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Sample records for affects bone remodeling

  1. Alteration of proteoglycan sulfation affects bone growth and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Gualeni, Benedetta; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Marty-Morieux, Caroline; De Leonardis, Fabio; Franchi, Marco; Monti, Luca; Forlino, Antonella; Houillier, Pascal; Rossi, Antonio; Geoffroy, Valerie

    2013-05-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) is a chondrodysplasia caused by mutations in the SLC26A2 gene, leading to reduced intracellular sulfate pool in chondrocytes, osteoblasts and fibroblasts. Hence, proteoglycans are undersulfated in the cartilage and bone of DTD patients. To characterize the bone phenotype of this skeletal dysplasia we used the Slc26a2 knock-in mouse (dtd mouse), that was previously validated as an animal model of DTD in humans. X-rays, bone densitometry, static and dynamic histomorphometry, and in vitro studies revealed a primary bone defect in the dtd mouse model. We showed in vivo that this primary bone defect in dtd mice is due to decreased bone accrual associated with a decreased trabecular and periosteal appositional rate at the cell level in one month-old mice. Although the osteoclast number evaluated by histomorphometry was not different in dtd compared to wild-type mice, urine analysis of deoxypyridinoline cross-links and serum levels of type I collagen C-terminal telopeptides showed a higher resorption rate in dtd mice compared to wild-type littermates. Electron microscopy studies showed that collagen fibrils in bone were thinner and less organized in dtd compared to wild-type mice. These data suggest that the low bone mass observed in mutant mice could possibly be linked to the different bone matrix compositions/organizations in dtd mice triggering changes in osteoblast and osteoclast activities. Overall, these results suggest that proteoglycan undersulfation not only affects the properties of hyaline cartilage, but can also lead to unbalanced bone modeling and remodeling activities, demonstrating the importance of proteoglycan sulfation in bone homeostasis.

  2. Alteration of proteoglycan sulfation affects bone growth and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gualeni, Benedetta; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Marty-Morieux, Caroline; De Leonardis, Fabio; Franchi, Marco; Monti, Luca; Forlino, Antonella; Houillier, Pascal; Rossi, Antonio; Geoffroy, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) is a chondrodysplasia caused by mutations in the SLC26A2 gene, leading to reduced intracellular sulfate pool in chondrocytes, osteoblasts and fibroblasts. Hence, proteoglycans are undersulfated in the cartilage and bone of DTD patients. To characterize the bone phenotype of this skeletal dysplasia we used the Slc26a2 knock-in mouse (dtd mouse), that was previously validated as an animal model of DTD in humans. X-rays, bone densitometry, static and dynamic histomorphometry, and in vitro studies revealed a primary bone defect in the dtd mouse model. We showed in vivo that this primary bone defect in dtd mice is due to decreased bone accrual associated with a decreased trabecular and periosteal appositional rate at the cell level in one month-old mice. Although the osteoclast number evaluated by histomorphometry was not different in dtd compared to wild-type mice, urine analysis of deoxypyridinoline cross-links and serum levels of type I collagen C-terminal telopeptides showed a higher resorption rate in dtd mice compared to wild-type littermates. Electron microscopy studies showed that collagen fibrils in bone were thinner and less organized in dtd compared to wild-type mice. These data suggest that the low bone mass observed in mutant mice could possibly be linked to the different bone matrix compositions/organizations in dtd mice triggering changes in osteoblast and osteoclast activities. Overall, these results suggest that proteoglycan undersulfation not only affects the properties of hyaline cartilage, but can also lead to unbalanced bone modeling and remodeling activities, demonstrating the importance of proteoglycan sulfation in bone homeostasis. PMID:23369989

  3. Moderate-Intensity Rotating Magnetic Fields Do Not Affect Bone Quality and Bone Remodeling in Hindlimb Suspended Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Guanghao; Zhai, Mingming; Tong, Shichao; Xu, Qiaoling; Xie, Kangning; Wu, Xiaoming; Tang, Chi; Xu, Xinmin; Liu, Juan; Guo, Wei; Jiang, Maogang; Luo, Erping

    2014-01-01

    Abundant evidence has substantiated the positive effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) and static magnetic fields (SMF) on inhibiting osteopenia and promoting fracture healing. However, the osteogenic potential of rotating magnetic fields (RMF), another common electromagnetic application modality, remains poorly characterized thus far, although numerous commercial RMF treatment devices have been available on the market. Herein the impacts of RMF on osteoporotic bone microarchitecture, bone strength and bone metabolism were systematically investigated in hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rats. Thirty two 3-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the Control (n = 10), HU (n = 10) and HU with RMF exposure (HU+RMF, n = 12) groups. Rats in the HU+RMF group were subjected to daily 2-hour exposure to moderate-intensity RMF (ranging from 0.60 T to 0.38 T) at 7 Hz for 4 weeks. HU caused significant decreases in body mass and soleus muscle mass of rats, which were not obviously altered by RMF. Three-point bending test showed that the mechanical properties of femurs in HU rats, including maximum load, stiffness, energy absorption and elastic modulus were not markedly affected by RMF. µCT analysis demonstrated that 4-week RMF did not significantly prevent HU-induced deterioration of femoral trabecular and cortical bone microarchitecture. Serum biochemical analysis showed that RMF did not significantly change HU-induced decrease in serum bone formation markers and increase in bone resorption markers. Bone histomorphometric analysis further confirmed that RMF showed no impacts on bone remodeling in HU rats, as evidenced by unchanged mineral apposition rate, bone formation rate, osteoblast numbers and osteoclast numbers in cancellous bone. Together, our findings reveal that RMF do not significantly affect bone microstructure, bone mechanical strength and bone remodeling in HU-induced disuse osteoporotic rats. Our study indicates potentially

  4. Bone remodeling after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bellorin-Font, Ezequiel; Rojas, Eudocia; Carlini, Raul G; Suniaga, Orlando; Weisinger, José R

    2003-06-01

    Several studies have indicated that bone alterations after transplantation are heterogeneous. Short-term studies after transplantation have shown that many patients exhibit a pattern consistent with adynamic bone disease. In contrast, patients with long-term renal transplantation show a more heterogeneous picture. Thus, while adynamic bone disease has also been described in these patients, most studies show decreased bone formation and prolonged mineralization lag-time faced with persisting bone resorption, and even clear evidence of generalized or focal osteomalacia in many patients. Thus, the main alterations in bone remodeling are a decrease in bone formation and mineralization up against persistent bone resorption, suggesting defective osteoblast function, decreased osteoblastogenesis, or increased osteoblast death rates. Indeed, recent studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that there is an early decrease in osteoblast number and surfaces, as well as in reduced bone formation rate and delayed mineralization after transplantation. These alterations are associated with an early increase in osteoblast apoptosis that correlates with low levels of serum phosphorus. These changes were more frequently observed in patients with low turnover bone disease. In contrast, PTH seemed to preserve osteoblast survival. The mechanisms of hypophosphatemia in these patients appear to be independent of PTH, suggesting that other phosphaturic factors may play a role. However, further studies are needed to determine the nature of a phosphaturic factor and its relationship to the alterations of bone remodeling after transplantation.

  5. Bone Remodeling Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foucar, Charlie; Goldberg, Leslie; Hon, Bodin; Moore, Shannon; Williams, Evan

    2009-01-01

    The impact of bone loss due to different mechanical loadings in microgravity is a major concern for astronauts upon reintroduction to gravitational forces in exploration missions to the Moon and Mars. it has been shown that astronauts not only lose bone at differing rates, with levels up to 2% per month, but each astronaut will respond to bone loss treatments differently. Pre- and post-flight imaging techniques and frozen urine samples for post-flight laboratory immunoassays To develop a novel, non-invasive, highly . sensitive, portable, intuitive, and low-powered device to measure bone resorption levels in 'real time' to provide rapid and Individualized feedback to maximize the efficacy of bone loss countermeasures 1. Collect urine specimen and analyze the level of bone resorption marker, DPD (deoxypridinoline) excreted. 2. Antibodies specific to DPD conjugated with nanoshells and mixed with specimen, the change in absorbance from agglutination is measured by an optical device. 3. The concentration of DPD is displayed and recorded on a PDA

  6. Bone remodeling as a spatial evolutionary game.

    PubMed

    Ryser, Marc D; Murgas, Kevin A

    2017-04-07

    Bone remodeling is a complex process involving cell-cell interactions, biochemical signaling and mechanical stimuli. Early models of the biological aspects of remodeling were non-spatial and focused on the local dynamics at a fixed location in the bone. Several spatial extensions of these models have been proposed, but they generally suffer from two limitations: first, they are not amenable to analysis and are computationally expensive, and second, they neglect the role played by bone-embedded osteocytes. To address these issues, we developed a novel model of spatial remodeling based on the principles of evolutionary game theory. The analytically tractable framework describes the spatial interactions between zones of bone resorption, bone formation and quiescent bone, and explicitly accounts for regulation of remodeling by bone-embedded, mechanotransducing osteocytes. Using tools from the theory of interacting particle systems we systematically classified the different dynamic regimes of the spatial model and identified regions of parameter space that allow for global coexistence of resorption, formation and quiescence, as observed in physiological remodeling. In coexistence scenarios, three-dimensional simulations revealed the emergence of sponge-like bone clusters. Comparison between spatial and non-spatial dynamics revealed substantial differences and suggested a stabilizing role of space. Our findings emphasize the importance of accounting for spatial structure and bone-embedded osteocytes when modeling the process of bone remodeling. Thanks to the lattice-based framework, the proposed model can easily be coupled to a mechanical model of bone loading.

  7. Pulsatile Fluid Shear in Bone Remodeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frangos, John A.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to elucidate the sensitivity to transients in fluid shear stress in bone remodeling. Bone remodeling is clearly a function of the local mechanical environment which includes interstitial fluid flow. Traditionally, load-induced remodeling has been associated with low frequency (1-2 Hz) signals attributed to normal locomotion. McLeod and Rubin, however, demonstrated in vivo remodeling events associated with high frequency (15-30 Hz) loading. Likewise, other in vivo studies demonstrated that slowly applied strains did not trigger remodeling events. We therefore hypothesized that the mechanosensitive pathways which control bone maintenance and remodeling are differentially sensitive to varying rates of applied fluid shear stress.

  8. Periprosthetic Bone Remodelling in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    GEORGEANU, Vlad; ATASIEI, Tudor; GRUIONU, Lucian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The clinical studies have shown that the displacement of the prosthesis components, especially of the tibial one is higher during the first year, after which it reaches an equilibrum position compatible with a good long term functioning. This displacement takes place due to bone remodelling close to the implant secondary to different loading concentrations over different areas of bone. Material and Method: Our study implies a simulation on a computational model using the finite element analysis. The simulation started taking into account arbitrary points because of non-linear conditions of bone-prosthesis interface and it was iterative.. A hundred consecutive situations corresponding to intermediate bone remodelling phases have been calculated according to given loadings. Bone remodelling was appreciated as a function of time and bone density for each constitutive element of the computational model created by finite element method. For each constitutive element a medium value of stress during the walking cycle was applied. Results: Analyse of proximal epiphysis-prosthesis complex slices showed that bone density increase is maintained all over the stem in the immediately post-operative period. At 10 months, the moment considered to be the end of bone remodelling, areas with increased bone density are fewer and smaller. Meanwhile, their distribution with a concentration toward the internal compartment in the distal metaphysis is preserved. Conclusions: After the total knee arthroplasty the tibial bone suffered a process of remodelling adapted to the new stress conditions. This bone remodelling can influence, sometimes negatively, especially in the cases with tibial component varus malposition, the fixation, respectively the survival of the prosthesis. This process has been demonstrated both by clinical trials and by simulation, using the finite elements method of periprosthetic bone remodelling. PMID:25553127

  9. Bone modeling and remodeling: potential as therapeutic targets for the treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Langdahl, Bente; Ferrari, Serge; Dempster, David W

    2016-12-01

    The adult skeleton is renewed by remodeling throughout life. Bone remodeling is a process where osteoclasts and osteoblasts work sequentially in the same bone remodeling unit. After the attainment of peak bone mass, bone remodeling is balanced and bone mass is stable for one or two decades until age-related bone loss begins. Age-related bone loss is caused by increases in resorptive activity and reduced bone formation. The relative importance of cortical remodeling increases with age as cancellous bone is lost and remodeling activity in both compartments increases. Bone modeling describes the process whereby bones are shaped or reshaped by the independent action of osteoblast and osteoclasts. The activities of osteoblasts and osteoclasts are not necessarily coupled anatomically or temporally. Bone modeling defines skeletal development and growth but continues throughout life. Modeling-based bone formation contributes to the periosteal expansion, just as remodeling-based resorption is responsible for the medullary expansion seen at the long bones with aging. Existing and upcoming treatments affect remodeling as well as modeling. Teriparatide stimulates bone formation, 70% of which is remodeling based and 20-30% is modeling based. The vast majority of modeling represents overflow from remodeling units rather than de novo modeling. Denosumab inhibits bone remodeling but is permissive for modeling at cortex. Odanacatib inhibits bone resorption by inhibiting cathepsin K activity, whereas modeling-based bone formation is stimulated at periosteal surfaces. Inhibition of sclerostin stimulates bone formation and histomorphometric analysis demonstrated that bone formation is predominantly modeling based. The bone-mass response to some osteoporosis treatments in humans certainly suggests that nonremodeling mechanisms contribute to this response and bone modeling may be such a mechanism. To date, this has only been demonstrated for teriparatide, however, it is clear that

  10. Bone modeling and remodeling: potential as therapeutic targets for the treatment of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Langdahl, Bente; Ferrari, Serge; Dempster, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The adult skeleton is renewed by remodeling throughout life. Bone remodeling is a process where osteoclasts and osteoblasts work sequentially in the same bone remodeling unit. After the attainment of peak bone mass, bone remodeling is balanced and bone mass is stable for one or two decades until age-related bone loss begins. Age-related bone loss is caused by increases in resorptive activity and reduced bone formation. The relative importance of cortical remodeling increases with age as cancellous bone is lost and remodeling activity in both compartments increases. Bone modeling describes the process whereby bones are shaped or reshaped by the independent action of osteoblast and osteoclasts. The activities of osteoblasts and osteoclasts are not necessarily coupled anatomically or temporally. Bone modeling defines skeletal development and growth but continues throughout life. Modeling-based bone formation contributes to the periosteal expansion, just as remodeling-based resorption is responsible for the medullary expansion seen at the long bones with aging. Existing and upcoming treatments affect remodeling as well as modeling. Teriparatide stimulates bone formation, 70% of which is remodeling based and 20–30% is modeling based. The vast majority of modeling represents overflow from remodeling units rather than de novo modeling. Denosumab inhibits bone remodeling but is permissive for modeling at cortex. Odanacatib inhibits bone resorption by inhibiting cathepsin K activity, whereas modeling-based bone formation is stimulated at periosteal surfaces. Inhibition of sclerostin stimulates bone formation and histomorphometric analysis demonstrated that bone formation is predominantly modeling based. The bone-mass response to some osteoporosis treatments in humans certainly suggests that nonremodeling mechanisms contribute to this response and bone modeling may be such a mechanism. To date, this has only been demonstrated for teriparatide, however, it is clear that

  11. Mediators of inflammation and bone remodeling in rheumatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Anita T.; Gravallese, Ellen M.

    2015-01-01

    Remodeling of bone is a continuous process that occurs throughout life. Under normal physiologic conditions, bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-forming osteoblasts are tightly coupled and regulated to ensure the proper balance, such that there is no net change in bone mass. However, inflammation perturbs normal bone homeostasis. The impact of inflammation on bone is dependent upon the anatomic site affected, cell types, factors and cytokines present in the local microenvironment, and local mechanical forces. Cytokines are central to the pathogenesis of inflammation-induced bone loss and contribute to the uncoupling of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption and osteoblast-mediated bone formation, thereby disrupting normal remodeling. In this review, we will discuss the effects of cytokines on bone in two settings, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondyloarthritis (SpA), a disease category that includes ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), reactive arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and juvenile onset spondyloarthropathy. The outcome for bone in these disease settings is quite different, and an understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms leading to the net impact on bone has been essential in developing new therapeutic approaches to bone health in these diseases. PMID:26481971

  12. Application of Petri nets in bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingxi; Yokota, Hiroki

    2009-07-06

    Understanding a mechanism of bone remodeling is a challenging task for both life scientists and model builders, since this highly interactive and nonlinear process can seldom be grasped by simple intuition. A set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) have been built for simulating bone formation as well as bone resorption. Although solving ODEs numerically can provide useful predictions for dynamical behaviors in a continuous time frame, an actual bone remodeling process in living tissues is driven by discrete events of molecular and cellular interactions. Thus, an event-driven tool such as Petri nets (PNs), which may dynamically and graphically mimic individual molecular collisions or cellular interactions, seems to augment the existing ODE-based systems analysis. Here, we applied PNs to expand the ODE-based approach and examined discrete, dynamical behaviors of key regulatory molecules and bone cells. PNs have been used in many engineering areas, but their application to biological systems needs to be explored. Our PN model was based on 8 ODEs that described an osteoprotegerin linked molecular pathway consisting of 4 types of bone cells. The models allowed us to conduct both qualitative and quantitative evaluations and evaluate homeostatic equilibrium states. The results support that application of PN models assists understanding of an event-driven bone remodeling mechanism using PN-specific procedures such as places, transitions, and firings.

  13. Densitometric evaluation of periprosthetic bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Parchi, Paolo Domenico; Cervi, Valentina; Piolanti, Nicola; Ciapini, Gianluca; Andreani, Lorenzo; Castellini, Iacopo; Poggetti, Andrea; Lisanti, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Summary The application of Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in orthopaedic surgery gradually has been extended from the study of osteoporosis to different areas of interest like the study of the relation between bone and prosthetic implants. Aim of this review is to analyze changes that occur in periprosthetic bone after the implantation of a total hip arthroplasty (THA) or a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In THA the pattern of adaptive bone remodeling with different cementless femoral stems varies and it appears to be strictly related to the design and more specifically to where the femoral stem is fixed on bone. Short stems with metaphyseal fixation allow the maintenance of a more physiologic load transfer to the proximal femur decreasing the entity of bone loss. Femoral bone loss after TKA seems to be related to the stress shielding induced by the implants while tibial bone remodeling seems to be related to postoperative changes in knee alignment (varus/valgus) and consequently in tibial load transfer. After both THA and TKA stress shielding seems to be an inevitable phenomenon that occurs mainly in the first year after surgery. PMID:25568658

  14. VEGF inhibition as possible therapy in spondyloarthritis patients: Targeting bone remodelling.

    PubMed

    Lacout, Alexis; Carlier, Robert Yves; El Hajjam, Mostafa; Marcy, Pierre Yves

    2017-04-01

    Spondyloarthritis refers to a group of chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases that predominantly affects the axial skeleton, causing pain and stiffness. Human bone is highly dynamic organ that interacts with a wide array cells and tissues. Process of bone remodelling relies on a delicate balance between bone formation and bone resorption, orchestrated by osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Disruption of this homeostatic balance of bone removal and replacement can manifest as inappropriate new bone formation found in spondylarthritis. We hypothesize that VEGF may promote bone remodelling, stimulate angiogenesis, and both osteoclastic and osteoblastic activity. Anti VEGF may be tested as a dedicated therapy to prevent bone remodelling in spondyloarthritis patients, namely in cases of aggressive disease. Bone remodelling could be monitored by using [18F]Fluoride PET scan.

  15. Bone Remodeling and Energy Metabolism: New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Francisco J. A.; Rosen, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    Bone mineral, adipose tissue and energy metabolism are interconnected by a complex and multilevel series of networks. Calcium and phosphorus are utilized for insulin secretion and synthesis of high energy compounds. Adipose tissue store lipids and cholecalciferol, which, in turn, can influence calcium balance and energy expenditure. Hormones long-thought to solely modulate energy and mineral homeostasis may influence adipocytic function. Osteoblasts are a target of insulin action in bone. Moreover, endocrine mediators, such as osteocalcin, are synthesized in the skeleton but regulate carbohydrate disposal and insulin secretion. Finally, osteoblasts and adipocytes originate from the same mesenchymal progenitor. The mutual crosstalk between osteoblasts and adipocytes within the bone marrow microenvironment plays a crucial role in bone remodeling. In the present review we provide an overview of the reciprocal control between bone and energy metabolism and its clinical implications. PMID:26273493

  16. Development of Bone Remodeling Model for Spaceflight Bone Physiology Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennline, James A.; Werner, Christopher R.; Lewandowski, Beth; Thompson, Bill; Sibonga, Jean; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2015-01-01

    Current spaceflight exercise countermeasures do not eliminate bone loss. Astronauts lose bone mass at a rate of 1-2% a month (Lang et al. 2004, Buckey 2006, LeBlanc et al. 2007). This may lead to early onset osteoporosis and place the astronauts at greater risk of fracture later in their lives. NASA seeks to improve understanding of the mechanisms of bone remodeling and demineralization in 1g in order to appropriately quantify long term risks to astronauts and improve countermeasures. NASA's Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) is working with NASA's bone discipline to develop a validated computational model to augment research efforts aimed at achieving this goal.

  17. Chondromodulin I Is a Bone Remodeling Factor

    PubMed Central

    Nakamichi, Yuko; Shukunami, Chisa; Yamada, Takashi; Aihara, Ken-ichi; Kawano, Hirotaka; Sato, Takashi; Nishizaki, Yuriko; Yamamoto, Yoko; Shindo, Masayo; Yoshimura, Kimihiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Hiraki, Yuji; Kato, Shigeaki

    2003-01-01

    Chondromodulin I (ChM-I) was supposed from its limited expression in cartilage and its functions in cultured chondrocytes as a major regulator in cartilage development. Here, we generated mice deficient in ChM-I by targeted disruption of the ChM-I gene. No overt abnormality was detected in endochondral bone formation during embryogenesis and cartilage development during growth stages of ChM-I−/− mice. However, a significant increase in bone mineral density with lowered bone resorption with respect to formation was unexpectedly found in adult ChM-I−/− mice. Thus, the present study established that ChM-I is a bone remodeling factor. PMID:12509461

  18. Probabilistic Study of Bone Remodeling Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, C.; Gorla, R. S. R.

    2013-08-01

    The dynamic bone remodeling process is a computationally challenging research area that struggles to understand the actual mechanisms. It has been observed that a mechanical stimulus in the bone greatly affects the remodeling process. A 3D finite element model of a femur is created and a probabilistic analysis is performed on the model. The probabilistic analysis measures the sensitivities of various parameters related to the material properties, geometric properties, and the three load cases defined as Single Leg Stance, Abduction, and Adduction. The sensitivity of each parameter is based on the calculated maximum mechanical stimulus and analyzed at various values of probabilities ranging from 0.001 to 0.999. The analysis showed that the parameters associated with the Single Leg Stance load case had the highest sensitivity with a probability of 0.99 and the angle of the force applied to the joint of the proximal femur had the overall highest sensitivity

  19. Factors affecting bone growth.

    PubMed

    Gkiatas, Ioannis; Lykissas, Marios; Kostas-Agnantis, Ioannis; Korompilias, Anastasios; Batistatou, Anna; Beris, Alexandros

    2015-02-01

    Bone growth and development are products of the complex interactions of genetic and environmental factors. Longitudinal bone growth depends on the growth plate. The growth plate has 5 different zones-each with a different functional role-and is the final target organ for longitudinal growth. Bone length is affected by several systemic, local, and mechanical factors. All these regulation systems control the final length of bones in a complicated way. Despite its significance to bone stability, bone growth in width has not been studied as extensively as longitudinal bone growth. Bone growth in width is also controlled by genetic factors, but mechanical loading regulates periosteal apposition. In this article, we review the most recent data regarding bone growth from the embryonic age and analyze the factors that control bone growth. An understanding of this complex system is important in identifying metabolic and developmental bone diseases and fracture risk.

  20. Parallel mechanisms suppress cochlear bone remodeling to protect hearing.

    PubMed

    Jáuregui, Emmanuel J; Akil, Omar; Acevedo, Claire; Hall-Glenn, Faith; Tsai, Betty S; Bale, Hrishikesh A; Liebenberg, Ellen; Humphrey, Mary Beth; Ritchie, Robert O; Lustig, Lawrence R; Alliston, Tamara

    2016-08-01

    Bone remodeling, a combination of bone resorption and formation, requires precise regulation of cellular and molecular signaling to maintain proper bone quality. Whereas osteoblasts deposit and osteoclasts resorb bone matrix, osteocytes both dynamically resorb and replace perilacunar bone matrix. Osteocytes secrete proteases like matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP13) to maintain the material quality of bone matrix through perilacunar remodeling (PLR). Deregulated bone remodeling impairs bone quality and can compromise hearing since the auditory transduction mechanism is within bone. Understanding the mechanisms regulating cochlear bone provides unique ways to assess bone quality independent of other aspects that contribute to bone mechanical behavior. Cochlear bone is singular in its regulation of remodeling by expressing high levels of osteoprotegerin. Since cochlear bone expresses a key PLR enzyme, MMP13, we examined whether cochlear bone relies on, or is protected from, osteocyte-mediated PLR to maintain hearing and bone quality using a mouse model lacking MMP13 (MMP13(-/-)). We investigated the canalicular network, collagen organization, lacunar volume via micro-computed tomography, and dynamic histomorphometry. Despite finding defects in these hallmarks of PLR in MMP13(-/-) long bones, cochlear bone revealed no differences in these markers, nor hearing loss as measured by auditory brainstem response (ABR) or distortion product oto-acoustic emissions (DPOAEs), between wild type and MMP13(-/-) mice. Dynamic histomorphometry revealed abundant PLR by tibial osteocytes, but near absence in cochlear bone. Cochlear suppression of PLR corresponds to repression of several key PLR genes in the cochlea relative to long bones. These data suggest that cochlear bone uniquely maintains bone quality and hearing independent of MMP13-mediated osteocytic PLR. Furthermore, the cochlea employs parallel mechanisms to inhibit remodeling by osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and by

  1. Adaptive scapula bone remodeling computational simulation: Relevance to regenerative medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Gulshan B.; Robertson, Douglas D.

    2013-07-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty success has been attributed to many factors including, bone quality, soft tissue balancing, surgeon experience, and implant design. Improved long-term success is primarily limited by glenoid implant loosening. Prosthesis design examines materials and shape and determines whether the design should withstand a lifetime of use. Finite element (FE) analyses have been extensively used to study stresses and strains produced in implants and bone. However, these static analyses only measure a moment in time and not the adaptive response to the altered environment produced by the therapeutic intervention. Computational analyses that integrate remodeling rules predict how bone will respond over time. Recent work has shown that subject-specific two- and three dimensional adaptive bone remodeling models are feasible and valid. Feasibility and validation were achieved computationally, simulating bone remodeling using an intact human scapula, initially resetting the scapular bone material properties to be uniform, numerically simulating sequential loading, and comparing the bone remodeling simulation results to the actual scapula's material properties. Three-dimensional scapula FE bone model was created using volumetric computed tomography images. Muscle and joint load and boundary conditions were applied based on values reported in the literature. Internal bone remodeling was based on element strain-energy density. Initially, all bone elements were assigned a homogeneous density. All loads were applied for 10 iterations. After every iteration, each bone element's remodeling stimulus was compared to its corresponding reference stimulus and its material properties modified. The simulation achieved convergence. At the end of the simulation the predicted and actual specimen bone apparent density were plotted and compared. Location of high and low predicted bone density was comparable to the actual specimen. High predicted bone density was greater than actual

  2. Adaptive scapula bone remodeling computational simulation: Relevance to regenerative medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Gulshan B.; Robertson, Douglas D.

    2013-07-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty success has been attributed to many factors including, bone quality, soft tissue balancing, surgeon experience, and implant design. Improved long-term success is primarily limited by glenoid implant loosening. Prosthesis design examines materials and shape and determines whether the design should withstand a lifetime of use. Finite element (FE) analyses have been extensively used to study stresses and strains produced in implants and bone. However, these static analyses only measure a moment in time and not the adaptive response to the altered environment produced by the therapeutic intervention. Computational analyses that integrate remodeling rules predict how bone will respond over time. Recent work has shown that subject-specific two- and three dimensional adaptive bone remodeling models are feasible and valid. Feasibility and validation were achieved computationally, simulating bone remodeling using an intact human scapula, initially resetting the scapular bone material properties to be uniform, numerically simulating sequential loading, and comparing the bone remodeling simulation results to the actual scapula’s material properties. Three-dimensional scapula FE bone model was created using volumetric computed tomography images. Muscle and joint load and boundary conditions were applied based on values reported in the literature. Internal bone remodeling was based on element strain-energy density. Initially, all bone elements were assigned a homogeneous density. All loads were applied for 10 iterations. After every iteration, each bone element’s remodeling stimulus was compared to its corresponding reference stimulus and its material properties modified. The simulation achieved convergence. At the end of the simulation the predicted and actual specimen bone apparent density were plotted and compared. Location of high and low predicted bone density was comparable to the actual specimen. High predicted bone density was greater than

  3. Analogy of strain energy density based bone-remodeling algorithm and structural topology optimization.

    PubMed

    Jang, In Gwun; Kim, Il Yong; Kwak, Byung Ban

    2009-01-01

    In bone-remodeling studies, it is believed that the morphology of bone is affected by its internal mechanical loads. From the 1970s, high computing power enabled quantitative studies in the simulation of bone remodeling or bone adaptation. Among them, Huiskes et al. (1987, "Adaptive Bone Remodeling Theory Applied to Prosthetic Design Analysis," J. Biomech. Eng., 20, pp. 1135-1150) proposed a strain energy density based approach to bone remodeling and used the apparent density for the characterization of internal bone morphology. The fundamental idea was that bone density would increase when strain (or strain energy density) is higher than a certain value and bone resorption would occur when the strain (or strain energy density) quantities are lower than the threshold. Several advanced algorithms were developed based on these studies in an attempt to more accurately simulate physiological bone-remodeling processes. As another approach, topology optimization originally devised in structural optimization has been also used in the computational simulation of the bone-remodeling process. The topology optimization method systematically and iteratively distributes material in a design domain, determining an optimal structure that minimizes an objective function. In this paper, we compared two seemingly different approaches in different fields-the strain energy density based bone-remodeling algorithm (biomechanical approach) and the compliance based structural topology optimization method (mechanical approach)-in terms of mathematical formulations, numerical difficulties, and behavior of their numerical solutions. Two numerical case studies were conducted to demonstrate their similarity and difference, and then the solution convergences were discussed quantitatively.

  4. Control of bone remodelling by applied dynamic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyon, L. E.; Rubin, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    The data showing the relationship between bone mass and peak strain magnitude prepared and submitted for publication. The data from experiments relating remodelling activity with static or dynamic loads were prepared and submitted for publication. Development of programs to relate the location of remodelling activity with he natural and artificial dynamic strain distributions continued. Experiments on the effect of different strain rates on the remodelling response continued.

  5. Chemistry of bone remodelling preserved in extant and fossil Sirenia.

    PubMed

    Anné, Jennifer; Wogelius, Roy A; Edwards, Nicholas P; van Veelen, Arjen; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Manning, Phillip L

    2016-05-01

    Bone remodelling is a crucial biological process needed to maintain elemental homeostasis. It is important to understand the trace elemental inventories that govern these processes as malfunctions in bone remodelling can have devastating effects on an organism. In this study, we use a combination of X-ray techniques to map, quantify, and characterise the coordination chemistry of trace elements within the highly remodelled bone tissues of extant and extinct Sirenia (manatees and dugongs). The dense bone structure and unique body chemistry of sirenians represent ideal tissues for studying both high remodelling rates as well as unique fossilisation pathways. Here, elemental maps revealed uncorrelated patterning of Ca and Zn within secondary osteons in both extant and fossil sirenians, as well as elevated Sr within the connecting canals of fossil sirenians. Concentrations of these elements are comparable between extant and fossil material indicating geochemical processing of the fossil bone has been minimal. Zn was found to be bound in the same coordination within the apatite structure in both extant and fossil bone. Accurate quantification of trace elements in extant material was only possible when the organic constituents of the bone were included. The comparable distributions, concentrations, and chemical coordination of these physiologically important trace elements indicate the chemistry of bone remodelling has been preserved for 19 million years. This study signifies the powerful potential of merging histological and chemical techniques in the understanding of physiological processes in both extant and extinct vertebrates.

  6. Predicting bone remodeling around tissue- and bone-level dental implants used in reduced bone width.

    PubMed

    Eser, Atilim; Tonuk, Ergin; Akca, Kivanc; Dard, Michel M; Cehreli, Murat Cavit

    2013-09-03

    The objective of this study was to predict time-dependent bone remodeling around tissue- and bone-level dental implants used in patients with reduced bone width. The remodeling of bone around titanium tissue-level, and titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy bone-level implants was studied under 100 N oblique load for one month by implementing the Stanford theory into three-dimensional finite element models. Maximum principal stress, minimum principal stress, and strain energy density in peri-implant bone and displacement in x- and y- axes of the implant were evaluated. Maximum and minimum principal stresses around tissue-level implant were higher than bone-level implants and both bone-level implants experienced comparable stresses. Total strain energy density in bone around titanium implants slightly decreased during the first two weeks of loading followed by a recovery, and the titanium-zirconium implant showed minor changes in the axial plane. Total strain energy density changes in the loading and contralateral sides were higher in tissue-level implant than other implants in the cortical bone at the horizontal plane. The displacement values of the implants were almost constant over time. Tissue-level implants were associated with higher stresses than bone-level implants. The time-dependent biomechanical outcome of titanium-zirconium alloy bone-level implant was comparable to the titanium implant.

  7. The roles of exercise in bone remodeling and in prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yu; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Lingli; Wu, Juanni; Guo, Jianming; Zou, Dongchen; Chen, Binglin; Sun, Zhongguang; Shen, Chao; Zou, Jun

    2016-11-01

    With a rapid increase in the aging population, osteoporosis has become a global health problem. Although anti-resorption and anabolic drugs are available, osteoporosis cannot be completely cured. Exercise is an economical, efficacious, and safe way to prevent the development of osteoporosis. Recent studies have investigated the mechanisms by which exercise affects bone remodeling. Here we update the progress made on the effects of exercise on bone cells, including bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, osteoblasts, osteocytes, and osteoclasts, as well as on bone mass, bone strength, and geometry, hoping to provide a theoretical basis to improve osteoporosis prevention and treatment with exercise.

  8. Systems analysis of bone remodelling as a homeostatic regulator.

    PubMed

    Chen, A; Hamamura, K; Zhang, P; Chen, Y; Yokota, H

    2010-01-01

    Bone remodelling in adult skeleton is a process of maintaining bone mass through combined activities of bone forming osteoblasts and bone resorbing osteoclasts. Focusing on a molecular pathway mediated by osteoprotegerin, the authors derived a mathematical formulation for molecular interactions and cellular behaviours. The authors also treated this remodelling process as a homeostatic regulator in a framework of linear quadratic problems. A primary question was: does a solution of a matrix Riccati equation provide a guideline for therapeutic interventions for prevention of bone loss? In order to elucidate the systems dynamics, the authors analysed the perturbed set of equations around a stable equilibrium state together with the original equations. The results demonstrate that a homeostatic regulator with the selected control variables effectively reduces bone degradation activities and restore a physiological remodelling process. To partially validate efficacy of the described intervention strategy, biological experiments were conducted with an osteoblast cell line using one of the control variables, salubrinal (chemical agent). The authors observed that administration of salubrinal activated mRNA levels of transcription factors and an osteogenic marker gene as well as enhancement of mineralisation. Taken together, the current study supports a potential usage of control theories in active regulation of bone remodelling homeostasis.

  9. A multiscale analytical approach for bone remodeling simulations: linking scales from collagen to trabeculae.

    PubMed

    Colloca, Michele; Blanchard, Romane; Hellmich, Christian; Ito, Keita; van Rietbergen, Bert

    2014-07-01

    considerably affect the bone density at the millimeter scale. In fact, smaller tissue density induces remodeling activities leading to finally higher overall bone density. The multiscale analytical model proposed in this study potentially provides an accurate and efficient tool for simulating patient-specific bone remodeling, which might be of importance in particular for the hip and spine, where an accurate assessment of bone micro-architecture is not possible.

  10. Suppressed bone remodeling in black bears conserves energy and bone mass during hibernation.

    PubMed

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan; Buckendahl, Patricia; Carpenter, Caren; Henriksen, Kim; Vaughan, Michael; Donahue, Seth

    2015-07-01

    Decreased physical activity in mammals increases bone turnover and uncouples bone formation from bone resorption, leading to hypercalcemia, hypercalcuria, bone loss and increased fracture risk. Black bears, however, are physically inactive for up to 6 months annually during hibernation without losing cortical or trabecular bone mass. Bears have been shown to preserve trabecular bone volume and architectural parameters and cortical bone strength, porosity and geometrical properties during hibernation. The mechanisms that prevent disuse osteoporosis in bears are unclear as previous studies using histological and serum markers of bone remodeling show conflicting results. However, previous studies used serum markers of bone remodeling that are known to accumulate with decreased renal function, which bears have during hibernation. Therefore, we measured serum bone remodeling markers (BSALP and TRACP) that do not accumulate with decreased renal function, in addition to the concentrations of serum calcium and hormones involved in regulating bone remodeling in hibernating and active bears. Bone resorption and formation markers were decreased during hibernation compared with when bears were physically active, and these findings were supported by histomorphometric analyses of bone biopsies. The serum concentration of cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART), a hormone known to reduce bone resorption, was 15-fold higher during hibernation. Serum calcium concentration was unchanged between hibernation and non-hibernation seasons. Suppressed and balanced bone resorption and formation in hibernating bears contributes to energy conservation, eucalcemia and the preservation of bone mass and strength, allowing bears to survive prolonged periods of extreme environmental conditions, nutritional deprivation and anuria.

  11. The Role of Semaphorin 3A in Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenxia; Hao, Jin; Duan, Xin; Wu, Nan; Zhou, Zongke; Yang, Fan; Li, Juan; Zhao, Zhihe; Huang, Shishu

    2017-01-01

    Bone remodeling occurs at the bone surface throughout adult life and associates bony quantity and quality. This process is a balance between the osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption, which cross-talks together. Semaphorin 3A is a membrane-associated secreted protein and regarded as a diffusible axonal chemorepellent, which has been identified in the involvement of bone resorption and formation synchronously. However, the role of Semaphorin 3A in bone homeostasis and diseases remains elusive, in particular the association to osteoblasts and osteoclasts. In this review article, we summarize recent progress of Semaphorin 3A in the bone mass, homeostasis, and diseases and discuss the novel application of nerve-based bone regeneration. This will facilitate the understanding of Semaphorin 3A in skeletal biology and shed new light on the modulation and potential treatment in the bone disorders. PMID:28293171

  12. Soy Isoflavones and Osteoporotic Bone Loss: A Review with an Emphasis on Modulation of Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xi; Lee, Sun-Kyeong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Osteoporosis is an age-related disorder that affects both women and men, although estrogen deficiency induced by menopause accelerates bone loss in older women. As the demographic shifts to a more aged population, a growing number of men and women will be afflicted with osteoporosis. Since the current drug therapies available have multiple side effects, including increased risk of developing certain types of cancer or complications, a search for potential nonpharmacologic alternative therapies for osteoporosis is of prime interest. Soy isoflavones (SI) have demonstrated potential bone-specific effects in a number of studies. This article provides a systematic review of studies on osteoporotic bone loss in relation to SI intake from diet or supplements to comprehensively explain how SI affect the modulation of bone remodeling. Evidence from epidemiologic studies supports that dietary SI attenuate menopause-induced osteoporotic bone loss by decreasing bone resorption and stimulating bone formation. Other studies have also illustrated that bone site-specific trophic and synergistic effects combined with exercise intervention might contribute to improve the bioavailability of SI or strengthen the bone-specific effects. To date, however, the effects of dietary SI on osteoporotic bone loss remain inconclusive, and study results vary from study to study. The current review will discuss the potential factors that result in the conflicting outcomes of these studies, including dosages, intervention materials, study duration, race, and genetic differences. Further well-designed studies are needed to fully understand the underlying mechanism and evaluate the effects of SI on osteoporosis in humans. PMID:26670451

  13. The role of microRNAs in bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Dian; Hao, Jin; Shen, Yu; Tang, Ge; Li, Mei-Le; Huang, Shi-Hu; Zhao, Zhi-He

    2015-01-01

    Bone remodeling is balanced by bone formation and bone resorption as well as by alterations in the quantities and functions of seed cells, leading to either the maintenance or deterioration of bone status. The existing evidence indicates that microRNAs (miRNAs), known as a family of short non-coding RNAs, are the key post-transcriptional repressors of gene expression, and growing numbers of novel miRNAs have been verified to play vital roles in the regulation of osteogenesis, osteoclastogenesis, and adipogenesis, revealing how they interact with signaling molecules to control these processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the roles of miRNAs in regulating bone remodeling as well as novel applications for miRNAs in biomaterials for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26208037

  14. Computer-simulated bone architecture in a simple bone-remodeling model based on a reaction-diffusion system.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Ken-ichi; Wada, Yoshitaka; Takahashi, Akiyuki; Kikuchi, Masanori

    2005-01-01

    Bone is a complex system with functions including those of adaptation and repair. To understand how bone cells can create a structure adapted to the mechanical environment, we propose a simple bone remodeling model based on a reaction-diffusion system influenced by mechanical stress. Two-dimensional bone models were created and subjected to mechanical loads. The conventional finite element method (FEM) was used to calculate stress distribution. A stress-reactive reaction-diffusion model was constructed and used to simulate bone remodeling under mechanical loads. When an external mechanical stress was applied, stimulated bone formation and subsequent activation of bone resorption produced an efficient adaptation of the internal shape of the model bone to a given stress, and demonstrated major structures of trabecular bone seen in the human femoral neck. The degree of adaptation could be controlled by modulating the diffusion constants of hypothetical local factors. We also tried to demonstrate the deformation of bone structure during osteoporosis by the modulation of a parameter affecting the balance between formation and resorption. This simple model gives us an insight into how bone cells can create an architecture adapted to environmental stress, and will serve as a useful tool to understand both physiological and pathological states of bone based on structural information.

  15. Bone microdamage, remodeling and bone fragility: how much damage is too much damage?

    PubMed

    Seref-Ferlengez, Zeynep; Kennedy, Oran D; Schaffler, Mitchell B

    2015-01-01

    Microdamage resulting from fatigue or 'wear and tear' loading contributes to bone fragility; however, the full extent of its influence is not completely understood. Linear microcracks (∼50-100 μm) and diffuse damage (clusters of sublamellar-sized cracks) are the two major bone microdamage types, each with different mechanical and biological consequences. Healthy bone, due to its numerous microstructural interfaces and its ability to affect matrix level repair, deals effectively with microdamage. From a material standpoint, healthy bone behaves much like engineering composites like carbon-fiber reinforced plastics. Both materials allow matrix damage to form during fatigue loading and use microstructural interfaces to dissipate energy and limit microcrack propagation to slow fracture. The terms fracture toughness and 'toughening mechanism', respectively, describe mechanical behavior and microstructural features that prevent crack growth and make it harder to fracture a material. Critically, toughness is independent of strength. In bone, primary toughening features include mineral and collagen interfaces, lamellae and tissue heterogeneity among osteons. The damage tolerance of bone and other composites can be overcome with sustained loading and/or matrix changes such that the microstructure no longer limits microcrack propagation. With reduced remodeling due to aging, disease or remodeling suppression, microdamage accumulation can occur along with loss of tissue heterogeneity. Both contribute additively to reduced fracture toughness. Thus, the answer to the key question for bone fragility of how much microdamage is too much is extremely complex. It ultimately depends on the interplay between matrix damage content, internal repair and effectiveness of matrix-toughening mechanisms.

  16. Bone microdamage, remodeling and bone fragility: how much damage is too much damage?

    PubMed Central

    Seref-Ferlengez, Zeynep; Kennedy, Oran D; Schaffler, Mitchell B

    2015-01-01

    Microdamage resulting from fatigue or ‘wear and tear' loading contributes to bone fragility; however, the full extent of its influence is not completely understood. Linear microcracks (∼50–100 μm) and diffuse damage (clusters of sublamellar-sized cracks) are the two major bone microdamage types, each with different mechanical and biological consequences. Healthy bone, due to its numerous microstructural interfaces and its ability to affect matrix level repair, deals effectively with microdamage. From a material standpoint, healthy bone behaves much like engineering composites like carbon-fiber reinforced plastics. Both materials allow matrix damage to form during fatigue loading and use microstructural interfaces to dissipate energy and limit microcrack propagation to slow fracture. The terms fracture toughness and 'toughening mechanism', respectively, describe mechanical behavior and microstructural features that prevent crack growth and make it harder to fracture a material. Critically, toughness is independent of strength. In bone, primary toughening features include mineral and collagen interfaces, lamellae and tissue heterogeneity among osteons. The damage tolerance of bone and other composites can be overcome with sustained loading and/or matrix changes such that the microstructure no longer limits microcrack propagation. With reduced remodeling due to aging, disease or remodeling suppression, microdamage accumulation can occur along with loss of tissue heterogeneity. Both contribute additively to reduced fracture toughness. Thus, the answer to the key question for bone fragility of how much microdamage is too much is extremely complex. It ultimately depends on the interplay between matrix damage content, internal repair and effectiveness of matrix-toughening mechanisms. PMID:25848533

  17. Localized tissue mineralization regulated by bone remodelling: A computational approach

    PubMed Central

    Decco, Oscar; Adams, George; Cook, Richard B.; García Aznar, José Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Bone is a living tissue whose main mechanical function is to provide stiffness, strength and protection to the body. Both stiffness and strength depend on the mineralization of the organic matrix, which is constantly being remodelled by the coordinated action of the bone multicellular units (BMUs). Due to the dynamics of both remodelling and mineralization, each sample of bone is composed of structural units (osteons in cortical and packets in cancellous bone) created at different times, therefore presenting different levels of mineral content. In this work, a computational model is used to understand the feedback between the remodelling and the mineralization processes under different load conditions and bone porosities. This model considers that osteoclasts primarily resorb those parts of bone closer to the surface, which are younger and less mineralized than older inner ones. Under equilibrium loads, results show that bone volumes with both the highest and the lowest levels of porosity (cancellous and cortical respectively) tend to develop higher levels of mineral content compared to volumes with intermediate porosity, thus presenting higher material densities. In good agreement with recent experimental measurements, a boomerang-like pattern emerges when plotting apparent density at the tissue level versus material density at the bone material level. Overload and disuse states are studied too, resulting in a translation of the apparent–material density curve. Numerical results are discussed pointing to potential clinical applications. PMID:28306746

  18. A Computational Model for Simulating Spaceflight Induced Bone Remodeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennline, James A.; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2014-01-01

    An overview of an initial development of a model of bone loss due to skeletal unloading in weight bearing sites is presented. The skeletal site chosen for the initial application of the model is the femoral neck region because hip fractures can be debilitating to the overall performance health of astronauts. The paper begins with the motivation for developing such a model of the time course of change in bone in order to understand the mechanism of bone demineralization experienced by astronauts in microgravity, to quantify the health risk, and to establish countermeasures. Following this, a general description of a mathematical formulation of the process of bone remodeling is discussed. Equations governing the rate of change of mineralized bone volume fraction and active osteoclast and osteoblast are illustrated. Some of the physiology of bone remodeling, the theory of how imbalance in remodeling can cause bone loss, and how the model attempts to capture this is discussed. The results of a preliminary validation analysis that was carried out are presented. The analysis compares a set of simulation results against bone loss data from control subjects who participated in two different bed rest studies. Finally, the paper concludes with outlining the current limitations and caveats of the model, and planned future work to enhance the state of the model.

  19. Localized tissue mineralization regulated by bone remodelling: A computational approach.

    PubMed

    Berli, Marcelo; Borau, Carlos; Decco, Oscar; Adams, George; Cook, Richard B; García Aznar, José Manuel; Zioupos, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Bone is a living tissue whose main mechanical function is to provide stiffness, strength and protection to the body. Both stiffness and strength depend on the mineralization of the organic matrix, which is constantly being remodelled by the coordinated action of the bone multicellular units (BMUs). Due to the dynamics of both remodelling and mineralization, each sample of bone is composed of structural units (osteons in cortical and packets in cancellous bone) created at different times, therefore presenting different levels of mineral content. In this work, a computational model is used to understand the feedback between the remodelling and the mineralization processes under different load conditions and bone porosities. This model considers that osteoclasts primarily resorb those parts of bone closer to the surface, which are younger and less mineralized than older inner ones. Under equilibrium loads, results show that bone volumes with both the highest and the lowest levels of porosity (cancellous and cortical respectively) tend to develop higher levels of mineral content compared to volumes with intermediate porosity, thus presenting higher material densities. In good agreement with recent experimental measurements, a boomerang-like pattern emerges when plotting apparent density at the tissue level versus material density at the bone material level. Overload and disuse states are studied too, resulting in a translation of the apparent-material density curve. Numerical results are discussed pointing to potential clinical applications.

  20. Intracortical remodeling parameters are associated with measures of bone robustness.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Haviva M; Hampson, Naomi A; Guth, J Jared; Lin, David; Jepsen, Karl J

    2014-10-01

    Prior work identified a novel association between bone robustness and porosity, which may be part of a broader interaction whereby the skeletal system compensates for the natural variation in robustness (bone width relative to length) by modulating tissue-level mechanical properties to increase stiffness of slender bones and to reduce mass of robust bones. To further understand this association, we tested the hypothesis that the relationship between robustness and porosity is mediated through intracortical, BMU-based (basic multicellular unit) remodeling. We quantified cortical porosity, mineralization, and histomorphometry at two sites (38% and 66% of the length) in human cadaveric tibiae. We found significant correlations between robustness and several histomorphometric variables (e.g., % secondary tissue [R(2)  = 0.68, P < 0.004], total osteon area [R(2)  = 0.42, P < 0.04]) at the 66% site. Although these associations were weaker at the 38% site, significant correlations between histological variables were identified between the two sites indicating that both respond to the same global effects and demonstrate a similar character at the whole bone level. Thus, robust bones tended to have larger and more numerous osteons with less infilling, resulting in bigger pores and more secondary bone area. These results suggest that local regulation of BMU-based remodeling may be further modulated by a global signal associated with robustness, such that remodeling is suppressed in slender bones but not in robust bones. Elucidating this mechanism further is crucial for better understanding the complex adaptive nature of the skeleton, and how interindividual variation in remodeling differentially impacts skeletal aging and an individuals' potential response to prophylactic treatments.

  1. The Digital Astronaut Project Bone Remodeling Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennline, J. A.; Mulugeta, L.; Lewandowski, B. E.; Thompson, W. K.; Sibonga, J. D.

    2013-01-01

    One of the main objectives is to provide a tool to help HHC address Bone Gap Osteo 4: We don't know the contribution of each risk factor on bone loss and recovery of bone strength and which factors are the best targets for countermeasure application; and Osteo7: We need to identify options for mitigation of early onset osteoporosis before, during, and after spaceflight.

  2. Regulation of bone formation and remodeling by G-protein-coupled receptor 48.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian; Zhou, Wei; Zhou, Xin; Li, Dali; Weng, Jinsheng; Yi, Zhengfang; Cho, Sung Gook; Li, Chenghai; Yi, Tingfang; Wu, Xiushan; Li, Xiao-Ying; de Crombrugghe, Benoit; Höök, Magnus; Liu, Mingyao

    2009-08-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) 48 (Gpr48; Lgr4), a newly discovered member of the glycoprotein hormone receptor subfamily of GPCRs, is an orphan GPCR of unknown function. Using a knockout mouse model, we have characterized the essential roles of Gpr48 in bone formation and remodeling. Deletion of Gpr48 in mice results in a dramatic delay in osteoblast differentiation and mineralization, but not in chondrocyte proliferation and maturation, during embryonic bone formation. Postnatal bone remodeling is also significantly affected in Gpr48(-/-) mice, including the kinetic indices of bone formation rate, bone mineral density and osteoid formation, whereas the activity and number of osteoclasts are increased as assessed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Examination of the molecular mechanism of Gpr48 action in bone formation revealed that Gpr48 can activate the cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway to regulate the expression level of Atf4 in osteoblasts. Furthermore, we show that Gpr48 significantly downregulates the expression levels of Atf4 target genes/proteins, such as osteocalcin (Ocn; Bglap2), bone sialoprotein (Bsp; Ibsp) and collagen. Together, our data demonstrate that Gpr48 regulates bone formation and remodeling through the cAMP-PKA-Atf4 signaling pathway.

  3. Periosteal response in translation-induced bone remodelling.

    PubMed Central

    Feik, S A; Ellender, G; Crowe, D M; Ramm-Anderson, S M

    1990-01-01

    Translation of transplanted bones induces strain in the periosteum and subsequent bone remodelling. This study examines the periosteal response on the leading and trailing sides of translated bones using an in vivo model where internal bone strain is virtually eliminated. Caudal vertebrae from 4 days old rats were threaded onto the arms of pre-stressed helical torsion springs and transplanted subcutaneously. In the experimental rats, the appliances were activated seven days later causing the bones to translate. Tissues were examined both optically and by transmission electron microscopy. A connective tissue sheath or capsule forms around the bones and, as the arms of the appliance move apart, traction on the enveloping soft tissues produces compression of the periosteum on the leading side and tension on the trailing side with remodelling occurring in a direction opposite to translation. The control periosteum has an ordered structure with well-delineated osteogenic, mid- and fibrous zones. During translation the periosteum on the leading side is consistently narrower than on the trailing side and shows a gradual reduction in formative activity followed by resorption in select areas. Cells and fibres are aligned predominantly parallel to the bone surface. Accelerated formation characterises the trailing side during the translation phase with increased activity and widening of all three periosteal layers. The fibrous layer merges with the connective tissue sheath which frequently is oriented approximately perpendicular to the bone surface. The direction of remodelling is reversed when translation ceases with corresponding changes visible in the periosteum, the osteoblastic layer being the last to show changes. A normal periosteal structure and remodelling pattern is regained when equilibrium of the bones within the soft tissues is attained. This study shows that the enveloping soft tissues profoundly influence the nature and rate of bone remodelling. The changes are

  4. The Digital Astronaut Project Bone Remodeling Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennline, James A.; Mulugeta, Lealem; Lewandowski, Beth E.; Thompson, William K.; Sibonga, Jean D.

    2014-01-01

    Under the conditions of microgravity, astronauts lose bone mass at a rate of 1% to 2% a month, particularly in the lower extremities such as the proximal femur: (1) The most commonly used countermeasure against bone loss has been prescribed exercise, (2) However, current exercise countermeasures do not completely eliminate bone loss in long duration, 4 to 6 months, spaceflight, (3,4) leaving the astronaut susceptible to early onset osteoporosis and a greater risk of fracture later in their lives. The introduction of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device, coupled with improved nutrition, has further minimized the 4 to 6 month bone loss. But further work is needed to implement optimal exercise prescriptions, and (5) In this light, NASA's Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) is working with NASA physiologists to implement well-validated computational models that can help understand the mechanisms of bone demineralization in microgravity, and enhance exercise countermeasure development.

  5. Expression of RANKL/OPG during bone remodeling in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, H.; Mine, T.; Ogasa, H.; Taguchi, T.; Liang, C.T.

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} This is the first study to determine the relationship between osteogenic differentiation and RANKL/OPG expression during bone remodeling in vivo. {yields} The OPG expression peak occurred during the bone formation phase, whereas the marked elevation of RANKL expression was observed during the bone resorption phase. {yields} Histological analysis showed that RANKL/OPG immunoreactivity was predominantly associated with bone marrow cells in the marrow cavity. {yields} The present study confirmed that RANKL/OPG are key factors linking bone formation to resorption during the bone remodeling process. -- Abstract: The interaction between receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) plays a dominant role in osteoclastogenesis. As both proteins are produced by osteoblast lineage cells, they are considered to represent a key link between bone formation and resorption. In this study, we investigated the expression of RANKL and OPG during bone remodeling in vivo to determine the relationship between osteoclastogenic stimulation and osteoblastic differentiation. Total RNA was prepared from rat femurs after marrow ablation on days 0, 3, 6, and 9. The temporal activation patterns of osteoblast-related genes (procollagen {alpha}1 (I), alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and osteocalcin) were examined by Northern blot analysis. An appreciable increase in the expression of these osteoblast markers was observed on day 3. The peak increase in gene expression was observed on day 6 followed by a slight reduction by day 9. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the OPG mRNA expression was markedly upregulated on day 6 and slightly decreased on day 9. In contrast, RANKL mRNA expression was increased by more than 20-fold on day 9. The RANKL/OPG ratio, an index of osteoclastogenic stimulation, peaked on day 9. Histological analysis showed that RANKL and OPG immunoreactivity were predominantly associated with bone marrow cells. The

  6. Bone remodeling during prenatal morphogenesis of the human mental foramen.

    PubMed

    Radlanski, Ralf J; Renz, Herbert; Lajvardi, Souzan; Schneider, Richard A

    2004-08-01

    From a morphogenetic point of view, the mental foramen of the mandible is a highly suitable model to study the interactions of different tissues such as nerves, vessels, mesenchymal cells, cartilage, and bone. In previous work, we provided a three-dimensional description of the mental foramen at different developmental stages, and now we complement those studies with a three-dimensional visualization of different bone remodeling activities around the mental foramen. Histological serial sections of human embryos and fetuses, ranging in size from 25 to 117 mm crown-rump-length (CRL), were used to characterize the bone remodeling activity (apposition, inactivity, and resorption). We quantified and reconstructed this activity in three dimensions, and included information on the spatial relationship of the nerves, vessels, and dental primordia. In general, the mandible showed strong apposition at its outer surfaces. The brim of the mental foramen, however, displayed changing remodeling activity at different stages. In the depth of the bony gutter, which provides space for the nerve and the blood vessels, we found bone resorption beneath the inferior alveolar vein. Bone was also resorbed in proximity to the dental primordia. In future studies, we will relate gene expression data to these morphological findings in order to identify molecular mechanisms that regulate this complex system.

  7. Inflammatory and bone remodeling responses to the cytolethal distending toxins.

    PubMed

    Belibasakis, Georgios N; Bostanci, Nagihan

    2014-04-04

    The cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs) are a family of exotoxins produced by a wide range of Gram-negative bacteria. They are known for causing genotoxic stress to the cell, resulting in growth arrest and eventually apoptotic cell death. Nevertheless, there is evidence that CDTs can also perturb the innate immune responses, by regulating inflammatory cytokine production and molecular mediators of bone remodeling in various cell types. These cellular and molecular events may in turn have an effect in enhancing local inflammation in diseases where CDT-producing bacteria are involved, such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Haemophilus ducreyi, Campylobacter jejuni and Helicobacter hepaticus. One special example is the induction of pathological bone destruction in periodontitis. The opportunistic oral pathogen Aggregatibatcer actinoycemetemcomitans, which is involved in the aggressive form of the disease, can regulate the molecular mechanisms of bone remodeling in a manner that favors bone resorption, with the potential involvement of its CDT. The present review provides an overview of all known to-date inflammatory or bone remodeling responses of CDTs produced by various bacterial species, and discusses their potential contribution to the pathogenesis of the associated diseases.

  8. Chronic alcoholism and bone remodeling processes: Caveats and considerations for the forensic anthropologist.

    PubMed

    Michael, Amy R; Bengtson, Jennifer D

    2016-02-01

    Clinical literature provides substantial information on the effects of chronic alcohol abuse on bone remodeling and related skeletal disease processes. This biomedical information is seldom considered in detail by forensic anthropologists, who often rely on normative macroscopic models of bone remodeling and traditional macroscopic age estimation methods in the creation of biological profiles. The case study presented here considers the ways that alcoholism disrupts normal bone remodeling processes, thus skewing estimations of age-at-death. Alcoholism affects bone macroscopically, resulting in a porous appearance and an older estimation of age, while simultaneously inhibiting osteoblastic activity and resulting in a younger microscopic appearance. Forensic anthropologists must also be cognizant of pathological remodeling stemming from alcoholism in cases where trauma analysis is critical to the reconstruction of events leading up to death, as fracture healing rates can be affected. Beyond the case study, we also consider how forensic anthropologists and practitioners can recognize and account for osteological signatures of alcoholism in medico-legal contexts. In order to best estimate age at death, a combined macroscopic and microscopic approach should be employed whenever possible alcohol and drug abuse is known or suspected.

  9. Transcriptional regulation of bone and joint remodeling by NFAT

    PubMed Central

    Sitara, Despina; Aliprantis, Antonios O.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis and arthritis are highly prevalent diseases and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. These diseases result from aberrant tissue remodeling leading to weak, fracture-prone bones or painful, dysfunctional joints. The nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factor family controls diverse biologic processes in vertebrates. Here, we review the scientific evidence that links NFAT-regulated gene transcription to bone and joint pathology. A particular emphasis is placed on the role of NFATs in bone resorption and formation by osteoclasts and osteoblasts, respectively. In addition, emerging data that connect NFATs with cartilage biology, angiogenesis, nociception, and neurogenic inflammation are explored. The goal of this article is to highlight the importance of tissue remodeling in musculoskeletal disease and situate NFAT-driven cellular responses within this context to inspire future research endeavors. PMID:20193006

  10. Phase field approaches of bone remodeling based on TIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganghoffer, Jean-François; Rahouadj, Rachid; Boisse, Julien; Forest, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The process of bone remodeling includes a cycle of repair, renewal, and optimization. This adaptation process, in response to variations in external loads and chemical driving factors, involves three main types of bone cells: osteoclasts, which remove the old pre-existing bone; osteoblasts, which form the new bone in a second phase; osteocytes, which are sensing cells embedded into the bone matrix, trigger the aforementioned sequence of events. The remodeling process involves mineralization of the bone in the diffuse interface separating the marrow, which contains all specialized cells, from the newly formed bone. The main objective advocated in this contribution is the setting up of a modeling and simulation framework relying on the phase field method to capture the evolution of the diffuse interface between the new bone and the marrow at the scale of individual trabeculae. The phase field describes the degree of mineralization of this diffuse interface; it varies continuously between the lower value (no mineral) and unity (fully mineralized phase, e.g. new bone), allowing the consideration of a diffuse moving interface. The modeling framework is the theory of continuous media, for which field equations for the mechanical, chemical, and interfacial phenomena are written, based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Additional models for the cellular activity are formulated to describe the coupling of the cell activity responsible for bone production/resorption to the kinetics of the internal variables. Kinetic equations for the internal variables are obtained from a pseudo-potential of dissipation. The combination of the balance equations for the microforce associated to the phase field and the kinetic equations lead to the Ginzburg-Landau equation satisfied by the phase field with a source term accounting for the dissipative microforce. Simulations illustrating the proposed framework are performed in a one-dimensional situation showing the evolution of

  11. Connecting mechanics and bone cell activities in the bone remodeling process: an integrated finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Hambli, Ridha

    2014-01-01

    Bone adaptation occurs as a response to external loadings and involves bone resorption by osteoclasts followed by the formation of new bone by osteoblasts. It is directly triggered by the transduction phase by osteocytes embedded within the bone matrix. The bone remodeling process is governed by the interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts through the expression of several autocrine and paracrine factors that control bone cell populations and their relative rate of differentiation and proliferation. A review of the literature shows that despite the progress in bone remodeling simulation using the finite element (FE) method, there is still a lack of predictive models that explicitly consider the interaction between osteoblasts and osteoclasts combined with the mechanical response of bone. The current study attempts to develop an FE model to describe the bone remodeling process, taking into consideration the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. The mechanical behavior of bone is described by taking into account the bone material fatigue damage accumulation and mineralization. A coupled strain-damage stimulus function is proposed, which controls the level of autocrine and paracrine factors. The cellular behavior is based on Komarova et al.'s (2003) dynamic law, which describes the autocrine and paracrine interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts and computes cell population dynamics and changes in bone mass at a discrete site of bone remodeling. Therefore, when an external mechanical stress is applied, bone formation and resorption is governed by cells dynamic rather than adaptive elasticity approaches. The proposed FE model has been implemented in the FE code Abaqus (UMAT routine). An example of human proximal femur is investigated using the model developed. The model was able to predict final human proximal femur adaptation similar to the patterns observed in a human proximal femur. The results obtained reveal complex spatio-temporal bone

  12. Connecting Mechanics and Bone Cell Activities in the Bone Remodeling Process: An Integrated Finite Element Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Hambli, Ridha

    2014-01-01

    Bone adaptation occurs as a response to external loadings and involves bone resorption by osteoclasts followed by the formation of new bone by osteoblasts. It is directly triggered by the transduction phase by osteocytes embedded within the bone matrix. The bone remodeling process is governed by the interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts through the expression of several autocrine and paracrine factors that control bone cell populations and their relative rate of differentiation and proliferation. A review of the literature shows that despite the progress in bone remodeling simulation using the finite element (FE) method, there is still a lack of predictive models that explicitly consider the interaction between osteoblasts and osteoclasts combined with the mechanical response of bone. The current study attempts to develop an FE model to describe the bone remodeling process, taking into consideration the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. The mechanical behavior of bone is described by taking into account the bone material fatigue damage accumulation and mineralization. A coupled strain–damage stimulus function is proposed, which controls the level of autocrine and paracrine factors. The cellular behavior is based on Komarova et al.’s (2003) dynamic law, which describes the autocrine and paracrine interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts and computes cell population dynamics and changes in bone mass at a discrete site of bone remodeling. Therefore, when an external mechanical stress is applied, bone formation and resorption is governed by cells dynamic rather than adaptive elasticity approaches. The proposed FE model has been implemented in the FE code Abaqus (UMAT routine). An example of human proximal femur is investigated using the model developed. The model was able to predict final human proximal femur adaptation similar to the patterns observed in a human proximal femur. The results obtained reveal complex spatio-temporal bone

  13. Bone remodelling analysis of the humerus after a shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Quental, Carlos; Folgado, João; Fernandes, Paulo R; Monteiro, Jacinto

    2012-10-01

    The shoulder arthroplasty has become an efficient treatment for some pathologies. However there are complications that can compromise its success. Among them, the stress shielding effect on the humerus has been reported as a possible cause of failure. The objective of this work was to investigate the bone remodelling in the humerus after a shoulder arthroplasty. For this purpose, computational models were developed to analyse the stress shielding contribution to the humeral component failure of shoulder arthroplasties, with a cemented and an uncemented prosthesis. A computational remodelling model was used to characterize the bone apparent density at each site of the humerus. The density distribution was obtained by the solution of a problem that takes into account both structural stiffness and the metabolic cost of bone maintenance. Bone was subjected to 6 load cases that include the glenohumeral reaction force and the action of 10 muscles. In the implanted models, different interface conditions were tested for the bone-implant and the cement-implant interfaces. Moreover, a pathological case defined by a poorer quality of bone was considered. In the healthy situation, the models that better model in vivo conditions showed no significant changes in bone mass. However, the results for the pathological case showed some bone resorption which supports the importance given to the quality of bone in the success of the joint replacement. Bearing in mind the conditions addressed, the results lead to conclude that the stress shielding is not a key factor for the humeral component failure of shoulder arthroplasties in a healthy situation though several issues, including muscle function and bone quality, may heighten its effect.

  14. Theoretical and numerical study of a bone remodeling model: the effect of osteocyte cells distribution.

    PubMed

    Baiotto, S; Zidi, M

    2004-09-01

    It is well argued that osteocytes are mechanosensory cells and are involved in the regulation of bone remodeling. In previous works, the predictions from a simulation model have suggested that both the influencing distance of osteocytes and the magnitude of the mechanical loads determine the thickness of trabeculae whereas the number of osteocytes primarily affects the rate of bone remodeling. The question that remains not completely answered is: for the same number of osteocytes, what is the effect of different distributions on the remodeling process? Based on a particular regulatory bone remodeling model, the question is addressed, in part, by performing a stability analysis in connection with numerical simulations. The results allow us to demonstrate that, on one hand, we cannot reach a conclusion about the stability of the model for a nonuniform osteocyte distribution. This implies that there is no relationship between the different parameters conveying the stability of the model. On the other hand, we show that the osteocyte cell distribution has a significant influence on the bone morphology, which seems to be confirmed by simulations with real data obtained from rat tibia.

  15. External bone remodeling after injectable calcium-phosphate cement in benign bone tumor: two cases in the hand.

    PubMed

    Ichihara, S; Vaiss, L; Acciaro, A L; Facca, S; Liverneaux, P

    2015-12-01

    Bone remodeling commonly occurred after fracture and curettage benign bone tumor. A lot of previous articles reported "internal" trabecular bone remodeling. There were no previous clinical reports about "external" cortical bone remodeling. We present here 2 clinical cases of "external" bone remodeling after injectable calcium-phosphate in benign bone tumor in the hand. In two cases of benign bone tumor, we performed complete removal of the tumor and immediate filling of the metacarpal bone with injectable calcium-phosphate cement Arexbone(®) from the mechanical viewpoint. With respect to the shape of the calcium-phosphate, by using an injection-type, calcium-phosphate is adhered uniformly to the bone cortex by injecting, remodeling has been promoted. After 5 and 8years, both cases were no recurrences, and the shape of the metacarpal looked close to the contralateral side. These findings supposed to be concerned with potential self-healing and self-protection mechanism in human body.

