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Sample records for affects carbon allocation

  1. Browsing affects intra-ring carbon allocation in species with contrasting wood anatomy.

    PubMed

    Palacio, S; Paterson, E; Sim, A; Hester, A J; Millard, P

    2011-02-01

    Current knowledge on tree carbon (C) allocation to wood is particularly scarce in plants subjected to disturbance factors, such as browsing, which affects forest regeneration worldwide and has an impact on the C balance of trees. Furthermore, quantifying the degree to which tree rings are formed from freshly assimilated vs. stored carbohydrates is highly relevant for our understanding of tree C allocation. We used (13)C labelling to quantify seasonal allocation of stored C to wood formation in two species with contrasting wood anatomy: Betula pubescens Ehrh. (diffuse-porous) and Quercus petraea [Matt.] Liebl. (ring-porous). Clipping treatments (66% shoot removal, and unclipped) were applied to analyse the effect of browsing on C allocation into tree rings, plus the effects on tree growth, architecture, ring width and non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs). The relative contribution of stored C to wood formation was greater in the ring-porous (55-70%) than in the diffuse-porous species (35-60%), although each species followed different seasonal trends. Clipping did not cause a significant depletion of C stores in either species. Nonetheless, a significant increase in the proportion of stored C allocated to earlywood growth was observed in clipped birches, and this could be explained through changes in tree architecture after clipping. The size of C pools across tree species seems to be important in determining the variability of seasonal C allocation patterns to wood and their sensibility to disturbances such as browsing. Our results indicate that the observed changes in C allocation to earlywood in birch were not related to variations in the amount or concentration of NSC stores, but to changes in the seasonal availability of recently assimilated C caused by modifications in tree architecture after browsing.

  2. Allocation, stress tolerance and carbon transport in plants: how does phloem physiology affect plant ecology?

    PubMed

    Savage, Jessica A; Clearwater, Michael J; Haines, Dustin F; Klein, Tamir; Mencuccini, Maurizio; Sevanto, Sanna; Turgeon, Robert; Zhang, Cankui

    2016-04-01

    Despite the crucial role of carbon transport in whole plant physiology and its impact on plant-environment interactions and ecosystem function, relatively little research has tried to examine how phloem physiology impacts plant ecology. In this review, we highlight several areas of active research where inquiry into phloem physiology has increased our understanding of whole plant function and ecological processes. We consider how xylem-phloem interactions impact plant drought tolerance and reproduction, how phloem transport influences carbon allocation in trees and carbon cycling in ecosystems and how phloem function mediates plant relations with insects, pests, microbes and symbiotes. We argue that in spite of challenges that exist in studying phloem physiology, it is critical that we consider the role of this dynamic vascular system when examining the relationship between plants and their biotic and abiotic environment.

  3. Grassland management affects belowground carbon allocation in mountain grasslands and its resistance and resilience to drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlowsky, Stefan; Augusti, Angela; Ingrisch, Johannes; Hasibeder, Roland; Bahn, Michael; Gleixner, Gerd

    2015-04-01

    Future climate scenarios do not only forecast increased extreme events during summer, but also more frequent drought events in the early season. In mountain grasslands, different land uses may contribute to the response of the ecosystem to climate changes, like drought in May and June. In this study, we examined the drought response of two differently managed grasslands, 1) a more intensive used meadow and 2) a less intensive used abandoned area. Our aim was to highlight differences in both resistance and resilience of ecosystem functioning, based on carbon (C) belowground allocation as a key function in the plant-rhizosphere continuum. Therefore, we used an isotopic approach and in particular, we used 13C pulse labelling to track the fate of newly assimilated C from leaves, to roots and to soil, up to different microbial communities. We performed two 13C pulse labellings, the first during the acute phase of drought, when the water status of soil was drastically decreased compared to the control; and the second during the recovery phase, when the soil water status was restored to control level. We followed the kinetics of 13C incorporation in above- and below-ground bulk material as well as non-structural sugars, in general soil microbial biomass, in different soil microbial communities and in CO2 respired from roots, up to 5 days from each labelling. Preliminary results from the 13C analyses of bulk phytomass material and soil microbial biomass indicate, as expected, different kinetics of aboveground 13C incorporation and its belowground allocation. During the acute phase of drought, 13C incorporation shows a decrease compared to the control for both land uses, with generally higher reductions in meadow treatments. Root 13C tracer dynamics follow the leaf 13C enrichment with a delay. High label amounts are found in leaves directly after labelling, whereas in roots high 13C incorporation is found first after 24 hours, accompanied by a fast decrease of 13C label in

  4. Drought induced changes of plant belowground carbon allocation affect soil microbial community function in a subalpine meadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchslueger, L.; Bahn, M.; Fritz, K.; Hasibeder, R.; Richter, A.

    2012-12-01

    There is growing evidence that climate extremes may affect ecosystem carbon dynamics more strongly than gradual changes in temperatures or precipitation. Climate projections suggest more frequent heat waves accompanied by extreme drought periods in many parts of Europe, including the Alps. Drought is considered to decrease plant C uptake and turnover, which may in turn decrease belowground C allocation and potentially has significant consequences for microbial community composition and functioning. However, information on effects of drought on C dynamics at the plant-soil interface in real ecosystems is still scarce. Our study aimed at understanding how summer drought affects soil microbial community composition and the uptake of recently assimilated plant C by different microbial groups in grassland. We hypothesized that under drought 1) the microbial community shifts, fungi being less affected than bacteria, 2) plants decrease belowground C allocation, which further reduces C transfer to soil microbes and 3) the combined effects of belowground C allocation, reduced soil C transport due to reduced soil moisture and shift in microbial communities cause an accumulation of extractable organic C in the soil. Our study was conducted as part of a rain-exclusion experiment in a subalpine meadow in the Austrian Central Alps. After eight weeks of rain exclusion we pulse labelled drought and control plots with 13CO2 and traced C in plant biomass, extractable organic C (EOC) and soil microbial communities using phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA). Drought induced a shift of the microbial community composition: gram-positive bacteria became more dominant, whereas gram-negative bacteria were not affected by drought. Also the relative abundance of fungal biomass was not affected by drought. While total microbial biomass (as estimated by total microbial PLFA content) increased during drought, less 13C was taken up. This reduction was pronounced for bacterial biomarkers. It reflects

  5. Carbon allocation and accumulation in conifers

    SciTech Connect

    Gower, S.T.; Isebrands, J.G.; Sheriff, D.W.

    1995-07-01

    Forests cover approximately 33% of the land surface of the earth, yet they are responsible for 65% of the annual carbon (C) accumulated by all terrestrial biomes. In general, total C content and net primary production rates are greater for forests than for other biomes, but C budgets differ greatly among forests. Despite several decades of research on forest C budgets, there is still an incomplete understanding of the factors controlling C allocation. Yet, if we are to understand how changing global events such as land use, climate change, atmospheric N deposition, ozone, and elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} affect the global C budget, a mechanistic understanding of C assimilation, partitioning, and allocation is necessary. The objective of this chapter is to review the major factors that influence C allocation and accumulation in conifer trees and forests. In keeping with the theme of this book, we will focus primarily on evergreen conifers. However, even among evergreen conifers, leaf, canopy, and stand-level C and nutrient allocation patterns differ, often as a function of leaf development and longevity. The terminology related to C allocation literature is often inconsistent, confusing and inadequate for understanding and integrating past and current research. For example, terms often used synonymously to describe C flow or movement include translocation, transport, distribution, allocation, partitioning, apportionment, and biomass allocation. A common terminology is needed because different terms have different meanings to readers. In this paper we use C allocation, partitioning, and accumulation according to the definitions of Dickson and Isebrands (1993). Partitioning is the process of C flow into and among different chemical, storage, and transport pools. Allocation is the distribution of C to different plant parts within the plant (i.e., source to sink). Accumulation is the end product of the process of C allocation.

  6. Molecular insights into how a deficiency of amylose affects carbon allocation – carbohydrate and oil analyses and gene expression profiling in the seeds of a rice waxy mutant

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding carbon partitioning in cereal seeds is of critical importance to develop cereal crops with enhanced starch yields for food security and for producing specified end-products high in amylose, β-glucan, or fructan, such as functional foods or oils for biofuel applications. Waxy mutants of cereals have a high content of amylopectin and have been well characterized. However, the allocation of carbon to other components, such as β-glucan and oils, and the regulation of the altered carbon distribution to amylopectin in a waxy mutant are poorly understood. In this study, we used a rice mutant, GM077, with a low content of amylose to gain molecular insight into how a deficiency of amylose affects carbon allocation to other end products and to amylopectin. We used carbohydrate analysis, subtractive cDNA libraries, and qPCR to identify candidate genes potentially responsible for the changes in carbon allocation in GM077 seeds. Results Carbohydrate analysis indicated that the content of amylose in GM077 seeds was significantly reduced, while that of amylopectin significantly rose as compared to the wild type BP034. The content of glucose, sucrose, total starch, cell-wall polysaccharides and oil were only slightly affected in the mutant as compared to the wild type. Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) experiments generated 116 unigenes in the mutant on the wild-type background. Among the 116 unigenes, three, AGP, ISA1 and SUSIBA2-like, were found to be directly involved in amylopectin synthesis, indicating their possible roles in redirecting carbon flux from amylose to amylopectin. A bioinformatics analysis of the putative SUSIBA2-like binding elements in the promoter regions of the upregulated genes indicated that the SUSIBA2-like transcription factor may be instrumental in promoting the carbon reallocation from amylose to amylopectin. Conclusion Analyses of carbohydrate and oil fractions and gene expression profiling on a global scale in the

  7. Generalized Münch coupling between sugar and water fluxes for modelling carbon allocation as affected by water status.

    PubMed

    Daudet, F A; Lacointe, A; Gaudillère, J P; Cruiziat, P

    2002-02-07

    A model of within-plant carbon allocation is proposed which makes a generalized use of the Münch mechanism to integrate carbon and water functions and their involvement in growth limitations. The plant is envisioned as a branched network of resistive pathways (phloem and xylem) with nodal organs acting as sources and sinks for sucrose. Four elementary organs (leaf, stem, fruit, root) are described with their particular sink functions and hydraulic attributes. Given the rates of photosynthesis and transpiration and the hydraulic properties of the network as inputs, the model calculates the internal fluxes of water and sucrose. Xylem water potential (Psi), phloem sucrose concentration (C) and turgor pressure (P) are calculated everywhere in the network accounting for osmotic equilibrium between apoplasm and symplasm and coupled functioning of xylem and phloem. The fluxes of phloem and xylem saps are driven by the gradients of P and Psi, respectively. The fruit growth rate is assumed as turgor pressure dependent. To demonstrate its ability to address within-plant competition, the model is run with a simple-branched structure gathering three leaves, eight stem segments, three competing growing fruits and one root. The model was programmed with P-Spice, a software specifically designed for simulating electrical circuits but easily adaptable to physiology. Simulations of internal water fluxes, sucrose concentrations and fruit growth rates are given for different conditions of soil water availability and hydraulic resistances (sensitivity analysis). The discussion focuses on the potential interest of this approach in functional--structural plant models to address water stress-induced effects.

  8. A diminution in ascorbate oxidase activity affects carbon allocation and improves yield in tomato under water deficit.

    PubMed

    Garchery, Cécile; Gest, Noé; Do, Phuc T; Alhagdow, Moftah; Baldet, Pierre; Menard, Guillaume; Rothan, Christophe; Massot, Capucine; Gautier, Hélène; Aarrouf, Jawad; Fernie, Alisdair R; Stevens, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of carbon allocation between photosynthetic source leaves and sink tissues in response to stress is an important factor controlling plant yield. Ascorbate oxidase is an apoplastic enzyme, which controls the redox state of the apoplastic ascorbate pool. RNA interference was used to decrease ascorbate oxidase activity in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). Fruit yield was increased in these lines under three conditions where assimilate became limiting for wild-type plants: when fruit trusses were left unpruned, when leaves were removed or when water supply was limited. Several alterations in the transgenic lines could contribute to the improved yield and favour transport of assimilate from leaves to fruits in the ascorbate oxidase lines. Ascorbate oxidase plants showed increases in stomatal conductance and leaf and fruit sugar content, as well as an altered apoplastic hexose:sucrose ratio. Modifications in gene expression, enzyme activity and the fruit metabolome were coherent with the notion of the ascorbate oxidase RNAi lines showing altered sink strength. Ascorbate oxidase may therefore be a target for strategies aimed at improving water productivity in crop species.

  9. Transcriptional control of monolignol biosynthesis in Pinus taeda: factors affecting monolignol ratios and carbon allocation in phenylpropanoid metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anterola, Aldwin M.; Jeon, Jae-Heung; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2002-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling of the phenylpropanoid pathway in Pinus taeda cell suspension cultures was carried out using quantitative real time PCR analyses of all known genes involved in the biosynthesis of the two monolignols, p-coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols (lignin/lignan precursors). When the cells were transferred to a medium containing 8% sucrose and 20 mm potassium iodide, the monolignol/phenylpropanoid pathway was induced, and transcript levels for phenylalanine ammonia lyase, cinnamate 4-hydroxylase, p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase, 4-coumarate:CoA ligase, caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase, and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase were coordinately up-regulated. Provision of increasing levels of exogenously supplied Phe to saturating levels (40 mm) to the induction medium resulted in further up-regulation of their transcript levels in the P. taeda cell cultures; this in turn was accompanied by considerable increases in both p-coumaryl and coniferyl alcohol formation and excretion. By contrast, transcript levels for both cinnamate 4-hydroxylase and p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase were only slightly up-regulated. These data, when considered together with metabolic profiling results and genetic manipulation of various plant species, reveal that carbon allocation to the pathway and its differential distribution into the two monolignols is controlled by Phe supply and differential modulation of cinnamate 4-hydroxylase and p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase activities, respectively. The coordinated up-regulation of phenylalanine ammonia lyase, 4-coumarate:CoA ligase, caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase in the presence of increasing concentrations of Phe also indicates that these steps are not truly rate-limiting, because they are modulated according to metabolic demand. Finally, the transcript profile of a putative acid/ester O-methyltransferase, proposed as an alternative catalyst for O-methylation leading

  10. Healthcare resource allocation decisions affecting uninsured services

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Krista Lyn; Taylor, Holly A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Using the example of community access programs (CAPs), the purpose of this paper is to describe resource allocation and policy decisions related to providing health services for the uninsured in the USA and the organizational values affecting these decisions. Design/methodology/approach The study used comparative case study methodology at two geographically diverse sites. Researchers collected data from program documents, meeting observations, and interviews with program stakeholders. Findings Five resource allocation or policy decisions relevant to providing healthcare services were described at each site across three categories: designing the health plan, reacting to funding changes, and revising policies. Organizational values of access to care and stewardship most frequently affected resource allocation and policy decisions, while economic and political pressures affect the relative prioritization of values. Research limitations/implications Small sample size, the potential for social desirability or recall bias, and the exclusion of provider, member or community perspectives beyond those represented among participating board members. Practical implications Program directors or researchers can use this study to assess the extent to which resource allocation and policy decisions align with organizational values and mission statements. Social implications The description of how healthcare decisions are actually made can be matched with literature that describes how healthcare resource decisions ought to be made, in order to provide a normative grounding for future decisions. Originality/value This study addresses a gap in literature regarding how CAPs actually make resource allocation decisions that affect access to healthcare services. PMID:27934550

  11. Reproductive allocation in plants as affected by elevated carbon dioxide and other environmental changes: a synthesis using meta-analysis and graphical vector analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianzhong; Taub, Daniel R; Jablonski, Leanne M

    2015-04-01

    Reproduction is an important life history trait that strongly affects dynamics of plant populations. Although it has been well documented that elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere greatly enhances biomass production in plants, the overall effect of elevated CO2 on reproductive allocation (RA), i.e., the proportion of biomass allocated to reproductive structures, is little understood. We combined meta-analysis with graphical vector analysis to examine the overall effect of elevated CO2 on RA and how other environmental factors, such as low nutrients, drought and elevated atmospheric ozone (O3), interacted with elevated CO2 in affecting RA in herbaceous plants. Averaged across all species of different functional groups and environmental conditions, elevated CO2 had little effect on RA (-0.9%). RA in plants of different reproductive strategies and functional groups, however, differed in response to elevated CO2. For example, RA in iteroparous wild species decreased by 8%, while RA in iteroparous crops increased significantly (+14%) at elevated CO2. RA was unaffected by CO2 in plants grown with no stress or in low-nutrient soils. RA decreased at elevated CO2 and elevated O3, but increased in response to elevated CO2 in drought-stressed plants, suggesting that elevated CO2 could ameliorate the adverse effect of drought on crop production to some extent. Our results demonstrate that elevated CO2 and other global environmental changes have the potential to greatly alter plant community composition through differential effects on RA of different plant species and thus affect the dynamics of natural and agricultural ecosystems in the future.

  12. Long-term exposure to twice-ambient ozone (O3) affects carbon sink strength, allocation and stem growth in adult central European forest trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grams, T. E.; Matyssek, R.

    2009-12-01

    Amongst air pollutants, ground-level ozone (O3) is potentially the most detrimental to vegetation. Spreading globally, enhanced O3 levels are predicted to increase, in particular, in rapidly developing countries and, thus, O3 must now be considered in climate change scenarios and post-Kyoto policies. Here, we present an appraisal of a unique 8-year free-air O3 fumigation experiment on adult European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Noway spruce (Picea abies), ecologically and economically important, late-succession tree species in Central Europe. For the first time, whole-plant canopies of naturally grown, 60 to 70 years old forest trees were exposed to twice-ambient O3 levels for a total of eight years. Throughout the study period, enhanced O3 uptake in the elevated O3 treatment affected net C fixation and distinctly weakened the whole-stem growth in beech. In contrast, adult spruce at the same site did not display decline in stem biomass development. Those findings corroborate species-specific sensitivities to O3 reported from previous chamber studies on juvenile beech and spruce trees. Carbon allocation of adult trees, as a mechanistical basis of growth processes, was investigated through stable isotope tracer experiments using 13C depleted CO2 at the canopy level. To this end, a novel free-air CO2 exposure system, named tubeFACE, was developed, which employed micro-porous PVC tubes hanging through the canopy of adult trees. In a 19-day 13CO2/12CO2 labeling experiment, CO2 with a δ13C of -46.9 ‰ was continuously released into the canopy to increase [CO2] by 100 µmol mol-1, resulting in a reduction in δ13C of about 8 ‰. Subsequently, C allocation to respiratory pools of various tree organs was studied. Similar to the reduced stem growth in beech, elevated O3 significantly reduced allocation of labeled C to stem respiration, whereas in spruce such a reduction was not found. Hence, our study underlines the need to understand O3 risks by species, so that modeling

  13. Carbon Allocation into Different Fine-Root Classes of Young Abies alba Trees Is Affected More by Phenology than by Simulated Browsing

    PubMed Central

    Endrulat, Tina; Buchmann, Nina; Brunner, Ivano

    2016-01-01

    Abies alba (European silver fir) was used to investigate possible effects of simulated browsing on C allocation belowground by 13CO2 pulse-labelling at spring, summer or autumn, and by harvesting the trees at the same time point of the labelling or at a later season for biomass and for 13C-allocation into the fine-root system. Before budburst in spring, the leader shoots and 50% of all lateral shoots of half of the investigated 5-year old Abies alba saplings were clipped to simulate browsing. At harvest, different fine-root classes were separated, and starch as an important storage compartment was analysed for concentrations. The phenology had a strong effect on the allocation of the 13C-label from shoots to roots. In spring, shoots did not supply the fine-roots with high amounts of the 13C-label, because the fine-roots contained less than 1% of the applied 13C. In summer and autumn, however, shoots allocated relatively high amounts of the 13C-label to the fine roots. The incorporation of the 13C-label as structural C or as starch into the roots is strongly dependent on the root type and the root diameter. In newly formed fine roots, 3–5% of the applied 13C was incorporated, whereas 1–3% in the ≤0.5 mm root class and 1–1.5% in the >0.5–1.0 mm root class were recorded. Highest 13C-enrichment in the starch was recorded in the newly formed fine roots in autumn. The clipping treatment had a significant positive effect on the amount of allocated 13C-label to the fine roots after the spring labelling, with high relative 13C-contents observed in the ≤0.5 mm and the >0.5–1.0 mm fine-root classes of clipped trees. No effects of the clipping were observed after summer and autumn labelling in the 13C-allocation patterns. Overall, our data imply that the season of C assimilation and, thus, the phenology of trees is the main determinant of the C allocation from shoots to roots and is clearly more important than browsing. PMID:27123860

  14. Carbon limitation reveals allocation priority to defense compounds in peppermint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkelova, Lenka; Unsicker, Sybille; Forkel, Matthias; Huang, Jianbei; Trumbore, Susan; Hartmann, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    Studies of carbon partitioning during insect or pathogen infestation reveal high carbon investment into induced chemical defenses to deter the biotic agent (Baldwin, 1998). However, little is known how carbon investment into chemical defenses changes under abiotic stress such as drought. Drought forces plants to close their stomata to prevent water loss through transpiration while decreasing the amount of assimilated carbon. Furthermore drought hampers carbohydrates translocation due to declining plant hydration and reduced phloem functioning (McDowell, 2011; Hartmann et al., 2013; Sevanto, 2014). Hence long lasting drought can force plants into carbon starvation. The aim of our study was to disentangle carbon allocation priorities between growth, maintenance metabolism, storage and production of defense compounds under carbon limiting conditions using peppermint as our model plant. Drought is not the only method how to manipulate plant carbon metabolism and photosynthetic yield. Exposing plants to reduced [CO2] air is a promising tool simulating drought induced carbon limitation without affecting phloem functioning and so carbohydrate translocation (Hartmann et al., 2015). We exposed peppermint plants to drought (50% of the control irrigation) and to low [CO2] (progressive decrease from 350 ppm to 20 ppm) to disentangle hydraulic failure from carbon starvation effects on carbon allocation. Drought was applied as a cross-treatment yielding four treatments: watered and high [CO2] (W+CO2), drought and high [CO2] (D+CO2), water and low [CO2] (W-CO2), drought and low [CO2] (D-CO2). We analyzed the most abundant terpenoid defense compounds (α-Pinene, sabinene, myrcene, limonene, menthone, menthol and pulegone) and used continuous 13CO2 labelling to trace allocation pattern of new and old assimilated carbon in the four carbon sinks (structural biomass, water soluble sugars, starch and terpenoid defense compounds) in young expanding leaf tissue. This leaf tissue grew

  15. Shading responses of carbon allocation dynamics in mountain grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahn, M.; Lattanzi, F. A.; Brueggemann, N.; Siegwolf, R. T.; Richter, A.

    2012-12-01

    Carbon (C) allocation strongly influences plant and soil processes. Global environmental changes can alter source - sink relations of plants with potential implications for C allocation. Short-term C allocation dynamics in ecosystems and their responses to environmental changes are still poorly understood. To analyze effects of assimilate supply (i.e. C source strength) on ecosystem C allocation dynamics and the role of non-structural carbohydrates, canopy sections of a mountain meadow were pulse labeled with 13CO2 and subsequently shaded for a week or left unshaded (control). Tracer dynamics in above- and belowground sucrose and starch pools were analysed and coupled using compartmental modelling. The hypothesis was tested that shading affects tracer dynamics in non-structural carbohydrates and diminishes the transfer of recently assimilated C to roots and their storage pools. In unshaded plots up to 40% of assimilated C was routed through short-term storage in shoot starch and sucrose to buffer day / night cycles in photosynthesis. Shoot- and root sucrose and shoot starch were kinetically closely related pools. The tracer dynamics of the modelled root sucrose pool corresponded well with those in soil CO2 efflux. Root starch played no role in buffering day / night cycles and likely acted as a seasonal store. Shading strongly reduced sucrose and starch concentrations in shoots but not roots and resulted in a massive reduction of leaf respiration, while root respiration was much less diminished. Shading affected tracer dynamics in sucrose and starch of shoots: shoot starch rapidly lost tracer, while sucrose transiently increased its tracer content. Surprisingly, shading did not alter the dynamics of root carbohydrates. Even under severe C limitation after one week of shading, tracer C continued to be incorporated in root starch. Also the amount of 13C incorporated in phospholipid fatty acids of soil microbial communities was not reduced by shading, though its

  16. Comparing Different Model Structures for Carbon Allocation in the Community Land Model (CLM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montane, F.; Fox, A. M.; Arellano, A. F.; Scaven, V. L.; Alexander, M. R.; Moore, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying the intensity of feedback mechanisms between terrestrial ecosystems and climate is a central challenge for understanding the global carbon cycle. Part of this challenge includes understanding how climate affects not only NPP, but also C allocation in different plant tissues (leaves, stem and roots) which determines the C residence time. For instance, C could be sequestered over longer time periods if changes in climate increase allocation to long-lived plant tissue (e.g. woody components) with respect to short-lived tissues (e.g. leaves). Networks of eddy covariance towers like AmeriFlux provide the infrastructure necessary to study relationships between ecosystem processes and climate forcing. We ran the Community Land Model (CLM) for six temperate forests in North America (AmeriFlux sites) using different model structures for the C allocation module: i) standard carbon allocation module in CLM, which allocates C to the stem and leaves as a dynamic function of NPP and with fixed coefficients for the rest of parameters; ii) alternative C allocation module, which allocates C to the root and stem as a dynamic function of NPP and with fixed coefficients for the rest of parameters; and iii) alternative C allocation module with fixed coefficients for all the parameters. We compare C allocation patterns and climate sensitivities betwen the different model structures and available observations for the sites. We suggest some future approaches to reduce model uncertainty in the current scheme for C allocation in CLM and its climate sensitivity.

  17. New insights into mechanisms driving carbon allocation in tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Hofhansl, Florian; Schnecker, Jörg; Singer, Gabriel; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The proportion of carbon allocated to wood production is an important determinant of the carbon sink strength of global forest ecosystems. Understanding the mechanisms controlling wood production and its responses to environmental drivers is essential for parameterization of global vegetation models and to accurately predict future responses of tropical forests in terms of carbon sequestration. Here, we synthesize data from 105 pantropical old-growth rainforests to investigate environmental controls on the partitioning of net primary production to wood production (%WP) using structural equation modeling. Our results reveal that %WP is governed by two independent pathways of direct and indirect environmental controls. While temperature and soil phosphorus availability indirectly affected %WP via increasing productivity, precipitation and dry season length both directly increased %WP via tradeoffs along the plant economics spectrum. We provide new insights into the mechanisms driving %WP, allowing us to conclude that projected climate change could enhance %WP in less productive tropical forests, thus increasing carbon sequestration in montane forests, but adversely affecting lowland forests.

  18. Sexual competition affects biomass partitioning, carbon-nutrient balance, Cd allocation and ultrastructure of Populus cathayana females and males exposed to Cd stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Duan, Baoli; Xu, Gang; Korpelainen, Helena; Niinemets, Ülo; Li, Chunyang

    2016-11-01

    Although increasing attention has been paid to plant adaptation to soil heavy metal contamination, competition and neighbor effects have been largely overlooked, especially in dioecious plants. In this study, we investigated growth as well as biochemical and ultrastructural responses of Populus cathayana Rehder females and males to cadmium (Cd) stress under different sexual competition patterns. The results showed that competition significantly affects biomass partitioning, photosynthetic capacity, leaf and root ultrastructure, Cd accumulation, the contents of polyphenols, and structural and nonstructural carbohydrates. Compared with single-sex cultivation, plants of opposite sexes exposed to sexual competition accumulated more Cd in tissues and their growth was more strongly inhibited, indicating enhanced Cd toxicity under sexual competition. Under intrasexual competition, females showed greater Cd accumulation, more serious damage at the ultrastructural level and greater reduction in physiological activity than under intersexual competition, while males performed better under intrasexual competition than under intersexual competition. Males improved the female microenvironment by greater Cd uptake and lower resource consumption under intersexual competition. These results demonstrate that the sex of neighbor plants and competition affect sexual differences in growth and in key physiological processes under Cd stress. The asymmetry of sexual competition highlighted here might regulate population structure, and spatial segregation and phytoremediation potential of both sexes in P. cathayana growing in heavy metal-contaminated soils.

  19. Above-belowground Carbon Allocation in Earth System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, X.; Hoffman, F. M.; Xu, X.; Iversen, C. M.; Kumar, J.

    2014-12-01

    Above-belowground carbon allocation is a critical mechanism for vegetation growth and its adaptation to the changing environment. The model representation of carbon allocation mechanisms significantly influence the simulated carbon stock and land-atmosphere exchange in Earth System Models (ESMs). Few previous studies, however, have investigated and evaluated the above-belowground carbon allocation in ESMs. In this study, we analyzed carbon density in belowground, total vegetation (above + belowground), and belowground:vegetation ratios of eleven ESMs from the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), which were used for the latest IPCC Assessment Report (AR5). Overall, results of ESMs are not consistent with observational data; both the belowground and total vegetation carbon density are underestimated in tropical/subtropical and temperate regions, while overestimated in arctic/subarctic regions. Moreover, the ratios of belowground:total vegetation carbon are underestimated in all three climate zones. The model-data discrepancies in carbon density vary substantially among biomes, while the ratios of belowground:total vegetation carbon are consistently underestimated across all major biomes expect tropical moist forests. This study indicates that the carbon allocation algorithms in current ESMs need to be improved to better simulate vegetation growth and its responses to global change.

  20. Source and sink carbon dynamics and carbon allocation in the Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, Christopher E.; Metcalfe, D. B.; Girardin, C. A. J.; Amezquita, F. F.; Durand, L.; Huaraca Huasco, W.; Silva-Espejo, J. E.; Araujo-Murakami, A.; Costa, M. C.; Costa, A. C. L.; Rocha, W.; Meir, P.; Galbraith, D.; Malhi, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Changes to the carbon cycle in tropical forests could affect global climate, but predicting such changes has been previously limited by lack of field-based data. Here we show seasonal cycles of the complete carbon cycle for 14, 1 ha intensive carbon cycling plots which we separate into three regions: humid lowland, highlands, and dry lowlands. Our data highlight three trends: (1) there is differing seasonality of total net primary productivity (NPP) with the highlands and dry lowlands peaking in the dry season and the humid lowland sites peaking in the wet season, (2) seasonal reductions in wood NPP are not driven by reductions in total NPP but by carbon during the dry season being preferentially allocated toward either roots or canopy NPP, and (3) there is a temporal decoupling between total photosynthesis and total carbon usage (plant carbon expenditure). This decoupling indicates the presence of nonstructural carbohydrates which may allow growth and carbon to be allocated when it is most ecologically beneficial rather than when it is most environmentally available.

  1. Environmental control of carbon allocation matters for modelling forest growth.

    PubMed

    Guillemot, Joannès; Francois, Christophe; Hmimina, Gabriel; Dufrêne, Eric; Martin-StPaul, Nicolas K; Soudani, Kamel; Marie, Guillaume; Ourcival, Jean-Marc; Delpierre, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    We aimed to evaluate the importance of modulations of within-tree carbon (C) allocation by water and low-temperature stress for the prediction of annual forest growth with a process-based model. A new C allocation scheme was implemented in the CASTANEA model that accounts for lagged and direct environmental controls of C allocation. Different approaches (static vs dynamic) to modelling C allocation were then compared in a model-data fusion procedure, using satellite-derived leaf production estimates and biometric measurements at c. 10(4) sites. The modelling of the environmental control of C allocation significantly improved the ability of CASTANEA to predict the spatial and year-to-year variability of aboveground forest growth along regional gradients. A significant effect of the previous year's water stress on the C allocation to leaves and wood was reported. Our results also are consistent with a prominent role of the environmental modulation of sink demand in the wood growth of the studied species. Data available at large scales can inform forest models about the processes driving annual and seasonal C allocation. Our results call for a greater consideration of C allocation drivers, especially sink-demand fluctuations, for the simulations of current and future forest productivity with process-based models.

  2. Winter wheat optimizes allocation in response to carbon limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianbei; Hammerbacher, Almuth; Trumbore, Susan; Hartmann, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    • Plant photosynthesis is not carbon-saturated at current atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) thus carbon allocation priority is of critical importance in determining plant response to environmental changes, including increasing [CO2]. • We quantified the percentage of daytime net assimilation (A) allocated to whole-plant nighttime respiration (R) and structural growth (SG), nonstructural carbohydrates (NSC) and secondary metabolites (SMs) during winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) vegetative growth (over 4 weeks) at glacial, ambient, and elevated [CO2] (170, 390 and 680 ppm). • We found that R/A remained relatively constant (11-14%) across [CO2] treatments, whereas plants allocated less C to growth and more C to export at low [CO2] than elevated [CO2]; low [CO2] grown plants tended to invest overall less C into NSC and SMs than to SG due to reduced NSC availability; while leaf SMs/NSC was greater at 170 ppm than at 680 ppm [CO2] this was the opposite for root SMs/NSC; biomass, especially NSC, were preferentially allocated to leaves instead of stems and roots, likely to relieve C limitation induced by low [CO2]. • We conclude that C limitation may force plants to reduce C allocation to long-term survival in order to secure short-term survival. Furthermore, they optimized allocation of the available resource by concentrating biomass and storage to those tissues responsible for assimilation.

  3. Belowground carbon allocation in unfertilized and fertilized red pine plantations in northern Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Haynes, B E; Gower, S T

    1995-05-01

    We estimated carbon allocation to belowground processes in unfertilized and fertilized red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) plantations in northern Wisconsin to determine how soil fertility affects belowground allocation patterns. We used soil CO(2) efflux and litterfall measurements to estimate total belowground carbon allocation (root production and root respiration) by the carbon balance method, established root-free trenched plots to examine treatment effects on microbial respiration, estimated fine root production by sequential coring, and developed allometric equations to estimate coarse root production. Fine root production ranged from 150 to 284 g m(-2) year(-1) and was significantly lower for fertilized plots than for unfertilized plots. Coarse root production ranged from 60 to 90 g m(-2) year(-1) and was significantly lower for fertilized plots than for unfertilized plots. Annual soil CO(2) fluxes ranged from 331 to 541 g C m(-2) year(-1) and were significantly lower for fertilized plots than for unfertilized plots. Annual foliage litterfall ranged from 110 to 187 g C m(-2) year(-1) and was significantly greater for fertilized plots than for unfertilized plots. Total belowground carbon allocation ranged from 188 to 395 g C m(-2) year(-1) and was significantly lower for fertilized than for unfertilized plots. Annual soil CO(2) flux was lower for trenched plots than for untrenched plots but did not differ between fertilized and unfertilized trenched plots. Collectively, these independent estimates suggest that fertilization decreased the relative allocation of carbon belowground.

  4. Supply chain carbon footprinting and responsibility allocation under emission regulations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Xiao; Chen, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Reduction of greenhouse gas emissions has become an enormous challenge for any single enterprise and its supply chain because of the increasing concern on global warming. This paper investigates carbon footprinting and responsibility allocation for supply chains involved in joint production. Our study is conducted from the perspective of a social planner who aims to achieve social value optimization. The carbon footprinting model is based on operational activities rather than on firms because joint production blurs the organizational boundaries of footprints. A general model is proposed for responsibility allocation among firms who seek to maximize individual profits. This study looks into ways for the decentralized supply chain to achieve centralized optimality of social value under two emission regulations. Given a balanced allocation for the entire supply chain, we examine the necessity of over-allocation to certain firms under specific situations and find opportunities for the firms to avoid over-allocation. The comparison of the two regulations reveals that setting an emission standard per unit of product will motivate firms to follow the standard and improve their emission efficiencies. Hence, a more efficient and promising policy is needed in contrast to existing regulations on total production.

  5. Mycorrhizae alter quality and quantity of carbon allocated below ground

    SciTech Connect

    Rygiewicz, P.T.; Andersen, C.P.

    1994-01-01

    Plants and soils are a critically important element in the global carbon-energy equation. It is estimated that in forest ecosystems over two-thirds of the carbon is contained in soils and peat deposits. Despite the importance of forest soils in the global carbon cycle, fluxes of carbon associated with fundamental processes and soil functional groups are inadequately quantified, limiting our understanding of carbon movement and sequestration in soils. The authors report the direct measurement of carbon in and through all major pools of a mycorrhizal (fungus-root) coniferous seedling (a complete carbon budget). The mycorrhizal symbiont reduces overall retention of carbon in the plant-fungus symbiosis by increasing carbon in roots and below-ground respiration and reducing its retention and release above ground. Below ground, mycorrhizal plants shifted allocation of carbon to pools that are rapidly turned over, primarily to fine roots and fungal hyphae, the host root and fungal respiration. Mycorrhizae alter the size of below-ground carbon pools, the quality and, therefore, the retention time of carbon below ground.

  6. Adaptation of carbon allocation under light and nutrient reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegener, Frederik; Werner, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    The allocation of recently assimilated carbon (C) by plants depends on developmental stage and on environmental factors, but the underlying mechanisms are still a matter of debate. Whereas shifts in the allocation of photosynthates induced by reduced water availability, enhanced temperature and CO2 concentration were recently investigated in various studies, less is known about the response to light and nutrient reduction. We induced different allocation patterns in the Mediterranean shrub Halimium halimifolium L. by a reduction of light (Low L treatment) and nutrient availability (Low N treatment) and analysed allocation parameters as well as morphological and physiological traits for 15 months. Finally, we conducted a 13CO2 pulse-labelling and followed the fate of recently assimilated carbon to eight different classes of plant tissues and respiration for 13 days. The results revealed a high intraspecific variability in C distribution to tissues and in respiration. Allocation changes even varied within leaf and stem tissue classes (e.g. more C in main stems, less in lateral stems). These results show that the common separation of plant tissues in only three classes, i.e. root, shoot and leaf tissues, can result in missing information about allocation changes. The nutrient reduction enhanced the transport of recently assimilated C from leaves to roots in terms of quantity (c. 200%) and velocity compared to control plants. Interestingly, a 57% light reduction enhanced photosynthetic capacity and caused no change in final biomass after 15 months. Therefore, our results support the recently discussed sink regulation of photosynthesis. Finally, our results indicate that growing heterotrophic tissues strongly reduce the C loss from storage and structural C pools and therefore enhance the fraction of recent assimilates used for respiration. We propose that this interruption of the C reflux from storage and structural C pools could be a control mechanism for C

  7. Genomics Mechanisms of Carbon Allocation and Partitioning in Poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Kirst, Matias; Peter, Gary; Martin, Timothy

    2009-07-30

    The genetic control of carbon allocation and partitioning in woody perennial plants is poorly understood despite its importance for carbon sequestration. It is also unclear how environmental cues such as nitrogen availability impact the genes that regulate growth, and biomass allocation and wood composition in trees. To address these questions we phenotyped 396 clonally replicated genotypes of an interspecific pseudo-backcross pedigree of Populus for wood composition and biomass traits in above and below ground organs. The loci that regulate growth, carbon allocation and partitioning under two nitrogen conditions were identified, defining the contribution of environmental cues to their genetic control. Fifty-seven quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified for twenty traits analyzed. The majority of QTL are specific to one of the two nitrogen treatments, demonstrating significant nitrogen-dependent genetic control. A highly significant genetic correlation was observed between plant growth and lignin/cellulose composition, and QTL co-localization identified the genomic position of potential pleiotropic regulators. Gene expression analysis of all poplar genes was also characterized in differentiating xylem, whole-roots and developing leaves of 192 of the segregating population. By integrating the QTL and gene expression information we identified genes that regulate carbon partitioning and several biomass growth related properties. The work developed in this project resulted in the publication of three book chapters, four scientific articles (three others currently in preparation), 17 presentations in international conferences and two provisional patent applications.

  8. Quantifying Belowground Carbon Allocation in the Northeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverberg, S. K.; Ollinger, S. V.; Smith, M.; Lloyd, K. L.

    2005-12-01

    Forest soils represent a substantial component of the terrestrial carbon cycle and are an important research area for a number of carbon cycle science initiatives. Whereas patterns of aboveground productivity have been relatively well measured and are increasingly included in regional-scale model analyses, belowground estimates are still highly uncertain and progress has been hampered by a variety of methodological difficulties. The lack of data poses a problem because belowground measurements are needed to create a complete carbon budget for terrestrial ecosystems at local, regional and global scales. Ecosystem carbon balances will help identify how and where carbon is being stored, as well as how that might change as forests grow, die back, or transition into different forest types as a result of climate changes. This study focuses on quantifying belowground carbon allocation in the Bartlett Experimental Forest (BEF) of the New Hampshire White Mountains, and examining the degree to which spatial patterns can be related to patterns of soil and canopy nitrogen status. The work is part of a landscape-scale North American Carbon Program (NACP) study currently taking place at the BEF. Belowground carbon allocation can be estimated by subtracting soil respiration from litter (leaf, branch) measurements. Litter and soil respiration are being measured at two scales within the study area. The first includes a 1km2 area around an eddy flux tower at BEF, and is part of the intensive NACP study. Additional plots are distributed throughout the broader landscape to capture a greater degree of variation in vegetation, soils and topography. The goals of the project are (1) to contribute the belowground carbon portion to the total ecosystem carbon budget of BEF, and (2) to extrapolate soil carbon from the plot level to landscape and regional scales using remote sensing of foliar N.

  9. Unravelling carbon allocation dynamics in an evergreen temperate forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griebel, Anne; Bennett, Lauren T.; Arndt, Stefan K.

    2015-04-01

    Eucalypt trees have the potential to sequester carbon from the atmosphere year-round by maintaining evergreen leaves with a prolonged multi-year lifetime. Unlike deciduous trees, eucalypts are generally known to grow opportunistic resulting in a lack of defined growth rings and no distinct seasonal crown turnover events. Stem expansion has been successfully measured with micro-dendrometers, however, it remains challenging to monitor crown dynamics at a similarly high temporal resolution. Hence, carbon allocation dynamics and seasonal variations of carbon distribution between stem and crown biomass remain largely unknown for evergreen species. Ecosystem scale observations of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) from a flux tower located in a predominantly temperature and moisture regulated environment in south-eastern Australia have demonstrated that the ecosystem is a constant terrestrial sink for carbon. Intra-annual variations in temperature and moisture and prolonged heat waves and dry spells result in a wide range of annual sums (e.g. 2013: NEE~4 t C ha-1yr-1, 2012: NEE~12 t C ha-1yr-1). Newly developed low-cost terrestrial lidar sensors (VEGNET) now allow for automated daily monitoring of crown dynamics, enabling more detailed observations on the duration of crown biomass changes. In addition to leaf area index (LAI), VEGNET sensors define the location within the crown strata of the gains and losses in plant volume across the vertical forest structure. With the development of VEGNET sensors, combined with ecosystem carbon fluxes from eddy covariance measurements and with micro-dendrometers, we are able to quantify the dynamics of carbon allocation to above ground biomass pools. Our results demonstrate that stem growth dominates in spring and in autumn, and is strongly associated with water availability. Leaf turnover predominantly takes place in summer and is initiated by prolonged heat stress and isolated storm events, yet crown biomass remains stable throughout the

  10. Carbon allocation in a Bornean tropical rainforest without dry seasons.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Ayumi; Kume, Tomonori; Komatsu, Hikaru; Saitoh, Taku M; Ohashi, Mizue; Nakagawa, Michiko; Suzuki, Masakazu; Otsuki, Kyoichi; Kumagai, Tomo'omi

    2013-07-01

    To clarify characteristics of carbon (C) allocation in a Bornean tropical rainforest without dry seasons, gross primary production (GPP) and C allocation, i.e., above-ground net primary production (ANPP), aboveground plant respiration (APR), and total below-ground carbon flux (TBCF) for the forest were examined and compared with those from Amazonian tropical rainforests with dry seasons. GPP (30.61 MgC ha(-1) year(-1), eddy covariance measurements; 34.40 MgC ha(-1) year(-1), biometric measurements) was comparable to those for Amazonian rainforests. ANPP (6.76 MgC ha(-1) year(-1)) was comparable to, and APR (8.01 MgC ha(-1) year(-1)) was slightly lower than, their respective values for Amazonian rainforests, even though aboveground biomass was greater at our site. TBCF (19.63 MgC ha(-1) year(-1)) was higher than those for Amazonian forests. The comparable ANPP and higher TBCF were unexpected, since higher water availability would suggest less fine root competition for water, giving higher ANPP and lower TBCF to GPP. Low nutrient availability may explain the comparable ANPP and higher TBCF. These data show that there are variations in C allocation patterns among mature tropical rainforests, and the variations cannot be explained solely by differences in soil water availability.

  11. Responses of belowground carbon allocation dynamics to extended shading in mountain grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahn, Michael; Lattanzi, Fernando A.; Hasibeder, Roland; Wild, Birgit; Koranda, Marianne; Danese, Valentina; Brüggemann, Nicolas; Schmitt, Michael; Siegwolf, Rolf; Richter, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Carbon (C) allocation strongly influences plant and soil processes. Short-term C allocation dynamics in ecosystems and their responses to environmental changes are still poorly understood. Using in situ 13CO2 pulse labeling, we studied the effects of one week of shading on the transfer of recent photoassimilates between sugars and starch of above- and belowground plant organs and to soil microbial communities of a mountain meadow. C allocation to roots and microbial communities was rapid. Shading strongly reduced sucrose and starch concentrations in shoots, but not roots, and affected tracer dynamics in sucrose and starch of shoots, but not roots: recent C was slowly incorporated into root starch irrespective of the shading treatment. Shading reduced leaf respiration more strongly than root respiration. It caused no reduction in the amount of 13C incorporated into fungi and gram-negative bacteria, but increased its residence time. These findings suggest that, under interrupted C supply, belowground C allocation (as reflected by the amount of tracer allocated to root starch, soil microbial communities and belowground respiration) was maintained at the expense of aboveground C status, and that C source strength may affect the turnover of recent plant-derived C in soil microbial communities. (Reference: Bahn et al. 2013. New Phytologist 198:116-126)

  12. Responses of belowground carbon allocation dynamics to extended shading in mountain grassland.

    PubMed

    Bahn, Michael; Lattanzi, Fernando A; Hasibeder, Roland; Wild, Birgit; Koranda, Marianne; Danese, Valentina; Brüggemann, Nicolas; Schmitt, Michael; Siegwolf, Rolf; Richter, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Carbon (C) allocation strongly influences plant and soil processes. Short-term C allocation dynamics in ecosystems and their responses to environmental changes are still poorly understood. Using in situ (13) CO(2) pulse labeling, we studied the effects of 1 wk of shading on the transfer of recent photoassimilates between sugars and starch of above- and belowground plant organs and to soil microbial communities of a mountain meadow. C allocation to roots and microbial communities was rapid. Shading strongly reduced sucrose and starch concentrations in shoots, but not roots, and affected tracer dynamics in sucrose and starch of shoots, but not roots: recent C was slowly incorporated into root starch irrespective of the shading treatment. Shading reduced leaf respiration more strongly than root respiration. It caused no reduction in the amount of (13) C incorporated into fungi and Gram-negative bacteria, but increased its residence time. These findings suggest that, under interrupted C supply, belowground C allocation (as reflected by the amount of tracer allocated to root starch, soil microbial communities and belowground respiration) was maintained at the expense of aboveground C status, and that C source strength may affect the turnover of recent plant-derived C in soil microbial communities.

