured from 0.5 to 20 GHz using a precision open-ended coaxial probe. Previously, we reported the dielectric properties of normal breast tissue samples obtained from reduction surgeries. Here, we report the dielectric properties of normal (adipose, glandular and fibroconnective), malignant (invasive and non-invasive ductal and lobular carcinomas) and benign (fibroadenomas and cysts) breast tissue samples obtained from cancer surgeries. We fit a one-pole Cole-Cole model to the complex permittivity data set of each characterized sample. Our analyses show that the contrast in the microwave-frequency dielectric properties between malignant and normal adipose-dominated tissues in the breast is considerable, as large as 10:1, while the contrast in the microwave-frequency dielectric properties between malignant and normal glandular/fibroconnective tissues in the breast is no more than about 10%.

  8. Normal Adult Aging and the Contextual Influences Affecting Speech and Meaningful Sound Perception

    PubMed Central

    Aydelott, Jennifer; Leech, Robert; Crinion, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    It is widely accepted that hearing loss increases markedly with age, beginning in the fourth decade ISO 7029 (2000). Age-related hearing loss is typified by high-frequency threshold elevation and associated reductions in speech perception because speech sounds, especially consonants, become inaudible. Nevertheless, older adults often report additional and progressive difficulties in the perception and comprehension of speech, often highlighted in adverse listening conditions that exceed those reported by younger adults with a similar degree of high-frequency hearing loss (Dubno, Dirks, & Morgan) leading to communication difficulties and social isolation (Weinstein & Ventry). Some of the age-related decline in speech perception can be accounted for by peripheral sensory problems but cognitive aging can also be a contributing factor. In this article, we review findings from the psycholinguistic literature predominantly over the last four years and present a pilot study illustrating how normal age-related changes in cognition and the linguistic context can influence speech-processing difficulties in older adults. For significant progress in understanding and improving the auditory performance of aging listeners to be made, we discuss how future research will have to be much more specific not only about which interactions between auditory and cognitive abilities are critical but also how they are modulated in the brain. PMID:21307006

  9. Vasomotor tone does not affect perfusion heterogeneity and gas exchange in normal primate lungs during normoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenny, R. W.; Robertson, H. T.; Hlastala, M. P.

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether vasoregulation is an important cause of pulmonary perfusion heterogeneity, we measured regional blood flow and gas exchange before and after giving prostacyclin (PGI(2)) to baboons. Four animals were anesthetized with ketamine and mechanically ventilated. Fluorescent microspheres were used to mark regional perfusion before and after PGI(2) infusion. The lungs were subsequently excised, dried inflated, and diced into approximately 2-cm(3) pieces (n = 1,208-1,629 per animal) with the spatial coordinates recorded for each piece. Blood flow to each piece was determined for each condition from the fluorescent signals. Blood flow heterogeneity did not change with PGI(2) infusion. Two other measures of spatial blood flow distribution, the fractal dimension and the spatial correlation, did not change with PGI(2) infusion. Alveolar-arterial O(2) differences did not change with PGI(2) infusion. We conclude that, in normal primate lungs during normoxia, vasomotor tone is not a significant cause of perfusion heterogeneity. Despite the heterogeneous distribution of blood flow, active regulation of regional perfusion is not required for efficient gas exchange.

  10. Normal adult aging and the contextual influences affecting speech and meaningful sound perception.

    PubMed

    Aydelott, Jennifer; Leech, Robert; Crinion, Jennifer

    2010-12-01

    It is widely accepted that hearing loss increases markedly with age, beginning in the fourth decade ISO 7029 (2000). Age-related hearing loss is typified by high-frequency threshold elevation and associated reductions in speech perception because speech sounds, especially consonants, become inaudible. Nevertheless, older adults often report additional and progressive difficulties in the perception and comprehension of speech, often highlighted in adverse listening conditions that exceed those reported by younger adults with a similar degree of high-frequency hearing loss (Dubno, Dirks, & Morgan) leading to communication difficulties and social isolation (Weinstein & Ventry). Some of the age-related decline in speech perception can be accounted for by peripheral sensory problems but cognitive aging can also be a contributing factor. In this article, we review findings from the psycholinguistic literature predominantly over the last four years and present a pilot study illustrating how normal age-related changes in cognition and the linguistic context can influence speech-processing difficulties in older adults. For significant progress in understanding and improving the auditory performance of aging listeners to be made, we discuss how future research will have to be much more specific not only about which interactions between auditory and cognitive abilities are critical but also how they are modulated in the brain. PMID:21307006

  11. Visual Contextual Effects of Orientation, Contrast, Flicker, and Luminance: All Are Affected by Normal Aging

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Bao N.; McKendrick, Allison M.

    2016-01-01

    The perception of a visual stimulus can be markedly altered by spatial interactions between the stimulus and its surround. For example, a grating stimulus appears lower in contrast when surrounded by a similar pattern of higher contrast: a phenomenon known as surround suppression of perceived contrast. Such center–surround interactions in visual perception are numerous and arise from both cortical and pre-cortical neural circuitry. For example, perceptual surround suppression of luminance and flicker are predominantly mediated pre-cortically, whereas contrast and orientation suppression have strong cortical contributions. Here, we compare the perception of older and younger observers on a battery of tasks designed to assess such visual contextual effects. For all visual dimensions tested (luminance, flicker, contrast, and orientation), on average the older adults showed greater suppression of central targets than the younger adult group. The increase in suppression was consistent in magnitude across all tasks, suggesting that normal aging produces a generalized, non-specific alteration to contextual processing in vision. PMID:27148047

  12. Thermal coagulation-induced changes of the optical properties of normal and adenomatous human colon tissues in vitro in the spectral range 400 1100 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Huilan; Xing, Da; Wei, Huajiang; Gu, Huaimin; Wu, Guoyong; Lu, Jianjun

    2008-04-01

    The absorption coefficients, the reduced scattering coefficients and the optical penetration depths for native and coagulated human normal and adenomatous colon tissues in vitro were determined over the range of 400-1100 nm using a spectrophotometer with an internal integrating sphere system, and the inverse adding-doubling method was applied to calculate the tissue optical properties from diffuse reflectance and total transmittance measurements. The experimental results showed that in the range of 400-1100 nm there were larger absorption coefficients (P < 0.01) and smaller reduced scattering coefficients (P < 0.01) for adenomatous colon tissues than for normal colon tissues, and there were smaller optical penetration depths for adenomatous colon tissues than for normal colon tissues, especially in the near-infrared wavelength. Thermal coagulation induced significant increase of the absorption coefficients and reduced scattering coefficients for the normal and adenomatous colon tissues, and significantly reduced decrease of the optical penetration depths for the normal and adenomatous colon tissues. The smaller optical penetration depth for coagulated adenomatous colon tissues is a disadvantage for laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT). It is necessary to adjust the application parameters of lasers to achieve optimal therapy.

  13. Feasibility of normal tissue dose reduction in radiotherapy using low strength magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Youngseob; Jung, In-Hye; Kwak, Jungwon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Toxicity of mucosa is one of the major concerns of radiotherapy (RT), when a target tumor is located near a mucosal lined organ. Energy of photon RT is transferred primarily by secondary electrons. If these secondary electrons could be removed in an internal cavity of mucosal lined organ, the mucosa will be spared without compromising the target tumor dose. The purpose of this study was to present a RT dose reduction in near target inner-surface (NTIS) of internal cavity, using Lorentz force of magnetic field. Materials and Methods Tissue equivalent phantoms, composed with a cylinder shaped internal cavity, and adjacent a target tumor part, were developed. The phantoms were irradiated using 6 MV photon beam, with or without 0.3 T of perpendicular magnetic field. Two experimental models were developed: single beam model (SBM) to analyze central axis dose distributions and multiple beam model (MBM) to simulate a clinical case of prostate cancer with rectum. RT dose of NTIS of internal cavity and target tumor area (TTA) were measured. Results With magnetic field applied, bending effect of dose distribution was visualized. The depth dose distribution of SBM showed 28.1% dose reduction of NTIS and little difference in dose of TTA with magnetic field. In MBM, cross-sectional dose of NTIS was reduced by 33.1% with magnetic field, while TTA dose were the same, irrespective of magnetic field. Conclusion RT dose of mucosal lined organ, located near treatment target, could be modulated by perpendicular magnetic field. PMID:26484306

  14. Localization and identification of granzymes A and B-expressing cells in normal human lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Kummer, J A; Kamp, A M; Tadema, T M; Vos, W; Meijer, C J; Hack, C E

    1995-04-01

    Cytoplasmic granules from activated natural killer (NK) and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) contain a pore-forming protein, perforin, and several homologous serine proteinases called granzymes. Expression of these proteins correlates with the cytolytic potential of cytotoxic lymphocytes. Using a panel of MoAbs specific for human granzyme A and B, respectively, expression of these proteinases in non-pathological lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) subpopulations was investigated. Using immunohistochemistry and double stainings, the phenotype of granzyme-expressing cells in lymphoid tissue was investigated. Granzyme-positive cells were detected in all lymphoid tissues tested. No large differences in the number and distribution between granzyme A- and granzyme B-positive cells were observed. The highest number of positive cells was located in the red pulp of the spleen. Significant numbers were detected in tonsil, lymph nodes, liver and thymus. Low numbers were present in the lamina propria of non-inflamed stomach, small intestine and colon. Phenotypic analysis and cell sorting showed that most of the granzyme-positive cells in lymphoid tissue and PBL consisted of CD3-CD16+CD56+ lymphocytes. Hardly any granzyme-positive CD3+CD8+ CTL were present in peripheral blood. The synthesis of granzyme A as well as B by both CD3+CD16+CD56+ and CD3+CD8+ cells in peripheral blood was increased upon IL-2 stimulation. These results indicate that in normal lymphoid tissue the predominant cytolytic cell population is formed by the NK cells, and activated CTL are rare.

  15. Comparison of gene expression of SOX2 and OCT4 in normal tissue, polyps, and colon adenocarcinoma using immunohistochemical staining

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Ardeshir; Kianersi, Kianoosh; Beiraghdar, Mozhdeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cancer stem cells have been isolated and characterized in all common cancers. SOX2 and OCT4 are important genes to enhance the self-renewal ability as activate stem cells and inhibit the genes that start differentiation and thus maintain the self-renewal ability of stem cells. Also, the aim of this study is “Comparison of gene expression of SOX2 and OCT4 in normal tissue, polyps, and colon adenocarcinoma using immunohistochemical staining.” Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study conducted on 20 patients so that for each patient, a sample of healthy tissue, dysplastic polyp tissue, and colon adenocarcinoma were provided as microscopic sections and staining on each tissue was performed through immunohistochemistry method by markers OCT4 and SOX2. The collected data were interred into SPSS version 18.0, (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) software and the level of significance were considered as <0.05. Results: The study sample consisted of 20 patients including 11 men (55%) and 9 women (45%) with a mean age of 55.6 ± 9.88 years. There was no association between Oct4 and colorectal cancer (CRC) patients (P > 0.05), but there was a significant correlation between Sox2 expression and CRC (P < 0.05). Patients in many aspects such as race, type of polyp, presence of lymph node, grade and intensity of Sox2 in different types of patients’ tissues (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Regarding our findings, the expression of Sox2 would be a liable marker for evaluating of cancer progression and could be a treatment target of CRC cells. PMID:26645019

  16. PMCA activity and membrane tubulin affect deformability of erythrocytes from normal and hypertensive human subjects.

    PubMed

    Monesterolo, Noelia E; Nigra, Ayelen D; Campetelli, Alexis N; Santander, Verónica S; Rivelli, Juan F; Arce, Carlos A; Casale, Cesar H

    2015-11-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated formation of a complex between acetylated tubulin and brain plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA), and the effect of the lipid environment on structure of this complex and on PMCA activity. Deformability of erythrocytes from hypertensive human subjects was reduced by an increase in membrane tubulin content. In the present study, we examined the regulation of PMCA activity by tubulin in normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes, and the effect of exogenously added diacylglycerol (DAG) and phosphatidic acid (PA) on erythrocyte deformability. Some of the key findings were that: (i) PMCA was associated with tubulin in normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes, (ii) PMCA enzyme activity was directly correlated with erythrocyte deformability, and (iii) when tubulin was present in the erythrocyte membrane, treatment with DAG or PA led to increased deformability and associated PMCA activity. Taken together, our findings indicate that PMCA activity is involved in deformability of both normotensive and hypertensive erythrocytes. This rheological property of erythrocytes is affected by acetylated tubulin and its lipid environment because both regulate PMCA activity.

  17. Discrimination of Basal Cell Carcinoma from Normal Skin Tissue Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Je-Ho; Lee, Heonho; Yoon, Dahye; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kim, Moon-Bum; Kim, Shukmann

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) spectroscopy is a useful tool for investigating the metabolism of various cancers. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer. However, to our knowledge, data on metabolic profiling of BCC have not been reported in the literature. The objective of the present study was to investigate the metabolic profiling of cutaneous BCC using HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to analyze the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity of histopathologically confirmed BCC tissues and normal skin tissue (NST) samples. The metabolic intensity normalized to the total spectral intensities in BCC and NST was compared, and multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Univariate analysis revealed 9 metabolites that showed statistically significant difference between BCC and NST. In multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with the HR-MAS NMR metabolic profiles revealed a clear separation of BCC from NST. The receiver operating characteristic curve generated from the results revealed an excellent discrimination of BCC from NST with an area under the curve (AUC) value of 0.961. The present study demonstrated that the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity differ between BCC and NST, and that HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy can be a valuable tool in the diagnosis of BCC. PMID:26934749

  18. Discrimination of Basal Cell Carcinoma from Normal Skin Tissue Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mun, Je-Ho; Lee, Heonho; Yoon, Dahye; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kim, Moon-Bum; Kim, Shukmann

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) spectroscopy is a useful tool for investigating the metabolism of various cancers. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer. However, to our knowledge, data on metabolic profiling of BCC have not been reported in the literature. The objective of the present study was to investigate the metabolic profiling of cutaneous BCC using HR-MAS (1)H NMR spectroscopy. HR-MAS (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used to analyze the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity of histopathologically confirmed BCC tissues and normal skin tissue (NST) samples. The metabolic intensity normalized to the total spectral intensities in BCC and NST was compared, and multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Univariate analysis revealed 9 metabolites that showed statistically significant difference between BCC and NST. In multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with the HR-MAS NMR metabolic profiles revealed a clear separation of BCC from NST. The receiver operating characteristic curve generated from the results revealed an excellent discrimination of BCC from NST with an area under the curve (AUC) value of 0.961. The present study demonstrated that the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity differ between BCC and NST, and that HR-MAS (1)H NMR spectroscopy can be a valuable tool in the diagnosis of BCC. PMID:26934749

  19. Normal weight estonian prepubertal boys show a more cardiovascular-risk-associated adipose tissue distribution than austrian counterparts.