  16. Minireview: Nuclear Receptor Regulation of Osteoclast and Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zixue; Li, Xiaoxiao

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing cells essential for skeletal remodeling and regeneration. However, excessive osteoclasts often contribute to prevalent bone degenerative diseases such as osteoporosis, arthritis, and cancer bone metastasis. Osteoclast dysregulation is also associated with rare disorders such as osteopetrosis, pycnodysostosis, Paget's disease, and Gorham-Stout syndrome. The nuclear receptor (NR) family of transcription factors functions as metabolic sensors that control a variety of physiological processes including skeletal homeostasis and serves as attractive therapeutic targets for many diseases. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the new players and the new mechanisms for how NRs regulate osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. An enhanced understanding of NR functions in osteoclastogenesis will facilitate the development of not only novel osteoprotective medicine but also prudent strategies to minimize the adverse skeletal effects of certain NR-targeting drugs for a better treatment of cancer and metabolic diseases. PMID:25549044

  17. Retinoid X receptors orchestrate osteoclast differentiation and postnatal bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Menéndez-Gutiérrez, María P.; Rőszer, Tamás; Fuentes, Lucía; Núñez, Vanessa; Escolano, Amelia; Redondo, Juan Miguel; De Clerck, Nora; Metzger, Daniel; Valledor, Annabel F.; Ricote, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing cells that are important for maintenance of bone remodeling and mineral homeostasis. Regulation of osteoclast differentiation and activity is important for the pathogenesis and treatment of diseases associated with bone loss. Here, we demonstrate that retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are key elements of the transcriptional program of differentiating osteoclasts. Loss of RXR function in hematopoietic cells resulted in formation of giant, nonresorbing osteoclasts and increased bone mass in male mice and protected female mice from bone loss following ovariectomy, which induces osteoporosis in WT females. The increase in bone mass associated with RXR deficiency was due to lack of expression of the RXR-dependent transcription factor v-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene family, protein B (MAFB) in osteoclast progenitors. Evaluation of osteoclast progenitor cells revealed that RXR homodimers directly target and bind to the Mafb promoter, and this interaction is required for proper osteoclast proliferation, differentiation, and activity. Pharmacological activation of RXRs inhibited osteoclast differentiation due to the formation of RXR/liver X receptor (LXR) heterodimers, which induced expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), resulting in indirect MAFB upregulation. Our study reveals that RXR signaling mediates bone homeostasis and suggests that RXRs have potential as targets for the treatment of bone pathologies such as osteoporosis. PMID:25574839

  18. Activation of Bone Remodeling after Fatigue: Differential Response to Linear Microcracks and Diffuse Damage

    PubMed Central

    Herman, B.C.; Cardoso, L.; Majeska, R.J.; Jepsen, K.J.; Schaffler, M.B

    2010-01-01

    Recent experiments point to two predominant forms of fatigue microdamage in bone: linear microcracks (tens to a few hundreds microns in length) and “diffuse damage” (patches of diffuse stain uptake in fatigued bone comprised of clusters of sublamellar-sized cracks). The physiological relevance of diffuse damage in activating bone remodeling is not known. In this study microdamage amount and type were varied to assess whether linear or diffuse microdamage have similar effects on the activation of intracortical resorption. Activation of resorption was correlated to the number of linear microcracks (Cr.Dn) in the bone (R2=0.60, p<0.01). In contrast, there was no activation of resorption in response to diffuse microdamage alone. Furthermore, there was no significant change in osteocyte viability in response to diffuse microdamage, suggesting that osteocyte apoptosis, which is know to activate remodeling at typical linear microcracks in bone, does not result from sublamellar damage. These findings indicate that inability of diffuse microdamage to activate resorption may be due to lack of a focal injury response. Finally, we found that duration of loading does not affect the remodeling response. In conclusion, our data indicate that osteocytes activate resorption in response to linear microcracks but not diffuse microdamage, perhaps due to lack of a focal injury-induced apoptotic response. PMID:20633708

  19. Epigenetic Regulation of Bone Remodeling and Its Impacts in Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghayor, Chafik; Weber, Franz E.

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics describes mechanisms which control gene expression and cellular processes without changing the DNA sequence. The main mechanisms in epigenetics are DNA methylation in CpG-rich promoters, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). DNA methylation modifies the function of the DNA and correlates with gene silencing. Histone modifications including acetylation/deacetylation and phosphorylation act in diverse biological processes such as transcriptional activation/inactivation and DNA repair. Non-coding RNAs play a large part in epigenetic regulation of gene expression in addition to their roles at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Osteoporosis is the most common skeletal disorder, characterized by compromised bone strength and bone micro-architectural deterioration that predisposes the bones to an increased risk of fracture. It is most often caused by an increase in bone resorption that is not sufficiently compensated by a corresponding increase in bone formation. Nowadays it is well accepted that osteoporosis is a multifactorial disorder and there are genetic risk factors for osteoporosis and bone fractures. Here we review emerging evidence that epigenetics contributes to the machinery that can alter DNA structure, gene expression, and cellular differentiation during physiological and pathological bone remodeling. PMID:27598138

  20. Theoretical investigation of the role of the RANK-RANKL-OPG system in bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Pivonka, Peter; Zimak, Jan; Smith, David W; Gardiner, Bruce S; Dunstan, Colin R; Sims, Natalie A; Martin, T John; Mundy, Gregory R

    2010-01-21

    The RANK-RANKL-OPG system is an essential signaling pathway involved in bone cell-cell communication, with ample evidence that modification of the RANK-RANKL-OPG signaling pathway has major effects on bone remodeling. The first focus of this paper is to demonstrate that a theoretical model of bone cell-cell interactions is capable of qualitatively reproducing changes in bone associated with RANK-RANKL-OPG signaling. To do this we consider either biological experiments or bone diseases related to receptor and/or ligand deficiencies, including RANKL over-expression, ablation of OPG production and/or RANK receptor modifications. The second focus is to investigate a wide range of possible therapeutic strategies for re-establishing bone homeostasis for various pathologies of the RANK-RANKL-OPG pathway. These simulations indicate that bone diseases associated with the RANK-RANKL-OPG pathway are very effective in triggering bone resorption compared to bone formation. These results align with Hofbauer's "convergence hypothesis", which states that catabolic bone diseases most effectively act through the RANK-RANKL-OPG system. Additionally, we demonstrate that severity of catabolic bone diseases strongly depends on how many components of this pathway are affected. Using optimization algorithms and the theoretical model, we identify a variety of successful "virtual therapies" for different disease states using both single and dual therapies.

  1. Interstitial fluid flow in canaliculi as a mechanical stimulus for cancellous bone remodeling: in silico validation.

    PubMed

    Kameo, Yoshitaka; Adachi, Taiji

    2014-08-01

    Cancellous bone has a dynamic 3-dimensional architecture of trabeculae, the arrangement of which is continually reorganized via bone remodeling to adapt to the mechanical environment. Osteocytes are currently believed to be the major mechanosensory cells and to regulate osteoclastic bone resorption and osteoblastic bone formation in response to mechanical stimuli. We previously developed a mathematical model of trabecular bone remodeling incorporating the possible mechanisms of cellular mechanosensing and intercellular communication in which we assumed that interstitial fluid flow activates the osteocytes to regulate bone remodeling. While the proposed model has been validated by the simulation of remodeling of a single trabecula, it remains unclear whether it can successfully represent in silico the functional adaptation of cancellous bone with its multiple trabeculae. In the present study, we demonstrated the response of cancellous bone morphology to uniaxial or bending loads using a combination of our remodeling model with the voxel finite element method. In this simulation, cancellous bone with randomly arranged trabeculae remodeled to form a well-organized architecture oriented parallel to the direction of loading, in agreement with the previous simulation results and experimental findings. These results suggested that our mathematical model for trabecular bone remodeling enables us to predict the reorganization of cancellous bone architecture from cellular activities. Furthermore, our remodeling model can represent the phenomenological law of bone transformation toward a locally uniform state of stress or strain at the trabecular level.

  2. Effects of loading frequency on the functional adaptation of trabeculae predicted by bone remodeling simulation.

    PubMed

    Kameo, Yoshitaka; Adachi, Taiji; Hojo, Masaki

    2011-08-01

    The process of bone remodeling is regulated by metabolic activities of many bone cells. While osteoclasts and osteoblasts are responsible for bone resorption and formation, respectively, activities of these cells are believed to be controlled by a mechanosensory system of osteocytes embedded in the extracellular bone matrix. Several experimental and theoretical studies have suggested that the strain-derived interstitial fluid flow in lacuno-canalicular porosity serves as the prime mover for bone remodeling. Previously, we constructed a mathematical model for trabecular bone remodeling that interconnects the microscopic cellular activities with the macroscopic morphological changes in trabeculae through the mechanical hierarchy. This model assumes that fluid-induced shear stress acting on osteocyte processes is a driving force for bone remodeling. The validity of this model has been demonstrated with a remodeling simulation using a two-dimensional trabecular model. In this study, to investigate the effects of loading frequency, which is thought to be a significant mechanical factor in bone remodeling, we simulated morphological changes of a three-dimensional single trabecula under cyclic uniaxial loading with various frequencies. The results of the simulation show the trabecula reoriented to the loading direction with the progress of bone remodeling. Furthermore, as the imposed loading frequency increased, the diameter of the trabecula in the equilibrium state was enlarged by remodeling. These results indicate that our simulation model can successfully evaluate the relationship between loading frequency and trabecular bone remodeling.

  3. Simulating Bone Loss in Microgravity Using Mathematical Formulations of Bone Remodeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennline, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Most mathematical models of bone remodeling are used to simulate a specific bone disease, by disrupting the steady state or balance in the normal remodeling process, and to simulate a therapeutic strategy. In this work, the ability of a mathematical model of bone remodeling to simulate bone loss as a function of time under the conditions of microgravity is investigated. The model is formed by combining a previously developed set of biochemical, cellular dynamics, and mechanical stimulus equations in the literature with two newly proposed equations; one governing the rate of change of the area of cortical bone tissue in a cross section of a cylindrical section of bone and one governing the rate of change of calcium in the bone fluid. The mechanical stimulus comes from a simple model of stress due to a compressive force on a cylindrical section of bone which can be reduced to zero to mimic the effects of skeletal unloading in microgravity. The complete set of equations formed is a system of first order ordinary differential equations. The results of selected simulations are displayed and discussed. Limitations and deficiencies of the model are also discussed as well as suggestions for further research.

  4. [Bone Cell Biology Assessed by Microscopic Approach. The effects of bisphosphonates on bone remodeling, microdamage accumulation and fracture repair process].

    PubMed

    Mashiba, Tasuku

    2015-10-01

    Basically bisphosphonates are the agents that prevent the deterioration of bone structure due to suppressed bone remodeling although they are able to increase the thickness of cortical bone by suppressing bone resorption in the cortical surfaces. On the other hand, suppression of bone remodeling allows microdamage accumulation by impaired repair of damages, therefore, severe remodeling suppression over long time period could promote bone fatigue process, leading to fatigue fractures such as atypical femoral fracture. The use of bisphosphonate after fracture may delays natural fracture healing process due to suppressed callus remodeling. Bisphosphonate that has high binding affinity to bone easily accumulates in bone, therefore, easily causes severely suppressed bone turnover following long term treatment, and its effects last longer even after withdrawal.

  5. Impaired bone remodeling and its correction by combination therapy in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis-I.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Sonja C; Koehne, Till; Cornils, Kerstin; Markmann, Sandra; Riedel, Christoph; Pestka, Jan M; Schweizer, Michaela; Baldauf, Christina; Yorgan, Timur A; Krause, Matthias; Keller, Johannes; Neven, Mona; Breyer, Sandra; Stuecker, Ralf; Muschol, Nicole; Busse, Bjoern; Braulke, Thomas; Fehse, Boris; Amling, Michael; Schinke, Thorsten

    2015-12-15

    Mucopolysaccharidosis-I (MPS-I) is a lysosomal storage disease (LSD) caused by inactivating mutations of IDUA, encoding the glycosaminoglycan-degrading enzyme α-l-iduronidase. Although MPS-I is associated with skeletal abnormalities, the impact of IDUA deficiency on bone remodeling is poorly defined. Here we report that Idua-deficient mice progressively develop a high bone mass phenotype with pathological lysosomal storage in cells of the osteoblast lineage. Histomorphometric quantification identified shortening of bone-forming units and reduced osteoclast numbers per bone surface. This phenotype was not transferable into wild-type mice by bone marrow transplantation (BMT). In contrast, the high bone mass phenotype of Idua-deficient mice was prevented by BMT from wild-type donors. At the cellular level, BMT did not only normalize defects of Idua-deficient osteoblasts and osteocytes but additionally caused increased osteoclastogenesis. Based on clinical observations in an individual with MPS-I, previously subjected to BMT and enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), we treated Idua-deficient mice accordingly and found that combining both treatments normalized all histomorphometric parameters of bone remodeling. Our results demonstrate that BMT and ERT profoundly affect skeletal remodeling of Idua-deficient mice, thereby suggesting that individuals with MPS-I should be monitored for their bone remodeling status, before and after treatment, to avoid long-term skeletal complications.

  6. Sclerostin Promotes Bone Remodeling in the Process of Tooth Movement

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Rui; Bai, Ding; Sheu, Tzongjen; He, Yao; Yang, Xianrui; Xue, Chaoran; He, Yiruo; Zhao, Mengyuan; Han, Xianglong

    2017-01-01

    Tooth movement is a biological process of bone remodeling induced by mechanical force. Sclerostin secreted by osteocytes is mechanosensory and important in bone remodeling. However, little is known regarding the role of sclerostin in tooth movement. In this study, models of experimental tooth movement were established in rats and mice. Sclerostin expression was investigated with immunohistochemistry staining, and osteoclastic activity was analyzed with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells underwent uniaxial compression and tension stress or were cultured in hypoxia conditions. Expression of sclerostin was assessed by RT-qPCR and ELISA. MLO-Y4 cells were cultured with recombinant human sclerostin (rhSCL) interference and then co-cultured with RAW264.7 osteoclast precursor cells. Expressions of RANKL and OPG were analyzed by RT-qPCR, and osteoclastic activity was assessed by TRAP staining. During tooth movement, sclerostin was expressed differently in compression and tension sites. In SOST knock-out mice, there were significantly fewer TRAP-positive cells than in WT mice during tooth movement in compression sites. In-vitro studies showed that the expression of sclerostin in MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells was not different under a uniaxial compression and tension force, whereas hypoxia conditions significantly increased sclerostin expression in MLO-Y4 cells. rhSCL interference increased the expression of RANKL and the RANKL/OPG ratio in MLO-Y4 cells and the osteoclastic induction ability of MLO-Y4 cells in experimental osteocyte-osteoclast co-culture. These data suggest that sclerostin plays an important role in the bone remodeling of tooth movement. PMID:28081119

  7. Sclerostin Promotes Bone Remodeling in the Process of Tooth Movement.

    PubMed

    Shu, Rui; Bai, Ding; Sheu, Tzongjen; He, Yao; Yang, Xianrui; Xue, Chaoran; He, Yiruo; Zhao, Mengyuan; Han, Xianglong

    2017-01-01

    Tooth movement is a biological process of bone remodeling induced by mechanical force. Sclerostin secreted by osteocytes is mechanosensory and important in bone remodeling. However, little is known regarding the role of sclerostin in tooth movement. In this study, models of experimental tooth movement were established in rats and mice. Sclerostin expression was investigated with immunohistochemistry staining, and osteoclastic activity was analyzed with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells underwent uniaxial compression and tension stress or were cultured in hypoxia conditions. Expression of sclerostin was assessed by RT-qPCR and ELISA. MLO-Y4 cells were cultured with recombinant human sclerostin (rhSCL) interference and then co-cultured with RAW264.7 osteoclast precursor cells. Expressions of RANKL and OPG were analyzed by RT-qPCR, and osteoclastic activity was assessed by TRAP staining. During tooth movement, sclerostin was expressed differently in compression and tension sites. In SOST knock-out mice, there were significantly fewer TRAP-positive cells than in WT mice during tooth movement in compression sites. In-vitro studies showed that the expression of sclerostin in MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells was not different under a uniaxial compression and tension force, whereas hypoxia conditions significantly increased sclerostin expression in MLO-Y4 cells. rhSCL interference increased the expression of RANKL and the RANKL/OPG ratio in MLO-Y4 cells and the osteoclastic induction ability of MLO-Y4 cells in experimental osteocyte-osteoclast co-culture. These data suggest that sclerostin plays an important role in the bone remodeling of tooth movement.

  8. Static versus dynamic loads as an influence on bone remodelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyon, L. E.; Rubin, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    Bone remodelling activity in the avian ulna was assessed under conditions of disuse alone, disuse with a superimposed continuous compressive load, and disuse interrupted by a short daily period of intermittent loading. The ulna preparation is made by two submetaphyseal osteotomies, the cut ends of the bone being covered with stainless steel caps which, together with the bone they enclosed, are pierced by pins emerging transcutaneously on the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the wing. The 110 mm long undisturbed section of the bone shaft can be protected from functional loading, loaded continuously in compression by joining the pins with springs, or loaded intermittently in compression by engaging the pins in an Instron machine. Similar loads (525 n) were used in both static and dynamic cases engendering similar peak strains at the bone's midshaft (-2000 x 10-6). The intermitent load was applied at a frequency of 1 Hz during a single 100 second period per day as a ramped square wave, with a rate of change of strain during the ramp of 0.01 per second.

  9. Retinoid Receptors in Bone and Their Role in Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Petra; Conaway, H. Herschel; Lerner, Ulf H.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin A (retinol) is a necessary and important constituent of the body which is provided by food intake of retinyl esters and carotenoids. Vitamin A is known best for being important for vision, but in addition to the eye, vitamin A is necessary in numerous other organs in the body, including the skeleton. Vitamin A is converted to an active compound, all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), which is responsible for most of its biological actions. ATRA binds to intracellular nuclear receptors called retinoic acid receptors (RARα, RARβ, RARγ). RARs and closely related retinoid X receptors (RXRα, RXRβ, RXRγ) form heterodimers which bind to DNA and function as ligand-activated transcription factors. It has been known for many years that hypervitaminosis A promotes skeleton fragility by increasing osteoclast formation and decreasing cortical bone mass. Some epidemiological studies have suggested that increased intake of vitamin A and increased serum levels of retinoids may decrease bone mineral density and increase fracture rate, but the literature on this is not conclusive. The current review summarizes how vitamin A is taken up by the intestine, metabolized, stored in the liver, and processed to ATRA. ATRA’s effects on formation and activity of osteoclasts and osteoblasts are outlined, and a summary of clinical data pertaining to vitamin A and bone is presented. PMID:25814978

  10. The effects of proteasome inhibitors on bone remodeling in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Zangari, Maurizio; Suva, Larry J

    2016-05-01

    Bone disease is a characteristic feature of multiple myeloma, a malignant plasma cell dyscrasia. In patients with multiple myeloma, the normal process of bone remodeling is dysregulated by aberrant bone marrow plasma cells, resulting in increased bone resorption, prevention of new bone formation, and consequent bone destruction. The ubiquitin-proteasome system, which is hyperactive in patients with multiple myeloma, controls the catabolism of several proteins that regulate bone remodeling. Clinical studies have reported that treatment with the first-in-class proteasome inhibitor bortezomib reduces bone resorption and increases bone formation and bone mineral density in patients with multiple myeloma. Since the introduction of bortezomib in 2003, several next-generation proteasome inhibitors have also been used clinically, including carfilzomib, oprozomib, ixazomib, and delanzomib. This review summarizes the available preclinical and clinical evidence regarding the effect of proteasome inhibitors on bone remodeling in multiple myeloma.

  11. Roles of the kidney in the formation, remodeling and repair of bone.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kai; Yin, Zhiwei; Xie, Yuansheng

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between the kidney and bone is highly complex, and the kidney plays an important role in the regulation of bone development and metabolism. The kidney is the major organ involved in the regulation of calcium and phosphate homeostasis, which is essential for bone mineralization and development. Many substances synthesized by the kidney, such as 1,25(OH)2D3, Klotho, bone morphogenetic protein-7, and erythropoietin, are involved in different stages of bone formation, remodeling and repair. In addition, some cytokines which can be affected by the kidney, such as osteoprotegerin, sclerostin, fibroblast growth factor -23 and parathyroid hormone, also play important roles in bone metabolism. In this paper, we summarize the possible effects of these kidney-related cytokines on bone and their possible mechanisms. Most of these cytokines can interact with one another, constituting an intricate network between the kidney and bone. Therefore, kidney diseases should be considered among patients presenting with osteodystrophy and disturbances in bone and mineral metabolism, and treatment for renal dysfunction may accelerate their recovery.

  12. Bone remodelling in Neanderthal mandibles from the El Sidrón site (Asturias, Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Maza, Cayetana; Rosas, Antonio; García-Vargas, Samuel; Estalrrich, Almudena; de la Rasilla, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Skull morphology results from the bone remodelling mechanism that underlies the specific bone growth dynamics. Histological study of the bone surface from Neanderthal mandible specimens of El Sidrón (Spain) provides information about the distribution of the remodelling fields (bone remodelling patterns or BRP) indicative of the bone growth directions. In comparison with other primate species, BRP shows that Neanderthal mandibles from the El Sidrón (Spain) sample present a specific BRP. The interpretation of this map allows inferences concerning the growth directions that explain specific morphological traits of the Neanderthal mandible, such as its quadrangular shape and the posterior location of the mental foramen. PMID:21307043

  13. Bone remodelling in Neanderthal mandibles from the El Sidrón site (Asturias, Spain).

    PubMed

    Martinez-Maza, Cayetana; Rosas, Antonio; García-Vargas, Samuel; Estalrrich, Almudena; de la Rasilla, Marco

    2011-08-23

    Skull morphology results from the bone remodelling mechanism that underlies the specific bone growth dynamics. Histological study of the bone surface from Neanderthal mandible specimens of El Sidrón (Spain) provides information about the distribution of the remodelling fields (bone remodelling patterns or BRP) indicative of the bone growth directions. In comparison with other primate species, BRP shows that Neanderthal mandibles from the El Sidrón (Spain) sample present a specific BRP. The interpretation of this map allows inferences concerning the growth directions that explain specific morphological traits of the Neanderthal mandible, such as its quadrangular shape and the posterior location of the mental foramen.

  14. Model structure and control of bone remodeling: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Pivonka, Peter; Zimak, Jan; Smith, David W; Gardiner, Bruce S; Dunstan, Colin R; Sims, Natalie A; Martin, T John; Mundy, Gregory R

    2008-08-01

    It is generally accepted that RANKL is highly expressed in osteoblast precursor cells while OPG is highly expressed in mature osteoblasts, but to date no functional utility to the BMU has been proposed for this particular ligand-decoy-receptor expression profile. As discovered in the mid 90s, the RANK-RANKL-OPG signaling cascade is a major signaling pathway regulating bone remodeling. In this paper we study theoretically the functional implications of particular RANKL/OPG expression profiles on bone volume. For this purpose we formulate an extended bone-cell dynamics model describing functional behaviour of basic multicellular units (BMUs) responsible for bone resorption and formation. This model incorporates the RANK-RANKL-OPG signaling together with the regulating action of TGF-beta on bone cells. The bone-cell population model employed here builds on the work of Lemaire et al. (2004) [1], but incorporates the following significant modifications: (i) addition of a rate equation describing changes in bone volume with time as the key 'output function' tracking functional behaviour of BMUs, (ii) a rate equation describing release of TGF-beta from the bone matrix, (iii) expression of OPG and RANKL on both osteoblastic cell lines, and (iv) modified activator/repressor functions. Using bone volume as a functional selection criterion, we find that there is a preferred arrangement for ligand expression on particular cell types, and further, that this arrangement coincides with biological observations. We then investigate the model parameter space combinatorially, searching for preferred 'groupings' of changes in differentiation rates of various cell types. Again, a criterion of bone volume change is employed to identify possible ways of optimally controlling BMU responses. While some combinations of changes in differentiation rates are clearly unrealistic, other combinations of changes in differentiation rates are potentially functionally significant. Most importantly

  15. Biological mechanisms of bone and cartilage remodelling--genomic perspective.

    PubMed

    Borovecki, F; Pecina-Slaus, N; Vukicevic, S

    2007-12-01

    Rapid advancements in the field of genomics, enabled by the achievements of the Human Genome Project and the complete decoding of the human genome, have opened an unimaginable set of opportunities for scientists to further unveil delicate mechanisms underlying the functional homeostasis of biological systems. The trend of applying whole-genome analysis techniques has also contributed to a better understanding of physiological and pathological processes involved in homeostasis of bone and cartilage tissues. Gene expression profiling studies have yielded novel insights into the complex interplay of osteoblast and osteoclast regulation, as well as paracrine and endocrine control of bone and cartilage remodelling. Mechanisms of new bone formation responsible for fracture healing and distraction osteogenesis, as well as healing of joint cartilage defects, have also been extensively studied. Microarray experiments have been especially useful in studying pathological processes involved in diseases such as osteoporosis or bone tumours. Existing results show that microarrays hold great promise in areas such as identification of targets for novel therapies or development of new biomarkers and classifiers in skeletal diseases.

  16. Glucocorticoid suppression of osteocyte perilacunar remodeling is associated with subchondral bone degeneration in osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Tristan W.; Acevedo, Claire; Mazur, Courtney M.; Hall-Glenn, Faith; Fields, Aaron J.; Bale, Hrishikesh A.; Ritchie, Robert O.; Lotz, Jeffrey C.; Vail, Thomas P.; Alliston, Tamara

    2017-01-01

    Through a process called perilacunar remodeling, bone-embedded osteocytes dynamically resorb and replace the surrounding perilacunar bone matrix to maintain mineral homeostasis. The vital canalicular networks required for osteocyte nourishment and communication, as well as the exquisitely organized bone extracellular matrix, also depend upon perilacunar remodeling. Nonetheless, many questions remain about the regulation of perilacunar remodeling and its role in skeletal disease. Here, we find that suppression of osteocyte-driven perilacunar remodeling, a fundamental cellular mechanism, plays a critical role in the glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis. In glucocorticoid-treated mice, we find that glucocorticoids coordinately suppress expression of several proteases required for perilacunar remodeling while causing degeneration of the osteocyte lacunocanalicular network, collagen disorganization, and matrix hypermineralization; all of which are apparent in human osteonecrotic lesions. Thus, osteocyte-mediated perilacunar remodeling maintains bone homeostasis, is dysregulated in skeletal disease, and may represent an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of osteonecrosis. PMID:28327602

  17. Canine cortical bone autograft remodeling in two simultaneous skeletal sites.

    PubMed

    Delloye, C; Coutelier, L; Vincent, A; d'Hemricourt, J; Bourgois, R

    1986-01-01

    for fluorescence indicates that new bone deposition is more dependent upon skeletal metabolic activity. Within each graft, porosity and new bone formation were not well correlated. In the ulna, the bone mineral content (BMC) reflected the graft volumetric variations during the remodeling, with the lowest mean value at 3 months. For each graft, BMC was well correlated with the torsional stiffness. When torsionally loaded, the maximal tangential shear stress at failure of the graft was negatively related to its cortical porosity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  18. Informing phenomenological structural bone remodelling with a mechanistic poroelastic model.

    PubMed

    Villette, Claire C; Phillips, Andrew T M

    2016-02-01

    Studies suggest that fluid motion in the extracellular space may be involved in the cellular mechanosensitivity at play in the bone tissue adaptation process. Previously, the authors developed a mesoscale predictive structural model of the femur using truss elements to represent trabecular bone, relying on a phenomenological strain-based bone adaptation algorithm. In order to introduce a response to bending and shear, the authors considered the use of beam elements, requiring a new formulation of the bone adaptation drivers. The primary goal of the study presented here was to isolate phenomenological drivers based on the results of a mechanistic approach to be used with a beam element representation of trabecular bone in mesoscale structural modelling. A single-beam model and a microscale poroelastic model of a single trabecula were developed. A mechanistic iterative adaptation algorithm was implemented based on fluid motion velocity through the bone matrix pores to predict the remodelled geometries of the poroelastic trabecula under 42 different loading scenarios. Regression analyses were used to correlate the changes in poroelastic trabecula thickness and orientation to the initial strain outputs of the beam model. Linear (R(2) > 0.998) and third-order polynomial (R(2) > 0.98) relationships were found between change in cross section and axial strain at the central axis, and between beam reorientation and ratio of bending strain to axial strain, respectively. Implementing these relationships into the phenomenological predictive algorithm for the mesoscale structural femur has the potential to produce a model combining biofidelic structure and mechanical behaviour with computational efficiency.

  19. Assessment of failure of cemented polyethylene acetabular component due to bone remodeling: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajesh

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study is to determine failure of the cemented polyethylene acetabular component, which might occur due to excessive bone resorption, cement-bone interface debonding and fatigue failure of the cement mantle. Three-dimensional finite element models of intact and implanted pelvic bone were developed and bone remodeling algorithm was implemented for present analysis. Soderberg fatigue failure diagram was used for fatigue assessment of the cement mantle. Hoffman failure criterion was considered for prediction of cement-bone interface debonding. Results indicate fatigue failure of the cement mantle and implant-bone interface debonding might not occur due to bone remodeling.

  20. Modulation of gene expression in bone cells during strain-adapted bone remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein-Nulend, J.; Bacabac, R. G.; Vatsa, A.; Tan, S. D.; Smit, Th. H.; van Loon, J. J. W. A.

    2005-08-01

    Bone tissue can adapt to changing mechanical demands. The osteocytes are believed to play a role as the "professional" mechanosensory cells of bone, and the lacuno-canalicular network as the structure that mediates mechanosensing. Loading on bone produces flow of interstitial fluid in the lacunar-canalicular network along the surface of osteocytes, which is likely the physiological signal for bone cell adaptive responses in vivo. The alignment of secondary osteons along the dominant loading direction suggests that bone remodeling is guided by mechanical strain. We propose that alignment during remodeling occurs as a result of different canalicular flow patterns around cutting cone and reversal zone during loading.The response of osteocytes to fluid flow includes prostaglandin synthesis and expression of inducible cyclooxygenase-2, an enzyme that mediates mechanical loading-induced bone formation in vivo. The response of osteocytes to fluid flow also includes nitric oxide production, and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Nitric oxide has been shown to mediate the mechanical effects in bone, leading to enhanced prostaglandin E2 release. These studies have increased our understanding of the cell biology underlying Wolff's Law. This may lead to new strategies for combating disuse-related osteoporosis, such as occurs during long- mission spaceflights.

  1. High-dose therapy improves the bone remodelling compartment canopy coverage and bone formation in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Hinge, Maja; Delaisse, Jean-Marie; Plesner, Torben; Clasen-Linde, Erik; Salomo, Morten; Andersen, Thomas Levin

    2015-11-01

    Bone loss in multiple myeloma (MM) is caused by an uncoupling of bone formation to resorption trigged by malignant plasma cells. Increasing evidence indicates that the bone remodelling compartment (BRC) canopy, which normally covers the remodelling sites, is important for coupled bone remodelling. Loss of this canopy has been associated with bone loss. This study addresses whether the bone remodelling in MM is improved by high-dose therapy. Bone marrow biopsies obtained from 20 MM patients, before and after first-line treatment with high-dose melphalan followed by autologous stem cell transplantation, and from 20 control patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance were histomorphometrically investigated. This investigation confirmed that MM patients exhibited uncoupled bone formation to resorption and reduced canopy coverage. More importantly, this study revealed that a good response to anti-myeloma treatment increased the extent of formative bone surfaces with canopy, and reduced the extent of eroded surfaces without canopy, reverting the uncoupled bone remodelling, while improving canopy coverage. The association between improved coupling and the canopy coverage supports the notion that canopies are critical for the coupling of bone formation to resorption. Furthermore, this study supports the observation that systemic bone disease in MM can be reversed in MM patients responding to anti-myeloma treatment.

  2. On the Use of Bone Remodelling Models to Estimate the Density Distribution of Bones. Uniqueness of the Solution.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Reina, Javier; Ojeda, Joaquín; Mayo, Juana

    2016-01-01

    Bone remodelling models are widely used in a phenomenological manner to estimate numerically the distribution of apparent density in bones from the loads they are daily subjected to. These simulations start from an arbitrary initial distribution, usually homogeneous, and the density changes locally until a bone remodelling equilibrium is achieved. The bone response to mechanical stimulus is traditionally formulated with a mathematical relation that considers the existence of a range of stimulus, called dead or lazy zone, for which no net bone mass change occurs. Implementing a relation like that leads to different solutions depending on the starting density. The non-uniqueness of the solution has been shown in this paper using two different bone remodelling models: one isotropic and another anisotropic. It has also been shown that the problem of non-uniqueness is only mitigated by removing the dead zone, but it is not completely solved unless the bone formation and bone resorption rates are limited to certain maximum values.

  3. Osteoblastic Wnts differentially regulate bone remodeling and the maintenance of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yong; Lu, Cheng; Cao, Jingjing; Zhou, Rujiang; Yao, Yiyun; Yu, Jian; Zhang, Lingling; Zhao, Haixia; Li, Hanjun; Zhao, Jianzhi; Zhu, Xuming; He, Lin; Liu, Yongzhong; Yao, Zhengju; Yang, Xiao; Guo, Xizhi

    2013-07-01

    Wnt signaling has important roles in embryonic bone development and postnatal bone remodeling, but inconsistent impact on bone property is observed in different genetic alterations of Lrp5 and β-catenin. More importantly, it is still controversial whether Lrp5 regulate bone formation locally or globally through gut-derived serotonin. Here we explored the function of Wnt proteins in osteoblastic niche through inactivation of the Wntless (Wls) gene, which abrogates the secretion of Wnts. The depletion of Wls in osteoblast progenitor cells resulted in severe osteopenia with more profound defects in osteoblastogenesis, osteoclastogenesis and maintenance of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) compared to that observed in Lrp5 and β-catenin mutants. These findings support the point of view that Wnt/Lrp5 signaling locally regulates bone mass accrual through multiple effects of osteoblastic Wnts on osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption. Moreover, osteoblastic Wnts confer a niche role for maintenance of BMSCs, providing novel cues for the definition of BMSCs niche in bone marrow.

  4. Exploring the Bone Proteome to Help Explain Altered Bone Remodeling and Preservation of Bone Architecture and Strength in Hibernating Marmots.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Alison H; Roteliuk, Danielle M; Gookin, Sara E; McGrew, Ashley K; Broccardo, Carolyn J; Condon, Keith W; Prenni, Jessica E; Wojda, Samantha J; Florant, Gregory L; Donahue, Seth W

    2016-01-01

    Periods of physical inactivity increase bone resorption and cause bone loss and increased fracture risk. However, hibernating bears, marmots, and woodchucks maintain bone structure and strength, despite being physically inactive for prolonged periods annually. We tested the hypothesis that bone turnover rates would decrease and bone structural and mechanical properties would be preserved in hibernating marmots (Marmota flaviventris). Femurs and tibias were collected from marmots during hibernation and in the summer following hibernation. Bone remodeling was significantly altered in cortical and trabecular bone during hibernation with suppressed formation and no change in resorption, unlike the increased bone resorption that occurs during disuse in humans and other animals. Trabecular bone architecture and cortical bone geometrical and mechanical properties were not different between hibernating and active marmots, but bone marrow adiposity was significantly greater in hibernators. Of the 506 proteins identified in marmot bone, 40 were significantly different in abundance between active and hibernating marmots. Monoaglycerol lipase, which plays an important role in fatty acid metabolism and the endocannabinoid system, was 98-fold higher in hibernating marmots compared with summer marmots and may play a role in regulating the changes in bone and fat metabolism that occur during hibernation.

  5. Determinants of ovine compact bone viscoelastic properties: effects of architecture, mineralization, and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Les, C M; Spence, C A; Vance, J L; Christopherson, G T; Patel, B; Turner, A S; Divine, G W; Fyhrie, D P

    2004-09-01

    Significant decreases in ovine compact bone viscoelastic properties (specifically, stress-rate sensitivity, and damping efficiency) are associated with three years of ovariectomy and are particularly evident at higher frequencies [Proc. Orthop. Res. Soc. 27 (2002) 89]. It is unclear what materials or architectural features of bone are responsible for either the viscoelastic properties themselves, or for the changes in those properties that were observed with estrogen depletion. In this study, we examined the relationship between these viscoelastic mechanical properties and features involving bone architecture (BV/TV), materials parameters (ash density, %mineralization), and histologic evidence of remodeling (%remodeled, cement line interface). The extent of mineralization was inversely proportional to the material's efficiency in damping stress oscillations. The damping characteristics of bone material from ovariectomized animals were significantly more sensitive to variation in mineralization than was bone from control animals. At low frequencies (6 Hz or less), increased histologic evidence of remodeling was positively correlated with increased damping efficiency. However, the dramatic decreases in stress-rate sensitivity that accompanied 3-year ovariectomy were seen throughout the bone structure and occurred even in areas with little or no secondary Haversian remodeling as well as in areas of complete remodeling. Taken together, these data suggest that, while the mineral component may modify the viscoelastic behavior of bone, the basic mechanism underlying bone viscoelastic behavior, and of the changes in that behavior with estrogen depletion, reside in a non-mineral component of the bone that can be significantly altered in the absence of secondary remodeling.

  6. Does Simulated Spaceflight Modify Epigenetic Status During Bone Remodeling?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Nicholas J.; Stevick, Rebecca J.; Tran, Luan H.; Nalavadi, Mohit O.; Almeida, Eduardo A.C.; Globus, Ruth K.; Alwood, Joshua S.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of spaceflight conditions on epigenetics. The term epigenetics describes changes to the genome that can affect expression of a gene without changes to the sequence of DNA. Epigenetic processes are thought to underlie cellular differentiation, where transcription of specific genes occurs in response to key stimuli, and may be heritable - passing from one cell to its daughter cell. We hypothesize that the mechanical environment during spaceflight, namely microgravity-induced weightlessness or exercise regulate gene expression in the osteoblast-lineage cells both to control bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts, which continually shapes bone structure throughout life. Similarly we intend to evaluate how radiation regulates these same bone cell activity and differentiation related genes. We further hypothesize that the regulation in bone cell gene expression is at least partially controlled through epigenetic mechanisms of methylation or small non-coding RNA (microRNAs). We have acquired preliminary data suggesting that global genome methylation is modified in response to axial compression of the tibia - a model of exercise. We intend to pursue these hypotheses wherein we will evaluate changes in gene expression and, congruently, changes in epigenetic state in bones from mice subjected to the aforementioned conditions: hindlimb unloading to simulate weightlessness, axial compression of the tibia, or radiation exposure in order to gain insight into the role of epigenetics in spaceflight-induced bone loss.

  7. Trabecular bone remodelling simulation considering osteocytic response to fluid-induced shear stress.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Taiji; Kameo, Yoshitaka; Hojo, Masaki

    2010-06-13

    In bone functional adaptation by remodelling, osteocytes in the lacuno-canalicular system are believed to play important roles in the mechanosensory system. Under dynamic loading, bone matrix deformation generates an interstitial fluid flow in the lacuno-canalicular system; this flow induces shear stress on the osteocytic process membrane that is known to stimulate the osteocytes. In this sense, the osteocytes behave as mechanosensors and deliver mechanical information to neighbouring cells through the intercellular communication network. In this study, bone remodelling is assumed to be regulated by the mechanical signals collected by the osteocytes. From the viewpoint of multi-scale biomechanics, we propose a mathematical model of trabecular bone remodelling that takes into account the osteocytic mechanosensory network system. Based on this model, a computational simulation of trabecular bone remodelling was conducted for a single trabecula under cyclic uniaxial loading, demonstrating functional adaptation to the applied mechanical loading as a load-bearing construct.

  8. The Digital Astronaut Project Computational Bone Remodeling Model (Beta Version) Bone Summit Summary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennline, James; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2013-01-01

    changes in bone cell populations that remove and replace bone in packets within the bone region. The DAP bone model is unique in several respects. In particular in takes former models of volume fraction changes one step higher in fidelity and separates BVF into separate equations for mineralized and osteoid volume fractions governed by a mineralization rate. This more closely follows the physiology of the remodeling unit cycles where bone is first resorbed and then followed by the action of osteoblasts to lay down collagen matrix which eventually becomes mineralized. In another respect, the modules allow the functional description of the time rate of change of other parameters and variables in the model during a computational simulation. More detailed description of the model, preliminary validation results, current limitation and caveats, and planned advancements are provided in sections 2 through 5. The DAP bone model is being developed primarily as a research tool, and not as a clinical tool like QCT. Even if it transitions to a clinical tool, it is not intended to replace QCT or any other clinical tool. Moreover, the DAP bone model does not predict bone fracture. Its purpose is to provide valuable additional data via "forward prediction" simulations for during and after spaceflight missions to gain insight on, (1) mechanisms of bone demineralization in microgravity, and (2) the volumetric changes at the various bone sites in response to in-flight and post-flight exercise countermeasures. This data can then be used as input to the Keyak [8] (or equivalent) FE analysis method to gain insight on how bone strength may change during and after flight. This information can also be useful to help optimize exercise countermeasure protocols to minimize changes in bone strength during flight, and improve regain of bone strength post-flight. To achieve this goal, the bone model will be integrated with DAP's exercise countermeasure models to simulate the effect of exercise

  9. The Effect of Irradiation on Bone Remodelling and the Structural Integrity of the Vertebral Column

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    1965. Schantz, A, AL Schiller and SP Kadish. Localized aplasia in irradiated vertebral bone marrow: A frequently overlooked gross observation. Arch...undergo the bone remodelling sequence together bone marrow-the soft, fatty substance filling the medullary cavaties and spongy extremities of the long

  10. Finite element representation of bone substitute remodelling in the jaw bone.

    PubMed

    Gedrange, Tomasz; Mai, Ronald; Weingaertner, Jens; Hietschold, Volker; Bourauel, Christoph; Pradel, Winnie; Lauer, Günter; Proff, Peter

    2008-10-01

    The finite element (FE) method was originally developed on a physical basis for the computation of structure-mechanical problems. Meanwhile, it has been widely applied to medical issues. This study sought a suitable method to build a FE model for remodelling processes in osseous defects supplemented with bone substitute material. For this purpose, the second right premolars were extracted from four pig mandibles (Sus scrofa domesticus) and the extraction alveoli were provided with synthetic bone substitute material. After 70 days, a segmented osteotomy of this area was performed for specimen collection. Radiographs of the specimens were taken in defined planes before and after fixation and embedded with Technovit 9100. Fixation-related shrinkage was quantified from the radiographs using reference lines. Computer tomographic (CT) and microCT images of the fixed and embedded specimens were obtained. From these data, a FE model was built. The construction of a FE model is sufficient to represent bone remodelling after supply of bone substitute material. The use of microCT data permits building a clearly more precise model.

  11. Preventing Cartilage Degeneration in Warfighters by Elucidating Novel Mechanisms Regulating Osteocyte-Mediated Perilacunar Bone Remodeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    in healthy bone or in disease. Therefore, we will test the hypothesis that mechanical load and TGFβ signaling interact to regulate PLR, and that this...Requirements……………………..……………11 9. Appendices……………………………………………………….……11 2   1. INTRODUCTION Bone and cartilage cooperate to support healthy joint...known to remodel the local bone environment through a process called perilacunar remodeling (PLR). PLR is important for maintaining bone quality. We

  12. Modalities for Visualization of Cortical Bone Remodeling: The Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Kimberly D; Cooper, David M L

    2015-01-01

    Bone's ability to respond to load-related phenomena and repair microdamage is achieved through the remodeling process, which renews bone by activating groups of cells known as basic multicellular units (BMUs). The products of BMUs, secondary osteons, have been extensively studied via classic two-dimensional techniques, which have provided a wealth of information on how histomorphology relates to skeletal structure and function. Remodeling is critical in maintaining healthy bone tissue; however, in osteoporotic bone, imbalanced resorption results in increased bone fragility and fracture. With increasing life expectancy, such degenerative bone diseases are a growing concern. The three-dimensional (3D) morphology of BMUs and their correlation to function, however, are not well-characterized and little is known about the specific mechanisms that initiate and regulate their activity within cortical bone. We believe a key limitation has been the lack of 3D information about BMU morphology and activity. Thus, this paper reviews methodologies for 3D investigation of cortical bone remodeling and, specifically, structures associated with BMU activity (resorption spaces) and the structures they create (secondary osteons), spanning from histology to modern ex vivo imaging modalities, culminating with the growing potential of in vivo imaging. This collection of papers focuses on the theme of "putting the 'why' back into bone architecture." Remodeling is one of two mechanisms "how" bone structure is dynamically modified and thus an improved 3D understanding of this fundamental process is crucial to ultimately understanding the "why."

  13. Remodeling of the Mandibular Bone Induced by Overdentures Supported by Different Numbers of Implants.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Xin, Haitao; Zhao, Yanfang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Wu, Yulu

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the process of mandibular bone remodeling induced by implant-supported overdentures. computed tomography (CT) images were collected from edentulous patients to reconstruct the geometry of the mandibular bone and overdentures supported by implants. Based on the theory of strain energy density (SED), bone remodeling models were established using the user material subroutine (UMAT) in abaqus. The stress distribution in the mandible and bone density change was investigated to determine the effect of implant number on the remodeling of the mandibular bone. The results indicated that the areas where high Mises stress values were observed were mainly situated around the implants. The stress was concentrated in the distal neck region of the distal-most implants. With an increased number of implants, the biting force applied on the dentures was almost all taken up by implants. The stress and bone density in peri-implant bone increased. When the stress reached the threshold of remodeling, the bone density began to decrease. In the posterior mandible area, the stress was well distributed but increased with decreased implant numbers. Changes in bone density were not observed in this area. The computational results were consistent with the clinical data. The results demonstrate that the risk of bone resorption around the distal-most implants increases with increased numbers of implants and that the occlusal force applied to overdentures should be adjusted to be distributed more in the distal areas of the mandible.

  14. In vivo monitoring of bone architecture and remodeling after implant insertion: The different responses of cortical and trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Li, Zihui; Kuhn, Gisela; von Salis-Soglio, Marcella; Cooke, Stephen J; Schirmer, Michael; Müller, Ralph; Ruffoni, Davide

    2015-12-01

    The mechanical integrity of the bone-implant system is maintained by the process of bone remodeling. Specifically, the interplay between bone resorption and bone formation is of paramount importance to fully understand the net changes in bone structure occurring in the peri-implant bone, which are eventually responsible for the mechanical stability of the bone-implant system. Using time-lapsed in vivo micro-computed tomography combined with new composite material implants, we were able to characterize the spatio-temporal changes of bone architecture and bone remodeling following implantation in living mice. After insertion, implant stability was attained by a quick and substantial thickening of the cortical shell which counteracted the observed loss of trabecular bone, probably due to the disruption of the trabecular network. Within the trabecular compartment, the rate of bone formation close to the implant was transiently higher than far from the implant mainly due to an increased mineral apposition rate which indicated a higher osteoblastic activity. Conversely, in cortical bone, the higher rate of bone formation close to the implant compared to far away was mostly related to the recruitment of new osteoblasts as indicated by a prevailing mineralizing surface. The behavior of bone resorption also showed dissimilarities between trabecular and cortical bone. In the former, the rate of bone resorption was higher in the peri-implant region and remained elevated during the entire monitoring period. In the latter, bone resorption rate had a bigger value away from the implant and decreased with time. Our approach may help to tune the development of smart implants that can attain a better long-term stability by a local and targeted manipulation of the remodeling process within the cortical and the trabecular compartments and, particularly, in bone of poor health.

  15. Nicotine effect on bone remodeling during orthodontic tooth movement: Histological study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shintcovsk, Ricardo Lima; Knop, Luégya; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro; Maruo, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nicotine is harmful to angiogenesis, osteogenesis and synthesis of collagen. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nicotine on bone remodeling during orthodontic movement in rats. Methods Eighty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: Group C (control), group CM (with orthodontic movement) and group NM (nicotine with orthodontic movement) groups. The animals comprising groups C and CM received 0.9% saline solution while group NM received nicotine solution (2 mg/kg). A nickel-titanium closed-coil spring was used to induce tooth movement. The animals were euthanized and tissue specimens were processed histologically. We quantified blood vessels, Howship's lacunae and osteoclast-like cells present in the tension and compression areas of periodontal ligaments. The extent of bone formation was evaluated under polarized light to determine the percentage of immature/mature collagen. Results We observed lower blood vessel densities in the NM group in comparison to the CM group, three (p < 0.001) and seven (p < 0.05) days after force application. Osteoclast-like cells and Howship's lacunae in the NM group presented lower levels of expression in comparison to the CM group, with significant differences on day 7 (p < 0.05 for both variables) and day 14 (p < 0.05 for osteoclast-like cells and p < 0.01 for Howship's lacunae). The percentage of immature collagen increased in the NM group in comparison to the CM group with a statistically significant difference on day 3 (p < 0.05), day 7 (p < 0.001), day 14 (p < 0.001) and day 21 (p < 0.001). Conclusions Nicotine affects bone remodeling during orthodontic movement, reducing angiogenesis, osteoclast-like cells and Howship's lacunae, thereby delaying the collagen maturation process in developed bone matrix. PMID:24945520

  16. Remodelling of bone and bones: effects of translation and strain on transplants.

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, A. W.; Feik, S. A.; Storey, E.

    1984-01-01

    Tail segments, from 4-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats, consisting of caudal vertebrae (CV) approximately 7-9 were impaled on 0.23-mm diameter Elgiloy wire and transplanted subcutaneously into 50-70 g male hosts to study the effects on transplants of (a) impaling (b) strain and (c) translation. The CV were impaled onto straight lengths of wire to serve as controls (a); onto a wire curved to form a loop and exert a bending force (b) and onto the arms of a spring which moved bones through the surrounding tissues, i.e. translation (c). Tissue changes were studied up to 28 days by radiographic and histological techniques. Control bones grow relatively normally along the straight wire. The CV subjected to strain bend initially and then grow in an arc along the curve of the wire. The outer bone shaft usually becomes straighter while the inner one becomes concave and rarefied. In the translated bones remodelling occurs in a direction generally opposite to the direction of movement but this is modified by the influence of soft tissue tension and pressure. Bone resorbs on the outer leading side under continuous pressure and forms on the inner trailing side under continuous tension. The process is essentially the same as that seen in 'cortical drift'; however, since translation is rapid there is an alteration in the shape of the translated bones as formation on the trailing side is faster than resorption on the leading side.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 3 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 PMID:6388616

  17. Tooth dentin defects reflect genetic disorders affecting bone mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Vital, S. Opsahl; Gaucher, C.; Bardet, C.; Rowe, P.S.; George, A.; Linglart, A.; Chaussain, C.

    2012-01-01

    Several genetic disorders affecting bone mineralization may manifest during dentin mineralization. Dentin and bone are similar in several aspects, especially pertaining to the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) which is secreted by well-differentiated odontoblasts and osteoblasts, respectively. However, unlike bone, dentin is not remodelled and is not involved in the regulation of calcium and phosphate metabolism. In contrast to bone, teeth are accessible tissues with the shedding of deciduous teeth and the extractions of premolars and third molars for orthodontic treatment. The feasibility of obtaining dentin makes this a good model to study biomineralization in physiological and pathological conditions. In this review, we focus on two genetic diseases that disrupt both bone and dentin mineralization. Hypophosphatemic rickets is related to abnormal secretory proteins involved in the ECM organization of both bone and dentin, as well as in the calcium and phosphate metabolism. Osteogenesis imperfecta affects proteins involved in the local organization of the ECM. In addition, dentin examination permits evaluation of the effects of the systemic treatment prescribed to hypophosphatemic patients during growth. In conclusion, dentin constitutes a valuable tool for better understanding of the pathological processes affecting biomineralization. PMID:22296718

  18. On the Use of Bone Remodelling Models to Estimate the Density Distribution of Bones. Uniqueness of the Solution

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Reina, Javier; Ojeda, Joaquín; Mayo, Juana

    2016-01-01

    Bone remodelling models are widely used in a phenomenological manner to estimate numerically the distribution of apparent density in bones from the loads they are daily subjected to. These simulations start from an arbitrary initial distribution, usually homogeneous, and the density changes locally until a bone remodelling equilibrium is achieved. The bone response to mechanical stimulus is traditionally formulated with a mathematical relation that considers the existence of a range of stimulus, called dead or lazy zone, for which no net bone mass change occurs. Implementing a relation like that leads to different solutions depending on the starting density. The non-uniqueness of the solution has been shown in this paper using two different bone remodelling models: one isotropic and another anisotropic. It has also been shown that the problem of non-uniqueness is only mitigated by removing the dead zone, but it is not completely solved unless the bone formation and bone resorption rates are limited to certain maximum values. PMID:26859888

  19. Distribution of bone remodeling units in the otic capsule of the rabbit. A semiquantitative morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, M S; Jørgensen, M B; Bretlau, P

    1992-01-01

    Distribution of bone remodeling units (BRU) in relation to the perilymphatic space was studied in undecalcified temporal bones from adult rabbits labeled in vivo with bone-seeking fluorochromes. Based on recordings of focal bone formation, relative densities of BRUs inside concentric tissue zones around the inner ear spaces were estimated. Zonal densities of BRUs were found to decline towards the perilymphatic space, lending further support to the existence of a local inner ear mechanism in control of capsular bone tissue dynamics. The possible nature of this mechanism is considered briefly with special reference to inner ear electromechanic activity.

  20. Monitoring in vivo (re)modeling: a computational approach using 4D microCT data to quantify bone surface movements.

    PubMed

    Birkhold, Annette I; Razi, Hajar; Weinkamer, Richard; Duda, Georg N; Checa, Sara; Willie, Bettina M

    2015-06-01

    Bone undergoes continual damage repair and structural adaptation to changing external loads with the aim of maintaining skeletal integrity throughout life. The ability to monitor bone (re)modeling would allow for a better understanding in how various pathologies and interventions affect bone turnover and subsequent bone strength. To date, however, current methods to monitor bone (re)modeling over time and in space are limited. We propose a novel method to visualize and quantify bone turnover, based on in vivo microCT imaging and a 4D computational approach. By in vivo tracking of spatially correlated formation and resorption sites over time it classifies bone restructuring into (re)modeling sequences, the spatially and temporally linked sequences of formation, resorption and quiescent periods on the bone surface. The microCT based method was validated using experimental data from an in vivo mouse tibial loading model and ex vivo data of the mouse tibia. In this application, the method allows the visualization of time-resolved cortical (re)modeling and the quantification of short-term and long-term modeling on the endocortical and periosteal surface at the mid-diaphysis of loaded and control mice tibiae. Both short-term and long-term modeling processes, independent formation and resorption events, could be monitored and modeling (spatially not correlated formation and resorption) and remodeling (resorption followed by new formation at the same site) could be distinguished on the bone surface. This novel method that combines in vivo microCT with a computational approach is a powerful tool to monitor bone turnover in animal models now and is waiting to be applied to human patients in the near future.

  1. Miniplates and mini-implants: bone remodeling as their biological foundation1

    PubMed Central

    Consolaro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The tridimensional network formed by osteocytes controls bone design by coordinating cell activity on trabecular and cortical bone surfaces, especially osteoblasts and clasts. Miniplates and mini-implants provide anchorage, allowing all other orthodontic and orthopedic components, albeit afar, to deform and stimulate the network of osteocytes to command bone design remodeling upon "functional demand" established by force and its vectors. By means of transmission of forces, whether near or distant, based on anchorage provided by miniplates, it is possible to change the position, shape and size as well as the relationship established between the bones of the jaws. Understanding bone biology and the continuous remodeling of the skeleton allows the clinician to perform safe and accurate rehabilitation treatment of patients, thus increasing the possibilities and types of intervention procedures to be applied in order to restore patient's esthetics and function. PMID:26691966

  2. Cyclical behavior of bone remodeling and bone loss in healthy women after menopause: results of a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Mazzuoli, G; Marinucci, D; D'erasmo, E; Acca, M; Pisani, D; Rinaldi, M G; Bianchi, G; Diacinti, D; Minisola, S

    2002-12-01

    Annual changes in lumbar bone mineral density (LBMD) and bone remodeling markers were measured in 238 healthy pre- and postmenopausal women, aged 45-74 years. The subjects were divided into groups according to their menstrual status and years since menopause. The results obtained indicate that bone loss is not a constant process over time but rather exhibits cyclical damping oscillations. When the log-linear trend of LBMD decrement was transformed into a constant by considering annual percentage changes, the presence of a cyclical component of 7 years was evident. By employing a harmonic regression model, the cyclical component was also statistically significant on baseline data. The cyclical behavior of LBMD decrement corresponded to an analogous behavior of the bone remodeling markers. These results suggest that a lack of estrogen acts as a synchronizer on bone remodeling by triggering a latent cyclical rhythm of bone loss that persists throughout life after menopause. The existence of a chronobiological rhythm of bone loss starting after menopause, if confirmed, could have important clinical implications.

  3. Activity and loading influence the predicted bone remodeling around cemented hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Alexander S

    2014-04-01

    Periprosthetic bone remodeling is frequently observed after total hip replacement. Reduced bone density increases the implant and bone fracture risk, and a gross loss of bone density challenges fixation in subsequent revision surgery. Computational approaches allow bone remodeling to be predicted in agreement with the general clinical observations of proximal resorption and distal hypertrophy. However, these models do not reproduce other clinically observed bone density trends, including faster stabilizing mid-stem density losses, and loss-recovery trends around the distal stem. These may resemble trends in postoperative joint loading and activity, during recovery and rehabilitation, but the established remodeling prediction approach is often used with identical pre- and postoperative load and activity assumptions. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the influence of pre- to postoperative changes in activity and loading upon the predicted progression of remodeling. A strain-adaptive finite element model of a femur implanted with a cemented Charnley stem was generated, to predict 60 months of periprosthetic remodeling. A control set of model input data assumed identical pre- and postoperative loading and activity, and was compared to the results obtained from another set of inputs with three varying activity and load profiles. These represented activity changes during rehabilitation for weak, intermediate and strong recoveries, and pre- to postoperative joint force changes due to hip center translation and the use of walking aids. Predicted temporal bone density change trends were analyzed, and absolute bone density changes and the time to homeostasis were inspected, alongside virtual X-rays. The predicted periprosthetic bone density changes obtained using modified loading inputs demonstrated closer agreement with clinical measurements than the control. The modified inputs also predicted the clinically observed temporal density change trends, but still under

  4. Bone Status in Patients with Epilepsy: Relationship to Markers of Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Sherifa A.; Moussa, Ehab M. M.; Youssef, Ahmad H.; Abd ElHameed, Mohammed A.; NasrEldin, Eman

    2014-01-01

    Patients with epilepsy and treated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) may develop metabolic bone disease; however, the exact pathogenesis of bone loss with AEDs is still unclear. Included were 75 adults with epilepsy (mean age: 31.90 ± 5.62 years; duration of treatment with AEDs: 10.57 ± 3.55 years) and 40 matched healthy controls. Bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral densities (BMD) of the femoral neck and lumbar spine were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Blood samples were analyzed for calcium, magnesium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25OHD), soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (sRANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG), and OPG/RANKL ratio (markers of bone remodeling). Compared to controls, patients had lower BMD, BMC, Z-score, and T-score at the femoral neck and lumbar spine (all p < 0.001). Seventy-two percent and 29.33% of patients had osteoporosis of the lumbar spine and femoral neck. Patients had significantly lower serum calcium, 25(OH)D, and OPG and higher ALP, sRANKL levels, and sRANKL/OPG (all p < 0.001). Fifty-two percent of patients had hypocalcemia, 93% had hypovitaminosis D, 31% had high levels of sRANKL, and 49% had low levels of OPG. No differences were identified between DEXA and laboratory results in relation to the type, dose, or serum levels of AEDs. BMD at the femoral neck and lumbar spine were found to be correlated with the duration of illness (p = 0.043; p = 0.010), duration of treatment with AEDs (p < 0.001; p = 0.012), and serum levels of 25(OH)D (p = 0.042; p = 0.010), sRANKLs (p = 0.005; p = 0.01), and OPG (p = 0.006; p = 0.01). In linear regression analysis and after adjusting for gender, age, weight, duration, and number of AEDs, we observed an association between BMD, 25(OH)D (p = 0.04) and sRANKL (p = 0.03) concentrations. We conclude that AEDs may compromise bone health through disturbance

  5. Regional variability in secondary remodeling within long bone cortices of catarrhine primates: the influence of bone growth history.

    PubMed

    McFarlin, Shannon C; Terranova, Carl J; Zihlman, Adrienne L; Enlow, Donald H; Bromage, Timothy G

    2008-09-01

    Secondary intracortical remodeling of bone varies considerably among and within vertebrate skeletons. Although prior research has shed important light on its biomechanical significance, factors accounting for this variability remain poorly understood. We examined regional patterning of secondary osteonal bone in an ontogenetic series of wild-collected primates, at the midshaft femur and humerus of Chlorocebus (Cercopithecus) aethiops (n = 32) and Hylobates lar (n = 28), and the midshaft femur of Pan troglodytes (n = 12). Our major objectives were: 1) to determine whether secondary osteonal bone exhibits significant regional patterning across inner, mid-cortical and outer circumferential cortical rings within cross-sections; and if so, 2) to consider the manner in which this regional patterning may reflect the influence of relative tissue age and other circumstances of bone growth. Using same field-of-view images of 100-microm-thick cross-sections acquired in brightfield and circularly polarized light microscopy, we quantified the percent area of secondary osteonal bone (%HAV) for whole cross-sections and across the three circumferential rings within cross-sections. We expected bone areas with inner and middle rings to exhibit higher %HAV than the outer cortical ring within cross-sections, the latter comprising tissues of more recent depositional history. Observations of primary bone microstructural development provided an additional context in which to evaluate regional patterning of intracortical remodeling. Results demonstrated significant regional variability in %HAV within all skeletal sites. As predicted,%HAV was usually lowest in the outer cortical ring within cross-sections. However, regional patterning across inner vs. mid-cortical rings showed a more variable pattern across taxa, age classes, and skeletal sites examined. Observations of primary bone microstructure revealed that the distribution of endosteally deposited bone had an important influence on

  6. Regional variability in secondary remodeling within long bone cortices of catarrhine primates: the influence of bone growth history

    PubMed Central

    McFarlin, Shannon C; Terranova, Carl J; Zihlman, Adrienne L; Enlow, Donald H; Bromage, Timothy G

    2008-01-01

    Secondary intracortical remodeling of bone varies considerably among and within vertebrate skeletons. Although prior research has shed important light on its biomechanical significance, factors accounting for this variability remain poorly understood. We examined regional patterning of secondary osteonal bone in an ontogenetic series of wild-collected primates, at the midshaft femur and humerus of Chlorocebus (Cercopithecus) aethiops (n = 32) and Hylobates lar (n = 28), and the midshaft femur of Pan troglodytes (n = 12). Our major objectives were: 1) to determine whether secondary osteonal bone exhibits significant regional patterning across inner, mid-cortical and outer circumferential cortical rings within cross-sections; and if so, 2) to consider the manner in which this regional patterning may reflect the influence of relative tissue age and other circumstances of bone growth. Using same field-of-view images of 100-µm-thick cross-sections acquired in brightfield and circularly polarized light microscopy, we quantified the percent area of secondary osteonal bone (%HAV) for whole cross-sections and across the three circumferential rings within cross-sections. We expected bone areas with inner and middle rings to exhibit higher %HAV than the outer cortical ring within cross-sections, the latter comprising tissues of more recent depositional history. Observations of primary bone microstructural development provided an additional context in which to evaluate regional patterning of intracortical remodeling. Results demonstrated significant regional variability in %HAV within all skeletal sites. As predicted,%HAV was usually lowest in the outer cortical ring within cross-sections. However, regional patterning across inner vs. mid-cortical rings showed a more variable pattern across taxa, age classes, and skeletal sites examined. Observations of primary bone microstructure revealed that the distribution of endosteally deposited bone had an important influence on the

  7. Parametric sensitivity analysis applied to a specific one-dimensional internal bone remodelling problem.

    PubMed

    Ramtani, S

    2007-08-01

    The relative importance of the various parameters in inducing bone mass loss and osteoclastic perforations is still controversial. Therefore, there is a significant motivation to better understand the parameters behind such dynamic response, and great interest to carry out a parametric sensitivity study as it can provide useful information. As an application, the widely-accepted bone remodelling equation [M.G. Mullender, R. Huiskes, H. Weinans, A physiological approach to the simulation of bone remodeling as self organizational control process, J. Biomech. 27 (1994) 1389.] is investigated using the "n units" model [M. Zidi, S. Ramtani, Bone remodeling theory applied to the study of n unit-elements model, J Biomech. 32 (1999) 743.]. This analysis pointed out that the power in the modulus density relationship p and the power to which density is raised in normalizing the energy stimulus q, known as strongly implicated in the stability condition of the remodelling process, were also stated as insensitive parameters in the bone loss area.

  8. Integration of a Finite Element Model with the DAP Bone Remodeling Model to Characterize Bone Response to Skeletal Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, Christopher R.; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, J. G.; Pennline, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) has developed a bone remodeling model that has been validated for predicting volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) changes of trabecular and cortical bone in the absence of mechanical loading. The model was recently updated to include skeletal loading from exercise and free living activities to maintain healthy bone using a new daily load stimulus (DLS). This new formula was developed based on an extensive review of existing DLS formulas, as discussed in the abstract by Pennline et al. The DLS formula incorporated into the bone remodeling model utilizes strains and stress calculated from finite element model (FEM) of the bone region of interest. The proximal femur was selected for the initial application of the DLS formula, with a specific focus on the femoral neck. METHODS: The FEM was generated from CAD geometry of a femur using de-identified CT data. The femur was meshed using linear tetrahedral elements Figure (1) with higher mesh densities in the femoral neck region, which is the primary region of interest for the initial application of the DLS formula in concert with the DAP bone remodeling model. Nodal loads were applied to the femoral head and the greater trochanter and the base of the femur was held fixed. An L2 norm study was conducted to reduce the length of the femoral shaft without significantly impacting the stresses in the femoral neck. The material properties of the FEM of the proximal femur were separated between cortical and trabecular regions to work with the bone remodeling model. Determining the elements with cortical material properties in the FEM was based off of publicly available CT hip scans [4] that were segmented, cleaned, and overlaid onto the FEM.

  9. Bone remodeling in the context of cellular and systemic regulation: the role of osteocytes and the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Niedźwiedzki, Tadeusz; Filipowska, Joanna

    2015-10-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue that undergoes constant remodeling. The appropriate course of this process determines development and regeneration of the skeleton. Tight molecular control of bone remodeling is vital for the maintenance of appropriate physiology and microarchitecture of the bone, providing homeostasis, also at the systemic level. The process of remodeling is regulated by a rich innervation of the skeleton, being the source of various growth factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones regulating function of the bone. Although the course of bone remodeling at the cellular level is mainly associated with the activity of osteoclasts and osteoblasts, recently also osteocytes have gained a growing interest as the principal regulators of bone turnover. Osteocytes play a significant role in the regulation of osteogenesis, releasing sclerostin (SOST), an inhibitor of bone formation. The process of bone turnover, especially osteogenesis, is also modulated by extra-skeletal molecules. Proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts are promoted by the brain-derived serotonin and hypothetically inhibited by its intestinal equivalent. The activity of SOST and serotonin is either directly or indirectly associated with the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, the main regulatory pathway of osteoblasts function. The impairment of bone remodeling may lead to many skeletal diseases, such as high bone mass syndrome or osteoporosis. In this paper, we review the most recent data on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of bone remodeling control, with particular emphasis on the role of osteocytes and the nervous system in this process.

  10. Hydrogels That Allow and Facilitate Bone Repair, Remodeling, and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Short, Aaron R.; Koralla, Deepthi; Deshmukh, Ameya; Wissel, Benjamin; Stocker, Benjamin; Calhoun, Mark; Dean, David; Winter, Jessica O.

    2015-01-01

    Bone defects can originate from a variety of causes, including trauma, cancer, congenital deformity, and surgical reconstruction. Success of the current “gold standard” treatment (i.e., autologous bone grafts) is greatly influenced by insufficient or inappropriate bone stock. There is thus a critical need for the development of new, engineered materials for bone repair. This review describes the use of natural and synthetic hydrogels as scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. We discuss many of the advantages that hydrogels offer as bone repair materials, including their potential for osteoconductivity, biodegradability, controlled growth factor release, and cell encapsulation. We also discuss the use of hydrogels in composite devices with metals, ceramics, or polymers. These composites are useful because of the low mechanical moduli of hydrogels. Finally, the potential for thermosetting and photo-cross-linked hydrogels as three-dimensionally (3D) printed, patient-specific devices is highlighted. Three-dimensional printing enables controlled spatial distribution of scaffold materials, cells, and growth factors. Hydrogels, especially natural hydrogels present in bone matrix, have great potential to augment existing bone tissue engineering devices for the treatment of critical size bone defects. PMID:26693013

  11. Twelve Months of Voluntary Heavy Alcohol Consumption in Male Rhesus Macaques Suppresses Intracortical Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gaddini, Gino W.; Grant, Kathleen A.; Woodall, Andrew; Stull, Cara; Maddalozzo, Gianni F.; Zhang, Bo; Turner, Russell T.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic heavy alcohol consumption is a risk factor for cortical bone fractures in males. The increase in fracture risk may be due, in part, to reduced bone quality. Intracortical (osteonal) bone remodeling is the principle mechanism for maintaining cortical bone quality. However, it is not clear how alcohol abuse impacts intracortical bone remodeling. This study investigated the effects of long-duration heavy alcohol consumption on intracortical bone remodeling in a non-human primate model. Following a 4-month induction period, male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta, n = 21) were allowed to voluntarily self-administer water or alcohol (4% ethanol w/v) for 22 h/d, 7 d/wk for 12 months. Control monkeys (n = 13) received water and an isocaloric maltose-dextrin solution. Tetracycline hydrochloride was administered orally 17 and 3 days prior to sacrifice for determination of active mineralization sites. Animals in the alcohol group consumed 2.7 ± 0.2 g alcohol/kg/d (mean ± SE) during the 12 months of self-administration, resulting in a mean daily blood alcohol concentration of 77 ± 9 mg/dl from samples taken at 7 h after the start of a daily session. However, blood alcohol concentration varied widely from day to day, with peak levels exceeding 250 mg/dl, modeling a binge-drinking pattern of alcohol consumption. The skeletal response to alcohol was determined by densitometry, microcomputed tomography and histomorphometry. Significant differences in tibial bone mineral content, bone mineral density, and cortical bone architecture (cross-sectional volume, cortical volume, marrow volume, cortical thickness, and polar moment of inertia) in the tibial diaphysis were not detected with treatment. However, cortical porosity was lower (1.8 ± 0.5 % versus 0.6 ± 0.1 %, p = 0.021) and labeled osteon density was lower (0.41 ± 0.2/mm2 versus 0.04 ± 0.01/mm2, p < 0.003) in alcohol-consuming monkeys compared to controls, indicating a reduced rate of intracortical bone remodeling

  12. Twelve months of voluntary heavy alcohol consumption in male rhesus macaques suppresses intracortical bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Gaddini, Gino W; Grant, Kathleen A; Woodall, Andrew; Stull, Cara; Maddalozzo, Gianni F; Zhang, Bo; Turner, Russell T; Iwaniec, Urszula T

    2015-02-01

    Chronic heavy alcohol consumption is a risk factor for cortical bone fractures in males. The increase in fracture risk may be due, in part, to reduced bone quality. Intracortical (osteonal) bone remodeling is the principle mechanism for maintaining cortical bone quality. However, it is not clear how alcohol abuse impacts intracortical bone remodeling. This study investigated the effects of long-duration heavy alcohol consumption on intracortical bone remodeling in a non-human primate model. Following a 4-month induction period, male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta, n=21) were allowed to voluntarily self-administer water or alcohol (4% ethanol w/v) for 22h/d, 7 d/wk for 12months. Control monkeys (n=13) received water and an isocaloric maltose-dextrin solution. Tetracycline hydrochloride was administered orally 17 and 3days prior to sacrifice for determination of active mineralization sites. Animals in the alcohol group consumed 2.7±0.2g alcohol/kg/d (mean±SE) during the 12months of self-administration, resulting in a mean daily blood alcohol concentration of 77±9mg/dl from samples taken at 7h after the start of a daily session. However, blood alcohol concentration varied widely from day to day, with peak levels exceeding 250mg/dl, modeling a binge-drinking pattern of alcohol consumption. The skeletal response to alcohol was determined by densitometry, microcomputed tomography and histomorphometry. Significant differences in tibial bone mineral content, bone mineral density, and cortical bone architecture (cross-sectional volume, cortical volume, marrow volume, cortical thickness, and polar moment of inertia) in the tibial diaphysis were not detected with treatment. However, cortical porosity was lower (1.8±0.5 % versus 0.6±0.1 %, p=0.021) and labeled osteon density was lower (0.41±0.2/mm(2)versus 0.04±0.01/mm(2), p<0.003) in alcohol-consuming monkeys compared to controls, indicating a reduced rate of intracortical bone remodeling. In concordance, plasma CTx

  13. Prediction of denosumab effects on bone remodeling: A combined pharmacokinetics and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Hambli, Ridha; Boughattas, Mohamed Hafedh; Daniel, Jean-Luc; Kourta, Azeddine

    2016-07-01

    Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that inhibits receptor activator of nuclearfactor-kappa B ligand (RANKL). This key mediator of osteoclast activities has been shown to inhibit osteoclast differentiation and hence, to increase bone mineral density (BMD) in treated patients. In the current study, we develop a computer model to simulate the effects of denosumab treatments (dose and duration) on the proximal femur bone remodeling process quantified by the variation in proximal femur BMD. The simulation model is based on a coupled pharmacokinetics model of denosumab with a pharmacodynamics model consisting of a mechanobiological finite element remodeling model which describes the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. The mechanical behavior of bone is described by taking into account the bone material fatigue damage accumulation and mineralization. A coupled strain-damage stimulus function is proposed which controls the level of bone cell autocrine and paracrine factors. The cellular behavior is based on Komarova et al.׳s (2003) dynamic law which describes the autocrine and paracrine interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts and computes cell population dynamics and changes in bone mass at a discrete site of bone remodeling. Therefore, when an external mechanical stress is applied, bone formation and resorption is governed by cell dynamics rather than by adaptive elasticity approaches. The proposed finite element model was implemented in the finite element code Abaqus (UMAT routine). In order to perform a preliminary validation, in vivo human proximal femurs were selected and scanned at two different time intervals (at baseline and at a 36-month interval). Then, a 3D FE model was generated and the denosumab-remodeling algorithm was applied to the scans at t0 simulating daily walking activities for a duration of 36 months. The predicted results (density variation) were compared to existing published ones performed on a human cohort (FREEDOM).