  13. Role of metabolite transporters in source-sink carbon allocation

    PubMed Central

    Ludewig, Frank; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Plants assimilate carbon dioxide during photosynthesis in chloroplasts. Assimilated carbon is subsequently allocated throughout the plant. Generally, two types of organs can be distinguished, mature green source leaves as net photoassimilate exporters, and net importers, the sinks, e.g., roots, flowers, small leaves, and storage organs like tubers. Within these organs, different tissue types developed according to their respective function, and cells of either tissue type are highly compartmentalized. Photoassimilates are allocated to distinct compartments of these tissues in all organs, requiring a set of metabolite transporters mediating this intercompartmental transfer. The general route of photoassimilates can be briefly described as follows. Upon fixation of carbon dioxide in chloroplasts of mesophyll cells, triose phosphates either enter the cytosol for mainly sucrose formation or remain in the stroma to form transiently stored starch which is degraded during the night and enters the cytosol as maltose or glucose to be further metabolized to sucrose. In both cases, sucrose enters the phloem for long distance transport or is transiently stored in the vacuole, or can be degraded to hexoses which also can be stored in the vacuole. In the majority of plant species, sucrose is actively loaded into the phloem via the apoplast. Following long distance transport, it is released into sink organs, where it enters cells as source of carbon and energy. In storage organs, sucrose can be stored, or carbon derived from sucrose can be stored as starch in plastids, or as oil in oil bodies, or – in combination with nitrogen – as protein in protein storage vacuoles and protein bodies. Here, we focus on transport proteins known for either of these steps, and discuss the implications for yield increase in plants upon genetic engineering of respective transporters. PMID:23847636

  14. Management and fertility control ecosystem carbon allocation to biomass production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campioli, Matteo; Vicca, Sara; Janssens, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    Carbon (C) allocation within the ecosystem is one of the least understood processes in plant- and geo-sciences. The proportion of the C assimilated through photosynthesis (gross primary production, GPP) that is used for biomass production (BP) is a key variable of the C allocation process and it has been termed as biomass production efficiency (BPE). We investigated the potential drivers of BPE using a global dataset of BP, GPP, BPE and ancillary ecosystem characteristics (vegetation properties, climatic and environmental variables, anthropogenic impacts) for 131 sites comprising six major ecosystem types: forests, grasslands, croplands, tundra, boreal peatlands and marshes. We obtained two major findings. First, site fertility is the key driver of BPE across forests, with nutrient-rich forests allocating 58% of their photosynthates to BP, whereas this fraction is only 42% for nutrient-poor forests. Second, by disentangling the effect of management from the effect of fertility and by integrating all ecosystem types, we observed that BPE is globally not driven by the 'natural' site fertility, but by the positive effect brought by management on the nutrient availability. This resulted in managed ecosystems having substantially larger BPE than natural ecosystems. These findings will crucially improve our elucidation of the human impact on ecosystem functioning and our predictions of the global C cycle.

  15. Summer drought alters carbon allocation to roots and root respiration in mountain grassland

    PubMed Central

    Hasibeder, Roland; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Richter, Andreas; Bahn, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Drought affects the carbon (C) source and sink activities of plant organs, with potential consequences for belowground C allocation, a key process of the terrestrial C cycle. The responses of belowground C allocation dynamics to drought are so far poorly understood. We combined experimental rain exclusion with 13C pulse labelling in a mountain meadow to analyse the effects of summer drought on the dynamics of belowground allocation of recently assimilated C and how it is partitioned among different carbohydrate pools and root respiration. Severe soil moisture deficit decreased the ecosystem C uptake and the amounts and velocity of C allocated from shoots to roots. However, the proportion of recently assimilated C translocated belowground remained unaffected by drought. Reduced root respiration, reflecting reduced C demand under drought, was increasingly sustained by C reserves, whilst recent assimilates were preferentially allocated to root storage and an enlarged pool of osmotically active compounds. Our results indicate that under drought conditions the usage of recent photosynthates is shifted from metabolic activity to osmotic adjustment and storage compounds. PMID:25385284

  16. Mechanisms driving carbon allocation in tropical rainforests: allometric constraints and environmental responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofhansl, Florian; Schnecker, Jörg; Singer, Gabriel; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Tropical forest ecosystems play a major role in global water and carbon cycles. However, mechanisms of C allocation in tropical forests and their response to environmental variation are largely unresolved as, due to the scarcity of data, they are underrepresented in global syntheses of forest C allocation. Allocation of gross primary production to wood production exerts a key control on forest C residence time and biomass C turnover, and therefore is of special interest for terrestrial ecosystem research and earth system science. Here, we synthesize pantropical data from 105 old-growth rainforests to investigate relationships between climate (mean annual precipitation, mean annual temperature, dry season length and cloud cover), soil nutrient relations (soil N:P) and the partitioning of aboveground net primary production (ANPP) to wood production (WPart) using structural equation modelling. Our results show a strong increase of WPart with ANPP, pointing towards allometric scaling controls on WPart, with increasing light competition in more productive forests triggering greater ANPP allocation to wood production. ANPP itself was positively affected by mean annual temperature and soil N:P. Beyond these allometric controls on WPart we found direct environmental controls. WPart increased with dry season length in tropical montane rainforests and with mean annual precipitation in lowland tropical rainforests. We discuss different trade-offs between plant traits, such as community-wide changes along the wood economics spectrum, the leaf economics spectrum and the plant resource economics spectrum, as underlying mechanisms for direct climatic controls on WPart. We thereby provide new insights into mechanisms driving carbon allocation to WPart in tropical rainforests and show that low and high productive tropical rainforests may respond differently to projected global changes.

  17. Examining Carbon Acquisition and Allocation in Coccolithophores: Carbon Accounting to Understand Paleoproductivity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelps, S. R.; Polissar, P. J.; Stoll, H. M.; deMenocal, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    It is increasingly clear that coccolithophores actively manage their growth and carbon allocation in response to changing environmental conditions. For example, recent work has identified carbon-concentrating mechanisms in coccolithophores—in which the organisms actively enhance the abundance of CO2 in the chloroplast by pumping in bicarbonate—as the source of vital isotope effects in coccolith calcite. Understanding the record for and consequences of this management in the geologic record remains challenging. Here we examine the geometry and geochemistry of coccoliths in surface sediments from the deep ocean to relate these measurements to the modern growth environment in the surface ocean. In this core-top dataset that spans a wide range of environmental and oceanographic settings, we measure the size and thickness of coccolith plates, the trace metal and stable isotopic carbon in coccolith calcite, as well as determine alkenone biomarker fluxes and alkenone carbon isotopic composition (ɛp). This holistic approach aims to elucidate the carbon acquisition and allocation strategies employed by modern coccolithophores and ultimately provide a better framework for interpreting paleoproductivity. This method may provide insight into the growth rate and carbon allocation of coccoliths in the past, and may improve our understanding of the influence of atmospheric CO2 on coccolithophore communities.

  18. Effect of long-term drought on carbon allocation and nitrogen uptake of Pinus sylvestris seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumpanen, Jukka; Aaltonen, Heidi; Lindén, Aki; Köster, Kajar; Biasi, Christina; Heinonsalo, Jussi

    2015-04-01

    Weather extremes such as drought events are expected to increase in the future as a result of climate change. The drought affects the allocation of carbon assimilated by plants e.g. by modifying the root to shoot ratio, amount of fine roots and the amount of mycorrhizal fungal hyphae. We studied the effect of long term drought on the allocation of carbon in a common garden experiment with 4-year-old Pinus sylvestris seedlings. Half of the seedlings were exposed to long-term drought by setting the soil water content close to wilting point for over two growing seasons whereas the other half was grown in soil close to field capacity. We conducted a pulse labelling with 13CO2 in the end of the study by injecting a known amount of 13C enriched CO2 to the seedlings and measuring the CO2 uptake and distribution of 13C to the biomass of the seedlings and to the root and rhizosphere respiration. In addition, we studied the effect of drought on the decomposition of needle litter and uptake of nitrogen by 15N labelled needles buried in the soil in litter bags. The litterbags were collected and harvested in the end of the experiment and the changes in microbial community in the litterbags were studied from the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) composition. We also determined the 15N isotope concentrations from the needles of the seedlings to study the effect of drought on the nitrogen uptake of the seedlings. Our results indicate that the drought had a significant effect both on the biomass allocation of the seedlings and on the microbial species composition. The amount of carbon allocated belowground was much higher in the seedlings exposed to drought compared to the control seedlings. The seedlings seemed to adapt their carbon allocation to long-term drought to sustain adequate needle biomass and water uptake. The seedlings also adapted their osmotic potential and photosynthesis capacity to sustain the long-term drought as was indicated by the measurements of osmotic potential

  19. Aboveground Tree Growth Varies with Belowground Carbon Allocation in a Tropical Rainforest Environment

    PubMed Central

    Raich, James W.; Clark, Deborah A.; Schwendenmann, Luitgard; Wood, Tana E.

    2014-01-01

    Young secondary forests and plantations in the moist tropics often have rapid rates of biomass accumulation and thus sequester large amounts of carbon. Here, we compare results from mature forest and nearby 15–20 year old tree plantations in lowland Costa Rica to evaluate differences in allocation of carbon to aboveground production and root systems. We found that the tree plantations, which had fully developed, closed canopies, allocated more carbon belowground - to their root systems - than did mature forest. This increase in belowground carbon allocation correlated significantly with aboveground tree growth but not with canopy production (i.e., leaf fall or fine litter production). In contrast, there were no correlations between canopy production and either tree growth or belowground carbon allocation. Enhanced allocation of carbon to root systems can enhance plant nutrient uptake, providing nutrients beyond those required for the production of short-lived tissues such as leaves and fine roots, and thus enabling biomass accumulation. Our analyses support this deduction at our site, showing that enhanced allocation of carbon to root systems can be an important mechanism promoting biomass accumulation during forest growth in the moist tropics. Identifying factors that control when, where and for how long this occurs would help us to improve models of forest growth and nutrient cycling, and to ascertain the role that young forests play in mitigating increased atmospheric carbon dioxide. PMID:24945351

  20. Aboveground tree growth varies with belowground carbon allocation in a tropical rainforest environment.

    PubMed

    Raich, James W; Clark, Deborah A; Schwendenmann, Luitgard; Wood, Tana E

    2014-01-01

    Young secondary forests and plantations in the moist tropics often have rapid rates of biomass accumulation and thus sequester large amounts of carbon. Here, we compare results from mature forest and nearby 15-20 year old tree plantations in lowland Costa Rica to evaluate differences in allocation of carbon to aboveground production and root systems. We found that the tree plantations, which had fully developed, closed canopies, allocated more carbon belowground - to their root systems - than did mature forest. This increase in belowground carbon allocation correlated significantly with aboveground tree growth but not with canopy production (i.e., leaf fall or fine litter production). In contrast, there were no correlations between canopy production and either tree growth or belowground carbon allocation. Enhanced allocation of carbon to root systems can enhance plant nutrient uptake, providing nutrients beyond those required for the production of short-lived tissues such as leaves and fine roots, and thus enabling biomass accumulation. Our analyses support this deduction at our site, showing that enhanced allocation of carbon to root systems can be an important mechanism promoting biomass accumulation during forest growth in the moist tropics. Identifying factors that control when, where and for how long this occurs would help us to improve models of forest growth and nutrient cycling, and to ascertain the role that young forests play in mitigating increased atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  1. Effects of prolonged drought stress on Scots pine seedling carbon allocation.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, Heidi; Lindén, Aki; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Biasi, Christina; Pumpanen, Jukka

    2016-12-14

    As the number of drought occurrences has been predicted to increase with increasing temperatures, it is believed that boreal forests will become particularly vulnerable to decreased growth and increased tree mortality caused by the hydraulic failure, carbon starvation and vulnerability to pests following these. Although drought-affected trees are known to have stunted growth, as well as increased allocation of carbon to roots, still not enough is known about the ways in which trees can acclimate to drought. We studied how drought stress affects belowground and aboveground carbon dynamics, as well as nitrogen uptake, in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings exposed to prolonged drought. Overall 40 Scots pine seedlings were divided into control and drought treatments over two growing seasons. Seedlings were pulse-labelled with (13)CO2 and litter bags containing (15)N-labelled root biomass, and these were used to follow nutrient uptake of trees. We determined photosynthesis, biomass distribution, root and rhizosphere respiration, water potential, leaf osmolalities and carbon and nitrogen assimilation patterns in both treatments. The photosynthetic rate of the drought-induced seedlings did not decrease compared to the control group, the maximum leaf specific photosynthetic rate being 0.058 and 0.045 µmol g(-1) s(-1) for the drought and control treatments, respectively. The effects of drought were, however, observed as lower water potentials, increased osmolalities as well as decreased growth and greater fine root-to-shoot ratio in the drought-treated seedlings. We also observed improved uptake of labelled nitrogen from soil to needles in the drought-treated seedlings. The results indicate acclimation of seedlings to long-term drought by aiming to retain sufficient water uptake with adequate allocation to roots and root-associated mycorrhizal fungi. The plants seem to control water potential with osmolysis, for which sufficient photosynthetic capability is needed.

  2. [Characteristics of carbon storage and its allocation in Erythrophleum fordii plantations with different ages].

    PubMed

    Ming, An-Gang; Jia, Hong-Yan; Tian, Zu-Wei; Tao, Yi; Lu, Li-Hu; Cai, Dao-Xiong; Shi, Zuo-Min; Wang, Wei-Xia

    2014-04-01

    Carbon storage and its allocation of 7-, 29- and 32-year-old Erythrophleum fordii plantation ecosystems in Guangxi were studied on the basis of biomass survey. The results showed that the carbon contents in different organs of E. fordii, ranging from 509.0 to 572.4 g x kg(-1), were in the order of stem > branch > root > bark > leaf. No significant differences in carbon content were observed among the shrub, herb and litter layers of the E. fordii plantations with different ages. Carbon content in the soil layer (0-100 cm) decreased with increasing the soil depth, but increased with increasing the stand age. The carbon storage of the arbor layer was 21.8, 100.0 and 121.6 t x hm(-2) for 7-, 29- and 32-year-old stands, respectively, and the order of carbon storage allocation in different organs was same as the order of carbon content. The 7-, 29- and 32-year-old E. fordii plantation ecosystems stored carbon at 132.6, 220.2 and 242.6 t x hm(-2), respectively. The arbor layer and soil layer were the main carbon pools, accounting for more than 97% of carbon storage in the ecosystem. Carbon storage allocation increased in arbor layer but decreased in soil layer with increasing the stand age. The influence of stand age on carbon storage allocation in shrub, herb and litter layers did not show a obvious regular pattern.

  3. Edaphic controls on ecosystem-level carbon allocation in two contrasting Amazon forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Eliana M.; Peñuela-Mora, María. Cristina; Sierra, Carlos A.; Lloyd, Jon; Phillips, Oliver L.; Moreno, Flavio H.; Navarrete, Diego; Prieto, Adriana; Rudas, Agustín.; Álvarez, Esteban; Quesada, Carlos A.; Grande-Ortíz, Maria Angeles; García-Abril, Antonio; Patiño, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    Studies of carbon allocation in forests provide essential information for understanding spatial and temporal differences in carbon cycling that can inform models and predict possible responses to changes in climate. Amazon forests play a particularly significant role in the global carbon balance, but there are still large uncertainties regarding abiotic controls on the rates of net primary production (NPP) and the allocation of photosynthetic products to different ecosystem components. We evaluated three different aspects of stand-level carbon allocation (biomass, NPP, and its partitioning) in two amazon forests on different soils (nutrient-rich clay soils versus nutrient-poor sandy soils) but otherwise growing under similar conditions. We found differences in carbon allocation patterns between these two forests, showing that the forest on clay soil had a higher aboveground and total biomass as well as a higher aboveground NPP than the sandy forest. However, differences between the two forest types in terms of total NPP were smaller, as a consequence of different patterns in the carbon allocation of aboveground and belowground components. The proportional allocation of NPP to new foliage was relatively similar between them. Our results of aboveground biomass increments and fine-root production suggest a possible trade-off between carbon allocation to fine roots versus aboveground compartments, as opposed to the most commonly assumed trade-off between total aboveground and belowground production. Despite these differences among forests in terms of carbon allocation, the leaf area index showed only small differences, suggesting that this index is more indicative of total NPP than its aboveground or belowground components.

  4. Phenology of belowground carbon allocation in a mid-latitude forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramoff, R. Z.; Klosterman, S.; Finzi, A. C.

    2012-12-01

    Annual forest productivity and carbon storage are affected by the amount and timing of carbon allocated belowground. Despite clear relationships between some climate factors (e.g. temperature) and NPP, there are still large gaps in our understanding of the partitioning between above and belowground C allocation. It is generally assumed that above and belowground phenology is synchronous, but a number of recent studies show that there is wide variability. Some phenological studies suggest that root production peaks are offset from leaf out and shoot elongation. Related belowground processes such as root respiration and nonstructural carbohydrate accumulation may also be offset from root or shoot production as a result of tradeoffs in C allocation. Due to uncertainties in the seasonal pattern and magnitude of allocation to roots, we have collected measurements of root phenology for three temperate tree species at Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA: eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), red oak (Quercus rubra), and white ash (Fraxinus americana). Bi-weekly to monthly measurements of root production, root respiration, and root nonstructural carbohydrate content are used to determine when roots are receiving C from aboveground and patterns of C use. Minirhizotron and soil core data suggest that fine root biomass does not accumulate in a unimodal peak. In T.canadensis stands, fine root production peaks in late May, coinciding with green up and shoot elongation. In Q.rubra stands, fine root production begins in early June, about 3 weeks after leaf out and continues throughout the season in oscillating peaks. Average turnover times for Q.rubra and T.canadensis were 3.76 years and 6.83 years respectively. Standing root biomass for all stands fluctuates seasonally but with high spatial variability, with live fine root biomass averaging 210 ± 75.2 gC m-2 in F.americana stands, 554 ± 241 gC m-2 in Q.rubra, and 449 ± 172 gC m-2 in T.canadensis. Root respiration for all stands

  5. Carbon allocation changes: an adaptive response to variations in atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, S. P.; Li, G.; Prentice, I. C. C.

    2015-12-01

    Given the ubiquity of nutrient constraints on primary production, an optimal carbon allocation strategy is expected to increase total below-ground allocation (fine root production and turnover, allocation to mycorrhizae and carbon exudation to the rhizophere) as CO2 concentration increases. Conversely, below-ground allocation should be reduced under low CO2 concentrations, as occurred during glacial times. Using a coupled generic primary production and tree-growth model, we quantify the changes in carbon allocation that are required to explain the apparent homoeostasis of tree radial growth during recent decades and between glacial and interglacial conditions. These results suggest a resolution of the apparent paradox of continuing terrestrial CO2 uptake (a consequence of CO2 fertilization) and the widespread lack of observed radial growth enhancement in trees. Adaptive shifts in carbon allocation are thus a key feature that needs to be accounted for in models to predict, for example, future timber yields as well as in large-scale ecosystem and carbon cycle models.

  6. Carbon allocation changes: an adaptive response to variations in atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Sandy; Li, Guangqi; Prentice, Iain Colin

    2016-04-01

    Given the ubiquity of nutrient constraints on primary production, an optimal carbon allocation strategy is expected to increase total below-ground allocation (fine root production and turnover, allocation to mycorrhizae and carbon exudation to the rhizophere) as atmospheric CO2 concentration increases. Conversely, below-ground allocation should be reduced when atmospheric CO2 concentrations were low, as occurred during glacial times. Using a coupled generic primary production and tree-growth model, we quantify the changes in carbon allocation that are required to explain the apparent homoeostasis of tree radial growth during recent decades and between glacial and interglacial conditions. These results suggest a resolution of the apparent paradox of continuing terrestrial CO2 uptake (a consequence of CO2 fertilization) and the widespread lack of observed enhancement of stem growth in trees. Adaptive shifts in carbon allocation are thus a key feature that should to be accounted for in models to predict tree growth and future timber harvests, as well as in large-scale ecosystem and carbon cycle models.

  7. The QQS orphan gene of Arabidopsis modulates carbon and nitrogen allocation in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    2015-01-01

    The genome of each species contains as high as 8% of genes that are uniquely present in that species. Little is known about the functional significance of these so-called species specific or orphan genes. The Arabidopsis thaliana gene Qua-Quine Starch (QQS) is species specific. Here, we show that altering QQS expression in Arabidopsis affects carbon partitioning to both starch and protein. We hypothesized QQS may be conserved in a feature other than primary sequence, and as such could function to impact composition in another species. To test the potential of QQS in affecting composition in an ectopic species, we introduced QQS into soybean. Soybean T1 lines expressing QQS have up to 80% decreased leaf starch and up to 60% increased leaf protein; T4 generation seeds from field-grown plants contain up to 13% less oil, while protein is increased by up to 18%. These data broaden the concept of QQS as a modulator of carbon and nitrogen allocation, and demonstrate that this species-specific gene can affect the seed composition of an agronomic species thought to have diverged from Arabidopsis 100 million years ago. PMID:25146936

  8. The effects of defoliation on carbon allocation: can carbon limitation reduce growth in favour of storage?

    PubMed

    Wiley, Erin; Huepenbecker, Sarah; Casper, Brenda B; Helliker, Brent R

    2013-11-01

    There is no consensus about how stresses such as low water availability and temperature limit tree growth. Sink limitation to growth and survival is often inferred if a given stress does not cause non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) concentrations or levels to decline along with growth. However, trees may actively maintain or increase NSC levels under moderate carbon stress, making the pattern of reduced growth and increased NSCs compatible with carbon limitation. To test this possibility, we used full and half defoliation to impose severe and moderate carbon limitation on 2-year-old Quercus velutina Lam. saplings grown in a common garden. Saplings were harvested at either 3 weeks or 4 months after treatments were applied, representing short- and longer-term effects on woody growth and NSC levels. Both defoliation treatments maintained a lower total leaf area than controls throughout the experiment with no evidence of photosynthetic up-regulation, and resulted in a similar total biomass reduction. While fully defoliated saplings had lower starch levels than controls in the short term, half defoliated saplings maintained control starch levels in both the short and longer term. In the longer term, fully defoliated saplings had the greatest starch concentration increment, allowing them to recover to near-control starch levels. Furthermore, between the two harvest dates, fully and half defoliated saplings allocated a greater proportion of new biomass to starch than did controls. The maintenance of control starch levels in half defoliated saplings indicates that these trees actively store a substantial amount of carbon before growth is carbon saturated. In addition, the allocation shift favouring storage in defoliated saplings is consistent with the hypothesis that, as an adaptation to increasing carbon stress, trees can prioritize carbon reserve formation at the expense of growth. Our results suggest that as carbon limitation increases, reduced growth is not necessarily

  9. Carbon allocation belowground in Pinus pinaster using stable carbon isotope pulse labeling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannoura, M.; Bosc, A.; Chipeaux, C.; Sartore, M.; Lambrot, C.; Trichet, P.; Bakker, M.; Loustau, D.; Epron, D.

    2010-12-01

    Carbon allocation belowground competes with aboveground growth and biomass production. In the other hand, it contributes to resource acquisition such as nutrient, water and carbon sequestration in soil. Thus, a better characterization of carbon flow from plant to soil and its residence time within each compartment is an important issue for understanding and modeling forest ecosystem carbon budget. 13C pulse labeling of whole crown was conducted at 4 seasons to study the fate of assimilated carbon by photosynthesis into the root on 12 year old Pinus pinaster planted in the INRA domain of Pierroton. Maritime pine is the most widely planted species in South-West Europe. Stem, root and soil CO2 effluxes and their isotope composition were measured continuously by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy with a trace gas analyzer (TGA 100A; Campbell Scientific) coupled to flow-through chambers. 13CO2 recovery and peak were observed in respiration of each compartment after labeling. It appeared sequentially from top of stem to bottom, and to coarse root. The maximum velocity of carbon transfer was calculated as the difference in time lag of recovery between two positions on the trunk or on the root. It ranged between 0.08-0.2 m h-1 in stem and between 0.04-0.12 m h-1 in coarse root. This velocity was higher in warmer season, and the difference between time lag of recovery and peak increased after first frost. Photosynthates arrived underground 1.5 to 5 days after labeling, at similar time in soil CO2 effluxes and coarse root respiration. 0.08-1.4 g of carbon was respired per tree during first 20 days following labeling. It presented 0.6 -10% of 13C used for labeling and it is strongly related to seasons. The isotope signal was detected in fine root organs and microbial biomass by periodical core sampling. The peak was observed 6 days after labeling in early summer while it was delayed more than 10 days in autumn and winter with less amount of carbon allocated

  10. [Soil labile organic carbon contents and their allocation characteristics under different land uses at dry-hot valley].

    PubMed

    Tang, Guo-yong; Li, Kun; Sun, Yong-yu; Zhang, Chun-hua

    2010-05-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC), readily oxidation organic carbon (ROC), microbial biomass carbon (MBC)and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) contents and their allocation ratios were comparatively investigated under Leucaena leucocephala woodland, Acacia auriculiformis woodland, dry cropland and wasteland in dry-hot valley. Results showed that SOC contents were not significant differences among the four land uses with the range of 4.22-5.19 g x kg(-1). ROC contents under L. leucocephala (2.14 g x kg(-1)) and A. auriculiformis woodland (2.03 g x kg(-1)) were both significantly higher than those under dry cropland (1.38 g x kg(-1)) and wasteland (1.34 g x kg(-1)). The highest MBC and DOC contents both presented under dry cropland among the four land uses, whereas the lowest occurred under wasteland. ROC allocation ratios under woodlands were 1.3 to 1.6 times to those under dry cropland and wasteland. MBC and DOC allocation ratios under cropland were higher than those under other three land uses, and the ratios were closely among woodlands and wasteland. Plant residue amounts and management were primarily determined ROC contents, and soil water content and plant residue quantity were mainly affected the variation of MBC and DOC contents under the four land uses. The change of ROC contents could sensitively indicate SOC dynamics in dry-hot valley, but the change of MBC or DOC could not.

  11. High intraspecific ability to adjust both carbon uptake and allocation under light and nutrient reduction in Halimium halimifolium L.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Frederik; Beyschlag, Wolfram; Werner, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    The allocation of recently assimilated carbon (C) by plants depends on developmental stage and on environmental factors, but the underlying mechanisms are still a matter of debate. In the present study, we investigated the regulation of C uptake and allocation and their adjustments during plant growth. We induced different allocation strategies in the Mediterranean shrub Halimium halimifolium L. by a reduction of light (Low L treatment) and nutrient availability (Low N treatment) and analyzed allocation parameters as well as morphological and physiological traits for 15 months. Further, we conducted a (13)CO2 pulse-labeling and followed the way of recently assimilated carbon to eight different tissue classes and respiration for 13 days. The plant responses were remarkably distinct in our study, with mainly morphological/physiological adaptions in case of light reduction and adjustment of C allocation in case of nutrient reduction. The transport of recently assimilated C to the root system was enhanced in amount (c. 200%) and velocity under nutrient limited conditions compared to control plants. Despite the 57% light reduction the total biomass production was not affected in the Low L treatment. The plants probably compensated light reduction by an improvement of their ability to fix C. Thus, our results support the concept that photosynthesis is, at least in a medium term perspective, influenced by the C demand of the plant and not exclusively by environmental factors. Finally, our results indicate that growing heterotrophic tissues strongly reduce the C reflux from storage and structural C pools and therefore enhance the fraction of recent assimilates allocated to respiration. We propose that this interruption of the C reflux from storage and structural C pools could be a regulation mechanism for C translocation in plants.

  12. High intraspecific ability to adjust both carbon uptake and allocation under light and nutrient reduction in Halimium halimifolium L.

    PubMed Central

    Wegener, Frederik; Beyschlag, Wolfram; Werner, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    The allocation of recently assimilated carbon (C) by plants depends on developmental stage and on environmental factors, but the underlying mechanisms are still a matter of debate. In the present study, we investigated the regulation of C uptake and allocation and their adjustments during plant growth. We induced different allocation strategies in the Mediterranean shrub Halimium halimifolium L. by a reduction of light (Low L treatment) and nutrient availability (Low N treatment) and analyzed allocation parameters as well as morphological and physiological traits for 15 months. Further, we conducted a 13CO2 pulse-labeling and followed the way of recently assimilated carbon to eight different tissue classes and respiration for 13 days. The plant responses were remarkably distinct in our study, with mainly morphological/physiological adaptions in case of light reduction and adjustment of C allocation in case of nutrient reduction. The transport of recently assimilated C to the root system was enhanced in amount (c. 200%) and velocity under nutrient limited conditions compared to control plants. Despite the 57% light reduction the total biomass production was not affected in the Low L treatment. The plants probably compensated light reduction by an improvement of their ability to fix C. Thus, our results support the concept that photosynthesis is, at least in a medium term perspective, influenced by the C demand of the plant and not exclusively by environmental factors. Finally, our results indicate that growing heterotrophic tissues strongly reduce the C reflux from storage and structural C pools and therefore enhance the fraction of recent assimilates allocated to respiration. We propose that this interruption of the C reflux from storage and structural C pools could be a regulation mechanism for C translocation in plants. PMID:26300906

  13. Carbon allocation during defoliation: testing a defense-growth trade-off in balsam fir

    PubMed Central

    Deslauriers, Annie; Caron, Laurie; Rossi, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    During repetitive defoliation events, carbon can become limiting for trees. To maintain growth and survival, the resources have to be shared more efficiently, which could result in a trade-off between the different physiological processes of a plant. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of defoliation in carbon allocation of balsam fir [Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.] to test the presence of a trade-off between allocation to growth, carbon storage, and defense. Three defoliation intensities [control (C-trees, 0% defoliation), moderately (M-trees, 41–60%), and heavily (H-trees, 61–80%) defoliated] were selected in order to monitor several variables related to stem growth (wood formation in xylem), carbon storage in stem and needle (non-structural soluble sugars and starch), and defense components in needles (terpenoids compound) from May to October 2011. The concentration of starch was drastically reduced in both wood and leaves of H-trees with a quasi-absence of carbon partitioning to storage in early summer. Fewer kinds of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes were formed with an increasing level of defoliation indicating a lower carbon allocation for the production of defense. The carbon allocation to wood formation gradually reduced at increasing defoliation intensities, with a lower growth rate and fewer tracheids resulting in a reduced carbon sequestration in cell walls. The hypothesis of a trade-off between the allocations to defense components and to non-structural (NCS) and structural (growth) carbon was rejected as most of the measured variables decreased with increasing defoliation. The starch amount was highly indicative of the tree carbon status at different defoliation intensity and future research should focus on the mechanism of starch utilization for survival and growth following an outbreak. PMID:26029235

  14. Carbon allocation and carbon isotope fluxes in the plant-soil-atmosphere continuum: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüggemann, N.; Gessler, A.; Kayler, Z.; Keel, S. G.; Badeck, F.; Barthel, M.; Boeckx, P.; Buchmann, N.; Brugnoli, E.; Esperschütz, J.; Gavrichkova, O.; Ghashghaie, J.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Keitel, C.; Knohl, A.; Kuptz, D.; Palacio, S.; Salmon, Y.; Uchida, Y.; Bahn, M.

    2011-11-01

    The terrestrial carbon (C) cycle has received increasing interest over the past few decades, however, there is still a lack of understanding of the fate of newly assimilated C allocated within plants and to the soil, stored within ecosystems and lost to the atmosphere. Stable carbon isotope studies can give novel insights into these issues. In this review we provide an overview of an emerging picture of plant-soil-atmosphere C fluxes, as based on C isotope studies, and identify processes determining related C isotope signatures. The first part of the review focuses on isotopic fractionation processes within plants during and after photosynthesis. The second major part elaborates on plant-internal and plant-rhizosphere C allocation patterns at different time scales (diel, seasonal, interannual), including the speed of C transfer and time lags in the coupling of assimilation and respiration, as well as the magnitude and controls of plant-soil C allocation and respiratory fluxes. Plant responses to changing environmental conditions, the functional relationship between the physiological and phenological status of plants and C transfer, and interactions between C, water and nutrient dynamics are discussed. The role of the C counterflow from the rhizosphere to the aboveground parts of the plants, e.g. via CO2 dissolved in the xylem water or as xylem-transported sugars, is highlighted. The third part is centered around belowground C turnover, focusing especially on above- and belowground litter inputs, soil organic matter formation and turnover, production and loss of dissolved organic C, soil respiration and CO2 fixation by soil microbes. Furthermore, plant controls on microbial communities and activity via exudates and litter production as well as microbial community effects on C mineralization are reviewed. A further part of the paper is dedicated to physical interactions between soil CO2 and the soil matrix, such as CO2 diffusion and dissolution processes within the

  15. Carbon allocation in ectomycorrhizal plants at limited optimal N supply: an attempt aat unraveling conflicting theories.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Ana; Hampp, Rüdiger; Magel, Elisabeth; Martins-Loução, Maria-Amélia

    2011-01-01

    With regard to mycorrhiza, conflicting theories try to explain how the balance between fungal demand for carbohydrates and the plant’s needs for nutrients varies, resulting in conflicting predictions. In order to evaluate current concepts, we investigated some metabolic parameters, which are indicative for plant carbon allocation in response to mycorrhization at limited and optimal N supply. Pinus pinaster seedlings were inoculated with living or dead (control) cultures of Pisolithus tinctorius, supplied with ammonium at 4 (limiting) or 7% d−1 (non-limiting) N relative addition rate (RARN), and followed development for 29 days. Mycorrhizal colonization of roots was quantified by the determination of ergosterol. A series of enzymes (sucrose and trehalose metabolism, anaplerosis) and metabolites (soluble carbohydrate, including trehalose; fructose 2,6 bisphosphate, free amino acids) relevant in the C/N exchange between symbionts, and in the carbon allocation and sink strength within the plant were assayed for 2-day-intervals for up to 14 days, and at 5-day-intervals for the rest of the experiment. The first 10 days reflected the establishment of mycorrhizal interaction, and the carbon allocation to the root was higher in M plants independent of N supply. Following this period, carbon allocation became N-related, higher at low, and lower at high N supply. The belowground C investment of M plants was dependent on N availability, but not on N gain. Finally, increased belowground C allocation was accompanied by a shift from plant to fungal metabolism.

  16. Elevated tropospheric ozone affects the concentration and allocation of mineral nutrients of two bamboo species.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Minghao; Lam, Shu Kee; Li, Yingchun; Chen, Shuanglin

    2017-01-15

    The increase in tropospheric ozone (O3) affects plant physiology and ecosystem processes, and consequently the cycle of nutrients. While mineral nutrients are critical for plant growth, the effect of elevated tropospheric O3 concentration on the uptake and allocation of mineral nutrients by plants is not well understood. Using open top chambers (OTCs), we investigated the effect of elevated O3 on calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg) and iron (Fe) in mature bamboo species Phyllostachys edulis and Oligostachyum lubricum. Our results showed that elevated O3 decreased the leaf biomass of P. edulis and O. lubricum by 35.1% and 26.7%, respectively, but had no significant effect on the biomass of branches, stem or root. For P. edulis, elevated O3 increased the nutrient (Ca, Mg and Fe) concentration and allocation in leaf but reduced the concentration in other organs. In contrast, elevated O3 increased the nutrient concentration and allocation in the branch of O. lubricum but decreased that of other organs. We also found that that P. edulis and O. lubricum responded differently to elevated O3 in terms of nutrient (Ca, Mg and Fe) uptake and allocation. This information is critical for nutrient management and adaptation strategies for sustainable growth of P. edulis and O. lubricum under global climate change.

  17. Plant allocation of carbon to defense as a function of herbivory, light and nutrient availability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeAngelis, Donald L.; Ju, Shu; Liu, Rongsong; Bryant, John P.; Gourley, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    We use modeling to determine the optimal relative plant carbon allocations between foliage, fine roots, anti-herbivore defense, and reproduction to maximize reproductive output. The model treats these plant components and the herbivore compartment as variables. Herbivory is assumed to be purely folivory. Key external factors include nutrient availability, degree of shading, and intensity of herbivory. Three alternative functional responses are used for herbivory, two of which are variations on donor-dependent herbivore (models 1a and 1b) and one of which is a Lotka–Volterra type of interaction (model 2). All three were modified to include the negative effect of chemical defenses on the herbivore. Analysis showed that, for all three models, two stable equilibria could occur, which differs from most common functional responses when no plant defense component is included. Optimal strategies of carbon allocation were defined as the maximum biomass of reproductive propagules produced per unit time, and found to vary with changes in external factors. Increased intensity of herbivory always led to an increase in the fractional allocation of carbon to defense. Decreases in available limiting nutrient generally led to increasing importance of defense. Decreases in available light had little effect on defense but led to increased allocation to foliage. Decreases in limiting nutrient and available light led to decreases in allocation to reproduction in models 1a and 1b but not model 2. Increases in allocation to plant defense were usually accompanied by shifts in carbon allocation away from fine roots, possibly because higher plant defense reduced the loss of nutrients to herbivory.

  18. The decadal state of the terrestrial carbon cycle: Global retrievals of terrestrial carbon allocation, pools, and residence times.

    PubMed

    Bloom, A Anthony; Exbrayat, Jean-François; van der Velde, Ivar R; Feng, Liang; Williams, Mathew

    2016-02-02

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is currently the least constrained component of the global carbon budget. Large uncertainties stem from a poor understanding of plant carbon allocation, stocks, residence times, and carbon use efficiency. Imposing observational constraints on the terrestrial carbon cycle and its processes is, therefore, necessary to better understand its current state and predict its future state. We combine a diagnostic ecosystem carbon model with satellite observations of leaf area and biomass (where and when available) and soil carbon data to retrieve the first global estimates, to our knowledge, of carbon cycle state and process variables at a 1° × 1° resolution; retrieved variables are independent from the plant functional type and steady-state paradigms. Our results reveal global emergent relationships in the spatial distribution of key carbon cycle states and processes. Live biomass and dead organic carbon residence times exhibit contrasting spatial features (r = 0.3). Allocation to structural carbon is highest in the wet tropics (85-88%) in contrast to higher latitudes (73-82%), where allocation shifts toward photosynthetic carbon. Carbon use efficiency is lowest (0.42-0.44) in the wet tropics. We find an emergent global correlation between retrievals of leaf mass per leaf area and leaf lifespan (r = 0.64-0.80) that matches independent trait studies. We show that conventional land cover types cannot adequately describe the spatial variability of key carbon states and processes (multiple correlation median = 0.41). This mismatch has strong implications for the prediction of terrestrial carbon dynamics, which are currently based on globally applied parameters linked to land cover or plant functional types.

  19. The decadal state of the terrestrial carbon cycle: Global retrievals of terrestrial carbon allocation, pools, and residence times

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, A. Anthony; Exbrayat, Jean-François; van der Velde, Ivar R.; Feng, Liang; Williams, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is currently the least constrained component of the global carbon budget. Large uncertainties stem from a poor understanding of plant carbon allocation, stocks, residence times, and carbon use efficiency. Imposing observational constraints on the terrestrial carbon cycle and its processes is, therefore, necessary to better understand its current state and predict its future state. We combine a diagnostic ecosystem carbon model with satellite observations of leaf area and biomass (where and when available) and soil carbon data to retrieve the first global estimates, to our knowledge, of carbon cycle state and process variables at a 1° × 1° resolution; retrieved variables are independent from the plant functional type and steady-state paradigms. Our results reveal global emergent relationships in the spatial distribution of key carbon cycle states and processes. Live biomass and dead organic carbon residence times exhibit contrasting spatial features (r = 0.3). Allocation to structural carbon is highest in the wet tropics (85–88%) in contrast to higher latitudes (73–82%), where allocation shifts toward photosynthetic carbon. Carbon use efficiency is lowest (0.42–0.44) in the wet tropics. We find an emergent global correlation between retrievals of leaf mass per leaf area and leaf lifespan (r = 0.64–0.80) that matches independent trait studies. We show that conventional land cover types cannot adequately describe the spatial variability of key carbon states and processes (multiple correlation median = 0.41). This mismatch has strong implications for the prediction of terrestrial carbon dynamics, which are currently based on globally applied parameters linked to land cover or plant functional types. PMID:26787856

  20. Carbon allocation and carbon isotope fluxes in the plant-soil-atmosphere continuum: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüggemann, N.; Gessler, A.; Kayler, Z.; Keel, S. G.; Badeck, F.; Barthel, M.; Boeckx, P.; Buchmann, N.; Brugnoli, E.; Esperschütz, J.; Gavrichkova, O.; Ghashghaie, J.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Keitel, C.; Knohl, A.; Kuptz, D.; Palacio, S.; Salmon, Y.; Uchida, Y.; Bahn, M.

    2011-04-01

    The terrestrial carbon (C) cycle has received increasing interest over the past few decades, however, there is still a lack of understanding of the fate of newly assimilated C allocated within plants and to the soil, stored within ecosystems and lost to the atmosphere. Stable carbon isotope studies can give novel insights into these issues. In this review we provide an overview of an emerging picture of plant-soil-atmosphere C fluxes, as based on C isotope studies, and identify processes determining related C isotope signatures. The first part of the review focuses on isotopic fractionation processes within plants during and after photosynthesis. The second major part elaborates on plant-internal and plant-rhizosphere C allocation patterns at different time scales (diel, seasonal, interannual), including the speed of C transfer and time lags in the coupling of assimilation and respiration, as well as the magnitude and controls of plant-soil C allocation and respiratory fluxes. Plant responses to changing environmental conditions, the functional relationship between the physiological and phenological status of plants and C transfer, and interactions between C, water and nutrient dynamics are discussed. The role of the C counterflow from the rhizosphere to the aboveground parts of the plants, e.g. via CO2 dissolved in the xylem water or as xylem-transported sugars, is highlighted. The third part is centered around belowground C turnover, focusing especially on above- and belowground litter inputs, soil organic matter formation and turnover, production and loss of dissolved organic C, soil respiration and CO2 fixation by soil microbes. Furthermore, plant controls on microbial communities and activity via exudates and litter production as well as microbial community effects on C mineralization are reviewed. The last part of the paper is dedicated to physical interactions between soil CO2 and the soil matrix, such as CO2 diffusion and dissolution processes within the

  1. DESPOT, a process-based tree growth model that allocates carbon to maximize carbon gain.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Thomas N; Roberts, David W

    2006-02-01

    We present a new model of tree growth, DESPOT (Deducing Emergent Structure and Physiology Of Trees), in which carbon (C) allocation is adjusted in each time step to maximize whole-tree net C gain in the next time step. Carbon gain, respiration and the acquisition and transport of substitutable photosynthetic resources (nitrogen, water and light) are modeled on a process basis. The current form of DESPOT simulates a uniform, monospecific, self-thinning stand. This paper describes DESPOT and its general behavior in comparison to published data, and presents an evaluation of the sensitivity of its qualitative predictions by Monte Carlo parameter sensitivity analysis. DESPOT predicts determinate height growth and steady stand-level net primary productivity (NPP), but slow declines in aboveground NPP and leaf area index. Monte Carlo analysis, wherein the model was run repeatedly with randomly different parameter sets, revealed that many parameter sets do not lead to sustainable NPP. Of those that do lead to sustainable growth, the ratios at maturity of net to gross primary productivity and of leaf area to sapwood area are highly conserved.

  2. 30 CFR 519.415 - How will bonus and royalty credits affect revenues allocated to Gulf producing States?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... affect revenues allocated to Gulf producing States? If bonus and royalty credits issued under Section 104(c) of the Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act are used to pay bonuses or royalties on leases in the... revenues allocated to Gulf producing States? 519.415 Section 519.415 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF...

  3. 30 CFR 219.415 - How will bonus and royalty credits affect revenues allocated to Gulf producing States?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How will bonus and royalty credits affect revenues allocated to Gulf producing States? 219.415 Section 219.415 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT... allocated to Gulf producing States? If bonus and royalty credits issued under Section 104(c) of the Gulf...

  4. Carbon allocation below ground transfers and lipid turnover in a plant-microbial association

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Radioactive tracers were used to study the carbon allocation to above ground, coarse- and fine-roots, plant tissues, mycorrhizal lipids, below-ground respiration, and to soil in a mycorrhizal association. Sorghum bicolor was grown in soil with a non mycorrhizal microbial inoculum with and without Gl...

  5. THE EFFECT OF OZONE ON BELOW-GROUND CARBON ALLOCATION IN WHEAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Short term 14CO2 pulse and chase experiments were conducted in order to investigate the effect ozone on below-ground carbon allocation in spring wheat seedlings (Triticum aestivumL. ?ANZA'). Wheat seedlings were grown in a sand-hydroponic system and exposed to either high ozone ...

