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  1. Psychosocial predictors of treatment outcome for trauma-affected refugees

    PubMed Central

    Sonne, Charlotte; Carlsson, Jessica; Bech, Per; Vindbjerg, Erik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Elklit, Ask

    2016-01-01

    Background The effects of treatment in trials with trauma-affected refugees vary considerably not only between studies but also between patients within a single study. However, we know little about why some patients benefit more from treatment, as few studies have analysed predictors of treatment outcome. Objective The objective of the study was to examine possible psychosocial predictors of treatment outcome for trauma-affected refugees. Method The participants were 195 adult refugees with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) who were enrolled in a 6- to 7-month treatment programme at the Competence Centre for Transcultural Psychiatry (CTP), Denmark. The CTP Predictor Index used in the study included 15 different possible outcome predictors concerning the patients’ past, chronicity of mental health problems, pain, treatment motivation, prerequisites for engaging in psychotherapy, and social situation. The primary outcome measure was PTSD symptoms measured on the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ). Other outcome measures included the Hopkins Symptom Check List-25, the WHO-5 Well-being Index, Sheehan Disability Scale, Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Scales, the somatisation scale of the Symptoms Checklist-90, Global Assessment of Functioning scales, and pain rated on visual analogue scales. The relations between treatment outcomes and the total score as well as subscores of the CTP Predictor Index were analysed. Results Overall, the total score of the CTP Predictor Index was significantly correlated to pre- to post treatment score changes on the majority of the ratings mentioned above. While employment status was the only single item significantly correlated to HTQ-score changes, a number of single items from the CTP Predictor Index correlated significantly with changes in depression and anxiety symptoms, but the size of the correlation coefficients were modest. Conclusions The total score of the CTP Predictor Index correlated significantly with outcomes on most

  2. Isolated polycystic morphology: Does it affect the IVF treatment outcomes?

    PubMed

    Bezirganoglu, N; Seckin, K D; Baser, E; Karsli, M F; Yeral, M I; Cicek, M N

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the current study was to compare women who have normal ovarian ultrasonographic findings and women with ovulatory polycystic ovary (PCO), in terms of IVF treatment outcome. The study was conducted at a tertiary referral hospital and included 906 women who underwent IVF treatment. Of these, 224 of the women had PCO (24.7%) and 682 of the women had normal ovarian morphology (75.3%) at the time of ultrasonographic examination prior to IVF. The treatment outcomes were compared between the two groups. In the PCO group, the number of oocytes at the size of > 16 mm, the overall number of collected oocytes and the number of fertilised oocytes were found to be significantly higher. Furthermore, the rates of implantation, biochemical pregnancy and clinical pregnancy were significantly higher in the PCO group (p < 0.05). The detection of PCO morphology on baseline ultrasonography in IVF candidates may be associated with higher treatment success.

  3. Cryotherapy in Treatment of Keloids: Evaluation of Factors Affecting Treatment Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Barara, Meenu; Mendiratta, Vibhu; Chander, Ram

    2012-01-01

    Background: Keloids are cosmetically disfiguring benign fibrous outgrowths, which present as a major therapeutic dilemma due to their frequent recurrence. Despite a wide therapeutic armamentarium available for these scars, none has been found to be completely effective and satisfactory. Cryosurgery has offered some promise in the treatment of keloids.We conducted this study to evaluate the effect of cryotherapy in treatment of keloids and to relate the treatment outcome with the clinico-etiological factors. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based interventional study was conducted in 30 patients of keloids. Patients received two freeze thaw cycles of 15 seconds each at four weekly intervals for six sessions or flattening greater than 75%; whichever occurred earlier. Patients were assessed after three treatment sessions and at treatment completion regarding thickness and firmness of lesions. Patient satisfaction scale was used to evaluate the treatment outcome at completion of six treatment sessions. Paired Students t-test and Analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used for statistical analysis. Results: Average flattening noted after 3 and 6 sessions of cryotherapy was 30.76% and 58.13%, respectively. The duration of lesions and thickness of keloids correlated significantly with the result of treatment. The site and aetiology did not influence the outcome of cryosurgical treatment. Conclusion: Cryotherapy seems to be an effective treatment modality for keloids of recent onset, particularly smaller lesions. Duration and thickness of the keloids were found to be the most important factors in determining treatment outcome with cryotherapy in our study. Larger studies are, however, required to confirm the efficacy of this treatment modality and to validate our findings of the factors affecting treatment outcome. PMID:23112514

  4. Factors affecting treatment outcomes in drug-resistant tuberculosis cases in the Northern Cape, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Elliott, E; Draper, H R; Baitsiwe, P; Claassens, M M

    2014-09-21

    The Northern Cape Province has low cure rates (21%) for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). We audited the programme to identify factors affecting treatment outcomes. Cases admitted to two drug-resistant TB units from 2007 to 2009 had data extracted from clinical folders. Unfavourable treatment outcomes were found in 58% of the 272 cases. A multivariable regression analysis found that male sex was associated with unfavourable outcome (P = 0.009). Weight at diagnosis (P < 0.001) and oral drug adherence (P < 0.001) were also associated with an unfavourable outcome; however, injectable drug adherence was not (P = 0.395). Positive baseline smear and human immunodeficiency virus positive status were not associated with unfavourable outcome. Shorter, more patient-friendly regimens may go a long way to improving adherence and outcomes.

  5. Association between Physical Pain and Alcohol Treatment Outcomes: The Mediating Role of Negative Affect

    PubMed Central

    Witkiewitz, Katie; McCallion, Elizabeth; Vowles, Kevin E.; Kirouac, Megan; Frohe, Tessa; Maisto, Stephen A.; Hodgson, Ray; Heather, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Objective Physical pain and negative affect have been described as risk factors for alcohol use following alcohol treatment. The current study was a secondary analysis of two clinical trials for alcohol use disorder (AUD) to examine the associations between pain, negative affect and AUD treatment outcomes. Method Participants included 1383 individuals from the COMBINE Study (COMBINE Study Group, 2003; 31% female, 23% ethnic minorities, average age=44.4 (SD=10.2)), a multisite combination pharmacotherapy and behavioral intervention study for AUD in the United States, and 742 individuals from the United Kingdom Alcohol Treatment Trial (UKATT Research Team, 2001; 25.9% female, 4.4% ethnic minorities, average age=41.6 (SD=10.1)) a multisite behavioral intervention study for AUD in the United Kingdom. The Form-90 was used to collect alcohol use data, the Short Form Health Survey and Quality of Life measures were used to assess pain, and negative affect was assessed using the Brief Symptom Inventory (COMBINE) and the General Health Questionnaire (UKATT). Results Pain scores were significantly associated with drinking outcomes in both datasets. Greater pain scores were associated with greater negative affect and increases in pain were associated with increases in negative affect. Negative affect significantly mediated the association between pain and drinking outcomes and this effect was moderated by social behavior network therapy (SBNT) in the UKATT study, with SBNT attenuating the association between pain and drinking. Conclusion Findings suggest pain and negative affect are associated among individuals in AUD treatment and that negative affect mediated pain may be a risk factor for alcohol relapse. PMID:26098375

  6. Mechanisms of Behavioral and Affective Treatment Outcomes in a Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Boys

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Jeffrey D.; Loeber, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Evidence for effective treatment for behavioral problems continues to grow, yet evidence about the effective mechanisms underlying those interventions has lagged behind. The Stop Now and Plan (SNAP) program is a multicomponent intervention for boys between 6 and 11. This study tested putative treatment mechanisms using data from 252 boys in a randomized controlled trial of SNAP versus treatment as usual. SNAP includes a 3 month group treatment period followed by individualized intervention, which persisted through the 15 month study period. Measures were administered in four waves: at baseline and at 3, 9 and 15 months after baseline. A hierarchical linear modeling strategy was used. SNAP was associated with improved problem-solving skills, prosocial behavior, emotion regulation skills, and reduced parental stress. Prosocial behavior, emotion regulation skills and reduced parental stress partially mediated improvements in child aggression. Improved emotion regulation skills partially mediated treatment-related child anxious-depressed outcomes. Improvements in parenting behaviors did not differ between treatment conditions. The results suggest that independent processes may drive affective and behavioral outcomes, with some specificity regarding the mechanisms related to differing treatment outcomes. PMID:25619927

  7. Epilepsy due to PNPO mutations: genotype, environment and treatment affect presentation and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Philippa B.; Camuzeaux, Stephane S.M.; Footitt, Emma J.; Mills, Kevin A.; Gissen, Paul; Fisher, Laura; Das, Krishna B.; Varadkar, Sophia M.; Zuberi, Sameer; McWilliam, Robert; Stödberg, Tommy; Plecko, Barbara; Baumgartner, Matthias R.; Maier, Oliver; Calvert, Sophie; Riney, Kate; Wolf, Nicole I.; Livingston, John H.; Bala, Pronab; Morel, Chantal F.; Feillet, François; Raimondi, Francesco; Del Giudice, Ennio; Chong, W. Kling; Pitt, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The first described patients with pyridox(am)ine 5’-phosphate oxidase deficiency all had neonatal onset seizures that did not respond to treatment with pyridoxine but responded to treatment with pyridoxal 5’-phosphate. Our data suggest, however, that the clinical spectrum of pyridox(am)ine 5’-phosphate oxidase deficiency is much broader than has been reported in the literature. Sequencing of the PNPO gene was undertaken for a cohort of 82 individuals who had shown a reduction in frequency and severity of seizures in response to pyridoxine or pyridoxal 5’-phosphate. Novel sequence changes were studied using a new cell-free expression system and a mass spectrometry-based assay for pyridoxamine phosphate oxidase. Three groups of patients with PNPO mutations that had reduced enzyme activity were identified: (i) patients with neonatal onset seizures responding to pyridoxal 5’-phosphate (n = 6); (ii) a patient with infantile spasms (onset 5 months) responsive to pyridoxal 5’-phosphate (n = 1); and (iii) patients with seizures starting under 3 months of age responding to pyridoxine (n = 8). Data suggest that certain genotypes (R225H/C and D33V) are more likely to result in seizures that to respond to treatment with pyridoxine. Other mutations seem to be associated with infertility, miscarriage and prematurity. However, the situation is clearly complex with the same combination of mutations being seen in patients who responded and did not respond to pyridoxine. It is possible that pyridoxine responsiveness in PNPO deficiency is affected by prematurity and age at the time of the therapeutic trial. Other additional factors that are likely to influence treatment response and outcome include riboflavin status and how well the foetus has been supplied with vitamin B6 by the mother. For some patients there was a worsening of symptoms on changing from pyridoxine to pyridoxal 5’-phosphate. Many of the mutations in PNPO affected residues involved in binding flavin

  8. Client Preferences Affect Treatment Satisfaction, Completion, and Clinical Outcome: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lindhiem, Oliver; Bennett, Charles B.; Trentacosta, Christopher J.; McLear, Caitlin

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of client preferences on treatment satisfaction, completion, and clinical outcome. Our search of the literature resulted in 34 empirical articles describing 32 unique clinical trials that either randomized some clients to an active choice condition (shared decision making condition or choice of treatment) or assessed client preferences. Clients who were involved in shared decision making, chose a treatment condition, or otherwise received their preferred treatment evidenced higher treatment satisfaction (ESd = .34; p < .001), increased completion rates (ESOR = 1.37; ESd = .17; p < .001), and superior clinical outcome (ESd = .15; p < .0001), compared to clients who were not involved in shared decision making, did not choose a treatment condition, or otherwise did not receive their preferred treatment. Although the effect sizes are modest in magnitude, they were generally consistent across several potential moderating variables including study design (preference versus active choice), psychoeducation (informed versus uninformed), setting (inpatient versus outpatient), client diagnosis (mental health versus other), and unit of randomization (client versus provider). Our findings highlight the clinical benefit of assessing client preferences, providing treatment choices when two or more efficacious options are available, and involving clients in treatment-related decisions when treatment options are not available. PMID:25189522

  9. Does the Time of Radiotherapy Affect Treatment Outcomes? A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Chan, S; Rowbottom, L; McDonald, R; Bjarnason, G A; Tsao, M; Danjoux, C; Barnes, E; Popovic, M; Lam, H; DeAngelis, C; Chow, E

    2017-04-01

    Circadian rhythm-dependent cell cycle progression produces daily variations in radiosensitivity. This literature review aims to summarise the data on whether radiotherapy outcomes differ depending on administration time. A literature search was conducted on Ovid Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and PubMed using key words such as 'radiotherapy', 'circadian rhythm', 'treatment outcome' and 'survival'. Articles evaluating the correlation between radiotherapy time and outcomes in cancer patients were included and relevant information was extracted. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria. Four investigated lung cancer patients undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases, with one study observing improved local control and survival in patients treated in the morning. Another two studies with breast and cervical cancer patients observed that the prevalence of toxicities was higher in afternoon and morning cohorts, respectively. Two studies in head and neck cancer patients found trends indicating morning patients experienced less oral mucositis. Increased toxicities and biochemical failure rates were associated with evening treatment in prostate cancer patients. As inconsistencies in the literature exist regarding the time dependency of radiotherapy outcomes, further investigation is warranted.

  10. Prognosis in autism: do specialist treatments affect long-term outcome?

    PubMed

    Howlin, P

    1997-06-01

    Many different treatments have been claimed to have a dramatic impact on children with autism. This paper reviews what is known about the outcome in adult life and examines the limitations and advantages of a variety of intervention approaches. It concludes that there is little evidence of any "cure" for autism, but appropriately structured programmes for education and management in the early years can play a significant role in enhancing functioning in later life.

  11. Chronic urinary retention in men: how we define it, and how does it affect treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Negro, Carlo L A; Muir, Gordon H

    2012-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Chronic urinary retention (CUR) is a poorly defined entity, as the key element of definition, significant postvoid residual urine volume (PVR), has not a worldwide and moreover evidenced-based definition. There is no agreement on which is the threshold value to define a significant PVR and different society produced guidelines with different thresholds ranging from 300 mL to 1000 mL. Diagnosis is difficult, and management has not been defined yet. There is a lack of studies on the best management of these patients, as this group of patients has always been considered at high risk of failure. Only one study compares conservative with the surgical management but it is not a randomised controlled trail. This review offers a systematic appraisal of the most recent publications on CUR. It indicates the absence of a real worldwide agreed definition, as the two keys element of it are not satisfactorily defined yet: significant PVR, is suffering from a lack of evidenced-based definition, and percussable or palpable bladder is a very nebulous concept as it is not a criteria of certainty as different individual variables affect it. This has an important effect on management which is not structured. Most of the trials involving benign prostatic hyperplasia treatments (either medical or surgical) tend to exclude this group of patients, which is a clinically important group, comprising up to a quarter of men undergoing TURP in the UK. Urinary retention describes a bladder that does not empty completely or does not empty at all. Historically, urinary retention has been classified as either acute or chronic the latter is generally classified as high pressure or low pressure according to the bladder filling pressure on urodynamic. A MEDLINE® search for articles written in English and published before January 2010 was done using a list of terms related to urinary retention: 'urinary retention', 'chronic urinary retention

  12. Cross-reactive immunologic material status affects treatment outcomes in Pompe disease infants

    PubMed Central

    Kishnani, Priya S.; Goldenberg, Paula C.; DeArmey, Stephanie L.; Heller, James; Benjamin, Danny; Young, Sarah; Bali, Deeksha; Smith, Sue Ann; Li, Jennifer S.; Mandel, Hanna; Koeberl, Dwight; Rosenberg, Amy; Chen, Y-T

    2013-01-01

    Deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) causes Pompe disease, which is usually fatal if onset occurs in infancy. Patients synthesize a non-functional form of GAA or are unable to form native enzyme. Enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human GAA (rhGAA) prolongs survival in infantile Pompe patients but may be less effective in cross-reactive immunologic material (CRIM)-negative patients. We retrospectively analyzed the influence of CRIM status on outcome in 21 CRIM-positive and 11 CRIM-negative infantile Pompe patients receiving rhGAA. Patients were from the clinical setting and from clinical trials of rhGAA, were ≤6 months of age, were not invasively ventilated, and were treated with IV rhGAA at a cumulative or total dose of 20 or 40 mg/kg/2 weeks. Outcome measures included survival, invasive ventilator-free survival, cardiac status, gross motor development, development of antibodies to rhGAA, and levels of urinary Glc4. Following 52 weeks of treatment, 6/11 (54.5%) CRIM-negative and 1/21 (4.8%) CRIM-positive patients were deceased or invasively ventilated (p < 0.0001). By age 27.1 months, all CRIM-negative patients and 4/21 (19.0%) CRIM-positive patients were deceased or invasively ventilated. Cardiac function and gross motor development improved significantly more in the CRIM-positive group. IgG antibodies to rhGAA developed earlier and serotiters were higher and more sustained in the CRIM-negative group. CRIM-negative status predicted reduced overall survival and invasive ventilator-free survival and poorer clinical outcomes in infants with Pompe disease treated with rhGAA. The effect of CRIM status on outcome appears to be mediated by antibody responses to the exogenous protein. PMID:19775921

  13. Cross-reactive immunologic material status affects treatment outcomes in Pompe disease infants.

    PubMed

    Kishnani, Priya S; Goldenberg, Paula C; DeArmey, Stephanie L; Heller, James; Benjamin, Danny; Young, Sarah; Bali, Deeksha; Smith, Sue Ann; Li, Jennifer S; Mandel, Hanna; Koeberl, Dwight; Rosenberg, Amy; Chen, Y-T

    2010-01-01

    Deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) causes Pompe disease, which is usually fatal if onset occurs in infancy. Patients synthesize a non-functional form of GAA or are unable to form native enzyme. Enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human GAA (rhGAA) prolongs survival in infantile Pompe patients but may be less effective in cross-reactive immunologic material (CRIM)-negative patients. We retrospectively analyzed the influence of CRIM status on outcome in 21 CRIM-positive and 11 CRIM-negative infantile Pompe patients receiving rhGAA. Patients were from the clinical setting and from clinical trials of rhGAA, were 6 months of age, were not invasively ventilated, and were treated with IV rhGAA at a cumulative or total dose of 20 or 40 mg/kg/2 weeks. Outcome measures included survival, invasive ventilator-free survival, cardiac status, gross motor development, development of antibodies to rhGAA, and levels of urinary Glc(4). Following 52 weeks of treatment, 6/11 (54.5%) CRIM-negative and 1/21 (4.8%) CRIM-positive patients were deceased or invasively ventilated (p<0.0001). By age 27.1 months, all CRIM-negative patients and 4/21 (19.0%) CRIM-positive patients were deceased or invasively ventilated. Cardiac function and gross motor development improved significantly more in the CRIM-positive group. IgG antibodies to rhGAA developed earlier and serotiters were higher and more sustained in the CRIM-negative group. CRIM-negative status predicted reduced overall survival and invasive ventilator-free survival and poorer clinical outcomes in infants with Pompe disease treated with rhGAA. The effect of CRIM status on outcome appears to be mediated by antibody responses to the exogenous protein.

  14. Cognitive and affective predictors of treatment outcome in Cognitive Processing Therapy and Prolonged Exposure for posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Shireen L; Vogt, Dawne S; Resick, Patricia A

    2009-09-01

    This study examined cognitive and affective predictors of treatment dropout and treatment efficacy in Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) and Prolonged Exposure (PE) for PTSD. Study participants were women with PTSD from a sexual assault who received at least one session of either treatment (n = 145) as part of a randomized clinical trial. Results revealed that younger age, lower intelligence, and less education were associated with higher treatment dropout, whereas higher depression and guilt at pretreatment were associated with greater improvement in PTSD symptomatology. Results by treatment condition indicated that women with higher anger at pretreatment were more likely to dropout of PE and that older women in PE and younger women in CPT had the best overall outcomes. These findings have implications for efforts to enhance treatment efficacy and retention in CBT treatment protocols.

  15. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy and treatment outcomes among conflict-affected and forcibly displaced populations: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Optimal adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is required to promote viral suppression and to prevent disease progression and mortality. Forcibly displaced and conflict-affected populations may face challenges succeeding on HAART. We performed a systematic review of the literature on adherence to HAART and treatment outcomes in these groups, including refugees and internally-displaced persons (IDPs), assessed the quality of the evidence and suggest a future research program. Methods Medline, Embase, and Global Health databases for 1995–2011 were searched using the Ovid platform. A backward citation review of subsequent work that had cited the Ovid results was performed using the Web of Science database. ReliefWeb and Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) websites were searched for additional grey literature. Results and conclusion We screened 297 records and identified 17 reports covering 15 quantitative and two qualitative studies from 13 countries. Three-quarters (11/15) of the quantitative studies were retrospective studies based on chart review; five studies included <100 clients. Adherence or treatment outcomes were reported in resettled refugees, conflict-affected persons, internally-displaced persons (IDPs), and combinations of refugees, IDPs and other foreign-born persons. The reviewed reports showed promise for conflict-affected and forcibly-displaced populations; the range of optimal adherence prevalence reported was 87–99.5%. Treatment outcomes, measured using virological, immunological and mortality estimates, were good in relation to non-affected groups. Given the diversity of settings where forcibly-displaced and conflict-affected persons access ART, further studies on adherence and treatment outcomes are needed to support scale-up and provide evidence-based justifications for inclusion of these vulnerable groups in national treatment plans. Future studies and program evaluations should focus on systematic monitoring of

  16. Does obesity affect outcomes of treatment for lumbar stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis? Analysis of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT)

    PubMed Central

    Rihn, Jeffrey A.; Radcliff, Kristen; Hilibrand, Alan S.; Anderson, David T.; Zhao, Wenyan; Lurie, Jon; Vaccaro, Alexander R.; Freedman, Mitch K.; Albert, Todd J.; Weinstein, James N.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective subgroup analysis of prospectively collected data according to treatment received. Objective The purpose of this study is to determine if obesity affects treatment outcomes for lumbar stenosis (SpS) and degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). Summary of Background Data Obesity is thought to be associated with increased complications and potentially less favorable outcomes following the treatment of degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine. This, however, remains a matter of debate in the existing literature. Methods An as-treated analysis was performed on patients enrolled in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) for the treatment of SpS or DS. A comparison was made between patients with a body mass index (BMI) <30 (“non-obese”, n=373 SpS, 376 DS) and those with a BMI ≥ 30 (“obese”, n=261 SpS, 225 DS). Baseline patient characteristics, intraoperative data, and complications were documented. Primary and secondary outcomes were measured at baseline and regular follow-up time intervals up to 4 years. The difference in improvement over baseline between surgical and nonsurgical treatment (i.e. treatment effect) was determined at each follow-up interval for the obese and nonobese groups. Results At 4-years follow-up, operative and nonoperative treatment provided improvement in all primary outcome measures over baseline in patients with BMI of < 30 and ≥ 30. For SpS patients, there were no differences in the surgical complication or reoperation rates between groups. DS patients with BMI ≥ 30 had a higher postoperative infection rate (5% vs. 1%, p=0.05) and twice the reoperation rate at 4-years follow-up (20% vs. 11%, p=0.01) than those with BMI < 30. At 4-years, surgical treatment of SpS and DS was equally effective in both BMI groups in terms of the primary outcome measures, with the exception that obese DS patients had less improvement from baseline in the SF36 physical function score compared to nonobese patients (22

  17. Biofilm layers affect the treatment outcomes of NaF and Nano-hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, M; He, L B; Exterkate, R A M; Cheng, L; Li, J Y; Ten Cate, J M; Crielaard, W; Deng, D M

    2015-04-01

    During caries formation, dental biofilms function not only as acid producers but also as reservoirs and diffusion barriers for active caries-preventive components. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of biofilms as a stagnant layer on the efficacy of NaF and nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA). Biofilms of Streptococcus mutans C180-2 were formed on the surfaces of artificially demineralized enamel in an active attachment biofilm model. After 2 days of biofilm formation, the model was subjected to a pH-cycling schedule, together with a control group without biofilms. Specimens were treated for 5 min twice daily with water, a 10% nHA slurry, or 18.4 mM NaF. At the end of the pH-cycling period, the biofilms were removed for the determination of the viable counts, the lactic acid production, and the calcium content. The mineral changes in the demineralized enamel blocks were analyzed by transversal microradiography. No differences in the biofilm viable counts and lactic acid production were found in the different treatment groups. The mean calcium content of the biofilms in the nHA group was 60.7 ± 15.3 mmol/g wet weight, which was approximately 8-fold higher than in the other 2 groups. The application of NaF resulted in net remineralization, but in the presence of a biofilm, net demineralization was observed. In contrast, nHA treatment reduced further demineralization compared with the water treatment, but the presence of a biofilm enhanced this effect. In conclusion, the presence of biofilms clearly influenced the treatment outcomes of anticaries products. Biofilms could either enhance or impede their efficacy. This result implies that biofilms should be included in the in vitro tests for the preclinical screening of caries-protective agents.

  18. Antimuscarinic Agent Treatment Affecting Patient-Reported Outcomes in Overactive Bladder Syndrome With Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated improvements in overactive bladder symptoms and depressive symptoms after solifenacin treatment in overactive bladder patients with or without depressive symptoms. Methods We performed a prospective study of patients who had been diagnosed with overactive bladder from July 2013 to June 2014. Based on the Beck Depression Inventory questionnaire, the test subjects were divided into group 1, without depressive symptoms (0–9 points), and group 2, with depressive symptoms (10 or more points). The patients were administered 5 mg of solifenacin for 3 months. The following outcomes were analyzed at the first visit, 4 weeks, and 12 weeks: the overactive bladder symptom score (OABSS), International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), patients’ perceptions of their bladder condition, and the Beck Depression Inventory. Results A total of 72 patients participated, and 52 patients completed the study. Most outcome measures showed improvements in both groups at weeks 4 and 12. Especially in group 2, the questionnaires showed significant improvements from baseline to week 12, indicating that solifenacin was effective at treating overactive bladder symptoms (group 1 vs. group 2: OABSS, −2.67±0.80 vs. −3.00±0.77; P<0.01; IPSS-total, −2.14±2.15 vs. −4.94±1.70; P<0.01). Statistically significant decreases in the Beck Depression Inventory score from baseline to weeks 4 and 12 were observed in group 2 (group 1 vs. group 2: 1.43±0.74 vs. −2.68±4.05 at week 4, P<0.001; 0.10±3.37 vs. −5.52±5.82 at week 12, P<0.001). Conclusions In overactive bladder patients with depressive symptoms, solifenacin can help improve quality of life and depressive symptoms at the same time. PMID:28043114

  19. Do Pharmacological and Behavioral Interventions Differentially Affect Treatment Outcome for Children with Social Phobia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharfstein, Lindsay A.; Beidel, Deborah C.; Rendon Finnell, Laura; Distler, Aaron; Carter, Nathan T.

    2011-01-01

    In a randomized trial for children with social phobia (SP), Social Effectiveness Therapy for Children (SET-C; a treatment consisting of exposure and social skills training) and fluoxetine were more effective than pill placebo in reducing social distress and behavioral avoidance, but only SET-C demonstrated significantly improved overall social…

  20. Does Oxidative Stress Induced by Alcohol Consumption Affect Orthodontic Treatment Outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Barcia, Jorge M.; Portolés, Sandra; Portolés, Laura; Urdaneta, Alba C.; Ausina, Verónica; Pérez-Pastor, Gema M. A.; Romero, Francisco J.; Villar, Vincent M.

    2017-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS Ethanol, Periodontal ligament, Extracellular matrix, Orthodontic movement. Alcohol is a legal drug present in several drinks commonly used worldwide (chemically known as ethyl alcohol or ethanol). Alcohol consumption is associated with several disease conditions, ranging from mental disorders to organic alterations. One of the most deleterious effects of ethanol metabolism is related to oxidative stress. This promotes cellular alterations associated with inflammatory processes that eventually lead to cell death or cell cycle arrest, among others. Alcohol intake leads to bone destruction and modifies the expression of interleukins, metalloproteinases and other pro-inflammatory signals involving GSKβ, Rho, and ERK pathways. Orthodontic treatment implicates mechanical forces on teeth. Interestingly, the extra- and intra-cellular responses of periodontal cells to mechanical movement show a suggestive similarity with the effects induced by ethanol metabolism on bone and other cell types. Several clinical traits such as age, presence of systemic diseases or pharmacological treatments, are taken into account when planning orthodontic treatments. However, little is known about the potential role of the oxidative conditions induced by ethanol intake as a possible setback for orthodontic treatment in adults. PMID:28179886

  1. A Retrospective Case-Control Study, Factors Affecting Treatment Outcomes for Pulmonary Tuberculosis in İstanbul, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Babalık, Aylin; Kılıçaslan, Zeki; Kızıltaş, Şule; Gencer, Serap; Öngen, Gül

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis is a public health problem and its transmission is a threat to the community. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the factors influencing the treatment outcomes and the effectiveness of the National Tuberculosis Program (NTP) in relation to the application of the directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS) program in various sites in Istanbul, Turkey. Study Design: Case-Control Study Methods: A case-control study was used, where cases and controls were randomly selected from the Turkish Tuberculosis National Database, which includes complete data on treatment outcomes for patients recorded in the database from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2009 and had one year follow-up. Results: The case group was composed of 464 patients with adverse outcome, while the control group was composed of 441 patients who had been cured of disease. Factors associated with adverse treatment outcome were >65 years of age (OR: 3.39 (1.99–5.76)) ; male gender (OR:2.11 (1.49–2.99)); born outside Turkey (OR: 5.48 (2.13–14.04)); co-morbidity (OR: 1.85 (1.29–2.65)); bilateral radiologic lesions (OR: 2.07 (1.41–3.00); previous treatment history (OR: 3.99 (2.78–5.74)); 3rd month positive microscopy (OR: 4.96 (3.04–8.09)) and any H&R +/− others multidrug resistant (MDR) resistance (OR: 22.64 (6.92–74.08)). There was no association between the adverse treatment outcome and the application site of direct observation treatment, short course (DOTS) delivery and the supervisors. Conclusion: Our findings indicate similar quality in DOTS application and supervision among patients with or without adverse treatment outcomes. However, patients with certain characteristics should be carefully monitored and aggressively treated. PMID:25207101

  2. ANALYSIS OF FACTORS AFFECTING OUTCOME OF ULTRASOUND-GUIDED RADIOFREQUENCY HEAT ABLATION FOR TREATMENT OF PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM IN DOGS.

    PubMed

    Bucy, Daniel; Pollard, Rachel; Nelson, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) parathyroid ablation is a noninvasive treatment for hyperparathyroidism in dogs. There are no published data assessing factors associated with RF parathyroid ablation success or failure in order to guide patient selection and improve outcome. The purpose of this retrospective analytical study was to determine whether imaging findings, biochemical data, or concurrent diseases were associated with RF heat ablation treatment failure. For inclusion in the study, dogs must have had a clinical diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism, undergone cervical ultrasound and RF ablation of abnormal parathyroid tissue, and must have had at least 3 months of follow-up information available following the date of ultrasound-guided parathyroid ablation. Dogs were grouped based on those with recurrent or persistent hypercalcemia and those without recurrent or persistent hypercalcemia following therapy. Parathyroid nodule size, thyroid lobe size, nodule location, and presence of concurrent disease were recorded. Recurrence of hypercalcemia occurred in 9/32 dogs that had ablation of abnormal parathyroid tissue (28%) and one patient had persistent hypercalcemia (3%) following parathyroid ablation. Nodule width (P = 0.036), height (P = 0.028), and largest cross-sectional area (P = 0.023) were larger in dogs that had recurrent or persistent hypercalcemia following ablation. Hypothyroidism was more common in dogs with recurrent disease (P = 0.044). Radiofrequency ablation was successful in 22/32 (69%) dogs. Larger parathyroid nodule size and/or concurrent hypothyroidism were associated with treatment failure in dogs that underwent ultrasound-guided RF parathyroid nodule ablation.

  3. Acute-phase protein concentration and metabolic status affect the outcome of treatment in cows with clinical and subclinical endometritis.

    PubMed

    Heidarpour, M; Mohri, M; Fallah-Rad, A H; Dehghan Shahreza, F; Mohammadi, M

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of acute-phase protein concentration and metabolic status in the establishment and resistance of clinical endometritis (CE) and subclinical endometritis (SE) in dairy cows. We also characterised the treatment-related changes in the concentration of acute-phase proteins and metabolic variables in dairy cows affected by CE and SE. Cows of the SE and CE groups presented a significantly higher β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), haptoglobin and total sialic acid (TSA) concentrations compared with a healthy group of animals. A significantly lower serum calcium concentration, and a significantly higher serum aspartate aminotransferase activity in the CE group, were observed when compared with SE and healthy groups. The comparison of parameters before treatment indicated that cows suffering from CE or SE with lower concentrations of hepatic and inflammatory markers showed a better response to further treatment, and endometritis was not detected in the second examination. Moreover, decreased concentrations of BHB, acute-phase proteins and hepatic markers were observed after successful treatment for endometritis in CE and SE cows. The results obtained in this study suggest that improved liver function and a decrease in the acute-phase protein concentration might favour the resolution of endometritis after treatment.

  4. Treatment factors affecting outcomes in HIV-associated non-Hodgkin lymphomas: a pooled analysis of 1546 patients

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiaonan; Wang, Dan; Tamari, Roni; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Mounier, Nicolas; Kaplan, Lawrence D.; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Spina, Michele; Tirelli, Umberto; Weiss, Rudolf; Galicier, Lionel; Boue, Francois; Wilson, Wyndham H.; Wyen, Christoph; Oriol, Albert; Navarro, José-Tomás; Dunleavy, Kieron; Little, Richard F.; Ratner, Lee; Garcia, Olga; Morgades, Mireia; Remick, Scot C.; Noy, Ariela; Sparano, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Limited comparative data exist for the treatment of HIV-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We analyzed pooled individual patient data for 1546 patients from 19 prospective clinical trials to assess treatment-specific factors (type of chemotherapy, rituximab, and concurrent combination antiretroviral [cART] use) and their influence on the outcomes complete response (CR), progression free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). In our analysis, rituximab was associated with a higher CR rate (odds ratio [OR] 2.89; P < .001), improved PFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.50; P < .001), and OS (HR 0.51; P < .0001). Compared with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP), initial therapy with more dose-intense regimens resulted in better CR rates (ACVBP [doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vindesine, bleomycin and prednisolone]: OR 1.70; P < .04), PFS (ACVBP: HR 0.72; P = .049; “intensive regimens”: HR 0.35; P < .001) and OS (“intensive regimens”: HR 0.54; P < .001). Infusional etoposide, prednisone, infusional vincristine, infusional doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (EPOCH) was associated with significantly better OS in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (HR 0.33; P = .03). Concurrent use of cART was associated with improved CR rates (OR 1.89; P = .005) and trended toward improved OS (HR 0.78; P = .07). These findings provide supporting evidence for current patterns of care where definitive evidence is unavailable. PMID:24014242

  5. Do School Facilities Affect Academic Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Mark

    This review explores which facility attributes affect academic outcomes the most and in what manner and degree. The research is examined in six categories: indoor air quality, ventilation, and thermal comfort; lighting; acoustics; building age and quality; school size; and class size. The review concludes that school facilities affect learning.…

  6. Treatment and Outcomes of Aspergillosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... at Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & Testing Treatment & Outcomes Health Professionals Statistics More Resources Mucormycosis Definition Symptoms People at Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & Testing ...

  7. Treatment and Outcomes of Histoplasmosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... at Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & Testing Treatment & Outcomes Health Professionals Statistics More Resources Mucormycosis Definition Symptoms People at Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & Testing ...

  8. Early Adolescent Affect Predicts Later Life Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kansky, Jessica; Allen, Joseph P.; Diener, Ed

    2016-01-01

    Background Subjective well-being as a predictor for later behavior and health has highlighted its relationship to health, work performance, and social relationships. However, the majority of such studies neglect the developmental nature of well-being in contributing to important changes across the transition to adulthood. Methods To examine the potential role of subjective well-being as a long-term predictor of critical life outcomes, we examined indicators of positive and negative affect at age 14 as a predictor of relationship, adjustment, self worth, and career outcomes a decade later at ages 23 to 25, controlling for family income and gender. We utilized multi-informant methods including reports from the target participant, close friends, and romantic partners in a demographically diverse community sample of 184 participants. Results Early adolescent positive affect predicted less relationship problems (less self-reported and partner-reported conflict, greater friendship attachment as rated by close peers), healthy adjustment to adulthood (lower levels of depression, anxiety, and loneliness). It also predicted positive work functioning (higher levels of career satisfaction and job competence) and increased self-worth. Negative affect did not significantly predict any of these important life outcomes. In addition to predicting desirable mean levels of later outcomes, early positive affect predicted beneficial changes across time in many outcomes. Conclusions The findings extend early research on the beneficial outcomes of subjective well-being by having an earlier assessment of well-being, including informant reports in measuring a large variety of outcome variables, and by extending the findings to a lower socioeconomic group of a diverse and younger sample. The results highlight the importance of considering positive affect as an important component of subjective well-being distinct from negative affect. PMID:27075545

  9. Does comorbid chronic pain affect posttraumatic stress disorder diagnosis and treatment? Outcomes of posttraumatic stress disorder screening in Department of Veterans Affairs primary care.

    PubMed

    Outcalt, Samantha D; Hoen, Helena Maria; Yu, Zhangsheng; Franks, Tenesha Marie; Krebs, Erin E

    2016-01-01

    Because posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is both prevalent and underrecognized, routine primary care-based screening for PTSD has been implemented across the Veterans Health Administration. PTSD is frequently complicated by the presence of comorbid chronic pain, and patients with both conditions have increased symptom severity and poorer prognosis. Our objective was to determine whether the presence of pain affects diagnosis and treatment of PTSD among Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) patients who have a positive PTSD screening test. This retrospective cohort study used clinical and administrative data from six Midwestern VA medical centers. We identified 4,244 VA primary care patients with a positive PTSD screen and compared outcomes for those with and without a coexisting pain diagnosis. Outcomes were three clinically appropriate responses to positive PTSD screening: (1) mental health visit, (2) PTSD diagnosis, and (3) new selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) prescription. We found that patients with coexisting pain had a lower rate of mental health visits than those without pain (hazard ratio: 0.889, 95% confidence interval: 0.821-0.962). There were no significant differences in the rate of PTSD diagnosis or new SSRI prescription between patients with and without coexisting pain.

  10. Does the Length of Disability between Injury and Functional Restoration Program Entry Affect Treatment Outcomes for Patients with Chronic Disabling Occupational Musculoskeletal Disorders?

    PubMed

    Asih, Sali; Neblett, Randy; Mayer, Tom G; Gatchel, Robert J

    2017-02-21

    Purpose Functional restoration programs (FRPs), for patients with chronic disabling occupational musculoskeletal disorders (CDOMDs), have consistently demonstrated positive socioeconomic treatment outcomes, including decreased psychosocial distress and increased work return. The pre-treatment length of disability (LOD), or time between injury and treatment admission, has been shown to influence FRP work outcomes. Some studies have found that shorter LOD is associated with better work outcomes. However, few studies have actually examined cohorts with LOD duration longer than 18 months. This present study evaluated the effects of extended LOD (beyond 18 months) on important treatment outcomes. Methods A total cohort of 1413 CDOMD patients entered an FRP. Of those, 312 did not complete the program, so they were eliminated from outcome analyses. The 1101 patients who completed the FRP were classified based on LOD: Late Rehabilitation (LR, 3-6 months, n = 190); Chronic Disability (CD, 7-17 months, n = 494); and Late Chronic Disability (LCD). The LCD, in turn, consisted of four separate subgroups: 18-23 months (LCD-18, n = 110); 24-35 months (LCD-24, n = 123); 36-71 months (LCD-36, n = 74); and 72+ months (LCD-72, n = 110). Patients were evaluated upon admission and were reassessed at discharge. Those patients who chose to pursue work goals post-treatment (n = 912) were assessed 1-year later. Results Longer LOD was associated with less likelihood of completing the FRP (p < .001). Compared to the other LOD groups, a relatively large percentage of patients (47%) in the longest- disability group were receiving social security disability benefits. Associations were found between longer LOD and more severe patient-reported pain, disability, and depressive symptoms at treatment admission. At discharge, symptom severity decreased for these patient-reported variables in all LOD groups (p < .001). Using binary logistic regressions, it was found

  11. TMD DIAGNOSTIC GROUPS AFFECT OUTCOMES INDEPENDENTLY OF TREATMENT IN PATIENTS AT-RISK FOR DEVELOPING CHRONICITY: A TWO-YEAR FOLLOW-UP STUDY+

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Celeste; Dougall, Angela Liegey; Haggard, Rob; Buschang, Peter; Karbowski, Steve; Riggs, Richard; Gatchel, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess whether a biobehavioral intervention would be more effective for patients with myogenous temporomandibular disorder (m-TMD) when compared to other patients receiving either a self-care intervention or no intervention. Three outcomes were assessed: psychosocial distress; pain; and functioning. Methods Participants (n=435) were from community dental clinics in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex seeking treatment for their acute TMD symptoms, and were recruited between 2008 and 2013. Outcome evaluations were conducted immediately post-intervention, as well as at 1- and 2-years after the interventions. For the current study, analyses using two-level hierarchical Multilevel Linear Models (MLMs) were conducted. Results Contrary to expectations, patients did not respond differently to the intervention based on their TMD diagnosis. However, acute m-TMD patients, especially those who had other comorbid TMD diagnoses, reported the highest levels of pain and pain-related symptoms and disability. They also exhibited poorer jaw functioning, especially if they were at high-risk for chronic TMD. Conclusion This study supports the finding that acute m-TMD tends to result in more severe symptom presentations, particularly if diagnosed in combination with other TMD diagnoses. Additionally, patients do not appear to respond better to biobehavioral treatment or self-care on the basis of their diagnoses. PMID:27472521

  12. The role of negative affectivity and negative reactivity to emotions in predicting outcomes in the unified protocol for the transdiagnostic treatment of emotional disorders.

    PubMed

    Sauer-Zavala, Shannon; Boswell, James F; Gallagher, Matthew W; Bentley, Kate H; Ametaj, Amantia; Barlow, David H

    2012-09-01

    The present study aimed to understand the contributions of both the trait tendency to experience negative emotions and how one relates to such experience in predicting symptom change during participation in the Unified Protocol (UP), a transdiagnostic treatment for emotional disorders. Data were derived from a randomized controlled trial comparing the UP to a waitlist control/delayed-treatment condition. First, effect sizes of pre- to post-treatment change for frequency of negative emotions and several variables measuring reactivity to emotional experience (emotional awareness and acceptance, fear of emotions, and anxiety sensitivity) were examined. Second, the relative contributions of change in negative emotions and emotional reactivity in predicting symptom (clinician-rated anxiety, depression, and severity of principal diagnosis) reductions were investigated. Results suggested that decreases in the frequency of negative emotions and reactivity to emotions following participation in the UP were both large in magnitude. Further, two emotional reactivity variables (fear of emotions and anxiety sensitivity) remained significantly related to symptom outcomes when controlling for negative emotions, and accounted for significant incremental variance in their prediction. These findings lend support to the notion that psychological health depends less on the frequency of negative emotions and more on how one relates to these emotions when they occur.

  13. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia: Treatment and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, Mahdi; Feki, Mouna Mnif; Sfar, Mohamed Habib; Abid, Mohamed

    2013-10-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) describes a group of autosomal recessive disorders where there is impairment of cortisol biosynthesis. CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency accounts for 95% of cases and shows a wide range of clinical severity. Glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement therapies are the mainstays of treatment of CAH. The optimal treatment for adults with CAH continues to be a challenge. Important long-term health issues for adults with CAH affect both men and women. These issues may either be due to the disease or to steroid treatment and may affect final height, fertility, cardiometabolic risk, bone metabolism, neuro-cognitive development and the quality-of-life. Patients with CAH should be regularly followed-up from childhood to adulthood by multidisciplinary teams who have knowledge of CAH. Optimal replacement therapy, close clinical and laboratory monitoring, early life-style interventions, early and regular fertility assessment and continuous psychological management are needed to improve outcome.

  14. Conception of Learning Outcomes in the Bloom's Taxonomy Affective Domain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savickiene, Izabela

    2010-01-01

    The article raises a problematic issue regarding an insufficient base of the conception of learning outcomes in the Bloom's taxonomy affective domain. The search for solutions introduces the conception of teaching and learning in the affective domain as well as presents validity criteria of learning outcomes in the affective domain. The…

  15. Vestibular rehabilitation strategies and factors that affect the outcome.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadou, Anna; Skalidi, Nikoleta; Velegrakis, Georgios A

    2012-11-01

    Ever since the introduction of Cawthorne-Cooksey exercises, vestibular rehabilitation (VR) has been gaining popularity in the treatment of the dizzy patient. Numerous studies support the effectiveness of VR in improving balance/walking skills, eye-head coordination and the quality of life of the patient. Different rehabilitation protocols have been used to treat patients with peripheral and central vestibular disorders. Assessment of the patients' progress is based on the patients' selfperception of dizziness and their functional skills. Factors such as age, medication, time of onset of vertigo and home based VR have been evaluated on their effect on the rehabilitation's outcome. The aim of this review is to evaluate rehabilitation strategies and discuss the factors that affect the outcome.

  16. Demotivation: Affective States and Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falout, Joseph; Elwood, James; Hood, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Demotivation can negatively influence the learner's attitudes and behaviors, degrade classroom group dynamics and teacher's motivation, and result in long-term and widespread negative learning outcomes. 900 university EFL learners were surveyed to investigate the demotivating factors in learning English as a foreign language (EFL) in Japan, and…

  17. Trait Affect and Job Search Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Stephane; Saks, Alan M.; Zikic, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    The present study examines the role of trait affect in job search. One hundred and twenty-three university students completed measures of positive and negative affectivity, conscientiousness, job search self-efficacy, job search clarity, and job search intensity during their last year of school while on the job market. At the end of the school…

  18. Targeting treatment for optimal outcome.

    PubMed

    Husted, S E

    2000-01-01

    Rapid assessment of patients presenting with acute chest pain is essential, in order to distinguish between those who have a life-threatening condition, such as myocardial infarction or unstable angina, and the substantial proportion who do not have an acute coronary syndrome. It is thus of vital importance that reliable techniques are available to facilitate rapid risk stratification, as an aid to both clinical diagnosis and management strategy decisions. Assessments based on clinical findings, electrocardiographic monitoring, symptom-limited exercise testing, and biochemical marker measurements, used either singly or in various combinations, can fulfill this role. The present paper reviews some of the recent data that demonstrate the value of these techniques. Very few studies allow conclusions to be drawn about optimal treatment strategies in relation to groups stratified according to prognostic markers, and the question of whether intense medical treatment or early invasive intervention is most beneficial is one that clinical trials have yet to address adequately. In the recently completed Fragmin and Fast Revascularization during InStability in Coronary artery disease (FRISC II) study, comparisons were made of clinical outcomes achieved with early invasive versus noninvasive (i.e., medical) management strategies, and with short-term versus prolonged anticoagulation with dalteparin sodium (Fragmin), in patients with unstable coronary artery disease. All study participants underwent symptom-limited exercise testing and provided blood sample for measurements of biochemical markers; continuous electrocardiography monitoring and echocardiography were also performed in a high proportion of patients. Data from the FRISC II trial thus shed further light on the issue of risk stratification and its use to determine optimal treatment strategies.

  19. Treatment of invasive fungal infections in high risk hematological patients. The outcome with liposomal amphotericin B is not negatively affected by prior administration of mold-active azoles.

    PubMed

    De la Serna, Javier; Jarque, Isidro; López-Jiménez, Javier; Fernández-Navarro, Jose María; Gómez, Valle; Jurado, Manuel; Pascual, Adriana; Serrano, Josefina; Romero, Mónica; Vallejo, Carlos

    2013-03-01

    There are concerns of a reduced effect of liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB) given sequentially after mold-active azoles due to a possible antagonism in their antifungal mechanism. To investigate this possible effect in the clinic, we retrospectively studied 182 high risk hematologic patients with invasive fungal infections (IFI) who were treated with L-AmB. Overall, 96 patients (52.7%) had possible, 52 (28.6%) probable and 34 (18.7%) proven IFI according to EORTC classification. Most had suspected or proven invasive aspergillosis. We compared patients with prior exposure to mold-active azoles (n=100) to those having not (n=82). The group with prior mold-active azoles included more patients with poor risk features for IFI as acute myeloid leukemia (p<0.05) and prolonged neutropenia (p<0.05). A favorable response in the IFI, defined as a complete or partial response, was achieved in 75% and 74.4% of patients in the whole cohort, and in 66% and 74.4% of patients with probable or proven IFI in the two groups. None of these differences were significant. Multivariate analysis showed that refractory baseline disease and renal dysfunction were adverse factors for response in the IFI (p<0.05). Survival was poorer for patients with prior broad spectrum azoles (p<0.05), and for those who did not recover from neutropenia (p<0.05). In conclusion, the effectiveness of treatment of breakthrough fungal infection with L-AmB is not likely to be affected by prior exposure to mold-active azoles prophylaxis, but survival largely depends on host and disease factors.

  20. Implicit emotion regulation affects outcome evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiwei; Tang, Ping; Gu, Ruolei; Luo, Wenbo; Luo, Yue-jia

    2015-06-01

    Efficient implicit emotion regulation processes, which run without awareness, are important for human well-being. In this study, to investigate the influence of implicit emotion regulation on psychological and electrophysiological responses to gains and losses, participants were required to select between two Chinese four-character idioms to match the meaning of the third one before they performed a monetary gambling task. According to whether their meanings were related to emotion regulation, the idioms fell into two categories. Event-related potentials and self-rating emotional experiences to outcome feedback were recorded during the task. Priming emotion regulation reduced subjective emotional experience to both gains and losses and the amplitudes of the feedback-related negativity, while the P3 component was not influenced. According to these results, we suggest that the application of implicit emotion regulation effectively modulated the subjective emotional experience and the motivational salience of current outcomes without the cost of cognitive resources. This study implicates the potential significance of implicit emotion regulation in decision-making processes.

  1. Attributions of responsibility and affective reactions to decision outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zeelenberg, M; van der Pligt, J; de Vries, N K

    2000-06-01

    Immediate affective reactions to outcomes are more intense following decisions to act than following decisions not to act. This finding holds for both positive and negative outcomes. We relate this "actor-effect" to attribution theory and argue that decision makers are seen as more responsible for outcomes when these are the result of a decision to act as compared to a decision not to act. Experiment 1 (N = 80) tests the main assumption underlying our reasoning and shows that affective reactions to decision outcomes are indeed more intense when the decision maker is seen as more responsible. Experiment 2 (N = 40) tests whether the actor effect can be predicted on the basis of differential attributions following action and inaction. Participants read vignettes in which active and passive actors obtained a positive or negative outcome. Action resulted in more intense affect than inaction, and positive outcomes resulted in more intense affect than negative outcomes. Experiment 2 further shows that responsibility attributions and affective reactions to outcomes are highly correlated; that is, more extreme affective reactions are associated with more internal attributions. We discuss the implications for research on post-decisional reactions.

  2. Thematic Teaching: Integrating Cognitive and Affective Outcomes in Elementary Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodeur, Doris R.

    1998-01-01

    Defines thematic teaching, also known as interdisciplinary or authentic instruction, as representing cross-disciplinary programs which integrate cognitive, affective, and psychomotor outcomes. Highlights include integrating thematic teaching into elementary school classrooms, cognitive and social learning theories, motivation, cooperative…

  3. Radiation-induced sarcomas of bone: factors that affect outcome.

    PubMed

    Kalra, S; Grimer, R J; Spooner, D; Carter, S R; Tillman, R M; Abudu, A

    2007-06-01

    We identified 42 patients who presented to our unit over a 27-year period with a secondary radiation-induced sarcoma of bone. We reviewed patient, tumour and treatment factors to identify those that affected outcome. The mean age of the patients at presentation was 45.6 years (10 to 84) and the mean latent interval between radiotherapy and diagnosis of the sarcoma was 17 years (4 to 50). The median dose of radiotherapy given was estimated at 50 Gy (mean 49; 20 to 66). There was no correlation between radiation dose and the time to development of a sarcoma. The pelvis was the most commonly affected site (14 patients (33%)). Breast cancer was the most common primary tumour (eight patients; 19%). Metastases were present at diagnosis of the sarcoma in nine patients (21.4%). Osteosarcoma was the most common diagnosis and occurred in 30 cases (71.4%). Treatment was by surgery and chemotherapy when indicated: 30 patients (71.4%) were treated with the intention to cure. The survival rate was 41% at five years for those treated with the intention to cure but in those treated palliatively the mean survival was only 8.8 months (2 to 22), and all had died by two years. The only factor found to be significant for survival was the ability to completely resect the tumour. Limb sarcomas had a better prognosis (66% survival at five years) than central ones (12% survival at five years) (p = 0.009). Radiation-induced sarcoma is a rare complication of radiotherapy. Both surgical and oncological treatment is likely to be compromised by the treatment received previously by the patient.

  4. Expectations predict chronic pain treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Stéphanie; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Choinière, Manon; Rainville, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests an association between patient pretreatment expectations and numerous health outcomes. However, it remains unclear if and how expectations relate to outcomes after treatments in multidisciplinary pain programs. The present study aims at investigating the predictive association between expectations and clinical outcomes in a large database of chronic pain patients. In this observational cohort study, participants were 2272 patients treated in one of 3 university-affiliated multidisciplinary pain treatment centers. All patients received personalized care, including medical, psychological, and/or physical interventions. Patient expectations regarding pain relief and improvements in quality of life and functioning were measured before the first visit to the pain centers and served as predictor variables. Changes in pain intensity, depressive symptoms, pain interference, and tendency to catastrophize, as well as satisfaction with pain treatment and global impressions of change at 6-month follow-up, were considered as treatment outcomes. Structural equation modeling analyses showed significant positive relationships between expectations and most clinical outcomes, and this association was largely mediated by patients' global impressions of change. Similar patterns of relationships between variables were also observed in various subgroups of patients based on sex, age, pain duration, and pain classification. Such results emphasize the relevance of patient expectations as a determinant of outcomes in multimodal pain treatment programs. Furthermore, the results suggest that superior clinical outcomes are observed in individuals who expect high positive outcomes as a result of treatment.

  5. Factors affecting results of fluoroscopy-guided facet joint injection: Probable differences in the outcome of treatment between pure facet joint hypertrophy and concomitant diseases

    PubMed Central

    Albayrak, Akif; Ozkul, Baris; Balioglu, Mehmet Bulent; Atici, Yunus; Gultekin, Muhammet Zeki; Albayrak, Merih Dilan

    2016-01-01

    Study Design: Retrospective cohort study. Purpose: Facet joints are considered a common source of chronic low-back pain. To determine whether pathogens related to the facet joint arthritis have any effect on treatment failure. Materials and Methods: Facet joint injection was applied to 94 patients treated at our hospital between 2011 and 2012 (mean age 59.5 years; 80 women and 14 men). For the purpose of analysis, the patients were divided into two groups. Patients who only had facet hypertrophy were placed in group A (47 patients, 41 women and 6 men, mean age 55.3 years) and patients who had any additional major pathology to facet hypertrophy were placed in group B (47 patients, 39 women and 8 men, mean age 58.9 years). Injections were applied around the facet joint under surgical conditions utilizing fluoroscopy device guidance. A mixture of methylprednisolone and lidocaine was used as the injection ingredient. Results: In terms of Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and visual analog scale (VAS) scores, no significant difference was found between preinjection and immediate postinjection values in both groups, and the scores of group A patients were significantly lower (P < 0.005) compared with that of group B patients at the end of the third, sixth, and twelfth month. Conclusion: For low-back pain caused by facet hypertrophy, steroid injection around the facet joint is an effective treatment, but if there is an existing major pathology, it is not as effective. PMID:27041884

  6. Defining and Assessing Affective Outcomes in Undergraduate Pediatric Dentistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Claire L.

    1990-01-01

    The affective aspect of the curriculum is defined as the development of appropriate and measurable values such as ethical behavior, honesty, tolerance, and becoming a life-long learner. In outcome assessment of the affective category, the goal is to evaluate the transition of the student to a professional. (MLW)

  7. Passive coping response to depressive symptoms among low-income homebound older adults: does it affect depression severity and treatment outcome?

    PubMed

    Choi, Namkee G; Hegel, Mark T; Sirrianni, Leslie; Marinucci, Mary Lynn; Bruce, Martha L

    2012-11-01

    Due to their homebound state, lack of financial resources, and/or other life demands, a significant proportion of depressed, low-income homebound older adults experience depression. Because of their limited access to psychotherapy, most of these older adults self-manage their depressive symptoms. The purposes of this study were to examine (1) the relationship between homebound older adults' coping responses to depressed mood and the severity of their depressive symptoms at baseline (n = 121), and (2) the moderating effect of passive coping responses on the relationship between participation in problem-solving therapy (PST: in-person or telehealth delivery) and depressive symptoms at 12- and 24-week follow-ups. Controlling for the effects of demographic and disability characteristics, cognitive passive coping was significantly associated with baseline depressive symptoms, while behavioral passive coping was not. The main effect of baseline cognitive passive coping response was also significant in mixed-effects regression analysis, but the interaction between coping pattern and group was not significant. The results point to a possibility that cognitive passive copers may have benefited as much from PST as the rest of the PST participants. Further research needs to examine the moderating effect of coping responses to depressive symptoms on treatment efficacy of PST and other psychosocial interventions for late-life depression.

  8. Passive Coping Response to Depressive Symptoms among Low-Income Homebound Older Adults: Does It Affect Depression Severity and Treatment Outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Namkee G.; Hegel, Mark T.; Sirrianni, Leslie; Marinucci, Mary Lynn; Bruce, Martha L.

    2012-01-01

    Due to their homebound state, lack of financial resources, and/or other life demands, a significant proportion of depressed, low-income homebound older adults experience depression. Because of their limited access to psychotherapy, most of these older adults self-manage their depressive symptoms. The purposes of this study were to examine (1) the relationship between homebound older adults’ coping responses to depressed mood and the severity of their depressive symptoms at baseline (n =121), and (2) the moderating effect of passive coping responses on the relationship between participation in problem-solving therapy (PST: in-person or telehealth delivery) and depressive symptoms at 12- and 24-week follow-ups. Controlling for the effects of demographic and disability characteristics, cognitive passive coping was significantly associated with baseline depressive symptoms, while behavioral passive coping was not. The main effect of baseline cognitive passive coping response was also significant in mixed-effects regression analysis, but the interaction between coping pattern and group was not significant. The results point to a possibility that cognitive passive copers may have benefited as much from PST as the rest of the PST participants. Further research needs to examine the moderating effect of coping responses to depressive symptoms on treatment efficacy of PST and other psychosocial interventions for late-life depression. PMID:22982081

  9. Client outcomes from rural substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Matthew L; Leukefeld, Carl G; Garrity, Thomas F; Godlaski, Theodore; Schoeneberger, Marlies; Townsend, Michael; Hascal, Karyn

    2007-03-01

    Several national evaluations have been conducted since the late 1960s that have assessed the effectiveness of publicly-funded substance abuse treatment in the United States. These studies, however, have focused principally on urban-based treatment programs, and it is unclear whether findings from urban programs can be replicated in outcome studies of programs in rural areas. The current study, therefore, examined the treatment outcomes of clients admitted to one of several short-term inpatient or outpatient drug-free treatment agencies in rural Kentucky. Findings showed that treatment was associated with reductions in drug use and criminality during a six-month follow-up interval. Employment status also improved significantly, and health services utilization was reduced. The similarity between the current findings and findings from national outcome studies of urban-based treatment programs is discussed.

  10. Outcome Prediction in Clinical Treatment Processes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhengxing; Dong, Wei; Ji, Lei; Duan, Huilong

    2016-01-01

    Clinical outcome prediction, as strong implications for health service delivery of clinical treatment processes (CTPs), is important for both patients and healthcare providers. Prior studies typically use a priori knowledge, such as demographics or patient physical factors, to estimate clinical outcomes at early stages of CTPs (e.g., admission). They lack the ability to deal with temporal evolution of CTPs. In addition, most of the existing studies employ data mining or machine learning methods to generate a prediction model for a specific type of clinical outcome, however, a mathematical model that predicts multiple clinical outcomes simultaneously, has not yet been established. In this study, a hybrid approach is proposed to provide a continuous predictive monitoring service on multiple clinical outcomes. More specifically, a probabilistic topic model is applied to discover underlying treatment patterns of CTPs from electronic medical records. Then, the learned treatment patterns, as low-dimensional features of CTPs, are exploited for clinical outcome prediction across various stages of CTPs based on multi-label classification. The proposal is evaluated to predict three typical classes of clinical outcomes, i.e., length of stay, readmission time, and the type of discharge, using 3492 pieces of patients' medical records of the unstable angina CTP, extracted from a Chinese hospital. The stable model was characterized by 84.9% accuracy and 6.4% hamming-loss with 3 latent treatment patterns discovered from data, which outperforms the benchmark multi-label classification algorithms for clinical outcome prediction. Our study indicates the proposed approach can potentially improve the quality of clinical outcome prediction, and assist physicians to understand the patient conditions, treatment inventions, and clinical outcomes in an integrated view.

  11. Factors Affecting the Outcomes of School Bond Elections in Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lode, Marlin D.

    In spite of a nationwide concern for the crumbling infrastructure of school buildings, the prospects of passing bond issues to repair or replace buildings are elusive. This study examined positive and negative factors that affected the outcomes of school bond elections in four purposefully-selected school districts in Iowa. Variables that…

  12. Using Student Support Systems to Increase Cognitive and Affective Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soled, Suzanne Wegener; Bosma, Jennifer F.

    1992-01-01

    Student support systems (small groups of students who meet to learn), help combat the problem of large student-to-teacher ratios and increase cognitive and affective outcomes. Small groups allow large amounts of participation and interaction, rapid error correction, individualized practice, and self-paced work that actively involves students in…

  13. Institutional Factors Affecting Biophysical Outcomes in Forest Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Eric A.

    2009-01-01

    Although there is considerable interest in the impact of diverse policies affecting the biophysical outcomes in forests, gaining a substantial sample over time of forests under different institutional arrangements has been difficult. This article analyzes data from 46 forests located in six countries over time. In forests where policies have been…

  14. Melanin content in melanoma metastases affects the outcome of radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Brożyna, Anna A; Jóźwicki, Wojciech; Roszkowski, Krzysztof; Filipiak, Jan; Slominski, Andrzej T

    2016-04-05

    Melanin possess radioprotective and scavenging properties, and its presence can affect the behavior of melanoma cells, its surrounding environment and susceptibility to the therapy, as showed in vitro experiments. To determine whether melanin presence in melanoma affects the efficiency of radiotherapy (RTH) we evaluated the survival time after RTH treatment in metastatic melanoma patients (n = 57). In another cohort of melanoma patients (n = 84), the relationship between melanin level and pT and pN status was determined. A significantly longer survival time was found in patients with amelanotic metastatic melanomas in comparison to the melanotic ones, who were treated with either RTH or chemotherapy (CHTH) and RTH. These differences were more significant in a group of melanoma patients treated only with RTH. A detailed analysis of primary melanomas revealed that melanin levels were significantly higher in melanoma cells invading reticular dermis than the papillary dermis. A significant reduction of melanin pigmentation in pT3 and pT4 melanomas in comparison to pT1 and T2 tumors was observed. However, melanin levels measured in pT3-pT4 melanomas developing metastases (pN1-3, pM1) were higher than in pN0 and pM0 cases. The presence of melanin in metastatic melanoma cells decreases the outcome of radiotherapy, and melanin synthesis is related to higher disease advancement. Based on our previous cell-based and clinical research and present research we also suggest that inhibition of melanogenesis can improve radiotherapy modalities. The mechanism of relationship between melanogenesis and efficacy of RTH requires additional studies, including larger melanoma patients population and orthotopic, imageable mouse models of metastatic melanoma.

  15. Treatment of affective disorders in cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Mavrides, Nicole; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2015-06-01

    Patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) commonly have syndromal major depression, and depression has been associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Prevalence of depression is between 17% and 47% in CVD patients. Pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic interventions have long been studied, and in general are safe and somewhat efficacious in decreasing depressive symptoms in patients with CVD. The impact on cardiac outcomes remains unclear. The evidence from randomized controlled clinical trials indicates that antidepressants, especially selective serotonin uptake inhibitors, are overwhelmingly safe, and likely to be effective in the treatment of depression in patients with CVD. This review describes the prevalence of depression in patients with CVD, the physiological links between depression and CVD, the treatment options for affective disorders, and the clinical trials that demonstrate efficacy and safety of antidepressant medications and psychotherapy in this patient population. Great progress has been made in understanding potential mediators between major depressive disorder and CVD--both health behaviors and shared biological risks such as inflammation.

