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Sample records for affects bone mass

  1. Human Apolipoprotein E Isoforms differentially affect Bone Mass and Turnover in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dieckmann, Marco; Beil, F. Timo; Mueller, Brigitte; Bartelt, Alexander; Marshall, Robert P.; Koehne, Till; Amling, Michael; Ruether, Wolfgang; Cooper, Jackie A.; Humphries, Steve E.; Herz, Joachim; Niemeier, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The primary role of apolipoprotein E (apoE) is to mediate the cellular uptake of lipoproteins. However, a new role for apoE as a regulator of bone metabolism in mice has recently been established. In contrast to mice, the human APOE gene is characterized by three common isoforms APOE ε2, ε3 and ε4 that result in different metabolic properties of the apoE isoforms, but it remains controversial whether the APOE polymorphism influences bone traits in humans. To clarify this, we investigated bone phenotypes of apoE knock-in mice, which express one human isoform each (apoE2 k.i., apoE3 k.i., apoE4 k.i.) in place of the mouse apoE. Analysis of 12 week-old female knock-in mice revealed increased levels of biochemical bone formation and resorption markers in apoE2 k.i. animals as compared to apoE3 k.i. and apoE4 k.i., with a reduced OPG/RANKL ratio in apoE2 k.i., indicating increased turnover with prevailing resorption in apoE2 k.i.. Accordingly, histomorphometric and μCT analyses demonstrated significantly lower trabecular bone mass in apoE2 than in apoE3 and apoE4 k.i. animals, which was reflected by a significant reduction of lumbar vertebrae maximum force resistance. Unlike trabecular bone, femoral cortical thickness, and stability was not differentially affected by the apoE isoforms. To extend these observations to the human situation, plasma from middle-aged healthy men homozygous for ε2/ε2, ε3/ε3, and ε4/ε4 (n=21, n=80, n=55 respectively) was analyzed with regard to bone turnover markers. In analogy to apoE2 k.i. mice, a lower OPG/RANKL ratio was observed in the serum of ε2/ε2 carriers as compared to ε3/ε3 and ε4/ε4 individuals (p=0.02 for ε2/ε2 vs ε4/ε4). In conclusion, the current data strongly underline the general importance of apoE as a regulator of bone metabolism and identifies the APOE ε2 allele as a potential genetic risk factor for low trabecular bone mass and vertebral fractures in humans. PMID:22991192

  2. Oral contraceptive use by teenage women does not affect peak bone mass: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, T; Taylor, D S; Lin, H M; Matthews, A E; Eggli, D F; Legro, R S

    2000-10-01

    This longitudinal observational study determined the effect of oral contraceptive (OC) use during adolescence on peak bone mass (PBM). The sample comprised 62 non-Hispanic, White females in The Penn State Young Women's Health Study, who were studied for 8 years between the ages of 12 and 20. There were 28 OC users who used OCs for a minimum of 6 months and were still using them at age 20, and 34 nonusers who had never used the regimen. Total body bone, dedicated hipbone, and body composition measurements were made by dual-energy roentgenogram absorptiometry. There was no difference between OC users and nonusers in the anthropometric, body composition, or total body bone measurements. By age 20, the average duration of OC use by the user group was 22 months. At this age, the groups remained indistinguishable in anthropometric, body composition, total body, and hipbone measurements, and in age of menarche and sports exercise scores. These findings suggest that OC use by healthy, White, teenage females does not affect acquisition of PBM. PMID:11020515

  3. Consumption of different sources of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids by growing female rats affects long bone mass and microarchitecture.

    PubMed

    Lukas, Robin; Gigliotti, Joseph C; Smith, Brenda J; Altman, Stephanie; Tou, Janet C

    2011-09-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) consumption has been reported to improve bone health. However, sources of ω-3 PUFAs differ in the type of fatty acids and structural form. The study objective was to determine the effect of various ω-3 PUFAs sources on bone during growth. Young (age 28d) female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned (n=10/group) to a high fat 12% (wt) diet consisting of either corn oil (CO) or ω-3 PUFA rich, flaxseed (FO), krill (KO), menhaden (MO), salmon (SO) or tuna (TO) for 8 weeks. Bone mass was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and bone microarchitecture by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Bone turnover markers were measured by enzyme immunoassay. Lipid peroxidation was measured by calorimetric assays. Results showed that rats fed TO, rich in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6ω-3) had higher (P<0.009) tibial bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) and lower (P=0.05) lipid peroxidation compared to the CO-fed rats. Reduced lipid peroxidation was associated with increased tibial BMD (r2=0.08, P=0.02) and BMC (r2=0.71, P=0.01). On the other hand, rats fed FO or MO, rich in alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3ω-3), improved bone microarchitecture compared to rats fed CO or SO. Serum osteocalcin was higher (P=0.03) in rats fed FO compared to rats fed SO. Serum osteocalcin was associated with improved trabecular bone microarchitecture. The animal study results suggest consuming a variety of ω-3 PUFA sources to promote bone health during the growth stage. PMID:21672645

  4. Current socio-economic measures, and not those measured during infancy, affect bone mass in poor urban South african children.

    PubMed

    Norris, Shane A; Sheppard, Zoë A; Griffiths, Paula L; Cameron, Noël; Pettifor, John M

    2008-09-01

    Understanding the impact of socio-economic status (SES) on physical development in children is important, especially in developing countries where considerable inequalities persist. This is the first study to examine the association between SES on bone development at the whole body, femoral neck, and lumbar spine in black children living in Soweto and Johannesburg, South Africa. Linear regression models were used to study associations between SES during infancy and current SES, anthropometric, and DXA-derived bone mass in 9/10-yr-old children (n = 309). Findings suggest that current SES measures, rather than SES during infancy, are stronger predictors of current whole body bone area (BA) and whole body BMC after adjusting for body size, pubertal development, physical activity, habitual dietary calcium intake, and body composition. SES had no significant effect on either hip or spine bone mass. Caregiver's marital/cohabiting status (indicator of social support) and whether there was a television in the home (indicator of greater income) at age 9/10 yr were the most important socio-economic determinants of whole body BA and BMC. SES has a significant independent effect on whole body BMC through its impact on BA. This suggests that poverty alleviation policies in South Africa could have a positive effect on bone health. PMID:18442310

  5. Peripheral bone mass is not affected by winter vitamin D deficiency in children and young adults from Ushuaia.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, M B; Wittich, A; Mautalen, C; Chaperon, A; Kizlansky, A

    2000-09-01

    Low vitamin D levels in elderly people are associated with reduced bone mass, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and increased fracture risk. Its effect on the growing skeleton is not well known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible influence of chronic winter vitamin D deficiency and higher winter parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels on bone mass in prepubertal children and young adults. The study was carried out in male and female Caucasian subjects. A total of 163 prepubertal children (X age +/- 1 SD: 8.9 +/- 0.7 years) and 234 young adults (22.9 +/- 3.6 years) who had never received vitamin D supplementation were recruited from two areas in Argentina: (1)Ushuaia (55 degrees South latitude), where the population is known to have low winter 25OHD levels and higher levels of PTH in winter than in summer, and (2)Buenos Aires (34 degrees S), where ultraviolet (UV) radiation and vitamin D nutritional status in the population are adequate all year round. Bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD) of the ultradistal and distal radius were measured in the young adults. Only distal radius measurements were taken in the children. Similar results were obtained in age-sex matched groups from both areas. The only results showing significant difference corresponded to comparison among the Ushuaian women: those whose calcium (Ca) intake was below 800 mg/day presented lower BMD and BMC values than those whose Ca intake was above that level (0.469 +/- 0.046 versus 0.498 +/- 0.041 g/cm(2), P < 0.02; 3.131 +/- 0.367 versus 3.339 +/- 0.386 g, P < 0.05, respectively). In conclusion, peripheral BMD and BMC were similar in children and young adults from Ushuaia and Buenos Aires in spite of the previously documented difference between both areas regarding UV radiation and winter vitamin D status. BMD of axial skeletal areas as well the concomitant effect of a low Ca diet and vitamin D deficiency on the growing skeleton should be studied further. PMID:10954776

  6. Low Bone Mass in Thalassemia

    MedlinePlus

    4 Low Bone Mass in Thalassemia • In addition to a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D, your doctor may recommend taking calcium ... What can be done to treat low bone mass? Following all of the above prevention measures is ...

  7. Treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism does not affect bone mass as determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, peripheral quantitative computed tomography and quantitative bone ultrasound in Spanish women

    PubMed Central

    Roncero-Martin, Raul; Calderon-Garcia, Julian F.; Santos-Vivas, Mercedes; Vera, Vicente; Martínez-Alvárez, Mariana; Rey-Sanchez, Purificación

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The results of studies examining the influence of subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) and levothyroxine (L-T4) replacement therapy on bone have generated considerable interest but also controversy. The present research aims to evaluate the effects of L-T4 treatment on different skeletal sites in women. Material and methods A group of 45 premenopausal (mean age: 43.62 ±6.65 years) and 180 postmenopausal (mean age: 59.51 ±7.90 years) women with SCH who were undergoing L-T4 replacement therapy for at least 6 months were compared to 58 pre- and 180 postmenopausal women with SCH (untreated) matched for age. The mean doses of L-T4 were 90.88 ±42.59 µg/day in the premenopausal women and 86.35 ±34.11 µg/day in the postmenopausal women. Bone measurements were obtained using quantitative bone ultrasound (QUS) for the phalanx, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) for the lumbar spine and hip, and peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) for the non-dominant distal forearm. Results No differences were observed between patients and untreated controls in these bone measurements except in the bone mineral density (BMD) of the spine (p = 0.0214) in postmenopausal women, which was greater in treated women than in untreated controls. Conclusions Our results indicate that adequate metabolic control through replacement treatment with L-T4 in pre- and postmenopausal women does not affect bone mass. PMID:26528344

  8. Is Bone Tissue Really Affected by Swimming? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Bruton, Alejandro; Gónzalez-Agüero, Alejandro; Gómez-Cabello, Alba; Casajús, José A.; Vicente-Rodríguez, Germán

    2013-01-01

    Background Swimming, a sport practiced in hypogravity, has sometimes been associated with decreased bone mass. Aim This systematic review aims to summarize and update present knowledge about the effects of swimming on bone mass, structure and metabolism in order to ascertain the effects of this sport on bone tissue. Methods A literature search was conducted up to April 2013. A total of 64 studies focusing on swimmers bone mass, structure and metabolism met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Results It has been generally observed that swimmers present lower bone mineral density than athletes who practise high impact sports and similar values when compared to sedentary controls. However, swimmers have a higher bone turnover than controls resulting in a different structure which in turn results in higher resistance to fracture indexes. Nevertheless, swimming may become highly beneficial regarding bone mass in later stages of life. Conclusion Swimming does not seem to negatively affect bone mass, although it may not be one of the best sports to be practised in order to increase this parameter, due to the hypogravity and lack of impact characteristic of this sport. Most of the studies included in this review showed similar bone mineral density values in swimmers and sedentary controls. However, swimmers present a higher bone turnover than sedentary controls that may result in a stronger structure and consequently in a stronger bone. PMID:23950908

  9. Genetic control of bone mass.

    PubMed

    Boudin, Eveline; Fijalkowski, Igor; Hendrickx, Gretl; Van Hul, Wim

    2016-09-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is a quantitative traits used as a surrogate phenotype for the diagnosis of osteoporosis, a common metabolic disorder characterized by increased fracture risk as a result of a decreased bone mass and deterioration of the microarchitecture of the bone. Normal variation in BMD is determined by both environmental and genetic factors. According to heritability studies, 50-85% of the variance in BMD is controlled by genetic factors which are mostly polygenic. In contrast to the complex etiology of osteoporosis, there are disorders with deviating BMD values caused by one mutation with a large impact. These mutations can result in monogenic bone disorders with either an extreme high (sclerosteosis, Van Buchem disease, osteopetrosis, high bone mass phenotype) or low BMD (osteogenesis imperfecta, juvenile osteoporosis, primary osteoporosis). Identification of the disease causing genes, increased the knowledge on the regulation of BMD and highlighted important signaling pathways and novel therapeutic targets such as sclerostin, RANKL and cathepsin K. Genetic variation in genes involved in these pathways are often also involved in the regulation of normal variation in BMD and osteoporosis susceptibility. In the last decades, identification of genetic factors regulating BMD has proven to be a challenge. Several approaches have been tested such as linkage studies and candidate and genome wide association studies. Although, throughout the years, technological developments made it possible to study increasing numbers of genetic variants in populations with increasing sample sizes at the same time, only a small fraction of the genetic impact can yet be explained. In order to elucidate the missing heritability, the focus shifted to studying the role of rare variants, copy number variations and epigenetic influences. This review summarizes the genetic cause of different monogenic bone disorders with deviating BMD and the knowledge on genetic factors

  10. The Factors Affecting Bone Density in Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Hajiabbasi, Asghar; Shafaghi, Afshin; Fayazi, Haniyeh Sadat; Shenavar Masooleh, Irandokht; Hedayati Emami, Mohammad Hassan; Ghavidel Parsa, Pooneh; Amir Maafi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bone loss is common in cirrhosis. However, the prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis has been heterogeneous in different reports. Reduction in bone formation with or without increase in bone resorption appears to be responsible for bone loss in these patients. Objectives: We aimed to investigate bone loss in patients with cirrhosis at different anatomical sites and key factors that might affect it. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 97 patients with cirrhosis who were referred to Razi Hospital, Rasht, Iran, from 2008 to 2010, were studied. Cirrhosis was diagnosed using biopsy and/or clinical and paraclinical findings. Bone mineral densitometry was done in L2 through L4 lumbar spine (LS) and femoral neck (FN), using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) (QDR 1000, Hologic DEXA Inc, Waltham, Massachusetts, the United States). Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 18. A P value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 97 patients with cirrhosis (55.7% male) and the mean age of 51 ± 13 years and median body mass index (BMI) of 22.7 kg/m2 were recruited over a two-year period. Etiologies of cirrhosis were hepatitis C (40.2%), hepatitis B (26.8%), cryptogenic (21.6%), and other causes (11.4%). Child A, B, and C, were seen in 16.5%, 47.4%, and 36.1% of patients, respectively. The DEXA results were abnormal in 78.4% of our participants (osteopenia, 45.4%; osteoporosis, 33%). BMI and calculated glomerular filtration rate (GFRc) had moderate positive and Child score had moderate negative significant correlation with T score in both anatomical sites. There was no significant association between abnormal DEXA and the causes of cirrhosis. The univariate analysis showed that the risk of abnormal results in DEXA was significantly higher in those with low BMI, current smoking, higher Child score, and low GFRc; however, in multivariate analysis, the abnormal results were more frequent in those with lower

  11. Relative bone mass decreased in mice fed high dietary fat despite an increase in body mass and bone formation markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteoporosis and obesity are interrelated health disorders. Osteoblasts and adipocytes are derived from common mesenchymal stem cells and age-related osteoporosis is associated with increased bone marrow adipogenesis. To determine whether bone mass and osteoblast number and activity are affected by ...

  12. Affective Disorders, Bone Metabolism, and Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the relationship between affective disorders, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone metabolism is unresolved, although there is growing evidence that many medications used to treat affective disorders are associated with low BMD or alterations in neuroendocrine systems that influence bone turnover. The objective of this review is to describe the current evidence regarding the association of unipolar and bipolar depression with BMD and indicators of bone metabolism, and to explore potential mediating and confounding influences of those relationships. The majority of studies of unipolar depression and BMD indicate that depressive symptoms are associated with low BMD. In contrast, evidence regarding the relationship between bipolar depression and BMD is inconsistent. There is limited but suggestive evidence to support an association between affective disorders and some markers of bone turnover. Many medications used to treat affective disorders have effects on physiologic systems that influence bone metabolism, and these conditions are also associated with a range of health behaviors that can influence osteoporosis risk. Future research should focus on disentangling the pathways linking psychotropic medications and their clinical indications with BMD and fracture risk. PMID:23874147

  13. A quantification strategy for missing bone mass in case of osteolytic bone lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Fränzle, Andrea Giske, Kristina; Bretschi, Maren; Bäuerle, Tobias; Hillengass, Jens; Bendl, Rolf

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Most of the patients who died of breast cancer have developed bone metastases. To understand the pathogenesis of bone metastases and to analyze treatment response of different bone remodeling therapies, preclinical animal models are examined. In breast cancer, bone metastases are often bone destructive. To assess treatment response of bone remodeling therapies, the volumes of these lesions have to be determined during the therapy process. The manual delineation of missing structures, especially if large parts are missing, is very time-consuming and not reproducible. Reproducibility is highly important to have comparable results during the therapy process. Therefore, a computerized approach is needed. Also for the preclinical research, a reproducible measurement of the lesions is essential. Here, the authors present an automated segmentation method for the measurement of missing bone mass in a preclinical rat model with bone metastases in the hind leg bones based on 3D CT scans. Methods: The affected bone structure is compared to a healthy model. Since in this preclinical rat trial the metastasis only occurs on the right hind legs, which is assured by using vessel clips, the authors use the left body side as a healthy model. The left femur is segmented with a statistical shape model which is initialised using the automatically segmented medullary cavity. The left tibia and fibula are segmented using volume growing starting at the tibia medullary cavity and stopping at the femur boundary. Masked images of both segmentations are mirrored along the median plane and transferred manually to the position of the affected bone by rigid registration. Affected bone and healthy model are compared based on their gray values. If the gray value of a voxel indicates bone mass in the healthy model and no bone in the affected bone, this voxel is considered to be osteolytic. Results: The lesion segmentations complete the missing bone structures in a reasonable way. The mean

  14. Deficiency of Thrombospondin-4 in Mice Does Not Affect Skeletal Growth or Bone Mass Acquisition, but Causes a Transient Reduction of Articular Cartilage Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Maciej; Peters, Stephanie; Baum, Wolfgang; Schett, Georg; Ruether, Wolfgang; Niemeier, Andreas; Schinke, Thorsten; Amling, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Although articular cartilage degeneration represents a major public health problem, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly characterized. We have previously utilized genome-wide expression analysis to identify specific markers of porcine articular cartilage, one of them being Thrombospondin-4 (Thbs4). In the present study we analyzed Thbs4 expression in mice, thereby confirming its predominant expression in articular cartilage, but also identifying expression in other tissues, including bone. To study the role of Thbs4 in skeletal development and integrity we took advantage of a Thbs4-deficient mouse model that was analyzed by undecalcified bone histology. We found that Thbs4-deficient mice do not display phenotypic differences towards wildtype littermates in terms of skeletal growth or bone mass acquisition. Since Thbs4 has previously been found over-expressed in bones of Phex-deficient Hyp mice, we additionally generated Thbs4-deficient Hyp mice, but failed to detect phenotypic differences towards Hyp littermates. With respect to articular cartilage we found that Thbs4-deficient mice display transient thinning of articular cartilage, suggesting a protective role of Thbs4 for joint integrity. Gene expression analysis using porcine primary cells revealed that Thbs4 is not expressed by synovial fibroblasts and that it represents the only member of the Thbs gene family with specific expression in articular, but not in growth plate chondrocytes. In an attempt to identify specific molecular effects of Thbs4 we treated porcine articular chondrocytes with human THBS4 in the absence or presence of conditioned medium from porcine synovial fibroblasts. Here we did not observe a significant influence of THBS4 on proliferation, metabolic activity, apoptosis or gene expression, suggesting that it does not act as a signaling molecule. Taken together, our data demonstrate that Thbs4 is highly expressed in articular chondrocytes, where its presence in the

  15. Monosodium glutamate-sensitive hypothalamic neurons contribute to the control of bone mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elefteriou, Florent; Takeda, Shu; Liu, Xiuyun; Armstrong, Dawna; Karsenty, Gerard

    2003-01-01

    Using chemical lesioning we previously identified hypothalamic neurons that are required for leptin antiosteogenic function. In the course of these studies we observed that destruction of neurons sensitive to monosodium glutamate (MSG) in arcuate nuclei did not affect bone mass. However MSG treatment leads to hypogonadism, a condition inducing bone loss. Therefore the normal bone mass of MSG-treated mice suggested that MSG-sensitive neurons may be implicated in the control of bone mass. To test this hypothesis we assessed bone resorption and bone formation parameters in MSG-treated mice. We show here that MSG-treated mice display the expected increase in bone resorption and that their normal bone mass is due to a concomitant increase in bone formation. Correction of MSG-induced hypogonadism by physiological doses of estradiol corrected the abnormal bone resorptive activity in MSG-treated mice and uncovered their high bone mass phenotype. Because neuropeptide Y (NPY) is highly expressed in MSG-sensitive neurons we tested whether NPY regulates bone formation. Surprisingly, NPY-deficient mice had a normal bone mass. This study reveals that distinct populations of hypothalamic neurons are involved in the control of bone mass and demonstrates that MSG-sensitive neurons control bone formation in a leptin-independent manner. It also indicates that NPY deficiency does not affect bone mass.

  16. Alteration of proteoglycan sulfation affects bone growth and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gualeni, Benedetta; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Marty-Morieux, Caroline; De Leonardis, Fabio; Franchi, Marco; Monti, Luca; Forlino, Antonella; Houillier, Pascal; Rossi, Antonio; Geoffroy, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) is a chondrodysplasia caused by mutations in the SLC26A2 gene, leading to reduced intracellular sulfate pool in chondrocytes, osteoblasts and fibroblasts. Hence, proteoglycans are undersulfated in the cartilage and bone of DTD patients. To characterize the bone phenotype of this skeletal dysplasia we used the Slc26a2 knock-in mouse (dtd mouse), that was previously validated as an animal model of DTD in humans. X-rays, bone densitometry, static and dynamic histomorphometry, and in vitro studies revealed a primary bone defect in the dtd mouse model. We showed in vivo that this primary bone defect in dtd mice is due to decreased bone accrual associated with a decreased trabecular and periosteal appositional rate at the cell level in one month-old mice. Although the osteoclast number evaluated by histomorphometry was not different in dtd compared to wild-type mice, urine analysis of deoxypyridinoline cross-links and serum levels of type I collagen C-terminal telopeptides showed a higher resorption rate in dtd mice compared to wild-type littermates. Electron microscopy studies showed that collagen fibrils in bone were thinner and less organized in dtd compared to wild-type mice. These data suggest that the low bone mass observed in mutant mice could possibly be linked to the different bone matrix compositions/organizations in dtd mice triggering changes in osteoblast and osteoclast activities. Overall, these results suggest that proteoglycan undersulfation not only affects the properties of hyaline cartilage, but can also lead to unbalanced bone modeling and remodeling activities, demonstrating the importance of proteoglycan sulfation in bone homeostasis. PMID:23369989

  17. Osteopontin Deficiency Increases Bone Fragility but Preserves Bone Mass

    PubMed Central

    Thurner, Philipp J.; Chen, Carol G.; Ionova-Martin, Sophi; Sun, Luling; Harman, Adam; Porter, Alexandra; Ager, Joel W.; Ritchie, Robert O.; Alliston, Tamara

    2010-01-01

    The ability of bone to resist catastrophic failure is critically dependent upon the material properties of bone matrix, a composite of hydroxyapatite, collagen type I, and noncollagenous proteins. These properties include elastic modulus, hardness, and fracture toughness. Like other aspects of bone quality, matrix material properties are biologically-defined and can be disrupted in skeletal disease. While mineral and collagen have been investigated in greater detail, the contribution of noncollagenous proteins such as osteopontin to bone matrix material properties remains unclear. Several roles have been ascribed to osteopontin in bone, many of which have the potential to impact material properties. To elucidate the role of osteopontin in bone quality, we evaluated the structure, composition, and material properties of bone from osteopontin-deficient mice and wild-type littermates at several length scales. Most importantly, the results show that osteopontin deficiency causes a 30% decrease in fracture toughness, suggesting an important role for OPN in preventing crack propagation. This significant decline in fracture toughness is independent of changes in whole bone mass, structure, or matrix porosity. Using nanoindentation and quantitative backscattered electron imaging to evaluate osteopontin-deficient bone matrix at the micrometer level, we observed a significant reduction in elastic modulus and increased variability in calcium concentration. Matrix heterogeneity was also apparent at the ultrastructural level. In conclusion, we find that osteopontin is essential for the fracture toughness of bone, and reduced toughness in osteopontin-deficient bone may be related to the increased matrix heterogeneity observed at the micro-scale. By exploring the effects of osteopontin-deficiency on bone matrix material properties, composition and organization, this study suggests that reduced fracture toughness is one mechanism by which loss of noncollagenous proteins contribute

  18. Functions of vasopressin and oxytocin in bone mass regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Tamma, Roberto; Yuen, Tony; Colaianni, Graziana; Ji, Yaoting; Cuscito, Concetta; Bailey, Jack; Dhawan, Samarth; Lu, Ping; Calvano, Cosima D.; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Zambonin, Carlo G.; Di Benedetto, Adriana; Stachnik, Agnes; Liu, Peng; Grano, Maria; Colucci, Silvia; Davies, Terry F.; New, Maria I.; Zallone, Alberta; Zaidi, Mone

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies show that oxytocin (Oxt) and vasopressin (Avp) have opposing actions on the skeleton exerted through high-affinity G protein-coupled receptors. We explored whether Avp and Oxtr can share their receptors in the regulation of bone formation by osteoblasts. We show that the Avp receptor 1α (Avpr1α) and the Oxt receptor (Oxtr) have opposing effects on bone mass: Oxtr−/− mice have osteopenia, and Avpr1α−/− mice display a high bone mass phenotype. More notably, this high bone mass phenotype is reversed by the deletion of Oxtr in Oxtr−/−:Avpr1α−/− double-mutant mice. However, although Oxtr is not indispensable for Avp action in inhibiting osteoblastogenesis and gene expression, Avp-stimulated gene expression is inhibited when the Oxtr is deleted in Avpr1α−/− cells. In contrast, Oxt does not interact with Avprs in vivo in a model of lactation-induced bone loss in which Oxt levels are high. Immunofluorescence microscopy of isolated nucleoplasts and Western blotting and MALDI-TOF of nuclear extracts show that Avp triggers Avpr1α localization to the nucleus. Finally, a specific Avpr2 inhibitor, tolvaptan, does not affect bone formation or bone mass, suggesting that Avpr2, which primarily functions in the kidney, does not have a significant role in bone remodeling. PMID:26699482

  19. The genetics of bone mass and susceptibility to bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Karasik, David; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Johnson, Mark L

    2016-06-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mass and an increased risk of fracture. Genetic factors, environmental factors and gene-environment interactions all contribute to a person's lifetime risk of developing an osteoporotic fracture. This Review summarizes key advances in understanding of the genetics of bone traits and their role in osteoporosis. Candidate-gene approaches dominated this field 20 years ago, but clinical and preclinical genetic studies published in the past 5 years generally utilize more-sophisticated and better-powered genome-wide association studies (GWAS). High-throughput DNA sequencing, large genomic databases and improved methods of data analysis have greatly accelerated the gene-discovery process. Linkage analyses of single-gene traits that segregate in families with extreme phenotypes have led to the elucidation of critical pathways controlling bone mass. For example, components of the Wnt-β-catenin signalling pathway have been validated (in both GWAS and functional studies) as contributing to various bone phenotypes. These notable advances in gene discovery suggest that the next decade will witness cataloguing of the hundreds of genes that influence bone mass and osteoporosis, which in turn will provide a roadmap for the development of new drugs that target diseases of low bone mass, including osteoporosis. PMID:27052486

  20. Umbilical cord leptin predicts neonatal bone mass.

    PubMed

    Javaid, M K; Godfrey, K M; Taylor, P; Robinson, S M; Crozier, S R; Dennison, E M; Robinson, J S; Breier, B R; Arden, N K; Cooper, C

    2005-05-01

    Evidence is accumulating that the risk of osteoporosis in later life may be determined in part by environmental influences on bone development during intrauterine and early postnatal life. A potential role for fetal leptin in mediating these effects is suggested by animal studies showing that leptin influences prenatal osteoblast growth and development, and that fetal leptin concentrations are altered by changes in maternal nutrition. In a group of term human infants we reported previously that maternal birthweight, smoking, fat mass, and exercise during late pregnancy independently predict neonatal bone mass. To investigate the potential role of leptin in mediating these effects, we now relate leptin concentrations in umbilical venous serum to neonatal bone mass and body composition in 117 infants. There were strong positive associations between umbilical venous leptin concentration and each of whole body bone mineral contents (BMC) (r = 0.42, P < or = 0.001) and estimated volumetric bone density (r = 0.21, P = 0.02); whole body lean mass (r = 0.21, P < or = 0.024); and whole body fat mass (r = 0.60, P < 0.001). The associations with neonatal BMC and fat mass, but not with lean mass, were independent of associations that we have reported previously between cord serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) concentrations and neonatal body composition. Among the maternal determinants of neonatal bone mass, cord leptin explained the relationship with maternal fat stores, but not those with the mother's own birthweight, smoking, or physical activity. We conclude that umbilical venous leptin predicts both the size of the neonatal skeleton and its estimated volumetric mineral density. In addition, among previously documented maternal determinants of neonatal bone mass in healthy pregnancies, maternal fat stores may mediate their effect on fetal bone accrual through variation in fetal leptin concentrations. PMID:15864467

  1. Calcium requirements of growing rats based on bone mass, structure, or biomechanical strength are similar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although calcium (Ca) supplementation increases bone density, the increase is small and the impact on bone strength and fracture risk is uncertain. To investigate if bone mass, morphology, and biomechanical properties are affected by deficient to copious dietary Ca concentrations, the long bones (ti...

  2. Osteoporosis: Peak Bone Mass in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... higher in men than in women. Before puberty, boys and girls acquire bone mass at similar rates. After puberty, ... teenage boys to get enough calcium. Physical Activity. Girls and boys and young adults who exercise regularly generally achieve ...

  3. Association between Bone Mass and Dental Hypomineralization.

    PubMed

    van der Tas, J T; Elfrink, M E C; Vucic, S; Heppe, D H M; Veerkamp, J S J; Jaddoe, V W V; Rivadeneira, F; Hofman, A; Moll, H A; Wolvius, E B

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between the bone mass (bone mineral content [BMC]) and hypomineralized second primary molars (HSPMs)/molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) in 6-y-old children. This cross-sectional study was embedded in the Generation R Study, a population-based prospective cohort study, starting from fetal life until adulthood in Rotterdam, Netherlands. The European Academy of Pediatric Dentistry criteria were used to score the intraoral photographs on the presence or absence of HSPMs and MIH. Bone mass was measured with a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan. Intraoral photographs and DXA scans were available in 6,510 6-y-old children. Binary logistic regression models were used to study the association between the bone mass and HSPMs/MIH. In total, 5,586 children had their second primary molars assessed and a DXA scan made; 507 children were diagnosed with HSPM. Of 2,370 children with data on their permanent first molars, 203 were diagnosed with MIH. In the fully adjusted model, children with lower BMC (corrected for bone area) were more likely to have HSPMs (odds ratio, 1.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.26 per 1-standard deviation decrease). A lower BMC (corrected for bone area) was not associated with MIH (odds ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.87 to 1.20 per 1-standard deviation decrease). We observed a negative association between BMC (corrected for bone area) and HSPMs. No association was found between BMC (corrected for bone area) and MIH. Future research should focus on investigating the mechanism underlying the negative association between the bone mass and HSPMs. Our study, in a large population of 6-y-old children, adds the finding that BMC (corrected for bone size) is associated with HSPMs but not with MIH in childhood. PMID:26747420

  4. Minireview: The Link Between Fat and Bone: Does Mass Beget Mass?

    PubMed Central

    Buettner, Christoph; Sun, Li; Iqbal, Jameel

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis is less common in individuals with high fat mass. This putative osteoprotection is likely an adaptive mechanism that allows obese individuals to better carry their increased body mass. Recent studies have focused on hormones that link fat to bone. Adipokines, such as leptin, modulate bone cells through both direct and indirect actions, whereas molecules activating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ drive mesenchymal stem cell differentiation towards adipocytes away from the osteoblastic lineage. There is emerging evidence that bone-derived osteocalcin regulates insulin release and insulin sensitivity and, hence, might indirectly affect fat mass. Despite these molecular connections between fat and bone, animal and human studies call into question a primary role for body fat in determining bone mass. Mice devoid of fat do not have a skeletal phenotype, and in humans, the observed correlations between bone and body mass are not just due to adipose tissue. An improved understanding of the integrative physiology at the fat-bone interface should allow us develop therapies for both osteoporosis and obesity. PMID:22467495

  5. Bone mass and bone metabolic indices in male master rowers.

    PubMed

    Śliwicka, Ewa; Nowak, Alicja; Zep, Wojciech; Leszczyński, Piotr; Pilaczyńska-Szcześniak, Łucja

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess bone mass and bone metabolic indices in master athletes who regularly perform rowing exercises. The study was performed in 29 men: 14 master rowers and 15 non-athletic, body mass index-matched controls. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements of the areal bone mineral density (aBMD) were performed for the total body, regional areas (arms, total forearms, trunk, thoracic spine, pelvis, and legs), lumbar spine (L1-L4), left hip (total hip and femoral neck), and forearm (33 % radius of the dominant and nondominant forearm). Serum concentrations of osteocalcin, collagen type I cross-linked C-telopeptide, visfatin, resistin, insulin, and glucose were determined. Comparative analyses showed significantly lower levels of body fat and higher lean body mass values in the rowers compared to the control group. The rowers also had significantly higher values of total and regional (left arm, trunk, thoracic spine, pelvis, and leg) BMD, as well as higher BMD values for the lumbar spine and the left hip. There were significant differences between the groups with respect to insulin, glucose, and the index of homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance. In conclusion, the systematic training of master rowers has beneficial effects on total and regional BMD and may be recommended for preventing osteoporosis. PMID:25224128

  6. Telomerized presenescent osteoblasts prevent bone mass loss in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yudoh, K; Nishioka, K

    2004-06-01

    Previously, we showed that human osteoblasts expressing the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene exhibited specific survival advantages--the result of breaching the replicative senescence barrier and maintaining the phenotypic and functional properties of primary osteoblasts in vitro over the total replicative capacity of primary osteoblasts. We postulated that rejuvenated osteoblasts may have a potential to correct bone loss or osteopenia in age-related osteoporotic diseases. In the present study, we studied whether telomerized presenescent osteoblasts prevent bone mass loss in vivo. After obtaining the informed consent from a patient with osteoarthritis who underwent the arthroplastic knee surgery, osteoblastic cells were isolated from donor bone sample. We transfected the gene encoding hTERT into human osteoblastic cells. Human bone fragments from a donor were incubated with human hTERT-transfected presenescent (in vitro aged) osteoblasts or mock-transfected presenescent osteoblasts in culture medium containing Matrigel. We subcutaneously implanted human bone fragments with telomerized presenescent osteoblasts or primary presenescent osteoblasts as three-dimensional Matrigel xenografts in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice (each group: six mice) and analyzed the grafts at 6 weeks after implantation. We also determined whether telomerized osteoblasts affect the bone-forming capacity in vivo, using a well-established mouse transplantation model in which ceramic hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate particles are used as carrier vehicle. Telomerized presenescent osteoblasts were rejuvenated, and maintained the functional properties of young osteoblasts in vitro. Bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD) were measured by ash weight and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, respectively. Whereas BMC and BMD of human bone fragments, which were inoculated with aged osteoblasts in SCID mice, decreased with time, telomerized

  7. Aerobic workout and bone mass in females.

    PubMed

    Alfredson, H; Nordström, P; Lorentzon, R

    1997-12-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate bone mass in females participating in aerobic workout. Twenty-three females (age 24.1 +/- 2.7 years), participating in aerobic workout for about 3 hours/week, were compared with 23 age-, weight- and height-matched non-active females. Areal bone mineral density (BMD) was measured in total body, head, whole dominant humerus, lumbar spine, right femoral neck, Ward's triangle, trochanter femoris, in specific sites in right femur diaphysis, distal femur, proximal tibia and tibial diaphysis, and bone mineral content (BMC) was measured in the whole dominant arm and right leg, using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The aerobic workout group had significantly (P < 0.05-0.01) higher BMD in total body (3.7%), lumbar spine (7.8%), femoral neck (11.6%), Ward's triangle (11.7%), trochanter femoris (9.6%), proximal tibia (6.8%) and tibia diaphysis (5.9%) compared to the non-active controls. There were no differences between the groups concerning BMD of the whole dominant humerus, femoral diaphysis, distal femur and BMC and lean mass of the whole dominant arm and right leg. Leaness of the whole dominant arm and leg was correlated to BMC of the whole dominant arm and right leg in both groups. In young females, aerobic workout containing alternating high and low impact movements for the lower body is associated with a higher bone mass in clinically important sites like the lumbar spine and hip, but muscle strengthening exercises like push-ups and soft-glove boxing are not associated with a higher bone mass in the dominant humerus. It appears that there is a skeletal adaptation to the loads of the activity. PMID:9458499

  8. The peak bone mass concept: is it still relevant?

    PubMed

    Schönau, Eckhard

    2004-08-01

    The peak bone mass concept implies that optimal skeletal development during childhood and adolescence will prevent fractures in late adulthood. This concept is based on the observation that areal bone density increases with growth during childhood, is highest around 20 years of age and declines thereafter. However, it is now clear that strong bones in the youngster do not necessarily lead to a fracture-free old age. In the recent bone densitometric literature, the terms bone mass and bone density are typically used synonymously. In physics, density has been defined as the mass of a body divided by its volume. In clinical practice and science, "bone density" usually has a different meaning-the degree to which a radiation beam is attenuated by a bone, as judged from a two-dimensional projection image (areal bone density). The attenuation of a radiation beam does not only depend on physical density, but also on bone size. A small bone therefore has a lower areal bone density than a larger bone, even if the physical density is the same. Consequently, a low areal bone density value can simply reflect the small size of an otherwise normal bone. At present, bone mass analysis is very useful for epidemiological studies on factors that may have an impact on bone development. There is an ongoing discussion about whether the World Health Organization (WHO) definition of osteoporosis is over-simplistic and requires upgrading to include indices representing the distribution of bone and mineral (bone strength indices). The following suggestions and recommendations outline a new concept: bone mass should not be related to age. There is now more and more evidence that bone mass should be related to bone size or muscle function. Thus analyzed, there is no such entity as a "peak bone mass". Many studies are currently under way to evaluate whether these novel approaches increase sensitivity and specificity of fracture prediction in an individual. Furthermore, the focus of many bone

  9. The myokine irisin increases cortical bone mass

    PubMed Central

    Colaianni, Graziana; Cuscito, Concetta; Mongelli, Teresa; Pignataro, Paolo; Buccoliero, Cinzia; Liu, Peng; Lu, Ping; Sartini, Loris; Di Comite, Mariasevera; Mori, Giorgio; Di Benedetto, Adriana; Brunetti, Giacomina; Yuen, Tony; Sun, Li; Reseland, Janne E.; Colucci, Silvia; New, Maria I.; Zaidi, Mone; Cinti, Saverio; Grano, Maria

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear how physical activity stimulates new bone synthesis. We explored whether irisin, a newly discovered myokine released upon physical activity, displays anabolic actions on the skeleton. Young male mice were injected with vehicle or recombinant irisin (r-irisin) at a low cumulative weekly dose of 100 µg kg−1. We observed significant increases in cortical bone mass and strength, notably in cortical tissue mineral density, periosteal circumference, polar moment of inertia, and bending strength. This anabolic action was mediated primarily through the stimulation of bone formation, but with parallel notable reductions in osteoclast numbers. The trabecular compartment of the same bones was spared, as were vertebrae from the same mice. Higher irisin doses (3,500 µg kg−1 per week) cause browning of adipose tissue; this was not seen with low-dose r-irisin. Expectedly, low-dose r-irisin modulated the skeletal genes, Opn and Sost, but not Ucp1 or Pparγ expression in white adipose tissue. In bone marrow stromal cell cultures, r-irisin rapidly phosphorylated Erk, and up-regulated Atf4, Runx2, Osx, Lrp5, β-catenin, Alp, and Col1a1; this is consistent with a direct receptor-mediated action to stimulate osteogenesis. We also noted that, although the irisin precursor Fndc5 was expressed abundantly in skeletal muscle, other sites, such as bone and brain, also expressed Fndc5, albeit at low levels. Furthermore, muscle fibers from r-irisin–injected mice displayed enhanced Fndc5 positivity, and irisin induced Fdnc5 mRNA expression in cultured myoblasts. Our data therefore highlight a previously unknown action of the myokine irisin, which may be the molecular entity responsible for muscle–bone connectivity. PMID:26374841

  10. The myokine irisin increases cortical bone mass.

    PubMed

    Colaianni, Graziana; Cuscito, Concetta; Mongelli, Teresa; Pignataro, Paolo; Buccoliero, Cinzia; Liu, Peng; Lu, Ping; Sartini, Loris; Di Comite, Mariasevera; Mori, Giorgio; Di Benedetto, Adriana; Brunetti, Giacomina; Yuen, Tony; Sun, Li; Reseland, Janne E; Colucci, Silvia; New, Maria I; Zaidi, Mone; Cinti, Saverio; Grano, Maria

    2015-09-29

    It is unclear how physical activity stimulates new bone synthesis. We explored whether irisin, a newly discovered myokine released upon physical activity, displays anabolic actions on the skeleton. Young male mice were injected with vehicle or recombinant irisin (r-irisin) at a low cumulative weekly dose of 100 µg kg(-1). We observed significant increases in cortical bone mass and strength, notably in cortical tissue mineral density, periosteal circumference, polar moment of inertia, and bending strength. This anabolic action was mediated primarily through the stimulation of bone formation, but with parallel notable reductions in osteoclast numbers. The trabecular compartment of the same bones was spared, as were vertebrae from the same mice. Higher irisin doses (3,500 µg kg(-1) per week) cause browning of adipose tissue; this was not seen with low-dose r-irisin. Expectedly, low-dose r-irisin modulated the skeletal genes, Opn and Sost, but not Ucp1 or Pparγ expression in white adipose tissue. In bone marrow stromal cell cultures, r-irisin rapidly phosphorylated Erk, and up-regulated Atf4, Runx2, Osx, Lrp5, β-catenin, Alp, and Col1a1; this is consistent with a direct receptor-mediated action to stimulate osteogenesis. We also noted that, although the irisin precursor Fndc5 was expressed abundantly in skeletal muscle, other sites, such as bone and brain, also expressed Fndc5, albeit at low levels. Furthermore, muscle fibers from r-irisin-injected mice displayed enhanced Fndc5 positivity, and irisin induced Fdnc5 mRNA expression in cultured myoblasts. Our data therefore highlight a previously unknown action of the myokine irisin, which may be the molecular entity responsible for muscle-bone connectivity. PMID:26374841

  11. IMPACT OF DEFICIENT NUTRITION IN BONE MASS AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    COSTA, Tatiana Munhoz da Rocha Lemos; PAGANOTO, Mariana; RADOMINSKI, Rosana Bento; BORBA, Victoria Zeghbi Cochenski

    2016-01-01

    Background: Essential nutrients are considered for the prevention of the bone loss that occurs after bariatric surgery. Aim: Evaluate nutrients involved in bone metabolism, and relate to serum concentrations of calcium, vitamin D, and parathyroid hormone, and the use of supplements and sun exposure on the bone mass of patients who had undergone gastric bypass surgery. Methods: An observational study, with patients who had undergone the surgery 12 or more months previously, operated group (OG), compared to a control group (CG). Results: Were included 56 in OG and 27 in the CG. The mean age was 36.4±8.5 years. The individuals in the OG, compared to CG, consumed inadequate amounts of protein and daily calcium. The OG had a higher prevalence of low sun exposure, lower levels of 25OH Vitamin D (21.3±10.9 vs. 32.1±11.8 ng/dl), and increased serum levels of parathyroid hormone (68.1±32.9 vs. 39.9±11.9 pg/ml, p<0.001). Secondary hyperparathyroidism was present only in the OG (41.7%). The mean lumbar spine bone mineral density was lower in the OG. Four individuals from the OG had low bone mineral density for chronological age, and no one from the CG. Conclusion: The dietary components that affect bone mass in patients undergoing bariatric surgery were inadequate. The supplementation was insufficient and the sun exposure was low. These changes were accompanied by secondary hyperparathyroidism and a high prevalence of low bone mass in lumbar spine in these subjects. PMID:27120738

  12. Adynamic Bone Decreases Bone Toughness During Aging by Affecting Mineral and Matrix.

    PubMed

    Ng, Adeline H; Omelon, Sidney; Variola, Fabio; Allo, Bedilu; Willett, Thomas L; Alman, Benjamin A; Grynpas, Marc D

    2016-02-01

    Adynamic bone is the most frequent type of bone lesion in patients with chronic kidney disease; long-term use of antiresorptive therapy may also lead to the adynamic bone condition. The hallmark of adynamic bone is a loss of bone turnover, and a major clinical concern of adynamic bone is diminished bone quality and an increase in fracture risk. Our current study aims to investigate how bone quality changes with age in our previously established mouse model of adynamic bone. Young and old mice (4 months old and 16 months old, respectively) were used in this study. Col2.3Δtk (DTK) mice were treated with ganciclovir and pamidronate to create the adynamic bone condition. Bone quality was evaluated using established techniques including bone histomorphometry, microcomputed tomography, quantitative backscattered electron imaging, and biomechanical testing. Changes in mineral and matrix properties were examined by powder X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Aging controls had a natural decline in bone formation and resorption with a corresponding deterioration in trabecular bone structure. Bone turnover was severely blunted at all ages in adynamic animals, which preserved trabecular bone loss normally associated with aging. However, the preservation of trabecular bone mass and structure in old adynamic mice did not rescue deterioration of bone mechanical properties. There was also a decrease in cortical bone toughness in old adynamic mice that was accompanied by a more mature collagen matrix and longer bone crystals. Little is known about the effects of metabolic bone disease on bone fracture resistance. We observed an age-related decrease in bone toughness that was worsened by the adynamic condition, and this decrease may be due to material level changes at the tissue level. Our mouse model may be useful in the investigation of the mechanisms involved in fractures occurring in elderly patients on antiresorptive therapy who have very low bone turnover. PMID:26332924

  13. Genetic selection to increase bone strength affects prevalence of keel bone damage and egg parameters in commercially housed laying hens.

    PubMed

    Stratmann, A; Fröhlich, E K F; Gebhardt-Henrich, S G; Harlander-Matauschek, A; Würbel, H; Toscano, M J

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of keel bone damage as well as external egg parameters of 2 pure lines divergently selected for high (H) and low (L) bone strength were investigated in 2 aviary systems under commercial conditions. A standard LSL hybrid was used as a reference group. Birds were kept mixed per genetic line (77 hens of the H and L line and 201 or 206 hens of the LSL line, respectively, per pen) in 8 pens of 2 aviary systems differing in design. Keel bone status and body mass of 20 focal hens per line and pen were assessed at 17, 18, 23, 30, 36, 43, 52, and 63 wk of age. External egg parameters (i.e., egg mass, eggshell breaking strength, thickness, and mass) were measured using 10 eggs per line at both 38 and 57 wk of age. Body parameters (i.e. tarsus and third primary wing feather length to calculate index of wing loading) were recorded at 38 wk of age and mortality per genetic line throughout the laying cycle. Bone mineral density (BMD) of 15 keel bones per genetic line was measured after slaughter to confirm assignment of the experimental lines. We found a greater BMD in the H compared with the L and LSL lines. Fewer keel bone fractures and deviations, a poorer external egg quality, as well as a lower index of wing loading were found in the H compared with the L line. Mortality was lower and production parameters (e.g., laying performance) were higher in the LSL line compared with the 2 experimental lines. Aviary design affected prevalence of keel bone damage, body mass, and mortality. We conclude that selection of specific bone traits associated with bone strength as well as the related differences in body morphology (i.e., lower index of wing loading) have potential to reduce keel bone damage in commercial settings. Also, the housing environment (i.e., aviary design) may have additive effects. PMID:26944960

  14. Effects of the environment on bone mass: A human taphonomic study.

    PubMed

    Delannoy, Yann; Colard, Thomas; Le Garff, Erwan; Mesli, Vadim; Aubernon, Cindy; Penel, Guillaume; Hedouin, Valéry; Gosset, Didier

    2016-05-01

    An experiment was designed using human ribs placed in different environments to document how moisture and temperature affect the bone mass according to the postmortem interval. The bones were defleshed, weighed and partially buried, with some ribs being left unburied as controls. The ribs were weighed daily, and the mass loss was monitored over a period of 90days. The results showed that significant differences in bone mass loss exist between environments, where the bone mass loss was significantly faster in an environment with low moisture content. This mass loss is thought to be primarily associated with the desiccation of the body and then for a greater part, with the atmospheric moisture content. However, the loss of bone mass can also be explained by early alterations in the organo-mineral matrix which were highlighted by Raman spectroscopy method. PMID:27161926

  15. Common endocrine control of body weight, reproduction, and bone mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, Shu; Elefteriou, Florent; Karsenty, Gerard

    2003-01-01

    Bone mass is maintained constant between puberty and menopause by the balance between osteoblast and osteoclast activity. The existence of a hormonal control of osteoblast activity has been speculated for years by analogy to osteoclast biology. Through the search for such humoral signal(s) regulating bone formation, leptin has been identified as a strong inhibitor of bone formation. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular infusion of leptin has shown that the effect of this adipocyte-derived hormone on bone is mediated via a brain relay. Subsequent studies have led to the identification of hypothalamic groups of neurons involved in leptin's antiosteogenic function. In addition, those neurons or neuronal pathways are distinct from neurons responsible for the regulation of energy metabolism. Finally, the peripheral mediator of leptin's antiosteogenic function has been identified as the sympathetic nervous system. Sympathomimetics administered to mice decreased bone formation and bone mass. Conversely, beta-blockers increased bone formation and bone mass and blunted the bone loss induced by ovariectomy.

  16. Bone Mass Measurement: What the Numbers Mean

    MedlinePlus

    ... Friendly Page June 2015 What Is a Bone Density Test? A bone mineral density (BMD) test is ... check your progress. Who Should Get a Bone Density Test? The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends ...

  17. Effects of an exercise intervention on bone mass in pediatric bone tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Müller, C; Winter, C; Boos, J; Gosheger, G; Hardes, J; Vieth, V; Rosenbaum, D

    2014-07-01

    The aim was to evaluate the effects of additional exercises during inpatient stays on bone mass in pediatric bone tumor patients. 21 patients were non-randomly allocated either to the exercise group (n = 10) or the control group (n = 11). DXA of the lumbar spine, the non-affected femur and both calcanei was performed after completion of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (baseline), as well as 6 and 12 months after baseline. Bone mineral content (BMC), bone mineral density (BMD) and height-corrected lumbar spine Z-scores were determined. Group changes after 6 and 12 months were compared by covariance analyses. Additionally, daily physical activities (PA) were assessed by means of accelerometry. After adjusting for initial age, height and weight, mean reductions in lumbar spine and femoral BMC were lower in the exercise group (not significant). Effect sizes during the observational period for lumbar spine and femur BMC were generally small (partial η² = 0.03). The exercise group demonstrated substantially higher PA levels in terms of gait cycles per day, per hour and moderate PA (activities above 40 gait cycles per minute). Additional exercises for bone tumor patients are feasible during hospitalization. Though the intervention did not influence BMC, it appeared beneficial regarding PA promotion with respect to volume and intensity. PMID:24408763

  18. Caloric restriction leads to high marrow adiposity and low bone mass in growing mice

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, MJ; Cloutier, AM; Thomas, NA; Panus, DA; Lotinun, S; Pinz, I; Baron, R; Rosen, CJ; Bouxsein, ML

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The effects of caloric restriction (CR) on the skeleton are well studied in adult rodents, and include lower cortical bone mass but higher trabecular bone volume. Much less is known about how CR affects bone mass in young, rapidly growing animals. This is an important problem because low caloric intake during skeletal acquisition in humans, as in anorexia nervosa, is associated with low bone mass, increased fracture risk, and osteoporosis in adulthood. To explore this question, we tested the effect of caloric restriction on bone mass and microarchitecture during rapid skeletal growth in young mice. Methods At 3 wks of age we weaned male C57Bl/6J mice onto 30% caloric restriction (CR, 10% Kcal/fat) or normal diet (N, 10% Kcal/fat). Outcomes at 6 (N=4/group) and 12 wks of age (N=8/group) included body mass, femur length, serum leptin and IGF-1, whole body bone mineral density (WBBMD, g/cm2), cortical and trabecular bone architecture at the midshaft and distal femur, bone formation and cellularity, and marrow fat measurement. Results Compared to N, CR mice had 52% and 88% lower serum leptin and 33% and 39% lower serum IGF-1 at 6 and 12 wks of age (p<0.05 for all). CR mice were smaller, with lower bone mineral density, trabecular and cortical bone properties. Bone formation indices were lower, while bone resorption indices were higher (p<0.01 for all) in CR vs. N. Despite having lower %body fat, bone marrow adiposity was dramatically elevated in CR vs. N (p<0.05). Conclusion Caloric restriction in young, growing mice is associated with impaired skeletal acquisition, low leptin and IGF-1 levels, and high marrow adiposity. These results support the hypothesis that caloric restriction during rapid skeletal growth is deleterious to cortical and trabecular bone mass and architecture, in contrast to potential skeletal benefits of CR in aging animals. PMID:20229598

  19. The nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein CIZ reduces adult bone mass by inhibiting bone morphogenetic protein-induced bone formation.

    PubMed

    Morinobu, Mikihiko; Nakamoto, Tetsuya; Hino, Kazunori; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Shen, Zhong-Jian; Nakashima, Kazuhisa; Nifuji, Akira; Yamamoto, Haruyasu; Hirai, Hisamaru; Noda, Masaki

    2005-03-21

    Osteoporosis is a major health problem; however, the mechanisms regulating adult bone mass are poorly understood. Cas-interacting zinc finger protein (CIZ) is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that localizes at cell adhesion plaques that form where osteoblasts attach to substrate. To investigate the potential role of CIZ in regulating adult bone mass, we examined the bones in CIZ-deficient mice. Bone volume was increased and the rates of bone formation were increased in CIZ-deficient mice, whereas bone resorption was not altered. CIZ deficiency enhanced the levels of mRNA expression of genes encoding proteins related to osteoblastic phenotypes, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as well as osterix mRNA expression in whole long bones. Bone marrow cells obtained from the femora of CIZ-deficient mice revealed higher ALP activity in culture and formed more mineralized nodules than wild-type cells. CIZ deficiency enhanced bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-induced osteoblastic differentiation in bone marrow cells in cultures, indicating that BMP is the target of CIZ action. CIZ deficiency increased newly formed bone mass after femoral bone marrow ablation in vivo. Finally, BMP-2-induced bone formation on adult mouse calvariae in vivo was enhanced by CIZ deficiency. These results establish that CIZ suppresses the levels of adult bone mass through inhibition of BMP-induced activation of osteoblasts. PMID:15781586

  20. Moderate-intensity rotating magnetic fields do not affect bone quality and bone remodeling in hindlimb suspended rats.

    PubMed

    Jing, Da; Cai, Jing; Wu, Yan; Shen, Guanghao; Zhai, Mingming; Tong, Shichao; Xu, Qiaoling; Xie, Kangning; Wu, Xiaoming; Tang, Chi; Xu, Xinmin; Liu, Juan; Guo, Wei; Jiang, Maogang; Luo, Erping

    2014-01-01

    Abundant evidence has substantiated the positive effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) and static magnetic fields (SMF) on inhibiting osteopenia and promoting fracture healing. However, the osteogenic potential of rotating magnetic fields (RMF), another common electromagnetic application modality, remains poorly characterized thus far, although numerous commercial RMF treatment devices have been available on the market. Herein the impacts of RMF on osteoporotic bone microarchitecture, bone strength and bone metabolism were systematically investigated in hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rats. Thirty two 3-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the Control (n = 10), HU (n = 10) and HU with RMF exposure (HU+RMF, n = 12) groups. Rats in the HU+RMF group were subjected to daily 2-hour exposure to moderate-intensity RMF (ranging from 0.60 T to 0.38 T) at 7 Hz for 4 weeks. HU caused significant decreases in body mass and soleus muscle mass of rats, which were not obviously altered by RMF. Three-point bending test showed that the mechanical properties of femurs in HU rats, including maximum load, stiffness, energy absorption and elastic modulus were not markedly affected by RMF. µCT analysis demonstrated that 4-week RMF did not significantly prevent HU-induced deterioration of femoral trabecular and cortical bone microarchitecture. Serum biochemical analysis showed that RMF did not significantly change HU-induced decrease in serum bone formation markers and increase in bone resorption markers. Bone histomorphometric analysis further confirmed that RMF showed no impacts on bone remodeling in HU rats, as evidenced by unchanged mineral apposition rate, bone formation rate, osteoblast numbers and osteoclast numbers in cancellous bone. Together, our findings reveal that RMF do not significantly affect bone microstructure, bone mechanical strength and bone remodeling in HU-induced disuse osteoporotic rats. Our study indicates potentially

  1. Moderate-Intensity Rotating Magnetic Fields Do Not Affect Bone Quality and Bone Remodeling in Hindlimb Suspended Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Guanghao; Zhai, Mingming; Tong, Shichao; Xu, Qiaoling; Xie, Kangning; Wu, Xiaoming; Tang, Chi; Xu, Xinmin; Liu, Juan; Guo, Wei; Jiang, Maogang; Luo, Erping

    2014-01-01

    Abundant evidence has substantiated the positive effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) and static magnetic fields (SMF) on inhibiting osteopenia and promoting fracture healing. However, the osteogenic potential of rotating magnetic fields (RMF), another common electromagnetic application modality, remains poorly characterized thus far, although numerous commercial RMF treatment devices have been available on the market. Herein the impacts of RMF on osteoporotic bone microarchitecture, bone strength and bone metabolism were systematically investigated in hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rats. Thirty two 3-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the Control (n = 10), HU (n = 10) and HU with RMF exposure (HU+RMF, n = 12) groups. Rats in the HU+RMF group were subjected to daily 2-hour exposure to moderate-intensity RMF (ranging from 0.60 T to 0.38 T) at 7 Hz for 4 weeks. HU caused significant decreases in body mass and soleus muscle mass of rats, which were not obviously altered by RMF. Three-point bending test showed that the mechanical properties of femurs in HU rats, including maximum load, stiffness, energy absorption and elastic modulus were not markedly affected by RMF. µCT analysis demonstrated that 4-week RMF did not significantly prevent HU-induced deterioration of femoral trabecular and cortical bone microarchitecture. Serum biochemical analysis showed that RMF did not significantly change HU-induced decrease in serum bone formation markers and increase in bone resorption markers. Bone histomorphometric analysis further confirmed that RMF showed no impacts on bone remodeling in HU rats, as evidenced by unchanged mineral apposition rate, bone formation rate, osteoblast numbers and osteoclast numbers in cancellous bone. Together, our findings reveal that RMF do not significantly affect bone microstructure, bone mechanical strength and bone remodeling in HU-induced disuse osteoporotic rats. Our study indicates potentially

  2. Factors Affecting Bone Mineral Density in Adults with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Young Kwon; Kim, Ae Ryoung; Kim, On Yoo; Lee, Kilchan; Suh, Young Joo

    2012-01-01

    Objective To clarify factors affecting bone mineral density (BMD) in adults with cerebral palsy (CP). Method Thirty-five patients with CP participated in this study. Demographic data including gender, age, body mass index (BMI), subtype according to neuromotor type and topographical distribution, ambulatory function, and functional independence measure (FIM) were investigated. The BMD of the lumbar spine and femur were measured using Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and the factors affecting BMD were analyzed. Results The BMD had no significant association with factors such as gender, age, and subtype in adults with CP. However, BMI was significantly correlated with the BMD of lumbar spine and femur (p<0.05). The FIM score was also positively correlated with the BMD of femur (p<0.05). Moreover, CP patients with higher ambulatory function had significantly higher BMD of femur (p<0.05). Conclusion These findings suggest that BMI and functional levels such as FIM and ambulatory function can affect BMD in adults with CP. The results might be used as basic data, suggesting the importance of treatment including weight bearing exercise and gait training in adults with CP. PMID:23342308

  3. The Rho-GEF Kalirin regulates bone mass and the function of osteoblasts and osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Su; Eleniste, Pierre P.; Wayakanon, Kornchanok; Mandela, Prashant; Eipper, Betty A.; Mains, Richard E.; Allen, Matthew R.; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by the balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts. Dysregulation in the activity of the bone cells can lead to osteoporosis, a disease characterized by low bone mass and an increase in bone fragility and risk of fracture. Kalirin is a novel GTP-exchange factor protein that has been shown to play a role in cytoskeletal remodeling and dendritic spine formation in neurons. We examined Kalirin expression in skeletal tissue and found that it was expressed in osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Furthermore, micro-CT analyses of the distal femur of global Kalirin knockout (Kal-KO) mice revealed significantly reduced trabecular and cortical bone parameters in Kal-KO mice, compared to WT mice, with significantly reduced bone mass in 8, 14 and 36 week-old female Kal-KO mice. Male mice also exhibited a decrease in bone parameters but not to the level seen in female mice. Histomorphometric analyses also revealed decreased bone formation rate in 14 week-old female Kal-KO mice, as well as decreased osteoblast number/bone surface and increased osteoclast surface/bone surface. Consistent with our in vivo findings, the bone resorbing activity and differentiation of Kal-KO osteoclasts was increased in vitro. Although alkaline phosphatase activity by Kal-KO osteoblasts was increased in vitro, Kal-KO osteoblasts showed decreased mineralizing activity, as well as decreased secretion of OPG, which was inversely correlated with ERK activity. Taken together, our findings suggest that deletion of Kalirin directly affects osteoclast and osteoblast activity, leading to decreased OPG secretion by osteoblasts which is likely to alter the RANKL/OPG ratio and promote osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, Kalirin may play a role in paracrine and/or endocrine signaling events that control skeletal bone remodeling and the maintenance of bone mass. PMID:24380811

  4. The Rho-GEF Kalirin regulates bone mass and the function of osteoblasts and osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Su; Eleniste, Pierre P; Wayakanon, Kornchanok; Mandela, Prashant; Eipper, Betty A; Mains, Richard E; Allen, Matthew R; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2014-03-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by the balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts. Dysregulation in the activity of the bone cells can lead to osteoporosis, a disease characterized by low bone mass and an increase in bone fragility and risk of fracture. Kalirin is a novel GTP-exchange factor protein that has been shown to play a role in cytoskeletal remodeling and dendritic spine formation in neurons. We examined Kalirin expression in skeletal tissue and found that it was expressed in osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Furthermore, micro-CT analyses of the distal femur of global Kalirin knockout (Kal-KO) mice revealed significantly reduced trabecular and cortical bone parameters in Kal-KO mice, compared to WT mice, with significantly reduced bone mass in 8, 14 and 36week-old female Kal-KO mice. Male mice also exhibited a decrease in bone parameters but not to the level seen in female mice. Histomorphometric analyses also revealed decreased bone formation rate in 14week-old female Kal-KO mice, as well as decreased osteoblast number/bone surface and increased osteoclast surface/bone surface. Consistent with our in vivo findings, the bone resorbing activity and differentiation of Kal-KO osteoclasts was increased in vitro. Although alkaline phosphatase activity by Kal-KO osteoblasts was increased in vitro, Kal-KO osteoblasts showed decreased mineralizing activity, as well as decreased secretion of OPG, which was inversely correlated with ERK activity. Taken together, our findings suggest that deletion of Kalirin directly affects osteoclast and osteoblast activity, leading to decreased OPG secretion by osteoblasts which is likely to alter the RANKL/OPG ratio and promote osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, Kalirin may play a role in paracrine and/or endocrine signaling events that control skeletal bone remodeling and the maintenance of bone mass. PMID:24380811

  5. Diet-induced Obesity Alters Bone Remodeling Leading to Decreased Femoral Trabecular Bone Mass in Mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Body mass derived from an obesity condition may be detrimental to bone health but the mechanism is unknown. This study was to examine changes in bone structure and serum cytokines related to bone metabolism in obese mice induced by a high-fat diet(HFD). Mice fed the HFD were obese and had higher ser...

  6. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation regulates in vitro bone formation and bone mass.

    PubMed

    Shah, M; Kola, B; Bataveljic, A; Arnett, T R; Viollet, B; Saxon, L; Korbonits, M; Chenu, C

    2010-08-01

    Adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a regulator of energy homeostasis, has a central role in mediating the appetite-modulating and metabolic effects of many hormones and antidiabetic drugs metformin and glitazones. The objective of this study was to determine if AMPK can be activated in osteoblasts by known AMPK modulators and if AMPK activity is involved in osteoblast function in vitro and regulation of bone mass in vivo. ROS 17/2.8 rat osteoblast-like cells were cultured in the presence of AMPK activators (AICAR and metformin), AMPK inhibitor (compound C), the gastric peptide hormone ghrelin and the beta-adrenergic blocker propranolol. AMPK activity was measured in cell lysates by a functional kinase assay and AMPK protein phosphorylation was studied by Western Blotting using an antibody recognizing AMPK Thr-172 residue. We demonstrated that treatment of ROS 17/2.8 cells with AICAR and metformin stimulates Thr-172 phosphorylation of AMPK and dose-dependently increases its activity. In contrast, treatment of ROS 17/2.8 cells with compound C inhibited AMPK phosphorylation. Ghrelin and propranolol dose-dependently increased AMPK phosphorylation and activity. Cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity were not affected by metformin treatment while AICAR significantly inhibited ROS 17/2.8 cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity at high concentrations. To study the effect of AMPK activation on bone formation in vitro, primary osteoblasts obtained from rat calvaria were cultured for 14-17days in the presence of AICAR, metformin and compound C. Formation of 'trabecular-shaped' bone nodules was evaluated following alizarin red staining. We demonstrated that both AICAR and metformin dose-dependently increase trabecular bone nodule formation, while compound C inhibits bone formation. When primary osteoblasts were co-treated with AICAR and compound C, compound C suppressed the stimulatory effect of AICAR on bone nodule formation

  7. Bone loss: Quantitative imaging techniques for assessing bone mass in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Njeh, Christopher F; Genant, Harry K

    2000-01-01

    Osteoporosis is associated with low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue with clinical manifestation of low trauma fractures. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a risk factor due to generalized and articular bone loss. This minireview presents past and current bone mass measurement techniques in RA. These techniques include: plain radiographs, absorptiometry, quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and ultrasound. The most widely used technique is dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). RA patients have lower bone mass as compared with normals and substantial bone loss may occur early after the onset of disease. Measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) at the hand using either DXA or ultrasound maybe a useful tool in the management of RA patients. PMID:11094457

  8. Daily leptin blunts marrow fat but does not impact bone mass in calorie-restricted mice.

    PubMed

    Devlin, M J; Brooks, D J; Conlon, C; Vliet, M van; Louis, L; Rosen, C J; Bouxsein, M L

    2016-06-01

    Starvation induces low bone mass and high bone marrow adiposity in humans, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The adipokine leptin falls in starvation, suggesting that hypoleptinemia may be a link between negative energy balance, bone marrow fat accumulation, and impaired skeletal acquisition. In that case, treating mice with leptin during caloric restriction (CR) should reduce marrow adipose tissue (MAT) and improve bone mass. To test this hypothesis, female C57Bl/6J mice were fed a 30% CR or normal (N) diet from 5 to 10 weeks of age, with daily injections of vehicle (VEH), 1mg/kg leptin (LEP1), or 2mg/kg leptin (LEP2) (N=6-8/group). Outcomes included body mass, body fat percentage, and whole-body bone mineral density (BMD) via peripheral dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, cortical and trabecular microarchitecture via microcomputed tomography (μCT), and MAT volume via μCT of osmium tetroxide-stained bones. Overall, CR mice had lower body mass, body fat percentage, BMD, and cortical bone area fraction, but more connected trabeculae, vs N mice (P<0.05 for all). Most significantly, although MAT was elevated in CR vs N overall, leptin treatment blunted MAT formation in CR mice by 50% vs VEH (P<0.05 for both leptin doses). CR LEP2 mice weighed less vs CR VEH mice at 9-10 weeks of age (P<0.05), but leptin treatment did not affect body fat percentage, BMD, or bone microarchitecture within either diet. These data demonstrate that once daily leptin bolus during CR inhibits bone marrow adipose expansion without affecting bone mass acquisition, suggesting that leptin has distinct effects on starvation-induced bone marrow fat formation and skeletal acquisition. PMID:27340200

  9. Poor bone health in underprivileged Indian girls: an effect of low bone mass accrual during puberty.

    PubMed

    Khadilkar, Anuradha V; Sanwalka, Neha J; Kadam, Nidhi S; Chiplonkar, Shashi A; Khadilkar, Vaman V; Mughal, M Zulf

    2012-05-01

    A socio-economic gradient exists for most reasons of morbidity and mortality including delayed puberty in lower (LSES) as compared to higher (HSES) socio-economic stratum and puberty is an important factor affecting bone status in children and adolescents. Thus, a cross-sectional study was conducted on 195 age-matched pairs of girls (8-17years) from LSES and HSES in Pune City, India to assess the hypothesis that socio-economic factors working through late puberty would have a negative association with bone status of adolescents. Height, weight and Tanner stage were assessed. Total body bone mineral content (TBBMC), total body bone area (TBBA), total body bone mineral density (TBBMD), lean body mass (LBM) and total body fat mass (TBFM) were measured using GE Lunar DPX Pro Pencil Beam DXA (Wisconsin, USA) scanner. Mean TBBMC (1172±434g), TBBA (1351±356cm(2)), TBBMD (0.846±0.104g/cm(2)), LBM (21,622±5306g) and TBFM (7746±5194g) in LSES girls were significantly lower than that of HSES girls [TBBMC (1483±525g), TBBA (1533±380cm(2)), TBBMD (0.942±0.119g/cm(2)), LBM (24,308±5829g) and TBFM (12,196±7404g)] (p<0.01). There was a significant effect of age and puberty on all bone parameters. The differences in TBBMC, TBBA, LBM and TBFM between the 2 socio-economic strata at Tanner stage I were not significant (p>0.1) whereas there were significant differences in these parameters from Tanner stages II to V (p<0.05). The percentage difference between LSES and HSES girls in TBBMC, TBBA, TBBMD, LBM and TBFM was 3.4%, 0%, 3.7%, 0.2% and 17.3% respectively at Tanner stage I which increased to 19.1%, 9.7%, 10.4%, 8.8% and 31.2% respectively at Tanner stage V. In conclusion, our results suggest that pubertal years may provide a window of opportunity to promote bone health in adolescent girls from the lower socio-economic stratum. PMID:22370248

  10. Spontaneous recovery of bone mass after cure of endogenous hypercortisolism.

    PubMed

    Randazzo, Maria Elena; Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Vanzulli, Angelo; Loli, Paola

    2012-06-01

    Patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS) develop osteopenia-osteoporosis. The present study evaluates the recovery of bone mass within 2 years after remission of hypercortisolism and in long term follow up, an issue rarely addressed. Twenty patients (6M, 14F, 3 post-menopausal, 15-64 years old), 15 with Cushing's disease, 2 with ectopic ACTH syndrome, 3 with ACTH-independent CS were studied. BMD, T and Z scores at lumbar spine and proximal femur were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry before and 7-33 months after treatment of hypercortisolism. Five patients were treated with bisphosphonates. Four patients had hypogonadism and 4 GH-deficiency. At baseline all patients showed osteopenia/osteoporosis and the spine appeared more damaged than the femur; femur BMD was positively related with body mass index (BMI). No correlations were observed between spine and femur bone parameters and duration of disease or severity of hypercortisolism. Bone parameters did not differ in patients with or without GH or other pituitary deficiencies. After cure of hypercortisolism a significant improvement in spine BMD, Z and T scores and in femur Z and T scores was observed with normalization in 3 patients; there was no significant difference in percent improvement between femur and spine. The increase in bone parameters at spine and femur was independent from values at baseline. The percent increase in spine T and Z scores was positively related with time elapsed since cure. Bisphosphonates did not influence the recovery of bone mineralization. In long term follow up, after a median period of 7 years a further improvement in bone density was observed in 100% of patients at spine and in 9/11 at femur, although 8/11 patients still had femoral and/or vertebral T score in the range of osteopenia/osteoporosis. Spontaneous improvement of osteoporosis after cure of hypercortisolism occurs both at spine and femur, is independent from basal conditions and not affected by bisphosphonates

  11. Acute hypothalamic suppression significantly affects trabecular bone but not cortical bone following recovery and ovariectomy surgery in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Kathryn A.; Lunny, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Osteoporosis is “a pediatric disease with geriatric consequences.” Bone morphology and tissue quality co-adapt during ontogeny for sufficient bone stiffness. Altered bone morphology from hypothalamic amenorrhea, a risk factor for low bone mass in women, may affect bone strength later in life. Our purpose was to determine if altered morphology following hypothalamic suppression during development affects cortical bone strength and trabecular bone volume (BV/TV) at maturity. Methods. Female rats (25 days old) were assigned to a control (C) group (n = 45) that received saline injections (.2 cc) or an experimental group (GnRH-a) (n = 45) that received gonadotropin releasing hormone antagonist injections (.24 mg per dose) for 25 days. Fifteen animals from each group were sacrificed immediately after the injection protocol at Day 50 (C, GnRH-a). The remaining animals recovered for 135 days and a subset of each group was sacrificed at Day 185 ((C-R) (n = 15) and (G-R) (n = 15)). The remaining animals had an ovariectomy surgery (OVX) at 185 days of age and were sacrificed 40 days later (C-OVX) (n = 15) and (G-OVX) (n = 15). After sacrifice femurs were mechanically tested and scanned using micro CT. Serum C-terminal telopeptides (CTX) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) were measured. Two-way ANOVA (2 groups (GnRH-a and Control) X 3 time points (Injection Protocol, Recovery, post-OVX)) was computed. Results. GnRH-a injections suppressed uterine weights (72%) and increased CTX levels by 59%. Bone stiffness was greater in the GnRH-a groups compared to C. Ash content and cortical bone area were similar between groups at all time points. Polar moment of inertia, a measure of bone architecture, was 15% larger in the GnRH-a group and remained larger than C (19%) following recovery. Both the polar moment of inertia and cortical area increased linearly with the increases in body weight. Following the injection protocol, trabecular BV/TV was 31% lower in the Gn

  12. Acute hypothalamic suppression significantly affects trabecular bone but not cortical bone following recovery and ovariectomy surgery in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Yingling, Vanessa R; Mitchell, Kathryn A; Lunny, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Osteoporosis is "a pediatric disease with geriatric consequences." Bone morphology and tissue quality co-adapt during ontogeny for sufficient bone stiffness. Altered bone morphology from hypothalamic amenorrhea, a risk factor for low bone mass in women, may affect bone strength later in life. Our purpose was to determine if altered morphology following hypothalamic suppression during development affects cortical bone strength and trabecular bone volume (BV/TV) at maturity. Methods. Female rats (25 days old) were assigned to a control (C) group (n = 45) that received saline injections (.2 cc) or an experimental group (GnRH-a) (n = 45) that received gonadotropin releasing hormone antagonist injections (.24 mg per dose) for 25 days. Fifteen animals from each group were sacrificed immediately after the injection protocol at Day 50 (C, GnRH-a). The remaining animals recovered for 135 days and a subset of each group was sacrificed at Day 185 ((C-R) (n = 15) and (G-R) (n = 15)). The remaining animals had an ovariectomy surgery (OVX) at 185 days of age and were sacrificed 40 days later (C-OVX) (n = 15) and (G-OVX) (n = 15). After sacrifice femurs were mechanically tested and scanned using micro CT. Serum C-terminal telopeptides (CTX) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) were measured. Two-way ANOVA (2 groups (GnRH-a and Control) X 3 time points (Injection Protocol, Recovery, post-OVX)) was computed. Results. GnRH-a injections suppressed uterine weights (72%) and increased CTX levels by 59%. Bone stiffness was greater in the GnRH-a groups compared to C. Ash content and cortical bone area were similar between groups at all time points. Polar moment of inertia, a measure of bone architecture, was 15% larger in the GnRH-a group and remained larger than C (19%) following recovery. Both the polar moment of inertia and cortical area increased linearly with the increases in body weight. Following the injection protocol, trabecular BV/TV was 31% lower in the Gn

  13. Genetic determinants of bone mass in adults. A twin study.

    PubMed Central

    Pocock, N A; Eisman, J A; Hopper, J L; Yeates, M G; Sambrook, P N; Eberl, S

    1987-01-01

    The relative importance of genetic factors in determining bone mass in different parts of the skeleton is poorly understood. Lumbar spine and proximal femur bone mineral density and forearm bone mineral content were measured by photon absorptiometry in 38 monozygotic and 27 dizygotic twin pairs. Bone mineral density was significantly more highly correlated in monozygotic than in dizygotic twins for the spine and proximal femur and in the forearm of premenopausal twin pairs, which is consistent with significant genetic contributions to bone mass at all these sites. The lesser genetic contribution to proximal femur and distal forearm bone mass compared with the spine suggests that environmental factors are of greater importance in the aetiology of osteopenia of the hip and wrist. This is the first demonstration of a genetic contribution to bone mass of the spine and proximal femur in adults and confirms similar findings of the forearm. Furthermore, bivariate analysis suggested that a single gene or set of genes determines bone mass at all sites. PMID:3624485

  14. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors, pentoxifylline and rolipram, increase bone mass mainly by promoting bone formation in normal mice.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, T; Kobayashi, S; Ebara, S; Yoshimura, Y; Horiuchi, H; Tsutsumimoto, T; Wakabayashi, S; Takaoka, K

    2000-12-01

    The administration of either Pentoxifylline (PTX), a methylxanthine derivative and an inhibitor of cyclic AMP (c-AMP) phosphodiesterases (PDEs), or Rolipram, an inhibitor specific to type-4 PDE (PDE4) in normal mice, significantly increased both cortical and cancellous bone mass. Vertebrae and tibiae from mice treated with PTX or Rolipram were analyzed by means of bone densitometry and histomorphometry. The results revealed that both PTX and Rolipram increased bone mass in normal mice mainly through the acceleration of bone formation. These findings suggest that both PTX and Rolipram can enhance physiological bone formation and thereby increase bone mass in normal mice. The possibility that these agents may be of value for the treatment of osteoporosis is discussed. PMID:11113392

  15. Dietary patterns associated with fat and bone mass in young children123

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Philip R; Claytor, Randal P; Copeland, Kristen A; Hornung, Richard W; Daniels, Stephen R; Kalkwarf, Heidi J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Obesity and osteoporosis have origins in childhood, and both are affected by dietary intake and physical activity. However, there is little information on what constitutes a diet that simultaneously promotes low fat mass and high bone mass accrual early in life. Objective: Our objective was to identify dietary patterns related to fat and bone mass in children during the age period of 3.8–7.8 y. Design: A total of 325 children contributed data from 13 visits over 4 separate study years (age ranges: 3.8–4.8, >4.8–5.8, >5.8–6.8, and >6.8–7.8 y). We performed reduced-rank regression to identify dietary patterns related to fat mass and bone mass measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry for each study year. Covariables included race, sex, height, weight, energy intake, calcium intake, physical activity measured by accelerometry, and time spent viewing television and playing outdoors. Results: A dietary pattern characterized by a high intake of dark-green and deep-yellow vegetables was related to low fat mass and high bone mass; high processed-meat intake was related to high bone mass; and high fried-food intake was related to high fat mass. Dietary pattern scores remained related to fat mass and bone mass after all covariables were controlled for (P < 0.001–0.03). Conclusion: Beginning at preschool age, diets rich in dark-green and deep-yellow vegetables and low in fried foods may lead to healthy fat and bone mass accrual in young children. PMID:20519562

  16. Bone and body mass changes during space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, V.; Oganov, V.; LeBlanc, A.; Rakmonov, A.; Taggart, L.; Bakulin, A.; Huntoon, C.; Grigoriev, A.; Varonin, L.