  14. Osteoprogenitor cells from bone marrow and cortical bone: understanding how the environment affects their fate.

    PubMed

    Corradetti, Bruna; Taraballi, Francesca; Powell, Sebastian; Sung, David; Minardi, Silvia; Ferrari, Mauro; Weiner, Bradley K; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2015-05-01

    Bone is a dynamic organ where skeletal progenitors and hematopoietic cells share and compete for space. Presumptive mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been identified and harvested from the bone marrow (BM-MSC) and cortical bone fragments (CBF-MSC). In this study, we demonstrate that despite the cells sharing a common ancestor, the differences in the structural properties of the resident tissues affect cell behavior and prime them to react differently to stimuli. Similarly to the bone marrow, the cortical portion of the bone contains a unique subset of cells that stains positively for the common MSC-associated markers. These cells display different multipotent differentiation capability, clonogenic expansion, and immunosuppressive potential. In particular, when compared with BM-MSC, CBF-MSC are bigger in size, show a lower proliferation rate at early passages, have a greater commitment toward the osteogenic lineage, constitutively produce nitric oxide as a mediator for bone remodeling, and more readily respond to proinflammatory cytokines. Our data suggest that the effect of the tissue's microenvironment makes the CBF-MSC a superior candidate in the development of new strategies for bone repair.

  15. Homocysteine mediated decrease in bone blood flow and remodeling: role of folic acid.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Neetu; Kandel, Madhavi; Munjal, Charu; Qipshidze, Natia; Vacek, Jonathan C; Pushpakumar, Sathnur B; Metreveli, Naria; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2011-10-01

    Deficiencies in folate lead to increased serum concentrations of homocysteine (Hcy), which is known as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), is associated with bone disorders. Although, Hcy accumulates collagen in bone and contribute to decrease in bone strength. The mechanism of Hcy induced bone loss and remodeling is unclear. Therefore, the present study was aimed to determine the role of folic acid (FA) in genetically HHcy-associated decrease in bone blood flow and remodeling. Wild type (WT) and cystathionine-β-synthase heterozygous (CBS+/-) mice were used in this study and supplemented with or without FA (300 mg/kg, Hcy reducing agent) in drinking water for 6 weeks. The tibial bone blood flow was measured by laser Doppler and ultrasonic flow probe method. The tibial bone density (BD) was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The bone homogenates were analyzed for oxidative stress, NOX-4 as oxidative marker and thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1) as anti-oxidant marker, bone remodeling (MMP-9) and bio-availability of nitric oxide (eNOS/iNOS/NO) by Western blot method. The results suggested that there was decrease in tibial blood flow in CBS+/- mice. The BD was also reduced in CBS+/- mice. There was an increase in NOX-4, iNOS, MMP-9 protein as well as MMP-9 activity in CBS+/- mice and decrease in Trx-1, eNOS protein levels, in part by decreasing NO bio-availability in CBS+/- mice. Interestingly, these effects were ameliorated by FA and suggested that FA supplementation may have therapeutic potential against genetically HHcy induced bone loss.

  16. Strontium ranelate reduces cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone remodeling in rat osteoarthritis model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, De-gang; Ding, Hui-feng; Mao, Yuan-qing; Liu, Ming; Yu, Bo; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Xiao-qing; Li, Yang; Liu, Guang-wang; Nie, Shao-bo; Liu, Shen; Zhu, Zhen-an

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether strontium ranelate (SR), a new antiosteoporotic agent, could attenuate cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone remodeling in osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: Medial meniscal tear (MMT) operation was performed in adult SD rats to induce OA. SR (625 or 1800 mg·kg−1·d−1) was administered via gavage for 3 or 6 weeks. After the animals were sacrificed, articular cartilage degeneration was evaluated using toluidine blue O staining, SOX9 immunohistochemistry and TUNEL assay. The changes in microarchitecture indices and tissue mineral density (TMD), chemical composition (mineral-to-collagen ratio), and intrinsic mechanical properties of the subchondral bones were measured using micro-CT scanning, confocal Raman microspectroscopy and nanoindentation testing, respectively. Results: The high-dose SR significantly attenuated cartilage matrix and chondrocyte loss at 6 weeks, and decreased chondrocyte apoptosis, improved the expression of SOX9, a critical transcription factor responsible for the expression of anabolic genes type II collagen and aggrecan, at both 3 and 6 weeks. Meanwhile, the high-dose SR also significantly attenuated the subchondral bone remodeling at both 3 and 6 weeks, as shown by the improved microarchitecture indices, TMD, mineral-to-collagen ratio and intrinsic mechanical properties. In contrast, the low-dose SR did not significantly change all the detection indices of cartilage and bone at both 3 and 6 weeks. Conclusion: The high-dose SR treatment can reduce articular cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone remodeling in the rat MMT model of OA. PMID:23334238

  17. Knee loading protects against osteonecrosis of the femoral head by enhancing vessel remodeling and bone healing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Daquan; Li, Xinle; Li, Jie; Yang, Jing; Yokota, Hiroki; Zhang, Ping

    2015-12-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a serious orthopedic problem. Moderate loads with knee loading promote bone formation, but their effects on osteonecrosis have not been investigated. Using a rat model, we examined a hypothesis that knee loading enhances vessel remodeling and bone healing through the modulation of the fate of bone marrow-derived cells. In this study, osteonecrosis was induced by transecting the ligamentum teres followed by a tight ligature around the femoral neck. For knee loading, 5 N loads were laterally applied to the knee at 15 Hz for 5 min/day for 5 weeks. Changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) of the femur were measured by pDEXA, and ink infusion was performed to evaluate vessel remodeling. Femoral heads were harvested for histomorphometry, and bone marrow-derived cells were isolated to examine osteoclast development and osteoblast differentiation. The results showed that osteonecrosis significantly induced bone loss, and knee loading stimulated both vessel remodeling and bone healing. The osteonecrosis group exhibited the lowest trabecular BV/TV (p b 0.001) in the femoral head, and lowest femoral BMD and BMC (both p b 0.01). However, knee loading increased trabecular BV/TV (p b 0.05) as well as BMD (pb 0.05) and BMC (p b 0.01). Osteonecrosis decreased the vessel volume (pb 0.001), vessel number (pb 0.001) and VEGF expression (p b 0.01), and knee loading increased them (pb 0.001, pb 0.001 and p b 0.01). Osteonecrosis activated osteoclast development, and knee loading reduced its formation, migration, adhesion and the level of “pit” formation (pb 0.001, pb 0.01, pb 0.001 and pb 0.001). Furthermore, knee loading significantly increased osteoblast differentiation and CFU-F (both p b 0.001). A significantly positive correlation was observed between vessel remodeling and bone healing (both p b 0.01). These results indicate that knee loading could be effective in repair osteonecrosis of the femoral head in a rat

  18. Modulation of bone remodeling via mechanically activated ion channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Randall L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    A critical factor in the maintenance of bone mass is the physical forces imposed upon the skeleton. Removal of these forces, such as in a weightless environment, results in a rapid loss of bone, whereas application of exogenous mechanical strain has been shown to increase bone formation. Numerous flight and ground-based experiments indicate that the osteoblast is the key bone cell influenced by mechanical stimulation. Aside from early transient fluctuations in response to unloading, osteoclast number and activity seem unaffected by removal of strain. However, bone formation is drastically reduced in weightlessness and osteoblasts respond to mechanical strain with an increase in the activity of a number of second messenger pathways resulting in increased anabolic activity. Unfortunately, the mechanism by which the osteoblast converts physical stimuli into a biochemical message, a process we have termed biochemical coupling, remains elusive. Prior to the application of this grant, we had characterized a mechanosensitive, cation nonselective channel (SA-cat) in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells that we proposed is the initial signalling mechanism for mechanotransduction. During the execution of this grant, we have made considerable progress to further characterize this channel as well as to determine its role in the osteoblastic response to mechanical strain. To achieve these goals, we combined electrophysiologic techniques with cellular and molecular biology methods to examine the role of these channels in the normal function of the osteoblast in vitro.

  19. Subchondral bone remodeling: comparing nanofracture with microfracture. An ovine in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    ZEDDE, PIETRO; CUDONI, SEBASTIANO; GIACHETTI, GIACOMO; MANUNTA, MARIA LUCIA; MASALA, GEROLAMO; BRUNETTI, ANTONIO; MANUNTA, ANDREA FABIO

    2016-01-01

    Purpose microfracture, providing direct stimulation of chondrogenic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the subchondral bone, remains the most frequently used primary cartilage repair technique. However, the newly formed type I collagen-rich fibrocartilaginous tissue has poor biomechanical properties and a tendency to degenerate. To overcome these limitations the nanofracture technique was introduced. Our purpose was to compare subchondral bone remodeling 6 months after microfracture versus nanofracture (subchondral needling) treatment in an ovine model. Methods full-thickness chondral lesions were created in the load-bearing area of the medial femoral condyles in four adult sheep. Each animal was then treated on one side with microfracture and on the contralateral side with nanofracture. Subchondral bone remodeling was assessed by micro-CT using a Bruker® SKYSCAN and CTVOX 2.7 software (Bruker Corp., Billerica, MA, USA) for image reconstruction; trabecular bone density measurements were performed through a color-representation structure thickness analysis. Results at the six-month endpoint, the microfracture-treated samples showed limited perforation depth and cone-shaped channels with large diameters at the joint surface. The channel walls displayed a high degree of regularity with significant trabecular bone compaction leading to a sealing effect with limited communication with the surrounding trabecular canals. Condyles treated with nanofracture showed channels characterized by greater depth and smaller diameters and natural irregularities of the channel walls, absence of trabecular compaction around the perforation, remarkable communication with trabecular canals, and neo-trabecular remodeling inside the channels. Conclusions nanofracture is an effective and innovative repair technique allowing deeper perforation into subchondral bone with less trabecular fragmentation and compaction when compared to microfracture; it results in better restoration of the normal

  20. Impact of targeted PPAR gamma disruption on bone remodeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma), known as the master regulator of adipogenesis, has been regarded as a promising target for new anti-osteoporosis therapy due to its role in regulating bone marrow mesenchymal stem/progenitor cell (BMSC) lineage commitment. However, the p...

  1. Evaluation of bone remodeling in regard to the age of scaphoid non-unions

    PubMed Central

    Rein, Susanne; Hanisch, Uwe; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Zwipp, Hans; Rammelt, Stefan; Weindel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyse bone remodeling in regard to the age of scaphoid non-unions (SNU) with immunohistochemistry. METHODS: Thirty-six patients with symptomatic SNU underwent surgery with resection of the pseudarthrosis. The resected material was evaluated histologically after staining with hematoxylin-eosin (HE), tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), CD 68, osteocalcin (OC) and osteopontin (OP). Histological examination was performed in a blinded fashion. RESULTS: The number of multinuclear osteoclasts in the TRAP-staining correlated with the age of the SNU and was significantly higher in younger SNU (P = 0.034; r = 0.75). A higher number of OP-immunoreactive osteoblasts significantly correlated with a higher number of OC-immunoreactive osteoblasts (P = 0.001; r = 0.55). Furthermore, a greater number of OP-immunoreactive osteoblasts correlated significantly with a higher number of OP-immunoreactive multinuclear osteoclasts (P = 0.008; r = 0.43). SNU older than 6 mo showed a significant decrease of the number of fibroblasts (P = 0.04). Smoking and the age of the patients had no influence on bone remodeling in SNU. CONCLUSION: Multinuclear osteoclasts showed a significant decrease in relation to the age of SNU. However, most of the immunhistochemical findings of bone remodeling do not correlate with the age of the SNU. This indicates a permanent imbalance of bone formation and resorption as indicated by a concurrent increase in both osteoblast and osteoclast numbers. A clear histological differentiation into phases of bone remodeling in SNU is not possible. PMID:27458552

  2. Evaluation of bone remodeling around single dental implants of different lengths: a mechanobiological numerical simulation and validation using clinical data.

    PubMed

    Sotto-Maior, Bruno Salles; Mercuri, Emílio Graciliano Ferreira; Senna, Plinio Mendes; Assis, Neuza Maria Souza Picorelli; Francischone, Carlos Eduardo; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha

    2016-01-01

    Algorithmic models have been proposed to explain adaptive behavior of bone to loading; however, these models have not been applied to explain the biomechanics of short dental implants. Purpose of present study was to simulate bone remodeling around single implants of different lengths using mechanoregulatory tissue differentiation model derived from the Stanford theory, using finite elements analysis (FEA) and to validate the theoretical prediction with the clinical findings of crestal bone loss. Loading cycles were applied on 7-, 10-, or 13-mm-long dental implants to simulate daily mastication and bone remodeling was assessed by changes in the strain energy density of bone after a 3, 6, and 12 months of function. Moreover, clinical findings of marginal bone loss in 45 patients rehabilitated with same implant designs used in the simulation (n = 15) were computed to validate the theoretical results. FEA analysis showed that although the bone density values reduced over time in the cortical bone for all groups, bone remodeling was independent of implant length. Clinical data showed a similar pattern of bone resorption compared with the data generated from mathematical analyses, independent of implant length. The results of this study showed that the mechanoregulatory tissue model could be employed in monitoring the morphological changes in bone that is subjected to biomechanical loads. In addition, the implant length did not influence the bone remodeling around single dental implants during the first year of loading.

  3. Affective Disorders, Bone Metabolism, and Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the relationship between affective disorders, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone metabolism is unresolved, although there is growing evidence that many medications used to treat affective disorders are associated with low BMD or alterations in neuroendocrine systems that influence bone turnover. The objective of this review is to describe the current evidence regarding the association of unipolar and bipolar depression with BMD and indicators of bone metabolism, and to explore potential mediating and confounding influences of those relationships. The majority of studies of unipolar depression and BMD indicate that depressive symptoms are associated with low BMD. In contrast, evidence regarding the relationship between bipolar depression and BMD is inconsistent. There is limited but suggestive evidence to support an association between affective disorders and some markers of bone turnover. Many medications used to treat affective disorders have effects on physiologic systems that influence bone metabolism, and these conditions are also associated with a range of health behaviors that can influence osteoporosis risk. Future research should focus on disentangling the pathways linking psychotropic medications and their clinical indications with BMD and fracture risk. PMID:23874147

  4. [Effect of dosed diet restriction on physiological remodeling and bioelectric properties of bone].

    PubMed

    Levashov, M I; Ianko, R V; Chaka, E G; Safonov, S L

    2014-07-01

    The effect of dosed diet restriction on the physiological remodeling and bioelectric properties of bone tissue was studied in 48 male Wistar rats 3- and 18-months of age. The rate of bone tissue apposition was studied by the dynamic histomorphometry method (intravital tetracycline labeling). Electric potentials on the periosteal surface of the freshly isolated femurs were recorded. The magnitude of dielectric loss factor was determined to assess the quality of bone tissue. The control rats received a standard diet. The experimental rats received a limited diet (60 % of the standard mass) for 28 days. The magnitude and rate of the bone tissue apposition on the endosteal and periosteal surface of the tibia were less by 38.4% and 122.7% respectively in experimental rats after dosed diet restriction. Electric potential in the metaphyseal-epiphyseal growth zones of the femur was 29.7% lower, and the dielectric loss factor increased by 15.8%. The bone tissue apposition rate and the electric potential magnitude were increased 10 days after completion of the dosed diet restriction. The magnitude of the dielectric loss factor decreased after returning to the standard diet. Key words: dosed diet restriction, bone, remodelling, bioelectric properties.

  5. Computational Evaluation of the Effects of Bone Ingrowth on Bone Resorptive Remodeling after a Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Duk-Young; Kang, Yu-Bong; Tsutsumi, Sadami; Nakai, Ryusuke; Ikeuchi, Ken; Sekel, Ron

    In this study, we simulated a wide cortex separation from a cementless hip prosthesis using the bone resorption remodeling method that is based on the generation of high compressive stress around the distal cortical bone. Thereafter, we estimated the effect on late migration quantities of the hip prosthesis produced by the interface state arising from bone ingrowth. This was accomplished using cortical bone remodeling over a long period of time. Two-dimensional natural hip and implanted hip FEM models were constructed with each of the following interface statements between the bone and prosthesis: (1) non-fixation, (2) proximal 1/3, (3) proximal 2/3 and (4) full-fixation. The fixation interfaces in the fully and partially porous coated regions were rigidly fixed by bony ingrowth. The non-fixation model was constructed as a critical situation, with the fibrous or bony tissue not integrated at all into the implant surface. The daily load history was generated using the three loading cases of a one-legged stance as well as abduction and adduction motions. With the natural hip and one-legged stance, the peak compressive principal stresses were found to be under the criteria value for causing bone resorption, while no implant movement occurred. The migration magnitude of the stem of the proximal 1/3 fixation model with adduction motion was much higher, reaching 6%, 11%and 21%greater than those of the non-fixation, proximal 2/3 fixation and all-fixation models, respectively. The full-fixation model showed the lowest compressive principal stress and implant movement. Thus, we concluded that the late loosening and subsequent movement of the stem in the long term could be estimated with the cortical bone remodeling method based on a high compressive stress at the bone-implant interface. The change caused at the bone-prosthesis interface by bony or fibrous tissue ingrowth constituted the major factor in determining the extent of cortical bone resorption occurring with

  6. Scleraxis and osterix antagonistically regulate tensile force-responsive remodeling of the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone.

    PubMed

    Takimoto, Aki; Kawatsu, Masayoshi; Yoshimoto, Yuki; Kawamoto, Tadafumi; Seiryu, Masahiro; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Hiraki, Yuji; Shukunami, Chisa

    2015-02-15

    The periodontal ligament (PDL) is a mechanosensitive noncalcified fibrous tissue connecting the cementum of the tooth and the alveolar bone. Here, we report that scleraxis (Scx) and osterix (Osx) antagonistically regulate tensile force-responsive PDL fibrogenesis and osteogenesis. In the developing PDL, Scx was induced during tooth eruption and co-expressed with Osx. Scx was highly expressed in elongated fibroblastic cells aligned along collagen fibers, whereas Osx was highly expressed in the perialveolar/apical osteogenic cells. In an experimental model of tooth movement, Scx and Osx expression was significantly upregulated in parallel with the activation of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling on the tension side, in which bone formation compensates for the widened PDL space away from the bone under tensile force by tooth movement. Scx was strongly expressed in Scx(+)/Osx(+) and Scx(+)/Osx(-) fibroblastic cells of the PDL that does not calcify; however, Scx(-)/Osx(+) osteogenic cells were dominant in the perialveolar osteogenic region. Upon BMP6-driven osteoinduction, osteocalcin, a marker for bone formation was downregulated and upregulated by Scx overexpression and knockdown of endogenous Scx in PDL cells, respectively. In addition, mineralization by osteoinduction was significantly inhibited by Scx overexpression in PDL cells without affecting Osx upregulation, suggesting that Scx counteracts the osteogenic activity regulated by Osx in the PDL. Thus, Scx(+)/Osx(-), Scx(+)/Osx(+) and Scx(-)/Osx(+) cell populations participate in the regulation of tensile force-induced remodeling of periodontal tissues in a position-specific manner.

  7. Bone Microenvironment Specific Roles of ITAM Adapter Signaling during Bone Remodeling Induced by Acute Estrogen-Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yalei; Torchia, James; Yao, Wei; Lane, Nancy E.; Lanier, Lewis L.; Nakamura, Mary C.; Humphrey, Mary Beth

    2007-01-01

    Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) signaling mediated by DAP12 or Fcε receptor Iγ chain (FcRγ) have been shown to be critical for osteoclast differentiation and maturation under normal physiological conditions. Their function in pathological conditions is unknown. We studied the role of ITAM signaling during rapid bone remodeling induced by acute estrogen-deficiency in wild-type (WT), DAP12-deficient (DAP12-/-), FcRγ-deficient (FcRγ-/-) and double-deficient (DAP12-/-FcRγ-/-) mice. Six weeks after ovariectomy (OVX), DAP12-/-FcRγ-/- mice showed resistance to lumbar vertebral body (LVB) trabecular bone loss, while WT, DAP12-/- and FcRγ-/- mice had significant LVB bone loss. In contrast, all ITAM adapter-deficient mice responded to OVX with bone loss in both femur and tibia of approximately 40%, relative to basal bone volumes. Only WT mice developed significant cortical bone loss after OVX. In vitro studies showed microenvironmental changes induced by OVX are indispensable for enhanced osteoclast formation and function. Cytokine changes, including TGFβ and TNFα, were able to induce osteoclastogenesis independent of RANKL in BMMs from WT but not DAP12-/- and DAP12-/-FcRγ-/- mice. FSH stimulated RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation from BMMs in WT, but not DAP12-/- and DAP12-/-FcRγ-/- mice. Our study demonstrates that although ITAM adapter signaling is critical for normal bone remodeling, estrogen-deficiency induces an ITAM adapter-independent bypass mechanism allowing for enhanced osteoclastogenesis and activation in specific bony microenvironments. PMID:17611621

  8. Changes in the population of perivascular cells in the bone tissue remodeling zones under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katkova, Olena; Rodionova, Natalia; Shevel, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    Microgravity and long-term hypokinesia induce reduction both in bone mass and mineral saturation, which can lead to the development of osteoporosis and osteopenia. (Oganov, 2003). Reorganizations and adaptive remodeling processes in the skeleton bones occur in the topographical interconnection with blood capillaries and perivascular cells. Radioautographic studies with 3H- thymidine (Kimmel, Fee, 1980; Rodionova, 1989, 2006) have shown that in osteogenesis zones there is sequential differentiation process of the perivascular cells into osteogenic. Hence the study of populations of perivascular stromal cells in areas of destructive changes is actual. Perivascular cells from metaphysis of the rat femoral bones under conditions of modeling microgravity were studied using electron microscopy and cytochemistry (hindlimb unloading, 28 days duration) and biosatellite «Bion-M1» (duration of flight from April 19 till May 19, 2013 on C57, black mice). It was revealed that both control and test groups populations of the perivascular cells are not homogeneous in remodeling adaptive zones. These populations comprise of adjacent to endothelium poorly differentiated forms and isolated cells with signs of differentiation (specific increased volume of rough endoplasmic reticulum in cytoplasm). Majority of the perivascular cells in the control group (modeling microgravity) reveals reaction to alkaline phosphatase (marker of the osteogenic differentiation). In poorly differentiated cells this reaction is registered in nucleolus, nucleous and cytoplasm. In differentiating cells activity of the alkaline phosphatase is also detected on the outer surface of the cellular membrane. Unlike the control group in the bones of experimental animals reaction to the alkaline phosphatase is registered not in all cells of perivascular population. Part of the differentiating perivascular cells does not contain a product of the reaction. Under microgravity some poorly differentiated perivascular

  9. Mathematical Model of Bone Remodeling Captures the Antiresorptive and Anabolic Actions of Various Therapies.

    PubMed

    Ross, David S; Mehta, Khamir; Cabal, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    A better understanding of the molecular pathways regulating the bone remodeling process should help in the development of new antiresorptive regulators and anabolic regulators, that is, regulators of bone resorption and of bone formation. Understanding the mechanisms by which parathyroid hormone (PTH) influences bone formation and how it switches from anabolic to catabolic action is important for treating osteoporosis (Poole and Reeve in Curr Opin Pharmacol 5:612-617, 2005). In this paper we describe a mathematical model of bone remodeling that incorporates, extends, and integrates several models of particular aspects of this biochemical system (Cabal et al. in J Bone Miner Res 28(8):1830-1836, 2013; Lemaire et al. in J Theor Biol 229:293-309, 2004; Peterson and Riggs in Bone 46:49-63, 2010; Raposo et al. in J Clin Endocrinol Metab 87(9):4330-4340, 2002; Ross et al. in J Disc Cont Dyn Sys Series B 17(6):2185-2200, 2012). We plan to use this model as a bone homeostasis platform to develop anabolic and antiresorptive compounds. The model will allow us to test hypotheses about the dynamics of compounds and to test the potential benefits of combination therapies. At the core of the model is the idealized account of osteoclast and osteoblast signaling given by Lemaire et al. (J Theor Biol 229:293-309, 2004). We have relaxed some of their assumptions about the roles of osteoprotegerin, transforming growth factor [Formula: see text], and receptor activator of nuclear factor [Formula: see text]B ligand; we have devised more detailed models of the interactions of these species. We have incorporated a model of the effect of calcium sensing receptor antagonists on remodeling (Cabal et al. in J Bone Miner Res 28(8):1830-1836, 2013). We have also incorporated a basic model of the effects of vitamin D on calcium homeostasis. We have included a simple model of the mechanism proposed by Bellido et al. (2003), Ross et al. (J Disc Cont Dyn Sys Series B 17(6):2185-2200, 2012), of the

  10. Osteoblast connexin43 modulates skeletal architecture by regulating both arms of bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Marcus; Grimston, Susan K.; Norris, Jin Yi; Guillotin, Bertrand; Shaw, Angela; Beniash, Elia; Civitelli, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43) has an important role in skeletal homeostasis, and Cx43 gene (Gja1) mutations have been linked to oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD), a human disorder characterized by prominent skeletal abnormalities. To determine the function of Cx43 at early steps of osteogenesis and its role in the ODDD skeletal phenotype, we have used the Dermo1 promoter to drive Gja1 ablation or induce an ODDD mutation in the chondro-osteogenic linage. Both Gja1 null and ODDD mutant mice develop age-related osteopenia, primarily due to a progressive enlargement of the medullary cavity and cortical thinning. This phenotype is the consequence of a high bone turnover state, with increased endocortical osteoclast-mediated bone resorption and increased periosteal bone apposition. Increased bone resorption is a noncell autonomous defect, caused by exuberant stimulation of osteoclastogenesis by Cx43-deficient bone marrow stromal cells, via decreased Opg production. The latter is part of a broad defect in osteoblast differentiation and function, which also results in abnormal structural and material properties of bone leading to decreased resistance to mechanical load. Thus Cx43 in osteogenic cells is a critical regulator of both arms of the bone remodeling cycle, its absence causing structural changes remindful of aged or disused bone. PMID:21346198

  11. Osteoblast connexin43 modulates skeletal architecture by regulating both arms of bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Marcus; Grimston, Susan K; Norris, Jin Yi; Guillotin, Bertrand; Shaw, Angela; Beniash, Elia; Civitelli, Roberto

    2011-04-15

    Connexin43 (Cx43) has an important role in skeletal homeostasis, and Cx43 gene (Gja1) mutations have been linked to oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD), a human disorder characterized by prominent skeletal abnormalities. To determine the function of Cx43 at early steps of osteogenesis and its role in the ODDD skeletal phenotype, we have used the Dermo1 promoter to drive Gja1 ablation or induce an ODDD mutation in the chondro-osteogenic linage. Both Gja1 null and ODDD mutant mice develop age-related osteopenia, primarily due to a progressive enlargement of the medullary cavity and cortical thinning. This phenotype is the consequence of a high bone turnover state, with increased endocortical osteoclast-mediated bone resorption and increased periosteal bone apposition. Increased bone resorption is a noncell autonomous defect, caused by exuberant stimulation of osteoclastogenesis by Cx43-deficient bone marrow stromal cells, via decreased Opg production. The latter is part of a broad defect in osteoblast differentiation and function, which also results in abnormal structural and material properties of bone leading to decreased resistance to mechanical load. Thus Cx43 in osteogenic cells is a critical regulator of both arms of the bone remodeling cycle, its absence causing structural changes remindful of aged or disused bone.

  12. The role of muscle loading on bone (Re)modeling at the developing enthesis.

    PubMed

    Tatara, Alexander M; Lipner, Justin H; Das, Rosalina; Kim, H Mike; Patel, Nikunj; Ntouvali, Eleni; Silva, Matthew J; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2014-01-01

    Muscle forces are necessary for the development and maintenance of a mineralized skeleton. Removal of loads leads to malformed bones and impaired musculoskeletal function due to changes in bone (re)modeling. In the current study, the development of a mineralized junction at the interface between muscle and bone was examined under normal and impaired loading conditions. Unilateral mouse rotator cuff muscles were paralyzed using botulinum toxin A at birth. Control groups consisted of contralateral shoulders injected with saline and a separate group of normal mice. It was hypothesized that muscle unloading would suppress bone formation and enhance bone resorption at the enthesis, and that the unloading-induced bony defects could be rescued by suppressing osteoclast activity. In order to modulate osteoclast activity, mice were injected with the bisphosphonate alendronate. Bone formation was measured at the tendon enthesis using alizarin and calcein fluorescent labeling of bone surfaces followed by quantitative histomorphometry of histologic sections. Bone volume and architecture was measured using micro computed tomography. Osteoclast surface was determined via quantitative histomorphometry of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase stained histologic sections. Muscle unloading resulted in delayed initiation of endochondral ossification at the enthesis, but did not impair bone formation rate. Unloading led to severe defects in bone volume and trabecular bone architecture. These defects were partially rescued by suppression of osteoclast activity through alendronate treatment, and the effect of alendronate was dose dependent. Similarly, bone formation rate was increased with increasing alendronate dose across loading groups. The bony defects caused by unloading were therefore likely due to maintained high osteoclast activity, which normally decreases from neonatal through mature timepoints. These results have important implications for the treatment of muscle unloading

  13. [Bone remodeling markers in saliva as compared to serum in rats].

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Gretel; Gonzáles Chaves, Macarena; Somoza, Julia; Friedman, Silvia; Zeni, Susana N

    2006-01-01

    Bone markers are useful tools to measure bone remodeling; currently they are assessed in serum and urinary samples; however there is little information concerning their measurement in saliva. The present experimental study evaluates the possibility to measure collagen type I carboxiterminal telopeptide (CTX) and bone alkaline phosphatase (b-AP) in saliva, its correlation with serum samples in normal conditions and in the increase of the bone remodeling due to estrogen deficiency. Twenty four normal adult Wistar rats (300 +/- 20 g) [12 SHAM and 12 rats after 1 week of bilateral ovariectomy (OVX)] were studied. Fasting serum and total saliva after stimulation with pilocarpine were collected. In both samples were measured: CTX (ng/ml) by ELISA (RatLabs, Osteometer Bio Tech, Denmark) and b-AP (IU/L) (Wiener, colorimetrically). Both CTX and b-AL in serum samples were significantly higher in OVX than in SHAM rats (15.3 +/- 4.0 vs. 21.8 +/- 6.4, p < 0.05 y 71 +/- 29 vs. 104 +/- 23; p < 0.01, respectively). Saliva presented the same behaviour (3.6 +/- 0.5 vs. 6.4 +/- 2.9; p < 0.02 y 73 +/- 29 vs. 90 +/- 8; p < 0.003, respectively). When saliva CTX and b-AP were plotted against serum concentration significant positive correlations were obtained: r = 0.58, p < 0.05 and r = 0.59; p < 0.05, respectively. In conclusion, the present results are promisory in the sense of the potential use of a salivary-based test for evaluating bone remodeling. However, the use of this methodology for clinical practice needs extensive additional investigations.

  14. Osteocyte density in aging subjects is enhanced in bone adjacent to remodeling haversian systems.

    PubMed

    Power, J; Loveridge, N; Rushton, N; Parker, M; Reeve, J

    2002-06-01

    The osteocyte is a candidate regulatory cell for bone remodeling. Previously, we demonstrated that there is a substantial (approximately 50%) loss of osteocytes from their lacunae in the cortex of the elderly femoral neck. Higher occupancy was evident in tissue exhibiting high remodeling and high porosity. The present study examines the distribution of osteocytes within individual osteonal systems at differing stages of the remodeling cycle. In 22 subjects, lacunar density, osteocyte density, and their quotient, the percent lacunar occupancy, was assessed up to a distance of 65 microm from the canal surface in six quiescent, resorbing, and forming osteons. In both forming (p = 0.024) and resorbing (p = 0.034) osteons, osteocyte densities were significantly higher in cases of hip fracture than controls. However, there were no significant between-group differences in lacunar occupancy. In both cases and controls, osteocyte density (p < 0.0001; mean difference +/-SEM: 157 +/- 34/mm2) and lacunar occupancy (p = 0.025; mean difference: 8.1 +/- 3.4%) were shown to be significantly higher in forming compared with quiescent osteons. Interestingly, resorbing systems also exhibited significantly elevated osteocyte density in both the fracture and the control group combined (mean difference 76 +/- 23/mm2; p = 0.003). Lacunar occupancy was also greater in resorbing compared with quiescent osteons (both groups combined: p = 0.022; mean difference: 5.7 +/- 2.3%). Elevated osteocyte density and lacunar occupancy in forming compared with quiescent systems was expected because of the likely effects of aging on quiescent osteons. However, the higher levels of these parameters in resorbing compared with quiescent systems was the opposite of what we expected and suggests that, in addition to their postulated mechanosensory role in the suppression of remodeling and bone loss, osteocytes might also contribute to processes initiating or maintaining bone resorption.

  15. An in vivo assessment of muscular activity and the importance of electrical phenomena in bone remodelling.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, F; Houston, W J

    1990-01-01

    Modified orthopaedic pins were placed close to the medial and distal epiphyses of the tibia in 4 anaesthetised rabbits, in order to allow the application of controlled external loading cycles. Rosette strain gauges were placed at midshaft level, where the greatest compressive and tensile strains were expected during loading. Two weeks later, following stabilisation of the pins by bone healing, the animals were anaesthetised again and silver-silver chloride electrodes were attached close to the strain gauges in order to measure the changes in electrical potential difference. A sinusoidal load cycle was exerted between the pins with peak levels of 100 N or 250 N depending on the age of the animal. A fluctuation in potential difference, in synchrony with the strain recorded by the strain gauges, was recorded. The maximum potential difference was 2.2 mV, and it was not possible to exceed this with increased bone strain. After demonstration of the piezoelectric effect, repeated stimuli were applied to the sciatic nerve, producing a twitch in the muscles adjacent to the tibia. The electric potential difference from the muscles completely overwhelmed the local potential difference at the bone surface. A further two animals were prepared as previously described, and one electrode was placed on the endosteal surface. The electrical events mirror the changes found across the limb. The stimulus to bone remodeling, as distinct from growth, is usually loading in association with muscular activity. The fact that the changes in electrical fields at the bone surface are predominantly those originating in the muscles indicates that local electrical phenomena generated by bone strain cannot be the factors initiating the cellular response that is responsible for bone remodeling. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2272901

  16. Subchondral bone microstructural damage by increased remodelling aggravates experimental osteoarthritis preceded by osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Osteoporosis (OP) increases cartilage damage in a combined rabbit model of OP and osteoarthritis (OA). Accordingly, we assessed whether microstructure impairment at subchondral bone aggravates cartilage damage in this experimental model. Methods OP was induced in 20 female rabbits, by ovariectomy and intramuscular injections of methylprednisolone hemisuccinate for four weeks. Ten healthy animals were used as controls. At week 7, OA was surgically induced in left knees of all rabbits. At 22 weeks, after sacrifice, microstructure parameters were assessed by micro-computed tomography, and osteoprotegerin (OPG), receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) protein expressions were evaluated by Western Blot at subchondral bone. In addition, cartilage damage was estimated using the histopathological Mankin score. Mann-Whitney and Spearman statistical tests were performed as appropriate, using SPSS software v 11.0. Significant difference was established at P < 0.05. Results Subchondral bone area/tissue area, trabecular thickness and polar moment of inertia were diminished in OPOA knees compared with control or OA knees (P < 0.05). A decrease of plate thickness, ALP expression and OPG/RANKL ratio as well as an increased fractal dimension and MMP9 expression occurred at subchondral bone of OA, OP and OPOA knees vs. controls (P < 0.05). In addition, the severity of cartilage damage was increased in OPOA knees vs. controls (P < 0.05). Remarkably, good correlations were observed between structural and remodelling parameters at subchondral bone, and furthermore, between subchondral structural parameters and cartilage Mankin score. Conclusions Microstructure impairment at subchondral bone associated with an increased remodelling aggravated cartilage damage in OA rabbits with previous OP. Our results suggest that an increased subchondral bone resorption may account for the exacerbation of cartilage

  17. A joined role of canopy and reversal cells in bone remodeling--lessons from glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Pia Rosgaard; Andersen, Thomas Levin; Hauge, Ellen-Margrethe; Bollerslev, Jens; Delaissé, Jean-Marie

    2015-04-01

    Successful bone remodeling demands that osteoblasts restitute the bone removed by osteoclasts. In human cancellous bone, a pivotal role in this restitution is played by the canopies covering the bone remodeling surfaces, since disruption of canopies in multiple myeloma, postmenopausal- and glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis is associated with the absence of progression of the remodeling cycle to bone formation, i.e., uncoupling. An emerging concept explaining this critical role of canopies is that they represent a reservoir of osteoprogenitors to be delivered to reversal surfaces. In postmenopausal osteoporosis, this concept is supported by the coincidence between the absence of canopies and scarcity of cells on reversal surfaces together with abortion of the remodeling cycle. Here we tested whether this concept holds true in glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. A histomorphometric analysis of iliac crest biopsies from patients exposed to long-term glucocorticoid treatment revealed a subpopulation of reversal surfaces corresponding to the characteristics of arrest found in postmenopausal osteoporosis. Importantly, these arrested reversal surfaces were devoid of canopy coverage in almost all biopsies, and their prevalence correlated with a deficiency in bone forming surfaces. Taken together with the other recent data, the functional link between canopies, reversal surface activity, and the extent of bone formation surface in postmenopausal- and glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, supports a model where bone restitution during remodeling demands recruitment of osteoprogenitors from the canopy onto reversal surfaces. These data suggest that securing the presence of functional local osteoprogenitors deserves attention in the search of strategies to prevent the bone loss that occurs during bone remodeling in pathological situations.

  18. MAGED1 is a negative regulator of bone remodeling in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei; Xu, Lijuan; Ma, Xiao; Xu, Jiake; Wang, Jing; Xian, Mengmeng; Zhou, Xiaotian; Wang, Min; Wang, Fang; Qin, An; Pan, Qiuhui; Wen, Chuanjun

    2015-10-01

    Melanoma antigen family D1 (MAGED1), an important adaptor protein, has been shown to ubiquitously express and play critical roles in many aspects of cellular events and physiological functions. However, its role in bone remodeling remains unknown. We, therefore, analyzed the bone phenotype of Maged1-deficient mice. Maged1-deficient mice displayed a significant osteoporotic phenotype with a marked decrease in bone density and deterioration of trabecular architecture. Histomorphometric analysis demonstrated an increased mineral apposition rate as well as increased osteoclast number and surface in Maged1 knockout mice. At the cellular level, Maged1-deficient osteoblasts exhibited an increased proliferation rate and accelerated differentiation. MAGED1 deficiency also caused a promotion in osteoclastogenesis, and that was attributed to the cell autonomous acceleration of differentiation in osteoclasts and an increased receptor activator of NF-κB ligand/osteoprotegerin ratio, a major index of osteoclastogenesis, in osteoblasts. Thus, we identified MAGED1 as a novel regulator of osteoblastogenesis, osteoclastogenesis, and bone remodeling in a mouse model.

  19. The Regulatory Roles of MicroRNAs in Bone Remodeling and Perspectives as Biomarkers in Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mengge; Zhou, Xiaoya; Chen, Lili; Huang, Shishu; Leung, Victor; Wu, Nan; Pan, Haobo; Zhen, Wanxin; Lu, William; Peng, Songlin

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are involved in many cellular and molecular activities and played important roles in many biological and pathological processes, such as tissue formation, cancer development, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, it has been reported that microRNAs can modulate the differentiation and activities of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, the key cells that are involved in bone remodeling process. Meanwhile, the results from our and other research groups showed that the expression profiles of microRNAs in the serum and bone tissues are significantly different in postmenopausal women with or without fractures compared to the control. Therefore, it can be postulated that microRNAs might play important roles in bone remodeling and that they are very likely to be involved in the pathological process of postmenopausal osteoporosis. In this review, we will present the updated research on the regulatory roles of microRNAs in osteoblasts and osteoclasts and the expression profiles of microRNAs in osteoporosis and osteoporotic fracture patients. The perspective of serum microRNAs as novel biomarkers in bone loss disorders such as osteoporosis has also been discussed. PMID:27073801

  20. Histological Comparison in Rats between Carbonate Apatite Fabricated from Gypsum and Sintered Hydroxyapatite on Bone Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ayukawa, Yasunori; Suzuki, Yumiko; Tsuru, Kanji; Koyano, Kiyoshi; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    Carbonate apatite (CO3Ap), the form of apatite found in bone, has recently attracted attention. The purpose of the present study was to histologically evaluate the tissue/cellular response toward the low-crystalline CO3Ap fabricated using a dissolution-precipitation reaction with set gypsum as a precursor. When set gypsum was immersed in a 100°C 1 mol/L Na3PO4 aqueous solution for 24 h, the set gypsum transformed into CO3Ap. Both CO3Ap and sintered hydroxyapatite (s-HAp), which was used as a control, were implanted into surgically created tibial bone defects of rats for histological evaluation. Two and 4 weeks after the implantation, histological sections were created and observed using light microscopy. The CO3Ap granules revealed both direct apposition of the bone matrix by osteoblasts and osteoclastic resorption. In contrast, the s-HAp granules maintained their contour even after 4 weeks following implantation which implied that there was a lack of replacement into the bone. The s-HAp granules were sometimes encapsulated with fibrous tissue, and macrophage polykaryon was occasionally observed directly apposed to the implanted granules. From the viewpoint of bone remodeling, the CO3Ap granules mimicked the bone matrix, suggesting that CO3Ap may be an appropriate bone substitute.

  1. Early reversal cells in adult human bone remodeling: osteoblastic nature, catabolic functions and interactions with osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Abdelgawad, Mohamed Essameldin; Delaisse, Jean-Marie; Hinge, Maja; Jensen, Pia Rosgaard; Alnaimi, Ragad Walid; Rolighed, Lars; Engelholm, Lars H; Marcussen, Niels; Andersen, Thomas Levin

    2016-06-01

    The mechanism coupling bone resorption and formation is a burning question that remains incompletely answered through the current investigations on osteoclasts and osteoblasts. An attractive hypothesis is that the reversal cells are likely mediators of this coupling. Their nature is a big matter of debate. The present study performed on human cancellous bone is the first one combining in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to demonstrate their osteoblastic nature. It shows that the Runx2 and CD56 immunoreactive reversal cells appear to take up TRAcP released by neighboring osteoclasts. Earlier preclinical studies indicate that reversal cells degrade the organic matrix left behind by the osteoclasts and that this degradation is crucial for the initiation of the subsequent bone formation. To our knowledge, this study is the first addressing these catabolic activities in adult human bone through electron microscopy and analysis of molecular markers. Periosteoclastic reversal cells show direct contacts with the osteoclasts and with the demineralized resorption debris. These early reversal cells show (1) ¾-collagen fragments typically generated by extracellular collagenases of the MMP family, (2) MMP-13 (collagenase-3) and (3) the endocytic collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180. The prevalence of these markers was lower in the later reversal cells, which are located near the osteoid surfaces and morphologically resemble mature bone-forming osteoblasts. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that reversal cells colonizing bone surfaces right after resorption are osteoblast-lineage cells, and extends to adult human bone remodeling their role in rendering eroded surfaces osteogenic.

  2. Contrasting roles of leukemia inhibitory factor in murine bone development and remodeling involve region-specific changes in vascularization.

    PubMed

    Poulton, Ingrid J; McGregor, Narelle E; Pompolo, Sueli; Walker, Emma C; Sims, Natalie A

    2012-03-01

    We describe here distinct functions of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) in bone development/growth and adult skeletal homeostasis. In the growth plate and developing neonate bones, LIF deficiency enhanced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels, enlarged blood vessel formation, and increased the formation of "giant" osteoclasts/chondroclasts that rapidly destroyed the mineralized regions of the growth plate and developing neonatal bone. Below this region, osteoblasts formed large quantities of woven bone. In contrast, in adult bone undergoing remodeling osteoclast formation was unaffected by LIF deficiency, whereas osteoblast formation and function were both significantly impaired, resulting in osteopenia. Consistent with LIF promoting osteoblast commitment, enhanced marrow adipocyte formation was also observed in adult LIF null mice, and adipocytic differentiation of murine stromal cells was delayed by LIF treatment. LIF, therefore, controls vascular size and osteoclast differentiation during the transition of cartilage to bone, whereas an anatomically separate LIF-dependent pathway regulates osteoblast and adipocyte commitment in bone remodeling.

  3. Differentiation potentials of perivascular cells in the bone tissue remodeling zones under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionova, Natalia; Katkova, Olena

    Adaptive remodeling processes in the skeleton bones occur in the close topographical interconnection with blood capillaries followed by perivascular cells. Radioautographic studies with 3Н- thymidine (Kimmel D.B., Fee W.S., 1980; Rodionova N.V., 1989, 2006) has shown that in osteogenesis zones there is sequential differentiation process of the perivascular cells into osteogenic ones. Using electron microscopy and cytochemistry we studied perivsacular cells in metaphysis of the rats femoral bones under conditions of modeling microgravity (28 days duration) and in femoral bonеs metaphyses of rats flown on board of the space laboratory (Spacelab - 2) It was revealed that population of the perivascular cells is not homogeneous in adaptive zones of the remodeling in both control and test groups (lowering support loading). This population comprises adjacent to endothelium little differentiated forms and isolated cells with differentiation features (specific volume of rough endoplasmic reticulum in cytoplasm is increased). Majority of the perivascular cells in the control group reveals reaction to alkaline phosphatase (marker of the osteogenic differentiation). In little differentiated cells this reaction is registered in nucleolus, nucleous and cytoplasm. In differentiating cells activity of the alkaline phosphatase is also detected on the outer surface of the cellular membrane. Unlike the control group in the bones of animals under microgravitaty reaction to the alkaline phosphatase is registered not for all cells of perivascular population. Part of the differentiating perivascular cells does not contain a product of the reaction. There is also visible trend of individual alkaline phosphatase containing perivascular cells amounts decrease (i.e. osteogenic cells-precursors). Under microgravity some little differentiated perivascular cells reveal destruction signs. Found decrease trend of the alkaline phosphatase containing cells (i.e. osteogenic cells) number in

  4. Analysis of microstructural and mechanical alterations of trabecular bone in a simulated three-dimensional remodeling process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Ji, Baohua; Liu, X Sherry; Guo, X Edward; Huang, Yonggang; Hwang, Keh-Chih

    2012-09-21

    Bone remodeling is a complex dynamic process, which modulates both bone mass and bone microstructure. In addition to bone mass, bone microstructure is an important contributor to bone quality in osteoporosis and fragility fractures. However, the quantitative knowledge of evolution of three-dimensional (3D) trabecular microstructure in adaptation to the external forces is currently limited. In this study, a new 3D simulation method of remodeling of human trabecular bone was developed to quantitatively study the dynamic evolution of bone mass and trabecular microstructure in response to different external loading conditions. The morphological features of trabecular plate and rod, such as thickness and number density in different orientations were monitored during the remodeling process using a novel imaging analysis technique, namely Individual Trabecula Segmentation (ITS). We showed that the volume fraction and microstructures of trabecular bone including, trabecular type and orientation, were determined by the applied mechanical load. Particularly, the morphological parameters of trabecular plates were more sensitive to the applied load, indicating that they played the major role in the mechanical properties of the trabecular bone. Reducing the applied load caused severe microstructural deteriorations of trabecular bone, such as trabecular plate perforation, rod breakage, and a conversion from plates to rods.

  5. [Control of bone remodeling by nervous system. Regulation of bone metabolism by appetite regulating neuropeptides].

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Toru; Takeda, Shu

    2010-12-01

    The traditional view of bone metabolism as a primarily endocrine activity has been expanded in recent years following the identification of nervous system controlling bone metabolism by leptin studies. Especially, hypothalamic appetite regulating-peptides, such as NPY, CART and NMU have been demonstrated to be bone-regulating neuropeptides. Recently, other neuropeptides, such as serotonin and oxytocin, are reported to be associated with bone metabolism.

  6. Diet-induced Obesity Alters Bone Remodeling Leading to Decreased Femoral Trabecular Bone Mass in Mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Body mass derived from an obesity condition may be detrimental to bone health but the mechanism is unknown. This study was to examine changes in bone structure and serum cytokines related to bone metabolism in obese mice induced by a high-fat diet(HFD). Mice fed the HFD were obese and had higher ser...

  7. Bone remodeling markers and bone metastases: From cancer research to clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Arlindo; Alho, Irina; Casimiro, Sandra; Costa, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a frequent finding in the natural history of several types of cancers. However, its anticipated risk, diagnosis and response to therapy are still challenging to assess in clinical practice. Markers of bone metabolism are biochemical by-products that provide insight into the tumor–bone interaction, with potential to enhance the clinical management of patients with bone metastases. In fact, these markers had a cornerstone role in the development of bone-targeted agents; however, its translation to routine practice is still unclear, as reflected by current international guidelines. In this review, we aimed to capture several of the research and clinical translational challenges regarding the use of bone metabolism markers that we consider relevant for future research in bone metastasis. PMID:25908969

  8. Role of Periostin in Adhesion and Migration of Bone Remodeling Cells.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Teresa; Viloria, Cristina G; Solares, Laura; Fontanil, Tania; González-Chamorro, Elena; De Carlos, Félix; Cobo, Juan; Cal, Santiago; Obaya, Alvaro J

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein highly expressed in collagen-rich tissues subjected to continuous mechanical stress. Functionally, periostin is involved in tissue remodeling and its altered function is associated to numerous pathological processes. In orthodontics, periostin plays key roles in the maintenance of dental tissues and it is mainly expressed in those areas where tension or pressing forces are taking place. In this regard, high expression of periostin is essential to promote migration and proliferation of periodontal ligament fibroblasts. However little is known about the participation of periostin in migration and adhesion processes of bone remodeling cells. In this work we employ the mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 and the macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cell lines to overexpress periostin and perform different cell-based assays to study changes in cell behavior. Our data indicate that periostin overexpression not only increases adhesion capacity of MC3T3-E1 cells to different matrix proteins but also hampers their migratory capacity. Changes on RNA expression profile of MC3T3-E1 cells upon periostin overexpression have been also analyzed, highlighting the alteration of genes implicated in processes such as cell migration, adhesion or bone metabolism but not in bone differentiation. Overall, our work provides new evidence on the impact of periostin in osteoblasts physiology.

  9. Role of Periostin in Adhesion and Migration of Bone Remodeling Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cobo, Teresa; Viloria, Cristina G.; Solares, Laura; Fontanil, Tania; González-Chamorro, Elena; De Carlos, Félix; Cobo, Juan; Cal, Santiago; Obaya, Alvaro J.

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein highly expressed in collagen-rich tissues subjected to continuous mechanical stress. Functionally, periostin is involved in tissue remodeling and its altered function is associated to numerous pathological processes. In orthodontics, periostin plays key roles in the maintenance of dental tissues and it is mainly expressed in those areas where tension or pressing forces are taking place. In this regard, high expression of periostin is essential to promote migration and proliferation of periodontal ligament fibroblasts. However little is known about the participation of periostin in migration and adhesion processes of bone remodeling cells. In this work we employ the mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 and the macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cell lines to overexpress periostin and perform different cell-based assays to study changes in cell behavior. Our data indicate that periostin overexpression not only increases adhesion capacity of MC3T3-E1 cells to different matrix proteins but also hampers their migratory capacity. Changes on RNA expression profile of MC3T3-E1 cells upon periostin overexpression have been also analyzed, highlighting the alteration of genes implicated in processes such as cell migration, adhesion or bone metabolism but not in bone differentiation. Overall, our work provides new evidence on the impact of periostin in osteoblasts physiology. PMID:26809067

  10. Bone effects of space flight analysis by quantum concept of bone remodelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfitt, A. M.

    During the manned Skylab flights mineral losses from the calcaneum and changes in external calcium balance were in the ranges found for healthy subjects at bedrest. Calcium balance reached a nadir of -200 mg/day by two months with no change thereafter; the negative balance was due to increased urinary excretion with no change in net absorption. The total calcium loss averaged 18 g in the longest flight of 84 days; the densitiometric data suggested that about two-thirds of this came from trabecular bone and about one-third from cortical bone. These data could represent reversible bone loss due to increased birth rate of normal osteoclasts and osteoblasts and consequent increase in bone turnover and in reversible mineral deficit, or irreversible bone loss due to overactive osteoclasts and/or underactive osteoblasts. If the former explanation is correct, significant bone loss is unlikely whatever the duration of future flights, except in older persons already losing bone; if the latter explanation is correct, space flights longer than six months may lead to a significant increase in fracture risk in later life. Neither terrestrial immobilization nor unwilling animals in orbit are ideal models for the effects of space flight on human bone. To choose between reversible and irreversible mechanisms of bone loss, and to determine the effects of space flight on lifelong fracture risk, future astronauts and cosmonauts must undergo adequate histologic study of bone after in vivo tetracycline labeling.

  11. The effect of hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp and exercise on bone remodeling markers in obese men

    PubMed Central

    Levinger, Itamar; Brennan-Speranza, Tara C; Jerums, George; Stepto, Nigel K; Serpiello, Fabio R; McConell, Glenn K; Anderson, Mitchell; Hare, David L; Byrnes, Elizabeth; Ebeling, Peter R; Seeman, Ego

    2015-01-01

    Bone remodelling markers (BRMs) are suppressed following a glucose load and during glucose infusion. As exercise increases indices of bone health and improves glucose handling, we hypothesised that, at rest, hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp will suppress BRMs in obese men and that exercise prior to the clamp will prevent this suppression. Eleven obese nondiabetic men (age 58.1±2.2 years, body mass index=33.1±1.4 kg m−2 mean±s.e.m.) had a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp (HEC) at rest (Control) and 60 min post exercise (four bouts × 4 min cycling at 95% of hazard ratiopeak). Blood samples were analysed for serum insulin, glucose, bone formation markers, total osteocalcin (tOC) and procollagen type 1 N-terminal propeptide (P1NP), and the bone resorption marker, β-isomerised C-terminal telopeptides (β-CTx). In the control trial (no exercise), tOC, P1NP and β-CTx decreased with HEC by >10% compared with baseline (P<0.05). Fasting serum glucose, but not insulin, tended to correlate negatively with the BRMs (β range −0.57 to −0.66, p range 0.051–0.087). β-CTx, but not OC or P1NP, increased within 60 min post exercise (∼16%, P<0.01). During the post-exercise HEC, the glucose infusion rate was ∼30% higher compared with the no exercise trial. Despite this, BRMs were only suppressed to a similar extent as in the control session (10%). HEC suppressed BRMs in obese men. Exercise did not prevent this suppression of BRMs by HEC but improved glucose handling during the trial. It remains to be tested whether an exercise intervention of longer duration may be able to prevent the effect of HEC on bone remodelling. PMID:26331010

  12. Involvement of the Nonneuronal Cholinergic System in Bone Remodeling in Rat Midpalatal Suture after Rapid Maxillary Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jie; Wang, Lue; Miao, Cong; Ge, Lihua; Tian, Zhenchuan; Wang, Jianhong

    2016-01-01

    Few studies sought to analyze the expression and function of the nonneuronal acetylcholine system in bone remodeling in vivo due to the lack of suitable models. We established a rat maxilla expansion model in which the midline palatine suture of the rat was rapidly expanded under mechanical force application, inducing tissue remodeling and new bone formation, which could be a suitable model to investigate the role of the nonneuronal acetylcholine system in bone remodeling in vivo. During the expansion, the expression pattern changes of the nonneuronal cholinergic system components and the mRNA levels of OPG/RANKL were detected by immunohistochemistry or real-time PCR. The value of the RANKL/OPG ratio significantly increased after 1 day of expansion, indicating dominant bone resorption induced by the mechanical stimulation; however after 3 days of expansion, the value of the RANKL/OPG ratio significantly decreased, suggesting a dominant role of the subsequent bone formation process. Increasing expression of Ach was detected after 3 days of expansion which indicated that ACh might play a role in bone formation. The mRNA expression levels of other components also showed observable changes during the expansion which confirmed the involvement of the nonneuronal cholinergic system in the process of bone remodeling in vivo. Further researches are still needed to figure out the detailed functions of the nonneuronal cholinergic system and its components. PMID:27478838

  13. sFRP4-dependent Wnt signal modulation is critical for bone remodeling during postnatal development and age-related bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Haraguchi, Ryuma; Kitazawa, Riko; Mori, Kiyoshi; Tachibana, Ryosuke; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Imai, Yuuki; Abe, Takaya; Kitazawa, Sohei

    2016-01-01

    sFRP4 is an extracellular Wnt antagonist that fine-tunes its signal activity by direct binding to Wnts. Bone fragility under oxidative stress by diabetes and aging is partly related to the suppression of the Wnt signal through upregulated sFRP4. Here, to explore the functions of sFRP4 as a balancer molecule in bone development and remodeling, we analyzed the sFRP4 knock-in mouse strain. X-gal and immunohistochemically stained signals in sFRP4-LacZ heterozygous mice were detectable in restricted areas, mostly in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, of the femoral diaphysis after neonatal and postnatal stages. Histological and μCT analyses showed increased trabecular bone mass with alteration of the Wnt signal and osteogenic activity in sFRP4 mutants; this augmented the effect of the buildup of trabecular bone during the ageing period. Our results indicate that sFRP4 plays a critical role in bone development and remodeling by regulating osteoblasts and osteoclasts, and that its functional loss prevents age-related bone loss in the trabecular bone area. These findings imply that sFRP4 functions as a key potential endogenous balancer of the Wnt signaling pathway by efficiently having direct influence on both bone formation and bone absorption during skeletal bone development and maintenance through remodeling. PMID:27117872

  14. E-selectin ligand 1 regulates bone remodeling by limiting bioactive TGF-β in the bone microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Grafe, Ingo; Bae, Yangjin; Chen, Shan; Chen, Yuqing; Bertin, Terry K; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Ambrose, Catherine G; Lee, Brendan

    2013-04-30

    TGF-β is abundantly produced in the skeletal system and plays a crucial role in skeletal homeostasis. E-selectin ligand-1 (ESL-1), a Golgi apparatus-localized protein, acts as a negative regulator of TGF-β bioavailability by attenuating maturation of pro-TGF-β during cartilage homeostasis. However, whether regulation of intracellular TGF-β maturation by ESL-1 is also crucial during bone homeostasis has not been well defined. Here, we show that Esl-1(-/-) mice exhibit a severe osteopenia with elevated bone resorption and decreased bone mineralization. In primary culture, Esl-1(-/-) osteoclast progenitors show no difference in osteoclastogenesis. However, Esl-1(-/-) osteoblasts show delayed differentiation and mineralization and stimulate osteoclastogenesis more potently in the osteoblast-osteoclast coculture, suggesting that ESL-1 primarily acts in osteoblasts to regulate bone homeostasis. In addition, Esl-1(-/-) calvaria exhibit an elevated mature TGF-β/pro-TGF-β ratio, with increased expression of TGF-β downstream targets (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, parathyroid hormone-related peptide, connective tissue growth factor, and matrix metallopeptidase 13, etc.) and a key regulator of osteoclastogenesis (receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand). Moreover, in vivo treatment with 1D11, a pan-TGF-β antibody, significantly improved the low bone mass of Esl-1(-/-) mice, suggesting that elevated TGF-β signaling is the major cause of osteopenia in Esl-1(-/-) mice. In summary, our study identifies ESL-1 as an important regulator of bone remodeling and demonstrates that the modulation of TGF-β maturation is pivotal in the maintenance of a homeostatic bone microenvironment and for proper osteoblast-osteoclast coupling.

  15. Galectin-3 Cleavage Alters Bone Remodeling: Different Outcomes in Breast and Prostate Cancer Skeletal Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kosei; Kho, Dhong Hyo; Yanagawa, Takashi; Harazono, Yosuke; Hogan, Victor; Chen, Wei; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Mehra, Rohit; Raz, Avraham

    2016-03-15

    Management of bone metastasis remains clinically challenging and requires the identification of new molecular target(s) that can be therapeutically exploited to improve patient outcome. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) has been implicated as a secreted factor that alters the bone microenvironment. Proteolytic cleavage of Gal-3 may also contribute to malignant cellular behaviors, but has not been addressed in cancer metastasis. Here, we report that Gal-3 modulates the osteolytic bone tumor microenvironment in the presence of RANKL. Gal-3 was localized on the osteoclast cell surface, and its suppression by RNAi or a specific antagonist markedly inhibited osteoclast differentiation markers, including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, and reduced the number of mature osteoclasts. Structurally, the 158-175 amino acid sequence in the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of Gal-3 was responsible for augmented osteoclastogenesis. During osteoclast maturation, Gal-3 interacted and colocalized with myosin-2A along the surface of cell-cell fusion. Pathologically, bone metastatic cancers expressed and released an intact form of Gal-3, mainly detected in breast cancer bone metastases, as well as a cleaved form, more abundant in prostate cancer bone metastases. Secreted intact Gal-3 interacted with myosin-2A, leading to osteoclastogenesis, whereas a shift to cleaved Gal-3 attenuated the enhancement in osteoclast differentiation. Thus, our studies demonstrate that Gal-3 shapes the bone tumor microenvironment through distinct roles contingent on its cleavage status, and highlight Gal-3 targeting through the CRD as a potential therapeutic strategy for mitigating osteolytic bone remodeling in the metastatic niche.

  16. Synchrotron imaging reveals bone healing and remodelling strategies in extinct and extant vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Anné, Jennifer; Edwards, Nicholas P.; Wogelius, Roy A.; Tumarkin-Deratzian, Allison R.; Sellers, William I.; van Veelen, Arjen; Bergmann, Uwe; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Egerton, Victoria M.; Manning, Phillip L.

    2014-01-01

    Current understanding of bone healing and remodelling strategies in vertebrates has traditionally relied on morphological observations through the histological analysis of thin sections. However, chemical analysis may also be used in such interpretations, as different elements are known to be absorbed and used by bone for different physiological purposes such as growth and healing. These chemical signatures are beyond the detection limit of most laboratory-based analytical techniques (e.g. scanning electron microscopy). However, synchrotron rapid scanning–X-ray fluorescence (SRS–XRF) is an elemental mapping technique that uniquely combines high sensitivity (ppm), excellent sample resolution (20–100 µm) and the ability to scan large specimens (decimetre scale) approximately 3000 times faster than other mapping techniques. Here, we use SRS–XRF combined with microfocus elemental mapping (2–20 µm) to determine the distribution and concentration of trace elements within pathological and normal bone of both extant and extinct archosaurs (Cathartes aura and Allosaurus fragilis). Results reveal discrete chemical inventories within different bone tissue types and preservation modes. Chemical inventories also revealed detail of histological features not observable in thin section, including fine structures within the interface between pathological and normal bone as well as woven texture within pathological tissue. PMID:24806709

  17. Synchrotron imaging reveals bone healing and remodelling strategies in extinct and extant vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Anné, Jennifer; Edwards, Nicholas P; Wogelius, Roy A; Tumarkin-Deratzian, Allison R; Sellers, William I; van Veelen, Arjen; Bergmann, Uwe; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Egerton, Victoria M; Manning, Phillip L

    2014-07-06

    Current understanding of bone healing and remodelling strategies in vertebrates has traditionally relied on morphological observations through the histological analysis of thin sections. However, chemical analysis may also be used in such interpretations, as different elements are known to be absorbed and used by bone for different physiological purposes such as growth and healing. These chemical signatures are beyond the detection limit of most laboratory-based analytical techniques (e.g. scanning electron microscopy). However, synchrotron rapid scanning-X-ray fluorescence (SRS-XRF) is an elemental mapping technique that uniquely combines high sensitivity (ppm), excellent sample resolution (20-100 µm) and the ability to scan large specimens (decimetre scale) approximately 3000 times faster than other mapping techniques. Here, we use SRS-XRF combined with microfocus elemental mapping (2-20 µm) to determine the distribution and concentration of trace elements within pathological and normal bone of both extant and extinct archosaurs (Cathartes aura and Allosaurus fragilis). Results reveal discrete chemical inventories within different bone tissue types and preservation modes. Chemical inventories also revealed detail of histological features not observable in thin section, including fine structures within the interface between pathological and normal bone as well as woven texture within pathological tissue.

  18. Implementation and Integration of a Finite Element Model into the Bone Remodeling Model to Characterize Skeletal Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, C. R.; Lewandowski, B.; Boppana, A.; Pennline, J. A.

    2017-01-01

    NASA's Digital Astronaut Project is developing a bone physiology model to predict changes in bone mineral density over the course of a space mission. The model intends to predict bone loss due to exposure in microgravity as well as predicting bone maintenance due to mechanical stimulus generated by exercise countermeasures. These predictions will be used to inform exercise device efficacy and to help design exercise protocols that will maintain bone mineral density during long exposures to microgravity during spaceflight. The mechanical stimulus and the stresses that are exhibited on the bone are important factors for bone remodeling. These stresses are dependent on the types of exercise that are performed and vary throughout the bone due to the geometry. A primary area of focus for bone health is the proximal femur. This location is critical in transmitting loads between the upper and lower body and have been known to be a critical failure point in older individuals with conditions like osteoporosis.

  19. Influence of exercise on bone remodeling-related hormones and cytokines in ovariectomized rats: a model of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Lihui; Chen, Xi; Lv, Shuang; Dong, Miaomiao; Zhang, Li; Tu, Jiaheng; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Lingli; Song, Yinan; Xu, Leiting; Zou, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of exercise on postmenopausal osteoporosis and the mechanisms by which exercise affects bone remodeling. Sixty-three Wistar female rats were randomly divided into five groups: (1) control group, (2) sham-operated group, (3) OVX (Ovariectomy) group, (4) DES-OVX (Diethylstilbestrol-OVX) group, and (5) Ex-OVX (Exercise-OVX) group. The rat osteoporosis model was established through ovariectomy. The Ex-OVX rats were made to run 251.2 meters every day, 6 d/wk for 3 months in a running wheel. Trabecular bone volume (TBV%), total resorption surface (TRS%), trabecular formation surface (TFS%), mineralization rate (MAR), bone cortex mineralization rate (mAR), and osteoid seam width (OSW) were determined by bone histomorphometry. The mRNA and protein levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β2), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) were determined by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Serum levels of estrogen estradiol (E2), calcitonin (CT), osteocalcin (BGP), and parathyroid hormone (PTH) were determined by ELISA assays. The investigation revealed that compared to the control and the sham-operated groups, the OVX group showed significantly lower levels of TBV%, E2, and CT, but much higher levels of TRS%, TFS%, MAR, OSW, BGP, and PTH. The Ex-OVX group showed increased TBV% and serum levels of E2 and CT compared to the OVX group. Ovariectomy also led to a significant increase in IL-1β mRNA and protein levels in the bone marrow and IL-6 and Cox-2 protein levels in tibias. In addition, the Ex-OVX group showed lower levels of IL-1 mRNA and protein, IL-6 mRNA, and Cox-2 mRNA and protein than those in the OVX group. The upshot of the study suggests that exercise can significantly increase bone mass in postmenopausal osteoporosis rat models by inhibiting bone resorption and increasing bone formation, especially in trabecular bones.