    PubMed

    Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra J; Moeller, Reinhard; Horejsi, Renate; Jürimäe, Toivo; Jürimäe, Jaak; Mäestu, Jarek; Purge, Priit; Saar, Meeli; Tafeit, Erwin; Kaimbacher, Petra; Kruschitz, Renate; Weghuber, Daniel; Schnedl, Wolfgang J; Mangge, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Risk phenotypes for cardiovascular disease (CVD) differ markedly between countries, like the reported high difference in CVD mortality in Austria and Estonia. Hitherto, the goal of this study was to find out risk profiles in body fat distribution yet present in childhood, paving the way for later clinical end points. Methods. he subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) distribution patterns in 553 Austrian (A) and Estonian (E) clinically healthy normal weight boys aged 11.1 (±0.8) years were analysed. We applied the patented optical device Lipometer which determines the individual subcutaneous adipose tissue topography (SAT-Top). Results. Total body fat did not differ significantly between E and A boys. A discriminant analysis using all Lipometer data, BMI, and the total body fat (TBF) yielded 84.6% of the boys correctly classified in Estonians and Austrians by 9 body sites. A factor analysis identified the SAT distribution of E as critically similar to male adult patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Conclusions. We show in normal weight Estonian boys a highly significant decreased fat accumulation on the lower body site compared to age matched Austrian males. This SAT-Top phenotype may play an important role for the increased cardiovascular risk seen in the Estonian population.

  20. Identification of a novel spliced variant of the SYT gene expressed in normal tissues and in synovial sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Tamborini, E; Agus, V; Mezzelani, A; Riva, C; Sozzi, G; Azzarelli, A; Pierotti, M A; Pilotti, S

    2001-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma (SS) is cytogenetically characterized by the translocation t(X;18)(p11.2-q11.2) generating a fusion between the SYT gene on chromosome 18 and one member of the SSX family gene (SSX1; SSX2; SSX4) on chromosome X. Here, we report for the first time that 2 forms of SYT mRNA are present in both normal tissues and SSs. By amplifying the full-length SYT cDNA of two SSs, we detected 2 bands, here designated N-SYT and I-SYT. The latter, previously undescribed, contains an in-frame insertion of 93 bp. Its sequencing revealed a 100% homology with the mouse SYT gene. These two SYT forms were present, although in different amounts, in all human normal tissues examined, including kidney, stomach, lung, colon, liver and synovia. Coexistence of N-SYT and I-SYT (both fused with SSX) was detected in a series of 59 SSs (35 monophasic and 24 biphasic) and in a SS cell line. A preliminary analysis of the differential expression levels of N-SYT and I-SYT in SSs revealed that the latter was consistently overexpressed, suggesting a role in SS pathogenesis. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11308259

  1. Normal Weight Estonian Prepubertal Boys Show a More Cardiovascular-Risk-Associated Adipose Tissue Distribution than Austrian Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra J.; Moeller, Reinhard; Horejsi, Renate; Jürimäe, Toivo; Jürimäe, Jaak; Mäestu, Jarek; Purge, Priit; Saar, Meeli; Tafeit, Erwin; Kaimbacher, Petra; Kruschitz, Renate; Weghuber, Daniel; Schnedl, Wolfgang J.; Mangge, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Risk phenotypes for cardiovascular disease (CVD) differ markedly between countries, like the reported high difference in CVD mortality in Austria and Estonia. Hitherto, the goal of this study was to find out risk profiles in body fat distribution yet present in childhood, paving the way for later clinical end points. Methods. he subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) distribution patterns in 553 Austrian (A) and Estonian (E) clinically healthy normal weight boys aged 11.1 (±0.8) years were analysed. We applied the patented optical device Lipometer which determines the individual subcutaneous adipose tissue topography (SAT-Top). Results. Total body fat did not differ significantly between E and A boys. A discriminant analysis using all Lipometer data, BMI, and the total body fat (TBF) yielded 84.6% of the boys correctly classified in Estonians and Austrians by 9 body sites. A factor analysis identified the SAT distribution of E as critically similar to male adult patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Conclusions. We show in normal weight Estonian boys a highly significant decreased fat accumulation on the lower body site compared to age matched Austrian males. This SAT-Top phenotype may play an important role for the increased cardiovascular risk seen in the Estonian population. PMID:24555148

  2. Effects of supplemental vitamin D and calcium on normal colon tissue and circulating biomarkers of risk for colorectal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Bostick, Roberd M

    2015-04-01

    This brief review, based on an invited presentation at the 17th Workshop on Vitamin D, is to summarize a line of the author's research that has been directed at the intertwined missions of clarifying and/or developing vitamin D and calcium as preventive agents against colorectal cancer in humans, understanding the mechanisms by which these agents may reduce risk for the disease, and developing 'treatable' biomarkers of risk for colorectal cancer. The biological plausibility and observational and clinical trial evidence for vitamin D and calcium in reducing risk for colorectal neoplasms, the development of pre-neoplastic biomarkers of risk for colorectal neoplasms, and the clinical trial findings from the author's research group on the efficacy of vitamin D and calcium in modulating these biomarkers are summarized. Regarding the latter, we tested the efficacy of 800 IU (20μg) of vitamin D3 and 2.0g of calcium daily, alone and combined vs. placebo over 6 months on modulating normal colon tissue and circulating hypothesis-based biomarkers of risk for colorectal neoplasms in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2×2 factorial design clinical trial (n=92). The tissue-based biomarkers were measured in biopsies of normal-appearing rectal mucosa using immunohistochemistry with quantitative image analysis, and a panel of circulating inflammation markers was measured using enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISA). Statistically significant proportional tissue increases in the vitamin D group relative to the placebo group were found in bax (51%), p21 (141%), APC (48%), E-cadherin (78%), MSH2 (179%), the CaSR (39%), and CYP27B1 (159%). In blood, there was a 77% statistically significant decrease in a summary inflammation z-score. The findings for calcium were similar to those for vitamin D. These findings indicate that supplemental vitamin D3 or calcium can favorably modulate multiple normal colon tissue and circulating hypothesis-based biomarkers of risk for colorectal

  3. Assessment of normal tissue complications following prostate cancer irradiation: Comparison of radiation treatment modalities using NTCP models

    SciTech Connect

    Takam, Rungdham; Bezak, Eva; Yeoh, Eric E.; Marcu, Loredana

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of the rectum, bladder, urethra, and femoral heads following several techniques for radiation treatment of prostate cancer were evaluated applying the relative seriality and Lyman models. Methods: Model parameters from literature were used in this evaluation. The treatment techniques included external (standard fractionated, hypofractionated, and dose-escalated) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy (I-125 seeds), and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (Ir-192 source). Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum, bladder, and urethra retrieved from corresponding treatment planning systems were converted to biological effective dose-based and equivalent dose-based DVHs, respectively, in order to account for differences in radiation treatment modality and fractionation schedule. Results: Results indicated that with hypofractionated 3D-CRT (20 fractions of 2.75 Gy/fraction delivered five times/week to total dose of 55 Gy), NTCP of the rectum, bladder, and urethra were less than those for standard fractionated 3D-CRT using a four-field technique (32 fractions of 2 Gy/fraction delivered five times/week to total dose of 64 Gy) and dose-escalated 3D-CRT. Rectal and bladder NTCPs (5.2% and 6.6%, respectively) following the dose-escalated four-field 3D-CRT (2 Gy/fraction to total dose of 74 Gy) were the highest among analyzed treatment techniques. The average NTCP for the rectum and urethra were 0.6% and 24.7% for LDR-BT and 0.5% and 11.2% for HDR-BT. Conclusions: Although brachytherapy techniques resulted in delivering larger equivalent doses to normal tissues, the corresponding NTCPs were lower than those of external beam techniques other than the urethra because of much smaller volumes irradiated to higher doses. Among analyzed normal tissues, the femoral heads were found to have the lowest probability of complications as most of their volume was irradiated to lower

  4. Aluminum concentrations in central and peripheral areas of malignant breast lesions do not differ from those in normal breast tissues

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aluminum is used in a wide range of applications and is a potential environmental hazard. The known genotoxic effects of aluminum might play a role in the development of breast cancer. However, the data currently available on the subject are not sufficient to establish a causal relationship between aluminum exposure and the augmented risk of developing breast cancer. To achieve maximum sensitivity and specificity in the determination of aluminum levels, we have developed a detection protocol using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The objective of the present study was to compare the aluminum levels in the central and peripheral areas of breast carcinomas with those in the adjacent normal breast tissues, and to identify patient and/or tumor characteristics associated with these aluminum levels. Methods A total of 176 patients with breast cancer were included in the study. Samples from the central and peripheral areas of their tumors were obtained, as well as from the surrounding normal breast tissue. Aluminum quantification was performed using GFAAS. Results The average (mean ± SD) aluminum concentrations were as follows: central area, 1.88 ± 3.60 mg/kg; peripheral area, 2.10 ± 5.67 mg/kg; and normal area, 1.68 ± 11.1 mg/kg. Overall and two-by-two comparisons of the aluminum concentrations in these areas indicated no significant differences. We detected a positive relationship between aluminum levels in the peripheral areas of the tumors, age and menopausal status of the patients (P = .02). Conclusions Using a sensitive quantification technique we detected similar aluminum concentrations in the central and peripheral regions of breast tumors, and in normal tissues. In addition, we did not detect significant differences in aluminum concentrations as related to the location of the breast tumor within the breast, or to other relevant tumor features such as stage, size and steroid receptor status. The next

  5. Gas density does not affect pulmonary acoustic transmission in normal men.

    PubMed

    Mahagnah, M; Gavriely, N

    1995-03-01

    Fremitus, the transmission of sound and vibration from the mouth to the chest wall, has long been used clinically to examine the pulmonary system. Recently, modern technology has become available to measure the acoustic transfer function (TF) and transit times (TT) of the pulmonary system. Because sound speed is inversely proportional to the square root of gas density in free gas, but not in porous media, we measured the effect of air and Heliox (80% He-20% O2) breathing on pulmonary sound transmission in six healthy subjects to investigate the mechanism of sound transmission. Wide-band noise (75-2,000 Hz) was "injected" into the mouth and picked up over the trachea and chest wall. The averaged power spectra, TF, phase, and coherence were calculated using a fast Fourier transform-based algorithm. The phase data were used to calculate TT as a function of frequency. TF was found to consist of a low-pass filter property with essentially flat transmitted energy to 300 Hz and exponential decline to 600 Hz at the anterior right upper lobe (CR) and flat transmission to 100 Hz with exponential decline to 150 Hz at the right posterior base (BR). TF was not affected by breathing Heliox. The average TT values, calculated from the slopes of the averaged phase, were 1.5 +/- 0.5 ms for trachea to CR and 5.2 +/- 0.5 ms for trachea to BR transmission during air breathing. During Heliox breathing, the values of TT were 1.5 +/- 0.5 ms and 4.9 +/- 0.5 ms from the trachea to CR and from the trachea to BR locations, respectively. These results suggest that sound transmission in the respiratory system is dominated by wave propagation through the parenchymal porous structure. PMID:7775338

  6. Associations between genetic variation in one-carbon metabolism and LINE-1 DNA methylation in histologically normal breast tissues

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, Adana A M; Marian, Catalin; Brasky, Theodore M; Dumitrescu, Ramona G; Liu, Zhenhua; Mason, Joel B; Makambi, Kepher H; Spear, Scott L; Kallakury, Bhaskar V S; Freudenheim, Jo L; Shields, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide DNA hypomethylation is an early event in the carcinogenic process. Percent methylation of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) is a biomarker of genome-wide methylation and is a potential biomarker for breast cancer. Understanding factors associated with percent LINE-1 DNA methylation in histologically normal tissues could provide insight into early stages of carcinogenesis. In a cross-sectional study of 121 healthy women with no prior history of cancer who underwent reduction mammoplasty, we examined associations between plasma and breast folate, genetic variation in one-carbon metabolism, and percent LINE-1 methylation using multivariable regression models (adjusting for race, oral contraceptive use, and alcohol use). Results are expressed as the ratio of LINE-1 methylation relative to that of the referent group, with the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). We found no significant associations between plasma or breast folate and percent LINE-1 methylation. Variation in MTHFR, MTR, and MTRR were significantly associated with percent LINE-1 methylation. Variant allele carriers of MTHFR A1289C had 4% lower LINE-1 methylation (Ratio 0.96, 95% CI 0.93–0.98), while variant allele carriers of MTR A2756G (Ratio 1.03, 95% CI 1.01–1.06) and MTRR A66G (Ratio 1.03, 95% CI 1.01–1.06) had 3% higher LINE-1 methylation, compared to those carrying the more common genotypes of these SNPs. DNA methylation of LINE-1 elements in histologically normal breast tissues is influenced by polymorphisms in genes in the one-carbon metabolism pathway. Future studies are needed to investigate the sociodemographic, environmental and additional genetic determinants of DNA methylation in breast tissues and the impact on breast cancer susceptibility. PMID:26090795

  7. Classification of normal and precancerous cervical tissues using nonlinear maximum representation and discrimination features (NMRDF) on polarized reflectance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Seema; Agarwal, Asha; Pandey, Kiran; Pradhan, Asima

    2015-03-01

    Reflectance spectroscopy contains information of scatterers and absorbers present inside biological tissues and has been successfully used to diagnose disease. Success of any diagnostic tool depends upon the potential of statistical algorithm to extract appropriate diagnostic features from the measured optical data. In our recent study, we have used the potential of the classification algorithm, Nonlinear Maximum Representation and Discrimination Features (NMRDF) to extract important diagnostic features from reflectance spectra of normal and dysplastic human cervical tissue. This NMRDF algorithm uses the higher order correlation information in the input data, which helps to represent the asymmetrically distributed data and provides the closed form solution of the nonlinear transform for maximum discrimination. We have recorded unpolarized, co and cross-polarized reflectance spectra from 350nm to 650nm, illuminating the human cervical tissue epithelium with white light source. A total of 139 samples were divided into training and validation data sets. The input parameters were optimized using training data sets to extract the appropriate nonlinear features from the input reflectance spectra. These extracted nonlinear features are used as input for nearest mean classifier to calculate the sensitivity and specificity for both training as well as validation data sets. We have observed that co-polarized components provide maximum sensitivity and specificity compared to cross-polarized components and unpolarized data. This is expected since co-polarized light provides subsurface information while cross-polarized and unpolarized data mask the vital epithelial information through high diffuse scattering.