  16. Treatment of affective disorders in cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Mavrides, Nicole; Nemeroff, Charles B.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) commonly have syndromal major depression, and depression has been associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Prevalence of depression is between 17% and 47% in CVD patients. Pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic interventions have long been studied, and in general are safe and somewhat efficacious in decreasing depressive symptoms in patients with CVD. The impact on cardiac outcomes remains unclear. The evidence from randomized controlled clinical trials indicates that antidepressants, especially selective serotonin uptake inhibitors, are overwhelmingly safe, and likely to be effective in the treatment of depression in patients with CVD. This review describes the prevalence of depression in patients with CVD, the physiological links between depression and CVD, the treatment options for affective disorders, and the clinical trials that demonstrate efficacy and safety of antidepressant medications and psychotherapy in this patient population. Great progress has been made in understanding potential mediators between major depressive disorder and CVD—both health behaviors and shared biological risks such as inflammation. PMID:26246788

  17. Moyamoya Disease: Treatment and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tackeun; Oh, Chang Wan; Bang, Jae Seung; Kim, Jeong Eun; Cho, Won-Sang

    2016-01-01

    Although the pathogenesis of moyamoya disease (MMD) has not been fully elucidated, the effectiveness of surgical revascularization in preventing stroke has been addressed by many studies. The main mechanism of surgical revascularization is augmenting the intracranial blood flow using an external carotid system by either direct bypass or pial synangiosis. This can improve resting cerebral blood flow as well as vascular reserve capacity. For direct revascularization, the superficial temporal artery is used as the donor artery in most cases, although the occipital artery may be used in limited cases. Usually, the cortical branch of the middle cerebral artery is selected as the recipient of direct anastomosis. As for indirect revascularization, various techniques using different kinds of connective tissues have been introduced. In some cases, reinforcing the anterior cerebral artery and the posterior cerebral artery territories can be considered. The effectiveness of surgical revascularization for preventing ischemic stroke had been generally accepted by many studies. However, for preventing hemorrhagic stroke, new evidence has been added by a recent randomized controlled trial. The incidence of peri-operative complications such as stroke and hyperperfusion syndrome seems to be high due to the nature of the disease and technical demands for treatment. Preventing and adequately managing these complications are essential for ensuring the benefits of surgery. PMID:26846757

  18. Daily affective experiences predict objective sleep outcomes among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tavernier, Royette; Choo, Sungsub B; Grant, Kathryn; Adam, Emma K

    2016-02-01

    Adolescence is a sensitive period for changes in both sleep and affect. Although past research has assessed the association between affect and sleep among adolescents, few studies have examined both trait (typical) and day-to-day changes in affect, and fewer still have specifically examined negative social evaluative emotions (e.g. embarrassment) in relation to sleep. Both between- and within-person variations in daily affect were examined in relation to four objectively-measured sleep outcomes (sleep hours; sleep latency; sleep efficiency; and length of wake bouts) among adolescents. Participants (N = 77 high-school students; 42.9% female; M = 14.37 years) wore an actiwatch and completed daily-diaries for 3 days. The results of hierarchical linear models (controlling for age, gender, race, ethnicity, parental employment status, income, puberty and caffeine) indicated that negative social evaluative emotions and high-arousal affective experiences generally predicted poor sleep outcomes, whereas low-arousal affective experiences were associated with good sleep outcomes. Specifically, at the person level, adolescents reporting higher negative social evaluative emotions had shorter average sleep hours, and those experiencing higher anxiety–nervousness had longer wake bouts. In addition, individuals experiencing more dysphoria (sad, depressed, lonely) had longer average sleep hours and shorter wake bouts, while those experiencing more calmness had shorter sleep latencies. At the within-person level, individuals had longer sleep latencies following days that they had experienced high-arousal positive affect (e.g. excitement), and had longer wake bouts following days they had experienced more negative social evaluative emotions. The results highlight the detrimental effects of negative social evaluative emotions and high-arousal affective states for adolescent sleep.

  19. Daily Affective Experiences Predict Objective Sleep Outcomes among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Tavernier, Royette; Choo, Sungsub B; Grant, Kathryn; Adam, Emma K

    2015-01-01

    Summary Adolescence is a sensitive period for changes in both sleep and affect. Although past research has assessed the association between affect and sleep among adolescents, few studies have examined both trait (typical) and day-to-day changes in affect, and fewer still have specifically examined negative social evaluative emotions (NSEE; e.g., embarrassment) in relation to sleep. We examined both between- and within-person variations in daily affect in relation to four objectively-measured sleep outcomes (sleep hours, sleep latency, sleep efficiency, and length of wake bouts) among adolescents. Participants (N = 77 high school students, 42.9% female; M = 14.37 years) wore an actiwatch and completed daily diaries for 3 days. Results of hierarchical linear models (controlling for age, gender, race, ethnicity, parental employment status, income, puberty, and caffeine) indicated that NSEE and high arousal affective experiences generally predicted poor sleep outcomes, whereas low arousal affective experiences were associated with good sleep outcomes. Specifically, at the person level, adolescents reporting higher NSEE had shorter average sleep hours, and those experiencing higher anxiety-nervousness had longer wake bouts. In addition, individuals experiencing more dysphoria (sad, depressed, lonely) had longer average sleep hours and shorter wake bouts, while those experiencing more calmness had shorter sleep latencies. At the within person level, individuals had longer sleep latencies following days that they had experienced high arousal positive affect (e.g., excitement) and had longer wake bouts following days they had experienced more NSEE. Results highlight the detrimental effects of NSEE and high arousal affective states for adolescent sleep. PMID:26365539

  20. Therapist Perception of Treatment Outcome: Evaluating Treatment Outcomes among Youth with Antisocial Behavior Problems

    PubMed Central

    Crandal, Brent R.; Foster, Sharon L.; Chapman, Jason E.; Cunningham, Phillippe B.; Brennan, Patricia A.; Whitmore, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Effective evaluation of treatment requires the use of measurement tools producing reliable scores that can be used to make valid decisions about the outcomes of interest. Therapist-rated treatment outcome scores that are obtained within the context of empirically supported treatments (EST) could provide clinicians and researchers with data that are easily accessible and complimentary to existing instrumentation. We examined the psychometric properties of scores from the Therapist Perception of Treatment Outcome: Youth Antisocial Behavior (TPTO:YAB), an instrument developed to assess therapist judgments of treatment success among families participating in an EST, Multsystemic Therapy (MST), for youth with antisocial behavior problems. Data were drawn from a longitudinal study of MST. The initial 20-item TPTO was completed by therapists of 111 families at mid-treatment and 163 families at treatment termination. Rasch model dimensionality analyses provided evidence for two dimensions reflecting youth- and caregiver-related aspects of treatment outcome, although a bifactor analyses suggested that these dimensions reflected a single more general construct. Rasch analyses were also used to assess item and rating scale characteristics and refine the number of items. These analyses suggested items performed similarly across time and that scores reflect treatment outcome in similar ways at mid and post-treatment. Multilevel and zero-order analyses provided evidence for the validity of TPTO scores. TPTO scores were moderately correlated with scores of youth and caregiver behaviors targeted in treatment, adding support to its use as a treatment outcome measurement instrument. PMID:25642936

  1. What Are Some Common Outcomes of Stroke and Some Common Treatments for These Outcomes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Publications What are some common outcomes of stroke & some common treatments for these outcomes? Skip sharing ... and temperature changes Depression Types of Treatment for Stroke Stroke treatment includes: Emergency treatment Preventing another stroke ...

  2. Factors affecting intellectual outcome in pediatric brain tumor patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ellenberg, L.; McComb, J.G.; Siegel, S.E.; Stowe, S.

    1987-11-01

    A prospective study utilizing repeated intellectual testing was undertaken in 73 children with brain tumors consecutively admitted to Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles over a 3-year period to determine the effect of tumor location, extent of surgical resection, hydrocephalus, age of the child, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy on cognitive outcome. Forty-three patients were followed for at least two sequential intellectual assessments and provide the data for this study. Children with hemispheric tumors had the most general cognitive impairment. The degree of tumor resection, adequately treated hydrocephalus, and chemotherapy had no bearing on intellectual outcome. Age of the child affected outcome mainly as it related to radiation. Whole brain radiation therapy was associated with cognitive decline. This was especially true in children below 7 years of age, who experienced a very significant loss of function after whole brain radiation therapy.

  3. Therapist perception of treatment outcome: Evaluating treatment outcomes among youth with antisocial behavior problems.

    PubMed

    Crandal, Brent R; Foster, Sharon L; Chapman, Jason E; Cunningham, Phillippe B; Brennan, Patricia A; Whitmore, Elizabeth A

    2015-06-01

    Effective evaluation of treatment requires the use of measurement tools producing reliable scores that can be used to make valid decisions about the outcomes of interest. Therapist-rated treatment outcome scores that are obtained within the context of empirically supported treatments (ESTs) could provide clinicians and researchers with data that are easily accessible and complimentary to existing instrumentation. We examined the psychometric properties of scores from the Therapist Perception of Treatment Outcome: Youth Antisocial Behavior (TPTO:YAB), an instrument developed to assess therapist judgments of treatment success among families participating in an EST, Multisystemic Therapy (MST), for youth with antisocial behavior problems. Data were drawn from a longitudinal study of MST. The initial 20-item TPTO:YAB was completed by therapists of 111 families at midtreatment and 163 families at treatment termination. Rasch model dimensionality analyses provided evidence for 2 dimensions reflecting youth- and caregiver-related aspects of treatment outcome, although a bifactor analyses suggested that these dimensions reflected a single more general construct. Rasch analyses were also used to assess item and rating scale characteristics and refine the number of items. These analyses suggested items performed similarly across time and that scores reflect treatment outcome in similar ways at mid and posttreatment. Multilevel and zero-order analyses provided evidence for the validity of TPTO:YAB scores. TPTO:YAB scores were moderately correlated with scores of youth and caregiver behaviors targeted in treatment, adding support to its use as a treatment outcome measurement instrument.

  4. The effects of different sources of occupational stress on affective, motivational, and psychosomatic outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Ovalle, N.K. II.

    1991-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of role conflict, role ambiguity, and five additional potential sources of occupational stress on an affective outcome (job satisfaction), a motivational outcome (intent to quit), and two psychosomatic outcomes (mental and physical anxiety). In addition to role conflict and role ambiguity, the five additional sources of occupational stress centered on job characteristics, work pressures, rewards and opportunities, interaction of the job and home life, and lack of job challenge. Data were collected from 85 technicians and managers in a service organization. The results of correlation and multiple regression analyses indicated that each of the sources of stress have significant yet different effects on the outcomes. Moreover, role conflict and ambiguity did not have as much of an effect across all outcomes as the other five sources of stress. These findings could be used to improve the measurement, understanding, and treatment of occupational stress. Other implications are discussed. 23 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. Affective Outcomes of Coursework on Computer Technology in Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Barbara; Delaney, Connie; Weiler, Kay

    1989-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine affective outcomes of the introduction to computer technology provided baccalaureate nursing students. Correlates of positive attitudes were also investigated. Third, the construct validity of the two parallel forms of the attitude measure employed was studied. A one group, pre-test, post-test design was used. Analysis using a paired t-test showed that students' attitudes were significantly higher after the coursework than before it. Significant relationships between attitudes toward computing and the following factors were revealed: area of greatest interest in computing, expectations of future use of computers, age, and basic nursing/RN student status. Outcomes of the study contribute to the construct validity of the attitude measures.

  6. Outcomes of ablative fractional laser scar treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deok-Woo; Hwang, Na-Hyun; Yoon, Eul-Sik; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Park, Seung-Ha

    2015-04-01

    Ablative fractional laser (AFL) systems are commonly used to treat various scars, and recent reports have indicated that early scar treatment with fractional lasers has good aesthetic results. Some scars respond dramatically to AFL treatment, incurring high levels of patient satisfaction; however, other scars respond poorly or became worse after treatment. This study was designed to clarify prognostic factors that predict AFL scar treatment outcomes. A total of 108 patients were included in this study. The fractional laser treatments were repeated every 4 weeks until the scar site was acceptable and no additional improvement was expected or the patient discontinued the treatment. The scar improvements were defined as changes in the Manchester scar scale (MSS) from before to after laser treatment. A digital camera was used to acquire digital photographs of the scars under the same light source, the same background, exposure, and white balance. This study developed a modification of the MSS for image analysis in which colour assessment was based on L*a*b* colour co-ordinates of the digital images. The mean MSS values prior to and after laser treatments were 11.6 ± 3.6 and 9.5 ± 2.9, respectively (p < 0.01). AFL treatment improved the qualities of each scar, and the improvements were evident in colour and contour. Scar elevation, pigmentation, high vascularity, early onset of treatment, and the number of treatment sessions were directly related to scar improvement after AFL therapy (p < 0.05). AFL treatments were effective methods for scar treatment. Clinicians can use these prognostic factors to determine treatment plans and to estimate scar improvement after AFL treatment.

  7. Factors affecting patient outcome in primary cutaneous aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Tatara, Alexander M.; Mikos, Antonios G.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary cutaneous aspergillosis (PCA) is an uncommon infection of the skin. There is a paucity of organized literature regarding this entity in regard to patient characteristics, associated Aspergillus species, and treatment modalities on outcome (disease recurrence, disease dissemination, and mortality). We reviewed all published reports of PCA from 1967 to 2015. Cases were deemed eligible if they included the following: patient baseline characteristics (age, sex, underlying condition), evidence of proven or probable PCA, primary treatment strategy, and outcome. We identified 130 eligible cases reported from 1967 to 2015. The patients were predominantly male (63.8%) with a mean age of 30.4 ± 22.1 years. Rates of PCA recurrence, dissemination, and mortality were 10.8%, 18.5%, and 31.5%, respectively. In half of the cases, there was an association with a foreign body. Seven different Aspergillus species were reported to cause PCA. Systemic antifungal therapy without surgery was the most common form of therapy (60% of cases). Disease dissemination was more common in patients with underlying systemic conditions and occurred on average 41.4 days after PCA diagnosis (range of 3–120 days). In a multivariate linear regression model of mortality including only patients with immunosuppressive conditions, dissemination and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome were statistically significantly associated with increased mortality. Nearly one-third of patients with PCA die with the disease. Dissemination and host status are critical in patient outcome. PMID:27367980

  8. Treatment of Human-Caused Trauma: Attrition in the Adult Outcomes Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthieu, Monica; Ivanoff, Andre

    2006-01-01

    Attrition or dropout is the failure of a participant to complete, comply, or the prematurely discontinuation or discharge from treatment, resulting in lost data and affecting outcomes. This review of 10 years of adult posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment outcome literature specific to Criterion A events of human origin examines how…

  9. Side effects as influencers of treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Zafar

    2008-01-01

    Research relative to the efficacy of a therapeutic agent commands a clinician's greatest interest, but treatment decisions are made based on optimizing efficacy and tolerability/safety considerations. Second-generation atypical antipsychotic drugs are a study in the importance of taking a careful look at the full benefit-risk profile of each drug. The disorders that atypical antipsychotics are approved to treat--schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and bipolar disorder--are associated with an increased rate of certain medical comorbidities compared to the general population. Between-drug differences in efficacy are relatively modest for the atypicals, or between atypicals and conventionals, while differences in safety and tolerability are larger and more clinically relevant. The current article will provide a brief summary of safety-related issues that influence treatment outcome and choice of drug.

  10. Type of Speech Material Affects Acceptable Noise Level Test Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Xaver; Dingemanse, Gertjan; Goedegebure, André; Janse, Esther

    2016-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) test, in which individuals indicate what level of noise they are willing to put up with while following speech, has been used to guide hearing aid fitting decisions and has been found to relate to prospective hearing aid use. Unlike objective measures of speech perception ability, ANL outcome is not related to individual hearing loss or age, but rather reflects an individual’s inherent acceptance of competing noise while listening to speech. As such, the measure may predict aspects of hearing aid success. Crucially, however, recent studies have questioned its repeatability (test–retest reliability). The first question for this study was whether the inconsistent results regarding the repeatability of the ANL test may be due to differences in speech material types used in previous studies. Second, it is unclear whether meaningfulness and semantic coherence of the speech modify ANL outcome. To investigate these questions, we compared ANLs obtained with three types of materials: the International Speech Test Signal (ISTS), which is non-meaningful and semantically non-coherent by definition, passages consisting of concatenated meaningful standard audiology sentences, and longer fragments taken from conversational speech. We included conversational speech as this type of speech material is most representative of everyday listening. Additionally, we investigated whether ANL outcomes, obtained with these three different speech materials, were associated with self-reported limitations due to hearing problems and listening effort in everyday life, as assessed by a questionnaire. ANL data were collected for 57 relatively good-hearing adult participants with an age range representative for hearing aid users. Results showed that meaningfulness, but not semantic coherence of the speech material affected ANL. Less noise was accepted for the non-meaningful ISTS signal than for the meaningful speech materials. ANL repeatability was comparable

  11. Understanding pharmacokinetics to improve tuberculosis treatment outcome

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Jonathan; Heysell, Scott K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) remains the leading cause of death from a curable infectious disease; drug-resistant TB threatens to dismantle all prior gains in global control. Suboptimal circulating anti-TB drug concentrations can lead to lack of cure and acquired drug resistance. Areas covered This review will introduce pharmacokinetic parameters for key anti-TB drugs, as well as the indications and limitations of measuring these parameters in clinical practice. Current and novel methodologies for delivering anti-TB pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic data are highlighted and gaps in operational research described. Expert opinion Individual pharmacokinetic variability is commonplace, underappreciated and difficult to predict without therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). Pharmacokinetic thresholds associated with poor TB treatment outcome in drug-susceptible TB have recently been described and may now guide the application of TDM, but require validation in a variety of settings and comorbidities. Dried blood spots for TDM and prepackaged multidrug plates for minimum inhibitory concentration testing will overcome barriers of accessibility and represent areas for innovation. Operationalizing pharmacokinetics has the potential to improve TB outcomes in the most difficult-to-treat forms of the disease such as multidrug resistance. Clinical studies in these areas are eagerly anticipated and we expect will better define the rational introduction of novel therapeutics. PMID:24597717

  12. Multihospital System Membership and Patient Treatments, Expenditures, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between hospital membership in systems and the treatments, expenditures, and outcomes of patients. Data Sources The Medicare Provider Analysis and Review dataset, for data on Medicare patients admitted to general medical-surgical hospitals between 1985 and 1998 with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI); the American Hospital Association Annual Survey, for data on hospitals. Study Design A multivariate regression analysis. An observation is a fee-for-service Medicare AMI patient admitted to a study hospital. Dependent variables include patient transfers, catheterizations, angioplasties or bypass surgeries, 90-day mortality, and Medicare expenditures. Independent variables include system participation, other admission hospital and patient traits, and hospital and year fixed effects. The five-part system definition incorporates the size and location of the index admission hospital and the size and distance of its partners. Principal Findings While the effects of multihospital system membership on patients are in general limited, patients initially admitted to small rural system hospitals that have big partners within 100 miles experience lower mortality rates than patients initially admitted to independent hospitals. Regression results show that to the extent system hospital patients experience differences in treatments and outcomes relative to patients of independent hospitals, these differences remain even after controlling for the admission hospital's capacity to provide cardiac services. Conclusions Multihospital system participation may affect AMI patient treatment and outcomes through factors other than cardiac service offerings. Additional investigation into the nature of these factors is warranted. PMID:15230926

  13. Negative Treatment Outcomes of Behavioral Parent Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assemany, Amy E.; McIntosh, David E.

    2002-01-01

    The purposes of this review were to: outline literature on negative treatment outcomes of behavioral parent training programs; detail variables found to be predictive of negative treatment outcomes; and suggest future directions of study. It is suggested that despite studies documenting positive outcomes of behavioral parent training programs,…

  14. Genetics of long-term treatment outcome in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Chiara; Serretti, Alessandro

    2016-02-04

    Bipolar disorder (BD) shows one of the strongest genetic predispositions among psychiatric disorders and the identification of reliable genetic predictors of treatment response could significantly improve the prognosis of the disease. The present study investigated genetic predictors of long-term treatment-outcome in 723 patients with BD type I from the STEP-BD (Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder) genome-wide dataset. BD I patients with >6months of follow-up and without any treatment restriction (reflecting a natural setting scenario) were included. Phenotypes were the total and depressive episode rates and the occurrence of one or more (hypo)manic/mixed episodes during follow-up. Quality control of genome-wide data was performed according to standard criteria and linear/logistic regression models were used as appropriate under an additive hypothesis. Top genes were further analyzed through a pathway analysis. Genes previously involved in the susceptibility to BD (DFNB31, SORCS2, NRXN1, CNTNAP2, GRIN2A, GRM4, GRIN2B), antidepressant action (DEPTOR, CHRNA7, NRXN1), and mood stabilizer or antipsychotic action (NTRK2, CHRNA7, NRXN1) may affect long-term treatment outcome of BD. Promising findings without previous strong evidence were TRAF3IP2-AS1, NFYC, RNLS, KCNJ2, RASGRF1, NTF3 genes. Pathway analysis supported particularly the involvement of molecules mediating the positive regulation of MAPK cascade and learning/memory processes. Further studies focused on the outlined genes may be helpful to provide validated markers of BD treatment outcome.

  15. Reproductive Outcome Following Hysteroscopic Treatment of Uterine Septum

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeilzadeh, Seddigheh; Delavar, Mouloud Agajani; Andarieh, Maryam Ghanbari

    2014-01-01

    Background: Septate uterus is the most common uterine anomaly and a cause for miscarriage and infertility. Existing data suggested a better reproductive outcome of uterine septum following hysteroscopic septum resection. Objective: Current study was administered to share our experience in hystroscopic septum resection for reproductive outcome following hysteroscopic treatment of uterine septum and specifically focusing on different treatment protocols after hysteroscopic septum resection. Methods& materials: This study was a cross-sectional study based on secondary data that was obtained from medical records of infertile women who had undergone transvaginal hysteroscopy and used different treatment protocols after hysteroscopic correction of uterine septum in Infertility and Reproductive Health Research Center between April 2005 and February 2014. Results: The total number of infertile women underwent hysteroscopy uterine septoplasty was 106. The hysteroscopy septoplasty resulted in an overall pregnancy rate of 67% and a live birth 57.5%. Pregnancy rate for patients who had not male infertility was 92.1%. The chi-square test did not reveal any statistically significant difference in side affect, pregnancy, live birth, abortion, preterm deliveries, and term deliveries rate between these patients either with consistent hormone therapy plus IUD insertion or with alternate hormone therapy plus IUD after hysteroscopic metroplasty. Conclusion: The findings of the present study indicated hysteroscopic septum resection to remove a uterine septum in women with infertility is safe and may be an efficacious procedure. Treatment following hysteroscopic septum resection, either the consistent or the alternate protocol is both beneficial to improve pregnancy rate. PMID:25685079

  16. Learning Outcomes in Affective Domain within Contemporary Architectural Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savic, Marko; Kashef, Mohamad

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary architectural education has shifted from the traditional focus on providing students with specific knowledge and skill sets or "inputs" to outcome based, student-centred educational approach. Within the outcome based model, students' performance is assessed against measureable objectives that relate acquired knowledge…

  17. Do Learning Style and Learning Environment Affect Learning Outcome?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiBartola, Leesa M.; Miller, Miriam K.; Turley, Catherine L.

    2001-01-01

    Kolb's Learning Style Inventory was completed by 29 allied health students on campus and 27 in distance education. Both groups had similar learning outcomes. Only the Diverger learning style showed a correlation between learning environment and outcome: 83% of Divergers with above average grades were in distance education. (Contains 20…

  18. Bibliotherapy Treatment for Children with Adjustment Difficulties: A Comparison of Affective and Cognitive Bibliotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betzalel, Nurit; Shechtman, Zipora

    2010-01-01

    This study compared outcomes following cognitive and affective bibliotherapy treatment with 79 children and adolescents in a residential home in Israel. Treatment children were compared to a control-no treatment group from the same home. Anxiety was measured through a self-report measure (Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale; Reynolds &…

  19. Psychological Factors Affecting Rehabilitation and Outcomes Following Elective Orthopaedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Flanigan, David C; Everhart, Joshua S; Glassman, Andrew H

    2015-09-01

    Orthopaedic surgery often requires many months of rehabilitation to achieve a successful outcome, regardless of subspecialty. Several important psychological factors strongly influence pain perceptions, rehabilitation compliance, and patient outcomes after common orthopaedic surgeries that require extensive rehabilitation, including total joint arthroplasty, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and spine surgery for degenerative disease. Early recognition of patients exhibiting psychological distress, fear-avoidance behavior, or poor perceived self-efficacy or pessimistic personality traits can be used to improve preoperative risk stratification for poor rehabilitation or surgical outcomes. Several intervention strategies exist to address these psychological factors when they appear to contribute suboptimal postoperative rehabilitation or recovery.

  20. Review of thumb carpometacarpal arthritis classification, treatment and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, Joshua; Calder, Kevin; Williams, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis (CMC OA) is a common disease, affecting up to 11% and 33% of men and women in their 50s and 60s, respectively, which leads to pain, laxity and weakness of the CMC joint. Based on the staging of the CMC OA, different forms of treatment can be used, including both conservative and surgical measures. Surgical options include osteotomy, trapezial excision, ligament reconstruction with or without tendon interposition, and various prosthetic interpositional implants with or without trapezial excision. The present article reviews the staging of CMC OA, the evaluation of hand function using patient-reported questionnaires, and outcomes of both conservative and surgical treatments. The present review also introduces a commercially available interpositional spacer surgical technique for CMC OA and the early evidence that the literature has shown for improving hand function, strength and stability of the thumb CMC joint postoperatively. PMID:23204884

  1. Impact of bupropion and cognitive–behavioral treatment for depression on positive affect, negative affect, and urges to smoke during cessation treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kahler, Christopher W.; Leventhal, Adam M.; Abrantes, Ana M.; Lloyd-Richardson, Elizabeth; Niaura, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Bupropion and cognitive–behavioral treatment (CBT) for depression have been used as components of treatments designed to alleviate affective disturbance during smoking cessation. Studies of treatment-related changes in precessation affect or urges to smoke are needed to evaluate the proposed mechanisms of these treatments. Methods: The present report examines affective trajectories and urges to smoke prior to, on quit day, and after quitting in a sample of 524 smokers randomized to receive bupropion versus placebo and CBT versus standard smoking cessation CBT. Results: Bupropion and/or CBT did not affect the observed decreases in positive affect and increases in negative affect prior to cessation. However, on quit day, observed levels of negative affect and urges to smoke were diminished significantly among individuals receiving bupropion. Decreases in positive affect prior to quitting, lower levels of positive affect, and increased levels of negative affect and urges to smoke on quit day were each related to higher risk of smoking lapse. Depression proneness was an independent predictor of lower positive affect and higher negative affect but did not moderate the effects of bupropion on outcomes. In mediational analyses, the effect of bupropion was accounted for in part by lower negative affect and urges to smoke on quit day. Discussion: Results support the efficacy of bupropion in reducing relapse risk associated with urges to smoke and negative affect and suggest the need to better understand the role of low positive affect as a risk factor for early lapse. PMID:19574407

  2. Outcome Expectations and Associated Treatment Outcomes in Motivational Enhancement Therapy Delivered in English and Spanish

    PubMed Central

    Serafini, Kelly; Decker, Suzanne; Kiluk, Brian D.; Añez, Luis; Paris, Manuel; Frankforter, Tami; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives The relationship between patients’ baseline expectations regarding treatment outcome and actual outcomes has not been widely studied within the field of substance use disorders. We hypothesized that outcome expectations would be unrelated to outcomes in a study investigating Motivational Enhancement Therapy delivered in English (MET-E) consistent with our earlier work, and conducted exploratory analyses in a separate study that investigated the same treatment delivered in Spanish (MET-S). Methods These secondary analyses compared patient outcome expectations and substance use treatment outcomes in two large, multisite randomized controlled clinical trials that evaluated three sessions of MET-E or MET-S. The MET-E sample included 461 participants and the MET-S sample included 405 participants. Outcome expectations were measured by a single item regarding expectations about abstinence prior to initiating treatment. Results Outcome expectations were strongly associated with most substance use outcomes in the MET-S trial (but not in MET-E), even after controlling for severity of substance use at baseline. In MET-S, those who indicated that they were ‘unsure’ that they would achieve abstinence during treatment submitted a greater percentage of drug-positive urine toxicology screens during the treatment period than those who were ‘sure’ they would achieve abstinence (F = 18.83, p <.001). Discussion and Conclusions Patients’ outcome expectations regarding the likelihood of abstinence may be an important predictor of drug use treatment outcomes among Spanish-speakers, but not necessarily for English-speakers. Scientific Significance Individual differences and cultural factors may play a role in the association between outcome expectations and treatment outcomes. PMID:26541501

  3. Nurse managed prenatal programs affect outcomes for corporations.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P E; Bitowski, B E; Bell, P L

    1997-09-01

    Faced with higher medical costs and increased insurance premiums, corporations are focusing on health promotion and wellness. With increasing numbers of women in the workforce, corporations have identified the need for prenatal programs. By developing, initiating, and evaluating outcome-based prenatal programs nurses can target the health care needs of this select population. One such program documented several outcomes including improved employee health and an 86% reduction in maternal/newborn costs.

  4. Effect of Treatment Modality on Long-Term Outcomes in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, L. Eugene; Hodgkins, Paul; Caci, Hervé; Kahle, Jennifer; Young, Susan

    2015-01-01

    or longer durations did not markedly affect proportion of improved outcomes reported, but measurement of outcomes long periods after treatment cessation may attenuate results. PMID:25714373

  5. Patient Satisfaction and Sustained Outcomes of Drug Abuse Treatment

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, ZHIWEI; GERSTEIN, DEAN R.; FRIEDMANN, PETER D.

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated the relationship between patients’ self-rated satisfaction with treatment services during and shortly after treatment with their drug use outcomes at one year follow-up, using a U.S. national panel survey of patients in 62 methadone, outpatient, short-term residential, and long-term residential programs. A favorable evaluation of treatment near the time of discharge had a significant positive relationship with drug use improvement outcomes approximately one year later, independent of the separately measured effects of treatment duration, counseling intensity, patient adherence to treatment protocols, pre-treatment drug use patterns, and other characteristics of patients and treatment programs. PMID:18420772

  6. Can a future choice affect a past measurement's outcome?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonov, Yakir; Cohen, Eliahu; Elitzur, Avshalom C.

    2015-04-01

    An EPR experiment is studied where each particle within the entangled pair undergoes a few weak measurements (WMs) along some pre-set spin orientations, with the outcomes individually recorded. Then the particle undergoes one strong measurement along an orientation chosen at the last moment. Bell-inequality violation is expected between the two final measurements within each EPR pair. At the same time, statistical agreement is expected between these strong measurements and the earlier weak ones performed on that pair. A contradiction seemingly ensues: (i) Bell's theorem forbids spin values to exist prior to the choice of the orientation measured; (ii) A weak measurement is not supposed to determine the outcome of a successive strong one; and indeed (iii) Almost no disentanglement is inflicted by the WMs; and yet (iv) The outcomes of weak measurements statistically agree with those of the strong ones, suggesting the existence of pre-determined values, in contradiction with (i). Although the conflict can be solved by mere mitigation of the above restrictions, the most reasonable resolution seems to be that of the Two-State-Vector Formalism (TSVF), namely, that the choice of the experimenter has been encrypted within the weak measurement's outcomes, even before the experimenters themselves know what their choice will be.

  7. Prediction of antiepileptic drug treatment outcomes using machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colic, Sinisa; Wither, Robert G.; Lang, Min; Zhang, Liang; Eubanks, James H.; Bardakjian, Berj L.

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Antiepileptic drug (AED) treatments produce inconsistent outcomes, often necessitating patients to go through several drug trials until a successful treatment can be found. This study proposes the use of machine learning techniques to predict epilepsy treatment outcomes of commonly used AEDs. Approach. Machine learning algorithms were trained and evaluated using features obtained from intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG) recordings of the epileptiform discharges observed in Mecp2-deficient mouse model of the Rett Syndrome. Previous work have linked the presence of cross-frequency coupling (I CFC) of the delta (2-5 Hz) rhythm with the fast ripple (400-600 Hz) rhythm in epileptiform discharges. Using the I CFC to label post-treatment outcomes we compared support vector machines (SVMs) and random forest (RF) machine learning classifiers for providing likelihood scores of successful treatment outcomes. Main results. (a) There was heterogeneity in AED treatment outcomes, (b) machine learning techniques could be used to rank the efficacy of AEDs by estimating likelihood scores for successful treatment outcome, (c) I CFC features yielded the most effective a priori identification of appropriate AED treatment, and (d) both classifiers performed comparably. Significance. Machine learning approaches yielded predictions of successful drug treatment outcomes which in turn could reduce the burdens of drug trials and lead to substantial improvements in patient quality of life.

  8. Tuberculosis treatment outcomes in Europe: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Faustini, A; Hall, A J; Perucci, C A

    2005-09-01

    In order to facilitate the control of tuberculosis (TB), the World Health Organization (WHO) has defined a standardised short-course chemotherapy and a strategy, directly observed therapy. In 2000, WHO surveillance of TB treatments in Europe recorded a successful outcome rate of 77%. The aim of this report is to estimate treatment outcomes in European countries based on published studies and to identify their determinants. A systematic review was conducted of published reports of TB treatment outcomes in Europe. Meta-analysis, meta-regression and subgrouping were used to pool treatment outcomes and analyse associations with mean age, sex, immigration status and multidrug resistance. Of the 197 articles identified in the search, 26 were eligible for the review; 74.4% of outcomes were successful, 12.3% were unsuccessful and 6.8% of patients died. Heterogeneity was high for all outcomes. National estimates were possible for six countries. Multidrug resistance was inversely associated with successful outcome, which were fewer in populations with >9% multidrug-resistant TB, and in patients aged <44 yrs. Successful tuberculosis treatment outcomes were below the 85% threshold suggested by the World Health Organization. There was an inverse association with levels of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The unexplained heterogeneity between the studies for unsuccessful outcomes seems to be due to differing interpretations given to World Health Organization definitions.

  9. The Prevalence and Treatment Outcomes of Primary Tooth Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Arikan, Volkan; Sari, Saziye; Sonmez, Hayriye

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the type and prevalence of primary tooth injuries, as well as their treatment and treatment outcomes, among children referred to the Department of Pedodontics at the Ankara University Faculty of Dentistry in Turkey. Methods: The study population consisted of patients applying to the department with a primary tooth injury over a period of 21 months. Fifty-one patients presented with trauma to 99 primary teeth. Clinical and radiographic examinations were conducted on each patient. Age, sex, time, cause of injury, and number of teeth affected were recorded, and the type of trauma was identified according to Andreasen’s classification. The teeth were treated by one of the authors. Results: The majority of trauma occurred between the ages of 2 and 4. The most common type of injury was lateral luxation (33.3%). Most injuries (33.3%) presented during May. The most common form of treatment was follow-up only (39.4%), followed by extraction (29.3%) and root canal treatment (12.1%). The average follow-up period was 11 months. During the follow-up period, complications were observed in 4 teeth. Conclusions: The study results show that in the absence of acute symptoms, parents tend not to apply to a dental clinic for children’s injuries. This finding highlights the importance of informing the public about primary tooth injuries and their consequences. PMID:20922165

  10. Pilot-testing a statewide outcome monitoring system: overview of the California Treatment Outcome Project (CALTOP).

    PubMed

    Evans, Elizabeth; Hser, Yih-Ing

    2004-05-01

    Timely information provided by an effective outcome monitoring system (OMS) is key to making improvements in treatment program effectiveness, service provision, and client outcomes. The California Treatment Outcome Project (CalTOP) developed and pilot-tested an automated outcome monitoring system for California's alcohol and other drug (AOD) system of care. CalTOP was designed to track client movement through treatment programs, measure standardized assessment of client service needs, record service utilization, assess treatment outcomes and client satisfaction, and determine the extent to which treatment produces cost-offsets in other health and social service systems. Information collected by CalTOP revealed that client problem severity at admission was high, services needed were diverse, and treatment services were generally not well matched to the level of problem severity or needs of clients. Also, client retention and length of stay in treatment were generally insufficient to maximize the potential benefits associated with treatment. This article presents the type of information on client demographics and treatment retention that was provided by CalTOP and outlines recommendations for implementing an AOD outcome monitoring system statewide.

  11. Is volume important in aneurysm treatment outcome?

    PubMed

    Katsargyris, Athanasios; Klonaris, Chris; Verhoeven, Eric L

    2017-04-01

    Several studies have suggested that surgical procedures performed at high-volume centers may result in superior outcome. Technically more demanding procedures such as aortic aneurysm repair appear to demonstrate a stronger relationship with volume. The present chapter reviewed the literature using the MEDLINE database to identify studies investigating the effect of volume in aortic aneurysm repair outcomes. The great majority of studies identified shows an advantage for high-volume hospitals with regard to perioperative mortality of abdominal (AAA), thoracic (TAA) and thoracoabdominal (TAAA) aortic aneurysm repair. A similar advantage is shown for high-volume surgeons. The volume advantage appears to be less evident for simple endovascular procedures (EVAR & TEVAR), compared to more complex endovascular (F/BEVAR) and open surgical procedures. Superior outcomes observed in high-volume hospitals are not only explained by increased surgeons' experience, but importantly also by a more effective management of intra- and postoperative complications. Confounding factors to be taken into account are the timing of the studies in relation to positive evolution of outcomes in several high-risk procedures, and patient cohorts selected in regions with very low- and very high-volume hospitals only.

  12. Decisions That Affect Outcomes in the Distant Future.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    75-030-0713 and #78-072-0721 NSF Grant #FNn-72-04149-AO1 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK The Board of...lng expoctat in- about the. outcomes by charging or rebat in ; i, each cuotomr. P The concept of a social brokerage ftrm i sinilar to that ,f , charity ...contributes to charities . For this reason, we would ask the individual questions about other decisions and tradeoffs 104 .0. -e e ’. ". ’*- . " 0 Lvd 6 . he has

  13. How much do immigration and trade affect labor market outcomes?

    PubMed

    Borjas, G J; Freeman, R B; Katz, L F

    1997-01-01

    "This paper provides new estimates of the impact of immigration and trade on the U.S. labor market.... We examine the relation between economic outcomes for native workers and immigrant flows to regional labor markets.... We...use the factor proportions approach to examine the contributions of immigration and trade to recent changes in U.S. educational wage differentials and attempt to provide a broader assessment of the impact of immigration on the incomes of U.S. natives." Comments and discussion by John DiNardo, John M. Abowd, and others are included (pp. 68-85).

  14. Thrombocytopenia in pregnancy: do the time of diagnosis and delivery route affect pregnancy outcome in parturients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura?

    PubMed

    Yuce, T; Acar, D; Kalafat, E; Alkilic, A; Cetindag, E; Soylemez, F

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the determining effects of diagnosis time on pregnancy outcomes in a population of pregnant women with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Records of all the pregnant women with thrombocytopenia were evaluated. Those with a confirmed diagnosis of ITP were included in the study. Main outcome measures were antenatal thrombocyte count, postpartum haemorrhage rate, and route of delivery. Foetal outcomes such as foetal thrombocyte count, haemorrhage, and birth weight were also reported as secondary outcome measures. Time of diagnosis either antenatal or preconception did not significantly alter the investigated parameters. Delivery route had no impact on complication rates. Time of diagnosis also did not affect treatment modality. ITP is rare disorder accounting for less than 5 % of all pregnant thrombocytopenias. Time of diagnosis does not affect maternal-foetal outcomes or treatment modality unless diagnosis is made during labour. Compared to gestational thrombocytopenia, treatment rates may differ but treatment modalities remain the same and the effort put into making the differential should be weighed against maternal stress factors for lengthy laboratory evaluation as long as the thrombocytopenia is of pure nature without any systemic involvement.

  15. Socioeconomic status does not affect the outcome of liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hwan Y; Galabova, Violetta; Edwin, David; Thuluvath, Paul J

    2002-12-01

    The outcome of liver transplantation is dependent on many factors. It was suggested that racial disparities in outcome may be related to differences in socioeconomic status (SES). In this retrospective study, we analyzed the effect of SES on graft and patient survival. Two hundred seventy-six adult patients who underwent liver transplantation at our institution from July 1988 to June 2001 were included in the analysis. Educational and occupation statuses were coded using established criteria (Hollingshead Index of Social Status [HI]). SES then was calculated using the HI formula: SES = education level x 3 + occupation x 5, and categorized into four groups: group 1, score less than 29 (n = 71); group 2, score of 29 to 42 (n = 82); group 3, score of 42 to 53 (n = 69); and group 4, score greater than 53 (n = 54). Kaplan-Meier analysis was used for graft and patient survival, and Cox regression analysis was used to determine the effect of confounding factors. Demographics of all four groups were similar. One-, 2-, and 5-year graft and patient survival did not differ significantly across groups by Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression survival analysis. In conclusion, SES did not predict graft and patient survival after liver transplantation.

  16. Family-School Links: How Do They Affect Educational Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan, Ed.; Dunn, Judith F., Ed.

    This book explores issues related to the links between families and schools and how they affect children's educational achievement, and is organized as follows: Part 1, titled "Families and Schools: How Can They Work Together To Promote Children's School Success?" contains the following chapters: chapter 1, "Family Involvement in…

  17. Learning with Computers in Small Groups: Cognitive and Affective Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mevarech, Zemira R.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examines the effects of cooperative and individualistic computer-assisted instruction (CAI) programs on cognitive and affective variables in Israeli grade six mathematics classes. Analyses of the data indicate that students who used CAI for drill and practice in pairs performed better than students who used the same program individually. (30…

  18. The Synergistic Effect of Affective Factors on Student Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Brady Michael; Lin, Huann-shyang; Yore, Larry D.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates how affective and self-related factors impact participation in science learning and environmental awareness and responsibility. Using PISA 2006 datasets from Taiwan and Canada having similar level of science competency, the model for this study verifies and expands an earlier model by examining the relationships among…

  19. Secondary science classroom dissections: Informing policy by evaluating cognitive outcomes and exploring affective outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allspaw, Kathleen M.

    Animal protection organizations claim that dissection is pedagogically unsound and that it will cause students to lose respect for non-human animals. Science teacher organizations support curricula that teach respect for animal life and include dissection. Prior research compared dissection to dissection alternatives. Four of the six studies revealed no difference between groups on tests of cognitive outcomes. One study revealed that dissection was superior, and one revealed that the alternative was superior. No differences in attitudes toward science, dissection or school were found. Attitudes toward non-human animals were not measured. This study focused on the dissections of earthworms and frogs in middle and high school classrooms. Pre and post-tests of conceptual understanding revealed failing scores and no significant pre/post differences. Because these tests required critical thinking skills, and the dissection activities did not, it is difficult to determine if the poor performance on these tests indicates the inability of the students to think critically, and/or if it indicates the ineffectiveness of dissection. Further studies of dissections that focus on critical thinking would be necessary to make this distinction. Classroom observations, student written narratives, and student and adult interviews revealed mixed attitudes toward non-human animals. Student behaviors during dissection were similar to those behaviors exhibited during non-dissection activities. Most students and adults readily supported worm dissections while they expressed some trepidation about frog dissections. Students and adults universally expressed affection for their pets and opposed the use of their own pets for dissection/research. There was slight support for the use of dogs and cats for dissection/research, but only those students who expressed hate for cats said that they could dissect cats. None of the students or adults expressed a willingness to dissect dogs. Some students

  20. SOCIOECONOMIC, CULTURAL, AND BEHAVIORAL FACTORS AFFECTING HISPANIC HEALTH OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    MORALES, LEO S.; LARA, MARIELENA; KINGTON, RAYNARD S.; VALDEZ, ROBERT O.; ESCARCE, JOSÉ J.

    2006-01-01

    Evidence suggests that social and economic factors are important determinants of health. Yet, despite higher poverty rates, less education, and worse access to health care, health outcomes of many Hispanics living in the United States today are equal to, or better than, those of non-Hispanic whites. This paradox is described in the literature as the epidemiological paradox or Hispanic health paradox. In this paper, the authors selectively review data and research supporting the existence of the epidemiological paradox. They find substantial support for the existence of the epidemiological paradox, particularly among Mexican Americans. Census undercounts of Hispanics, misclassification of Hispanic deaths, and emigration of Hispanics do not fully account for the epidemiological paradox. Identifying protective factors underlying the epidemiological paradox, while improving access to care and the economic conditions among Hispanics, are important research and policy implications of this review. PMID:12407964

  1. Socioeconomic, cultural, and behavioral factors affecting Hispanic health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Morales, Leo S; Lara, Marielena; Kington, Raynard S; Valdez, Robert O; Escarce, José J

    2002-11-01

    Evidence suggests that social and economic factors are important determinants of health. Yet, despite higher porverty rates, less education, and worse access to health care, health outcomes of many Hispanics living in the United States today are equal to, or better than, those of non-Hispanic whites. This paradox is described in the literature as the epidemiological paradox or Hispanic health paradox. In this paper, the authors selectively review data and research supporting the existence of the epidemiological paradox. They find substantial support for the existence of the epidemiological paradox, particularly among Mexican Americans. Census undercounts of Hispanics, misclassification of Hispanic deaths, and emigration of Hispanics do not fully account for the epidemiological paradox. Identifying protective factors underlying the epidemiological paradox, while improving access to care and the economic conditions among Hispanics, are important research and policy implications of this review.

  2. Visceral leishmaniasis treatment outcome and its determinants in northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Welay, Getachew Mebrahtu; Alene, Kefyalew Addis

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Poor treatment outcomes of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) are responsible for the high mortality rate of this condition in resource-limited settings such as Ethiopia. This study aimed to identify the proportion of poor VL treatment outcomes in northwest Ethiopia and to evaluate the determinants associated with poor outcomes. METHODS A hospital-based retrospective study was conducted among 595 VL patients who were admitted to Kahsay Abera Hospital in northwest Ethiopia from October 2010 to April 2013. Data were entered into Epi Info version 7.0 and exported to SPSS version 20 for analysis. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models were fitted to identify the determinants of VL treatment outcomes. Adjusted odds ratio (aORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used, and p-values <0.05 were considered to indicate statistical significance. RESULTS The proportion of poor treatment outcomes was 23.7%. Late diagnosis (≥29 days) (aOR, 4.34; 95% CI, 2.22 to 8.46), severe illness at admission (inability to walk) (aOR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.06 to 2.40) and coinfection with VL and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (aOR, 2.72; 95% CI, 1.40 to 5.20) were found to be determinants of poor VL treatment outcomes. CONCLUSIONS Poor treatment outcomes, such as death, treatment failure, and non-adherence, were found to be common. Special attention must be paid to severely ill and VL/HIV-coinfected patients. To improve VL treatment outcomes, the early diagnosis and treatment of VL patients is recommended. PMID:28092934

  3. Outcome Studies in the Treatment of Panic Disorder: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beamish, Patricia M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Reviews outcome studies in the treatment of panic disorder without agoraphobia for adults. Presents evidence supporting the efficacy of psychopharmacological and cognitive-behavioral interventions. Addresses the need for standards of care in counseling persons with panic disorder. (RB)

  4. Parenting Cognition and Affective Outcomes Following Parent Management Training: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Colalillo, Sara; Johnston, Charlotte

    2016-09-01

    Parent management training (PMT) is considered the gold standard in the treatment of child behavior problems. The secondary effects of these interventions, particularly on parent well-being, are infrequently studied, despite evidence that parents of children with behavior problems often experience personal difficulties. This narrative review examined the affective and parenting cognition outcomes of PMT for mothers and fathers of children ages 2-13 years, across 48 controlled treatment studies. Substantial support was found for reductions in parenting stress, and increases in perceived parenting competence following PMT. Evidence indicated fewer improvements in domains more distal from parenting, including parent depressive symptoms and marital relationship dysfunction. A number of studies suggested parent gender as a moderator of parent outcomes of PMT; however, the underrepresentation of fathers in existing research limits conclusions in this regard. Avenues for future research are highlighted to address current gaps in the literature, and to further our understanding of the ways in which both children and parents may benefit from PMT.

  5. Esthesioneuroblastoma With Poor Outcome Despite Extensive Treatment.

    PubMed

    Niyaz, Leyla; Gunduz, Kaan; Meco, Cem; Kankaya, Duygu

    2015-10-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is a rare malignant tumor of neuroectodermal origin. It usually presents with nonspecific symptoms, such as nasal obstruction, epistaxis, and pain, but has an aggressive course if the treatment is delayed. The authors report a case of esthesioneuroblastoma in a 47-year-old woman, treated with extensive surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Despite intensive treatment, the patient developed a local recurrence with systemic metastasis and succumbed 4 months later.

  6. Intervention outcomes among HIV-affected families over 18 months.

    PubMed

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Rice, Eric; Comulada, W Scott; Best, Karin; Elia, Carla; Peters, Katherine; Li, Li; Green, Sara; Valladares, Ena

    2012-07-01

    We evaluate the efficacy of a family-based intervention over time among HIV-affected families. Mothers living with HIV (MLH; n = 339) in Los Angeles and their school-aged children were randomized to either an intervention or control condition and followed for 18 months. MLH and their children in the intervention received 16 cognitive-behavioral, small-group sessions designed to help them maintain physical and mental health, parent while ill, address HIV-related stressors, and reduce HIV-transmission behaviors. At recruitment, MLH reported few problem behaviors related to physical health, mental health, or sexual or drug transmission acts. Compared to MLH in the control condition, intervention MLH were significantly more likely to monitor their own CD4 cell counts and their children were more likely to decrease alcohol and drug use. Most MLH and their children had relatively healthy family relationships. Family-based HIV interventions should be limited to MLH who are experiencing substantial problems.

  7. Borderline Personality Characteristics and Treatment Outcome in Cognitive-Behavioral Treatments for PTSD in Female Rape Victims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Stephanie B.; Rizvi, Shireen L.; Resick, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    Many studies report that comorbid borderline personality pathology is associated with poorer outcomes in the treatment of Axis I disorders. Given the high rates of comorbidity between borderline personality pathology and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), it is essential to determine whether borderline symptomatology affects PTSD treatment…

  8. Childhood tuberculosis in Bhutan: profile and treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dorji, T.; Edgnton, M. E.; Kumar, A. M. V.; Wangchuk, D.; Dophu, U.; Jamtsho, T.; Rinzin, C.

    2013-01-01

    Setting: All hospitals and health centres under the National Tuberculosis Control Programme (NTCP) in Bhutan. Objective: To describe the number and proportion of childhood tuberculosis (TB) cases registered under the NTCP in 2010, their demographic and clinical characteristics and any associations with treatment outcomes. Design: Retrospective cohort study involving a review of TB treatment cards and registers. Results: Of 1332 TB cases registered, 187 (14%) were children aged <15 years, 75 (40%) were aged <5 years, and 180 (96%) were new cases; nearly half were extra-pulmonary TB, with lymphadenitis being the most common form. The overall treatment success rate was 93%, and none of the demographic and clinical characteristics were associated with treatment outcomes. A few recording deficiencies were identified. Conclusion: TB in children is well recognised in Bhutan, and their treatment outcomes were excellent. PMID:26392988

  9. Inositol Treatment and ART Outcomes in Women with PCOS

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Deepika

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 5–10% of women in reproductive age and is characterized by oligo/amenorrhea, androgen excess, insulin resistance, and typical polycystic ovarian morphology. It is the most common cause of infertility secondary to ovulatory dysfunction. The underlying etiology is still unknown but is believed to be multifactorial. Insulin-sensitizing compounds such as inositol, a B-complex vitamin, and its stereoisomers (myo-inositol and D-chiro-inositol) have been studied as an effective treatment of PCOS. Administration of inositol in PCOS has been shown to improve not only the metabolic and hormonal parameters but also ovarian function and the response to assisted-reproductive technology (ART). Accumulating evidence suggests that it is also capable of improving folliculogenesis and embryo quality and increasing the mature oocyte yield following ovarian stimulation for ART in women with PCOS. In the current review, we collate the evidence and summarize our current knowledge on ovarian stimulation and ART outcomes following inositol treatment in women with PCOS undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) and/or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). PMID:27795706

  10. Inositol Treatment and ART Outcomes in Women with PCOS.

    PubMed

    Garg, Deepika; Tal, Reshef

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 5-10% of women in reproductive age and is characterized by oligo/amenorrhea, androgen excess, insulin resistance, and typical polycystic ovarian morphology. It is the most common cause of infertility secondary to ovulatory dysfunction. The underlying etiology is still unknown but is believed to be multifactorial. Insulin-sensitizing compounds such as inositol, a B-complex vitamin, and its stereoisomers (myo-inositol and D-chiro-inositol) have been studied as an effective treatment of PCOS. Administration of inositol in PCOS has been shown to improve not only the metabolic and hormonal parameters but also ovarian function and the response to assisted-reproductive technology (ART). Accumulating evidence suggests that it is also capable of improving folliculogenesis and embryo quality and increasing the mature oocyte yield following ovarian stimulation for ART in women with PCOS. In the current review, we collate the evidence and summarize our current knowledge on ovarian stimulation and ART outcomes following inositol treatment in women with PCOS undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) and/or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI).

  11. Psychosocial Environment and Affective Outcomes in Technology-Rich Classrooms: Testing a Causal Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, Jeffrey P.; Fraser, Barry J.

    2009-01-01

    Research investigated classroom environment antecedent variables and student affective outcomes in Australian high schools. The Technology-Rich Outcomes-Focused Learning Environment Inventory (TROFLEI) was used to assess 10 classroom environment dimensions: student cohesiveness, teacher support, involvement, investigation, task orientation,…

  12. Food stoichiometry affects the outcome of Daphnia–parasite interaction

    PubMed Central

    Aalto, Sanni L; Pulkkinen, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for growth in consumers. P-limitation and parasite infection comprise one of the most common stressor pairs consumers confront in nature. We conducted a life-table study using a Daphnia–microsporidian parasite model, feeding uninfected or infected Daphnia with either P-sufficient or P-limited algae, and assessed the impact of the two stressors on life-history traits of the host. Both infection and P-limitation negatively affected some life-history traits tested. However, under P-limitation, infected animals had higher juvenile growth rate as compared with uninfected animals. All P-limited individuals died before maturation, regardless of infection. The numbers of spore clusters of the microsporidian parasite did not differ in P-limited or P-sufficient hosts. P-limitation, but not infection, decreased body phosphorus content and ingestion rates of Daphnia tested in separate experiments. As parasite spore production did not suffer even under extreme P-limitation, our results suggest that parasite was less limited by P than the host. We discuss possible interpretations concerning the stoichiometrical demands of parasite and suggest that our results are explained by parasite-driven changes in carbon (C) allocation of the hosts. We conclude that the impact of nutrient starvation and parasite infection on consumers depends not only on the stoichiometric demands of host but also those of the parasite. PMID:23762513

  13. Treatment outcome of otomycosis in Ilorin, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ologe, F E; Nwabuisi, C

    2002-01-01

    Among 141 patients suspected of having otomycosis, 76 (53.9%) were mycologically confirmed. The fungi isolated were Aspergillus sp (63.4%), Candida (35.5%) and Mucor (1.3%). Ninety-six per cent were symptom free within 2 weeks of topical application of 1% clotrimazole cream, after thorough failures in the cleaning of debri in the ear canal. Treatment failures were minimal, including recurrence (2.6%), acute otitis externa (1.3%), foreign body in the ear (1.3%) and blocking of ear by therapeutic agent (2.6%). This treatment regimen is simple, efficacious, cost effective and safe; hence it is recommended for adoption in the management of otomycosis.

  14. Intensive Stuttering Modification Therapy: A Multidimensional Assessment of Treatment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blomgren, Michael; Roy, Nelson; Callister, Thomas; Merrill, Ray M.

    2005-01-01

    Nineteen adults who stutter participated in a 3-week intensive stuttering modification treatment program (the Successful Stuttering Management Program [SSMP]). A series of 14 fluency and affective-based measures were assessed before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 6 months after treatment. Measures included stuttering frequency; the…

  15. Client Engagement Characteristics Associated with Problem Gambling Treatment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, Nicki A.; Cosic, Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Previous research examining the factors associated with problem gambling treatment outcomes has examined client factors and to date, treatment characteristics, therapist factors, and client-therapist interactions have essentially remained unexplored. This study aimed to investigate how client engagement variables (client-rated therapeutic…

  16. Does Smoking Intervention Influence Adolescent Substance Use Disorder Treatment Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Mark G.; Prochaska, Judith J.

    2008-01-01

    Although tobacco use is reported by the majority of substance use disordered (SUD) youth, little work has examined tobacco focused interventions with this population. The present study is an initial investigation of the effect of a tobacco use intervention on adolescent SUD treatment outcomes. Participants were adolescents in SUD treatment taking…

  17. Exploring the Relationship between Conduct Disorder and Residential Treatment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shabat, Julia Cathcart; Lyons, John S.; Martinovich, Zoran

    2008-01-01

    We examined the differential outcomes in residential treatment for youths with conduct disorder (CD)--with special attention paid to interactions with age and gender--in a sample of children and adolescents in 50 residential treatment centers and group homes across Illinois. Multi-disciplinary teams rated youths ages 6-20 (N = 457) on measures of…

  18. Does therapist’s attitude affect clinical outcome of lumbar facet joint injections?

    PubMed Central

    Middendorp, Marcus; Kollias, Konstantinos; Ackermann, Hanns; Splettstößer, Annina; Vogl, Thomas J; Khan, M Fawad; Maataoui, Adel

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate if the clinical outcome of intra-articular lumbar facet joint injections is affected by the therapist’s attitude. METHODS: A total of 40 patients with facet joint-associated chronic low back pain were randomly divided into two groups. All patients received computed tomography-guided, monosegmental intra-articular facet joint injections. Following the therapeutic procedure, the patients of the experimental group (EG) held a conversation with the radiologist in a comfortable atmosphere. During the dialog, the patients were encouraged to ask questions and were shown four images. The patients of the control group (CG) left the clinic without any further contact with the radiologist. Outcome was assessed using a pain-based Verbal Numeric Scale at baseline, at 1 wk and at 1, 3, and 6 mo after first treatment. RESULTS: The patient demographics showed no differences between the groups. The patients of the EG received 57 interventional procedures in total, while the patients of the CG received 70 interventional procedures. In both groups, the pain scores decreased significantly over the entire observation period. Compared to the CG, the EG showed a statistically significant reduction of pain at 1 wk and 1 mo post-treatment, while at 3 and 6 mo after treatment, there were no significant differences between both groups. CONCLUSION: Our results show a significant effect on pain relief during the early post-interventional period in the EG as compared to the CG. The basic principle behind the higher efficacy might be the phenomenon of hetero-suggestion. PMID:27358691

  19. [Hyponatremia: effective treatment based on calculated outcomes].

    PubMed

    Vervoort, G; Wetzels, J F M

    2006-09-30

    A 78-year-old man was treated for symptomatic hyponatremia. Despite administration of an isotonic NaCl 0.9% solution, plasma sodium remained unchanged due to high concentrations of sodium and potassium in the urine. After infusion of a hypertonic NaCl solution, a satisfactory increase in plasma sodium was reached and symptoms resolved gradually. The hyponatremia was found to be caused by hypothyroidism, which was treated. A 70-year-old female was admitted to the hospital with loss of consciousness and hyponatremia. She was treated initially with a hypertonic NaCl 2.5% solution, which resulted in a steady increase in plasma sodium and a resolution of symptoms. Treatment was changed to an isotonic NaCl 0.9% infusion to attenuate the rise of serum sodium. Nevertheless plasma sodium increased too rapidly due to increased diuresis and reduced urinary sodium and potassium excretion. A slower increase in plasma sodium was achieved by administering a glucose 5% infusion. Hyponatremia is frequently observed in hospitalised patients. It should be treated effectively, and the rate of correction should be adapted to the clinical situation. Effective treatment is determined by calculating changes in effective osmoles and the resulting changes in the distribution of water over extra- and intracellular spaces. Changes in urine production and urinary excretion of sodium and potassium should be taken into account.

  20. Do early changes in the HAM-D-17 anxiety/somatization factor items affect the treatment outcome among depressed outpatients? Comparison of two controlled trials of St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) versus a SSRI.

    PubMed

    Bitran, Stella; Farabaugh, Amy H; Ameral, Victoria E; LaRocca, Rachel A; Clain, Alisabet J; Fava, Maurizio; Mischoulon, David

    2011-07-01

    To assess whether early changes in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 anxiety/somatization items predict remission in two controlled studies of Hypericum perforatum (St John's wort) versus selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for major depressive disorder. The Hypericum Depression Trial Study Group (National Institute of Mental Health) randomized 340 patients to Hypericum, sertraline, or placebo for 8 weeks, whereas the Massachusetts General Hospital study randomized 135 patients to Hypericum, fluoxetine, or placebo for 12 weeks. The investigators examined whether remission was associated with early changes in anxiety/somatization symptoms. In the National Institute of Mental Health study, significant associations were observed between remission and early improvement in the anxiety (psychic) item (sertraline arm), somatic (gastrointestinal item; Hypericum arm), and somatic (general) symptoms (placebo arm). None of the three treatment arms of the Massachusetts General Hospital study showed significant associations between anxiety/somatization symptoms and remission. When both study samples were pooled, we found associations for anxiety (psychic; selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors arm), somatic (gastrointestinal), and hypochondriasis (Hypericum arm), and anxiety (psychic) and somatic (general) symptoms (placebo arm). In the entire sample, remission was associated with the improvement in the anxiety (psychic), somatic (gastrointestinal), and somatic (general) items. The number and the type of anxiety/somatization items associated with remission varied depending on the intervention. Early scrutiny of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 anxiety/somatization items may help to predict remission of major depressive disorder.

  1. Angiosomes: how do they affect my treatment?

    PubMed

    Palena, Luis Mariano; Garcia, Luis Fernando; Brigato, Cesare; Sultato, Enrico; Candeo, Alessandro; Baccaglini, Tommaso; Manzi, Marco

    2014-09-01

    The number of diabetic patients is actually increasing all around the world, consequently, critical limb ischemia and ischemic diabetic foot disorders related to the presence of diabetic occlusive arterial disease will represent in the next few years a challenging issue for vascular specialists. Revascularization represents one step in the treatment for the multidisciplinary team, reestablishing an adequate blood flow to the wound area, essential for healing and avoiding major amputations. The targets of revascularization can be established to obtain a "complete" revascularization, treating all tibial and foot vessels or following the angiosome and wound-related artery model, obtaining direct blood flow for the wound. In this article, we summarize our experience in endovascular treatment of diabetic critical limb ischemia, focusing on the angiosome and wound-related artery model of revascularization and the technical challenges in treating below-the-knee and below-the-ankle vessels.

  2. Cigarette smoking and short-term addiction treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Harrell, P T; Montoya, I D; Preston, K L; Juliano, L M; Gorelick, D A

    2011-06-01

    Cigarette smoking is common among patients in cocaine and opioid dependence treatment, and may influence treatment outcome. We addressed this issue in a secondary analysis of data from an outpatient clinical trial of buprenorphine treatment for concurrent cocaine and opioid dependence (13 weeks, N=200). The association between cigarette smoking (lifetime cigarette smoking status, number of cigarettes smoked per day prior to study entry) and short-term treatment outcome (% of urine samples positive for cocaine or opioids, treatment retention) was evaluated with analysis of covariance, bivariate correlations, and multivariate linear regression. Nicotine-dependent smokers (66% of participants) had a significantly higher percentage of cocaine-positive urine samples than non-smokers (12% of participants) (76% vs. 62%), but did not differ in percentage of opioid-positive urine samples or treatment retention. Number of cigarettes smoked per day at baseline was positively associated with percentage of cocaine-positive urine samples, even after controlling for baseline sociodemographic and drug use characteristics, but was not significantly associated with percentage of opioid-positive urine samples or treatment retention. These results suggest that cigarette smoking is associated with poorer short-term outcome of outpatient treatment for cocaine dependence, but perhaps not of concurrent opioid dependence, and support the importance of offering smoking cessation treatment to cocaine-dependent patients.

  3. Factors affecting the precision of warfarin treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Britt, R. P.; James, A. H.; Raskino, C. L.; Thompson, S. G.

    1992-01-01

    AIM: To determine what factors influence the precision of anticoagulant control using warfarin by examining the computerised records of 2207 patients. METHODS: Records from seven district general hospitals were combined and analysed. The precision of anticoagulant control was taken as the absolute deviation of International Normalised Ratio (INR) from target at the most recent determination. This quantity was examined using univariate and multiple regression analyses. RESULTS: Deviation of INR from target was continuously distributed, almost symmetrically about a mean of zero. The patients' age and sex had little bearing on control. Patients with a high target INR were more likely to be undertreated, and patients taking higher doses of warfarin were more likely to be overtreated. Previous over- or undertreatment were strongly related to poorer current control. The control of treatment varied substantially among the seven hospitals. One possible cause of this variation was the dose adjustment coefficient: the greater the dose adjustment for a given deviation from target INR, the better was the control achieved. CONCLUSION: Several groups of patients were identified whose control was less satisfactory and in whom anticoagulant treatment needs particular scrutiny: these include patients with a record of previous over- or undertreatment, but not elderly patients in general. The variation in control among hospitals is a source of concern that merits further attention to achieve better uniformity of anticoagulant treatment. Images PMID:1452773

  4. The Bidirectional Relationship Between Body Mass Index and Treatment Outcome in Adolescents with Treatment-Resistant Depression

    PubMed Central

    Mansoor, Brandon; Rengasamy, Manivel; Hilton, Robert; Porta, Giovanna; He, Jiayan; Spirito, Anthony; Emslie, Graham J.; Mayes, Taryn L.; Clarke, Gregory; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Shamseddeen, Wael; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective Depression and obesity are associated, but the impact of obesity on depression treatment outcome, or, conversely, the impact of treatment on body mass index (BMI) in depressed adolescents has not been reported. In this article, we examine the bidirectional relationships between BMI and treatment response in adolescents with treatment-resistant depression. Method Participants in the Treatment of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) Resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) study had height and weight assessed at baseline, weekly for the first 6 weeks, biweekly for the next 6 weeks, and monthly from weeks 12 through 24. The impact of baseline BMI as a predictor and moderator of treatment response was assessed. In addition, participants' changes in BMI were assessed as a function of specific treatment assignment and treatment response. Results Participants assigned to SSRIs had a greater increase in BMI-for-age-sex z-score and weight than did those assigned to venlafaxine. Post-hoc, those treated with paroxetine or citalopram had the biggest increases in BMI, relative to fluoxetine or venlafaxine. Overweight or obesity was neither a predictor nor a moderator of treatment outcome, nor of subsequent BMI change. Conclusions Overweight status does not appear to affect treatment response in adolescents with resistant depression. The successful treatment of depression does not appear to favorably affect weight or BMI. Fluoxetine and venlafaxine are less likely to cause an increase in BMI than paroxetine or citalopram. PMID:24024532

  5. Feedback from Outcome Measures and Treatment Effectiveness, Treatment Efficiency, and Collaborative Practice: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Gondek, Dawid; Edbrooke-Childs, Julian; Fink, Elian; Deighton, Jessica; Wolpert, Miranda

    2016-05-01

    Due to recent increases in the use of feedback from outcome measures in mental health settings, we systematically reviewed evidence regarding the impact of feedback from outcome measures on treatment effectiveness, treatment efficiency, and collaborative practice. In over half of 32 studies reviewed, the feedback condition had significantly higher levels of treatment effectiveness on at least one treatment outcome variable. Feedback was particularly effective for not-on-track patients or when it was provided to both clinicians and patients. The findings for treatment efficiency and collaborative practice were less consistent. Given the heterogeneity of studies, more research is needed to determine when and for whom feedback is most effective.