  20. Long-term prediction of three-dimensional bone architecture in simulations of pre-, peri- and post-menopausal microstructural bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ralph

    2005-03-01

    The mechanical behavior of trabecular bone depends on the internal bone structure. It is generally accepted now that the trabecular bone structure is a result of a load adaptive bone remodeling. The mathematical laws that relate bone remodeling to the local state of stress and strain, however, are still under investigation. The aim of this project was to investigate if changes in the trabecular architecture as observed with age-related bone loss and osteoporosis can be predicted from a computer model that simulates bone resorption after hormone depletion based on realistic models of trabecular microstructure using micro-computed tomography (muCT). A compact desktop muCT providing a nominal isotropic resolution of 14 mum was used to measure two groups of seven trabecular bone specimens from pre-menopausal and post-menopausal women respectively. A novel algorithm was developed to simulate age-related bone loss for the specimens in the first group. The algorithm, also referred to as simulated bone atrophy (SIBA), describes a truly three-dimensional approach and is based directly on cellular bone remodeling with an underlying realistic time frame. Bone resorption is controlled by osteoclastic penetration depth and bone formation is governed by the efficiency level of the osteoblasts. The simulation itself describes an iterative process with a cellular remodeling cycle of 197 days. Activation frequency is controllable and can be adjusted for the different phases of pre-, peri- and post-menopause. For our simulations, osteoblastic and osteoclastic activities were in balance until the onset of menopause, set to be at the age of 50 years. In that period, the structure remained almost constant. After the onset of menopause an imbalance in the cell activities was modeled resulting in a net bone loss. The doubling of the activation frequency in the peri-menopausal phase caused a pronounced loss. Using advanced animation tools and quantitative bone morphometry, the changes in

  1. The thermodynamic driving force for bone growth and remodelling: a hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Helmut O.K; Lazar, Markus

    2007-01-01

    The Eshelby stress (static energy momentum) tensor is derived for bone modelled as an inhomogeneous piezoelectric and piezomagnetic Cosserat (micropolar) medium. The divergence of this tensor is the configurational force felt by material gradients and defects in the medium. Just as in inhomogeneous elastic media, this force is identified with the thermodynamic force for phase transformations, in bone it is the thermodynamic cause of structural transformations, i.e. remodelling and growth. The thermodynamic approach shows that some terms of driving force are proportional to the stress, and some acting on material inhomogeneities are quadratic in the stress—the latter outweigh by far the former. Since inertial forces due to acceleration enter the energy–momentum tensor, it follows that the rate of loading matters and that both tension and compression stimulate growth, which is favoured at heterogeneities. PMID:17698479

  2. Biochemical markers as predictors of bone remodelling in dental disorders: a narrative description of literature

    PubMed Central

    Duvina, Marco; Barbato, Luigi; Brancato, Leila; Rose, Giovanna Delle; Amunni, Franco; Tonelli, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis is a systemic disease in which the skeletal condition is characterized by a decreased mass of normally mineralized bone, due to an augmentation of bone resorption processes. Bone biomarkers serum are used for the diagnosis. On the other hand the main cause of the resorption in the bone jaws are periodontitis, inflammatory cysts, developmental cysts, odontogenic neoplasms. Periodontal diseases can be localized to a single site of the jaws or can affect all the teeth, with a massive bone resorption. The cysts are classified in developmental and inflammatory. They caused a local bone resorption in the jaws. Keratocystic odontogenic tumor produces a large bone resorption for its local aggressive nature. Their diagnosis is clinical and radiological. The aim of our review is to find a correlation between bone biomarkers serum and periodontitis, inflammatory cists, developmental cysts, odontogenetic neoplasms. The RANK/RANKL/OPG system is the most studied not only in osteoporosis but also in the periodontitis, inflammatory cysts, developmental cysts, odontogenic neoplasms. In the last years osteoimmunology was used to study the periodontal disease progression, because the immunity cells start the bone resorption processes. A lot of studies analyze the biomarkers present in the biofluids, as saliva and gingival crevicular fluid, but not the correlation with serum biomarkers. Future studies must be organized to deepen the correlation between bone biomarkers and bone jaws resorption and to allow diagnosis and prognosis of periodontitis, inflammatory cysts, developmental cysts, odontogenic neoplasms. PMID:23087720

  3. Effects of Constitutive β-Catenin Activation on Vertebral Bone Growth and Remodeling at Different Postnatal Stages in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Liang, Huaping; Feng, Jianquan; Zong, Zhaowen

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is essential for controlling bone mass; however, little is known about the variable effects of the constitutive activation of β-catenin (CA-β-catenin) on bone growth and remodeling at different postnatal stages. The goal of the present study was to observe the effects of CA-β-catenin on vertebral bone growth and remodeling in mice at different postnatal stages. In particular, special attention was paid to whether CA-β-catenin has detrimental effects on these processes. Methods Catnblox(ex 3) mice were crossed with mice expressing the TM-inducible Cre fusion protein, which could be activated at designated time points via injection of tamoxifen. β-catenin was stabilized by tamoxifen injection 3 days, and 2, 4, 5, and 7 months after birth, and the effects lasted for one month. Radiographic imaging, micro-computed tomography, immunohistochemistry, and safranin O and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining were employed to observe the effects of CA-β-catenin on vertebral bone growth and remodeling. Results CA-β-catenin in both early (3 days after birth) and late stages (2, 4, 5, and 7 months after birth) increased bone formation and decreased bone resorption, which together increased vertebral bone volume. However, when β-catenin was stabilized in the early stage, vertebral linear growth was retarded, and the mice demonstrated shorter statures. In addition, the newly formed bone was mainly immature and located close to the growth plate. In contrast, when β-catenin was stabilized in the late stage, vertebral linear growth was unaffected, and the newly formed bone was mainly mature and evenly distributed throughout the vertebral body. Conclusions CA-β-catenin in both early and late stages of growth can increase vertebral bone volume, but β-catenin has differential effects on vertebral growth and remodeling when activated at different postnatal stages. PMID:24066100

  4. Skeletal Site-specific Effects of Zoledronate on in vivo Bone Remodeling and in vitro BMSCs Osteogenic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xue; Yu, Wanlu; Zhao, Hang; Su, Jiansheng; Sheng, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) has been associated with long-term oral or intravenous administration of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (BPs). However, the pathogenesis of BRONJ remains unknown, and definitively effective treatment has not yet been established. Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis (BRON) tends to occur in maxillofacial bones. Why this occurs is still unclear. Here we show that zoledronate (Zol) treatment suppresses alveolar bone remodeling after tooth typical clinical and radiographic hallmarks of the human BRONJ, whereas enhances peripheral bone quantity in bone remodeling following injury in the same individuals, shown as increased cortical bone thickness, increased trabecular bone formation and accelerated bone defect repair. We find that the RANKL/OPG ratio and Wnt-3a expression are suppressed at the extracted alveolar sites in Zol-treated rats compared with those at the injured sites of peripheral bones. We also show that Zol-treated bone marrow stromal cell (BMSCs) derived from jaw and peripheral bones exhibit differences in cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, expression of osteogenic and chondrogenic related marker genes, and in vivo bone formation capacity. Hopefully, this study will help us better understand the pathogenesis of BRONJ, and deepen the theoretical research. PMID:28139685

  5. Various effects of antidepressant drugs on bone microarchitectecture, mechanical properties and bone remodeling

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnet, N. . E-mail: nicolas.bonnet15@wanadoo.fr; Bernard, P.; Beaupied, H; Bizot, J.C.; Trovero, F.; Courteix, D.; Benhamou, C.L.

    2007-05-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of various drugs which present antidepressant properties: selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, fluoxetine), serotonin and noradrenaline-reuptake inhibitors (Desipramine) and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE, rolipram and tofisopam) on bone microarchitecture and biomechanical properties. Twelve female mice were studied per group starting at an age of 10 weeks. During 4 weeks, they received subcutaneously either placebo or 20 mg kg{sup -1} day{sup -1} of desipramine, fluoxetine or 10 mg kg{sup -1} day{sup -1} of rolipram or tofisopam. Serum Osteocalcin and CTx were evaluated by ELISA. Bone microarchitecture of the distal femur was characterized by X-ray microCT (Skyscan1072). Mechanical properties were assessed by three-point bending test (Instron 4501) and antidepressant efficacy by forced swimming and open field tests. Fluoxetine displayed lower TbTh (- 6.1%, p < 0.01) and tofisopam higher TbTh (+ 5.0%, p < 0.05) versus placebo. Rolipram and tofisopam treatments induced higher BV/TV than placebo (+ 23.8% and + 18.3% respectively). Desipramine group had significantly higher cortical area (+ 4.8%, p < 0.01) and fluoxetine lower cortical area (- 6.1%, p < 0.01) compared to placebo. The stiffness and Young's modulus were lower in the fluoxetine group (77 {+-} 13 N mm{sup -1}, 6431 {+-} 1182 MPa) than in placebo (101 {+-} 9 N mm{sup -1}, 8441 {+-} 1180 MPa). Bone markers indicated a significantly higher bone formation in tofisopam (+ 8.6%) and a lower in fluoxetine (- 56.1%) compared to placebo. These data suggest deleterious effects for SSRIs, both on trabecular and cortical bone and a positive effect of PDE inhibitors on trabecular bone. Furthermore tofisopam anabolic effect in terms of bone markers, suggests a potential therapeutic effect of the PDE inhibitors on bone.

  6. Regulators of G protein signaling 12 promotes osteoclastogenesis in bone remodeling and pathological bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, X; Cao, J; Liu, T; Li, Y-P; Scannapieco, F; He, X; Oursler, M J; Zhang, X; Vacher, J; Li, C; Olson, D; Yang, S

    2015-01-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (Rgs) have pivotal roles in controlling various cellular processes, such as cell differentiation. How Rgs proteins regulate osteoclast (OC) differentiation, function and bone homeostasis is poorly understood. It was previously demonstrated that Rgs12, the largest protein in the Rgs family, is predominantly expressed in OCs and regulates OC differentiation in vitro. To further understand the role and mechanism of Rgs12 in OC differentiation and bone diseases in vivo, we created OC-targeted Rgs12 knockout mice by using inducible Mx1-Cre and CD11b-Cre. Deletion of Rgs12 in hematopoietic cells or specifically in OC precursors resulted in increased bone mass with decreased OC numbers. Loss of Rgs12 impaired OC differentiation and function with impaired Ca2+ oscillations and reduced nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) 2 expression. The introduction of wild-type osteoblasts did not rescue the defective osteoclastogenesis. Ectopic expression of NFAT2 rescued defective OC differentiation in CD11b;Rgs12fl/fl cells and promoted normal OC differentiation. Moreover, deletion of Rgs12 significantly inhibited pathological osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction in Rgs12-deficient mice that were subjected to ovariectomy and lipodysaccharide for bone loss. Thus our findings demonstrate that Rgs12 is an important regulator in OC differentiation and function and identify Rgs12 as a potential therapeutic target for osteoporosis and inflammation-induced bone loss. PMID:25909889

  7. The roles of parathyroid hormone in bone remodeling: prospects for novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, G; Di Somma, C; Rubino, M; Faggiano, A; Vuolo, L; Guerra, E; Contaldi, P; Savastano, S; Colao, A

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this review is to focus on the roles of PTH in bone remodeling. PTH plays a central role in regulating calcium-phosphate metabolism and its production increases in response to low serum calcium levels. A continue hypersecretion of PTH, as occurs in primary hyperparathyroidism, leads to bone resorption. On the other hand, there is clear evidence of the anabolic properties of PTH.When administered at a low dose and intermittently, this hormone seems to be able to exert positive effects on bone volume and microarchitecture. The effects of PTH are mediated by PTH/PTH-related protein receptor, a G protein that can activate the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PK)A and calcium-dependent PKC; the activation of PKA account for most of the PTH anabolic action. The anabolic actions of PTH involve direct effects on osteoblasts and indirect effects mediated by activation of skeletal growth factors (IGF-I) and inhibition of growth factor antagonists, such as sclerostin. PTH enhances the number and the activation of osteoblast through 4 pathways: increasing osteoblast proliferation and differentiation, decreasing osteoblast apoptosis and reducing the negative effects of peroxisome proliferator activator (PPAR)γ receptor on osteoblast differentiation. Moreover PTH enhances the Wnt-β catenin pathway, that is central to osteogenesis and bone formation, inhibiting sclerostin. Finally, PTH induces the synthesis of IGF-I and, due to its prodifferentiating and pro-survival effects on osteoblasts, this could be a key mediator of PTH effect on osteoblasts. In conclusion, the intermittent administration of PTH has a pleiotropic anabolic effect on bone; further studies about mechanisms of action of PTH could be a starting point to new osteoporosis treatments.

  8. Stability analysis of a Komarova type model for the interactions of osteoblast and osteoclast cells during bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Jerez, S; Chen, B

    2015-06-01

    In order to analyze theoretically the dynamics of osteoblast and osteoclast cells in the bone remodeling process we first consider a simplified Komarova model. The existence of periodic solutions, which is consistent with the biophysical phenomenon, has been observed only numerically for the general model. By a stability analysis of the simplified model we provide sufficient conditions to obtain existence and uniqueness of positive periodic solutions. Considering recent biological evidence about the participation of another cells like osteocytes in the regulation of bone remodeling, we incorporate to the simplified model a new term as a way to model the signaling of external agents in the remodeling process. Finally, we demonstrate that this new model has stable positive non-periodic solutions. All the theoretical results are accompanied by computational simulations.

  9. Blood flow for bone remodelling correlates with locomotion in living and extinct birds.

    PubMed

    Allan, Georgina H; Cassey, Phillip; Snelling, Edward P; Maloney, Shane K; Seymour, Roger S

    2014-08-15

    Nutrient arteries enter limb bones through discrete foramina on the shafts. They are required for bone remodelling in response to mechanical loading and dynamic forces imposed by locomotion. The cross-sectional area of the nutrient foramen of the femur represents an index of blood flow rate to the shaft and thus provides insight into the animal's level of activity. Morphometric data on femoral length, mass and foramen size from 100 extant bird species and eight extinct moa species were analysed allometrically and phylogenetically. The nutrient foramen blood flow index (Qi) and femur mass (Mf) increase with body mass (Mb). At 1 kg body mass, cursorial species have approximately 2.1 times higher Qi and 1.9 times heavier Mf than volant species. The scaling of Qi on Mf is independent of the primary mode of locomotion, but the ratio Qi/Mf decreases significantly in larger birds, although absolute Qi increases. The overall avian equation for Qi on Mb is not significantly different from previous data from mammals, but when differences in blood pressure are accounted for, estimated blood flow to the femur is approximately 1.9 times higher in cursorial birds than in mammals, possibly in relation to bipedalism and quadrupedalism, respectively. Femoral bone blood flow in both endothermic groups is estimated to be 50-100 times higher than in ectothermic reptiles.

  10. Coping with time scales in disease systems analysis: application to bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stephan; Post, Teun M; Peletier, Lambertus A; Boroujerdi, Massoud A; Danhof, Meindert

    2011-12-01

    In this study we demonstrate the added value of mathematical model reduction for characterizing complex dynamic systems using bone remodeling as an example. We show that for the given parameter values, the mechanistic RANK-RANKL-OPG pathway model proposed by Lemaire et al. (J Theor Biol 229:293-309, 2004) can be reduced to a simpler model, which can describe the dynamics of the full Lemaire model to very good approximation. The response of both models to changes in the underlying physiology and therapeutic interventions was evaluated in four physiologically meaningful scenarios: (i) estrogen deficiency/estrogen replacement therapy, (ii) Vitamin D deficiency, (iii) ageing, and (iv) chronic glucocorticoid treatment and its cessation. It was found that on the time scale of disease progression and therapeutic intervention, the models showed negligible differences in their dynamic properties and were both suitable for characterizing the impact of estrogen deficiency and estrogen replacement therapy, Vitamin D deficiency, ageing, and chronic glucocorticoid treatment and its cessation on bone forming (osteoblasts) and bone resorbing (osteoclasts) cells. It was also demonstrated how the simpler model could help in elucidating qualitative properties of the observed dynamics, such as the absence of overshoot and rebound, and the different dynamics of onset and washout.

  11. One carbon metabolism and bone homeostasis and remodeling: A review of experimental research and population studies.

    PubMed

    Feigerlova, Eva; Demarquet, Lea; Guéant, Jean-Louis

    2016-07-01

    Homocysteine (HCY) is a degradation product of the methionine pathway. The B vitamins, in particular vitamin B12 and folate, are the primary nutritional determinant of HCY levels and therefore their deficiencies result in hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHCY). Prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHCY) and related dietary deficiencies in B vitamins and folate increase with age and have been related to osteoporosis and abnormal development of epiphyseal cartilage and bone in rodents. Here we provide a review of experimental and population studies. The negative effects of HHCY and/or B vitamins and folate deficiencies on bone formation and remodeling are documented by cell models, including primary osteoblasts, osteoclast and bone progenitor cells as well as by animal and human studies. However, underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are complex and remain poorly understood. Whether these associations are the direct consequences of impaired one carbon metabolism is not clarified and more studies are still needed to translate these findings to human population. To date, the evidence is limited and somewhat conflicting, however further trials in groups most vulnerable to impaired one carbon metabolism are required.

  12. Remodelling of bone and bones: growth of normal and transplanted caudal vertebrae.

    PubMed Central

    Feik, S A; Storey, E

    1983-01-01

    Changes in the rate of growth, shape and structure of the 8th, 16th and 22nd caudal vertebrae of 4 and 24-27 days old Sprague-Dawley rats were studied in situ and in three different non-functional transplantation sites for 12 weeks. With increasing size, maturity and age the three vertebrae showed progressively decreasing growth, changes in shape and structural abnormalities. The smallest anlages grew faster and matured sooner than normal, so that their length equalled that of controls. Central endochondral necrosis in older bones was associated with decreased longitudinal growth but in some younger ones, despite a perforation of the cartilage and herniation of the nucleus pulposus into the marrow cavity of the shaft, growth proceeded at near normal rates. The free ends of older, larger transplants grew faster than the abutting ends joined by joint connective tissue, indicating that central necrosis of cartilage resulted from impaired nutrient diffusion. The results suggest that the cartilage model may possess an inherent capacity to produce a certain limited amount of bone tissue which may be distributed either in the form of long and thin or short and inwaisted bones, depending on the balance of forces between interstitial cartilage expansion and the restraining ensheathing periosteal-perichondrial tissues. This basic form may be modified further by functional forces. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 9 PMID:6339456

  13. Bone remodeling at microscrew interface near extraction site in the beagle dog mandible-histologic and immunohistochemical analyses

    PubMed Central

    WEI, Guangxi; HU, Yun; ZHENG, Leilei; HUO, Jinfeng; TANG, Tian; DENG, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Extraction is often used as part of orthodontic therapy, and good control of anchorage is a key step after extraction. Although microscrews can be implanted close to the extraction site in order to achieve orthodontic support, the efficiency of bone remodeling at the implant-bone interface near the extraction region is dubious. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate bone remodeling of the bone-microscrew interface near the tooth extraction site, in the absence of loading. Material and Methods Third and fourth premolars were extracted from the mandibles of beagle dogs, followed by placement of test microscrews near the extraction sites. Control microscrews were placed further away from the extraction site. All samples were collected after 1, 3, 8, or 12 weeks of healing following extraction. The bone remodeling process at the interface was evaluated using histologic and immunohistochemical analyses. Results Initially, a large number of inflammatory cells were aggregated at the interface. The expression levels of core binding factor (Cbfa1), osteocalcin (OC) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) were inconspicuous in both groups, whereas tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was strongly expressed, especially in the test groups (P<0.05). Subsequently, the expression levels of Cbfa1, OC and TGF-β were found to increase significantly, and active osteogenesis was observed. Conclusions During week 1, inflammatory reaction is a major concern at the bone-microscrew interface near the extraction site. However, with healing, the influence of extraction on the remodeling of bone surrounding the microscrews decreases, thus facilitating successful treatment. PMID:24212991

  14. Simulation of multi-stage nonlinear bone remodeling induced by fixed partial dentures of different configurations: a comparative clinical and numerical study.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhipeng; Yoda, Nobuhiro; Chen, Junning; Zheng, Keke; Sasaki, Keiichi; Swain, Michael V; Li, Qing

    2017-04-01

    This paper aimed to develop a clinically validated bone remodeling algorithm by integrating bone's dynamic properties in a multi-stage fashion based on a four-year clinical follow-up of implant treatment. The configurational effects of fixed partial dentures (FPDs) were explored using a multi-stage remodeling rule. Three-dimensional real-time occlusal loads during maximum voluntary clenching were measured with a piezoelectric force transducer and were incorporated into a computerized tomography-based finite element mandibular model. Virtual X-ray images were generated based on simulation and statistically correlated with clinical data using linear regressions. The strain energy density-driven remodeling parameters were regulated over the time frame considered. A linear single-stage bone remodeling algorithm, with a single set of constant remodeling parameters, was found to poorly fit with clinical data through linear regression (low [Formula: see text] and R), whereas a time-dependent multi-stage algorithm better simulated the remodeling process (high [Formula: see text] and R) against the clinical results. The three-implant-supported and distally cantilevered FPDs presented noticeable and continuous bone apposition, mainly adjacent to the cervical and apical regions. The bridged and mesially cantilevered FPDs showed bone resorption or no visible bone formation in some areas. Time-dependent variation of bone remodeling parameters is recommended to better correlate remodeling simulation with clinical follow-up. The position of FPD pontics plays a critical role in mechanobiological functionality and bone remodeling. Caution should be exercised when selecting the cantilever FPD due to the risk of overloading bone resorption.

  15. Computational simulation of the bone remodeling using the finite element method: an elastic-damage theory for small displacements

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The resistance of the bone against damage by repairing itself and adapting to environmental conditions is its most important property. These adaptive changes are regulated by physiological process commonly called the bone remodeling. Better understanding this process requires that we apply the theory of elastic-damage under the hypothesis of small displacements to a bone structure and see its mechanical behavior. Results The purpose of the present study is to simulate a two dimensional model of a proximal femur by taking into consideration elastic-damage and mechanical stimulus. Here, we present a mathematical model based on a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations and we develop the variational formulation for the mechanical problem. Then, we implement our mathematical model into the finite element method algorithm to investigate the effect of the damage. Conclusion The results are consistent with the existing literature which shows that the bone stiffness drops in damaged bone structure under mechanical loading. PMID:23663260

  16. Impact of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells on remodeling the lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharides in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mohi El-Din, Mouchira M; Rashed, Laila A; Mahmoud Haridy, Mohi A; Khalil, Atef Mohamed; Mohamed Albadry, Mohamed A

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluated the potential of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to regulate cytokines and remodel the lung induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS; O-antigen). Materials & methods: A group of mice (n = 21) was inoculated intraperitoneally with one dose 0.1 ml containing 0.025 mg LPS/mouse, and another treated intravenously with one dose of labeling bone marrow derived MSCs at 7.5 × 105 cell/mouse 4 h after LPS injection. All animals were sacrificed on the 1st, 7th and 14th days post-injection. Results: MSCs increased the level of IL-10 with suppression of TNF-α, decrease of collagen fibers and renewal of alveolar type I cells, together with lung tissue remodeling. Conclusion: MSCs were shown to modulate inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-10) and to differentiate into alveolar type I cells, which prevented fibrosis in lung tissue from LPS-treated mice. PMID:28344826

  17. Osteoporosis and alzheimer pathology: Role of cellular stress response and hormetic redox signaling in aging and bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Carolin; Koverech, Guido; Crupi, Rosalia; Di Paola, Rosanna; Koverech, Angela; Lodato, Francesca; Scuto, Maria; Salinaro, Angela T.; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Calabrese, Edward J.; Calabrese, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and osteoporosis are multifactorial progressive degenerative disorders. Increasing evidence shows that osteoporosis and hip fracture are common complication observed in AD patients, although the mechanisms underlying this association remain poorly understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are emerging as intracellular redox signaling molecules involved in the regulation of bone metabolism, including receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand-dependent osteoclast differentiation, but they also have cytotoxic effects that include lipoperoxidation and oxidative damage to proteins and DNA. ROS generation, which is implicated in the regulation of cellular stress response mechanisms, is an integrated, highly regulated, process under control of redox sensitive genes coding for redox proteins called vitagenes. Vitagenes, encoding for proteins such as heat shock proteins (Hsps) Hsp32, Hsp70, the thioredoxin, and the sirtuin protein, represent a systems controlling a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways relevant to life span and involved in the preservation of cellular homeostasis under stress conditions. Consistently, nutritional anti-oxidants have demonstrated their neuroprotective potential through a hormetic-dependent activation of vitagenes. The biological relevance of dose–response affects those strategies pointing to the optimal dosing to patients in the treatment of numerous diseases. Thus, the heat shock response has become an important hormetic target for novel cytoprotective strategies focusing on the pharmacological development of compounds capable of modulating stress response mechanisms. Here we discuss possible signaling mechanisms involved in the activation of vitagenes which, relevant to bone remodeling and through enhancement of cellular stress resistance provide a rationale to limit the deleterious consequences associated to homeostasis disruption with consequent impact on the aging process. PMID:24959146

  18. [New therapies for children affected by bone diseases].

    PubMed

    Ballhausen, Diana; Dépraz, Nuria Garcia; Kern, Ilse; Unger, Sheila; Bonafé, Luisa

    2012-02-22

    Considerable progress has been achieved in recent years in treating children affected by bone diseases. Advances in the understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of genetic bone diseases have led to the development of enzyme replacement therapies for various lysosomal storage diseases, following the breakthrough initiated in treating Gaucher disease. Clinical studies are underway with tailored molecules correcting bone fragility and alleviating chronic bone pain and other manifestations of hypophosphatasia, or promoting growth of long bones in achondroplasia patients. We further report our very encouraging experience with intravenous bisphosphonate treatment in children suffering from secondary osteopenia and the high prevalence of calcium and vitamin D deficits in these severely disabled children.

  19. The influence of different loads on the remodeling process of a bone and bioresorbable material mixture with voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgio, Ivan; Andreaus, Ugo; Madeo, Angela

    2016-03-01

    A model of a mixture of bone tissue and bioresorbable material with voids was used to numerically analyze the physiological balance between the processes of bone growth and resorption and artificial material resorption in a plate-like sample. The adopted model was derived from a theory for the behavior of porous solids in which the matrix material is linearly elastic and the interstices are void of material. The specimen—constituted by a region of bone living tissue and one of bioresorbable material—was acted by different in-plane loading conditions, namely pure bending and shear. Ranges of load magnitudes were identified within which physiological states become possible. Furthermore, the consequences of applying different loading conditions are examined at the end of the remodeling process. In particular, maximum value of bone and material mass densities, and extensions of the zones where bone is reconstructed were identified and compared in the two different load conditions. From the practical view point, during surgery planning and later rehabilitation, some choice of the following parameters is given: porosity of the graft, material characteristics of the graft, and adjustment of initial mixture tissue/bioresorbable material and later, during healing and remodeling, optimal loading conditions.

  20. Multitracer Molecular Imaging of Paget Disease Targeting Bone Remodeling, Fatty Acid Metabolism, and PSMA Expression on PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Derlin, Thorsten; Weiberg, Desiree; Sohns, Jan M

    2016-12-01

    Paget disease is a chronic disorder resulting in enlarged and misshapen bones, and is caused by disorganized bone remodeling. We present the case of an 85-year-old man with prostatic adenocarcinoma and known Paget disease of the right iliac bone who underwent Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen ligand, C-acetate, and F-fluoride PET/CT for restaging of cancer. On all PET scans, increased tracer accumulation was observed in Paget disease of bone. Besides that Paget disease may mimic metastases on PET/CT using various radiotracers, including Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen ligands and C-acetate, this case highlights the potential of multiparametric disease characterization on PET.

  1. Effects of altered bone remodeling and retention of cement lines on bone quality in osteopetrotic aged c-Src-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroto; Takakuda, Kazuo; Matsumoto, Hiroko N; Miyata, Atsushi; Baba, Otto; Tabata, Makoto J; Ushiki, Tatsuo; Oda, Tsuyoshi; McKee, Marc D; Takano, Yoshiro

    2010-02-01

    Cement lines represent mineralized, extracellular matrix interfacial boundaries at which bone resorption by osteoclasts is followed by bone deposition by osteoblasts. To determine the contribution of cement lines to bone quality, the osteopetrotic c-Src mouse model-where cement lines accumulate and persist as a result of defective osteoclastic resorption-was used to investigate age-related changes in structural and mechanical properties of bone having long-lasting cement lines. Cement lines of osteopetrotic bones in c-Src knockout mice progressively mineralized with age up to the level that the entire matrix of cement lines was lost by EDTA decalcification. While it was anticipated that suppressed and abnormal remodeling, together with the accumulation of cement line interfaces, would lead to defective bone quality with advancing age of the mutant mice, unexpectedly, three-point bending tests of the long bones of 1-year-old c-Src-deficient mice indicated significantly elevated strength relative to age-matched wild-type bones despite the presence of numerous de novo microcracks. Among these microcracks in the c-Src bones, there was no sign of preferential propagation or arrest of microcracks along the cement lines in either fractured or nonfractured bones of old c-Src mice. These data indicate that cement lines are not the site of a potential internal failure of bone strength in aged c-Src osteopetrotic mice and that abundant and long-lasting cement lines in these osteopetrotic bones appear to have no negative impacts on the mechanical properties of this low-turnover bone despite their progressive hypermineralization (and thus potential brittleness) with age.

  2. Osteocytes, not Osteoblasts or Lining Cells, are the Main Source of the RANKL Required for Osteoclast Formation in Remodeling Bone.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jinhu; Piemontese, Marilina; Onal, Melda; Campbell, Josh; Goellner, Joseph J; Dusevich, Vladimir; Bonewald, Lynda; Manolagas, Stavros C; O'Brien, Charles A

    2015-01-01

    The cytokine receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), encoded by the Tnfsf11 gene, is essential for osteoclastogenesis and previous studies have shown that deletion of the Tnfsf11 gene using a Dmp1-Cre transgene reduces osteoclast formation in cancellous bone by more than 70%. However, the Dmp1-Cre transgene used in those studies leads to recombination in osteocytes, osteoblasts, and lining cells making it unclear whether one or more of these cell types produce the RANKL required for osteoclast formation in cancellous bone. Because osteoblasts, osteocytes, and lining cells have distinct locations and functions, distinguishing which of these cell types are sources of RANKL is essential for understanding the orchestration of bone remodeling. To distinguish between these possibilities, we have now created transgenic mice expressing the Cre recombinase under the control of regulatory elements of the Sost gene, which is expressed in osteocytes but not osteoblasts or lining cells in murine bone. Activity of the Sost-Cre transgene in osteocytes, but not osteoblast or lining cells, was confirmed by crossing Sost-Cre transgenic mice with tdTomato and R26R Cre-reporter mice, which express tdTomato fluorescent protein or LacZ, respectively, only in cells expressing the Cre recombinase or their descendants. Deletion of the Tnfsf11 gene in Sost-Cre mice led to a threefold decrease in osteoclast number in cancellous bone and increased cancellous bone mass, mimicking the skeletal phenotype of mice in which the Tnfsf11 gene was deleted using the Dmp1-Cre transgene. These results demonstrate that osteocytes, not osteoblasts or lining cells, are the main source of the RANKL required for osteoclast formation in remodeling cancellous bone.

  3. Impaired differentiation of macrophage lineage cells attenuates bone remodeling and inflammatory angiogenesis in Ndrg1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Watari, Kosuke; Shibata, Tomohiro; Nabeshima, Hiroshi; Shinoda, Ai; Fukunaga, Yuichi; Kawahara, Akihiko; Karasuyama, Kazuyuki; Fukushi, Jun-Ichi; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Kuwano, Michihiko; Ono, Mayumi

    2016-01-18

    N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a responsible gene for a hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy-Lom (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4D). This is the first study aiming to assess the contribution of NDRG1 to differentiation of macrophage lineage cells, which has important implications for bone remodeling and inflammatory angiogenesis. Ndrg1 knockout (KO) mice exhibited abnormal curvature of the spine, high trabecular bone mass, and reduced number of osteoclasts. We observed that serum levels of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and macrophage-related cytokines were markedly decreased in KO mice. Differentiation of bone marrow (BM) cells into osteoclasts, M1/M2-type macrophages and dendritic cells was all impaired. Furthermore, KO mice also showed reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis by cancer cells, accompanied by decreased infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages. The transfer of BM-derived macrophages from KO mice into BM-eradicated wild type (WT) mice induced much less tumor angiogenesis than observed in WT mice. Angiogenesis in corneas in response to inflammatory stimuli was also suppressed with decreased infiltration of macrophages. Taken together, these results indicate that NDRG1 deficiency attenuates the differentiation of macrophage lineage cells, suppressing bone remodeling and inflammatory angiogenesis. This study strongly suggests the crucial role of NDRG1 in differentiation process for macrophages.

  4. A prospective randomised study of periprosthetic femoral bone remodeling using four different bearings in hybrid total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Zerahn, Bo; Borgwardt, Lotte; Ribel-Madsen, Søren; Borgwardt, Arne

    2011-01-01

    We performed a study to assess whether different bearing materials have an impact on femoral bone remodeling within the first four years after a hybrid total hip arthroplasty. 205 of 300 patients were available for 4 years follow-up after being randomly allocated to four prosthetic combinations: A: Zirconia ceramic head, polyethylene cup; B: Cobalt-Chrome-Molybdenum head and cup; C: Zirconia ceramic head, polyethylene moulded on the Titanium shell of the Asian cup; D: Alumina head and cup. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured with Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry in seven Gruen zones adjacent to the femoral implant. Scans were performed within one week after surgery and four years postoperatively. Clinical outcomes were monitored using the Oxford Hip Score (OHS). A high proportion of patients from group D were excluded due to re-operations (19 patients). BMD decreased significantly in all Gruen zones with the largest declines in group D. BMD changes in Gruen zones 1, 2, 3, 6, and 7 correlated with height, and body weight. Advanced age was associated with an increase in bone loss in Gruen zones 1, 2, 3, 6, and 7. A large stem size was associated with a decline in BMD in Gruen zones 1, 6, and 7.Bone remodeling after total hip arthroplasty may depend on the composition of bearing materials, but age, height, weight, and stem size are also related to changes in BMD.

  5. The importance of the SIBLING family of proteins on skeletal mineralisation and bone remodelling.

    PubMed

    Staines, Katherine A; MacRae, Vicky E; Farquharson, Colin

    2012-09-01

    The small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoprotein (SIBLING) family consists of osteopontin, bone sialoprotein, dentin matrix protein 1, dentin sialophosphoprotein and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein. These proteins share many structural characteristics and are primarily located in bone and dentin. Accumulating evidence has implicated the SIBLING proteins in matrix mineralisation. Therefore, in this review, we discuss the individual role that each of the SIBLING proteins has in this highly orchestrated process. In particular, we emphasise how the nature and extent of their proteolytic processing and post-translational modification affect their functional role. Finally, we describe the likely roles of the SIBLING proteins in clinical disorders of hypophosphataemia and their potential therapeutic use.

  6. Remodeling of Autogenous Bone Grafts after Osteotome Sinus Floor Elevation Assessed by Limited Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Tetsuya; Takenouchi, Yuka; Mori, Kyoko; Ariji, Miyuki; Nishida, Kaori; Ito, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the radiographic appearance of bone graft domes longitudinally after osteotome sinus floor elevation using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). This study presents the radiological findings of a 6-month follow-up CBCT study in maxillary osteotome sinus floor elevation. We examined 52 patients with a crestal bone height of less than 8 mm in the posterior maxilla who required sinus augmentation. Implants (n = 91) were subsequently placed in regenerated bone following osteotome sinus floor elevation; autogenous bone was used as the augmentation material. In all cases, the grafted augmentation material tended to be absorbed, but at least 1 mm of grafted augmentation material was recognized around the implant fixtures on CBCT at the second implant operation. The border between the grafted augmentation material and the existing bone was indistinct. The grafted area apical to the implants undergoes shrinkage and remodeling. It was suggested that sufficient grafted autogenous bone changes into bone to support an implant. PMID:23956747

  7. Is Bone Tissue Really Affected by Swimming? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Bruton, Alejandro; Gónzalez-Agüero, Alejandro; Gómez-Cabello, Alba; Casajús, José A.; Vicente-Rodríguez, Germán

    2013-01-01

    Background Swimming, a sport practiced in hypogravity, has sometimes been associated with decreased bone mass. Aim This systematic review aims to summarize and update present knowledge about the effects of swimming on bone mass, structure and metabolism in order to ascertain the effects of this sport on bone tissue. Methods A literature search was conducted up to April 2013. A total of 64 studies focusing on swimmers bone mass, structure and metabolism met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Results It has been generally observed that swimmers present lower bone mineral density than athletes who practise high impact sports and similar values when compared to sedentary controls. However, swimmers have a higher bone turnover than controls resulting in a different structure which in turn results in higher resistance to fracture indexes. Nevertheless, swimming may become highly beneficial regarding bone mass in later stages of life. Conclusion Swimming does not seem to negatively affect bone mass, although it may not be one of the best sports to be practised in order to increase this parameter, due to the hypogravity and lack of impact characteristic of this sport. Most of the studies included in this review showed similar bone mineral density values in swimmers and sedentary controls. However, swimmers present a higher bone turnover than sedentary controls that may result in a stronger structure and consequently in a stronger bone. PMID:23950908

  8. Nutritional factors affecting poultry bone health.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Robert H

    2008-05-01

    Outlined are two main current research concerns relating to skeletal disorders in poultry: (a) osteoporosis in egg-laying hens; (b) leg problems caused by rapid bone growth in broiler chickens. Surveys indicate that 30% of caged laying hens suffer at least one lifetime fracture (a severe welfare issue). Modern hybrids produce one egg per d for 50 weeks. For this period 'normal' bone turnover ceases; only medullary bone (MB) is formed, a woven bone type of limited structural value. MB is resorbed for eggshell formation alongside structural bone, leading to increased fracture risk. Avian osteoporosis is reduced by activity and genetic selection but nutrition is also important. Fluoride and vitamin K are beneficial but the timing of nutritional intervention is important. Ca, inorganic P and vitamin D must be adequate and the form of Ca is critical. Limestone fed as particulates benefits skeletal and eggshell quality. In hens fed particulate limestone compared with flour-fed hens the tibiotarsus breaking strength and radiographic density are increased at 56 weeks of age (P<0.01 and P<0.001 respectively) and the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive stained active osteoclasts (mean number per microscopic field) is decreased (P<0.001). In broiler (meat) chickens selection for rapid growth from approximately 50 g to 3 kg in 42 d has inadvertently produced skeletal disorders such as tibial dyschondroplasia, rickets and associated valgus-varus deformities leading to lameness. The beneficial skeletal effects during growth of increased dietary n-3 PUFA:n-6 PUFA (utilising salmon oil) have been demonstrated. Experiments simulating daylight UVB levels have produced beneficial skeletal effects in Ca- and vitamin D-deficient chicks.

  9. The effect of alendronate (Fosamax) and implant surface on bone integration and remodeling in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, S R; Jaffe, W L; Valle, C D; Jazrawi, L; Maurer, S; Baitner, A; Wright, K; Sala, D; Hawkins, M; Di Cesare, P E

    2001-01-01

    Patients at high risk for osteoporosis and its associated morbidity, including postmenopausal women, are being pharmacologically managed to stabilize and improve bone mass. Alendronate sodium (Fosamax) is a commonly used antiresorptive agent effective in osteopenic women for reducing bone resorption, increasing bone density, and decreasing fracture incidence. With the increased incidence of alendronate-treated women who are undergoing hip replacement or fracture repair by prosthesis placement, data are needed to predict how alendronate affects host bone integration with uncemented surfaces. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of alendronate on new bone formation and attachment to implant surfaces in a normal and simulated estrogen-deficient, calcium-deficient canine model, using an implantable bone growth chamber. Alendronate did not affect host bone integration to surfaces commonly used in uncemented total joint arthroplasty, but there were significant differences dependent solely on the type of surface.

  10. Bone morphogenic protein-2 regulates the myogenic differentiation of PMVECs in CBDL rat serum-induced pulmonary microvascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Chen, Lin; Zeng, Jing; Cui, Jian; Ning, Jiao-Nin; Wang, Guan-Song; Belguise, Karine; Wang, Xiaobo; Qian, Gui-Sheng; Lu, Kai-Zhi; Yi, Bin

    2015-08-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is characterized by an arterial oxygenation defect induced by intrapulmonary vasodilation (IPVD) that increases morbidity and mortality. In our previous study, it was determined that both the proliferation and the myogenic differentiation of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) play a key role in the development of IPVD. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the relationship between IPVD and the myogenic differentiation of PMVECs remains unknown. Additionally, it has been shown that bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP2), via the control of protein expression, may regulate cell differentiation including cardiomyocyte differentiation, neuronal differentiation and odontoblastic differentiation. In this study, we observed that common bile duct ligation (CBDL)-rat serum induced the upregulation of the expression of several myogenic proteins (SM-α-actin, calponin, SM-MHC) and enhanced the expression levels of BMP2 mRNA and protein in PMVECs. We also observed that both the expression levels of Smad1/5 and the activation of phosphorylated Smad1/5 were significantly elevated in PMVECs following exposure to CBDL-rat serum, which was accompanied by the down-regulation of Smurf1. The blockage of the BMP2/Smad signaling pathway with Noggin inhibited the myogenic differentiation of PMVECs, a process that was associated with relatively low expression levels of both SM-α-actin and calponin in the setting of CBDL-rat serum exposure, although SM-MHC expression was not affected. These findings suggested that the BMP2/Smad signaling pathway is involved in the myogenic differentiation of the PMVECs. In conclusion, our data highlight the pivotal role of BMP2 in the CBDL-rat serum-induced myogenic differentiation of PMVECs via the activation of both Smad1 and Smad5 and the down-regulation of Smurf1, which may represent a potential therapy for HPS-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling.

  11. The remodeling pattern of human mandibular alveolar bone during prenatal formation from 19 to 270mm CRL.

    PubMed

    Radlanski, Ralf J; Renz, Herbert; Tsengelsaikhan, Nyamdorj; Schuster, Felix; Zimmermann, Camilla A

    2016-05-01

    The underlying mechanisms of human bone morphogenesis leading to a topologically specific shape remain unknown, despite increasing knowledge of the basic molecular aspects of bone formation and its regulation. The formation of the alveolar bone, which houses the dental primordia, and later the dental roots, may serve as a model to approach general questions of bone formation. Twenty-five heads of human embryos and fetuses (Radlanski-Collection, Berlin) ranging from 19mm to 270mm (crown-rump-length) CRL were prepared as histological serial sections. For each stage, virtual 3D-reconstructions were made in order to study the morphogenesis of the mandibular molar primordia with their surrounding bone. Special focus was given to recording the bone-remodeling pattern, as diagnosed from the histological sections. In early stages (19-31mm CRL) developing bone was characterized by appositional only. At 41, in the canine region, mm CRL bony extensions were found forming on the bottom of the trough. Besides general apposition, regions with resting surfaces were also found. At a fetal size of 53mm CRL, septa have developed and led to a compartment for canine development. Furthermore, one shared compartment for the incisor primordia and another shared compartment for the molars also developed. Moreover, the inner surfaces of the dental crypts showed resorption of bone. From this stage on, a general pattern became established such that the compartmentalizing ridges and septa between all of the dental primordia and the brims of the crypts were noted, and were due to appositional growth of bone, while the crypts enlarged on their inner surfaces by resorption. By 160mm CRL, the dental primordia were larger, and all of the bony septa had become reduced in size. The primordia for the permanent teeth became visible at 225mm CRL and shared the crypts of their corresponding deciduous primordia.

  12. A numerical simulation of the effect of using porous superelastic Nitinol and stiff Titanium fixation hardware on the bone remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raad, Bahram; Shayesteh Moghaddam, Narges; Elahinia, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate the effect of two different fixation hardware materials on bone remodeling after a mandibular reconstruction surgery and to restore the mandible's function, healthy appearance, mastication, swallowing, breathing, and speech. The hypothesis is that using fixation hardware with stiffness close to that of the surrounding bone will result in a more successful healing process in the mandible bone. The finite element model includes the material properties and forces of the cancellous bone, cortical bone, ligaments, muscles, and teeth. The reconstruction surgery is modeled by including the fixation hardware and the grafted bone. In the sectioned mandible, to best mimic the geometry of the mandible, two single barrel grafts are placed at the top of each other to form a double barrel graft set. Two different materials were used as the mandibular fixation parts, stiff Ti-6Al-4V, and porous superelastic Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) alloys. A comparison of these two alloys demonstrates that using porous NiTi alloy as the fixation part results in a faster healing pace. Furthermore, the density distribution in the mandibular bone after the healing process is more similar to the normal mandible density distribution. The simulations results indicate that the porous superelastic NiTi fixation hardware transfers and distributes the existing forces on the mandible bone more favorably. The probability of stress shielding and/or stress concentration decrease. This type of fixation hardware, therefore, is more appropriate for mandible bone reconstruction surgery. These predictions are in agreement with the clinical observations.

  13. Liquid scintillation based quantitative measurement of dual radioisotopes (3H and 45Ca) in biological samples for bone remodeling studies.

    PubMed

    Hui, Susanta K; Sharma, M; Bhattacharyya, M H

    2012-01-01

    Acute and prolonged bone complications associated with radiation and chemotherapy in cancer survivors underscore the importance of establishing a laboratory-based complementary dual-isotope tool to evaluate short- as well as long-term bone remodeling in an in vivo model. To address this need, a liquid scintillation dual-label method was investigated using different scintillation cocktails for quantitative measurement of (3)H-tetracycline ((3)H-TC) and (45)Ca as markers of bone turnover in mice. Individual samples were prepared over a wide range of known (45)Ca/(3)H activity ratios. Results showed that (45)Ca/(3)H activity ratios determined experimentally by the dual-label method were comparable to the known activity ratios (percentage difference ∼2%), but large variations were found in samples with (45)Ca/(3)H activity ratios in range of 2-10 (percentage difference ∼20-30%). Urine and fecal samples from mice administered with both (3)H-TC and (45)Ca were analyzed with the dual-label method. Positive correlations between (3)H and (45)Ca in urine (R=0.93) and feces (R=0.83) indicate that (3)H-TC and (45)Ca can be interchangeably used to monitor longitudinal in vivo skeletal remodeling.

  14. [Dental alveolar bone and dental arch remodeling in children: orthodontic diagnosis and treatments based on individual child arch development].

    PubMed

    Xiaobing, Li

    2016-12-01

    The etiology of malocclusions basically involves both congenital and environmental factors. Malocclusion is the result of the abnormal development of the orofacial complex (including tooth, dental alveolar bone, upper and lower jaws). Early orthodontic interceptive treatments involve the elimination of all congenital and environmental factors that contribute to the malformation of the orofacial complex, as well as interrupt the deviated development of the orofacial complex and the occlusion. Early orthodontic interceptive treatments mainly aim to use children's growth potential to correct abnormal developments of occlusions and orthodontically treat malocclusions more efficiently. The early orthodontic interceptive treatments include correcting the child's bad oral habits, training the abnormal functioned para-oral muscles, maintaining the normal eruptions of succeeding permanent teeth, applying interceptive treatments to the mal-developed teeth, and employing functional orthopedic treatments for abnormal growths of the upper and lower jaws. In orthodontics, correcting mal-positioned teeth is called orthodontic treatment, while rectifying the abnormal relationships of the upper and lower jaws is called functional orthopedic treatment. However, no clear definition is available as regards to the early orthodontic interceptive treatment of malocclusions caused by the deviated development of the dental alveolar bone. This new theory of "early dental alveolar bone and dental arch remodeling technique" was proposed by Professor Li Xiaobing of the Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics in West China Hospital of Stomatology through his clinical analyses and investigation of his early orthodontic interceptive treatments. He defined the early orthodontic corrections of abnormal growth of dental alveolar bone as "remodel". The "early dental alveolar bone and dental arch remodeling theory and technique" is proved useful in

  15. Factors affecting left ventricular remodeling after valve replacement for aortic stenosis. An overview

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Emmanuel; Troise, Giovanni; Cirillo, Marco; Brunelli, Federico; Tomba, Margherita Dalla; Mhagna, Zen; Tasca, Giordano; Quaini, Eugenio

    2006-01-01

    Although a small percentage of patients with critical aortic stenosis do not develop left ventricle hypertrophy, increased ventricular mass is widely observed in conditions of increased afterload. There is growing epidemiological evidence that hypertrophy is associated with excess cardiac mortality and morbidity not only in patients with arterial hypertension, but also in those undergoing aortic valve replacement. Valve replacement surgery relieves the aortic obstruction and prolongs the life of many patients, but favorable or adverse left ventricular remodeling is affected by a large number of factors whose specific roles are still a subject of debate. Age, gender, hemodynamic factors, prosthetic valve types, myocyte alterations, interstitial structures, blood pressure control and ethnicity can all influence the process of left ventricle mass regression, and myocardial metabolism and coronary artery circulation are also involved in the changes occurring after aortic valve replacement. The aim of this overview is to analyze these factors in the light of our experience, elucidate the important question of prosthesis-patient mismatch by considering the method of effective orifice area, and discuss surgical timings and techniques that can improve the management of patients with aortic valve stenosis and maximize the probability of mass regression. PMID:16803632

  16. Genetic manipulation of the ghrelin signaling system in male mice reveals bone compartment specificity of acylated and unacylated ghrelin in the regulation of bone remodeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin receptor-deficient (Ghsr-/-) mice that lack acylated ghrelin (AG) signaling retain a metabolic response to unacylated ghrelin (UAG). Recently, we showed that Ghsr-deficiency affects bone metabolism. The aim of this study was to further establish the impact of AG and UAG on bone metabolism. W...

  17. CYR61/CCN1 stimulates proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts in vitro and contributes to bone remodeling in vivo in myeloma bone disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Peng, Fengping; Liu, Zhaoyun; Jiang, Fengjuan; Li, Lijuan; Gao, Shan; Wang, Guojin; Song, Jia; Ruan, Erbao; Shao, Zonghong; Fu, Rong

    2017-02-01

    Cysteine-rich 61 (CYR61/CCN1), a secreted protein in bone marrow (BM) microenvironment, has diverse effects on many cellular activities such as growth and differentiation. However, the effect of CCN1 on osteoblasts (OBs) in myeloma bone disease remains unclear. In our study, the level of CCN1 in multiple myeloma (MM) patients was detected by ELISA and RT-PCR. The proliferation and differentiation of OBs from MM patients were observed after stimulated by CCN1 in vitro. The myeloma cells transduced with CYR61 gene (RPMI‑8226/CYR61) were injected in a mouse model to evaluate the efficacy of CCN1 in vivo and compare with zoledronic acid. The results showed that CYR61/CCN1 levels in BM supernatant and OBs both elevated significantly in all newly diagnosed MM patients, especially in patients without bone disease (P=0.001 and P<0.001). After 30 ng/l CCN1 stimulation for 24 h, the quantity and mineralization of OBs increased significantly in vitro (P=0.046 and 0.048). The transcription factors of Wnt pathway, runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and β-catenin were upregulated in OBs after CCN1 stimulation (P=0.012 and 0.011). After injection of RPMI‑8226 cells, bone lesions were observed obviously by microCT and histochemistry at 7 weeks. Radiographic analysis of the bones showed decreased resorption in CCN1 overexpression group and zoledronic acid group, while severe resorption in negative control. Furthermore, trabecular bone volume in CCN1 overexpression group (1.7539±0.16949) was significantly higher than zoledronic acid group (1.2839±0.077) (P=0.012). In conclusion, CCN1 can stimulate the proliferation and differentiation of OBs in vitro and contribute to bone remodeling in vivo in MBD.

  18. Cybernetic aspects of bone modeling and remodeling, with special reference to osteoporosis and whole-bone strength.

    PubMed

    Frost, H M

    2001-01-01

    Assume mythical physiologists were taught that renal physiology and its disorders depend on "kidney cells" and their regulation by nonmechanical factors, but were taught nothing about nephrons. For decades they "knew" that idea was correct, just as Ptolemy "knew" the universe centers on our planet. But then others began to describe nephrons, their roles in renal physiology and disorders, and problems they revealed in former views, so doubts and controversies began. Today real physiologists encounter a similar situation for bone health and its disorders. A 1960 paradigm attributed such things to bone's effector cells (osteoblasts and osteoclasts) and their regulation by nonmechanical factors, without "nephron-equivalent" or biomechanical input. But both mechanical and nonmechanical factors regulate bone's nephron equivalents. Adding features of those equivalents to the 1960 views led to the Utah paradigm, which suggests problems in former views and better explanations for "osteoporosis," whole-bone strength, and other bone disorders. Such things incited controversies among current skeletal physiologists. Cybernetics concerns the relationships, mechanisms, signals, and message traffic that help to control the behavior and other features of dynamic systems. A cybernetic analysis of the bone physiology in the Utah paradigm can add many features to the 1960 paradigm that help to understand osteoporoses, other bone disorders, and whole-bone strength (and bone mass). The added features also show new and pertinent targets for the related research.

  19. Effects of Condensation on Peri-implant Bone Density and Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Wu, Y; Perez, K C; Hyman, S; Brunski, J B; Tulu, U; Bao, C; Salmon, B; Helms, J A

    2017-04-01

    Bone condensation is thought to densify interfacial bone and thus improve implant primary stability, but scant data substantiate either claim. We developed a murine oral implant model to test these hypotheses. Osteotomies were created in healed maxillary extraction sites 1) by drilling or 2) by drilling followed by stepwise condensation with tapered osteotomes. Condensation increased interfacial bone density, as measured by a significant change in bone volume/total volume and trabecular spacing, but it simultaneously damaged the bone. On postimplant day 1, the condensed bone interface exhibited microfractures and osteoclast activity. Finite element modeling, mechanical testing, and immunohistochemical analyses at multiple time points throughout the osseointegration period demonstrated that condensation caused very high interfacial strains, marginal bone resorption, and no improvement in implant stability. Collectively, these multiscale analyses demonstrate that condensation does not positively contribute to implant stability.

  20. Bone remodeling after total hip arthroplasty with a short stemmed metaphyseal loading implant: finite element analysis validated by a prospective DEXA investigation.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Matthias; Kurtz, Agnes; Stukenborg-Colsman, Christina; Nolte, Ingo; Weigel, Nelly; Bouguecha, Anas; Behrens, Bernd A

    2012-11-01

    In total hip arthroplasty (THA), short stemmed cementless implants are used because they are thought to stimulate physiological bone remodeling and reduce stress shielding. We performed a numerical investigation on bone remodeling after implantation of a specific short stemmed implant using finite element analysis (FEA). Overall bone mass loss was 2.8% in the entire femur. Bone mass decrease was mostly found in the proximal part of the calcar and in the greater trochanter due to the vast cross section of the implant, probably leading to stress shielding. In the diaphysis, no change in the apparent bone density was proven. The assumptions made agreed well with bone remodeling data from THA recipients who underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. However, the clinical investigation revealed a bone mass increase in the minor trochanter region that was less pronounced in the FEA. Further comparisons to other stem designs must be done to verify if the relative advantages of the investigated implant can be accepted.

  1. Spatial Distribution and Remodeling of Elastic Modulus of Bone in Micro Regime as Prediction of Early Stage Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Kartikey; Lin, Liangjun; Hu, Minyi; Muir, Jesse; Qin, Yi-Xian.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the local distribution of bone mechanical properties on a micro-nano scale and its correlation to strain distribution. Left tibia samples were obtained from 5-month old female Sprague Dawley rats, including baseline control (n=9) and hindlimb suspended (n=9) groups. Elastic modulus was measured by nanoindentation at the dedicated locations. Three additional tibias from control rats were loaded axially to measure bone strain, with 6–10N at 1Hz on a Bose machine for strain measurements. In the control group, the difference of the elastic modulus between periosteum and endosteum was much higher at the anterior and posterior regions (2.6GPa), where higher strain differences were observed (45με). Minimal elastic modulus difference between periosteum and endosteum was observed at the medial region (0.2GPa), where neutral axis of the strain distribution was oriented with lower strain difference (5με). In the disuse group, however, the elastic modulus differences in the anterior posterior regions reduced to 1.2GPa from 2.6GPa in the control group, and increased in the medial region to 2.7GPa from 0.2GPa. It is suggested that the remodeling rate in a region of bone is possibly influenced by the strain gradient from periosteum to endosteum. Such pattern of moduli gradients was compromised in disuse osteopenia, suggesting that the remodeling in distribution of micro-nano elastic moduli among different regions may serve as a predictor for early stage of osteoporosis. PMID:26705110

  2. Bone morphogenic protein-2 regulates the myogenic differentiation of PMVECs in CBDL rat serum-induced pulmonary microvascular remodeling

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chang; Chen, Lin; Zeng, Jing; Cui, Jian; Ning, Jiao-nin; Wang, Guan-song; Belguise, Karine; Wang, Xiaobo; Qian, Gui-sheng; Lu, Kai-zhi; Yi, Bin

    2015-08-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is characterized by an arterial oxygenation defect induced by intrapulmonary vasodilation (IPVD) that increases morbidity and mortality. In our previous study, it was determined that both the proliferation and the myogenic differentiation of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) play a key role in the development of IPVD. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the relationship between IPVD and the myogenic differentiation of PMVECs remains unknown. Additionally, it has been shown that bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP2), via the control of protein expression, may regulate cell differentiation including cardiomyocyte differentiation, neuronal differentiation and odontoblastic differentiation. In this study, we observed that common bile duct ligation (CBDL)-rat serum induced the upregulation of the expression of several myogenic proteins (SM-α-actin, calponin, SM-MHC) and enhanced the expression levels of BMP2 mRNA and protein in PMVECs. We also observed that both the expression levels of Smad1/5 and the activation of phosphorylated Smad1/5 were significantly elevated in PMVECs following exposure to CBDL-rat serum, which was accompanied by the down-regulation of Smurf1. The blockage of the BMP2/Smad signaling pathway with Noggin inhibited the myogenic differentiation of PMVECs, a process that was associated with relatively low expression levels of both SM-α-actin and calponin in the setting of CBDL-rat serum exposure, although SM-MHC expression was not affected. These findings suggested that the BMP2/Smad signaling pathway is involved in the myogenic differentiation of the PMVECs. In conclusion, our data highlight the pivotal role of BMP2 in the CBDL-rat serum-induced myogenic differentiation of PMVECs via the activation of both Smad1 and Smad5 and the down-regulation of Smurf1, which may represent a potential therapy for HPS-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling. - Highlights: • CBDL-rat serum promotes the myogenic

  3. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of chicken osteocalcin and its use in evaluation of perch effects on bone remodeling in caged White Leghorns.

    PubMed

    Jiang, S; Cheng, H W; Hester, P Y; Hou, J-F

    2013-08-01

    Osteocalcin (OC) is a sensitive biochemical marker for evaluating bone turnover in mammals. The role of avian OC is less clear because of the need for a chicken assay. Our objectives were to develop an assay using indirect competitive ELISA for detecting chicken serum OC and use the assay to examine the effects of perches on bone remodeling in caged hens. Anti-chicken OC polyclonal antibody was produced by immunization of rabbits with a recombinant OC from Escherichia coli. Chicken OC extracted from bone was used as a coated protein, and purified chicken OC was used for calibration. The limit of detection of the developed OC ELISA was 0.13 ng/mL. The intra- and interassay CV were <7 and <12%, respectively. The sensitivity of the developed OC ELISA was compared with a commercial Rat-Mid OC ELISA in laying hens housed in conventional cages with or without perches. Serum samples were collected from 71-wk-old White Leghorn hens subjected to 4 treatments. Treatment 1 was control chickens that never had access to perches during their life cycle. Treatment 2 chickens had perches during the pullet phase (0 to 16.9 wk of age), whereas treatment 3 chickens had perches only during the egg-laying phase of the life cycle (17 to 71 wk of age). Treatment 4 chickens always had access to perches (0 to 71 wk of age). Correlation between the 2 assays was 0.62 (P < 0.0001). Levels of serum OC using the developed chicken ELISA were higher than that detected using the Rat-Mid ELISA (P < 0.0001). Results from the chicken ELISA assay showed that hens with perch access had higher concentrations of serum OC than hens without perches during egg laying (P = 0.04). Pullet access to perches did not affect serum OC levels in 71-wk-old hens (P = 0.15). In conclusion, a chicken OC ELISA has been validated that is sensitive and accurate with adequate discriminatory power for measuring bone remodeling in chickens.

  4. Urinary alpha and beta C-telopeptides of collagen I: clinical implications in bone remodeling in patients with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    de la Piedra, C; Calero, J A; Traba, M L; Asensio, M D; Argente, J; Muñoz, M T

    1999-01-01

    Fragments derived from degradation of type I collagen C-telopeptide (CTX) can be nonisomerized (alpha) or beta-isomerized (beta) depending on the age of bone; i.e., mainly the alpha form is derived from new bone and the beta form from old bone. We have studied 41 female patients with anorexia nervosa (AN), aged 18.5 +/- 2.2 years (range 16-24 years), and with an evolution time between 1.5 and 11 years, and 31 healthy control females (C), with a mean age of 19 +/- 2.3 years (range 16-24 years). The AN patients showed a significant decrease in bone mass, with a mean Z-score of bone mineral density (BMD) of -3.2 +/- 0.8 (range -0.9 to -5.4). The aim of our study was to determine the levels of urinary alpha- and beta-CTX markers of bone resorption, the alpha/beta ratio (alpha/beta), and the level of bone alkaline phosphatase (bAP), a biochemical marker of bone formation, in order to relate them to the degree of osteopenia and the status of bone remodeling. Statistical analysis was by the Mann-Whitney test. The degree of osteopenia correlated with bAP levels (p = 0.0027) but not with the other parameters. Patients with AN were divided into three groups according to their levels of bAP: high (H), normal (N) or low (L). We found that BMD was significantly lower, and alpha- and beta-CTX were significantly higher, in groups H and N than in group L. Bone AP correlated significantly with alpha-CTX (p = 0.0042) and alpha/beta (0.0095) in the controls, but not with beta-CTX, while in AN patients bAP correlated with beta-CTX (p = 0.0000) and with alpha-CTX (p = 0.022) but not with the alpha/beta ratio. The ratio CTX/bAP (resorption/formation) was similar in AN patients and controls. It is concluded that: (1) patients with AN have a high degree of osteopenia which correlated with bAP levels; (2) urinary CTX fragments found in AN patients seem to come mainly from old bone (beta-CTX), while CTX found in healthy adolescent control females come from new bone (alpha-CTX). For this

  5. Development of LiCl-containing calcium aluminate cement for bone repair and remodeling applications.

    PubMed

    Acuña-Gutiérrez, I O; Escobedo-Bocardo, J C; Almanza-Robles, J M; Cortés-Hernández, D A; Saldívar-Ramírez, M M G; Reséndiz-Hernández, P J; Zugasti-Cruz, A

    2017-01-01

    The effect of LiCl additions on the in vitro bioactivity, hemolysis, cytotoxicity, compressive strength and setting time of calcium aluminate cements was studied. Calcium aluminate clinker (AC) was obtained via solid state reaction from reagent grade chemicals of CaCO3 and Al2O3. Calcium aluminate cements (CAC) were prepared by mixing the clinker with water or aqueous LiCl solutions (0.01, 0.0125 or 0.015M (M)) using a w/c ratio of 0.4. After 21days of immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF) at physiological conditions of temperature and pH, a Ca-P rich layer, identified as hydroxyapatite (HA), was formed on the cement without LiCl and on the cement prepared with 0.01M of LiCl solution. This indicates the high bioactivity of these cements. The cements setting times were significantly reduced using LiCl. The measured hemolysis percentages, all of them lower than 5%, indicated that the cements were not hemolytic. The compressive strength of the cements was not negatively affected by the LiCl additions. The obtained cement when a solution of LiCl 0.010M was added, presented high compressive strength, appropriated bioactivity, no cytotoxicity and low setting time, making this material a potentially bone cement.

  6. Effects of remifemin treatment on bone integrity and remodeling in rats with ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guangxia; Leng, Huijie; Wang, Ke; Wang, Jianwei; Zhu, Sainan; Jia, Jing; Chen, Xing; Zhang, Weiguang; Qin, Lihua; Bai, Wenpei

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of Remifemin (isopropanolic extract of Cimicifuga Racemosa) on postmenopausal osteoporosis. 120 female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four groups: sham surgery with vehicle, ovariectomy with vehicle, ovariectomy with estradiol valerate, or ovariectomy with Remifemin. Daily oral administrations of the vehicle, estradiol valerate, or Remifemin began 2 weeks after surgery and lasted to 4, 8, or 12 weeks. Ten rats in each group were sacrificed at each timestep with assessment of bone mineral density, trabecular bone structure, and biomechanical parameters of the femur and lumbar vertebra. Bone turnover markers were evaluated 12 weeks after surgery. Both drugs prevented bone density loss in the distal end of the femur and preserved the trabecular bone structure in both the lumbar vertebra and distal end of the femur following ovariectomy. Both drugs protected bone stiffness at the tested regions and reduced bone reabsorption in ovariectomized rats. The preventive effects of Remifemin against bone-loss can rival those of estradiol valerate if treatment duration is adequately extended. In conclusion, Remifemin may demonstrate equivalent effects to estradiol valerate in terms of preventing postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  7. Prenatal development of the human mandible. 3D reconstructions, morphometry and bone remodelling pattern, sizes 12-117 mm CRL.

    PubMed

    Radlanski, Ralf J; Renz, Herbert; Klarkowski, Marie C

    2003-10-01

    Human embryos and fetuses ( n=25) ranging from 12 to 117 mm CRL (crown-rump-length) were serially sectioned and the mandibles were reconstructed in 3D. In addition, characteristic areas of apposition, resorption and resting zones were projected onto the surface of the mandibular reconstructions after histological evaluation of the remodeling processes. Furthermore, morphometric data were taken to describe growth processes in horizontal views. In this way the changing outlines as seen in 3D could be correlated with the remodeling patterns and with the changes in growth. In these stages the mandible showed a general appositional growth, but resorption areas were found at the posterior margins of the mental foramen and at the lateral and medial posterior bony planes at concave surfaces. The bulging of bone underneath and over Meckel's cartilage could be recognized as active appositional growth areas. Meckel's cartilage itself lay in a trough which could be characterized by less apposition and even resorption. Questions were raised in how much the gap between our present knowledge of genetic expression of signaling molecules and the precise morphologic description of the mandibles can be bridged.

  8. Treatment with eldecalcitol positively affects mineralization, microdamage, and collagen crosslinks in primate bone.

    PubMed

    Saito, Mitsuru; Grynpas, Marc D; Burr, David B; Allen, Matthew R; Smith, Susan Y; Doyle, Nancy; Amizuka, Norio; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Kida, Yoshikuni; Marumo, Keishi; Saito, Hitoshi

    2015-04-01

    Eldecalcitol (ELD), an active form of vitamin D analog approved for the treatment of osteoporosis in Japan, increases lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD), suppresses bone turnover markers, and reduces fracture risk in patients with osteoporosis. We have previously reported that treatment with ELD for 6 months improved the mechanical properties of the lumbar spine in ovariectomized (OVX) cynomolgus monkeys. ELD treatment increased lumbar BMD, suppressed bone turnover markers, and reduced histomorphometric parameters of both bone formation and resorption in vertebral trabecular bone. In this study, we elucidated the effects of ELD on bone quality (namely, mineralization, microarchitecture, microdamage, and bone collagen crosslinks) in OVX cynomolgus monkeys in comparison with OVX-vehicle control monkeys. Density fractionation of bone powder prepared from lumbar vertebrae revealed that ELD treatment shifted the distribution profile of bone mineralization to a higher density, and backscattered electron microscopic imaging showed improved trabecular bone connectivity in the ELD-treated groups. Higher doses of ELD more significantly reduced the amount of microdamage compared to OVX-vehicle controls. The fractionated bone powder samples were divided according to their density, and analyzed for collagen crosslinks. Enzymatic crosslinks were higher in both the high-density (≥2.0 mg/mL) and low-density (<2.0 mg/mL) fractions from the ELD-treated groups than in the corresponding fractions in the OVX-vehicle control groups. On the other hand, non-enzymatic crosslinks were lower in both the high- and low-density fractions. These observations indicated that ELD treatment stimulated the enzymatic reaction of collagen crosslinks and bone mineralization, but prevented non-enzymatic reaction of collagen crosslinks and accumulation of bone microdamage. Bone anti-resorptive agents such as bisphosphonates slow down bone remodeling so that bone mineralization, bone microdamage

  9. Influence of Bone Remodeling Inhibition on the Development of Experimental Stress Fractures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-01

    bone 99mTc activity, followed later and variably a periosteal reaction (Fig 1). In subsequent studies, we measured tibial diaphyseal strains at the...of the tibial diaphysis of an experimentally- loaded rabbit showing periosteal reactive bone after 6 weeks of chronic loading. (Voxel size – 0.5mm x...bisphosphonate and vehicle treated groups. Interestingly, these animals with the greatest periosteal response appeared to have initially smaller tibial

  10. Regulators of G protein signaling 12 (Rgs12) promotes osteoclastogenesis in bone remodeling and pathologic bone loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium (Ca2+) signaling plays a pivotal role in controlling various cellular processes such as secretion, differentiation, proliferation, motility, and cell death through the release of Ca2+ from internal stores and entry from extracellular fluid. In bone, receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL)...

  11. Study of bone remodeling of two models of femoral cementless stems by means of DEXA and finite elements

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A hip replacement with a cemented or cementless femoral stem produces an effect on the bone called adaptive remodelling, attributable to mechanical and biological factors. All of the cementless prostheses designs try to achieve an optimal load transfer in order to avoid stress-shielding, which produces an osteopenia. Long-term densitometric studies taken after implanting ABG-I and ABG-II stems confirm that the changes made to the design and alloy of the ABG-II stem help produce less proximal atrophy of the femur. The simulation with FE allowed us to study the biomechanical behaviour of two stems. The aim of this study was, if possible, to correlate the biological and mechanical findings. Methods Both models with prostheses ABG-I and II have been simulated in five different moments of time which coincide with the DEXA measurements: postoperative, 6 months, 1, 3 and 5 years, in addition to the healthy femur as the initial reference. For the complete comparative analysis of both stems, all of the possible combinations of bone mass (group I and group II of pacients in two controlled studies for ABG-I and II stems, respectively), prosthetic geometry (ABG-I and ABG-II) and stem material (Wrought Titanium or TMZF) were simulated. Results and Discussion In both groups of bone mass an increase of stress in the area of the cancellous bone is produced, which coincides with the end of the HA coating, as a consequence of the bottleneck effect which is produced in the transmission of loads, and corresponds to Gruen zones 2 and 6, where no osteopenia can be seen in contrast to zones 1 and 7. Conclusions In this study it is shown that the ABG-II stem is more effective than the ABG-I given that it generates higher tensional values on the bone, due to which proximal bone atrophy diminishes. This biomechanical behaviour with an improved transmission of loads confirmed by means of FE simulation corresponds to the biological findings obtained with Dual-Energy X

  12. Strain-related bone remodeling in distraction osteogenesis of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Meyer, U; Wiesmann, H P; Kruse-Lösler, B; Handschel, J; Stratmann, U; Joos, U

    1999-03-01

    Distraction osteogenesis has become a mainstay in craniofacial surgery. However, there are several unresolved problems concerning the biology of bone regeneration. We investigated the biomechanical effects of mandibular lengthening in 32 rabbits on a cellular and histologic level. The mandible was subjected to a corticotomy, held in a neutral position for 4 days, and then lengthened at various strain rates and frequencies for 10 days. Radiographic, histologic, and electron microscopic examinations showed a strain-related bone regeneration. Application of physiologic strain rates (2000 microstrains or 0.2 percent) led to a bridging of the artificial fracture exhibiting woven ossification, whereas at 20,000 microstrains trabecular bone formation was demonstrated. In contrast, hyperphysiologic strain magnitudes (200,000 microstrains and 300,000 microstrains) showed a fibrous tissue formation. Multiple strain applications (10 cycles/day versus 1 cycle/day) increased the width of the distraction gap without changing the stage of bone regeneration. The gradual distraction of bone in physiologic magnitudes at higher frequencies seems to be desirable for a bony differentiation and may help to improve clinical applications.