    Long duration space flight has shown us that humans have significant bone loss and mineral changes because they are living in microgravity. Skylab and the longer Salyut and Mir missions, are providing us useful data and allowing us to explore the mechanism involved in skeletal turnover. Bone redistribution occurs throughout space flight with bone loss predominately in the weight bearing bones of posture and locomotion. The primary health hazards which may occur during space flight induced by skeletal changes include signs and symptoms of hypercalcemia, and the risk of kidney stones and metastatic calcification. After flight lengthy recovery of bone mass and the possible increase in the risk of bone fracture should be considered. Continued research studies are being directed toward determining the mechanisms by which bone is lost in space and developing more effective countermeasures by both the US (Schneider and McDonald, 1984 and Schneider, LeBlanc & Huntoon, 1993) and Russian (Grigoriev et. al., 1989) space programs.

  17. Suppressed bone remodeling in black bears conserves energy and bone mass during hibernation

    PubMed Central

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan; Buckendahl, Patricia; Carpenter, Caren; Henriksen, Kim; Vaughan, Michael; Donahue, Seth

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Decreased physical activity in mammals increases bone turnover and uncouples bone formation from bone resorption, leading to hypercalcemia, hypercalcuria, bone loss and increased fracture risk. Black bears, however, are physically inactive for up to 6 months annually during hibernation without losing cortical or trabecular bone mass. Bears have been shown to preserve trabecular bone volume and architectural parameters and cortical bone strength, porosity and geometrical properties during hibernation. The mechanisms that prevent disuse osteoporosis in bears are unclear as previous studies using histological and serum markers of bone remodeling show conflicting results. However, previous studies used serum markers of bone remodeling that are known to accumulate with decreased renal function, which bears have during hibernation. Therefore, we measured serum bone remodeling markers (BSALP and TRACP) that do not accumulate with decreased renal function, in addition to the concentrations of serum calcium and hormones involved in regulating bone remodeling in hibernating and active bears. Bone resorption and formation markers were decreased during hibernation compared with when bears were physically active, and these findings were supported by histomorphometric analyses of bone biopsies. The serum concentration of cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART), a hormone known to reduce bone resorption, was 15-fold higher during hibernation. Serum calcium concentration was unchanged between hibernation and non-hibernation seasons. Suppressed and balanced bone resorption and formation in hibernating bears contributes to energy conservation, eucalcemia and the preservation of bone mass and strength, allowing bears to survive prolonged periods of extreme environmental conditions, nutritional deprivation and anuria. PMID:26157160

  18. Diet-induced obesity alters bone remodeling leading to decreased femoral trabecular bone mass in mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jay J; Sun, Li; Gao, Hongwei

    2010-03-01

    Obesity-derived body mass may be detrimental to bone health through not well-defined mechanisms. In this study we determined changes in bone structure and serum cytokines related to bone metabolism in diet-induced obese mice. Mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) had higher serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and leptin but lower osteocalcin concentrations than those fed the normal-fat diet. The HFD increased multinucleated TRAP-positive osteoclasts in bone marrow compared to the control diet. Despite being much heavier, mice fed the HFD had lower femoral bone volume, trabecular number, and connectivity density and higher trabecular separation than mice on the control diet. These findings suggest that obesity induced by a HFD increases bone resorption that may blunt any positive effects of increased body weight on bone. PMID:20392249

  19. Factors influencing bone mass accrual: focus on nutritional aspects.

    PubMed

    Viljakainen, H T

    2016-08-01

    Until recently, much of the research exploring the role of nutrition on bone mass accrual has focused on single nutrients. Although randomised controlled trials have provided key information about the effects of calcium and vitamin D on bone, they also have limitations, e.g. generalisation, implementation of the results and long-term consequences. Human subjects do not eat single nutrients, but foods, and describing healthy food patterns for optimising bone mineral accrual is warranted. Recent advances in research suggest that the effects of whole diet are larger than those of single nutrients on bone health. Research should focus on younger age groups to identify the life-course determinants of osteoporosis during prenatal, infancy, childhood and adolescence that would help to maximise peak bone mass. Food patterns that describe the variability, quality and choices of individuals give broader insight and may provide new strategies for preventing osteoporosis. PMID:27169333

  20. Restoring and maintaining bone in osteopenic female rat skeleton: I. Changes in bone mass and structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, L. Y.; Jee, W. S.; Ke, H. Z.; Kimmel, D. B.

    1992-01-01

    This experiment contains the crucial data for the lose, restore, and maintain (LRM) concept, a practical approach for reversing existing osteoporosis. The LRM concept uses anabolic agents to restore bone mass and architecture (+ phase) and then switches to an agent with the established ability to maintain bone mass, to keep the new bone (+/- phase). The purpose of this study was to learn whether switching to an agent known chiefly for its ability to maintain existing bone mass preserves new bone induced by PGE2 in osteopenic, estrogen-depleted rats. The current study had three phases, the bone loss (-), restore (+), and maintain (+/-) phases. We ovariectomized (OX) or sham ovariectomized (sham-OX) 5.5-month-old female rats (- phase). The OX rats were treated 5 months postovariectomy with 1-6 mg PGE2 per kg/day for 75 days to restore lost cancellous bone mass (+ phase), and then PGE2 treatment was stopped and treatment began with 1 or 5 micrograms/kg of risedronate, a bisphosphonate, twice a week for 60 days (+/- phase). During the loss (-) phase, the cancellous bone volume of the proximal tibial metaphysis in the OX rat fell to 19% of initial and 30% of age-matched control levels. During the restore (+) phase, the cancellous bone volume in OX rats doubled. When PGE2 treatment was stopped, however, and no special maintenance efforts were made during the maintain (+/-) phase, the PGE2-induced cancellous bone disappeared. In contrast, the PGE2-induced cancellous bone persisted when the PGE2 treatment was followed by either a 1 or 5 micrograms treatment of risedronate per kg given twice a week for 60 days during the maintain (+/-) phase. The tibial shaft demonstrated very little cortical bone loss during the loss (-) phase in OX rats. The tibial shaft cortical bone fell some 8%. During the restore (+) phase, new cortical bone in OX rats increased by 22%. When PGE2 treatment was stopped and nothing was given during the maintain (+/-) phase, however, all but the PGE2

  1. Dietary dried plum increases bone mass, suppresses proinflammatory cytokines and promotes attainment of peak bone mass in male mice.

    PubMed

    Shahnazari, Mohammad; Turner, Russell T; Iwaniec, Urszula T; Wronski, Thomas J; Li, Min; Ferruzzi, Mario G; Nissenson, Robert A; Halloran, Bernard P

    2016-08-01

    Nutrition is an important determinant of bone health and attainment of peak bone mass. Diets containing dried plum (DP) have been shown to increase bone volume and strength. These effects may be linked to the immune system and DP-specific polyphenols. To better understand these relationships, we studied DP in skeletally mature (6-month-old) and growing (1- and 2-month-old) C57Bl/6 male mice. In adult mice, DP rapidly (<2 weeks) increased bone volume (+32%) and trabecular thickness (+24%). These changes were associated with decreased osteoclast surface (Oc.S/BS) and decreased serum CTX, a marker of bone resorption. The reduction in Oc.S/BS was associated with a reduction in the osteoclast precursor pool. Osteoblast surface (Ob.S/BS) and bone formation rate were also decreased suggesting that the gain in bone in adult mice is a consequence of diminished bone resorption and formation, but resorption is reduced more than formation. The effects of DP on bone were accompanied by a decline in interleukins, TNF and MCP-1, suggesting that DP is acting in part through the immune system to suppress inflammatory activity and reduce the size of the osteoclast precursor pool. Feeding DP was accompanied by an increase in plasma phenolics, some of which have been shown to stimulate bone accrual. In growing and young adult mice DP at levels as low as 5% of diet (w/w) increased bone volume. At higher levels (DP 25%), bone volume was increased by as much as 94%. These data demonstrate that DP feeding dramatically increases peak bone mass during growth. PMID:27239754

  2. Caloric restriction leads to high marrow adiposity and low bone mass in growing mice.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Maureen J; Cloutier, Alison M; Thomas, Nishina A; Panus, David A; Lotinun, Sutada; Pinz, Ilka; Baron, Roland; Rosen, Clifford J; Bouxsein, Mary L

    2010-09-01

    The effects of caloric restriction (CR) on the skeleton are well studied in adult rodents and include lower cortical bone mass but higher trabecular bone volume. Much less is known about how CR affects bone mass in young, rapidly growing animals. This is an important problem because low caloric intake during skeletal acquisition in humans, as in anorexia nervosa, is associated with low bone mass, increased fracture risk, and osteoporosis in adulthood. To explore this question, we tested the effect of caloric restriction on bone mass and microarchitecture during rapid skeletal growth in young mice. At 3 weeks of age, we weaned male C57Bl/6J mice onto 30% caloric restriction (10% kcal/fat) or normal diet (10% kcal/fat). Outcomes at 6 (n = 4/group) and 12 weeks of age (n = 8/group) included body mass, femur length, serum leptin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) values, whole-body bone mineral density (WBBMD, g/cm(2)), cortical and trabecular bone architecture at the midshaft and distal femur, bone formation and cellularity, and marrow fat measurement. Compared with the normal diet, CR mice had 52% and 88% lower serum leptin and 33% and 39% lower serum IGF-1 at 6 and 12 weeks of age (p < .05 for all). CR mice were smaller, with lower bone mineral density, trabecular, and cortical bone properties. Bone-formation indices were lower, whereas bone-resorption indices were higher (p < .01 for all) in CR versus normal diet mice. Despite having lower percent of body fat, bone marrow adiposity was elevated dramatically in CR versus normal diet mice (p < .05). Thus we conclude that caloric restriction in young, growing mice is associated with impaired skeletal acquisition, low leptin and IGF-1 levels, and high marrow adiposity. These results support the hypothesis that caloric restriction during rapid skeletal growth is deleterious to cortical and trabecular bone mass and architecture, in contrast to potential skeletal benefits of CR in aging animals

  3. Bone Mass and Bone Quality are Altered by Hypoactivity in the Chicken

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado, E.; Libouban, H.; Basle, M. F.; Chappard, D.

    2008-06-01

    Disuse induces a rapid bone loss in adults. Hypoactivity also decreases bone mass in adults but its effects in young growing animals are largely unknown. 10 chicks of the rapidly growing strain 857K were grown in a large enclosure; 10 others were kept in small cages with little space to move around. They were sacrificed at 56 days and femur and tibia were evaluated by texture analysis, DEXA and microCT. Hypoactivity had no effect on the length and diameter the bones. BMD, microCT (BV/TV and trabecular microarchitecture) and texture analysis were always found significantly reduced in the bones of hypodynamic animals.

  4. Influence of body weight on bone mass, architecture and turnover.

    PubMed

    Iwaniec, Urszula T; Turner, Russell T

    2016-09-01

    Weight-dependent loading of the skeleton plays an important role in establishing and maintaining bone mass and strength. This review focuses on mechanical signaling induced by body weight as an essential mechanism for maintaining bone health. In addition, the skeletal effects of deviation from normal weight are discussed. The magnitude of mechanical strain experienced by bone during normal activities is remarkably similar among vertebrates, regardless of size, supporting the existence of a conserved regulatory mechanism, or mechanostat, that senses mechanical strain. The mechanostat functions as an adaptive mechanism to optimize bone mass and architecture based on prevailing mechanical strain. Changes in weight, due to altered mass, weightlessness (spaceflight), and hypergravity (modeled by centrifugation), induce an adaptive skeletal response. However, the precise mechanisms governing the skeletal response are incompletely understood. Furthermore, establishing whether the adaptive response maintains the mechanical competence of the skeleton has proven difficult, necessitating the development of surrogate measures of bone quality. The mechanostat is influenced by regulatory inputs to facilitate non-mechanical functions of the skeleton, such as mineral homeostasis, as well as hormones and energy/nutrient availability that support bone metabolism. Although the skeleton is very capable of adapting to changes in weight, the mechanostat has limits. At the limits, extreme deviations from normal weight and body composition are associated with impaired optimization of bone strength to prevailing body size. PMID:27352896

  5. ONO-5334, a cathepsin K inhibitor, improves bone strength by preferentially increasing cortical bone mass in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Yasuo; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Mori, Hiroshi; Kawada, Naoki; Kayasuga, Ryoji; Nakanishi, Yasutomo; Tanaka, Makoto; Imagawa, Akira; Ohmoto, Kazuyuki; Kawabata, Kazuhito

    2014-11-01

    This study compared the effects of ONO-5334, a cathepsin K inhibitor, with those of alendronate on bone mass and strength in ovariectomized rats. Ovariectomy resulted in significant elevation in urinary deoxypyridinoline and plasma C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) 8 weeks after surgery. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography analysis showed that total, trabecular, and cortical bone mineral content (BMC) decreased in the proximal tibia, which was paralleled with a significant decline in bone strength. Treatment with ONO-5334 (0.12, 0.6, 3 or 15 mg/kg) once daily for 8 weeks dose-dependently restored the decrease in total BMC and bone mineral density (BMD) in the proximal tibia and suppressed urinary deoxypyridinoline and plasma CTX levels. Alendronate (1 mg/kg, once daily) also fully restored these bone mass parameters. Separate analysis of trabecular and cortical bones, however, showed that ONO-5334 only partially restored trabecular BMD and BMC at 15 mg/kg, whereas alendronate fully restored these parameters. On the other hand, ONO-5334 increased both cortical BMD and BMC with an effect more potent than that of alendronate. Bone geometric analysis indicated that ONO-5334 at 15 mg/kg decreased endosteal circumference without affecting periosteal circumference, resulting in marked increase in cortical thickness. Interestingly, the effects of ONO-5334 on bone strength parameters were more prominent than those of alendronate, although the two test compounds had a similar effect on total BMC. Taken together, our results indicate that ONO-5334 has pharmacological characteristics different from those of alendronate and may offer a unique therapy for patients with osteoporosis. PMID:24317478

  6. The influence of simvastatin in rats mandible and femur bone mass under Freund's adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Seferos, Nikos; Pantopoulou, Alkistis; Kotsiou, Antonia; Rallis, Georgios; Tesseromatis, Christine

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritis in rats has been used widely as a model of rodent arthropathy and polyarthritis followed by osteoporosis, decreased bone formation and increased bone formation. Osteoporosis is characterized by rapid reduce of bone mass affecting more than 100 million people worldwide. Periodontitis a chronic inflammatory, of multifactorian origin disease has been associated with general osteoporosis. Protective bone-specific anabolic and antiresorptive effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors have also been evaluated in normal and osteoporotic bone. AIM. The aim of the study was to investigate mandible and femur bone density in Freund's adjuvant induced arthritis rats under the influence of simvastatin. METHODS. Three groups (A, B, C) of 7 Wistar male rats each aged 3 months, (292±48.38 g) were used. A control. Group B and C subjected experimental arthritis via complete Freund's adjuvant injected in right paw. Group C was treated with simvastatin 0.5 mg/kg/daily po 14 days. Femur, mandible were isolated and sizes parameters, biochemical serum findings and BMD were estimated. RESULTS. CFA established by paw diameter, adrenals and spleen weight increase and thymus weight decrease, while biochemical serum findings were also affected. Reduced femur, mandible weight and general bone mass parameters BMD evaluated via DEXA occurred and restored under simvastatin treatment. CONCLUSIONS. CFA induced mandible and femur injuries are repaired by ssimvatatin treatment that could be therapeutically useful. PMID:23037783

  7. LRP5 and bone mass regulation: Where are we now?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Mark L

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of causal mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene underlying conditions of altered bone mass ushered in a new era in bone research. Since those original publications, the role of Lrp5 and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway controlled by Lrp5 and its homologs, Lrp6 and Lrp4, in bone mass regulation has been an intense area of investigation. Studies to date have implicated this pathway in skeletal development, osteoblast differentiation and proliferation, osteoblast/osteocyte apoptosis, regulation of the balance between osteogenesis–chondrogenesis–adipogenesis, regulation of osteoclastogenesis and the response of bone to mechanical loading. Interestingly, the data from knockout and transgenic mice involving Lrp4/5/6 and/or their regulators, as well as β-catenin signaling pathway components, and in vitro studies have sometimes yielded conflicting results. Adding to the complexity of the system are the studies that suggested Lrp5 regulated bone mass through a gut-bone endocrine signaling system involving Lrp5 mediated control of gut serotonin synthesis. However, recent studies have called this into question and so this provocative concept remains an open question. Clearly, the manipulation of Lrp5/Wnt/β-catenin pathway presents as a major target for drug development to treat diseases of low bone mass such as osteoporosis and these new therapies are in full progress. At present, although it is clear that Lrp5 has a role in bone mass regulation, much of the details remain to be elucidated and this is a major and exciting challenge for future studies. PMID:23951413

  8. Sympathetic control of bone mass regulated by osteopontin

    PubMed Central

    Nagao, Masashi; Feinstein, Timothy N.; Ezura, Yoichi; Hayata, Tadayoshi; Notomi, Takuya; Saita, Yoshitomo; Hanyu, Ryo; Hemmi, Hiroaki; Izu, Yayoi; Takeda, Shu; Wang, Kathryn; Rittling, Susan; Nakamoto, Tetsuya; Kaneko, Kazuo; Kurosawa, Hisashi; Karsenty, Gerard; Denhardt, David T.; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Noda, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system suppresses bone mass by mechanisms that remain incompletely elucidated. Using cell-based and murine genetics approaches, we show that this activity of the sympathetic nervous system requires osteopontin (OPN), a cytokine and one of the major members of the noncollagenous extracellular matrix proteins of bone. In this work, we found that the stimulation of the sympathetic tone by isoproterenol increased the level of OPN expression in the plasma and bone and that mice lacking OPN (OPN-KO) suppressed the isoproterenol-induced bone loss by preventing reduced osteoblastic and enhanced osteoclastic activities. In addition, we found that OPN is necessary for changes in the expression of genes related to bone resorption and bone formation that are induced by activation of the sympathetic tone. At the cellular level, we showed that intracellular OPN modulated the capacity of the β2-adrenergic receptor to generate cAMP with a corresponding modulation of cAMP-response element binding (CREB) phosphorylation and associated transcriptional events inside the cell. Our results indicate that OPN plays a critical role in sympathetic tone regulation of bone mass and that this OPN regulation is taking place through modulation of the β2-adrenergic receptor/cAMP signaling system. PMID:21990347

  9. Effect of Probiotics Supplementation on Bone Mineral Content and Bone Mass Density

    PubMed Central

    Parvaneh, Kolsoom; Jamaluddin, Rosita; Karimi, Golgis; Erfani, Reza

    2014-01-01

    A few studies in animals and a study in humans showed a positive effect of probiotic on bone metabolism and bone mass density. Most of the investigated bacteria were Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium . The positive results of the probiotics were supported by the high content of dietary calcium and the high amounts of supplemented probiotics. Some of the principal mechanisms include (1) increasing mineral solubility due to production of short chain fatty acids; (2) producing phytase enzyme by bacteria to overcome the effect of mineral depressed by phytate; (3) reducing intestinal inflammation followed by increasing bone mass density; (4) hydrolysing glycoside bond food in the intestines by Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria. These mechanisms lead to increase bioavailability of the minerals. In conclusion, probiotics showed potential effects on bone metabolism through different mechanisms with outstanding results in the animal model. The results also showed that postmenopausal women who suffered from low bone mass density are potential targets to consume probiotics for increasing mineral bioavailability including calcium and consequently increasing bone mass density. PMID:24587733

  10. Effect of probiotics supplementation on bone mineral content and bone mass density.

    PubMed

    Parvaneh, Kolsoom; Jamaluddin, Rosita; Karimi, Golgis; Erfani, Reza

    2014-01-01

    A few studies in animals and a study in humans showed a positive effect of probiotic on bone metabolism and bone mass density. Most of the investigated bacteria were Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. The positive results of the probiotics were supported by the high content of dietary calcium and the high amounts of supplemented probiotics. Some of the principal mechanisms include (1) increasing mineral solubility due to production of short chain fatty acids; (2) producing phytase enzyme by bacteria to overcome the effect of mineral depressed by phytate; (3) reducing intestinal inflammation followed by increasing bone mass density; (4) hydrolysing glycoside bond food in the intestines by Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria. These mechanisms lead to increase bioavailability of the minerals. In conclusion, probiotics showed potential effects on bone metabolism through different mechanisms with outstanding results in the animal model. The results also showed that postmenopausal women who suffered from low bone mass density are potential targets to consume probiotics for increasing mineral bioavailability including calcium and consequently increasing bone mass density. PMID:24587733

  11. Hypermobility syndrome increases the risk for low bone mass.

    PubMed

    Gulbahar, Selmin; Sahin, Ebru; Baydar, Meltem; Bircan, Ciğdem; Kizil, Ramazan; Manisali, Metin; Akalin, Elif; Peker, Ozlen

    2006-07-01

    Few studies on the benign joint hypermobility syndrome suggest a tendency toward osteopenia, but there are conflicting results. We assessed bone mineral density in pre-menopausal women with hypermobility. Twenty-five consecutive Caucasian women diagnosed with benign hypermobility syndrome by Beighton score and 23 age- and sex-matched controls were included in the study. Age, menarch age, number of pregnancies, duration of lactation, physical activity and calcium intake were questioned according to European Vertebral Osteoporosis Study Group (EVOS) form. All subjects were pre-menopausal and none of them were on treatment with any drugs effecting bone metabolism or had any other systemic disease. No statistically significant difference was found for body mass index, menarch age, number of pregnancies, duration of lactation, calcium intake, calcium score and physical activity score between the two groups. Total femoral and trochanteric bone mineral density and t and z scores were significantly lower in hypermobile patients compared to the control group. Ward's triangle and femoral neck z scores were also found to be significantly low in hypermobile patients (p<0.05). Significant negative correlations were found between the Beighton scores and trochanteric BMD, t and z scores (r=-0.29, r=-0.30, and r=-0.32) in hypermobility patients. Low bone mass was more frequently found among subjects with hypermobility (p=0.03). Hypermobility was found to increase the risk for low bone mass by 1.8 times (95% confidence interval 1.01-3.38). Our study suggests that pre-menopausal women with joint hypermobility have lower bone mineral density when compared to the controls and hypermobility increases the risk for low bone mass. PMID:16311714

  12. Reduced bone mass accrual in mouse model of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongrun; Wergedal, Jon E; Rundle, Charles H; Mohan, Subburaman

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can affect bone by influencing the production/actions of pituitary hormones and neuropeptides that play significant regulatory roles in bone metabolism. Previously, we demonstrated that experimental TBI exerted a negative effect on the skeleton. Since mild TBI (mTBI) accounts for the majority of TBI cases, this study was undertaken to evaluate TBI effects using a milder impact model in female mice. Repetitive mTBI caused microhemorrhaging, astrocytosis, and increased anti-inflammatory protective actions in the brain of the impacted versus control mice 2 wk after the first impact. Serum levels of growth regulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) were reduced by 28.9%. Bone mass was reduced significantly in total body as well as individual skeletons. Tibial total cortical density was reduced by 7.0%, which led to weaker bones, as shown by a 31.3% decrease in femoral size adjusted peak torque. A 27.5% decrease in tibial trabecular bone volume per total volume was accompanied by a 34.3% (p = 0.07) decrease in bone formation rate (BFR) per total area. Based on our data, we conclude that repetitive mTBI exerted significant negative effects on accrual of both cortical and trabecular bone mass in mice caused by a reduced BFR. PMID:25785491

  13. Numerical test concerning bone mass apposition under electrical and mechanical stimulus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes a model of bone remodeling that encompasses mechanical and electrical stimuli. The remodeling formulation proposed by Weinans and collaborators was used as the basis of this research, with a literature review allowing a constitutive model evaluating the permittivity of bone tissue to be developed. This allowed the mass distribution that depends on mechanical and electrical stimuli to be obtained. The remaining constants were established through numerical experimentation. The results demonstrate that mass distribution is altered under electrical stimulation, generally resulting in a greater deposition of mass. In addition, the frequency of application of an electric field can affect the distribution of mass; at a lower frequency there is more mass in the domain. These numerical experiments open up discussion concerning the importance of the electric field in the remodeling process and propose the quantification of their effects. PMID:22578031

  14. Histone Deacetylases in Skeletal Development and Bone Mass Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.

    2011-01-01

    The skeleton is a multifunctional and regenerative organ. Dynamic activities within the bone microenvironment necessitate and instigate rapid and temporal changes in gene expression within the cells (osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes) responsible for skeletal maintenance. Regulation of gene expression is controlled, in part, by histone deacetylases (Hdacs), which are intracellular enzymes that directly affect chromatin structure and transcription factor activity. Key roles for several Hdacs in bone development and biology have been elucidated though in vitro and in vivo models. Recent findings suggest that clinical usage of small molecule Hdac inhibitors for conditions like epilepsy, bipolar disorder, cancer, and a multitude of other ailments may have unintended effects on bone cell populations. Here we review the progress that has been made in the last decade in understanding how Hdacs contribute to bone development and maintenance. PMID:21185361

  15. Bone Mass in Young Adults with down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guijarro, M.; Valero, C.; Paule, B.; Gonzalez-Macias, J.; Riancho, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Down syndrome (DS) is a frequent cause of intellectual disability. With the increasing life expectancy of these patients, concerns have been raised about the risk of osteoporosis. In fact, several investigators have reported a reduced bone mass in DS. However, the results may be confounded by comorbid diseases, and differences in…

  16. Bone Mass and Mineral Metabolism Alterations in Adult Celiac Disease: Pathophysiology and Clinical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Di Stefano, Michele; Mengoli, Caterina; Bergonzi, Manuela; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis affects many patients with celiac disease (CD), representing the consequence of calcium malabsorption and persistent activation of mucosal inflammation. A slight increase of fracture risk is evident in this condition, particularly in those with overt malabsorption and in postmenopausal state. The adoption of a correct gluten-free diet (GFD) improves bone derangement, but is not able to normalize bone mass in all the patients. Biomarkers effective in the prediction of bone response to gluten-free diet are not yet available and the indications of guidelines are still imperfect and debated. In this review, the pathophysiology of bone loss is correlated to clinical aspects, defining an alternative proposal of management for this condition. PMID:24284619

  17. Bone mass and mineral metabolism alterations in adult celiac disease: pathophysiology and clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, Michele; Mengoli, Caterina; Bergonzi, Manuela; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2013-11-01

    Osteoporosis affects many patients with celiac disease (CD), representing the consequence of calcium malabsorption and persistent activation of mucosal inflammation. A slight increase of fracture risk is evident in this condition, particularly in those with overt malabsorption and in postmenopausal state. The adoption of a correct gluten-free diet (GFD) improves bone derangement, but is not able to normalize bone mass in all the patients. Biomarkers effective in the prediction of bone response to gluten-free diet are not yet available and the indications of guidelines are still imperfect and debated. In this review, the pathophysiology of bone loss is correlated to clinical aspects, defining an alternative proposal of management for this condition. PMID:24284619

  18. Influence of different sports on bone mass in growing girls.

    PubMed

    Ubago-Guisado, Esther; Gómez-Cabello, Alba; Sánchez-Sánchez, Javier; García-Unanue, Jorge; Gallardo, Leonor

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse whether there are differences in bone mass in girls playing different sports. Two hundred girls (10.6 ± 1.5 years old, Tanner stages I-III) participated in the study and were divided into groups of 40 (swimmers, soccer players, basketball players, handball players and controls). Bone mineral content and bone mineral density (BMD) (whole body and hip) were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The degree of sexual development was determined using Tanner test, and physical activity habits were recorded through a questionnaire designed ad hoc for this research. Girls were divided by pubertal stage and the type of sport. In the prepubertal group, intertrochanteric BMD was significantly higher in both handball and soccer players compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Furthermore, in the pubertal group, total BMD, mean arms BMD, pelvis BMD, femoral neck BMD, intertrochanteric BMD and Ward's triangle BMD were significantly higher in soccer and handball players compared with the control group (P < 0.05), and the swimmers showed significantly higher values in the mean arms BMD compared with the control group (P < 0.01). Our data suggest that sport practice during puberty, especially in activities that support the body weight, may be an important factor in achieving a high peak bone mass and improving bone health in girls. PMID:25607233

  19. Effect of protein intake on bone and muscle mass in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Genaro, Patrícia de Souza; Martini, Lígia Araújo

    2010-10-01

    The aging process is frequently characterized by an involuntary loss of muscle (sarcopenia) and bone (osteoporosis) mass. Both chronic diseases are associated with decreased metabolic rate, increased risk of falls/fracture, and, as a result, increased morbidity and loss of independence in the elderly. The quality and quantity of protein intake affects bone and muscle mass in several ways and there is evidence that increased essential amino acid or protein availability can enhance muscle protein synthesis and anabolism, as well as improve bone homeostasis in older subjects. A thorough evaluation of renal function is important, since renal function decreases with age. Finally, protein and calcium intake should be considered in the prevention or treatment of the chronic diseases osteoporosis and sarcopenia. PMID:20883419

  20. Regulation of osteoclast function and bone mass by RAGE

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zheng; Immel, David; Xi, Cai-Xia; Bierhaus, Angelika; Feng, Xu; Mei, Lin; Nawroth, Peter; Stern, David M.; Xiong, Wen-Cheng

    2006-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily that has multiple ligands and is implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases, including diabetic complications, neurodegenerative disorders, and inflammatory responses. However, the role of RAGE in normal physiology is largely undefined. Here, we present evidence for a role of RAGE in osteoclast maturation and function, which has consequences for bone remodeling. Mice lacking RAGE had increased bone mass and bone mineral density and decreased bone resorptive activity in vivo. In vitro–differentiated RAGE-deficient osteoclasts exhibited disrupted actin ring and sealing zone structures, impaired maturation, and reduced bone resorptive activity. Impaired signaling downstream of αvβ3 integrin was observed in RAGE−/− bone marrow macrophages and precursors of OCs. These results demonstrate a role for RAGE in osteoclast actin cytoskeletal reorganization, adhesion, and function, and suggest that the osteosclerotic-like phenotype observed in RAGE knockout mice is due to a defect in osteoclast function. PMID:16606672

  1. Bone Mass and Bone Quality Are Altered by Hypoactivity in the Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Eric; Pascaretti-Grizon, Florence; Goyenvalle, Eric; Audran, Maurice; Chappard, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Disuse induces a rapid bone loss in adults; sedentarity is now recognized as a risk factor for osteoporosis. Hypoactivity or confinement also decrease bone mass in adults but their effects are largely unknown and only few animal models have been described. We have used 10 chickens of the rapidly growing strain 857K bred in a large enclosure (FREE group); 10 others were confined in small cages with little space to move around (HYPO group). They were sacrificed at 53 days and femurs and tibias were evaluated by texture analysis, dual energy X-ray densitometry, microcomputed tomography (microCT) and histomorphometry. Hypoactivity had no effect on the length and diameter of the bones. Bone mineral density (BMD), microCT (trabecular bone volume and trabecular microarchitecture) and texture analysis were always found significantly reduced in the animals of the HYPO group. BMD was reduced at both femur and tibia diaphysises; BMD of the metaphysis was significantly reduced in the femur but not in the tibia. An increase in osteoid volume and surfaces was noted in the HYPO group. However, there was no alteration of the mineral phase as the osteoid thickness did not differ from control animals. Bone loss was much more pronounced at the lower femur metaphysis than at the upper metaphysis of the tibia. At the tibia, only microarchitectural changes of trabecular bone could be evidenced. The confined chicken represents a new method for the study of hypodynamia since these animals do not have surgical lesions. PMID:25635404

  2. Lack of seasonal variation in bone mass and biochemical estimates of bone turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Overgaard, K.; Nilas, L.; Johansen, J.S.; Christiansen, C.

    1988-01-01

    Three previous studies have indicated a seasonal variation in bone mineral content, with values during the summer being 1.7% to 7.5% higher than during the winter. We have examined the seasonal influence on both bone mass, biochemical estimates of bone turnover and vitamin D metabolites in 86 healthy women, aged 29-53 years. All participants were followed up for 2 years with examinations every 6 weeks or 3 months. Bone mineral content in the proximal and distal part of the forearm (single photon absorptiometry) did not reveal any significant seasonal variation, whereas bone mineral density of the lumbar spine (dual photon absorptiometry) indicated that the highest values occurred in winter. None of the biochemical parameters showed any statistically significant cyclical changes. Serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 showed a highly significant seasonal variation, whereas the serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D concentration was virtually unchanged. We conclude that seasonal variation in bone mineral content and bone turnover should not be taken into account when interpreting data from longitudinal studies of healthy pre- and postmenopausal women on a sufficient vitamin D nutriture.

  3. Peripheral cannabinoid receptor, CB2, regulates bone mass

    PubMed Central

    Ofek, Orr; Karsak, Meliha; Leclerc, Nathalie; Fogel, Meirav; Frenkel, Baruch; Wright, Karen; Tam, Joseph; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kram, Vardit; Shohami, Esther; Mechoulam, Raphael; Zimmer, Andreas; Bab, Itai

    2006-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoids bind to and activate two G protein-coupled receptors, the predominantly central cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and peripheral cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2). Whereas CB1 mediates the cannabinoid psychotropic, analgesic, and orectic effects, CB2 has been implicated recently in the regulation of liver fibrosis and atherosclerosis. Here we show that CB2-deficient mice have a markedly accelerated age-related trabecular bone loss and cortical expansion, although cortical thickness remains unaltered. These changes are reminiscent of human osteoporosis and may result from differential regulation of trabecular and cortical bone remodeling. The CB2–/– phenotype is also characterized by increased activity of trabecular osteoblasts (bone-forming cells), increased osteoclast (the bone-resorbing cell) number, and a markedly decreased number of diaphyseal osteoblast precursors. CB2 is expressed in osteoblasts, osteocytes, and osteoclasts. A CB2-specific agonist that does not have any psychotropic effects enhances endocortical osteoblast number and activity and restrains trabecular osteoclastogenesis, apparently by inhibiting proliferation of osteoclast precursors and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand expression in bone marrow-derived osteoblasts/stromal cells. The same agonist attenuates ovariectomy-induced bone loss and markedly stimulates cortical thickness through the respective suppression of osteoclast number and stimulation of endocortical bone formation. These results demonstrate that the endocannabinoid system is essential for the maintenance of normal bone mass by osteoblastic and osteoclastic CB2 signaling. Hence, CB2 offers a molecular target for the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis, the most prevalent degenerative disease in developed countries. PMID:16407142

  4. Genistein treatment increases bone mass in obese, hyperglycemic mice

    PubMed Central

    Michelin, Richard M; Al-Nakkash, Layla; Broderick, Tom L; Plochocki, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus are associated with elevated risk of limb bone fracture. Incidences of these conditions are on the rise worldwide. Genistein, a phytoestrogen, has been shown by several studies to demonstrate bone-protective properties and may improve bone health in obese type 2 diabetics. Methods In this study, we test the effects of genistein treatment on limb bone and growth plate cartilage histomorphometry in obese, hyperglycemic ob/ob mice. Six-week-old ob/ob mice were divided into control and genistein-treated groups. Genistein-treated mice were fed a diet containing 600 mg genistein/kg for a period of 4 weeks. Cross-sectional geometric and histomorphometric analyses were conducted on tibias. Results Genistein-treated mice remained obese and hyperglycemic. However, histomorphometric comparisons show that genistein-treated mice have greater tibial midshaft diameters and ratios of cortical bone to total tissue area than the controls. Genistein-treated mice also exhibit decreased growth plate thickness of the proximal tibia. Conclusion Our results indicate that genistein treatment affects bone of the tibial midshaft in the ob/ob mouse, independent of improvements in the hyperglycemic state and body weight. PMID:27042131

  5. Probiotics (Bifidobacterium longum) Increase Bone Mass Density and Upregulate Sparc and Bmp-2 Genes in Rats with Bone Loss Resulting from Ovariectomy

    PubMed Central

    Parvaneh, Kolsoom; Ebrahimi, Mahdi; Sabran, Mohd Redzwan; Karimi, Golgis; Hwei, Angela Ng Min; Abdul-Majeed, Saif; Ahmad, Zuraini; Ibrahim, Zuriati; Jamaluddin, Rosita

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that exert beneficial effects on the host, when administered in adequate amounts. Mostly, probiotics affect the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of the host and alter the composition of gut microbiota. Nowadays, the incidence of hip fractures due to osteoporosis is increasing worldwide. Ovariectomized (OVX) rats have fragile bone due to estrogen deficiency and mimic the menopausal conditions in women. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the effects of Bifidobacterium longum (B. longum) on bone mass density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), bone remodeling, bone structure, and gene expression in OVX rats. The rats were randomly assigned into 3 groups (sham, OVX, and the OVX group supplemented with 1 mL of B. longum 108–109 colony forming units (CFU)/mL). B. longum was given once daily for 16 weeks, starting from 2 weeks after the surgery. The B. longum supplementation increased (p < 0.05) serum osteocalcin (OC) and osteoblasts, bone formation parameters, and decreased serum C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) and osteoclasts, bone resorption parameters. It also altered the microstructure of the femur. Consequently, it increased BMD by increasing (p < 0.05) the expression of Sparc and Bmp-2 genes. B. longum alleviated bone loss in OVX rats and enhanced BMD by decreasing bone resorption and increasing bone formation. PMID:26366421

  6. Probiotics (Bifidobacterium longum) Increase Bone Mass Density and Upregulate Sparc and Bmp-2 Genes in Rats with Bone Loss Resulting from Ovariectomy.

    PubMed

    Parvaneh, Kolsoom; Ebrahimi, Mahdi; Sabran, Mohd Redzwan; Karimi, Golgis; Hwei, Angela Ng Min; Abdul-Majeed, Saif; Ahmad, Zuraini; Ibrahim, Zuriati; Jamaluddin, Rosita

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that exert beneficial effects on the host, when administered in adequate amounts. Mostly, probiotics affect the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of the host and alter the composition of gut microbiota. Nowadays, the incidence of hip fractures due to osteoporosis is increasing worldwide. Ovariectomized (OVX) rats have fragile bone due to estrogen deficiency and mimic the menopausal conditions in women. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the effects of Bifidobacterium longum (B. longum) on bone mass density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), bone remodeling, bone structure, and gene expression in OVX rats. The rats were randomly assigned into 3 groups (sham, OVX, and the OVX group supplemented with 1 mL of B. longum 10(8)-10(9) colony forming units (CFU)/mL). B. longum was given once daily for 16 weeks, starting from 2 weeks after the surgery. The B. longum supplementation increased (p < 0.05) serum osteocalcin (OC) and osteoblasts, bone formation parameters, and decreased serum C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) and osteoclasts, bone resorption parameters. It also altered the microstructure of the femur. Consequently, it increased BMD by increasing (p < 0.05) the expression of Sparc and Bmp-2 genes. B. longum alleviated bone loss in OVX rats and enhanced BMD by decreasing bone resorption and increasing bone formation. PMID:26366421

  7. Bone development in black ducks as affected by dietary toxaphene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehrle, P.M.; Finley, M.T.; Ludke, J.L.; Mayer, F.L.; Kaiser, T.E.

    1979-01-01

    Black ducks, Anas rubripes, were exposed to dietary toxaphene concentrations of 0, 10, or 50 μg/g of food for 90 days prior to laying and through the reproductive season. Toxaphene did not affect reproduction or survival, but reduced growth and impaired backbone development in ducklings. Collagen, the organic matrix of bone, was decreased significantly in cervical vertebrae of ducklings fed 50 μg/g, and calcium conentrations increased in vertebrae of ducklings fed 10 or 50 μg/g. The effects of toxaphene were observed only in female ducklings. In contrast to effects on vertebrae, toxaphene exposure did not alter tibia development. Toxaphene residues in carcasses of these ducklings averaged slightly less than the dietary levels.

  8. Final Report: Bone Mass Inheritance: A Project to Identify the Genetic Regulation of Bone Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Recker, Robert R., M.D.

    2002-03-28

    This project was designed to find human chromosomal locations that contain genes regulating peak bone density. It is part of a whole genome search for those loci,each responsible for at least 15% of the variation in the peak adult bone density. We accomplished this with a sib pair design, combined with simultaneous examination of extended kindreds. This project gave partial support of the recruitment which has now been completed. The project will extend into 2003. During the remainder of the project, a whole genome scan will be performed from the entire cohort of 2226 persons who have DNA archived, followed by linkage analysis. This project will meet the scientific objective leading eventually to expanded options for treating the condition that leads to bone thinning osteoporosis, and potential fractures in aging populations.

  9. MicroRNA variants as genetic determinants of bone mass.

    PubMed

    Dole, Neha S; Delany, Anne M

    2016-03-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most abundant genetic variants that contribute to the heritability of bone mass. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) are key post-transcriptional regulators that modulate the differentiation and function of skeletal cells by targeting multiple genes in the same or distinct signaling pathways. SNPs in miRNA genes and miRNA binding sites can alter miRNA abundance and mRNA targeting. This review describes the potential impact of miRNA-related SNPs on skeletal phenotype. Although many associations between SNPs and bone mass have been described, this review is limited to gene variants for which a function has been experimentally validated. SNPs in miRNA genes (miR-SNPs) that impair miRNA processing and alter the abundance of mature miRNA are discussed for miR-146a, miR-125a, miR-196a, miR-149 and miR-27a. SNPs in miRNA targeting sites (miR-TS-SNPs) that alter miRNA binding are described for the bone remodeling genes bone morphogenetic protein receptor 1 (Bmpr1), fibroblast growth factor 2 (Fgf2), osteonectin (Sparc) and histone deacetylase 5 (Hdac5). The review highlights two aspects of miRNA-associated SNPs: the mechanism for altering miRNA mediated gene regulation and the potential of miR-associated SNPs to alter osteoblast, osteoclast or chondrocyte differentiation and function. Given the polygenic nature of skeletal diseases like osteoporosis and osteoarthritis, validating the function of additional miRNA-associated SNPs has the potential to enhance our understanding of the genetic determinants of bone mass and predisposition to selected skeletal diseases. PMID:26723575

  10. Electromagnetic fields do not affect bone micro-architecture in osteoporotic rats

    PubMed Central

    van der Jagt, O. P.; van der Linden, J. C.; Waarsing, J. H.; Verhaar, J. A. N.; Weinans, H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Electromagnetic fields (EMF) are widely used in musculoskeletal disorders. There are indications that EMF might also be effective in the treatment of osteoporosis. To justify clinical follow-up experiments, we examined the effects of EMF on bone micro-architectural changes in osteoporotic and healthy rats. Moreover, we tested the effects of EMF on fracture healing. Methods EMF (20 Gauss) was examined in rats (aged 20 weeks), which underwent an ovariectomy (OVX; n = 8) or sham-ovariectomy (sham-OVX; n = 8). As a putative positive control, all rats received bilateral fibular osteotomies to examine the effects on fracture healing. Treatment was applied to one proximal lower leg (three hours a day, five days a week); the lower leg was not treated and served as a control. Bone architectural changes of the proximal tibia and bone formation around the osteotomy were evaluated using in vivo microCT scans at start of treatment and after three and six weeks. Results In both OVX and sham-OVX groups, EMF did not result in cancellous or cortical bone changes during follow-up. Moreover, EMF did not affect the amount of mineralised callus volume around the fibular osteotomy. Conclusions In this study we were unable to reproduce the strong beneficial findings reported by others. This might indicate that EMF treatment is very sensitive to the specific set-up, which would be a serious hindrance for clinical use. No evidence was found that EMF treatment can influence bone mass for the benefit of osteoporotic patients. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:230–5. PMID:25015993

  11. Deletion of FGFR3 in Osteoclast Lineage Cells Results in Increased Bone Mass in Mice by Inhibiting Osteoclastic Bone Resorption.

    PubMed

    Su, Nan; Li, Xiaogang; Tang, Yubin; Yang, Jing; Wen, Xuan; Guo, Jingyuan; Tang, Junzhou; Du, Xiaolan; Chen, Lin

    2016-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) participates in bone remodeling. Both Fgfr3 global knockout and activated mice showed decreased bone mass with increased osteoclast formation or bone resorption activity. To clarify the direct effect of FGFR3 on osteoclasts, we specifically deleted Fgfr3 in osteoclast lineage cells. Adult mice with Fgfr3 deficiency in osteoclast lineage cells (mutant [MUT]) showed increased bone mass. In a drilled-hole defect model, the bone remodeling of the holed area in cortical bone was also impaired with delayed resorption of residual woven bone in MUT mice. In vitro assay demonstrated that there was no significant difference between the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive osteoclasts derived from wild-type and Fgfr3-deficient bone marrow monocytes, suggesting that FGFR3 had no remarkable effect on osteoclast formation. The bone resorption activity of Fgfr3-deficient osteoclasts was markedly decreased accompanying with downregulated expressions of Trap, Ctsk, and Mmp 9. The upregulated activity of osteoclastic bone resorption by FGF2 in vitro was also impaired in Fgfr3-deficient osteoclasts, indicating that FGFR3 may participate in the regulation of bone resorption activity of osteoclasts by FGF2. Reduced adhesion but not migration in osteoclasts with Fgfr3 deficiency may be responsible for the impaired bone resorption activity. Our study for the first time genetically shows the direct positive regulation of FGFR3 on osteoclastic bone resorption. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26990430

  12. CCL20/CCR6 Signaling Regulates Bone Mass Accrual in Mice.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Michele; Jayaraman, Swaathi; Swenson, Emily; Tusing, Brittany; Weber, Kristy L; Kominsky, Scott L

    2016-07-01

    CCL20 is a member of the macrophage inflammatory protein family and is reported to signal monogamously through the receptor CCR6. Although studies have identified the genomic locations of both Ccl20 and Ccr6 as regions important for bone quality, the role of CCL20/CCR6 signaling in regulating bone mass is unknown. By micro-computed tomography (μCT) and histomorphometric analysis, we show that global loss of Ccr6 in mice significantly decreases trabecular bone mass coincident with reduced osteoblast numbers. Notably, CCL20 and CCR6 were co-expressed in osteoblast progenitors and levels increased during osteoblast differentiation, indicating the potential of CCL20/CCR6 signaling to influence osteoblasts through both autocrine and paracrine actions. With respect to autocrine effects, CCR6 was found to act as a functional G protein-coupled receptor in osteoblasts and although its loss did not appear to affect the number or proliferation rate of osteoblast progenitors, differentiation was significantly inhibited as evidenced by delays in osteoblast marker gene expression, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralization. In addition, CCL20 promoted osteoblast survival concordant with activation of the PI3K-AKT pathway. Beyond these potential autocrine effects, osteoblast-derived CCL20 stimulated the recruitment of macrophages and T cells, known facilitators of osteoblast differentiation and survival. Finally, we generated mice harboring a global deletion of Ccl20 and found that Ccl20(-/-) mice exhibit a reduction in bone mass similar to that observed in Ccr6(-/-) mice, confirming that this phenomenon is regulated by CCL20 rather than alternate CCR6 ligands. Collectively, these data indicate that CCL20/CCR6 signaling may play an important role in regulating bone mass accrual, potentially by modulating osteoblast maturation, survival, and the recruitment of osteoblast-supporting cells. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26890063

  13. Volleyball and Basketball Enhanced Bone Mass in Prepubescent Boys.

    PubMed

    Zouch, Mohamed; Chaari, Hamada; Zribi, Anis; Bouajina, Elyès; Vico, Laurence; Alexandre, Christian; Zaouali, Monia; Ben Nasr, Hela; Masmoudi, Liwa; Tabka, Zouhair

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of volleyball and basketball practice on bone acquisition and to determine which of these 2 high-impact sports is more osteogenic in prepubertal period. We investigated 170 boys (aged 10-12 yr, Tanner stage I): 50 volleyball players (VB), 50 basketball players (BB), and 70 controls. Bone mineral content (BMC, g) and bone area (BA, cm(2)) were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at different sites. We found that, both VB and BB have a higher BMC at whole body and most weight-bearing and nonweight-bearing sites than controls, except the BMC in head which was lower in VB and BB than controls. Moreover, only VB exhibited greater BMC in right and left ultra-distal radius than controls. No significant differences were observed between the 3 groups in lumbar spine, femoral neck, and left third D radius BMC. Athletes also exhibited a higher BA in whole body, limbs, lumbar spine, and femoral region than controls. In addition, they have a similar BA in head and left third D radius with controls. The VB exhibited a greater BA in most radius region than controls and a greater femoral neck BA than BB. A significant positive correlation was reported between total lean mass and both BMC and BA in whole body, lumbar spine, total hip, and right whole radius among VB and BB. In summary, we suggest that volleyball and basketball have an osteogenic effect BMC and BA in loaded sites in prepubescent boys. The increased bone mass induced by both volleyball and basketball training in the stressed sites was associated to a decreased skull BMC. Moreover, volleyball practice produces a more sensitive mechanical stress in loaded bones than basketball. This effect seems translated by femoral neck expansion. PMID:26235943

  14. Partial Reductions in Mechanical Loading Yield Proportional Changes in Bone Density, Bone Architecture, and Muscle Mass

    PubMed Central

    Ellman, Rachel; Spatz, Jordan; Cloutier, Alison; Palme, Rupert; Christiansen, Blaine A; Bouxsein, Mary L

    2014-01-01

    Although the musculoskeletal system is known to be sensitive to changes in its mechanical environment, the relationship between functional adaptation and below-normal mechanical stimuli is not well defined. We investigated bone and muscle adaptation to a range of reduced loading using the partial weight suspension (PWS) system, in which a two-point harness is used to offload a tunable amount of body weight while maintaining quadrupedal locomotion. Skeletally mature female C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to partial weight bearing at 20%, 40%, 70%, or 100% of body weight for 21 days. A hindlimb unloaded (HLU) group was included for comparison in addition to age-matched controls in normal housing. Gait kinematics was measured across the full range of weight bearing, and some minor alterations in gait from PWS were identified. With PWS, bone and muscle changes were generally proportional to the degree of unloading. Specifically, total body and hindlimb bone mineral density, calf muscle mass, trabecular bone volume of the distal femur, and cortical area of the femur midshaft were all linearly related to the degree of unloading. Even a load reduction to 70% of normal weight bearing was associated with significant bone deterioration and muscle atrophy. Weight bearing at 20% did not lead to better bone outcomes than HLU despite less muscle atrophy and presumably greater mechanical stimulus, requiring further investigation. These data confirm that the PWS model is highly effective in applying controllable, reduced, long-term loading that produces predictable, discrete adaptive changes in muscle and bone of the hindlimb. PMID:23165526

  15. Exercise in youth: High bone mass, large bone size, and low fracture risk in old age.

    PubMed

    Tveit, M; Rosengren, B E; Nilsson, J Å; Karlsson, M K

    2015-08-01

    Physical activity is favorable for peak bone mass but if the skeletal benefits remain and influence fracture risk in old age is debated. In a cross-sectional controlled mixed model design, we compared dual X-ray absorptiometry-derived bone mineral density (BMD) and bone size in 193 active and retired male elite soccer players and 280 controls, with duplicate measurements of the same individual done a mean 5 years apart. To evaluate lifetime fractures, we used a retrospective controlled study design in 397 retired male elite soccer players and 1368 controls. Differences in bone traits were evaluated by Student's t-test and fracture risk assessments by Poisson regression and Cox regression. More than 30 years after retirement from sports, the soccer players had a Z-score for total body BMD of 0.4 (0.1 to 0.6), leg BMD of 0.5 (0.2 to 0.8), and femoral neck area of 0.3 (0.0 to 0.5). The rate ratio for fracture after career end was 0.6 (0.4 to 0.9) and for any fragility fracture 0.4 (0.2 to 0.9). Exercise-associated bone trait benefits are found long term after retirement from sports together with a lower fracture risk. This indicates that physical activity in youth could reduce the burden of fragility fractures. PMID:25109568

  16. Higher Doses of Bisphosphonates Further Improve Bone Mass, Architecture, and Strength but Not the Tissue Material Properties in Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shahnazari, Mohammad; Yao, Wei; Dai, WeiWei; Wang, Bob; Ionova-Martin, Sophi S.; Ritchie, Robert O.; Heeren, Daniel; Burghardt, Andrew J.; Nicolella, Daniel P.; Kimiecik, Michael G.; Lane, Nancy E.

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of a series of experiments designed to determine the effects of ibandronate (Ibn) and risedronate (Ris) on a number of bone quality parameters in aged osteopenic rats to explain how bone material and bone mass may be affected by the dose of bisphosphonates (BP) and contribute to their anti-fracture efficacy. Eighteen-month old female rats underwent either ovariectomy or sham surgery. The ovariectomized (OVX) groups were left untreated for 2 months to develop osteopenia. Treatments started at 20 months of age as follows: sham and OVX control (treated with saline), OVX+risedronate 30 and 90 (30 or 90 μg/kg/dose), and OVX+ibandronate 30 and 90 (30 or 90 μg/kg/dose). The treatments were given monthly for four months by subcutaneous injection. At sacrifice at 24 months of age the 4th lumbar vertebra was used for μCT scans (bone mass, architecture, and degree of mineralization of bone, DMB) and histomorphometry, and the 6th lumbar vertebra, tibia, and femur were collected for biomechanical testing to determine bone structural and material strength, cortical fracture toughness, and tissue elastic modulus. The compression testing of the vertebral bodies (LVB6) was simulated using finite-element analysis (FEA) to also estimate the bone structural stiffness. Both Ibn and Ris dose-dependently increased bone mass and improved vertebral bone microarchitecture and mechanical properties compared to OVX control. Estimates of vertebral maximum stress from FEA were correlated with vertebral maximum load (r=0.5, p<0.001) and maximum stress (r=0.4, p<0.005) measured experimentally. Tibial bone bending modulus and cortical strength increased compared to OVX with both BP but no dose-dependent effect was observed. DMB and elastic modulus of trabecular bone were improved with Ibn30 compared to OVX but were not affected in other BP-treated groups. DMB of tibial cortical bone showed no change with BP treatments. The fracture toughness examined in midshaft femurs did

  17. Effects of a high fat diet on bone of growing rats. Correlations between visceral fat, adiponectin and bone mass density

    PubMed Central

    Lac, Gerard; Cavalie, Helian; Ebal, Edmond; Michaux, Odile

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we investigated some bone parameters (bone mineral content, bone mineral density, skeleton area) in growing rats fed with a high fat diet. Correlations between bone and body composition parameters are reported. Two groups of Wistar male rats (35 days old, body mass 80 ± 6 g) were used. Water and food were given "ad libitum" during 10 weeks. Sixteen rats (L) were given a lipid enriched diet and were compared to 16 rats (S) fed with a standard diet. Body composition and bone parameters were assessed using DXA. Results indicated that L rats had lower body mass, lean body mass; fat mass was not different between the two groups. Bone mineral content, bone mineral density, skeleton area of L rats were lower compared with S rats. Significant correlations were noted between body composition, adiponectin and bone parameters. High fat diet intake during the growing period has deleterious effects on bone parameters in rats. This study confirms in growing rats that a high fat diet is pathogenic, including bone metabolism. PMID:18442361

  18. Body Mass, Training, Menses, and Bone in Adolescent Runners: A 3-y Follow-Up

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract: Endurance runners with low bone mass during adolescence may be at risk of developing a low peak bone mineral density (BMD) as a young adult. However, it is possible that they mature late and undergo delayed bone mass accumulation. PURPOSE: We evaluated 40 adolescent runners (age 15.9 ± 0....

  19. Bone mass and bone turnover in power athletes, endurance athletes, and controls: a 12-month longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Bennell, K L; Malcolm, S A; Khan, K M; Thomas, S A; Reid, S J; Brukner, P D; Ebeling, P R; Wark, J D

    1997-05-01

    Strain magnitude may be more important than the number of loading cycles in controlling bone adaptation to loading. To test this hypothesis, we performed a 12 month longitudinal cohort study comparing bone mass and bone turnover in elite and subelite track and field athletes and less active controls. The cohort comprised 50 power athletes (sprinters, jumpers, hurdlers, multievent athletes; 23 women, 27 men), 61 endurance athletes (middle-distance runners, distance runners; 30 women, 31 men), and 55 nonathlete controls (28 women, 27 men) aged 17-26 years. Total bone mineral content (BMC), regional bone mineral density (BMD), and soft tissue composition were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Bone turnover was assessed by serum osteocalcin (human immunoradiometric assay) indicative of bone formation, and urinary pyridinium crosslinks (high-performance liquid chromatography) indicative of bone resorption. Questionnaires quantified menstrual, dietary and physical activity characteristics. Baseline results showed that power athletes had higher regional BMD at lower limb, lumbar spine, and upper limb sites compared with controls (p < 0.05). Endurance athletes had higher BMD than controls in lower limb sites only (p < 0.05). Maximal differences in BMD between athletes and controls were noted at sites loaded by exercise. Male and female power athletes had greater bone density at the lumbar spine than endurance athletes. Over the 12 months, both athletes and controls showed modest but significant increases in total body BMC and femur BMD (p < 0.001). Changes in bone density were independent of exercise status except at the lumbar spine. At this site, power athletes gained significantly more bone density than the other groups. Levels of bone formation were not elevated in athletes and levels of bone turnover were not predictive of subsequent changes in bone mass. Our results provide further support for the concept that bone response to mechanical loading depends

  20. Pyridoxine deficiency affects biomechanical properties of chick tibial bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masse, P. G.; Rimnac, C. M.; Yamauchi, M.; Coburn, S. P.; Rucker, R. B.; Howell, D. S.; Boskey, A. L.

    1996-01-01

    The mechanical integrity of bone is dependent on the bone matrix, which is believed to account for the plastic deformation of the tissue, and the mineral, which is believed to account for the elastic deformation. The validity of this model is shown in this study based on analysis of the bones of vitamin B6-deficient and vitamin B6-replete chick bones. In this model, when B6-deficient and control animals are compared, vitamin B6 deficiency has no effect on the mineral content or composition of cortical bone as measured by ash weight (63 +/- 6 vs. 58 +/- 3); mineral to matrix ratio of the FTIR spectra (4.2 +/- 0.6 vs. 4.5 +/- 0.2), line-broadening analyses of the X-ray diffraction 002 peak (beta 002 = 0.50 +/- 0.1 vs. 0.49 +/- 0.01), or other features of the infrared spectra. In contrast, collagen was significantly more extractable from vitamin B6-deficient chick bones (20 +/- 2% of total hydroxyproline extracted vs. 10 +/- 3% p < or = 0.001). The B6-deficient bones also contained an increased amount of the reducible cross-links DHLNL, dehydro-dihydroxylysinonorleucine, (1.03 +/- 0.07 vs. 0.84 +/- 0.13 p < or = 0.001); and a nonsignificant increase in HLNL, dehydro-hydroxylysinonorleucine, (0.51 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.43 +/- 0.03, p < or = 0.10). There were no significant changes in bone length, bone diameter, or area moment of inertia. In four-point bending, no significant changes in elastic modulus, stiffness, offset yield deflection, or fracture deflection were detected. However, fracture load in the B6-deficient animals was decreased from 203 +/- 35 MPa to 151 +/- 23 MPa, p < or = 0.01, and offset yield load was decreased from 165 +/- 9 MPa to 125 +/- 14 MPa, p < or = 0.05. Since earlier histomorphometric studies had demonstrated that the B6-deficient bones were osteopenic, these data suggest that although proper cortical bone mineralization occurred, the alterations of the collagen resulted in changes to bone mechanical performance.

  1. Intrauterine stress induces bone loss in adult offspring of C3H/HeJ mice having high bone mass phenotype but not C57BL/6J mice with low bone mass phenotype.

    PubMed

    Raygorodskaya, M; Gabet, Y; Shochat, C; Kobyliansky, E; Torchinsky, A; Karasik, D

    2016-06-01

    In this study we examined to what extent and how genetics may modify osteoporosis risk arising due to environmental stresses which act during the antenatal period of life and have the potential to induce bone loss in adulthood. C57Bl/6J (C57) and C3H/HeJ (C3H) mice were used as a model system. The mice were exposed to a single injection of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-AZA) on day 10 of pregnancy and the structure and bone mineral density (BMD) of the femur and 3rd lumbar vertebra of 3- and 6-month-old male and female offspring were evaluated by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Besides, we also attempted to evaluate whether 5-AZA affects the expression of some osteogenic genes in the embryonic limb buds. The main observation of this study is that 5-AZA-induced loss of bone quality was registered in 6-mo-old C3H offspring but not in their C57 counterparts. We also observed that C57 and C3H embryos may differ in their response to 5-AZA-induced detrimental stimuli: whereas 5-AZA treated C3H embryos exhibited a decreased expression of Col1a1, C57 embryos exhibit a decreased expression of Sox9. Overall, our study, by thorough characterization of bone homeostasis in 3- and 6-month-old offspring of 5-AZA-exposed C57 and C3H mice, allows hypothesizing that the adaptive response to antenatal insults may be stronger in offspring inherently exhibiting a low bone mass phenotype than in offspring inherently exhibiting a high bone mass phenotype. PMID:27072519

  2. Cochlear otosclerosis: does bone formation affect cochlear implant surgery?

    PubMed

    Fayad, J; Moloy, P; Linthicum, F H

    1990-05-01

    This study aimed to demonstrate that new bone formation in the scala tympani of patients deaf from otosclerosis does not preclude cochlear implant surgery. In seven temporal bones from patients with otosclerosis, we measured the extent of new bone from the round window to the distal part of the new growth. We compared results to surgical data on the extent of drilling and depth and ease of placement of the electrode in 20 patients deaf from otosclerosis. We also examined clinical performance and voltage requirements for long-term implant use in patients with and patients without ossification of the scala tympani. Findings in our limited sample of patients and bones show that obstruction of the basal turn, which occurs in some otosclerotic patients, does not preclude implant surgery. The dynamic range in the studied sample was relatively stable long-term and clinical performance did not differ between groups with and without an ossified scala tympani. PMID:2188511

  3. Deficiency and Also Transgenic Overexpression of Timp-3 Both Lead to Compromised Bone Mass and Architecture In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hopkinson, Mark; Poulet, Blandine; Pollard, Andrea S.; Shefelbine, Sandra J.; Chang, Yu-Mei; Francis-West, Philippa; Bou-Gharios, George; Pitsillides, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-3 (TIMP-3) regulates extracellular matrix via its inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases and membrane-bound sheddases. Timp-3 is expressed at multiple sites of extensive tissue remodelling. This extends to bone where its role, however, remains largely unresolved. In this study, we have used Micro-CT to assess bone mass and architecture, histological and histochemical evaluation to characterise the skeletal phenotype of Timp-3 KO mice and have complemented this by also examining similar indices in mice harbouring a Timp-3 transgene driven via a Col-2a-driven promoter to specifically target overexpression to chondrocytes. Our data show that Timp-3 deficiency compromises tibial bone mass and structure in both cortical and trabecular compartments, with corresponding increases in osteoclasts. Transgenic overexpression also generates defects in tibial structure predominantly in the cortical bone along the entire shaft without significant increases in osteoclasts. These alterations in cortical mass significantly compromise predicted tibial load-bearing resistance to torsion in both genotypes. Neither Timp-3 KO nor transgenic mouse growth plates are significantly affected. The impact of Timp-3 deficiency and of transgenic overexpression extends to produce modification in craniofacial bones of both endochondral and intramembranous origins. These data indicate that the levels of Timp-3 are crucial in the attainment of functionally-appropriate bone mass and architecture and that this arises from chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages. PMID:27519049

  4. Sex steroids and bone mass. A study of changes about the time of menopause.

    PubMed Central

    Slemenda, C; Hui, S L; Longcope, C; Johnston, C C

    1987-01-01

    To examine the relationships between bone loss and sex steroids, 84 peri- and postmenopausal women were studied at 4-mo intervals for 3 yr. At each visit, measurements were made of bone mass at the midshaft and distal radius, of steroids, of gonadotropins, and of bone gla protein (BGP). Bone loss was approximately 1% per yr among late perimenopausal and postmenopausal groups, whereas the early perimenopausal group lost no bone. Mean serum estrogen and BGP concentrations predicted rates of bone loss. BGP was negatively correlated with the rate of bone loss (r = -0.45) and with mean estrogen concentrations (r = -0.40). Multivariate regressions showed estrogen concentrations to be strong independent predictors of the slope of bone mass over time. When BGP concentrations were added to the models, the significance of estrogen was reduced, suggesting that a portion of the estrogen effect was mediated through effects on rates of bone remodelling. PMID:3500182

  5. Stem cell origin differently affects bone tissue engineering strategies

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli-Belmonte, Monica; Teti, Gabriella; Salvatore, Viviana; Focaroli, Stefano; Orciani, Monia; Dicarlo, Manuela; Fini, Milena; Orsini, Giovanna; Di Primio, Roberto; Falconi, Mirella

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering approaches are encouraging for the improvement of conventional bone grafting technique drawbacks. Thanks to their self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation ability, stem cells are one of the major actors in tissue engineering approaches, and among these adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold a great promise for regenerative medicine strategies. Bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) are the first- identified and well-recognized stem cell population used in bone tissue engineering. Nevertheless, several factors hamper BM-MSC clinical application and subsequently, new stem cell sources have been investigated for these purposes. The fruitful selection and combination of tissue engineered scaffold, progenitor cells, and physiologic signaling molecules allowed the surgeon to reconstruct the missing natural tissue. On the basis of these considerations, we analyzed the capability of two different scaffolds, planned for osteochondral tissue regeneration, to modulate differentiation of adult stem cells of dissimilar local sources (i.e., periodontal ligament, maxillary periosteum) as well as adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), in view of possible craniofacial tissue engineering strategies. We demonstrated that cells are differently committed toward the osteoblastic phenotype and therefore, taking into account their specific features, they could be intriguing cell sources in different stem cell-based bone/periodontal tissue regeneration approaches. PMID:26441682

  6. Cyclic cryopreservation affects the nanoscale material properties of trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Landauer, Alexander K; Mondal, Sumona; Yuya, Philip A; Kuxhaus, Laurel

    2014-11-01

    Tissues such as bone are often stored via freezing, or cryopreservation. During an experimental protocol, bone may be frozen and thawed a number of times. For whole bone, the mechanical properties (strength and modulus) do not significantly change throughout five freeze-thaw cycles. Material properties at the trabecular and lamellar scales are distinct from whole bone properties, thus the impact of freeze-thaw cycling at this scale is unknown. To address this, the effect of repeated freezing on viscoelastic material properties of trabecular bone was quantified via dynamic nanoindentation. Vertebrae from five cervine spines (1.5-year-old, male) were semi-randomly assigned, three-to-a-cycle, to 0-10 freeze-thaw cycles. After freeze-thaw cycling, the vertebrae were dissected, prepared and tested. ANOVA (factors cycle, frequency, and donor) on storage modulus, loss modulus, and loss tangent, were conducted. Results revealed significant changes between cycles for all material properties for most cycles, no significant difference across most of the dynamic range, and significant differences between some donors. Regression analysis showed a moderate positive correlation between cycles and material property for loss modulus and loss tangent, and weak negative correlation for storage modulus, all correlations were significant. These results indicate that not only is elasticity unpredictably altered, but also that damping and viscoelasticity tend to increase with additional freeze-thaw cycling. PMID:25278046

  7. Pinto Bean Hull Extract Supplementation Favorably Affects Markers of Bone Metabolism and Bone Structure in Mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bean hulls are rich in phenolic compounds known to possess antioxidant activity that may have beneficial effect on bone health. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of bean hull extract (BHE) from pinto beans on bone structure and serum markers in twelve-month-old male C57BL/6 mice fed e...

  8. Deletion of BMP receptor type IB decreased bone mass in association with compromised osteoblastic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal progenitors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ce; Iura, Ayaka; Terajima, Masahiko; Liu, Fei; Lyons, Karen; Pan, Haichun; Zhang, Honghao; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Mishina, Yuji; Sun, Hongchen

    2016-01-01

    We previously found that disruption of two type I BMP receptors, Bmpr1a and Acvr1, respectively, in an osteoblast-specific manner, increased bone mass in mice. BMPR1B, another BMP type I receptor, is also capable of binding to BMP ligands and transduce BMP signaling. However, little is known about the function of BMPR1B in bone. In this study, we investigated the bone phenotype in Bmpr1b null mice and the impacts of loss of Bmpr1b on osteoblasts and osteoclasts. We found that deletion of Bmpr1b resulted in osteopenia in 8-week-old male mice, and the phenotype was transient and gender specific. The decreased bone mass was neither due to the changes in osteoblastic bone formation activity nor osteoclastic bone resorption activity in vivo. In vitro differentiation of Bmpr1b null osteoclasts was increased but resorption activity was decreased. Calvarial pre-osteoblasts from Bmpr1b mutant showed comparable differentiation capability in vitro, while they showed increased BMP-SMAD signaling in culture. Different from calvarial pre-osteoblasts, Bmpr1b mutant bone marrow mesenchymal progenitors showed compromised differentiation in vitro, which may be a reason for the osteopenic phenotype in the mutant mice. In conclusion, our results suggested that BMPR1B plays distinct roles from BMPR1A and ACVR1 in maintaining bone mass and transducing BMP signaling. PMID:27048979

  9. Deletion of BMP receptor type IB decreased bone mass in association with compromised osteoblastic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ce; Iura, Ayaka; Terajima, Masahiko; Liu, Fei; Lyons, Karen; Pan, Haichun; Zhang, Honghao; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Mishina, Yuji; Sun, Hongchen

    2016-01-01

    We previously found that disruption of two type I BMP receptors, Bmpr1a and Acvr1, respectively, in an osteoblast-specific manner, increased bone mass in mice. BMPR1B, another BMP type I receptor, is also capable of binding to BMP ligands and transduce BMP signaling. However, little is known about the function of BMPR1B in bone. In this study, we investigated the bone phenotype in Bmpr1b null mice and the impacts of loss of Bmpr1b on osteoblasts and osteoclasts. We found that deletion of Bmpr1b resulted in osteopenia in 8-week-old male mice, and the phenotype was transient and gender specific. The decreased bone mass was neither due to the changes in osteoblastic bone formation activity nor osteoclastic bone resorption activity in vivo. In vitro differentiation of Bmpr1b null osteoclasts was increased but resorption activity was decreased. Calvarial pre-osteoblasts from Bmpr1b mutant showed comparable differentiation capability in vitro, while they showed increased BMP-SMAD signaling in culture. Different from calvarial pre-osteoblasts, Bmpr1b mutant bone marrow mesenchymal progenitors showed compromised differentiation in vitro, which may be a reason for the osteopenic phenotype in the mutant mice. In conclusion, our results suggested that BMPR1B plays distinct roles from BMPR1A and ACVR1 in maintaining bone mass and transducing BMP signaling. PMID:27048979

  10. Does aspiration of bones and joints affect results of later bone scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Canale, S.T.; Harkness, R.M.; Thomas, P.A.; Massie, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    To determine the effect, if any, of needle aspiration on /sup 99m/Tc bone scanning, three different areas of 15 dogs were first aspirated and then imaged with technetium bone scintigraphy. The hip joint was aspirated, the distal femoral metaphysis was drilled and aspirated, and the tibial periosteum was scraped with an 18- or 20-gauge needle. Varying amounts of trauma were inflicted to simulate varying difficulties at aspiration. /sup 99m/Tc bone scans were obtained from 5 h to 10 days later. There was no evidence of focal technetium uptake after any hip joint aspiration. This was consistent regardless of the amount of trauma inflicted or the time from aspiration to bone scanning. Metaphyseal cortical drilling and tibial periosteal scraping occasionally caused some focal uptake when scanning was delayed greater than 2 days. When osteomyelitis or pyarthrosis is clinically suspected, joint aspiration can be performed without fear of producing a false- positive bone scan.