  6. ENGAGEMENT IN OUTPATIENT SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT AND EMPLOYMENT OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    Dunigan, Robert; Acevedo, Andrea; Campbell, Kevin; Garnick, Deborah W.; Horgan, Constance M.; Huber, Alice; Lee, Margaret T.; Panas, Lee; Ritter, Grant A.

    2013-01-01

    This study, a collaboration between an academic research center and Washington State’s health, employment and correction departments, investigates the extent to which treatment engagement, a widely adopted performance measure, is associated with employment, an important outcome for individuals receiving treatment for substance use disorders. Two-stage Heckman probit regressions were conducted using 2008 administrative data for 7,570 adults receiving publicly-funded treatment. The first stage predicted employment in the year following the first treatment visit and three separate second stages models predicted number of quarters employed, wages, and hours worked. Engagement as a main effect was not significant for any of the employment outcomes. However, for clients with prior criminal justice involvement, engagement was associated with both employment and higher wages following treatment. Clients with criminal justice involvement face greater challenge regarding employment, so the identification of any actionable step which increases the likelihood of employment or wages is an important result. PMID:23686216

  7. Juvenile kyphosis: effects of different variables on conservative treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Platero, D; Luna, J D; Pedraza, V

    1997-09-01

    We reviewed the records of 212 patients with idiopathic or Scheuermann-type juvenile kyphosis (Scheuermann's disease). The 200 patients available for follow-up were divided into three groups depending on the degree of angular deformity, and the influence of different variables on treatment outcome in each group was investigated. A very influential positive variable was combined treatment with a body cast plus brace; exercise treatment also produced acceptable results. Other variables that positively influenced the outcome of treatment were compliance with treatment, and (unexpectedly) elevated initial Risser sign (skeletal maturity). An initial Risser sign of 0 or 1 was, in contrast with other studies, associated with smaller improvement. However, initial maximal wedging, etiology and initial assessment of curve flexibility did not influence the degree of improvement in the initial angular deformity.

  8. Comorbidity in youth with specific phobias: Impact of comorbidity on treatment outcome and the impact of treatment on comorbid disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ollendick, Thomas H.; Öst, Lars-Göran; Reuterskiöld, Lena; Costa, Natalie

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was twofold. In an analysis of data from an existing randomized control trial of brief cognitive behavioral treatment on specific phobias (One-Session Treatment, OST; Ollendick et al., 2009), we examined 1) the effect of comorbid specific phobias and other anxiety disorders on treatment outcomes, and 2) the effect of treatment of the specific phobia on these co-occurring disorders. These relations were explored in 100 youth presenting with animal, natural environment, situational, and “other” types of phobia. Youth were reliably diagnosed with the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for DSM-IV: Child and Parent versions (Silverman & Albano, 1996). Clinician Severity Ratings at post-treatment and 6-month follow-up were examined as were parent and child treatment outcome satisfaction measures. Results indicated that the presence of comorbid phobias or anxiety disorders did not affect treatment outcomes; moreover, treatment of the targeted specific phobias led to significant reductions in the clinical severity of other co-occurring specific phobias and related anxiety disorders. These findings speak to the generalization of the effects of this time-limited treatment approach. Implications for treatment of principal and comorbid disorders are discussed, and possible mechanisms for these effects are commented upon. PMID:20573338

  9. Comorbidity in youth with specific phobias: Impact of comorbidity on treatment outcome and the impact of treatment on comorbid disorders.

    PubMed

    Ollendick, Thomas H; Ost, Lars-Göran; Reuterskiöld, Lena; Costa, Natalie

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was twofold. In an analysis of data from an existing randomized control trial of brief cognitive behavioral treatment on specific phobias (One-Session Treatment, OST; Ollendick et al., 2009), we examined 1) the effect of comorbid specific phobias and other anxiety disorders on treatment outcomes, and 2) the effect of treatment of the specific phobia on these co-occurring disorders. These relations were explored in 100 youth presenting with animal, natural environment, situational, and "other" types of phobia. Youth were reliably diagnosed with the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for DSM-IV: Child and Parent versions (Silverman & Albano, 1996). Clinician severity ratings at post-treatment and 6-month follow-up were examined as were parent and child treatment outcome satisfaction measures. Results indicated that the presence of comorbid phobias or anxiety disorders did not affect treatment outcomes; moreover, treatment of the targeted specific phobias led to significant reductions in the clinical severity of other co-occurring specific phobias and related anxiety disorders. These findings speak to the generalization of the effects of this time-limited treatment approach. Implications for treatment of principal and comorbid disorders are discussed, and possible mechanisms for these effects are commented upon.

  10. Treatment Outcome of Patients with Buruli Ulcer Disease in Togo

    PubMed Central

    Beissner, Marcus; Arens, Nathalie; Wiedemann, Franz; Piten, Ebekalisaï; Kobara, Basile; Bauer, Malkin; Herbinger, Karl-Heinz; Badziklou, Kossi; Banla Kere, Abiba; Löscher, Thomas; Nitschke, Jörg; Bretzel, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    Background Following introduction of antimycobacterial treatment of Buruli ulcer disease (BUD), several clinical studies evaluated treatment outcomes of BUD patients, in particular healing times, secondary lesions and functional limitations. Whereas recurrences were rarely observed, paradoxical reactions and functional limitations frequently occurred. Although systematic BUD control in Togo was established as early as 2007, treatment outcome has not been reviewed to date. Therefore, a pilot project on post-treatment follow-up of BUD patients in Togo aimed to evaluate treatment outcomes and to provide recommendations for optimization of treatment success. Methodology/Principal Findings Out of 199 laboratory confirmed BUD patients, 129 could be enrolled in the study. The lesions of 109 patients (84.5%) were completely healed without any complications, 5 patients (3.9%) had secondary lesions and 15 patients (11.6%) had functional limitations. Edema, category III ulcers >15cm, healing times >180 days and a limitation of movement at time of discharge constituted the main risk factors significantly associated with BUD related functional limitations (P<0.01). Review of all BUD related documentation revealed major shortcomings, in particular concerning medical records on adjuvant surgical and physiotherapeutic treatment. Conclusions/Significance This study presents the first systematic analysis of treatment outcome of BUD patients from Togo. Median times to healing and the absence of recurrences were in line with findings reported by other investigators. The percentage of functional limitations of 11.6% was lower than in other studies, and edema, category III ulcers, healing time >180 days and limitation of movement at discharge constituted the main risk factors for functional limitations in Togolese BUD patients. Standardized treatment plans, patient assessment and follow-up, as well as improved management of medical records are recommended to allow for intensified

  11. Treatment process, alliance and outcome in brief versus extended treatments for marijuana dependence

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Carly J.; Nich, Charla; Steinberg, Karen; Roffman, Roger A.; Corvino, Joanne; Babor, Thomas F.; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims The Marijuana Treatment Project, a large multi-site randomized clinical trial, compared a delayed treatment control condition with a brief (two-session) and extended (nine-session) multi-component treatment among 450 marijuana-dependent participants. In this report we present treatment process data, including the fidelity of treatment delivery in the three community-based treatment settings as well as the relationships between treatment process and outcome. Design Independent evaluations of clinician adherence and competence ratings were made based on 633 videotaped sessions from 163 participants. Relationships between clinician adherence and competence, ratings of the working alliance and marijuana treatment outcomes were evaluated. Findings Protocol treatments were implemented with strong fidelity to manual specifications and with few significant differences in adherence and competence ratings across sites. In the brief two-session treatment condition, only the working alliance was associated significantly with frequency of marijuana use, but in the extended treatment therapist ratings of working alliance predicted outcomes, as did the interaction of alliance and curvilinear adherence. Conclusions Behavioral treatments for marijuana use were delivered in community settings with good fidelity. Participant and therapist working alliance scores were associated significantly with improved marijuana use outcomes in a brief behavioral treatment for adults with marijuana dependence. In extended treatment the therapist ratings of working alliance were associated with more positive outcome. However, in that treatment there was also a significant interaction between alliance and curvilinear adherence. PMID:20840200

  12. Relationships between Treatment Expectations and Treatment Outcomes among Outpatients with Substance Use Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raylu, Namrata; Kaur, Inderjit

    2012-01-01

    Currently, studies exploring the relationship between treatment expectations (TE) and outcome among individuals with substance use problems are significantly lacking. This is important as relapse and attrition rates among this group are greater than those with other psychological problems. Understanding how TE impact treatment outcomes among this…

  13. Factish relations: Affective bodies in diabetes treatment.

    PubMed

    Danholt, Peter

    2013-07-01

    Chronic diseases pose a major challenge to contemporary western healthcare systems, and consequently there are numerous initiatives designed to meet these challenges. Patient empowerment is considered to be extremely important in chronic disease management. But what does it mean to become an 'active patient', managing a condition? This article argues that people are always active in shaping their agency and the agency of numerous others, and that we need to attend to these processes of configuration in order to better understand and conceptualize the problem of chronic disease management. This article analyses the daily practices of people with Type 2 Diabetes, with the use of what is described as the 'sociology of attachment' in the field of science and technology studies. The implications of seeing and analysing chronic conditions in this manner are that determinist understandings of chronic conditions are challenged. Accordingly, an experimental and constructive attitude towards the production and assembling of the chronically ill body is enabled. Such an attitude holds that relations with multiple other bodies and entities, such as technologies, the disease, medication and so on continuously and relentlessly affect how the condition unfolds and consequently, the room for interventional strategies and transformation of the chronically ill body is enlarged.

  14. Affective psychosis following Accutane (isotretinoin) treatment.

    PubMed

    Barak, Yoram; Wohl, Yonit; Greenberg, Yifa; Bar Dayan, Yosefa; Friedman, Tali; Shoval, Gideon; Knobler, Haim Y

    2005-01-01

    Isotretinoin (Accutane) ranks in the top 10 of the US Food and Drug Administration's database of drugs associated with reports of depression and suicide attempts. However, this association is still controversial because up to 5.6% of patients with moderate acne may have pre-existing suicidal ideations, improvement of acne often reduces associated depression, and isotretinoin users are reportedly no more likely than those taking antibiotics for acne to have depression or commit suicide. We describe a series of cases of manic psychosis that developed in a 1-year period (2003) in association with isotretinoin treatment and resulted in suicidality and progression to long-standing psychosis. Cases were drawn from 500 soldiers who had been evaluated in a military specialists dermatology clinic for severe acne. Data were summarized from medical records of five severe acne patients treated by isotretinion during their compulsory military service. Data from their draft board examinations and service records, as well as repeated clinical assessments by certified psychiatrists at the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) Mental Health Department clinic, were evaluated. Five young adults developed manic psychosis within a mean of 7.6 months of exposure to isotretinoin. In three cases, this was accompanied by a suicide attempt, and in three cases, psychosis lasted for longer than 6 months. Either a personal history of obsessive-compulsive disorder, neurological insult or family history of a major psychiatric illness were present in all cases. The present case-series is suggestive of an increase in the likelihood of an association between exposure to isotretinion and manic psychosis. Associated risk factors were both family and personal history of psychiatric morbidity. Further studies are needed to establish our findings.

  15. Quality of Life, Psychological Interventions and Treatment Outcome in Tuberculosis Patients: The Indian Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Peddireddy, Vidyullatha

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Psychological distress is being recognized in individuals affected with many diseases since it affects quality of life (QOF) and has gained importance in the clinical settings. Psychological interventions and their effect on the treatment outcome have yielded encouraging results in many diseased conditions. Tuberculosis (TB) ranks as a deadly disease resulting in millions of deaths worldwide. However, the effect of TB on the psychological status of patients and interventions to improve treatment outcome is neglected, especially in underdeveloped and developing countries. Methods: Systematic review of research papers that published on the QOF in TB and the effect of psychological interventions on treatment outcome were conducted. Results: Tuberculosis patients experience high levels of stress and decreased QOF. In the Indian scenario, TB patients undergo immense psychological stress similar to what is reported in other locations. Psychological interventions renewed hope on life and adherence to medication and treatment outcomes. Such psychological interventions are not practiced in Indian clinical settings. Conclusion: There is an urgent need for both governmental and non-governmental organizations to devise strategies to include psychological interventions mandatory during TB treatments. In the absence of such interventions, the fight against TB in India will remain incomplete. PMID:27833578

  16. Management of soft-tissue sarcomas; treatment strategies, staging, and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ramu, Eyal M.; Houdek, Matthew T.; Isaac, Christian E.; Dickie, Colleen I.; Ferguson, Peter C.; Wunder, Jay S.

    2017-01-01

    Soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) are a rare group of malignant tumors which can affect any age group. For the majority of patients who present with a localized STS, treatment involves a multidisciplinary team decision-making approach ultimately relying on surgical resection with or without adjuvant radiation for successful limb salvage. The goals of treatment are to provide the patient with a functional extremity without local tumor relapse. The purpose of this article is to review the treatment of extremity STS, with a focus on staging, treatment options, and outcomes. PMID:28287387

  17. How home care is essential to ensuring successful orthodontic treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Levin, Roger

    2004-09-01

    Patients can significantly affect the outcome of their orthodontic treatment. A practice committed to developing the right systems, scripts, and educational materials will experience a more satisfied patient, increased efficiencies, and higher profits. Educating and motivating patients to maintain their oral health and providing recommendations or dispensing of home care tools such as a power toothbrush increases patient compliance, positively impacts treatment outcomes, enhances customer service, and generates a new revenue stream for the practice. In a tight economy and a highly competitive orthodontic market, a power toothbrush can positively impact your marketing and case close rate. Treatment and fees being relatively equal, patients will tend to accept treatment from a practice that can demonstrate concern for the patients' overall oral health and greater value-added components to the orthodontic case. Power toothbrushes as part of a comprehensive orthodontic treatment provide a great differentiating marketing strategy.

  18. The presence or severity of pulmonary hypertension does not affect outcomes for single-lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Julliard, Walker A; Meyer, Keith C; De Oliveira, Nilto C; Osaki, Satoru; Cornwell, Richard C; Sonetti, David A; Maloney, James D

    2016-05-01

    Advanced lung disease (ALD) that requires lung transplantation (LTX) is frequently associated with pulmonary hypertension (PH). Whether the presence of PH significantly affects the outcomes following single-lung transplantation (SLT) remains controversial. Therefore, we retrospectively examined the outcomes of 279 consecutive SLT recipients transplanted at our centre, and the patients were split into four groups based on their mean pulmonary artery pressure values. Outcomes, including long-term survival and primary graft dysfunction, did not differ significantly for patients with versus without PH, even when PH was severe. We suggest that SLT can be performed safely in patients with ALD-associated PH.

  19. Predicting Future Clinical Adjustment from Treatment Outcome and Process Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, G. R.; Forgatch, Marion S.

    1995-01-01

    Issues related to the use of outcome and process data from the treatment of antisocial children to predict future childhood adjustment were examined through a study of 69 children. Data supported the hypothesis that measures of processes thought to produce changes in child behavior would serve to predict future adjustment. (SLD)

  20. Alliance, Technology, and Outcome in the Treatment of Anxious Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Brian C.; Choudhury, Muniya S.; Shortt, Alison L.; Pincus, Donna B.; Creed, Torrey A.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2004-01-01

    A strong therapeutic alliance is intuitively important in a cognitive-behavioral treatment of anxious youth where the child must confront feared stimuli in numerous exposure tasks. Research examining alliance-outcome relationships and the specific role of the alliance is currently limited. Is the alliance supportive in nature, does it enhance…

  1. The Effects of Drinking Goal on Treatment Outcome for Alcoholism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bujarski, Spencer; O'Malley, Stephanie S.; Lunny, Katy; Ray, Lara A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: It is well known to clinicians and researchers in the field of alcoholism that patients vary with respect to drinking goal. The objective in this study was to elucidate the contribution of drinking goal to treatment outcome in the context of specific behavioral and pharmacological interventions. Method: Participants were 1,226…

  2. Psychophysiological Outcome of Behavioral and Pharmacological Treatments of Agoraphobia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelson, Larry; Mavissakalian, Matig

    1985-01-01

    Examined relative and combined effectiveness of behavior therapy and pharmacotherapy in 62 severe, chronic agoraphobics. Identified differential temporal response and treatment patterns across psychophysiological domains. Synchrony/desynchrony phenomena yielded significant findings with regard to process and clinical outcome status. Exploratory…

  3. Functional Outcomes in the Treatment of Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Lenard A.; Spencer, Thomas J.; Levine, Louise R.; Ramsey, Janet L.; Tamura, Roy; Kelsey, Douglas; Ball, Susan G.; Allen, Albert J.; Biederman, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Objective: ADHD is associated with significant functional impairment in adults. The present study examined functional outcomes following 6-month double-blind treatment with either atomoxetine or placebo. Method: Patients were 410 adults (58.5% male) with "DSM-IV"--defined ADHD. They were randomly assigned to receive either atomoxetine 40 mg/day to…

  4. The effects of affective and cognitive empathy on adolescents' behavior and outcomes in conflicts with mothers.

    PubMed

    Van Lissa, Caspar J; Hawk, Skyler T; Meeus, Wim H J

    2017-02-09

    The current study investigated whether manipulations of affective and cognitive empathy have differential effects on observed behavior and self-reported outcomes in adolescent-mother conflict discussions. We further examined how these situational empathy inductions interact with preexisting empathic dispositions. To promote ecological validity, we conducted home visits to study conflict discussions about real disagreements in adolescent-mother relationships. We explored the roles of sex, age, and maternal support and power as covariates and moderators. Results indicated that the affective empathy manipulation had no significant effects on behavior, although a trend in the hypothesized direction suggested that affective empathy might promote active problem solving. The cognitive empathy manipulation led to lower conflict escalation and promoted other-oriented listening for adolescents low in dispositional cognitive empathy. State-trait interactions indicated that the empathy manipulations had significant effects on self-reported outcomes for adolescents lower in dispositional empathic concern. For these adolescents, both manipulations promoted outcome satisfaction, but only the cognitive manipulation promoted perceived fairness. This suggests that cognitive empathy, in particular, allows adolescents to distance themselves from the emotional heat of a conflict and listen to mothers' point of view, leading to outcomes perceived as both satisfying and fair. These findings are relevant for interventions and clinicians because they demonstrate unique effects of promoting affective versus cognitive empathy. Because even these minimal manipulations promoted significant effects on observed behavior and self-reported outcomes, particularly for low-empathy adolescents, stronger structural interventions are likely to have marked benefits.

  5. Psychosocial stress and treatment outcome following assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Sanders, K A; Bruce, N W

    1999-06-01

    This study investigated the association between psychosocial stress and outcome of in-vitro fertilization and gamete intra-Fallopian transfer treatment. Ninety women, enrolled for treatment at a private infertility clinic, completed two self-administered psychometric tests (Bi-polar Profile of Mood States, POMS; and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, STAI) and a questionnaire to ascertain demographic and lifestyle characteristics before the start of treatment. Approximately 12 months later an outcome measure was determined for each participant in terms of whether she was pregnant or not pregnant and the number of treatment cycles undertaken to achieve clinical pregnancy. The women's scores on the psychological tests were similar to published normative scores. On univariate analysis, history of a previous pregnancy was positively related to the probability of pregnancy and full-time employment, a more 'hostile' mood state and higher trait anxiety were associated with a lower cumulative pregnancy rate. A Cox multiple regression model found previous pregnancy history, trait anxiety, and the POMS agreeable-hostile and elated-depressed scales to be the most important lifestyle and stress variables predictive of pregnancy. The results emphasize the importance of psychosocial stress in treatment outcome but indicate that the relationships are complex. Further studies are required to validate whether these findings can be generalized to other populations.

  6. Hispanic Subgroups, Acculturation, and Substance Abuse Treatment Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chartier, Karen G; Carmody, Tom; Akhtar, Maleeha; Stebbins, Mary B; Walters, Scott T; Warden, Diane

    2015-12-01

    This study explored Hispanic subgroup differences in substance use treatment outcomes, and the relationship of acculturation characteristics to these outcomes. Data were from a multisite randomized clinical trial of motivational enhancement therapy versus treatment as usual in a sample of Spanish-speaking substance abusers. Participants were Cuban American (n=34), Mexican American (n=209), Puerto Rican (n=78), and other Hispanic American (n=54). Results suggested that Cuban Americans and individuals with more connection to Hispanic culture had lower treatment retention. Hispanics born in the U.S and those who spoke English at home had a lower percentage of days abstinent during weeks 5-16, although Puerto Ricans born in the U.S. and Cuban Americans living more years in the U.S. had a higher percentage of days abstinent in weeks 1-4 and 5-16, respectively. Results may inform future hypothesis-driven studies in larger Hispanic treatment seeking samples of the relationship between acculturation and treatment outcome.

  7. Hispanic Subgroups, Acculturation, and Substance Abuse Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Karen G.; Carmody, Tom; Akhtar, Maleeha; Stebbins, Mary B.; Walters, Scott T.; Warden, Diane

    2015-01-01

    This study explored Hispanic subgroup differences in substance use treatment outcomes, and the relationship of acculturation characteristics to these outcomes. Data were from a multisite randomized clinical trial of motivational enhancement therapy versus treatment as usual in a sample of Spanish-speaking substance abusers. Participants were Cuban American (n=34), Mexican American (n=209), Puerto Rican (n=78), and other Hispanic American (n=54). Results suggested that Cuban Americans and individuals with more connection to Hispanic culture had lower treatment retention. Hispanics born in the U.S and those who spoke English at home had a lower percentage of days abstinent during weeks 5-16, although Puerto Ricans born in the U.S. and Cuban Americans living more years in the U.S. had a higher percentage of days abstinent in weeks 1-4 and 5-16, respectively. Results may inform future hypothesis-driven studies in larger Hispanic treatment seeking samples of the relationship between acculturation and treatment outcome. PMID:26362001

  8. Registering initial defaulters and reporting on their treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Harries, A D; Rusen, I D; Chiang, C-Y; Hinderaker, S G; Enarson, D A

    2009-07-01

    This Unresolved Issues article highlights three original articles that appeared last year in the Journal discussing the phenomenon of initial defaulters. There are three important challenges with patients that appear in the laboratory sputum register but are not recorded in the tuberculosis (TB) patient register: the first is how to identify these patients, trace them and get them on to treatment as soon as possible; the second is how to register and report on these cases as part of the case-finding component of TB control; and the third is whether to include these initial default patients in the cohort analysis of treatment outcomes. We recommend a step-wise approach to these challenges and advocate that these patients be included, wherever possible, in the TB patient register and in the cohort analysis of treatment outcomes.

  9. Tooth positioners and their effects on treatment outcome

    PubMed Central

    Pravindevaprasad, A.; Therese, Beena Agnes

    2013-01-01

    Malocclusion can also be corrected by means of clear removable appliances called as “tooth positioners” or “aligners”. A tooth positioner is used to control settling and to minimize or eliminate relapse of the teeth after an orthodontic treatment. In this article, a complete review of the objectives, course of treatment, fabrication, and the materials used for fabrication of tooth positioners along with their importance and disadvantages were discussed. Tooth positioners did improve the overall orthodontic treatment outcome as quantified by the ABO (American Board of orthodontics) objective scoring method. But once the initial occlusal contact was achieved, the vertical movement of teeth was found to be inhibited. PMID:24082720

  10. Treatment of anal human papillomavirus-associated disease: a long term outcome study.

    PubMed

    Nathan, M; Hickey, N; Mayuranathan, L; Vowler, S L; Singh, N

    2008-07-01

    Treatment for human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated anal canal disease has been unsatisfactory. The objective of our study was to determine the treatment outcome in our cohort with anal HPV disease. Overall, 181 patients were evaluated over a median period of 19.1 months (range = 2.8-125.5). Eighty-eight patients (48.6%) with high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) and 82 patients (45.3%) with low-grade AIN underwent treatment. One hundred and forty-one patients (77.9%) received laser ablative treatment as an outpatient procedure. The treatment yielded cure, defined as a disease-free state at 12 months after treatment, in 63.0% (114/181). Median time to cure for the cohort was 31.5 months (95% confidence interval: 23.0-40.0). Treatment outcome showed no evidence of being affected by age, sexual preference, history of smoking or presence of high-grade disease. Median time to cure was significantly affected by a positive HIV status (P = 0.02) and the extent (volume) of the disease (P = 0.01). Contrary to the current view that treatment of HPV-related anal disease is difficult, unrewarding due to recurrences and may lead to substantial morbidity, we demonstrate that effective treatment is possible for both low- and high-grade AIN. These findings should help with the general desire to introduce screening for AIN for at-risk groups.

  11. Subject Eligibility Criteria Can Substantially Influencethe Results of Alcohol-Treatment Outcome Research*

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, Keith; Harris, Alex H.S.; Weingardt, Kenneth R.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Most alcohol-treatment studies exclude some patients from participation based on particular criteria (e.g., comorbid illegal drug abuse, homelessness). The current study evaluated whether such eligibility criteria can change the outcome results a study obtains. Method: Five widely used treatment research eligibility criteria—(1) psychiatric problems, (2) medical problems, (3) social-residential instability, (4) low motivation/noncompliance, and (5) drug problems—were applied to two samples of real-world alcohol patients whose outcomes were known. Comparing outcomes of the samples with and without the application of eligibility criteria produced estimates of bias in outcome results, as well as an assessment of change in statistical power. Results: Medical and psychiatric eligibility criteria produced a moderate bias in outcome estimates (e.g., a 10% or less change in outcome results). In contrast, social-residential instability, low motivation/noncompliance, and drug use produced a large (e.g., up to an 18% change) to a very large (e.g., up to a 51% change) bias in outcome estimates. Sensitivity analyses showed that these biases are even larger if eligibility criteria are operationalized in a broad rather than a narrow fashion. Contrary to expectation, eligibility criteria did not produce their theoretically expected benefit of increased statistical power. Conclusions: Researchers who use eligibility criteria should do so judiciously and interpret outcome results in light of potential bias introduced by the ineligibility of some patients for study enrollment. Efforts to integrate findings across treatment outcome studies should also consider how conclusions might be affected by the eligibility criteria used in different research areas. PMID:18781251

  12. Phobic anxiety and depression as predictor variables for treatment outcome. A LISREL analysis on treated female alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Haver, Brit; Gjestad, Rolf

    2005-01-01

    The study focuses on the relationship between phobic anxiety and depression, alcohol abuse, treatment and drinking outcome in female alcoholics. A structural equation analysis (LISREL) was used to test the strength and direction of predictor variables, enabling the development of models for the process of change taking place following treatment. Participants were patients attending a specific treatment programme for women with alcohol problems at Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. One hundred and twenty female alcoholics consecutively admitted during 1991-1993 were followed up 2 years after treatment. The Alcohol Use Inventory (AUI) and Symptom Check List-90 were used at intake and follow-up. Duration of problem drinking and depression at follow-up affected drinking outcome directly and negatively, whereas duration of treatment affected drinking outcome directly and positively in all our models. Phobic anxiety on the other hand affected drinking outcome negatively and indirectly, via shorter treatment duration and higher depression at follow-up. Using different outcome variables as an end product resulted in only minor changes. Thus, the model presented is viewed as robust and clinically meaningful. The results underscore the importance of phobic anxiety and recurrent or sustained depression--in addition to the pre-treatment duration of problem drinking--for the drinking outcome among female alcoholics.

  13. The role of expectation in the therapeutic outcomes of alcohol and drug addiction treatments.

    PubMed

    Spagnolo, Primavera A; Colloca, Luana; Heilig, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Throughout history, patient-physician relationships have been acknowledged as an important component of the therapeutic effects of any pharmacological treatment. Here, we discuss the role of physicians' expectations in influencing the therapeutic outcomes of alcohol and drug addiction pharmacological treatments. As largely demonstrated, such expectations and attitudes may contribute to produce placebo and nocebo effects that in turn affect the course of the disease and the response to the therapy. This article is aimed at discussing the current insights into expectations, placebo and nocebo mechanisms and their impact on the therapeutic outcomes of alcohol and drug addiction treatments; with the goal of informing physicians and other health care providers about the potentially widespread implications for clinical practice and for a successful treatment regimen.

  14. The Role of Expectation in the Therapeutic Outcomes of Alcohol and Drug Addiction Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Spagnolo, Primavera A.; Colloca, Luana; Heilig, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Throughout history, patient–physician relationships have been acknowledged as an important component of the therapeutic effects of any pharmacological treatment. Here, we discuss the role of physicians' expectations in influencing the therapeutic outcomes of alcohol and drug addiction pharmacological treatments. As largely demonstrated, such expectations and attitudes may contribute to produce placebo and nocebo effects that in turn affect the course of the disease and the response to the therapy. This article is aimed at discussing the current insights into expectations, placebo and nocebo mechanisms and their impact on the therapeutic outcomes of alcohol and drug addiction treatments; with the goal of informing physicians and other health care providers about the potentially widespread implications for clinical practice and for a successful treatment regimen. PMID:25761920

  15. Resilient appliance-therapy treatment outcome in patients with TMD pain correlated to MRI-determined changes in condyle position.

    PubMed

    Limchaichana, Napat; Nilsson, Håkan; Petersson, Arne; Ekberg, EwaCarin

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this research was to study if changes in condyle position in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients could be a factor that is affected by resilient appliance therapy and if it influences the treatment outcome. The study investigated 48 patients randomly assigned to a treatment group (T group = 21 patients, using resilient appliance) or a control group (C group = 27 patients, using nonoccluding appliance). Changes in the condyle-fossa relationship (with and without the appliance) were determined in an MRI examination. Ten weeks after treatment, the treatment outcome was measured. The results showed that with the appliance, change in condyle position occurred in 76% of the T group and 22% of the C group (p < 0.001). Sixty-seven percent (67%) of the T group and 44% of the C group experienced a successful treatment outcome. Treatment outcome was not related to changes in condyle position in patients with TMD pain.

  16. Competition within Computer-Assisted Cooperative Learning Environments: Cognitive, Affective, and Social Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Fu-Yun

    2001-01-01

    Examines the effects and implications of embedding the element of competition in computer-assisted cooperative learning situations on student cognitive, affective, and social outcomes. Results of statistical analyses of Taiwanese fifth graders show that cooperation without inter-group competition engendered better attitudes and promoted more…

  17. Technology Integration before Student Outcomes: Factors Affecting Teacher Adoption of Technology in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandyopadhyay, Alankar

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1920s, ICTs have been endorsed as solutions to challenges of access and quality in education. Proponents have also supported technology use in education on grounds that it could potentially impact cognitive, affective, and pedagogical outcomes. Based on these perceived benefits, many developed and developing countries have been…

  18. Coping with Challenge and Hindrance Stressors in Teams: Behavioral, Cognitive, and Affective Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearsall, Matthew J.; Ellis, Aleksander P. J.; Stein, Jordan H.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize the challenge-hindrance framework to examine the discrete and combined effects of different environmental stressors on behavioral, cognitive, and affective outcomes at the team level. Results from 83 teams working on a command and control simulation indicated that the introduction of a challenge stressor…

  19. School Factors Explaining Achievement on Cognitive and Affective Outcomes: Establishing a Dynamic Model of Educational Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creemers, Bert; Kyriakides, Leonidas

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic model of educational effectiveness defines school level factors associated with student outcomes. Emphasis is given to the two main aspects of policy, evaluation, and improvement in schools which affect quality of teaching and learning at both the level of teachers and students: a) teaching and b) school learning environment. Five…

  20. Hospital–Physician Affiliations and Patient Treatments, Expenditures, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between hospital–physician affiliations and the treatments, expenditures, and outcomes of patients. Data Sources Sources include the Medicare Provider Analysis and Review dataset, the American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey, and the Area Resource File (ARF). Study Design A multivariate regression analysis of the relationship between hospital–physician affiliations (such as physician–hospital organizations [PHOs] or salaried employment) and the treatment of Medicare patients with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction admitted to general medical-surgical hospitals between 1994 and 1998. Dependent variables include whether the patient received a catheterization or angioplasty or bypass surgery; whether a patient was readmitted, or died within 90 days of initial admission; and expenditures. Independent variables include patient, admission hospital, and market characteristics, as well as hospital and year fixed effects. Principal Findings The integrated salary model form of hospital–physician affiliation is associated with slightly higher procedure rates, and higher patient expenditures. At the same time, there is little evidence that hospital–physician affiliations in the aggregate have had any measurable impact on patient treatment or outcomes. Conclusions The limited effect of hospital–physician affiliations on patient outcomes is consistent with previous research showing that affiliations have not much changed the nature of health care delivery. However, the finding that the integrated salary model is associated with higher treatment intensity suggests that affiliations may have had some impact on patients, and could have more in the future. PMID:15032954

  1. Family treatment of child anxiety: outcomes, limitations and future directions.

    PubMed

    Creswell, Cathy; Cartwright-Hatton, Sam

    2007-09-01

    Anxiety of childhood is a common and serious condition. The past decade has seen an increase in treatment-focussed research, with recent trials tending to give greater attention to parents in the treatment process. This review examines the efficacy of family-based cognitive behaviour therapy and attempts to delineate some of the factors that might have an impact on its efficacy. The choice and timing of outcome measure, age and gender of the child, level of parental anxiety, severity and type of child anxiety and treatment format and content are scrutinised. The main conclusions are necessarily tentative, but it seems likely that Family Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (FCBT) is superior to no treatment, and, for some outcome measures, also superior to Child Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CCBT). Where FCBT is successful, the results are consistently maintained at follow-up. It appears that where a parent is anxious, and this is not addressed, outcomes are less good. However, for children of anxious parents, FCBT is probably more effective than CCBT. What is most clear is that large, well-designed studies, examining these factors alone and in combination, are now needed.

  2. Need for Cognitive Closure Modulates How Perceptual Decisions Are Affected by Task Difficulty and Outcome Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Viola, Vanda; Tosoni, Annalisa; Brizi, Ambra; Salvato, Ilaria; Kruglanski, Arie W.; Galati, Gaspare; Mannetti, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which Need for Cognitive Closure (NCC), an individual-level epistemic motivation, can explain inter-individual variability in the cognitive effort invested on a perceptual decision making task (the random motion task). High levels of NCC are manifested in a preference for clarity, order and structure and a desire for firm and stable knowledge. The study evaluated how NCC moderates the impact of two variables known to increase the amount of cognitive effort invested on a task, namely task ambiguity (i.e., the difficulty of the perceptual discrimination) and outcome relevance (i.e., the monetary gain associated with a correct discrimination). Based on previous work and current design, we assumed that reaction times (RTs) on our motion discrimination task represent a valid index of effort investment. Task ambiguity was associated with increased cognitive effort in participants with low or medium NCC but, interestingly, it did not affect the RTs of participants with high NCC. A different pattern of association was observed for outcome relevance; high outcome relevance increased cognitive effort in participants with moderate or high NCC, but did not affect the performance of low NCC participants. In summary, the performance of individuals with low NCC was affected by task difficulty but not by outcome relevance, whereas individuals with high NCC were influenced by outcome relevance but not by task difficulty; only participants with medium NCC were affected by both task difficulty and outcome relevance. These results suggest that perceptual decision making is influenced by the interaction between context and NCC. PMID:26716987

  3. How temporal evolution of intracranial collaterals in acute stroke affects clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Paliwal, Prakash; Low, Adrian F.; Tay, Edgar L.W.; Gopinathan, Anil; Nadarajah, Mahendran; Ting, Eric; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Seet, Raymond C.S.; Ahmad, Aftab; Chan, Bernard P.L.; Teoh, Hock L.; Soon, Derek; Rathakrishnan, Rahul; Sharma, Vijay K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We compared intracranial collaterals on pretreatment and day 2 brain CT angiograms (CTA) to assess their evolution and relationship with functional outcomes in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients treated with IV tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Methods: Consecutive AIS patients who underwent pretreatment and day 2 CTA and received IV tPA during 2010–2013 were included. Collaterals were evaluated by 2 independent neuroradiologists using 3 predefined criteria: the Miteff system, the Maas system, and 20-point collateral scale by the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score methodology. We stratified our cohort by baseline pre-tPA state of their collaterals and by recanalization status of the primary vessel for analysis. Good outcomes at 3 months were defined by a modified Rankin Scale score of 0–1. Results: This study included 209 patients. Delayed collateral recruitment by any grading system was not associated with good outcomes. All 3 scoring systems showed that collateral recruitment on the follow-up CTA from a baseline poor collateral state was significantly associated with poor outcome and increased bleeding risk. When the primary vessel remained persistently occluded, collateral recruitment was significantly associated with worse outcomes. Interestingly, collateral recruitment was significantly associated with increased mortality in 2 of the 3 grading systems. Conclusions: Not all collateral recruitment is beneficial; delayed collateral recruitment may be different from early recruitment and can result in worse outcomes and higher mortality. Prethrombolysis collateral status and recanalization are determinants of how intracranial collateral evolution affects functional outcomes. PMID:26740681

  4. Treatment compliance and outcome in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, Jonathan S; Franklin, Martin E; Zoellner, Lori A; DiBernardo, Corrie L

    2002-09-01

    Exposure and ritual prevention (EX/RP) is an effective treatment for obsessive compulsive-disorder (OCD), although it is neither universally nor completely helpful. Compliance with EX/RP treatment procedures has been linked theoretically to posttreatment outcome, yet empirical exploration of this relationship has been insufficient. In this study, therapists were asked to rate the treatment compliance of 28 consecutive patients who received EX/RP on a fee-for-service basis. Results indicated that understanding the treatment rationale and compliance with in-session and homework exposure instructions, but not with ritual prevention and self-monitoring of rituals, was significantly related to posttreatment OCD symptom severity. Clinical implications of these findings and future directions in treatment compliance research with OCD patients are discussed.

  5. Comparing Outcomes for Youth Served in Treatment Foster Care and Treatment Group Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robst, John; Armstrong, Mary; Dollard, Norin

    2011-01-01

    This study compared youth in the Florida Medicaid system prior to entry into treatment foster care or treatment group care, and compared outcomes in the 6 months after treatment. Florida Medicaid data from FY2003/04 through 2006/2007 along with Department of Juvenile Justice, Department of Law Enforcement, and involuntary examination data were…

  6. Barriers to Implementing Treatment Integrity Procedures in School Psychology Research: Survey of Treatment Outcome Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanetti, Lisa M. Hagermoser; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment integrity data are essential to drawing valid conclusions in treatment outcome studies. Such data, however, are not always included in peer-reviewed research articles in school psychology or related fields. To gain a better understanding of why treatment integrity data are lacking in the school psychology research, we surveyed the…

  7. ADHD, Multimodal Treatment, and Longitudinal Outcome: Evidence, Paradox, and Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, L. Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Given major increases in the diagnosis of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and in rates of medication for this condition, we carefully examine evidence for effects of single versus multimodal (i.e., combined medication and psychosocial/behavioral) interventions for ADHD. Our primary data source is the Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with ADHD (MTA), a 14-month, randomized clinical trial in which intensive behavioral, medication, and multimodal treatment arms were contrasted with one another and with community intervention (treatment-as-usual), regarding outcome domains of ADHD symptoms, comorbidities, and core functional impairments. Although initial reports emphasized the superiority of well-monitored medication for symptomatic improvement, reanalyses and reappraisals have highlighted (a) the superiority of combination treatment for composite outcomes and for domains of functional impairment (e.g., academic achievement, social skills, parenting practices); (b) the importance of considering moderator and mediator processes underlying differential patterns of outcome, including comorbid subgroups and improvements in family discipline style during the intervention period; (c) the emergence of side effects (e.g., mild growth suppression) in youth treated with long-term medication; and (d) the diminution of medication’s initial superiority once the randomly assigned treatment phase turned into naturalistic follow-up. The key paradox is that whereas ADHD clearly responds to medication and behavioral treatment in the short term, evidence for long-term effectiveness remains elusive. We close with discussion of future directions and a call for greater understanding of relevant developmental processes in the attempt to promote optimal, generalized, and lasting treatments for this important and impairing neurodevelopmental disorder. PMID:25558298

  8. Acute Coronary Syndromes in Women: Recent Treatment Trends and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Garth

    2016-01-01

    In the USA and internationally, women experience farranging differences with respect to acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and myocardial infarction (MI). Women suffer from more comorbidities than men, such as smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and poor mental health. They some-times exhibit atypical MI presentation symptoms and are overall less likely to present with chest pain. Women are more likely than men to encounter delays between the onset of symptoms and arrival at the hospital or to guideline treatment. The use of various surgical and pharmacological treatments, including revascularization approaches, also differs. Women, on average, have worse outcomes than men following MI, with more complications, higher mortality rates, and poorer recovery. Internationally, outcomes are similar despite various differences in health care and culture in non-US countries. In this review, we detail differences regarding ACS and MI in women, describing their complex correlations and discussing their possible causes. Educational approaches that are tailored to women might help to reduce the incidence of ACS and MI, as well as outcomes following hospitalization. Although outcomes following acute MI have been improving over the years, women may require special consideration in order to see continued improvement. PMID:26884685

  9. Elevated depressive affect is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes among African Americans with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael J; Kimmel, Paul L; Greene, Tom; Gassman, Jennifer J; Wang, Xuelei; Brooks, Deborah H; Charleston, Jeanne; Dowie, Donna; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Cooper, Lisa A; Bruce, Marino A; Kusek, John W; Norris, Keith C; Lash, James P

    2011-09-01

    This study was designed to examine the impact of elevated depressive affect on health outcomes among participants with hypertensive chronic kidney disease in the African-American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) Cohort Study. Elevated depressive affect was defined by Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) thresholds of 11 or more, above 14, and by 5-Unit increments in the score. Cox regression analyses were used to relate cardiovascular death/hospitalization, doubling of serum creatinine/end-stage renal disease, overall hospitalization, and all-cause death to depressive affect evaluated at baseline, the most recent annual visit (time-varying), or average from baseline to the most recent visit (cumulative). Among 628 participants at baseline, 42% had BDI-II scores of 11 or more and 26% had a score above 14. During a 5-year follow-up, the cumulative incidence of cardiovascular death/hospitalization was significantly greater for participants with baseline BDI-II scores of 11 or more compared with those with scores <11. The baseline, time-varying, and cumulative elevated depressive affect were each associated with a significant higher risk of cardiovascular death/hospitalization, especially with a time-varying BDI-II score over 14 (adjusted HR 1.63) but not with the other outcomes. Thus, elevated depressive affect is associated with unfavorable cardiovascular outcomes in African Americans with hypertensive chronic kidney disease.

  10. Student perceptions of their biology teacher's interpersonal teaching behaviors and student achievement and affective learning outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Wade Clay, Jr.

    The primary goals of this dissertation were to determine the relationships between interpersonal teaching behaviors and student achievement and affective learning outcomes. The instrument used to collect student perceptions of teacher interpersonal teaching behaviors was the Questionnaire on Teacher Interactions (QTI). The instrument used to assess student affective learning outcomes was the Biology Student Affective Instrument (BSAI). The interpersonal teaching behavior data were collected using students as the observers. 111 students in an urban influenced, rural high school answered the QTI and BSAI in September 1997 and again in April 1998. At the same time students were pre and post tested using the Biology End of Course Examination (BECE). The QTI has been used primarily in European and Oceanic areas. The instrument was also primarily used in educational stratified environment. This was the first time the BSAI was used to assess student affective learning outcomes. The BECE is a Texas normed cognitive assessment test and it is used by Texas schools districts as the end of course examination in biology. The interpersonal teaching behaviors model was tested to ascertain if predictive power in the USA and in a non-stratified educational environment. Findings indicate that the QTI is an adequate predictor of student achievement in biology. The results were not congruent with the non-USA data and results, this indicates that the QTI is a society/culturally sensitive instrument and the instrument needs to be normed to a particular society/culture before it is used to affect teachers' and students' educational environments.

  11. Staff training and ambulatory tuberculosis treatment outcomes: a cluster randomized controlled trial in South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, Simon; Dick, Judy; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Lombard, Carl J.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether adding a training intervention for clinic staff to the usual DOTS strategy (the internationally recommended control strategy for tuberculosis (TB)) would affect the outcomes of TB treatment in primary care clinics with treatment success rates below 70%. METHODS: A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted from July 1996 to July 2000 in nurse-managed ambulatory primary care clinics in Cape Town, South Africa. Clinics with successful TB treatment completion rates of less than 70% and annual adult pulmonary TB loads of more than 40 patients per year were randomly assigned to either the intervention (n = 12) or control (n = 12) groups. All clinics completed follow-up. Treatment outcomes were measured in cohorts of adult, pulmonary TB patients before the intervention (n = 1200) and 9 months following the training (n = 1177). The intervention comprised an 18-hour experiential, participatory in-service training programme for clinic staff delivered by nurse facilitators and focusing on patient centredness, critical reflection on practice, and quality improvement. The main outcome measure was successful treatment, defined as patients who were cured and those who had completed tuberculosis treatment. FINDINGS: The estimated effect of the intervention was an increase in successful treatment rates of 4.8% (95% confidence interval (CI): -5.5% to 15.2%) and in bacteriological cure rates of 10.4% (CI: -1.2% to 22%). A treatment effect of 10% was envisaged, based on the views of policy-makers on the minimum effect size for large-scale implementation. CONCLUSION: This is the first evidence from a randomized controlled trial on the effects of experiential, participatory training on TB outcomes in primary care facilities in a developing country. Such training did not appear to improve TB outcomes. However, the results were inconclusive and further studies are required. PMID:15868015

  12. Directly Observed Therapy and Improved Tuberculosis Treatment Outcomes in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Anuwatnonthakate, Amornrat; Limsomboon, Pranom; Nateniyom, Sriprapa; Wattanaamornkiat, Wanpen; Komsakorn, Sittijate; Moolphate, Saiyud; Chiengsorn, Navarat; Kaewsa-ard, Samroui; Sombat, Potjaman; Siangphoe, Umaporn; Mock, Philip A.; Varma, Jay K.

    2008-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that tuberculosis (TB) patients receive directly observed therapy (DOT). Randomized controlled trials have not consistently shown that this practice improves TB treatment success rates. In Thailand, one of 22 WHO-designated high burden TB countries, patients may have TB treatment observed by a health care worker (HCW), family member, or no one. We studied whether DOT improved TB treatment outcomes in a prospective, observational cohort. Methods and Findings We prospectively collected epidemiologic data about TB patients treated at public and private facilities in four provinces in Thailand and the national infectious diseases hospital from 2004–2006. Public health staff recorded the type of observed therapy that patients received during the first two months of TB treatment. We limited our analysis to pulmonary TB patients never previously treated for TB and not known to have multidrug-resistant TB. We analyzed the proportion of patients still on treatment at the end of two months and with treatment success at the end of treatment according to DOT type. We used propensity score analysis to control for factors associated with DOT and treatment outcome. Of 8,031 patients eligible for analysis, 24% received HCW DOT, 59% family DOT, and 18% self-administered therapy (SAT). Smear-positive TB was diagnosed in 63%, and 21% were HIV-infected. Of patients either on treatment or that defaulted at two months, 1601/1636 (98%) patients that received HCW DOT remained on treatment at two months compared with 1096/1268 (86%) patients that received SAT (adjusted OR [aOR] 3.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.4–6.0) and 3782/3987 (95%) patients that received family DOT (aOR 2.1; CI, 1.4–3.1). Of patients that had treatment success or that defaulted at the end of treatment, 1369/1477 (93%) patients that received HCW DOT completed treatment compared with 744/1074 (69%) patients that received SAT (aOR 3.3; CI, 2.4–4.5) and

  13. Does treatment of SDB in children improve cardiovascular outcome?

    PubMed

    Vlahandonis, Anna; Walter, Lisa M; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2013-02-01

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is a common disorder in both adults and children and is caused by the obstruction of the upper airway during sleep. Unlike adults, most cases of paediatric SDB are due to the presence of enlarged tonsils and adenoids, thus the main treatment option is adenotonsillectomy (T&A). It is well known that obstructive sleep apnoea in adults increases the risk for hypertension, coronary artery disease and stroke, and there is now mounting evidence that SDB also has a significant impact on the cardiovascular system in children with reports of elevated blood pressure, endothelial dysfunction and altered autonomic cardiovascular control. As there is now substantial evidence that elevated blood pressure in childhood is carried on to adulthood it is important to know if treatment of SDB improves cardiovascular outcomes. Studies in adults have shown that treatment of SDB leads to improvements in cardiovascular function, including a reduction in pulmonary artery pressure, systemic blood pressure and endothelial dysfunction. However, studies exploring the outcomes of treatment of SDB in children on the cardiovascular system are limited and varied in their methodology and outcome measures. As a number of cardiovascular disturbances are sequelae of SDB, early detection and management could result in the reduction of elevated blood pressure in children, and consequently a reduction in cardiovascular morbidity in adulthood. The aim of this review is to summarise the findings of studies to date which have investigated the cardiovascular outcomes in children treated for SDB and to make recommendations for future management of this very common disease.

  14. Identifying predictors of treatment outcome in a drug court program.

    PubMed

    Roll, John M; Prendergast, Michael; Richardson, Kimberly; Burdon, William; Ramirez, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    Drug courts are popular for dealing with drug-abusing offenders. However, relatively little is known about participant characteristics that reliably predict either success or failure in these treatment settings. In this article, we report on 99 individuals who were enrolled in a drug court program (approximately one-half of whom successfully completed the program). Using, logistic regression techniques we identified 2 significant predictors of outcome. First, individuals who were employed at the time of their enrollment into the drug court program were more likely to successfully complete the treatment program. Second, individuals with a history of illicit intravenous drug use were less likely to complete the program.

  15. The Australian Treatment Outcome Study (ATOS): what have we learnt about treatment for heroin dependence?

    PubMed

    Darke, Shane; Ross, Joanne; Teesson, Maree

    2007-01-01

    Opioids make the single largest contribution to illicit drug-related mortality and morbidity worldwide In this paper we reflect upon what has been learnt regarding treatment outcome and the natural history of heroin use from the Australian Treatment Outcome Study (ATOS). We focus on what we knew prior to ATOS, what ATOS revealed that is novel, and the implications for research, practice and policy. ATOS provided strong evidence for sustained improvement attributable to treatment across the three years of the study. It is argued that treatment for heroin dependence is money well spent, and leads to clear and sustained benefits to both heroin users and society.

  16. Clinical symptoms and microbiological outcomes in tuberculosis treatment trials.

    PubMed

    Bark, C M; Dietze, R; Okwera, A; Quelapio, M I; Thiel, B A; Johnson, J L

    2011-11-01

    During a recent Food and Drug Administration workshop on clinical trials to evaluate new TB drugs, questions were raised regarding the use of bacteriologic endpoints such as treatment failure and relapse as measures of improvement in health status and long term outcome after treatment. FDA scientists asked how patients' clinical signs and symptoms changed during therapy, noting that while such information is usually collected during clinical trials, it is not often reported. We analyzed data from an international phase 3 TB treatment trial that included systematic assessments of symptoms. The percentage of subjects with self-reported symptoms at baseline ranged from 30% for dyspnea to 81% for cough, with 51% reporting fever. During therapy, fever, sweats, and dyspnea decreased most rapidly, with near resolution by the end of therapy. Chest pain and cough resolved more slowly; 13% of subjects reported cough at six months. Symptom resolution during treatment did not differ between those who relapsed and those who did not. Among those with microbiological relapse, symptoms returned with significant increases in the proportion with fever, cough, and chest pain. At the time of relapse, cough was the most frequent symptom, occurring in 75% of subjects who relapsed but only 12% of those who did not. Our data support the continued use of bacteriologic endpoints based on sputum culture as surrogate measures of the relief of symptoms, improvement in health status and favorable long term treatment outcome in TB drug trials.

  17. [Personality changes of neurotic patients as outcome of the treatment].

    PubMed

    Jodzio, K

    1993-01-01

    The present article attempted to assess the importance of outcomes which appeared during the treatment of 30 neurotic patients. This study specially concentrates on measures of emotional empathy, self-confidence and introspection. There were two surveys in the clinical group: before and after the treatment was completed. Data were compared with a control group, also consisting of 30 persons (15 male and 15 female) matched for age and education. All patients attending group psychotherapy were also treated by pharmacotherapy. As it appeared from the analysis before treatment high empathy in patients was found, but this declined after therapy, however it was still significantly higher than in the control group. The first survey revealed also that patients demonstrated lower levels of self-confidence and introspection. After treatment there were no important differences between the groups. Relationships between the studied qualities were not statistically significant.

  18. Behavior Therapy and the Transdermal Nicotine Patch: Effects on Cessation Outcome, Affect, and Coping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinciripini, Paul M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Process and outcome of a smoking cessation program using behavior therapy along (BT) or behavior therapy plus the nicotine patch (BTP) was studied in 64 participants. Abstinence was significantly higher for the BTP group from the end of behavioral treatment (79% vs. 63%) through the three-month follow-up, with the effects weakening at the six- and…

  19. Are lifetime affective disorders predictive of long-term outcome in severe adolescent anorexia nervosa?

    PubMed

    Carrot, B; Radon, L; Hubert, T; Vibert, S; Duclos, J; Curt, F; Godart, N

    2017-03-03

    Depression and anxiety are commonly associated with anorexia nervosa (AN) and contribute to difficulties in social integration, a negative factor for outcome in AN. The link between those disorders and AN has been poorly studied. Thus, our objective was to investigate (1) the link between outcome nine years after hospitalisation for AN and the occurrence of lifetime anxious or depressive comorbidities; (2) the prognostic value of these comorbidities on patient outcome; 181 female patients were hospitalised for AN (between 13 and 22 years old), and were re-evaluated for their psychological, dietary, physical and social outcomes, from 6 to 12 years after their hospitalisation. The link between anxious and depressive disorders (premorbid to AN and lifetime) and the outcome assessment criteria were tested through multivariate analyses; 63% of the participants had good or intermediate outcome, 83% had presented at least one anxiety or depression disorder in the course of their lives, half of them before the onset of AN. Premorbid obsessive compulsive disorders (OCD), BMI at admission, and premenarchal AN all contribute to poor prognosis. Social phobia and agoraphobia affect the subjects' quality of life and increase eating disorder symptoms. These results encourage a systematic assessment of, and care for, anxiety and depression comorbidities among female adolescent patients with a particular focus on premorbid OCD.

  20. Pathways to poor educational outcomes for HIV/AIDS-affected youth in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Orkin, Mark; Boyes, Mark E; Cluver, Lucie D; Zhang, Yuning

    2014-01-01

    A recent systematic review of studies in the developing world has critically examined linkages from familial HIV/AIDS and associated factors such as poverty and child mental health to negative child educational outcomes. In line with several recommendations in the review, the current study modelled relationships between familial HIV/AIDS, poverty, child internalising problems, gender and four educational outcomes: non-enrolment at school, non-attendance, deficits in grade progression and concentration problems. Path analyses reveal no direct associations between familial HIV/AIDS and any of the educational outcomes. Instead, HIV/AIDS-orphanhood or caregiver HIV/AIDS-sickness impacted indirectly on educational outcomes via the poverty and internalising problems that they occasioned. This has implications for evidence-based policy inferences. For instance, by addressing such intervening variables generally, rather than by seeking to target families affected by HIV/AIDS, interventions could avoid exacerbating stigmatisation, while having a more direct and stronger impact on children's educational outcomes. This analytic approach also suggests that future research should seek to identify causal paths, and may include other intervening variables related to poverty (such as child housework and caring responsibilities) or to child mental health (such as stigma and abuse), that are linked to both familial HIV/AIDS and educational outcomes.

  1. Factors affecting outcome in poor grade subarachnoid haemorrhage: An institutional study

    PubMed Central

    Kranthi, Sannepaneni; Sahu, Barada P.; Aniruddh, Purohit

    2016-01-01

    Context: Poor grade subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is usually associated with unfavorable outcomes and optimal management is deemed complicated. Most centres follow an expectant management strategy or a less aggressive approach till patients improve to good clinical grades. This approach has been associated with higher mortality and morbidity. However, not all patients with poor clinical condition fare badly. Identification and early aggressive management of this select group of patients may lead to favorable outcomes. Settings and Design: Prospective non-randomized study. Materials and Methods: We prospectively analyzed 19 cases presented in WFNS grade 4 and 5 and factors affecting their outcome at a tertiary care centre in south India. This study was aimed at identifying those few poor grade patients who are probable candidates for a good outcome. Statistical Analysis Used: All the variables were analyzed for possible correlations with the SPSS version 13 software. The Chi-square test with a P < 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results: Of 19 cases, 13 were operated and good outcome was seen in 53.8% of the patients who underwent surgery and aggressive management. All 7 patients who were managed conservatively died. 15.8% of the patients had low density changes (P = 0.625). Absence of such changes was associated with a good long term outcome (P = 0.004). 9 patients had intraventricular hemorrhage at presentation and 5 patients having hydrocephalus underwent extra-ventricular drainage. Statistically significant factors precluding good outcome were the presence of infarcts and thick SAH in the cisterns. Conclusions: Poor grade (WFNS 4 and 5) SAH patients with or without ICH, IVH, if operated within 3 days can give rise to favorable outcome in around 50%. However, presence of patchy infarcts associated with thick subarachnoid blood (Fisher grade 3) precludes long term survival or meaningful recovery. Hence, aggressive management is unlikely to alter the

  2. Dynamic association between negative affect and alcohol lapses following alcohol treatment.

    PubMed

    Witkiewitz, Katie; Villarroel, Nadia Aracelliz

    2009-08-01

    Clinical research has found a strong association between negative affect and returning to alcohol use after a period of abstinence. Yet little is known about the probability of a lapse given a particular level of negative affect or whether there is a reciprocal relationship between negative affect and alcohol use across time. The goal of the current study was to examine the association between negative affect and drinking behavior in the 1st year following alcohol treatment. The authors applied an associative latent transition analysis to the Project MATCH outpatient data (n = 952) and then replicated the model in the Project MATCH aftercare data (n = 774). Changes in drinking following treatment were significantly associated with current and prior changes in negative affect, and changes in negative affect were related to prior changes in drinking (effect size range = 0.13-0.33). The results supported the hypothesis that negative affect and alcohol lapses are dynamically linked and suggest that targeting the relationship between negative affect and alcohol use could greatly decrease the probability of lapses and improve alcohol treatment outcomes.

  3. Examining intrinsic versus extrinsic exercise goals: cognitive, affective, and behavioral outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sebire, Simon J; Standage, Martyn; Vansteenkiste, Maarten

    2009-04-01

    Grounded in self-determination theory (SDT), this study had two purposes: (a) examine the associations between intrinsic (relative to extrinsic) exercise goal content and cognitive, affective, and behavioral outcomes; and (b) test the mediating role of psychological need satisfaction in the Exercise Goal Content --> Outcomes relationship. Using a sample of 410 adults, hierarchical regression analysis showed relative intrinsic goal content to positively predict physical self-worth, self-reported exercise behavior, psychological well-being, and psychological need satisfaction and negatively predict exercise anxiety. Except for exercise behavior, the predictive utility of relative intrinsic goal content on the dependent variables of interest remained significant after controlling for participants' relative self-determined exercise motivation. Structural equation modeling analyses showed psychological need satisfaction to partially mediate the effect of relative intrinsic goal content on the outcome variables. Our findings support further investigation of exercise goals commensurate with the goal content perspective advanced in SDT.

  4. Cognitive behavior therapy with Internet addicts: treatment outcomes and implications.

    PubMed

    Young, Kimberly S

    2007-10-01

    Research over the last decade has identified Internet addiction as a new and often unrecognized clinical disorder that impact a user's ability to control online use to the extent that it can cause relational, occupational, and social problems. While much of the literature explores the psychological and social factors underlying Internet addiction, little if any empirical evidence exists that examines specific treatment outcomes to deal with this new client population. Researchers have suggested using cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) as the treatment of choice for Internet addiction, and addiction recovery in general has utilized CBT as part of treatment planning. To investigate the efficacy of using CBT with Internet addicts, this study investigated 114 clients who suffered from Internet addiction and received CBT at the Center for Online Addiction. This study employed a survey research design, and outcome variables such as client motivation, online time management, improved social relationships, improved sexual functioning, engagement in offline activities, and ability to abstain from problematic applications were evaluated on the 3rd, 8th, and 12th sessions and over a 6-month follow-up. Results suggested that Caucasian, middle-aged males with at least a 4-year degree were most likely to suffer from some form of Internet addiction. Preliminary analyses indicated that most clients were able to manage their presenting complaints by the eighth session, and symptom management was sustained upon a 6-month follow-up. As the field of Internet addiction continues to grow, such outcome data will be useful in treatment planning with evidenced-based protocols unique to this emergent client population.

  5. Infertility treatment outcome in sub groups of obese population

    PubMed Central

    Awartani, Khalid A; Nahas, Samar; Al Hassan, Saad H; Al Deery, Mashael A; Coskun, Serdar

    2009-01-01

    Background Obesity is a common disorder with a negative impact on IVF treatment outcome. It is not clear whether morbidly obese women (BMI >= 35 kg/m2) respond to treatment differently as compared to obese women (BMI = 30–34.9 kg/m2) in IVF. Our aim was to compare the outcome of IVF or ICSI treatments in obese patients to that in morbidly obese patients. Methods This retrospective cohort study was conducted in a tertiary care centre. Patients inclusion criteria were as follows; BMI ≥ 30, age 20–40 years old, first cycle IVF/ICSI treatment with primary infertility and long follicular pituitary down regulation protocol. Results A total of 406 obese patients (group A) and 141 morbidly obese patients (group B) satisfied the inclusion criteria. Average BMI was 32.1 ± 1.38 kg/m2 for group A versus 37.7 ± 2.99 kg/m2 for group B. Patient age, cause of infertility, duration of stimulation, fertilization rate, and number of transferred embryos were similar in both groups. Compared to group A, group B had fewer medium size and mature follicles (14 vs. 16), fewer oocytes collected (7 vs. 9) and required higher doses of HMG (46.2 vs. 38.5 amps). There was also a higher cancellation rate in group B (28.3% vs. 19%) and lower clinical pregnancy rate per started cycle (19.9% vs. 28.6%). Conclusion In a homogenous infertile and obese patient population stratified according to their BMI, morbid obesity is associated with unfavorable IVF/ICSI cycle outcome as evidenced by lower pregnancy rates. It is recommended that morbidly obese patients undergo appropriate counseling before the initiation of this expensive and invasive therapy. PMID:19473499

  6. Strategies for managing aortoiliac occlusions: access, treatment and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Clair, Daniel G; Beach, Jocelyn M

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of severe aortoiliac disease has dramatically evolved from a dependence on open aortobifemoral grafting to hybrid and endovascular only approaches. Open surgery has been the gold standard treatment of severe aortoiliac disease with excellent patency rates, but with increased length of stay and major complications. In contrast, endovascular interventions can successfully treat almost any lesion with decreased risk, compared to open surgery. Although primary patency rates remain inferior, secondary endovascular interventions are often minor procedures resulting in comparable long-term outcomes. The risks of renal insufficiency, embolization and access complications are not insignificant; however, most can be prevented or managed without significant clinical consequence. Endovascular therapies should be considered a first-line treatment option for all patients with aortoiliac disease, especially those with high-risk cardiovascular comorbidities. PMID:25907618

  7. Effects of Comorbidity on Treatment Processes and Outcomes among Adolescents in Drug Treatment Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grella, Christine E.; Joshi, Vandana; Hser, Yih-Ing

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between treatment processes and posttreatment abstinence using data from the Drug Abuse Treatment Outcomes Studies for Adolescents (N = 810), with a focus on differences between adolescents with and without a comorbid mental disorder. The majority of the sample (62%) was diagnosed with at least one co-occurring…

  8. The Antidepressant Treatment Response Index as a Predictor of Reboxetine Treatment Outcome in Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Caudill, Marissa M; Hunter, Aimee M; Cook, Ian A; Leuchter, Andrew F

    2015-10-01

    Biomarkers to predict clinical outcomes early during the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) could reduce suffering and improve outcomes. A quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG) biomarker, the Antidepressant Treatment Response (ATR) index, has been associated with outcomes of treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants in patients with MDD. Here, we report the results of a post hoc analysis initiated to evaluate whether the ATR index may also be associated with reboxetine treatment outcome, given that its putative mechanism of action is via norepinephrine reuptake inhibition (NRI). Twenty-five adults with MDD underwent qEEG studies during open-label treatment with reboxetine at doses of 8 to 10 mg daily for 8 weeks. The ATR index calculated after 1 week of reboxetine treatment was significantly associated with overall Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) improvement at week 8 (r=0.605, P=.001), even after controlling for baseline depression severity (P=.002). The ATR index predicted response (≥50% reduction in HAM-D) with 70.6% sensitivity and 87.5% specificity, and remission (final HAM-D≤7) with 87.5% sensitivity and 64.7% specificity. These results suggest that the ATR index may be a useful biomarker of clinical response during NRI treatment of adults with MDD. Future studies are warranted to investigate further the potential utility of the ATR index as a predictor of noradrenergic antidepressant treatment response.

  9. Similarity of Outcome Predictors across Opiate, Cocaine, and Alcohol Treatments: Role of Treatment Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLellan, A. Thomas; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Outcomes were predicted by similar factors, regardless of drug problem or type of treatment. Greater substance use at follow-up was predicted by greater severity of use at admission, not number of services during treatment. Social adjustment was negatively predicted by more severe psychiatric problems at admission and positively predicted by more…

  10. Different school placements following language unit attendance: which factors affect language outcome?

    PubMed

    Conti-Ramsden, Gina; Botting, Nicola; Knox, Emma; Simkin, Zoë

    2002-01-01

    The study compared the outcomes of two groups of children who were attending language unit provision at 7 years of age. Of 242 children in the original study, 62 (28%) transferred to mainstream school placements at age 8 years. These children were then closely matched to children still attending language unit provision at this age using measures of non-verbal IQ, expression and comprehension. These two groups of children were compared on outcome at 11 years in the areas of language skill, non-verbal IQ and social behaviour. Teacher/speech-language therapist opinions of placement were also examined as factors affecting outcome. Results show that children who moved to mainstream provision at 8 years were more likely to be attending mainstream at 11 years, although the majority received extra support. No further differences were evident in outcome according to placement type. However, there was a main effect of teacher/therapist opinion on outcome--children whose teachers were not entirely happy with the 8-year placement performed more poorly at 11 years on language measures. There were no differences on any other measures. The findings suggest that follow-on placements for children attending language units need to be more closely in line with teacher's opinions and that more flexibility needs to be evident in school placement policy in order that appropriate educational settings can be arranged.