  8. Proximal placement of lateral thigh skin markers reduces soft tissue artefact during normal gait using the Conventional Gait Model.

    PubMed

    Cockcroft, John; Louw, Quinette; Baker, Richard

    2016-11-01

    A primary source of measurement error in gait analysis is soft-tissue artefact. Hip and knee angle measurements, regularly used in clinical decision-making, are particularly prone to pervasive soft tissue on the femur. However, despite several studies of thigh marker artefact it remains unclear how lateral thigh marker height affects results using variants of the Conventional Gait Model. We compared Vicon Plug-in Gait hip and knee angle estimates during gait using a proximal and distal thigh marker placement for ten healthy subjects. Knee axes were estimated by optimizing thigh rotation offsets to minimize knee varus-valgus range during gait. Relative to the distal marker, the proximal marker produced 37% less varus-valgus range and 50% less hip rotation range (p < 0.001), suggesting that it produced less soft-tissue artefact in knee axis estimates. The thigh markers also produced different secondary effects on the knee centre estimate. Using whole gait cycle optimization, the distal marker showed greater minimum and maximum knee flexion (by 6° and 2° respectively) resulting in a 4° reduction in range. Mid-stance optimization reduced distal marker knee flexion by 5° throughout, but proximal marker results were negligibly affected. Based on an analysis of the Plug-in Gait knee axis definition, we show that the proximal marker reduced sensitivity to soft-tissue artefact by decreasing collinearity between the points defining the femoral frontal plane and reducing anteroposterior movement between the knee and thigh markers. This study suggests that a proximal thigh marker may be preferable when performing gait analysis using the Plug-in Gait model.

  9. Proximal placement of lateral thigh skin markers reduces soft tissue artefact during normal gait using the Conventional Gait Model.

    PubMed

    Cockcroft, John; Louw, Quinette; Baker, Richard

    2016-11-01

    A primary source of measurement error in gait analysis is soft-tissue artefact. Hip and knee angle measurements, regularly used in clinical decision-making, are particularly prone to pervasive soft tissue on the femur. However, despite several studies of thigh marker artefact it remains unclear how lateral thigh marker height affects results using variants of the Conventional Gait Model. We compared Vicon Plug-in Gait hip and knee angle estimates during gait using a proximal and distal thigh marker placement for ten healthy subjects. Knee axes were estimated by optimizing thigh rotation offsets to minimize knee varus-valgus range during gait. Relative to the distal marker, the proximal marker produced 37% less varus-valgus range and 50% less hip rotation range (p < 0.001), suggesting that it produced less soft-tissue artefact in knee axis estimates. The thigh markers also produced different secondary effects on the knee centre estimate. Using whole gait cycle optimization, the distal marker showed greater minimum and maximum knee flexion (by 6° and 2° respectively) resulting in a 4° reduction in range. Mid-stance optimization reduced distal marker knee flexion by 5° throughout, but proximal marker results were negligibly affected. Based on an analysis of the Plug-in Gait knee axis definition, we show that the proximal marker reduced sensitivity to soft-tissue artefact by decreasing collinearity between the points defining the femoral frontal plane and reducing anteroposterior movement between the knee and thigh markers. This study suggests that a proximal thigh marker may be preferable when performing gait analysis using the Plug-in Gait model. PMID:26929983

  10. Tumor and normal tissue motion in the thorax during respiration: Analysis of volumetric and positional variations using 4D CT

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Elisabeth . E-mail: eweiss@mcvh-vcu.edu; Wijesooriya, Krishni; Dill, S. Vaughn; Keall, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate temporospatial variations of tumor and normal tissue during respiration in lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: In 14 patients, gross tumor volume (GTV) and normal tissue structures were manually contoured on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scans. Structures were evaluated for volume changes, centroid (center of mass) motion, and phase dependence of variations relative to inspiration. Only volumetrically complete structures were used for analysis (lung in 2, heart in 8, all other structures in >10 patients). Results: During respiration, the magnitude of contoured volumes varied up to 62.5% for GTVs, 25.5% for lungs, and 12.6% for hearts. The range of maximum three-dimensional centroid movement for individual patients was 1.3-24.0 mm for GTV, 2.4-7.9 mm for heart, 5.2-12.0 mm for lungs, 0.3-5.5 mm for skin markers, 2.9-10.0 mm for trachea, and 6.6-21.7 mm for diaphragm. During respiration, the centroid positions of normal structures varied relative to the centroid position of the respective GTV by 1.5-8.1 mm for heart, 2.9-9.3 mm for lungs, 1.2-9.2 mm for skin markers, 0.9-7.1 mm for trachea, and 2.7-16.4 mm for diaphragm. Conclusion: Using 4D-CT, volumetric changes, positional alterations as well as changes in the position of contoured structures relative to the GTV were observed with large variations between individual patients. Although the interpretation of 4D-CT data has considerable uncertainty because of 4D-CT artifacts, observer variations, and the limited acquisition time, the findings might have a significant impact on treatment planning.

  11. Thickness of the subchondral mineralised tissue zone (SMZ) in normal male and female and pathological human patellae

    PubMed Central

    ECKSTEIN, FELIX; MILZ, STEFAN; ANETZBERGER, HERMANN; PUTZ, REINHARD

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to analyse sex differences of the thickness of the subchondral mineralised tissue zone (SMZ), and to find out whether systematic changes of SMZ thickness are associated with naturally occurring, non-full-thickness cartilage lesions of human patellae. In 32 methyl-methacrylate-embedded specimens (16 normal, 8 with focal medial, and 8 with lateral lesions) the SMZ thickness was determined, using a binocular macroscope and an image analysing system. In each case, the thickness distribution was reconstructed throughout the entire joint surface. The maximal and mean SMZ thicknesses were significantly higher in males than in females (P<0.01). In normal patellae and those with lateral lesions, the thickness was significantly thicker laterally than medially (P<0.05), but it was not in specimens with medial damage. Patellae with medial damage exhibited a significantly lower total mean and lateral mean (P<0.05). A lower SMZ thickness was found directly beneath medial lesions than beneath lateral ones, but the local thickness was always in the range of that observed in normal specimens. We conclude that differences of patellar SMZ thickness exist between males and females. Naturally occurring cartilage lesions appear, however, not to be associated with local changes of SMZ thickness, but they may be associated with an altered regional distribution pattern within the joint surface. PMID:9568563

  12. Normal Tissue Anatomy for Oropharyngeal Cancer: Contouring Variability and Its Impact on Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Mary; Demiroz, Candan; Vineberg, Karen A.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Balter, James M.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the variability of organ at risk (OAR) delineation and the resulting impact on intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plan optimization in head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: An expert panel of 3 radiation oncologists jointly delineated OARs, including the parotid and submandibular glands (SM), pharyngeal constrictors (PC), larynx, and glottis (GL), in 10 patients with advanced oropharynx cancer in 3 contouring sessions, spaced at least 1 week apart. Contour variability and uncertainty, as well as their dosimetric impact on IMRT planning for each case, were assessed. Results: The mean difference in total volume for each OAR was 1 cm{sup 3} ({sigma} 0.5 cm{sup 3}). Mean fractional overlap was 0.7 ({sigma} 0.1) and was highest (0.8) for the larynx and bilateral SMs and parotids and lowest (0.5) for PC. There were considerable spatial differences in contours, with the ipsilateral parotid and PC displaying the most variability (0.9 cm), which was most prominent in cases in which tumors obliterated fat planes. Both SMs and GL had the smallest differences (0.5 cm). The mean difference in OAR dose was 0.9 Gy (range 0.6-1.1 Gy, {sigma} 0.1 Gy), with the smallest difference for GL and largest for both SMs and the larynx. Conclusions: Despite substantial difference in OAR contours, optimization was barely affected, with a 0.9-Gy mean difference between optimizations, suggesting relative insensitivity of dose distributions for IMRT of oropharynx cancer to the extent of OARs.

  13. Insulin-resistant subjects have normal angiogenic response to aerobic exercise training in skeletal muscle, but not in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Walton, R Grace; Finlin, Brian S; Mula, Jyothi; Long, Douglas E; Zhu, Beibei; Fry, Christopher S; Westgate, Philip M; Lee, Jonah D; Bennett, Tamara; Kern, Philip A; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2015-01-01

    Reduced vessel density in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle is associated with obesity and may result in decreased perfusion, decreased oxygen consumption, and insulin resistance. In the presence of VEGFA, Angiopoietin-2 (Angpt2) and Angiopoietin-1 (Angpt1) are central determinants of angiogenesis, with greater Angpt2:Angpt1 ratios promoting angiogenesis. In skeletal muscle, exercise training stimulates angiogenesis and modulates transcription of VEGFA, Angpt1, and Angpt2. However, it remains unknown whether exercise training stimulates vessel growth in human adipose tissue, and it remains unknown whether adipose angiogenesis is mediated by angiopoietin signaling. We sought to determine whether insulin-resistant subjects would display an impaired angiogenic response to aerobic exercise training. Insulin-sensitive (IS, N = 12) and insulin-resistant (IR, N = 14) subjects had subcutaneous adipose and muscle (vastus lateralis) biopsies before and after 12 weeks of cycle ergometer training. In both tissues, we measured vessels and expression of pro-angiogenic genes. Exercise training did not increase insulin sensitivity in IR Subjects. In skeletal muscle, training resulted in increased vessels/muscle fiber and increased Angpt2:Angpt1 ratio in both IR and IS subjects. However, in adipose, exercise training only induced angiogenesis in IS subjects, likely due to chronic suppression of VEGFA expression in IR subjects. These results indicate that skeletal muscle of IR subjects exhibits a normal angiogenic response to exercise training. However, the same training regimen is insufficient to induce angiogenesis in adipose tissue of IR subjects, which may help to explain why we did not observe improved insulin sensitivity following aerobic training. PMID:26038468

  14. Identification of cell types, tissues and pathways affected by risk loci in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Zhao, Pan; Shen, Changbing; Shen, Songke; Zheng, Xiaodong; Zuo, Xianbo; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Xuejun; Yin, Xianyong

    2016-04-01

    Many common variants have been found associated with the risk of psoriasis, but the underlying mechanism is still largely unknown, mostly owing to the difficulty in dissecting the mechanism of each variant using representative cell type and tissue in biological experiments. We applied an integrative method SNPsea which has been developed by investigators in Broad, to identify the most relevant cell types, tissues, and pathways to psoriasis by assessing the condition specificity affected by psoriasis genome-wide association studies-implicated genes. We employed this software on 89 single-nucleotide polymorphisms with genome-wide significance in Han Chinese and Caucasian populations. We found significant evidence for peripheral blood CD56 + NK cells (P = 1.30 × 10(-7)), Langerhans cells (P = 4.96 × 10(-6)) and CD14+ monocytes (P < 4.80 × 10(-5)) in psoriasis. We suggested that the DNase I hypersensitivity sites in CD14+ cells were active in psoriasis (P = 2.20 × 10(-16)). In addition, we discovered that biotic stimulus response, cytokine production and NF-κB pathways were significantly activated in psoriasis (P < 1.00 × 10(-5)). In conclusion, we found several innate immune cells and immune pathways in psoriasis that will help guide biological experiments for psoriasis risk variants in future.

