Science.gov

Sample records for affective lability scale

  1. Hard Exercise, Affect Lability, and Personality Among Individuals with Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Brownstone, Lisa M.; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Joiner, Thomas E.; Le Grange, Daniel; Mitchell, James E.; Crow, Scott J.; Peterson, Carol B.; Crosby, Ross D.; Klein, Marjorie H.; Bardone-Cone, Anna M.

    2013-01-01

    The current study explores the personality traits of compulsivity (e.g., sense of orderliness and duty to perform tasks completely) and restricted expression (e.g., emotion expression difficulties) as potential moderators of the relation between affect lability and frequency of hard exercise episodes in a sample of individuals with bulimic pathology. Participants were 204 adult females recruited in five Midwestern cities who met criteria for threshold or subthreshold bulimia nervosa (BN). Compulsivity was found to significantly moderate the relation between affect lability and number of hard exercise episodes over the past 28 days, such that among those with high compulsivity, level of affect lability was associated with the number of hard exercise episodes; whereas, among those with low compulsivity, affect lability was not associated with the number of hard exercise episodes. The same pattern of findings emerged for restricted expression; however, this finding approached, but did not reach statistical significance. As such, it appears that affect lability is differentially related to hard exercise among individuals with BN depending upon the level of compulsivity and, to a more limited extent, restricted expression. These results suggest that, for individuals with BN with either compulsivity or restricted expression, focusing treatment on increasing flexibility and/or verbal expression of emotions may help them in the context of intense, fluctuating affect. PMID:24183126

  2. Lability of potentially toxic elements in soils affected by smelting activities.

    PubMed

    Popescu, I; Biasioli, M; Ajmone-Marsan, F; Stănescu, R

    2013-01-01

    Determination of total concentration of potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in soil is not a reliable tool for evaluating potential exposure risk for humans. PTE lability (EDTA, SBET and solution extraction) and chemical speciation (BCR sequential extraction) were investigated for Pb, Cd, Cu, and Zn, as well as how these could be affected by flooding in soils polluted by smelting activities. The flooding experiment was performed in pots from which soil solution was extracted at different time intervals using Rhizon Moisture Samplers. After experiments, the soil was again subjected to the previous extractions (EDTA, SBET, and BCR) in order to reveal the changes which occurred during anoxia. From the results we can conclude that PTE lability is very high and flooding caused the increase in their mobility up to 100% (for bioaccessible Pb). The experiment demonstrated that temporary reducing conditions can increase the risk of contaminants passing to other environmental compartments and the food chain.

  3. Lability of potentially toxic elements in soils affected by smelting activities.

    PubMed

    Popescu, I; Biasioli, M; Ajmone-Marsan, F; Stănescu, R

    2013-01-01

    Determination of total concentration of potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in soil is not a reliable tool for evaluating potential exposure risk for humans. PTE lability (EDTA, SBET and solution extraction) and chemical speciation (BCR sequential extraction) were investigated for Pb, Cd, Cu, and Zn, as well as how these could be affected by flooding in soils polluted by smelting activities. The flooding experiment was performed in pots from which soil solution was extracted at different time intervals using Rhizon Moisture Samplers. After experiments, the soil was again subjected to the previous extractions (EDTA, SBET, and BCR) in order to reveal the changes which occurred during anoxia. From the results we can conclude that PTE lability is very high and flooding caused the increase in their mobility up to 100% (for bioaccessible Pb). The experiment demonstrated that temporary reducing conditions can increase the risk of contaminants passing to other environmental compartments and the food chain. PMID:23127724

  4. How Spatial Variation in Areal Extent and Configuration of Labile Vegetation States Affect the Riparian Bird Community in Arctic Tundra

    PubMed Central

    Henden, John-André; Yoccoz, Nigel G.; Ims, Rolf A.; Langeland, Knut

    2013-01-01

    The Arctic tundra is currently experiencing an unprecedented combination of climate change, change in grazing pressure by large herbivores and growing human activity. Thickets of tall shrubs represent a conspicuous vegetation state in northern and temperate ecosystems, where it serves important ecological functions, including habitat for wildlife. Thickets are however labile, as tall shrubs respond rapidly to both abiotic and biotic environmental drivers. Our aim was to assess how large-scale spatial variation in willow thicket areal extent, configuration and habitat structure affected bird abundance, occupancy rates and species richness so as to provide an empirical basis for predicting the outcome of environmental change for riparian tundra bird communities. Based on a 4-year count data series, obtained through a large-scale study design in low arctic tundra in northern Norway, statistical hierarchical community models were deployed to assess relations between habitat configuration and bird species occupancy and community richness. We found that species abundance, occupancy and richness were greatly affected by willow areal extent and configuration, habitat features likely to be affected by intense ungulate browsing as well as climate warming. In sum, total species richness was maximized in large and tall willow patches of small to intermediate degree of fragmentation. These community effects were mainly driven by responses in the occupancy rates of species depending on tall willows for foraging and breeding, while species favouring other vegetation states were not affected. In light of the predicted climate driven willow shrub encroachment in riparian tundra habitats, our study predicts that many bird species would increase in abundance, and that the bird community as a whole could become enriched. Conversely, in tundra regions where overabundance of large herbivores leads to decreased areal extent, reduced height and increased fragmentation of willow thickets

  5. How spatial variation in areal extent and configuration of labile vegetation states affect the riparian bird community in Arctic tundra.

    PubMed

    Henden, John-André; Yoccoz, Nigel G; Ims, Rolf A; Langeland, Knut

    2013-01-01

    The Arctic tundra is currently experiencing an unprecedented combination of climate change, change in grazing pressure by large herbivores and growing human activity. Thickets of tall shrubs represent a conspicuous vegetation state in northern and temperate ecosystems, where it serves important ecological functions, including habitat for wildlife. Thickets are however labile, as tall shrubs respond rapidly to both abiotic and biotic environmental drivers. Our aim was to assess how large-scale spatial variation in willow thicket areal extent, configuration and habitat structure affected bird abundance, occupancy rates and species richness so as to provide an empirical basis for predicting the outcome of environmental change for riparian tundra bird communities. Based on a 4-year count data series, obtained through a large-scale study design in low arctic tundra in northern Norway, statistical hierarchical community models were deployed to assess relations between habitat configuration and bird species occupancy and community richness. We found that species abundance, occupancy and richness were greatly affected by willow areal extent and configuration, habitat features likely to be affected by intense ungulate browsing as well as climate warming. In sum, total species richness was maximized in large and tall willow patches of small to intermediate degree of fragmentation. These community effects were mainly driven by responses in the occupancy rates of species depending on tall willows for foraging and breeding, while species favouring other vegetation states were not affected. In light of the predicted climate driven willow shrub encroachment in riparian tundra habitats, our study predicts that many bird species would increase in abundance, and that the bird community as a whole could become enriched. Conversely, in tundra regions where overabundance of large herbivores leads to decreased areal extent, reduced height and increased fragmentation of willow thickets

  6. Interaction between environmental factors affects the accumulation of root proteins in hydroponically grown Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.).

    PubMed

    Bedon, Frank; Majada, Juan; Feito, Isabel; Chaumeil, Philippe; Dupuy, Jean-William; Lomenech, Anne-Marie; Barre, Aurélien; Gion, Jean-Marc; Plomion, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.) is used for pulp and paper production worldwide. In this report we studied changes in protein expression in one osmotically stressed elite clone widely used in industrial plantations in Spain. High molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG) was used as an osmoticum in the growing medium. Roots of rooted cuttings were sampled after 3 and 36 h of treatment. Water potential and abscissic acid content were measured in shoot and root apices to characterize the physiological states of the plants. Total soluble proteins from roots were extracted and separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Gels were stained with Coomassie brillant blue for quantitative analysis of protein accumulation. From a total of 406 reproducible spots, 34 were found to be differentially expressed depending on treatment (osmotic versus control condition) and/or stress duration (3 h versus 36 h), and were further characterized by tandem mass spectrometry. Several proteins were reliably identified including adenosine kinase, actin, stress-related proteins as well as proteins associated to cellular processes, among which some residents of the endoplasmic reticulum. This study constitutes the first investigation of the root proteome in this important forest tree genus. PMID:20974537

  7. Interaction between environmental factors affects the accumulation of root proteins in hydroponically grown Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.).

    PubMed

    Bedon, Frank; Majada, Juan; Feito, Isabel; Chaumeil, Philippe; Dupuy, Jean-William; Lomenech, Anne-Marie; Barre, Aurélien; Gion, Jean-Marc; Plomion, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.) is used for pulp and paper production worldwide. In this report we studied changes in protein expression in one osmotically stressed elite clone widely used in industrial plantations in Spain. High molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG) was used as an osmoticum in the growing medium. Roots of rooted cuttings were sampled after 3 and 36 h of treatment. Water potential and abscissic acid content were measured in shoot and root apices to characterize the physiological states of the plants. Total soluble proteins from roots were extracted and separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Gels were stained with Coomassie brillant blue for quantitative analysis of protein accumulation. From a total of 406 reproducible spots, 34 were found to be differentially expressed depending on treatment (osmotic versus control condition) and/or stress duration (3 h versus 36 h), and were further characterized by tandem mass spectrometry. Several proteins were reliably identified including adenosine kinase, actin, stress-related proteins as well as proteins associated to cellular processes, among which some residents of the endoplasmic reticulum. This study constitutes the first investigation of the root proteome in this important forest tree genus.

  8. The tool of microbial genomics research for interpreting the lability of permafrost carbon and potential greenhouse gas feedbacks at different scales of resolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldrop, M. P.; Machelprang, R.; Hultman, J.; Wickland, K. P.

    2012-12-01

    One quarter of the earth's terrestrial surface is underlain by permafrost, or perennially frozen soils. Permafrost soils contain approximately 25% to 50% of the total global soil carbon pool nearly double the atmospheric carbon (C) reservoir. Decomposition of this C by microorganisms may produce globally significant quantities of both carbon dioxide and methane. These processes provide a positive feedback between climate change and the altered biogeochemistry of northern ecosystems. The fate of carbon residing in thawing permafrost soils depends on a number of physical factors including the thermal properties of soils (which affect heat flow rates), its disturbance regime (controlling changes in physical properties), and hydrologic regime (where soil-water interactions can rapidly thaw permafrost). Yet the mechanism of soil organic matter decomposition and greenhouse gas production operates primarily through the microbial loop: growth, carbon and nutrient mineralization, electron transfer, and enzyme production. We tested whether molecular analysis of microbial communities can be utilized as an indicator of permafrost C lability and potential greenhouse gas production from permafrost soils across multiple temporal and spatial scales. For short term studies of lability we compared rates of C turnover in soil incubations to chemical indices of soil lability, soil enzymes, and the abundance of soil microbial populations. Permafrost soils for the incubation ranged from frozen peatlands to dry uplands and Pleistocene Yedoma. For analysis at the annual to decadal scale, we utilized a permafrost thaw gradient at the Bonanza Creek LTER near Fairbanks Alaska. At this gradient, a Black Spruce forest underlain by permafrost thawed to form a thermokarst bog <50 years ago. Over the short term (months), the lability of permafrost C is reflected in the chemistry of dissolved constituents of permafrost, and it is also reflected in the change in abundance of total soil bacteria

  9. Feasibility of labile Zn phytoextraction using enhanced tobacco and sunflower: results of five- and one-year field-scale experiments in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Herzig, Rolf; Nehnevajova, Erika; Pfistner, Charlotte; Schwitzguebel, Jean-Paul; Ricci, Arturo; Keller, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Phytoextraction with somaclonal variants of tobacco and sunflower mutant lines (non-GMs) with enhanced metal uptake and tolerance can be a sustainable alternative to conventional destructive decontamination methods, especially for stripping bioavailable zinc excess in topsoil. The overall results of a 5-year time series experiment at field scale in north-eastern Switzerland confirm that the labile Zn pool in soil can be lowered by 45-70%, whereas subplots without phytoextraction treatment maintained labile Zn concentrations. In 2011, the phytoextraction experiment site was enlarged by a factor of 3, and the labile 0.1 M NaNO3 extractable Zn concentration in the soil was reduced up to 58% one period after harvest. A Mass Balance Analysis confirmed soil Zn decontamination in line with plant Zn uptake. The plants partially take Zn from the non-labile pool of the totaL The sustainability of Zn phytoextraction in subplots that no longer exceed the Swiss trigger value is now assessed over time. In contrary to the phytoextraction of total soil Zn which needs a long cleaning up time, the bioavailable Zn stripping is feasible within a few years period. PMID:24933882

  10. Changes in lead and zinc lability during weathering-induced acidification of desert mine tailings: Coupling chemical and micro-scale analyses.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Sarah M; White, Scott A; Thompson, Thomas L; Maier, Raina M; Chorover, Jon

    2009-12-01

    Desert mine tailings may accumulate toxic metals in the near surface centimeters because of low water through-flux rates. Along with other constraints, metal toxicity precludes natural plant colonization even over decadal time scales. Since unconsolidated particles can be subjected to transport by wind and water erosion, potentially resulting in direct human and ecosystem exposure, there is a need to know how the lability and form of metals change in the tailings weathering environment. A combination of chemical extractions, X-ray diffraction, micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy were employed to study Pb and Zn contamination in surficial arid mine tailings from the Arizona Klondyke State Superfund Site. Initial site characterization indicated a wide range in pH (2.5 to 8.0) in the surficial tailings pile. Ligand-promoted (DTPA) extractions, used to assess plant-available metal pools, showed decreasing available Zn and Mn with progressive tailings acidification. Aluminum shows the inverse trend, and Pb and Fe show more complex pH dependence. Since the tailings derive from a common source and parent mineralogy, it is presumed that variations in pH and "bioavailable" metal concentrations result from associated variation in particle-scale geochemistry. Four sub-samples, ranging in pH from 2.6 to 5.4, were subjected to further characterization to elucidate micro-scale controls on metal mobility. With acidification, total Pb (ranging from 5 - 13 g kg(-1)) was increasingly associated with Fe and S in plumbojarosite aggregates. For Zn, both total (0.4 - 6 g kg(-1)) and labile fractions decreased with decreasing pH. Zinc was found to be primarily associated with the secondary Mn phases manjiroite and chalcophanite. The results suggest that progressive tailings acidification diminishes the overall lability of the total Pb and Zn pools.

  11. Changes in lead and zinc lability during weathering-induced acidification of desert mine tailings: Coupling chemical and micro-scale analyses

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sarah M.; White, Scott A.; Thompson, Thomas L.; Maier, Raina M.; Chorover, Jon

    2009-01-01

    Desert mine tailings may accumulate toxic metals in the near surface centimeters because of low water through-flux rates. Along with other constraints, metal toxicity precludes natural plant colonization even over decadal time scales. Since unconsolidated particles can be subjected to transport by wind and water erosion, potentially resulting in direct human and ecosystem exposure, there is a need to know how the lability and form of metals change in the tailings weathering environment. A combination of chemical extractions, X-ray diffraction, micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy were employed to study Pb and Zn contamination in surficial arid mine tailings from the Arizona Klondyke State Superfund Site. Initial site characterization indicated a wide range in pH (2.5 to 8.0) in the surficial tailings pile. Ligand-promoted (DTPA) extractions, used to assess plant-available metal pools, showed decreasing available Zn and Mn with progressive tailings acidification. Aluminum shows the inverse trend, and Pb and Fe show more complex pH dependence. Since the tailings derive from a common source and parent mineralogy, it is presumed that variations in pH and “bioavailable” metal concentrations result from associated variation in particle-scale geochemistry. Four sub-samples, ranging in pH from 2.6 to 5.4, were subjected to further characterization to elucidate micro-scale controls on metal mobility. With acidification, total Pb (ranging from 5 – 13 g kg−1) was increasingly associated with Fe and S in plumbojarosite aggregates. For Zn, both total (0.4 – 6 g kg−1) and labile fractions decreased with decreasing pH. Zinc was found to be primarily associated with the secondary Mn phases manjiroite and chalcophanite. The results suggest that progressive tailings acidification diminishes the overall lability of the total Pb and Zn pools. PMID:20161492

  12. Testing the Grandchildren's Received Affection Scale using Affection Exchange Theory.

    PubMed

    Mansson, Daniel H

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the Grandchildren's Received Affection Scale (GRAS) using Affection Exchange Theory (Floyd, 2006). In accordance with Affection Exchange Theory, it was hypothesized that grandchildren's scores on the Trait Affection Received Scale (i.e., the extent to which individuals by nature receive affection) would be related significantly and positively to their reports of received affection from their grandparents (i.e., their scores on the GRAS). Additionally, a research question was asked to explore if grandchildren's received affection from their grandparents is dependent on their grandparent's biological sex or lineage (i.e., maternal vs paternal). Thus, young adult grandchildren (N = 422) completed the GRAS and the Trait Affection Received Scale. The results of zero-order Pearson correlational analyses provided support for the hypothesis, whereas the results of MANOVAs tests only partially support extant grandparent-grandchild theory and research. These findings broaden the scope of Affection Exchange Theory and also bolster the GRAS's utility in future grandparent-grandchild affectionate communication research. PMID:23833883

  13. Testing the Grandchildren's Received Affection Scale using Affection Exchange Theory.

    PubMed

    Mansson, Daniel H

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the Grandchildren's Received Affection Scale (GRAS) using Affection Exchange Theory (Floyd, 2006). In accordance with Affection Exchange Theory, it was hypothesized that grandchildren's scores on the Trait Affection Received Scale (i.e., the extent to which individuals by nature receive affection) would be related significantly and positively to their reports of received affection from their grandparents (i.e., their scores on the GRAS). Additionally, a research question was asked to explore if grandchildren's received affection from their grandparents is dependent on their grandparent's biological sex or lineage (i.e., maternal vs paternal). Thus, young adult grandchildren (N = 422) completed the GRAS and the Trait Affection Received Scale. The results of zero-order Pearson correlational analyses provided support for the hypothesis, whereas the results of MANOVAs tests only partially support extant grandparent-grandchild theory and research. These findings broaden the scope of Affection Exchange Theory and also bolster the GRAS's utility in future grandparent-grandchild affectionate communication research.

  14. Contents of Highly Labile Trace Elements in H4-6 Chondrite Falls Are Not Affected by Post-Accretionary Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, S. F.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1999-03-01

    Contents of volatile trace elements in H4-6 chondrites were established during nebular condensation and accretion and the most thermally labile of these were unaffected by metamorphism of their parent bodies, shock heating or close solar approach.

  15. Heat-labile IgG2a antibodies affect cure of Trypanosoma musculi infection in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Wechsler, D S; Kongshavn, P A

    1986-11-01

    Immune plasma (IP) obtained from mice cured of Trypanosoma musculi infection is able to mediate trypanosome clearance both in vivo and in vitro. A protein A-derived immunoglobulin fraction of IP containing primarily IgG2a and IgG3 shares this curative activity. Additional purification of IP with the use of anti-IgG2a and anti-IgG3 coupled to Sepharose beads demonstrates that the curative activity of IP resides solely in the IgG2a fraction; IP depleted of IgG2a is no longer able to effect T. musculi removal. Furthermore, this curative IgG2a is labile to heat treatment for 30 min at 56 degrees C. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays show that trypanosome-specific IgG2a builds up gradually over the course of infection, and temporarily drops slightly at the time of parasite clearance.

  16. Soil respiration, labile carbon pools, and enzyme activities as affected by tillage practices in a tropical rice-maize-cowpea cropping system.

    PubMed

    Neogi, S; Bhattacharyya, P; Roy, K S; Panda, B B; Nayak, A K; Rao, K S; Manna, M C

    2014-07-01

    In order to identify the viable option of tillage practices in rice-maize-cowpea cropping system that could cut down soil carbon dioxide (CO2) emission, sustain grain yield, and maintain better soil quality in tropical low land rice ecology soil respiration in terms of CO2 emission, labile carbon (C) pools, water-stable aggregate C fractions, and enzymatic activities were investigated in a sandy clay loam soil. Soil respiration is the major pathway of gaseous C efflux from terrestrial systems and acts as an important index of ecosystem functioning. The CO2-C emissions were quantified in between plants and rows throughout the year in rice-maize-cowpea cropping sequence both under conventional tillage (CT) and minimum tillage (MT) practices along with soil moisture and temperature. The CO2-C emissions, as a whole, were 24 % higher in between plants than in rows, and were in the range of 23.4-78.1, 37.1-128.1, and 28.6-101.2 mg m(-2) h(-1) under CT and 10.7-60.3, 17.3-99.1, and 17.2-79.1 mg m(-2) h(-1) under MT in rice, maize, and cowpea, respectively. The CO2-C emission was found highest under maize (44 %) followed by rice (33 %) and cowpea (23 %) irrespective of CT and MT practices. In CT system, the CO2-C emission increased significantly by 37.1 % with respect to MT on cumulative annual basis including fallow. The CO2-C emission per unit yield was at par in rice and cowpea signifying the beneficial effect of MT in maintaining soil quality and reduction of CO2 emission. The microbial biomass C (MBC), readily mineralizable C (RMC), water-soluble C (WSC), and permanganate-oxidizable C (PMOC) were 19.4, 20.4, 39.5, and 15.1 % higher under MT than CT. The C contents in soil aggregate fraction were significantly higher in MT than CT. Soil enzymatic activities like, dehydrogenase, fluorescein diacetate, and β-glucosidase were significantly higher by 13.8, 15.4, and 27.4 % under MT compared to CT. The soil labile C pools, enzymatic activities, and

  17. Factors Affecting Scale Adhesion on Steel Forgings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitterman, J. A.; Bacco, R. P.; Boggs, W. E.

    1982-04-01

    Occasionally, undesirable "sticky" adherent scale forms on low-carbon steel during reheating for hot forging. The mechanical abrading or chemical pickling required to remove this scale adds appreciably to the fabrication cost. Characterization of the steel-scale system by metallographic examination, x-ray diffraction, and electron-probe microanalysis revealed that nickel, silicon, and/or sulfur might be involved in the mechanism of sticky-scale formation. Laboratory reheating tests were conducted on steels with varied concentrations of nickel and silicon in atmospheres simulating those resulting from burning natural gas or sulfur-bearing fuels. Subsequent characterization of the scale formed during the tests tends to confirm that the composition of the steel, especially increased nickel and silicon contents, and the presence of the sulfur in the furnace atmosphere cause the formation of this undesirable scale.

  18. Labile compounds in plant litter reduce the sensitivity of decomposition to warming and altered precipitation.

    PubMed

    Suseela, Vidya; Tharayil, Nishanth; Xing, Baoshan; Dukes, Jeffrey S

    2013-10-01

    Together, climate and litter quality strongly regulate decomposition rates. Although these two factors and their interaction have been studied across species in continent-scale experiments, few researchers have studied how labile and recalcitrant compounds interact to influence decomposition, or the climate sensitivity of decomposition, within a litter type. Over a period of 3 yr, we studied the effects of warming and altered precipitation on mass loss and compound-specific decomposition using two litter types that possessed similar heteropolymer chemistry, but different proportions of labile and recalcitrant compounds. Climate treatments immediately affected the mass loss of the more recalcitrant litter, but affected the more labile litter only after 2 yr. After 3 yr, although both litter types had lost similar amounts of mass, warming (c. 4°C) and supplemental precipitation (150% of ambient) together accelerated the degradation of alkyl-carbon and lignin only in the more recalcitrant litter, highlighting the role of initial litter quality in determining whether the chemistry of litter residues converges or diverges under different climates. Our finding that labile compounds in litter reduce the climate sensitivity of mass loss and the decomposition of recalcitrant matrix is novel. Our results highlight the potential for litter quality to regulate the effect of climatic changes on the sequestration of litter-derived carbon. PMID:23822593

  19. Measuring Mathematics Anxiety: Psychometric Analysis of a Bidimensional Affective Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bai, Haiyan; Wang, LihShing; Pan, Wei; Frey, Mary

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a theoretically and methodologically sound bidimensional affective scale measuring mathematics anxiety with high psychometric quality. The psychometric properties of a 14-item Mathematics Anxiety Scale-Revised (MAS-R) adapted from Betz's (1978) 10-item Mathematics Anxiety Scale were empirically analyzed on a…

  20. The Development of the Meta-Affective Trait Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzuntiryaki-Kondakci, Esen; Kirbulut, Zubeyde Demet

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a Meta-Affective Trait Scale (MATS) to measure the meta-affective inclinations related to emotions that students have while they are studying for their classes. First, a pilot study was performed with 380 10th-grade students. Results of the exploratory factor analysis supported a two-factor structure of the…

  1. Legal factors affecting the financing of small scale hydroelectric projects

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.H.; Ringo, M.J.; Forgione, N.

    1983-09-01

    An introduction to the major business organizational options open to small-scale hydroelectric (SSH) projects is given. The major federal income tax treatments of these options are compared. Significant general federal income tax factors affecting SSH projects are reintroduced and explained. Some of the special federal income tax problem areas in SSH development are isolated. Tax benefit flow through or transfer mechanisms are discussed. Tax exempt financing opportunities for private SSH projects are reviewed. (MHR)

  2. Rapid decomposition of labile soil organic matter inputs obscures sensitivity of heterotrophic respiration to temperature: A model analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, W. M.; Gu, L.; King, A. W.

    2003-12-01

    Labile carbon, although often a small fraction of soil organic matter (SOM), significantly affects heterotrophic respiration at short time scales because of its rapid decomposition. However, in the current literature, most soil respiration measurements are interpreted without simultaneous information on labile carbon pool dynamics. Sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature is routinely derived directly from field observations and such relationships have been used to extrapolate effects of global change (e.g. warming) on the carbon emission from SOM. Here we used a multi-pool SOM model to demonstrate the impacts of seasonal fluctuations in labile carbon pools. Labile carbon pool sizes varied widely in response to seasonal changes in representative plant material inputs and temperature even though the model was operating at an equilibrium state (in terms of annual means). Convolution of the dynamics of fast turnover carbon pools and temporal progression in temperature led to misrepresentation and misinterpretation of the heterotrophic respiration - temperature relationships estimated from bulk soil CO2 exchanges. Temperature sensitivity was overestimated when the variations of labile carbon pools and temperature were in phase and underestimated when they were out of phase. Furthermore, with normally used observation time windows (weeks to a year), temperature sensitivity was more likely to be underestimated. A distortion of temperature sensitivity (Q10) from 2 (actual, sensitive dependence on temperature) to nearly 1 (false, no dependence on temperature) was shown. Our analysis indicates that cautions must be taken when soil respiration - temperature relationships are evaluated based on bulk soil observations and that sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature estimated directly under field conditions should not be used to predict future carbon cycle climate feedbacks.

  3. Factors affecting the predictive validity of the Braden Scale.

    PubMed

    Capobianco, M L; McDonald, D D

    1996-01-01

    This descriptive correlational study explored the predictive validity of the Braden Scale and factors affecting it A Braden score was determined within 4 hours of admission for 50 adult medical/surgical inpatients. Independent skin assessments were made three times a week and at discharge. Fourteen patients (28%) developed pressure ulcers. A Braden score cutoff of 18 or less resulted in a 71% sensitivity, 83% specificity, 63% predictive value of a positive test, and 88% predictive value of a negative test. Three of the four patients incorrectly predicted to be not at risk scored "inadequate" on the nutrition subscale. Two of the four also were underweight. Of the six patients incorrectly predicted at risk for a pressure ulcer, three had been placed on air mattresses and were receiving levothyroxine (Synthroid). This study provides further evidence of the Braden Scale's predictive validity. The results suggest that patients who are underweight or getting inadequate nutrition be considered at increased risk for pressure ulcers.

  4. Scaling Up Family Therapy in Fragile, Conflict-Affected States.

    PubMed

    Charlés, Laurie L

    2015-09-01

    This article discusses the design and delivery of two international family therapy-focused mental health and psychosocial support training projects, one in a fragile state and one in a post-conflict state. The training projects took place in Southeast Asia and the Middle East/North Africa. Each was funded, supported, and implemented by local, regional, and international stakeholders, and delivered as part of a broader humanitarian agenda to develop human resource capacity to work with families affected by atrocities. The two examples illustrate how task-shifting/task-sharing and transitional justice approaches were used to inform the scaling-up of professionals involved in each project. They also exemplify how state-citizen phenomena in each location affected the project design and delivery.

  5. Memory expression is independent of memory labilization/reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Karina A; Suárez, Luis D; Lynch, Victoria M; Molina, Víctor A; Delorenzi, Alejandro

    2013-11-01

    There is growing evidence that certain reactivation conditions restrict the onset of both the destabilization phase and the restabilization process or reconsolidation. However, it is not yet clear how changes in memory expression during the retrieval experience can influence the emergence of the labilization/reconsolidation process. To address this issue, we used the context-signal memory model of Chasmagnathus. In this paradigm a short reminder that does not include reinforcement allows us to evaluate memory labilization and reconsolidation, whereas a short but reinforced reminder restricts the onset of such a process. The current study investigated the effects of the glutamate antagonists, APV (0.6 or 1.5 μg/g) and CNQX (1 μg/g), prior to the reminder session on both behavioral expression and the reconsolidation process. Under conditions where the reminder does not initiate the labilization/reconsolidation process, APV prevented memory expression without affecting long-term memory retention. In contrast, APV induced amnesic effects in the long-term when administered before a reminder session that triggers reconsolidation. Under the present parametric conditions, the administration of CNQX prior to the reminder that allows memory to enter reconsolidation impairs this process without disrupting memory expression. Overall, the present findings suggest that memory reactivation--but not memory expression--is necessary for labilization and reconsolidation. Retrieval and memory expression therefore appear not to be interchangeable concepts.

  6. Factors affecting economies of scale in combined sewer systems.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Max; Wolfram, Martin; Anja, Herlyn

    2010-01-01

    A generic model is introduced that represents the combined sewer infrastructure of a settlement quantitatively. A catchment area module first calculates the length and size distribution of the required sewer pipes on the basis of rain patterns, housing densities and area size. These results are fed into the sewer-cost module in order to estimate the combined sewer costs of the entire catchment area. A detailed analysis of the relevant input parameters for Swiss settlements is used to identify the influence of size on costs. The simulation results confirm that an economy of scale exists for combined sewer systems. This is the result of two main opposing cost factors: (i) increased construction costs for larger sewer systems due to larger pipes and increased rain runoff in larger settlements, and (ii) lower costs due to higher population and building densities in larger towns. In Switzerland, the more or less organically grown settlement structures and limited land availability emphasise the second factor to show an apparent economy of scale. This modelling approach proved to be a powerful tool for understanding the underlying factors affecting the cost structure for water infrastructures.

  7. Large-scale mapping of mutations affecting zebrafish development

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Robert; Rauch, Gerd-Jörg; Geiger-Rudolph, Silke; Albrecht, Andrea; van Bebber, Frauke; Berger, Andrea; Busch-Nentwich, Elisabeth; Dahm, Ralf; Dekens, Marcus PS; Dooley, Christopher; Elli, Alexandra F; Gehring, Ines; Geiger, Horst; Geisler, Maria; Glaser, Stefanie; Holley, Scott; Huber, Matthias; Kerr, Andy; Kirn, Anette; Knirsch, Martina; Konantz, Martina; Küchler, Axel M; Maderspacher, Florian; Neuhauss, Stephan C; Nicolson, Teresa; Ober, Elke A; Praeg, Elke; Ray, Russell; Rentzsch, Brit; Rick, Jens M; Rief, Eva; Schauerte, Heike E; Schepp, Carsten P; Schönberger, Ulrike; Schonthaler, Helia B; Seiler, Christoph; Sidi, Samuel; Söllner, Christian; Wehner, Anja; Weiler, Christian; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2007-01-01

    Background Large-scale mutagenesis screens in the zebrafish employing the mutagen ENU have isolated several hundred mutant loci that represent putative developmental control genes. In order to realize the potential of such screens, systematic genetic mapping of the mutations is necessary. Here we report on a large-scale effort to map the mutations generated in mutagenesis screening at the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology by genome scanning with microsatellite markers. Results We have selected a set of microsatellite markers and developed methods and scoring criteria suitable for efficient, high-throughput genome scanning. We have used these methods to successfully obtain a rough map position for 319 mutant loci from the Tübingen I mutagenesis screen and subsequent screening of the mutant collection. For 277 of these the corresponding gene is not yet identified. Mapping was successful for 80 % of the tested loci. By comparing 21 mutation and gene positions of cloned mutations we have validated the correctness of our linkage group assignments and estimated the standard error of our map positions to be approximately 6 cM. Conclusion By obtaining rough map positions for over 300 zebrafish loci with developmental phenotypes, we have generated a dataset that will be useful not only for cloning of the affected genes, but also to suggest allelism of mutations with similar phenotypes that will be identified in future screens. Furthermore this work validates the usefulness of our methodology for rapid, systematic and inexpensive microsatellite mapping of zebrafish mutations. PMID:17212827

  8. Labile Compounds in Plant Litter Reduce the Sensitivity of Decomposition to Warming and Altered Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suseela, V.; Tharayil, N.; Xing, B.; Dukes, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    Together, climate and litter quality strongly regulate decomposition rates. While these two factors and their interaction have been studied across species in continent-scale experiments, few researchers have studied how labile and recalcitrant compounds interact to influence decomposition, or the climate sensitivity of decomposition, within a litter type. Over a period of three years, we studied the effects climate change on mass loss and compound-specific decomposition using two litter types that differed in the relative proportions of labile and recalcitrant compounds, but that had heteropolymers with similar molecular structure. We examined how warming and altered precipitation affected the decomposition of two types of Polygonum cuspidatum (Japanese knotweed) litter (stem litter that was either newly senesced or one year old), at the Boston-Area Climate Experiment (BACE), in Massachusetts, USA. We placed litter bags in an old-field ecosystem exposed to four levels of warming (up to 4oC) and three levels of precipitation (ambient, drought (-50%) and wet (+50%) treatments. The compound-specific degradation of litter was assessed using Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Climate treatments immediately affected mass loss of the more recalcitrant litter, but affected the more labile litter only after two years. After three years, although both litter types had lost similar amounts of mass, warming (~4oC) and supplemental precipitation (150% of ambient) together accelerated degradation of alkyl-carbon and lignin only in the more recalcitrant litter, highlighting the role of initial litter quality in determining whether the chemistry of litter residues converges or diverges under different climates. The results from this study indicate that the effect of climate on litter decomposition depends on the quality of litter; litter with a greater initial proportion of labile compounds was less

  9. Labile disulfide bonds are common at the leucocyte cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, Clive; Cresswell, Peter; Ciaccia, Laura; Thomas, Benjamin; Barclay, A. Neil

    2011-01-01

    Redox conditions change in events such as immune and platelet activation, and during viral infection, but the biochemical consequences are not well characterized. There is evidence that some disulfide bonds in membrane proteins are labile while others that are probably structurally important are not exposed at the protein surface. We have developed a proteomic/mass spectrometry method to screen for and identify non-structural, redox-labile disulfide bonds in leucocyte cell-surface proteins. These labile disulfide bonds are common, with several classes of proteins being identified and around 30 membrane proteins regularly identified under different reducing conditions including using enzymes such as thioredoxin. The proteins identified include integrins, receptors, transporters and cell–cell recognition proteins. In many cases, at least one cysteine residue was identified by mass spectrometry as being modified by the reduction process. In some cases, functional changes are predicted (e.g. in integrins and cytokine receptors) but the scale of molecular changes in membrane proteins observed suggests that widespread effects are likely on many different types of proteins including enzymes, adhesion proteins and transporters. The results imply that membrane protein activity is being modulated by a ‘redox regulator’ mechanism. PMID:22645650

  10. Development of a Behavioral Affective Relationship Scale for Encounter Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadish, William R., Jr.; Zarle, Thomas

    The paper outlines several studies over a two-year period to develop a self-report and observer-rating measure of sensitivity/encounter group outcome. The initial form of the scale was taken from McMillan (1971) who developed a measure of 16 categories of group outcome; McMillan's work indicated the scale had high reliability. Subsequent study…

  11. Labile sulfide and sulfite in phytochelatin complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Eannetta, N.T.; Steffens, J.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Heavy metals such as cadmium induce tomato cell cultures to synthesize the metal binding polypeptides ({gamma}-Glu-Cys){sub 3} and ({gamma}-Glu-Cys){sub 4}-Gly (phytochelatins). Tomato cells selected for growth on normally lethal concentrations of CdCl{sub 2} synthesize higher quantities of these polypeptides. Cd{sup r} cells are not cross-resistant to other heavy metals, and recent work suggests that metal detoxification by these peptides may be Cd-specific. The occurrence of labile sulfur as a component of the metal complex raises questions concerning possible functions of phytochelatins besides that of Cd binding. The presence of acid-labile sulfide ion in phytochelatin complexes has been reported by several groups. We report the additional finding that labile sulfite is also present in these complexes and in higher amounts than sulfide. Sulfide and sulfite are both released from the metal binding complex by acidification or by treatment with EDTA.

  12. Scales affect performance of Monarch butterfly forewings in autorotational flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demko, Anya; Lang, Amy

    2012-11-01

    Butterfly wings are characterized by rows of scales (approximately 100 microns in length) that create a shingle-like pattern of cavities over the entire surface. It is hypothesized that these cavities influence the airflow around the wing and increase aerodynamic performance. A forewing of the Monarch butterfly (Danus plexippus) naturally undergoes autorotational flight in the laminar regime. Autorotational flight is an accurate representation of insect flight because the rotation induces a velocity gradient similar to that found over a flapping wing. Drop test flights of 22 forewings before and after scale removal were recorded with a high-speed camera and flight behavior was quantified. It was found that removing the scales increased the descent speed and decreased the descent factor, a measure of aerodynamic efficacy, suggesting that scales increased the performance of the forewings. Funded by NSF REU Grant 1062611.

  13. Does small scale structure significantly affect cosmological dynamics?

    PubMed

    Adamek, Julian; Clarkson, Chris; Durrer, Ruth; Kunz, Martin

    2015-02-01

    The large-scale homogeneity and isotropy of the Universe is generally thought to imply a well-defined background cosmological model. It may not. Smoothing over structure adds in an extra contribution, transferring power from small scales up to large. Second-order perturbation theory implies that the effect is small, but suggests that formally the perturbation series may not converge. The amplitude of the effect is actually determined by the ratio of the Hubble scales at matter-radiation equality and today-which are entirely unrelated. This implies that a universe with significantly lower temperature today could have significant backreaction from more power on small scales, and so provides the ideal testing ground for understanding backreaction. We investigate this using two different N-body numerical simulations-a 3D Newtonian and a 1D simulation which includes all relevant relativistic effects. We show that while perturbation theory predicts an increasing backreaction as more initial small-scale power is added, in fact the virialization of structure saturates the backreaction effect at the same level independently of the equality scale. This implies that backreaction is a small effect independently of initial conditions. Nevertheless, it may still contribute at the percent level to certain cosmological observables and therefore it cannot be neglected in precision cosmology. PMID:25699430

  14. Does Small Scale Structure Significantly Affect Cosmological Dynamics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamek, Julian; Clarkson, Chris; Durrer, Ruth; Kunz, Martin

    2015-02-01

    The large-scale homogeneity and isotropy of the Universe is generally thought to imply a well-defined background cosmological model. It may not. Smoothing over structure adds in an extra contribution, transferring power from small scales up to large. Second-order perturbation theory implies that the effect is small, but suggests that formally the perturbation series may not converge. The amplitude of the effect is actually determined by the ratio of the Hubble scales at matter-radiation equality and today—which are entirely unrelated. This implies that a universe with significantly lower temperature today could have significant backreaction from more power on small scales, and so provides the ideal testing ground for understanding backreaction. We investigate this using two different N -body numerical simulations—a 3D Newtonian and a 1D simulation which includes all relevant relativistic effects. We show that while perturbation theory predicts an increasing backreaction as more initial small-scale power is added, in fact the virialization of structure saturates the backreaction effect at the same level independently of the equality scale. This implies that backreaction is a small effect independently of initial conditions. Nevertheless, it may still contribute at the percent level to certain cosmological observables and therefore it cannot be neglected in precision cosmology.

  15. Maternal emotion socialization differentially predicts third-grade children's emotion regulation and lability.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Megan L; Halberstadt, Amy G; Castro, Vanessa L; MacCormack, Jennifer K; Garrett-Peters, Patricia

    2016-03-01

    Numerous parental emotion socialization factors have been implicated as direct and indirect contributors to the development of children's emotional competence. To date, however, no study has combined parents' emotion-related beliefs, behaviors, and regulation strategies in one model to assess their cumulative-as well as unique-contributions to children's emotion regulation. We considered the 2 components that have recently been distinguished: emotion regulation and emotional lability. We predicted that mothers' beliefs about the value of and contempt for children's emotions, mothers' supportive and nonsupportive reactions to their children's emotions, as well as mothers' use of cognitive reappraisal and suppression of their own emotions would each contribute unique variance to their children's emotion regulation and lability, as assessed by children's teachers. The study sample consisted of an ethnically and socioeconomically diverse group of 165 mothers and their third-grade children. Different patterns emerged for regulation and lability: Controlling for family income, child gender, and ethnicity, only mothers' lack of suppression as a regulatory strategy predicted greater emotion regulation in children, whereas mothers' valuing of children's emotions, mothers' lack of contempt for children's emotions, mothers' use of cognitive reappraisal to reinterpret events, and mothers' lack of emotional suppression predicted less lability in children. These findings support the divergence of emotion regulation and lability as constructs and indicate that, during middle childhood, children's lability may be substantially and uniquely affected by multiple forms of parental socialization.

  16. Labels affect preschoolers' tool-based scale errors.

    PubMed

    Hunley, Samuel B; Hahn, Erin R

    2016-11-01

    Scale errors offer a unique context in which to examine the interdependencies between language and action. Here, we manipulated the presence of labels in a tool-based paradigm previously shown to elicit high rates of scale errors. We predicted that labels would increase children's scale errors with tools by directing attention to shape, function, and category membership. Children between the ages of 2 and 3years were introduced to an apparatus and shown how to produce its function using a tool (e.g., scooping a toy fish from an aquarium using a net). In each of two test trials, children were asked to choose between two novel tools to complete the same task: one that was a large non-functional version of the tool presented in training and one novel functional object (different in shape). A total of four tool-apparatus sets were tested. The results indicated that without labels, scale errors decreased over the two test trials. In contrast, when labels were present, scale errors remained high in the second test trial. We interpret these findings as evidence that linguistic cues can influence children's action-based errors with tools.

  17. Effects of carbon substrate lability on carbon mineralization dynamics of tropical peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauhiainen, Jyrki; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Könönen, Mari; Limin, Suwido; Vasander, Harri

    2016-04-01

    Extensive draining at tropical ombrotrophic peatlands in Southeast Asia has made them global 'hot spots' for greenhouse gas emissions. Management practises and fires have led to changed substrate status, which affects microbial processes. Here, we present the first data on how management practises affect carbon (C) mineralization processes at these soils. We compared the carbon mineralization potentials of pristine forest soils to those of drained fire affected soils at various depths, with and without additional labile substrates (glucose, glutamate and NO3-N) and in oxic and anoxic conditions by dedicated ex situ experiments. Carbon mineralization (CO2 and CH4 production) rates were higher in the pristine site peat, which contains more labile carbon due to higher input via vegetation. Production rates decreased with depth together with decreasing availability of labile carbon. Consequently, the increase in production rates after labile substrate addition was relatively modest from pristine site as compared to the managed site and from the top layers as compared to deeper layers. Methanogenesis had little importance in total carbon mineralization. Adding labile C and N enhanced heterotrophic CO2 production more than the sole addition of N. Surprisingly, oxygen availability was not an ultimate requirement for substantial CO2 production rates, but anoxic respiration yielded comparable rates, especially at the pristine soils. Flooding of these sites will therefore reduce, but not completely cease, peat carbon loss. Reintroduced substantial vegetation and fertilization in degraded peatlands can enrich recalcitrant peat with simple C and N compounds and thus increase microbiological activity.

  18. Addressing Scaling Affects in Forest Watersheds with WEPP Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliot, W.; Robichaud, P.; Foltz, R.

    2006-12-01

    The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model is a physically based model developed over the past 20 years by the USDA Agriculture Research Service (ARS) and numerous other agencies and universities. The soil hydrologic properties are hydraulic conductivity for estimating surface infiltration, and in the current version of WEPP (version 2004.7), the clay content of the lowest layer to estimate conductivity for deep seepage. During the 1990s, Forest Service scientists used modified Purdue rainfall simulators to estimate saturated hydraulic conductivity on a number of forest conditions on 1 sq m plots. When validation of WEPP for forest conditions was carried out, it became apparent that hydraulic conductivity as measured by rainfall simulation was almost double what it should be when used at a hillslope scale (up to 20 ha). The reasons for this were not clear, although likely contributors were: the very dry soil conditions common in western forests during the field season, high rates of lateral flow beneath plot borders, and natural water repellency from organic materials. The current forest soils database for the WEPP interfaces now has saturated hydraulic conductivity value of 42 mm per hour for a sandy loam for an undisturbed forest, as compared to observed values of 35 to 82 mm per hour. When the WEPP technology was applied to forest watersheds ranging from 9 to 176 ha, the predicted runoff was much less than observed values. This was because even in small forested watersheds with steep slopes subsurface lateral flow dominates the runoff hydrology. A new version of WEPP is under development to incorporate this flow. When using this version of WEPP, a hydraulic conductivity value of 17.3 mm per hour was necessary for the 9 ha watershed that had been disturbed, compared to a value of 105 mm per hour for the 176 ha forested watershed. This scale effect shows that as area increases, conductivity necessarily decreases as the dominant runoff processes changes from

  19. Photo-lability of deep ocean dissolved black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbins, A.; Niggemann, J.; Dittmar, T.

    2012-05-01

    Dissolved black carbon (DBC), defined here as condensed aromatics isolated from seawater via PPL solid phase extraction and quantified as benzenepolycarboxylic acid (BPCA) oxidation products, is a significant component of the oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool. These condensed aromatics are widely distributed in the open ocean and appear to be tens of thousands of years old. As such DBC is regarded as highly refractory. In the current study, the photo-lability of DBC, DOC and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM; ultraviolet-visible absorbance) were determined over the course of a 28 day irradiation of North Atlantic Deep Water under a solar simulator. During the irradiation DBC fell from 1044 ± 164 nM-C to 55 ± 15 nM-C, a 20-fold decrease in concentration. Dissolved black carbon photo-degradation was more rapid and more extensive than for bulk CDOM and DOC. The concentration of DBC correlated with CDOM absorbance and the quality of DBC indicated by the ratios of different BPCAs correlated with CDOM absorbance spectral slope, suggesting the optical properties of CDOM may provide a proxy for both DBC concentrations and quality in natural waters. Further, the photo-lability of components of the DBC pool increased with their degree of aromatic condensation. These trends indicate that a continuum of compounds of varying photo-lability exists within the marine DOC pool. In this continuum, photo-lability scales with aromatic character, specifically the degree of condensation. Scaling the rapid photo-degradation of DBC to rates of DOC photo-mineralisation for the global ocean leads to an estimated photo-chemical half-life for oceanic DBC of less than 800 years. This is more than an order of magnitude shorter than the apparent age of DBC in the ocean. Consequently, photo-degradation is posited as the primary sink for oceanic DBC and the apparent survival of DBC molecules in the oceans for millennia appears to be facilitated not by their inherent inertness but

  20. Development and Validation of Children's Environmental Affect (Attitude, Sensitivity and Willingness to Take Action) Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdogan, Mehmet; Marcinkowski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the design, development, validation, and psychometric properties of the Children's Environmental Affect Scale (CEAS). The following steps were taken in developing the CEAS. A substantial review of literature on environmental affect and EL helped the researchers identify several scales and questionnaires that, in turn, help…

  1. How large-scale subsidence affects stratocumulus transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Dussen, J. J.; de Roode, S. R.; Siebesma, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Some climate modeling results suggest that the Hadley circulation might weaken in a future climate, causing a subsequent reduction in the large-scale subsidence velocity in the subtropics. In this study we analyze the cloud liquid water path (LWP) budget from large-eddy simulation (LES) results of three idealized stratocumulus transition cases, each with a different subsidence rate. As shown in previous studies a reduced subsidence is found to lead to a deeper stratocumulus-topped boundary layer, an enhanced cloud-top entrainment rate and a delay in the transition of stratocumulus clouds into shallow cumulus clouds during its equatorwards advection by the prevailing trade winds. The effect of a reduction of the subsidence rate can be summarized as follows. The initial deepening of the stratocumulus layer is partly counteracted by an enhanced absorption of solar radiation. After some hours the deepening of the boundary layer is accelerated by an enhancement of the entrainment rate. Because this is accompanied by a change in the cloud-base turbulent fluxes of moisture and heat, the net change in the LWP due to changes in the turbulent flux profiles is negligibly small.

  2. The Affect and Arousal Scales: Psychometric Properties of the Dutch Version and Multigroup Confirmatory Factor Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Bolle, Marleen; De Fruyt, Filip; Decuyper, Mieke

    2010-01-01

    Psychometric properties of the Dutch version of the Affect and Arousal Scales (AFARS) were inspected in a combined clinical and population sample (N = 1,215). The validity of the tripartite structure and the relations between Negative Affect, Positive Affect, and Physiological Hyperarousal (PH) were investigated for boys and girls, younger (8-11…

  3. Scaling preferential flow processes in agricultural soils affected by tillage and trafficking at the field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipović, Vilim; Coquet, Yves

    2016-04-01

    There is an accumulation of experimental evidences that agricultural soils, at least the top horizons affected by tillage practices, are not homogeneous and present a structure that is strongly dependent on farming practices like tillage and trafficking. Soil tillage and trafficking can create compacted zones in the soil with hydraulic properties and porosity which are different from those of the non-compacted zones. This spatial variability can strongly influence transport processes and initiate preferential flow. Two or three dimensional models can be used to account for spatial variability created by agricultural practices, but such models need a detailed assessment of spatial heterogeneity which can be rather impractical to provide. This logically raises the question whether and how one dimensional model may be designed and used to account for the within-field spatial variability in soil structure created by agricultural practices. Preferential flow (dual-permeability) modelling performed with HYDRUS-1D will be confronted to classical modelling based on the Richards and convection-dispersion equations using HYDRUS-2D taking into account the various soil heterogeneities created by agricultural practices. Our goal is to derive one set of equivalent 1D soil hydraulic parameters from 2D simulations which accounts for soil heterogeneities created by agricultural operations. A field experiment was carried out in two phases: infiltration and redistribution on a plot by uniform sprinkle irrigation with water or bromide solution. Prior to the field experiment the soil structure of the tilled layer was determined along the face of a large trench perpendicular to the tillage direction (0.7 m depth and 3.1 m wide). Thirty TDR probes and tensiometers were installed in different soil structural zones (Δ compacted soil and Γ macroporous soil) which ensured soil water monitoring throughout the experiment. A map of bromide was constructed from small core samples (4 cm diam

  4. Biotic and abiotic controls on diurnal fluctuations in labile soil phosphorus of a wet tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Vandecar, Karen L; Lawrence, Deborah; Wood, Tana; Oberbauer, Steven F; Das, Rishiraj; Tully, Katherine; Schwendenmann, Luitgard

    2009-09-01

    The productivity of many tropical wet forests is generally limited by bioavailable phosphorus (P). Microbial activity is a key regulator of P availability in that it determines both the supply of P through organic matter decomposition and the depletion of bioavailable P through microbial uptake. Both microbial uptake and mineralization occur rapidly, and their net effect on P availability varies with soil moisture, temperature, and soil organic matter quantity and quality. Exploring the mechanisms driving P availability at fine temporal scales can provide insight into the coupling of carbon, water, and nutrient cycles, and ultimately, the response of tropical forests to climate change. Despite the recognized importance of P cycling to the dynamics of wet tropical forests and their potential sensitivity to short-term fluctuations in bioavailable P, the diurnal pattern of P remains poorly understood. This study quantifies diurnal fluctuations in labile soil P and evaluates the importance of biotic and abiotic factors in driving these patterns. To this end, measurements of labile P were made every other hour in a Costa Rican wet tropical forest oxisol. Spatial and temporal variation in Bray-extractable P were investigated in relation to ecosystem carbon flux, soil CO2 efflux, soil moisture, soil temperature, solar radiation, and sap-flow velocity. Spatially averaged bi-hourly (every two hours) labile P ranged from 0.88 to 2.48 microg/g across days. The amplitude in labile P throughout the day was 0.61-0.82 microg/g (41-54% of mean P concentrations) and was characterized by a bimodal pattern with a decrease at midday. Labile P increased with soil CO2 efflux and soil temperature and declined with increasing sap flow and solar radiation. Together, soil CO2 efflux, soil temperature, and sap flow explained 86% of variation in labile P.

  5. Black carbon absorption at the global scale is affected by particle-scale diversity in composition.

    PubMed

    Fierce, Laura; Bond, Tami C; Bauer, Susanne E; Mena, Francisco; Riemer, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) exerts a strong, but uncertain, warming effect on the climate. BC that is coated with non-absorbing material absorbs more strongly than the same amount of BC in an uncoated particle, but the magnitude of this absorption enhancement (Eabs) is not well constrained. Modelling studies and laboratory measurements have found stronger absorption enhancement than has been observed in the atmosphere. Here, using a particle-resolved aerosol model to simulate diverse BC populations, we show that absorption is overestimated by as much as a factor of two if diversity is neglected and population-averaged composition is assumed across all BC-containing particles. If, instead, composition diversity is resolved, we find Eabs=1-1.5 at low relative humidity, consistent with ambient observations. This study offers not only an explanation for the discrepancy between modelled and observed absorption enhancement, but also demonstrates how particle-scale simulations can be used to develop relationships for global-scale models. PMID:27580627

  6. Black carbon absorption at the global scale is affected by particle-scale diversity in composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierce, Laura; Bond, Tami C.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Mena, Francisco; Riemer, Nicole

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) exerts a strong, but uncertain, warming effect on the climate. BC that is coated with non-absorbing material absorbs more strongly than the same amount of BC in an uncoated particle, but the magnitude of this absorption enhancement (Eabs) is not well constrained. Modelling studies and laboratory measurements have found stronger absorption enhancement than has been observed in the atmosphere. Here, using a particle-resolved aerosol model to simulate diverse BC populations, we show that absorption is overestimated by as much as a factor of two if diversity is neglected and population-averaged composition is assumed across all BC-containing particles. If, instead, composition diversity is resolved, we find Eabs=1-1.5 at low relative humidity, consistent with ambient observations. This study offers not only an explanation for the discrepancy between modelled and observed absorption enhancement, but also demonstrates how particle-scale simulations can be used to develop relationships for global-scale models.

  7. Black Carbon Absorption at the Global Scale Is Affected by Particle-Scale Diversity in Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fierce, Laura; Bond, Tami C.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Mena, Francisco; Riemer, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) exerts a strong, but uncertain, warming effect on the climate. BC that is coated with non-absorbing material absorbs more strongly than the same amount of BC in an uncoated particle, but the magnitude of this absorption enhancement (E(sub abs)) is not well constrained. Modelling studies and laboratory measurements have found stronger absorption enhancement than has been observed in the atmosphere. Here, using a particle-resolved aerosol model to simulate diverse BC populations, we show that absorption is overestimated by as much as a factor of two if diversity is neglected and population-averaged composition is assumed across all BC-containing particles. If, instead, composition diversity is resolved, we find E(sub abs) = 1 - 1.5 at low relative humidity, consistent with ambient observations. This study offers not only an explanation for the discrepancy between modelled and observed absorption enhancement, but also demonstrates how particle-scale simulations can be used to develop relationships for global-scale models.

  8. Black carbon absorption at the global scale is affected by particle-scale diversity in composition

    PubMed Central

    Fierce, Laura; Bond, Tami C.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Mena, Francisco; Riemer, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) exerts a strong, but uncertain, warming effect on the climate. BC that is coated with non-absorbing material absorbs more strongly than the same amount of BC in an uncoated particle, but the magnitude of this absorption enhancement (Eabs) is not well constrained. Modelling studies and laboratory measurements have found stronger absorption enhancement than has been observed in the atmosphere. Here, using a particle-resolved aerosol model to simulate diverse BC populations, we show that absorption is overestimated by as much as a factor of two if diversity is neglected and population-averaged composition is assumed across all BC-containing particles. If, instead, composition diversity is resolved, we find Eabs=1−1.5 at low relative humidity, consistent with ambient observations. This study offers not only an explanation for the discrepancy between modelled and observed absorption enhancement, but also demonstrates how particle-scale simulations can be used to develop relationships for global-scale models. PMID:27580627

  9. Large-scale climatic anomalies affect marine predator foraging behaviour and demography.

    PubMed

    Bost, Charles A; Cotté, Cedric; Terray, Pascal; Barbraud, Christophe; Bon, Cécile; Delord, Karine; Gimenez, Olivier; Handrich, Yves; Naito, Yasuhiko; Guinet, Christophe; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2015-10-27

    Determining the links between the behavioural and population responses of wild species to environmental variations is critical for understanding the impact of climate variability on ecosystems. Using long-term data sets, we show how large-scale climatic anomalies in the Southern Hemisphere affect the foraging behaviour and population dynamics of a key marine predator, the king penguin. When large-scale subtropical dipole events occur simultaneously in both subtropical Southern Indian and Atlantic Oceans, they generate tropical anomalies that shift the foraging zone southward. Consequently the distances that penguins foraged from the colony and their feeding depths increased and the population size decreased. This represents an example of a robust and fast impact of large-scale climatic anomalies affecting a marine predator through changes in its at-sea behaviour and demography, despite lack of information on prey availability. Our results highlight a possible behavioural mechanism through which climate variability may affect population processes.

  10. Large-scale climatic anomalies affect marine predator foraging behaviour and demography

    PubMed Central

    Bost, Charles A.; Cotté, Cedric; Terray, Pascal; Barbraud, Christophe; Bon, Cécile; Delord, Karine; Gimenez, Olivier; Handrich, Yves; Naito, Yasuhiko; Guinet, Christophe; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Determining the links between the behavioural and population responses of wild species to environmental variations is critical for understanding the impact of climate variability on ecosystems. Using long-term data sets, we show how large-scale climatic anomalies in the Southern Hemisphere affect the foraging behaviour and population dynamics of a key marine predator, the king penguin. When large-scale subtropical dipole events occur simultaneously in both subtropical Southern Indian and Atlantic Oceans, they generate tropical anomalies that shift the foraging zone southward. Consequently the distances that penguins foraged from the colony and their feeding depths increased and the population size decreased. This represents an example of a robust and fast impact of large-scale climatic anomalies affecting a marine predator through changes in its at-sea behaviour and demography, despite lack of information on prey availability. Our results highlight a possible behavioural mechanism through which climate variability may affect population processes. PMID:26506134

  11. Large-scale climatic anomalies affect marine predator foraging behaviour and demography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bost, Charles A.; Cotté, Cedric; Terray, Pascal; Barbraud, Christophe; Bon, Cécile; Delord, Karine; Gimenez, Olivier; Handrich, Yves; Naito, Yasuhiko; Guinet, Christophe; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2015-10-01

    Determining the links between the behavioural and population responses of wild species to environmental variations is critical for understanding the impact of climate variability on ecosystems. Using long-term data sets, we show how large-scale climatic anomalies in the Southern Hemisphere affect the foraging behaviour and population dynamics of a key marine predator, the king penguin. When large-scale subtropical dipole events occur simultaneously in both subtropical Southern Indian and Atlantic Oceans, they generate tropical anomalies that shift the foraging zone southward. Consequently the distances that penguins foraged from the colony and their feeding depths increased and the population size decreased. This represents an example of a robust and fast impact of large-scale climatic anomalies affecting a marine predator through changes in its at-sea behaviour and demography, despite lack of information on prey availability. Our results highlight a possible behavioural mechanism through which climate variability may affect population processes.

  12. Large-scale climatic anomalies affect marine predator foraging behaviour and demography.

    PubMed

    Bost, Charles A; Cotté, Cedric; Terray, Pascal; Barbraud, Christophe; Bon, Cécile; Delord, Karine; Gimenez, Olivier; Handrich, Yves; Naito, Yasuhiko; Guinet, Christophe; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2015-01-01

    Determining the links between the behavioural and population responses of wild species to environmental variations is critical for understanding the impact of climate variability on ecosystems. Using long-term data sets, we show how large-scale climatic anomalies in the Southern Hemisphere affect the foraging behaviour and population dynamics of a key marine predator, the king penguin. When large-scale subtropical dipole events occur simultaneously in both subtropical Southern Indian and Atlantic Oceans, they generate tropical anomalies that shift the foraging zone southward. Consequently the distances that penguins foraged from the colony and their feeding depths increased and the population size decreased. This represents an example of a robust and fast impact of large-scale climatic anomalies affecting a marine predator through changes in its at-sea behaviour and demography, despite lack of information on prey availability. Our results highlight a possible behavioural mechanism through which climate variability may affect population processes. PMID:26506134

  13. Characterizing scale-specific environmental factors affecting soil organic carbon along two landscape transects.

    PubMed

    She, Dongli; Cao, Yutong; Chen, Qian; Yu, Shuang'en

    2016-09-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is one of the most important soil properties affecting many other soil and environmental properties and processes. In order to understand and manage SOC effectively, it is important to identify the scale-specific main factors affecting SOC distributions, which in this study occurred in a watershed on the Loess Plateau. Two transects were selected that passed along the upper slopes on each side of the main gully of the Liudaogou watershed. Transect 1 (3411-m length) had 27 sampling sites at 131-m intervals; transect 2 (3597 m length) had 30 sampling sites at 124-m intervals. The two transects were chosen in order to compare landscape patterns of differing complexity that were in close proximity, which reduced the effects of factors that would be caused by different locations. The landscape of transect 1 was more complex due to the greater diversity in cultivation. Multivariate empirical mode decomposition (MEMD) decomposed the total variation in SOC and five selected environmental factors into four intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) and a residual according to the scale of occurrence. Scale-specific correlation analysis was used to identify significant relationships between SOC and the environmental factors. The dominant scales were those that were the largest contributors to the total SOC variance; for transect 1, this was the IMF 1 (scale of 403 m), whereas for transect 2, it was the medium scale of the IMF 2 (scale of 688 m). For both transects, vegetation properties (vegetation cover and aboveground biomass) were the main factors affecting SOC distributions at their respective dominant scales. At each scale, the main effective factors could be identified although at the larger scales, their contributions to the overall variance were almost negligible. The distributions of SOC and the factors affecting it were found to be scale dependent. The results of this study highlighted the suitability of the MEMD method in revealing the main scale

  14. Scale-dependent factors affecting North American river otter distribution in the midwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jeffress, Mackenzie R.; Paukert, C.P.; Whittier, Joanna B.; Sandercock, B.K.; Gipson, P.S.

    2011-01-01

    The North American river otter (Lontra canadensis) is recovering from near extirpation throughout much of its range. Although reintroductions, trapping regulations and habitat improvements have led to the reestablishment of river otters in the Midwest, little is known about how their distribution is influenced by local- and landscape-scale habitat. We conducted river otter sign surveys from Jan. to Apr. in 2008 and 2009 in eastern Kansas to assess how local- and landscape-scale habitat factors affect river otter occupancy. We surveyed three to nine 400-m stretches of stream and reservoir shorelines for 110 sites and measured local-scale variables (e.g., stream order, land cover types) within a 100 m buffer of the survey site and landscape-scale variables (e.g., road density, land cover types) for Hydrological Unit Code 14 watersheds. We then used occupancy models that account for the probability of detection to estimate occupancy as a function of these covariates using Program PRESENCE. The best-fitting model indicated river otter occupancy increased with the proportion of woodland cover and decreased with the proportion of cropland and grassland cover at the local scale. Occupancy also increased with decreased shoreline diversity, waterbody density and stream density at the landscape scale. Occupancy was not affected by land cover or human disturbance at the landscape scale. Understanding the factors and scale important to river otter occurrence will be useful in identifying areas for management and continued restoration. ?? 2011, American Midland Naturalist.

  15. Fate and lability of silver in soils: Effect of ageing

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate and lability of added soluble Ag in soils over time was examined by measurement of labile metal (E-value) by isotopic dilution using the 110mAg radioactive isotope and the solid-phase speciation of Ag by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrosco...

  16. Assessing Preschool Children's Pretend Play: Preliminary Validation of the Affect in Play Scale-Preschool Version

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaugars, Astrida Seja; Russ, Sandra W.

    2009-01-01

    Research Findings: A description of the development and preliminary validation of the Affect in Play Scale-Preschool version (APS-P) is presented by demonstrating associations among preschool children's play, creativity, and daily behavior using multiple methodologies. Thirty-three preschool-age children completed a standardized 5-minute play task…

  17. Fast labile carbon turnover obscures sensitivity of heterotrophic respiration from soil to temperature: A model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Lianhong; Post, Wilfred M.; King, Anthony W.

    2004-03-01

    Labile carbon, although often a small fraction of soil organic carbon (SOC), significantly affects heterotrophic respiration at short timescales because of its rapid decomposition. However, in the current literature, most soil respiration measurements are interpreted without simultaneous information on labile carbon pool dynamics. Sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature is routinely derived directly from field observations, and such relationships have been used to extrapolate effects of global change (e.g., warming) on carbon emission from SOC. Here we use a multipool SOC model to demonstrate the impacts of seasonal fluctuations of labile carbon pools on interpretation of soil respiration measurements. We find that labile carbon pool sizes vary widely in response to seasonal changes in representative plant material inputs and temperature even though the model is operating at equilibrium in terms of annual means. Convolution of the dynamics of fast turnover carbon pools and temporal progression in temperature lead to misrepresentation and misinterpretation of the heterotrophic respiration-temperature relationships estimated from bulk soil CO2 exchanges. Temperature sensitivity is overestimated when the variations of labile carbon pools and temperature are in phase and underestimated when they are out of phase. Furthermore, with normally used observation time windows (weeks to a year), temperature sensitivity is more likely to be underestimated. A distortion of temperature sensitivity (Q10) from 2 (actual, sensitive dependence on temperature) to nearly 1 (false, no dependence on temperature) is shown. Applying estimated temperature sensitivity parameter back into the model considerably overestimates soil carbon storage at equilibrium. Our findings indicate that caution must be taken when soil respiration-temperature relationships are evaluated based on bulk soil observations and when sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature estimated directly under field

  18. Measuring natural pest suppression at different spatial scales affects the importance of local variables.

    PubMed

    Bennett, A B; Gratton, C

    2012-10-01

    The role biodiversity plays in the provision of ecosystem services is widely recognized, yet few ecological studies have identified characteristics of natural systems that support and maintain ecosystem services. The purpose of this study was to identify landscape variables correlated with natural pest suppression carried out by arthropod natural enemies, predators and parasitoids. We conducted two field experiments, one observational and one experimental, where landscape variables at broad and local scales were measured and related to natural pest suppression. The first experiment measured natural pest suppression at 16 sites across an urban to rural landscape gradient in south central Wisconsin. We found natural enemy diversity positively affected natural pest suppression, whereas flower diversity negatively affected pest suppression. No relationship was found between natural pest suppression and broad scale variables, which measured the percentage of different land cover classes in the surrounding landscape. In the second experiment, we established small (2- by 3-m) replicated plots that experimentally varied flower diversity (0, 1, or 7 species) within a plot. We found no significant relationship between natural pest suppression and the different levels of flower diversity. The fact that we only found differences in natural pest suppression in our first experiment, which measured natural pest suppression at sites separated by larger distances than our second experiment, suggests the more appropriate scale for measuring ecosystem services performed by mobile organisms like insects, is across broad spatial scales where variation in natural enemies communities and the factors that affect them become more apparent.

  19. Preservation of labile organic matter in soils of drained thaw lakes in Northern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Carsten W.; Rethemeyer, Janet; Kao-Kniffin, Jenny; Löppmann, Sebastian; Hinkel, Kenneth; Bockheim, James

    2014-05-01

    A large number of studies predict changing organic matter (OM) dynamics in arctic soils due to global warming. In contrast to rather slowly altering bulk soil properties, single soil organic matter (SOM) fractions can provide a more detailed picture of the dynamics of differently preserved SOM pools in climate sensitive arctic regions. By the study of the chemical composition of such distinctive SOM fractions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) together with radiocarbon analyses it is possible to evaluate the stability of the major OM pools. Approximately 50-75% of Alaska's Arctic Coastal Plain is covered with thaw lakes and drained thaw lakes that follow a 5,000 yr cycle of development (between creation and final drainage), thus forming a natural soil chronosequence. The drained thaw lakes offer the possibility to study SOM dynamics affected by permafrost processes over millennial timescales. In April 2010 we sampled 16 soil cores (including the active and permanent layer) reaching from young drained lakes (0-50 years since drainage) to ancient drained lakes (3000-5500 years since drainage). Air dried soil samples from soil horizons of the active and permanent layer were subjected to density fractionation in order to differentiate particulate OM and mineral associated OM. The chemical composition of the SOM fractions was analyzed by 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. For a soil core of a young and an ancient drained thaw lake basin we also analyzed the 14C content. For the studied soils we can show that up to over 25 kg OC per square meter are stored mostly as labile, easily degradable organic matter rich in carbohydrates. In contrast only 10 kg OC per square meter were sequestered as presumably more stable mineral associated OC dominated by aliphatic compounds. Comparable to soils of temperate regions, we found small POM (< 20 µm) occluded in aggregated soil structures which differed in the chemical composition from larger organic particles. This was

  20. Protein degradation by ubiquitin–proteasome system in formation and labilization of contextual conditioning memory

    PubMed Central

    Sol Fustiñana, María; de la Fuente, Verónica; Federman, Noel; Freudenthal, Ramiro

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) of protein degradation has been evaluated in different forms of neural plasticity and memory. The role of UPS in such processes is controversial. Several results support the idea that the activation of this system in memory consolidation is necessary to overcome negative constrains for plasticity. In this case, the inhibition of the UPS during consolidation impairs memory. Similar results were reported for memory reconsolidation. However, in other cases, the inhibition of UPS had no effect on memory consolidation and reconsolidation but impedes the amnesic action of protein synthesis inhibition after retrieval. The last finding suggests a specific action of the UPS inhibitor on memory labilization. However, another interpretation is possible in terms of the synthesis/degradation balance of positive and negative elements in neural plasticity, as was found in the case of long-term potentiation. To evaluate these alternative interpretations, other reconsolidation-interfering drugs than translation inhibitors should be tested. Here we analyzed initially the UPS inhibitor effect in contextual conditioning in crabs. We found that UPS inhibition during consolidation impaired long-term memory. In contrast, UPS inhibition did not affect memory reconsolidation after contextual retrieval but, in fact, impeded memory labilization, blocking the action of drugs that does not affect directly the protein synthesis. To extend these finding to vertebrates, we performed similar experiments in contextual fear memory in mice. We found that the UPS inhibitor in hippocampus affected memory consolidation and blocked memory labilization after retrieval. These findings exclude alternative interpretations to the requirement of UPS in memory labilization and give evidence of this mechanism in both vertebrates and invertebrates. PMID:25135196

  1. Protein degradation by ubiquitin-proteasome system in formation and labilization of contextual conditioning memory.

    PubMed

    Sol Fustiñana, María; de la Fuente, Verónica; Federman, Noel; Freudenthal, Ramiro; Romano, Arturo

    2014-09-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) of protein degradation has been evaluated in different forms of neural plasticity and memory. The role of UPS in such processes is controversial. Several results support the idea that the activation of this system in memory consolidation is necessary to overcome negative constrains for plasticity. In this case, the inhibition of the UPS during consolidation impairs memory. Similar results were reported for memory reconsolidation. However, in other cases, the inhibition of UPS had no effect on memory consolidation and reconsolidation but impedes the amnesic action of protein synthesis inhibition after retrieval. The last finding suggests a specific action of the UPS inhibitor on memory labilization. However, another interpretation is possible in terms of the synthesis/degradation balance of positive and negative elements in neural plasticity, as was found in the case of long-term potentiation. To evaluate these alternative interpretations, other reconsolidation-interfering drugs than translation inhibitors should be tested. Here we analyzed initially the UPS inhibitor effect in contextual conditioning in crabs. We found that UPS inhibition during consolidation impaired long-term memory. In contrast, UPS inhibition did not affect memory reconsolidation after contextual retrieval but, in fact, impeded memory labilization, blocking the action of drugs that does not affect directly the protein synthesis. To extend these finding to vertebrates, we performed similar experiments in contextual fear memory in mice. We found that the UPS inhibitor in hippocampus affected memory consolidation and blocked memory labilization after retrieval. These findings exclude alternative interpretations to the requirement of UPS in memory labilization and give evidence of this mechanism in both vertebrates and invertebrates.

  2. A review of modifying factors affecting usage of diagnostic rating scales in concussion management.

    PubMed

    Dessy, Alexa; Rasouli, Jonathan; Gometz, Alex; Choudhri, Tanvir

    2014-07-01

    Sport-related concussion has gained increasing recognition as a result of recent legislation, public health initiatives and media coverage. Moreover, there have been substantial paradigm shifts in the management of concussion. This article will discuss the variables that affect the use of diagnostic rating scales such as ImPACT and SCAT in the current management of concussed individuals. Specifically, patient-specific modifying factors affecting test interpretation, including age, gender, fitness level, psychiatric conditions, learning disorders and other components of medical history will be addressed, as well as methodological concerns with baseline testing. PMID:24908218

  3. Characteristics of the labile neurotoxin associated with nervous coccidiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Isler, C M; Bellamy, J E; Wobeser, G A

    1987-01-01

    Reported are the results of preliminary attempts to characterize the molecular weight, heat sensitivity and other features of a labile neurotoxin identified in the serum of calves exhibiting neurological signs in association with coccidial enteritis. The labile neurotoxin activity is heat labile (60 degrees C for 30 min) and is lost upon exposure to acidic pH (5.5) and cysteine (1.75 g/100 mL serum). Activity can be recovered from the precipitate of a 30% wt/vol solution of (NH4)2SO4 in serum. Ultrafiltration trials suggest that labile neurotoxin activity may be linked to a molecule of over 300,000 MW. PMID:2955866

  4. Using the Origin and Pawn, Positive Affect, CASPM, and Cognitive Anxiety Content Analysis Scales in Counseling Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viney, Linda L.; Caputi, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Content analysis scales apply rigorous measurement to verbal communications and make possible the quantification of text in counseling research. The limitations of the Origin and Pawn Scales (M. T. Westbrook & L. L. Viney, 1980), the Positive Affect Scale (M. T. Westbrook, 1976), the Content Analysis Scales of Psychosocial Maturity (CASPM; L. L.…

  5. Why is firefly oxyluciferin a notoriously labile substance?

    PubMed

    Maltsev, Oleg V; Nath, Naba K; Naumov, Panče; Hintermann, Lukas

    2014-01-13

    The chemistry of firefly bioluminescence is important for numerous applications in biochemistry and analytical chemistry. The emitter of this bioluminescent system, firefly oxyluciferin, is difficult to handle. The cause of its lability was clarified while its synthesis was reinvestigated. A side product was identified and characterized by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. The reason for the lability of oxyluciferin is now ascribed to autodimerization of the coexisting enol and keto forms in a Mannich-type reaction.