  13. TULA-2, a novel histidine phosphatase regulates bone remodeling by modulating osteoclast function

    PubMed Central

    Back, Steven H.; Adapala, Naga Suresh; Barbe, Mary F.; Carpino, Nick C.; Tsygankov, Alexander Y.; Sanjay, Archana

    2013-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue that depends on the intricate relationship between protein tyrosine kinases (PTK) and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) for maintaining homeostasis. PTKs and PTPs act like molecular on and off switches and help modulate differentiation and the attachment of osteoclasts to bone matrix regulating bone resorption. The novel protein T-cell Ubiquitin Ligand-2 (TULA-2), which is abundantly expressed in osteoclasts, is a novel histidine phosphatase. Our results show that of the two family members only TULA-2 is expressed in osteoclasts and that its expression is sustained throughout the course of osteoclast differentiation suggesting that TULA-2 may play a role during early as well late stages of osteoclast differentiation. Skeletal analysis of mice that do not express TULA or TULA-2 proteins (DKO Mice) revealed that there was a decrease in bone volume due to increased osteoclast numbers and function. Furthermore, in vitro experiments indicated that bone marrow precursor cells from DKO mice have an increased potential to form osteoclasts. At the molecular level, the absence of TULA-2 in osteoclasts results in increased Syk phosphorylation at the Y352 and Y525/526 residues and activation of phospholipase C gamma 2 (PLCγ2) upon engagement of Immune-receptor-Tyrosine-based-Activation-Motif (ITAM)–mediated signaling. Furthermore, expression of a phosphatase-dead TULA-2 leads to increased osteoclast function. Taken together, these results suggest that TULA-2 negatively regulates osteoclast differentiation and function. PMID:23149425

  14. In vivo micro-CT analysis of bone remodeling in a rat calvarial defect model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umoh, Joseph U.; Sampaio, Arthur V.; Welch, Ian; Pitelka, Vasek; Goldberg, Harvey A.; Underhill, T. Michael; Holdsworth, David W.

    2009-04-01

    The rodent calvarial defect model is commonly used to investigate bone regeneration and wound healing. This study presents a micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) methodology for measuring the bone mineral content (BMC) in a rat calvarial defect and validates it by estimating its precision error. Two defect models were implemented. A single 6 mm diameter defect was created in 20 rats, which were imaged in vivo for longitudinal experiments. Three 5 mm diameter defects were created in three additional rats, which were repeatedly imaged ex vivo to determine precision. Four control rats and four rats treated with bone morphogenetic protein were imaged at 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks post-surgery. Scan parameters were 80 kVp, 0.45 mA and 180 mAs. Images were reconstructed with an isotropic resolution of 45 µm. At 6 weeks, the BMC in control animals (4.37 ± 0.66 mg) was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than that in treated rats (11.29 ± 1.01 mg). Linear regression between the BMC and bone fractional area, from 20 rats, showed a strong correlation (r2 = 0.70, p < 0.0001), indicating that the BMC can be used, in place of previous destructive analysis techniques, to characterize bone growth. The high precision (2.5%) of the micro-CT methodology indicates its utility in detecting small BMC changes in animals.

  15. Fibrinolysis inhibitors adversely affect remodeling of tissues sealed with fibrin glue.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Lissy K; Vijayan Lal, Arthur; Uma Shankar, P R; Mohanty, Mira

    2003-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out to determine if aprotinin and epsilon -amino caproic acid increases the quality of Fibrin glue. A rat model was used for tissues such as liver and skin while rabbits were used for application of glue in dura mater. Apposition of all the tissues, glued with fibrin was found to be good and remnants of the polymerized fibrin were seen even on the seventh day of application, though inhibitors were not incorporated with the glue. In skin, excessive amounts of fibrin remained as a result of addition of aprotinin and epsilon -amino caproic acid, as compared to the glue applied without any inhibitor. After dural sealing, the wound repair and new bone formation at craniotomy site progressed well in the fibrin glue applied area as compared to the commercially available glue that contained aprotinin. The adhesive strength of the glue without or with fibrinolysis inhibitors was found to be similar, after 1h grafts on rat back. The observations from this study suggests that the use of aprotinin with fibrin glue may not be required because, even liver tissue that is known to have high fibrinolytic activity was sealed and repaired well in the absence of plasminogen inhibitors. On the other hand, it was found that if inhibitors were added, nondegraded matrix remained in the tissue even after 15 days and affected migration of repair cells. Thus, the inhibition of fibrinolysis after fibrin glue application is found detrimental to wound healing.

  16. The effects of pullet body weight, dietary nonpyhtate phosphorus intake, and breeder feeding regimen on production performance, chick quality, and bone remodeling in broiler breeders.

    PubMed

    Ekmay, R D; Salas, C; England, J; Cerrate, S; Coon, C N

    2012-04-01

    A 3 × 2 × 2 factorial experiment, consisting of 52 hens per treatment, was conducted to determine the effects of pullet BW, dietary nonphytate phosphorus (NPP), and feeding regimen on performance, progeny quality, and bone remodeling. Cobb 500 broiler breeder pullets were reared to 3 different growth curves: 20% under, Cobb standard, and 20% over. Body weights were recorded weekly and feed adjustments made accordingly. At 21 wk, 624 hens were fed one of 2 breeder diets differing only in the amount of dietary NPP: 0.15 or 0.40%. A normal feeding regimen was appropriate for the particular growth curve; an alternative regimen considered the 3 growth curves together as a flock. At 24, 26, and 29 wk, blood was collected from 5 hens per treatment every 4 h over a 24-h period. Plasma samples were analyzed for total alkaline phosphatase, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, parathyroid hormone-related peptide, Ca, and inorganic P. Eggs per hen housed were diminished in hens fed the low dietary NPP and by low pullet target weight. Hens fed low dietary NPP also had lower egg weights but better eggshell quality. Mortality was significantly higher in hens fed low dietary NPP. Breeder tibia relative strength and ash were also significantly lower in hens fed low dietary NPP, regardless of the quantitative amount. Progeny tibia ash was not affected by any treatment. Total alkaline phosphatase responded to pullet BW, however by wk 29, total alkaline phosphatase also became sensitive to dietary NPP. The NPP by pullet BW interaction for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase levels became significant by 29 wk, and pullet BW was significant at wk 24. The NPP by pullet growth curve interaction was also critical for plasma inorganic P levels throughout the sampling period. In summary, both 0.15% dietary NPP and reared pullets 20% under standard BW negatively affect egg production but do not impair progeny productivity. Body composition appears to be a main contributor in bone remodeling

  17. Cartilage Repair and Subchondral Bone Remodeling in Response to Focal Lesions in a Mini-Pig Model: Implications for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Matthew B.; Belkin, Nicole S.; Milby, Andrew H.; Henning, Elizabeth A.; Bostrom, Marc; Kim, Minwook; Pfeifer, Christian; Meloni, Gregory; Dodge, George R.; Burdick, Jason A.; Schaer, Thomas P.; Steinberg, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Preclinical large animal models are essential for evaluating new tissue engineering (TE) technologies and refining surgical approaches for cartilage repair. Some preclinical animal studies, including the commonly used minipig model, have noted marked remodeling of the subchondral bone. However, the mechanisms underlying this response have not been well characterized. Thus, our objective was to compare in-vivo outcomes of chondral defects with varied injury depths and treatments. Design: Trochlear chondral defects were created in 11 Yucatan minipigs (6 months old). Groups included an untreated partial-thickness defect (PTD), an untreated full-thickness defect (FTD), and FTDs treated with microfracture, autologous cartilage transfer (FTD-ACT), or an acellular hyaluronic acid hydrogel. Six weeks after surgery, micro-computed tomography (μCT) was used to quantitatively assess defect fill and subchondral bone remodeling. The quality of cartilage repair was assessed using the ICRS-II histological scoring system and immunohistochemistry for type II collagen. A finite element model (FEM) was developed to assess load transmission. Results: Using μCT, substantial bone remodeling was observed for all FTDs, but not for the PTD group. The best overall histological scores and greatest type II collagen staining was found for the FTD-ACT and PTD groups. The FEM confirmed that only the FTD-ACT group could initially restore appropriate transfer of compressive loads to the underlying bone. Conclusions: The bony remodeling observed in this model system appears to be a biological phenomena and not a result of altered mechanical loading, with the depth of the focal chondral defect (partial vs. full thickness) dictating the bony remodeling response. The type of cartilage injury should be carefully controlled in studies utilizing this model to evaluate TE approaches for cartilage repair. PMID:25318414

  18. Membrane fluidization triggers membrane remodeling which affects the thermotolerance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shigapova, Natalia; Török, Zsolt; Balogh, Gábor; Goloubinoff, Pierre; Vígh, László; Horváth, Ibolya

    2005-03-25

    Treatment of Escherichia coli with non-lethal doses of heat or benzyl alcohol (BA) causes transient membrane fluidization and permeabilization, and induces the rapid transcription of heat-shock genes in a sigma32-dependent manner. This early response is followed by a rapid adaptation (priming) of the cells to otherwise lethal elevated temperature, in strong correlation with an observed remodeling of the composition and alkyl chain unsaturation of membrane lipids. The acquisition of cellular thermotolerance in BA-primed cells is unrelated to protein denaturation and is not accompanied by the formation of major heat-shock proteins, such as GroEL and DnaK. This suggests that the rapid remodeling of membrane composition is sufficient for the short-term bacterial thermotolerance.

  19. Uterine distension differentially affects remodelling and distensibility of the uterine vasculature in non-pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Osol, George; Barron, Carolyn; Mandalà, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    During pregnancy the mammalian uterine circulation undergoes significant expansive remodelling necessary for normal pregnancy outcome. The underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that myometrial stretch actively stimulates uterine vascular remodelling by developing a new surgical approach to induce unilateral uterine distension in non-pregnant rats. Three weeks after surgery, which consisted of an infusion of medical-grade silicone into the uterine lumen, main and mesometrial uterine artery and vein length, diameter and distensibility were recorded. Radial artery diameter, distensibility and vascular smooth muscle mitotic rate (Ki67 staining) were also measured. Unilateral uterine distension resulted in significant increases in the length of main uterine artery and vein and mesometrial segments but had no effect on vessel diameter or distensibility. In contrast, there were significant increases in the diameter of the radial arteries associated with the distended uterus. These changes were accompanied by reduced arterial distensibility and increased vascular muscle hyperplasia. In summary, this is the first report to show that myometrial stretch is a sufficient stimulus to induce significant remodelling of uterine vessels in non-pregnant rats. Moreover, the results indicate differential regulation of these growth processes as a function of vessel size and type.

  20. Changes of blood parameters associated with bone remodeling following experimentally induced fatty liver disorder in laying hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies have demonstrated that obesity and osteoporosis are two linked disorders in humans. This study examined if excessive lipid consumption affects bone metabolism in laying hens. One hundred 63-week-old laying hens were randomly divided into two treatments, i.e., fed with a regular diet (control...

  1. Genetic Dissection of a QTL Affecting Bone Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Sabik, Olivia L.; Medrano, Juan F.; Farber, Charles R.

    2017-01-01

    Parameters of bone geometry such as width, length, and cross-sectional area are major determinants of bone strength. Although these traits are highly heritable, few genes influencing bone geometry have been identified. Here, we dissect a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) influencing femur size. This QTL was originally identified in an F2 cross between the C57BL/6J-hg/hg (HG) and CAST/EiJ strains and was referred to as femur length in high growth mice 2 (Feml2). Feml2 was located on chromosome (Chr.) 9 at ∼20 cM. Here, we show that the HG.CAST-(D9Mit249-D9Mit133)/Ucd congenic strain captures Feml2. In an F2 congenic cross, we fine-mapped the location of Feml2 to an ∼6 Mbp region extending from 57.3 to 63.3 Mbp on Chr. 9. We have identified candidates by mining the complete genome sequence of CAST/EiJ and through allele-specific expression (ASE) analysis of growth plates in C57BL/6J × CAST/EiJ F1 hybrids. Interestingly, we also find that the refined location of Feml2 overlaps a cluster of six independent genome-wide associations for human height. This work provides the foundation for the identification of novel genes affecting bone geometry. PMID:28082324

  2. Genetic Dissection of a QTL Affecting Bone Geometry.

    PubMed

    Sabik, Olivia L; Medrano, Juan F; Farber, Charles R

    2017-03-10

    Parameters of bone geometry such as width, length, and cross-sectional area are major determinants of bone strength. Although these traits are highly heritable, few genes influencing bone geometry have been identified. Here, we dissect a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) influencing femur size. This QTL was originally identified in an F2 cross between the C57BL/6J-hg/hg (HG) and CAST/EiJ strains and was referred to as femur length in high growth mice 2 (Feml2). Feml2 was located on chromosome (Chr.) 9 at ∼20 cM. Here, we show that the HG.CAST-(D9Mit249-D9Mit133)/Ucd congenic strain captures Feml2 In an F2 congenic cross, we fine-mapped the location of Feml2 to an ∼6 Mbp region extending from 57.3 to 63.3 Mbp on Chr. 9. We have identified candidates by mining the complete genome sequence of CAST/EiJ and through allele-specific expression (ASE) analysis of growth plates in C57BL/6J × CAST/EiJ F1 hybrids. Interestingly, we also find that the refined location of Feml2 overlaps a cluster of six independent genome-wide associations for human height. This work provides the foundation for the identification of novel genes affecting bone geometry.

  3. Effect of femoral canal shape on mechanical stress distribution and adaptive bone remodelling around a cementless tapered-wedge stem

    PubMed Central

    Oba, M.; Kobayashi, N.; Ike, H.; Tezuka, T.; Saito, T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In total hip arthroplasty (THA), the cementless, tapered-wedge stem design contributes to achieving initial stability and providing optimal load transfer in the proximal femur. However, loading conditions on the femur following THA are also influenced by femoral structure. Therefore, we determined the effects of tapered-wedge stems on the load distribution of the femur using subject-specific finite element models of femurs with various canal shapes. Patients and Methods We studied 20 femurs, including seven champagne flute-type femurs, five stovepipe-type femurs, and eight intermediate-type femurs, in patients who had undergone cementless THA using the Accolade TMZF stem at our institution. Subject–specific finite element (FE) models of pre- and post-operative femurs with stems were constructed and used to perform FE analyses (FEAs) to simulate single-leg stance. FEA predictions were compared with changes in bone mineral density (BMD) measured for each patient during the first post-operative year. Results Stovepipe models implanted with large-size stems had significantly lower equivalent stress on the proximal-medial area of the femur compared with champagne-flute and intermediate models, with a significant loss of BMD in the corresponding area at one year post-operatively. Conclusions The stovepipe femurs required a large-size stem to obtain an optimal fit of the stem. The FEA result and post-operative BMD change of the femur suggest that the combination of a large-size Accolade TMZF stem and stovepipe femur may be associated with proximal stress shielding. Cite this article: M. Oba, Y. Inaba, N. Kobayashi, H. Ike, T. Tezuka, T. Saito. Effect of femoral canal shape on mechanical stress distribution and adaptive bone remodelling around a cementless tapered-wedge stem. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:362–369. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.59.2000525. PMID:27601435

  4. BIOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS AND BONE REMODELING IN RESPONSE TO OOPHORECTOMY AND AQUATIC TRAINING

    PubMed Central

    SOUZA, HELENA RIBEIRO; GIROL, ANA PAULA; SCHIAVETO, ADRIANA PAULA SANCHEZ; GEROMEL, MAIRTO ROBERIS; IYOMASA, MELINA MIZUSAKI; ARRUDA, MAURÍCIO FERRAZ DE

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate whether swimming could prevent bone loss and could be indicated to assist in treatment of osteoporosis. Methods: Female rats were divided into 4 groups (n=6), two of them were oophorectomized. Animals from two groups, one oophorectomized and another not oophorectomized, underwent aquatic training for eight weeks. After training, the animals were sacrificed and their blood was collected for calcium and alkaline phosphatase serum dosage; the femur was removed and subjected to radiological and histological densitometry analysis to assess bone loss and osteoclast counting on femoral head and neck. Results: Increase in serum calcium was not observed. There was an increasing activity of alkaline phosphatase in the oophorectomized groups. The radiographs suggest that there was a greater bone mass density in the trained groups. Concerning histology, the trained groups had better tissue structural organization than the sedentary groups. In the oophorectomized and sedentary group, higher presence of osteoclasts was observed a. Conclusion: Exercise and oophorectomy did not promote changes in serum calcium levels. The decrease of sex steroids caused by oophorectomy was responsible for severe bone loss, but swimming exercise was able to reduce this loss. Oophorectomy promoted the proliferation of osteoclasts and the exercise proved to be able to diminish it. Level of Evidence I, Experimental Study. PMID:28149187

  5. Effect of calcium phosphate and vitamin D3 supplementation on bone remodelling and metabolism of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and iron

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of calcium phosphate and/or vitamin D3 on bone and mineral metabolism. Methods Sixty omnivorous healthy subjects participated in the double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel designed study. Supplements were tricalcium phosphate (CaP) and cholecalciferol (vitamin D3). At the beginning of the study (baseline), all subjects documented their normal nutritional habits in a dietary record for three successive days. After baseline, subjects were allocated to three intervention groups: CaP (additional 1 g calcium/d), vitamin D3 (additional 10 μg/d) and CaP + vitamin D3. In the first two weeks, all groups consumed placebo bread, and afterwards, for eight weeks, the test bread according to the intervention group. In the last week of each study period (baseline, placebo, after four and eight weeks of intervention), a faecal (three days) and a urine (24 h) collection and a fasting blood sampling took place. Calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and iron were determined in faeces, urine and blood. Bone formation and resorption markers were analysed in blood and urine. Results After four and eight weeks, CaP and CaP + vitamin D3 supplementations increased faecal excretion of calcium and phosphorus significantly compared to placebo. Due to the vitamin D3 supplementations (vitamin D3, CaP + vitamin D3), the plasma 25-(OH)D concentration significantly increased after eight weeks compared to placebo. The additional application of CaP led to a significant increase of the 25-(OH)D concentration already after four weeks. Bone resorption and bone formation markers were not influenced by any intervention. Conclusions Supplementation with daily 10 μg vitamin D3 significantly increases plasma 25-(OH)D concentration. The combination with daily 1 g calcium (as CaP) has a further increasing effect on the 25-(OH)D concentration. Both CaP alone and in combination with vitamin D3 have no beneficial effect on bone

  6. Bone mineral density-affecting genes in Africans.

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Gordon; Haynatzki, Gleb; Haynatzka, Vera; Howell, Ryan; Kosoko-Lasaki, Sade; Fu, Yun-Xin; Yu, Fei; Gallagher, John C.; Wilson, M. Roy

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have recently reported the role of environmental exposure in the ethnic diversity of bone mineral density (BMD). Potential genetic difference has not been adequately assessed. PURPOSE: To determine allele frequencies of BMD-affecting genes and their association with BMD in Africans. METHODS: Allele frequencies at 18 polymorphic sites in 13 genes that affect BMD in Asians and/or Caucasians were determined in 143 recent immigrants (55 men and 88 women, 18-51 years of age) from sub-Saharan Sudan to the United States. Genetic association studies were performed. RESULTS: Among the 14 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 10 were significantly different in allele frequency between Sudanese and Asians, and 10 between Sudanese and Caucasians. Only the osteocalcin gene was not significantly different in allele frequency among Sudanese, Asians and Caucasians. Allele frequencies in the TGFB, COL1A1 and CSR genes were extremely low (<0.04) in the Sudanese. Frequencies of microsatellite alleles in four genes were significantly different among Sudanese, Asians and Caucasians. SNPs in the VDR and ERalpha genes were associated with BMD and/or BMC (bone mineral content) at several bone sites. CONCLUSIONS: Genetic difference may play a role in the ethnic diversity in BMD and/or BMC. PMID:16895279

  7. Repeated freeze-thawing of bone tissue affects Raman bone quality measurements

    PubMed Central

    McElderry, John-David P.; Kole, Matthew R.; Morris, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to probe fresh tissue is a key feature to biomedical Raman spectroscopy. However, it is unclear how Raman spectra of calcified tissues are affected by freezing. In this study, six transverse sections of femoral cortical bone were subjected to multiple freeze/thaw cycles and probed using a custom Raman microscope. Significant decreases were observed in the amide I and amide III bands starting after two freeze thaw cycles. Raman band intensities arising from proline residues of frozen tissue appeared consistent with fresh tissue after four cycles. Crystallinity values of bone mineral diminished slightly with freezing and were noticeable after only one freezing. Mineral carbonate levels did not deviate significantly with freezing and thawing. The authors recommend freezing and thawing bone tissue only once to maintain accurate results. PMID:21806253

  8. Small body size and extreme cortical bone remodeling indicate phyletic dwarfism in Magyarosaurus dacus (Sauropoda: Titanosauria).

    PubMed

    Stein, Koen; Csiki, Zoltan; Rogers, Kristina Curry; Weishampel, David B; Redelstorff, Ragna; Carballido, Jose L; Sander, P Martin

    2010-05-18

    Sauropods were the largest terrestrial tetrapods (>10(5) kg) in Earth's history and grew at rates that rival those of extant mammals. Magyarosaurus dacus, a titanosaurian sauropod from the Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) of Romania, is known exclusively from small individuals (<10(3) kg) and conflicts with the idea that all sauropods were massive. The diminutive M. dacus was a classical example of island dwarfism (phyletic nanism) in dinosaurs, but a recent study suggested that the small Romanian titanosaurs actually represent juveniles of a larger-bodied taxon. Here we present strong histological evidence that M. dacus was indeed a dwarf (phyletic nanoid). Bone histological analysis of an ontogenetic series of Magyarosaurus limb bones indicates that even the smallest Magyarosaurus specimens exhibit a bone microstructure identical to fully mature or old individuals of other sauropod taxa. Comparison of histologies with large-bodied sauropods suggests that Magyarosaurus had an extremely reduced growth rate, but had retained high basal metabolic rates typical for sauropods. The uniquely decreased growth rate and diminutive body size in Magyarosaurus were adaptations to life on a Cretaceous island and show that sauropod dinosaurs were not exempt from general ecological principles limiting body size.

  9. Small body size and extreme cortical bone remodeling indicate phyletic dwarfism in Magyarosaurus dacus (Sauropoda: Titanosauria)

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Koen; Csiki, Zoltan; Rogers, Kristina Curry; Weishampel, David B.; Redelstorff, Ragna; Carballido, Jose L.; Sander, P. Martin

    2010-01-01

    Sauropods were the largest terrestrial tetrapods (>105 kg) in Earth's history and grew at rates that rival those of extant mammals. Magyarosaurus dacus, a titanosaurian sauropod from the Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) of Romania, is known exclusively from small individuals (<103 kg) and conflicts with the idea that all sauropods were massive. The diminutive M. dacus was a classical example of island dwarfism (phyletic nanism) in dinosaurs, but a recent study suggested that the small Romanian titanosaurs actually represent juveniles of a larger-bodied taxon. Here we present strong histological evidence that M. dacus was indeed a dwarf (phyletic nanoid). Bone histological analysis of an ontogenetic series of Magyarosaurus limb bones indicates that even the smallest Magyarosaurus specimens exhibit a bone microstructure identical to fully mature or old individuals of other sauropod taxa. Comparison of histologies with large-bodied sauropods suggests that Magyarosaurus had an extremely reduced growth rate, but had retained high basal metabolic rates typical for sauropods. The uniquely decreased growth rate and diminutive body size in Magyarosaurus were adaptations to life on a Cretaceous island and show that sauropod dinosaurs were not exempt from general ecological principles limiting body size. PMID:20435913

  10. Class IIa histone deacetylases affect neuronal remodeling and functional outcome after stroke.

    PubMed

    Kassis, Haifa; Shehadah, Amjad; Li, Chao; Zhang, Yi; Cui, Yisheng; Roberts, Cynthia; Sadry, Neema; Liu, Xianshuang; Chopp, Michael; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2016-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated that stroke induces nuclear shuttling of class IIa histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4). Stroke-induced nuclear shuttling of HDAC4 is positively and significantly correlated with improved indices of neuronal remodeling in the peri-infarct cortex. In this study, using a rat model for middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), we tested the effects of selective inhibition of class IIa HDACs on functional recovery and neuronal remodeling when administered 24hr after stroke. Adult male Wistar rats (n = 15-17/group) were subjected to 2 h MCAO and orally gavaged with MC1568 (a selective class IIa HDAC inhibitor), SAHA (a non-selective HDAC inhibitor), or vehicle-control for 7 days starting 24 h after MCAO. A battery of behavioral tests was performed. Lesion volume measurement and immunohistochemistry were performed 28 days after MCAO. We found that stroke increased total HDAC activity in the ipsilateral hemisphere compared to the contralateral hemisphere. Stroke-increased HDAC activity was significantly decreased by the administration of SAHA as well as by MC1568. However, SAHA significantly improved functional outcome compared to vehicle control, whereas selective class IIa inhibition with MC1568 increased mortality and lesion volume and did not improve functional outcome. In addition, MC1568 decreased microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2, dendrites), phosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain (pNFH, axons) and myelin basic protein (MBP, myelination) immunoreactivity in the peri-infarct cortex. Quantitative RT-PCR of cortical neurons isolated by laser capture microdissection revealed that MC1568, but not SAHA, downregulated CREB and c-fos expression. Additionally, MC1568 decreased the expression of phosphorylated CREB (active) in neurons. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that selective inhibition of class IIa HDACs impairs neuronal remodeling and neurological outcome. Inactivation of CREB and c-fos by MC1568 likely contributes to

  11. Genetic and hormonal control of bone volume, architecture, and remodeling in XXY mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peter Y; Kalak, Robert; Lue, Yanhe; Jia, Yue; Erkkila, Krista; Zhou, Hong; Seibel, Markus J; Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald S; Dunstan, Colin R

    2010-10-01

    Klinefelter syndrome is the most common chromosomal aneuploidy in men (XXY karyotype, 1 in 600 live births) and results in testicular (infertility and androgen deficiency) and nontesticular (cognitive impairment and osteoporosis) deficits. The extent to which skeletal changes are due to testosterone deficiency or arise directly from gene overdosage cannot be determined easily in humans. To answer this, we generated XXY mice through a four-generation breeding scheme. Eight intact XXY and 9 XY littermate controls and 8 castrated XXY mice and 8 castrated XY littermate controls were euthanized at 1 year of age. Castration occurred 6 months prior to killing. A third group of 9 XXY and 11 XY littermates were castrated and simultaneously implanted with a 1-cm Silastic testosterone capsule 8 weeks prior to sacrifice. Tibias were harvested from all three groups and examined by micro-computed tomography and histomorphometry. Blood testosterone concentration was assayed by radioimmunoassay. Compared with intact XY controls, intact androgen-deficient XXY mice had lower bone volume (6.8% +/- 1.2% versus 8.8% +/- 1.7%, mean +/- SD, p = .01) and thinner trabeculae (50 +/- 4 µm versus 57 +/- 5 µm, p = .007). Trabecular separation (270 +/- 20 µm versus 270 +/- 20 µm) or osteoclast number relative to bone surface (2.4 +/- 1.0/mm2 versus 2.7 +/- 1.5/mm2) did not differ significantly. Testosterone-replaced XXY mice continued to show lower bone volume (5.5% +/- 2.4% versus 8.1% +/- 3.5%, p = .026). They also exhibited greater trabecular separation (380 +/- 69 µm versus 324 +/- 62 µm, p = .040) but equivalent blood testosterone concentrations (6.3 +/- 1.8 ng/mL versus 8.2 +/- 4.2 ng/mL, p = .28) compared with testosterone-replaced XY littermates. In contrast, castration alone drastically decreased bone volume (p < .001), trabecular thickness (p = .05), and trabecular separation (p

  12. In vivo bone tunnel remodeling in symptomatic patients after ACL reconstruction: a retrospective comparison of articular and extra-articular fixation

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Dominic T.; Rasch, Helmut; Hirschmann, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background there is only a paucity of studies dealing with bone remodeling within the tunnels after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of tendon graft type and surgical fixation technique on bone tunnel remodeling in patients with symptomatic knees after ACL reconstruction. Methods in a retrospective study 99mTc-HDP bone tracer uptake (BTU) in SPECT/CT of 57 knees with symptoms of pain and/or instability after ACL reconstruction was investigated. All 57 knees were subdivided according their anatomy (femur and tibia), fixation (articular versus extra-articular fixation) and graft types into eight groups: femoral-articular versus extra-articular fixation using bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) and hamstring autografts; tibial-articular versus extra-articular fixation using patellar tendon and hamstring autografts; BTU grading for each area of the localisation scheme were recorded. Tunnel diameter and length was measured in the CT scans. Results BTU was higher for the articular fixation in the femur and for the extra-articular fixation in the tibial tunnel. Patellar tendon graft fixation showed a significantly higher BTU in the superior-lateral and posterior-central area of the tibia, meaning the areas of the tibial tunnel near the entrance into the joint. Tunnel enlargement correlated significantly with increased BTU (p<0.05). Conclusion assessment of in vivo bone tunnel remodelling in symptomatic patients after ACL reconstruction revealed different patterns of BTU with regards to graft and fixation method. PMID:26958543

  13. Majoon ushba, a polyherbal compound ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis via regulating inflammatory and bone remodeling markers in rats.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Ramamoorthi; Doss, Hari Madhuri; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the anti-arthritic effect of majoon ushba (MU) and its underlying mechanism in adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA) rats. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete freund's adjuvant (0.1ml) into the right hind paw of the Wistar albino rats. MU (1000mg/kg/b.wt) and methotrexate (3mg/kg/b.wt) were administered from day 11 to day 18th for 8days after adjuvant induction. We have found that MU treatment significantly increased the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) and inhibited the over production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) (ELISA) in the serum of adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. The mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-17), inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2)), MCP-1, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand (RANKL) and transcription factors (NF-кB and AP-1) (Real-Time PCR) was found significantly downregulated in the synovial tissues of MU treated arthritic rats. In addition, the protein expression of NF-кB, IL-17, COX-2, and RANKL (western blotting and immunohistochemistry analysis) was found reduced. On the other hand, osteoprotegerin (OPG), a bone remodeling marker was found to be elevated in synovial tissues of MU treated arthritic rats. Furthermore, MU treatment prevented body weight loss and reduced the joint paw edema, cell infiltration, cartilage and bone degradation as evidenced by the histopathological and radiological analysis. In conclusion, our current findings provide scientific evidence for the traditional claim of MU as an anti-arthritic drug.

  14. Sequential activation of different pathway networks in ischemia-affected and non-affected myocardium, inducing intrinsic remote conditioning to prevent left ventricular remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Pavo, Noemi; Lukovic, Dominika; Zlabinger, Katrin; Zimba, Abelina; Lorant, David; Goliasch, Georg; Winkler, Johannes; Pils, Dietmar; Auer, Katharina; Jan Ankersmit, Hendrik; Giricz, Zoltán; Baranyai, Tamas; Sárközy, Márta; Jakab, András; Garamvölgyi, Rita; Emmert, Maximilian Y.; Hoerstrup, Simon P.; Hausenloy, Derek J.; Ferdinandy, Péter; Maurer, Gerald; Gyöngyösi, Mariann

    2017-01-01

    We have analyzed the pathway networks of ischemia-affected and remote myocardial areas after repetitive ischemia/reperfusion (r-I/R) injury without ensuing myocardial infarction (MI) to elaborate a spatial- and chronologic model of cardioprotective gene networks to prevent left ventricular (LV) adverse remodeling. Domestic pigs underwent three cycles of 10/10 min r-I/R by percutaneous intracoronary balloon inflation/deflation in the mid left anterior descending artery, without consecutive MI. Sham interventions (n = 8) served as controls. Hearts were explanted at 5 h (n = 6) and 24 h (n = 6), and transcriptomic profiling of the distal (ischemia-affected) and proximal (non-affected) anterior myocardial regions were analyzed by next generation sequencing (NGS) and post-processing with signaling pathway impact and pathway network analyses. In ischemic region, r-I/R induced early activation of Ca-, adipocytokine and insulin signaling pathways with key regulator STAT3, which was also upregulated in the remote areas together with clusterin (CLU) and TNF-alpha. During the late phase of cardioprotection, antigen immunomodulatory pathways were activated with upregulation of STAT1 and CASP3 and downregulation of neprilysin in both zones, suggesting r-I/R induced intrinsic remote conditioning. The temporo-spatially differently activated pathways revealed a global myocardial response, and neprilysin and the STAT family as key regulators of intrinsic remote conditioning for prevention of adverse remodeling. PMID:28266659

  15. Using PET/CT Bone Scan Dynamic Data to Evaluate Tibia Remodeling When a Taylor Spatial Frame Is Used: Short and Longer Term Differences

    PubMed Central

    Lundblad, Henrik; Maguire, Gerald Q.; Karlsson-Thur, Charlotte; Jonsson, Cathrine; Noz, Marilyn E.; Zeleznik, Michael P.; Jacobsson, Hans; Weidenhielm, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Eighteen consecutive patients, treated with a Taylor Spatial Frame for complex tibia conditions, gave their informed consent to undergo Na18F− PET/CT bone scans. We present a Patlak-like analysis utilizing an approximated blood time-activity curve eliminating the need for blood aliquots. Additionally, standardized uptake values (SUV) derived from dynamic acquisitions were compared to this Patlak-like approach. Spherical volumes of interest (VOIs) were drawn to include broken bone, other (normal) bone, and muscle. The SUVm(t) (m = max, mean) and a series of slopes were computed as (SUVm(ti) − SUVm(tj))/(ti − tj), for pairs of time values ti and tj. A Patlak-like analysis was performed for the same time values by computing ((VOIp(ti)/VOIe(ti))−(VOIp(tj)/VOIe(tj)))/(ti − tj), where p = broken bone, other bone, and muscle and e = expected activity in a VOI. Paired comparisons between Patlak-like and SUVm slopes showed good agreement by both linear regression and correlation coefficient analysis (r = 84%, rs = 78%-SUVmax, r = 92%, and rs = 91%-SUVmean), suggesting static scans could substitute for dynamic studies. Patlak-like slope differences of 0.1 min−1 or greater between examinations and SUVmax differences of ~5 usually indicated good remodeling progress, while negative Patlak-like slope differences of −0.06 min−1 usually indicated poor remodeling progress in this cohort. PMID:26436093

  16. Atrial natriuretic peptide affects cardiac remodeling, function, heart failure, and survival in a mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Gladysheva, Inna P; Fan, Tai-Hwang M; Sullivan, Ryan; Houng, Aiilyan K; Reed, Guy L

    2014-03-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a frequent cause of heart failure and death. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a biomarker of dilated cardiomyopathy, but there is controversy whether ANP modulates the development of heart failure. Therefore, we examined whether ANP affects heart failure, cardiac remodeling, function, and survival in a well-characterized, transgenic model of dilated cardiomyopathy. Mice with dilated cardiomyopathy with normal ANP levels survived longer than mice with partial ANP (P<0.01) or full ANP deficiency (P<0.001). In dilated cardiomyopathy mice, ANP protected against the development of heart failure as indicated by reduced lung water, alveolar congestion, pleural effusions, etc. ANP improved systolic function and reduced cardiomegaly. Pathological cardiac remodeling was diminished in mice with normal ANP as indicated by decreased ventricular interstitial and perivascular fibrosis. Mice with dilated cardiomyopathy and normal ANP levels had better systolic function (P<0.001) than mice with dilated cardiomyopathy and ANP deficiency. Dilated cardiomyopathy was associated with diminished cardiac transcripts for NP receptors A and B in mice with normal ANP and ANP deficiency, but transcripts for NP receptor C and C-type natriuretic peptide were selectively altered in mice with dilated cardiomyopathy and ANP deficiency. Taken together, these data indicate that ANP has potent effects in experimental dilated cardiomyopathy that reduce the development of heart failure, prevent pathological remodeling, preserve systolic function, and reduce mortality. Despite the apparent overlap in physiological function between the NPs, these data suggest that the role of ANP in dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure is not compensated physiologically by other NPs.

  17. Adipokines: A Possible Contribution to Vascular and Bone Remodeling in Idiopathic Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kochetkova, Evgenia A; Ugai, Ludmila G; Maistrovskaia, Yuliya V; Nevzorova, Vera A

    2017-04-01

    Osteoporosis is a major comorbidity of cardio-respiratory diseases, but the mechanistic links between pulmonary arterial hypertension and bone remain elusive. The purpose of the stud was to evaluate serum adipokines and endothelin-1 (ET-1) levels in the patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) NYHA class III-IV and to determine its associations with bone mineral density (BMD). Pulmonary and hemodynamic parameters, BMD Z-scores at the lumbar spine (LS) and femoral neck (FN), serum leptin, adiponectin, visfatin and endothelin-1 (ET-1), were evaluated in 32 patients with IPAH NYHA class III-IV and 30 healthy volunteers. Leptin, adiponectin and ET-1 were higher in the patients with IPAH than in healthy subjects. Visfatin level showed a tendency to increase compared to that of healthy subjects (p = 0.076). The univariate analysis revealed a positive correlation between BMD Z-scores at both sites and 6-min walk test, and inverse relation with pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP). Adiponectin and visfatin showed positive correlations with PVR (p = 0.009 and p = 0.006). Serum adiponectin, visfatin and leptin were inversely associated with Z-scores. After adjusting for BMI and FMI, such associations persisted between visfatin and adiponectin levels and Z-scores at both sites. ET-1 related to mPAP, cardiac index and PVR. Negative correlation was observed between ET-1 and FN BMD (p = 0.01). Positive correlations have revealed between ET-1 and adiponectin (p = 0.02), visfatin (p = 0.004) in IPAH patients. These results provide further evidence that adipokine and endothelial dysregulation may cause not only a decrease in BMD, but also an increase in hemodynamic disorders of IPAH.

  18. Biological Regulation of Bone Quality

    PubMed Central

    Alliston, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    The ability of bone to resist fracture is determined by the combination of bone mass and bone quality. Like bone mass, bone quality is carefully regulated. Of the many aspects of bone quality, this review focuses on biological mechanisms that control the material quality of the bone extracellular matrix (ECM). Bone ECM quality depends upon ECM composition and organization. Proteins and signaling pathways that affect the mineral or organic constituents of bone ECM impact bone ECM material properties, such as elastic modulus and hardness. These properties are also sensitive to pathways that regulate bone remodeling by osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes. Several extracellular proteins, signaling pathways, intracellular effectors, and transcription regulatory networks have been implicated in the control of bone ECM quality. A molecular understanding of these mechanisms will elucidate the biological control of bone quality and suggest new targets for the development of therapies to prevent bone fragility. PMID:24894149

  19. Are uniform regional safety factors an objective of adaptive modeling/remodeling in cortical bone?

    PubMed

    Skedros, John G; Dayton, Michael R; Sybrowsky, Christian L; Bloebaum, Roy D; Bachus, Kent N

    2003-07-01

    It has been hypothesized that a major objective of morphological adaptation in limb-bone diaphyses is the achievement of uniform regional safety factors between discrete cortical locations (e.g. between cranial and caudal cortices at mid-diaphysis). This hypothesis has been tested, and appears to be supported in the diaphyses of ovine and equine radii. The present study more rigorously examined this question using the equine third metacarpal (MC3), which has had functionally generated intracortical strains estimated by a sophisticated finite element model. Mechanical properties of multiple mid-diaphyseal specimens were evaluated in both tension and compression, allowing for testing of habitually tensed or compressed regions in their respective habitual loading mode ("strain-mode-specific" loading). Elastic modulus, and yield and ultimate strength and strain, were correlated with in vivo strain data from a previously published finite element model. Mechanical tests revealed minor variations in elastic modulus, and yield and ultimate strength in both tension and compression loading, while physiological strains varied significantly between the cortices. Contrary to the hypothesis of uniform safety factors, the MC3 has a broad range of tension (caudo-medial, 4.0; cranio-lateral, 37.7) and compression (caudo-medial, 5.7; cranio-lateral, 68.9) safety factors.

  20. Can Na18F PET/CT be used to study bone remodeling in the tibia when patients are being treated with a Taylor Spatial Frame?

    PubMed

    Lundblad, Henrik; Maguire, Gerald Q; Olivecrona, Henrik; Jonsson, Cathrine; Jacobsson, Hans; Noz, Marilyn E; Zeleznik, Michael P; Weidenhielm, Lars; Sundin, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring and quantifying bone remodeling are of interest, for example, in correction osteotomies, delayed fracture healing pseudarthrosis, bone lengthening, and other instances. Seven patients who had operations to attach an Ilizarov-derived Taylor Spatial Frame to the tibia gave informed consent. Each patient was examined by Na(18)F PET/CT twice, at approximately six weeks and three months after the operation. A validated software tool was used for the following processing steps. The first and second CT volumes were aligned in 3D and the respective PET volumes were aligned accordingly. In the first PET volume spherical volumes of interest (VOIs) were delineated for the crural fracture and normal bone and transferred to the second PET volume for SUVmax evaluation. This method potentially provides clinical insight into questions such as, when has the bone remodeling progressed well enough to safely remove the TSF? and when is intervention required, in a timelier manner than current methods? For example, in two patients who completed treatment, the SUVmax between the first and second PET/CT examination decreased by 42% and 13%, respectively. Further studies in a larger patient population are needed to verify these preliminary results by correlating regional Na(18)F PET measurements to clinical and radiological findings.

  1. Estrogen Opposes the Apoptotic Effects of Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7 on Tissue Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, David G.; Jin, Donald F.; Sanders, Michel M.

    2000-01-01

    Interactions between estrogen and growth factor signaling pathways at the level of gene expression play important roles in the function of reproductive tissues. For example, estrogen regulates transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) in the uterus during the proliferative phase of the mammalian reproductive cycle. Bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7), a member of the TGFβ superfamily, is also involved in the development and function of reproductive tissues. However, relatively few studies have addressed the expression of BMP-7 in reproductive tissues, and the role of BMP-7 remains unclear. As part of an ongoing effort to understand how estrogen represses gene expression and to study its interactions with other signaling pathways, chick BMP-7 (cBMP-7) was cloned. cBMP-7 mRNA levels are repressed threefold within 8 h following estrogen treatment in the chick oviduct, an extremely estrogen-responsive reproductive tissue. This regulation occurs at the transcriptional level. Estrogen has a protective role in many tissues, and withdrawal from estrogen often leads to tissue regression; however, the mechanisms mediating regression of the oviduct remain unknown. Terminal transferase-mediated end-labeling and DNA laddering assays demonstrated that regression of the oviduct during estrogen withdrawal involves apoptosis, which is a novel observation. cBMP-7 mRNA levels during estrogen withdrawal increase concurrently with the apoptotic index of the oviduct. Furthermore, addition of purified BMP-7 induces apoptosis in primary oviduct cells. This report demonstrates that the function of BMP-7 in the oviduct involves the induction of apoptosis and that estrogen plays an important role in opposing this function. PMID:10848589

  2. Bone development in black ducks as affected by dietary toxaphene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehrle, P.M.; Finley, M.T.; Ludke, J.L.; Mayer, F.L.; Kaiser, T.E.

    1979-01-01

    Black ducks, Anas rubripes, were exposed to dietary toxaphene concentrations of 0, 10, or 50 μg/g of food for 90 days prior to laying and through the reproductive season. Toxaphene did not affect reproduction or survival, but reduced growth and impaired backbone development in ducklings. Collagen, the organic matrix of bone, was decreased significantly in cervical vertebrae of ducklings fed 50 μg/g, and calcium conentrations increased in vertebrae of ducklings fed 10 or 50 μg/g. The effects of toxaphene were observed only in female ducklings. In contrast to effects on vertebrae, toxaphene exposure did not alter tibia development. Toxaphene residues in carcasses of these ducklings averaged slightly less than the dietary levels.

  3. New objective measurement of forehead symmetry in unicoronal craniosynostosis - comparison between fronto-orbital advancement and forehead remodelling with a bone graft.

    PubMed

    Maltese, Giovanni; Tarnow, Peter; Lindström, Annelie; Lagerlöf, Jakob Heydorn; Bernhardt, Peter; Tovetjärn, Robert; Kölby, Lars

    2014-02-01

    Patients with unicoronal synostosis (UCS) present with ipsilateral forehead flattening, contralateral frontal bossing, and rotation of the facial midline. Uni- or bilateral fronto-orbital advancement (FOA) techniques are the most common surgical approaches for correction of UCS. The purpose of this study was to objectively evaluate the surgical outcome in patients for UCS, using a new MATLAB computer tool programmed to measure the symmetry of the two halves of the forehead.Files were reviewed from a consecutive series of patients treated for UCS at the unit, from 1979-2008. The patients were grouped according to the method of operation used. The computer tool evaluated preoperative and postoperative cephalograms and CT scans. Eighty-eight patients were included. The male-to-female ratio was 1:2.4. Forty-six patients had been operated on with FOA and 42 with forehead remodelling using a calvarial bone graft. Forehead symmetry was significantly improved by both techniques (p < 0.001 for both), but the postoperative forehead symmetry was significantly better after forehead remodelling (p = 0.025). The reoperation rate was much lower for the second group (6.5 vs 37.2%, p < 0.001). It is concluded that forehead remodelling with a calvarial bone graft creates a more symmetrical forehead than FOA and may, therefore, be a better alternative for treatment of unicoronal synostosis.

  4. Cross-Talk Between Human Tenocytes and Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Potentiates Extracellular Matrix Remodeling In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ekwueme, Emmanuel C.; Shah, Jay V.; Mohiuddin, Mahir; Ghebes, Corina A.; Crispim, João F.; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Fernandes, Hugo A.M.; Freeman, Joseph W.

    2016-01-01

    Tendon and ligament (T/L) pathologies account for a significant portion of musculoskeletal injuries and disorders. Tissue engineering has emerged as a promising solution in the regeneration of both tissues. Specifically, the use of multipotent human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC) has shown great promise to serve as both a suitable cell source for tenogenic regeneration and a source of trophic factors to induce tenogenesis. Using four donor sets, we investigated the bidirectional paracrine tenogenic response between human hamstring tenocytes (hHT) and bone marrow-derived hMSC. Cell metabolic assays showed that only one hHT donor experienced sustained notable increases in cell metabolic activity during co-culture. Histological staining confirmed that co-culture induced elevated collagen protein levels in both cell types at varying time-points in two of four donor sets assessed. Gene expression analysis using qPCR showed the varied up-regulation of anabolic and catabolic markers involved in extracellular matrix maintenance for hMSC and hHT. Furthermore, analysis of hMSC/hHT co-culture secretome using a reporter cell line for TGF-β, a potent inducer of tenogenesis, revealed a trend of higher TGF-β bioactivity in hMSC secretome compared to hHT. Finally, hHT cytoskeletal immunostaining confirmed that both cell types released soluble factors capable of inducing favorable tenogenic morphology, comparable to control levels of soluble TGF-β1. These results suggest a potential for TGF-β-mediated signaling mechanism that is involved during the paracrine interplay between the two cell types that is reminiscent of T/L matrix remodeling/ turnover. These findings have significant implications in the clinical use of hMSC for common T/L pathologies. PMID:26308651

  5. Long-term Bone Remodeling in HA-coated Stems: A Radiographic Review of 208 Total Hip Arthroplasties (THAs) with 15 to 20 Years Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Boldt, Jens G; Cartillier, Jean-Claude; Machenaud, Alain; Vidalain, Jean-Pierre

    2015-11-01

    We present a prospective study focused on radiographic long-term outcomes and bone remodeling at a mean of 17.0 years (range: 15 to 20) in 208 cementless fully HA-coated femoral stems (Corail, DePuy International Ltd, Leeds, UK). Total hip replacements in this study were performed by three members of the surgeon design group between 1986 and 1991. Radiographic evaluation focused on periprosthetic osteolysis, bone remodeling, osseous integration, subsidence, metaphyseal or diaphyseal load transfer, and femoral stress shielding. The radiographs were digitized and examined with contrast-enhancing software for analysis of the trabecular architecture. Radiographic signs of aseptic stem loosening were visible in two cases (1%). Three stems (1.4%) showed metaphyseal periprosthetic osteolysis in four of seven Gruen zones associated with eccentric polyethylene wear awaiting metaphyseal bone grafting and cup liner exchange. One stem (0.5%) was revised due to infection. No stem altered in varus or valgus alignment more than two degrees, and mean subsidence was 0.1 mm (range: 0 to 2 mm) after a mean of 17.0 years. A total of 5 stems (2.4%) required or are awaiting revision surgery. Trabecular orientation and micro-anatomy suggested main proximal load-transfer patterns in all except 3 cases (98.6%). Combined metaphyseal and diaphyseal osseointegration and bone remodeling were visible in 100 stems (48%). Diaphyseal stress shielding and cortical thickening were observed in 3 stems (1.4%). Other radiographic features are discussed in depth. This long-term study of 208 fully HA-coated Corail stems showed satisfactory osseointegration and fixation in 203 cases (97.6%) after a mean of 17.0 years follow-up. Stem failures were associated with extreme eccentric polyethylene wear.

  6. Three-dimensional micro-level computational study of Wolff's law via trabecular bone remodeling in the human proximal femur using design space topology optimization.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Christopher; Kim, Il Yong

    2011-03-15

    The law of bone remodeling, commonly referred to as Wolff's Law, asserts that the internal trabecular bone adapts to external loadings, reorienting with the principal stress trajectories to maximize mechanical efficiency creating a naturally optimum structure. The goal of the current study was to utilize an advanced structural optimization algorithm, called design space optimization (DSO), to perform a micro-level three-dimensional finite element bone remodeling simulation on the human proximal femur and analyse the results to determine the validity of Wolff's hypothesis. DSO optimizes the layout of material by iteratively distributing it into the areas of highest loading, while simultaneously changing the design domain to increase computational efficiency. The result is a "fully stressed" structure with minimized compliance and increased stiffness. The large-scale computational simulation utilized a 175 μm mesh resolution and the routine daily loading activities of walking and stair climbing. The resulting anisotropic trabecular architecture was compared to both Wolff's trajectory hypothesis and natural femur samples from literature using a variety of visualization techniques, including radiography and computed tomography (CT). The results qualitatively revealed several anisotropic trabecular regions, that were comparable to the natural human femurs. Quantitatively, the various regional bone volume fractions from the computational results were consistent with quantitative CT analyses. The global strain energy proceeded to become more uniform during optimization; implying increased mechanical efficiency was achieved. The realistic simulated trabecular geometry suggests that the DSO method can accurately predict bone adaptation due to mechanical loading and that the proximal femur is an optimum structure as the Wolff hypothesized.

  7. Using PET/CT Bone Scan Dynamic Data to Evaluate Tibia Remodeling When a Taylor Spatial Frame Is Used: Short and Longer Term Differences.

    PubMed

    Lundblad, Henrik; Maguire, Gerald Q; Karlsson-Thur, Charlotte; Jonsson, Cathrine; Noz, Marilyn E; Zeleznik, Michael P; Jacobsson, Hans; Weidenhielm, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Eighteen consecutive patients, treated with a Taylor Spatial Frame for complex tibia conditions, gave their informed consent to undergo Na(18)F(-) PET/CT bone scans. We present a Patlak-like analysis utilizing an approximated blood time-activity curve eliminating the need for blood aliquots. Additionally, standardized uptake values (SUV) derived from dynamic acquisitions were compared to this Patlak-like approach. Spherical volumes of interest (VOIs) were drawn to include broken bone, other (normal) bone, and muscle. The SUV m (t) (m = max, mean) and a series of slopes were computed as (SUV m (t i ) - SUV m (t j ))/(t i - t j ), for pairs of time values t i and t j . A Patlak-like analysis was performed for the same time values by computing ((VOI p (t i )/VOI e (t i ))-(VOI p (t j )/VOI e (t j )))/(t i - t j ), where p = broken bone, other bone, and muscle and e = expected activity in a VOI. Paired comparisons between Patlak-like and SUV m slopes showed good agreement by both linear regression and correlation coefficient analysis (r = 84%, r s = 78%-SUVmax, r = 92%, and r s = 91%-SUVmean), suggesting static scans could substitute for dynamic studies. Patlak-like slope differences of 0.1 min(-1) or greater between examinations and SUVmax differences of ~5 usually indicated good remodeling progress, while negative Patlak-like slope differences of -0.06 min(-1) usually indicated poor remodeling progress in this cohort.

  8. Collagen modifications in postmenopausal osteoporosis: advanced glycation endproducts may affect bone volume, structure and quality.

    PubMed

    Willett, Thomas L; Pasquale, Julia; Grynpas, Marc D

    2014-09-01

    The classic model of postmenopausal osteoporosis (PM-OP) starts with the depletion of estrogen, which in turn stimulates imbalanced bone remodeling, resulting in loss of bone mass/volume. Clinically, this leads to fractures because of structural weakness. Recent work has begun to provide a more complete picture of the mechanisms of PM-OP involving oxidative stress and collagen modifications known as advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). On one hand, AGEs may drive imbalanced bone remodeling through signaling mediated by the receptor for AGEs (RAGE), stimulating resorption and inhibiting formation. On the other hand, AGEs are associated with degraded bone material quality. Oxidative stress promotes the formation of AGEs, inhibits normal enzymatically derived crosslinking and can degrade collagen structure, thereby reducing fracture resistance. Notably, there are multiple positive feedback loops that can exacerbate the mechanisms of PM-OP associated with oxidative stress and AGEs. Anti-oxidant therapies may have the potential to inhibit the oxidative stress based mechanisms of this disease.

  9. Radiation-induced sarcomas of bone: factors that affect outcome.

    PubMed

    Kalra, S; Grimer, R J; Spooner, D; Carter, S R; Tillman, R M; Abudu, A

    2007-06-01

    We identified 42 patients who presented to our unit over a 27-year period with a secondary radiation-induced sarcoma of bone. We reviewed patient, tumour and treatment factors to identify those that affected outcome. The mean age of the patients at presentation was 45.6 years (10 to 84) and the mean latent interval between radiotherapy and diagnosis of the sarcoma was 17 years (4 to 50). The median dose of radiotherapy given was estimated at 50 Gy (mean 49; 20 to 66). There was no correlation between radiation dose and the time to development of a sarcoma. The pelvis was the most commonly affected site (14 patients (33%)). Breast cancer was the most common primary tumour (eight patients; 19%). Metastases were present at diagnosis of the sarcoma in nine patients (21.4%). Osteosarcoma was the most common diagnosis and occurred in 30 cases (71.4%). Treatment was by surgery and chemotherapy when indicated: 30 patients (71.4%) were treated with the intention to cure. The survival rate was 41% at five years for those treated with the intention to cure but in those treated palliatively the mean survival was only 8.8 months (2 to 22), and all had died by two years. The only factor found to be significant for survival was the ability to completely resect the tumour. Limb sarcomas had a better prognosis (66% survival at five years) than central ones (12% survival at five years) (p = 0.009). Radiation-induced sarcoma is a rare complication of radiotherapy. Both surgical and oncological treatment is likely to be compromised by the treatment received previously by the patient.

  10. Experiment K-310: The effect of space flight on ostenogenesis and dentinogenesis in the mandible of rats. Supplement 1: The effects of space flight on alveolar bone modeling and remodeling in the rat mandible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van, P. T.; Vignery, A.; Bacon, R.

    1981-01-01

    The histomorphometric study of alveolar bone, a non-weight-bearing bone submitted mainly to the mechanical stimulations of mastication, showed that space flight decreases the remodeling activity but does not induce a negative balance between resorption and formation. The most dramatic effect of space flight has been observed along the periosteal surface, and especially in areas not covered with masticatory muscles, where bone formation almost stopped completely during the flight period. This bone, having been submitted to the same mechanical forces in the flight animals and the controls, leads to the conclusion that factors other than mechanical loading might be involved in the decreased bone formation during flight.

  11. Radiological study of two disseminated maligant non-Hodgkin lymphomas affecting only the bones in children

    SciTech Connect

    Vanel, D; Rebibo, G.; Tamman, S.; Bayle, C.; Hartmann, O.

    1982-12-01

    Malignant non-Hodgkin lymphomas are a neoplastic proliferation of lymphoid cells whose clinical manifestations are extremely variable. All tissues can be affected. There may be localization in lymphoid organs (Waldeyer's ring, spleen, digestive tract), other localizations (lungs, pleura, liver, bone marrow, central nervous system) and unusual localizations. Although bone marrow is often affected, bone involvement is very rare in the early stages of the disease. This report concerns the radiological study of two disseminated malignant non-Hodgkin lymphomas affecting only the bone in children.

  12. Opioid receptor agonists may favorably affect bone mechanical properties in rats with estrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Janas, Aleksandra; Folwarczna, Joanna

    2017-02-01

    The results of epidemiological, clinical, and in vivo and in vitro experimental studies on the effect of opioid analgesics on bone are inconsistent. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of morphine (an agonist of opioid receptors), buprenorphine (a partial μ opioid receptor agonist and κ opioid receptor antagonist), and naloxone (an antagonist of opioid receptors) on the skeletal system of female rats in vivo. The experiments were carried out on 3-month-old Wistar rats, divided into two groups: nonovariectomized (intact; NOVX) rats and ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The bilateral ovariectomy was performed 7 days before the start of drug administration. Morphine hydrochloride (20 mg/kg/day s.c.), buprenorphine (0.05 mg/kg/day s.c.), or naloxone hydrochloride dihydrate (2 mg/kg/day s.c.) were administered for 4 weeks to NOVX and OVX rats. In OVX rats, the use of morphine and buprenorphine counteracted the development of osteoporotic changes in the skeletal system induced by estrogen deficiency. Morphine and buprenorphine beneficially affected also the skeletal system of NOVX rats, but the effects were much weaker than those in OVX rats. Naloxone generally did not affect the rat skeletal system. The results confirmed the role of opioid receptors in the regulation of bone remodeling processes and demonstrated, in experimental conditions, that the use of opioid analgesics at moderate doses may exert beneficial effects on the skeletal system, especially in estrogen deficiency.

  13. Bisphosphonates and bone quality

    PubMed Central

    Pazianas, Michael; van der Geest, Stefan; Miller, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are bone-avid compounds used as first-line medications for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. They are also used in other skeletal pathologies such as Paget's and metastatic bone disease. They effectively reduce osteoclast viability and also activity in the resorptive phase of bone remodelling and help preserve bone micro-architecture, both major determinants of bone strength and ultimately of the susceptibility to fractures. The chemically distinctive structure of each BP used in the clinic determines their unique affinity, distribution/penetration throughout the bone and their individual effects on bone geometry, micro-architecture and composition or what we call ‘bone quality'. BPs have no clinically significant anabolic effects. This review will touch upon some of the components of bone quality that could be affected by the administration of BPs. PMID:24876930

  14. Does Orthodontic Treatment Affect the Alveolar Bone Density?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian-Hong; Huang, Heng-Li; Liu, Chien-Feng; Wu, Jay; Li, Yu-Fen; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few studies involving human participants have been conducted to investigate the effect of orthodontic treatment on alveolar bone density around the teeth. Our previous study revealed that patients who received 6 months of active orthodontic treatment exhibited an ∼24% decrease in alveolar bone density around the teeth. However, after an extensive retention period following orthodontic treatment, whether the bone density around the teeth can recover to its original state from before the treatment remains unclear, thus warranting further investigation. The purpose of this study was to assess the bone density changes around the teeth before, during, and after orthodontic treatment. Dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to measure the changes in bone density around 6 teeth in the anterior maxilla (maxilla central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines) of 8 patients before and after orthodontic treatment. Each patient underwent 3 dental CBCT scans: before treatment (T0); at the end of 7 months of active orthodontic treatment (T1); after several months (20–22 months) of retention (T2). The Friedman test was applied to evaluate the changes in the alveolar bone density around the teeth according to the 3 dental CBCT scans. From T0 to T1, a significant reduction in bone density was observed around the teeth (23.36 ± 10.33%); by contrast, a significant increase was observed from T1 to T2 (31.81 ± 23.80%). From the perspective of the overall orthodontic treatment, comparing the T0 and T2 scans revealed that the bone density around the teeth was relatively constant (a reduction of only 0.75 ± 19.85%). The results of the statistical test also confirmed that the difference in bone density between T0 and T2 was nonsignificant. During orthodontic tooth movement, the alveolar bone density around the teeth was reduced. However, after a period of bone recovery, the reduced bone density recovered to its previous state from before the

  15. Does Orthodontic Treatment Affect the Alveolar Bone Density?

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Hong; Huang, Heng-Li; Liu, Chien-Feng; Wu, Jay; Li, Yu-Fen; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2016-03-01

    Few studies involving human participants have been conducted to investigate the effect of orthodontic treatment on alveolar bone density around the teeth. Our previous study revealed that patients who received 6 months of active orthodontic treatment exhibited an ∼24% decrease in alveolar bone density around the teeth. However, after an extensive retention period following orthodontic treatment, whether the bone density around the teeth can recover to its original state from before the treatment remains unclear, thus warranting further investigation.The purpose of this study was to assess the bone density changes around the teeth before, during, and after orthodontic treatment.Dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to measure the changes in bone density around 6 teeth in the anterior maxilla (maxilla central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines) of 8 patients before and after orthodontic treatment. Each patient underwent 3 dental CBCT scans: before treatment (T0); at the end of 7 months of active orthodontic treatment (T1); after several months (20-22 months) of retention (T2). The Friedman test was applied to evaluate the changes in the alveolar bone density around the teeth according to the 3 dental CBCT scans.From T0 to T1, a significant reduction in bone density was observed around the teeth (23.36 ± 10.33%); by contrast, a significant increase was observed from T1 to T2 (31.81 ± 23.80%). From the perspective of the overall orthodontic treatment, comparing the T0 and T2 scans revealed that the bone density around the teeth was relatively constant (a reduction of only 0.75 ± 19.85%). The results of the statistical test also confirmed that the difference in bone density between T0 and T2 was nonsignificant.During orthodontic tooth movement, the alveolar bone density around the teeth was reduced. However, after a period of bone recovery, the reduced bone density recovered to its previous state from before the orthodontic treatment

  16. Physical characteristics affecting the tensile failure properties of compact bone.

    PubMed

    Currey, J D

    1990-01-01

    Compact bone specimens from a wide variety of reptiles, birds, and mammals were tested in tension, and their failure properties related to mineral volume fraction, porosity and histological orientation. The principal findings were that the ultimate strain and the work under the stress-strain curve declined sharply with mineralisation, as did the stress and strain appearing after the specimen had yielded. Ultimate tensile strength was not simply related to any combination of the possible explanatory variables, but some relatively poorly mineralised bones, notably antlers, had high stresses at failure. These high strengths were allowed by a great increase in stress after the bones had yielded at quite low stresses.

  17. Pyridoxine deficiency affects biomechanical properties of chick tibial bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masse, P. G.; Rimnac, C. M.; Yamauchi, M.; Coburn, S. P.; Rucker, R. B.; Howell, D. S.; Boskey, A. L.

    1996-01-01

    The mechanical integrity of bone is dependent on the bone matrix, which is believed to account for the plastic deformation of the tissue, and the mineral, which is believed to account for the elastic deformation. The validity of this model is shown in this study based on analysis of the bones of vitamin B6-deficient and vitamin B6-replete chick bones. In this model, when B6-deficient and control animals are compared, vitamin B6 deficiency has no effect on the mineral content or composition of cortical bone as measured by ash weight (63 +/- 6 vs. 58 +/- 3); mineral to matrix ratio of the FTIR spectra (4.2 +/- 0.6 vs. 4.5 +/- 0.2), line-broadening analyses of the X-ray diffraction 002 peak (beta 002 = 0.50 +/- 0.1 vs. 0.49 +/- 0.01), or other features of the infrared spectra. In contrast, collagen was significantly more extractable from vitamin B6-deficient chick bones (20 +/- 2% of total hydroxyproline extracted vs. 10 +/- 3% p < or = 0.001). The B6-deficient bones also contained an increased amount of the reducible cross-links DHLNL, dehydro-dihydroxylysinonorleucine, (1.03 +/- 0.07 vs. 0.84 +/- 0.13 p < or = 0.001); and a nonsignificant increase in HLNL, dehydro-hydroxylysinonorleucine, (0.51 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.43 +/- 0.03, p < or = 0.10). There were no significant changes in bone length, bone diameter, or area moment of inertia. In four-point bending, no significant changes in elastic modulus, stiffness, offset yield deflection, or fracture deflection were detected. However, fracture load in the B6-deficient animals was decreased from 203 +/- 35 MPa to 151 +/- 23 MPa, p < or = 0.01, and offset yield load was decreased from 165 +/- 9 MPa to 125 +/- 14 MPa, p < or = 0.05. Since earlier histomorphometric studies had demonstrated that the B6-deficient bones were osteopenic, these data suggest that although proper cortical bone mineralization occurred, the alterations of the collagen resulted in changes to bone mechanical performance.

  18. The use of biochemical markers of bone remodeling in multiple myeloma: a report of the International Myeloma Working Group.

    PubMed

    Terpos, E; Dimopoulos, M A; Sezer, O; Roodman, D; Abildgaard, N; Vescio, R; Tosi, P; Garcia-Sanz, R; Davies, F; Chanan-Khan, A; Palumbo, A; Sonneveld, P; Drake, M T; Harousseau, J-L; Anderson, K C; Durie, B G M

    2010-10-01

    Lytic bone disease is a frequent complication of multiple myeloma (MM). Lytic lesions rarely heal and X-rays are of limited value in monitoring bone destruction during anti-myeloma or anti-resorptive treatment. Biochemical markers of bone resorption (amino- and carboxy-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (NTX and CTX, respectively) or CTX generated by matrix metalloproteinases (ICTP)) and bone formation provide information on bone dynamics and reflect disease activity in bone. These markers have been investigated as tools for evaluating the extent of bone disease, risk of skeletal morbidity and response to anti-resorptive treatment in MM. Urinary NTX, serum CTX and serum ICTP are elevated in myeloma patients with osteolytic lesions and correlate with advanced disease stage. Furthermore, urinary NTX and serum ICTP correlate with risk for skeletal complications, disease progression and overall survival. Bone markers have also been used for the early diagnosis of bone lesions. This International Myeloma Working Group report summarizes the existing data for the role of bone markers in assessing the extent of MM bone disease and in monitoring bone turnover during anti-myeloma therapies and provides information on novel markers that may be of particular interest in the near future.

  19. In vivo loading increases mechanical properties of scaffold by affecting bone formation and bone resorption rates.

    PubMed

    Roshan-Ghias, Alireza; Lambers, Floor M; Gholam-Rezaee, Mehdi; Müller, Ralph; Pioletti, Dominique P

    2011-12-01

    A successful bone tissue engineering strategy entails producing bone-scaffold constructs with adequate mechanical properties. Apart from the mechanical properties of the scaffold itself, the forming bone inside the scaffold also adds to the strength of the construct. In this study, we investigated the role of in vivo cyclic loading on mechanical properties of a bone scaffold. We implanted PLA/β-TCP scaffolds in the distal femur of six rats, applied external cyclic loading on the right leg, and kept the left leg as a control. We monitored bone formation at 7 time points over 35 weeks using time-lapsed micro-computed tomography (CT) imaging. The images were then used to construct micro-finite element models of bone-scaffold constructs, with which we estimated the stiffness for each sample at all time points. We found that loading increased the stiffness by 60% at 35 weeks. The increase of stiffness was correlated to an increase in bone volume fraction of 18% in the loaded scaffold compared to control scaffold. These changes in volume fraction and related stiffness in the bone scaffold are regulated by two independent processes, bone formation and bone resorption. Using time-lapsed micro-CT imaging and a newly-developed longitudinal image registration technique, we observed that mechanical stimulation increases the bone formation rate during 4-10 weeks, and decreases the bone resorption rate during 9-18 weeks post-operatively. For the first time, we report that in vivo cyclic loading increases mechanical properties of the scaffold by increasing the bone formation rate and decreasing the bone resorption rate.

  20. Bone volume fraction explains the variation in strength and stiffness of cancellous bone affected by metastatic cancer and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Nazarian, Ara; von Stechow, Dietrich; Zurakowski, David; Müller, Ralph; Snyder, Brian D

    2008-12-01

    Preventing nontraumatic fractures in millions of patients with osteoporosis or metastatic cancer may significantly reduce the associated morbidity and reduce health-care expenditures incurred by these fractures. Predicting fracture occurrence requires an accurate understanding of the relationship between bone structure and the mechanical properties governing bone fracture that can be readily measured. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a single analytic relationship with either bone tissue mineral density or bone volume fraction (BV/TV) as independent variables could predict the strength and stiffness of normal and pathologic cancellous bone affected by osteoporosis or metastatic cancer. After obtaining institutional review board approval and informed consent, 15 patients underwent excisional biopsy of metastatic prostate, breast, lung, ovarian, or colon cancer from the spine and/or femur to obtain 41 metastatic cancer specimens. In addition, 96 noncancer specimens were excised from 43 age- and site-matched cadavers. All specimens were imaged using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and backscatter emission imaging and tested mechanically by uniaxial compression and nanoindentation. The minimum BV/TV, measured using quantitative micro-CT, accounted for 84% of the variation in bone stiffness and strength for all cancellous bone specimens. While relationships relating bone density to strength and stiffness have been derived empirically for normal and osteoporotic bone, these relationships have not been applied to skeletal metastases. This simple analytic relationship will facilitate large-scale screening and prediction of fracture risk for normal and pathologic cancellous bone using clinical CT systems to determine the load capacity of bones altered by metastatic cancer, osteoporosis, or both.

  1. Changes of blood parameters associated with bone remodeling following experimentally induced fatty liver disorder in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Jiang, S; Cheng, H W; Cui, L Y; Zhou, Z L; Hou, J F

    2013-06-01

    Studies have demonstrated that obesity and osteoporosis are linked disorders in humans. This study examined the hypothesis that excessive lipid consumption affects bone metabolism in laying hens. A total of one hundred 63-wk-old laying hens were randomly divided into 2 treatments and fed either a regular layer diet (control) or a high energy and low protein diet (HE-LP; experimental treatment) for 80 d. Egg production, feed intake, and BW were recorded at various days during the treatment. At d 80, ten randomly chosen birds per treatment group were killed. Abdominal fat weight, liver weight, and liver fat content were determined. Serum levels of total calcium, inorganic phosphate, and alkaline phosphatase were measured using a biochemical analyzer. Serum concentrations of osteocalcin, leptin-like protein, and estrogen were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Tibia length and width were measured using a vernier caliper; density of the right tibias was determined using an x-ray scanner; and mechanical properties of the left tibias were analyzed using a material testing machine. The expression of osteocalcin and osteoprotegerin mRNA in the keel bone was analyzed by real-time PCR. The concentration of osteocalcin protein in the keels was measured using western blot. Compared with control hens, hens fed the HE-LP diet had lower egg production, lower feed intake, greater liver fat content, and greater abdominal fat pad mass (P < 0.05). Feeding the HE-LP diet increased serum alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin, leptin-like protein, and estrogen concentrations (P < 0.05), and decreased the keel osteocalcin concentrations (P < 0.05). There were significant positive correlations between the serum concentrations of leptin-like protein, estrogen, and osteocalcin regardless of treatment (P < 0.05). The results indicated that HE-LP diet induced a fatty liver disorder in laying hens with an upregulation in bone turnover and exacerbated skeletal damage. The data

  2. Cyclic cryopreservation affects the nanoscale material properties of trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Landauer, Alexander K; Mondal, Sumona; Yuya, Philip A; Kuxhaus, Laurel

    2014-11-07

    Tissues such as bone are often stored via freezing, or cryopreservation. During an experimental protocol, bone may be frozen and thawed a number of times. For whole bone, the mechanical properties (strength and modulus) do not significantly change throughout five freeze-thaw cycles. Material properties at the trabecular and lamellar scales are distinct from whole bone properties, thus the impact of freeze-thaw cycling at this scale is unknown. To address this, the effect of repeated freezing on viscoelastic material properties of trabecular bone was quantified via dynamic nanoindentation. Vertebrae from five cervine spines (1.5-year-old, male) were semi-randomly assigned, three-to-a-cycle, to 0-10 freeze-thaw cycles. After freeze-thaw cycling, the vertebrae were dissected, prepared and tested. ANOVA (factors cycle, frequency, and donor) on storage modulus, loss modulus, and loss tangent, were conducted. Results revealed significant changes between cycles for all material properties for most cycles, no significant difference across most of the dynamic range, and significant differences between some donors. Regression analysis showed a moderate positive correlation between cycles and material property for loss modulus and loss tangent, and weak negative correlation for storage modulus, all correlations were significant. These results indicate that not only is elasticity unpredictably altered, but also that damping and viscoelasticity tend to increase with additional freeze-thaw cycling.