  15. Identification of cell types, tissues and pathways affected by risk loci in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Zhao, Pan; Shen, Changbing; Shen, Songke; Zheng, Xiaodong; Zuo, Xianbo; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Xuejun; Yin, Xianyong

    2016-04-01

    Many common variants have been found associated with the risk of psoriasis, but the underlying mechanism is still largely unknown, mostly owing to the difficulty in dissecting the mechanism of each variant using representative cell type and tissue in biological experiments. We applied an integrative method SNPsea which has been developed by investigators in Broad, to identify the most relevant cell types, tissues, and pathways to psoriasis by assessing the condition specificity affected by psoriasis genome-wide association studies-implicated genes. We employed this software on 89 single-nucleotide polymorphisms with genome-wide significance in Han Chinese and Caucasian populations. We found significant evidence for peripheral blood CD56 + NK cells (P = 1.30 × 10(-7)), Langerhans cells (P = 4.96 × 10(-6)) and CD14+ monocytes (P < 4.80 × 10(-5)) in psoriasis. We suggested that the DNase I hypersensitivity sites in CD14+ cells were active in psoriasis (P = 2.20 × 10(-16)). In addition, we discovered that biotic stimulus response, cytokine production and NF-κB pathways were significantly activated in psoriasis (P < 1.00 × 10(-5)). In conclusion, we found several innate immune cells and immune pathways in psoriasis that will help guide biological experiments for psoriasis risk variants in future. PMID:26563434

  16. Does Acellular Dermal Matrix Thickness Affect Complication Rate in Tissue Expander Based Breast Reconstruction?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. While the benefits of using acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) in breast reconstruction are well described, their use has been associated with additional complications. The purpose of this study was to determine if ADM thickness affects complications in breast reconstruction. Methods. A retrospective chart review was performed including all tissue expander based breast reconstructions with AlloDerm (LifeCell, Branchburg, NJ) over 4 years. We evaluated preoperative characteristics and assessed postoperative complications including seroma, hematoma, infection, skin necrosis, and need for reintervention. We reviewed ADM thickness and time to Jackson-Pratt (JP) drain removal. Results. Fifty-five patients underwent 77 ADM-associated tissue expander based breast reconstructions, with average age of 48.1 years and average BMI of 25.9. Average ADM thickness was 1.21 mm. We found higher complication rates in the thick ADM group. Significant associations were found between smokers and skin necrosis (p < 0.0001) and seroma and prolonged JP drainage (p = 0.0004); radiated reconstructed breasts were more likely to suffer infections (p = 0.0085), and elevated BMI is a significant predictor for increased infection rate (p = 0.0037). Conclusion. We found a trend toward increased complication rates with thicker ADMs. In the future, larger prospective studies evaluating thickness may provide more information. PMID:27190645

  17. A hybrid electron and photon IMRT planning technique that lowers normal tissue integral patient dose using standard hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Rosca, Florin

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: To present a mixed electron and photon IMRT planning technique using electron beams with an energy range of 6-22 MeV and standard hardware that minimizes integral dose to patients for targets as deep as 7.5 cm. Methods: Ten brain cases, two lung, a thyroid, an abdominal, and a parotid case were planned using two planning techniques: a photon-only IMRT (IMRT) versus a mixed modality treatment (E + IMRT) that includes an enface electron beam and a photon IMRT portion that ensures a uniform target coverage. The electron beam is delivered using a regular cutout placed in an electron cone. The electron energy was chosen to provide a good trade-off between minimizing integral dose and generating a uniform, deliverable plan. The authors choose electron energies that cover the deepest part of PTV with the 65%-70% isodose line. The normal tissue integral dose, the dose for ring structures around the PTV, and the volumes of the 75%, 50%, and 25% isosurfaces were used to compare the dose distributions generated by the two planning techniques. Results: The normal tissue integral dose was lowered by about 20% by the E + IMRT plans compared to the photon-only IMRT ones for most studied cases. With the exception of lungs, the dose reduction associated to the E + IMRT plans was more pronounced further away from the target. The average dose ratio delivered to the 0-2 cm and the 2-4 cm ring structures for brain patients for the two planning techniques were 89.6% and 70.8%, respectively. The enhanced dose sparing away from the target for the brain patients can also be observed in the ratio of the 75%, 50%, and 25% isodose line volumes for the two techniques, which decreases from 85.5% to 72.6% and further to 65.1%, respectively. For lungs, the lateral electron beams used in the E + IMRT plans were perpendicular to the mostly anterior/posterior photon beams, generating much more conformal plans. Conclusions: The authors proved that even using the existing electron delivery

  18. Analysis of the genetic phylogeny of multifocal prostate cancer identifies multiple independent clonal expansions in neoplastic and morphologically normal prostate tissue.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Colin S; Eeles, Rosalind; Wedge, David C; Van Loo, Peter; Gundem, Gunes; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Kremeyer, Barbara; Butler, Adam; Lynch, Andrew G; Camacho, Niedzica; Massie, Charlie E; Kay, Jonathan; Luxton, Hayley J; Edwards, Sandra; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Dennis, Nening; Merson, Sue; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Zamora, Jorge; Corbishley, Cathy; Thomas, Sarah; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Ramakrishna, Manasa; O'Meara, Sarah; Matthews, Lucy; Clark, Jeremy; Hurst, Rachel; Mithen, Richard; Bristow, Robert G; Boutros, Paul C; Fraser, Michael; Cooke, Susanna; Raine, Keiran; Jones, David; Menzies, Andrew; Stebbings, Lucy; Hinton, Jon; Teague, Jon; McLaren, Stuart; Mudie, Laura; Hardy, Claire; Anderson, Elizabeth; Joseph, Olivia; Goody, Victoria; Robinson, Ben; Maddison, Mark; Gamble, Stephen; Greenman, Christopher; Berney, Dan; Hazell, Steven; Livni, Naomi; Fisher, Cyril; Ogden, Christopher; Kumar, Pardeep; Thompson, Alan; Woodhouse, Christopher; Nicol, David; Mayer, Erik; Dudderidge, Tim; Shah, Nimish C; Gnanapragasam, Vincent; Voet, Thierry; Campbell, Peter; Futreal, Andrew; Easton, Douglas; Warren, Anne Y; Foster, Christopher S; Stratton, Michael R; Whitaker, Hayley C; McDermott, Ultan; Brewer, Daniel S; Neal, David E

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide DNA sequencing was used to decrypt the phylogeny of multiple samples from distinct areas of cancer and morphologically normal tissue taken from the prostates of three men. Mutations were present at high levels in morphologically normal tissue distant from the cancer, reflecting clonal expansions, and the underlying mutational processes at work in morphologically normal tissue were also at work in cancer. Our observations demonstrate the existence of ongoing abnormal mutational processes, consistent with field effects, underlying carcinogenesis. This mechanism gives rise to extensive branching evolution and cancer clone mixing, as exemplified by the coexistence of multiple cancer lineages harboring distinct ERG fusions within a single cancer nodule. Subsets of mutations were shared either by morphologically normal and malignant tissues or between different ERG lineages, indicating earlier or separate clonal cell expansions. Our observations inform on the origin of multifocal disease and have implications for prostate cancer therapy in individual cases.

  19. Comparison of Radiation-Induced Normal Lung Tissue Density Changes for Patients From Multiple Institutions Receiving Conventional or Hypofractionated Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Diot, Quentin; Marks, Lawrence B.; Bentzen, Soren M.; Senan, Suresh; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Lawrence, Michael V.; Miften, Moyed; Palma, David A.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively assess changes in computed tomography (CT)–defined normal lung tissue density after conventional and hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: The pre-RT and post-RT CT scans from 118 and 111 patients receiving conventional and hypofractionated RT, respectively, at 3 institutions were registered to each other and to the 3-dimensional dose distribution to quantify dose-dependent changes in normal lung tissue density. Dose-response curves (DRC) for groups of patients receiving conventional and hypofractionated RT were generated for each institution, and the frequency of density changes >80 Hounsfield Units (HU) was modeled depending on the fractionation type using a Probit model for different follow-up times. Results: For the pooled data from all institutions, there were significant differences in the DRC between the conventional and hypofractionated groups; the respective doses resulting in 50% complication risk (TD{sub 50}) were 62 Gy (95% confidence interval [CI] 57-67) versus 36 Gy (CI 33-39) at <6 months, 48 Gy (CI 46-51) versus 31 Gy (CI 28-33) at 6-12 months, and 47 Gy (CI 45-49) versus 35 Gy (32-37) at >12 months. The corresponding m values (slope of the DRC) were 0.52 (CI 0.46-0.59) versus 0.31 (CI 0.28-0.34) at <6 months, 0.46 (CI 0.42-0.51) versus 0.30 (CI 0.26-0.34) at 6-12 months, and 0.45 (CI 0.42-0.50) versus 0.31 (CI 0.27-0.35) at >12 months (P<.05 for all comparisons). Conclusion: Compared with conventional fractionation, hypofractionation has a lower TD{sub 50} and m value, both suggesting an increased degree of normal tissue density sensitivity with hypofractionation.

  20. SU-E-J-264: Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Derived Features to Quantify Radiotherapy-Induced Normal Tissue Morbidity

    SciTech Connect

    Thor, M; Tyagi, N; Deasy, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-derived features as indicators of Radiotherapy (RT)-induced normal tissue morbidity. We also investigate the relationship between these features and RT dose in four critical structures. Methods: We demonstrate our approach for four patients treated with RT for base of tongue cancer in 2005–2007. For each patient, two MRI scans (T1-weighted pre (T1pre) and post (T1post) gadolinium contrast-enhancement) were acquired within the first six months after RT. The assessed morbidity endpoint observed in 2/4 patients was Grade 2+ CTCAEv.3 trismus. Four ipsilateral masticatory-related structures (masseter, lateral and medial pterygoid, and the temporal muscles) were delineated on both T1pre and T1post and these scans were co-registered to the treatment planning CT using a deformable demons algorithm. For each structure, the maximum and mean RT dose, and six MRI-derived features (the second order texture features entropy and homogeneity, and the first order mean, median, kurtosis, and skewness) were extracted and compared structure-wise between patients with and without trismus. All MRI-derived features were calculated as the difference between T1pre and T1post, ΔS. Results: For 5/6 features and all structures, ΔS diverged between trismus and non-trismus patients particularly for the masseter, lateral pterygoid, and temporal muscles using the kurtosis feature (−0.2 vs. 6.4 for lateral pterygoid). Both the maximum and mean RT dose in all four muscles were higher amongst the trismus patients (with the maximum dose being up to 25 Gy higher). Conclusion: Using MRI-derived features to quantify RT-induced normal tissue complications is feasible. We showed that several features are different between patients with and without morbidity and that the RT dose in all investigated structures are higher amongst patients with morbidity. MRI-derived features, therefore, has the potential to

  1. Protons Offer Reduced Normal-Tissue Exposure for Patients Receiving Postoperative Radiotherapy for Resected Pancreatic Head Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, Romaine C.; Huh, Soon N.; Prado, Karl L.; Yi, Byong Y.; Sharma, Navesh K.; Ho, Meng W.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Li, Zuofeng; Regine, William F.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the potential role for adjuvant proton-based radiotherapy (PT) for resected pancreatic head cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 2008 and November 2008, 8 consecutive patients with resected pancreatic head cancers underwent optimized intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning. IMRT plans used between 10 and 18 fields and delivered 45 Gy to the initial planning target volume (PTV) and a 5.4 Gy boost to a reduced PTV. PTVs were defined according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704 radiotherapy guidelines. Ninety-five percent of PTVs received 100% of the target dose and 100% of the PTVs received 95% of the target dose. Normal tissue constraints were as follows: right kidney V18 Gy to <70%; left kidney V18 Gy to <30%; small bowel/stomach V20 Gy to <50%, V45 Gy to <15%, V50 Gy to <10%, and V54 Gy to <5%; liver V30 Gy to <60%; and spinal cord maximum to 46 Gy. Optimized two- to three-field three-dimensional conformal proton plans were retrospectively generated on the same patients. The team generating the proton plans was blinded to the dose distributions achieved by the IMRT plans. The IMRT and proton plans were then compared. A Wilcoxon paired t-test was performed to compare various dosimetric points between the two plans for each patient. Results: All proton plans met all normal tissue constraints and were isoeffective with the corresponding IMRT plans in terms of PTV coverage. The proton plans offered significantly reduced normal-tissue exposure over the IMRT plans with respect to the following: median small bowel V20 Gy, 15.4% with protons versus 47.0% with IMRT (p = 0.0156); median gastric V20 Gy, 2.3% with protons versus 20.0% with IMRT (p = 0.0313); and median right kidney V18 Gy, 27.3% with protons versus 50.5% with IMRT (p = 0.0156). Conclusions: By reducing small bowel and stomach exposure, protons have the potential to reduce the acute and late toxicities of postoperative chemoradiation in this setting.

  2. The Potential for Dose Dumping in Normal Tissues with IMRT for Pelvic and H and N Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, Nandanuri; Mazur, Andrzej K.; Sampath, Seshadri; Osian, Adrian; Sood, Brij M.; Ravi, Akkamma; Nori, Dattatreyudu

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the potential for dose dumping in normal tissues (>85% of prescription dose) and to analyze effectiveness of techniques used in reducing dose dumping during IMRT. Two hundred sixty-five intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for 55 patients with prostate, head-and-neck (H and N), and cervix cancers with 6-MV photon beams and >5 fields were reviewed to analyze why dose dumping occurred, and the techniques used to reduce dose dumping. Various factors including gantry angles, depth of beams (100 - SSD), duration of optimization, severity of dose-volume constraints (DVC) on normal structures, and spatial location of planning treatment volumes (PTV) were reviewed in relation to dose dumping. In addition, the effect of partial contouring of rectum in beam's path on dose dumping in rectum was studied. Dose dumping occurred at d{sub max} in 17 pelvic cases (85% to 129%). This was related to (1) depth of beams (100 SSD [source-to-skin distance]), (2) PTV located between normal structures with DVC, and (3) relative lack of rectum and bladder in beam's path. Dose dumping could be reduced to 85% by changing beam angles and/or DVC for normal structures in 5 cases and by creating 'phantom structures' in 12 cases. Decreasing the iterations (duration of optimization) also reduced dose dumping and monitor units (MUs). Part of uncontoured rectum, if present in the field, received a higher dose than the contoured rectum with DVC, indicating that complete delineation of normal structures and DVC is necessary to prevent dose dumping. In H and N, when PTV extends inadvertently into air beyond the body even by a few millimeters, dose dumping occurred in beam's path (220% for 5-field and 170%, 7-field plans). Keeping PTV margins within body contour reduced this type of dose dumping. Beamlet optimization, duration of optimization, spatial location of PTV, and DVC on PTV and normal structures has the potential to cause dose dumping

  3. Quantitative sodium MRI of the human brain at 9.4 T provides assessment of tissue sodium concentration and cell volume fraction during normal aging.

    PubMed

    Thulborn, Keith; Lui, Elaine; Guntin, Jonathan; Jamil, Saad; Sun, Ziqi; Claiborne, Theodore C; Atkinson, Ian C

    2016-02-01

    Sodium ion homeostasis is a fundamental property of viable tissue, allowing the tissue sodium concentration to be modeled as the tissue cell volume fraction. The modern neuropathology literature using ex vivo tissue from selected brain regions indicates that human brain cell density remains constant during normal aging and attributes the volume loss that occurs with advancing age to changes in neuronal size and dendritic arborization. Quantitative sodium MRI performed with the enhanced sensitivity of ultrahigh-field 9.4 T has been used to investigate tissue cell volume fraction during normal aging. This cross-sectional study (n = 49; 21-80 years) finds that the in vivo tissue cell volume fraction remains constant in all regions of the brain with advancing age in individuals who remain cognitively normal, extending the ex vivo literature reporting constant neuronal cell density across the normal adult age range. Cell volume fraction, as measured by quantitative sodium MRI, is decreased in diseases of cell loss, such as stroke, on a time scale of minutes to hours, and in response to treatment of brain tumors on a time scale of days to weeks. Neurodegenerative diseases often have prodromal periods of decades in which regional neuronal cell loss occurs prior to clinical presentation. If tissue cell volume fraction can detect such early pathology, this quantitative parameter may permit the objective measurement of preclinical disease progression. This current study in cognitively normal aging individuals provides the basis for the pursuance of investigations directed towards such neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Differentiation between human normal colon mucosa and colon cancer tissue using ToF-SIMS imaging technique and principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji-Won; Shon, Hyun Kyong; Yoo, Byong Chul; Kim, In Hoo; Moon, Dae Won; Lee, Tae Geol

    2008-12-01

    Human normal colon mucosa and colon cancer tissue were studied using the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) and principal component analysis (PCA) techniques. The surfaces of the tissues were successfully cleaned by C 602+ cluster-ion beams before the ToF-SIMS images were obtained. A PCA on the spectra and images were performed to compare differences in the peaks and images of normal and cancer tissues. Significant differences in principal component 1 (PC 1) score values for normal and cancer tissues were observed, and each PC 1 loadings had a specific peak profile of proteins. In addition, the PC images obtained from the ToF-SIMS images for normal and cancer tissues were clearly distinguishable, and the amino acid fragments associated with normal and cancer tissues were found to have originated from the lamina propria region and the epithelium cells, respectively. Based on the PCA results, structural distortion of the crypts in the cancer colon tissue could be attributed to the proliferation of the cancerous epithelium cells. This work shows that the application of the ToF-SIMS imaging technique with PCA could be a useful method of obtaining valuable information for cancer analysis.