  6. Flocculated meltwater particles control Arctic land-sea fluxes of labile iron.

    PubMed

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Elberling, Bo; Winter, Christian; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest

    2016-01-01

    Glacial meltwater systems supply the Arctic coastal ocean with large volumes of sediment and potentially bioavailable forms of iron, nitrogen and carbon. The particulate fraction of this supply is significant but estuarine losses have been thought to limit the iron supply from land. Here, our results reveal how flocculation (particle aggregation) involving labile iron may increase horizontal transport rather than enhance deposition close to the source. This is shown by combining field observations in Disko Fjord, West Greenland, and laboratory experiments. Our data show how labile iron affects floc sizes, shapes and densities and consequently yields low settling velocities and extended sediment plumes. We highlight the importance of understanding the flocculation mechanisms when examining fluxes of meltwater transported iron in polar regions today and in the future, and we underline the influence of terrestrial hotspots on the nutrient and solute cycles in Arctic coastal waters. PMID:27050673

  7. Flocculated meltwater particles control Arctic land-sea fluxes of labile iron

    PubMed Central

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Elberling, Bo; Winter, Christian; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest

    2016-01-01

    Glacial meltwater systems supply the Arctic coastal ocean with large volumes of sediment and potentially bioavailable forms of iron, nitrogen and carbon. The particulate fraction of this supply is significant but estuarine losses have been thought to limit the iron supply from land. Here, our results reveal how flocculation (particle aggregation) involving labile iron may increase horizontal transport rather than enhance deposition close to the source. This is shown by combining field observations in Disko Fjord, West Greenland, and laboratory experiments. Our data show how labile iron affects floc sizes, shapes and densities and consequently yields low settling velocities and extended sediment plumes. We highlight the importance of understanding the flocculation mechanisms when examining fluxes of meltwater transported iron in polar regions today and in the future, and we underline the influence of terrestrial hotspots on the nutrient and solute cycles in Arctic coastal waters. PMID:27050673

  8. Flocculated meltwater particles control Arctic land-sea fluxes of labile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markussen, Thor Nygaard; Elberling, Bo; Winter, Christian; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest

    2016-04-01

    Glacial meltwater systems supply the Arctic coastal ocean with large volumes of sediment and potentially bioavailable forms of iron, nitrogen and carbon. The particulate fraction of this supply is significant but estuarine losses have been thought to limit the iron supply from land. Here, our results reveal how flocculation (particle aggregation) involving labile iron may increase horizontal transport rather than enhance deposition close to the source. This is shown by combining field observations in Disko Fjord, West Greenland, and laboratory experiments. Our data show how labile iron affects floc sizes, shapes and densities and consequently yields low settling velocities and extended sediment plumes. We highlight the importance of understanding the flocculation mechanisms when examining fluxes of meltwater transported iron in polar regions today and in the future, and we underline the influence of terrestrial hotspots on the nutrient and solute cycles in Arctic coastal waters.

  9. Scale-dependency of effective hydraulic conductivity on fire-affected hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhans, Christoph; Lane, Patrick N. J.; Nyman, Petter; Noske, Philip J.; Cawson, Jane G.; Oono, Akiko; Sheridan, Gary J.

    2016-07-01

    Effective hydraulic conductivity (Ke) for Hortonian overland flow modeling has been defined as a function of rainfall intensity and runon infiltration assuming a distribution of saturated hydraulic conductivities (Ks). But surface boundary condition during infiltration and its interactions with the distribution of Ks are not well represented in models. As a result, the mean value of the Ks distribution (KS¯), which is the central parameter for Ke, varies between scales. Here we quantify this discrepancy with a large infiltration data set comprising four different methods and scales from fire-affected hillslopes in SE Australia using a relatively simple yet widely used conceptual model of Ke. Ponded disk (0.002 m2) and ring infiltrometers (0.07 m2) were used at the small scales and rainfall simulations (3 m2) and small catchments (ca 3000 m2) at the larger scales. We compared KS¯ between methods measured at the same time and place. Disk and ring infiltrometer measurements had on average 4.8 times higher values of KS¯ than rainfall simulations and catchment-scale estimates. Furthermore, the distribution of Ks was not clearly log-normal and scale-independent, as supposed in the conceptual model. In our interpretation, water repellency and preferential flow paths increase the variance of the measured distribution of Ks and bias ponding toward areas of very low Ks during rainfall simulations and small catchment runoff events while areas with high preferential flow capacity remain water supply-limited more than the conceptual model of Ke predicts. The study highlights problems in the current theory of scaling runoff generation.

  10. The brain's emotional foundations of human personality and the Affective Neuroscience Personality Scales.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kenneth L; Panksepp, Jaak

    2011-10-01

    Six of the primary-process subcortical brain emotion systems - SEEKING, RAGE, FEAR, CARE, GRIEF and PLAY - are presented as foundational for human personality development, and hence as a potentially novel template for personality assessment as in the Affective Neurosciences Personality Scales (ANPS), described here. The ANPS was conceptualized as a potential clinical research tool, which would help experimentalists and clinicians situate subjects and clients in primary-process affective space. These emotion systems are reviewed in the context of a multi-tiered framing of consciousness spanning from primary affect, which encodes biological valences, to higher level tertiary (thought mediated) processing. Supporting neuroscience research is presented along with comparisons to Cloninger's Temperament and Character Inventory and the Five Factor Model (FFM). Suggestions are made for grounding the internal structure of the FFM on the primal emotional systems recognized in affective neuroscience, which may promote substantive dialog between human and animal research traditions. Personality is viewed in the context of Darwinian "continuity" with the inherited subcortical brain emotion systems being foundational, providing major forces for personality development in both humans and animals, and providing an affective infrastructure for an expanded five factor descriptive model applying to normal and clinical human populations as well as mammals generally. Links with ontogenetic and epigenetic models of personality development are also presented. Potential novel clinical applications of the CARE maternal-nurturance system and the PLAY system are also discussed.

  11. Large-scale climatic patterns and area affected by mountain pine beetle in British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macias Fauria, Marc; Johnson, E. A.

    2009-03-01

    We present evidence of high spatial synchrony in an area affected by mountain pine beetle (MPB, Dendroctonus ponderosae) across large distances in British Columbia, Canada, in a study of a spatially explicit database of an area affected by MPB-caused tree mortality for the period 1959-2002. We further show that large-scale climatic patterns (Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and, to a lesser degree, Arctic Oscillation (AO)) are strongly related to the observed MPB synchrony, and that they probably operate through controlling the frequency of extreme cold winter temperatures that affect MPB larvae survival. A smaller portion of the data's variability is linked to the onset of the two largest outbreaks in the studied period and might be attributed to dispersal from outbreak-prone areas or else to differences in microhabitat (e.g., host availability) in these regions. The onset of a warm PDO phase in 1976 favored MPB outbreaks by reducing the occurrence of extremely low winter temperatures province-wide. Likewise, the exceptionally high and persistent AO values of the late 1980s and 1990s enhanced MPB activity in the southern and northern parts of the region. Summer warmth cannot be discarded as an important agent at smaller scales.

  12. The Affective Slider: A Digital Self-Assessment Scale for the Measurement of Human Emotions.

    PubMed

    Betella, Alberto; Verschure, Paul F M J

    2016-01-01

    Self-assessment methods are broadly employed in emotion research for the collection of subjective affective ratings. The Self-Assessment Manikin (SAM), a pictorial scale developed in the eighties for the measurement of pleasure, arousal, and dominance, is still among the most popular self-reporting tools, despite having been conceived upon design principles which are today obsolete. By leveraging on state-of-the-art user interfaces and metacommunicative pictorial representations, we developed the Affective Slider (AS), a digital self-reporting tool composed of two slider controls for the quick assessment of pleasure and arousal. To empirically validate the AS, we conducted a systematic comparison between AS and SAM in a task involving the emotional assessment of a series of images taken from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS), a database composed of pictures representing a wide range of semantic categories often used as a benchmark in psychological studies. Our results show that the AS is equivalent to SAM in the self-assessment of pleasure and arousal, with two added advantages: the AS does not require written instructions and it can be easily reproduced in latest-generation digital devices, including smartphones and tablets. Moreover, we compared new and normative IAPS ratings and found a general drop in reported arousal of pictorial stimuli. Not only do our results demonstrate that legacy scales for the self-report of affect can be replaced with new measurement tools developed in accordance to modern design principles, but also that standardized sets of stimuli which are widely adopted in research on human emotion are not as effective as they were in the past due to a general desensitization towards highly arousing content. PMID:26849361

  13. The Affective Slider: A Digital Self-Assessment Scale for the Measurement of Human Emotions

    PubMed Central

    Betella, Alberto; Verschure, Paul F. M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Self-assessment methods are broadly employed in emotion research for the collection of subjective affective ratings. The Self-Assessment Manikin (SAM), a pictorial scale developed in the eighties for the measurement of pleasure, arousal, and dominance, is still among the most popular self-reporting tools, despite having been conceived upon design principles which are today obsolete. By leveraging on state-of-the-art user interfaces and metacommunicative pictorial representations, we developed the Affective Slider (AS), a digital self-reporting tool composed of two slider controls for the quick assessment of pleasure and arousal. To empirically validate the AS, we conducted a systematic comparison between AS and SAM in a task involving the emotional assessment of a series of images taken from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS), a database composed of pictures representing a wide range of semantic categories often used as a benchmark in psychological studies. Our results show that the AS is equivalent to SAM in the self-assessment of pleasure and arousal, with two added advantages: the AS does not require written instructions and it can be easily reproduced in latest-generation digital devices, including smartphones and tablets. Moreover, we compared new and normative IAPS ratings and found a general drop in reported arousal of pictorial stimuli. Not only do our results demonstrate that legacy scales for the self-report of affect can be replaced with new measurement tools developed in accordance to modern design principles, but also that standardized sets of stimuli which are widely adopted in research on human emotion are not as effective as they were in the past due to a general desensitization towards highly arousing content. PMID:26849361

  14. Total Dissolved Cobalt and Labile Cobalt in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, M. A.; Noble, A.

    2012-12-01

    This study presents the total and labile dissolved cobalt distributions from the North Atlantic GEOTRACES Zonal Transect expeditions of the fall of 2010 and 2011. Labile cobalt was detected in much of the water column below the euphotic zone, suggesting that strong cobalt binding ligands were not present in excess of the total cobalt concentration. Near complete complexation of cobalt was observed in surface waters, and linear relationships were observed when both total and labile cobalt were compared to phosphate in surface waters, indicative of a strong biological influence on cobalt cycling. Decoupling of cobalt and macronutrients in the surface waters was observed approaching the North American coast, and a relationship between cobalt and salinity was observed, suggesting that coastal inputs may dominate the distributions of cobalt there. In deep waters, both total and labile cobalt were generally lower in concentration than at intermediate depths, which is evidence of scavenging processes removing cobalt from the water column. Elevated concentrations of labile and total cobalt were observed in samples taken within the TAG hydrothermal plume, and a reverse relationship between cobalt and oxygen was observed in the western basin OMZ.

  15. Fate and lability of silver in soils: effect of ageing.

    PubMed

    Settimio, Lara; McLaughlin, Mike J; Kirby, Jason K; Langdon, Kate A; Lombi, Enzo; Donner, Erica; Scheckel, Kirk G

    2014-08-01

    The fate and lability of added soluble Ag in soils over time was examined by measurement of labile metal (E-value) by isotopic dilution using the (110m)Ag radioactive isotope and the solid-phase speciation of Ag by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. After two weeks of ageing the E-values for Ag decreased by 20-90% with a further decrease of 10-40% after six months. The overall decrease in labile Ag for all soils after the 6 month ageing period was 50-100%. The ageing was more rapid and pronounced in the alkaline soils. XANES results for Ag in soils indicated that for the majority of soils the added Ag(+) was reduced to metallic Ag over time, and associations with Fe-oxohydroxides and reduced S groups in organic matter also decreased Ag lability. Strong positive correlations were found between metallic Ag and non-labile Ag and between organic carbon and Ag bonded with S species.

  16. In situ high-resolution evaluation of labile arsenic and mercury in sediment of a large shallow lake.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Yao, Yu; Wang, Peifang; Hou, Jun; Qian, Jin; Yuan, Ye; Fan, Xiulei

    2016-01-15

    The precise evaluation of arsenic (As) and mercury (Hg) bioavailability in sediment is crucial to controlling As and Hg contamination, but traditional ex situ measurements hamper comprehensive analysis of labile As and Hg in sediment. In this study, we characterized in situ labile As and Hg in sediment of Lake Hongze using the zirconium (Zr) oxide diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique and 3-mercaptopropyl functionalized silica gel DGT, respectively. The concentrations of DGT-labile As and Hg in the sediment profiles were found to exhibit considerable variation, ranging from 0.15 to 4.15 μg L(-1) for As and from 0.04 to 1.35 μg L(-1) for Hg. As and Hg flux values, calculated based on the concentration gradients measured from the DGT profiles for both the overlying water and sediment close to the sediment-water interface, were used to determine the contamination status of As and Hg. Flux values of As and Hg were between -0.066 and 0.067 ng cm(-2)d(-1) and between -0.0187 and 0.0181 ng cm(-2)d(-1), respectively. The GNU's Not Unix R (GNU R) programming language was used to identify outliers of As and Hg at various depths at the sampling sites. The results indicate that the sites with the most outliers were all located in the regions that were seriously affected by contaminants from the Huai River. The DGT-labile As and Hg concentrations in the 0-30 mm layer were found to be significantly correlated with concentrations of labile As and Hg, total dissolved As and Hg, and total As and Hg in the overlying water, as indicated by ex situ measurements. Results show that DGT is a reliable and high-resolution technique that can be used for in situ monitoring of the labile fractions of As and Hg in sediment in fresh water bodies. PMID:26398454

  17. In situ high-resolution evaluation of labile arsenic and mercury in sediment of a large shallow lake.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Yao, Yu; Wang, Peifang; Hou, Jun; Qian, Jin; Yuan, Ye; Fan, Xiulei

    2016-01-15

    The precise evaluation of arsenic (As) and mercury (Hg) bioavailability in sediment is crucial to controlling As and Hg contamination, but traditional ex situ measurements hamper comprehensive analysis of labile As and Hg in sediment. In this study, we characterized in situ labile As and Hg in sediment of Lake Hongze using the zirconium (Zr) oxide diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique and 3-mercaptopropyl functionalized silica gel DGT, respectively. The concentrations of DGT-labile As and Hg in the sediment profiles were found to exhibit considerable variation, ranging from 0.15 to 4.15 μg L(-1) for As and from 0.04 to 1.35 μg L(-1) for Hg. As and Hg flux values, calculated based on the concentration gradients measured from the DGT profiles for both the overlying water and sediment close to the sediment-water interface, were used to determine the contamination status of As and Hg. Flux values of As and Hg were between -0.066 and 0.067 ng cm(-2)d(-1) and between -0.0187 and 0.0181 ng cm(-2)d(-1), respectively. The GNU's Not Unix R (GNU R) programming language was used to identify outliers of As and Hg at various depths at the sampling sites. The results indicate that the sites with the most outliers were all located in the regions that were seriously affected by contaminants from the Huai River. The DGT-labile As and Hg concentrations in the 0-30 mm layer were found to be significantly correlated with concentrations of labile As and Hg, total dissolved As and Hg, and total As and Hg in the overlying water, as indicated by ex situ measurements. Results show that DGT is a reliable and high-resolution technique that can be used for in situ monitoring of the labile fractions of As and Hg in sediment in fresh water bodies.

  18. Affective Video Retrieval: Violence Detection in Hollywood Movies by Large-Scale Segmental Feature Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Eyben, Florian; Weninger, Felix; Lehment, Nicolas; Schuller, Björn; Rigoll, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Without doubt general video and sound, as found in large multimedia archives, carry emotional information. Thus, audio and video retrieval by certain emotional categories or dimensions could play a central role for tomorrow's intelligent systems, enabling search for movies with a particular mood, computer aided scene and sound design in order to elicit certain emotions in the audience, etc. Yet, the lion's share of research in affective computing is exclusively focusing on signals conveyed by humans, such as affective speech. Uniting the fields of multimedia retrieval and affective computing is believed to lend to a multiplicity of interesting retrieval applications, and at the same time to benefit affective computing research, by moving its methodology “out of the lab” to real-world, diverse data. In this contribution, we address the problem of finding “disturbing” scenes in movies, a scenario that is highly relevant for computer-aided parental guidance. We apply large-scale segmental feature extraction combined with audio-visual classification to the particular task of detecting violence. Our system performs fully data-driven analysis including automatic segmentation. We evaluate the system in terms of mean average precision (MAP) on the official data set of the MediaEval 2012 evaluation campaign's Affect Task, which consists of 18 original Hollywood movies, achieving up to .398 MAP on unseen test data in full realism. An in-depth analysis of the worth of individual features with respect to the target class and the system errors is carried out and reveals the importance of peak-related audio feature extraction and low-level histogram-based video analysis. PMID:24391704

  19. [Techniques of preparation and indications of labile blood products].

    PubMed

    Clément, S

    2011-04-01

    Labile blood products are obtained from samples of whole blood or aphaeresis. The techniques of preparation evolve with technological advances, which allow both an increasing automation and an intensification of the sanitary safety of the blood products. Over the last ten years, thanks to the availability of new technologies, several measures have been introduced in order to reduce the risk of transmission of pathogens and prevent the onset of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI): leukoreduction, use of platelet storage solutions, inactivation of plasma and presumably of platelets in a very near future. The control of transfusion risk also depends on proper use of labile blood products. To assist the prescriber in his treatment options and to standardize practices, the French Agency for Sanitary Safety of Health Products has issued recommendations in terms of utilization of blood products that are detailed in this review of major labile blood products available.

  20. Repeated Labilization-Reconsolidation Processes Strengthen Declarative Memory in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Forcato, Cecilia; Rodríguez, María L. C.; Pedreira, María E.

    2011-01-01

    The idea that memories are immutable after consolidation has been challenged. Several reports have shown that after the presentation of a specific reminder, reactivated old memories become labile and again susceptible to amnesic agents. Such vulnerability diminishes with the progress of time and implies a re-stabilization phase, usually referred to as reconsolidation. To date, the main findings describe the mechanisms associated with the labilization-reconsolidation process, but little is known about its functionality from a biological standpoint. Indeed, two functions have been proposed. One suggests that destabilization of the original memory after the reminder allows the integration of new information into the background of the original memory (memory updating), and the other suggests that the labilization-reconsolidation process strengthens the original memory (memory strengthening). We have previously reported the reconsolidation of human declarative memories, demonstrating memory updating in the framework of reconsolidation. Here we deal with the strengthening function attributed to the reconsolidation process. We triggered labilization-reconsolidation processes successively by repeated presentations of the proper reminder. Participants learned an association between five cue-syllables and their respective response-syllables. Twenty-four hours later, the paired-associate verbal memory was labilized by exposing the subjects to one, two or four reminders. The List-memory was evaluated on Day 3 showing that the memory was improved when at least a second reminder was presented in the time window of the first labilization-reconsolidation process prompted by the earlier reminder. However, the improvement effect was revealed on Day 3, only when at least two reminders were presented on Day2 and not as a consequence of only retrieval. Therefore, we propose central concepts for the reconsolidation process, emphasizing its biological role and the parametrical constrains

  1. Repeated labilization-reconsolidation processes strengthen declarative memory in humans.

    PubMed

    Forcato, Cecilia; Rodríguez, María L C; Pedreira, María E

    2011-01-01

    The idea that memories are immutable after consolidation has been challenged. Several reports have shown that after the presentation of a specific reminder, reactivated old memories become labile and again susceptible to amnesic agents. Such vulnerability diminishes with the progress of time and implies a re-stabilization phase, usually referred to as reconsolidation. To date, the main findings describe the mechanisms associated with the labilization-reconsolidation process, but little is known about its functionality from a biological standpoint. Indeed, two functions have been proposed. One suggests that destabilization of the original memory after the reminder allows the integration of new information into the background of the original memory (memory updating), and the other suggests that the labilization-reconsolidation process strengthens the original memory (memory strengthening). We have previously reported the reconsolidation of human declarative memories, demonstrating memory updating in the framework of reconsolidation. Here we deal with the strengthening function attributed to the reconsolidation process. We triggered labilization-reconsolidation processes successively by repeated presentations of the proper reminder. Participants learned an association between five cue-syllables and their respective response-syllables. Twenty-four hours later, the paired-associate verbal memory was labilized by exposing the subjects to one, two or four reminders. The List-memory was evaluated on Day 3 showing that the memory was improved when at least a second reminder was presented in the time window of the first labilization-reconsolidation process prompted by the earlier reminder. However, the improvement effect was revealed on Day 3, only when at least two reminders were presented on Day 2 and not as a consequence of only retrieval. Therefore, we propose central concepts for the reconsolidation process, emphasizing its biological role and the parametrical

  2. Cholinergic and serotonergic modulations differentially affect large-scale functional networks in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Shah, Disha; Blockx, Ines; Keliris, Georgios A; Kara, Firat; Jonckers, Elisabeth; Verhoye, Marleen; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2016-07-01

    Resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI) is a widely implemented technique used to investigate large-scale topology in the human brain during health and disease. Studies in mice provide additional advantages, including the possibility to flexibly modulate the brain by pharmacological or genetic manipulations in combination with high-throughput functional connectivity (FC) investigations. Pharmacological modulations that target specific neurotransmitter systems, partly mimicking the effect of pathological events, could allow discriminating the effect of specific systems on functional network disruptions. The current study investigated the effect of cholinergic and serotonergic antagonists on large-scale brain networks in mice. The cholinergic system is involved in cognitive functions and is impaired in, e.g., Alzheimer's disease, while the serotonergic system is involved in emotional and introspective functions and is impaired in, e.g., Alzheimer's disease, depression and autism. Specific interest goes to the default-mode-network (DMN), which is studied extensively in humans and is affected in many neurological disorders. The results show that both cholinergic and serotonergic antagonists impaired the mouse DMN-like network similarly, except that cholinergic modulation additionally affected the retrosplenial cortex. This suggests that both neurotransmitter systems are involved in maintaining integrity of FC within the DMN-like network in mice. Cholinergic and serotonergic modulations also affected other functional networks, however, serotonergic modulation impaired the frontal and thalamus networks more extensively. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the utility of pharmacological rsfMRI in animal models to provide insights into the role of specific neurotransmitter systems on functional networks in neurological disorders. PMID:26195064

  3. Fine-scale urbanization affects Odonata species diversity in ponds of a megacity (Paris, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanmougin, Martin; Leprieur, Fabien; Loïs, Grégoire; Clergeau, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    Current developments in urban ecology include very few studies focused on pond ecosystems, though ponds are recognized as biodiversity hotspots. Using Odonata as an indicator model, we explored changes in species composition in ponds localized along an urban gradient of a megacity (Paris, France). We then assessed the relative importance of local- and landscape-scale variables in shaping Odonata α-diversity patterns using a model-averaging approach. Analyses were performed for adult (A) and adult plus exuviae (AE) census data. At 26 ponds, we recorded 657 adults and 815 exuviae belonging to 17 Odonata species. The results showed that the Odonata species assemblage composition was not determined by pond localization along the urban gradient. Similarly, pond characteristics were found to be similar among urban, suburban and periurban ponds. The analyses of AE census data revealed that fine-scale urbanization (i.e., increased density of buildings surrounding ponds) negatively affects Odonata α-diversity. In contrast, pond localization along the urban gradient weakly explained the α-diversity patterns. Several local-scale variables, such as the coverage of submerged macrophytes, were found to be significant drivers of Odonata α-diversity. Together, these results show that the degree of urbanization around ponds must be considered instead of pond localization along the urban gradient when assessing the potential impacts of urbanization on Odonata species diversity. This work also indicates the importance of exuviae sampling in understanding the response of Odonata to urbanization.

  4. Examining affect and perfectionism in relation to eating disorder symptoms among women with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Jason M; Mason, Tyler B; Utzinger, Linsey M; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Crosby, Ross D; Engel, Scott G; Mitchell, James E; Le Grange, Daniel; Crow, Scott J; Peterson, Carol B

    2016-07-30

    This study examined personality and affective variables in relation to eating disorder symptoms in anorexia nervosa (AN). Women (N=118) with DSM-IV AN completed baseline questionnaires (Beck Depression Inventory, Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale) and interviews (Eating Disorder Examination, Yale-Brown-Cornell Eating Disorder Scale), followed by two weeks of ecological momentary assessment (EMA) involving multiple daily reports of affective states and eating disorder behaviors. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted using eating disorder symptoms as dependent variables (i.e., EMA binge eating, EMA self-induced vomiting, eating disorder rituals, eating disorder preoccupations, dietary restraint). Predictor variables were maladaptive perfectionism (baseline), depressive symptoms (baseline), and affect lability (EMA). Results revealed that affect lability was independently associated with binge eating, whereas depressive symptoms were independently associated with self-induced vomiting. Depressive symptoms were independently associated with eating disorder rituals, whereas both depressive symptoms and maladaptive perfectionism were independently associated with eating disorder preoccupations. Finally, maladaptive perfectionism and affect lability were both independently associated with dietary restraint. This pattern of findings suggests the importance of affective and personality constructs in relation to eating disorder symptoms in AN and may highlight the importance of targeting these variables in the context of treatment.

  5. Examining affect and perfectionism in relation to eating disorder symptoms among women with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Jason M; Mason, Tyler B; Utzinger, Linsey M; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Crosby, Ross D; Engel, Scott G; Mitchell, James E; Le Grange, Daniel; Crow, Scott J; Peterson, Carol B

    2016-07-30

    This study examined personality and affective variables in relation to eating disorder symptoms in anorexia nervosa (AN). Women (N=118) with DSM-IV AN completed baseline questionnaires (Beck Depression Inventory, Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale) and interviews (Eating Disorder Examination, Yale-Brown-Cornell Eating Disorder Scale), followed by two weeks of ecological momentary assessment (EMA) involving multiple daily reports of affective states and eating disorder behaviors. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted using eating disorder symptoms as dependent variables (i.e., EMA binge eating, EMA self-induced vomiting, eating disorder rituals, eating disorder preoccupations, dietary restraint). Predictor variables were maladaptive perfectionism (baseline), depressive symptoms (baseline), and affect lability (EMA). Results revealed that affect lability was independently associated with binge eating, whereas depressive symptoms were independently associated with self-induced vomiting. Depressive symptoms were independently associated with eating disorder rituals, whereas both depressive symptoms and maladaptive perfectionism were independently associated with eating disorder preoccupations. Finally, maladaptive perfectionism and affect lability were both independently associated with dietary restraint. This pattern of findings suggests the importance of affective and personality constructs in relation to eating disorder symptoms in AN and may highlight the importance of targeting these variables in the context of treatment. PMID:27208513

  6. Scaling up nutrition in fragile and conflict-affected states: the pivotal role of governance.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sebastian A J; Perez-Ferrer, Carolina; Griffiths, Andrew; Brunner, Eric

    2015-02-01

    Acute and chronic undernutrition undermine conditions for health, stability and socioeconomic development across the developing world. Although fragile and conflict-affected states have some of the highest rates of undernutrition globally, their response to the multilateral 'Scaling Up Nutrition' (SUN) initiative in its first two-year period was ambivalent. The purpose of this research was to investigate factors affecting fragile and conflict-affected states' engagement with SUN, and to examine what differentiated those fragile states that joined SUN in its first phase from those that did not. Drawing on global databases (Unicef, World Bank, UNDP), and qualitative country case studies (Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Sierra Leone, Pakistan and Yemen) we used bivariate logistic regressions and principal component analysis to assess social, economic and political factors across 41 fragile states looking for systematic differences between those that had signed up to SUN before March 2013 (n = 16), and those that had not (n = 25). While prevalence of malnutrition, health system functioning and level of citizen empowerment had little or no impact on a fragile state's likelihood of joining SUN, the quality of governance (QOG) strongly predicted accession. SUN-signatory fragile states scored systematically better on the World Bank's Country Policy and Institutional Assessment (CPIA) and the Worldwide Governance Indicators 'effectiveness of government' indices. We conclude that strengthening governance in fragile states may enhance their engagement with initiatives such as SUN, but also (recognising the potential for endogeneity), that the way aid is structured and delivered in fragile states may be an underlying determinant of whether and how governance in such contexts improves. The research demonstrates that more nuanced analysis of conditions within and among countries classed as 'fragile and conflict-affected' is both possible and necessary if aid

  7. How to Compute Labile Metal-Ligand Equilibria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Levie, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The different methods used for computing labile metal-ligand complexes, which are suitable for an iterative computer solution, are illustrated. The ligand function has allowed students to relegate otherwise tedious iterations to a computer, while retaining complete control over what is calculated.

  8. Neuropsychological Correlates of Emotional Lability in Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banaschewski, Tobias; Jennen-Steinmetz, Christine; Brandeis, Daniel; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Kuntsi, Jonna; Poustka, Luise; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J.; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C.; Albrecht, Bjorn; Chen, Wai; Uebel, Henrik; Schlotz, Wolff; van der Meere, Jaap J.; Gill, Michael; Manor, Iris; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Oades, Robert D.; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Faraone, Stephen V.; Asherson, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Background: Emotional lability (EL) is commonly seen in patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The reasons for this association remain currently unknown. To address this question, we examined the relationship between ADHD and EL symptoms, and performance on a range of neuropsychological tasks to clarify whether EL symptoms…

  9. Floral resources and habitat affect the composition of hummingbirds at the local scale in tropical mountaintops.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, L C; Rodrigues, M

    2015-01-01

    Hummingbird communities tend to respond to variation in resources, having a positive relationship between abundance and diversity of food resources and the abundance and/or diversity of hummingbirds. Here we examined the influence of floral resource availability, as well as seasonality and type of habitat on the composition of hummingbird species. The study was carried out in two habitats of eastern Brazilian mountaintops. A gradient representative of the structure of hummingbird community, based on species composition, was obtained by the ordination of samples using the method of non-metric multidimensional scaling. The composition of hummingbird species was influenced by the type of habitat and floral resource availability, but not by seasonality. Hummingbird communities differ between habitats mainly due to the relative abundance of hummingbird species. The variation in composition of hummingbird species with the variation in floral resource availability may be related to differences in feeding habits of hummingbirds. Hummingbird species with the longest bills visited higher proportions of ornithophilous species, while hummingbirds with shorter bills visited higher proportions of non-ornithophilous species. The results demonstrate that at local-scale the composition of hummingbird species is affected by the type of habitat and floral resources availability, but not by seasonality.

  10. Development and validation of the Affect in Play Scale-brief rating version (APS-BR).

    PubMed

    Cordiano, Tori J Sacha; Russ, Sandra W; Short, Elizabeth J

    2008-01-01

    The Affect in Play Scale (APS; Russ, 1987, 2004) is one of few reliable, standardized measures of pretend play, yet the fact that it requires videotaping and extensive training to score compromises its clinical utility. In this study, we developed and validated a brief rating version (APS-BR) that does not require videotaping. Construct validity was established by comparing scores from the original APS and the APS-BR using an existing data set of videotaped play (n = 46). We examined associations between scores on the APS-BR and theoretically relevant measures of divergent thinking and emotional memories. Scores on the APS-BR related strongly to those on the APS, and the pattern of correlations for each scale and relevant criterion measures was similar in strength and direction, supporting the APS-BR as an alternate form of the APS. In addition, we completed a pilot study to examine the efficacy of using the APS-BR in its intended in vivo format (n = 28). Results from both studies suggest that the APS-BR is a promising brief measure of children's pretend play that can be substituted for the APS in clinical and research settings. PMID:18444095

  11. Floral resources and habitat affect the composition of hummingbirds at the local scale in tropical mountaintops.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, L C; Rodrigues, M

    2015-01-01

    Hummingbird communities tend to respond to variation in resources, having a positive relationship between abundance and diversity of food resources and the abundance and/or diversity of hummingbirds. Here we examined the influence of floral resource availability, as well as seasonality and type of habitat on the composition of hummingbird species. The study was carried out in two habitats of eastern Brazilian mountaintops. A gradient representative of the structure of hummingbird community, based on species composition, was obtained by the ordination of samples using the method of non-metric multidimensional scaling. The composition of hummingbird species was influenced by the type of habitat and floral resource availability, but not by seasonality. Hummingbird communities differ between habitats mainly due to the relative abundance of hummingbird species. The variation in composition of hummingbird species with the variation in floral resource availability may be related to differences in feeding habits of hummingbirds. Hummingbird species with the longest bills visited higher proportions of ornithophilous species, while hummingbirds with shorter bills visited higher proportions of non-ornithophilous species. The results demonstrate that at local-scale the composition of hummingbird species is affected by the type of habitat and floral resources availability, but not by seasonality. PMID:25945619

  12. Development and validation of the Affect in Play Scale-brief rating version (APS-BR).

    PubMed

    Cordiano, Tori J Sacha; Russ, Sandra W; Short, Elizabeth J

    2008-01-01

    The Affect in Play Scale (APS; Russ, 1987, 2004) is one of few reliable, standardized measures of pretend play, yet the fact that it requires videotaping and extensive training to score compromises its clinical utility. In this study, we developed and validated a brief rating version (APS-BR) that does not require videotaping. Construct validity was established by comparing scores from the original APS and the APS-BR using an existing data set of videotaped play (n = 46). We examined associations between scores on the APS-BR and theoretically relevant measures of divergent thinking and emotional memories. Scores on the APS-BR related strongly to those on the APS, and the pattern of correlations for each scale and relevant criterion measures was similar in strength and direction, supporting the APS-BR as an alternate form of the APS. In addition, we completed a pilot study to examine the efficacy of using the APS-BR in its intended in vivo format (n = 28). Results from both studies suggest that the APS-BR is a promising brief measure of children's pretend play that can be substituted for the APS in clinical and research settings.

  13. Simulating wind-affected snow accumulations at catchment to basin scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winstral, Adam; Marks, Danny; Gurney, Robert

    2013-05-01

    In non-forested mountain regions, wind plays a dominant role in determining snow accumulation and melt patterns. A new, computationally efficient algorithm for distributing the complex and heterogeneous effects of wind on snow distributions was developed. The distribution algorithm uses terrain structure, vegetation, and wind data to adjust commonly available precipitation data to simulate wind-affected accumulations. This research describes model development and application in three research catchments in the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed in southwest Idaho, USA. All three catchments feature highly variable snow distributions driven by wind. The algorithm was used to derive model forcings for Isnobal, a mass and energy balance distributed snow model. Development and initial testing took place in the Reynolds Mountain East catchment (0.36 km2) where R2 values for the wind-affected snow distributions ranged from 0.50 to 0.67 for four observation periods spanning two years. At the Upper Sheep Creek catchment (0.26 km2) R2 values for the wind-affected model were 0.66 and 0.70. These R2 values matched or exceeded previously published cross-validation results from regression-based statistical analyses of snow distributions in similar environments. In both catchments the wind-affected model accurately located large drift zones, snow-scoured slopes, and produced melt patterns consistent with observed streamflow. Models that did not account for wind effects produced relatively homogenous SWE distributions, R2 values approaching 0.0, and melt patterns inconsistent with observed streamflow. The Dobson Creek (14.0 km2) application incorporated elevation effects into the distribution routine and was conducted over a two-dimensional grid of 6.67 × 105 pixels. Comparisons with satellite-derived snow-covered-area again demonstrated that the model did an excellent job locating regions with wind-affected snow accumulations. This final application demonstrated that the

  14. Testing Different Versions of the Affective Neuroscience Personality Scales in a Clinical Sample

    PubMed Central

    Geir, Pedersen; Selsbakk, Johansen Merete; Theresa, Wilberg; Sigmund, Karterud

    2014-01-01

    Background As a tool to investigate the experiences of six primary emotions, Davis, Panksepp, and Normansell [1] developed the Affective Neuroscience Personality Scales (ANPS). However, the psychometric properties of the ANPS have been questioned, and in particular the factor structure. This study replicates earlier psychometric studies on ANPS in a sample of (546) personality disordered patients, and also includes ANPS-S, a recent short version of ANPS by Pingault and colleagues [2], and a truncated version of BANPS by Barrett and colleagues [3]. Methodology/Principal Findings The study of the full ANPS revealed acceptable internal consistencies of the primary emotion subscales, ranging from 0.74–0.87. However, factor analyses revealed poor to mediocre fit for a six factor solution. Correlational analyses, in addition, revealed too high correlations between PLAY and SEEK, and between SADNESS and FEAR. The two short versions displayed better psychometric properties. The range of internal consistency was 0.61–0.80 for the BANPS scales and 0.65–84 for the ANPS-S. Backward Cronbach Alpha Curves indicated potentials for improvement on all three versions of the questionnaire. Items retained in the short versions did not systematically cover the full theoretical content of the long scales, in particular for CARE and SADNESS in the BANPS. The major problems seem to reside in the operationalization of the CARE and SADNESS subscales of ANPS. Conclusions/Significance Further work needs to be done in order to realize a psychometrically sound instrument for the assessment of primary emotional experiences. PMID:25289939

  15. The Labile Limits of Forbidden Interactions.

    PubMed

    González-Varo, Juan P; Traveset, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Forbidden links are defined as pairwise interactions that are prevented by the biological traits of the species. We focus here on the neglected importance of intraspecific trait variation in the forbidden link concept. We show how intraspecific trait variability at different spatiotemporal scales, and through ontogeny, reduces the expected prevalence of forbidden interactions. We also highlight how behavior can foster interactions that, from traits, would be predicted to be forbidden. We therefore discuss the drawbacks of frameworks recently developed to infer biotic interactions using available trait data (mean values). Mispredictions can have disproportionate effects on inferences about community dynamics. Thus, we suggest including intraspecific variability in trait-based models and using them to guide the sampling of real interactions in the field for validation. PMID:27471077

  16. Factors affecting efficient in vitro micropropagation of Muscari muscarimi Medikus using twin bulb scale.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Cigdem Alev; Khawar, Khalid Mahmood; Unal, Fatma

    2015-03-01

    Endemic Muscari muscarimi Medikus is the most fragrant plant among Muscari species and has a high ornamental potential. The natural populations of M. muscarimi, are severely affected by increased environmental pollution and urbanization. There is a need to develop a micropropagation method that should serve effectively for commercial propagation and conservation. Therefore, the study targeted to set up a strategy for efficient in vitro bulblet regeneration system of M. muscarimi using twin scale bulb explants on 1.0 × MS medium containing 4.44, 8.88, 17.76 μM BAP (6-Benzylaminopurine) plus 2.685, 5.37, 10.74 μM NAA (α-Naphthalene acetic acid). Maximum number of 19 daughter axillary bulblets and 16 daughter adventitious bulblets per twin bulb scale explant was regenerated on 1.0 × MS medium containing 17.76 μM BAP plus 10.74 μM NAA and 17.76 μM BAP plus 2.685 μM NAA respectively. The daughter bulblets regenerated on twin bulb scales on 8 out of 9 regeneration treatment could be easily rooted on 1.0 × MS medium containing 4.9 μM IBA (Indole-3-butyric acid). The daughter bulblets regenerated on 9th treatment (1.0 × MS medium containing 17.76 μM BAP plus 10.74 μM NAA) were transferred to 1.0 × MS medium containing 30 g/l sucrose to break negative carry over effect of this dose of BAP-NAA, where they grew 2-3 roots of variable length. Daughter bulblet diameter was increased by culturing them on 1.0 × MS medium containing 4.44 μM BAP plus 5.37 μM NAA. The results verified that both age and the source of explants had significant effect on regeneration. In another set of experiments, twin scales were obtained from in vitro regenerated daughter bulblets, although they induced bulblets, yet their bulblet regeneration percentage, mean number of bulblets per explant and their diameter were significantly reduced. In vitro regenerated bulblets were acclimatized in growth chamber under ambient conditions of temperature and humidity on

  17. Factors affecting efficient in vitro micropropagation of Muscari muscarimi Medikus using twin bulb scale.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Cigdem Alev; Khawar, Khalid Mahmood; Unal, Fatma

    2015-03-01

    Endemic Muscari muscarimi Medikus is the most fragrant plant among Muscari species and has a high ornamental potential. The natural populations of M. muscarimi, are severely affected by increased environmental pollution and urbanization. There is a need to develop a micropropagation method that should serve effectively for commercial propagation and conservation. Therefore, the study targeted to set up a strategy for efficient in vitro bulblet regeneration system of M. muscarimi using twin scale bulb explants on 1.0 × MS medium containing 4.44, 8.88, 17.76 μM BAP (6-Benzylaminopurine) plus 2.685, 5.37, 10.74 μM NAA (α-Naphthalene acetic acid). Maximum number of 19 daughter axillary bulblets and 16 daughter adventitious bulblets per twin bulb scale explant was regenerated on 1.0 × MS medium containing 17.76 μM BAP plus 10.74 μM NAA and 17.76 μM BAP plus 2.685 μM NAA respectively. The daughter bulblets regenerated on twin bulb scales on 8 out of 9 regeneration treatment could be easily rooted on 1.0 × MS medium containing 4.9 μM IBA (Indole-3-butyric acid). The daughter bulblets regenerated on 9th treatment (1.0 × MS medium containing 17.76 μM BAP plus 10.74 μM NAA) were transferred to 1.0 × MS medium containing 30 g/l sucrose to break negative carry over effect of this dose of BAP-NAA, where they grew 2-3 roots of variable length. Daughter bulblet diameter was increased by culturing them on 1.0 × MS medium containing 4.44 μM BAP plus 5.37 μM NAA. The results verified that both age and the source of explants had significant effect on regeneration. In another set of experiments, twin scales were obtained from in vitro regenerated daughter bulblets, although they induced bulblets, yet their bulblet regeneration percentage, mean number of bulblets per explant and their diameter were significantly reduced. In vitro regenerated bulblets were acclimatized in growth chamber under ambient conditions of temperature and humidity on

  18. Quantification of Labile Soil Mercury by Stable Isotope Dilution Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetaya, Waleed; Huang, Jen-How; Osterwalder, Stefan; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element that can cause severe health problems to humans. Mercury is emitted to the atmosphere from both natural and anthropogenic sources and can be transported over long distances before it is deposited to aquatic and terrestrial environments. Aside from accumulation in soil solid phases, Hg deposited in soils may migrate to surface- and ground-water or enter the food chain, depending on its lability. There are many operationally-defined extraction methods proposed to quantify soil labile metals. However, these methods are by definition prone to inaccuracies such as non-selectivity, underestimation or overestimation of the labile metal pool. The isotopic dilution technique (ID) is currently the most promising method for discrimination between labile and non-labile metal fractions in soil with a minimum disturbance to soil-solid phases. ID assesses the reactive metal pool in soil by defining the fraction of metal both in solid and solution phases that is isotopically-exchangeable known as the 'E-value'. The 'E-value' represents the metal fraction in a dynamic equilibrium with the solution phase and is potentially accessible to plants. This is carried out by addition of an enriched metal isotope to soil suspensions and quantifying the fraction of metal that is able to freely exchange with the added isotope by measuring the equilibrium isotopic ratio by ICP-MS. E-value (mg kg‑1) is then calculated as follows: E-Value = (Msoil/ W) (CspikeVspike/ Mspike) (Iso1IAspike ‑Iso2IAspikeRss / Iso2IAsoil Rss - Iso1IAsoil) where M is the average atomic mass of the metal in the soil or the spike, W is the mass of soil (kg), Cspike is the concentration of the metal in the spike (mg L‑1), Vspike is the volume of spike (L), IA is isotopic abundance, and Rss is the equilibrium ratio of isotopic abundances (Iso1:Iso2). Isotopic dilution has been successfully applied to determine E-values for several elements. However, to our knowledge, this method has not

  19. Quantification of Labile Soil Mercury by Stable Isotope Dilution Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetaya, Waleed; Huang, Jen-How; Osterwalder, Stefan; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element that can cause severe health problems to humans. Mercury is emitted to the atmosphere from both natural and anthropogenic sources and can be transported over long distances before it is deposited to aquatic and terrestrial environments. Aside from accumulation in soil solid phases, Hg deposited in soils may migrate to surface- and ground-water or enter the food chain, depending on its lability. There are many operationally-defined extraction methods proposed to quantify soil labile metals. However, these methods are by definition prone to inaccuracies such as non-selectivity, underestimation or overestimation of the labile metal pool. The isotopic dilution technique (ID) is currently the most promising method for discrimination between labile and non-labile metal fractions in soil with a minimum disturbance to soil-solid phases. ID assesses the reactive metal pool in soil by defining the fraction of metal both in solid and solution phases that is isotopically-exchangeable known as the 'E-value'. The 'E-value' represents the metal fraction in a dynamic equilibrium with the solution phase and is potentially accessible to plants. This is carried out by addition of an enriched metal isotope to soil suspensions and quantifying the fraction of metal that is able to freely exchange with the added isotope by measuring the equilibrium isotopic ratio by ICP-MS. E-value (mg kg-1) is then calculated as follows: E-Value = (Msoil/ W) (CspikeVspike/ Mspike) (Iso1IAspike -Iso2IAspikeRss / Iso2IAsoil Rss - Iso1IAsoil) where M is the average atomic mass of the metal in the soil or the spike, W is the mass of soil (kg), Cspike is the concentration of the metal in the spike (mg L-1), Vspike is the volume of spike (L), IA is isotopic abundance, and Rss is the equilibrium ratio of isotopic abundances (Iso1:Iso2). Isotopic dilution has been successfully applied to determine E-values for several elements. However, to our knowledge, this method has not yet

  20. Large-scale brain networks are distinctly affected in right and left mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    de Campos, Brunno Machado; Coan, Ana Carolina; Lin Yasuda, Clarissa; Casseb, Raphael Fernandes; Cendes, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) with hippocampus sclerosis (HS) is associated with functional and structural alterations extending beyond the temporal regions and abnormal pattern of brain resting state networks (RSNs) connectivity. We hypothesized that the interaction of large-scale RSNs is differently affected in patients with right- and left-MTLE with HS compared to controls. We aimed to determine and characterize these alterations through the analysis of 12 RSNs, functionally parceled in 70 regions of interest (ROIs), from resting-state functional-MRIs of 99 subjects (52 controls, 26 right- and 21 left-MTLE patients with HS). Image preprocessing and statistical analysis were performed using UF(2) C-toolbox, which provided ROI-wise results for intranetwork and internetwork connectivity. Intranetwork abnormalities were observed in the dorsal default mode network (DMN) in both groups of patients and in the posterior salience network in right-MTLE. Both groups showed abnormal correlation between the dorsal-DMN and the posterior salience, as well as between the dorsal-DMN and the executive-control network. Patients with left-MTLE also showed reduced correlation between the dorsal-DMN and visuospatial network and increased correlation between bilateral thalamus and the posterior salience network. The ipsilateral hippocampus stood out as a central area of abnormalities. Alterations on left-MTLE expressed a low cluster coefficient, whereas the altered connections on right-MTLE showed low cluster coefficient in the DMN but high in the posterior salience regions. Both right- and left-MTLE patients with HS have widespread abnormal interactions of large-scale brain networks; however, all parameters evaluated indicate that left-MTLE has a more intricate bihemispheric dysfunction compared to right-MTLE. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3137-3152, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Hot Stuff: Lability of Forest Floor DOM to Aerobic Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbonniere, R. A.; Creed, I. F.; Kapila, R.; Collins, J.

    2004-05-01

    The hypothesis that the lability of DOM to aerobic microbial degradation to CO2 is related to its age and character is tested in an incubation study conducted using an assemblage of soil bacteria in their natural state. Extracts (WF) of leaf and forest floor material characterized by different degrees of degradation: green leaves, fresh fallen leaves, litter (one year weathering), fibric matter, hemic matter and peat were used in this study. The working hypothesis is that these extracts represent a chronosequence of degradation and DOM extracted from them might also represent a similar lability sequence. As well aliquots of the WF extracts were processed to remove DOM fractions. Thus a fulvic acid (FA) fraction was made by precipitating and removing humic acid, and a hydrophilic fraction (HPI) by removing hydrophobics from the FA using XAD-8 resin. Incubations were carried out on all three DOM solutions from each extract to determine if there were differences in lability among the fractions. When comparing the WF solutions for CO2 production, the green leaves, litter, fibric and hemic extracts showed approximately the same CO2 yield, on an equal C basis, and the fresh fallen leaves and peat produced less. For five of the six extracts the respective WF and HPI solutions yielded nearly the same quantity of CO2 per mg C suggesting that the HPI component contributes almost all the lability. Furthermore the magnitudes of the C-normalized CO2 yield for these solutions are similar to that for glucose, which fractionates as HPI. For the same five extracts the FA solution yielded lower quantities of CO2, on an equal C basis, than WF and HPI suggesting that the hydrophobic content of the extracts may inhibit aerobic degradation. The peat extract solutions yielded a different CO2 production distribution with the HPI only slightly higher than the FA which in turn was much greater than WF. The material from which this extract was made is much older and contains significant HA

  2. The Facial Affective Scale as a Predictor for Pain Unpleasantness When Children Undergo Immunizations

    PubMed Central

    Finnström, Berit; Mörelius, Evalotte

    2014-01-01

    Needle fear is a common problem in children undergoing immunization. To ensure that the individual child's needs are met during a painful procedure it would be beneficial to be able to predict whether there is a need for extra support. The self-reporting instrument facial affective scale (FAS) could have potential for this purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the FAS can predict pain unpleasantness in girls undergoing immunization. Girls, aged 11-12 years, reported their expected pain unpleasantness on the FAS at least two weeks before and then experienced pain unpleasantness immediately before each vaccination. The experienced pain unpleasantness during the vaccination was also reported immediately after each immunization. The level of anxiety was similarly assessed during each vaccination and supplemented with stress measures in relation to the procedure in order to assess and evaluate concurrent validity. The results show that the FAS is valid to predict pain unpleasantness in 11-12-year-old girls who undergo immunizations and that it has the potential to be a feasible instrument to identify children who are in need of extra support to cope with immunization. In conclusion, the FAS measurement can facilitate caring interventions. PMID:24734174

  3. Psychometric Characteristics of the EEAA (Scale of Affective Strategies in the Learning Process)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villardón-Gallego, Lourdes; Yániz, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Affective strategies for coping with affective states linked to the learning process may be oriented toward controlling emotions or toward controlling motivation. Both types affect performance, directly and indirectly. The objective of this research was to design an instrument for measuring the affective strategies used by university…

  4. Labile methyl balances for normal humans on various dietary regimens.

    PubMed

    Mudd, S H; Poole, J R

    1975-06-01

    Normal young adult male and female subjects were maintained on fixed dietary regimens which were either essentially normal or were semisynthetic and curtailed in methionine and choline intakes and virtually free of cystine. The subjects maintained stable weights and remained in positive nitrogen balance or within the zone of sulfur equilibrium. Choline intakes were calculated, and urinary excretions of creatinine, creatine, and sacrosine were measured. Creatinine excretions of male subjects on essentially normal diets outweighed the total intakes of labile methyl groups. Taking into account the excretions of additional methylated compounds, as judged from published values, it appears that methyl neogenesis must normally play a role in both males and females. When labile methyl intake is curtailed, de novo formation of methyl groups is quantitatively more significant than ingestion of preformed methyl moieties. On the normal diets used in these experiments, the average homocysteinyl moiety in males cycled between methionine and homocysteine at least 1.9 times before being converted to cystathionine. For females, the average number of cycles was at least 1.5. When labile methyl intake was curtailed, the average number of cycles rose to 3.9 for males and 3.0 for females under the conditions employed.

  5. Altered precipitation regime affects the function and composition of soil microbial communities on multiple time scales.

    PubMed

    Zeglin, L H; Bottomley, P J; Jumpponen, A; Rice, C W; Arango, M; Lindsley, A; McGowan, A; Mfombep, P; Myrold, D D

    2013-10-01

    Climate change models predict that future precipitation patterns will entail lower-frequency but larger rainfall events, increasing the duration of dry soil conditions. Resulting shifts in microbial C cycling activity could affect soil C storage. Further, microbial response to rainfall events may be constrained by the physiological or nutrient limitation stress of extended drought periods; thus seasonal or multiannual precipitation regimes may influence microbial activity following soil wet-up. We quantified rainfall-driven dynamics of microbial processes that affect soil C loss and retention, and microbial community composition, in soils from a long-term (14-year) field experiment contrasting "Ambient" and "Altered" (extended intervals between rainfalls) precipitation regimes. We collected soil before, the day following, and five days following 2.5-cm rainfall events during both moist and dry periods (June and September 2011; soil water potential = -0.01 and -0.83 MPa, respectively), and measured microbial respiration, microbial biomass, organic matter decomposition potential (extracellular enzyme activities), and microbial community composition (phospholipid fatty acids). The equivalent rainfall events caused equivalent microbial respiration responses in both treatments. In contrast, microbial biomass was higher and increased after rainfall in the Altered treatment soils only, thus microbial C use efficiency (CUE) was higher in Altered than Ambient treatments (0.70 +/- 0.03 > 0.46 +/- 0.10). CUE was also higher in dry (September) soils. C-acquiring enzyme activities (beta-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, and phenol oxidase) increased after rainfall in moist (June), but not dry (September) soils. Both microbial biomass C:N ratios and fungal:bacterial ratios were higher at lower soil water contents, suggesting a functional and/or population-level shift in the microbiota at low soil water contents, and microbial community composition also differed following wet

  6. Altered precipitation regime affects the function and composition of soil microbial communities on multiple time scales.

    PubMed

    Zeglin, L H; Bottomley, P J; Jumpponen, A; Rice, C W; Arango, M; Lindsley, A; McGowan, A; Mfombep, P; Myrold, D D

    2013-10-01

    Climate change models predict that future precipitation patterns will entail lower-frequency but larger rainfall events, increasing the duration of dry soil conditions. Resulting shifts in microbial C cycling activity could affect soil C storage. Further, microbial response to rainfall events may be constrained by the physiological or nutrient limitation stress of extended drought periods; thus seasonal or multiannual precipitation regimes may influence microbial activity following soil wet-up. We quantified rainfall-driven dynamics of microbial processes that affect soil C loss and retention, and microbial community composition, in soils from a long-term (14-year) field experiment contrasting "Ambient" and "Altered" (extended intervals between rainfalls) precipitation regimes. We collected soil before, the day following, and five days following 2.5-cm rainfall events during both moist and dry periods (June and September 2011; soil water potential = -0.01 and -0.83 MPa, respectively), and measured microbial respiration, microbial biomass, organic matter decomposition potential (extracellular enzyme activities), and microbial community composition (phospholipid fatty acids). The equivalent rainfall events caused equivalent microbial respiration responses in both treatments. In contrast, microbial biomass was higher and increased after rainfall in the Altered treatment soils only, thus microbial C use efficiency (CUE) was higher in Altered than Ambient treatments (0.70 +/- 0.03 > 0.46 +/- 0.10). CUE was also higher in dry (September) soils. C-acquiring enzyme activities (beta-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, and phenol oxidase) increased after rainfall in moist (June), but not dry (September) soils. Both microbial biomass C:N ratios and fungal:bacterial ratios were higher at lower soil water contents, suggesting a functional and/or population-level shift in the microbiota at low soil water contents, and microbial community composition also differed following wet

  7. Fluxionality and lability in rhenium 4'-hydroxyterpyridine complexes: evidence for an associative mechanism and correlated fluxionality and lability.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Moreira, Vanesa; Thorp-Greenwood, Flora L; Arthur, Richard J; Kariuki, Benson M; Jenkins, Robert L; Coogan, Michael P

    2010-08-28

    The complexes [ReX(CO)(3)(N,N-eta(2)-4'-hydroxy-2-2',6'-2''-terpyridine)] (X = Cl,Br,I) have been synthesised and their ligand exchange reactions and fluxionality of the terpyridine unit studied. The halides are far more labile in these species than in analogous bipyridines, and it is proposed that the ligand fluxionality is involved in this reactivity. Structural studies of the family are reported along with spectroscopic studies including variable temperature NMR which is used to demonstrate a negative entropy of activation for the fluxional process. Synthesis of an analogue which is incapable of fluxional behaviour confirms the link between fluxionality and lability in these complexes.

  8. Changes in labile soil organic matter fractions following land use change from monocropping to poplar-based agroforestry systems in a semiarid region of Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Mao, Rong; Zeng, De-Hui; Li, Lu-Jun; Hu, Ya-Lin

    2012-11-01

    Labile fractions of soil organic matter (SOM) respond rapidly to land management practices and can be used as a sensitive indicator of changes in SOM. However, there is little information about the effect of agroforestry practices on labile SOM fractions in semiarid regions of China. In order to test the effects of land use change from monocropping to agroforestry systems on labile SOM fractions, we investigated soil microbial biomass C (MBC) and N, particulate organic matter C (POMC) and N (POMN), as well as total organic C (TOC) and total N (TN) in the 0- to 15-cm and the 15- to 30-cm layers in 4-year-old poplar-based agroforestry systems and adjoining monocropping systems with two different soil textures (sandy loam and sandy clay loam) in a semiarid region of Northeast China. Our results showed that poplar-based agroforestry practices affected soil MBC, POMC, and POMN, albeit there was no significant difference in TOC and TN. Agroforestry practices increased MBC, POMC, and POMN in sandy clay loam soils. However, in sandy loam soils, agroforestry practices only increased MBC and even decreased POMC and POMN at the 0- to 15-cm layer. Our results suggest that labile SOM fractions respond sensitively to poplar-based agroforestry practices and can provide early information about the changes in SOM in semiarid regions of Northeast China and highlight that the effects of agroforestry practices on labile SOM fractions vary with soil texture.

  9. Clinical Assessment of Affective Instability: Comparing EMA indices, questionnaire reports, and retrospective recall

    PubMed Central

    Solhan, Marika B.; Trull, Timothy J.; Jahng, Seungmin; Wood, Phillip K.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional self-report measures of psychopathology may be influenced by a variety of recall biases. Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) reduces these biases by assessing individuals' experiences as they occur in their natural environments. This study examines the discrepancy between trait questionnaire, retrospective report, and EMA measures of affective instability in psychiatric outpatients either with a borderline personality diagnosis (BPD; n=58) or with a current major depressive episode or dysthymia (MDD/DYS; n=42). We examined the agreement of three trait measures of affective instability (Personality Assessment Inventory-Borderline Features scaleAffective Instability scale, Affect Intensity Measure, and the Affect Lability Scales) and one retrospective mood recall task with EMA indices of mood and mood instability. Results indicate only modest to moderate agreement between momentary and questionnaire assessments of trait affective instability; agreement between recalled mood changes and EMA indices was poor. Implications for clinical research and practice and possible applications of EMA methodology are discussed. PMID:19719353

  10. The role of affective instability and UPPS impulsivity in borderline personality disorder features.

    PubMed

    Tragesser, Sarah L; Robinson, R Joe

    2009-08-01

    Current theories of borderline personality disorder (BPD) suggest that extreme levels of affective instability/emotional dysregulation, impulsivity, or a combination of these traits account for the symptoms of BPD. The present study tested the extent to which personality measures of affective instability and impulsivity could account for BPD features in a nonclinical sample. One hundred forty-one undergraduates completed the Affective Lability Scale, the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale, and the Personality Assessment Inventory for Borderlines. Both affective instability and impulsivity were uniquely associated with BPD features. Shifts between euthymia and anger, and between anxiety and depression, were associated with BPD features, as were the urgency and (lack of) premeditation scales. Results indicated that specific BPD features may be differentially accounted for by affective instability vs. impulsivity, consistent with perspectives on BPD emphasizing combinations of affective instability and impulsivity as underlying dimensions of the disorder. PMID:19663657

  11. Toward Making the Invisible Visible Using a Scale: Prospective Teachers' Thoughts and Affective Reactions to Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akkuzu, Nalan; Uyulgan, Melis Arzu

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the development and initial validation of a feedback scale which measures the thoughts and affective reactions of prospective teachers concerning feedback on their teaching experiences. To reach this goal, data from 512 prospective teachers were used to test the internal consistency, exploratory and confirmative factor…

  12. The Consequences of Perfectionism Scale: Factorial Structure and Relationships with Perfectionism, Performance Perfectionism, Affect, and Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoeber, Joachim; Hoyle, Azina; Last, Freyja

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the Consequences of Perfectionism Scale (COPS) and its relationships with perfectionism, performance perfectionism, affect, and depressive symptoms in 202 university students using confirmatory factor analysis, correlations, and regression analyses. Results suggest that the COPS is a reliable and valid measure of positive…

  13. A Budyko framework for estimating how lateral redistribution affects large-scale evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouholahnejad, Elham; Kirchner, James W.

    2016-04-01

    , lateral redistribution can alter regional ET fluxes. Using this approach, one can obtain a first-order estimate for how much lateral redistribution may affect evapotranspiration rates at regional, continental, and global scales.

  14. Persistent Associative Plasticity at an Identified Synapse Underlying Classical Conditioning Becomes Labile with Short-Term Homosynaptic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Schacher, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Synapses express different forms of plasticity that contribute to different forms of memory, and both memory and plasticity can become labile after reactivation. We previously reported that a persistent form of nonassociative long-term facilitation (PNA-LTF) of the sensorimotor synapses in Aplysia californica, a cellular analog of long-term sensitization, became labile with short-term heterosynaptic reactivation and reversed when the reactivation was followed by incubation with the protein synthesis inhibitor rapamycin. Here we examined the reciprocal impact of different forms of short-term plasticity (reactivations) on a persistent form of associative long-term facilitation (PA-LTF), a cellular analog of classical conditioning, which was expressed at Aplysia sensorimotor synapses when a tetanic stimulation of the sensory neurons was paired with a brief application of serotonin on 2 consecutive days. The expression of short-term homosynaptic plasticity [post-tetanic potentiation or homosynaptic depression (HSD)], or short-term heterosynaptic plasticity [serotonin-induced facilitation or neuropeptide Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2 (FMRFa)-induced depression], at synapses expressing PA-LTF did not affect the maintenance of PA-LTF. The kinetics of HSD was attenuated at synapses expressing PA-LTF, which required activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Both PA-LTF and the attenuated kinetics of HSD were reversed by either a transient blockade of PKC activity or a homosynaptic, but not heterosynaptic, reactivation when paired with rapamycin. These results indicate that two different forms of persistent synaptic plasticity, PA-LTF and PNA-LTF, expressed at the same synapse become labile when reactivated by different stimuli. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Activity-dependent changes in neural circuits mediate long-term memories. Some forms of long-term memories become labile and can be reversed with specific types of reactivations, but the mechanism is complex. At the cellular level

  15. Multi-Scale Modeling of Liquid Phase Sintering Affected by Gravity: Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olevsky, Eugene; German, Randall M.

    2012-01-01

    A multi-scale simulation concept taking into account impact of gravity on liquid phase sintering is described. The gravity influence can be included at both the micro- and macro-scales. At the micro-scale, the diffusion mass-transport is directionally modified in the framework of kinetic Monte-Carlo simulations to include the impact of gravity. The micro-scale simulations can provide the values of the constitutive parameters for macroscopic sintering simulations. At the macro-scale, we are attempting to embed a continuum model of sintering into a finite-element framework that includes the gravity forces and substrate friction. If successful, the finite elements analysis will enable predictions relevant to space-based processing, including size and shape and property predictions. Model experiments are underway to support the models via extraction of viscosity moduli versus composition, particle size, heating rate, temperature and time.

  16. Reactivation of fear memory renders consolidated amygdala synapses labile.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongyeon; Song, Beomjong; Hong, Ingie; Kim, Jihye; Lee, Junuk; Park, Sungmo; Eom, Jae Yong; Lee, C Justin; Lee, Sukwon; Choi, Sukwoo

    2010-07-14

    It is believed that memory reactivation transiently renders consolidated memory labile and that this labile or deconsolidated memory is reconsolidated in a protein synthesis-dependent manner. The synaptic correlate of memory deconsolidation upon reactivation, however, has not been fully characterized. Here, we show that 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG), an agonist for group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRI), induces synaptic depotentiation only at thalamic input synapses onto the lateral amygdala (T-LA synapses) where synaptic potentiation is consolidated, but not at synapses where synaptic potentiation is not consolidated. Using this mGluRI-induced synaptic depotentiation (mGluRI-depotentiation) as a marker of consolidated synapses, we found that mGluRI-depotentiation correlated well with the state of memory deconsolidation and reconsolidation in a predictable manner. DHPG failed to induce mGluRI-depotentiation in slices prepared immediately after reactivation when the reactivated memory was deconsolidated. DHPG induced mGluRI-depotentiation 1 h after reactivation when the reactivated memory was reconsolidated, but it failed to do so when reconsolidation was blocked by a protein synthesis inhibitor. To test the memory-specificity of mGluRI-depotentiation, conditioned fear was acquired twice using two discriminative tones (2.8 and 20 kHz). Under this condition, mGluRI-depotentiation was fully impaired in slices prepared immediately after reactivation with both tones, whereas mGluRI-depotentiation was partially impaired immediately after reactivation with the 20 kHz tone. Consistently, microinjection of DHPG into the LA 1 h after reactivation reduced fear memory retention, whereas DHPG injection immediately after reactivation failed to do so. Our findings suggest that, upon memory reactivation, consolidated T-LA synapses enter a temporary labile state, displaying insensitivity to mGluRI-depotentiation.

  17. Do Vermont's Floodplains Constitute an Important Source of Labile Carbon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdrial, J. N.; Dolan, A.; Kemsley, M.

    2014-12-01

    Floodplains are extremely heterogeneous landscapes with respect to soil and sediment composition and can present an important source of carbon (C) during floods. For example, stream bank soils and sediments are zones of active erosion and deposition of sediment associated C. Due to the presence of plants, riparian soils contain high amounts of C that is exchanged between stream waters and banks. Abandoned channels and meander wetlands that remain hydrologically connected to the main channel contain high amounts of organic matter that can be flushed into the stream during high discharge. This heterogeneity, result of floodplain geomorphology, land cover and use, can profoundly impact the amount and type of dissolved organic matter (DOM) introduced into streams. In order to assess DOM characteristics leached from heterogeneous floodplain soils, aqueous soil extracts were performed on soil samples representative of different land covers (n=20) at four depths. Extracts were analyzed for dissolved organic C and total dissolved nitrogen with a Shimadzu C analyzer. Colored dissolved organic matter characteristics was measured with the Aqualog Fluorescence Spectrometer and quantified with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Preliminary data from three floodplains in Vermont (Connecticut, Missisquoi and Mad River) show a 3D variability of longitudinal, lateral, and vertical extents on water-extractable, mobile C. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations in meander swamp samples were found up to 9 times higher than in those of soils from agricultural field indicative of an important C source. Although C concentrations in adjacent fields were low, high abundance of labile C (indicated by tryptophan-like fluorescence) in water extracts from fields indicates recent biological production of C. This labile C is easily processed by microbes and transformed to the greenhouse gas CO2. These results provide important information on the contribution and lability of different floodplain

  18. Alkali lability of bacteriophage phi W-14 DNA.

    PubMed

    Lewis, H A; Miller, R C; Stone, J C; Warren, R A

    1975-12-01

    The molecular weight of bacteriophage phi W-14 DNA, determined by velocity sedimentation in neutral sucrose gradients, was 92 +/- 6 X 10(6). The DNA showed marked fragmentation in alkaline sucrose gradients. This fragmentation was not a consequence of preexisting single-strand interruptions in the DNA, since thermal denaturation of DNA yielded intact single strands. The alpha-putrescinylthymine groups in phi W-14 DNA appeared to be labile; some, or parts of some, of these groups were cleaved from the DNA in alkali. PMID:1202241

  19. Field experimental approach to bromide leaching as affected by scale-specific rainfall characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendroth, Ole; Vasquez, Vicente; Matocha, Christopher J.

    2011-06-01

    Although inherent soil spatial and temporal variabilities complicate analysis of solute leaching, impacts of specific processes associated with rainfall amount, intensity, and frequency on solute leaching under field conditions require investigation. The objective of this study was to introduce (1) a new experimental approach to quantify bromide (Br-) leaching under field conditions as influenced by rainfall characteristics and (2) analytical opportunities applicable to scale-specific spatial treatment distribution. The quantitative range of treatments was established in nonrandom periodically oscillating patterns. The characteristic length of a period over which a treatment fluctuates was considered the specific treatment scale. A Br- tracer study was established in the field with treatments applied at two different spatial scales. The tracer was applied with a sprayer in a transect of 32 plots, each 2 m long, followed by a site-specific sprinkler irrigation, and 128 soil cores subsequently taken at 0.5 m intervals and divided into 10-cm depth increments. The scale-specific associations between treatments and Br- center of mass (COM) were addressed. Treatments can be periodically imposed over specific scales and their spatial relationships quantified with semivariance and power spectral analysis. An additive state-space model was applied to separate the long- and short-wave components of Br- COM. Subsequently, the large-scale process was described in an autoregressive state-space model. The proposed experimental approach and the separation of small- and large-scale variability components support studying soil ecosystem processes that vary at different scales even in the presence of underlying large-scale trends that are currently considered obstacles in field research.

  20. Hourly Fluctuations in Labile Soil Phosphorus in Response to Climate Variability in a Wet Tropical Forest, La Selva, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecar, K. L.; Lawrence, D. C.; Das, R.; Clark, D. A.; Oberbauer, S. F.; Schwendenmann, L.

    2007-05-01

    Tropical rain forests are one of the most productive ecosystems in the world and play a significant role in the global carbon budget. Changes in phosphorus cycling dynamics as a result of on-going climate change have the potential to limit productivity in this ecosystem. Our objective was to determine hourly patterns in labile soil phosphorus throughout the day and explore possible mechanisms driving these patterns. We conducted an in situ experiment on soils from a wet tropical forest at La Selva Biological Station located in N.E. Costa Rica. A variety of climatic and biotic variables including temperature, precipitation, PAR, soil temperature, soil moisture and soil respiration were measured in order to determine their effect on labile phosphorus. Our results indicate that labile phosphorus does vary significantly throughout the day in response to a combination of climatic variables. An understanding of the mechanisms driving phosphorus availability at fine temporal scales can provide a valuable indicator of long term trends in phosphorus cycling dynamics.

  1. Labile neurotoxin in serum of calves with "nervous" coccidiosis.

    PubMed Central

    Isler, C M; Bellamy, J E; Wobeser, G A

    1987-01-01

    Mouse inoculation was used to test for the presence of a toxin in the serum, cerebrospinal fluid, and intestinal contents collected from cases of bovine enteric coccidiosis, with and without neurological signs, and from control calves. Intravenous inoculation of mice with 10 mL/kg of serum from calves showing nervous signs caused effects significantly different from those caused by the inoculation of serum from calves not showing nervous signs and from control calves. The effect was particularly evident in female mice. At this dosage severe neurological signs such as loss of righting reflex, seizures and death occurred only with serum from calves with "nervous coccidiosis". The results suggest that serum from the calves with neurological signs contains a neurotoxin. This toxin appears to be highly labile. It was not present in the cerebrospinal fluid at levels comparable to those in the serum. The significance of this labile neurotoxin with respect to the pathogenesis of the neurological signs associated with bovine enteric coccidiosis is unknown. PMID:2955865

  2. Choice of resolution by functional trait or taxonomy affects allometric scaling in soil food webs.

    PubMed

    Sechi, Valentina; Brussaard, Lijbert; De Goede, Ron G M; Rutgers, Michiel; Mulder, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Belowground organisms often display a shift in their mass-abundance scaling relationships due to environmental factors such as soil chemistry and atmospheric deposition. Here we present new empirical data that show strong differences in allometric scaling according to whether the resolution at the local scale is based on a taxonomic or a functional classification, while only slight differences arise according to soil environmental conditions. For the first time, isometry (an inverse 1:1 proportion) is recognized in mass-abundance relationships, providing a functional signal for constant biomass distribution in soil biota regardless of discrete trophic levels. Our findings are in contrast to those from aquatic ecosystems, in that higher trophic levels in soil biota are not a direct function of increasing body mass.

  3. An ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry index to estimate natural organic matter lability

    PubMed Central

    D'Andrilli, Juliana; Cooper, William T; Foreman, Christine M; Marshall, Alan G

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Determining the chemical constituents of natural organic matter (NOM) by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FTICRMS) remains the ultimate measure for probing its source material, evolution, and transport; however, lability and the fate of organic matter (OM) in the environment remain controversial. FTICRMS-derived elemental compositions are presented in this study to validate a new interpretative method to determine the extent of NOM lability from various environments. Methods FTICRMS data collected over the last decade from the same 9.4 tesla instrument using negative electrospray ionization at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, Florida, was used to validate the application of a NOM lability index. Solid-phase extraction cartridges were used to isolate the NOM prior to FTICRMS; mass spectral peaks were calibrated internally by commonly identified NOM homologous series, and molecular formulae were determined for NOM composition and lability analysis. Results A molecular lability boundary (MLB) was developed from the FTICRMS molecular data, visualized from van Krevelen diagrams, dividing the data into more and less labile constituents. NOM constituents above the MLB at H/C ≥1.5 correspond to more labile material, whereas NOM constituents below the MLB, H/C <1.5, exhibit less labile, more recalcitrant character. Of all marine, freshwater, and glacial environments considered for this study, glacial ecosystems were calculated to contain the most labile OM. Conclusions The MLB extends our interpretation of FTICRMS NOM molecular data to include a metric of lability, and generally ranked the OM environments from most to least labile as glacial > marine > freshwater. Applying the MLB is useful not only for individual NOM FTICRMS studies, but also provides a lability threshold to compare and contrast molecular data with other FTICRMS instruments that survey NOM from around the world. Copyright © 2015

  4. Mechanisms Affecting the Sustainability and Scale-up of a System-Wide Numeracy Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobis, Janette

    2011-01-01

    With deliberate system-level reform now being acted upon around the world, both successful and unsuccessful cases provide a rich source of knowledge from which we can learn to improve large-scale reform. Research surrounding the effectiveness of a theory-based system-wide numeracy reform operating in primary schools across Australia is examined to…

  5. FIELD-SCALE STUDIES: HOW DOES SOIL SAMPLE PRETREATMENT AFFECT REPRESENTATIVENESS ? (ABSTRACT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Samples from field-scale studies are very heterogeneous and can contain large soil and rock particles. Oversize materials are often removed before chemical analysis of the soil samples because it is not practical to include these materials. Is the extracted sample representativ...

  6. FIELD-SCALE STUDIES: HOW DOES SOIL SAMPLE PRETREATMENT AFFECT REPRESENTATIVENESS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Samples from field-scale studies are very heterogeneous and can contain large soil and rock particles. Oversize materials are often removed before chemical analysis of the soil samples because it is not practical to include these materials. Is the extracted sample representativ...

  7. Parameters affecting the resilience of scale-free networks to random failures.

    SciTech Connect

    Link, Hamilton E.; LaViolette, Randall A.; Lane, Terran; Saia, Jared

    2005-09-01

    It is commonly believed that scale-free networks are robust to massive numbers of random node deletions. For example, Cohen et al. in (1) study scale-free networks including some which approximate the measured degree distribution of the Internet. Their results suggest that if each node in this network failed independently with probability 0.99, most of the remaining nodes would still be connected in a giant component. In this paper, we show that a large and important subclass of scale-free networks are not robust to massive numbers of random node deletions. In particular, we study scale-free networks which have minimum node degree of 1 and a power-law degree distribution beginning with nodes of degree 1 (power-law networks). We show that, in a power-law network approximating the Internet's reported distribution, when the probability of deletion of each node is 0.5 only about 25% of the surviving nodes in the network remain connected in a giant component, and the giant component does not persist beyond a critical failure rate of 0.9. The new result is partially due to improved analytical accommodation of the large number of degree-0 nodes that result after node deletions. Our results apply to power-law networks with a wide range of power-law exponents, including Internet-like networks. We give both analytical and empirical evidence that such networks are not generally robust to massive random node deletions.