  6. Aspen SUCROSE TRANSPORTER3 allocates carbon into wood fibers.

    PubMed

    Mahboubi, Amir; Ratke, Christine; Gorzsás, András; Kumar, Manoj; Mellerowicz, Ewa J; Niittylä, Totte

    2013-12-01

    Wood formation in trees requires carbon import from the photosynthetic tissues. In several tree species, including Populus species, the majority of this carbon is derived from sucrose (Suc) transported in the phloem. The mechanism of radial Suc transport from phloem to developing wood is not well understood. We investigated the role of active Suc transport during secondary cell wall formation in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides). We show that RNA interference-mediated reduction of PttSUT3 (for Suc/H(+) symporter) during secondary cell wall formation in developing wood caused thinner wood fiber walls accompanied by a reduction in cellulose and an increase in lignin. Suc content in the phloem and developing wood was not significantly changed. However, after (13)CO2 assimilation, the SUT3RNAi lines contained more (13)C than the wild type in the Suc-containing extract of developing wood. Hence, Suc was transported into developing wood, but the Suc-derived carbon was not efficiently incorporated to wood fiber walls. A yellow fluorescent protein:PttSUT3 fusion localized to plasma membrane, suggesting that reduced Suc import into developing wood fibers was the cause of the observed cell wall phenotype. The results show the importance of active Suc transport for wood formation in a symplasmically phloem-loading tree species and identify PttSUT3 as a principal transporter for carbon delivery into secondary cell wall-forming wood fibers.

  7. Precision requirements do not affect the allocation of visual working memory capacity.

    PubMed

    He, Xu; Zhang, Weiwei; Li, Cuihong; Guo, Chunyan

    2015-03-30

    There has been a debate about whether allocation of visual working memory (VWM) capacity was flexible. One of the key points about this issue is whether complexity has an effect on the capacity, and one of the critical features of complex objects is higher requirements on the encoding precision than simple objects. Thus we investigated the influence of precision requirements on the allocation of VWM capacity resources, by comparing VWM capacity under different levels of sample-test similarity in a change-detection task. If the VWM capacity is limited by a fixed number of items, then the capacity should not be affected by precision requirements; however, if the capacity is allocated flexibly, then precision requirements should influence the capacity. Cowan's K and amplitude of contralateral delay activity (CDA) were used as behavioral and neurophysiological measures of VWM capacity, respectively. Cowan's K for high-precision discrimination was calculated on the basis of the accuracy of a small number of large-change trials inserted into high-precision blocks. This approach avoided the confounder of different test-phase difficulties between the low- and high-precision conditions and controlled for errors during the test phase. The results showed no effect of precision requirements on VWM capacity. However, analysis of the late positive component (LPC) amplitude indicated that higher precision requirements indeed caused more top-down control over VWM retention. These results support the hypothesis that VWM is limited by a fixed number of items.

  8. Belowground carbon allocation dynamics in changing environments: insights from in situ pulse labeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahn, M.

    2012-12-01

    Belowground carbon (C) allocation is a key process in ecosystems: it plays an important role for plant C storage, fuels root metabolism and provides substrates for soil microorganisms, with strong implications for microbial community composition and activity and thus soil organic matter turnover. Belowground C allocation has been well studied in young plants and mesocosms, and as long-term patterns in ecosystems. Much less is known on the short-term dynamics of C allocation in mature plants and ecosystems, which reflect more closely the actual processes underlying observed C allocation patterns and the mechanisms determining responses to changing environmental conditions. C allocation dynamics can best be analyzed with isotopic pulse labeling experiments, which permit a tracing of recently photo-assimilated C to carbohydrate pools, microbial communities and respiratory fluxes. This overview talk will highlight the potential and limitations of in situ isotopic tracer experiments for assessing belowground C allocation dynamics in changing environments, summarize some major recent findings and point towards emerging research questions.

  9. Clonal Patch Size and Ramet Position of Leymus chinensis Affected Reproductive Allocation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuo; Yang, Yunfei

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive allocation is critically important for population maintenance and usually varies with not only environmental factors but also biotic ones. As a typical rhizome clonal plant in China's northern grasslands, Leymus chinensis usually dominates the steppe communities and grows in clonal patches. In order to clarify the sexual reproductive allocation of L. chinensis in the process of the growth and expansion, we selected L. chinensis clonal patches of a range of sizes to examine the reproductive allocation and allometric growth of the plants. Moreover, the effects of position of L. chinensis ramets within the patch on their reproductive allocation were also examined. Clonal patch size and position both significantly affected spike biomass, reproductive tiller biomass and SPIKE/TILLER biomass ratio. From the central to the marginal zone, both the spike biomass and reproductive tiller biomass displayed an increasing trend in all the five patch size categories except for reproductive tiller biomass in 15–40m2 category. L. chinensis had significantly larger SPIKE/TILLER biomass ratio in marginal zone than in central zone of clonal patches that are larger than 15 m2 in area. Regression analysis showed that the spike biomass and SPIKE/TILLER biomass ratio were negatively correlated with clonal patch size while patch size showed significantly positive effect on SEED/SPIKE biomass ratio, but the reproductive tiller biomass and SEED/TILLER biomass ratio were not dependent on clonal patch size. The relationships between biomass of spike and reproductive tiller, between mature seed biomass and spike biomass and between mature seed biomass and reproductive tiller biomass were significant allometric for all or some of patch size categories, respectively. The slopes of all these allometric relationships were significantly different from 1. The allometric growth of L. chinensis is patch size-dependent. This finding will be helpful for developing appropriate practices for

  10. Climate warming shifts carbon allocation from stemwood to roots in calcium-depleted spruce forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lapenis, Andrei Gennady; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Heim, Alexander; Zheng, Chengyang; Shortle, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Increased greening of northern forests, measured by the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), has been presented as evidence that a warmer climate has increased both net primary productivity (NPP) and the carbon sink in boreal forests. However, higher production and greener canopies may accompany changes in carbon allocation that favor foliage or fine roots over less decomposable woody biomass. Furthermore, tree core data throughout mid- and northern latitudes have revealed a divergence problem (DP), a weakening in tree ring responses to warming over the past half century that is receiving increasing attention, but remains poorly understood. Often, the same sites exhibit trend inconsistency phenomenon (TIP), namely positive, or no trends in growing season NDVI where negative trends in tree ring indexes are observed. Here we studied growth of two Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands in western Russia that exhibited both the DP and TIP but were subject to soil acidification and calcium depletion of differing timing and severity. Our results link the decline in radial growth starting in 1980 to a shift in carbon allocation from wood to roots driven by a combination of two factors: (a) soil acidification that depleted calcium and impaired root function and (b) earlier onset of the growing season that further taxed the root system. The latter change in phenology appears to act as a trigger at both sites to push trees into nutrient limitation as the demand for Ca increased with the longer growing season, thereby causing the shift in carbon allocation.

  11. Climate warming shifts carbon allocation from stemwood to roots in calcium-depleted spruce forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenis, Andrei; Lawrence, Gregory; Buyantuev, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Increased greening of northern forests, measured by the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), has been presented as evidence that a warmer climate has increased both net primary productivity (NPP) and the carbon sink in boreal forests. However, higher production and greener canopies may accompany changes in carbon allocation that favor foliage or fine roots over less decomposable woody biomass. Furthermore, tree core data throughout mid- and northern latitudes have revealed a divergence problem (DP), a weakening in tree ring responses to warming over the past half century that is receiving increasing attention, but remains poorly understood. Often, the same sites exhibit trend inconsistency phenomenon (TIP), namely positive, or no trends in growing season NDVI where negative trends in tree ring indexes are observed. Here we studied growth of two Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands in western Russia that exhibited both the DP and TIP but were subject to soil acidification and calcium depletion of differing timing and severity. Our results link the decline in radial growth starting in 1980 to a shift in carbon allocation from wood to roots driven by a combination of two factors: (a) soil acidification that depleted calcium and impaired root function and (b) earlier onset of the growing season that further taxed the root system. The latter change in phenology appears to act as a trigger at both sites to push trees into nutrient limitation as the demand for Ca increased with the longer growing season, thereby causing the shift in carbon allocation.

  12. Allocation to carbon storage pools in Norway spruce saplings under drought and low CO2.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Henrik; McDowell, Nate G; Trumbore, Susan

    2015-03-01

    Non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) are critical to maintain plant metabolism under stressful environmental conditions, but we do not fully understand how NSC allocation and utilization from storage varies with stress. While it has become established that storage allocation is unlikely to be a mere overflow process, very little empirical evidence has been produced to support this view, at least not for trees. Here we present the results of an intensively monitored experimental manipulation of whole-tree carbon (C) balance (young Picea abies (L.) H Karst.) using reduced atmospheric [CO2] and drought to reduce C sources. We measured specific C storage pools (glucose, fructose, sucrose, starch) over 21 weeks and converted concentration measurement into fluxes into and out of the storage pool. Continuous labeling ((13)C) allowed us to track C allocation to biomass and non-structural C pools. Net C fluxes into the storage pool occurred mainly when the C balance was positive. Storage pools increased during periods of positive C gain and were reduced under negative C gain. (13)C data showed that C was allocated to storage pools independent of the net flux and even under severe C limitation. Allocation to below-ground tissues was strongest in control trees followed by trees experiencing drought followed by those grown under low [CO2]. Our data suggest that NSC storage has, under the conditions of our experimental manipulation (e.g., strong progressive drought, no above-ground growth), a high allocation priority and cannot be considered an overflow process. While these results also suggest active storage allocation, definitive proof of active plant control of storage in woody plants requires studies involving molecular tools.

  13. Growth and carbon allocation of tropical and temperate N-fixing trees grown in elevated CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Tissue, D.T.; Megonigal, J.P.; Thomas, R.B.

    1995-09-01

    Seeds of two tree species, Gliricidia seplum (tropical) and Robinia pseudoacacia (temperate), were inoculated with N-fixing Rhizobium bacteria and grown in environmentally controlled glasshouses for 75 days to determine the effects of atmospheric CO{sub 2} on seedling growth and carbon allocation. Seedlings were grown in ambient CO{sub 2}(35 Pa) and elevated CO{sub 22}(70 Pa) and watered with a N-deficient nutrient solution such that bacterial N-fixation was the only source of N. Elevated CO{sub 2} increased leaf, stem, root and total biomass in Gliricidia, but did not affect nodule mass; Robinia biomass was unchanged by CO{sub 2}. Leaf photosynthetic rates at 70 Pa CO{sub 2} were increased 49% in Gliricidia, but were unchanged in Robinia, and there was no change in respiration rate in either species. A {sup 14}CO{sub 2} labelling experiment demonstrated that elevated CO{sub 2} did not affect the kinetics or allocation patterns of photosynthetically fixed carbon to nodules or other plant parts in either species. Our results demonstrate that Gliricidia, but not Robinia, will show an early, positive growth and photosynthetic response to elevated CO{sub 2} in N-poor soils, suggesting that tropical N-fixing trees may be more responsive than temperate N-fixing trees to future atmospheric CO{sub 2} conditions.

  14. A hybrid method for provincial scale energy-related carbon emission allocation in China.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hongtao; Zhang, Yingxuan; Wang, Huizhi; Huang, Yanying; Xu, He

    2014-01-01

    Achievement of carbon emission reduction targets proposed by national governments relies on provincial/state allocations. In this study, a hybrid method for provincial energy-related carbon emissions allocation in China was developed to provide a good balance between production- and consumption-based approaches. In this method, provincial energy-related carbon emissions are decomposed into direct emissions of local activities other than thermal power generation and indirect emissions as a result of electricity consumption. Based on the carbon reduction efficiency principle, the responsibility for embodied emissions of provincial product transactions is assigned entirely to the production area. The responsibility for carbon generation during the production of thermal power is borne by the electricity consumption area, which ensures that different regions with resource endowments have rational development space. Empirical studies were conducted to examine the hybrid method and three indices, per capita GDP, resource endowment index and the proportion of energy-intensive industries, were screened to preliminarily interpret the differences among China's regional carbon emissions. Uncertainty analysis and a discussion of this method are also provided herein.

  15. Is growth reduction in defoliated trees a consequence of prioritized carbon allocation to reserves?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoch, Guenter; Schmid, Sandra; Palacio, Sara

    2015-04-01

    Tissue concentrations of carbon reserve compounds are frequently used as proxies for the carbon balance of trees, but the mechanisms regulating the formation of carbon reserves are still under debate. It is often assumed that carbon storage in trees is largely a consequence of surplus carbon supply (reserve accumulation). In contrast, carbon storage might also occur against prevailing carbon demand from other sink activities, like growth (reserve formation), in which case carbon reserve pools might increase even at carbon limitation, and thus, cannot be used as indicators for a tree's carbon supply status. Such a situation might be severe defoliation by herbivores. Especially in evergreen tree species, it has been shown that natural and experimental defoliation leads to a reduction of growth that is proportional to the lost leaf area. Compared to this strong effect on growth, carbon reserve pools (i.e. sugars, starch and storage lipids) of defoliated trees often exert only a temporary decrease immediately after defoliation, while tissue concentrations of carbon reserves return to those of undefoliated trees by the end of the growing season. Within a recent experiment, we investigated, if the growth decline in trees following early season defoliation is the consequence of prioritized carbon allocation to carbon reserves over growth. To test this hypothesis we grew seedlings of evergreen Quecus ilex and deciduous Quercus petraea trees under low (140 ppm), medium (280 ppm) and high (560 ppm) CO2 concentrations and completely defoliated half of the seedlings in each CO2 treatment at the beginning of the growing season. In undefoliated control trees, CO2 had a significant positive effect on the seasonal growth in both species. Defoliation had a strong negative impact on growth in the evergreen Q. illex, but less in the deciduous Q. petraea. In both species, the growth reduction after defoliation relative to undefoliated controls was very similar at all three CO2

  16. Estimates of carbon allocation to ectomycorrhizal fungi in a temperate forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumber-Davila, S. J.; Ouimette, A.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) limitation restricts net primary productivity both globally and within the northeastern United States; therefore limiting the amount of carbon stored. Despite the importance of N to carbon (C) storage, we still lack an understanding of how trees compete for N belowground. In the Northeasters UN, trees associate with two main groups of fungal symbionts which supply the plant nitrogen, either ectomcorrhizal (ECM) or arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Since ECM creates an extensive hyphal network and has strong enzymatic capabilities, they are generally favored in forests with low N availabilities; however they have a higher C demand. Here we attempt to provide a more thorough understanding of whole-plant carbon allocation in temperate forests, by quantifying wood, foliar, and root NPP, as well as belowground C allocation to ECM fungi. The study was conducted across plots with a range of N availability and tree species composition within Bartlett Experimental Forest (BEF), NH, a current NEON site. Ingrowth core-methods utilized in the study indicate there is high soil fungal biomass in N-poor sites than at N-rich sites with the N-poor sites averaging at 600 grams of fungal carbon per meter squared compared to the N-rich sites having less than 200 grams. Soil, foliar, and root N isotopes (δ15N) show evidence of enhanced N isotope fractionation and C allocation to mycorrhizal fungi in the N-poor sites. Results from this study are being used to incorporate C allocation to mycorrhizal fungi into a process-based forest ecosystem.

  17. Re-feeding food-deprived male meadow voles affects the sperm allocation of their rival males.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Ashlee A; Delbarco-Trillo, Javier; Ferkin, Michael H

    2012-12-01

    An individual's nutritional status affects the manner in which same- and opposite-sex conspecifics respond to that individual, which may affect their fitness. Male meadow voles, Microtus pennsylvanicus, increase their sperm allocation if they encounter the scent mark of an unfamiliar male that is not nutritionally challenged. If, however, the scent mark comes from a male that has been food deprived for 24 hours, stud male voles do not increase their sperm allocation. Food deprived males may be viewed as being lower quality and a reduced risk of sperm competition by rival males. We hypothesized that stud males in promiscuous mating systems tailor their sperm allocations depending on whether rival males have been food deprived and then re-fed. We predicted that newly re-fed males will be considered a strong risk of sperm competition because of the potentially high fitness and survival costs associated with food deprivation in males, and that they will cause stud males to increase their sperm allocation. Our results, however, showed that the recovery period from 24 hours of food deprivation was a relatively slow process. It took between 96 hours and 336 hours of re-feeding male scent donors that were food deprived for 24 hours to induce stud males to increase their sperm allocation to levels comparable to when scent donors were not food deprived. Stud male voles may be conserving the amount of sperm allocated until the male scent donors have recovered from food deprivation and subsequent re-feeding.

  18. Influence of pCO2 on carbon allocation in nodulated Medicago sativa L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereyra, Gabriela; Hartmann, Henrik; Ziegler, Waldemar; Michalzik, Beate; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel; Trumbore, Susan

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentrations (pCO_2) have been related to changes in plant carbon (C) availability and photosynthetic capacity, yet there is no clear consensus as to the effect of pCO2 on the plant C balance and on nitrogen fixation in symbiotic systems. We investigated how different pCO2 (Pleistocene: 170 ppm, ambient: 400 ppm and projected future: 700 ppm) influence C allocation in nodulated Medicago sativa L. We labeled 17 week old plants with depleted 13C (-34.7±1.2‰) and traced the label over a 9-day period, to assess the redistribution of newly assimilated C across different sinks, including nodules. We analyzed N concentrations in plant tissues and found no significant differences in leaves and roots across treatments. However, growth and C fixation rates increased with pCO_2, and differences were greatest between 170 ppm and 700 ppm. Across pCO2 treatments we observed a 13C-enrichment in roots compared to leaves. We further observed the highest 13C depletion of non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) and respired CO2 in tissues of plants grown at 700 ppm, especially in leaves and nodules. Our preliminary results suggest that sink organs like roots and nodules are fed with newly-assimilated NSCs from leaves to support respiration, and especially in 170 ppm plants represented a major respiratory loss of newly assimilated C (≈ 35{%} of the total plant respiration). Our results suggest that although plant metabolic processes like photosynthesis and respiration are affected by changes in pCO_2, nitrogen acquisition in such a symbiotic system is not.

  19. Increased forest carbon storage with increased atmospheric CO2 despite nitrogen limitation: a game-theoretic allocation model for trees in competition for nitrogen and light.

    PubMed

    Dybzinski, Ray; Farrior, Caroline E; Pacala, Stephen W

    2015-03-01

    Changes in resource availability often cause competitively driven changes in tree allocation to foliage, wood, and fine roots, either via plastic changes within individuals or through turnover of individuals with differing strategies. Here, we investigate how optimally competitive tree allocation should change in response to elevated atmospheric CO2 along a gradient of nitrogen and light availability, together with how those changes should affect carbon storage in living biomass. We present a physiologically-based forest model that includes the primary functions of wood and nitrogen. From a tree's perspective, wood is an offensive and defensive weapon used against neighbors in competition for light. From a biogeochemical perspective, wood is the primary living reservoir of stored carbon. Nitrogen constitutes a tree's photosynthetic machinery and the support systems for that machinery, and its limited availability thus reduces a tree's ability to fix carbon. This model has been previously successful in predicting allocation to foliage, wood, and fine roots along natural productivity gradients. Using game theory, we solve the model for competitively optimal foliage, wood, and fine root allocation strategies for trees in competition for nitrogen and light as a function of CO2 and nitrogen mineralization rate. Instead of down-regulating under nitrogen limitation, carbon storage under elevated CO2 relative to carbon storage at ambient CO2 is approximately independent of the nitrogen mineralization rate. This surprising prediction is a consequence of both increased competition for nitrogen driving increased fine root biomass and increased competition for light driving increased allocation to wood under elevated CO2 .

  20. National assessment of geologic carbon dioxide storage resources: allocations of assessed areas to Federal lands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buursink, Marc L.; Cahan, Steven M.; Warwick, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Following the geologic basin-scale assessment of technically accessible carbon dioxide storage resources in onshore areas and State waters of the United States, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that an area of about 130 million acres (or about 200,000 square miles) of Federal lands overlies these storage resources. Consequently, about 18 percent of the assessed area associated with storage resources is allocated to Federal land management. Assessed areas are allocated to four other general land-ownership categories as follows: State lands about 4.5 percent, Tribal lands about 2.4 percent, private and other lands about 72 percent, and offshore areas about 2.6 percent.

  1. Monitoring CO2 emissions to gain a dynamic view of carbon allocation to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Slavíková, Renata; Püschel, David; Janoušková, Martina; Hujslová, Martina; Konvalinková, Tereza; Gryndlerová, Hana; Gryndler, Milan; Weiser, Martin; Jansa, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Quantification of carbon (C) fluxes in mycorrhizal plants is one of the important yet little explored tasks of mycorrhizal physiology and ecology. (13)CO2 pulse-chase labelling experiments are increasingly being used to track the fate of C in these plant-microbial symbioses. Nevertheless, continuous monitoring of both the below- and aboveground CO2 emissions remains a challenge, although it is necessary to establish the full C budget of mycorrhizal plants. Here, a novel CO2 collection system is presented which allows assessment of gaseous CO2 emissions (including isotopic composition of their C) from both belowground and shoot compartments. This system then is used to quantify the allocation of recently fixed C in mycorrhizal versus nonmycorrhizal Medicago truncatula plants with comparable biomass and mineral nutrition. Using this system, we confirmed substantially greater belowground C drain in mycorrhizal versus nonmycorrhizal plants, with the belowground CO2 emissions showing large variation because of fluctuating environmental conditions in the glasshouse. Based on the assembled (13)C budget, the C allocation to the mycorrhizal fungus was between 2.3% (increased (13)C allocation to mycorrhizal substrate) and 2.9% (reduction of (13)C allocation to mycorrhizal shoots) of the plant gross photosynthetic production. Although the C allocation to shoot respiration (measured during one night only) did not differ between the mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal plants under our experimental conditions, it presented a substantial part (∼10%) of the plant C budget, comparable to the amount of CO2 released belowground. These results advocate quantification of both above- and belowground CO2 emissions in future studies.

  2. Light Competition and Carbon Partitioning-Allocation in an improved Forest Ecosystem Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collalti, Alessio; Santini, Monia; Valentini Valentini, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    . Hence, the presence of a cohort in a storey determines the amount of light received for the photosynthetic processes. The population density (numbers of trees per cell) represents a good competition index for determining the tree crown structure and tree crown dimension within a forest population. The tree crown tend to branch out horizontally to intercept as much light as possible. The model assess the structure of the tree crown both vertically and horizontally on the base of the population density and it up-scales the result to the whole stand. The canopy depth and the percentage of horizontal coverage determines moreover a crowding competition index that lead to a specific biomass partitioning-allocation ratio among the different tree components (foliage, roots and stem) and especially for the stem affecting Height-Diameter (at breast height) ratio. In this model, Height-Diameter ratio is used as an alternative competition index in determining the vigour and the strength of competition on free growth status of trees. The forest dominant vegetative cover affects moreover the presence of a dominated layer, it influences its yield and its Carbon stocking capacity and hence it influences the forest ecosystem CO2 carbon balance. From this model it is possible to simulate the impact of Climate Change on forests, the feedback of one or more dominated layers in terms of CO2 uptake in a forest stand and the effects of forest management activities for the next years.

  3. Where does the carbon go? A model-data intercomparison of vegetation carbon allocation and turnover processes at two temperate forest free-air CO2 enrichment sites.

    PubMed

    De Kauwe, Martin G; Medlyn, Belinda E; Zaehle, Sönke; Walker, Anthony P; Dietze, Michael C; Wang, Ying-Ping; Luo, Yiqi; Jain, Atul K; El-Masri, Bassil; Hickler, Thomas; Wårlind, David; Weng, Ensheng; Parton, William J; Thornton, Peter E; Wang, Shusen; Prentice, I Colin; Asao, Shinichi; Smith, Benjamin; McCarthy, Heather R; Iversen, Colleen M; Hanson, Paul J; Warren, Jeffrey M; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J

    2014-08-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (eCO2) has the potential to increase vegetation carbon storage if increased net primary production causes increased long-lived biomass. Model predictions of eCO2 effects on vegetation carbon storage depend on how allocation and turnover processes are represented. We used data from two temperate forest free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments to evaluate representations of allocation and turnover in 11 ecosystem models. Observed eCO2 effects on allocation were dynamic. Allocation schemes based on functional relationships among biomass fractions that vary with resource availability were best able to capture the general features of the observations. Allocation schemes based on constant fractions or resource limitations performed less well, with some models having unintended outcomes. Few models represent turnover processes mechanistically and there was wide variation in predictions of tissue lifespan. Consequently, models did not perform well at predicting eCO2 effects on vegetation carbon storage. Our recommendations to reduce uncertainty include: use of allocation schemes constrained by biomass fractions; careful testing of allocation schemes; and synthesis of allocation and turnover data in terms of model parameters. Data from intensively studied ecosystem manipulation experiments are invaluable for constraining models and we recommend that such experiments should attempt to fully quantify carbon, water and nutrient budgets.

  4. Sensitivity of ring growth and carbon allocation to climatic variation vary within ponderosa pine trees.

    PubMed

    Kerhoulas, Lucy P; Kane, Jeffrey M

    2012-01-01

    Most dendrochronological studies focus on cores sampled from standard positions (main stem, breast height), yet vertical gradients in hydraulic constraints and priorities for carbon allocation may contribute to different growth sensitivities with position. Using cores taken from five positions (coarse roots, breast height, base of live crown, mid-crown branch and treetop), we investigated how radial growth sensitivity to climate over the period of 1895-2008 varies by position within 36 large ponderosa pines (Pinus ponderosa Dougl.) in northern Arizona. The climate parameters investigated were Palmer Drought Severity Index, water year and monsoon precipitation, maximum annual temperature, minimum annual temperature and average annual temperature. For each study tree, we generated Pearson correlation coefficients between ring width indices from each position and six climate parameters. We also investigated whether the number of missing rings differed among positions and bole heights. We found that tree density did not significantly influence climatic sensitivity to any of the climate parameters investigated at any of the sample positions. Results from three types of analyses suggest that climatic sensitivity of tree growth varied with position height: (i) correlations of radial growth and climate variables consistently increased with height; (ii) model strength based on Akaike's information criterion increased with height, where treetop growth consistently had the highest sensitivity and coarse roots the lowest sensitivity to each climatic parameter; and (iii) the correlation between bole ring width indices decreased with distance between positions. We speculate that increased sensitivity to climate at higher positions is related to hydraulic limitation because higher positions experience greater xylem tensions due to gravitational effects that render these positions more sensitive to climatic stresses. The low sensitivity of root growth to all climatic variables

  5. Equity and the Allocation of Miigation Burdens: A Carbon Budgets Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanitkar, T. T. I. O. S. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC AR5) provides global estimates of future cumulative carbon dioxide emissions of anthropogenic origin, for various representative concentration pathways (RCP). For example, for an approximately 50% probability of limiting the increase in temperature to 2 deg. C, the table shows that the limit on cumulative global carbon-dioxide emissions is 780 Gt of carbon between 2012 and 2100. We can now ask what each nation will get as a share of the globally allowed cumulative emissions. Corresponding to this share of cumulative emissions, every nation will have the flexibility to consider a range of emissions trajectories within its share. This paper calculates the "entitlements" and potential emissions (based on some reasonable growth and reduction rates) using four different methods for all the four RCPs discussed in the IPCC report - i) simply allocating the remaining carbon space (for the period from 2012 to 2100) on a per capita basis amongst the regions; ii) calculating entitlements for the period between 1850 and 2100 based on total emissions emitted in the past and allowed in the future divided among countries on a per capita basis; iii) the entitlements calculated in (ii) are weighted by per capita GDP to include a measure of 'capability' while calculating entitlements; iv) the entitlements calculated in (ii) are weighted by non-income HDI as another measure of 'capability'. The values are benchmarked against the potential emissions for the future resulting from the commitments already made by different countries and regions towards mitigation. The paper then goes on to provide an estimate for the avoided cost of carbon for India given a range of constraints on emissions that it will have to undertake as a part of such a schema of allocating the mitigation burden.

  6. Corticosterone facilitates begging and affects resource allocation in the black-legged kittiwake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kitaysky, A.S.; Wingfield, J.C.; Piatt, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    Parent black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) and their dependent chicks respond to food shortages by increasing circulating levels of corticosterone. To examine the behavioral significance of corticosterone release, we experimentally increased levels of circulating corticosterone in parents and chicks up to the levels observed during food shortages. We found that corticosterone-implanted chicks begged more frequently than sham-implanted controls. Corticosterone-implanted chicks in broods of two begged more frequently than singletons. Parent kittiwakes then responded to the increase in corticosterone levels in their chicks by increasing chick-feeding rates. However, feeding rates were not different among corticosterone-implanted chicks in broods of two and singletons. We also found that corticosterone-implanted parents spent more time away from the nest - perhaps foraging - and less time brooding/guarding chicks than sham-implanted controls. Untreated mates of the corticosterone-implanted bird did not compensate for the change in their partner's behavior; consequently, chicks were left unattended about 20% of the time compared to 1% at the control nests. However, corticosterone-implanted parents did not decrease their chick-feeding rates. Our findings suggest two functional implications of the increased corticosterone secretion during food shortages in the black-legged kittiwake: it facilitates begging in chicks, and it affects time allocated by parents to guarding young at the nest. Thus, release of corticosterone might provide a mechanistic link between physiological condition and behavioral interactions among adults and their young.

  7. Improving representation of nitrogen uptake, allocation, and carbon assimilation in the Community Land Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghimire, B.; Riley, W. J.; Koven, C.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrogen is the most important nutrient limiting plant carbon assimilation and growth, and is required for production of photosynthetic enzymes, growth and maintenance respiration, and maintaining cell structure. The forecasted rise in plant available nitrogen through atmospheric nitrogen deposition and the release of locked soil nitrogen by permafrost thaw in high latitude ecosystems is likely to result in an increase in plant productivity. However a mechanistic representation of plant nitrogen dynamics is lacking in earth system models. Most earth system models ignore the dynamic nature of plant nutrient uptake and allocation, and further lack tight coupling of below- and above-ground processes. In these models, the increase in nitrogen uptake does not translate to a corresponding increase in photosynthesis parameters, such as maximum Rubisco capacity and electron transfer rate. We present an improved modeling framework implemented in the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) for dynamic plant nutrient uptake, and allocation to different plant parts, including leaf enzymes. This modeling framework relies on imposing a more realistic flexible carbon to nitrogen stoichiometric ratio for different plant parts. The model mechanistically responds to plant nitrogen uptake and leaf allocation though changes in photosynthesis parameters. We produce global simulations, and examine the impacts of the improved nitrogen cycling. The improved model is evaluated against multiple observations including TRY database of global plant traits, nitrogen fertilization observations and 15N tracer studies. Global simulations with this new version of CLM4.5 showed better agreement with the observations than the default CLM4.5-CN model, and captured the underlying mechanisms associated with plant nitrogen cycle.

  8. Human footprint affects US carbon balance more than climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bachelet, Dominique; Ferschweiler, Ken; Sheehan, Tim; Baker, Barry; Sleeter, Benjamin M.; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2017-01-01

    The MC2 model projects an overall increase in carbon capture in conterminous United States during the 21st century while also simulating a rise in fire causing much carbon loss. Carbon sequestration in soils is critical to prevent carbon losses from future disturbances, and we show that natural ecosystems store more carbon belowground than managed systems do. Natural and human-caused disturbances affect soil processes that shape ecosystem recovery and competitive interactions between native, exotics, and climate refugees. Tomorrow's carbon budgets will depend on how land use, natural disturbances, and climate variability will interact and affect the balance between carbon capture and release.

  9. Growing up with stress - carbon sequestration and allocation dynamics of a broadleaf evergreen forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griebel, Anne; Bennett, Lauren T.; Arndt, Stefan K.

    2016-04-01

    Evergreen forests have the potential to sequester carbon year-round due to the presence of leaves with a multi-year lifespan. Eucalypt forests occur in warmer climates where temperature and radiation are not imposing a strong seasonality. Thus, unlike deciduous or many coniferous trees, many eucalypts grow opportunistically as conditions allow. As such, many eucalypts do not produce distinct growth rings, which present challenges to the implementation of standard methods and data interpretation approaches for monitoring and explaining carbon allocation dynamics in response to climatic stress. As a consequence, there is a lack of detailed understanding of seasonal growth dynamics of evergreen forests as a whole, and, in particular, of the influence of climatic drivers on carbon allocation to the various biomass pools. We used a multi-instrument approach in a mixed species eucalypt forest to investigate the influence of climatic drivers on the seasonal growth dynamics of a predominantly temperate and moisture-regulated environment in south-eastern Australia. Ecosystem scale observations of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) from a flux tower in the Wombat forest near Melbourne indicated that the ecosystem is a year-round carbon sink, but that intra-annual variations in temperature and moisture along with prolonged heat waves and dry spells resulted in a wide range of annual sums over the past three years (NEE ranging from ~4 to 12 t C ha-1 yr-1). Dendrometers were used to monitor stem increments of the three dominant eucalypt species. Stem expansion was generally opportunistic with the greatest increments under warm but moist conditions (often in spring and autumn), and the strongest indicators of stem growth dynamics being radiation, vapour pressure deficit and a combined heat-moisture index. Differences in the seasonality of stem increments between species were largely due to differences in the canopy position of sampled individuals. The greatest stem increments were

  10. Sugar Allocation to Metabolic Pathways is Tightly Regulated and Affects the Virulence of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Kawada-Matsuo, Miki; Oogai, Yuichi; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria take up and metabolize sugar as a carbohydrate source for survival. Most bacteria can utilize many sugars, including glucose, sucrose, and galactose, as well as amino sugars, such as glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine. After entering the cytoplasm, the sugars are mainly allocated to the glycolysis pathway (energy production) and to various bacterial component biosynthesis pathways, including the cell wall, nucleic acids and amino acids. Sugars are also utilized to produce several virulence factors, such as capsule and lipoteichoic acid. Glutamine-fructose-6-phosphate aminotransferase (GlmS) and glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase (NagB) have crucial roles in sugar distribution to the glycolysis pathway and to cell wall biosynthesis. In Streptococcus mutans, a cariogenic pathogen, the expression levels of glmS and nagB are coordinately regulated in response to the presence or absence of amino sugars. In addition, the disruption of this regulation affects the virulence of S. mutans. The expression of nagB and glmS is regulated by NagR in S. mutans, but the precise mechanism underlying glmS regulation is not clear. In Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis, the mRNA of glmS has ribozyme activity and undergoes self-degradation at the mRNA level. However, there is no ribozyme activity region on glmS mRNA in S. mutans. In this review article, we summarize the sugar distribution, particularly the coordinated regulation of GlmS and NagB expression, and its relationship with the virulence of S. mutans. PMID:28036052

  11. Effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 on carbon allocation patterns in Eriphorum vaginatum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, L.

    2013-12-01

    Greenhouse gases of particular importance to the human induced greenhouse effect are, e.g., CO2 and CH4. Natural and agricultural wetlands together contribute with over 40 % of the annual atmospheric emissions of CH4 and are, therefore, considered to be the largest single contributor of this gas to the troposphere. There is a growing concern that increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 will stimulate CH4 production and emission from wetland ecosystems, resulting in feedback mechanisms that in future will increase the radiative forcing of these ecosystems. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 on fluxes of CO2 and CH4, biomass allocation patterns and amount of labile substrates (i.e. low molecular weight organic acids, OAs) for CH4 production in the root vicinity of Eriophorum vaginatum. Eriophorum cores and plants were collected at Fäjemyr, a temperate ombrotrophic bog situated in the south of Sweden. These were cultivated under controlled environmental conditions in an atmosphere of 390 or 800 ppm of CO2 (n=5 per treatment). After a one month development period gas fluxes were measured twice per week over one month using a Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer (Gasmet Dx-4030) and OAs using a liquid chromatography-ionspray tandem mass spectrometry system (Dionex ICS-2500 and Applied Biosystems 2000 Q-Trap triple quadrupole MS). The results clearly show that elevated CO2 significantly affects all measured parts of the carbon cycle. Greenhouse gas fluxes were significantly (repeated measures test) higher under elevated CO2 conditions, NEE p < 0.0001, Reco p = 0.005, GPP p = 0.012 and CH4 p = 0.022. As were biomass of leaves, roots and concentration of OAs around the roots of plants, p = 0.045, p = 0 = 0.045 and p = 0.045 respectively (Kruskal wallis 1-way anova). The study shows higher CH4 emissions under elevated CO2 and that this may be due to a priming effect, due to input of fresh labile-C via living roots and

  12. The intraspecific variability of short- and long-term carbon allocation, turnover and fluxes under different environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegener, Frederik; Beyschlag, Wolfram; Werner, Christiane

    2014-05-01

    Carbon allocation strategies differ clearly between functional plant groups (e.g. grasses, shrubs and trees) and to a lesser extent between different species of the same functional group. However, little is known about the plasticity of carbon allocation within the same species. To investigate the variability of carbon (C) allocation, we induced different allocation pattern in the Mediterranean shrub Halimium halimifolium by changing growing conditions (light and nutrition) and followed the plant development for 15 months. We analyzed morphological and physiological traits, and changes in C allocation and δ13C values in seven tissue classes: 1st generation leaves, 2nd generation leaves, emerging leaves, lateral shoots, stem, main roots and fine roots. We used a soil/canopy chamber system that enables independent measurements of above and belowground δ13CO2-exchange, enabling total estimates of carbon gain during photosynthesis and the carbon loss during respiration on a whole plant level. Moreover, we followed the fate of recently assimilated carbon in all plant tissues by 13CO2 pulse labeling for 13 days. A reduction of light (Low L treatment) increased allocation to stems by 84% and the specific leaf area (SLA) by 29%, compared to control. Reduced nutrient availability (Low N treatment) enhanced carbon allocation into fine roots by 57%. We found high intraspecific variability in turnover times of C pools. The Low N treatment enhanced transport of recently assimilated C from leaves to roots in quantity (22% compared to 7% in control plants) and velocity (13C peak in main roots after 5h compared to 18h in control). The treatments differed also in fractions of 13C recovered within leaves: 48%, 28% and 41% of 13C from labeling were found after 13 days in leaves of control, Low N, and Low L, respectively. Through the combination of natural carbon isotope analysis, 13CO2 labeling and whole-plant chamber measurements we obtained information about long and short-term C

  13. Pulling Rank: Military Rank Affects Hormone Levels and Fairness in an Allocation Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Siart, Benjamin; Pflüger, Lena S.; Wallner, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Status within social hierarchies has great effects on the lives of socially organized mammals. Its effects on human behavior and related physiology, however, is relatively little studied. The present study investigated the impact of military rank on fairness and behavior in relation to salivary cortisol (C) and testosterone (T) levels in male soldiers. For this purpose 180 members of the Austrian Armed Forces belonging to two distinct rank groups participated in two variations of a computer-based guard duty allocation experiment. The rank groups were (1) warrant officers (high rank, HR) and (2) enlisted men (low rank, LR). One soldier from each rank group participated in every experiment. At the beginning of the experiment, one participant was assigned to start standing guard and the other participant at rest. The participant who started at rest could choose if and when to relieve his fellow soldier and therefore had control over the experiment. In order to trigger perception of unfair behavior, an additional experiment was conducted which was manipulated by the experimenter. In the manipulated version both soldiers started in the standing guard position and were never relieved, believing that their opponent was at rest, not relieving them. Our aim was to test whether unfair behavior causes a physiological reaction. Saliva samples for hormone analysis were collected at regular intervals throughout the experiment. We found that in the un-manipulated setup high-ranking soldiers spent less time standing guard than lower ranking individuals. Rank was a significant predictor for C but not for T levels during the experiment. C levels in the HR group were higher than in the LR group. C levels were also elevated in the manipulated experiment compared to the un-manipulated experiment, especially in LR. We assume that the elevated C levels in HR were caused by HR feeling their status challenged by the situation of having to negotiate with an individual of lower military rank

  14. Pulling Rank: Military Rank Affects Hormone Levels and Fairness in an Allocation Experiment.

    PubMed

    Siart, Benjamin; Pflüger, Lena S; Wallner, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Status within social hierarchies has great effects on the lives of socially organized mammals. Its effects on human behavior and related physiology, however, is relatively little studied. The present study investigated the impact of military rank on fairness and behavior in relation to salivary cortisol (C) and testosterone (T) levels in male soldiers. For this purpose 180 members of the Austrian Armed Forces belonging to two distinct rank groups participated in two variations of a computer-based guard duty allocation experiment. The rank groups were (1) warrant officers (high rank, HR) and (2) enlisted men (low rank, LR). One soldier from each rank group participated in every experiment. At the beginning of the experiment, one participant was assigned to start standing guard and the other participant at rest. The participant who started at rest could choose if and when to relieve his fellow soldier and therefore had control over the experiment. In order to trigger perception of unfair behavior, an additional experiment was conducted which was manipulated by the experimenter. In the manipulated version both soldiers started in the standing guard position and were never relieved, believing that their opponent was at rest, not relieving them. Our aim was to test whether unfair behavior causes a physiological reaction. Saliva samples for hormone analysis were collected at regular intervals throughout the experiment. We found that in the un-manipulated setup high-ranking soldiers spent less time standing guard than lower ranking individuals. Rank was a significant predictor for C but not for T levels during the experiment. C levels in the HR group were higher than in the LR group. C levels were also elevated in the manipulated experiment compared to the un-manipulated experiment, especially in LR. We assume that the elevated C levels in HR were caused by HR feeling their status challenged by the situation of having to negotiate with an individual of lower military rank

  15. Nitrogen-induced metabolic changes and molecular determinants of carbon allocation in Dunaliella tertiolecta

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kenneth Wei Min; Lin, Huixin; Shen, Hui; Lee, Yuan Kun

    2016-01-01

    Certain species of microalgae are natural accumulators of lipids, while others are more inclined to store starch. However, what governs the preference to store lipids or starch is not well understood. In this study, the microalga Dunaliella tertiolecta was used as a model to study the global gene expression profile regulating starch accumulation in microalgae. D. tertiolecta, when depleted of nitrogen, produced only 1% of dry cell weight (DCW) in neutral lipids, while starch was rapidly accumulated up to 46% DCW. The increased in starch content was accompanied by a coordinated overexpression of genes shunting carbon towards starch synthesis, a response not seen in the oleaginous microalgae Nannochloropsis oceanica, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii or Chlorella vulgaris. Genes in the central carbon metabolism pathways, particularly those of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, were also simultaneously upregulated, indicating a robust interchange of carbon skeletons for anabolic and catabolic processes. In contrast, fatty acid and triacylglycerol synthesis genes were downregulated or unchanged, suggesting that lipids are not a preferred form of storage in these cells. This study reveals the transcriptomic influence behind storage reserve allocation in D. tertiolecta and provides valuable insights into the possible manipulation of genes for engineering microorganisms to synthesize products of interest. PMID:27849022

  16. Nitrogen-induced metabolic changes and molecular determinants of carbon allocation in Dunaliella tertiolecta.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kenneth Wei Min; Lin, Huixin; Shen, Hui; Lee, Yuan Kun

    2016-11-16

    Certain species of microalgae are natural accumulators of lipids, while others are more inclined to store starch. However, what governs the preference to store lipids or starch is not well understood. In this study, the microalga Dunaliella tertiolecta was used as a model to study the global gene expression profile regulating starch accumulation in microalgae. D. tertiolecta, when depleted of nitrogen, produced only 1% of dry cell weight (DCW) in neutral lipids, while starch was rapidly accumulated up to 46% DCW. The increased in starch content was accompanied by a coordinated overexpression of genes shunting carbon towards starch synthesis, a response not seen in the oleaginous microalgae Nannochloropsis oceanica, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii or Chlorella vulgaris. Genes in the central carbon metabolism pathways, particularly those of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, were also simultaneously upregulated, indicating a robust interchange of carbon skeletons for anabolic and catabolic processes. In contrast, fatty acid and triacylglycerol synthesis genes were downregulated or unchanged, suggesting that lipids are not a preferred form of storage in these cells. This study reveals the transcriptomic influence behind storage reserve allocation in D. tertiolecta and provides valuable insights into the possible manipulation of genes for engineering microorganisms to synthesize products of interest.

  17. Plant acclimation impacts carbon allocation to isoprene emissions: evidence from past to future CO2 levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Hugo J.; van der Laan, Annick; Dekker, Stefan C.; Holzinger, Rupert

    2016-04-01

    Isoprene (C5H8) is produced in plant leaves as a side product of photosynthesis, whereby approximately 0.1-2.0% of the photosynthetic carbon uptake is released back into the atmosphere via isoprene emissions. Isoprene biosynthesis is thought to alleviate oxidative stress, specifically in warm, dry and high-light environments. Moreover, isoprene biosynthesis is influenced by atmospheric CO2 concentrations in the short term (weeks) via acclimation in photosynthetic biochemistry. In order to understand the effects of CO2-induced climate change on carbon allocation in plants it is therefore important to quantify how isoprene biosynthesis and emissions are effected by both short-term responses and long-term acclimation to rising atmospheric CO2 levels. A promising development for modelling CO2-induced changes in isoprene emissions is the Leaf-Energetic-Status model (referred to as LES-model hereafter, see Harrison et al., 2013 and Morfopoulos et al., 2014). This model simulates isoprene emissions based on the hypothesis that isoprene biosynthesis depends on the imbalance between the photosynthetic electron supply of reducing power and the electron demands of carbon fixation. In addition to environmental conditions, this imbalance is determined by the photosynthetic electron transport capacity (Jmax) and the maximum carboxylation capacity of Rubisco (V cmax). Here we compare predictions of the LES-model with observed isoprene emission responses of Quercus robur (pedunculate oak) specimen that acclimated to CO2 levels representative of the last glacial, the present and the end of this century (200, 400 and 800 ppm, respectively) for two growing seasons. Plants were grown in walk-in growth chambers with tight control of light, temperature, humidity and CO2 concentrations. Photosynthetic biochemical parameters V cmax and Jmax were determined with a Licor LI-6400XT photosynthesis system

  18. Defaunation affects carbon storage in tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Bello, Carolina; Galetti, Mauro; Pizo, Marco A; Magnago, Luiz Fernando S; Rocha, Mariana F; Lima, Renato A F; Peres, Carlos A; Ovaskainen, Otso; Jordano, Pedro

    2015-12-01

    Carbon storage is widely acknowledged as one of the most valuable forest ecosystem services. Deforestation, logging, fragmentation, fire, and climate change have significant effects on tropical carbon stocks; however, an elusive and yet undetected decrease in carbon storage may be due to defaunation of large seed dispersers. Many large tropical trees with sizeable contributions to carbon stock rely on large vertebrates for seed dispersal and regeneration, however many of these frugivores are threatened by hunting, illegal trade, and habitat loss. We used a large data set on tree species composition and abundance, seed, fruit, and carbon-related traits, and plant-animal interactions to estimate the loss of carbon storage capacity of tropical forests in defaunated scenarios. By simulating the local extinction of trees that depend on large frugivores in 31 Atlantic Forest communities, we found that defaunation has the potential to significantly erode carbon storage even when only a small proportion of large-seeded trees are extirpated. Although intergovernmental policies to reduce carbon emissions and reforestation programs have been mostly focused on deforestation, our results demonstrate that defaunation, and the loss of key ecological interactions, also poses a serious risk for the maintenance of tropical forest carbon storage.