  11. Seasonal affective disorder, winter type: current insights and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Meesters, Ybe; Gordijn, Marijke CM

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD), winter type, is a seasonal pattern of recurrent major depressive episodes most commonly occurring in autumn or winter and remitting in spring/summer. The syndrome has been well-known for more than three decades, with light treatment being the treatment of first choice. In this paper, an overview is presented of the present insights in SAD. Description of the syndrome, etiology, and treatment options are mentioned. Apart from light treatment, medication and psychotherapy are other treatment options. The predictable, repetitive nature of the syndrome makes it possible to discuss preventive treatment options. Furthermore, critical views on the concept of SAD as a distinct diagnosis are discussed. PMID:27942239

  12. Patient characteristics, treatment patterns, and health outcomes among COPD phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Allen-Ramey, Felicia C; Gupta, Shaloo; DiBonaventura, Marco daCosta

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recent literature has suggested that emphysema and chronic bronchitis, traditionally considered to be entities overlapping within chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), may be distinct disorders. Few studies have examined the differences in patient characteristics and health outcomes between these conditions. This study examined whether COPD phenotypes represent distinct patient populations, in a large nationally representative US sample. Methods: Data were obtained from the 2010 US National Health and Wellness Survey (NHWS). NHWS respondents (n = 75,000) were categorized as a COPD phenotype based on their self-reported diagnosis of COPD only (n = 970), emphysema only (n = 399), or chronic bronchitis only (n = 2071). Phenotypes were compared on demographics, health characteristics, treatment patterns, health outcomes, work productivity, and resource use. Variables were compared using Chi-square and analysis of variance tests for categorical and continuous outcomes, respectively. Health outcomes were also examined using regression modeling, controlling for demographic and health characteristic covariates. Results: Patients with chronic bronchitis were significantly younger (51.38 years versus 63.24 years for COPD versus 63.30 years for emphysema, P < 0.05) and more likely to be employed (46.98% versus 23.81% for COPD versus 28.33% for emphysema, P < 0.05). Relative to the other phenotypes, patients with chronic bronchitis were also significantly more likely to be female, nonwhite, and to exercise currently (all P < 0.05), and were significantly less likely to be a current or former smoker (P < 0.05). Controlling for demographic and health characteristics, patients self-identified as having COPD only reported significantly worse physical quality of life (adjusted mean 36.69) and health utilities (adjusted mean 0.65) and significantly more absenteeism (adjusted mean 7.08%), presenteeism (adjusted mean 30.73%), overall work impairment (adjusted mean

  13. Long-Term Outcome and Factors Affecting Prognosis of Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy for Chronic Refractory Achilles Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the factors affecting prognosis of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) for chronic refractory Achilles tendinopathy (AT). Methods Thirty-six patients (48 consecutive feet) with chronic AT (>6 months) and who underwent ESWT for ‘poor’ or ‘fair’ grade in Roles-Maudsley Score (RMS) after unsuccessful conservative treatment were included in the present study. A maximum of 12 sessions of ESWT were conducted until treatment success: RMS reached ‘good’ or ‘excellent’. Termination of ESWT for no response, or ‘poor’ or ‘fair’ grade was regarded as treatment failure. Immediate outcome, long-term outcome (telephone interview after mean 26 months), and factors affecting treatment success were analyzed. Results Numeric Rating Scale was significantly decreased at immediate and long-term follow-up. Success rate was 71.1% and 90.3%, respectively. Univariate logistic regression identified that immediate treatment success was associated with retrocalcaneal enthesophyte on X-ray (odds ratio [OR], 0.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.01–0.28), pretreatment abnormal ultrasonography echogenicity within Achilles tendon (OR, 18.89; 95% CI, 2.08–171.96), mean duration of ‘post-treatment soreness’ (OR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.33–0.94), and duration of ‘post-treatment soreness after first ESWT’ (OR, 0.06; 95% CI, 0.01–0.34). The duration of ‘post-treatment soreness after first ESWT’ was found to be the only factor associated with long-term success (OR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.10–0.99). Conclusion ESWT appears to be effective in achieving long-term success in chronic refractory AT. Immediate success was associated with absence of retrocalcaneal enthesophyte on X-ray, presence of pretreatment abnormal ultrasonography echogenicity, shorter mean duration of ‘post-treatment soreness’, and shorter duration of ‘post-treatment soreness after first ESWT’. The shorter duration of ‘post-treatment soreness after first ESWT’ was

  14. Factors affecting the outcome of distal realignment for patellofemoral disorders of the knee.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Jen; Chan, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Han-Hsiang; Wu, Su-Ter

    2005-06-01

    This study correlated the risk factors with the clinical outcome of distal realignment for patellofemoral disorders in 48 patients with 53 knees with 25 to 96 months follow-up. The indications for surgery included pain and disability due to patellofemoral disorders with failure of at least 6 months of conservative treatments. The evaluations included pain scores, Lysholm functional scores and radiographs of the knee. The overall results were satisfactory in 47 knees (88.7%) and unsatisfactory in six knees (11.3%). There was no correlation of the clinical results with age, sex, body weight and body height, preoperative pain scores and Lysholm scores. However, the clinical outcome correlated with the severity of articular damage and the correction of patellar malalignment. Error in patient selection and inadequate surgical technique were attributable to poor outcomes.

  15. Obesity, but not Metabolic Syndrome, Negatively Affects Outcome in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Susan L; Kemp, David E; Friedman, Edward S; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A; Sylvia, Louisa G; Calabrese, Joseph R; Rabideau, Dustin J; Ketter, Terence A; Thase, Michael E; Singh, Vivek; Tohen, Mauricio; Bowden, Charles L; Bernstein, Emily E; Brody, Benjamin D; Deckersbach, Thilo; Kocsis, James H; Kinrys, Gustavo; Bobo, William V; Kamali, Masoud; McInnis, Melvin G; Leon, Andrew C.; Faraone, Stephen; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Shelton, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    Objective Examine the effects of obesity and metabolic syndrome on outcome in bipolar disorder. Method The Comparative Effectiveness of a Second Generation Antipsychotic Mood Stabilizer and a Classic Mood Stabilizer for Bipolar Disorder (Bipolar CHOICE) study randomized 482 participants with bipolar disorder in a six-month trial comparing lithium- and quetiapine-based treatment. Baseline variables were compared between groups with and without obesity, with and without abdominal obesity, and with and without metabolic syndrome, respectively. The effects of baseline obesity, abdominal obesity, and metabolic syndrome on outcomes were examined using mixed effects linear regression models. Results At baseline, 44.4% of participants had obesity, 48.0% had abdominal obesity, and 27.3% had metabolic syndrome; neither obesity, nor abdominal obesity, nor metabolic syndrome were associated with increased global severity, mood symptoms, or suicidality, or with poorer functioning or life satisfaction. Treatment groups did not differ on prevalence of obesity, abdominal obesity, or metabolic syndrome. By contrast, among the entire cohort, obesity was associated with less global improvement and less improvement in total mood and depressive symptoms, suicidality, functioning, and life satisfaction after six months of treatment. Abdominal obesity was associated with similar findings. Metabolic syndrome had no effect on outcome. Conclusion Obesity and abdominal obesity, but not metabolic syndrome, were associated with less improvement after six months of lithium- or quetiapine-based treatment. PMID:26114830

  16. Amelogenesis Imperfecta: Rehabilitation and Brainstorming on the Treatment Outcome after the First Year

    PubMed Central

    İzgi, Ayça Deniz; Kale, Ediz; Niğiz, Remzi

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) affects enamel on primary and permanent dentition. This hereditary disorder is characterized by loss of enamel, poor esthetics, and hypersensitivity. Functional and cosmetic rehabilitation is challenging with variety of treatment options. This report presents the treatment of an AI patient using conventional fixed dentures and discusses issues related to posttreatment complications and prosthetic treatment outcome after 1 year of follow-up. A 19-year-old male AI patient with impaired self-esteem presented with hypersensitive, discolored, and mutilated teeth. Clinical examination revealed compromised occlusion and anterior open-bite. After hygiene maintenance full-coverage porcelain-fused-to-metal fixed restorations were indicated and applied. At the end of the treatment acceptable functional and esthetic results could be achieved. However, nearly a year after treatment a gingival inflammation in the esthetic zone complicated the outcome. Insufficient oral hygiene was to be blamed. Tooth sensitivity present from early childhood in these patients may prevent oral hygiene from becoming a habit. The relaxation due to relieve of hypersensitivity after treatment makes oral hygiene learning difficult. Continuous oral hygiene maintenance motivation may be crucial for the success of the treatment of AI patients. Treatment of AI patients should be carefully planned and an acceptable risk-benefit balance should be established. PMID:26783475

  17. Yoga as a Complementary Treatment of Depression: Effects of Traits and Moods on Treatment Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Ian A.; Davydov, Dmitry M.; Ottaviani, Cristina; Leuchter, Andrew F.; Abrams, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    Preliminary findings support the potential of yoga as a complementary treatment of depressed patients who are taking anti-depressant medications but who are only in partial remission. The purpose of this article is to present further data on the intervention, focusing on individual differences in psychological, emotional and biological processes affecting treatment outcome. Twenty-seven women and 10 men were enrolled in the study, of whom 17 completed the intervention and pre- and post-intervention assessment data. The intervention consisted of 20 classes led by senior Iyengar yoga teachers, in three courses of 20 yoga classes each. All participants were diagnosed with unipolar major depression in partial remission. Psychological and biological characteristics were assessed pre- and post-intervention, and participants rated their mood states before and after each class. Significant reductions were shown for depression, anger, anxiety, neurotic symptoms and low frequency heart rate variability in the 17 completers. Eleven out of these completers achieved remission levels post-intervention. Participants who remitted differed from the non-remitters at intake on several traits and on physiological measures indicative of a greater capacity for emotional regulation. Moods improved from before to after the yoga classes. Yoga appears to be a promising intervention for depression; it is cost-effective and easy to implement. It produces many beneficial emotional, psychological and biological effects, as supported by observations in this study. The physiological methods are especially useful as they provide objective markers of the processes and effectiveness of treatment. These observations may help guide further clinical application of yoga in depression and other mental health disorders, and future research on the processes and mechanisms. PMID:18227917

  18. Impact of Parkinson's disease and its pharmacologic treatment on quality of life and economic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Scheife, R T; Schumock, G T; Burstein, A; Gottwald, M D; Luer, M S

    2000-05-15

    The impact of Parkinson's disease (PD) and its pharmacologic treatment on health-related quality of life (HRQL) and economic outcomes is reviewed. PD is a chronic and progressive neurologic disorder characterized by specific motor deficits resulting from the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The cardinal symptoms are tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and loss of postural reflexes. PD markedly reduces HRQL and places an economic burden on society of up to $25 billion per year. Patients' inability to move freely and to perform everyday tasks restricts their independence and leads to increased reliance on caregivers and assistive devices. Emotional and psychosocial well-being is also negatively affected. As the disease progresses, the response to levodopa typically decreases and various motor complications develop; these are difficult to treat and result in further declines in HRQL. The economic costs of PD include both direct health care costs (for drugs, physician services, and hospitalization) and indirect costs (for lost worker productivity). Economic analyses of PD and its treatments can help guide effective allocation of health care resources. Various antiparkinsonian agents and formulations, such as extended-release levodopa-carbidopa and pramipexole, have been found to be cost-effective relative to other agents. The newest antiparkinsonian drugs, cathechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors, also have the potential to improve HRQL and economic outcomes, although more study is needed to confirm this. The total impact of PD and its treatment can be fully appreciated only when HRQL and economic outcomes, in addition to clinical outcomes, are examined.

  19. Beneficial Effect of Insulin Treatment on Islet Transplantation Outcomes in Akita Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kikawa, Kazuhide; Sakano, Daisuke; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Tsuyama, Tomonori; Kume, Kazuhiko; Endo, Fumio; Kume, Shoen

    2014-01-01

    Islet transplantation is a promising potential therapy for patients with type 1 diabetes. The outcome of islet transplantation depends on the transplantation of a sufficient amount of β-cell mass. However, the initial loss of islets after transplantation is problematic. We hypothesized the hyperglycemic status of the recipient may negatively affect graft survival. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated the effect of insulin treatment on islet transplantation involving a suboptimal amount of islets in Akita mice, which is a diabetes model mouse with an Insulin 2 gene missense mutation. Fifty islets were transplanted under the left kidney capsule of the recipient mouse with or without insulin treatment. For insulin treatment, sustained-release insulin implants were implanted subcutaneously into recipient mice 2 weeks before transplantation and maintained for 4 weeks. Islet transplantation without insulin treatment did not reverse hyperglycemia. In contrast, the group that received transplants in combination with insulin treatment exhibited improved fasting blood glucose levels until 18 weeks after transplantation, even after insulin treatment was discontinued. The group that underwent islet transplantation in combination with insulin treatment had better glucose tolerance than the group that did not undergo insulin treatment. Insulin treatment improved graft survival from the acute phase (i.e., 1 day after transplantation) to the chronic phase (i.e., 18 weeks after transplantation). Islet apoptosis increased with increasing glucose concentration in the medium or blood in both the in vitro culture and in vivo transplantation experiments. Expression profile analysis of grafts indicated that genes related to immune response, chemotaxis, and inflammatory response were specifically upregulated when islets were transplanted into mice with hyperglycemia compared to those with normoglycemia. Thus, the results demonstrate that insulin treatment protects islets from

  20. Bad actions or bad outcomes? Differentiating affective contributions to the moral condemnation of harm.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ryan M; Hannikainen, Ivar A; Cushman, Fiery A

    2014-06-01

    Moral condemnation of harmful behavior is influenced by both cognitive and affective processes. However, despite much recent research, the proximate source of affect remains unclear. One obvious contender is empathy; simulating the victim's pain could lead one to judge an action as wrong ("outcome aversion"). An alternative, less obvious source is one's own aversion to performing the action itself ("action aversion"). To dissociate these alternatives, we developed a scale that assessed individual aversions to (a) witnessing others experience painful outcomes (e.g., seeing someone fall down stairs); and (b) performing actions that are harmless yet aversive (e.g., stabbing a fellow actor with a fake stage knife). Across 4 experiments, we found that moral condemnation of both first-person and third-party harmful behavior in the context of moral dilemmas is better predicted by one's aversion to action properties than by an affective response to victim suffering. In a fifth experiment, we manipulated both action aversion and the degree of expected suffering across a number of actions and found that both factors make large, independent contributions to moral judgment. Together, these results suggest we may judge others' actions by imagining what it would feel like to perform the action rather than experience the consequences of the action. Accordingly, they provide a counterpoint to a dominant but largely untested assumption that empathy is the key affective response governing moral judgments of harm.

  1. Congenital syndactyly: outcome of surgical treatment in 131 webs.

    PubMed

    Vekris, Marios D; Lykissas, Marios G; Soucacos, Panayiotis N; Korompilias, Anastasios V; Beris, Alexandros E

    2010-03-01

    Congenital syndactyly is one of the most common congenital hand differences and various methods of surgical treatment have been described since the 19th century. Nevertheless, unsatisfactory results including web creep, flexion contractures, and rotational deformities of the fingers are still reported. This study presents the outcome of syndactyly release in 131 webs in 78 patients. The sex ratio was 40 males/38 females. The age ranged from 4 months to 22 years (average: 4 y). In the majority of the webs the result was good or excellent. The type of flaps used for the reconstruction of the web was important as the combination of a dorsal rectangular and 2 volar triangular flaps gave superior results than the use of 2 triangular flaps. The less rewarding overall outcome was obtained in the presence of associated differences of the involved fingers, that is, complex complicated syndactyly and in the cases of delayed correction. Use of a dorsal rectangular flap in combination with 2 volar triangular flaps and use of full thickness skin grafts, ensure a satisfactory outcome and minimize the number of operations per web.

  2. Improving Outcome of Psychosocial Treatments by Enhancing Memory and Learning

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Allison G.; Lee, Jason; Williams, Joseph; Hollon, Steven D.; Walker, Matthew P.; Thompson, Monique A.; Smith, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Mental disorders are prevalent and lead to significant impairment. Progress toward establishing treatments has been good. However, effect sizes are small to moderate, gains may not persist, and many patients derive no benefit. Our goal is to highlight the potential for empirically-supported psychosocial treatments to be improved by incorporating insights from cognitive psychology and research on education. Our central question is: If it were possible to improve memory for content of sessions of psychosocial treatments, would outcome substantially improve? This question arises from five lines of evidence: (a) mental illness is often characterized by memory impairment, (b) memory impairment is modifiable, (c) psychosocial treatments often involve the activation of emotion, (d) emotion can bias memory and (e) memory for psychosocial treatment sessions is poor. Insights from scientific knowledge on learning and memory are leveraged to derive strategies for a transdiagnostic and transtreatment cognitive support intervention. These strategies can be applied within and between sessions and to interventions delivered via computer, the internet and text message. Additional novel pathways to improving memory include improving sleep, engaging in exercise and imagery. Given that memory processes change across the lifespan, services to children and older adults may benefit from cognitive support. PMID:25544856

  3. Anxious distress predicts subsequent treatment outcome and side effects in depressed patients starting antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Gaspersz, Roxanne; Lamers, Femke; Kent, Justine M; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Smit, Johannes H; van Hemert, Albert M; Schoevers, Robert A; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2017-01-01

    Evidence has shown that the DSM-5 anxious distress specifier captures a clinically valid construct that predicts a worse clinical course. Although of importance for treatment planning and monitoring, however, the specifier's ability to predict treatment outcome is unknown. This is the first study to examine the ability of the DSM-5 anxious distress specifier to predict treatment response and side effects in depressed patients who recently initiated antidepressant treatment. Patients were from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety, an ongoing longitudinal cohort study. Baseline, 1-year and 2-year follow-up data were used from 149 patients (18-65 years) with current Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) who recently started adequately dosed antidepressant medication. Five self-report items were used to construct the DSM-5 anxious distress specifier. Treatment outcomes were depression severity after 1 year and 2 years, remission of MDD after 2 years and antidepressant side effects during treatment. For comparison, analyses were repeated for comorbid DSM-IV-based anxiety disorders as a predictor. In depressed patients who received antidepressant treatment, the anxious distress specifier (prevalence = 59.1%) significantly predicted higher severity (1 year: B = 1.94, P = 0.001; 2 years: B = 1.63, P = 0.001), lower remission rates (OR = 0.44, P = 0.0496) and greater frequency of side effects (≥4 vs. 0: OR = 2.74, P = 0.061). In contrast, the presence of comorbid anxiety disorders did not predict these treatment outcomes. The anxious distress specifier significantly predicts poorer treatment outcomes as shown by higher depression severity, lower remission rates, and greater frequency of antidepressant side effects in patients with MDD on adequate antidepressant treatment. Therefore, this simple 5-item specifier is of potential great clinical usefulness for treatment planning and monitoring in depressed patients.

  4. Depression beliefs, treatment preference, and outcomes in a randomized trial for major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Boadie W; Kelley, Mary E; Mletzko, Tanja C; Velasquez, Cristina M; Craighead, W Edward; Mayberg, Helen S

    2012-03-01

    Previous studies suggest that individual preferences for medication- or psychotherapy-based treatments for depression may affect outcomes in clinical trials that compare these two forms of treatment. We assessed patients' beliefs about the causes of their depression, their preferred treatment, and strength of that preference in 80 patients participating in a 12-week clinical trial evaluating neuroimaging predictors of response to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) or escitalopram. Forty-five patients expressed a preference for one of the 2 treatments, but being matched to preference did not influence remission or completion rates. Medication-preferring patients were more likely to terminate the trial early, regardless of treatment received. CBT-preferring patients rarely endorsed unknown causes for their depression, and medication-preferring patients were highly unlikely to identify pessimistic attitudes as a source of their depression. Among patients willing to be randomized to treatment, preference does not appear to strongly influence outcome. Specific preferences for CBT or medication may reflect differing conceptualizations about depressive illness, knowledge of which may enhance treatment retention and efficacy.

  5. Does Augmented Reality Affect High School Students' Learning Outcomes in Chemistry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, Jonathan Christopher

    Some teens may prefer using a self-directed, constructivist, and technologic approach to learning rather than traditional classroom instruction. If it can be demonstrated, educators may adjust their teaching methodology. The guiding research question for this study focused on how augmented reality affects high school students' learning outcomes in chemistry, as measured by a pretest and posttest methodology when ensuring that the individual outcomes were not the result of group collaboration. This study employed a quantitative, quasi-experimental study design that used a comparison and experimental group. Inferential statistical analysis was employed. The study was conducted at a high school in southwest Colorado. Eighty-nine respondents returned completed and signed consent forms, and 78 participants completed the study. Results demonstrated that augmented reality instruction caused posttest scores to significantly increase, as compared to pretest scores, but it was not as effective as traditional classroom instruction. Scores did improve under both types of instruction; therefore, more research is needed in this area. The present study was the first quantitative experiment controlling for individual learning to validate augmented reality using mobile handheld digital devices that affected individual students' learning outcomes without group collaboration. This topic was important to the field of education as it may help educators understand how students learn and it may also change the way students are taught.

  6. Memory modification as an outcome variable in anxiety disorder treatment.

    PubMed

    Tryon, Warren W; McKay, Dean

    2009-05-01

    Learning and memory are interdependent processes. Memories are learned, and cumulative learning requires memory. It is generally accepted that learning contributes to psychopathology and consequently to pertinent memory formation. Neuroscience and psychological research have established that memory is an active reconstructive process that is influenced by thoughts, feelings, and behaviors including post-event information. Recent research on the treatment of anxiety disorders using medications (i.e., d-cyclcloserine) to alter neurological systems associated with memory used in conjunction with behavior therapy suggests that memory is part of a central mechanism in the etiology and maintenance of these conditions. The main thesis of this article is that learning-based interventions create new memories that may modify existing ones. This raises the possibility of using such memory modifications to measure intervention outcome. A connectionist context for understanding this phenomenon and informing intervention is provided, with specific reference to post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder. Recommendations for future research examining the role of memory change in treatment outcome are suggested.

  7. Analysis of treatment outcomes for primary tonsillar lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun Hee; Cho, Seok Goo; Jung, Seung Eun; Kim, Sung Hoon; O, Joo Hyun; Park, Gyeong Sin; Yang, Suk Woo; Lee, In Seok; Rhee, Chin Kook; Choi, Byung Ock

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although each Waldeyer’s ring sub-site is considered an independent prognostic factor, few studies have assessed the prognosis and treatment of tonsillar lymphoma. Treatment outcomes were analyzed in patients with primary tonsillar lymphoma who were treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT). Materials and Methods Nineteen patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma were evaluated, with a median follow-up of 53 months. Age, sex, and histology, amongst other factors, were reviewed. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were analyzed. Results Most patients had Ann Arbor stage I-II (94.7%), IPI score of 0 (89.5%), and complete remission after chemotherapy (89.5%). The 5-year PFS and OS rates were 74.6% and 80%, respectively. In univariate analysis, the rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) regimen resulted in a better PFS than the cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) regimen (88.9% vs. 50.0%; p = 0.053). RT dose was related to the survival outcome (p = 0.010 for PFS, p = 0.044 for OS). Patients were classified into the CHOP + RT (>40 Gy) group and R-CHOP + RT (≤40 Gy) group. The 5-year PFS rates were 50% in the CHOP + RT group, and 100 % in the R-CHOP + RT group (p = 0.018). The 5-year OS rates were 66.7% and 100%, respectively (p = 0.087). Conclusion Primary tonsillar lymphoma patients typically have favorable outcomes. Chemotherapy (R-CHOP) combined with relatively lower dose consolidative RT may be safe and effective for primary tonsillar lymphoma. PMID:28030899

  8. Oncological and surgical outcome after treatment of pelvic sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Puchner, Stephan E.; Funovics, Philipp T.; Böhler, Christoph; Kaider, Alexandra; Stihsen, Christoph; Hobusch, Gerhard M.; Panotopoulos, Joannis; Windhager, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives Treatment of pelvic tumors remains challenging due to complex anatomy, poor oncological outcome and high complication rates. We sought to investigate the long-term oncological and surgical outcome of these patients. Methods Between 1980 and 2012, 147 patients underwent surgical treatment for pelvic sarcoma. Histological diagnosis was Chondrosarcoma in 54, Ewing’s Sarcoma/PNET in 37, Osterosarcoma in 32 and others in 24 patients. Statistical analysis for the evaluation of oncological and surgical outcome was performed by applying Cox proportional hazards regression and Fine-Gray regression models for competing risk (CR) endpoints. Results The estimated overall survival (OS) to death was 80%, 45% and 37% at 1, 5 and 10 years, respectively. Univariate analyses revealed a statistically significant unadjusted influence of age age (p = 0.038; HR = 1.01), margin (p = 0.043; HR = 0.51) and grade (p = 0.001; HR = 2.27) on OS. Considering the multivariable model, grade (p = 0.005; HR = 3.04) and tumor volume (p = 0.014; HR = 1.18) presented themselves as independent prognostic factors on OS. CR analysis showed a cumulative incidence for major complication of 31% at 5 years. Endoprosthetic reconstruction had a higher risk for experiencing a major complication (p<0.0001) and infection (p = 0.001). Conclusions Pelvic resections are still associated with a high incidence of complications. Patients with pelvic reconstruction and high volume tumors are especially at risk. Consequently, a cautious decision-making process is necessary when indicating pelvic reconstruction, although a restrictive approach to pelvic reconstruction is not necessarily reasonable when the other option is major amputation. PMID:28199377

  9. Impact of treatment protocol on outcome of localized Ewing's sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Nasaka, Srividya; Gundeti, Sadashivudu; Ganta, Ranga Raman; Arigela, Ravi Sankar; Linga, Vijay Gandhi; Maddali, Lakshmi Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Background: The outcome of localized Ewing's sarcoma has improved with multi-disciplinary approach. Survivals of Ewing's sarcoma from the Asian countries differed between centers. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the records of newly diagnosed localized Ewing's sarcoma patients from 2002 to 2012. The patients were analyzed in three groups; Group 1(2002-2004) who received non-ifosfomide based regimens, Group 2(2005-2008) who received VDC/IE for 12 cycles, and Group 3(2009-2012), who received VDC/IE for 17 cycles. The groups were compared for their baseline characteristics, treatment protocol and outcome. Results: Seventy three patients were included in the study. The median age of presentation was 15 years, with slight male predominance. Axial primary was seen in 62%. The median RFS of the three groups was 26.4, 31.4 and 36.8 months respectively (P = 0.0018). The median OS was 27.9, 35 and 43 months respectively (P = 0.0007). At a median follow-up of 35 months, the 3 year RFS and OS for the three treatment groups were 17%, 31%, 60% and 35%, 45% and 70% respectively. Larger tumor size, axial primary, high LDH were associated with poorer survival. Radiotherapy was associated with inferior local control and survival. Conclusions: We found that the survival of our ESFT patients improved over time with intensified multiagent chemotherapy and with lesser time to local therapy. But the results were still inferior to those reported in literature. We had majority of patients presenting in axial site and radiotherapy as the predominant mode of local control. The outcome may further improve with surgery as local control procedure. PMID:28032089

  10. Paternal investment and status-related child outcomes: timing of father's death affects offspring success.

    PubMed

    Shenk, Mary K; Scelza, Brooke A

    2012-09-01

    Recent work in human behavioural ecology has suggested that analyses focusing on early childhood may underestimate the importance of paternal investment to child outcomes since such investment may not become crucial until adolescence or beyond. This may be especially important in societies with a heritable component to status, as later investment by fathers may be more strongly related to a child's adult status than early forms of parental investment that affect child survival and child health. In such circumstances, the death or absence of a father may have profoundly negative effects on the adult outcomes of his children that cannot be easily compensated for by the investment of mothers or other relatives. This proposition is tested using a multigenerational dataset from Bangalore, India, containing information on paternal mortality as well as several child outcomes dependent on parental investment during adolescence and young adulthood. The paper examines the effects of paternal death, and the timing of paternal death, on a child's education, adult income, age at marriage and the amount spent on his or her marriage, along with similar characteristics of spouses. Results indicate that a father's death has a negative impact on child outcomes, and that, in contrast to some findings in the literature on father absence, the effects of paternal death are strongest for children who lose their father in late childhood or adolescence.

  11. Childhood trauma and treatment outcome in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Cakir, Sibel; Tasdelen Durak, Rumeysa; Ozyildirim, Ilker; Ince, Ezgi; Sar, Vedat

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential influence of childhood trauma on clinical presentation, psychiatric comorbidity, and long-term treatment outcome of bipolar disorder. A total of 135 consecutive patients with bipolar disorder type I were recruited from an ongoing prospective follow-up project. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders were administered to all participants. Response to long-term treatment was determined from the records of life charts of the prospective follow-up project. There were no significant differences in childhood trauma scores between groups with good and poor responses to long-term lithium treatment. Poor responders to long-term anticonvulsant treatment, however, had elevated emotional and physical abuse scores. Lifetime diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was associated with poor response to lithium treatment and antidepressant use but not with response to treatment with anticonvulsants. Total childhood trauma scores were related to the total number of lifetime comorbid psychiatric disorders, antidepressant use, and the presence of psychotic features. There were significant correlations between all types of childhood abuse and the total number of lifetime comorbid psychiatric diagnoses. Whereas physical neglect was related to the mean severity of the mood episodes and psychotic features, emotional neglect was related to suicide attempts. A history of childhood trauma or PTSD may be a poor prognostic factor in the long-term treatment of bipolar disorder. Whereas abusive experiences in childhood seem to lead to nosological fragmentation (comorbidity), childhood neglect tends to contribute to the severity of the mood episodes.

  12. Does the type of treatment supporter influence tuberculosis treatment outcomes in Zimbabwe?

    PubMed

    Mlilo, N; Sandy, C; Harries, A D; Kumar, A M V; Masuka, N; Nyathi, B; Edginton, M; Isaakidis, P; Manzi, M; Siziba, N

    2013-06-21

    Zimbabwe National Tuberculosis Guidelines advise that direct observation of anti-tuberculosis treatment (DOT) can be provided by a family member/relative as a last resort. In 2011, in Nkayi District, of 763 registered tuberculosis (TB) patients, 59 (8%) received health facility-based DOT, 392 (51%) received DOT from a trained community worker and 306 (40%) from a family member/relative. There were no differences in TB treatment outcomes between the three DOT groups, apart from a higher frequency rate of 'no reported outcomes' for those receiving family-based DOT. Family members should be trained to use a suitable DOT support package.

  13. Pediatric Malignancies, Treatment Outcomes and Abandonment of Pediatric Cancer Treatment in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Slone, Jeremy S.; Chunda-Liyoka, Catherine; Perez, Marta; Mutalima, Nora; Newton, Robert; Chintu, Chifumbe; Kankasa, Chipepo; Chipeta, James; Heimburger, Douglas C.; Vermund, Sten H.; Friedman, Debra L.

    2014-01-01

    Background There exist significant challenges to the receipt of comprehensive oncologic treatment for children diagnosed with cancer in sub-Saharan Africa. To better define those challenges, we investigated treatment outcomes and risk factors for treatment abandonment in a cohort of children diagnosed with cancer at the University Teaching Hospital (UTH), the site of the only pediatric oncology ward in Zambia. Methods Using an established database, a retrospective cohort study was conducted of children aged 0–15 years admitted to the pediatric oncology ward between July 2008 and June 2010 with suspected cancer. Diagnosis, mode of diagnosis, treatment outcome, and risk factors for abandonment of treatment were abstracted from this database and clinical medical records. Results Among 162 children treated at the UTH during the study time period that met inclusion criteria, only 8.0% completed a treatment regimen with most of the patients dying during treatment or abandoning care. In multivariable analysis, shorter distance from home to the UTH was associated with a lower risk of treatment abandonment (Adjusted Odds Ratio [aOR] = 0.48 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.23–0.97). Conversely maternal education less than secondary school was associated with increased risk for abandonment (aOR = 1.65; 95% CI 1.05–2.58). Conclusions Despite availability of dedicated pediatric oncology treatment, treatment completion rates are poor, due in part to the logistical challenges faced by families, low educational status, and significant distance from the hospital. Alternative treatment delivery strategies are required to bring effective pediatric oncology care to the patients in need, as their ability to come to and remain at a central tertiary care facility for treatment is limited. We suggest that the extensive system now in place in most of sub-Saharan Africa that sustains life-long antiretroviral therapy for children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection

  14. Changes in affect during treatment for depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kring, Ann M; Persons, Jacqueline B; Thomas, Cannon

    2007-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the tripartite model [Clark, L. A., & Watson, D. (1991). Tripartite model of anxiety and depression: Psychometric evidence and psychometric implications. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 100, 316-336] can be extended to account for change during treatment for anxiety and depression. Forty-one patients treated naturalistically in private practice with cognitive behavior therapy completed weekly measures of depression, anxiety, negative affect (NA), positive affect (PA), and anxious arousal (AA). Consistent with the model, NA was associated with anxiety and depression during treatment, PA was more strongly related to depression than to anxiety, and AA was more strongly related to anxiety than to depression. As predicted, symptoms of depression and anxiety and NA all decreased during treatment. As predicted, AA also decreased, particularly for patients with panic disorder. PA increased during treatment, but only for patients who showed a significant decline in depression and only over an extended period of treatment. Nearly two-thirds of the variance in anxiety change was accounted for by changes in depression and NA, and just over three-fourths of the variance in depression change was accounted for by changes in anxiety and NA, indicating that much of the change in anxiety and depression across the course of treatment is shared in common.

  15. Cigarette smoking as a target for potentiating outcomes for methamphetamine abuse treatment

    PubMed Central

    Brensilver, Matthew; Heinzerling, Keith G.; Swanson, Aimee-Noelle; Telesca, Donatello; Furst, Benjamin A.; Shoptaw, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction and Aims Cigarette smoking occurs frequently among individuals with methamphetamine dependence. Preclinical and clinical evidence has suggested that the common co-abuse of methamphetamine and cigarettes represents a pharmacologically meaningful pattern. Methods The present study is a secondary analysis of a randomised, placebo-controlled trial of bupropion treatment for methamphetamine dependence (bupropion n=36; placebo n=37). A hierarchical logistic modelling approach assessed the efficacy of bupropion for reducing MA use separately among smokers and non-smokers. Among smokers, relations between cigarettes smoked and MA use were assessed. Results Smoking status did not affect treatment responsiveness in either the bupropion condition or the placebo condition. In the placebo condition, increased cigarette use was associated with an increased probability of methamphetamine use during the same time period. This effect was not observed in the bupropion condition. Discussion and Conclusions Initial smoking status did not impact treatment outcomes. Among smokers, results suggest that bupropion may dissociate cigarette and methamphetamine use. The effect was modest and a precise pharmacologic mechanism remains elusive. Cholinergic systems may be relevant for methamphetamine use outcomes. Future studies should continue to assess the role of smoking in methamphetamine treatment outcomes. PMID:22385210

  16. Thiopurine methyltransferase and treatment outcome in the UK acute lymphoblastic leukaemia trial ALL2003.

    PubMed

    Lennard, Lynne; Cartwright, Cher S; Wade, Rachel; Vora, Ajay

    2015-08-01

    The influence of thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) genotype on treatment outcome was investigated in the United Kingdom childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia trial ALL2003, a trial in which treatment intensity was adjusted based on minimal residual disease (MRD). TPMT genotype was measured in 2387 patients (76% of trial entrants): 2190 were homozygous wild-type, 189 were heterozygous for low activity TPMT alleles (166 TPMT*1/*3A, 19 TPMT*1/*3C, 3 TPMT*1/*2 and 1 TPMT*1/*9) and 8 were TPMT deficient. In contrast to the preceding trial ALL97, there was no difference in event-free survival (EFS) between the TPMT genotypes. The 5-year EFS for heterozygous TPMT*1/*3A patients was the same in both trials (88%), but for the homozygous wild-type TPMT*1/*1 patients, EFS improved from 80% in ALL97% to 88% in ALL2003. Importantly, the unexplained worse outcome for heterozygous TPMT*1/*3C patients observed in ALL97 (5-year EFS 53%) was not seen in ALL2003 (5-year EFS 94%). In a multivariate Cox regression analysis the only significant factor affecting EFS was MRD status (hazard ratio for high-risk MRD patients 4·22, 95% confidence interval 2·97-5·99, P < 0·0001). In conclusion, refinements in risk stratification and treatment have reduced the influence of TPMT genotype on treatment outcome in a contemporary protocol.

  17. Combination therapy including serratiopeptidase improves outcomes of mechanical-antibiotic treatment of periimplantitis.

    PubMed

    Sannino, G; Gigola, P; Puttini, M; Pera, F; Passariello, C

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed as a retrospective analysis of clinical outcomes of cases of periimplantitis treated by mechanical debridement and the administration of antibiotics combined or not with the administration of either the proteolytic enzyme serratiopeptidase (SPEP) or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Clinical charts of 544 partially edentulous patients treated for periimplantitis between June 1996 and December 2010 were analyzed to obtain clinical data of the affected implants just before the beginning of treatment and 12 months later to evaluate the outcomes of combined mechanical antibiotic treatment alone or in combination with the co-administration of the anti-inflammatory SPEP or NSAIDs. The comparative analysis revealed that therapeutic outcomes were significantly different in the three groups. Failure rate in the group that received SPEP (6 percent) was significantly lower compared to the group that received NSAIDS (16.9 percent; P less than 0.01) and to the group that received no anti-inflammatory therapy (18.9 percent; P less than 0.01). Treatment including SPEP was associated with significantly better healing also when successful treatments alone were considered. The data reported in this paper strongly support the hypothesis that SPEP is a valid addition to protocols for the combined therapy of peri-implantitis. In fact, it allows to enhance success rates significantly and also favors better tissue repair around successfully treated implants as compared to other regimens.

  18. Optimizing Population Health and Economic Outcomes: Innovative Treatment for BPH

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optimizing Population Health and Economic Outcomes: Innovative Treatment for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) Transcribed and adapted for publication by Janice L. Clarke, RN, BBA Editorial: David B. Nash, MD, MBA   S-2 Introduction   S-2 Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)   S-3 • Overview   S-3• Current BPH Treatment Paradigm   S-4• BPH Continuum of Care: Bladder Health   S-5 New Treatment Option for BPH   S-5 • The UroLift® System   S-6• Positioning of UroLift® in BPH Treatment Paradigm   S-7 New Value Proposition   S-8 • Addressing Bladder Health: Breaking the Cycle   S-8• Cost Benefit Analysis: The Big Picture   S-8 Patient and Family Engagement   S-10 Summary   S-11 PMID:22823180

  19. Criminal justice outcomes after engagement in outpatient substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Garnick, Deborah W; Horgan, Constance M; Acevedo, Andrea; Lee, Margaret T; Panas, Lee; Ritter, Grant A; Dunigan, Robert; Bidorini, Alfred; Campbell, Kevin; Haberlin, Karin; Huber, Alice; Lambert-Wacey, Dawn; Leeper, Tracy; Reynolds, Mark; Wright, David

    2014-03-01

    The relationship between engagement in outpatient treatment facilities in the public sector and subsequent arrest is examined for clients in Connecticut, New York, Oklahoma and Washington. Engagement is defined as receiving another treatment service within 14 days of beginning a new episode of specialty treatment and at least two additional services within the next 30 days. Data are from 2008 and survival analysis modeling is used. Survival analyses express the effects of model covariates in terms of "hazard ratios," which reflect a change in the likelihood of outcome because of the covariate. Engaged clients had a significantly lower hazard of any arrest than non-engaged in all four states. In NY and OK, engaged clients also had a lower hazard of arrest for substance-related crimes. In CT, NY, and OK engaged clients had a lower hazard of arrest for violent crime. Clients in facilities with higher engagement rates had a lower hazard of any arrest in NY and OK. Engaging clients in outpatient treatment is a promising approach to decrease their subsequent criminal justice involvement.

  20. Dimensions of impulsive behavior and treatment outcomes for adolescent smokers.

    PubMed

    Harris, Millie; Penfold, Robert B; Hawkins, Ariane; Maccombs, Jared; Wallace, Bryan; Reynolds, Brady

    2014-02-01

    Adolescent cigarette smoking rates remain a significant public health concern, and as a result there is a continued need to understand factors that contribute to an adolescent's ability to reduce or quit smoking. Previous research suggests that impulsive behavior may be associated with treatment outcomes for smoking. The current research (N = 81) explored 3 dimensions of impulsive behavior as predictors of treatment response from a social-cognitive type program for adolescent smokers (i.e., Not On Tobacco; N-O-T). Measures included laboratory assessments of delay discounting, sustained attention, and behavioral disinhibition. A self-report measure of impulsivity was also included. Adolescent smokers who had better sustained attention were more likely to reduce or quit smoking by the end of treatment. No other measures of impulsivity were significantly associated with treatment response. From these findings, an adolescent smoker's ability to sustain attention appears to be an important behavioral attribute to consider when implementing smoking cessation programs such as N-O-T.

  1. Criminal Justice Outcomes after Engagement in Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Garnick, Deborah W.; Horgan, Constance M.; Acevedo, Andrea; Lee, Margaret T.; Panas, Lee; Ritter, Grant A.; Dunigan, Robert; Bidorini, Alfred; Campbell, Kevin; Haberlin, Karin; Huber, Alice; Lambert-Wacey, Dawn; Leeper, Tracy; Reynolds, Mark; Wright, David

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between engagement in outpatient treatment facilities in the public sector and subsequent arrest is examined for clients in Connecticut, New York, Oklahoma and Washington. Engagement is defined as receiving another treatment service within 14 days of beginning a new episode of specialty treatment and at least two additional services within the next 30 days. Data are from 2008 and survival analysis modeling is used. Survival analyses express the effects of model covariates in terms of “hazard ratios,” which reflect a change in the likelihood of outcome because of the covariate. Engaged clients had a significantly lower hazard of any arrest than non-engaged in all four states. In NY and OK, engaged clients also had a lower hazard of arrest for substance-related crimes. In CT, NY, and OK engaged clients had a lower hazard of arrest for violent crime. Clients in facilities with higher engagement rates had a lower hazard of any arrest in NY and OK. Engaging clients in outpatient treatment is a promising approach to decrease their subsequent criminal justice involvement. PMID:24238717

  2. Using skinfold calipers while teaching body fatness-related concepts: cognitive and affective outcomes.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, J R; Eklund, R C; Williams, A C

    2003-12-01

    Body composition testing has been advocated as part of fitness test batteries in an educational effort to promote health-related fitness, and to prevent public health problems like obesity. However, the measurement of the body composition of children and youth, especially involving the use of skinfold calipers, has raised concerns. In two experiments the cognitive and affective consequences of skinfold caliper use in a 7th grade (155 boys, 177 girls, total N = 332) health/physical education context were examined. Experiment 1 demonstrated that the students could be taught to accurately measure a partner and/or significantly learn body fatness-related concepts compared to controls. It was also shown that inexpensive plastic Fat Control calipers produced accurate measurements. Experiment 2 was designed to replicate the significant cognitive outcome effects, and also to test the hypothesis that psychological damage is a likely consequence of skinfold caliper use-and that hypothesis was refuted. Specifically, knowledge scores, and outcome scores on adapted affect scales (e.g., PANAS, MAACL), physical self-esteem scales (CY-PSPP) and on the Social Physique Anxiety Scale supported the premise that skinfold calipers can be used in an educational context to facilitate cognitive learning without causing adverse affective consequences.

  3. Treatment beliefs, health behaviors and their association with treatment outcome in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    von Arx, Lill-Brith Wium; Gydesen, Helge; Skovlund, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Objective While the prevalence of type 2 diabetes is growing, it is increasingly well recognized that treatment outcomes in primary care practice are often suboptimal. The aim of this study is to examine the extent to which treatment beliefs and health behaviors predict diabetes health outcome as measured by glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level, blood pressure, and lipid profile. Research design and methods This was a large-scale cross-sectional, registry-based study involving a well-defined type 2 diabetes population, in the county of Funen, Denmark. Registry data were combined with a 27-item self-reported survey administered to all insulin-treated people in the registry (n=3160). The survey was constructed to operationalize key concepts of diabetes management, diabetes treatment beliefs, and health behaviors. Results In total, 1033 respondents answered the survey. The majority of treatment beliefs and health behaviors examined were predictors of glycemic control and, to a large extent, lipid profile. Absence from, or a low frequency of, self-measured blood glucose, non-adherence to general medical advice and the prescribed treatment, a low primary care utilization, and perceived low treatment efficacy were factors positively associated with HbA1c levels, s-cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein. Conversely, infrequent self-measured blood glucose was associated with a significantly higher likelihood of having a blood pressure below 130/80 mm Hg. Perceived low treatment efficacy was the only health belief associated with poorer levels of health outcome other than HbA1c. Conclusions Health behaviors were stronger predictors for health outcomes than treatment beliefs. Self-reported adherence to either the treatment regimen or general medical advice most consistently predicted both glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:27110367

  4. Paravalvular Regurgitation: Clinical Outcomes in Surgical and Percutaneous Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Carlos Passos; Rezek, Daniele; Costa, Eduardo Paiva; de Carvalho, Edvagner Sergio Leite; Moscoso, Freddy Antonio Brito; Taborga, Percy Richard Chavez; Jeronimo, Andreia Dias; Abizaid, Alexandre Antonio Cunha; Ramos, Auristela Isabel de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Background Paravalvular regurgitation (paravalvular leak) is a serious and rare complication associated with valve replacement surgery. Studies have shown a 3% to 6% incidence of paravalvular regurgitation with hemodynamic repercussion. Few studies have compared surgical and percutaneous approaches for repair. Objectives To compare the surgical and percutaneous approaches for paravalvular regurgitation repair regarding clinical outcomes during hospitalization and one year after the procedure. Methods This is a retrospective, descriptive and observational study that included 35 patients with paravalvular leak, requiring repair, and followed up at the Dante Pazzanese Institute of Cardiology between January 2011 and December 2013. Patients were divided into groups according to the established treatment and followed up for 1 year after the procedure. Results The group submitted to percutaneous treatment was considered to be at higher risk for complications because of the older age of patients, higher prevalence of diabetes, greater number of previous valve surgeries and lower mean creatinine clearance value. During hospitalization, both groups had a large number of complications (74.3% of cases), with no statistical difference in the analyzed outcomes. After 1 year, the percutaneous group had a greater number of re-interventions (8.7% vs 20%, p = 0.57) and a higher mortality rate (0% vs. 20%, p = 0.08). A high incidence of residual mitral leak was observed after the percutaneous procedure (8.7% vs. 50%, p = 0.08). Conclusion Surgery is the treatment of choice for paravalvular regurgitation. The percutaneous approach can be an alternative for patients at high surgical risk. PMID:27305109

  5. Do Insurance Mandates Affect Racial Disparities in Outcomes for Children with Autism?

    PubMed

    Doshi, Pratik; Tilford, J Mick; Ounpraseuth, Songthip; Kuo, Dennis Z; Payakachat, Nalin

    2017-02-01

    Objective The study investigated whether state mandates for private insurers to provide services for children with autism influence racial disparities in outcomes. Methods The study used 2005/2006 and 2009/2010 waves of the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs. Children with a current diagnosis of autism were included in the sample. Children residing in 14 states and the District of Columbia that were not covered by the mandate in the 2005/2006 survey, but were covered in the 2009/2010 survey, served as the mandate group. Children residing in 32 states that were not covered by a mandate in either wave served as the comparison group. Outcome measures assessed included care quality, family economics, and child health. A difference-in-difference-in-differences (DDD) approach was used to assess the impact of the mandates on racial disparities in outcomes. Results Non-white children had less access to family-centered care compared to white children in both waves of data, but this difference was not apparent across mandate and comparison states as only the comparison states had significant differences. Parents of non-white children reported paying less in annual out-of-pocket expenses compared to parents of white children across waves and groups. DDD estimates did not provide evidence that the mandates had statistically significant effects on improving or worsening racial disparities for any outcome measure. Conclusions This study did not find evidence that state mandates on private insurers affected racial disparities in outcomes for children with autism.

  6. Treatment of condyloma acuminata in pregnant women with cryotherapy combined with proanthocyanidins: Outcome and safety.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Juan; Zhu, Dong-Ning; Dang, Yan-Ling; Zhao, Xiong

    2016-06-01

    Patients with condyloma acuminata (CA) during pregnancy represent a special risk group. The outcomes of many treatment methods for such cases are not satisfactory. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the treatment outcome and safety of cryotherapy combined with proanthocyanidins (PCs) for CA in pregnant women. In this study, 46 pregnant women with CA were treated with cryotherapy combined with PCs. The lesions were sprayed with liquid nitrogen until the color of the wart changed from flesh colored to purple. A PC-containing formulation was then sprayed onto a non-woven fabric or single-layer gauze and applied to the affected area. The PC treatment was applied for 20 min, 2 or 3 times per day. All patients were followed up at 1 and 3 months. No visible warts remained after the cryotherapy and PC treatment. At the 1-month follow-up, only 1 case of recurrence was identified. At 3 months, 5 cases of recurrence were identified, and the recurrence rate was 10.9%. The satisfaction rate of the patients was 94% at 1 month and 87% at 3 months after treatment. All pregnancies resulted in healthy live births without delivery complications. Cryotherapy combined with PCs is indicated to be a safe and effective procedure and may serve as a treatment option for pregnant women with CA.

  7. Treatment of condyloma acuminata in pregnant women with cryotherapy combined with proanthocyanidins: Outcome and safety

    PubMed Central

    YANG, LI-JUAN; ZHU, DONG-NING; DANG, YAN-LING; ZHAO, XIONG

    2016-01-01

    Patients with condyloma acuminata (CA) during pregnancy represent a special risk group. The outcomes of many treatment methods for such cases are not satisfactory. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the treatment outcome and safety of cryotherapy combined with proanthocyanidins (PCs) for CA in pregnant women. In this study, 46 pregnant women with CA were treated with cryotherapy combined with PCs. The lesions were sprayed with liquid nitrogen until the color of the wart changed from flesh colored to purple. A PC-containing formulation was then sprayed onto a non-woven fabric or single-layer gauze and applied to the affected area. The PC treatment was applied for 20 min, 2 or 3 times per day. All patients were followed up at 1 and 3 months. No visible warts remained after the cryotherapy and PC treatment. At the 1-month follow-up, only 1 case of recurrence was identified. At 3 months, 5 cases of recurrence were identified, and the recurrence rate was 10.9%. The satisfaction rate of the patients was 94% at 1 month and 87% at 3 months after treatment. All pregnancies resulted in healthy live births without delivery complications. Cryotherapy combined with PCs is indicated to be a safe and effective procedure and may serve as a treatment option for pregnant women with CA. PMID:27284325

  8. Identifying possible reasons why female street sex workers have poor drug treatment outcomes: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Jeal, Nikki; Macleod, John; Salisbury, Chris; Turner, Katrina

    2017-01-01

    Aims To explore street sex workers (SSWs) views and experiences of drug treatment, in order to understand why this population tend to experience poor drug treatment outcomes. Design In-depth interviews. Setting Bristol, UK. Participants 24 current and exited SSWs with current or previous experience of problematic use of heroin and/or crack cocaine. Findings Participants described how feeling unable to discuss their sex work in drug treatment groups undermined their engagement in the treatment process. They outlined how disclosure of sex work resulted in stigma from male and female service users as well as adverse interactions with male service users. Participants highlighted that non-disclosure meant they could not discuss unresolved trauma issues which were common and which emerged or increased when they reduced their drug use. As trauma experiences had usually involved men as perpetrators participants said it was not appropriate to discuss them in mixed treatment groups. SSWs in recovery described how persistent trauma-related symptoms still affected their lives many years after stopping sex work and drug use. Participants suggested SSW-only services and female staff as essential to effective care and highlighted that recent service changes were resulting in loss of trusted staff and SSW-only treatment services. This was reported to be reducing the likelihood of SSWs engaging in drug services, with the resultant loss of continuity of care and reduced time with staff acting as barriers to an effective therapeutic relationship. Conclusions SSWs face many barriers to effective drug treatment. SSW-only treatment groups, continuity of care with treatment staff and contact with female staff, particularly individuals who have had similar lived experience, could improve the extent to which SSWs engage and benefit from drug treatment services. Service engagement and outcomes may also be improved by drug services that include identification and treatment of trauma

  9. Successful Pregnancy Outcome in a Patient with Solitary Kidney Affected by Angiomyolipoma: A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Kavita; Nanda, Sakshi; Choudhary, Sumesh; Gandhi, Khushali

    2016-01-01

    Renal angiomyolipoma is a rare benign tumour and its occurrence during pregnancy is even rare. It is usually diagnosed incidentally. It can increase in size during pregnancy and can present acutely as rupture with retroperitoneal haemorrhage, mechanism of which is still unclear. We present a case of successful pregnancy outcome in a patient with congenital solitary kidney affected by angiomyolipoma, diagnosed incidentally at 19 years of age. The patient had conceived twice. Her antenatal and post partum period was uneventful both the times. PMID:27891407

  10. The Association Between Treatment Frequency and Treatment Outcome for Cardiovascular Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Suk; Park, Choon Seon; Kim, Myunghwa; Kim, Myo Jeong; Lee, Kun Sei; Sim, Sung Bo; Chee, Hyun Keun; Park, Nam Hee; Park, Sung Min

    2016-01-01

    Background This study analyzed the association between the volume of heart surgeries and treatment outcomes for hospitals in the last five years. Methods Hospitals that perform heart surgeries were chosen throughout Korea as subjects using from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. The treatment outcome of the heart surgeries was defined as the mortality within 30 postoperative days, while the annual volume of the surgeries was categorized. Logistic regression was used as the statistical analysis method, and the impacts of the variables on the heart surgery treatment outcomes were then analyzed. Results The chance of death of patients who received surgery in a hospital that performed 50 or more surgeries annually was noticeably lower than patients receiving operations from hospitals that performed fewer than 50 surgeries annually, indicating that the chance of death decreases as the annual volume of heart surgeries in the hospital increases. In particular, the mortality rate in hospitals that performed more than 200 surgeries annually was less than half of that in hospitals that performed 49 or fewer surgeries annually. Conclusion These results indicate that accumulation of a certain level of heart surgery experience is critical in improving or maintaining the quality of heart surgeries. In order to improve the treatment outcomes of small hospitals, a support policy must be implemented that allows for cooperation with experienced professionals. PMID:28035294

  11. The Relationship between Pre-Treatment Clinical Profile and Treatment Outcome in an Integrated Stuttering Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huinck, Wendy J.; Langevin, Marilyn; Kully, Deborah; Graamans, Kees; Peters, Herman F. M.; Hulstijn, Wouter

    2006-01-01

    A procedure for subtyping individuals who stutter and its relationship to treatment outcome is explored. Twenty-five adult participants of the Comprehensive Stuttering Program (CSP) were classified according to: (1) stuttering severity and (2) severity of negative emotions and cognitions associated with their speech problem. Speech characteristics…

  12. Predictors and Moderators of Treatment Outcome in the Pediatric Obsessive Compulsive Treatment Study (POTS I)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Abbe Marrs; Sapyta, Jeffrey J.; Moore, Phoebe S.; Freeman, Jennifer B.; Franklin, Martin E.; March, John S.; Foa, Edna B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To identify predictors and moderators of outcome in the first Pediatric OCD Treatment Study (POTS I) among youth (N = 112) randomly assigned to sertraline, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), both sertraline and CBT (COMB), or a pill placebo. Method: Potential baseline predictors and moderators were identified by literature review. The…

  13. Frequency and outcome of treatment in polycystic ovaries related infertility

    PubMed Central

    Arain, Farzana; Arif, Nesreen; Halepota, Hafeez

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility is defined as inability of couple to conceive after one year of unprotected intercourse. The prevalence of infertility in Pakistan is 21.9%. The most common cause of medically treatable infertility is polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCO). This study was conducted to see the frequency and outcome of treatment in PCOs related infertility in infertile couples coming to Mohammad Medical College Hospital, Mirpurkhas, Sindh. Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted at Muhammad Medical College for three years from 2005 to 2008. Total 1289 infertile couples were included in this study. Result: The frequency of PCOs in female related infertility was 38.5%. Other causes of female infertility were in the frequency of 44% pelvic inflammatory disease, 12.3% endometriosis, 2.9% hyperprolactenemia, and 1.35% hypothyroidism. Patients with PCOS were given different treatment modalities. One hundred fifty patients with PCO were given ovulation induction with clomephene citrate and out of them 109 (72%) conceived. Sixty three women were given combination of clomephene citrate and Metformin. Out of them 50 (79%) conceived. Five patients were given gonadotrophins, Out of them 2 (40%) patients conceived. Five patients had laparoscopic drilling out of them 3 (60%) conceived. Conclusion: In contrast to the literature review Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome turned out to be the second most common cause of female related infertility. But as the international literature shows it had very good out come after medical and /or surgical treatment. PMID:26150870

  14. Could training executive function improve treatment outcomes for eating disorders?

    PubMed

    Juarascio, Adrienne S; Manasse, Stephanie M; Espel, Hallie M; Kerrigan, Stephanie G; Forman, Evan M

    2015-07-01

    Current gold standard treatments for eating disorders (EDs) lack satisfactory efficacy, and traditional psychological treatments do not directly address executive functioning deficits underpinning ED pathology. The goal of this paper is to explore the potential for enhancing ED treatment outcomes by improving executive functioning deficits that have been demonstrated to underlie eating pathology. To achieve our objective, we (1) review existing evidence for executive functioning deficits that underpin EDs and consider the extent to which these deficits could be targeted in neurocognitive training programs, (2) present the evidence for the one ED neurocognitive training program well-studied to date (Cognitive Remediation Therapy), (3) discuss the utility of neurocognitive training programs that have been developed for other psychiatric disorders with similar deficits, and (4) provide suggestions for the future development and research of neurocognitive training programs for EDs. Despite the fact that the body of empirical work on neurocognitive training programs for eating disorders is very small, we conclude that their potential is high given the combined evidence for the role of deficits in executive functioning in EDs, the initial promise of Cognitive Remediation Training, and the success in treating related conditions with neurocognitive training. Based on the evidence to date, it appears that the development and empirical evaluation of neurocognitive training programs for EDs is warranted.

  15. Classical Galactosaemia in Ireland: incidence, complications and outcomes of treatment.

    PubMed

    Coss, K P; Doran, P P; Owoeye, C; Codd, M B; Hamid, N; Mayne, P D; Crushell, E; Knerr, I; Monavari, A A; Treacy, E P

    2013-01-01

    Newborn screening for the inborn error of metabolism, classical galactosaemia prevents life-threatening complications in the neonatal period. It does not however influence the development of long-term complications and the complex pathophysiology of this rare disease remains poorly understood. The objective of this study was to report the development of a healthcare database (using Distiller Version 2.1) to review the epidemiology of classical galactosaemia in Ireland since initiation of newborn screening in 1972 and the long-term clinical outcomes of all patients attending the National Centre for Inherited Metabolic Disorders (NCIMD). Since 1982, the average live birth incidence rate of classical galactosaemia in the total Irish population was approximately 1:16,476 births. This reflects a high incidence in the Irish 'Traveller' population, with an estimated birth incidence of 1:33,917 in the non-Traveller Irish population. Despite early initiation of treatment (dietary galactose restriction), the long-term outcomes of classical galactosaemia in the Irish patient population are poor; 30.6 % of patients ≥ 6 yrs have IQs <70, 49.6 % of patients ≥ 2.5 yrs have speech or language impairments and 91.2 % of females ≥ 13 yrs suffer from hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism (HH) possibly leading to decreased fertility. These findings are consistent with the international experience. This emphasizes the requirement for continued clinical research in this complex disorder.

  16. Predicted and experienced affective responses to the outcome of the 2008 U.S. presidential election.

    PubMed

    Kitchens, Michael B; Corser, Grant C; Gohm, Carol L; VonWaldner, Kristen L; Foreman, Elizabeth L

    2010-12-01

    People typically have intense feelings about politics. Therefore, it was no surprise that the campaign and eventual election of Barack Obama were highly anticipated and emotionally charged events, making it and the emotion experienced afterward a useful situation in which to replicate prior research showing that people typically overestimate the intensity and duration of their future affective states. Consequently, it was expected that Obama supporters and McCain supporters might overestimate the intensity of their affective responses to the outcome of the election. Data showed that while McCain supporters underestimated how happy they would be following the election, Obama supporters accurately predicted how happy they would be following the election. These data provide descriptive information on the accuracy of people's predicted reactions to the 2008 U.S. presidential election. The findings are discussed in the context of the broad literature and this specific and unique event.

  17. Affective States and State Tests: Investigating How Affect and Engagement during the School Year Predict End-of-Year Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardos, Zachary A.; Baker, Ryan S. J. D.; San Pedro, Maria O. C. Z.; Gowda, Sujith M.; Gowda, Supreeth M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the correspondence between student affect and behavioural engagement in a web-based tutoring platform throughout the school year and learning outcomes at the end of the year on a high-stakes mathematics exam in a manner that is both longitudinal and fine-grained. Affect and behaviour detectors are used to estimate…

  18. Patient-reported outcomes in stuttering treatment: conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Franic, Duska M; Bothe, Anne K

    2008-04-01

    Evaluation of: Yaruss JS, Quesal RW. Overall Assessment of the Speaker's Experience of Stuttering (OASES): documenting multiple outcomes in stuttering treatment. J. Fluency Disord. 31(2), 90-115 (2006) [1] . These authors presented the first complete instrument intended to measure the impact of stuttering in adults who stutter (Overall Assessment of the Speaker's Experience of Stuttering; [OASES]). OASES is a 100-item self-report metric with four sections: general information, reactions to stuttering, communication in daily situations and quality of life. Its conceptual framework includes historic views of the influence of emotional and cognitive variables on stuttering; the WHO's International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps (ICIDH); and the WHO's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). However, both this conceptual framework and the psychometric data presented to support the OASES are problematic in ways that clinicians and researchers in areas well-beyond stuttering may find informative as they consider their own applications.

  19. Trauma in patients with temporomandibular disorders: frequency and treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    De Boever, J A; Keersmaekers, K

    1996-02-01

    Controversy exists on the aetiological importance and the effect of jaw macrotrauma (fractures excluded) on the occurrence of temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of jaw injury in TMD patients and to compare the severity of the symptoms, the clinical characteristics and the treatment outcome in TMD patients with or without a history of trauma to the head and neck region directly linked to the onset of symptoms. The study sample included 400 consecutive TMD clinical patients. In 24.5% of patients the onset of the pain and dysfunction could be linked directly to the trauma, mainly whiplash accidents. No significant differences could be found between the two groups in daily recurrent headache, dizziness, neck pain, joint crepitation and pain in the joints. Maximal mouth opening was less than 20 mm in 14.3% of patients with a history of trauma and in 4.1% of those without such a history. According to the Helkimo dysfunction index (DI), more trauma than non-trauma TMD patients belonged to the severe dysfunction groups (DI 4 and 5) at first examination. The outcome of a conservative treatment procedure (counselling, occlusal splint, physiotherapy, occasionally occlusal therapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammation drugs was not different between the two groups at the 1 year evaluation. The degree of maximal opening was similar: less than 20 mm in 3.7% and 2.2% in trauma and non-trauma patients respectively. Forty percent and 41% respectively were symptom free or had DI = 1. The results suggest that external trauma to the joint or to the jaw in general is an important initiating factor in the aetiology of TMD but also that the prognosis is favourable.

  20. Patient Characteristics and Treatment Outcomes for African American, Hispanic, and White Adolescents in DATOS-A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rounds-Bryant, Jennifer L.; Staab, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    Compared background, pre-treatment characteristics, and post-treatment outcomes of African American, Hispanic, and white adolescent substance abusers participating in the Drug Abuse Treatment Outcome Studies for Adolescents (DATOS-A). Found that patients were similar with respect to basic pre-treatment demographics. Compared to white adolescents,…

  1. Is Measured Hearing Aid Benefit Affected by Seeing Baseline Outcome Questionnaire Responses?

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, ShienPei; Cates, Megan; Saunders, Gabrielle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether hearing aid outcome measured by the Hearing Handicap Inventory (HHI) for the Elderly/Adults (Newman, Weinstein, Jacobson, & Hug, 1990; Ventry & Weinstein, 1982) is differentially affected by informed vs. blind administration of the postfitting questionnaire. Method Participants completed the HHI at their hearing aid evaluation and again at their hearing aid follow-up visit. At follow-up, half received a clean HHI form (blind administration), whereas the remainder responded on their original form (informed administration) and could thus base their follow-up responses on those they gave at the hearing aid evaluation. Results The data show that for the population examined here, informed administration of the follow-up HHI did not yield a different outcome to blind administration of the follow-up HHI. This was not influenced by past hearing aid use, age of the participant, or the duration of time between baseline questionnaire completion and follow-up completion. Conclusion These data suggest that completion of follow-up questionnaires in either informed or blind format will have little impact on HHI responses, most likely because of the many other factors that combined to influence hearing aid outcome. PMID:21940983

  2. A retrospective observational analysis to identify patient and treatment-related predictors of outcomes in a community mental health programme

    PubMed Central

    Green, Stuart A; Honeybourne, Emmi; Chalkley, Sylvia R; Price, Geraint; Bell, Derek; Green, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to identify patient and treatment factors that affect clinical outcomes of community psychological therapy through the development of a predictive model using historic data from 2 services in London. In addition, the study aims to assess the completeness of data collection, explore how treatment outcomes are discriminated using current criteria for classifying recovery, and assess the feasibility and need for undertaking a future larger population analysis. Design Observational, retrospective discriminant analysis. Setting 2 London community mental health services that provide psychological therapies for common mental disorders including anxiety and depression. Participants A total of 7388 patients attended the services between February 2009 and May 2012, of which 4393 (59%) completed therapy, or there was an agreement to end therapy, and were included in the study. Primary and secondary outcome measures Different combinations of the clinical outcome scores for anxiety Generalised Anxiety Disorder-7 and depression Patient Health Questionnaire-9 were used to construct different treatment outcomes. Results The predictive models were able to assign a positive or negative clinical outcome to each patient based on 5 independent pre-treatment variables, with an accuracy of 69.4% and 79.3%, respectively: initial severity of anxiety and depression, ethnicity, deprivation and gender. The number of sessions attended/missed were also important factors identified in recovery. Conclusions Predicting whether patients are likely to have a positive outcome following treatment at entry might allow suitable modification of scheduled treatment, possibly resulting in improvements in outcomes. The model also highlights factors not only associated with poorer outcomes but inextricably linked to prevalence of common mental disorders, emphasising the importance of social determinants not only in poor health but also poor recovery. PMID:25995234

  3. Affective forecasting in an orangutan: predicting the hedonic outcome of novel juice mixes.

    PubMed

    Sauciuc, Gabriela-Alina; Persson, Tomas; Bååth, Rasmus; Bobrowicz, Katarzyna; Osvath, Mathias

    2016-11-01

    Affective forecasting is an ability that allows the prediction of the hedonic outcome of never-before experienced situations, by mentally recombining elements of prior experiences into possible scenarios, and pre-experiencing what these might feel like. It has been hypothesised that this ability is uniquely human. For example, given prior experience with the ingredients, but in the absence of direct experience with the mixture, only humans are said to be able to predict that lemonade tastes better with sugar than without it. Non-human animals, on the other hand, are claimed to be confined to predicting-exclusively and inflexibly-the outcome of previously experienced situations. Relying on gustatory stimuli, we devised a non-verbal method for assessing affective forecasting and tested comparatively one Sumatran orangutan and ten human participants. Administered as binary choices, the test required the participants to mentally construct novel juice blends from familiar ingredients and to make hedonic predictions concerning the ensuing mixes. The orangutan's performance was within the range of that shown by the humans. Both species made consistent choices that reflected independently measured taste preferences for the stimuli. Statistical models fitted to the data confirmed the predictive accuracy of such a relationship. The orangutan, just like humans, thus seems to have been able to make hedonic predictions concerning never-before experienced events.