  8. Measuring One Aspect of Teachers' Affective States: Development of the Science Teachers' Pedagogical Discontentment Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southerland, Sherry A.; Nadelson, Louis; Sowell, Scot; Saka, Yavuz; Kahveci, Murat; Granger, Ellen M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research is to describe the development of the Science Teachers' Pedagogical Discontentment Scale, an instrument that measures the discontentment that arises in teachers as they recognize a mismatch between their own pedagogical beliefs and goals and their actual classroom practices. From a conceptual change perspective, we explore…

  9. Non-native salmonids affect amphibian occupancy at multiple spatial scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pilliod, David S.; Hossack, Blake R.; Bahls, Peter F.; Bull, Evelyn L.; Corn, Paul Stephen; Hokit, Grant; Maxell, Bryce A.; Munger, James C.; Wyrick, Aimee

    2010-01-01

    Aim The introduction of non-native species into aquatic environments has been linked with local extinctions and altered distributions of native species. We investigated the effect of non-native salmonids on the occupancy of two native amphibians, the long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum) and Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris), across three spatial scales: water bodies, small catchments and large catchments. Location Mountain lakes at ≥ 1500 m elevation were surveyed across the northern Rocky Mountains, USA. Methods We surveyed 2267 water bodies for amphibian occupancy (based on evidence of reproduction) and fish presence between 1986 and 2002 and modelled the probability of amphibian occupancy at each spatial scale in relation to habitat availability and quality and fish presence. Results After accounting for habitat features, we estimated that A. macrodactylum was 2.3 times more likely to breed in fishless water bodies than in water bodies with fish. Ambystoma macrodactylum also was more likely to occupy small catchments where none of the water bodies contained fish than in catchments where at least one water body contained fish. However, the probability of salamander occupancy in small catchments was also influenced by habitat availability (i.e. the number of water bodies within a catchment) and suitability of remaining fishless water bodies. We found no relationship between fish presence and salamander occupancy at the large-catchment scale, probably because of increased habitat availability. In contrast to A. macrodactylum, we found no relationship between fish presence and R. luteiventris occupancy at any scale. Main conclusions Our results suggest that the negative effects of non-native salmonids can extend beyond the boundaries of individual water bodies and increase A. macrodactylum extinction risk at landscape scales. We suspect that niche overlap between non-native fish and A. macrodactylum at higher elevations in the northern Rocky

  10. The Affective Reactivity Index: A Concise Irritability Scale for Clinical and Research Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringaris, Argyris; Goodman, Robert; Ferdinando, Sumudu; Razdan, Varun; Muhrer, Eli; Leibenluft, Ellen; Brotman, Melissa A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Irritable mood has recently become a matter of intense scientific interest. Here, we present data from two samples, one from the United States and the other from the United Kingdom, demonstrating the clinical and research utility of the parent- and self-report forms of the Affective Reactivity Index (ARI), a concise dimensional measure…

  11. Multi-scale habitat selection affects offspring survival in a precocial species.

    PubMed

    Bloom, P M; Clark, R G; Howerter, D W; Armstrong, L M

    2013-12-01

    In theory, habitat preferences should be adaptive. Accordingly, fitness is often assumed to be greater in preferred habitats; however, this assumption is rarely tested and, when it is, the results are often equivocal. Habitat preferences may not directly convey fitness advantages if animals are constrained by tradeoffs with other selective pressures like predation or food availability. We address unresolved questions about the survival consequences of habitat choices made during brood-rearing in a precocial species with exclusive maternal care (mallard Anas platyrhynchos, n = 582 radio-marked females on 27 sites over 8 years). We directly linked duckling survival with habitat selection patterns at two spatial scales using logistic regression and model selection techniques. At the landscape scale (55-80 km(2)), females that demonstrated stronger selection of areas with more cover type 4 wetlands and greater total cover type 3 wetland area (wetlands with large expanses of open water surrounded by either a narrow or wide peripheral band of vegetation, respectively) had lower duckling survival rates than did females that demonstrated weaker selection of these habitats. At finer scales (0.32-7.16 km(2)), females selected brood-rearing areas with a greater proportion of wetland habitat with no consequences for duckling survival. However, females that avoided woody perennial habitats composed of trees and shrubs fledged more ducklings. The relationship between habitat selection and survival depended on both spatial scale and habitats considered. Females did not consistently select brood-rearing habitats that conferred the greatest benefits, an unexpected finding, although one that has also been reported in other recent studies of breeding birds.

  12. Dynamic spatial patterns of leaf traits affect total respiration on the crown scale.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Hongxuan; Han, Fengsen; Li, Yuanzheng; Hu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Temporal and spatial variations of leaf traits caused conflicting conclusions and great estimating errors of total carbon budget on crown scales. However, there is no effective method to quantitatively describe and study heterogeneous patterns of crowns yet. In this study, dynamic spatial patterns of typical ecological factors on crown scales were investigated during two sky conditions, and CEZs (crown ecological zones) method was developed for spatial crown zoning, within which leaf traits were statistically unchanged. The influencing factors on hourly and spatial variations of leaf dark respiration (Rd) were analysed, and total crown respiration (Rt) was estimated based on patterns of CEZs. The results showed that dynamic spatial patterns of air temperature and light intensity changed significantly by CEZs in special periods and positions, but not continuously. The contributions of influencing factors on variations of Rd changed with crown depth and sky conditions, and total contributions of leaf structural and chemical traits were higher during sunny days than ecological factors, but lower during cloudy days. The estimated errors of Rt may be obviously reduced with CEZs. These results provided some references for scaling from leaves to crown, and technical foundations for expanding lab-control experiments to open field ones. PMID:27225586

  13. Dynamic spatial patterns of leaf traits affect total respiration on the crown scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Hongxuan; Han, Fengsen; Li, Yuanzheng; Hu, Dan

    2016-05-01

    Temporal and spatial variations of leaf traits caused conflicting conclusions and great estimating errors of total carbon budget on crown scales. However, there is no effective method to quantitatively describe and study heterogeneous patterns of crowns yet. In this study, dynamic spatial patterns of typical ecological factors on crown scales were investigated during two sky conditions, and CEZs (crown ecological zones) method was developed for spatial crown zoning, within which leaf traits were statistically unchanged. The influencing factors on hourly and spatial variations of leaf dark respiration (Rd) were analysed, and total crown respiration (Rt) was estimated based on patterns of CEZs. The results showed that dynamic spatial patterns of air temperature and light intensity changed significantly by CEZs in special periods and positions, but not continuously. The contributions of influencing factors on variations of Rd changed with crown depth and sky conditions, and total contributions of leaf structural and chemical traits were higher during sunny days than ecological factors, but lower during cloudy days. The estimated errors of Rt may be obviously reduced with CEZs. These results provided some references for scaling from leaves to crown, and technical foundations for expanding lab-control experiments to open field ones.

  14. Estimates of Marine Debris Accumulation on Beaches Are Strongly Affected by the Temporal Scale of Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen D. A.; Markic, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Marine debris is a global issue with impacts on marine organisms, ecological processes, aesthetics and economies. Consequently, there is increasing interest in quantifying the scale of the problem. Accumulation rates of debris on beaches have been advocated as a useful proxy for at-sea debris loads. However, here we show that past studies may have vastly underestimated the quantity of available debris because sampling was too infrequent. Our study of debris on a small beach in eastern Australia indicates that estimated daily accumulation rates decrease rapidly with increasing intervals between surveys, and the quantity of available debris is underestimated by 50% after only 3 days and by an order of magnitude after 1 month. As few past studies report sampling frequencies of less than a month, estimates of the scale of the marine debris problem need to be critically re-examined and scaled-up accordingly. These results reinforce similar, recent work advocating daily sampling as a standard approach for accurate quantification of available debris in coastal habitats. We outline an alternative approach whereby site-specific accumulation models are generated to correct bias when daily sampling is impractical. PMID:24367607

  15. Estimates of marine debris accumulation on beaches are strongly affected by the temporal scale of sampling.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen D A; Markic, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Marine debris is a global issue with impacts on marine organisms, ecological processes, aesthetics and economies. Consequently, there is increasing interest in quantifying the scale of the problem. Accumulation rates of debris on beaches have been advocated as a useful proxy for at-sea debris loads. However, here we show that past studies may have vastly underestimated the quantity of available debris because sampling was too infrequent. Our study of debris on a small beach in eastern Australia indicates that estimated daily accumulation rates decrease rapidly with increasing intervals between surveys, and the quantity of available debris is underestimated by 50% after only 3 days and by an order of magnitude after 1 month. As few past studies report sampling frequencies of less than a month, estimates of the scale of the marine debris problem need to be critically re-examined and scaled-up accordingly. These results reinforce similar, recent work advocating daily sampling as a standard approach for accurate quantification of available debris in coastal habitats. We outline an alternative approach whereby site-specific accumulation models are generated to correct bias when daily sampling is impractical.

  16. Estimates of marine debris accumulation on beaches are strongly affected by the temporal scale of sampling.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen D A; Markic, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Marine debris is a global issue with impacts on marine organisms, ecological processes, aesthetics and economies. Consequently, there is increasing interest in quantifying the scale of the problem. Accumulation rates of debris on beaches have been advocated as a useful proxy for at-sea debris loads. However, here we show that past studies may have vastly underestimated the quantity of available debris because sampling was too infrequent. Our study of debris on a small beach in eastern Australia indicates that estimated daily accumulation rates decrease rapidly with increasing intervals between surveys, and the quantity of available debris is underestimated by 50% after only 3 days and by an order of magnitude after 1 month. As few past studies report sampling frequencies of less than a month, estimates of the scale of the marine debris problem need to be critically re-examined and scaled-up accordingly. These results reinforce similar, recent work advocating daily sampling as a standard approach for accurate quantification of available debris in coastal habitats. We outline an alternative approach whereby site-specific accumulation models are generated to correct bias when daily sampling is impractical. PMID:24367607

  17. Dynamic spatial patterns of leaf traits affect total respiration on the crown scale

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Hongxuan; Han, Fengsen; Li, Yuanzheng; Hu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Temporal and spatial variations of leaf traits caused conflicting conclusions and great estimating errors of total carbon budget on crown scales. However, there is no effective method to quantitatively describe and study heterogeneous patterns of crowns yet. In this study, dynamic spatial patterns of typical ecological factors on crown scales were investigated during two sky conditions, and CEZs (crown ecological zones) method was developed for spatial crown zoning, within which leaf traits were statistically unchanged. The influencing factors on hourly and spatial variations of leaf dark respiration (Rd) were analysed, and total crown respiration (Rt) was estimated based on patterns of CEZs. The results showed that dynamic spatial patterns of air temperature and light intensity changed significantly by CEZs in special periods and positions, but not continuously. The contributions of influencing factors on variations of Rd changed with crown depth and sky conditions, and total contributions of leaf structural and chemical traits were higher during sunny days than ecological factors, but lower during cloudy days. The estimated errors of Rt may be obviously reduced with CEZs. These results provided some references for scaling from leaves to crown, and technical foundations for expanding lab-control experiments to open field ones. PMID:27225586

  18. Controlled Cu nanoparticle growth on wrinkle affecting deposition of large scale graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mohsin; Uddin, Md Jasim; Rahman, Muhammad Anisur; Kishi, Naoki; Soga, Tetsuo

    2016-09-01

    For Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) grown graphene on Cu substrate, deviation from atomic orientation in crystals may be resulted from diffusion of abnormalities in the form of Cu nanoparticle (NP) formation or defects and affects graphene quality and properties drastically. However, for the uniform graphene deposition, mechanism of nanoparticle formation and its suppression procedure need to be better understood. We report growth of graphene, affected by Cu nanoparticles (NPs) emergence on Cu substrates. In the current study, growth of these nanoparticles has been suppressed by fine tuning of carrier gas by two-fold gas insertion mechanism and hence, quality and uniformity of graphene is significantly improved. It has been also observed that during the deposition by CVD, Cu nanoparticles cluster preferentially on wrinkles or terrace of the Cu surface. Composition of NP is extensively studied and found to be the oxide nanoparticle of Cu. Our result, controlled NP growth affecting deposition of graphene layer would provide useful insight on the growth of uniform and high quality Single layer or bilayer graphene for numerous electronics applications.

  19. Dog paw preference shows lability and sex differences.

    PubMed

    Poyser, Fay; Caldwell, Christine; Cobb, Matthew

    2006-09-01

    Paw preferences in domestic dogs were studied using three different behavioural tests, recording frequency, duration and latency of paw use. No overall population tendency to right- or left-paw preference was seen on any of the tests, nor could a sub-population of handed dogs be detected. This failure to replicate previous reports that male dogs tend to use their left paws while females use their right was counterbalanced by a significant tendency for male dogs to use their left paw when initially presented with one test, and for the latency of left paw use to be significantly shorter than that for right paw use on these initial presentations. This significant effect disappeared with repeated presentation of the test, and was not present in females. We conclude that behavioural lateralisation appears to be a labile category in dogs, and may be related to brain hemispheric effects in responding to novel stimuli.

  20. The role of labile sulfur compounds in thermochemical sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrani, Alon; Zhang, Tongwei; Ma, Qisheng; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Tang, Yongchun

    2008-06-01

    The reduction of sulfate to sulfide coupled with the oxidation of hydrocarbons to carbon dioxide, commonly referred to as thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR), is an important abiotic alteration process that most commonly occurs in hot carbonate petroleum reservoirs. In the present study we focus on the role that organic labile sulfur compounds play in increasing the rate of TSR. A series of gold-tube hydrous pyrolysis experiments were conducted with n-octane and CaSO4 in the presence of reduced sulfur (e.g. H2S, S°, organic S) at temperatures of 330 and 356 °C under a constant confining pressure. The in-situ pH was buffered to 3.5 (∼6.3 at room temperature) with talc and silica. For comparison, three types of oil with different total S and labile S contents were reacted under similar conditions. The results show that the initial presence of organic or inorganic sulfur compounds increases the rate of TSR. However, organic sulfur compounds, such as 1-pentanethiol or diethyldisulfide, were significantly more effective in increasing the rate of TSR than H2S or elemental sulfur (on a mole S basis). The increase in rate is achieved at relatively low concentrations of 1-pentanethiol, less than 1 wt% of the total n-octane, which is comparable to the concentration of organic S that is common in many oils (∼0.3 wt%). We examined several potential reaction mechanisms to explain the observed reactivity of organic LSC. First, the release of H2S from the thermal degradation of thiols was discounted as an important mechanism due to the significantly greater reactivity of thiol compared to an equivalent amount of H2S. Second, we considered the generation of olefines in association with the elimination of H2S during thermal degradation of thiols because olefines are much more reactive than n-alkanes during TSR. In our experiments, olefines increased the rate of TSR, but were less effective than 1-pentanethiol and other organic LSC. Third, the thermal decomposition of

  1. The role of labile sulfur compounds in thermochemical sulfate reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amrani, A.; Zhang, T.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Tang, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The reduction of sulfate to sulfide coupled with the oxidation of hydrocarbons to carbon dioxide, commonly referred to as thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR), is an important abiotic alteration process that most commonly occurs in hot carbonate petroleum reservoirs. In the present study we focus on the role that organic labile sulfur compounds play in increasing the rate of TSR. A series of gold-tube hydrous pyrolysis experiments were conducted with n-octane and CaSO4 in the presence of reduced sulfur (e.g. H2S, S??, organic S) at temperatures of 330 and 356 ??C under a constant confining pressure. The in-situ pH was buffered to 3.5 (???6.3 at room temperature) with talc and silica. For comparison, three types of oil with different total S and labile S contents were reacted under similar conditions. The results show that the initial presence of organic or inorganic sulfur compounds increases the rate of TSR. However, organic sulfur compounds, such as 1-pentanethiol or diethyldisulfide, were significantly more effective in increasing the rate of TSR than H2S or elemental sulfur (on a mole S basis). The increase in rate is achieved at relatively low concentrations of 1-pentanethiol, less than 1 wt% of the total n-octane, which is comparable to the concentration of organic S that is common in many oils (???0.3 wt%). We examined several potential reaction mechanisms to explain the observed reactivity of organic LSC. First, the release of H2S from the thermal degradation of thiols was discounted as an important mechanism due to the significantly greater reactivity of thiol compared to an equivalent amount of H2S. Second, we considered the generation of olefines in association with the elimination of H2S during thermal degradation of thiols because olefines are much more reactive than n-alkanes during TSR. In our experiments, olefines increased the rate of TSR, but were less effective than 1-pentanethiol and other organic LSC. Third, the thermal decomposition of

  2. Lability of renal papillary tissue composition in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Atherton, J C

    1978-01-01

    1. The acute effects of (a) a minor operative procedure using ether as the anaesthetic, and (b) the administration of 0.9% saline as a single I.V. injection in the conscious rat, on renal tissue composition were studied in hydropenic and normally hydrated rats. 2. The operative procedure and anaesthesia induced a rapid and transient decrease in papillary osmolality in both hydropenic and normally hydrated animals, the important contributing factor being a significant decrease in urea content. 3. Administration of a small volume of saline caused a rapid decrease in urea content, and an increase in water content. 4. It is concluded that papillary composition is extremely labile, large changes being produced by relatively minor experimental procedures. PMID:624997

  3. Chemical leaching methods and measurements of marine labile particulate Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revels, B. N.; John, S.

    2012-12-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential nutrient for life. Yet its low solubility and concentration in the ocean limits marine phytoplankton productivity in many regions of the world. Dissolved phase Fe (<0.4μm) has traditionally been considered the most biologically accessible form, however, the particulate phase (>0.4μm) may contain an important, labile reservoir of Fe that may also be available to phytoplankton. However, concentration data alone cannot elucidate the sources of particulate Fe to the ocean and to what extent particulate iron may support phytoplankton growth. Isotopic analysis of natural particles may help to elucidate the biogeochemical cycling of Fe, though it is important to find a leaching method which accesses bioavailable Fe. Thirty-three different chemical leaches were performed on a marine sediment reference material, MESS-3. The combinations included four different acids (25% acetic acid, 0.01M HCl, 0.5M HCl, 0.1M H2SO4 at pH2), various redox conditions (0.02M hydroxylamine hydrochloride or 0.02M H2O2), three temperatures (25°C, 60°C, 90°C), and three time points (10 minutes, 2 hours, 24 hours). Leached Fe concentrations varied from 1mg/g to 35mg/g, with longer treatment times, stronger acids, and hotter temperatures generally associated with an increase in leached Fe. δ56Fe in these leaches varied from -1.0‰ to +0.2‰. Interestingly, regardless of leaching method used, there was a very similar relationship between the amount of Fe leached from the particles and the δ56Fe of this iron. Isotopically lighter δ56Fe values were associated with smaller amounts of leached Fe whereas isotopically heavier δ56Fe values were associated with larger amounts of leached Fe. Two alternate hypotheses could explain these data. Either, the particles may contain pools of isotopically light Fe that are easily accessed early in dissolution, or isotopically light Fe may be preferentially leached from the particle due to a kinetic isotope effect during dissolution

  4. Landscape-scale analysis of aboveground tree carbon stocks affected by mountain pine beetles in Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, B. C.; Hicke, J. A.; Hudak, A. T.

    2012-12-01

    Bark beetle outbreaks kill billions of trees in western North America, and the resulting tree mortality can significantly impact local and regional carbon cycling. However, substantial variability in mortality occurs within outbreak areas. Our objective was to quantify landscape-scale effects of beetle infestations on aboveground carbon (AGC) stocks using field observations and remotely sensed data across a 5054 ha study area that had experienced a mountain pine beetle outbreak. Tree mortality was classified using multispectral imagery that separated green, red, and gray trees, and models relating field observations of AGC to LiDAR data were used to map AGC. We combined mortality and AGC maps to quantify AGC in beetle-killed trees. Thirty-nine per cent of the forested area was killed by beetles, with large spatial variability in mortality severity. For the entire study area, 40-50% of AGC was contained in beetle-killed trees. When considered on a per-hectare basis, 75-89% of the study area had >25% AGC in killed trees and 3-6% of the study area had >75% of the AGC in killed trees. Our results show that despite high variability in tree mortality within an outbreak area, bark beetle epidemics can have a large impact on AGC stocks at the landscape scale.

  5. Factors affecting the spatial patterns of soil infiltration capacity at the hillslope scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Winnie; Coles, Anna; Appels, Willemijn; Hopp, Luisa; McDonnell, Jeffrey

    2014-05-01

    The quantification of soil infiltration capacity (Ic) and its relation to soil properties have been the subject of many studies in the past decades. However, the controls on the spatial organization of infiltration capacity in the landscape are still poorly understood. A better understanding of the patterns of Ic is important since these patterns govern runoff generation and possible threshold runoff responses in low-angled terrain prone to overland flow. In this study we present spatial patterns of Ic on a 5 ha low-angled agricultural field in Southern Saskatchewan and explore above- and below-ground controls. The study site is located in the semi-arid region of western Canada with a mean annual precipitation of 350 mm. Runoff on these loess soils (Brown Chernozems) is mainly generated during spring snowmelt and occurs as infiltration-excess overland flow over frozen ground. Hillslopes in that region typically have a slope of 1-4%. Infiltration capacity was measured on the 5 ha field in late summer 2013 at 63 randomly distributed locations, using a single ring infiltrometer (Cornell Sprinkle Infiltrometer). Geostatistical analyses were carried out to explore the spatial organization of Ic. Soil depth was measured at 17 locations across the field, the roughness of the soil surface was described for each Ic measuring location and the microtopography on a 456 cm2 area was determined at 60 locations. Hillslope-scale topographic controls will be examined by correlating terrain indices with the Ic pattern. Furthermore, three dye tracer experiments with Brilliant Blue were carried out at a low, medium and high Ic spot to investigate the question if local scale macroporosity can explain the spatial distribution of Ic. Infiltration capacities range from 0 to 79.4 mm h-1 with a median of 11.7 mm h-1 and show no significant correlation with surface roughness, microtopography or soil depth. However, first geostatistical analyses suggest that there is a spatial organization of

  6. Simulation of normal, carrier and affected controls for large-scale genotyping of cattle for factor XI deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyaya, P N; Jha, M; Muraleedharan, P; Gupta, R R; Rathod, R N; Mehta, H H; Khoda, V K

    2006-01-01

    An insertion mutation within exon 12 of the factor XI gene has been described in Holstein cattle. This has opened the prospect for large-scale screening of cattle using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique for the rapid identification of heterozygous animals. To facilitate such a screening process, the mutant and normal alleles of factor XI gene, represented by 244- and 320-bp PCR amplified fragments, were individually cloned in Escherichia coli using a multicopy plasmid cloning vehicle to generate pFXI-N and pFXI-M, respectively. The authenticity of the inserts was confirmed by nucleotide sequencing. A nested PCR method was developed, by which PCR amplicons generated from primers with annealing sites on the recombinant plasmids and by flanking the insert were used as templates for amplification of the diagnostic products using factor XI gene-specific primers. An equimolar mixture of both PCR amplicons, originating from pFXI-N and pFXI-M, constituted the carrier control while the individual amplicons were the affected and normal controls. The controls were used as references for in-gel comparison to screen a population of 307 cattle and 259 water buffaloes; the frequency of the mutant allele was found to be 0. No DNA size standards were required in this study. The simulated control DNA samples representing normal, carrier and affected cattle have the potential to help in large-scale screening of a cattle population for individuals that are carriers or affected by factor XI deficiency.

  7. Spatial Scale and Field Management Affect Patterns of Phosphorus Loss in Cranberry Floodwaters.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Casey D; Kleinman, Peter J A; DeMoranville, Carolyn J

    2016-01-01

    Although cranberries ( Ait.) are indigenous to the northeastern United States, phosphorus (P) fertilizer additions and periodic flooding make commercial cranberry a potential source of P to the region's lakes and streams. In this study, we report values of P export in cranberry floodwaters that range from <0.8 to 4.7 kg P ha, generally reflecting differences in the hydrological, edaphic, and management factors underlying soil P transfer to floodwater. The relatively high P loading rate (4.7 P kg P ha) was associated with harvest flooding of organic-rich soils. Periods of winter flooding and the discharge of harvest floodwater from mineral soils resulted in relatively low P loss (<0.8 kg P ha). Increases in concentrations of total dissolved P (DP) and total particulate P (PP) in floodwater as stage decreased below the surface of the cranberry bed were consistent with the transport of dissolved P in soil porewater and mobilization of particulate P in ditches. Variations in floodwater DP, as well as conservative and reactive tracer concentrations, suggested that the processes by which soil P is released to porewater included desorption of near-surface soil P and anaerobic dissolution of iron-P compounds deeper in the soil profile. At the farm scale, concentrations of DP and PP steadily increased over time, presumably because drainage waters from beds farther upgradient had longer contact times with P-rich sources, such as soil porewater and ditch sediments. Overall, the study illustrates the role that scale-dependent processes impart on patterns of P loss in agricultural production systems. PMID:26828184

  8. Exome Sequencing of 75 Individuals from Multiply Affected Coeliac Families and Large Scale Resequencing Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Vanisha; Bockett, Nicholas A.; Levine, Adam P.; Mirza, Muddassar M.; Hunt, Karen A.; Ciclitira, Paul J.; Hummerich, Holger; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Simpson, Michael A.; Plagnol, Vincent; van Heel, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Coeliac disease (CeD) is a highly heritable common autoimmune disease involving chronic small intestinal inflammation in response to dietary wheat. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region, and 40 newer regions identified by genome wide association studies (GWAS) and dense fine mapping, account for ∼40% of the disease heritability. We hypothesized that in pedigrees with multiple individuals with CeD rare [minor allele frequency (MAF) <0.5%] mutations of larger effect size (odds ratios of ∼ 2–5) might exist. We sequenced the exomes of 75 coeliac individuals of European ancestry from 55 multiply affected families. We selected interesting variants and genes for further follow up using a combination of: an assessment of shared variants between related subjects, a model-free linkage test, and gene burden tests for multiple, potentially causal, variants. We next performed highly multiplexed amplicon resequencing of all RefSeq exons from 24 candidate genes selected on the basis of the exome sequencing data in 2,248 unrelated coeliac cases and 2,230 controls. 1,335 variants with a 99.9% genotyping call rate were observed in 4,478 samples, of which 939 were present in coding regions of 24 genes (Ti/Tv 2.99). 91.7% of coding variants were rare (MAF <0.5%) and 60% were novel. Gene burden tests performed on rare functional variants identified no significant associations (p<1×10−3) in the resequenced candidate genes. Our strategy of sequencing multiply affected families with deep follow up of candidate genes has not identified any new CeD risk mutations. PMID:25635822

  9. How do slope and surface roughness affect plot-scale overland flow connectivity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peñuela, Andrés; Javaux, Mathieu; Bielders, Charles L.

    2015-09-01

    Surface micro-topography and slope drive the hydrological response of plots through the gradual filling of depressions as well as the establishment of hydraulic connections between overflowing depressions. Therefore, quantifying and understanding the effects of surface roughness and slope on plot-scale overland flow connectivity is crucial to improve current hydrological modeling and runoff prediction. This study aimed at establishing predictive equations relating structural and functional connectivity indicators in function of slope and roughness. The Relative Surface Connection function (RSCf) was used as a functional connectivity indicator was applied. Three characteristic parameters were defined to characterize the RSCf: the surface initially connected to the outlet, the connectivity threshold and the maximum depression storage (DSmax). Gaussian surface elevation fields (6 m × 6 m) were generated for a range of slopes and roughnesses (sill σ and range R of the variogram). A full factorial of 6 slopes (0-15%), 6 values of R (50-400 mm) and 6 values of σ (2-40 mm) was considered, and the RSCf calculated for 10 realizations of each combination. Results showed that the characteristic parameters of the RSCf are greatly influenced by R, σ and slope. At low slopes and high ratios of σ/2R, the characteristic parameters of the RSCf appear linked to a single component of the surface roughness (R or σ). On the contrary, both R and σ are needed to predict the RSCf at high slopes and low ratios of σ/2R. A simple conceptualization of surface depressions as rectangles, whose shape was determined by R and σ, allowed deriving simple mathematical expressions to estimate the characteristic parameters of the RSCf in function of R, σ and slope. In the case of DSmax, the proposed equation performed better than previous empirical expressions found in the literature which do not account for the horizontal component of the surface roughness. The proposed expressions allow

  10. Does temperature affect the accuracy of vented pressure transducer in fine-scale water level measurement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Higgins, C. W.

    2015-03-01

    Submersible pressure transducers have been utilized for collecting water level data since the early 1960s. Together with a digital data logger, it is a convenient way to record water level fluctuations for long-term monitoring. Despite the wide use of pressure transducers for water level monitoring, little has been reported regarding their accuracy and performance under field conditions. The effects of temperature fluctuations on the output of vented pressure transducers were considered in this study. The pressure transducers were tested under both laboratory and field conditions. The results of this study indicate that temperature fluctuation has a strong effect on the transducer output. Rapid changes in temperature introduce noise and fluctuations in the water level readings under a constant hydraulic head while the absolute temperature is also related to sensor errors. The former is attributed to venting and the latter is attributed to temperature compensation effects in the strain gauges. Individual pressure transducers responded differently to the thermal fluctuations in the same testing environment. In the field of surface hydrology, especially when monitoring fine-scale water level fluctuations, ignoring or failing to compensate for the temperature effect can introduce considerable error into pressure transducer readings. It is recommended that a performance test for the pressure transducer is conducted before field deployment.

  11. Functional properties as affected by laboratory-scale parboiling of rough rice and brown rice.

    PubMed

    Patindol, J; Newton, J; Wang, Y-J

    2008-10-01

    Rough rice (RR) is the conventional feedstock for parboiling. The use of brown rice (BR) instead of RR is gaining interest because it results in shorter processing time and lower energy requirement. This study compared the functional properties of milled parboiled rice under different parboiling conditions from RR and BR. Presoaked RR and BR from cultivars Bolivar, Cheniere, Dixiebelle, and Wells were parboiled under mild (20 min, 100 degrees C, 0 kPa) and severe (20 min, 120 degrees C, 98 kPa) laboratory-scale conditions. Head rice yield improved on the RR and BR samples subjected to severe parboiling and was comparable to that of a commercially parboiled sample. Mild parboiling of BR resulted in lower head rice yields. Parboiling generally resulted in decreased head rice whiteness, decreased apparent amylose, increased total lipid, and sparingly changed protein content. Under the same parboiling conditions, the extent of starch gelatinization was higher for BR compared to RR as manifested by some distinct differences in pasting and thermal properties. The cooking characteristics (water uptake ratio, leached materials, and volumetric expansion) and cooked rice texture (hardness and stickiness) of RR and BR subjected to severe parboiling were fairly comparable. Differences in parboiled rice functional properties due to cultivar effect were evident. PMID:19019108

  12. Why does offspring size affect performance? Integrating metabolic scaling with life-history theory.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Amanda K; White, Craig R; Marshall, Dustin J

    2015-11-22

    Within species, larger offspring typically outperform smaller offspring. While the relationship between offspring size and performance is ubiquitous, the cause of this relationship remains elusive. By linking metabolic and life-history theory, we provide a general explanation for why larger offspring perform better than smaller offspring. Using high-throughput respirometry arrays, we link metabolic rate to offspring size in two species of marine bryozoan. We found that metabolism scales allometrically with offspring size in both species: while larger offspring use absolutely more energy than smaller offspring, larger offspring use proportionally less of their maternally derived energy throughout the dependent, non-feeding phase. The increased metabolic efficiency of larger offspring while dependent on maternal investment may explain offspring size effects-larger offspring reach nutritional independence (feed for themselves) with a higher proportion of energy relative to structure than smaller offspring. These findings offer a potentially universal explanation for why larger offspring tend to perform better than smaller offspring but studies on other taxa are needed.

  13. Why does offspring size affect performance? Integrating metabolic scaling with life-history theory.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Amanda K; White, Craig R; Marshall, Dustin J

    2015-11-22

    Within species, larger offspring typically outperform smaller offspring. While the relationship between offspring size and performance is ubiquitous, the cause of this relationship remains elusive. By linking metabolic and life-history theory, we provide a general explanation for why larger offspring perform better than smaller offspring. Using high-throughput respirometry arrays, we link metabolic rate to offspring size in two species of marine bryozoan. We found that metabolism scales allometrically with offspring size in both species: while larger offspring use absolutely more energy than smaller offspring, larger offspring use proportionally less of their maternally derived energy throughout the dependent, non-feeding phase. The increased metabolic efficiency of larger offspring while dependent on maternal investment may explain offspring size effects-larger offspring reach nutritional independence (feed for themselves) with a higher proportion of energy relative to structure than smaller offspring. These findings offer a potentially universal explanation for why larger offspring tend to perform better than smaller offspring but studies on other taxa are needed. PMID:26559952

  14. Impacts of Labile Organic Carbon Concentration on Organic and Inorganic Nitrogen Utilization by a Stream Biofilm Bacterial Community

    PubMed Central

    Leff, Laura G.

    2013-01-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, carbon (C) availability strongly influences nitrogen (N) dynamics. One manifestation of this linkage is the importance in the dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), which can serve as both a C and an N source, yet our knowledge of how specific properties of DOM influence N dynamics are limited. To empirically examine the impact of labile DOM on the responses of bacteria to DON and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), bacterial abundance and community composition were examined in controlled laboratory microcosms subjected to various combinations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), DON, and DIN treatments. Bacterial communities that had colonized glass beads incubated in a stream were treated with various glucose concentrations and combinations of inorganic and organic N (derived from algal exudate, bacterial protein, and humic matter). The results revealed a strong influence of C availability on bacterial utilization of DON and DIN, with preferential uptake of DON under low C concentrations. Bacterial DON uptake was affected by the concentration and by its chemical nature (labile versus recalcitrant). Labile organic N sources (algal exudate and bacterial protein) were utilized equally well as DIN as an N source, but this was not the case for the recalcitrant humic matter DON treatment. Clear differences in bacterial community composition among treatments were observed based on terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms (T-RFLP) of 16S rRNA genes. C, DIN, and DON treatments likely drove changes in bacterial community composition that in turn affected the rates of DON and DIN utilization under various C concentrations. PMID:24038688

  15. Fractal Scaling of Particle Size Distribution and Relationships with Topsoil Properties Affected by Biological Soil Crusts

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guang-Lei; Ding, Guo-Dong; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Qin, Shu-Gao; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Bao, Yan-Feng; Liu, Yun-Dong; Wan, Li; Deng, Ji-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Background Biological soil crusts are common components of desert ecosystem; they cover ground surface and interact with topsoil that contribute to desertification control and degraded land restoration in arid and semiarid regions. Methodology/Principal Findings To distinguish the changes in topsoil affected by biological soil crusts, we compared topsoil properties across three types of successional biological soil crusts (algae, lichens, and mosses crust), as well as the referenced sandland in the Mu Us Desert, Northern China. Relationships between fractal dimensions of soil particle size distribution and selected soil properties were discussed as well. The results indicated that biological soil crusts had significant positive effects on soil physical structure (P<0.05); and soil organic carbon and nutrients showed an upward trend across the successional stages of biological soil crusts. Fractal dimensions ranged from 2.1477 to 2.3032, and significantly linear correlated with selected soil properties (R2 = 0.494∼0.955, P<0.01). Conclusions/Significance Biological soil crusts cause an important increase in soil fertility, and are beneficial to sand fixation, although the process is rather slow. Fractal dimension proves to be a sensitive and useful index for quantifying changes in soil properties that additionally implies desertification. This study will be essential to provide a firm basis for future policy-making on optimal solutions regarding desertification control and assessment, as well as degraded ecosystem restoration in arid and semiarid regions. PMID:24516668

  16. Neuronal Dysregulation in Stroke-Associated Pseudobulbar Affect (PBA): Diagnostic Scales and Current Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Lapchak, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Until recently there was little understanding of the exact pathophysiology and treatment choices for stroke patients with Pseudobulbar affect (PBA). PBA is typically characterized by outbursts or uncontrollable laughing or crying and in the majority of patients, the outbursts being involuntary and incompatible with the patients’ emotional state. PBA is a behavioral syndrome reported to be displayed in 28–52% of stroke patients with first or multiple strokes, and incidence may be higher in patients who have had prior stroke events, and higher in females. There is typically involvement of glutaminergic, serotoninergic and dopaminergic neuronal circuits of the corticolimbic-subcorticothalamic-pontocerebellar network. PBA is now understood to be a disinhibition syndrome in which specific pathways involving serotonin and glutamate are disrupted or modulated causing reduced cortical inhibition of a cerebellar/brainstem-situated “emotional” laughing or crying focal center. Stroke-induced disruption of one or more neuronal pathway circuits may “disinhibit” voluntary laughing and crying making the process involuntary. With a “new” treatment currently being marketed to treat PBA patients, this article will delve into the neurological and physiological basis for PBA in stroke, and review progress with the diagnosis and treatment of PBA. PMID:26693049

  17. Landscape-scale factors affecting feral horse habitat use during summer within the rocky mountain foothills.

    PubMed

    Girard, Tisa L; Bork, Edward W; Nielsen, Scott E; Neilsen, Scott E; Alexander, Mike J

    2013-02-01

    Public lands occupied by feral horses in North America are frequently managed for multiple uses with land use conflict occurring among feral horses, livestock, wildlife, and native grassland conservation. The factors affecting habitat use by horses is critical to understand where conflict may be greatest. We related horse presence and abundance to landscape attributes in a GIS to examine habitat preferences using 98 field plots sampled within a portion of the Rocky Mountain Forest Reserve of SW Alberta, Canada. Horse abundance was greatest in grassland and cut block habitats, and lowest in conifer and mixedwood forest. Resource selection probability functions and count models of faecal abundance indicated that horses preferred areas closer to water, with reduced topographic ruggedness, situated farther from forests, and located farther away from primary roads and trails frequented by recreationalists, but closer to small linear features (i.e. cut lines) that may be used as beneficial travel corridors. Horse presence and abundance were closely related to cattle presence during summer, suggesting that both herbivores utilise the same habitats. Estimates of forage biomass removal (44 %) by mid-July were near maximum acceptable levels. In contrast to horse-cattle associations, horses were negatively associated with wild ungulate abundance, although the mechanism behind this remains unclear and warrants further investigation. Our results indicate that feral horses in SW Alberta exhibit complex habitat selection patterns during spring and summer, including overlap in use with livestock. This finding highlights the need to assess and manage herbivore populations consistent with rangeland carrying capacity and the maintenance of range health.

  18. Landscape-Scale Factors Affecting Feral Horse Habitat Use During Summer Within The Rocky Mountain Foothills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, Tisa L.; Bork, Edward W.; Neilsen, Scott E.; Alexander, Mike J.

    2013-02-01

    Public lands occupied by feral horses in North America are frequently managed for multiple uses with land use conflict occurring among feral horses, livestock, wildlife, and native grassland conservation. The factors affecting habitat use by horses is critical to understand where conflict may be greatest. We related horse presence and abundance to landscape attributes in a GIS to examine habitat preferences using 98 field plots sampled within a portion of the Rocky Mountain Forest Reserve of SW Alberta, Canada. Horse abundance was greatest in grassland and cut block habitats, and lowest in conifer and mixedwood forest. Resource selection probability functions and count models of faecal abundance indicated that horses preferred areas closer to water, with reduced topographic ruggedness, situated farther from forests, and located farther away from primary roads and trails frequented by recreationalists, but closer to small linear features (i.e. cut lines) that may be used as beneficial travel corridors. Horse presence and abundance were closely related to cattle presence during summer, suggesting that both herbivores utilise the same habitats. Estimates of forage biomass removal (44 %) by mid-July were near maximum acceptable levels. In contrast to horse-cattle associations, horses were negatively associated with wild ungulate abundance, although the mechanism behind this remains unclear and warrants further investigation. Our results indicate that feral horses in SW Alberta exhibit complex habitat selection patterns during spring and summer, including overlap in use with livestock. This finding highlights the need to assess and manage herbivore populations consistent with rangeland carrying capacity and the maintenance of range health.

  19. NH3-promoted ligand lability in eleven-vertex rhodathiaboranes.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Beatriz; Roy, Beatriz; Macías, Ramón; Artigas, Maria Jose; Lahoz, Fernando J; Oro, Luis A

    2014-12-01

    The reaction of the 11-vertex rhodathiaborane, [8,8-(PPh3)2-nido-8,7-RhSB9H10] (1), with NH3 affords inmediately the adduct, [8,8,8-(NH3)(PPh3)2-nido-8,7-RhSB9H10] (4). The NH3-Rh interaction induces the labilization of the PPh3 ligands leading to the dissociation product, [8,8-(NH3)(PPh3)-nido-8,7-RhSB9H10] (5), which can then react with another molecule of NH3 to give [8,8,8-(NH3)2(PPh3)-nido-8,7-RhSB9H10] (6). These clusters have been characterized in situ by multielement NMR spectroscopy at different temeperatures. The variable temperature behavior of the system demonstrates that the intermediates 4-6 are in equilibrium, involving ligand exchange processes. On the basis of low intensity signals present in the (1)H NMR spectra of the reaction mixture, some species are tentatively proposed to be the bis- and tris-NH3 ligated clusters, [8,8-(NH3)2-nido-8,7-RhSB9H10] (7) and [8,8,8-(NH3)3-nido-8,7-RhSB9H10] (8). After evaporation of the solvent and the excess of NH3, the system containing species 4-8 regenerates the starting reactant, 1, thus closing a stoichiometric cycle of ammonia addition and loss. After 40 h at room temperature, the reaction of 1 with NH3 gives the hydridorhodathiaborane, [8,8,8-(H)(PPh3)2-nido-8,7-RhSB9H9] (2), as a single product. The reported rhodathiaboranes show reversible H3N-promoted ligand lability, which implies weak Rh-N interactions, leading to a rare case of metal complexes that circumvent "classical" Werner chemistry.

  20. To Fish or Not to Fish: Factors at Multiple Scales Affecting Artisanal Fishers' Readiness to Exit a Declining Fishery

    PubMed Central

    Daw, Tim M.; Cinner, Joshua E.; McClanahan, Timothy R.; Brown, Katrina; Stead, Selina M.; Graham, Nicholas A. J.; Maina, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Globally, fisheries are challenged by the combined impacts of overfishing, degradation of ecosystems and impacts of climate change, while fisheries livelihoods are further pressured by conservation policy imperatives. Fishers' adaptive responses to these pressures, such as exiting from a fishery to pursue alternative livelihoods, determine their own vulnerability, as well as the potential for reducing fishing effort and sustaining fisheries. The willingness and ability to make particular adaptations in response to change, such as exiting from a declining fishery, is influenced by economic, cultural and institutional factors operating at scales from individual fishers to national economies. Previous studies of exit from fisheries at single or few sites, offer limited insight into the relative importance of individual and larger-scale social and economic factors. We asked 599 fishers how they would respond to hypothetical scenarios of catch declines in 28 sites in five western Indian Ocean countries. We investigated how socioeconomic variables at the individual-, household- and site-scale affected whether they would exit fisheries. Site-level factors had the greatest influence on readiness to exit, but these relationships were contrary to common predictions. Specifically, higher levels of infrastructure development and economic vitality - expected to promote exit from fisheries - were associated with less readiness to exit. This may be due to site level histories of exit from fisheries, greater specialisation of fishing households, or higher rewards from fishing in more economically developed sites due to technology, market access, catch value and government subsidies. At the individual and household scale, fishers from households with more livelihood activities, and fishers with lower catch value were more willing to exit. These results demonstrate empirically how adaptive responses to change are influenced by factors at multiple scales, and highlight the importance

  1. To fish or not to fish: factors at multiple scales affecting artisanal fishers' readiness to exit a declining fishery.

    PubMed

    Daw, Tim M; Cinner, Joshua E; McClanahan, Timothy R; Brown, Katrina; Stead, Selina M; Graham, Nicholas A J; Maina, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Globally, fisheries are challenged by the combined impacts of overfishing, degradation of ecosystems and impacts of climate change, while fisheries livelihoods are further pressured by conservation policy imperatives. Fishers' adaptive responses to these pressures, such as exiting from a fishery to pursue alternative livelihoods, determine their own vulnerability, as well as the potential for reducing fishing effort and sustaining fisheries. The willingness and ability to make particular adaptations in response to change, such as exiting from a declining fishery, is influenced by economic, cultural and institutional factors operating at scales from individual fishers to national economies. Previous studies of exit from fisheries at single or few sites, offer limited insight into the relative importance of individual and larger-scale social and economic factors. We asked 599 fishers how they would respond to hypothetical scenarios of catch declines in 28 sites in five western Indian Ocean countries. We investigated how socioeconomic variables at the individual-, household- and site-scale affected whether they would exit fisheries. Site-level factors had the greatest influence on readiness to exit, but these relationships were contrary to common predictions. Specifically, higher levels of infrastructure development and economic vitality - expected to promote exit from fisheries - were associated with less readiness to exit. This may be due to site level histories of exit from fisheries, greater specialisation of fishing households, or higher rewards from fishing in more economically developed sites due to technology, market access, catch value and government subsidies. At the individual and household scale, fishers from households with more livelihood activities, and fishers with lower catch value were more willing to exit. These results demonstrate empirically how adaptive responses to change are influenced by factors at multiple scales, and highlight the importance

  2. Factors Affecting the Rate of Penetration of Large-Scale Electricity Technologies: The Case of Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    James R. McFarland; Howard J. Herzog

    2007-05-14

    This project falls under the Technology Innovation and Diffusion topic of the Integrated Assessment of Climate Change Research Program. The objective was to better understand the critical variables that affect the rate of penetration of large-scale electricity technologies in order to improve their representation in integrated assessment models. We conducted this research in six integrated tasks. In our first two tasks, we identified potential factors that affect penetration rates through discussions with modeling groups and through case studies of historical precedent. In the next three tasks, we investigated in detail three potential sets of critical factors: industrial conditions, resource conditions, and regulatory/environmental considerations. Research to assess the significance and relative importance of these factors involved the development of a microeconomic, system dynamics model of the US electric power sector. Finally, we implemented the penetration rate models in an integrated assessment model. While the focus of this effort is on carbon capture and sequestration technologies, much of the work will be applicable to other large-scale energy conversion technologies.

  3. Evolutionarily labile responses to a signal of aggressive intent.

    PubMed Central

    Moretz, Jason A; Morris, Molly R

    2003-01-01

    Males of many swordtail species possess vertical bar pigment patterns that are used both in courtship and agonistic interactions. Expression of the bars may function as a conventional threat signal during conflicts with rival males; bars intensify at the onset of aggression and fade in the subordinate male at contest's end. We used mirror image stimulation and bar manipulations to compare the aggressive responses of the males of four swordtail species to their barred and barless images. We found that having a response to the bars is tightly linked to having genes for bars, while the nature of the response the bars evoked varied across species. Specifically, we report the first known instance where closely related species exhibited differing and contradictory responses to a signal of aggressive motivation. Demonstrating that a signal conveys the same information across species (aggressive intent) while the response to that information has changed among species suggests that the nature of the responses are more evolutionarily labile than the signal. PMID:14613614

  4. Wheat-germ aspartate transcarbamoylase. Purification and cold-lability.

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, J E; Yon, R J; Butterworth, P J

    1979-01-01

    1. Aspartate transcarbamoylase was purified approx. 3000-fold from wheat (Triticum vulgare) germ in 15-20% yield. The product has a specific activity of 14 mumol/min per mg of protein and is approx. 90% pure. The purification scheme includes the use of biospecific "imphilyte" chromatography as described by Yon [Biochem.J.(1977) 161, 233-237]. The enzyme was passed successively through columns of CPAD [N-(3-carboxypropionyl)aminodecyl]-Sepharose in the absence and presence respectively of the ligands UMP and L-aspartate. In the second passage the enzyme was specifically displaced away from impurities with which it co-migrated in the first passage. These two steps contributed a factor of 80 to the overall purification. 2. The enzyme is slowly inactivated on dilution at 0 degrees C and pH 7.0, the inactivation being partially reversible. A detailed investigation of the temperature- and pH-dependence of the cold-inactivation suggested that it was initiated by the perturbation of the pKa values of groups with a moderately high and positive heat of ionization, which were tentatively identified as histidine residues. These findings support a new concept of cold-lability proposed by Bock, Gilbert & Frieden [Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. (1975) 66, 564-569]. PMID:43131

  5. Multi-scale interactions affecting transport, storage, and processing of solutes and sediments in stream corridors (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. W.; Packman, A. I.

    2010-12-01

    Surface water and groundwater flow interact with the channel geomorphology and sediments in ways that determine how material is transported, stored, and transformed in stream corridors. Solute and sediment transport affect important ecological processes such as carbon and nutrient dynamics and stream metabolism, processes that are fundamental to stream health and function. Many individual mechanisms of transport and storage of solute and sediment have been studied, including surface water exchange between the main channel and side pools, hyporheic flow through shallow and deep subsurface flow paths, and sediment transport during both baseflow and floods. A significant challenge arises from non-linear and scale-dependent transport resulting from natural, fractal fluvial topography and associated broad, multi-scale hydrologic interactions. Connections between processes and linkages across scales are not well understood, imposing significant limitations on system predictability. The whole-stream tracer experimental approach is popular because of the spatial averaging of heterogeneous processes; however the tracer results, implemented alone and analyzed using typical models, cannot usually predict transport beyond the very specific conditions of the experiment. Furthermore, the results of whole stream tracer experiments tend to be biased due to unavoidable limitations associated with sampling frequency, measurement sensitivity, and experiment duration. We recommend that whole-stream tracer additions be augmented with hydraulic and topographic measurements and also with additional tracer measurements made directly in storage zones. We present examples of measurements that encompass interactions across spatial and temporal scales and models that are transferable to a wide range of flow and geomorphic conditions. These results show how the competitive effects between the different forces driving hyporheic flow, operating at different spatial scales, creates a situation

  6. A novel nanoparticulate system for sustained delivery of acid-labile lansoprazole.

    PubMed

    Alai, Milind Sadashiv; Lin, Wen Jen

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, an effort was made to develop the Eudragit RS100 based nanoparticulate system for sustained delivery of an acid-labile drug, lansoprazole (LPZ). LPZ-loaded Eudragit RS100 nanoparticles (ERSNPs) were prepared by oil-in-water emulsion-solvent evaporation method. The effects of various formulation variables such as polymer concentration, drug amount and solvent composition on physicochemical performance of nanoparticles and in vitro drug release were investigated. All nanoparticles were spherical with particle size 198.9 ± 8.6-376.9 ± 5.6 nm and zeta potential +35.1 ± 1.7 to +40.2 ± 0.8 mV. The yield of nanoparticles was unaffected by change of these three variables. However, the drug loading and encapsulation efficiency were affected by polymer concentration and drug amount. On the other hand, the particle size of nanoparticles was significantly affected by polymer concentration and internal phase composition due to influence of droplet size during emulsification process. All nanoparticles prolonged drug release for 24h which was dominated by a combination of drug diffusion and polymer chain relaxation. The fastest and the slowest release rates were observed in C2-1002-10/0 and C8-4001-10/0, respectively, based on the release rate constant (k). Thus, the developed nanoparticles possessed a potential as a nano-carrier to sustain drug delivery for treatment of acid related disorders.

  7. Sample storage-induced changes in the quantity and quality of soil labile organic carbon

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shou-Qin; Cai, Hui-Ying; Chang, Scott X.; Bhatti, Jagtar S.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of sample storage methods on the quantity and quality of labile soil organic carbon are not fully understood even though their effects on basic soil properties have been extensively studied. We studied the effects of air-drying and frozen storage on cold and hot water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Cold- and hot-WSOC in air-dried and frozen-stored soils were linearly correlated with those in fresh soils, indicating that storage proportionally altered the extractability of soil organic carbon. Air-drying but not frozen storage increased the concentrations of cold-WSOC and carbohydrate in cold-WSOC, while both increased polyphenol concentrations. In contrast, only polyphenol concentration in hot-WSOC was increased by air-drying and frozen storage, suggesting that hot-WSOC was less affected by sample storage. The biodegradability of cold- but not hot-WSOC was increased by air-drying, while both air-drying and frozen storage increased humification index and changed specific UV absorbance of both cold- and hot-WSOC, indicating shifts in the quality of soil WSOC. Our results suggest that storage methods affect the quantity and quality of WSOC but not comparisons between samples, frozen storage is better than air-drying if samples have to be stored, and storage should be avoided whenever possible when studying the quantity and quality of both cold- and hot-WSOC. PMID:26617054

  8. Sample storage-induced changes in the quantity and quality of soil labile organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shou-Qin; Cai, Hui-Ying; Chang, Scott X.; Bhatti, Jagtar S.

    2015-11-01

    Effects of sample storage methods on the quantity and quality of labile soil organic carbon are not fully understood even though their effects on basic soil properties have been extensively studied. We studied the effects of air-drying and frozen storage on cold and hot water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Cold- and hot-WSOC in air-dried and frozen-stored soils were linearly correlated with those in fresh soils, indicating that storage proportionally altered the extractability of soil organic carbon. Air-drying but not frozen storage increased the concentrations of cold-WSOC and carbohydrate in cold-WSOC, while both increased polyphenol concentrations. In contrast, only polyphenol concentration in hot-WSOC was increased by air-drying and frozen storage, suggesting that hot-WSOC was less affected by sample storage. The biodegradability of cold- but not hot-WSOC was increased by air-drying, while both air-drying and frozen storage increased humification index and changed specific UV absorbance of both cold- and hot-WSOC, indicating shifts in the quality of soil WSOC. Our results suggest that storage methods affect the quantity and quality of WSOC but not comparisons between samples, frozen storage is better than air-drying if samples have to be stored, and storage should be avoided whenever possible when studying the quantity and quality of both cold- and hot-WSOC.

  9. Comparison of Outcomes in Patients With Nonobstructive, Labile-Obstructive, and Chronically Obstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pozios, Iraklis; Corona-Villalobos, Celia; Sorensen, Lars L; Bravo, Paco E; Canepa, Marco; Pisanello, Chiara; Pinheiro, Aurelio; Dimaano, Veronica L; Luo, Hongchang; Dardari, Zeina; Zhou, Xun; Kamel, Ihab; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Bluemke, David A; Abraham, M Roselle; Abraham, Theodore P

    2015-09-15

    Patients with nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) are considered low risk, generally not requiring aggressive intervention. However, nonobstructive and labile-obstructive HC have been traditionally classified together, and it is unknown if these 2 subgroups have distinct risk profiles. We compared cardiovascular outcomes in 293 patients HC (96 nonobstructive, 114 labile-obstructive, and 83 obstructive) referred for exercise echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging and followed for 3.3 ± 3.6 years. A subgroup (34 nonobstructive, 28 labile-obstructive, 21 obstructive) underwent positron emission tomography. The mean number of sudden cardiac death risk factors was similar among groups (nonobstructive: 1.4 vs labile-obstructive: 1.2 vs obstructive: 1.4 risk factors, p = 0.2). Prevalence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was similar across groups but more non-obstructive patients had late gadolinium enhancement ≥20% of myocardial mass (23 [30%] vs 19 [18%] labile-obstructive and 8 [11%] obstructive, p = 0.01]. Fewer labile-obstructive patients had regional positron emission tomography perfusion abnormalities (12 [46%] vs nonobstructive 30 [81%] and obstructive 17 [85%], p = 0.003]. During follow-up, 60 events were recorded (36 ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation, including 30 defibrillator discharges, 12 heart failure worsening, and 2 deaths). Nonobstructive patients were at greater risk of VT/VF at follow-up, compared to labile obstructive (hazed ratio 0.18, 95% confidence interval 0.04 to 0.84, p = 0.03) and the risk persisted after adjusting for age, gender, syncope, family history of sudden cardiac death, abnormal blood pressure response, and septum ≥3 cm (p = 0.04). Appropriate defibrillator discharges were more frequent in nonobstructive (8 [18%]) compared to labile-obstructive (0 [0%], p = 0.02) patients. In conclusion, nonobstructive hemodynamics is associated with more pronounced fibrosis and ischemia than labile

  10. Scaling the Ivory Tower: Factors that Affect the Matriculation of African American Graduate Students in Science, Engineering, and Mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Alfred

    2000-11-01

    This presentation focuses on factors that affect the matriculation of African American graduate students in science, engineering, and technology. These factors are highlighted according to their impact on student achievement at various levels (i.e., k-12, undergraduate, and graduate). The presentation describes these factors as enablers and inhibitors to African American student success; how they relate to increasing the number of African American students in the science, engineering, and mathematics workforce; and how the problem becomes an issue of "scale" in more than one sense of the word. Finally, the presentation offers research-documented strategies for the recruitment and retention of African American students, and how certain steps must be taken in order to ensure adequate representation of this and other ethnic groups in the scientific and technological workforce.

  11. The effect of flood events on the partitioning of labile and refractory carbon in the Missouri-Mississippi River system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, K. M.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Kolker, A.; Allison, M. A.; Nittrouer, J. A.; Duncan, D. D.; Nyman, J. A.; Butcher, K. A.; Adamic, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    The Missouri-Mississippi River system (MMRS) transports over 40% (4.0 x 109 kg) of the United States's annual input of total organic carbon (OC) from land to the marine environment, yet it is challenging to assess the MMRS’s exact role in the global carbon cycle because of the system’s complexity and temporal variability (i.e. high discharge events and low flow regimes). Determining the relative proportion of labile OC to refractory OC entrained in the MMRS during high and mean flow conditions would lend to the understanding of the MMRS’s role in the flux of carbon between the biospheric and atmospheric reservoirs, which is central to determining the role of anthropogenic CO2 in the global carbon cycle and in climate change. In this study, we investigate the relative proportion of labile OC to refractory OC in the lower MMRS during high and near-mean flow conditions in the springs of 2008 and 2009, respectively. The 2008 spring flood discharged 105 km3 of water, the maximum amount of water ever allowed out of the main channel, at a maximum rate of 4.3 x 104 m3s-1. Events of this scale have occurred only nine times in the past 80 years. Additionally, during the spring 2008 flood, bedload sand and large particulate OC transport rates were observed to increase exponentially. The following spring, high discharge rates returned to near-mean values with a peak discharge of 3.6 x 103 m3s-1. Using radiocarbon age and the thermal stability of organic matter (OM) as a proxy for lability, we evaluate the spectra of ages of particulate OM transported in the lower MMRS during these two flow regimes using a programmed-temperature pyrolysis/combustion system (PTP/CS) coupled with 14C determination. The PTP/CS utilizes the differences in thermal stability of acid insoluble particulate organic matter (AIPOM) to separate different components from the bulk. Employing PTP/CS on bulk AIPOM can complement experiments measuring small proportions of total OM such as compound

  12. Analysis of matrix effects critical to microbial transport in organic waste-affected soils across laboratory and field scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unc, Adrian; Goss, Michael J.; Cook, Simon; Li, Xunde; Atwill, Edward R.; Harter, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Organic waste applications to soil (manure, various wastewaters, and biosolids) are among the most significant sources of bacterial contamination in surface and groundwater. Transport of bacteria through the vadose zone depends on flow path geometry and stability and is mitigated by interaction between soil, soil solution, air-water interfaces, and characteristics of microbial surfaces. After initial entry, the transport through soil depends on continued entrainment of bacteria and resuspension of those retained in the porous structure. We evaluated the retention of bacteria-sized artificial microspheres, varying in diameter and surface charge and applied in different suspending solutions, by a range of sieved soils contained in minicolumns, the transport of hydrophobic bacteria-sized microspheres through undisturbed soil columns as affected by waste type under simulated rainfall, and the field-scale transport of Enterococcus spp. to an unconfined sandy aquifer after the application of liquid manure. Microsphere retention reflected microsphere properties. The soil type and suspending solution affected retention of hydrophilic but not hydrophobic particles. Retention was not necessarily facilitated by manure-microsphere-soil interactions but by manure-soil interactions. Undisturbed column studies confirmed the governing role of waste type on vadose-zone microsphere transport. Filtration theory applied as an integrated analysis of transport across length scales showed that effective collision efficiency depended on the distance of travel. It followed a power law behavior with the power coefficient varying from ˜0.4 over short distances to >0.9 over 1 m (i.e., very little filtration for a finite fraction of biocolloids), consistent with reduced influence of soil solution and biocolloid properties at longer travel distances.

  13. Assessment of pretend play in preschool-aged children: validation and factor analysis of the affect in play scale-preschool version.

    PubMed

    Fehr, Karla K; Russ, Sandra W

    2014-01-01

    The Affect in Play Scale-Preschool (APS-P) and Affect in Play Scale-Preschool-Brief Rating (APS-P-BR) versions assess cognitive and affective play processes during a 5-min standardized play task. In this study, construct validity, external validity, and factor analyses for each scale were examined in 107 preschoolers. Reliability and validity were supported. Unlike results found with school-aged samples, positive affect loaded with the cognitive variables on factor analyses of the APS-P and APS-P-BR, suggesting that negative and undefined affect might represent a separate factor in preschool-aged children. Developmental significance and implications for use of the 2 scoring versions are discussed. PMID:24090344

  14. DETERMINATION OF APPARENT QUANTUM YIELD SPECTRA FOR THE FORMATION OF BIOLOGICALLY LABILE PHOTOPRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantum yield spectra for the photochemical formation of biologically labile photoproducts from dissolved organic matter (DOM) have not been available previously, although they would greatly facilitate attempts to model photoproduct formation rates across latitudinal, seasonal, a...

  15. Diversity of ampeloviruses in mealybug and soft scale vectors and in grapevine hosts from leafroll-affected vineyards.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, M; Marsella-Herrick, P; Loeb, G M; Martinson, T E; Hoch, H C

    2009-10-01

    The occurrence and diversity of Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 1 (GLRaV-1) and Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3 (GLRaV-3) in the soft scales Parthenolecanium corni and Pulvinaria innumerabilis and in the mealybug Pseudococcus maritimus was determined in leafroll-affected vineyards in the Finger Lakes region of New York. Groups of 1 to 4 specimens were collected under loose grapevine bark and tested by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for segments of the second diverged copy of the GLRaV-1 coat protein gene or GLRaV-3 heat-shock protein 70-homologue gene. Virus-specific RT-PCR products were amplified from immature insect vectors and adult mealybugs. Single viral amplicons were obtained mostly from immature vectors (35%, 30 of 85) and dual viral amplicons from immature (16%, 10 of 61) and adult (100%, 14 of 14) mealybugs, including individuals. These observations suggested a simultaneous uptake of GLRaV-1 and GLRaV-3 by individual mealybugs. Furthermore, a comparative nucleotide sequence analysis of viral amplicons from soft scales, mealybugs, and grapevines from which vectors were collected showed identical or highly similar haplotypes, indicating that uptake of GLRaV-1 and GLRaV-3 likely occurred by direct feeding of vectors on their host plants.

  16. Scales

    MedlinePlus

    Scales are a visible peeling or flaking of outer skin layers. These layers are called the stratum ... Scales may be caused by dry skin, certain inflammatory skin conditions, or infections. Eczema , ringworm , and psoriasis ...

  17. Ferrihydrite Containing Gel for Chemical Imaging of Labile Phosphate Species in Sediments and Soils Using Diffusive Gradients in Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Santner, Jakob; Prohaska, Thomas; Luo, Jun; Zhang, Hao

    2012-01-01

    We report on a novel binding gel for phosphate, based on ferrihydrite, and its use in diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) for measuring labile phosphate species in waters, sediments, and soils. An existing method of binding layer preparation was modified to overcome potential problems with deterioration of ferrihydrite due to conversion to goethite. The gel was characterized regarding its suitability for conventional DGT measurements as well as for measuring two-dimensional distributions of P with high spatial resolution using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). The effects of pH, ionic strength and storage time of gels on phosphate binding were investigated and the kinetics of binding and the maximum binding capacity were determined. The gel is shown to have a considerably higher P capacity than the conventional ferrihydrite DGT binding layers. LA-ICPMS analysis of DGT standards with P concentrations ranging from 0.088 ± 0.005 to 4.47 ± 0.16 μg cm−2 resulted in reproducible calibration curves which could be described using a simple power function. We demonstrate that the new gel is well suited for analyzing small-scale changes of P concentrations in soils. Moreover, the gel can be used as an alternative to conventional DGT gels that incorporate powdered ferrihydrite, with improved characteristics for the determination of labile phosphate. PMID:20735010

  18. Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Labile Trace Elements in H Chondrites: Evidence for Meteoroid Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, S. F.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1992-07-01

    Differences have been observed between meteorite populations with vastly different terrestrial ages, i.e. Antarctic and non-Antarctic meteorite populations (Koeberl and Cassidy, 1991 and references therein). Comparisons of labile trace element contents (Wolf and Lipschutz, 1992) and induced TL parameters (Benoit and Sears, 1992) in samples from Victoria Land and Queen Maud Land, populations which also differ in mean terrestrial age (Nishiizumi et al, 1989), show significant differences consistent with different average thermal histories. These differences are consistent with the proposition that the flux of meteoritic material to Earth varied temporally. Variations in the flux of meteoritic material over time scales of 10^5 10^6 y require the existence of undispersed streams of meteoroids of asteroidal origin which were initially disputed by Wetherill ( 1986) but have since been observed (Olsson-Steele, 1988; Oberst, 1989; Halliday et al. 1990). Orbital evidence for meteoroid and asteroid streams has been independently obtained by others, particularly Halliday et al.(1990) and Drummond (1991). A group of H chondrites of various petrographic types and diverse CRE ages that yielded 16 falls from 1855 until 1895 in the month of May has been proposed to be two co-orbital meteoroid streams with a common source (R. T. Dodd, personal communication). Compositional evidence of a preterrestrial association of the proposed stream members, if it exists, might be observed in the most sensitive indicators of genetic thermal history, the labile trace elements. We report RNAA data for the concentrations of 14 trace elements, mostly labile ones, (Ag, Au, Bi, Cd, Cs, Co, Ga, In, Rb, Sb, Se, Te, Tl, and Zn) in H4-6 ordinary chondrites. Variance of elemental concentrations within a subpopulation, the members of a proposed co-orbital meteorite stream for example, could be expected to be smaller than the variance for the entire population. We utilize multivariate linear regression and

  19. Heat-labile enterotoxin of Escherichia coli promotes intestinal colonization of Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Verbrugghe, Elin; Van Parys, Alexander; Leyman, Bregje; Boyen, Filip; Arnouts, Sven; Lundberg, Urban; Ducatelle, Richard; Van den Broeck, Wim; Yekta, Maryam Atef; Cox, Eric; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank

    2015-12-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of infantile and travellers' diarrhoea, which poses a serious health burden, especially in developing countries. In addition, ETEC bacteria are a major cause of illness and death in neonatal and recently weaned pigs. The production of a heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) promotes the colonization and pathogenicity of ETEC and may exacerbate co-infections with other enteric pathogens such as Salmonella enterica. We showed that the intraintestinal presence of LT dramatically increased the intestinal Salmonella Typhimurium load in experimentally inoculated pigs. This could not be explained by direct alteration of the invasion or survival capacity of Salmonella in enterocytes, in vitro. However, we demonstrated that LT affects the enteric mucus layer composition in a mucus-secreting goblet cell line by significantly decreasing the expression of mucin 4. The current results show that LT alters the intestinal mucus composition and aggravates a Salmonella Typhimurium infection, which may result in the exacerbation of the diarrhoeal illness. PMID:26616654

  20. Estimating the Size of HIV Key Affected Populations in Chongqing, China, Using the Network Scale-Up Method

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wen; Wu, Guohui; Zhang, Wei; Hladik, Wolfgang; Abdul-Quader, Abu; Bulterys, Marc; Fuller, Serena; Wang, Lu

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the average social network size in the general population and the size of HIV key affected populations (KAPs) in Chongqing municipality using the network scale-up method (NSUM). Methods A general population survey was conducted in 2011 through a multistage random sampling method. Participants aged between 18 and 60 years were recruited. The average social network size (c) was estimated and adjusted by known population method. The size of HIV KAP in Chongqing municipality was estimated using the adjusted c value with adjustment for the transmission effect using the scaled respect factor. Results 3,026 inhabitants of Chongqing agreed to the survey, and 2,957 (97.7%) completed the questionnaire. The adjusted c value was 310. The estimated size of KAP was 28,418(95% Confidence Interval (CI):26,636∼30,201) for female sex workers (FSW), 163,199(95%CI:156,490∼169,908) for clients of FSW, 37,959(95%CI: 34,888∼41,030) for drug users (DU), 14,975(95%CI:13,047∼16,904) for injecting drug users (IDU) and 16,767(95%CI:14,602∼18,932) for men who have sex with men (MSM). The ratio of clients to FSW was 5.74∶1, and IDU accounted for 39.5% of the DU population. The estimates suggest that FSW account for 0.37% of the female population aged 15–49 years in Chongqing, and clients of FSW and MSM represent 2.09% and 0.21% of the male population aged 15–49 years in the city, respectively. Conclusion NSUM provides reasonable population size estimates for FSW, their clients, DU and IDU in Chongqing. However, it is likely to underestimate the population size of MSM even after adjusting for the transmission effect. PMID:23967246

  1. Nitrogen Mineralization and Assimilation at Millimeter Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Cliff, John B.; Bottomley, Peter J.; Gaspar, Dan J.; Myrold, David D.

    2006-11-15

    This study used inoculated, artificial soil microcosms containing sand, clay, cellulose, and localized hotspots of highly labile, organic-N containing dead bacteria to study N mineralization and assimilation at submillimeter and centimeter scales. Labeling with 15NH4+ along with measurement of label assimilated into microbial biomass at the bulk scale allowed estimation of gross rates of ammonification and N assimilation using isotope dilution. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) analyses of transects of organic-15N across Si wafers in contact with the microcosms indicated strong gradients of 15NH4+ assimilation as a function of proximity to the hotspots that were not apparent using bulk analyses. This combination of bulk and ToF-SIMS analyses represents a powerful approach to explore the physical and biochemical factors that affect N process heterogeneities in soils.

  2. In Situ, High-Resolution Profiles of Labile Metals in Sediments of Lake Taihu.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Gong, Mengdan; Li, Yangyang; Xu, Lv; Wang, Yan; Jing, Rui; Ding, Shiming; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing labile metal distribution and biogeochemical behavior in sediments is crucial for understanding their contamination characteristics in lakes, for which in situ, high-resolution data is scare. The diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) technique was used in-situ at five sites across Lake Taihu in the Yangtze River delta in China to characterize the distribution and mobility of eight labile metals (Fe, Mn, Zn, Ni, Cu, Pb, Co and Cd) in sediments at a 3 mm spatial resolution. The results showed a great spatial heterogeneity in the distributions of redox-sensitive labile Fe, Mn and Co in sediments, while other metals had much less marked structure, except for downward decreases of labile Pb, Ni, Zn and Cu in the surface sediment layers. Similar distributions were found between labile Mn and Co and among labile Ni, Cu and Zn, reflecting a close link between their geochemical behaviors. The relative mobility, defined as the ratio of metals accumulated by DGT to the total contents in a volume of sediments with a thickness of 10 mm close to the surface of DGT probe, was the greatest for Mn and Cd, followed by Zn, Ni, Cu and Co, while Pb and Fe had the lowest mobility; this order generally agreed with that defined by the modified BCR approach. Further analyses showed that the downward increases of pH values in surface sediment layer may decrease the lability of Pb, Ni, Zn and Cu as detected by DGT, while the remobilization of redox-insensitive metals in deep sediment layer may relate to Mn cycling through sulphide coprecipitation, reflected by several corresponding minima between these metals and Mn. These in situ data provided the possibility for a deep insight into the mechanisms involved in the remobilization of metals in freshwater sediments. PMID:27608033

  3. In Situ, High-Resolution Profiles of Labile Metals in Sediments of Lake Taihu

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Gong, Mengdan; Li, Yangyang; Xu, Lv; Wang, Yan; Jing, Rui; Ding, Shiming; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing labile metal distribution and biogeochemical behavior in sediments is crucial for understanding their contamination characteristics in lakes, for which in situ, high-resolution data is scare. The diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) technique was used in-situ at five sites across Lake Taihu in the Yangtze River delta in China to characterize the distribution and mobility of eight labile metals (Fe, Mn, Zn, Ni, Cu, Pb, Co and Cd) in sediments at a 3 mm spatial resolution. The results showed a great spatial heterogeneity in the distributions of redox-sensitive labile Fe, Mn and Co in sediments, while other metals had much less marked structure, except for downward decreases of labile Pb, Ni, Zn and Cu in the surface sediment layers. Similar distributions were found between labile Mn and Co and among labile Ni, Cu and Zn, reflecting a close link between their geochemical behaviors. The relative mobility, defined as the ratio of metals accumulated by DGT to the total contents in a volume of sediments with a thickness of 10 mm close to the surface of DGT probe, was the greatest for Mn and Cd, followed by Zn, Ni, Cu and Co, while Pb and Fe had the lowest mobility; this order generally agreed with that defined by the modified BCR approach. Further analyses showed that the downward increases of pH values in surface sediment layer may decrease the lability of Pb, Ni, Zn and Cu as detected by DGT, while the remobilization of redox-insensitive metals in deep sediment layer may relate to Mn cycling through sulphide coprecipitation, reflected by several corresponding minima between these metals and Mn. These in situ data provided the possibility for a deep insight into the mechanisms involved in the remobilization of metals in freshwater sediments. PMID:27608033

  4. Textural and rheological properties of Pacific whiting surimi as affected by nano-scaled fish bone and heating rates.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tao; Park, Jae W

    2015-08-01

    Textural and rheological properties of Pacific whiting (PW) surimi were investigated at various heating rates with the use of nano-scaled fish bone (NFB) and calcium chloride. Addition of NFB and slow heating improved gel strength significantly. Activity of endogenous transglutaminase (ETGase) from PW surimi was markedly induced by both NFB calcium and calcium chloride, showing an optimal temperature at 30°C. Initial storage modulus increased as NFB calcium concentration increased and the same trend was maintained throughout the temperature sweep. Rheograms with temperature sweep at slow heating rate (1°C/min) exhibited two peaks at ∼ 35°C and ∼ 70°C. However, no peak was observed during temperature sweep from 20 to 90°C at fast heating rate (20°C/min). Protein patterns of surimi gels were affected by both heating rate and NFB calcium concentration. Under slow heating, myosin heavy chain intensity decreased with NFB calcium concentration, indicating formation of ε-(γ-glutamyl) lysine cross-links by ETGase and NFB calcium ion.

  5. Effect of warming on the degradation and production of low-molecular-weight labile organic carbon in an Arctic tundra soil

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Ziming; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Liang, Liyuan; Graham, David E.; Gu, Baohua

    2016-01-16

    The fate of soil organic carbon (SOC) stored in the Arctic permafrost is a key concern as temperatures continue to rise in the northern hemisphere. Studies and conceptual models suggest that SOC degradation is affected by the composition of SOC, but it is unclear exactly what portions of SOC are vulnerable to rapid breakdown and what mechanisms may be controlling SOC degradation upon permafrost thaw. Here, we examine the dynamic consumption and production of labile SOC in an anoxic incubation experiment using soil samples from the active layer at the Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska, USA. Free-reducing sugars, alcohols, andmore » low-molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids were analyzed during incubation at either –2 or 8 °C for up to 240 days. Results show that simple sugar and alcohol SOC largely account for the initial rapid release of CO2 and CH4 through anaerobic fermentation, whereas the fermentation products, acetate and formate, are subsequently utilized as primary substrates for methanogenesis. Iron(III) reduction is correlated to acetate production and methanogenesis, suggesting its important role as an electron acceptor in tundra SOC respiration. These observations are further supported in a glucose addition experiment, in which rapid CO2 and CH4 production occurred concurrently with rapid production and consumption of labile organics such as acetate. However, addition of tannic acid, as a more complex organic substrate, showed little influence on the overall production of CO2 and CH4 and organic acids. Together our study shows that LMW labile organics in SOC control the initial rapid release of green-house gases upon warming. We thus present a conceptual framework for the labile SOC transformations and their relations to fermentation, iron reduction and methanogenesis, thereby providing the basis for improved model prediction of climate feedbacks in the Arctic.« less

  6. Role of trypsin-like cleavage at arginine 192 in the enzymatic and cytotonic activities of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, C C; Messer, R J; Cieplak, W

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies of cholera toxin and Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin have suggested that proteolytic cleavage plays an important role in the expression of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and toxicity. Specifically, several studies have implicated a trypsin-like cleavage at arginine 192, which lies within an exposed region subtended by a disulfide bond in the intact A subunit, in toxicity. To investigate the role of this modification in the enzymatic and cytotonic properties of heat-labile enterotoxin, the response of purified, recombinant A subunit to tryptic activation and the effect of substituting arginine 192 with glycine on the activities of the holotoxin were examined. The recombinant A subunit of heat-labile enterotoxin exhibited significant levels of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity that were only nominally increased (approximately twofold) by prior limited trypsinolysis. The enzymatic activity also did not appear to be affected by auto-ADP-ribosylation that occurs during the high-level synthesis of the recombinant A subunit in E. coli. A mutant form of the holotoxin containing the arginine 192-to-glycine substitution exhibited levels of cytotonic activity for CHO cells that were similar to that of the untreated, wild-type holotoxin but exhibited a marked delay in the ability to increase intracellular levels of cyclic AMP in Caco-2 cells. The results indicate that trypsin-like cleavage of the A subunit of E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin at arginine 192 is not requisite to the expression of enzymatic activity by the A subunit and further reveal that this modification, although it enhances the biological and enzymatic activities of the toxin, is not absolutely required for the enterotoxin to elicit cytotonic effects. Images PMID:7927684

  7. Soil Microbial and Enzymatic Responses to Complex and Labile Nutrient Inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, S. D.; Vitousek, P. M.