  19. Defaunation affects carbon storage in tropical forests

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Carolina; Galetti, Mauro; Pizo, Marco A.; Magnago, Luiz Fernando S.; Rocha, Mariana F.; Lima, Renato A. F.; Peres, Carlos A.; Ovaskainen, Otso; Jordano, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Carbon storage is widely acknowledged as one of the most valuable forest ecosystem services. Deforestation, logging, fragmentation, fire, and climate change have significant effects on tropical carbon stocks; however, an elusive and yet undetected decrease in carbon storage may be due to defaunation of large seed dispersers. Many large tropical trees with sizeable contributions to carbon stock rely on large vertebrates for seed dispersal and regeneration, however many of these frugivores are threatened by hunting, illegal trade, and habitat loss. We used a large data set on tree species composition and abundance, seed, fruit, and carbon-related traits, and plant-animal interactions to estimate the loss of carbon storage capacity of tropical forests in defaunated scenarios. By simulating the local extinction of trees that depend on large frugivores in 31 Atlantic Forest communities, we found that defaunation has the potential to significantly erode carbon storage even when only a small proportion of large-seeded trees are extirpated. Although intergovernmental policies to reduce carbon emissions and reforestation programs have been mostly focused on deforestation, our results demonstrate that defaunation, and the loss of key ecological interactions, also poses a serious risk for the maintenance of tropical forest carbon storage. PMID:26824067

  20. The importance of internal CO2 gradients in tree roots for assessing belowground carbon allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, Jasper; De Bel, Bryan; Wittocx, Jonas; Anné, Thomas; McGuire, Mary Anne; Teskey, Robert O.; Steppe, Kathy

    2015-04-01

    In trees, it is known that allocation of recent assimilates belowground fuels metabolic processes like root respiration. Nonetheless, the fraction of carbon allocated belowground remains poorly quantified as the energetic costs of tree root metabolism remain largely unknown. Current estimates of root respiration are calculated from measurements of CO2 efflux from roots or soil. However, a substantial portion of CO2 released by root respiration might remain within the tree root system rather than diffusing into the soil environment, indicating that root respiration consumes substantially more carbohydrates than previously recognized. We measured internal CO2 concentration ([CO2]) and sap flow in three longitudinal sections of two large roots of American beech (Fagus grandifolia) and yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) trees (n=4 trees per species), while simultaneously measuring [CO2] in neighboring soil. We hypothesized that [CO2] would be lowest in soil and increase from the root tip to the base of the stem. We observed substantially higher [CO2] in tree roots (on average 8.5 ± 2.0 and 5.2 ± 1.9 Vol% for American beech and yellow poplar, respectively) compared with the soil environment (1.0 ± 0.4 and 1.3 ± 1.3 Vol% around American beech and yellow poplar, respectively), indicating that root tissues exert substantial barriers to outward diffusion of respired CO2. Moreover, we observed an internal [CO2] gradient from root tip to stem base which suggests that progressively more respired CO2 dissolved in flowing xylem sap as it moved from the soil through the root xylem. These results confirm that a fraction of root-respired CO2 concentrates in the xylem sap of the root system and fluxes upward within the tree. This CO2 that is removed from the site of respiration cannot be accounted for with measurements of CO2 efflux from roots or soil, indicating that efflux-based techniques underestimate the energetic costs of tree root metabolism and therefore the amount

  1. Where does the carbon go?–Plant carbon allocation under climate change

    DOE PAGES

    Sevanto, Sanna; Dickman, L. Turin

    2015-06-01

    The ability of terrestrial vegetation to both take up and release carbon and water makes understanding climate change effects on plant function critical. These effects could alter the impacts and feedbacks of vegetation on climate and either slow down or accelerate climatic warming (Bonan 2008). In conclusion, studies on plant responses to increased atmospheric CO2 concentration and elevated temperatures have become abundant in the last 20 years (for reviews, see Way and Oren 2010, Franks et al. 2013).

  2. Where does the carbon go?–Plant carbon allocation under climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Sevanto, Sanna; Dickman, L. Turin

    2015-06-01

    The ability of terrestrial vegetation to both take up and release carbon and water makes understanding climate change effects on plant function critical. These effects could alter the impacts and feedbacks of vegetation on climate and either slow down or accelerate climatic warming (Bonan 2008). In conclusion, studies on plant responses to increased atmospheric CO2 concentration and elevated temperatures have become abundant in the last 20 years (for reviews, see Way and Oren 2010, Franks et al. 2013).

  3. CARBON AND NITROGEN ALLOCATION MODEL FOR THE SUB-TROPICAL SEAGRASS THALASSIA TESTUDINUM AND THE TEMPERATE SEAGRASS ZOSTER MARINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our understanding of seagrass physiology is based on crude estimates of production and biomass. To better understand the complex physiological relationships between the plants and the environment we developed a model of carbon and nitrogen allocation in the sub-tropical seagrass ...

  4. Carbon Monoxide Affecting Planetary Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chao; Horst, Sarah

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric hazes are present in a range of solar system and extrasolar planetary atmospheres, and organic hazes, such as that in Titan's atmosphere, could be a source of prebiotic molecules.1 However, the chemistry occurring in planetary atmospheres and the resulting chemical structures are still not clear. Numerous experimental simulations2 have been carried out in the laboratory to understand the chemistry in N2/CH4 atmospheres, but very few simulations4 have included CO in their initial gas mixtures, which is an important component in many N2/CH4 atmospheres including Titan, Triton, and Pluto.3 Here we have conducted a series of atmosphere simulation experiments using AC glow discharge (cold plasma) as energy source to irradiate reactions in gas mixtures of CO, CH4, and N2 with a range of CO mixing ratios (from 0, 0.05%, 0.2%, 0.5%, 1%, 2.5%, to 5%) at low temperature (~100 K). Gas phase products are monitored during the reaction by quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS), and solid phase products are analyzed by solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). MS results show that with the increase of CO in the initial gases, the production of nitrogenous organic molecules increases while the production of hydrogen molecules decreases in the gas phase. NMR measurements of the solid phase products show that with the increase of CO, hydrogen atoms bonded to nitrogen or oxygen in unsaturated structures increase while those bonded to saturated carbon decrease, which means more unsaturated species and less saturated species formed with the addition of CO. MS and NMR results demonstrate that the inclusion of CO affects the compositions of both gas and solid phase products, indicating that CO has an important impact on the chemistry occurring in our experiments and probably in planetary atmospheres.1. Hörst, S. M., et al. 2012, AsBio, 12, 8092. Cable, M. L., et al. 2012, Chem. Rev., 112, 18823. Lutz, B. L., et al. 1983, Sci, 220, 1374; Greaves, J. S., et al

  5. Effect of light intensity on physiological changes, carbon allocation and neutral lipid accumulation in oleaginous microalgae.

    PubMed

    He, Qiaoning; Yang, Haijian; Wu, Lei; Hu, Chunxiang

    2015-09-01

    Chlorella sp. and Monoraphidium sp. were the potential microalgal species for lipid production. This study aimed to investigate different light intensities (40, 200, 400 μmol photon m(-2) s(-1)) on physiological changes, photosynthetic carbon partitioning and neutral lipid accumulation in both microalgae. Results suggested that under high light (HL, 400 μmol photon m(-2) s(-1)), chlorophyll degraded, protein and carbohydrate content decreased; more carbon allocated into lipid as well as most of intracellular space was occupied by lipid bodies. Moreover, with the lipid accumulation, Fv/Fm decreased and ROS scavenging enzyme increased. Membrane lipid reduced dramatic (29.73-37.97%) to format NL (71.66% of total lipid in Chlorella sp. L1 and 60.65% in Monoraphidium dybowskii Y2). The NL productivity under HL (51.36 and 49.71 mg L(-1) d(-1)) were more than 3 times of those under LL. Additionally, FAME profiles proved that the useful fatty acid components for biodiesel production were enhanced under HL.

  6. Age, allocation and availability of nonstructural carbon in mature red maple trees.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Mariah S; Czimczik, Claudia I; Keenan, Trevor F; Murakami, Paula F; Pederson, Neil; Schaberg, Paul G; Xu, Xiaomei; Richardson, Andrew D

    2013-12-01

    The allocation of nonstructural carbon (NSC) to growth, metabolism and storage remains poorly understood, but is critical for the prediction of stress tolerance and mortality. We used the radiocarbon ((14) C) 'bomb spike' as a tracer of substrate and age of carbon in stemwood NSC, CO2 emitted by stems, tree ring cellulose and stump sprouts regenerated following harvesting in mature red maple trees. We addressed the following questions: which factors influence the age of stemwood NSC?; to what extent is stored vs new NSC used for metabolism and growth?; and, is older, stored NSC available for use? The mean age of extracted stemwood NSC was 10 yr. More vigorous trees had both larger and younger stemwood NSC pools. NSC used to support metabolism (stem CO2 ) was 1-2 yr old in spring before leaves emerged, but reflected current-year photosynthetic products in late summer. The tree ring cellulose (14) C age was 0.9 yr older than direct ring counts. Stump sprouts were formed from NSC up to 17 yr old. Thus, younger NSC is preferentially used for growth and day-to-day metabolic demands. More recently stored NSC contributes to annual ring growth and metabolism in the dormant season, yet decade-old and older NSC is accessible for regrowth.

  7. Carbon allocation, source-sink relations and plant growth: do we need to revise our carbon centric concepts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körner, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Since the discovery that plants 'eat air' 215 years ago, carbon supply was considered the largely unquestioned top driver of plant growth. The ease at which CO2 uptake (C source activity) can be measured, and the elegant algorithms that describe the responses of photosynthesis to light, temperature and CO2 concentration, explain why carbon driven growth and productivity became the starting point of all process based vegetation models. Most of these models, nowadays adopt other environmental drivers, such as nutrient availability, as modulating co-controls, but the carbon priority is retained. Yet, if we believe in the basic rules of stoichometry of all life, there is an inevitable need of 25-30 elements other then carbon, oxygen and hydrogen to build a healthy plant body. Plants compete for most of these elements, and their availability (except for N) is finite per unit land area. Hence, by pure plausibility, it is a highly unlikely situation that carbon plays the rate limiting role of growth under natural conditions, except in deep shade or on exceptionally fertile soils. Furthermore, water shortage and low temperature, both act directly upon tissue formation (meristems) long before photosynthetic limitations come into play. Hence, plants will incorporate C only to the extent other environmental drivers permit. In the case of nutrients and mature ecosystems, this sink control of plant growth may be masked in the short term by a tight, almost closed nutrient cycle or by widening the C to other element ratio. Because source and sink activity must match in the long term, it is not possible to identify the hierarchy of growth controls without manipulating the environment. Dry matter allocation to C rich structures and reserves may provide some stoichimetric leeway or periodic escapes from the more fundamental, long-term environmental controls of growth and productivity. I will explain why carbon centric explanations of growth are limited or arrive at plausible answers

  8. Light regulation of pyruvate allocation into primary and secondary carbon metabolism in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, K.; Werner, C.; Wegener, F.; Meyers, K.; Abrell, L.

    2012-12-01

    While plant metabolic processes are known to exert a large influence on climate and air quality through the emission of CO2 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), controls over the allocation of assimilated carbon to these important components of the global carbon cycle are poorly understood. In plants, pyruvate lies at the heart of carbon metabolism by acting as a key product of photosynthesis and glycolysis and as a substrate used in respiratory and secondary biosynthetic pathways (e.g. VOCs). It is now well recognized that light has a strong inhibitory effect on mitochondrial respiration and recent studies have shown this contributes to an accumulation of pyruvate. However, little is known about the impact(s) this has on biosynthetic processes including VOCs and how the different carbon atoms within pyruvate are utilized. In this study, we quantified diurnal VOC and CO2 fluxes from intact branches of a Mediterranean shrub (Halimium halimifolium) under controlled light conditions. In addition, we utilized positionally specific 13C-labeled pyruvate branch feeding together with stable isotope analysis to trace the partitioning of C1, C2, and C3 carbon atoms of pyruvate into VOCs and CO2 emissions in the light and in the dark. In the light, we found high emission rates of a large array of VOC including volatile isoprenoids, oxygenated VOCs, green leaf volatiles, aromatics, sulfides, and nitrogen containing VOCs. In addition, elevated 13C-VOC emissions were stimulated by pyruvate-2-13C and pyruvate-2,3-13C but not pyruvate-1-13C while the opposite was the case for 13CO2 emissions (respiration). Moreover, we found that in the dark, 13C-VOC emissions dramatically declined while 13CO2 emissions were strongly stimulated. Our observations suggest that in the light, H. halimifolium dedicates a high pyruvate flux through secondary biosynthetic pathways including the pyruvate dehydrogenase bypass, mevalonic acid, MEP/DOXP, shikimic acid, and fatty acid pathways, which are

  9. Optimal Plant Carbon Allocation Implies a Biological Control on Nitrogen Availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, I. C.; Stocker, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    The degree to which nitrogen availability limits the terrestrial C sink under rising CO2 is a key uncertainty in carbon cycle and climate change projections. Results from ecosystem manipulation studies and meta-analyses suggest that plant C allocation to roots adjusts dynamically under varying degrees of nitrogen availability and other soil fertility parameters. In addition, the ratio of biomass production to GPP appears to decline under nutrient scarcity. This reflects increasing plant C exudation into the soil (Cex) with decreasing nutrient availability. Cex is consumed by an array of soil organisms and may imply an improvement of nutrient availability to the plant. Thus, N availability is under biological control, but incurs a C cost. In spite of clear observational support, this concept is left unaccounted for in Earth system models. We develop a model for the coupled cycles of C and N in terrestrial ecosystems to explore optimal plant C allocation under rising CO2 and its implications for the ecosystem C balance. The model follows a balanced growth approach, accounting for the trade-offs between leaf versus root growth and Cex in balancing C fixation and N uptake. We assume that Cex is proportional to root mass, and that the ratio of N uptake (Nup) to Cex is proportional to inorganic N concentration in the soil solution. We further assume that Cex is consumed by N2-fixing processes if the ratio of Nup:Cex falls below the inverse of the C cost of N2-fixation. Our analysis thereby accounts for the feedbacks between ecosystem C and N cycling and stoichiometry. We address the question of how the plant C economy will adjust under rising atmospheric CO2 and what this implies for the ecosystem C balance and the degree of N limitation.

  10. Eco-hydrologic Modeling of Rangelands: Evaluating a New Carbon Allocation Approach and Simulating Ecosystem Response to Changing Climate and Management Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, J. J.; Tague, C.; Choate, J. S.; Adam, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    More than one-third of the United States' land cover is comprised of rangelands, which support both forage production and livestock grazing. For grasses in both semi-arid and humid environments, small changes in precipitation and temperature, as well as grazing, can have disproportionately larger impacts on ecosystem processes. For example, these areas may experience large response pulses under highly variable precipitation and other potential future changes. The ultimate goal of this study is to provide information on the interactions between management activities, climate and ecosystem processes to inform sustainable rangeland management. The specific objectives of this paper are to (1) evaluate a new carbon allocation strategy for grasses and (2) test the sensitivity of this improved strategy to changes in climate and grazing strategies. The Regional Hydro-ecologic Simulation System (RHESSys) is a process-based, watershed-scale model that simulates hydrology and biogeochemical cycling with dynamic soil and vegetation modules. We developed a new carbon allocation algorithm for partitioning net primary productivity (NPP) between roots and leaves for grasses. The 'hybrid' approach represents a balance between preferential partitioning due to environmental conditions and age-related growth. We evaluated this new allocation scheme at the point-scale at a variety of rangeland sites in the U.S. using observed biomass measurements and against existing allocation schemes used in RHESSys. Additionally, changes in the magnitude, frequency, and intensity of precipitation and temperature were used to assess ecosystem responses using our new allocation scheme. We found that changes in biomass and NPP were generally more sensitive to changes in precipitation than changes in temperature. At more arid sites, larger percent reductions in historic baseline precipitation affected biomass and NPP more negatively. We incorporated grazing impacts through biomass removal. We found that

  11. Competition for light and water increases tree carbon allocation to fine roots and leaves in a next-generation dynamic vegetation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichstein, J. W.; Zhang, T.; Weng, E.; Farrior, C.; Dybzinski, R.; Birdsey, R.; Pacala, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    The response of the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle to climate change is a key uncertainty in land models. An important component of this uncertainty concerns plant functional diversity, which is typically represented in land models by ~10 functional types (PFTs) with fixed traits. However, few land models include the individual-level competitive mechanisms that largely determine how plant functional traits are distributed in time and space in real ecosystems. We have developed a new land model that represents height-structured competition for light with a simple canopy space-filling algorithm, the perfect plasticity approximation (PPA). The new land model, LM3-PPA, allows for an arbitrary number of PFTs (or 'species') whose spatial-temporal distributions are determined by the outcome of competition for light and water. We performed experiments with a modified version of LM3-PPA in 10 eastern U.S. grid cells and across simulated precipitation gradients to determine how competition for light and water affects tree C allocation to leaves, fine roots, and wood across climate gradients and in response to episodic drought. We studied the performance of 16 allocational types ('species') in monoculture and in competition with each other to determine the competitively-optimal, NPP-maximizing, and biomass-maximizing C allocation strategy under different environmental conditions. Under chronically moist conditions, competitively-optimal, NPP-maximizing, and biomass-maximizing trees all had similar C allocation. However, under chronically dry conditions, competitively-optimal trees allocated more C to both fine roots and leaves, and less C to wood, compared to NPP- or biomass-maximizing strategies. When subject to episodic drought, the most drought-tolerant allocational strategies had relatively low allocation to leaves (and thus low leaf area and low water demand). Thus, the "over-investment" in leaves that results from resource competition increases the vulnerability of

  12. Modeling changes in red spruce carbon balance and allocation in response to interacting ozone and nutrient stresses.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, David A.; Beloin, Ronald M.; Yanai, Ruth D.

    1991-01-01

    The simulation model TREGRO was developed to analyze the response of red spruce saplings to multiple stresses, such as drought, nutrient deficiency, and exposure to pollutants. The model provides a method of identifying changes in structural and non-structural carbon resources in the tree that may become measurable only after many years of exposure. The model is based on the assumption that the ability of plants to take up and use carbon, water, and nutrients depends on the interrelationships in availability among the three resources. Consequently, the model simulates the simultaneous cycling of these resources. In the model, the tree is divided into the following compartments: a canopy of leaves grouped by age class, branches, stem, and coarse and fine roots in a number of soil horizons. In each of these compartments we track three carbon pools: living structure, dead structure or wood, and total non-structural carbohydrate. The model calculates the photosynthesis of an entire red spruce tree each hour as a function of ambient environmental conditions and the availability of light, water, and nutrients; the daily redistribution of carbon throughout the plant; and the loss of carbon by respiration and senescence. To accomplish this task, the model tracks the flow of carbon dioxide to the sites of fixation within the leaves, the availability of light in the canopy, water and nutrient resources in each of three soil horizons, and the amounts of these resources taken up by the tree. Soil and plant water potentials, photosynthesis, and leaf respiration are simulated on an hourly timestep; nutrient uptake, allocation and growth are computed on a daily timestep. Through a set of example simulations, we demonstrate how the model can be used to examine the mechanisms by which plants respond to stresses experienced alone and in combination. The model was used to predict the growth decrease and the shifting pattern of carbon allocation expected for an isolated tree exposed

  13. Influence of atmospheric [CO2] on growth, carbon allocation and cost of plant tissues on leaf nitrogen concentration maintenance in nodulated Medicago sativa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereyra, Gabriela; Hartmann, Henrik; Ziegler, Waldemar; Michalzik, Beate; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel; Trumbore, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Plant carbon (C) allocation and plant metabolic processes (i.e. photosynthesis and respiration) can be affected by changes in C availability, for example from changing atmospheric [CO2]. In nodulated plants, C availability may also influence nitrogen (N) fixation by bacteriods. But C allocation and N fixation are often studied independently and hence do not allow elucidating interactive effects. We investigated how different atmospheric [CO2] (Pleistocene: 170 ppm, ambient: 400 ppm and projected future: 700 ppm) influence plant growth, allocation to nodules, and the ratio of photosynthesis-to-respiration (R:A) as an indicator of C cost in Medicago sativa inoculated with Ensifer meliloti. M. sativa grew c. 38% more nodules at 400 ppm and 700 ppm than at 170 ppm. However, ratios of above- and belowground plant biomass to nodule biomass were constant over time and independent of atmospheric [CO2]. Total non-structural carbohydrate concentrations were not significantly different between plants grown at 400 and 700 ppm, but were four to five-fold higher than in 170 ppm plants. Leaf level N concentration was similar across treatments, but N-based photosynthetic rates were 82% and 93% higher in leaves of plants grown at 400 and 700 ppm, respectively, than plants grown at 170 ppm. In addition, leaf R:A was greater (48% or 55%) in plants grown at 170 ppm than plants grown at 400 and 700 ppm. Similarly, the greatest proportion of assimilated CO2 released by root respiration occurred in rhizobial plants growing at 170 ppm. Our results suggest that C limitation in nodulated Medicago sativa plants did not influence C allocation to nodule biomass but caused a proportionally greater allocation of C to belowground respiration, most likely to bacteriods. This suggests that N tissue concentration was maintained at low [CO2] by revving up bacteriod metabolism and at the expense of non-structural carbohydrate reserves.

  14. Belowground carbon allocation patterns in a dry Mediterranean ecosystem: a comparison of two models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    María, Almagro; Jorge, López; Carolina, Boix-Fayos; Juan, Albadalejo; María, Martínez-Mena

    2010-05-01

    Total belowground C allocation (TBCA) represents a large fraction of gross primary production; it can exceed aboveground net primary production, and provides the primary source of detrital C to mineral soil. Here, we measure soil respiration, water erosion, litterfall and estimated annual changes in C stored in mineral soil, litter and roots, in three representative land uses in a Mediterranean ecosystem (late-successional forest, abandoned agricultural field, rain-fed olive grove), and use two C balance approaches (steady-state and non-steady-state) to estimate TBCA. Both TBCA approaches are compared to assess how different C fluxes (outputs and inputs) affect our estimates of TBCA within each land use. In addition, annual net ecosystem productivity is determined and C allocation patterns are examined for each land use. We hypothesized that changes in C stored in mineral soil, litter and roots will be minor compared to soil respiration, but will still have a significant effect on the estimates of TBCA. Annual net ecosystem productivity was 648, 541 and 324 g C m-2 yr-1 for forest, abandoned field and olive grove, respectively. Across land uses, more than 60 % of the C was allocated belowground. Soil respiration (FS) was the largest component in the TBCA approaches across all land uses. Annual C losses through water erosion were negligible compared to FS (less than 1%) and had little effect on the estimates of TBCA. Annual changes in C stored in the soil, litter layer and roots were low compared to FS (16, 24 and 10 % for forest, abandoned field and olive grove, respectively), but had a significant effect on the estimates of TBCA. In our sites, an assumption that ?[CS + CR + CL]/?t= 0 will give biased estimates of TBCA, particularly in the abandoned agricultural field, where soil C storage may be increasing more rapidly. Therefore, the steady-state model is unsuited to these Mediterranean ecosystems and the full model is recommended. The results from this study

  15. Storage of atmospheric carbon in global litter and soil pools in response to vegetation change and biomass allocation

    SciTech Connect

    Klooster, S.A.; Potter, C.S.

    1995-06-01

    Changes in the distribution of vegetation types under altered climate regimes could have important consequences for the storage of stems. Because there are relatively few definitive field studies of changes in whole ecosystem carbon process-level models driven by gridded global databases may provide reasonable indicators of to changes in vegetation cover. We have used plant litter quality (lignin content) and carbon allocation to woody tissues as surrogates for testing the hypothetical effects of future vegetation change using the CASA (Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach) Biosphere model. The model is driven by global gridded (1{degree}) satellite imagery on a monthly time interval to simulate seasonal patterns in net ecosystem carbon balance and steady-state carbon storage in detritus arid soils. Sensitivity tests treated litter quality and allocation effects independently from other direct effects of changes in climate, atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels, and primary production. Results support the hypothesis that soil C storage in today`s temperate and boreal forest life zones are those most sensitive to changes in litter lignin content which may accompany increased climate stress. For these systems, the model predicts that a 50% increase in litter lignin concentration would result in a long-term net gain of about 10% C from the atmosphere into surface litter and soil organic matter pools. A 50% decrease in C allocation to woody tissues would invoke a net loss of 10% C from litter and soil organic matter pools.

  16. Interpretation of tree-ring data with a model for primary production, carbon allocation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Wang, H.; Harrison, S. P.; Prentice, I. C.

    2013-12-01

    We present a simple, generic model of annual tree growth, called ';T'. This model accepts input from a generic light-use efficiency model which is known to provide good simulations of terrestrial carbon exchange. The light-use efficiency model provides values for Gross Primary Production (GPP) per unit of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Absorbed PAR is estimated from the current leaf area. GPP is allocated to foliage, transport-tissue, and fine-root production and respiration, in such a way as to satisfy well-understood dimensional relationships. The result is a model that can represent both ontogenetic effects and the effects of environmental variations and trends on growth. The model has been applied to simulate ring-width series from multiple individual trees in temperature- and drought-limited contexts. Each tree is initialized at its actual diameter at the time when local climate records started. These records are used to drive the trees' subsequent growth. Realistic simulations of the pattern of interannual variability of ring-width are generated, and shown to relate statistically to climate. An upward trend in ring-width during 1958-2007 is shown to be present in the primary observations, and in the simulations; but not in the standard, detrended ring-width series. This approach combines two modelling approaches previously developed in the global carbon cycle and forest science literature respectively. Neither has been widely applied in the context of tree-ring based climate reconstruction. This combination of methods offers promise, however, because it could provide a way to sidestep several known problems. These include: reliance on correlations for the interpretation of ring-width variations in terms of climate; the necessity of detrending using empirical functions (which can remove trends caused by variations in the environment as well as those that are ontogenetic); and the difficulty of assessing effects of extrinsic, non

  17. Modelling the climatic drivers determining photosynthesis and carbon allocation in evergreen Mediterranean forests using multiproxy long time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gea-Izquierdo, G.; Guibal, F.; Joffre, R.; Ourcival, J. M.; Simioni, G.; Guiot, J.

    2015-02-01

    Climatic drivers limit several important physiological processes involved in ecosystem carbon dynamics including gross primary productivity (GPP) and carbon allocation in vegetation. Climatic variability limits these two processes differently. We developed an existing mechanistic model to analyse photosynthesis and variability in carbon allocation in two evergreen species at two Mediterranean forests. The model was calibrated using a combination of eddy covariance CO2 flux data, dendrochronological time series of secondary growth and forest inventory data. The model was modified to be climate explicit in the key processes addressing acclimation of photosynthesis and allocation. It succeeded to fit both the high- and the low-frequency response of stand GPP and carbon allocation to the stem. This would support its capability to address both carbon source and sink limitations. Simulations suggest a decrease in mean stomatal conductance in response to environmental changes and an increase in mean annual intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE) in both species during the last 50 years. However, this was not translated on a parallel increase in ecosystem water use efficiency (WUE). A long-term decrease in annual GPP matched the local trend in precipitation since the 1970s observed in one site. In contrast, GPP did not show a negative trend and the trees buffered the climatic variability observed at the site where long-term precipitation remained stable. In our simulations these temporal changes would be partly related to increasing [CO2] because the model includes biochemical equations where photosynthesis is directly linked to [CO2]. Long-term trends in GPP did not match those in growth, in agreement with the C-sink hypothesis. There is a great potential to use the model with abundant dendrochronological data and analyse forest performance under climate change. This would help to understand how different interfering environmental factors produce instability in the climatic

  18. Allometric constraints on, and trade-offs in, belowground carbon allocation and their control of soil respiration across global forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangshui; Yang, Yusheng; Robinson, David

    2014-05-01

    To fully understand how soil respiration is partitioned among its component fluxes and responds to climate, it is essential to relate it to belowground carbon allocation, the ultimate carbon source for soil respiration. This remains one of the largest gaps in knowledge of terrestrial carbon cycling. Here, we synthesize data on gross and net primary production and their components, and soil respiration and its components, from a global forest database, to determine mechanisms governing belowground carbon allocation and their relationship with soil respiration partitioning and soil respiration responses to climatic factors across global forest ecosystems. Our results revealed that there are three independent mechanisms controlling belowground carbon allocation and which influence soil respiration and its partitioning: an allometric constraint; a fine-root production vs. root respiration trade-off; and an above- vs. belowground trade-off in plant carbon. Global patterns in soil respiration and its partitioning are constrained primarily by the allometric allocation, which explains some of the previously ambiguous results reported in the literature. Responses of soil respiration and its components to mean annual temperature, precipitation, and nitrogen deposition can be mediated by changes in belowground carbon allocation. Soil respiration responds to mean annual temperature overwhelmingly through an increasing belowground carbon input as a result of extending total day length of growing season, but not by temperature-driven acceleration of soil carbon decomposition, which argues against the possibility of a strong positive feedback between global warming and soil carbon loss. Different nitrogen loads can trigger distinct belowground carbon allocation mechanisms, which are responsible for different responses of soil respiration to nitrogen addition that have been observed. These results provide new insights into belowground carbon allocation, partitioning of soil

  19. Greater carbon allocation to mycorrhizal fungi reduces tree nitrogen uptake in a boreal forest.

    PubMed

    Hasselquist, Niles J; Metcalfe, Daniel B; Inselsbacher, Erich; Stangl, Zsofia; Oren, Ram; Näsholm, Torgny; Högberg, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The central role that ectomycorrhizal (EM) symbioses play in the structure and function of boreal forests pivots around the common assumption that carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) are exchanged at rates favorable for plant growth. However, this may not always be the case. It has been hypothesized that the benefits mycorrhizal fungi convey to their host plants strongly depends upon the availability of C and N, both of which are rapidly changing as a result of intensified human land use and climate change. Using large-scale shading and N addition treatments, we assessed the independent and interactive effects of changes in C and N supply on the transfer of N in intact EM associations with -15 yr. old Scots pine trees. To assess the dynamics of N transfer in EM symbioses, we added trace amounts of highly enriched 5NO3(-) label to the EM-dominated mor-layer and followed the fate of the 15N label in tree foliage, fungal chitin on EM root tips, and EM sporocarps. Despite no change in leaf biomass, shading resulted in reduced tree C uptake, ca. 40% lower fungal biomass on EM root tips, and greater 15N label in tree foliage compared to unshaded control plots, where more 15N label was found in fungal biomass on EM colonized root tips. Short-term addition of N shifted the incorporation of 15N label from EM fungi to tree foliage, despite no significant changes in below-ground tree C allocation to EM fungi. Contrary to the common assumption that C and N are exchanged at rates favorable for plant growth, our results show for the first time that under N-limited conditions greater C allocation to EM fungi in the field results in reduced, not increased, N transfer to host trees. Moreover, given the ubiquitous nature of mycorrhizal symbioses, our results stress the need to incorporate mycorrhizal dynamics into process-based ecosystem models to better predict forest C and N cycles in light of global climate change.

  20. The dynamics of annual carbon allocation to wood in European forests is consistent with a combined source-sink limitation of growth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemot, Joannès; Martin-StPaul, Nicolas K.; Dufrêne, Eric; François, Christophe; Soudani, Kamel; Ourcival, Jean-Marc; Leadley, Paul; Delpierre, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    The extent to which forest growth is limited by carbon (C) supply (source control) or by cambial activity (sink control) will strongly determines the responses of trees to global changes. However, the physiological processes responsible for the limitation of forest growth are still under debate. The aim of this study was i) to evaluate the key drivers of the annual carbon allocation to wood along large soil and climate regional gradients in four tree species representative of the main European forest biomes (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, Quercus ilex and Picea abies) ii) to implement the identified key drivers in a new C allocation scheme within the CASTANEA terrestrial biosphere model (TBM). Combining field measurements and process-based simulations at 49 sites (931 site-years), our analyses revealed that the inter-site variability in C allocation to wood was predominantly driven by an age-related decline. The direct control of temperature or water stress on sink activity (i.e. independently from their effects on C supply) exerted a strong influence on the annual woody growth in all the species considered, including deciduous temperate species. The lagged effect of the past environment conditions was a significant driver of the annual C allocation to wood. Carbon supply appeared to strongly limit growth only in deciduous temperate species. Our study supports the premise that European forest growth is under a complex panel of source- and sink- limitations, contradicting the simple source control implemented in most TBMs. The implementation of these combined forest growth limitations in the CASTANEA model significantly improved its performance when evaluated against independent stand growth data at the regional scale (mainland France, >10000 plots). We finally discuss how the sink imitation affects the CASTANEA simulated projections of forest productivity along the 21th century, especially with respect to the expected fertilizing effect of increasing atmospheric

  1. Effects of ozone and acidic deposition on carbon allocation and mycorrhizal colonization of Pinus taeda L. seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.B.; O'Neal, E.G.

    1991-03-01

    Patterns of carbon allocation and mycorrhizal colonization were examined in loblolly pine seedlings from two half-sib families exposed to three ozone treatments (charcoal-filtered air, ambient air + 80 ppb O{sub 3}, and ambient air + 160 ppb O{sub 3}) and three rain pH levels (5.2, 4.5, and 3.3) for 12 weeks in open-topped chambers in a field setting. No statistically significant effects of ozone or rain pH were detected on biomass, root:shoot ratios, or carbon allocation; some consistent patterns were observed, however. Coarse root starch concentrations and mycorrhizal infection varied significantly with ozone levels. No significant interactions of ozone, rain pH, or genotype were detected.

  2. Drought effects on allocation of recent carbon: From beech leaves to soil CO2 efflux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruehr, N. K.; Offermann, C. A.; Gessler, A.; Winkler, J. B.; Buchmann, N. C.; Barnard, R. L.

    2009-12-01

    Recent studies have highlighted a direct and fast transfer of recently-assimilated carbon from tree canopy to roots and soil microorganisms. However, the response of this carbon flux to environmental conditions remains largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated drought effects on translocation of recently-assimilated carbon, by pulse-labelling 1.5-year old beech tree mesocosms with 13CO2. During the first week after pulse-labelling, 13C signatures were measured daily in leaves, twigs, coarse and fine root water-soluble and total organic matter, phloem organic matter, soil microbial biomass, as well as in soil CO2 efflux. Drought reduced C assimilation and doubled the residence time of recently-assimilated C in leaf biomass. In phloem organic matter, the 13C label peaked immediately after labelling then decayed exponentially in the control treatment, while under drought the peak occurred 4 days after labelling. In soil microbial biomass, the label peaked 1 day after labelling in the control treatment, whereas under drought no peak was measured. The contribution of recently assimilated C to soil CO2 efflux was decreased by 33% in the drought treatment 2 days after labelling. Thus, our study showed that drought reduced both magnitude and velocity of the coupling between canopy photosynthesis and belowground processes in beech mesocosms. This will likely affect soil biogeochemical cycling, with potential consequences including slower soil nitrogen cycling and changes in carbon sequestration potential under future climate conditions.

  3. The reallocation of carbon in P deficient lupins affects biological nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed

    Kleinert, Aleysia; Venter, Mauritz; Kossmann, Jens; Valentine, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    It is not known how phosphate (P) deficiency affects the allocation of carbon (C) to biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) in legumes. The alteration of the respiratory and photosynthetic C costs of BNF was investigated under P deficiency. Although BNF can impose considerable sink stimulation on host respiratory and photosynthetic C, it is not known how the change in the C and energy allocation during P deficiency may affect BNF. Nodulated Lupinus luteus plants were grown in sand culture, using a modified Long Ashton nutrient solution containing no nitrogen (N) for ca. four weeks, after which one set was exposed to a P-deficient nutrient medium, while the other set continued growing on a P-sufficient nutrient medium. Phosphorus stress was measured at 20 days after onset of P-starvation. During P stress the decline in nodular P levels was associated with lower BNF and nodule growth. There was also a shift in the balance of photosynthetic and respiratory C toward a loss of C during P stress. Below-ground respiration declined under limiting P conditions. However, during this decline there was also a shift in the proportion of respiratory energy from maintenance toward growth respiration. Under P stress, there was an increased allocation of C toward root growth, thereby decreasing the amount of C available for maintenance respiration. It is therefore possible that the decline in BNF under P deficiency may be due to this change in resource allocation away from respiration associated with direct nutrient uptake, but rather toward a long term nutrient acquisition strategy of increased root growth.

  4. Prior mating success can affect allocation towards future sexual signaling in crickets

    PubMed Central

    Chiswell, Rachel; Girard, Madeline; Fricke, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Fitness is often correlated with the expression level of a sexually selected trait. However, sexually selected traits are costly to express such that investment in their expression should be optimised to maximize their overall fitness gains. Social interactions, in the form of successful and unsuccessful matings, may offer males one type of feedback allowing them to gauge how to allocate their resources towards sexual signaling. Here we tested whether adult male black field crickets (Teleogryllus commodus) modify the extent of their calling effort (the sexually selected trait) in response to successful and unsuccessful matings with females. To examine the effect that mating interactions with females have on investment into sexual signaling, we monitored male calling effort after maturation and then provided males with a female at two points within their life, manipulating whether or not males were able to successfully mate each time. Our results demonstrate that males alter their investment towards sexual signaling in response to successful matings, but only if the experience occurs early in their life. Males that mated early decreased their calling effort sooner than males that were denied a mating. Our results demonstrate that social feedback in the form of successful and unsuccessful matings has the potential to alter the effort a male places towards sexual signaling. PMID:25392758

  5. Simulation of tree-ring widths with a model for primary production, carbon allocation, and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Harrison, S. P.; Prentice, I. C.; Falster, D.

    2014-12-01

    We present a simple, generic model of annual tree growth, called "T". This model accepts input from a first-principles light-use efficiency model (the "P" model). The P model provides values for gross primary production (GPP) per unit of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Absorbed PAR is estimated from the current leaf area. GPP is allocated to foliage, transport tissue, and fine-root production and respiration in such a way as to satisfy well-understood dimensional and functional relationships. Our approach thereby integrates two modelling approaches separately developed in the global carbon-cycle and forest-science literature. The T model can represent both ontogenetic effects (the impact of ageing) and the effects of environmental variations and trends (climate and CO2) on growth. Driven by local climate records, the model was applied to simulate ring widths during the period 1958-2006 for multiple trees of Pinus koraiensis from the Changbai Mountains in northeastern China. Each tree was initialised at its actual diameter at the time when local climate records started. The model produces realistic simulations of the interannual variability in ring width for different age cohorts (young, mature, and old). Both the simulations and observations show a significant positive response of tree-ring width to growing-season total photosynthetically active radiation (PAR0) and the ratio of actual to potential evapotranspiration (α), and a significant negative response to mean annual temperature (MAT). The slopes of the simulated and observed relationships with PAR0 and α are similar; the negative response to MAT is underestimated by the model. Comparison of simulations with fixed and changing atmospheric CO2 concentration shows that CO2 fertilisation over the past 50 years is too small to be distinguished in the ring-width data, given ontogenetic trends and interannual variability in climate.

  6. Simulation of tree ring-widths with a model for primary production, carbon allocation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Harrison, S. P.; Prentice, I. C.; Falster, D.

    2014-07-01

    We present a simple, generic model of annual tree growth, called "T". This model accepts input from a first-principles light-use efficiency model (the P model). The P model provides values for Gross Primary Production (GPP) per unit of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Absorbed PAR is estimated from the current leaf area. GPP is allocated to foliage, transport-tissue, and fine root production and respiration, in such a way as to satisfy well-understood dimensional and functional relationships. Our approach thereby integrates two modelling approaches separately developed in the global carbon-cycle and forest-science literature. The T model can represent both ontogenetic effects (impact of ageing) and the effects of environmental variations and trends (climate and CO2) on growth. Driven by local climate records, the model was applied to simulate ring widths during 1958-2006 for multiple trees of Pinus koraiensis from the Changbai Mountain, northeastern China. Each tree was initialised at its actual diameter at the time when local climate records started. The model produces realistic simulations of the interannual variability in ring width for different age cohorts (young, mature, old). Both the simulations and observations show a significant positive response of tree-ring width to growing-season total photosynthetically active radiation (PAR0) and the ratio of actual to potential evapotranspiration (α), and a significant negative response to mean annual temperature (MAT). The slopes of the simulated and observed relationships with PAR0 and α are similar; the negative response to MAT is underestimated by the model. Comparison of simulations with fixed and changing atmospheric CO2 concentration shows that CO2 fertilization over the past 50 years is too small to be distinguished in the ring-width data given ontogenetic trends and interannual variability in climate.

  7. Influence of elevated carbon dioxide and temperature on belowground carbon allocation and enzyme activities in tropical flooded soil planted with rice.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, P; Roy, K S; Neogi, S; Manna, M C; Adhya, T K; Rao, K S; Nayak, A K

    2013-10-01

    Changes in the soil labile carbon fractions and soil biochemical properties to elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) and temperature reflect the changes in the functional capacity of soil ecosystems. The belowground root system and root-derived carbon products are the key factors for the rhizospheric carbon dynamics under elevated CO2 condition. However, the relationship between interactive effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on belowground soil carbon accrual is not very clear. To address this issue, a field experiment was laid out to study the changes of carbon allocation in tropical rice soil (Aeric Endoaquept) under elevated CO2 and elevated CO2 + elevated temperature conditions in open top chambers (OTCs). There were significant increase of root biomass by 39 and 44 % under elevated CO2 and elevated CO2 + temperature compared to ambient condition, respectively. A significant increase (55 %) of total organic carbon in the root exudates under elevated CO2 + temperature was noticed. Carbon dioxide enrichment associated with elevated temperature significantly increased soil labile carbon, microbial biomass carbon, and activities of carbon-transforming enzyme like β-glucosidase. Highly significant correlations were noticed among the different soil enzymes and soil labile carbon fractions.

  8. Modelling the climatic drivers determining photosynthesis and carbon allocation in evergreen Mediterranean forests using multiproxy long time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gea-Izquierdo, G.; Guibal, F.; Joffre, R.; Ourcival, J. M.; Simioni, G.; Guiot, J.

    2015-06-01

    Climatic drivers limit several important physiological processes involved in ecosystem carbon dynamics including gross primary productivity (GPP) and carbon allocation in vegetation. Climatic variability limits these two processes differently. We developed an existing mechanistic model to analyse photosynthesis and variability in carbon allocation in two evergreen species at two Mediterranean forests. The model was calibrated using a combination of eddy covariance CO2 flux data, dendrochronological time series of secondary growth and forest inventory data. The model was modified to be climate explicit in the key processes addressing the acclimation of photosynthesis and the pattern of C allocation, particularly to water stress. It succeeded in fitting both the high- and the low-frequency response of stand GPP and carbon allocation to stem growth. This would support its capability to address both C-source and C-sink limitations. Simulations suggest a decrease in mean stomatal conductance in response to a recent enhancement in water stress and an increase in mean annual intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE) in both species during the last 50 years. However, this was not translated into a parallel increase in ecosystem water use efficiency (WUE). The interannual variability in WUE closely followed that in iWUE at both sites. Nevertheless, long-term decadal variability in WUE followed the long-term decrease in annual GPP matching the local trend in annual precipitation observed since the late 1970s at one site. In contrast, at the site where long-term precipitation remained stable, GPP and WUE did not show a negative trend and the trees buffered the climatic variability. In our simulations these temporal changes were related to acclimation processes at the canopy level, including modifications in LAI and stomatal conductance, but also partly related to increasing [CO2] because the model includes biochemical equations where photosynthesis is directly linked to [CO2

  9. Storage of atmospheric carbon in global litter and soil pools in response to vegetation change and biomass allocation

    SciTech Connect

    Klooster, S.A.; Potter, C.S.

    1995-09-01

    Changes in the distribution of vegetation types under altered climate regimes could have important consequences for the storage of atmospheric carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. Because there are relatively few definitive field studies of changes in whole ecosystem carbon balance under modified climate stress, process-level models driven by gridded global databases may provide reasonable indicators of biome-specific sensitivity of C storage to changes in vegetation cover. We have used plant litter quality (lignin content) and carbon allocation to woody tissues as surrogates for testing the hypothetical effects of future vegetation change using the CASA (Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach) Biosphere model. The model is driven by global gridded (1{degrees}) satellite imagery on a monthly time interval to simulate seasonal patterns in net ecosystem carbon balance and steady-state carbon storage in detritus and soils. Sensitivity tests treated litter quality and allocation effects independently from other direct effects of changes in climate, atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels, and primary production. Results support the hypothesis that soil C storage in today`s temperate and boreal forest life zones are those most sensitive to changes in litter lignin content which may accompany increased climate stress. For these systems, the model predicts that a 50% increase in litter lignin concentrations would result in a long-term net gain of about 10% C from the atmosphere into surface litter and soil organic matter pools. A 50% decrease in C allocation to woody tissues would invoke a net loss of 10% C from litter and soil organic matter pools.