  5. Cytochrome P450 differences in normal and imposex-affected female whelk Buccinum undatum from the open North Sea.

    PubMed

    Santos, M M; ten Hallers-Tjabbes, C C; Vieira, N; Boon, J P; Porte, C

    2002-01-01

    Normal and imposex-affected female Buccinum undatum were sampled from the open North Sea at three locations, one with low, and two with high shipping densities. Cytochrome P450 components and P450 aromatase activity were determined in the microsomal fractions isolated from pooled digestive gland/gonads. Cytochrome P450 aromatase activity was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in normal females collected in the low shipping density area (1,325 +/- 295 fmol/h/mg protein) than levels from imposex animals from a high shipping density area (620 +/- 287 fmol/h/mg protein). A negative correlation was found between aromatase activity and organotin body burden (r = -0.99). Levels of CYP450, cytochrome b5 and NADPH cytochrome c reductase activity did not show differences among groups. This is the first field evidence of depressed aromatase activity in imposex affected females, although additional research under laboratory controlled conditions is required to fully understand the mechanisms underlying the development of imposex in this species.

  6. Radioprotection by WR-151327 against the late normal tissue damage in mouse hind legs from gamma ray radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Satoru; Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko

    1994-11-15

    To evaluate the protective effect of WR-151327 on late radiation-induced damaged to normal tissues in mice, the right hind legs of mice with or without WR-151327 administration (400 mg/kg) were irradiated with {sup 137}Cs gamma rays. Leg contracture and skin shrinkage assays were performed at 380 days after irradiation. The mice were killed on day 400 postirradiation and histological sections of the legs were made. The thickness of the dermis, epidermis, and skin (dermis plus epidermis) was measured. The muscular area of the legs and the posterior knee angle between the femur and tibia were also measured. The left hind legs were similarly assessed as nonirradiated controls. Group means and standard deviations were calculated and dose-response curves were drawn for every endpoint. Then, the dose modifying factor (DMF) for each endpoint and the correlations among endpoints were determined. Latae damage assayed by leg contracture and skin shrinkage progressed with increasing radiation dose. However, it was reduced by drug treatment. The significant effect was indicated for skin shrinkage by a DMF of 1.8 at 35%. The DMF for leg contracture was 1.3 at 6 mm. In the irradiated legs, epidermal hyperplasia and dermal fibrosis in the skin, muscular atrophy, and extension disturbance of the knee joint were observed. These changes progressed with increasing radiation dose. Skin damage assayed by the present endpoints was also reduced by drug treatment by DMFs of 1.4 to 1.7. However, DMFs for damage to the muscle and knee were not determined because no isoeffect was observed. There were good correlations between leg contracture or skin shrinkage and the other endpoints in both untreated and drug-treated mice. WR-151327 has the potential to protect against radiation-induced late normal tissue damage. 17 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Quantitative Evaluation of Collagen Crosslinks and Corresponding Tensile Mechanical Properties in Mouse Cervical Tissue during Normal Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kyoko; Jiang, Hongfeng; Kim, MiJung; Vink, Joy; Cremers, Serge; Paik, David; Wapner, Ronald; Mahendroo, Mala; Myers, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    The changes in the mechanical integrity of the cervix during pregnancy have implications for a successful delivery. Cervical collagens are known to remodel extensively in mice with progressing gestation leading to a soft cervix at term. During this process, mature crosslinked collagens are hypothesized to be replaced with immature less crosslinked collagens to facilitate cervical softening and ripening. To determine the mechanical role of collagen crosslinks during normal mouse cervical remodeling, tensile load-to-break tests were conducted for the following time points: nonpregnant (NP), gestation day (d) 6, 12, 15, 18 and 24 hr postpartum (PP) of the 19-day gestation period. Immature crosslinks (HLNL and DHLNL) and mature crosslinks (DPD and PYD) were measured using ultra performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MS/MS). There were no significant changes in the total immature crosslink density (HLNL+DHLNL mol per collagen mol) throughout normal mouse gestation (range: 0.31–0.49). Total mature crosslink density (PYD+DPD mol per collagen mol) decreased significantly in early softening from d6 to d15 (d6: 0.17, d12: 0.097, d15: 0.026) and did not decrease with further gestation. The maturity ratio (total mature to total immature crosslinks) significantly decreased in early softening from d6 to d15 (d6: 0.2, d15: 0.074). All of the measured crosslinks correlated significantly with a measure of tissue stiffness and strength, with the exception of the immature crosslink HLNL. This data provides quantitative evidence to support the hypothesis that as mature crosslinked collagens decline, they are replaced by immature collagens to facilitate increased tissue compliance in the early softening period from d6 to d15. PMID:25397407

  8. A simple analysis of extinction spectra of cancerous and normal prostate tissues in near infrared range using a size discrete particle distribution and Mie scattering model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kenneth J.; Chen, Jun

    2015-03-01

    The extinction spectra and optical coefficients of human cancerous and normal prostate tissues were investigated in the spectral range of 750 nm - 860 nm. The scattering coefficient (μs) was determined from the extinction measurements on thin prostate tissue and Beer's law. The absorption coefficient (μa) and the reduced scattering coefficient (μs') were extracted from integrate sphere intensity measurements on prostate tissue of which the thickness is in the multiple scattering range. The anisotropy factor (g) was calculated using the extracted values of μs and μs'. A micro-optical model of soft biological tissue was introduced to simulate the numerical computation of the absolute magnitudes of its scattering coefficients from the refractive index and a particle distribution function based on the Mie theory. A key assumption of the model is that the refractive index variations caused by microscopic tissue elements can be treated as particles with sizes distributed according to a skewed log-normal distribution function. The particle distribution and mean particle size of the two types of tissues were then calculated. Results show that the mean diameter of the particle size of cancerous tissue is larger than that of the cancerous tissue, which is responsible for larger reduced scattering coefficient of normal tissue in comparison with cancerous tissue. The results can be explained the change of tissue during prostate cancer evolution defined by Gleason Grade. The difference of the particles distribution and optical coefficients of cancerous and normal prostate tissues may present a potential criterion for prostate cancer detection.

  9. Selection of Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn under Abiotic Stresses, Hormone Treatments and Different Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yucheng; Luo, Jun; Xu, Sheng; Wang, Wei; Liu, Tingting; Han, Chao; Chen, Yijun; Kong, Lingyi

    2016-01-01

    Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn is one of the main traditional Chinese medicines producing coumarins and plenty of literatures are focused on the biosynthesis of coumarins. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is a widely used method in studying the biosynthesis pathway and the selection of reference genes plays a crucial role in accurate normalization. To facilitate biosynthesis study of coumarins, twelve candidate reference genes were selected from the transcriptome database of P. praeruptorum according to previous studies. Then, BestKeeper, geNoFrm and NormFinder were used for selecting stably expressed reference genes in different tissues and under various stress treatments. The results indicated that, among the twelve candidate reference genes, the SAND family protein (SAND), actin 2 (ACT2), ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (UBC9), protein phosphatase 2A gene (PP2A) and polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTBP1) were the most stable reference genes under different experimental treatments, while glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and tubulin beta-6 (TUB6) were the least stable genes. In addition, the suitability of SAND, TIP41-like protein (TIP41), UBC9, ACT2, TUB6 and their combination as reference genes were confirmed by normalizing the expression of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO) in different treatments. This work is the first survey of the stability of reference genes in P. praeruptorum and provides guidelines to obtain more accurate qRT-PCR results in P. praeruptorum and other plant species. PMID:27022972

  10. Selection of Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn under Abiotic Stresses, Hormone Treatments and Different Tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yucheng; Luo, Jun; Xu, Sheng; Wang, Wei; Liu, Tingting; Han, Chao; Chen, Yijun; Kong, Lingyi

    2016-01-01

    Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn is one of the main traditional Chinese medicines producing coumarins and plenty of literatures are focused on the biosynthesis of coumarins. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is a widely used method in studying the biosynthesis pathway and the selection of reference genes plays a crucial role in accurate normalization. To facilitate biosynthesis study of coumarins, twelve candidate reference genes were selected from the transcriptome database of P. praeruptorum according to previous studies. Then, BestKeeper, geNoFrm and NormFinder were used for selecting stably expressed reference genes in different tissues and under various stress treatments. The results indicated that, among the twelve candidate reference genes, the SAND family protein (SAND), actin 2 (ACT2), ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (UBC9), protein phosphatase 2A gene (PP2A) and polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTBP1) were the most stable reference genes under different experimental treatments, while glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and tubulin beta-6 (TUB6) were the least stable genes. In addition, the suitability of SAND, TIP41-like protein (TIP41), UBC9, ACT2, TUB6 and their combination as reference genes were confirmed by normalizing the expression of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO) in different treatments. This work is the first survey of the stability of reference genes in P. praeruptorum and provides guidelines to obtain more accurate qRT-PCR results in P. praeruptorum and other plant species.

  11. The metabolism of Tay-Sachs ganglioside: catabolic studies with lysosomal enzymes from normal and Tay-Sachs brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Tallman, J F; Johnson, W G; Brady, R O

    1972-09-01

    The catabolism of Tay-Sachs ganglioside, N-acetylgalactosaminyl- (N-acetylneuraminosyl) -galactosylglucosylceramide, has been studied in lysosomal preparations from normal human brain and brain obtained at biopsy from Tay-Sachs patients. Utilizing Tay-Sachs ganglioside labeled with (14)C in the N-acetylgalactosaminyl portion or (3)H in the N-acetylneuraminosyl portion, the catabolism of Tay-Sachs ganglioside may be initiated by either the removal of the molecule of N-acetylgalactosamine or N-acetylneuraminic acid. The activity of the N-acetylgalactosamine-cleaving enzyme (hexosaminidase) is drastically diminished in such preparations from Tay-Sachs brain whereas the activity of the N-acetylneuraminic acid-cleaving enzyme (neuraminidase) is at a normal level. Total hexosaminidase activity as measured with an artificial fluorogenic substrate is increased in tissues obtained from patients with the B variant form of Tay-Sachs disease and it is virtually absent in the O-variant patients. The addition of purified neuraminidase and various purified hexosaminidases exerted only a minimal synergistic effect on the hydrolysis of Tay-Sachs ganglioside in the lysosomal preparations from the control or patient with the O variant of Tay-Sachs disease.

  12. The expression of histamine H4 receptor mRNA in the skin and other tissues of normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Eisenschenk, Melissa N C; Torres, Sheila M F; Oliveira, Simone; Been, Clint S

    2011-10-01

    The histamine 4 (H(4)) receptor was first cloned and characterized in 2000 using the human H(3) receptor DNA sequence. The H(4) receptor has been shown to participate in various aspects of inflammation, such as chemotaxis, upregulation of adhesion molecule expression and modulation of cytokine secretion. The primary goal of this study was to determine whether H(4) receptor mRNA is expressed in normal canine skin by performing an RT-PCR. An additional goal was to determine the expression of this receptor in the colon, liver, spleen and kidney. Tissues were collected from five healthy, young-adult pit bull dogs. Samples were immediately placed in RNAlater(®) solution and stored at -20°C until processed. The amplified products in all skin samples in addition to the colon, liver, spleen and kidney (variable expression) had the expected size of 400-500 bp. The sequenced amplicons matched the National Center for Biotechnology Information published sequence for the canine H(4) receptor. The study results showed that canine normal skin expresses the H(4) receptor mRNA. Further studies using immunohistochemistry should be conducted to demonstrate the expression of the H(4) receptor at the protein level and to localize the expression of this receptor in the skin. PMID:21392139

  13. Ectopic Expression of WRINKLED1 Affects Fatty Acid Homeostasis in Brachypodium distachyon Vegetative Tissues1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Munz, Jacob; Cass, Cynthia; Zienkiewicz, Agnieszka; Kong, Que; Ma, Wei; Sedbrook, John; Benning, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG) is a storage lipid used for food purposes and as a renewable feedstock for biodiesel production. WRINKLED1 (WRI1) is a transcription factor that governs fatty acid (FA) synthesis and, indirectly, TAG accumulation in oil-storing plant tissues, and its ectopic expression has led to TAG accumulation in vegetative tissues of different dicotyledonous plants. The ectopic expression of BdWRI1 in the grass Brachypodium distachyon induced the transcription of predicted genes involved in glycolysis and FA biosynthesis, and TAG content was increased up to 32.5-fold in 8-week-old leaf blades. However, the ectopic expression of BdWRI1 also caused cell death in leaves, which has not been observed previously in dicotyledonous plants such as Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Lipid analysis indicated that the free FA content was 2-fold elevated in BdWRI1-expressing leaf blades of B. distachyon. The transcription of predicted genes involved in β-oxidation was induced. In addition, linoleic FA treatment caused cell death in B. distachyon leaf blades, an effect that was reversed by the addition of the FA biosynthesis inhibitor cerulenin. Taken together, ectopic expression of BdWRI1 in B. distachyon enhances FA biosynthesis and TAG accumulation in leaves, as expected, but also leads to increased free FA content, which has cytotoxic effects leading to cell death. Thus, while WRI appears to ubiquitously affect FA biosynthesis and TAG accumulation in diverse plants, its ectopic expression can lead to undesired side effects depending on the context of the specific lipid metabolism of the respective plant species. PMID:26419778

  14. Assessment of the effects of ultrasound-mediated glucose on permeability of normal, benign, and cancerous human lung tissues with the Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Huajiang; Wu, Guoyong; Guo, Zhouyi; Yang, Hongqin; He, Yonghong; Xie, Shusen; Guo, Xiao

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of ultrasound-mediated analyte diffusion on permeability of normal, benign, and cancerous human lung tissue in vitro and to find more effective sonophoretic (SP) delivery in combination with the optical clearing agents (OCAs) method to distinguish normal and diseased lung tissues. The permeability coefficients of SP in combination with OCAs diffusion in lung tissue were measured with Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). 30% glucose and SP with a frequency of 1 MHz and an intensity of 0.80 W/cm2 over a 3 cm probe was simultaneously applied for 15 min. Experimental results show that the mean permeability coefficients of 30% glucose/SP were found to be (2.01±0.21)×10-5 cm/s from normal lung (NL) tissue, (2.75±0.28)×10-5 cm/s from lung benign granulomatosis (LBG) tissue, (4.53±0.49)×10-5 cm/s from lung adenocarcinoma tumor (LAT) tissue, and (5.81±0.62)×10-5 cm/s from lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) tissue, respectively. The permeability coefficients of 30% glucose/SP increase approximately 36.8%, 125.4%, and 189.1% for the LBG, LAT, and LSCC tissue compared with that for the NL tissue, respectively. There were statistically significant differences in permeability coefficients of 30% glucose/SP between LBG and NL tissue (p<0.05), between LAT and NL tissue (p<0.05), and between LSCC and NL tissue (p<0.05). The results suggest that the OCT functional imaging technique to combine an ultrasound-OCAs combination method could become a powerful tool in early diagnosis and monitoring of changed microstructure of pathologic human lung tissue.