    2003-12-01

    Microbial extracellular enzymes are essential for converting complex organic compounds into smaller molecules that are available for plant and microbial uptake. However, enzyme production represents a substantial resource cost for microbes, and microbes may be under selection to produce enzymes only when benefits exceed costs. We predicted that soil enzyme activities would be highest when complex substrates were abundant, but available nutrients were scarce (large potential benefit from enzyme production). We also predicted that rates of nutrient and carbon mineralization would correspond to observed shifts in enzyme activities. To test these predictions, we added insoluble and available carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus substrates to soil incubations and measured enzyme activities, CO2 respiration, microbial biomass, and nutrient mineralization. Labile carbon additions increased respiration rates and microbial biomass, while labile nutrient additions were taken up by microbes but did not increase respiration rates. Labile carbon + nitrogen additions increased acid phosphatase activity, while labile nitrogen additions suppressed aminopeptidase activity. Insoluble nutrients caused major increases in enzyme and microbial activities only when added in combination with complementary labile nutrients (e.g. insoluble carbon + available nitrogen and phosphorus). These results indicate that microbes respond to soil nutrient status by changing patterns of extracellular enzyme production. Such changes can allow microbes to access nutrients in complex molecules, but may be limited by the availability of resources to build enzymes.

  8. Using High Performance Computing to Understand Roles of Labile and Nonlabile U(VI) on Hanford 300 Area Plume Longevity

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtner, Peter C.; Hammond, Glenn E.

    2012-07-28

    Evolution of a hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] plume at the Hanford 300 Area bordering the Columbia River is investigated to evaluate the roles of labile and nonlabile forms of U(VI) on the longevity of the plume. A high fidelity, three-dimensional, field-scale, reactive flow and transport model is used to represent the system. Richards equation coupled to multicomponent reactive transport equations are solved for times up to 100 years taking into account rapid fluctuations in the Columbia River stage resulting in pulse releases of U(VI) into the river. The peta-scale computer code PFLOTRAN developed under a DOE SciDAC-2 project is employed in the simulations and executed on ORNL's Cray XT5 supercomputer Jaguar. Labile U(VI) is represented in the model through surface complexation reactions and its nonlabile form through dissolution of metatorbernite used as a surrogate mineral. Initial conditions are constructed corresponding to the U(VI) plume already in place to avoid uncertainties associated with the lack of historical data for the waste stream. The cumulative U(VI) flux into the river is compared for cases of equilibrium and multirate sorption models and for no sorption. The sensitivity of the U(VI) flux into the river on the initial plume configuration is investigated. The presence of nonlabile U(VI) was found to be essential in explaining the longevity of the U(VI) plume and the prolonged high U(VI) concentrations at the site exceeding the EPA MCL for uranium.

  9. Predicting probability of occurrence and factors affecting distribution and abundance of three Ozark endemic crayfish species at multiple spatial scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nolen, Matthew S.; Magoulick, Daniel D.; DiStefano, Robert J.; Imhoff, Emily M.; Wagner, Brian K.

    2014-01-01

    We found that a range of environmental variables were important in predicting crayfish distribution and abundance at multiple spatial scales and their importance was species-, response variable- and scale dependent. We would encourage others to examine the influence of spatial scale on species distribution and abundance patterns.

  10. Major factors affecting in situ biodegradation rates of jet-fuel during large-scale biosparging project in sedimentary bedrock.

    PubMed

    Machackova, Jirina; Wittlingerova, Zdena; Vlk, Kvetoslav; Zima, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), mainly jet fuel, had taken place at the former Soviet Army air base in the Czech Republic. The remediation of large-scale petroleum contamination of soil and groundwater has provided valuable information about biosparging efficiency in the sandstone sedimentary bedrock. In 1997 petroleum contamination was found to be present in soil and groundwater across an area of 28 hectares, divided for the clean-up purpose into smaller clean-up fields (several hectares). The total estimated quantity of TPH released to the environment was about 7,000 metric tons. Biosparging was applied as an innovative clean-up technology at the site and was operated over a 10-year period (1997-2008). Importance of a variety of factors that affect bacterial activity in unsaturated and saturated zones was widely studied on the site and influence of natural and technological factors on clean-up efficiency in heavily contaminates areas of clean-up fields (initial contaminant mass 111-452 metric ton/ha) was evaluated. Long-term monitoring of the groundwater temperature has shown seasonal rises and falls of temperature which have caused a fluctuation in biodegradation activity during clean-up. By contrast, an overall rise of average groundwater temperature was observed in the clean-up fields, most probably as a result of the biological activity during the clean-up process. The significant rise of biodegradation rates, observed after air sparging intensification, and strong linear correlation between the air injection rates and biodegradation activities have shown that the air injection rate is the principal factor in biodegradation efficiency in heavily contaminated areas. It has a far more important role for achieving a biodegradation activity than the contamination content which appeared to have had only a slight effect after the removal of about 75% of initial contamination.

  11. Comparison of metal lability in air-dried and fresh dewatered drinking water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Pei, Yuansheng; Zhao, Yaqian

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the labilities of Al, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sr, V and Zn in air-dried (for 60 days) and fresh dewatered WTRs were compared using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), fractionation, in vitro digestion and a plant enrichment test. The results showed that the air-dried and fresh dewatered WTRs had different properties, e.g., organic matter composition and available nutrients. The air-dried and fresh dewatered WTRs were non-haf zardous according to the TCLP assessment method used in the United States; however, the metals in the two types of WTRs had different lability. Compared with the metals in the fresh dewatered WTRs, those in the air-dried WTRs tended to be in more stable fractions and also exhibited lower bioaccessibility and bioavailability. Therefore, air-drying can decrease the metal lability and thereby reduce the potential metal pollution risk of WTRs.

  12. Controls on the composition and lability of dissolved organic matter in Siberia's Kolyma River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, P. J.; Davydova, A.; Zimov, N.; Spencer, R. G. M.; Davydov, S.; Bulygina, E.; Zimov, S.; Holmes, R. M.

    2012-03-01

    High-latitude northern rivers export globally significant quantities of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the Arctic Ocean. Climate change, and its associated impacts on hydrology and potential mobilization of ancient organic matter from permafrost, is likely to modify the flux, composition, and thus biogeochemical cycling and fate of exported DOC in the Arctic. This study examined DOC concentration and the composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) across the hydrograph in Siberia's Kolyma River, with a particular focus on the spring freshet period when the majority of the annual DOC load is exported. The composition of DOM within the Kolyma basin was characterized using absorbance-derived measurements (absorbance coefficienta330, specific UV absorbance (SUVA254), and spectral slope ratio SR) and fluorescence spectroscopy (fluorescence index and excitation-emission matrices (EEMs)), including parallel factor analyses of EEMs. Increased surface runoff during the spring freshet led to DOM optical properties indicative of terrestrial soil inputs with high humic-like fluorescence, SUVA254, and low SRand fluorescence index (FI). Under-ice waters, in contrast, displayed opposing trends in optical properties representing less aromatic, lower molecular weight DOM. We demonstrate that substantial losses of DOC can occur via biological (˜30% over 28 days) and photochemical pathways (>29% over 14 days), particularly in samples collected during the spring freshet. The emerging view is therefore that of a more dynamic and labile carbon pool than previously thought, where DOM composition plays a fundamental role in controlling the fate and removal of DOC at a pan-Arctic scale.

  13. Radiation-induced heat-labile sites that convert into DNA double-strand breaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The yield of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in SV40 DNA irradiated in aqueous solution was found to increase by more than a factor of two as a result of postirradiation incubation of the DNA at 50 degrees C and pH 8.0 for 24 h. This is in agreement with data from studies performed at 37 degrees C that were published previously. Importantly, similar results were also obtained from irradiation of mammalian DNA in agarose plugs. These results suggest that heat-labile sites within locally multiply damaged sites are produced by radiation and are subsequently transformed into DSBs. Since incubation at 50 degrees C is typically employed for lysis of cells in commonly used pulsed-field gel assays for detection of DSBs in mammalian cells, the possibility that heat-labile sites are present in irradiated cells was also studied. An increase in the apparent number of DSBs as a function of lysis time at 50 degrees C was found with kinetics that was similar to that for irradiated DNA, although the magnitude of the increase was smaller. This suggests that heat-labile sites are also formed in the cell. If this is the case, a proportion of DSBs measured by the pulsed-field gel assays may occur during the lysis step and may not be present in the cell as breaks but as heat-labile sites. It is suggested that such sites consist mainly of heat-labile sugar lesions within locally multiply damaged sites. Comparing rejoining of DSBs measured with short and long lysis procedure indicates that the heat-labile sites are repaired with fast kinetics in comparison with repair of the bulk of DSBs.

  14. Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2009-01-01

    The common approach to scaling, according to Christopher Dede, a professor of learning technologies at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, is to jump in and say, "Let's go out and find more money, recruit more participants, hire more people. Let's just keep doing the same thing, bigger and bigger." That, he observes, "tends to fail, and fail…

  15. Mechanisms affecting the transport and retention of bacteria, bacteriophage and microspheres in laboratory-scale saturated fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seggewiss, G.; Dickson, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater is becoming an increasingly important water source due to the ever-increasing demands from agricultural, residential and industrial consumers. In search of more secure sources, wells are routinely finished over large vertical depths in bedrock aquifers, creating new hydraulic pathways and thus increasing the risk of cross contamination. Moreover, hydraulic pathways are also being altered and created by increasing water withdrawal rates from these wells. Currently, it is not well understood how biological contaminants are transported through, and retained in, fractured media thereby making risk assessment and land use decisions difficult. Colloid transport within fractured rock is a complex process with several mechanisms affecting transport and retention, including: advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, diffusion, size exclusion, adsorption, and decay. Several researchers have investigated the transport of bacteria, bacteriophage, and microspheres (both carboxylated and plain) to evaluate the effects of surface properties and size on transport and retention. These studies have suggested that transport is highly dependent on the physico-chemical properties of the particle, the fracture, and the carrying fluid. However, these studies contain little detail regarding the specific mechanisms responsible for transport beyond speculating about their existence. Further, little work has been done to compare the transport of these particulate materials through the same fracture, allowing for direct observations based on particulate size and surface properties. This research examines the similarities and differences in transport and retention between four different particles through two different laboratory-scale, saturated fractures. This work is designed to explore the effects of particle size, surface properties, ionic strength of the carrying solution, and aperture field characteristics on transport and retention in single, saturated fractures. The particulates

  16. Modeling Individual Differences in Within-Person Variation of Negative and Positive Affect in a Mixed Effects Location Scale Model Using BUGS/JAGS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rast, Philippe; Hofer, Scott M.; Sparks, Catharine

    2012-01-01

    A mixed effects location scale model was used to model and explain individual differences in within-person variability of negative and positive affect across 7 days (N=178) within a measurement burst design. The data come from undergraduate university students and are pooled from a study that was repeated at two consecutive years. Individual…

  17. Superinduction of metallothionein I by inhibition of protein synthesis: role of a labile repressor in MTF-1 mediated gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yongyi; Lin, Gary X; Millecchia, Lyndell; Ma, Qiang

    2006-01-01

    Induction of metallothioneins (MTs) through the metal-activated transcription factor-1 (MTF-1) provides a model response for analyzing transcriptional gene regulation by heavy metals. Here, we report inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide (CHX) increases induction of Mt1 by approximately five-fold, a phenomenon designated as "superinduction." Characterization of superinduction revealed it is time- and concentration-dependent of CHX, requires the presence of an MTF-1 activator, and occurs at a transcriptional level, suggesting a labile repressor in the control of Mt1 induction. Genetic analyses using Mtf1 null cells and a metal response element (MRE)-driven reporter construct showed that superinduction of Mt1 is mediated through MTF-1 and MRE-dependent transcription. Analyses of intracellular zinc content by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging demonstrated that treatment with CHX alone or CHX plus an inducer does not increase the total zinc accumulation or the concentration of free zinc in cells under the conditions in which superinduction occurs. Moreover, superinduction was observed in cells cultured in a zinc-depleted medium, suggesting that superinduction does not involve elevation of intracellular zinc concentration. Northern blotting showed that Cd, CHX, or Cd + CHX does not affect the expression of the mRNA of MTF-1. Immunoblotting using antibodies specific for MTF-1 demonstrated that Cd induces a down-regulation of the MTF-1 protein, whereas cotreatment with Cd and CHX blocked the Cd-induced degradation of MTF-1. The findings reveal a new mechanistic aspect of the superinduction of Mt1, in which a labile repressor negatively controls agonist-induced turnover of the MTF-1 protein. PMID:16615093

  18. Is the distribution of the lancelet Branchiostoma caribaeum affected by sewage discharges? An analysis at multiple scales of variability.

    PubMed

    Barboza, Carlos Alberto de Moura; Hadlich, Heliatrice Louise; Sandrini-Neto, Leonardo; Martins, César de Castro; Lana, Paulo da Cunha

    2013-04-15

    Spatial variation in the density and biomass of Branchiostoma caribaeum was analyzed along a sewage contamination gradient identified by fecal steroids in a subtropical estuary, southern Brazil. Sampling, repeated in the austral winter and summer, followed a hierarchical design nested at four spatial scales (sector>1 km; area>100 m; site>10 m; replicate<1 m). Density and biomass were significantly lower at sites characterized by high concentrations of fecal steroids. The best combinations of variables that explained the biological similarities among sites involved contamination indicators. Most of the variation of biological data was found at the smallest scales and could be related with the sediment texture. Our study highlighted the usefulness of a multi-scale perspective to evaluate distribution patterns of benthic invertebrates as a biological indication of environmental pollution. Gradient analyses at larger spatial scales may be invalidated by the patchy distribution of benthic fauna if they do not account for such small scale variability.

  19. Is the distribution of the lancelet Branchiostoma caribaeum affected by sewage discharges? An analysis at multiple scales of variability.

    PubMed

    Barboza, Carlos Alberto de Moura; Hadlich, Heliatrice Louise; Sandrini-Neto, Leonardo; Martins, César de Castro; Lana, Paulo da Cunha

    2013-04-15

    Spatial variation in the density and biomass of Branchiostoma caribaeum was analyzed along a sewage contamination gradient identified by fecal steroids in a subtropical estuary, southern Brazil. Sampling, repeated in the austral winter and summer, followed a hierarchical design nested at four spatial scales (sector>1 km; area>100 m; site>10 m; replicate<1 m). Density and biomass were significantly lower at sites characterized by high concentrations of fecal steroids. The best combinations of variables that explained the biological similarities among sites involved contamination indicators. Most of the variation of biological data was found at the smallest scales and could be related with the sediment texture. Our study highlighted the usefulness of a multi-scale perspective to evaluate distribution patterns of benthic invertebrates as a biological indication of environmental pollution. Gradient analyses at larger spatial scales may be invalidated by the patchy distribution of benthic fauna if they do not account for such small scale variability. PMID:23452624

  20. Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Murray Gibson

    2007-04-27

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  1. Scales

    ScienceCinema

    Murray Gibson

    2016-07-12

    Musical scales involve notes that, sounded simultaneously (chords), sound good together. The result is the left brain meeting the right brain — a Pythagorean interval of overlapping notes. This synergy would suggest less difference between the working of the right brain and the left brain than common wisdom would dictate. The pleasing sound of harmony comes when two notes share a common harmonic, meaning that their frequencies are in simple integer ratios, such as 3/2 (G/C) or 5/4 (E/C).

  2. Non-labile silver species in biosolids remain stable throughout 50 years of weathering and ageing.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increasing commercial use of nanosilver has focussed attention on the fate of silver (Ag) in the wastewater release pathway. This paper reports the speciation and lability of Ag in archived, stockpiled, and contemporary biosolids from the UK, USA and Australia, and indicates that...

  3. Measurement of labile copper in wine by medium exchange stripping potentiometry utilising screen printed carbon electrodes.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrew C; Kontoudakis, Nikolaos; Barril, Celia; Schmidtke, Leigh M; Scollary, Geoffrey R

    2016-07-01

    The presence of copper in wine is known to impact the reductive, oxidative and colloidal stability of wine, and techniques enabling measurement of different forms of copper in wine are of particular interest in understanding these spoilage processes. Electrochemical stripping techniques developed to date require significant pretreatment of wine, potentially disturbing the copper binding equilibria. A thin mercury film on a screen printed carbon electrode was utilised in a flow system for the direct analysis of labile copper in red and white wine by constant current stripping potentiometry with medium exchange. Under the optimised conditions, including an enrichment time of 500s and constant current of 1.0μA, the response range was linear from 0.015 to 0.200mg/L. The analysis of 52 red and white wines showed that this technique generally provided lower labile copper concentrations than reported for batch measurement by related techniques. Studies in a model system and in finished wines showed that the copper sulfide was not measured as labile copper, and that loss of hydrogen sulfide via volatilisation induced an increase in labile copper within the model wine system.

  4. Occurrence and abundance of carbohydrates and amino compounds in sequentially extracted labile soil organic matter fractions.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study aimed to investigate the content of carbohydrates and amino compounds in three labile fraction of soil organic matter (SOM). Soil samples were collected from two agricultural fields in southern Italy and the light fraction (LF), the 500–53-µm particulate organic matter (POM) and the mobil...

  5. Non-labile silver species in biosolids remain stable throughout 50 years of weathering and ageing.

    PubMed

    Donner, E; Scheckel, K; Sekine, R; Popelka-Filcoff, R S; Bennett, J W; Brunetti, G; Naidu, R; McGrath, S P; Lombi, E

    2015-10-01

    Increasing commercial use of nanosilver has focussed attention on the fate of silver (Ag) in the wastewater release pathway. This paper reports the speciation and lability of Ag in archived, stockpiled, and contemporary biosolids from the UK, USA and Australia, and indicates that biosolids Ag concentrations have decreased significantly over recent decades. XANES revealed the importance of reduced-sulfur binding environments for Ag speciation in materials ranging from freshly produced sludge to biosolids weathered under ambient environmental conditions for more than 50 years. Isotopic dilution with (110 m)Ag showed that Ag was predominantly non-labile in both fresh and aged biosolids (13.7% mean lability), with E-values ranging from 0.3 to 60 mg/kg and 5 mM CaNO3 extractable Ag from 1.2 to 609 μg/kg (0.002-3.4% of the total Ag). This study indicates that at the time of soil application, biosolids Ag will be predominantly Ag-sulfides and characterised by low isotopic lability.

  6. Instruments and methods for the quantitative measurement of factors affecting hygienist/dentist efforts during scaling and root planing of the teeth.

    PubMed

    White, D J; Cox, E R; Arends, J; Nieborg, J H; Leydsman, H; Wieringa, D W; Dijkman, A G; Ruben, J R

    1996-01-01

    Manual calculus debridement through scaling accounts for a significant proportion of hygienist efforts in dental and periodontal practices. Despite this, little is quantitatively known concerning the effects of instruments, technique and treatments on debridement (scaling) efficiency or efficacy. The total work effort expended by therapists in calculus debridement results from the sum of the efforts associated with each scaling stroke. Each scaling stroke, in turn, is affected by a variety of physical forces, including those in the control of the therapist and those intrinsic to the calculus substrate. The development of procedures and treatments to facilitate easier calculus removal requires consideration of the physical and technique-related factors which contribute to hygienist effort. Instruments have recently been developed which can quantitatively measure force dynamics associated with scaling procedures, including both therapist-applied forces and forces developed due to the extreme hardness and tenacity of supra- and subgingival calculus deposits. The scaling instrument developed to quantitatively record developed forces in scaling, the Quanticalc, can be used for the assessment of techniques and treatments which can soften calculus, facilitating easier debridement. The device can also be used to instruct therapists on factors contributing to surface roughness and tactile response to these factors. The scaling instrument developed to quantitatively measure therapist applied forces in scaling, the Zappa device, can be used for assessment of techniques which can increase the efficiency of calculus removal with minimal damage to sound root substance. In this paper, the force dynamics associated with manual scaling procedures of dental professionals are defined. These force dynamics account for the total work expended by hygienists and other professionals in the important task of calculus removal. Using this as a foundation, the design, use, calibration and

  7. Glaciers as a source of ancient and labile organic matter to the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Hood, Eran; Fellman, Jason; Spencer, Robert G M; Hernes, Peter J; Edwards, Rick; D'Amore, David; Scott, Durelle

    2009-12-24

    Riverine organic matter supports of the order of one-fifth of estuarine metabolism. Coastal ecosystems are therefore sensitive to alteration of both the quantity and lability of terrigenous dissolved organic matter (DOM) delivered by rivers. The lability of DOM is thought to vary with age, with younger, relatively unaltered organic matter being more easily metabolized by aquatic heterotrophs than older, heavily modified material. This view is developed exclusively from work in watersheds where terrestrial plant and soil sources dominate streamwater DOM. Here we characterize streamwater DOM from 11 coastal watersheds on the Gulf of Alaska that vary widely in glacier coverage (0-64 per cent). In contrast to non-glacial rivers, we find that the bioavailability of DOM to marine microorganisms is significantly correlated with increasing (14)C age. Moreover, the most heavily glaciated watersheds are the source of the oldest ( approximately 4 kyr (14)C age) and most labile (66 per cent bioavailable) DOM. These glacial watersheds have extreme runoff rates, in part because they are subject to some of the highest rates of glacier volume loss on Earth. We estimate the cumulative flux of dissolved organic carbon derived from glaciers contributing runoff to the Gulf of Alaska at 0.13 +/- 0.01 Tg yr(-1) (1 Tg = 10(12) g), of which approximately 0.10 Tg is highly labile. This indicates that glacial runoff is a quantitatively important source of labile reduced carbon to marine ecosystems. Moreover, because glaciers and ice sheets represent the second largest reservoir of water in the global hydrologic system, our findings indicate that climatically driven changes in glacier volume could alter the age, quantity and reactivity of DOM entering coastal oceans.

  8. Small beetle, large-scale drivers: how regional and landscape factors affect outbreaks of the European spruce bark beetle

    PubMed Central

    Seidl, Rupert; Müller, Jörg; Hothorn, Torsten; Bässler, Claus; Heurich, Marco; Kautz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Summary 1. Unprecedented bark beetle outbreaks have been observed for a variety of forest ecosystems recently, and damage is expected to further intensify as a consequence of climate change. In Central Europe, the response of ecosystem management to increasing infestation risk has hitherto focused largely on the stand level, while the contingency of outbreak dynamics on large-scale drivers remains poorly understood. 2. To investigate how factors beyond the local scale contribute to the infestation risk from Ips typographus (Col., Scol.), we analysed drivers across seven orders of magnitude in scale (from 103 to 1010 m2) over a 23-year period, focusing on the Bavarian Forest National Park. Time-discrete hazard modelling was used to account for local factors and temporal dependencies. Subsequently, beta regression was applied to determine the influence of regional and landscape factors, the latter characterized by means of graph theory. 3. We found that in addition to stand variables, large-scale drivers also strongly influenced bark beetle infestation risk. Outbreak waves were closely related to landscape-scale connectedness of both host and beetle populations as well as to regional bark beetle infestation levels. Furthermore, regional summer drought was identified as an important trigger for infestation pulses. Large-scale synchrony and connectivity are thus key drivers of the recently observed bark beetle outbreak in the area. 4. Synthesis and applications. Our multiscale analysis provides evidence that the risk for biotic disturbances is highly dependent on drivers beyond the control of traditional stand-scale management. This finding highlights the importance of fostering the ability to cope with and recover from disturbance. It furthermore suggests that a stronger consideration of landscape and regional processes is needed to address changing disturbance regimes in ecosystem management. PMID:27041769

  9. Factors affecting the intensity of epidermal papillomatosis in populations of roach, Rutilus rutilus (L.), estimated as scale coverage.

    PubMed

    Korkea-aho, T; Vainikka, A; Taskinen, J

    2006-02-01

    Studies of epidermal papillomatosis in fish populations have only rarely focused on the intensity of the disease, i.e. the number and size of papillomas. Furthermore, the methods used to evaluate the intensity of papillomatosis have not been standardized. We tested the reliability of a method based on counting of scales covered by papilloma tumours in roach, Rutilus rutilus (L). In addition, we studied the frequency distributions of the number of scales covered by papillomas within populations, evaluated the correlation between the prevalence and mean intensity of the disease among populations and examined the intensity of papillomatosis in roach with respect to sex and size of fish. Reliability of the scale coverage method was high. Therefore, the method could offer an effective way to determine the intensity of papillomatosis in fish species with large scales. The frequency distribution of the scale coverage of papillomas was highly aggregated within all populations studied. The mean intensity of papillomatosis increased with the size of the fish and was higher in males than in females. However, there was no correlation between the mean intensity and prevalence of the disease among the 19 roach populations studied. PMID:16436122

  10. Methionine ligand lability of homologous monoheme cytochromes c.

    PubMed

    Levin, Benjamin D; Walsh, Kelly A; Sullivan, Kristal K; Bren, Kara L; Elliott, Sean J

    2015-01-01

    Direct electrochemical analysis of adsorbed bacterial monoheme cytochromes c has revealed a phenomenological loss of the axial methionine when examined using pyrolytic "edge-plane" graphite (EPG) electrodes. While prior findings have reported that the Met-loss state may be quantitatively understood using the cytochrome c from Hydrogenobacter thermophilus as a model system, here we demonstrate that the formation of the Met-loss state upon EPG electrodes can be observed for a range of cytochrome orthologs. Through an electrochemical comparison of the wild-type proteins from organisms of varying growth temperature optima, we establish that Met-ligand losses at graphite surfaces have similar energetics to the "foldons" for known protein folding pathways. Furthermore, a downward shift in reduction potential to approximately -100 mV vs standard hydrogen electrode was observed, similar to that of the alkaline transition found in mitochondrial cytochromes c. Pourbaix diagrams for the Met-loss forms of each cytochrome, considered here in comparison to mutants where the Met-ligand has been substituted to His or Ala, suggest that the nature of the Met-loss state is distinct from either a His-/aquo- or a bis-His-ligated heme center, yet more closely matches the pKa values found for bis-His-ligated hemes., We find the propensity for adoption of the Met-loss state in bacterial monoheme cytochromes c scales with their overall thermal stability, though not with the specific stability of the Fe-Met bond.

  11. Exploring Individual and Item Factors that Affect Assessment Validity for Diverse Learners: Results from a Large-Scale Cognitive Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Phoebe C.; Kopriva, Rebecca J.; Chen, Chen-Su; Emick, Jessica E.

    2006-01-01

    A cognitive lab technique (n=156) was used to investigate interactions between individual factors and item factors presumed to affect assessment validity for diverse students, including English language learners. Findings support the concept of "access"--an interaction between specific construct-irrelevant item features and individual…

  12. Labile trace metal contribution of the runoff collector to a semi-urban river.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, J D; Granger, D; Binet, G; Litrico, X; Huneau, F; Peyraube, N; Le Coustumer, P

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the distribution of labile trace metals (LTMs; Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in a semi-urban runoff collector was examined to assess its influence to a natural aqueous system (Jalle River, Bordeaux, France). This river is of high importance as it is part of a natural reserve dedicated to conserving aquatic flora and fauna. Two sampling campaigns with a differing precipitation condition (period 1, spring season; and period 2, summer season associated with storms) were considered. Precipitation and water flow were monitored. The collector is active as it is receptive to precipitation changes. It influences the river through discharging water, contributing LTMs, and channeling the mass fluxes. During period 2 where precipitation rate is higher, 25 % of the total water volume of the river was supplied by the collector. LTMs were detected at the collector. Measurements were done by using diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) probes deployed during 1, 7, and 14 days in each period. The results showed that in an instantaneous period (day 1 or D1), most of these trace metals are above the environmental quality standards (Cd, Co, Cr, and Zn). The coefficient of determination (r (2) > 0.50) employed confirmed that the LTM concentrations in the downstream can be explained by the collector. While Co and Cr are from the upstream and the collector, Cd, Cu, and Zn are mostly provided by the collector. Ni, however, is mostly delivered by the upstream. Using the concentrations observed, the river can be affected by the collector in varying ways: (1) adding effect, resulting from the mix of the upstream and the collector (if upstream ˂ downstream); (2) diluted (if upstream ˃ downstream); and (3) conservative or unaffected (upstream ~ downstream). The range of LTM mass fluxes that the collector holds are as follows: (1) limited range or ˂10 g/day, Cd (0.04-1.75 g/day), Co (0.08-05.42 g/day), Ni (0.06-1.45 g/day), and Pb (0.08-9.89 g/day); (2) moderate

  13. Factors Affecting the Inter-annual to Centennial Time Scale Variability of All Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Abdul; Brönnimann, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The All Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (AISMR) is highly important for the livelihood of more than 1 billion people living in the Indian sub-continent. The agriculture of this region is heavily dependent on seasonal (JJAS) monsoon rainfall. An early start or a slight delay of monsoon, or an early withdrawal or prolonged monsoon season may upset the farmer's agricultural plans, can cause significant reduction in crop yield, and hence economic loss. Understanding of AISMR is also vital because it is a part of global atmospheric circulation system. Several studies show that AISMR is influenced by internal climate forcings (ICFs) viz. ENSO, AMO, PDO etc. as well as external climate forcings (ECFs) viz. Greenhouse Gases, volcanic eruptions, and Total Solar Irradiance (TSI). We investigate the influence of ICFs and ECFs on AISMR using recently developed statistical technique called De-trended Partial-Cross-Correlation Analysis (DPCCA). DPCCA can analyse a complex system of several interlinked variables. Often, climatic variables, being cross correlated, are simultaneously tele-connected with several other variables and it is not easy to isolate their intrinsic relationship. In the presence of non-stationarities and background signals the calculated correlation coefficients can be overestimated and erroneous. DPCCA method removes the non-stationarities and partials out the influence of background signals from the variables being cross correlated and thus give a robust estimate of correlation. We have performed the analysis using NOAA Reconstructed SSTs and homogenised instrumental AISMR data set from 1854-1999. By employing the DPCCA method we find that there is a statistically insignificant negative intrinsic relation (by excluding the influence of ICFs, and ECFs except TSI) between AISMR and TSI on decadal to centennial time scale. The ICFs considerably modulate the relation between AISMR and solar activity between 50-80 year time scales and transform this relationship

  14. A decision support tool for simulating the effects of alternative policies affecting water resources: an application at the European scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassio, A.; Giupponi, C.; Hiederer, R.; Simota, C.

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents the methodology applied and results obtained from testing the Decision Support System 'mDSS' developed by the MULINO Project (Multi-sectoral, integrated and operational decision support system for the sustainable use of water resources at the catchment scale), for assessing alternative measures for the reduction of nitrogen pressure from agriculture on water resources at European level. The European policy background is set by the EU Nitrates Directive (91/676/EEC) and the Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC). The nature of the research is exploratory. It is aimed in particular at testing the usefulness of available official statistics for ex ante evaluations of alternative policy measures at the European scale, and the feasibility of such operations within the newly released mDSS software. Alternative measures for reducing N-pressure and spatial targets were designed and simulated in a GIS environment based on raster maps of 1 km resolution. The geographic extent of the present work is defined as the agricultural land of EU15. Data deriving from official statistics were used to calculate a simplified nitrogen balance, in which the sources of nitrogen are separated into organic (livestock manure) and mineral fertilisers, to distinguish the potential contribution of livestock and crop productions to water pollution at the river basin scale. Spatial indicators and evaluation indices were defined within a conceptual framework. For the study the DPSIR approach (Driving force, Pressure, State, Impact, Response), proposed by the European Environmental Agency, was adopted. The approach was subsequently elaborated by means of the multi-criteria functionality provided by mDSS. The results of this application test at the regional scale highlight the potential of the tool for evaluating the effects of policy measures targeted at different spatial implementation strategies through the application of simple screening models and using available data

  15. Factors Affecting the Development of Oxide Scales on Austenitic Stainless Steels during Hot Rolling in Steckel Mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobo, S. J.; Rainforth, W. M.

    2008-10-01

    The hot rolling of austenitic stainless steels in Steckel Mills introduces particular characteristics to the development of oxides scales and surface structures. In this work, the formation of oxide structures during multipass hot rolling of 302 steel was studied under different sets of processing parameters in a laboratory system designed for the simulation of the Steckel process. The resulting surface structures were characterized by a set of complementary techniques involving scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and glow discharge optical spectroscopy (GDOS). The surface analysis revealed two alternative surface structures: one consisting in a thin protective oxide layer rich in Cr2O3 and the other consisting in thick complex structures containing several successive nonprotective oxide scale and metal layers resulting from a cyclic oxidation pattern involving stages of protective oxidation, chemical breakaway, and duplex oxidation. The critical condition that determined the activation of one mechanism or the other was identified associated with the parabolic rate constant for Cr2O3 growth and the diffusivity of Cr in the alloy. The effects of changes in temperature, deformation, and furnace atmosphere are discussed. Alternatives for controlling scale development are presented.

  16. Effect of hydrogen sulfide on phosphorus lability in lake sediments amended with drinking water treatment residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Liu, Juanfeng; Pei, Yuansheng

    2013-05-01

    The use of drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) to immobilize P in sediments is a novel approach for lake restoration. However, the lability of P in WTRs-amended sediments may vary with many factors, e.g., hydrogen sulfide content. Earlier works in our laboratory have demonstrated that WTRs are effective sorbents for hydrogen sulfide in water. Thus, we hypothesized that the lability of P in WTRs-amended sediments would not be increased by hydrogen sulfide. The results of this work suggested that this hypothesis was tenable. Compared to the raw sediments, the amended sediments had significantly lower P desorption potential in the presence of hydrogen sulfide at different times, pH and concentrations. Moreover, the amended sediments were also better able to adsorb hydrogen sulfide. In the amended sediments, the P, which was easily desorbed due to the effect of hydrogen sulfide, was transformed into the Fe/Al bound P.

  17. Biosolids-amended soils: Part II. Chemical lability as a measure of contaminant bioaccessability.

    PubMed

    Schwab, A P; Lewis, K; Banks, M K

    2006-10-01

    Biosolids recycling by amending agricultural soils has increased significantly over the last few decades. The presence of contaminants in small, bioavailable quantities has generated concerns about health threats resulting from accumulation of potential toxins in the food chain. In this study, land application of biosolids was evaluated for environmental risk. Chemical lability tests for metals were used for the test soils and included analyses for water soluble, exchangeable, and metals extractable by the physiologically based extraction test. Chemical extractions detected slight increases in labile metal concentrations for many of the treated soils, particularly those receiving long-term applications of 5 years or more. Significantly higher metal concentrations were observed in the soils that had been exposed to biosolids before the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (Washington, D.C.) 503 Rule (U.S. EPA, 2004) was implemented. PMID:17120442

  18. Adhesin degradation accelerates delivery of heat-labile toxin by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Roy, Koushik; Kansal, Rita; Bartels, Scott R; Hamilton, David J; Shaaban, Salwa; Fleckenstein, James M

    2011-08-26

    Many enteric pathogens, including enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), produce one or more serine proteases that are secreted via the autotransporter (or type V) bacterial secretion pathway. These molecules have collectively been referred to as SPATE proteins (serine protease autotransporter of the Enterobacteriaceae). EatA, an autotransporter previously identified in ETEC, possesses a functional serine protease motif within its secreted amino-terminal passenger domain. Although this protein is expressed by many ETEC strains and is highly immunogenic, its precise function is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that EatA degrades a recently characterized adhesin, EtpA, resulting in modulation of bacterial adhesion and accelerated delivery of the heat-labile toxin, a principal ETEC virulence determinant. Antibodies raised against the passenger domain of EatA impair ETEC delivery of labile toxin to epithelial cells suggesting that EatA may be an effective target for vaccine development. PMID:21757737

  19. Relationship between the lability of sediment-bound Cd and its bioaccumulation in edible oyster.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Ramteke, Darwin; Chakraborty, Sucharita; Chennuri, Kartheek; Bardhan, Pratirupa

    2015-11-15

    A linkage between Cd speciation in sediments and its bioaccumulation in edible oyster (Crassostrea sp.) from a tropical estuarine system was established. Bioaccumulation of Cd in edible oyster increased with the increasing lability and dissociation rate constants of Cd-sediment complexes in the bottom sediments. Total Cd concentration in sediment was not a good indicator of Cd-bioavailability. Increasing trace metal competition in sediments increased lability and bioavailability of Cd in the tropical estuarine sediment. Low thermodynamic stability and high bioavailability of Cd in the estuarine sediment were responsible for high bioaccumulation of Cd in edible oysters (3.2-12.2mgkg(-1)) even though the total concentration of Cd in the bottom sediment was low (0.17-0.49mgkg(-1)).

  20. Glycosylation efficiencies on different solid supports using a hydrogenolysis-labile linker

    PubMed Central

    Collot, Mayeul; Eller, Steffen; Weishaupt, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Summary Automated oligosaccharide assembly requires suitable linkers to connect the first monosaccharide to a solid support. A new hydrogenolysis-labile linker that is stable under both acidic and basic conditions was designed, synthesized and coupled to different resins. Glycosylation and cleavage efficiencies on these functionalized solid supports were investigated, and restrictions for the choice of solid support for oligosaccharide synthesis were found. PMID:23400514

  1. Labile and stabilised fractions of soil organic carbon in some intensively cultivated alluvial soils.

    PubMed

    Verma, B C; Datta, S P; Rattan, R K; Singh, A K

    2013-11-01

    The present investigation was undertaken in view of the limited information on the relative proportion of labile and stabilized fractions of soil organic carbon (SOC) in intensively cultivated lands, particularly under tropics. The specific objectives were i) to study the comparative recovery of SOC by different methods of labile carbon estimation under intensively cultivated lands and ii) to evaluate the impact of agricultural practices on carbon management index. For this purpose, in all, 105 surface soil samples were collected from intensively cultivated tube well and sewage irrigated agricultural lands. These samples were analysed for total as well as labile pools of SOC. Results indicated that Walkley and Black, KMnO4-oxidizable and microbial biomass carbon constituted the total SOC to the extent of 10.2 to 47.4, 1.66 to 23.2 and 0.30 to 5.49%, respectively with the corresponding mean values of 26.2, 9.16 and 2.15%. Lability of SOC was considerably higher in sewage irrigated soils than tube well irrigated soils under intensive cropping. Under soybean-wheat, the higher values of carbon management index (CMI) (279 and 286) were associated with the treatments where entire amount of nitrogen was supplied through FYM. Similar results were obtained under rice-wheat, whereas in case of maize-wheat the highest value of CMI was recorded under treatment receiving NPK through chemical fertilizer along with green manure. There was also a significant improvement in CMI under integrated (chemical fertilizer + organics) and chemical fertilizer-treated plots. The values of CMI ranged from 220 to 272 under cultivated lands receiving irrigation through sewage and industrial effluents. PMID:24555339

  2. Bis(haloBODIPYs) with Labile Helicity: Valuable Simple Organic Molecules That Enable Circularly Polarized Luminescence.

    PubMed

    Ray, César; Sánchez-Carnerero, Esther M; Moreno, Florencio; Maroto, Beatriz L; Agarrabeitia, Antonia R; Ortiz, María J; López-Arbeloa, Íñigo; Bañuelos, Jorge; Cohovi, Komlan D; Lunkley, Jamie L; Muller, Gilles; de la Moya, Santiago

    2016-06-20

    Simple organic molecules (SOM) based on bis(haloBODIPY) are shown to enable circularly polarized luminescence (CPL), giving rise to a new structural design for technologically valuable CPL-SOMs. The established design comprises together synthetic accessibility, labile helicity, possibility of reversing the handedness of the circularly polarized emission, and reactive functional groups, making it unique and attractive as advantageous platform for the development of smart CPL-SOMs.

  3. Modeling compensatory responses of ecosystem-scale water fluxes in forests affected by pine and spruce beetle mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millar, D.; Ewers, B. E.; Peckham, S. D.; Mackay, D. S.; Frank, J. M.; Massman, W. J.; Reed, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) and spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) epidemics have led to extensive mortality in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii) forests in the Rocky Mountains of the western US. In both of these tree species, mortality results from hydraulic failure within the xylem, due to blue stain fungal infection associated with beetle attack. However, the impacts of these disturbances on ecosystem-scale water fluxes can be complex, owing to their variable and transient nature. In this work, xylem scaling factors that reduced whole-tree conductance were initially incorporated into a forest ecohydrological model (TREES) to simulate the impact of beetle mortality on evapotranspiration (ET) in both pine and spruce forests. For both forests, simulated ET was compared to observed ET fluxes recorded using eddy covariance techniques. Using xylem scaling factors, the model overestimated the impact of beetle mortality, and observed ET fluxes were approximately two-fold higher than model predictions in both forests. The discrepancy between simulated and observed ET following the onset of beetle mortality may be the result of spatial and temporal heterogeneity of plant communities within the foot prints of the eddy covariance towers. Since simulated ET fluxes following beetle mortality in both forests only accounted for approximately 50% of those observed in the field, it is possible that newly established understory vegetation in recently killed tree stands may play a role in stabilizing ecosystem ET fluxes. Here, we further investigate the unaccounted for ET fluxes in the model by breaking it down into multiple cohorts that represent live trees, dying trees, and understory vegetation that establishes following tree mortality.

  4. Examining the Interplay of Processes Across Multiple Time-Scales: Illustration With the Intraindividual Study of Affect, Health, and Interpersonal Behavior (iSAHIB)

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Nilam; Conroy, David E.; Pincus, Aaron L.; Lorek, Amy; Rebar, Amanda; Roche, Michael J.; Coccia, Michael; Morack, Jennifer; Feldman, Josh; Gerstorf, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Human development is characterized by the complex interplay of processes that manifest at multiple levels of analysis and time-scales. We introduce the Intraindividual Study of Affect, Health and Interpersonal Behavior (iSAHIB) as a model for how multiple time-scale study designs facilitate more precise articulation of developmental theory. Combining age heterogeneity, longitudinal panel, daily diary, and experience sampling protocols, the study made use of smartphone and web-based technologies to obtain intensive longitudinal data from 150 persons age 18–89 years as they completed three 21-day measurement bursts (t = 426 bursts, t = 8,557 days) wherein they provided reports on their social interactions (t = 64,112) as they went about their daily lives. We illustrate how multiple time-scales of data can be used to articulate bioecological models of development and the interplay among more ‘distal’ processes that manifest at ‘slower’ time-scales (e.g., age-related differences and burst-to-burst changes in mental health) and more ‘proximal’ processes that manifest at ‘faster’ time-scales (e.g., changes in context that progress in accordance with the weekly calendar and family influence processes). PMID:26989350

  5. Consolidated and labile odor memory are separately encoded within the Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Scheunemann, Lisa; Jost, Eva; Richlitzki, Antje; Day, Jonathan P; Sebastian, Sujith; Thum, Andreas S; Efetova, Marina; Davies, Shireen-A; Schwärzel, Martin

    2012-11-28

    Memories are classified as consolidated (stable) or labile according to whether they withstand amnestic treatment, or not. In contrast to the general prevalence of this classification, its neuronal and molecular basis is poorly understood. Here, we focused on consolidated and labile memories induced after a single cycle training in the Drosophila aversive olfactory conditioning paradigm and we used mutants to define the impact of cAMP signals. At the biochemical level we report that cAMP signals misrelated in either rutabaga (rut) or dunce (dnc) mutants separate between consolidated anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM) and labile anesthesia-sensitive memory (ASM). Those functionally distinct cAMP signals act within different neuronal populations: while rut-dependent cAMP signals act within Kenyon cells (KCs) of the mushroom bodies to support ASM, dnc-sensitive cAMP signals support ARM within antennal lobe local neurons (LNs) and KCs. Collectively, different key positions along the olfactory circuitry seem to get modified during storage of ARM or ASM independently. A precise separation between those functionally distinct cAMP signals seems mandatory to allocate how they support appropriate memories.

  6. Effects of chemical amendments on the lability and speciation of metals in anaerobically digested biosolids.

    PubMed

    Donner, Erica; Brunetti, Gianluca; Zarcinas, Bernie; Harris, Paul; Tavakkoli, Ehsan; Naidu, Ravi; Lombi, Enzo

    2013-10-01

    The interaction of inorganic contaminants present in biosolids with iron, aluminum, and manganese oxy/hydroxides has been advocated as a key mechanism limiting their bioavailability. In this study, we investigated whether this is indeed the case, and further, whether it can be exploited to produce optimized biosolids products through the addition of chemical additives during sewage sludge processing. Experiments were conducted to investigate whether the addition of iron- and aluminum-based amendments (at 5 different rates) during the anaerobic digestion phase of wastewater treatment can effectively change the speciation or lability of contaminant metals (copper, zinc and cadmium) in biosolids destined for use in agriculture. The performance of the bioreactors was monitored throughout and the speciation and lability were determined in both fresh and 3-month aged biosolids using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (Cu, Zn) and isotopic dilution ((65)Cu, (65)Zn, (109)Cd). The tested amendments (FeCl3, Al2(SO4)3, and Al-rich water treatment residual) did not cause significant changes in metal speciation and were of limited use for reducing the lability of contaminant metals in good quality biosolids (suitable for use in agriculture), suggesting that high affinity binding sites were already in excess in these materials. However, the use of chemical amendments may offer advantages in terms of treatment process optimization and may also be beneficial when biosolids are used for contaminated site remediation. PMID:23981056

  7. Substrate lability and plant activity controls greenhouse gas release from Neotropical peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjogersten, Sofie; Hoyos, Jorge; Lomax, Barry; Turner, Ben; Wright, Emma

    2014-05-01

    Almost one third of global CO2 emissions resulting from land use change and substantial CH4 emissions originate from tropical peatlands. However, our understanding of the controls of CO2 and CH4 release from tropical peatlands are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of peat lability and the activity of the vegetation on gas release using a combination of field and laboratory experiments. We demonstrated that peat lability constrained CH4 production to the surface peat under anaerobic conditions. The presence of plants shifted the C balance from a C source to a C sink with respect to CO2 while the activity of the root system strongly influenced CH4 emissions through its impact on soil O2 inputs. Both field and laboratory data suggest a coupling between the photosynthetic activity of the vegetation and the release of both CO2 and CH4 following the circadian rhythm of the dominant plant functional types. Forest clearance for agriculture resulted in elevated CH4 release, which we attribute in part to the cessation of root O2 inputs to the peat. We conclude that high emissions of CO2 and CH4 from forested tropical peatlands are likely driven by labile C inputs from the vegetation but that root O2 release may limit CH4 emissions.

  8. Evolution of phenotypic plasticity and environmental tolerance of a labile quantitative character in a fluctuating environment.

    PubMed

    Lande, R

    2014-05-01

    Quantitative genetic models of evolution of phenotypic plasticity are used to derive environmental tolerance curves for a population in a changing environment, providing a theoretical foundation for integrating physiological and community ecology with evolutionary genetics of plasticity and norms of reaction. Plasticity is modelled for a labile quantitative character undergoing continuous reversible development and selection in a fluctuating environment. If there is no cost of plasticity, a labile character evolves expected plasticity equalling the slope of the optimal phenotype as a function of the environment. This contrasts with previous theory for plasticity influenced by the environment at a critical stage of early development determining a constant adult phenotype on which selection acts, for which the expected plasticity is reduced by the environmental predictability over the discrete time lag between development and selection. With a cost of plasticity in a labile character, the expected plasticity depends on the cost and on the environmental variance and predictability averaged over the continuous developmental time lag. Environmental tolerance curves derived from this model confirm traditional assumptions in physiological ecology and provide new insights. Tolerance curve width increases with larger environmental variance, but can only evolve within a limited range. The strength of the trade-off between tolerance curve height and width depends on the cost of plasticity. Asymmetric tolerance curves caused by male sterility at high temperature are illustrated. A simple condition is given for a large transient increase in plasticity and tolerance curve width following a sudden change in average environment.

  9. Labile soil carbon inputs mediate the soil microbial community composition and plant residue decomposition rates

    SciTech Connect

    De Graaff, Marie-Anne; Classen, Aimee T; Castro Gonzalez, Hector F; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2010-01-01

    Root carbon (C) inputs may regulate decomposition rates in soil, and in this study we ask: how do labile C inputs regulate decomposition of plant residues, and soil microbial communities? In a 14 d laboratory incubation, we added C compounds often found in root exudates in seven different concentrations (0, 0.7, 1.4, 3.6, 7.2, 14.4 and 21.7 mg C g{sup -1} soil) to soils amended with and without {sup 13}C-labeled plant residue. We measured CO{sub 2} respiration and shifts in relative fungal and bacterial rRNA gene copy numbers using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Increased labile C input enhanced total C respiration, but only addition of C at low concentrations (0.7 mg C g{sup -1}) stimulated plant residue decomposition (+2%). Intermediate concentrations (1.4, 3.6 mg C g{sup -1}) had no impact on plant residue decomposition, while greater concentrations of C (> 7.2 mg C g{sup -1}) reduced decomposition (-50%). Concurrently, high exudate concentrations (> 3.6 mg C g{sup -1}) increased fungal and bacterial gene copy numbers, whereas low exudate concentrations (< 3.6 mg C g{sup -1}) increased metabolic activity rather than gene copy numbers. These results underscore that labile soil C inputs can regulate decomposition of more recalcitrant soil C by controlling the activity and relative abundance of fungi and bacteria.

  10. A comprehensive factorial design study of variables affecting CaCO3 scaling under magnetic water treatment.

    PubMed

    Alimi, Fathi; Boubakri, Ali; Tlili, Mohamed M; Ben Amor, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic water treatment (MWT) could be an interesting alternative to chemical treatment to prevent scaling and has been used as an antiscaling treatment for domestic and industrial equipment. A two level-three factor (2(3)) full factorial design was used to evaluate the effects of pH (6-7.5), flow rate (0.54-0.94) and application of a magnetic field on the induction time (IT), total precipitation (TP) rate and homogeneous precipitation (HP) rate of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) scale from hard water. The experimental results and statistical analysis show that the pH, flow rate and interaction between pH and magnetic field have negative effects on IT response. In the case of TP rate response, the magnitude of the main influence is attributed to the magnetic field, followed by pH value and their interaction. Flow rate and pH value have a negative effect on HP rate response, but their interaction has a positive effect. Within these factor ranges, these studied responses predicted by the models were in good agreement with the experimental values. The coefficient of determination (R(2)) for reduction time, TP ratio and HP ratio were 97.8%, 99.12% and 99.92%, respectively. These results were analyzed statistically using Minitab 15.

  11. Perceived utility of emotion: the structure and construct validity of the Perceived Affect Utility Scale in a cross-ethnic sample.

    PubMed

    Chow, Philip I; Berenbaum, Howard

    2012-01-01

    This study introduces a new measure of the perceived utility of emotion, which is the degree to which emotions are perceived to be useful in achieving goals. In this study, we administered this new measure, the Perceived Affect Utility Scale (PAUSe), to a sample of 142 European American and 156 East Asian American college students. Confirmatory factor analyses provided support for a new, culturally informed parsing of emotion and for perceived utility of emotion to be distinguishable from ideal affect, a related but separate construct. Next, we explored the potential importance of perceived utility of emotion in cultural research. Through path analyses, we found that: (a) culturally relevant variables (e.g., independence) played a mediating role in the link between ethnic group and perceived utility of emotion; and (b) perceived utility of emotion played a mediating role in the link between culturally relevant variables and ideal affect. In particular, perceived utility of self-centered emotions (e.g., pride) was found to be associated with independence and ideal affect of those same emotions. In contrast, perceived utility of other-centered emotions (e.g., appreciation) was found to be associated with interdependence, dutifulness/self-discipline, and ideal affect of those same emotions. Implications for perceived utility of emotion in understanding cultural factors are discussed.

  12. Predicting the solubility and lability of Zn, Cd, and Pb in soils from a minespoil-contaminated catchment by stable isotopic exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzouk, E. R.; Chenery, S. R.; Young, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Rookhope catchment of Weardale, England, has a diverse legacy of contaminated soils due to extensive lead mining activity over four centuries. We measured the isotopically exchangeable content of Pb, Cd and Zn (E-values) in a large representative subset of the catchment soils (n = 246) using stable isotope dilution. All three metals displayed a wide range of %E-values (c. 1-100%) but relative lability followed the sequence Cd > Pb > Zn. A refinement of the stable isotope dilution approach also enabled detection of non-reactive metal contained within suspended sub-micron (<0.22 μm) colloidal particles (SCP-metal). For most soils, the presence of non-labile SCP-metal caused only minor over-estimation of E-values (<2%) but the effect was greater for soils with particularly large humus or carbonate contents. Approximately 80%, 53% and 66% of the variability in Zn, Cd and Pb %E-values (respectively) could be explained by pH, loss on ignition and total metal content. E-values were affected by the presence of ore minerals at high metal contents leading to an inconsistent trend in the relationship between %E-value and soil metal concentration. Metal solubility, in the soil suspensions used to measure E-values, was predicted using the WHAM geochemical speciation model (versions VI and VII). The use of total and isotopically exchangeable metal as alternative input variables was compared; the latter provided significantly better predictions of solubility, especially in the case of Zn. Lead solubility was less well predicted by either version of WHAM, with over-prediction at low pH and under-prediction at high soil pH values. Quantify the isotopically exchangeable fractions of Zn, Cd and Pb (E-values), and assess their local and regional variability, using multi-element stable isotope dilution, in a diverse range of soil ecosystems within the catchment of an old Pb/Zn mining area. Assess the controlling influences of soil properties on metal lability and develop

  13. Spatial scale and sampling resolution affect measures of gap disturbance in a lowland tropical forest: implications for understanding forest regeneration and carbon storage.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Elena; Dalling, James W

    2014-03-01

    Treefall gaps play an important role in tropical forest dynamics and in determining above-ground biomass (AGB). However, our understanding of gap disturbance regimes is largely based either on surveys of forest plots that are small relative to spatial variation in gap disturbance, or on satellite imagery, which cannot accurately detect small gaps. We used high-resolution light detection and ranging data from a 1500 ha forest in Panama to: (i) determine how gap disturbance parameters are influenced by study area size, and the criteria used to define gaps; and (ii) to evaluate how accurately previous ground-based canopy height sampling can determine the size and location of gaps. We found that plot-scale disturbance parameters frequently differed significantly from those measured at the landscape-level, and that canopy height thresholds used to define gaps strongly influenced the gap-size distribution, an important metric influencing AGB. Furthermore, simulated ground surveys of canopy height frequently misrepresented the true location of gaps, which may affect conclusions about how relatively small canopy gaps affect successional processes and contribute to the maintenance of diversity. Across site comparisons need to consider how gap definition, scale and spatial resolution affect characterizations of gap disturbance, and its inferred importance for carbon storage and community composition. PMID:24452032

  14. Spatial scale and sampling resolution affect measures of gap disturbance in a lowland tropical forest: implications for understanding forest regeneration and carbon storage.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Elena; Dalling, James W

    2014-03-01

    Treefall gaps play an important role in tropical forest dynamics and in determining above-ground biomass (AGB). However, our understanding of gap disturbance regimes is largely based either on surveys of forest plots that are small relative to spatial variation in gap disturbance, or on satellite imagery, which cannot accurately detect small gaps. We used high-resolution light detection and ranging data from a 1500 ha forest in Panama to: (i) determine how gap disturbance parameters are influenced by study area size, and the criteria used to define gaps; and (ii) to evaluate how accurately previous ground-based canopy height sampling can determine the size and location of gaps. We found that plot-scale disturbance parameters frequently differed significantly from those measured at the landscape-level, and that canopy height thresholds used to define gaps strongly influenced the gap-size distribution, an important metric influencing AGB. Furthermore, simulated ground surveys of canopy height frequently misrepresented the true location of gaps, which may affect conclusions about how relatively small canopy gaps affect successional processes and contribute to the maintenance of diversity. Across site comparisons need to consider how gap definition, scale and spatial resolution affect characterizations of gap disturbance, and its inferred importance for carbon storage and community composition.

  15. Does El Niño-Southern Oscillation affect the precipitation in Korea on seasonal time scales?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Chang-Hoi; Choi, Woosuk; Kim, Jinwon; Kim, Maeng-Ki; Yoo, Hee-Dong

    2016-08-01

    A number of studies in the past two decades have attempted to find the relationship between the precipitation in Korea and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on various time scales. Comprehensive analyses of station precipitation data in Korea for the 61-year period, 1954-2014, in this study show that the effects of ENSO on the seasonal precipitation in Korea are practically negligible. The correlation between summer precipitation and ENSO is insignificant regardless of the intensity, type (e.g., eastern-Pacific or central-Pacific), and stage (e.g., developing, mature, or decaying) of ENSO. Somewhat meaningful correlation between ENSO and precipitation in Korea occurs only in the ENSO-developing fall. Because summer rainfall accounts for over half of the annual total and fall is a dry season in Korea, the overall effects of ENSO on precipitation in Korea are practically nonexistent.

  16. Predators determine how weather affects the spatial niche of lizard prey: exploring niche dynamics at a fine scale.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Darias, Marta; Schoener, Thomas W; Spiller, David A; Losos, Jonathan B

    2012-12-01

    Although abiotic and biotic factors can interact to shape the spatial niche of a species, studies that explore the interactive effects of both at a local scale are rare. We demonstrate that one of the main axes (perch height) characterizing the spatial niche of a common lizard, Anolis sagrei, varies according to the interactive effects of weather and the activity of a larger predatory lizard, Leiocephalus carinatus. Results were completely consistent: no matter how favorable the weather conditions for using the ground (mainly characterized by temperature, humidity, wind speed, rain), A. sagrei did not do so if the predator was present. Hence, great behavioral plasticity enabled A. sagrei to adjust its use of space very quickly. To the best of our knowledge, these results constitute the first field demonstration for anoles (and possibly for other animals as well) of how time-varying environmental conditions and predator presence interact to produce short-term changes in utilization along a major niche axis.

  17. Small scale hydrology in a pristine and an affected peatland: effects of flood water on soil biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorenhout, Michel; Cusell, Casper

    2014-05-01

    Many peatlands have a water regime of fluctuating water levels. Flooding of peatsoils occurs in several Dutch peatlands. The quality of this floodwater is important for the ecological value of the peatlands. Well known are the eutrophying effects of polluted flood water on the N- and P- limited vegetation. Nutrients can, however, also be released from the soil; anoxic conditions are known to release Fe-bound phosphorus. It is therefore important to focus on small scale hydrology in projects where water levels are manipulated and floodings are induced. Three types of peatlands have been the subject of two separate studies on hydrology, ecological value and soil biogeochemistry. Two pristine sites and one recently restored flood water storage basin were monitored during 2009-2013. These three sites cover the natural range of peatsoils: from floating fens to degraded and fixed peat soils. All sites have peat as the main soil type, but the age and typology differs. The two pristine sites, the Wieden and Weerribben, are characterized by limited natural and/or induced flooding events. These sites have peaty soils. The soils in the Wieden are fixed to the sandy substrate below, the peaty soils in the Weerribben are completely floating on a water layer. The ecological value of the Wieden and the Weerribben is high, but their value may decline due to low variation in water levels. The third site, the Onlanden area, is a large created storm water storage basin. The Onlanden area is a former agricultural area, inhabited since the Medieval period. It has a fixed and rather degraded peaty soil. Large scale restoration of water inlets and dams has created an area that will get flooded at regular intervals. The Onlanden was the subject of an archaeological monitoring project. All sites were equipped with monitoring stations for local and regional water levels, soil moisture and soil redox potential as the indicator for the local biogeochemistry. Cusell et al (2013) studied the

  18. Do experimental units of different scale affect the biological performance of European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax larvae?

    PubMed

    Lika, K; Pavlidis, M; Mitrizakis, N; Samaras, A; Papandroulakis, N

    2015-04-01

    The effects of different tank volumes (2000, 500 and 40 l) on European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax larval rearing, relating to growth, survival, quality and stress variables, were investigated. A dynamic energy budget (DEB) model was used to analyse the results. The hydrodynamics of the tanks exhibited differences, with the water currents in the 2000 l tanks to be almost one order of magnitude stronger than those in the 40 l ones. Important differences in fish growth were observed between small and large tank-rearing volumes, with the smallest tank resulting in the slowest growth. Based on the DEB model analysis, growth differences were related to feeding rates, with growth in the smaller tank limited by food availability. Differences in survival rates were not statistically significant among the tank-rearing volumes. The quality evaluation of the fry (in terms of swimbladder, jaw and skeletal abnormalities) showed differences, with the smallest tank having the highest percentage of deformed individuals. This could be attributed to both the feeding variances and the hydrodynamics in the tanks. No differences were observed in terms of whole-body cortisol at the two developmental stages; flexion, and when the larvae body was fully covered by melanophores; when analysis was performed. This indicates that the allostatic load exerted on fish of different groups was similar and inside the fish-coping abilities range, in terms of the cortisol response axis. The selection of the experimental scale is of importance, especially when the results are to be transferred and applied on an industrial scale.

  19. Molecular insights into the microbial formation of marine dissolved organic matter: recalcitrant or labile?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, B. P.; Kattner, G.; Witt, M.; Passow, U.

    2014-08-01

    The degradation of marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an important control variable in the global carbon cycle. For our understanding of the kinetics of organic matter cycling in the ocean, it is crucial to achieve a mechanistic and molecular understanding of its transformation processes. A long-term microbial experiment was performed to follow the production of non-labile DOM by marine bacteria. Two different glucose concentrations and dissolved algal exudates were used as substrates. We monitored the bacterial abundance, concentrations of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), nutrients, amino acids and transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) for 2 years. The molecular characterization of extracted DOM was performed by ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) after 70 days and after ∼2 years of incubation. Although glucose quickly degraded, a non-labile DOC background (5-9% of the initial DOC) was generated in the glucose incubations. Only 20% of the organic carbon from the algal exudate degraded within the 2 years of incubation. The degradation rates for the non-labile DOC background in the different treatments varied between 1 and 11 μmol DOC L-1 year-1. Transparent exopolymer particles, which are released by microorganisms, were produced during glucose degradation but decreased back to half of the maximum concentration within less than 3 weeks (degradation rate: 25 μg xanthan gum equivalents L-1 d-1) and were below detection in all treatments after 2 years. Additional glucose was added after 2 years to test whether labile substrate can promote the degradation of background DOC (co-metabolism; priming effect). A priming effect was not observed but the glucose addition led to a slight increase of background DOC. The molecular analysis demonstrated that DOM generated during glucose degradation differed appreciably from DOM transformed during the degradation of the algal exudates. Our

  20. Assessing the Selectivity of Extractant Solutions for Recovering Labile Arsenic Associated with Iron (Hydr)oxides and Sulfides in Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sequential extractions can provide analytical constraints on the identification of mineral phases that control arsenic speciation in sediments. Model solids were used in this study to evaluate different solutions designed to extract arsenic from relatively labile solid phases. ...

  1. Reduced contribution of thermally-labile sugar lesions to DNA double-strand break formation after exposure to neutrons.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyendra K; Wu, Wenqi; Stuschke, Martin; Bockisch, Andreas; Iliakis, George

    2012-12-01

    In cells exposed to ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks (DSBs) form within clustered damage sites from lesions disrupting the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone. It is commonly assumed that DSBs form promptly and are immediately detected and processed by the cellular DNA damage response apparatus. However, DSBs also form by delayed chemical conversion of thermally-labile sugar lesions (TLSL) to breaks. We recently reported that conversion of thermally-labile sugar lesions to breaks occurs in cells maintained at physiological temperatures. Here, we investigate the influence of radiation quality on the formation of thermally-labile sugar lesions dependent DSBs. We show that, although the yields of total DSBs are very similar after exposure to neutrons and X rays, the yields of thermally-labile sugar lesions dependent DSBs from neutrons are decreased in comparison to that from X rays. Thus, the yields of prompt DSBs for neutrons are greater than for X rays. Notably, after neutron irradiation the decreased yield of thermally-labile sugar lesion dependent DSBs is strongly cell line dependent, likely reflecting subtle differences in DNA organization. We propose that the higher ionization density of neutrons generates with higher probability prompt DSBs within ionization clusters and renders the ensuing chemical evolution of thermally-labile sugar lesions inconsequential to DNA integrity. Modification of thermally-labile sugar lesion evolution may define novel radiation protection strategies aiming at decreasing DSB formation by chemically preserving thermally-labile sugar lesions until other DSB contributing lesions within the clustered damage site are removed by non-DSB repair pathways. PMID:23088767

  2. Reduced contribution of thermally-labile sugar lesions to DNA double-strand break formation after exposure to neutrons.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satyendra K; Wu, Wenqi; Stuschke, Martin; Bockisch, Andreas; Iliakis, George

    2012-12-01

    In cells exposed to ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks (DSBs) form within clustered damage sites from lesions disrupting the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone. It is commonly assumed that DSBs form promptly and are immediately detected and processed by the cellular DNA damage response apparatus. However, DSBs also form by delayed chemical conversion of thermally-labile sugar lesions (TLSL) to breaks. We recently reported that conversion of thermally-labile sugar lesions to breaks occurs in cells maintained at physiological temperatures. Here, we investigate the influence of radiation quality on the formation of thermally-labile sugar lesions dependent DSBs. We show that, although the yields of total DSBs are very similar after exposure to neutrons and X rays, the yields of thermally-labile sugar lesions dependent DSBs from neutrons are decreased in comparison to that from X rays. Thus, the yields of prompt DSBs for neutrons are greater than for X rays. Notably, after neutron irradiation the decreased yield of thermally-labile sugar lesion dependent DSBs is strongly cell line dependent, likely reflecting subtle differences in DNA organization. We propose that the higher ionization density of neutrons generates with higher probability prompt DSBs within ionization clusters and renders the ensuing chemical evolution of thermally-labile sugar lesions inconsequential to DNA integrity. Modification of thermally-labile sugar lesion evolution may define novel radiation protection strategies aiming at decreasing DSB formation by chemically preserving thermally-labile sugar lesions until other DSB contributing lesions within the clustered damage site are removed by non-DSB repair pathways.

  3. Coordination chemistry strategies for dynamic helicates: time-programmable chirality switching with labile and inert metal helicates.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Hiroyuki; Tsukube, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    'Chirality switching' is one of the most important chemical processes controlling many biological systems. DNAs and proteins often work as time-programmed functional helices, in which specific external stimuli alter the helical direction and tune the time scale of subsequent events. Although a variety of organic foldamers and their hybrids with natural helices have been developed, we highlight coordination chemistry strategies for development of structurally and functionally defined metal helicates. These metal helicates have characteristic coordination geometries, redox reactivities and spectroscopic/magnetic properties as well as complex chiralities. Several kinds of inert metal helicates maintain rigid helical structures and their stereoisomers are separable by optical resolution techniques, while labile metal helicates offer dynamic inversion of their helical structures via non-covalent interactions with external chemical signals. The latter particularly have dynamically ordered helical structures, which are controlled by the combinations of metal centres and chiral ligands. They further function as time-programmable switches of chirality-derived dynamic rotations, translations, stretching and shape flipping, which are useful applications in nanoscience and related technology.

  4. Repair of radiation-induced heat-labile sites is independent of DNA-PKcs, XRCC1 or PARP

    SciTech Connect

    Stenerlöw, Bo; Karlsson, Karin H.; Radulescu, Irina; Rydberg, Bjorn; Stenerlow, Bo

    2008-04-29

    Ionizing radiation induces a variety of different DNA lesions: in addition to the most critical DNA damage, the DSB, numerous base alterations, SSBs and other modifications of the DNA double-helix are formed. When several non-DSB lesions are clustered within a short distance along DNA, or close to a DSB, they may interfere with the repair of DSBs and affect the measurement of DSB induction and repair. We have previously shown that a substantial fraction of DSBs measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) are in fact due to heat-labile sites (HLS) within clustered lesions, thus reflecting an artifact of preparation of genomic DNA at elevated temperature. To further characterize the influence of HLS on DSB induction and repair, four human cell lines (GM5758, GM7166, M059K, U-1810) with apparently normal DSB rejoining were tested for bi-phasic rejoining after gamma irradiation. When heat-released DSBs were excluded from the measurements the fraction of fast rejoining decreased to less than 50% of the total. However, neither the half-times of the fast (t{sub 1/2} = 7-8 min) or slow (t{sub 1/2} = 2.5 h) DSB rejoining were changed significantly. At t=0 the heat-released DSBs accounted for almost 40% of the DSBs, corresponding to 10 extra DSB/cell/Gy in the initial DSB yield. These heat-released DSBs were repaired within 60-90 min in all tested cells, including M059K cells treated with wortmannin or DNA-PKcs defect M059J cells. Furthermore, cells lacking XRCC1 or Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) rejoined both total DSBs and heat-released DSBs similar to normal cells. In summary, the presence of heat-labile sites have a substantial impact on DSB induction yields and DSB rejoining rates measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and HLS repair is independent of DNA-PKcs, XRCC1 and PARP.

  5. Interactive effects of water supply and defoliation on photosynthesis, plant water status and growth of Eucalyptus globulus Labill.

    PubMed

    Quentin, A G; O'Grady, A P; Beadle, C L; Mohammed, C; Pinkard, E A

    2012-08-01

    Increased climatic variability, including extended periods of drought stress, may compromise on the health of forest ecosystems. The effects of defoliating pests on plantations may also impact on forest productivity. Interactions between climate signals and pest activity are poorly understood. In this study, we examined the combined effects of reduced water availability and defoliation on maximum photosynthetic rate (A(sat)), stomatal conductance (g(s)), plant water status and growth of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. Field-grown plants were subjected to two water-availability regimes, rain-fed (W-) and irrigated (W+). In the summer of the second year of growth, leaves from 75% of crown length removed from trees in both watering treatments and physiological responses within the canopies were examined. We hypothesized that defoliation would result in improved plant water status providing a mechanistic insight into leaf- and canopy-scale gas-exchange responses. Defoliated trees in the W+ treatment exhibited higher A(sat) and g(s) compared with non-defoliated trees, but these responses were not observed in the W- treatment. In contrast, at the whole-plant scale, maximum rates of transpiration (E(max)) and canopy conductance (G(Cmax)) and soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance (K(P)) increased in both treatments following defoliation. As a result, plant water status was unaffected by defoliation and trees in the defoliated treatments exhibited homeostasis in this respect. Whole-plant soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance was strongly correlated with leaf scale g(s) and A(sat) following the defoliation, providing a mechanistic insight into compensatory up-regulation of photosynthesis. Above-ground height and diameter growth were unaffected by defoliation in both water availability treatments, suggesting that plants use a range of responses to compensate for the impacts of defoliation.

  6. Interactive effects of water supply and defoliation on photosynthesis, plant water status and growth of Eucalyptus globulus Labill.

    PubMed

    Quentin, A G; O'Grady, A P; Beadle, C L; Mohammed, C; Pinkard, E A

    2012-08-01

    Increased climatic variability, including extended periods of drought stress, may compromise on the health of forest ecosystems. The effects of defoliating pests on plantations may also impact on forest productivity. Interactions between climate signals and pest activity are poorly understood. In this study, we examined the combined effects of reduced water availability and defoliation on maximum photosynthetic rate (A(sat)), stomatal conductance (g(s)), plant water status and growth of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. Field-grown plants were subjected to two water-availability regimes, rain-fed (W-) and irrigated (W+). In the summer of the second year of growth, leaves from 75% of crown length removed from trees in both watering treatments and physiological responses within the canopies were examined. We hypothesized that defoliation would result in improved plant water status providing a mechanistic insight into leaf- and canopy-scale gas-exchange responses. Defoliated trees in the W+ treatment exhibited higher A(sat) and g(s) compared with non-defoliated trees, but these responses were not observed in the W- treatment. In contrast, at the whole-plant scale, maximum rates of transpiration (E(max)) and canopy conductance (G(Cmax)) and soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance (K(P)) increased in both treatments following defoliation. As a result, plant water status was unaffected by defoliation and trees in the defoliated treatments exhibited homeostasis in this respect. Whole-plant soil-to-leaf hydraulic conductance was strongly correlated with leaf scale g(s) and A(sat) following the defoliation, providing a mechanistic insight into compensatory up-regulation of photosynthesis. Above-ground height and diameter growth were unaffected by defoliation in both water availability treatments, suggesting that plants use a range of responses to compensate for the impacts of defoliation. PMID:22874831

  7. [Seasonal dynamics of soil labile nitrogen pools and net nitrogen mineralization in subalpine forests along an elevational gradient in western Sichuan, China].

    PubMed

    Yin, Rui; Xu, Zhen-Feng; Wu, Fu-Zhong; Yang, Wan-Qin; Xiong, Li; Xiao, Sa; Ma, Zhi-Liang; Li, Zhi-Ping

    2013-12-01

    The seasonal dynamics of soil labile nitrogen pools and net nitrogen mineralization of three subalpine forests along an elevation gradient (3600, 3300 and 3000 m), western Sichuan, China were examined. Obvious seasonal dynamics were found in soil labile nitrogen pools (ammonium, nitrate, microbial biomass nitrogen and dissolved organic nitrogen) and net nitrogen mineralization rate, but the seasonality varied with the measured nitrogen pools. The concentrations of soil nitrate (8.38-89.60 mg x kg(-1)) were significantly higher than those of ammonium (0.44-8.43 mg x kg(-1)) in four sampling periods (non-growing season, early, middle and late growing season). Regardless of the elevation, the rate of soil net nitrogen mineralization was negative (-0.77 to -0.56 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)) early in the growing season, but positive in the other three periods. Except for nitrate, the contents of ammonium, microbial biomass nitrogen and dissolved organic nitrogen varied significantly with elevation and the altitude effects on those pools were dependent on seasons. In summary, soil nitrification was the major process of net soil nitrogen mineralization and soil nitrogen mineralization was not affected by elevational gradient. Soil nitrogen mineralization (0.42-0.99 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)) in winter was considerable in this area. Relatively high inorganic nitrogen in early spring might be favorable for vegetation growth, but might also be lost from soil ecosystem through leaching. PMID:24697050

  8. [Seasonal dynamics of soil labile nitrogen pools and net nitrogen mineralization in subalpine forests along an elevational gradient in western Sichuan, China].

    PubMed

    Yin, Rui; Xu, Zhen-Feng; Wu, Fu-Zhong; Yang, Wan-Qin; Xiong, Li; Xiao, Sa; Ma, Zhi-Liang; Li, Zhi-Ping

    2013-12-01

    The seasonal dynamics of soil labile nitrogen pools and net nitrogen mineralization of three subalpine forests along an elevation gradient (3600, 3300 and 3000 m), western Sichuan, China were examined. Obvious seasonal dynamics were found in soil labile nitrogen pools (ammonium, nitrate, microbial biomass nitrogen and dissolved organic nitrogen) and net nitrogen mineralization rate, but the seasonality varied with the measured nitrogen pools. The concentrations of soil nitrate (8.38-89.60 mg x kg(-1)) were significantly higher than those of ammonium (0.44-8.43 mg x kg(-1)) in four sampling periods (non-growing season, early, middle and late growing season). Regardless of the elevation, the rate of soil net nitrogen mineralization was negative (-0.77 to -0.56 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)) early in the growing season, but positive in the other three periods. Except for nitrate, the contents of ammonium, microbial biomass nitrogen and dissolved organic nitrogen varied significantly with elevation and the altitude effects on those pools were dependent on seasons. In summary, soil nitrification was the major process of net soil nitrogen mineralization and soil nitrogen mineralization was not affected by elevational gradient. Soil nitrogen mineralization (0.42-0.99 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1)) in winter was considerable in this area. Relatively high inorganic nitrogen in early spring might be favorable for vegetation growth, but might also be lost from soil ecosystem through leaching.

  9. The scaling of host density with richness affects the direction, shape, and detectability of diversity-disease relationships.

    PubMed

    Mihaljevic, Joseph R; Joseph, Maxwell B; Orlofske, Sarah A; Paull, Sara H

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen transmission responds differently to host richness and abundance, two unique components of host diversity. However, the heated debate around whether biodiversity generally increases or decreases disease has not considered the relationships between host richness and abundance that may exist in natural systems. Here we use a multi-species model to study how the scaling of total host community abundance with species richness mediates diversity-disease relationships. For pathogens with density-dependent transmission, non-monotonic trends emerge between pathogen transmission and host richness when host community abundance saturates with richness. Further, host species identity drives high variability in pathogen transmission in depauperate communities, but this effect diminishes as host richness accumulates. Using simulation we show that high variability in low richness communities and the non-monotonic relationship observed with host community saturation may reduce the detectability of trends in empirical data. Our study emphasizes that understanding the patterns and predictability of host community composition and pathogen transmission mode will be crucial for predicting where and when specific diversity-disease relationships should occur in natural systems.