  10. Rain-Shelter Cultivation Modifies Carbon Allocation in the Polyphenolic and Volatile Metabolism of Vitis vinifera L. Chardonnay Grapes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mei-Mei; Yang, Xiao-Fan; Li, Zheng; Wang, Jun; Pan, Qiu-Hong

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of rain-shelter cultivation on the biosynthesis of flavonoids and volatiles in grapes, with an aim of determining whether rain-shelter application could help to improve the sensory attributes and quality of grapes. Vitis vinifera L. Chardonnay grapes, grown in the Huaizhuo basin region of northern China, were selected within two consecutive years. A rain-shelter roof was constructed using a colorless polyethylene (PE) film with a light transmittance of 80%. Results showed that rain-shelter treatment did not affect the accumulation of soluble solids during grape maturation. However, the allocation of assimilated carbon in phenolic and volatile biosynthetic pathways varied significantly, leading to alterations in polyphenolic and volatile profiles. The rain-shelter cultivation enhanced the concentration of flavan-3-ols via the flavonoid-3’5’-hydroxylase (F3’5’H) pathway, but reduced the level of flavonols and flavan-3-ols via the flavonoid-3’-hydroxylase (F3’H) pathway. In addition, the rain-shelter cultivation significantly enhanced the synthesis of fatty acid-derived volatiles, isoprene-derived terpenoids and amino acid-derived branched-chain aliphatics, but led to a decrease in the accumulation of isoprene-derived norisoprenoids and amino acid-derived benzenoids. Principal component analysis revealed some key compounds that differentiated the grapes cultivated under open-field and rain-shelter conditions. Moreover, the effect of the rain-shelter application on the accumulation of these compounds appeared to be vintage dependent. The alteration of their profiles caused by the rain-shelter treatment was significant in the vintage that received higher rainfall, which usually took place in the first rapid growth and veraison phases. PMID:27218245

  11. Rain-Shelter Cultivation Modifies Carbon Allocation in the Polyphenolic and Volatile Metabolism of Vitis vinifera L. Chardonnay Grapes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Li, Xiao-Xi; Han, Mei-Mei; Yang, Xiao-Fan; Li, Zheng; Wang, Jun; Pan, Qiu-Hong

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of rain-shelter cultivation on the biosynthesis of flavonoids and volatiles in grapes, with an aim of determining whether rain-shelter application could help to improve the sensory attributes and quality of grapes. Vitis vinifera L. Chardonnay grapes, grown in the Huaizhuo basin region of northern China, were selected within two consecutive years. A rain-shelter roof was constructed using a colorless polyethylene (PE) film with a light transmittance of 80%. Results showed that rain-shelter treatment did not affect the accumulation of soluble solids during grape maturation. However, the allocation of assimilated carbon in phenolic and volatile biosynthetic pathways varied significantly, leading to alterations in polyphenolic and volatile profiles. The rain-shelter cultivation enhanced the concentration of flavan-3-ols via the flavonoid-3'5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H) pathway, but reduced the level of flavonols and flavan-3-ols via the flavonoid-3'-hydroxylase (F3'H) pathway. In addition, the rain-shelter cultivation significantly enhanced the synthesis of fatty acid-derived volatiles, isoprene-derived terpenoids and amino acid-derived branched-chain aliphatics, but led to a decrease in the accumulation of isoprene-derived norisoprenoids and amino acid-derived benzenoids. Principal component analysis revealed some key compounds that differentiated the grapes cultivated under open-field and rain-shelter conditions. Moreover, the effect of the rain-shelter application on the accumulation of these compounds appeared to be vintage dependent. The alteration of their profiles caused by the rain-shelter treatment was significant in the vintage that received higher rainfall, which usually took place in the first rapid growth and veraison phases.

  12. Assimilation and allocation of carbon and nitrogen of thermal and nonthermal Agrostis species in response to high soil temperature.

    PubMed

    Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Huang, Bingru; Lambers, Hans

    2006-01-01

    We studied whether changes in the assimilation and allocation of carbon and nitrogen are associated with plant tolerance to high soil temperatures. Two Agrostis species, thermal Agrostis scabra, a species adapted to high-temperature soils in geothermal areas in Yellowstone National Park (USA), and two cultivars of a cool-season species, Agrostis stolonifera, L-93 and Penncross, were exposed to soil temperatures of 37 or 20 degrees C, while shoots were exposed to 20 degrees C. Net photosynthesis rate, photochemical efficiency, NO(3) (-)-assimilation rate and root viability decreased with increasing soil temperatures in both species. However, the decreases were less pronounced for A. scabra than for both A. stolonifera cultivars. Carbon investment in growth of plants exposed to 37 degrees C decreased more dramatically in both A. stolonifera cultivars than in A. scabra. Nitrogen allocation to shoots was greater in A. scabra than in both creeping bentgrass cultivars at 37 degrees C soil temperature. Our results demonstrate that plant tolerance to high soil temperature is related to efficient expenditure and adjustment of C- and N-allocation patterns between growth and respiration.

  13. Heterogeneous Light Supply Affects Growth and Biomass Allocation of the Understory Fern Diplopterygium glaucum at High Patch Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Song, Yao-Bin; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2011-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in resource supply is common and responses to heterogeneous resource supply have been extensively documented in clonal angiosperms but not in pteridophytes. To test the hypotheses that clonal integration can modify responses of pteridophytes to heterogeneous resource supply and the integration effect is larger at higher patch contrast, we conducted a field experiment with three homogeneous and two heterogeneous light treatments on the rhizomatous, understory fern Diplopterygium glaucum in an evergreen broad-leaved forest in East China. In homogeneous treatments, all D. glaucum ramets in 1.5 m×1.5 m units were subjected to 10, 40 and 100% natural light, respectively. In the heterogeneous treatment of low patch contrast, ramets in the central 0.5 m×0.5 m plots of the units were subjected to 40% natural light and their interconnected ramets in the surrounding area of the units to 100%; in the heterogeneous treatment of high patch contrast, ramets in the central plots were subjected to 10% natural light and those in the surrounding area to 100%. In the homogeneous treatments, biomass and number of living ramets in the central plots decreased and number of dead ramets increased with decreasing light supply. At low contrast heterogeneous light supply did not affect performance or biomass allocation of D. glaucum in the central plots, but at high contrast it increased lamina biomass and number of living ramets older than annual and modified biomass allocation to lamina and rhizome. Thus, clonal integration can affect responses of understory ferns to heterogeneous light supply and ramets in low light patches can be supported by those in high light. The results also suggest that effects of clonal integration depend on the degree of patch contrast and a significant integration effect may be found only under a relatively high patch contrast. PMID:22132189

  14. Red:far-red light conditions affect the emission of volatile organic compounds from barley (Hordeum vulgare), leading to altered biomass allocation in neighbouring plants

    PubMed Central

    Kegge, Wouter; Ninkovic, Velemir; Glinwood, Robert; Welschen, Rob A. M.; Voesenek, Laurentius A. C. J.; Pierik, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play various roles in plant–plant interactions, and constitutively produced VOCs might act as a cue to sense neighbouring plants. Previous studies have shown that VOCs emitted from the barley (Hordeum vulgare) cultivar ‘Alva’ cause changes in biomass allocation in plants of the cultivar ‘Kara’. Other studies have shown that shading and the low red:far-red (R:FR) conditions that prevail at high plant densities can reduce the quantity and alter the composition of the VOCs emitted by Arabidopsis thaliana, but whether this affects plant–plant signalling remains unknown. This study therefore examines the effects of far-red light enrichment on VOC emissions and plant–plant signalling between ‘Alva’ and ‘Kara’. Methods The proximity of neighbouring plants was mimicked by supplemental far-red light treatment of VOC emitter plants of barley grown in growth chambers. Volatiles emitted by ‘Alva’ under control and far-red light-enriched conditions were analysed using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS). ‘Kara’ plants were exposed to the VOC blend emitted by the ‘Alva’ plants that were subjected to either of the light treatments. Dry matter partitioning, leaf area, stem and total root length were determined for ‘Kara’ plants exposed to ‘Alva’ VOCs, and also for ‘Alva’ plants exposed to either control or far-red-enriched light treatments. Key Results Total VOC emissions by ‘Alva’ were reduced under low R:FR conditions compared with control light conditions, although individual volatile compounds were found to be either suppressed, induced or not affected by R:FR. The altered composition of the VOC blend emitted by ‘Alva’ plants exposed to low R:FR was found to affect carbon allocation in receiver plants of ‘Kara’. Conclusions The results indicate that changes in R:FR light conditions influence the emissions of VOCs in barley, and that these altered emissions

  15. Invader disruption of belowground plant mutualisms reduces carbon acquisition and alters allocation patterns in a native forest herb.

    PubMed

    Hale, Alison N; Lapointe, Line; Kalisz, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Invasive plants impose novel selection pressures on naïve mutualistic interactions between native plants and their partners. As most plants critically rely on root fungal symbionts (RFSs) for soil resources, invaders that disrupt plant-RFS mutualisms can significantly depress native plant fitness. Here, we investigate the consequences of RFS mutualism disruption on native plant fitness in a glasshouse experiment with a forest invader that produces known anti-fungal allelochemicals. Over 5 months, we regularly applied either green leaves of the allelopathic invader Alliaria petiolata, a nonsystemic fungicide to simulate A. petiolata's effects, or green leaves of nonallelopathic Hesperis matronalis (control) to pots containing the native Maianthemum racemosum and its RFSs. We repeatedly measured M. racemosum physiology and harvested plants periodically to assess carbon allocation. Alliaria petiolata and fungicide treatment effects were indistinguishable: we observed inhibition of the RFS soil hyphal network and significant reductions in M. racemosum physiology (photosynthesis, transpiration and conductance) and allocation (carbon storage, root biomass and asexual reproduction) in both treatments relative to the control. Our findings suggest a general mechanistic hypothesis for local extinction of native species in ecosystems challenged by allelopathic invaders: RFS mutualism disruption drives carbon stress, subsequent declines in native plant vigor, and, if chronic, declines in RFS-dependent species abundance.

  16. Factors affecting the United Nations' response to natural disasters: what determines the allocation of the Central Emergency Response Fund?

    PubMed

    Robinson, Tyler D; Oliveira, Thiago M; Kayden, Stephanie

    2017-01-30

    Natural disasters can overwhelm the domestic response of a country, leaving it dependent on external humanitarian relief. The Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) of the United Nations centralises humanitarian funding and thus allows for a rapid response. This study combined data to analyse the factors that affected the allocation of CERF funding to countries that suffered a natural disaster between 2007 and 2013. It generated descriptive statistics and information on relative risks, and performed regressions of CERF funding across countries. There were 4,346 disasters in total in 188 countries between 2007 and 2013. CERF provided USD 2.98 billion to 87 countries, comprising 3.3 per cent of their total humanitarian funding. CERF more frequently supplied aid to countries in North Africa and the Middle East, and to those that had suffered geophysical disasters. Appropriately, it funds vulnerable countries experiencing severe natural disasters, yet its funding may be affected by variables beyond severity and vulnerability. Further investigation is warranted, therefore.

  17. Seasonal variations of the amount of carbon allocated to respiration after in situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of trees (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epron, D.; Dannoura, M.; Ngao, J.; Plain, C.; Berveller, D.; Chipeaux, C.; Gerant, D.; Bosc, A.; Maillard, P.; Loustau, D.; Damesin, C.; Cats Project (Anr-07-Blan-0109)

    2010-12-01

    Soil and trunk respiration are the major sources of carbon from forest ecosystems to the atmosphere and they account for a large fraction of total ecosystem respiration. The amount of photosynthate allocated to respiration affects the growth of the tree and the potential for carbon sequestration of forest ecosystems. This study, aiming at understanding patterns of carbon allocation to respiration among species and seasons, consisted in pure 13CO2 labelling of the entire crown of three different tree species (beech, oak and pine) at distinct phenological stages between Sept 2008 and Feb 2010. 13C was then tracked for several weeks in soil and trunk CO2 efflux at high temporal resolution using tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometry (Plain et al. 2009). Recovery of 13C in trunk and soil CO2 efflux was observed a few couple of hours after the beginning of the labelling in oak and beech. There is a rapid transfer of 13C belowground with a maximum occurring within 2 to 4 days after labelling. Label was recovered at the same time in the respiration and in the biomass of both fine roots and microbes. Maximum recovery occurred earlier in beech and oak, while it happened later in Pine. Indeed, the velocity of phloem transport, calculated as the difference of time lags in 13C recovery in trunk respiration at different height, was around 0.10-0.2m/h in pine and around 0.2-1.2 m/h in oak and beech, reflecting difference in phloem anatomy between angiosperm and gymnosperm. The cumulated amount of label recovered in soil CO2 efflux 20 days after labelling varied among the seasons in all species, from 1 to 16% in beech, 2 to 11% in oak and 1 to 11% in pine. For all species, allocation to soil respiration was greater in early summer compared to spring, late summer and autumn. A compartmental analysis is further conducted to characterise functional pools of labelled substrates and storage compounds that contribute to both trunk and soil respiration. [Plain C, Gérant D

  18. A device for single leaf labelling with CO2 isotopes to study carbon allocation and partitioning in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant biomass consists primarily of carbohydrates derived from photosynthesis. Monitoring the assimilation of carbon via the Calvin-Benson cycle and its subsequent utilisation is fundamental to understanding plant growth. The use of stable and radioactive carbon isotopes, supplied to plants as CO2, allows the measurement of fluxes through the intermediates of primary photosynthetic metabolism, long-distance transport of sugars in the vasculature, and the synthesis of structural and storage components. Results Here we describe the design of a system for supplying isotopically labelled CO2 to single leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that the system works well using short pulses of 14CO2 and that it can be used to produce robust qualitative and quantitative data about carbon export from source leaves to the sink tissues, such as the developing leaves and the roots. Time course experiments show the dynamics of carbon partitioning between storage as starch, local production of biomass, and export of carbon to sink tissues. Conclusion This isotope labelling method is relatively simple to establish and inexpensive to perform. Our use of 14CO2 helps establish the temporal and spatial allocation of assimilated carbon during plant growth, delivering data complementary to those obtained in recent studies using 13CO2 and MS-based metabolomics techniques. However, we emphasise that this labelling device could also be used effectively in combination with 13CO2 and MS-based techniques. PMID:24252607

  19. Scale of Carbon Nanomaterials Affects Neural Outgrowth and Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Franca, Eric; Jao, PitFee; Fang, Sheng-Po; Alagapan, Sankaraleengam; Pan, Liangbin; Yoon, Jung Hae; Yoon, Yong-Kyu ‘YK’

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials have become increasingly popular microelectrode materials for neuroscience applications. Here we study how the scale of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers affect neural viability, outgrowth, and adhesion. Carbon nanotubes were deposited on glass coverslips via a layer-by-layer method with polyethylenimine (PEI). Carbonized nanofibers were fabricated by electrospinning SU-8 and pyrolyzing the nanofiber depositions. Additional substrates tested were carbonized and SU-8 thin films and SU-8 nanofibers. Surfaces were O2-plasma treated, coated with varying concentrations of PEI, seeded with E18 rat cortical cells, and examined at 3, 4, and 7 days in vitro (DIV). Neural adhesion was examined at 4 DIV utilizing a parallel plate flow chamber. At 3 DIV, neural viability was lower on the nanofiber and thin film depositions treated with higher PEI concentrations which corresponded with significantly higher zeta potentials (surface charge); this significance was drastically higher on the nanofibers suggesting that the nanostructure may collect more PEI molecules, causing increased toxicity. At 7 DIV, significantly higher neurite outgrowth was observed on SU-8 nanofiber substrates with nanofibers a significant fraction of a neuron’s size. No differences were detected for carbonized nanofibers or carbon nanotubes. Both carbonized and SU-8 nanofibers had significantly higher cellular adhesion post-flow in comparison to controls whereas the carbon nanotubes were statistically similar to control substrates. These data suggest a neural cell preference for larger-scale nanomaterials with specific surface treatments. These characteristics could be taken advantage of in the future design and fabrication of neural microelectrodes. PMID:26829799

  20. The dynamic of the annual carbon allocation to wood in European tree species is consistent with a combined source-sink limitation of growth: implications for modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemot, J.; Martin-StPaul, N. K.; Dufrene, E.; Francois, C.; Soudani, K.; Ourcival, J. M.; Delpierre, N.

    2015-05-01

    The extent to which wood growth is limited by carbon (C) supply (i.e. source control) or by cambial activity (i.e. sink control) will strongly determine the responses of trees to global changes. Nevertheless, the physiological processes that are responsible for limiting forest growth are still a matter of debate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the key determinants of the annual C allocation to wood along large soil and climate regional gradients over France. The study was conducted for five tree species representative of the main European forest biomes (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, Quercus ilex, Quercus robur and Picea abies). The drivers of stand biomass growth were assessed on both inter-site and inter-annual scales. Our data set comprised field measurements performed at 49 sites (931 site-years) that included biometric measurements and a variety of stand characteristics (e.g. soil water holding capacity, leaf area index). It was complemented with process-based simulations when possible explanatory variables could not be directly measured (e.g. annual and seasonal tree C balance, bioclimatic water stress indices). Specifically, the relative influences of tree C balance (source control), direct environmental control (water and temperature controls of sink activity) and allocation adjustments related to age, past climate conditions, competition intensity and soil nutrient availability on growth were quantified. The inter-site variability in the stand C allocation to wood was predominantly driven by age-related decline. The direct effects of temperature and water stress on sink activity (i.e. effects independent from their effects on the C supply) exerted a strong influence on the annual stand wood growth in all of the species considered, including deciduous temperate species. The lagged effect of the past environmental conditions (e.g. the previous year's water stress and low C uptake) significantly affected the annual C allocation to wood. The C supply

  1. Allocation of carbon to fine root compounds and their residence times in a boreal forest depend on root size class and season.

    PubMed

    Keel, Sonja G; Campbell, Catherine D; Högberg, Mona N; Richter, Andreas; Wild, Birgit; Zhou, Xuhui; Hurry, Vaughan; Linder, Sune; Näsholm, Torgny; Högberg, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Fine roots play a key role in the forest carbon balance, but their carbon dynamics remain largely unknown. We pulse labelled 50 m(2) patches of young boreal forest by exposure to (13)CO(2) in early and late summer. Labelled photosynthates were traced into carbon compounds of < 1 and 1-3 mm diameter roots (fine roots), and into bulk tissue of these and first-order roots (root tips). Root tips were the most strongly labelled size class. Carbon allocation to all size classes was higher in late than in early summer; mean residence times (MRTs) in starch increased from 4 to 11 months. In structural compounds, MRTs were 0.8 yr in tips and 1.8 yr in fine roots. The MRT of carbon in sugars was in the range of days. Functional differences within the fine root population were indicated by carbon allocation patterns and residence times. Pronounced allocation of recent carbon and higher turnover rates in tips are associated with their role in nutrient and water acquisition. In fine roots, longer MRTs but high allocation to sugars and starch reflect their role in structural support and storage. Accounting for heterogeneity in carbon residence times will improve and most probably reduce the estimates of fine root production.

  2. Age-related variation in carbon allocation at tree and stand scales in beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) using a chronosequence approach.

    PubMed

    Genet, H; Bréda, N; Dufrêne, E

    2010-02-01

    Two types of physiological mechanisms can contribute to growth decline with age: (i) the mechanisms leading to the reduction of carbon assimilation (input) and (ii) those leading to modification of the resource economy. Surprisingly, the processes relating to carbon allocation have been little investigated as compared to research on the processes governing carbon assimilation. The objective of this paper was thus to test the hypothesis that growth decrease related to age is accompanied by changes in carbon allocation to the benefit of storage and reproductive functions in two contrasting broad-leaved species: beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.). Age-related changes in carbon allocation were studied using a chronosequence approach. Chronosequences, each consisting of several even-aged stands ranging from 14 to 175 years old for beech and from 30 to 134 years old for sessile oak, were divided into five or six age classes. In this study, carbon allocations to growth, storage and reproduction were defined as the relative amount of carbon invested in biomass increment, carbohydrate increment and seed production, respectively. Tree-ring width and allometric relationships were used to assess biomass increment at the tree and stand scales. Below-ground biomass was assessed using a specific allometric relationship between root:shoot ratio and age, established from the literature review. Seasonal variations of carbohydrate concentrations were used to assess carbon allocation to storage. Reproduction effort was quantified for beech stands by collecting seed and cupule production. Age-related flagging of biomass productivity was assessed at the tree and stand scales, and carbohydrate quantities in trees increased with age for both species. Seed and cupule production increased with stand age in beech from 56 gC m(-)(2) year(-1) at 30 years old to 129 gC m(-2) year(-1) at 138 years old. In beech, carbon allocation to storage and

  3. Competition for water and light in closed-canopy forests: a tractable model of carbon allocation with implications for carbon sinks.

    PubMed

    Farrior, Caroline E; Dybzinski, Ray; Levin, Simon A; Pacala, Stephen W

    2013-03-01

    Abstract The dependence of forest productivity and community composition on rainfall is the result of complex interactions at multiple scales, from the physiology of carbon gain and water loss to competition among individuals and species. In an effort to understand the role of these multiscale interactions in the dependence of forest structure on rainfall, we build a tractable model of individual plant competition for water and light. With game-theoretic analyses, we predict the dominant plant allocation strategy, forest productivity, and carbon storage. We find that the amount and timing of rainfall are critical to forest structure. Comparing two forests that differ only in the total time plants spend in water saturation, the model predicts that the wetter forest has fewer fine roots, more leaves, and more woody biomass than the drier forest. In contrast, if two forests differ only in the amount of water available during water limitation, the model predicts that the wetter forest has more fine roots than the drier forest and equivalent leaves and woody biomass. The difference in these responses to increases in water availability has significant implications for potential carbon sinks with rising atmospheric CO2. We predict that enhanced productivity from increased leaf-level water-use efficiency during water limitation will be allocated to fine roots if plants respond competitively, producing only a small and short-lived carbon sink.

  4. Cross-continental comparison of the functional composition and carbon allocation of two altitudinal forest transects in Ecuador and Rwanda.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauters, Marijn; Bruneel, Stijn; Demol, Miro; Taveirne, Cys; Van Der Heyden, Dries; Boeckx, Pascal; Kearsley, Elizabeth; Cizungu, Landry; Verbeeck, Hans

    2016-04-01

    Tropical forests are key actors in the global carbon cycle. Predicting future responses of these forests to global change is challenging, but important for global climate models. However, our current understanding of such responses is limited, due to the complexity of forest ecosystems and the slow dynamics that inherently form these systems. Our understanding of ecosystem ecology and functioning could greatly benefit from experimental setups including strong environmental gradients in the tropics, as found on altitudinal transects. We setup two such transects in both South-America and Africa, focussing on shifts in carbon allocation, forest structure and functional composition. By a cross-continental comparison of both transects, we will gain insight in how different or alike both tropical forests biomes are in their responses, and how universal the observed adaption mechanisms are.

  5. Effect of increased CO sub 2 and decreased O sub 2 on photosynthesis, and carbon allocation in source leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Fondy, B.R. ); Geiger, D.R.; Shieh, W.-J. )

    1990-05-01

    The effect of raising the rate of photosynthesis on the allocation of carbon between sucrose and starch was studied by means of steady-state radiolabeling. Sugar beet source leaves on intact plants were exposed to ambient levels of CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} for 3 hrs. Next CO{sub 2} was raised to 600 {mu}LL{sup {minus}3} for 3 hrs then O{sub 2} was decreased to 2% for 3 hrs. Rates of net carbon exchange (NCE), export, and starch and sucrose synthesis were measured. NCER increased by 30% under the combined treatments and the proportion of photosynthate allocated to starch and to sucrose did not change. When O{sub 2} concentration was lowered, NCER increased but export did not and sucrose accumulated. This observation, and our earlier conclusion that export rate usually equals sucrose synthesis rate, lead us to conclude that low O{sub 2} directly inhibited export. Low O{sub 2} treatment causes sucrose to accumulate in a sugar beet leaf which usually accumulates little sucrose.

  6. Carbon Allocation of 13CO2-labeled Photoassimilate in Larix gmelinii Saplings - A Physiological Basis for Isotope Dendroclimatology in Eastern Siberia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagawa, A.; Sugimoto, A.; Maximov, T. C.

    2006-12-01

    Tree-ring density and widths have been successfully used to reconstruct summer temperatures in high- northern latitudes, although a discrepancy between tree-growth and temperature has been found for recent decades. The so-called "reduced sensitivity" of tree rings to summer temperatures has been observed especially strongly in northern Siberia (Briffa et al., 1998) and drought stress (increased water use efficiency) arose from global warming and/or increasing CO2 are suggested as causes (Barber et al. 2000, Saurer et al. 2004). By using carbon isotope ratio as an indicator of drought stress and ring-width/density as indicators of growth, we can clarify how drought stress caused by recent global warming affects wood formation of Siberian trees. However, isotope dendroclimatology is still in its infancy and our understanding of basic physiological processes of isotope signal transfer from leaves to tree rings is insufficient. In order to understand translocation, storage, and allocation of photoassimilate to different organs of trees, we pulse- labeled ten L. gmelinii growing in a continuous permafrost zone with stable 13CO2. We studied seasonal course of carbon allocation patterns of photoassimilate among needles, branches, stem and roots and also how spring, summer, and autumn photoassimilate is later used for both earlywood and latewood formation. About half of the carbon in new needles was derived from stored material. The starch pool in non- needle parts, which can be used for xylem formation, drew about 43 percent of its carbon from previous year's photoassimilate, suggesting that carbon storage is the key mechanism behind autocorrelation in (isotope) dendroclimatology. Analysis of intra-annual 13C of the tree rings formed after the labeling revealed that earlywood contained photoassimilate from the previous summer and autumn as well as from the current spring. Latewood was mainly composed of photoassimilate from the current year's summer/autumn, although it

  7. Contrasting carbon allocation responses of juvenile European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) to competition and ozone.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Wilma; Lehmeier, Christoph Andreas; Winkler, Jana Barbro; Matyssek, Rainer; Edgar Grams, Thorsten Erhard

    2015-01-01

    Allocation of recent photoassimilates of juvenile beech and spruce in response to twice-ambient ozone (2 × O(3)) and plant competition (i.e. intra vs. inter-specific) was examined in a phytotron study. To this end, we employed continuous (13)CO(2)/(12)CO(2) labeling during late summer and pursued tracer kinetics in CO(2) released from stems. In beech, allocation of recent photoassimilates to stems was significantly lowered under 2 × O(3) and increased in spruce when grown in mixed culture. As total tree biomass was not yet affected by the treatments, C allocation reflected incipient tree responses providing the mechanistic basis for biomass partitioning as observed in longer experiments. Compartmental modeling characterized functional properties of substrate pools supplying respiratory C demand. Respiration of spruce appeared to be exclusively supplied by recent photoassimilates. In beech, older C, putatively located in stem parenchyma cells, was a major source of respiratory substrate, reflecting the fundamental anatomical disparity between angiosperm beech and gymnosperm spruce.

  8. How life affects the geochemical cycle of carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James C. G.

    1992-01-01

    Developing a quantitative understanding of the biogeochemical cycles of carbon as they have worked throughout Earth history on various time scales, how they have been affected by biological evolution, and how changes in the carbon content of ocean and atmosphere may have affected climate and the evolution of life are the goals of the research. Theoretical simulations were developed that can be tuned to reproduce such data as exist and, once tuned, can be used to predict properties that have not yet been observed. This is an ongoing process, in which models and results are refined as new data and interpretations become available and as understanding of the global system improves. Results of the research are described in several papers which were published or submitted for publication. These papers are summarized. Future research plans are presented.

  9. Microbial Carbon Cycling in Permafrost-Affected Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Vishnivetskaya, T.; Liebner, Susanne; Wilhelm, Ronald; Wagner, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The Arctic plays a key role in Earth s climate system as global warming is predicted to be most pronounced at high latitudes and because one third of the global carbon pool is stored in ecosystems of the northern latitudes. In order to improve our understanding of the present and future carbon dynamics in climate sensitive permafrost ecosystems, present studies concentrate on investigations of microbial controls of greenhouse gas fluxes, on the activity and structure of the involved microbial communities, and on their response to changing environmental conditions. Permafrost-affected soils can function as both a source and a sink for carbon dioxide and methane. Under anaerobic conditions, caused by flooding of the active layer and the effect of backwater above the permafrost table, the mineralization of organic matter can only be realized stepwise by specialized microorganisms. Important intermediates of the organic matter decomposition are hydrogen, carbon dioxide and acetate, which can be further reduced to methane by methanogenic archaea. Evolution of methane fluxes across the subsurface/atmosphere boundary will thereby strongly depend on the activity of anaerobic methanogenic archaea and obligately aerobic methane oxidizing proteobacteria, which are known to be abundant and to significantly reduce methane emissions in permafrost-affected soils. Therefore current studies on methane-cycling microorganisms are the object of particular attention in permafrost studies, because of their key role in the Arctic methane cycle and consequently of their significance for the global methane budget.

  10. Examining Patterns of Carbon Assimilation and Allocation to Defense Processes in a Restored Southern Pine Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritger, H.; Novick, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    Southern pine forests provide many important ecosystem services, including biodiversity, carbon sequestration, and softwood timber production, which is a vital component of local economies in the American South. However, all southern pine forests are sensitive to damage from infestations of bark beetles and drought events, which can lead to declines in productivity that may cause mortality in extreme cases, and which may increase in frequency in the future due to ongoing climate change. This study explores how southern pine management for restored, old-growth like conditions, in contrast with management for timber production, affects stand scale drought response and tree resistance to bark beetle herbivory by leveraging a suite of data from a new eddy covariance flux monitoring site in a 65-year-old restored loblolly (Pinus taeda) and shortleaf (Pinus echinata) pine forest situated in the Crossett Experimental Forest (Arkansas, USA). The sensitivity of ecosystem scale fluxes of CO2 and H2O to drought is interpreted through a synthesis with other long-running Ameriflux sites located in southern pine forests. The effects of the management regime on resin production, which is the pine trees' main defense against beetle attacks, are assessed by comparing monthly resin flow observations collected over the course of the 2013 growing season in the restored stand and in a co-located stand of even-age planted loblolly pines managed for timber production. Results show that loblolly in the uneven-aged stand consistently produced much larger amounts of resin than loblolly in the even-aged stand, and shortleaf pines were the lowest producers throughout the growing season. No significant relationship between resin flow and diameter at breast height was observed within or across species and sites; thus, species and management effects are independent of their effect on tree size.

  11. Carbon allocation and element composition in four Chlamydomonas mutants defective in genes related to the CO2 concentrating mechanism.

    PubMed

    Memmola, Francesco; Mukherjee, Bratati; Moroney, James V; Giordano, Mario

    2014-09-01

    Four mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with defects in different components of the CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) or in Rubisco activase were grown autotrophically at high pCO2 and then transferred to low pCO2, in order to study the role of different components of the CCM on carbon allocation and elemental composition. To study carbon allocation, we measured the relative size of the main organic pools by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence was used to analyze the elemental composition of algal cells. Our data show that although the organic pools increased their size at high CO2 in all strains, their stoichiometry was highly homeostatic, i.e., the ratios between carbohydrates and proteins, lipid and proteins, and carbohydrates and lipids, did not change significantly. The only exception was the wild-type 137c, in which proteins decreased relative to carbohydrates and lipids, when the cells were transferred to low CO2. It is noticeable that the two wild types used in this study responded differently to the transition from high to low CO2. Malfunctions of the CCM influenced the concentration of several elements, somewhat altering cell elemental stoichiometry: especially the C/P and N/P ratios changed appreciably in almost all strains as a function of the growth CO2 concentration, except in 137c and the Rubisco activase mutant rca1. In strain cia3, defective in the lumenal carbonic anhydrase (CA), the cell quotas of P, S, Ca, Mn, Fe, and Zn were about 5-fold higher at low CO2 than at high CO2. A Principle Components Analysis showed that, mostly because of its elemental composition, cia3 behaved in a substantially different way from all other strains, at low CO2. The lumenal CA thus plays a crucial role, not only for the correct functioning of the CCM, but also for element utilization. Not surprisingly, growth at high CO2 attenuated differences among strains.

  12. Carbon allocation in plants and ecosystems - insights from stable isotope studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessler, Arthur

    2014-05-01

    Trees are large global stores of carbon (C) that will be impacted by increased carbon dioxide levels and climate change. However, at present we cannot properly predict the carbon balance of forests in future as we lack knowledge on how plant physiological processes, the transfer of carbon within the plant, carbon storage, and remobilization in the plant tissues as well as the release of carbon from the roots to the soil interact with environmental drivers and ecosystem-scale processes. This paper will summarise how stable isotope techniques can give new insights in the fate of newly assimilated C in plants and ecosystems on time scales from hours to seasons and it will include studies either characterizing temporal and spatial variation in the natural abundance of carbon and oxygen isotopes or applying isotopically enriched tracers. It comprises the assessment of the mechanisms of C partitioning among specific metabolic pathways, between plant organs and into various ecosystem C pools with different residence times. Moreover stable isotopes are highly suitable tools to characterise the role of the phloem, which is the central long-distance conveyer distributing C from source to sinks and thus plays a central role in linking sites and structures of storage, growth and other metabolic activities. A deeper understanding of these processes and their interaction with environmental drivers is critical for predicting how trees and ecosystems will respond to coming global environmental changes, including increased temperature, altered precipitation, and elevated carbon dioxide concentrations.

  13. The influence of season on carbon allocation to suberin and other stem components of cork oak saplings.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Pedro L; Curt, M Dolores; Pereira, Helena; Fernández, Jesús

    2016-12-14

    The growth pattern of cork oak (Quercus suber L.), an important component of South Mediterranean woodlands, is seasonal. Seasonality has been found for shoot, radial and cork ring growth as well as for carbon (C) photoassimilation, nutrients remobilization and water relations, among other physiological aspects. However, little is known about the seasonality of C allocation to cork oak chemical compounds, including suberin, a major component of cork. In order to achieve this goal, an isotopic tracer experiment was conducted using 18-month-old cork oaks so that the fate of C photoassimilated in different seasons could be traced into biochemical (main organic) stem components. Two distinct patterns of C allocation, associated with the stages of active plant growth and dormancy, were identified and described. Evidence was provided that translocation of photoassimilated C to stems does not cease during the dormancy period and that suberin is the major C sink for the C assimilated throughout the whole active growth period, as compared with other stem components.

  14. Direct in situ measurement of Carbon Allocation to Mycorrhizal Fungi in a California Mixed-Conifer Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, M. F.

    2011-12-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi represent a large allocation of C to ecosystems, based on indirect measurements (tree girdling) and glasshouse extrapolations. However, we have no direct measures carbon (C) sink, in part because technologies for studying belowground dynamics on time scales at which roots and microbes grow and die have not existed. We initiated new sensor and observation platforms belowground to characterize and quantify belowground dynamics in a California mixed-conifer ecosystem. For the first time, we directly observed growth and mortality of mycorrhizal fungi in situ. We measured soil CO2, T and θ at 5-min intervals into the soil profile. Using our automated minirhizotron (AMR) for hyphal dynamics and the Bartz minirhizotron for longer-term and spatial variation in roots and rhizomorphs, we measured root, rhizomorph, hyphal growth, and belowground phenology up to 4x daily. These data are coupled with sensors measuring eddy flux of water and CO2, sapflow for water fluxes and C fixation activity, and photographs for leaf phenology. Because our data were collected at short intervals, we can describe integrative C exchange using the DayCent model for NPP and measured NPP of rhizomorphs, and fungal hyphae. Here, we focused on an arbuscular mycorrhiza dominated meadow and an ectomycorrhizal pine/oak forest at the James Reserve, in southern California. By daily measuring hyphal growth and mortality, we constructed life-span estimates of mycorrhizal hyphae, and from these, C allocation estimates. In the meadow, the NPP was 141g/m2/y, with a productivity of fine root+internal AM fungi of 76.5g C/m2/y, and an estimated 10% of which is AM fungal C allocation (7.7 g/m2/y). Extramatrical AM hyphal peak standing crop was 10g/m2, with a lifespan of 46 days (with active hyphae persisting for ~240 days per year days). Thus, the annual AM fungal allocation was 7.7g C/m2/y internal and 52g/m2/y external, for a net allocation of 84g C/m2/y, or 60% of the estimated NPP. In the

  15. Coupling carbon allocation with leaf and root phenology predicts tree-grass partitioning along a savanna rainfall gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverd, V.; Smith, B.; Raupach, M.; Briggs, P.; Nieradzik, L.; Beringer, J.; Hutley, L.; Trudinger, C. M.; Cleverly, J.

    2015-10-01

    The relative complexity of the mechanisms underlying savanna ecosystem dynamics, in comparison to other biomes such as temperate and tropical forests, challenges the representation of such dynamics in ecosystem and Earth system models. A realistic representation of processes governing carbon allocation and phenology for the two defining elements of savanna vegetation (namely trees and grasses) may be a key to understanding variations in tree/grass partitioning in time and space across the savanna biome worldwide. Here we present a new approach for modelling coupled phenology and carbon allocation, applied to competing tree and grass plant functional types. The approach accounts for a temporal shift between assimilation and growth, mediated by a labile carbohydrate store. This is combined with a method to maximise long-term net primary production (NPP) by optimally partitioning plant growth between fine roots and (leaves + stem). The computational efficiency of the analytic method used here allows it to be uniquely and readily applied at regional scale, as required, for example, within the framework of a global biogeochemical model. We demonstrate the approach by encoding it in a new simple carbon/water cycle model that we call HAVANA (Hydrology and Vegetation-dynamics Algorithm for Northern Australia), coupled to the existing POP (Population Orders Physiology) model for tree demography and disturbance-mediated heterogeneity. HAVANA-POP is calibrated using monthly remotely-sensed fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fPAR) and eddy-covariance-based estimates of carbon and water fluxes at 5 tower sites along the Northern Australian Tropical Transect (NATT), which is characterized by large gradients in rainfall and wildfire disturbance. The calibrated model replicates observed gradients of fPAR, tree leaf area index, basal area and foliage projective cover along the NATT. The model behaviour emerges from complex feed-backs between the plant

  16. Coupling carbon allocation with leaf and root phenology predicts tree-grass partitioning along a savanna rainfall gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverd, V.; Smith, B.; Raupach, M.; Briggs, P.; Nieradzik, L.; Beringer, J.; Hutley, L.; Trudinger, C. M.; Cleverly, J.

    2016-02-01

    The relative complexity of the mechanisms underlying savanna ecosystem dynamics, in comparison to other biomes such as temperate and tropical forests, challenges the representation of such dynamics in ecosystem and Earth system models. A realistic representation of processes governing carbon allocation and phenology for the two defining elements of savanna vegetation (namely trees and grasses) may be a key to understanding variations in tree-grass partitioning in time and space across the savanna biome worldwide. Here we present a new approach for modelling coupled phenology and carbon allocation, applied to competing tree and grass plant functional types. The approach accounts for a temporal shift between assimilation and growth, mediated by a labile carbohydrate store. This is combined with a method to maximize long-term net primary production (NPP) by optimally partitioning plant growth between fine roots and (leaves + stem). The computational efficiency of the analytic method used here allows it to be uniquely and readily applied at regional scale, as required, for example, within the framework of a global biogeochemical model.We demonstrate the approach by encoding it in a new simple carbon-water cycle model that we call HAVANA (Hydrology and Vegetation-dynamics Algorithm for Northern Australia), coupled to the existing POP (Population Orders Physiology) model for tree demography and disturbance-mediated heterogeneity. HAVANA-POP is calibrated using monthly remotely sensed fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fPAR) and eddy-covariance-based estimates of carbon and water fluxes at five tower sites along the North Australian Tropical Transect (NATT), which is characterized by large gradients in rainfall and wildfire disturbance. The calibrated model replicates observed gradients of fPAR, tree leaf area index, basal area, and foliage projective cover along the NATT. The model behaviour emerges from complex feedbacks between the plant

  17. Allocating a 2 °C cumulative carbon budget to countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gignac, Renaud; Damon Matthews, H.

    2015-07-01

    Recent estimates of the global carbon budget, or allowable cumulative CO2 emissions consistent with a given level of climate warming, have the potential to inform climate mitigation policy discussions aimed at maintaining global temperatures below 2 °C. This raises difficult questions, however, about how best to share this carbon budget amongst nations in a way that both respects the need for a finite cap on total allowable emissions, and also addresses the fundamental disparities amongst nations with respect to their historical and potential future emissions. Here we show how the contraction and convergence (C&C) framework can be applied to the division of a global carbon budget among nations, in a manner that both maintains total emissions below a level consistent with 2 °C, and also adheres to the principle of attaining equal per capita CO2 emissions within the coming decades. We show further that historical differences in responsibility for climate warming can be quantified via a cumulative carbon debt (or credit), which represents the amount by which a given country’s historical emissions have exceeded (or fallen short of) the emissions that would have been consistent with their share of world population over time. This carbon debt/credit calculation enhances the potential utility of C&C, therefore providing a simple method to frame national climate mitigation targets in a way that both accounts for historical responsibility, and also respects the principle of international equity in determining future emissions allowances.

  18. In Situ Carbon Stable Isotope Tracer Experiments Elucidate Carbon Translocation Rates and Allocation Patterns in Zostera marina L. (eelgrass)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The intertidal seagrass Zostera marina is an important species that provides critical habitat for a number of estuarine species. Despite its widespread distribution, there is limited information on seasonal patterns of carbon dynamics of plants growing in situ, particularly esti...

  19. Belowground carbon allocation by trees drives seasonal patterns of extracellular enzyme activities by altering microbial community composition in a beech forest soil.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Christina; Koranda, Marianne; Kitzler, Barbara; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Schnecker, Jörg; Schweiger, Peter; Rasche, Frank; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Sessitsch, Angela; Richter, Andreas

    2010-08-01

    *Plant seasonal cycles alter carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) availability for soil microbes, which may affect microbial community composition and thus feed back on microbial decomposition of soil organic material and plant N availability. The temporal dynamics of these plant-soil interactions are, however, unclear. *Here, we experimentally manipulated the C and N availability in a beech forest through N fertilization or tree girdling and conducted a detailed analysis of the seasonal pattern of microbial community composition and decomposition processes over 2 yr. *We found a strong relationship between microbial community composition and enzyme activities over the seasonal course. Phenoloxidase and peroxidase activities were highest during late summer, whereas cellulase and protease peaked in late autumn. Girdling, and thus loss of mycorrhiza, resulted in an increase in soil organic matter-degrading enzymes and a decrease in cellulase and protease activity. *Temporal changes in enzyme activities suggest a switch of the main substrate for decomposition between summer (soil organic matter) and autumn (plant litter). Our results indicate that ectomycorrhizal fungi are possibly involved in autumn cellulase and protease activity. Our study shows that, through belowground C allocation, trees significantly alter soil microbial communities, which may affect seasonal patterns of decomposition processes.

  20. Effects of carbon dioxide and phosphorus supply on potato dry matter allocation and canopy morphology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) generally exhibit a positive growth response to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration (CO2) and require high amounts of phosphorus (P) fertilizer. Despite its prominence as a world-wide staple crop, there is little data that quantifies effects of P, and n...

  1. Vulnerability and resilience to droughts in South-West USA: carbon allocation and impact on wood and evaporative anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerin, M. F.; von Arx, G.; McDowell, N. G.; Pockman, W.; Andreu-Hayles, L.; Gentine, P.

    2015-12-01

    Survival and distribution of conifers across the globe will depend on their adaptive potential to the new climatic conditions (warmer, more droughts, heat waves). Recent studies predicting forest evolution have mainly focused on understanding tree mortality processes (hydraulic failure, carbon starvation, biotic stresses). These explicit causes of mortality are also the result of unsuccessful adaptation on a longer period. Using a 7 years drought-irrigation experiment in New Mexico, USA, we investigated the response to water availability on structure-function interactions at the tree level. Bridging dendrology and physiology on multiple individuals of local Pinion pine, we observe a structural dynamics in i) wood anatomy ii) evaporative anatomy and a resulting functional dynamics in i) leaf water potential and ii) water use efficiency on multiple time scales (daily to interannual). These results emphasize the tight coupling between carbon allocation and the surface hydrologic cycle on longer time scales and its impact on resilience and mortality, which is not included in current generation land-surface models. figure: Wood anatomy obtained from a 5.2mm core of a Pinion Edulis from the experimental site - illustrating the variability of the water transport capacities accross years

  2. Productivity and carbon allocation in pure and mixed-species plantations of Eucalyptus grandis and Acacia mangium in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouvellon, Y.; Laclau, J.; Epron, D.; Le Maire, G.; Gonçalves, J.; Bouillet, J.

    2010-12-01

    Nitrogen fertilizer inputs are required in fast growing eucalypt plantations to meet tree requirements, and to compensate for the large nitrogen outputs associated with wood exportation at the end of the short rotations. Due to the economic and potential environmental cost of fertilizers, mixed-species plantations (MSP) with N-fixing species (NFS) such as Acacia sp. might be an attractive option to improve the long-term soil N (and possibly soil carbon) status. In such MSP, increases in N availability may influence the productivity and C partitioning of the non-N fixing species. To investigate the effects of NFS on nutrient cycling, wood production, C sequestration, and soil fertility, a randomized block design including monocultures of Eucalyptus grandis (100%E) and Acacia mangium (100%A), and mixtures of these species (50%E:50%A) was set up in southern Brazil. Our specific goals in the present study were to compare the production and C allocation patterns of these plantations, during the two last years of the 6-yr rotation. We hypothesized that 1) a large part of the differences in wood production between monospecific stands would be explained by differences in C allocation; and 2) the C allocation patterns of each species would be strongly modified in mixed- species plantations compared to mono-specific plantations due to inter-specific interactions and shifts in soil N status. Biomass increase (growth, G) in the different plant compartments was assessed by means of inventories and allometric relationships. Total aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP), and the productivity of each aboveground plant compartment were estimated from measurements of G and litterfall (L) (ANPP=G+L). Total belowground C allocations (TBCA) were estimated using a mass-balance approach as soil CO2 efflux C minus the C input from aboveground litter plus changes in the C stored in roots, in the forest floor litter layer, and in soil. Over this first rotation, mixing NFS with eucalypt

  3. Non-structural carbon dynamics and allocation relate to growth rate and leaf habit in California oaks.

    PubMed

    Trumbore, Susan; Czimczik, Claudia I; Sierra, Carlos A; Muhr, Jan; Xu, Xiaomei

    2015-11-01

    Trees contain non-structural carbon (NSC), but it is unclear for how long these reserves are stored and to what degree they are used to support plant activity. We used radiocarbon ((14)C) to show that the carbon (C) in stemwood NSC can achieve ages of several decades in California oaks. We separated NSC into two fractions: soluble (∼50% sugars) and insoluble (mostly starch) NSC. Soluble NSC contained more C than insoluble NSC, but we found no consistent trend in the amount of either pool with depth in the stem. There was no systematic difference in C age between the two fractions, although ages increased with stem depth. The C in both NSC fractions was consistently younger than the structural C from which they were extracted. Together, these results indicate considerable inward mixing of NSC within the stem and rapid exchange between soluble and insoluble pools, compared with the timescale of inward mixing. We observed similar patterns in sympatric evergreen and deciduous oaks and the largest differences among tree stems with different growth rates. The (14)C signature of carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted from tree stems was higher than expected from very recent photoassimilates, indicating that the mean age of C in respiration substrates included a contribution from C fixed years previously. A simple model that tracks NSC produced each year, followed by loss (through conversion to CO2) in subsequent years, matches our observations of inward mixing of NSC in the stem and higher (14)C signature of stem CO2 efflux. Together, these data support the idea of continuous accumulation of NSC in stemwood and that 'vigor' (growth rate) and leaf habit (deciduous vs evergreen) control NSC pool size and allocation.