  15. Affective responses to increasing levels of exercise intensity in normal-weight, overweight, and obese middle-aged women.

    PubMed

    Ekkekakis, Panteleimon; Lind, Erik; Vazou, Spiridoula

    2010-01-01

    At least 60 min of daily physical activity (PA) are recommended for weight control, a target achieved by only 3% of obese (OB) women. The purposes of this study were to examine (i) the affective responses of normal-weight (NW), overweight (OW), and OB middle-aged sedentary women to exercise of increasing intensity and (ii) the relationship of affective responses to self-efficacy and social physique anxiety. The women participated in a graded treadmill protocol to volitional exhaustion while providing ratings of pleasure-displeasure and perceived activation each minute. The Activation Deactivation Adjective Check List (AD ACL) was also completed before and after exercise. The affective responses of NW and OW women did not differ. However OB women gave lower pleasure ratings during the incremental protocol and reported lower Energy scores immediately after the protocol. Social physique anxiety, but not self-efficacy, was inversely related to pleasure and energy. The lower levels of pleasure and energy experienced by OB than nonobese women could account in part for their dramatically low levels of PA participation. Modifying the cognitive antecedents of social physique anxiety might be a useful intervention strategy.

  16. Depth-resolved monitoring of diffusion of hyperosmotic agents in normal and malignant human esophagus tissues using optical coherence tomography in-vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Qingliang; Guo Zhouyi; Wei Huajiang; Yang Hongqin; Xie Shusen

    2011-10-31

    Depth-resolved monitoring with differentiation and quantification of glucose diffusion in healthy and abnormal esophagus tissues has been studied in vitro. Experiments have been performed using human normal esophagus and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues by the optical coherence tomography (OCT). The images have been continuously acquired for 120 min in the experiments, and the depth-resolved and average permeability coefficients of the 40 % glucose solution have been calculated by the OCT amplitude (OCTA) method. We demonstrate the capability of the OCT technique for depth-resolved monitoring, differentiation, and quantifying of glucose diffusion in normal esophagus and ESCC tissues. It is found that the permeability coefficients of the 40 % glucose solution are not uniform throughout the normal esophagus and ESCC tissues and increase from (3.30 {+-} 0.09) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} and (1.57 {+-} 0.05) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} at the mucous membrane of normal esophagus and ESCC tissues to (1.82 {+-} 0.04) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} and (3.53 {+-} 0.09) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1} at the submucous layer approximately 742 {mu}m away from the epithelial surface of normal esophagus and ESCC tissues, respectively. (optical coherence tomography)

  17. Depth-resolved monitoring of diffusion of hyperosmotic agents in normal and malignant human esophagus tissues using optical coherence tomography in-vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qingliang; Guo, Zhouyi; Wei, Huajiang; Yang, Hongqin; Xie, Shusen

    2011-10-01

    Depth-resolved monitoring with differentiation and quantification of glucose diffusion in healthy and abnormal esophagus tissues has been studied in vitro. Experiments have been performed using human normal esophagus and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues by the optical coherence tomography (OCT). The images have been continuously acquired for 120 min in the experiments, and the depth-resolved and average permeability coefficients of the 40 % glucose solution have been calculated by the OCT amplitude (OCTA) method. We demonstrate the capability of the OCT technique for depth-resolved monitoring, differentiation, and quantifying of glucose diffusion in normal esophagus and ESCC tissues. It is found that the permeability coefficients of the 40 % glucose solution are not uniform throughout the normal esophagus and ESCC tissues and increase from (3.30 ± 0.09) × 10-6 and (1.57 ± 0.05) × 10-5 cm s-1 at the mucous membrane of normal esophagus and ESCC tissues to (1.82 ± 0.04) × 10-5 and (3.53 ± 0.09) × 10-5 cm s-1 at the submucous layer approximately 742 μm away from the epithelial surface of normal esophagus and ESCC tissues, respectively.

  18. Effect of bax, bcl-2 and bcl-xL on regulating apoptosis in tissues of normal liver and hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiao-Zhong; Shao, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Min-Pei; Xu, Jian-Hua; Ren, Li-Nan; Zhao, Jia-Jun; Li, Hong-Yu; Wang, Di

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of bax, bcl-2 and bcl-xL mRNA in the tissues of normal liver and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and analyze the relationship between the expression of bax, bcl-2 and bcl-xL mRNA and clinical parameters of HCC patients. METHODS: The expression of bax, bcl-2 and bcl-xL mRNA of normal liver and HCC was measured by Northern blot. Statistical analyses were made by t test and correlation analysis. RESULTS: A very low mRNA level was indicated at bax, bcl-2 and bcl-xL in the HCC tissues in contrast to the tissues of normal liver by Northern blot analysis. The analyses of mRNA level revealed that HCC tissues exhibited a mean 7.6-fold decrease in bax, 4.2-fold in bcl-2 and 3.5-fold in bcl-xL in comparison with normal control tissues, respectively. Positive correlation was found between bax and bcl-xL (r = 0.7061,P < 0.01). There was no significance between the mRNA expression of these three genes and age, gender, tumor differentiation and tumor stage of HCC patients . CONCLUSION: The results are consistent with the fact that apoptosis rarely occurs in normal livers but increases in HCC, indicating that bcl-2 and bcl-xL may play a very important role in regulating the apoptosis of normal liver and HCC. PMID:12439925

  19. Cell culture density affects the proliferation activity of human adipose tissue stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Seong; Lee, Myoung Woo; Ko, Young Jong; Chun, Yong Hoon; Kim, Hyung Joon; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe; Yoo, Keon Hee

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of cell density on the proliferation activity of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from adipose tissue (AT-MSCs) over time in culture. Passage #4 (P4) and #12 (P12) AT-MSCs from two donors were plated at a density of 200 (culture condition 1, CC1) or 5000 (culture condition 2, CC2) cells cm(-2) . After 7 days of incubation, P4 and P12 AT-MSCs cultured in CC1 were thin and spindle-shaped, whereas those cultured in CC2 had extensive cell-to-cell contacts and an expanded cell volume. In addition, P4 and P12 AT-MSCs in CC1 divided more than three times, while those in CC2 divided less than once on average. Flow cytometric analysis using 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate N-succinimidyl ester dye showed that the fluorescence intensity of AT-MSCs was lower in CC1 than in CC2. Furthermore, expression of proliferation-associated genes, such as CDC45L, CDC20A and KIF20A, in P4 AT-MSCs was higher in CC1 than in CC2, and this difference was also observed in P12 AT-MSCs. These data demonstrated that cell culture density affects the proliferation activity of MSCs, suggesting that it is feasible to design a strategy to prepare suitable MSCs using specific culture conditions.

  20. Dietary n-3 PUFA affect lipid metabolism and tissue function-related genes in bovine muscle.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Beate; Hocquette, Jean-Francois; Cassar-Malek, Isabelle; Nuernberg, Gerd; Nuernberg, Karin

    2012-09-01

    Gene expression profiles of bovine longissimus muscle as affected by dietary n-3 v. n-6 fatty acid (FA) intervention were analysed by microarray pre-screening of >3000 muscle biology/meat quality-related genes as well as subsequent quantitative RT-PCR gene expression validation of genes encoding lipogenesis-related transcription factors (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β, sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor 1), key-lipogenic enzymes (acetyl-CoA carboxylase α (ACACA), fatty acid synthase (FASN), stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD)), lipid storage-associated proteins (adipose differentiation-related protein (ADFP)) and muscle biology-related proteins (cholinergic receptor, nicotinic, α1, farnesyl diphosphate farnesyl transferase 1, sema domain 3C (SEMA3C)). Down-regulation of ACACA (P = 0·00), FASN (P = 0·09) and SCD (P = 0·02) gene expression upon an n-3 FA intervention directly corresponded to reduced SFA, MUFA and total FA concentrations in longissimus muscle, whereas changes in ADFP (P = 0·00) and SEMA3C (P = 0·05) gene expression indicated improved muscle function via enhanced energy metabolism, vasculogenesis, innervation and mediator synthesis. The present study highlights the significance of dietary n-3 FA intervention on muscle development, maintenance and function, which are relevant for meat quality tailoring of bovine tissues and modulating animal production-relevant physiological processes.

  1. Deletion of the huntingtin proline-rich region does not significantly affect normal huntingtin function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Neveklovska, Michelle; Clabough, Erin B. D.; Steffan, Joan S.; Zeitlin, Scott O.

    2012-01-01

    The N-terminus of Huntingtin, the protein encoded by the Huntington’s disease gene, contains a stretch of polyglutamine residues that is expanded in Huntington’s disease. The polyglutamine stretch is flanked by two conserved protein domains in vertebrates: an N1-17 domain, and a proline-rich region (PRR). The PRR can modulate the structure of the adjacent polyglutamine stretch, and is a binding site for several interacting proteins. To determine the role of the PRR in Huntingtin function, we have generated a knock-in allele of the mouse Huntington’s disease gene homolog that expresses full-length normal huntingtin lacking the PRR. Mice that are homozygous for the huntingtin PRR deletion are born at the normal Mendelian frequency, suggesting that the PRR is not required for essential huntingtin functions during embryonic development. Moreover, adult homozygous mutants did not exhibit any significant differences from wild-type controls in general motor function and motor learning. However, 18 month-old male, but not female, homozygous PRR deletion mutants exhibited deficits in the Morris water task, suggesting that age-dependent spatial learning and memory may be affected in a sex-specific fashion by the huntingtin PRR deletion. PMID:22956985

  2. Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) deficiencies affect expression of lipolytic activities in mouse adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Morak, Maria; Schmidinger, Hannes; Riesenhuber, Gernot; Rechberger, Gerald N; Kollroser, Manfred; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Kronenberg, Florian; Hermetter, Albin

    2012-12-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) are key enzymes involved in intracellular degradation of triacylglycerols. It was the aim of this study to elucidate how the deficiency in one of these proteins affects the residual lipolytic proteome in adipose tissue. For this purpose, we compared the lipase patterns of brown and white adipose tissue from ATGL (-/-) and HSL (-/-) mice using differential activity-based gel electrophoresis. This method is based on activity-recognition probes possessing the same substrate analogous structure but carrying different fluorophores for specific detection of the enzyme patterns of two different tissues in one electrophoresis gel. We found that ATGL-deficiency in brown adipose tissue had a profound effect on the expression levels of other lipolytic and esterolytic enzymes in this tissue, whereas HSL-deficiency hardly showed any effect in brown adipose tissue. Neither ATGL- nor HSL-deficiency greatly influenced the lipase patterns in white adipose tissue. Enzyme activities of mouse tissues on acylglycerol substrates were analyzed as well, showing that ATGL-and HSL-deficiencies can be compensated for at least in part by other enzymes. The proteins that responded to ATGL-deficiency in brown adipose tissue were overexpressed and their activities on acylglycerols were analyzed. Among these enzymes, Es1, Es10, and Es31-like represent lipase candidates as they catalyze the hydrolysis of long-chain acylglycerols.