  10. Factors affecting the microbial populations at full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) wastewater treatment plants in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    López-Vázquez, Carlos M; Hooijmans, Christine M; Brdjanovic, Damir; Gijzen, Huub J; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2008-05-01

    The influence of operating and environmental conditions on the microbial populations of the enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process at seven full-scale municipal activated sludge wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in The Netherlands was studied. Data from the selected WWTPs concerning process configuration, operating and environmental conditions were compiled. The EBPR activity from each plant was determined by execution of anaerobic-anoxic-aerobic batch tests using fresh activated sludge. Fractions of Accumulibacter as potential phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAO), and Competibacter, Defluviicoccus-related microorganisms and Sphingomonas as potential glycogen accumulating organisms (GAO) were quantified using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The relationships among plant process configurations, operating parameters, environmental conditions, EBPR activity and microbial populations fractions were evaluated using a statistical approach. A well-defined and operated denitrification stage and a higher mixed liquor pH value in the anaerobic stage were positively correlated with the occurrence of Accumulibacter. A well-defined denitrification stage also stimulated the development of denitrifying PAO (DPAO). A positive correlation was observed between Competibacter fractions and organic matter concentrations in the influent. Nevertheless, Competibacter did not cause a major effect on the EBPR performance. The observed Competibacter fractions were not in the range that would have led to EBPR deterioration. Likely, the low average sewerage temperature (12+/-2 degrees C) limited their proliferation. Defluviicoccus-related microorganisms were seen only in negligible fractions in a few plants (<0.1% as EUB), whereas Sphingomonas were not observed.

  11. Factors Affecting Process Temperature and Biogas Production in Small-scale Rural Biogas Digesters in Winter in Northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pham, C H; Vu, C C; Sommer, S G; Bruun, S

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the main factors influencing digester temperature and methods to reduce heat losses during the cold season in the subtropics. Four composite digesters (two insulated and two uninsulated) were buried underground to measure their internal temperature (°C) at a depth of 140 cm and 180 cm, biogas production and methane (CH4) concentration in biogas from August to February. In parallel the temperature of the air (100 cm above ground), in the slurry mixing tank and in the soil (10, 100, 140, and 180 cm depth) was measured by thermocouple. The influent amount was measured daily and the influent chemical composition was measured monthly during the whole experimental period. Seasonal variations in air temperature significantly affected the temperature in the soil, mixing tank and digester. Consequently, biogas production, which is temperature dependent, was influenced by the season. The main factors determining the internal temperature in the digesters were insulation with Styrofoam, air temperature and temperature of slurry in the mixing tank. Biogas production is low due to the cold climate conditions in winter in Northern Vietnam, but the study proved that storing slurry in the mixing tank until its temperature peak at around 14:00 h will increase the temperature in the digester and thus increase potential biogas production. Algorithms are provided linking digester temperature to the temperature of slurry in the mixing tank.

  12. Factors Affecting Process Temperature and Biogas Production in Small-scale Rural Biogas Digesters in Winter in Northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pham, C H; Vu, C C; Sommer, S G; Bruun, S

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the main factors influencing digester temperature and methods to reduce heat losses during the cold season in the subtropics. Four composite digesters (two insulated and two uninsulated) were buried underground to measure their internal temperature (°C) at a depth of 140 cm and 180 cm, biogas production and methane (CH4) concentration in biogas from August to February. In parallel the temperature of the air (100 cm above ground), in the slurry mixing tank and in the soil (10, 100, 140, and 180 cm depth) was measured by thermocouple. The influent amount was measured daily and the influent chemical composition was measured monthly during the whole experimental period. Seasonal variations in air temperature significantly affected the temperature in the soil, mixing tank and digester. Consequently, biogas production, which is temperature dependent, was influenced by the season. The main factors determining the internal temperature in the digesters were insulation with Styrofoam, air temperature and temperature of slurry in the mixing tank. Biogas production is low due to the cold climate conditions in winter in Northern Vietnam, but the study proved that storing slurry in the mixing tank until its temperature peak at around 14:00 h will increase the temperature in the digester and thus increase potential biogas production. Algorithms are provided linking digester temperature to the temperature of slurry in the mixing tank. PMID:25050049

  13. Factors Affecting Process Temperature and Biogas Production in Small-scale Rural Biogas Digesters in Winter in Northern Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Pham, C. H.; Vu, C. C.; Sommer, S. G.; Bruun, S.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the main factors influencing digester temperature and methods to reduce heat losses during the cold season in the subtropics. Four composite digesters (two insulated and two uninsulated) were buried underground to measure their internal temperature (°C) at a depth of 140 cm and 180 cm, biogas production and methane (CH4) concentration in biogas from August to February. In parallel the temperature of the air (100 cm above ground), in the slurry mixing tank and in the soil (10, 100, 140, and 180 cm depth) was measured by thermocouple. The influent amount was measured daily and the influent chemical composition was measured monthly during the whole experimental period. Seasonal variations in air temperature significantly affected the temperature in the soil, mixing tank and digester. Consequently, biogas production, which is temperature dependent, was influenced by the season. The main factors determining the internal temperature in the digesters were insulation with Styrofoam, air temperature and temperature of slurry in the mixing tank. Biogas production is low due to the cold climate conditions in winter in Northern Vietnam, but the study proved that storing slurry in the mixing tank until its temperature peak at around 14:00 h will increase the temperature in the digester and thus increase potential biogas production. Algorithms are provided linking digester temperature to the temperature of slurry in the mixing tank. PMID:25050049

  14. How does the connectivity of open-framework conglomerates within multi-scale hierarchical fluvial architecture affect oil sweep efficiency in waterflooding?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominic, D. F.; Gershenzon, N. I.; Soltanian, M. R.; Ritzi, R. W., Jr.; Keefer, D. A.; Shaffer, E.; Storsved, B.

    2014-12-01

    We studied the effects on oil sweep efficiency of the proportion, hierarchical organization, and connectivity of high-permeability open-framework conglomerate (OFC) cross-sets within the multi-scale stratal architecture found in fluvial deposits. Utilizing numerical simulations and the RVA/Paraview open-source visualization package, we analyzed oil production rate, water breakthrough time, and spatial and temporal distribution of residual oil saturation. The effective permeability of the reservoir exhibits large-scale anisotropy created by the organization of OFC cross-sets within unit bars, and the organization of unit bars within compound bars. As a result, oil sweep efficiency critically depends on the direction of the pressure gradient. When pressure gradient is oriented normal to paleoflow direction, the total oil production and the water breakthrough time are larger, and remaining oil saturation is smaller. This result is found regardless of the proportion or connectivity of the OFC cross-sets, within the ranges examined. Contrary to expectations, the total amount of trapped oil due to the effect of capillary trapping does not depend on the pressure gradient within the examined range. Hence the pressure difference between production and injection wells does not affect sweep efficiency, although the spatial distribution of oil remaining in the reservoir depends on this value. Whether or not clusters of connected OFC span the domain does not affect sweep efficiency, only the absolute rate of oil production. The RVA/Paraview application allowed us to visualize and examine these non-intuitive results.

  15. Clinical assessment of affective instability: comparing EMA indices, questionnaire reports, and retrospective recall.

    PubMed

    Solhan, Marika B; Trull, Timothy J; Jahng, Seungmin; Wood, Phillip K

    2009-09-01

    Traditional self-report measures of psychopathology may be influenced by a variety of recall biases. Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) reduces these biases by assessing individuals' experiences as they occur in their natural environments. This study examines the discrepancy between trait questionnaire, retrospective report, and EMA measures of affective instability in psychiatric outpatients either with a borderline personality diagnosis (n = 58) or with a current episode of major depressive disorder or dysthymia (n = 42). The authors examined the agreement of 3 trait measures of affective instability-the Affective Instability subscale of the Personality Assessment Inventory-Borderline Features scale (L. C. Morey, 1991), the Affect Intensity Measure (R. J. Larsen, E. Diener, & R. Emmons, 1986), and the Affect Lability Scales (P. D. Harvey, B. R. Greenberg, & M. R. Serper, 1989)-and 1 retrospective mood recall task with EMA indices of mood and mood instability. Results indicate only modest to moderate agreement between momentary and questionnaire assessments of trait affective instability; agreement between recalled mood changes and EMA indices was poor. Implications for clinical research and practice and possible applications of EMA methodology are discussed.

  16. Labile Low-Molecular-Mass Metal Complexes in Mitochondria: Trials and Tribulations of a Burgeoning Field.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Paul A; Moore, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    Iron, copper, zinc, manganese, cobalt, and molybdenum play important roles in mitochondrial biochemistry, serving to help catalyze reactions in numerous metalloenzymes. These metals are also found in labile "pools" within mitochondria. Although the composition and cellular function of these pools are largely unknown, they are thought to be comprised of nonproteinaceous low-molecular-mass (LMM) metal complexes. Many problems must be solved before these pools can be fully defined, especially problems stemming from the lability of such complexes. This lability arises from inherently weak coordinate bonds between ligands and metals. This is an advantage for catalysis and trafficking, but it makes characterization difficult. The most popular strategy for investigating such pools is to detect them using chelator probes with fluorescent properties that change upon metal coordination. Characterization is limited because of the inevitable destruction of the complexes during their detection. Moreover, probes likely react with more than one type of metal complex, confusing analyses. An alternative approach is to use liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). With help from a previous lab member, the authors recently developed an LC-ICP-MS approach to analyze LMM extracts from yeast and mammalian mitochondria. They detected several metal complexes, including Fe580, Fe1100, Fe1500, Cu5000, Zn1200, Zn1500, Mn1100, Mn2000, Co1200, Co1500, and Mo780 (numbers refer to approximate masses in daltons). Many of these may be used to metalate apo-metalloproteins as they fold inside the organelle. The LC-based approach also has challenges, e.g., in distinguishing artifactual metal complexes from endogenous ones, due to the fact that cells must be disrupted to form extracts before they are passed through chromatography columns prior to analysis. Ultimately, both approaches will be needed to characterize these intriguing complexes and to

  17. Interactions between recalcitrant and labile organic carbon in streams - Can stream biofilms mediate a priming effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, M. M.; Wagner, K.; Herberg, E. R.; Burns, N. R.; Wanek, W.; Battin, T. J.

    2012-04-01

    Inland waters - such as streams, rivers and lakes - are increasingly recognized as important components in the global carbon cycle. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in these systems is diverse in structure, origin and reactivity, and a fraction of it is regarded as recalcitrant to microbial degradation. In soils, degradation of recalcitrant carbon is often controlled by the availability of labile carbon sources. This is linked to the priming effect (PE). Mounting evidence suggests that PE is also important in aquatic ecosystems but there are so far very few studies addressing this topic. Biofilms are vital components of aquatic ecosystems. In stream biofilms, heterotrophic bacteria and algae coexist in close proximity, exposing the bacteria to both recalcitrant DOC of terrestrial origin and labile organic carbon from the algae. We hypothesize that this makes stream biofilms hotspots for PE. We used plug-flow bioreactors inoculated with natural stream biofilm bacterial communities to test the potential of a priming effect in aquatic ecosystems. The bioreactors were amended with an isotope-labeled plant extract serving as a model of recalcitrant DOC in streams. Labile carbon sources, in the form of glucose and an algal extract were added to induce PE. Nitrate and phosphate were also added to assess the role of these inorganic nutrients on carbon uptake. Microbial uptake of the different carbon sources was monitored by measuring the concentrations and isotopic ratios of respired CO2, biomass and DOC. Our results suggest that the priming effect plays a role in stream carbon cycling and that it is potentially an important process in other aquatic ecosystems.

  18. Total and Labile Phosphorus Concentrations as Influenced by Riparian Buffer Soil Properties.

    PubMed

    Young, Eric O; Ross, Donald S

    2016-01-01

    Riparian buffers can act as a phosphorus (P) source under active stream bank erosion. Using soil and landscape variables (soil series, drainage class, organic matter, and pH) to index P concentrations could improve P loss risk tools for buffers. The objectives of this study were (i) to determine if soil properties could predict total and labile P concentrations within a 10-ha riparian buffer and (ii) to quantify the degree of spatial dependence of P and related properties. Soil samples were taken in 15-cm increments to a depth of 60 cm using a grid ( = 71) from an established riparian buffer along the Rock River in Vermont. Total soil P (TP), plant-available P determined by Modified Morgan extraction (MM-P), pH, soil organic matter (SOM), soil texture, and select cations were measured. We found that TP (152-1536 mg P kg) and MM-P (0.4-14.6 mg kg) ranged widely, with distinct differences between soil series. Mean TP and MM-P were greater in alluvial and glaciolacustrine soils compared with glacial till. Across all samples, MM-P was weakly related to soil properties; however, total labile P (orthophosphate + organic P measured by ICP) and unreactive labile P (ICP-P - colorimetric-P) could both be predicted by SOM ( = 0.59 and 0.73, respectively). Strong spatial dependence was found for P and related properties as revealed by geospatial analyses. Results show that P availability in the buffer was strongly related to soil genesis and support site-specific approaches for P loss risk evaluation in buffers.

  19. Core-Shell Hydrogel Particles Harvest, Concentrate and Preserve Labile Low Abundance Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Caterina; Patanarut, Alexis; George, Tony; Bishop, Barney; Zhou, Weidong; Fredolini, Claudia; Ross, Mark M.; Espina, Virginia; Pellacani, Giovanni; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Liotta, Lance A.; Luchini, Alessandra

    2009-01-01

    Background The blood proteome is thought to represent a rich source of biomarkers for early stage disease detection. Nevertheless, three major challenges have hindered biomarker discovery: a) candidate biomarkers exist at extremely low concentrations in blood; b) high abundance resident proteins such as albumin mask the rare biomarkers; c) biomarkers are rapidly degraded by endogenous and exogenous proteinases. Methodology and Principal Findings Hydrogel nanoparticles created with a N-isopropylacrylamide based core (365 nm)-shell (167 nm) and functionalized with a charged based bait (acrylic acid) were studied as a technology for addressing all these biomarker discovery problems, in one step, in solution. These harvesting core-shell nanoparticles are designed to simultaneously conduct size exclusion and affinity chromatography in solution. Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), a clinically relevant, highly labile, and very low abundance biomarker, was chosen as a model. PDGF, spiked in human serum, was completely sequestered from its carrier protein albumin, concentrated, and fully preserved, within minutes by the particles. Particle sequestered PDGF was fully protected from exogenously added tryptic degradation. When the nanoparticles were added to a 1 mL dilute solution of PDGF at non detectable levels (less than 20 picograms per mL) the concentration of the PDGF released from the polymeric matrix of the particles increased within the detection range of ELISA and mass spectrometry. Beyond PDGF, the sequestration and protection from degradation for a series of additional very low abundance and very labile cytokines were verified. Conclusions and Significance We envision the application of harvesting core-shell nanoparticles to whole blood for concentration and immediate preservation of low abundance and labile analytes at the time of venipuncture. PMID:19274087

  20. Enantiomeric Excesses of Acid Labile Amino Acid Precursors of the Murchison Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzarello, Sandra

    1998-01-01

    Amino acids present in carbonaceous chondrite are extracted in water in part as free compounds and in approximately equal part as acid labile precursors. On the assumption that they would be free of contamination, the precursors of two Murchison amino acids that have terrestrial occurrence, alanine and glutamic acid, have been targeted for analysis of their enantiomeric ratios. Pyroglutamic acid, the precursor of glutamic acid, was found with an L-enantiomeric excess comparable to that of the free acid, while alanine's precursor, N-acetyl alanine, appears approximately racemic. Also alpha-imino propioacetic acid, a proposed end product of alanine synthesis in the meteorite, was analyzed and found racemic.

  1. Organic chemistry of basal ice - presence of labile, low molecular weight compounds available for microbial metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lis, Grzegorz P.; Wadham, Jemma L.; Lawson, Emily; Stibal, Marek; Telling, Jon

    2010-05-01

    Recent studies show that subglacial environments previously thought to be devoid of life contain a host of active microbial organisms. Presence of liquid water due to overburden pressure, the release of nutrients from chemical erosion of bedrock, and the potential carbon sources in overridden sediments facilitate life in this extreme environment. However, little is still known of concentrations and diversity of labile organic compounds essential for sustaining microbial metabolism in subglacial environments. Three subglacial ecosystems that considerably differ in range and amount of available organic compounds were selected for this study 1-Engabreen, northern Norway, overlying high-grade metamorphic rocks with low organic carbon content; 2-Finsterwalderbreen, Svalbard, overriding ancient black shales with a relatively high carbon content yet recalcitrant to microbiological consumption; and 3-Russell Glacier in western Greenland with recently overridden quaternary organic rich paleosols. Basal and pressure ridge ice samples were collected and subsequently analysed for low molecular weight organic compounds, with the emphasis on volatile fatty acids, carbohydrates and amino acids. The highest concentration of labile organic compounds in Greenland basal ice suggest that recently overridden paleosols have the greatest potential for sustaining microbial populations present within and underneath basal ice. The high concentration of "ancient" organic carbon in basal ice from Finsterwalderbreen, Svalbard, doesn't correlate with the presence of labile organic compounds. This indicates the inability of microbes to digest recalcitrant kerogen carbon in cold temperatures. In all three investigated environments, concentrations of labile organic compounds are elevated in basal ice with a high debris content. Until recently, most models of the global carbon cycle tend to neglect the pool of subglacial organic carbon as little is known about the range and concentrations of

  2. Dissolved organic carbon lability increases with water residence time in the alluvial aquifer of a river floodplain ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helton, Ashley M.; Wright, Meredith S.; Bernhardt, Emily S.; Poole, Geoffrey C.; Cory, Rose M.; Stanford, Jack A.

    2015-04-01

    We assessed spatial and temporal patterns of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) lability and composition throughout the alluvial aquifer of the 16 km2 Nyack Floodplain in northwest Montana, USA. Water influx to the aquifer derives almost exclusively from the Middle Fork of the Flathead River, and water residence times within the aquifer range from days to months. Across seasons and channel discharge conditions, we measured DOC concentration, lability, and optical properties of aquifer water sampled from 12 wells, both near and ~3 m below the water table. Concentrations of DOC were typically low (542 ± 22.7 µg L-1; mean ± se), and the percentage of labile DOC averaged 18 ± 12% during 3 day laboratory assays. Parallel factor analysis of fluorescence excitation-emission matrices revealed two humic-like and two amino acid-like fluorescence groups. Total DOC, humic-like components, and specific UV absorbance decreased with water residence time, consistent with sorption to aquifer sediments. However, labile DOC (both concentration and fraction) increased with water residence time, suggesting a concurrent influx or production of labile DOC. Thus, although the carbon-poor, oxygen-rich aquifer is a net sink for DOC, recalcitrant DOC appears to be replaced with more labile DOC along aquifer flow paths. Our observation of DOC production in long flow paths contrasts with studies of hyporheic DOC consumption along short (centimeters to meters) flow paths and highlights the importance of understanding the role of labile organic matter production and/or influx in alluvial aquifer carbon cycling.

  3. Self-Compassion Scale (SCS): Psychometric Properties of The French Translation and Its Relations with Psychological Well-Being, Affect and Depression.

    PubMed

    Kotsou, Ilios; Leys, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years, the topic of self-compassion has attracted increasing attention from both scientific and clinical fields. The Self-Compassion Scale (SCS) was created to specifically capture this way of being kind and understanding towards oneself in moments of turmoil. In this article, we present a French adaptation of the SCS. We first explore the psychometric properties of this adaptation and then investigate its relation to psychological well-being. As in the original version of the SCS, the French adaptation has a strong 6-factor structure but a weaker hierarchical second order structure. However the bi-factor model yields a good omega index suggesting the relevance of a single score accounting for self-compassion. Moreover, there was a relation between the SCS and classical outcomes such as a positive relation with psychological well-being and negative relation with depressive symptoms. We then hypothesized that self-compassion would have a moderating role on the relation between affect and depression. This hypothesis was confirmed: expressing negative affect is correlated with depressive symptoms; however, being kind with oneself lowers depressive symptoms even when expressing negative affect. In conclusion, this research presents a valid self-compassion measure for French-speaking researchers and clinicians and outlines the need for further research on the concept of self-compassion. PMID:27078886

  4. Self-Compassion Scale (SCS): Psychometric Properties of The French Translation and Its Relations with Psychological Well-Being, Affect and Depression.

    PubMed

    Kotsou, Ilios; Leys, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years, the topic of self-compassion has attracted increasing attention from both scientific and clinical fields. The Self-Compassion Scale (SCS) was created to specifically capture this way of being kind and understanding towards oneself in moments of turmoil. In this article, we present a French adaptation of the SCS. We first explore the psychometric properties of this adaptation and then investigate its relation to psychological well-being. As in the original version of the SCS, the French adaptation has a strong 6-factor structure but a weaker hierarchical second order structure. However the bi-factor model yields a good omega index suggesting the relevance of a single score accounting for self-compassion. Moreover, there was a relation between the SCS and classical outcomes such as a positive relation with psychological well-being and negative relation with depressive symptoms. We then hypothesized that self-compassion would have a moderating role on the relation between affect and depression. This hypothesis was confirmed: expressing negative affect is correlated with depressive symptoms; however, being kind with oneself lowers depressive symptoms even when expressing negative affect. In conclusion, this research presents a valid self-compassion measure for French-speaking researchers and clinicians and outlines the need for further research on the concept of self-compassion.

  5. Self-Compassion Scale (SCS): Psychometric Properties of The French Translation and Its Relations with Psychological Well-Being, Affect and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Kotsou, Ilios; Leys, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years, the topic of self-compassion has attracted increasing attention from both scientific and clinical fields. The Self-Compassion Scale (SCS) was created to specifically capture this way of being kind and understanding towards oneself in moments of turmoil. In this article, we present a French adaptation of the SCS. We first explore the psychometric properties of this adaptation and then investigate its relation to psychological well-being. As in the original version of the SCS, the French adaptation has a strong 6-factor structure but a weaker hierarchical second order structure. However the bi-factor model yields a good omega index suggesting the relevance of a single score accounting for self-compassion. Moreover, there was a relation between the SCS and classical outcomes such as a positive relation with psychological well-being and negative relation with depressive symptoms. We then hypothesized that self-compassion would have a moderating role on the relation between affect and depression. This hypothesis was confirmed: expressing negative affect is correlated with depressive symptoms; however, being kind with oneself lowers depressive symptoms even when expressing negative affect. In conclusion, this research presents a valid self-compassion measure for French-speaking researchers and clinicians and outlines the need for further research on the concept of self-compassion. PMID:27078886

  6. Isolation of Labile Multi-protein Complexes by in vivo Controlled Cellular Cross-Linking and Immuno-magnetic Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Zlatic, Stephanie A.; Ryder, Pearl V.; Salazar, Gloria; Faundez, Victor

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic nature of cellular machineries is frequently built on transient and/or weak protein associations. These low affinity interactions preclude stringent methods for the isolation and identification of protein networks around a protein of interest. The use of chemical crosslinkers allows the selective stabilization of labile interactions, thus bypassing biochemical limitations for purification. Here we present a protocol amenable for cells in culture that uses a homobifunctional crosslinker with a spacer arm of 12 Å, dithiobis-(succinimidyl proprionate) (DSP). DSP is cleaved by reduction of a disulphide bond present in the molecule. Cross-linking combined with immunoaffinity chromatography of proteins of interest with magnetic beads allows the isolation of protein complexes that otherwise would not withstand purification. This protocol is compatible with regular western blot techniques and it can be scaled up for protein identification by mass spectrometry1. Stephanie A. Zlatic and Pearl V. Ryder contributed equally to this work. PMID:20216526

  7. Novel diffusive gradients in thin films technique to assess labile sulfate in soil.

    PubMed

    Hanousek, Ondrej; Mason, Sean; Santner, Jakob; Chowdhury, Md Mobaroqul Ahsan; Berger, Torsten W; Prohaska, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    A novel diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique for sampling labile soil sulfate was developed, based on a strong basic anion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400) for sulfate immobilization on the binding gel. For reducing the sulfate background on the resin gels, photopolymerization was applied instead of ammonium persulfate-induced polymerization. Agarose cross-linked polyacrylamide (APA) hydrogels were used as diffusive layer. The sulfate diffusion coefficient in APA gel was determined as 9.83 × 10(-6) ± 0.35 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) at 25 °C. The accumulated sulfate was eluted in 1 mol L(-1) HNO3 with a recovery of 90.9 ± 1.6 %. The developed method was tested against two standard extraction methods for soil sulfate measurement. The obtained low correlation coefficients indicate that DGT and conventional soil test methods assess differential soil sulfate pools, rendering DGT a potentially important tool for measuring labile soil sulfate.

  8. Structure and function of cholera toxin and the related Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Spangler, B D

    1992-01-01

    Cholera and the related Escherichia coli-associated diarrheal disease are important problems confronting Third World nations and any area where water supplies can become contaminated. The disease is extremely debilitating and may be fatal in the absence of treatment. Symptoms are caused by the action of cholera toxin, secreted by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, or by a closely related heat-labile enterotoxin, produced by Escherichia coli, that causes a milder, more common traveler's diarrhea. Both toxins bind receptors in intestinal epithelial cells and insert an enzymatic subunit that modifies a G protein associated with the adenylate cyclase complex. The consequent stimulated production of cyclic AMP, or other factors such as increased synthesis of prostaglandins by intoxicated cells, initiates a metabolic cascade that results in the excessive secretion of fluid and electrolytes characteristic of the disease. The toxins have a very high degree of structural and functional homology and may be evolutionarily related. Several effective new vaccine formulations have been developed and tested, and a growing family of endogenous cofactors is being discovered in eukaryotic cells. The recent elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of the heat-labile enterotoxin has provided an opportunity to examine and compare the correlations between structure and function of the two toxins. This information may improve our understanding of the disease process itself, as well as illuminate the role of the toxin in studies of signal transduction and G-protein function. Images PMID:1480112

  9. Effects of lability of metal complex on free ion measurement using DMT.

    PubMed

    Weng, Liping; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H; Temminghoff, Erwin J M

    2010-04-01

    Very low concentrations of free metal ion in natural samples can be measured using the Donnan membrane technique (DMT) based on ion transport kinetics. In this paper, the possible effects of slow dissociation of metal complexes on the interpretation of kinetic DMT are investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The expressions of the lability parameter, Lgrangian , were derived for DMT. Analysis of new experimental studies using synthetic solution containing NTA as the ligand and Cu(2+) ions shows that when the ionic strength is low (labile species measured using other dynamic sensors (DGT, GIME) in several freshwaters, it is concluded that in most waters ion transport in DMT is controlled by diffusion in the membrane. Only in very soft waters (<0.7 mM Ca+Mg), the dissociation rate of natural metal complex may influence ion transport in DMT. In this case, neglecting this effect may lead to an underestimation of the free metal ion concentration measured.

  10. Novel diffusive gradients in thin films technique to assess labile sulfate in soil.

    PubMed

    Hanousek, Ondrej; Mason, Sean; Santner, Jakob; Chowdhury, Md Mobaroqul Ahsan; Berger, Torsten W; Prohaska, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    A novel diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique for sampling labile soil sulfate was developed, based on a strong basic anion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400) for sulfate immobilization on the binding gel. For reducing the sulfate background on the resin gels, photopolymerization was applied instead of ammonium persulfate-induced polymerization. Agarose cross-linked polyacrylamide (APA) hydrogels were used as diffusive layer. The sulfate diffusion coefficient in APA gel was determined as 9.83 × 10(-6) ± 0.35 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) at 25 °C. The accumulated sulfate was eluted in 1 mol L(-1) HNO3 with a recovery of 90.9 ± 1.6 %. The developed method was tested against two standard extraction methods for soil sulfate measurement. The obtained low correlation coefficients indicate that DGT and conventional soil test methods assess differential soil sulfate pools, rendering DGT a potentially important tool for measuring labile soil sulfate. PMID:27491301

  11. Windows of embryonic sexual lability in two lizard species with environmental sex determination.

    PubMed

    Shine, Richard; Warner, Daniel A; Radder, Rajkumar

    2007-07-01

    Temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) occurs in all major reptile lineages, but the selective forces and physiological mechanisms that link sex to incubation temperature may differ among and within those groups. Different models for TSD evolution make different predictions about when offspring sex will respond to environmental cues. Although TSD has evolved in several lizard lineages, there is less detailed information on these taxa than in turtles and crocodilians with TSD. We incubated eggs of an agamid lizard (Amphibolurus muricatus) and a scincid lizard (Bassiana duperreyi), two species with TSD. Rather than manipulate incubation temperature to identify periods of sexual lability (as in most previous studies of this topic), we topically applied the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole to eggs at a variety of times through the incubation period. Fadrozole application sex-reversed the resultant hatchlings if applied from the time of oviposition until at least 60% of the way through incubation. In all of the TSD lizard species studied so far, offspring sex is determined either while the eggs are held inside the mother's body or soon after oviposition, providing substantial maternal control over incubation temperatures at this critical period. Hence, the hypothesis that TSD evolves because it enables offspring sex to be matched to conditions that are unpredictable at the time of laying is less likely to apply to squamates than to turtles, sphenodontians, and (especially) crocodiles, in which the period of sexual lability is delayed until long after oviposition.

  12. Rhizosphere Environment and Labile Phosphorus Release from Organic Waste-Amended Soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, Thanh H.

    2015-04-01

    Crop residues and biofertilizers are primary sources of nutrients for organic crop production. However, soils treated with large amounts of nutrient-enriched manure have elevated phosphorus (P) levels in regions of intensive animal agriculture. Surpluses occurred in these amended soils, resulting in large pools of exchangeable inorganic P (Pi) and enzyme-labile organic P (Po) that averaging 30.9 and 68.2 mg kg-1, respectively. Organic acids produced during crop residue decomposition can promote the complexation of counter-ions and decouple and release unbound Pi from metal and alkali metal phosphates. Animal manure and cover crop residues also contain large amounts of soluble organic matter, and likely generate similar ligands. However, a high degree of heterogeneity in P spatial distribution in such amended fields, arising from variances in substrate physical forms ranging from slurries to dried solids, composition, and diverse application methods and equipment. Distinct clusters of Pi and Po were observed, where accumulation of the latter forms was associated with high soil microbial biomass C and reduced phosphomonoesterases' activity. Accurate estimates of plant requirements and lability of soil P pools, and real-time plant and soil P sensing systems are critical considerations to optimally manage manure-derived nutrients in crop production systems. An in situ X-ray fluorescence-based approach to sensing canopy and soil XRFS-P was developed to improve the yield-soil P relationship for optimal nutrient recommendations in addition to allowing in-the-field verification of foliar P status.

  13. [Effects of land use change on soil labile organic carbon in Central Jiangxi of China].

    PubMed

    Du, Man-Yi; Fan, Shao-Hui; Liu, Guang-Lu; Qi, Liang-Hua; Guo, Bao-Hu; Tang, Xiao-Lu; Xiao, Fu-Ming

    2013-10-01

    Selecting the 15-year abandoned land (AL) and three forest lands [Phyllostachys edulis plantation (PE), Schima superba secondary forest (SS), and Cunninghamia Lanceolata plantation (CL)] in Anfu County of Jiangxi Province as test objects, this paper studied the effects of land use change on the soil organic carbon (SOC) pool and soil labile organic carbon (SLOC) contents. The soil organic carbon (SOC), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), hot- water extractable carbon (HWC), and readily oxidizable carbon (ROC) contents in the test lands were all in the order of PE>CL>SS>AL. As compared with those in AL, the SOC content, soil carbon stock, and soil labile organic carbon (SLOC) contents in the three forest lands all decreased with increasing soil depth, and had an obvious accumulation in surface soil. The proportions of different kinds of SLOC to soil total organic carbon differed markedly, among which, ROC had the highest proportion, while MBC had the smallest one. There existed significant relationships between SOC, MBC, HWC, and ROC. The MBC, HWC, and ROC contained higher content of active carbon, and were more sensitive to the land use change, being able to be used as the indicators for evaluating the soil quality and fertility in central Jiangxi Province. PMID:24483085

  14. [Effects of land use change on soil labile organic carbon in Central Jiangxi of China].

    PubMed

    Du, Man-Yi; Fan, Shao-Hui; Liu, Guang-Lu; Qi, Liang-Hua; Guo, Bao-Hu; Tang, Xiao-Lu; Xiao, Fu-Ming

    2013-10-01

    Selecting the 15-year abandoned land (AL) and three forest lands [Phyllostachys edulis plantation (PE), Schima superba secondary forest (SS), and Cunninghamia Lanceolata plantation (CL)] in Anfu County of Jiangxi Province as test objects, this paper studied the effects of land use change on the soil organic carbon (SOC) pool and soil labile organic carbon (SLOC) contents. The soil organic carbon (SOC), microbial biomass carbon (MBC), hot- water extractable carbon (HWC), and readily oxidizable carbon (ROC) contents in the test lands were all in the order of PE>CL>SS>AL. As compared with those in AL, the SOC content, soil carbon stock, and soil labile organic carbon (SLOC) contents in the three forest lands all decreased with increasing soil depth, and had an obvious accumulation in surface soil. The proportions of different kinds of SLOC to soil total organic carbon differed markedly, among which, ROC had the highest proportion, while MBC had the smallest one. There existed significant relationships between SOC, MBC, HWC, and ROC. The MBC, HWC, and ROC contained higher content of active carbon, and were more sensitive to the land use change, being able to be used as the indicators for evaluating the soil quality and fertility in central Jiangxi Province.

  15. [Effects of stand structure regulation on soil labile organic carbon in Pinus elliottii plantation].

    PubMed

    Tan, Gui-Xia; Liu, Yuan-Qiu; Li, Lian-Lian; Liu, Wu; Zan, Yu-Ting; Huo, Bing-Nan; He, Mu-Jiao

    2014-05-01

    Taking 21-year-old Pinus elliottii pure plantation as the control, effects of enrichment planting with broadleaf trees (Liquidambar fornosana) after thinning the conifer trees (P. elliottii) on soil labile organic carbon of different plantations, including 3-year-old, 6-year-old, 9-year-old P. elliottii and 21-year-old P. elliottii-L. fornosana mixed plantations, were investigated. The results showed that the contents of soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC), readily oxidizable organic carbon (ROC), and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) significantly increased in the 6-year-old and 9-year-old plantations compared with those in the 21-year-old P. elliottii pure plantation. Soil labile organic carbon contents in the 21-year-old P. elliottii-L. fornosana mixed plantation increased significantly than those in 3-year-old, 6-year-old, 9-year-old stands, and the DOC, ROC and MBC contents increased by 113.1%, 53.3% and 54.6%, respectively, compared with those in the 21-year-old P. elliottii pure plantation. The results suggested that replanting with broadleaf trees are an effective measure to improve the soil ecological function in pure P. elliottii plantation.

  16. Total spontaneous resolution of chiral covalent networks from stereochemically labile metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anna; Håkansson, Mikael; Jagner, Susan

    2005-09-01

    Stereochemically labile copper and zinc complexes with the N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine ligand (dmeda) have been shown to be promising precursors for the total spontaneous resolution of chiral covalent networks. (N,N')-[Cu(NO3)2(dmeda)]infinity crystallises as a conglomerate and yields either enantiopure (R,R)-1 or enantiopure (S,S)-1. A mixed-valence copper(I/II) complex, [{Cu(II)Br2(dmeda)}3(Cu(I)Br)2]infinity (2), which crystallises as a pair of interpenetrating chiral (10,3)-a nets, is formed from CuBr, CuBr2 and dmeda. One net contains ligands with solely (R,R) configuration and exhibits helices with (P) configuration while the other has solely (S,S)-dmeda ligands and gives rise to a net in which the helices have (M) configuration. The whole crystalline arrangement is racemic, because the interpenetrating chiral nets are of opposite handedness. With zinc chloride (R,S)-[ZnCl(dmeda)2]2[ZnCl4] (3) is obtained, which is a network structure, although not chiral. Total spontaneous resolution of stereochemically labile metal complexes formed from achiral or racemic building blocks is suggested as a viable route for the preparation of covalent chiral networks. Once the absolute structure of the compound has been determined by X-ray crystallography, a quantitative determination of the enantiomeric excess of the bulk product can be undertaken by means of solid-state CD spectroscopy.

  17. Heterotrophic activity and biodegradation of labile and refractory compounds by groundwater and stream microbial populations.

    PubMed Central

    Ladd, T I; Ventullo, R M; Wallis, P M; Costerton, J W

    1982-01-01

    The bacteriology and heterotrophic activity of a stream and of nearby groundwater in Marmot Basin, Alberta, Canada, were studied. Acridine orange direct counts indicated that bacterial populations in the groundwater were greater than in the stream. Bacteria that were isolated from the groundwater were similar to species associated with soils. Utilization of labile dissolved organic material as measured by the heterotrophic potential technique with glutamic acid, phenylalanine, and glycolic acid as substrates was generally greater in the groundwater. In addition, specific activity indices for the populations suggested greater metabolic activity per bacterium in the groundwater. 14C-labeled lignocellulose, preferentially labeled in the lignin fraction by feeding Picea engelmannii [14C]phenylalanine, was mineralized by microorganisms in both the groundwater and the stream, but no more than 4% of the added radioactivity was lost as 14CO2 within 960 h. Up to 20% of [3'-14C]cinnamic acid was mineralized by microorganisms in both environments within 500 h. Both microbial populations appear to influence the levels of labile and recalcitrant dissolved organic material in mountain streams. PMID:7125651

  18. Novel diffusive gradients in thin films technique to assess labile sulfate in soil

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan Chowdhury, Md Mobaroqul; Berger, Torsten W.; Prohaska, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A novel diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique for sampling labile soil sulfate was developed, based on a strong basic anion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400) for sulfate immobilization on the binding gel. For reducing the sulfate background on the resin gels, photopolymerization was applied instead of ammonium persulfate-induced polymerization. Agarose cross-linked polyacrylamide (APA) hydrogels were used as diffusive layer. The sulfate diffusion coefficient in APA gel was determined as 9.83 × 10−6 ± 0.35 × 10-6 cm2 s−1 at 25 °C. The accumulated sulfate was eluted in 1 mol L−1 HNO3 with a recovery of 90.9 ± 1.6 %. The developed method was tested against two standard extraction methods for soil sulfate measurement. The obtained low correlation coefficients indicate that DGT and conventional soil test methods assess differential soil sulfate pools, rendering DGT a potentially important tool for measuring labile soil sulfate. PMID:27491301

  19. Constraints on Transport and Emplacement Mechanisms of Labile Fractions in Lunar Cold Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, D.; Gertsch, L.

    2014-01-01

    Sustaining the scientific exploration of the Solar System will require a significant proportion of the necessary fuels and propellants, as well as other bulk commodities, to be produced from local raw materials [1]. The viability of mineral production depends on the ability to locate and characterize mineable deposits of the necessary feedstocks. This requires, among other things, a workable understanding of the mechanisms by which such deposits form, which is the subject of Economic Geology. Multiple deposition scenarios are possible for labile materials on the Moon. This paper suggests labile fractions moved diffusely through space; deposits may grow richer with depth until low porosity rock; lateral transport is likely to have occurred with the regolith, at least for short distances; crystalline ice may not exist; the constituent phases could be extremely complex. At present we can constrain the sources only mildly; once on the Moon, the transport mechanisms inherently mix and therefore obscure the origins. However, the importance of expanding our understanding of ore-forming processes on the Moon behooves us to make the attempt. Thus begins a time of new inquiry for Economic Geology.

  20. Metal contents of phytoplankton and labile particulate material in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twining, Benjamin S.; Rauschenberg, Sara; Morton, Peter L.; Vogt, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Phytoplankton contribute significantly to global C cycling and serve as the base of ocean food webs. Phytoplankton require trace metals for growth and also mediate the vertical distributions of many metals in the ocean. We collected bulk particulate material and individual phytoplankton cells from the upper water column (<150 m) of the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the US GEOTRACES North Atlantic Zonal Transect cruise (GEOTRACES GA03). Particulate material was first leached to extract biogenic and potentially-bioavailable elements, and the remaining refractory material was digested in strong acids. The cruise track spanned several ocean biomes and geochemical regions. Particulate concentrations of metals associated primarily with lithogenic phases (Fe, Al, Ti) were elevated in surface waters nearest North America, Africa and Europe, and elements associated primarily with biogenic material (P, Cd, Zn, Ni) were also found at higher concentrations near the coasts. However metal/P ratios of labile particulate material were also elevated in the middle of the transect for Fe, Ni, Co, Cu, and V. P-normalized cellular metal quotas measured with synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) were generally comparable to ratios in bulk labile particles but did not show mid-basin increases. Manganese and Fe ratios and cell quotas were higher in the western part of the section, nearest North America, and both elements were more enriched in bulk particles, relative to P, than in cells, suggesting the presence of labile oxyhydroxide particulate phases. Cellular Fe quotas thus did not increase in step with aeolian dust inputs, which are highest near Africa; these data suggest that the dust inputs have low bioavailability. Copper and Ni cell quotas were notably higher nearest the continental margins. Overall mean cellular metal quotas were similar to those measured in the Pacific and Southern Oceans except for Fe, which was approximately 3-fold higher in North Atlantic cells. Cellular Fe

  1. Cu lability and bioavailability in an urban stream during baseflow versus stormflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, T.; Luan, H.

    2012-12-01

    Urban streams are dynamic systems with many anthropogenic inputs and stressors. Existing contaminant inputs are regulated through total maximum daily loads. Techniques for assessing that load are based on a combination of acute and chronic water quality criteria, biotic ligand models, and physical, chemical and biological assessments. In addition, the apportionment of reduction in load to different sources is based on total mass and not, for example, on bioavailable fraction. Our understanding of the impact of different metal inputs to stream impairment is limited. Free metal ions are understood to play a role in direct cellular uptake, but metal speciation (e.g. free metal, labile metals, or size fractionated) is relevant to more complex stream food webs. As part of an ongoing study, this work examines dissolved and particulate Cu concentrations in the Hockanum River, Vernon, CT situated in a developed watershed. Stream samples were taken during baseflow as well as stormflow upstream and downstream of wastewater treatment plant and stormwater runoff inputs. In addition, diffusive gradient in thin-film (DGT) devices which measure labile metal concentrations and cultured periphyton were used to examine bioavailable fractions. Total and filtered Cu concentrations ranged from about 1.3 to 10.7 μg/L, and 0.9 to 5.1 μg/L, respectively. Cu concentrations always increased downstream of the wastewater treatment plant by about 1.1-2 times, and effluent accounted for about 30% of baseflow. Generally, small increases (<10%) in concentration were observed in metals directly downstream of stormwater inlets, likely due to low volumes of runoff contributed from stormwater outfalls during these sampling periods. However, Cu concentrations were elevated (about 2-5 times higher) at all sites downstream from the wastewater treatment plant downstream sampling point, suggesting contributions from sediment resuspension. DGT measured concentrations represented 30 to 70% of dissolved Cu

  2. Trade-offs between clonal and sexual reproduction in Sagittaria latifolia (Alismataceae) scale up to affect the fitness of entire clones.

    PubMed

    Van Drunen, Wendy E; Dorken, Marcel E

    2012-10-01

    Many plants combine sexual reproduction with vegetative propagation, but how trade-offs between these reproductive modes affect fitness is poorly understood. Although such trade-offs have been demonstrated at the level of individual shoots (ramets), there is little evidence that they scale up to affect genet fitness. For hermaphrodites, reproductive investment is further divided between female and male sexual functions. Female function should generally incur greater carbon costs than male function, which might involve greater nitrogen (N) costs. Using a common garden experiment with diclinous, clonal Sagittaria latifolia we manipulated investment in reproduction through female and male sex functions of 412 plants from monoecious and dioecious populations. We detected a 1:1 trade-off between biomass investment in female function and clonal reproduction. For male function, there was no apparent trade-off between clonal and sexual reproduction in terms of biomass investment. Instead, male function incurred a substantially higher N cost. Our results indicate that: trade-offs between investment in clonal propagation and sexual reproduction occur at the genet level in S. latifolia; and sexual reproduction interferes with clonal expansion, with investment in female function limiting the quantity of clonal propagules produced, and investment in male function limiting the nutrient content of clonal propagules.

  3. Estimating environmental conditions affecting protozoal pathogen removal in surface water wetland systems using a multi-scale, model-based approach.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Miles E; Hogan, Jennifer; Smith, Woutrina A; Oates, Stori C; Miller, Melissa A; Hardin, Dane; Shapiro, Karen; Los Huertos, Marc; Conrad, Patricia A; Dominik, Clare; Watson, Fred G R

    2014-09-15

    Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, and Toxoplasma gondii are waterborne protozoal pathogens distributed worldwide and empirical evidence suggests that wetlands reduce the concentrations of these pathogens under certain environmental conditions. The goal of this study was to evaluate how protozoal removal in surface water is affected by the water temperature, turbidity, salinity, and vegetation cover of wetlands in the Monterey Bay region of California. To examine how protozoal removal was affected by these environmental factors, we conducted observational experiments at three primary spatial scales: settling columns, recirculating wetland mesocosm tanks, and an experimental research wetland (Molera Wetland). Simultaneously, we developed a protozoal transport model for surface water to simulate the settling columns, the mesocosm tanks, and the Molera Wetland. With a high degree of uncertainty expected in the model predictions and field observations, we developed the model within a Bayesian statistical framework. We found protozoal removal increased when water flowed through vegetation, and with higher levels of turbidity, salinity, and temperature. Protozoal removal in surface water was maximized (~0.1 hour(-1)) when flowing through emergent vegetation at 2% cover, and with a vegetation contact time of ~30 minutes compared to the effects of temperature, salinity, and turbidity. Our studies revealed that an increase in vegetated wetland area, with water moving through vegetation, would likely improve regional water quality through the reduction of fecal protozoal pathogen loads.

  4. Fine-scale patterns of odor encounter by the antennules of mantis shrimp tracking turbulent plumes in wave-affected and unidirectional flow.

    PubMed

    Mead, Kristina S; Wiley, Megan B; Koehl, M A R; Koseff, Jeffrey R

    2003-01-01

    Many marine animals track odor plumes to their source. Although studies of plume-tracking behavior have been performed in unidirectional flow, benthic animals such as crustaceans live in coastal habitats characterized by waves. We compared signal encounters by odor-plume-tracking stomatopods (mantis shrimp) in wave-affected and unidirectional flow in a flume. Stomatopods are small enough that we can study their natural behavior in a flume. They sample odors by flicking their antennules. A thin sheet of laser light illuminating an odor plume labeled with dye [planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique] permitted us to measure the instantaneous odor concentration encountered by the animal's chemosensory organs (antennules) while it tracked the plume. We simultaneously measured behavior and the high-resolution odor signal at the spatial and temporal scale of the animal. We found that the navigating animal encountered odor filaments more often in wave-affected flow than in unidirectional flow. Odor filaments along the animals' antennules were significantly wider and of higher concentration in waves than in unidirectional flow. PMID:12456708

  5. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) val66met polymorphism differentially affects performance on subscales of the Wechsler Memory Scale - Third Edition (WMS-III).

    PubMed

    Lamb, Yvette N; Thompson, Christopher S; McKay, Nicole S; Waldie, Karen E; Kirk, Ian J

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene and the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene influence brain structure and function, as well as cognitive abilities. They are most influential in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC), respectively. Recall and recognition are forms of memory proposed to have different neural substrates, with recall having a greater dependence on the PFC and hippocampus. This study aimed to determine whether the BDNF val(66)met or COMT val(158)met polymorphisms differentially affect recall and recognition, and whether these polymorphisms interact. A sample of 100 healthy adults was assessed on recall and familiarity-based recognition using the Faces and Family Pictures subscales of the Wechsler Memory Scale - Third Edition (WMS-III). COMT genotype did not affect performance on either task. The BDNF polymorphism (i.e., met carriers relative to val homozygotes) was associated with poorer recall ability, while not influencing recognition. Combining subscale scores in memory tests such as the WMS might obscure gene effects. Our results demonstrate the importance of distinguishing between recall and familiarity-based recognition in neurogenetics research.

  6. Development and Lability in the Parent-Child Relationship During Adolescence: Associations With Pubertal Timing and Tempo

    PubMed Central

    Marceau, Kristine; Ram, Nilam; Susman, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents' and parents' reactions to pubertal development are hypothesized to contribute to changes in family dynamics. Using 7-year longitudinal data from the NICHD-SECCYD (488 boys, 475 girls) we examined relations between pubertal development (timing, tempo) and trajectories (developmental change and year-to-year lability) of parent-child conflict and closeness from age 8.5 to 15.5 years. Changes were mostly characterized by year-to-year fluctuations – lability. Parent-child conflict increased and closeness decreased some with age. Pubertal timing and tempo were more consistently associated with lability in parent-child relationships than with long-term trends, although faster tempo was associated with steeper decreases in parent-child closeness. Findings provide a platform for examining how puberty contributes to both long-term and transient changes in adolescents' relationships and adjustment. PMID:26321856

  7. Partial coupling and differential regulation of biologically and photo-chemically labile dissolved organic carbon across boreal aquatic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapierre, J.-F.; del Giorgio, P. A.

    2014-05-01

    Despite the rapidly increasing volume of research on the biological and photochemical degradation of DOC in aquatic environments, little is known on the large-scale patterns in biologically and photo-chemically degradable DOC (Bd-DOC and Pd-DOC, respectively) in continental watersheds, and on the links that exist between these two key properties that greatly influence the flow of carbon from continents to oceans. Here we explore the patterns of Bd- and Pd-DOC across hundreds of boreal lakes, rivers and wetlands spanning a large range of system trophy and terrestrial influence, and compared the drivers of these two reactive pools of DOC at the landscape level. Using standardized incubations of natural waters, we found that the concentrations of Bd- and Pd-DOC co-varied across all systems studied but were nevertheless related to different pools of dissolved organic matter (DOM, identified by fluorescence analyses) in ambient waters. A combination of nutrients and protein-like DOM explained nearly half of the variation in Bd-DOC, whereas Pd-DOC was exclusively predicted by DOM optical properties, consistent with the photochemical degradability of specific fluorescent DOM (FDOM) pools that we experimentally determined. The concentrations of colored DOM (CDOM), a proxy of terrestrial influence, almost entirely accounted for the observed relationship between FDOM and the concentrations of both Bd- and Pd-DOC. The concentrations of CDOM and of the putative bio-labile fluorescence component shifted from complete decoupling in clear-water environments to strong coupling in browner streams and wetlands. This suggests a baseline autochthonous Bd-DOC pool fuelled by internal production that is gradually overwhelmed by land-derived Bd-DOC as terrestrial influence increases across landscape gradients. The importance of land as a major source of both biologically and photo-chemically degradable DOC for continental watersheds resulted in a partial coupling of those carbon pools in

  8. Labile trace elements in basaltic achondrites: Can they distinguish between meteorites from the Moon, Mars, and V-type asteroids?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Stephen F.; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Lipschutz, Michael E.

    2009-06-01

    We report data for 14 mainly labile trace elements (Ag, Au, Bi, Cd, Cs, Ga, In, Rb, Sb, Se, Te, Tl, U, and Zn) in eight whole-rock lunar meteorites (Asuka [A-] 881757, Dar al Gani [DaG] 262, Elephant Moraine [EET] 87521, Queen Alexandra Range [QUE] 93069, QUE 94269, QUE 94281, Yamato [Y-] 793169, and Y-981031), and Martian meteorite (DaG 476) and incorporate these into a comparative study of basaltic meteorites from the Moon, Mars, and V-type asteroids. Multivariate cluster analysis of data for these elements in 14 lunar, 13 Martian, and 34 howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) meteorites demonstrate that materials from these three parents are distinguishable using these markers of late, low-temperature episodes. This distinguishability is essentially as complete as that based on markers of high-temperature igneous processes. Concentrations of these elements in 14 lunar meteorites are essentially lognormally distributed and generally more homogeneous than in Martian and HED meteorites. Mean siderophile and labile element concentrations in the 14 lunar meteorites indicate the presence of a CI-equivalent micrometeorite admixture of 2.6% When only feldspathic samples are considered, our data show a slightly higher value of 3.4% consistent with an increasing micrometeorite content in regolith samples of higher maturity. Concentrations of labile elements in the 8 feldspathic samples hint at the presence of a fractionated highly labile element component, possibly volcanic in origin, at a level comparable to the micrometeorite component. Apparently, the process(es) that contributed to establishing lunar meteorite siderophile and labile trace element contents occurred in a system open to highly labile element transport.

  9. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Delirium Rating Scale Revised-98 (DRS-R98).

    PubMed

    Thurber, Steven; Kishi, Yasuhiro; Trzepacz, Paula T; Franco, Jose G; Meagher, David J; Lee, Yanghyun; Kim, Jeong-Lan; Furlanetto, Leticia M; Negreiros, Daniel; Huang, Ming-Chyi; Chen, Chun-Hsin; Kean, Jacob; Leonard, Maeve

    2015-01-01

    Principal components analysis applied to the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 contributes to understanding the delirium construct. Using a multisite pooled international delirium database, the authors applied confirmatory factor analysis to Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 scores from 859 adult patients evaluated by delirium experts (delirium, N=516; nondelirium, N=343). Confirmatory factor analysis found all diagnostic features and core symptoms (cognitive, language, thought process, sleep-wake cycle, motor retardation), except motor agitation, loaded onto factor 1. Motor agitation loaded onto factor 2 with noncore symptoms (delusions, affective lability, and perceptual disturbances). Factor 1 loading supports delirium as a single construct, but when accompanied by psychosis, motor agitation's role may not be solely as a circadian activity indicator. PMID:25923855

  10. Hereditary heat-labile hexosaminidase B: its implication for recognizing Tay-Sachs genotypes.

    PubMed

    Navon, R; Nutman, J; Kopel, R; Gaber, L; Gadoth, N; Goldman, B; Nitzan, M

    1981-11-01

    Two pairs of alleles, at the two loci of hexosaminidase (HEX), were found to segregate in an Arab inbred family: the normal and the mutant Tay-Sachs (TSD) alleles of HEX A, and the normal and a mutant allele of HEX B. Since the mutant HEX B is heat labile, no reliable identification of TSD genotypes can be obtained in its presence, as long as the proportions of HEX A and B are estimated by the routinely used heat-inactivation method. The genotypes may be correctly identified in such cases by separation of the two isoenzymes on ion-exchange chromatography, estimating their individual activities, and calculating the ratio between them. Of the nine genotype combinations possible with these two pairs of alleles, five have been identified in the reported family by this procedure. PMID:6459736

  11. Heat-labile enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and intestinal protozoa in asymptomatic travellers.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, P; Cross, J H

    1977-12-01

    Thirty-two asymptomatic travellers who had recently journeyed in the Near, Middle, and Far East and had experienced a high incidence of diarrhoeal disease were screened for heat-labile enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ent+ E. coli) and other bacterial and parasitic pathogens. Six percent were colonized with ent+ E. coli and while other bacterial pathogens were not found, the intestinal protozoa Giardia lamblia (13%), Entamoeba histolytica (6%), Entamoeba coli (6%), Endolimax nana (6%), and Entamoeba hartmanni (3%) were detected in the stools. Ent+ E. coli, G. lamblia and E. histolytica should be considered in the differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease in travellers returning from the Orient. Furthermore, these travellers may be a potential source for the introduction of ent+ E. coli into communities where such organisms are relatively rare. PMID:351820

  12. Significance of Isotopically Labile Organic Hydrogen in Thermal Maturation of Organic Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Arndt Schimmelmann; Maria Mastalerz

    2010-03-30

    Isotopically labile organic hydrogen in fossil fuels occupies chemical positions that participate in isotopic exchange and in chemical reactions during thermal maturation from kerogen to bitumen, oil and gas. Carbon-bound organic hydrogen is isotopically far less exchangeable than hydrogen bound to nitrogen, oxygen, or sulfur. We explore why organic hydrogen isotope ratios express a relationship with organic nitrogen isotope ratios in kerogen at low to moderate maturity. We develop and apply new techniques to utilize organic D/H ratios in organic matter fractions and on a molecular level as tools for exploration for fossil fuels and for paleoenvironmental research. The scope of our samples includes naturally and artificially matured substrates, such as coal, shale, oil and gas.

  13. Effect of temperature on the decomposition rate of labile and stable organic matter in an agrochernozem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionova, A. A.; Kvitkina, A. K.; Yevdokimov, I. V.; Bykhovets, S. S.; Stulin, A. F.

    2014-05-01

    An hypothesis about the different temperature dependences of the decomposition of the labile and stable organic carbon pools has been tested using an agrochernozem sampled from an experimental plot of 42-year-old continuous corn in Voronezh oblast. The partitioning of the CO2 loss during the decomposition of the labile and stable soil organic matter (SOM) at 2, 12, and 22°C in a long-term incubation experiment was performed using the method of 13C natural abundance by C3-C4 transition. On the basis of the determined decomposition constants, the SOM pools have been arranged in an order according to their increasing stability: plant residues < new (C4) SOM < old (C3) SOM. The tested hypothesis has been found valid only for a limited temperature interval. The temperature coefficient Q 10 increases in the stability order from 1.2 to 4.3 in the interval of 12-22°C. At low temperatures (2-12°C), the values of Q 10 insignificantly vary among the SOM pools and lie in the range of 2.2-2.8. Along with the decomposition constants of the SOM, the new-to-old carbon ratio in the CO2 efflux from the soil and the magnitude of the negative priming effect for the old SOM caused by the input of new organic matter depend on the temperature. In the soil under continuous corn fertilized with NPK, the increased decomposition of C3 SOM is observed compared to the unfertilized control; the temperature dependences of the SOM decomposition are similar in both agrochernozem treatments.

  14. Labile and recalcitrant organic matter utilization by river biofilm under increasing water temperature.

    PubMed

    Ylla, Irene; Romaní, Anna M; Sabater, Sergi

    2012-10-01

    Microbial biofilms in rivers contribute to the decomposition of the available organic matter which typically shows changes in composition and bioavailability due to their origin, seasonality, and watershed characteristics. In the context of global warming, enhanced biofilm organic matter decomposition would be expected but this effect could be specific when either a labile or a recalcitrant organic matter source would be available. A laboratory experiment was performed to mimic the effect of the predicted increase in river water temperature (+4 °C above an ambient temperature) on the microbial biofilm under differential organic matter sources. The biofilm microbial community responded to higher water temperature by increasing bacterial cell number, respiratory activity (electron transport system) and microbial extracellular enzymes (extracellular enzyme activity). At higher temperature, the phenol oxidase enzyme explained a large fraction of respiratory activity variation suggesting an enhanced microbial use of degradation products from humic substances. The decomposition of hemicellulose (β-xylosidase activity) seemed to be also favored by warmer conditions. However, at ambient temperature, the enzymes highly responsible for respiration activity variation were β-glucosidase and leu-aminopeptidase, suggesting an enhanced microbial use of polysaccharides and peptides degradation products. The addition of labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC; dipeptide plus cellobiose) caused a further augmentation of heterotrophic biomass and respiratory activity. The changes in the fluorescence index and the ratio Abs(250)/total DOC indicated that higher temperature accelerated the rates of DOC degradation. The experiment showed that the more bioavailable organic matter was rapidly cycled irrespective of higher temperature while degradation of recalcitrant substances was enhanced by warming. Thus, pulses of carbon at higher water temperature might have consequences for DOC

  15. Oxidative stress and labile plasmatic iron in anemic patients following blood therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marília Sabo; Rissi, Tatiana Tamborena; Zuravski, Luisa; Mezzomo, Juliana; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Folmer, Vanderlei; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes; Manfredini, Vanusa; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Puntel, Robson Luiz

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the plasmatic iron content and evaluate the oxidative stress (OS) markers in subjects receiving blood therapy. METHODS: Thirty-nine individuals with unspecified anemia receiving blood transfusions and 15 healthy subjects were included in the study. Anemic subjects were divided into three subgrouP: (1) those that received up to five blood transfusions (n = 14); (2) those that received from five to ten transfusions (n = 11); and (3) those that received more than ten transfusions (n = 14). Blood samples were collected by venous arm puncture and stored in tubes containing heparin. The plasma and cells were separated by centrifugation and subsequently used for analyses. Statistical analyses were performed using Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance followed by Dunn’s multiple comparison tests when appropriate. RESULTS: The eletrophoretic hemoglobin profiles of the subjects included in this study indicated that no patients presented with hemoglobinopathy. Labile plasmatic iron, ferritin, protein carbonyl, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and dichlorofluorescein diacetate oxidation were significantly higher (P < 0.05), whereas total thiol levels were significantly lower (P < 0.05) in transfused subjects compared to controls. Additionally, the activity of catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase were significantly lower in the transfused subjects (P < 0.05). Antioxidant enzyme activities and total thiol levels were positively correlated (P < 0.05), and negatively correlated with the levels of protein carbonyl and TBARS (P < 0.05). In contrast, protein carbonyl and TBARS were positively correlated (P < 0.05). Altogether, these data confirm the involvement of OS in patients following therapy with repeated blood transfusions. CONCLUSION: Our data reveal that changes in OS markers are correlated with levels of labile plasmatic iron and ferritin and the number of transfusions. PMID:25254188

  16. Labile and recalcitrant organic matter utilization by river biofilm under increasing water temperature.

    PubMed

    Ylla, Irene; Romaní, Anna M; Sabater, Sergi

    2012-10-01

    Microbial biofilms in rivers contribute to the decomposition of the available organic matter which typically shows changes in composition and bioavailability due to their origin, seasonality, and watershed characteristics. In the context of global warming, enhanced biofilm organic matter decomposition would be expected but this effect could be specific when either a labile or a recalcitrant organic matter source would be available. A laboratory experiment was performed to mimic the effect of the predicted increase in river water temperature (+4 °C above an ambient temperature) on the microbial biofilm under differential organic matter sources. The biofilm microbial community responded to higher water temperature by increasing bacterial cell number, respiratory activity (electron transport system) and microbial extracellular enzymes (extracellular enzyme activity). At higher temperature, the phenol oxidase enzyme explained a large fraction of respiratory activity variation suggesting an enhanced microbial use of degradation products from humic substances. The decomposition of hemicellulose (β-xylosidase activity) seemed to be also favored by warmer conditions. However, at ambient temperature, the enzymes highly responsible for respiration activity variation were β-glucosidase and leu-aminopeptidase, suggesting an enhanced microbial use of polysaccharides and peptides degradation products. The addition of labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC; dipeptide plus cellobiose) caused a further augmentation of heterotrophic biomass and respiratory activity. The changes in the fluorescence index and the ratio Abs(250)/total DOC indicated that higher temperature accelerated the rates of DOC degradation. The experiment showed that the more bioavailable organic matter was rapidly cycled irrespective of higher temperature while degradation of recalcitrant substances was enhanced by warming. Thus, pulses of carbon at higher water temperature might have consequences for DOC

  17. Temporal Changes in Photochemically Labile DOM and Implications for Carbon Budgets in Peatland Aquatic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickard, A.

    2015-12-01

    Aquatic systems in peatland catchments are subject to high loading of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from surrounding terrestrial environments. However the significance of photochemical transformation of DOM in peatland carbon budgets remains poorly constrained. In this study UV irradiation experiments were conducted on water samples collected over one year from two contrasting systems in Scotland: a stream draining a peatland with high levels of DOM and a reservoir draining a peat catchment with low levels of DOM. Further samples were collected from the high DOM system during two storm events. After experimental exposure, optical and chemical analyses were employed to determine photochemical lability of the DOM pool. At both sites irradiation-induced decreases in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as a percentage of the total carbon pool were greatest in winter, suggesting that DOM was depleted in photo-reactive molecules in summer. Seasonal variability in DOC was high at the stream site and was positively correlated with CO₂ and CO photoproduction (r2 = 0.81 and 0.83, respectively; p<0.05). Lignin phenol analyses indicate considerable contribution of peat to the DOM pool at the stream site, particularly during summer. Whilst DOC concentrations did not vary greatly during storm events, UV-Vis absorbance indicators did, signifying changing DOM source material from activation of different hydrological pathways. The most photo-reactive DOM occurred 5-10 hours after peak discharge, suggesting that storms replenish photochemically labile DOM in headwater streams. Conservative estimates using data from this study suggest that up to 7% of the DOM pool of peatland streams can be lost (primarily as CO₂ and CO) upon exposure to 8 hours of environmentally representative UV irradiation. Further investigation in field campaigns under natural UV exposure are underway to assess the importance of photodegradation of DOM as a loss pathway of carbon based gases from aquatic systems.

  18. Poly(ortho ester amides): Acid-labile Temperature-responsive Copolymers for Potential Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rupei; Palumbo, R. Noelle; Ji, Weihang; Wang, Chun

    2009-01-01

    A new, convenient pathway is developed to synthesize highly hydrolytically labile poly(ortho ester amide) (POEA) copolymers that overcomes some of the major weaknesses of the traditional methods of synthesizing poly(ortho esters) and their derivatives. A diamine monomer containing a built-in, stabilized ortho ester group was synthesized and was used for polycondensation with diacid esters, giving rise to a series of POEA copolymers with unique stimuli-responsive properties. The POEA undergoes temperature-responsive, reversible sol-gel phase transition in water. Phase diagrams of the POEA/H2O mixture reveal the concentration-dependent existence of different phases, including hydrogel and opaque or clear solution. Such behavior may be attributed to the temperature-dependent hydrogen-bonding involving the amide groups in the POEA backbone and hydrophobic interactions between POEA chains, and it is tunable by selecting diacid monomers with different chemical structures. The kinetics of POEA mass loss in physiological aqueous buffers and release of a model macromolecular drug, fluorescently labeled dextran, are nearly zero-order, suggesting predominantly surface-restricted polymer erosion. The rates of polymer erosion and drug release are much faster at pH 5.0 than pH 7.4. No cytotoxicity was found for the polymer extracts and the polymer degradation products at concentrations as high as 1 mg/ml. The normal morphology of fibroblasts cultured directly in contact with POEA films was not altered. These novel acid-labile temperature-responsive POEA copolymers may be potentially useful for a wide range of biomedical applications such as minimal invasive delivery of controlled-release drug formulations that respond to biological temperature and acidic-pH environments in cells and tissues. PMID:19281150

  19. Molecular insights into the microbial formation of marine dissolved organic matter: recalcitrant or labile?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, B. P.; Kattner, G.; Witt, M.; Passow, U.

    2014-02-01

    The degradation of marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an important control variable in the global carbon cycle and dependent on the DOM composition. For our understanding of the kinetics of organic matter cycling in the ocean, it is therefore crucial to achieve a mechanistic and molecular understanding of its transformation processes. A long-term microbial experiment was performed to follow the production of non-labile DOM by marine bacteria. Two different glucose concentrations and dissolved algal exudates were used as substrates. We monitored the bacterial abundance, concentrations of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), nutrients, amino acids, and transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) for two years. Ultrahigh resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) allowed the molecular characterization of extracted DOM after 70 days and after ∼2 years of incubation. Although glucose was quickly degraded, a DOC background was generated in glucose incubations. Only 20% of the organic carbon from algal exudate was degraded within the 2 years of incubation. TEP, which are released by micro-organisms, were produced during glucose degradation but decreased within less than three weeks back to half of the maximum concentration and were below detection in all treatments after 2 years. The molecular analysis demonstrated that DOM generated during glucose degradation differed appreciably from DOM produced during the degradation of the algal exudates. Our results led to several conclusions: (i) Higher substrate levels result in a higher level of non-labile DOC which is an important prerequisite for carbon sequestration in the ocean; (ii) TEP are generated by bacteria but are also degraded rapidly, thus limiting their potential contribution to carbon sequestration; (iii) The molecular signatures of DOM derived from algal exudates or glucose after 70 days of incubation differed strongly from refractory DOM. After 2 years

  20. Small-Scale Variation in Fuel Loads Differentially Affects Two Co-Dominant Bunchgrasses in a Species-Rich Pine Savanna

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Paul R.; Harms, Kyle E.; Platt, William J.; Passmore, Heather A.; Myers, Jonathan A.

    2012-01-01

    Ecological disturbances frequently control the occurrence and patterning of dominant plants in high-diversity communities like C4 grasslands and savannas. In such ecosystems disturbance-related processes can have important implications for species, and for whole communities when those species are dominant, yet mechanistic understanding of such processes remains fragmentary. Multiple bunchgrass species commonly co-dominate disturbance-dependent and species-rich pine savannas, where small-scale fuel heterogeneity may influence bunchgrass survival and growth following fires. We quantified how fire in locally varying fuel loads influenced dynamics of dominant C4 bunchgrasses in a species-rich pine savanna in southeastern Louisiana, USA. We focused on two congeneric, co-dominant species (Schizachyrium scoparium and S. tenerum) with similar growth forms, functional traits and reproductive strategies to highlight effects of fuel heterogeneity during fires. In experimental plots with either reduced or increased fuels versus controls with unmanipulated fuels, we compared: 1) bunchgrass damage and 2) mortality from fires; 3) subsequent growth and 4) flowering. Compared to controls, fire with increased fuels caused greater damage, mortality and subsequent flowering, but did not affect post-fire growth. Fire with reduced fuels had no effect on any of the four measures. The two species responded differently to fire with increased fuels – S. scoparium incurred measurably more damage and mortality than S. tenerum. Logistic regression indicated that the larger average size of S. tenerum tussocks made them resistant to more severe burning where fuels were increased. We speculate that locally increased fuel loading may be important in pine savannas for creating colonization sites because where fuels are light or moderate, dominant bunchgrasses persist through fires. Small-scale heterogeneity in fires, and differences in how species tolerate fire may together promote shared local

  1. Informing the scale-up of Kenya’s nursing workforce: a mixed methods study of factors affecting pre-service training capacity and production

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Given the global nursing shortage and investments to scale-up the workforce, this study evaluated trends in annual student nurse enrolment, pre-service attrition between enrolment and registration, and factors that influence nurse production in Kenya. Methods This study used a mixed methods approach with data from the Regulatory Human Resources Information System (tracks initial student enrolment through registration) and the Kenya Health Workforce Information System (tracks deployment and demographic information on licensed nurses) for the quantitative analyses and qualitative data from key informant interviews with nurse training institution educators and/or administrators. Trends in annual student nurse enrolment from 1999 to 2010 were analyzed using regulatory and demographic data. To assess pre-service attrition between training enrolment and registration with the nursing council, data for a cohort that enrolled in training from 1999 to 2004 and completed training by 2010 was analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression was used to test for factors that significantly affected attrition. To assess the capacity of nurse training institutions for scale-up, qualitative data was obtained through key informant interviews. Results From 1999 to 2010, 23,350 students enrolled in nurse training in Kenya. While annual new student enrolment doubled between 1999 (1,493) and 2010 (3,030), training institutions reported challenges in their capacity to accommodate the increased numbers. Key factors identified by the nursing faculty included congestion at clinical placement sites, limited clinical mentorship by qualified nurses, challenges with faculty recruitment and retention, and inadequate student housing, transportation and classroom space. Pre-service attrition among the cohort that enrolled between 1999 and 2004 and completed training by 2010 was found to be low (6%). Conclusion To scale-up the nursing workforce in Kenya, concurrent investments in expanding the

  2. Tillage and rotational effects on exchangeable and enzyme-labile phosphorus forms in conventional and organic cropping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transformations of crop residues and bio-fertilizers used as primary sources of nutrients for organic grain and forage production are influenced by soil management practices. The effects of management of the near-surface zone on labile phosphorus (P) forms were studied in soil under three organ...

  3. Plant-Soil Relationships of Bromus tectorum L.: Interactions among Labile Carbon Additions, Soil Invasion Status, and Fertilizer.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasion of western North America by the annual exotic grass Bromus tectorum L. (cheatgrass) has been an ecological disaster. High soil bioavailability of nitrogen is a contributing factor in the invasive potential of B. tectorum. Application of labile carbon sources to the soil can immobilize soil ...

  4. On the Labile Memory Buffer in the Attentional Blink: Masking the T2 Representation by Onset Transients Mediates the AB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jannati, Ali; Spalek, Thomas M.; Di Lollo, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Report of a second target (T2) is impaired when presented within 500 ms of the first (T1). This attentional blink (AB) is known to cause a delay in T2 processing during which T2 must be stored in a labile memory buffer. We explored the buffer's characteristics using different types of masks after T2. These characteristics were inferred by…

  5. Thermal Analysis of Labile Trace Elements in CM and CV Carbonaceous Chondrites Using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauretta, D. S.; Klaue, B.; Blum, J. D.; Buseck, P. R.

    2001-01-01

    We developed a technique to measure the thermal release profiles of a suite of labile elements (Zn, As, Se, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Te, Pt, Hg, Au, Tl, Pb, Bi). Conclusions are reached about the behavior of each element during parent-body alteration. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. A Longitudinal Study of Emotion Regulation, Emotion Lability-Negativity, and Internalizing Symptomatology in Maltreated and Nonmaltreated Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim-Spoon, Jungmeen; Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2013-01-01

    The longitudinal contributions of emotion regulation and emotion lability-negativity to internalizing symptomatology were examined in a low-income sample (171 maltreated and 151 nonmaltreated children, from age 7 to 10 years). Latent difference score models indicated that for both maltreated and nonmaltreated children, emotion regulation was a…

  7. An anaerobic incubation study of metal lability in drinking water treatment residue with implications for practical reuse.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Yuan, Nannan; Pei, Yuansheng

    2014-06-15

    Drinking water treatment residue (WTR) is an inevitable by-product generated during the treatment of drinking water with coagulating agents. The beneficial reuse of WTR as an amendment for environmental remediation has attracted growing interest. In this work, we investigated the lability of Al, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sr, V and Zn in Fe/Al hydroxide-comprised WTR based on a 180-day anaerobic incubation test using fractionation, in vitro digestion and a toxicity characteristic leaching procedure. The results indicated that most metals in the WTR were stable during anaerobic incubation and that the WTR before and after incubation could be considered non-hazardous in terms of leachable metal contents according to US EPA Method 1311. However, the lability of certain metals in the WTR after incubation increased substantially, especially Mn, which may be due to the reduction effect. Therefore, although there is no evidence presented to restrict the use of WTR in the field, the lability of metals (especially Mn) in WTR requires further assessment prior to field application. In addition, fractionation (e.g., BCR) is recommended for use to determine the potential lability of metals under various conditions.

  8. In situ measurements of labile Al and Mn in acid mine drainage using diffusive gradients in thin films.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Jens

    2007-08-15

    The technique of diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) can be used for in situ measurements of labile metal species in water, but the application for this method on acid mine drainage (AMD) is complicated due to reduced sampler adsorption of metals at low pH. This study evaluates the use of DGT on labile Al and Mn in AMD (pH 3.1-4.2). DGT measurements were performed both in standard solutions in the laboratory and in situ in the field. Laboratory results show that DGT can be used in water with pH as low as 3.0 for Al and 4.0 for Mn without correcting for reduced adsorption. Below pH 4.0, the adsorption of Mn showed a linearly decrease with pH to approximately 55% at pH 3.0. Taking this correction into account revealed that 84-100% of the total dissolved Al and Mn measured in the field was DGT-labile. Measurements using DGT agreed well with predictions using the speciation program WHAM VI. This study shows that the use of DGT can be extended below the previously reported pH working range for Al, and for Mn using a simple linear correction with respect to pH, and demonstrates that the technique can be applied for monitoring time-integrated labile metal concentrations at AMD sites. PMID:17620010

  9. Emotional Lability in Children and Adolescents with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Clinical Correlates and Familial Prevalence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobanski, Esther; Banaschewski, Tobias; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Chen, Wai; Franke, Barbara; Holtmann, Martin; Krumm, Bertram; Sergeant, Joseph; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Stringaris, Argyris; Taylor, Eric; Anney, Richard; Ebstein, Richard P.; Gill, Michael; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Oades, Robert D.; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The goal of this study was to investigate the occurrence, severity and clinical correlates of emotional lability (EL) in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and to examine factors contributing to EL and familiality of EL in youth with ADHD. Methods: One thousand, one hundred and eighty-six children with ADHD…

  10. Langley Full-scale-tunnel Investigation of the Factors Affecting the Static Lateral-stability Characteristics of a Typical Fighter-type Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Roy H

    1947-01-01

    The factors that affect the rate of change of rolling moment with yaw of a typical fighter-type airplane were investigated in the Langley full-scale tunnel on a typical fighter-type airplane.Eight representative flight conditions were investigated in detail. The separate effects of propeller operation, of the wing-fuselage combination, and of the vertical tail to the effective dihedral of the airplane in each condition were determined. The results of the tests showed that for the airplane with the propeller removed, the wing-fuselage combination had positive dihedral effect which increased considerably with increasing angle of attack for all conditions. Flap deflection decreased the dihedral effect of the wing-fuselage combination slightly as compared with that with the flaps retracted. Flap deflection resulted in negative dihedral effect due to the vertical tail. Propeller operation decreased the lateral stability parameter of the airplane for all the conditions investigated with larger decreases being measured for the flaps deflected conditions.