  3. A magnesium based phosphate binder reduces vascular calcification without affecting bone in chronic renal failure rats.

    PubMed

    Neven, Ellen; De Schutter, Tineke M; Dams, Geert; Gundlach, Kristina; Steppan, Sonja; Büchel, Janine; Passlick-Deetjen, Jutta; D'Haese, Patrick C; Behets, Geert J

    2014-01-01

    The alternative phosphate binder calcium acetate/magnesium carbonate (CaMg) effectively reduces hyperphosphatemia, the most important inducer of vascular calcification, in chronic renal failure (CRF). In this study, the effect of low dose CaMg on vascular calcification and possible effects of CaMg on bone turnover, a persistent clinical controversy, were evaluated in chronic renal failure rats. Adenine-induced CRF rats were treated daily with 185 mg/kg CaMg or vehicle for 5 weeks. The aortic calcium content and area% calcification were measured to evaluate the effect of CaMg. To study the effect of CaMg on bone remodeling, rats underwent 5/6th nephrectomy combined with either a normal phosphorus diet or a high phosphorus diet to differentiate between possible bone effects resulting from either CaMg-induced phosphate deficiency or a direct effect of Mg. Vehicle or CaMg was administered at doses of 185 and 375 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks. Bone histomorphometry was performed. Aortic calcium content was significantly reduced by 185 mg/kg/day CaMg. CaMg ameliorated features of hyperparathyroid bone disease. In CRF rats on a normal phosphorus diet, the highest CaMg dose caused an increase in osteoid area due to phosphate depletion. The high phosphorus diet combined with the highest CaMg dose prevented the phosphate depletion and thus the rise in osteoid area. CaMg had no effect on osteoblast/osteoclast or dynamic bone parameters, and did not alter bone Mg levels. CaMg at doses that reduce vascular calcification did not show any harmful effect on bone turnover.

  4. [Bone involvement in endocrinopathies].

    PubMed

    Ribot, C; Trémollières, F; Pouillès, J M

    1994-06-04

    Progress in bone densitometry, particularly biphotonic absoptiometry, has made it possible to better identify the effects of endocrinopathies on bone. Both cortical and trabecular bone structures can be evaluated quantitatively and topographically revealing important information on the pathophysiology of bone loss. Sex hormones play a major role in the regulation of bone mineralization and hypogonadism, whatever the origin, can lead to deleterious effects. Bone loss is known to be significative in high performance female athletes with amenorrhoea; long-term consequences are not yet determined, but stress fractures have been reported in up to 50%. Other hypogonadisms leading to bone demineralization include anorexia nervosa, chronic intake of gonadotrophin releasing hormone analogues and anti-oestrogens, and hyperprolactinism. Hyperthyroidism leads to a negative calcium balance and demineralization with remodelling, predominantly in cortical bone. In hypothyroid states a 10% bone loss is observed in vertebrae. In both cases, bone densitometry should be performed in order to evaluate the effect of treatment. The deleterious effect of spontaneous or iatrogenic hypercortisism is well known, leading to spontaneous wedge fractures of the vertebrae due to predominating trabecular bone loss. The mechanism of action of corticosteroids on bone metabolism is complex, but the major effect is an inhibition of osteoblast maturation. Recovery may be possible, but no large long-term series have yet been reported. Hyperparathyroidism and acromegaly also affect bone mineralization. The information provided by bone densitometry is essential to properly manage patients with endocrinopathies affecting bone mineralization.

  5. Integrated remodeling-to-fracture finite element model of human proximal femur behavior.

    PubMed

    Hambli, Ridha; Lespessailles, Eric; Benhamou, Claude-Laurent

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop an integrated remodeling-to-fracture finite element model allowing for the combined simulation of (i) simulation of a human proximal femur remodeling under a given boundary conditions, (ii) followed by the simulation of its fracture behavior (force-displacement curve and fracture pattern) under quasi-static load. The combination of remodeling and fracture simulation into one unified model consists in considering that the femur properties resulting from the remodeling simulation correspond to the initial state for the fracture prediction. The remodeling model is based on phenomenological one based on a coupled strain and fatigue damage stimulus. The fracture model is based on continuum damage mechanics in order to predict the progressive fracturing process which allows to predict the fracture pattern and the complete force-displacement curve under quasi-static load. To prevent mesh-dependence that generally affects the damage propagation rate, regularization technique was applied in the current work. To investigate the potential of the proposed unified remodeling-to-fracture model, we performed remodeling simulations on a 3D proximal femur model for a duration of 365 days under five different daily loading conditions followed by a side fall fracture simulation reproducing previously published experimental tests (de Bakker et al. (2009), case C, male, 72 years old). We show here that the implementation of an integrated remodeling-to-fracture model provides more realistic prediction strategy to assess the bone remodeling effects on the fracture risk of bone.

  6. Does aspiration of bones and joints affect results of later bone scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Canale, S.T.; Harkness, R.M.; Thomas, P.A.; Massie, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    To determine the effect, if any, of needle aspiration on /sup 99m/Tc bone scanning, three different areas of 15 dogs were first aspirated and then imaged with technetium bone scintigraphy. The hip joint was aspirated, the distal femoral metaphysis was drilled and aspirated, and the tibial periosteum was scraped with an 18- or 20-gauge needle. Varying amounts of trauma were inflicted to simulate varying difficulties at aspiration. /sup 99m/Tc bone scans were obtained from 5 h to 10 days later. There was no evidence of focal technetium uptake after any hip joint aspiration. This was consistent regardless of the amount of trauma inflicted or the time from aspiration to bone scanning. Metaphyseal cortical drilling and tibial periosteal scraping occasionally caused some focal uptake when scanning was delayed greater than 2 days. When osteomyelitis or pyarthrosis is clinically suspected, joint aspiration can be performed without fear of producing a false- positive bone scan.

  7. High levels of periostin correlate with increased fracture rate, diffuse MRI pattern, abnormal bone remodeling and advanced disease stage in patients with newly diagnosed symptomatic multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Terpos, E; Christoulas, D; Kastritis, E; Bagratuni, T; Gavriatopoulou, M; Roussou, M; Papatheodorou, A; Eleutherakis-Papaiakovou, E; Kanellias, N; Liakou, C; Panagiotidis, I; Migkou, M; Kokkoris, P; Moulopoulos, L A; Dimopoulos, M A

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein that is implicated in the biology of normal bone remodeling and in different cancer cell growth and metastasis. However, there is no information on the role of periostin in multiple myeloma (MM). Thus, we evaluated periostin in six myeloma cell lines in vitro; in the bone marrow plasma and serum of 105 newly diagnosed symptomatic MM (NDMM) patients and in the serum of 23 monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), 33 smoldering MM (SMM) patients, 30 patients at the plateau phase post-first-line therapy, 30 patients at first relapse and 30 healthy controls. We found high levels of periostin in the supernatants of myeloma cell lines compared with ovarian cancer cell lines that were not influenced by the incubation with the stromal cell line HS5. In NDMM patients the bone marrow plasma periostin was almost fourfold higher compared with the serum levels of periostin and correlated with the presence of fractures and of diffuse magnetic resonance imaging pattern of marrow infiltration. Serum periostin was elevated in NDMM patients compared with healthy controls, MGUS and SMM patients and correlated with advanced disease stage, high lactate dehydrogenase, increased activin-A, increased bone resorption and reduced bone formation. Patients at first relapse had also elevated periostin compared with healthy controls, MGUS and SMM patients, while even patients at the plateau phase had elevated serum periostin compared with healthy controls. These results support an important role of periostin in the biology of myeloma and reveal periostin as a possible target for the development of antimyeloma drugs. PMID:27716740

  8. In vitro assessment of biomaterial-induced remodeling of subchondral and cancellous bone for the early intervention of joint degeneration with focus on the spinal disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCanless, Jonathan D.

    Osteoarthritis-associated pain of the spinal disc, knee, and hip derives from degeneration of cartilagenous tissues in these joints. Traditional therapies have focused on these cartilage (and disc specific nucleus pulposus) changes as a means of treatment through tissue grafting, regenerative synthetic implants, non-regenerative space filling implants, arthroplasty, and arthrodesis. Although such approaches may seem apparent upon initial consideration of joint degeneration, tissue pathology has shown changes in the underlying bone and vascular bed precede the onset of cartilaginous changes. It is hypothesized that these changes precedent joint degeneration and as such may provide a route for early prevention. The current work proposes an injectable biomaterial-based therapy within these subchondral and cancellous bone regions as a means of preventing or reversing osteoarthritis. Two human concentrated platelet releasate-containing alginate hydrogel/beta-tricalcium phosphate composites have been developed for this potential biomaterial application. The undertaking of assessing these materials through bench-, in vitro, and ex vivo work is described herein. These studies showed the capability of the biomaterials to initiate a wound healing response in monocytes, angiogenic and differentiation behavior in immature endothelial cells, and early osteochondral differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells. These cellular activities are associated with fracture healing and endochondral bone formation, demonstrating the potential of the biomaterials to induce osseous and vascular tissue remodeling underlying osteoarthritic joints as a novel therapy for a disease with rapidly growing healthcare costs.

  9. p38α MAPK regulates proliferation and differentiation of osteoclast progenitors and bone remodeling in an aging-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Qian; Jia, Hao; Li, Ping; Qiu, Shoutao; Yeh, James; Wang, Yibin; Zhang, Zhen-Lin; Ao, Junping; Li, Baojie; Liu, Huijuan

    2017-01-01

    Bone mass is determined by the balance between bone formation, carried out by mesenchymal stem cell-derived osteoblasts, and bone resorption, carried out by monocyte-derived osteoclasts. Here we investigated the potential roles of p38 MAPKs, which are activated by growth factors and cytokines including RANKL and BMPs, in osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption by ablating p38α MAPK in LysM+monocytes. p38α deficiency promoted monocyte proliferation but regulated monocyte osteoclastic differentiation in a cell-density dependent manner, with proliferating p38α−/− cultures showing increased differentiation. While young mutant mice showed minor increase in bone mass, 6-month-old mutant mice developed osteoporosis, associated with an increase in osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption and an increase in the pool of monocytes. Moreover, monocyte-specific p38α ablation resulted in a decrease in bone formation and the number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, likely due to decreased expression of PDGF-AA and BMP2. The expression of PDGF-AA and BMP2 was positively regulated by the p38 MAPK-Creb axis in osteoclasts, with the promoters of PDGF-AA and BMP2 having Creb binding sites. These findings uncovered the molecular mechanisms by which p38α MAPK regulates osteoclastogenesis and coordinates osteoclastogenesis and osteoblastogenesis. PMID:28382965

  10. UK Food Standards Agency Optimal Nutrition Status Workshop: environmental factors that affect bone health throughout life.

    PubMed

    Burns, Lynn; Ashwell, Margaret; Berry, Jacqueline; Bolton-Smith, Caroline; Cassidy, Aedin; Dunnigan, Matthew; Khaw, Kay Tee; Macdonald, Helen; New, Susan; Prentice, Ann; Powell, Jonathan; Reeve, Jonathan; Robins, Simon; Teucher, Birgit

    2003-06-01

    The UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) convened a group of expert scientists to discuss and review UK FSA- and Department of Health-funded research on diet and bone health. This research focused on the lifestyle factors that are amenable to change and may significantly affect bone health and the risk of osteoporotic fracture. The potential benefits of fruits and vegetables, meat, Ca, vitamins D and K and phyto-oestrogens were presented and discussed. Other lifestyle factors were also discussed, particularly the effect of physical activity and possible gene-nutrient interactions affecting bone health.

  11. Breast Cancer Metastasis to Bone Affects Osteoblast Differentiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Miele, M.E., Babu, G.R., Melly, R., Beck, L.N., Kent, J., Gilman, V.R., Sosnowski, D.M., Campo , D.A., Gay, C.V., Budgeon, L.R., Christensen, N.D...a gift from Dr. Henry Donahue, Penn State Hershey Medical Center. MDA-MB-231 cells were maintained in DMEM containing 5% fetal bovine serum (FBS) and...metastasis of breast cancer to bone, J.Orthop.Sci. 5 (2000) 75-81. [15] E. Luegmayr, F. Varga , T. Frank, et al., Effects of triiodothyronine on

  12. Increased Cell Proliferation and Gene Expression of Genes Related to Bone Remodeling, Cell Adhesion and Collagen Metabolism in the Periodontal Ligament of Unopposed Molars in Growing Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dorotheou, Domna; Farsadaki, Vassiliki; Bochaton-Piallat, Marie-Luce; Giannopoulou, Catherine; Halazonetis, Thanos D.; Kiliaridis, Stavros

    2017-01-01

    Tooth eruption, the process by which teeth emerge from within the alveolar bone into the oral cavity, is poorly understood. The post-emergent phase of tooth eruption continues throughout life, in particular, if teeth are not opposed by antagonists. The aim of the present study was to better understand the molecular processes underlying post-emergent tooth eruption. Toward this goal, we removed the crowns of the maxillary molars on one side of the mouth of 14 young rats and examined gene expression patterns in the periodontal ligaments (PDLs) of the ipsilateral and contralateral mandibular molars, 3 and 15 days later. Nine untreated rats served as controls. Expression of six genes, Adamts18, Ostn, P4ha3, Panx3, Pth1r, and Tnmd, was upregulated in unopposed molars relative to molars with antagonists. These genes function in osteoblast differentiation and proliferation, cell adhesion and collagen metabolism. Proliferation of PDL cells also increased following loss of the antagonist teeth. Interestingly, mutations in PTH1R have been linked to defects in the post-emergent phase of tooth eruption in humans. We conclude that post-emergent eruption of unopposed teeth is associated with gene expression patterns conducive to alveolar bone formation and PDL remodeling. PMID:28239357

  13. Vitamin D: more than just affecting calcium and bone.

    PubMed

    Staud, Roland

    2005-10-01

    Vitamin D is a fat-soluble steroid that is essential for maintaining normal calcium metabolism. In vitamin D deficiency, calcium absorption is insufficient and cannot satisfy the body's needs. Consequently, parathyroid hormone production increases and calcium is mobilized from bones and reabsorbed in the kidneys to maintain normal serum calcium levels--a condition defined as secondary hyperparathyroidism. Most organs, including the gut, brain, heart, pancreas, skin, kidneys, and immune system have receptors for 1,25 (OH)vitamin D. Furthermore, all of these organs have the capacity to synthesize 1,25 (OH)vitamin D from vitamin D. Extensive research suggests that vitamin D deficiency is common and represents a global health problem. Clinical consequences related to low vitamin D levels include not only osteomalacia, osteoporosis, and rickets, but also neuro-muscular dysfunction and fractures. Falls related to neuromuscular dysfunction lead to 40% of all nursing home admissions and are the largest single cause of injury-related deaths in elderly people. About one-third of all persons 65 and older fall at least once a year, resulting in more than 1.5 million emergency room treatments and more than 300,000 hospitalizations. Falls cause more than 11,000 deaths per year, most of them in elderly patients (> or = 75 years) who suffer hip fractures. It is well established that vitamin D deficiency not only has serious consequences for bone health, but also for other organ systems. Previous studies have shown that vitamin D supplementation reduces the number of fractures and directly improves neuromuscular function, thus helping to prevent falls and subsequent fractures. In addition, vitamin D appears to have other important functions as a regulator of cell differentiation and cell growth.

  14. Cell and Signal Components of the Microenvironment of Bone Metastasis Are Affected by Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Bendinelli, Paola; Maroni, Paola; Matteucci, Emanuela; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastatic cells release bone microenvironment proteins, such as the matricellular protein SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine), and share a cell signaling typical of the bone metabolism controlled by Runx2. The megakaryocytes in the bone marrow engrafted by the metastases seem to be one of the principal microenvironment sources of the biological stimuli, implicated in the formation of an osteoblastic niche, and affecting metastasis phenotype and colonization. Educated platelets in the circulation might derive from megakaryocytes in bone metastasis. The evaluation of predictive markers in the circulating platelets might be useful for the stratification of patients for therapeutic purposes. The hypoxic environment in bone metastasis is one of the key regulators of the network of the biological soluble and structural components of the matrix. In bone metastatic cells under hypoxia, similar patterns of Runx2 and SPARC are observed, both showing downregulation. Conversely, hypoxia induces Endothelin 1, which upregulates SPARC, and these biological stimuli may be considered prognostic markers of bone metastasis in breast carcinoma patients. PMID:27187355

  15. Prebiotics, probiotics, and synbiotics affect mineral absorption, bone mineral content, and bone structure.

    PubMed

    Scholz-Ahrens, Katharina E; Ade, Peter; Marten, Berit; Weber, Petra; Timm, Wolfram; Açil, Yahya; Glüer, Claus-C; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen

    2007-03-01

    Several studies in animals and humans have shown positive effects of nondigestible oligosaccharides (NDO) on mineral absorption and metabolism and bone composition and architecture. These include inulin, oligofructose, fructooligosaccharides, galactooligosaccharides, soybean oligosaccharide, and also resistant starches, sugar alcohols, and difructose anhydride. A positive outcome of dietary prebiotics is promoted by a high dietary calcium content up to a threshold level and an optimum amount and composition of supplemented prebiotics. There might be an optimum composition of fructooligosaccharides with different chain lengths (synergy products). The efficacy of dietary prebiotics depends on chronological age, physiological age, menopausal status, and calcium absorption capacity. There is evidence for an independent probiotic effect on facilitating mineral absorption. Synbiotics, i.e., a combination of probiotics and prebiotics, can induce additional effects. Whether a low content of habitual NDO would augment the effect of dietary prebiotics or synbiotics remains to be studied. The underlying mechanisms are manifold: increased solubility of minerals because of increased bacterial production of short-chain fatty acids, which is promoted by the greater supply of substrate; an enlargement of the absorption surface by promoting proliferation of enterocytes mediated by bacterial fermentation products, predominantly lactate and butyrate; increased expression of calcium-binding proteins; improvement of gut health; degradation of mineral complexing phytic acid; release of bone-modulating factors such as phytoestrogens from foods; stabilization of the intestinal flora and ecology, also in the presence of antibiotics; stabilization of the intestinal mucus; and impact of modulating growth factors such as polyamines. In conclusion, prebiotics are the most promising but also best investigated substances with respect to a bone-health-promoting potential, compared with probiotics

  16. Diabetes mellitus related bone metabolism and periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ying-Ying; Xiao, E; Graves, Dana T

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease are chronic diseases affecting a large number of populations worldwide. Changed bone metabolism is one of the important long-term complications associated with diabetes mellitus. Alveolar bone loss is one of the main outcomes of periodontitis, and diabetes is among the primary risk factors for periodontal disease. In this review, we summarise the adverse effects of diabetes on the periodontium in periodontitis subjects, focusing on alveolar bone loss. Bone remodelling begins with osteoclasts resorbing bone, followed by new bone formation by osteoblasts in the resorption lacunae. Therefore, we discuss the potential mechanism of diabetes-enhanced bone loss in relation to osteoblasts and osteoclasts. PMID:25857702

  17. Diabetes mellitus related bone metabolism and periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying-Ying; Xiao, E; Graves, Dana T

    2015-06-26

    Diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease are chronic diseases affecting a large number of populations worldwide. Changed bone metabolism is one of the important long-term complications associated with diabetes mellitus. Alveolar bone loss is one of the main outcomes of periodontitis, and diabetes is among the primary risk factors for periodontal disease. In this review, we summarise the adverse effects of diabetes on the periodontium in periodontitis subjects, focusing on alveolar bone loss. Bone remodelling begins with osteoclasts resorbing bone, followed by new bone formation by osteoblasts in the resorption lacunae. Therefore, we discuss the potential mechanism of diabetes-enhanced bone loss in relation to osteoblasts and osteoclasts.

  18. Antioxidant Impregnated Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene Wear Debris Particles Display Increased Bone Remodeling and a Superior Osteogenic:Osteolytic Profile vs. Conventional UHMWPE Particles in a Murine Calvaria Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Hallab, Nadim J.; Liao, Yen-Shuo; Narayan, Venkat; Schwarz, Edward M.; Xie, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis remains a major limitation of long-term successful total hip replacements with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) bearings. As intra and extracellular reactive oxygen species are know to contribute to wear debris-induced osteoclastic bone resorption and decreased osteoblastic bone formation, antioxidant doped UHMWPE has emerged as an approach to reduce the osteolytic potential of wear debris and maintain coupled bone remodeling. To test this hypothesis in vivo, we evaluated the effects of crosslinked UHMWPE wear debris particles (AltrX™), versus similar wear particles made from COVERNOX™ containing UHMWPE (AOX™), in an established murine calvaria model. Eight-week-old female C57B/6 mice (n=10/Group) received a pre-op micro-CT scan prior to surgical implantation of the UHMWPE particles (2mg), or surgery without particles (sham). Dynamic labeling was performed by intraperitoneal injection of calcein on day 7 and alizarin on day 9, and the calvaria were harvested for micro-CT and histology on day 10. Surprisingly, we found that AOX particles induced significantly more bone resorption (1.72-fold) and osteoclast numbers (1.99-fold) vs. AltrX (p<0.001). However, AOX also significantly induced 1.64-fold more new bone formation vs. AltrX (p<0.01). Moreover, while the osteolytic:osteogenic ratio of both particles was very close to 1.0, which is indicative of coupled remodeling, AOX was more osteogenic (Slope=1.13±0.10 vs. 0.97±0.10). Histomorphometry of the metabolically labeled undecalcified calvaria revealed a consistent trend of greater MAR in AOX vs. AltrX. Collectively, these results demonstrate that anti-oxidant impregnated UHMWPE particles have decreased osteolytic potential due to their increased osteogenic properties that support coupled bone remodeling. PMID:26495749

  19. Numerical assessment of bone remodeling around conventionally and early loaded titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants.

    PubMed

    Akça, Kıvanç; Eser, Atılım; Çavuşoğlu, Yeliz; Sağırkaya, Elçin; Çehreli, Murat Cavit

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate conventionally and early loaded titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants by three-dimensional finite element stress analysis. Three-dimensional model of a dental implant was created and a thread area was established as a region of interest in trabecular bone to study a localized part of the global model with a refined mesh. The peri-implant tissues around conventionally loaded (model 1) and early loaded (model 2) implants were implemented and were used to explore principal stresses, displacement values, and equivalent strains in the peri-implant region of titanium and titanium-zirconium implants under static load of 300 N with or without 30° inclination applied on top of the abutment surface. Under axial loading, principal stresses in both models were comparable for both implants and models. Under oblique loading, principal stresses around titanium-zirconium implants were slightly higher in both models. Comparable stress magnitudes were observed in both models. The displacement values and equivalent strain amplitudes around both implants and models were similar. Peri-implant bone around titanium and titanium-zirconium implants experiences similar stress magnitudes coupled with intraosseous implant displacement values under conventional loading and early loading simulations. Titanium-zirconium implants have biomechanical outcome comparable to conventional titanium implants under conventional loading and early loading.

  20. Two distinct mechanisms mediate the involvement of bone marrow cells in islet remodeling: neogenesis of insulin-producing cells and support of islet recovery.

    PubMed

    Iskovich, Svetlana; Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza; Sadikov, Tamila; Yaniv, Isaac; Stein, Jerry; Askenasy, Nadir

    2015-01-01

    We have recently reported that small-sized bone marrow cells (BMCs) isolated by counterflow centrifugal elutriation and depleted of lineage markers (Fr25lin(-)) have the capacity to differentiate and contribute to regeneration of injured islets. In this study, we assess some of the characteristics of these cells compared to elutriated hematopoietic progenitors (R/O) and whole BMCs in a murine model of streptozotocin-induced chemical diabetes. The GFP(bright)CD45(+) progeny of whole BMCs and R/O progenitors progressively infiltrate the pancreas with evolution of donor chimerism; are found at islet perimeter, vascular, and ductal walls; and have a modest impact on islet recovery from injury. In contrast, Fr25lin(-) cells incorporate in the islets, convert to GFP(dim)CD45(-)PDX-1(+) phenotypes, produce proinsulin, and secrete insulin with significant contribution to stabilization of glucose homeostasis. The elutriated Fr25lin(-) cells express low levels of CD45 and are negative for SCA-1 and c-kit, as removal of cells expressing these markers did not impair conversion to produce insulin. BMCs mediate two synergistic mechanisms that contribute to islet recovery from injury: support of islet remodeling by hematopoietic cells and neogenesis of insulin-producing cells from stem cells.

  1. Low Concentration of Sodium Butyrate from Ultrabraid+NaBu suture, Promotes Angiogenesis and Tissue Remodelling in Tendon-bones Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Donghui; Andrade, Silvia Passos; Castro, Pollyana Ribeiro; Treacy, John; Ashworth, Jason; Slevin, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Sodium butyrate (NaBu), a form of short-chain fatty acid (SCFA), acts classically as a potent anti-angiogenic agent in tumour angiogenesis models, some authors demonstrated that low concentrations of NaBu may contribute to healing of tendon-bone injury in part at least through promotion of tissue remodelling. Here, we investigated the effects of low-range concentrations of NaBu using in vitro and in vivo assays using angiogenesis as the primary outcome measure and the mechanisms through which it acts. We demonstrated that NaBu, alone or perfused from the UltraBraid+NaBu suture was pro-angiogenic at very low-range doses promoting migration, tube formation and cell invasion in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). Furthermore, cell exposure to low NaBu concentrations increased expression of proteins involved in angiogenic cell signalling, including p-PKCβ1, p-FAK, p-ERK1/2, p-NFκβ, p-PLCγ1 and p-VEGFR2. In addition, inhibitors of both VEGFR2 and PKCβ1 blocked the angiogenic response. In in vivo assays, low concentrations of NaBu induced neovascularization in sponge implants in mice, evidenced by increased numbers of vessels and haemoglobin content in these implants. The findings in this study indicate that low concentrations of NaBu could be an important compound to stimulate angiogenesis at a site where vasculature is deficient and healing is compromised. PMID:27694930

  2. A delay in pubertal onset affects the covariation of body weight, estradiol, and bone size.

    PubMed

    Yingling, Vanessa R

    2009-04-01

    The skeletal system functions as a locomotive organ and a mineral reservoir and combinations of genetic and environmental factors affect the skeletal system. Although delayed puberty is associated with compromised bone mass, suppression of estrogen should be beneficial to cortical strength. The purpose was to employ path analysis to study bone strength and delayed puberty. Forty-five female rats were randomly assigned to a control group (n = 15) and an experimental group (n = 30) that received injections of gonadotropin releasing hormone antagonist (GnRH-a). Causal models were constructed by specifying directed paths between bone traits. The first model tested the hypothesis that the functional relationships between bone traits and body weight were altered by a delay in pubertal onset. GnRH-a injections during puberty altered the covariation between body weight and bone size. The second model was constructed to test the hypothesis that variability in stiffness was causally related to variability in body weight. The model also tested the relationship between the periosteal and endocortical surfaces and their relationship to stiffness. There was no change in the relationship between the surfaces in the GnRH-a group. The third model determined the effect of estradiol on both total area and relative cortical area in both groups. The relationship between periosteal surface and serum estradiol levels was only significant during estrogen suppression. These data suggest that increases in body weight during or prior to puberty may not be protective of bone strength.

  3. A 5-year exercise program in pre- and peripubertal children improves bone mass and bone size without affecting fracture risk.

    PubMed

    Detter, Fredrik T L; Rosengren, Björn E; Dencker, Magnus; Nilsson, J-Å; Karlsson, Magnus K

    2013-04-01

    We studied the effect in children of an exercise intervention program on fracture rates and skeletal traits. Fractures were registered for 5 years in a population-based prospective controlled exercise intervention study that included children aged 6-9 years at study start, 446 boys and 362 girls in the intervention group and 807 boys and 780 girls in the control group. Intervention subjects received 40 min/school day of physical education and controls, 60 min/week. In 73 boys and 48 girls in the intervention group and 52 boys and 48 girls in the control group, bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm(2)) and bone area (mm(2)) were followed annually by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, after which annual changes were calculated. At follow-up we also assessed trabecular and cortical volumetric BMD (g/cm(3)) and bone structure by peripheral computed tomography in the tibia and radius. There were 20.0 fractures/1,000 person-years in the intervention group and 18.5 fractures/1,000 person-years in the control group, resulting in a rate ratio of 1.08 (0.79-1.47) (mean and 95 % CI). The gain in spine BMD was higher in both girls (difference 0.01 g/cm(2), 0.005-0.019) and boys (difference 0.01 g/cm(2), 0.001-0.008) in the intervention group. Intervention girls also had higher gain in femoral neck area (difference 0.04 mm(2), 0.005-0.083) and at follow-up larger tibial bone mineral content (difference 0.18 g, 0.015-0.35), larger tibial cortical area (difference 17 mm(2), 2.4-31.3), and larger radial cross-sectional area (difference 11.0 mm(2), 0.63-21.40). As increased exercise improves bone mass and in girls bone size without affecting fracture risk, society ought to encourage exercise during growth.

  4. Impact of repeated intravenous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells infusion on myocardial collagen network remodeling in a rat model of doxorubicin-induced dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Li, Qianxiao; Na, Rongmei; Li, Xiaofei; Liu, Baiting; Meng, Lili; Liutong, Hanyu; Fang, Weiyi; Zhu, Ning; Zheng, Xiaoqun

    2014-02-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation improved cardiac function and reduced myocardial fibrosis in both ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. We evaluated the effects of repeated peripheral vein injection of MSCs on collagen network remodeling and myocardial TGF-β1, AT1, CYP11B2 (aldosterone synthase) gene expressions in a rat model of doxorubicin (DOX)-induced dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Thirty-eight out of 53 SD rats survived at 10 weeks post-DOX injection (2.5 mg/kg/week for 6 weeks, i.p.) were divided into DCM blank (without treatment, n = 12), DCM placebo (intravenous tail injection of 0.5 mL serum-free culture medium every other day for ten times, n = 13), and DCM plus MSCs group (intravenous tail injection of 5 × 10(6) MSCs dissolved in 0.5 mL serum-free culture medium every other day for 10 times, n = 13). Ten untreated rats served as normal controls. At 20 weeks after DOX injection, echocardiography, myocardial collagen content, myocardial expressions of types I and III collagen, TGF-β1, AT1, and CYP11B2 were compared among groups. At 20 weeks post-DOX injection, 8 rats (67%) survived in DCM blank group, 9 rats (69%) survived in DCM placebo group while 13 rats (100 %) survived in DCM plus MSCs group. Left ventricular end-diastolic diameter was significantly higher and ejection fraction was significantly lower in DCM blank and DCM placebo groups compared to normal control rats, which were significantly improved in DCM plus MSCs group (all p < 0.05 vs. DCM blank and DCM placebo groups). Moreover, myocardial collagen volume fraction, types I and III collagen, myocardial mRNA expressions of TGF-β1, AT1, CYP11B2, and collagen I/III ratio were all significantly lower in DCM plus MSCs group compared to DCM blank and DCM placebo groups (all p < 0.05). Repeated intravenous MSCs transplantation could improve cardiac function by attenuating myocardial collagen network remodeling possibly through downregulating renin

  5. Repeated short climatic change affects the epidermal differentiation program and leads to matrix remodeling in a human organotypic skin model.

    PubMed

    Boutrand, Laetitia-Barbollat; Thépot, Amélie; Muther, Charlotte; Boher, Aurélie; Robic, Julie; Guéré, Christelle; Vié, Katell; Damour, Odile; Lamartine, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    Human skin is subject to frequent changes in ambient temperature and humidity and needs to cope with these environmental modifications. To decipher the molecular response of human skin to repeated climatic change, a versatile model of skin equivalent subject to "hot-wet" (40°C, 80% relative humidity [RH]) or "cold-dry" (10°C, 40% RH) climatic stress repeated daily was used. To obtain an exhaustive view of the molecular mechanisms elicited by climatic change, large-scale gene expression DNA microarray analysis was performed and modulated function was determined by bioinformatic annotation. This analysis revealed several functions, including epidermal differentiation and extracellular matrix, impacted by repeated variations in climatic conditions. Some of these molecular changes were confirmed by histological examination and protein expression. Both treatments (hot-wet and cold-dry) reduced the expression of genes encoding collagens, laminin, and proteoglycans, suggesting a profound remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Strong induction of the entire family of late cornified envelope genes after cold-dry exposure, confirmed at protein level, was also observed. These changes correlated with an increase in epidermal differentiation markers such as corneodesmosin and a thickening of the stratum corneum, indicating possible implementation of defense mechanisms against dehydration. This study for the first time reveals the complex pattern of molecular response allowing adaption of human skin to repeated change in its climatic environment.

  6. Repeated short climatic change affects the epidermal differentiation program and leads to matrix remodeling in a human organotypic skin model

    PubMed Central

    Boutrand, Laetitia-Barbollat; Thépot, Amélie; Muther, Charlotte; Boher, Aurélie; Robic, Julie; Guéré, Christelle; Vié, Katell; Damour, Odile; Lamartine, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    Human skin is subject to frequent changes in ambient temperature and humidity and needs to cope with these environmental modifications. To decipher the molecular response of human skin to repeated climatic change, a versatile model of skin equivalent subject to “hot–wet” (40°C, 80% relative humidity [RH]) or “cold–dry” (10°C, 40% RH) climatic stress repeated daily was used. To obtain an exhaustive view of the molecular mechanisms elicited by climatic change, large-scale gene expression DNA microarray analysis was performed and modulated function was determined by bioinformatic annotation. This analysis revealed several functions, including epidermal differentiation and extracellular matrix, impacted by repeated variations in climatic conditions. Some of these molecular changes were confirmed by histological examination and protein expression. Both treatments (hot–wet and cold–dry) reduced the expression of genes encoding collagens, laminin, and proteoglycans, suggesting a profound remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Strong induction of the entire family of late cornified envelope genes after cold–dry exposure, confirmed at protein level, was also observed. These changes correlated with an increase in epidermal differentiation markers such as corneodesmosin and a thickening of the stratum corneum, indicating possible implementation of defense mechanisms against dehydration. This study for the first time reveals the complex pattern of molecular response allowing adaption of human skin to repeated change in its climatic environment. PMID:28243135

  7. Simulations of trabecular remodeling and fatigue: is remodeling helpful or harmful?

    PubMed

    van Oers, René F M; van Rietbergen, Bert; Ito, Keita; Huiskes, Rik; Hilbers, Peter A J

    2011-05-01

    Microdamage-targeted resorption is paradoxal, because it entails the removal of bone from a region that was already overloaded. Under continued intense loading, resorption spaces could potentially cause more damage than they remove. To investigate this problem, we incorporated damage algorithms in a computer-simulation model for trabecular remodeling. We simulated damage accumulation and bone remodeling in a trabecular architecture, for two fatigue regimens, a 'moderate' regimen, and an 'intense' regimen with a higher number of loading cycles per day. Both simulations were also performed without bone remodeling to investigate if remodeling removed or exacerbated the damage. We found that remodeling tends to remove damage under the 'moderate' fatigue regimen, but it exacerbates damage under the 'intense' regimen. This harmful effect of remodeling may play a role in the development of stress fractures.

  8. Fluoride-Induced Oxidative and Inflammatory Stress in Osteosarcoma Cells: Does It Affect Bone Development Pathway?

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Deepa; Naoghare, Pravin K; Bafana, Amit; Kannan, Krishnamurthi; Sivanesan, Saravanadevi

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is reported to negatively affect osteoblast cells. Present study reports oxidative and inflammatory signatures in fluoride-exposed human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells, and their possible association with the genes involved in osteoblastic differentiation and bone development pathways. HOS cells were challenged with sublethal concentration (8 mg/L) of sodium fluoride for 30 days and analyzed for transcriptomic expression. In total, 2632 transcripts associated with several biological processes were found to be differentially expressed. Specifically, genes involved in oxidative stress, inflammation, osteoblastic differentiation, and bone development pathways were found to be significantly altered. Variation in expression of key genes involved in the abovementioned pathways was validated through qPCR. Expression of serum amyloid A1 protein, a key regulator of stress and inflammatory pathways, was validated through western blot analysis. This study provides evidence that chronic oxidative and inflammatory stress may be associated with the fluoride-induced impediment in osteoblast differentiation and bone development.

  9. BoneCreo: a novel approach for generating a geometric model of the bone structure.

    PubMed

    Wrona, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Bones, the fundamental part of the skeleton, are constantly subjected to many biological processes including growth, feeding and remodelling. Remodelling causes changes in bone structure that may be difficult to notice on a day-to-day basis but become significant over the longer time span. It acts on the cancellous and cortical bone tissue, causing alterations in thickness and spatial arrangement in the first and alternations in pore size in the second. In healthy individuals such changes are a part of the natural bone remodelling process explained by Wolff's law. However, the direction of such changes is difficult to predict in patients in various pathological states in which bone health is affected. Here, we present a method to generate a computer based geometric model of the bone structure based on the cancellous tissue structure images. As a result we obtained a geometric model of the structure corresponding to the physical model of the cancellous bone. Such a model can be used in computer simulation to predict the remodelling changes in the healthy and pathological bone structures.

  10. Factors affecting directional migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to the injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Xia, Peng; Pan, Su; Cheng, Jieping; Yang, Maoguang; Qi, Zhiping; Hou, Tingting; Yang, Xiaoyu

    2014-09-15

    Microtubule-associated protein 1B plays an important role in axon guidance and neuronal migration. In the present study, we sought to discover the mechanisms underlying microtubule-associated protein 1B mediation of axon guidance and neuronal migration. We exposed bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to okadaic acid or N-acetyl-D-erythro-sphingosine (an inhibitor and stimulator, respectively, of protein phosphatase 2A) for 24 hours. The expression of the phosphorylated form of type I microtubule-associated protein 1B in the cells was greater after exposure to okadaic acid and lower after N-acetyl-D-erythro-sphingosine. We then injected the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells through the ear vein into rabbit models of spinal cord contusion. The migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells towards the injured spinal cord was poorer in cells exposed to okadaic acid- and N-acetyl-D-erythro-sphingosine than in non-treated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Finally, we blocked phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathways in rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells using the inhibitors LY294002 and U0126, respectively. LY294002 resulted in an elevated expression of phosphorylated type I microtubule-associated protein 1B, whereas U0126 caused a reduction in expression. The present data indicate that PI3K and ERK1/2 in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells modulate the phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein 1B via a cross-signaling network, and affect the migratory efficiency of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells towards injured spinal cord.

  11. In vivo bone remodeling rates determination and compressive stiffness variations before, during 60 days bed rest and two years follow up: A micro-FE-analysis from HR-pQCT measurements of the berlin Bed Rest Study-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Zully; Belavy, Daniel; Baumann, Wolfgang W.; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2017-03-01

    Bed rest studies are used for simulation and study of physiological changes as observed in unloading/non-gravity environments. Amongst others, bone mass reduction, similar as occurring due to aging osteoporosis, combined with bio-fluids redistribution and muscle atrophy have been observed and analyzed. Advanced radiological methods of high resolution such as HR-pQCT (XtremeCT) allow 3D-visualizing in vivo bone remodeling processes occurring during absence/reduction of mechanical stimuli (0 to <1 g) as simulated by bed rest. Induced bone micro-structure (e.g. trabecular number, cortical thickness, porosity) and density variations can be quantified. However, these parameters are average values of each sample and important information regarding bone mass distribution and within bone mechanical behaviour is lost. Finite element models with hexa-elements of identical size as the HR-pQCT measurements (0.082 mm×0.082 mm×0.082 mm, ca. 7E6 elements/sample) can be used for subject-specific in vivo stiffness calculation. This technique also allows quantifying if bone microstructural changes represent a risk of mechanical bone collapse (fracture).

  12. Clinical factors affecting pathological fracture and healing of unicameral bone cysts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Unicameral bone cyst (UBC) is the most common benign lytic bone lesion seen in children. The aim of this study is to investigate clinical factors affecting pathological fracture and healing of UBC. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 155 UBC patients who consulted Nagoya musculoskeletal oncology group hospitals in Japan. Sixty of the 155 patients had pathological fracture at presentation. Of 141 patients with follow-up periods exceeding 6 months, 77 were followed conservatively and 64 treated by surgery. Results The fracture risk was significantly higher in the humerus than other bones. In multivariate analysis, ballooning of bone, cyst in long bone, male sex, thin cortical thickness and multilocular cyst were significant adverse prognostic factors for pathological fractures at presentation. The healing rates were 30% and 83% with observation and surgery, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that fracture at presentation and history of biopsy were good prognostic factors for healing of UBC in patients under observation. Conclusion The present results suggest that mechanical disruption of UBC such as fracture and biopsy promotes healing, and thus watchful waiting is indicated in these patients, whereas patients with poor prognostic factors for fractures should be considered for surgery. PMID:24884661

  13. Dietary calcium restriction affects mesenchymal stem cell activity and bone development in neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Avanika; Alexander, Lindsey S; Seabolt, Brynn S; Catrambone, Daniel E; McClung, James P; Odle, Jack; Pfeiler, T Wayne; Loboa, Elizabeth G; Stahl, Chad H

    2011-03-01

    The effects of dietary calcium (Ca) deficiency on skeletal integrity are well characterized in growing and mature mammals; however, less is known about Ca nutrition during the neonatal period. In this study, we examined the effects of neonatal Ca nutrition on bone integrity, endocrine hormones, and mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) activity. Neonatal pigs (24 ± 6 h of age) received either a Ca-adequate (1.2 g/100 g) or an ~40% Ca-deficient diet for 18 d. Ca deficiency reduced (P < 0.05) bone flexural strength and bone mineral density without major differences in plasma indicators of Ca status. There were no meaningful differences in plasma Ca, phosphate (PO(4)), parathyroid hormone, or 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol due to Ca nutrition throughout the study. Calcium deficiency also reduced (P < 0.05) the in vivo proliferation of MSC by ~50%. In vitro studies utilizing homologous sera demonstrated that MSC activity was affected (P < 0.05) by both the Ca status of the pig and the sera as well as by their interaction. The results indicate that neonatal Ca nutrition is crucial for bone integrity and suggest that early-life Ca restriction may have long-term effects on bone integrity via programming of MSC.

  14. Erythropoietin in bone - Controversies and consensus.

    PubMed

    Hiram-Bab, Sahar; Neumann, Drorit; Gabet, Yankel

    2017-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is the main hormone that regulates the production of red blood cells (hematopoiesis), by stimulating their progenitors. Beyond this vital function, several emerging roles have been noted for Epo in other tissues, including neurons, heart and retina. The skeletal system is also affected by Epo, however, its actions on bone are, as yet, controversial. Here, we review the seemingly contradicting evidence regarding Epo effects on bone remodeling. We also discuss the evidence pointing to a direct versus indirect effect of Epo on the osteoblastic and osteoclastic cell lineages. The current controversy may derive from a context-dependent mode of action of Epo, namely opposite skeletal actions during bone regeneration and steady-state bone remodeling. Differences in conclusions from the published in-vitro studies may thus relate to the different experimental conditions. Taken together, these studies indicate a complexity of Epo functions in bone cells.

  15. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibition causes simultaneous bone loss and excess bone formation within growing bone in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nurmio, Mirja; Joki, Henna; Kallio, Jenny; Maeaettae, Jorma A.; Vaeaenaenen, H. Kalervo; Toppari, Jorma; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Laitala-Leinonen, Tiina

    2011-08-01

    During postnatal skeletal growth, adaptation to mechanical loading leads to cellular activities at the growth plate. It has recently become evident that bone forming and bone resorbing cells are affected by the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitor imatinib mesylate (STI571, Gleevec (registered)) . Imatinib targets PDGF, ABL-related gene, c-Abl, c-Kit and c-Fms receptors, many of which have multiple functions in the bone microenvironment. We therefore studied the effects of imatinib in growing bone. Young rats were exposed to imatinib (150 mg/kg on postnatal days 5-7, or 100 mg/kg on postnatal days 5-13), and the effects of RTK inhibition on bone physiology were studied after 8 and 70 days (3-day treatment), or after 14 days (9-day treatment). X-ray imaging, computer tomography, histomorphometry, RNA analysis and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate bone modeling and remodeling in vivo. Imatinib treatment eliminated osteoclasts from the metaphyseal osteochondral junction at 8 and 14 days. This led to a resorption arrest at the growth plate, but also increased bone apposition by osteoblasts, thus resulting in local osteopetrosis at the osteochondral junction. The impaired bone remodelation observed on day 8 remained significant until adulthood. Within the same bone, increased osteoclast activity, leading to bone loss, was observed at distal bone trabeculae on days 8 and 14. Peripheral quantitative computer tomography (pQCT) and micro-CT analysis confirmed that, at the osteochondral junction, imatinib shifted the balance from bone resorption towards bone formation, thereby altering bone modeling. At distal trabecular bone, in turn, the balance was turned towards bone resorption, leading to bone loss. - Research Highlights: > 3-Day imatinib treatment. > Causes growth plate anomalies in young rats. > Causes biomechanical changes and significant bone loss at distal trabecular bone. > Results in loss of osteoclasts at osteochondral junction.

  16. Evaluation of the parameters affecting bone temperature during drilling using a three-dimensional dynamic elastoplastic finite element model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Chuan; Tu, Yuan-Kun; Zhuang, Jun-Yan; Tsai, Yi-Jung; Yen, Cheng-Yo; Hsiao, Chih-Kun

    2017-03-28

    A three-dimensional dynamic elastoplastic finite element model was constructed and experimentally validated and was used to investigate the parameters which influence bone temperature during drilling, including the drill speed, feeding force, drill bit diameter, and bone density. Results showed the proposed three-dimensional dynamic elastoplastic finite element model can effectively simulate the temperature elevation during bone drilling. The bone temperature rise decreased with an increase in feeding force and drill speed, however, increased with the diameter of drill bit or bone density. The temperature distribution is significantly affected by the drilling duration; a lower drilling speed reduced the exposure duration, decreases the region of the thermally affected zone. The constructed model could be applied for analyzing the influence parameters during bone drilling to reduce the risk of thermal necrosis. It may provide important information for the design of drill bits and surgical drilling powers.

  17. Retinal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Jones, B W; Kondo, M; Terasaki, H; Lin, Y; McCall, M; Marc, R E

    2012-07-01

    Retinal photoreceptor degeneration takes many forms. Mutations in rhodopsin genes or disorders of the retinal pigment epithelium, defects in the adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter, ABCR gene defects, receptor tyrosine kinase defects, ciliopathies and transport defects, defects in both transducin and arrestin, defects in rod cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase, peripherin defects, defects in metabotropic glutamate receptors, synthetic enzymatic defects, defects in genes associated with signaling, and many more can all result in retinal degenerative disease like retinitis pigmentosa (RP) or RP-like disorders. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and AMD-like disorders are possibly due to a constellation of potential gene targets and gene/gene interactions, while other defects result in diabetic retinopathy or glaucoma. However, all of these insults as well as traumatic insults to the retina result in retinal remodeling. Retinal remodeling is a universal finding subsequent to retinal degenerative disease that results in deafferentation of the neural retina from photoreceptor input as downstream neuronal elements respond to loss of input with negative plasticity. This negative plasticity is not passive in the face of photoreceptor degeneration, with a phased revision of retinal structure and function found at the molecular, synaptic, cell, and tissue levels involving all cell classes in the retina, including neurons and glia. Retinal remodeling has direct implications for the rescue of vision loss through bionic or biological approaches, as circuit revision in the retina corrupts any potential surrogate photoreceptor input to a remnant neural retina. However, there are a number of potential opportunities for intervention that are revealed through the study of retinal remodeling, including therapies that are designed to slow down photoreceptor loss, interventions that are designed to limit or arrest remodeling events, and

  18. Bone morphogenetic protein Smads signaling in mesenchymal stem cells affected by osteoinductive calcium phosphate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhurong; Wang, Zhe; Qing, Fangzhu; Ni, Yilu; Fan, Yujiang; Tan, Yanfei; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-03-01

    Porous calcium phosphate ceramics (CaP ceramics) could induce ectopic bone formation which was regulated by various signal molecules. In this work, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cultured on the surface of osteoinductive hydroxyapatite (HA) and biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramics in comparison with control (culture plate) for up to 14 days to detect the signal molecules which might be affected by the CaP ceramics. Without adding osteogenic factors, MSCs cultured on HA and BCP both expressed higher Runx2, Osterix, collagen type I, osteopontin, bone sialoprotein, and osteocalcin at various stages compared with control, thus confirmed the osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs. Later study demonstrated the messenger RNA level of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and BMP4 were also significantly enhanced by HA and BCP. Furthermore, Smad1, 4, 5, and Dlx5, the main molecules in the BMP/Smads signaling pathway, were upregulated by HA and BCP. Moreover, the higher expression of Smads and BMP2, 4 in BCP over HA, corresponded to the better performance of BCP in stimulating in vitro osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs. This was in accordance with the better osteoinductivity of BCP over HA in vivo. Altogether, these results implied that the CaP ceramics may initiate the osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs by influencing the expression of molecules in BMP/Smads pathway.

  19. Arteriovenous Fistula Affects Bone Mineral Density Measurements in End-Stage Renal Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Torregrosa, José-Vicente; Fuster, David; Peris, Pilar; Vidal-Sicart, Sergi; Solà, Oriol; Domenech, Beatriz; Martín, Gloria; Casellas, Joan; Pons, Francisca

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Hemodialysis needs an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) that may influence the structure and growth of nearby bone and affect bone mass measurement. The study analyzed the effect of AVF in the assessment of forearm bone mineral density (BMD) measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and examined its influence on the final diagnosis of osteoporosis. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Forty patients (52 ± 18 yr) in hemodialysis program (12 ± 8 yr) with permeable AVF in forearm were included. Patients were divided in two groups (over and under 50 yr). BMD of both forearms (three areas), lumbar spine, and femur was measured by DXA. Forearm measurements in each arm were compared. Patients were diagnosed as normal only if all territories were considered nonpathologic and osteoporosis/osteopenia was determined by the lowest score found. Results: Ten patients were excluded and 30 patients were analyzed. BMD in the forearm with AVF was significantly lower than that observed in the contralateral forearm in both groups of patients and in all forearm areas analyzed. When only lumbar spine and femur measurements were considered, 70% of patients were nonpathologic and 30% were osteoporotic. However, inclusion of AVF forearm classified 63% as osteoporotic and a further 27% as osteopenic, leaving only 10% as nonpathologic. Conclusions: Forearm AVF affects BMD measurements by decreasing their values in patients with end-stage renal failure. This may produce an overdiagnosis of osteoporosis, which should be taken into account when evaluating patients of this type. PMID:19713298

  20. Antioxidant impregnated ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear debris particles display increased bone remodeling and a superior osteogenic:osteolytic profile vs. conventional UHMWPE particles in a murine calvaria model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Hallab, Nadim J; Liao, Yen-Shuo; Narayan, Venkat; Schwarz, Edward M; Xie, Chao

    2016-05-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis remains a major limitation of long-term successful total hip replacements with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) bearings. As intra and extracellular reactive oxygen species are know to contribute to wear debris-induced osteoclastic bone resorption and decreased osteoblastic bone formation, antioxidant doped UHMWPE has emerged as an approach to reduce the osteolytic potential of wear debris and maintain coupled bone remodeling. To test this hypothesis in vivo, we evaluated the effects of crosslinked UHMWPE wear debris particles (AltrX(™) ), versus similar wear particles made from COVERNOX(™) containing UHMWPE (AOX(™) ), in an established murine calvaria model. Eight-week-old female C57B/6 mice (n = 10/Group) received a pre-op micro-CT scan prior to surgical implantation of the UHMWPE particles (2mg), or surgery without particles (sham). Dynamic labeling was performed by intraperitoneal injection of calcein on day 7 and alizarin on day 9, and the calvaria were harvested for micro-CT and histology on day 10. Surprisingly, we found that AOX particles induced significantly more bone resorption (1.72-fold) and osteoclast numbers (1.99-fold) vs. AltrX (p < 0.001). However, AOX also significantly induced 1.64-fold more new bone formation vs. AltrX (p < 0.01). Moreover, while the osteolytic:osteogenic ratio of both particles was very close to 1.0, which is indicative of coupled remodeling, AOX was more osteogenic (Slope = 1.13 ± 0.10 vs. 0.97 ± 0.10). Histomorphometry of the metabolically labeled undecalcified calvaria revealed a consistent trend of greater MAR in AOX vs. AltrX. Collectively, these results demonstrate that anti-oxidant impregnated UHMWPE particles have decreased osteolytic potential due to their increased osteogenic properties that support coupled bone remodeling. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:845-851, 2016.

  1. Low dose pioglitazone does not affect bone formation and resorption markers or bone mineral density in streptozocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Tsirella, E; Mavrakanas, T; Rager, O; Tsartsalis, S; Kallaras, K; Kokkas, B; Mironidou-Tzouveleki, M

    2012-04-01

    Our study aims to investigate the effect of a low-dose pioglitazone regimen on bone mineral density and bone formation-resorption markers in control and diabetic rats. Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: non-diabetic controls, control rats receiving pioglitazone (3 mg/kg), streptozocin-treated diabetic rats (50 mg/kg), diabetic rats treated with pioglitazone (3 mg/kg). The duration of the experiment was 8 weeks. Diabetes in our rats was associated with weight loss, increased urinary calcium excretion and reduced plasma osteocalcin levels. Diabetes mellitus did not affect bone mineral density. Pioglitazone administration had no impact on bone formation and resorption markers levels and did not modify bone mineral density in the four studied groups. Pioglitazone at the 3 mg/kg dose was not associated with significant skeletal complications in our experimental model.

  2. Zebrafish Bone and General Physiology Are Differently Affected by Hormones or Changes in Gravity.

    PubMed

    Aceto, Jessica; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Marée, Raphael; Dardenne, Nadia; Jeanray, Nathalie; Wehenkel, Louis; Aleström, Peter; van Loon, Jack J W A; Muller, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Teleost fish such as zebrafish (Danio rerio) are increasingly used for physiological, genetic and developmental studies. Our understanding of the physiological consequences of altered gravity in an entire organism is still incomplete. We used altered gravity and drug treatment experiments to evaluate their effects specifically on bone formation and more generally on whole genome gene expression. By combining morphometric tools with an objective scoring system for the state of development for each element in the head skeleton and specific gene expression analysis, we confirmed and characterized in detail the decrease or increase of bone formation caused by a 5 day treatment (from 5dpf to 10 dpf) of, respectively parathyroid hormone (PTH) or vitamin D3 (VitD3). Microarray transcriptome analysis after 24 hours treatment reveals a general effect on physiology upon VitD3 treatment, while PTH causes more specifically developmental effects. Hypergravity (3g from 5dpf to 9 dpf) exposure results in a significantly larger head and a significant increase in bone formation for a subset of the cranial bones. Gene expression analysis after 24 hrs at 3g revealed differential expression of genes involved in the development and function of the skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine and cardiovascular systems. Finally, we propose a novel type of experimental approach, the "Reduced Gravity Paradigm", by keeping the developing larvae at 3g hypergravity for the first 5 days before returning them to 1g for one additional day. 5 days exposure to 3g during these early stages also caused increased bone formation, while gene expression analysis revealed a central network of regulatory genes (hes5, sox10, lgals3bp, egr1, edn1, fos, fosb, klf2, gadd45ba and socs3a) whose expression was consistently affected by the transition from hyper- to normal gravity.

  3. Zebrafish Bone and General Physiology Are Differently Affected by Hormones or Changes in Gravity

    PubMed Central

    Aceto, Jessica; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Marée, Raphael; Dardenne, Nadia; Jeanray, Nathalie; Wehenkel, Louis; Aleström, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Teleost fish such as zebrafish (Danio rerio) are increasingly used for physiological, genetic and developmental studies. Our understanding of the physiological consequences of altered gravity in an entire organism is still incomplete. We used altered gravity and drug treatment experiments to evaluate their effects specifically on bone formation and more generally on whole genome gene expression. By combining morphometric tools with an objective scoring system for the state of development for each element in the head skeleton and specific gene expression analysis, we confirmed and characterized in detail the decrease or increase of bone formation caused by a 5 day treatment (from 5dpf to 10 dpf) of, respectively parathyroid hormone (PTH) or vitamin D3 (VitD3). Microarray transcriptome analysis after 24 hours treatment reveals a general effect on physiology upon VitD3 treatment, while PTH causes more specifically developmental effects. Hypergravity (3g from 5dpf to 9 dpf) exposure results in a significantly larger head and a significant increase in bone formation for a subset of the cranial bones. Gene expression analysis after 24 hrs at 3g revealed differential expression of genes involved in the development and function of the skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine and cardiovascular systems. Finally, we propose a novel type of experimental approach, the "Reduced Gravity Paradigm", by keeping the developing larvae at 3g hypergravity for the first 5 days before returning them to 1g for one additional day. 5 days exposure to 3g during these early stages also caused increased bone formation, while gene expression analysis revealed a central network of regulatory genes (hes5, sox10, lgals3bp, egr1, edn1, fos, fosb, klf2, gadd45ba and socs3a) whose expression was consistently affected by the transition from hyper- to normal gravity. PMID:26061167

  4. A report from Fukushima: an assessment of bone health in an area affected by the Fukushima nuclear plant incident.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Takeaki; Ito, Kazuo; Kato, Shigeaki; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Ochi, Sae; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Saito, Yasutoshi

    2013-11-01

    Bone health was assessed for inhabitants of an area affected by the Fukushima nuclear plant incident. Osteoporotic patients, who had been treated with active vitamin D3 and/or bisphosphonate at Soma Central Hospital before the Fukushima incident, were enrolled. Changes in bone turnover markers and bone mineral density were retrospectively analyzed. Serum levels of a bone resorption marker, serum type I collagen cross-linked N-telopeptide were decreased in all the treated groups, whereas those of a bone formation marker, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, were increased. Accordingly, bone mineral density, estimated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, was increased in the lumbar spine of all groups, but bone mass increase in the proximal femur was detected only in the group treated with the two agents in combination. From the degree of these parameter changes, the antiosteoporotic treatments looked effective and were equivalent to the expected potency of past observations. At this stage, the present study implies that the Fukushima nuclear incident did not bring an acute risk to bone health in the affected areas.

  5. Evidence for efficacy of drugs affecting bone metabolism in preventing hip fracture.

    PubMed Central

    Kanis, J. A.; Johnell, O.; Gullberg, B.; Allander, E.; Dilşen, G.; Gennari, C.; Lopes Vaz, A. A.; Lyritis, G. P.; Mazzuoli, G.; Miravet, L.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the effects of taking drugs affecting bone metabolism on the risk of hip fracture in women aged over 50 years. DESIGN--Retrospective, population based, case-control study by questionnaire. SETTING--14 centres in six countries in southern Europe. SUBJECTS--2086 women with hip fracture and 3532 control women matched for age. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Number of drugs affecting bone metabolism taken and length taken for. RESULTS--Women taking drugs affecting bone metabolism had a significantly decreased risk of hip fracture. After adjustment for differences in other risk factors, the relative risk of hip fractures was 0.55 (95% confidence interval 0.31 to 0.85) in women taking oestrogens, 0.75 (0.60 to 0.94) in those taking calcium, and 0.69 (0.51 to 0.92) in those taking calcitonin. The fall in risk was not significant for anabolic steroids (0.6 (0.29 to 1.22)). Neither vitamin D nor fluorides were associated with a significant decrease in the risk of hip fracture. The effect on hip fracture risk increased significantly with increasing duration of exposure (risk ratio 0.8 (0.61 to 1.05) for less than median exposure v 0.66 (0.5 to 0.88) for greater than median exposure). Drugs were equally effective in older and younger women, with the exception of oestrogen. CONCLUSIONS--Oestrogen, calcium, and calcitonins significantly decrease the risk of hip fracture. Short term intervention late in the natural course of osteoporosis may have significant effects on the incidence of hip fracture. PMID:1463947

  6. Cortical remodeling during menopause, rheumatoid arthritis, glucocorticoid and bisphosphonate therapy.

    PubMed

    Aeberli, Daniel; Schett, Georg

    2013-03-21

    Bone mass, bone geometry and its changes are based on trabecular and cortical bone remodeling. Whereas the effects of estrogen loss, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), glucocorticoid (GC) and bisphosphonate (BP) on trabecular bone remodeling have been well described, the effects of these conditions on the cortical bone geometry are less known. The present review will report current knowledge on the effects of RA, GC and BP on cortical bone geometry and its clinical relevance. Estrogen deficiency, RA and systemic GC lead to enhanced endosteal bone resorption. While in estrogen deficiency and under GC therapy endosteal resorption is insufficiently compensated by periosteal apposition, RA is associated with some periosteal bone apposition resulting in a maintained load-bearing capacity and stiffness. In contrast, BP treatment leads to filling of endosteal bone cavities at the epiphysis; however, periosteal apposition at the bone shaft seems to be suppressed. In summary, estrogen loss, RA and GC show similar effects on endosteal bone remodeling with an increase in bone resorption, whereas their effect on periosteal bone remodeling may differ. Despite over 50 years of GC therapy and over 25 years of PB therapy, there is still need for better understanding of the skeletal effects of these drugs as well as of inflammatory disease such as RA on cortical bone remodeling.

  7. High vitamin D3 diet administered during active colitis negatively affects bone metabolism in an adoptive T cell transfer model

    PubMed Central

    Larmonier, C. B.; McFadden, R.-M. T.; Hill, F. M.; Schreiner, R.; Ramalingam, R.; Besselsen, D. G.; Ghishan, F. K.

    2013-01-01

    Decreased bone mineral density (BMD) represents an extraintestinal complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Vitamin D3 has been considered a viable adjunctive therapy in IBD. However, vitamin D3 plays a pleiotropic role in bone modeling and regulates the bone formation-resorption balance, depending on the physiological environment, and supplementation during active IBD may have unintended consequences. We evaluated the effects of vitamin D3 supplementation during the active phase of disease on colonic inflammation, BMD, and bone metabolism in an adoptive IL-10−/− CD4+ T cell transfer model of chronic colitis. High-dose vitamin D3 supplementation for 12 days during established disease had negligible effects on mucosal inflammation. Plasma vitamin D3 metabolites correlated with diet, but not disease, status. Colitis significantly reduced BMD. High-dose vitamin D3 supplementation did not affect cortical bone but led to a further deterioration of trabecular bone morphology. In mice fed a high vitamin D3 diet, colitis more severely impacted bone formation markers (osteocalcin and bone alkaline phosphatase) and increased bone resorption markers, ratio of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand to osteoprotegrin transcript, plasma osteoprotegrin level, and the osteoclast activation marker tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (ACp5). Bone vitamin D receptor expression was increased in mice with chronic colitis, especially in the high vitamin D3 group. Our data suggest that vitamin D3, at a dose that does not improve inflammation, has no beneficial effects on bone metabolism and density during active colitis or may adversely affect BMD and bone turnover. These observations should be taken into consideration in the planning of further clinical studies with high-dose vitamin D3 supplementation in patients with active IBD. PMID:23639807

  8. Heparin affects human bone marrow stromal cell fate: Promoting osteogenic and reducing adipogenic differentiation and conversion.

    PubMed

    Simann, Meike; Schneider, Verena; Le Blanc, Solange; Dotterweich, Julia; Zehe, Viola; Krug, Melanie; Jakob, Franz; Schilling, Tatjana; Schütze, Norbert

    2015-09-01

    Heparins are broadly used for the prevention and treatment of thrombosis and embolism. Yet, osteoporosis is considered to be a severe side effect in up to one third of all patients on long-term treatment. However, the mechanisms underlying this clinical problem are only partially understood. To investigate if heparin affects differentiation of skeletal precursors, we examined the effects of heparin on the osteogenic and adipogenic lineage commitment and differentiation of primary human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs). Due to the known inverse relationship between adipogenesis and osteogenesis and the capacity of pre-differentiated cells to convert into the respective other lineage, we also determined heparin effects on osteogenic conversion and adipogenic differentiation/conversion. Interestingly, heparin did not only significantly increase mRNA expression and enzyme activity of the osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP), but it also promoted mineralization during osteogenic differentiation and conversion. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of the osteogenic marker bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4) was enhanced. In addition, heparin administration partly prevented adipogenic differentiation and conversion demonstrated by reduced lipid droplet formation along with a decreased expression of adipogenic markers. Moreover, luciferase reporter assays, inhibitor experiments and gene expression analyses revealed that heparin had putative permissive effects on osteogenic signaling via the BMP pathway and reduced the mRNA expression of the Wnt pathway inhibitors dickkopf 1 (DKK1) and sclerostin (SOST). Taken together, our data show a rather supportive than inhibitory effect of heparin on osteogenic hBMSC differentiation and conversion in vitro. Further studies will have to investigate the net effects of heparin administration on bone formation versus bone resorption in vivo to unravel the molecular mechanisms of heparin-associated osteoporosis and reconcile

  9. Bone resorption is affected by follicular phase length in female rotating shift workers.

    PubMed Central

    Lohstroh, Pete N; Chen, Jiangang; Ba, Jianming; Ryan, Louise M; Xu, Xiping; Overstreet, James W; Lasley, Bill L

    2003-01-01

    Stressors as subtle as night work or shift work can lead to irregular menstrual cycles, and changes in reproductive hormone profiles can adversely affect bone health. This study was conducted to determine if stresses associated with the disruption of regular work schedule can induce alterations in ovarian function which, in turn, are associated with transient bone resorption. Urine samples from 12 rotating shift workers from a textile mill in Anqing, China, were collected in 1996-1998 during pairs of sequential menstrual cycles, of which one was longer than the other (28.4 vs. 37.4 days). Longer cycles were characterized by a prolonged follicular phase. Work schedules during the luteal-follicular phase transition (LFPT) preceding each of the two cycles were evaluated. All but one of the shorter cycles were associated with regular, forward phase work shift progression during the preceding LFPT. In contrast, five longer cycles were preceded by a work shift interrupted either by an irregular shift or a number of "off days." Urinary follicle-stimulating hormone levels were reduced in the LFPT preceding longer cycles compared with those in the LFPT preceding shorter cycles. There was greater bone resorption in the follicular phase of longer cycles than in that of shorter cycles, as measured by urinary deoxypyridinoline. These data confirm reports that changes in work shift can lead to irregularity in menstrual cycle length. In addition, these data indicate that there may be an association between accelerated bone resorption in menstrual cycles and changes of regularity in work schedule during the preceding LFPT. PMID:12676625

  10. New insights to the role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor in bone phenotype and in dioxin-induced modulation of bone microarchitecture and material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Herlin, Maria; Finnilä, Mikko A.J.; Zioupos, Peter; Aula, Antti; Risteli, Juha; Miettinen, Hanna M.; Jämsä, Timo; Tuukkanen, Juha; Korkalainen, Merja; Håkansson, Helen; Viluksela, Matti

    2013-11-15

    Bone is a target for high affinity aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) ligands, such as dioxins. Although bone morphology, mineral density and strength are sensitive endpoints of dioxin toxicity, less is known about effects on bone microarchitecture and material properties. This study characterizes TCDD-induced modulations of bone tissue, and the role of AHR in dioxin-induced bone toxicity and for normal bone phenotype. Six AHR-knockout (Ahr{sup −/−}) and wild-type (Ahr{sup +/+}) mice of both genders were exposed to TCDD weekly for 10 weeks, at a total dose of 200 μg/kg bw. Bones were examined with micro-computed tomography, nanoindentation and biomechanical testing. Serum levels of bone remodeling markers were analyzed, and the expression of genes related to osteogenic differentiation was profiled using PCR array. In Ahr{sup +/+} mice, TCDD-exposure resulted in harder bone matrix, thinner and more porous cortical bone, and a more compact trabecular bone compartment. Bone remodeling markers and altered expression of a number of osteogenesis related genes indicated imbalanced bone remodeling. Untreated Ahr{sup −/−} mice displayed a slightly modified bone phenotype as compared with untreated Ahr{sup +/+} mice, while TCDD exposure caused only a few changes in bones of Ahr{sup −/−} mice. Part of the effects of both TCDD-exposure and AHR-deficiency were gender dependent. In conclusion, exposure of adult mice to TCDD resulted in harder bone matrix, thinner cortical bone, mechanically weaker bones and most notably, increased trabecular bone volume fraction in Ahr{sup +/+} mice. AHR is involved in bone development of a normal bone phenotype, and is crucial for manifestation of TCDD-induced bone alterations. - Highlights: • TCDD disrupts bone remodeling resulting in altered cortical and trabecular bone. • In trabecular bone an anabolic effect is observed. • Cortical bone is thinner, more porous, harder, stiffer and mechanically weaker. • AHR ablation

  11. Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmberger, Thomas K.; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten

    The typical clinical signs in bone tumours are pain, destruction and destabilization, immobilization, neurologic deficits, and finally functional impairment. Primary malignant bone tumours are a rare entity, accounting for about 0.2% of all malignancies. Also benign primary bone tumours are in total rare and mostly asymptomatic. The most common symptomatic benign bone tumour is osteoid osteoma with an incidence of 1:2000.

  12. Deficiency of AXL in Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Does Not Affect Advanced Atherosclerotic Lesion Progression.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Manikandan; Proto, Jonathan D; Matsushima, Glenn K; Tabas, Ira

    2016-12-13

    AXL, a member of the TAM (Tyro3, Axl, MerTK) family of receptors, plays important roles in cell survival, clearance of dead cells (efferocytosis), and suppression of inflammation, which are processes that critically influence atherosclerosis progression. Whereas MerTK deficiency promotes defective efferocytosis, inflammation, and plaque necrosis in advanced murine atherosclerosis, the role of Axl in advanced atherosclerosis progression is not known. Towards this end, bone marrow cells from Axl(-/-) or wild-type mice were transplanted into lethally irradiated Ldlr(-/-) mice. These chimeric mice were then fed the Western-type diet (WD) for 17 weeks. We demonstrate that lesional macrophages in WT mice express Axl but that Axl deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells does not affect lesion size, cellularity, necrosis, or inflammatory parameters in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Moreover, apoptosis of lesional cells was unaffected, and we found no evidence of defective lesional efferocytosis. In contrast to previously reported findings with MerTK deficiency, hematopoietic cell-Axl deficiency in WD-fed Ldlr(-/-) mice does not affect the progression of advanced atherosclerosis or lesional processes associated with TAM receptor signaling. These findings suggest a heretofore unappreciated TAM receptor hierarchy in advanced atherosclerosis.