  3. Length of FMR1 repeat alleles within the normal range does not substantially affect the risk of early menopause

    PubMed Central

    Ruth, Katherine S.; Bennett, Claire E.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Weedon, Michael N.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Murray, Anna

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Is the length of FMR1 repeat alleles within the normal range associated with the risk of early menopause? SUMMARY ANSWER The length of repeat alleles within the normal range does not substantially affect risk of early menopause. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY There is a strong, well-established relationship between length of premutation FMR1 alleles and age at menopause, suggesting that this relationship could continue into the normal range. Within the normal range, there is conflicting evidence; differences in ovarian reserve have been identified with FMR1 repeat allele length, but a recent population-based study did not find any association with age at menopause as a quantitative trait. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION We analysed cross-sectional baseline survey data collected at recruitment from 2004 to 2010 from a population-based, prospective epidemiological cohort study of >110 000 women to investigate whether repeat allele length was associated with early menopause. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHOD We included 4333 women from the Breakthrough Generations Study (BGS), of whom 2118 were early menopause cases (menopause under 46 years) and 2215 were controls. We analysed the relationship between length of FMR1 alleles and early menopause using logistic regression with allele length as continuous and categorical variables. We also conducted analyses with the outcome age at menopause as a quantitative trait as well as appropriate sensitivity and exploratory analyses. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE There was no association of the shorter or longer FMR1 allele or their combined genotype with the clinically relevant end point of early menopause in our main analysis. Likewise, there were no associations with age at menopause as a quantitative trait in our secondary analysis. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION Women with homozygous alleles in the normal range may have undetected FMR1 premutation alleles, although there was no evidence to suggest this. We

  4. Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling of Radiation-Induced Hypothyroidism After Head-and-Neck Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhshandeh, Mohsen; Hashemi, Bijan; Mahdavi, Seied Rabi Mehdi; Nikoofar, Alireza; Vasheghani, Maryam; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the dose-response relationship of the thyroid for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in head-and-neck radiation therapy, according to 6 normal tissue complication probability models, and to find the best-fit parameters of the models. Methods and Materials: Sixty-five patients treated with primary or postoperative radiation therapy for various cancers in the head-and-neck region were prospectively evaluated. Patient serum samples (tri-iodothyronine, thyroxine, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free tri-iodothyronine, and free thyroxine) were measured before and at regular time intervals until 1 year after the completion of radiation therapy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the patients' thyroid gland were derived from their computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning data. Hypothyroidism was defined as increased TSH (subclinical hypothyroidism) or increased TSH in combination with decreased free thyroxine and thyroxine (clinical hypothyroidism). Thyroid DVHs were converted to 2 Gy/fraction equivalent doses using the linear-quadratic formula with {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy. The evaluated models included the following: Lyman with the DVH reduced to the equivalent uniform dose (EUD), known as LEUD; Logit-EUD; mean dose; relative seriality; individual critical volume; and population critical volume models. The parameters of the models were obtained by fitting the patients' data using a maximum likelihood analysis method. The goodness of fit of the models was determined by the 2-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Ranking of the models was made according to Akaike's information criterion. Results: Twenty-nine patients (44.6%) experienced hypothyroidism. None of the models was rejected according to the evaluation of the goodness of fit. The mean dose model was ranked as the best model on the basis of its Akaike's information criterion value. The D{sub 50} estimated from the models was approximately 44 Gy. Conclusions: The implemented normal tissue

  5. Localization of 5'-ribonucleotide phosphohydrolase in regenerating (and normal) limb tissues of the adult newt Notophthalmus viridescens.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A J; Woerthwein, K F

    1975-08-11

    The regenerating forelimb of the adult newt, Notophthalmus viridescens was investigated for 5'-nucleotidase (5' ribonucleotide phosphohydrolase, 3.1.3.5) acitivity. The newt's humeri were surgically removed, and after a twenty-one-day recovery period, the forelimbs amputated above the elbows. Regenerates were sampled at predetermined times for specific phases in the progress of regeneration, frozen, sectioned in a cryostat, and the sections fixed in 10% cold formol calcium. The Wachstein and Meisel [25] lead procedure at neutral pH was used predominately in these experiments, although tests were also conducted with Gomori's [14] calcium, Allen's [21] highly alkaline procedures. The substrates used to obtain specific enzyme reactions were adenine, cytosine, guanine, uracil and inosine 5'-monophosphate nucleotides. Sodium beta-glycerophosphate served as a non-specific phosphomonoesterase substrate, distilled water replaced substrate, and inhibitors such as zinc and cyanide ions were used as control measures to assist in increasing the precision in interpreting the results obtained. The most reactive 5'-nucleotidase (5'-Nase) loci were in the walls of the blood vascular system, mysial and neural sheaths, dermis, and periosteum: the principal cells involved were macrophages, endothelium of blood vessels, and fibrocytes of connective tissues. A moderate enzyme response was elicited from secretory cells of some of the subcutaneous glands, hypertrophied chondrocytes and osteogenic centers, chondrocytes in the articular regions and within red blood cells and leucocytes. Normal, injured and degenerating, or regenerating striated muscle and nerve fibers were judged unreactive for 5'-Nase. The epidermis and wound epithelium displayed negative responses for 5'-Nase. Cells forming the regeneration blastema were 5'-Nase reactive during the early formative phase, but with growth and development of the blastema into bulb and conic forms, these cells did not respond for this enzyme

  6. Comparative pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution profiles of four major bioactive components in normal and hepatic fibrosis rats after oral administration of Fuzheng Huayu recipe.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Liu, Shan; Wang, Chang-Hong; Tao, Yan-Yan; Zhou, Hua; Liu, Cheng-Hai

    2015-10-10

    Fuzheng Huayu recipe (FZHY) is a herbal product for the treatment of liver fibrosis approved by the Chinese State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA), but its pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution had not been investigated. In this study, the liver fibrotic model was induced with intraperitoneal injection of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), and FZHY was given orally to the model and normal rats. The plasma pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution profiles of four major bioactive components from FZHY were analyzed in the normal and fibrotic rat groups using an ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method. Results revealed that the bioavailabilities of danshensu (DSS), salvianolic acid B (SAB) and rosmarinic acid (ROS) in liver fibrotic rats increased 1.49, 3.31 and 2.37-fold, respectively, compared to normal rats. There was no obvious difference in the pharmacokinetics of amygdalin (AMY) between the normal and fibrotic rats. The tissue distribution of DSS, SAB, and AMY trended to be mostly in the kidney and lung. The distribution of DSS, SAB, and AMY in liver tissue of the model rats was significantly decreased compared to the normal rats. Significant differences in the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution profiles of DSS, ROS, SAB and AMY were observed in rats with hepatic fibrosis after oral administration of FZHY. These results provide a meaningful basis for developing a clinical dosage regimen in the treatment of hepatic fibrosis by FZHY. PMID:26048667

  7. Alkaline phosphatase (tissue-nonspecific isoenzyme) is a phosphoethanolamine and pyridoxal-5'-phosphate ectophosphatase: normal and hypophosphatasia fibroblast study.

    PubMed Central

    Fedde, K N; Whyte, M P

    1990-01-01

    To clarify its physiologic role, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was examined in normal skin fibroblasts and was shown to be the tissue-nonspecific (TNS) isoenzyme type (as evidenced by heat and inhibition profiles) and to be active toward millimolar concentrations of the putative natural substrates phosphoethanolamine (PEA) and pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP). Fibroblast ALP has a low-affinity activity, with a distinctly alkaline pH optimum (9.3), toward 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate (4-MUP), PEA, and PLP but a more physiologic pH optimum (8.3) toward physiologic concentrations (micromolar) of PEA and PLP. Normal fibroblast ALP is linked to the outside of the plasma membrane, since in intact cell monolayers (1) dephosphorylation rates of the membrane-impermeable substrates PEA and PLP in the medium at physiologic pH were similar to those observed with disrupted cell monolayers, (2) brief exposure to acidic medium resulted in greater than 90% inactivation of the total ALP activity, and (3) digestion with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) released about 80% of the ALP activity. Hypophosphatasia fibroblasts were markedly deficient (2%-5% control values) in alkaline and physiologic ALP activity when 4-MUP, PLP, and PEA were used as substrate. The majority of the detectable ALP activity, however, appeared to be properly lipid anchored in ecto-orientation. Thus, our findings of genetic deficiency of PEA- and PLP-phosphatase activity in hypophosphatasia fibroblasts, as well as our biochemical findings, indicate that TNS-ALP acts physiologically as a lipid-anchored PEA and PLP ectophosphatase. PMID:2220817

  8. Plant maturity and nitrogen fertilization affected fructan metabolism in harvestable tissues of timothy (Phleum pratense L.).

    PubMed

    Ould-Ahmed, Marouf; Decau, Marie-Laure; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; Lafrenière, Carole; Drouin, Pascal

    2014-10-15

    Timothy (Phleum pratense L.) is an important grass forage used for pasture, hay, and silage in regions with cool and humid growth seasons. One of the factors affecting the nutritive value of this grass is the concentration of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC), mainly represented by fructans. NSC concentration depends on multiple factors, making it hardly predictable. To provide a better understanding of NSC metabolism in timothy, the effects of maturity stage and nitrogen (N) fertilization level on biomass, NSC and N-compound concentrations were investigated in the tissues used for forage (leaf blades and stems surrounded by leaf sheaths) of hydroponically grown plants. Moreover, activities and relative expression level of enzymes involved in fructan metabolism were measured in the same tissues. Forage biomass was not altered by the fertilization level but was strongly modified by the stage of development. It increased from vegetative to heading stages while leaf-to-stem biomass ratio decreased. Total NSC concentration, which was not altered by N fertilization level, increased between heading and anthesis due to an accumulation of fructans in leaf blades. Fructan metabolizing enzyme activities (fructosyltransferase-FT and fructan exohydrolase-FEH) were not or only slightly altered by both maturity stage and N fertilization level. Conversely, the relative transcript levels of genes coding for enzymes involved in fructan metabolism were modified by N supply (PpFT1 and Pp6-FEH1) or maturity stage (PpFT2). The relative transcript level of PpFT1 was the highest in low N plants while that of Pp6-FEH1 was the highest in high N plants. Morevoer, transcript level of PpFT1 was negatively correlated with nitrate concentration while that of PpFT2 was positively correlated with sucrose concentration. This distinct regulation of the two genes coding for 6-sucrose:fructan fructosyltransferase (6-SFT) may allow a fine adequation of C allocation towards fructan synthesis in

  9. Technical issues affecting the implementation of US Environmental Protection Agency's proposed fish tissue-based aquatic criterion for selenium.

    PubMed

    Lemly, A Dennis; Skorupa, Joseph P

    2007-10-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency is developing a national water quality criterion for selenium that is based on concentrations of the element in fish tissue. Although this approach offers advantages over the current water-based regulations, it also presents new challenges with respect to implementation. A comprehensive protocol that answers the "what, where, and when" is essential with the new tissue-based approach in order to ensure proper acquisition of data that apply to the criterion. Dischargers will need to understand selenium transport, cycling, and bioaccumulation in order to effectively monitor for the criterion and, if necessary, develop site-specific standards. This paper discusses 11 key issues that affect the implementation of a tissue-based criterion, ranging from the selection of fish species to the importance of hydrological units in the sampling design. It also outlines a strategy that incorporates both water column and tissue-based approaches. A national generic safety-net water criterion could be combined with a fish tissue-based criterion for site-specific implementation. For the majority of waters nationwide, National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permitting and other activities associated with the Clean Water Act could continue without the increased expense of sampling and interpreting biological materials. Dischargers would do biotic sampling intermittently (not a routine monitoring burden) on fish tissue relative to the fish tissue criterion. Only when the fish tissue criterion is exceeded would a full site-specific analysis including development of intermedia translation factors be necessary. PMID:18046804

  10. Feasibility of a novel deformable image registration technique to facilitate classification, targeting, and monitoring of tumor and normal tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Kristy K. . E-mail: kristy.brock@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Dawson, Laura A.; Sharpe, Michael B.; Moseley, Douglas J.; Jaffray, David A.

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of a biomechanical-based deformable image registration technique for the integration of multimodality imaging, image guided treatment, and response monitoring. Methods and Materials: A multiorgan deformable image registration technique based on finite element modeling (FEM) and surface projection alignment of selected regions of interest with biomechanical material and interface models has been developed. FEM also provides an inherent method for direct tracking specified regions through treatment and follow-up. Results: The technique was demonstrated on 5 liver cancer patients. Differences of up to 1 cm of motion were seen between the diaphragm and the tumor center of mass after deformable image registration of exhale and inhale CT scans. Spatial differences of 5 mm or more were observed for up to 86% of the surface of the defined tumor after deformable image registration of the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance images. Up to 6.8 mm of motion was observed for the tumor after deformable image registration of the CT and cone-beam CT scan after rigid registration of the liver. Deformable registration of the CT to the follow-up CT allowed a more accurate assessment of tumor response. Conclusions: This biomechanical-based deformable image registration technique incorporates classification, targeting, and monitoring of tumor and normal tissue using one methodology.

  11. A comparison of tissue engineering based repair of calvarial defects using adipose stem cells from normal and osteoporotic rats

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Ming; Li, Jingting; McConda, David B.; Wen, Sijin; Clovis, Nina B.; Danley, Suzanne S.

    2015-01-01

    Repairing large bone defects presents a significant challenge, especially in those people who have a limited regenerative capacity such as in osteoporotic (OP) patients. The aim of this study was to compare adipose stem cells (ASCs) from both normal (NORM) and ovariectomized (OVX) rats in osteogenic potential using both in vitro and in vivo models. After successful establishment of a rat OP model, we found that ASCs from OVX rats exhibited a comparable proliferation capacity to those from NORM rats but had significantly higher adipogenic and relatively lower osteogenic potential. Thirty-two weeks post-implantation with poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) alone or PLGA seeded with osteogenic-induced ASCs for critical-size calvarial defects, the data from Herovici’s collagen staining and micro-computed tomography suggested that the implantation of ASC-PLGA constructs exhibited a higher bone volume density compared to the PLGA alone group, especially in the NORM rat group. Intriguingly, the defects from OVX rats exhibited a higher bone volume density compared to NORM rats, especially for implantation of the PLGA alone group. Our results indicated that ASC based tissue constructs are more beneficial for the repair of calvarial defects in NORM rats while implantation of PLGA scaffold contributed to defect regeneration in OVX rats. PMID:25940459

  12. Differential action on cancer and normal tissue by adrenochrome monoaminoguanidine methanesulfonate and cytochrome C combined with radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsugawa, S. ); Sugahara, T. )

    1994-06-15

    The possibility that radioprotective effects on potent natural killer (NK) cells by adrenochrome monoaminoguanidine methanesulfonate (AMM) + cytochrome C during radiotherapy (RT) for lung cancer might result in the radiosensitization of human lung cancer cells in vivo is examined. Human lung cancer xenografts in the right hind legs of KSN mice (10 weeks old) were locally irradiated with 20 Gy of X ray. AMM (10 mg/kg/day) and/or cytochrome C (CCC) (5 mg/kg/day) were given intraperitoneally immediately before or after RT, followed by daily administration for 4 days. Natural killer activities of host splenocytes were also tested with the standard [sup 51]Cr releasing assay with YAC-1 cells as target cells. In a clinical study, 65 patients with lung cancer were treated with more than 50 Gy of RT with or without combination with AMM + CCC, OK-432 or AMM + CCC + OK-432. Before and after RT, lymphocyte subsets in the peripheral blood were examined with dichromatic analysis using an Ortho Spectrum IIIFCM system and fluorescent MABs. In this study, the change in the absolute number of each subset was investigated. AMM + cytochrome C augumented NK activity in KSN nude mice, protected potent NK cells in patients with lung cancer against RT and sensitized the human lung cancer xenografts to RT. AMM + cytochrome C may have potential as a differential modulator of radiosensitivity of normal tissues and of tumors. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. A comparison of tissue engineering based repair of calvarial defects using adipose stem cells from normal and osteoporotic rats.