  4. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure affects fertilization outcome in swine animal model.

    PubMed

    Bernabò, N; Tettamanti, E; Russo, V; Martelli, A; Turriani, M; Mattoli, M; Barboni, B

    2010-06-01

    Modern society continuously exposes the population to electromagnetic radiation, the effects of which on human health, in particular reproduction, are still unknown. The aim of this research was to assess the effect of acute (1h) exposure of boar spermatozoa to a 50 Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) on early fertility outcome. The effect of intensities ranging from 0 to 2 mT on morpho-functional integrity of capacitated spermatozoa was examined in vitro. The oviducts containing or without spermatozoa were then exposed to the minimum in vivo, TD(50,) and maximum intensities determined in vitro, 4h before ovulation. The effects of ELF-EMF on spermatozoa in terms of early embryo development were evaluated after 12h and 6 days. It was found that in vitro ELF-EMF > 0.5 mT induced a progressive acrosome damage, thus compromising the ability of spermatozoa to undergo acrosomal reaction after zona pellucida stimulation and reducing the in vitro fertilization outcome. These effects became evident at 0.75 mT and reached the plateau at 1 mT. Under in vivo conditions, the ELF-EMF intensity of 1 mT was able to compromise sperm function, significantly reducing the fertilization rate. In addition, the exposure of oviducts to fields > or = 0.75 mT in the absence of spermatozoa was able to negatively affect early embryo development. In fact, it was found to cause a slowdown in the embryo cleavage. In conclusion, it was demonstrated how and at which intensities ELF-EMF negatively affect early fertility outcome in a highly predictive animal model.

  5. Affective outcomes of virtual reality exposure therapy for anxiety and specific phobias: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Thomas D; Rizzo, Albert A

    2008-09-01

    Virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) is an increasingly common treatment for anxiety and specific phobias. Lacking is a quantitative meta-analysis that enhances understanding of the variability and clinical significance of anxiety reduction outcomes after VRET. Searches of electronic databases yielded 52 studies, and of these, 21 studies (300 subjects) met inclusion criteria. Although meta-analysis revealed large declines in anxiety symptoms following VRET, moderator analyses were limited due to inconsistent reporting in the VRET literature. This highlights the need for future research studies that report uniform and detailed information regarding presence, immersion, anxiety and/or phobia duration, and demographics.

  6. Treatment Outcomes of Patients With Tardive Dyskinesia and Chronic Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Caroff, Stanley N.; Davis, Vicki G.; Miller, Del D.; Davis, Sonia M.; Rosenheck, Robert A.; McEvoy, Joseph P.; Campbell, E. Cabrina; Saltz, Bruce L.; Riggio, Silvana; Chakos, Miranda H.; Swartz, Marvin S.; Keefe, Richard S. E.; Stroup, T. Scott; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We compared the response to antipsychotic treatment between patients with and without tardive dyskinesia (TD) and examined the course of TD. Method This analysis compared 200 patients with DSM-IV–defined schizophrenia and TD and 997 patients without TD, all of whom were randomly assigned to receive one of 4 second-generation antipsychotics. The primary clinical outcome measure was time to all-cause treatment discontinuation, and the primary measure for evaluating the course of TD was change from baseline in Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS) score. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to compare treatment discontinuation between groups. Changes in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and neurocognitive scores were compared using mixed models and analysis of variance. Treatment differences between drugs in AIMS scores and all-cause discontinuation were examined for those with TD at baseline. Percentages of patients meeting criteria for TD postbase-line or showing changes in AIMS scores were evaluated with χ2 tests. Data were collected from January 2001 to December 2004. Results Time to treatment discontinuation for any cause was not significantly different between the TD and non-TD groups (χ21 =0.11, P = .743). Changes in PANSS scores were not significantly different (F1,974 = 0.82, P = .366), but patients with TD showed less improvement in neurocognitive scores (F1,359=6.53, P =.011). Among patients with TD, there were no significant differences between drugs in the decline in AIMS scores (F3,151 = 0.32, P = .811); 55% met criteria for TD at 2 consecutive visits postbaseline, 76% met criteria for TD at some or all postbaseline visits, 24% did not meet criteria for TD at any subsequent visit, 32% showed a ≥ 50% decrease in AIMS score, and 7% showed a ≥ 50% increase in AIMS score. Conclusions Schizophrenia patients with and without TD were similar in time to discontinuation of

  7. Endovascular Treatment of Epistaxis: Indications, Management, and Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Strach, Katharina; Schroeck, Andreas; Wilhelm, Kai; Greschus, Susanne; Tschampa, Henriette; Moehlenbruch, Markus; Naehle, Claas P.; Jakob, Mark; Gerstner, Andreas O. H.; Bootz, Friedrich; Schild, Hans H.; Urbach, Horst

    2011-12-15

    Objective: Epistaxis is a common clinical problem, and the majority of bleedings can be managed conservatively. However, due to extensive and sometimes life-threatening bleeding, further treatment, such as superselective embolization, may be required. We report our experience with endovascular treatment of life-threatening epistaxis. Methods: All patients presenting with excessive epistaxis, which received endovascular treatment at a German tertiary care facility between January 2001 and December 2009, were retrospectively identified. Demographic data, etiology, origin and clinical relevance of bleeding, interventional approach, therapy-associated complications, and outcome were assessed. Results: A total of 48 patients required 53 embolizations. Depending on the etiology of bleeding, patients were assigned to three groups: 1) idiopathic epistaxis (31/48), 2) traumatic or iatrogenic epistaxis (12/48), and 3) hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) (5/48). Eleven of 48 patients required blood transfusions, and 9 of these 11 patients (82%) were termed clinically unstable. The sphenopalatine artery was embolized unilaterally in 10 of 53 (18.9%) and bilaterally in 41 of 53 (77.4%) procedures. During the same procedure, additional vessels were embolized in three patients (3/53; 5.7%). In 2 of 53(3.8%) cases, the internal carotid artery (ICA) was occluded. Long-term success rates of embolization were 29 of 31 (93.5%) for group 1 and 11 of 12 (91.7%) for group 2 patients. Embolization of patients with HHT offered at least a temporary relief in three of five (60%) cases. Two major complications (necrosis of nasal tip and transient hemiparesis) occurred after embolization. Conclusions: Endovascular treatment proves to be effective for prolonged and life-threatening epistaxis. It is easily repeatable if the first procedure is not successful and offers a good risk-benefit profile.

  8. [Treatment and outcome of complications after free flap-plasty].

    PubMed

    Giunta, R; Geisweid, A; Lukas, B; Feller, A M

    2000-05-01

    Free tissue transplantation is a routine procedure in reconstructive surgery. Although a lot of free flap techniques have been described, the postoperative management of complications has gained only little interest. Nevertheless, complications of perfusion after free tissue transplantation are not rare and require a systematic approach. The aim of this study is to classify perfusion failures with a simple grading system prospectively on a large clinical series and to evaluate the results of treatment to improve management. In the past ten months, 70 consecutive free flaps have been performed. By the end of the operation, the operating surgeon gave a prognosis concerning the probability of a possible perfusion complication. Postoperative monitoring was done exclusively by clinical examination (colour, time for recapillarisation and bleeding after puncture). According to these parameters, arterial and venous insufficiencies have been classified into four grades. After recording type, time and treatment of a postoperative complication, the result of treatment was rated subjectively and a cause was noted when possible. The final result was classified either as total flap loss, partial flap loss or successful tissue transplantation. A total of 28 (40%) complications, which were treated with an average of 2.1 options, were recorded. The ratio between arterial and venous failure was 15:13. In 21 cases surgical intervention became necessary (intraoperative n = 12, postoperative n = 9). The arising complication was diagnosed correctly in nine cases by the operating surgeon. In ten cases, the cause of the complication remained unclear. In 18 cases, the complication was treated successfully without any flap loss. In six cases partial flap loss was observed and in four cases a total flap loss had to be accepted. Our results confirm that only few objective criteria for treatment options with perfusion failures after free tissue transplantation exist. Nevertheless, the

  9. Does Segmental Kyphosis Affect Surgical Outcome after a Posterior Decompressive Laminectomy in Multisegmental Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Tarush; Prasad, Gautam; Deore, Tushar; Bhojraj, Shekhar Y.

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis. Purpose To compare results of laminectomy in multisegmental compressive cervical myelopathy (CSM) with lordosis versus segmental kyphosis. Overview of Literature Laminectomy is an established procedure for decompression in CSM with cervical lordosis. However in patients with segmental kyphosis, it is associated with risk of progression of kyphosis and poor outcome. Whether this loss of sagittal alignment affects functional outcome is not clear. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 68 patients who underwent laminectomy for CSM from 1998 to 2009. As per preoperative magnetic resonance images, 36 patients had preoperative lordosis (Group 1) and 32 had segmental kyphosis (Group 2). We studied age at the time of surgery, duration of preoperative symptoms, recovery rate, magnitude of postoperative backward shifting of spinal cord and loss of sagittal alignment. Results Mean follow up was 5.05 years (range, 2–13 years) and mean age at the time of surgery 61.88 years. Group 1 had 20 men and 16 women and Group 2 had 19 men and 13 women. Mean recovery rate in Group 1 was 60.32%, in Group 2 was 63.7% without any statistical difference (p-value 0.21, one tailed analysis of variance). Two patients of Group 1 had loss of cervical lordosis by five degrees. In Group 2 seven patients had progression of segmental kyphosis by 5–10 degrees and two patients by more than 10 degrees. Mean cord shift was more in Group 1 (mean, 2.41 mm) as compared to Group 2 (mean, –1.97 mm) but it had no correlation to recovery rate. Patients with younger age (mean, 57 years) and less duration of preoperative symptoms (mean, 4.86 years) had better recovery rate (75%). Conclusions Clinical outcome in CSM is not related to preoperative cervical spine alignment. Thus, lordosis is not mandatory for planning laminectomy in CSM. Good outcome is expected in younger patients operated earliest after onset of symptoms. PMID:28243365

  10. Lung perfusion and emphysema distribution affect the outcome of endobronchial valve therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Christian; Theilig, Dorothea; Herzog, Dominik; Poellinger, Alexander; Doellinger, Felix; Schreiter, Nils; Schreiter, Vera; Schürmann, Dirk; Temmesfeld-Wollbrueck, Bettina; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Suttorp, Norbert; Hubner, Ralf-Harto

    2016-01-01

    The exclusion of collateral ventilation (CV) and other factors affect the clinical success of endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR). However, despite its benefits, the outcome of ELVR remains difficult to predict. We investigated whether clinical success could be predicted by emphysema distribution assessed by computed tomography scan and baseline perfusion assessed by perfusion scintigraphy. Data from 57 patients with no CV in the target lobe (TL) were retrospectively analyzed after ELVR with valves. Pulmonary function tests (PFT), St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), and 6-minute walk tests (6MWT) were performed on patients at baseline. The sample was grouped into high and low levels at the median of TL perfusion, ipsilateral nontarget lobe (INL) perfusion, and heterogeneity index (HI). These groups were analyzed for association with changes in outcome parameters from baseline to 3 months follow-up. Compared to baseline, patients showed significant improvements in PFT, SGRQ, and 6MWT (all P≤0.001). TL perfusion was not associated with changes in the outcome. High INL perfusion was significantly associated with increases in 6MWT (P=0.014), and high HI was associated with increases in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), (P=0.012). Likewise, there were significant correlations for INL perfusion and improvement of 6MWT (r=0.35, P=0.03) and for HI and improvement in FEV1 (r=0.45, P=0.001). This study reveals new attributes that associate with positive outcomes for patient selection prior to ELVR. Patients with high perfusions in INL demonstrated greater improvements in 6MWT, while patients with high HI were more likely to respond in FEV1. PMID:27354783

  11. Does amblyopia affect educational, health, and social outcomes? Findings from 1958 British birth cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rahi, J S; Cumberland, P M; Peckham, C S

    2006-01-01

    Objective To determine any association of amblyopia with diverse educational, health, and social outcomes in order to inform current debate about population screening for this condition. Design, setting, and participants Comparison of 8432 people with normal vision in each eye with 429 (4.8%) people with amblyopia (childhood unilateral reduced acuity when tested with correction and unaccounted for by eye disease) from the 1958 British birth cohort, with respect to subsequent health and social functioning. Results No functionally or clinically significant differences existed between people with and without amblyopia in educational outcomes, behavioural difficulties or social maladjustment, participation in social activities, unintended injuries (school, workplace, or road traffic accidents as driver), general or mental health and mortality, paid employment, or occupation based social class trajectories. Conclusions It may be difficult to distinguish, at population level, between the lives of people with amblyopia and those without, in terms of several important outcomes. A pressing need exists for further concerted research on what it means to have amblyopia and, specifically, how this varies with severity and how it changes with treatment, so that screening programmes can best serve those who have the most to gain from early identification. PMID:16520328

  12. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect the outcome of arthroscopic Bankart repair?

    PubMed Central

    Blomquist, J; Solheim, E; Liavaag, S; Baste, V; Havelin, L I

    2014-01-01

    To achieve pain control after arthroscopic shoulder surgery, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a complement to other analgesics. However, experimental studies have raised concerns that these drugs may have a detrimental effect on soft tissue-to-bone healing and, thus, have a negative effect on the outcome. We wanted to investigate if there are any differences in the clinical outcome after the arthroscopic Bankart procedure for patients who received NSAIDs prescription compared with those who did not. 477 patients with a primary arthroscopic Bankart procedure were identified in the Norwegian shoulder instability register and included in the study. 32.5% received prescription of NSAIDs post-operatively. 370 (78%) of the patients answered a follow-up questionnaire containing the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability index (WOSI). Mean follow-up was 21 months. WOSI at follow-up were 75% in the NSAID group and 74% in the control group. 12% of the patients in the NSAID group and 14% in the control group reported recurrence of instability. The reoperation rate was 5% in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups. Prescription of short-term post-operative NSAID treatment in the post-operative period did not influence on the functional outcome after arthroscopic Bankart procedures. PMID:24750379

  13. Treatment outcome of vocal cord leukoplakia by transoral laser microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shih-Wei; Chao, Wei-Chieh; Lee, Yun-Shien; Chang, Liang-Che; Hsieh, Tsan-Yu; Chen, Tai-An; Luo, Cheng-Ming

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the treatment outcome and analyze the associated factors of postoperative recurrence in patients who received transoral laser microsurgery for vocal cord leukoplakia. The demographic, histopathological data were retrospectively reviewed and the factors associated with recurrence of vocal leukoplakia after surgery were analyzed statistically. A total of 44 patients, including 36 males and 8 females, with a mean age of 50.4 ± 13.4 years, were enrolled. All the patients received excision of the vocal leukoplakia by carbon dioxide laser (2-4 Watt, ultrapulse mode) under general anesthesia. No patients had malignant transformation after surgery. Postoperative recurrence occurred in 10 patients (22.7 %). Univariate analysis showed that patients who had the habit of cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking, and presence of gastroesophageal reflux disease tended to recur. Among these risk factors, presence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (odds ratio 8.43) was the independent prognostic factor for recurrence using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Carbon dioxide laser excision is effective for treating vocal leukoplakia that is still confined to dysplasia of any degree, with acceptable morbidity. This study suggests that the presence of gastroesophageal reflux disease is the prognostic indicator for postoperative recurrence of vocal leukoplakia. Aggressive treatment of reflux disease for those who have received surgical excision for vocal leukoplakia is indicated.

  14. Delay in diagnosis of retinoblastoma: risk factors and treatment outcome

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, A.; Kingston, J.; Hungerford, J.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Delay in diagnosis of retinoblastoma causes considerable parental distress; however, the primary healthcare professional (PHP) may have difficulty detecting the most common presenting symptom—leucocoria. Alternatively, the PHP may not appreciate that retinoblastoma is the pathology underlying more common ocular symptoms in infants and young children.
METHOD—The parents of 100 recently diagnosed patients with retinoblastoma were interviewed to establish the extent of diagnostic delay, ascertain any associated risk factors, and to determine whether or not delay influenced treatment outcome.
RESULTS—Although nearly 50% of patients were referred to an ophthalmologist within 1 week of first consulting a PHP, one quarter waited more than 8 weeks. There was a significantly increased risk of diagnostic delay in younger patients, those presenting with squint rather than leucocoria, and those first presenting to a health visitor rather than to a general practitioner. The risk of local tumour invasion was significantly increased by diagnostic delay. Treatment with primary enucleation was not increased by diagnostic delay. There were no deaths during the study period.
CONCLUSION—Primary healthcare professionals require education about the importance of ocular symptoms, especially squint, in paediatric patients.

 PMID:10574806

  15. Long term outcome of Aldosteronism after target treatments

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Vin-Cent; Wang, Shuo-Meng; Chang, Chia-Hui; Hu, Ya-Hui; Lin, Lian-Yu; Lin, Yen-Hung; Chueh, Shih-Chieh Jeff; Chen, Likwang; Wu, Kwan-Dun

    2016-01-01

    There exists a great knowledge gap in terms of long-term effects of various surgical and pharmacological treatments on outcomes among primary aldosteronism (PA) patients. Using a validated algorithm, we extracted longitudinal data for all PA patients diagnosed in 1997–2010 and treated in the Taiwan National Health Insurance. We identified 3362 PA patients for whom the mean length of follow-up was 5.75 years. PA has higher major cardiovascular events (MACE) than essential hypertension (23.3% vs 19.3%, p = 0.015). Results from the Cox model suggest a strong effect of adrenalectomy on lowering mortality (HR = 0.23 with residual hypertension and 0.21 with resolved hypertension). While need for receptor antagonist (MRA) MRA after diagnosis suggests that a defined daily dose (DDD) of MRA between 12.5 and 50 mg may alleviate risk of death in a U-shape pattern. A specificity test identified patients who has aldosterone producing adenoma (HR = 0.50, p = 0.005) also confirmed adrenalectomy attenuated all-cause mortality. Adrenalectomy decreases long-term all-cause mortality independently from PA cure from hypertension. Prescription corresponding to a DDD between 12.5 and 50 mg may decrease mortality for patients needing MRA. It calls for more attention on early diagnosis, early treatment and prescription of appropriate dosage of MRA for PA patients. PMID:27586402

  16. Outcomes of Cataract Surgery Following Treatment for Retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeong Min; Lee, Byung Joo; Kim, Jeong Hun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the long-term visual outcomes and complications of cataract surgery in eyes previously treated for retinoblastoma. Methods We reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation at Seoul National University Children's Hospital for a secondary cataract that developed after retinoblastoma treatment. Results During the period between 1990 and 2014, 208 eyes of 147 patients received eye-salvaging treatment (radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and local therapy) for retinoblastoma at Seoul National University Children's Hospital. Among these eyes, a secondary cataract was detected in 17 eyes of 14 patients, and five eyes of five patients underwent cataract surgery. The median age of cataract formation was 97 months (range, 38 to 153 months). The medial interval between the diagnosis of retinoblastoma and cataract formation was 79 months (range, 29 to 140 months). All patients received posterior chamber intraocular lens insertion after irrigation and aspiration of the lens through a scleral tunnel incision. Anterior vitrectomy and posterior capsulotomy were performed in two eyes and a laser capsulotomy was subsequently performed in one eye. No intraoperative and postoperative complications occurred. The median follow-up after surgery was 36 months (range, 14 to 47 months). The final best corrected visual acuities were improved in all five eyes. No intraocular tumor recurrences or metastases occurred. Conclusions After retinoblastoma regression, cataract extraction in our series was not associated with tumor recurrence or metastasis. Visual improvement was noted in every patient. PMID:28243024

  17. Does Cognitive Impairment Affect Rehabilitation Outcome in Parkinson’s Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Ferrazzoli, Davide; Ortelli, Paola; Maestri, Roberto; Bera, Rossana; Giladi, Nir; Ghilardi, Maria Felice; Pezzoli, Gianni; Frazzitta, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Background: The cognitive status is generally considered as a major determinant of rehabilitation outcome in Parkinson’s disease (PD). No studies about the effect of cognitive impairment on motor rehabilitation outcomes in PD have been performed before. Objective: This study is aimed to evaluate the impact of cognitive decline on rehabilitation outcomes in patients with PD. Methods: We retrospectively identified 485 patients with PD hospitalized for a 4-week Multidisciplinary Intensive Rehabilitation Treatment (MIRT) between January 2014 and September 2015. According to Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), patients were divided into: group 1—normal cognition (score 27–30), group 2—mild cognitive impairment (score 21–26), group 3—moderate or severe cognitive impairment (score ≤ 20). According to Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB), subjects were divided into patients with normal (score ≥13.8) and pathological (score <13.8) executive functions. The outcome measures were: Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Parkinson’s Disease Disability Scale (PDDS), Six Minutes Walking Test (6MWT), Timed Up and Go Test (TUG) and Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Results: All scales had worse values with the increase of cognitive impairment and passing from normal to pathological executive functions. After rehabilitation, all the outcome measures improved in all groups (p < 0.0001). Between groups, the percentage of improvement was significantly different for total UPDRS (p = 0.0009, best improvement in normal MMSE group; p = 0.019, best improvement in normal FAB group), and BBS (p < 0.0001, all pairwise comparisons significant, best improvement in patients with worse MMSE score; p < 0.0001, best improvement in patients with pathological FAB). TUG (p = 0.006) and BBS (p < 0.0001) improved in patients with pathological FAB score, more than in those with normal FAB score. Conclusions: Patients gain benefit in the rehabilitative outcomes, regardless of cognition

  18. Epidemiology and treatment outcome of head injury in children: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Nnadi, M. O. N.; Bankole, O. B.; Fente, B. G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Head injury in children is a major concern all over the world. The increasing level of poverty in the world is exposing more children to trauma situations. The future consequences of trauma in these children are enormous, hence prevention they say, is better than cure. Aim of the Study: The study was designed to determine the etiological pattern, age group affectation and treatment outcome in children managed for head injury in our center. Methods: It was a prospective, descriptive and cross-sectional study of children with head injuries managed in our center from July 2010 to December 2013. Data were collected using structured proforma that was part of our prospective Data Bank approved by our hospital Research and Ethics Committee. Data were collected in accident and emergency unit, Intensive Care Unit, wards and out-patient clinic. The data was analyzed using Epi Info 7 software. Results: Total of 76 children managed by the unit and followed-up to a minimum of 3 months qualified for the study. There were 42 males. The age ranged from 7 months to 18 years with a mean of 8.66 years. There were 30 adolescent/teenagers. Road traffic accident formed 63.15%. Pedestrian accident was more among preschool and school children. Thirty-seven patients had mild head injury. Sixty-six patients were managed conservatively. The commonest posttraumatic effect was seizure (15.79%). Good functional outcome (≥4) was seen in 92.1%. Mode of accident and severity of injury affected the outcome. Conclusions: The etiologies of traumatic brain injury, from our study, were age dependent with falls commonest in toddlers and pedestrian accident commonest in pre-school and school ages. The outcome of treatment was related to severity of injury. PMID:25624926

  19. Major Depression and Antidepressant Treatment: Impact on Pregnancy and Neonatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wisner, Katherine L.; Sit, Dorothy K.Y.; Hanusa, Barbara H.; Moses-Kolko, Eydie L.; Bogen, Debra L.; Hunker, Diane F.; Perel, James M.; Jones-Ivy, Sonya; Bodnar, Lisa M.; Singer, Lynn T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use during pregnancy incurs a low absolute risk for major malformations; however, other adverse outcomes have been reported. Major depression also affects reproductive outcomes. This study examined whether 1) minor physical anomalies, 2) maternal weight gain and infant birth weight, 3) preterm birth, and 4) neonatal adaptation are affected by SSRI or depression exposure. Method This prospective observational investigation included maternal assessments at 20, 30, and 36 weeks of gestation. Neonatal outcomes were obtained by blinded review of delivery records and infant examinations. Pregnant women (N=238) were categorized into three mutually exclusive exposure groups: 1) no SSRI, no depression (N=131); 2) SSRI exposure (N=71), either continuous (N=48) or partial (N=23); and 3) major depressive disorder (N=36), either continuous (N=14) or partial (N=22). The mean depressive symptom level of the group with continuous depression and no SSRI exposure was significantly greater than for all other groups, demonstrating the expected treatment effect of SSRIs. Main outcomes were minor physical anomalies, maternal weight gain, infant birth weight, pregnancy duration, and neonatal characteristics. Results Infants exposed to either SSRIs or depression continuously across gestation were more likely to be born preterm than infants with partial or no exposure. Neither SSRI nor depression exposure increased risk for minor physical anomalies or reduced maternal weight gain. Mean infant birth weights were equivalent. Other neonatal outcomes were similar, except 5-minute Apgar scores. Conclusions For depressed pregnant women, both continuous SSRI exposure and continuous untreated depression were associated with preterm birth rates exceeding 20%. PMID:19289451

  20. Does the etiology affect the outcome and satisfaction rates of penile prosthesis implantation surgery?

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Ibrahim Halil; Arslan, Burak; Kozacioglu, Zafer; Yonguc, Tarik; Degirmenci, Tansu; Gunlusoy, Bulent; Minareci, Suleyman

    2014-11-01

    Our aim was to compare the outcomes and satisfaction rates of men undergoing penile prostheses implantation (PPI) secondary to radical prostatectomy (RP) and other causes of vasculogenic erectile dysfunction (ED). A total of 142 patients, of whom 60 underwent PPI due to ED following RP (Group 1) and 82 underwent PPI due to ED with other vasculogenic causes (Group 2) were included in this study. The preoperative erectile status was evaluated with the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). The satisfaction of patients and partners were evaluated by a telephone interview using Erectile Dysfunction Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction (EDITS) questionnaire and Erectile Dysfunction Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction Partner Survey. Preoperative mean IIEF scores were significantly lower in Group 1 (17.5 ± 6.4 vs. 24.2 ± 5.1, p = 0.01). For Groups 1 and 2, the mean EDITS scores of the patients were 58 ± 10 and 71 ± 8, respectively, and that for the partners were 46 ± 8 and 65 ± 7, respectively. Group 1 had significantly lower scores both for the EDITS and the EDITS Partner Survey (p = 0.03, p = 0.01, respectively). Patients who had undergone RP and their partners were found to have lower satisfaction rates compared to patients with other causes of vasculogenic ED who had penile implant surgery. From this point of view, it is important to know the patient's expectations about the treatment outcomes and a preoperative psychological and sexual counseling should be managed for possible treatment alternatives after RP.

  1. Thiamine transporter-2 deficiency: outcome and treatment monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The clinical characteristics distinguishing treatable thiamine transporter-2 deficiency (ThTR2) due to SLC19A3 genetic defects from the other devastating causes of Leigh syndrome are sparse. Methods We report the clinical follow-up after thiamine and biotin supplementation in four children with ThTR2 deficiency presenting with Leigh and biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease phenotypes. We established whole-blood thiamine reference values in 106 non-neurological affected children and monitored thiamine levels in SLC19A3 patients after the initiation of treatment. We compared our results with those of 69 patients with ThTR2 deficiency after a review of the literature. Results At diagnosis, the patients were aged 1 month to 17 years, and all of them showed signs of acute encephalopathy, generalized dystonia, and brain lesions affecting the dorsal striatum and medial thalami. One patient died of septicemia, while the remaining patients evidenced clinical and radiological improvements shortly after the initiation of thiamine. Upon follow-up, the patients received a combination of thiamine (10–40 mg/kg/day) and biotin (1–2 mg/kg/day) and remained stable with residual dystonia and speech difficulties. After establishing reference values for the different age groups, whole-blood thiamine quantification was a useful method for treatment monitoring. Conclusions ThTR2 deficiency is a reversible cause of acute dystonia and Leigh encephalopathy in the pediatric years. Brain lesions affecting the dorsal striatum and medial thalami may be useful in the differential diagnosis of other causes of Leigh syndrome. Further studies are needed to validate the therapeutic doses of thiamine and how to monitor them in these patients. PMID:24957181

  2. Effect of Religiosity and Spirituality on Drug Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Anglin, M. Douglas; Annon, Jeffery; Longshore, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    This study empirically tested one component of a comprehensive model of the role of religiosity and spirituality (R/S) in drug treatment that is presented as a companion article in this special issue. Data collected from individuals dependent on heroin receiving narcotic replacement therapy were used to assess the effects of R/S on drug treatment outcomes. Based on their R and S scores, participants were assigned to one of four groups: those whose scores remained consistently high across the 12-month study period were compared to those whose scores were consistently low, increased, or decreased across the same period. Results indicated that at both study completion (12 months after admission) and 6 months after that participants in the consistently high and increasing spirituality groups self-reported significantly fewer days of heroin and cocaine/crack use than those in the consistently low group (p<0.05). There were no significant differences among the religiosity groups on self-reported heroin or cocaine/crack use. Results from χ2 analyses indicated that at 12 months the results of urinalysis for the presence of opiates, but not cocaine/crack, were dependent on spirituality group membership (p<0.01) but not religiosity group membership. Results also indicated that at the 6-month follow-up, there were significantly more participants in the decreasing group who were not in maintenance treatment who had a positive urinalysis and fewer in the increasing group than would be expected if the two variables were independent (p<0.05). Implications for addictions health services are discussed. PMID:18770043

  3. Genetic variations associated with gemcitabine treatment outcome in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Wei; Jenkins, Gregory; Xie, Fang; Carlson, Erin E.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Bamlet, William R.; Petersen, Gloria M.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Wang, Liewei

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is a rapidly fatal disease with gemcitabine remaining the first-line therapy. We performed a genotype–phenotype association study to identify biomarkers for predicting gemcitabine treatment outcome. Materials and methods We selected the top 200 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified from our previous genome-wide association study to associate with overall survival using 400 patients treated with/or without gemcitabine, followed by imputation analysis for regions around the identified SNPs and a replication study using an additional 537 patients by the TaqMan genotyping assay. Functional validation was performed using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR for gemcitabine-induced expression in genotyped lymphoblastoid cell lines and siRNA knockdown for candidate genes in pancreatic cancer cell lines. Results Four SNPs in chromosome 1, 3, 9, and 20 showed an interaction with gemcitabine from the discovery cohort of 400 patients (P<0.01). Subsequently, we selected those four genotyped plus four imputed SNPs for SNP×gemcitabine interaction analysis using the secondary validation cohort. Two imputed SNPs in CDH4 and KRT8P35 showed a trend in interaction with gemcitabine treatment. The lymphoblastoid cell lines with the variant sequences showed increased CDH4 expression compared with the wild-type cells after gemcitabine exposure. Knockdown of CDH4 significantly desensitized pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine cytotoxicity. The CDH4 SNPs that interacted with treatment are more predictive than prognostic. Conclusion We identified SNPs with gemcitabine-dependent effects on overall survival. CDH4 might contribute to variations in gemcitabine response. These results might help us to better predict gemcitabine response in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27749787

  4. Outcomes of different treatments on Takayasu’s arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yu; Zhou, Jian; Wei, Xiaolong; Sun, Yudong; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Jiaxuan; Feng, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Background Takayasu’s arteritis (TA) is a nonspecific chronic inflammation of the aorta and its branches. This study compared the outcomes of surgical treatments including bypass surgery, cutting balloon angioplasty and conventional balloon angioplasty to TA patients exhibiting supra-aortic arterial (SAA). Methods This retrospective study was conducted on 42 TA patients, obtained from hospital database, who underwent surgical therapy due to SAA lesions from January 2010 to March 2015. Ten patients were reconstructed using cutting balloon angioplasty, 16 patients received conventional balloon angioplasty and 16 patients from bypass surgery. The primary patency, recurrent symptoms, re-intervention, early (<30 days) and late complications associated with treatment were evaluated. Results In the conventional balloon angioplasty group, two patients were converted to bypass surgery as the guidewire could not traverse the lesions. The follow-up at 30.07±17.96 months (range, 1–60 months) showed restenosis or occlusion development in 40.9% arteries in conventional balloon angioplasty, compared with 6.3% after bypass surgery (P=0.018). The restenosis or occlusion rate between cutting balloon angioplasty and conventional balloon angioplasty groups were insignificant (P=0.738). In the re-intervention, three out of four (75%) treated by cutting balloon angioplasty were patent as compared to the three out of nine arteries (33.3%) dealt with by conventional angioplasty that was patent (P=0.266). Intracerebral hemorrhage (n=1) was developed in the bypass surgery group. Mortality was not observed in any of the groups. Conclusions Cutting balloon angioplasty can be considered as a safe, effective, and less-invasive alternative for non-diffuse SAA lesions, especially in young TA patients. However, bypass surgery has better primary patency rate than endovascular treatment. PMID:27747001

  5. Effect of anxiety on treatment presentation and outcome: results from the Marijuana Treatment Project.

    PubMed

    Buckner, Julia D; Carroll, Kathleen M

    2010-08-15

    Despite emerging evidence of the efficacy of psychotherapies for marijuana dependence, variability in outcome exists. This study examined the role of anxiety on treatment involvement and outcome. Four questions were examined: (1) Is greater anxiety associated with greater impairment at baseline? (2) Is baseline anxiety related to greater marijuana use and problems following treatment? (3) Does adding cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) to motivation enhancement therapy (MET) reduce anxiety relative to MET alone; (4) Are reductions in anxiety associated with better outcomes? The sample comprised 450 marijuana-dependent patients in the Marijuana Treatment Project. Marijuana use and anxiety were measured at pretreatment and 4- and 9-month follow-ups. At baseline, anxiety was linked to more marijuana-related problems. CBT was associated with less anxiety at follow-up compared to MET alone. Reductions in anxiety were related to less marijuana use. In fact, reduction in anxiety from baseline to 4-month follow-up was associated with less marijuana use at 9 months, but reduction in marijuana use did not predict subsequent anxiety. Data suggest that anxiety is an important variable that deserves further attention in marijuana-dependence treatment.

  6. A Study of the Cognitive and Affective Outcomes of a Collegiate Science Learning Game.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of playing a science education game on the cognitive and affective processes of black graduate students at Florida A. and M. University. The effects measured were changes in attitude toward science, general confidence in mastery of science, general achievement on science, and mastery of specific scientific concepts. The usefulness of background and personality variables in predicting success in the two treatments was also investigated. (Author)

  7. Purpose in Life Predicts Treatment Outcome Among Adult Cocaine Abusers in Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Rosemarie A.; MacKinnon, Selene; Johnson, Jennifer; Rohsenow, Damaris J.

    2010-01-01

    A sense of purpose in life has been positively associated with mental health and well-being and has been negatively associated with alcohol use in correlational and longitudinal studies, but has not been studied as a predictor of cocaine treatment outcome. This study examined pre-treatment purpose in life as a predictor of response to a 30-day residential substance use treatment program among 154 participants with cocaine dependence. Purpose in life was unrelated to cocaine or alcohol use during the 6 months pretreatment. After controlling for age, baseline use, and depressive symptoms, purpose in life significantly (p < .01) predicted relapse to any use of cocaine and to alcohol, and the number of days cocaine or alcohol was used in the six months after treatment. Findings suggest that increasing purpose in life may be an important aspect of treatment among cocaine dependent patients. PMID:21129893

  8. Ankylosing Spondylitis: Patterns of Spinal Injury and Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yuksel, Kasım Zafer

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review. Purpose We retrospectively reviewed our patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) to identify their patterns of spinal fractures to help clarify management strategies and the morbidity and mortality rates associated with this group of patients. Overview of Literature Because of the brittleness of bone and long autofused spinal segments in AS, spinal fractures are common even after minor trauma and often associated with overt instability. Methods Between January 1, 1998 and March 2011, 30 patients (23 males, 7 females; mean age, 70.43 years; range, 45 to 95 years) with the radiographic diagnosis of AS of the spinal column had 42 fractures. Eight patients presented with significant trauma, 17 after falls, and 5 after minor falls or no recorded trauma. Eleven patients presented with a neurological injury, ranging from mild sensory loss to quadriplegia. Results There were 16 compression and 10 transverse fractures, two Jefferson's fractures, one type II and two type III odontoid process fractures, and five fractures of the posterior spinal elements (including lamina and/or facet, three spinous process fractures, three transverse process fractures). Twenty-four fractures affected the craniocervical junction and/or cervical vertebrae, 17 were thoracic, and one involved the lumbar spine. The most affected vertebrae were C6 and T10. The mean follow-up was 29.9 months. One patient was lost to follow-up. Eighteen patients were treated conservatively with bed rest and bracing. Twelve patients underwent surgery for spinal stabilization either with an anterior, posterior or combined approach. Conclusions Nonsurgical treatment can be considered especially in the elderly patients with AS and spinal trauma but without instability or major neurological deficits. The nonfusion rate in conservatively treated patients is low. When treatment is selected for patients with spinal fractures and AS, the pattern of injury must be considered and the need

  9. Motorcycle-Related Traumatic Brain Injuries: Helmet Use and Treatment Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Nnadi, Mathias Ogbonna Nnanna; Bankole, Olufemi Babatola; Fente, Beleudanyo Gbalipre

    2015-01-01

    Summary. With increasing use of motorcycle as means of transport in developing countries, traumatic brain injuries from motorcycle crashes have been increasing. The only single gadget that protects riders from traumatic brain injury is crash helmet. Objective. The objectives were to determine the treatment outcome among traumatic brain injury patients from motorcycle crashes and the rate of helmet use among them. Methods. It was a prospective, cross-sectional study of motorcycle-related traumatic brain injury patients managed in our center from 2010 to 2014. Patients were managed using our unit protocol for traumatic brain injuries. Data for the study were collected in accident and emergency, intensive care unit, wards, and outpatient clinic. The data were analyzed using Environmental Performance Index (EPI) info 7 software. Results. Ninety-six patients were studied. There were 87 males. Drivers were 65. Only one patient wore helmet. Majority of them were between 20 and 40 years. Fifty-three patients had mild head injuries. Favorable outcome among them was 84.35% while mortality was 12.5%. Severity of the injury affected the outcome significantly. Conclusion. Our study showed that the helmet use by motorcycle riders was close to zero despite the existing laws making its use compulsory in Nigeria. The outcome was related to severity of injuries. PMID:26317112

  10. Learning science in a cooperative setting: Academic achievement and affective outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarowitz, Reuven; Hertz-Lazarowitz, Rachel; Baird, J. Hugh

    A learning unit in earth science was taught to high school students, using a jigsaw-group mastery learning approach. The sample consisted of 73 students in the experimental group and 47 students who learned the topic in an individualized mastery learning approach. The study lasted 5 weeks. Pretests and posttests on academic achievement and affective outcomes were administered. Data were treated with an analysis of covariance. The results show that students of the experimental group achieved significantly higher on academic outcomes, both normative and objective scores. On the creative essay test, the differences in number of ideas and total essay score were not significant between the groups, although the mean scores for number of words were higher for the individualized mastery learning group. On the affective domain, jigsaw-group mastery learning students scored significantly higher on self-esteem, number of friends, and involvement in the classroom. No differences were found in cohesiveness, cooperation, competition, and attitudes toward the subject learned. The results are discussed through the evaluation and comparison of the two methods of instruction used in this study.The cooperative learning movement began in junior high schools as part of the desegregation process, aiming at facilitating positive ethnic relations and increasing academic achievement and social skills among diverse students (Aronson, Stephan, Sikes, Blaney, & Snapp, 1978; Sharan & Hertz-Lazarowitz, 1980; Slavin, 1980). However, elementary teachers quickly recognized the potential of cooperative methods, and such methods were adopted freely in elementary schools before becoming widespread on the junior and senior high level. It has only been during the past few years that application of cooperative learning has been studied extensively with these older students.Cooperative learning methods generally involve heterogeneous groups working together on tasks that are deliberately structured to

  11. Seasonal Affective Disorder: An Overview of Assessment and Treatment Approaches.

    PubMed

    Melrose, Sherri

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal affective disorder or SAD is a recurrent major depressive disorder with a seasonal pattern usually beginning in fall and continuing into winter months. A subsyndromal type of SAD, or S-SAD, is commonly known as "winter blues." Less often, SAD causes depression in the spring or early summer. Symptoms center on sad mood and low energy. Those most at risk are female, are younger, live far from the equator, and have family histories of depression, bipolar disorder, or SAD. Screening instruments include the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire (SPAQ). Typical treatment includes antidepressant medications, light therapy, Vitamin D, and counselling. This paper provides an overview of SAD.

  12. Combinations in multimodality treatments and clinical outcomes during cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Combination approach could be easily considered as the future of therapeutics in all pathological states including cancer. Scientists are trying different combinations in order to determine synergism among different therapeutics which ultimately helps in the improved and more efficient management of the affected patients. Combination of multi-chemotherapeutic agents, or multi-drug therapy, may be the most commonly used strategy for cancer treatment. Monotherapy causes drug resistance and loses its response in patients after several cycles of treatment. While combining different anticancer drugs together for cancer treatment, as in the case of the cocktail therapy for HIV, not only overcomes the drug resistance but also leads to a synergistic effect, therefore showing prolonged survival for patients. The present review article is focused on different combinations in use for better efficiency of therapeutics against cancer. We searched the electronic database PubMed for pre-clinical as well as clinical controlled trials reporting diagnostic as well as therapeutic advances of various combinations in cancer. It was observed clearly that combination approach is better in various aspects including increase in efficacy, specificity and decline in the unwanted side effects. PMID:28101195

  13. Reinforcement sensitivity underlying treatment-seeking smokers' affect, smoking reinforcement motives, and affective responses.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Robinson, Jason D; Engelmann, Jeffrey M; Lam, Cho Y; Minnix, Jennifer A; Karam-Hage, Maher; Wetter, David W; Dani, John A; Kosten, Thomas R; Cinciripini, Paul M

    2015-06-01

    Nicotine dependence has been suggested to be related to reinforcement sensitivity, which encompasses behavioral predispositions either to avoid aversive (behavioral inhibition) or to approach appetitive (behavioral activation) stimuli. Reinforcement sensitivity may shape motives for nicotine use and offer potential targets for personalized smoking cessation therapy. However, little is known regarding how reinforcement sensitivity is related to motivational processes implicated in the maintenance of smoking. Additionally, women and men differ in reinforcement sensitivity, and such difference may cause distinct relationships between reinforcement sensitivity and motivational processes for female and male smokers. In this study, the authors characterized reinforcement sensitivity in relation to affect, smoking-related reinforcement motives, and affective responses, using self-report and psychophysiological measures, in over 200 smokers before treating them. The Behavioral Inhibition/Activation Scales (BIS/BAS; Carver & White, 1994) was used to measure reinforcement sensitivity. In female and male smokers, BIS was similarly associated with negative affect and negative reinforcement of smoking. However, positive affect was positively associated with BAS Drive scores in male smokers, and this association was reversed in female smokers. BIS was positively associated with corrugator electromyographic reactivity toward negative stimuli and left frontal electroencephalogram alpha asymmetry. Female and male smokers showed similar relationships for these physiological measures. These findings suggest that reinforcement sensitivity underpins important motivational processes (e.g., affect), and gender is a moderating factor for these relationships. Future personalized smoking intervention, particularly among more dependent treatment-seeking smokers, may experiment to target individual differences in reinforcement sensitivity. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. The Differential Outcomes Procedure Enhances Adherence to Treatment: A Simulated Study with Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Michael; Plaza, Victoria; Fuentes, Luis J.; Estévez, Angeles F.

    2015-01-01

    Memory for medical recommendations is a prerequisite for good adherence to treatment, and therefore to ameliorate the negative effects of the disease, a problem that mainly affects people with memory deficits. We conducted a simulated study to test the utility of a procedure (the differential outcomes procedure, DOP) that may improve adherence to treatment by increasing the patient’s learning and retention of medical recommendations regarding medication. The DOP requires the structure of a conditional discriminative learning task in which correct choice responses to specific stimulus–stimulus associations are reinforced with a particular reinforcer or outcome. In two experiments, participants had to learn and retain in their memory the pills that were associated with particular disorders. To assess whether the DOP improved long-term retention of the learned disorder/pill associations, participants were asked to perform two recognition memory tests, 1 h and 1 week after completing the learning phase. The results showed that compared with the standard non-differential outcomes procedure, the DOP produced better learning and long-term retention of the previously learned associations. These findings suggest that the DOP can be used as a useful complementary technique in intervention programs targeted at increasing adherence to clinical recommendations. PMID:26913010

  15. The Differential Outcomes Procedure Enhances Adherence to Treatment: A Simulated Study with Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Molina, Michael; Plaza, Victoria; Fuentes, Luis J; Estévez, Angeles F

    2015-01-01

    Memory for medical recommendations is a prerequisite for good adherence to treatment, and therefore to ameliorate the negative effects of the disease, a problem that mainly affects people with memory deficits. We conducted a simulated study to test the utility of a procedure (the differential outcomes procedure, DOP) that may improve adherence to treatment by increasing the patient's learning and retention of medical recommendations regarding medication. The DOP requires the structure of a conditional discriminative learning task in which correct choice responses to specific stimulus-stimulus associations are reinforced with a particular reinforcer or outcome. In two experiments, participants had to learn and retain in their memory the pills that were associated with particular disorders. To assess whether the DOP improved long-term retention of the learned disorder/pill associations, participants were asked to perform two recognition memory tests, 1 h and 1 week after completing the learning phase. The results showed that compared with the standard non-differential outcomes procedure, the DOP produced better learning and long-term retention of the previously learned associations. These findings suggest that the DOP can be used as a useful complementary technique in intervention programs targeted at increasing adherence to clinical recommendations.

  16. Treatment adherence, clinical outcomes, and economics of triple-drug therapy in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Panjabi, Sumeet; Lacey, Michael; Bancroft, Timothy; Cao, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Poor antihypertensive treatment adherence adversely affects blood pressure control. We analyzed US health plan data to assess the impact of fixed- versus loose-dose triple-combination therapy on adherence, clinical, and economic outcomes. Patients initiating triple therapy with an angiotensin receptor blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, or beta blocker plus amlodipine and hydrochlorothiazide comprised three cohorts. Within-cohort comparisons were made between fixed-dose combinations of two antihypertensives plus a second pill (two pills) or three separate pills. Outcomes included adherence, cardiovascular events, health care resource use, and costs for patients with ≥ 12 months follow-up. A total of 16,290 patients were matched. Patients receiving two pills were more likely to be adherent (P < .001) and less likely to discontinue treatment (P < .001) across all cohorts. Therapy with two versus three pills resulted in significantly lower adjusted risk of cardiovascular events (hazard ratio = 0.76, P = .005) in the beta blocker cohort only. Total adjusted health care costs were significantly lower for two- versus three-pill therapy in the beta blocker cohort only (cost ratio = 0.74 overall, P < .01; 0.71 hypertension-attributable, P < .01). In patients with hypertension requiring triple therapy, fixed-dose combinations that lower pill burden may improve adherence (seen across all cohorts) and clinical outcomes (seen in the beta blocker cohort) without increasing health care costs.

  17. Bystanders affect the outcome of mother–infant interactions in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Stuart; Gerald, Melissa S.; Suggs, Dianne N.

    2009-01-01

    Animal communication involves the transfer of information between a sender and one or more receivers. However, such interactions do not happen in a social vacuum; third parties are typically present, who can potentially eavesdrop upon or intervene in the interaction. The importance of such bystanders in shaping the outcome of communicative interactions has been widely studied in humans, but has only recently received attention in other animal species. Here, we studied bouts of infant crying among rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in order to investigate how the presence of bystanders may affect the outcome of this signalling interaction between infants and mothers. It was hypothesized that, as crying is acoustically aversive, bystanders may be aggressive to the mother or the infant in order to bring the crying bout to a close. Consequently, it was predicted that mothers should acquiesce more often to crying if in the presence of potentially aggressive animals. In line with this prediction, it was found that mothers gave infants access to the nipple significantly more often when crying occurred in the presence of animals that posed a high risk of aggression towards them. Both mothers and infants tended to receive more aggression from bystanders during crying bouts than outside of this time, although such aggression was extremely rare and was received by less than half of the mothers and infants in the study. Mothers were also found to be significantly more aggressive to their infants while the latter were crying than outside of crying bouts. These results provide new insight into the complex dynamics of mother–offspring conflict, and indicate that bystanders may play an important role in shaping the outcome of signalling interactions between infants and their mothers. PMID:19324744

  18. Obesity Early in Adulthood Increases Risk but Does Not Affect Outcomes of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Manal M.; Abdel-Wahab, Reham; Kaseb, Ahmed; Shalaby, Ahmed; Phan, Alexandria T.; El-Serag, Hashem B.; Hawk, Ernest; Morris, Jeff; Raghav, Kanwal Pratap Singh; Lee, Ju-Seog; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Bortus, Gehan; Torres, Harrys A.; Amos, Christopher I.; Wolff, Robert A.; Li, Donghui

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Despite the significant association between obesity and several cancers, it has been difficult to establish an association between obesity and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients with HCC often have ascites, making it a challenge to accurately determine body mass index (BMI), and many factors contribute to the development of HCC. We performed a case–control study to investigate whether obesity early in adulthood affects risk, age of onset, or outcomes of patients with HCC. METHODS We interviewed 622 patients newly diagnosed with HCC from January 2004 through December 2013, along with 660 healthy controls (frequency-matched by age and sex) to determine weights, heights, and body sizes (self-reported) at various ages before HCC development or enrollment as controls. Multivariable logistic and Cox regression analyses were performed to determine the independent effects of early obesity on risk for HCC and patient outcomes, respectively. BMI was calculated, and patients with a BMI ≥30 kg/m2 were considered obese. RESULTS Obesity in early adulthood (age, mid-20s to mid-40s) is a significant risk factor for HCC. The estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were 2.6 (1.4–4.4), 2.3 (1.2–4.4), and 3.6 (1.5–8.9) for the entire population, men, and women, respectively. Each unit increase in BMI at early adulthood was associated with a 3.89-month decrease in age at HCC diagnosis (P<.001). Moreover, there is a synergistic interaction between obesity and hepatitis virus infection. However, we found no effect of obesity on the overall survival of patients with HCC. CONCLUSION Early adulthood obesity is associated with increased risk of developing HCC at a young age in the absence of major HCC risk factors, with no effect on outcomes of patients with HCC. PMID:25836985

  19. Visual Acuity Testing: Feedback Affects Neither Outcome nor Reproducibility, but Leaves Participants Happier

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Michael; Schäfer, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of visual acuity is a well standardized procedure at least for expert opinions and clinical trials. It is often recommended not giving patients feedback on the correctness of their responses. As this viewpoint has not been quantitatively examined so far, we quantitatively assessed possible effects of feedback on visual acuity testing. In 40 normal participants we presented Landolt Cs in 8 orientations using the automated Freiburg Acuity Test (FrACT, outcome measures were absolute visual acuity (logMAR), its test-retest agreement (limits of agreement) and participants’ comfort estimates on a 5-step symmetric Likert scale. Feedback influenced acuity outcome significantly (p = 0.02), but with a tiny effect size: 0.02 logMAR poorer acuity for (D) compared to (A), even weaker effects for (B) and (C). Test-retest agreement was high (limits of agreement: ± 1.0 lines) and did not depend on feedback (p>0.5). The comfort ranking clearly differed, by 2 steps on the Likert scale: the condition (A)–no feedback–was on average “slightly uncomfortable”, the other three conditions were “slightly comfortable” (p<0.0001). Feedback affected neither reproducibility nor the acuity outcome to any relevant extent. The participants, however, reported markedly greater comfort with any kind of feedback. We conclude that systematic feedback (as implemented in FrACT) offers nothing but advantages for routine use. PMID:26824693

  20. Teammates and social influence affect weight loss outcomes in a team-based weight loss competition.

    PubMed

    Leahey, Tricia M; Kumar, Rajiv; Weinberg, Brad M; Wing, Rena R

    2012-07-01

    Team-based internet interventions are increasing in popularity as a way of promoting weight loss in large numbers of individuals. Given that social networks influence health behavior change, this study investigated the effects of teammates and social influence on individual weight loss during a team-based weight loss competition. Shape Up Rhode Island (SURI) 2009 was a 12-week online program open to adult residents of Rhode Island. Participants joined with a team and competed with other teams on weight loss and/or physical activity. Overweight/obese (OW/OB) individuals (N = 3,330; 76% female; age = 46.1 ± 10.8; BMI = 31.2 ± 5.3 kg/m(2)), representing 987 teams, completed the weight loss program. Multilevel modeling was used to examine whether weight loss clustered among teammates and whether percentage of teammates in the weight loss division and reported teammate influence on weight loss were associated with individual weight outcomes. OW/OB completers reported losing 4.2 ± 3.4% of initial body weight. Weight loss was similar among teammates (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.10, P < 0.001). Moreover, having a greater percentage of teammates in the weight loss division and reporting higher social influence for weight loss were associated with greater percent weight loss (P's ≤ 0.002). Similarly, achieving a clinically significant (5%) weight loss tended to cluster within teams (ICC = 0.09; P < 0.001) and having more teammates in the weight loss division and higher social influence for weight loss were associated with increased likelihood of achieving a 5% weight loss (odds ratio (OR) = 1.06; OR = 1.20, respectively). These results suggest that teammates affect weight loss outcomes during a team-based intervention. Harnessing and maximizing teammate influence for weight loss may enhance weight outcomes in large-scale team-based programs.

  1. Burn Patient Acuity Demographics, Scar Contractures, and Rehabilitation Treatment Time Related to Patient Outcomes (ACT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Scar Contractures, and Rehabilitation Treatment Time Related to Patient Outcomes, conveniently referred to as the ACT for representing Acuity...acute and intermediate phases of burn rehabilitation through the collection of daily treatment information for analysis. In particular, the ACT is...primarily interested in investigating the influence that time spent receiving rehabilitation treatments has on patient outcomes as a reflection of

  2. Burn Patient Acuity Demographics, Scar Contractures and Rehabilitation Treatment Time Related to Patient Outcomes (ACT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    Patient Acuity Demographics, Scar Contractures and Rehabilitation Treatment Time Related to Patient Outcomes (ACT) Mr. Reginald Richard American Burn...and Rehabilitation Treatment Time Related to Patient Outcomes, conveniently referred to as the ACT representing Acuity, Contractures and Time, is...wound leading to scar contracture begins almost immediately after the burning process stops. Rehabilitation treatment delivered prior to beginning

  3. Through what mechanisms do protected areas affect environmental and social outcomes?

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Paul J; Hanauer, Merlin M

    2015-11-05

    To develop effective protected area policies, scholars and practitioners must better understand the mechanisms through which protected areas affect social and environmental outcomes. With strong evidence about mechanisms, the key elements of success can be strengthened, and the key elements of failure can be eliminated or repaired. Unfortunately, empirical evidence about these mechanisms is limited, and little guidance for quantifying them exists. This essay assesses what mechanisms have been hypothesized, what empirical evidence exists for their relative contributions and what advances have been made in the past decade for estimating mechanism causal effects from non-experimental data. The essay concludes with a proposed agenda for building an evidence base about protected area mechanisms.

  4. Through what mechanisms do protected areas affect environmental and social outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Paul J.; Hanauer, Merlin M.

    2015-01-01

    To develop effective protected area policies, scholars and practitioners must better understand the mechanisms through which protected areas affect social and environmental outcomes. With strong evidence about mechanisms, the key elements of success can be strengthened, and the key elements of failure can be eliminated or repaired. Unfortunately, empirical evidence about these mechanisms is limited, and little guidance for quantifying them exists. This essay assesses what mechanisms have been hypothesized, what empirical evidence exists for their relative contributions and what advances have been made in the past decade for estimating mechanism causal effects from non-experimental data. The essay concludes with a proposed agenda for building an evidence base about protected area mechanisms. PMID:26460122

  5. Treatment Trends and Outcomes of Small-Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Koay, Eugene J.; Teh, Bin S.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Butler, E. Brian

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Treatment for small-cell carcinoma of the bladder is largely guided by case reports, retrospective reviews, and small prospective trials. This study aimed to study outcomes using a large population-based database. Methods: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database (1991-2005) was used to analyze how different treatment combinations of specific bladder surgeries, chemotherapy, and radiation affected patient outcomes. Trends in the use of these combinations over time were also analyzed. Results: A total of 533 patients were retrieved from the database. A bladder-sparing approach involving transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) combined with chemotherapy and radiation yielded no significant difference in overall survival compared with patients undergoing at least a cystectomy (of whom over 90% received radical cystectomy) with chemotherapy (p > 0.05). The analysis of treatment trends indicated that these two general strategies for cure combined to account for fewer than 20% of patients. A majority of patients (54%) received TURBT as their only surgical treatment, and a subset analysis of these patients indicated that chemotherapy played a role in all stages of disease (p < 0.05) whereas radiation improved overall survival in regional-stage disease (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Relatively few patients with small-cell carcinoma of the bladder receive potentially curative therapies. Chemotherapy should be a major component of treatment. Cystectomy and bladder-sparing approaches represent two viable strategies and deserve further investigation to identify the patients who may benefit from organ preservation or not. In addition, the role of radiation in regional-stage disease should be investigated further, because it positively affects survival after TURBT.

  6. Exposing physicians to reduced residency work hours did not adversely affect patient outcomes after residency.

    PubMed

    Jena, Anupam B; Schoemaker, Lena; Bhattacharya, Jay

    2014-10-01

    In 2003, work hours for physicians-in-training (residents) were capped by regulation at eighty hours per week, leading to the hotly debated but unexplored issue of whether physicians today are less well trained as a result of these work-hour reforms. Using a unique database of nearly all hospitalizations in Florida during 2000-09 that were linked to detailed information on the medical training history of the physician of record for each hospitalization, we studied whether hospital mortality and patients' length-of-stay varied according to the number of years a physician was exposed to the 2003 duty-hour regulations during his or her residency. We examined this database of practicing Florida physicians, using a difference-in-differences analysis that compared trends in outcomes of junior physicians (those with one-year post-residency experience) pre- and post-2003 to a control group of senior physicians (those with ten or more years of post-residency experience) who were not exposed to these reforms during their residency. We found that the duty-hour reforms did not adversely affect hospital mortality and length-of-stay of patients cared for by new attending physicians who were partly or fully exposed to reduced duty hours during their own residency. However, assessment of the impact of the duty-hour reforms on other clinical outcomes is needed.

  7. Spirituality and religiousness as predictive factors of outcome in schizophrenia and schizo-affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Sylvia; Perroud, Nader; Gillieron, Christiane; Brandt, Pierre-Yves; Rieben, Isabelle; Borras, Laurence; Huguelet, Philippe

    2011-04-30

    Spirituality and religiousness have been shown to be highly prevalent in patients with schizophrenia. This study assesses the predictive value of helpful vs. harmful use of religion to cope with schizophrenia or schizo-affective disorder at 3 years. From an initial cohort of 115 outpatients, 80% were reassessed for positive, negative and general symptoms, clinical global impression, social adaptation and quality of life. For patients with helpful religion at baseline, the importance of spirituality was predictive of fewer negative symptoms, better clinical global impression, social functioning and quality of life. The frequencies of religious practices in community and support from religious community had no effect on outcome. For patients with harmful religion at baseline, no relationships were elicited. This result may be due to sample size. Indeed, helpful spiritual/religious coping concerns 83% of patients, whereas harmful spiritual/religious coping concerns only 14% of patients. Our study shows that helpful use of spirituality is predictive of a better outcome. Spirituality may facilitate recovery by providing resources for coping with symptoms. In some cases, however, spirituality and religiousness are a source of suffering. Helpful vs. harmful spiritual/religious coping appears to be of clinical significance.

  8. The Kupffer Cell Number Affects the Outcome of Living Donor Liver Transplantation from Elderly Donors

    PubMed Central

    Hidaka, Masaaki; Eguchi, Susumu; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Soyama, Akihiko; Ono, Shinichiro; Adachi, Tomohiko; Natsuda, Koji; Kugiyama, Tota; Hara, Takanobu; Okada, Satomi; Imamura, Hajime; Miuma, Satoshi; Miyaaki, Hisamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Background There have been no previous reports how Kupffer cells affect the outcome of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) with an elderly donor. The aim of this study was to elucidate the influence of Kupffer cells on LDLT. Methods A total of 161 adult recipients underwent LDLT. The graft survival, prognostic factors for survival, and graft failure after LDLT were examined between cases with a young donor (<50, n = 112) and an elderly donor (≥50, N = 49). The Kupffer cells, represented by CD68-positive cell in the graft, were examined in the young and elderly donors. Results In a multivariable analysis, a donor older than 50 years, sepsis, and diabetes mellitus were significant predictors of graft failure after LDLT. The CD68 in younger donors was significantly more expressed than that in elderly donors. The group with a less number of CD68-positive cells in the graft had a significantly poor survival in the elderly donor group and prognostic factor for graft failure. Conclusions The worse outcome of LDLT with elderly donors might be related to the lower number of Kupffer cells in the graft, which can lead to impaired recovery of the liver function and may predispose patients to infectious diseases after LDLT. PMID:27819035

  9. Prompted to treatment by the criminal justice system: Relationships with treatment retention and outcome among cocaine users

    PubMed Central

    Kiluk, Brian D.; Serafini, Kelly; Malin-Mayor, Bo; Babuscio, Theresa A.; Nich, Charla; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives A substantial portion of individuals entering treatment for substance use have been referred by the criminal justice system, yet there are conflicting reports regarding treatment engagement and outcome differences compared to those not referred. This study examined baseline characteristic and treatment outcome differences among cocaine-dependent individuals participating in cocaine treatment randomized trials. Methods This secondary analysis pooled samples across five completed randomized controlled trials, resulting in 434 participants. Of these, 67 (15%) were prompted to treatment by the criminal justice system. Results This subsample of criminal justice prompted (CJP) individuals did not differ from those not prompted by the criminal justice system in terms of gender, race/ethnicity, marital status, or age. However, the CJP group reported more years of regular cocaine use, more severe employment and legal problems, as well as less readiness to change prior to treatment. Treatment outcomes did not differ significantly from those without a criminal justice prompt, and on some measures the outcomes for CJP group were better (e.g., percentage of days cocaine abstinent, number of therapy sessions attended). Discussion and Conclusions These findings suggest that being prompted to treatment by the criminal justice system may not lead to poorer treatment engagement or substance use outcomes for individuals participating in randomized controlled treatment trials. Scientific Significance Despite some baseline indicators of poorer treatment prognosis, individuals who have been prompted to treatment by the criminal justice system have similar treatment outcomes as those presenting to treatment voluntarily. PMID:25809378

  10. Factors affecting the incidence and outcome of Trueperella pyogenes mastitis in cows

    PubMed Central

    ISHIYAMA, Dai; MIZOMOTO, Tomoko; UEDA, Chise; TAKAGI, Nobuyuki; SHIMIZU, Noriko; MATSUURA, Yu; MAKUUCHI, Yuto; WATANABE, Aiko; SHINOZUKA, Yasunori; KAWAI, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    The main factors affecting the outcome of Trueperella pyogenes (T. pyogenes) mastitis were examined through a survey of diagnostic data and interviews relating to the occurrence of T. pyogenes mastitis in 83 quarters from 82 Holstein cows between August 2012 and April 2014. Ultimately, one cow was sold during the examination, and 82 quarters from 81 cows were used for analysis on prognosis. T. pyogenes mastitis occurred year round in both lactating and dry cows. The incidence of T. pyogenes mastitis did not significantly differ by month or show seasonality in either lactating or dry cows. Therefore, the occurrence of T. pyogenes mastitis also differed from that of summer mastitis. The 1-month survival rate of infected cows was 64.6% (53/82), and the recovery rate of quarters with T. pyogenes mastitis was 14.6% (12/82). Bivariate logistic regression analysis was performed with survival and culling of infected cows as objective variables and with recovery and non-recovery of quarters with T. pyogenes mastitis as objective variables. The severe cases were significantly culled (odds ratio, 16.30) compared to mild cases, and the status of quarters didn’t recover (odds ratio, 6.50). The results suggest that mild to moderate symptom severity at the time of onset are the main factors affecting outcomes in cows and recovery of quarters infected with T. pyogenes mastitis. Further, high level of NAGase activity also suggested the potential use as an indicator of culling of cows with T. pyogenes mastitis. PMID:28163273

  11. Improving the outcomes of children affected by parental substance abuse: a review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, Stacy; Conner, Emma; Miller, Melodi; Messina, Nena

    2015-01-01

    Substance abuse is a major public health concern that impacts not just the user but also the user’s family. The effect that parental substance abuse has on children has been given substantial attention over the years. Findings from the literature suggest that children of substance-abusing parents have a high risk of developing physical and mental health and behavioral problems. A number of intervention programs have been developed for parents who have a substance abuse problem. There have also been a number of interventions that have been developed for children who have at least one parent with a substance abuse problem. However, it remains unclear how we can best mitigate the negative effects that parental substance abuse has on children due to the scarcity of evaluations that utilize rigorous methodologies such as experimental designs. The purpose of this study is to review randomized controlled trials of intervention programs targeting parents with substance abuse problems and/or children with at least one parent with a substance abuse problem in order to identify programs that show some promise in improving the behavioral and mental health outcomes of children affected by parental substance abuse. Four randomized controlled trials that met our eligibility criteria were identified using major literature search engines. The findings from this review suggest that interventions that focus on improving parenting practices and family functioning may be effective in reducing problems in children affected by parental substance abuse. However, further research utilizing rigorous methodologies are needed in order to identify other successful interventions that can improve the outcomes of these children long after the intervention has ended. PMID:25670915

  12. The Role of Positive Affect in Pain and its Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Patrick H.; Garland, Eric L.