  13. Deficiency of AXL in Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Does Not Affect Advanced Atherosclerotic Lesion Progression

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Manikandan; Proto, Jonathan D.; Matsushima, Glenn K.; Tabas, Ira

    2016-01-01

    AXL, a member of the TAM (Tyro3, Axl, MerTK) family of receptors, plays important roles in cell survival, clearance of dead cells (efferocytosis), and suppression of inflammation, which are processes that critically influence atherosclerosis progression. Whereas MerTK deficiency promotes defective efferocytosis, inflammation, and plaque necrosis in advanced murine atherosclerosis, the role of Axl in advanced atherosclerosis progression is not known. Towards this end, bone marrow cells from Axl−/− or wild-type mice were transplanted into lethally irradiated Ldlr−/− mice. These chimeric mice were then fed the Western-type diet (WD) for 17 weeks. We demonstrate that lesional macrophages in WT mice express Axl but that Axl deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells does not affect lesion size, cellularity, necrosis, or inflammatory parameters in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Moreover, apoptosis of lesional cells was unaffected, and we found no evidence of defective lesional efferocytosis. In contrast to previously reported findings with MerTK deficiency, hematopoietic cell-Axl deficiency in WD-fed Ldlr−/− mice does not affect the progression of advanced atherosclerosis or lesional processes associated with TAM receptor signaling. These findings suggest a heretofore unappreciated TAM receptor hierarchy in advanced atherosclerosis. PMID:27958361

  14. Role of Osteocyte-derived Insulin-Like Growth Factor I in Developmental Growth, Modeling, Remodeling, and Regeneration of the Bone

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Matilda H. C.; Lau, K. H. William

    2014-01-01

    The osteocyte has long been considered to be the primary mechanosensory cell in the bone. Recent evidence has emerged that the osteocyte is also a key regulator of various bone and mineral metabolism and that its regulatory effects are in part mediated through locally produced osteocyte-derived factors, such as sclerostin, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL), and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23. Osteocytes secrete large amounts of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I in bone. Although IGF-I produced locally by other bone cells, such as osteoblasts and chondrocytes, has been shown to play important regulatory roles in bone turnover and developmental bone growth, the functional role of osteocyte-derived IGF-I in the bone and mineral metabolism has not been investigated and remains unclear. However, results of recent studies in osteocyte Igf1 conditional knockout transgenic mice have suggested potential regulatory roles of osteocyte-derived IGF-I in various aspects of bone and mineral metabolism. In this review, evidence supporting a regulatory role for osteocyte-derived IGF-I in the osteogenic response to mechanical loading, the developmental bone growth, the bone response to dietary calcium depletion and repletion, and in fracture repair is discussed. A potential coordinated regulatory relationship between the effect of osteocyte-derived IGF-I on bone size and the internal organ size is also proposed. PMID:24707466

  15. Role of Osteocyte-derived Insulin-Like Growth Factor I in Developmental Growth, Modeling, Remodeling, and Regeneration of the Bone.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Matilda H C; Lau, K H William; Baylink, David J

    2014-02-01

    The osteocyte has long been considered to be the primary mechanosensory cell in the bone. Recent evidence has emerged that the osteocyte is also a key regulator of various bone and mineral metabolism and that its regulatory effects are in part mediated through locally produced osteocyte-derived factors, such as sclerostin, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL), and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23. Osteocytes secrete large amounts of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I in bone. Although IGF-I produced locally by other bone cells, such as osteoblasts and chondrocytes, has been shown to play important regulatory roles in bone turnover and developmental bone growth, the functional role of osteocyte-derived IGF-I in the bone and mineral metabolism has not been investigated and remains unclear. However, results of recent studies in osteocyte Igf1 conditional knockout transgenic mice have suggested potential regulatory roles of osteocyte-derived IGF-I in various aspects of bone and mineral metabolism. In this review, evidence supporting a regulatory role for osteocyte-derived IGF-I in the osteogenic response to mechanical loading, the developmental bone growth, the bone response to dietary calcium depletion and repletion, and in fracture repair is discussed. A potential coordinated regulatory relationship between the effect of osteocyte-derived IGF-I on bone size and the internal organ size is also proposed.

  16. Decreased bone turnover with balanced resorption and formation prevent cortical bone loss during disuse (hibernation) in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis).

    PubMed

    McGee, Meghan E; Maki, Aaron J; Johnson, Steven E; Nelson, O Lynne; Robbins, Charles T; Donahue, Seth W

    2008-02-01

    Disuse uncouples bone formation from resorption, leading to increased porosity, decreased bone geometrical properties, and decreased bone mineral content which compromises bone mechanical properties and increases fracture risk. However, black bear bone properties are not adversely affected by aging despite annual periods of disuse (i.e., hibernation), which suggests that bears either prevent bone loss during disuse or lose bone and subsequently recover it at a faster rate than other animals. Here we show decreased cortical bone turnover during hibernation with balanced formation and resorption in grizzly bear femurs. Hibernating grizzly bear femurs were less porous and more mineralized, and did not demonstrate any changes in cortical bone geometry or whole bone mechanical properties compared to active grizzly bear femurs. The activation frequency of intracortical remodeling was 75% lower during hibernation than during periods of physical activity, but the normalized mineral apposition rate was unchanged. These data indicate that bone turnover decreases during hibernation, but osteons continue to refill at normal rates. There were no changes in regional variation of porosity, geometry, or remodeling indices in femurs from hibernating bears, indicating that hibernation did not preferentially affect one region of the cortex. Thus, grizzly bears prevent bone loss during disuse by decreasing bone turnover and maintaining balanced formation and resorption, which preserves bone structure and strength. These results support the idea that bears possess a biological mechanism to prevent disuse osteoporosis.

  17. AGE-RELATED FACTORS AFFECTING THE POST-YIELD ENERGY DISSIPATION OF HUMAN CORTICAL BONE

    PubMed Central

    Nyman, Jeffry S.; Roy, Anuradha; Tyler, Jerrod H.; Acuna, Rae L.; Gayle, Heather J.; Wang, Xiaodu

    2007-01-01

    The risk of bone fracture depends in part on the quality of the tissue, not just the size and mass. This study assessed the post-yield energy dissipation of cortical bone in tension as a function of age and composition. Tensile specimens were prepared from tibiae of human cadavers in which male and female donors were divided into two age groups: middle aged (51 to 56 years old, n = 9) and elderly (72 to 90 years old, n = 8). By loading, unloading, and reloading a specimen with rest period inserted in between, tensile properties at incremental strain levels were assessed. In addition, the post-yield toughness was estimated and partitioned as follows: plastic strain energy related to permanent deformation, released elastic strain energy related to stiffness loss, and hysteresis energy related to viscous behavior. Porosity, mineral and collagen content, and collagen crosslinks of each specimen were also measured to determine the micro and ultrastructural properties of the tissue. It was found that age affected all the energy terms plus strength but not elastic stiffness. The post-yield energy terms were correlated with porosity, pentosidine (a marker of non-enzymatic crosslinks), and collagen content, all of which significantly varied with age. General linear models with the highest possible R2 value suggested that the pentosidine concentration and collagen content provided the best explanation of the age-related decrease in the post-yield energy dissipation of bone. Among them, pentosidine concentration had the greatest contribution to plastic strain energy and was the best explanatory variable of damage accumulation. PMID:17266142

  18. Skeletal Complications in Neurofibromatosis Type 1: the Role of Neurofibromin Haploinsufficiency in Defective Skeletal Remodeling and Bone Healing in NF1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    L.H. 2007. Conditional mutagenesis reveals that NFATc1 is required for osteoclast differentiation in vivo. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 66:A6-A7...of skeletal disease and bone resorption in NF1, this study will determine if current methods of pharmacological intervention can modulate NF1 bone...tissue. Little is known of the cellular or molecular characteristics of NF1 bone tissue that lead to skeletal manifestations of the disease . In this

  19. [Fluoride effect on bone formation--an overview].

    PubMed

    Mohr, H

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to evaluate our present knowledge of fluoride effect on bone formation on basis of the literature. It is likely that fluoride affects the remodelling processes of the skeleton as well as growth related bone formation. During bone remodelling the amount of bone and osteoid tissue is increased by alteration of the balance between resorption and formation. This finding may be accompagnied by impaired mineralization. In studies of fluoride effect on growth related bone formation a number of quantitative histologic alterations have been observed. These include reduction in epiphyseal plate thickness and changes in cellular morphology as well as a retardation of mineralization. The pathogenetic mechanisms behind the observed effects and the variation in tissue response are still unexplained. Fluoride may have a direct cellular effect causing disturbances in cell morphology and metabolism, but the effects may also involve local supracellular mechanisms as well as the general homeostasis of the individual.

  20. A quantification strategy for missing bone mass in case of osteolytic bone lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Fränzle, Andrea Giske, Kristina; Bretschi, Maren; Bäuerle, Tobias; Hillengass, Jens; Bendl, Rolf

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Most of the patients who died of breast cancer have developed bone metastases. To understand the pathogenesis of bone metastases and to analyze treatment response of different bone remodeling therapies, preclinical animal models are examined. In breast cancer, bone metastases are often bone destructive. To assess treatment response of bone remodeling therapies, the volumes of these lesions have to be determined during the therapy process. The manual delineation of missing structures, especially if large parts are missing, is very time-consuming and not reproducible. Reproducibility is highly important to have comparable results during the therapy process. Therefore, a computerized approach is needed. Also for the preclinical research, a reproducible measurement of the lesions is essential. Here, the authors present an automated segmentation method for the measurement of missing bone mass in a preclinical rat model with bone metastases in the hind leg bones based on 3D CT scans. Methods: The affected bone structure is compared to a healthy model. Since in this preclinical rat trial the metastasis only occurs on the right hind legs, which is assured by using vessel clips, the authors use the left body side as a healthy model. The left femur is segmented with a statistical shape model which is initialised using the automatically segmented medullary cavity. The left tibia and fibula are segmented using volume growing starting at the tibia medullary cavity and stopping at the femur boundary. Masked images of both segmentations are mirrored along the median plane and transferred manually to the position of the affected bone by rigid registration. Affected bone and healthy model are compared based on their gray values. If the gray value of a voxel indicates bone mass in the healthy model and no bone in the affected bone, this voxel is considered to be osteolytic. Results: The lesion segmentations complete the missing bone structures in a reasonable way. The mean

  1. Bone microenvironment signals in osteosarcoma development.

    PubMed

    Alfranca, Arantzazu; Martinez-Cruzado, Lucia; Tornin, Juan; Abarrategi, Ander; Amaral, Teresa; de Alava, Enrique; Menendez, Pablo; Garcia-Castro, Javier; Rodriguez, Rene

    2015-08-01

    The bone is a complex connective tissue composed of many different cell types such as osteoblasts, osteoclasts, chondrocytes, mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells, hematopoietic cells and endothelial cells, among others. The interaction between them is finely balanced through the processes of bone formation and bone remodeling, which regulates the production and biological activity of many soluble factors and extracellular matrix components needed to maintain the bone homeostasis in terms of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Osteosarcoma (OS) emerges in this complex environment as a result of poorly defined oncogenic events arising in osteogenic lineage precursors. Increasing evidence supports that similar to normal development, the bone microenvironment (BME) underlies OS initiation and progression. Here, we recapitulate the physiological processes that regulate bone homeostasis and review the current knowledge about how OS cells and BME communicate and interact, describing how these interactions affect OS cell growth, metastasis, cancer stem cell fate and therapy outcome.

  2. Aromatase Activity and Bone Loss in Men

    PubMed Central

    Merlotti, Daniela; Gennari, Luigi; Stolakis, Konstantinos; Nuti, Ranuccio

    2011-01-01

    Aromatase is a specific component of the cytochrome P450 enzyme system responsible for the transformation of androgen precursors into estrogens. This enzyme is encoded by the CYP19A1 gene located at chromosome 15q21.2, that is, expressed in ovary and testis, but also in many extraglandular sites such as the placenta, brain, adipose tissue, and bone. The activity of aromatase regulates the concentrations of estrogens with endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine effects on target issues including bone. Importantly, extraglandular aromatization of circulating androgen precursors is the major source of estrogen in men. Clinical and experimental evidences clearly indicate that aromatase activity and estrogen production are necessary for longitudinal bone growth, the attainment of peak bone mass, pubertal growth spurt, epiphyseal closure, and normal bone remodeling in young individuals. Moreover, with aging, individual differences in aromatase activity may significantly affect bone loss and fracture risk in men. PMID:21772971

  3. Behaviour of water bound in bone marrow cells affected by organic solvents of different polarity.

    PubMed

    Turov, Vladimir V; Kerus, Sergey V; Gun'ko, Vladimir M

    2009-08-01

    The behaviour of intracellular water affected by organic solvents of different polarity in partially dehydrated marrow cells obtained from tubular bones of broiler chickens was studied using (1)H NMR spectroscopy at 210-290K. The (1)H NMR spectra of intracellular water include two signals which can be assigned to strongly (SAW, chemical shift of the proton resonance delta(H)=4-5ppm) and weakly (WAW, delta(H)=1.2-1.7ppm) associated waters which can be also divided into weakly (WBW, frozen at 250-0.8kJ/mol) and strongly (SBW, unfrozen at T<250K, DeltaG<-0.8kJ/mol) bound intracellular waters. Solvents of different polarity such as dimethylsulfoxide-d(6) (Me(2)SO-d(6)), acetonitrile-d(3), and chloroform-d differently affect structure, Gibbs free energy, and molecular mobility of intracellular water. A maximal fraction of SBW in WAW and a minimal fraction of SBW in SAW are observed on absorption of acetonitrile (0.8g/g) by cells. The opposite results are on addition of Me(2)SO (0.8g/g) which strongly changes organisation of intracellular water and enhances the freezing point depression of SBW.

  4. Bone formation: roles of genistein and daidzein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bone remodeling consists of a balance between bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts. Osteoporosis is the result of increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation causing a decreased bone mass density, loss of bone microarchitecture, and an increased risk of fractu...

  5. Skeletal Complications in Neurofibromatosis Type 1: The Role of Neurofibromin Haploinsufficiency in Defective Skeletal Remodeling and Bone Healing in NF1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 01-01-2007 2. REPORT TYPE Annual...with hematoxylin. Controls with no primary or no secondary antibody were clean (not shown). In the figure, bone tissue is identified by "B". All...neurofibromin in normal mouse bone and in a mouse model of fracture healing. Personnel We were fortunate to recruit Tania N. Crotti, Ph.D

  6. Calcium-regulating hormones, bone mineral content, breaking load and trabecular remodeling are altered in growing pigs fed calcium-deficient diets.

    PubMed

    Eklou-Kalonji, E; Zerath, E; Colin, C; Lacroix, C; Holy, X; Denis, I; Pointillart, A

    1999-01-01

    Studies on calcium nutrition in appropriate large animal models can be directly relevant to humans. We have examined the effect of dietary Ca deficiency on various bone and bone-related variables, including plasma markers, histomorphometry, mineral content and breaking strength in pigs. Three groups of eight 38-d-old female pigs were fed adequate (0.9%; control), low (0.4%; LCa) or very low (0.1%; VLCa) Ca diets for 32 d. Plasma Ca significantly decreased over time only in the VLCa-deficient pigs. The concentrations of the parathyroid hormones (PTH) and calcitriol increased as Ca deficiency developed, and the plasma PTH and calcitriol levels varied inversely with dietary Ca. The total bone ash contents, bending moments, trabecular bone volume and the mineral apposition rate all decreased as the calcium intake decreased. The osteoclast surface areas were greater than those of controls in both Ca-deficient groups, whereas the osteoblast surface areas were greater only in the VLCa group. The plasma osteoblast-related markers (alkaline phosphatase, carboxy-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen and osteocalcin) were either greater or unaffected in the Ca-deficient pigs. The results indicate that deficient bone mineralization combined with an increased bone resorption led to bone loss and fragility. The differences in the changes in bone cells (number and activity) between LCa and VLCa groups might be due to differences (time and extent) of circulating PTH and calcitriol. The defective mineralization in both Ca-depleted groups resulted mainly from the lack of Ca because their osteoblast activity was either maintained or stimulated. The results also underline the progressive sensitivity of pigs to Ca supply and the usefulness of this model.

  7. Roles of leptin in bone metabolism and bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu Xu; Yang, Tianfu

    2015-09-01

    Adipose tissue has been more accepted as an active contributor to whole body homeostasis, rather than just a fat depot, since leptin, a 16 kDa protein, was discovered as the product of the obese gene in 1994. With more and more studies conducted on this hormone, it has been shown that there is a close relationship between adipose tissue and bone, which have important effects on each other. Bone is the source of many hormones, such as osteocalcin, that can affect energy metabolism and then the anabolism or catabolism of fat tissue. In contrast, the adipose tissue synthesizes and releases a series of adipokines, which are involved in bone metabolism through direct or indirect effects on bone formation and resorption. Interestingly, leptin, one of the most important cytokines derived from fat tissue, seems to account for the largest part of effects on bone, through direct or indirect involvement in bone remodeling and by playing a significant role in many bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, rheumatic arthritis, bone tumors and even fractures. In this review, we will discuss the progress in leptin research, particularly focusing on the roles of leptin in bone diseases.

  8. Low 17beta-estradiol levels in CNR1 knock-out mice affect spermatid chromatin remodeling by interfering with chromatin reorganization.

    PubMed

    Cacciola, Giovanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Altucci, Lucia; Ledent, Catherine; Mason, J Ian; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo; Cobellis, Gilda

    2013-06-01

    The type 1-cannabinoid receptor, CNR1, regulates differentiation of spermatids. Indeed, we have recently reported that the genetic inactivation of Cnr1 in mice influenced chromatin remodeling of spermatids, by reducing histone displacement and then sperm chromatin quality indices (chromatin condensation and DNA integrity). Herein, we have studied, at both central and testicular levels, the molecular signals potentially involved in histone displacement. In particular, investigation of the neuroendocrine axis involved in estrogen production demonstrated down-regulation of the axis supporting FSH/estrogen secretion in Cnr1-knockout male mice. Conversely, Cnr1-knockout male mice treated with 17beta-estradiol showed a weak increase of pituitary Fsh-beta subunit mRNA levels and a rescue of sperm chromatin quality indices demonstrating that estrogens, possibly in combination with FSH secretion, play an important role in regulating chromatin remodeling of spermatids.

  9. BoneNET: a network model of bone microstructure and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehyong; Bone, Lawrence; Ramanathan, Murali; Zhang, Aidong

    2013-01-01

    We develop a network model of bone microstructure and dynamics, BoneNET, which is capable of quantitative assessment of Bone Mineral Density (BMD) and bone remodelling dynamics. First, we introduce a network model of bone microstructure by describing structural properties and process of bone network modelling. Secondly, we explain a mathematical model of bone microstructure by analysing the density for mineralised fibres of bone microstructure. Finally, we provide a bone remodelling dynamics among osteoblast and osteoclast and study bone networks by proposing several measurements to calculate bone strength and identify critical elements in bone microstructure.

  10. Metformin revisited: Does this regulator of AMP-activated protein kinase secondarily affect bone metabolism and prevent diabetic osteopathy

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Antonio Desmond; Cortizo, Ana María; Sedlinsky, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Patients with long-term type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) can develop skeletal complications or “diabetic osteopathy”. These include osteopenia, osteoporosis and an increased incidence of low-stress fractures. In this context, it is important to evaluate whether current anti-diabetic treatments can secondarily affect bone metabolism. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) modulates multiple metabolic pathways and acts as a sensor of the cellular energy status; recent evidence suggests a critical role for AMPK in bone homeostasis. In addition, AMPK activation is believed to mediate most clinical effects of the insulin-sensitizer metformin. Over the past decade, several research groups have investigated the effects of metformin on bone, providing a considerable body of pre-clinical (in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo) as well as clinical evidence for an anabolic action of metformin on bone. However, two caveats should be kept in mind when considering metformin treatment for a patient with type 2 DM at risk for diabetic osteopathy. In the first place, metformin should probably not be considered an anti-osteoporotic drug; it is an insulin sensitizer with proven macrovascular benefits that can secondarily improve bone metabolism in the context of DM. Secondly, we are still awaiting the results of randomized placebo-controlled studies in humans that evaluate the effects of metformin on bone metabolism as a primary endpoint. PMID:27022443

  11. When size matters: differences in demineralized bone matrix particles affect collagen structure, mesenchymal stem cell behavior, and osteogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Dozza, B; Lesci, I G; Duchi, S; Della Bella, E; Martini, L; Salamanna, F; Falconi, M; Cinotti, S; Fini, M; Lucarelli, E; Donati, D

    2017-04-01

    Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) is a natural, collagen-based, osteoinductive biomaterial. Nevertheless, there are conflicting reports on the efficacy of this product. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether DBM collagen structure is affected by particle size and can influence DBM cytocompatibility and osteoinductivity. Sheep cortical bone was ground and particles were divided in three fractions with different sizes, defined as large (L, 1-2 mm), medium (M, 0.5-1 mm), and small (S, <0.5 mm). After demineralization, the chemical-physical analysis clearly showed a particle size-dependent alteration in collagen structure, with DBM-M being altered but not as much as DBM-S. DBM-M displayed a preferable trend in almost all biological characteristics tested, although all DBM particles revealed an optimal cytocompatibility. Subcutaneous implantation of DBM particles into immunocompromised mice resulted in bone induction only for DBM-M. When sheep MSC were seeded onto particles before implantation, all DBM particles were able to induce new bone formation with the best incidence for DBM-M and DBM-S. In conclusion, the collagen alteration in DBM-M is likely the best condition to promote bone induction in vivo. Furthermore, the choice of 0.5-1 mm particles may enable to obtain more efficient and consistent results among different research groups in bone tissue-engineering applications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1019-1033, 2017.

  12. Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bears (Ursus americanus) prevent trabecular bone loss during disuse (hibernation).

    PubMed

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Wojda, Samantha J; Barlow, Lindsay N; Drummer, Thomas D; Castillo, Alesha B; Kennedy, Oran; Condon, Keith W; Auger, Janene; Black, Hal L; Nelson, O Lynne; Robbins, Charles T; Donahue, Seth W

    2009-12-01

    Disuse typically causes an imbalance in bone formation and bone resorption, leading to losses of cortical and trabecular bone. In contrast, bears maintain balanced intracortical remodeling and prevent cortical bone loss during disuse (hibernation). Trabecular bone, however, is more detrimentally affected than cortical bone in other animal models of disuse. Here we investigated the effects of hibernation on bone remodeling, architectural properties, and mineral density of grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bear (Ursus americanus) trabecular bone in several skeletal locations. There were no differences in bone volume fraction or tissue mineral density between hibernating and active bears or between pre- and post-hibernation bears in the ilium, distal femur, or calcaneus. Though indices of cellular activity level (mineral apposition rate, osteoid thickness) decreased, trabecular bone resorption and formation indices remained balanced in hibernating grizzly bears. These data suggest that bears prevent bone loss during disuse by maintaining a balance between bone formation and bone resorption, which consequently preserves bone structure and strength. Further investigation of bone metabolism in hibernating bears may lead to the translation of mechanisms preventing disuse-induced bone loss in bears into novel treatments for osteoporosis.

  13. Dietary supplements and physical exercise affecting bone and body composition in frail elderly persons.

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, N; Chin A Paw, M J; de Groot, L C; Hiddink, G J; van Staveren, W A

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study determined the effect of enriched foods and all-around physical exercise on bone and body composition in frail elderly persons. METHODS: A 17-week randomized, controlled intervention trial, following a 2 x 2 factorial design--(1) enriched foods, (2) exercise, (3) both, or (4) neither--was performed in 143 frail elderly persons (aged 78.6 +/- 5.6 years). Foods were enriched with multiple micronutrients; exercises focused on skill training, including strength, endurance, coordination, and flexibility. Main outcome parameters were bone and body composition. RESULTS: Exercise preserved lean mass (mean difference between exercisers and non-exercisers: 0.5 kg +/- 1.2 kg; P < .02). Groups receiving enriched food had slightly increased bone mineral density (+0.4%), bone mass (+0.6%), and bone calcium (+0.6%) compared with groups receiving non-enriched foods, in whom small decreases of 0.1%, 0.2%, and 0.4%, respectively, were found. These groups differed in bone mineral density (0.006 +/- 0.020 g/cm2; P = .08), total bone mass (19 +/- g; P = .04), and bone calcium (8 +/- 21 g; P = .03). CONCLUSIONS: Foods containing a physiologic dose of micronutrients slightly increased bone density, mass, and calcium, whereas moderately intense exercise preserved lean body mass in frail elderly persons. PMID:10846514

  14. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of chicken osteocalcin and its use in evaluation of perch effects on bone remodeling in caged White Leghorns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteocalcin (OC) is a sensitive biochemical marker for evaluating bone turnover in mammals. The role of avian OC is less clear because of a need for a chicken assay. Our objectives were to develop an assay using indirect competitive ELISA for detecting chicken serum OC and use the assay to examine t...

  15. Paget's Disease of Bone

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Paget's Disease of Bone What is Paget's Disease of Bone? Click for more information Enlarged and Misshapen Bones Paget's disease of bone causes affected bones to ...

  16. Subtle changes in bone mineralization density distribution in most severely affected patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Misof, B M; Roschger, P; Jorgetti, V; Klaushofer, K; Borba, V Z C; Boguszewski, C L; Cohen, A; Shane, E; Zhou, H; Dempster, D W; Moreira, C A

    2015-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with low aBMD as measured by DXA and altered microstructure as assessed by bone histomorphometry and microcomputed tomography. Knowledge of bone matrix mineralization is lacking in COPD. Using quantitative backscatter electron imaging (qBEI), we assessed cancellous (Cn.) and cortical (Ct.) bone mineralization density distribution (BMDD) in 19 postmenopausal women (62.1 ± 7.3 years of age) with COPD. Eight had sustained fragility fractures, and 13 had received treatment with inhaled glucocorticoids. The BMDD outcomes from the patients were compared with healthy reference data and were correlated with previous clinical and histomorphometric findings. In general, the BMDD outcomes for the patients were not significantly different from the reference data. Neither the subgroups of with or without fragility fractures or of who did or did not receive inhaled glucocorticoid treatment, showed differences in BMDD. However, subgroup comparison according to severity revealed 10% decreased cancellous mineralization heterogeneity (Cn.CaWidth) for the most severely affected compared with less affected patients (p=0.042) and compared with healthy premenopausal controls (p=0.021). BMDD parameters were highly correlated with histomorphometric cancellous bone volume (BV/TV) and formation indices: mean degree of mineralization (Cn.CaMean) versus BV/TV (r=0.58, p=0.009), and Cn.CaMean and Ct.CaMean versus bone formation rate (BFR/BS) (r=-0.71, p<0.001). In particular, those with lower BV/TV (<50th percentile) had significantly lower Cn.CaMean (p=0.037) and higher Cn.CaLow (p=0.020) compared with those with higher (>50th percentile) BV/TV. The normality in most of the BMDD parameters and bone formation rates as well as the significant correlations between them suggests unaffected mineralization processes in COPD. Our findings also indicate no significant negative effect of treatment with inhaled glucocorticoids on the bone

  17. Evaluation of different rotary devices on bone repair in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro Junior, Paulo Domingos; Barleto, Christiane Vespasiano; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Matsumoto, Mariza Akemi

    2007-01-01

    In oral surgery, the quality of bone repair may be influenced by several factors that can increase the morbidity of the procedure. The type of equipment used for ostectomy can directly affect bone healing. The aim of this study was to evaluate bone repair of mandible bone defects prepared in rabbits using three different rotary devices. Fifteen New Zealand rabbits were randomly assigned to 3 groups (n=5) according to type of rotary device used to create bone defects: I--pneumatic low-speed rotation engine, II--pneumatic high-speed rotation engine, and III--electric low-speed rotation engine. The anatomic pieces were surgically obtained after 2, 7 and 30 days and submitted to histological and morphometric analysis. The morphometric results were expressed as the total area of bone remodeling matrix using an image analysis system. Increases in the bone remodeling matrix were noticed with time along the course of the experiment. No statistically significant differences (p>0.05) were observed among the groups at the three sacrificing time points considering the total area of bone mineralized matrix, although the histological analysis showed a slightly advanced bone repair in group III compared to the other two groups. The findings of the present study suggest that the type of rotary device used in oral and maxillofacial surgery does not interfere with the bone repair process.

  18. Teaching resources. Chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Lue, Neal F

    2005-07-26

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes and slides for a class covering chromatin remodeling mechanisms and is part of the course "Cell Signaling Systems: a Course for Graduate Students." The lecture begins with a discussion of chromatin organization and then proceeds to describe the process of chromatin remodeling through a review of chromatin remodeling complexes and methods used to study their function.

  19. Bone turnover markers: Emerging tool in the management of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sahana; Kapoor, Nitin; Bondu, Joseph Dian; Thomas, Nihal; Paul, Thomas Vizhalil

    2016-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue which undergoes constant remodeling throughout the life span. Bone turnover is balanced with coupling of bone formation and resorption at various rates leading to continuous remodeling of bone. A study of bone turnover markers (BTMs) provides an insight of the dynamics of bone turnover in many metabolic bone disorders. An increase in bone turnover seen with aging and pathological states such as osteoporosis leads to deterioration of bone microarchitecture and thus contributes to an increase in the risk of fracture independent of low bone mineral density (BMD). These microarchitectural alterations affecting the bone quality can be assessed by BTMs and thus may serve as a complementary tool to BMD in the assessment of fracture risk. A systematic search of literature regarding BTMs was carried out using the PubMed database for the purpose of this review. Various reliable, rapid, and cost-effective automated assays of BTMs with good sensitivity are available for the management of osteoporosis. However, BTMs are subjected to various preanalytical and analytical variations necessitating strict sample collection and assays methods along with utilizing ethnicity-based reference standards for different populations. Estimation of fracture risk and monitoring the adherence and response to therapy, which is a challenge in a chronic, asymptomatic disease such as osteoporosis, are the most important applications of measuring BTMs. This review describes the physiology of bone remodeling, various conventional and novel BTMs, and BTM assays and their role in the assessment of fracture risk and monitoring response to treatment with antiresorptive or anabolic agents. PMID:27867890

  20. [Effects of sodium chloride on bone health].

    PubMed

    Sarić, Marija; Piasek, Martina

    2005-03-01

    This paper discusses the physiology of sodium effects on calcium metabolism and possible implications of increased salt intake on bone remodelling and bone mass. Osteoporosis is an increasing public health problem affecting more than 200 million of women around the world. The major complications of osteoporosis are fractures, which are frequently associated with high morbidity and mortality. A number of clinical, epidemiological and experimental studies aim at identifying lifestyle factors that may improve bone mass and prevent bone loss. Different nutrients are proposed to play a role in bone development during growth and in the maintenance of bone mass thereafter. However, the importance of sodium intake for bone health has not been elucidated. It is well known that high dietary sodium intake decreases renal calcium reabsorption, which in turn leads to a greater urinary calcium excretion. This effect has been demonstrated in studies in humans of all ages as well as in experimental animals. It is not clear to what extent sodium-induced calcium loss is compensated for by increased intestinal calcium absorption. It is suspected that, if not fully compensated, sustained hypercalciuria due to increased sodium intake may diminish bone mass. Postmenopausal women showed that increased dietary salt may indeed augment bone resorption. Sodium effects on bone mass in various studies are inconsistent and there is still no evidence that increased salt intake is a risk factor in the aetiology of osteoporosis A randomized longitudinal study of different sodium intake in two groups of subject could clarify the role of sodium in bone mass.

  1. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the effects of alendronate on bone mineral density and bone remodelling in perimenopausal women with low bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Khan, Aliya; Dubois, Sacha; Khan, Amina A; Rahman, M Zohair; Khan, O Ahmed; Syed, Hamid T; Derzko, Christine

    2014-11-01

    Contexte : Les femmes périménopausées peuvent connaître une perte osseuse rapide aux points du squelette qui comptent des os tant corticaux que spongieux, ce qui accroît la prévalence de l’ostéoporose à la suite de la ménopause. Méthodes : Nous avons mené un essai comparatif randomisé avec placebo (d’une durée de 12 mois) qui cherchait à évaluer les effets de l’administration de 70 mg d’alendronate et de 2 800 UI de cholécalciférol (une fois par semaine, pendant 12 mois), par comparaison avec l’administration d’un placebo et de cholécalciférol. Le critère d’évaluation principal était la modification (en pourcentage, entre la valeur de départ et la valeur à 12 mois) de la densité minérale osseuse (DMO) de la colonne lombaire. Parmi les critères d’évaluation secondaires, on trouvait la modification de la DMO du col fémoral et les modifications des marqueurs biochimiques du renouvellement des cellules osseuses. Résultats : Nous avons sollicité la participation de 45 femmes à l’étude. Cinq participantes se sont désistées avant la randomisation pour des raisons n’ayant rien à voir avec l’étude. Quarante femmes ont été affectées au hasard à un groupe devant recevoir de l’alendronate ou à un groupe devant recevoir un placebo. Chez les femmes traitées à l’alendronate, la DMO moyenne de la colonne lombaire a connu une hausse de l’ordre de 3,66 % (différence moyenne appariée, μd = 0,032; ± 0,008 ET) à 12 mois, par comparaison avec une baisse de l’ordre de 3,33 % (μd = −0,030; ± 0,008 ET) au sein du groupe témoin (P < 0,001). Au niveau du col fémoral au sein du groupe « alendronate », la DMO moyenne a connu une hausse de l’ordre de 2,07 % (μd = 0,014; ± 0,009 ET) à 12 mois, par comparaison avec une baisse de l’ordre de 1,87 % (μd = −0,014; ± 0,008 ET) au sein du groupe témoin (P = 0,046). Aucune différence en matière de DMO n’a été constat

  2. Bone quality is affected by food restriction and by nutrition-induced catch-up growth.

    PubMed

    Pando, Rakefet; Masarwi, Majdi; Shtaif, Biana; Idelevich, Anna; Monsonego-Ornan, Efrat; Shahar, Ron; Phillip, Moshe; Gat-Yablonski, Galia

    2014-12-01

    Growth stunting constitutes the most common effect of malnutrition. When the primary cause of malnutrition is resolved, catch-up (CU) growth usually occurs. In this study, we have explored the effect of food restriction (RES) and refeeding on bone structure and mechanical properties. Sprague-Dawley male rats aged 24 days were subjected to 10 days of 40% RES, followed by refeeding for 1 (CU) or 26 days long-term CU (LTCU). The rats fed ad libitum served as controls. The growth plates were measured, osteoclasts were identified using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining, and micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning and mechanical testing were used to study structure and mechanical properties. Micro-CT analysis showed that RES led to a significant reduction in trabecular BV/TV and trabecular number (Tb.N), concomitant with an increase in trabecular separation (Tb.Sp). Trabecular BV/TV and Tb.N were significantly greater in the CU group than in the RES in both short- and long-term experiments. Mechanical testing showed that RES led to weaker and less compliant bones; interestingly, bones of the CU group were also more fragile after 1 day of CU. Longer term of refeeding enabled correction of the bone parameters; however, LTCU did not achieve full recovery. These results suggest that RES in young rats attenuated growth and reduced trabecular bone parameters. While nutrition-induced CU growth led to an immediate increase in epiphyseal growth plate height and active bone modeling, it was also associated with a transient reduction in bone quality. This should be taken into consideration when treating children undergoing CU growth.

  3. Remodeling patterns of occipital growth: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Kranioti, Elena F; Rosas, Antonio; García-Vargas, Samuel; Estalrrich, Almudena; Bastir, Markus; Peña-Melián, Angel

    2009-11-01

    Occipital growth depends on coordinated deposition and resorption on the external and internal surface and includes interrelated processes of movement: cortical drift, displacement, and relocation. The current work aspires to map patterns of remodeling activity on the endocranial surface of the occipital bone from childhood to adulthood using a larger study sample compared with previous studies. The study sample consists of 5 adult and 10 immature (2(1/4) to 8 years old) occipital bones from skeletal remains from the eighteenth and nineteenth century. Preparation of the samples includes the elaboration of negative impressions, positive replicas coated with gold, and observed with the reflected light microscope. Cerebellar fossae are typically resorptive in both immature and adult specimens. Cerebral fossae, on the other hand, exhibit a resorptive surface in early childhood and turn into depository around the age of 7 years, which places this transition within the age interval of the completion of cerebral development. Depository fields are also observed in adult cerebral fossae. The remodeling map presented here is consistent with the results of Mowbray (Anat Rec B New Anat 2005;283B:14-22) and differs from cellular patterns described by Enlow. Future research implicating more elements of the neurocapsule can shed light on the factors affecting and driving occipital growth.

  4. Bisphosphonate treatment affects trabecular bone apparent modulus through micro-architecture rather than matrix properties.

    PubMed

    Day, J S; Ding, M; Bednarz, P; van der Linden, J C; Mashiba, T; Hirano, T; Johnston, C C; Burr, D B; Hvid, I; Sumner, D R; Weinans, H

    2004-05-01

    Bisphosphonates are emerging as an important treatment for osteoporosis. But whether the reduced fracture risk associated with bisphosphonate treatment is due to increased bone mass, improved trabecular architecture and/or increased secondary mineralization of the calcified matrix remains unclear. We examined the effects of bisphosphonates on both the trabecular architecture and matrix properties of canine trabecular bone. Thirty-six beagles were divided into a control group and two treatment groups, one receiving risedronate and the other alendronate at 5-6 times the clinical dose for osteoporosis treatment. After one year, the dogs were killed, and samples from the first lumbar vertebrae were examined using a combination of micro-computed tomography, finite element modeling, and mechanical testing. By combining these methods, we examined the treatment effects on the calcified matrix and trabecular architecture independently. Conventional histomorphometry and microdamage data were obtained from the second and third lumbar vertebrae of the same dogs [Bone 28 (2001) 524]. Bisphosphonate treatment resulted in an increased apparent Young's modulus, decreased bone turnover, increased calcified matrix density, and increased microdamage. We could not detect any change in the effective Young's modulus of the calcified matrix in the bisphosphonate treated groups. The observed increase in apparent Young's modulus was due to increased bone mass and altered trabecular architecture rather than changes in the calcified matrix modulus. We hypothesize that the expected increase in the Young's modulus of the calcified matrix due to the increased calcified matrix density was counteracted by the accumulation of microdamage.

  5. GDF11 decreases bone mass by stimulating osteoclastogenesis and inhibiting osteoblast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weiqing; Zhou, Liyan; Zhou, Chenchen; Zhang, Shiwen; Jing, Junjun; Xie, Liang; Sun, Ningyuan; Duan, Xiaobo; Jing, Wei; Liang, Xing; Zhao, Hu; Ye, Ling; Chen, Qianming; Yuan, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is an age-related disease that affects millions of people. Growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) is a secreted member of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily. Deletion of Gdf11 has been shown to result in a skeletal anterior–posterior patterning disorder. Here we show a role for GDF11 in bone remodelling. GDF11 treatment leads to bone loss in both young and aged mice. GDF11 inhibits osteoblast differentiation and also stimulates RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis through Smad2/3 and c-Fos-dependent induction of Nfatc1. Injection of GDF11 impairs bone regeneration in mice and blocking GDF11 function prevents oestrogen-deficiency-induced bone loss and ameliorates age-related osteoporosis. Our data demonstrate that GDF11 is a previously unrecognized regulator of bone remodelling and suggest that GDF11 is a potential target for treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:27653144

  6. Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Larissa A; Laurie, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a complex, progressive condition arising from a variety of genetic and pathogenic causes. Patients present with a spectrum of histologic and pathophysiological features, likely reflecting the diversity in underlying pathogenesis. It is widely recognized that structural alterations in the vascular wall contribute to all forms of pulmonary hypertension. Features characteristic of the remodeled vasculature in patients with pulmonary hypertension include increased stiffening of the elastic proximal pulmonary arteries, thickening of the intimal and/or medial layer of muscular arteries, development of vaso-occlusive lesions and the appearance of cells expressing smooth muscle specific markers in normally non-muscular small diameter vessels, resulting from proliferation and migration of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells and cellular trans-differentiation. The development of several animal models of pulmonary hypertension has provided the means to explore the mechanistic underpinnings of pulmonary vascular remodeling, although none of the experimental models currently used entirely replicates the pulmonary arterial hypertension observed in patients. Herein, we provide an overview of the histological abnormalities observed in humans with pulmonary hypertension and in preclinical models and discuss insights gained regarding several key signaling pathways contributing to the remodeling process. In particular, we will focus on the roles of ion homeostasis, endothelin-1, serotonin, bone morphogenetic proteins, Rho kinase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle and endothelial cells, highlighting areas of cross-talk between these pathways and potentials for therapeutic targeting. PMID:23334338

  7. Gorham-Stout syndrome affecting the temporal bone with cerebrospinal fluid leakage.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Noriko; Ogiwara, Hideki; Miyazaki, Osamu; Kitamuara, Masayuki; Nishina, Sachiko; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Maekawa, Takanobu; Morota, Nobuhito

    2013-09-01

    Gorham-Stout syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by progressive osteolysis that leads to the disappearance of bone. Lymphvascular proliferation causes the local destruction of bony tissue. Owing to the low incidence of this syndrome, little is known about its etiology or treatment. We present an 11-year-old girl with Gorham-Stout syndrome that involved right petrous apex in temporal bone and upper clivus, which cause intracranial pressure increase and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. The patient required surgical repair of CSF leakage by extradural middle fossa approach with temporal fascia flap. Combined treatment with interferon and propranolol prevented the progression of osteolysis.

  8. Role of reactive oxygen species in myocardial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Shah, Ajay M

    2007-03-01

    Adverse cardiac remodeling is a fundamental process in the progression to chronic heart failure. Although the mechanisms underlying cardiac remodeling are multi-factorial, a significant body of evidence points to the crucial roles of increased reactive oxygen species. This article reviews recent advances in delineating the different sources of production for reactive oxygen species (namely mitochondria, xanthine oxidase, uncoupled nitric oxide synthases, and NADPH oxidases) that may be involved in cardiac remodeling and the aspects of the remodeling process that they affect. These data could suggest new ways of targeting redox pathways for the prevention and treatment of adverse cardiac remodeling.

  9. Short-term vitamin A supplementation does not affect bone turnover in men.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Tisha N; Krueger, Diane C; Engelke, Jean A; Harke, Judy M; Binkley, Neil C

    2002-06-01

    Limited data in humans and animals indicate that excess vitamin A stimulates bone resorption and inhibits bone formation, effects that over time might lead to bone loss and fracture. Thus, it is possible that vitamin A supplementation is a currently unrecognized risk factor for the development of osteoporosis. To further evaluate this possibility, a prospective, randomized, single-blind study of vitamin A supplementation was conducted in 80 healthy men age 18-58 y. One half received 7576 microg (25,000 IU) of retinol palmitate daily with their evening meal; the others took a placebo. Blood was collected from fasting subjects and serum prepared at baseline and after 2, 4 and 6 wk of supplementation. Serum bone specific alkaline phosphatase (BSAP) and N-Telopeptide of type 1 collagen (NTx) were measured at all time points. Serum osteocalcin (Oc) was measured at baseline and after 6 wk of supplementation. BSAP, NTx and Oc did not differ between the supplemented and placebo-treated groups over the course of the study. In conclusion, short-term vitamin A supplementation at this dosage in healthy men does not alter serum markers of skeletal turnover. Thus, it is unlikely that short-term administration of vitamin A would contribute to the development of osteoporosis. Whether long-term vitamin A supplementation might have adverse skeletal effects remains to be determined.

  10. An analysis of factors affecting the mercury content in the human femoral bone.

    PubMed

    Zioła-Frankowska, A; Dąbrowski, M; Kubaszewski, Ł; Rogala, P; Kowalski, A; Frankowski, M

    2017-01-01

    The study was carried out to determine the content of mercury in bone tissue of the proximal femur (head and neck bone) of 95 patients undergoing total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis, using CF-AFS analytical technique. Furthermore, the investigations were aimed at assessing the impact of selected factors, such as age, gender, tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, exposure to chemical substance at work, type of degenerative changes, clinical evaluation and radiological parameters, type of medications, on the concentration of mercury in the head and neck of the femur, resected in situ. Mercury was obtained in all samples of the head and neck of the femur (n = 190) in patients aged 25-91 years. The mean content of mercury for the whole group of patients was as follows: 37.1 ± 35.0 ng/g for the femoral neck and 24.2 ± 19.5 ng/g for the femoral head. The highest Hg contents were found in femoral neck samples, both in women and men, and they amounted to 169.6 and 176.5 ng/g, respectively. The research showed that the mercury content of bones can be associated with body mass index, differences in body anatomy, and gender. The uses of statistical analysis gave the possibility to define the influence of factors on mercury content in human femoral bones.

  11. New laboratory tools in the assessment of bone quality.

    PubMed

    Chappard, D; Baslé, M F; Legrand, E; Audran, M

    2011-08-01

    Bone quality is a complex set of intricated and interdependent factors that influence bone strength. A number of methods have emerged to measure bone quality, taking into account the organic or the mineral phase of the bone matrix, in the laboratory. Bone quality is a complex set of different factors that are interdependent. The bone matrix organization can be described at five different levels of anatomical organization: nature (organic and mineral), texture (woven or lamellar), structure (osteons in the cortices and arch-like packets in trabecular bone), microarchitecture, and macroarchitecture. Any change in one of these levels can alter bone quality. An altered bone remodeling can affect bone quality by influencing one or more of these factors. We have reviewed here the main methods that can be used in the laboratory to explore bone quality on bone samples. Bone remodeling can be evaluated by histomorphometry; microarchitecture is explored in 2D on histological sections and in 3D by microCT or synchrotron. Microradiography and scanning electron microscopy in the backscattered electron mode can measure the mineral distribution; Raman and Fourier-transformed infra-red spectroscopy and imaging can simultaneously explore the organic and mineral phase of the matrix on multispectral images; scanning acoustic microscopy and nanoindentation provide biomechanical information on individual trabeculae. Finally, some histological methods (polarization, surface staining, fluorescence, osteocyte staining) may also be of interest in the understanding of quality as a component of bone fragility. A growing number of laboratory techniques are now available. Some of them have been described many years ago and can find a new youth; others having benefited from improvements in physical and computer techniques are now available.

  12. Rye Affects Bacterial Translocation, Intestinal Viscosity, Microbiota Composition and Bone Mineralization in Turkey Poults

    PubMed Central

    Tellez, Guillermo; Latorre, Juan D.; Kuttappan, Vivek A.; Hargis, Billy M.; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that rye significantly increased both viscosity and Clostridium perfringens proliferation when compared with corn in an in vitro digestive model. Two independent trials were conducted to evaluate the effect of rye as a source of energy on bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, gut microbiota composition, and bone mineralization, when compared with corn in turkey poults. In each experiment, day-of-hatch, turkey poults were randomly assigned to either a corn or a rye diet (n = 0 /group). At 10 d of age, in both experiments, 12 birds/group were given an oral gavage dose of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-d). After 2.5 h of oral gavage, blood and liver samples were collected to evaluate the passage of FITC-d and bacterial translocation (BT) respectively. Duodenum, ileum and cecum gut sections were collected to evaluate intestinal viscosity and to enumerate gut microbiota. Tibias were collected for observation of bone parameters. Broilers fed with a rye diet showed increased (p<0.05) intestinal viscosity, BT, and serum FITC-d. Bacterial enumeration revealed that turkey poults fed with rye had increased the number of total lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in all three sections of the gastrointestinal tract evaluated when compared to turkey poults fed with corn. Turkey poults fed with rye also had significantly higher coliforms in duodenum and ileum but not in the ceca, whereas the total number of anaerobes increased only in duodenum. A significant reduction in bone strength and bone mineralization was observed in turkey poults fed with rye when compared with corn fed turkey poults. In conclusion, rye evoked mucosal damage in turkey poults that increased intestinal viscosity, increased leakage through the intestinal tract, and altered the microbiota composition and bone mineralization. Studies to evaluate dietary inclusion of selected Direct-Fed Microbial (DFM) candidates that produce exogenous enzymes in rye fed turkey poults are

  13. Rye affects bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, microbiota composition and bone mineralization in Turkey poults.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Guillermo; Latorre, Juan D; Kuttappan, Vivek A; Hargis, Billy M; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that rye significantly increased both viscosity and Clostridium perfringens proliferation when compared with corn in an in vitro digestive model. Two independent trials were conducted to evaluate the effect of rye as a source of energy on bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, gut microbiota composition, and bone mineralization, when compared with corn in turkey poults. In each experiment, day-of-hatch, turkey poults were randomly assigned to either a corn or a rye diet (n = 0 /group). At 10 d of age, in both experiments, 12 birds/group were given an oral gavage dose of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-d). After 2.5 h of oral gavage, blood and liver samples were collected to evaluate the passage of FITC-d and bacterial translocation (BT) respectively. Duodenum, ileum and cecum gut sections were collected to evaluate intestinal viscosity and to enumerate gut microbiota. Tibias were collected for observation of bone parameters. Broilers fed with a rye diet showed increased (p<0.05) intestinal viscosity, BT, and serum FITC-d. Bacterial enumeration revealed that turkey poults fed with rye had increased the number of total lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in all three sections of the gastrointestinal tract evaluated when compared to turkey poults fed with corn. Turkey poults fed with rye also had significantly higher coliforms in duodenum and ileum but not in the ceca, whereas the total number of anaerobes increased only in duodenum. A significant reduction in bone strength and bone mineralization was observed in turkey poults fed with rye when compared with corn fed turkey poults. In conclusion, rye evoked mucosal damage in turkey poults that increased intestinal viscosity, increased leakage through the intestinal tract, and altered the microbiota composition and bone mineralization. Studies to evaluate dietary inclusion of selected Direct-Fed Microbial (DFM) candidates that produce exogenous enzymes in rye fed turkey poults are

  14. The bone-muscle ratio of fetal lambs is affected more by maternal nutrition during pregnancy than by maternal size.

    PubMed

    Firth, E C; Rogers, C W; Vickers, M; Kenyon, P R; Jenkinson, C M C; Blair, H T; Johnson, P L; Mackenzie, D D S; Peterson, S W; Morris, S T

    2008-06-01

    Bone formation and loss are related to the strain imposed on bone by muscle forces. Bone mineral content (BMC) and lean mass (LM) of fetal lambs was determined at day 140 of pregnancy in 8 groups of ewes, which were of either large or small body size, on either high (ad libitum) or maintenance pasture intake from day 21 of pregnancy, or carrying either singletons or twins. BMC and LM (using DXA scanning) of fetal hindquarters/spine were corrected to leg length. BMC and LM were less in twin than singleton groups (P < 0.001). Large ewes on high intake produced single fetuses with a (group mean) BMC/LM ratio that was higher (P < 0.002) than that in fetuses of large ewes with singletons on maintenance intake or twins on either high or maintenance intakes, the ratios of which were not different. In single fetuses from small ewes on high intake, the BMC/LM ratio was higher than those from small ewes with singletons on maintenance intake or twins on either high or maintenance intakes, the ratios of which were not different. The ratio was not different in singleton fetuses of ewes on high intake, whether they were large or small. Different fetal environments resulted in a given amount of muscle being associated with a higher or lower bone mass. Dietary intake during pregnancy was more important than maternal size in affecting the ratio. We conclude that intrauterine environmental factors may be important in determining bone mass postnatally, and possibly later in life.

  15. Reciprocal Interactions between Multiple Myeloma Cells and Osteoprogenitor Cells Affect Bone Formation and Tumor Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    frequent occurrence of tumour metastases in bone (discussed later), as well as serious infections such as tuberculosis involving this tissue before...as shown in Figure 3 below. Our next step was to use a TurboRed (RFP)-containing plasmid packaged into a lentivirus to infect the cells and...Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139; dDepartment of Oral Medicine, Infection and Immunity, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Harvard Medical

  16. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor knockout mice have altered bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ding; Cheng, Hua; Hamrick, Mark; Zhong, Qing; Ding, Ke-Hong; Correa, Daniel; Williams, Sandra; Mulloy, Anthony; Bollag, Wendy; Bollag, Roni J; Runner, Royce R; McPherson, James C; Insogna, Karl; Isales, Carlos M

    2005-12-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is an incretin hormone, which is secreted from endocrine cells in the small intestine after meal ingestion. GIP has been shown to affect osteoblastic function in vitro; however, the in vivo effects of GIP on bone remodeling remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of GIP in modulating bone turnover, by evaluating serum markers of bone turnover, bone density, bone morphology, and changes in biomechanical bone strength over time (one to five months) in GIP receptor knockout mice (GIPR-/- mice). The GIPR-/- mice showed a decreased bone size, lower bone mass, altered bone microarchitecture and biomechanical properties, and altered parameters for bone turnover, especially in bone formation. Moreover, the effects of GIP on bone mass were site-specific and compensatory mechanism developed over time and ameliorated the impact of the loss of GIP signaling on bone mass. Further, GIPR-/- mice had earlier age-related changes than wild-type mice in body composition, including bone mass, lean body mass, and fat percentage. In summary, our results indicate that GIP has an anabolic effect on bone mass and bone quality and suggests that GIP may be a hormonal link between nutrient ingestion and utilization.

  17. Effect of Chromatin-Remodeling Agents in Hepatic Differentiation of Rat Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Danna; Li, Tong; Heraud, Philip; Parnpai, Rangsun

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic events, including covalent histone modifications and DNA methylation, play fundamental roles in the determination of lineage-specific gene expression and cell fates. The aim of this study was to determine whether the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor (DNMTi) 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) and the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) trichostatin A (TSA) promote the hepatic differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBM-MSCs) and their therapeutic effect on liver damage. 1 μM TSA and 20 μM 5-aza-dC were added to standard hepatogenic medium especially at differentiation and maturation steps and their potential function on hepatic differentiation in vitro and in vivo was determined. Exposure of rBM-MSCs to 1 μM TSA at both the differentiation and maturation steps considerably improved hepatic differentiation. TSA enhanced the development of the hepatocyte shape, promoted the chronological expression of hepatocyte-specific markers, and improved hepatic functions. In contrast, treatment of rBM-MSCs with 20 μM 5-aza-dC alone or in combination with TSA was ineffective in improving hepatic differentiation in vitro. TSA and/or 5-aza-dC derived hepatocytes-like cells failed to improve the therapeutic potential in liver damage. We conclude that HDACis enhance hepatic differentiation in a time-dependent manner, while DNMTis do not induce the hepatic differentiation of rBM-MSCs in vitro. Their in vivo function needs further investigation. PMID:27242905

  18. High phosphorus intakes acutely and negatively affect Ca and bone metabolism in a dose-dependent manner in healthy young females.

    PubMed

    Kemi, Virpi E; Kärkkäinen, Merja U M; Lamberg-Allardt, Christel J E

    2006-09-01

    Ca and P are both essential nutrients for bone and are known to affect one of the most important regulators of bone metabolism, parathyroid hormone (PTH). Too ample a P intake, typical of Western diets, could be deleterious to bone through the increased PTH secretion. Few controlled dose-response studies are available on the effects of high P intake in man. We studied the short-term effects of four P doses on Ca and bone metabolism in fourteen healthy women, 20-28 years of age, who were randomized to four controlled study days; thus each study subject served as her own control. P supplement doses of 0 (placebo), 250, 750 or 1500 mg were taken, divided into three doses during the study day. The meals served were exactly the same during each study day and provided 495 mg P and 250 mg Ca. The P doses affected the serum PTH (S-PTH) in a dose-dependent manner (P=0.0005). There was a decrease in serum ionized Ca concentration only in the highest P dose (P=0.004). The marker of bone formation, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, decreased (P=0.05) and the bone resorption marker, N-terminal telopeptide of collagen type I, increased in response to the P doses (P=0.05). This controlled dose-response study showed that P has a dose-dependent effect on S-PTH and increases PTH secretion significantly when Ca intake is low. Acutely high P intake adversely affects bone metabolism by decreasing bone formation and increasing bone resorption, as indicated by the bone metabolism markers.

  19. Inhibitor of DASH proteases affects expression of adhesion molecules in osteoclasts and reduces myeloma growth and bone disease.

    PubMed

    Pennisi, Angela; Li, Xin; Ling, Wen; Khan, Sharmin; Gaddy, Dana; Suva, Larry J; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D; Aziz, Nazneen; Yaccoby, Shmuel

    2009-06-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV activity and/or structure homologues (DASH) are serine proteases implicated in tumourigenesis. We previously found that a DASH protease, fibroblast activation protein (FAP), was involved in osteoclast-induced myeloma growth. Here we further demonstrated expression of various adhesion molecules in osteoclasts cultured alone or cocultured with myeloma cells, and tested the effects of DASH inhibitor, PT-100, on myeloma cell growth, bone disease, osteoclast differentiation and activity, and expression of adhesion molecules in osteoclasts. PT-100 had no direct effects on viability of myeloma cells or mature osteoclasts, but significantly reduced survival of myeloma cells cocultured with osteoclasts. Real-time PCR array for 85 adhesion molecules revealed upregulation of 17 genes in osteoclasts after coculture with myeloma cells. Treatment of myeloma/osteoclast cocultures with PT-100 significantly downregulated 18 of 85 tested genes in osteoclasts, some of which are known to play roles in tumourigenesis and osteoclastogenesis. PT-100 also inhibited osteoclast differentiation and subsequent pit formation. Resorption activity of mature osteoclasts and differentiation of osteoblasts were not affected by PT-100. In primary myelomatous severe combined immunodeficient (SCID)-hu mice PT-100 reduced osteoclast activity, bone resorption and tumour burden. These data demonstrated that DASH proteases are involved in myeloma bone disease and tumour growth.

  20. Increased Bone Mass in Female Mice Lacking Mast Cell Chymase

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Thomas; Gustafson, Ann-Marie; Calounova, Gabriela; Hu, Lijuan; Rasmusson, Annica; Jonsson, Kenneth B.; Wernersson, Sara; Åbrink, Magnus; Andersson, Göran; Larsson, Sune; Melhus, Håkan; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Here we addressed the potential impact of chymase, a mast-cell restricted protease, on mouse bone phenotype. We show that female mice lacking the chymase Mcpt4 acquired a persistent expansion of diaphyseal bone in comparison with wild type controls, reaching a 15% larger diaphyseal cross sectional area at 12 months of age. Mcpt4-/- mice also showed increased levels of a bone anabolic serum marker and higher periosteal bone formation rate. However, they were not protected from experimental osteoporosis, suggesting that chymase regulates normal bone homeostasis rather than the course of osteoporosis. Further, the absence of Mcpt4 resulted in age-dependent upregulation of numerous genes important for bone formation but no effects on osteoclast activity. In spite of the latter, Mcpt4-/- bones had increased cortical porosity and reduced endocortical mineralization. Mast cells were found periosteally and, notably, bone-proximal mast cells in Mcpt4-/- mice were degranulated to a larger extent than in wild type mice. Hence, chymase regulates degranulation of bone mast cells, which could affect the release of mast cell-derived factors influencing bone remodelling. Together, these findings reveal a functional impact of mast cell chymase on bone. Further studies exploring the possibility of using chymase inhibitors as a strategy to increase bone volume may be warranted. PMID:27936149

  1. Pregnancy and lactation affect markers of calcium and bone metabolism differently in adolescent and adult women with low calcium intakes.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Flávia F; Laboissière, Fabrícia P; King, Janet C; Donangelo, Carmen M

    2002-08-01

    Physiologic adaptation to the high calcium demand during pregnancy and lactation may be different in adolescents than in adults, particularly at low calcium intake. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare biochemical markers of calcium and bone metabolism between adolescent (14-19 y) and adult (21-35 y) women with calcium intake approximately 500 mg/d, in three different physiologic states, i.e., control (nonpregnant, nonlactating; NPNL), pregnant and lactating. Markers of calcium metabolism [serum Ca, P and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH); urinary Ca and P] and of bone turnover [urinary deoxypyridinoline (D-Pyr) and plasma bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP)] were measured in NPNL (adolescents, n = 12 and adults, n = 25), pregnant (adolescents, n = 30 and adults, n = 36) and lactating (adolescents, n = 19 and adults, n = 26) women. In the NPNL women, iPTH, D-Pyr and BAP were higher (P < 0.001) and urinary Ca was lower (P < 0.001) in adolescents than in adults. Serum iPTH was higher (P < 0.001) and urinary Ca was lower (P < 0.01) in adolescents than in adults also in pregnancy and lactation. Compared with NPNL women, serum Ca decreased (P < 0.001) with pregnancy in adolescents but not in adults. The increase in D-Pyr with pregnancy and lactation was very pronounced in adults ( approximately 130%, P < 0.001) but less in adolescents (<25%, P < 0.01). BAP increased (P < 0.001) with pregnancy and lactation in adults ( approximately 60%) but decreased (P < 0.001) with pregnancy in adolescents ( approximately 13%). Pregnancy and lactation appear to affect bone turnover in adolescent and adult women with low calcium intake differently.

  2. Factors that affect postnatal bone growth retardation in the twitcher murine model of Krabbe disease.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Miguel Agustin; Ries, William Louis; Shanmugarajan, Srinivasan; Arboleda, Gonzalo; Singh, Inderjit; Singh, Avtar Kaur

    2010-01-01

    Krabbe disease is an inherited lysosomal disorder in which galactosylsphingosine (psychosine) accumulates mainly in the central nervous system. To gain insight into the possible mechanism(s) that may be participating in the inhibition of the postnatal somatic growth described in the animal model of this disease (twitcher mouse, twi), we studied their femora. This study reports that twi femora are smaller than of those of wild type (wt), and present with abnormality of marrow cellularity, bone deposition (osteoblastic function), and osteoclastic activity. Furthermore, lipidomic analysis indicates altered sphingolipid homeostasis, but without significant changes in the levels of sphingolipid-derived intermediates of cell death (ceramide) or the levels of the osteoclast-osteoblast coupling factor (sphingosine-1-phosphate). However, there was significant accumulation of psychosine in the femora of adult twi animals as compared to wt, without induction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha or interleukin-6. Analysis of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) plasma levels, a liver secreted hormone known to play a role in bone growth, indicated a drastic reduction in twi animals when compared to wt. To identify the cause of the decrease, we examined the IGF-1 mRNA expression and protein levels in the liver. The results indicated a significant reduction of IGF-1 mRNA as well as protein levels in the liver from twi as compared to wt littermates. Our data suggest that a combination of endogenous (psychosine) and endocrine (IGF-1) factors play a role in the inhibition of postnatal bone growth in twi mice; and further suggest that derangements of liver function may be contributing, at least in part, to this alteration.

  3. Integrating Epigenomic Elements and GWASs Identifies BDNF Gene Affecting Bone Mineral Density and Osteoporotic Fracture Risk

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan; Dong, Shan-Shan; Chen, Xiao-Feng; Jing, Ying-Aisha; Yang, Man; Yan, Han; Shen, Hui; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Tan, Li-Jun; Tian, Qing; Deng, Hong-Wen; Yang, Tie-Lin

    2016-01-01

    To identify susceptibility genes for osteoporosis, we conducted an integrative analysis that combined epigenomic elements and previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) data, followed by validation at population and functional levels, which could identify common regulatory elements and predict new susceptibility genes that are biologically meaningful to osteoporosis. By this approach, we found a set of distinct epigenomic elements significantly enriched or depleted in the promoters of osteoporosis-associated genes, including 4 transcription factor binding sites, 27 histone marks, and 21 chromatin states segmentation types. Using these epigenomic marks, we performed reverse prediction analysis to prioritize the discovery of new candidate genes. Functional enrichment analysis of all the prioritized genes revealed several key osteoporosis related pathways, including Wnt signaling. Genes with high priority were further subjected to validation using available GWASs datasets. Three genes were significantly associated with spine bone mineral density, including BDNF, PDE4D, and SATB2, which all closely related to bone metabolism. The most significant gene BDNF was also associated with osteoporotic fractures. RNA interference revealed that BDNF knockdown can suppress osteoblast differentiation. Our results demonstrated that epigenomic data could be used to indicate common epigenomic marks to discover additional loci with biological functions for osteoporosis. PMID:27465306

  4. Paranasal bone: the prime factor affecting the decision to use transsinus vs zygomatic implants for biomechanical support for immediate function in maxillary dental implant reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Ole T; Adams, Mark W; Smith, Edmund

    2014-01-01

    Paranasal bone affects the decision-making process for placement of implants for immediate function in the highly resorbed maxilla. The most important bone for apical fixation of implants in this setting is the lateral nasal bone mass. Maximum available bone mass found at the pyriform above the nasal fossa, designated M point, can most often engage two implants placed at 30-degree angles. The second most important area of paranasal bone mass is the subnasal bone of the premaxilla, which is required to engage an angled implant at the alveolar crest. However, only 4 to 5 mm in height is needed when implants are angled posterior to engage M point. The third most important paranasal bone site for implant fixation is the midline nasal crest extending upward to the vomer. This site, which is usually type 1/2 bone, can engage implants apically and provide enough fixation for immediate function even if implants are short. These anatomical bone sites enable placement of implants to obtain a 12- to 15-mm anterior-posterior spread, which is favorable for immediate function.

  5. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) for the assessment of bone strength in most of bone affecting conditions in developmental age: a review.

    PubMed

    Stagi, Stefano; Cavalli, Loredana; Cavalli, Tiziana; de Martino, Maurizio; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2016-09-26

    Peripheral quantitative computed tomography provides an automatical scan analysis of trabecular and cortical bone compartments, calculating not only their bone mineral density (BMD), but also bone geometrical parameters, such as marrow and cortical Cross-Sectional Area (CSA), Cortical Thickness (CoTh), both periosteal and endosteal circumference, as well as biomechanical parameters like Cross-Sectional Moment of Inertia (CSMI), a measure of bending, polar moment of inertia, indicating bone strength in torsion, and Strength Strain Index (SSI). Also CSA of muscle and fat can be extracted. Muscles, which are thought to stimulate bones to adapt their geometry and mineral content, are determinant to preserve or increase bone strength; thus, pQCT provides an evaluation of the functional 'muscle-bone unit', defined as BMC/muscle CSA ratio. This functional approach to bone densitometry can establish if bone strength is normally adapted to the muscle force, and if muscle force is adequate for body size, providing more detailed insights to targeted strategies for the prevention and treatment of bone fragility. The present paper offers an extensive review of technical features of pQCT and its possible clinical application in the diagnostic of bone status as well as in the monitoring of the skeleton's health follow-up.

  6. Positive effects of bisphosphonates on bone and muscle in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung-Hee; Sugamori, Kim S; Grynpas, Marc D; Mitchell, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy are at increased risk of decreased bone mineral density and bone fracture as a result of inactivity. To determine if antiresorptive bisphosphonates could improve bone quality and their effects on muscle we studied the Mdx mouse, treated with pamidronate during peak bone growth at 5 and 6 weeks of age, and examined the outcome at 13 weeks of age. Pamidronate increased cortical bone architecture and strength in femurs with increased resistance to fracture. While overall long bone growth was not affected by pamidronate, there was significant inhibition of remodeling in metaphyseal trabecular bone with evidence of residual calcified cartilage. Pamidronate treatment had positive effects on skeletal muscle in the Mdx mice with decreased serum and muscle creatine kinase and evidence of improved muscle histology and grip strength.

  7. A bisphosphonate that does not affect osteoclasts prevents osteoblast and osteocyte apoptosis and the loss of bone strength induced by glucocorticoids in mice.

    PubMed

    Plotkin, L I; Bivi, Nicoletta; Bellido, T

    2011-07-01

    Although a major effect of bisphosphonates on bone is inhibition of resorption resulting from their ability to interfere with osteoclast function, these agents also prevent osteoblast and osteocyte apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. However, the contribution of the latter property to the overall beneficial effects of the drugs on bone remains unknown. We compared herein the action on glucocorticoid-induced bone disease of the classical bisphosphonate alendronate with that of IG9402, a bisphosphonate analog that preserves osteoblast and osteocyte viability but does not induce osteoclast apoptosis in vitro. The bisphosphonates were injected daily (2.3 μmol/kg) to 5-month-old Swiss Webster mice (6-11 per group), starting 3 days before implantation of pellets releasing the glucocorticoid prednisolone (2.1 mg/kg/day). IG9402 did not affect levels of circulating C-telopeptide or osteocalcin, markers of resorption and formation, respectively, nor did it decrease mRNA levels of osteocalcin or collagen 1a1 in bone. On the other hand, alendronate decreased all these parameters. Moreover, IG9402 did not reduce cancellous mineralizing surface, mineral apposition rate, or bone formation rate, whereas alendronate induced a decrease in each of these bone formation measures. These findings demonstrate that, in contrast to alendronate, IG9402 does not inhibit bone turnover. Both alendronate and IG9402, on the other hand, activated survival kinase signaling in vivo, as evidenced by induction of ERK phosphorylation in bone. Furthermore, both bisphosphonates prevented the increase in osteoblast and osteocyte apoptosis as well as the decrease in vertebral bone mass and strength induced by glucocorticoids. We conclude that a bisphosphonate that does not affect osteoclasts prevents osteoblast and osteocyte apoptosis and the loss of bone strength induced by glucocorticoids in mice.

  8. Numerical test concerning bone mass apposition under electrical and mechanical stimulus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes a model of bone remodeling that encompasses mechanical and electrical stimuli. The remodeling formulation proposed by Weinans and collaborators was used as the basis of this research, with a literature review allowing a constitutive model evaluating the permittivity of bone tissue to be developed. This allowed the mass distribution that depends on mechanical and electrical stimuli to be obtained. The remaining constants were established through numerical experimentation. The results demonstrate that mass distribution is altered under electrical stimulation, generally resulting in a greater deposition of mass. In addition, the frequency of application of an electric field can affect the distribution of mass; at a lower frequency there is more mass in the domain. These numerical experiments open up discussion concerning the importance of the electric field in the remodeling process and propose the quantification of their effects. PMID:22578031

  9. Numerical test concerning bone mass apposition under electrical and mechanical stimulus.

    PubMed

    Garzón-Alvarado, Diego A; Ramírez-Martínez, Angélica M; Cardozo de Martínez, Carmen Alicia

    2012-05-11

    This article proposes a model of bone remodeling that encompasses mechanical and electrical stimuli. The remodeling formulation proposed by Weinans and collaborators was used as the basis of this research, with a literature review allowing a constitutive model evaluating the permittivity of bone tissue to be developed. This allowed the mass distribution that depends on mechanical and electrical stimuli to be obtained. The remaining constants were established through numerical experimentation. The results demonstrate that mass distribution is altered under electrical stimulation, generally resulting in a greater deposition of mass. In addition, the frequency of application of an electric field can affect the distribution of mass; at a lower frequency there is more mass in the domain. These numerical experiments open up discussion concerning the importance of the electric field in the remodeling process and propose the quantification of their effects.