  11. Oral immunization of mice with attenuated Salmonella enteritidis containing a recombinant plasmid which codes for production of the B subunit of heat-labile Escherichia coli enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Clements, J D; Lyon, F L; Lowe, K L; Farrand, A L; el-Morshidy, S

    1986-01-01

    We used Salmonella enteritidis serotype dublin strain SL1438, a nonreverting, aromatic-dependent, histidine-requiring mutant, as a recipient for a recombinant plasmid coding for production of the nontoxic B subunit of the heat-labile Escherichia coli enterotoxin. The S. enteritidis derivative EL23 produced heat-labile enterotoxin subunit B that was indistinguishable from heat-labile enterotoxin subunit B produced by strains of E. coli or Salmonella typhi harboring the same plasmid. Mice immunized orally with strain EL23 developed progressively increasing mucosal and serum antibody responses to both heat-labile enterotoxin subunit B and to the lipopolysaccharide of the vaccine strain. The mucosal antibody response was shown to be immunoglobulin A specific and to be capable of neutralizing the biological activities of both E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin and cholera enterotoxin in vitro. Images PMID:3527989

  12. A retrospective study using the pressure ulcer scale for healing (PUSH) tool to examine factors affecting stage II pressure ulcer healing in a Korean acute care hospital.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung Hee

    2014-09-01

    Stage II pressure ulcers (PUs) should be managed promptly and appropriately in order to prevent complications. To identify the factors affecting Stage II PU healing and optimize care, the electronic medical records of patients with a Stage II PU in an acute care hospital were examined. Patient and ulcer characteristics as well as nutritional assessment variables were retrieved, and ulcer variables were used to calculate Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH) scores. The effect of all variables on healing status (healed versus nonhealed) and change in PUSH score for healing rate were compared. Records of 309 Stage II PUs from 155 patients (mean age 61.2 ± 15.2 [range 5-89] years, 182 [58.9%] male) were retrieved and analyzed. Of those, 221 healed and 88 were documented as not healed at the end of the study. The variables that were significantly different between patients with PUs that did and did not heal were: major diagnosis (P = 0.001), peripheral arterial disease (P = 0.007), smoking (P = 0.048), serum albumin ( <2.5 g/dL) (P = 0.002), antidepressant use (P = 0.035), vitamin use (P = 0.006), history of surgery (P <0.001), PU size (P = 0.003), Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) score (P = 0.020), Braden scale score (P = 0.003), and mean arterial pressure (MAP, mm Hg) (P = 0.026). The Cox proportional hazard model showed a significant positive difference in PUSH score change -indicative of healing - when pressure-redistribution surfaces were used (P <0.001, HR = 2.317), PU size was small (≤3.0 cm2, P = 0.006, HR = 1.670), MAP (within a range of 52-112 mm Hg) was higher P = 0.010, HR = 1.016), and patients were provided multivitamins (P = 0.037, HR=1.431). The results of this study suggest strategies for healing Stage II PUs in the acute care setting should include early recognition of lower-stage PUs, the provision of static pressure-redistribution surfaces and multivitamins, and maintaining higher MAP may facilitate healing and prevent deterioration

  13. Combination of metamorphism and deformation affect the nano-scale pore structures and macromolecule characteristics of high-rank deformed coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Li, H.; Ju, Y.

    2013-12-01

    experiments indicates that adsorption/desorption capacity shows a 'U' type with nano-pores volume and specific surface area, coals with best adsorption capacity contained both vitrinite and inertinite with an approximate ratio of 4:1 or 1:4, the increase of aromatic and aliphatic content individually facilitated the adsorption of CBM. Generally speaking, the adsorption/desorption capacity of ductile deformed coals is higher than that of brittle ones, but metamorphism could dramatically affects the final results. To enhance CBM production and reduce carbon emission, the appropriate coal-bearing strata need to be chosen. Our research shows that metamorphism and deformation affect the nano-scale pore structures and macromolecule characteristics of different coals. Therefore brittle-ductile superposed zone with medium-high rank coals has high gas content and permeability which is promising to exploit and helpful to environmental protection.

  14. How landscape scale changes affect ecological processes in conservation areas: external factors influence land use by zebra (Equus burchelli) in the Okavango Delta.

    PubMed

    Bartlam-Brooks, Hattie L A; Bonyongo, Mpaphi C; Harris, Stephen

    2013-09-01

    Most large-bodied wildlife populations in sub-Saharan Africa only survive in conservation areas, but are continuing to decline because external changes influence ecological processes within reserves, leading to a lack of functionality. However, failure to understand how landscape scale changes influence ecological processes limits our ability to manage protected areas. We used GPS movement data to calculate dry season home ranges for 14 zebra mares in the Okavango Delta and investigated the effects of a range of landscape characteristics (number of habitat patches, mean patch shape, mean index of juxtaposition, and interspersion) on home range size. Resource utilization functions (RUF) were calculated to investigate how specific landscape characteristics affected space use. Space use by all zebra was clustered. In the wetter (Central) parts of the Delta home range size was negatively correlated with the density of habitat patches, more complex patch shapes, low juxtaposition of habitats and an increased availability of floodplain and grassland habitats. In the drier (Peripheral) parts of the Delta, higher use by zebra was also associated with a greater availability of floodplain and grassland habitats, but a lower density of patches and simpler patch shapes. The most important landscape characteristic was not consistent between zebra within the same area of the Delta, suggesting that no single foraging strategy is substantially superior to others, and so animals using different foraging strategies may all thrive. The distribution and complexity of habitat patches are crucial in determining space use by zebra. The extent and duration of seasonal flooding is the principal process affecting habitat patch characteristics in the Okavango Delta, particularly the availability of floodplains, which are the habitat at greatest risk from climate change and anthropogenic disturbance to the Okavango's catchment basin. Understanding how the factors that determine habitat

  15. Fluxes of phytopigments and labile organic matter to the deep ocean in the NE Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabiano, M.; Pusceddu, A.; Dell'Anno, A.; Armeni, M.; Vanucci, S.; Lampitt, R. S.; Wolff, G. A.; Danovaro, R.

    Downward fluxes of labile organic matter (phytopigments, proteins and carbohydrates) were measured between September 1996 and August 1998 at three depths 1000 m, 3000 m and 4700 m (c. 100 mab) over the Porcupine Abyssal Plain (PAP, NE Atlantic), to provide detailed information on the biochemical characteristics of organic inputs to the deep sea. Temporal changes in the carbohydrate and protein fluxes were compared to carbohydrate and protein contents of the surficial sediment on the seabed beneath the traps at 4850 m depth. Fluxes of carbohydrate, protein and phytopigments (chlorophylls-a and -b, and phaeophytins-a and -b) displayed strong seasonal variations, but limited interannual variability between the two years of measurement. Fluxes of labile organic matter were characterised by strong pulses which occurred in spring and early summer, suggesting that the deep PAP area experiences relatively predictable patterns of vertical fluxes. No major quantitative differences in organic matter fluxes were observed between traps at different depths, but highest carbohydrate fluxes (time-weighted mean 2.4 mg m -2 d -1) were observed at 4700 m, whereas highest protein fluxes were observed at 1000 m (time-weighted mean 2.1 mg m -2 d -1). Carbohydrate, protein and phytopigment fluxes were correlated significantly, suggesting that settling material was associated with primary organic matter (i.e., phytodetritus) inputs from the photic layer. The contributions of chlorophyll-a and -b, and of phaeophytin-a and -b did not change significantly with increasing depth. Nor did the ratio of total phaeopigments to total chlorophylls did change greatly with depth (0.3-0.4 at both 3000 m and 4700 m depth) suggesting that degradation rates in the sinking particles were low. Protein and carbohydrate concentrations in the sediments at 4850 m depth (collected during 6 cruises between 1996 and 1998) and vertical fluxes at 3000 m depth followed inverse temporal patterns; peak concentrations

  16. Dissolved organic carbon lability and stable isotope shifts during microbial decomposition in a tropical river system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geeraert, N.; Omengo, F. O.; Govers, G.; Bouillon, S.

    2016-01-01

    A significant amount of carbon is transported to the ocean as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in rivers. During transport, it can be transformed through microbial consumption and photochemical oxidation. In dark incubation experiments with water from the Tana River, Kenya, we examined the consumption of DOC through microbial decomposition and the associated change in its carbon stable isotope composition (δ13C). In 15 of the 18 incubations, DOC concentrations decreased significantly by 10 to 60 %, with most of the decomposition taking place within the first 24-48 h. After 8 days, the remaining DOC was up to 3 ‰ more depleted in 13C compared with the initial pool, and the change in δ13C correlated strongly with the fraction of DOC remaining. We hypothesize that the shift in δ13C is consistent with greater microbial lability of DOC originating from herbaceous C4 vegetation than DOC derived from woody C3 vegetation in the semi-arid lower Tana. The results complement earlier findings that the stable isotope concentration of riverine DOC does not necessarily reflect the proportion of C3 and C4-derived DOC in the catchment: besides spatial distribution patterns of different vegetation types, processing within the river can further influence the δ13C of riverine OC.

  17. An improved high pressure freezing and freeze substitution method to preserve the labile vaccinia virus nucleocapsid.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Desyree Murta; Moussatche, Nissin; Condit, Richard C

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, high pressure freezing and freeze substitution have been widely used for electron microscopy to reveal viral and cellular structures that are difficult to preserve. Vaccinia virus, a member of the Poxviridae family, presents one of the most complex viral structures. The classical view of vaccinia virus structure consists of an envelope surrounding a biconcave core, with a lateral body in each concavity of the core. This classical view was challenged by Peters and Muller (1963), who demonstrated the presence of a folded tubular structure inside the virus core and stated the difficulty in visualizing this structure, possibly because it is labile and cannot be preserved by conventional sample preparation. Therefore, this tubular structure, now called the nucleocapsid, has been mostly neglected over the years. Earlier studies were able to preserve the nucleocapsid, but with low efficiency. In this study, we report the protocol (and troubleshooting) that resulted in preservation of the highest numbers of nucleocapsids in several independent preparations. Using this protocol, we were able to demonstrate an interdependence between the formation of the virus core wall and the nucleocapsid, leading to the hypothesis that an interaction exists between the major protein constituents of these compartments, A3 (core wall) and L4 (nucleocapsid). Our results show that high pressure freezing and freeze substitution can be used in more in-depth studies concerning the nucleocapsid structure and function.

  18. Labile male morphology and intraspecific male polymorphism in the Philotrypesis fig wasps.

    PubMed

    Jousselin, Emmanuelle; van Noort, Simon; Greeff, Jaco M

    2004-12-01

    We investigate the evolution of male morphology in the fig wasps belonging to the genus Philotrypesis (Chalcidoidea, Sycorectinae). We first reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships of Philotrypesis associated with African figs using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. We then determine male morphotypes in the species included in our phylogeny and show that intraspecific polymorphism is common. Most species present two types of males and some species have up to three types. These morphotypes are believed to represent alternative mating tactics: some males show morphological adaptations to fighting, others are winged dispersers and others are small sneakers. Mapping out these variations onto our phylogeny reveals that the combination of morphs changes randomly along the branches of the tree. Both parsimony and likelihood approaches indicate that there has been at least one transition from dimorphism to trimorphism, several gains and losses of the small morph and two independent acquisitions of the winged morph. Using maximum likelihood analyses of character evolution, we estimate transition rates for each morph and show that the evolution of each type of morph are not correlated and that forward and backward transition rates are not significantly different. Our results altogether suggest that male morphology is evolutionary labile, it responds quickly to selection imposed by the mating environment. This study, also suggests that seemingly complex phenotypes, such as winged males, can evolve several times and can even be recreated after having been lost.

  19. Evaluation of a ganglioside immunosorbent assay for detection of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed

    Bäck, E; Svennerholm, A M; Holmgren, J; Möllby, R

    1979-12-01

    The GM1 ganglioside enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (GM1-ELISA), an immunological method for detection of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT), was quantitatively and qualitatively compared with the conventional adrenal cell test for the identification of LT-producing strains. A micromodification model of the assay was developed. Enterotoxin preparations from 120 E. coli isolates from individuals with diarrhea, which had been previously shown to be enterotoxigenic by the adrenal cell test, and from 44 control strains of E. coli were compared in parallel by the two methods. Quantitatively the covariation of the enterotoxin titers was highly significant (RS = 0.98, P less than 0.001), the GM1-ELISA being somewhat more sensitive than the adrenal cell test. The methodological error was less than 5% in both tests. Qualitatively the overall agreement for positive and negative reactions for the two methods was 89%. The GM1-ELISA is practical for routine use in the diagnosis of enterotoxigenic E. coli, especially in laboratories without facilities for cell culture.

  20. Stabilized liquid membrane device (SLMD) for the passive, integrative sampling of labile metals in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brumbaugh, W.G.; Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.; Manahan, S.E.

    2002-01-01

    A stabilized liquid membrane device (SLMD) is described for potential use as an in situ, passive, integrative sampler for cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in natural waters. The SLMD (patent pending) consists of a 2.5-cm-wide by 15-cm-long strip of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) layflat tubing containing 1 mL of an equal mixture (v/v) of oleic acid (cis-9-octadecenoic acid) and EMO-8Q (7-[4-ethyl-1-methyloctyl]-8-quinolinol). The reagent mixture continuously diffuses to the exterior surface of the LDPE membrane, and provides for sequestration of several divalent metals for up to several weeks. Depending on sampler configuration, concentration factors of several thousand can be realized for these metal ions after just a few days. In addition to in situ deployment, the SLMD may be useful for laboratory determination of labile metal species in grab samples. Methods for minimizing the effects of water flow on the sampling rate are currently under investigation.

  1. Facile synthesis of acid-labile polymers with pendent ortho esters.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing; Ji, Ran; Gao, Shi-Juan; Du, Fu-Sheng; Li, Zi-Chen

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a facile approach for preparation of acid-labile and biocompatible polymers with pendent cyclic ortho esters, which is based on the efficient and mild reactions between cyclic ketene acetal (CKA) and hydroxyl groups. Three CKAs, 2-ethylidene-1,3-dioxane (EDO), 2-ethylidene-1,3-dioxolane (EDL), and 2-ethylidene-4- methyl-1,3-dioxolane (EMD) were prepared from the corresponding cyclic vinyl acetals by catalytic isomerization of the double bond. The reaction of CKAs with different alcohols and diols was examined using trace of p-toluenesulfonic acid as a catalyst. For the monohydroxyl alcohols, cyclic ortho esters were formed by simple addition of the hydroxyl group toward CKAs with ethanol showing a much greater reactivity than iso-propanol. When 1,2- or 1,3-diols were used to react with the CKAs, we observed the isomerized cyclic ortho esters besides the simple addition products. Biocompatible polyols, that is, poly(2-hydroxyethyl acrylate) (PHEA) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were then modified with CKAs, and the degree of substitution of the pendent ortho esters can be easily tuned by changing feed ratio. Both the small molecule ortho esters and the CKA-modified polymers demonstrate the pH-dependent hydrolysis profiles, which depend also on the chemical structure of the ortho esters as well as the polymer hydrophobicity. PMID:22176024

  2. Uncaria tomentosa (Willd. ex. Roem. & Schult.) DC. and Eucalyptus globulus Labill. interactions when administered with diazepam.

    PubMed

    Quílez, A M; Saenz, M T; García, M D

    2012-03-01

    The safety of natural drugs is defined by their side effects and toxicity as well as any interactions that may occur if taken together with other drugs. In particular, it is essential to identify synergies, antagonisms and other types of interference with other drugs so that the correct choice can be made from the range of phytomedicines available. The aim of this work was to investigate changes in the pharmacological effect of diazepam (2 mg/kg) on the CNS when administered together with a medicinal plant: Eucalyptus globulus Labill. (eucalyptus 6 mg/kg and 3.25 mg/kg) or Uncaria tomentosa (Willd. ex Roem. & Schult). DC. (cat's claw, 7.14 mg/kg and 3.54 mg/kg). Various different psychopharmacological effects were evaluated through assessing exploratory behavior, muscle relaxation and spontaneous motor activity. Both phytodrugs interacted with the benzodiazepine. Eucalyptus had an inhibitory effect at both doses and could be useful at the highest dose in cases where the desired effect of the depressant is moderate anxiolytic activity without marked muscle relaxation. Cat's claw, at both doses, enhanced the action of diazepam on spontaneous motor activity and, at the lowest dose, exploratory ability. These herbal drugs could be useful for their antiinflammatory activity in musculoskeletal pathologies treated with benzodiazepines.

  3. Labile phases and the ocean's strontium cycle: A method of sediment trap sampling for acantharians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Renate E.; Betzer, Peter R.

    Acantharians are abundant marine planktonic protists and are the only marine organisms that use strontium as a major structural component. These organisms incorporate Sr in the form of celestite (SrSO4) into their skeletons and cysts [Odum, 1951]. Because the ocean is undersaturated with respect to SrSO4 [North, 1974], settling skeletons of dead acantharians and acantharian cysts are readily dissolved. After an initial burst of activity following their discovery in the mid-nineteenth century [Haeckel, 1887; Popofsky, 1909; Schewiakoff, 1926], the study of acantharians lagged during the mid-twentieth century. In part, this hiatus was related to the fact that acantharians are not preserved in the sedimentary record. Another contributing factor was the evolution in sampling and preservation techniques that mitigated against the preservation of these labile phases [Beers and Stewart, 1970; Michaels, 1988]. On the other hand, their susceptibility to dissolution implicates them as important mediators of the ocean's Sr budget [Bernstein et al., 1987]. Our short-term and relatively shallow sediment trap deployments, lack of preservatives, and rapid sample processing permitted the collection of the often elusive acantharian specimens.

  4. Assessing the labile arsenic pool in contaminated paddy soils by isotopic dilution techniques and simple extractions.

    PubMed

    Stroud, Jacqueline L; Khan, M Asaduzzman; Norton, Gareth J; Islam, M Rafiqul; Dasgupta, Tapash; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Price, Adam H; Meharg, Andrew A; McGrath, Steve P; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2011-05-15

    Arsenic (As) contamination of paddy soils threatens rice cultivation and the health of populations relying on rice as a staple crop. In the present study, isotopic dilution techniques were used to determine the chemically labile (E value) and phytoavailable (L value) pools of As in a range of paddy soils from Bangladesh, India, and China and two arable soils from the UK varying in the degree and sources of As contamination. The E value accounted for 6.2-21.4% of the total As, suggesting that a large proportion of soil As is chemically nonlabile. L values measured with rice grown under anaerobic conditions were generally larger than those under aerobic conditions, indicating increased potentially phytoavailable pool of As in flooded soils. In an incubation study, As was mobilized into soil pore water mainly as arsenite under flooded conditions, with Bangladeshi soils contaminated by irrigation of groundwater showing a greater potential of As mobilization than other soils. Arsenic mobilization was best predicted by phosphate-extractable As in the soils. PMID:21504212

  5. Energy evaluation of forest residues originated from Eucalyptus globulus Labill in Galicia.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Regueira, L; Proupín-Castiñeiras, J; Rodríguez-Añón, J A

    2002-03-01

    The possibility of retrieving the energy contained in forest residues originating from wood exploitation in Galicia (Spain) is evaluated. This study was made on Eucalyptus globulus Labill occupying a forest surface of 240000 ha. This species plays an important role in the economical development of Galicia, as it is the main forest species for production of pulp. Sampling was made over 1999 in seven different zones, three main stations plus four selected for comparison, situated in Galicia. The residues originating from cutting were sorted into three different groups and their calorific values were measured by static bomb calorimetry. These calorific values, close to 7200 kJ kg(-1), make possible the use of this residual biomass as an energy source. Calorific values were measured by static bomb calorimeter in an oxygen atmosphere. Flammability was determined using a standard epiradiator. Simultaneously, some other parameters, elementary chemical composition, heavy metal contents, moisture, density, ash percentage after combustion in the bomb, and main bioclimatic characteristics, were also determined. PMID:11848377

  6. Development and bioorthogonal activation of palladium-labile prodrugs of gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jason T; Dawson, John C; Fraser, Craig; Rybski, Witold; Torres-Sánchez, Carmen; Bradley, Mark; Patton, E Elizabeth; Carragher, Neil O; Unciti-Broceta, Asier

    2014-06-26

    Bioorthogonal chemistry has become one of the main driving forces in current chemical biology, inspiring the search for novel biocompatible chemospecific reactions for the past decade. Alongside the well-established labeling strategies that originated the bioorthogonal paradigm, we have recently proposed the use of heterogeneous palladium chemistry and bioorthogonal Pd(0)-labile prodrugs to develop spatially targeted therapies. Herein, we report the generation of biologically inert precursors of cytotoxic gemcitabine by introducing Pd(0)-cleavable groups in positions that are mechanistically relevant for gemcitabine's pharmacological activity. Cell viability studies in pancreatic cancer cells showed that carbamate functionalization of the 4-amino group of gemcitabine significantly reduced (>23-fold) the prodrugs' cytotoxicity. The N-propargyloxycarbonyl (N-Poc) promoiety displayed the highest sensitivity to heterogeneous palladium catalysis under biocompatible conditions, with a reaction half-life of less than 6 h. Zebrafish studies with allyl, propargyl, and benzyl carbamate-protected rhodamines confirmed N-Poc as the most suitable masking group for implementing in vivo bioorthogonal organometallic chemistry. PMID:24867590

  7. Nitric oxide is necessary for labilization of a consolidated context memory during reconsolidation in terrestrial snails.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Pavel M; Roshchin, Matvey; Timoshenko, Alia K; Gainutdinov, Khalil L; Bogodvid, Tatiana K; Muranova, Lyudmila N; Zuzina, Alena B; Korshunova, Tatiana A

    2014-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is known to be involved in associative memory formation. We investigated the influence of blocking NO function on the reconsolidation of context memory in terrestrial snails (Helix lucorum L.). After a 10 day session of electric shocks in one context only, context memory in snails was observed in test sessions as the significant difference of amplitudes of withdrawal responses to tactile stimuli in two different contexts. After a 1 day rest, a session of 'reminding' was performed, preceded by injection in different groups of the snails with either vehicle or combination of the protein synthesis blocker anisomycin (ANI) with one of the following drugs: the NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO, the NO-synthase inhibitors N-omega-nitro-L-arginin, nitroindazole and NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride, or the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine. Testing the context memory at different time intervals after the reminder under ANI injection showed that the context memory was impaired at 24 h and later, whereas the reminder under combined injection of ANI and each of the NO-synthase inhibitors used or the NO scavenger showed no impairment of long-term context memory. Injection of the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine with or without reminder had no effect on context memory. The results obtained demonstrated that NO is necessary for labilization of a consolidated context memory.

  8. An intermetallic Au24Ag20 superatom nanocluster stabilized by labile ligands.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Su, Haifeng; Xu, Chaofa; Li, Gang; Gell, Lars; Lin, Shuichao; Tang, Zichao; Häkkinen, Hannu; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2015-04-01

    An intermetallic nanocluster containing 44 metal atoms, Au24Ag20(2-SPy)4(PhC≡C)20Cl2, was successfully synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal analysis and density funtional theory computations. The 44 metal atoms in the cluster are arranged as a concentric three-shell Au12@Ag20@Au12 Keplerate structure having a high symmetry. For the first time, the co-presence of three different types of anionic ligands (i.e., phenylalkynyl, 2-pyridylthiolate, and chloride) was revealed on the surface of metal nanoclusters. Similar to thiolates, alkynyls bind linearly to surface Au atoms using their σ-bonds, leading to the formation of two types of surface staple units (PhC≡C-Au-L, L = PhC≡C(-) or 2-pyridylthiolate) on the cluster. The co-presence of three different surface ligands allows the site-specific surface and functional modification of the cluster. The lability of PhC≡C(-) ligands on the cluster was demonstrated, making it possible to keep the metal core intact while removing partial surface capping. Moreover, it was found that ligand exchange on the cluster occurs easily to offer various derivatives with the same metal core but different surface functionality and thus different solubility. PMID:25803406

  9. Expression of functional pentameric heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit of Escherichia coli in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jung-Gu; Kim, Jung-Ae; Chung, Hea-Jong; Kim, Tae-Geum; Kim, Jung-Mi; Lee, Kyung-Ryul; Park, Seung-Moon; Yang, Moon-Sik; Kim, Dae-Hyuk

    2009-05-01

    Although the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) has already been expressed in several different systems, including prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, studies regarding the synthesis of LTB into oligomeric structures of pentameric size in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been limited. Therefore, this study used a functional signal peptide of the amylase 1A protein from rice to direct the yeast-expressed LTB towards the endoplasmic reticulum to oligomerize with the expected pentameric size. The expression and assembly of the recombinant LTB were confirmed in both the cell-free extract and culture media of the recombinant strain using a Western blot analysis. The binding of the LTB pentamers to intestinal epithelial cell membrane glycolipid receptors was further verified using a GM1-ganglioside enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (GM1-ELISA). On the basis of the GM1-ELISA results, pentameric LTB proteins comprised approximately 0.5-2.0% of the total soluble proteins, and the maximum quantity of secreted LTB was estimated to be 3 mg/l after a 3-day cultivation period. Consequently, the synthesis of LTB monomers and their assembly into biologically active oligomers in a recombinant S. cerevisiae strain demonstrated the feasibility of using a GRAS microorganism-based adjuvant, as well as the development of carriers against mucosal disease. PMID:19494699

  10. Lability of GABAA receptor function in human partial epilepsy: possible relationship to hypometabolism.

    PubMed

    Pumain, René; Ahmed, Mounia Sid; Kurcewicz, Irène; Trottier, Suzanne; Louvel, Jacques; Turak, Baris; Devaux, Bertrand; Laschet, Jacques

    2008-11-01

    The function of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R) is maintained by endogenous phosphorylation. We have shown that the corresponding kinase is the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), using the locally produced glycolytic ATP. In addition, using cerebral tissue obtained during curative surgery for epilepsy, we showed that both the endogenous phosphorylation and the GABA(A)R function are significantly reduced in the "epileptogenic" cerebral cortex when compared to "control" tissue. This dysfunction likely contributes to seizure generation and/or transition from the interictal to the ictal state. Glucose utilization is decreased in the epileptogenic cortex of patients with partial epilepsy in the interictal state, but the relationship to the disorder remains unclear. We propose that this hypometabolism is related to the deficiency in the endogenous phosphorylation of GABA(A)R and the resulting greater lability of GABAergic inhibition. Several lines of evidences indeed suggest that GABAergic inhibition is costly in terms of metabolic consumption. The deficiency of this glycolysis-dependent mechanism may thus link epileptogenicity to glucose hypometabolism. The antiepileptic effect of ketogenic diets may be mediated by the subsequent rise in the NADH/NAD(+) index, which favors GABA(A)R endogenous phosphorylation and should contribute to restoration of GABAergic inhibition in the epileptogenic zone.

  11. Phospholipase C (heat-labile hemolysin) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: purification and preliminary characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Berka, R M; Vasil, M L

    1982-01-01

    Phospholipase C (heat-labile hemolysin) was purified from Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture supernatants to near homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by a novel application of DEAE-Sephacel chromatography. Enzymatic activity remained associated with DEAE-Sephacel even in the presence of 1 M NaCl, but was eluted with a linear gradient of 0 to 5% tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide. Elution from DEAE-Sephacel was also obtained with 2% lysophosphatidylcholine, and to a lesser extent with 2% phosphorylcholine, but not at all with choline. The enzyme was highly active toward phospholipids possessing substituted ammonium groups (e.g., phosphatidycholine, lysophosphatidylcholine, and sphingomyelin); however, it had little if any activity toward phospholipids lacking substituted ammonium groups (e.g., phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphaditylglycerol). Collectively, these data suggest that phospholipase C from P. aeruginosa exhibits high affinity for substituted ammonium groups, but requires an additional hydrophobic moiety for optimum binding. The specific activity of the purified enzyme preparation increased 1,900-fold compared with that of culture supernatants. The molecular weight of the phospholipase C was estimated to be 78,000 by both sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Sephacryl S-200 column chromatography and was 76,000 by high-performance size exclusion chromatography. The isoelectric point was 5.5. Amino acid analysis showed that phospholipase C was rich in glycine, serine, threonine, aspartyl, glutamyl, and aromatic amino acids, but was cystine free. Images PMID:6811552

  12. Acid-Labile Subunit Deficiency and Growth Failure: Description of Two Novel Cases

    PubMed Central

    David, A; Rose, S.J.; Miraki-Moud, F.; Metherell, L.A.; Savage, M.O.; Clark, A.J.L.; Camacho-Hübner, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Mutations in the acid-labile subunit (ALS) gene (IGFALS) have been associated with circulating insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) deficiency and short stature. Whether severe pubertal delay is also part of the phenotype remains controversial due to the small number of cases reported. We report 2 children with a history of growth failure due to novel IGFALS mutations. Methods The growth hormone receptor gene (GHR) and IGFALS were analyzed by direct sequencing. Ternary complex formation was studied by size exclusion chromatography. Results Two boys of 13.3 and 10.6 years, with pubertal stages 2 and 1, had mild short stature (−3.2 and −2.8 SDS, respectively) and a biochemical profile suggestive of growth hormone resistance. No defects were identified in the GHR. Patient 1 was homozygous for the IGFALS missense mutation P73L. Patient 2 was a compound heterozygote for the missense mutation L134Q and a novel GGC to AG substitution at position 546–548 (546–548delGGCinsAG). The latter causes a frameshift and the appearance of a premature stop codon. Size exclusion chromatography showed no peaks corresponding to ternary and binary complexes in either patient. Conclusion Screening of the IGFALS is important in children with short stature associated with low serum IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and ALS. PMID:20389102

  13. Membrane Transport Behavior and the Lability of Chloride on Polyphosphazenes Bearing Bulky Substituents

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart; John R. Klaehn; Christopher J. Orme

    2007-08-01

    Polyphosphazenes are an intriguing class of inorganic polymers where much of their functionality is derived from pendant groups attached to phosphorus. The backbone of the polymer consists of alternating phosphorus and nitrogen atoms where the bonding is conventionally drawn as alternating double and single bonds. Orbital nodes are located at each phosphorus atom resulting in electron delocalization between phosphorus atoms, but not through them. Thus, the polymer backbone has a high degree of flexibility where halogens or other leaving groups can be effectively displaced with nucleophiles. In this paper, the first known example of a polyphosphazene with large quantities of non-labile chloride substituents induced by neighboring group steric effects will be discussed. This example is the result of the substitution of poly[bis-chlorophosphazene] with the sodium salt of 3,5-di-tert-butylphenol where only 60% of the chlorines were displaced. This contrasts with the 100% substitution observed with other phenols (phenol, 4-tert-butylphenol, 3-methylphenol, etc.).

  14. Assessing the labile arsenic pool in contaminated paddy soils by isotopic dilution techniques and simple extractions.

    PubMed

    Stroud, Jacqueline L; Khan, M Asaduzzman; Norton, Gareth J; Islam, M Rafiqul; Dasgupta, Tapash; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Price, Adam H; Meharg, Andrew A; McGrath, Steve P; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2011-05-15

    Arsenic (As) contamination of paddy soils threatens rice cultivation and the health of populations relying on rice as a staple crop. In the present study, isotopic dilution techniques were used to determine the chemically labile (E value) and phytoavailable (L value) pools of As in a range of paddy soils from Bangladesh, India, and China and two arable soils from the UK varying in the degree and sources of As contamination. The E value accounted for 6.2-21.4% of the total As, suggesting that a large proportion of soil As is chemically nonlabile. L values measured with rice grown under anaerobic conditions were generally larger than those under aerobic conditions, indicating increased potentially phytoavailable pool of As in flooded soils. In an incubation study, As was mobilized into soil pore water mainly as arsenite under flooded conditions, with Bangladeshi soils contaminated by irrigation of groundwater showing a greater potential of As mobilization than other soils. Arsenic mobilization was best predicted by phosphate-extractable As in the soils.

  15. Chemical reactivity of labile sulfur of iron-sulfur proteins. The reaction of triphenyl phosphine.

    PubMed

    Manabe, T; Goda, K; Kimura, T

    1976-04-23

    The reaction of triphenyl phosphine to iron-sulfur proteins from adrenal cortex mitochondria, spinach chloroplasts, and Clostridium pasteurianum was investigated. As ethanol concentrations in the reaction mixture increased, the rate of the reaction decreased. In the simultaneous presence of 1 M KC1 and 5 M urea, the reaction rate reached at maximum. Under these conditions the initial rates of the decolorization reaction by the phosphine were found to be 8.7, 0.88, and 1.8 nmol of ferredoxin per min at 25 degrees C for adrenal, spinach, and clostridial ferredoxins, respectively. The kinetic curves for the reaction of the phosphine sulfide formation, the loss of labile sulfur, and the deterioriation of visible absorption showed a similar pattern with a comparable rate. During this reaction, the complete reduction of ferric ions present in ferredoxin was observed with a fast rate under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. These results suggest that the iron atoms in ferredoxin are first reduced by the intramolecular reductants in the presence of triphenyl phosphine with the concomitant formation of S2-2, which then reacts with triphenyl phosphine resulting in the formation of triphenyl phosphine sulfide.

  16. Isolation and evolution of labile sulfur allotropes via kinetic encapsulation in interactive porous networks

    PubMed Central

    Kitagawa, Hakuba; Ohtsu, Hiroyoshi; Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J.; Kawano, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of small sulfur allotropes have long remained unachievable because of their extreme lability. This study reports the first direct observation of disulfur (S2) with X-ray crystallography. Sulfur gas was kinetically trapped and frozen into the pores of two Cu-based porous coordination networks containing interactive iodide sites. Stabilization of S2 was achieved either through physisorption or chemisorption on iodide anions. One of the networks displayed shape selectivity for linear molecules only, therefore S2 was trapped and remained stable within the material at room temperature and higher. In the second network, however, the S2 molecules reacted further to produce bent-S3 species as the temperature was increased. Following the thermal evolution of the S2 species in this network using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy unveiled the generation of a new reaction intermediate never observed before, the cyclo-tri­sulfur dication (cyclo-S3 2+). It is envisaged that kinetic guest trapping in interactive crystalline porous networks will be a promising method to investigate transient chemical species. PMID:27437110

  17. Involvement of intracellular labile zinc in suppression of DEVD-caspase activity in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ho, L H; Ratnaike, R N; Zalewski, P D

    2000-02-01

    Age-related tissue Zn deficiency may contribute to neuronal and glial cell death by apoptosis in Alzheimer's dementia. To investigate this, we studied the effects of increasing or decreasing the levels of intracellular labile Zn on apoptosis of human neuroblastoma BE(2)-C cells in vitro. BE(2)-C cells were primed for 18 h with butyrate (1 mM) before addition of staurosporine (1 microM), an effector enzyme of apoptosis, for a further 3 h to induce DEVD-caspase activity. An increase in intracellular Zn using Zn ionophore pyrithione suppressed DEVD-caspase activity, while a decrease in intracellular Zn induced by Zn chelator TPEN mimicked staurosporine by activating DEVD-caspase in butyrate-primed cells. The distribution of intracellular Zn in the cells was demonstrated with the UV-excitable Zn-specific fluorophore Zinquin. Confocal images showed distinct cytoplasmic and cytoskeletal fluorescence. We propose that Zn decreases the level of apoptosis in neuronal cells exposed to toxins, possibly by stabilizing their cytoskeleton.

  18. Effect of pH on Metal Lability in Drinking Water Treatment Residuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhui; Yuan, Nannan; Pei, Yuansheng

    2014-01-01

    Drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs), by-products generated during treatment of drinking water, can be reused as environmental amendments to remediate contamination. However, this beneficial reuse may be hampered by the potential release of toxic contaminants (e.g., metals) in the WTRs. In present study, batch tests and then fractionation, in vitro digestion, and the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure were used to investigate the release and extractability of metals in the Fe/Al hydroxides comprised WTRs under differing pH. The results demonstrated that significant release from WTRs for Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Fe, Mg, Mn, Pb, Sr, and Zn occurred under low pH (acid condition); for As, Mo, and V under high pH (alkaline condition); and for Al, Cu, and Ni under both conditions. In comparison, most metals in the WTRs were more easily released under low pH, but the release was stable at a relatively low level between pH 6 and 9, especially under alkaline conditions. Further analysis indicated that the chemical extractability and bioaccessibility of many metals was found to increase in the WTRs after being leached, even though the leached WTRs could still be considered nonhazardous. These results demonstrated that pH had a substantial effect on the lability of metals in WTRs. Overall, caution should be used when considering pH conditions during WTRs reuse to avoid potential metal pollution.

  19. An intermetallic Au24Ag20 superatom nanocluster stabilized by labile ligands.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Su, Haifeng; Xu, Chaofa; Li, Gang; Gell, Lars; Lin, Shuichao; Tang, Zichao; Häkkinen, Hannu; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2015-04-01

    An intermetallic nanocluster containing 44 metal atoms, Au24Ag20(2-SPy)4(PhC≡C)20Cl2, was successfully synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal analysis and density funtional theory computations. The 44 metal atoms in the cluster are arranged as a concentric three-shell Au12@Ag20@Au12 Keplerate structure having a high symmetry. For the first time, the co-presence of three different types of anionic ligands (i.e., phenylalkynyl, 2-pyridylthiolate, and chloride) was revealed on the surface of metal nanoclusters. Similar to thiolates, alkynyls bind linearly to surface Au atoms using their σ-bonds, leading to the formation of two types of surface staple units (PhC≡C-Au-L, L = PhC≡C(-) or 2-pyridylthiolate) on the cluster. The co-presence of three different surface ligands allows the site-specific surface and functional modification of the cluster. The lability of PhC≡C(-) ligands on the cluster was demonstrated, making it possible to keep the metal core intact while removing partial surface capping. Moreover, it was found that ligand exchange on the cluster occurs easily to offer various derivatives with the same metal core but different surface functionality and thus different solubility.

  20. Determination of labile copper, cobalt, and chromium in textile mill wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Crain, J.S.; Essling, A.M.; Kiely, J.T.

    1997-01-01

    Copper, chromium, and cobalt species present in filtered wastewater effluent were separated by cation exchange and reverse phase chromatography. Three sample fractions were obtained: one containing metal cations (i.e., trivalent Cr, divalent Cu, and divalent Co), one containing organic species (including metallized dyes), and one containing other unretained species. The metal content of each fraction was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The sum of the corrected data was compared to the metal content of a filtered effluent aliquot digested totally with fuming sulfuric acid. Other aliquots of the filtered effluent were spiked with the metals of interest and digested to confirm chemical yield and accuracy. Method detection limits were consistently below 20 {mu}g L{sup -1} for Cu, 30 {mu}g L{sup -1} for Co, and 10 {mu}g L{sup -1} for Cr. Spike recoveries for undifferentiated Cu and Cr were statistically indistinguishable from unity; although Co spike recoveries were slightly low ({approximately}95%), its chemical yield was 98%. Copper retention on the sodium sulfonate cation exchange resin was closely correlated with the [EDTA]/[Cu] ratio, suggesting that metals retained upon the cation exchange column were assignable to labile metal species; however, mass balances for all three elements, though reasonable ({approximately}90%), were significantly different from unity. Mechanical factors may have contributed to the material loss, but other data suggest that some metal species reacted irreversibly with the reverse phase column. 3 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Thermodynamic N-donor trans influence in labile pseudo-octahedral zinc complexes: a delusion?

    PubMed

    Aboshyan-Sorgho, Lilit; Lathion, Timothée; Guénée, Laure; Besnard, Céline; Piguet, Claude

    2014-12-15

    While the forces responsible for the chelate effect are well-established in coordination chemistry, the origin and implementation of the related thermodynamic trans influence remains debatable. This work illustrates a simple approach for quantifying this effect in labile pseudo-octahedral [Zn(Lk)3](2+) complexes lacking stereochemical preferences (Lk = L1–L4 are unsymmetrical didentate α,α′-diimine ligands). In line with statistics, the triply degenerated meridional isomers mer-[Zn(Lk)3](2+) are stabilized by 0.8 ≤ ΔGexch(mer→fac) ≤ 4.2 kJ/mol over their nondegenerated facial analogues fac-[Zn(Lk)3](2+) and therefore display no apparent trans influence at room temperature. However, the dissection of the free energy terms into opposite enthalpic (favoring the facial isomers) and entropic (favoring the meridional isomers) contributions reveals a trans influence assigned to solvation processes occurring in polar solvents. Altogether, the thermodynamic trans influence operating in [Zn(α,α′-diimine)3](2+) complexes is 1–2 orders of magnitude smaller than the chelate effect. A weak templating effect provided by a noncovalent lanthanide tripod is thus large enough to produce the wanted facial isomer at room temperature. PMID:25407515

  2. DGT measurement in low flow conditions: diffusive boundary layer and lability considerations.

    PubMed

    Uher, Emmanuelle; Tusseau-Vuillemin, Marie-Hélène; Gourlay-France, Catherine

    2013-07-01

    Recent papers have alerted the scientific community that a diffusive boundary layer (DBL) forming in front of diffusive gradients in thin film (DGT) devices when they are immersed in water might have a significant impact on the results and have suggested a method to assess the DBL. This paper aims at evaluating to what extent the DBL impacts the results of metal measurement in water by DGT and providing new information on the dissociation kinetics of metal complexes in wastewater by using DBL calculation. A careful study of the influence of the water velocity on the measurement with DGTs equipped with restricted gels is presented. Deployments took place in the laboratory with a range of stirring speeds (0-400 rpm) and in a canal receiving treated wastewater with increasing controlled water velocity (0.07-3 cm s(-1)). Even under extreme low flow conditions, the error made in using the equation that does not take into account that the DBL was lower than the analytical error. Nevertheless, the DBL is the seat of dissociation of complexes and increases the lability window beyond the steric constraints of the hydrogel. The capacity of restricted gels to only sample inorganic species under these conditions is questioned. This study also is an opportunity to provide information on metal-ligand interactions in wastewater by creating the kinetic signature of the wastewater. Unlike previous studies which used different types of water, Pb was the more limited metal and interacted strongly with the ligands. PMID:23722876

  3. Determination of labile inorganic and organic species of Al and Cu in river waters using the diffusive gradients in thin films technique.

    PubMed

    Tonello, Paulo Sergio; Goveia, Danielle; Rosa, André Henrique; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes; Menegário, Amauri Antonio

    2011-03-01

    The diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique, using a diffusive gel or a restrictive gel, was evaluated for the determination of labile inorganic and organic species of Al and Cu in model synthetic solutions and river water samples. Experiments were performed both in situ and in the laboratory. In the solutions containing Al ions, the major labile fraction consisted of inorganic species. The organic complex fractions were mainly kinetically inert. For the model Cu solutions, the most labile fraction consisted of inorganic species; however, significant amounts of labile organic complexes of Cu were also present. A comparison was made between the results obtained using restrictive gel DGT and tangential flow ultrafiltration (TF-UF). The Cu fraction determined by restrictive gel DGT (corresponding to the "free" ions plus the labile fraction of small molecular size complexes) was larger than that determined by TF-UF (corresponding to all small molecular size ions), suggesting that the techniques exhibited different porosities for discrimination of inorganic species. For the river water samples analyzed in the laboratory, less than 45% of the analytes were present in labile forms, with most being organic species. For the in situ measurements, the labile inorganic and organic fractions were larger than those obtained in the laboratory analyses. These differences could have been due to errors incurred during sample collection and storage. All results were consistent with those found using two different methods, namely, solid-phase extraction and the DGT technique employing the apparent diffusion coefficient.

  4. The effect of controlled floods on decadal-scale changes in channel morphology and fine sediment storage in a debris-fan affected river canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, E. R.; Grams, P. E.; Schmidt, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    In 2011, a large magnitude flow release from Flaming Gorge Reservoir resulted in the third highest recorded discharge of the Green River downstream from Flaming Gorge Dam subsequent to its closure in 1963. Following this event, we made measurements of channel geometry, tracer gravel displacement, and sandbar sedimentology at four long-term monitoring reaches within the Canyon of Lodore in Dinosaur National Monument, Colorado. Here we integrate these data with nearly two decades of channel monitoring at these sites, encompassing five controlled floods, and providing a coarse resolution, but coherent, picture of channel response and changes in fine sediment storage in a canyon-bound river. We discuss these results in the context of long-term monitoring of controlled flood response along the Colorado River in Marble and Grand Canyons, Arizona. In Canyon of Lodore, moderate, short-duration controlled floods have had little effect on channel morphology or fine sediment storage. Alternatively, higher magnitude floods approaching the pre-dam mean annual flood, such as in 1999 and 2011, tended to be long duration and scoured fine sediment from the channel bed, in some places up to 5 m, while building eddy sandbars to within a meter of flood stage. This resulted in a net export of sediment from the monitored reaches. Between floods, eddy sand bars erode and the pools fill with fine sediment. We have observed only minor erosion or reworking of gravel bars and channel margin deposits stabilized by vegetation encroachment. The Green River in Canyon of Lodore is a scaled-down version of the Colorado River in debris fan-affected Marble and Grand Canyons. Both rivers now exist in varying degrees of sediment deficit due to upstream reservoirs. Coarse sediment from debris fans and hillslopes limits vertical incision and channel migration, focusing the post-dam geomorphic response to sediment imbalance on fine sediment located in eddy sandbars, pools, and channel margin deposits. In

  5. Dual, differential isotope labeling shows the preferential movement of labile plant constituents into mineral-bonded soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Haddix, Michelle L; Paul, Eldor A; Cotrufo, M Francesca

    2016-06-01

    The formation and stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM) are major concerns in the context of global change for carbon sequestration and soil health. It is presently believed that lignin is not selectively preserved in soil and that chemically labile compounds bonding to minerals comprise a large fraction of the SOM. Labile plant inputs have been suggested to be the main precursor of the mineral-bonded SOM. Litter decomposition and SOM formation are expected to have temperature sensitivity varying with the lability of plant inputs. We tested this framework using dual (13) C and (15) N differentially labeled plant material to distinguish the metabolic and structural components within a single plant material. Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) seedlings were grown in an enriched (13) C and (15) N environment and then prior to harvest, removed from the enriched environment and allowed to incorporate natural abundance (13) C-CO2 and (15) N fertilizer into the metabolic plant components. This enabled us to achieve a greater than one atom % difference in (13) C between the metabolic and structural components within the plant litter. This differentially labeled litter was incubated in soil at 15 and 35 °C, for 386 days with CO2 measured throughout the incubation. After 14, 28, 147, and 386 days of incubation, the soil was subsequently fractionated. There was no difference in temperature sensitivity of the metabolic and structural components with regard to how much was respired or in the amount of litter biomass stabilized. Only the metabolic litter component was found in the sand, silt, or clay fraction while the structural component was exclusively found in the light fraction. These results support the stabilization framework that labile plant components are the main precursor of mineral-associated organic matter. PMID:27142168

  6. CD44 Binding to Hyaluronic Acid Is Redox Regulated by a Labile Disulfide Bond in the Hyaluronic Acid Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Kellett-Clarke, Helena; Stegmann, Monika; Barclay, A. Neil; Metcalfe, Clive

    2015-01-01

    CD44 is the primary leukocyte cell surface receptor for hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix. Enzymatic post translational cleavage of labile disulfide bonds is a mechanism by which proteins are structurally regulated by imparting an allosteric change and altering activity. We have identified one such disulfide bond in CD44 formed by Cys77 and Cys97 that stabilises the HA binding groove. This bond is labile on the surface of leukocytes treated with chemical and enzymatic reducing agents. Analysis of CD44 crystal structures reveal the disulfide bond to be solvent accessible and in the–LH hook configuration characteristic of labile disulfide bonds. Kinetic trapping and binding experiments on CD44-Fc chimeric proteins show the bond is preferentially reduced over the other disulfide bonds in CD44 and reduction inhibits the CD44-HA interaction. Furthermore cells transfected with CD44 no longer adhere to HA coated surfaces after pre-treatment with reducing agents. The implications of CD44 redox regulation are discussed in the context of immune function, disease and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26379032

  7. Labile sleep promotes awareness of abstract knowledge in a serial reaction time task

    PubMed Central

    Kirov, Roumen; Kolev, Vasil; Verleger, Rolf; Yordanova, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Sleep has been identified as a critical brain state enhancing the probability of gaining insight into covert task regularities. Both non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep have been implicated with offline re-activation and reorganization of memories supporting explicit knowledge generation. According to two-stage models of sleep function, offline processing of information during sleep is sequential requiring multiple cycles of NREM and REM sleep stages. However, the role of overnight dynamic sleep macrostructure for insightfulness has not been studied so far. In the present study, we test the hypothesis that the frequency of interactions between NREM and REM sleep stages might be critical for awareness after sleep. For that aim, the rate of sleep stage transitions was evaluated in 53 participants who learned implicitly a serial reaction time task (SRTT) in which a determined sequence was inserted. The amount of explicit knowledge about the sequence was established by verbal recall after a night of sleep following SRTT learning. Polysomnography was recorded in this night and in a control night before and was analyzed to compare the rate of sleep-stage transitions between participants who did or did not gain awareness of task regularity after sleep. Indeed, individual ability of explicit knowledge generation was strongly associated with increased rate of transitions between NREM and REM sleep stages and between light sleep stages and slow wave sleep. However, the rate of NREM–REM transitions specifically predicted the amount of explicit knowledge after sleep in a trait-dependent way. These results demonstrate that enhanced lability of sleep goes along with individual ability of knowledge awareness. Observations suggest that facilitated dynamic interactions between sleep stages, particularly between NREM and REM sleep stages play a role for offline processing which promotes rule extraction and awareness. PMID:26441730

  8. Profiling of structurally labile oxylipins in plants by in situ derivatization with pentafluorobenzyl hydroxylamine.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Birgit; Lauchli, Ryan; Sonwa, Mesmin Mekem; Schmidt, Annika; Boland, Wilhelm

    2006-01-15

    A GC-MS-based method for the simultaneous quantification of common oxylipins along with labile and highly reactive compounds based on in situ derivatization with pentafluorobenzyl hydroxylamine to the corresponding O-2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl oximes (PFB oximes) is presented. The approach covers oxo derivatives such as jasmonic acid (JA), 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA), certain phytoprostanes, unsaturated oxo-acids, oxo-hydroxy acids, and aldehyde fragments from the polar head of fatty acids. In the positive electron impact-MS mode, the PFB oximes display characteristic fragment ions that greatly facilitate the identification of oxylipins in complex matrices. In addition, the fluorinated derivatives allow a highly selective and low-background analysis by negative chemical ionization. Besides showing the general value of the method for the identification of a broad range of oxylipins (18 examples), we also demonstrate sensitivity, linearity, and reproducibility for the quantification of JA, OPDA, 11-oxo-9-undecenoic acid, and 13-oxo-9,11-tridecadienoic acid. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by differential profiling of these four oxylipins in lima bean leaves after mechanical wounding and feeding by the herbivore Spodoptera littoralis. Caterpillar feeding induced several oxylipins, whereas after wounding only the level of JA increased. The rapid in situ derivatization prevents the isomerization of cis-JA to trans-JA. The resting level of JA in lima beans showed an isomer ratio of 80:20 for trans/cis-JA. After wounding, de novo synthesis of JA alters the ratio to 20:80 in favor of the cis isomer.

  9. Kinetics characterization of c-Src binding to lipid membranes: Switching from labile to persistent binding.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Anabel-Lise; Busquets, Maria Antònia; Sagués, Francesc; Pons, Miquel

    2016-02-01

    Cell signaling by the c-Src proto-oncogen requires the attachment of the protein to the inner side of the plasma membrane through the myristoylated N-terminal region, known as the SH4 domain. Additional binding regions of lower affinity are located in the neighbor intrinsically disordered Unique domain and the structured SH3 domain. Here we present a surface plasmon resonance study of the binding of a myristoylated protein including the SH4, Unique and SH3 domains of c-Src to immobilized liposomes. Two distinct binding processes were observed: a fast and a slow one. The second process lead to a persistently bound form (PB) with a slower binding and a much slower dissociation rate than the first one. The association and dissociation of the PB form could be detected using an anti-SH4 antibody. The kinetic analysis revealed that binding of the PB form follows a second order rate law suggesting that it involves the formation of c-Src dimers on the membrane surface. A kinetically equivalent PB form is observed in a myristoylated peptide containing only the SH4 domain but not in a construct including the three domains but with a 12-carbon lauroyl substituent instead of the 14-carbon myristoyl group. The PB form is observed with neutral lipids but its population increases when the immobilized liposomes contain negatively charged lipids. We suggest that the PB form may represent the active signaling form of c-Src while the labile form provides the capacity for fast 2D search of the target signaling site on the membrane surface. PMID:26638178

  10. [Effects of understory removal on soil labile organic carbon pool in a Cinnamomum camphora plantation].

    PubMed

    Wu, Ya-Cong; Li, Zheng-Cai; Cheng, Cai-Fang; Liu, Rong-Jie; Wang, Bin; Geri, Le-Tu

    2013-12-01

    Taking a 48-year-old Cinnamomum camphora plantation in the eastern area of our subtropics as test object, this paper studied the labile organic carbon contents and their ratios to the total organic carbon (TOC) in 0-60 cm soil layer under effects of understory removal (UR). As compared with no understory removal (CK), the soil TOC and easily-oxidized carbon (EOC) contents under UR decreased, with a decrement of 4.8% - 34.1% and 27.1% - 36.2%, respectively, and the TOC and EOC contents had a significant difference in 0-10 cm and 0-20 cm layers, respectively. The water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) (except in 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm layers) and light fraction organic matter (LFOM) under UR increaesd, but the difference was not significant. The ratio of soil WSOC to soil TOC in UR stand was higher than that in CK stand, while the ratio of soil EOC to soil TOC showed an opposite trend. In the two stands, soil WSOC, EOC, and LFOM had significant or extremely significant correlations with soil TOC, and the correlation coefficients of soil EOC and LFOM with soil TOC were higher in UR stand than in CK, but the correlation coefficient between soil WSOC and TOC was in opposite. The soil EOC, LFOM, and TOC in the two stands were significantly or extremely significantly correlated with soil nutrients, but the soil WSOC in UR stand had no significant correlations with soil hydrolyzable N, available P, exchangeable Ca, and exchangeable Mg.

  11. Kinetics characterization of c-Src binding to lipid membranes: Switching from labile to persistent binding.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Anabel-Lise; Busquets, Maria Antònia; Sagués, Francesc; Pons, Miquel

    2016-02-01

    Cell signaling by the c-Src proto-oncogen requires the attachment of the protein to the inner side of the plasma membrane through the myristoylated N-terminal region, known as the SH4 domain. Additional binding regions of lower affinity are located in the neighbor intrinsically disordered Unique domain and the structured SH3 domain. Here we present a surface plasmon resonance study of the binding of a myristoylated protein including the SH4, Unique and SH3 domains of c-Src to immobilized liposomes. Two distinct binding processes were observed: a fast and a slow one. The second process lead to a persistently bound form (PB) with a slower binding and a much slower dissociation rate than the first one. The association and dissociation of the PB form could be detected using an anti-SH4 antibody. The kinetic analysis revealed that binding of the PB form follows a second order rate law suggesting that it involves the formation of c-Src dimers on the membrane surface. A kinetically equivalent PB form is observed in a myristoylated peptide containing only the SH4 domain but not in a construct including the three domains but with a 12-carbon lauroyl substituent instead of the 14-carbon myristoyl group. The PB form is observed with neutral lipids but its population increases when the immobilized liposomes contain negatively charged lipids. We suggest that the PB form may represent the active signaling form of c-Src while the labile form provides the capacity for fast 2D search of the target signaling site on the membrane surface.

  12. Immunological Study of the Heat-Labile Enterotoxins of Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Gyles, Carlton L.

    1974-01-01

    Immunodiffusion experiments were conducted to associate a precipitin line with Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT). Wild strains of porcine and of human enteropathogenic E. coli as well as laboratory-derived enterotoxigenic variants of E. coli K-12 were used for LT antigen preparations. These were produced mainly by ultrafiltration and ammonium sulfate precipitation of broth culture supernatants. When antisera with anti-LT activity were reacted with antigen preparations from Ent+ and Ent− variants of E. coli K-12, a line “a” was given by Ent+ but not by Ent− preparations. Line “a” was removed by absorption of anti-LT serum with antigen preparation from an Ent+E. coli K-12, but was unaffected when the antigen preparation used to absorb the serum was from an Ent−E. coli K-12. A line identical to “a” was given by antigen preparations from wild strains of porcine enteropathogenic E. coli reacted with homologous or heterologous anti-LT sera. One human strain of enteropathogenic E. coli was shown to possess an antigen identical to that which gave rise to line “a.” To demonstrate this line it was necessary to use high concentrations of gammaglobulin and high concentrations of the crude antigen preparations. LT preparations reacted with anticholera toxin to give a line “c,” which showed a reaction of partial identity with line “b” produced by reaction of pure choleragenoid and anticholera toxin. Lines “a” and “c” gave reactions of identity. Images PMID:4206029

  13. Conformational Switching and Nanoscale Assembly of Human Prion Protein into Polymorphic Amyloids via Structurally Labile Oligomers.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Vijit; Arya, Shruti; Bhattacharya, Mily; Mukhopadhyay, Samrat

    2015-12-29

    Conformational switching of the prion protein (PrP) from an α-helical normal cellular form (PrP(C)) to an aggregation-prone and self-propagating β-rich scrapie form (PrP(Sc)) underlies the molecular basis of pathogenesis in prion diseases. Anionic lipids play a critical role in the misfolding and conformational conversion of the membrane-anchored PrP into the amyloidogenic pathological form. In this work, we have used a diverse array of techniques to interrogate the early intermediates during amyloid formation from recombinant human PrP in the presence of a membrane mimetic anionic detergent such as sodium dodecyl sulfate. We have been able to detect and characterize two distinct types of interconvertible oligomers. Our results demonstrate that highly ordered large β-oligomers represent benign off-pathway intermediates that lack the ability to mature into amyloid fibrils. On the contrary, structurally labile small oligomers are capable of switching to an ordered amyloid-state that exhibits profound toxicity to mammalian cells. Our fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements revealed that the partially disordered PrP serves as precursors to small amyloid-competent oligomers. These on-pathway oligomers are eventually sequestered into higher order supramolecular assemblies that conformationally mature into polymorphic amyloids possessing varied nanoscale morphology as evident by the atomic force microscopy imaging. The nanoscale diversity of fibril architecture is attributed to the heterogeneous ensemble of early obligatory oligomers and offers a plausible explanation for the existence of multiple prion strains in vivo. PMID:26645611

  14. Parenteral Adjuvant Effects of an Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Natural Heat-Labile Toxin Variant.

    PubMed

    Braga, Catarina J M; Rodrigues, Juliana F; Medina-Armenteros, Yordanka; Farinha-Arcieri, Luís E; Ventura, Armando M; Boscardin, Silvia B; Sbrogio-Almeida, Maria E; Ferreira, Luís C S

    2014-01-01

    Native type I heat-labile toxins (LTs) produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains exert strong adjuvant effects on both antibody and T cell responses to soluble and particulate antigens following co-administration via mucosal routes. However, inherent enterotoxicity and neurotoxicity (following intra-nasal delivery) had reduced the interest in the use of these toxins as mucosal adjuvants. LTs can also behave as powerful and safe adjuvants following delivery via parenteral routes, particularly for activation of cytotoxic lymphocytes. In the present study, we evaluated the adjuvant effects of a new natural LT polymorphic form (LT2), after delivery via intradermal (i.d.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) routes, with regard to both antibody and T cell responses. A recombinant HIV-1 p24 protein was employed as a model antigen for determination of antigen-specific immune responses while the reference LT (LT1), produced by the ETEC H10407 strain, and a non-toxigenic LT form (LTK63) were employed as previously characterized LT types. LT-treated mice submitted to a four dose-base immunization regimen elicited similar p24-specific serum IgG responses and CD4(+) T cell activation. Nonetheless, mice immunized with LT1 or LT2 induced higher numbers of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells and in vivo cytotoxic responses compared to mice immunized with the non-toxic LT derivative. These effects were correlated with stronger activation of local dendritic cell populations. In addition, mice immunized with LT1 and LT2, but not with LTK63, via s.c. or i.d. routes developed local inflammatory reactions. Altogether, the present results confirmed that the two most prevalent natural polymorphic LT variants (LT1 or LT2) display similar and strong adjuvant effects for subunit vaccines administered via i.d. or s.c. routes.

  15. [Impact of Land Utilization Pattern on Distributing Characters of Labile Organic Carbon in Soil Aggregates in Jinyun Mountain].

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Jiang, Chang-sheng; Hao, Qing-ju

    2015-09-01

    Four land utilization patterns were selected for this study in Jinyun mountain, including subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest (abbreviation: forest), sloping farmland, orchard and abandoned land. Soil samples were taken every 10 cm in the depth of 60 cm soil and proportions of large macroaggregates (> 2 mm), small macroaggregates (0. 25-2 mm), microaggregates (0. 053 - 0. 25 mm) and silt + clay (<0. 053 mm) were obtained by wet sieving method to measure the content of organic carbon and labile organic carbon in each aggregate fraction and analyze impacts of land uses on organic carbon and labile organic carbon of soil aggregates. LOC content of four soil aggregates were significantly reduced with the increase of soil depth; in layers of 0-60 cm soil depth, our results showed that LOC contents of forest and abandoned land were higher than orchard and sloping farmland. Reserves of labile organic carbon were estimated by the same soil quality, it revealed that forest (3. 68 Mg.hm-2) > abandoned land (1. 73 Mg.hm-2) > orchard (1. 43 Mg.hm-2) >sloping farmland (0.54 Mg.hm-2) in large macroaggregates, abandoned land (7.77, 5. 01 Mg.hm-2) > forest (4. 96, 2.71 Mg.hm-2) > orchard (3. 33, 21. 10 Mg.hm-2) > sloping farmland (1. 68, 1. 35 Mg.hm-2) in small macroaggregates and microaggregates, and abandoned land(4. 32 Mg.hm-2) > orchard(4. 00 Mg.hm-2) > forest(3. 22 Mg.hm-2) > sloping farmland (2.37 Mg.hm-2) in silt + clay, forest and abandoned land were higher than orchard and sloping farmland in other three soil aggregates except silt + clay. It was observed that the level of organic carbon and labile organic carbon were decreased when bringing forest under cultivation to orchard or farmland, and augments on organic carbon and labile organic carbon were found after exchanging farmland to abandoned land. The most reverses of forest and abandoned land emerged in small macroaggregates, orchard and sloping farmland were in microaggregates. That was, during the

  16. [Impact of Land Utilization Pattern on Distributing Characters of Labile Organic Carbon in Soil Aggregates in Jinyun Mountain].

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Jiang, Chang-sheng; Hao, Qing-ju

    2015-09-01

    Four land utilization patterns were selected for this study in Jinyun mountain, including subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest (abbreviation: forest), sloping farmland, orchard and abandoned land. Soil samples were taken every 10 cm in the depth of 60 cm soil and proportions of large macroaggregates (> 2 mm), small macroaggregates (0. 25-2 mm), microaggregates (0. 053 - 0. 25 mm) and silt + clay (<0. 053 mm) were obtained by wet sieving method to measure the content of organic carbon and labile organic carbon in each aggregate fraction and analyze impacts of land uses on organic carbon and labile organic carbon of soil aggregates. LOC content of four soil aggregates were significantly reduced with the increase of soil depth; in layers of 0-60 cm soil depth, our results showed that LOC contents of forest and abandoned land were higher than orchard and sloping farmland. Reserves of labile organic carbon were estimated by the same soil quality, it revealed that forest (3. 68 Mg.hm-2) > abandoned land (1. 73 Mg.hm-2) > orchard (1. 43 Mg.hm-2) >sloping farmland (0.54 Mg.hm-2) in large macroaggregates, abandoned land (7.77, 5. 01 Mg.hm-2) > forest (4. 96, 2.71 Mg.hm-2) > orchard (3. 33, 21. 10 Mg.hm-2) > sloping farmland (1. 68, 1. 35 Mg.hm-2) in small macroaggregates and microaggregates, and abandoned land(4. 32 Mg.hm-2) > orchard(4. 00 Mg.hm-2) > forest(3. 22 Mg.hm-2) > sloping farmland (2.37 Mg.hm-2) in silt + clay, forest and abandoned land were higher than orchard and sloping farmland in other three soil aggregates except silt + clay. It was observed that the level of organic carbon and labile organic carbon were decreased when bringing forest under cultivation to orchard or farmland, and augments on organic carbon and labile organic carbon were found after exchanging farmland to abandoned land. The most reverses of forest and abandoned land emerged in small macroaggregates, orchard and sloping farmland were in microaggregates. That was, during the

  17. A reciprocal allosteric mechanism for efficient transfer of labile intermediates between active sites in CAD, the mammalian pyrimidine-biosynthetic multienzyme polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Irvine, H S; Shaw, S M; Paton, A; Carrey, E A

    1997-08-01

    Carbamoyl phosphate is the product of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS II) activity and the substrate of the aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) activity, each of which is found in CAD, a large 240-kDa multienzyme polypeptide in mammals that catalyses the first three steps in pyrimidine biosynthesis. In our study of the transfer of the labile intermediate between the two active sites, we have used assays that differentiate the synthesis of carbamoyl phosphate from the overall reaction of CPS II and ATCase that produces carbamoyl aspartate. We provided excess exogenous carbamoyl phosphate and monitored its access to the respective active sites through the production of carbamoyl phosphate and carbamoyl aspartate from radiolabelled bicarbonate. Three features indicate interactions between the folded CPS II and ATCase domains causing reciprocal conformational changes. First, even in the presence of approximately 1 mM unlabelled carbamoyl phosphate, when the aspartate concentration is high ATCase uses endogenous carbamoyl phosphate for the synthesis of radiolabelled carbamoyl aspartate. In contrast, the isolated CPS II forward reaction is inhibited by excess unlabelled carbamoyl phosphate. Secondly, the affinity of the ATCase for carbamoyl phosphate and aspartate is modulated when substrates bind to CPS II. Thirdly, the transition-state analogue phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate is a less efficient inhibitor of the ATCase when the substrates for CPS II are present. All these effects operate when CPS II is in the more active P state, which is induced by high concentrations of ATP and magnesium ions and when 5'-phosphoribosyl diphosphate (the allosteric activator) is present with low concentrations of ATP; these are conditions that would be met during active biosynthesis in the cell. We propose a phenomenon of reciprocal allostery that encourages the efficient transfer of the labile intermediate within the multienzyme polypeptide CAD. In this model, binding of aspartate to

  18. Bipolar Mass Spectrometry of Labile Coordination Complexes, Redox Active Inorganic Compounds, and Proteins Using a Glass Nebulizer for Sonic-Spray Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonakis, Manolis M.; Tsirigotaki, Alexandra; Kanaki, Katerina; Milios, Constantinos J.; Pergantis, Spiros A.

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we report on the development of a novel nebulizer configuration for sonic-spray ionization (SSI) mass spectrometry (MS), more specifically for a version of SSI that is referred to as Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization (V-EASI) MS. The developed nebulizer configuration is based on a commercially available pneumatic glass nebulizer that has been used extensively for aerosol formation in atomic spectrometry. In the present study, the nebulizer was modified in order to achieve efficient V-EASI-MS operation. Upon evaluating this system, it has been demonstrated that V-EASI-MS offers some distinct advantages for the analysis of coordination compounds and redox active inorganic compounds over the predominantly used electrospray ionization (ESI) technique. Such advantages, for this type of compounds, are demonstrated here for the first time. More specifically, a series of labile heptanuclear heterometallic [CuII 6LnIII] clusters held together with artificial amino acid ligands, in addition to easily oxidized inorganic oxyanions of selenium and arsenic, were analyzed. The observed advantages pertain to V-EASI appearing to be a "milder" ionization source than ESI, not requiring electrical potentials for gas phase ion formation, thus eliminating the possibility of unwanted redox transformations, allowing for the "simultaneous" detection of negative and positive ions (bipolar analysis) without the need to change source ionization conditions, and also not requiring the use of syringes and delivery pumps. Because of such features, especially because of the absence of ionization potentials, EASI can be operated with minimal requirements for source parameter optimization. We observed that source temperature and accelerating voltage do not seem to affect labile compounds to the extent they do in ESI-MS. In addition, bipolar analysis of proteins was demonstrated here by acquiring both positive and negative ion mass spectra from the same protein solutions

  19. Bipolar mass spectrometry of labile coordination complexes, redox active inorganic compounds, and proteins using a glass nebulizer for sonic-spray ionization.

    PubMed

    Antonakis, Manolis M; Tsirigotaki, Alexandra; Kanaki, Katerina; Milios, Constantinos J; Pergantis, Spiros A

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we report on the development of a novel nebulizer configuration for sonic-spray ionization (SSI) mass spectrometry (MS), more specifically for a version of SSI that is referred to as Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization (V-EASI) MS. The developed nebulizer configuration is based on a commercially available pneumatic glass nebulizer that has been used extensively for aerosol formation in atomic spectrometry. In the present study, the nebulizer was modified in order to achieve efficient V-EASI-MS operation. Upon evaluating this system, it has been demonstrated that V-EASI-MS offers some distinct advantages for the analysis of coordination compounds and redox active inorganic compounds over the predominantly used electrospray ionization (ESI) technique. Such advantages, for this type of compounds, are demonstrated here for the first time. More specifically, a series of labile heptanuclear heterometallic [Cu(II) 6Ln(III)] clusters held together with artificial amino acid ligands, in addition to easily oxidized inorganic oxyanions of selenium and arsenic, were analyzed. The observed advantages pertain to V-EASI appearing to be a "milder" ionization source than ESI, not requiring electrical potentials for gas phase ion formation, thus eliminating the possibility of unwanted redox transformations, allowing for the "simultaneous" detection of negative and positive ions (bipolar analysis) without the need to change source ionization conditions, and also not requiring the use of syringes and delivery pumps. Because of such features, especially because of the absence of ionization potentials, EASI can be operated with minimal requirements for source parameter optimization. We observed that source temperature and accelerating voltage do not seem to affect labile compounds to the extent they do in ESI-MS. In addition, bipolar analysis of proteins was demonstrated here by acquiring both positive and negative ion mass spectra from the same protein solutions

  20. Dissolved and labile concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in the South Fork Coeur d'Alene River, Idaho: Comparisons among chemical equilibrium models and implications for biotic ligand models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balistrieri, L.S.; Blank, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    In order to evaluate thermodynamic speciation calculations inherent in biotic ligand models, the speciation of dissolved Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in aquatic systems influenced by historical mining activities is examined using equilibrium computer models and the diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique. Several metal/organic-matter complexation models, including WHAM VI, NICA-Donnan, and Stockholm Humic model (SHM), are used in combination with inorganic speciation models to calculate the thermodynamic speciation of dissolved metals and concentrations of metal associated with biotic ligands (e.g., fish gills). Maximum dynamic metal concentrations, determined from total dissolved metal concentrations and thermodynamic speciation calculations, are compared with labile metal concentrations measured by DGT to assess which metal/organic-matter complexation model best describes metal speciation and, thereby, biotic ligand speciation, in the studied systems. Results indicate that the choice of model that defines metal/organic-matter interactions does not affect calculated concentrations of Cd and Zn associated with biotic ligands for geochemical conditions in the study area, whereas concentrations of Cu and Pb associated with biotic ligands depend on whether the speciation calculations use WHAM VI, NICA-Donnan, or SHM. Agreement between labile metal concentrations and dynamic metal concentrations occurs when WHAM VI is used to calculate Cu speciation and SHM is used to calculate Pb speciation. Additional work in systems that contain wide ranges in concentrations of multiple metals should incorporate analytical speciation methods, such as DGT, to constrain the speciation component of biotic ligand models. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. The mechanism of stereospecific C-H oxidation by Fe(Pytacn) complexes: bioinspired non-heme iron catalysts containing cis-labile exchangeable sites.

    PubMed

    Prat, Irene; Company, Anna; Postils, Verònica; Ribas, Xavi; Que, Lawrence; Luis, Josep M; Costas, Miquel

    2013-05-17

    A detailed mechanistic study of the hydroxylation of alkane C-H bonds using H2O2 by a family of mononuclear non heme iron catalysts with the formula [Fe(II)(CF3SO3)2(L)] is described, in which L is a tetradentate ligand containing a triazacyclononane tripod and a pyridine ring bearing different substituents at the α and γ positions, which tune the electronic or steric properties of the corresponding iron complexes. Two inequivalent cis-labile exchangeable sites, occupied by triflate ions, complete the octahedral iron coordination sphere. The C-H hydroxylation mediated by this family of complexes takes place with retention of configuration. Oxygen atoms from water are incorporated into hydroxylated products and the extent of this incorporation depends in a systematic manner on the nature of the catalyst, and the substrate. Mechanistic probes and isotopic analyses, in combination with detailed density functional theory (DFT) calculations, provide strong evidence that C-H hydroxylation is performed by highly electrophilic [Fe(V)(O)(OH)L] species through a concerted asynchronous mechanism, involving homolytic breakage of the C-H bond, followed by rebound of the hydroxyl ligand. The [Fe(V)(O)(OH)L] species can exist in two tautomeric forms, differing in the position of oxo and hydroxide ligands. Isotopic-labeling analysis shows that the relative reactivities of the two tautomeric forms are sensitively affected by the α substituent of the pyridine, and this reactivity behavior is rationalized by computational methods.

  2. The distance of visual targets affects the spatial magnitude and multifractal scaling of standing body sway in younger and older adults.

    PubMed

    Munafo, Justin; Curry, Christopher; Wade, Michael G; Stoffregen, Thomas A

    2016-09-01

    The spatial magnitude of standing body sway is greater during viewing of more distant targets and reduced when viewing nearby targets. Classical interpretations of this effect are based on the projective geometry of changes in visual stimulation that are brought about by body sway. Such explanations do not motivate predictions about the temporal dynamics of body sway. We asked whether the distance of visible targets would affect both the spatial magnitude and the multifractality of standing body sway. It has been suggested that the multifractality of movement may change with age. Separately, previous research has not addressed the effects of target distance on postural sway in older adults. For these reasons, we crossed our variation in target distance with variation in age. In an open-air setting, we measured standing body sway in younger and older adults while looking at visual targets that were placed at three distances. The distance of visual targets affected the spatial magnitude of body sway in younger adults, replicating past studies. Target distance also affected the spatial magnitude of sway in older adults, confirming that this relation persists despite other age-related changes. Target distance also affected the multifractality of body sway, but this effect was modulated by age. Finally, the width of the multifractal spectrum was greater for older adults than for younger adults, revealing that healthy aging can affect the multifractality of movement. These findings reveal similarities and differences between the spatial magnitude and the multifractality of human movement. PMID:27255223

  3. Detection of Labile Low-Molecular-Mass Transition Metal Complexes in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Sean P.; Moore, Michael J.; Lindahl, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid chromatography was used with an on-line inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer to detect low-molecular-mass (LMM) transition metal complexes in mitochondria isolated from fermenting yeast cells, human Jurkat cells, and mouse brain and liver. These complexes constituted 20 – 40% of total mitochondrial Mn, Fe, Zn, and Cu ions. The major LMM Mn complex in yeast mitochondria had a mass of ca. 1100 Da and a concentration of ~ 2 μM. Mammalian mitochondria contained a second Mn species with a mass of ca. 2000 Da at a comparable concentration. The major Fe complex in mitochondria isolated from exponentially growing yeast cells had a mass of ca. 580 Da; the concentration of Fe580 in mitochondria was ca. 100 μM. When mitochondria were isolated from fermenting cells in post-exponential phase, the mass of the dominant LMM Fe complex was ca. 1100 Da. Upon incubation, the intensity of Fe1100 declined and Fe580 increased, suggesting that the two are interrelated. Mammalian mitochondria contained Fe580 and 2 other Fe species (Fe2000 and Fe1100) at concentrations of ca. 50 μM each. The dominant LMM Zn species in mitochondria had a mass of ca. 1200 Da and a concentration of ca. 110 μM. Mammalian mitochondria contained a second major LMM Zn species at 1500 Da. The dominant LMM Cu species in yeast mitochondria had a mass of ca. 5000 Da and a concentration in yeast mitochondria of ca. 16 μM; Cu5000 was not observed in mammalian mitochondria. The dominant Co species in mitochondria, Co1200, had a concentration of 20 nM and was probably a cobalamin. Mammalian but not yeast mitochondria contained a LMM Mo species, Mo730, at ca. 1 μM concentration. Increasing Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn concentrations 10 fold in the medium increased the concentration of the same element in the corresponding isolated mitochondria. Treatment with metal chelators confirmed that these LMM species were labile. The dominant S species at 1100 Da was not free GSH or GSSG. PMID:26018429

  4. Stabilization of labile organic C along a chronosequence of soil development: mineralogical vs. biological controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, J. W.; Waldrop, M. P.; Strawn, D.; Harden, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    age class. In similar studies, soils containing a higher proportion of poorly crystalline minerals typically have a higher degree of hydration, surface area, and variable charge, which can increase microbial yield, reducing the amount of CO2 produced per unit biomass and increasing potential for soil C sequestration. Additionally, total flux of 13CO2 was significantly higher and recovery of 13C in microbial pools trended lower for the phenolic than for glucose for all soils types excluding the 24ka terrace. The broader implication, which may warrant consideration in models of terrestrial C flux, is that altering the constituency of labile C inputs to these soil environments could similarly influence the degree to which C is stabilized in soil mineral assemblages.