    PubMed

    Pei, Ming; Li, Jingting; McConda, David B; Wen, Sijin; Clovis, Nina B; Danley, Suzanne S

    2015-09-01

    Repairing large bone defects presents a significant challenge, especially in those people who have a limited regenerative capacity such as in osteoporotic (OP) patients. The aim of this study was to compare adipose stem cells (ASCs) from both normal (NORM) and ovariectomized (OVX) rats in osteogenic potential using both in vitro and in vivo models. After successful establishment of a rat OP model, we found that ASCs from OVX rats exhibited a comparable proliferation capacity to those from NORM rats but had significantly higher adipogenic and relatively lower osteogenic potential. Thirty-two weeks post-implantation with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) alone or PLGA seeded with osteogenic-induced ASCs for critical-size calvarial defects, the data from Herovici's collagen staining and micro-computed tomography suggested that the implantation of ASC-PLGA constructs exhibited a higher bone volume density compared to the PLGA alone group, especially in the NORM rat group. Intriguingly, the defects from OVX rats exhibited a higher bone volume density compared to NORM rats, especially for implantation of the PLGA alone group. Our results indicated that ASC based tissue constructs are more beneficial for the repair of calvarial defects in NORM rats while implantation of PLGA scaffold contributed to defect regeneration in OVX rats.

  14. Obtaining Normal Tissue Constraints Using Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) in Patients with Oral Cavity, Oropharnygeal, and Laryngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, William K.J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate normal tissue dose constraints while maintaining planning target volume (PTV) prescription without reducing PTV margins. Sixteen patients with oral cavity carcinoma (group I), 27 patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma (group II), and 28 patients with laryngeal carcinoma (group III) were reviewed. Parotid constraints were a mean dose to either parotid < 26 Gy (PP1), 50% of either parotid < 30 Gy (PP2), or 20 cc of total parotid < 20 Gy (PP3). Treatment was intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). All patients met constraints for cord and brain stem. The mandibular constraints were met in 66%, 29%, and 57% of patients with oral, oropharyngeal, and laryngeal cancers, respectively. Mean dose of 26 Gy (PP1) was achieved in 44%, 41%, and 38% of oral, oropharyngeal, and laryngeal patients. PP2 (parotid constraint of 30 Gy to less than 50% of one parotid) was the easiest to achieve (group I, II, and III: 82%, 76%, and 78%, respectively). PP3 (20 cc of total parotid < 20 Gy) was difficult, and was achieved in 25%, 17%, and 35% of oral, oropharyngeal, and laryngeal patients, respectively. Mean parotid dose of 26 Gy was met 40% of the time. However, a combination of constraints allowed for sparing of the parotid based on different criteria and was met in high numbers. This was accomplished without reducing PTV-parotid overlap. What dose constraint best correlates with subjective and objective functional outcomes remains a focus for future study.

  15. Hsa-miR-520d induces hepatoma cells to form normal liver tissues via a stemness-mediated process

    PubMed Central

    Tsuno, Satoshi; Wang, Xinhui; Shomori, Kohei; Hasegawa, Junichi; Miura, Norimasa

    2014-01-01

    The human ncRNA gene RGM249 regulates the extent of differentiation of cancer cells and the conversion of 293FT cells to hiPSCs. To identify the factors underlying this process, we investigated the effects of lentivirally inducing miR-520d expression in 293FT and HLF cells in vitro. Subsequently, we evaluated tumor formation in a xenograft model. Transformed HLF cells were Oct4 and Nanog positive within 24 h, showed p53 upregulation and hTERT downregulation, and mostly lost their migration abilities. After lentiviral infection, the cells were intraperitoneally injected into mice, resulting in benign teratomas (6%), the absence of tumors (87%) or differentiation into benign liver tissues (7%) at the injection site after 1 month. We are the first to demonstrate the loss of malignant properties in cancer cells in vivo through the expression of a single microRNA (miRNA). This miRNA successfully converted 293FT and hepatoma cells to hiPSC-like cells. The regulation of malignancy by miR-520d appears to be through the conversion of cancer cells to normal stem cells, maintaining p53 upregulation. PMID:24458129

  16. Non-Gaussian Diffusion Imaging for Enhanced Contrast of Brain Tissue Affected by Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Geffroy, Françoise; Le Bihan, Denis; Shah, N. Jon

    2014-01-01

    Recent diffusion MRI studies of stroke in humans and animals have shown that the quantitative parameters characterising the degree of non-Gaussianity of the diffusion process are much more sensitive to ischemic changes than the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) considered so far as the “gold standard”. The observed changes exceeded that of the ADC by a remarkable factor of 2 to 3. These studies were based on the novel non-Gaussian methods, such as diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) and log-normal distribution function imaging (LNDFI). As shown in our previous work investigating the animal stroke model, a combined analysis using two methods, DKI and LNDFI provides valuable complimentary information. In the present work, we report the application of three non-Gaussian diffusion models to quantify the deviations from the Gaussian behaviour in stroke induced by transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rat brains: the gamma-distribution function (GDF), the stretched exponential model (SEM), and the biexponential model. The main goal was to compare the sensitivity of various non-Gaussian metrics to ischemic changes and to investigate if a combined application of several models will provide added value in the assessment of stroke. We have shown that two models, GDF and SEM, exhibit a better performance than the conventional method and allow for a significantly enhanced visualization of lesions. Furthermore, we showed that valuable information regarding spatial properties of stroke lesions can be obtained. In particular, we observed a stratified cortex structure in the lesions that were well visible in the maps of the GDF and SEM metrics, but poorly distinguishable in the ADC-maps. Our results provided evidence that cortical layers tend to be differently affected by ischemic processes. PMID:24586610

  17. Nutrition during mid to late gestation affects growth, adipose tissue deposition, and tenderness in cross-bred beef steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient restriction of the dam during gestation can have detrimental effects on the progeny. Adipocyte differentiation occurs during mid to late gestation, and therefore nutrition during this time is expected to affect adipose tissue development and resulting carcass composition of steers. Thus, th...

  18. In situ characterization of protein aggregates in human tissues affected by light chain amyloidosis: a FTIR microspectroscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Ami, Diletta; Lavatelli, Francesca; Rognoni, Paola; Palladini, Giovanni; Raimondi, Sara; Giorgetti, Sofia; Monti, Luca; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Natalello, Antonino; Merlini, Giampaolo

    2016-01-01

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis, caused by deposition of amyloidogenic immunoglobulin light chains (LCs), is the most common systemic form in industrialized countries. Still open questions, and premises for developing targeted therapies, concern the mechanisms of amyloid formation in vivo and the bases of organ targeting and dysfunction. Investigating amyloid material in its natural environment is crucial to obtain new insights on the molecular features of fibrillar deposits at individual level. To this aim, we used Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy for studying in situ unfixed tissues (heart and subcutaneous abdominal fat) from patients affected by AL amyloidosis. We compared the infrared response of affected tissues with that of ex vivo and in vitro fibrils obtained from the pathogenic LC derived from one patient, as well as with that of non amyloid-affected tissues. We demonstrated that the IR marker band of intermolecular β-sheets, typical of protein aggregates, can be detected in situ in LC amyloid-affected tissues, and that FTIR microspectroscopy allows exploring the inter- and intra-sample heterogeneity. We extended the infrared analysis to the characterization of other biomolecules embedded within the amyloid deposits, finding an IR pattern that discloses a possible role of lipids, collagen and glycosaminoglycans in amyloid deposition in vivo. PMID:27373200

  19. In situ characterization of protein aggregates in human tissues affected by light chain amyloidosis: a FTIR microspectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Ami, Diletta; Lavatelli, Francesca; Rognoni, Paola; Palladini, Giovanni; Raimondi, Sara; Giorgetti, Sofia; Monti, Luca; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Natalello, Antonino; Merlini, Giampaolo

    2016-01-01

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis, caused by deposition of amyloidogenic immunoglobulin light chains (LCs), is the most common systemic form in industrialized countries. Still open questions, and premises for developing targeted therapies, concern the mechanisms of amyloid formation in vivo and the bases of organ targeting and dysfunction. Investigating amyloid material in its natural environment is crucial to obtain new insights on the molecular features of fibrillar deposits at individual level. To this aim, we used Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy for studying in situ unfixed tissues (heart and subcutaneous abdominal fat) from patients affected by AL amyloidosis. We compared the infrared response of affected tissues with that of ex vivo and in vitro fibrils obtained from the pathogenic LC derived from one patient, as well as with that of non amyloid-affected tissues. We demonstrated that the IR marker band of intermolecular β-sheets, typical of protein aggregates, can be detected in situ in LC amyloid-affected tissues, and that FTIR microspectroscopy allows exploring the inter- and intra-sample heterogeneity. We extended the infrared analysis to the characterization of other biomolecules embedded within the amyloid deposits, finding an IR pattern that discloses a possible role of lipids, collagen and glycosaminoglycans in amyloid deposition in vivo. PMID:27373200

  20. Treatment with D-penicillamine or zinc sulphate affects copper metabolism and improves but not normalizes antioxidant capacity parameters in Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Gromadzka, Grażyna; Grażyna, Gromadzka; Karpińska, Agata; Agata, Karpińska; Przybyłkowski, Adam; Adam, Przybyłkowski; Litwin, Tomasz; Tomasz, Litwin; Wierzchowska-Ciok, Agata; Agata, Wierzchowska-Ciok; Dzieżyc, Karolina; Karolina, Dzieżyc; Chabik, Grzegorz; Grzegorz, Chabik; Członkowska, Anna; Anna, Członkowska

    2014-02-01

    Copper accumulation in tissues due to a biallelic pathogenic mutation of the gene: ATP7B results in a clinical phenotype known as Wilson disease (WD). Aberrations in copper homeostasis can create favourable conditions for superoxide-yielding redox cycling and oxidative tissue damage. Drugs used in WD treatment aim to remove accumulated copper and normalise the free copper concentration in the blood. In the current study the effect of decoppering treatment on copper metabolism and systemic antioxidant capacity parameters was analyzed. Treatment naïve WD patients (TNWD) (n = 33), those treated with anti-copper drugs (TWD) (n = 99), and healthy controls (n = 99) were studied. Both TNWD and TWD patients characterised with decreased copper metabolism parameters, as well as decreased total antioxidant potential (AOP), glutathione (GSH) level, activity of catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and S-transferase glutathione, compared to controls. TWD patients had significantly lower copper metabolism parameters, higher total AOP and higher levels of GSH than TWD individuals; however, no difference was observed between these two patient groups with respect to the rest of the antioxidant capacity parameters. Patients who had undergone treatment with D-penicillamine or zinc sulphate did not differ with respect to copper metabolism or antioxidant capacity parameters, with the exception of GPx that was lower in D-penicillamine treated individuals. These data suggest that anti-copper treatment affects copper metabolism as well as improves, but does not normalize, natural antioxidant capacity in patients with WD. We propose to undertake studies aimed to evaluate the usefulness of antioxidants as well as selenium as a supplemental therapy in WD.

  1. Inter-electrode tissue resistance is not affected by tissue oedema when electrically stimulating the lower limb of sepsis patients.

    PubMed

    Durfee, William K; Young, Joseph R; Ginz, Hans F

    2014-05-01

    ICU patients typically are given large amounts of fluid and often develop oedema. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the oedema would change inter-electrode resistance and, thus, require a different approach to using non-invasive electrical stimulation of nerves to assess muscle force. Inter-electrode tissue resistance in the lower leg was measured by applying a 300 µs constant current pulse and measuring the current through and voltage across the stimulating electrodes. The protocol was administered to nine ICU patients with oedema, eight surgical patients without oedema and eight healthy controls. No significant difference in inter-electrode resistance was found between the three groups. For all groups, resistance decreased as stimulation current increased. In conclusion, inter-electrode resistance in ICU patients with severe oedema is the same as the resistance in regular surgical patients and healthy controls. This means that non-invasive nerve stimulation devices do not need to be designed to accommodate different resistances when used with oedema patients; however, surface stimulation does require higher current levels with oedema patients because of the increased distance between the skin surface and the targeted nerve or muscle.

  2. Inter-electrode tissue resistance is not affected by tissue oedema when electrically stimulating the lower limb of sepsis patients.

    PubMed

    Durfee, William K; Young, Joseph R; Ginz, Hans F

    2014-05-01

    ICU patients typically are given large amounts of fluid and often develop oedema. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the oedema would change inter-electrode resistance and, thus, require a different approach to using non-invasive electrical stimulation of nerves to assess muscle force. Inter-electrode tissue resistance in the lower leg was measured by applying a 300 µs constant current pulse and measuring the current through and voltage across the stimulating electrodes. The protocol was administered to nine ICU patients with oedema, eight surgical patients without oedema and eight healthy controls. No significant difference in inter-electrode resistance was found between the three groups. For all groups, resistance decreased as stimulation current increased. In conclusion, inter-electrode resistance in ICU patients with severe oedema is the same as the resistance in regular surgical patients and healthy controls. This means that non-invasive nerve stimulation devices do not need to be designed to accommodate different resistances when used with oedema patients; however, surface stimulation does require higher current levels with oedema patients because of the increased distance between the skin surface and the targeted nerve or muscle. PMID:24758395

  3. Strategies for tissue engineering cardiac constructs to affect functional repair following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ye, Kathy Yuan; Black, Lauren Deems

    2011-10-01

    Tissue-engineered cardiac constructs are a high potential therapy for treating myocardial infarction. These therapies have the ability to regenerate or recreate functional myocardium following the infarction, restoring some of the lost function of the heart and thereby preventing congestive heart failure. Thr