  11. High fat diet promotes achievement of peak bone mass in young rats

    SciTech Connect

    Malvi, Parmanand; Piprode, Vikrant; Chaube, Balkrishna; Pote, Satish T.; Mittal, Monika; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Wani, Mohan R.; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • High fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass at younger age. • Shifting from high fat to normal diet normalizes obese parameters. • Bone parameters are sustained even after withdrawal of high fat diet. - Abstract: The relationship between obesity and bone is complex. Epidemiological studies demonstrate positive as well as negative correlation between obesity and bone health. In the present study, we investigated the impact of high fat diet-induced obesity on peak bone mass. After 9 months of feeding young rats with high fat diet, we observed obesity phenotype in rats with increased body weight, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol. There were significant increases in serum total alkaline phosphatase, bone mineral density and bone mineral content. By micro-computed tomography (μ-CT), we observed a trend of better trabecular bones with respect to their microarchitecture and geometry. This indicated that high fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass and microstructure at younger age. We subsequently shifted rats from high fat diet to normal diet for 6 months and evaluated bone/obesity parameters. It was observed that after shifting rats from high fat diet to normal diet, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol were significantly decreased. Interestingly, the gain in bone mineral density, bone mineral content and trabecular bone parameters by HFD was retained even after body weight and obesity were normalized. These results suggest that fat rich diet during growth could accelerate achievement of peak bone mass that is sustainable even after withdrawal of high fat diet.

  12. Modifications of histamine receptor signaling affect bone mechanical properties in rats.

    PubMed

    Folwarczna, Joanna; Janas, Aleksandra; Pytlik, Maria; Śliwiński, Leszek; Wiercigroch, Marek; Brzęczek, Anna

    2014-02-01

    Histamine receptors are expressed on bone cells and histamine may be involved in regulation of bone metabolism. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of loratadine (an H(1) receptor antagonist), ranitidine (an H(2) receptor antagonist) and betahistine (an H(3) receptor antagonist and H(1) receptor agonist) on bone mechanical properties in rats. Loratadine (5 mg/kg/day, po), ranitidine (50 mg/kg/day, po), or betahistine dihydrochloride (5 mg/kg/day, po), were administered for 4 weeks to non-ovariectomized and bilaterally ovariectomized (estrogen-deficient) 3-month-old rats, and their effects were compared with appropriate controls. Serum levels of bone turnover markers, bone mineralization and mechanical properties of the proximal tibial metaphysis, femoral diaphysis and femoral neck were studied. In rats with normal estrogen level, administration of loratadine slightly favorably affected mechanical properties of compact bone, significantly increasing the strength of the femoral neck (p < 0.05), and tending to increase the strength of the femoral diaphysis. Ranitidine did not significantly affect the investigated parameters, and betahistine decreased the strength of the tibial metaphysis (cancellous bone, p < 0.01). There were no significant effects of the drugs on serum bone turnover markers. In estrogen-deficient rats, the drugs did not significantly affect the investigated skeletal parameters. In conclusion, the effects of histamine H(1), H(2) and H(3) receptor antagonists on the skeletal system in rats were differential and dependent on estrogen status. PMID:24905313

  13. AGE-RELATED FACTORS AFFECTING THE POST-YIELD ENERGY DISSIPATION OF HUMAN CORTICAL BONE

    PubMed Central

    Nyman, Jeffry S.; Roy, Anuradha; Tyler, Jerrod H.; Acuna, Rae L.; Gayle, Heather J.; Wang, Xiaodu

    2007-01-01

    The risk of bone fracture depends in part on the quality of the tissue, not just the size and mass. This study assessed the post-yield energy dissipation of cortical bone in tension as a function of age and composition. Tensile specimens were prepared from tibiae of human cadavers in which male and female donors were divided into two age groups: middle aged (51 to 56 years old, n = 9) and elderly (72 to 90 years old, n = 8). By loading, unloading, and reloading a specimen with rest period inserted in between, tensile properties at incremental strain levels were assessed. In addition, the post-yield toughness was estimated and partitioned as follows: plastic strain energy related to permanent deformation, released elastic strain energy related to stiffness loss, and hysteresis energy related to viscous behavior. Porosity, mineral and collagen content, and collagen crosslinks of each specimen were also measured to determine the micro and ultrastructural properties of the tissue. It was found that age affected all the energy terms plus strength but not elastic stiffness. The post-yield energy terms were correlated with porosity, pentosidine (a marker of non-enzymatic crosslinks), and collagen content, all of which significantly varied with age. General linear models with the highest possible R2 value suggested that the pentosidine concentration and collagen content provided the best explanation of the age-related decrease in the post-yield energy dissipation of bone. Among them, pentosidine concentration had the greatest contribution to plastic strain energy and was the best explanatory variable of damage accumulation. PMID:17266142

  14. Parallels between Nutrition and Physical Activity: Research Questions in Development of Peak Bone Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Connie M.

    2015-01-01

    Lifestyle choices are attributed to 40% to 60% of adult peak bone mass. The National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) sought to update its 2000 consensus statement on peak bone mass and partnered with the American Society for Nutrition, which, in turn, charged a 9-member writing committee with using a systematic review approach to update the previous…

  15. Mutations in Known Monogenic High Bone Mass Loci Only Explain a Small Proportion of High Bone Mass Cases.

    PubMed

    Gregson, Celia L; Wheeler, Lawrie; Hardcastle, Sarah A; Appleton, Louise H; Addison, Kathryn A; Brugmans, Marieke; Clark, Graeme R; Ward, Kate A; Paggiosi, Margaret; Stone, Mike; Thomas, Joegi; Agarwal, Rohan; Poole, Kenneth Es; McCloskey, Eugene; Fraser, William D; Williams, Eleanor; Bullock, Alex N; Davey Smith, George; Brown, Matthew A; Tobias, Jon H; Duncan, Emma L

    2016-03-01

    High bone mass (HBM) can be an incidental clinical finding; however, monogenic HBM disorders (eg, LRP5 or SOST mutations) are rare. We aimed to determine to what extent HBM is explained by mutations in known HBM genes. A total of 258 unrelated HBM cases were identified from a review of 335,115 DXA scans from 13 UK centers. Cases were assessed clinically and underwent sequencing of known anabolic HBM loci: LRP5 (exons 2, 3, 4), LRP4 (exons 25, 26), SOST (exons 1, 2, and the van Buchem's disease [VBD] 52-kb intronic deletion 3'). Family members were assessed for HBM segregation with identified variants. Three-dimensional protein models were constructed for identified variants. Two novel missense LRP5 HBM mutations ([c.518C>T; p.Thr173Met], [c.796C>T; p.Arg266Cys]) were identified, plus three previously reported missense LRP5 mutations ([c.593A>G; p.Asn198Ser], [c.724G>A; p.Ala242Thr], [c.266A>G; p.Gln89Arg]), associated with HBM in 11 adults from seven families. Individuals with LRP5 HBM (∼prevalence 5/100,000) displayed a variable phenotype of skeletal dysplasia with increased trabecular BMD and cortical thickness on HRpQCT, and gynoid fat mass accumulation on DXA, compared with both non-LRP5 HBM and controls. One mostly asymptomatic woman carried a novel heterozygous nonsense SOST mutation (c.530C>A; p.Ser177X) predicted to prematurely truncate sclerostin. Protein modeling suggests the severity of the LRP5-HBM phenotype corresponds to the degree of protein disruption and the consequent effect on SOST-LRP5 binding. We predict p.Asn198Ser and p.Ala242Thr directly disrupt SOST binding; both correspond to severe HBM phenotypes (BMD Z-scores +3.1 to +12.2, inability to float). Less disruptive structural alterations predicted from p.Arg266Cys, p.Thr173Met, and p.Gln89Arg were associated with less severe phenotypes (Z-scores +2.4 to +6.2, ability to float). In conclusion, although mutations in known HBM loci may be asymptomatic, they only account for a very small

  16. Mutations in Known Monogenic High Bone Mass Loci Only Explain a Small Proportion of High Bone Mass Cases

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Lawrie; Hardcastle, Sarah A; Appleton, Louise H; Addison, Kathryn A; Brugmans, Marieke; Clark, Graeme R; Ward, Kate A; Paggiosi, Margaret; Stone, Mike; Thomas, Joegi; Agarwal, Rohan; Poole, Kenneth ES; McCloskey, Eugene; Fraser, William D; Williams, Eleanor; Bullock, Alex N; Davey Smith, George; Brown, Matthew A; Tobias, Jon H; Duncan, Emma L

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT High bone mass (HBM) can be an incidental clinical finding; however, monogenic HBM disorders (eg, LRP5 or SOST mutations) are rare. We aimed to determine to what extent HBM is explained by mutations in known HBM genes. A total of 258 unrelated HBM cases were identified from a review of 335,115 DXA scans from 13 UK centers. Cases were assessed clinically and underwent sequencing of known anabolic HBM loci: LRP5 (exons 2, 3, 4), LRP4 (exons 25, 26), SOST (exons 1, 2, and the van Buchem's disease [VBD] 52‐kb intronic deletion 3′). Family members were assessed for HBM segregation with identified variants. Three‐dimensional protein models were constructed for identified variants. Two novel missense LRP5 HBM mutations ([c.518C>T; p.Thr173Met], [c.796C>T; p.Arg266Cys]) were identified, plus three previously reported missense LRP5 mutations ([c.593A>G; p.Asn198Ser], [c.724G>A; p.Ala242Thr], [c.266A>G; p.Gln89Arg]), associated with HBM in 11 adults from seven families. Individuals with LRP5 HBM (∼prevalence 5/100,000) displayed a variable phenotype of skeletal dysplasia with increased trabecular BMD and cortical thickness on HRpQCT, and gynoid fat mass accumulation on DXA, compared with both non‐LRP5 HBM and controls. One mostly asymptomatic woman carried a novel heterozygous nonsense SOST mutation (c.530C>A; p.Ser177X) predicted to prematurely truncate sclerostin. Protein modeling suggests the severity of the LRP5‐HBM phenotype corresponds to the degree of protein disruption and the consequent effect on SOST‐LRP5 binding. We predict p.Asn198Ser and p.Ala242Thr directly disrupt SOST binding; both correspond to severe HBM phenotypes (BMD Z‐scores +3.1 to +12.2, inability to float). Less disruptive structural alterations predicted from p.Arg266Cys, p.Thr173Met, and p.Gln89Arg were associated with less severe phenotypes (Z‐scores +2.4 to +6.2, ability to float). In conclusion, although mutations in known HBM loci may be asymptomatic, they only

  17. Gli1 haploinsufficiency leads to decreased bone mass with an uncoupling of bone metabolism in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Kitaura, Yoshiaki; Hojo, Hironori; Komiyama, Yuske; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Chung, Ung-il; Ohba, Shinsuke

    2014-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays important roles in various development processes. This signaling is necessary for osteoblast formation during endochondral ossification. In contrast to the established roles of Hh signaling in embryonic bone formation, evidence of its roles in adult bone homeostasis is not complete. Here we report the involvement of Gli1, a transcriptional activator induced by Hh signaling activation, in postnatal bone homeostasis under physiological and pathological conditions. Skeletal analyses of Gli1+/- adult mice revealed that Gli1 haploinsufficiency caused decreased bone mass with reduced bone formation and accelerated bone resorption, suggesting an uncoupling of bone metabolism. Hh-mediated osteoblast differentiation was largely impaired in cultures of Gli1+/- precursors, and the impairment was rescued by Gli1 expression via adenoviral transduction. In addition, Gli1+/- precursors showed premature differentiation into osteocytes and increased ability to support osteoclastogenesis. When we compared fracture healing between wild-type and Gli1+/- adult mice, we found that the Gli1+/- mice exhibited impaired fracture healing with insufficient soft callus formation. These data suggest that Gli1, acting downstream of Hh signaling, contributes to adult bone metabolism, in which this molecule not only promotes osteoblast differentiation but also represses osteoblast maturation toward osteocytes to maintain normal bone homeostasis. PMID:25313900

  18. Gli1 Haploinsufficiency Leads to Decreased Bone Mass with an Uncoupling of Bone Metabolism in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kitaura, Yoshiaki; Hojo, Hironori; Komiyama, Yuske; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Chung, Ung-il; Ohba, Shinsuke

    2014-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays important roles in various development processes. This signaling is necessary for osteoblast formation during endochondral ossification. In contrast to the established roles of Hh signaling in embryonic bone formation, evidence of its roles in adult bone homeostasis is not complete. Here we report the involvement of Gli1, a transcriptional activator induced by Hh signaling activation, in postnatal bone homeostasis under physiological and pathological conditions. Skeletal analyses of Gli1+/− adult mice revealed that Gli1 haploinsufficiency caused decreased bone mass with reduced bone formation and accelerated bone resorption, suggesting an uncoupling of bone metabolism. Hh-mediated osteoblast differentiation was largely impaired in cultures of Gli1+/− precursors, and the impairment was rescued by Gli1 expression via adenoviral transduction. In addition, Gli1+/− precursors showed premature differentiation into osteocytes and increased ability to support osteoclastogenesis. When we compared fracture healing between wild-type and Gli1+/− adult mice, we found that the Gli1+/− mice exhibited impaired fracture healing with insufficient soft callus formation. These data suggest that Gli1, acting downstream of Hh signaling, contributes to adult bone metabolism, in which this molecule not only promotes osteoblast differentiation but also represses osteoblast maturation toward osteocytes to maintain normal bone homeostasis. PMID:25313900

  19. Effects of Sequential Osteoporosis Treatments on Trabecular Bone Mass and Strength in Osteopenic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Amugongo, Sarah K; Yao, Wei; Jia, Junjing; Lay, Yu-An E; Dai, Weiwei; Jiang, Li; Walsh, Daniel; Li, Chin-Shang; Dave, N. K. N.; Olivera, Diana; Panganiban, Brian; Ritchie, Robert O.; Lane, Nancy E

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Individual agents used to treat human osteoporosis reduce fracture risk by ~50-60%. Since agents that act with complementary mechanisms are available, sequential therapies that mix anti-resorptive and anabolic agents could improve fracture risk reduction, when compared to monotherapies. Methods We evaluated bone mass, bone microarchitecture, and bone strength in adult ovariectomized (OVX), osteopenic rats, during different sequences of vehicle (Veh), parathyroid hormone (PTH), alendronate (Aln), or raloxifene (Ral) in three 90 day treatment periods, over nine months. Differences among groups were evaluated. The interrelationships of bone mass and microarchitecture endpoints, and their relationship to bone strength were studied. Results Estrogen deficiency caused bone loss. OVX rats treated with Aln monotherapy had significantly better bone mass, microarchitecture, and bone strength than untreated OVX rats. Rats treated with an Aln drug holiday had bone mass and microarchitecture similar to the Aln monotherapy group, but with significantly lower bone strength. PTH-treated rats had markedly higher bone endpoints, but all were lost after PTH withdrawal without follow-up treatment. Rats treated with PTH followed by Aln had better bone endpoints than those treated with Aln monotherapy, PTH monotherapy, or an Aln holiday. Rats treated initially with Aln or Ral, then switched to PTH, also had better bone endpoints, than monotherapy treatment. Rats treated with Aln, then PTH, and returned to Aln had the highest values for all endpoints. Conclusion Our data indicate that anti-resorptive therapy can be coupled with an anabolic agent, to produce and maintain better bone mass, microarchitecture, and strength than can be achieved with any monotherapy. PMID:24722767

  20. Factors that affect bone mineral accrual in the adolescent growth spurt.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Susan J; Vatanparast, Hassanali; Baxter-Jones, Adam; Faulkner, Robert A; Mirwald, Robert; Bailey, Donald A

    2004-03-01

    The development of bone mass during the growing years is an important determinant for risk of osteoporosis in later life. Adequate dietary intake during the growth period may be critical in reaching bone growth potential. The Saskatchewan Bone Mineral Accrual Study (BMAS) is a longitudinal study of bone growth in Caucasian children. We have calculated the times of maximal peak bone mineral content (BMC) velocity to be 14.0 +/- 1.0 y in boys and 12.5 +/- 0.9 y in girls; bone growth is maximal approximately 6 mo after peak height velocity. In the 2 y of peak skeletal growth, adolescents accumulate over 25% of adult bone. BMAS data may provide biological data on calcium requirements through application of calcium accrual values to factorial calculations of requirement. As well, our data are beginning to reveal how dietary patterns may influence attainment of bone mass during the adolescent growth spurt. Replacing milk intake by soft drinks appears to be detrimental to bone gain by girls, but not boys. Fruit and vegetable intake, providing alkalinity to bones and/or acting as a marker of a healthy diet, appears to influence BMC in adolescent girls, but not boys. The reason why these dietary factors appear to be more influential in girls than in boys may be that BMAS girls are consuming less than their requirement for calcium, while boys are above their threshold. Specific dietary and nutrient recommendations for adolescents are needed in order to ensure optimal bone growth and consolidation during this important life stage. PMID:14988470

  1. A systematic review of psychosocial factors affecting survival after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hoodin, Flora; Weber, Shauncie

    2003-01-01

    An electronic database search identified 15 studies of psychosocial factors affecting survival after bone marrow transplantation. The studies were assessed for methodological quality by two reviewers using the procedures of Bland and colleagues. Although some studies found that psychological variables affect survival after bone marrow transplantation, the reviewers' analysis of the methodologically sound studies suggested that survival after bone marrow transplantation is not substantively affected by depressed mood or other psychopathology in adults or by social support in adults or children. Longer survival may be related to lower "anxious preoccupation," higher "fighting spirit," and better quality of life ratings before and soon after transplant in adults. Overall, however, the literature is insufficiently developed to provide definitive evidence for a relationship between psychological variables and survival after bone marrow transplantation. Future primary studies in this area should be designed to maximize replicability and generalizability. PMID:12724499

  2. Restoring and Maintaining Bone in Osteopenic Female Rat Skeleton. Part 1; Changes in Bone Mass and Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Li Ya; Jee, Webster S. S.; Ke, Hua Zhu; Kimmel, Donald B.

    1992-01-01

    This experiment contains the crucial data for the lose, restore, and maintain (LRM) concept, a practical approach for reversing existing osteoporosis. The LRM concept uses anabolic agents to restore bone mass and architecture (+ phase) and then switches to an agent with the established ability to maintain bone mass, to keep the new bone (+/- phase). The purpose of this study was to learn whether switching to an agent known chiefly for its ability to maintain existing bone mass preserves new bone induced by PGE2, in osteopenic,estrogen-depleted rats. The current study had three phases, the bone loss (-), restore (+), and maintain (+/-) phases. We ovariectomized (OX) or sham ovariectomized (sham-OX) 5.5 month-old female rats (- phase). The OX rats were treated 5 months postovariectomy with 1-6 mg PGE2, per kg/day for 75 days to restore lost cancellous bone mass (+ phase), and then PGE2, treatment was stopped and treatment began with 1 or 5 micro-g/kg of risedronate, a bisphosphonate, twice a week for 60 days (+/- phase). During the loss (-) phase, the cancellous bone volume of the proximal tibial metaphysis in the OX rat fell to 19% of initial and 30% of age-matched control levels. During the restore (+) phase, the cancellous bone volume in OX rats doubled. When PGE2 treatment was stopped, however, and no special maintenance efforts were made during the maintain (+/-) phase, the PGE2-induced cancellous bone disappeared. In contrast, the PGE2-induced cancellous bone persisted when the PGE2 treatment was followed by either a 1 or 5 micro-g treatment of risedronate per kg given twice a week for 60 days during the maintain (+/-) phase. The tibial shaft demonstrated very little cortical bone loss during the loss (-) phase in OX rats. The tibial shaft cortical bone fell some 8%. During the restore (+) phase, new cortical bone in OX rats increased by 22%. When PGE2 treatment was stopped and nothing was given during the maintain (+/-) phase, however, all but the PGE2-induced

  3. The negative bone effects of the disease and of chronic corticosteroid treatment in premenopausal women affected by rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fassio, A; Idolazzi, L; Jaber, M A; Dartizio, C; Viapiana, O; Rossini, M; Gatti, D

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a well-known extra-articular complication in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The chronic corticosteroid treatment, the functional impairment associated with RA and the disease itself appear to be the most relevant determinants. Most of the previous studies involved postmenopausal women, in whom the estrogenic deficiency might amplify the negative effect towards bone of both RA and corticosteroid therapy. We decided to evaluate bone health in a cohort of premenopausal RA patients. The study population includes 47 premenopausal women attending our outpatient clinic for RA and twice as many healthy age-matched control women selected from the hospital personnel. The bone density at the spine and femoral neck were significantly lower in patients with RA as compared with controls. When spine bone mineral density (BMD) values were adjusted for the cumulative glucocorticoid (GC) dose alone and for the cumulative GC dose plus body mass index (BMI) the mean differences between two groups decreased but they remained statistically significant. We found no difference when the spine BMD was adjusted for cumulative GC dose, BMI and health assessment questionnaire. The difference in femoral neck BMD remained statistically significant also after all the same adjustments. In conclusion, our study shows that a BMD deficiency is frequent also in premenopausal women affected by RA, especially at femoral site and that the main determinants of this bone loss are not only the disease-related weight loss, corticosteroid therapy and functional impairment, but also the systemic effects of the disease itself. PMID:27608794

  4. Dietary restriction does not adversely affect bone geometry and mechanics in rapidly growing male wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Jennifer; Lamothe, Jeremy M; Zernicke, Ronald F; Auer, Roland N; Reimer, Raylene A

    2005-02-01

    The present study assessed the effects of dietary restriction on tibial and vertebral mechanical and geometrical properties in 2-mo-old male Wistar rats. Two-month-old male Wistar rats were randomized to the ad libitum (n=8) or the 35% diet-restricted (DR) feeding group (n=9) for 5 mo. Tibiae and L6 vertebrae were dissected out for microcomputed tomography (microCT) scanning and subsequently fractured in biomechanical testing to determine geometrical and mechanical properties. The DR group had significantly lower mean tibial length, mass, area, and cross-sectional moment of inertia, as well as vertebral energy to maximal load. After adjustment for body mass, however, DR tibial mean maximal load and stiffness, and DR vertebral area, height, volume, and maximal load were significantly greater, relative to ad libitum means. No significant differences were found between the DR and ad libitum mineral ash fractions. Because the material properties of the tibiae between the two groups were not significantly different, presumably the material integrity of the bones was not adversely affected as a consequence of DR. The similar material characteristics were consistent with mineral ash fractions that were not different between the two groups. Vertebral maximal load and stiffness were not significant between the DR and ad libitum animals. Importantly, we show that a level of dietary restriction (35%) that is less severe than many studies (40%), and without micronutrient compensation does not adversely affect tibial and vertebral mechanical properties in young growing male rats when normalized for body mass. PMID:15585686

  5. Osteoarthritis of the Distal Interphalangeal and First Carpometacarpal Joints is Associated with High Bone Mass in Women and Small Bone Size and Low Lean Mass in Men

    PubMed Central

    von Schewelov, Thord; Magnusson, Håkan; Cöster, Maria; Karlsson, Caroline; Rosengren, Björn E

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine if primary hand osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with abnormal bone and anthropometric traits. Methods: We used DXA to measure total body bone mineral density (BMD), femoral neck width (bone size) and total body lean and fat mass in 39 subjects with hand OA (primary DIP and/or CMC I) and 164 controls. Data are presented as mean Z-scores or Odds Ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals. Results: Women with hand OA had (compared to controls) higher BMD (0.5(0.1,0.9)) but similar bone size (-0.3(-0.8,0.2)), lean mass (0.3(-0.3,0.9)), fat mass (-0.1(-0.6,0.5)) and BMI (0.0(-0.6,0.6)). Men with hand OA had (compared to controls) similar BMD (-0.1(-0.7,0.6)), smaller bone size (-0.5(-1.1,-0.01)), lower lean mass (-0.6(-1.1,-0.04)), and similar fat mass (-0.2(-0.7,0.4)) and BMI -0.1(-0.6,0.6). In women, each SD higher BMD was associated with an OR of 1.8 (1.03, 3.3) for having hand OA. In men each SD smaller bone size was associated with an OR of 1.8 (1.02, 3.1) and each SD lower proportion of lean body mass with an OR of 1.9 (1.1, 3.3) for having hand OA. Conclusion: Women with primary DIP finger joint and/or CMC I joint OA have a phenotype with higher BMD while men with the disease have a smaller bone size and lower lean body mass. PMID:26401163

  6. The recent prevalence of Osteoporosis and low bone mass in the United States based on bone mineral density at the Femoral Neck or Lumbar Spine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of our study was to estimate the prevalence of osteoporosis and low bone mass based on bone mineral density (BMD) at the femoral neck and the lumbar spine in adults 50 years and older in the United States (US). We applied prevalence estimates of osteoporosis or low bone mass at the femoral ...

  7. Muscular development and physical activity as major determinants of femoral bone mass acquisition during growth

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Rodriguez, G; Ara, I; Perez-Gomez, J; Dorado, C; Calbet, J

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate to what extent bone mass accrual is determined by physical activity and changes in lean, fat, and total body mass during growth. Methods: Twenty six physically active and 16 age matched control boys were followed up for three years. All subjects were prepubertal at the start of the survey (mean (SEM) age 9.4 (0.3) years). The weekly physical activity of the active boys included compulsory physical education sessions (80–90 minutes a week), three hours a week of extracurricular sports participation, and occasional sports competitions at weekends. The physical activity of the control group was limited to the compulsory physical education curriculum. Bone mineral content (BMC) and areal density (BMD), lean mass, and fat mass were measured by dual energy x ray absorptiometry. Results: The effect of sports participation on femoral bone mass accrual was remarkable. Femoral BMC and BMD increased twice as much in the active group as in the controls over the three year period (p<0.05). The greatest correlation was found between the increment in femoral bone mass and the increment in lean mass (BMC r = 0.67 and BMD r = 0.69, both p<0.001). Multiple regression analysis revealed enhancement in lean mass as the best predictor of the increment in femoral bone BMC (R = 0.65) and BMD (R = 0.69). Conclusions: Long term sports participation during early adolescence results in greater accrual of bone mass. Enhancement of lean mass seems to be the best predictor of this bone mass accumulation. However, for a given muscle mass, a greater level of physical activity is associated with greater bone mass and density in peripubertal boys. PMID:16118297

  8. Changes in vertebral bone marrow fat and bone mass after gastric bypass surgery: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Schafer, A L; Li, X; Schwartz, A V; Tufts, L S; Wheeler, A L; Grunfeld, C; Stewart, L; Rogers, S J; Carter, J T; Posselt, A M; Black, D M; Shoback, D M

    2015-05-01

    Bone marrow fat may serve a metabolic role distinct from other fat depots, and it may be altered by metabolic conditions including diabetes. Caloric restriction paradoxically increases marrow fat in mice, and women with anorexia nervosa have high marrow fat. The longitudinal effect of weight loss on marrow fat in humans is unknown. We hypothesized that marrow fat increases after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery, as total body fat decreases. In a pilot study of 11 morbidly obese women (6 diabetic, 5 nondiabetic), we measured vertebral marrow fat content (percentage fat fraction) before and 6 months after RYGB using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Total body fat mass declined in all participants (mean ± SD decline 19.1 ± 6.1 kg or 36.5% ± 10.9%, p<0.001). Areal bone mineral density (BMD) decreased by 5.2% ± 3.5% and 4.1% ± 2.6% at the femoral neck and total hip, respectively, and volumetric BMD decreased at the spine by 7.4% ± 2.8% (p<0.001 for all). Effects of RYGB on marrow fat differed by diabetes status (adjusted p=0.04). There was little mean change in marrow fat in nondiabetic women (mean +0.9%, 95% CI -10.0 to +11.7%, p=0.84). In contrast, marrow fat decreased in diabetic women (-7.5%, 95% CI -15.2 to +0.1%, p=0.05). Changes in total body fat mass and marrow fat were inversely correlated among nondiabetic (r=-0.96, p=0.01) but not diabetic (r=0.52, p=0.29) participants. In conclusion, among those without diabetes, marrow fat is maintained on average after RYGB, despite dramatic declines in overall fat mass. Among those with diabetes, RYGB may reduce marrow fat. Thus, future studies of marrow fat should take diabetes status into account. Marrow fat may have unique metabolic behavior compared with other fat depots. PMID:25603463

  9. Changes in Vertebral Bone Marrow Fat and Bone Mass After Gastric Bypass Surgery: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, AL; Li, X; Schwartz, AV; Tufts, LS; Wheeler, AL; Grunfeld, C; Stewart, L; Rogers, SJ; Carter, JT; Posselt, AM; Black, DM; Shoback, DM

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow fat may serve a metabolic role distinct from other fat depots, and it may be altered by metabolic conditions including diabetes. Caloric restriction paradoxically increases marrow fat in mice, and women with anorexia nervosa have high marrow fat. The longitudinal effect of weight loss on marrow fat in humans is unknown. We hypothesized that marrow fat increases after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery, as total body fat decreases. In a pilot study of 11 morbidly obese women (6 diabetic, 5 nondiabetic), we measured vertebral marrow fat content (percentage fat fraction) before and 6 months after RYGB using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Total body fat mass declined in all participants (mean ±SD decline 19.1 ±6.1 kg or 36.5 ±10.9%, p<0.001). Areal bone mineral density (BMD) decreased by 5.2 ±3.5% and 4.1 ±2.6% at the femoral neck and total hip, respectively, and volumetric BMD decreased at the spine by 7.4 ±2.8% (p<0.001 for all). Effects of RYGB on marrow fat differed by diabetes status (adjusted p=0.04). There was little mean change in marrow fat in nondiabetic women (mean +0.9%, 95% CI -10.0 to +11.7%, p=0.84). In contrast, marrow fat decreased in diabetic women (−7.5%, 95% CI -15.2 to +0.1%, p=0.05). Changes in total body fat mass and marrow fat were inversely correlated among nondiabetic (r=−0.96, p=0.01) but not diabetic (r=0.52, p=0.29) participants. In conclusion, among those without diabetes, marrow fat is maintained on average after RYGB, despite dramatic declines in overall fat mass. Among those with diabetes, RYGB may reduce marrow fat. Thus, future studies of marrow fat should take diabetes status into account. Marrow fat may have unique metabolic behavior compared with other fat depots. PMID:25603463

  10. Effects of denosumab, alendronate, or denosumab following alendronate on bone turnover, calcium homeostasis, bone mass and bone strength in ovariectomized cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kostenuik, Paul J; Smith, Susan Y; Samadfam, Rana; Jolette, Jacquelin; Zhou, Lei; Ominsky, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a chronic disease wherein increased bone remodeling reduces bone mass and bone strength. Antiresorptive agents including bisphosphonates are commonly used to mitigate bone loss and fracture risk. Osteoclast inhibition via denosumab (DMAb), a RANKL inhibitor, is a newer approach for reducing fracture risk in patients at increased risk for fracture. The safety of transitioning from bisphosphonate therapy (alendronate; ALN) to DMAb was examined in mature ovariectomized (OVX) cynomolgus monkeys (cynos). One day after OVX, cynos (7-10/group) were treated with vehicle (VEH, s.c.), ALN (50 μg/kg, i.v., twice monthly) or DMAb (25 mg/kg/month, s.c.) for 12 months. Other animals received VEH or ALN for 6 months and then transitioned to 6 months of DMAb. DMAb caused significantly greater reductions in serum CTx than ALN, and transition from ALN to DMAb caused further reductions relative to continued ALN. DMAb and ALN decreased serum calcium (Ca), and transition from ALN to DMAb resulted in a lesser decline in Ca relative to DMAb or to VEH-DMAb transition. Bone histomorphometry indicated significantly reduced trabecular and cortical remodeling with DMAb or ALN. Compared with ALN, DMAb caused greater reductions in osteoclast surface, eroded surface, cortical porosity and fluorochrome labeling, and transition from ALN to DMAb reduced these parameters relative to continued ALN. Bone mineral density increased in all active treatment groups relative to VEH controls. Destructive biomechanical testing revealed significantly greater vertebral strength in all three groups receiving DMAb, including those receiving DMAb after ALN, relative to VEH controls. Bone mass and strength remained highly correlated in all groups at all tested skeletal sites, consistent with normal bone quality. These data indicate that cynos transitioned from ALN to DMAb exhibited reduced bone resorption and cortical porosity, and increased BMD and bone strength, without

  11. Cell fusion in osteoclasts plays a critical role in controlling bone mass and osteoblastic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Ryotaro; Ninomiya, Ken; Miyamoto, Kana; Suzuki, Toru; Sato, Yuiko

    2008-12-19

    The balance between osteoclast and osteoblast activity is central for maintaining the integrity of bone homeostasis. Here we show that mice lacking dendritic cell specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), an essential molecule for osteoclast cell-cell fusion, exhibited impaired bone resorption and upregulation of bone formation by osteoblasts, which do not express DC-STAMP, which led to increased bone mass. On the contrary, DC-STAMP over-expressing transgenic (DC-STAMP-Tg) mice under the control of an actin promoter showed significantly accelerated cell-cell fusion of osteoclasts and bone resorption, with decreased osteoblastic activity and bone mass. Bone resorption and formation are known to be regulated in a coupled manner, whereas DC-STAMP regulates bone homeostasis in an un-coupled manner. Thus our results indicate that inhibition of a single molecule provides both decreased osteoclast activity and increased bone formation by osteoblasts, thereby increasing bone mass in an un-coupled and a tissue specific manner.

  12. DLX3 regulates bone mass by targeting genes supporting osteoblast differentiation and mineral homeostasis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Isaac, J; Erthal, J; Gordon, J; Duverger, O; Sun, H-W; Lichtler, A C; Stein, G S; Lian, J B; Morasso, M I

    2014-09-01

    Human mutations and in vitro studies indicate that DLX3 has a crucial function in bone development, however, the in vivo role of DLX3 in endochondral ossification has not been established. Here, we identify DLX3 as a central attenuator of adult bone mass in the appendicular skeleton. Dynamic bone formation, histologic and micro-computed tomography analyses demonstrate that in vivo DLX3 conditional loss of function in mesenchymal cells (Prx1-Cre) and osteoblasts (OCN-Cre) results in increased bone mass accrual observed as early as 2 weeks that remains elevated throughout the lifespan owing to increased osteoblast activity and increased expression of bone matrix genes. Dlx3OCN-conditional knockout mice have more trabeculae that extend deeper in the medullary cavity and thicker cortical bone with an increased mineral apposition rate, decreased bone mineral density and increased cortical porosity. Trabecular TRAP staining and site-specific Q-PCR demonstrated that osteoclastic resorption remained normal on trabecular bone, whereas cortical bone exhibited altered osteoclast patterning on the periosteal surface associated with high Opg/Rankl ratios. Using RNA sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation-Seq analyses, we demonstrate that DLX3 regulates transcription factors crucial for bone formation such as Dlx5, Dlx6, Runx2 and Sp7 as well as genes important to mineral deposition (Ibsp, Enpp1, Mepe) and bone turnover (Opg). Furthermore, with the removal of DLX3, we observe increased occupancy of DLX5, as well as increased and earlier occupancy of RUNX2 on the bone-specific osteocalcin promoter. Together, these findings provide novel insight into mechanisms by which DLX3 attenuates bone mass accrual to support bone homeostasis by osteogenic gene pathway regulation. PMID:24948010

  13. DLX3 regulates bone mass by targeting genes supporting osteoblast differentiation and mineral homeostasis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, J; Erthal, J; Gordon, J; Duverger, O; Sun, H-W; Lichtler, A C; Stein, G S; Lian, J B; Morasso, M I

    2014-01-01

    Human mutations and in vitro studies indicate that DLX3 has a crucial function in bone development, however, the in vivo role of DLX3 in endochondral ossification has not been established. Here, we identify DLX3 as a central attenuator of adult bone mass in the appendicular skeleton. Dynamic bone formation, histologic and micro-computed tomography analyses demonstrate that in vivo DLX3 conditional loss of function in mesenchymal cells (Prx1-Cre) and osteoblasts (OCN-Cre) results in increased bone mass accrual observed as early as 2 weeks that remains elevated throughout the lifespan owing to increased osteoblast activity and increased expression of bone matrix genes. Dlx3OCN-conditional knockout mice have more trabeculae that extend deeper in the medullary cavity and thicker cortical bone with an increased mineral apposition rate, decreased bone mineral density and increased cortical porosity. Trabecular TRAP staining and site-specific Q-PCR demonstrated that osteoclastic resorption remained normal on trabecular bone, whereas cortical bone exhibited altered osteoclast patterning on the periosteal surface associated with high Opg/Rankl ratios. Using RNA sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation-Seq analyses, we demonstrate that DLX3 regulates transcription factors crucial for bone formation such as Dlx5, Dlx6, Runx2 and Sp7 as well as genes important to mineral deposition (Ibsp, Enpp1, Mepe) and bone turnover (Opg). Furthermore, with the removal of DLX3, we observe increased occupancy of DLX5, as well as increased and earlier occupancy of RUNX2 on the bone-specific osteocalcin promoter. Together, these findings provide novel insight into mechanisms by which DLX3 attenuates bone mass accrual to support bone homeostasis by osteogenic gene pathway regulation. PMID:24948010

  14. Cell and Signal Components of the Microenvironment of Bone Metastasis Are Affected by Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Bendinelli, Paola; Maroni, Paola; Matteucci, Emanuela; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastatic cells release bone microenvironment proteins, such as the matricellular protein SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine), and share a cell signaling typical of the bone metabolism controlled by Runx2. The megakaryocytes in the bone marrow engrafted by the metastases seem to be one of the principal microenvironment sources of the biological stimuli, implicated in the formation of an osteoblastic niche, and affecting metastasis phenotype and colonization. Educated platelets in the circulation might derive from megakaryocytes in bone metastasis. The evaluation of predictive markers in the circulating platelets might be useful for the stratification of patients for therapeutic purposes. The hypoxic environment in bone metastasis is one of the key regulators of the network of the biological soluble and structural components of the matrix. In bone metastatic cells under hypoxia, similar patterns of Runx2 and SPARC are observed, both showing downregulation. Conversely, hypoxia induces Endothelin 1, which upregulates SPARC, and these biological stimuli may be considered prognostic markers of bone metastasis in breast carcinoma patients. PMID:27187355

  15. Cell and Signal Components of the Microenvironment of Bone Metastasis Are Affected by Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Bendinelli, Paola; Maroni, Paola; Matteucci, Emanuela; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastatic cells release bone microenvironment proteins, such as the matricellular protein SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine), and share a cell signaling typical of the bone metabolism controlled by Runx2. The megakaryocytes in the bone marrow engrafted by the metastases seem to be one of the principal microenvironment sources of the biological stimuli, implicated in the formation of an osteoblastic niche, and affecting metastasis phenotype and colonization. Educated platelets in the circulation might derive from megakaryocytes in bone metastasis. The evaluation of predictive markers in the circulating platelets might be useful for the stratification of patients for therapeutic purposes. The hypoxic environment in bone metastasis is one of the key regulators of the network of the biological soluble and structural components of the matrix. In bone metastatic cells under hypoxia, similar patterns of Runx2 and SPARC are observed, both showing downregulation. Conversely, hypoxia induces Endothelin 1, which upregulates SPARC, and these biological stimuli may be considered prognostic markers of bone metastasis in breast carcinoma patients. PMID:27187355

  16. Low bone mass in behaviorally HIV-infected young men on antiretroviral therapy: adolescent trials network (ATN) study 021B

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peak bone mass is achieved in adolescence/early adulthood and is the key determinant of bone mass in adulthood. We evaluated the association of bone mass with HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) during this critical period among behaviorally HIV infected young men and seronegative control...

  17. Parallels between nutrition and physical activity: research questions in development of peak bone mass.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Connie M

    2015-06-01

    Lifestyle choices are attributed to 40% to 60% of adult peak bone mass. The National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) sought to update its 2000 consensus statement on peak bone mass and partnered with the American Society for Nutrition, which, in turn, charged a 9-member writing committee with using a systematic review approach to update the previous NOF guidelines. PubMed searches of the scientific literature from January 2000 through December 2014 were conducted on all relevant lifestyle choice factors and their relation to increasing bone mass during childhood and adolescence. The writing group concluded that there is strong evidence for the benefits of physical activity and calcium intake on bone mass accretion, moderately strong evidence for the benefits of vitamin D and dairy intake on bone mass and for physical activity on bone structure, and weaker evidence for other lifestyle choices. There were parallels and synergies between the benefits of diet and exercise on development of peak bone mass, but the type of evidence and public policy recommendations in the two disciplines differ in several important ways. Nutrition uses a more reductionist approach in contrast to physical activity, which uses a more global approach. This leads to differences in research priorities in the 2 disciplines. The disciplines can advance more quickly through collaboration and adoption of the best approaches from each other. PMID:25965111

  18. Bone mass in schoolchildren in Brazil: the effect of racial miscegenation, pubertal stage, and socioeconomic differences.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Roberto Regis; Guerra-Junior, Gil; de Azevedo Barros-Filho, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate bone mass by phalanges ultrasound in healthy white and black schoolchildren in relationship to socioeconomic level, pubertal stage, and body composition. Included were 1,356 healthy schoolchildren aged from 6 to 11 years from different socioeconomic levels and both genders; all were placed into white and black groups. Weight, height, body mass index, fat percentage, fat mass, and lean mass were evaluated by anthropometric methods, and AD-SoS bone quantity and UBPI bone quality were evaluated using a third-generation IGEA phalanges DBM Sonic BP ultrasound. Data were compared using the Mann-Whitney, chi-squared, correlation coefficient, and analyses of multiple linear regression statistical tests with 5% significance. Black schoolchildren predominated in the low socioeconomic levels. Higher values of weight and height for black boys and girls were observed in the lean mass in relation to white children of the same gender and age. An increasing variation in the bone quantity mean was observed from 6 to 11 years of age and with pubertal stage for both genders and skin color. The white schoolchildren presented higher values of bone quantity and quality in relation to the black children. The anthropometric, gender, and socioeconomic level variables explained only 16 and 11% of the variability of bone quantity and quality, respectively. As such, the present study, carried out with healthy black and white Brazilian schoolchildren, demonstrated higher bone mass, as evaluated by ultrasound, in white than in black schoolchildren. PMID:19283337

  19. The bone resorption inhibitors odanacatib and alendronate affect post-osteoclastic events differently in ovariectomized rabbits.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Pia Rosgaard; Andersen, Thomas Levin; Pennypacker, Brenda L; Duong, Le T; Delaissé, Jean-Marie

    2014-02-01

    Odanacatib (ODN) is a bone resorption inhibitor which differs from standard antiresorptives by its ability to reduce bone resorption without decreasing bone formation. What is the reason for this difference? In contrast with other antiresorptives, such as alendronate (ALN), ODN targets only the very last step of the resorption process. We hypothesize that ODN may therefore modify the remodeling events immediately following osteoclastic resorption. These events belong to the reversal phase and include recruitment of osteoblasts, which is critical for connecting bone resorption to formation. We performed a histomorphometric study of trabecular remodeling in vertebrae of estrogen-deficient rabbits treated or not with ODN or ALN, a model where ODN, but not ALN, was previously shown to preserve bone formation. In line with our hypothesis, we found that ODN treatment compared to ALN results in a shorter reversal phase, faster initiation of osteoid deposition on the eroded surfaces, and higher osteoblast recruitment. The latter is reflected by higher densities of mature bone forming osteoblasts and an increased subpopulation of cuboidal osteoblasts. Furthermore, we found an increase in the interface between osteoclasts and surrounding osteoblast-lineage cells. This increase is expected to favor the osteoclast-osteoblast interactions required for bone formation. Regarding bone resorption itself, we show that ODN, but not ALN, treatment results in shallower resorption lacunae, a geometry favoring bone stiffness. We conclude that, compared to standard antiresorptives, ODN shows distinctive effects on resorption geometry and on reversal phase activities which positively affect osteoblast recruitment and may therefore favor bone formation. PMID:24085265

  20. Increased bone mass is an unexpected phenotype associated with deletion of the calcitonin gene

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Ana O.; Catala-Lehnen, Philip; Thomas, Pamela M.; Priemel, Matthias; Rueger, Johannes M.; Nasonkin, Igor; Bradley, Allan; Hughes, Mark R.; Ordonez, Nelson; Cote, Gilbert J.; Amling, Michael; Gagel, Robert F.

    2002-01-01

    Calcitonin (CT) is a known inhibitor of bone resorption. Calcitonin gene–related peptide-α (CGRPα), produced by alternative RNA processing of the CT/CGRP gene, has no clearly defined role in bone. To better understand the physiologic role of the CT/CGRP gene we created a mouse in which the coding sequences for both CT and CGRPα were deleted by homologous recombination. The CT/CGRP–/– knockout (KO) mice procreated normally, there were no identifiable developmental defects at birth, and they had normal baseline calcium-related chemistry values. However, KO animals were more responsive to exogenous human parathyroid hormone as evidenced by a greater increase of the serum calcium concentration and urine deoxypyridinoline crosslinks, an effect reversed by CT and mediated by a greater increase in bone resorption than in controls. Surprisingly, KO mice have significantly greater trabecular bone volume and a 1.5- to 2-fold increase in bone formation at 1 and 3 months of age. This effect appears to be mediated by increased bone formation. In addition, KO mice maintain bone mass following ovariectomy, whereas wild-type mice lose approximately one-third of their bone mass over 2 months. These findings argue for dual roles for CT/CGRP gene products: prevention of bone resorption in hypercalcemic states and a regulatory role in bone formation. PMID:12488435

  1. Increased bone mass is an unexpected phenotype associated with deletion of the calcitonin gene.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Ana O; Catala-Lehnen, Philip; Thomas, Pamela M; Priemel, Matthias; Rueger, Johannes M; Nasonkin, Igor; Bradley, Allan; Hughes, Mark R; Ordonez, Nelson; Cote, Gilbert J; Amling, Michael; Gagel, Robert F

    2002-12-01

    Calcitonin (CT) is a known inhibitor of bone resorption. Calcitonin gene-related peptide-alpha (CGRPalpha), produced by alternative RNA processing of the CT/CGRP gene, has no clearly defined role in bone. To better understand the physiologic role of the CT/CGRP gene we created a mouse in which the coding sequences for both CT and CGRPalpha were deleted by homologous recombination. The CT/CGRP(-/-) knockout (KO) mice procreated normally, there were no identifiable developmental defects at birth, and they had normal baseline calcium-related chemistry values. However, KO animals were more responsive to exogenous human parathyroid hormone as evidenced by a greater increase of the serum calcium concentration and urine deoxypyridinoline crosslinks, an effect reversed by CT and mediated by a greater increase in bone resorption than in controls. Surprisingly, KO mice have significantly greater trabecular bone volume and a 1.5- to 2-fold increase in bone formation at 1 and 3 months of age. This effect appears to be mediated by increased bone formation. In addition, KO mice maintain bone mass following ovariectomy, whereas wild-type mice lose approximately one-third of their bone mass over 2 months. These findings argue for dual roles for CT/CGRP gene products: prevention of bone resorption in hypercalcemic states and a regulatory role in bone formation. PMID:12488435

  2. Influence of muscle mass and bone mass on the mobility of elderly women: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of muscle mass and bone mineral density on markers of mobility in dwelling elderly women. Methods This cross-sectional study included 99 elderly women, who were 65 years old or above, in Campinas-SP, Brazil. To collect data, we used sociodemographic data, the body mass index (BMI), health status, comorbidities, use of medications, mobility tests (TUG and gait speed) and examinations of the body composition (densitometry with dual-emission X-ray absorptiometry “DXA”). In order to examine the relationship between muscle and bone mass with mobility (gait speed and TUG), we applied the Spearman correlation coefficient. Also was applied the analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) adjusted for age and comorbidities. To identify the factors associated with mobility, we used the univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. The level of significance for statistical tests was P < 0.05. Results The correlation between sarcopenia and bone mineral density with mobility tests showed a significant relationship only between sarcopenia and TUG (r = 0.277, P = 0.006) in Spearman correlation coefficient. The result of the correlation analysis (ANCOVA) showed that sarcopenia was associated with gait speed (r2 = 0.0636, P = 0.0018) and TUG (r2 = 0.0898, P = 0.0027). The results of the multivariate analysis showed that age (P = 0.034, OR = 1.081) was associated with worse performance on gait speed. By highlighting the TUG test, the results of the multivariate analysis showed that the age (P = 0.004, OR = 1.111) and BMI in overweight (P = 0.011, OR = 7.83) and obese (P < 0.001, OR = 7.84) women were associated with lower performance of the functionality of the lower limbs. Conclusion The findings with regard to mobility tests which were analyzed in this study indicate the association of variables related to the aging process that contribute to the

  3. Prebiotics, probiotics, and synbiotics affect mineral absorption, bone mineral content, and bone structure.

    PubMed

    Scholz-Ahrens, Katharina E; Ade, Peter; Marten, Berit; Weber, Petra; Timm, Wolfram; Açil, Yahya; Glüer, Claus-C; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen

    2007-03-01

    Several studies in animals and humans have shown positive effects of nondigestible oligosaccharides (NDO) on mineral absorption and metabolism and bone composition and architecture. These include inulin, oligofructose, fructooligosaccharides, galactooligosaccharides, soybean oligosaccharide, and also resistant starches, sugar alcohols, and difructose anhydride. A positive outcome of dietary prebiotics is promoted by a high dietary calcium content up to a threshold level and an optimum amount and composition of supplemented prebiotics. There might be an optimum composition of fructooligosaccharides with different chain lengths (synergy products). The efficacy of dietary prebiotics depends on chronological age, physiological age, menopausal status, and calcium absorption capacity. There is evidence for an independent probiotic effect on facilitating mineral absorption. Synbiotics, i.e., a combination of probiotics and prebiotics, can induce additional effects. Whether a low content of habitual NDO would augment the effect of dietary prebiotics or synbiotics remains to be studied. The underlying mechanisms are manifold: increased solubility of minerals because of increased bacterial production of short-chain fatty acids, which is promoted by the greater supply of substrate; an enlargement of the absorption surface by promoting proliferation of enterocytes mediated by bacterial fermentation products, predominantly lactate and butyrate; increased expression of calcium-binding proteins; improvement of gut health; degradation of mineral complexing phytic acid; release of bone-modulating factors such as phytoestrogens from foods; stabilization of the intestinal flora and ecology, also in the presence of antibiotics; stabilization of the intestinal mucus; and impact of modulating growth factors such as polyamines. In conclusion, prebiotics are the most promising but also best investigated substances with respect to a bone-health-promoting potential, compared with probiotics

  4. Obesity induced by high dietary fat leads to increased bone resorption marker, TRAP, and decreased bone mass in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity, which is growing in prevalence, is a risk factor for such chronic health disorders as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. However, it is thought to be a protective factor for osteoporosis and bone fractures in humans. Accumulating data in humans suggest that fat mass has a negative effect...

  5. A 21-Week Bone Deposition Promoting Exercise Programme Increases Bone Mass in Young People with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Aguero, Alejandro; Vicente-Rodriguez, German; Gomez-Cabello, Alba; Ara, Ignacio; Moreno, Luis A.; Casajus, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether the bone mass of young people with Down syndrome may increase, following a 21-week conditioning training programme including plyometric jumps. Method: Twenty-eight participants with Down syndrome (13 females, 15 males) aged 10 to 19 years were divided into exercise (DS-E; n = 14; eight females, six males mean age 13y 8mo,…

  6. Maintaining Restored Bone with Bisphoshonate in the Ovariectomized Rat Skeleton: Dynamic Histomorphometry of Changes in Bone Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, W. S. S.; Tang, L.; Ke, H. Z.; Setterberg, R. B.; Kimmel, D. B.

    1993-01-01

    This experiment contains the crucial data for the Lose, Restore and Maintain (LRM) concept, a practical approach for reversing existing osteoporosis. The LRM concept uses ovariectomy (ox) to lose bone, an anabolic agent to restore bone mass and then switches to an anti-resorptive agent to maintain bone mass. We ox'd or sham-ox'd rats for 150 days (Loss Phase), treated them with 6 mg PGE2/kg/d for 75 days to restore lost cancellous bone mass (Restore Phase) and then stopped PGE2 treatment and began treatment with 1 or 5 micro-g/kg Risedronate, a bisphosphonate twice a week for 60 days (Maintain Phase). During the Loss Phase, cancellous bone volumes of the proximal tibial metaphysis (PTM) in the ox'd rat fell to 19% of initial controls. During the Restore Phase, the PTM bone volume in ox'd rats doubled. However, when PGE2 treatment was stopped, the PGE2-induced cancellous bone disappeared. In contrast, 5 micro-g of Risedronate inhibited the bone loss and maintained it at the PGE2 treatment level. The key dynamic histomorphometry value for the restore (R) and maintenance (M) phases was the ratio of bone formation to resorption rates. The ratio was elevated to 5.8 in the R phase and depressed to 0.4 for no and 1 micro-g Risedronate treated M phase and to a ratio of near unity of 1.1 for the 5 micro-g Risedronate treatment. These findings indicate that we were successful in maintaining the new PTM bone induced by PGE2 after discontinuing PGE2 by administering enough Risedronate, a resorption inhibitor. We concluded that the LRM concept is correct and such an approach should be considered when employing anabolic agents or growth factors in the treatment of osteoporosis. Continued use of an anabolic agent may not be appropriate because of cost, potential adverse side effects and a loss of efficacy.

  7. Maintaining Restored Bone with Bisphosphonate in the Ovariectomized Rat Skeleton: Dynamic Histomorphometry of Changes in Bone Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, W. S. S.; Tang, L.; Ke, H. Z.; Setterberg, R. B.; Kimmel, D. B.

    1993-01-01

    This experiment contains the crucial data for the Lose, Restore and Maintain (LRM) concept, a practical approach for reversing existing osteoporosis. The LRM concept uses ovariectomy (ox) to lose bone, an anabolic agent to restore bone mass and then switches to an antiresorptive agent to maintain bone mass. We ox'd or sham-ox'd rats for 150 days (Loss Phase), treated them with 6 mg PGE(sub 2)kg/d for 75 days to restore lost cancellous bone mass (Restore Phase) and then stopped PGE(sub 2) treatment and began treatment with 1 or 5 micrograms/kg Risedronate, a bisphosphonate twice a week for 60 days (Maintain Phase). During the Loss Phase, cancellous bone volumes of the Proximal Tibial Metaphysis (PTM) in the ox'd rat fell to 19% of initial controls. During the Restore Phase, the PTM bone volume in ox'd rats doubled. However, when PGE(sub 2) treatment was stopped, the PGE(sub 2)-induced cancellous bone disappeared. In contrast, 5 miligrams of Risedronate inhibited the bone loss and maintained it at the PGE(sub 2) treatment level. The key dynamic histomorphometry value for the Restore (R) and Maintenance (M) phases was the ratio of bone formation to resorption rates. The ratio was elevated to 5.8 in the R phase and depressed to 0.4 for no and 1 miligram Risedronate treated M phase and to a ratio of near unity of 1.1 for the 5miligrams Risedronate treatment. These findings indicate that we were successful in maintaining the new PTM bone induced by PGE(sub 2) after discontinuing PGE(sub 2) by administering enough Risedronate, a resorption inhibitor. We concluded that the LRM concept is correct and such an approach should be considered when employing anabolic agents or growth factors in the treatment of osteoporosis. Continued use of an anabolic agent may not be appropriate because of cost, potential adverse side effects and a loss of efficacy.

  8. Effect of chronic undernutrition on body mass and mechanical bone quality under normoxic and altitude hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Lezon, Christian; Bozzini, Clarisa; Agûero Romero, Alan; Pinto, Patricia; Champin, Graciela; Alippi, Rosa M; Boyer, Patricia; Bozzini, Carlos E

    2016-05-01

    Both undernutrition and hypoxia exert a negative influence on both growth pattern and bone mechanical properties in developing rats. The present study explored the effects of chronic food restriction on both variables in growing rats exposed to simulated high-altitude hypoxia. Male rats (n 80) aged 28 d were divided into normoxic (Nx) and hypoxic (Hx) groups. Hx rats were exposed to hypobaric air (380 mmHg) in decompression chambers. At T0, Nx and Hx rats were subdivided into four equal subgroups: normoxic control and hypoxic controls, and normoxic growth-restricted and hypoxic growth-restricted received 80 % of the amount of food consumed freely by their respective controls for a 4-week period. Half of these animals were studied at the end of this period (T4). The remaining rats in each group continued under the same environmental conditions, but food was offered ad libitum to explore the type of catch-up growth during 8 weeks. Structural bone properties (strength and stiffness) were evaluated in the right femur midshaft by the mechanical three-point bending test; geometric properties (length, cross-sectional area, cortical mass, bending cross-sectional moment of inertia) and intrinsic properties of the bone tissue (elastic modulus) were measured or derived from appropriate equations. Bone mineralisation was assessed by ash measurement of the left femur. These data indicate that the growth-retarded effects of diminished food intake, induced either by food restriction or hypoxia-related inhibition of appetite, generated the formation of corresponding smaller bones in which subnormal structural and geometric properties were observed. However, they seemed to be appropriate to the body mass of the animals and suggest, therefore, that the bones were not osteopenic. When food restriction was imposed in Hx rats, the combined effects of both variables were additive, inducing a further reduction of bone mass and bone load-carrying capacity. In all cases, the mechanical

  9. Exercise improves body fat, lean mass and bone mass in breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Melinda L.; Alvarez-Reeves, Marty; Cadmus, Lisa; Mierzejewski, Eileen; Mayne, Susan T.; Yu, Herbert; Chung, Gina G.; Jones, Beth; Knobf, M. Tish; DiPietro, Loretta

    2010-01-01

    Given the negative effects of a breast cancer diagnosis and its treatments on body weight and bone mass, we investigated the effects of a 6-month randomized controlled aerobic exercise intervention vs. usual care on body composition in breast cancer survivors. Secondary aims were to examine the effects stratified by important prognostic and physiologic variables. Seventy-five physically inactive postmenopausal breast cancer survivors were recruited through the Yale-New Haven Hospital Tumor Registry and randomly assigned to an exercise (n = 37) or usual care (n = 38) group. The exercise group participated in 150 min/wk of supervised gym- and home-based moderate-intensity aerobic exercise. The usual care group was instructed to maintain their current physical activity level. Body composition was assessed at baseline and 6-months via dual energy x-ray absorptiometry by one radiologist blinded to the intervention group of the participants. On average, exercisers increased moderate-intensity aerobic exercise by 129 min/wk over and above baseline levels compared with 45 min/wk among usual care participants (p < .001). Exercisers experienced decreases in percent body fat (p = .0022) and increases in lean mass (p = .047) compared with increases in body fat and decreases in lean mass in usual care participants. BMD was also maintained among exercisers compared with a loss among usual care participants (p = .043). In summary, moderate-intensity aerobic exercise, such as brisk walking, produces favorable changes in body composition that may improve breast cancer prognosis. PMID:19629060

  10. Predictors of bone mass by peripheral quantitative computed tomography in early adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Moyer-Mileur, L; Xie, B; Ball, S; Bainbridge, C; Stadler, D; Jee, W S

    2001-01-01

    This cross-sectional study used peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) to evaluate the influences of age, body size, puberty, calcium intake, and physical activity on bone acquisition in healthy early adolescent girls. The pQCT technique provides analyses of volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) (mg/cm(3)) for total as well as cortical and trabecular bone compartments and bone strength expressed as polar strength strain index (mm(2)). Bone mass of the nondominant distal and midshaft tibia by pQCT and lumbar spine and hip by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) were measured in 84 girls ages 11-14 yr. Pubertal stage, menarche status, anthropometrics, and 3-d food intake and physical activity records were collected. Total and cortical bone mineral content and vBMD measurements by pQCT were significantly related to lumbar spine and femoral neck BMD measurements by DXA. We did not note any significant determinants or predictors for trabecular bone mass. Body weight was the most important predictor and determinant of total and cortical bone density and strength in healthy adolescent girls. Menarche, calcium intake, height, body mass index, and weight-bearing physical activity level age were also identified as minor but significant predictors and determinants of bone density and strength. Bone measurements by the pQCT technique provide information on bone acquisition, architecture, and strength during rapid periods of growth and development. Broader cross-sectional studies using the pQCT technique to evaluate the influence of age, gender, ethnicity, puberty, body size, and lifestyle factors on bone acquisition and strength are needed. PMID:11748336

  11. New brittle bone disorder: report of a family with six affected individuals.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, G; Haga, N; Aoki, K; Hamazaki, M; Taniguchi, K; Iwaya, T

    1999-06-01

    We report on a family in which four females and two males in three generations had a previously undescribed brittle bone disorder that was dominantly transmitted through a maternal line. The cardinal manifestations of the disorder comprised dolichocephaly with frontal bossing, hypoplasia of the midface, postpubertal prognathism, micromelic short stature, coarse trabeculae of the entire skeleton, and bone fragility of variable degrees. Mild spondylar modification and iliac hypoplasia were other hallmarks that were recognized in childhood. The proband, a 19-year-old male, was most severely affected with multiple wormian bones in the calvaria, repetitive fractures, intractable bowing of the legs and forearms, and pseudofractures of the long bones with metaphyseal narrowing. His male cousin was next severely affected with angular deformity restricted to the forearm. The four females were much less affected without angular deformity. The mode of inheritance was thus consistent with either an autosomal dominant trait with sex-influence or an X-linked semidominant trait. Histological bone examination in the proband showed atrophy and fibrous degeneration of the lamellar trabeculae and disorganized chondro-osseous junction, which implied that the disorder involved both intramembranous and enchondral ossifications. PMID:10340645

  12. Calcium supplementation trials and bone mass development in children, adolescents, and young adults.

    PubMed

    Vatanparast, Hassanali; Whiting, Susan J

    2006-04-01

    The development of bone mass during childhood through young adulthood is an important determinant of bone health later in life, and calcium is the major building block. Most randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of calcium supplementation have been done in girls; however, calcium supplementation in boys has been investigated in recent studies. Positive short-term effects on bone measures during growth has been shown in boys and girls, particularly in weight-bearing appendicular bone, although the lifelong effect is not certain. PMID:16673756

  13. Intercomparison of techniques for the non-invasive measurement of bone mass

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of methods are presently available for the non-invasive measurement of bone mass of both normal individuals and patients with metabolic disorders. Chief among these methods are radiographic techniques such as radiogrammetry, photon absorptiometry, computer tomography, Compton scattering and neutron activation analysis. In this review, the salient features of the bone measurement techniques are discussed along with their accuracy and precision. The advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques for measuring bone mass are summarized. Where possible, intercomparisons are made of the various techniques.

  14. Zoledronate prevents lactation induced bone loss and results in additional post-lactation bone mass in mice.

    PubMed

    Wendelboe, Mette Høegh; Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Henriksen, Kim; Vegger, Jens Bay; Brüel, Annemarie

    2016-06-01

    In rodents, lactation is associated with a considerable and very rapid bone loss, which almost completely recovers after weaning. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the bisphosphonate Zoledronate (Zln) can inhibit lactation induced bone loss, and if Zln interferes with recovery of bone mass after lactation has ceased. Seventy-six 10-weeks-old NMRI mice were divided into the following groups: Baseline, Pregnant, Lactation, Lactation+Zln, Recovery, Recovery+Zln, and Virgin Control (age-matched). The lactation period was 12days, then the pups were removed, and thereafter recovery took place for 28days. Zln, 100μg/kg, was given s.c. on the day of delivery, and again 4 and 8days later. Mechanical testing, μCT, and dynamic histomorphometry were performed. At L4, lactation resulted in a substantial loss of bone strength (-55% vs. Pregnant, p<0.01), BV/TV (-40% vs. Pregnant, p<0.01), and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) (-29% vs. Pregnant, p<0.001). Treatment with Zln completely prevented lactation induced loss of bone strength, BV/TV, and Tb.Th at L4. Full recovery of micro-architectural and mechanical properties was found 28days after weaning in vehicle-treated mice. Interestingly, the recovery group treated with Zln during the lactation period had higher BV/TV (+45%, p<0.01) and Tb.Th (+16%, p<0.05) compared with virgin controls. Similar results were found at the proximal tibia and femur. This indicates that Zln did not interfere with the bone formation taking place after weaning. On this background, we conclude that post-lactation bone formation is not dependent on a preceding lactation induced bone loss. PMID:27021151

  15. Bone architectural and structural properties after 56Fe26+ radiation-induced changes in body mass.

    PubMed

    Willey, J S; Grilly, L G; Howard, S H; Pecaut, M J; Obenaus, A; Gridley, D S; Nelson, G A; Bateman, T A

    2008-08-01

    High-energy, high-charge (HZE) radiation, including iron ions ((56)Fe(26+)), is a component of the space environment. We recently observed a profound loss of trabecular bone in mice after whole-body HZE irradiation. The goal of this study was to examine morphology in bones that were excluded from a (56)Fe(26+) beam used to irradiate the body. Using 10-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats and excluding the hind limbs and pelvis, we irradiated animals with 0, 1, 2 and 4 Gy (56)Fe(26+) ions and killed them humanely after 9 months. Animals grew throughout the experiment. Trabecular bone volume, connectivity and thickness within the proximal tibiae were significantly lower than control in a dose-dependent manner. Irradiated animals generally had less body mass than controls, which largely accounted for the variability in bone parameters as determined by ANCOVA. Likewise, lower cortical parameters were associated with reduced mass. However, lesser trabecular thickness in the 4-Gy group could not be attributed to body mass alone. Indicators of bone metabolism were generally unchanged, suggesting stabilized turnover. Exposure to (56)Fe(26+) ions can alter trabecular microarchitecture in shielded bones. Reduced body mass seems to be correlated with these deficits of trabecular and cortical bone. PMID:18666808

  16. Suture materials affect peri-implant bone healing and implant osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Villa, Oscar; Lyngstadaas, Staale P; Monjo, Marta; Satué, Maria; Rønold, Hans J; Petzold, Christiane; Wohlfahrt, Johan C

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the remnants of two suture materials on osseointegration of titanium implants in a rabbit tibial model. Calibrated defects were prepared in the tibia of five Chinchilla rabbits. Filaments of nonresorbable (NR) nylon or resorbable (R) chitosan were placed at the bone to implant interface, whereas control sites had no suture material. After a healing period of 4 weeks, a pull-out test procedure was performed followed by enzymatic analyses of the wound fluid and relative quantification of mRNA levels for bone-related and cytokine markers from the peri-implant bone. A trend toward a reduced pull-out force was observed in the NR group (NR: 23.0 ± 12.8 N; R: 33.9 ± 11.3 N; control: 33.6 ± 24.0 N). Similarly, the bone resorption marker vacuolar type H+-ATPase was increased in the NR group compared with that in the control group (P = 0.041). The R group showed trends for lower alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin expression and higher total protein content and RNA compared with the control group. In this submerged healing model, peri-implant bone healing was marginally affected by the two suture materials tested. However, there was a tendency toward better osseointegration and lower expression of bone resorption markers in the R group compared with the control group. PMID:26369486

  17. Measurement of spinal or peripheral bone mass to estimate early postmenopausal bone loss

    SciTech Connect

    Riis, B.J.; Christiansen, C.

    1988-04-01

    This report presents data from 153 healthy, early postmenopausal women who were randomly allocated to two years of treatment with estrogen or placebo. Bone mineral content in the forearms was measured by single-photon absorptiometry, and bone mineral density of the lumbar spine and total-body bone mineral by dual-photon absorptiometry, before and after one and two years of treatment. At the end of the two years, there were highly significant differences of 6 to 7 percent between the estrogen and the placebo groups at all sites measured. The range of the changes of the spine measurement was twice that of the forearm and total-body measurements. It is concluded that measurement of the forearm by single-photon absorptiometry is superior to measurement of the spine by dual-photon absorptiometry both in clinical studies and in the individual patient for detecting estrogen-dependent bone loss and its treatment by estrogen replacement.

  18. Sweet Taste Receptor Deficient Mice Have Decreased Adiposity and Increased Bone Mass

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Becky R.; Learman, Brian S.; Parlee, Sebastian D.; Scheller, Erica L.; Mori, Hiroyuki; Cawthorn, William P.; Ning, Xiaomin; Krishnan, Venkatesh; Ma, Yanfei L.; Tyrberg, Björn; MacDougald, Ormond A.

    2014-01-01

    Functional expression of sweet taste receptors (T1R2 and T1R3) has been reported in numerous metabolic tissues, including the gut, pancreas, and, more recently, in adipose tissue. It has been suggested that sweet taste receptors in these non-gustatory tissues may play a role in systemic energy balance and metabolism. Smaller adipose depots have been reported in T1R3 knockout mice on a high carbohydrate diet, and sweet taste receptors have been reported to regulate adipogenesis in vitro. To assess the potential contribution of sweet taste receptors to adipose tissue biology, we investigated the adipose tissue phenotypes of T1R2 and T1R3 knockout mice. Here we provide data to demonstrate that when fed an obesogenic diet, both T1R2 and T1R3 knockout mice have reduced adiposity and smaller adipocytes. Although a mild glucose intolerance was observed with T1R3 deficiency, other metabolic variables analyzed were similar between genotypes. In addition, food intake, respiratory quotient, oxygen consumption, and physical activity were unchanged in T1R2 knockout mice. Although T1R2 deficiency did not affect adipocyte number in peripheral adipose depots, the number of bone marrow adipocytes is significantly reduced in these knockout animals. Finally, we present data demonstrating that T1R2 and T1R3 knockout mice have increased cortical bone mass and trabecular remodeling. This report identifies novel functions for sweet taste receptors in the regulation of adipose and bone biology, and suggests that in these contexts, T1R2 and T1R3 are either dependent on each other for activity or have common independent effects in vivo. PMID:24466105

  19. Decreased Osteoclastogenesis and High Bone Mass in Mice with Impaired Insulin Clearance Due to Liver-Specific Inactivation to CEACAM1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, S.; Kaw, M.; Harris, M.T.; Ebraheim, N.; McInerney, M.F.; Najjar, S.M.; Lecka-Czernik, B.