    2014-01-01

    This narrative review summarizes and integrates the available literature on PA and pain to: 1) Provide a brief overview of PA and summarize the key findings that have emerged in the study of PA and chronic pain; 2) Provide a theoretical foundation from which to understand how PA operates in the context of chronic pain; and 3) Highlight how the prevailing psychosocial treatments for chronic pain address PA in the therapeutic context, and offer suggestions for how future treatment development research can maximize the benefit of PA for patients with chronic pain. To that end, we review experimental studies that have assessed the association of evoked PA and pain sensitivity, as well as clinical studies that have assessed the association of naturally occurring PA and clinical pain in the context of chronic pain. The evidence suggests PA influences pain, over and above the influence of NA. We offer an “upward spiral” model of positive affect, resilience and pain self-management, which makes specific predictions that PA will buffer maladaptive cognitive and affective responses to pain, and promote active engagement in valued goals that enhance chronic pain self-management. PMID:24751543

  13. Preventive Services by Medical and Dental Providers and Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kranz, A.M.; Rozier, R.G.; Preisser, J.S.; Stearns, S.C.; Weinberger, M.; Lee, J.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Nearly all state Medicaid programs reimburse nondental primary care providers (PCPs) for providing preventive oral health services to young children; yet, little is known about how treatment outcomes compare with children visiting dentists. This study compared the association between the provider of preventive services (PCP, dentist, or both) with Medicaid-enrolled children before their third birthday and subsequent dental caries-related treatment (CRT) and CRT payment. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of young children enrolled in North Carolina Medicaid during 2000 to 2006. The annual number of CRT and CRT payments per child between the ages of 3 and 5 yr were estimated with a zero-inflated negative binomial regression and a hurdle model, respectively. Models were adjusted for relevant child- and county-level characteristics and used propensity score weighting to address observed confounding. Results: We examined 41,453 children with > 1 preventive oral health visit from a PCP, dentist, or both before their third birthday. Unadjusted annual mean CRT and payments were lowest among children who had only PCP visits (CRT = 0.87, payment = $172) and higher among children with only dentist visits (CRT = 1.48, payment = $234) and both PCP and dentist visits (CRT = 1.52, payment = $273). Adjusted results indicated that children who had dentist visits (with or without PCP visits) had significantly more CRT and higher CRT payments per year during the ages of 3 and 4 yr than children who had only PCP visits. However, these differences attenuated each year after age 3 yr. Conclusions: Because of children’s increased opportunity to receive multiple visits in medical offices during well-child visits, preventive oral health services provided by PCPs may lead to a greater reduction in CRT than dentist visits alone. This study supports guidelines and reimbursement policies that allow preventive dental visits based on individual needs. PMID:24891593

  14. Development of a Core Set of Outcomes for Randomized Controlled Trials with Multiple Outcomes – Example of Pulp Treatments of Primary Teeth for Extensive Decay in Children

    PubMed Central

    Smaïl-Faugeron, Violaine; Fron Chabouis, Hélène; Durieux, Pierre; Attal, Jean-Pierre; Muller-Bolla, Michèle; Courson, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Evidence-based comparisons of interventions can be challenging because of the diversity of outcomes in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We aimed to describe outcomes in RCTs assessing pulp treatments for primary teeth and to develop a core set of component outcomes to be part of composite outcome defining the failure of a pulp treatment. Methods We systematically reviewed articles of RCTs comparing pulp treatments for primary molars published up to February 2012. We abstracted all outcomes assessed in each trial, then used a small-group consensus process to group similar outcomes, which were reduced to a composite outcome of failure of a pulp treatment by a 3-round Delphi process involving expert authors and dentists. Results We included 47 reports of RCTs in the review, for 83 reported outcomes (median 11 outcomes per RCT). These outcomes were grouped into 24 overarching outcome categories. We contacted 210 experts for the Delphi process and 25% to 30% participated. The process identified the following 5 component outcomes as part of a composite outcome of failure of a pulp treatment: soft-tissue pathology, pain, pathologic mobility, pathologic radiolucency and pathologic root resorption. Conclusions RCTs of pulp treatments for primary teeth investigate diverse outcomes. Our consensus process, involving clinicians but no patient, allowed for compiling a core set of component outcomes to define the composite outcome failure of a pulp treatment for primary teeth. PMID:23300955

  15. Screening for autoantibodies in chronic hepatitis C patients has no effect on treatment initiation or outcome.

    PubMed

    Mauss, S; Berger, F; Schober, A; Moog, G; Heyne, R; John, C; Pape, S; Hueppe, D; Pfeiffer-Vornkahl, H; Alshuth, U

    2013-04-01

    Autoantibodies in hepatitis C virus-infected patients may indicate autoimmune hepatitis or other immune-mediated diseases. This may impact safety and efficacy of interferon-based therapy of chronic hepatitis C. We investigated the association between a positive test result for a variety of autoantibodies and the initiation and efficacy of therapy for chronic hepatitis C. We analysed an observational cohort of 24 306 patients for an association between autoantibodies and treatment outcome. 8241 patients were tested simultaneously for antinuclear antibodies (ANA), liver kidney microsomal antibodies (LKM), smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) and antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA). Matched-pair analysis was performed matching one autoantibody-positive patient to three controls. Control patients had negative tests for all four antibodies. Analyses were performed for patients with a single positive autoantibody test and for patients with multiple positive autoantibody tests. A positive test result for ANA, LKM, SMA or AMA did not affect the physician's decision to initiate therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. In addition, a positive test for one or multiple autoantibodies did not adversely affect sustained virologic response. There was no difference in fibrosis stage or alanine transaminase at baseline or during therapy irrespective of antibody status. Thyroid dysfunction was more frequent in patients with positive LKM antibodies (P = 0.004). Initiation of therapy for chronic hepatitis C and outcome were not affected by the presence of ANA, LKM, SMA or AMA. Routine testing of these autoantibodies seems not warranted. Determination of autoantibodies should be guided by individualized clinical decisions.

  16. Posthospitalization Outcomes for Psychiatric Sex Offenders: Comparing Two Treatment Protocols.

    PubMed

    Stinson, Jill D; McVay, Lee Ann; Becker, Judith V

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of safe offender strategies (SOS) in comparison with relapse prevention (RP) in a sample of 91 inpatient males in a secure psychiatric setting. All men evidenced a history of violent sexual offending and were diagnosed with serious psychiatric disorders and/or intellectual disabilities. Participants who received SOS (n= 58) and RP (n= 33) were followed from 6 to 36 months post release. SOS clients were significantly less likely to be arrested (0%) or rehospitalized (5.2%) than RP clients (9% arrested; 54.5% rehospitalized). In addition, SOS clients were more likely to transition continuously to less restrictive alternatives, with no returns to high security, in comparison with RP clients. The authors discuss implications for use of SOS, a treatment that facilitates skills development and affects global self-regulatory functioning, particularly in sex offenders with serious mental illness or intellectual impairment, in promoting community reintegration and limiting returns to psychiatric settings.

  17. The role of alexithymia and gastrointestinal-specific anxiety as predictors of treatment outcome in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Porcelli, Piero; De Carne, Massimo; Leandro, Gioacchino

    2017-02-01

    In a previous investigation irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) was associated more to alexithymia than gastrointestinal-specific anxiety (GSA). In this study their independent contribution in predicting treatment outcome was longitudinally investigated. Consecutive 150 IBS patients were evaluated for IBS symptoms, alexithymia, GSA, and psychological distress with validated scales after as-usual treatment for 6-12months. The primary treatment outcome was improvement measured with the IBS-Severity Scoring System that showed 111 patients who improved and 39 who did not improve. Improvement was associated to both alexithymia (d=1.27) and GSA (d=4.63) but only alexithymia showed overtime stability by hierarchical regression, controlled for co-variables. A series of logistic and linear regressions showed that baseline alexithymia, but not GSA, independently predicted both post-treatment improvement status (Cox & Snell R(2)=0.15; overall classification rate=74%) and symptom change (23% of explained variance). Although alexithymia and GSA were closely related IBS symptoms, only alexithymia was found to be a stable trait and a stronger predictor of treatment outcome than GSA. Since no treatment was established to be definitely effective for IBS, clinicians might improve treatment outcome by identifying patients with high alexithymia, attempting to improve their coping skills, emotional regulation, and affective awareness.

  18. Incorporating Meaningful Gamification in a Blended Learning Research Methods Class: Examining Student Learning, Engagement, and Affective Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Meng; Hew, Khe Foon

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how the use of meaningful gamification affects student learning, engagement, and affective outcomes in a short, 3-day blended learning research methods class using a combination of experimental and qualitative research methods. Twenty-two postgraduates were randomly split into two groups taught by the same…

  19. Implications for managed care for improving outcomes in Parkinson's disease: balancing aggressive treatment with appropriate care.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jack J

    2011-10-01

    Disability in Parkinson's disease (PD) is due not only to progressive impairment in balance, gait, and motor-related tasks, but also to several nonmotor symptoms affecting autonomic, neuropsychiatric, and sensory functions. The prevalence of PD in the United States is rising due to the expanding elderly population. Direct medical costs associated with PD are significant and influenced by level of disability and associated complexity of management. As new treatments are made available, reevaluation of treatment benefits and paradigms is warranted, for both motor and nonmotor symptoms of PD, to better manage outcomes. In addition to evaluation of symptomatic therapies for PD, attention to advances in disease-modifying therapies and to management of nonmotor symptoms should be an integral component of PD surveillance in the managed care environment.

  20. Effect of Diabetes Mellitus on Tuberculosis Treatment Outcome and Adverse Reactions in Patients Receiving Directly Observed Treatment Strategy in India: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Ali Nasir; Khayyam, Khalid Umer

    2016-01-01

    Despite successful implementation of directly observed treatment, short course (DOTS) in India, the growing number of diabetes mellitus (DM) patients appears to be a cause in the increasing tuberculosis (TB) incidence, affecting their management. In this regard, a prospective study was conducted on DOTS patients in three primary health care centers in urban slum region of South Delhi, India, to evaluate the effect of DM on sputum conversion, treatment outcome, and adverse drug reactions (ADR) due to anti-TB treatment. Eligible TB patients underwent blood glucose screening at treatment initiation. Disease presentation, clinical outcome, and ADRs were compared between patients of TB with and without DM. Out of 316 patients, the prevalence of DM was found to be 15.8%, in which 19.4% and 9.6% were PTB and EPTB patients, respectively. DM patients have observed higher sputum positivity (OR 1.247 95% CI; 0.539–2.886) at the end of 2-month treatment and poor outcome (OR 1.176 95% CI; 0.310–4.457) at the completion of treatment compared with non DM patients. Presence of DM was significantly associated (OR 3.578 95% CI; 1.114–11.494, p = 0.032) with the development of ADRs. DM influences the treatment outcome of PTB patients in our setting and also on the ADR incidence. PMID:27642601

  1. Connecting Stuttering Management and Measurement: V. Deduction and Induction in the Development of Stuttering Treatment Outcome Measures and Stuttering Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onslow, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Background: The development of evidence-based practice, which is increasingly popular in stuttering treatment, is closely linked to the development of outcome measures. Aims: Two approaches to the development of stuttering treatment outcome measures are outlined. The first is the deductive, top-down approach, where the development of specific…

  2. Influence of wavelength on the outcome of the treatment of TMJ disorders: TMDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.; Marques, Aparecida Maria C.; Carvalho, Carolina M.; Cangussú, Maria Cristina T.; Soares, Luiz Guilherme P.

    2013-03-01

    It is known that wavelength influences the outcome of many clinical protocols. Laser-phototherapy (LPT) and LEDs have been used on the treatment of pain of several origins including temporomandibular disorders - TMDs. TMDs are common painful multifactorial conditions affecting the temporomandibular joint whose treatment depends on the type and symptoms. Initially it requires pain control and for this, drugs, biting plates, oclusal adjustment, physiotherapy or their association are used. This work reports a series of patients of the Center of Biophotonics of the Federal University of Bahia over 10 years. Following standard anamneses, clinical and imaginologic examination and with the diagnosis of any type of TMD, the patients were set for light treatment. Treatment consisted of three sessions a week during six week. Prior irradiation, the patients were asked to score their pain using a VAS. λ780, λ 790, λ 830nm and/or λ660 and λ680nm lasers or LED were used on each session. Most patients were female (~43.6 years old). At the end of the 12 sessions the patients were again examined and score their pain using VAS. No other intervention was carried out during the treatment. The results were statistically analyzed and showed that most patients were asymptomatic or improved after treatment and that the association of wavelengths was very efficient on the symptomatic group. It is concluded that the association of both wavelengths was effective on pain reduction on TMJ disorders of several origins.

  3. A Review of Educational Outcomes in the Children's Mental Health Treatment Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Kimberly D.; Brandt, Nicole Evangelista; Stephan, Sharon H.; Chorpita, Bruce F.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the measurement of educational outcomes related to children's mental health treatments. A total of 85 papers describing 88 randomized controlled trials that included at least one educational outcome and one mental health outcome were included in these analyses. Forty-five different measures were identified as the primary educational…

  4. Predictors and Moderators of Treatment Outcome in the Pediatric Obsessive Compulsive Treatment Study (POTS I)

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Abbe Marrs; Sapyta, Jeffrey J.; Moore, Phoebe S.; Freeman, Jennifer B.; Franklin, Martin E.; March, John S.; Foa, Edna B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify predictors and moderators of outcome in the first Pediatric OCD Treatment Study (POTS I) among youth (N=112) randomly assigned to sertraline, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), both sertraline and CBT (COMB), or a pill placebo. Method Potential baseline predictors and moderators were identified by literature review. The outcome measure was an adjusted week 12 predicted score for the Children’s Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS). Main and interactive effects of treatment condition and each candidate predictor or moderator variable were examined using GLM on the adjusted predicted week 12 CY-BOCS scores. Results Youth with lower OCD severity, less OCD-related functional impairment, greater insight, fewer comorbid externalizing symptoms, and lower levels of family accommodation showed greater improvement across treatment conditions than their counterparts after acute POTS treatment. Those with a family history of OCD had a six-fold decrease in effect size in CBT monotherapy relative to their counterparts in CBT without a family history of OCD. Conclusions Greater attention is needed to build optimized intervention strategies for more complex youth with OCD. Youth with a family history of OCD are not likely to benefit from CBT unless offered in combination with an SSRI. PMID:20855047

  5. Treatment of child anxiety: an exploratory study of the role of maternal anxiety and behaviours in treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Creswell, Cathy; Willetts, Lucy; Murray, Lynne; Singhal, Meghna; Cooper, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common among parents of anxious children and have been found to impede child treatment outcomes, yet it is unclear whether it is parental anxiety that needs to be targeted in therapy or associated parental behaviours. Twenty-two children (6-12 years) with a current anxiety disorder and their mothers received cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) for child anxiety. In addition, of the 12 mothers who met criteria for a current anxiety disorder, 6 received CBT for their own disorder. Assessments were made of the mother-child interaction. The main findings were: (1) children did less well from treatment where their mothers had a current anxiety disorder; (2) treatment of maternal anxiety disorder did not improve child treatment outcome; and (3) maternal overinvolvement and expression of fear was associated with child treatment outcome. The results suggest that in the context of maternal anxiety disorder, child treatment outcome may be improved by specifically targeting parenting behaviours.

  6. Therapeutic Alliance and Treatment Outcome in the Outpatient Treatment of Urban Adolescents: The Role of Callous-Unemotional Traits.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Laurel A; Schmidt, Adam T; Henderson, Craig E; Hogue, Aaron

    2016-11-10

    Callous-unemotional (CU) traits designate a unique subset of youth with externalizing psychopathology who have a severe pattern of aggressive behavior and tend to have worse outcomes in treatment. However, little research has addressed how CU traits relate to different components of psychotherapy, such as the therapeutic alliance. The current study examined the role of CU traits in predicting therapeutic alliance in 59 adolescents (M age = 15.3, 51% female, 64% Hispanic American, 15% African American) who were part of a larger randomized naturalistic trial of outpatient behavioral psychotherapy. Multilevel regression analysis further investigated the role of therapeutic alliance in predicting treatment outcome (as measured by self-reported delinquency) and the moderating role of CU traits. Results suggested that regardless of the severity of their externalizing problems, youth with higher levels of CU traits reported more positive ratings of therapeutic alliance. In addition, a positive therapeutic alliance predicted reductions in delinquent behavior, and this association was even stronger for youth higher in CU traits. Our results suggest that CU traits are related to improvement in the formation of the therapeutic alliance among youth with externalizing psychopathology, perhaps because these youth lack many of the social and emotional deficits that other youth with conduct problems possess. Adolescents high in CU traits should not be viewed as untreatable. Indeed, the therapeutic alliance may be an important mechanism for affecting meaningful change in these adolescents' lives. (PsycINFO Database Record

  7. Factors Affecting Response to Infertility Treatment: Case of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Peyromusavi, Fatemeh; Barouni, Mohsen; Naderi, Tayebeh; Shahravan, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Infertility affects both women and men in all the countries. Infertility often has profound long-term or short-term impacts on the people involved and puts them at risk of familial and social pressures. According to WHO estimates, between 8% and 12% of all the couples worldwide experience some form of infertility during their reproductive life, i.e. 50–80 million people are affected. The aim of this study was to evaluate the response to infertility treatment by taking into account factors such as age, hirsutism, menstruation and galactose among women in Kerman. Methodology: Of a total of 300 patient files evaluated 220 cases were flawless, of which the study factors were recorded. These data were estimated by Logit model. The dependent variable was the response to treatment (0 and 1) and the independent variables included age of men and women, hirsutism, menstruation, galactose, duration of the period no preventive measures were used and body mass index. After entering the data, model output was analyzed by using the STATA software. Results: The results showed that of all the model variables, female age (prob=0.0065), menstruation (prob=0.04), hirsutism (prob=0.02), marriage age (in months) (prob=0.02) and BMI were significant and other variables were not significant. McFadden analysis for goodness of fit was 0.92. Conclusion: The study results showed that women should pay more attention to variables such as BMI, menstruation quality (regular and irregular) and aging because clinical disregard of any of the above can have a significant impact on the individual’s fertility. PMID:26234994

  8. Optimal functional outcome measures for assessing treatment for Dupuytren’s disease: a systematic review and recommendations for future practice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dupuytren's disease of the hand is a common condition affecting the palmar fascia, resulting in progressive flexion deformities of the digits and hence limitation of hand function. The optimal treatment remains unclear as outcomes studies have used a variety of measures for assessment. Methods A literature search was performed for all publications describing surgical treatment, percutaneous needle aponeurotomy or collagenase injection for primary or recurrent Dupuytren’s disease where outcomes had been monitored using functional measures. Results Ninety-one studies met the inclusion criteria. Twenty-two studies reported outcomes using patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) ranging from validated questionnaires to self-reported measures for return to work and self-rated disability. The Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score was the most utilised patient-reported function measure (n=11). Patient satisfaction was reported by eighteen studies but no single method was used consistently. Range of movement was the most frequent physical measure and was reported in all 91 studies. However, the methods of measurement and reporting varied, with seventeen different techniques being used. Other physical measures included grip and pinch strength and sensibility, again with variations in measurement protocols. The mean follow-up time ranged from 2 weeks to 17 years. Conclusions There is little consistency in the reporting of outcomes for interventions in patients with Dupuytren’s disease, making it impossible to compare the efficacy of different treatment modalities. Although there are limitations to the existing generic patient reported outcomes measures, a combination of these together with a disease-specific questionnaire, and physical measures of active and passive individual joint Range of movement (ROM), grip and sensibility using standardised protocols should be used for future outcomes studies. As Dupuytren’s disease tends to recur

  9. Treatment and outcome of giant cell tumors of the pelvis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Giant cell tumors (GCTs) of bone rarely affect the pelvis. We report on 20 cases that have been treated at our institution during the last 20 years. Methods 20 patients with histologically benign GCT of the pelvis were included in this study. 9 tumors were primarily located in the iliosacral area, 6 in the acetabular area, and 5 in the ischiopubic area. 8 patients were treated by intralesional curettage and 6 by intralesional resection with additional curettage of the margins. 3 patients with iliacal tumors were treated by wide resection. 2 patients were treated by a combination of external beam irradiation and surgery, and 1 patient solely by irradiation. In addition, 9 patients received selective arterial embolization one day before surgery. Of the 6 patients with acetabular tumors, 1 secondarily received an endoprosthesis and 1 was primarily treated by hip transposition. The patients were followed for a median time of 3 (1–11) years. Results 1 patient with a pubic tumor developed a local recurrence 1 year after intralesional resection and additional curettage of the margins. The recurrence presented as a small soft tissue mass within the scar tissue of the gluteal muscles and was treated by resection. No secondary sarcoma was detected and none of the patients developed pulmonary metastases or multicentricity. No major complication occurred during surgery. Interpretation We conclude that most GCTs of the pelvis can be treated by intralesional procedures. For tumors of the iliac wing, wide resection can be an alternative. Surgical treatment of tumors affecting the acetabular region often results in functional impairment. Pre-surgical selective arterial embolization appears to be a safe procedure that may reduce the risk of local recurrence. PMID:19916695

  10. Applications of Text Messaging, and Bibliotherapy for Treatment of Patients Affected by Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Taleban, Roya; Zamani, Ahmadreza; Moafi, Mohammad; Jiryaee, Nasrin; Khadivi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intensity of depressive symptoms could be exacerbated due to the paucity of appropriate treatments. We assessed the effectiveness of bibliotherapy and text messaging, which aimed at amelioration of patient's behavior and consciousness, which could lead to suicide prevention. Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial implemented in rural health centers of Isfahan district (Iran). Health centers were assigned in three trials consisting of the booklet, text messaging, and control groups. Each group consisted of 70 patients. Inclusion criteria were being affected by depressive symptom, <18 years, and cell phone accessibility. Mental retardation, drug and alcohol abuse, visual disability, dementia, suicide attempt history, electrotherapy, and receiving psychological interventions were our not met criteria. Our patient outcomes comprised intensity of depressive symptom and treatment compliance. The first two trials were requested to study instructive booklets in 30 days while the second cohort was demanded to study the booklet in accordance with the daily delivered text messaging. Results: Out of 210 individuals, 198 patients finished this study. The intensity of depressive symptom was significantly affected through time and group factors as well as time-group interaction (F = 12.30, P < 0.001). Based on treatment compliance, the interactive effect of group factor and the time factor was statistically significant. Conclusions: It seems that bibliotherapy could efficiently decrease the intensity of depressive symptoms. Nevertheless, in comparison with our booklet trial, the text messaging group achieved neither durable nor significant success; thus, bibliotherapy could be utilized as a complementary methodology aiming depression treatment. PMID:27076884

  11. Predictors of outcomes of psychological treatments for disordered gambling: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Merkouris, S S; Thomas, S A; Browning, C J; Dowling, N A

    2016-08-01

    This systematic review aimed to synthesise the evidence relating to pre-treatment predictors of gambling outcomes following psychological treatment for disordered gambling across multiple time-points (i.e., post-treatment, short-term, medium-term, and long-term). A systematic search from 1990 to 2016 identified 50 articles, from which 11 socio-demographic, 16 gambling-related, 21 psychological/psychosocial, 12 treatment, and no therapist-related variables, were identified. Male gender and low depression levels were the most consistent predictors of successful treatment outcomes across multiple time-points. Likely predictors of successful treatment outcomes also included older age, lower gambling symptom severity, lower levels of gambling behaviours and alcohol use, and higher treatment session attendance. Significant associations, at a minimum of one time-point, were identified between successful treatment outcomes and being employed, ethnicity, no gambling debt, personality traits and being in the action stage of change. Mixed results were identified for treatment goal, while education, income, preferred gambling activity, problem gambling duration, anxiety, any psychiatric comorbidity, psychological distress, substance use, prior gambling treatment and medication use were not significantly associated with treatment outcomes at any time-point. Further research involving consistent treatment outcome frameworks, examination of treatment and therapist predictor variables, and evaluation of predictors across long-term follow-ups is warranted to advance this developing field of research.

  12. Nonambulatory cows: Duration of recumbency and quality of nursing care affect outcome of flotation therapy.

    PubMed

    Stojkov, J; Weary, D M; von Keyserlingk, M A G

    2016-03-01

    Cows that are unable or unwilling to stand and remain recumbent for ≥ 12 h are defined as nonambulatory. Care and management of nonambulatory cattle is considered a major animal welfare concern facing the livestock industry, particularly the dairy sector. Flotation therapy has gained interest as a means to promote recovery in nonambulatory cows and is based on the concept that by floating the cow in warm water, secondary pressure damage to muscles and nerves will be reduced. The objective of this study was to assess the physiological responses to stress related to the flotation therapy and to evaluate the effect of recumbency duration and nursing care on the outcome of the flotation therapy. The outcomes of 34 nonambulatory Holstein dairy cows were analyzed after they were subjected to flotation therapy. The duration of recumbency and quality of nursing care provided before initiation of the flotation treatment were assessed based on producer responses to survey questions, and from on-site observations by the researchers. A veterinarian examined all cows before flotation therapy began. The treatment was divided into 5 phases: baseline (before filling), manipulation (placing the cow into the tank), filling (the tank was filled with water), flotation (the cow was confined in the filled tank), and draining (water was removed from the tank). Stress responses to the procedure, excluding the manipulation portion, were assessed using heart rate variability. The high-frequency component (HF normalized units) decreased during the filling and draining phases (2.8 ± 0.2 and 3.1 ± 0.4, respectively) compared with the baseline and floating phase (5.1 ± 0.6 and 4.9 ± 0.3, [corrected] respectively). These results indicate that the stress related to the flotation therapy is greatest during the filling and draining phases of the treatment, when cows likely have to exert increased effort to transition to a standing position. The flotation therapy was less likely to be

  13. Short treatment time and excellent treatment outcome in accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for T1 glottic cancer.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Yukihisa; Hieda, Yoko; Yoshida, Rika; Yoshizako, Takeshi; Fuchiwaki, Takafumi; Aoi, Noriaki; Sekihara, Kazumasa; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Kawauchi, Hideyuki; Kitagaki, Hajime; Sasaki, Ryohei; Inomata, Taisuke

    2015-11-01

    Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy was performed as treatment for patients with T1 glottic cancer, and its utility was evaluated based on treatment outcomes and adverse effects. Fifty-eight men who had undergone radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. Tumor classification was Tis in 4 patients, T1a in 38, and T1b in 16. Histological examination revealed squamous cell carcinoma in 55 patients. Travel time from home to hospital was 0-1 hour for 24 patients, 1-2 hours for 9, and >2 hours for 25. Laser vaporization was performed prior to radiotherapy in 38 patients, and 19 patients received concurrent chemotherapy with an agent such as S-1. Patients were irradiated twice daily using an irradiation container. Most patients received a dose of 1.5 Gy/fraction up to a total of 60 Gy. The median overall treatment time was 30 days, with a median observation period of 59.6 months. A complete response was observed in all patients. The 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rates were 97.2%, 93.2%, and 97.8%, respectively. Although grade 3 pharyngeal mucositis was observed in 2 patients, there were no other grade 3 or higher acute adverse events. As late toxicity, grade 2 laryngeal edema and grade 1 laryngeal hemorrhage were observed in 1 patient each, but no serious events such as laryngeal necrosis or laryngeal stenosis were observed. In conclusion, this treatment method brings excellent outcome and will substantially reduce the treatment duration among patients who need to stay at nearby hotels while undergoing treatment at hospitals in rural areas.

  14. Biopsychosocial determinants of treatment outcome for mood and anxiety disorders up to 8 months postpartum.

    PubMed

    Misri, Shaila; Albert, Gillian; Abizadeh, Jasmin; Kendrick, Kristin; Carter, Diana; Ryan, Deirdre; Oberlander, Tim F

    2012-08-01

    Little is known about the biopsychosocial determinants that predict postpartum treatment outcome for mood and anxiety disorders. Postpartum mood and anxiety symptoms and psychosocial/biological variables were recorded for 8 months of 22 women treated with antidepressants during pregnancy. Depression scores decreased by 58%, whereas anxiety scores decreased by 35%. Family history of psychiatric illness and prior psychiatric illness unrelated to pregnancy predicted depressive treatment outcome, and sexual abuse history and prior psychiatric illness unrelated to pregnancy predicted anxiety outcome. Biological and psychosocial variables predicted pharmacological treatment outcome in postpartum-depressed and anxious women.

  15. Periapical healing outcome following single visit endodontic treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Moksha; Babshet, Medha

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of apical periodontitis in diabetes mellitus patients is high. The altered immunity in diabetes affects the healing process of periapical tissue. Single visit endodontic treatment has shown to increase the periapical healing rate with better patient compliance. Hence the present study aims at evaluating the clinical and radiographic healing outcome of single visit endodontic treatment, in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with periapical disease. Material and Methods Eighty patients with periapical disease were divided into 2 groups of 40 each: Group I, Control subjects and Group II, Type 2 diabetics. Glycosylated hemoglobin levels were assessed preoperatively and at follow up intervals in diabetics. Pre-operative assessment of periapical status was done using CPDR (Clinical periapical diagnosis of root), QLDR (Qualitative radiographic diagnosis of tooth) and QTDR (Quantitative radiographic diagnosis of tooth) criteria. Postoperative healing was evaluated following single-visit endodontic treatment by Strindberg criteria. Results Group 2 subjects had chronic and exacerbating lesions with significantly larger lesions (p=0.029). 100 % clinical healing outcome in diabetic group was seen in two months. Group 2 showed 85% success in one year on radiographic evaluation. Poor controlled diabetics showed failure compared to fair and good controlled. Conclusions Type 2 diabetics had chronic and larger sized lesions when compared to control subjects. The periapical lesions in patients with poor diabetic control showed failure. The clinical and radiographic healing outcome of single visit endodontic therapy was delayed in diabetic patients. Key words:Apical periodontitis, diabetes mellitus type 2, endodontics, periapical lesion, strindberg criteria. PMID:27957260

  16. Predicting CPAP Use and Treatment Outcomes Using Composite Indices of Sleep Apnea Severity

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Karthik; James, Kathryn T.; Weaver, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Measures of baseline sleep apnea disease burden (apnea-hypopnea index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale) predict continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence, but composite indices of sleep apnea severity (Sleep Apnea Severity Index, Modified Sleep Apnea Severity Index) may be more robust measures of disease burden. We tested the relative prognostic ability of each measure of sleep apnea disease burden to predict subsequent CPAP adherence and subjective sleep outcomes. Methods: Prospective cohort study at a tertiary academic sleep center. Patients (n = 323) underwent initial diagnostic polysomnography for suspected obstructive sleep apnea and 6 mo of subsequent CPAP therapy Results: Baseline apnea-hypopnea index and both composite indices predicted adherence to CPAP therapy at 6 mo in multivariate analyses (all p ≤ 0.001). Baseline Epworth Sleepiness Scale did not predict CPAP adherence (p = 0.22). Both composite indices were statistically stronger predictors of CPAP adherence at 6 mo than apnea-hypopnea index (p < 0.001). In multivariate analyses, baseline apnea-hypopnea index (p < 0.05) and both composite indices (both p < 0.04) predicted change in Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, whereas only the composite indices predicted changes in Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (both p < 0.001). Adjustment for treatment adherence did not affect the relationship of the composite indices with change in Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (both p ≤ 0.005). Conclusions: Composite indices of baseline sleep apnea severity better predict objective CPAP adherence and subjective treatment outcomes than baseline apnea-hypopnea index and baseline Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Citation: Balakrishnan K, James KT, Weaver EM. Predicting CPAP use and treatment outcomes using composite indices of sleep apnea severity. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(6):849–854. PMID:26857052

  17. A NTCP approach for estimating the outcome in radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Strigari, L.; Sciuto, R.; Benassi, M.; Bergomi, S.; Nocentini, S.; Maini, C. L.

    2008-09-15

    Radioiodine has been in use for over 60 years as a treatment for hyperthyroidism. Major changes in clinical practice have led to accurate dosimetry capable of avoiding the risks of adverse effects and the optimization of the treatment. The aim of this study was to test the capability of a radiobiological model, based on normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), to predict the outcome after oral therapeutic {sup 131}I administration. Following dosimetric study, 79 patients underwent treatment for hyperthyroidism using radioiodine and then 67 had at least a one-year follow up. The delivered dose was calculated using the MIRD formula, taking into account the measured maximum uptake of administered iodine transferred to the thyroid, U0, and the effective clearance rate, T{sub eff} and target mass. The dose was converted to normalized total dose delivered at 2 Gy per fraction (NTD{sub 2}). Furthermore, the method to take into account the reduction of the mass of the gland during radioiodine therapy was also applied. The clinical outcome and dosimetric parameters were analyzed in order to study the dose-response relationship for hypothyroidism. The TD{sub 50} and m parameters of the NTCP model approach were then estimated using the likelihood method. The TD{sub 50}, expressed as NTD{sub 2}, resulted in 60 Gy (95% C.I.: 45-75 Gy) and 96 Gy (95% C.I.: 86-109 Gy) for patients affected by Graves or autonomous/multinodular disease, respectively. This supports the clinical evidence that Graves' disease should be characterized by more radiosensitive cells compared to autonomous nodules. The m parameter for all patients was 0.27 (95% C.I.: 0.22-0.36). These parameters were compared with those reported in the literature for hypothyroidism induced after external beam radiotherapy. The NTCP model correctly predicted the clinical outcome after the therapeutic administration of radioiodine in our series.

  18. Neural activation during processing of aversive faces predicts treatment outcome in alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Charlet, Katrin; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Richter, Anne; Naundorf, Karina; Dornhof, Lina; Weinfurtner, Christopher E J; König, Friederike; Walaszek, Bernadeta; Schubert, Florian; Müller, Christian A; Gutwinski, Stefan; Seissinger, Annette; Schmitz, Lioba; Walter, Henrik; Beck, Anne; Gallinat, Jürgen; Kiefer, Falk; Heinz, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Neuropsychological studies reported decoding deficits of emotional facial expressions in alcohol-dependent patients, and imaging studies revealed reduced prefrontal and limbic activation during emotional face processing. However, it remains unclear whether this reduced neural activation is mediated by alcohol-associated volume reductions and whether it interacts with treatment outcome. We combined analyses of neural activation during an aversive face-cue-comparison task and local gray matter volumes (GM) using Biological Parametric Mapping in 33 detoxified alcohol-dependent patients and 33 matched healthy controls. Alcoholics displayed reduced activation toward aversive faces-neutral shapes in bilateral fusiform gyrus [FG; Brodmann areas (BA) 18/19], right middle frontal gyrus (BA46/47), right inferior parietal gyrus (BA7) and left cerebellum compared with controls, which were explained by GM differences (except for cerebellum). Enhanced functional activation in patients versus controls was found in left rostral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and medial frontal gyrus (BA10/11), even after GM reduction control. Increased ACC activation correlated significantly with less (previous) lifetime alcohol intake [Lifetime Drinking History (LDH)], longer abstinence and less subsequent binge drinking in patients. High LDH appear to impair treatment outcome via its neurotoxicity on ACC integrity. Thus, high activation of the rostral ACC elicited by affective faces appears to be a resilience factor predicting better treatment outcome. Although no group differences were found, increased FG activation correlated with patients' higher LDH. Because high LDH correlated with worse task performance for facial stimuli in patients, elevated activation in the fusiform 'face' area may reflect inefficient compensatory activation. Therapeutic interventions (e.g. emotion evaluation training) may enable patients to cope with social stress and to decrease relapses after detoxification.

  19. Does crossover innervation really affect the clinical outcome? A comparison of outcome between unilateral and bilateral digital nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Oruç, Melike; Ozer, Kadri; Çolak, Özlem; Kankaya, Yüksel; Koçer, Uğur

    2016-09-01

    Digital nerve injuries are the mostly detected nerve injury in the upper extremity. However, since the clinical phenomenon of crossover innervation at some degree from uninjured digital nerve to the injured side occurs after digital nerve injuries is sustained, one could argue that this concept might even result in the overestimation of the outcome of the digital nerve repair. With this knowledge in mind, this study aimed to present novel, pure, focused and valuable clinical data by comparing the outcomes of bilateral and unilateral digital nerve repair. A retrospective review of 28 fingers with unilateral or bilateral digital nerve repair using end-to-end technique in 19 patients within 2 years was performed. Weber's two-point discrimination, sharp/dull discrimination, warm/cold sensation and Visual Analog Scale scoring were measured at final 12-month follow ups in all patients. There was no significant difference in recovery of sensibility after unilateral and bilateral digital nerve repairs. Though there is crossover innervation microscopically, it is not important in the clinical evaluation period. According to clinical findings from this study, crossover innervations appear to be negligible in the estimation of outcomes of digital neurorrhaphy.

  20. A meta-analysis of the influence of comorbidity on treatment outcome in the anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, Bunmi O; Cisler, Josh M; Tolin, David F

    2010-08-01

    Although psychiatric comorbidity is common among patients with anxiety disorders, its impact on treatment outcome remains unclear. The present study used meta-analytic techniques to examine the relationship between diagnostic comorbidity and treatment outcome for patients with anxiety disorders. One hundred forty-eight anxiety-disordered treatment samples (combined N=3534) were examined for post-treatment effects from the PsychINFO database. Samples consisted of those exposed to both active (CBT, dynamic therapy, drug treatment, CBT+drug treatment, mindfulness) and inactive treatments (placebo/attention control, wait-list). All treatments were associated with significant improvement at post-treatment, and active treatments were associated with greater effects than were inactive treatments. However, overall comorbidity was generally unrelated to effect size at post-treatment or at follow-up. A significant negative relationship between overall comorbidity and treatment outcome was found for mixed or "neurotic" anxiety samples when examining associations between comorbidity and specific diagnoses. Conversely, there was a significant positive relationship between overall comorbidity and treatment outcome for panic disorder and/or agoraphobia and PTSD or sexual abuse survivors. These findings suggest that while diagnostic comorbidity may not impact the effects of specific anxiety disorder treatments, it appears to differentially impact outcome for specific anxiety disorder diagnoses.

  1. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in the Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorder and Comorbid Affective Disorder: A Pilot Matched Control Trial.

    PubMed

    Thekiso, Thekiso B; Murphy, Philip; Milnes, Jennie; Lambe, Kathryn; Curtin, Aisling; Farren, Conor K

    2015-11-01

    This study examined whether acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) enhances treatment as usual (TAU) in improving treatment outcomes in patients with alcohol use disorder (AUD) and comorbid affective disorder. Fifty-two participants were included in the study, of whom 26 were patients with AUD and either depression or bipolar disorder treated with ACT group therapy in parallel with TAU (inpatient integrated treatment) and 26 were matched controls who had received TAU alone. Drinking and craving outcomes were total alcohol abstinence, cumulative abstinence duration (CAD) and Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale (OCDS) scores at 3 and 6 months postintervention. Affective and anxiety outcomes were Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) scores at these follow-ups. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics were similar in both groups. Retention rates were high: 100% of the ACT group were followed up at 3 and 6 months; 92.3% and 84.6% of the TAU alone group were followed up at 3 and 6 months, respectively. Patients in the ACT group reported significantly higher CAD at 3 and 6 months, significantly lower BDI and BAI scores at 3 and 6 months, and significantly lower OCDS scores at 3 months, than those who received only TAU. No other significant differences in treatment outcomes were found between the groups. ACT provides added benefit to TAU in improving drinking, craving, depression and anxiety outcomes in patients with AUD and comorbid affective disorder. Most treatment improvements were sustained over a 6-month follow-up period.

  2. Predicting Adolescent Drug Abuse Treatment Outcome with the Personal Experience Inventory (PEI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinchfield, Randy; Winters, Ken C.

    2004-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the clinical utility of the Personal Experience Inventory (PEI) Psychosocial scales to predict adolescent drug abuse treatment outcome. The role of psychosocial risk factors in predicting treatment outcome also has theoretical interest given that such factors have been associated with the development of…

  3. Predicting Residential Treatment Outcomes for Emotionally and Behaviorally Disordered Youth: The Role of Pretreatment Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    den Dunnen, Wendy; St. Pierre, Jeff; Stewart, Shannon L.; Johnson, Andrew; Cook, Steven; Leschied, Alan W.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined outcomes with 170 children and youth admitted to residential treatment with complex mental health problems. Overall, outcomes at 2 years post-treatment was predicted by children and youth's behavioral pretreatment status reflected in lower internalizing and externalizing behavior at admission. These findings recognize a cluster…

  4. Multiple Measures of Outcome in Assessing a Prison-Based Drug Treatment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prendergast, Michael L.; Hall, Elizabeth A.; Wexler, Harry K.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluations of prison-based drug treatment programs typically focus on one or two dichotomous outcome variables related to recidivism. In contrast, this paper uses multiple measures of outcomes related to crime and drug use to examine the impact of prison treatment. Crime variables included self-report data of time to first illegal activity,…

  5. Regenerative Endodontic Treatment: Report of Two Cases with Different Clinical Management and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Khoshkhounejad, Mehrfam; Shokouhinejad, Noushin

    2015-01-01

    Endodontic intervention in necrotic immature permanent teeth is usually a clinical challenge. With appropriate case selection, regenerative treatment can be effective, providing a desirable outcome. However, there is still no consensus on the optimal disinfection protocol or the method to achieve predictable clinical outcome. This article presents two cases of regenerative treatment in necrotic immature teeth, using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and BiodentineTM as coronal barriers and different irrigants, which led to different clinical outcomes. PMID:26884781

  6. Integrating Surgery Into Treatment Paradigms for Organ Preservation: Tailoring Treatment to Biology Improves Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Gregory T.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was introduced into treatment paradigms for curable head and neck cancer in the early 1970s in an effort to reduce the magnitude of mutilating surgery and to provide a rationale for adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in patients who responded to initial chemotherapy. The large number of trials that followed failed to demonstrate improved survival when neoadjuvant chemotherapy was added to conventional surgery or radiation. Importantly, a consistent observation in these neoadjuvant trials was the significant association of clinical tumor response to neoadjuvant therapy and favorable prognosis. Results: The findings led to development of a new treatment paradigm that was based on the hypothesis that the biology of an individual cancer is more predictive of response to specific therapy and overall outcome than is anatomic tumor site or extent, and on the corollary that matching treatment modality to biology will improve overall survival rates. Conclusions: This report identifies key findings that are important in the design and analysis of organ preservation trials and biologic markers predictive of response and outcomes. Ongoing studies incorporating biomarkers such as p53, Bcl-xL, HPV, EGFR, COX-2, and tumor promoter gene methylation are underway and will identify new targets for molecular manipulation, response monitoring, and tumor imaging that could allow real-time changes in how we integrate the various components of multi-modal therapy.

  7. Preoperative opioid strength may not affect outcomes of anterior cervical procedures: a post hoc analysis of 2 prospective, randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Michael P.; Anderson, Paul A.; Sasso, Rick C.; Riew, K. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Object The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between preoperative opioid strength and outcomes of anterior cervical decompressive surgery. Methods A retrospective cohort of 1004 patients enrolled in 1 of 2 investigational device exemption studies comparing cervical total disc arthroplasty (TDA) and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for single-level cervical disease causing radiculopathy or myelopathy was selected. At a preoperative visit, opioid use data, Neck Disability Index (NDI) scores, 36-ltem Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) scores, and numeric rating scale scores for neck and arm pain were collected. Patients were divided into strong (oxycodone/morphine/meperidine), weak (codeine/propoxyphene/ hydrocodone), and opioid-naïve groups. Preoperative and postoperative (24 months) outcomes scores were compared within and between groups using the paired t-test and ANCOVA, respectively. Results Patients were categorized as follows: 226 strong, 762 weak, and 16 opioid naïve. The strong and weak groups were similar with respect to age, sex, race, marital status, education level, Worker's Compensation status, litigation status, and alcohol use. At 24-month follow-up, no differences in change in arm or neck pain scores (arm: strong –52.3, weak –50.6, naïve –54.0, p = 0.244; neck: strong –52.7, weak –50.8, naïve –44.6, p = 0.355); NDI scores (strong –36.0, weak –33.3, naïve –32.3, p = 0.181); or SF-36 Physical Component Summary scores (strong: 14.1, weak 13.3, naïve 21.7, p = 0.317) were present. Using a 15-point improvement in NDI to determine success, the authors found no between-groups difference in success rates (strong 80.6%, weak 82.7%, naïve 73.3%, p = 0.134). No difference existed between treatment arms (TDA vs ACDF) for any outcome at any time point. Conclusions Preoperative opioid strength did not adversely affect outcomes in this analysis. Careful patient selection can yield good results in this patient

  8. Does Family Structure Affect Children's Educational Outcomes? NBER Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollak, Robert A.; Ginther, Donna K.

    This paper examines correlations between children's educational outcomes and family structure. Although popular discussions focus on distinctions between two-parent and single-parent families, earlier research shows that outcomes for stepchildren are similar to outcomes for children in single-parent families, and earlier researchers suggested that…

  9. Variable gene dispersal conditions and spatial deforestation patterns can interact to affect tropical tree conservation outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kashimshetty, Yamini; Pelikan, Stephan; Rogstad, Steven H

    2015-01-01

    Tropical lowland rain forest (TLRF) biodiversity is under threat from anthropogenic factors including deforestation which creates forest fragments of different sizes that can further undergo various internal patterns of logging. Such interventions can modify previous equilibrium abundance and spatial distribution patterns of offspring recruitment and/or pollen dispersal. Little is known about how these aspects of deforestation and fragmentation might synergistically affect TLRF tree recovery demographics and population genetics in newly formed forest fragments. To investigate these TLRF anthropogenic disturbance processes we used the computer program NEWGARDEN (NG), which models spatially-explicit, individual-based plant populations, to simulate 10% deforestation in six different spatial logging patterns for the plant functional type of a long-lived TLRF canopy tree species. Further, each logging pattern was analyzed under nine varying patterns of offspring versus pollen dispersal distances that could have arisen post-fragmentation. Results indicated that gene dispersal condition (especially via offspring) had a greater effect on population growth and genetic diversity retention (explaining 98.5% and 88.8% of the variance respectively) than spatial logging pattern (0.2% and 4.7% respectively), with 'Near' distance dispersal maximizing population growth and genetic diversity relative to distant dispersal. Within logged regions of the fragment, deforestation patterns closer to fragment borders more often exhibited lower population recovery rates and founding genetic diversity retention relative to more centrally located logging. These results suggest newly isolated fragments have populations that are more sensitive to the way in which their offspring and pollen dispersers are affected than the spatial pattern in which subsequent logging occurs, and that large variation in the recovery rates of different TLRF tree species attributable to altered gene dispersal

  10. Variable Gene Dispersal Conditions and Spatial Deforestation Patterns Can Interact to Affect Tropical Tree Conservation Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kashimshetty, Yamini; Pelikan, Stephan; Rogstad, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    Tropical lowland rain forest (TLRF) biodiversity is under threat from anthropogenic factors including deforestation which creates forest fragments of different sizes that can further undergo various internal patterns of logging. Such interventions can modify previous equilibrium abundance and spatial distribution patterns of offspring recruitment and/or pollen dispersal. Little is known about how these aspects of deforestation and fragmentation might synergistically affect TLRF tree recovery demographics and population genetics in newly formed forest fragments. To investigate these TLRF anthropogenic disturbance processes we used the computer program NEWGARDEN (NG), which models spatially-explicit, individual-based plant populations, to simulate 10% deforestation in six different spatial logging patterns for the plant functional type of a long-lived TLRF canopy tree species. Further, each logging pattern was analyzed under nine varying patterns of offspring versus pollen dispersal distances that could have arisen post-fragmentation. Results indicated that gene dispersal condition (especially via offspring) had a greater effect on population growth and genetic diversity retention (explaining 98.5% and 88.8% of the variance respectively) than spatial logging pattern (0.2% and 4.7% respectively), with ‘Near’ distance dispersal maximizing population growth and genetic diversity relative to distant dispersal. Within logged regions of the fragment, deforestation patterns closer to fragment borders more often exhibited lower population recovery rates and founding genetic diversity retention relative to more centrally located logging. These results suggest newly isolated fragments have populations that are more sensitive to the way in which their offspring and pollen dispersers are affected than the spatial pattern in which subsequent logging occurs, and that large variation in the recovery rates of different TLRF tree species attributable to altered gene dispersal

  11. Treatment outcomes for methamphetamine users: California Proposition 36 and comparison clients.

    PubMed

    Brecht, Mary-Lynn; Urada, Darren

    2011-09-01

    Methamphetamine (meth) is a major drug of abuse in California and several other states, particularly among criminal offender populations. Over the past decade, substance abuse treatment systems have had to adapt to and accommodate the increasing needs of meth users and, in California, deal with the impact of Proposition 36, which has resulted in a greater number of criminal offenders entering the treatment system. This study examines selected treatment performance and outcome indicators for California Proposition 36 offenders entering substance abuse treatment for meth use and compares their performance and outcomes to other subgroups of California treatment clients differentiated by whether or not they were admitted to treatment through Proposition 36 and whether or not their primary substance was meth. Significant improvements in all outcome domains were seen across the populations, and treatment performance and outcomes were not substantively inferior for the offender or meth-using groups.

  12. Preoperative physical therapy treatment did not influence postoperative pain and disability outcomes in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Carolina; Coronado, Rogelio A; Simon, Corey B; Wright, Thomas W; Moser, Michael W; Farmer, Kevin W; George, Steven Z

    2016-01-01

    Background There is limited literature investigating preoperative physical therapy (pre-op PT) treatment on pain intensity and disability after musculoskeletal surgery. The purposes of the present cohort study were to describe patient characteristics for those who had and did not have pre-op PT treatment and determine whether pre-op PT influenced the length of postoperative physical therapy (post-op PT) treatment (number of sessions) and 3-month and 6-month postsurgical outcomes, such as pain intensity and disability. Patients and methods A total of 124 patients (mean age =43 years, 81 males) with shoulder pain were observed before and after shoulder arthroscopic surgery. Demographic data, medical history, and validated self-report questionnaires were collected preoperatively and at 3 months and 6 months after surgery. Analysis of variance models were performed to identify differences across measures for patients who had pre-op PT treatment and those who did not and to examine outcome differences at 3 months and 6 months. Alpha was set at the 0.05 level for statistical significance. Results Males had less participation in pre-op PT than females (P=0.01). In contrast, age, pain intensity, disability, and pain-associated psychological factors did not differ between pre-op PT treatment groups (P>0.05). Subacromial bursectomies were more commonly performed in patients having pre-op PT treatment (P<0.05). Pre-op PT treatment did not influence length of post-op PT treatment and did not affect 3-month and 6-month pain intensity and disability outcomes. Differences in distribution of pre-op PT for males and females and subacromial bursectomy did not influence 3-month or 6-month postsurgical outcomes. Conclusion Receiving pre-op PT treatment did not influence post-op PT treatment or pain and disability outcomes at 3 months and 6 months. This prospective cohort study provides no evidence of benefit for pre-op PT on post-op PT treatment or postsurgical outcomes. Females or

  13. Perceptions of Intragroup Rejection and Coping Strategies: Malleable Factors Affecting Hispanic Adolescents’ Emotional and Academic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Michael T.; Crano, William D.; Unger, Jennifer B.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding psychosocial factors that affect the academic achievement of Hispanic adolescents remains a nationwide priority in the United States. Extending previous studies of the stressful effects of perceived discrimination, this year-long longitudinal study examined the correlates of perceived ethnic in-group rejection, coping strategies and fatalistic beliefs, on depressive symptoms, grades, and college aspirations of 2,214 Hispanic adolescents (54 % female) in Southern California. Based on the transactional model of stress and coping and on self-perception theory, structural equation models revealed that high perceived intragroup rejection (10th grade) and low levels of active coping (11th grade) were associated with depressive symptoms in 11th grade. Also, depressive symptoms partially mediated the link between intragroup rejection and both academic outcomes. Avoidant coping strategies (e.g., watching TV) also predicted depressive symptoms and were positively related to fatalism. In addition, fatalism was negatively related to grades and aspiration to attend college. The findings suggest the need to help adolescents find adequate outlets for communication and to create awareness about the potential effects of intragroup rejection. PMID:24234042

  14. Selecting networks of nature reserves: methods do affect the long-term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Virolainen, K. M.; Virola, T.; Suhonen, J.; Kuitunen, M.; Lammi, A.; ki, P. Siikam

    1999-01-01

    Data on vascular plants of boreal lakes in Finland were used to compare the efficiency of reserve selection methods in representing four aspects of biodiversity over a 63 year period. These aspects included species richness, phylogenetic diversity, restricted range diversity and threatened species. Our results show that the efficiency of reserve selection methods depends on the selection criteria used and on the aspect of biodiversity under consideration. Heuristic methods and optimizing algorithms were nearly equally efficient in selecting lake networks over a small geographical range. In addition, a scoring procedure was observed to be efficient in maintaining different aspects of biodiversity over time. However, the random selection of lakes seems to be the most inefficient option for a reserve network. In general, reserve selection methods seem to favour lakes that maximize one aspect of diversity at the time of selection, but the network may not be the best option for maintaining the maximum diversity over time. The reserve selection methods do affect the long-term outcome but it is impossible to recommend one method over the others unequivocally.

  15. Efficient phagocytosis and laccase activity affect the outcome of HIV-associated cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Sabiiti, Wilber; Robertson, Emma; Beale, Mathew A.; Johnston, Simon A.; Brouwer, Annemarie E.; Loyse, Angela; Jarvis, Joseph N.; Gilbert, Andrew S.; Fisher, Matthew C.; Harrison, Thomas S.; May, Robin C.; Bicanic, Tihana

    2014-01-01

    Background. Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is a leading cause of HIV-associated mortality globally. High fungal burden in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at diagnosis and poor fungal clearance during treatment are recognized adverse prognostic markers; however, the underlying pathogenic factors that drive these clinical manifestations are incompletely understood. We profiled a large set of clinical isolates for established cryptococcal virulence traits to evaluate the contribution of C. neoformans phenotypic diversity to clinical presentation and outcome in human cryptococcosis. Methods. Sixty-five C. neoformans isolates from clinical trial patients with matched clinical data were assayed in vitro to determine murine macrophage uptake, intracellular proliferation rate (IPR), capsule induction, and laccase activity. Analysis of the correlation between prognostic clinical and host immune parameters and fungal phenotypes was performed using Spearman’s r, while the fungal-dependent impact on long-term survival was determined by Cox regression analysis. Results. High levels of fungal uptake by macrophages in vitro, but not the IPR, were associated with CSF fungal burden (r = 0.38, P = 0.002) and long-term patient survival (hazard ratio [HR] 2.6, 95% CI 1.2–5.5, P = 0.012). High-uptake strains were hypocapsular (r = –0.28, P = 0.05) and exhibited enhanced laccase activity (r = 0.36, P = 0.003). Fungal isolates with greater laccase activity exhibited heightened survival ex vivo in purified CSF (r = 0.49, P < 0.0001) and resistance to clearance following patient antifungal treatment (r = 0.39, P = 0.003). Conclusion. These findings underscore the contribution of cryptococcal-phagocyte interactions and laccase-dependent melanin pathways to human clinical presentation and outcome. Furthermore, characterization of fungal-specific pathways that drive clinical manifestation provide potential targets for the development of therapeutics and the management of CM. Funding. This work

  16. Cognitive predictors and moderators of winter depression treatment outcomes in cognitive-behavioral therapy vs. light therapy.

    PubMed

    Sitnikov, Lilya; Rohan, Kelly J; Evans, Maggie; Mahon, Jennifer N; Nillni, Yael I

    2013-12-01

    There is no empirical basis for determining which seasonal affective disorder (SAD) patients are best suited for what type of treatment. Using data from a parent clinical trial comparing light therapy (LT), cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), and their combination (CBT + LT) for SAD, we constructed hierarchical linear regression models to explore baseline cognitive vulnerability constructs (i.e., dysfunctional attitudes, negative automatic thoughts, response styles) as prognostic and prescriptive factors of acute and next winter depression outcomes. Cognitive constructs did not predict or moderate acute treatment outcomes. Baseline dysfunctional attitudes and negative automatic thoughts were prescriptive of next winter treatment outcomes. Participants with higher baseline levels of dysfunctional attitudes and negative automatic thoughts had less severe depression the next winter if treated with CBT than if treated with LT. In addition, participants randomized to solo LT who scored at or above the sample mean on these cognitive measures at baseline had more severe depressive symptoms the next winter relative to those who scored below the mean. Baseline dysfunctional attitudes and negative automatic thoughts did not predict treatment outcomes in participants assigned to solo CBT or CBT + LT. Therefore, SAD patients with extremely rigid cognitions did not fare as well in the subsequent winter if treated initially with solo LT. Such patients may be better suited for initial treatment with CBT, which directly targets cognitive vulnerability processes.

  17. Affect integration as a predictor of change: affect consciousness and treatment response in open-ended psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Solbakken, Ole André; Hansen, Roger Sandvik; Havik, Odd E; Monsen, Jon Trygve

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between baseline levels of affect integration and the magnitude of change during and after open-ended psychotherapy. Affect integration reflects the capacity for accessing and utilizing the adaptive properties of affects for personal adjustment, along with the more general capability of tolerating and regulating affective activation. It is thus a capacity with relevance for the postulated mechanisms of change in various treatment modalities. Overall, the results indicated that patients with more severe problems in affect integration had larger improvements in symptoms, interpersonal and personality problems in open-ended treatment than those with less severe problems. This was also the case when examining the predictive effects of the integration of specific affects on changes in interpersonal relatedness. It was indicated that increasing problems with the integration of discrete affects were associated with distinct patterns of change in different interpersonal problem domains.

  18. Parent Inclusion in Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention: The Influence of Parental Stress, Parent Treatment Fidelity and Parent-Mediated Generalization of Behavior Targets on Child Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Kristin; Vicari, Stefano; Valeri, Giovanni; D'Elia, Lidia; Arima, Serena; Fava, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Although early intensive behavior interventions have been efficient in producing positive behavior outcome in young children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, there is a considerable variety in the children's progress. Research has suggested that parental and treatment factors are likely to affect children's response to treatment. The purpose of the…

  19. Effects of Enhanced Psychological Test Feedback on Treatment Outcome: Therapeutic Implications of the Barnum Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halperin, Keith M.; Snyder, C.R.

    1979-01-01

    Ascertained whether diagnostic feedback had a positive influence on treatment outcome. Snake-fearful females took psychological tests and were randomly assigned to treatment conditions. The greatest therapeutic improvement resulted for the enhanced-personality-feedback-with-treatment group as compared to the treatment-only group. The…

  20. Does Hypothyroidism Affect Post-Operative Outcome of Patients Undergoing Carpal Tunnel Release?

    PubMed Central

    Roshanzamir, Sharareh; Mortazavi, Sahameddin; Dabbaghmanesh, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Risk factors associated with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome include repetitive use of hand and wrist, advanced age, obesity, pregnancy, diabetes mellitus and thyroid disease. Decompression of the median nerve is the last treatment of choice usually indicated when negative results to conservative treatments remain for three months. In this study, we aimed to find out whether hypothyroid patients would respond to CTS surgical decompression differently in comparison to healthy individuals. Methods This case control study was conducted on patients with CTS in need of surgical release who were refered to Shahid Faghihi hospital, International Branch of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran from January 2013 to January 2015. Twenty-five hypothyroid and 22 euthyroid patients were recruited. Hypothyroidism was diagnosed based on clinical symptoms and serum TSH level. All patients were followed for three weeks after surgery and a Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTQ) was completed for them pre and post operation. An electrophysiological study was performed during the same follow up period. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 16. Results The CTS grade reported by electrophysiological study, decreased significantly 3 weeks after operation in comparison with preoperative grades (p<0.001). A significant decrease was observed in the immediate postoperative BCTQ scores compared to preoperative (p<0.001). Also a decrease was detected in the three weeks of postoperative follow up compared to immediate postoperative BCTQ scores (p<0.001) and preoperative BCTQ scores (p<0.001). Postoperative BCTQ scores of euthyroid patients decreased more in comparison to hypothyroid patients (p<0.001). Conclusion It seems that, hypothyroidism has an effect on postoperative outcome of carpal tunnel release. PMID:27790353

  1. Do Menopausal Status and Use of Hormone Therapy Affect Antidepressant Treatment Response? Findings from the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) Study

    PubMed Central

    Toups, Marisa; Rush, A. John; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Thase, Michael E.; Luther, James; Warden, Diane; Fava, Maurizio; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Menopausal status and use of hormonal contraception or menopausal hormone therapy (HT) may affect treatment response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). This report evaluates whether menopausal status and use of hormonal contraceptives or menopausal HT affect outcome in women treated with citalopram. Methods In the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study, 896 premenopausal and 544 postmenopausal women were treated with citalopram for 12–14 weeks. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics were used in adjusted analysis of the effect of menopausal status and use of hormonal contraceptives or menopausal HT on outcomes. Remission was defined as final Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression-17 (HRSD17) ≤7 or Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Report (QIDS-SR16) score ≤5 and response as ≥50% decrease from the baseline QIDS-SR16 score. Results Premenopausal and postmenopausal women differed in multiple clinical and demographic baseline variables but did not differ in response or remission rates. Premenopausal women taking hormonal contraceptives had significantly greater unadjusted remission rates on the HRSD17 and the QIDS-SR16 than women not taking contraception. Response and remission rates were not different between postmenopausal women taking vs. not taking HT. Adjusted results showed no significant difference in any outcome measure across menopause status in women who were not taking contraception/HT. There were no significant differences in adjusted results across HT status in premenopausal or postmenopausal women. Conclusions In this study, citalopram treatment outcome was not affected by menopausal status. Hormonal contraceptives and HT also did not affect probability of good outcome. PMID:23398127

  2. The impact of the therapeutic alliance on treatment outcome in patients with dissociative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Elisabeth; Brand, Bethany L.; Mattanah, Jonathan F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Research has shown that the therapeutic alliance plays an important role in enhancing treatment outcome among individuals with a variety of disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the therapeutic alliance and treatment outcome has not yet been studied in dissociative disorders (DD). Objectives The current study sought to investigate the impact of alliance on treatment outcome for DD patients. Methods Data from a naturalistic, longitudinal international treatment study of DD patients and their therapists were analyzed to determine if the alliance, as reported by patients and therapists, was associated with treatment outcome. Results Patients with higher self-rated alliance had fewer symptoms of dissociation, PTSD, and general distress, as well as higher levels of therapist-rated adaptive functioning. Over time, self-rated alliance scores predicted better outcomes, after controlling for patient adaptive capacities including symptom management at the time when the alliance ratings were made. Patient-rated alliance was more strongly associated with outcome than therapist-rated alliance. Conclusion Therapists who work with DD patients should understand the importance of the alliance on treatment outcome. These findings are consistent with previous literature demonstrating the importance of developing and maintaining a strong therapeutic alliance, although the effect sizes of individuals with DD were stronger than what has been found in many other patient groups. A greater understanding of the impact of the alliance in traumatized individuals may contribute to better outcomes for these individuals. PMID:24616755

  3. Cushing's syndrome presenting as treatment-resistant bipolar affective disorder: A step in understanding endocrine etiology of mood disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ummar, I. Syed; Rajaraman, Venkateswaran; Loganathan, N.

    2015-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) is the multisystem disorder which is due to cortisol excess. It is very difficult to diagnose in early stages, especially when psychiatric manifestations are the predominant complaints. It could result in significant morbidity and mortality. We report a case of resistant bipolar affective disorder secondary to CS. Early diagnosis and treatment will lead to better functional outcome and prevention of neurocognitive side-effects of excessive cortisol. PMID:26124528

  4. Impact of comorbidity on treatment outcome in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bøje, Charlotte Rotbøl

    2014-01-01

    The significant association with tobacco and alcohol combined with advanced age at time of diagnosis predispose head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients to increased risk of comorbidities. The presence of comorbidity affects treatment, treatment selection and subsequent outcome. Multiple studies have demonstrated comorbidity to be a strong prognostic factor for survival, and therefore comorbidity can be a major confounder in clinical trials. This review provides a summary of the current literature on comorbidity in head and neck cancer, measurements of comorbidity, the impact of comorbidity on treatment, treatment selection, and survival. A systematic search was performed in six electronic databases. In all, 31 papers were selected for this review. A meta-analysis on the prognostic impact of comorbidity was performed including 10 studies. Furthermore, 21 studies concerning comorbidity were reviewed. Several valid indices to classify comorbidity were described in the literature, none proven to be superior over the other. The prevalence of comorbidity increased with age and the presence of comorbidity influenced treatment and treatment selection. Furthermore, comorbidity was associated with lower socio economic status and increased the risk of early retirement after treatment. The meta-analysis on comorbidity as a prognostic factor, including 22,932 patients, showed that overall survival was significantly worsened among patients with comorbidity (HR=1.38 (1.32-1.43)). Increasing comorbidity-score was associated with increased risk of death. Comorbidity is important in HNSCC and significantly impacts on overall survival. Trials concerning HNSCC should always include information on comorbidity and randomized trials should stratify patients according to comorbidity in order to avoid bias in the study.