  5. Effects of composition of labile organic matter on biogenic production of methane in the coastal sediments of the Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Maria-Judith; Fernandes, Christabelle E G; Fernandes, Sheryl Oliveira; Kirchman, David L; Bharathi, P A Loka

    2011-11-01

    Coastal regions are potential zones for production of methane which could be governed by ecological/environmental differences or even sediment properties of a niche. In order to test the hypothesis that methanogenesis in most marine sediments could be driven more by proteins than by carbohydrates and lipid content of labile organic matter (LOM), incubation experiments were carried out with sediments from different environmental niches to measure methane production. The methane production rates were examined in relationship to the sediment biochemistry, i.e., carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids. The gas production measured by head space method ranged from 216 ng g( -1) day( -1) in the mangrove sediments to 3.1 μg g( -1) day( -1) in the shallow Arabian Sea. LOM ranged from 1.56 to 2.85 mg g( -1) in the shallow Arabian Sea, from 3.35 to 5.43 mg g( -1) in the mangrove estuary, and from 0.66 to 0.70 mg g( -1) in the sandy sediments with proteins contributing maximum to the LOM pool. Proteins influenced methane production in the clayey sediments of shallow depths of the Arabian Sea (r = 0.933, p < 0.001) and mangrove estuary (r = 0.981, p < 0.001) but in the sandy beach sediments, carbohydrates (r = 0.924, p < 0.001) governed the net methane production. The gas production was more pronounced in shallow and surface sediments and it decreased with depth apparently governed by the decrease in lability index. Thus, the lability index and protein content are important factors that determine methane production rates in these coastal ecosystems.

  6. Differences in dissolved organic matter lability between alpine glaciers and alpine rock glaciers of the American West

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, E.; Fegel, T. S., II; Baron, J.; Boot, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    While alpine glaciers in montane regions represent the largest flux of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from global ice melt no research has examined the bioavailability of DOM melted out of glacial ice in the western continental United States. Furthermore, rock glaciers are an order of magnitude more abundant than ice glaciers in U.S., yet are not included in budgets for perennial ice carbon stores. Our research aims to understand differences in the bioavailability of carbon from ice glaciers and rock glaciers along the Central Rocky Mountains of Colorado. Identical microbial communities were fed standardized amounts of DOM from four different ice glacier-rock glaciers pairs. Using laboratory incubations, paired with mass spectrometry based metabolomics and 16S gene sequencing; we were able to examine functional definitions of DOM lability in glacial ice. We hypothesized that even though DOM quantities are similar in the outputs of both glacial types in our study area, ice glacial DOM would be more bioavailable than DOM from rock glaciers due to higher proportions of byproducts from microbial metabolism than rock glacier DOM, which has higher amounts of "recalcitrant" plant material. Our results show that DOM from ice glaciers is more labile than DOM from geologically and geographically similar paired rock glaciers. Ice glacier DOM represents an important pool of labile carbon to headwater ecosystems of the Rocky Mountains. Metabolomic analysis shows numerous compounds from varying metabolite pathways, including byproducts of nitrification before and after incubation, meaning that, similar to large maritime glaciers in Alaska and Europe, subglacial environments in the mountain ranges of the United States are hotspots for biological activity and processing of organic carbon.

  7. Induction of heat-labile sites in DNA of mammalian cells by the antitumor alkylating drug CC-1065

    SciTech Connect

    Zsido, T.J.; Woynarowski, J.M.; Baker, R.M.; Gawron, L.S.; Beerman, T.A. )

    1991-04-16

    CC-1065 is a very potent antitumor antibiotic capable of covalent and noncovalent binding to the minor groove of naked DNA. Upon thermal treatment, covalent adducts formed between CC-1065 and DNA generate strand break. The authors have shown that this molecular damage can be detected following CC-1065 treatment of mammalian whole cells. Using alkaline sucrose gradient analysis, They observe thermally induced breakage of ({sup 14}C)thymidine-prelabeled DNA from drug-treated African green monkey kidney BSC-1 cells. Very little damage to cellular DNA by CC-1065 can be detected without first heating the drug-treated samples. CC-1065 can also generate heat-labile sites within DNA during cell lysis and heating, subsequent to the exposure of cells to drug, suggesting that a pool of free and noncovalently bound drug is available for posttreatment adduct formation. This effect was controlled for by mixing ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled untreated cells with the ({sup 14}C)thymidine-labeled drug-treated samples. The lowest drug dose at which heat-labile sites were detected was 3 nM CC-1065 (3 single-stranded breaks/10{sup 6} base pairs). This concentration reduced survival of BSC-1 cells to 0.1% in cytotoxicity assays. The generation of CC-1065-induced lesions in cellular DNA is time dependent (the frequency of lesions caused by a 60 nM treatment reaching a plateau at 2 h) and is not readily reversible. The results of this study demonstrate that CC-1065 does generate heat-labile sites with the cellular DNA of intact cells and suggest that a mechanism of cytotoxic action of CC-1065 involves formation of covalent adducts to DNA.

  8. Synthesis of Acid-Labile PEG and PEG-Doxorubicin-Conjugate Nanoparticles via Brush-First ROMP

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A panel of acid-labile bis-norbornene cross-linkers was synthesized and evaluated for the formation of acid-degradable brush-arm star polymers (BASPs) via the brush-first ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) method. An acetal-based cross-linker was identified that, when employed in conjunction with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) macromonomer, provided highly controlled BASP formation reactions. A combination of this new cross-linker with a novel doxorubicin (DOX)-branch-PEG macromonomer provided BASPs that simultaneously degrade and release cytotoxic DOX in vitro. PMID:25243099

  9. Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia in Taiwan due to an antibody against a labile component of HPA-3a (Baka).

    PubMed

    Lin, M; Shieh, S H; Liang, D C; Yang, T F; Shibata, Y

    1995-01-01

    We report on two siblings who developed severe neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT) due to an alloantibody against a labile component or components of the HPA-3a (Baka) antigen. The antibody reacted only with fresh, unfixed platelets by the solid-phase red cell adherence test, immunofluorescence test and mixed passive haemagglutination test. In the latter method, weakly fixed platelets also gave a weak positive reaction. Monoclonal-antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigens and immunoblotting tests gave negative results. Our findings may possibly help to explain why in some cases of NAIT no platelet-specific antibody is demonstrable in tests with fixed or solubilized platelets.

  10. The Stable and Radio- Carbon Isotopic Content of Labile and Refractory Carbon in Atmospheric Particulate Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNichol, A. P.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Gerlach, D. S.; Hayes, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    Studies of the isotopic content of atmospheric particulate matter are hampered by difficulties in chemically defining the pools of carbon and analytically isolating the different pools. We are conducting studies on reference materials and atmospheric aerosol samples to develop a method to measure stable and radio- carbon isotopes on the labile and refractory carbon. We are using a flow-through combustion system that allows us to combust, collect and measure the isotopic content of the gases produced at all stages of heating/oxidizing. We compare our results to those measured using a chemothermal oxidation method (CTO) (Gustafsson et al., 2001). In this method, refractory carbon is defined as the material remaining after pre- combusting a sample at 375°C in the presence of oxygen for 24 hours. The reference materials are diesel soot, apple leaves and a hybrid of the two (DiesApple), all from NIST. These provide carbon with two well-defined fractions -- the soot provides refractory carbon that is radiocarbon dead and the apple leaves provide organic carbon that is radiocarbon modern. Radiocarbon results from DiesApple indicate that the "refractory" carbon defined by the CTO method is actually a mixture of old and modern carbon that contains over 25% modern carbon. This suggests that charred material formed from the apples leaves during the pre-combustion step is contributing to the fraction we identify as refractory carbon. We are studying this by analyzing the individual materials and the mixture using our flow-through system. First results with this system indicate that the refractory fraction trapped from the DiesApple contains much less modern carbon than the CTO method, less than 7%. We will present detailed concentration and isotopic results of the generation of carbon dioxide during programmed combustion of each of the reference materials. We studied the radiocarbon content of both the total carbon (TC) and refractory carbon in the fine particulate matter (PM

  11. Argon direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry in conjunction with makeup solvents: a method for analysis of labile compounds.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongmei; Wan, Debin; Song, Fengrui; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2013-02-01

    Helium direct analysis in real time (He-DART) mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of labile compounds usually tends to be challenging because of the occurrence of prominent fragmentation, which obscures the assigning of an ion to an independent species or merely a fragment in a mixture. In the present work, argon DART (Ar-DART) MS in conjunction with makeup solvents has been demonstrated to analyze a variety of labile compounds including nucleosides, alkaloids, glucose, and other small molecules. The results presented here confirm that Ar-DART can generate significantly less energetic ions than conventional He-DART and is able to produce the intact molecular ions with little or no fragmentation in both positive and negative ion modes. Adding a makeup solvent (absolute ethyl alcohol, methanol, fluorobenzene, or acetone) to the argon gas stream at the exit of the DART ion source can result in 1-2 orders of magnitude increase in detection signals. The sensitivity attainable by Ar-DART was found to be comparable to that by He-DART. The investigation of influence of solvents improves our understanding of the fundamental desorption and ionization processes in DART. The practical application of this rapid and high throughput method is demonstrated by the successful analysis of a natural product (Crude Kusnezoff Monkshood) extract, demonstrating the great potential in mixture research.

  12. Unifying soil respiration pulses, inhibition, and temperature hysteresis through dynamics of labile soil carbon and O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, P. Y.; Grantz, D. A.; Chatterjee, A.; Eberwein, J. E.; Allsman, L. A.; Jenerette, G. D.

    2014-04-01

    Event-driven and diel dynamics of soil respiration (Rs) strongly influence terrestrial carbon (C) emissions and are difficult to predict. Wetting events may cause a large pulse or strong inhibition of Rs. Complex diel dynamics include hysteresis in the relationship between Rs and soil temperature. The mechanistic basis for these dynamics is not well understood, resulting in large discrepancies between predicted and observed Rs. We present a unifying approach for interpreting these phenomena in a hot arid agricultural environment. We performed a whole ecosystem wetting experiment with continuous measurement of Rs to study pulse responses to wetting in a heterotrophic system. We also investigated Rs during cultivation of Sorghum bicolor to evaluate the role of photosynthetic C in the regulation of diel variation in Rs. Finally, we adapted a Rs model with sensitivity to soil O2 and water content by incorporating two soil C pools differing in lability. We observed a large wetting-induced pulse of Rs from the fallow field and were able to accurately simulate the pulse via release of labile soil C. During the exponential phase of plant growth, Rs was inhibited in response to wetting, which was accurately simulated through depletion of soil O2. Without plants, hysteresis was not observed; however, with growing plants, an increasingly significant counterclockwise hysteresis developed. Hysteresis was simulated via a dynamic photosynthetic C pool and was not likely controlled by physical processes. These results help characterize the complex regulation of Rs and improve understanding of these phenomena under warmer and more variable conditions.

  13. Labile pyrogenic dissolved organic carbon in major Siberian Arctic rivers: Implications for wildfire-stream metabolic linkages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers-Pigg, Allison N.; Louchouarn, Patrick; Amon, Rainer M. W.; Prokushkin, Anatoly; Pierce, Kayce; Rubtsov, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    burning produces a spectrum of thermally altered materials that releases pyrogenic carbon (PyC) to terrestrial, atmospheric, and aquatic systems. Most studies focus on the refractory end of the PyC spectrum, derived from middle- to high-temperature combustion. Low-temperature PyC is produced during wildfires and has been found to be particularly labile and water soluble. Here we find that in each of the major Siberian watersheds, low-temperature fire-derived biomarkers are present in detectable concentrations during all flow regimes of the 2004-2006 sampling period, confirming that PyC is an intrinsic component of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool mobilized by hydrologic events. Gymnosperm combustion, from the southern portions of these watersheds, is the primary source of this Py-DOC input. Using first-order degradation rates and transit times of water through these rivers, about half of the total estimated flux of this material may be remineralized during transport from fire source to river mouth (20-40 days), demonstrating the input of a labile source of PyC to these watersheds.

  14. Rapid and nondestructive measurement of labile Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb and As in DGT by using field portable-XRF.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheng; Williams, Paul N; Zhang, Hao

    2013-09-01

    The technique of diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) is often employed to quantify labile metals in situ; however, it is a challenge to perform the measurements in-field. This study evaluated the capability of field-portable X-ray fluorescence (FP-XRF) to swiftly generate elemental speciation information with DGT. Biologically available metal ions in environmental samples passively preconcentrate in the thin films of DGT devices, providing an ideal and uniform matrix for XRF nondestructive detection. Strong correlation coefficients (r > 0.992 for Mn, Cu, Zn, Pb and As) were obtained for all elements during calibration. The limits of quantitation (LOQ) for the investigated elements of FP-XRF on DGT devices are 2.74 for Mn, 4.89 for Cu, 2.89 for Zn, 2.55 for Pb, and 0.48 for As (unit: μg cm(-2)). When Pb and As co-existed in the solution trials, As did not interfere with Pb detection when using Chelex-DGT. However, there was a significant enhancement of the Pb reading attributed to As when ferrihydrite binding gels were tested, consistent with Fe-oxyhydroxide surfaces absorbing large quantities of As. This study demonstrates the value of the FP-XRF technique to rapidly and nondestructively detect the metals accumulated in DGT devices, providing a new and simple diagnostic tool for on-site environmental monitoring of labile metals/metalloids.

  15. Second international round robin for the quantification of serum non-transferrin-bound iron and labile plasma iron in patients with iron-overload disorders.

    PubMed

    de Swart, Louise; Hendriks, Jan C M; van der Vorm, Lisa N; Cabantchik, Z Ioav; Evans, Patricia J; Hod, Eldad A; Brittenham, Gary M; Furman, Yael; Wojczyk, Boguslaw; Janssen, Mirian C H; Porter, John B; Mattijssen, Vera E J M; Biemond, Bart J; MacKenzie, Marius A; Origa, Raffaella; Galanello, Renzo; Hider, Robert C; Swinkels, Dorine W

    2016-01-01

    Non-transferrin-bound iron and its labile (redox active) plasma iron component are thought to be potentially toxic forms of iron originally identified in the serum of patients with iron overload. We compared ten worldwide leading assays (6 for non-transferrin-bound iron and 4 for labile plasma iron) as part of an international inter-laboratory study. Serum samples from 60 patients with four different iron-overload disorders in various treatment phases were coded and sent in duplicate for analysis to five different laboratories worldwide. Some laboratories provided multiple assays. Overall, highest assay levels were observed for patients with untreated hereditary hemochromatosis and β-thalassemia intermedia, patients with transfusion-dependent myelodysplastic syndromes and patients with transfusion-dependent and chelated β-thalassemia major. Absolute levels differed considerably between assays and were lower for labile plasma iron than for non-transferrin-bound iron. Four assays also reported negative values. Assays were reproducible with high between-sample and low within-sample variation. Assays correlated and correlations were highest within the group of non-transferrin-bound iron assays and within that of labile plasma iron assays. Increased transferrin saturation, but not ferritin, was a good indicator of the presence of forms of circulating non-transferrin-bound iron. The possibility of using non-transferrin-bound iron and labile plasma iron measures as clinical indicators of overt iron overload and/or of treatment efficacy would largely depend on the rigorous validation and standardization of assays.

  16. Intracellular labile iron determines H2O2-induced apoptotic signaling via sustained activation of ASK1/JNK-p38 axis.

    PubMed

    Mantzaris, M D; Bellou, S; Skiada, V; Kitsati, N; Fotsis, T; Galaris, D

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) acts as a second messenger in signal transduction participating in several redox regulated pathways, including cytokine and growth factor stimulated signals. However, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying these processes remain poorly understood and require further investigation. In this work, using Jurkat T lymphoma cells and primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells, it was observed that changes in intracellular "labile iron" were able to modulate signal transduction in H2O2-induced apoptosis. Chelation of intracellular labile iron by desferrioxamine rendered cells resistant to H2O2-induced apoptosis. In order to identify the exact points of iron action, we investigated selected steps in H2O2-mediated apoptotic pathway, focusing on mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) JNK, p38 and ERK. It was observed that spatiotemporal changes in intracellular labile iron, induced by H2O2, influenced the oxidation pattern of the upstream MAP3K ASK1 and promoted the sustained activation of JNK-p38 axis in a defined time-dependent context. Moreover, we indicate that H2O2 induced spatiotemporal changes in intracellular labile iron, at least in part, by triggering the destabilization of lysosomal compartments, promoting a concomitant early response in proteins of iron homeostasis. These results raise the possibility that iron-mediated oxidation of distinct proteins may be implicated in redox signaling processes. Since labile iron can be pharmacologically modified in vivo, it may represent a promising target for therapeutic interventions in related pathological conditions.

  17. Nano-size scaling of alloy intra-particle vs. inter-particle separation transitions: prediction of distinctly interface-affected critical behaviour.

    PubMed

    Polak, M; Rubinovich, L

    2016-07-21

    Phase-separation second-order transitions in binary alloy particles consisting of ∼1000 up to ∼70 000 atoms (∼1-10 nm) are modeled focusing on the unexplored issue of finite-size scaling in such systems, particularly on evaluation of correlation-length critical exponents. Our statistical-thermodynamic approach is based on mean-field analytical expression for the Ising model free energy that facilitates highly efficient computations furnishing comprehensive data for fcc rectangular nanoparticles (NPs). These are summed up in intra- and inter-particle scaling plots as well as in nanophase separation diagrams. Temperature-induced variations in the interface thickness in Janus-type intra-particle configurations and NP size-dependent shifts in the critical temperature of their transition to solid-solution reflect power-law behavior with the same critical exponent, ν = 0.83. It is attributed to dominant interfacial effects that are absent in inter-particle transitions. Variations in ν with nano-size, as revealed by a refined analysis, are linearly extrapolated in order to bridge the gap to larger particles within and well beyond the nanoscale, ultimately yielding ν = 1.0. Besides these findings, the study indicates the key role of the surface-area to volume ratio as an effective linear size, revealing a universal, particle-shape independent, nanoscaling of the critical-temperature shifts. PMID:27338842

  18. How much do tides affect the circulation of the Mediterranean Sea? From local processes in the Strait of Gibraltar to basin-scale effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, C.; Garcia-Lafuente, J.; Sannino, G.; Sanchez-Garrido, J. C.

    2014-09-01

    The effects of tidal forcing on the exchange flow through the Strait of Gibraltar and the circulation in the near-field region are revisited with a regional numerical model. Also a basin-scale model run is conducted in a first attempt to assess the impact of these local processes on the Western Mediterranean thermohaline circulation. In the Strait of Gibraltar, tides are found to (1) increase the exchange flow volume transport, (2) modify the hydrological properties of Atlantic inflowing waters through the enhancement of mixing, and (3) facilitate the drainage of Mediterranean deep water. In the far-field, the model reveals that these local processes can favor deep convection in the Gulf of Lion. Some thoughts are provided offering possible explanations.

  19. Small-scale patterns in snowmelt timing affect gene flow and the distribution of genetic diversity in the alpine dwarf shrub Salix herbacea.

    PubMed

    Cortés, A J; Waeber, S; Lexer, C; Sedlacek, J; Wheeler, J A; van Kleunen, M; Bossdorf, O; Hoch, G; Rixen, C; Wipf, S; Karrenberg, S

    2014-09-01

    Current threats to biodiversity, such as climate change, are thought to alter the within-species genetic diversity among microhabitats in highly heterogeneous alpine environments. Assessing the spatial organization and dynamics of genetic diversity within species can help to predict the responses of organisms to environmental change. In this study, we evaluated whether small-scale heterogeneity in snowmelt timing restricts gene flow between microhabitats in the common long-lived dwarf shrub Salix herbacea L. We surveyed 273 genets across 12 early- and late-snowmelt sites (that is, ridges and snowbeds) in the Swiss Alps for phenological variation over 2 years and for genetic variation using seven SSR markers. Phenological differentiation triggered by differences in snowmelt timing did not correlate with genetic differentiation between microhabitats. On the contrary, extensive gene flow appeared to occur between microhabitats and slightly less extensively among adjacent mountains. However, ridges exhibited significantly lower levels of genetic diversity than snowbeds, and patterns of effective population size (Ne) and migration (Nem) between microhabitats were strongly asymmetric, with ridges acting as sources and snowbeds as sinks. As no recent genetic bottlenecks were detected in the studied sites, this asymmetry is likely to reflect current meta-population dynamics of the species dominated by gene flow via seeds rather than ancient re-colonization after the last glacial period. Overall, our results suggest that seed dispersal prevents snowmelt-driven genetic isolation, and snowbeds act as sinks of genetic diversity. We discuss the consequences of such small-scale variation in gene flow and diversity levels for population responses to climate change.

  20. Tritium excretion after intravenous administration of tritium labelled adrenaline and noradrenaline and digital vascular reactivity to adrenaline and noradrenaline in normotensive and labile hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    De Guia, D; Mendlowitz, M; Vlachakis, N D; Gitlow, S E; Nissenbaum, M

    1980-01-01

    1. The 24-h urinary excretion of tritium after tritiated adrenaline administration and digital vascular reactivity to exogenously administered adrenaline and noradrenaline were measured in ten normotensive and in twenty-eight labile essential hypertensive subjects. Tritiated noradrenaline excretion and apparent noradrenaline secretion rate were also measured in ten and eleven of these subjects, respectively. 2. Despite overlapping, the mean 24-h tritium excretion after 3H-adrenaline administration as well as reactivity to adrenaline were significantly greater in the hypertensive than in the normotensive subjects, whether or not they had increased responsiveness to noradrenaline. Significant correlation, however, was observed between tritium excretion of adrenaline and reactivity to adrenaline in both labile hypertensive and normotensive subjects. These measurements were also both significantly correlated with percentage variability in systolic and diastolic blood pressure in the labile hypertensive subjects. 3. No significant correlation was observed between adrenaline as against noradrenaline measurements, whether physiological or biochemical, in either hypertensive or normotensive subjects.

  1. Distribution of dissolved labile and particulate iron and copper in Terra Nova Bay polynya (Ross Sea, Antarctica) surface waters in relation to nutrients and phytoplankton growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivaro, Paola; Ianni, Carmela; Massolo, Serena; Abelmoschi, M. Luisa; De Vittor, Cinzia; Frache, Roberto

    2011-05-01

    The distribution of the dissolved labile and of the particulate Fe and Cu together with dissolved oxygen, nutrients, chlorophyll a and total particulate matter was investigated in the surface waters of Terra Nova Bay polynya in mid-January 2003. The measurements were conducted within the framework of the Italian Climatic Long-term Interactions of the Mass balance in Antarctica (CLIMA) Project activities. The labile dissolved fraction was operationally defined by employing the chelating resin Chelex-100, which retains free and loosely bound trace metal species. The dissolved labile Fe ranges from below the detection limit (0.15 nM) to 3.71 nM, while the dissolved labile Cu from below the detection limit (0.10 nM) to 0.90 nM. The lowest concentrations for both metals were observed at 20 m depth (the shallowest depth for which metals were measured). The concentration of the particulate Fe was about 5 times higher than the dissolved Fe concentration, ranging from 0.56 to 24.83 nM with an average of 6.45 nM. The concentration of the particulate Cu ranged from 0.01 to 0.71 nM with an average of 0.17 nM. The values are in agreement with the previous data collected in the same area. We evaluated the role of the Fe and Cu as biolimiting metals. The N:dissolved labile Fe ratios (18,900-130,666) would or would not allow a complete nitrate removal, on the basis of the N:Fe requirement ratios that we calculated considering the N:P and the C:P ratios estimated for diatoms. This finding partially agrees with the Si:N ratio that we found (2.29). Moreover we considered a possible influence of the dissolved labile Cu on the Fe uptake process.

  2. Large-Scale Glycomics of Livestock: Discovery of Highly Sensitive Serum Biomarkers Indicating an Environmental Stress Affecting Immune Responses and Productivity of Holstein Dairy Cows.

    PubMed

    Rehan, Ibrahim F; Ueda, Koichiro; Mitani, Tomohiro; Amano, Maho; Hinou, Hiroshi; Ohashi, Tetsu; Kondo, Seiji; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2015-12-01

    Because various stresses strongly influence the food productivity of livestock, biomarkers to indicate unmeasurable environmental stress in domestic animals are of increasing importance. Thermal comfort is one of the basic principles of dairy cow welfare that enhances productivity. To discover sensitive biomarkers that monitor such environmental stresses in dairy cows, we herein performed, for the first time, large-scale glycomics on 336 lactating Holstein cow serum samples over 9 months between February and October. Glycoblotting combined with MALDI-TOF/MS and DMB/HPLC allowed for comprehensive glycomics of whole serum glycoproteins. The results obtained revealed seasonal alterations in serum N-glycan levels and their structural characteristics, such as an increase in high-mannose type N-glycans in spring, the occurrence of di/triantennary complex type N-glycans terminating with two or three Neu5Gc residues in summer and autumn, and N-glycans in winter dominantly displaying Neu5Ac. A multivariate analysis revealed a correlation between the serum expression levels of these season-specific glycoforms and productivity.

  3. Large-Scale Glycomics of Livestock: Discovery of Highly Sensitive Serum Biomarkers Indicating an Environmental Stress Affecting Immune Responses and Productivity of Holstein Dairy Cows.

    PubMed

    Rehan, Ibrahim F; Ueda, Koichiro; Mitani, Tomohiro; Amano, Maho; Hinou, Hiroshi; Ohashi, Tetsu; Kondo, Seiji; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2015-12-01

    Because various stresses strongly influence the food productivity of livestock, biomarkers to indicate unmeasurable environmental stress in domestic animals are of increasing importance. Thermal comfort is one of the basic principles of dairy cow welfare that enhances productivity. To discover sensitive biomarkers that monitor such environmental stresses in dairy cows, we herein performed, for the first time, large-scale glycomics on 336 lactating Holstein cow serum samples over 9 months between February and October. Glycoblotting combined with MALDI-TOF/MS and DMB/HPLC allowed for comprehensive glycomics of whole serum glycoproteins. The results obtained revealed seasonal alterations in serum N-glycan levels and their structural characteristics, such as an increase in high-mannose type N-glycans in spring, the occurrence of di/triantennary complex type N-glycans terminating with two or three Neu5Gc residues in summer and autumn, and N-glycans in winter dominantly displaying Neu5Ac. A multivariate analysis revealed a correlation between the serum expression levels of these season-specific glycoforms and productivity. PMID:26595672

  4. [Effects of the different land use on soil labile organic matter and carbon management index in Junyun Mountain].

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Jiang, Chang-Sheng; Hao, Qing-Ju; Zhu, Tao

    2013-10-01

    The impacts of different land use on soil organic matter (SOM), soil labile organic matter (SLOM) and their efficiency ratios (ER), and soil carbon management index (CMI) were studied in this study. Subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest (abbreviation: forest) , sloping farmland, orchard and abandoned land were selected and soils at the depths of 0-10, 10-20, 20-30, 30-40, 40-50 and 50-60 cm were sampled in the spring of 2011 to determine the contents of soil organic matter and labile organic matter. The results showed that the contents of soil organic matter and soil labile organic matter both decreased with the increase of soil depth under all four land use types; however, forest and orchard enriched SOM and SLOM contents in the 0-10 cm and 0-20 cm soil layers, respectively, while the contents of SOM and SLOM decreased evenly in sloping farmland and abandoned land. In the whole soil layer (0-60 cm) , the order of SOM and SLOM contents was abandoned land > forest > orchard > sloping farmland, indicating that at the conversion from forest into orchard or sloping farmland, SOM was reduced by 21.56% (P >0.05) and 55.90% (P <0.05), respectively, and at the conversion from sloping farmland into abandoned land, the low SLOM, middle SLOM and high SLOM increased by 144.2% (P<0.05) , 153.3% (P <0.05) and 242.7% (P <0.05), respectively. There was no significant difference in low ER, middle ER and high ER among the four land uses as suggested by ANOVA which showed that SRs were not sensible to the change of land use. All three CMis were in the order of abandoned land > forest > orchard > sloping farmland, revealing that forest reclamation resulted in the reduction of soil organic carbon storage and the decline of soil quality, and the abandonment of sloping farmland would increase soil carbon sink and improve soil quality. Three kinds of SLOM were all positively correlated with soil total nitrogen, available phosphorus and available potassium, while negatively correlated

  5. Competition and coexistence of sulfate-reducing bacteria, acetogens and methanogens in a lab-scale anaerobic bioreactor as affected by changing substrate to sulfate ratio.

    PubMed

    Dar, Shabir A; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Stams, Alfons J M; Kuenen, J Gijs; Muyzer, Gerard

    2008-04-01

    The microbial population structure and function of natural anaerobic communities maintained in lab-scale continuously stirred tank reactors at different lactate to sulfate ratios and in the absence of sulfate were analyzed using an integrated approach of molecular techniques and chemical analysis. The population structure, determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and by the use of oligonucleotide probes, was linked to the functional changes in the reactors. At the influent lactate to sulfate molar ratio of 0.35 mol mol(-1), i.e., electron donor limitation, lactate oxidation was mainly carried out by incompletely oxidizing sulfate-reducing bacteria, which formed 80-85% of the total bacterial population. Desulfomicrobium- and Desulfovibrio-like species were the most abundant sulfate-reducing bacteria. Acetogens and methanogenic Archaea were mostly outcompeted, although less than 2% of an acetogenic population could still be observed at this limiting concentration of lactate. In the near absence of sulfate (i.e., at very high lactate/sulfate ratio), acetogens and methanogenic Archaea were the dominant microbial communities. Acetogenic bacteria represented by Dendrosporobacter quercicolus-like species formed more than 70% of the population, while methanogenic bacteria related to uncultured Archaea comprising about 10-15% of the microbial community. At an influent lactate to sulfate molar ratio of 2 mol mol(-1), i.e., under sulfate-limiting conditions, a different metabolic route was followed by the mixed anaerobic community. Apparently, lactate was fermented to acetate and propionate, while the majority of sulfidogenesis and methanogenesis were dependent on these fermentation products. This was consistent with the presence of significant levels (40-45% of total bacteria) of D. quercicolus-like heteroacetogens and a corresponding increase of propionate-oxidizing Desulfobulbus-like sulfate-reducing bacteria (20% of the total bacteria). Methanogenic Archaea

  6. [Spatial variability of soil nitrogen and related affecting factors at a county scale in hilly area of Mid-Sichuan Basin].

    PubMed

    Luo, You-Lin; Li, Qi-Quan; Wang, Chang-Quan; Li, Bin; Zhang, Xin; Feng, Wen-Ying; Weng, Qian; Wu, Mian

    2015-02-01

    Spatial distribution characteristics of soil total nitrogen ( TN ) and available nitrogen ( AN ) were analyzed by using geostatistical methods and the effects of the influencing factors were quantified by regression analysis based on 555 soil samples collected in RenShou county. The results showed that the contents of soil TN ranged from 0.34-2.57 g x kg(-1) with a mean value of 1.12 g x kg(-1), which indicated the TN of the study area was at a medium level, and AN ranged from 25.86-184.17 mg x kg(-1) with a mean value of 74.35 mg x kg(-1), which indicated the AN of the study area was low. The values of the nugget to sill ratio were 0.608 and 0.790 respectively, which suggestd TN had moderate spatial dependence, which was determined by the co-effects of structural and random factors, while AN was mainly affected by random factors. The contents of TN and AN in north area were much higher than those of south area and distribution of Patchy. The soil parent materials were able to explain 6.3% and 1.0% of TN and AN spatial variability. Soil types explained 26.5% - 36.1% of TN variability and 27.7% - 28.7% of AN variability. Topographical factors explained 5.5% of TN variability and 6.1% of AN variability, the structural factors of soil types reflected spatial variability of nitrogen in the study area. The randomness factors of land use types explained 37.7% of TN variability and 40.0% of AN variability that were much larger than the other factors, which suggested land use had the higherst independent explaining capacity for nitrogen spatial variability among those influence factors and land use type was the main factor to accurately predict the spatial distribution of soil nitrogen in the hilly area of Middle Sichuan Basin.

  7. Irrigation Practice Affects Soil Phosphorus Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ippolito, J.; Bjorneberg, D.

    2011-12-01

    It is expected, given the same water source applied to the same soil, that changes in soil chemistry would be subtle when comparing furrow and sprinkler irrigation practices. From four paired fields, we collected soil (after similar crops were harvested in September) from the 0-5 cm depth. Samples were analyzed for changes in soil P chemistry due to sprinkler or furrow irrigation using: 1) the Olsen soil test P extraction; 2) the alkaline phosphatase enzyme assay; 3) a sequential extraction technique which fractionated inorganic and organic soil P pools; and 4) a measure of the amorphous soil Al and Fe mineral phases. Olsen-extractable soil P was lower under sprinkler irrigation; however, this was not due to a reduction in microbial phosphatase activity. Soils under sprinkler irrigation contained lower inorganic P concentrations in soluble/Al-bound/Fe-bound and in the occluded phases, lesser amounts of organic P present in the moderately labile and non-labile fractions, and contained lower amorphous Fe concentrations. These results indicate that the method of water application affects soil chemistry and nutrient cycling.

  8. Assessment of toxic metals in groundwater and saliva in an arsenic affected area of West Bengal, India: A pilot scale study.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Subhamoy; Kundu, Amit Kumar; Adhikari, Jishnu; Chatterjee, Debankur; Iglesias, Monica; Nriagu, Jerome; Guha Mazumder, Debendra Nath; Shomar, Basem; Chatterjee, Debashis

    2015-10-01

    affected communities.

  9. Sensitivity of spectral reflectance values to different burn and vegetation ratios: A multi-scale approach applied in a fire affected area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleniou, Magdalini; Koutsias, Nikos

    2013-05-01

    The aim of our study was to explore the spectral properties of fire-scorched (burned) and non fire-scorched (vegetation) areas, as well as areas with different burn/vegetation ratios, using a multisource multiresolution satellite data set. A case study was undertaken following a very destructive wildfire that occurred in Parnitha, Greece, July 2007, for which we acquired satellite images from LANDSAT, ASTER, and IKONOS. Additionally, we created spatially degraded satellite data over a range of coarser resolutions using resampling techniques. The panchromatic (1 m) and multispectral component (4 m) of IKONOS were merged using the Gram-Schmidt spectral sharpening method. This very high-resolution imagery served as the basis to estimate the cover percentage of burned areas, bare land and vegetation at pixel level, by applying the maximum likelihood classification algorithm. Finally, multiple linear regression models were fit to estimate each land-cover fraction as a function of surface reflectance values of the original and the spatially degraded satellite images. The main findings of our research were: (a) the Near Infrared (NIR) and Short-wave Infrared (SWIR) are the most important channels to estimate the percentage of burned area, whereas the NIR and red channels are the most important to estimate the percentage of vegetation in fire-affected areas; (b) when the bi-spectral space consists only of NIR and SWIR, then the NIR ground reflectance value plays a more significant role in estimating the percent of burned areas, and the SWIR appears to be more important in estimating the percent of vegetation; and (c) semi-burned areas comprising 45-55% burned area and 45-55% vegetation are spectrally closer to burned areas in the NIR channel, whereas those areas are spectrally closer to vegetation in the SWIR channel. These findings, at least partially, are attributed to the fact that: (i) completely burned pixels present low variance in the NIR and high variance in the

  10. Identification of the Presence of Variant Hemoglobin Using a Measurement of the Labile HbA1c (#C) Fraction.

    PubMed

    Koga, Masafumi; Inada, Shinya; Miyazaki, Ayako

    2016-07-01

    Labile HbA1c migrates in the #C fraction together with modified hemoglobin (such as carbamylated hemoglobin, acetaldehyde hemoglobin, and acetylated hemoglobin) when HbA1c is measured by Arkray's high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). It is assumed that most of the labile glycation products of variant hemoglobin do not migrate in #C fraction; in addition, a part of the stable glycation products of variant hemoglobin migrates in #C fraction. We hypothesized that subjects with variant hemoglobin are likely to show abnormally low or high values of #C fraction. In this study, we investigated this hypothesis. Twenty-one non-diabetic subjects with nine types of variant hemoglobin, and 103 non-diabetic subjects without variant hemoglobin were used. HbA1c and #C fraction were measured by Arkray's HPLC (HA-8180) using standard mode. The values of #C fraction in the control group were 1.75 ± 0.15% (range: 1.5-2.1%). The variant hemoglobin group reported #C fraction values of ≤1.3% in twelve subjects, ≥2.3% in five subjects, and within the reference range (1.4-2.2%) in three subjects. When the cutoff values of #C fraction were set at ≤1.3% and ≥2.3%, sensitivity and specificity were 86% and 100%, respectively. Most non-diabetic subjects with variant hemoglobin showed abnormal values of #C fraction. Measurement of #C fraction is a useful screening test for variant hemoglobin in non-diabetic subjects. PMID:27466298

  11. Thermally labile components of aqueous humor potently induce osteogenic potential in adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Joshua T; Kwon, Heung Sun; Wood, Joshua A; Borjesson, Dori L; Tomarev, Stanislav I; Murphy, Christopher J; Russell, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) hold promise for use in cell-based therapies. Their intrinsic anti-inflammatory properties are potentially useful for treatments of inflammatory conditions such as uveitis, while their ability to differentiate along multiple cell lineages suggests use in regenerating damaged or degenerated tissue. However, how ASCs will respond to the intraocular environment is poorly studied. We have recently reported that aqueous humor (AH), the fluid that nourishes the anterior segment of the eye, potently increases alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of ASCs, indicating osteogenic differentiation. Here, we expand on our previous findings to better define the nature of this response. To this end, we cultured ASCs in the presence of 0, 5, 10, and 20% AH and assayed them for ALP activity. We found ALP activity correlates with increasing AH concentrations from 5 to 20%, and that longer treatments result in increased ALP activity. By using serum free media and pretreating AH with dextran-coated charcoal, we found that serum and charcoal-adsorbable AH components augment but are not required for this response. Further, by heat-treating the AH, we established that thermally labile components are required for the osteogenic response. Finally, we showed myocilin, a protein present in AH, could induce ALP activity in ASCs. However, this was to a lesser extent than untreated 5% AH, and myocilin could only partially rescue the effect after heat treatment, documenting there were additional thermally labile constituents of AH involved in the osteogenic response. Our work adds to the understanding of the induction of ALP in ASCs following exposure to AH, providing important insight in how ASCs will be influenced by the ocular environment. In conclusion, increased osteogenic potential upon exposure to AH represents a potential challenge to developing ASC cell-based therapies directed at the eye.

  12. The enhanced catalytic performance of cobalt catalysts towards butadiene polymerization by introducing a labile donor in a salen ligand.

    PubMed

    Gong, Dirong; Wang, Baolin; Jia, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Xuequan

    2014-03-14

    A family of cobalt complexes supported by a tridentate Schiff base ligand with a labile donor (O, S, N) as a pendant arm (Co1-Co12, formulated as CoL2) were synthesized by the treatment of the corresponding ligands with cobalt acetate tetrahydrate. The resultant complexes were well characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, magnetic moment as well as EI-MS. The solid-state structures of Co7 and Co12 were determined by X-ray diffraction and both established a distorted octahedron geometry around the cobalt center. The butadiene polymerization capabilities of the 12 complexes were evaluated and compared in representative cases. Diethylaluminum chloride (AlEt2Cl) was found to be the compatible activator resulting in highly active catalysts for producing polybutadiene of 93.8-98.2% cis-1,4 enchainment with negligible 1,2-structure and trans-1,4 units. It appears that a certain degree of lability of the donor is beneficial for high catalytic activity, generally following the order of O > S > N, and the high cis-1,4 selectivity. Moreover, the remarkable thermal stability of these systems has been achieved: the catalytic systems have the ability of conducting a high level of active and selective polymerization, reaching an upper limit of polymerization temperature of about 70 °C. The enhanced catalytic performances were further rationalized by the established diene polymerization mechanism, which could shed light on developing highly selective and reactive industrially applicable catalysts with an enhanced thermal stability. PMID:24468706

  13. An acid-labile block copolymer of PDMAEMA and PEG as potential carrier for intelligent gene delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Lin, Song; Du, Fusheng; Wang, Yang; Ji, Shouping; Liang, Dehai; Yu, Lei; Li, Zichen

    2008-01-01

    Intelligent gene delivery systems based on physiologically triggered reversible shielding technology have evinced enormous interest due to their potential in vivo applications. In the present work, an acid-labile block copolymer consisting of poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) segments connected through a cyclic ortho ester linkage (PEG- a-PDMAEMA) was synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization of DMAEMA using a PEG macroinitiator with an acid-cleavable end group. PEG- a-PDMAEMA condensed with plasmid DNA formed polyplex nanoparticles with an acid-triggered reversible PEG shield. The pH-dependent shielding/deshielding effect of PEG chains on the polyplex particles were evaluated by zeta potential and size measurements. At pH 7.4, polyplexes generated from PEG- a-PDMAEMA exhibited smaller particle size, lower surface charge, reduced interaction with erythrocytes, and less cytotoxicity compared to PDMAEMA-derived polyplexes. At pH 5.0, zeta potential of polyplexes formed from PEG- a-PDMAEMA increased, leveled up after 2 h of incubation and gradual aggregation occurred in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). In contrast, the stably shielded polyplexes formed by DNA and an acid-stable block copolymer, PEG- b-PDMAEMA, did not change in size and zeta potential in 6 h. In vitro transfection efficiency of the acid-labile copolymer greatly increased after 6 h incubation at pH 5.0, approaching the same level of PDMAEMA, whereas there was only slight increase in efficiency for the stable copolymer, PEG- b-PDMAEMA.

  14. The enhanced catalytic performance of cobalt catalysts towards butadiene polymerization by introducing a labile donor in a salen ligand.

    PubMed

    Gong, Dirong; Wang, Baolin; Jia, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Xuequan

    2014-03-14

    A family of cobalt complexes supported by a tridentate Schiff base ligand with a labile donor (O, S, N) as a pendant arm (Co1-Co12, formulated as CoL2) were synthesized by the treatment of the corresponding ligands with cobalt acetate tetrahydrate. The resultant complexes were well characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, magnetic moment as well as EI-MS. The solid-state structures of Co7 and Co12 were determined by X-ray diffraction and both established a distorted octahedron geometry around the cobalt center. The butadiene polymerization capabilities of the 12 complexes were evaluated and compared in representative cases. Diethylaluminum chloride (AlEt2Cl) was found to be the compatible activator resulting in highly active catalysts for producing polybutadiene of 93.8-98.2% cis-1,4 enchainment with negligible 1,2-structure and trans-1,4 units. It appears that a certain degree of lability of the donor is beneficial for high catalytic activity, generally following the order of O > S > N, and the high cis-1,4 selectivity. Moreover, the remarkable thermal stability of these systems has been achieved: the catalytic systems have the ability of conducting a high level of active and selective polymerization, reaching an upper limit of polymerization temperature of about 70 °C. The enhanced catalytic performances were further rationalized by the established diene polymerization mechanism, which could shed light on developing highly selective and reactive industrially applicable catalysts with an enhanced thermal stability.

  15. Interleukin-2 signalling is modulated by a labile disulfide bond in the CD132 chain of its receptor

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, Clive; Cresswell, Peter; Barclay, A. Neil

    2012-01-01

    Certain disulfide bonds present in leucocyte membrane proteins are labile and can be reduced in inflammation. This can cause structural changes that result in downstream functional effects, for example, in integrin activation. Recent studies have shown that a wide range of membrane proteins have labile disulfide bonds including CD132, the common gamma chain of the receptors for several cytokines including interleukin-2 and interleukin-4 (IL-2 and IL-4). The Cys183–Cys232 disulfide bond in mouse CD132 is susceptible to reduction by enzymes such as thioredoxin (TRX), gamma interferon-inducible lysosomal thiolreductase and protein disulfide isomerase, which are commonly secreted during immune activation. The Cys183–Cys232 disulfide bond is also reduced in an in vivo lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute model of inflammation. Conditions that lead to the reduction of the Cys183–Cys232 disulfide bond in CD132 inhibit proliferation of an IL-2-dependent T cell clone and concomitant inhibition of the STAT-5 signalling pathway. The same reducing conditions had no effect on the proliferation of an IL-2-independent T cell clone, nor did they reduce disulfide bonds in IL-2 itself. We postulate that reduction of the Cys183–Cys232 disulfide in CD132 inhibits IL-2 binding to the receptor complex. Published data show that the Cys183–Cys232 disulfide bond is exposed at the surface of CD132 and in close contact with IL-2 and IL-4 in their respective receptor complexes. In addition, mutants in these Cys residues in human CD132 lead to immunodeficiency and loss of IL-2 binding. These results have wider implications for the regulation of cytokine receptors in general, as their activity can be modulated by a ‘redox regulator’ mechanism caused by the changes in the redox environment that occur during inflammation and activation of the immune system. PMID:22645657

  16. EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON LABILE AND STRUCTURAL CARBON IN DOUGLAS-FIR NEEDLES AS ESTIMATED BY DELTA 13C AND C AREA MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isotopic measurements may provide new insights into levels in leaves of labile and structural carbon (C) under climate change. In a 4-year climate change experiment using Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir) seedlings and a 2x2 factorial design in enclosed chambers (n=3), atmosph...

  17. Simultaneous experimental determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate with irradiation radio frequency power-dependent quantitative CEST MRI analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2013-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging is sensitive to dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, and has been increasingly evaluated for molecular imaging and in vivo applications. However, the experimentally measured CEST effect depends on the CEST agent concentration, exchange rate and relaxation time. In addition, there may be non-negligible direct radio-frequency (RF) saturation effects, particularly severe for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) agents owing to their relatively small chemical shift difference from that of the bulk water resonance. As such, the commonly used asymmetry analysis only provides CEST-weighted information. Recently, it has been shown with numerical simulation that both labile proton concentration and exchange rate can be determined by evaluating the RF power dependence of DIACEST effect. To validate the simulation results, we prepared and imaged two CEST phantoms: a pH phantom of serially titrated pH at a fixed creatine concentration and a concentration phantom of serially varied creatine concentration titrated to the same pH, and solved the labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate per-pixel. For the concentration phantom, we showed that the labile proton fraction ratio is proportional to the CEST agent concentration with negligible change in the exchange rate. Additionally, we found the exchange rate of the pH phantom is dominantly base-catalyzed with little difference in the labile proton fraction ratio. In summary, our study demonstrated quantitative DIACEST MRI, which remains promising to augment the conventional CEST-weighted MRI analysis.

  18. Simultaneous determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate with irradiation radio frequency (RF) power dependent quantitative CEST MRI analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging is sensitive to dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, and has been increasingly evaluated for molecular imaging and in vivo applications. However, the experimentally measured CEST effect depends on the CEST agent concentration, exchange rate and relaxation time. In addition, there may be non-negligible direct radio-frequency (RF) saturation effects, particularly severe for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) agents due to their relatively small chemical shift difference from that of the bulk water resonance. As such, the commonly used asymmetry analysis only provides CEST-weighted information. Recently, it has been shown with numerical simulation that both labile proton concentration and exchange rate can be determined by evaluating the RF power dependence of DIACEST effect. To validate the simulation results, we prepared and imaged two CEST phantoms: a pH phantom of serially titrated pH at a fixed creatine concentration and a concentration phantom of serially varied creatine concentration titrated to the same pH, and solved the labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate per-pixel. For the concentration phantom, we showed that the labile proton fraction ratio is proportional to the CEST agent concentration with negligible change in the exchange rate. Additionally, we found the exchange rate of the pH phantom is dominantly base-catalyzed with little difference in the labile proton fraction ratio. In summary, our study demonstrated quantitative DIACEST MRI, which remains promising to augment the conventional CEST-weighted MRI analysis. PMID:23606428

  19. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (qCEST) MRI--RF spillover effect-corrected omega plot for simultaneous determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Dai, ZhuoZhi; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is sensitive to dilute proteins and peptides as well as microenvironmental properties. However, the complexity of the CEST MRI effect, which varies with the labile proton content, exchange rate and experimental conditions, underscores the need for developing quantitative CEST (qCEST) analysis. Towards this goal, it has been shown that omega plot is capable of quantifying paramagnetic CEST MRI. However, the use of the omega plot is somewhat limited for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) MRI because it is more susceptible to direct radio frequency (RF) saturation (spillover) owing to the relatively small chemical shift. Recently, it has been found that, for dilute DIACEST agents that undergo slow to intermediate chemical exchange, the spillover effect varies little with the labile proton ratio and exchange rate. Therefore, we postulated that the omega plot analysis can be improved if RF spillover effect could be estimated and taken into account. Specifically, simulation showed that both labile proton ratio and exchange rate derived using the spillover effect-corrected omega plot were in good agreement with simulated values. In addition, the modified omega plot was confirmed experimentally, and we showed that the derived labile proton ratio increased linearly with creatine concentration (p < 0.01), with little difference in their exchange rate (p = 0.32). In summary, our study extends the conventional omega plot for quantitative analysis of DIACEST MRI.

  20. The early faint sun paradox: organic shielding of ultraviolet-labile greenhouse gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.; Chyba, C.

    1997-01-01

    Atmospheric mixing ratios of approximately 10(-5 +/- 1) for ammonia on the early Earth would have been sufficient, through the resulting greenhouse warming, to counteract the temperature effects of the faint early sun. One argument against such model atmospheres has been the short time scale for ammonia photodissociation by solar ultraviolet light. Here it is shown that ultraviolet absorption by steady-state amounts of high-altitude organic solids produced from methane photolysis may have shielded ammonia sufficiently that ammonia resupply rates were able to maintain surface temperatures above freezing.

  1. Anti-plasmodial activity of aroylhydrazone and thiosemicarbazone iron chelators: effect on erythrocyte membrane integrity, parasite development and the intracellular labile iron pool.

    PubMed

    Walcourt, Asikiya; Kurantsin-Mills, Joseph; Kwagyan, John; Adenuga, Babafemi B; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Lovejoy, David B; Lane, Darius J R; Richardson, Des R

    2013-12-01

    Iron chelators inhibit the growth of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, in culture and in animal and human studies. We previously reported the anti-plasmodial activity of the chelators, 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311), 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde 4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (N4mT), and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde 4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (N4pT). In fact, these ligands showed greater growth inhibition of chloroquine-sensitive (3D7) and chloroquine-resistant (7G8) strains of P. falciparum in culture compared to desferrioxamine (DFO). The present study examined the effects of 311, N4mT and N4pT on erythrocyte membrane integrity and asexual parasite development. While the characteristic biconcave disk shape of the erythrocytes was unaffected, the chelators caused very slight hemolysis at IC50 values that inhibited parasite growth. The chelators 311, N4mT and N4pT affected all stages of the intra-erythrocytic development cycle (IDC) of P. falciparum in culture. However, while these ligands primarily affected the ring-stage, DFO inhibited primarily trophozoite and schizont-stages. Ring, trophozoite and schizont-stages of the IDC were inhibited by significantly lower concentrations of 311, N4mT, and N4pT (IC50=4.45±1.70, 10.30±4.40, and 3.64±2.00μM, respectively) than DFO (IC50=23.43±3.40μM). Complexation of 311, N4mT and N4pT with iron reduced their anti-plasmodial activity. Estimation of the intracellular labile iron pool (LIP) in erythrocytes showed that the chelation efficacy of 311, N4mT and N4pT corresponded to their anti-plasmodial activities, suggesting that the LIP may be a potential source of non-heme iron for parasite metabolism within the erythrocyte. This study has implications for malaria chemotherapy that specifically disrupts parasite iron utilization.

  2. Affective Induction and Creative Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernández-Abascal, Enrique G.; Díaz, María D. Martín

    2013-01-01

    Three studies explored the relation between affect and production of creative divergent thinking, assessed with the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (Figural TTCT). In the first study, general, positive, and negative affect, assessed with the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS) were compared with creative production. In the second study,…

  3. Arsenic in ground water in six districts of West bengal, India: the biggest arsenic calamity in the world. Part 2. Arsenic concentration in drinking water, hair, nails, urine, skin-scale and liver tissue (biopsy) of the affected people.

    PubMed

    Das, D; Chatterjee, A; Mandal, B K; Samanta, G; Chakraborti, D; Chanda, B

    1995-03-01

    In six districts of West Bengal arsenic has been found in ground water above the maximum permissible limit recommended by the WHO of 0.05 mg l-1. This water is used by the villagers for drinking, cooking and other household purposes. These six districts have an area of 34,000 km2 and hold a population of 30 million. Over the last five years we have surveyed only a few small areas of these six affected districts and our survey revealed that, at present, at least 800,000 people from 312 villages in 37 blocks are drinking contaminated water and more than 175,000 people are showing arsenical skin lesions that are the late stages of manifestation of arsenic toxicity. Most of the three stages of arsenic-related clinical manifestations are observed amongst the affected people. The common symptoms are conjunctivitis, melanosis, depigmentation, keratosis and hyperkeratosis; cases of gangrene and malignant neoplasms are also observed. The source of arsenic is geological. We have analysed thousands of arsenic contaminated water samples. Most of the water samples contain a mixture of arsenite and arsenate and in none of them could we detect methylarsonic or dimethylarsenic acid. We have also analysed a large number of urine, hair and nail samples, several skin-scales and some liver tissues (biopsy samples) of the people drinking the arsenic contaminated water and showing arsenical skin lesions. Flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-HGAAS) was used for the analysis of hair, nails, urine and skin-scale after decomposition by various techniques. The liver tissues were analysed by Zeeman corrected-ETAAS using a few milligrams of the biopsy samples.

  4. Is litter decomposition 'primed' by primary producer-release of labile carbon in terrestrial and aquatic experimental systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, A. Margarida P. M.; Kritzberg, Emma S.; Rousk, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    It is possible that recalcitrant organic matter (ROM) can be 'activated' by inputs of labile organic matter (LOM) through the priming effect (PE). Investigating the PE is of major importance to fully understand the microbial use of ROM and its role on carbon (C) and nutrient cycling in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. In aquatic ecosystems it is thought that the PE is triggered by periphytic algae release of LOM. Analogously, in terrestrial systems it is hypothesized that the LOM released in plant rhizospheres, or from the green crusts on the surface of agricultural soils, stimulate the activity and growth of ROM decomposers. Most previous studies on PE have utilised pulse additions of single substrates at high concentrations. However, to achieve an assessment of the true importance of the PE, it is important to simulate a realistic delivery of LOM. We investigated, in a series of 2-week laboratory experiments, how primary producer (PP)-release of LOM influence litter degradation in terrestrial and aquatic experimental systems. We used soil (terrestrial) and pond water (aquatic) microbial communities to which litter was added under light and dark conditions. In addition, glucose was added at PP delivery rates in dark treatments to test if the putative PE in light systems could be reproduced. We observed an initial peak of bacterial growth rate followed by an overall decrease over time with no treatment differences. In light treatments, periphytic algae growth and increased fungal production was stimulated when bacterial growth declined. In contrast, both fungal growth and algal production were negligible in dark treatments. This reveals a direct positive influence of photosynthesis on fungal growth. To investigate if PP LOM supplements, and the associated fungal growth, translate into a modulated litter decomposition, we are using stable isotopes to track the use of litter and algal-derived carbon by determining the δ13C in produced CO2. Fungi and bacteria

  5. Use of the distributions of adamantane acids to profile short-term temporal and pond-scale spatial variations in the composition of oil sands process-affected waters.

    PubMed

    Lengger, Sabine K; Scarlett, Alan G; West, Charles E; Frank, Richard A; Hewitt, L Mark; Milestone, Craig B; Rowland, Steven J

    2015-08-01

    Oil industry produced waters, such as the oils sands process-affected waters (OSPW) of Alberta, Canada, represent a challenge in terms of risk assessment and reclamation due to their extreme complexity, particularly of the organic chemical constituents, including the naphthenic acids (NA). The identification of numerous NA in single samples has raised promise for the use of NA distributions for profiling OSPW. However, monitoring of the success of containment is still difficult, due to the lack of knowledge of the homogeneity (or otherwise) of OSPW composition within, and between, different industry containments. Here we used GC×GC-MS to compare the NA of five OSPW samples from each of two different industries. Short-term temporal and pond-scale spatial variations in the distributions of known adamantane acids and diacids and other unknown tricyclic acids were examined and a statistical appraisal of the replicate data made. The presence/absence of individual acids easily distinguished the OSPW NA of one industry from those of the other. The proportions of tricyclic acids with different carbon numbers also varied significantly between the OSPW of the two industries. The pond-scale spatial variation in NA in OSPW samples was higher than the short-term (2 weeks) temporal variations. An OSPW sample from an aged pond was exceptionally high in the proportion of C15,16,17 compounds, possibly due to increased biotransformation. Such techniques could possibly also help to distinguish different sources of NA in the environment. PMID:26160340

  6. Spatial distribution of labile and protected fractions of soil organic matter as a combined effect of variable soil texture and forest tree species composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruba, Piotr; Socha, Jarosław; Błońska, Ewa; Lasota, Jarosław

    2014-05-01

    In this investigations we focused on the effects of variable soil texture and forest species composition on: (1) stocks of soil organic carbon (SOC) in the organic horizon (O) and mineral soil (A and B horizons), and (2) content of carbon in physically separated fractions of samples from the A horizon: free light fraction (CfLF), occluded (inside aggregates) free light fraction (CoLF), and mineral associated fraction (CMA). Study area was located in the Swietokrzskie mountains, central Poland. The soils were derived from Triassic claystones and sandstones and Quaternary sandy deposits. The dominant forest species were Silver fir and European beech, with minor admixture of common hornbeam and Scots pine. We set up 275 plots in regular 200x200 m grid. Spatial dependence and correlations were analyzed using multiple regression and geostatistical tools: variogram and cross-variogram. The results demonstrated that the proportion between carbon stored in above ground tree biomass, soil organic horizon and mineral soil is roughly 10:5:5 (kg m-2). A key factor regulating retention of organic matter in soils was the content of fine fractions (FF). The content of FF positively affected the content of SOM in mineral soil and negatively the content of SOM accumulated in the organic horizon. Regarding the fraction of SOC in the A horizons, the content of FF had strong positive effect on the content of CMA (CMA [g kg-1]= 1.4 + 0.40 × FF[%], n=275, R2=0.70), weak positive influence on the CfLF, and no effect on CoLF. The content of labile fraction accumulated as the O horizon and CfLF fraction in the A horizon were negatively correlated. Results of statistical and geostatistical analysis suggest that the increasing share of beech and hornbeam had a positive effect on carbon stores in mineral soil and the opposite was true for the relationship between the FF content and carbon stores in the O horizon. Fir, in the other hand, positively influenced the content of carbon occluded

  7. Intranuclear delivery of an antiviral peptide mediated by the B subunit of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Loregian, Arianna; Papini, Emanuele; Satin, Barbara; Marsden, Howard S.; Hirst, Timothy R.; Palù, Giorgio

    1999-01-01

    We report an intracellular peptide delivery system capable of targeting specific cellular compartments. In the model system we constructed a chimeric protein consisting of the nontoxic B subunit of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (EtxB) fused to a 27-mer peptide derived from the DNA polymerase of herpes simplex virus 1. Viral DNA synthesis takes places in the nucleus and requires the interaction with an accessory factor, UL42, encoded by the virus. The peptide, designated Pol, is able to dissociate this interaction. The chimeric protein, EtxB-Pol, retained the functional properties of both EtxB and peptide components and was shown to inhibit viral DNA polymerase activity in vitro via disruption of the polymerase-UL42 complex. When added to virally infected cells, EtxB-Pol had no effect on adenovirus replication but specifically interfered with herpes simplex virus 1 replication. Further studies showed that the antiviral peptide localized in the nucleus, whereas the EtxB component remained associated with vesicular compartments. The results indicate that the chimeric protein entered through endosomal acidic compartments and that the Pol peptide was cleaved from the chimeric protein before being translocated into the nucleus. The system we describe is suitable for delivery of peptides that specifically disrupt protein–protein interactions and may be developed to target specific cellular compartments. PMID:10220447

  8. Effects of grazing intensity on soil labile organic carbon fractions in a desert steppe area in Inner Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jixin; Wang, Xiaoping; Sun, Xiangyang; Zhang, Lin; Tian, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Grazing can cause changes in soil carbon (C) level. This study aimed to elucidate the response of soil labile organic carbon (SLOC) under four different grazing intensities: non grazing (NG), 0 sheep·ha(-1); light grazing (LG), 0.91 sheep·ha(-1); moderate grazing (MG), 1.82 sheep·ha(-1), and heavy grazing (HG), 2.73 sheep·ha(-1). Results showed that there was no significant difference in total soil organic carbon (TOC) and soil inorganic carbon (SIC) content from three soil depths (0-15 cm, 15-30 cm, and 30-45 cm) under different grazing intensities. However, the SLOC including particulate organic carbon (POC), light fraction organic carbon (LFOC), and readily oxidizable carbon (ROC) content at a depth of 0-15 cm decreased with the increasing grazing intensity among LG, MG and HG. The SLOC content at depths of 15-30 cm under the NG and LG were significantly higher than that under the MG and the HG. The TOC and SLOC content decreased with increasing depths of soil horizons, but SIC content increased. The variation trend of the density of different soil carbon fractions and the ratio of individual SLOC fractions to TOC were similar to that of the soil carbon content of corresponding fractions. These results indicated that MG and HG treatments caused C loss at 0-30 cm; and SLOC was more sensitive than TOC in response to different grazing intensities.

  9. Anatomical network analysis shows decoupling of modular lability and complexity in the evolution of the primate skull.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Altava, Borja; Boughner, Julia C; Diogo, Rui; Villmoare, Brian A; Rasskin-Gutman, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Modularity and complexity go hand in hand in the evolution of the skull of primates. Because analyses of these two parameters often use different approaches, we do not know yet how modularity evolves within, or as a consequence of, an also-evolving complex organization. Here we use a novel network theory-based approach (Anatomical Network Analysis) to assess how the organization of skull bones constrains the co-evolution of modularity and complexity among primates. We used the pattern of bone contacts modeled as networks to identify connectivity modules and quantify morphological complexity. We analyzed whether modularity and complexity evolved coordinately in the skull of primates. Specifically, we tested Herbert Simon's general theory of near-decomposability, which states that modularity promotes the evolution of complexity. We found that the skulls of extant primates divide into one conserved cranial module and up to three labile facial modules, whose composition varies among primates. Despite changes in modularity, statistical analyses reject a positive feedback between modularity and complexity. Our results suggest a decoupling of complexity and modularity that translates to varying levels of constraint on the morphological evolvability of the primate skull. This study has methodological and conceptual implications for grasping the constraints that underlie the developmental and functional integration of the skull of humans and other primates.

  10. Contact-facilitated drug delivery with Sn2 lipase labile prodrugs optimize targeted lipid nanoparticle drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dipanjan; Pham, Christine T N; Weilbaecher, Katherine N; Tomasson, Michael H; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2016-01-01

    Sn2 lipase labile phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery offer an important advancement in Nanomedicine. Many drugs incorporated into nanosystems, targeted or not, are substantially lost during circulation to the target. However, favorably altering the pharmacokinetics and volume of distribution of systemic drug delivery can offer greater efficacy with lower toxicity, leading to new prolonged-release nanoexcipients. However, the concept of achieving Paul Erhlich's inspired vision of a 'magic bullet' to treat disease has been largely unrealized due to unstable nanomedicines, nanosystems achieving low drug delivery to target cells, poor intracellular bioavailability of endocytosed nanoparticle payloads, and the substantial biological barriers of extravascular particle penetration into pathological sites. As shown here, Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery prevent premature drug diffusional loss during circulation and increase target cell bioavailability. The Sn2 phospholipid prodrug approach applies equally well for vascular constrained lipid-encapsulated particles and micelles the size of proteins that penetrate through naturally fenestrated endothelium in the bone marrow or thin-walled venules of an inflamed microcirculation. At one time Nanomedicine was considered a 'Grail Quest' by its loyal opposition and even many in the field adsorbing the pains of a long-learning curve about human biology and particles. However, Nanomedicine with innovations like Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs has finally made 'made the turn' toward meaningful translational success.

  11. Interaction with Cfd1 increases the kinetic lability of FeS on the Nbp35 scaffold.

    PubMed

    Pallesen, Leif J; Solodovnikova, Natalia; Sharma, Anil K; Walden, William E

    2013-08-01

    P-loop NTPases of the ApbC/Nbp35 family are involved in FeS protein maturation in nearly all organisms and are proposed to function as scaffolds for initial FeS cluster assembly. In yeast and animals, Cfd1 and Nbp35 are homologous P-loop NTPases that form a heterotetrameric complex essential for FeS protein maturation through the cytosolic FeS cluster assembly (CIA) pathway. Cfd1 is conserved in animals, fungi, and several archaeal species, but in many organisms, only Nbp35 is present, raising the question of the unique roles played by Cfd1 and Nbp35. To begin to investigate this issue, we examined Cfd1 and Nbp35 function in budding yeast. About half of each protein was detected in a heterocomplex in logarithmically growing yeast. Nbp35 readily bound (55)Fe when fed to cells, whereas (55)Fe binding by free Cfd1 could not be detected. Rapid (55)Fe binding to and release from Nbp35 was impaired by Cfd1 deficiency. A Cfd1 mutation that caused a defect in heterocomplex stability supported iron binding to Nbp35 but impaired iron release. Our results suggest a model in which Cfd1-Nbp35 interaction increases the lability of assembled FeS on the Nbp35 scaffold for transfer to target apo-FeS proteins.

  12. Complexation of labile aluminium species by chelating resins Iontosorb--a new method for Al environmental risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Matús, Peter; Kubová, Jana

    2005-09-01

    The utilization of chelating ion-exchange by the method based on binding strength and kinetic discrimination for aluminium fractionation was studied. Two chelating cellulose resins, Iontosorb Oxin (IO) and Iontosorb Salicyl (IS), were used for the determination of quickly reacting labile aluminium species. The possibilities of aluminium fractionation on these chelating resins were investigated by a solid phase extraction technique. The study of the pH (2.5-6.0) influence on the Al complexation by both resins indicates that at low pH the IS has lower sorption capacity but better adsorptive kinetic properties than IO. The optimal resin complexation time for reactive Al species was experimentally found after aluminium sorption study at pH 4.0 in synthetic solutions containing some inorganic and organic ligands, which simulate the composition of analysed acid soil and water samples. The negative influence of sulphate and iron on the Al complexation by IS resin was found and investigated. The flame atomic absorption spectrometry was used for the aluminium quantification.

  13. Supercritical fluid assisted production of micrometric powders of the labile trypsin and chitosan/trypsin composite microparticles.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu-Bin; Guan, Yi-Xin; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2015-07-15

    Supercritical fluid assisted atomization introduced by a hydrodynamic cavitation mixer (SAA-HCM) was used to prepare micrometric particles of a labile protein, i.e., trypsin from aqueous solution without use of any organic solvents. The trypsin particles precipitated had various morphologies under different process conditions, with particle diameters ranging from 0.2 to 4 μm. FTIR, SDS-PAGE, CD and fluorescence spectra were performed to analyze the structural stability of the protein, and trypsin retained above 70% of the biological activity. Besides, chitosan was selected as the polymer carrier in an effort to prepare trypsin composite microparticles via SAA-HCM process. The influences of chitosan molecular weight, polymer/protein ratio and solution concentration on the particle morphology and size distribution were investigated in detail. Non-coalescing spherical composite microparticles with a narrow particle distribution (0.2-3 μm) could be obtained. The SAA-HCM prepared particles were amorphous as demonstrated by XRD and had a loading efficiency about 90%. The protein release profiles of the composite microparticles were evaluated using both the immersion condition and a Franz diffusion cell. Finally, the distribution of the protein within the particles was characterized through CLSM analysis of FITC-labeled trypsin-loaded chitosan microparticles. The SAA-HCM process is demonstrated to be a protein-friendly and promising technique for production of protein and polymer/protein composite particles formulations from aqueous solutions for drug delivery systems. PMID:25957701

  14. Metal Fluxes from Porewaters and Labile Sediment Phases for Predicting Metal Exposure and Bioaccumulation in Benthic Invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Amato, Elvio D; Simpson, Stuart L; Belzunce-Segarra, Maria J; Jarolimek, Chad V; Jolley, Dianne F

    2015-12-15

    The use of diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) for predicting metal bioavailability was investigated by exposing the bivalve Tellina deltoidalis to an identical series of metal-contaminated sediments deployed simultaneously in the field and laboratory. To understand the differences in metal exposure occurring between laboratory- and field-based bioassays, we investigated changes in metal fluxes to DGT probes in sediments and in metal concentrations and partitioning to porewaters and overlying waters. DGT-metal fluxes (Cu, Pb, and Zn) were lower in the overlying waters of most field bioassays compared to the laboratory, causing differences in Pb and Zn bioaccumulation between bivalves exposed to laboratory and field conditions. Overall, DGT-metal fluxes provided predictions of metal bioaccumulation similar to those obtained using dilute-acid extractable metal measurements. This study demonstrates that, irrespective of the physicochemical properties of the sediment and type of exposure (laboratory or field), sediments pose a significant risk of bioaccumulation by T. deltoidalis when the Cu, Pb, and Zn DGT flux exceeds 3.5, 1.3, and 156 μg/h/m(2), respectively. The results presented here support the use of the DGT technique for sediment quality assessment and the hypothesis that DGT-metal fluxes may potentially be useful surrogates for the lability of metals for all exposure routes.

  15. Contact-facilitated drug delivery with Sn2 lipase labile prodrugs optimize targeted lipid nanoparticle drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Pham, Christine TN; Weilbaecher, Katherine N; Tomasson, Michael H; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2016-01-01

    Sn2 lipase labile phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery offer an important advancement in Nanomedicine. Many drugs incorporated into nanosystems, targeted or not, are substantially lost during circulation to the target. However, favorably altering the pharmacokinetics and volume of distribution of systemic drug delivery can offer greater efficacy with lower toxicity, leading to new prolonged-release nanoexcipients. However, the concept of achieving Paul Erhlich's inspired vision of a ‘magic bullet’ to treat disease has been largely unrealized due to unstable nanomedicines, nanosystems achieving low drug delivery to target cells, poor intracellular bioavailability of endocytosed nanoparticle payloads, and the substantial biological barriers of extravascular particle penetration into pathological sites. As shown here, Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery prevent premature drug diffusional loss during circulation and increase target cell bioavailability. The Sn2 phospholipid prodrug approach applies equally well for vascular constrained lipid-encapsulated particles and micelles the size of proteins that penetrate through naturally fenestrated endothelium in the bone marrow or thin-walled venules of an inflamed microcirculation. At one time Nanomedicine was considered a ‘Grail Quest’ by its loyal opposition and even many in the field adsorbing the pains of a long-learning curve about human biology and particles. However, Nanomedicine with innovations like Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs has finally made ‘made the turn’ toward meaningful translational success. PMID:26296541

  16. Effect of inorganic and organic copper fertilizers on copper nutrition in Spinacia oleracea and on labile copper in soil.

    PubMed

    Obrador, Ana; Gonzalez, Demetrio; Alvarez, Jose M

    2013-05-22

    To ensure an optimal concentration of Cu in food crops, the effectiveness of eight liquid Cu fertilizers was studied in a spinach ( Spinacia oleracea L.) crop grown on Cu-deficient soil under greenhouse conditions. Plant dry matter yields, Cu concentrations in spinach plants (total and morpholino acid (MES)- and ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS)-extractable), and Cu uptakes were studied. The behavior of Cu in soil was evaluated by both single and sequential extraction procedures. The highest quantities of Cu in labile forms in the soil, total uptakes, and Cu concentrations in the plants were associated with the application of the two sources that contained Cu chelated by EDTA and/or DTPA. The fertilizers containing these Cu chelates represent a promising approach to achieve high levels of agronomic biofortification. The stronger correlations obtained between low-molecular-weight organic acid-extractable Cu in soil and the Cu concentrations and Cu uptakes by the plants show the suitability of this soil extraction method for predicting Cu available to spinach plants.

  17. Contact-facilitated drug delivery with Sn2 lipase labile prodrugs optimize targeted lipid nanoparticle drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dipanjan; Pham, Christine T N; Weilbaecher, Katherine N; Tomasson, Michael H; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2016-01-01

    Sn2 lipase labile phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery offer an important advancement in Nanomedicine. Many drugs incorporated into nanosystems, targeted or not, are substantially lost during circulation to the target. However, favorably altering the pharmacokinetics and volume of distribution of systemic drug delivery can offer greater efficacy with lower toxicity, leading to new prolonged-release nanoexcipients. However, the concept of achieving Paul Erhlich's inspired vision of a 'magic bullet' to treat disease has been largely unrealized due to unstable nanomedicines, nanosystems achieving low drug delivery to target cells, poor intracellular bioavailability of endocytosed nanoparticle payloads, and the substantial biological barriers of extravascular particle penetration into pathological sites. As shown here, Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery prevent premature drug diffusional loss during circulation and increase target cell bioavailability. The Sn2 phospholipid prodrug approach applies equally well for vascular constrained lipid-encapsulated particles and micelles the size of proteins that penetrate through naturally fenestrated endothelium in the bone marrow or thin-walled venules of an inflamed microcirculation. At one time Nanomedicine was considered a 'Grail Quest' by its loyal opposition and even many in the field adsorbing the pains of a long-learning curve about human biology and particles. However, Nanomedicine with innovations like Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs has finally made 'made the turn' toward meaningful translational success. PMID:26296541

  18. Fmoc-Sec(Xan)-OH: synthesis and utility of Fmoc selenocysteine SPPS derivatives with acid-labile sidechain protection.

    PubMed

    Flemer, Stevenson

    2015-01-01

    We report here the synthesis of the first selenocysteine SPPS derivatives which bear TFA-labile sidechain protecting groups. New compounds Fmoc-Sec(Xan)-OH and Fmoc-Sec(Trt)-OH are presented as useful and practical alternatives to the traditional Fmoc-Sec-OH derivatives currently available to the peptide chemist. From a bis Fmoc-protected selenocystine precursor, multiple avenues of diselenide reduction were attempted to determine the most effective method for subsequent attachment of the protecting group electrophiles. Our previously reported one-pot reduction methodology was ultimately chosen as the optimal approach toward the synthesis of these novel building blocks, and both were easily obtained in high yield and purity. Fmoc-Sec(Xan)-OH was discovered to be bench-stable for extended timeframes while the corresponding Fmoc-Sec(Trt)-OH derivative appeared to detritylate slowly when not stored at -20 °C. Both Sec derivatives were incorporated into single- and multiple-Sec-containing test peptides in order to ascertain the peptides' deprotection behavior and final form upon TFA cleavage. Single-Sec-containing test peptides were always isolated as their corresponding diselenide dimers, while dual-Sec-containing peptide sequences were afforded exclusively as their intramolecular diselenides.