  4. The role of pleiotropy and linkage in genes affecting a sexual ornament and bone allocation in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, M; Rubin, C-J; Höglund, A; Sahlqvist, A-S; Jonsson, K B; Kerje, S; Ekwall, O; Kämpe, O; Andersson, L; Jensen, P; Wright, D

    2014-05-01

    Sexual selection and the ornaments that inform such choices have been extensively studied, particularly from a phenotypic perspective. Although more is being revealed about the genetic architecture of sexual ornaments, much still remains to be discovered. The comb of the chicken is one of the most widely recognized sexual ornaments, which has been shown to be correlated with both fecundity and bone allocation. In this study, we use a combination of multiple intercrosses between White Leghorn populations and wild-derived Red Junglefowl to, first, map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for bone allocation and, second, to identify expression QTL that correlate and colocalize with comb mass. These candidate quantitative genes were then assessed for potential pleiotropic effects on bone tissue and fecundity traits. We identify genes that correlate with both relative comb mass and bone traits suggesting a combination of both pleiotropy and linkage mediates gene regulatory variation in these traits.

  5. Growth, allocation and tissue chemistry of Picea abies seedlings affected by nutrient supply during the second growing season.

    PubMed

    Kaakinen, Seija; Jolkkonen, Annika; Iivonen, Sari; Vapaavuori, Elina

    2004-06-01

    One-year-old Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) seedlings were grown hydroponically in a growth chamber to investigate the effects of low and high nutrient availability (LN; 0.25 mM N and HN; 2.50 mM N) on growth, biomass allocation and chemical composition of needles, stem and roots during the second growing season. Climatic conditions in the growth chamber simulated the mean growing season from May to early October in Flakaliden, northern Sweden. In the latter half of the growing season, biomass allocation changed in response to nutrient availability: increased root growth and decreased shoot growth led to higher root/shoot ratios in LN seedlings than in HN seedlings. At high nutrient availability, total biomass, especially stem biomass, increased, as did total nonstructural carbohydrate and nitrogen contents per seedling. Responses of stem chemistry to nutrient addition differed from those of adult trees of the same provenance. In HN seedlings, concentrations of alpha-cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin decreased in the secondary xylem. Our results illustrate the significance of retranslocation of stored nutrients to support new growth early in the season when root growth and nutrient uptake are still low. We conclude that nutrient availability alters allocation patterns, thereby influencing the success of 2-year-old Norway spruce seedlings at forest planting sites.

  6. EFFECTS OF CARBON DIOXIDE AND OZONE ON GROWTH AND BIOMASS ALLOCATION IN PINUS PONDEROSA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The future productivity of forests will be affected by combinations of elevated atmospheric CO2 and O3. Because productivity of forests will, in part, be determined by growth of young trees, we evaluated shoot growth and biomass responses of Pinus ponderosa seedlings exposed to ...

  7. The dynamic of annual carbon allocation to wood in European forests is consistent with a combined source-sink limitation of growth: implications for modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemot, J.; Martin-StPaul, N. K.; Dufrêne, E.; François, C.; Soudani, K.; Ourcival, J. M.; Delpierre, N.

    2015-02-01

    The extent to which forest growth is limited by carbon (C) supply (source control) or by cambial activity (sink control) will condition the response of trees to global changes. However, the physiological processes responsible for the limitation of forest growth are still under debate. The aim of this study is to evaluate the key drivers of the annual carbon allocation to wood along large soil and climate regional gradients in five tree species representative of the main European forest biomes (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, Quercus ilex, Quercus robur and Picea abies). Combining field measurements and process-based simulations at 49 sites (931 site-years), we assessed the stand biomass growth dependences at both inter-site and inter-annual scales. Specifically, the relative influence of forest C balance (source control), direct environmental control (water and temperature controls of sink activity) and allocation adjustments related to age, past climate conditions, competition intensity and soil nutrient availability on growth were quantified. The inter-site variability in stand C allocation to wood was predominantly driven by an age-related decline. The direct control of temperature or water stress on sink activity (i.e. independently from their effects on C supply) exerted a strong influence on the annual stand woody growth in all the species considered, including deciduous temperate species. The lagged effect of the past environment conditions was a significant driver of the annual C allocation to wood. Carbon supply appeared to strongly limit growth only in deciduous temperate species. We provide an evaluation of the spatio-temporal dynamics of annual carbon allocation to wood in European forests. Our study supports the premise that European forest growth is under a complex control including both source and sink limitations. The relative influences of the different growth drivers strongly vary across years and spatial ecological gradients. We suggest a

  8. Production and carbon allocation in monocultures and mixed-species plantations of Eucalyptus grandis and Acacia mangium in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nouvellon, Yann; Laclau, Jean-Paul; Epron, Daniel; Le Maire, Guerric; Bonnefond, Jean-Marc; Gonçalves, José Leonardo M; Bouillet, Jean-Pierre

    2012-06-01

    Introducing nitrogen-fixing tree species in fast-growing eucalypt plantations has the potential to improve soil nitrogen availability compared with eucalypt monocultures. Whether or not the changes in soil nutrient status and stand structure will lead to mixtures that out-yield monocultures depends on the balance between positive interactions and the negative effects of interspecific competition, and on their effect on carbon (C) uptake and partitioning. We used a C budget approach to quantify growth, C uptake and C partitioning in monocultures of Eucalyptus grandis (W. Hill ex Maiden) and Acacia mangium (Willd.) (treatments E100 and A100, respectively), and in a mixture at the same stocking density with the two species at a proportion of 1 : 1 (treatment MS). Allometric relationships established over the whole rotation, and measurements of soil CO(2) efflux and aboveground litterfall for ages 4-6 years after planting were used to estimate aboveground net primary production (ANPP), total belowground carbon flux (TBCF) and gross primary production (GPP). We tested the hypotheses that (i) species differences for wood production between E. grandis and A. mangium monocultures were partly explained by different C partitioning strategies, and (ii) the observed lower wood production in the mixture compared with eucalypt monoculture was mostly explained by a lower partitioning aboveground. At the end of the rotation, total aboveground biomass was lowest in A100 (10.5 kg DM m(-2)), intermediate in MS (12.2 kg DM m(-2)) and highest in E100 (13.9 kg DM m(-2)). The results did not support our first hypothesis of contrasting C partitioning strategies between E. grandis and A. mangium monocultures: the 21% lower growth (ΔB(w)) in A100 compared with E100 was almost entirely explained by a 23% lower GPP, with little or no species difference in ratios such as TBCF/GPP, ANPP/TBCF, ΔB(w)/ANPP and ΔB(w)/GPP. In contrast, the 28% lower ΔB(w) in MS than in E100 was explained both by

  9. Greenhouse gas balance of mountain dairy farms as affected by grassland carbon sequestration.

    PubMed

    Salvador, Sara; Corazzin, Mirco; Romanzin, Alberto; Bovolenta, Stefano

    2017-03-30

    Recent studies on milk production have often focused on environmental impacts analysed using the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach. In grassland-based livestock systems, soil carbon sequestration might be a potential sink to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) balance. Nevertheless, there is no commonly shared methodology. In this work, the GHG emissions of small-scale mountain dairy farms were assessed using the LCA approach. Two functional units, kg of Fat and Protein Corrected Milk (FPCM) and Utilizable Agricultural Land (UAL), and two different emissions allocations methods, no allocation and physical allocation, which accounts for the co-product beef, were considered. Two groups of small-scale dairy farms were identified based on the Livestock Units (LU) reared: <30 LU (LLU) and >30 LU (HLU). Before considering soil carbon sequestration in LCA, performing no allocation methods, LLU farms tended to have higher GHG emission than HLU farms per kg of FPCM (1.94 vs. 1.59 kg CO2-eq/kg FPCM, P ≤ 0.10), whereas the situation was reversed upon considering the m(2) of UAL as a functional unit (0.29 vs. 0.89 kg CO2-eq/m(2), P ≤ 0.05). Conversely, considering physical allocation, the difference between the two groups became less noticeable. When the contribution from soil carbon sequestration was included in the LCA and no allocation method was performed, LLU farms registered higher values of GHG emission per kg of FPCM than HLU farms (1.38 vs. 1.10 kg CO2-eq/kg FPCM, P ≤ 0.05), and the situation was likewise reversed in this case upon considering the m(2) of UAL as a functional unit (0.22 vs. 0.73 kg CO2-eq/m(2), P ≤ 0.05). To highlight how the presence of grasslands is crucial for the carbon footprint of small-scale farms, this study also applied a simulation for increasing the forage self-sufficiency of farms to 100%. In this case, an average reduction of GHG emission per kg of FPCM of farms was estimated both with no allocation and with physical

  10. Desiccation of sediments affects assimilate transport within aquatic plants and carbon transfer to microorganisms.

    PubMed

    von Rein, I; Kayler, Z E; Premke, K; Gessler, A

    2016-11-01

    With the projected increase in drought duration and intensity in future, small water bodies, and especially the terrestrial-aquatic interfaces, will be subjected to longer dry periods with desiccation of the sediment. Drought effects on the plant-sediment microorganism carbon continuum may disrupt the tight linkage between plants and microbes which governs sediment carbon and nutrient cycling, thus having a potential negative impact on carbon sequestration of small freshwater ecosystems. However, research on drought effects on the plant-sediment carbon transfer in aquatic ecosystems is scarce. We therefore exposed two emergent aquatic macrophytes, Phragmites australis and Typha latifolia, to a month-long summer drought in a mesocosm experiment. We followed the fate of carbon from leaves to sediment microbial communities with (13) CO2 pulse labelling and microbial phospholipid-derived fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. We found that drought reduced the total amount of carbon allocated to stem tissues but did not delay the transport. We also observed an increase in accumulation of (13) C-labelled sugars in roots and found a reduced incorporation of (13) C into the PLFAs of sediment microorganisms. Drought induced a switch in plant carbon allocation priorities, where stems received less new assimilates leading to reduced starch reserves whilst roots were prioritised with new assimilates, suggesting their use for osmoregulation. There were indications that the reduced carbon transfer from roots to microorganisms was due to the reduction of microbial activity via direct drought effects rather than to a decrease in root exudation or exudate availability.

  11. Allocation of Nitrogen and Carbon Is Regulated by Nodulation and Mycorrhizal Networks in Soybean/Maize Intercropping System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guihua; Sheng, Lichao; Zhao, Dan; Sheng, Jiandong; Wang, Xiurong; Liao, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Soybean/maize intercropping has remarkable advantages in increasing crop yield and nitrogen (N) efficiency. However, little is known about the contributions of rhizobia or arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) to yield increases and N acquisition in the intercropping system. Plus, the mechanisms controlling carbon (C) and N allocation in intercropping systems remain unsettled. In the present study, a greenhouse experiment combined with 15N and 13C labeling was conducted using various inoculation and nutrient treatments. The results showed that co-inoculation with AMF and rhizobia dramatically increased biomass and N content of soybean and maize, and moderate application of N and phosphorus largely amplified the effect of co-inoculation. Maize had a competitive advantage over soybean only under co-inoculation and moderate nutrient availability conditions, indicating that the effects of AMF and rhizobia in intercropping systems are closely related to nutrient status. Results from 15N labeling showed that the amount of N transferred from soybean to maize in co-inoculations was 54% higher than that with AMF inoculation alone, with this increased N transfer partly resulting from symbiotic N fixation. The results from 13C labeling showed that 13C content increased in maize shoots and decreased in soybean roots with AMF inoculation compared to uninoculated controls. Yet, with co-inoculation, 13C content increased in soybean. These results indicate that photosynthate assimilation is stimulated by AM symbiosis in maize and rhizobial symbiosis in soybean, but AMF inoculation leads to soybean investing more carbon than maize into common mycorrhizal networks (CMNs). Overall, the results herein demonstrate that the growth advantage of maize when intercropped with soybean is due to acquisition of N by maize via CMNs while this crop contributes less C into CMNs than soybean under co-inoculation conditions. PMID:28018420

  12. Carbon and nitrogen allocation and partitioning in traditional and modern wheat genotypes under pre-industrial and future CO₂ conditions.

    PubMed

    Aljazairi, S; Arias, C; Nogués, S

    2015-05-01

    The results of a simultaneous (13)C and (15)N labelling experiment with two different durum wheat cultivars, Blanqueta (a traditional wheat) and Sula (modern), are presented. Plants were grown from the seedling stage in three fully controllable plant growth chambers for one growing season and at three different CO₂ levels (i.e. 260, 400 and 700 ppm). Short-term isotopic labelling (ca. 3 days) was performed at the anthesis stage using (13)CO₂ supplied with the chamber air and (15)NH₄₋(15)NO₃ applied with the nutrient solution, thereby making it possible to track the allocation and partitioning of (13)C and (15) N in the different plant organs. We found that photosynthesis was up-regulated at pre-industrial CO₂ levels, whereas down-regulation occurred under future CO₂ conditions. (13)C labelling revealed that at pre-industrial CO₂ carbon investment by plants was higher in shoots, whereas at future CO₂ levels more C was invested in roots. Furthermore, the modern genotype invested more C in spikes than did the traditional genotype, which in turn invested more in non-reproductive shoot tissue. (15)N labelling revealed that the modern genotype was better adapted to assimilating N at higher CO₂ levels, whereas the traditional genotype was able to assimilate N more efficiently at lower CO₂ levels.

  13. Differential allocation of carbon in mosses and grasses governs ecosystem sequestration: a 13C tracer study in the high Arctic.

    PubMed

    Woodin, S J; van der Wal, R; Sommerkorn, M; Gornall, J L

    2009-12-01

    *This study investigates the influence of vegetation composition on carbon (C) sequestration in a moss-dominated ecosystem in the Arctic. *A (13)C labelling study in an arctic wet meadow was used to trace assimilate into C pools of differing recalcitrance within grasses and mosses and to determine the retention of C by these plant groups. *Moss retained 70% of assimilated (13)C over the month following labelling, which represented half the growing season. By contrast, the vascular plants, comprising mostly grasses, retained only 40%. The mechanism underlying this was that moss allocated 80% of the (13)C to recalcitrant C pools, a much higher proportion than in grasses (56%). *This method enabled elucidation of a plant trait that will influence decomposition and hence persistence of assimilated C in the ecosystem. We predict that moss-dominated vegetation will retain sequestered C more strongly than a grass-dominated community. Given the strong environmental drivers that are causing a shift from moss to grass dominance, this is likely to result in a reduction in future ecosystem C sink strength.

  14. Tissue chemistry and carbon allocation in seedlings of Pinus palustris subjected to elevated atmospheric CO(2) and water stress.

    PubMed

    Runion, G. B.; Entry, J. A.; Prior, S. A.; Mitchell, R. J.; Rogers, H. H.

    1999-04-01

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) seedlings were grown in 45-l pots and exposed to ambient or elevated (365 or 730 &mgr;mol CO(2) mol(-1)) CO(2) concentration in open-top chambers for 20 months. Two water-stress treatments (target values of -0.5 or -1.5 MPa xylem pressure potential) were imposed 19 weeks after initiation of the study. At harvest, tissues (needles, stems, taproots, coarse roots, and fine roots) were analyzed for carbon (C), nitrogen (N), nonpolar extractives (fats, waxes, and oils), nonstructural carbohydrates (sugars and starch), structural components (cellulose and lignin), and tannins. The greatest dry weights and lowest N concentrations occurred in tissues of plants grown at elevated CO(2) or with adequate water. Although allocation of C fractions among tissues was generally unaffected by treatments, concentrations of the analyzed compounds were influenced by treatments in needles and taproots, but not in stems and lateral roots. Needles and taproots of plants exposed to elevated CO(2) had increased concentrations of nonstructural carbohydrates. Among plant tissues, elevated CO(2) caused reductions in structural C concentrations and foliar concentrations of fats, waxes and oils.

  15. Fungal nutrient allocation in common mycorrhizal networks is regulated by the carbon source strength of individual host plants.

    PubMed

    Fellbaum, Carl R; Mensah, Jerry A; Cloos, Adam J; Strahan, Gary E; Pfeffer, Philip E; Kiers, E Toby; Bücking, Heike

    2014-07-01

    Common mycorrhizal networks (CMNs) of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in the soil simultaneously provide multiple host plants with nutrients, but the mechanisms by which the nutrient transport to individual host plants within one CMN is controlled are unknown. Using radioactive and stable isotopes, we followed the transport of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) in the CMNs of two fungal species to plants that differed in their carbon (C) source strength, and correlated the transport to the expression of mycorrhiza-inducible plant P (MtPt4) and ammonium (1723.m00046) transporters in mycorrhizal roots. AM fungi discriminated between host plants that shared a CMN and preferentially allocated nutrients to high-quality (nonshaded) hosts. However, the fungus also supplied low-quality (shaded) hosts with nutrients and maintained a high colonization rate in these plants. Fungal P transport was correlated to the expression of MtPt4. The expression of the putative ammonium transporter 1723.m00046 was dependent on the fungal nutrient supply and was induced when the CMN had access to N. Biological market theory has emerged as a tool with which the strategic investment of competing partners in trading networks can be studied. Our work demonstrates how fungal partners are able to retain bargaining power, despite being obligately dependent on their hosts.

  16. Temporal changes in allocation and partitioning of new carbon as (11)C elicited by simulated herbivory suggest that roots shape aboveground responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ferrieri, Abigail P; Agtuca, Beverly; Appel, Heidi M; Ferrieri, Richard A; Schultz, Jack C

    2013-02-01

    Using the short-lived isotope (11)C (t(1/2) = 20.4 min) as (11)CO(2), we captured temporal changes in whole-plant carbon movement and partitioning of recently fixed carbon into primary and secondary metabolites in a time course (2, 6, and 24 h) following simulated herbivory with the well-known defense elicitor methyl jasmonate (MeJA) to young leaves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Both (11)CO(2) fixation and (11)C-photosynthate export from the labeled source leaf increased rapidly (2 h) following MeJA treatment relative to controls, with preferential allocation of radiolabeled resources belowground. At the same time, (11)C-photosynthate remaining in the aboveground sink tissues showed preferential allocation to MeJA-treated, young leaves, where it was incorporated into (11)C-cinnamic acid. By 24 h, resource allocation toward roots returned to control levels, while allocation to the young leaves increased. This corresponded to an increase in invertase activity and the accumulation of phenolic compounds, particularly anthocyanins, in young leaves. Induction of phenolics was suppressed in sucrose transporter mutant plants (suc2-1), indicating that this phenomenon may be controlled, in part, by phloem loading at source leaves. However, when plant roots were chilled to 5°C to disrupt carbon flow between above- and belowground tissues, source leaves failed to allocate resources belowground or toward damaged leaves following wounding and MeJA treatment to young leaves, suggesting that roots may play an integral role in controlling how plants respond defensively aboveground.

  17. Biodegradation of clomazone in a California rice field soil: carbon allocation and community effects.

    PubMed

    Tomco, Patrick L; Holmes, William E; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2013-03-20

    Degradation pathways for the herbicide clomazone in a California rice field soil were characterized via pulse-labeling of anaerobic (flooded) and aerobic (moist) soil microcosms. Clomazone-derived (13)C in the major C pools of a rice ecosystem and soil phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles were analyzed over time to determine if (1) the compound accumulates in the microbial biomass, (2) it affects temporal microbial population dynamics, and (3) it is either preferentially metabolized or cometabolized. In anaerobic microcosms, the compound was rapidly biotransformed to ring-open clomazone, upon which it persisted in the aqueous phase, whereas aerobic microcosms degraded it slower but a greater percentage was mineralized. Anaerobic biomass decreased after clomazone was added, and aerobic actinomycete abundance differed between treatments and controls. Additionally, PLFA and (13)C PLFA were statistically similar between treatment and controls. Thus, microbial cometabolism is likely to be the dominant degrading mechanism governing clomazone fate in California rice fields.

  18. Ecosystem carbon density and allocation across a chronosequence of longleaf pine forests.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, Lisa J; Stokes, Thomas A; Butnor, John R; Johnsen, Kurt H; Gonzalez-Benecke, Carlos A; Martin, Timothy A; Cropper, Wendell P; Anderson, Pete H; Ramirez, Michael R; Lewis, John C

    2017-01-01

    Forests can partially offset greenhouse gas emissions and contribute to climate change mitigation, mainly through increases in live biomass. We quantified carbon (C) density in 20 managed longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) forests ranging in age from 5 to 118 years located across the southeastern United States and estimated above- and belowground C trajectories. Ecosystem C stock (all pools including soil C) and aboveground live tree C increased nonlinearly with stand age and the modeled asymptotic maxima were 168 Mg C/ha and 80 Mg C/ha, respectively. Accumulation of ecosystem C with stand age was driven mainly by increases in aboveground live tree C, which ranged from <1 Mg C/ha to 74 Mg C/ha and comprised <1% to 39% of ecosystem C. Live root C (sum of below-stump C, ground penetrating radar measurement of lateral root C, and live fine root C) increased with stand age and represented 4-22% of ecosystem C. Soil C was related to site index, but not to stand age, and made up 39-92% of ecosystem C. Live understory C, forest floor C, downed dead wood C, and standing dead wood C were small fractions of ecosystem C in these frequently burned stands. Stand age and site index accounted for 76% of the variation in ecosystem C among stands. The mean root-to-shoot ratio calculated as the average across all stands (excluding the grass-stage stand) was 0.54 (standard deviation of 0.19) and higher than reports for other conifers. Long-term accumulation of live tree C, combined with the larger role of belowground accumulation of lateral root C than in other forest types, indicates a role of longleaf pine forests in providing disturbance-resistant C storage that can balance the more rapid C accumulation and C removal associated with more intensively managed forests. Although other managed southern pine systems sequester more C over the short-term, we suggest that longleaf pine forests can play a meaningful role in regional forest C management.

  19. The Dynamic of Annual Carbon Allocation to Wood in European Forests Is Consistent with a Combined Source-Sink Limitation of Growth: Implications on Growth Simulations in a Terrestrial Biosphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemot, J.; Martin-StPaul, N. K.; Dufrêne, E.; François, C.; Soudani, K.; Ourcival, J. M.; Leadley, P.; Delpierre, N.

    2014-12-01

    The extent to which forest growth is limited by carbon (C) supply (source control) or by cambial activity (sink control) will strongly determines the responses of trees to global changes. However, the physiological processes responsible for the limitation of forest growth are still under debate. The aim of this study was i) to evaluate the key drivers of the annual carbon allocation to wood along large soil and climate regional gradients in four tree species representative of the main European forest biomes (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, Quercus ilex and Picea abies) ii) to implement the identified key drivers in a new C allocation scheme within the CASTANEA terrestrial biosphere model (TBM). Combining field measurements and process-based simulations at 49 sites (931 site-years), our analyses revealed that the inter-site variability in C allocation to wood was predominantly driven by an age-related decline. The direct control of temperature or water stress on sink activity (i.e. independently from their effects on C supply) exerted a strong influence on the annual woody growth in all the species considered, including deciduous temperate species. The lagged effect of the past environment conditions was a significant driver of the annual C allocation to wood. Carbon supply appeared to strongly limit growth only in deciduous temperate species. Our study supports the premise that European forest growth is under a complex panel of source- and sink- limitations, contradicting the simple source control implemented in most TBMs. The implementation of these combined forest growth limitations in the CASTANEA model significantly improved its performance when evaluated against independent stand growth data at the regional scale (mainland France, >103 plots). We finally discuss how the sink imitation affects the CASTANEA simulated projections of forest productivity along the 21th century, especially with respect to the expected fertilizing effect of increasing atmospheric

  20. Drought effects on allocation of recent carbon: from beech leaves to soil CO2 efflux.

    PubMed

    Ruehr, Nadine K; Offermann, Christine A; Gessler, Arthur; Winkler, Jana Barbro; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Buchmann, Nina; Barnard, Romain L

    2009-12-01

    *Recent studies have highlighted a direct, fast transfer of recently assimilated C from the tree canopy to the soil. However, the effect of environmental changes on this flux remains largely unknown. *We investigated the effects of drought on the translocation of recently assimilated C, by pulse-labelling 1.5-yr-old beech tree mesocosms with (13)CO(2). (13)C signatures were then measured daily for 1 wk in leaves, twigs, coarse and fine root water-soluble and total organic matter, phloem organic matter, soil microbial biomass and soil CO(2) efflux. *Drought reduced C assimilation and doubled the residence time of recently assimilated C in leaf biomass. In phloem organic matter, the (13)C label peaked immediately after labelling then decayed exponentially in the control treatment, while under drought it peaked 4 d after labelling. In soil microbial biomass, the label peaked 1 d after labelling in the control treatment, whereas under drought no peak was measured. Two days after labelling, drought decreased the contribution of recently assimilated C to soil CO(2) efflux by 33%. *Our study showed that drought reduced the coupling between canopy photosynthesis and belowground processes. This will probably affect soil biogeochemical cycling, with potential consequences including slower soil nitrogen cycling and changes in C-sequestration potential under future climate conditions.

  1. Ecophysiological differences in tree carbon gain and water use for two fast growing loblolly pine ideotypes that differ in carbon allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, C. A.; Johnsen, K. H.; Dougherty, P.; Albaugh, T.; Patterson, S.

    2013-12-01

    We examined the ecophysiological basis for differences in growth efficiency and water-use for two contrasting Pinus taeda (L.) ideotypes: a ';broad-crown' (BC) and a ';narrow crown' (NC) clone, which allocate more growth to leaves and wood, respectively. Tree growth, above and belowground biomass production, fine root turnover, light use efficiency (LUE), and transpiration on a ground (Et) and leaf (EL) basis were measured periodically over eight years. Silviculture treatments were a control consisting of shearing and bedding following local commercial operations and a mulch treatment where chipped logging residue (C/N≈700) was incorporated into the soil during bedding at a rate of 25 Mg ha-1. We hypothesized that: 1) the NC and BC clone would display similar aboveground productivity in the control treatment, but because of lower leaf area and thus lower nitrogen demand, the NC would display higher productivity than BC on the mulch treatment, 2) the NC would have higher LUE, and 3) the NC clone would have lower Et and EL. There were no treatment, clone, or interaction effects on stemwood production. At age eight, standing stem biomass was 80.7 and 86.0 Mg ha-1 (p=0.33), for the NC and BC, respectively. However, there were significant clone effects on carbon allocation. The BC had greater foliage (BC: 8.1, NC: 6.6 Mg ha-1, se=0.2, p=0.01) and branch (BC: 15.0, NC: 12.4 Mg ha-1, se=0.4, p<0.001) biomass, while the NC clone had greater taproot (BC: 14.8, NC: 17.1, Mg ha-1, se=0.4, p=0.003) and coarse root (>2mm) (BC: 9.7, NC: 11.23 Mg ha-1, se=0.2, P<0.001) biomass. In addition, the NC clone averaged on a monthly basis 30% more fine root biomass (<2mm) (BC: 42.4, NC: 61.0 g m-2, se=4.0, p=0.011). The BC clone had 16% more LAI (BC: 3.52×0.12, NC: 2.94×0.14 m2 m-2) at peak foliage biomass and had more leaf area to conducting sapwood area (AL/AS) (BC: 0.175 m2 cm-2, NC: 0.150 m2 cm-2) than the NC clone. Growth efficiency, defined as annual stem increment per unit

  2. Elevated air humidity affects hydraulic traits and tree size but not biomass allocation in young silver birches (Betula pendula).

    PubMed

    Sellin, Arne; Rosenvald, Katrin; Õunapuu-Pikas, Eele; Tullus, Arvo; Ostonen, Ivika; Lõhmus, Krista

    2015-01-01

    As changes in air temperature, precipitation, and air humidity are expected in the coming decades, studies on the impact of these environmental shifts on plant growth and functioning are of major importance. Greatly understudied aspects of climate change include consequences of increasing air humidity on forest ecosystems, predicted for high latitudes. The main objective of this study was to find a link between hydraulic acclimation and shifts in trees' resource allocation in silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) in response to elevated air relative humidity (RH). A second question was whether the changes in hydraulic architecture depend on tree size. Two years of application of increased RH decreased the biomass accumulation in birch saplings, but the biomass partitioning among aboveground parts (leaves, branches, and stems) remained unaffected. Increased stem Huber values (xylem cross-sectional area to leaf area ratio) observed in trees under elevated RH did not entail changes in the ratio of non-photosynthetic to photosynthetic tissues. The reduction of stem-wood density is attributable to diminished mechanical load imposed on the stem, since humidified trees had relatively shorter crowns. Growing under higher RH caused hydraulic conductance of the root system (K R) to increase, while K R (expressed per unit leaf area) decreased and leaf hydraulic conductance increased with tree size. Saplings of silver birch acclimate to increasing air humidity by adjusting plant morphology (live crown length, slenderness, specific leaf area, and fine-root traits) and wood density rather than biomass distribution among aboveground organs. The treatment had a significant effect on several hydraulic properties of the trees, while the shifts were largely associated with changes in tree size but not in biomass allocation.

  3. Allocation to leaf area and sapwood area affects water relations of co-occurring savanna and forest trees.

    PubMed

    Gotsch, Sybil G; Geiger, Erika L; Franco, Augusto C; Goldstein, Guillermo; Meinzer, Frederick C; Hoffmann, William A

    2010-06-01

    Water availability is a principal factor limiting the distribution of closed-canopy forest in the seasonal tropics, suggesting that forest tree species may not be well adapted to cope with seasonal drought. We studied 11 congeneric species pairs, each containing one forest and one savanna species, to test the hypothesis that forest trees have a lower capacity to maintain seasonal homeostasis in water relations relative to savanna species. To quantify this, we measured sap flow, leaf water potential (Psi(L)), stomatal conductance (g (s)), wood density, and Huber value (sapwood area:leaf area) of the 22 study species. We found significant differences in the water relations of these two species types. Leaf area specific hydraulic conductance of the soil/root/leaf pathway (G (t)) was greater for savanna species than forest species. The lower G (t) of forest trees resulted in significantly lower Psi(L) and g (s) in the late dry season relative to savanna trees. The differences in G (t) can be explained by differences in biomass allocation of savanna and forest trees. Savanna species had higher Huber values relative to forest species, conferring greater transport capacity on a leaf area basis. Forest trees have a lower capacity to maintain homeostasis in Psi(L) due to greater allocation to leaf area relative to savanna species. Despite significant differences in water relations, relationships between traits such as wood density and minimum Psi(L) were indistinguishable for the two species groups, indicating that forest and savanna share a common axis of water-use strategies involving multiple traits.

  4. Elevated air humidity affects hydraulic traits and tree size but not biomass allocation in young silver birches (Betula pendula)

    PubMed Central

    Sellin, Arne; Rosenvald, Katrin; Õunapuu-Pikas, Eele; Tullus, Arvo; Ostonen, Ivika; Lõhmus, Krista

    2015-01-01

    As changes in air temperature, precipitation, and air humidity are expected in the coming decades, studies on the impact of these environmental shifts on plant growth and functioning are of major importance. Greatly understudied aspects of climate change include consequences of increasing air humidity on forest ecosystems, predicted for high latitudes. The main objective of this study was to find a link between hydraulic acclimation and shifts in trees’ resource allocation in silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) in response to elevated air relative humidity (RH). A second question was whether the changes in hydraulic architecture depend on tree size. Two years of application of increased RH decreased the biomass accumulation in birch saplings, but the biomass partitioning among aboveground parts (leaves, branches, and stems) remained unaffected. Increased stem Huber values (xylem cross-sectional area to leaf area ratio) observed in trees under elevated RH did not entail changes in the ratio of non-photosynthetic to photosynthetic tissues. The reduction of stem–wood density is attributable to diminished mechanical load imposed on the stem, since humidified trees had relatively shorter crowns. Growing under higher RH caused hydraulic conductance of the root system (KR) to increase, while KR (expressed per unit leaf area) decreased and leaf hydraulic conductance increased with tree size. Saplings of silver birch acclimate to increasing air humidity by adjusting plant morphology (live crown length, slenderness, specific leaf area, and fine-root traits) and wood density rather than biomass distribution among aboveground organs. The treatment had a significant effect on several hydraulic properties of the trees, while the shifts were largely associated with changes in tree size but not in biomass allocation. PMID:26528318

  5. Allocation of freshly assimilated carbon into primary and secondary metabolites after in situ ¹³C pulse labelling of Norway spruce (Picea abies).

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Steffen; Dippold, Michaela A; Werner, Christiane; Wiesenberg, Guido L B; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Glaser, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    Plants allocate carbon (C) to sink tissues depending on phenological, physiological or environmental factors. We still have little knowledge on C partitioning into various cellular compounds and metabolic pathways at various ecophysiological stages. We used compound-specific stable isotope analysis to investigate C partitioning of freshly assimilated C into tree compartments (needles, branches and stem) as well as into needle water-soluble organic C (WSOC), non-hydrolysable structural organic C (stOC) and individual chemical compound classes (amino acids, hemicellulose sugars, fatty acids and alkanes) of Norway spruce (Picea abies) following in situ (13)C pulse labelling 15 days after bud break. The (13)C allocation within the above-ground tree biomass demonstrated needles as a major C sink, accounting for 86% of the freshly assimilated C 6 h after labelling. In needles, the highest allocation occurred not only into the WSOC pool (44.1% of recovered needle (13)C) but also into stOC (33.9%). Needle growth, however, also caused high (13)C allocation into pathways not involved in the formation of structural compounds: (i) pathways in secondary metabolism, (ii) C-1 metabolism and (iii) amino acid synthesis from photorespiration. These pathways could be identified by a high (13)C enrichment of their key amino acids. In addition, (13)C was strongly allocated into the n-alkyl lipid fraction (0.3% of recovered (13)C), whereby (13)C allocation into cellular and cuticular exceeded that of epicuticular fatty acids. (13)C allocation decreased along the lipid transformation and translocation pathways: the allocation was highest for precursor fatty acids, lower for elongated fatty acids and lowest for the decarbonylated n-alkanes. The combination of (13)C pulse labelling with compound-specific (13)C analysis of key metabolites enabled tracing relevant C allocation pathways under field conditions. Besides the primary metabolism synthesizing structural cell compounds, a complex

  6. Dependence of Photosynthetic Capacity, Photosynthetic Pigment Allocation, and Carbon Storage on Nitrogen Levels in Foliage of Aspen Stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Sullivan, Joseph H.; Papagno, Andrea J.

    2000-01-01

    complexes and enzymes. In mature leaves, differences in pigment content vs. N among canopy strata were accentuated when N was expressed per unit leaf area (Mg cm (exp -2)) . However, the simplest log-linear relationship between a pigment variable and N was obtained for a ratio describing the relative allocation of photosynthetic pigment to Chl a (Chl a/[Chl b + carotenoids], microgram cm (exp -2)/ microgram cm-2) vs. %N (r (exp 2) = 0.90, n=343, P less than 0.001). Attainment of comparable A (sub max) Chl a content and relative Chl a allocation per unit N (mg cm (exp -2)) was achieved at different foliar N levels per canopy group: the lowest N requirement was for hazelnut leaves in the lowest, shaded stratum at the older, closed canopy site; the highest N requirement was in aspen leaves of the upper-most stratum at the younger, more open canopy site. These results highlight the differences in physiological responses between young and fully expanded leaves and show that sustaining those foliar constituents and processes important to C balance may require higher foliar N levels in leaves of establishing vs. mature aspen stands. There may be implications for remote-sensing assessments made for carbon balance in springtime, or over a landscape mosaic comprised of different aged stands.

  7. Assessing the Significance of Above- and Belowground Carbon Allocation of Fast- and Slow-Growing Families of Loblolly Pine - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Topa, M. A.; Weinstein, D. A.; Retzlaff, W. A.

    2001-03-01

    During this project we experimentally evaluated the below-ground biomass and carbon allocation and partitioning of four different fast- and slow-growing families of loblolly pine located in Scotland County, NC, in an effort to increase the long-term performance of the crop. The trees were subjected to optimal nutrition and control since planting in 1993. Destructive harvests in 1998 and 2000 were used for whole?plant biomass estimates and to identify possible family differences in carbon acquisition (photosynthesis) and water use efficiency. At regular intervals throughout each year we sampled tissues for carbohydrate analyses to assess differences in whole-tree carbon storage. Mini rhizotron observation tubes were installed to monitor root system production and turnover. Stable isotope analysis was used to examine possible functional differences in water and nutrient acquisition of root systems between the various families. A genetic dissection of root ontogenic and architectural traits, including biomass partitioning, was conducted using molecular markers to better understand the functional implications of these traits on resource acquisition and whole-plant carbon allocation.

  8. Event-Related Potentials Reveal Preserved Attention Allocation but Impaired Emotion Regulation in Patients with Epilepsy and Comorbid Negative Affect

    PubMed Central

    De Taeye, Leen; Pourtois, Gilles; Meurs, Alfred; Boon, Paul; Vonck, Kristl; Carrette, Evelien; Raedt, Robrecht

    2015-01-01

    Patients with epilepsy have a high prevalence of comorbid mood disorders. This study aims to evaluate whether negative affect in epilepsy is associated with dysfunction of emotion regulation. Event-related potentials (ERPs) are used in order to unravel the exact electrophysiological time course and investigate whether a possible dysfunction arises during early (attention) and/or late (regulation) stages of emotion control. Fifty epileptic patients with (n = 25) versus without (n = 25) comorbid negative affect plus twenty-five matched controls were recruited. ERPs were recorded while subjects performed a face- or house-matching task in which fearful, sad or neutral faces were presented either at attended or unattended spatial locations. Two ERP components were analyzed: the early vertex positive potential (VPP) which is normally enhanced for faces, and the late positive potential (LPP) that is typically larger for emotional stimuli. All participants had larger amplitude of the early face-sensitive VPP for attended faces compared to houses, regardless of their emotional content. By contrast, in patients with negative affect only, the amplitude of the LPP was significantly increased for unattended negative emotional expressions. These VPP results indicate that epilepsy with or without negative affect does not interfere with the early structural encoding and attention selection of faces. However, the LPP results suggest abnormal regulation processes during the processing of unattended emotional faces in patients with epilepsy and comorbid negative affect. In conclusion, this ERP study reveals that early object-based attention processes are not compromised by epilepsy, but instead, when combined with negative affect, this neurological disease is associated with dysfunction during the later stages of emotion regulation. As such, these new neurophysiological findings shed light on the complex interplay of epilepsy with negative affect during the processing of emotional

  9. Ground-level ozone differentially affects nitrogen acquisition and allocation in mature European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) trees.

    PubMed

    Weigt, R B; Häberle, K H; Millard, P; Metzger, U; Ritter, W; Blaschke, H; Göttlein, A; Matyssek, R

    2012-10-01

    Impacts of elevated ground-level ozone (O(3)) on nitrogen (N) uptake and allocation were studied on mature European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) in a forest stand, hypothesizing that: (i) chronically elevated O(3) limits nutrient uptake, and (ii) beech responds more sensitively to elevated O(3) than spruce, as previously found for juvenile trees. Tree canopies were exposed to twice-ambient O(3) concentrations (2 × O(3)) by a free-air fumigation system, with trees under ambient O(3) serving as control. After 5 years of O(3) fumigation, (15)NH(4)(15)NO(3) was applied to soil, and concentrations of newly acquired N (N(labelled)) and total N (N(total)) in plant compartments and soil measured. Under 2 × O(3), N(labelled) and N(total) were increased in the bulk soil and tended to be lower in fine and coarse roots of both species across the soil horizons, supporting hypothesis (i). N(labelled) was reduced in beech foliage by up to 60%, and by up to 50% in buds under 2 × O(3). Similarly, N(labelled) in stem bark and phloem was reduced. No such reduction was observed in spruce, reflecting a stronger effect on N acquisition in beech in accordance with hypothesis (ii). In spruce, 2 × O(3) tended to favour allocation of new N to foliage. N(labelled) in beech foliage correlated with cumulative seasonal transpiration, indicating impaired N acquisition was probably caused by reduced stomatal conductance and, hence, water transport under elevated O(3). Stimulated fine root growth under 2 × O(3) with a possible increase of below-ground N sink strength may also have accounted for lowered N allocation to above-ground organs. Reduced N uptake and altered allocation may enhance the use of stored N for growth, possibly affecting long-term stand nutrition.

  10. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide in agroecosystems affects groundwater quality

    SciTech Connect

    Torbert, H.A.; Prior, S.A.; Rogers, H.H.; Schlesinger, W.H.; Mullins, G.L.; Runion, G.B.

    1996-07-01

    Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentration has led to concerns about global changes to the environment. One area of global change that has not been addressed is the effect of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on groundwater quality below agroecosystems. Elevated CO{sub 2} concentration alterations of plant growth and C/N ratios may modify C and N cycling in soil and affect nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) leaching to groundwater. This study was conducted to examine the effects of a legume (soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]) and a nonlegume (grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench]) CO{sub 2}-enriched agroecosystems on NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} movement below the root zone in a Blanton loamy sand (loamy siliceous, thermic, Grossarenic Paleudults). The study was a split-plot design replicated three times with plant species (soybean and grain sorghum) as the main plots and CO{sub 2} concentration ({approximately}360 and {approximately}720 {mu}L L{sup {minus}1} CO{sub 2}) as subplots using open-top field chambers. Fertilizer application was made with {sup 15}N-depleted NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} to act as a fertilizer tracer. Soil solution samples were collected weekly at 90-cm depth for a 2-yr period and monitored for NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N concentrations. Isotope analysis of soil solution indicated that the decomposition of organic matter was the primary source of No{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N in soil solution below the root zone through most of the monitoring period. Significant differences were observed for NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N concentrations between soybean and grain sorghum, with soybean having the higher NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N concentration. Elevated CO{sub 2} increased total dry weight, total N content, and C/N ratio of residue returned to soil in both years. Elevated CO{sub 2} significantly decreased NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N concentrations below the root zone in both soybean and grain sorghum. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Growth, biomass allocation and nutrient use efficiency in Cladium jamaicense and Typha domingensis as affected by phosphorus and oxygen availability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenzen, B.; Brix, H.; Mendelssohn, I.A.; McKee, K.L.; Miao, S.L.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of phosphorus (P) and oxygen availability on growth, biomass allocation and nutrient use efficiency in Cladium jamaicense Crantz and Typha domingensis Pers. were studied in a growth facility equipped with steady-state hydroponic rhizotrons. The treatments included four P concentrations (10, 40, 80 and 500 ??g I-1) and two oxygen concentration (8.0 and <0.5 mg O2 I-1) in the culture solutions. In Cladium, no clear relationship was found between P availability and growth rate (19-37 mg g-1 d-1), the above to below ground biomass ratio (A/B) (mean = 4.6), or nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) (mean = 72 g dry weight g-1 N). However, the ratio between root supported tissue (leaves, rhizomes and ramets) and root biomass (S/R) (5.6-8) increased with P availability. In contrast, the growth rate (48-89 mg g-1 d-1) and the biomass ratios A/B (2.4-6.1) and S/R (5.4-10.3) of Typha increased with P availability, while NUE (71-30 g dry weight g-1 N) decreased. The proportion of root laterals was similar in the two species, but Typha had thinner root laterals (diameter = 186 ??m) than Cladium (diameter = 438 ??m) indicating a larger root surface area in Typha. The two species had a similar P use efficiency (PUE) at 10 ??g PI-1 (mean = 1134 g dry weight g-1 P) and at 40 and 80 ??g PI-1 (mean = 482 dry weight g-1 P) but the N/P ratio indicated imbalances in nutrient uptake at a higher P concentration (40 ??g PI-1) in Typha than in Cladium (10 ??g PI-1). The two species had similar root specific P accumulation rate at the two lowest P levels, whereas Typha had 3-13-fold higher P uptake rates at the two highest P levels, indicating a higher nutrient uptake capacity in Typha. The experimental oxygen concentration in the rhizosphere had only limited effect on the growth of the two species and had little effect on biomass partitioning and nutrient use efficiency. The aerenchyma in these species was probably sufficient to maintain adequate root oxygenation under partially oxygen

  12. Allocation of nutrients to somatic tissues in young ovariectomized grasshoppers.

    PubMed

    Judd, Evan T; Hatle, John D; Drewry, Michelle D; Wessels, Frank J; Hahn, Daniel A

    2010-11-01

    The disposable soma hypothesis predicts that when reproduction is reduced, life span is increased because more nutrients are invested in the soma, increasing somatic repair. Rigorously testing the hypothesis requires tracking nutrients from ingestion to allocation to the soma or to reproduction. Fruit flies on life-extending dietary restriction increase allocation to the soma "relative" to reproduction, suggesting that allocation of nutrients can be associated with extension of life span. Here, we use stable isotopes to track ingested nutrients in ovariectomized grasshoppers during the first oviposition cycle. Previous work has shown that ovariectomy extends life span, but investment of protein in reproduction is not reduced until after the first clutch of eggs is laid. Because ovariectomy does not affect investment in reproduction at this age, the disposable soma hypothesis would predict that ovariectomy should also not affect investment in somatic tissues. We developed grasshopper diets with distinct signatures of ¹³C and ¹⁵N, but that produced equivalent reproductive outputs. These diets are, therefore, appropriate for the reciprocal switches in diet needed for tracking ingested nutrients. Incorporation of stable isotopes into eggs showed that grasshoppers are income breeders, especially for carbon. Allocation to the fat body of nitrogen ingested as adults was slightly increased by ovariectomy; this was our only result that was not consistent with the disposable soma hypothesis. In contrast, ovariectomy did not affect allocation of nitrogen to femoral muscles. Further, allocation of carbon to the fat body or femoral muscles did not appear to be affected by ovariectomy. Total anti-oxidant activities in the hemolymph and femoral muscles were not affected by ovariectomy. These experiments showed that allocation of nutrients was altered little by ovariectomy in young grasshoppers. Additional studies on older individuals are needed to further test the disposable

  13. Sowing Density: A Neglected Factor Fundamentally Affecting Root Distribution and Biomass Allocation of Field Grown Spring Barley (Hordeum Vulgare L.).