  5. Does Timing of Colon Procedures Affect Outcomes in D-IBS Trials?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianmin; Sherrill, Beth; Hamm, Lynne A.; Mangel, Allen W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy is usually performed prior to enrollment into clinical trials of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Two main reasons are to rule out alternative diagnoses and to ensure that colitis is not present. However, the possible impact of a recent versus remote colon procedure on symptoms in IBS trials has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of timing of colon procedures on symptoms in IBS trials. Methods Post hoc analyses were conducted using placebo patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS in a phase 2 trial. Pain, frequency, consistency, and urgency were analyzed using repeated measures models during the first 7 days of treatment and over the entire 12-week treatment period. Results Fifty-two placebo patients were grouped by whether they had a colon exam performed between screening and randomization (Group 1) or had a normal colon procedure during the 3 years prior to screening for this trial (Group 2). Average screening symptom scores were comparable between the two groups. Evaluation of various symptoms showed that there were no consistent significant differences between the two groups in pain, frequency, consistency, or urgency. Conclusions After the required 3-day post-procedure recovery period, there was no evidence that colonoscopy timing affected subsequent IBS symptoms. PMID:27956995

  6. Toll-like Receptor 1 Polymorphisms Affect Innate Immune Responses and Outcomes in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wurfel, Mark M.; Gordon, Anthony C.; Holden, Tarah D.; Radella, Frank; Strout, Jeanna; Kajikawa, Osamu; Ruzinski, John T.; Rona, Gail; Black, R. Anthony; Stratton, Seth; Jarvik, Gail P.; Hajjar, Adeline M.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Rieder, Mark; Sevransky, Jonathan; Maloney, James P.; Moss, Marc; Martin, Greg; Shanholtz, Carl; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Gao, Li; Brower, Roy; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Walley, Keith R.; Russell, James A.; Martin, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Polymorphisms affecting Toll-like receptor (TLR)–mediated responses could predispose to excessive inflammation during an infection and contribute to an increased risk for poor outcomes in patients with sepsis. Objectives: To identify hypermorphic polymorphisms causing elevated TLR-mediated innate immune cytokine and chemokine responses and to test whether these polymorphisms are associated with increased susceptibility to death, organ dysfunction, and infections in patients with sepsis. Methods: We screened single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 43 TLR-related genes to identify variants affecting TLR-mediated inflammatory responses in blood from healthy volunteers ex vivo. The SNP associated most strongly with hypermorphic responses was tested for associations with death, organ dysfunction, and type of infection in two studies: a nested case–control study in a cohort of intensive care unit patients with sepsis, and a case–control study using patients with sepsis, patients with sepsis-related acute lung injury, and healthy control subjects. Measurements and Main Results: The SNP demonstrating the most hypermorphic effect was the G allele of TLR1−7202A/G (rs5743551), which associated with elevated TLR1-mediated cytokine production (P < 2 × 10−20). TLR1−7202G marked a coding SNP that causes higher TLR1-induced NF-κB activation and higher cell surface TLR1 expression. In the cohort of patients with sepsis TLR1−7202G predicted worse organ dysfunction and death (odds ratio, 1.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–3.09). In the case-control study TLR1−7202G was associated with sepsis-related acute lung injury (odds ratio, 3.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.59–7.27). TLR1−7202G also associated with a higher prevalence of gram-positive cultures in both clinical studies. Conclusions: Hypermorphic genetic variation in TLR1 is associated with increased susceptibility to organ dysfunction, death, and gram-positive infection in sepsis. PMID

  7. The Frequency and Outcome of Acute Kidney Injury in a Tertiary Hospital: Which Factors Affect Mortality?

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Sukru; Arı, Derya; Ozkan, Gulsum; Cansız, Muammer; Kaynar, Kubra

    2015-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in hospitalized patients. Incidence and mortality rates vary from country to country, and according to different in-hospital monitoring units and definitions of AKI. The aim of this study was to determine factors affecting frequency of AKI and mortality in our hospital. We retrospectively evaluated data for 1550 patients diagnosed with AKI and 788 patients meeting the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guideline AKI criteria out of a total of 174 852 patients hospitalized in our institution between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012. Staging was performed based on KDIGO Clinical Practice for Acute Kidney Injury and RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function and End-stage renal failure). Demographic and biochemical data were recorded and correlations with mortality were assessed. The frequency of AKI in our hospital was 0.9%, with an in-hospital mortality rate of 34.6%. At multivariate analysis, diastolic blood pressure (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.87-0.92; P < 0.001), monitoring in the intensive care unit (OR 0.18, 95% CI 0.09-0.38; P < 0.001), urine output (OR 4.00, 95% CI 2.03-7.89; P < 0.001), duration of oliguria (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.34-1.69; P < 0.001), length of hospitalization (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.79-0.88; P < 0.001), dialysis requirement (OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.12-4.71; P < 0.05), APACHE II score (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.09-1.24; P < 0.001), and albumin level (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.21-0.50; P < 0.001) were identified as independent determinants affecting mortality. Frequency of AKI and associated mortality rates in our regional reference hospital were compatible with those in the literature. This study shows that KDIGO criteria are more sensitive in determining AKI. Mortality was not correlated with staging based on RIFLE or KDIGO. Nonetheless, our identification of urine output as one of the independent determinants of mortality suggests that this

  8. Fighting while Parasitized: Can Nematode Infections Affect the Outcome of Staged Combat in Beetles?

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, David; Willoughby, Anna; Davis, Andrew K.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of non-lethal parasites may be felt most strongly when hosts engage in intense, energy-demanding behaviors. One such behavior is fighting with conspecifics, which is common among territorial animals, including many beetle species. We examined the effects of parasites on the fighting ability of a saproxylic beetle, the horned passalus (Odontotaenius disjunctus, Family: Passalidae), which is host to a non-lethal nematode, Chondronema passali. We pitted pairs of randomly-chosen (but equally-weighted) beetles against each other in a small arena and determined the winner and aggression level of fights. Then we examined beetles for the presence, and severity of nematode infections. There was a non-significant tendency (p = 0.065) for the frequency of wins, losses and draws to differ between beetles with and without C. passali; non-parasitized individuals (n = 104) won 47% of their fights while those with the parasite (n = 88) won 34%, a 13% difference in wins. The number of nematodes in a beetle affected the outcome of fights between infected and uninfected individuals in an unexpected fashion: fighting ability was lowest in beetles with the lowest (p = 0.033), not highest (p = 0.266), nematode burdens. Within-fight aggression was highest when both beetles were uninfected and lowest when both were infected (p = 0.034). Collectively, these results suggest the nematode parasite, C. passali, is associated with a modest reduction in fighting ability in horned passalus beetles, consistent with the idea that parasitized beetles have lower energy available for fighting. This study adds to a small but growing body of evidence showing how parasites negatively influence fighting behavior in animals. PMID:25830367

  9. The effect of playing a science center-based mobile game: Affective outcomes and gender differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood-Blaine, Dana

    Situated in a hands-on science center, The Great STEM Caper was a collaborative mobile game built on the ARIS platform that was designed to engage 5th-9th grade players in NGSS science and engineering practices while they interacted with various exhibits. Same gender partners sharing one iPad would search for QR codes placed at specific exhibits; scanning a code within the game would launch a challenge for that exhibit. The primary hypothesis was that in- game victories would be equivalent to "mastery experiences" as described by Bandura (1997) and would result in increased science self-efficacy. Gender differences in gameplay behaviors and perceptions were also studied. The study included two groups, one that played the game during their visit and one that explored the science center in the traditional way. The Motivation to Learn Science Questionnaire was administered to participants in both groups both before and after their visit to the science center. Participants wore head-mounted GoPro cameras to record their interactions within the physical and social environment. No differences in affective outcomes were found between the game and comparison groups or between boys and girls in the game group. The MLSQ was unable to measure any significant change in science self-efficacy, interest and enjoyment of science, or overall motivation to learn science in either group. However, girls outperformed boys on every measure of game achievement. Lazzaro's (2004) four types of fun were found to be a good fit for describing the gender differences in game perceptions and behaviors. Girls tended to enjoy hard fun and collaborative people fun while boys enjoyed easy fun and competitive people fun. While boys associated game achievement with enjoyment and victory, girls perceived their game achievement as difficult, rather than enjoyable or victorious.

  10. Treatment Approach, Autism Severity and Intervention Outcomes in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zachor, Ditza A.; Itzchak, Esther Ben

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined the relation between autism severity at baseline, type of intervention employed and outcomes in young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Seventy-eight children with ASD, aged 15-35 months (M=25.4, SD=4.2), received either applied behavioral analysis (ABA) or integration of several intervention approaches…

  11. Does adherence to treatment mediate the relationship between patients' treatment outcome expectancies and the outcomes of pain intensity and recovery from acute low back pain?

    PubMed

    Haanstra, Tsjitske M; Kamper, Steven J; Williams, Christopher M; Spriensma, Alette S; Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; Maher, Christopher G; de Vet, Henrica C W; Ostelo, Raymond W J G

    2015-08-01

    It is believed that patients' expectancies about the effectiveness of treatment influence their treatment outcomes, but the working mechanism is rarely studied in patients with low back pain. Theoretical models suggest that adherence to treatment may be an important pathway. The aim of this study was to assess the mediating role of adherence to treatment in the relationship between expectancies and the outcomes of recovery and pain intensity in patients with acute low back pain. This study used data from a randomized placebo-controlled trial of paracetamol for acute low back pain. Expectancies were measured with the Credibility Expectancy Questionnaire. Adherence was measured with a medication diary. Pain intensity was recorded daily in a diary on a 0 to 10 pain scale, and recovery was defined as the first of 7 consecutive days scoring 0 or 1 on a 6-point pain scale. Cox regression (dependent variable: recovery) and linear mixed-model analyses (dependent variable: daily pain intensity scores) were performed. The "difference in coefficients" approach was used to establish mediation. A total of 1573 participants were included in current analyses. There was a small but highly significant relationship between expectancies and outcomes; 3.3% of the relationship between expectancies and recovery and 14.2% of the relationship between expectancies and pain intensity were mediated by adherence to treatment. This study does not convincingly support the theory that adherence is a key pathway in the relationship between treatment outcome expectancies and recovery and pain intensity in this acute low back pain population.

  12. Treatment outcome of new smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Penang, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background According to the World Health Organization’s recent report, in Malaysia, tuberculosis (TB) treatment success rate for new smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients is still below the global success target of 85%. In this study, we evaluated TB treatment outcome among new smear positive PTB patients, and identified the predictors of unsuccessful treatment outcome and longer duration of treatment (i.e., > 6 months). Methods The population in this study consisted of all new smear positive PTB patients who were diagnosed at the chest clinic of Penang General Hospital between March 2010 and February 2011. During the study period, a standardized data collection form was used to obtain socio-demographic, clinical and treatment related data of the patients from their medical charts and TB notification forms (Tuberculosis Information System; TBIS). These data sources were reviewed at the time of the diagnosis of the patients and then at the subsequent follow-up visits until their final treatment outcomes were available. The treatment outcomes of the patients were reported in line with six outcome categories recommended by World Health Organization. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to find the independent risk factors for unsuccessful treatment outcome and longer treatment duration. Data were analyzed using the PASW (Predictive Analysis SoftWare, version 19.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp). Results Among the 336 PTB patients (236 male and 100 female) notified during the study period, the treatment success rate was 67.26% (n = 226). Out of 110 patients in unsuccessful outcome category, 30 defaulted from the treatment, 59 died and 21 were transferred to other health care facilities. The mean duration of TB treatment was 8.19 (SD 1.65) months. In multiple logistic regression analysis, risk factors for unsuccessful treatment outcome were foreign nationality, male gender and being illiterate. Similarly, risk factors for mortality due to TB

  13. Retention and Outcome in a Narcotic Antagonist Treatment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capone, Thomas; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Patients in an outpatient narcotic antagonist treatment program were followed through their course of treatment. Those who remained longer were found to enter treatment with more stable employment records and less recent opiate use. They also appeared more successful at termination, with better vocational stability, less extraneous drug use, and…

  14. Do benefits in kind or refunds affect health service utilization and health outcomes? A natural experiment from Japan.

    PubMed

    Takaku, Reo; Bessho, Shun-Ichiro

    2017-03-12

    Although the payment systems of public health insurance vary greatly across countries, we still have limited knowledge of their effects. To quantify the changes from a benefits in kind system to a refund system, we exploit the largest physician strike in Japan since the Second World War. During the strike in 1971 led by the Japan Medical Association (JMA), JMA physicians resigned as health insurance doctors, but continued to provide medical care and even health insurance treatment in some areas. This study uses the regional differences in resignation rates as a natural experiment to examine the effect of the payment method of health insurance on medical service utilization and health outcomes. In the main analysis, aggregated monthly prefectural data are used (N=46). Our estimation results indicate that if the participation rate of the strike had increased by 1% point and proxy claims were refused completely, the number of cases of insurance benefits and the total amount of insurance benefits would have decreased by 0.78% and 0.58%, respectively compared with the same month in the previous year. Moreover, the average amount of insurance benefits per claim increased since patients with relatively less serious diseases might have sought health care less often. Finally, our results suggest that the mass of resignations did not affect death rates.

  15. Polymorphisms in folate pathway and pemetrexed treatment outcome in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Goricar, Katja; Kovac, Viljem; Dolzan, Vita

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A combination of pemetrexed and cisplatin has been shown to improve the outcome in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), however, there is a great heterogeneity in treatment response among patients. The aim of our study was to evaluate the influence of polymorphisms in folate pathway and transporter genes on pemetrexed treatment outcome in Slovenian patients with MPM. Methods MPM patients treated with pemetrexed in the course of a prospective randomized clinical trial were genotyped for nineteen polymorphisms in five genes of folate pathway and six transporter genes. Logistic regression was used to assess the influence of polymorphisms on treatment efficacy and toxicity, while Cox regression was used to determine their influence on progression-free and overall survival. Results Patients with at least one polymorphic MTHFD1 rs2236225 allele had a significantly lower response rate (p = 0.005; odds ratio [OR] = 0.12; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.03−0.54) and shorter progression-free survival (p = 0.032; hazard ratio [HR] = 3.10; 95% CI = 1.10−8.74) than non-carriers. Polymorphisms in transporter genes did not influence survival; however, several were associated with toxicity. Liver toxicity was significantly lower in carriers of polymorphic ABCC2 rs2273697 (p = 0.028; OR = 0.23; 95% CI = 0.06−0.85), SLCO1B1 rs4149056 (p = 0.028; OR = 0.23; 95% CI = 0.06−0.85) and rs11045879 (p = 0.014; OR = 0.18; 95% CI = 0.05−0.71) alleles compared to non-carriers, as well as in patients with SLCO1B1 GCAC haplotype (p = 0.048; OR = 0.17; 95% CI = 0.03−0.98). Gastrointestinal toxicity was much more common in patients with polymorphic ABCC2 rs717620 allele (p = 0.004; OR = 10.67; 95% CI = 2.15−52.85) and ABCC2 CAG haplotype (p = 0.006; OR = 5.67; 95% CI = 1.64−19.66). Conclusions MTHFD1 polymorphism affected treatment response and survival, while polymorphisms in ABCC2 and SLCO1B1 transporter genes influenced the risk for toxicity. These

  16. Linking Affective Commitment, Career Self-Efficacy, and Outcome Expectations: A Test of Social Cognitive Career Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Amanda M.; Dahling, Jason J.; Garcia, Pablo A.

    2013-01-01

    The authors tested a model based on the satisfaction model of social cognitive career theory (SCCT) that links college students' affective commitment to their major (the emotional identification that students feel toward their area of study) with career decision self-efficacy (CDSE) and career outcome expectations. Results indicate that CDSE…

  17. Cognitive and Socio-Affective Outcomes of Project-Based Learning: Perceptions of Greek Second Chance School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koutrouba, Konstantina; Karageorgou, Elissavet

    2013-01-01

    The present questionnaire-based study was conducted in 2010 in order to examine 677 Greek Second Chance School (SCS) students' perceptions about the cognitive and socio-affective outcomes of project-based learning. Data elaboration, statistical and factor analysis showed that the participants found that project-based learning offered a second…

  18. Methamphetamine treatment outcomes among gay men attending a LGBTI-specific treatment service in Sydney, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Kolstee, Johann; Lambert, Sarah; Ness, Ross; Hannan, Siobhan; Holt, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Gay and bisexual men (GBM) report higher rates of methamphetamine use compared to heterosexual men, and thus have a heightened risk of developing problems from their use. We examined treatment outcomes among GBM clients receiving outpatient counseling at a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI)-specific, harm reduction treatment service in Sydney, Australia. GBM receiving treatment for methamphetamine use from ACON’s Substance Support Service between 2012–15 (n = 101) were interviewed at treatment commencement, and after 4 sessions (n = 60; follow-up 1) and 8 sessions (n = 32; follow-up 2). At each interview, clients completed measures of methamphetamine use and dependence, other substance use, injecting risk practices, psychological distress and quality of life. The median age of participants was 41 years and 56.4% identified as HIV-positive. Participants attended a median of 5 sessions and attended treatment for a median of 112 days. There was a significant reduction in the median days of methamphetamine use in the previous 4 weeks between baseline (4 days), follow-up 1 (2 days) and follow-up 2 (2 days; p = .001). There was a significant reduction in the proportion of participants reporting methamphetamine dependence between baseline (92.1%), follow-up 1 (78.3%) and follow-up 2 (71.9%, p < .001). There were also significant reductions in psychological distress (p < .001), and significant improvements in quality of life (p < .001). Clients showed reductions in methamphetamine use and improved psychosocial functioning over time, demonstrating the potential effectiveness of a LGBTI-specific treatment service. PMID:28207902

  19. Methamphetamine treatment outcomes among gay men attending a LGBTI-specific treatment service in Sydney, Australia.

    PubMed

    Lea, Toby; Kolstee, Johann; Lambert, Sarah; Ness, Ross; Hannan, Siobhan; Holt, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Gay and bisexual men (GBM) report higher rates of methamphetamine use compared to heterosexual men, and thus have a heightened risk of developing problems from their use. We examined treatment outcomes among GBM clients receiving outpatient counseling at a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI)-specific, harm reduction treatment service in Sydney, Australia. GBM receiving treatment for methamphetamine use from ACON's Substance Support Service between 2012-15 (n = 101) were interviewed at treatment commencement, and after 4 sessions (n = 60; follow-up 1) and 8 sessions (n = 32; follow-up 2). At each interview, clients completed measures of methamphetamine use and dependence, other substance use, injecting risk practices, psychological distress and quality of life. The median age of participants was 41 years and 56.4% identified as HIV-positive. Participants attended a median of 5 sessions and attended treatment for a median of 112 days. There was a significant reduction in the median days of methamphetamine use in the previous 4 weeks between baseline (4 days), follow-up 1 (2 days) and follow-up 2 (2 days; p = .001). There was a significant reduction in the proportion of participants reporting methamphetamine dependence between baseline (92.1%), follow-up 1 (78.3%) and follow-up 2 (71.9%, p < .001). There were also significant reductions in psychological distress (p < .001), and significant improvements in quality of life (p < .001). Clients showed reductions in methamphetamine use and improved psychosocial functioning over time, demonstrating the potential effectiveness of a LGBTI-specific treatment service.

  20. Relationship between Nutritional Support and Tuberculosis Treatment Outcomes in West Bengal, India

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Blesson; Volkmann, Tyson; Cornelius, Sushma; Mukhopadhay, Sugata; MejoJose; Mitra, Kaushik; Kumar, Ajay M. V.; Oeltmann, John E.; Parija, Sidhajyoti; Prabhakaran, Aslesh Ottapura; Moonan, Patrick K.; Chadha, Vineet K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Poverty and poor nutrition are associated with the risk of developing tuberculosis (TB). Socioeconomic factors may interfere with anti-tuberculosis treatment compliance and its outcome. We examined whether providing nutritional support (monthly supply of rice and lentil beans) to TB patients who live below the poverty line was associated with TB treatment outcome. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of sputum smear-positive pulmonary TB patients living below the poverty line (income of <$1.25 per day) registered for anti-tuberculosis treatment in two rural districts of West Bengal, India during 2012 to 2013. We compared treatment outcomes among patients who received nutritional support with those who did not. A log-binomial regression model was used to assess the relation between nutritional support and unsuccessful treatment outcome (loss-to-follow-up, treatment failure and death). Results Of 173 TB patients provided nutritional support, 15 (9%) had unsuccessful treatment outcomes, while 84 (21%) of the 400 not provided nutrition support had unsuccessful treatment outcomes (p < 0.001). After adjusting for age, sex and previous treatment, those who received nutritional support had a 50% reduced risk of unsuccessful treatment outcome than those who did not receive nutritional support (Relative Risk: 0.51; 95% Confidence Intervals: 0.30 - 0.86). Conclusion Under programmatic conditions, monthly rations of rice and lentils were associated with lower risk of unsuccessful treatment outcome among impoverished TB patients. Given the relatively small financial commitment needed per patient ($10 per patient per month), the national TB programme should consider scaling up nutritional support among TB patients living below the poverty line. PMID:28042591

  1. How Group Experience Affects Outcomes from NOLS Programs: A Means-End Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldenberg, Marni; Soule, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Using means-end theory, this study evaluates how being part of a group influences outcomes of National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) participants. This study examines outcomes from NOLS courses during the summer of 2006 in the Wind River Mountain Range of Wyoming. Immediately following 2006 course completion, a convenience sample of 345…

  2. Attachment insecurity predicts eating disorder symptoms and treatment outcomes in a clinical sample of women.

    PubMed

    Illing, Vanessa; Tasca, Giorgio A; Balfour, Louise; Bissada, Hany

    2010-09-01

    We examined the extent to which attachment insecurity was related to eating disorder (ED) symptoms, and predictive of treatment outcomes. Women diagnosed with anorexia nervosa (AN) restricting subtype (ANR), AN binge purge subtype (ANB), or bulimia nervosa (BN) completed an attachment scale pretreatment, and ED symptom scales pretreatment (N = 243) and post-treatment (N = 157). A comparison sample of 126 non-ED women completed attachment scales on 1 occasion. Those with EDs had significantly higher attachment insecurity than non-ED. ANB was associated with higher attachment avoidance compared with ANR and BN, and higher attachment anxiety compared with BN. Higher attachment anxiety was significantly related to greater ED symptom severity and poorer treatment outcome across all EDs even after controlling for ED diagnosis. Attachment dimensions substantially contribute to our understanding of ED symptoms and treatment outcome. Addressing attachment insecurity when treating those with EDs may improve treatment outcomes.

  3. Epipolymorphisms associated with the clinical outcome of autoimmune arthritis affect CD4+ T cell activation pathways.

    PubMed

    Spreafico, Roberto; Rossetti, Maura; Whitaker, John W; Wang, Wei; Lovell, Daniel J; Albani, Salvatore

    2016-11-29

    Multifactorial diseases, including autoimmune juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), result from a complex interplay between genetics and environment. Epigenetic mechanisms are believed to integrate such gene-environment interactions, fine-tuning gene expression, and possibly contributing to immune system dysregulation. Although anti-TNF therapy has strongly increased JIA remission rates, it is not curative and up to 80% of patients flare upon treatment withdrawal. Thus, a crucial unmet medical and scientific need is to understand the immunological mechanisms associated with remission or flare to inform clinical decisions. Here, we explored the CD4(+) T-cell DNA methylome of 68 poly-articular and extended oligo-articular JIA patients, before and after anti-TNF therapy withdrawal, to identify features associated with maintenance of inactive disease. Individual CpG sites were clustered in coherent modules without a priori knowledge of their function through network analysis. The methylation level of several CpG modules, specifically those enriched in CpG sites belonging to genes that mediate T-cell activation, uniquely correlated with clinical activity. Differences in DNA methylation were already detectable at the time of therapy discontinuation, suggesting epigenetic predisposition. RNA profiling also detected differences in T-cell activation markers (including HLA-DR) but, overall, its sensitivity was lower than epigenetic profiling. Changes to the T-cell activation signature at the protein level were detectable by flow cytometry, confirming the biological relevance of the observed alterations in methylation. Our work proposes epigenetic discrimination between clinical activity states, and reveals T-cell-related biological functions tied to, and possibly predicting or causing, clinical outcome.

  4. Epipolymorphisms associated with the clinical outcome of autoimmune arthritis affect CD4+ T cell activation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Spreafico, Roberto; Rossetti, Maura; Whitaker, John W.; Wang, Wei; Lovell, Daniel J.; Albani, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Multifactorial diseases, including autoimmune juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), result from a complex interplay between genetics and environment. Epigenetic mechanisms are believed to integrate such gene–environment interactions, fine-tuning gene expression, and possibly contributing to immune system dysregulation. Although anti-TNF therapy has strongly increased JIA remission rates, it is not curative and up to 80% of patients flare upon treatment withdrawal. Thus, a crucial unmet medical and scientific need is to understand the immunological mechanisms associated with remission or flare to inform clinical decisions. Here, we explored the CD4+ T-cell DNA methylome of 68 poly-articular and extended oligo-articular JIA patients, before and after anti-TNF therapy withdrawal, to identify features associated with maintenance of inactive disease. Individual CpG sites were clustered in coherent modules without a priori knowledge of their function through network analysis. The methylation level of several CpG modules, specifically those enriched in CpG sites belonging to genes that mediate T-cell activation, uniquely correlated with clinical activity. Differences in DNA methylation were already detectable at the time of therapy discontinuation, suggesting epigenetic predisposition. RNA profiling also detected differences in T-cell activation markers (including HLA-DR) but, overall, its sensitivity was lower than epigenetic profiling. Changes to the T-cell activation signature at the protein level were detectable by flow cytometry, confirming the biological relevance of the observed alterations in methylation. Our work proposes epigenetic discrimination between clinical activity states, and reveals T-cell–related biological functions tied to, and possibly predicting or causing, clinical outcome. PMID:27849614

  5. Relationship between symptom impairment and treatment outcome in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a physician perspective.

    PubMed

    Setyawan, Juliana; Fridman, Moshe; Hodgkins, Paul; Quintero, Javier; Erder, M Haim; Katić, Božena J; Harpin, Valerie

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated the association between those symptoms/behaviours of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) that were present at diagnosis and outcomes of treatment in children and adolescents in six European countries. Physicians abstracted clinical records from patients (6-17 years) diagnosed with ADHD between 2004 and 2007 and treated for ≥2 years. Physicians scored the severity of impairment for core ADHD symptoms and additional (non-core) ADHD symptoms/behaviours at diagnosis and estimated treatment adherence (defined as an estimated >80 % adherence on weekdays and >50 % adherence on weekends). Treatment modalities included pharmacological treatment, behavioural therapy, or both. Pharmacological treatment was further subclassified by medication class. The outcome, optimal treatment success (OTS), was defined as complete symptom control with high satisfaction with treatment. Multivariate logistic regression modelling examined the relationship between OTS and symptom impairment. Of 730 patients, 200 (27 %) achieved OTS. These patients were more likely to demonstrate lower impairment in non-core ADHD symptoms/behaviours and have fewer pre-existing comorbidities. They were also more likely to be adherent and engaged with treatment, with an explicit treatment goal to improve inattention/school performance. Neither core symptoms' severity nor treatment types were associated with OTS. OTS rates were low, with patients having less impairment of non-core ADHD symptoms/behaviours and fewer comorbidities more likely to achieve OTS. Potentially modifiable factors affecting OTS were as follows: treatment adherence, treatment engagement, and a treatment goal to improve inattention/school performance. These data suggest that there may be opportunities to optimize current treatment use, and develop new treatment strategies to improve core and non-core ADHD symptoms/behaviours.

  6. Experiential acceptance, motivation for recovery, and treatment outcome in eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    Espel, Hallie M.; Goldstein, Stephanie P.; Manasse, Stephanie M.; Juarascio, Adrienne S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study sought to test whether the relationship between experiential acceptance (EA) and treatment outcome among eating disorder (ED) patients was mediated by motivation. Methods Upon admission to a residential ED treatment facility, female patients completed measures of EA, motivation, and baseline ED symptom severity (covariate); symptom severity was reassessed at discharge. Results Higher levels of baseline EA predicted significantly greater symptom reduction during treatment. Moreover, results from bootstrapped mediation analyses indicated that the relationship between EA and treatment outcome was partially mediated by motivation: increased EA was associated with greater motivation to give up ED behaviors at the beginning of treatment, and this led to greater symptom reduction from admission to discharge. Conclusions Motivation appears to be one mechanism by which EA facilitates improved treatment outcomes in EDs. Further development of interventions that promote EA as a means for improving motivation and subsequent ED treatment response may be warranted. PMID:26511501

  7. The MAPI as a Treatment Outcome Measure for Adolescent Inpatients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piersma, Harry L.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Administered Millon Adolescent Personality Inventory at admission and discharge to 215 hospitalized adolescent psychiatric patients. Found significant mean score differences for both internalizing (affective disorder) and externalizing (disruptive behavior disorder) adolescents. Internalizing adolescents reported significantly greater distress at…

  8. Enhancing the patient involvement in outcomes: a study protocol of personalised outcome measurement in the treatment of substance misuse

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Involving patients in treatment is becoming increasingly popular in mental health [Sales & Alves: Personalized evaluation of psychological treatments: A review of tools and research designs, submitted]. However, in substance misuse treatment settings, the patient perspective about treatment tends to be overlooked. This has been cited as a key priority by Orford et al. [Addiction, 103: 875-885, 2008] who included patient feedback about treatment as one of ten areas requiring an urgent paradigm shift in addiction research and practice. This project will apply an innovative method to involve substance misuse patients in psychological therapies, by asking them to suggest topics to evaluate their treatment. These topics suggested by patients can be written as a list of personalised items, so-called as patient-generated outcome measures (PGOM). Despite its patient-friendly features, PGOM’s have never been used in this population, which is what this project aims to overcome. Methods/design This project is part of an International Exchange Platform on Personalising Addiction Treatment. Data will be collected in two phases (pre-post study and focus groups with patients) to explore the following: 1). How reliable and sensitive to change are PGOM’s and standardised measures in substance misuse treatment? 2). Do PGOM’s add relevant information to standardised measures? 3). What are the views of substance misuse patients about personalised outcome assessment? 4). Development of guidelines on using PGOM’s in this population Discussion This research will potentially demonstrate the diversity of personal problems among patients seeking substance misuse treatment, suggesting the relevance of PGOM as a method to personalise outcome measurement and, ultimately, guiding treatment provision. It is expected that, as in previous studies, PGOM’s will be perceived as helpful and patient-friendly tools, where patients may express their own concerns in a semi

  9. The Outcome of Multiple Slit on Plaque with Plication Technique for the Treatment of Peyronie's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Su Hwan; Jeong, Hyeong Guk; Park, Jong Jin; Chae, Ji Yun; Kim, Jong Wook; Oh, Mi Mi; Park, Hong Seok; Kim, Je Jong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the postoperative outcome of the multiple slit on plaque plication technique for the treatment of Peyronie's disease. Materials and Methods We retrospectively evaluated 22 patients who underwent plaque incision with penile plication for the surgical treatment of Peyronie's disease, who had failed medical treatment between 2009 and 2014. Patients were grouped by preoperative degree of penile curvature into Group I: mild (n=5, 22.7%), Group II: moderate (n=11, 50.0%), and Group III: severe (n=6, 27.3%). After a thorough review of the medical records, we evaluated (a) the correction of the curvature; (b) sexual function; and (c) any penile shortening or other complications. Results The mean postoperative follow-up period was 39 months. Complete correction of the curvature was attained in 21 patients (95.5%). As an inevitable complication, minimal penile shortening (<1.5 cm) was reported by 14 patients (82.4%) but did not adversely affect sexual intercourse (0%), and all patients found the extent of penile shortening to be acceptable. Nineteen patients had good erectile function (International Index of Erectile Function >21). The most frequent complication was subcutaneous penile edema in three patients (13.6%), which was resolved within about 3 months following surgery. Conclusions As a modified technique, multiple slit on plaque with plication is a simple, minimally-invasive and effective technique for correcting penile curvature regardless of curvature severity. The degree of penile curvature does not significantly predict the amount of penile length loss. PMID:27169125

  10. Surgical and Antimicrobial Treatment of Prosthetic Vascular Graft Infections at Different Surgical Sites: A Retrospective Study of Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Elzi, Luigia; Gurke, Lorenz; Battegay, Manuel; Widmer, Andreas F.; Weisser, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Objective Little is known about optimal management of prosthetic vascular graft infections, which are a rare but serious complication associated with graft implants. The goal of this study was to compare and characterize these infections with respect to the location of the graft and to identify factors associated with outcome. Methods This was a retrospective study over more than a decade at a tertiary care university hospital that has an established multidisciplinary approach to treating graft infections. Cases of possible prosthetic vascular graft infection were identified from the hospital's infectious diseases database and evaluated against strict diagnostic criteria. Patients were divided into groups according to the locations of their grafts: thoracic-aortic, abdominal-aortic, or peripheral-arterial. Statistical analyses included evaluation of patient and infection characteristics, time to treatment failure, and factors associated specifically with cure rates in aortic graft infections. The primary endpoint was cure at one year after diagnosis of the infection. Results Characterization of graft infections according to the graft location did show that these infections differ in terms of their characteristics and that the prognosis for treatment seems to be influenced by the location of the infection. Cure rate and all-cause mortality at one year were 87.5% and 12.5% in 24 patients with thoracic-aortic graft infections, 37.0% and 55.6% in 27 patients with abdominal-aortic graft infections, and 70.0% and 30.0% in 10 patients with peripheral-arterial graft infections. In uni- and multivariate analysis, the type of surgical intervention used in managing infections (graft retention versus graft replacement) did not affect primary outcome, whereas a rifampicin-based antimicrobial regimen was associated with a higher cure rate. Conclusions We recommend that future prospective studies differentiate prosthetic vascular graft infections according to the location of the

  11. Pregnancy outcomes and the effect of metformin treatment in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ghazeeri, Ghina S; Nassar, Anwar H; Younes, Zeina; Awwad, Johnny T

    2012-06-01

    This article is a review of the literature assessing pregnancy outcomes and the effect of metformin treatment among women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). A review of research published in English was undertaken using PubMed and MEDLINE databases. The weight of the available evidence suggests that pregnant women with PCOS are at an increased risk of developing gestational diabetes, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, preterm birth and early pregnancy loss. Obesity is a contributory factor for the increased risk of gestational diabetes in this group of women and is estimated to affect 5-40% of pregnant women with PCOS. The prevalence of other obstetric complications is estimated at 10-30% for gestational hypertension, 8-15% for pre-eclampsia and 6-15% for preterm birth. The association between PCOS and early pregnancy loss may not be direct, wherein the presence of PCOS-associated hyperinsulinemia, leading to hyperandrogenemia, has been implicated in the pathophysiology of early pregnancy loss. Apart from the role of metformin in improving the metabolic consequences accompanying PCOS, it has been shown to improve pregnancy rates in women with PCOS who are resistant to clomiphene citrate. In conclusion, pregnancy in women with PCOS is associated with adverse obstetric outcomes (multiple adverse obstetric risk). Whether metformin should be administered throughout pregnancy still remains controversial. Further prospective studies that foster a larger number of participants and adjust for all potentially confounding factors are needed.

  12. Pediatric Feeding Disorders: A Quantitative Synthesis of Treatment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, William G.; Jaquess, David L.; Morton, Jane F.; Herzinger, Caitlin V.

    2010-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature regarding treatment of pediatric feeding disorders was conducted. Articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals (1970-2010) evaluating treatment of severe food refusal or selectivity were identified. Studies demonstrating strict experimental control were selected and analyzed. Forty-eight single-case research…

  13. Effect of Organizational Climate on Youth Outcomes in Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Neil; Leon, Scott C.; Epstein, Richard A.; Durkin, Elizabeth; Helgerson, Jena; Lakin-Starr, Brittany L.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the association between organizational climate and changes in internalizing and externalizing behavior for youth in residential treatment centers (RTCs). The sample included 407 youth and 349 front-line residential treatment staff from 17 RTCs in Illinois. Youth behavior was measured using the Child Functional Assessment Rating…

  14. Outcome Evaluation of a High-Intensity Inpatient Sex Offender Treatment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olver, Mark E.; Wong, Stephen C. P.; Nicholaichuk, Terry P.

    2009-01-01

    The treatment outcome of a high-intensity inpatient sex offender treatment program was evaluated by comparing the sexual recidivism rates of 472 treated and 282 untreated sex offenders. The program is designed for moderate- to high-risk sex offenders and follows the principles of effective correctional treatment. The current investigation is an…

  15. Predictors and Moderators of Outcome in Family-Based Treatment for Adolescent Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grange, Daniel; Crosby, Ross D.; Lock, James

    2008-01-01

    The predictors and moderators of treatment outcome for adolescents with bulimia nervosa (BN) are explored among those who participated in family based treatment or individual supportive psychotherapy. It is concluded that family-based treatment of BN may be most effective in those cases with low levels of eating disorder psychopathology.

  16. National Analysis of Differences among Substance Abuse Treatment Outcomes: College Student and Nonstudent Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahker, Ethan; Acion, Laura; Arndt, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To discover differences between student and nonstudent substance abuse treatment demographics, treatment characteristics, and outcomes. Participants: Conducted February 2014, clients without prior treatment admissions, aged 18-24, not in methadone maintenance therapy, and in nonintensive and ambulatory intensive outpatient treatment…

  17. Predictors of Short-Term Treatment Outcomes among California's Proposition 36 Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Evans, Elizabeth; Teruya, Cheryl; Huang, David; Anglin, M. Douglas

    2007-01-01

    California's voter-initiated Proposition 36 offers non-violent drug offenders community-based treatment as an alternative to incarceration or probation without treatment. This article reports short-term treatment outcomes subsequent to this major shift in drug policy. Data are from 1104 individuals randomly selected from all Proposition 36…

  18. The Relation of Patients' Treatment Preferences to Outcome in a Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leykin, Yan; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Gallop, Robert; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Shelton, Richard C.; Hollon, Steven D.

    2007-01-01

    Randomization procedures are performed in order to maximize the internal validity of treatment outcome studies. Objections have been made that this practice undermines the external validity of these studies because it ignores patients' treatment preferences, thereby precluding the self-selection of treatment that can occur in the community. This…

  19. Five-Year Longitudinal Treatment Outcomes of the ISTAR Comprehensive Stuttering Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langevin, Marilyn; Kully, Deborah; Teshima, Shelli; Hagler, Paul; Narasimha Prasad, N. G.

    2010-01-01

    Replicated evidence of satisfactory 1- and 2-year post-treatment outcomes has been reported for the "Comprehensive Stuttering Program" (CSP). However, little is known about longer term outcomes of the CSP. Yearly follow-up measures were obtained from 18 participants for 5 consecutive years. At 5-year follow-up, participants were maintaining…

  20. Outdoor Behavioral Health Care: Client and Treatment Characteristics Effects on Young Adult Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Sean D.; Stroud, Daniel; Hoag, Matthew J.; Combs, Katie M.

    2016-01-01

    A lack of clarity exists regarding how different clients respond to outdoor behavioral health care (OBH). In this study, specific client and treatment characteristics were assessed for 186 young adults completing an OBH therapeutic wilderness program. Clinical outcomes were measured with the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2. Hierarchical linear modeling…

  1. Appropriate timing of uterine cavity length measurement positively affects assisted reproduction cycle outcome.

    PubMed

    Madani, Tahereh; Ashrafi, Mahnaz; Abadi, Akram Bahman; Kiani, Kiandokht

    2009-11-01

    An appropriate and easy embryo transfer has a direct impact on pregnancy rates. Proper evaluation of the uterocervical axis and uterine depth are necessary for suitable embryo transfer. The aim of this study was to assess the appropriate time for cervical axis evaluation and uterine measurement. A total of 124 patients undergoing IVF treatment were included in the study. They were divided equally into two groups. In group I (62 women), uterine cavity depth was measured and the uterocervical axis was determined on day 2 or 3 of the menstrual cycle, and in group II (62 women) at the time of oocyte retrieval. There was a statistically significant difference in clinical pregnancy rates between the two groups (P = 0.006). Thirty-four women became pregnant in group I (64.2%) versus 19 women in group II (35.8%). In conclusion, uterine cavity measurement is necessary for suitable embryo transfer. It seems that the time of measurement significantly affects clinical pregnancy rate in IVF cycles. The best time for uterine measurement is on day 2 or 3 of menstruation.

  2. Predictors of Treatment Outcomes among Depressed Women with Childhood Sexual Abuse Histories

    PubMed Central

    Cort, Natalie A.; Gamble, Stephanie A.; Smith, Phillip N.; Chaudron, Linda H.; Lu, Naiji; He, Hua; Talbot, Nancy L.

    2012-01-01

    Background A notable portion (21%) of female patients receiving treatment for depression in community mental health centers (CMHC) has childhood sexual abuse (CSA) histories. Treatment outcomes in this population are heterogeneous; identifying factors associated with differential outcomes could inform treatment development. This exploratory study begins to address the gap in what is known about predictors of treatment outcomes among depressed women with sexual abuse histories. Method Seventy women with major depressive disorder and CSA histories in a CMHC were randomly assigned to Interpersonal Psychotherapy (n = 37) or usual care (n = 33). Using generalized estimating equations, we examined four pre-treatment predictor domains (i.e., sociodemographic characteristics, clinical features, social and physical functioning, and trauma features) potentially related to depression treatment outcomes. Results Among sociodemographic characteristics, Black race/ethnicity, public assistance income, and unemployment were associated with less depressive symptom reduction over the course of treatment. Two clinical features, chronic depression and borderline personality disorder, were also related to less reduction in depressive symptoms across the treatment period. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the clinical relevance of attending to predictors of depressed women with CSA histories being treated in public sector mental health centers. Particular sociodemographic characteristics and clinical features among these women may be significant indicators of risk for relatively poorer treatment outcomes. PMID:22570264

  3. Foreign language affects the contribution of intentions and outcomes to moral judgment.

    PubMed

    Geipel, Janet; Hadjichristidis, Constantinos; Surian, Luca

    2016-09-01

    We examine whether the use of a foreign language, as opposed to the native language, influences the relative weight intentions versus outcomes carry in moral evaluations. In Study 1, participants were presented with actions that had positive outcomes but were motivated by dubious intentions, while in Study 2 with actions that had negative outcomes but were motivated by positive intentions. Participants received the materials either in their native or a foreign language. Foreign language prompted more positive moral evaluations in Study 1 and less positive evaluations in Study 2. These results show that foreign language reduces the relative weight placed on intentions versus outcomes. We discuss several theoretical accounts that are consistent with the results such as that foreign language attenuates emotions (triggered by intentions) or it depletes cognitive resources.

  4. Fibromyalgia syndrome: review of clinical presentation, pathogenesis, outcome measures, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mease, Philip

    2005-08-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) is a common chronic pain condition that affects at least 2% of the adult population in the USA and other regions in the world where FM is studied. Prevalence rates in some regions have not been ascertained and may be influenced by differences in cultural norms regarding the definition and attribution of chronic pain states. Chronic, widespread pain is the defining feature of FM, but patients may also exhibit a range of other symptoms, including sleep disturbance, fatigue, irritable bowel syndrome, headache, and mood disorders. Although the etiology of FM is not completely understood, the syndrome is thought to arise from influencing factors such as stress, medical illness, and a variety of pain conditions in some, but not all patients, in conjunction with a variety of neurotransmitter and neuroendocrine disturbances. These include reduced levels of biogenic amines, increased concentrations of excitatory neurotransmitters, including substance P, and dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. A unifying hypothesis is that FM results from sensitization of the central nervous system. Establishing diagnosis and evaluating effects of therapy in patients with FM may be difficult because of the multifaceted nature of the syndrome and overlap with other chronically painful conditions. Diagnostic criteria, originally developed for research purposes, have aided our understanding of this patient population in both research and clinical settings, but need further refinement as our knowledge about chronic widespread pain evolves. Outcome measures, borrowed from clinical research in pain, rheumatology, neurology, and psychiatry, are able to distinguish treatment response in specific symptom domains. Further work is necessary to validate these measures in FM. In addition, work is under way to develop composite response criteria, intended to address the multidimensional nature of this syndrome. A range of medical treatments, including

  5. Timing of antiretroviral therapy and TB treatment outcomes in patients with TB-HIV in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Shewade, H. D.; Kyaw, N. T. T.; Oo, M. M.; Aung, T. K.; Aung, S. T.; Oo, H. N.; Win, T.; Harries, A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: Integrated HIV Care programme, Mandalay, Myanmar. Objectives: To determine time to starting antiretroviral treatment (ART) in relation to anti-tuberculosis treatment (ATT) and its association with TB treatment outcomes in patients co-infected with tuberculosis (TB) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) enrolled from 2011 to 2014. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Results: Of 1708 TB-HIV patients, 1565 (92%) started ATT first and 143 (8%) started ART first. Treatment outcomes were missing for 226 patients and were thus not included. In those starting ATT first, the median time to starting ART was 8.6 weeks. ART was initiated after 8 weeks in 830 (53%) patients. Unsuccessful outcome was found in 7%, with anaemia being an independent predictor. In patients starting ART first, the median time to starting ATT was 21.6 weeks. ATT was initiated within 3 months in 56 (39%) patients. Unsuccessful outcome was found in 12%, and in 20% of those starting ATT within 3 months. Patients with CD4 count <100/mm3 had a four times higher risk of an unsuccessful outcome. Conclusions: Timing of ART in relation to ATT was not an independent risk factor for unsuccessful outcome. Extensive screening for TB with rapid and sensitive diagnostic tests in HIV-infected persons and close monitoring of anaemia and immunosuppression are recommended to further improve TB treatment outcomes among patients with TB-HIV. PMID:27358804

  6. Pediatric Proximal Phalanx Fractures: Outcomes and Complications after the Surgical Treatment of Displaced Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Jeffrey S.; London, Daniel A.; Stepan, Jeffrey G.; Goldfarb, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The outcomes literature on proximal phalanx fractures in children is sparse. The purpose of this study is to report the complications and outcomes of displaced proximal phalanx fractures after treatment with closed reduction and percutaneous pinning. Methods A retrospective chart review identified 105 patients treated with closed reduction and percutaneous pinning of displaced proximal phalanx fractures. Specific complications were recorded for all patients. Thirty-one of these patients returned more than 1 year after surgery for assessment including visual analog scales of pain level, functional ability, and aesthetics. Objective measurements included range of motion, grip and pinch strength, and finger deformity. Radiographs were taken to assess deformity. Results Five of the 105 patients (4.8%) had a complication including infection, pin site complication, or malunion. Thirty- six had stiffness and 31 ultimately underwent hand therapy to regain motion. Subcondylar fractures were associated with a greater likelihood of stiffness. In the 31 patients returning for assessment, the median visual analog scale score was 0 for pain (none), function (full), and aesthetics (perfect). Range of motion, grip, and pinch strength were equivalent to the contralateral side. Seven of the 31 patients (22.6%) had a measureable coronal plane deviation averaging 5° (range 3°-13°) on radiographs. Deviation was associated with subcondylar fractures and a worse aesthetic VAS. Deviation was not associated with worse outcomes overall. Conclusions Pediatric patients with a displaced proximal phalanx fracture treated with closed reduction and percutaneous pinning have an initial notable complication rate related to stiffness; subcondylar proximal phalanx fractures are more commonly affected. At greater than 1 year follow up, patients had full motion, no pain, and were happy with both function and appearance despite minor deformity in some. These complication data may help

  7. Expressed Emotion, Family Functioning, and Treatment Outcome for Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Rienecke, Renee D.; Accurso, Erin C.; Lock, James; Le Grange, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the relation between parental expressed emotion (EE) and treatment outcome among adolescents participating in a treatment study for adolescent anorexia nervosa, as well as its impact on family functioning. One hundred and twenty-one families were assigned to family-based treatment or adolescent-focused therapy. Paternal criticism predicted lesser improvement in eating disorder psychopathology at end of treatment. There was also a significant interaction between maternal hostility and treatment, indicating that adolescents whose mothers displayed hostility had greater increases in percent of expected body weight in adolescent-focused therapy than family-based treatment. In addition, maternal hostility predicted less improvement in general family functioning and family communication at the end of treatment. Findings suggest that maternal and paternal EE may differentially impact treatment outcome and should be directly attended to in clinical settings. Future research is needed to further explore ways in which parental EE can be effectively modified in treatment. PMID:26201083

  8. Predicting the In-Hospital Responsiveness to Treatment of Alcoholics. Social Factors as Predictors of Outcome. Brain Damage as a Factor in Treatment Outcome of Chronic Alcoholic Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascia, George V.; And Others

    The authors attempt to locate predictor variables associated with the outcome of alcoholic treatment programs. Muscia's study focuses on the predictive potential of: (1) response to a GSR conditioning procedure; (2) several personality variables; and (3) age and IQ measures. Nine variables, reflecting diverse perspectives, were selected as a basis…

  9. [Tuberculosis annual report 2008--series 10. Treatment outcome and TB deaths].

    PubMed

    2010-08-01

    Evaluation of the outcome of treatment by the cohort analysis method is an important aspect of TB control. In the Japanese tuberculosis (TB) surveillance system, the outcome of treatment is automatically classified by computer according to the order of pre-set algorithm, so the treatment outcome is evaluated very rigidly. Although treatment outcomes are classified roughly into the eight categories of "cured", "completed", "died", "failed", "defaulted", "transferred", "still on treatment" and "not evaluated", there are actually 15 categories in our surveillance system; each category of "completed", "defaulted", and "still on treatment" has two subcategories and "not evaluated" has five subcategories. In the case of new sputum smear positive pulmonary cases (n=9,421) newly notified in 2007, their treatment outcome was as follows; "success" which combined "cured" and "completed" was 45.5%, "died" was 18.4%, "failed" was 1.0%, "defaulted" was 5.0%, "transferred" was 3.2%, "still on treatment" was 12.0% and "not evaluated" was 14.9%. Among the 5.0% who were classified as "defaulted", 0.7% was due to treatment interruption for more than consecutive 60 days or 2 months, and 4.3% was due to premature treatment cessation of any causes. The category "not evaluated" includes those who died before beginning treatment, those whose initial treatment regimen is unknown, those whose treatment is other than standard treatment, those who stopped INH and/or RFP before treatment completion, and those whose information is insufficient for classifying treatment outcome. In addition to evaluation of treatment outcome by the cohort method, the proportion of deaths was observed among all forms of TB patients (n = 25,184) and new sputum smear positive pulmonary patients (n=9421) who were newly registered in 2007. 16.4% of all forms of TB cases and 22.5% of new sputum smear positive pulmonary cases died within one year after beginning of treatment. Among new sputum smear positive pulmonary

  10. Endophthalmitis following pars plana vitrectomy: a literature review of incidence, causative organisms, and treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Vivek Pravin; Pathengay, Avinash; Schwartz, Stephen G; Flynn, Harry W

    2014-01-01

    Endophthalmitis following pars plana vitrectomy is a very uncommon cause of endophthalmitis. Cases reported over the last decade show a decrease in incidence over time. To optimize visual outcome, early diagnosis and treatment are essential. In this review we report a summary of the incidence of endophthalmitis following vitrectomy, various risk factors for their occurrence, the microbiological profile and the visual outcomes post treatment. PMID:25382968

  11. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome: Improving outcome with lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Westerink, N L; Nuver, J; Lefrandt, J D; Vrieling, A H; Gietema, J A; Walenkamp, A M E

    2016-12-01

    Increasing numbers of long-term cancer survivors face important treatment related adverse effects. Cancer treatment induced metabolic syndrome (CTIMetS) is an especially prevalent and harmful condition. The aetiology of CTIMetS likely differs from metabolic syndrome in the general population, but effective treatment and prevention methods are probably similar. In this review, we summarize the potential mechanisms leading to the development of CTIMetS after various types of cancer treatment. Furthermore, we propose a safe and accessible method to treat or prevent CTIMetS through lifestyle change. In particular, we suggest that a lifestyle intervention and optimization of energy balance can prevent or mitigate the development of CTIMetS, which may contribute to optimal survivorship care.

  12. Can long-term thiamine treatment improve the clinical outcomes of myotonic dystrophy type 1?

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Antonio; Trevi, Erika; Pala, Maria Immacolata; Fancellu, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1, also known as Steinert's disease, is an autosomal dominant disorder with multisystemic clinical features affecting the skeletal and cardiac muscles, the eyes, and the endocrine system. Thiamine (vitamin B1) is a cofactor of fundamental enzymes involved in the energetic cell metabolism; recent studies described its role in oxidative stress, protein processing, peroxisomal function, and gene expression. Thiamine deficiency is critical mainly in the central and peripheral nervous system, as well as in the muscular cells. Our aim was to investigate the potential therapeutical effects of long-term treatment with thiamine in myotonic dystrophy type 1 in an observational open-label pilot study. We described two patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 treated with intramuscular thiamine 100 mg twice a week for 12 or 11 months. We evaluated the patients using the grading of muscle strength according to Medical Research Council (MRC), the Muscular Impairment Rating Scale (MIRS), and the Modified Barthel index. High-dose thiamine treatment was well tolerated and effective in improving the motor symptomatology, particularly the muscle strength evaluated with the MRC scale, and the patients’ activities of daily living using the Modified Barthel Index. At the end of treatment, the MRC score was 5 in the proximal muscles and 2–4 in the distal muscles (the MRC score before the treatment was 3–4 and 1–3, respectively). The MIRS grade improved by 25% compared to baseline for both patients. In patient #1, the Modified Barthel Index improved by 44%, and in patient #2 by 29%. These findings suggest that clinical outcomes are improved by long-term thiamine treatment. PMID:27857755

  13. Therapist Adherence/Competence and Treatment Outcome: A Meta-Analytic Review

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Christian A.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Barber, Jacques P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The authors conducted a meta-analytic review of adherence–outcome and competence– outcome findings, and examined plausible moderators of these relations. Method A computerized search of the PsycINFO database was conducted. In addition, the reference sections of all obtained studies were examined for any additional relevant articles or review chapters. The literature search identified 36 studies that met the inclusion criteria. Results R-type effect size estimates were derived from 32 adherence–outcome and 17 competence–outcome findings. Neither the mean weighted adherence– outcome (r = .02) nor competence–outcome (r = .07) effect size estimates were found to be significantly different from zero. Significant heterogeneity was observed across both the adherence–outcome and competence–outcome effect size estimates, suggesting that the individual studies were not all drawn from the same population. Moderator analyses revealed that larger competence–outcome effect size estimates were associated with studies that either targeted depression or did not control for the influence of the therapeutic alliance. Conclusions One explanation for these results is that, among the treatment modalities represented in this review, therapist adherence and competence play little role in determining symptom change. However, given the significant heterogeneity observed across findings, mean effect sizes must be interpreted with caution. Factors that may account for the nonsignificant adherence– outcome and competence–outcome findings reported within many of the studies reviewed are addressed. Finally, the implication of these results and directions for future process research are discussed. PMID:20350031

  14. Varicoceles in the pediatric population: Diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    de los Reyes, Thomas; Locke, Jennifer; Afshar, Kourosh

    2017-01-01

    Varicocele is commonly encountered in adolescents. There are still many controversies regarding pathophysiology, health effects, clinical significance, and optimum treatment of this condition. This article reviews the current evidence pertaining to children and adolescents with varicocele. This group present a unique and somehow challenging situation, since they are still going through pubertal changes that may confound the effects of the disease and its treatment on the developing testes. PMID:28265315

  15. Hospital treatment, mortality and healthcare costs in relation to socioeconomic status among people with bipolar affective disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Ling-Ling; Chen, Yu-Chun; Kuo, Kuei-Hong; Chang, Chin-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence regarding the relationships between the socioeconomic status and long-term outcomes of individuals with bipolar affective disorder (BPD) is lacking. Aims We aimed to estimate the effects of baseline socioeconomic status on longitudinal outcomes. Method A national cohort of adult participants with newly diagnosed BPD was identified in 2008. The effects of personal and household socioeconomic status were explored on outcomes of hospital treatment, mortality and healthcare costs, over a 3-year follow-up period (2008–2011). Results A total of 7987 participants were recruited. The relative risks of hospital treatment and mortality were found elevated for the ones from low-income households who also had higher healthcare costs. Low premium levels did not correlate with future healthcare costs. Conclusions Socioeconomic deprivation is associated with poorer outcome and higher healthcare costs in BPD patients. Special care should be given to those with lower socioeconomic status to improve outcomes with potential benefits of cost savings in the following years. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © 2016 The Royal College of Psychiatrists. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703748

  16. Factors associated with an unfavourable outcome after Salter innominate osteotomy in patients with unilateral developmental dysplasia of the hip: does occult dysplasia of the contralateral hip affect the outcome?

    PubMed

    Kaneko, H; Kitoh, H; Mishima, K; Matsushita, M; Kadono, I; Ishiguro, N; Hattori, T

    2014-10-01

    Salter innominate osteotomy is an effective reconstructive procedure for the treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), but some children have a poor outcome at skeletal maturity. In order to investigate factors associated with an unfavourable outcome, we assessed the development of the contralateral hip. We retrospectively reviewed 46 patients who underwent a unilateral Salter osteotomy at between five and seven years of age, with a mean follow-up of 10.3 years (7 to 20). The patients were divided into three groups according to the centre-edge angle (CEA) of the contralateral hip at skeletal maturity: normal (> 25°, 22 patients), borderline (20° to 25°, 17 patients) and dysplastic (< 20°, 7 patients). The CEA of the affected hip was measured pre-operatively, at eight to nine years of age, at 11 to 12 years of age and at skeletal maturity. The CEA of the affected hip was significantly smaller in the borderline and dysplastic groups at 11 and 12 years of age (p = 0.012) and at skeletal maturity (p = 0.017) than in the normal group. Severin group III was seen in two (11.8%) and four hips (57.1%) of the borderline and dysplastic groups, respectively (p < 0.001). Limited individual development of the acetabulum was associated with an unfavourable outcome following Salter osteotomy.

  17. The Bi-Directional Relationship between Parent-Child Conflict and Treatment Outcome in Treatment-Resistant Adolescent Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rengasamy, Manivel; Mansoor, Brandon M.; Hilton, Robert; Porta, Giovanna; He, Jiayan; Emslie, Graham J.; Mayes, Taryn; Clarke, Gregory N.; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Keller, Martin B.; Ryan, Neal D.; Birmaher, Boris; Shamseddeen, Wael; Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Brent, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the bidirectional relationship between parent-child discord and treatment outcome for adolescent treatment-resistant depression. Method: Depressed youth who had not responded to an adequate course of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) were randomized to either a switch to another SSRI or venlafaxine, with or…

  18. Clinical outcome of conservative treatment of injured inferior alveolar nerve during dental implant placement

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon-Tae; Pang, Kang-Mi; Jung, Hun-Jong; Kim, Soung-Min; Kim, Myung-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Infererior alveolar nerve (IAN) damage may be one of the distressing complications occurring during implant placement. Because of nature of closed injury, a large proportion is approached non-invasively. The purpose of this study was to analyze the outcomes of conservative management of the injured nerve during dental implant procedure. Materials and Methods Sixty-four patients of implant related IAN injury, who were managed by medication or observation from January 1997 to March 2007 at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Seoul National University Dental Hospital, were retrospectively investigated. The objective tests and subjective evaluations were performed to evaluate the degree of damage and duration of sensory disturbance recovery. Tests were performed on the day of the first visit and every two months afterward. Patient's initial symptoms, proximity of the implant to the IAN, time interval between implant surgery and the first visit to our clinic, and treatment after implant surgery were analyzed to determine whether these factors affected the final outcomes. Results Among the 64 patients, 23 had a chief complaint of sensory disturbance and others with dysesthesia. The mean time until first visit to our hospital after the injury was 10.9 months.One year after nerve injury, the sensation was improved in 9 patients, whereas not improved in 38 patients, even 4 patients experienced deterioration. Better prognosis was observed in the group of patients with early visits and with implants placed or managed not too close to the IAN. Conclusion Nearly 70% of patients with IAN injury during implant placement showed no improvement in sensation or dysesthesia with the conservative management. Earlier decision for active treatment needs to be considered because of possibility of deterioration of symptoms and unsatisfactory recovery. PMID:24471030

  19. Improving addictions treatment outcomes by empowering self and others.

    PubMed

    Wood, Thomas E; Englander-Golden, Paula; Golden, David E; Pillai, Vijayan K

    2010-10-01

    The present research tested the effectiveness of adding an interpersonal, interactive, experiential training programme to addictions treatment that enhances motivation, cognitive-behavioural coping skills, social support, and group cohesiveness. The research was conducted in a co-educational, long-term residential treatment facility for addictive disorders (alcohol and other substances, sexual addiction, eating disorders, compulsive shopping, and gambling) and concomitant psychiatric diagnoses. The added training is co-created by participants. They choose challenging situations important in their lives that are played out as 'movies' in which they play and experience all the parts. Motivation for change, skills to implement positive changes, self-efficacy, empathy, positive support, and group cohesiveness are rooted in their own experiences and the feedback they receive from others, as they behave in empowering and disempowering ways. The training resulted in significant increases in empowering communication, self-esteem and quality of group life in the treatment group and in the family. Many of these results have large effect sizes and are consistent with the findings from prior studies. The results obtained in this study suggest that Say It Straight training can be an effective addition to the treatment of addictions in residential treatment. Future research is needed to determine the long-term effects of this training on relapse.

  20. Motivation and Treatment Credibility Predicts Dropout, Treatment Adherence, and Clinical Outcomes in an Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Relaxation Program: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Erik; Hursti, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Background In previous research, variables such as age, education, treatment credibility, and therapeutic alliance have shown to affect patients’ treatment adherence and outcome in Internet-based psychotherapy. A more detailed understanding of how such variables are associated with different measures of adherence and clinical outcomes may help in designing more effective online therapy. Objective The aims of this study were to investigate demographical, psychological, and treatment-specific variables that could predict dropout, treatment adherence, and treatment outcomes in a study of online relaxation for mild to moderate stress symptoms. Methods Participant dropout and attrition as well as data from self-report instruments completed before, during, and after the online relaxation program were analyzed. Multiple linear and logistical regression analyses were conducted to predict early dropout, overall attrition, online treatment progress, number of registered relaxation exercises, posttreatment symptom levels, and reliable improvement. Results Dropout was significantly predicted by treatment credibility, whereas overall attrition was associated with reporting a focus on immediate consequences and experiencing a low level of intrinsic motivation for the treatment. Treatment progress was predicted by education level and treatment credibility, whereas number of registered relaxation exercises was associated with experiencing intrinsic motivation for the treatment. Posttreatment stress symptoms were positively predicted by feeling external pressure to participate in the treatment and negatively predicted by treatment credibility. Reporting reliable symptom improvement after treatment was predicted by treatment credibility and therapeutic bond. Conclusions This study confirmed that treatment credibility and a good working alliance are factors associated with successful Internet-based psychotherapy. Further, the study showed that measuring adherence in different ways

  1. Sex differences in outcomes of methadone maintenance treatment for opioid addiction: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Use of methadone for the treatment of opioid addiction is an effective harm-reduction approach, although variability in treatment outcomes among individuals has been reported. Men and women with opioid addiction have been known to differ in factors such as opioid use patterns and characteristics at treatment entry; however, little has been reported about differences in methadone treatment outcomes between men and women. Therefore, we present a protocol for a systematic review which aims to provide a summary of existing literature on sex differences in outcomes of methadone treatment for opioid addiction. Methods/Design Electronic search of PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases will be conducted using a priori defined search strategy. Two authors (MB and BBD) will independently screen potential articles for eligibility using pre-determined inclusion and exclusion criteria and extract key information using a data extraction form designed for this study. Discrepancies will be resolved using a third party (ZS). The primary outcome will be sex differences in response to treatment defined as abstinence from illicit opioid use. We will also assess sex differences in treatment outcomes including treatment retention, remission status post-treatment, polysubstance abuse, methadone dose, drug-related adverse events, health status, psychological status, mortality, criminal activity, high risk sexual behavior, social support/relations, and employment. A meta-analysis will be conducted if possible; risk of bias and overall quality of evidence will be assessed to determine confidence in the estimates. Discussion We anticipate that this review will highlight how men and women differ in methadone treatment outcomes and allow us to generate conclusions that can be applied to treatment in a clinical setting. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD42013006549 PMID:24887111

  2. Meta-Analysis of Treatment Outcomes Measured by the Y-OQ and Y-OQ-SR Comparing Wilderness and Non-Wilderness Treatment Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillis, Harold L.; Speelman, Elizabeth; Linville, Noelle; Bailey, Emily; Kalle, Ashley; Oglesbee, Nathan; Sandlin, James; Thompson, Lauren; Jensen, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background: Monitoring youth treatments requires outcome instruments sensitive to change. The Y-OQ and the Y-OQ-SR measure behavioral change during psychological treatment. Objective: The focus of this study was to compare treatment progress of youth in studies using the Youth Outcome Questionnaire (YOQ) or the Youth Outcome Questionnaire Self…

  3. Parameters affecting the formation of perfluoroalkyl acids during wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Guerra, P; Kim, M; Kinsman, L; Ng, T; Alaee, M; Smyth, S A

    2014-05-15

    This study examined the fate and behaviour of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in liquid and solid samples from five different wastewater treatment types: facultative and aerated lagoons, chemically assisted primary treatment, secondary aerobic biological treatment, and advanced biological nutrient removal treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest data set from a single study available in the literature to date for PFAAs monitoring study in wastewater treatment. Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was the predominant PFAA in wastewater with levels from 2.2 to 150ng/L (influent) and 1.9 to 140ng/L (effluent). Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) was the predominant compound in primary sludge, waste biological sludge, and treated biosolids with concentrations from 6.4 to 2900ng/g dry weight (dw), 9.7 to 8200ng/gdw, and 2.1 to 17,000ng/gdw, respectively. PFAAs were formed during wastewater treatment and it was dependant on both process temperature and treatment type; with higher rates of formation in biological wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) operating at longer hydraulic retention times and higher temperatures. PFAA removal by sorption was influenced by different sorption tendencies; median log values of the solid-liquid distribution coefficient estimated from wastewater biological sludge and final effluent were: PFOS (3.73)>PFDA (3.68)>PFNA (3.25)>PFOA (2.49)>PFHxA (1.93). Mass balances confirmed the formation of PFAAs, low PFAA removal by sorption, and high PFAA levels in effluents.