    2010-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with normal-to-higher bone mineral density (BMD) and increased rate of fracture. Hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia may affect bone mass and quality in the diabetic skeleton. In order to dissect the effect of hyperinsulinemia from the hyperglycemic impact on bone homeostasis, we have analyzed L-SACC1 mice, a murine model of impaired insulin clearance in liver causing hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance without fasting hyperglycemia. Adult L-SACC1 mice exhibit significantly higher trabecular and cortical bone mass, attenuated bone formation as measured by dynamic histomorphometry, and reduced number of osteoclasts. Serum levels of bone formation (BALP) and bone resorption markers (TRAP5b and CTX) are decreased by approximately 50%. The L-SACC1 mutation in the liver affects myeloid cell lineage allocation in the bone marrow: the (CD3−CD11b−CD45R−) population of osteoclast progenitors is decreased by 40% and the number of (CD3−CD11b−CD45R+) B-cell progenitors is increased by 60%. L-SACC1 osteoclasts express lower levels of c-fos and RANK and their differentiation is impaired. In vitro analysis corroborated a negative effect of insulin on osteoclast recruitment, maturation and the expression levels of c-fos and RANK transcripts. Although bone formation is decreased in L-SACC1 mice, the differentiation potential and expression of the osteoblast-specific gene markers in L-SACC1-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) remain unchanged as compared to the WT. Interestingly, however MSC from L-SACC1 mice exhibit increased PPARγ2 and decreased IGF-1 transcript levels. These data suggest that high bone mass in L-SACC1 animals results, at least in part, from a negative regulatory effect of insulin on bone resorption and formation, which leads to decreased bone turnover. Because low bone turnover contributes to decreased bone quality and an increased incidence of fractures, studies on L-SACC1 mice may advance our understanding of altered

  20. Frequency of Teriparatide Administration Affects the Histological Pattern of Bone Formation in Young Adult Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tomomaya; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Sasaki, Muneteru; Hongo, Hiromi; Tsuboi, Kanako; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Ota, Masahiro; Haraguchi, Mai; Takahata, Masahiko; Oda, Kimimitsu; Luiz de Freitas, Paulo Henrique; Takakura, Aya; Takao-Kawabata, Ryoko; Isogai, Yukihiro; Amizuka, Norio

    2016-07-01

    Evidence supports that daily and once-weekly administration of teriparatide, human (h)PTH(1-34), enhance bone mass in osteoporotic patients. However, it is uncertain whether different frequencies of hPTH(1-34) administration would induce bone formation similarly in terms of quantity and quality. To investigate that issue, mice were subjected to different frequencies of PTH administration, and their bones were histologically examined. Frequencies of administration were 1 time/2 days, 1 time a day, and 2 and 4 times a day. Mice were allocated to either to control or to 3 different dosing regimens: 80 μg/kg of hPTH(1-34) per injection (80 μg/kg per dose), 80 μg/kg of hPTH(1-34) per day (80 μg/kg · d), or 20 μg/kg of hPTH(1-34) per day (20 μg/kg · d). With the regimens of 80 μg/kg per dose and 80 μg/kg · d, high-frequency hPTH(1-34) administration increased metaphyseal trabecular number. However, 4 doses per day induced the formation of thin trabeculae, whereas the daily PTH regimen resulted in thicker trabeculae. A similar pattern was observed with the lower daily hPTH(1-34) dose (20 μg/kg · d): more frequent PTH administration led to the formation of thin trabeculae, showing a thick preosteoblastic cell layer, several osteoclasts, and scalloped cement lines that indicated accelerated bone remodeling. On the other hand, low-frequency PTH administration induced new bone with mature osteoblasts lying on mildly convex surfaces representative of arrest lines, which suggests minimodeling-based bone formation. Thus, high-frequency PTH administration seems to increase bone mass rapidly by forming thin trabeculae through accelerated bone remodeling. Alternatively, low-frequency PTH administration leads to the formation of thicker trabeculae through bone remodeling and minimodeling. PMID:27227535

  1. Swimming Activity Prevents the Unloading Induced Loss of Bone Mass, Architecture, and Strength in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Falcai, Maurício J.; Leoni, Graziela Bianchi; de Sousa Neto, Manoel Damião; Volpon, Jose B.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether swimming activity associated with a three-week period of hypoactivity could prevent the deleterious effects of disuse on the tibias of tail-suspended rats. Forty Wistar rats were divided into five groups: (HS) permanently hindlimb suspension rats; (HS + Swim) rats submitted to unloading interrupted by swimming exercise; (HS + WB) hindlimb suspension rats with interruption for regular weight bearing for the same length of time as the HS+Swim rats; (Control) control rats that were allowed regular cage activities; and (Control + Swim) control rats that underwent swimming exercise. At the end of the experiment, bone mineral density, bone strength, and trabecular quantification were analyzed. The hindlimb-suspended rats exhibited bone quality loss (significant decrease in BMD, bone strength, and deterioration of trabecular and cortical bone architecture; decrease in BV/TV, TbN, TbTh, ConnD, CtV, and CtTh; and increase in TbSp) when compared to control rats. In contrast, trained rats showed a significant increase of 43% in bone mass, 29% in bone strength, 58% in trabecular thickness, 85% in bone volume, 27% in trabeculae number, and 30% in cortical volume, when compared to the hindlimb-suspended rats. We conclude that swimming activity not only ameliorates but also fully prevents the deleterious effects on bone quality in osteopenic rats. PMID:26090414

  2. Loss of BMPR2 leads to high bone mass due to increased osteoblast activity

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Jonathan W.; Intini, Giuseppe; Gamer, Laura; Lotinun, Sutada; Salazar, Valerie S.; Ote, Satoshi; Cox, Karen; Baron, Roland; Rosen, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Imbalances in the ratio of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) versus activin and TGFβ signaling are increasingly associated with human diseases yet the mechanisms mediating this relationship remain unclear. The type 2 receptors ACVR2A and ACVR2B bind BMPs and activins but the type 2 receptor BMPR2 only binds BMPs, suggesting that type 2 receptor utilization might play a role in mediating the interaction of these pathways. We tested this hypothesis in the mouse skeleton, where bone mass is reciprocally regulated by BMP signaling and activin and TGFβ signaling. We found that deleting Bmpr2 in mouse skeletal progenitor cells (Bmpr2-cKO mice) selectively impaired activin signaling but had no effect on BMP signaling, resulting in an increased bone formation rate and high bone mass. Additionally, activin sequestration had no effect on bone mass in Bmpr2-cKO mice but increased bone mass in wild-type mice. Our findings suggest a novel model whereby BMPR2 availability alleviates receptor-level competition between BMPs and activins and where utilization of ACVR2A and ACVR2B by BMPs comes at the expense of activins. As BMP and activin pathway modulation are of current therapeutic interest, our findings provide important mechanistic insight into the relationship between these pathways in human health. PMID:25663702

  3. Resveratrol supplementation preserves long bone mass, microstructure, and strength in hindlimb-suspended old male rats.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Stephanie M; Jackson, Janna R; Ryan, Michael J; Gigliotti, Joseph C; Alway, Stephan E; Tou, Janet C

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol has gained popularity as an "anti-aging" compound due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Few studies have investigated the role of resveratrol supplementation in the prevention of age-related bone loss and skeletal disuse despite increased inactivity and age-related bone loss in the elderly. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of resveratrol supplementation on disuse and age-related bone loss. Old (age 33 months) Fischer 344 × Brown Norway male rats were provided either trans-resveratrol (12.5 mg/kg bw/day) or deionized distilled water by oral gavage for 21 days. Rats were hindlimb-suspended (HLS) or kept ambulatory (AMB) for 14 days. Both femora and tibiae were collected. Bone mass was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and bone microstructure was determined by micro-computed tomography. HLS of old male rats accelerated loss of bone mineral content, decreased trabecular bone volume per unit of total volume, and increased trabecular separation. Resveratrol supplementation ameliorated bone demineralization and loss of bone microarchitecture in HLS old male rats. The peak force measured by the three-point bending test was reduced (P = 0.007) in HLS/control compared to AMB/control rats. Resveratrol supplementation ameliorated HLS-induced loss of femur strength. Plasma osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase was higher (P < 0.04) and C-reactive protein was lower (P = 0.04) in old male rats given resveratrol. The bone protective effects of resveratrol appeared to be mediated through increased osteoblast bone formation, possibly due to reduced inflammation. Based on the results, resveratrol supplementation appeared to provide a feasible dietary therapy for preserving the skeletal system during disuse and age-related bone loss. PMID:23686002

  4. Calcitropic hormone levels in polynesians: evidence against their role in interracial differences in bone mass.

    PubMed

    Reid, I R; Cullen, S; Schooler, B A; Livingston, N E; Evans, M C

    1990-05-01

    Blacks are known to have a higher bone mass than whites and have recently been found to have significantly different levels of calcitropic hormones and other biochemical indices of calcium metabolism. To assess the possible significance of these biochemical differences to interracial differences in bone mass, we have undertaken an assessment of indices of calcium metabolism in Polynesian subjects, since they also have a higher bone mass than whites. Serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were slightly lower in Polynesians than in whites (65 +/- 5 vs. 95 +/- 10 nmol/L; P less than 0.02), but there were no differences between the groups in serum levels of calcium (total and ionized), phosphate, magnesium, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, PTH, calcitonin, alkaline phosphatase activity, and bone gla-protein. Furthermore, urinary excretion of hydroxyproline, calcium, phosphate, magnesium, sodium, and potassium and the tubular maximum for the reabsorption of phosphate were not different between whites and Polynesians. Intestinal strontium absorption was similar in the two groups. In contrast, distal forearm bone mineral content was higher in Polynesians (P less than 0.01) and midupper arm muscle area was also increased in this group (P less than 0.005). It is concluded that the higher bone mass of Polynesians cannot be attributed to alterations in the basal levels of calcitropic hormones, but may be related to their greater muscle mass. It is probable that the previously observed black-white differences in the vitamin D endocrine system are secondary to the effects of skin color on vitamin D synthesis and are not contributory to the lower bone mass of whites. PMID:2335580

  5. Clinical factors affecting pathological fracture and healing of unicameral bone cysts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Unicameral bone cyst (UBC) is the most common benign lytic bone lesion seen in children. The aim of this study is to investigate clinical factors affecting pathological fracture and healing of UBC. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 155 UBC patients who consulted Nagoya musculoskeletal oncology group hospitals in Japan. Sixty of the 155 patients had pathological fracture at presentation. Of 141 patients with follow-up periods exceeding 6 months, 77 were followed conservatively and 64 treated by surgery. Results The fracture risk was significantly higher in the humerus than other bones. In multivariate analysis, ballooning of bone, cyst in long bone, male sex, thin cortical thickness and multilocular cyst were significant adverse prognostic factors for pathological fractures at presentation. The healing rates were 30% and 83% with observation and surgery, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that fracture at presentation and history of biopsy were good prognostic factors for healing of UBC in patients under observation. Conclusion The present results suggest that mechanical disruption of UBC such as fracture and biopsy promotes healing, and thus watchful waiting is indicated in these patients, whereas patients with poor prognostic factors for fractures should be considered for surgery. PMID:24884661

  6. Rictor/mTORC2 loss in osteoblasts impairs bone mass and strength.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-Mei; Zhao, Lin; Liu, Ting-Ting; Jiao, Pei-Lin; Zhao, Dian-Dian; Shih, Mei-Shu; Tao, Bei; Sun, Li-Hao; Zhao, Hong-Yan; Liu, Jian-Min

    2016-09-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a Ser/Thr kinase conserved through evolution that coordinates extra cellular signals associated with cell growth. Main functions of mTOR present in the form of two complexes, namely mTORC1 and mTORC2, which are distinct in their unique components, raptor and rictor. In the current study, using a Cre/loxp system, we found an anabolic effect of mTORC2 signaling on skeleton. Osteoblast differentiation was reduced, with down-regulation of mTORC2 signaling activity in primary cultures of osteoblasts that did not contain rictor. Mice with a specific deletion of rictor in mature osteoblasts showed a significant reduction in lean mass and bone mineral density by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry analysis. Micro-computed tomography, histomorphometric, and molecular biological analyses revealed a marked impairment of the cortical bone mass and microarchitecture, as well as minor changes in trabecular bone, of the Rictorob(-/-) mice. Cortical bone mass and thickness of the femoral mid-shaft were dramatically reduced, with unusual increases in porosity and marrow area in Rictorob(-/-) mice. Thinner trabeculae were found in the L4 vertebrae with relatively normal structural indices of trabecular numbers and separation. A lower rate of bone turnover was observed, as the consequence of the decreased individual osteoblast activity and bone resorption. Furthermore, these changes were associated with significantly decreased bone biomechanical properties. In conclusion, expression of rictor in osteoblasts is essential for the maintenance of normal bone remodeling and microarchitecture, especially for the maintenance of the cortical bone. PMID:27262777

  7. Histone deacetylase 3 is required for maintenance of bone mass during aging

    PubMed Central

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Bradley, Elizabeth W.; Dudakovic, Amel; Carlson, Samuel W.; Ryan, Zachary C.; Kumar, Rajiv; Dadsetan, Mahrokh; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Chen, Qingshan; An, Kai-Nan; Westendorf, Jennifer J.

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 3 (Hdac3) is a nuclear enzyme that removes acetyl groups from lysine residues in histones and other proteins to epigenetically regulate gene expression. Hdac3 interacts with bone-related transcription factors and co-factors such as Runx2 and Zfp521, and thus is poised to play a key role in the skeletal system. To understand the role of Hdac3 in osteoblasts and osteocytes, Hdac3 conditional knockout (CKO) mice were created with the Osteocalcin (OCN) promoter driving Cre expression. Hdac3 CKOOCN mice were of normal size and weight, but progressively lost trabecular and cortical bone mass with age. The Hdac3 CKOOCN mice exhibited reduced cortical bone mineralization and material properties and suffered frequent fractures. Bone resorption was lower, not higher, in the Hdac3 CKOOCN mice, suggesting that primary defects in osteoblasts caused the reduced bone mass. Indeed, reductions in bone formation were observed. Osteoblasts and osteocytes from Hdac3 CKOOCN mice showed increased DNA damage and reduced functional activity in vivo and in vitro. Thus, Hdac3 expression in osteoblasts and osteocytes is essential for bone maintenance during aging. PMID:23085085

  8. The mammalian lectin galectin-8 induces RANKL expression, osteoclastogenesis, and bone mass reduction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, Yaron; Shatz-Azoulay, Hadas; Vivanti, Alessia; Hever, Navit; Levy, Yifat; Karmona, Rotem; Brumfeld, Vlad; Baraghithy, Saja; Attar-Lamdar, Malka; Boura-Halfon, Sigalit; Bab, Itai; Zick, Yehiel

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal integrity is maintained by the co-ordinated activity of osteoblasts, the bone-forming cells, and osteoclasts, the bone-resorbing cells. In this study, we show that mice overexpressing galectin-8, a secreted mammalian lectin of the galectins family, exhibit accelerated osteoclasts activity and bone turnover, which culminates in reduced bone mass, similar to cases of postmenopausal osteoporosis and cancerous osteolysis. This phenotype can be attributed to a direct action of galectin-8 on primary cultures of osteoblasts that secrete the osteoclastogenic factor RANKL upon binding of galectin-8. This results in enhanced differentiation into osteoclasts of the bone marrow cells co-cultured with galectin-8-treated osteoblasts. Secretion of RANKL by galectin-8-treated osteoblasts can be attributed to binding of galectin-8 to receptor complexes that positively (uPAR and MRC2) and negatively (LRP1) regulate galectin-8 function. Our findings identify galectins as new players in osteoclastogenesis and bone remodeling, and highlight a potential regulation of bone mass by animal lectins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05914.001 PMID:25955862

  9. The mammalian lectin galectin-8 induces RANKL expression, osteoclastogenesis, and bone mass reduction in mice.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Yaron; Shatz-Azoulay, Hadas; Vivanti, Alessia; Hever, Navit; Levy, Yifat; Karmona, Rotem; Brumfeld, Vlad; Baraghithy, Saja; Attar-Lamdar, Malka; Boura-Halfon, Sigalit; Bab, Itai; Zick, Yehiel

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal integrity is maintained by the co-ordinated activity of osteoblasts, the bone-forming cells, and osteoclasts, the bone-resorbing cells. In this study, we show that mice overexpressing galectin-8, a secreted mammalian lectin of the galectins family, exhibit accelerated osteoclasts activity and bone turnover, which culminates in reduced bone mass, similar to cases of postmenopausal osteoporosis and cancerous osteolysis. This phenotype can be attributed to a direct action of galectin-8 on primary cultures of osteoblasts that secrete the osteoclastogenic factor RANKL upon binding of galectin-8. This results in enhanced differentiation into osteoclasts of the bone marrow cells co-cultured with galectin-8-treated osteoblasts. Secretion of RANKL by galectin-8-treated osteoblasts can be attributed to binding of galectin-8 to receptor complexes that positively (uPAR and MRC2) and negatively (LRP1) regulate galectin-8 function. Our findings identify galectins as new players in osteoclastogenesis and bone remodeling, and highlight a potential regulation of bone mass by animal lectins. PMID:25955862

  10. Menstrual irregularity and bone mass in premenopausal women: Cross-sectional associations with testosterone and SHBG

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There have been few studies examining the associations between menstrual irregularity, androgens and bone mass in population-based samples of premenopausal women. This study aimed to describe the associations between menstrual pattern, testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and bone mass in a population-based sample of premenopausal women. Methods Cross-sectional study (N = 382, mean age 31.5 years). Menstrual pattern was assessed by questionnaire, bone mass measured by quantitative ultrasound (QUS) and androgen status was assessed by levels of serum testosterone, SHBG and the free androgen index (FAI). Results Women with irregular cycles (n = 41, 11%) had higher free androgen index (FAI, P = 0.01) and higher QUS measurements including speed of sound (SOS, 1%, P < 0.05), quantitative ultrasound index (QUI, 7%, p < 0.05), and broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA, 7%, p = 0.10). These associations persisted after adjustment for age and body mass index (BMI). After further adjustment for hormonal factors (either testosterone, SHBG or FAI), the strength of the associations was moderately attenuated, however, women with irregular cycles still had a 6% increase in mean QUS. Total testosterone, FAI and SHBG were also associated with QUS measures (testosterone and FAI, r +0.11 to +0.21, all p < 0.05; SHBG r -0.14 to -0.16, all p < 0.05) and the associations remained significant after adjustment. Conclusion Irregular menstrual cycles were associated with higher bone mass in this population-based sample of premenopausal women suggesting menstrual disturbance should continue to be evaluated but may be less harmful for bone mass. The association between menstrual irregularity and bone mass was partially mediated by markers of androgen status especially free testosterone. PMID:21190585

  11. Bone Mineral and Predictors of Bone Mass in White, Hispanic, and Asian Early Pubertal Girls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Racial differences in body size have been suggested to explain racial differences in bone in black and white youth. Previous studies of nonblack racial differences during growth used small cohorts spread over a large developmental age and cannot adequately address this question. Mater...

  12. A bispecific antibody targeting sclerostin and DKK-1 promotes bone mass accrual and fracture repair

    PubMed Central

    Florio, Monica; Gunasekaran, Kannan; Stolina, Marina; Li, Xiaodong; Liu, Ling; Tipton, Barbara; Salimi-Moosavi, Hossein; Asuncion, Franklin J.; Li, Chaoyang; Sun, Banghua; Tan, Hong Lin; Zhang, Li; Han, Chun-Ya; Case, Ryan; Duguay, Amy N.; Grisanti, Mario; Stevens, Jennitte; Pretorius, James K.; Pacheco, Efrain; Jones, Heidi; Chen, Qing; Soriano, Brian D.; Wen, Jie; Heron, Brenda; Jacobsen, Frederick W.; Brisan, Emil; Richards, William G.; Ke, Hua Zhu; Ominsky, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the Wnt antagonist sclerostin increases bone mass in patients with osteoporosis and in preclinical animal models. Here we show increased levels of the Wnt antagonist Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) in animals treated with sclerostin antibody, suggesting a negative feedback mechanism that limits Wnt-driven bone formation. To test our hypothesis that co-inhibition of both factors further increases bone mass, we engineer a first-in-class bispecific antibody with single residue pair mutations in the Fab region to promote efficient and stable cognate light–heavy chain pairing. We demonstrate that dual inhibition of sclerostin and DKK-1 leads to synergistic bone formation in rodents and non-human primates. Furthermore, by targeting distinct facets of fracture healing, the bispecific antibody shows superior bone repair activity compared with monotherapies. This work supports the potential of this agent both for treatment and prevention of fractures and offers a promising therapeutic approach to reduce the burden of low bone mass disorders. PMID:27230681

  13. A bispecific antibody targeting sclerostin and DKK-1 promotes bone mass accrual and fracture repair.

    PubMed

    Florio, Monica; Gunasekaran, Kannan; Stolina, Marina; Li, Xiaodong; Liu, Ling; Tipton, Barbara; Salimi-Moosavi, Hossein; Asuncion, Franklin J; Li, Chaoyang; Sun, Banghua; Tan, Hong Lin; Zhang, Li; Han, Chun-Ya; Case, Ryan; Duguay, Amy N; Grisanti, Mario; Stevens, Jennitte; Pretorius, James K; Pacheco, Efrain; Jones, Heidi; Chen, Qing; Soriano, Brian D; Wen, Jie; Heron, Brenda; Jacobsen, Frederick W; Brisan, Emil; Richards, William G; Ke, Hua Zhu; Ominsky, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the Wnt antagonist sclerostin increases bone mass in patients with osteoporosis and in preclinical animal models. Here we show increased levels of the Wnt antagonist Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) in animals treated with sclerostin antibody, suggesting a negative feedback mechanism that limits Wnt-driven bone formation. To test our hypothesis that co-inhibition of both factors further increases bone mass, we engineer a first-in-class bispecific antibody with single residue pair mutations in the Fab region to promote efficient and stable cognate light-heavy chain pairing. We demonstrate that dual inhibition of sclerostin and DKK-1 leads to synergistic bone formation in rodents and non-human primates. Furthermore, by targeting distinct facets of fracture healing, the bispecific antibody shows superior bone repair activity compared with monotherapies. This work supports the potential of this agent both for treatment and prevention of fractures and offers a promising therapeutic approach to reduce the burden of low bone mass disorders. PMID:27230681

  14. Estimation of bone Calcium-to-Phosphorous mass ratio using dual-energy nonlinear polynomial functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulou, P.; Koukou, V.; Martini, N.; Michail, C.; Kounadi, E.; Kandarakis, I.; Nikiforidis, G.; Fountos, G.

    2015-09-01

    In this study an analytical approximation of dual-energy inverse functions is presented for the estimation of the calcium-to-phosphorous (Ca/P) mass ratio, which is a crucial parameter in bone health. Bone quality could be examined by the X-ray dual-energy method (XDEM), in terms of bone tissue material properties. Low- and high-energy, log- intensity measurements were combined by using a nonlinear function, to cancel out the soft tissue structures and generate the dual energy bone Ca/P mass ratio. The dual-energy simulated data were obtained using variable Ca and PO4 thicknesses on a fixed total tissue thickness. The XDEM simulations were based on a bone phantom. Inverse fitting functions with least-squares estimation were used to obtain the fitting coefficients and to calculate the thickness of each material. The examined inverse mapping functions were linear, quadratic, and cubic. For every thickness, the nonlinear quadratic function provided the optimal fitting accuracy while requiring relative few terms. The dual-energy method, simulated in this work could be used to quantify bone Ca/P mass ratio with photon-counting detectors.

  15. Suture locking of isolated internal locking knotless suture anchors is not affected by bone quality

    PubMed Central

    Woodmass, Jarret M; Matthewson, Graeme; Ono, Yohei; Bois, Aaron J; Boorman, Richard S; Lo, Ian KY; Thornton, Gail M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical performance of different suture locking mechanisms including: i) interference fit between the anchor and the bone (eg, 4.5 mm PushLock, 5.5 mm SwiveLock), ii) internal locking mechanism within the anchor itself (eg, 5.5 mm SpeedScrew), or iii) a combination of interference fit and internal locking (eg, 4.5 mm MultiFIX P, 5.5 mm MultiFIX S). Methods Anchors were tested in foam blocks representing normal (20/8 foam) or osteopenic (8/8 foam) bone, using standard suture loops pulled in-line with the anchor to isolate suture locking. Mechanical testing included cyclic testing for 500 cycles from 10 N to 60 N at 60 mm/min, followed by failure testing at 60 mm/min. Displacement after 500 cycles at 60 N, number of cycles at 3 mm displacement, load at 3 mm displacement, and maximum load were evaluated. Results Comparing 8/8 foam to 20/8 foam, load at 3 mm displacement and maximum load were significantly decreased (P<0.05) with decreased bone quality for anchors that, even in part, relied on an interference fit suture locking mechanism (ie, 4.5 mm PushLock, 5.5 mm SwiveLock, 4.5 mm MultiFIX P, 5.5 mm MultiFIX S). Bone quality did not affect the mechanical performance of 5.5 mm SpeedScrew anchors which have an isolated internal locking mechanism. Conclusion The mechanical performance of anchors that relied, even in part, on interference fit were affected by bone quality. Isolated internal locking knotless suture anchors functioned independently of bone quality. Anchors with a combined type (interference fit and internal locking) suture locking mechanism demonstrated similar mechanical performance to isolated internal locking anchors in osteopenic foam comparing similar sized anchors. Clinical relevance In osteopenic bone, knotless suture anchors that have an internal locking mechanism (isolated or combined type) may be advantageous for secure tendon fixation to bone. PMID:26124683

  16. The effect of exercise on bone mass and structural geometry during growth.

    PubMed

    Daly, Robin M

    2007-01-01

    Regular weight-bearing exercise is widely reported to have beneficial effects on bone mineral content and areal bone mineral density during growth, but the structural basis underlying these changes remains uncertain. In young athletic children, participation in high-impact sports has been shown to enhance bone formation on the periosteal and/or endosteal surfaces of long bones at loaded skeletal sites. Participation in moderate physical activity, recreational play or school-based exercise interventions designed to specifically load bone have also been shown to enhance bone mineral accrual. However, few data are available on the surface-specific effects of exercise training or general physical activity on bone. Based on the limited data available, it would appear that the structural response of bone to exercise during growth is maturity dependent and sex specific; prior to puberty exercise appears to increase periosteal apposition in both sexes, whereas during or late in puberty exercise appears to result in periosteal expansion in boys but endocortical contraction in girls. In most cases, these geometric changes lead to an increase in bone bending strength. However, there are contrasting results as to whether the pre- or peripubertal years are an optimal time to intervene for the greatest osteogenic response; it is likely that both periods represent an important time for incorporating physical activity to optimize bone health. There are also many unresolved questions as to the optimal dose of exercise (intensity, frequency, duration and rate of progression) needed to enhance bone strength in children and adolescents. We know that weight-bearing exercise is important, and that activities should be dynamic, variable in nature, applied rapidly and intermittently, and that relatively few loading cycles are required. Although several effective interventions have been designed for improving bone mass, further research is needed to define the specific exercise programs or

  17. Decreased osteoclastogenesis, osteoblastogenesis and low bone mass in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Dong, Yonghui; Huang, Xin; Li, Mi; Qin, Liang; Ren, Ye; Guo, Fengjing; Chen, Anmin; Huang, Shilong

    2014-10-01

    The effect of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on bone is controversial. Therefore, the present study investigated whether T2DM causes osteoporosis and explored the underlying mechanisms involved in this process. The effects of T2DM on bone physiology were analyzed in a mouse model of T2DM; KK/Upj‑Ay/J (KK‑Ay) mice develop diabetes after 8 weeks and exhibit stable diabetes symptoms and signs after 10 weeks when fed a KK‑Ay mouse maintenance fodder. Diabetic mice exhibited hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and increased body and fat pad weight in comparison with C57BL/6 non-diabetic mice. Furthermore, diabetic mice demonstrated low bone weight and bone mineral density in the femur, tibia and fifth lumbar vertebra. Using von Kossa and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, alkaline phosphatase and TRAP activity analyses and gene profiling it was demonstrated that osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis were impaired in diabetic mice. To evaluate the bone biomechanics, the ultimate load of the bone was analyzed. It was found that the ultimate load of the tibia in diabetic mice was lower than that in the controls. The results from the present study suggest that bone metabolism is impaired in T2DM, resulting in decreased osteoblastogenesis, osteoclastogenesis and bone mass. PMID:25109926

  18. Choline Kinase β Mutant Mice Exhibit Reduced Phosphocholine, Elevated Osteoclast Activity, and Low Bone Mass*

    PubMed Central

    Kular, Jasreen; Tickner, Jennifer C.; Pavlos, Nathan J.; Viola, Helena M.; Abel, Tamara; Lim, Bay Sie; Yang, Xiaohong; Chen, Honghui; Cook, Robert; Hool, Livia C.; Zheng, Ming Hao; Xu, Jiake

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of bone homeostasis requires tight coupling between bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts. However, the precise molecular mechanism(s) underlying the differentiation and activities of these specialized cells are still largely unknown. Here, we identify choline kinase β (CHKB), a kinase involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, as a novel regulator of bone homeostasis. Choline kinase β mutant mice (flp/flp) exhibit a systemic low bone mass phenotype. Consistently, osteoclast numbers and activity are elevated in flp/flp mice. Interestingly, osteoclasts derived from flp/flp mice exhibit reduced sensitivity to excessive levels of extracellular calcium, which could account for the increased bone resorption. Conversely, supplementation of cytidine 5′-diphosphocholine in vivo and in vitro, a regimen that bypasses CHKB deficiency, restores osteoclast numbers to physiological levels. Finally, we demonstrate that, in addition to modulating osteoclast formation and function, loss of CHKB corresponds with a reduction in bone formation by osteoblasts. Taken together, these data posit CHKB as a new modulator of bone homeostasis. PMID:25451916

  19. Rare EN1 Variants and Pediatric Bone Mass.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jonathan A; Chesi, Alessandra; McCormack, Shana E; Roy, Sani M; Cousminer, Diana L; Kalkwarf, Heidi J; Lappe, Joan M; Gilsanz, Vicente; Oberfield, Sharon E; Shepherd, John A; Kelly, Andrea; Zemel, Babette S; Grant, Struan Fa

    2016-08-01

    A recent whole-genome sequencing study in search of variation associated with adult areal bone mineral density (aBMD) identified rare variants near EN1, with markedly large effect sizes, and a common variant near SOX6. To understand the developmental effects of these loci, we sought to determine if they were associated with pediatric dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry-derived aBMD and bone mineral content (BMC) and if the associations were modified by sex. Our sample comprised 733 females and 685 males of European ancestry enrolled in the longitudinal Bone Mineral Density in Childhood Study (up to 7 annual study visits). Sex- and age-specific Z-scores, adjusted for height, were calculated for the total hip, femoral neck, spine, and distal radius. Total body less head (TBLH) BMC Z-scores were also calculated. The previously reported single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near EN1 and SOX6 were derived from our imputed data set. Linear mixed-effects models were used to test associations between each SNP and bone Z-scores, plus interactions with sex were explored. The rare T allele of lead EN1 SNP rs11692564 was associated with higher aBMD Z-score for total hip (beta = 0.62, p = 9.0 × 10(-4) ) and femoral neck (beta = 0.53, p = 0.010). In sex-stratified analyses, this variant was associated with higher bone Z-scores in females only, with the associations being strongest for total hip (sex interaction p = 1.9 × 10(-4) ; beta females = 0.86, p = 6.6 × 10(-6) ) and femoral neck (sex interaction p = 0.016; beta females = 0.73, p = 0.001). The common G allele of SOX6 SNP rs11024028 was associated with higher aBMD Z-score for total hip (beta = 0.12, p = 0.009), femoral neck (beta = 0.13, p = 0.003), and TBLH-BMC (beta = 0.09, p = 0.007); furthermore, this association strengthened in males in the sex-stratified analyses. Our findings reveal that rare genetic variation near EN1 and common variation

  20. Vitamin-D nutrition and bone mass in adolescent black girls.

    PubMed Central

    Talwar, Sonia A.; Swedler, Jane; Yeh, James; Pollack, Simcha; Aloia, John F.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between bone mass and serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone in African-American adolescent girls. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional sample at a suburban research center. METHODS: Twenty-one adolescent black girls 12-14 years of age, were studied during winter with biochemical measurements of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Bone mass assessment was done with dual energy x-ray absorbsiometry (DXA) and peripheral quantitative computed tomography of the radius (p-QCT). Anthropometric, physical activity and nutritional data were collected. RESULTS: All participants were vitamin-D deficient (serum 25-OHD level <50 nmol/L), of whom nine (43%) were severely vitamin-D deficient (serum 25-OHD level <20 nmol/L). Mean daily intake of dietary calcium was 540 mg/d and vitamin D was 195 IU/d. There was a positive correlation, although statistically not significant, between serum 25-OHD and various bone mass measurements. Serum PTH was inversely correlated to total body BMD (r = -0.51, p = 0.02) and other bone mineral density at the lumbar spine, total femur and mid-radius. CONCLUSION: Vitamin-D insufficiency is a widely prevalent problem among adolescent African-American girls. Our data implies that enhancing vitamin-D nutrition resulting in lower serum PTH levels could potentially influence their peak bone mass. PMID:17595934

  1. Thin healthy women have a similar low bone mass to women with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, D; Rodríguez, M; García Alemán, J; García-Almeida, J M; Picón, M J; Fernández-Aranda, F; Tinahones, F J

    2009-09-01

    An association between anorexia nerviosa (AN) and low bone mass has been demonstrated. Bone loss associated with AN involves hormonal and nutritional impairments, though their exact contribution is not clearly established. We compared bone mass in AN patients with women of similar weight with no criteria for AN, and a third group of healthy, normal-weight, age-matched women. The study included forty-eight patients with AN, twenty-two healthy eumenorrhoeic women with low weight (LW group; BMI < 18.5 kg/m2) and twenty healthy women with BMI >18.5 kg/m2 (control group), all of similar age. We measured lean body mass, percentage fat mass, total bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density in lumbar spine (BMD LS) and in total (tBMD). We measured anthropometric parameters, leptin and growth hormone. The control group had greater tBMD and BMD LS than the other groups, with no differences between the AN and LW groups. No differences were found in tBMD, BMD LS and total BMC between the restrictive (n 25) and binge-purge type (n 23) in AN patients. In AN, minimum weight (P = 0.002) and percentage fat mass (P = 0.02) explained BMD LS variation (r2 0.48) and minimum weight (r2 0.42; P = 0.002) for tBMD in stepwise regression analyses. In the LW group, BMI explained BMD LS (r2 0.72; P = 0.01) and tBMD (r2 0.57; P = 0.04). We concluded that patients with AN had similar BMD to healthy thin women. Anthropometric parameters could contribute more significantly than oestrogen deficiency in the achievement of peak bone mass in AN patients. PMID:19302720

  2. Calcium supplementation, bone mineral density and bone mineral content. Predictors of bone mass changes in adolescent mothers during the 6-month postpartum period.

    PubMed

    Malpeli, Agustina; Apezteguia, María; Mansur, José L; Armanini, Alicia; Macías Couret, Melisa; Villalobos, Rosa; Kuzminczuk, Marta; Gonzalez, Horacio F

    2012-03-01

    We determined the effect of calcium supplementation on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) and identified predictors of bone mass changes in adolescent mothers 6 months postpartum. A prospective, analytical, clinical study was performed in adolescent mothers (< or = 19 years old; n = 37) from La Plata, Argentina. At 15 days postpartum, mothers were randomly assigned into one of two groups and started with calcium supplementation; one group received dairy products (932 mg Ca; n = 19) and the other calcium citrate tablets (1000 mg calcium/day; n = 18). Weight, height and dietary intake were measured and BMD was determined by DEXA at 15 days (baseline) and 6 months postpartum. BMC, total body BMD and BMD were assessed in lumbar spine, femoral neck, trochanter and total hip. Regression models were used to identify the relationship of total body BMD and BMC with independent variables (calcium supplementation, months of lactation, weight at 6 months, percent weight change, lean mass at 6 months, percent lean mass change, total calcium intake). Results showed that changes in BMD and BMC at the different sites were similar in both groups, and changes in percent body weight and total calcium intake were the main predictive factors. In conclusion, the effect of calcium was similar with either form of supplementation, i.e., dairy products or tablets, and changes in percent body weight and total calcium intake were predictors of total body BMD and BMC changes. PMID:23477205

  3. N-acetylcysteine supplementation decreases osteoclast differentiation and increases bone mass in mice fed a high-fat diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies have demonstrated that obesity induced by high-fat diets increases bone resorption, decreases trabecular bone mass, and reduces bone strength in various animal models. This study investigated whether N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant and a glutathione precursor, alters glutathione statu...

  4. Administration of soluble activin receptor 2B increases bone and muscle mass in a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    DiGirolamo, Douglas J.; Singhal, Vandana; Chang, Xiaoli; Lee, Se-Jin; Germain-Lee, Emily L.

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) comprises a group of heritable connective tissue disorders generally defined by recurrent fractures, low bone mass, short stature and skeletal fragility. Beyond the skeletal complications of OI, many patients also report intolerance to physical activity, fatigue and muscle weakness. Indeed, recent studies have demonstrated that skeletal muscle is also negatively affected by OI, both directly and indirectly. Given the well-established interdependence of bone and skeletal muscle in both physiology and pathophysiology and the observations of skeletal muscle pathology in patients with OI, we investigated the therapeutic potential of simultaneous anabolic targeting of both bone and skeletal muscle using a soluble activin receptor 2B (ACVR2B) in a mouse model of type III OI (oim). Treatment of 12-week-old oim mice with ACVR2B for 4 weeks resulted in significant increases in both bone and muscle that were similar to those observed in healthy, wild-type littermates. This proof of concept study provides encouraging evidence for a holistic approach to treating the deleterious consequences of OI in the musculoskeletal system. PMID:26161291

  5. High bone mass in mice lacking Cx37 because of defective osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Costa, Rafael; Hassan, Iraj; Reginato, Rejane D; Davis, Hannah M; Bruzzaniti, Angela; Allen, Matthew R; Plotkin, Lilian I

    2014-03-21

    Connexin (Cx) proteins are essential for cell differentiation, function, and survival in all tissues with Cx43 being the most studied in bone. We now report that Cx37, another member of the connexin family of proteins, is expressed in osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes. Mice with global deletion of Cx37 (Cx37(-/-)) exhibit higher bone mineral density, cancellous bone volume, and mechanical strength compared with wild type littermates. Osteoclast number and surface are significantly lower in bone of Cx37(-/-) mice. In contrast, osteoblast number and surface and bone formation rate in bones from Cx37(-/-) mice are unchanged. Moreover, markers of osteoblast activity ex vivo and in vivo are similar to those of Cx37(+/+) littermates. sRANKL/M-CSF treatment of nonadherent Cx37(-/-) bone marrow cells rendered a 5-fold lower level of osteoclast differentiation compared with Cx37(+/+) cell cultures. Further, Cx37(-/-) osteoclasts are smaller and have fewer nuclei per cell. Expression of RANK, TRAP, cathepsin K, calcitonin receptor, matrix metalloproteinase 9, NFATc1, DC-STAMP, ATP6v0d1, and CD44, markers of osteoclast number, fusion, or activity, is lower in Cx37(-/-) osteoclasts compared with controls. In addition, nonadherent bone marrow cells from Cx37(-/-) mice exhibit higher levels of markers for osteoclast precursors, suggesting altered osteoclast differentiation. The reduction of osteoclast differentiation is associated with activation of Notch signaling. We conclude that Cx37 is required for osteoclast differentiation and fusion, and its absence leads to arrested osteoclast maturation and high bone mass in mice. These findings demonstrate a previously unrecognized role of Cx37 in bone homeostasis that is not compensated for by Cx43 in vivo. PMID:24509854

  6. High Bone Mass in Mice Lacking Cx37 Because of Defective Osteoclast Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco-Costa, Rafael; Hassan, Iraj; Reginato, Rejane D.; Davis, Hannah M.; Bruzzaniti, Angela; Allen, Matthew R.; Plotkin, Lilian I.

    2014-01-01

    Connexin (Cx) proteins are essential for cell differentiation, function, and survival in all tissues with Cx43 being the most studied in bone. We now report that Cx37, another member of the connexin family of proteins, is expressed in osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes. Mice with global deletion of Cx37 (Cx37−/−) exhibit higher bone mineral density, cancellous bone volume, and mechanical strength compared with wild type littermates. Osteoclast number and surface are significantly lower in bone of Cx37−/− mice. In contrast, osteoblast number and surface and bone formation rate in bones from Cx37−/− mice are unchanged. Moreover, markers of osteoblast activity ex vivo and in vivo are similar to those of Cx37+/+ littermates. sRANKL/M-CSF treatment of nonadherent Cx37−/− bone marrow cells rendered a 5-fold lower level of osteoclast differentiation compared with Cx37+/+ cell cultures. Further, Cx37−/− osteoclasts are smaller and have fewer nuclei per cell. Expression of RANK, TRAP, cathepsin K, calcitonin receptor, matrix metalloproteinase 9, NFATc1, DC-STAMP, ATP6v0d1, and CD44, markers of osteoclast number, fusion, or activity, is lower in Cx37−/− osteoclasts compared with controls. In addition, nonadherent bone marrow cells from Cx37−/− mice exhibit higher levels of markers for osteoclast precursors, suggesting altered osteoclast differentiation. The reduction of osteoclast differentiation is associated with activation of Notch signaling. We conclude that Cx37 is required for osteoclast differentiation and fusion, and its absence leads to arrested osteoclast maturation and high bone mass in mice. These findings demonstrate a previously unrecognized role of Cx37 in bone homeostasis that is not compensated for by Cx43 in vivo. PMID:24509854

  7. Ameloblastin, an Extracellular Matrix Protein, Affects Long Bone Growth and Mineralization.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuanyu; Fukumoto, Satoshi; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Evans, Carla A; Diekwisch, Thomas Gh; Luan, Xianghong

    2016-06-01

    Matrix molecules such as the enamel-related calcium-binding phosphoprotein ameloblastin (AMBN) are expressed in multiple tissues, including teeth, bones, and cartilage. Here we have asked whether AMBN is of functional importance for timely long bone development and, if so, how it exerts its function related to osteogenesis. Adolescent AMBN-deficient mice (AMBN(Δ5-6) ) suffered from a 33% to 38% reduction in femur length and an 8.4% shorter trunk spinal column when compared with WT controls, whereas there was no difference between adult animals. On a cellular level, AMBN truncation resulted in a shortened growth plate and a 41% to 49% reduction in the number of proliferating tibia chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) isolated from AMBN mutant mice displayed defects in proliferation and differentiation potential as well as cytoskeleton organization. Osteogenesis-related growth factors, such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and BMP7, were also significantly (46% to 73%) reduced in AMBN-deficient BMSCs. Addition of exogenous AMBN restored cytoskeleton structures in AMBN mutant BMSCs and resulted in a dramatic 400% to 600% increase in BMP2, BMP7, and Col1A expression. Block of RhoA diminished the effect of AMBN on osteogenic growth factor and matrix protein gene expression. Addition of exogenous BMP7 and IGF1 rescued the proliferation and differentiation potential of AMBN-deficient BMSCs. Confirming the effects of AMBN on long bone growth, back-crossing of mutant mice with full-length AMBN overexpressors resulted in a complete rescue of AMBN(Δ5-6) bone defects. Together, these data indicate that AMBN affects extracellular matrix production and cell adhesion properties in the long bone growth plate, resulting in altered cytoskeletal dynamics, increased osteogenesis-related gene expression, as well as osteoblast and chondrocyte proliferation. We propose that AMBN facilitates rapid long bone growth and an important growth spurt during the

  8. The salutary effect of dietary calcium on bone mass in a rat model of simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bikle, D. D.; Globus, R.; Halloran, B. P.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1985-01-01

    Whether supplementation of dietary calcium reduces the differences in bone mass of unweighed limbs and normally weighted limbs, and whether parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) respond differently to dietary calcium in unweighted animals in comparison with pair-fed controls was studied. The hind limbs of rats were unweighted by a tail suspension method and diets containing 0.1% to 2.4% calcium. After 2 weeks serum calcium, phosphorus, PTH and 1,25(OH)2D intestinal calcium transport were determined and bone mass, ash weight, and calcium in the tibia, L-1 vertebra, and humerus were measured. No significant differences in body weights were observed among the various groups. Suspended rats maintained constant levels of serum calcium and phosphate over the wide range of dietary calcium. Serum PTH and 1,25(OH)2D and intestinal calcium transport fell as dietary calcium was increased. Bone calcium in the tibia and vertebra from suspended rats remained less than that from pair-fed control. It is suggested that although no striking difference between suspended and control animals was observed in response to dieteary calcium, increasing dietary calcium may reduce the negative impact of unloading on the calcium content of the unweighted bones. The salutary effect of high dietary calcium appears to be due to inhibition of bone resorption rather than to stimulation of bone formation.

  9. Cyclosporin A does not affect the absolute rate of cortical bone resorption at the organ level in the growing rat.

    PubMed

    Klein, L; Lemel, M S; Wolfe, M S; Shaffer, J

    1994-10-01

    The weanling rat, an animal model of rapid bone turnover, was used to evaluate the effects of various doses of cyclosporin A (CsA) on various bones during different time periods. Sprague-Dawley male rats were extensively prelabeled with 3H-tetracycline during 1-3 weeks of age. At 4 weeks of age, four groups of rats were given daily subcutaneous injections: vehicle or CsA--low dose (10 mg/kg), intermediary dose (20 mg/kg), or high dose (30 mg/kg) for 7, 14, or 28 days. Three different whole bones--the femur (low turnover), scapula (moderate turnover), and lumbar-6 vertebra (high turnover) were harvested intact at 4, 5, 6, and 8 weeks of age. The whole bones were assayed weekly for total dry defatted weight, calcium mass (formation), and loss of 3H-tetracycline (bone resorption) following treatment with CsA. Serum CsA levels, calcium creatinine, and alkaline phosphatase were measured weekly. Significant decreases in serum calcium and alkaline phosphatase were observed at 1 and 2 weeks, and were normalized by 4 weeks of treatment. No significant changes in serum creatinine were noted. For all three doses of CsA, no effect was observed on the absolute rate of cortical bone resorption of three different, whole bones over three time periods. Body weight and bone formation in treated animals was significantly smaller in a dose- and time-related fashion compared with control animals at sacrifice. However, compared with the initial control animals, body weights and bone masses of the final treated animals were much larger, suggesting that the smaller bone masses were due to insufficient growth and slow gain in bone mass.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7820781

  10. Fusion mass bone quality after uninstrumented spinal fusion in older patients

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Finn B.; Langdahl, Bente L.; Ernst, Carsten; Fruensgaard, Søren; Østergaard, Jørgen; Andersen, Jens Langer; Rasmussen, Sten; Niedermann, Bent; Høy, Kristian; Helmig, Peter; Holm, Randi; Lindblad, Bent Erling; Hansen, Ebbe Stender; Egund, Niels; Bünger, Cody

    2010-01-01

    Older people are at increased risk of non-union after spinal fusion, but little is known about the factors determining the quality of the fusion mass in this patient group. The aim of this study was to investigate fusion mass bone quality after uninstrumented spinal fusion and to evaluate if it could be improved by additional direct current (DC) electrical stimulation. A multicenter RCT compared 40 and 100 μA DC stimulation with a control group of uninstrumented posterolateral fusion in patients older than 60 years. This report comprised 80 patients who underwent DEXA scanning at the 1 year follow-up. The study population consisted of 29 men with a mean age of 72 years (range 62–85) and 51 women with a mean age of 72 years (range 61–84). All patients underwent DEXA scanning of their fusion mass. Fusion rate was assessed at the 2 year follow-up using thin slice CT scanning. DC electrical stimulation did not improve fusion mass bone quality. Smokers had lower fusion mass BMD (0.447 g/cm2) compared to non-smokers (0.517 g/cm2) (P = 0.086). Women had lower fusion mass BMD (0.460 g/cm2) compared to men (0.552 g/cm2) (P = 0.057). Using linear regression, fusion mass bone quality, measured as BMD, was significantly influenced by gender, age of the patient, bone density of the remaining part of the lumbar spine, amount of bone graft applied and smoking. Fusion rates in this cohort was 34% in the control group and 33 and 43% in the 40 and 100 μA groups, respectively (not significant). Patients classified as fused after 2 years had significant higher fusion mass BMD at 1 year (0.592 vs. 0.466 g/cm2, P = 0.0001). Fusion mass bone quality in older patients depends on several factors. Special attention should be given to women with manifest or borderline osteoporosis. Furthermore, bone graft materials with inductive potential might be considered for this patient population. PMID:20429017

  11. Hydroxyapatite crystallinity does not affect the repair of critical size bone defects

    PubMed Central

    CONZ, Marcio Baltazar; GRANJEIRO, José Mauro; SOARES, Gloria de Almeida

    2011-01-01

    Objective The physicochemical properties of hydroxyapatite (HA) granules were observed to affect the biological behavior of graft materials. The aim of this work was to analyze the tissue response of two HA granules with different crystallinity and Ca/P ratio in vivo. Material and Methods The HA granules were produced in the Biomaterials Laboratory (COPPE/UFRJ). The testing materials were HA granules presenting a Ca/P molar ratio of 1.60 and 28% crystallinity (HA-1), and a Ca/P molar ratio of 1.67 and 70% crystallinity (HA-2). Both HAs were implanted into a critical-size calvaria rat defects. Results To note, in the control group, the bone defects were filled with blood clot only. Descriptive and histomorphometric analyses after 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively showed mild inflammatory infiltrate, mainly comprising macrophage-like and multinucleated giant cells, and an increase in the volume density of the fibrous tissues (p<0.05), which was in contrast to the similar volume density of the newly formed bone and biomaterials in relation to the control group. Conclusion Thus, we concluded that HA-1 and HA-2 are biocompatible and non-degradable, and that crystallinity does not affect bone repair of critical size defects. PMID:21655775

  12. Enzalutamide Reduces the Bone Mass in the Axial But Not the Appendicular Skeleton in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianyao; Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Börjesson, Anna E; Lagerquist, Marie K; Sjögren, Klara; Windahl, Sara H; Koskela, Antti; Grahnemo, Louise; Islander, Ulrika; Wilhelmson, Anna S; Tivesten, Åsa; Tuukkanen, Juha; Ohlsson, Claes

    2016-02-01

    Testosterone is a crucial regulator of the skeleton, but the role of the androgen receptor (AR) for the maintenance of the adult male skeleton is unclear. In the present study, the role of the AR for bone metabolism and skeletal growth after sexual maturation was evaluated by means of the drug enzalutamide, which is a new AR antagonist used in the treatment of prostate cancer patients. Nine-week-old male mice were treated with 10, 30, or 100 mg/kg·d of enzalutamide for 21 days or were surgically castrated and were compared with vehicle-treated gonadal intact mice. Although orchidectomy reduced the cortical bone thickness and trabecular bone volume fraction in the appendicular skeleton, these parameters were unaffected by enzalutamide. In contrast, both enzalutamide and orchidectomy reduced the bone mass in the axial skeleton as demonstrated by a reduced lumbar spine areal bone mineral density (P < .001) and trabecular bone volume fraction in L5 vertebrae (P < .001) compared with vehicle-treated gonadal intact mice. A compression test of the L5 vertebrae revealed that the mechanical strength in the axial skeleton was significantly reduced by enzalutamide (maximal load at failure -15.3% ± 3.5%; P < .01). The effects of enzalutamide in the axial skeleton were associated with a high bone turnover. In conclusion, enzalutamide reduces the bone mass in the axial but not the appendicular skeleton in male mice after sexual maturation. We propose that the effect of testosterone on the axial skeleton in male mice is mainly mediated via the AR. PMID:26587782

  13. Effects of conjugated linoleic acid and exercise on bone mass in young male Balb/C mice.

    PubMed

    Banu, Jameela; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Rahman, Mizanur; O'Shea, Marianne; Fernandes, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    There is an increase in obesity among the population of industrialized countries, and dietary supplementation with Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) has been reported to lower body fat mass. However, weight loss is generally associated with negative effects on bone mass, but CLA is reported to have beneficial effects on bone. Furthermore, another factor that is well established to have a beneficial effect on bone is exercise (EX). However, a combination therapy of CLA and EX on bone health has not been studied. In this paper, we report the beneficial effects of CLA and EX on bone, in four different groups of Balb-C young, male mice. There were 4 groups in our study: 1. Safflower oil (SFO) sedentary (SED); 2. SFO EX; 3. CLA SED; 4. CLA EX. Two months old mice, under their respective treatment regimens were followed for 14 weeks. Mice were scanned in vivo using a DEXA scanner before and after treatment. At the end of the treatment period, the animals were sacrificed, the left tibia was removed and scanned using peripheral quantitative computerized tomography (pQCT). The results showed that although CLA decreased gain in body weight by 35%, it however increased bone mass by both reducing bone resorption and increasing bone formation. EX also decreased gain in body weight by 21% and increased bone mass; but a combination of CLA and EX, however, did not show any further increase in bone mass. In conclusion, CLA increases bone mass in both cancellous and cortical bones, and the effects of CLA on bone is not further improved by EX in pure cortical bone of young male mice. PMID:16556311

  14. Zebrafish Bone and General Physiology Are Differently Affected by Hormones or Changes in Gravity

    PubMed Central

    Aceto, Jessica; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Marée, Raphael; Dardenne, Nadia; Jeanray, Nathalie; Wehenkel, Louis; Aleström, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Teleost fish such as zebrafish (Danio rerio) are increasingly used for physiological, genetic and developmental studies. Our understanding of the physiological consequences of altered gravity in an entire organism is still incomplete. We used altered gravity and drug treatment experiments to evaluate their effects specifically on bone formation and more generally on whole genome gene expression. By combining morphometric tools with an objective scoring system for the state of development for each element in the head skeleton and specific gene expression analysis, we confirmed and characterized in detail the decrease or increase of bone formation caused by a 5 day treatment (from 5dpf to 10 dpf) of, respectively parathyroid hormone (PTH) or vitamin D3 (VitD3). Microarray transcriptome analysis after 24 hours treatment reveals a general effect on physiology upon VitD3 treatment, while PTH causes more specifically developmental effects. Hypergravity (3g from 5dpf to 9 dpf) exposure results in a significantly larger head and a significant increase in bone formation for a subset of the cranial bones. Gene expression analysis after 24 hrs at 3g revealed differential expression of genes involved in the development and function of the skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine and cardiovascular systems. Finally, we propose a novel type of experimental approach, the "Reduced Gravity Paradigm", by keeping the developing larvae at 3g hypergravity for the first 5 days before returning them to 1g for one additional day. 5 days exposure to 3g during these early stages also caused increased bone formation, while gene expression analysis revealed a central network of regulatory genes (hes5, sox10, lgals3bp, egr1, edn1, fos, fosb, klf2, gadd45ba and socs3a) whose expression was consistently affected by the transition from hyper- to normal gravity. PMID:26061167

  15. Zebrafish Bone and General Physiology Are Differently Affected by Hormones or Changes in Gravity.

    PubMed

    Aceto, Jessica; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Marée, Raphael; Dardenne, Nadia; Jeanray, Nathalie; Wehenkel, Louis; Aleström, Peter; van Loon, Jack J W A; Muller, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Teleost fish such as zebrafish (Danio rerio) are increasingly used for physiological, genetic and developmental studies. Our understanding of the physiological consequences of altered gravity in an entire organism is still incomplete. We used altered gravity and drug treatment experiments to evaluate their effects specifically on bone formation and more generally on whole genome gene expression. By combining morphometric tools with an objective scoring system for the state of development for each element in the head skeleton and specific gene expression analysis, we confirmed and characterized in detail the decrease or increase of bone formation caused by a 5 day treatment (from 5dpf to 10 dpf) of, respectively parathyroid hormone (PTH) or vitamin D3 (VitD3). Microarray transcriptome analysis after 24 hours treatment reveals a general effect on physiology upon VitD3 treatment, while PTH causes more specifically developmental effects. Hypergravity (3g from 5dpf to 9 dpf) exposure results in a significantly larger head and a significant increase in bone formation for a subset of the cranial bones. Gene expression analysis after 24 hrs at 3g revealed differential expression of genes involved in the development and function of the skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine and cardiovascular systems. Finally, we propose a novel type of experimental approach, the "Reduced Gravity Paradigm", by keeping the developing larvae at 3g hypergravity for the first 5 days before returning them to 1g for one additional day. 5 days exposure to 3g during these early stages also caused increased bone formation, while gene expression analysis revealed a central network of regulatory genes (hes5, sox10, lgals3bp, egr1, edn1, fos, fosb, klf2, gadd45ba and socs3a) whose expression was consistently affected by the transition from hyper- to normal gravity. PMID:26061167

  16. Bone density and anisotropy affect periprosthetic cement and bone stresses after anatomical glenoid replacement: A micro finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Yan; Santos, Inês; Müller, Peter E; Pietschmann, Matthias F

    2016-06-14

    Glenoid loosening is still a main complication for shoulder arthroplasty. We hypothesize that cement and bone stresses potentially leading to fixation failure are related not only to glenohumeral conformity, fixation design or eccentric loading, but also to bone volume fraction, cortical thickness and degree of anisotropy in the glenoid. In this study, periprosthetic bone and cement stresses were computed with micro finite element models of the replaced glenoid depicting realistic bone microstructure. These models were used to quantify potential effects of bone microstructural parameters under loading conditions simulating different levels of glenohumeral conformity and eccentric loading simulating glenohumeral instability. Results show that peak cement stresses were achieved near the cement-bone interface in all loading schemes. Higher stresses within trabecular bone tissue and cement mantle were obtained within specimens of lower bone volume fraction and in regions of low anisotropy, increasing with decreasing glenohumeral conformity and reaching their maxima below the keeled design when the load is shifted superiorly. Our analyses confirm the combined influences of eccentric load shifts with reduced bone volume fraction and anisotropy on increasing periprosthetic stresses. They finally suggest that improving fixation of glenoid replacements must reduce internal cement and bone tissue stresses, in particular in glenoids of low bone density and heterogeneity. PMID:27087675

  17. Impact of denosumab on bone mass in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Brown-Glaberman, Ursa; Stopeck, Alison T

    2013-01-01

    Cancer therapy-induced bone loss (CTIBL) is a form of secondary osteoporosis associated with systemic chemotherapy and hormonal ablation therapy. The monitoring and treatment of CTIBL is an important component of comprehensive cancer care, especially for patients with curable disease and long life expectancies. Whereas oral bisphosphonates remain the most commonly used therapeutic option for CTIBL, additional treatment options may be required for patients who do not respond adequately or are intolerant to bisphosphonates, have renal insufficiency, or are receiving treatment with nephrotoxic medications. For these patients, denosumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), offers an effective and well-tolerated alternative. Several recent randomized trials have examined the use of denosumab as treatment for CTIBL associated with hormone ablation therapy for breast and prostate cancer. Recent data suggest a possible role for RANKL inhibitors in both chemoprevention and the prevention of cancer recurrence through direct effects on breast tissue and breast cancer stem cells. The outcomes of several international Phase III clinical trials currently underway will help clarify the role of denosumab in patients undergoing cancer therapy. PMID:23861604

  18. Calibration of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for quantitative measurements of lead in bone.

    PubMed

    Bellis, David J; Hetter, Katherine M; Jones, Joseph; Amarasiriwardena, Dula; Parsons, Patrick J

    2006-01-01

    Lead accumulates in bone over many years or decades. Accordingly, the study of lead in bone is important in determining the fate of ingested lead, the potential for remobilization, and for the application of bone lead measurements as a biomarker of lead exposure. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to measure the spatial distribution of lead in bone on the micrometer scale. In general, LA-ICP-MS studies are somewhat limited by the lack of matrix-matched standards and/or reference materials for calibration and validation purposes. Here we describe the application of pressed pellets prepared from New York State Department of Health candidate Reference Materials for Lead in Bone (levels 1 through 4), to provide a linear calibration for (208)Pb/(43)Ca in the concentration range <1 to 30 μg g(-1). The limit of detection was estimated as 0.2 μg g(-1). The measured lead values for pelletized NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal and SRM 1400 Bone Ash were in good agreement with certified reference values. Using this approach, we quantitatively measured the spatial distribution of lead in a cross-section of goat metacarpal from a lead-dosed animal. The lead content was spatially variable in the range of 2 to 30 μg g(-1) with a complex distribution. In some sections, lead appeared to be enriched in the center of the bone relative to peripheral areas, indicating preferential accumulation in trabecular (spongy) rather than cortical bone. In addition, there were discrete areas of lead enrichment, or hot spots, of 100 to 200 μm in width. PMID:22833692

  19. Calibration of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for quantitative measurements of lead in bone

    PubMed Central

    Bellis, David J.; Hetter, Katherine M.; Jones, Joseph; Amarasiriwardena, Dula

    2012-01-01

    Summary Lead accumulates in bone over many years or decades. Accordingly, the study of lead in bone is important in determining the fate of ingested lead, the potential for remobilization, and for the application of bone lead measurements as a biomarker of lead exposure. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to measure the spatial distribution of lead in bone on the micrometer scale. In general, LA-ICP-MS studies are somewhat limited by the lack of matrix-matched standards and/or reference materials for calibration and validation purposes. Here we describe the application of pressed pellets prepared from New York State Department of Health candidate Reference Materials for Lead in Bone (levels 1 through 4), to provide a linear calibration for 208Pb/43Ca in the concentration range <1 to 30 μg g−1. The limit of detection was estimated as 0.2 μg g−1. The measured lead values for pelletized NIST SRM 1486 Bone Meal and SRM 1400 Bone Ash were in good agreement with certified reference values. Using this approach, we quantitatively measured the spatial distribution of lead in a cross-section of goat metacarpal from a lead-dosed animal. The lead content was spatially variable in the range of 2 to 30 μg g−1 with a complex distribution. In some sections, lead appeared to be enriched in the center of the bone relative to peripheral areas, indicating preferential accumulation in trabecular (spongy) rather than cortical bone. In addition, there were discrete areas of lead enrichment, or hot spots, of 100 to 200 μm in width. PMID:22833692

  20. Bone Density

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone health. It compares your bone density, or mass, to that of a healthy person who is ... Whether your osteoporosis treatment is working Low bone mass that is not low enough to be osteoporosis ...

  1. Adolescence: How do we increase intestinal calcium absorption to allow for bone mineral mass accumulation?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An increase in calcium absorptive efficiency (fractional absorption of dietary calcium) during adolescence is associated with a rapid increase in total body bone mineral mass (BMM) accumulation. This increase occurs across a range of calcium intakes. It appears to be principally mediated by hormonal...

  2. 42 CFR 410.31 - Bone mass measurement: Conditions for coverage and frequency standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... by the FDA under 21 CFR part 807, or approved for marketing by the FDA for this use under 21 CFR part... the use of a dual energy x-ray absorptiometry system (axial skeleton). (3) Medicare covers a medically... bone mass measurement is performed by a dual energy x-ray absorptiometry system (axial skeleton)...

  3. 42 CFR 410.31 - Bone mass measurement: Conditions for coverage and frequency standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... by the FDA under 21 CFR part 807, or approved for marketing by the FDA for this use under 21 CFR part... the use of a dual energy x-ray absorptiometry system (axial skeleton). (3) Medicare covers a medically... bone mass measurement is performed by a dual energy x-ray absorptiometry system (axial skeleton)...

  4. 42 CFR 410.31 - Bone mass measurement: Conditions for coverage and frequency standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... by the FDA under 21 CFR part 807, or approved for marketing by the FDA for this use under 21 CFR part... the use of a dual energy x-ray absorptiometry system (axial skeleton). (3) Medicare covers a medically... bone mass measurement is performed bya dual energy x-ray absorptiometry system (axial skeleton)...

  5. 42 CFR 410.31 - Bone mass measurement: Conditions for coverage and frequency standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... by the FDA under 21 CFR part 807, or approved for marketing by the FDA for this use under 21 CFR part... the use of a dual energy x-ray absorptiometry system (axial skeleton). (3) Medicare covers a medically... bone mass measurement is performed by a dual energy x-ray absorptiometry system (axial skeleton)...

  6. 42 CFR 410.31 - Bone mass measurement: Conditions for coverage and frequency standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... by the FDA under 21 CFR part 807, or approved for marketing by the FDA for this use under 21 CFR part... the use of a dual energy x-ray absorptiometry system (axial skeleton). (3) Medicare covers a medically... bone mass measurement is performed bya dual energy x-ray absorptiometry system (axial skeleton)...

  7. The novel bisphosphonate disodium dihydrogen-4-[(methylthio) phenylthio] methanebisphosphonate increases bone mass in post-ovariectomy rats.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Aiko; Chiba, Mirei; Ota, Takeru; Yasuda, Mayumi; Suzuki, Keiko; Kanemitsu, Takuya; Itoh, Takashi; Shinoda, Hisashi; Igarashi, Kaoru

    2016-05-01

    The novel bisphosphonate (BP) disodium dihydrogen-4-[(methylthio) phenylthio] methanebisphosphonate (MPMBP) is a non-nitrogen-containing BP with an antioxidant side chain that possesses anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated the systemic effects of this compound on bone loss induced by ovariectomy (OVX) in adult rats. Micro-computed tomography revealed that MPMBP increased bone mass and density in both the metaphysis and diaphysis, and improved the structural properties important for mechanical strength of osteoporotic bone. Sequential bone labeling with tetracycline and calcein indicated that MPMBP decreased longitudinal growth of the primary spongiosa (PS), but stimulated cortical bone formation in the diaphysis. MPMBP increased type I collagen accumulation in the PS, and decreased the number and size of adipocytes in the bone marrow, suggesting inhibition of increased bone marrow adipogenesis induced by OVX. Furthermore, MPMBP reduced the number of bone resorbing cathepsin K-positive osteoclasts induced by OVX. These results suggest that MPMBP could improve bone loss induced by estrogen deficiency. Both stimulation of bone formation and inhibition of bone resorption might play a role in the increase in bone mass and bone density after MPMBP treatment. PMID:27245552

  8. Disruption of Lrp4 function by genetic deletion or pharmacological blockade increases bone mass and serum sclerostin levels

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ming-Kang; Kramer, Ina; Huber, Thomas; Kinzel, Bernd; Guth-Gundel, Sabine; Leupin, Olivier; Kneissel, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    We identified previously in vitro LRP4 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4) as a facilitator of the WNT (Wingless-type) antagonist sclerostin and found mutations disrupting this function to be associated with high bone mass in humans similar to patients lacking sclerostin. To further delineate the role of LRP4 in bone in vivo, we generated mice lacking Lrp4 in osteoblasts/osteocytes or osteocytes only. Lrp4 deficiency promoted progressive cancellous and cortical bone gain in both mutants, although more pronouncedly in mice deficient in osteoblast/osteocyte Lrp4, consistent with our observation in human bone that LRP4 is most strongly expressed by osteoblasts and early osteocytes. Bone gain was related primarily to increased bone formation. Interestingly, Lrp4 deficiency in bone dramatically elevated serum sclerostin levels whereas bone expression of Sost encoding for sclerostin was unaltered, indicating that osteoblastic Lrp4 retains sclerostin within bone. Moreover, we generated anti-LRP4 antibodies selectively blocking sclerostin facilitator function while leaving unperturbed LRP4–agrin interaction, which is essential for neuromuscular junction function. These antibodies increased bone formation and thus cancellous and cortical bone mass in skeletally mature rodents. Together, we demonstrate a pivotal role of LRP4 in bone homeostasis by retaining and facilitating sclerostin action locally and provide a novel avenue to bone anabolic therapy by antagonizing LRP4 sclerostin facilitator function. PMID:25404300

  9. Experiment K305: Quantitative analysis of selected bone parameters. Supplement 2: Bone elongation rate and bone mass in metaphysis of long bones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, W. S. S.; Kimmel, D. B.; Smith, C.; Dell, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    The proximal humeral metaphysis of rats from time periods recovery plus zero days (R+0), recovery plus six days (R+6), and recovery plus twenty nine days (R+29) was analyzed. The volume of calcified cartilage and bone in flight and synchronous controls was reduced in groups R+0 and R+6, but was normal in group R+29. The number of functional bone cells (osteoblasts and osteoclasts) was decreased in proportion to the amount of bone in the early groups, and was normal in the last group. The fatty marrow volume was increased only in flight animals of groups R+0 and R+6, but was normal in the R+29 group. Accumulation of excess fatty marrow was seen only in flight animals. The decreased amount of bone and calcified cartilage is believed to be the result of a temporarily slowed or arrested production of calcified cartilage as a substrate for bone formation. This would have resulted from slowed bone elongation during flight and synchronous control conditions. Bone elongation returned to normal by twenty nine days after return.

  10. Effect of body mass in children with hematologic malignancies undergoing allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Aplenc, Richard; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Sung, Lillian; Zhu, Xiaochun; Ho, Vincent T.; Cooke, Kenneth; Dvorak, Christopher; Hale, Gregory; Isola, Luis M.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Olsson, Richard; Pulsipher, Michael; Bunin, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    The rising incidence of pediatric obesity may significantly affect bone marrow transplantation (BMT) outcomes. We analyzed outcomes in 3687 children worldwide who received cyclophosphamide-based BMT regimens for leukemias between 1990 and 2007. Recipients were classified according to age-adjusted body mass index (BMI) percentiles as underweight (UW), at risk of UW (RUW), normal, overweight (OW), or obese (OB). Median age and race were similar in all groups. Sixty-one percent of OB children were from the United States/Canada. Three-year relapse-free and overall survival ranged from 48% to 52% (P = .54) and 55% to 58% (P = .81) across BMI groups. Three-year leukemia relapses were 33%, 33%, 29%, 25%, and 21% in the UW, RUW, normal, OW, and OB groups, respectively (P < .001). Corresponding cumulative incidences for transplant-related mortality (TRM) were 18%, 19%, 21%, 22%, and 28% (P < .01). Multivariate analysis demonstrated a decreased risk of relapse compared with normal BMI (relative risk [RR] = 0.73; P < .01) and a trend toward higher TRM (RR = 1.28; P = .014). BMI in children is not significantly associated with different survival after BMT for hematologic malignancies. Obese children experience less relapse posttransplant compared with children with normal BMI; however, this benefit is offset by excess in TRM. PMID:24711663

  11. FIAT represses ATF4-mediated transcription to regulate bone mass in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Vionnie W C; Ambartsoumian, Gourgen; Verlinden, Lieve; Moir, Janet M; Prud'homme, Josée; Gauthier, Claude; Roughley, Peter J; St-Arnaud, René

    2005-05-23

    We report the characterization of factor inhibiting activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4)-mediated transcription (FIAT), a leucine zipper nuclear protein. FIAT interacted with ATF4 to inhibit binding of ATF4 to DNA and block ATF4-mediated transcription of the osteocalcin gene in vitro. Transgenic mice overexpressing FIAT in osteoblasts also had reduced osteocalcin gene expression and decreased bone mineral density, bone volume, mineralized volume, trabecular thickness, trabecular number, and decreased rigidity of long bones. Mineral homeostasis, osteoclast number and activity, and osteoblast proliferation and apoptosis were unchanged in transgenics. Expression of osteoblastic differentiation markers was largely unaffected and type I collagen synthesis was unchanged. Mineral apposition rate was reduced in transgenic mice, suggesting that the lowered bone mass was due to a decline in osteoblast activity. This cell-autonomous decrease in osteoblast activity was confirmed by measuring reduced alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization in primary osteoblast cultures. These results show that FIAT regulates bone mass accrual and establish FIAT as a novel transcriptional regulator of osteoblastic function. PMID:15911876

  12. Prostaglandin E2 Increased Rat Cortical Bone Mass When Administered Immediately Following Ovariectomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ke, Hua Zhu; Jee, Webster S.S.; Zeng, Qing Qiang; Li, Mei; Lin, Bai Yun

    1993-01-01

    cavity to increase total bone mass in the tibial shaft of OVX rats when given immediately following ovafiectomy.

  13. Female Mice Lacking Estrogen Receptor-α in Hypothalamic Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) Neurons Display Enhanced Estrogenic Response on Cortical Bone Mass

    PubMed Central

    Farman, H. H.; Windahl, S. H.; Westberg, L.; Isaksson, H.; Egecioglu, E.; Schele, E.; Ryberg, H.; Jansson, J. O.; Tuukkanen, J.; Koskela, A.; Xie, S. K.; Hahner, L.; Zehr, J.; Clegg, D. J.; Lagerquist, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens are important regulators of bone mass and their effects are mainly mediated via estrogen receptor (ER)α. Central ERα exerts an inhibitory role on bone mass. ERα is highly expressed in the arcuate (ARC) and the ventromedial (VMN) nuclei in the hypothalamus. To test whether ERα in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, located in ARC, is involved in the regulation of bone mass, we used mice lacking ERα expression specifically in POMC neurons (POMC-ERα−/−). Female POMC-ERα−/− and control mice were ovariectomized (OVX) and treated with vehicle or estradiol (0.5 μg/d) for 6 weeks. As expected, estradiol treatment increased the cortical bone thickness in femur, the cortical bone mechanical strength in tibia and the trabecular bone volume fraction in both femur and vertebrae in OVX control mice. Importantly, the estrogenic responses were substantially increased in OVX POMC-ERα−/− mice compared with the estrogenic responses in OVX control mice for cortical bone thickness (+126 ± 34%, P < .01) and mechanical strength (+193 ± 38%, P < .01). To test whether ERα in VMN is involved in the regulation of bone mass, ERα was silenced using an adeno-associated viral vector. Silencing of ERα in hypothalamic VMN resulted in unchanged bone mass. In conclusion, mice lacking ERα in POMC neurons display enhanced estrogenic response on cortical bone mass and mechanical strength. We propose that the balance between inhibitory effects of central ERα activity in hypothalamic POMC neurons in ARC and stimulatory peripheral ERα-mediated effects in bone determines cortical bone mass in female mice. PMID:27254004

  14. Female Mice Lacking Estrogen Receptor-α in Hypothalamic Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) Neurons Display Enhanced Estrogenic Response on Cortical Bone Mass.

    PubMed

    Farman, H H; Windahl, S H; Westberg, L; Isaksson, H; Egecioglu, E; Schele, E; Ryberg, H; Jansson, J O; Tuukkanen, J; Koskela, A; Xie, S K; Hahner, L; Zehr, J; Clegg, D J; Lagerquist, M K; Ohlsson, C

    2016-08-01

    Estrogens are important regulators of bone mass and their effects are mainly mediated via estrogen receptor (ER)α. Central ERα exerts an inhibitory role on bone mass. ERα is highly expressed in the arcuate (ARC) and the ventromedial (VMN) nuclei in the hypothalamus. To test whether ERα in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, located in ARC, is involved in the regulation of bone mass, we used mice lacking ERα expression specifically in POMC neurons (POMC-ERα(-/-)). Female POMC-ERα(-/-) and control mice were ovariectomized (OVX) and treated with vehicle or estradiol (0.5 μg/d) for 6 weeks. As expected, estradiol treatment increased the cortical bone thickness in femur, the cortical bone mechanical strength in tibia and the trabecular bone volume fraction in both femur and vertebrae in OVX control mice. Importantly, the estrogenic responses were substantially increased in OVX POMC-ERα(-/-) mice compared with the estrogenic responses in OVX control mice for cortical bone thickness (+126 ± 34%, P < .01) and mechanical strength (+193 ± 38%, P < .01). To test whether ERα in VMN is involved in the regulation of bone mass, ERα was silenced using an adeno-associated viral vector. Silencing of ERα in hypothalamic VMN resulted in unchanged bone mass. In conclusion, mice lacking ERα in POMC neurons display enhanced estrogenic response on cortical bone mass and mechanical strength. We propose that the balance between inhibitory effects of central ERα activity in hypothalamic POMC neurons in ARC and stimulatory peripheral ERα-mediated effects in bone determines cortical bone mass in female mice. PMID:27254004

  15. High vitamin D3 diet administered during active colitis negatively affects bone metabolism in an adoptive T cell transfer model

    PubMed Central

    Larmonier, C. B.; McFadden, R.-M. T.; Hill, F. M.; Schreiner, R.; Ramalingam, R.; Besselsen, D. G.; Ghishan, F. K.

    2013-01-01

    Decreased bone mineral density (BMD) represents an extraintestinal complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Vitamin D3 has been considered a viable adjunctive therapy in IBD. However, vitamin D3 plays a pleiotropic role in bone modeling and regulates the bone formation-resorption balance, depending on the physiological environment, and supplementation during active IBD may have unintended consequences. We evaluated the effects of vitamin D3 supplementation during the active phase of disease on colonic inflammation, BMD, and bone metabolism in an adoptive IL-10−/− CD4+ T cell transfer model of chronic colitis. High-dose vitamin D3 supplementation for 12 days during established disease had negligible effects on mucosal inflammation. Plasma vitamin D3 metabolites correlated with diet, but not disease, status. Colitis significantly reduced BMD. High-dose vitamin D3 supplementation did not affect cortical bone but led to a further deterioration of trabecular bone morphology. In mice fed a high vitamin D3 diet, colitis more severely impacted bone formation markers (osteocalcin and bone alkaline phosphatase) and increased bone resorption markers, ratio of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand to osteoprotegrin transcript, plasma osteoprotegrin level, and the osteoclast activation marker tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (ACp5). Bone vitamin D receptor expression was increased in mice with chronic colitis, especially in the high vitamin D3 group. Our data suggest that vitamin D3, at a dose that does not improve inflammation, has no beneficial effects on bone metabolism and density during active colitis or may adversely affect BMD and bone turnover. These observations should be taken into consideration in the planning of further clinical studies with high-dose vitamin D3 supplementation in patients with active IBD. PMID:23639807

  16. Effects of denosumab on bone density, mass and strength in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Denosumab is a human monoclonal antibody which specifically blocks receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand and is a very potent antiresorptive drug. Its efficacy in reducing the risk of vertebral, hip and nonskeletal fracture has been proven in a large prospective, randomized multicenter study of 7808 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis [Fracture Reduction Evaluation of Denosumab in Osteoporosis Every 6 Months (FREEDOM) trial]. Denosumab causes somewhat greater increases in bone mineral density (BMD) than the class of bisphosphonate antiresorptives. Denosumab also causes an increase in bone mass and bone strength in the spine, ultradistal and diaphysis of the radius, proximal tibia and the hip. Recently long-term treatment with denosumab has been shown to cause a continued almost linear increase in total hip and femoral neck BMD beyond 3 years up to 8 years. In this respect, denosumab seems to differ from the bisphosphonate group in which the rate of improvement of BMD diminishes and for some drugs becomes negative after 3–4 years when the process of secondary mineralization flattens out. This unique property of an antiresorptive drug points towards mechanisms of action which differ from the bisphosphonate group. Both types of antiresorptives decrease cortical porosity but contrary to bisphosphonates the reduction in cortical porosity continues with denosumab which, in addition, also seems to cause a slight continuous modeling-based formation of new bone despite suppression of bone remodeling. The net effect is an increase in cortical thickening and bone mass, and increased strength of cortical bone. This may contribute substantially to the significant further reduction of the nonvertebral fracture risk which was found in the long-term denosumab arm of the FREEDOM extension trial during years 4–7. PMID:26029270

  17. Losartan increases bone mass and accelerates chondrocyte hypertrophy in developing skeleton.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shan; Grover, Monica; Sibai, Tarek; Black, Jennifer; Rianon, Nahid; Rajagopal, Abbhirami; Munivez, Elda; Bertin, Terry; Dawson, Brian; Chen, Yuqing; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Lee, Brendan; Yang, Tao; Bae, Yangjin

    2015-05-01

    Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are a group of anti-hypertensive drugs that are widely used to treat pediatric hypertension. Recent application of ARBs to treat diseases such as Marfan syndrome or Alport syndrome has shown positive outcomes in animal and human studies, suggesting a broader therapeutic potential for this class of drugs. Multiple studies have reported a benefit of ARBs on adult bone homeostasis; however, its effect on the growing skeleton in children is unknown. We investigated the effect of Losartan, an ARB, in regulating bone mass and cartilage during development in mice. Wild type mice were treated with Losartan from birth until 6 weeks of age, after which bones were collected for microCT and histomorphometric analyses. Losartan increased trabecular bone volume vs. tissue volume (a 98% increase) and cortical thickness (a 9% increase) in 6-weeks old wild type mice. The bone changes were attributed to decreased osteoclastogenesis as demonstrated by reduced osteoclast number per bone surface in vivo and suppressed osteoclast differentiation in vitro. At the molecular level, Angiotensin II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in RAW cells was attenuated by Losartan. Similarly, RANKL-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation was suppressed by Losartan, suggesting a convergence of RANKL and angiotensin signaling at the level of ERK1/2 regulation. To assess the effect of Losartan on cartilage development, we examined the cartilage phenotype of wild type mice treated with Losartan in utero from conception to 1 day of age. Growth plates of these mice showed an elongated hypertrophic chondrocyte zone and increased Col10a1 expression level, with minimal changes in chondrocyte proliferation. Altogether, inhibition of the angiotensin pathway by Losartan increases bone mass and accelerates chondrocyte hypertrophy in growth plate during skeletal development. PMID:25779879

  18. Losartan increases bone mass and accelerates chondrocyte hypertrophy in developing skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Rianon, Nahid; Rajagopal, Abbhirami; Munivez, Elda; Bertin, Terry; Dawson, Brian; Chen, Yuqing; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Lee, Brendan; Yang, Tao; Bae, Yangjin

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are a group of anti-hypertensive drugs that are widely used to treat pediatric hypertension. Recent application of ARBs to treat diseases such as Marfan syndrome or Alport syndrome has shown positive outcomes in animal and human studies, suggesting a broader therapeutic potential for this class of drugs. Multiple studies have reported a benefit of ARBs on adult bone homeostasis; however, its effect on the growing skeleton in children is unknown. We investigated the effect of Losartan, an ARB, in regulating bone mass and cartilage during development in mice. Wild type mice were treated with Losartan from birth until 6 weeks of age, after which bones were collected for microCT and histomorphometric analyses. Losartan increased trabecular bone volume vs. tissue volume (a 98% increase) and cortical thickness (a 9% increase) in 6-weeks old wild type mice. The bone changes were attributed to decreased osteoclastogenesis as demonstrated by reduced osteoclast number per bone surface in vivo and suppressed osteoclast differentiation in vitro. At the molecular level, Angiotensin II-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in RAW cells was attenuated by Losartan. Similarly, RANKL-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation was suppressed by Losartan, suggesting a convergence of RANKL and angiotensin signaling at the level of ERK1/2 regulation. To assess the effect of Losartan on cartilage development, we examined the cartilage phenotype of wild type mice treated with Losartan in utero from conception to 1 day of age. Growth plates of these mice showed an elongated hypertrophic chondrocyte zone and increased Col10a1 expression level, with minimal changes in chondrocyte proliferation. Altogether, inhibition of the angiotensin pathway by Losartan increases bone mass and accelerates chondrocyte hypertrophy in growth plate during skeletal development. PMID:25779879

  19. Panoramic Measures for Oral Bone Mass in Detecting Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Calciolari, E.; Donos, N.; Park, J.C.; Petrie, A.; Mardas, N.