    PubMed

    Hecht, Vera L; Temperton, Vicky M; Nagel, Kerstin A; Rascher, Uwe; Postma, Johannes A

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the function of root traits and the genetic variation in these traits are often conducted under controlled conditions using individual potted plants. Little is known about root growth under field conditions and how root traits are affected by agronomic practices in particular sowing density. We hypothesized that with increasing sowing density, root length density (root length per soil volume, cm cm(-3)) increases in the topsoil as well as specific root length (root length per root dry weight, cm g(-1)) due to greater investment in fine roots. Therefore, we studied two spring barley cultivars at ten different sowing densities (24-340 seeds m(-2)) in 2 consecutive years in a clay loam field in Germany and established sowing density dose-response curves for several root and shoot traits. We took soil cores for measuring roots up to a depth of 60 cm in and between plant rows (inter-row distance 21 cm). Root length density increased with increasing sowing density and was greatest in the plant row in the topsoil (0-10 cm). Greater sowing density increased specific root length partly through greater production of fine roots in the topsoil. Rooting depth (D50) of the major root axes (root diameter class 0.4-1.0 mm) was not affected. Root mass fraction decreased, while stem mass fraction increased with sowing density and over time. Leaf mass fraction was constant over sowing density but greater leaf area was realized through increased specific leaf area. Considering fertilization, we assume that light competition caused plants to grow more shoot mass at the cost of investment into roots, which is partly compensated by increased specific root length and shallow rooting. Increased biomass per area with greater densities suggest that density increases the efficiency of the cropping system, however, declines in harvest index at densities over 230 plants m(-2) suggest that this efficiency did not translate into greater yield. We conclude that plant density is a

  14. Sowing Density: A Neglected Factor Fundamentally Affecting Root Distribution and Biomass Allocation of Field Grown Spring Barley (Hordeum Vulgare L.)

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Vera L.; Temperton, Vicky M.; Nagel, Kerstin A.; Rascher, Uwe; Postma, Johannes A.

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the function of root traits and the genetic variation in these traits are often conducted under controlled conditions using individual potted plants. Little is known about root growth under field conditions and how root traits are affected by agronomic practices in particular sowing density. We hypothesized that with increasing sowing density, root length density (root length per soil volume, cm cm−3) increases in the topsoil as well as specific root length (root length per root dry weight, cm g−1) due to greater investment in fine roots. Therefore, we studied two spring barley cultivars at ten different sowing densities (24–340 seeds m−2) in 2 consecutive years in a clay loam field in Germany and established sowing density dose-response curves for several root and shoot traits. We took soil cores for measuring roots up to a depth of 60 cm in and between plant rows (inter-row distance 21 cm). Root length density increased with increasing sowing density and was greatest in the plant row in the topsoil (0–10 cm). Greater sowing density increased specific root length partly through greater production of fine roots in the topsoil. Rooting depth (D50) of the major root axes (root diameter class 0.4–1.0 mm) was not affected. Root mass fraction decreased, while stem mass fraction increased with sowing density and over time. Leaf mass fraction was constant over sowing density but greater leaf area was realized through increased specific leaf area. Considering fertilization, we assume that light competition caused plants to grow more shoot mass at the cost of investment into roots, which is partly compensated by increased specific root length and shallow rooting. Increased biomass per area with greater densities suggest that density increases the efficiency of the cropping system, however, declines in harvest index at densities over 230 plants m−2 suggest that this efficiency did not translate into greater yield. We conclude that plant density is a

  15. Factors affecting the adsorption of chromium (VI) on activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yavuz, R.; Orbak, I.; Karatepe, N.

    2006-09-15

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the adsorption behavior of chromium (VI) on two different activated carbon samples produced from Tuncbilek lignite. The effects of the initial chromium (VI) concentration (250-1000 mg/L), temperature (297-323 K) and pH (2.0-9.5) on adsorption were investigated systematically. The effectiveness of the parameters on chromium adsorption was found to be in the order of pH, the initial Cr(VI) concentration and the temperature. Increasing the pH from 2.0 to 9.5 caused a decrease in adsorption. However, the adsorption was increased by increasing the initial Cr(VI) concentration and temperature. The multilinear mathematical model was also developed to predict the Cr(VI) adsorption on activated carbon samples within the experimental conditions.

  16. Sex-related differences in growth and carbon allocation to defence in Populus tremula as explained by current plant defence theories.

    PubMed

    Randriamanana, Tendry R; Nybakken, Line; Lavola, Anu; Aphalo, Pedro J; Nissinen, Katri; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta

    2014-05-01

    Plant defence theories have recently evolved in such a way that not only the quantity but also the quality of mineral nutrients is expected to influence plant constitutive defence. Recently, an extended prediction derived from the protein competition model (PCM) suggested that nitrogen (N) limitation is more important for the production of phenolic compounds than phosphorus (P). We aimed at studying sexual differences in the patterns of carbon allocation to growth and constitutive defence in relation to N and P availability in Populus tremula L. seedlings. We compared the gender responses in photosynthesis, growth and whole-plant allocation to phenolic compounds at different combination levels of N and P, and studied how they are explained by the main plant defence theories. We found no sexual differences in phenolic concentrations, but interestingly, slow-growing females had higher leaf N concentration than did males, and genders differed in their allocation priority. There was a trade-off between growth and the production of flavonoid-derived phenylpropanoids on one hand, and between the production of salicylates and flavonoid-derived phenylpropanoids on the other. Under limited nutrient conditions, females prioritized mineral nutrient acquisition, flavonoid and condensed tannin (CT) production, while males invested more in above-ground biomass. Salicylate accumulation followed the growth differentiation balance hypothesis as low N mainly decreased the production of leaf and stem salicylate content while the combination of both low N and low P increased the amount of flavonoids and CTs allocated to leaves and to a lesser extent stems, which agrees with the PCM. We suggest that such a discrepancy in the responses of salicylates and flavonoid-derived CTs is linked to their clearly distinct biosynthetic origins and/or their metabolic costs.

  17. Different carbon sources affect PCB accumulation by marine bivalves.

    PubMed

    Laitano, M V; Silva Barni, M F; Costa, P G; Cledón, M; Fillmann, G; Miglioranza, K S B; Panarello, H O

    2016-02-01

    Pampean creeks were evaluated in the present study as potential land-based sources of PCB marine contamination. Different carbon and nitrogen sources from such creeks were analysed as boosters of PCB bioaccumulation by the filter feeder bivalve Brachidontes rodriguezii and grazer limpet Siphonaria lessoni. Carbon of different source than marine and anthropogenic nitrogen assimilated by organisms were estimated through their C and N isotopic composition. PCB concentration in surface sediments and mollusc samples ranged from 2.68 to 6.46 ng g(-1) (wet weight) and from 1074 to 4583 ng g(-1) lipid, respectively, reflecting a punctual source of PCB contamination related to a landfill area. Thus, despite the low flow of creeks, they should not be underestimated as contamination vectors to the marine environment. On the other hand, mussels PCB bioaccumulation was related with the carbon source uptake which highlights the importance to consider this factor when studying PCB distribution in organisms of coastal systems.

  18. Net primary productivity, allocation pattern and carbon use efficiency in an apple orchard assessed by integrating eddy covariance, biometric and continuous soil chamber measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotelli, D.; Montagnani, L.; Manca, G.; Tagliavini, M.

    2013-05-01

    Carbon use efficiency (CUE), the ratio of net primary production (NPP) over gross primary production (GPP), is a functional parameter that could possibly link the current increasingly accurate global GPP estimates with those of net ecosystem exchange, for which global predictors are still unavailable. Nevertheless, CUE estimates are actually available for only a few ecosystem types, while information regarding agro-ecosystems is scarce, in spite of the simplified spatial structure of these ecosystems that facilitates studies on allocation patterns and temporal growth dynamics. We combined three largely deployed methods, eddy covariance, soil respiration and biometric measurements, to assess monthly values of CUE, NPP and allocation patterns in different plant organs in an apple orchard during a complete year (2010). We applied a measurement protocol optimized for quantifying monthly values of carbon fluxes in this ecosystem type, which allows for a cross check between estimates obtained from different methods. We also attributed NPP components to standing biomass increments, detritus cycle feeding and lateral exports. We found that in the apple orchard, both net ecosystem production and gross primary production on a yearly basis, 380 ± 30 g C m-2 and 1263 ± 189 g C m-2 respectively, were of a magnitude comparable to those of natural forests growing in similar climate conditions. The largest differences with respect to forests are in the allocation pattern and in the fate of produced biomass. The carbon sequestered from the atmosphere was largely allocated to production of fruit: 49% of annual NPP was taken away from the ecosystem through apple production. Organic material (leaves, fine root litter, pruned wood and early fruit falls) contributing to the detritus cycle was 46% of the NPP. Only 5% was attributable to standing biomass increment, while this NPP component is generally the largest in forests. The CUE, with an annual average of 0.71 ± 0.12, was higher

  19. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Dispersion Methods Affect Their Aggregation, Deposition, and Biomarker Response

    EPA Science Inventory

    To systematically evaluate how dispersion methods affect the environmental behaviors of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), MWNTs were dispersed in various solutions (e.g., surfactants, natural organic matter (NOM), and etc.) via ultrasonication (SON) and long-term stirring (LT...

  20. Fracture Behavior of Ultra-Low-Carbon Steel Plate and Heat-Affected-Zone.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    ganese-molybdenum steel caused an increase in the DBTT . However. it cannot be assumed that the presence of these TiN cubes always causes detrimental...Department Research & Development Report 0 N Fracture Behavior of Ultra-Low-Carbon Steel Plate and Heat-Affected-Zone by M. G. Vassilaros CO a- Co -e DTIC...Materials Engineering Department Research & Development Report Fracture Behavior of Ultra-Low-Carbon Steel Plate and Heat-Affected-Zone by M. G

  1. Black Carbon Vertical Profiles Strongly Affect Its Radiative Forcing Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of black carbon (BC) aerosols on the global radiation balance is not well constrained. Here twelve global aerosol models are used to show that at least 20% of the present uncertainty in modeled BC direct radiative forcing (RF) is due to diversity in the simulated vertical profile of BC mass. Results are from phases 1 and 2 of the global aerosol model intercomparison project (AeroCom). Additionally, a significant fraction of the variability is shown to come from high altitudes, as, globally, more than 40% of the total BC RF is exerted above 5 km. BC emission regions and areas with transported BC are found to have differing characteristics. These insights into the importance of the vertical profile of BC lead us to suggest that observational studies are needed to better characterize the global distribution of BC, including in the upper troposphere.

  2. Black Carbon Vertical Profiles Strongly Affect its Radiative Forcing Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Bellouin, N.; Diehl, T.; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, Stefan; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, Joyce E.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, Kai

    2013-03-01

    The impact of black carbon (BC) aerosols on the global radiation balance is not well constrained. Here twelve global aerosol models are used to show that at least 20% of the present uncertainty in modeled BC direct radiative forcing (RF) is due to diversity in the simulated vertical profile of BC mass. Results are from phases 1 and 2 of the global aerosol model intercomparison project (AeroCom). Additionally, a significant fraction of the variability is shown to come from high altitudes, as, globally, more than 40% of the total BC RF is exerted above 5 km. BC emission regions and areas with transported BC are found to have differing characteristics. These insights into the importance of the vertical profile of BC lead us to suggest that observational studies are needed to better characterize the global distribution of BC, including in the upper troposphere.

  3. Climatic Versus Biotic Constraints on Carbon and Water Fluxes in Seasonally Drought-affected Ponderosa Pine Ecosystems. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, P. A.; Law, B. E.; Williams, M.; Irvine, J.; Kurpius, M.; Moore, D.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the relative importance of climatic versus biotic controls on gross primary production (GPP) and water vapor fluxes in seasonally drought-affected ponderosa pine forests. The study was conducted in young (YS), mature (MS), and old stands (OS) over 4 years at the AmeriFlux Metolius sites. Model simulations showed that interannual variation of GPP did not follow the same trends as precipitation, and effects of climatic variation were smallest at the OS (50%), and intermediate at the YS (<20%). In the young, developing stand, interannual variation in leaf area has larger effects on fluxes than climate, although leaf area is a function of climate in that climate can interact with age-related shifts in carbon allocation and affect whole-tree hydraulic conductance. Older forests, with well-established root systems, appear to be better buffered from effects of seasonal drought and interannual climatic variation. Interannual variation of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) was also lowest at the OS, where NEE is controlled more by interannual variation of ecosystem respiration, 70% of which is from soil, than by the variation of GPP, whereas variation in GPP is the primary reason for interannual changes in NEE at the YS and MS. Across spatially heterogeneous landscapes with high frequency of younger stands resulting from natural and anthropogenic disturbances, interannual climatic variation and change in leaf area are likely to result in large interannual variation in GPP and NEE.

  4. Climatic versus biotic constraints on carbon and water fluxes in seasonally drought-affected ponderosa pine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, P. A.; Law, B. E.; Williams, M.; Irvine, J.; Kurpius, M.; Moore, D.

    2004-12-01

    We investigated the relative importance of climatic versus biotic controls on gross primary production (GPP) and water vapor fluxes in seasonally drought-affected ponderosa pine forests. The study was conducted in young (YS), mature (MS), and old stands (OS) over 4 years at the AmeriFlux Metolius sites. Model simulations showed that interannual variation of GPP did not follow the same trends as precipitation, and effects of climatic variation were smallest at the OS (<10%), largest at the MS (>50%), and intermediate at the YS (<20%). In the young, developing stand, interannual variation in leaf area has larger effects on fluxes than climate, although leaf area is a function of climate in that climate can interact with age-related shifts in carbon allocation and affect whole-tree hydraulic conductance. Older forests, with well-established root systems, appear to be better buffered from effects of seasonal drought and interannual climatic variation. Interannual variation of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) was also lowest at the OS, where NEE is controlled more by interannual variation of ecosystem respiration, 70% of which is from soil, than by the variation of GPP, whereas variation in GPP is the primary reason for interannual changes in NEE at the YS and MS. Across spatially heterogeneous landscapes with high frequency of younger stands resulting from natural and anthropogenic disturbances, interannual climatic variation and change in leaf area are likely to result in large interannual variation in GPP and NEE.

  5. Age-related body weight constraints on prenatal and milk provisioning in Iberian red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus) affect allocation of maternal resources.

    PubMed

    Landete-Castillejos, T; García, A; Carrión, D; Estevez, J A; Ceacero, F; Gaspar-López, E; Gallego, L

    2009-02-01

    Maternal phenotypic characteristics can influence key life history variables of their offspring through maternal effects. In this study, we examined how body size constraints on maternal weight in yearling and subadult compared to adult hinds (age class effects) affected prenatal (calf birth weight, calf to hind weight ratio) and postnatal (milk) provisioning of Iberian red deer calves. Age correlated with all prenatal and postnatal investment traits except calf gains, although correlations were weaker than those with maternal weight. Once the effect of linear increase in weight with age was removed from models, yearlings showed additional reductions in calf birth weight, calf gains, and milk provisioning. The low-calf birth weight might increase the risk of calf mortality during lactation, as this occurs primarily during the first day of life and is strongly related to birth weight. Yearlings showed a greater prenatal allocation of resources in terms of greater calf to hind weight ratio probably as an extra effort by yearling mothers to balance calf neonatal mortality. It might compensate young mothers to produce low-quality calves while still growing rather than waiting for the uncertain possibility of surviving to the next reproductive season.

  6. Factors affecting ex-situ aqueous mineral carbonation using calcium and magnesium silicate minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Dahlin, David C.; O'Connor, William K.; Penner, Larry R.; Rush, G.E.

    2004-01-01

    Carbonation of magnesium- and calcium-silicate minerals to form their respective carbonates is one method to sequester carbon dioxide. Process development studies have identified reactor design as a key component affecting both the capital and operating costs of ex-situ mineral sequestration. Results from mineral carbonation studies conducted in a batch autoclave were utilized to design and construct a unique continuous pipe reactor with 100% recycle (flow-loop reactor). Results from the flow-loop reactor are consistent with batch autoclave tests, and are being used to derive engineering data necessary to design a bench-scale continuous pipeline reactor.

  7. Key biogeochemical factors affecting soil carbon storage in Posidonia meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, Oscar; Ricart, Aurora M.; Lavery, Paul S.; Mateo, Miguel Angel; Arias-Ortiz, Ariane; Masque, Pere; Rozaimi, Mohammad; Steven, Andy; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2016-08-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors influence the accumulation of organic carbon (Corg) in seagrass ecosystems. We surveyed Posidonia sinuosa meadows growing in different water depths to assess the variability in the sources, stocks and accumulation rates of Corg. We show that over the last 500 years, P. sinuosa meadows closer to the upper limit of distribution (at 2-4 m depth) accumulated 3- to 4-fold higher Corg stocks (averaging 6.3 kg Corg m-2) at 3- to 4-fold higher rates (12.8 g Corg m-2 yr-1) compared to meadows closer to the deep limits of distribution (at 6-8 m depth; 1.8 kg Corg m-2 and 3.6 g Corg m-2 yr-1). In shallower meadows, Corg stocks were mostly derived from seagrass detritus (88 % in average) compared to meadows closer to the deep limit of distribution (45 % on average). In addition, soil accumulation rates and fine-grained sediment content (< 0.125 mm) in shallower meadows (2.0 mm yr-1 and 9 %, respectively) were approximately 2-fold higher than in deeper meadows (1.2 mm yr-1 and 5 %, respectively). The Corg stocks and accumulation rates accumulated over the last 500 years in bare sediments (0.6 kg Corg m-2 and 1.2 g Corg m-2 yr-1) were 3- to 11-fold lower than in P. sinuosa meadows, while fine-grained sediment content (1 %) and seagrass detritus contribution to the Corg pool (20 %) were 8- and 3-fold lower than in Posidonia meadows, respectively. The patterns found support the hypothesis that Corg storage in seagrass soils is influenced by interactions of biological (e.g., meadow productivity, cover and density), chemical (e.g., recalcitrance of Corg stocks) and physical (e.g., hydrodynamic energy and soil accumulation rates) factors within the meadow. We conclude that there is a need to improve global estimates of seagrass carbon storage accounting for biogeochemical factors driving variability within habitats.

  8. Genotypic Tannin Levels in Populus tremula Impact the Way Nitrogen Enrichment Affects Growth and Allocation Responses for Some Traits and Not for Others.

    PubMed

    Bandau, Franziska; Decker, Vicki Huizu Guo; Gundale, Michael J; Albrectsen, Benedicte Riber

    2015-01-01

    Plant intraspecific variability has been proposed as a key mechanism by which plants adapt to environmental change. In boreal forests where nitrogen availability is strongly limited, nitrogen addition happens indirectly through atmospheric N deposition and directly through industrial forest fertilization. These anthropogenic inputs of N have numerous environmental consequences, including shifts in plant species composition and reductions in plant species diversity. However, we know less about how genetic differences within plant populations determine how species respond to eutrophication in boreal forests. According to plant defense theories, nitrogen addition will cause plants to shift carbon allocation more towards growth and less to chemical defense, potentially enhancing vulnerability to antagonists. Aspens are keystone species in boreal forests that produce condensed tannins to serve as chemical defense. We conducted an experiment using ten Populus tremula genotypes from the Swedish Aspen Collection that express extreme levels of baseline investment into foliar condensed tannins. We investigated whether investment into growth and phenolic defense compounds in young plants varied in response to two nitrogen addition levels, corresponding to atmospheric N deposition and industrial forest fertilization. Nitrogen addition generally caused growth to increase, and tannin levels to decrease; however, individualistic responses among genotypes were found for height growth, biomass of specific tissues, root:shoot ratios, and tissue lignin and N concentrations. A genotype's baseline ability to produce and store condensed tannins also influenced plant responses to N, although this effect was relatively minor. High-tannin genotypes tended to grow less biomass under low nitrogen levels and more at the highest fertilization level. Thus, the ability in aspen to produce foliar tannins is likely associated with a steeper reaction norm of growth responses, which suggests a

  9. Genotypic Tannin Levels in Populus tremula Impact the Way Nitrogen Enrichment Affects Growth and Allocation Responses for Some Traits and Not for Others

    PubMed Central

    Bandau, Franziska; Decker, Vicki Huizu Guo; Gundale, Michael J.; Albrectsen, Benedicte Riber

    2015-01-01

    Plant intraspecific variability has been proposed as a key mechanism by which plants adapt to environmental change. In boreal forests where nitrogen availability is strongly limited, nitrogen addition happens indirectly through atmospheric N deposition and directly through industrial forest fertilization. These anthropogenic inputs of N have numerous environmental consequences, including shifts in plant species composition and reductions in plant species diversity. However, we know less about how genetic differences within plant populations determine how species respond to eutrophication in boreal forests. According to plant defense theories, nitrogen addition will cause plants to shift carbon allocation more towards growth and less to chemical defense, potentially enhancing vulnerability to antagonists. Aspens are keystone species in boreal forests that produce condensed tannins to serve as chemical defense. We conducted an experiment using ten Populus tremula genotypes from the Swedish Aspen Collection that express extreme levels of baseline investment into foliar condensed tannins. We investigated whether investment into growth and phenolic defense compounds in young plants varied in response to two nitrogen addition levels, corresponding to atmospheric N deposition and industrial forest fertilization. Nitrogen addition generally caused growth to increase, and tannin levels to decrease; however, individualistic responses among genotypes were found for height growth, biomass of specific tissues, root:shoot ratios, and tissue lignin and N concentrations. A genotype’s baseline ability to produce and store condensed tannins also influenced plant responses to N, although this effect was relatively minor. High-tannin genotypes tended to grow less biomass under low nitrogen levels and more at the highest fertilization level. Thus, the ability in aspen to produce foliar tannins is likely associated with a steeper reaction norm of growth responses, which suggests a

  10. Chirality affects aggregation kinetics of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Khan, Iftheker A; Afrooz, A R M Nabiul; Flora, Joseph R V; Schierz, P Ariette; Ferguson, P Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Saleh, Navid B

    2013-02-19

    Aggregation kinetics of chiral-specific semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was systematically studied through time-resolved dynamic light scattering. Varied monovalent (NaCl) and divalent (CaCl(2)) electrolyte composition was used as background solution chemistry. Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) was used to study the effects of natural organic matter on chirally separated SWNT aggregation. Increasing salt concentration and introduction of divalent cations caused aggregation of SWNT clusters by suppressing the electrostatic repulsive interaction from the oxidized surfaces. The (6,5) SWNTs, i.e., SG65, with relatively lower diameter tubes compared to (7,6), i.e., SG76, showed substantially higher stability (7- and 5-fold for NaCl and CaCl(2), respectively). The critical coagulation concentration (CCC) values were 96 and 13 mM NaCl in the case of NaCl and 2.8 and 0.6 mM CaCl(2) for SG65 and SG76, respectively. The increased tube diameter for (7,6) armchair SWNTs likely presented with higher van der Waals interaction and thus increased the aggregation propensity substantially. The presence of SRHA enhanced SWNT stability in divalent CaCl(2) environment through steric interaction from adsorbed humic molecules; however showed little or no effects for monovalent NaCl. The mechanism of aggregation-describing favorable interaction tendencies for (7,6) SWNTs-is probed through ab initio molecular modeling. The results suggest that SWNT stability can be chirality dependent in typical aquatic environment.

  11. [Effects of different nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium fertilization modes on carbon- and nitrogen accumulation and allocation in rice plant].

    PubMed

    Feng, Lei; Tong, Cheng-li; Shi, Hui; Wu, Jin-shui; Chen, An-lei; Zhou, Ping

    2011-10-01

    Based on a 20-year field site-specific fertilization experiment in Taoyuan Experimental Station of Agriculture Ecosystems under Chinese Ecosystem Research Network (CERN), this paper studied the effects of different fertilization modes of N, P, and K on the accumulation and allocation of C and N in rice plant. The fertilization mode N-only showed the highest C and N contents (433 g kg(-1) and 18.9 g kg(-1), respectively) in rice grain, whereas the modes balanced fertilization of chemical N, P and K (NPK) and its combination with organic mature recycling (NPKC) showed the highest storage of C and N in rice plant. In treatments NPK and NPKC, the C storage in rice grain and in stem and leaf was 1960 kg hm(-2) and 2015 kg hm(-2), and 2002 kg hm(-2) and 2048 kg hm(-2), and the N storage in rice grain was 80.5 kg hm(-2) and 80.6 kg hm(-2), respectively. Treatment NPK had the highest N storage (59.3 kg hm(-2)) in stem and leaf. Balanced fertilization of chemical N, P, and K combined with organic manure recycling increased the accumulation of C and N in rice plant significantly. Comparing with applying N only, balanced fertilization of chemical N, P, and K was more favorable to the accumulation and allocation of C and N in rice plant during its growth period.

  12. Direct in situ measurement of Carbon Allocation to Mycorrhizal Fungi in a California Mixed-Conifer Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, M.

    2012-04-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi consume fixed C in ecosystems in exchange for soil resources. We used sensor and observation platforms belowground to quantify belowground dynamics in a California mixed-conifer ecosystem. We directly observed growth and mortality of mycorrhizal fungi in situ on a daily basis using an automated minirhizotron. We measured soil CO2, T and soil moisture at 5-min intervals into the soil profile. These data are coupled with sensors measuring eddy flux of water and CO2, sapflow for water fluxes and C fixation activity, and photographs for leaf phenology. We used DayCent modeling for net primary productivity (NPP) and measured NPP of rhizomorphs, and fungal hyphae. In an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) meadow, NPP was 141g/m2/y, with a productivity of fine root NPP of 76.5g C/m2/y, an estimated 10 percent of which is AM fungal C (7.7 g/m2/y). Extramatrical AM hyphal peak standing crop was 4.4g/m2, with a lifespan of 46 days, with active hyphae persisting for 240 days per year. The extramatrical AM fungal hyphal C was 22.9g/m2/y, for a total net allocation to AM fungi of 30.5 C/m2/y, or 22 percent of the estimated NPP. In the ectomycorrhizal (EM) forest, root standing crop (200g C/m2/y) and rhizomorph (2mg C/m2/y) was 33 percent of the NPP (600g C/m2/y). EM fungal hyphae standing crop was 18g/m2/y, with a 48day lifespan, persisting throughout the year, or 59 g C/m2/y. EM root tips and rhizomorph life spans were nearly a year. Assuming that EM fungi represent 40 percent of the fine root EM NPP (of 200g C/m2/y) or 80g C/m2/y, most of the rhizomorph (in the mineral soil) mass being EM (or 2mg C), and 57 percent of the soil fungal NPP or 80 g C/m2/y, then the EM NPP is 139 C/m2/y, or 23 percent of the estimated NPP (600g C/m2/y). As an independent check on the allocation of C, we applied the Hobbie and Hobbie isotopic fractionation d15N model to C allocation. Using d15N of Chantarellus sp. (10.6) and Rhizopogon sp. (9.1), with a leaf d15N of -4.9, we estimated

  13. Functional diversity of carbon-gain, water-use, and leaf-allocation traits in trees of a threatened lowland dry forest in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Sandquist, Darren R; Cordell, Susan

    2007-09-01

    We examined carbon-gain, water-use, and leaf-allocation traits for six tree species of a Hawaiian dry forest to better understand the functional diversity within this threatened ecosystem. Tropical dry forests are among the most endangered ecosystems on Earth, and in Hawaii, as elsewhere, declining biodiversity threatens ecosystem processes that may depend on forest functional diversity. We found broad variation among species including a two-fold difference for mean photosynthetic rate, a greater than three-fold difference for predawn water potential, and a nearly three-fold difference for leaf life span. Principal component analysis showed a clear separation of species based on carbon-gain vs. water-use related axes, and δ(13)C analysis revealed differing limitations (supply vs. demand) on carbon assimilation. The broad functional variation not only spanned traditional classifications (avoiders vs. tolerators), but also included unusual strategies (e.g., fast growth with drought tolerance). Correlations among traits, including leaf life span, leaf mass per area, and %N, followed typical global patterns, but some exceptions appeared as a result of unique life-history characteristics, such as latex-rich sap and root parasitism. Elucidating functional variation provides important information that can be used to link plant biodiversity with ecosystem processes and also facilitate the management and preservation of tropical dry forests and other threatened communities.

  14. Modelling Plant and Soil Nitrogen Feedbacks Affecting Forest Carbon Gain at High CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtrie, R. E.; Norby, R. J.; Franklin, O.; Pepper, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    Short-term, direct effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on plant carbon gain are relatively well understood. There is considerable uncertainty, however, about longer-term effects, which are influenced by various plant and ecosystem feedbacks. A key feedback in terrestrial ecosystems occurs through changes in plant carbon (C) allocation patterns. For instance, if high CO2 were to increase C allocation to roots, then plants may experience positive feedback through improved plant nutrition. A second type of feedback, associated with decomposition of soil-organic matter, may reduce soil-nutrient availability at high CO2. This paper will consider mechanistic models of both feedbacks. Effects of high CO2 on plant C allocation will be investigated using a simple model of forest net primary production (NPP) that incorporates the primary mechanisms of plant carbon and nitrogen (N) balance. The model called MATE (Model Any Terrestrial Ecosystem) includes an equation for annual C balance that depends on light- saturated photosynthetic rate and therefore on [CO2], and an equation for N balance incorporating an expression for N uptake as a function of root mass. The C-N model is applied to a Free Air CO2 Exchange (FACE) experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee, USA, where closed-canopy, monoculture stands of the deciduous hardwood sweetgum ( Liquidambar styraciflua) have been growing at [CO2] of 375 and 550 ppm for ten years. Features of this experiment are that the annual NPP response to elevated CO2 has averaged approximately 25% over seven years, but that annual fine-root production has almost doubled on average, with especially large increases in later years of the experiment (Norby et al. 2006). The model provides a simple graphical approach for analysing effects of elevated CO2 and N supply on leaf/root/wood C allocation and productivity. It simulates increases in NPP and fine-root production at the ORNL FACE site that are consistent

  15. Factors affecting the retention of methyl iodide by iodide-impregnated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, M.L.; Malstrom, R.A.

    1990-12-31

    Iodide-impregnated activated carbon that had been in use for up to 30 months was studied to characterize those factors that affect its interaction with and retention of methyl iodide. Humidity and competing organic sorbents were observed to decrease the residence time of the methyl iodide on the carbon bed. Additionally, changes in the effective surface area and the loss of iodide from the surface are both important in determining the effectiveness of the carbon for retaining radioactive iodine from methyl iodide. A simple model incorporating both factors gave a fairly good fit to the experimental data.

  16. Factors affecting the retention of methyl iodide by iodide-impregnated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, M.L.; Malstrom, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Iodide-impregnated activated carbon that had been in use for up to 30 months was studied to characterize those factors that affect its interaction with and retention of methyl iodide. Humidity and competing organic sorbents were observed to decrease the residence time of the methyl iodide on the carbon bed. Additionally, changes in the effective surface area and the loss of iodide from the surface are both important in determining the effectiveness of the carbon for retaining radioactive iodine from methyl iodide. A simple model incorporating both factors gave a fairly good fit to the experimental data.

  17. Can we Constrain Carbon Assimilation and Allocation in a Multi-Species Hardwood Forest Using Water Flux Measurements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, K. V.; Oren, R.; Poulter, B.; Oishi, A. C.; Ellsworth, D. S.; Katul, G. G.

    2002-12-01

    Annual carbon budgets of terrestrial ecosystems and how climate perturbations alter them remain an active research area. A combination of measurements collected at multiple spatial and temporal scales is used in conjunction with models to quantify the relationship between water fluxes and C budgets. A multi-layer model for canopy CO2 uptake is employed in which the primary input is mean canopy stomatal conductance scaled via sap-flux of water vapor (gw) in a multi-species hardwood forest stand at the Duke Forest, NC, USA. The ecophysiological model relates stomatal conductance of CO2 (gCO2) to the ratio of internal (Ci) to external CO2 concentration (Ca) that is then used to calculate net assimilation (Anet) after correction for differences in diffusivities. Modeled assimilation rates agreed well with instantaneous leaf level measurements in the upper canopy, collected via porometry and monthly daytime carbon fluxes measured via eddy-flux augmented with daytime soil and wood respiration. Additionally annual biomass production augmented with construction and maintenance respiration agreed well with annual carbon uptake. The combination of sapflux measurements and the model provide reliable constrains on CO2 budgets in terrestrial ecosystems and showed lower carbon uptake in hardwood forest of the southeast than previously published.

  18. Age and site-related patterns of carbon allocation to wood, foliage and roots on reclaimed kaolin mines in Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Legerski, A.; Hendrick, R.; Ogden, E.

    1996-12-31

    We quantified merchantable stand volume, leaf area indices (LAI), and root densities in twelve Pinus taeda L. forests growing on reclaimed kaolin mines in Georgia. Stands were 11 to 36 yrs old, and formed two productivity classes, Projected wood volume on the poor sites ranged 104 to 142 m{sup 3}/ha and from 164 to 298 on the better sites. LAI was not related to age on either the good or poor sites, LAIs reach their maximal values early in stand development (<12 yrs). Fine roots (0-1 mm) within the upper 1 m were most abundant on the poorer sites. Roots were nearly absent at depths>50 cm in stands aged 14 or less, but neatly equal in density to surface roots in the older stands. Stand age was strongly and negatively related to fine root density on both site types. Densities of larger, more perennial roots (1-2 mm) decreased with stand age on poor sites and increased on good sites. Stand productivity is closely related to LAI, and root densities show that trees allocate more energy into fine, absorbing roots on the poorer sites. Deep fine root densities indicate that trees must explore progressively greater volumes of soil to meet water and nutritional needs in reclaimed soils.

  19. Influence of nutrient signals and carbon allocation on the expression of phosphate and nitrogen transporter genes in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hui; Yuan, Xiaolei; Duan, Jianfeng; Li, Wenhu; Zhai, Bingnian; Gao, Yajun

    2017-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization of plant roots causes the down-regulation of expression of phosphate (Pi) or nitrogen (N) transporter genes involved in direct nutrient uptake pathways. The mechanism of this effect remains unknown. In the present study, we sought to determine whether the expression of Pi or N transporter genes in roots of winter wheat colonized by AM fungus responded to (1) Pi or N nutrient signals transferred from the AM extra-radical hyphae, or (2) carbon allocation changes in the AM association. A three-compartment culture system, comprising a root compartment (RC), a root and AM hyphae compartment (RHC), and an AM hyphae compartment (HC), was used to test whether the expression of Pi or N transporter genes responded to nutrients (Pi, NH4+ and NO3-) added only to the HC. Different AM inoculation density treatments (roots were inoculated with 0, 20, 50 and 200 g AM inoculum) and light regime treatments (6 hours light and 18 hours light) were established to test the effects of carbon allocation on the expression of Pi or N transporter genes in wheat roots. The expression of two Pi transporter genes (TaPT4 and TaPHT1.2), five nitrate transporter genes (TaNRT1.1, TaNRT1.2, TaNRT2.1, TaNRT2.2, and TaNRT2.3), and an ammonium transporter gene (TaAMT1.2) was quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The expression of TaPT4, TaNRT2.2, and TaAMT1.2 was down-regulated by AM colonization only when roots of host plants received Pi or N nutrient signals. However, the expression of TaPHT1.2, TaNRT2.1, and TaNRT2.3 was down-regulated by AM colonization, regardless of whether there was nutrient transfer from AM hyphae. The expression of TaNRT1.2 was also down-regulated by AM colonization even when there was no nutrient transfer from AM hyphae. The present study showed that an increase in carbon consumption by the AM fungi did not necessarily result in greater down-regulation of expression of Pi or N transporter genes. PMID:28207830

  20. Influence of nutrient signals and carbon allocation on the expression of phosphate and nitrogen transporter genes in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hui; Yuan, Xiaolei; Duan, Jianfeng; Li, Wenhu; Zhai, Bingnian; Gao, Yajun

    2017-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization of plant roots causes the down-regulation of expression of phosphate (Pi) or nitrogen (N) transporter genes involved in direct nutrient uptake pathways. The mechanism of this effect remains unknown. In the present study, we sought to determine whether the expression of Pi or N transporter genes in roots of winter wheat colonized by AM fungus responded to (1) Pi or N nutrient signals transferred from the AM extra-radical hyphae, or (2) carbon allocation changes in the AM association. A three-compartment culture system, comprising a root compartment (RC), a root and AM hyphae compartment (RHC), and an AM hyphae compartment (HC), was used to test whether the expression of Pi or N transporter genes responded to nutrients (Pi, NH4+ and NO3-) added only to the HC. Different AM inoculation density treatments (roots were inoculated with 0, 20, 50 and 200 g AM inoculum) and light regime treatments (6 hours light and 18 hours light) were established to test the effects of carbon allocation on the expression of Pi or N transporter genes in wheat roots. The expression of two Pi transporter genes (TaPT4 and TaPHT1.2), five nitrate transporter genes (TaNRT1.1, TaNRT1.2, TaNRT2.1, TaNRT2.2, and TaNRT2.3), and an ammonium transporter gene (TaAMT1.2) was quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The expression of TaPT4, TaNRT2.2, and TaAMT1.2 was down-regulated by AM colonization only when roots of host plants received Pi or N nutrient signals. However, the expression of TaPHT1.2, TaNRT2.1, and TaNRT2.3 was down-regulated by AM colonization, regardless of whether there was nutrient transfer from AM hyphae. The expression of TaNRT1.2 was also down-regulated by AM colonization even when there was no nutrient transfer from AM hyphae. The present study showed that an increase in carbon consumption by the AM fungi did not necessarily result in greater down-regulation of expression of Pi or N transporter genes.

  1. Differences in Carbon Assimilation and Allocation between Pine Forests Growing under Ambient and Enriched-CO2 Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, K. V.; Oren, R.; Katul, G. G.; Ellsworth, D. S.; Lai, C.; Herrick, J. D.

    2002-05-01

    To constrain annual carbon budgets of terrestrial ecosystems and to assess how climate perturbations alter them, a combination of measurements collected at multiple spatial and temporal scales and models must be used. Here we investigate the use of sapflux measurements along with simplified biochemical equations for carboxylation efficiency to estimate canopy scale photosynthesis under ambient and enriched CO2 conditions. Towards this end, a comprehensive multi-layer model for canopy CO2 uptake is developed in which the primary input is mean canopy stomatal conductance scaled via sap-flux of water vapor (gw) in a homogenous Pinus taeda L. and L. styraciflua stand at the Duke Forest, NC, USA. The ecophysiological model relates stomatal conductance of CO2 (gCO2) to the ratio of internal (Ci) to external CO2 concentration (Ca) which is then used to calculate net assimilation (Anet) after correction for differences in diffusivities. Other novel features in the model is a radiative transfer scheme that explicitly accounts for penumbra. Modeled assimilation rates agreed well with instantaneous leaf level measurements in the upper canopy, collected via porometry and monthly daytime carbon fluxes measured via eddy-flux augmented with daytime soil and wood respiration. Additionally annual biomass production augmented with construction and maintenance respiration agreed well with annual carbon uptake for the two years and three plots under investigation. The combination of sapflux measurements and the proposed model provide reliable constrains on CO2 budgets in terrestrial ecosystems.

  2. Repeated administrations of carbon nanotubes in male mice cause reversible testis damage without affecting fertility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yuhong; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Jingping; Mu, Qingxin; Zhang, Weidong; Butch, Elizabeth R.; Snyder, Scott E.; Yan, Bing

    2010-09-01

    Soluble carbon nanotubes show promise as materials for in vivo delivery and imaging applications. Several reports have described the in vivo toxicity of carbon nanotubes, but their effects on male reproduction have not been examined. Here, we show that repeated intravenous injections of water-soluble multiwalled carbon nanotubes into male mice can cause reversible testis damage without affecting fertility. Nanotubes accumulated in the testes, generated oxidative stress and decreased the thickness of the seminiferous epithelium in the testis at day 15, but the damage was repaired at 60 and 90 days. The quantity, quality and integrity of the sperm and the levels of three major sex hormones were not significantly affected throughout the 90-day period. The fertility of treated male mice was unaffected; the pregnancy rate and delivery success of female mice that mated with the treated male mice did not differ from those that mated with untreated male mice.

  3. Repeated carbon nanotube administrations in male mice cause reversible testis damage without affecting fertility

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yuhong; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Jingping; Mu, Qingxin; Zhang, Weidong; Butch, Elizabeth R.; Snyder, Scott E.; Yan, Bing

    2010-01-01

    Soluble carbon nanotubes are promising materials for in vivo delivery and imaging applications. Several reports have described the in vivo toxicity of carbon nanotubes, however, their effects on male reproduction have not been examined. Here we show that repeated intravenous injections of water-soluble multi-walled carbon nanotubes into male mice can cause reversible testis damage without affecting fertility. Nanotubes accumulated in the testes, generated oxidative stress, and decreased the thickness of the seminiferous epithelium in the testis at day 15, but the damage was repaired after 60 and 90 days. The quantity, quality, and integrity of the sperm and the levels of three major sex hormones were not significantly affected throughout the 90-day period. The fertility of treated male mice was unaffected; the pregnancy rate and delivery success of female mice that mated with the treated male mice did not differ from those that mated with untreated male mice. PMID:20693989

  4. Infrared warming affects intrarow soil carbon dioxide efflux during early vegetative growth of spring wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Global warming will likely affect carbon cycles in agricultural soils. Our objective was to deploy infrared (IR) warming to characterize the effect of global warming on soil temperature (Ts), volumetric soil-water content ('s), and intrarow soil CO2 efflux (Fs) of an open-field spring wheat (Triticu...

  5. Ecosystem carbon storage capacity as affected by disturbance regimes: A general theoretical model

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Ensheng; Luo, Yiqi; Wang, Weile; Wang, Han; Hayes, Daniel J; McGuire, A. David; Hastings, Alan; Schimel, David

    2012-01-01

    Disturbances have been recognized as a key factor shaping terrestrial ecosystem states and dynamics. A general model that quantitatively describes the relationship between carbon storage and disturbance regime is critical for better understanding large scale terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics. We developed a model (REGIME) to quantify ecosystem carbon storage capacities (E[x]) under varying disturbance regimes with an analytical solution E[x] = U {center_dot} {tau}{sub E} {center_dot} {lambda}{lambda} + s {tau} 1, where U is ecosystem carbon influx, {tau}{sub E} is ecosystem carbon residence time, and {tau}{sub 1} is the residence time of the carbon pool affected by disturbances (biomass pool in this study). The disturbance regime is characterized by the mean disturbance interval ({lambda}) and the mean disturbance severity (s). It is a Michaelis-Menten-type equation illustrating the saturation of carbon content with mean disturbance interval. This model analytically integrates the deterministic ecosystem carbon processes with stochastic disturbance events to reveal a general pattern of terrestrial carbon dynamics at large scales. The model allows us to get a sense of the sensitivity of ecosystems to future environmental changes just by a few calculations. According to the REGIME model, for example, approximately 1.8 Pg C will be lost in the high-latitude regions of North America (>45{sup o} N) if fire disturbance intensity increases around 5.7 time the current intensity to the end of the twenty-first century, which will require around 12% increases in net primary productivity (NPP) to maintain stable carbon stocks. If the residence time decreased 10% at the same time additional 12.5% increases in NPP are required to keep current C stocks. The REGIME model also lays the foundation for analytically modeling the interactions between deterministic biogeochemical processes and stochastic disturbance events.

  6. Water level changes affect carbon turnover and microbial community composition in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Weise, Lukas; Ulrich, Andreas; Moreano, Matilde; Gessler, Arthur; Kayler, Zachary E; Steger, Kristin; Zeller, Bernd; Rudolph, Kristin; Knezevic-Jaric, Jelena; Premke, Katrin

    2016-05-01

    Due to climate change, many lakes in Europe will be subject to higher variability of hydrological characteristics in their littoral zones. These different hydrological regimes might affect the use of allochthonous and autochthonous carbon sources. We used sandy sediment microcosms to examine the effects of different hydrological regimes (wet, desiccating, and wet-desiccation cycles) on carbon turnover. (13)C-labelled particulate organic carbon was used to trace and estimate carbon uptake into bacterial biomass (via phospholipid fatty acids) and respiration. Microbial community changes were monitored by combining DNA- and RNA-based real-time PCR quantification and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA. The shifting hydrological regimes in the sediment primarily caused two linked microbial effects: changes in the use of available organic carbon and community composition changes. Drying sediments yielded the highest CO2 emission rates, whereas hydrological shifts increased the uptake of allochthonous organic carbon for respiration. T-RFLP patterns demonstrated that only the most extreme hydrological changes induced a significant shift in the active and total bacterial communities. As current scenarios of climate change predict an increase of drought events, frequent variations of the hydrological regimes of many lake littoral zones in central Europe are anticipated. Based on the results of our study, this phenomenon may increase the intensity and amplitude in rates of allochthonous organic carbon uptake and CO2 emissions.