  4. Treatment Outcome for Street-Living, Homeless Youth

    PubMed Central

    Slesnick, Natasha; Prestopnik, Jillian L.; Meyers, Robert J.; Glassman, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Comprehensive intervention for homeless, street living youth that addresses substance use, social stability, physical and mental health issues has received very little attention. In this study, street living youth aged 14 to 22 were recruited from a drop-in center and randomly assigned the Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA) or treatment as usual (TAU) through a drop-in center. Findings showed that youth assigned to CRA, compared to TAU, reported significantly reduced substance use (37% v. 17% reduction), depression (40% v. 23%) and increased social stability (58% v. 13%). Youth in both conditions improved in many other behavioral domains including substance use, internalizing and externalizing problems, and emotion and task oriented coping. This study indicates that homeless youth can be engaged into treatment and respond favorably to intervention efforts. However, more treatment development research is needed to address the barriers associated with serving these youth. PMID:16989957

  5. Systematic review of apraxia treatments to improve occupational performance outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lindsten-McQueen, Kathryn; Weiner, Nikki Williamson; Wang, Hsin-Yen; Josman, Naomi; Connor, Lisa Tabor

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to assess effectiveness of apraxia treatments using a systematic review. In contrast to previous reviews, each study was rated as to its applicability to occupational therapy practice and its focus on occupational performance using the FAME rating system (defined by four categories: Feasibility, Appropriateness, Meaningfulness, Effectiveness). This systematic review included eight studies: four randomized controlled trials (level 1 evidence) and four pre-post designs (level 3 evidence). Three treatment approaches were reported: errorless learning with training of details; gesture training; and strategy training. FAME scores ranged from A to C. All studies reported significant treatment effects, but only one demonstrated an impact on observed occupational performance that transferred from clinic to home.

  6. Does goal setting in activity-focused interventions for children with cerebral palsy influence treatment outcome?

    PubMed

    Brogren Carlberg, Eva; Löwing, Kristina

    2013-11-01

    Today, treatment for children with cerebral palsy predominantly aims at improving the children's possibilities to perform everyday activities in their natural environment. The activities in focus for intervention are often expressed as specific goals, frequently defined in a collaborative goal-setting process between professionals and parents. The role of goal setting to improve the outcome of the intervention has not been shown in the literature so far. Thus, the aim of this systematic review was to explore if goal setting has an impact on treatment outcome assessed by standardized measures. CINAHL and MEDLINE were searched from January 2000 to October 2012, resulting in a final selection of 13 articles, six of which were randomized controlled trials. Methodological quality was assessed and study characteristics were analysed descriptively. Subject characteristics, type of intervention/s, frequency, and intensity of therapy varied largely. Outcome was assessed by standardized outcome measures as well as evaluated through aspects of goal attainment. Most studies showed robust within-group changes according to study-appropriate standardized measures, whereas the between-group comparisons exhibited less consistent differences in outcome. The review does not provide support for a positive effect of goal setting per se on treatment outcome. Studies that specifically measure the effect of goal setting on treatment outcome are needed.

  7. Impact of Obesity on Heart and Lung Transplantation: Does Pre-Transplant Obesity Affect Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Bozso, S J; Nagendran, Je; Gill, R S; Freed, D H; Nagendran, Ja

    2017-03-01

    Increasing prevalence of obesity has led to a rise in the number of prospective obese heart and lung transplant recipients. The optimal management strategy of obese patients with end-stage heart and lung failure remains controversial. This review article discusses and provides a summary of the literature surrounding the impact of obesity on outcomes in heart and lung transplantation. Studies on transplant obesity demonstrate controversy in terms of morbidity and mortality outcomes and obesity pre-transplantation. However, the impact of obesity on outcomes seems to be more consistently demonstrated in lung rather than heart transplantation. The ultimate goal in heart and lung transplantation in the obese patient is to identify those at highest risk of complication that may warrant therapies to mitigate risk by addressing comorbid conditions.

  8. Clinician-Reported Outcome Assessments of Treatment Benefit: Report of the ISPOR Clinical Outcome Assessment Emerging Good Practices Task Force

    PubMed Central

    Powers, John H.; Patrick, Donald L.; Walton, Marc K.; Marquis, Patrick; Cano, Stefan; Hobart, Jeremy; Isaac, Maria; Vamvakas, Spiros; Slagle, Ashley; Molsen, Elizabeth; Burke, Laurie B.

    2017-01-01

    A clinician-reported outcome (ClinRO) assessment is a type of clinical outcome assessment (COA). ClinRO assessments, like all COAs (patient-reported, observer-reported, or performance outcome assessments), are used to 1) measure patients’ health status and 2) define end points that can be interpreted as treatment benefits of medical interventions on how patients feel, function, or survive in clinical trials. Like other COAs, ClinRO assessments can be influenced by human choices, judgment, or motivation. A ClinRO assessment is conducted and reported by a trained health care professional and requires specialized professional training to evaluate the patient’s health status. This is the second of two reports by the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment—Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force. The first report provided an overview of COAs including definitions important for an understanding of COA measurement practices. This report focuses specifically on issues related to ClinRO assessments. In this report, we define three types of ClinRO assessments (readings, ratings, and clinician global assessments) and describe emerging good measurement practices in their development and evaluation. The good measurement practices include 1) defining the context of use; 2) identifying the concept of interest measured; 3) defining the intended treatment benefit on how patients feel, function, or survive reflected by the ClinRO assessment and evaluating the relationship between that intended treatment benefit and the concept of interest; 4) documenting content validity; 5) evaluating other measurement properties once content validity is established (including intra- and inter-rater reliability); 6) defining study objectives and end point(s) objectives, and defining study end points and placing study end points within the hierarchy of end points; 7) establishing interpretability in trial results; and 8) evaluating operational considerations for the implementation

  9. The outcomes of home treatment for borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Turhan, Sibel; Taylor, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method There is currently no trial or other scientific evidence informing the efficacy of any crisis intervention for people with borderline personality disorder (BPD). We aimed to assess the patterns of service use by patients with BPD taken on for crisis resolution and home treatment between 2010 and 2013. Patients with a diagnosis of BPD were identified and demographic and clinical data were collected. Results All patients were female, and a high proportion had recurrent presentations to crisis and home treatment services in Edinburgh. Many appeared to benefit from intensive home treatment, as measured by the Clinical Global Impression scale. A small number of patients (n = 5) were responsible for more than half of all referrals. Polypharmacy, or regular use of multiple medications, was common, with 62% of all patients receiving three or more regular medications. Clinical implications Crisis and home treatment services can be beneficial to most people with BPD in crisis. The high rate of polypharmacy seen in this study is of concern. PMID:28377808

  10. Hepatitis C virus infection and prisoners: Epidemiology, outcome and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zampino, Rosa; Coppola, Nicola; Sagnelli, Caterina; Di Caprio, Giovanni; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    The studies on hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in prison populations are few and mostly cross-sectional. We analyzed prevalently the articles appearing on PubMed in the last ten years. HCV infection is frequent in prisoners, prevalences ranging from 3.1% to 38% according to the HCV endemicity in the geographical location of the prison and in the countries of origin of the foreign prisoners and to the prevalence of intravenous drug use, which is the most important risk factor for HCV infection, followed by an older age of prisoners and previous prison terms. HCV replication in anti-HCV-positive cases varies from 45% to 90% in different studies, and the most common HCV genotypes are generally 1 and 3. The response to antiviral treatment is similar in prisoners to that of the general population. Unfortunately, treatment is administered less frequently to prisoners because of the difficulties in management and follow-up. The new directly acting antivirals offer a good therapy option for inmates because of their good efficacy, short duration of treatment and low incidence of side effects. The efforts of the prison authorities and medical staff should be focused on reducing the spread of HCV infection in prisons by extending the possibility of follow-up and treatment to more prisoners with chronic hepatitis C. PMID:26413221

  11. [The new pathogenetic treatment of cervical dystonia: rationale, methods, outcomes].

    PubMed

    Naryshkin, A G; Preobrazhenskaia, I G; Timofeev, I S; Filimonov, V N; Sheliakin, A M

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents data obtained from studies of the impact of the otolithic apparatus of the inner ear on the degree of symptoms of cervical dystonia. The findings make it possible to substantiate a pathogenetic treatment of this disease, which involves intratimpanal unilateral injection of the vestibulotoxic antibiotic streptomycin. The results achieved and the mechanisms of the therapeutical effect observed are discussed.

  12. Improving Treatment Outcome for Oppositional Defiant Disorder in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, Elizabeth P.

    2007-01-01

    Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) is relatively common among 3-8 year-old children and its presence puts children at risk for more serious and stable behavior problems. Behavioral Parent Training (BPT) as the most empirical support as a treatment for children with ODD as well as for children with clinically significant conduct problems. The…

  13. Substance Abuse Treatment Outcomes for Coerced and Noncoerced Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Anna C.; Gregoire, Thomas K.

    2007-01-01

    This study provides new evidence regarding the relation of coerced care to posttreatment substance use and addiction severity while controlling for two important factors: readiness to change and addiction severity at admission to treatment. The initial study sample consisted of 289 people who agreed to participate in a prospective study of…

  14. Relationship Between Smokers’ Modes of Entry Into Quitlines and Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Mignonne C.; Seltzer, Ryan G.N.; Cameron, Michael; Pugmire, Juliana; Michael, Stephen; Leischow, Scott J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess the relationship between the mode of entry into a quitline service and subsequent tobacco use treatment outcomes. Methods A retrospective study using logistic regression analysis of 11,040 Arizona Smokers’ Helpline (ASHLine) clients was conducted to determine whether self- or medical referrals were related to 7- and 30-day point prevalence tobacco treatment outcomes at 7 months postquit. Results Smokers referred to the ASHLine by a health care provider were more likely to quit smoking than were those who self-referred. Conclusions Mode of entry into a quitline service for smoking cessation is related to treatment outcomes. Reasons for this outcome are uncertain and require additional research. PMID:22251778

  15. Spirituality factors in the prediction of outcomes of PTSD treatment for U.S. military veterans.

    PubMed

    Currier, Joseph M; Holland, Jason M; Drescher, Kent D

    2015-02-01

    Spirituality is a multifaceted construct that might affect veterans' recovery from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in adaptive and maladaptive ways. Using a cross-lagged panel design, this study examined longitudinal associations between spirituality and PTSD symptom severity among 532 U.S. veterans in a residential treatment program for combat-related PTSD. Results indicated that spirituality factors at the start of treatment were uniquely predictive of PTSD symptom severity at discharge, when accounting for combat exposure and both synchronous and autoregressive associations between the study variables, βs = .10 to .16. Specifically, veterans who scored higher on adaptive dimensions of spirituality (daily spiritual experiences, forgiveness, spiritual practices, positive religious coping, and organizational religiousness) at intake fared significantly better in this program. In addition, possible spiritual struggles (operationalized as negative religious coping) at baseline were predictive of poorer PTSD outcomes, β = .11. In contrast to these results, PTSD symptomatology at baseline did not predict any of the spirituality variables at posttreatment. In keeping with a spiritually integrative approach to treating combat-related PTSD, these results suggest that understanding the possible spiritual context of veterans' trauma-related concerns might add prognostic value and equip clinicians to alleviate PTSD symptomatology among those veterans who possess spiritual resources or are somehow struggling in this domain.

  16. Spinal Recurrence From Intracranial Germinoma: Risk Factors and Treatment Outcome for Spinal Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko Yoshii, Yoshihiko; Shikama, Naoto; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Uno, Takashi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Itami, Jun; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Iraha, Shiro; Hyodo, Akio; Toita, Takafumi; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Tamaki, Wakana; Ito, Hisao; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the risk factors of spinal recurrence in patients with intracranial germinoma and clinical outcomes of patients who developed spinal recurrence. Methods and Materials: Between 1980 and 2007, 165 patients with no evidence of spinal metastases at diagnosis were treated with cranial radiotherapy without spinal irradiation. The median follow-up in all 165 patients was 61.2 months (range, 1.2-260.1 months). Results: After the initial treatment, 15 patients (9.1%) developed spinal recurrences. Multivariate analysis revealed that large intracranial disease ({>=}4 cm) and multifocal intracranial disease were independent risk factors for spinal recurrence. Radiation field, total radiation dose, and the use of chemotherapy did not affect the occurrence of spinal recurrences. Of the 15 patients who experienced spinal recurrence, the 3-year actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival (DFS) rates from the beginning of salvage treatments were 65% and 57%, respectively. In the analysis, presence of intracranial recurrence and salvage treatment modality (radiotherapy with chemotherapy vs. radiotherapy alone) had a statistically significant impact on DFS. The 3-year DFS rate in patients with no intracranial recurrence and treated with both spinal radiotherapy and chemotherapy was 100%, whereas only 17% in patients with intracranial recurrence or treated with radiotherapy alone (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Large intracranial disease and multifocal intracranial disease were risk factors for spinal recurrence in patients with intracranial germinoma with no evidence of spinal metastases at diagnosis. For patients who developed spinal recurrence alone, salvage treatment combined with spinal radiotherapy and chemotherapy was effective in controlling the recurrent disease.

  17. Method of induction could affect emotional outcomes: comment on markey, chin, vanepps, and loewenstein (2014 ).

    PubMed

    Bench, Shane W; Yaugher, Ashley C; Lench, Heather C

    2015-04-01

    Markey, Chin, Vanepps, and Loewenstein (2014) demonstrated six methods for the induction of boredom. However, a clear and testable definition of boredom should be established prior to experimental manipulation of the construct. Defining boredom from a functional emotion perspective is one approach that affords a definition separable from the outcomes associated with boredom and insight into which manipulations may effectively target the construct.

  18. Neighborhoods and Youth: How Neighborhood Demographics and Social Processes Affect Youth Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swisher, Ray

    2008-01-01

    Researchers over the past two decades have increasingly recognized the importance of neighborhood contexts for youth development. For example, living in a disadvantaged neighborhood has been associated with a wide range of negative outcomes throughout the early years of the life course. However, neighborhoods likely have very different effects,…

  19. Does Year Round Schooling Affect the Outcome and Growth of California's API Scores?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Amery D.; Stone, Jake E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examined whether year round schooling (YRS) in California had an effect upon the outcome and growth of schools' Academic Performance Index (API) scores. While many previous studies had examined the connection between YRS and academic achievement, most had lacked the statistical rigour required to provide reliable interpretations. As a…

  20. The Mediating Role of Affective Commitment in the Relation of the Feedback Environment to Work Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris-Watts, Christina; Levy, Paul E.

    2004-01-01

    The Feedback Environment, as opposed to the formal performance appraisal process, is comprised of the daily interactions between members of an organization (Steelman, Levy, & Snell, in press). Relations between the feedback environment and work outcome variables such as Organizational Citizenship Behavior (OCB) were examined through the mediating…

  1. Culture-Specific Variables That May Affect Employment Outcomes for Mexican-American Youth with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier-Kronick, Nancy

    This paper reviews variables specific to the Mexican-American culture that might influence work-related behavior and outcomes for youths with disabilities from this population. Areas covered include: parental/family network; cultural view of disability; religious influences; acculturation levels; language issues; education and employment…

  2. Can a future choice affect a past measurement’s outcome?

    SciTech Connect

    Aharonov, Yakir; Cohen, Eliahu; Elitzur, Avshalom C.

    2015-04-15

    An EPR experiment is studied where each particle within the entangled pair undergoes a few weak measurements (WMs) along some pre-set spin orientations, with the outcomes individually recorded. Then the particle undergoes one strong measurement along an orientation chosen at the last moment. Bell-inequality violation is expected between the two final measurements within each EPR pair. At the same time, statistical agreement is expected between these strong measurements and the earlier weak ones performed on that pair. A contradiction seemingly ensues: (i) Bell’s theorem forbids spin values to exist prior to the choice of the orientation measured; (ii) A weak measurement is not supposed to determine the outcome of a successive strong one; and indeed (iii) Almost no disentanglement is inflicted by the WMs; and yet (iv) The outcomes of weak measurements statistically agree with those of the strong ones, suggesting the existence of pre-determined values, in contradiction with (i). Although the conflict can be solved by mere mitigation of the above restrictions, the most reasonable resolution seems to be that of the Two-State-Vector Formalism (TSVF), namely, that the choice of the experimenter has been encrypted within the weak measurement’s outcomes, even before the experimenters themselves know what their choice will be.

  3. Does Surgical Management of the Hand in Children with Spastic Unilateral Cerebral Palsy Affect Functional Outcome?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Munster, Judith C.; Maathuis, Karel G. B.; Haga, Nienke; Verheij, Nienke P.; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this review was to examine the literature on the effects of surgery of the spastic hand in children with cerebral palsy on functional outcome and muscle coordination. We performed a search of the relevant literature in Medline, Embase, and Biological Abstracts from 1966 to June 2006. The search resulted in eight studies on the effect of…

  4. Effect of prior medical treatments on ischemic stroke severity and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Simona; Toni, Danilo; Bignamini, Angelo A.; Zaninelli, Augusto; Gensini, Gian Franco; Carolei, Antonio

    Summary Antiplatelets, antihypertensives, and statins might reduce the severity of the event or improve outcome in patients who, despite prior medical treatment, have a stroke. We evaluated, in patients who had an ischemic stroke, the effect, on stroke severity and outcome, of prior treatment with antiplatelets, antihypertensives, and statins, used either alone or in a three-drug combination. Stroke in Italy and Related Impact on Outcome (SIRIO) was a prospective, nationwide, multicenter, hospital-based, observational study that included patients aged ≥18 years with acute ischemic stroke. We studied 2,529 acute ischemic stroke patients from the SIRIO population: 887 were antiplatelet users, 1,497 antihypertensive users, 231 statin users, and 138 three-drug combination users prior to the index event. The adjusted logistic regression analysis showed an association between prior treatment with statins and good functional outcome at discharge, while prior treatment with antiplatelets, antihypertensives or the three-drug combination did not influence severity or outcome. The absolute probability of a good functional outcome was 46.3% (95% CI: 40.3%–53.2%) in statin users and 36.7% (95% CI: 34.7%–38.7%) in non-users of statins; the absolute risk difference was 9.6% (95% CI: 2.9%–16.4%; p=0.004). Prior treatment with antiplatelets, antihypertensives, or the three-drug combination did not influence stroke severity or outcome, while prior treatment with statins did not influence stroke severity but was associated with a better functional outcome. PMID:22152434

  5. Does Orthodontic Treatment Affect the Alveolar Bone Density?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian-Hong; Huang, Heng-Li; Liu, Chien-Feng; Wu, Jay; Li, Yu-Fen; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few studies involving human participants have been conducted to investigate the effect of orthodontic treatment on alveolar bone density around the teeth. Our previous study revealed that patients who received 6 months of active orthodontic treatment exhibited an ∼24% decrease in alveolar bone density around the teeth. However, after an extensive retention period following orthodontic treatment, whether the bone density around the teeth can recover to its original state from before the treatment remains unclear, thus warranting further investigation. The purpose of this study was to assess the bone density changes around the teeth before, during, and after orthodontic treatment. Dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to measure the changes in bone density around 6 teeth in the anterior maxilla (maxilla central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines) of 8 patients before and after orthodontic treatment. Each patient underwent 3 dental CBCT scans: before treatment (T0); at the end of 7 months of active orthodontic treatment (T1); after several months (20–22 months) of retention (T2). The Friedman test was applied to evaluate the changes in the alveolar bone density around the teeth according to the 3 dental CBCT scans. From T0 to T1, a significant reduction in bone density was observed around the teeth (23.36 ± 10.33%); by contrast, a significant increase was observed from T1 to T2 (31.81 ± 23.80%). From the perspective of the overall orthodontic treatment, comparing the T0 and T2 scans revealed that the bone density around the teeth was relatively constant (a reduction of only 0.75 ± 19.85%). The results of the statistical test also confirmed that the difference in bone density between T0 and T2 was nonsignificant. During orthodontic tooth movement, the alveolar bone density around the teeth was reduced. However, after a period of bone recovery, the reduced bone density recovered to its previous state from before the

  6. Does Orthodontic Treatment Affect the Alveolar Bone Density?

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Hong; Huang, Heng-Li; Liu, Chien-Feng; Wu, Jay; Li, Yu-Fen; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2016-03-01

    Few studies involving human participants have been conducted to investigate the effect of orthodontic treatment on alveolar bone density around the teeth. Our previous study revealed that patients who received 6 months of active orthodontic treatment exhibited an ∼24% decrease in alveolar bone density around the teeth. However, after an extensive retention period following orthodontic treatment, whether the bone density around the teeth can recover to its original state from before the treatment remains unclear, thus warranting further investigation.The purpose of this study was to assess the bone density changes around the teeth before, during, and after orthodontic treatment.Dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to measure the changes in bone density around 6 teeth in the anterior maxilla (maxilla central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines) of 8 patients before and after orthodontic treatment. Each patient underwent 3 dental CBCT scans: before treatment (T0); at the end of 7 months of active orthodontic treatment (T1); after several months (20-22 months) of retention (T2). The Friedman test was applied to evaluate the changes in the alveolar bone density around the teeth according to the 3 dental CBCT scans.From T0 to T1, a significant reduction in bone density was observed around the teeth (23.36 ± 10.33%); by contrast, a significant increase was observed from T1 to T2 (31.81 ± 23.80%). From the perspective of the overall orthodontic treatment, comparing the T0 and T2 scans revealed that the bone density around the teeth was relatively constant (a reduction of only 0.75 ± 19.85%). The results of the statistical test also confirmed that the difference in bone density between T0 and T2 was nonsignificant.During orthodontic tooth movement, the alveolar bone density around the teeth was reduced. However, after a period of bone recovery, the reduced bone density recovered to its previous state from before the orthodontic treatment

  7. Cognitive load imposed by ultrasound-facilitated teaching does not adversely affect gross anatomy learning outcomes.

    PubMed

    Jamniczky, Heather A; Cotton, Darrel; Paget, Michael; Ramji, Qahir; Lenz, Ryan; McLaughlin, Kevin; Coderre, Sylvain; Ma, Irene W Y

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasonography is increasingly used in medical education, but its impact on learning outcomes is unclear. Adding ultrasound may facilitate learning, but may also potentially overwhelm novice learners. Based upon the framework of cognitive load theory, this study seeks to evaluate the relationship between cognitive load associated with using ultrasound and learning outcomes. The use of ultrasound was hypothesized to facilitate learning in anatomy for 161 novice first-year medical students. Using linear regression analyses, the relationship between reported cognitive load on using ultrasound and learning outcomes as measured by anatomy laboratory examination scores four weeks after ultrasound-guided anatomy training was evaluated in consenting students. Second anatomy examination scores of students who were taught anatomy with ultrasound were compared with historical controls (those not taught with ultrasound). Ultrasound's perceived utility for learning was measured on a five-point scale. Cognitive load on using ultrasound was measured on a nine-point scale. Primary outcome was the laboratory examination score (60 questions). Learners found ultrasound useful for learning. Weighted factor score on "image interpretation" was negatively, but insignificantly, associated with examination scores [F (1,135) = 0.28, beta = -0.22; P = 0.61]. Weighted factor score on "basic knobology" was positively and insignificantly associated with scores; [F (1,138) = 0.27, beta = 0.42; P = 0.60]. Cohorts exposed to ultrasound had significantly higher scores than historical controls (82.4% ± SD 8.6% vs. 78.8% ± 8.5%, Cohen's d = 0.41, P < 0.001). Using ultrasound to teach anatomy does not negatively impact learning and may improve learning outcomes. Anat Sci Educ 10: 144-151. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  8. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Review: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aijaz; Wong, Robert J; Harrison, Stephen A

    2015-11-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of abnormal serum aminotransferase levels in both developed and developing countries. Patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a subset of NAFLD, are at risk for progressive liver disease and in need of effective treatment options. A practical approach may be pursued by identifying patients with NAFLD with the highest likelihood for histologic evidence of NASH. Despite decades of clinical trials, no single treatment can be recommended to all patients with NASH. Importantly, there is no evidence that pioglitazone or vitamin E improves fibrosis. Bariatric surgeries may improve hepatic histology in morbidly obese patients with NASH, although randomized clinical trials are lacking. Currently, NASH is the second leading etiology of liver disease among adults awaiting liver transplantation in the United States. The primary and secondary prevention of NAFLD may require aggressive strategies for managing obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome.

  9. PFAPA syndrome: a review on treatment and outcome.

    PubMed

    Vanoni, Federica; Theodoropoulou, Katerina; Hofer, Michaël

    2016-06-27

    The syndrome of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (PFAPA syndrome) is the most common cause of periodic fever in childhood. The current pharmacological treatment includes corticosteroids, which usually are efficacious in the management of fever episodes, colchicine, for the prophylaxis of febrile episodes, and other medication for which efficacy has not been proven so far. Tonsillectomy is an option for selected patients. Usually PFAPA syndrome resolves during adolescence, but there is increasing evidence that this condition may persist into adulthood.

  10. Novel mechanisms, treatments, and outcome measures in childhood sleep

    PubMed Central

    Colonna, Annalisa; Smith, Anna B.; Pal, Deb K.; Gringras, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disorders and sleep of insufficient duration and quality are on the increase due to changes in our lifestyle, particularly in children and adolescents. Sleep disruption is also more common in children with medical conditions, compounding their difficulties. Recent studies have focused on new mechanisms that explain how learning and cognitive performance depend on a good night’s sleep. Growing alongside this latest understanding is an innovative new field of non-drug interventions that improve sleep architecture, with resulting cognitive improvements. However, we need to rigorously evaluate such potentially popular and self-administered sleep interventions with equally state-of-the-art outcome measurement tools. Animated hand-held games, that incorporate embedded sleep-dependent learning tasks, promise to offer new robust methods of measuring changes in overnight learning. Portable computing technology has the potential to offer practical, inexpensive and reliable tools to indirectly assess the quality of sleep. They may be adopted in both clinical and educational settings, providing a unique way of monitoring the effect of sleep disruption on learning, leading also to a radical rethink of how we manage chronic diseases. PMID:26029140

  11. Outcomes following treatment of veterans for substance and tobacco addiction.

    PubMed

    Vest, Bridgette Helms; Kane, Catherine; DeMarce, Josephine; Barbero, Edie; Harmon, Rebecca; Hawley, Joanne; Lehmann, Lauren

    2014-10-01

    Persons who use tobacco in addition to alcohol and other drugs have increased health risks and mortality rates. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of participation in a tobacco cessation program on tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use in a population seeking treatment for substance use disorders (SUDs). Tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use were assessed by urine drug screens, breathalyzer readings, and self-report. Veterans (N=137) with a tobacco use disorder enrolled in inpatient program for the treatment of SUDs at the Salem Veterans Affairs Medical Center participated in tobacco cessation education as part of their treatment programming. Use of tobacco, drugs and/or alcohol was evaluated upon admission, 2 weeks following admission, at discharge and 1 month following graduation. The 1-month follow-up rate was 70.8%, with 97 veterans completing the follow-up assessment. Of those 97 veterans, 90.7% (n=88) reported abstinence from alcohol and 91.8% (n=89) reported abstinence from other drugs of abuse. Fourteen veterans (14.4%) reported abstinence from tobacco at the 1-month follow-up. The veterans reporting abstinence from tobacco use also reported abstinence from alcohol and other drugs at the 1-month follow-up.

  12. Motivation and Affective Outcomes of Physical Education: Implications for Heath Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reppa, Glykeria P.

    2007-01-01

    Enjoyment and mood affection are considered to be main targets of intervention to promote physical activity (PA). Health education based on PA is seeking to explore the factors that affect children to foster and retain healthy habits. This study recognizes that the teaching methodology is crucial and attempts to investigate the effect two…

  13. On Sparse representation for Optimal Individualized Treatment Selection with Penalized Outcome Weighted Learning

    PubMed Central

    Song, Rui; Kosorok, Michael; Zeng, Donglin; Zhao, Yingqi; Laber, Eric; Yuan, Ming

    2015-01-01

    As a new strategy for treatment which takes individual heterogeneity into consideration, personalized medicine is of growing interest. Discovering individualized treatment rules (ITRs) for patients who have heterogeneous responses to treatment is one of the important areas in developing personalized medicine. As more and more information per individual is being collected in clinical studies and not all of the information is relevant for treatment discovery, variable selection becomes increasingly important in discovering individualized treatment rules. In this article, we develop a variable selection method based on penalized outcome weighted learning through which an optimal treatment rule is considered as a classification problem where each subject is weighted proportional to his or her clinical outcome. We show that the resulting estimator of the treatment rule is consistent and establish variable selection consistency and the asymptotic distribution of the estimators. The performance of the proposed approach is demonstrated via simulation studies and an analysis of chronic depression data. PMID:25883393

  14. Intensity and Learning Outcomes in the Treatment of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Linstead, Erik; Dixon, Dennis R; French, Ryan; Granpeesheh, Doreen; Adams, Hilary; German, Rene; Powell, Alva; Stevens, Elizabeth; Tarbox, Jonathan; Kornack, Julie

    2017-03-01

    Ample research has shown that intensive applied behavior analysis (ABA) treatment produces robust outcomes for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD); however, little is known about the relationship between treatment intensity and treatment outcomes. The current study was designed to evaluate this relationship. Participants included 726 children, ages 1.5 to 12 years old, receiving community-based behavioral intervention services. Results indicated a strong relationship between treatment intensity and mastery of learning objectives, where higher treatment intensity predicted greater progress. Specifically, 35% of the variance in mastery of learning objectives was accounted for by treatment hours using standard linear regression, and 60% of variance was accounted for using artificial neural networks. These results add to the existing support for higher intensity treatment for children with ASD.

  15. Long-term outcome and prediction models of activities of daily living in Alzheimer disease with cholinesterase inhibitor treatment.

    PubMed

    Wattmo, Carina; Wallin, Åsa K; Londos, Elisabet; Minthon, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    In untreated patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) the functional ability is gradually lost. What happens to the patients after continuous long-term cholinesterase inhibitor (ChEI) treatment is less investigated. The objective of this study was to describe the longitudinal functional outcome and analyze factors affecting the outcome in ChEI-treated patients. In an open, 3-year, nonrandomized, prospective, multicenter study in a routine clinical setting, 790 patients were treated with either donepezil, rivastigmine, or galantamine. At baseline and every 6 months, they were assessed with several rating scales including Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL), Physical Self-Maintenance Scale (PSMS), and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). A faster functional decline was associated with lower cognitive ability at baseline, older age, and the interaction of higher education and longer time in the study. The patients residing with a spouse or relative showed slower deterioration in IADL score. A higher mean dose of ChEI, regardless of drug agent, was also related to slower instrumental ADL decline. Prediction models for longitudinal functional outcome were provided. AD severity at baseline is a key factor in obtaining reliable clinical prognoses of the long-term ADL ability. The dosage of ChEI treatment could possibly lead to a different functional outcome.

  16. PATIENT EXPECTATIONS DID NOT PREDICT OUTCOME OF DRUG AND BEHAVIORAL TREATMENT OF URGENCY URINARY INCONTINENCE

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, Mary P; DuBeau, Catherine E.; Kraus, Stephen R.; Johnson, Harry W.; Rahn, David D.; Mallett, Veronica; Stoddard, Anne M.; Zyczynski, Halina M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether expectations of treatment outcomes in women participating in a drug and behavioral treatment trial for urge urinary incontinence are related to patient factors, demographics, health-related locus of control and treatment outcomes. Methods Baseline assessments included expectations (improvement in bladder condition, time to improvement in bladder condition, and duration of improvement) and the multidimensional health locus of control (MHLC) scale. Outcomes were measured by patient global impression of improvement (PGI-I) at the end of active treatment (10 weeks) and 8 months after trial start. Results At baseline among 173 subjects, 114 (66%) believed their incontinence would get ‘very much better,’ 94 (55%) expected improvement by one month, and 111 (66%) expected improvement would last the rest of their lives.. There were no significant associations between baseline expectations or MHLC with PGI-I at 10 weeks or 8 months. Conclusions Expectations of treatment outcome and MHLC did not predict eventual patient-reported treatment outcome in this sample of women with urge-predominant urinary incontinence participating in a trial of drug and behavioral therapy. PMID:22453106

  17. Tuberculosis treatment outcomes among hospital workers at a public teaching and national referral hospital in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Makori, L.; Gikera, M.; Wafula, J.; Chakaya, J.; Edginton, M. E.; Kumar, A. M. V.

    2013-01-01

    Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH), Nairobi, Ken-ya, a large referral and teaching hospital. Objective: 1) To document tuberculosis (TB) case notification rates and trends; 2) to describe demographic, clinical and workplace characteristics and treatment outcomes; and 3) to examine associations between demographic and clinical characteristics, HIV/AIDS (human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome) treatment and anti-tuberculosis treatment outcomes among hospital workers with TB at KNH during the period 2006–2011. Design: A retrospective cohort study involving a review of medical records. Results: The TB case notification rate among hospital staff ranged between 413 and 901 per 100 000 staff members per year; 51% of all cases were extra-pulmonary TB; 74% of all cases were among medical, paramedical and support staff. The TB-HIV coinfection rate was 60%. Only 75% had a successful treatment outcome. Patients in the retreatment category, those with unknown HIV status and those who were support staff had a higher risk of poor treatment outcomes. Conclusion: The TB case rate among hospital workers was unacceptably high compared to that of the general population, and treatment outcomes were poor. Infection control in the hospital and management of staff with TB requires urgent attention. PMID:26393055

  18. Current management of fecal incontinence: Choosing amongst treatment options to optimize outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Van Koughnett, Julie Ann M; Wexner, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    The severity of fecal incontinence widely varies and can have dramatic devastating impacts on a person’s life. Fecal incontinence is common, though it is often under-reported by patients. In addition to standard treatment options, new treatments have been developed during the past decade to attempt to effectively treat fecal incontinence with minimal morbidity. Non-operative treatments include dietary modifications, medications, and biofeedback therapy. Currently used surgical treatments include repair (sphincteroplasty), stimulation (sacral nerve stimulation or posterior tibial nerve stimulation), replacement (artificial bowel sphincter or muscle transposition) and diversion (stoma formation). Newer augmentation treatments such as radiofrequency energy delivery and injectable materials, are minimally invasive tools that may be good options before proceeding to surgery in some patients with mild fecal incontinence. In general, more invasive surgical treatments are now reserved for moderate to severe fecal incontinence. Functional and quality of life related outcomes, as well as potential complications of the treatment must be considered and the treatment of fecal incontinence must be individualized to the patient. General indications, techniques, and outcomes profiles for the various treatments of fecal incontinence are discussed in detail. Choosing the most effective treatment for the individual patient is essential to achieve optimal outcomes in the treatment of fecal incontinence. PMID:24409050

  19. Association of diabetes and tuberculosis: impact on treatment and post-treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Corona, María Eugenia; Cruz-Hervert, Luis Pablo; García-García, Lourdes; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; Bobadilla-del-Valle, Miriam; Canizales-Quintero, Sergio; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Báez-Saldaña, Renata; Téllez-Vázquez, Norma; Montero-Campos, Rogelio; Mongua-Rodriguez, Norma; Martínez-Gamboa, Rosa Areli; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the clinical consequences of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods We conducted a prospective study of patients with TB in Southern Mexico. From 1995 to 2010, patients with acid-fast bacilli or Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum samples underwent epidemiological, clinical and microbiological evaluation. Annual follow-ups were performed to ascertain treatment outcome, recurrence, relapse and reinfection. Results The prevalence of DM among 1262 patients with pulmonary TB was 29.63% (n=374). Patients with DM and pulmonary TB had more severe clinical manifestations (cavities of any size on the chest x-ray, adjusted OR (aOR) 1.80, 95% CI 1.35 to 2.41), delayed sputum conversion (aOR 1.51, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.10), a higher probability of treatment failure (aOR 2.93, 95% CI 1.18 to 7.23), recurrence (adjusted HR (aHR) 1.76, 95% CI 1.11 to 2.79) and relapse (aHR 1.83, 95% CI 1.04 to 3.23). Most of the second episodes among patients with DM were caused by bacteria with the same genotype but, in 5/26 instances (19.23%), reinfection with a different strain occurred. Conclusions Given the growing epidemic of DM worldwide, it is necessary to add DM prevention and control strategies to TB control programmes and vice versa and to evaluate their effectiveness. The concurrence of both diseases potentially carries a risk of global spreading, with serious implications for TB control and the achievement of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. PMID:23250998

  20. An Outcomes Perspective of the Role of Residential Treatment in the System of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, John S.; Woltman, Heather; Martinovich, Zoran; Hancock, Brian

    2009-01-01

    A variety of factors are putting great pressure on residential treatment centers to justify their role in the child serving system through evidence of impact on the lives of children, youth, and families. The present study describes the role of residential treatment from an outcomes perspective in a midsized state over the course of a 5 year…

  1. Power to Detect Differences between Alternative Treatments in Comparative Psychotherapy Outcome Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazdin, Alan E.; Bass, Debra

    1989-01-01

    Drew 85 outcome studies from 9 journals from 1984 through 1986. Examined data in each article to provide estimates of effect sizes and to evaluate statistical power at posttreatment and follow-up. Findings indicated that power of studies to detect differences between treatment and no treatment was generally quite adequate given relatively large…

  2. Alliance in Two Telephone-Administered Treatments: Relationship with Depression and Health Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckner, Victoria; Vella, Lea; Howard, Isa; Mohr, David C.

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between therapeutic alliance and both depression and health outcomes in a randomized clinical trial of 2 telephone-administered treatments with 97 clients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The 16-week, manualized treatments compared were telephone-administered cognitive-behavioral therapy (T-CBT) and…

  3. Treatment process in the therapeutic community: associations with retention and outcomes among adolescent residential clients.

    PubMed

    Edelen, Maria Orlando; Tucker, Joan S; Wenzel, Suzanne L; Paddock, Susan M; Ebener, Patricia; Dahl, Jim; Mandell, Wallace

    2007-06-01

    This study examined associations of a new multidimensional measure of therapeutic community (TC) treatment process, the Dimensions of Change Instrument (DCI), with treatment retention (n = 397) and posttreatment outcomes (n = 207) among adolescent residential clients. Adolescents who increased during the first 30 days in treatment on three of the eight DCI factors (Positive Self-Attitude and Commitment to Abstinence; Problem Recognition; Social Network) were more likely to stay in treatment for 90 days or more. Although change in DCI factor scores was not directly predictive of posttreatment outcomes, staying in treatment for 90 days or more increased the likelihood of attending 12-step meetings and having a 12-step sponsor after leaving treatment. Several demographic and pretreatment characteristics also predicted retention, posttreatment outcomes, or both. Much remains to be learned about how the TC treatment process produces positive outcomes for adolescents; however, results from this study highlight components of the treatment process that may be particularly important for practitioners to consider and monitor in their clients.

  4. Baseline Depressive Symptoms Predict Poor Substance Use Outcome Following Adolescent Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subramaniam, Geetha A.; Stitzer, Maxine A.; Clemmey, Philip; Kolodner, Ken; Fishman, Marc J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To characterize baseline depressive symptoms among substance-abusing adolescents and determine their association with post residential treatment substance use outcomes. Method: In total, 153 adolescents (mean age 6.6 years, plus or minus 0.11) entering residential treatment were assessed at intake and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Beck…

  5. Using Motivational Interviewing to Enhance Treatment Outcome in People with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Helen Blair; Zuckoff, Allan

    2011-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a leading cause of health-related disability. There are two evidence-based treatments for OCD, pharmacotherapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy consisting of exposure and response prevention (EX/RP). Although effective, outcome from both treatments is often limited by patient lack of adherence to the…

  6. Longitudinal HIV Risk Behavior among the Drug Abuse Treatment Outcome Studies (DATOS) Adult Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Debra A.; Brecht, Mary-Lynn; Herbeck, Diane; Evans, Elizabeth; Huang, David; Hser, Yih-Ing

    2008-01-01

    Longitudinal trajectories for HIV risk were examined over 5 years following treatment among 1,393 patients who participated in the nationwide Drug Abuse Treatment Outcome Studies. Both injection drug use and sexual risk behavior declined over time, with most of the decline occurring between intake and the first-year follow-up. However, results of…

  7. Adolescents in Residential and Inpatient Treatment: A Review of the Outcome Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bettmann, Joanna E.; Jasperson, Rachael A.

    2009-01-01

    Operationalizing treatment efficacy has become essential in the field of psychotherapy. Managed health care now requires psychotherapy to produce measurable outcomes and define success concretely. This requirement has resulted in research attempting to identify empirically supported and evidence-based treatments. This article presents a review of…

  8. Clinical Utility of the Modified Stroop Task as a Treatment Outcome Measure: Questions Raised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Jillian R.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Touyz, Stephen W.; Griffiths, Rosalyn A.; Beumont, Pierre J. V.

    2004-01-01

    Data from an outpatient treatment trial for anorexia nervosa were examined to gain preliminary insights as to whether the modified Stroop colour-naming task might offer a useful measure of treatment outcome. It was hypothesised that interference for eating-, weight- and shape-related words on a modified version on the Stroop colour-naming task…

  9. Adolescent and Parent Alliance and Treatment Outcome in Multidimensional Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelef, Karni; Diamond, Gary M.; Diamond, Guy S.; Liddle, Howard A.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the relation between adolescent and parent therapeutic alliances and treatment outcome among 65 substance-abusing adolescents receiving multidimensional family therapy. Observer ratings of parent alliance predicted premature termination from treatment. Observer ratings, but not self-report, of adolescent…

  10. Orthodontic treatment outcomes obtained by application of a finishing protocol

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-Flórez, Alvaro; Barbosa-Lis, Diana María; Zapata-Noreña, Oscar Arturo; Marín-Velásquez, Julissa Andrea; Afanador-Bayona, Sergio Andrés

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the results of a finishing protocol implemented in patients treated in the Orthodontics graduate program at Universidad de Antioquia. Evaluation was carried out by means of the criteria set by the Objective Grading System (OGS) of the American Board of Orthodontics (ABO). Methods: Cast models and panoramic radiographs of 34 patients were evaluated. The intervention group (IG) consisted of 17 patients (19.88 ± 4.4 years old) treated under a finishing protocol. This protocol included training in finishing, application of a finishing guide, brackets repositioning and patient's follow-up. Results of the IG were compared to a control group of 17 patients (21.88 ± 7.0 years old) selected by stratified randomization without finishing intervention (CG). Results: The scores for both CG and IG were 38.00 ± 9.0 and 31.41 ± 9.6 (p = 0.048), respectively. The score improved significantly in the IG group, mainly regarding marginal ridges (CG: 5.59 ± 2.2; IG: 3.65 ± 1.8) (p = 0.009) and root angulation (CG: 7.59 ± 2.8; IG: 4.88 ± 2.6) (p = 0.007). Criteria that did not improve, but had the highest scores were: alignment (CG: 6.35 ± 2.7; IG: 6.82 ± 2.8) (p = 0.62) and buccolingual inclination (CG: 3.6 ± 5.88; IG: 5.29 ± 3.9) (p = 0.65). Conclusions: Standardization and implementation of a finishing protocol contributed to improve clinical performance in the Orthodontics graduate program, as expressed by occlusal outcomes. Greater emphasis should be given on the finishing phase to achieve lower scores in the ABO grading system. PMID:27275620

  11. Genetic factors affecting patient responses to pancreatic cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fotopoulos, George; Syrigos, Konstantinos; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the exocrine pancreas is a malignancy with a high lethal rate. Surgical resection is the only possible curative mode of treatment. Metastatic pancreatic cancer is incurable with modest results from the current treatment options. New genomic information could prove treatment efficacy. An independent review of PubMed and ScienceDirect databases was performed up to March 2016, using combinations of terms such pancreatic exocrine cancer, chemotherapy, genomic profile, pancreatic cancer pharmacogenomics, genomics, molecular pancreatic pathogenesis, and targeted therapy. Recent genetic studies have identified new markers and therapeutic targets. Our current knowledge of pancreatic cancer genetics must be further advanced to elucidate the molecular basis and pathogenesis of the disease, improve the accuracy of diagnosis, and guide tailor-made therapies. PMID:27708512

  12. Chemical dependency treatment and employment outcomes: results from the 'ADATSA' program in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Luchansky, B; Brown, M; Longhi, D; Stark, K; Krupski, A

    2000-08-01

    The Alcohol and Drug Addiction Treatment and Support Act (ADATSA) created a treatment program for indigent clients in Washington State. This research assesses the relationship between the level of treatment services received and subsequent employment outcomes. Clients who completed their plan of treatment earned more than those who did not, controlling for other factors. Those clients who received vocational services, in addition to completing treatment, earned more than those who completed treatment only. While on average wages were low, this study does show that clients once deemed 'unemployable' can become productive.

  13. Does Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Affect Post-Treatment Methamphetamine Use?

    PubMed Central

    Glasner-Edwards, Suzette; Mooney, Larissa J.; Ang, Alfonso; Hillhouse, Maureen; Rawson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Objective Although trauma is a well-established risk factor for substance use disorders, little is known about the association between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and treatment outcomes among methamphetamine users. In the present study, we examine the relationship between PTSD and post-treatment methamphetamine use outcomes, hospitalizations, and overall psychiatric impairment. Methods Using data from 526 adults in the largest psychosocial clinical trial of methamphetamine users conducted to date, this study examined: (1) treatment outcomes of methamphetamine users with concomitant PTSD three years after psychosocial treatment for methamphetamine dependence; and (2) PTSD symptom clusters as risk factors for post-treatment relapse to methamphetamine use. Results PTSD was associated with poorer methamphetamine use outcomes; methamphetamine use frequency throughout the 3-year follow-up was significantly greater among individuals with a PTSD diagnosis, and those with PTSD had more than five times the odds of reporting methamphetamine use in the 30 days prior to the follow-up interview, OR= 5.2, 95% CI [2.0–13.3]. Additionally, higher levels of other Axis I psychopathology were observed among methamphetamine users with PTSD. Avoidance and arousal symptoms predicted post-treatment methamphetamine use. Conclusions Addressing these high risk PTSD symptoms and syndromes in methamphetamine users may be helpful as a means of improving treatment outcomes in this population. PMID:24065875

  14. [Hereditary spherocytosis. Review. Part II. Symptomatology, outcome, complications, and treatment].

    PubMed

    Donato, Hugo; Crisp, Renée Leonor; Rapetti, María Cristina; García, Eliana; Attie, Myriam

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis must always be suspected in children with anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, splenomegaly or cholelithiasis, in the asymptomatic individual with an affected relative, and in the neonate with hyperbilirubinemia with no blood group incompatibility; its early detection is key to avoid kernicterus. Follow-up of these patients is based on periodical control and supply of information on the adequate management of hemolytic or aplastic crisis, and early detection of cholelithiasis. The decision to perform splenectomy is usually associated with quality of life rather than life-threatening risk, and it should result from a consensus between patient, parents and physicians. The postsplenectomy follow-up is based on control of compliance with the prophylactic antibiotic therapy and the early diagnosis of infectious disorders.

  15. Clinical presentation and treatment outcome of retinoblastoma in children of South Western China

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jingge; Zeng, Jihong; Guo, Bo; He, Weimin; Chen, Jun; Lu, Fang; Chen, Danian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To study the clinical presentation and treatment outcome among children in South Western China with retinoblastoma (RB) and to determine factors predictive of poor outcome. A retrospective review of children diagnosed with RB from 2006 to 2015 at West China Hospital was undertaken. Demographic and clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes were studied. A total of 253 patients (unilateral 80.2%, bilateral 19.8%) were studied. Twenty six patients (10.3%) were from minority ethnic groups of China. The median onset age was 21 months. Leukocoria was the most common presenting sign (71%). Tumors were intraocular in 91.3% cases, extraocular in 8.7% cases. Extraocular RB patients had a longer median lag period than intraocular patients (9 months vs 2 months, P < 0.0001). In the intraocular group, 89.5% were advanced group D or E diseases. Enucleation was the major treatment for intraocular RB. However, over 10 years, the enucleation rate decreased constantly while more patients received chemotherapy. The Kaplan–Meier survival probability was 87.8%, 81.4%, and 74.8% at 3 years, 5 years, and 10 years, respectively. On Cox regression analysis, extraocular RB (P = 0.0008) and treatment abandonment (P < 0.0001) were associated with poor outcome; bilateral RB (P = 0.0116) and advanced pathological grade pT4 (P = 0.0011) were associated with poor outcome of intraocular RB. Most RB patients from South Western China were diagnosed at advanced clinical stage. Delayed presentation is related to extraocular RB which is a risk factor for poor outcome. Chemotherapy increased the eye salvage but had no effects to overall survival. Education for parents and general physicians for the early signs of RB (such as leukocoria), therapeutic strategy and treatment outcomes of RB may promote early diagnosis, improve the compliance, and outcome. PMID:27759657

  16. Clinical presentation and treatment outcome of retinoblastoma in children of South Western China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jingge; Zeng, Jihong; Guo, Bo; He, Weimin; Chen, Jun; Lu, Fang; Chen, Danian

    2016-10-01

    To study the clinical presentation and treatment outcome among children in South Western China with retinoblastoma (RB) and to determine factors predictive of poor outcome.A retrospective review of children diagnosed with RB from 2006 to 2015 at West China Hospital was undertaken. Demographic and clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes were studied.A total of 253 patients (unilateral 80.2%, bilateral 19.8%) were studied. Twenty six patients (10.3%) were from minority ethnic groups of China. The median onset age was 21 months. Leukocoria was the most common presenting sign (71%). Tumors were intraocular in 91.3% cases, extraocular in 8.7% cases. Extraocular RB patients had a longer median lag period than intraocular patients (9 months vs 2 months, P < 0.0001). In the intraocular group, 89.5% were advanced group D or E diseases. Enucleation was the major treatment for intraocular RB. However, over 10 years, the enucleation rate decreased constantly while more patients received chemotherapy. The Kaplan-Meier survival probability was 87.8%, 81.4%, and 74.8% at 3 years, 5 years, and 10 years, respectively. On Cox regression analysis, extraocular RB (P = 0.0008) and treatment abandonment (P < 0.0001) were associated with poor outcome; bilateral RB (P = 0.0116) and advanced pathological grade pT4 (P = 0.0011) were associated with poor outcome of intraocular RB.Most RB patients from South Western China were diagnosed at advanced clinical stage. Delayed presentation is related to extraocular RB which is a risk factor for poor outcome. Chemotherapy increased the eye salvage but had no effects to overall survival. Education for parents and general physicians for the early signs of RB (such as leukocoria), therapeutic strategy and treatment outcomes of RB may promote early diagnosis, improve the compliance, and outcome.

  17. Long-term asymmetric hearing affects cochlear implantation outcomes differently in adults with pre- and postlingual hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Boisvert, Isabelle; McMahon, Catherine M; Dowell, Richard C; Lyxell, Björn

    2015-01-01

    In many countries, a single cochlear implant is offered as a treatment for a bilateral hearing loss. In cases where there is asymmetry in the amount of sound deprivation between the ears, there is a dilemma in choosing which ear should be implanted. In many clinics, the choice of ear has been guided by an assumption that the reorganisation of the auditory pathways caused by longer duration of deafness in one ear is associated with poorer implantation outcomes for that ear. This assumption, however, is mainly derived from studies of early childhood deafness. This study compared outcomes following implantation of the better or poorer ear in cases of long-term hearing asymmetries. Audiological records of 146 adults with bilateral hearing loss using a single hearing aid were reviewed. The unaided ear had 15 to 72 years of unaided severe to profound hearing loss before unilateral cochlear implantation. 98 received the implant in their long-term sound-deprived ear. A multiple regression analysis was conducted to assess the relative contribution of potential predictors to speech recognition performance after implantation. Duration of bilateral significant hearing loss and the presence of a prelingual hearing loss explained the majority of variance in speech recognition performance following cochlear implantation. For participants with postlingual hearing loss, similar outcomes were obtained by implanting either ear. With prelingual hearing loss, poorer outcomes were obtained when implanting the long-term sound-deprived ear, but the duration of the sound deprivation in the implanted ear did not reliably predict outcomes. Contrary to an apparent clinical consensus, duration of sound deprivation in one ear has limited value in predicting speech recognition outcomes of cochlear implantation in that ear. Outcomes of cochlear implantation are more closely related to the period of time for which the brain is deprived of auditory stimulation from both ears.

  18. Idiosyncratic Variables Affecting Functional Analysis Outcomes: A Review (2001–2010)

    PubMed Central

    Schlichenmeyer, Kevin J.; Roscoe, Eileen M.; Rooker, Griffin W.; Wheeler, Emily E.; Dube, William V.

    2013-01-01

    Although typical functional analyses often produce clear outcomes, some studies have reported ambiguous results that cannot be interpreted. Such undifferentiated outcomes may occur if test conditions do not include relevant antecedent or consequent events. Clinicians then may try to modify the functional analysis conditions to include those events. Hanley, Iwata, and McCord (2003) reviewed the functional analysis literature through the year 2000 and described idiosyncratic variables included in modified functional analyses. The objective of the present review was to present a quantitative analysis of idiosyncratic antecedents and consequences in modified functional analyses during the past decade (2001 to 2010). We discuss the range of stimulus parameters tested and the assessment strategies used for informing the modified analysis conditions. PMID:24114110

  19. Idiosyncratic variables that affect functional analysis outcomes: a review (2001-2010).

    PubMed

    Schlichenmeyer, Kevin J; Roscoe, Eileen M; Rooker, Griffin W; Wheeler, Emily E; Dube, William V

    2013-01-01

    Although typical functional analyses often produce clear outcomes, some studies have reported ambiguous results that cannot be interpreted. Such undifferentiated outcomes may occur if test conditions do not include relevant antecedent or consequent events. Clinicians then may try to modify the functional analysis conditions to include those events. Hanley, Iwata, and McCord (2003) reviewed the functional analysis literature through 2000 and described idiosyncratic variables included in modified functional analyses. The objective of the present review was to present a quantitative analysis of idiosyncratic antecedents and consequences in modified functional analyses during the past decade (2001 to 2010). We discuss the range of stimulus parameters tested and the assessment strategies used for informing the modified analysis conditions.

  20. Preoperative factors affecting the outcome of unruptured posterior circulation aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Behzad; Morgan, Michael Kerin

    2011-01-01

    We retrospectively investigated preoperative variables contributing to adverse surgical outcome for repair of unruptured posterior circulation aneurysms on data collected prospectively between October 1989 and March 2010. Putative risk factors including age, sex, smoking status, positive family history, modified Rankin Score prior to the surgery, size of the aneurysm, specific site (basilar caput and trunk, vertebral artery and posterior inferior cerebellar artery), midline location, presence of calcium, thrombus or irregularity in the aneurysm on preoperative imaging, associated arteriovenous malformation and preoperative coiling were investigated using regression analyses. In a total of 121 operations, surgical mortality and morbidity was 16.3%. For patients with aneurysms less than 9mm this rate was 3.2%. Among the investigated variables we found that size, calcification of the aneurysm and age were each predictors of surgical outcome of unruptured posterior circulation aneurysms.

  1. Revision surgery for recurrent and persistent carpal tunnel syndrome: Clinical results and factors affecting outcomes.

    PubMed

    Djerbi, I; César, M; Lenoir, H; Coulet, B; Lazerges, C; Chammas, M

    2015-12-01

    Thirty-eight hands in 36 patients with recurrent or persistent carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) were reviewed retrospectively after a mean of 51 months (range 12-86) to identify factors that may lead to poor outcomes after surgical management. Clinical assessment focused on pain and sensitivity recovery, measured with a VAS and Weber's two-point discrimination test, respectively. At the latest follow-up, we found 11 excellent, 15 good, nine fair and three poor results. The risk of fair or poor results was significantly higher in the presence of intraneural fibrosis, severe preoperative sensory deficit, neuroma of the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve, workers compensation claims and number of previous surgeries. This last factor also significantly increased the risk of intraneural fibrosis. Despite disappointing outcomes, identification of these factors may improve our prognostic ability for revision surgery in cases of recurrent CTS.

  2. Surveillance, Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcome of Liver Cancer in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common type of cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. HCC is most common in Asia, but its prevalence is rapidly increasing in Western countries; consequently, HCC is a global medical issue that urgently needs to be addressed. Japan is the only developed country that has experienced both hepatitis B-related and hepatitis C-related HCC and has a long history of innovation when it comes to new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities, such as computed tomography angiography, anatomical resection, ablation, and transarterial chemoembolization. Among these innovations, a nationwide surveillance program was well established by the 1980s, and such a long-term national program does not exist anywhere else in the world. Summary More than 60% of the initially detected HCCs in Japan are Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage 0 or A, which can undergo curative therapies such as resection, ablation, or transplantation. The recent 5-year survival rate of HCC patients in Japan was 43% and the median survival time was 50 months. In addition, both incidence and mortality rates are drastically declining as a result of the successful surveillance program, careful diagnostic flow, and extensive repeated treatments. Key Message Japan's successful model in the surveillance, diagnosis, and treatment of HCC should be adopted as widely as possible to improve the survival of HCC patients worldwide. PMID:26020028

  3. The Management and Outcomes of Pharmacological Treatments for Tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Beebe Palumbo, Devon; Joos, Kathleen; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Tinnitus, a phantom sensation experienced by people around the world, currently is endured without a known cure. Some find the condition tolerable, while others are tortured on a daily basis from the incessant phantom noises. For those who seek treatment, oftentimes, they have a comorbid condition (e.g., depression, anxiety, insomnia), which is treated pharmaceutically. These products aim to reduce the comorbities associated with tinnitus thereby minimizing the overall burden present. Because of the phantom nature of tinnitus, it is often compared to neurologic pain. Since pain can be managed with pharmaceutical options, it is reasonable to assume that similar agents might work to alleviate tinnitus. The effects of antidepressants, benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, and glutamate antagonists are reviewed in this paper. Table 1 summarizes the pharmaceutical products discussed. Due to the variety of comorbid factors and potential causes of tinnitus, there may not be one pharmaceutical treatment that will combat every type of tinnitus. Nevertheless, a product that finally addresses the true cause of tinnitus, and not just its comorbidities, will benefit millions of people worldwide.

  4. The Management and Outcomes of Pharmacological Treatments for Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Devon Beebe; Joos, Kathleen; Ridder, Dirk De; Vanneste, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Tinnitus, a phantom sensation experienced by people around the world, currently is endured without a known cure. Some find the condition tolerable, while others are tortured on a daily basis from the incessant phantom noises. For those who seek treatment, oftentimes, they have a comorbid condition (e.g., depression, anxiety, insomnia), which is treated pharmaceutically. These products aim to reduce the comorbities associated with tinnitus thereby minimizing the overall burden present. Because of the phantom nature of tinnitus, it is often compared to neurologic pain. Since pain can be managed with pharmaceutical options, it is reasonable to assume that similar agents might work to alleviate tinnitus. The effects of antidepressants, benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, and glutamate antagonists are reviewed in this paper. Table 1 summarizes the pharmaceutical products discussed. Due to the variety of comorbid factors and potential causes of tinnitus, there may not be one pharmaceutical treatment that will combat every type of tinnitus. Nevertheless, a product that finally addresses the true cause of tinnitus, and not just its comorbidities, will benefit millions of people worldwide. PMID:26467416

  5. Predictive Factors Affecting Long-Term Outcome of Unilateral Lateral Rectus Recession

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee Kyung; Kim, Mi-Jin; Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Background There are few long-term outcome reports of unilateral lateral rectus (LR) recession for exotropia including a large number of subjects. Previous reports on unilateral LR recession commonly show extremely low rates of initial overcorrection and large exodrifts after surgery suggesting that the surgical dose may be increased. However, little is known of the long-term outcome of a large unilateral LR recession for exotropia. Objectives To determine long-term outcomes and predictive factors of recurrence after a large unilateral LR recession in patients with exotropia. Data Extraction Retrospective analysis was performed on 92 patients aged 3 to 17 years who underwent 10 mm unilateral LR recession for exotropia of ≤ 25 prism diopters (Δ) with prism and alternate cover testing and were followed up for more than 2 years after surgery. Final success rates within 10Δ of exophoria/tropia and 5Δ of esophoria/tropia at distance in the primary position, improvement in stereopsis and the predictive factors for recurrence were evaluated. Results At 24 months after surgery, 54% of patients had ocular alignment meeting the defined criteria of success, 45% had recurrence and 1% had overcorrection. After a mean follow-up of 39 months, 36% showed success, 63% showed recurrence and 1% resulted in overcorrection. The average time of recurrence was 23.4±14.7 months (range, 1–60 months) and the rate of recurrence per person-year was 23% after unilateral LR recession. Predictive factors of recurrence were a larger preoperative near angle of deviation (>16Δ) and larger initial postoperative exodeviation (>5Δ) at distance. Conclusions Long-term outcome of unilateral LR recession for exotropia showed low success rates with high recurrence, thus should be reserved for patients with a small preoperative near angle of exodeviation. PMID:26418819

  6. Risk analysis of the governance system affecting outcomes in the Great Barrier Reef.

    PubMed

    Dale, Allan P; Vella, Karen; Pressey, Robert L; Brodie, Jon; Gooch, Margaret; Potts, Ruth; Eberhard, Rachel

    2016-12-01

    The state and trend of the Great Barrier Reef's (GBR's) ecological health remains problematic, influencing United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) statements regarding GBR governance. While UNESCO's concerns triggered separate strategic assessments by the Australian and Queensland governments, there has been no independent and integrated review of the key risks within the overall system of governance influencing GBR outcomes. As a case study of international significance, this paper applies Governance Systems Analysis (GSA), a novel analytical framework that identifies the governance themes, domains and subdomains most likely to influence environmental and socio-economic outcomes in complex natural systems. This GBR-focussed application of GSA identifies governance subdomains that present high, medium, or low risk of failure to produce positive outcomes for the Reef. This enabled us to determine that three "whole of system" governance problems could undermine GBR outcomes. First, we stress the integrative importance of the Long Term Sustainability Plan (LTSP) Subdomain. Sponsored by the Australian and Queensland governments, this subdomain concerns the primary institutional arrangements for coordinated GBR planning and delivery, but due to its recent emergence, it faces several internal governance challenges. Second, we find a major risk of implementation failure in the achievement of GBR water quality actions due to a lack of system-wide focus on building strong and stable delivery systems at catchment scale. Finally, we conclude that the LTSP Subdomain currently has too limited a mandate/capacity to influence several high-risk subdomains that have not been, but must be more strongly aligned with Reef management (e.g. the Greenhouse Gas Emission Management Subdomain). Our analysis enables exploration of governance system reforms needed to address environmental trends in the GBR and reflects on the potential application of GSA in

  7. Does Acute Maternal Stress in Pregnancy Affect Infant Health Outcomes? Examination of a Large Cohort of Infants Born After the Terrorist Attacks of September 11, 2001

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Spandorfer S, Grill E, Davis O, Fasouliotis S, Rosenwaks Z: Septem- ber 11th in New York City (NYC): the effect of a catastrophe on IVF outcome in a...Naval Health Research Center Does acute maternal stress in pregnancy affect infant health outcomes ? Examination of A Large Cohort of Infants Born...California 92106 BioMed CentralBMC Public Health ssOpen AcceResearch article Does acute maternal stress in pregnancy affect infant health outcomes

  8. Effect of a Family Intervention on Psychological Outcomes of Children Affected by Parental HIV

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Liang, Li-Jung; Ji, Guoping; Wu, Jie; Xiao, Yongkang

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses intervention outcomes in children’s self-esteem, perceived parental care, and problem behavior and their potential connections to intervention outcomes in depressive symptoms and family functioning reported by parents living with HIV (PLH) and family members. A total of 79 families, consisting of 79 children, 88 PLH and 79 family members, were recruited from Anhui province, China. The intervention was delivered at the individual, family and community levels. Face-to-face interviews were administered at baseline, 3, and 6 months. A mixed-effects regression model was used to assess the intervention effect on the improvement of children’s reported self-esteem, parental care, and problem behavior. To further investigate the association between the parental measures and their children’s outcomes, we added parental measure as a time-varying covariate to explore whether the intervention effect on children was influenced by the parental measures. We observed some intervention effects related to children’s psychological measures accompanied by the improvement in mental health of PLH and family members. Our study findings highlight the importance of empowering families as a whole to confront HIV related challenges and the need to develop child-adequate and age-specific intervention strategies. PMID:24643313

  9. Distal Radial Fractures in the Superelderly: Does Malunion Affect Functional Outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Clement, N. D.; Duckworth, A. D.; Court-Brown, C. M.; McQueen, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The management of unstable distal radial fractures in the superelderly (≥80 years old) remains controversial. The aim of this study was to compare the functional outcome of super-elderly patients with and without malunion after a distal radial fracture. Methods. We identified 51 superelderly patients living independently with displaced fractures from a prospective database of 4024 patients with distal radial fractures. Activities of daily living, presence of wrist pain, whether the wrist had returned to its normal level function, grip strength and ROM were recorded. The dorsal angulation was measured radiographically. Results. There were 17 (33.3%) patients defined to have a malunion. The outcomes of the independent patients with and without malunion were compared at a mean follow-up of 15 months. No difference was observed in activities of daily living (P = 0.28), wrist pain (P = 0.14), whether the wrist had returned to its normal level function (P = 0.25), grip strength (P = 0.31), or ROM (P = 0.41). An increasing degree of dorsal angulation correlated with diminished ROM (P = 0.038), but did not correlate with activities of daily living (P = 0.10). Conclusions. Malunion of the distal radius does not influence the functional outcome of independent superelderly patients. PMID:24967123

  10. Impact of Cannabis Use on Treatment Outcomes among Adults Receiving Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for PTSD and Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ruglass, Lesia M.; Shevorykin, Alina; Radoncic, Vanja; Smith, Kathryn M. Z.; Smith, Philip H.; Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R.; Papini, Santiago; Hien, Denise A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Research has demonstrated a strong link between trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders (SUDs) in general and cannabis use disorders in particular. Yet, few studies have examined the impact of cannabis use on treatment outcomes for individuals with co-occurring PTSD and SUDs. Methods: Participants were 136 individuals who received cognitive-behavioral therapies for co-occurring PTSD and SUD. Multivariate regressions were utilized to examine the associations between baseline cannabis use and end-of-treatment outcomes. Multilevel linear growth models were fit to the data to examine the cross-lagged associations between weekly cannabis use and weekly PTSD symptom severity and primary substance use during treatment. Results: There were no significant positive nor negative associations between baseline cannabis use and end-of-treatment PTSD symptom severity and days of primary substance use. Cross-lagged models revealed that as cannabis use increased, subsequent primary substance use decreased and vice versa. Moreover, results revealed a crossover lagged effect, whereby higher cannabis use was associated with greater PTSD symptom severity early in treatment, but lower weekly PTSD symptom severity later in treatment. Conclusion: Cannabis use was not associated with adverse outcomes in end-of-treatment PTSD and primary substance use, suggesting independent pathways of change. The theoretical and clinical implications of the reciprocal associations between weekly cannabis use and subsequent PTSD and primary substance use symptoms during treatment are discussed. PMID:28178207

  11. The Involvement of a Concerned Significant Other in Gambling Disorder Treatment Outcome.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Murcia, Susana