    2015-01-01

    Different quantitative and qualitative indices calculated on oral panoramic radiographs have been proposed as useful tools to screen for reduced skeletal bone mineral density (BMD). Our aim was to systematically review the literature on linear and qualitative panoramic measures and to assess the accuracy of these indices by performing a meta-analysis of their sensitivity and specificity. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement was followed. Fifty studies were included in the qualitative appraisal and 19 were considered for meta-analysis. The methodological quality of the retrieved studies, assessed with the QUADAS-2 tool, was on average low. Three indices were reported by most of the studies: mandibular cortical width, panoramic mandibular index, and the Klemetti index. Mandibular cortical width presented with a better accuracy in excluding osteopenia/osteoporosis (specificity), since patients with a cortical width more than 4 mm had a normal BMD in 90% of the cases. Almost all studies used a cutoff of 0.3 for the panoramic mandibular index, resulting in an estimated sensitivity and specificity in detecting reduced BMD, respectively, of 0.723 (SE 0.160; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.352–0.926) and 0.733 (SE 0.066; 95% CI, 0.587–0.841). The presence of any kind of mandibular cortical erosion gave an estimated sensitivity and specificity in detecting reduced BMD, respectively, of 0.789 (SE 0.031; 95% CI, 0.721–0.843) and 0.562 (SE 0.047; 95% CI, 0.47–0.651) and a sensitivity and specificity in detecting osteoporosis, respectively, of 0.806 (SE 0.105; 95% CI, 0.528–0.9200) and 0.643 (SE 0.109; 95% CI, 0.417–0.820). The mandibular cortical width, panoramic mandibular index, and Klemetti index are overall useful tools that potentially could be used by dentists to screen for low BMD. Their limitations are mainly related to the experience/agreement between different operators and the different image quality

  20. The Relationship of Fat Distribution and Insulin Resistance with Lumbar Spine Bone Mass in Women

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Francisco J. A.; de Araújo, Iana M.; Carvalho, Adriana L.; Elias, Jorge; Salmon, Carlos E. G.; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H.

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow harbors a significant amount of body adipose tissue (BMAT). While BMAT might be a source of energy for bone modeling and remodeling, its increment can also represent impairment of osteoblast differentiation. The relationship between BMAT, bone mass and insulin sensitivity is only partially understood and seems to depend on the circumstances. The present study was designed to assess the association of BMAT with bone mineral density in the lumbar spine as well as with visceral adipose tissue, intrahepatic lipids, HOMA-IR, and serum levels of insulin and glucose. This cross-sectional clinical investigation included 31 non-diabetic women, but 11 had a pre-diabetes status. Dual X-ray energy absorptiometry was used to measure bone mineral density and magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess fat deposition in BMAT, visceral adipose tissue and liver. Our results suggest that in non-diabetic, there is an inverse relationship between bone mineral density in lumbar spine and BMAT and a trend persists after adjustment for weight, age, BMI and height. While there is a positive association between visceral adipose tissue and intrahepatic lipids with serum insulin levels, there is no association between BMAT and serum levels of insulin. Conversely, a positive relationship was observed between BMAT and serum glucose levels, whereas this association was not observed with other fat deposits. These relationships did not apply after adjustment for body weight, BMI, height and age. The present study shows that in a group of predominantly non-obese women the association between insulin resistance and BMAT is not an early event, as occurs with visceral adipose tissue and intrahepatic lipids. On the other hand, BMAT has a negative relationship with bone mineral density. Taken together, the results support the view that bone has a complex and non-linear relationship with energy metabolism. PMID:26067489

  1. Kinin B1 Receptor Deletion Affects Bone Healing in Type 1 Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Cignachi, Natália P; Pesquero, João B; Oliveira, Rogério B; Etges, Adriana; Campos, Maria M

    2015-12-01

    The effects of kinin B1 receptor (B1 R) deletion were examined on femur bone regeneration in streptozotocin (STZ)-type 1 diabetes. Diabetes induction in wild-type C57/BL6 (WTC57BL6) mice led to decrease in body weight and hyperglycemia, compared to the non-diabetic group of the same strain. The lack of B1 R did not affect STZ-elicited body weight loss, but partially prevented hyperglycemia. Diabetic mice had a clear delay in bone regeneration, and displayed large areas of loose connective tissue within the defects, with a reduced expression of the mineralization-related protein osteonectin, when compared to the non-diabetic WTC57/BL6. The non-diabetic and diabetic B1 R knockout (B1 RKO) mice had bone regeneration levels and osteonectin expression comparable to that seen in control WTC57/BL6 mice. WTC57/BL6 STZ-diabetic mice also showed a marked reduction of collagen contents, with increased immunolabeling for the apoptosis marker caspase-3, whereas diabetic B1 RKO had collagen levels and caspase-3 activity comparable to those observed in non-diabetic WTC57/BL6 or B1 RKO mice. No significant difference was detected in the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-stained cells, or in RANK/RANKL/OPG system immunolabeling throughout the experimental groups. Data bring novel evidence on the relevance of kinin B1 R under type 1 diabetes with regards to its role in bone regeneration. PMID:25969420

  2. Osteoblast-specific overexpression of amphiregulin leads to transient increase in femoral cancellous bone mass in mice.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Mithila; Lehner, Diana; Handschuh, Stephan; Jay, Freya F; Erben, Reinhold G; Schneider, Marlon R

    2015-12-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor ligand amphiregulin (AREG) has been implicated in bone physiology and in bone anabolism mediated by intermittent parathyroid hormone treatment. However, the functions of AREG in bone have been only incipiently evaluated in vivo. Here, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing AREG specifically in osteoblasts (Col1-Areg). pQCT analysis of the femoral metaphysis revealed increased trabecular bone mass at 4, 8, and 10weeks of age in Col1-Areg mice compared to control littermates. However, the high bone mass phenotype was transient and disappeared in older animals. Micro-CT analysis of the secondary spongiosa confirmed increased trabecular bone volume and trabecular number in the distal femur of 4-week-old AREG-tg mice compared to control littermates. Furthermore, μ-CT analysis of the primary spongiosa revealed unaltered production of new bone trabeculae in distal femora of Col1-Areg mice. Histomorphometric analysis revealed a reduced number of osteoclasts in 4-week-old Col1-Areg mice, but not at later time points. Cancellous bone formation rate remained unchanged in Col1-Areg mice at all time points. In addition, bone mass and bone turnover in lumbar vertebral bodies were similar in Col1-Areg and control mice at all ages examined. Proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts isolated from neonatal calvariae did not differ between Col1-Areg and control mice. Taken together, these data suggest that AREG overexpression in osteoblasts induces a transient high bone mass phenotype in the trabecular compartment of the appendicular skeleton by a growth-related, non-cell autonomous mechanism, leading to a positive bone balance with unchanged bone formation and lowered bone resorption. PMID:26103093

  3. A supra-cellular model for coupling of bone resorption to formation during remodeling: lessons from two bone resorption inhibitors affecting bone formation differently.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Pia Rosgaard; Andersen, Thomas Levin; Pennypacker, Brenda L; Duong, Le T; Engelholm, Lars H; Delaissé, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-10

    The bone matrix is maintained functional through the combined action of bone resorbing osteoclasts and bone forming osteoblasts, in so-called bone remodeling units. The coupling of these two activities is critical for securing bone replenishment and involves osteogenic factors released by the osteoclasts. However, the osteoclasts are separated from the mature bone forming osteoblasts in time and space. Therefore the target cell of these osteoclastic factors has remained unknown. Recent explorations of the physical microenvironment of osteoclasts revealed a cell layer lining the bone marrow and forming a canopy over the whole remodeling surface, spanning from the osteoclasts to the bone forming osteoblasts. Several observations show that these canopy cells are a source of osteoblast progenitors, and we hypothesized therefore that they are the likely cells targeted by the osteogenic factors of the osteoclasts. Here we provide evidence supporting this hypothesis, by comparing the osteoclast-canopy interface in response to two types of bone resorption inhibitors in rabbit lumbar vertebrae. The bisphosphonate alendronate, an inhibitor leading to low bone formation levels, reduces the extent of canopy coverage above osteoclasts. This effect is in accordance with its toxic action on periosteoclastic cells. In contrast, odanacatib, an inhibitor preserving bone formation, increases the extent of the osteoclast-canopy interface. Interestingly, these distinct effects correlate with how fast bone formation follows resorption during these respective treatments. Furthermore, canopy cells exhibit uPARAP/Endo180, a receptor able to bind the collagen made available by osteoclasts, and reported to mediate osteoblast recruitment. Overall these observations support a mechanism where the recruitment of bone forming osteoblasts from the canopy is induced by osteoclastic factors, thereby favoring initiation of bone formation. They lead to a model where the osteoclast-canopy interface is

  4. Bone Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common types of primary bone cancer are: • Multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma is the most common primary bone cancer. It ... Any bone can be affected by this cancer. Multiple myeloma affects approximately six people per 100,000 each ...

  5. OPG Treatment Prevents Bone Loss During Lactation But Does Not Affect Milk Production or Maternal Calcium Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ardeshirpour, Laleh; Dumitru, Cristina; Dann, Pamela; Sterpka, John; VanHouten, Joshua; Kim, Wonnam; Kostenuik, Paul; Wysolmerski, John

    2015-08-01

    Lactation is associated with increased bone turnover and rapid bone loss, which liberates skeletal calcium used for milk production. Previous studies suggested that an increase in the skeletal expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells ligand (RANKL) coupled with a decrease in osteoprotegerin (OPG) levels likely triggered bone loss during lactation. In this study, we treated lactating mice with recombinant OPG to determine whether bone loss during lactation was dependent on RANKL signaling and whether resorption of the maternal skeleton was required to support milk production. OPG treatment lowered bone resorption rates and completely prevented bone loss during lactation but, surprisingly, did not decrease osteoclast numbers. In contrast, OPG was quite effective at lowering osteoblast numbers and inhibiting bone formation in lactating mice. Furthermore, treatment with OPG during lactation prevented the usual anabolic response associated with reversal of lactational bone loss after weaning. Preventing bone loss had no appreciable effect on milk production, milk calcium levels, or maternal calcium homeostasis when mice were on a standard diet. However, when dietary calcium was restricted, treatment with OPG caused maternal hypocalcemia, maternal death, and decreased milk production. These studies demonstrate that RANKL signaling is a requirement for bone loss during lactation, and suggest that osteoclast activity may be required to increase osteoblast numbers during lactation in preparation for the recovery of bone mass after weaning. These data also demonstrate that maternal bone loss is not absolutely required to supply calcium for milk production unless dietary calcium intake is inadequate. PMID:25961842

  6. OPG Treatment Prevents Bone Loss During Lactation But Does Not Affect Milk Production or Maternal Calcium Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ardeshirpour, Laleh; Dumitru, Cristina; Dann, Pamela; Sterpka, John; VanHouten, Joshua; Kim, Wonnam; Kostenuik, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Lactation is associated with increased bone turnover and rapid bone loss, which liberates skeletal calcium used for milk production. Previous studies suggested that an increase in the skeletal expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells ligand (RANKL) coupled with a decrease in osteoprotegerin (OPG) levels likely triggered bone loss during lactation. In this study, we treated lactating mice with recombinant OPG to determine whether bone loss during lactation was dependent on RANKL signaling and whether resorption of the maternal skeleton was required to support milk production. OPG treatment lowered bone resorption rates and completely prevented bone loss during lactation but, surprisingly, did not decrease osteoclast numbers. In contrast, OPG was quite effective at lowering osteoblast numbers and inhibiting bone formation in lactating mice. Furthermore, treatment with OPG during lactation prevented the usual anabolic response associated with reversal of lactational bone loss after weaning. Preventing bone loss had no appreciable effect on milk production, milk calcium levels, or maternal calcium homeostasis when mice were on a standard diet. However, when dietary calcium was restricted, treatment with OPG caused maternal hypocalcemia, maternal death, and decreased milk production. These studies demonstrate that RANKL signaling is a requirement for bone loss during lactation, and suggest that osteoclast activity may be required to increase osteoblast numbers during lactation in preparation for the recovery of bone mass after weaning. These data also demonstrate that maternal bone loss is not absolutely required to supply calcium for milk production unless dietary calcium intake is inadequate. PMID:25961842

  7. A myostatin inhibitor (propeptide-Fc) increases muscle mass and muscle fiber size in aged mice but does not increase bone density or bone strength.

    PubMed

    Arounleut, Phonepasong; Bialek, Peter; Liang, Li-Fang; Upadhyay, Sunil; Fulzele, Sadanand; Johnson, Maribeth; Elsalanty, Mohammed; Isales, Carlos M; Hamrick, Mark W

    2013-09-01

    Loss of muscle and bone mass with age are significant contributors to falls and fractures among the elderly. Myostatin deficiency is associated with increased muscle mass in mice, dogs, cows, sheep and humans, and mice lacking myostatin have been observed to show increased bone density in the limb, spine, and jaw. Transgenic overexpression of myostatin propeptide, which binds to and inhibits the active myostatin ligand, also increases muscle mass and bone density in mice. We therefore sought to test the hypothesis that in vivo inhibition of myostatin using an injectable myostatin propeptide (GDF8 propeptide-Fc) would increase both muscle mass and bone density in aged (24 mo) mice. Male mice were injected weekly (20 mg/kg body weight) with recombinant myostatin propeptide-Fc (PRO) or vehicle (VEH; saline) for four weeks. There was no difference in body weight between the two groups at the end of the treatment period, but PRO treatment significantly increased mass of the tibialis anterior muscle (+ 7%) and increased muscle fiber diameter of the extensor digitorum longus (+ 16%) and soleus (+ 6%) muscles compared to VEH treatment. Bone volume relative to total volume (BV/TV) of the femur calculated by microCT did not differ significantly between PRO- and VEH-treated mice, and ultimate force (Fu), stiffness (S), toughness (U) measured from three-point bending tests also did not differ significantly between groups. Histomorphometric assays also revealed no differences in bone formation or resorption in response to PRO treatment. These data suggest that while developmental perturbation of myostatin signaling through either gene knockout or transgenic inhibition may alter both muscle and bone mass in mice, pharmacological inhibition of myostatin in aged mice has a more pronounced effect on skeletal muscle than on bone. PMID:23832079

  8. The role of pleiotropy and linkage in genes affecting a sexual ornament and bone allocation in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, M; Rubin, C-J; Höglund, A; Sahlqvist, A-S; Jonsson, K B; Kerje, S; Ekwall, O; Kämpe, O; Andersson, L; Jensen, P; Wright, D

    2014-05-01

    Sexual selection and the ornaments that inform such choices have been extensively studied, particularly from a phenotypic perspective. Although more is being revealed about the genetic architecture of sexual ornaments, much still remains to be discovered. The comb of the chicken is one of the most widely recognized sexual ornaments, which has been shown to be correlated with both fecundity and bone allocation. In this study, we use a combination of multiple intercrosses between White Leghorn populations and wild-derived Red Junglefowl to, first, map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for bone allocation and, second, to identify expression QTL that correlate and colocalize with comb mass. These candidate quantitative genes were then assessed for potential pleiotropic effects on bone tissue and fecundity traits. We identify genes that correlate with both relative comb mass and bone traits suggesting a combination of both pleiotropy and linkage mediates gene regulatory variation in these traits. PMID:24655072

  9. A universal scaling relationship between body mass and proximal limb bone dimensions in quadrupedal terrestrial tetrapods

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Body size is intimately related to the physiology and ecology of an organism. Therefore, accurate and consistent body mass estimates are essential for inferring numerous aspects of paleobiology in extinct taxa, and investigating large-scale evolutionary and ecological patterns in the history of life. Scaling relationships between skeletal measurements and body mass in birds and mammals are commonly used to predict body mass in extinct members of these crown clades, but the applicability of these models for predicting mass in more distantly related stem taxa, such as non-avian dinosaurs and non-mammalian synapsids, has been criticized on biomechanical grounds. Here we test the major criticisms of scaling methods for estimating body mass using an extensive dataset of mammalian and non-avian reptilian species derived from individual skeletons with live weights. Results Significant differences in the limb scaling of mammals and reptiles are noted in comparisons of limb proportions and limb length to body mass. Remarkably, however, the relationship between proximal (stylopodial) limb bone circumference and body mass is highly conserved in extant terrestrial mammals and reptiles, in spite of their disparate limb postures, gaits, and phylogenetic histories. As a result, we are able to conclusively reject the main criticisms of scaling methods that question the applicability of a universal scaling equation for estimating body mass in distantly related taxa. Conclusions The conserved nature of the relationship between stylopodial circumference and body mass suggests that the minimum diaphyseal circumference of the major weight-bearing bones is only weakly influenced by the varied forces exerted on the limbs (that is, compression or torsion) and most strongly related to the mass of the animal. Our results, therefore, provide a much-needed, robust, phylogenetically corrected framework for accurate and consistent estimation of body mass in extinct terrestrial

  10. Rapidly Growing Brtl/+ Mouse Model of Osteogenesis Imperfecta Improves Bone Mass and Strength with Sclerostin Antibody Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sinder, Benjamin P.; Salemi, Joseph D.; Ominsky, Michael S.; Caird, Michelle S.; Marini, Joan C.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable collagen-related bone dysplasia, characterized by brittle bones with increased fracture risk that presents most severely in children. Anti-resorptive bisphosphonates are frequently used to treat pediatric OI and controlled clinical trials have shown bisphosphonate therapy improves vertebral outcomes but has little benefit on long bone fracture rate. New treatments which increase bone mass throughout the pediatric OI skeleton would be beneficial. Sclerostin antibody (Scl-Ab) is a potential candidate anabolic therapy for pediatric OI and functions by stimulating osteoblastic bone formation via the canonical wnt signaling pathway. To explore the effect of Scl-Ab on the rapidly growing OI skeleton, we treated rapidly growing 3 week old Brtl/+ mice, harboring a typical heterozygous OI-causing Gly->Cys substitution on col1a1, for 5 weeks with Scl-Ab. Scl-Ab had anabolic effects in Brtl/+ and led to new cortical bone formation and increased cortical bone mass. This anabolic action resulted in improved mechanical strength to WT Veh levels without altering the underlying brittle nature of the material. While Scl-Ab was anabolic in trabecular bone of the distal femur in both genotypes, the effect was less strong in these rapidly growing Brtl/+ mice compared to WT. In conclusion, Scl-Ab was able to stimulate bone formation in a rapidly growing Brtl/+ murine model of OI, and represents a potential new therapy to improve bone mass and reduce fracture risk in pediatric OI. PMID:25445450

  11. Deletion of Histone Deacetylase 7 in Osteoclasts Decreases Bone Mass in Mice by Interactions with MITF

    PubMed Central

    Stemig, Melissa; Astelford, Kristina; Emery, Ann; Cho, Jangyeun J.; Allen, Ben; Huang, Tsang-hai; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram; Mansky, Kim C.; Jensen, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular regulators of osteoclast formation and function are an important area of research due to the central role of osteoclasts in bone resorption. Transcription factors such as MITF are essential for osteoclast generation by regulating expression of the genes required for cellular differentiation and resorptive function. We recently reported that histone deacetylase 7 (HDAC7) binds to and represses the transcriptional activity of MITF in osteoclasts, and that loss of HDAC7 in vitro accelerated osteoclastogenesis. In the current study, we extend this initial observation by showing that conditional deletion of HDAC7 in osteoclasts of mice leads to an in vivo enhancement in osteoclast formation, associated with increased bone resorption and lower bone mass. Expression of multiple MITF target genes is increased in bone marrow derived osteoclast cultures from the HDAC7 knockout mice. Interestingly, multiple regions of the HDAC7 amino-terminus can bind to MITF or exert repressive activity. Moreover, mutation or deletion of the HDAC7 conserved deacetylase catalytic domain had little effect on repressive function. These observations identify HDAC7 in osteoclasts as an important molecular regulator of MITF activity and bone homeostasis, but also highlight a gap in our understanding of exactly how HDAC7 functions as a corepressor. PMID:25875108

  12. Hypoestrogenism in young women and its influence on bone mass density.

    PubMed

    Meczekalski, Blazej; Podfigurna-Stopa, Agnieszka; Genazzani, Andrea Riccardo

    2010-09-01

    One of the most important hormonal factors responsible for bone health is estradiol. Genetic factors, adequacy of hormonal functioning, nutrition and physical activity may be the markers of bone status and development in young women. During adolescence, women reach peak bone acquisition and develop a skeletal mass. This process is largely regulated by endocrine factors mainly such as adequate levels of gonadal, adrenal and pituitary hormones. The crucial role played by estradiol and its impact on bones are very multiple. Estradiol induces growth factors' activation, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) production inhibition and is mainly referred to antiresorptive activity. Clinical situations leading to hypoestrogenism has been linked to decreased bone mineral density leading to osteopenia and osteoporosis. This status both in fertile and perimenopausal women can increase the risk of pathological fractures. Such conditions as hypothalamic-pituitary insufficiency (functional hypothalamic amenorrhea, anorexia nervosa, Kallmann syndrome, hyperprolactinemia), ovarian failure (gonadal dysgenesis, premature ovarian failure) and iatrogenic treatment (surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy) can cause hypoestrogenism. The treatment of osteopenia and osteoporosis caused by hypoestrogenism is very essential and multidirectional. The crucial role of the therapy is the achievement of proper serum estradiol concentration and eliminate the causes of hypoestrogenism. PMID:20504098

  13. X-ray dual energy spectral parameter optimization for bone Calcium/Phosphorus mass ratio estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulou, P. I.; Fountos, G. P.; Martini, N. D.; Koukou, V. N.; Michail, C. M.; Valais, I. G.; Kandarakis, I. S.; Nikiforidis, G. C.

    2015-09-01

    Calcium (Ca) and Phosphorus (P) bone mass ratio has been identified as an important, yet underutilized, risk factor in osteoporosis diagnosis. The purpose of this simulation study is to investigate the use of effective or mean mass attenuation coefficient in Ca/P mass ratio estimation with the use of a dual-energy method. The investigation was based on the minimization of the accuracy of Ca/P ratio, with respect to the Coefficient of Variation of the ratio. Different set-ups were examined, based on the K-edge filtering technique and single X-ray exposure. The modified X-ray output was attenuated by various Ca/P mass ratios resulting in nine calibration points, while keeping constant the total bone thickness. The simulated data were obtained considering a photon counting energy discriminating detector. The standard deviation of the residuals was used to compare and evaluate the accuracy between the different dual energy set-ups. The optimum mass attenuation coefficient for the Ca/P mass ratio estimation was the effective coefficient in all the examined set-ups. The variation of the residuals between the different set-ups was not significant.

  14. Vitamin D status in young women is strongly negatively related to body weight, body mass index and body fat, but is not associated to bone mass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Available data in elderly adults suggest that circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (250HD) concentrations are positively correlated with bone mineral density (BMD) and inversely associated with obesity. To characterize whether these relations are also present at the time of peak bone mass, we examined t...

  15. A novel quercetin analogue from a medicinal plant promotes peak bone mass achievement and bone healing after injury and exerts an anabolic effect on osteoporotic bone: the role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor as a mediator of osteogenic action.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Kunal; Mishra, Jay Sharan; Swarnkar, Gaurav; Siddiqui, Jawed Akhtar; Khan, Kainat; Kumari, Rashmi; Rawat, Preeti; Maurya, Rakesh; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya

    2011-09-01

    We recently reported that extracts made from the stem bark of Ulmus wallichiana promoted peak bone mass achievement in growing rats and preserved trabecular bone mass and cortical bone strength in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Further, 6-C-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(2S,3S)-(+)-3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavanol (GTDF), a novel flavonol-C-glucoside isolated from the extracts, had a nonestrogenic bone-sparing effect on OVX rats. Here we studied the effects of GTDF on osteoblast function and its mode of action and in vivo osteogenic effect. GTDF stimulated osteoblast proliferation, survival, and differentiation but had no effect on osteoclastic or adipocytic differentiation. In cultured osteoblasts, GTDF transactivated the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Activation of AhR mediated the stimulatory effect of GTDF on osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, GTDF stimulated cAMP production, which mediated osteogenic gene expression. GTDF treatments given to 1- to 2-day-old rats or adult rats increased the mRNA levels of AhR target genes in calvaria or bone marrow stromal cells. In growing female rats, GTDF promoted parameters of peak bone accrual in the appendicular skeleton, including increased longitudinal growth, bone mineral density, bone-formation rate (BFR), cortical deposition, and bone strength. GTDF promoted the process of providing newly generated bone to fill drill holes in the femurs of both estrogen-sufficient and -deficient rats. In osteopenic OVX rats, GTDF increased BFR and significantly restored trabecular bone compared with the ovaries-intact group. Together our data suggest that GTDF stimulates osteoblast growth and differentiation via the AhR and promotes modeling-directed bone accrual, accelerates bone healing after injury, and exerts anabolic effects on osteopenic rats likely by a direct stimulatory effect on osteoprogenitors. Based on these preclinical data, clinical evaluation of GTDF as a potential bone anabolic agent is warranted. PMID

  16. Effect of Sequential Treatments with Alendronate, Parathyroid Hormone (1-34) and Raloxifene on Cortical Bone Mass and Strength in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Amugongo, Sarah K.; Yao, Wei; Jia, Junjing; Dai, Weiwei; Lay, Yu-An E.; Jiang, Li; Harvey, Danielle; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Dave, Neil; Ritchie, Robert O.; Kimmel, Donald B.; Lane, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Anti-resorptive and anabolic agents are often prescribed for the treatment of osteoporosis continuously or sequentially for many years. However their impact on cortical bone quality and bone strength is not clear. Methods Six-month old female rats were either sham operated or ovariectomized (OVX). OVX rats were left untreated for two months and then were treated with vehicle (Veh), hPTH (1-34) (PTH), alendronate (Aln), or raloxifene (Ral) sequentially for three month intervals, for a total of three periods. Mid-tibial cortical bone architecture, mass, mineralization, and strength were measured on necropsy samples obtained after each period. Bone indentation properties were measured on proximal femur necropsy samples. Results Eight or more months of estrogen deficiency in rats resulted in decreased cortical bone area and thickness. Treatment with PTH for 3 months caused the deposition of endocortical lamellar bone that increased cortical bone area, thickness, and strength. These improvements were lost when PTH was withdrawn without followup treatment, but were maintained for the maximum times tested, six months with Ral and three months with Aln. Pre-treatment with anti-resorptives was also somewhat successful in ultimately preserving the additional endocortical lamellar bone formed under PTH treatment. These treatments did not affect bone indentation properties. Summary Sequential therapy that involved both PTH and anti-resorptive agents was required to achieve lasting improvements in cortical area, thickness, and strength in OVX rats. Anti-resorptive therapy, either prior to or following PTH, was required to preserve gains attributable to an anabolic agent. PMID:25016965

  17. Heat shock protein 60 protects skeletal tissue against glucocorticoid-induced bone mass loss by regulating osteoblast survival.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Sheng; Wu, Re-Wen; Ko, Jih-Yang; Tai, Ming-Hong; Ke, Huei-Ching; Yeh, Da-Wei; Wu, Shin-Long; Chen, Ming-Wen

    2011-11-01

    Excessive glucocorticoid administration accelerates osteoblast apoptosis and skeletal deterioration. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) regulate metabolic activities in osteoblastic cells. This study characterized the biological significance of HSP60 in glucocorticoid-induced bone loss. Rats were treated with glucocorticoid, HSP60 antisense oligonucleotides, or adenovirus-mediated HSP60 gene transfer. Bone mineral density, metaphyseal trabecular micro-architecture, and fragility were analyzed by dual X-ray absorptiometry, micro-computed tomography, and material testing, respectively. Differential proteomic profiles of bone tissue extracts were detected by bi-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Survival and proapoptotic signal transduction were quantified by immunoblotting. Glucocorticoid-treated rats had low bone mineral density and metaphyseal trabecular microstructure in association with downregulation of collagen 1α1 and HSP60 expressions in bone tissue. Gain of HSP60 function by adenovirus-mediated HSP60 gene transfer abrogated the deleterious effects of glucocorticoid treatment on bone mass, trabecular microstructure, and mechanical strength. Enhancement of HSP60 signaling attenuated the glucocorticoid-induced loss of trabecular bone volume, mineral acquisition reactions and osteoblast surface. HSP60 gene transfer activated ERK and Akt and reduced Bax and cytochrome c release, as well as caspase-3 cleavage, which attenuated the inhibitory effects of glucocorticoid treatment on osteoblast survival. Loss of HSP60 function by HSP60 antisense oligonucleotides accelerated mitochondrial apoptotic programs and osteoblast apoptosis. Knockdown of HSP60 induced loss of bone mass, micro-architecture integrity, and mechanical property. Taken together, loss of HSP60 signaling contributes to the glucocorticoid-induced enhancement of pro-apoptotic reactions, thereby accelerating osteoblast apoptosis and bone mass loss. Enhancement of HSP60 function is beneficial for

  18. Bone Metabolism in Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN) are at risk for low bone mass at multiple sites, associated with decreased bone turnover. Bone microarchitecture is also affected, with a decrease in bone trabecular volume and trabecular thickness, and an increase in trabecular separation. The adolescent years are typically the time when marked increases occur in bone mass accrual towards the attainment of peak bone mass, an important determinant of bone health and fracture risk in later life. AN often begins in the adolescent years, and decreased rates of bone mass accrual at this critical time are therefore also concerning for deficits in peak bone mass. Factors contributing to low bone density and decreased rates of bone accrual include alterations in body composition such as low BMI and lean body mass, and hormonal alterations such as hypogonadism, a nutritionally acquired resistance to growth hormone and low levels of IGF-1, relative hypercortisolemia, low levels of leptin, and increased adiponectin (for fat mass) and peptide YY. Therapeutic strategies include optimizing weight and menstrual recovery, and adequate calcium and vitamin D replacement. Oral estrogen-progesterone combination pills are not effective in increasing bone density in adolescents with AN. RhIGF-1 increases levels of bone formation markers in the short-term, while long-term effects remain to be determined. Bisphosphonates act by decreasing bone resorption, and are not optimal for use in adolescents with AN, in whom the primary defect is low bone formation. PMID:21301203

  19. Osteoporosis and low bone mass at the femur neck or lumbar spine in older adults: United States, 2005-2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many current clinical guidelines recommend that assessment of osteoporosis or low bone mass, as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) (1), be based on bone mineral density at either the femur neck region of the proximal femur (hip) or the lumbar spine (2,3). This data brief presents the mos...

  20. Mode of heparin attachment to nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite affects its interaction with bone morphogenetic protein-2.

    PubMed

    Goonasekera, Chandhi S; Jack, Kevin S; Bhakta, Gajadhar; Rai, Bina; Luong-Van, Emma; Nurcombe, Victor; Cool, Simon M; Cooper-White, Justin J; Grøndahl, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    Heparin has a high affinity for bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), which is a key growth factor in bone regeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate how the rate of release of BMP-2 was affected when adsorbed to nanosized hydroxyapatite (HAP) particles functionalized with heparin by different methods. Heparin was attached to the surface of HAP, either via adsorption or covalent coupling, via a 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) layer. The chemical composition of the particles was evaluated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and elemental microanalysis, revealing that the heparin grafting densities achieved were dependent on the curing temperature used in the fabrication of APTES-modified HAP. Comparable amounts of heparin were attached via both covalent coupling and adsorption to the APTES-modified particles, but characterization of the particle surfaces by zeta potential and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements indicated that the conformation of the heparin on the surface was dependent on the method of attachment, which in turn affected the stability of heparin on the surface. The release of BMP-2 from the particles after 7 days in phosphate-buffered saline found that 31% of the loaded BMP-2 was released from the APTES-modified particles with heparin covalently attached, compared to 16% from the APTES-modified particles with the heparin adsorbed. Moreover, when heparin was adsorbed onto pure HAP, it was found that the BMP-2 released after 7 days was 5% (similar to that from unmodified HAP). This illustrates that by altering the mode of attachment of heparin to HAP the release profile and total release of BMP-2 can be manipulated. Importantly, the BMP-2 released from all the heparin particle types was found by the SMAD 1/5/8 phosphorylation assay to be biologically active. PMID:26474791

  1. Bone metabolism in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Fazeli, Pouneh K; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-03-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), a psychiatric disorder predominantly affecting young women, is characterized by self-imposed, chronic nutritional deprivation and distorted body image. AN is associated with a number of medical comorbidities including low bone mass. The low bone mass in AN is due to an uncoupling of bone formation and bone resorption, which is the result of hormonal adaptations aimed at decreasing energy expenditure during periods of low energy intake. Importantly, the low bone mass in AN is associated with a significant risk of fractures and therefore treatments to prevent bone loss are critical. In this review, we discuss the hormonal determinants of low bone mass in AN and treatments that have been investigated in this population. PMID:24419863

  2. Bone Metabolism in Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), a psychiatric disorder predominantly affecting young women, is characterized by self-imposed chronic nutritional deprivation and distorted body image. AN is associated with a number of medical co-morbidities including low bone mass. The low bone mass in AN is due to an uncoupling of bone formation and bone resorption, which is the result of hormonal adaptations aimed at decreasing energy expenditure during periods of low energy intake. Importantly, the low bone mass in AN is associated with a significant risk of fractures and therefore treatments to prevent bone loss are critical. In this review, we discuss the hormonal determinants of low bone mass in AN and treatments that have been investigated in this population. PMID:24419863

  3. Hyperthyroidism and Hypothyroidism in Male Mice and Their Effects on Bone Mass, Bone Turnover, and the Wnt Inhibitors Sclerostin and Dickkopf-1.

    PubMed

    Tsourdi, Elena; Rijntjes, Eddy; Köhrle, Josef; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Rauner, Martina

    2015-10-01

    Thyroid hormones are key regulators of bone homeostasis, and Wnt signaling has been implicated in thyroid hormone-associated bone loss. Here we tested whether hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism interfere with dickkopf-1 (DKK1) and sclerostin, two inhibitors of Wnt signaling. Twelve-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were rendered either hyperthyroid or hypothyroid. Hyperthyroid mice displayed decreased trabecular (-54%, P < .001) and cortical bone density (-5%, P < .05) and reduced cortical thickness (-15%, P < .001), whereas hypothyroid mice showed a higher trabecular bone density (+26%, P < .001) with unchanged cortical bone parameters. Histomorphometry and biochemical markers of bone remodeling indicated high bone turnover in hyperthyroid mice and low bone turnover in hypothyroid mice. In vivo, serum DKK1 concentrations were decreased in hyperthyroid mice (-24%, P < .001) and increased in hypothyroid mice (+18%, P < .01). The increase of the number of DKK1-positive cells in hypothyroid mice was confirmed at the tissue level. Interestingly, sclerostin was increased in both disease models, although to a higher extent in hyperthyroid mice (+50%, P < .001, and +24%, P < .05). Serum sclerostin concentrations adjusted for bone mass were increased by 3.3-fold in hyperthyroid (P < .001) but not in hypothyroid mice. Consistently, sclerostin mRNA expression and the number of sclerostin-positive cells were increased in hyperthyroid but not in hypothyroid mice. Our data show that thyroid hormone-induced changes in bone remodeling are associated with a divergent regulation of DKK1 and sclerostin. Thus, the modulation of Wnt signaling by thyroid hormones may contribute to thyroid hormone-associated bone disease and altered expression of Wnt inhibitors may emerge as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26218891

  4. Inositol Polyphosphate 4-Phosphatase B as A Regulator of Bone Mass in Mice and Human

    PubMed Central

    Ferron, Mathieu; Boudiffa, Maya; Arsenault, Michel; Rached, Mohamed; Pata, Monica; Giroux, Sylvie; Elfassihi, Latifa; Kisseleva, Marina; Majerus, Philip W; Rousseau, François; Vacher, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis is a multifactorial genetic disease characterized by reduction of bone mass due to dysregulation of osteoclast differentiation or maturation. Herein, we identified a novel regulator of osteoclastogenesis, the murine homologue of inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type IIa (Inpp4bα). Expression of Inpp4bα is detected from early osteoclast differentiation to activation stage. Targeted expression of native Inpp4bα ex-vivo repressed whereas phosphatase-inactive Inpp4ba stimulated osteoclast differentiation. Inpp4bα acts on intracellular calcium level that modulates NFATc1 nuclear translocation and activation. In vivo mice deficient in Inpp4b displayed increased osteoclast differentiation rate and potential resulting in decreased bone mass and osteoporosis. Importantly, INPP4B in human was identified as a susceptibility locus for osteoporosis. This study defined Inpp4b as a major modulator of the osteoclast differentiation and as a gene linked to variability of bone mineral density in mice and humans. PMID:21982707

  5. Weight regulation and bone mass: a comparison between professional jockeys, elite amateur boxers, and age, gender and BMI matched controls.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Eimear; Crabtree, Nicola; McGoldrick, Adrian; Ashley, David T; McCaffrey, Noel; Warrington, Giles D

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare bone mass between two groups of jockeys (flat: n = 14; national hunt: n = 16); boxers (n = 14) and age, gender and BMI matched controls (n = 14). All subjects underwent dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanning for assessment of bone mass, with measurements made of the total body, vertebra L2-4 and femoral neck. Body composition and the relative contribution of fat and lean mass were extrapolated from the results. Data were analysed in accordance with differences in body composition, in particular, height, lean mass, fat mass and age. Both jockey groups were shown to display lower bone mass than either the boxers or control group at a number of sites including total body bone mineral density (BMD) (1.019 ± 0.06 and 1.17 ± 1.05 vs. 1.26 ± 0.01 and 1.26 ± 0.06 g cm(-2) for flat, national hunt, boxer and control, respectively), total body bone mineral content (BMC) less head, L2-4 BMD and femoral neck BMD and BMC (p < 0.05). Regression analysis revealed that lean mass and height were the primary predictors of total body BMC, although additional group-specific influences were present which reduced bone mass in the flat jockey group and enhanced it in the boxers (R (2) = 0.814). Reduced bone mass in jockeys may be a consequence of reduced energy availability in response to chronic weight restriction and could have particular implications for these athletes in light of the high risk nature of the sport. In contrast, the high intensity, high impact training associated with boxing may have conveyed an osteogenic stimulus on these athletes. PMID:21773703

  6. Normative Data for Bone Mass in Healthy Term Infants from Birth to 1 Year of Age

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Sina; Vanstone, Catherine A.; Weiler, Hope A.

    2012-01-01

    For over 2 decades, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) has been the gold standard for estimating bone mineral density (BMD) and facture risk in adults. More recently DXA has been used to evaluate BMD in pediatrics. However, BMD is usually assessed against reference data for which none currently exists in infancy. A prospective study was conducted to assess bone mass of term infants (37 to 42 weeks of gestation), weight appropriate for gestational age, and born to healthy mothers. The group consisted of 33 boys and 26 girls recruited from the Winnipeg Health Sciences Center (Manitoba, Canada). Whole body (WB) as well as regional sites of the lumbar spine (LS 1–4) and femur was measured using DXA (QDR 4500A, Hologic Inc.) providing bone mineral content (BMC) for all sites and BMD for spine. During the year, WB BMC increased by 200% (76.0 ± 14.2 versus 227.0 ± 29.7 g), spine BMC by 130% (2.35 ± 0.42 versus 5.37 ± 1.02 g), and femur BMC by 190% (2.94 ± 0.54 versus 8.50 ± 1.84 g). Spine BMD increased by 14% (0.266 ± 0.044 versus 0.304 ± 0.044 g/cm2) during the year. This data, representing the accretion of bone mass during the first year of life, is based on a representative sample of infants and will aid in the interpretation of diagnostic DXA scans by researchers and health professionals. PMID:23091773

  7. Dietary protein level and source differentially affect bone metabolism, strength, and intestinal calcium transporter expression during ad libitum and food-restricted conditions in male rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High protein diets may attenuate bone loss during energy restriction (ER). The objective of the current study was to determine whether high protein diets suppress bone turnover and improve bone quality in rats during ER and whether dietary protein source affects this relationship. Eighty 12-week o...

  8. Metformin revisited: Does this regulator of AMP-activated protein kinase secondarily affect bone metabolism and prevent diabetic osteopathy

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Antonio Desmond; Cortizo, Ana María; Sedlinsky, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Patients with long-term type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) can develop skeletal complications or “diabetic osteopathy”. These include osteopenia, osteoporosis and an increased incidence of low-stress fractures. In this context, it is important to evaluate whether current anti-diabetic treatments can secondarily affect bone metabolism. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) modulates multiple metabolic pathways and acts as a sensor of the cellular energy status; recent evidence suggests a critical role for AMPK in bone homeostasis. In addition, AMPK activation is believed to mediate most clinical effects of the insulin-sensitizer metformin. Over the past decade, several research groups have investigated the effects of metformin on bone, providing a considerable body of pre-clinical (in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo) as well as clinical evidence for an anabolic action of metformin on bone. However, two caveats should be kept in mind when considering metformin treatment for a patient with type 2 DM at risk for diabetic osteopathy. In the first place, metformin should probably not be considered an anti-osteoporotic drug; it is an insulin sensitizer with proven macrovascular benefits that can secondarily improve bone metabolism in the context of DM. Secondly, we are still awaiting the results of randomized placebo-controlled studies in humans that evaluate the effects of metformin on bone metabolism as a primary endpoint. PMID:27022443

  9. Metformin revisited: Does this regulator of AMP-activated protein kinase secondarily affect bone metabolism and prevent diabetic osteopathy.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Antonio Desmond; Cortizo, Ana María; Sedlinsky, Claudia

    2016-03-25

    Patients with long-term type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) can develop skeletal complications or "diabetic osteopathy". These include osteopenia, osteoporosis and an increased incidence of low-stress fractures. In this context, it is important to evaluate whether current anti-diabetic treatments can secondarily affect bone metabolism. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) modulates multiple metabolic pathways and acts as a sensor of the cellular energy status; recent evidence suggests a critical role for AMPK in bone homeostasis. In addition, AMPK activation is believed to mediate most clinical effects of the insulin-sensitizer metformin. Over the past decade, several research groups have investigated the effects of metformin on bone, providing a considerable body of pre-clinical (in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo) as well as clinical evidence for an anabolic action of metformin on bone. However, two caveats should be kept in mind when considering metformin treatment for a patient with type 2 DM at risk for diabetic osteopathy. In the first place, metformin should probably not be considered an anti-osteoporotic drug; it is an insulin sensitizer with proven macrovascular benefits that can secondarily improve bone metabolism in the context of DM. Secondly, we are still awaiting the results of randomized placebo-controlled studies in humans that evaluate the effects of metformin on bone metabolism as a primary endpoint. PMID:27022443

  10. Calcium- and Phosphorus-Supplemented Diet Increases Bone Mass after Short-Term Exercise and Increases Bone Mass and Structural Strength after Long-Term Exercise in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Michael A.; Bailey, Alyssa M.; Rondon, Matthew J.; McNerny, Erin M.; Sahar, Nadder D.; Kohn, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Exercise has long-lasting benefits to bone health that may help prevent fractures by increasing bone mass, bone strength, and tissue quality. Long-term exercise of 6–12 weeks in rodents increases bone mass and bone strength. However, in growing mice, a short-term exercise program of 3 weeks can limit increases in bone mass and structural strength, compared to non-exercised controls. Short-term exercise can, however, increase tissue strength, suggesting that exercise may create competition for minerals that favors initially improving tissue-level properties over structural-level properties. It was therefore hypothesized that adding calcium and phosphorus supplements to the diet may prevent decreases in bone mass and structural strength during a short-term exercise program, while leading to greater bone mass and structural strength than exercise alone after a long-term exercise program. A short-term exercise experiment was done for 3 weeks, and a long-term exercise experiment was done for 8 weeks. For each experiment, male 16-week old C57BL/6 mice were assigned to 4 weight-matched groups–exercise and non-exercise groups fed a control or mineral-supplemented diet. Exercise consisted of treadmill running at 12 m/min, 30 min/day for 7 days/week. After 3 weeks, exercised mice fed the supplemented diet had significantly increased tibial tissue mineral content (TMC) and cross-sectional area over exercised mice fed the control diet. After 8 weeks, tibial TMC, cross-sectional area, yield force, and ultimate force were greater from the combined treatments than from either exercise or supplemented diet alone. Serum markers of bone formation (PINP) and resorption (CTX) were both decreased by exercise on day 2. In exercised mice, day 2 PINP was significantly positively correlated with day 2 serum Ca, a correlation that was weaker and negative in non-exercised mice. Increasing dietary mineral consumption during an exercise program increases bone mass after 3 weeks and

  11. Calcium- and Phosphorus-Supplemented Diet Increases Bone Mass after Short-Term Exercise and Increases Bone Mass and Structural Strength after Long-Term Exercise in Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Michael A; Bailey, Alyssa M; Rondon, Matthew J; McNerny, Erin M; Sahar, Nadder D; Kohn, David H

    2016-01-01

    Exercise has long-lasting benefits to bone health that may help prevent fractures by increasing bone mass, bone strength, and tissue quality. Long-term exercise of 6-12 weeks in rodents increases bone mass and bone strength. However, in growing mice, a short-term exercise program of 3 weeks can limit increases in bone mass and structural strength, compared to non-exercised controls. Short-term exercise can, however, increase tissue strength, suggesting that exercise may create competition for minerals that favors initially improving tissue-level properties over structural-level properties. It was therefore hypothesized that adding calcium and phosphorus supplements to the diet may prevent decreases in bone mass and structural strength during a short-term exercise program, while leading to greater bone mass and structural strength than exercise alone after a long-term exercise program. A short-term exercise experiment was done for 3 weeks, and a long-term exercise experiment was done for 8 weeks. For each experiment, male 16-week old C57BL/6 mice were assigned to 4 weight-matched groups-exercise and non-exercise groups fed a control or mineral-supplemented diet. Exercise consisted of treadmill running at 12 m/min, 30 min/day for 7 days/week. After 3 weeks, exercised mice fed the supplemented diet had significantly increased tibial tissue mineral content (TMC) and cross-sectional area over exercised mice fed the control diet. After 8 weeks, tibial TMC, cross-sectional area, yield force, and ultimate force were greater from the combined treatments than from either exercise or supplemented diet alone. Serum markers of bone formation (PINP) and resorption (CTX) were both decreased by exercise on day 2. In exercised mice, day 2 PINP was significantly positively correlated with day 2 serum Ca, a correlation that was weaker and negative in non-exercised mice. Increasing dietary mineral consumption during an exercise program increases bone mass after 3 weeks and increases

  12. Tmem178 acts in a novel negative feedback loop targeting NFATc1 to regulate bone mass

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Corinne E.; Yang, Zhengfeng; Rimer, Ryan; Park-Min, Kyung-Hyun; Macaubas, Claudia; Mellins, Elizabeth D.; Novack, Deborah V.; Faccio, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipase C gamma-2 (PLCγ2)-dependent calcium (Ca2+) oscillations are indispensable for nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) activation and downstream gene transcription driving osteoclastogenesis during skeletal remodeling and pathological bone loss. Here we describe, to our knowledge, the first known function of transmembrane protein 178 (Tmem178), a PLCγ2 downstream target gene, as a critical modulator of the NFATc1 axis. In surprising contrast to the osteopetrotic phenotype of PLCγ2−/− mice, Tmem178−/− mice are osteopenic in basal conditions and are more susceptible to inflammatory bone loss, owing to enhanced osteoclast formation. Mechanistically, Tmem178 localizes to the ER membrane and regulates RANKL-induced Ca2+ fluxes, thus controlling NFATc1 induction. Importantly, down-regulation of Tmem178 is observed in human CD14+ monocytes exposed to plasma from systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients. Similar to the mouse model, reduced Tmem178 expression in human cells correlates with excessive osteoclastogenesis. In sum, these findings identify an essential role for Tmem178 to maintain skeletal mass and limit pathological bone loss. PMID:26644563

  13. Deletion of Estrogen Receptor Beta in Osteoprogenitor Cells Increases Trabecular but Not Cortical Bone Mass in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Nicks, Kristy M; Fujita, Koji; Fraser, Daniel; McGregor, Ulrike; Drake, Matthew T; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Westendorf, Jennifer J; Monroe, David G; Khosla, Sundeep

    2016-03-01

    Although the role of ERα in regulating bone metabolism has been extensively studied, ERβ has been largely dismissed as a relevant modulator of bone mass. Previous studies examining ERβ utilized a germline knockout mouse expressing transcript variants of ERβ and displaying systemic hormonal changes that confounded interpretation of the skeletal phenotype. Thus, we used a conditional ERβ mouse model to achieve deletion of ERβ specifically in early osteoprogenitor cells using the Prx1-Cre driver. We observed marked increases in the trabecular bone volume fraction (of 58% [p < 0.003] and 93% [p < 0.0003] in 6- and 12-week-old female ERβ(Prx1-CKO) mice, respectively) but no changes in cortical bone. Serum estradiol and IGF-I levels were unaltered in ERβ(Prx1-CKO) mice. Bone formation and resorption indices by histomorphometry and serum assays were unchanged in these mice, suggesting that alterations in bone turnover may have occurred early in development. However, the ratio of colony-forming unit-osteoblasts (CFU-OBs) to CFU-fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) was increased in bone marrow cultures from ERβ(Prx1-CKO) compared with control mice, indicating increased differentiation of osteoblast precursor cells into osteoblasts in ERβ(Prx1-CKO) mice. Detailed quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses of 128 genes in 16 prespecified pathways revealed significant downregulation of 11 pathways in ERβ(Prx1-CKO) mice. Thus, deletion of ERβ specifically in osteoblast lineage cells, in the absence of all splice variants, increases trabecular bone mass and modulates multiple pathways related to bone metabolism. These findings suggest that pharmacological inhibition of ERβ in bone may provide a novel approach to treat osteoporosis. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26418452

  14. Timing of peak bone mass in Caucasian females and its implication for the prevention of osteoporosis. Inference from a cross-sectional model.

    PubMed Central

    Matkovic, V; Jelic, T; Wardlaw, G M; Ilich, J Z; Goel, P K; Wright, J K; Andon, M B; Smith, K T; Heaney, R P

    1994-01-01

    To determine the timing of peak bone mass and density, we conducted a cross-sectional study of bone mass measurements in 265 premenopausal Caucasian females, aged 8-50 yr. Bone mass and bone mineral density were measured using dual X-ray absorptiometry and single-photon absorptiometry at the spine (anteroposterior, lateral), proximal femur, radius shaft, distal forearm, and the whole body. Bone mass parameters were analyzed using a quadratic regression model and segmented regression models with quadratic-quadratic or quadratic-linear form. The results show that most of the bone mass at multiple skeletal locations will be accumulated by late adolescence. This is particularly notable for bone mineral density of the proximal femur and the vertebral body. Bone mass of the other regions of interest is either no different in women between the age of 18 yr and the menopause or it is maximal in 50-yr-old women, indicating slow but permanent bone accumulation continuing at some sites up to the time of menopause. This gain in bone mass in premenopausal adult women is probably the result of continuous periosteal expansion with age. Since rapid skeletal mineral acquisition at all sites occurs relatively early in life, the exogenous factors which might optimize peak bone mass need to be more precisely identified and characterized. Images PMID:8113412

  15. Soccer increases bone mass in prepubescent boys during growth: a 3-yr longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Zouch, Mohamed; Zribi, Anis; Alexandre, Christian; Chaari, Hamada; Frere, Delphine; Tabka, Zouhair; Vico, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of 3-yr soccer practice on bone acquisition in prepubescent boys. We investigated 65 boys (aged 10-13 yr, Tanner stage I) at baseline, among which only 40 boys (Tanner stages II and III) have continued the 3-yr follow-up: 23 soccer players (F) completed 2-5 h of training plus 1 competition game per week and 17 controls (C). Bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm(2)) and bone mineral content (BMC, g) were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at different sites. At baseline, BMD was higher in soccer players than in controls in the whole body and legs. In contrast, there was nonsignificant difference BMD in head, femoral neck, arms, and BMC in all measured sites between groups. At 3-yr follow-up, soccer players were found to have higher BMD and BMC at all sites than controls, except for head BMD and BMC and arms BMC in which the difference was nonsignificant between groups. During the 3-yr follow-up, the soccer players were found to gain significantly more in lumbar spine (31.2% ± 2.9% vs 23.9% ± 2.1%; p < 0.05), femoral neck (24.1% ± 1.8% vs 11.4% ± 1.9%; p < 0.001), whole body (16.5% ± 1.4% vs 11.8% ± 1.5%; p < 0.05), and nondominant arm BMD (18.2% ± 1.4% vs 13.6% ± 1.7%; p < 0.05) as well as lumbar spine (62.5% ± 20.1% vs 39.5% ± 20.1%; p < 0.001), femoral neck, (37.7% ± 14.2% vs 28.9% ± 12.8%; p < 0.05) and nondominant arm BMC (68.6% ± 22.9% vs 50.1% ± 22.4%; p < 0.05) than controls. In contrast, soccer players have less %BMD and %BMC changes in the head than controls. A nonsignificant difference was found in legs, dominant arm, head %BMD and %BMC changes, and whole-body %BMC changes between groups. In summary, we suggest that soccer has an osteogenic effect BMD and BMC in loaded sites in pubertal soccer players. The increased bone mass induced by soccer training in the stressed sites was associated to a decreased skull bone mass after 3 yr of follow-up. PMID:25592396

  16. Bone Mass and Strength in School-Age Children Exhibit Sexual Dimorphism Related to Differences in Lean Mass: The Generation R Study.

    PubMed

    Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Heppe, Denise Hm; Yin, Jia-Lian; Trajanoska, Katerina; Uitterlinden, André G; Beck, Thomas J; Jaddoe, Vincent Wv; Rivadeneira, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    Bone strength, a key determinant of fracture risk, has been shown to display clear sexual dimorphism after puberty. We sought to determine whether sex differences in bone mass and hip bone geometry as an index of strength exist in school-age prepubertal children and the degree to which the differences are independent of body size and lean mass. We studied 3514 children whose whole-body and hip scans were measured using the same densitometer (GE-Lunar iDXA) at a mean age of 6.2 years. Hip dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans underwent hip structural analyses (HSA) with derivation of bone strength indices. Sex differences in these parameters were assessed by regression models adjusted for age, height, ethnicity, weight, and lean mass fraction (LMF). Whole-body bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) levels were 1.3% and 4.3% higher in girls after adjustment by LMF. Independent of LMF, boys had 1.5% shorter femurs, 1.9% and 2.2% narrower shaft and femoral neck with 1.6% to 3.4% thicker cortices than girls. Consequent with this geometry configuration, girls observed 6.6% higher stresses in the medial femoral neck than boys. When considering LMF, the sexual differences on the derived bone strength indices were attenuated, suggesting that differences in muscle loads may reflect an innate disadvantage in bone strength in girls, as consequence of their lower muscular acquisition. In summary, we show that bone sexual dimorphism is already present at 6 years of age, with boys having stronger bones than girls, the relation of which is influenced by body composition and likely attributable to differential adaptation to mechanical loading. Our results support the view that early life interventions (ie, increased physical activity) targeted during the pre- and peripubertal stages may be of high importance, particularly in girls, because before puberty onset, muscle mass is strongly associated with bone density and geometry in children. © 2015 American

  17. Visualizing fossilization using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry maps of trace elements in Late Cretaceous bones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koenig, A.E.; Rogers, R.R.; Trueman, C.N.

    2009-01-01

    Elemental maps generated by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) provide a previously unavailable high-resolution visualization of the complex physicochemical conditions operating within individual bones during the early stages of diagenesis and fossilization. A selection of LA-ICP-MS maps of bones collected from the Late Cretaceous of Montana (United States) and Madagascar graphically illustrate diverse paths to recrystallization, and reveal unique insights into geochemical aspects of taphonomic history. Some bones show distinct gradients in concentrations of rare earth elements and uranium, with highest concentrations at external bone margins. Others exhibit more intricate patterns of trace element uptake related to bone histology and its control on the flow paths of pore waters. Patterns of element uptake as revealed by LA-ICP-MS maps can be used to guide sampling strategies, and call into question previous studies that hinge upon localized bulk samples of fossilized bone tissue. LA-ICP-MS maps also allow for comparison of recrystallization rates among fossil bones, and afford a novel approach to identifying bones or regions of bones potentially suitable for extracting intact biogeochemical signals. ?? 2009 Geological Society of America.

  18. The National Osteoporosis Foundation's position statement on peak bone mass development and lifestyle factors: a systematic review and implementation recommendations.

    PubMed

    Weaver, C M; Gordon, C M; Janz, K F; Kalkwarf, H J; Lappe, J M; Lewis, R; O'Karma, M; Wallace, T C; Zemel, B S

    2016-04-01

    Lifestyle choices influence 20-40 % of adult peak bone mass. Therefore, optimization of lifestyle factors known to influence peak bone mass and strength is an important strategy aimed at reducing risk of osteoporosis or low bone mass later in life. The National Osteoporosis Foundation has issued this scientific statement to provide evidence-based guidance and a national implementation strategy for the purpose of helping individuals achieve maximal peak bone mass early in life. In this scientific statement, we (1) report the results of an evidence-based review of the literature since 2000 on factors that influence achieving the full genetic potential for skeletal mass; (2) recommend lifestyle choices that promote maximal bone health throughout the lifespan; (3) outline a research agenda to address current gaps; and (4) identify implementation strategies. We conducted a systematic review of the role of individual nutrients, food patterns, special issues, contraceptives, and physical activity on bone mass and strength development in youth. An evidence grading system was applied to describe the strength of available evidence on these individual modifiable lifestyle factors that may (or may not) influence the development of peak bone mass (Table 1). A summary of the grades for each of these factors is given below. We describe the underpinning biology of these relationships as well as other factors for which a systematic review approach was not possible. Articles published since 2000, all of which followed the report by Heaney et al. [1] published in that year, were considered for this scientific statement. This current review is a systematic update of the previous review conducted by the National Osteoporosis Foundation [1]. [Table: see text] Considering the evidence-based literature review, we recommend lifestyle choices that promote maximal bone health from childhood through young to late adolescence and outline a research agenda to address current gaps in knowledge

  19. The relationship between bioactive components in breast milk and bone mass in infants

    PubMed Central

    Casazza, Krista; Hanks, Lynae J; Fields, David A

    2014-01-01

    Human breast milk (HBM) contains numerous bioactive components, recently shown to be associated with growth and body composition in breastfed offspring. Reciprocity in adipogenic and osteogenic pathways suggests bone mass may also be influenced by these components. The association between bioactive components found in HBM and bone mineral content (BMC), to our knowledge, is unknown. The purpose of this proof-of-principle study was to evaluate the association between specific bioactive components in HBM in exclusively breastfed infants and skeletal health in the first 6 months of life and examine potential gender differences in these associations. Thirty-five mother–infant dyads were followed from 1 to 6 months. The contents of a single breast expression were used for analyses of bioactive components (insulin, glucose, leptin, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), whereas BMC was evaluated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. In the total sample, there was a positive association between TNFα and BMC at 1 (P=0.004) and 6 months (P=0.007). When stratified by sex, females exhibited a positive association between BMC and glucose and an inverse relationship between BMC and TNF-α at 1 month with TNF-α strengthening (P=0.006) at 6 months. In males, at 6 months a positive relationship between BMC and HBM glucose and an inverse relationship with HBM leptin were observed with no associations observed at 1 month. Although preliminary, the associations between bioactive components in HBM highlight the importance HBM has on bone accretion. It is critically important to identify factors in HBM that contribute to optimal bone health. PMID:25328673

  20. Association Analysis of WNT10B With Bone Mass and Structure Among Individuals of African Ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Zmuda, Joseph M; Yerges, Laura M; Kammerer, Candace M; Cauley, Jane A; Wang, Xiaojing; Nestlerode, Cara S; Wheeler, Victor W; Patrick, Alan L; Bunker, ClareAnn H; Moffett, Susan P; Ferrell, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    Wnts comprise a family of secreted growth factors that regulate the development and maintenance of many organs. Recently, Wnt10b was shown to stimulate osteoblastogenesis and bone formation in mice. To evaluate further the role of Wnt10b in bone health in humans, we performed bidirectional sequencing of ∼8 kb of the WNT10B gene region in 192 individuals (96 African, 96 white) to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We identified 19 SNPs with minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥0.01. Ten of these SNPs were not present in the NCBI dbSNP database (build 127), whereas 10 of the 20 SNPs (50%) reported in dbSNP were not verified. We initially genotyped seven tagging SNPs that captured common (MAF ≥ 0.05) variation in the region with r 2 > 0.80 and a potentially functional SNP in exon 5 in 1035 Afro-Caribbean men ≥40 yr of age. Association analysis showed three SNPs in a 3′ region of linkage disequilibrium that were associated with DXA measures of hip BMD. Associations between two of these three SNPs (rs1051886, rs3741627) with hip BMD were replicated in an additional 980 Afro-Caribbean men (p < 0.05), in the combined sample of 2015 men (p ≤ 0.006), and in 416 individuals ≥18 yr of age (mean, 44 yr) belonging to eight extended, multigenerational Afro-Caribbean families with mean family size >50 (3535 relative pairs; p < 0.05). Further analysis showed that rs1051886 and rs3741627 were associated with cortical cross-sectional area, periosteal circumference, and BMC in the radius, such that individuals with the minor alleles had lower biomechanical indices of long-bone bending strength. This analysis implicates the WNT10B locus as a genetic element in the regulation of bone mass and structural geometry. PMID:19016593

  1. Elevated Circulating Sclerostin Concentrations in Individuals With High Bone Mass, With and Without LRP5 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Kenneth E. S.; McCloskey, Eugene V.; Duncan, Emma L.; Rittweger, Jörn; Fraser, William D.; Smith, George Davey; Tobias, Jonathan H.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The role and importance of circulating sclerostin is poorly understood. High bone mass (HBM) caused by activating LRP5 mutations has been reported to be associated with increased plasma sclerostin concentrations; whether the same applies to HBM due to other causes is unknown. Objective: Our objective was to determine circulating sclerostin concentrations in HBM. Design and Participants: In this case-control study, 406 HBM index cases were identified by screening dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) databases from 4 United Kingdom centers (n = 219 088), excluding significant osteoarthritis/artifact. Controls comprised unaffected relatives and spouses. Main measures: Plasma sclerostin; lumbar spine L1, total hip, and total body DXA; and radial and tibial peripheral quantitative computed tomography (subgroup only) were evaluated. Results: Sclerostin concentrations were significantly higher in both LRP5 HBM and non-LRP5 HBM cases compared with controls: mean (SD) 130.1 (61.7) and 88.0 (39.3) vs 66.4 (32.3) pmol/L (both P < .001, which persisted after adjustment for a priori confounders). In combined adjusted analyses of cases and controls, sclerostin concentrations were positively related to all bone parameters found to be increased in HBM cases (ie, L1, total hip, and total body DXA bone mineral density and radial/tibial cortical area, cortical bone mineral density, and trabecular density). Although these relationships were broadly equivalent in HBM cases and controls, there was some evidence that associations between sclerostin and trabecular phenotypes were stronger in HBM cases, particularly for radial trabecular density (interaction P < .01). Conclusions: Circulating plasma sclerostin concentrations are increased in both LRP5 and non-LRP5 HBM compared with controls. In addition to the general positive relationship between sclerostin and DXA/peripheral quantitative computed tomography parameters, genetic factors predisposing to HBM may contribute to

  2. Skull bone mass deficit in prepubertal highly-trained gymnast girls.

    PubMed

    Courteix, D; Lespessailles, E; Obert, P; Benhamou, C L

    1999-07-01

    It is known that impact loading sport can increase the bone mineral density in the stressed sites of the skeleton in athletes. However, non weight-bearing sites are seldom studied in healthy young girl athletes. In order to study the effects of a long term intensive training on the non-stressed region of the skeleton (skull), we investigated both highly-trained girl athletes, involved in sports requiring or not significant impact loading on the skeleton and a girl control group. Bone mineral content (BMC) and density (BMD) were measured in the whole body, at lumbar spine, femoral neck, trochanter, Ward's triangle, radius, head and ribs, in 60 prepubertal girls including 12 swimmers, 32 gymnasts and 16 controls. Measurements were made by DXA. There were no statistical differences between the groups as regards age, height, body weight, body mass index, lean tissue mass and dietary calcium intake. Mean BMD in gymnasts was statistically higher than in other groups for radius (p < 0.001), femoral neck (p < 0.05) and Ward's triangle (p < 0.05) while there was no difference between swimmers and controls. Head BMC was significantly lower in gymnasts compared to other groups (241.9+/-41 g vs. 285.8+/-34.7 g and 291.1+/-50.2 g respectively in swimmers and controls, p < 0.001). The same observation was made for head BMD (p < 0.01). When body weight was used as a covariant, the contribution of the head BMC to the whole body was significantly lower (p < 0.001) in gymnasts (24.97%) than in swimmers (27.88%) and controls (27.77%). When compared between groups, the slopes of the regressions for head/whole body BMC or BMD were significantly lower in gymnasts (p < 0.05) than in other groups. These data suggest that in prepubertal children the increased bone density induced by gymnastic training in the stressed sites of the body could be related to a decreased skull bone mass. PMID:10452231

  3. Lycopene treatment against loss of bone mass, microarchitecture and strength in relation to regulatory mechanisms in a postmenopausal osteoporosis model.

    PubMed

    Ardawi, Mohammed-Salleh M; Badawoud, Mohammed H; Hassan, Sherif M; Rouzi, Abdulrahim A; Ardawi, Jumanah M S; AlNosani, Nouf M; Qari, Mohammed H; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-02-01

    Lycopene supplementation decreases oxidative stress and exhibits beneficial effects on bone health, but the mechanisms through which it alters bone metabolism in vivo remain unclear. The present study aims to evaluate the effects of lycopene treatment on postmenopausal osteoporosis. Six-month-old female Wistar rats (n=264) were sham-operated (SHAM) or ovariectomized (OVX). The SHAM group received oral vehicle only and the OVX rats were randomized into five groups receiving oral daily lycopene treatment (mg/kg body weight per day): 0 OVX (control), 15 OVX, 30 OVX, and 45 OVX, and one group receiving alendronate (ALN) (2μg/kg body weight per day), for 12weeks. Bone densitometry measurements, bone turnover markers, biomechanical testing, and histomorphometric analysis were conducted. Micro computed tomography was also used to evaluate changes in microarchitecture. Lycopene treatment suppressed the OVX-induced increase in bone turnover, as indicated by changes in biomarkers of bone metabolism: serum osteocalcin (s-OC), serum N-terminal propeptide of type 1 collagen (s-PINP), serum crosslinked carboxyterminal telopeptides (s-CTX-1), and urinary deoxypyridinoline (u-DPD). Significant improvement in OVX-induced loss of bone mass, bone strength, and microarchitectural deterioration was observed in lycopene-treated OVX animals. These effects were observed mainly at sites rich in trabecular bone, with less effect in cortical bone. Lycopene treatment down-regulated osteoclast differentiation concurrent with up-regulating osteoblast together with glutathione peroxidase (GPx) catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. These findings demonstrate that lycopene treatment in OVX rats primarily suppressed bone turnover to restore bone strength and microarchitecture. PMID:26549245

  4. Clinical and hormonal variables related to bone mass loss in anorexia nervosa patients.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Soto, María Luisa; González-Jiménez, Amalia; Chamorro-Fernández, Marta; Leyva-Martínez, Socorro

    2013-01-01

    A better understanding of the prognostic factors of low bone mass in anorexia nervosa (AN) and development of effective therapeutic strategies is critical. In order to determine which clinical, biochemical, and/or hormonal parameters could be related to bone mineral density (BMD), 47 female AN patients were classified according to the WHO osteoporosis criteria at lumbar spine (LS). This was a cross-sectional study of 16 AN women with osteoporosis criteria and 31without. Control group was 25 healthy, normal-weight, age-matched women. We assessed BMD using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at the LS and body composition. We measured serum fasting cortisol, estradiol, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), leptin, sex hormone-binding globulin, albumin and retinol binding protein levels. The prevalence of osteoporosis was 34% and osteopenia 19% at the LS. The AN group with osteoporosis had lower IGF-1 and estradiol levels (both p<0.001), lower serum leptin (p<0.02), and higher cortisolemia (p<0.03) levels compared with AN group without osteoporosis. The BMD and T-score at LS was inversely related to the duration of amenorrhea (p<0.02) and directly related to body mass index (BMI, p<0.002), total fat mass (p<0.03), serum IGF-1 (p<0.01), and estradiol levels (p<0.001) in AN patients. We conclude that AN women with a significant BMD loss have a high risk of developing osteoporosis. A low BMD is a consequence of hormonal alterations which include hypoestrogenism, hypoleptinemia, hypercortisolism, and decreases in IGF-1 levels, as well as a low BMI and fat mass. PMID:23601428

  5. Mass spectrometric monitoring of Sr-enriched bone cements--from in vitro to in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rohnke, Marcus; Henss, Anja; Kokesch-Himmelreich, Julia; Schumacher, Matthias; Ray, Seemun; Alt, Volker; Gelinsky, Michael; Janek, Juergen

    2013-11-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is a well-established technique in materials science, but is now increasingly applied also in the life sciences. Here, we demonstrate the potential of this analytical technique for use in the development of new bone implant materials. We tracked strontium-enriched calcium phosphate cements, which were developed for the treatment of osteoporotic bone, from in vitro to in vivo. Essentially, the spatial distribution of strontium in two different types of strontium-modified calcium phosphate cements is analysed by SIMS depth profiling. To gain information about the strontium release kinetics, the cements were immersed for 3, 7, 14 and 21 days in α-MEM and tris(hydroxymethyl)-aminomethane solution and analysed afterwards by ToF-SIMS depth profiling. For cements stored in α-MEM solution an inhibited strontium release was observed. By using principal component analysis to evaluate TOF-SIMS surface spectra, we are able to prove the adsorption of proteins on the cement surface, which inhibit the release kinetics. Cell experiments with human osteoblast-like cells cultured on the strontium-modified cements and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis of the mineralised extracellular matrix (mECM) prove clearly that strontium is incorporated into the mECM of the osteoblast-like cells. Finally, in an animal experiment, the strontium-doped cements are implanted into the femur of osteoporotic rats. After 6 weeks, only a slight release of strontium was found in the vicinity of the implant material. By using ToF-SIMS, it is proven that strontium is localised in regions of newly formed bone but also within the pre-existing tissue. PMID:24026517

  6. Bone mass and markers of bone and calcium metabolism in postmenopausal women treated with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (Calcitriol) for four years.

    PubMed

    Sairanen, S; Kärkkäinen, M; Tähtelä, R; Laitinen, K; Mäkelä, P; Lamberg-Allardt, C; Välimäki, M J

    2000-08-01

    To evaluate the long-term effect of calcitriol treatment on bone mineral density (BMD) of the femoral neck and lumbar spine and the parameters of calcium and bone metabolism in elderly women, 55 healthy, postmenopausal women, all aged 66 years, were enrolled in the study. Eighteen started a 4-year supplementation with 0.5 microg of calcitriol daily and 37 served as controls. Calcium intake of all the subjects was adjusted to 800 mg daily. In 4 years femoral neck BMD increased by 3.0% in the calcitriol group, but decreased by 1.6% in the control group (P = 0.009). The respective changes in lumbar spine BMD were +2.3% and +0.9% (P = 0.067). Two years' treatment with calcitriol increased the intestinal absorption of strontium by 57% (P < 0.001), doubled the urinary excretion of calcium (P < 0. 001), and decreased the mean parathyroid hormone (PTH) level by 32% (P < 0.01). In the calcitriol group the marker of bone formation, serum osteocalcin, decreased by 27% (P < 0.01), and the marker of bone resorption, serum C-telopeptide of type I collagen (CTx), by 33% (P = 0.05) after 2 years. In two subjects the calcitriol dose had to be reduced because of hypercalciuria. We conclude that calcitriol treatment increases bone mass at the femoral neck and lumbar spine, the increases being maintained for up to 4 years. The gain in bone mass results from reduced bone turnover which is partly a consequence of the enhanced intestinal absorption of calcium and suppressed serum PTH levels. PMID:10920216

  7. Paget's Disease of Bone

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Paget's Disease of Bone What is Paget's Disease of Bone? Click for more information Enlarged and Misshapen Bones Paget's disease of bone causes affected bones to ...

  8. Characterization of candidate reference materials for bone lead via interlaboratory study and double isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bellis, David J.; Hetter, Katherine M.; Verostek, Mary Frances; Parsons, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Four candidate ground bone reference materials (NYS RMs 05-01 through 04), were produced from lead-dosed bovine and caprine sources, and characterized by interlaboratory study. The consensus value ( X ) and expanded standard uncertainty (UX ) were determined from the robust average and standard deviation of the participants’ data for each NYS RM 05-01 through 04. The values were 1.08 ±0.04, 15.3 ±0.5, 12.4 ±0.5, and 29.9 ±1.1 μg g−1 Pb, respectively. Youden plots of z-scores showed a statistically significant correlation between the results for pairs of NYS RM 05-02 through 04, indicating common sources of between-laboratory variation affecting reproducibility. NYS RM 05-01 exhibited more random variability affecting repeatability at low concentration. Some participants using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) exhibited a negative bias compared to the all-method consensus value. Other methods used included inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), isotope dilution (ID-) ICP-MS, and ICP atomic (optical) emission spectroscopy (-OES). The NYS RMs 05-01 through 04 were subsequently re-analyzed in house using double ID-ICP-MS to assign certified reference values (C ) and expanded uncertainty (UC ) of 1.09 ± 0.03, 16.1 ± 0.3, 13.2 ± 0.3 and 31.5 ± 0.7, respectively, indicating a low bias in the interlaboratory data. SRM 1486 Bone Meal was analyzed for measurement quality assessment obtaining results in agreement with the certified values within the stated uncertainty. Analysis using a primary reference method based on ID-ICP-MS with full quantification of uncertainty calculated according to ISO guidelines provided traceability to SI units. PMID:23087531

  9. Body mass but not vitamin D status is associated with bone mineral content and density in young school children in northern Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Videhult, Frida K.; Öhlund, Inger; Hernell, Olle; West, Christina E.