  19. Photodissociation/gas diffusion/ion chromatography system for determination of total and labile cyanide in waters

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yan; Rocklin, R.D.; Joyce, R.J.; Doyle, M.J. )

    1990-04-01

    An automated system for determination of total and labile cyanide in water samples has been developed. The stable metal-cyanide complexes such as Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3{minus}} are photodissociated in an acidic medium with an on-line pyrex glass reaction coil irradiated by an intense Hg lamp. The released cyanide (HCN) is separated from most interferences in the sample matrix and is collected in a dilute NaOH solution by gas diffusion using a hydrophobic porous membrane separator. The cyanide ion is then separated from remaining interferences such as sulfide by ion exchange chromatography and is detected by an amperometric detector. The characteristics of the automated system were studied with solutions of free cyanide and metal-cyanide complexes. The results of cyanide determination for a number of wastewater samples obtained with the new method were compared with those obtained with the standard method. The sample throughput of the system is eight samples per hour and the detection limit for total cyanide is 0.1 {mu}g/L.

  20. Heterogenic virulence in a diarrheagenic Escherichia coli: evidence for an EPEC expressing heat-labile toxin of ETEC.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sanjucta; Pazhani, Gururaja P; Nataro, James P; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan

    2015-01-01

    We have encountered an Escherichia coli strain isolated from a child with acute diarrhea. This strain harbored eae and elt genes encoding for E. coli attaching and effacing property and heat-labile enterotoxin of EPEC and ETEC, respectively. Due to the presence of these distinct virulence factors, we named this uncommon strain as EPEC/ETEC hybrid. The elt gene was identified in a conjugally transferable plasmid of the EPEC/ETEC hybrid. In addition, several virulence genes in the locus of enterocyte effacement have been identified, which confirms that the EPEC/ETEC has an EPEC genetic background. The hybrid nature of this strain was further confirmed by using tissue culture assays. In the multi locus sequence typing (MLST) analysis, the EPEC/ETEC belonged to the sequence type ST328 and was belonging to ST278 Cplx. Sequence analysis of the plasmid DNA revealed presence of six large contigs with several insertion sequences. A phage integrase gene and the prophages of gp48 and gp49 have been found in the upstream of eltAB. In the downstream of elt, an urovirulence loci adhesion encoding (pap) cluster containing papG, and papC were also identified. Similar to other reports, we have identified a heterogenic virulence in a diarrheagenic E. coli but with different combination of genes. PMID:25465159

  1. Search for heat-labile enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in humans, livestock, food, and water in a community in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, P; Verhaert, L; Basaca-Sevilla, V; Banson, T; Cross, J; Orskov, F; Orskov, I

    1978-07-01

    Environmental sources of heat-labile enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli are unknown. The feces of 1,086 inhabitants (approximately 5%) of a small town in the Philippines, 28 pigs, and 10 water buffalo were cultured for enteric bacterial pathogens. Twenty-seven persons harbored pathogenic bacteria: five individuals had enterotoxigenic E. coli, 11 Salmonella species, nine Vibrio parahaemolyticus, one Shigella boydii, and one nonagglutinable Vibrio. Enterotoxigenic E. coli were isolated from two of 28 pigs and from one of 10 water buffalo. Cultures of 26 pieces of beef, 25 pieces of pork, and 52 leafy vegetables obtained from a community market failed to grow enterotoxigenic E. coli. None of 47 samples of contaminated surface water contained this pathogen. Serotypes of human and animal strains of enterotoxigenic E. coli were different, although E. coli O78:H12 isolated from a pig has previously been incriminated in human diarrheal disease. In this limited survey of a Philippine community, enterotoxigenic E. coli were isolated from humans and livestock. The possibility that enterotoxigenic E. coli infections are zoonotic warrants further investigation.

  2. The suppressive activities of six sources of medicinal ferns known as gusuibu on heat-labile enterotoxin-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hung-Chi; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Yang, Jiun-Long; Tsay, Hsin-Sheng; Hsiang, Chien-Yun; Ho, Tin-Yun

    2014-02-18

    Diarrheal disease is one of the most important worldwide health problems. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the most frequently isolated enteropathogen in diarrheal diseases. In developing countries, a very large number of people, especially children, suffer from diarrhea. To combat this problem, World Health Organization has constituted the Diarrhea Diseases Control Program which guides studies on traditional medicinal practices and preventive measures. Gusuibu, a traditional folk medicine, has been claimed to heal certain types of diarrhea. However, so far no scientific study has been carried out on the anti-diarrheal mechanism of Gusiubu. The present study was performed to examine the suppressive activities of ethanol extracts of six sources of folk medicinal ferns used as Gusuibu on heat-labile enterotoxin (LT)-induced diarrhea. Inhibitory effects of six sources were evaluated on the ETEC LT subunit B (LTB) and monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GMI) interaction by GM1-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and patent mouse gut assay. Our results indicated that Drynaria fortunei had no anti-diarrheal effect, while, among the remaining five folk medicinal ferns, four belonging to family Davalliaceae had significant abilities on both the blocking of LTB and GM1 interaction and the inhibition of LT-induced diarrhea. In conclusion, these findings suggested the potential application of Gusuibu as an anti-diarrheal remedy.

  3. Blue carbon for how long? Lability of buried salt marsh carbon released via erosion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, D.; Currin, C.; Mctigue, N.

    2015-12-01

    With our climate rapidly changing due to increasing greenhouse gas emissions, the ability of coastal wetlands to sequester carbon (C) on century to millennial time scales has bolstered new interest in these habitats. This stored sedimentary organic carbon termed "blue C" can be eroded to surface horizons from the impacts of sea level rise, storm events, or other physical modifications of the coastline, potentially returning CO2 to the atmosphere upon microbially mediated remineralization. The rates and extent of these remineralization processes are largely unknown. A field exercise revealed a horizontal gradient in the organic matter content of marsh sediments perpendicular to creek banks, as proximity to tidal creeks resulted in a decline in sediment C content, with some variation due to creekbank morphology. We also conducted lab experiments to test the effect of temperature, as in some systems it has been found that a 1°C increase in temperature increases organic matter decomposition rates by 20%. In this study, fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), pH, and pCO2 were measured to determine carbon remineralization rates of marsh sediment collected 30 cm below the surface. A 20°C and 30°C temperature treatment was instituted to examine Q10 and activation energy of the decomposition processes that could potentially act as a climate change positive feedback upon erosion of blue carbon. Laboratory results show that the century-old blue carbon overall is refractory to tidal creek microbes, as only a maximum of 0.28% of sediment organic C was respired in two-week incubations. However, the remineralization rate exhibited a Q10 of 2.45, indicating that the organic carbon, despite being refractory, is temperature sensitive and will degrade exponentially if exposed to higher temperatures. These rates were then modeled at current and projected temperature profiles and applied to actual erosion rates in the study site to assess the release of carbon dioxide via

  4. Formation of alkali labile linkages in DNA by hedamycin and use of hedamycin as a probe of protein-DNA complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, G N

    1982-01-01

    Hedamycin forms a stable complex with DNA and introduces alkali labile linkages in the DNA. These labile linkages are located at deoxyguanosine residues and are cleaved by the treatment used for breakage at bases alkylated by dimethyl sulfate. The reaction of hedamycin with all G residues in the chain is not uniform, and certain positions, particularily those in TG tracts, are especially reactive. The reaction of hedamycin with DNA can be inhibited by ethidium bromide, suggesting that intercalation is important in positioning the reactive group of hedamycin near to the base which is modified. The low amount of hedamycin needed to produce observable breakage, its specificity for reaction with DNA and its ability to react with DNA under mild conditions make it suitable for use as a probe of protein-DNA complexes. This was shown by the ability of lac repressor and RNA polymerase to block reaction of hedamycin with the DNA of the lac regulatory region. Images PMID:7133991

  5. Affective Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles T.

    This paper addresses itself to the question, "What does feeling have to do with knowing?" Two movements in affective education are discussed which have come into focus in recent years and which attempt to define the relationship between knowing and feeling. The first, a conscious application of the role of arousal in learning, emphasizes arousal…

  6. The formation of DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites in human blood lymphocytes exposed to 365-nm UVA radiation.

    PubMed

    Osipov, Andreyan N; Smetanina, Nadezhda M; Pustovalova, Margarita V; Arkhangelskaya, Ekaterina; Klokov, Dmitry

    2014-08-01

    The potency of UVA radiation, representing 90% of solar UV light reaching the earth's surface, to induce human skin cancer is the subject of continuing controversy. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of reactive oxygen species in DNA damage produced by the exposure of human cells to UVA radiation. This knowledge is important for better understanding of UV-induced carcinogenesis. We measured DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites in human lymphocytes exposed ex vivo to various doses of 365-nm UV photons compared to X-rays and hydrogen peroxide using the comet assay. We demonstrated that the UVA-induced DNA damage increased in a linear dose-dependent manner. The rate of DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites after exposure to 1J/cm(2) was similar to the rate induced by exposure to 1 Gy of X-rays or 25 μM hydrogen peroxide. The presence of either the hydroxyl radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide or the singlet oxygen quencher sodium azide resulted in a significant reduction in the UVA-induced DNA damage, suggesting a role for these reactive oxygen species in mediating UVA-induced DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites. We also showed that chromatin relaxation due to hypertonic conditions resulted in increased damage in both untreated and UVA-treated cells. The effect was the most significant in the presence of 0.5M Na(+), implying a role for histone H1. Our data suggest that the majority of DNA single-strand breaks and alkali-labile sites after exposure of human lymphocytes to UVA are produced by reactive oxygen species (the hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen) and that the state of chromatin may substantially contribute to the outcome of such exposures.

  7. 68Zn isotope exchange experiments reveal an unusual kinetic lability of the metal ions in the di-zinc form of IMP-1 metallo-beta-lactamase.

    PubMed

    Siemann, Stefan; Badiei, Hamid R; Karanassios, Vassili; Viswanatha, Thammaiah; Dmitrienko, Gary I

    2006-02-01

    The apparently paradoxical behaviour of facile exchange (kinetic lability) of tightly bound (thermodynamic stability) zinc ions in the enzyme IMP-1 metallo-beta-lactamase with Zn-68 and cadmium ions, as indicated by in-torch vaporization inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ITV-ICP-MS) and electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), is consistent with the involvement of a third metal ion in promoting Lewis acid/base type exchange processes.

  8. Mechanisms of recovery from sublethal damage and potentially lethal damage induced by BrdUrd/313 nm light treatment: alkali-labile lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, M. P.; Han, A.; Smith, V. N.

    1984-01-01

    BrdUrd pulse labelling of synchronous Chinese hamster cell cultures was used to correlate repair of sublethal damage with removal of alkali-labile lesions. Both processes were modified in a quantitatively similar manner by cysteamine. In addition, the age responses for repair of sublethal damage and for cysteamine reduction of repair agreed. Through the use of thymidine as an S-phase-blocking agent it was further demonstrated that progression past the S-phase of the cell cycle was required for the loss of resistance to UVB light in BrdUrd-substituted cells. Similarly, a thymidine block administered before synthesis upon the BrdUrd-substituted template prevented the cell from acquiring the sensitivity to UVB light normally associated with synthesis on a lesioned template. The UVB-light-sensitive mutant V79-UC was shown to have reduced capacities both for the accumulation of sublethal injury and for the removal of alkali-labile lesions. These data support the notion that alkali-labile lesions are responsible for sublethal damage in BrdUrd pulse-labelled Chinese hamster cells. PMID:6582920

  9. Total and labile metals in surface sediments of the tropical river-estuary system of Marabasco (Pacific coast of Mexico): Influence of an iron mine.

    PubMed

    Marmolejo-Rodríguez, Ana Judith; Prego, Ricardo; Meyer-Willerer, Alejandro; Shumilin, Evgueni; Cobelo-García, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Marabasco is a tropical river-estuary system comprising the Marabasco river and the Barra de Navidad Lagoon. The river is impacted by the Peña Colorada iron mine, which produces 3.5 million tons of pellets per year. Thirteen surface sediment samples were collected in May 2005 (dry season) in order to establish background levels of Al, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn in the system and to ascertain the potential mobility of metals in the sediments. Analyses were carried out in the fraction finer than 63 microm, and labile metals extracted according the BCR procedure. Certified reference materials were used for validation of methods. Total concentrations of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn were in the range of 0.05-0.34, 6-95, 0.7-31, 9-26, 2-18, and 53-179 mgkg(-1), respectively; Al and Fe ranges of 24-127, and 26-69 mgg(-1) correspondingly. Cadmium was found to be significantly labile in the sediments (20-100%), followed by Co (0-35%), Ni (3-16%) and Zn (0-25%), whereas the labile fraction for Cu, Fe and Pb was almost negligible (<4%). According with the total metal concentrations, background levels and normalised enrichment factors (NEF) of the metals studied, the impact of the Peña Colorada iron mine on the Marabasco system is lower than expected when compared with other similar World systems influenced by mining activities.

  10. Anaerobic BTEX degradation in oil sands tailings ponds: Impact of labile organic carbon and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stasik, Sebastian; Wick, Lukas Y; Wendt-Potthoff, Katrin

    2015-11-01

    The extraction of bitumen from oil sands in Alberta (Canada) produces volumes of tailings that are pumped into large anaerobic settling-basins. Beside bitumen, tailings comprise fractions of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) that derive from the application of industrial solvents. Due to their toxicity and volatility, BTEX pose a strong concern for gas- and water-phase environments in the vicinity of the ponds. The examination of two pond profiles showed that concentrations of indigenous BTEX decreased with depth, pointing at BTEX transformation in situ. With depth, the relative contribution of ethylbenzene and xylenes to total BTEX significantly decreased, while benzene increased relatively from 44% to 69%, indicating preferential hydrocarbon degradation. To predict BTEX turnover and residence time, we determined BTEX degradation rates in tailings of different depths in a 180-days microcosm study. In addition, we evaluated the impact of labile organic substrates (e.g. acetate) generally considered to stimulate hydrocarbon degradation and the contribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to BTEX turnover. In all depths, BTEX concentrations significantly decreased due to microbial activity, with degradation rates ranging between 4 and 9 μg kg(-1) d(-1). BTEX biodegradation decreased linearly in correlation with initial concentrations, suggesting a concentration-dependent BTEX transformation. SRB were not significantly involved in BTEX consumption, indicating the importance of methanogenic degradation. BTEX removal decreased to 70-90% in presence of organic substrates presumptively due to an accumulation of acetate that lowered BTEX turnover due to product inhibition. In those assays SRB slightly stimulated BTEX transformation by reducing inhibitory acetate levels.

  11. A simple and inexpensive enteric-coated capsule for delivery of acid-labile macromolecules to the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Miller, Darren S; Parsons, Anne Michelle; Bresland, John; Herde, Paul; Pham, Duc Minh; Tan, Angel; Hsu, Hung-yao; Prestidge, Clive A; Kuchel, Tim; Begg, Rezaul; Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul; Butler, Ross N

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the ecology of the gastrointestinal tract and the impact of the contents on the host mucosa is emerging as an important area for defining both wellness and susceptibility to disease. Targeted delivery of drugs to treat specific small intestinal disorders such as small bowel bacterial overgrowth and targeting molecules to interrogate or to deliver vaccines to the remote regions of the small intestine has proven difficult. There is an unmet need for methodologies to release probes/drugs to remote regions of the gastrointestinal tract in furthering our understanding of gut health and pathogenesis. In order to address this concern, we need to know how the regional delivery of a surrogate labeled test compound is handled and in turn, if delivered locally as a liquid or powder, the dynamics of its subsequent handling and metabolism. In the studies we report on in this paper, we chose (13)C sodium acetate ((13)C-acetate), which is a stable isotope probe that once absorbed in the small intestine can be readily measured non-invasively by collection and analysis of (13)CO2 in the breath. This would provide information of gastric emptying rates and an indication of the site of release and absorptive capacity. In a series of in vitro and in vivo pig experiments, we assessed the enteric-protective properties of a commercially available polymer EUDRAGIT(®) L100-55 on gelatin capsules and also on DRcaps(®). Test results demonstrated that DRcaps(®) coated with EUDRAGIT(®) L100-55 possessed enhanced enteric-protective properties, particularly in vivo. These studies add to the body of knowledge regarding gastric emptying in pigs and also begin the process of gathering specifications for the design of a simple and cost-effective enteric-coated capsule for delivery of acid-labile macromolecules to the small intestine.

  12. Variable effects of labile carbon on the carbon use of different microbial groups in black slate degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Anne-Gret; Trumbore, Susan; Xu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Dachung; Kothe, Erika; Gleixner, Gerd

    2011-05-01

    Weathering of ancient organic matter contributes significantly to biogeochemical carbon cycles over geological times. The principle role of microorganisms in this process is well recognized. However, information is lacking on the contribution of individual groups of microorganisms and on the effect of labile carbon sources to the degradation process. Therefore, we investigated the contribution of fungi, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in the degradation process using a column experiment. Investigations were performed on low metamorphic black slates. All columns contained freshly crushed, sieved (0.63-2 mm), not autoclaved black slates. Two columns were inoculated with the lignite-degrading fungus Schizophyllum commune and received a culture medium containing 13C labeled glucose, two columns received only this culture medium and two control columns received only water. The total mass balance was calculated from all carbon added to the slate and the CO 2 and DOC losses. Phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) were extracted to investigate microbial communities. We used both the compound specific 14C and 13C signal of the PLFA to quantify carbon uptake from black slates and the glucose of the culture medium, respectively. The total carbon loss in these columns exceeded the amount of added carbon by approximately 60%, indicating that black slate carbon has been used. PLFA associated with Gram-positive bacteria dominated the indigenous community and took up 22% of carbon from black slate carbon, whereas PLFA of Gram-negative bacteria used only 8% of carbon from the slates. PLFA of Gram-negative bacteria and fungi were both mostly activated by the glucose addition. The added Schizophyllum did not establish well in the columns and was overgrown by the indigenous microbial community. Our results suggest that especially Gram-positive bacteria are able to live on and degrade black slate material. They also benefit from easy degradable carbon from the nutrient broth. In

  13. Allele variants of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin are globally transmitted and associated with colonization factors.

    PubMed

    Joffré, Enrique; von Mentzer, Astrid; Abd El Ghany, Moataz; Oezguen, Numan; Savidge, Tor; Dougan, Gordon; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Sjöling, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. ETEC-mediated diarrhea is orchestrated by heat-labile toxin (LT) and heat-stable toxins (STp and STh), acting in concert with a repertoire of more than 25 colonization factors (CFs). LT, the major virulence factor, induces fluid secretion after delivery of a monomeric ADP-ribosylase (LTA) and its pentameric carrier B subunit (LTB). A study of ETEC isolates from humans in Brazil reported the existence of natural LT variants. In the present study, analysis of predicted amino acid sequences showed that the LT amino acid polymorphisms are associated with a geographically and temporally diverse set of 192 clinical ETEC strains and identified 12 novel LT variants. Twenty distinct LT amino acid variants were observed in the globally distributed strains, and phylogenetic analysis showed these to be associated with different CF profiles. Notably, the most prevalent LT1 allele variants were correlated with major ETEC lineages expressing CS1 + CS3 or CS2 + CS3, and the most prevalent LT2 allele variants were correlated with major ETEC lineages expressing CS5 + CS6 or CFA/I. LTB allele variants generally exhibited more-stringent amino acid sequence conservation (2 substitutions identified) than LTA allele variants (22 substitutions identified). The functional impact of LT1 and LT2 polymorphisms on virulence was investigated by measuring total-toxin production, secretion, and stability using GM1-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (GM1-ELISA) and in silico protein modeling. Our data show that LT2 strains produce 5-fold more toxin than LT1 strains (P < 0.001), which may suggest greater virulence potential for this genetic variant. Our data suggest that functionally distinct LT-CF variants with increased fitness have persisted during the evolution of ETEC and have spread globally. PMID:25404692

  14. Accelerated junctional rhythm and non-alternans repolarization lability precede ventricular tachycardia in Casq2−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Mezu, Ure; Singh, Prabhpreet; Shusterman, Vladimir; Hwang, Hyun Seok; Knollmann, Bjorn C.; Němec, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background Calsequestrin-2 (CASQ2) is a Ca2+ buffering protein of myocardial sarcoplasmic reticulum. CASQ2 mutations underlie a form of catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). The CPVT phenotype is recapitulated in Casq2−/− mice. Repolarization lability (RL) - beat-to-beat variability in the T wave morphology - has been reported in long-QT syndrome, but has not been evaluated in CPVT. Methods and Results ECG from Casq2−/− mice was evaluated with respect to heart rate (HR) and RL changes prior to onset of ventricular tachycardia (VT) to gain insight into arrhythmogenesis in CPVT. Telemetry from unrestrained mice (3-month-old males, 5 animals of each genotype) and ECG before and after isoproterenol administration in anesthetized mice was analyzed. Average HR in sinus rhythm (SR), occurrence of non-sinus rhythm and RL were quantified. HR was slower in Casq2−/− animals. Accelerated junctional rhythm (JR) occurred more frequently in Casq2−/− mice and often preceded VT. In Casq2−/− mice, HR increased prior to VT onset, prior to onset of JR and on transition from JR to VT. RL increased during progression from SR to VT and after isoproterenol administration in Casq2−/−, but not in Casq2+/+ animals. Isoproterenol did not increase repolarization alternans in either genotype. Conclusions Accelerated JR, likely caused by triggered activity in His/Purkinje system, occurs frequently in Casq2−/− mice. Absence of CASQ2 results in increased RL. Increase in HR and in RL precede onset of arrhythmias in this CPVT model. Non-alternans RL precedes ventricular arrhythmia in wider range of conditions than previously appreciated. PMID:22860618

  15. The acid-labile subunit is required for full effects of exogenous growth hormone on growth and carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Iori; Giesy, Sarah L; Harvatine, Kevin J; Kim, Jin Wook; Boisclair, Yves R

    2009-07-01

    Normal postnatal growth is dependent in part on overlapping actions of GH and IGF-I. These actions reflect GH stimulation of IGF-I production in liver and extrahepatic tissues, representing respectively the endocrine and autocrine/paracrine arms of the IGF system. Recent experiments in genetically modified mice show that each source of IGF-I can compensate for absence of the other but do not resolve their relative role in postnatal growth. In an effort to address this issue, we studied the GH responsiveness of mice harboring a null mutation of the acid-labile subunit (ALS). Null ALS mice have a substantial reduction in endocrine IGF-I but, unlike other models of plasma IGF-I deficiency, have no obvious additional endocrine defects. Wild type and null ALS mice of both sexes received daily sc injections of saline or recombinant bovine GH between d 35 and 63 of postnatal age. The GH-stimulated body weight gain of null ALS mice was reduced by more than 30% relative to wild type mice, irrespective of sex. Reductions in GH responsiveness were also seen for kidney and linear growth. Absence of ALS eliminated the ability of GH to increase plasma IGF-I despite intact GH-dependent stimulation of IGF-I expression in liver, adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle. GH treatment was also less efficient in antagonizing insulin action in null ALS mice. Overall, these results suggest that the GH effects mediated by endocrine IGF-I depends on ALS, and accordingly null ALS mice are less responsive to exogenous GH therapy.

  16. Comparative Adjuvant Effects of Type II Heat-Labile Enterotoxins in Combination with Two Different Candidate Ricin Toxin Vaccine Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Christopher J.; Rong, Yinghui; Mandell, Lorrie M.; Connell, Terry D.

    2015-01-01

    Type II heat-labile enterotoxins (HLTs) constitute a promising set of adjuvants that have been shown to enhance humoral and cellular immune responses when coadministered with an array of different proteins, including several pathogen-associated antigens. However, the adjuvant activities of the four best-studied HLTs, LT-IIa, LT-IIb, LT-IIbT13I, and LT-IIc, have never been compared side by side. We therefore conducted immunization studies in which LT-IIa, LT-IIb, LT-IIbT13I, and LT-IIc were coadministered by the intradermal route to mice with two clinically relevant protein subunit vaccine antigens derived from the enzymatic A subunit (RTA) of ricin toxin, RiVax and RVEc. The HLTs were tested with low and high doses of antigen and were assessed for their abilities to stimulate antigen-specific serum IgG titers, ricin toxin-neutralizing activity (TNA), and protective immunity. We found that all four HLTs tested were effective adjuvants when coadministered with RiVax or RVEc. LT-IIa was of particular interest because as little as 0.03 μg when coadministered with RiVax or RVEc proved effective at augmenting ricin toxin-specific serum antibody titers with nominal evidence of local inflammation. Collectively, these results justify the need for further studies into the mechanism(s) underlying LT-IIa adjuvant activity, with the long-term goal of evaluating LT-IIa's activity in humans. PMID:26491037

  17. A simple and inexpensive enteric-coated capsule for delivery of acid-labile macromolecules to the small intestine*

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Darren S.; Parsons, Anne Michelle; Bresland, John; Herde, Paul; Pham, Duc Minh; Tan, Angel; Hsu, Hung-yao; Prestidge, Clive A.; Kuchel, Tim; Begg, Rezaul; Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul; Butler, Ross N.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the ecology of the gastrointestinal tract and the impact of the contents on the host mucosa is emerging as an important area for defining both wellness and susceptibility to disease. Targeted delivery of drugs to treat specific small intestinal disorders such as small bowel bacterial overgrowth and targeting molecules to interrogate or to deliver vaccines to the remote regions of the small intestine has proven difficult. There is an unmet need for methodologies to release probes/drugs to remote regions of the gastrointestinal tract in furthering our understanding of gut health and pathogenesis. In order to address this concern, we need to know how the regional delivery of a surrogate labeled test compound is handled and in turn, if delivered locally as a liquid or powder, the dynamics of its subsequent handling and metabolism. In the studies we report on in this paper, we chose 13C sodium acetate (13C-acetate), which is a stable isotope probe that once absorbed in the small intestine can be readily measured non-invasively by collection and analysis of 13CO2 in the breath. This would provide information of gastric emptying rates and an indication of the site of release and absorptive capacity. In a series of in vitro and in vivo pig experiments, we assessed the enteric-protective properties of a commercially available polymer EUDRAGIT®L100-55 on gelatin capsules and also on DRcaps®. Test results demonstrated that DRcaps®coated with EUDRAGIT®L100-55 possessed enhanced enteric-protective properties, particularly in vivo. These studies add to the body of knowledge regarding gastric emptying in pigs and also begin the process of gathering specifications for the design of a simple and cost-effective enteric-coated capsule for delivery of acid-labile macromolecules to the small intestine. PMID:26160716

  18. Evaluation of acid-labile S-protecting groups to prevent Cys racemization in Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hibino, Hajime; Miki, Yasuyoshi; Nishiuchi, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Phosphonium and uronium salt-based reagents enable efficient and effective coupling reactions and are indispensable in peptide chemistry, especially in machine-assisted SPPS. However, after the activating and coupling steps with these reagents in the presence of tertiary amines, Fmoc derivatives of Cys are known to be considerably racemized during their incorporation. To avoid this side reaction, a coupling method mediated by phosphonium/uronium reagents with a weaker base, such as 2,4,6-trimethylpyridine, than the ordinarily used DIEA or that by carbodiimide has been recommended. However, these methods are appreciably inferior to the standard protocol applied for SPPS, that is, a 1 min preactivation procedure of coupling with phosphonium or uronium reagents/DIEA in DMF, in terms of coupling efficiency, and also the former method cannot reduce racemization of Cys(Trt) to an acceptable level (<1.0%) even when the preactivation procedure is omitted. Here, the 4,4′-dimethoxydiphenylmethyl and 4-methoxybenzyloxymethyl groups were demonstrated to be acid-labile S-protecting groups that can suppress racemization of Cys to an acceptable level (<1.0%) when the respective Fmoc derivatives are incorporated via the standard SPPS protocol of phosphonium or uronium reagents with the aid of DIEA in DMF. Furthermore, these protecting groups significantly reduced the rate of racemization compared to the Trt group even in the case of microwave-assisted SPPS performed at a high temperature. © 2013 The Authors. European Peptide Society published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24357151

  19. Development of pH-sensitive self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems for acid-labile lipophilic drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tianjing; Maniglio, Devid; Chen, Jie; Chen, Bin; Migliaresi, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Oral administration is the most convenient way of all the drug delivery routes. Orally administered bioactive compounds must resist the harsh acidic fluids or enzyme digestion in stomach, to reach their absorbed destination in small intestine. This is the case for silibinin, a drug used to protect liver cells against toxins that has also been demonstrated in vitro to possess anti-cancer effects. However, as many other drugs, silibinin can degrade in the stomach due to the action of the gastric fluid. The use of pH-sensitive self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (pH-SNEDDS) could overcome the drawback due to degradation of the drug in the stomach while enhancing its solubility and dissolution rate. In this paper we have investigated pH-sensitive self-nanoemulsifying formulations containing silibinin as model drug. Pseudo-ternary phase diagrams have been constructed in order to identify the self-emulsification regions under different pH. Solubility of silibinin in selected formulations has been assessed and stability of the pure drug and of the silibinin loaded pH-SNEDDS formulations in simulated gastric fluid had been compared. Droplet size of the optimized pH-SNEDDS has been correlated to pH, volume of dilution medium and silibinin loading amount. TEM (transmission electron microscopy) studies have shown that emulsion droplets had spherical shape and narrow size distribution. In vitro drug release studies of the optimal pH-SNEDDS indicated substantial increase of the drug release and release rate in comparison to pure silibinin and to the commercial silibinin tablet. The results indicated that pH-SNEDDS have potential to improve the biopharmaceutics properties of acid-labile lipophilic drugs.

  20. Pseudobulbar affect (PBA) in an incident ALS cohort: results from the Apulia registry (SLAP).

    PubMed

    Tortelli, Rosanna; Copetti, Massimiliano; Arcuti, Simona; Tursi, Marianna; Iurillo, Annalisa; Barulli, Maria Rosaria; Cortese, Rosa; Capozzo, Rosa; D'Errico, Eustachio; Marin, Benoit; Simone, Isabella Laura; Logroscino, Giancarlo

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency and the clinical correlations of pseudobulbar affect (PBA) in a population-based incident cohort of ALS patients. Incident ALS cases, diagnosed in 2011 and 2012, according to El Escorial criteria were enrolled from a prospective population-based registry in Apulia, Southern Italy. Neurological status was assessed using a standard neurological examination and the revised ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRSr). The Center for Neurologic Study-Lability Scale (CNS-LS), a self-administered questionnaire, was used to evaluate the presence and severity of PBA. Total scores range from 7 to 35. A score ≥13 was used to identify the presence of PBA. One-hundred thirty-two sporadic incident ALS cases were enrolled. Median disease duration was 20 months (range 2-143), median onset-diagnosis interval (ODI) 12 months (range 2-131), median ALSFRSr at baseline 36/48 (range 2-47) and median ALSFRSr bulbar sub-score 10/12 (range 0-12). Neurological examination revealed presence of PBA in 34/132 patients (26%). Pathological CNS-LS score was found in 45/132 patients (34%). Median total CNS-LS score was 9/35 (range 7-29). The subgroup with pathological CNS-LS was characterized by a short disease duration from symptom onset, ODI, time to diffusion to a second region, time to generalization and ALSFRSr bulbar sub-score, bulbar onset, "definite" diagnostic category, bulbar upper motor-neuron involvement and presence of PBA at neurological examination. In population-based setting, one-third of ALS patients present PBA at diagnosis. The presence of PBA is associated with bulbar UMN involvement and markers of a more severe phenotype.

  1. Acid-labile sulfides in shallow marine bottom sediments: A review of the impact on ecosystems in the Azov Sea, the NE Black Sea shelf and NW Adriatic lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, Yu. I.; Zakuskina, O. Yu

    2012-02-01

    Acid-labile sulfides (LS) increase in bottom sediments at sites in the Azov Sea, at the NE Black Sea shelf and in the coastal lagoons of NW Adriatic Sea experiencing direct impacts of anthropogenic pollution. Fresh anthropogenic organic matter stimulates the bacterial sulfate reduction and here the rate of the LS production overcomes their loss during the oxidation and pyritization. This results in the expansion of reduced sediment layer up to the bottom surface. The LS concentration in the reduced sediments varies between 300 and 2000 mg S l -1 of wet silt depending on the size of pollution loading and on the rate of sedimentation. In the oxidized sediments away from the direct pollution impact, the LS concentration did not exceed 100-150 mg S l -1. Being a strong cytochrome toxin, the LS adversely affect the coastal ecosystems. The concentrations over 600 mg S l -1 result in quasi total benthic mortality whereas >300-400 mg S l -1 depletes the benthic faunal abundance and taxonomic diversity. Accumulation of the LS in sediments also induces nocturnal hypoxia and stimulates domination of toxic cyanobacteria in the pelagic phytocenoses.

  2. [Affective dependency].

    PubMed

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy.

  3. [Affective dependency].

    PubMed

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy. PMID:23888587

  4. Mineralization of organic-matter labile fragments in the humus-accumulative horizon of soddy-podzolic soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, S. Ya.; Lazarev, A. S.; Fokin, A. D.

    2012-12-01

    The mineralization rate of the 14C-labeled organic matter (OM) in the humus-accumulative AE horizon of a soddy-podzolic soil was determined in a laboratory experiment. The labeling was performed in a field experiment when microamounts of 14C-labeled glucose, glycine, and uracil were added to tree waste in sacks embedded in the upper layer of the forest litter. Samples containing 14C were taken from the AE horizon (above which the sacks with the labeled material were placed) 7 and 20 months after the beginning of the experiment. The soil samples were wetted to a water content corresponding to ˜80% of the total water capacity and placed in hermetic vessels containing vials with a periodically renewed alkali solution. The incubation was performed at room temperature for 3.5 months; the alkali solutions in the vials were replaced and titrated 12 times during this period. Mineralization curves were plotted from the amounts of carbon dioxide absorbed by a 0.3 N NaOH solution, which were calculated for each time interval; its 14C content was determined by the scintillation method. The experimental treatments also included the determination of the OM mineralization rate in material from the AE horizon pretreated with a heavy liquid or a heavy liquid and a 0.1 N NaOH solution. The differences between the mineralization rates of the labeled organic matter applied to the soil in the form of glucose, glycine, and uracil under the field conditions after the interaction for 7 and 20 months were revealed. The changes in the mineralization rate after the successive extraction of the labile organic matter with a heavy liquid and a 0.1 N NaOH solution were studied. It was shown that the transformation of the labeled low-molecular-weight organic compounds in the soil over 20 months included their strong inclusion into the humus composition, which was confirmed by the similar values of the mineralization constants of the native and 14C-labeled OM. In addition, the treatments with the

  5. pH-responsive biodegradable micelles based on acid-labile polycarbonate hydrophobe: synthesis and triggered drug release.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Meng, Fenghua; Li, Feng; Ji, Shun-Jun; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2009-07-13

    pH-responsive biodegradable micelles were prepared from block copolymers comprising of a novel acid-labile polycarbonate hydrophobe and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Two new cyclic aliphatic carbonate monomers, mono-2,4,6-trimethoxybenzylidene-pentaerythritol carbonate (TMBPEC, 2a) and mono-4-methoxybenzylidene-pentaerythritol carbonate (MBPEC, 2b) were designed and successfully synthesized via a two-step procedure. The ring-opening polymerization of 2a or 2b in the presence of methoxy PEG in dichloromethane at 50 °C using zinc bis[bis(trimethylsilyl)amide] as a catalyst yielded the corresponding block copolymers PEG-PTMBPEC (3a) or PEG-PMBPEC (3b) with low polydispersities (PDI 1.03-1.04). The copolymerization of D,L-lactide (DLLA) and 2a under otherwise the same conditions could also proceed smoothly to afford PEG-P(TMBPEC-co-DLLA) (3c) block copolymer. These block copolymers readily formed micelles in water with sizes of about 120 nm as determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The hydrolysis of the acetals of the polycarbonate was investigated using UV/vis spectroscopy. The results showed that the acetals of micelles 3a, while stable at pH 7.4 are prone to rapid hydrolysis at mildly acidic pH of 4.0 and 5.0, with a half-life of 1 and 6.5 h, respectively. The acetal hydrolysis resulted in significant swelling of micelles, as a result of change of hydrophobic polycarbonate to hydrophilic polycarbonate. In comparison, the acetals of PMBPEC of micelles 3b displayed obviously slower hydrolysis at the same pH. Both paclitaxel and doxorubicin could be efficiently encapsulated into micelles 3a achieving high drug loading content (13.0 and 11.7 wt %, respectively). The in vitro release studies showed clearly a pH dependent release behavior, that is, significantly faster drug release at mildly acidic pH of 4.0 and 5.0 compared to physiological pH. These pH-responsive biodegradable micelles are promising as smart nanovehicles for targeted delivery of anticancer drugs.

  6. Relationship between heat-labile enterotoxin secretion capacity and virulence in wild type porcine-origin enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Wijemanne, Prageeth; Xing, Jun; Berberov, Emil M; Marx, David B; Francis, David H; Moxley, Rodney A

    2015-01-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) is an important virulence factor secreted by some strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). The prototypic human-origin strain H10407 secretes LT via a type II secretion system (T2SS). We sought to determine the relationship between the capacity to secrete LT and virulence in porcine-origin wild type (WT) ETEC strains. Sixteen WT ETEC strains isolated from cases of severe diarrheal disease were analyzed by GM1ganglioside enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure LT concentrations in culture supernatants. All strains had detectable LT in supernatants by 2 h of culture and 1 strain, which was particularly virulent in gnotobiotic piglets (3030-2), had the highest LT secretion level all porcine-origin WT strains tested (P<0.05). The level of LT secretion (concentration in supernatants at 6-h culture) explained 92% of the variation in time-to-a-moribund-condition (R2 = 0.92, P<0.0001) in gnotobiotic piglets inoculated with either strain 3030-2, or an ETEC strain of lesser virulence (2534-86), or a non-enterotoxigenic WT strain (G58-1). All 16 porcine ETEC strains were positive by PCR analysis for the T2SS genes, gspD and gspK, and bioinformatic analysis of 4 porcine-origin strains for which complete genomic sequences were available revealed a T2SS with a high degree of homology to that of H10407. Maximum Likelihood phylogenetic trees constructed using T2SS genes gspC, gspD, gspE and homologs showed that strains 2534-86 and 3030-2 clustered together in the same clade with other porcine-origin ETEC strains in the database, UMNK88 and UMN18. Protein modeling of the ATPase gene (gspE) further revealed a direct relationship between the predicted ATP-binding capacities and LT secretion levels as follows: H10407, -8.8 kcal/mol and 199 ng/ml; 3030-2, -8.6 kcal/mol and 133 ng/ml; and 2534-86, -8.5 kcal/mol and 80 ng/ml. This study demonstrated a direct relationship between predicted ATP-binding capacity of GspE and LT secretion, and

  7. Warming Alters the Routing of Labile and Slower-Turnover Carbon Through Distinct Microbial Groups in Boreal Forest Organic Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, S. E.; Billings, S. A.; Lane, C. S.; Li, J.; Fogel, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    with warming may also signify a source of N potentially supporting the enhanced microbial biomass and routing of the more labile, high C:N Oi through Gram-positive bacteria. Furthermore, the shifts in microbial substrate routing and biomass increases with warming observed here underscore the potential for changing proportions of microbial necromass components with warming and their contributions to SOC.

  8. Microphytobenthos in the Gulf of Trieste (Northern Adriatic Sea): Relationship with Labile Sedimentary Organic Matter and Nutrients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welker, C.; Sdrigotti, E.; Covelli, S.; Faganeli, J.

    2002-08-01

    Seasonal and inter-annual variations of microphytobenthos and inorganic nutrients were examined in sediments sited at 20 m depth in the Gulf of Trieste (Northern Adriatic Sea). Seasonal changes in water-soluble carbohydrates and proteins were studied in order to obtain information on quality and quantity of labile organic matter and the role of microphytobenthos in producing these compounds. Annual variations in microphytobenthos abundance in the surface sediment layer (0-1 cm) in the months from November 1992 to October 1993 and from July 1995 to June 1996 were similar. The vertical distribution of microphytobenthos abundance revealed a decrease with sediment depth. The depth profiles of water-soluble carbohydrates concentrations revealed a marked decrease with sediment depth. The profiles of protein concentration showed a more irregular pattern than carbohydrates without a progressive decline with sediment depth. In the upper 7 cm of surface sediment, a significant correlation between microphytobenthos abundance and both water-soluble carbohydrates and protein concentration was noticed during the months from July 1995 to March 1996. This positive relationship between the biopolymeric fraction and the microphytobenthos abundance suggest that water-soluble charbohydrates, as exocellular polymeric substances, mostly originate from the metabolic activity of microphytobenthos, whereas the proteins might be a good indicator of the microalgal biomass. Proteins in lower sediment layers could be associated with benthic heterotrophs too. The inorganic nutrient concentration, at the sediment overlying water, evidenced temporal variations with similar annual patterns. Positive correlation between microphytobenthos abundance and ammonium and silicate concentrations, at the water-sediment interface, were found. The lack of correlation between microphytobenthos and nitrite/nitrate concentration can be explained considering that, for their growth, microalgae use ammonium rather

  9. From sixty-two interviews on 'the worst and the best episode of your life'. Relationships between internal working models and a grammatical scale of subject-object affective connections.

    PubMed

    Seganti, A; Carnevale, G; Mucelli, R; Solano, L; Target, M

    2000-06-01

    The authors address the issue of inferring unconscious internal working models of interaction through language. After reviewing Main's seminal work of linguistic assessment through the 'adult attachment interview', they stress the idea of adults' internal working models (IWMs) as information-processing devices, which give moment-to-moment sensory orientation in the face of any past or present, animate or inanimate object. They propose that a selective perception of the objects could match expected with actual influence of objects on the subject's self, through very simple 'parallel-processed' categories of internal objects. They further hypothesise that the isomorphism between internal working models of interaction and grammatical connections between subjects and objects within a clause could be a key to tracking positive and negative images of self and other during discourse. An experiment is reported applying the authors' 'scale of subject/object affective connection' to the narratives of sixty-two subjects asked to write about the 'worst' and 'best' episodes of their lives. Participants had previously been classified using Hazan & Shaver's self-reported 'attachment types' (avoidant, anxious and secure) categorising individuals' general expectations in relation to others. The findings were that the subject/object distribution of positive and negative experience, through verbs defined for this purpose as either performative or state verbs, did significantly differ between groups. In addition, different groups tended, during the best episodes, significantly to invert the trend of positive/negative subject/object distribution shown during the worst episode. Results are discussed in terms of a psychoanalytic theory of improvement through co-operative elaboration of negative relational issues.

  10. Acid-labile pHPMA modification of four-arm oligoaminoamide pDNA polyplexes balances shielding and gene transfer activity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Beckert, Linda; Kostka, Libor; Kessel, Eva; Krhac Levacic, Ana; Kostkova, Hana; Etrych, Tomas; Lächelt, Ulrich; Wagner, Ernst

    2016-08-01

    We report novel pH-reversibly surface-shielded polyplexes with enhanced gene transfer activity upon systemic administration. A four-arm-structured sequence-defined cationic oligomer KK[HK[(H-Sph-K)3HC]2]2 was designed and synthesized on solid-phase, containing additional lysine residues not only for improved pDNA polyplex stability, but also providing attachment points for subsequent polyplex functionalization with amine-reactive shielding polymers. Herein, the surface of polyplexes was shielded with hydrophilic polymers, monovalent PEG or monovalent and multivalent pHPMA, optionally attached to the polyplex via the acid-labile linker AzMMMan. Overall, surface modification with PEG or pHPMA resulted in a decrease in the zeta potential of polyplexes, consistent with the degree of surface shielding. At pH 6.0, only polyplexes modified via the acid-labile linkage showed an increase in zeta potential, consistent with a "deshielding" in acidic environment, expected as beneficial for endosomal escape. Shielding was more efficient for multivalent pHPMA (20kDa, 30kDa) as compared to monovalent pHPMA (10kDa, 20kDa, 30kDa) or PEG (5kDa). In vitro transfection studies revealed higher gene expression by the polyplexes with the acid-labile shield as compared to their irreversibly shielded counterparts. Intravenous administration of AzMMMan-pHPMA modified polyplexes in an in vivo tumor mouse model mediated enhanced gene expression in the subcutaneous tumor and reduced undesirable expression in the liver. PMID:27235729

  11. Fate of metals in coastal sediments of a Mediterranean flood-dominated system: An approach based on total and labile fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussiez, Vincent; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Radakovitch, Olivier; Probst, Jean-Luc; Monaco, André; Charrière, Bruno; Buscail, Roselyne

    2011-05-01

    The dynamics of sediment-bound metals (Cs, Cu, Ni, Pb, Ti and Zn) were studied off the Têt River (western Gulf of Lion), a typical Mediterranean coastal river punctuated by short and violent flash-floods. Spatial and temporal sampling strategies were combined to elucidate the fate of these elements in response to both the riverine sediment input and the offshore transport of these sediments through hydrodynamics. Our results show the temporal entrapment of riverborne particles and associated metals, consecutively to a major flood event, in the nearshore sedimentary unit called prodelta. Here, deposition and resuspension mechanisms define a sedimentological cycle that could be followed completely in this study. In terms of speciation between reactive (labile) and residual fractions along the fluvio-deltaic continuum, our results show that Cu, Pb and Zn are the most labile (potentially mobile) metals in the river, in accordance with their contributions from anthropogenic sources. But in the marine surficial sediments, two main behaviours can be discriminated when compared to the riverine suspended particulate matter. While Pb and Zn depict rather a constant labile fraction, Cu is characterized by decreasing levels (up to 50% difference). In terms of environmental impact, these contrasting trends have direct repercussions for the contaminant dispersal in the coastal area. Whereas Pb and Zn conserve their enhanced levels because of their stronger affinity with fine sediments, Cu is marked by the entire loss of its anthropogenic component that is progressively transferred to the dissolved phase, likely mediated by organic ligands. We ascribe these behaviours to different post-depositional partition mechanisms with respect to oxidation of the particulate organic phase at the bottom sediment/water interface. Also, analysis of one sediment core from the prodelta indicates that these early diagenetic processes govern the chemical forms of land-derived contaminants

  12. Acid-labile pHPMA modification of four-arm oligoaminoamide pDNA polyplexes balances shielding and gene transfer activity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Beckert, Linda; Kostka, Libor; Kessel, Eva; Krhac Levacic, Ana; Kostkova, Hana; Etrych, Tomas; Lächelt, Ulrich; Wagner, Ernst

    2016-08-01

    We report novel pH-reversibly surface-shielded polyplexes with enhanced gene transfer activity upon systemic administration. A four-arm-structured sequence-defined cationic oligomer KK[HK[(H-Sph-K)3HC]2]2 was designed and synthesized on solid-phase, containing additional lysine residues not only for improved pDNA polyplex stability, but also providing attachment points for subsequent polyplex functionalization with amine-reactive shielding polymers. Herein, the surface of polyplexes was shielded with hydrophilic polymers, monovalent PEG or monovalent and multivalent pHPMA, optionally attached to the polyplex via the acid-labile linker AzMMMan. Overall, surface modification with PEG or pHPMA resulted in a decrease in the zeta potential of polyplexes, consistent with the degree of surface shielding. At pH 6.0, only polyplexes modified via the acid-labile linkage showed an increase in zeta potential, consistent with a "deshielding" in acidic environment, expected as beneficial for endosomal escape. Shielding was more efficient for multivalent pHPMA (20kDa, 30kDa) as compared to monovalent pHPMA (10kDa, 20kDa, 30kDa) or PEG (5kDa). In vitro transfection studies revealed higher gene expression by the polyplexes with the acid-labile shield as compared to their irreversibly shielded counterparts. Intravenous administration of AzMMMan-pHPMA modified polyplexes in an in vivo tumor mouse model mediated enhanced gene expression in the subcutaneous tumor and reduced undesirable expression in the liver.

  13. Seasonal Dynamics of Soil Labile Organic Carbon and Enzyme Activities in Relation to Vegetation Types in Hangzhou Bay Tidal Flat Wetland.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xuexin; Yang, Wenying; Wu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Soil labile organic carbon and soil enzymes play important roles in the carbon cycle of coastal wetlands that have high organic carbon accumulation rates. Soils under three vegetations (Phragmites australis, Spartina alterniflora, and Scirpusm mariqueter) as well as bare mudflat in Hangzhou Bay wetland of China were collected seasonally. Seasonal dynamics and correlations of soil labile organic carbon fractions and soil enzyme activities were analyzed. The results showed that there were significant differences among vegetation types in the contents of soil organic carbon (SOC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), excepting for that of microbial biomass carbon (MBC). The P. australis soil was with the highest content of both SOC (7.86 g kg-1) and DOC (306 mg kg-1), while the S. mariqueter soil was with the lowest content of SOC (6.83 g kg-1), and the bare mudflat was with the lowest content of DOC (270 mg kg-1). Soil enzyme activities were significantly different among vegetation types except for urease. The P. australis had the highest annual average activity of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (21.4 mg kg-1 h-1), and the S. alterniflora had the highest annual average activities of β-glycosidase (4.10 mg kg-1 h-1) and invertase (9.81 mg g-1 24h-1); however, the bare mudflat had the lowest activities of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (16.2 mg kg-1 h-1), β-glycosidase (2.87 mg kg-1 h-1), and invertase (8.02 mg g-1 24h-1). Analysis also showed that the soil labile organic carbon fractions and soil enzyme activities had distinct seasonal dynamics. In addition, the soil MBC content was significantly correlated with the activities of urease and β-glucosidase. The DOC content was significantly correlated with the activities of urease, alkaline phosphomonoesterase, and invertase. The results indicated that vegetation type is an important factor influencing the spatial-temporal variation of soil enzyme activities and labile organic carbon in coastal wetlands.

  14. Seasonal Dynamics of Soil Labile Organic Carbon and Enzyme Activities in Relation to Vegetation Types in Hangzhou Bay Tidal Flat Wetland

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xuexin; Yang, Wenying; Wu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Soil labile organic carbon and soil enzymes play important roles in the carbon cycle of coastal wetlands that have high organic carbon accumulation rates. Soils under three vegetations (Phragmites australis, Spartina alterniflora, and Scirpusm mariqueter) as well as bare mudflat in Hangzhou Bay wetland of China were collected seasonally. Seasonal dynamics and correlations of soil labile organic carbon fractions and soil enzyme activities were analyzed. The results showed that there were significant differences among vegetation types in the contents of soil organic carbon (SOC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), excepting for that of microbial biomass carbon (MBC). The P. australis soil was with the highest content of both SOC (7.86 g kg-1) and DOC (306 mg kg-1), while the S. mariqueter soil was with the lowest content of SOC (6.83 g kg-1), and the bare mudflat was with the lowest content of DOC (270 mg kg-1). Soil enzyme activities were significantly different among vegetation types except for urease. The P. australis had the highest annual average activity of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (21.4 mg kg-1 h-1), and the S. alterniflora had the highest annual average activities of β-glycosidase (4.10 mg kg-1 h-1) and invertase (9.81mg g-1 24h-1); however, the bare mudflat had the lowest activities of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (16.2 mg kg-1 h-1), β-glycosidase (2.87 mg kg-1 h-1), and invertase (8.02 mg g-1 24h-1). Analysis also showed that the soil labile organic carbon fractions and soil enzyme activities had distinct seasonal dynamics. In addition, the soil MBC content was significantly correlated with the activities of urease and β-glucosidase. The DOC content was significantly correlated with the activities of urease, alkaline phosphomonoesterase, and invertase. The results indicated that vegetation type is an important factor influencing the spatial-temporal variation of soil enzyme activities and labile organic carbon in coastal wetlands. PMID:26560310

  15. Low bacterial diversity and high labile organic matter concentrations in the sediments of the Medee deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basin.

    PubMed

    Akoumianaki, Ioanna; Nomaki, Hidetaka; Pachiadaki, Maria; Kormas, Konstantinos Ar; Kitazato, Hiroshi; Tokuyama, Hidekazu

    2012-01-01

    Studies in the center and margin of the Medee Basin, a Mediterranean deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basin, and at a reference site during Penelope cruise (2007), revealed the existence of a 7 m-thick halocline, with high salinity (328 psu), and high sedimentary organic carbon and biopolymer concentrations. The 194 16S rRNA sequences retrieved were grouped into 118 unique phylotypes. Pseudomonas gessardii, dominated in the center, while 33 phylotypes were detected at the margin and 73 at the reference site. The study suggested conditions hostile to bacteria in the sediments of the Medee Basin and preservation of sedimentary labile organic matter. PMID:22504432

  16. Seasonal Dynamics of Soil Labile Organic Carbon and Enzyme Activities in Relation to Vegetation Types in Hangzhou Bay Tidal Flat Wetland.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xuexin; Yang, Wenying; Wu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Soil labile organic carbon and soil enzymes play important roles in the carbon cycle of coastal wetlands that have high organic carbon accumulation rates. Soils under three vegetations (Phragmites australis, Spartina alterniflora, and Scirpusm mariqueter) as well as bare mudflat in Hangzhou Bay wetland of China were collected seasonally. Seasonal dynamics and correlations of soil labile organic carbon fractions and soil enzyme activities were analyzed. The results showed that there were significant differences among vegetation types in the contents of soil organic carbon (SOC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), excepting for that of microbial biomass carbon (MBC). The P. australis soil was with the highest content of both SOC (7.86 g kg-1) and DOC (306 mg kg-1), while the S. mariqueter soil was with the lowest content of SOC (6.83 g kg-1), and the bare mudflat was with the lowest content of DOC (270 mg kg-1). Soil enzyme activities were significantly different among vegetation types except for urease. The P. australis had the highest annual average activity of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (21.4 mg kg-1 h-1), and the S. alterniflora had the highest annual average activities of β-glycosidase (4.10 mg kg-1 h-1) and invertase (9.81 mg g-1 24h-1); however, the bare mudflat had the lowest activities of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (16.2 mg kg-1 h-1), β-glycosidase (2.87 mg kg-1 h-1), and invertase (8.02 mg g-1 24h-1). Analysis also showed that the soil labile organic carbon fractions and soil enzyme activities had distinct seasonal dynamics. In addition, the soil MBC content was significantly correlated with the activities of urease and β-glucosidase. The DOC content was significantly correlated with the activities of urease, alkaline phosphomonoesterase, and invertase. The results indicated that vegetation type is an important factor influencing the spatial-temporal variation of soil enzyme activities and labile organic carbon in coastal wetlands. PMID:26560310

  17. Affective responses to dance.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Julia F; Pollick, Frank E; Lambrechts, Anna; Gomila, Antoni

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present work was the characterization of mechanisms by which affective experiences are elicited in observers when watching dance movements. A total of 203 dance stimuli from a normed stimuli library were used in a series of independent experiments. The following measures were obtained: (i) subjective measures of 97 dance-naïve participants' affective responses (Likert scale ratings, interviews); and (ii) objective measures of the physical parameters of the stimuli (motion energy, luminance), and of the movements represented in the stimuli (roundedness, impressiveness). Results showed that (i) participants' ratings of felt and perceived affect differed, (ii) felt and perceived valence but not arousal ratings correlated with physical parameters of the stimuli (motion energy and luminance), (iii) roundedness in posture shape was related to the experience of more positive emotion than edgy shapes (1 of 3 assessed rounded shapes showed a clear effect on positiveness ratings while a second reached trend level significance), (iv) more impressive movements resulted in more positive affective responses, (v) dance triggered affective experiences through the imagery and autobiographical memories it elicited in some people, and (vi) the physical parameters of the video stimuli correlated only weakly and negatively with the aesthetics ratings of beauty, liking and interest. The novelty of the present approach was twofold; (i) the assessment of multiple affect-inducing mechanisms, and (ii) the use of one single normed stimulus set. The results from this approach lend support to both previous and present findings. Results are discussed with regards to current literature in the field of empirical aesthetics and affective neuroscience.

  18. Affective responses to dance.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Julia F; Pollick, Frank E; Lambrechts, Anna; Gomila, Antoni

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present work was the characterization of mechanisms by which affective experiences are elicited in observers when watching dance movements. A total of 203 dance stimuli from a normed stimuli library were used in a series of independent experiments. The following measures were obtained: (i) subjective measures of 97 dance-naïve participants' affective responses (Likert scale ratings, interviews); and (ii) objective measures of the physical parameters of the stimuli (motion energy, luminance), and of the movements represented in the stimuli (roundedness, impressiveness). Results showed that (i) participants' ratings of felt and perceived affect differed, (ii) felt and perceived valence but not arousal ratings correlated with physical parameters of the stimuli (motion energy and luminance), (iii) roundedness in posture shape was related to the experience of more positive emotion than edgy shapes (1 of 3 assessed rounded shapes showed a clear effect on positiveness ratings while a second reached trend level significance), (iv) more impressive movements resulted in more positive affective responses, (v) dance triggered affective experiences through the imagery and autobiographical memories it elicited in some people, and (vi) the physical parameters of the video stimuli correlated only weakly and negatively with the aesthetics ratings of beauty, liking and interest. The novelty of the present approach was twofold; (i) the assessment of multiple affect-inducing mechanisms, and (ii) the use of one single normed stimulus set. The results from this approach lend support to both previous and present findings. Results are discussed with regards to current literature in the field of empirical aesthetics and affective neuroscience. PMID:27235953

  19. Incorporating Watershed-Scale Groundwater/Surface Water Interactions to Better Understand How ENSO/PDO Teleconnections Affect Streamflow Variability in Geologically Complex, Semiarid, Snow-Dominated Mountainous Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsinnajinnie, L.; Frisbee, M. D.; Wilson, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    In the Southwestern U.S., warm anomalies in the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are associated with increased probability of wetter than normal winter precipitation. For semiarid, snow-dominated mountainous watersheds, teleconnections, such as ENSO, may strongly affect the magnitude and timing of snowmelt pulses in streamflow. In examining stream-gage data, an implicit assumption is made that all the streamflow generation processes operative within the watershed are captured by the stream gage. However, zones of strong groundwater discharge to the stream alternating with zones of strong recharge from the stream may emerge in geologically complex watersheds. The spatial complexity of these groundwater/surface water interactions may not be captured in the stream-gage discharge data. This may not be a problem in watersheds where streamflow is generated primarily by shallow, fast runoff processes. In that case, changes associated with ENSO can be quickly apparent in streamflow (i.e., an increase in snowpack associated with warm ENSO anomalies will quickly translate to increases in daily and peak streamflow). However, the spatial complexity of groundwater/surface water interactions creates a problem in geologically complex watersheds where interactions with deep, regional groundwater are present. In this case, we test the hypothesis that the combined effect of complex geology and deep groundwater interactions creates phase shifts between peak snowpack, onset and peak of snowmelt pulses, and teleconnection indices. Using time-series analysis, the relationships between teleconnections, and metrics for snowpack and streamflow are evaluated for selected watersheds in New Mexico, Arizona, and Colorado. A phase shift (lag) is observed between the Oceanic Nino Index (ONI) and onset and peak of snowmelt pulses in streamflow in snow-dominated watersheds with complex geology across scales of 50 to 1600 km2. Additionally, strong relationships between teleconnections and

  20. Ranking factors affecting emissions of GHG from incubated agricultural soils

    PubMed Central

    García-Marco, S; Ravella, S R; Chadwick, D; Vallejo, A; Gregory, A S; Cárdenas, L M

    2014-01-01

    Agriculture significantly contributes to global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and there is a need to develop effective mitigation strategies. The efficacy of methods to reduce GHG fluxes from agricultural soils can be affected by a range of interacting management and environmental factors. Uniquely, we used the Taguchi experimental design methodology to rank the relative importance of six factors known to affect the emission of GHG from soil: nitrate (NO3−) addition, carbon quality (labile and non-labile C), soil temperature, water-filled pore space (WFPS) and extent of soil compaction. Grassland soil was incubated in jars where selected factors, considered at two or three amounts within the experimental range, were combined in an orthogonal array to determine the importance and interactions between factors with a L16 design, comprising 16 experimental units. Within this L16 design, 216 combinations of the full factorial experimental design were represented. Headspace nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations were measured and used to calculate fluxes. Results found for the relative influence of factors (WFPS and NO3− addition were the main factors affecting N2O fluxes, whilst glucose, NO3− and soil temperature were the main factors affecting CO2 and CH4 fluxes) were consistent with those already well documented. Interactions between factors were also studied and results showed that factors with little individual influence became more influential in combination. The proposed methodology offers new possibilities for GHG researchers to study interactions between influential factors and address the optimized sets of conditions to reduce GHG emissions in agro-ecosystems, while reducing the number of experimental units required compared with conventional experimental procedures that adjust one variable at a time. PMID:25177207

  1. Ranking factors affecting emissions of GHG from incubated agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    García-Marco, S; Ravella, S R; Chadwick, D; Vallejo, A; Gregory, A S; Cárdenas, L M

    2014-07-01

    Agriculture significantly contributes to global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and there is a need to develop effective mitigation strategies. The efficacy of methods to reduce GHG fluxes from agricultural soils can be affected by a range of interacting management and environmental factors. Uniquely, we used the Taguchi experimental design methodology to rank the relative importance of six factors known to affect the emission of GHG from soil: nitrate (NO3 (-)) addition, carbon quality (labile and non-labile C), soil temperature, water-filled pore space (WFPS) and extent of soil compaction. Grassland soil was incubated in jars where selected factors, considered at two or three amounts within the experimental range, were combined in an orthogonal array to determine the importance and interactions between factors with a L16 design, comprising 16 experimental units. Within this L16 design, 216 combinations of the full factorial experimental design were represented. Headspace nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations were measured and used to calculate fluxes. Results found for the relative influence of factors (WFPS and NO3 (-) addition were the main factors affecting N2O fluxes, whilst glucose, NO3 (-) and soil temperature were the main factors affecting CO2 and CH4 fluxes) were consistent with those already well documented. Interactions between factors were also studied and results showed that factors with little individual influence became more influential in combination. The proposed methodology offers new possibilities for GHG researchers to study interactions between influential factors and address the optimized sets of conditions to reduce GHG emissions in agro-ecosystems, while reducing the number of experimental units required compared with conventional experimental procedures that adjust one variable at a time. PMID:25177207

  2. MULTIPLE SCALES FOR SUSTAINABLE RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This session will highlight recent research that incorporates the use of multiple scales and innovative environmental accounting to better inform decisions that affect sustainability, resilience, and vulnerability at all scales. Effective decision-making involves assessment at mu...

  3. Treatment of PCR products with exonuclease I and heat-labile alkaline phosphatase improves the visibility of combined bisulfite restriction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Kousuke; Emoto, Noriko; Sunohara, Mitsuhiro; Kawakami, Masanori; Kage, Hidenori; Nagase, Takahide; Ohishi, Nobuya; Takai, Daiya

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Incubating PCR products at a high temperature causes smears in gel electrophoresis. {yields} Smears interfere with the interpretation of methylation analysis using COBRA. {yields} Treatment with exonuclease I and heat-labile alkaline phosphatase eliminates smears. {yields} The elimination of smears improves the visibility of COBRA. -- Abstract: DNA methylation plays a vital role in the regulation of gene expression. Abnormal promoter hypermethylation is an important mechanism of inactivating tumor suppressor genes in human cancers. Combined bisulfite restriction analysis (COBRA) is a widely used method for identifying the DNA methylation of specific CpG sites. Here, we report that exonuclease I and heat-labile alkaline phosphatase can be used for PCR purification for COBRA, improving the visibility of gel electrophoresis after restriction digestion. This improvement is observed when restriction digestion is performed at a high temperature, such as 60 {sup o}C or 65 {sup o}C, with BstUI and TaqI, respectively. This simple method can be applied instead of DNA purification using spin columns or phenol/chloroform extraction. It can also be applied to other situations when PCR products are digested by thermophile-derived restriction enzymes, such as PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis.

  4. Rigid Tether Directed Regioselective Synthesis and Crystallographic Characterization of Labile 1,2,3,4-Bis(triazolino)[60]fullerene and Its Thermolized Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Muqing; Bao, Lipiao; Peng, Ping; Zheng, Shushu; Xie, Yunpeng; Lu, Xing

    2016-09-19

    Labile bis-triazoline adducts of C60 are supposed to be the precursors of bis-azafulleroids, but the formation mechanism is still unclear because of the incomplete isolation of the thermolized products and the lack of X-ray structures. A rigid-tethered reagent 1,2-bis(azidomethyl)benzene (1) was used to regioselectively synthesize the labile 1,2,3,4-bis(triazolino)[60]-fullerene (2), the structure of which was determined by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. Further thermolysis of 2 produces four products (3 a-3 d), which were all characterized by X-ray crystallography. Although 3 a and 3 b have traditional bis-azafulleroid structures, as proposed previously, 3 c and 3 d show unprecedented structures with either the coexistence of [5,6]-open and [6,6]-closed patterns or an oxidized structure with an 11-membered ring on the cage. A thermolysis mechanism is proposed to clarify long-term confusion about the transformation process from bis-triazoline adducts to bis-azafulleroids of C60 . PMID:27559715

  5. Higher temperature sensitivity for stable than for labile soil organic carbon--evidence from incubations of long-term bare fallow soils.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Romain; Barré, Pierre; Moyano, Fernando E; Christensen, Bent T; Bardoux, Gérard; Eglin, Thomas; Girardin, Cyril; Houot, Sabine; Kätterer, Thomas; van Oort, Folkert; Chenu, Claire

    2014-02-01

    The impact of climate change on the stability of soil organic carbon (SOC) remains a major source of uncertainty in predicting future changes in atmospheric CO2 levels. One unsettled issue is whether the mineralization response to temperature depends on SOC mineralization rate. Long-term (>25 years) bare fallow experiments (LTBF) in which the soil is kept free of any vegetation and organic inputs, and their associated archives of soil samples represent a unique research platform to examine this issue as with increasing duration of fallow, the lability of remaining total SOC decreases. We retrieved soils from LTBF experiments situated at Askov (Denmark), Grignon (France), Ultuna (Sweden), and Versailles (France) and sampled at the start of the experiments and after 25, 50, 52, and 79 years of bare fallow, respectively. Soils were incubated at 4, 12, 20, and 35 °C and the evolved CO2 monitored. The apparent activation energy (Ea) of SOC was then calculated for similar loss of CO2 at the different temperatures. The Ea was always higher for samples taken at the end of the bare-fallow period, implying a higher temperature sensitivity of stable C than of labile C. Our results provide strong evidence for a general relationship between temperature sensitivity and SOC stability upon which significant improvements in predictive models could be based.

  6. Identification of a Gene within a Pathogenicity Island of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli H10407 Required for Maximal Secretion of the Heat-Labile Enterotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Fleckenstein, James M.; Lindler, Luther E.; Elsinghorst, Eric A.; Dale, James B.

    2000-01-01

    Studies of the pathogenesis of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) have largely centered on extrachromosomal determinants of virulence, in particular the plasmid-encoded heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable enterotoxins and the colonization factor antigens. ETEC causes illnesses that range from mild diarrhea to severe cholera-like disease. These differences in disease severity are not readily accounted for by our current understanding of ETEC pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that Tia, a putative adhesin of ETEC H10407, is encoded on a large chromosomal element of approximately 46 kb that shares multiple features with previously described E. coli pathogenicity islands. Further analysis of the region downstream from tia revealed the presence of several candidate open reading frames (ORFs) in the same transcriptional orientation as tia. The putative proteins encoded by these ORFs bear multiple motifs associated with bacterial secretion apparatuses. An in-frame deletion in one candidate gene identified here as leoA (labile enterotoxin output) resulted in marked diminution of secretion of the LT enterotoxin and lack of fluid accumulation in a rabbit ileal loop model of infection. Although previous studies have suggested that E. coli lacks the capacity to secrete LT, our studies show that maximal release of LT from the periplasm of H10407 is dependent on one or more elements encoded on a pathogenicity island. PMID:10768971

  7. Simultaneous determination of labile proton concentration and exchange rate utilizing optimal RF power: Radio frequency power (RFP) dependence of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2010-02-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is increasingly used to probe mobile proteins and microenvironment properties, and shows great promise for tumor and stroke diagnosis. However, CEST MRI contrast mechanism is complex, depending not only on the CEST agent concentration, exchange and relaxation properties, but also varying with experimental conditions such as magnetic field strength and RF power. Hence, it remains somewhat difficult to quantify apparent CEST MRI contrast for properties such as pH, temperature and protein content. In particular, CEST MRI is susceptible to RF spillover effects in that RF irradiation may directly saturate the bulk water MR signal, leading to an optimal RF power at which the CEST contrast is maximal. Whereas RF spillover is generally considered an adverse effect, it is noted here that the optimal RF power strongly varies with exchange rate, although with negligible dependence on labile proton concentration. An empirical solution suggested that optimal RF power may serve as a sensitive parameter for simultaneously determining the labile proton content and exchange rate, hence, allowing improved characterization of the CEST system. The empirical solution was confirmed by numerical simulation, and experimental validation is needed to further evaluate the proposed technique.

  8. Effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) sources and nature of solid extraction sorbent on recoverable DOM composition: Implication into potential lability of different compound groups.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meilian; Kim, Sunghwan; Park, Jae-Eun; Kim, Hyun Sik; Hur, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Noting the source-dependent properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM), this study explored the recoverable compounds by solid phase extraction (SPE) of two common sorbents (C18 and PPL) eluted with methanol solvent for contrasting DOM sources via fluorescence excitation-emission matrix coupled with parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Fresh algae and leaf litter extracts DOM, one riverine DOM, and one upstream lacustrine DOM were selected for the comparison. C18 sorbent was generally found to extract more diverse molecular formula, relatively higher molecular weight, and more heteroatomic DOM compounds within the studied mass range than PPL sorbent except for the leaf litter extract. Even with the same sorbent, the main molecular features of the two end member DOM were distributed on different sides of the axes of a multivariate ordination, indicating the source-dependent characteristics of the recoverable compounds by the sorbents. In addition, further examination of the molecular formula uniquely present in the two end members and the upstream lake DOM suggested that proteinaceous, tannin-like, and heteroatomic DOM constituents might be potential compound groups which are labile and easily degraded during their mobilization into downstream watershed. This study provides new insights into the sorbent selectivity of DOM from diverse sources and potential lability of various compound groups.

  9. Detection of a variable intracellular acid-labile carbon pool in Thalassiosira weissflogii (Heterokontophyta) and Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta) in response to changes in the seawater carbon system.

    PubMed

    Isensee, Kirsten; Erez, Jonathan; Stoll, Heather M

    2014-02-01

    Accumulation of an intracellular pool of carbon (C(i) pool) is one strategy by which marine algae overcome the low abundance of dissolved CO2 (CO2 (aq) ) in modern seawater. To identify the environmental conditions under which algae accumulate an acid-labile C(i) pool, we applied a (14) C pulse-chase method, used originally in dinoflagellates, to two new classes of algae, coccolithophorids and diatoms. This method measures the carbon accumulation inside the cells without altering the medium carbon chemistry or culture cell density. We found that the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii [(Grunow) G. Fryxell & Hasle] and a calcifying strain of the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi [(Lohmann) W. W. Hay & H. P. Mohler] develop significant acid-labile C(i) pools. C(i) pools are measureable in cells cultured in media with 2-30 µmol l(-1) CO2 (aq), corresponding to a medium pH of 8.6-7.9. The absolute C(i) pool was greater for the larger celled diatoms. For both algal classes, the C(i) pool became a negligible contributor to photosynthesis once CO2 (aq) exceeded 30 µmol l(-1) . Combining the (14) C pulse-chase method and (14) C disequilibrium method enabled us to assess whether E. huxleyi and T. weissflogii exhibited thresholds for foregoing accumulation of DIC or reduced the reliance on bicarbonate uptake with increasing CO2 (aq) . We showed that the C(i) pool decreases with higher CO2 :HCO3 (-) uptake rates.

  10. UVA and visible light photons produce frank strand breaks in human P3 cell DNA as well as a new class of alkali-labile lesion

    SciTech Connect

    Peak, M.J.; Peak, J.G.

    1994-05-01

    Human P3 epithelioid cells were exposed to UVA (290--400 nm), as well as to blue and green photons in the 400--520 mm region of the spectrum, and the production of strand breaks in their DNA was measured by using elution. After exposure to blue photons the profiles were convex (downturning), shown to be due to the induction of a mixture of frank single-strand DNA breaks (SSB) plus rapidly developing alkali-labile sites (ALS). as well as latent breaks that develop during the first 6 h of the elution, termed slowly developing alkali-labile sites (SDALS). A significant proportion of the lesions produced by P3 cells by blue light photons are SDALS, whereas green light photons at 520 nm and UVA photons at 365 nm produce no SDALS and the elution profiles are exponential. This is also the case for Chinese hamster ovary cells exposed to 405 nm, evidence that a unique chromophore in P3 cells that absorbs strongly in the blue region leads to the formation of SDALS. The similarity in induction of SDALS at 460 and 405 nm is evidence that the chromophore is not a porphyrin, because these compounds have sharp absorption maxima in the lower 400 nm region. The chemical nature of these lesions as well as the cellular responses to them remain enigmatic.

  11. Effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) sources and nature of solid extraction sorbent on recoverable DOM composition: Implication into potential lability of different compound groups.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meilian; Kim, Sunghwan; Park, Jae-Eun; Kim, Hyun Sik; Hur, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Noting the source-dependent properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM), this study explored the recoverable compounds by solid phase extraction (SPE) of two common sorbents (C18 and PPL) eluted with methanol solvent for contrasting DOM sources via fluorescence excitation-emission matrix coupled with parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Fresh algae and leaf litter extracts DOM, one riverine DOM, and one upstream lacustrine DOM were selected for the comparison. C18 sorbent was generally found to extract more diverse molecular formula, relatively higher molecular weight, and more heteroatomic DOM compounds within the studied mass range than PPL sorbent except for the leaf litter extract. Even with the same sorbent, the main molecular features of the two end member DOM were distributed on different sides of the axes of a multivariate ordination, indicating the source-dependent characteristics of the recoverable compounds by the sorbents. In addition, further examination of the molecular formula uniquely present in the two end members and the upstream lake DOM suggested that proteinaceous, tannin-like, and heteroatomic DOM constituents might be potential compound groups which are labile and easily degraded during their mobilization into downstream watershed. This study provides new insights into the sorbent selectivity of DOM from diverse sources and potential lability of various compound groups. PMID:27117255

  12. Psychometric properties of the Wender-Reimherr Adult Attention Deficit Disorder Scale.

    PubMed

    Marchant, Barrie K; Reimherr, Fred W; Robison, Diane; Robison, Reid J; Wender, Paul H

    2013-09-01

    The Wender-Reimherr adult attention deficit disorder scale (WRAADDS; Wender, 1995) is a clinician-rated scale based on the Utah Criteria for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults. It assesses ADHD symptom severity across 7 domains: attention difficulties, hyperactivity/restlessness, temper, affective lability, emotional over-reactivity, disorganization, and impulsivity. The normative sample consisted of 120 males and females ages 20-49 with no personal or family history of ADHD. Patients with ADHD met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) criteria, included males and females ages 20-60, and came from 5 clinical trials. Measures of reliability (test-retest r = .96; interrater r = .75) and internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.78) were acceptable. The WRAADDS correlated with the Conners' Adult ADHD Rating Scale (CAARS; Conners, Erhardt, & Sparrow, 1999) total scores (r = .501, p < .001). WRAADDS hyperactivity + impulsivity correlated with the CAARS hyperactivity/impulsivity (r = .601, p < .001), and WRAADDS attention + disorganization correlated with the CAARS inattention (r = .430, p < .001). Discriminate validity (adults with vs. without ADHD) was significant for all domains (p < .001). Factor analysis yielded a 2-factor solution accounting for 58% of the variance, one containing the emotional dimensions and the second containing attention and disorganization. Hyperactivity/restlessness and impulsivity were split between both factors. Changes in response to treatment for the WRAADDS and CAARS were highly correlated (p < .001). These psychometric data support continued use of the WRAADDS in adults with ADHD.