  10. Effect of Nasal Calcitonin on the Health-Related Quality of Life in Postmenopause Women Affected With Low Bone Density

    PubMed Central

    Shohrati, Majid; Bayat, Noushin; Saburi, Amin; Abbasi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Physical activity and mental health could be affected by osteoporosis and various therapeutic options such as calcitonin may influence Quality Of Life (QOL) of these patients with Low Bone Density (LBD). Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of nasal calcitonin on QOL in post menopause women with LBD. Patients and Methods: This clinical trial study was performed on one hundred and fifteen menopause women with LBD less than 1 SD in Bone Mineral Densitometry (BMD) referred to Baqiyatallah Hospital in Tehran, Iran, during 2009 - 2010. They were assigned to receive 200 IU calcitonin nasal spray along with calcium (1000 mg) and vitamin D (400 IU) for 6 months. Quality of life was assessed by Short-Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire (Persian-validated version). Results: The mean age (± SD) of the participants was 58.75 ± 8.15 years. Intranasal spray of calcitonin increased QOL scores significantly (88.05 ± 15.63 vs. 92.15 ± 13.22, P value = 0.000). Bone mineral density of spine was increased from 0.834 ± 0.11 to 0.12 ± 0.852 and this difference in BMD of lumbar spine was statistically significant (P value: 0.003) but not significant in femur’s BMD (P value = 0.061). In comparison with BMD indexes, The QOL scores especially Mental Health domain changes had only a significant correlation with the changes of total T score in BMD (P = 0.031, Coefficient Correlation = 0.248). Conclusions: It seems that nasal spray of calcitonin can effectively improve QOL of women with LBD and QOL changes were not influenced by clinical or para-clinical alteration. Mental health domain must be more considered in further studies as a predicting domain for Health-Related Quality of Life (HR-QOL) changes. PMID:26421180

  11. Age-related BMAL1 change affects mouse bone marrow stromal cell proliferation and osteo-differentiation potential

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yijia; Xu, Xiaomei; Tan, Zhen; Ye, Cui; Chen, Yangxi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Aging people's bone regeneration potential is always impaired. Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) contain progenitors of osteoblasts. Donor age may affect MSCs’ proliferation and differentiation potential, but the genomic base is still unknown. Due to recent research's indication that a core circadian component, brain and muscle ARNT-like 1 protein (BMAL1), has a role in premature aging, we investigated the normal aging mechanism in mice with their MSCs and Bmal1 gene/protein level. Material and methods 1, 6 and 16 month old C57BL/6 mice were used and the bone marrow stromal cells were gained and cultured at early passage. Bmal1 gene and protein level were detected in these cells. Marrow stromal cells were also induced to differentiate to osteoblasts or adipocytes. Three groups of mice MSCs were compared on proliferation by flow cytometry, on cell senescence by SA-β-gal expression and after osteo-induction on osteogenic potential by the expression of osterix (Osx), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin (OCN). Results Bmal1 gene and protein level as well as S-phase fraction of the cell cycle decreased in MSCs along with the aging process. At the same time, SA-β-gal+ levels increased, especially in the aged mice MSCs. When induced to be osteogenic, Osx gene expression and ALP activity declined in the mid-age and aged mice MSCs, while OCN protein secretion deteriorated in the aged mice MSCs. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that mouse MSCs changed with their proliferation and osteo-differentiation abilities at different aging stages, and that Bmal1 is related to the normal aging process in MSCs. PMID:22457671

  12. Carpal Tunnel Cross-Sectional Area Affected by Soft Tissues Abutting the Carpal Bones.

    PubMed

    Gabra, Joseph N; Li, Zong-Ming

    2013-02-01

    The carpal tunnel accommodates free movement of its contents, and the tunnel's cross-sectional area is a useful morphological parameter for the evaluation of the space available for the carpal tunnel contents and of potential nerve compression in the tunnel. The osseous boundary of the carpal bones as the dorsal border of the carpal tunnel is commonly used to determine the tunnel area, but this boundary contains soft tissues such as numerous intercarpal ligaments and the flexor carpi radialis tendon. The aims of this study were to quantify the thickness of the soft tissues abutting the carpal bones and to investigate how this soft tissue influences the calculation of the carpal tunnel area. Magnetic resonance images were analyzed for eight cadaveric specimens. A medical balloon with a physiological pressure was inserted into an evacuated tunnel to identify the carpal tunnel boundary. The balloon-based (i.e. true carpal tunnel) and osseous-based carpal tunnel boundaries were extracted and divided into regions corresponding to the hamate, capitate, trapezoid, trapezium, and transverse carpal ligament (TCL). From the two boundaries, the overall and regional soft tissue thicknesses and areas were calculated. The soft tissue thickness was significantly greater for the trapezoid (3.1±1.2mm) and trapezium (3.4±1.0mm) regions than for the hamate (0.7±0.3mm) and capitate (1.2±0.5mm) regions. The carpal tunnel area using the osseous boundary (243.0±40.4mm(2)) was significantly larger than the balloon-based area (183.9±29.7mm(2)) with a ratio of 1.32. In other words, the carpal tunnel area can be estimated as 76% (= 1/1.32) of the osseous-based area. The abundance of soft tissue in the trapezoid and trapezium regions can be attributed mainly to the capitate-trapezium ligament and the flexor carpi radialis tendon. Inclusion of such soft tissue leads to overestimations of the carpal tunnel area. Correct quantification of the carpal tunnel area aids in examining carpal

  13. Remodeling A School Shop?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, G. E.

    1970-01-01

    Presents guidelines for remodeling a school shop combining major considerations of funds, program changes, class management, and flexibility, with the needs of wiring, painting, and placement of equipment. (Author)

  14. Identifying MRONJ-affected bone with digital fusion of functional imaging (FI) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT): case reports and hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Gayathri; Kalyoussef, Evelyne; Blitz-Goldstein, Meredith; Guerrero, Jessenia; Ghesani, Nasrin; Quek, Samuel Y P

    2017-03-01

    Surgical debridement of medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ) lesions is far less predictable than lesion resection. Margins for surgical debridement are guided by surrogate markers of bone viability, such as bleeding and bone fluorescence, which limit debridement to visibly necrotic bone. In contrast, surgical resection is extensive, including a substantial portion of surrounding bone. The concept that the MRONJ lesion is a composite of affected but viable ("compromised") and necrotic bone is supported by histopathological data. Hence, removing only the necrotic bone during lesion debridement could inadvertently leave behind residual compromised bone in the lesion, subsequently contributing to persistence or reestablishment of the lesion. Using 2 case reports, this manuscript illustrates a novel assessment of the MRONJ lesion to enable demarcation of both the compromised and necrotic portions of the lesion. This assessment uses tumor-surveillance functional bone imaging data that may already be available for cancer patients with MRONJ and fuses these data digitally with computed tomography/cone-beam computed tomography imaging of the jaw obtained during MRONJ assessment. If validated, preoperative functional imaging-based assessment of the MRONJ lesion could enable surgeons to eliminate both the compromised and nonviable portions of the lesion precisely with conservative debridement, matching surgical resection in outcome.

  15. Biology of Bone Tissue: Structure, Function, and Factors That Influence Bone Cells.

    PubMed

    Florencio-Silva, Rinaldo; Sasso, Gisela Rodrigues da Silva; Sasso-Cerri, Estela; Simões, Manuel Jesus; Cerri, Paulo Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue is continuously remodeled through the concerted actions of bone cells, which include bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, whereas osteocytes act as mechanosensors and orchestrators of the bone remodeling process. This process is under the control of local (e.g., growth factors and cytokines) and systemic (e.g., calcitonin and estrogens) factors that all together contribute for bone homeostasis. An imbalance between bone resorption and formation can result in bone diseases including osteoporosis. Recently, it has been recognized that, during bone remodeling, there are an intricate communication among bone cells. For instance, the coupling from bone resorption to bone formation is achieved by interaction between osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Moreover, osteocytes produce factors that influence osteoblast and osteoclast activities, whereas osteocyte apoptosis is followed by osteoclastic bone resorption. The increasing knowledge about the structure and functions of bone cells contributed to a better understanding of bone biology. It has been suggested that there is a complex communication between bone cells and other organs, indicating the dynamic nature of bone tissue. In this review, we discuss the current data about the structure and functions of bone cells and the factors that influence bone remodeling.

  16. Does light scattering affect the OCT quantitation of redox state of cytochrome oxidase in bone tissue?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangqun; Wang, Ruikang K.; El Haj, Alicia

    2002-06-01

    In our previous report, we have presented the possibility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to monitor the redox state of mitochondria enzyme Cytochrome oxidase (CytOx) in bone tissue. The previous results showed that reduction of the enzyme in periosteal tissue leads to a change in attenuation coefficient of 1.68 +/- 0.67mm-1 by OCT measurements. The new results from cultured cells fixed in 300 (mu) l agarose plug showed the difference in attenuation coefficient is 0.26+-0.10 mm-1 (n = 9) for 7x106 astrocytoma cells and 0.28+-0.13 mm-1 (n = 7) for 20x106 astrocytoma cells in agarose plug, respectively between cells with oxidised and reduced enzyme at 820nm. A decrease in attenuation coefficient of 0.35+-0.09 mm-1 (n = 4) for 10 million SKMES cells in agarose was also observed with the redox shift of CytOx. The absorption coefficient of the oxidized-reduced form of CytOx is measured approximately 8.4+-1.5x10-3/mm (n=3) and 8.2+-1.0x10-3/mm (n=3) at 820nm for astrocytoma cells and rat periosteum respectively by means of a biochemical assay. Thereby it can be seen that the change in attenuation coefficient of cultured cells with redox shift of CytOx mainly results from the scattering change.

  17. Bone age and factors affecting skeletal maturation at diagnosis of paediatric Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Shrikrishna V; Gopal, Raju A; Lila, Anurag; Menon, Padma S; Bandgar, Tushar R; Shah, Nalini S

    2010-12-01

    Paediatric Cushing's disease (CD) is usually associated with growth retardation, but there are only few published data on skeletal maturation at diagnosis. We analysed factors contributing to skeletal maturation and final height in Asian Indian patients with paediatric CD. We conducted retrospective analysis of 48 patients (29 males; 19 females) with mean age: 14.84 years at diagnosis (range 9-19 years). A single observer using the Greulich Pyle method determined the bone age (BA) of each child. BA delay, i.e. the difference between chronological age (CA) and BA, was compared with clinical and biochemical variables. BA delay was present in 35/48 (73%) patients (mean delay 1.6 years, range 0.5-5 years) and correlated negatively with height SDS (r = -0.594, P < 0.001) and positively with CA at diagnosis (r = 0.247, P < 0.05). There was no correlation with duration of symptoms before diagnosis, basal cortisol, midnight cortisol, ACTH or percentage suppression of low dose dexamethasone suppression cortisol (LDDST). We could not demonstrate any relationship between the duration of history before diagnosis and height SDS at final height. Mean final height SDS in patients was -1.84. We found that most children with CD had delayed BA and correlated significantly with CA and height SDS at diagnosis. Early diagnosis may reduce delay in skeletal maturation and thus contribute to optimal catch-up growth.

  18. Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells acquire bone cell-like responsiveness to fluid shear stress on osteogenic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Knippenberg, Marlene; Helder, Marco N; Doulabi, Behrouz Zandieh; Semeins, Cornelis M; Wuisman, Paul I J M; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2005-01-01

    To engineer bone tissue, mechanosensitive cells are needed that are able to perform bone cell-specific functions, such as (re)modeling of bone tissue. In vivo, local bone mass and architecture are affected by mechanical loading, which is thought to provoke a cellular response via loading-induced flow of interstitial fluid. Adipose tissue is an easily accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells for bone tissue engineering, and is available in abundant amounts compared with bone marrow. We studied whether adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) are responsive to mechanical loading by pulsating fluid flow (PFF) on osteogenic stimulation in vitro. We found that ATMSCs show a bone cell-like response to fluid shear stress as a result of PFF after the stimulation of osteogenic differentiation by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. PFF increased nitric oxide production, as well as upregulated cyclooxygenase-2, but not cyclooxygenase-1, gene expression in osteogenically stimulated AT-MSCs. These data suggest that AT-MSCs acquire bone cell-like responsiveness to pulsating fluid shear stress on 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-induced osteogenic differentiation. ATMSCs might be able to perform bone cell-specific functions during bone (re)modeling in vivo and, therefore, provide a promising new tool for bone tissue engineering.

  19. Finite element analysis of the effect of medullary contact on fracture healing and remodeling in the intramedullary interlocking nail-fixed tibia fracture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haosen; Hao, Zhixiu; Wen, Shizhu

    2017-04-01

    Intramedullary interlocking nail is an effective treatment for tibial diaphyseal fracture. The contact between medullary rod and diaphyseal cortex is able to enhance fracture stability. However, how and to what degree the contact affects fracture healing and subsequent bone remodeling is still unclear. To investigate this, fracture healing and remodeling algorithms were combined, improved, and used to simulate the healing and remodeling processes in a transverse tibial diaphyseal fracture fixed with an intramedullary interlocking nail device. Two different diaphyseal fracture statuses, three different initial loading levels, and two nail materials were considered. The results showed that the medullary contact could significantly enhance the fixation stability; the strain reduction was up to 80% in the initial granulation callus. However, low initial loading level was found to be a more potential risk factor for the insufficient loading-induced nonunion other than medullary contact and stiffer nail material. Furthermore, the stabilizing effect of medullary contact diminished when stiff bone tissue formed in the callus; thus, the remodeling in the long-term was not affected by medullary contact. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Investigation of factors affecting loosening of Ilizarov ring-wire external fixator systems at the bone-wire interface.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Finn E; Pankaj, Pankaj; Simpson, A Hamish R W

    2012-05-01

    The potential for peri-implant bone yielding and subsequent loosening of Ilizarov ring-wire external fixation systems was investigated using non-linear finite element (FE) analyses. A strain-based plasticity model was employed to simulate bone yielding. FE models also incorporated contact behavior at the wire-bone interface, orthotropic elasticity, and periosteal-endosteal variation of bone properties. These simulations were used to determine the extent and location of yielding with change in age-related bone structure and properties for the bone-Ilizarov construct at the tibial midshaft. At critical wire-bone interfaces, the predicted volume of yielded bone with four wires (on either side of the fracture) was ∼40% of that with two wires. Old-aged cases showed considerably greater bone yielding at the wire-bone interface than young cases (1.7-2.2 times greater volumes of yielded bone). The volume of yielded bone at all wire-bone interfaces decreased with an increase in wire pre-tension. The absence of continuous through-thickness yielding offers an explanation for the clinical observation that Ilizarov ring-wire fixation can provide stable fracture fixation even in bone with high porosity.

  1. Remodeling dynamics in the alveolar process in skeletally mature dogs.

    PubMed

    Huja, Sarandeep S; Fernandez, Soledad A; Hill, Kara J; Li, Yan

    2006-12-01

    Bone turnover rates can be altered by metabolic and mechanical demands. Due to the difference in the pattern of loading, we hypothesized that there are differences in bone remodeling rates between the maxillary and mandibular alveolar processes. Furthermore, in a canine model, the alveolar process of teeth that lack contact (e.g., second premolars) would have a different turnover rate than bone supporting teeth with functional contact (e.g., first molars). Six skeletally mature male dogs were given a pair of calcein labels. After sacrifice, specimens representing the anterior and posterior locations of both jaws were prepared for examination by histomorphometric methods to evaluate the bone volume/total volume (BV/TV; %), bone volume (mm2), mineral apposition rate (MAR; microm/day), and bone formation rate (BFR; %/year) in the alveolar process. There were no significant differences (P>0.05) in the BV/TV within the jaws. The bone volume within the alveolar process of the mandible was 2.8-fold greater than in the maxilla. The MAR was not significantly different between the jaws and anteroposterior locations. However, the BFR was significantly (P<0.0001) greater in the mandible than in the maxilla. The anterior location had higher (P=0.002) remodeling than the posterior location in the maxilla but not in the mandible. While there was a greater bone mass and increased remodeling in the mandible, no remodeling gradient in the coronal-apical direction was apparent in the alveolar process. Bone adaptation probably involves a complex interplay of bone turnover, mass, and architecture.

  2. Responds of Bone Cells to Microgravity: Ground-Based Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Jingbao; Xu, Huiyun; Yang, Pengfei; Xie, Li; Qian, Airong; Zhao, Yong; Shang, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Severe loss of bone occurs due to long-duration spaceflight. Mechanical loading stimulates bone formation, while bone degradation happens under mechanical unloading. Bone remodeling is a dynamic process in which bone formation and bone resorption are tightly coupled. Increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation caused by reduced mechanical loading, generally result in disrupted bone remodeling. Bone remodeling is orchestrated by multiple bone cells including osteoblast, osteocyte, osteoclast and mesenchymal stem cell. It is yet not clear that how these bone cells sense altered gravity, translate physical stimulus into biochemical signals, and then regulate themselves structurally and functionally. In this paper, studies elucidating the bioeffects of microgravity on bone cells (osteoblast, osteocyte, osteoclast, mesenchymal stem cell) using various platforms including spaceflight and ground-based simulated microgravity were summarized. Promising gravity-sensitive signaling pathways and protein molecules were proposed.

  3. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester preferentially sensitizes CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma to ionizing radiation without affecting bone marrow radioresponse

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.-J.; Liao, H.-F.; Tsai, T.-H.; Wang, S.-Y.; Shiao, M.-S. . E-mail: msshiao@vghtpe.gov.tw

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a component of propolis, was reported capable of depleting glutathione (GSH). We subsequently examined the radiosensitizing effect of CAPE and its toxicity. Methods and Materials: The effects of CAPE on GSH level, GSH metabolism enzyme activities, NF-{kappa}B activity, and radiosensitivity in mouse CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells were determined. BALB/c mouse with CT26 cells implantation was used as a syngeneic in vivo model for evaluation of treatment and toxicity end points. Results: CAPE entered CT26 cells rapidly and depleted intracellular GSH in CT26 cells, but not in bone marrow cells. Pretreatment with nontoxic doses of CAPE significantly enhanced cell killing by ionizing radiation (IR) with sensitizer enhancement ratios up to 2.2. Pretreatment of CT26 cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine reversed the GSH depletion activity and partially blocked the radiosensitizing effect of CAPE. CAPE treatment in CT26 cells increased glutathione peroxidase, decreased glutathione reductase, and did not affect glutathione S-transferase or {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase activity. Radiation activated NF-{kappa}B was reversed by CAPE pretreatment. In vivo study revealed that pretreatment with CAPE before IR resulted in greater inhibition of tumor growth and prolongation of survival in comparison with IR alone. Pretreatment with CAPE neither affected body weights nor produced hepatic, renal, or hematopoietic toxicity. Conclusions: CAPE sensitizes CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma to IR, which may be via depleting GSH and inhibiting NF-{kappa}B activity, without toxicity to bone marrow, liver, and kidney.

  4. Mechanical loading, damping, and load-driven bone formation in mouse tibiae.

    PubMed

    Dodge, Todd; Wanis, Mina; Ayoub, Ramez; Zhao, Liming; Watts, Nelson B; Bhattacharya, Amit; Akkus, Ozan; Robling, Alexander; Yokota, Hiroki

    2012-10-01

    Mechanical loads play a pivotal role in the growth and maintenance of bone and joints. Although loading can activate anabolic genes and induce bone remodeling, damping is essential for preventing traumatic bone injury and fracture. In this study we investigated the damping capacity of bone, joint tissue, muscle, and skin using a mouse hindlimb model of enhanced loading in conjunction with finite element modeling to model bone curvature. Our hypothesis was that loads were primarily absorbed by the joints and muscle tissue, but that bone also contributed to damping through its compression and natural bending. To test this hypothesis, fresh mouse distal lower limb segments were cyclically loaded in axial compression in sequential bouts, with each subsequent bout having less surrounding tissue. A finite element model was generated to model effects of bone curvature in silico. Two damping-related parameters (phase shift angle and energy loss) were determined from the output of the loading experiments. Interestingly, the experimental results revealed that the knee joint contributed to the largest portion of the damping capacity of the limb, and bone itself accounted for approximately 38% of the total phase shift angle. Computational results showed that normal bone curvature enhanced the damping capacity of the bone by approximately 40%, and the damping effect grew at an accelerated pace as curvature was increased. Although structural curvature reduces critical loads for buckling in beam theory, evolution apparently favors maintaining curvature in the tibia. Histomorphometric analysis of the tibia revealed that in response to axial loading, bone formation was significantly enhanced in the regions that were predicted to receive a curvature-induced bending moment. These results suggest that in addition to bone's compressive damping capacity, surrounding tissues, as well as naturally-occurring bone curvature, also contribute to mechanical damping, which may ultimately affect

  5. The Rho-GEF Kalirin regulates bone mass and the function of osteoblasts and osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Su; Eleniste, Pierre P; Wayakanon, Kornchanok; Mandela, Prashant; Eipper, Betty A; Mains, Richard E; Allen, Matthew R; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2014-03-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by the balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts. Dysregulation in the activity of the bone cells can lead to osteoporosis, a disease characterized by low bone mass and an increase in bone fragility and risk of fracture. Kalirin is a novel GTP-exchange factor protein that has been shown to play a role in cytoskeletal remodeling and dendritic spine formation in neurons. We examined Kalirin expression in skeletal tissue and found that it was expressed in osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Furthermore, micro-CT analyses of the distal femur of global Kalirin knockout (Kal-KO) mice revealed significantly reduced trabecular and cortical bone parameters in Kal-KO mice, compared to WT mice, with significantly reduced bone mass in 8, 14 and 36week-old female Kal-KO mice. Male mice also exhibited a decrease in bone parameters but not to the level seen in female mice. Histomorphometric analyses also revealed decreased bone formation rate in 14week-old female Kal-KO mice, as well as decreased osteoblast number/bone surface and increased osteoclast surface/bone surface. Consistent with our in vivo findings, the bone resorbing activity and differentiation of Kal-KO osteoclasts was increased in vitro. Although alkaline phosphatase activity by Kal-KO osteoblasts was increased in vitro, Kal-KO osteoblasts showed decreased mineralizing activity, as well as decreased secretion of OPG, which was inversely correlated with ERK activity. Taken together, our findings suggest that deletion of Kalirin directly affects osteoclast and osteoblast activity, leading to decreased OPG secretion by osteoblasts which is likely to alter the RANKL/OPG ratio and promote osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, Kalirin may play a role in paracrine and/or endocrine signaling events that control skeletal bone remodeling and the maintenance of bone mass.

  6. Regulation of Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Maryam; Peymani, Amir; Sahmani, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Bone is formed through the processes of endochondral and intramembranous ossification. In endochondral ossification primary mesenchymal cells differentiate to chondrocytes and then are progressively substituted by bone, while in intramembranous ossification mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate directly into osteoblasts to form bone. The steps of osteogenic proliferation, differentiation, and bone homeostasis are controlled by various markers and signaling pathways. Bone needs to be remodeled to maintain integrity with osteoblasts, which are bone-forming cells, and osteoclasts, which are bone-degrading cells.In this review we considered the major factors and signaling pathways in bone formation; these include fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), wingless-type (Wnt) genes, runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and osteoblast-specific transcription factor (osterix or OSX). PMID:28367467

  7. Regulation of Bone Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Maryam; Peymani, Amir; Sahmani, Mehdi

    2017-04-01

    Bone is formed through the processes of endochondral and intramembranous ossification. In endochondral ossification primary mesenchymal cells differentiate to chondrocytes and then are progressively substituted by bone, while in intramembranous ossification mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate directly into osteoblasts to form bone. The steps of osteogenic proliferation, differentiation, and bone homeostasis are controlled by various markers and signaling pathways. Bone needs to be remodeled to maintain integrity with osteoblasts, which are bone-forming cells, and osteoclasts, which are bone-degrading cells.In this review we considered the major factors and signaling pathways in bone formation; these include fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), wingless-type (Wnt) genes, runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and osteoblast-specific transcription factor (osterix or OSX).

  8. Paget's Disease of Bone: Approach to Its Historical Origins.

    PubMed

    Menéndez-Bueyes, Luis R; Soler Fernández, María Del Carmen

    Paget's disease of bone is the second most common bone disease after osteoporosis. It is characterized by focal regions of highly exaggerated bone remodeling, with abnormalities in all phases of the remodeling process. This study aims to investigate the hypothesis of a possible British origin of Paget's disease of bone by studying the worldwide geographic distribution of cases identified in ancient skeletons excavated from archaeological sites. The methodology consists in reviewing cases of Paget's disease of bone described in the literature.

  9. Bone loss of vertebral bodies at the operative segment after cervical arthroplasty: a potential complication?

    PubMed

    Heo, Dong Hwa; Lee, Dong Chan; Oh, Jong Yang; Park, Choon Keun

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Bony overgrowth and spontaneous fusion are complications of cervical arthroplasty. In contrast, bone loss or bone remodeling of vertebral bodies at the operation segment after cervical arthroplasty has also been observed. The purpose of this study is to investigate a potential complication-bone loss of the anterior portion of the vertebral bodies at the surgically treated segment after cervical total disc replacement (TDR)-and discuss the clinical significance. METHODS All enrolled patients underwent follow-up for more than 24 months after cervical arthroplasty using the Baguera C disc. Clinical evaluations included recording demographic data and measuring the visual analog scale and Neck Disability Index scores. Radiographic evaluations included measurements of the functional spinal unit's range of motion and changes such as bone loss and bone remodeling. The grading of the bone loss of the operative segment was classified as follows: Grade 1, disappearance of the anterior osteophyte or small minor bone loss; Grade 2, bone loss of the anterior portion of the vertebral bodies at the operation segment without exposure of the artificial disc; or Grade 3, significant bone loss with exposure of the anterior portion of the artificial disc. RESULTS Forty-eight patients were enrolled in this study. Among them, bone loss developed in 29 patients (Grade 1 in 15 patients, Grade 2 in 6 patients, and Grade 3 in 8 patients). Grade 3 bone loss was significantly associated with postoperative neck pain (p < 0.05). Bone loss was related to the motion preservation effect of the operative segment after cervical arthroplasty in contrast to heterotopic ossification. CONCLUSIONS Bone loss may be a potential complication of cervical TDR and affect early postoperative neck pain. However, it did not affect mid- to long-term clinical outcomes or prosthetic failure at the last follow-up. Also, this phenomenon may result in the motion preservation effect in the operative segment

  10. [Osteostimulating effect of bone xenograft on bone tissue regeneration].

    PubMed

    Balin, V N; Balin, D V; Iordanishvili, A K; Musikin, M I

    2015-01-01

    The aim of experimental case-control study performed in 28 dogs divided in 2 groups was to assess local tissue reactions on bone xenograft transplantation; dynamics of bone remodeling and formation at the site of bone defect wall contacting with bone xenograft; dynamics and mechanisms of xenograft remodeling. Transplantation of xenograft in conventional bone defects did not cause inflammatory of destructive reactions because of high biocompatibility of the material. At transplantation site active fibrous bone trabeculae formation filling the spaces between xenograft participles was observed. On the 90th day newly formed bone showed lammelar structure. Simultaneously from the 42d day the invasion of cell elements from recipient bed into the material was seen leading to xenograft resorption. The observed dynamics may be assessed as gradual substitution of xenograft with newly formed host bone structures.

  11. Histologic, Clinical, and Radiologic Findings of Alveolar Bone Expansion and Osteomyelitis of the Jaws in Cats.

    PubMed

    Bell, C M; Soukup, J W

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize clinical, radiologic, and histologic patterns of alveolar bone expansion and osteomyelitis in cats. Based on case materials submitted as surgical biopsy specimens, alveolar bone pathology was diagnosed in 28 cats. These cats had a total of 37 oral lesions with clinical and radiologic changes that involved bone and/or teeth, including periodontitis, bone expansion, tooth resorption, and/or chronic osteomyelitis; 32 lesions were evaluated by histopathology. Canine teeth were affected in 19 cats (27 affected teeth), with bilateral lesions in 5 (26.3%) cats. The caudal premolar and/or molar regions were affected in 10 cats (10 affected sites). All biopsy sites evaluated by a review of clinical images and/or radiographs had evidence of periodontitis. Clinical photographs showed expansion of alveolar bone in 13 of 16 (81%) biopsy sites evaluated. Radiologically, rarifying osseous proliferation of alveolar bone was seen at 26 of 27 (96%) biopsy sites, and tooth resorption occurred at 15 of 18 (83%) sites. Histologically, the tissue samples from canine sites had compressed trabeculae of mature remodeled bone, loose fibrous stroma with paucicellular inflammation, and mild proliferation of woven bone. Tissue samples from the premolar/molar biopsy sites were often highly cellular with mixed lymphoplasmacytic and chronic suppurative inflammation, ulceration with granulation tissue, and robust proliferation of woven bone. Alveolar bone expansion and osteomyelitis in cats occurs in conjunction with periodontal inflammation and frequently with tooth resorption.

  12. Cancer to bone: a fatal attraction

    PubMed Central

    Weilbaecher, Katherine N.; Guise, Theresa A.; McCauley, Laurie K.

    2013-01-01

    When cancer metastasizes to bone, considerable pain and deregulated bone remodelling occurs, greatly diminishing the possibility of cure. Metastasizing tumour cells mobilize and sculpt the bone microenvironment to enhance tumour growth and to promote bone invasion. Understanding the crucial components of the bone microenvironment that influence tumour localization, along with the tumour-derived factors that modulate cellular and protein matrix components of bone to favour tumour expansion and invasion, is central to the pathophysiology of bone metastases. Basic findings of tumour–bone interactions have uncovered numerous therapeutic opportunities that focus on the bone microenvironment to prevent and treat bone metastases. PMID:21593787

  13. Impairment of osteoclastic bone resorption in rapidly growing female p47phox knockout mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bone formation is dependent on the activity and differentiation of osteoblasts; whereas resorption of preexisting mineralized bone matrix by osteoclasts is necessary not only for bone development but also for regeneration and remodeling. Bone remodeling is a process in which osteoblasts and osteocla...

  14. Bone scaffolds loaded with siRNA-Semaphorin4d for the treatment of osteoporosis related bone defects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yufeng; Wei, Lingfei; Miron, Richard J.; Shi, Bin; Bian, Zhuan

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a prominent disorder affecting over 200 million people worldwide. Recently, semaphorins have been implicated in the cell-cell communication between osteoclasts and osteoblasts and have been associated with the progression of osteoporosis. Previously, we demonstrated that knockdown of semaphorin4d (Sema4d) using siRNA delivered with a bone-targeting system prevented bone loss in an osteoporotic animal model. Here, we used this bone-specific technology containing siRNA-Sema4d and fabricated a PLLA scaffold capable of enhancing bone repair following fracture. We investigated the ability of the implant to release siRNA-Sema4d into the surrounding tissues over time and to influence new bone formation in a 3 mm femur osteoporotic defect model in ovariectomized rats. Delivery of the bone-targeting system released from PLLA scaffolds began 2 hours post-implantation, peaked at 1 day, and was sustained over a 21 day period. μCT analysis demonstrated a significantly higher bone volume/total volume bone mineral density and number of osteoblasts in the rats that were transplanted with scaffolds loaded with siRNA-Sema4d. These results confirm the specific role of Sema4d in bone remodeling and demonstrate that significant increases in the speed and quality of new bone formation occur when siRNA-Sema4d is delivered via a PLLA scaffold. PMID:27254469

  15. Role of cortical bone in hip fracture.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    In this review, I consider the varied mechanisms in cortical bone that help preserve its integrity and how they deteriorate with aging. Aging affects cortical bone in two ways: extrinsically through its effects on the individual that modify its mechanical loading experience and 'milieu interieur'; and intrinsically through the prolonged cycle of remodelling and renewal extending to an estimated 20 years in the proximal femur. Healthy femoral cortex incorporates multiple mechanisms that help prevent fracture. These have been described at multiple length scales from the individual bone mineral crystal to the scale of the femur itself and appear to operate hierarchically. Each cortical bone fracture begins as a sub-microscopic crack that enlarges under mechanical load, for example, that imposed by a fall. In these conditions, a crack will enlarge explosively unless the cortical bone is intrinsically tough (the opposite of brittle). Toughness leads to microscopic crack deflection and bridging and may be increased by adequate regulation of both mineral crystal size and the heterogeneity of mineral and matrix phases. The role of osteocytes in optimising toughness is beginning to be worked out; but many osteocytes die in situ without triggering bone renewal over a 20-year cycle, with potential for increasing brittleness. Furthermore, the superolateral cortex of the proximal femur thins progressively during life, so increasing the risk of buckling during a fall. Besides preserving or increasing hip BMD, pharmaceutical treatments have class-specific effects on the toughness of cortical bone, although dietary and exercise-based interventions show early promise.

  16. TGF-β in cancer and bone: implications for treatment of bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Juárez, Patricia; Guise, Theresa A

    2011-01-01

    Bone metastases are common in patients with advanced breast, prostate and lung cancer. Tumor cells co-opt bone cells to drive a feed-forward cycle which disrupts normal bone remodeling to result in abnormal bone destruction or formation and tumor growth in bone. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a major bone-derived factor, which contributes to this vicious cycle of bone metastasis. TGF-β released from bone matrix during osteoclastic resorption stimulates tumor cells to produce osteolytic factors further increasing bone resorption adjacent to the tumor cells. TGF-β also regulates 1) key components of the metastatic cascade such as epithelial-mesenchymal transition, tumor cell invasion, angiogenesis and immunosuppression as well as 2) normal bone remodeling and coupling of bone resorption and formation. Preclinical models demonstrate that blockade of TGF-β signaling is effective to treat and prevent bone metastases as well as to increase bone mass.

  17. Quality control for bone quality parameters affected by subject motion in high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Pauchard, Yves; Liphardt, Anna-Maria; Macdonald, Heather M; Hanley, David A; Boyd, Steven K

    2012-06-01

    Subject motion during high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) causes image artifacts that affect morphological analysis of bone quality. The aim of our study was to determine effectiveness of techniques for quality control in the presence of motion in vivo including automated and manual approaches. First, repeatability of manual grading was determined within and between laboratories. Given proper training using a standardized scale and training images (provided by the manufacturer), we found that manual grading is suitable for repeatable image quality grading within and across sites (ICC>0.7). Both a new automated technique providing motion measures based on projection moments, and traditional manual grading (1=best, 5=worst) were subsequently used to assess subject data for motion in N=137 image pairs (scan/re-scan) from the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos) Calgary cohort. High quality image pairs were selected and measurement precision was estimated by calculating the coefficient of variation (CV). Consistent with previous data, density parameters (e.g. total bone mineral density) are more robust than structural (e.g. trabecular number) or finite element parameters (e.g. failure load). To obtain acceptable measurement precision, images should not exceed a manual grading of 3 (on a scale from 1 to 5) or an automatic (ε(T)) grading of 1.2. Automatic and manual grading provide comparable quality control, but the advantage of the automated technique is its ability to provide a motion value at scan time (providing a basis for real time decision regarding re-scan requirements), and the assessment is objective. Notably, automatic motion measurement can be performed retrospectively based on original scan data, and is therefore well suited for multi-center studies as well as any research where objective quality control is paramount.

  18. Repeated freeze-thaw cycles reduce the survival rate of osteocytes in bone-tendon constructs without affecting the mechanical properties of tendons.

    PubMed

    Suto, Kaori; Urabe, Ken; Naruse, Kouji; Uchida, Kentaro; Matsuura, Terumasa; Mikuni-Takagaki, Yuko; Suto, Mitsutoshi; Nemoto, Noriko; Kamiya, Kentaro; Itoman, Moritoshi

    2012-03-01

    Frozen bone-patellar tendon bone allografts are useful in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction as the freezing procedure kills tissue cells, thereby reducing immunogenicity of the grafts. However, a small portion of cells in human femoral heads treated by standard bone-bank freezing procedures survive, thus limiting the effectiveness of allografts. Here, we characterized the survival rates and mechanisms of cells isolated from rat bones and tendons that were subjected to freeze-thaw treatments, and evaluated the influence of these treatments on the mechanical properties of tendons. After a single freeze-thaw cycle, most cells isolated from frozen bone appeared morphologically as osteocytes and expressed both osteoblast- and osteocyte-related genes. Transmission electron microscopic observation of frozen cells using freeze-substitution revealed that a small number of osteocytes maintained large nuclei with intact double membranes, indicating that these osteocytes in bone matrix were resistant to ice crystal formation. We found that tendon cells were completely killed by a single freeze-thaw cycle, whereas bone cells exhibited a relatively high survival rate, although survival was significantly reduced after three freeze-thaw cycles. In patella tendons, the ultimate stress, Young's modulus, and strain at failure showed no significant differences between untreated tendons and those subjected to five freeze-thaw cycles. In conclusion, we identified that cells surviving after freeze-thaw treatment of rat bones were predominantly osteocytes. We propose that repeated freeze-thaw cycles could be applied for processing bone-tendon constructs prior to grafting as the treatment did not affect the mechanical property of tendons and drastically reduced surviving osteocytes, thereby potentially decreasing allograft immunogenecity.

  19. Bone and bone marrow: the same organ.

    PubMed

    Del Fattore, Andrea; Capannolo, Marta; Rucci, Nadia

    2010-11-01

    Interplays between bone and bone marrow are not limited to merely anatomic and histological connections, but include a tight functional correlation. Bone marrow resides within the medullary cavity of the bones and the process of hematopoiesis is regulated, at least in part, by bone cells. Moreover, osteoclasts and osteoblasts derive from precursors of hematopoietic and mesenchymal origin, respectively, both residing within the bone marrow. Alterations in one of these components typically cause impairment in the other, so diseases of the bone marrow compartment often affect the bone and vice versa. All these findings could make us to speculate that bone and bone marrow are not two separate districts, but can be considered as the two elements of the same unique functional unit, the bone-bone marrow organ. Here we will describe histological and functional interplays between bone and bone marrow, and will illustrate some diseases in which this tight correlation is evident.

  20. Long bone histology of the subterranean rodent Bathyergus suillus (Bathyergidae): ontogenetic pattern of cortical bone thickening.

    PubMed

    Montoya-Sanhueza, Germán; Chinsamy, Anusuya

    2017-02-01

    Patterns of bone development in mammals are best known from terrestrial and cursorial groups, but there is a considerable gap in our understanding of how specializations for life underground affect bone growth and development. Likewise, studies of bone microstructure in wild populations are still scarce, and they often include few individuals and tend to be focused on adults. For these reasons, the processes generating bone microstructural variation at intra- and interspecific levels are not fully understood. This study comprehensively examines the bone microstructure of an extant population of Cape dune molerats, Bathyergus suillus (Bathyergidae), the largest subterranean mammal endemic to the Western Cape of South Africa. The aim of this study is to investigate the postnatal bone growth of B. suillus using undecalcified histological sections (n = 197) of the femur, humerus, tibia-fibula, ulna and radius, including males and females belonging to different ontogenetic and reproductive stages (n = 42). Qualitative histological features demonstrate a wide histodiversity with thickening of the cortex mainly resulting from endosteal and periosteal bone depositions, whilst there is scarce endosteal resorption and remodeling throughout ontogeny. This imbalanced bone modeling allows the tissues deposited during ontogeny to remain relatively intact, thus preserving an excellent record of growth. The distribution of the different bone tissues observed in the cortex depends on ontogenetic status, anatomical features (e.g. muscle attachment structures) and location on the bone (e.g. anterior or lateral). The type of bone microstructure and modeling is discussed in relation to digging behavior, reproduction and physiology of this species. This study is the first histological assessment describing the process of cortical thickening in long bones of a fossorial mammal.

  1. The in situ mechanics of trabecular bone marrow: the potential for mechanobiological response.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Thomas A; Kreipke, Tyler C; Vaughan, Ted J; McNamara, Laoise M; Niebur, Glen L

    2015-01-01

    Bone adapts to habitual loading through mechanobiological signaling. Osteocytes are the primary mechanical sensors in bone, upregulating osteogenic factors and downregulating osteoinhibitors, and recruiting osteoclasts to resorb bone in response to microdamage accumulation. However, most of the cell populations of the bone marrow niche,which are intimately involved with bone remodeling as the source of bone osteoblast and osteoclast progenitors, are also mechanosensitive. We hypothesized that the deformation of trabecular bone would impart mechanical stress within the entrapped bone marrow consistent with mechanostimulation of the constituent cells. Detailed fluid-structure interaction models of porcine femoral trabecular bone and bone marrow were created using tetrahedral finite element meshes. The marrow was allowed to flow freely within the bone pores, while the bone was compressed to 2000 or 3000 microstrain at the apparent level.Marrow properties were parametrically varied from a constant 400 mPas to a power law rule exceeding 85 Pas. Deformation generated almost no shear stress or pressure in the marrow for the low viscosity fluid, but exceeded 5 Pa when the higher viscosity models were used. The shear stress was higher when the strain rate increased and in higher volume fraction bone. The results demonstrate that cells within the trabecular bone marrow could be mechanically stimulated by bone deformation, depending on deformation rate, bone porosity, and bone marrow properties. Since the marrow contains many mechanosensitive cells, changes in the stimulatory levels may explain the alterations in bone marrow morphology with aging and disease, which may in turn affect the trabecular bone mechanobiology and adaptation.

  2. Osteocyte density in woven bone.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, C J; Majeska, R J; Schaffler, M B

    2004-11-01

    Woven bone forms rapidly during tissue growth, following injury and in response to certain anabolic stimuli. Functional differences between woven and lamellar bone may be due, in part, to differences in osteocyte density (cells per unit tissue). Woven bone has been estimated to contain four to eight times more osteocytes than lamellar bone, although primary data to support this assertion are limited. Given recent findings implicating osteocytes as regulators of bone remodeling, bone formation and bone volume, such large differences in osteocyte density between woven and lamellar bone may have important consequences. In this study, we compared the density of osteocyte lacunae (lacunae/mm(2) tissue) in rat lamellar bone with that in woven bone formed under several different circumstances. We found that the lacunar density of lamellar cortical bone in the rat (834+/-83 cells/mm2, mean+/-SD) did not differ significantly from that of periosteal woven bone formed via intramembranous osteogenesis, either in response to mechanical loading (921+/-204 cells/mm2) or in the periosteal buttressing region of the fracture callus (1138+/-168 cells/mm2). In contrast, lacunar density of endochondrally derived woven bone in the center (gap) region of fracture callus was nearly 100% greater (1875+/-270 cells/mm2) than in lamellar cortical bone while lacunar density of primary spongiosa of the growth plate was 40% greater (1674+/-228 cells/mm2) than that in lamellar cancellous bone (1189+/-164). These findings demonstrate that lacunar density in woven bone varies depending on skeletal site and developmental history and appears to be elevated in endochondrally derived woven bone adjacent to marrow space. Given the considerable evidence supporting osteocytes as local initiators of bone remodeling, we suggest that woven bone with increased lacunar density may undergo remodeling at an accelerated rate.

  3. Remodeling the Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baule, Steven M.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses items that need to be considered when remodeling a school media center. Highlights include space and location for various functions, including projections of print versus electronic media; electrical and data wiring needs; lighting; security and supervision; and reuse of existing furniture and equipment. (LRW)

  4. Bone Regeneration Mediated by BMP4-Expressing Muscle-Derived Stem Cells Is Affected by Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Usas, Arvydas; Ho, Andrew M.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Olshanski, Anne; Peng, Hairong

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the delivery of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)4-secreting muscle-derived stem cells (MDSC-B4) capable of inducing bone formation in mice using collagen gel (CG), fibrin sealant (FS), and gelatin sponge carriers. After implanting these various cell-loaded scaffolds intramuscularly or into critical-size skull defects, we measured the extent of heterotopic ossification and calvarial defect healing over a 6-week period via radiographic, radiomorphometric, histological, and micro-computed tomography analyses. As expected, in the absence of MDSC-B4, there was no ectopic ossification and only minimal calvarial regeneration using each type of scaffold. Although CG and gelatin sponges loaded with BMP4-secreting cells produced the most ectopic bone, FS constructs produced bone with comparably less mineralization. In the mouse calvaria, we observed MDSC-B4-loaded scaffolds able to promote bone defect healing to a variable degree, but there were differences between these implants in the volume, shape, and morphology of regenerated bone. MDSC-B4 delivery in a gelatin sponge produced hypertrophic bone, whereas delivery in a CG and FS healed the defect with bone that closely resembled the quantity and configuration of native calvarium. In summary, hydrogels are suitable carriers for osteocompetent MDSCs in promoting bone regeneration, especially at craniofacial injury sites. PMID:19061430

  5. Hypochlorhydria‐induced calcium malabsorption does not affect fracture healing but increases post‐traumatic bone loss in the intact skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Haffner‐Luntzer, Melanie; Heilmann, Aline; Heidler, Verena; Liedert, Astrid; Schinke, Thorsten; Amling, Michael; Yorgan, Timur Alexander; vom Scheidt, Annika

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Efficient calcium absorption is essential for skeletal health. Patients with impaired gastric acidification display low bone mass and increased fracture risk because calcium absorption is dependent on gastric pH. We investigated fracture healing and post‐traumatic bone turnover in mice deficient in Cckbr, encoding a gastrin receptor that affects acid secretion by parietal cells. Cckbr−/− mice display hypochlorhydria, calcium malabsorption, and osteopenia. Cckbr−/− and wildtype (WT) mice received a femur osteotomy and were fed either a standard or calcium‐enriched diet. Healed and intact bones were assessed by biomechanical testing, histomorphometry, micro‐computed tomography, and quantitative backscattering. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) serum levels were determined by enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay. Fracture healing was unaffected in Cckbr−/− mice. However, Cckbr−/− mice displayed increased calcium mobilization from the intact skeleton during bone healing, confirmed by significantly elevated PTH levels and osteoclast numbers compared to WT mice. Calcium supplementation significantly reduced secondary hyperparathyroidism and bone resorption in the intact skeleton in both genotypes, but more efficiently in WT mice. Furthermore, calcium administration improved bone healing in WT mice, indicated by significantly increased mechanical properties and bone mineral density of the fracture callus, whereas it had no significant effect in Cckbr−/− mice. Therefore, under conditions of hypochlorhydria‐induced calcium malabsorption, calcium, which is essential for callus mineralization, appears to be increasingly mobilized from the intact skeleton in favor of fracture healing. Calcium supplementation during fracture healing prevented systemic calcium mobilization, thereby maintaining bone mass and improving fracture healing in healthy individuals whereas the effect was limited by gastric hypochlorhydria. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society

  6. Textural and rheological properties of Pacific whiting surimi as affected by nano-scaled fish bone and heating rates.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tao; Park, Jae W

    2015-08-01

    Textural and rheological properties of Pacific whiting (PW) surimi were investigated at various heating rates with the use of nano-scaled fish bone (NFB) and calcium chloride. Addition of NFB and slow heating improved gel strength significantly. Activity of endogenous transglutaminase (ETGase) from PW surimi was markedly induced by both NFB calcium and calcium chloride, showing an optimal temperature at 30°C. Initial storage modulus increased as NFB calcium concentration increased and the same trend was maintained throughout the temperature sweep. Rheograms with temperature sweep at slow heating rate (1°C/min) exhibited two peaks at ∼ 35°C and ∼ 70°C. However, no peak was observed during temperature sweep from 20 to 90°C at fast heating rate (20°C/min). Protein patterns of surimi gels were affected by both heating rate and NFB calcium concentration. Under slow heating, myosin heavy chain intensity decreased with NFB calcium concentration, indicating formation of ε-(γ-glutamyl) lysine cross-links by ETGase and NFB calcium ion.

  7. Anti-IL-20 monoclonal antibody promotes bone fracture healing through regulating IL-20-mediated osteoblastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Chiu, Yi-Shu; Chen, Wei-Yu; Huang, Kuo-Yuan; Jou, I-Ming; Wu, Po-Tin; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Chang, Ming-Shi

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss and skeletal fragility in bone fracture are caused by an imbalance in bone remodeling. The current challenge in bone fracture healing is to promote osteoblastogenesis and bone formation. We aimed to explore the role of IL-20 in osteoblastogenesis, osteoblast differentiation and bone fracture. Serum IL-20 was significantly correlated with serum sclerostin in patients with bone fracture. In a mouse model, anti-IL-20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) 7E increased bone formation during fracture healing. In vitro, IL-20 inhibited osteoblastogenesis by upregulating sclerostin, and downregulating osterix (OSX), RUNX2, and osteoprotegerin (OPG). IL-20R1 deficiency attenuated IL-20-mediated inhibition of osteoblast differentiation and maturation and reduced the healing time after a bone fracture. We conclude that IL-20 affects bone formation and downregulates osteoblastogenesis by modulating sclerostin, OSX, RUNX2, and OPG on osteoblasts. Our results demonstrated that IL-20 is involved in osteoregulation and anti-IL-20 mAb is a potential therapeutic for treating bone fracture or metabolic bone diseases. PMID:27075747

  8. Vessel remodelling, pregnancy hormones and extravillous trophoblast function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jessie Z-J; Sheehan, Penelope M; Brennecke, Shaun P; Keogh, Rosemary J

    2012-02-26

    During early human pregnancy, extravillous trophoblast (EVT) cells from the placenta invade the uterine decidual spiral arterioles and mediate the remodelling of these vessels such that a low pressure, high blood flow can be supplied to the placenta. This is essential to facilitate normal growth and development of the foetus. Defects in remodelling can manifest as the serious pregnancy complication pre-eclampsia. During the period of vessel remodelling three key pregnancy-associated hormones, human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG), progesterone (P(4)) and oestradiol (E(2)), are found in high concentrations at the maternal-foetal interface. Potentially these hormones may control EVT movement and thus act as regulators of vessel remodelling. This review will discuss what is known about how these hormones affect EVT proliferation, migration and invasion during vascular remodelling and the potential relationship between hCG, P(4), E(2) and the development of pre-eclampsia.

  9. Nuclear Receptors in Bone Physiology and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Min-Young; Inoue, Kazuki; Takada, Ichiro; Kouzmenko, Alexander; Kato, Shigeaki

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, our view on the skeleton as a mere solid physical support structure has been transformed, as bone emerged as a dynamic, constantly remodeling tissue with systemic regulatory functions including those of an endocrine organ. Reflecting this remarkable functional complexity, distinct classes of humoral and intracellular regulatory factors have been shown to control vital processes in the bone. Among these regulators, nuclear receptors (NRs) play fundamental roles in bone development, growth, and maintenance. NRs are DNA-binding transcription factors that act as intracellular transducers of the respective ligand signaling pathways through modulation of expression of specific sets of cognate target genes. Aberrant NR signaling caused by receptor or ligand deficiency may profoundly affect bone health and compromise skeletal functions. Ligand dependency of NR action underlies a major strategy of therapeutic intervention to correct aberrant NR signaling, and significant efforts have been made to design novel synthetic NR ligands with enhanced beneficial properties and reduced potential negative side effects. As an example, estrogen deficiency causes bone loss and leads to development of osteoporosis, the most prevalent skeletal disorder in postmenopausal women. Since administration of natural estrogens for the treatment of osteoporosis often associates with undesirable side effects, several synthetic estrogen receptor ligands have been developed with higher therapeutic efficacy and specificity. This review presents current progress in our understanding of the roles of various nuclear receptor-mediated signaling pathways in bone physiology and disease, and in development of advanced NR ligands for treatment of common skeletal disorders. PMID:23589826

  10. Analysis of bone protein and mineral composition in bone disease using synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Lisa M.; Hamerman, David; Chance, Mark R.; Carlson, Cathy S.

    1999-10-01

    Infrared (IR) microspectroscopy is an analytical technique that is highly sensitive to the chemical components in bone. The brightness of a synchrotron source permits the examination of individual regions of bone in situ at a spatial resolution superior to that of a conventional infrared source. At Beamlines U10B and U2B at the National Synchrotron Light Source, we are examining the role of bone chemical composition in bone disease. In osteoarthritis (OA), it has been demonstrated that the bone underlying the joint cartilage (subchondral bone) becomes thickened prior to cartilage breakdown. Using synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy, we have examined the chemical composition of the subchondral bone in histologically normal and OA monkeys. Results demonstrate that the subchondral bone of OA monkeys is significantly more mineralized than the normal bone, primarily due to an increase in carbonate concentration in the OA bone. High resolution analysis indicates that differences in carbonate content are uniform throughout the subchondral bone region, suggesting that high subchondral bone carbonate may be a marker for OA. Conversely, increases in phosphate content are more pronounced in the region near the marrow space, suggesting that, as the subchondral bone thickens, the bone also becomes more mineralized. Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by a reduction in bone mass and a skeleton that is more susceptible to fracture. To date, it is unclear whether bone remodeled after the onset of osteoporosis differs in chemical composition from older bone. Using fluorescence-assisted infrared microspectroscopy, we are comparing the composition of monkey bone remodeled at various time points after the onset of osteoporosis (induced by ovariectomy). We find that the chemical composition of bone remodeled one year after ovariectomy and one year prior to necropsy is similar to normal bone. On the other hand, bone remodeled two years after ovariectomy is less mature, indicated

  11. Altitude, pasture type, and sheep breed affect bone metabolism and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in grazing lambs.

    PubMed

    Willems, Helen; Leiber, Florian; Kohler, Martina; Kreuzer, Michael; Liesegang, Annette

    2013-05-15

    This study aimed to investigate the bone development of two mountain sheep breeds during natural summer grazing either in the lowlands or on different characteristic alpine pastures. Pasture types differed in topographic slope, plant species composition, general nutritional feeding value, Ca and P content, and Ca:P ratio of herbage. Twenty-seven Engadine sheep (ES) lambs and 27 Valaisian Black Nose sheep (VS) lambs were divided into four groups of 6 to 7 animals per breed and allocated to three contrasting alpine pasture types and one lowland pasture type. The lambs were slaughtered after 9 wk of experimental grazing. The steep alpine pastures in combination with a high (4.8) to very high (13.6) Ca:P ratio in the forage decreased total bone mineral content as measured in the middle of the left metatarsus of the lambs from both breeds, and cortical bone mineral content and cortical bone mineral density of ES lambs. Breed × pasture type interactions occurred in the development of total and cortical bone mineral content, and in cortical thickness, indicating that bone metabolism of different genotypes obviously profited differently from the varying conditions. An altitude effect occurred for 25-hydroxyvitamin D with notably higher serum concentrations on the three alpine sites, and a breed effect led to higher concentrations for ES than VS. Despite a high variance, there were pasture-type effects on serum markers of bone formation and resorption.

  12. Nucleosome Remodeling and Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Peter B.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is kept flexible and dynamic to respond to environmental, metabolic, and developmental cues through the action of a family of so-called “nucleosome remodeling” ATPases. Consistent with their helicase ancestry, these enzymes experience conformation changes as they bind and hydrolyze ATP. At the same time they interact with DNA and histones, which alters histone–DNA interactions in target nucleosomes. Their action may lead to complete or partial disassembly of nucleosomes, the exchange of histones for variants, the assembly of nucleosomes, or the movement of histone octamers on DNA. “Remodeling” may render DNA sequences accessible to interacting proteins or, conversely, promote packing into tightly folded structures. Remodeling processes participate in every aspect of genome function. Remodeling activities are commonly integrated with other mechanisms such as histone modifications or RNA metabolism to assemble stable, epigenetic states. PMID:24003213

  13. Issues in modern bone histomorphometry☆

    PubMed Central

    Recker, R.R.; Kimmel, D.B.; Dempster, D.; Weinstein, R.S.; Wronski, T.J.; Burr, D.B.

    2012-01-01

    This review reports on proceedings of a bone histomorphometry session conducted at the Fortieth International IBMS Sun Valley Skeletal Tissue Biology Workshop held on August 1, 2010. The session was prompted by recent technical problems encountered in conducting histomorphometry on bone biopsies from humans and animals treated with anti-remodeling agents such as bisphosphonates and RANKL antibodies. These agents reduce remodeling substantially, and thus cause problems in calculating bone remodeling dynamics using in vivo fluorochrome labeling. The tissue specimens often contain few or no fluorochrome labels, and thus create statistical and other problems in analyzing variables such as mineral apposition rates, mineralizing surface and bone formation rates. The conference attendees discussed these problems and their resolutions, and the proceedings reported here summarize their discussions and recommendations. PMID:21810491

  14. Dietary boron does not affect tooth strength, micro-hardness, and density, but affects tooth mineral composition and alveolar bone mineral density in rabbits fed a high-energy diet.

    PubMed

    Hakki, Sema S; SiddikMalkoc; Dundar, Niyazi; Kayis, Seyit Ali; Hakki, Erdogan E; Hamurcu, Mehmet; Baspinar, Nuri; Basoglu, Abdullah; Nielsen, Forrest H; Götz, Werner

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether dietary boron (B) affects the strength, density and mineral composition of teeth and mineral density of alveolar bone in rabbits with apparent obesity induced by a high-energy diet. Sixty female, 8-month-old, New Zealand rabbits were randomly assigned for 7 months into five groups as follows: (1) control 1, fed alfalfa hay only (5.91 MJ/kg and 57.5 mg B/kg); (2) control 2, high energy diet (11.76 MJ and 3.88 mg B/kg); (3) B10, high energy diet + 10 mg B gavage/kg body weight/96 h; (4) B30, high energy diet + 30 mg B gavage/kg body weight/96 h; (5) B50, high energy diet + 50 mg B gavage/kg body weight/96 h. Maxillary incisor teeth of the rabbits were evaluated for compression strength, mineral composition, and micro-hardness. Enamel, dentin, cementum and pulp tissue were examined histologically. Mineral densities of the incisor teeth and surrounding alveolar bone were determined by using micro-CT. When compared to controls, the different boron treatments did not significantly affect compression strength, and micro-hardness of the teeth, although the B content of teeth increased in a dose-dependent manner. Compared to control 1, B50 teeth had decreased phosphorus (P) concentrations. Histological examination revealed that teeth structure (shape and thickness of the enamel, dentin, cementum and pulp) was similar in the B-treated and control rabbits. Micro CT evaluation revealed greater alveolar bone mineral density in B10 and B30 groups than in controls. Alveolar bone density of the B50 group was not different than the controls. Although the B treatments did not affect teeth structure, strength, mineral density and micro-hardness, increasing B intake altered the mineral composition of teeth, and, in moderate amounts, had beneficial effects on surrounding alveolar bone.

  15. Biophotonics and Bone Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory; Fischer, David; Asipauskas, Marius; Chauhan, Chirag; Compitello, Nicole; Burke, Jamie; Tate, Melissa Knothe

    2004-01-01

    One of the more serious side effects of extended space flight is an accelerated bone loss. Rates of bone loss are highest in the weight-bearing bones of the hip and spine regions, and the average rate of bone loss as measured by bone mineral density measurements is around 1.2% per month for persons in a microgravity environment. It is well known that bone remodeling responds to mechanical forces. We are developing two-photon microscopy techniques to study bone tissue and bone cell cultures to better understand the fundamental response mechanism in bone remodeling. Osteoblast and osteoclast cell cultures are being studied, and the goal is to use molecular biology techniques in conjunction with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) to study the physiology of in-vitro cell cultures in response to various stimuli, such as fluid flow induced shear stress and mechanical stress. We have constructed a two-photon fluorescence microscope for these studies, and are currently incorporating FLIM detection. Current progress will be reviewed. This work is supported by the NASA John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium.

  16. Prevalence of Bone Mineral Density Abnormalities and Factors Affecting Bone Density in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Sathish Kumar; Gopal, Gopinath Kango; Rangasami, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a disease of wasting with airflow limitation, associated with a variety of systemic manifestations such as reduced Bone Mineral Density (BMD). There is a paucity of Indian studies on the effects of COPD on BMD. Aim This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis in COPD patients and the correlation between bone density and severity of COPD classified according to GOLD Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines (GOLD). Materials and Methods A prospective study of 60 patients diagnosed to have COPD, was conducted in the outpatient department of Respiratory Medicine, at a tertiary care hospital in Southern India, between September 2012 and September 2013. BMD was measured using ultrasound bone densitometer (ACHILLES GE HEALTH CARE). Patients with a T-score between -1 and -2.5 were considered to be osteopenic while patients with a T score less than -2.5 were considered to be osteoporotic (WHO criteria). Results Overall, 40 (67%) patients had an abnormal bone mineral density. A total of 21 (35%) patients were osteoporotic while 19 (33%) were osteopenic. BMD levels correlated with severity of obstruction (p<0.001), smoking status (p=0.02), age (p=0.05) and number of pack years (p=0.001). Conclusion Patients with COPD are at an increased risk for lower BMD and osteoporotic fractures and the risk appears to increase with disease severity. Further studies are required to assess whether routine BMD measurements in COPD patients is beneficial to diagnose osteoporosis and reduce morbidity. PMID:27790490

  17. Treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism does not affect bone mass as determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, peripheral quantitative computed tomography and quantitative bone ultrasound in Spanish women

    PubMed Central

    Roncero-Martin, Raul; Calderon-Garcia, Julian F.; Santos-Vivas, Mercedes; Vera, Vicente; Martínez-Alvárez, Mariana; Rey-Sanchez, Purificación

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The results of studies examining the influence of subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) and levothyroxine (L-T4) replacement therapy on bone have generated considerable interest but also controversy. The present research aims to evaluate the effects of L-T4 treatment on different skeletal sites in women. Material and methods A group of 45 premenopausal (mean age: 43.62 ±6.65 years) and 180 postmenopausal (mean age: 59.51 ±7.90 years) women with SCH who were undergoing L-T4 replacement therapy for at least 6 months were compared to 58 pre- and 180 postmenopausal women with SCH (untreated) matched for age. The mean doses of L-T4 were 90.88 ±42.59 µg/day in the premenopausal women and 86.35 ±34.11 µg/day in the postmenopausal women. Bone measurements were obtained using quantitative bone ultrasound (QUS) for the phalanx, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) for the lumbar spine and hip, and peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) for the non-dominant distal forearm. Results No differences were observed between patients and untreated controls in these bone measurements except in the bone mineral density (BMD) of the spine (p = 0.0214) in postmenopausal women, which was greater in treated women than in untreated controls. Conclusions Our results indicate that adequate metabolic control through replacement treatment with L-T4 in pre- and postmenopausal women does not affect bone mass. PMID:26528344

  18. The role of pleiotropy and linkage in genes affecting a sexual ornament and bone allocation in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, M; Rubin, C-J; Höglund, A; Sahlqvist, A-S; Jonsson, K B; Kerje, S; Ekwall, O; Kämpe, O; Andersson, L; Jensen, P; Wright, D

    2014-05-01

    Sexual selection and the ornaments that inform such choices have been extensively studied, particularly from a phenotypic perspective. Although more is being revealed about the genetic architecture of sexual ornaments, much still remains to be discovered. The comb of the chicken is one of the most widely recognized sexual ornaments, which has been shown to be correlated with both fecundity and bone allocation. In this study, we use a combination of multiple intercrosses between White Leghorn populations and wild-derived Red Junglefowl to, first, map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for bone allocation and, second, to identify expression QTL that correlate and colocalize with comb mass. These candidate quantitative genes were then assessed for potential pleiotropic effects on bone tissue and fecundity traits. We identify genes that correlate with both relative comb mass and bone traits suggesting a combination of both pleiotropy and linkage mediates gene regulatory variation in these traits.

  19. N-Phenacylthiazolium Bromide Reduces Bone Fragility Induced by Nonenzymatic Glycation

    PubMed Central

    Bradke, Brian S.; Vashishth, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation (NEG) describes a series of post-translational modifications in the collagenous matrices of human tissues. These modifications, known as advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), result in an altered collagen crosslink profile which impacts the mechanical behavior of their constituent tissues. Bone, which has an organic phase consisting primarily of type I collagen, is significantly affected by NEG. Through constant remodeling by chemical resorption, deposition and mineralization, healthy bone naturally eliminates these impurities. Because bone remodeling slows with age, AGEs accumulate at a greater rate. An inverse correlation between AGE content and material-level properties, particularly in the post-yield region of deformation, has been observed and verified. Interested in reversing the negative effects of NEG, here we evaluate the ability of n-phenacylthiazolium bromide (PTB) to cleave AGE crosslinks in human cancellous bone. Cancellous bone cylinders were obtained from nine male donors, ages nineteen to eighty, and subjected to one of six PTB treatments. Following treatment, each specimen was mechanically tested under physiological conditions to failure and AGEs were quantified by fluorescence. Treatment with PTB showed a significant decrease in AGE content versus control NEG groups as well as a significant rebound in the post-yield material level properties (p<0.05). The data suggest that treatment with PTB could be an effective means to reduce AGE content and decrease bone fragility caused by NEG in human bone. PMID:25062024

  20. Emerging strategies and therapies for treatment of Paget’s disease of bone

    PubMed Central

    Michou, Laëtitia; Brown, Jacques P

    2011-01-01

    Paget’s disease of bone (PDB) is a progressive monostotic or polyostotic metabolic bone disease characterized by focal abnormal bone remodeling, with increased bone resorption and excessive, disorganized, new bone formation. PDB rarely occurs before middle age, and it is the second most frequent metabolic bone disorder after osteoporosis, affecting up to 3% of adults over 55 years of age. One of the most striking and intriguing clinical features is the focal nature of the disorder, in that once the disease is established within a bone, there is only local spread within that bone and no systemic dissemination. Despite many years of intense research, the etiology of PDB has still to be conclusively determined. Based on a detailed review of genetic and viral factors incriminated in PDB, we propose a unifying hypothesis from which we can suggest emerging strategies and therapies. PDB results in weakened bone strength and abnormal bone architecture, leading to pain, deformity or, depending on the bone involved, fracture in the affected bone. The diagnostic assessment includes serum total alkaline phosphatase, total body bone scintigraphy, skull and enlarged view pelvis x-rays, and if needed, additional x-rays. The ideal therapeutic option would eliminate bone pain, normalize serum total alkaline phosphatase with prolonged remission, heal radiographic osteolytic lesions, restore normal lamellar bone, and prevent recurrence and complications. With the development of increasingly potent bisphosphonates, culminating in the introduction of a single intravenous infusion of zoledronic acid 5 mg, these goals of treatment are close to being achieved, together with long-term remission in almost all patients. Based on the recent pathophysiological findings, emerging strategies and therapies are reviewed: ie, pulse treatment with zoledronic acid; denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody directed against RANK ligand; tocilizumab, an interleukin-6 receptor inhibitor; odanacatib

  1. Regulation of bone mass by growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Olney, Robert C

    2003-09-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a peptide hormone secreted from the pituitary gland under the control of the hypothalamus. It has a many actions in the body, including regulating a number of metabolic pathways. Some, but not all, of its effects are mediated through insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Both GH and IGF-I play significant roles in the regulation of growth and bone metabolism and hence are regulators of bone mass. Bone mass increases steadily through childhood, peaking in the mid 20s. Subsequently, there is a slow decline that accelerates in late life. During childhood, the accumulation in bone mass is a combination of bone growth and bone remodeling. Bone remodeling is the process of new bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts. GH directly and through IGF-I stimulates osteoblast proliferation and activity, promoting bone formation. It also stimulates osteoclast differentiation and activity, promoting bone resorption. The result is an increase in the overall rate of bone remodeling, with a net effect of bone accumulation. The absence of GH results in a reduced rate of bone remodeling and a gradual loss of bone mineral density. Bone growth primarily occurs at the epiphyseal growth plates and is the result of the proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes. GH has direct effects on these chondrocytes, but primarily regulates this function through IGF-I, which stimulates the proliferation of and matrix production by these cells. GH deficiency severely limits bone growth and hence the accumulation of bone mass. GH deficiency is not an uncommon complication in oncology and has long-term effects on bone health.

  2. Probiotics (Bifidobacterium longum) Increase Bone Mass Density and Upregulate Sparc and Bmp-2 Genes in Rats with Bone Loss Resulting from Ovariectomy

    PubMed Central

    Parvaneh, Kolsoom; Ebrahimi, Mahdi; Sabran, Mohd Redzwan; Karimi, Golgis; Hwei, Angela Ng Min; Abdul-Majeed, Saif; Ahmad, Zuraini; Ibrahim, Zuriati; Jamaluddin, Rosita

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that exert beneficial effects on the host, when administered in adequate amounts. Mostly, probiotics affect the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of the host and alter the composition of gut microbiota. Nowadays, the incidence of hip fractures due to osteoporosis is increasing worldwide. Ovariectomized (OVX) rats have fragile bone due to estrogen deficiency and mimic the menopausal conditions in women. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the effects of Bifidobacterium longum (B. longum) on bone mass density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), bone remodeling, bone structure, and gene expression in OVX rats. The rats were randomly assigned into 3 groups (sham, OVX, and the OVX group supplemented with 1 mL of B. longum 108–109 colony forming units (CFU)/mL). B. longum was given once daily for 16 weeks, starting from 2 weeks after the surgery. The B. longum supplementation increased (p < 0.05) serum osteocalcin (OC) and osteoblasts, bone formation parameters, and decreased serum C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) and osteoclasts, bone resorption parameters. It also altered the microstructure of the femur. Consequently, it increased BMD by increasing (p < 0.05) the expression of Sparc and Bmp-2 genes. B. longum alleviated bone loss in OVX rats and enhanced BMD by decreasing bone resorption and increasing bone formation. PMID:26366421

  3. Chromatin Remodeling and Plant Immunity.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Zhu, Q; Liu, Y; Zhang, Q

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling, an important facet of the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes, is performed by two major types of multisubunit complexes, covalent histone- or DNA-modifying complexes, and ATP-dependent chromosome remodeling complexes. Snf2 family DNA-dependent ATPases constitute the catalytic subunits of ATP-dependent chromosome remodeling complexes, which accounts for energy supply during chromatin remodeling. Increasing evidence indicates a critical role of chromatin remodeling in the establishment of long-lasting, even transgenerational immune memory in plants, which is supported by the findings that DNA methylation, histone deacetylation, and histone methylation can prime the promoters of immune-related genes required for disease defense. So what are the links between Snf2-mediated ATP-dependent chromosome remodeling and plant immunity, and what mechanisms might support its involvement in disease resistance?

  4. Therapeutic actions of curcumin in bone disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rohanizadeh, Ramin; Deng, Yi; Verron, Elise

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin is the active component of turmeric extract derived from the Curcuma longa plant. In the last decade, curcumin has raised a considerable interest in medicine owing to its negligible toxicity and multiple therapeutic actions including anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial activities. Among the various molecular targets of curcumin, some are involved in bone remodeling, which strongly suggests that curcumin can affect the skeletal system. The review sheds light on the current and potential applications of curcumin to treat