    2016-01-01

    Background High latitude of residence where sun exposure is limited affects vitamin D status. Although vitamin D levels have been associated with poor bone health, cut-off values for optimising bone health are yet to be decided. Objective To assess vitamin D intake and status among young school children living at latitude 63–64 °N, in northern Sweden and to examine the association between vitamin D status and bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD). Design In a cross-sectional study, diet was assessed by a 4-day food diary and a food frequency questionnaire in 8- to 9-year-old children (n=120). Energy, vitamin D, and calcium intakes were calculated. Physical activity was assessed using a pedometer for 7 days. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (S-25[OH]D) levels were analysed by high-pressure liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation-mass spectrometry (n=113). BMC and BMD were assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. Height and weight were measured by standard procedures and BMI z-score was calculated using WHO AnthroPlus programme. Results The majority of children, 91%, did not reach the recommended vitamin D intake of 7.5 µg/day and 50% had insufficient S-25[OH]D levels defined as <50 nmol/l. The highest concentrations of S-25[OH]D were observed during the summer months (p=0.01). Body mass (p<0.01) but not S-25[OH]D was associated with measures of BMC and BMD. Furthermore, boys had higher total BMC (p=0.01), total body less head BMC (p=0.02), fat free mass (p<0.01), and a higher degree of physical activity (p=0.01) compared to girls. Conclusions Body mass was related to BMC and BMD measures in a population of prepubertal school children living at high latitudes in Sweden. Despite insufficient S-25[OH]D levels and low vitamin D intake, this did not appear to affect bone parameters. Prospective studies with repeated assessment of vitamin D status are needed to examine cut-off values for optimising bone health. PMID

  10. Deletion of Estrogen Receptor Beta in Osteoprogenitor Cells Increases Trabecular but Not Cortical Bone Mass in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nicks, Kristy M.; Fujita, Koji; Fraser, Daniel; McGregor, Ulrike; Drake, Matthew T.; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; Monroe, David G.; Khosla, Sundeep

    2016-01-01

    Although the role of ERα in regulating bone metabolism has been extensively studied, ERβ has been largely dismissed as a relevant modulator of bone mass. Previous studies examining ERβ utilized a germline knockout mouse expressing transcript variants of ERβ and displaying systemic hormonal changes that confounded interpretation of the skeletal phenotype. Thus, we used a conditional ERβ mouse model to achieve deletion of ERβ specifically in early osteoprogenitor cells using the Prx1-Cre driver. We observed marked increases in the trabecular bone volume fraction (of 58% [p <0.003] and 93% [p <0.0003] in 6- and 12-week-old female ERβPrx1–CKO mice, respectively) but no changes in cortical bone. Serum estradiol and IGF-I levels were unaltered in ERβPrx1–CKO mice. Bone formation and resorption indices by histomorphometry and serum assays were unchanged in these mice, suggesting that alterations in bone turnover may have occurred early in development. However, the ratio of colony-forming unit-osteoblasts (CFU-OBs) to CFU-fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) was increased in bone marrow cultures from ERβPrx1–CKO compared with control mice, indicating increased differentiation of osteoblast precursor cells into osteoblasts in ERβPrx1–CKO mice. Detailed quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses of 128 genes in 16 prespecified pathways revealed significant downregulation of 11 pathways in ERβPrx1–CKO mice. Thus, deletion of ERβ specifically in osteoblast lineage cells, in the absence of all splice variants, increases trabecular bone mass and modulates multiple pathways related to bone metabolism. These findings suggest that pharmacological inhibition of ERβ in bone may provide a novel approach to treat osteoporosis. PMID:26418452

  11. Subtle changes in bone mineralization density distribution in most severely affected patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Misof, B M; Roschger, P; Jorgetti, V; Klaushofer, K; Borba, V Z C; Boguszewski, C L; Cohen, A; Shane, E; Zhou, H; Dempster, D W; Moreira, C A

    2015-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with low aBMD as measured by DXA and altered microstructure as assessed by bone histomorphometry and microcomputed tomography. Knowledge of bone matrix mineralization is lacking in COPD. Using quantitative backscatter electron imaging (qBEI), we assessed cancellous (Cn.) and cortical (Ct.) bone mineralization density distribution (BMDD) in 19 postmenopausal women (62.1 ± 7.3 years of age) with COPD. Eight had sustained fragility fractures, and 13 had received treatment with inhaled glucocorticoids. The BMDD outcomes from the patients were compared with healthy reference data and were correlated with previous clinical and histomorphometric findings. In general, the BMDD outcomes for the patients were not significantly different from the reference data. Neither the subgroups of with or without fragility fractures or of who did or did not receive inhaled glucocorticoid treatment, showed differences in BMDD. However, subgroup comparison according to severity revealed 10% decreased cancellous mineralization heterogeneity (Cn.CaWidth) for the most severely affected compared with less affected patients (p=0.042) and compared with healthy premenopausal controls (p=0.021). BMDD parameters were highly correlated with histomorphometric cancellous bone volume (BV/TV) and formation indices: mean degree of mineralization (Cn.CaMean) versus BV/TV (r=0.58, p=0.009), and Cn.CaMean and Ct.CaMean versus bone formation rate (BFR/BS) (r=-0.71, p<0.001). In particular, those with lower BV/TV (<50th percentile) had significantly lower Cn.CaMean (p=0.037) and higher Cn.CaLow (p=0.020) compared with those with higher (>50th percentile) BV/TV. The normality in most of the BMDD parameters and bone formation rates as well as the significant correlations between them suggests unaffected mineralization processes in COPD. Our findings also indicate no significant negative effect of treatment with inhaled glucocorticoids on the bone

  12. Preservation and promotion of bone formation in the mandible as a response to a novel calcium-phosphate based biomaterial in mineral deficiency induced low bone mass male versus female rats

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Kritika; Naula, Diana P.; Mijares, Dindo Q.; Janal, Malvin N.; LeGeros, Raquel Z.; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Calcium and other trace mineral supplements have previously demonstrated to safely improve bone quality. We hypothesize that our novel calcium-phosphate based biomaterial (SBM) preserves and promotes mandibular bone formation in male and female rats on mineral deficient diet (MD). Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive one of three diets (n = 10): basic diet (BD), MD or mineral deficient diet with 2% SBM. Rats were sacrificed after 6 months. Micro-Computed Tomography (μCT) was used to evaluate bone volume and 3D-microarchitecture while microradiography (Faxitron) was used to measure bone mineral density from different sections of the mandible. Results showed that bone quality varied with region, gender and diet. MD reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and volume and increased porosity. SBM preserved BMD and bone mineral content (BMC) in the alveolar bone and condyle in both genders. In the alveolar crest and mandibular body, while preserving more bone in males, SBM also significantly supplemented female bone. Results indicate that mineral deficiency leads to low bone mass in skeletally immature rats, comparatively more in males. Furthermore, SBM administered as a dietary supplement was effective in preventing mandibular bone loss in all subjects. This study suggests that the SBM preparation has potential use in minimizing low peak bone mass induced by mineral deficiency and related bone loss irrespective of gender. PMID:26914814

  13. Preservation and promotion of bone formation in the mandible as a response to a novel calcium-phosphate based biomaterial in mineral deficiency induced low bone mass male versus female rats.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Kritika; Naula, Diana P; Mijares, Dindo Q; Janal, Malvin N; LeGeros, Racquel Z; Zhang, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Calcium and other trace mineral supplements have previously demonstrated to safely improve bone quality. We hypothesize that our novel calcium-phosphate based biomaterial (SBM) preserves and promotes mandibular bone formation in male and female rats on mineral deficient diet (MD). Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to receive one of three diets (n = 10): basic diet (BD), MD or mineral deficient diet with 2% SBM. Rats were sacrificed after 6 months. Micro-computed tomography (µCT) was used to evaluate bone volume and 3D-microarchitecture while microradiography (Faxitron) was used to measure bone mineral density from different sections of the mandible. Results showed that bone quality varied with region, gender and diet. MD reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and volume and increased porosity. SBM preserved BMD and bone mineral content (BMC) in the alveolar bone and condyle in both genders. In the alveolar crest and mandibular body, while preserving more bone in males, SBM also significantly supplemented female bone. Results indicate that mineral deficiency leads to low bone mass in skeletally immature rats, comparatively more in males. Furthermore, SBM administered as a dietary supplement was effective in preventing mandibular bone loss in all subjects. This study suggests that the SBM preparation has potential use in minimizing low peak bone mass induced by mineral deficiency and related bone loss irrespective of gender. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1622-1632, 2016. PMID:26914814

  14. An altered hormonal profile and elevated rate of bone loss are associated with low bone mass in professional horse-racing jockeys.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Eimear; McGoldrick, Adrian; Davenport, Colin; Kelleher, Grainne; Byrne, Brendan; Tormey, William; Smith, Diarmuid; Warrington, Giles D

    2012-09-01

    Horse-racing jockeys are a group of weight-restricted athletes, who have been suggested as undertaking rapid and extreme weight cycling practices in order to comply with stipulated body-mass standards. The aim of this study was to examine bone mass, turnover and endocrine function in jockeys and to compare this group with age, gender and body mass index matched controls. Twenty male professional jockeys and 20 healthy male controls participated. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scans and early morning fasting blood and urine samples were used to measure bone mass, turnover and a hormonal profile. Total body bone mineral density (BMD) was significantly lower in jockeys (1.143 ± 0.05 vs. 1.27 ± 0.06 g cm(-3), p < 0.01). Bone resorptive activity was elevated in the jockey group as indicated by significantly higher urinary NTx/creatinine (76.94 ± 29.52 vs. 55.9 ± 13.9 nmol mmol(-1), p < 0.01), resulting in a significantly negative uncoupling index between bone resorption and formation. Sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels were significantly higher in jockeys (41.21 ± 9.77 vs. 28.24 ± 9.98 nmol L(-1), p < 0.01) with a lower percentage of bioavailable testosterone (48.89 ± 7.38 vs. 59.18 ± 6.74 %, p < 0.01). SHBG and insulin-like growth factor-1 were independent predictors of total body and femoral neck BMD, respectively (p < 0.05). In conclusion, it appears that professional jockeys have an elevated rate of bone loss and reduced bone mass that appears to be associated with disrupted hormonal activity. It is likely that this may have occurred in response to the chronic weight cycling habitually experienced by this group. PMID:22491874

  15. Audiologic Patterns of Otic Capsule Preserving Temporal Bone Fracture: Effects of the Affected Subsites

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Young; Kim, Yoon Joong; Kim, Young Ho; Park, Min-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study was aimed to assess the relationship between the type of temporal bone area involved and conductive hearing loss. Methods. We enrolled 97 patients who visited the otolaryngology clinics of Seoul National University Hospital or Boramae Medical Center, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University with temporal bone fracture between January 2004 and January 2014. Audiometric parameters, including initial and improved air-bone (AB) conduction gap values, were reviewed in accordance with the temporal bone computed tomography (external auditory canal [EAC], middle ear [ME], mastoid [M], and ossicle [O]). Results. Patients with ossicular chain involvement exhibited a larger AB gap compared to those with no ossicular chain involvement at 250, 1,000, 2,000, and 4,000 Hz. Among the groups without ossicular chain involvement, the initial AB gap was largest in patients with EAC+ME+M involvement, followed by the ME+M and M-only involvement groups. The greatest improvement in the AB gap was observed in the EAC+ME+M group followed by the ME+M and M-only groups, irrespective of ossicular chain involvement. Improvements in AB gap values were smallest at 2,000 Hz. Conclusion. Conductive hearing loss pattern differed according to the temporal bone area involved. Therefore, areas such as the hematoma and hemotympanum, as well as the fracture line of the temporal bone area, must be evaluated to predict audiologic patterns with otic capsule preserving temporal bone fracture. PMID:27337953

  16. Individuals with high bone mass have an increased prevalence of radiographic knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hardcastle, S A; Dieppe, P; Gregson, C L; Arden, N K; Spector, T D; Hart, D J; Edwards, M H; Dennison, E M; Cooper, C; Sayers, A; Williams, M; Davey Smith, G; Tobias, J H

    2015-02-01

    We previously reported an association between high bone mass (HBM) and a bone-forming phenotype of radiographic hip osteoarthritis (OA). As knee and hip OA have distinct risk factors, in this study we aimed to determine (i) whether HBM is also associated with knee OA, and (ii) whether the HBM knee OA phenotype demonstrates a similar pattern of radiographic features to that observed at the hip. HBM cases (defined by DXA BMD Z-scores) from the UK-based HBM study were compared with unaffected family controls and general population controls from the Chingford and Hertfordshire cohort studies. A single blinded observer graded AP weight-bearing knee radiographs for features of OA (Kellgren-Lawrence score, osteophytes, joint space narrowing (JSN), sclerosis) using an atlas. Analyses used logistic regression, adjusting a priori for age and gender, and additionally for BMI as a potential mediator of the HBM-OA association, using Stata v12. 609 HBM knees in 311 cases (mean age 60.8years, 74% female) and 1937 control knees in 991 controls (63.4years, 81% female) were analysed. The prevalence of radiographic knee OA, defined as Kellgren-Lawrence grade≥2, was increased in cases (31.5% vs. 20.9%), with age and gender adjusted OR [95% CI] 2.38 [1.81, 3.14], p<0.001. The association between HBM and osteophytosis was stronger than that for JSN, both before and after adjustment for BMI which attenuated the ORs for knee OA and osteophytes in cases vs. controls by approximately 50%. Our findings support a positive association between HBM and knee OA. This association was strongest for osteophytes, suggesting HBM confers a general predisposition to a subtype of OA characterised by increased bone formation. PMID:25445455

  17. Pulsed electromagnetic fields partially preserve bone mass, microarchitecture, and strength by promoting bone formation in hindlimb-suspended rats.

    PubMed

    Jing, Da; Cai, Jing; Wu, Yan; Shen, Guanghao; Li, Feijiang; Xu, Qiaoling; Xie, Kangning; Tang, Chi; Liu, Juan; Guo, Wei; Wu, Xiaoming; Jiang, Maogang; Luo, Erping

    2014-10-01

    A large body of evidence indicates that pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF), as a safe and noninvasive method, could promote in vivo and in vitro osteogenesis. Thus far, the effects and underlying mechanisms of PEMF on disuse osteopenia and/or osteoporosis remain poorly understood. Herein, the efficiency of PEMF on osteoporotic bone microarchitecture, bone strength, and bone metabolism, together with its associated signaling pathway mechanism, was systematically investigated in hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rats. Thirty young mature (3-month-old), male Sprague-Dawley rats were equally assigned to control, HU, and HU + PEMF groups. The HU + PEMF group was subjected to daily 2-hour PEMF exposure at 15 Hz, 2.4 mT. After 4 weeks, micro-computed tomography (µCT) results showed that PEMF ameliorated the deterioration of trabecular and cortical bone microarchitecture. Three-point bending test showed that PEMF mitigated HU-induced reduction in femoral mechanical properties, including maximum load, stiffness, and elastic modulus. Moreover, PEMF increased serum bone formation markers, including osteocalcin (OC) and N-terminal propeptide of type 1 procollagen (P1NP); nevertheless, PEMF exerted minor inhibitory effects on bone resorption markers, including C-terminal crosslinked telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX-I) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAcP5b). Bone histomorphometric analysis demonstrated that PEMF increased mineral apposition rate, bone formation rate, and osteoblast numbers in cancellous bone, but PEMF caused no obvious changes on osteoclast numbers. Real-time PCR showed that PEMF promoted tibial gene expressions of Wnt1, LRP5, β-catenin, OPG, and OC, but did not alter RANKL, RANK, or Sost mRNA levels. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of PEMF on disuse-induced osteopenia were further confirmed in 8-month-old mature adult HU rats. Together, these results demonstrate that PEMF alleviated disuse-induced bone loss by promoting skeletal anabolic activities

  18. Osteoblast-Specific Overexpression of Human WNT16 Increases Both Cortical and Trabecular Bone Mass and Structure in Mice.

    PubMed

    Alam, Imranul; Alkhouli, Mohammed; Gerard-O'Riley, Rita L; Wright, Weston B; Acton, Dena; Gray, Amie K; Patel, Bhavmik; Reilly, Austin M; Lim, Kyung-Eun; Robling, Alexander G; Econs, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    Previous genome-wide association studies have identified common variants in genes associated with bone mineral density (BMD) and risk of fracture. Recently, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Wingless-type mouse mammary tumor virus integration site (WNT)16 that were associated with peak BMD in premenopausal women. To further identify the role of Wnt16 in bone mass regulation, we created transgenic (TG) mice overexpressing human WNT16 in osteoblasts. We compared bone phenotypes, serum biochemistry, gene expression, and dynamic bone histomorphometry between TG and wild-type (WT) mice. Compared with WT mice, WNT16-TG mice exhibited significantly higher whole-body areal BMD and bone mineral content (BMC) at 6 and 12 weeks of age in both male and female. Microcomputer tomography analysis of trabecular bone at distal femur revealed 3-fold (male) and 14-fold (female) higher bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV), and significantly higher trabecular number and trabecular thickness but lower trabecular separation in TG mice compared with WT littermates in both sexes. The cortical bone at femur midshaft also displayed significantly greater bone area/total area and cortical thickness in the TG mice in both sexes. Serum biochemistry analysis showed that male TG mice had higher serum alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, osteoprotegerin (OPG), OPG to receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (tumor necrosis family ligand superfamily, number 11; RANKL) ratio as compared with WT mice. Also, lower carboxy-terminal collagen cross-link (CTX) to tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5, isoform b (TRAPc5b) ratio was observed in TG mice compared with WT littermates in both male and female. Histomorphometry data demonstrated that both male and female TG mice had significantly higher cortical and trabecular mineralizing surface/bone surface and bone formation rate compared with sex-matched WT mice. Gene expression analysis demonstrated higher expression of Alp, OC, Opg, and Opg to

  19. [Relation between body mass index and bone mineral density in a sample population of Mexican women].

    PubMed

    Murillo-Uribe, A; Aranda-Gallegos, J E; Río de la Loza-Cava, M F; Ortíz-Luna, G; Mendoza-Torres, L J; Santos-González, J

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this trial is to demonstrate that a women with high body mass index (BMI > or = 28) has greater bone mineral density (BMD) from that with lower BMI. We studied 922 healthy women who met the inclusion criteria. They were classified into four groups according to their BMI (> or = 28 and < 28) and age (> or = 35 and < 35 years). Bone mineral measurement was performed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in the hip and at the lumbar region. BMD in overweight women older than 35 years was significantly higher in comparison with that of women with lower BMI, both in the hip and the lumbar spine. In overweight women younger than 35 years, we found greater BMD in the hip reaching statistical significance, but not at the lumbar spine. We conclude that obesity is associated with greater BMD (4% at the lumbar spine; 11% at the hip) probably due to both greater physical stress and higher estrogen levels. PMID:9737066

  20. First report of an aneurysmal bone cyst presenting as subungual mass.

    PubMed

    Müller, Cornelia Sigrid Lissi; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Koch, Katrin; Schneider, Günther; Pföhler, Claudia; Kohn, Dieter; Vogt, Thomas; Baumhoer, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Painful subungual tumor masses in the toes usually emerge as glomus tumors or subungual exostoses. We present a patient with an aneurysmal bone cyst located subungually in whom the diagnosis was delayed due to inadequate diagnostic procedures, which led to marked destruction of the distal phalanx of the great toe of the right foot. After biopsy, the distal phalanx could not be preserved due to critical soft tissue involvement and the size of the process. Thus, we describe this rare entity to encourage clinicians to establish the diagnosis by biopsy of a tissue swelling of unclear origin and duration that does not resolve after a short time. Imaging examinations are useful in demonstrating periosteal involvement and extension of the lesion and can be helpful in the diagnostic algorithm. An interdisciplinary approach is a top priority to ensure optimal treatment. PMID:27106295

  1. Markers of Bone Metabolism Are Affected by Renal Function and Growth Hormone Therapy in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doyon, Anke; Fischer, Dagmar-Christiane; Bayazit, Aysun Karabay; Canpolat, Nur; Duzova, Ali; Sözeri, Betül; Bacchetta, Justine; Balat, Ayse; Büscher, Anja; Candan, Cengiz; Cakar, Nilgun; Donmez, Osman; Dusek, Jiri; Heckel, Martina; Klaus, Günter; Mir, Sevgi; Özcelik, Gül; Sever, Lale; Shroff, Rukshana; Vidal, Enrico; Wühl, Elke; Gondan, Matthias; Melk, Anette; Querfeld, Uwe; Haffner, Dieter; Schaefer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The extent and relevance of altered bone metabolism for statural growth in children with chronic kidney disease is controversial. We analyzed the impact of renal dysfunction and recombinant growth hormone therapy on a panel of serum markers of bone metabolism in a large pediatric chronic kidney disease cohort. Methods Bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP5b), sclerostin and C-terminal FGF-23 (cFGF23) normalized for age and sex were analyzed in 556 children aged 6–18 years with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 10–60 ml/min/1.73m2. 41 children receiving recombinant growth hormone therapy were compared to an untreated matched control group. Results Standardized levels of BAP, TRAP5b and cFGF-23 were increased whereas sclerostin was reduced. BAP was correlated positively and cFGF-23 inversely with eGFR. Intact serum parathormone was an independent positive predictor of BAP and TRAP5b and negatively associated with sclerostin. BAP and TRAP5B were negatively affected by increased C-reactive protein levels. In children receiving recombinant growth hormone, BAP was higher and TRAP5b lower than in untreated controls. Sclerostin levels were in the normal range and higher than in untreated controls. Serum sclerostin and cFGF-23 independently predicted height standard deviation score, and BAP and TRAP5b the prospective change in height standard deviation score. Conclusion Markers of bone metabolism indicate a high-bone turnover state in children with chronic kidney disease. Growth hormone induces an osteoanabolic pattern and normalizes osteocyte activity. The osteocyte markers cFGF23 and sclerostin are associated with standardized height, and the markers of bone turnover predict height velocity. PMID:25659076

  2. Examination of the mass media process and personal factors affecting the assessment of mass media-disseminated health information.

    PubMed

    Avcı, Kadriye; Çakır, Tülin; Avşar, Zakir; Üzel Taş, Hanife

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the mass media and personal characteristics leading to health communication inequality as well as the role of certain factors in health communication's mass media process. Using both sociodemographic variables and Maletzke's model as a basis, we investigated the relationship between selected components of the mass communication process, the receiving of reliable health information as a result of health communication, and the condition of its use. The study involved 1853 people in Turkey and was structured in two parts. The first part dealt with questions regarding sociodemographic characteristics, the use of the mass media and the public's ability to obtain health information from it, the public's perception of the trustworthiness of health information, and the state of translating this information into health-promoting behaviours. In the second part, questions related to the mass communication process were posed using a five-point Likert scale. This section tried to establish structural equation modelling using the judgements prepared on the basis of the mass media model. Through this study, it has been observed that sociodemographic factors such as education and age affect individuals' use of and access to communication channels; individuals' trust in and selection of health information from the programme content and their changing health behaviours (as a result of the health information) are related to both their perception of the mass communication process and to sociodemographic factors, but are more strongly related to the former. PMID:25002272

  3. Bone quality is affected by food restriction and by nutrition-induced catch-up growth.

    PubMed

    Pando, Rakefet; Masarwi, Majdi; Shtaif, Biana; Idelevich, Anna; Monsonego-Ornan, Efrat; Shahar, Ron; Phillip, Moshe; Gat-Yablonski, Galia

    2014-12-01

    Growth stunting constitutes the most common effect of malnutrition. When the primary cause of malnutrition is resolved, catch-up (CU) growth usually occurs. In this study, we have explored the effect of food restriction (RES) and refeeding on bone structure and mechanical properties. Sprague-Dawley male rats aged 24 days were subjected to 10 days of 40% RES, followed by refeeding for 1 (CU) or 26 days long-term CU (LTCU). The rats fed ad libitum served as controls. The growth plates were measured, osteoclasts were identified using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining, and micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning and mechanical testing were used to study structure and mechanical properties. Micro-CT analysis showed that RES led to a significant reduction in trabecular BV/TV and trabecular number (Tb.N), concomitant with an increase in trabecular separation (Tb.Sp). Trabecular BV/TV and Tb.N were significantly greater in the CU group than in the RES in both short- and long-term experiments. Mechanical testing showed that RES led to weaker and less compliant bones; interestingly, bones of the CU group were also more fragile after 1 day of CU. Longer term of refeeding enabled correction of the bone parameters; however, LTCU did not achieve full recovery. These results suggest that RES in young rats attenuated growth and reduced trabecular bone parameters. While nutrition-induced CU growth led to an immediate increase in epiphyseal growth plate height and active bone modeling, it was also associated with a transient reduction in bone quality. This should be taken into consideration when treating children undergoing CU growth. PMID:25248555

  4. Pigment epithelium-derived factor restoration increases bone mass and improves bone plasticity in a model of osteogenesis imperfecta type VI via Wnt3a blockade.

    PubMed

    Belinsky, Glenn S; Sreekumar, Bharath; Andrejecsk, Jillian W; Saltzman, W Mark; Gong, Jingjing; Herzog, Raimund I; Lin, Samantha; Horsley, Valerie; Carpenter, Thomas O; Chung, Chuhan

    2016-08-01

    Null mutations in for pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), the protein product of the SERPINF1 gene, are the cause of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type VI. The PEDF-knockout (KO) mouse captures crucial elements of the human disease, including diminished bone mineralization and propensity to fracture. Our group and others have demonstrated that PEDF directs human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) commitment to the osteoblast lineage and modulates Wnt/β-catenin signaling, a major regulator of bone development; however, the ability of PEDF to restore bone mass in a mouse model of OI type VI has not been determined. In this study, PEDF delivery increased trabecular bone volume/total volume by 52% in 6-mo-old PEDF-KO mice but not in wild-type mice. In young (19-d-old) PEDF-KO mice, PEDF restoration increased bone volume fraction by 35% and enhanced biomechanical parameters of bone plasticity. A Wnt-green fluorescent protein reporter demonstrated dynamic changes in Wnt/β-catenin signaling characterized by early activation and marked suppression during terminal differentiation of hMSCs. Continuous Wnt3a exposure impeded mineralization of hMSCs, whereas the combination of Wnt3a and PEDF potentiated mineralization. Interrogation of the PEDF sequence identified a conserved motif found in other Wnt modulators, such as the dickkopf proteins. Mutation of a single amino acid on a 34-mer PEDF peptide increased mineralization of hMSC cultures compared with the native peptide sequence. These results indicate that PEDF counters Wnt signaling to allow for osteoblast differentiation and provides a mechanistic insight into how the PEDF null state results in OI type VI.-Belinsky, G. S., Sreekumar, B., Andrejecsk, J. W., Saltzman, W. M., Gong, J., Herzog, R. I., Lin, S., Horsley, V., Carpenter, T. O., Chung, C. Pigment epithelium-derived factor restoration increases bone mass and improves bone plasticity in a model of osteogenesis imperfecta type VI via Wnt3a blockade. PMID:27127101

  5. Does multiple paternity affect seed mass in angiosperms? An experimental test in Dalechampia scandens.

    PubMed

    Pélabon, C; Albertsen, E; Falahati-Anbaran, M; Wright, J; Armbruster, W S

    2015-09-01

    Flowers fertilized by multiple fathers may be expected to produce heavier seeds than those fertilized by a single father. However, the adaptive mechanisms leading to such differences remain unclear, and the evidence inconsistent. Here, we first review the different hypotheses predicting an increase in seed mass when multiple paternity occurs. We show that distinguishing between these hypotheses requires information about average seed mass, but also about within-fruit variance in seed mass, bias in siring success among pollen donors, and whether siring success and seed mass are correlated. We then report the results of an experiment on Dalechampia scandens (Euphorbiaceae), assessing these critical variables in conjunction with a comparison of seed mass resulting from crosses with single vs. multiple pollen donors. Siring success differed among males when competing for fertilization, but average seed mass was not affected by the number of fathers. Furthermore, paternal identity explained only 3.8% of the variance in seed mass, and siring success was not correlated with the mass of the seeds produced. Finally, within-infructescence variance in seed mass was not affected by the number of fathers. These results suggest that neither differential allocation nor sibling rivalry has any effect on the average mass of seeds in multiply sired fruits in D. scandens. Overall, the limited paternal effects observed in most studies and the possibility of diversification bet hedging among flowers (but not within flowers), suggest that multiple paternity within fruits or infructescence is unlikely to affect seed mass in a large number of angiosperm species. PMID:26174371

  6. Gravity, calcium, and bone - Update, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Morey-Holton, Emily

    1990-01-01

    Recent results obtained on skeletal adaptation, calcium metabolism, and bone browth during short-term flights and ground simulated-microgravity experiments are presented. Results demonstrate that two principal components of calcium metabolism respond within days to changes in body position and to weightlessness: the calcium endocrine system and bone characteristics. Furthermore, results of recent studies imply that bone biomechanics are more severely affected by spaceflight exposures than is the bone mass.

  7. The effects of dietary protein on bone mineral mass in young adults may be modulated by adolescent calcium intake.

    PubMed

    Vatanparast, Hassanali; Bailey, Donald A; Baxter-Jones, Adam D G; Whiting, Susan J

    2007-12-01

    The effect of dietary protein on bone mass measures at different life stages is controversial. We investigated the influence of protein intake on bone mass measures in young adults, considering the influence of calcium intake through adolescence. Subjects were 133 young adults (59 males, 74 females) who were participating in the Saskatchewan Pediatric Bone Mineral Accrual Study (1991-1997, 2003-2006). At adulthood, their mean age was 23 y. We assessed dietary intake via serial 24-h recalls carried out at least once yearly. Total body (TB) bone mineral content (BMC) and TB bone mineral density (BMD) were assessed annually using Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. We determined TB-BMC net gain from the age of peak height velocity (PHV) to early adulthood. We analyzed data from all subjects and subsets based on sex and calcium intake using multiple regression. TB-BMC significantly increased from age at PHV to early adulthood by 41% in males and 37% in females. Height, weight, physical activity, and sex were significant predictors of TB-BMC, TB-BMC net gain, and TB-BMD among all subjects. Protein intake predicted TB-BMC net gain in all subjects (beta = 0.11; P = 0.015). In females at peri-adolescence or early adulthood with adequate calcium intake (>1000 mg/d), protein intake positively predicted TB-BMC, TB-BMC net gain, and TB-BMD (P < 0.05). Our results indicate that when calcium intake is adequate, protein intake has a beneficial effect on the bone mass of young adult females. Protein, in the absence of sufficient calcium, does not confer as much benefit to bone. PMID:18029482

  8. Hoof position during limb loading affects dorsoproximal bone strains on the equine proximal phalanx.

    PubMed

    Singer, Ellen; Garcia, Tanya; Stover, Susan

    2015-07-16

    Sagittal fractures of the proximal phalanx (P1) in the racehorse appear to be associated with turf racing surfaces, which are known to restrict forward slide of the foot at impact. We hypothesized that restriction of forward foot slip would result in higher P1 bone strains during metacarpophalangeal joint (MCPJ) hyperextension. Unilateral limbs from six equine cadavers were instrumented with strain gauges and bone reference markers to measure dorsoproximal P1 bone strains and MCPJ extension, collateromotion and axial rotation during in vitro limb loading to 10,500 N. By limiting movement of the distal actuator platform, three different foot conditions (forward, free, and restricted) were applied in a randomised block design. Bone reference markers, recorded by video, were analyzed to determine motion of P1 relative to MC3. Rosette strain data were reduced to principal and shear magnitudes and directions. A mixed model ANOVA determined the effect of foot position on P1 bone strains and MCPJ angles. At 10,000 N load, the restricted condition resulted in higher P1 axial compressive (p=0.015), maximum shear (p=0.043) and engineering shear (p=0.046) strains compared to the forward condition. The restricted condition had higher compressive (p=0.025) and lower tensile (p=0.043) principal strains compared to the free condition. For the same magnitude of principal or shear strains, axial rotation and collateromotion angles were greatest for the restricted condition. Therefore, the increase in P1 principal compressive and shear bone strains associated with restricted foot slip indicate that alterations in foot:ground interaction may play a role in fracture occurrence in horses. PMID:26003484

  9. Age-related switch of bone mass in p47phox deficient mice through increased inflammatory milieu in bone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bone remodeling is age-dependently regulated and changes dramatically during the course of development. Excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals, has been suggested to be the leading cause of many inflammatory and degener...

  10. Direct stimulation of bone mass by increased GH signalling in the osteoblasts of Socs2−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Dobie, R; MacRae, V E; Huesa, C; van't Hof, R; Ahmed, S F; Farquharson, C

    2014-01-01

    The suppressor of cytokine signalling (Socs2 −/−)-knockout mouse is characterised by an overgrowth phenotype due to enhanced GH signalling. The objective of this study was to define the Socs2 −/− bone phenotype and determine whether GH promotes bone mass via IGF1-dependent mechanisms. Despite no elevation in systemic IGF1 levels, increased body weight in 4-week-old Socs2 −/− mice following GH treatment was associated with increased cortical bone area (Ct.Ar) (P<0.01). Furthermore, detailed bone analysis of male and female juvenile and adult Socs2 −/− mice revealed an altered cortical and trabecular phenotype consistent with the known anabolic effects of GH. Indeed, male Socs2 −/− mice had increased Ct.Ar (P<0.05) and thickness associated with increased strength. Despite this, there was no elevation in hepatic Igf1 expression, suggesting that the anabolic bone phenotype was the result of increased local GH action. Mechanistic studies showed that in osteoblasts and bone of Socs2 −/− mice, STAT5 phosphorylation was significantly increased in response to GH. Conversely, overexpression of SOCS2 decreased GH-induced STAT5 signalling. Although an increase in Igf1 expression was observed in Socs2 −/− osteoblasts following GH, it was not evident in vivo. Igf1 expression levels were not elevated in response to GH in 4-week-old mice and no alterations in expression was observed in bone samples of 6-week-old Socs2 −/− mice. These studies emphasise the critical role of SOCS2 in controlling the local GH anabolic bone effects. We provide compelling evidence implicating SOCS2 in the regulation of GH osteoblast signalling and ultimately bone accrual, which maybe via mechanisms that are independent of IGF1 production in vivo. PMID:25074853

  11. INTERLABORATORY COMPARISON OF MASS SPECTROMETRIC METHODS FOR LEAD ISOTOPES AND TRACE ELEMENTS IN NIST SRM 1400 BONE ASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The results of an interlaboratory comparison are reported for he lead isotope composition and for trace element concentrations in NIST SRM 1400 Bone Ash obtained using quadrupole and magnetic-sector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and (for the Pb isotopes on...

  12. The behavior of the micro-mechanical cement-bone interface affects the cement failure in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Waanders, Daan; Janssen, Dennis; Mann, Kenneth A.; Verdonschot, Nico

    2010-01-01

    In the current study, the effects of different ways to implement the complex micro-mechanical behavior of the cement-bone interface on the fatigue failure of the cement mantle was investigated. In an FEA-model of a cemented hip reconstruction the cement-bone interface was modeled and numerically implemented in four different ways: (I) as infinitely stiff, (II) as infinitely strong with a constant stiffness, (III) a mixed-mode failure response with failure in tension and shear, and (IV) realistic mixed mode behavior obtained from micro FEA-models. Case II, III and IV were analyzed using data from a stiff and a compliant micro-FEA model and their effects on cement failure were analyzed. The data used for Case IV was derived from experimental specimens that were tested previously. Although the total number of cement cracks was low for all cases, the compliant Case II resulted in twice as many cracks as Case I. All cases caused similar stress distributions at the interface. In all cases, the interface did not display interfacial softening; all stayed the elastic zone. Fatigue failure of the cement mantle resulted in a more favorable stress distribution at the cement-bone interface in terms of less tension and lower shear tractions. We conclude that immediate cement-bone interface failure is not likely to occur, but its local compliancy does affect the formation of cement cracks. This means that at a macro-level the cement-bone interface should be modeled as a compliant layer. However, implementation of interfacial post-yield softening does seem to be necessary. PMID:21036358

  13. Novel Genetic Loci Control Calcium Absorption and Femur Bone Mass as Well as Their Response to Low Calcium Intake in Male BXD Recombinant Inbred Mice.

    PubMed

    Reyes Fernandez, Perla C; Replogle, Rebecca A; Wang, Libo; Zhang, Min; Fleet, James C

    2016-05-01

    Low dietary calcium (Ca) intake during growth limits peak bone mass but physiological adaptation can prevent this adverse effect. To assess the genetic control on the physiologic response to dietary Ca restriction (RCR), we conducted a study in 51 BXD lines fed either 0.5% (basal) or 0.25% (low) Ca diets from ages 4 to 12 weeks (n = 8/line/diet). Ca absorption (CaAbs), femur bone mineral density (BMD), and bone mineral content (BMC) were examined. ANCOVA with body size as covariate was used to detect significant line and diet main effects, and line-by-diet interactions. Body size-corrected residuals were used for linkage mapping and to estimate heritability (h(2) ). Loci controlling the phenotypes were identified using composite interval mapping on each diet and for the RCR. h(2) of basal phenotypes (0.37-0.43) and their RCR (0.32-0.38) was moderate. For each phenotype, we identified multiple quantitative trait loci (QTL) on each diet and for the RCR. Several loci affected multiple traits: Chr 1 (88.3-90.6 cM, CaAbs, BMC), Chr 4 (45.8-49.2 cM, CaAbs, BMD, BMC), Chr 8 (28.6-31.6 cM, CaAbs, BMD, RCR), and Chr 15 (13.6-24 cM, BMD, BMC; 32.3-36 cM, CaAbs RCR, BMD). This suggests that gene clusters may regulate interdependent bone-related phenotypes. Using in silico expression QTL (eQTL) mapping and bioinformatic tools, we identified novel candidates for the regulation of bone under Ca stress (Ext1, Deptor), and for the first time, we report genes modulating Ca absorption (Inadl, Sc4mol, Sh3rf1, and Dennd3), and both Ca and bone metabolism (Tceanc2, Tll1, and Aadat). Our data reveal gene-by-diet interactions and the existence of novel relationships between bone and Ca metabolism during growth. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26636428

  14. Rye Affects Bacterial Translocation, Intestinal Viscosity, Microbiota Composition and Bone Mineralization in Turkey Poults

    PubMed Central

    Tellez, Guillermo; Latorre, Juan D.; Kuttappan, Vivek A.; Hargis, Billy M.; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that rye significantly increased both viscosity and Clostridium perfringens proliferation when compared with corn in an in vitro digestive model. Two independent trials were conducted to evaluate the effect of rye as a source of energy on bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, gut microbiota composition, and bone mineralization, when compared with corn in turkey poults. In each experiment, day-of-hatch, turkey poults were randomly assigned to either a corn or a rye diet (n = 0 /group). At 10 d of age, in both experiments, 12 birds/group were given an oral gavage dose of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-d). After 2.5 h of oral gavage, blood and liver samples were collected to evaluate the passage of FITC-d and bacterial translocation (BT) respectively. Duodenum, ileum and cecum gut sections were collected to evaluate intestinal viscosity and to enumerate gut microbiota. Tibias were collected for observation of bone parameters. Broilers fed with a rye diet showed increased (p<0.05) intestinal viscosity, BT, and serum FITC-d. Bacterial enumeration revealed that turkey poults fed with rye had increased the number of total lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in all three sections of the gastrointestinal tract evaluated when compared to turkey poults fed with corn. Turkey poults fed with rye also had significantly higher coliforms in duodenum and ileum but not in the ceca, whereas the total number of anaerobes increased only in duodenum. A significant reduction in bone strength and bone mineralization was observed in turkey poults fed with rye when compared with corn fed turkey poults. In conclusion, rye evoked mucosal damage in turkey poults that increased intestinal viscosity, increased leakage through the intestinal tract, and altered the microbiota composition and bone mineralization. Studies to evaluate dietary inclusion of selected Direct-Fed Microbial (DFM) candidates that produce exogenous enzymes in rye fed turkey poults are

  15. Rye affects bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, microbiota composition and bone mineralization in Turkey poults.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Guillermo; Latorre, Juan D; Kuttappan, Vivek A; Hargis, Billy M; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that rye significantly increased both viscosity and Clostridium perfringens proliferation when compared with corn in an in vitro digestive model. Two independent trials were conducted to evaluate the effect of rye as a source of energy on bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, gut microbiota composition, and bone mineralization, when compared with corn in turkey poults. In each experiment, day-of-hatch, turkey poults were randomly assigned to either a corn or a rye diet (n = 0 /group). At 10 d of age, in both experiments, 12 birds/group were given an oral gavage dose of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-d). After 2.5 h of oral gavage, blood and liver samples were collected to evaluate the passage of FITC-d and bacterial translocation (BT) respectively. Duodenum, ileum and cecum gut sections were collected to evaluate intestinal viscosity and to enumerate gut microbiota. Tibias were collected for observation of bone parameters. Broilers fed with a rye diet showed increased (p<0.05) intestinal viscosity, BT, and serum FITC-d. Bacterial enumeration revealed that turkey poults fed with rye had increased the number of total lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in all three sections of the gastrointestinal tract evaluated when compared to turkey poults fed with corn. Turkey poults fed with rye also had significantly higher coliforms in duodenum and ileum but not in the ceca, whereas the total number of anaerobes increased only in duodenum. A significant reduction in bone strength and bone mineralization was observed in turkey poults fed with rye when compared with corn fed turkey poults. In conclusion, rye evoked mucosal damage in turkey poults that increased intestinal viscosity, increased leakage through the intestinal tract, and altered the microbiota composition and bone mineralization. Studies to evaluate dietary inclusion of selected Direct-Fed Microbial (DFM) candidates that produce exogenous enzymes in rye fed turkey poults are

  16. Strategies for the chemical analysis of highly porous bone scaffolds using secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daming; Poologasundarampillai, Gowsihan; van den Bergh, Wouter; Chater, Richard J; Kasuga, Toshihiro; Jones, Julian R; McPhail, David S

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the distribution of critical elements (e.g. silicon and calcium) within silica-based bone scaffolds synthesized by different methods is central to the optimization of these materials. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) has been used to determine this information due to its very high surface sensitivity and its ability to map all the elements and compounds in the periodic table with high spatial resolution. The SIMS image data can also be combined with depth profiles to construct three-dimensional chemical maps. However, the scaffolds have interconnected pore networks, which are very challenging structures for the SIMS technique. To overcome this problem two experimental methodologies have been developed. The first method involved the use of the focused ion beam technique to obtain clear images of the regions of interest and subsequently mark them by introducing fiducial marks; the samples were then analysed using the ToF-SIMS technique to yield the chemical analyses of the regions of interest. The second method involved impregnating the pores using a suitable reagent so that a flat surface could be achieved, and this was followed by secondary ion mapping and 3D chemical imaging with ToF-SIMS. The samples used in this work were sol-gel 70S30C foam and electrospun fibres and calcium-containing silica/gelatin hybrid scaffolds. The results demonstrate the feasibility of both these experimental methodologies and indicate that these methods can provide an opportunity to compare various artificial bone scaffolds, which will be of help in improving scaffold synthesis and processing routes. The techniques are also transferable to many other types of porous material. PMID:24457328

  17. Genetic Analysis of High Bone Mass Cases from the BARCOS Cohort of Spanish Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Urreizti, Roser; Civit, Sergi; Cols, Neus; García-Giralt, Natàlia; Yoskovitz, Guy; Aranguren, Alvaro; Malouf, Jorge; Di Gregorio, Silvana; Río, Luís Del; Güerri, Roberto; Nogués, Xavier; Díez-Pérez, Adolfo; Grinberg, Daniel; Balcells, Susana

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the study were to establish the prevalence of high bone mass (HBM) in a cohort of Spanish postmenopausal women (BARCOS) and to assess the contribution of LRP5 and DKK1 mutations and of common bone mineral density (BMD) variants to a HBM phenotype. Furthermore, we describe the expression of several osteoblast-specific and Wnt-pathway genes in primary osteoblasts from two HBM cases. A 0.6% of individuals (10/1600) displayed Z-scores in the HBM range (sum Z-score >4). While no mutation in the relevant exons of LRP5 was detected, a rare missense change in DKK1 was found (p.Y74F), which cosegregated with the phenotype in a small pedigree. Fifty-five BMD SNPs from Estrada et al. [NatGenet 44:491-501,2012] were genotyped in the HBM cases to obtain risk scores for each individual. In this small group of samples, Z-scores were found inversely related to risk scores, suggestive of a polygenic etiology. There was a single exception, which may be explained by a rare penetrant genetic variant, counterbalancing the additive effect of the risk alleles. The expression analysis in primary osteoblasts from two HBM cases and five controls suggested that IL6R, DLX3, TWIST1 and PPARG are negatively related to Z-score. One HBM case presented with high levels of RUNX2, while the other displayed very low SOX6. In conclusion, we provide evidence of lack of LRP5 mutations and of a putative HBM-causing mutation in DKK1. Additionally, we present SNP genotyping and expression results that suggest additive effects of several genes for HBM. PMID:24736728

  18. Leptin in end stage renal disease (ESRD): a link between fat mass, bone and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Mallamaci, F; Tripepi, G; Zoccali, C

    2005-01-01

    Adipose tissue is now considered an important system operating strictly in concert with other systems. The adipocyte is the main producer of two pleiotropic compounds, leptin and adiponectin, modulating inflammation and having multiple effects in disparate organs including the cardiovascular and the central nervous system. Leptin has disparate influences on various physiologic and organ systems including glucose homeostasis, hematopoiesis and the reproductive and cardiovascular systems and is a crucial hormone for the regulation of food intake and body weight. Peripherally, leptin modulates insulin sensitivity and high leptin triggers insulin resistance and vice versa. Obesity, a situation where circulating leptin attains very high levels is accompanied by increased bone mass, a phenomenon which may depend on direct stimulation of osteoblasts by leptin. However in animal models the stimulating effect of leptin on the osteoblast is counterbalanced by a strong inhibitor effect on bone formation in the central nervous system. Two recent studies reported an inverse link between leptin, bone mass and PTH in dialysis patients suggesting that leptin may be implicated in low bone turnover in these patients, likely by a mechanism involving the central nervous system. Leptin induces vascular calcifications in vitro. In uremic man leptin is unrelated to valvular calcifications but predicts incident cardiovascular events in overweight and obese dialysis patients. Leptin seems to be a relevant player in the emerging connection between bone and cardiovascular alterations in patients with end stage renal disease. PMID:16245256

  19. Dinosaur bone beds and mass mortality: Implications for the K-T extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth

    1988-01-01

    Mass accumulations of fossilized large terrestrial vertebrate skeletons (bone beds: BB) provide a test for K-T catastrophic extinction hypotheses. The two major factors contributing to BB formation are mode of death and sedimentation rate. Catastrophic mass mortality (CMM) is the sudden death of numerous individuals where species, age, health, gender, or social ranking offer no survivorship advantage. Noncatastrophic mass mortality (NCMM) occurs over time and is strongly influenced by species, age, or gender. In addition to cause of death, sedimentation rate is also important in BB formation. Models of BBs can be made. The CMM drops all individuals in their tracks, therefore, the BB should reflect the living population with respect to species, age, or gender. The NCMM results in monospecific BBs skewed in the direction of the less fit, usually the very young or very old, or towards a specific gender. The NCMM and AM BBs may become more similar the more spread out over time NCMM deaths occur because carcasses are widely scattered requiring hydraulic accumulation, and the greater time allows for more disarticulation and weathering. The CMM and NCMM BB appear to be dominated by social animals. Applying this and the characteristics of mortality patterns to the uppermost Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation indicates that only NCMM and AM BB occur. Furthermore, NCMM BB are rare in the upper third of the Hell Creek. Near the K-T boundary, only AM BB are known. The absence of CMM and NCMM BB appears to be real reflecting a decrease in population levels of some dinosaurs prior to the K-T event. The absence of CMM suggests that the K-T event did not lead to an instantaneous extinction of dinosaurs. Nor was there a protracted die-off due to an asteroid impact winter, because no NCMM BB are known at or near the K-T boundary.

  20. Genetic predisposition to low bone mass is paralleled by an enhanced sensitivity to signals anabolic to the skeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judex, Stefan; Donahue, Leah-Rae; Rubin, Clinton

    2002-01-01

    The structure of the adult skeleton is determined, in large part, by its genome. Whether genetic variations may influence the effectiveness of interventions to combat skeletal diseases remains unknown. The differential response of trabecular bone to an anabolic (low-level mechanical vibration) and a catabolic (disuse) mechanical stimulus were evaluated in three strains of adult mice. In low bone-mineral-density C57BL/6J mice, the low-level mechanical signal caused significantly larger bone formation rates (BFR) in the proximal tibia, but the removal of functional weight bearing did not significantly alter BFR. In mid-density BALB/cByJ mice, mechanical stimulation also increased BFR, whereas disuse significantly decreased BFR. In contrast, neither anabolic nor catabolic mechanical signals influenced any index of bone formation in high-density C3H/HeJ mice. Together, data from this study indicate that the sensitivity of trabecular tissue to both anabolic and catabolic stimuli is influenced by the genome. Extrapolated to humans, these results may explain in part why prophylaxes for low bone mass are not universally effective, yet also indicate that there may be a genotypic indication of people who are at reduced risk of suffering from bone loss.

  1. Osteoblast-specific Notch2 inactivation causes increased trabecular bone mass at specific sites of the appendicular skeleton.

    PubMed

    Yorgan, Timur; Vollersen, Nele; Riedel, Christoph; Jeschke, Anke; Peters, Stephanie; Busse, Bjoern; Amling, Michael; Schinke, Thorsten

    2016-06-01

    Notch signaling is a key pathway controlling various cell fate decisions during embryogenesis and adult life. It is activated by binding of specific ligands to four different Notch receptors that are subsequently cleaved by presenilins to release an intracellular domain that enters the nucleus and activates specific transcription factors. While the skeletal analysis of various mouse models with activated or inactivated Notch signaling has demonstrated a general impact of this pathway on bone remodeling, the more recent identification of NOTCH2 mutations in individuals with Hajdu-Cheney syndrome (HCS) has highlighted its human relevance. Since HCS is primarily characterized by skeletal defects, these latter findings led us to analyze the specific role of Notch2 in skeletal remodeling. After observing Notch2 expression in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, we utilized Runx2-Cre and Lyz2-Cre mice to inactivate Notch2 in cells of the osteoblast or osteoclast lineage, respectively. Whereas Notch2(fl/fl)/Lyz2-Cre mice did not display significant alterations of skeletal growth, bone mass or remodeling, Notch2(fl/fl)/Runx2-Cre mice progressively developed skeletal abnormalities in long bones. More specifically, these mice displayed a striking increase of trabecular bone mass in the proximal femur and the distal tibia at 6 and 12months of age. Whereas undecalcified sectioning of the respective regions did not reveal impaired osteocyte differentiation as a potential trigger for the observed phenotype, ex vivo experiments with bone marrow cells identified an increased osteogenic capacity of Notch2(fl/fl)/Runx2-Cre cultures. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that Notch2 physiologically regulates bone remodeling by inhibiting trabecular bone formation in the appendicular skeleton. Understanding the underlying mechanisms may help to improve diagnosis and therapy of HCS. PMID:27102824

  2. Placental size at 19 weeks predicts offspring bone mass at birth: Findings from the Southampton Women’s Survey

    PubMed Central

    Crozier, SR; Winder, NR; Mahon, PA; Ntami, G; Godfrey, KM; Inskip, HM; Cooper, C

    2013-01-01

    Objectives In this study we investigate the relationships between placental size and neonatal bone mass and body composition, in a population based cohort. Study design 914 mother-neonate pairs were included. Placental dimensions were measured via ultrasound at 19 weeks gestation. Dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was performed on the neonates within the first two weeks of life. Results We observed positive relationships between placental volume at 19 weeks, and neonatal bone area (BA; r=0.26, p<0.001), bone mineral content (BMC; r=0.25, p<0.001) and bone mineral density (BMD; r=0.10, p=0.001). Thus placental volume accounted for 6.25% and 1.2% of the variation in neonatal BMC and BMD respectively at birth. These associations remained after adjustment for maternal factors previously shown to be associated with neonatal bone mineral accrual (maternal height, smoking, walking speed in late pregnancy, serum 25(OH) vitamin D and triceps skinfold thickness). Conclusions We found that placental volume at 19 weeks gestation was positively associated with neonatal bone size and mineral content. These relationships appeared independent of those maternal factors known to be associated with neonatal bone mass, consistent with notion that such maternal influences might act through modulation of aspects of placental function, e.g. utero-placental blood flow or maternal nutrient concentrations, rather than placental size itself. Low placental volume early in pregnancy may be a marker of a reduced postnatal skeletal size and increased risk of later fracture. PMID:22640438

  3. Child and Adolescent Affective and Behavioral Distress and Elevated Adult Body Mass Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Heather H.; Eddy, J. Mark; Kjellstrand, Jean M.; Snodgrass, J. Josh; Martinez, Charles R., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity rates throughout the world have risen rapidly in recent decades, and are now a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Several studies indicate that behavioral and affective distress in childhood may be linked to elevated adult body mass index (BMI). The present study utilizes data from a 20-year longitudinal study to examine the…

  4. Interindividual anatomical variations affect the plate-to-bone fit during osteosynthesis of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Hidemasa; Iwatsuki, Katsuyuki; Hara, Tatsuya; Kurimoto, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Michiro; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    We hypothesized that interindividual variations in the teardrop, which represents the volar projection of the lunate facet of the distal radius, cause unsatisfactory fitting of the volar locking plate to the bone. This can cause flexor tendon ruptures. Herein, we conducted a cross-sectional study and measured the ratio of teardrop height and the teardrop inclination angle as parameters of teardrop configuration for 200 standardized lateral radiographs (average age of the patients, 51 years). We also quantified the influence of the teardrop morphology by analyzing the fit of three locking plates to three radii with differing teardrop inclination angles using a three-dimensional computer-aided design system. The average ratios of the teardrop height and teardrop inclination angle were 0.42° (0.30-0.56°) and 28.8° (9.9-44.9°), respectively. The teardrop inclination angle was moderately correlated with age in men but not in women. In the plate-to-bone fit analyses, the fit of all the plates was significantly different between bones, with the configuration of the radius with the lowest teardrop inclination angle being the closest approximation to that of each plate. We demonstrated the interindividual variation in the shape of the teardrop and its influence on the fit of the volar plate, highlighting the importance of careful plate selection for achieving osteosynthesis of bones with a high teardrop inclination angle. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:953-960, 2016. PMID:26648456

  5. Do Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Affect Bone Healing? A Critical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pountos, Ippokratis; Georgouli, Theodora; Calori, Giorgio M.; Giannoudis, Peter V.

    2012-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) play an essential part in our approach to control pain in the posttraumatic setting. Over the last decades, several studies suggested that NSAIDs interfere with bone healing while others contradict these findings. Although their analgesic potency is well proven, clinicians remain puzzled over the potential safety issues. We have systematically reviewed the available literature, analyzing and presenting the available in vitro animal and clinical studies on this field. Our comprehensive review reveals the great diversity of the presented data in all groups of studies. Animal and in vitro studies present so conflicting data that even studies with identical parameters have opposing results. Basic science research defining the exact mechanism with which NSAIDs could interfere with bone cells and also the conduction of well-randomized prospective clinical trials are warranted. In the absence of robust clinical or scientific evidence, clinicians should treat NSAIDs as a risk factor for bone healing impairment, and their administration should be avoided in high-risk patients. PMID:22272177

  6. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect bone healing? A critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Pountos, Ippokratis; Georgouli, Theodora; Calori, Giorgio M; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2012-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) play an essential part in our approach to control pain in the posttraumatic setting. Over the last decades, several studies suggested that NSAIDs interfere with bone healing while others contradict these findings. Although their analgesic potency is well proven, clinicians remain puzzled over the potential safety issues. We have systematically reviewed the available literature, analyzing and presenting the available in vitro animal and clinical studies on this field. Our comprehensive review reveals the great diversity of the presented data in all groups of studies. Animal and in vitro studies present so conflicting data that even studies with identical parameters have opposing results. Basic science research defining the exact mechanism with which NSAIDs could interfere with bone cells and also the conduction of well-randomized prospective clinical trials are warranted. In the absence of robust clinical or scientific evidence, clinicians should treat NSAIDs as a risk factor for bone healing impairment, and their administration should be avoided in high-risk patients. PMID:22272177

  7. The high bone mass phenotype is characterised by a combined cortical and trabecular bone phenotype: Findings from a pQCT case–control study☆

    PubMed Central

    Gregson, Celia L.; Sayers, Adrian; Lazar, Victor; Steel, Sue; Dennison, Elaine M.; Cooper, Cyrus; Smith, George Davey; Rittweger, Jörn; Tobias, Jon H.

    2013-01-01

    High bone mass (HBM), detected in 0.2% of DXA scans, is characterised by a mild skeletal dysplasia largely unexplained by known genetic mutations. We conducted the first systematic assessment of the skeletal phenotype in unexplained HBM using pQCT in our unique HBM population identified from screening routine UK NHS DXA scans. pQCT measurements from the mid and distal tibia and radius in 98 HBM cases were compared with (i) 65 family controls (constituting unaffected relatives and spouses), and (ii) 692 general population controls. HBM cases had substantially greater trabecular density at the distal tibia (340 [320, 359] mg/cm3), compared to both family (294 [276, 312]) and population controls (290 [281, 299]) (p < 0.001 for both, adjusted for age, gender, weight, height, alcohol, smoking, malignancy, menopause, steroid and estrogen replacement use). Similar results were obtained at the distal radius. Greater cortical bone mineral density (cBMD) was observed in HBM cases, both at the midtibia and radius (adjusted p < 0.001). Total bone area (TBA) was higher in HBM cases, at the distal and mid tibia and radius (adjusted p < 0.05 versus family controls), suggesting greater periosteal apposition. Cortical thickness was increased at the mid tibia and radius (adjusted p < 0.001), implying reduced endosteal expansion. Together, these changes resulted in greater predicted cortical strength (strength strain index [SSI]) in both tibia and radius (p < 0.001). We then examined relationships with age; tibial cBMD remained constant with increasing age amongst HBM cases (adjusted β − 0.01 [− 0.02, 0.01], p = 0.41), but declined in family controls (− 0.05 [− 0.03, − 0.07], p < 0.001) interaction p = 0.002; age-related changes in tibial trabecular BMD, CBA and SSI were also divergent. In contrast, at the radius HBM cases and controls showed parallel age-related declines in cBMD and trabecular BMD. HBM is characterised by increased trabecular BMD and

  8. Effects of Habitual Physical Activity and Fitness on Tibial Cortical Bone Mass, Structure and Mass Distribution in Pre-pubertal Boys and Girls: The Look Study.

    PubMed

    Duckham, Rachel L; Rantalainen, Timo; Ducher, Gaele; Hill, Briony; Telford, Richard D; Telford, Rohan M; Daly, Robin M

    2016-07-01

    Targeted weight-bearing activities during the pre-pubertal years can improve cortical bone mass, structure and distribution, but less is known about the influence of habitual physical activity (PA) and fitness. This study examined the effects of contrasting habitual PA and fitness levels on cortical bone density, geometry and mass distribution in pre-pubertal children. Boys (n = 241) and girls (n = 245) aged 7-9 years had a pQCT scan to measure tibial mid-shaft total, cortical and medullary area, cortical thickness, density, polar strength strain index (SSIpolar) and the mass/density distribution through the bone cortex (radial distribution divided into endo-, mid- and pericortical regions) and around the centre of mass (polar distribution). Four contrasting PA and fitness groups (inactive-unfit, inactive-fit, active-unfit, active-fit) were generated based on daily step counts (pedometer, 7-days) and fitness levels (20-m shuttle test and vertical jump) for boys and girls separately. Active-fit boys had 7.3-7.7 % greater cortical area and thickness compared to inactive-unfit boys (P < 0.05), which was largely due to a 6.4-7.8 % (P < 0.05) greater cortical mass in the posterior-lateral, medial and posterior-medial 66 % tibial regions. Cortical area was not significantly different across PA-fitness categories in girls, but active-fit girls had 6.1 % (P < 0.05) greater SSIpolar compared to inactive-fit girls, which was likely due to their 6.7 % (P < 0.05) greater total bone area. There was also a small region-specific cortical mass benefit in the posterior-medial 66 % tibia cortex in active-fit girls. Higher levels of habitual PA-fitness were associated with small regional-specific gains in 66 % tibial cortical bone mass in pre-pubertal children, particularly boys. PMID:26983726

  9. Bone tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... physical exam. Tests that may be done include: Alkaline phosphatase blood level Bone biopsy Bone scan Chest x- ... also affect the results of the following tests: Alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme Blood calcium level Parathyroid hormone Blood phosphorus ...

  10. Distribution of fat, non-osseous lean and bone mineral mass in international Rugby Union and Rugby Sevens players.

    PubMed

    Higham, D G; Pyne, D B; Anson, J M; Dziedzic, C E; Slater, G J

    2014-06-01

    Differences in the body composition of international Rugby Union and Rugby Sevens players, and between players of different positions are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in the quantity and regional distribution of fat, non-osseous lean and bone mineral mass between playing units in Rugby Union and Rugby Sevens. Male Rugby Union (n=21 forwards, 17 backs) and Rugby Sevens (n=11 forwards, 16 backs) players from the Australian national squads were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The digital image of each player was partitioned into anatomical regions including the arms, legs, trunk, and android and gynoid regions. Compared with backs, forwards in each squad were heavier and exhibited higher absolute regional fat (Union 43-67%; ±~17%, range of % differences; ±~95% confidence limits (CL); Sevens 20-26%; ±~29%), non-osseous lean (Union 14-22%; ±~5.8%; Sevens 6.9-8.4%; ±~6.6%) and bone mineral (Union 12-26%; ±~7.2%; Sevens 5.0-11%; ±~7.2%) mass. When tissue mass was expressed relative to regional mass, differences between Rugby Sevens forwards and backs were mostly unclear. Rugby Union forwards had higher relative fat mass (1.7-4.7%; ±~1.9%, range of differences; ±~95% CL) and lower relative non-osseous lean mass (-4.2 to -1.8%; ±~1.8%) than backs in all body regions. Competing in Rugby Union or Rugby Sevens characterized the distribution of fat and non-osseous lean mass to a greater extent than a player's positional group, whereas the distribution of bone mineral mass was associated more with a player's position. Differences in the quantity and distribution of tissues appear to be related to positional roles and specific demands of competition in Rugby Union and Rugby Sevens. PMID:24408768

  11. Relationship of Weight and Body Mass Index with Bone Mineral Density in Adult Men from Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Hoxha, Rexhep; Islami, Hilmi; Qorraj-Bytyqi, Hasime; Thaçi, Shpetim; Bahtiri, Elton

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective: Body weight and body mass index (BMI) are considered strong predictors of osteoporotic fractures, though optimal BMI levels remain unsettled. There are several studies conducted on women about the relationship between BMI and bone mineral density (BMD), and just a few so far on men. Therefore, the objective of current study was to analyze the relationship between weight and BMI and BMD measured in lumbar spine (L1-L4), femur neck and total hip in 64 men from Kosovo. Methods: This cross-sectional study included a population of 64 men divided into three BMI groups. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) measurements were done in all the study participants. Results: Pearson's correlation analysis showed a significant positive correlation between weight and BMI and BMD in femur neck and in total hip, and a significant negative correlation between age and femur neck BMD. Age-adjusted linear regression analysis showed that weight and BMI had a significant positive association with BMD levels. Conclusion: Although the results show significant relationship between BMI and BMD, the negative relationship between age and femur neck BMD may serve as guidance to initiate early assessment of the BMD in this region as well as preventive measures of osteoporosis and fractures among ageing men population PMID:25568627

  12. Palaeoecological and morphofunctional interpretation of bone mass increase: an example in Late Cretaceous shallow marine squamates.

    PubMed

    Houssaye, Alexandra

    2013-02-01

    Bone mass increase (BMI; i.e. osteosclerosis with possible additional pachyostosis) is characteristically displayed by many Late Cretaceous squamates that adapted to shallow marine environments-plesiopelvic mosasauroids, stem-ophidians and pachyophiids. A combined morphological and microanatomical analysis of vertebrae and, to a lesser extent, ribs of these fossil squamates provides new data about the distribution and variability of this osseous specialization in these taxa. Classical thin sections and third generation synchrotron microtomography and laminography were used for the microanatomical analysis. Following the explanation of the likely involvement of this specialization in the control of buoyancy, body trim and Carrier's constraint, new palaeoecological inferences and new hypotheses about the locomotor abilities and life environment of these organisms are produced. The taxa displaying BMI are considered to have undertaken long dives, hovering slowly and maintaining a horizontal trim, in shallow and protected water environments. Conversely, marine stem-ophidians deprived of this specialization are regarded as slow surface swimmers able to live in more open marine environments. This study highlights the importance of microanatomical data for palaeoecological studies. It also discusses the significance of the use of this specialization as a character in phylogenetic studies. PMID:22943660

  13. Low bone mass and changes in the osteocyte network in mice lacking autophagy in the osteoblast lineage

    PubMed Central

    Piemontese, Marilina; Onal, Melda; Xiong, Jinhu; Han, Li; Thostenson, Jeff D.; Almeida, Maria; O’Brien, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy maintains cell function and homeostasis by recycling intracellular components. This process is also required for morphological changes associated with maturation of some cell types. Osteoblasts are bone forming cells some of which become embedded in bone and differentiate into osteocytes. This transformation includes development of long cellular projections and a reduction in endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. We examined the role of autophagy in osteoblasts by deleting Atg7 using an Osterix1-Cre transgene, which causes recombination in osteoblast progenitors and their descendants. Mice lacking Atg7 in the entire osteoblast lineage had low bone mass and fractures associated with reduced numbers of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Suppression of autophagy also reduced the amount of osteocyte cellular projections and led to retention of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria in osteocytes. These results demonstrate that autophagy in osteoblasts contributes to skeletal homeostasis and to the morphological changes associated with osteocyte formation. PMID:27064143

  14. Lean mass and fat mass have differing associations with bone microarchitecture assessed by high resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography in men and women from the Hertfordshire Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Mark H; Ward, Kate A; Ntani, Georgia; Parsons, Camille; Thompson, Jennifer; Sayer, Avan A; Dennison, Elaine M; Cooper, Cyrus

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the effects of muscle and fat on bone is increasingly important in the optimisation of bone health. We explored relationships between bone microarchitecture and body composition in older men and women from the Hertfordshire Cohort Study. 175 men and 167 women aged 72-81 years were studied. High resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) images (voxel size 82 μm) were acquired from the non-dominant distal radius and tibia with a Scanco XtremeCT scanner. Standard morphological analysis was performed for assessment of macrostructure, densitometry, cortical porosity and trabecular microarchitecture. Body composition was assessed using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) (Lunar Prodigy Advanced). Lean mass index (LMI) was calculated as lean mass divided by height squared and fat mass index (FMI) as fat mass divided by height squared. The mean (standard deviation) age in men and women was 76 (3) years. In univariate analyses, tibial cortical area (p<0.01), cortical thickness (p<0.05) and trabecular number (p<0.01) were positively associated with LMI and FMI in both men and women. After mutual adjustment, relationships between cortical area and thickness were only maintained with LMI [tibial cortical area, β (95% confidence interval (CI)): men 6.99 (3.97,10.01), women 3.59 (1.81,5.38)] whereas trabecular number and density were associated with FMI. Interactions by sex were found, including for the relationships of LMI with cortical area and FMI with trabecular area in both the radius and tibia (p<0.05). In conclusion, LMI and FMI appeared to show independent relationships with bone microarchitecture. Further studies are required to confirm the direction of causality and explore the mechanisms underlying these tissue-specific associations. PMID:26187195

  15. Factors that affect postnatal bone growth retardation in the twitcher murine model of Krabbe disease

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Miguel Agustin; Ries, William Louis; Shanmugarajan, Srinivasan; Arboleda, Gonzalo; Singh, Inderjit; Singh, Avtar Kaur

    2010-01-01

    Krabbe disease is an inherited lysosomal disorder in which galactosylsphingosine (psychosine) accumulates mainly in the central nervous system. To gain insight into the possible mechanism(s) that may be participating in the inhibition of the postnatal somatic growth described in the animal model of this disease (twitcher mouse, twi), we studied their femora. This study reports that twi femora are smaller than of those of wild type (wt), and present with abnormality of marrow cellularity, bone deposition (osteoblastic function), and osteoclastic activity. Furthermore, lipidomic analysis indicates altered sphingolipid homeostasis, but without significant changes in the levels of sphingolipid-derived intermediates of cell death (ceramide) or the levels of the osteoclast-osteoblast coupling factor (sphingosine-1-phosphate). However, there was significant accumulation of psychosine in the femora of adult twi animals as compared to wt, without induction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha or interleukin-6. Analysis of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) plasma levels, a liver secreted hormone known to play a role in bone growth, indicated a drastic reduction in twi animals when compared to wt. To identify the cause of the decrease, we examined the IGF-1 mRNA expression and protein levels in the liver. The results indicated a significant reduction of IGF-1 mRNA as well as protein levels in the liver from twi as compared to wt littermates. Our data suggest that a combination of endogenous (psychosine) and endocrine (IGF-1) factors play a role in the inhibition of postnatal bone growth in twi mice; and further suggest that derangements of liver function may be contributing, at least in part, to this alteration. PMID:20441793

  16. Age and skeletal sites affect BMP-2 responsiveness of human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Osyczka, Anna Maria; Damek-Poprawa, Monika; Wojtowicz, Aleksandra; Akintoye, Sunday O

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) contain osteoprogenitors responsive to stimulation by osteogenic growth factors like bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). When used as grafts, BMSCs can be harvested from different skeletal sites such as axial, appendicular, and orofacial bones, but the lower therapeutic efficacy of BMPs on BMSCs-responsiveness in humans compared to animal models may be due partly to effects of skeletal site and age of donor. We previously reported superior differentiation capacity and osteogenic properties of orofacial BMSCs relative to iliac crest BMSCs in same individuals. This study tested the hypothesis that recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) stimulates human BMSCs differently based on age and skeletal site of harvest. Adult maxilla, mandible, and iliac crest BMSCs from same individuals and pediatric iliac crest BMSCs were comparatively assessed for BMP-2 responsiveness under serum-containing and serum-free insulin-supplemented culture conditions. Adult orofacial BMSCs were more BMP-2-responsive than iliac crest BMSCs based on higher gene transcripts of alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and osteogenic transcription factors MSX-2 and Osterix in serum-free insulin-containing medium. Pediatric iliac crest BMSCs were more responsive to rhBMP-2 than adult iliac crest BMSCs based on higher expression of alkaline phosphatase and osteopontin in serum-containing medium. Unlike orofacial BMSCs, MSX-2 and Osterix transcripts were similarly expressed by adult and pediatric iliac crest BMSCs in response to rhBMP-2. These data demonstrate that age and skeletal site-specific differences exist in BMSC osteogenic responsiveness to BMP-2 stimulation and suggest that MSX-2 and Osterix may be potential regulatory transcription factors in BMP-mediated osteogenesis of adult orofacial cells. PMID:19637063

  17. Age and Skeletal Sites Affect BMP-2 Responsiveness of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Osyczka, Anna M.; Damek-Poprawa, Monika; Wojtowicz, Aleksandra; Akintoye, Sunday O.

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) contain osteoprogenitors responsive to stimulation by osteogenic growth factors like bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). When used as grafts, BMSCs can be harvested from different skeletal sites such as axial, appendicular and orofacial bones, but the lower therapeutic efficacy of BMPs on BMSCs-responsiveness in humans compared to animal models may be partly due to effects of skeletal site and age of donor. We previously reported superior differentiation capacity and osteogenic properties of orofacial BMSCs relative to iliac crest BMSCs in same individuals. This study tested the hypothesis that recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) stimulates human BMSCs differently based on age and skeletal site of harvest. Adult maxilla, mandible and iliac crest BMSCs from same individuals and pediatric iliac crest BMSCs were comparatively assessed for BMP-2 responsiveness under serum-containing and serum-free insulin-supplemented culture conditions. Adult orofacial BMSCs were more BMP-2-responsive than iliac crest BMSCs based on higher gene transcripts of alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin and osteogenic transcription factors MSX-2 and Osterix in serum-free insulin-containing medium. Pediatric iliac crest BMSCs were more responsive to rhBMP-2 than adult iliac crest BMSCs based on higher expression of alkaline phosphatase and osteopontin in serum-containing medium. Unlike orofacial BMSCs, MSX-2 and Osterix transcripts were similarly expressed by adult and pediatric iliac crest BMSCs in response to rhBMP-2. These data demonstrate that age and skeletal site-specific differences exist in BMSC osteogenic responsiveness to BMP-2 stimulation and suggest that MSX-2 and Osterix may be potential regulatory transcription factors in BMP-mediated osteogenesis of adult orofacial cells. PMID:19637063

  18. Identification and reciprocal introgression of a QTL affecting body mass in mice

    PubMed Central

    Christians, Julian K; Rance, Kellie A; Knott, Sara A; Pignatelli, Pat M; Oliver, Fiona; Bünger, Lutz

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a QTL in different genetic backgrounds. A QTL affecting body mass on chromosome 6 was identified in an F2 cross between two lines of mice that have been divergently selected for this trait. The effect of the QTL on mass increased between 6 and 10 weeks of age and was not sex-specific. Body composition analysis showed effects on fat-free dry body mass and fat mass. To examine the effect of this QTL in different genetic backgrounds, the high body mass sixth chromosome was introgressed into the low body mass genetic background and vice versa by repeated marker-assisted backcrossing. After three generations of backcrossing, new F2 populations were established within each of the introgression lines by crossing individuals that were heterozygous across the sixth chromosome. The estimated additive effect of the QTL on 10-week body mass was similar in both genetic backgrounds and in the original F2 population (i.e., ~0.4 phenotypic standard deviations); no evidence of epistatic interaction with the genetic background was found. The 95% confidence interval for the location of the QTL was refined to a region of approximately 7 cM between D6Mit268 and D6Mit123. PMID:15339634

  19. Lean Mass and Body Fat Percentage Are Contradictory Predictors of Bone Mineral Density in Pre-Menopausal Pacific Island Women

    PubMed Central

    Casale, Maria; von Hurst, Pamela R.; Beck, Kathryn L.; Shultz, Sarah; Kruger, Marlena C.; O’Brien, Wendy; Conlon, Cathryn A.; Kruger, Rozanne

    2016-01-01

    Anecdotally, it is suggested that Pacific Island women have good bone mineral density (BMD) compared to other ethnicities; however, little evidence for this or for associated factors exists. This study aimed to explore associations between predictors of bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm2), in pre-menopausal Pacific Island women. Healthy pre-menopausal Pacific Island women (age 16–45 years) were recruited as part of the larger EXPLORE Study. Total body BMD and body composition were assessed using Dual X-ray Absorptiometry and air-displacement plethysmography (n = 83). A food frequency questionnaire (n = 56) and current bone-specific physical activity questionnaire (n = 59) were completed. Variables expected to be associated with BMD were applied to a hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Due to missing data, physical activity and dietary intake factors were considered only in simple correlations. Mean BMD was 1.1 ± 0.08 g/cm2. Bone-free, fat-free lean mass (LMO, 52.4 ± 6.9 kg) and age were positively associated with BMD, and percent body fat (38.4 ± 7.6) was inversely associated with BMD, explaining 37.7% of total variance. Lean mass was the strongest predictor of BMD, while many established contributors to bone health (calcium, physical activity, protein, and vitamin C) were not associated with BMD in this population, partly due to difficulty retrieving dietary data. This highlights the importance of physical activity and protein intake during any weight loss interventions to in order to minimise the loss of muscle mass, whilst maximizing loss of adipose tissue. PMID:27483314

  20. Lean Mass and Body Fat Percentage Are Contradictory Predictors of Bone Mineral Density in Pre-Menopausal Pacific Island Women.

    PubMed

    Casale, Maria; von Hurst, Pamela R; Beck, Kathryn L; Shultz, Sarah; Kruger, Marlena C; O'Brien, Wendy; Conlon, Cathryn A; Kruger, Rozanne

    2016-01-01

    Anecdotally, it is suggested that Pacific Island women have good bone mineral density (BMD) compared to other ethnicities; however, little evidence for this or for associated factors exists. This study aimed to explore associations between predictors of bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm²), in pre-menopausal Pacific Island women. Healthy pre-menopausal Pacific Island women (age 16-45 years) were recruited as part of the larger EXPLORE Study. Total body BMD and body composition were assessed using Dual X-ray Absorptiometry and air-displacement plethysmography (n = 83). A food frequency questionnaire (n = 56) and current bone-specific physical activity questionnaire (n = 59) were completed. Variables expected to be associated with BMD were applied to a hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Due to missing data, physical activity and dietary intake factors were considered only in simple correlations. Mean BMD was 1.1 ± 0.08 g/cm². Bone-free, fat-free lean mass (LMO, 52.4 ± 6.9 kg) and age were positively associated with BMD, and percent body fat (38.4 ± 7.6) was inversely associated with BMD, explaining 37.7% of total variance. Lean mass was the strongest predictor of BMD, while many established contributors to bone health (calcium, physical activity, protein, and vitamin C) were not associated with BMD in this population, partly due to difficulty retrieving dietary data. This highlights the importance of physical activity and protein intake during any weight loss interventions to in order to minimise the loss of muscle mass, whilst maximizing loss of adipose tissue. PMID:27483314

  1. Glucocorticoids, Osteocytes, and Skeletal Fragility: The Role of Bone Vascularity

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoid administration is required for many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, but use of these drugs is associated with skeletal side effects including bone loss, fractures, and osteonecrosis. Fractures often occur without a reduction in bone mineral density, strongly suggesting that glucocorticoid excess adversely affects other aspects of bone strength. Although the primary effects of glucocorticoid excess on the skeleton are directly on bone cells, a vascular connection between these cells and the loss of bone strength appears likely. This review examines this connection and how it may explain the greater decline in bone strength than loss of bone mass that occurs with glucocorticoid excess. PMID:19591965

  2. Propranolol, a β-adrenergic antagonist, attenuates the decrease in trabecular bone mass in high calorie diet fed growing mice.

    PubMed

    Baek, Kyunghwa; Hwang, Hyo Rin; Park, Hyun-Jung; Kwon, Arang; Qadir, Abdul S; Baek, Jeong-Hwa

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the effects of high calorie and low calorie diets on skeletal integrity, and whether β-adrenergic blockade (BB) attenuates bone loss induced by dietary calorie alteration. Male 6-week-old C57BL/6 mice were assigned to either an ad-lib fed control diet (CON), a high calorie diet (HIGH), or a low calorie diet (LOW) group. In each diet group, mice were treated with either vehicle (VEH) or propranolol, a β-adrenergic antagonist. Over 12-weeks, β-blockade mitigated body weight and fat mass increases induced by the high calorie diet. Femoral trabecular bone mineral density and the expression levels of osteogenic marker genes in bone marrow cells were reduced in HIGHVEH and LOWVEH mice, and BB significantly attenuated this decline only in HIGH mice. In summary, the magnitude of bone loss induced by low calorie diet was greater than that caused by high calorie diet in growing mice, and β-blockade mitigated high calorie diet-induced bone loss. PMID:24393528

  3. Propranolol, a β-adrenergic antagonist, attenuates the decrease in trabecular bone mass in high calorie diet fed growing mice

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kyunghwa; Hwang, Hyo Rin; Park, Hyun-Jung; Kwon, Arang; Qadir, Abdul S.; Baek, Jeong-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of high calorie and low calorie diets on skeletal integrity, and whether β-adrenergic blockade (BB) attenuates bone loss induced by dietary calorie alteration. Male 6-week-old C57BL/6 mice were assigned to either an ad-lib fed control diet (CON), a high calorie diet (HIGH), or a low calorie diet (LOW) group. In each diet group, mice were treated with either vehicle (VEH) or propranolol, a β-adrenergic antagonist. Over 12-weeks, β-blockade mitigated body weight and fat mass increases induced by the high calorie diet. Femoral trabecular bone mineral density and the expression levels of osteogenic marker genes in bone marrow cells were reduced in HIGHVEH and LOWVEH mice, and BB significantly attenuated this decline only in HIGH mice. In summary, the magnitude of bone loss induced by low calorie diet was greater than that caused by high calorie diet in growing mice, and β-blockade mitigated high calorie diet-induced bone loss. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(9): 506-511] PMID:24393528

  4. Integrating Epigenomic Elements and GWASs Identifies BDNF Gene Affecting Bone Mineral Density and Osteoporotic Fracture Risk

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan; Dong, Shan-Shan; Chen, Xiao-Feng; Jing, Ying-Aisha; Yang, Man; Yan, Han; Shen, Hui; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Tan, Li-Jun; Tian, Qing; Deng, Hong-Wen; Yang, Tie-Lin

    2016-01-01

    To identify susceptibility genes for osteoporosis, we conducted an integrative analysis that combined epigenomic elements and previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) data, followed by validation at population and functional levels, which could identify common regulatory elements and predict new susceptibility genes that are biologically meaningful to osteoporosis. By this approach, we found a set of distinct epigenomic elements significantly enriched or depleted in the promoters of osteoporosis-associated genes, including 4 transcription factor binding sites, 27 histone marks, and 21 chromatin states segmentation types. Using these epigenomic marks, we performed reverse prediction analysis to prioritize the discovery of new candidate genes. Functional enrichment analysis of all the prioritized genes revealed several key osteoporosis related pathways, including Wnt signaling. Genes with high priority were further subjected to validation using available GWASs datasets. Three genes were significantly associated with spine bone mineral density, including BDNF, PDE4D, and SATB2, which all closely related to bone metabolism. The most significant gene BDNF was also associated with osteoporotic fractures. RNA interference revealed that BDNF knockdown can suppress osteoblast differentiation. Our results demonstrated that epigenomic data could be used to indicate common epigenomic marks to discover additional loci with biological functions for osteoporosis. PMID:27465306

  5. Integrating Epigenomic Elements and GWASs Identifies BDNF Gene Affecting Bone Mineral Density and Osteoporotic Fracture Risk.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan; Dong, Shan-Shan; Chen, Xiao-Feng; Jing, Ying-Aisha; Yang, Man; Yan, Han; Shen, Hui; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Tan, Li-Jun; Tian, Qing; Deng, Hong-Wen; Yang, Tie-Lin

    2016-01-01

    To identify susceptibility genes for osteoporosis, we conducted an integrative analysis that combined epigenomic elements and previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) data, followed by validation at population and functional levels, which could identify common regulatory elements and predict new susceptibility genes that are biologically meaningful to osteoporosis. By this approach, we found a set of distinct epigenomic elements significantly enriched or depleted in the promoters of osteoporosis-associated genes, including 4 transcription factor binding sites, 27 histone marks, and 21 chromatin states segmentation types. Using these epigenomic marks, we performed reverse prediction analysis to prioritize the discovery of new candidate genes. Functional enrichment analysis of all the prioritized genes revealed several key osteoporosis related pathways, including Wnt signaling. Genes with high priority were further subjected to validation using available GWASs datasets. Three genes were significantly associated with spine bone mineral density, including BDNF, PDE4D, and SATB2, which all closely related to bone metabolism. The most significant gene BDNF was also associated with osteoporotic fractures. RNA interference revealed that BDNF knockdown can suppress osteoblast differentiation. Our results demonstrated that epigenomic data could be used to indicate common epigenomic marks to discover additional loci with biological functions for osteoporosis. PMID:27465306

  6. Body Mass Index May Positively Correlate with Bone Mineral Density of Lumbar Vertebra and Femoral Neck in Postmenopausal Females

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shi-Feng; Du, Xin-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background Our study aimed to explore the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and bone mineral density (BMD) of lumbar vertebra and femoral neck in postmenopausal females. Material/Methods From September 2012 to September 2014, 236 healthy postmenopausal females who underwent physical examinations at the Women & Children’s Health Care Hospital of Linyi were enrolled into our study. These subjects were divided into 3 groups: underweight group, normal weight group, and overweight group. In addition, there were 2 age stratifications: <60 years old and ≥60 years old. DPX-L type dual-energy X-ray bone densitometry (American Lunar Company) was used to measure the BMD of lumbar vertebra and femoral neck in the recruited subjects. Pearson test was used for correlation analysis. Results BMDs and T-scores of lumbar vertebra (L1–L4), femoral neck, proximal femur, and Ward’s triangle region among the groups were ranked as follows: underweight group < normal weight group < overweight group. There were significant differences in body weight and BMI among the underweight, normal weight, and overweight groups (P<0.05). The T-scores of all examined anatomic locations showed significant differences between the underweight group and normal weight group, as well as between the underweight group and overweight group (both P<0.05). Only the T-scores of lumbar vertebra L2–L4 had significant differences between the normal weight group and overweight group (P<0.05). The BMDs of all anatomic components under study showed statistical differences in both age stratifications between the overweight group and underweight group, as well as between the overweight group and normal weight group (both P<0.05). When stratified above 60 years old, the BMDs of lumbar vertebra (L1, L2 and L4) showed statistical differences between the normal weight group and underweight group (P<0.05). Various factors could be ranked according to the absolute values of correlation coefficients as below

  7. Effects of deletion of ER-alpha in osteoblast-lineage cells on bone mass and adaptation to mechanical loading differs in female and male mice

    PubMed Central

    Melville, Katherine M.; Kelly, Natalie H.; Surita, Gina; Buchalter, Daniel B.; Schimenti, John C.; Main, Russell P.; Ross, F. Patrick; van der Meulen, Marjolein C. H.

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) has been implicated in bone’s response to mechanical loading in both males and females. ERα in osteoblast lineage cells is important for determining bone mass, but results depend on animal sex and the cellular stage at which ERα is deleted. We demonstrated previously that when ERα is deleted from mature osteoblasts and osteocytes in mixed background female mice, bone mass and strength are decreased. However, few studies exist examining the skeletal response to loading in bone cell-specific ERαKO mice. Therefore, we crossed ERα floxed (ERαfl/fl) and osteocalcin-Cre (OC-Cre) mice to generate animals lacking ERα in mature osteoblasts and osteocytes (pOC-ERαKO) and littermate controls (LC). At 10 weeks of age the left tibia was loaded in vivo for two weeks. We analyzed bone mass through microCT, bone formation rate by dynamic histomorphometry, bone strength from mechanical testing, and osteoblast and osteoclast activity by serum chemistry and immunohistochemistry. ERα in mature osteoblasts differentially regulated bone mass in males and females. Compared to LC, female pOC-ERαKO mice had decreased cortical and cancellous bone mass, while male pOC-ERαKO mice had equal or greater bone mass than LC. Bone mass results correlated with decreased compressive strength in pOC-ERαKO female L5 vertebrae, and with increased maximum moment in pOC-ERαKO male femora. Female pOC-ERαKO mice responded more to mechanical loading, while the response of pOC-ERαKO male animals was similar to their littermate controls. PMID:25707500

  8. The Effects of Variable Mass and Geometry, Pretwist, Shear Deformation and Rotatory Inertia on the Resonant Frequencies of Intact Long Bones: A Finite Element Model Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Donald R.; Orne, David

    1976-01-01

    The influence of pretwist, nonuniformities in mass and flexural stiffness, rotatory inertia and shear deformation on the natural frequencies of intact bones is evaluated by means of a linear elastic, finite-element model which has been programmed for solution on the digital computer. Theoretical results are compared to the results on the forced vibration of intact canine radii obtained experimentally by Thompson. Surprisingly, inclusion of fairly large pretwist angles (from -14 to 12 deg for one specimen) had little affect on the first three frequencies of transverse vibration in either the cranial or lateral directions. Inclusion of shear deformation reduced the third-mode frequency in the stiffest (lateral) direction by about six percent, otherwise shear deformation played a minor role in determining natural frequencies. Similarly. rotatory inertia had negligible influence up to the third natural frequency. The predominant influence on the first three natural frequencies of transverse vibration could be attributed to the variations in mass and flexural stiffness along the length of the test specimens. Different effective moduli of elasticity are required to yield correct absolute values for the frequencies which correspond to experimental findings. thus implying the presence of some inhomogeneities in material properties around the bone cross-section and/or along its length.

  9. Salivary adiponectin levels are associated with training intensity but not with bone mass or reproductive function in elite Rhythmic Gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Roupas, Nikolaos D; Maïmoun, Laurent; Mamali, Irene; Coste, Olivier; Tsouka, Alexandra; Mahadea, Krishna Kunal; Mura, Thibault; Philibert, Pascal; Gaspari, Laura; Mariano-Goulart, Denis; Leglise, Michel; Sultan, Charles; Georgopoulos, Neoklis A

    2014-01-01

    Elite Rhythmic Gymnasts (RGs) constitute a unique metabolic model and they are prone to developing Anorexia Athletica. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of training intensity on salivary adiponectin levels and assess a possible role of salivary adiponectin levels as a predictive factor of reproductive dysfunction and bone mass acquisition in elite RGs. The study included 80 elite female RGs participating in the World Rhythmic Gymnastics Championship tournament held in Montpellier, France on September 2011. Anthropometric values were assessed, training data and menstrual pattern were recorded, bone mass was measured with Broadband ultrasound attenuation (dB/Mhz) and baseline salivary adiponectin levels were determined. The athletes were classified as intensely and very intensely trained, considering the mean training intensity (40.84h/week). Moreover, considering their reproductive status, they were divided into RG's with normal menstruation, primary amenorrhea and oligomenorrhea. All comparisons were adjusted to age, BMI and body fat percentage differences. Very intensely trained RGs showed higher salivary adiponectin levels (p=0.05). Moreover, salivary adiponectin levels showed significant correlation with training intensity (r=0.409, p=0.003). On the other hand, no association of salivary adiponectin levels was documented with either reproductive function or bone mass acquisition. The results of the present study suggest that, in elite RGs, salivary adiponectin levels are associated with the intensity of training, possibly reflecting the deterioration of energy balance rather than the training stress. On the other hand, a predictive role of salivary adiponectin levels in reproductive dysfunction or bone mass acquisition could not be supported. PMID:24240086

  10. [Determination of trace elements in sika bone powder by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with microwave digestion].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Ming; Chen, Zhi-Yong; Han, Jin-Tu; Wang, Hui; Wang, Zhi-Wen

    2006-05-01

    Contents of trace elements in sika bone powder were determined with microwave digestion and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Under the optimum conditions, the detection limits (3sigma, n = 11) are in the range of 0. 000 6-1. 498 ng x mL(-1) with relative standard deviations of 1.7%-6.8%. The recoveries are between 91% and 109%. The analytical results of national certified reference demonstrated the applicability of the proposed method. PMID:16883876

  11. Effects of long term treatment with high doses of odanacatib on bone mass, bone strength, and remodeling/modeling in newly ovariectomized monkeys.

    PubMed

    Duong, L T; Pickarski, M; Cusick, T; Chen, C M; Zhuo, Y; Scott, K; Samadfam, R; Smith, S Y; Pennypacker, B L

    2016-07-01

    The objectives here were to evaluate the effects of odanacatib (ODN) at doses exceeding the clinical exposure on biomechanical properties of lumbar vertebrae (LV), hip and central femur (CF), and compare ODN to alendronate (ALN) on bone remodeling/modeling in ovariectomized (OVX) monkeys. Ten days post-surgery, animals were treated with vehicle (VEH), ODN-L (2mg/kg/day, p.o.), ODN-H (8/4mg/kg/day), or ALN (30μg/kg/week, s.c.) for 20months. An intact group was also included. ODN-L provided systemic exposures of 1.8-fold of clinical exposure. ODN-H started at 20-fold for 5.5months, and then reduced to 7.8-fold of clinical exposure, compared to ALN at approximated clinical exposure. From cross sectional analyses, LV density and peak load in ODN at both doses or ALN were not different from VEH or Intact. However, cortical thickness of femoral neck (FN) and CF in ODN were higher (21-34%, p<0.05) than VEH, due to smaller endocortical (Ec) perimeter of FN (10-11%; p<0.05) and CF (9-12%; ODN-L, p<0.05), and larger CF periosteal (Ps) perimeter (2-12%; ODN-H, p<0.001) versus VEH. ODN groups also showed slightly higher cortical porosity and Ps non-lamellar bone in CF. ODN-H treatment resulted in higher CF peak load (p<0.05) versus VEH. For all bone sites analyzed, a positive, linear relationship (r(2)=0.46-0.69, p<0.0001) of peak load to density or structural parameters was demonstrated. No treatment-related differences in the derived intrinsic strength properties were evidenced as compared between groups. ALN reduced all remodeling surfaces without affecting Ps modeling. Trabecular and intracortical remodeling were reduced in ODN groups, similar to ALN. Ec mineralizing surface in ODN-H trended to be lower than VEH by month 20, but Ec bone formation indices in ODN groups generally were not different from VEH. Ps modeling in ODN groups was significantly higher than other treatment groups. This study overall demonstrated the bone safety profile of ODN and its unique mechanism

  12. The Effects of Hypergravity and Adrenalectomy on Bone Mineral Content, Urine Calcium and Body Mass in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, A.; Ramirez, J.; Melson, E.; Moran, M.; Baer, L.; Arnaud, S.; Wade, C.; Girten, B.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The effects of 14 days of increased gravitational load, and the absence of adrenal stress hormones on total body bone mineral content (BMC) were examined in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Centrifugation at 2 Gs (2G) was used to increase the gravitational load, and bilateral adrenalectomy (ADX) was used to eliminate the production of adrenal stress hormones. Stationary groups at 1 G (1G) and sham operated (SHAM) animals served as controls. Thirty rats (n=6 or 8) made up the four experimental groups (1G SHAM, 1G ADX, 2G SHAM and 2G ADX). BMC was assessed by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) which was performed to determine the total body bone mineral content, and also through bone ashing of the left femur and the left humerus. Activity was determined through biotelemetry, also body mass and food intake were measured. Multi-factorial analysis of variance (MANCOVA) and Newman Keuls post hoc tests were used to analyze significant effects (p is less than 0.05) for the primary variables. Results from both DXA and the ashed femur indicated that BMC decreased significantly with increased G for both the SHAM and ADX groups. The BMC determined by DXA for the 1G ADX group was also significantly lower than the 1G SHAM group, however the 2G SHAM and 2G ADX groups were not significantly different. However, the bone ashing results showed the femur differed significantly only between the rates of centrifugation and not between the ADX and SHAM. The humerus showed no significant difference between any of the groups. There was a significant decrease in body mass with increased G and there was no ADX effect on body mass. When DXA BMC was normalized for body mass changes, there were no significant group differences. However, with bone ashing, the femur BMC/BW still showed significant difference between rates of centrifugation, with the 2G group being lower. Activity level decreased with body mass, and food intake data showed there was significant hypophagia during the first few days of

  13. Importance of participation rate in sampling of data in population based studies, with special reference to bone mass in Sweden.

    PubMed Central

    Düppe, H; Gärdsell, P; Hanson, B S; Johnell, O; Nilsson, B E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of participation rate in sampling on "normative" bone mass data. DESIGN: This was a comparison between two randomly selected samples from the same population. The participation rates in the two samples were 61.9% and 83.6%. Measurements were made of bone mass at different skeletal sites and of muscle strength, as well as an assessment of physical activity. SETTING: Malmö, Sweden. SUBJECTS: There were 230 subjects (117 men, 113 women), aged 21 to 42 years. RESULTS: Many subjects participated in both studies (163). Those who took part only in the study with the higher participation rate (67) almost invariably had higher values for bone mass density at the sites measured (up to 7.6% for men) than participants in the study with the lower participation rate. No differences in muscle strength were recorded. CONCLUSION: A high degree of compliance is important to achieve a reliable result in determining normal values in population based studies. PMID:8762383

  14. The Preventive Effect of Calcium Supplementation on Weak Bones Caused by the Interaction of Exercise and Food Restriction in Young Female Rats During the Period from Acquiring Bone Mass to Maintaining Bone Mass.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Yuki; Agata, Umon; Kakutani, Yuya; Kato, Shoyo; Noma, Yuichi; Hattori, Satoshi; Ogata, Hitomi; Ezawa, Ikuko; Omi, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    Increasing calcium (Ca) intake is important for female athletes with a risk of weak bone caused by inadequate food intake. The aim of the present study was to examine the preventive effect of Ca supplementation on low bone strength in young female athletes with inadequate food intake, using the rats as an experimental model. Seven-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: the sedentary and ad libitum feeding group (SED), voluntary running exercise and ad libitum feeding group (EX), voluntary running exercise and 30% food restriction group (EX-FR), and a voluntary running exercise, 30% food-restricted and high-Ca diet group (EX-FR+Ca). To Ca supplementation, we used 1.2% Ca diet as "high-Ca diet" that contains two-fold Ca of normal Ca diet. The experiment lasted for 12 weeks. As a result, the energy availability, internal organ weight, bone strength, bone mineral density, and Ca absorption in the EX-FR group were significantly lower than those in the EX group. The bone strength and Ca absorption in the EX-FR+Ca group were significantly higher than those in the EX-FR group. However, the bone strength in the EX-FR+Ca group did not reach that in the EX group. These results suggested that Ca supplementation had a positive effect on bone strength, but the effect was not sufficient to prevent lower bone strength caused by food restriction in young female athletes. PMID:26511476

  15. Jagged1 expression by osteoblast-lineage cells regulates trabecular bone mass and periosteal expansion in mice.

    PubMed

    Youngstrom, D W; Dishowitz, M I; Bales, C B; Carr, E; Mutyaba, P L; Kozloff, K M; Shitaye, H; Hankenson, K D; Loomes, K M

    2016-10-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the Notch ligand, Jagged1 (Jag1), result in multi-system developmental pathologies associated with Alagille syndrome (ALGS). ALGS patients present with skeletal manifestations including hemi-vertebrae, reduced bone mass, increased fracture incidence and poor bone healing. However, it is not known whether the increased fracture risk is due to altered bone homeostasis (primary) or nutritional malabsorption due to chronic liver disease (secondary). To determine the significance of Jag1 loss in bone, we characterized the skeletal phenotype of two Jag1-floxed conditional knockout mouse models: Prx1-Cre;Jag1(f/f) to target osteoprogenitor cells and their progeny, and Col2.3-Cre;Jag1(f/f) to target mid-stage osteoblasts and their progeny. Knockout phenotypes were compared to wild-type (WT) controls using quantitative micro-computed tomography, gene expression profiling and mechanical testing. Expression of Jag1 and the Notch target genes Hes1 and Hey1 was downregulated in all Jag1 knockout mice. Osteoblast differentiation genes were downregulated in whole bone of both groups, but unchanged in Prx1-Cre;Jag1(f/f) cortical bone. Both knockout lines exhibited changes in femoral trabecular morphology including decreased bone volume fraction and increased trabecular spacing, with males presenting a more severe trabecular osteopenic phenotype. Prx1-Cre;Jag1(f/f) mice showed an increase in marrow mesenchymal progenitor cell number and, counterintuitively, developed increased cortical thickness resulting from periosteal expansion, translating to greater mechanical stiffness and strength. Similar alterations in femoral morphology were observed in mice with canonical Notch signaling disrupted using Prx1-Cre-regulatable dominant-negative mastermind like-protein (dnMAML). Taken together, we report that 1) Jag1 negatively regulates the marrow osteochondral progenitor pool, 2) Jag1 is required for normal trabecular bone formation and 3) Notch signaling

  16. Enhanced Wnt signaling improves bone mass and strength, but not brittleness, in the Col1a1(+/mov13) mouse model of type I Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Christina M; Schwartz, Marissa A; Roberts, Heather J; Lim, Kyung-Eun; Spevak, Lyudmila; Boskey, Adele L; Zurakowski, David; Robling, Alexander G; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-09-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) comprises a group of genetic skeletal fragility disorders. The mildest form of OI, Osteogenesis Imperfecta type I, is frequently caused by haploinsufficiency mutations in COL1A1, the gene encoding the α1(I) chain of type 1 collagen. Children with OI type I have a 95-fold higher fracture rate compared to unaffected children. Therapies for OI type I in the pediatric population are limited to anti-catabolic agents. In adults with osteoporosis, anabolic therapies that enhance Wnt signaling in bone improve bone mass, and ongoing clinical trials are determining if these therapies also reduce fracture risk. We performed a proof-of-principle experiment in mice to determine whether enhancing Wnt signaling in bone could benefit children with OI type I. We crossed a mouse model of OI type I (Col1a1(+/Mov13)) with a high bone mass (HBM) mouse (Lrp5(+/p.A214V)) that has increased bone strength from enhanced Wnt signaling. Offspring that inherited the OI and HBM alleles had higher bone mass and strength than mice that inherited the OI allele alone. However, OI+HBM and OI mice still had bones with lower ductility compared to wild-type mice. We conclude that enhancing Wnt signaling does not make OI bone normal, but does improve bone properties that could reduce fracture risk. Therefore, agents that enhance Wnt signaling are likely to benefit children and adults with OI type 1. PMID:27297606

  17. Genome-Wide Association Study Using Extreme Truncate Selection Identifies Novel Genes Affecting Bone Mineral Density and Fracture Risk

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Emma L.; Danoy, Patrick; Kemp, John P.; Leo, Paul J.; McCloskey, Eugene; Nicholson, Geoffrey C.; Eastell, Richard; Prince, Richard L.; Eisman, John A.; Jones, Graeme; Sambrook, Philip N.; Reid, Ian R.; Dennison, Elaine M.; Wark, John; Richards, J. Brent; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Spector, Tim D.; Esapa, Chris; Cox, Roger D.; Brown, Steve D. M.; Thakker, Rajesh V.; Addison, Kathryn A.; Bradbury, Linda A.; Center, Jacqueline R.; Cooper, Cyrus; Cremin, Catherine; Estrada, Karol; Felsenberg, Dieter; Glüer, Claus-C.; Hadler, Johanna; Henry, Margaret J.; Hofman, Albert; Kotowicz, Mark A.; Makovey, Joanna; Nguyen, Sing C.; Nguyen, Tuan V.; Pasco, Julie A.; Pryce, Karena; Reid, David M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Roux, Christian; Stefansson, Kari; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tichawangana, Rumbidzai; Evans, David M.; Brown, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    Osteoporotic fracture is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Low bone mineral density (BMD) is a major predisposing factor to fracture and is known to be highly heritable. Site-, gender-, and age-specific genetic effects on BMD are thought to be significant, but have largely not been considered in the design of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of BMD to date. We report here a GWAS using a novel study design focusing on women of a specific age (postmenopausal women, age 55–85 years), with either extreme high or low hip BMD (age- and gender-adjusted BMD z-scores of +1.5 to +4.0, n = 1055, or −4.0 to −1.5, n = 900), with replication in cohorts of women drawn from the general population (n = 20,898). The study replicates 21 of 26 known BMD–associated genes. Additionally, we report suggestive association of a further six new genetic associations in or around the genes CLCN7, GALNT3, IBSP, LTBP3, RSPO3, and SOX4, with replication in two independent datasets. A novel mouse model with a loss-of-function mutation in GALNT3 is also reported, which has high bone mass, supporting the involvement of this gene in BMD determination. In addition to identifying further genes associated with BMD, this study confirms the efficiency of extreme-truncate selection designs for quantitative trait association studies. PMID:21533022

  18. Antiosteoporotic effect of orally administered yolk-derived peptides on bone mass in women

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Adham M; Watabe, Kazuya; Yamane, Tetsuro; Isono, Tadayuki; Okamura, Yoshitaka; Kawahito, Seiji; Takeshima, Kazuhito; Masuda, Kazuyuki; Kim, Mujo

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to verify the effect of oral intake of a yolk-derived peptide preparation (HYP) obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of yolk water-soluble protein on bone markers and bone density in 65 perimenopausal women with an average age of 47.6 ± 5.2 years. Subjects were divided into three groups, and then enrolled in a 6-month, randomized, double-blind clinical trial. Bone formation and resorption markers were measured at 0, 3, and 6 months, while bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar spines was measured at 0 and 6 months. Although the bone formation marker levels showed the similarity changes among the groups, bone resorption markers in the test HYP group were significantly decreased after 3 and 6 months in comparison to other groups (P < 0.05). After 6 months, BMD in the test HYP group maintained at healthy numerical values whereas BMD values were decreased in other groups. Hence HYP would be an antiosteoporotic agent originated from natural food to maintain bone health, especially for women. PMID:24936288

  19. Effect of Nasal Calcitonin on the Health-Related Quality of Life in Postmenopause Women Affected With Low Bone Density

    PubMed Central

    Shohrati, Majid; Bayat, Noushin; Saburi, Amin; Abbasi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Physical activity and mental health could be affected by osteoporosis and various therapeutic options such as calcitonin may influence Quality Of Life (QOL) of these patients with Low Bone Density (LBD). Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of nasal calcitonin on QOL in post menopause women with LBD. Patients and Methods: This clinical trial study was performed on one hundred and fifteen menopause women with LBD less than 1 SD in Bone Mineral Densitometry (BMD) referred to Baqiyatallah Hospital in Tehran, Iran, during 2009 - 2010. They were assigned to receive 200 IU calcitonin nasal spray along with calcium (1000 mg) and vitamin D (400 IU) for 6 months. Quality of life was assessed by Short-Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire (Persian-validated version). Results: The mean age (± SD) of the participants was 58.75 ± 8.15 years. Intranasal spray of calcitonin increased QOL scores significantly (88.05 ± 15.63 vs. 92.15 ± 13.22, P value = 0.000). Bone mineral density of spine was increased from 0.834 ± 0.11 to 0.12 ± 0.852 and this difference in BMD of lumbar spine was statistically significant (P value: 0.003) but not significant in femur’s BMD (P value = 0.061). In comparison with BMD indexes, The QOL scores especially Mental Health domain changes had only a significant correlation with the changes of total T score in BMD (P = 0.031, Coefficient Correlation = 0.248). Conclusions: It seems that nasal spray of calcitonin can effectively improve QOL of women with LBD and QOL changes were not influenced by clinical or para-clinical alteration. Mental health domain must be more considered in further studies as a predicting domain for Health-Related Quality of Life (HR-QOL) changes. PMID:26421180

  20. Prevalence of Osteoporosis and Low Bone Mass in Older Chinese Population Based on Bone Mineral Density at Multiple Skeletal Sites.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-Chien; Lin, Ying Chin; Lin, Yen-Kuang; Liu, Yi-Jui; Chang, Kwang-Hwa; Chieng, Poon-Ung; Chan, Wing P

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of osteoporosis is based on bone mineral density (BMD) measurement, which is site dependent and commonly discordant between measurement sites. We aimed to determine the prevalence of osteoporosis diagnosed based on BMD T-scores measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at different sites: the lumbar spine (LS) alone, femoral neck (FN) alone, or both. A total of 1712 women and 2028 men with LS and FN BMD measurements were enrolled. Over 50% discordance was found between osteoporosis classifications based on T-scores measured at the LS and FN. Use of the lowest T-scores measured at both the LS and right and left FN (rather than one site) significantly increased the prevalence of osteoporosis from 4.03 to 10.75% in postmenopausal women and 1.82 to 4.29% in men aged ≧50 years (p < 0.001). The trends of overall and age-adjusted prevalence of osteoporosis were similar in women and men. Osteoporosis was diagnosed at a higher rate if the USA reference rather than the Asia reference was used to calculate the T-score (26.64% vs. 10.75%). In conclusion, diagnosis based on the lowest T-score from multiple site BMD measurement can increase the prevalence of osteoporosis, demonstrating the higher sensitivity of the multiple site measurement strategy. PMID:27143609

  1. Prevalence of Osteoporosis and Low Bone Mass in Older Chinese Population Based on Bone Mineral Density at Multiple Skeletal Sites

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi-Chien; Lin, Ying Chin; Lin, Yen-Kuang; Liu, Yi-Jui; Chang, Kwang-Hwa; Chieng, Poon-Ung; Chan, Wing P.

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of osteoporosis is based on bone mineral density (BMD) measurement, which is site dependent and commonly discordant between measurement sites. We aimed to determine the prevalence of osteoporosis diagnosed based on BMD T-scores measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at different sites: the lumbar spine (LS) alone, femoral neck (FN) alone, or both. A total of 1712 women and 2028 men with LS and FN BMD measurements were enrolled. Over 50% discordance was found between osteoporosis classifications based on T-scores measured at the LS and FN. Use of the lowest T-scores measured at both the LS and right and left FN (rather than one site) significantly increased the prevalence of osteoporosis from 4.03 to 10.75% in postmenopausal women and 1.82 to 4.29% in men aged ≧50 years (p < 0.001). The trends of overall and age-adjusted prevalence of osteoporosis were similar in women and men. Osteoporosis was diagnosed at a higher rate if the USA reference rather than the Asia reference was used to calculate the T-score (26.64% vs. 10.75%). In conclusion, diagnosis based on the lowest T-score from multiple site BMD measurement can increase the prevalence of osteoporosis, demonstrating the higher sensitivity of the multiple site measurement strategy. PMID:27143609

  2. Bone Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The danger of disuse osteoporosis under weightless condition in space led to extensive research into measurements of bone stiffness and mass by the Biomedical Research Division of Ames and Stanford University. Through its Technology Utilization Program, NASA funded an advanced SOBSA, a microprocessor-controlled bone probe system. SOBSA determines bone stiffness by measuring responses to an electromagnetic shaker. With this information, a physician can identify bone disease, measure deterioration and prescribe necessary therapy. The system is now undergoing further testing.

  3. Carpal Tunnel Cross-Sectional Area Affected by Soft Tissues Abutting the Carpal Bones.

    PubMed

    Gabra, Joseph N; Li, Zong-Ming

    2013-02-01

    The carpal tunnel accommodates free movement of its contents, and the tunnel's cross-sectional area is a useful morphological parameter for the evaluation of the space available for the carpal tunnel contents and of potential nerve compression in the tunnel. The osseous boundary of the carpal bones as the dorsal border of the carpal tunnel is commonly used to determine the tunnel area, but this boundary contains soft tissues such as numerous intercarpal ligaments and the flexor carpi radialis tendon. The aims of this study were to quantify the thickness of the soft tissues abutting the carpal bones and to investigate how this soft tissue influences the calculation of the carpal tunnel area. Magnetic resonance images were analyzed for eight cadaveric specimens. A medical balloon with a physiological pressure was inserted into an evacuated tunnel to identify the carpal tunnel boundary. The balloon-based (i.e. true carpal tunnel) and osseous-based carpal tunnel boundaries were extracted and divided into regions corresponding to the hamate, capitate, trapezoid, trapezium, and transverse carpal ligament (TCL). From the two boundaries, the overall and regional soft tissue thicknesses and areas were calculated. The soft tissue thickness was significantly greater for the trapezoid (3.1±1.2mm) and trapezium (3.4±1.0mm) regions than for the hamate (0.7±0.3mm) and capitate (1.2±0.5mm) regions. The carpal tunnel area using the osseous boundary (243.0±40.4mm(2)) was significantly larger than the balloon-based area (183.9±29.7mm(2)) with a ratio of 1.32. In other words, the carpal tunnel area can be estimated as 76% (= 1/1.32) of the osseous-based area. The abundance of soft tissue in the trapezoid and trapezium regions can be attributed mainly to the capitate-trapezium ligament and the flexor carpi radialis tendon. Inclusion of such soft tissue leads to overestimations of the carpal tunnel area. Correct quantification of the carpal tunnel area aids in examining carpal

  4. Carpal Tunnel Cross-Sectional Area Affected by Soft Tissues Abutting the Carpal Bones

    PubMed Central

    Gabra, Joseph N.; Li, Zong-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The carpal tunnel accommodates free movement of its contents, and the tunnel's cross-sectional area is a useful morphological parameter for the evaluation of the space available for the carpal tunnel contents and of potential nerve compression in the tunnel. The osseous boundary of the carpal bones at the dorsal border of the carpal tunnel is commonly used to determine the tunnel area, but this boundary contains soft tissues such as numerous intercarpal ligaments and the flexor carpi radialis tendon. The aims of this study were to quantify the thickness of the soft tissues abutting the carpal bones and to investigate how this soft tissue influences the calculation of the carpal tunnel area. Magnetic resonance images were analyzed for eight cadaveric specimens. A medical balloon with a physiological pressure was inserted into an evacuated tunnel to identify the carpal tunnel boundary. The balloon-based (i.e., true carpal tunnel) and osseous-based carpal tunnel boundaries were extracted and divided into regions corresponding to the hamate, capitate, trapezoid, trapezium, and transverse carpal ligament (TCL). From the two boundaries, the overall and regional soft tissue thicknesses and areas were calculated. The soft tissue thickness was significantly greater for the trapezoid (3.1 ± 1.2 mm) and trapezium (3.4 ± 1.0 mm) regions than for the hamate (0.7 ± 0.3 mm) and capitate (1.2 ± 0.5 mm) regions. The carpal tunnel area using the osseous boundary (243.0 ± 40.4 mm2) was significantly larger than the balloon-based area (183.9 ± 29.7 mm2) with a ratio of 1.32. In other words, the carpal tunnel area can be estimated as 76% (= 1/1.32) of the osseous-based area. The abundance of soft tissue in the trapezoid and trapezium regions can be attributed mainly to the capitotrapezial ligament and the flexor carpi radialis tendon. Inclusion of such soft tissue leads to overestimations of the carpal tunnel area. Correct quantification of the carpal

  5. Effects of myokines on bone.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The links between muscle and bone have been recently examined because of the increasing number of patients with osteoporosis and sarcopenia. Myokines are skeletal muscle-derived humoral cytokines and growth factors, which exert physiological and pathological functions in various distant organs, including the regulation of glucose, energy and bone metabolism. Myostatin is a crucial myokine, the expression of which is mainly limited to muscle tissues. The inhibition of myostatin signaling increases bone remodeling, bone mass and muscle mass, and it may provide a target for the treatment of both sarcopenia and osteoporosis. As myostatin is involved in osteoclast formation and bone destruction in rheumatoid arthritis, myostatin may be a target myokine for the treatment of accelerated bone resorption and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. Numerous other myokines, including transforming growth factor-β, follistatin, insulin-like growth factor-I, fibroblast growth factor-2, osteoglycin, FAM5C, irisin, interleukin (IL)-6, leukemia inhibitory factor, IL-7, IL-15, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, ciliary neurotrophic factor, osteonectin and matrix metalloproteinase 2, also affect bone cells in various manners. However, the effects of myokines on bone metabolism are largely unknown. Further research is expected to clarify the interaction between muscle and bone, which may lead to greater diagnosis and the development of the treatment for muscle and bone disorders, such as osteoporosis and sarcopenia. PMID:27579164

  6. The rice FISH BONE gene encodes a tryptophan aminotransferase, which affects pleiotropic auxin-related processes.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takanori; Ito, Momoyo; Sumikura, Tsuyoshi; Nakayama, Akira; Nishimura, Takeshi; Kitano, Hidemi; Yamaguchi, Isomaro; Koshiba, Tomokazu; Hibara, Ken-Ichiro; Nagato, Yasuo; Itoh, Jun-Ichi

    2014-06-01

    Auxin is a fundamental plant hormone and its localization within organs plays pivotal roles in plant growth and development. Analysis of many Arabidopsis mutants that were defective in auxin biosynthesis revealed that the indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) pathway, catalyzed by the TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS (TAA) and YUCCA (YUC) families, is the major biosynthetic pathway of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). In contrast, little information is known about the molecular mechanisms of auxin biosynthesis in rice. In this study, we identified a auxin-related rice mutant, fish bone (fib). FIB encodes an orthologue of TAA genes and loss of FIB function resulted in pleiotropic abnormal phenotypes, such as small leaves with large lamina joint angles, abnormal vascular development, small panicles, abnormal organ identity and defects in root development, together with a reduction in internal IAA levels. Moreover, we found that auxin sensitivity and polar transport activity were altered in the fib mutant. From these results, we suggest that FIB plays a pivotal role in IAA biosynthesis in rice and that auxin biosynthesis, transport and sensitivity are closely interrelated. PMID:24654985

  7. Does light scattering affect the OCT quantitation of redox state of cytochrome oxidase in bone tissue?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangqun; Wang, Ruikang K.; El Haj, Alicia

    2002-06-01

    In our previous report, we have presented the possibility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to monitor the redox state of mitochondria enzyme Cytochrome oxidase (CytOx) in bone tissue. The previous results showed that reduction of the enzyme in periosteal tissue leads to a change in attenuation coefficient of 1.68 +/- 0.67mm-1 by OCT measurements. The new results from cultured cells fixed in 300 (mu) l agarose plug showed the difference in attenuation coefficient is 0.26+-0.10 mm-1 (n = 9) for 7x106 astrocytoma cells and 0.28+-0.13 mm-1 (n = 7) for 20x106 astrocytoma cells in agarose plug, respectively between cells with oxidised and reduced enzyme at 820nm. A decrease in attenuation coefficient of 0.35+-0.09 mm-1 (n = 4) for 10 million SKMES cells in agarose was also observed with the redox shift of CytOx. The absorption coefficient of the oxidized-reduced form of CytOx is measured approximately 8.4+-1.5x10-3/mm (n=3) and 8.2+-1.0x10-3/mm (n=3) at 820nm for astrocytoma cells and rat periosteum respectively by means of a biochemical assay. Thereby it can be seen that the change in attenuation coefficient of cultured cells with redox shift of CytOx mainly results from the scattering change.

  8. Donor age and cell passage affects differentiation potential of murine bone marrow-derived stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kretlow, James D; Jin, Yu-Qing; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Wen Jie; Hong, Tan-Hui; Zhou, Guangdong; Baggett, L Scott; Mikos, Antonios G; Cao, Yilin

    2008-01-01

    Background Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are a widely researched adult stem cell population capable of differentiation into various lineages. Because many promising applications of tissue engineering require cell expansion following harvest and involve the treatment of diseases and conditions found in an aging population, the effect of donor age and ex vivo handling must be understood in order to develop clinical techniques and therapeutics based on these cells. Furthermore, there currently exists little understanding as to how these two factors may be influenced by one another. Results Differences in the adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation capacity of murine MSCs harvested from donor animals of different age and number of passages of these cells were observed. Cells from younger donors adhered to tissue culture polystyrene better and proliferated in greater number than those from older animals. Chondrogenic and osteogenic potential decreased with age for each group, and adipogenic differentiation decreased only in cells from the oldest donors. Significant decreases in differentiation potentials due to passage were observed as well for osteogenesis of BMSCs from the youngest donors and chondrogenesis of the cells from the oldest donors. Conclusion Both increasing age and the number of passages have lineage dependent effects on BMSC differentiation potential. Furthermore, there is an obvious interplay between donor age and cell passage that in the future must be accounted for when developing cell-based therapies for clinical use. PMID:18957087

  9. Ultrastructural changes during the fatigue of bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, David H.

    2006-07-01

    Repetitive mechanical loading of bone can lead to ultrastructural-level damage, which can lead to fracture if not repaired. Skeletal fractures result not only from a loss in bone mass, but also because of alterations in tissue quality. Therefore, it is important to also delineate how changes in tissue ultrastructure affect the mechanistic response of bone to its physical environment. In this overview, factors affecting tissue quality, in particular fatigue resistance, are reviewed, followed by examples of recent work that has identified ultrastructural and compositional changes that occur in bone during fatigue.

  10. Does winter region affect spring arrival time and body mass of king eiders in northern Alaska?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Abby N.; Oppel, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    Events during the non-breeding season may affect the body condition of migratory birds and influence performance during the following breeding season. Migratory birds nesting in the Arctic often rely on endogenous nutrients for reproductive efforts, and are thus potentially subject to such carry-over effects. We tested whether king eider (Somateria spectabilis) arrival time and body mass upon arrival at breeding grounds in northern Alaska were affected by their choice of a winter region in the Bering Sea. We captured birds shortly after arrival on breeding grounds in early June 2002–2006 at two sites in northern Alaska and determined the region in which individuals wintered using satellite telemetry or stable isotope ratios of head feathers. We used generalized linear models to assess whether winter region explained variation in arrival body mass among individuals by accounting for sex, site, annual variation, and the date a bird was captured. We found no support for our hypothesis that either arrival time or arrival body mass of king eiders differed among winter regions. We conclude that wintering in different regions in the Bering Sea is unlikely to have reproductive consequences for king eiders in our study areas.

  11. Physical education in West Virginia schools: are we doing enough to generate peak bone mass and promote skeletal health?

    PubMed

    Shuler, Franklin D; Lycans, Dana; Gill, Thomas; Oliashirazi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Peak bone mass (PBM) is attained at 25-35 years of age, followed by a lifelong decline in bone strength. The most rapid increase in bone mass occurs between the ages of 12-17. Daily school physical education (PE) programs have been shown to produce measurable increases in PBM, but are not federally mandated. Increases in PBM can decrease the lifelong risk of osteoporosis and fractures; critical for West Virginia prevention programs. Nationally only 1 in 6 schools require PE three days per week, with 4% of elementary schools, 8% of middle schools and 2% of high schools providing daily PE. In 2005, West Virginia passed the Healthy Lifestyles Act that returned physical education to the K-12 curriculum. This law requires only one credit of PE from grades 9-12 and provides only 35% of the recommended PE for grades K-12. This article highlights the relationship of PE to PBM and discusses the potential impact on West Virginia skeletal health. PMID:23930566

  12. Aortic Calcification and Femoral Bone Density Are Independently Associated with Left Ventricular Mass in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chue, Colin D.; Wall, Nadezhda A.; Crabtree, Nicola J.; Zehnder, Daniel; Moody, William E.; Edwards, Nicola C.; Steeds, Richard P.; Townend, Jonathan N.; Ferro, Charles J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Vascular calcification and reduced bone density are prevalent in chronic kidney disease and linked to increased cardiovascular risk. The mechanism is unknown. We assessed the relationship between vascular calcification, femoral bone density and left ventricular mass in patients with stage 3 non-diabetic chronic kidney disease in a cross-sectional observational study. Methodology and Principal Findings A total of 120 patients were recruited (54% male, mean age 55±14 years, mean glomerular filtration rate 50±13 ml/min/1.73 m2). Abdominal aortic calcification was assessed using lateral lumbar spine radiography and was present in 48%. Mean femoral Z-score measured using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry was 0.60±1.06. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging was used to determine left ventricular mass. One patient had left ventricular hypertrophy. Subjects with aortic calcification had higher left ventricular mass compared to those without (56±16 vs. 48±12 g/m2, P = 0.002), as did patients with femoral Z-scores below zero (56±15 vs. 49±13 g/m2, P = 0.01). In univariate analysis presence of aortic calcification correlated with left ventricular mass (r = 0.32, P = 0.001); mean femoral Z-score inversely correlated with left ventricular mass (r = −0.28, P = 0.004). In a multivariate regression model that included presence of aortic calcification, mean femoral Z-score, gender and 24-hour systolic blood pressure, 46% of the variability in left ventricular mass was explained (P<0.001). Conclusions In patients with stage 3 non-diabetic chronic kidney disease, lower mean femoral Z-score and presence of aortic calcification are independently associated with increased left ventricular mass. Further research exploring the pathophysiology that underlies these relationships is warranted. PMID:22723973

  13. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester preferentially sensitizes CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma to ionizing radiation without affecting bone marrow radioresponse

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.-J.; Liao, H.-F.; Tsai, T.-H.; Wang, S.-Y.; Shiao, M.-S. . E-mail: msshiao@vghtpe.gov.tw

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a component of propolis, was reported capable of depleting glutathione (GSH). We subsequently examined the radiosensitizing effect of CAPE and its toxicity. Methods and Materials: The effects of CAPE on GSH level, GSH metabolism enzyme activities, NF-{kappa}B activity, and radiosensitivity in mouse CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells were determined. BALB/c mouse with CT26 cells implantation was used as a syngeneic in vivo model for evaluation of treatment and toxicity end points. Results: CAPE entered CT26 cells rapidly and depleted intracellular GSH in CT26 cells, but not in bone marrow cells. Pretreatment with nontoxic doses of CAPE significantly enhanced cell killing by ionizing radiation (IR) with sensitizer enhancement ratios up to 2.2. Pretreatment of CT26 cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine reversed the GSH depletion activity and partially blocked the radiosensitizing effect of CAPE. CAPE treatment in CT26 cells increased glutathione peroxidase, decreased glutathione reductase, and did not affect glutathione S-transferase or {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase activity. Radiation activated NF-{kappa}B was reversed by CAPE pretreatment. In vivo study revealed that pretreatment with CAPE before IR resulted in greater inhibition of tumor growth and prolongation of survival in comparison with IR alone. Pretreatment with CAPE neither affected body weights nor produced hepatic, renal, or hematopoietic toxicity. Conclusions: CAPE sensitizes CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma to IR, which may be via depleting GSH and inhibiting NF-{kappa}B activity, without toxicity to bone marrow, liver, and kidney.

  14. Does bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6) affect female fertility in the mouse?

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Koji; Su, You-Qiang; Eppig, John J

    2010-12-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6) is a transforming growth factor beta superfamily member produced by mammalian oocytes as well as other cell types. Despite well-characterized effects of recombinant BMP6 on granulosa cells in vitro, the function of BMP6 in vivo has been ill-defined. Therefore, the effects of genetic deletion of the Bmp6 gene on female mouse fertility were assessed. The mean litter size of Bmp6(-/-) females was reduced by 22% (P < 0.05) compared to Bmp6(+/+) controls. Not only did Bmp6(-/-) females naturally ovulate 24% fewer eggs, but competence of in vitro-matured oocytes to complete preimplantation development after fertilization in vitro was decreased by 50%. No apparent effect of Bmp6 deletion on either the morphology or the dynamics of follicular development was apparent. Nevertheless, levels of luteinizing hormone (LH)/human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-induced transcripts, which encode proteins required for cumulus expansion (HAS2, PTGS2, PTX3, and TNFAIP6), and of epidermal growth factor-like peptides (AREG, BTC, and EREG) were lower in Bmp6(-/-) mice than in controls after administration of a reduced dose of hCG (1 IU) in vivo. LH receptor (Lhcgr) transcript levels were not significantly lower in Bmp6(-/-) granulosa cells, suggesting that BMP6 is required for processes downstream of LH receptors. To assess whether another oocyte-derived BMP, BMP15, could have BMP6-redundant functions in vivo, the fertility of Bmp15/Bmp6 double mutants was assessed. Fertility was not significantly reduced in double-homozygous mutants compared with that in double-heterozygous controls. Therefore, BMP6 promotes normal fertility in female mice, at least in part, by enabling appropriate responses to LH and normal oocyte quality. Thus, Bmp6 probably is part of the complex genetic network that determines female fertility. PMID:20702851

  15. Links Between the Microbiome and Bone.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Christopher J; Guss, Jason D; Luna, Marysol; Goldring, Steven R

    2016-09-01

    The human microbiome has been shown to influence a number of chronic conditions associated with impaired bone mass and bone quality, including obesity, diabetes, and inflammatory bowel disease. The connection between the microbiome and bone health, however, has not been well studied. The few studies available demonstrate that the microbiome can have a large effect on bone remodeling and bone mass. The gut microbiome is the largest reservoir of microbial organisms in the body and consists of more than a thousand different species interacting with one another in a stable, dynamic equilibrium. How the microbiome can affect organs distant from the gut is not well understood but is believed to occur through regulation of nutrition, regulation of the immune system, and/or translocation of bacterial products across the gut endothelial barrier. Here we review each of these mechanisms and discuss their potential effect on bone remodeling and bone mass. We discuss how preclinical studies of bone-microbiome interactions are challenging because the microbiome is sensitive to genetic background, housing environment, and vendor source. Additionally, although the microbiome exhibits a robust response to external stimuli, it rapidly returns to its original steady state after a disturbance, making it difficult to sustain controlled changes in the microbiome over time periods required to detect alterations in bone remodeling, mass, or structure. Despite these challenges, an understanding of the mechanisms by which the gut microbiome affects bone has the potential to provide insights into the dissociation between fracture risk and bone mineral density in patients including those with obesity, diabetes, or inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, alteration of the gut microbiome has the potential to serve as a biomarker of bone metabolic activity as well as a target for therapies to improve bone structure and quality using pharmaceutical agents or pre- or probiotics. © 2016 American

  16. Effect of vitamin K2 on cortical and cancellous bone mass and hepatic lipids in rats with combined methionine-choline deficiency.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Jun; Seki, Azusa; Sato, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Hideo; Takeda, Tsuyoshi; Yeh, James K

    2011-05-01

    The present study examined changes of cancellous and cortical bone in rats with combined methionine-choline deficiency (MCD). In addition, the effects of vitamin K2 on cortical and cancellous bone mass and hepatic lipids were investigated in rats with MCD. Six-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into three groups of ten, including an age-matched control (standard diet) group, an MCD diet group, and an MCD diet+vitamin K2 (menatetrenone at 30mg/kg/d orally, 5 times a week) group. After the one-month experimental period, histomorphometric analysis was performed on cortical and cancellous bone from the tibial diaphysis and proximal metaphysis, respectively, while histological examination of the liver was performed after staining with hematoxylin and eosin and Oil Red O. MCD rats displayed weight loss, diffuse and centrilobular fatty changes of the liver, and a decrease of the cancellous bone volume per tissue volume (BV/TV) and percent cortical area (Ct Ar) as a result of decreased trabecular, periosteal, and endocortical bone formation along with increased trabecular and endocortical bone resorption. Administration of vitamin K2 to rats with MCD attenuated weight loss, accelerated the decrease of cancellous BV/TV due to an increase of bone remodeling, and ameliorated the decrease of percent Ct Ar by increasing periosteal and endocortical bone formation. Vitamin K2 administration also prevented MCD-induced diffuse fatty change of the liver. These findings suggest a beneficial effect of vitamin K2 on cortical bone mass and hepatic lipid metabolism in rats with MCD. The loss of cancellous bone mass could possibly have been due to re-distribution of minerals to cortical bone. PMID:21352961

  17. In vivo assessment of forearm bone mass and ulnar bending stiffness in healthy men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myburgh, K. H.; Zhou, L. J.; Steele, C. R.; Arnaud, S.; Marcus, R.

    1992-01-01

    The cross-sectional bending stiffness EI of the ulna was measured in vivo by mechanical resistance tissue analysis (MRTA) in 90 men aged 19-89 years. MRTA measures the impedance response of low-frequency vibrations to determine EI, which is a reflection of elastic modulus E and moment of inertia I for the whole ulna. EI was compared to conventional estimates of bone mineral content (BMC), bone width (BW), and BMC/BW, which were all measured by single-photon absorptiometry. Results obtained from the nondominant ulna indicate that BW increases (r = 0.27, p = 0.01) and ulnar BMC/BW decreases (r = -0.31, p < or = 0.005) with age. Neither BMC nor EI declined with age. The single best predictor of EI was BW (r2 = 0.47, p = 0.0001), and further small but significant contributions were made by BMC (r2 = 0.53, p = 0.0001) and grip strength (r2 = 0.55, p = 0.0001). These results suggest that the resistance of older men to forearm fracture is related to age-associated changes in the moment of inertia achieved by redistributing bone mineral farther from the bending axis. We conclude that the in vivo assessment of bone geometry offers important insights to the comprehensive evaluation of bone strength.

  18. [Relations between trabecular bone mass and the configuration in the space of the trabeculae of bone. Histomorphometric study of a population of 145 osteoporotic women].

    PubMed

    Chappard, D; Alexandre, C; Riffat, G

    1988-01-01

    145 women with involution osteoporosis and at least one vertebral compression noted on X-Rays, underwent a biopsy of the iliac wing and measurement of the mean cortical thickness, trabecular bony volume and parameters concerning the spatial configuration of bony trabecules (MTPT = Mean Trabecular Plate Thickness, MTPD = Mean Trabercular Plate Density, MTPS = Mean Trabecular Plate Separation), reflecting respectively the thickness, the density and the separation of the trabecules. The results were compared with those of a series of 22 control women of the same age. The post-menopausal osteoporotic patients present a decreased VTO, MTPD and MTPS with normal MTPT. Patients with senile osteoporosis show no difference as compared to the control patients of the same age. Half of the patients had a VTO higher than the spontaneous vertebral fracture threshold. Involution osteoporosis where the VTO exceeds the threshold present a significant decrease of the number of bony trabecules without decreased thickness. There is a negative correlation between age and the number of trabecules; a linear correlation between VTO and thickness, between VTO and trabecular density confirming the close relationship between mass and spatial configuration of the bone. There is a geometric configuration between density and separation of the trabecules, indicating a great sensitivity of the microstructural framework of disorganized trabecular bone. These data show that a decreased bony mass is not the only physiopathological mechanism observed during involution osteoporosis. Alterations of the spatial configuration of the trabecules or the mechanical resistance of the bony matrix are additional factors, the role of which might have been underestimated. PMID:3353672

  19. Menopause and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... You reach your highest bone mass (size and density) at about age 30. Then, sometime between age ... your bones, your doctor may do a bone density test (DEXA scan). This test gives exact measurements ...

  20. Association of Body Weight and Body Mass Index with Bone Mineral Density in Women and Men from Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Rexhepi, Sylejman; Bahtiri, Elton; Rexhepi, Mjellma; Sahatciu-Meka, Vjollca; Rexhepi, Blerta

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective: Body weight and body mass index (BMI) are considered potentially modifiable determinants of bone mass. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore the association between body weight and body mass index (BMI) with total hip and lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD). Methods: This cross-sectional study included a population of 100 women and 32 men from Kosovo into three BMI groups. All the study subjects underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements. Results: Total hip BMD levels of obese menopausal and premenopausal women and men were significantly higher compared to overweight or normal weight subjects, while lumbar spine BMD levels of only menopausal women and men were higher among obese subjects. Age-adjusted linear regression analysis showed that BMI is a significant independent associate of lumbar spine and total hip BMD in menopausal women and men. Conclusion: Despite positive association between BMI and lumbar spine and total hip BMD in menopausal women, presence of more obese and osteoporotic subjects among menopausal women represent a population at risk for fractures because of poor balance and frequent falls; therefore, both obesity and osteoporosis prevention efforts should begin early on in life. PMID:26543419

  1. Ultrasound insertion loss of rat parietal bone appears to be proportional to animal mass at submegahertz frequencies.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Meaghan A; Muller, Aidan; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2011-11-01

    Transcranial ultrasound therapy is an increasing area of research for noninvasive treatments in the brain including targeted drug delivery. Measurements of ultrasound transmission through rat parietal bone at five frequencies (0.268 MHz, 0.841 MHz, 1.409 MHz, 1.972 MHz and 2.53 MHz) were performed at 88 locations in 22 ex vivo rat skullcaps (Wistar) using a fiber-optic hydrophone system. At submegahertz frequencies, the skull insertion loss was found to be proportional to animal mass, while at higher frequencies this trend was lost. Maps of the transverse pressure profile of the transducer before and after skull insertion showed increased distortion effects at higher frequencies. Parietal bone thickness was measured and was found to increase with increasing body mass. Additional measurements were made through mouse and rabbit skulls at 2.53 MHz. At this frequency, aberration effects through mouse skull were negligible, while large distortions were observed through rat and rabbit skull. Preclinical transcranial ultrasound studies in rats may be improved by scaling applied powers according to body mass to produce more consistent in situ pressures. PMID:21925788

  2. Does the Time of Postoperative Bisphosphonate Administration Affect the Bone Union in Osteoporotic Intertrochanteric Fracture of Femur?

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoon Je; Chun, Young Soo; Kang, Joon Soon; Jung, Gwang Young; Lee, Jun Hee

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to investigate the effect of bisphosphonate administration starting time on bone healing and to identify the best administration time following surgical treatment of osteoporotic intertrochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods Two hundreds and eighty four patients (284 hips; 52 males, 232 females) who underwent surgery following osteoporotic intertrochanteric fracture from December 2002 to December 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. The average follow-up period was 68.4 months. The patients were divided into three groups according to the time of bisphosphonate administration after operation: 1 week (group A; n=102), 1 month (group B; n=89), and 3 months (group C; n=93). Koval scores and change of Koval scores 1 year after operation were used for clinical evaluation. For radiologic evaluation, the time of callus appearance across the fracture line on sagittal and coronal radiographs and the time to absence of pain during hip motion was judged as the time of bone union. Results Koval scores one year after surgery for groups A, B, and C were 2.44, 2.36, and 2.43 (P=0.895), respectively. The mean time of union was 12.4, 11.9, and 12.3 weeks after operation in the three groups (P=0.883), respectively. There were zero cases of nonunion. There were 3, 5, and 7 cases of fixative displacement in the three groups, respectively, but the distribution showed no significant difference (P>0.472). Conclusion The initiating time of bisphosphonate administration following surgery does not affect the clinical outcomes in patients with osteoporotic intertrochanteric fracture. PMID:27536634

  3. Investigate methods for measuring muscle and bone mass changes in astronauts and animals which occur during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    Sodium-22 is being used as a tracer for bone mineral metabolism studies. Dogs are being grown from puppies to adulthood on a diet containing a constant level of sodium-22 in order to uniformly tag the entire skeleton with a long lived radionuclide. This study is still in progress and the dogs are still growing. Potassium-40 measurements were made on people, who are replacing muscle mass lost due to leg injuries, in a second study. It appears that potassium-40 measurements provide an accurate and convenient method for determining relative changes in the muscle content of the leg.

  4. High-Dose α-Tocopherol Supplementation Does Not Induce Bone Loss in Normal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Shunji; Ito, Akemi; Shindo, Kaori; Toyoshi, Tohru; Bando, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress affects bone turnover. Preventative effects of antioxidants such as vitamin E on reduced bone mineral density and fractures associated with aging, osteoporosis, and smoking have been examined in animals and humans. The effects of vitamin E (α-tocopherol; αT) on bone health have yielded conflicting and inconclusive results from animal studies. In this study, to determine the bone effects of αT, we investigated the in vivo effects of αT on the bone mineral density, bone mass, bone microstructure, bone resorption, and osteogenesis through peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) measurements, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analyses, and bone histomorphometry of lumbar vertebrae and femurs in normal female Wistar rats fed diets containing αT in different quantities (0, 30, 120, or 600 mg/kg diet) for 8 weeks. To validate our hypotheses regarding bone changes, we examined ovariectomized rats as an osteoporosis model and control sham-operated rats in parallel. As expected, ovariectomized rats had reduced bone mineral density in lumbar vertebrae and the distal metaphyses of their femurs, reduced bone mass and deteriorated microstructure of cancellous bones in the vertebral body and distal femur metaphyses, and reduced bone mass due to resorption-dominant enhanced bone turnover in secondary cancellous bones in these sites. In comparison, αT administered to normal rats, even at the highest dose, did not induce reduced bone mineral density of lumbar vertebrae and femurs or a reduced bone mass or fragile microstructure of cancellous bones of the vertebral body and distal femur metaphyses. Instead, αT-fed rats showed a tendency for an osteogenesis-dominant bone mass increase in secondary cancellous bones in the vertebral body, in which active bone remodeling occurs. Thus, αT consumption may have beneficial effects on bone health. PMID:26147575

  5. High-Dose α-Tocopherol Supplementation Does Not Induce Bone Loss in Normal Rats.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Shunji; Ito, Akemi; Shindo, Kaori; Toyoshi, Tohru; Bando, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress affects bone turnover. Preventative effects of antioxidants such as vitamin E on reduced bone mineral density and fractures associated with aging, osteoporosis, and smoking have been examined in animals and humans. The effects of vitamin E (α-tocopherol; αT) on bone health have yielded conflicting and inconclusive results from animal studies. In this study, to determine the bone effects of αT, we investigated the in vivo effects of αT on the bone mineral density, bone mass, bone microstructure, bone resorption, and osteogenesis through peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) measurements, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analyses, and bone histomorphometry of lumbar vertebrae and femurs in normal female Wistar rats fed diets containing αT in different quantities (0, 30, 120, or 600 mg/kg diet) for 8 weeks. To validate our hypotheses regarding bone changes, we examined ovariectomized rats as an osteoporosis model and control sham-operated rats in parallel. As expected, ovariectomized rats had reduced bone mineral density in lumbar vertebrae and the distal metaphyses of their femurs, reduced bone mass and deteriorated microstructure of cancellous bones in the vertebral body and distal femur metaphyses, and reduced bone mass due to resorption-dominant enhanced bone turnover in secondary cancellous bones in these sites. In comparison, αT administered to normal rats, even at the highest dose, did not induce reduced bone mineral density of lumbar vertebrae and femurs or a reduced bone mass or fragile microstructure of cancellous bones of the vertebral body and distal femur metaphyses. Instead, αT-fed rats showed a tendency for an osteogenesis-dominant bone mass increase in secondary cancellous bones in the vertebral body, in which active bone remodeling occurs. Thus, αT consumption may have beneficial effects on bone health. PMID:26147575

  6. How do changes to plate thickness, length, and face-connectivity affect femoral cancellous bone's density and surface area? An investigation using regular cellular models.

    PubMed

    Anderson, I A; Carman, J B

    2000-03-01

    Models of regular cellular-solids representing femoral head 'medial group' bone were used to (1) compare thickness data for plate-like and beam-like structures at realistic surface areas and densities; (2) test the validity of a standard formula for trabecular thickness (Tb.Th); and (3) study how systematic changes in cancellous bone thicknesses, spacing, and face-connectivity affect relative density and surface area. Models of different face-connectivities, produced by plate removal from the unit cell, were fitted to bone density and surface area data. The medial group bone was anisotropic: the supero-inferior (SI) direction was the principal direction for bone plate alignment and the plane normal to this had the largest number of bone/void intersections per unit line length (P(I)). A comparison of boundary perimeter per unit area data, in planes normal to SI, with surface area data placed the medial group bone between prismatic structures in which walls are parallel to one principal direction and isotropic structures. Selective removal of plates from a closed-cell model produced a similar result. For the same relative density and surface-area, plate-like models had significantly thinner cross-sections than beam-like models. The formula for Tb.Th produced overestimates of model plate thickness by up to 20% at realistic femoral cancellous densities. Trends in data on surface area to volume ratio and density observed on sampled medial group bone could be simulated by plate thickness changes on models of intermediate face-connectivity (approximately 1.5) or by plate removal from models with relatively thick and short (low aspect-ratio) plates. The latter mechanism is unrealistic for it resulted in beam-like structures at low 'medial group' densities, an architecture unlike the predominantly plate-like bone in the sample. PMID:10673116

  7. Differences of bone mineral mass, volumetric bone mineral density, geometrical and structural parameters and derived strength of the tibia between premenopausal and postmenopausal women of different age groups: a peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography (pQCT) study.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, K D; Zoubos, A B; Papaioannou, N A; Mastrokalos, D; Galanos, A; Papagelopoulos, P J; Skarantavos, G

    2016-01-01

    Menopause constitutes a significant cause of bone loss, and it is currently debated whether bone mass is preserved or begins to decline substantially before that time in women. We used pQCT of the tibia to estimate differences of bone mineral mass, bone geometry and derived strength between premenopausal and postmenopausal Caucasian women of different age-groups per decade of age (20-79y). For each individual, we assessed total, trabecular and cortical bone mineral content (BMC, mg) and volumetric bone mineral density (BMD, mg/cm3); total and cortical cross-sectional areas (CSA, mm2); periosteal circumference (PERI_C, mm); endosteal circumference (ENDO_C, mm); mean cortical thickness (CRT_THK, mm); and Stress-Strain Index (SSI) . Comparisons were made both between premenopausal (N=84) and postmenopausal (N=231) women as distinct groups, and among women of the different age-groups. Our results indicated that premenopausal women had significantly higher trabecular and cortical BMC and vBMD, with higher cortical CSA, CRT_THK and SSI than postmenopausal women. Moreover, significant differences of trabecular but not cortical BMC, vBMD or SSI were found between women of the younger (<48y) age-groups. PERI_C, ENDO_C displayed lower values in the 20-29y group and higher values in the 70-79y group, denoting significant differences of bone geometry with aging. PMID:27282455

  8. Iliac crest trabecular bone mass and structure in patients with non-steroid treated rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Mellish, R W; O'Sullivan, M M; Garrahan, N J; Compston, J E

    1987-01-01

    Iliac crest trabecular bone volume and structure have been studied in bone biopsy specimens from 48 patients with classical or definite rheumatoid arthritis, none of whom had received steroids. Results were compared with those obtained from healthy controls matched for age and sex. The mean trabecular bone volume in female patients aged 34-50 years was significantly lower than in controls (p less than 0.01); in male patients aged 34-50 years values were also lower than those in controls (mean (SD) 17.8 (3.2) v 22.4 (5.6)% total medullary volume), though this difference was not statistically significant. Values in older patients were similar to those of controls. The mean trabecular plate thickness was significantly lower in female patients in all three age groups when compared with the controls (p less than 0.005, 0.05, and 0.005). Similar but non-significant changes were seen in male patients. The mean trabecular plate density, an index of trabecular number, and the mean trabecular plate separation showed no age related change in either male or female patients, in contrast with the female control group, in whom the mean trabecular plate density decreased and separation increased with age. These results suggest that non-steroid treated rheumatoid arthritis is associated with premature bone loss, the structural basis of which is trabecular thinning. PMID:3426289

  9. Calcium and vitamin D requirements for optimal bone mass during adolescence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There remains very strong interest in the calcium and vitamin D requirements of adolescents related to bone health. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) released new dietary guidelines in late 2010 for these nutrients. These guidelines were primarily based on literature published in 2009 and earlier and ...

  10. Effects of Long-Term Daily Administration of Prostaglandin-E2 on Maintaining Elevated Proximal Tibial Metaphyseal Cancellous Bone Mass in Male Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ke, Hua Zhu; Jee, Webster S. S.; Mori, Satoshi; Li, Xiao Jian; Kimmel, Donald B.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of long-term prostaglandin E(sub 2) (PGE(sub 2)) on cancellous bone in proximal tibial metaphysis were studied in 7 month old male Sprague-Dawley rats given daily subcutaneous injections of 0, 1, 3, and 6 mg PGE(sub 2)/kg/day and sacrificed after 60, 120, and 180 days. Histomorphometric analyses were performed on double fluorescent-labeled undecalcified bone specimens. After 60 days of treatment, PGE(sub 2) produced diffusely labeled trabecular bone area, increased trabecular bone area, eroded and labeled trabecular perimeter, mineral apposition rate, and bone formation rate at all dose levels when compared with age-matched controls. In rats given PGE(sub 2) for longer time periods (120 and 180 days), trabecular bone area, diffusely labeled trabecular bone area, labeled perimeter, mineral apposition, and bone formation rates were sustained at the elevated levels achieved earlier at 60-day treatment. The eroded perimeter continued to increase until 120 days, then plateau. The observation that continuous systemic PGE(sub 2) administration to adult male rats elevated metaphyseal cancellous bone mass to 3.5-fold of the control level within 60 days and maintained it for another 120 days indicates that the powerful skeletal anabolic effects of PGE2 can be sustained with continuous administration .

  11. Early loss of bone mineral density is correlated with a gain of fat mass in patients starting a protease inhibitor containing regimen: the prospective Lipotrip study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral treatment (ART) experience deep and early disorders in fat and bone metabolism, leading to concomitant changes in fat mass and bone mineral density. Methods We conducted a prospective study in treatment-naive HIV-infected patients randomized to receive two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in combination with either a protease inhibitor (PI) or a non-nucleosidic reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), to evaluate early changes in body composition, bone mineral density and metabolic markers as differentially induced by antiretroviral therapies. We measured changes in markers of carbohydrate, of fat and bone metabolism, and, using dual-emission X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), body composition and bone mineral density (BMD). Complete data on changes between baseline and after 21 months treatment were available for 35 patients (16 in the PI group and 19 in the NNRTI group). Results A significant gain in BMI and in total and lower limb fat mass was recorded only in patients receiving PI. A loss of lumbar BMD was observed in both groups, being higher with PI. Plasma markers of bone metabolism (alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, collagen crosslaps) and levels of parathormone and of 1,25diOH-vitamin D3 significantly increased in both groups, concomitant with a decline in 25OH-vitamin D3. Lipids and glucose levels increased in both groups but rise in triglyceride was more pronounced with PI. A correlation between loss of BMD and gain of fat mass is observed in patients starting PI. Conclusions We evidenced an early effect of ART on lipid and bone metabolisms. PI lead to a significant gain in fat mass correlated with a sharp drop in BMD but active bone remodelling is evident with all antiretroviral treatments, associated with low vitamin D levels and hyperparathyroidism. In parallel, signs of metabolic restoration are evident. However, early increases in lean and fat mass, triglycerides, waist circumference and

  12. Breastfeeding and Bone Mass at the Ages of 18 and 30: Prospective Analysis of Live Births from the Pelotas (Brazil) 1982 and 1993 Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Muniz, Ludmila Correa; Menezes, Ana Maria Baptista; Assunção, Maria Cecília Formoso; Wehrmeister, Fernando Cesar; Martínez-Mesa, Jeovany; Gonçalves, Helen; Domingues, Marlos Rodrigues; Gigante, Denise Petrucci; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Barros, Fernando C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of total breastfeeding, breastfeeding duration and type of breastfeeding at 3 months of age on bone mass at 18 and 30 years. Study Design A prospective, longitudinal study was conducted with two birth cohorts (1982 and 1993) in Pelotas, Southern Brazil. Measurements of bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD) at 18 and 30 years of age were obtained by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Information on breastfeeding was collected during the first 4 years of life. Analyses were performed by linear regression and stratified by sex. Results A total of 1109 and 3226 participants provided complete information on breastfeeding in early life and bone mass at 18 and 30 years, respectively. No association between breastfeeding and bone mass was observed in women at both ages nor among men at age 30. Among men at the age of 18, BMC and BMD were higher among those breastfed regardless of duration (p=0.032 and p=0.043, respectively). Conclusions Despite a very weak positive effect of breastfeeding (yes/no) on BMC and BMD at age 18 in men, most findings pointed to a lack of association between breastfeeding and bone mass until young adulthood. PMID:25880483

  13. Bone nutrients for vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Mangels, Ann Reed

    2014-07-01

    The process of bone mineralization and resorption is complex and is affected by numerous factors, including dietary constituents. Although some dietary factors involved in bone health, such as calcium and vitamin D, are typically associated with dairy products, plant-based sources of these nutrients also supply other key nutrients involved in bone maintenance. Some research suggests that vegetarian diets, especially vegan diets, are associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD), but this does not appear to be clinically significant. Vegan diets are not associated with an increased fracture risk if calcium intake is adequate. Dietary factors in plant-based diets that support the development and maintenance of bone mass include calcium, vitamin D, protein, potassium, and soy isoflavones. Other factors present in plant-based diets such as oxalic acid and phytic acid can potentially interfere with absorption and retention of calcium and thereby have a negative effect on BMD. Impaired vitamin B-12 status also negatively affects BMD. The role of protein in calcium balance is multifaceted. Overall, calcium and protein intakes in accord with Dietary Reference Intakes are recommended for vegetarians, including vegans. Fortified foods are often helpful in meeting recommendations for calcium and vitamin D. Plant-based diets can provide adequate amounts of key nutrients for bone health. PMID:24898231

  14. Facial affective reactions to bitter-tasting foods and body mass index in adults.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Burgos, D; Zamora, M C

    2013-12-01

    Differences in food consumption among body-weight statuses (e.g., higher fruit intake linked with lower body mass index (BMI) and energy-dense products with higher BMI) has raised the question of why people who are overweight or are at risk of becoming overweight eat differently from thinner people. One explanation, in terms of sensitivity to affective properties of food, suggests that palatability-driven consumption is likely to be an important contributor to food intake, and therefore body weight. Extending this approach to unpalatable tastes, we examined the relationship between aversive reactions to foods and BMI. We hypothesized that people who have a high BMI will show more negative affective reactions to bitter-tasting stimuli, even after controlling for sensory perception differences. Given that hedonic reactions may influence consumption even without conscious feelings of pleasure/displeasure, the facial expressions were included in order to provide more direct access to affective systems than subjective reports. Forty adults (28 females, 12 males) participated voluntarily. Their ages ranged from 18 to 46 years (M=24.2, SD=5.8). On the basis of BMI, participants were classified as low BMI (BMI<20; n=20) and high BMI (BMI>23; n=20). The mean BMI was 19.1 for low BMI (SD=0.7) and 25.2 for high BMI participants (SD=1.8). Each subject tasted 5 mL of a grapefruit juice drink and a bitter chocolate drink. Subjects rated the drinks' hedonic and incentive value, familiarity and bitter intensity immediately after each stimulus presentation. The results indicated that high BMI participants reacted to bitter stimuli showing more profound changes from baseline in neutral and disgust facial expressions compared with low BMI. No differences between groups were detected for the subjective pleasantness and familiarity. The research here is the first to examine how affective facial reactions to bitter food, apart from taste responsiveness, can predict differences in BMI

  15. SILICON AND BONE HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    JUGDAOHSINGH, R.

    2009-01-01

    Low bone mass (osteoporosis) is a silent epidemic of the 21st century, which presently in the UK results in over 200,000 fractures annually at a cost of over one billion pounds. Figures are set to increase worldwide. Understanding the factors which affect bone metabolism is thus of primary importance in order to establish preventative measures or treatments for this condition. Nutrition is an important determinant of bone health, but the effects of the individual nutrients and minerals, other than calcium, is little understood. Accumulating evidence over the last 30 years strongly suggest that dietary silicon is beneficial to bone and connective tissue health and we recently reported strong positive associations between dietary Si intake and bone mineral density in US and UK cohorts. The exact biological role(s) of silicon in bone health is still not clear, although a number of possible mechanisms have been suggested, including the synthesis of collagen and/or its stabilization, and matrix mineralization. This review gives an overview of this naturally occurring dietary element, its metabolism and the evidence of its potential role in bone health. PMID:17435952

  16. Relationship between Body Mass Composition, Bone Mineral Density, Skin Fibrosis and 25(OH) Vitamin D Serum Levels in Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Addolorata; Colia, Ripalta; Mele, Angiola; Di Bello, Valeria; Trotta, Antonello; Neve, Anna; Cantatore, Francesco Paolo

    2015-01-01

    A reduced bone mineral density (BMD) is observed in several rheumatic autoimmune diseases, including Systemic Sclerosis (SSc); nevertheless, data concerning the possible determinants of bone loss in this disease are not fully investigated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between BMD, body mass composition, skin sclerosis and serum Vitamin D levels in two subsets of SSc patients. 64 post-menopausal SSc patients, classified as limited cutaneous (lcSSc) or diffuse cutaneous (dcSSc) SSc, were studied. As control, 35 healthy post-menopausal women were recruited. Clinical parameters were evaluated, including the extent of skin involvement. BMD at lumbar spine, hip, femoral neck and body mass composition were determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, urine pyridinium cross-links, intact parathyroid hormone and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) were measured. BMD at spine, femoral neck and total hip was significantly lower in SSc patients compared to controls. In dcSSc subset, BMD at spine, femoral neck and total hip was significantly lower compared to lcSSc. No differences in both fat and lean mass were found in the three study groups even if patients with dcSSc showed a slightly lower total body mass compared to healthy controls. Total mineral content was significantly reduced in dSSc compared to both healthy subjects and lcSSc group. Hypovitaminosis D was observed both in healthy post-menopausal women and in SSc patients, but 25OHD levels were significantly lower in dcSSc compared to lcSSc and inversely correlated with the extent of skin thickness. These results support the hypothesis that the extent of skin involvement in SSc patients could be an important factor in determining low circulating levels of 25OHD, which in turn could play a significant role in the reduction of BMD and total mineral content. PMID:26375284

  17. Relationship between Body Mass Composition, Bone Mineral Density, Skin Fibrosis and 25(OH) Vitamin D Serum Levels in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Corrado, Addolorata; Colia, Ripalta; Mele, Angiola; Di Bello, Valeria; Trotta, Antonello; Neve, Anna; Cantatore, Francesco Paolo

    2015-01-01

    A reduced bone mineral density (BMD) is observed in several rheumatic autoimmune diseases, including Systemic Sclerosis (SSc); nevertheless, data concerning the possible determinants of bone loss in this disease are not fully investigated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between BMD, body mass composition, skin sclerosis and serum Vitamin D levels in two subsets of SSc patients. 64 post-menopausal SSc patients, classified as limited cutaneous (lcSSc) or diffuse cutaneous (dcSSc) SSc, were studied. As control, 35 healthy post-menopausal women were recruited. Clinical parameters were evaluated, including the extent of skin involvement. BMD at lumbar spine, hip, femoral neck and body mass composition were determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, urine pyridinium cross-links, intact parathyroid hormone and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) were measured. BMD at spine, femoral neck and total hip was significantly lower in SSc patients compared to controls. In dcSSc subset, BMD at spine, femoral neck and total hip was significantly lower compared to lcSSc. No differences in both fat and lean mass were found in the three study groups even if patients with dcSSc showed a slightly lower total body mass compared to healthy controls. Total mineral content was significantly reduced in dSSc compared to both healthy subjects and lcSSc group. Hypovitaminosis D was observed both in healthy post-menopausal women and in SSc patients, but 25OHD levels were significantly lower in dcSSc compared to lcSSc and inversely correlated with the extent of skin thickness. These results support the hypothesis that the extent of skin involvement in SSc patients could be an important factor in determining low circulating levels of 25OHD, which in turn could play a significant role in the reduction of BMD and total mineral content. PMID:26375284

  18. The Association between Muscle Mass Deficits Estimated from Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis and Lumbar Spine Bone Mineral Density in Korean Adults

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hye-Yeon; Lee, Kye-Bong; Cho, Sul-Bit; Im, In Jae; Kim, Hee Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background Bone mineral density (BMD) is influenced by many factors. Despite the reported association between body components and BMD, most of these studies investigated the relationship between absolute muscle mass or fat mass and BMD in postmenopausal women or elderly subjects. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between muscle mass deficits (MMD) estimated from bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and lumbar spinal BMD in Korean adults 20 to 49 years of age. Methods This cross-sectional study included 1,765 men and women who visited a health promotion center for a routine checkup. The lumbar spinal BMD was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Body composition analysis was performed using BIA. Results The mean age of the subjects was 40.2±6.3 years. Ten thousand subjects (56.7%) were males and 126 subjects (7.1%) belonged to the low BMD (Z-score ≤-2.0). MMD had the strongest influence on BMD after adjusting for all covariates. The adjusted odds ratio of Group 3 (MDD >2.6 kg) for low BMD was 2.74 (95% CI, 1.46-5.15) after adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, height, and smoking. Conclusions MMD estimated by BIA showed a significant association with BMD and could be regarded as an independent risk factor for low BMD in adults 20 to 49 years of age. These findings support that interventions such as physical activity or lifestyle changes may simultaneously modify both muscle and bone health in this age group. PMID:27294081

  19. Resistance training over 2 years increases bone mass in calcium-replete postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Kerr, D; Ackland, T; Maslen, B; Morton, A; Prince, R

    2001-01-01

    Understanding the stress/strain relationship between exercise and bone is critical to understanding the potential benefit of exercise in preventing postmenopausal bone loss. This study examined the effect of a 2-year exercise intervention and calcium supplementation (600 mg) on bone mineral density (BMD) in 126 postmenopausal women (mean age, 60 +/- 5 years). Assignment was by block randomization to one of three groups: strength (S), fitness (F), or nonexercise control (C). The two exercise groups completed three sets of the same nine exercises, three times a week. The S group increased the loading, while the F group had additional stationary bicycle riding with minimal increase in loading. Retention at 2 years was 71% (59% in the S group, 69% in the F group, and 83% in the C group), while the exercise compliance did not differ between the exercise groups (S group, 74 +/- 13%; F group, 77 +/- 14%). BMD was measured at the hip, lumbar spine, and forearm sites every 6 months using a Hologic 4500. Whole body BMD also was measured every 6 months on a Hologic 2000. There was no difference between the groups at the forearm, lumbar spine, or whole body sites. There was a significant effect of the strength program at the total (0.9 +/- 2.6%; p < 0.05) and intertrochanter hip site (1.1 +/- 3.0%; p < 0.01). There was a significant time and group interaction (p < 0.05) at the intertrochanter site by repeated measures. This study shows the effectiveness of a progressive strength program in increasing bone density at the clinically important hip site. We concluded that a strength program could be recommended as an adjunct lifestyle approach to osteoporosis treatment or used in combination with other therapies. PMID:11149482

  20. Evidence for reduced cancellous bone mass in the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. M.; Hsu, J. F.; Jee, W. S.; Matthews, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    The histomorphometric changes in the proximal tibial metaphysis and epiphyseal growth plate and midtibial shaft of 26-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) compared with those of the corresponding normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were studied. A decrease in body weight, growth plate thickness, and longitudinal growth rate of the proximal tibial epiphysis, trabecular bone volume, trabecular thickness and number, the number of osteoblasts and osteoprogenitor cells per millimeter square surface of the proximal tibial metaphysis, periosteal and endocortical apposition rate and bone formation rate of the tibial diaphysis were observed in the SHR. Additionally, systolic blood pressure, the number of osteoclasts per millimeter square surface and average number of nuclei per osteoclast of the proximal tibial metaphysis were significantly increased. Thus, osteoclastic activity is dominant over osteoblastic and chondroblastic activity in the SHR that results in a cancellous bone deficit in the skeleton. It will require additional work to ascertain the underlying cause for this condition as several factors in the SHR with a potential for causing this change are present, including elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH), depressed 1,25-(OH)2D3, low calcium absorption, reduced body weight (reduced loading) elevated blood pressure and possibly other direct cell differences in the mutant strain. At present elevated PTH and adaptation to underloading from reduced weight are postulated to be a likely cause, but additional studies are required to test this interpretation.

  1. A COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF UNCERTAINTIES AFFECTING THE STELLAR MASS-HALO MASS RELATION FOR 0 < z < 4

    SciTech Connect

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Conroy, Charlie

    2010-07-01

    We conduct a comprehensive analysis of the relationship between central galaxies and their host dark matter halos, as characterized by the stellar mass-halo mass (SM-HM) relation, with rigorous consideration of uncertainties. Our analysis focuses on results from the abundance matching technique, which assumes that every dark matter halo or subhalo above a specific mass threshold hosts one galaxy. We provide a robust estimate of the SM-HM relation for 0 < z < 1 and discuss the quantitative effects of uncertainties in observed galaxy stellar mass functions (including stellar mass estimates and counting uncertainties), halo mass functions (including cosmology and uncertainties from substructure), and the abundance matching technique used to link galaxies to halos (including scatter in this connection). Our analysis results in a robust estimate of the SM-HM relation and its evolution from z = 0 to z = 4. The shape and the evolution are well constrained for z < 1. The largest uncertainties at these redshifts are due to stellar mass estimates (0.25 dex uncertainty in normalization); however, failure to account for scatter in stellar masses at fixed halo mass can lead to errors of similar magnitude in the SM-HM relation for central galaxies in massive halos. We also investigate the SM-HM relation to z = 4, although the shape of the relation at higher redshifts remains fairly unconstrained when uncertainties are taken into account. We find that the integrated star formation at a given halo mass peaks at 10%-20% of available baryons for all redshifts from 0 to 4. This peak occurs at a halo mass of 7 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} at z = 0 and this mass increases by a factor of 5 to z = 4. At lower and higher masses, star formation is substantially less efficient, with stellar mass scaling as M{sub *} {approx} M {sup 2.3}{sub h} at low masses and M{sub *} {approx} M {sup 0.29}{sub h} at high masses. The typical stellar mass for halos with mass less than 10{sup 12} M{sub sun} has

  2. A Comprehensive Analysis of Uncertainties Affecting the Stellar Mass-Halo Mass Relation for 0

    SciTech Connect

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Conroy, Charlie; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2010-06-07

    We conduct a comprehensive analysis of the relationship between central galaxies and their host dark matter halos, as characterized by the stellar mass - halo mass (SM-HM) relation, with rigorous consideration of uncertainties. Our analysis focuses on results from the abundance matching technique, which assumes that every dark matter halo or subhalo above a specific mass threshold hosts one galaxy. We provide a robust estimate of the SM-HM relation for 0 < z < 1 and discuss the quantitative effects of uncertainties in observed galaxy stellar mass functions (GSMFs) (including stellar mass estimates and counting uncertainties), halo mass functions (including cosmology and uncertainties from substructure), and the abundance matching technique used to link galaxies to halos (including scatter in this connection). Our analysis results in a robust estimate of the SM-HM relation and its evolution from z=0 to z=4. The shape and evolution are well constrained for z < 1. The largest uncertainties at these redshifts are due to stellar mass estimates (0.25 dex uncertainty in normalization); however, failure to account for scatter in stellar masses at fixed halo mass can lead to errors of similar magnitude in the SM-HM relation for central galaxies in massive halos. We also investigate the SM-HM relation to z = 4, although the shape of the relation at higher redshifts remains fairly unconstrained when uncertainties are taken into account. We find that the integrated star formation at a given halo mass peaks at 10-20% of available baryons for all redshifts from 0 to 4. This peak occurs at a halo mass of 7 x 10{sup 11} M{sub {circle_dot}} at z = 0 and this mass increases by a factor of 5 to z = 4. At lower and higher masses, star formation is substantially less efficient, with stellar mass scaling as M{sub *} {approx} M{sub h}{sup 2.3} at low masses and M{sub *} {approx} M{sub h}{sup 0.29} at high masses. The typical stellar mass for halos with mass less than 10{sup 12} M

  3. Leptin regulates bone formation via the sympathetic nervous system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeda, Shu; Elefteriou, Florent; Levasseur, Regis; Liu, Xiuyun; Zhao, Liping; Parker, Keith L.; Armstrong, Dawna; Ducy, Patricia; Karsenty, Gerard

    2002-01-01

    We previously showed that leptin inhibits bone formation by an undefined mechanism. Here, we show that hypothalamic leptin-dependent antiosteogenic and anorexigenic networks differ, and that the peripheral mediators of leptin antiosteogenic function appear to be neuronal. Neuropeptides mediating leptin anorexigenic function do not affect bone formation. Leptin deficiency results in low sympathetic tone, and genetic or pharmacological ablation of adrenergic signaling leads to a leptin-resistant high bone mass. beta-adrenergic receptors on osteoblasts regulate their proliferation, and a beta-adrenergic agonist decreases bone mass in leptin-deficient and wild-type mice while a beta-adrenergic antagonist increases bone mass in wild-type and ovariectomized mice. None of these manipulations affects body weight. This study demonstrates a leptin-dependent neuronal regulation of bone formation with potential therapeutic implications for osteoporosis.

  4. Evaluation of cortical bone mass, thickness and density by z-scores in osteopenic conditions and in relation to menopause and estrogen treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Meema, S.; Meema, H.E.

    1982-08-01

    Z-scores express, differences from normals in standard deviation units, and are particularly useful for comparison of changes where normal values are age- and sex-dependent. We determined z-scores for bone mineral mass, cortical thickness, and bone mineral density in the radius in various conditions and diseases in both sexes. In the males, z-scores were calculated for age, but in the females z-scores for menopausal status (years postmenopausal exclusive of years on estrogen treatment) were found to be more appropriate. With few exceptions, changes in a disease were of a similar order in both sexes. For bone minerals mass few mean z-scores were significantly increased, but diseases with significantly decreased mean z-scores were numerous. The usefulness of z-scores in diagnosis and study of metabolic bone disease is discussed.

  5. Textural and rheological properties of Pacific whiting surimi as affected by nano-scaled fish bone and heating rates.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tao; Park, Jae W

    2015-08-01

    Textural and rheological properties of Pacific whiting (PW) surimi were investigated at various heating rates with the use of nano-scaled fish bone (NFB) and calcium chloride. Addition of NFB and slow heating improved gel strength significantly. Activity of endogenous transglutaminase (ETGase) from PW surimi was markedly induced by both NFB calcium and calcium chloride, showing an optimal temperature at 30°C. Initial storage modulus increased as NFB calcium concentration increased and the same trend was maintained throughout the temperature sweep. Rheograms with temperature sweep at slow heating rate (1°C/min) exhibited two peaks at ∼ 35°C and ∼ 70°C. However, no peak was observed during temperature sweep from 20 to 90°C at fast heating rate (20°C/min). Protein patterns of surimi gels were affected by both heating rate and NFB calcium concentration. Under slow heating, myosin heavy chain intensity decreased with NFB calcium concentration, indicating formation of ε-(γ-glutamyl) lysine cross-links by ETGase and NFB calcium ion. PMID:25766799

  6. Alterations of Mass Density and 3D Osteocyte Lacunar Properties in Bisphosphonate-Related Osteonecrotic Human Jaw Bone, a Synchrotron µCT Study

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Bernhard; Langer, Max; Varga, Peter; Pacureanu, Alexandra; Dong, Pei; Schrof, Susanne; Männicke, Nils; Suhonen, Heikki; Olivier, Cecile; Maurer, Peter; Kazakia, Galateia J.

    2014-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw, in association with bisphosphonates (BRONJ) used for treating osteoporosis or cancer, is a severe and most often irreversible side effect whose underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain largely unknown. Osteocytes are involved in bone remodeling and mineralization where they orchestrate the delicate equilibrium between osteoclast and osteoblast activity and through the active process called osteocytic osteolysis. Here, we hypothesized that (i) changes of the mineralized tissue matrix play a substantial role in the pathogenesis of BRONJ, and (ii) the osteocyte lacunar morphology is altered in BRONJ. Synchrotron µCT with phase contrast is an appropriate tool for assessing both the 3D morphology of the osteocyte lacunae and the bone matrix mass density. Here, we used this technique to investigate the mass density distribution and 3D osteocyte lacunar properties at the sub-micrometer scale in human bone samples from the jaw, femur and tibia. First, we compared healthy human jaw bone to human tibia and femur in order to assess the specific differences and address potential explanations of why the jaw bone is exclusively targeted by the necrosis as a side effect of BP treatment. Second, we investigated the differences between BRONJ and control jaw bone samples to detect potential differences which could aid an improved understanding of the course of BRONJ. We found that the apparent mass density of jaw bone was significantly smaller compared to that of tibia, consistent with a higher bone turnover in the jaw bone. The variance of the lacunar volume distribution was significantly different depending on the anatomical site. The comparison between BRONJ and control jaw specimens revealed no significant increase in mineralization after BP. We found a significant decrease in osteocyte-lacunar density in the BRONJ group compared to the control jaw. Interestingly, the osteocyte-lacunar volume distribution was not altered after BP treatment. PMID

  7. Overexpression of H1 Calponin in Osteoblast Lineage Cells Leads to a Decrease in Bone Mass by Disrupting Osteoblast Function and Promoting Osteoclast Formation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Nan; Chen, Maomao; Chen, Siyu; Li, Can; Xie, Yangli; Zhu, Ying; Zhang, Yaozong; Zhao, Ling; He, Qifen; Du, Xiaolan; Chen, Di; Chen, Lin

    2013-01-01

    H1 calponin (CNN1) is known as a smooth muscle-specific, actin-binding protein which regulates smooth muscle contractive activity. Although previous studies have shown that CNN1 has effect on bone, the mechanism is not well defined. To investigate the role of CNN1 in maintaining bone homeostasis, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing Cnn1 under the control of the osteoblast-specific 3.6-kb Col1a1 promoter. Col1a1-Cnn1 transgenic mice showed delayed bone formation at embryonic stage and decreased bone mass at adult stage. Morphology analyses showed reduced trabecular number, thickness and defects in bone formation. The proliferation and migration of osteoblasts were decreased in Col1a1-Cnn1 mice due to alterations in cytoskeleton. The early osteoblast differentiation of Col1a1-Cnn1 mice was increased, but the late stage differentiation and mineralization of osteoblasts derived from Col1a1-Cnn1 mice were significantly decreased. In addition to impaired bone formation, the decreased bone mass was also associated with enhanced osteoclastogenesis. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining revealed increased osteoclast numbers in tibias of 2-month-old Col1a1-Cnn1 mice, and increased numbers of osteoclasts co-cultured with Col1a1-Cnn1 osteoblasts. The ratio of RANKL to OPG was significantly increased in Col1a1-Cnn1 osteoblasts. These findings reveal a novel function of CNN1 in maintaining bone homeostasis by coupling bone formation to bone resorption. PMID:23044709

  8. Prader-Willi Critical Region, a Non-Translated, Imprinted Central Regulator of Bone Mass: Possible Role in Skeletal Abnormalities in Prader-Willi Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khor, Ee-Cheng; Fanshawe, Bruce; Qi, Yue; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Kulkarni, Rishikesh N; Enriquez, Ronaldo F; Purtell, Louise; Lee, Nicola J; Wee, Natalie K; Croucher, Peter I; Campbell, Lesley; Herzog, Herbert; Baldock, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS), a maternally imprinted disorder and leading cause of obesity, is characterised by insatiable appetite, poor muscle development, cognitive impairment, endocrine disturbance, short stature and osteoporosis. A number of causative loci have been located within the imprinted Prader-Willi Critical Region (PWCR), including a set of small non-translated nucleolar RNA's (snoRNA). Recently, micro-deletions in humans identified the snoRNA Snord116 as a critical contributor to the development of PWS exhibiting many of the classical symptoms of PWS. Here we show that loss of the PWCR which includes Snord116 in mice leads to a reduced bone mass phenotype, similar to that observed in humans. Consistent with reduced stature in PWS, PWCR KO mice showed delayed skeletal development, with shorter femurs and vertebrae, reduced bone size and mass in both sexes. The reduction in bone mass in PWCR KO mice was associated with deficiencies in cortical bone volume and cortical mineral apposition rate, with no change in cancellous bone. Importantly, while the length difference was corrected in aged mice, consistent with continued growth in rodents, reduced cortical bone formation was still evident, indicating continued osteoblastic suppression by loss of PWCR expression in skeletally mature mice. Interestingly, deletion of this region included deletion of the exclusively brain expressed Snord116 cluster and resulted in an upregulation in expression of both NPY and POMC mRNA in the arcuate nucleus. Importantly, the selective deletion of the PWCR only in NPY expressing neurons replicated the bone phenotype of PWCR KO mice. Taken together, PWCR deletion in mice, and specifically in NPY neurons, recapitulates the short stature and low BMD and aspects of the hormonal imbalance of PWS individuals. Moreover, it demonstrates for the first time, that a region encoding non-translated RNAs, expressed solely within the brain, can regulate bone mass in health and disease

  9. Prader-Willi Critical Region, a Non-Translated, Imprinted Central Regulator of Bone Mass: Possible Role in Skeletal Abnormalities in Prader-Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yue; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Kulkarni, Rishikesh N.; Enriquez, Ronaldo F.; Purtell, Louise; Lee, Nicola J.; Wee, Natalie K.; Croucher, Peter I.; Campbell, Lesley; Herzog, Herbert; Baldock, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS), a maternally imprinted disorder and leading cause of obesity, is characterised by insatiable appetite, poor muscle development, cognitive impairment, endocrine disturbance, short stature and osteoporosis. A number of causative loci have been located within the imprinted Prader-Willi Critical Region (PWCR), including a set of small non-translated nucleolar RNA’s (snoRNA). Recently, micro-deletions in humans identified the snoRNA Snord116 as a critical contributor to the development of PWS exhibiting many of the classical symptoms of PWS. Here we show that loss of the PWCR which includes Snord116 in mice leads to a reduced bone mass phenotype, similar to that observed in humans. Consistent with reduced stature in PWS, PWCR KO mice showed delayed skeletal development, with shorter femurs and vertebrae, reduced bone size and mass in both sexes. The reduction in bone mass in PWCR KO mice was associated with deficiencies in cortical bone volume and cortical mineral apposition rate, with no change in cancellous bone. Importantly, while the length difference was corrected in aged mice, consistent with continued growth in rodents, reduced cortical bone formation was still evident, indicating continued osteoblastic suppression by loss of PWCR expression in skeletally mature mice. Interestingly, deletion of this region included deletion of the exclusively brain expressed Snord116 cluster and resulted in an upregulation in expression of both NPY and POMC mRNA in the arcuate nucleus. Importantly, the selective deletion of the PWCR only in NPY expressing neurons replicated the bone phenotype of PWCR KO mice. Taken together, PWCR deletion in mice, and specifically in NPY neurons, recapitulates the short stature and low BMD and aspects of the hormonal imbalance of PWS individuals. Moreover, it demonstrates for the first time, that a region encoding non-translated RNAs, expressed solely within the brain, can regulate bone mass in health and disease

  10. Optimizing Bone Health in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Jason L.; Bowden, Sasigarn A.; Mahan, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness, with eventual loss of ambulation and premature death. The approved therapy with corticosteroids improves muscle strength, prolongs ambulation, and maintains pulmonary function. However, the osteoporotic impact of chronic corticosteroid use further impairs the underlying reduced bone mass seen in DMD, leading to increased fragility fractures of long bones and vertebrae. These serious sequelae adversely affect quality of life and can impact survival. The current clinical issues relating to bone health and bone health screening methods in DMD are presented in this review. Diagnostic studies, including biochemical markers of bone turnover and bone mineral density by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), as well as spinal imaging using densitometric lateral spinal imaging, and treatment to optimize bone health in patients with DMD are discussed. Treatment with bisphosphonates offers a method to increase bone mass in these children; oral and intravenous bisphosphonates have been used successfully although treatment is typically reserved for children with fractures and/or bone pain with low bone mass by DXA. PMID:26124831

  11. Cabozantinib inhibits growth of androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer and affects bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Holly M; Ruppender, Nazanin; Zhang, Xiaotun; Brown, Lisha G; Gross, Ted S; Morrissey, Colm; Gulati, Roman; Vessella, Robert L; Schimmoller, Frauke; Aftab, Dana T; Corey, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Cabozantinib is an inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, including MET and VEGFR2. In a phase II clinical trial in advanced prostate cancer (PCa), cabozantinib treatment improved bone scans in 68% of evaluable patients. Our studies aimed to determine the expression of cabozantinib targets during PCa progression and to evaluate its efficacy in hormone-sensitive and castration-resistant PCa in preclinical models while delineating its effects on tumor and bone. Using immunohistochemistry and tissue microarrays containing normal prostate, primary PCa, and soft tissue and bone metastases, our data show that levels of MET, P-MET, and VEGFR2 are increasing during PCa progression. Our data also show that the expression of cabozantinib targets are particularly pronounced in bone metastases. To evaluate cabozantinib efficacy on PCa growth in the bone environment and in soft tissues we used androgen-sensitive LuCaP 23.1 and castration-resistant C4-2B PCa tumors. In vivo, cabozantinib inhibited the growth of PCa in bone as well as growth of subcutaneous tumors. Furthermore, cabozantinib treatment attenuated the bone response to the tumor and resulted in increased normal bone volume. In summary, the expression pattern of cabozantinib targets in primary and castration-resistant metastatic PCa, and its efficacy in two different models of PCa suggest that this agent has a strong potential for the effective treatment of PCa at different stages of the disease. PMID:24205338

  12. Targeted disruption of BMP signaling through type IA receptor (BMPR1A) in osteocyte suppresses SOST and RANKL, leading to dramatic increase in bone mass, bone mineral density and mechanical strength.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Shuxian, Lin; Yamaguchi, Ryosuke; Phipps, Matthew; Aruwajoye, Olumide; Adapala, Naga Suresh; Yuan, Hui; Kim, Harry K W; Feng, Jian Q

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies suggest a critical role of osteocytes in controlling skeletal development and bone remodeling although the molecular mechanism is largely unknown. This study investigated BMP signaling in osteocytes by disrupting Bmpr1a under the Dmp1-promoter. The conditional knockout (cKO) mice displayed a striking osteosclerotic phenotype with increased trabecular bone volume, thickness, number, and mineral density as assessed by X-ray and micro-CT. The bone histomorphometry, H&E, and TRAP staining revealed a dramatic increase in trabecular and cortical bone masses but a sharp reduction in osteoclast number. Moreover, there was an increase in BrdU positive osteocytes (2-5-fold) and osteoid volume (~4-fold) but a decrease in the bone formation rate (~85%) in the cKO bones, indicating a defective mineralization. The SEM analysis revealed poorly formed osteocytes: a sharp increase in cell numbers, a great reduction in cell dendrites, and a remarkable change in the cell distribution pattern. Molecular studies demonstrated a significant decrease in the Sost mRNA levels in bone (>95%), and the SOST protein levels in serum (~85%) and bone matrices. There was a significant increase in the β-catenin (>3-fold) mRNA levels as well as its target genes Tcf1 (>6-fold) and Tcf3 (~2-fold) in the cKO bones. We also showed a significant decrease in the RANKL levels of serum proteins (~65%) and bone mRNA (~57%), and a significant increase in the Opg mRNA levels (>20-fold) together with a significant reduction in the Rankl/Opg ratio (>95%), which are responsible for a sharp reduction in the cKO osteoclasts. The values of mechanical strength were higher in cKO femora (i.e. max force, displacement, and work failure). These results suggest that loss of BMP signaling specifically in osteocytes dramatically increases bone mass presumably through simultaneous inhibition of RANKL and SOST, leading to osteoclast inhibition and Wnt activation together. Finally, a working hypothesis is

  13. Dicer ablation in osteoblasts by Runx2 driven cre-loxP recombination affects bone integrity, but not glucocorticoid-induced suppression of bone formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Baumgart, Mario; Groth, Marco; Wittmann, Jürgen; Jäck, Hans-Martin; Platzer, Matthias; Tuckermann, Jan P; Baschant, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIO) is one of the major side effects of long-term glucocorticoid (GC) therapy mediated mainly via the suppression of bone formation and osteoblast differentiation independently of GC receptor (GR) dimerization. Since microRNAs play a critical role in osteoblast differentiation processes, we investigated the role of Dicer dependent microRNAs in the GC-induced suppression of osteoblast differentiation. MicroRNA sequencing of dexamethasone-treated wild-type and GR dimer-deficient mesenchymal stromal cells revealed GC-controlled miRNA expression in a GR dimer-dependent and GR dimer-independent manner. To determine the functional relevance of mature miRNAs in GC-induced osteoblast suppression, mice with an osteoblast-specific deletion of Dicer (Dicer(Runx2Cre)) were exposed to glucocorticoids. In vitro generated Dicer-deficient osteoblasts were treated with dexamethasone and analyzed for proliferation, differentiation and mineralization capacity. In vivo, abrogation of Dicer-dependent miRNA biogenesis in osteoblasts led to growth retardation and impaired bone formation. However, subjecting these mice to GIO showed that bone formation was similar reduced in Dicer(Runx2Cre) mice and littermate control mice upon GC treatment. In line, differentiation of Dicer deficient osteoblasts was suppressed to the same extent as wild type cells by GC treatment. Therefore, Dicer-dependent small RNA biogenesis in osteoblasts plays only a minor role in the pathogenesis of GC-induced inhibition of bone formation. PMID:27554624

  14. Dicer ablation in osteoblasts by Runx2 driven cre-loxP recombination affects bone integrity, but not glucocorticoid-induced suppression of bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Baumgart, Mario; Groth, Marco; Wittmann, Jürgen; Jäck, Hans-Martin; Platzer, Matthias; Tuckermann, Jan P.; Baschant, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIO) is one of the major side effects of long-term glucocorticoid (GC) therapy mediated mainly via the suppression of bone formation and osteoblast differentiation independently of GC receptor (GR) dimerization. Since microRNAs play a critical role in osteoblast differentiation processes, we investigated the role of Dicer dependent microRNAs in the GC-induced suppression of osteoblast differentiation. MicroRNA sequencing of dexamethasone-treated wild-type and GR dimer-deficient mesenchymal stromal cells revealed GC-controlled miRNA expression in a GR dimer-dependent and GR dimer-independent manner. To determine the functional relevance of mature miRNAs in GC-induced osteoblast suppression, mice with an osteoblast-specific deletion of Dicer (DicerRunx2Cre) were exposed to glucocorticoids. In vitro generated Dicer-deficient osteoblasts were treated with dexamethasone and analyzed for proliferation, differentiation and mineralization capacity. In vivo, abrogation of Dicer-dependent miRNA biogenesis in osteoblasts led to growth retardation and impaired bone formation. However, subjecting these mice to GIO showed that bone formation was similar reduced in DicerRunx2Cre mice and littermate control mice upon GC treatment. In line, differentiation of Dicer deficient osteoblasts was suppressed to the same extent as wild type cells by GC treatment. Therefore, Dicer-dependent small RNA biogenesis in osteoblasts plays only a minor role in the pathogenesis of GC-induced inhibition of bone formation. PMID:27554624

  15. Agreement between bioelectrical impedance and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in assessing fat, lean and bone mass changes in adults after a lifestyle intervention.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, Duncan J; Chan, Natalie T-Y; Tse, Michael A; Joe, Glen M

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to assess the agreement of a commercially available bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) device in measuring changes in fat, lean and bone mass over a 10-week lifestyle intervention, with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) as reference. A sample of 136 volunteers (18-66 years) underwent a physical activity intervention to enhance lean mass and reduce fat mass. BIA (Tanita BC545) and DXA (Hologic Explorer) measures of whole-body composition were taken at baseline and at the end of the intervention. After an average of 74 ± 18 days intervention, DXA showed significant changes in 2 of 3 outcome variables: reduced fat mass of 0.802 ± 1.092 kg (P < 0.001), increased lean mass of 0.477 ± 0.966 kg (P < 0.001); minor non-significant increase of 0.007 ± 0.041 kg of bone mass (P = 0.052). The respective changes in BIA measures were a significant reduction of 0.486 ± 1.539 kg fat (P < 0.001), but non-significant increases of 0.084 ± 1.201 kg lean mass (P = 0.425), and 0.014 ± 0.091 kg bone (P = 0.074). Significant, but moderately weak, correlations were seen in absolute mass changes between DXA and BIA: 0.511 (fat), 0.362 (lean) and 0.172 (bone). Compared to DXA, BIA demonstrated mediocre agreement to changes in fat mass, but poor agreement to lean mass changes. BIA significantly underestimated the magnitude of changes in fat and lean mass compared to DXA. PMID:26451461

  16. A Healthier Lifestyle Pattern for Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Is Associated With Better Bone Mass in Southern Chinese Elderly Men and Women.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhao-min; Wong, Carmen Ka Man; Wong, Samuel Yeung-shan; Leung, Jason; Tse, Lap Ah; Chan, Ruth; Woo, Jean

    2015-08-01

    Lifestyle factors have been linked to bone health, however little is known about their combined impact on bone. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and osteoporosis are 2 major public health problems that share some common pathophysiology. We aimed to assess whether higher adherence to American Heart Association diet and lifestyle recommendations (AHA-DLR) was associated with better bone health in Chinese elderly.This was a cross-sectional study using data from the largest population-based study on osteoporosis in Asia (Mr and Ms Os, Hong Kong). The study recruited 4000 independent walking Chinese men and women aged ≥65 year. Information on demographic, health, and lifestyle factors was obtained by standardized questionnaires. An overall lifestyle score was estimated based on a modified adherence index of AHA-DLR. Bone mineral measurements of the whole body, total hip, lumbar spine, and femoral neck were made by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.Most lifestyle factors alone were not significantly associated bone mass. Overall lifestyle score in the highest quartile compared with the lowest quartile had significantly better bone mass at all sites in a dose-response manner. Every 10-unit of lifestyle score increase was associated with 0.005, 0.004, and 0.007 g/cm increases of bone mineral density (BMD) at whole body, femur neck, and total hip, respectively (all P < 0.05), and 13.2% (odds ratio 0.868; 95% CI 0.784, 0.961) decreased risk of osteoporosis at total hip after adjustment for potential covariates.Our study suggested that greater adherence to an overall healthy lifestyle for CVD risk reduction was associated with better bone mass among Chinese elderly. PMID:26252299

  17. Evaluation of Round Window Stimulation Using the Floating Mass Transducer by Intracochlear Sound Pressure Measurements in Human Temporal Bones

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Dong, Wei; Olson, Elizabeth S.; Rosowski, John J.; Ravicz, Michael E.; Merchant, Saumil N.

    2009-01-01

    Hypothesis Round window (RW) stimulation with a floating mass transducer (FMT) can be studied experimentally and optimized to enhance auditory transduction. Background The FMT (MED-EL Vibrant Soundbridge) has been recently implanted in patients with refractory conductive or mixed hearing loss to stimulate the RW with varying degrees of success. The mechanics of RW stimulation with the FMT have not been studied in a systematic manner. Methods In cadaveric human temporal bones, measurements of stapes velocity with laser vibrometry in response to FMT-RW stimulation were used to optimize FMT insertion. The effect of RW stimulation on hearing was estimated using simultaneous measurements of intracochlear pressures in both perilymphatic scalae with micro-optical pressure transducers. This enabled calculation of the differential pressure across the cochlear partition, which is directly tied to auditory transduction. Results The best coupling between the FMT and RW was achieved with a piece of fascia placed between the RW and the FMT, and by "bracing" the free end of the FMT against the hypotympanic wall with dental impression material. FMT-RW stimulation provided differential pressures comparable to sound-induced oval window stimulation above 1 kHz. However, below 1 kHz the FMT was less capable. Conclusions Measurements of stapes velocity and intracochlear sound pressures in scala vestibuli and scala tympani enabled experimental evaluation of FMT stimulation of the RW. The efficacy of FMT-RW coupling was influenced significantly by technical and surgical factors, which can be optimized. This temporal bone preparation also lays the foundation for future studies to investigate multiple issues of relevance to both basic and clinical science such as RW stimulation in stapes fixation, non-aerated middle-ears and third-window lesions, and to answer basic questions regarding bone conduction. PMID:19841600

  18. Selective PPARγ modulator INT131 normalizes insulin signaling defects and improves bone mass in diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae Ho; Huang, Hu; Choi, Kangduk; Mantzoros, Christos

    2012-01-01

    INT131 is a potent non-thiazolidinedione (TZD)-selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ modulator being developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial, INT131 has been shown to lower glucose levels and ameliorate insulin resistance without typical TZD side effects. To determine whether the insulin-sensitizing action of INT131 is mediated by effects on insulin-mediated glucose homeostasis and insulin signaling, high-fat diet-induced obese (DIO) insulin-resistant mice treated with INT131 were studied. INT131's effects on bone density were also investigated. Treatment with INT131 enhanced systemic insulin sensitivity, as revealed by lower insulin levels in the fasted state and an increase in the area above the curve during an insulin tolerance test. These effects were independent of changes in adiposity. Insulin-stimulated PI3K activity in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue of DIO mice was significantly reduced ∼50–65%, but this was restored completely by INT131 therapy. The INT131 effects on PI3K activity are most likely due to increased IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation. Concurrently, insulin-mediated Akt phosphorylation also increased after INT131 treatment in DIO mice. Importantly, INT131 therapy caused a significant increase in bone mineral density without alteration in circulating osteocalcin in these mice. These data suggest that a newly developed insulin-sensitizing agent, INT131, normalizes obesity-related defects in insulin action on PI3K signaling in insulin target tissues by a mechanism involved in glycemic control. If these data are confirmed in humans, INT131 could be used for treating type 2 diabetes without loss in bone mass. PMID:22215652

  19. Altitude, pasture type, and sheep breed affect bone metabolism and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in grazing lambs.

    PubMed

    Willems, Helen; Leiber, Florian; Kohler, Martina; Kreuzer, Michael; Liesegang, Annette

    2013-05-15

    This study aimed to investigate the bone development of two mountain sheep breeds during natural summer grazing either in the lowlands or on different characteristic alpine pastures. Pasture types differed in topographic slope, plant species composition, general nutritional feeding value, Ca and P content, and Ca:P ratio of herbage. Twenty-seven Engadine sheep (ES) lambs and 27 Valaisian Black Nose sheep (VS) lambs were divided into four groups of 6 to 7 animals per breed and allocated to three contrasting alpine pasture types and one lowland pasture type. The lambs were slaughtered after 9 wk of experimental grazing. The steep alpine pastures in combination with a high (4.8) to very high (13.6) Ca:P ratio in the forage decreased total bone mineral content as measured in the middle of the left metatarsus of the lambs from both breeds, and cortical bone mineral content and cortical bone mineral density of ES lambs. Breed × pasture type interactions occurred in the development of total and cortical bone mineral content, and in cortical thickness, indicating that bone metabolism of different genotypes obviously profited differently from the varying conditions. An altitude effect occurred for 25-hydroxyvitamin D with notably higher serum concentrations on the three alpine sites, and a breed effect led to higher concentrations for ES than VS. Despite a high variance, there were pasture-type effects on serum markers of bone formation and resorption. PMID:23471950

  20. How do radiographic techniques affect mass lesion detection performance in digital mammography?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M.; Scalzetti, Ernest M.; Dudley, Eric F.; Dance, David R.

    2004-05-01

    We investigated how the x-ray tube kV and mAs affected the detection of simulated lesions with diameters between 0.24 and 12 mm. Digital mammograms were acquired with and without mass lesions, permitting a difference image to be generated corresponding to the lesion alone. Isolated digital lesions were added at a reduced intensity to non-lesion images, and used in Four-Alternate Forced Choice (4-AFC) experiments to determine the lesion intensity that corresponded to an accuracy of 92% (I92%). Values of I92% were determined at x-ray tube output values ranging from 40 to 120 mAs, and x-ray tube voltages ranging from 24 to 32 kV. For mass lesions larger than ~0.8 mm, there was no significant change in detection peformance with changing mAs. Doubling of the x-ray tube output from 60 to 120 mAs resulted in an average change in I92% of only +3.8%, whereas the Rose model of lesion detection predicts a reduction in the experimental value of I92% of -29%. For the 0.24 mm lesion, however, reducing the x-ray beam mAs from 100 to 40 mAs reduced the average detection performance by ~60%. Contrast-detail curves for lesions with diameter >= 0.8 mm had a slope of ~+0.23, whereas the Rose model predicts a slope of -0.5. For lesions smaller than ~0.8 mm, contrast-detail slopes were all negative with the average gradient increasing with decreasing mAs value. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 24 to 32 kV at a constant display contrast resulted in a modest improvement in low contrast lesion detection performance of ~10%. Increasing the display window width from 2000 to 2500 reduced the average observer performance by ~6%. Our principal finding is that radiographic technique factors have little effect on detection performance for lesions larger than ~0.8 mm, but that the visibility of smaller lesions is affected by quantum mottle in qualitative agreement with the predictions of the Rose model.

  1. 5-Azacytidine-induced Protein 2 (AZI2) Regulates Bone Mass by Fine-tuning Osteoclast Survival*

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Kenta; Fukasaka, Masahiro; Uematsu, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Kondo, Takeshi; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Martino, Mikaël M.; Akira, Shizuo

    2015-01-01

    5-Azacytidine-induced protein 2 (AZI2) is a TNF receptor (TNFR)-associated factor family member-associated NF-κB activator-binding kinase 1-binding protein that regulates the production of IFNs. A previous in vitro study showed that AZI2 is involved in dendritic cell differentiation. However, the roles of AZI2 in immunity and its pleiotropic functions are unknown in vivo. Here we report that AZI2 knock-out mice exhibit normal dendritic cell differentiation in vivo. However, we found that adult AZI2 knock-out mice have severe osteoporosis due to increased osteoclast longevity. We revealed that the higher longevity of AZI2-deficient osteoclasts is due to an augmented activation of proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase Src (c-Src), which is a critical player in osteoclast survival. We found that AZI2 inhibits c-Src activity by regulating the activation of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a chaperone involved in c-Src dephosphorylation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that AZI2 indirectly inhibits c-Src by interacting with the Hsp90 co-chaperone Cdc37. Strikingly, administration of a c-Src inhibitor markedly prevented bone loss in AZI2 knock-out mice. Together, these findings indicate that AZI2 regulates bone mass by fine-tuning osteoclast survival. PMID:25691576

  2. 5-Azacytidine-induced protein 2 (AZI2) regulates bone mass by fine-tuning osteoclast survival.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Kenta; Fukasaka, Masahiro; Uematsu, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Kondo, Takeshi; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Martino, Mikaël M; Akira, Shizuo

    2015-04-10

    5-Azacytidine-induced protein 2 (AZI2) is a TNF receptor (TNFR)-associated factor family member-associated NF-κB activator-binding kinase 1-binding protein that regulates the production of IFNs. A previous in vitro study showed that AZI2 is involved in dendritic cell differentiation. However, the roles of AZI2 in immunity and its pleiotropic functions are unknown in vivo. Here we report that AZI2 knock-out mice exhibit normal dendritic cell differentiation in vivo. However, we found that adult AZI2 knock-out mice have severe osteoporosis due to increased osteoclast longevity. We revealed that the higher longevity of AZI2-deficient osteoclasts is due to an augmented activation of proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase Src (c-Src), which is a critical player in osteoclast survival. We found that AZI2 inhibits c-Src activity by regulating the activation of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a chaperone involved in c-Src dephosphorylation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that AZI2 indirectly inhibits c-Src by interacting with the Hsp90 co-chaperone Cdc37. Strikingly, administration of a c-Src inhibitor markedly prevented bone loss in AZI2 knock-out mice. Together, these findings indicate that AZI2 regulates bone mass by fine-tuning osteoclast survival. PMID:25691576

  3. Dual-photon absorptiometry: Comparison of bone mineral and soft tissue mass measurements in vivo with established methods

    SciTech Connect

    Heymsfield, S.B.; Wang, J.; Heshka, S.; Kehayias, J.J.; Pierson, R.N.

    1989-06-01

    This study extended initial observations that indicated the potential of dual-photon absorptiometry (DPA) to measure total-body bone mineral (TBBM) and fat in vivo. DPA-derived TBBM and fat were compared with established methods in 13 subjects (aged 24-94 y) who underwent measurement of body density (Db), total-body water (TBW), potassium (TBK), calcium (TBCa, delayed-gamma neutron activation), and nitrogen (prompt-gamma neutron activation). TBBM was highly correlated with TBCa (r = 0.95, p less than 0.001) and the slope of TBCa vs TBBM (0.34) was similar to Ca content of ashed skeleton (0.34-0.38). DPA-measured fat (means +/- SD, 16.7 +/- 4.9 kg) correlated significantly (r = 0.79-0.94; p less than 0.01-0.001) with fat established by Db (16.3 +/- 5.4 kg), TBW (16.0 +/- 4.3 kg), TBK (17.7 +/- 4.6 kg), combined TBW-neutron activation (17.6 +/- 5.9 kg), and means of all four methods (16.9 +/- 4.8 kg). DPA thus offers a new opportunity to study human skeleton in vivo and to quantify fat by a method independent from the classical assumption that bone represents a fixed fraction of fat-free body mass.

  4. Energy deficiency, menstrual disturbances and low bone mass: What do Australian exercising females know about the female athlete triad?

    PubMed

    Kyriazis, Stephanie M; Kukuljan, Sonja; Turner, Anne I; van der Pligt, Paige; Ducher, Gaele

    2012-02-15

    PURPOSE: Prevention of the female athlete triad is essential to protect female athletes' health. The aim of this study was to investigate the knowledge, attitudes and behaviours of regularly exercising adult females towards eating patterns, menstrual cycles and bone health. METHODS: A total of 191 female exercisers, aged 18-40 y, engaging in ≥2 hr/wk of strenuous activity, completed a survey. After excluding 11 surveys (due to incomplete answers), the 180 participants were categorised into lean-build sports (n=82; running/athletics, triathlon, swimming, cycling, dancing, rowing), non lean-build sports (n=94; basketball, netball, soccer, hockey, volleyball, tennis, trampoline, squash, Australian football) or gym/fitness activities (n=4). RESULTS: Mean (±SD) training volume was 9.0±5.5 hr/wk, with participants competing from local up to international level. Only 10% of respondents could name the 3 components of the female athlete triad. Regardless of the reported history of stress fracture, 45% of the respondents did not think that amenorrhoea (absence of menses for ≥ three months) could affect bone health, and 22% of those involved in lean-build sports would do nothing if experiencing amenorrhoea (vs. 3.2% in non lean-build sports, p=0.005). Lean-build sports, history of amenorrhoea and history of stress fracture were all significantly associated with not taking action in the presence of amenorrhoea (all p<0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Few active Australian women are aware of the detrimental effects of menstrual dysfunction on bone health. Education programs are needed to prevent the female athlete triad and ensure appropriate actions are taken by athletes when experiencing amenorrhoea. PMID:22349258

  5. [Bone quantitative ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Mami

    2016-01-01

    The conventional ultrasonic bone densitometry system can give us information of bone as ultrasonic wave velocity and attenuation. However, the data reflect both structural and material properties of bone. In order to focus only on the bone matrix properties without the effect of bone structure, studies of microscopic Brillouin scattering technique are introduced. The wave velocity in a trabecula was anisotropic and depended on the position and structure of the cancellous bone. The glycation also affected on the wave velocities in bone. As a new bone quality, the piezoelectricity of bone is also discussed. PMID:26728531

  6. Boning up on autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Irving M; Layfield, Robert; Lotz, Martin; Settembre, Carmine; Whitehouse, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    From an evolutionary perspective, the major function of bone is to provide stable sites for muscle attachment and affording protection of vital organs, especially the heart and lungs (ribs) and spinal cord (vertebrae and intervertebral discs). However, bone has a considerable number of other functions: serving as a store for mineral ions, providing a site for blood cell synthesis and participating in a complex system-wide endocrine system. Not surprisingly, bone and cartilage cell homeostasis is tightly controlled, as is the maintenance of tissue structure and mass. While a great deal of new information is accruing concerning skeletal cell homeostasis, one relatively new observation is that the cells of bone (osteoclasts osteoblasts and osteocytes) and cartilage (chondrocytes) exhibit autophagy. The focus of this review is to examine the significance of this process in terms of the functional demands of the skeleton in health and during growth and to provide evidence that dysregulation of the autophagic response is involved in the pathogenesis of diseases of bone (Paget disease of bone) and cartilage (osteoarthritis and the mucopolysaccharidoses). Delineation of molecular changes in the autophagic process is uncovering new approaches for the treatment of diseases that affect the axial and appendicular skeleton. PMID:24225636

  7. The obesity of bone

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Emanuela A.; Lenzi, Andrea; Migliaccio, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    During the last decades, obesity and osteoporosis have become important global health problems, and the belief that obesity is protective against osteoporosis has recently come into question. In fact, some recent epidemiologic and clinical studies have shown that a high level of fat mass might be a risk factor for osteoporosis and fragility fractures. Several potential mechanisms have been proposed to explain the complex relationship between adipose tissue and bone. Indeed, adipose tissue secretes various molecules, named adipokines, which are thought to have effects on metabolic, skeletal and cardiovascular systems. Moreover, fat tissue is one of the major sources of aromatase, an enzyme that synthesizes estrogens from androgen precursors, hormones that play a pivotal role in the maintenance of skeletal homeostasis, protecting against osteoporosis. Moreover, bone cells express several specific hormone receptors and recent observations have shown that bone-derived factors, such as osteocalcin and osteopontin, affect body weight control and glucose homeostasis. Thus, the skeleton is considered an endocrine target organ and an endocrine organ itself, likely influencing other organs as well. Finally, adipocytes and osteoblasts originate from a common progenitor, a pluripotential mesenchymal stem cell, which has an equal propensity for differentiation into adipocytes or osteoblasts (or other lines) under the influence of several cell-derived transcription factors. This review will highlight recent insights into the relationship between fat and bone, evaluating both potential positive and negative influences between adipose and bone tissue. It will also focus on the hypothesis that osteoporosis might be considered the obesity of bone. PMID:26623005

  8. PPARβ/δ affects pancreatic β cell mass and insulin secretion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, José; Barg, Sebastian; Vallois, David; Lahiri, Shawon; Roger, Catherine; Yessoufou, Akadiri; Pradevand, Sylvain; McDonald, Angela; Bonal, Claire; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona; Debril, Marie-Bernard; Metzger, Daniel; Chambon, Pierre; Herrera, Pedro; Rutter, Guy A.; Prentki, Marc; Thorens, Bernard; Wahli, Walter

    2012-01-01

    PPARβ/δ protects against obesity by reducing dyslipidemia and insulin resistance via effects in muscle, adipose tissue, and liver. However, its function in pancreas remains ill defined. To gain insight into its hypothesized role in β cell function, we specifically deleted Pparb/d in the epithelial compartment of the mouse pancreas. Mutant animals presented increased numbers of islets and, more importantly, enhanced insulin secretion, causing hyperinsulinemia. Gene expression profiling of pancreatic β cells indicated a broad repressive function of PPARβ/δ affecting the vesicular and granular compartment as well as the actin cytoskeleton. Analyses of insulin release from isolated PPARβ/δ-deficient islets revealed an accelerated second phase of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These effects in PPARβ/δ-deficient islets correlated with increased filamentous actin (F-actin) disassembly and an elevation in protein kinase D activity that altered Golgi organization. Taken together, these results provide evidence for a repressive role for PPARβ/δ in β cell mass and insulin exocytosis, and shed a new light on PPARβ/δ metabolic action. PMID:23093780

  9. Escaping affect: how motivated emotion regulation creates insensitivity to mass suffering.

    PubMed

    Cameron, C Daryl; Payne, B Keith

    2011-01-01

    As the number of people in need of help increases, the degree of compassion people feel for them ironically tends to decrease. This phenomenon is termed the collapse of compassion. Some researchers have suggested that this effect happens because emotions are not triggered by aggregates. We provide evidence for an alternative account. People expect the needs of large groups to be potentially overwhelming, and, as a result, they engage in emotion regulation to prevent themselves from experiencing overwhelming levels of emotion. Because groups are more likely than individuals to elicit emotion regulation, people feel less for groups than for individuals. In Experiment 1, participants displayed the collapse of compassion only when they expected to be asked to donate money to the victims. This suggests that the effect is motivated by self-interest. Experiment 2 showed that the collapse of compassion emerged only for people who were skilled at emotion regulation. In Experiment 3, we manipulated emotion regulation. Participants who were told to down-regulate their emotions showed the collapse of compassion, but participants who were told to experience their emotions did not. We examined the time course of these effects using a dynamic rating to measure affective responses in real time. The time course data suggested that participants regulate emotion toward groups proactively, by preventing themselves from ever experiencing as much emotion toward groups as toward individuals. These findings provide initial evidence that motivated emotion regulation drives insensitivity to mass suffering. PMID:21219076

  10. Subsurface mass transport affects the radioxenon signatures that are used to identify clandestine nuclear tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deinert, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    Underground nuclear tests produce anthropogenic isotopes that provide the only definitive means by which to determine whether a nuclear explosion has taken place. Verification of a suspected test under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty often relies on ratios of radioxenon isotopes. Gas samples are gathered either on-site or off-site with certain ranges of xenon isotope ratios considered to be a signature of a weapons test. It is well established that below ground transport can affect the rate at which Noble gasses will reach the surface. However, the relative abundance of anthropogenic isotopes is has long been assumed to rely solely on fission yield and decay rate. By including in subsurface transport models the effects of mass dependent diffusion, and a time dependent source term for the decay of radioiodine precursors, we show here that this assumption is not true. In fact, certain combinations of geology and atmospheric conditions can alter xenon isotope ratios sufficiently for a weapons test going unconfirmed under the current standards.

  11. Obstructive sleep apnea and metabolic bone disease: Insights in to the relationship between bone and sleep

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Christine M.; Shea, Steven A.; Stone, Katie L.; Cauley, Jane A.; Rosen, Clifford J.; Redline, Susan; Karsenty, Gerard; Orwoll, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and low bone mass are two prevalent conditions, particularly among older adults, a section of the U.S. population that is expected to grow dramatically over the coming years. OSA, the most common form of sleep disordered breathing, has been linked to multiple cardiovascular, metabolic, hormonal and inflammatory derangements and may have adverse effects on bone. However, little is known about how OSA (including the associated hypoxia and sleep loss) affects bone metabolism. In order to gain insight into the relationship between sleep and bone, we review the growing information on OSA and metabolic bone disease and discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms by which OSA may affect bone metabolism/architecture. PMID:25639209

  12. Liver-derived IGF-I regulates cortical bone mass but is dispensable for the osteogenic response to mechanical loading in female mice.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Johan; Windahl, Sara H; Saxon, Leanne; Sjögren, Klara; Koskela, Antti; Tuukkanen, Juha; Ohlsson, Claes

    2016-07-01

    Low circulating IGF-I is associated with increased fracture risk. Conditional depletion of IGF-I produced in osteoblasts or osteocytes inhibits the bone anabolic effect of mechanical loading. Here, we determined the role of endocrine IGF-I for the osteogenic response to mechanical loading in young adult and old female mice with adult, liver-specific IGF-I inactivation (LI-IGF-I(-/-) mice, serum IGF-I reduced by ≈70%) and control mice. The right tibia was subjected to short periods of axial cyclic compressive loading three times/wk for 2 wk, and measurements were performed using microcomputed tomography and mechanical testing by three-point bending. In the nonloaded left tibia, the LI-IGF-I(-/-) mice had lower cortical bone area and increased cortical porosity, resulting in reduced bone mechanical strength compared with the controls. Mechanical loading induced a similar response in LI-IGF-I(-/-) and control mice in terms of cortical bone area and trabecular bone volume fraction. In fact, mechanical loading produced a more marked increase in cortical bone mechanical strength, which was associated with a less marked increase in cortical porosity, in the LI-IGF-I(-/-) mice compared with the control mice. In conclusion, liver-derived IGF-I regulates cortical bone mass, cortical porosity, and mechanical strength under normal (nonloaded) conditions. However, despite an ∼70% reduction in circulating IGF-I, the osteogenic response to mechanical loading was not attenuated in the LI-IGF-I(-/-) mice. PMID:27221117

  13. In vivo impact of Dlx3 conditional inactivation in Neural Crest-Derived Craniofacial Bones

    PubMed Central

    Duverger, Olivier; Isaac, Juliane; Zah, Angela; Hwang, Joonsung; Berdal, Ariane; Lian, Jane B.; Morasso, Maria I.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in DLX3 in humans lead to defects in craniofacial and appendicular bones, yet the in vivo activity related to Dlx3 function during normal skeletal development have not been fully elucidated. Here we used a conditional knockout approach to analyze the effects of neural crest deletion of Dlx3 on craniofacial bones development. At birth, mutant mice exhibit a normal overall positioning of the skull bones, but a change in the shape of the calvaria was observed. Molecular analysis of the genes affected in the frontal bones and mandibles from these mice identified several bone markers known to affect bone development, with a strong prediction for increased bone formation and mineralization in vivo. Interestingly, while a subset of these genes were similarly affected in frontal bones and mandibles (Sost, Mepe, Bglap, Alp, Ibsp, Agt), several genes, including Lect1 and Calca, were specifically affected in frontal bones. Consistent with these molecular alterations, cells isolated from the frontal bone of mutant mice exhibited increased differentiation and mineralization capacities ex vivo, supporting cell autonomous defects in neural crest cells. However, adult mutant animals exhibited decreased bone mineral density in both mandibles and calvaria, as well as a significant increase in bone porosity. Together, these observations suggest that mature osteoblasts in the adult respond to signals that regulate adult bone mass and remodeling. This study provides new downstream targets for Dlx3 in craniofacial bone, and gives additional evidence of the complex regulation of bone formation and homeostasis in the adult skeleton. PMID:22886599

  14. In vivo impact of Dlx3 conditional inactivation in neural crest-derived craniofacial bones.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Olivier; Isaac, Juliane; Zah, Angela; Hwang, Joonsung; Berdal, Ariane; Lian, Jane B; Morasso, Maria I

    2013-03-01

    Mutations in DLX3 in humans lead to defects in craniofacial and appendicular bones, yet the in vivo activities related to Dlx3 function during normal skeletal development have not been fully elucidated. Here we used a conditional knockout approach to analyze the effects of neural crest deletion of Dlx3 on craniofacial bones development. At birth, mutant mice exhibit a normal overall positioning of the skull bones, but a change in the shape of the calvaria was observed. Molecular analysis of the genes affected in the frontal bones and mandibles from these mice identified several bone markers known to affect bone development, with a strong prediction for increased bone formation and mineralization in vivo. Interestingly, while a subset of these genes were similarly affected in frontal bones and mandibles (Sost, Mepe, Bglap, Alp, Ibsp, Agt), several genes, including Lect1 and Calca, were specifically affected in frontal bones. Consistent with these molecular alterations, cells isolated from the frontal bone of mutant mice exhibited increased differentiation and mineralization capacities ex vivo, supporting cell autonomous defects in neural crest cells. However, adult mutant animals exhibited decreased bone mineral density in both mandibles and calvaria, as well as a significant increase in bone porosity. Together, these observations suggest that mature osteoblasts in the adult respond to signals that regulate adult bone mass and remodeling. This study provides new downstream targets for Dlx3 in craniofacial bone, and gives additional evidence of the complex regulation of bone formation and homeostasis in the adult skeleton. PMID:22886599

  15. Physiological effects of microgravity on bone cells.

    PubMed

    Arfat, Yasir; Xiao, Wei-Zhong; Iftikhar, Salman; Zhao, Fan; Li, Di-Jie; Sun, Yu-Long; Zhang, Ge; Shang, Peng; Qian, Ai-Rong

    2014-06-01

    Life on Earth developed under the influence of normal gravity (1g). With evidence from previous studies, scientists have suggested that normal physiological processes, such as the functional integrity of muscles and bone mass, can be affected by microgravity during spaceflight. During the life span, bone not only develops as a structure designed specifically for mechanical tasks but also adapts for efficiency. The lack of weight-bearing forces makes microgravity an ideal physical stimulus to evaluate bone cell responses. One of the most serious problems induced by long-term weightlessness is bone mineral loss. Results from in vitro studies that entailed the use of bone cells in spaceflights showed modification in cell attachment structures and cytoskeletal reorganization, which may be involved in bone loss. Humans exposed to microgravity conditions experience various physiological changes, including loss of bone mass, muscle deterioration, and immunodeficiency. In vitro models can be used to extract valuable information about changes in mechanical stress to ultimately identify the different pathways of mechanotransduction in bone cells. Despite many in vivo and in vitro studies under both real microgravity and simulated conditions, the mechanism of bone loss is still not well defined. The objective of this review is to summarize the recent research on bone cells under microgravity conditions based on advances in the field. PMID:24687524

  16. Supplementation with calcium and short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides affects markers of bone turnover but not bone mineral density in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Slevin, Mary M; Allsopp, Philip J; Magee, Pamela J; Bonham, Maxine P; Naughton, Violetta R; Strain, J J; Duffy, Maresa E; Wallace, Julie M; Mc Sorley, Emeir M

    2014-03-01

    This 24-mo randomized, double-blind, controlled trial aimed to examine whether supplementation with a natural marine-derived multi-mineral supplement rich in calcium (Ca) taken alone and in conjunction with short-chain fructo-oligosaccharide (scFOSs) has a beneficial effect on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover markers (BTMs) in postmenopausal women. A total of 300 non-osteoporotic postmenopausal women were randomly assigned to daily supplements of 800 mg of Ca, 800 mg of Ca with 3.6 g of scFOS (CaFOS), or 9 g of maltodextrin. BMD was measured before and after intervention along with BTMs, which were also measured at 12 mo. Intention-to-treat ANCOVA identified that the change in BMD in the Ca and CaFOS groups did not differ from that in the maltodextrin group. Secondary analysis of changes to BTMs over time identified a greater decline in osteocalcin and C-telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) in the Ca group compared with the maltodextrin group at 12 mo. A greater decline in CTX was observed at 12 mo and a greater decline in osteocalcin was observed at 24 mo in the CaFOS group compared with the maltodextrin group. In exploratory subanalyses of each treatment group against the maltodextrin group, women classified with osteopenia and taking CaFOS had a smaller decline in total-body (P = 0.03) and spinal (P = 0.03) BMD compared with the maltodextrin group, although this effect was restricted to those with higher total-body and mean spinal BMD at baseline, respectively. Although the change in BMD observed did not differ between the groups, the greater decline in BTMs in the Ca and CaFOS groups compared with the maltodextrin group suggests a more favorable bone health profile after supplementation with Ca and CaFOS. Supplementation with CaFOS slowed the rate of total-body and spinal bone loss in postmenopausal women with osteopenia-an effect that warrants additional investigation. This trial was registered at www.controlled-trials.com as ISRCTN63118444. PMID

  17. Reduced bone mass in obese young rats through PPAR omega suppression of wnt/beta-catenin signaling and direct action of free fatty acids (NEFA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The relationship of obesity to skeletal development is unclear. We utilized total enteral nutrition to feed high and low fat diets (HFD and LFD) to rats for 4 wks to produce obesity. Weight gain was matched but fat mass, serum leptin and NEFA were increased by HFD (P < 0.05). HFD lowered total bone ...

  18. Reduced Bone Density and Cortical Bone Indices in Female Adiponectin-Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Naot, Dorit; Watson, Maureen; Callon, Karen E; Tuari, Donna; Musson, David S; Choi, Ally J; Sreenivasan, Dharshini; Fernandez, Justin; Tu, Pao Ting; Dickinson, Michelle; Gamble, Greg D; Grey, Andrew; Cornish, Jillian

    2016-09-01

    A positive association between fat and bone mass is maintained through a network of signaling molecules. Clinical studies found that the circulating levels of adiponectin, a peptide secreted from adipocytes, are inversely related to visceral fat mass and bone mineral density, and it has been suggested that adiponectin contributes to the coupling between fat and bone. Our study tested the hypothesis that adiponectin affects bone tissue by comparing the bone phenotype of wild-type and adiponectin-knockout (APN-KO) female mice between the ages of 8-37 weeks. Using a longitudinal study design, we determined body composition and bone density using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. In parallel, groups of animals were killed at different ages and bone properties were analyzed by microcomputed tomography, dynamic histomorphometry, 3-point bending test, nanoindentation, and computational modelling. APN-KO mice had reduced body fat and decreased whole-skeleton bone mineral density. Microcomputed tomography analysis identified reduced cortical area fraction and average cortical thickness in APN-KO mice in all the age groups and reduced trabecular bone volume fraction only in young APN-KO mice. There were no major differences in bone strength and material properties between the 2 groups. Taken together, our results demonstrate a positive effect of adiponectin on bone geometry and density in our mouse model. Assuming adiponectin has similar effects in humans, the low circulating levels of adiponectin associated with increased fat mass are unlikely to contribute to the parallel increase in bone mass. Therefore, adiponectin does not appear to play a role in the coupling between fat and bone tissue. PMID:27384302

  19. Effects of simulated weightlessness on bone mineral metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, R. K.; Bikle, D. D.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that prolonged space flight, bedrest, and immobilization are three factors which can produce a negative calcium balance, osteopenia, and an inhibition of bone formation. It is not known whether the effects of gravity on bone mineral metabolism are mediated by systemic endocrine factors which affect all bones simultaneously, or by local factors which affect each bone individually. The present investigation has the objective to test the relative importance of local vs. systemic factors in regulating the bone mineral response to conditions simulating weightlessness. Experiments were conducted with male Sprague-Dawley rats. The test conditions made it possible to compare the data from weighted and unweighted bones in the same animal. The obtained findings indicate that a decrease in bone mass relative to control value occurs rapidly under conditions which simulate certain aspects of weightlessness. However, this decrease reaches a plateau after 10 days.

  20. Genetic Analysis Identifies DDR2 as a Novel Gene Affecting Bone Mineral Density and Osteoporotic Fractures in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan; Yang, Tie-Lin; Dong, Shan-Shan; Yan, Han; Hao, Ruo-Han; Chen, Xiao-Feng; Chen, Jia-Bin; Tian, Qing; Li, Jian; Shen, Hui; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2015-01-01

    DDR2 gene, playing an essential role in regulating osteoblast differentiation and chondrocyte maturation, may influence bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis, but the genetic variations actually leading to the association remain to be elucidated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the genetic variants in DDR2 are associated with BMD and fracture risk. This study was performed in three samples from two ethnicities, including 1,300 Chinese Han subjects, 700 Chinese Han subjects (350 with osteoporotic hip fractures and 350 healthy controls) and 2,286 US white subjects. Twenty-eight SNPs in DDR2 were genotyped and tested for associations with hip BMD and fractures. We identified 3 SNPs in DDR2 significantly associated with hip BMD in the Chinese population after multiple testing adjustments, which were rs7521233 (P = 1.06×10−4, β: −0.018 for allele C), rs7553831 (P = 1.30×10−4, β: −0.018 for allele T), and rs6697469 (P = 1.59×10−3, β: −0.015 for allele C), separately. These three SNPs were in high linkage disequilibrium. Haplotype analyses detected two significantly associated haplotypes, including one haplotype in block 2 (P = 9.54×10−4, β: −0.016) where these three SNPs located. SNP rs6697469 was also associated with hip fractures (P = 0.043, OR: 1.42) in the Chinese population. The effect on fracture risk was consistent with its association with lower BMD. However, in the white population, we didn’t observe significant associations with hip BMD. eQTL analyses revealed that SNPs associated with BMD also affected DDR2 mRNA expression levels in Chinese. Our findings, together with the prior biological evidence, suggest that DDR2 could be a new candidate for osteoporosis in Chinese population. Our results also reveal an ethnic difference, which highlights the need for further genetic studies in each ethnic group. PMID:25658585

  1. Bone mass density estimation: Archimede’s principle versus automatic X-ray histogram and edge detection technique in ovariectomized rats treated with germinated brown rice bioactives

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Sani Ismaila; Maznah, Ismail; Mahmud, Rozi Binti; Esmaile, Maher Faik; Zuki, Abu Bakar Zakaria

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone mass density is an important parameter used in the estimation of the severity and depth of lesions in osteoporosis. Estimation of bone density using existing methods in experimental models has its advantages as well as drawbacks. Materials and methods In this study, the X-ray histogram edge detection technique was used to estimate the bone mass density in ovariectomized rats treated orally with germinated brown rice (GBR) bioactives, and the results were compared with estimated results obtained using Archimede’s principle. New bone cell proliferation was assessed by histology and immunohistochemical reaction using polyclonal nuclear antigen. Additionally, serum alkaline phosphatase activity, serum and bone calcium and zinc concentrations were detected using a chemistry analyzer and atomic absorption spectroscopy. Rats were divided into groups of six as follows: sham (nonovariectomized, nontreated); ovariectomized, nontreated; and ovariectomized and treated with estrogen, or Remifemin®, GBR-phenolics, acylated steryl glucosides, gamma oryzanol, and gamma amino-butyric acid extracted from GBR at different doses. Results Our results indicate a significant increase in alkaline phosphatase activity, serum and bone calcium, and zinc and ash content in the treated groups compared with the ovariectomized nontreated group (P < 0.05). Bone density increased significantly (P < 0.05) in groups treated with estrogen, GBR, Remifemin®, and gamma oryzanol compared to the ovariectomized nontreated group. Histological sections revealed more osteoblasts in the treated groups when compared with the untreated groups. A polyclonal nuclear antigen reaction showing proliferating new cells was observed in groups treated with estrogen, Remifemin®, GBR, acylated steryl glucosides, and gamma oryzanol. There was a good correlation between bone mass densities estimated using Archimede’s principle and the edge detection technique between the treated groups (r2 = 0.737, P

  2. Systemic injection of CK2.3, a novel peptide acting downstream of Bone Morphogenetic Protein receptor BMPRIa, leads to increased trabecular bone mass

    PubMed Central

    Akkiraju, Hemanth; Bonor, Jeremy; Olli, Kristine; Bowen, Chris; Bragdon, Beth; Coombs, Harold; Donahue, Leah Rae; Duncan, Randall; Nohe, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 (BMP2) regulates bone integrity by driving both osteogenesis and osteoclastogenesis. However, BMP2 as a therapeutic has significant drawbacks. We have designed a novel peptide CK2.3 that blocks the interaction of Casein Kinase 2 (CK2) with Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor type Ia (BMPRIa), thereby activating BMP signaling pathways in the absence of ligand. Here, we show that CK2.3 induced mineralization in primary osteoblast cultures isolated from calvaria and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) of 8 week old mice. Further, systemic tail vein injections of CK2.3 in 8 week old mice resulted in increased bone mineral density (BMD) and mineral apposition rate (MAR). In situ immunohistochemistry of the femur found that CK2.3 injection induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), but not Smad in osteocytes and osteoblasts, suggesting that CK2.3 signaling occurred through Smad independent pathway. Finally mice injected with CK2.3 exhibited decreased osteoclast differentiation and osteoclast activity. These data indicate that the novel mimetic peptide CK2.3 activated BMPRIa downstream signaling to enhance bone formation without the increase in osteoclast activity that accompanies BMP 2 stimulation. PMID:25331517

  3. Influence of Exercise and Training on Critical Stages of Bone Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Klentrou, Panagiota

    2016-05-01

    Although osteoporosis is considered a geriatric disease, factors affecting bone strength are most influential during child growth and development. This article reviews what is known and still unclear in terms of bone growth, development and adaptation relative to physical activity before and during puberty. Bone is responsive to certain exercise protocols early in puberty and less so in postpubertal years, where bone strength, rather than bone mass, being the outcome of interest. Mechanical loading and high impact exercise promote bone strength. Intense training before and during puberty, however, may negatively affect bone development. Future research should focus on increasing our mechanistic understanding of the manner by which diverse physical stressors alter the integrity of bone. Longitudinal studies that examine the extent to which muscle and bone are comodulated by growth in children are also recommended. PMID:26884506

  4. Considerations affecting the additional weight required in mass balance of ailerons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, W S

    1937-01-01

    This paper is essentially a consideration of mass balance of ailerons from a preliminary design standpoint, in which the extra weight of the mass counterbalance is the most important phase of the problem. Equations are developed for the required balance weight for a simple aileron and this weight is correlated with the mass-balance coefficient. It is concluded the location of the c.g. of the basic aileron is of paramount importance and that complete mass balance imposes no great weight penalty if the aileron is designed to have its c.g. inherently near to the hinge axis.

  5. Ibandronate and cementless total hip arthroplasty: densitometric measurement of periprosthetic bone mass and new therapeutic approach to the prevention of aseptic loosening

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Maurizio; Quarta, Eugenio; Quarta, Laura; Calcagnile, Fabio; Grimaldi, Antonella; Orgiani, M. Antonio; Marsilio, Antonio; Rollo, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Summary Studies of the mechanisms of periprosthetic bone loss have led to the development of pharmacologic strategies intended to enhance bone mass recovery after surgery and consequently prevent aseptic loosening and prolong the implant survival. Bisphosphonates, potent anti-resorptive drugs widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis and other disorders of bone metabolism, were shown to be particularly effective in reducing periprosthetic bone resorption in the first year after hip and knee arthroplasty, both cemented and cementless. Based on these results, we investigated the inhibitory effects of ibandronate on periprosthetic bone loss in a 2-year study of postmenopausal women that underwent cementless total hip arthroplasty. In the first 6 months both groups (A, treated with ibandronate 3 mg i.v. within five days after surgery and then with oral ibandronate 150 mg/month, plus calcium and vitamin D supplementation; and B, treated with calcium and vitamin D supplementation only) experienced bone loss, though to a lesser extent in group A. After 12 months, group A showed a remarkable BMD recovery, that was statistically significant versus baseline values (about +1, 74% of global BMD) and most evident in region R1 (+3, 81%) and R2 (+4, 12%); in group B, on the contrary, BMD values were unchanged compared with those at 6 months post-surgery. Quality of life scores also showed a greater improvement in group A, both at 6 and 12 months after surgery, likely because of the pain-reducing effects of ibandronate treatment. PMID:22783337

  6. Does the Grammatical Count/Mass Distinction Affect Semantic Representations? Evidence from Experiments in English and Japanese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwasaki, Noriko; Vinson, David P.; Vigliocco, Gabriella

    2010-01-01

    We investigate linguistic relativity effects by examining whether the grammatical count/mass distinction in English affects English speakers' semantic representations of noun referents, as compared with those of Japanese speakers, whose language does not grammatically distinguish nouns for countability. We used two tasks which are sensitive to…

  7. Is bone mineral density measurement using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry affected by gamma rays?

    PubMed

    Xie, Liang-Jun; Li, Jian-Fang; Zeng, Feng-Wei; Jiang, Hang; Cheng, Mu-Hua; Chen, Yi

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the gamma rays emitted from the radionuclide effect bone mineral density (BMD) measurement. Nine subjects (mean age: 56 ± 17.96 yr) scheduled for bone scanning underwent BMD measurement using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) (Hologic/Discovery A) before and 1, 2, and 4 h after injection of technetium-99m-methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP). Ten subjects (mean age: 41 ± 15.47 yr) scheduled for therapy of differentiated thyroid carcinoma with iodine-131 underwent BMD measurement before and 2 h after therapeutic radionuclide administration. All patients were given whole body BMD measurement, including head, arm, ribs, lumbar spine, pelvis, and leg sites. Besides, patients who referred to radioiodine therapy were given total hip and femoral neck BMD measurement as well. No statistically significant changes in BMD values were detected after 99mTc-MDP and iodine-131 administration for all measurement sites (p > 0.05), and individual difference of BMD before and after radionuclide imaging or therapy was less than the least significant change in lumbar spine, total hip, and fe