  7. Water level changes affect carbon turnover and microbial community composition in lake sediments

    PubMed Central

    Weise, Lukas; Ulrich, Andreas; Moreano, Matilde; Gessler, Arthur; E. Kayler, Zachary; Steger, Kristin; Zeller, Bernd; Rudolph, Kristin; Knezevic-Jaric, Jelena; Premke, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Due to climate change, many lakes in Europe will be subject to higher variability of hydrological characteristics in their littoral zones. These different hydrological regimes might affect the use of allochthonous and autochthonous carbon sources. We used sandy sediment microcosms to examine the effects of different hydrological regimes (wet, desiccating, and wet-desiccation cycles) on carbon turnover. 13C-labelled particulate organic carbon was used to trace and estimate carbon uptake into bacterial biomass (via phospholipid fatty acids) and respiration. Microbial community changes were monitored by combining DNA- and RNA-based real-time PCR quantification and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA. The shifting hydrological regimes in the sediment primarily caused two linked microbial effects: changes in the use of available organic carbon and community composition changes. Drying sediments yielded the highest CO2 emission rates, whereas hydrological shifts increased the uptake of allochthonous organic carbon for respiration. T-RFLP patterns demonstrated that only the most extreme hydrological changes induced a significant shift in the active and total bacterial communities. As current scenarios of climate change predict an increase of drought events, frequent variations of the hydrological regimes of many lake littoral zones in central Europe are anticipated. Based on the results of our study, this phenomenon may increase the intensity and amplitude in rates of allochthonous organic carbon uptake and CO2 emissions. PMID:26902802

  8. Hydrologic Treatments Affect Gaseous Carbon Loss From Organic Soils, Twitchell Island, California, October 1995-December 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Robin L.; Hastings, Lauren; Fujii, Roger

    2000-01-01

    Subsidence of organic soils in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, has increased the potential for levee failure and flooding in the region. Because oxidation of the peat soils is a primary cause of subsidence, reversion of affected lands to wetlands has been proposed as a mitigation tool. To test this hypothesis, three 10 x 10 meter enclosures were built on Twitchell Island in the Delta and managed as different wetland habitats. Emissions of carbon dioxide and methane were measured in situ from October 1995 through December 1997, from the systems that developed under the different water-management treatments. Treatments included a seasonal control (SC) under current island management conditions; reverse flooding (RF), where the land is intentionally flooded from early dry season until midsummer; permanent shallow flooding (F); and a more deeply flooded, open-water (OW) treatment. Hydrologic treatments affected microbial processes, plant community and temperature dynamics which, in turn, affected carbon cycling. Water-management treatments with a period of flooding significantly decreased gaseous carbon emissions compared to the seasonal control. Permanent flooding treatments showed significantly higher methane fluxes than treatments with some period of aerobic conditions. Shallow flooding treatments created conditions that support cattail [Typha species (spp.)] marshes, while deep flooding precluded emergent vegetation. Carbon inputs to the permanent shallow flooding treatment tended to be greater than the measured losses. This suggests that permanent shallow flooding has the greatest potential for managing subsidence of these soils by generating organic substrate more rapidly than is lost through decomposition. Carbon input estimates of plant biomass compared to measurements of gaseous carbon losses indicate the potential for mitigation of subsidence through hydrologic management of the organic soils in the area.

  9. The use of NH4(+) rather than NO3(-) affects cell stoichiometry, C allocation, photosynthesis and growth in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. UTEX LB 2380, only when energy is limiting.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Zuoxi; Giordano, Mario

    2017-02-01

    The assimilation of N-NO3(-) requires more energy than that of N-NH4(+) . This becomes relevant when energy is limiting and may impinge differently on cell energy budget depending on depth, time of the day and season. We hypothesize that N-limited and energy-limited cells of the oceanic cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. differ in their response to the N source with respect to growth, elemental stoichiometry and carbon allocation. Under N limitation, cells retained almost absolute homeostasis of elemental and organic composition, and the use of NH4(+) did not stimulate growth. When energy was limiting, however, Synechococcus grew faster in NH4(+) than in NO3(-) and had higher C (20%), N (38%) and S (30%) cell quotas. Furthermore, more C was allocated to protein, whereas the carbohydrate and lipid pool size did not change appreciably. Energy limitation also led to a higher photosynthetic rate relative to N limitation. We interpret these results as an indication that, under energy limitation, the use of the least expensive N source allowed a spillover of the energy saved from N assimilation to the assimilation of other nutrients. The change in elemental stoichiometry influenced C allocation, inducing an increase in cell protein, which resulted in a stimulation of photosynthesis and growth.

  10. Carbon storage potential by four macrophytes as affected by planting diversity in a created wetland.

    PubMed

    Means, Mary M; Ahn, Changwoo; Korol, Alicia R; Williams, Lisa D

    2016-01-01

    Wetland creation has become a commonplace method for mitigating the loss of natural wetlands. Often mitigation projects fail to restore ecosystem services of the impacted natural wetlands. One of the key ecosystem services of newly created wetlands is carbon accumulation/sequestration, but little is known about how planting diversity (PD) affects the ability of herbaceous wetland plants to store carbon in newly created wetlands. Most mitigation projects involve a planting regime, but PD, which may be critical in establishing biologically diverse and ecologically functioning wetlands, is seldom required. Using a set of 34 mesocosms (∼1 m(2) each), we investigated the effects of planting diversity on carbon storage potential of four native wetland plant species that are commonly planted in created mitigation wetlands in Virginia - Carex vulpinoidea, Eleocharis obtusa, Juncus effusus, and Mimulus ringens. The plants were grown under the four distinctive PD treatments [i.e., monoculture (PD 1) through four different species mixture (PD 4)]. Plant biomass was harvested after two growing seasons and analyzed for tissue carbon content. Competition values (CV) were calculated to understand how the PD treatment affected the competitive ability of plants relative to their biomass production and thus carbon storage potentials. Aboveground biomass ranged from 988 g/m(2) - 1515 g/m(2), being greatest in monocultures, but only when compared to the most diverse mixture (p = 0.021). However, carbon storage potential estimates per mesocosm ranged between 344 g C/m(2) in the most diverse mesocosms (PD 4) to 610 g C/m(2) in monoculture ones with no significant difference (p = 0.089). CV of E. obtusa and C. vulpinoidea showed a declining trend when grown in the most diverse mixtures but J. effusus and M. ringens displayed no difference across the PD gradient (p = 0.910). In monocultures, both M. ringens, and J. effusus appeared to store carbon as biomass more

  11. Does deciduous tree species identity affect carbon storage in temperate soils?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungkunst, Hermann; Schleuß, Per; Heitkamp, Felix

    2015-04-01

    Forest soils contribute roughly 70 % to the global terrestrial soil organic carbon (SOC) pool and thus play a vital role in the global carbon cycle. It is less clear, however, whether temperate tree species identity affects SOC storage beyond the coarse differentiation between coniferous and deciduous trees. The most important driver for soil SOC storage definitely is the fine mineral fraction (clay and fine silt) because of its high sorption ability. It is difficult to disentangle any additional biotic effects since clay and silt vary considerably in nature. For experimental approaches, the process of soil carbon accumulation is too slow and, therefore, sound results cannot be expected for decades. Here we will present our success to distinguish between the effects of fine particle content (abiotic) and tree species composition (biotic) on the SOC pool in an old-growth broad-leaved forest plots along a tree diversity gradient , i.e., 1- (beech), 3- (plus ash and lime tree)- and 5-(plus maple and hornbeam) species. The particle size fractions were separated first and then the carbon concentrations of each fraction was measured. Hence, the carbon content per unit clay was not calculated, as usually done, but directly measured. As expected, the variation in SOC content was mainly explained by the variations in clay content but not entirely. We found that the carbon concentration per unit clay and fine silt in the subsoil was by 30-35% higher in mixed than in monospecific stands indicating a significant species identity or species diversity effect on C stabilization. In contrast to the subsoil, no tree species effects was identified for the topsoil. Indications are given that the mineral phase was already carbon saturated and thus left no more room for a possible biotic effect. Underlying processes must remain speculative, but we will additionally present our latest microcosm results, including isotopic signatures, to underpin the proposed deciduous tree species

  12. Early and late seasonal carbon sequestration and allocation in larch trees growing on permafrost in Central Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masyagina, Oxana; Prokushkin, Anatoly; Kirdyanov, Alexander; Artyukhov, Aleksey; Udalova, Tatiana; Senchenkov, Sergey; Rublev, Aleksey

    2014-05-01

    Despite large geographic extent of deciduous conifer species Larix gmelinii, its seasonal photosynthetic activity and translocation of photoassimilated carbon within a tree remain poorly studied. To get better insight into productivity of larch trees growing on permafrost soils in Siberian larch biome we aimed to analyze dynamics of foliage parameters (i.e. leaf area, biomass, %N, %P etc.), seasonal dynamics of photosynthetic activity and apply whole tree labeling by 13CO2, which is powerful and effective tool for tracing newly developed assimilates translocation to tissues and organs of a tree (Kagawa et al., 2006; Keel et al., 2012). Experimental plot has been established in mature 105 year-old larch stand located within the continuous permafrost area near Tura settlement (Central Siberia, 64o17'13" N, 100o11'55" E, 148 m a.s.l.). Trees selected for experiments represented mean tree of the stand. Measurements of seasonal photosynthetic activity and foliar biomass sampling were arranged from early growing season (June 8, 2013) until yellowing and senescence of needles on September 17, 2013. Labeling by 13C in whole tree chamber was conducted by three pulses ([CO2]max ≤ 2,500 ppmv, 13CO2 (30% v/v)) at the early (June) and late (August) phase of growing season for different trees in 3 replicates each time. Both early season and late season labeling experiments demonstrated high rate of 13CO2 assimilation and respective enrichment of needle tissues by 13C: δ13C increased from -28.7 up to +670‰ just after labeling. However, there was distinct post-labeling dynamics of needle δ13C among two seasonal experiments. At the early season 13C depletion in labeled needles was slower, and δ13C approached after 40 days ca. +110 ‰ and remained constant till senescence. In the late season (August) needles were losing labeled C with much faster rate and approached only +1.5 ‰ upon senescence (28 days exposition). These findings suggest that in early season ca. 20% of

  13. Direct uptake of organically derived carbon by grass roots and allocation in leaves and phytoliths: 13C labeling evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, Anne; Balesdent, Jérôme; Cazevieille, Patrick; Chevassus-Rosset, Claire; Signoret, Patrick; Mazur, Jean-Charles; Harutyunyan, Araks; Doelsch, Emmanuel; Basile-Doelsch, Isabelle; Miche, Hélène; Santos, Guaciara M.

    2016-03-01

    In the rhizosphere, the uptake of low-molecular-weight carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) by plant roots has been well documented. While organic N uptake relative to total uptake is important, organic C uptake is supposed to be low relative to the plant's C budget. Recently, radiocarbon analyses demonstrated that a fraction of C from the soil was occluded in amorphous silica micrometric particles that precipitate in plant cells (phytoliths). Here, we investigated whether and to what extent organically derived C absorbed by grass roots can feed the C occluded in phytoliths. For this purpose we added 13C- and 15N-labeled amino acids (AAs) to the silicon-rich hydroponic solution of the grass Festuca arundinacea. The experiment was designed to prevent C leakage from the labeled nutritive solution to the chamber atmosphere. After 14 days of growth, the 13C and 15N enrichments (13C excess and 15N excess) in the roots, stems and leaves as well as phytoliths were measured relative to a control experiment in which no labeled AAs were added. Additionally, the 13C excess was measured at the molecular level, in AAs extracted from roots and stems and leaves. The net uptake of labeled AA-derived 13C reached 4.5 % of the total AA 13C supply. The amount of AA-derived 13C fixed in the plant was minor but not nil (0.28 and 0.10 % of total C in roots and stems/leaves, respectively). Phenylalanine and methionine that were supplied in high amounts to the nutritive solution were more 13C-enriched than other AAs in the plant. This strongly suggested that part of AA-derived 13C was absorbed and translocated into the plant in its original AA form. In phytoliths, AA-derived 13C was detected. Its concentration was on the same order of magnitude as in bulk stems and leaves (0.15 % of the phytolith C). This finding strengthens the body of evidences showing that part of organic compounds occluded in phytoliths can be fed by C entering the plant through the roots. Although this experiment was done in

  14. Direct uptake of organic carbon by grass roots and allocation in leaves and phytoliths: 13C labeling evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, A.; Balesdent, J.; Cazevieille, P.; Chevassus-Rosset, C.; Signoret, P.; Mazur, J.-C.; Harutyunyan, A.; Doelsch, E.; Basile-Doelsch, I.; Miche, H.; Santos, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    In the rhizosphere, the uptake of low molecular weight carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) by plant roots has been well documented. While organic N uptake relatively to total uptake is important, organic C uptake is supposed to be low relatively to the plant's C budget. Recently, radiocarbon analyses demonstrated that a fraction of C from the soil was occluded in amorphous silica micrometric particles that precipitate in plant cells (phytoliths). Here, we investigated whether and in which extent organic C absorbed by grass roots, under the form of either intact amino acids (AAs) or microbial metabolites, can feed the organic C occluded in phytoliths. For this purpose we added 13C- and 15N-labeled AAs to the silicon-rich hydroponic solution of the grass Festuca arundinacea. The experiment was designed to prevent C leakage from the labeled nutritive solution to the chamber atmosphere. After 14 days of growth, the 13C and 15N enrichments (13C-excess and 15N-excess) in the roots, stems and leaves, and phytoliths, as well as the 13C-excess in AAs extracted from roots and stems and leaves, were quantified relatively to a control experiment in which no labelled AAs were added. The net uptake of 13C derived from the labeled AAs supplied to the nutritive solution (AA-13C) by Festuca arundinacea represented 4.5 % of the total AA-13C supply. AA-13C fixed in the plant represented only 0.13 % of total C. However, the experimental conditions may have underestimated the extent of the process under natural and field conditions. Previous studies showed that 15N and 13C can be absorbed by the roots in several organic and inorganic forms. In the present experiment, the fact that phenylalanine and methionine, that were supplied in high amount to the nutritive solution, were more 13C-enriched than other AAs in the roots and stems and leaves strongly suggested that part of AA-13C was absorbed and translocated in its original AA form. The concentration of AA-13C represented only 0.15 % of the

  15. The addition of organic carbon and nitrate affects reactive transport of heavy metals in sandy aquifers.

    PubMed

    Satyawali, Yamini; Seuntjens, Piet; Van Roy, Sandra; Joris, Ingeborg; Vangeel, Silvia; Dejonghe, Winnie; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien

    2011-04-25

    Organic carbon introduction in the soil to initiate remedial measures, nitrate infiltration due to agricultural practices or sulphate intrusion owing to industrial usage can influence the redox conditions and pH, thus affecting the mobility of heavy metals in soil and groundwater. This study reports the fate of Zn and Cd in sandy aquifers under a variety of plausible in-situ redox conditions that were induced by introduction of carbon and various electron acceptors in column experiments. Up to 100% Zn and Cd removal (from the liquid phase) was observed in all the four columns, however the mechanisms were different. Metal removal in column K1 (containing sulphate), was attributed to biological sulphate reduction and subsequent metal precipitation (as sulphides). In the presence of both nitrate and sulphate (K2), the former dominated the process, precipitating the heavy metals as hydroxides and/or carbonates. In the presence of sulphate, nitrate and supplemental iron (Fe(OH)(3)) (K3), metal removal was also due to precipitation as hydroxides and/or carbonates. In abiotic column, K4, (with supplemental iron (Fe(OH)(3)), but no nitrate), cation exchange with soil led to metal removal. The results obtained were modeled using the reactive transport model PHREEQC-2 to elucidate governing processes and to evaluate scenarios of organic carbon, sulphate and nitrate inputs.

  16. Dynamic Channel Allocation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    7 1 . Fixed Channel Allocation (FCA) ........................................................7 2. Dynamic Channel ...19 7. CSMA/CD-Based Multiple Network Lines .....................................20 8. Hybrid Channel Allocation in Wireless Networks...28 1 . Channel Allocation

  17. Sex allocation and secondary sex ratio in Cuban boa (Chilabothrus angulifer): mother's body size affects the ratio between sons and daughters.

    PubMed

    Frynta, Daniel; Vejvodová, Tereza; Šimková, Olga

    2016-06-01

    Secondary sex ratios of animals with genetically determined sex may considerably deviate from equality. These deviations may be attributed to several proximate and ultimate factors. Sex ratio theory explains some of them as strategic decisions of mothers improving their fitness by selective investment in sons or daughters, e.g. local resource competition hypothesis (LRC) suggests that philopatric females tend to produce litters with male-biased sex ratios to avoid future competition with their daughters. Until now, only little attention has been paid to examine predictions of sex ratio theory in snakes possessing genetic sex determination and exhibiting large variance in allocation of maternal investment. Cuban boa is an endemic viviparous snake producing large-bodied newborns (∼200 g). Extremely high maternal investment in each offspring increases importance of sex allocation. In a captive colony, we collected breeding records of 42 mothers, 62 litters and 306 newborns and examined secondary sex ratios (SR) and sexual size dimorphism (SSD) of newborns. None of the examined morphometric traits of neonates appeared sexually dimorphic. The sex ratio was slightly male biased (174 males versus 132 females) and litter sex ratio significantly decreased with female snout-vent length. We interpret this relationship as an additional support for LRC as competition between mothers and daughters increases with similarity of body sizes between competing snakes.

  18. Sex allocation and secondary sex ratio in Cuban boa ( Chilabothrus angulifer): mother's body size affects the ratio between sons and daughters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frynta, Daniel; Vejvodová, Tereza; Šimková, Olga

    2016-06-01

    Secondary sex ratios of animals with genetically determined sex may considerably deviate from equality. These deviations may be attributed to several proximate and ultimate factors. Sex ratio theory explains some of them as strategic decisions of mothers improving their fitness by selective investment in sons or daughters, e.g. local resource competition hypothesis (LRC) suggests that philopatric females tend to produce litters with male-biased sex ratios to avoid future competition with their daughters. Until now, only little attention has been paid to examine predictions of sex ratio theory in snakes possessing genetic sex determination and exhibiting large variance in allocation of maternal investment. Cuban boa is an endemic viviparous snake producing large-bodied newborns (˜200 g). Extremely high maternal investment in each offspring increases importance of sex allocation. In a captive colony, we collected breeding records of 42 mothers, 62 litters and 306 newborns and examined secondary sex ratios (SR) and sexual size dimorphism (SSD) of newborns. None of the examined morphometric traits of neonates appeared sexually dimorphic. The sex ratio was slightly male biased (174 males versus 132 females) and litter sex ratio significantly decreased with female snout-vent length. We interpret this relationship as an additional support for LRC as competition between mothers and daughters increases with similarity of body sizes between competing snakes.

  19. Experimental sand burial affects seedling survivorship, morphological traits, and biomass allocation of Ulmus pumila var. sabulosa in the Horqin Sandy Land, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jiao; Busso, Carlos Alberto; Jiang, Deming; Musa, Ala; Wu, Dafu; Wang, Yongcui; Miao, Chunping

    2016-07-01

    As a native tree species, Ulmus pumila var. sabulosa (sandy elm) is widely distributed in the Horqin Sandy Land, China. However, seedlings of this species have to withstand various depths of sand burial after emergence because of increasing soil degradation, which is mainly caused by overgrazing, climate change, and wind erosion. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the changes in its survivorship, morphological traits, and biomass allocation when seedlings were buried at different burial depths: unburied controls and seedlings buried vertically up to 33, 67, 100, or 133 % of their initial mean seedling height. The results showed that partial sand burial treatments (i.e., less than 67 % burial) did not reduce seedling survivorship, which still reached 100 %. However, seedling mortality increased when sand burial was equal to or greater than 100 %. In comparison with the control treatment, seedling height and stem diameter increased at least by 6 and 14 % with partial burial, respectively. In the meantime, seedling taproot length, total biomass, and relative mass growth rates were at least enhanced by 10, 15.6, and 27.6 %, respectively, with the partial sand burial treatment. Furthermore, sand burial decreased total leaf area and changed biomass allocation in seedlings, partitioning more biomass to aboveground organs (e.g., leaves) and less to belowground parts (roots). Complete sand burial after seedling emergence inhibited its re-emergence and growth, even leading to death. Our findings indicated that seedlings of sandy elm showed some resistance to partial sand burial and were adapted to sandy environments from an evolutionary perspective. The negative effect of excessive sand burial after seedling emergence might help in understanding failures in recruitments of sparse elm in the study region.

  20. Ultra-high Resolution Carbon Isotope Records in Tree Rings: Indicators of Carbon Allocation and Growing Season Precipitation/Temperature (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahren, A.; Schubert, B.

    2010-12-01

    The rapidity and ease of carbon stable isotope measurements on organic substrates has opened the possibility of ultra-high resolution δ13C analyses within tree rings at < 30 to 100 micron increments. We present such measurements for 80 individual tree rings, from 10 trees spanning the last 55 million years in age from arctic, temperate, and tropical environments. Morphological features such as growth rings and resin canals were not preserved in some ancient specimens making identification of annual rings via standard techniques impossible. However, the annual patterns observed in ultra-high resolution δ13C records allowed for characterization of these unknown specimens as evergreen or deciduous. A combination of our data with that published in the literature showed a strong correlation between the amplitude of the δ13C pattern and growing season precipitation/temperature in > 90% of modern evergreen trees examined to date. Ultra-high resolution δ13C analyses of ancient, non-permineralized, evergreen trees could therefore provide quantitative estimates of past climate at annual or seasonal resolution.

  1. Dynamic Allocation of Sugars in Barley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumberbatch, L. C.; Crowell, A. S.; Fallin, B. A.; Howell, C. R.; Reid, C. D.; Weisenberger, A. G.; Lee, S. J.; McKisson, J. E.

    2014-03-01

    Allocation of carbon and nitrogen is a key factor for plant productivity. Measurements are carried out by tracing 11C-tagged sugars using positron emission tomography and coincidence counting. We study the mechanisms of carbon allocation and transport from carbohydrate sources (leaves) to sinks (stem, shoot, roots) under various environmental conditions such as soil nutrient levels and atmospheric CO2 concentration. The data are analyzed using a transfer function analysis technique to model transport and allocation in barley plants. The experimental technique will be described and preliminary results presented. This work was supported in part by USDOE Grant No. DE-FG02-97-ER41033 and DE-SC0005057.

  2. Zinc allocation and re-allocation in rice

    PubMed Central

    Stomph, Tjeerd Jan; Jiang, Wen; Van Der Putten, Peter E. L.; Struik, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Agronomy and breeding actively search for options to enhance cereal grain Zn density. Quantifying internal (re-)allocation of Zn as affected by soil and crop management or genotype is crucial. We present experiments supporting the development of a conceptual model of whole plant Zn allocation and re-allocation in rice. Methods: Two solution culture experiments using 70Zn applications at different times during crop development and an experiment on within-grain distribution of Zn are reported. In addition, results from two earlier published experiments are re-analyzed and re-interpreted. Results: A budget analysis showed that plant zinc accumulation during grain filling was larger than zinc allocation to the grains. Isotope data showed that zinc taken up during grain filling was only partly transported directly to the grains and partly allocated to the leaves. Zinc taken up during grain filling and allocated to the leaves replaced zinc re-allocated from leaves to grains. Within the grains, no major transport barrier was observed between vascular tissue and endosperm. At low tissue Zn concentrations, rice plants maintained concentrations of about 20 mg Zn kg−1 dry matter in leaf blades and reproductive tissues, but let Zn concentrations in stems, sheath, and roots drop below this level. When plant zinc concentrations increased, Zn levels in leaf blades and reproductive tissues only showed a moderate increase while Zn levels in stems, roots, and sheaths increased much more and in that order. Conclusions: In rice, the major barrier to enhanced zinc allocation towards grains is between stem and reproductive tissues. Enhancing root to shoot transfer will not contribute proportionally to grain zinc enhancement. PMID:24478788

  3. Allocation of atmospheric CO2 into labile sub-surface carbon pools: a stable isotope labelling approach in a tundra wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüggen, Norman; Knoblauch, Christian; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2015-04-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions from permafrost-affected wetlands are intensively studied due to their important role in the global carbon cycle. There are concerns of increasing methane and carbon dioxide fluxes from tundra wetlands due to permafrost degradation and hydrology changes in a warming Arctic. Understanding the sub-surface carbon pool interactions will improve the prediction on how trace gas fluxes from these ecosystems will respond to changing environmental conditions. Partitioning the sources of greenhouse gas fluxes will help to evaluate the quantitative role of recently produced plant photosynthates. Furthermore, partitioning allows separating respiration of long-term stored organic matter and freshly produced plant products. This knowledge is crucial for understanding the response of greenhouse gas fluxes in such wetlands to environmental changes. An in situ 13CO2 pulse-labelling experiment has been conducted in the northeast Siberian tundra (Samoylov island, Lena river delta) in August 2013 to quantify interactions among sub-surface carbon pools (DIC, DOC, CH4) in three depths (6, 16 and 36 cm) of the active layer. The experimental site was a low-centred polygon centre in a polygonal tundra landscape, with a sedge-moss (Carex-Scorpidium) plant association. The water table was at the soils' surface and the permafrost table in a depth of 50 cm. After the system has been 13CO2 pulse labelled, all three studied subsurface carbon pools (CH4, DIC and DOC) were clearly 13C-enriched, which accounts for atmospheric C incorporated into these pools. One day after the labelling, in 6 cm depth 1.5 percent of DIC and 0.1 percent of CH4were replaced by label C, which then steadily declined over a ten days period. The label C content of DOC increased gradually over the same period. In 16 cm depth, the label C increased gradually after labelling in both DIC and CH4. Label C was found in DIC and CH4 even in a depth of 36 cm, although in less pronounced concentrations

  4. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes affect drug transport across cell membrane in rat astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao; Schluesener, Hermann J.

    2010-03-01

    The impact of carbon nanotubes on the cell membrane is an aspect of particular importance and interest in the study of carbon nanotubes' interactions with living systems. One of the many functions of the cell membrane is to execute substance transport into and out of the cell. We investigated the influence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the transport of several compounds across in the cell membrane of rat astrocytes using flow cytometry. These compounds are fluorescein diacetate, carboxyfluorescein diacetate, rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin, which are prosubstrate/substrates of multidrug transporter proteins. Results showed that MWCNTs significantly inhibited cellular uptake of doxorubicin but not the other drugs and the mode of loading made a significant difference in doxorubicin uptake. Retention of fluorescein, carboxyfluorescein and rhodamine 123 was remarkably higher in MWCNT-exposed cells after an efflux period. A kinetics study also demonstrated slower efflux of intracellular fluorescein and rhodamine 123. Data presented in this paper suggest that MWCNTs could affect drug transport across cell membranes. The implications of the findings are discussed.

  5. Carbon amendment and soil depth affect the distribution and abundance of denitrifiers in agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Barrett, M; Khalil, M I; Jahangir, M M R; Lee, C; Cardenas, L M; Collins, G; Richards, K G; O'Flaherty, V

    2016-04-01

    The nitrite reductase (nirS and nirK) and nitrous oxide reductase-encoding (nosZ) genes of denitrifying populations present in an agricultural grassland soil were quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Samples from three separate pedological depths at the chosen site were investigated: horizon A (0-10 cm), horizon B (45-55 cm), and horizon C (120-130 cm). The effect of carbon addition (treatment 1, control; treatment 2, glucose-C; treatment 3, dissolved organic carbon (DOC)) on denitrifier gene abundance and N2O and N2 fluxes was determined. In general, denitrifier abundance correlated well with flux measurements; nirS was positively correlated with N2O, and nosZ was positively correlated with N2 (P < 0.03). Denitrifier gene copy concentrations per gram of soil (GCC) varied in response to carbon type amendment (P < 0.01). Denitrifier GCCs were high (ca. 10(7)) and the bac:nirK, bac:nirS, bac:nir (T) , and bac:nosZ ratios were low (ca. 10(-1)/10) in horizon A in all three respective treatments. Glucose-C amendment favored partial denitrification, resulting in higher nir abundance and higher N2O fluxes compared to the control. DOC amendment, by contrast, resulted in relatively higher nosZ abundance and N2 emissions, thus favoring complete denitrification. We also noted soil depth directly affected bacterial, archaeal, and denitrifier abundance, possibly due to changes in soil carbon availability with depth.

  6. Regulating nutrient allocation in plants

    DOEpatents

    Udvardi, Michael; Yang, Jiading; Worley, Eric

    2014-12-09

    The invention provides coding and promoter sequences for a VS-1 and AP-2 gene, which affects the developmental process of senescence in plants. Vectors, transgenic plants, seeds, and host cells comprising heterologous VS-1 and AP-2 genes are also provided. Additionally provided are methods of altering nutrient allocation and composition in a plant using the VS-1 and AP-2 genes.

  7. Ion Uptake in Tall Fescue as Affected by Carbonate, Chloride, and Sulfate Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lei; Gao, Yang; Li, Deying

    2014-01-01

    Turfgrass nutrient uptake may be differentially affected by different salts. The objective of this study was to compare nutrient uptake in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) as affected by carbonate, chloride, and sulfate under iso-osmotic, iso-Na+ strength conditions. ‘Tar Heel II’ and ‘Wolfpack’ cultivars were subjected to NaCl, Na2CO3, Na2SO4, CaCl2, NaCl+ CaCl2, Na2CO3+ CaCl2, and Na2SO4+ CaCl2, in the range of 0 to 225 mM. There was no cultivar difference regarding K, Na, Mg, and Mn content in shoots. ‘Tar Heel II’ had higher shoot Ca content than ‘Wolfpack’, which were 6.9 and 5.7 g kg−1, respectively. In general, K+/Na+ ratio decreased with increasing salt concentrations, which reached <1 at about 87.5 mM in Na2CO3 treatment. All salt treatments decreased Mg content in shoot tissues, especially in Na2CO3 and treatments containing CaCl2. Both Ca and Mg content in shoot were higher in the NaCl treatment than the Na2SO4 and Na2CO3 treatments. All salt treatments except Na2CO3 had higher Mn content in shoots compared to the control. In conclusion, nutrient uptake was differently affected by carbonate, chloride, and sulfate which are different in pH, electrical conductivity (EC), and osmotic potential at the same concentration. Adding Ca to the sodium salts increased Ca content and balanced K+/Na+ in shoots, but did not increase Mg content, which was below sufficient level. Maintaining Mg content in shoots under salinity stress was recommended. The physiological impact of elevated Mn content in shoot under salinity stress requires further study. PMID:24626173

  8. Factors Affecting Water Quality in Selected Carbonate Aquifers in the United States,1993-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, Bruce D.; Berndt, Marian P.; Katz, Brian G.; Ardis, Ann F.; Skach, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    Carbonate aquifers are an important source of water in the United States; however, these aquifers can be particularly susceptible to contamination from the land surface. The U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program collected samples from wells and springs in 12 carbonate aquifers across the country during 1993-2005; water-quality results for 1,042 samples were available to assess the factors affecting ground-water quality. These aquifers represent a wide range of climate, land-use types, degrees of confinement, and other characteristics that were compared and evaluated to assess the effect of those factors on water quality. Differences and similarities among the aquifers were also identified. Samples were analyzed for major ions, radon, nutrients, 47 pesticides, and 54 volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Geochemical analysis helped to identify dominant processes that may contribute to the differences in aquifer susceptibility to anthropogenic contamination. Differences in concentrations of dissolved oxygen and dissolved organic carbon and in ground-water age were directly related to the occurrence of anthropogenic contaminants. Other geochemical indicators, such as mineral saturation indexes and calcium-magnesium molar ratio, were used to infer residence time, an indirect indicator of potential for anthropogenic contamination. Radon exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 300 picocuries per liter in 423 of 735 wells sampled, of which 309 were drinking-water wells. In general, land use, oxidation-reduction (redox) status, and degree of aquifer confinement were the most important factors affecting the occurrence of anthropogenic contaminants. Although none of these factors individually accounts for all the variation in water quality among the aquifers, a combination of these characteristics accounts for the majority of the variation. Unconfined carbonate aquifers that had high

  9. Factors Affecting Regional Per-Capita Carbon Emissions in China Based on an LMDI Factor Decomposition Model

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Feng; Long, Ruyin; Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaohui; Yang, Qingliang

    2013-01-01

    China is considered to be the main carbon producer in the world. The per-capita carbon emissions indicator is an important measure of the regional carbon emissions situation. This study used the LMDI factor decomposition model–panel co-integration test two-step method to analyze the factors that affect per-capita carbon emissions. The main results are as follows. (1) During 1997, Eastern China, Central China, and Western China ranked first, second, and third in the per-capita carbon emissions, while in 2009 the pecking order changed to Eastern China, Western China, and Central China. (2) According to the LMDI decomposition results, the key driver boosting the per-capita carbon emissions in the three economic regions of China between 1997 and 2009 was economic development, and the energy efficiency was much greater than the energy structure after considering their effect on restraining increased per-capita carbon emissions. (3) Based on the decomposition, the factors that affected per-capita carbon emissions in the panel co-integration test showed that Central China had the best energy structure elasticity in its regional per-capita carbon emissions. Thus, Central China was ranked first for energy efficiency elasticity, while Western China was ranked first for economic development elasticity. PMID:24353753

  10. Factors affecting regional per-capita carbon emissions in China based on an LMDI factor decomposition model.

    PubMed

    Dong, Feng; Long, Ruyin; Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaohui; Yang, Qingliang

    2013-01-01

    China is considered to be the main carbon producer in the world. The per-capita carbon emissions indicator is an important measure of the regional carbon emissions situation. This study used the LMDI factor decomposition model-panel co-integration test two-step method to analyze the factors that affect per-capita carbon emissions. The main results are as follows. (1) During 1997, Eastern China, Central China, and Western China ranked first, second, and third in the per-capita carbon emissions, while in 2009 the pecking order changed to Eastern China, Western China, and Central China. (2) According to the LMDI decomposition results, the key driver boosting the per-capita carbon emissions in the three economic regions of China between 1997 and 2009 was economic development, and the energy efficiency was much greater than the energy structure after considering their effect on restraining increased per-capita carbon emissions. (3) Based on the decomposition, the factors that affected per-capita carbon emissions in the panel co-integration test showed that Central China had the best energy structure elasticity in its regional per-capita carbon emissions. Thus, Central China was ranked first for energy efficiency elasticity, while Western China was ranked first for economic development elasticity.

  11. Potassium nutrition and water availability affect phloem transport of photosynthetic carbon in eucalypt trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epron, Daniel; Cabral, Osvaldo; Laclau, Jean-Paul; Dannoura, Masako; Packer, Ana Paula; Plain, Caroline; Battie-Laclau, Patricia; Moreira, Marcelo; Trivelin, Paulo; Bouillet, Jean-Pierre; Gérant, Dominique; Nouvellon, Yann

    2015-04-01

    Potassium fertilisation strongly affects growth and carbon partitioning of eucalypt on tropical soil that are strongly weathered. In addition, potassium fertilization could be of great interest in mitigating the adverse consequences of drought in planted forests, as foliar K concentrations influence osmotic adjustment, stomatal regulation and phloem loading. Phloem is the main pathway for transferring photosynthate from source leaves to sink organs, thus controlling growth partitioning among the different tree compartments. But little is known about the effect of potassium nutrition on phloem transport of photosynthetic carbon and on the interaction between K nutrition and water availability. In situ 13C pulse labelling was conducted on tropical eucalypt trees (Eucalyptus grandis L.) grown in a trial plantation with plots in which 37% of throughfall were excluded (about 500 mm/yr) using home-made transparent gutters (-W) or not (+W) and plots that received 0.45 mol K m-2 applied as KCl three months after planting (+K) or not (-K). Three trees were labelled in each of the four treatments (+K+W, +K-W, -K+W and -K-W). Trees were labelled for one hour by injecting pure 13CO2 in a 27 m3 whole crown chamber. We estimated the velocity of carbon transfer in the trunk by comparing time lags between the uptake of 13CO2 and its recovery in trunk CO2 efflux recorded by off axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (Los Gatos Research) in two chambers per tree, one just under the crown and one at the base of the trunk. We analyzed the dynamics of the label recovered in the foliage and in the phloem sap by analysing carbon isotope composition of bulk leaf organic matter and phloem extracts using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The velocity of carbon transfer in the trunk and the initial rate 13C disappearance from the foliage were much higher in +K trees than in -K trees with no significant effect of rainfall. The volumetric flow of phloem, roughly estimated by multiplying

  12. Litter decay controlled by temperature, not soil properties, affecting future soil carbon.

    PubMed

    Gregorich, Edward G; Janzen, Henry; Ellert, Benjamin H; Helgason, Bobbi L; Qian, Budong; Zebarth, Bernie J; Angers, Denis A; Beyaert, Ronald P; Drury, Craig F; Duguid, Scott D; May, William E; McConkey, Brian G; Dyck, Miles F

    2017-04-01

    Widespread global changes, including rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations, climate warming and loss of biodiversity, are predicted for this century; all of these will affect terrestrial ecosystem processes like plant litter decomposition. Conversely, increased plant litter decomposition can have potential carbon-cycle feedbacks on atmospheric CO2 levels, climate warming and biodiversity. But predicting litter decomposition is difficult because of many interacting factors related to the chemical, physical and biological properties of soil, as well as to climate and agricultural management practices. We applied (13) C-labelled plant litter to soil at ten sites spanning a 3500-km transect across the agricultural regions of Canada and measured its decomposition over five years. Despite large differences in soil type and climatic conditions, we found that the kinetics of litter decomposition were similar once the effect of temperature had been removed, indicating no measurable effect of soil properties. A two-pool exponential decay model expressing undecomposed carbon simply as a function of thermal time accurately described kinetics of decomposition. (R(2)  = 0.94; RMSE = 0.0508). Soil properties such as texture, cation exchange capacity, pH and moisture, although very different among sites, had minimal discernible influence on decomposition kinetics. Using this kinetic model under different climate change scenarios, we projected that the time required to decompose 50% of the litter (i.e. the labile fractions) would be reduced by 1-4 months, whereas time required to decompose 90% of the litter (including recalcitrant fractions) would be reduced by 1 year in cooler sites to as much as 2 years in warmer sites. These findings confirm quantitatively the sensitivity of litter decomposition to temperature increases and demonstrate how climate change may constrain future soil carbon storage, an effect apparently not influenced by soil properties.

  13. Analysis of factors affecting the accuracy, reproducibility, and interpretation of microbial community carbon source utilization patterns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haack, S.K.; Garchow, H.; Klug, M.J.; Forney, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    We determined factors that affect responses of bacterial isolates and model bacterial communities to the 95 carbon substrates in Biolog microliter plates. For isolates and communities of three to six bacterial strains, substrate oxidation rates were typically nonlinear and were delayed by dilution of the inoculum. When inoculum density was controlled, patterns of positive and negative responses exhibited by microbial communities to each of the carbon sources were reproducible. Rates and extents of substrate oxidation by the communities were also reproducible but were not simply the sum of those exhibited by community members when tested separately. Replicates of the same model community clustered when analyzed by principal- components analysis (PCA), and model communities with different compositions were clearly separated un the first PCA axis, which accounted for >60% of the dataset variation. PCA discrimination among different model communities depended on the extent to which specific substrates were oxidized. However, the substrates interpreted by PCA to be most significant in distinguishing the communities changed with reading time, reflecting the nonlinearity of substrate oxidation rates. Although whole-community substrate utilization profiles were reproducible signatures for a given community, the extent of oxidation of specific substrates and the numbers or activities of microorganisms using those substrates in a given community were not correlated. Replicate soil samples varied significantly in the rate and extent of oxidation of seven tested substrates, suggesting microscale heterogeneity in composition of the soil microbial community.

  14. Can chlorofluorocarbon sorption to black carbon (char) affect groundwater age determinations?

    PubMed

    Choung, Sungwook; Allen-King, Richelle M

    2010-06-15

    Although adsorption is not generally considered important in low f(oc) (fraction organic carbon) aquifers, we show that chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) adsorption to black carbon (BC) is sufficiently large to retard transport and affect groundwater ages obtained with CFCs. Sorption isotherms of CFC-11, -12, and -113 to synthetic wood char were nonlinear (Freundlich n = 0.71-0.94) while humic acid isotherms were linear. Moreover, sorption to char was 10-1000 times greater than to humic acid for all three CFCs at the lowest observed concentrations, C(w)/S approximately 10(-8)-10(-7). We used the observed isotherms for char and humic acid to represent sorption to BC and amorphous organic matter, respectively, in a dual mode model to estimate retardation factors for a low f(oc) aquifer (= 0.06% gC g(-1)). The estimated retardation factors for the char-containing aquifer (presumed BC fraction = 9% of f(oc)) were approximately 6.8-10.6 at C(w)/S = 10(-8) and >5 times those estimated assuming amorphous organic matter partitioning only. The results indicate that unless CFC adsorption to BC is evaluated in transport, the groundwater age determined may be biased toward older than true ages. The CFC data archived in BC-containing aquifers may contain information about its adsorbent properties that could be useful to predict retardation of other chlorinated organic contaminants.

  15. Soil organic carbon pools and stocks in permafrost-affected soils on the tibetan plateau.

    PubMed

    Dörfer, Corina; Kühn, Peter; Baumann, Frank; He, Jin-Sheng; Scholten, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The Tibetan Plateau reacts particularly sensitively to possible effects of climate change. Approximately two thirds of the total area is affected by permafrost. To get a better understanding of the role of permafrost on soil organic carbon pools and stocks, investigations were carried out including both discontinuous (site Huashixia, HUA) and continuous permafrost (site Wudaoliang, WUD). Three organic carbon fractions were isolated using density separation combined with ultrasonic dispersion: the light fractions (<1.6 g cm(-3)) of free particulate organic matter (FPOM) and occluded particulate organic matter (OPOM), plus a heavy fraction (>1.6 g cm(-3)) of mineral associated organic matter (MOM). The fractions were analyzed for C, N, and their portion of organic C. FPOM contained an average SOC content of 252 g kg(-1). Higher SOC contents (320 g kg(-1)) were found in OPOM while MOM had the lowest SOC contents (29 g kg(-1)). Due to their lower density the easily decomposable fractions FPOM and OPOM contribute 27% (HUA) and 22% (WUD) to the total SOC stocks. In HUA mean SOC stocks (0-30 cm depth) account for 10.4 kg m(-2), compared to 3.4 kg m(-2) in WUD. 53% of the SOC is stored in the upper 10 cm in WUD, in HUA only 39%. Highest POM values of 36% occurred in profiles with high soil moisture content. SOC stocks, soil moisture and active layer thickness correlated strongly in discontinuous permafrost while no correlation between SOC stocks and active layer thickness and only a weak relation between soil moisture and SOC stocks could be found in continuous permafrost. Consequently, permafrost-affected soils in discontinuous permafrost environments are susceptible to soil moisture changes due to alterations in quantity and seasonal distribution of precipitation, increasing temperature and therefore evaporation.

  16. Severe dry winter affects plant phenology and carbon balance of a cork oak woodland understorey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, A. C.; Costa-e-Silva, F.; Dubbert, M.; Piayda, A.; Pereira, J. S.

    2016-10-01

    Mediterranean climates are prone to a great variation in yearly precipitation. The effects on ecosystem will depend on the severity and timing of droughts. In this study we questioned how an extreme dry winter affects the carbon flux in the understorey of a cork oak woodland? What is the seasonal contribution of understorey vegetation to ecosystem productivity? We used closed-system portable chambers to measure CO2 exchange of the dominant shrub species (Cistus salviifolius, Cistus crispus and Ulex airensis), of the herbaceous layer and on bare soil in a cork oak woodland in central Portugal during the dry winter year of 2012. Shoot growth, leaf shedding, flower and fruit setting, above and belowground plant biomass were measured as well as seasonal leaf water potential. Eddy-covariance and micrometeorological data together with CO2 exchange measurements were used to access the understorey species contribution to ecosystem gross primary productivity (GPP). The herbaceous layer productivity was severely affected by the dry winter, with half of the yearly maximum aboveground biomass in comparison with the 6 years site average. The semi-deciduous and evergreen shrubs showed desynchronized phenophases and lagged carbon uptake maxima. Whereas shallow-root shrubs exhibited opportunistic characteristics in exploiting the understorey light and water resources, deep rooted shrubs showed better water status but considerably lower assimilation rates. The contribution of understorey vegetation to ecosystem GPP was lower during summer with 14% and maximum during late spring, concomitantly with the lowest tree productivity due to tree canopy renewal. The herbaceous vegetation contribution to ecosystem GPP never exceeded 6% during this dry year stressing its sensitivity to winter and spring precipitation. Although shrubs are more resilient to precipitation variability when compared with the herbaceous vegetation, the contribution of the understorey vegetation to ecosystem GPP can

  17. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration affects interactions between Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae and two host plant species outdoors

    SciTech Connect

    Caulfield, F.; Bunce, J.A. )

    1994-08-01

    Beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Huebner), larvae were placed on sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) and pigweed (Amaranthus hybridus L.) plants in outdoor chambers in which the plants were growing at either the ambient ([approximately] 350 [mu]l liter[sup [minus]1]) or ambient plus 350 [mu]l liter[sup [minus]1] ([approximately] 700 [mu]l liter[sup [minus]1]) carbon dioxide concentration. A series of experiments was performed to determine if larvae reduced plant growth differently at the two carbon dioxide concentrations in either species and if the insect growth or survival differed with carbon dioxide concentration. Leaf nitrogen, water, starch, and soluble carbohydrate contents were measured to assess carbon dioxide concentration effects on leaf quality. Insect feeding significantly reduced plant growth in sugarbeet plants at 350 [mu]l liter[sup [minus]1] but not at 700 [mu]l liter[sup [minus]1] nor in pigweed at either carbon dioxide concentration. Larval survival was greater on sugarbeet plants at the elevated carbon dioxide concentration. Increased survival occurred only if the insects were at the elevated carbon dioxide concentration and consumed leaf material grown at the elevated concentration. Leaf quality was only marginally affected by growth at elevated carbon dioxide concentration in these experiments. The results indicate that in designing experiments to predict effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations on plant-insect interactions, both plants and insects should be exposed to the experimental carbon dioxide concentrations, as well as to as realistic environmental conditions as possible.

  18. Collective credit allocation in science.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hua-Wei; Barabási, Albert-László

    2014-08-26

    Collaboration among researchers is an essential component of the modern scientific enterprise, playing a particularly important role in multidisciplinary research. However, we continue to wrestle with allocating credit to the coauthors of publications with multiple authors, because the relative contribution of each author is difficult to determine. At the same time, the scientific community runs an informal field-dependent credit allocation process that assigns credit in a collective fashion to each work. Here we develop a credit allocation algorithm that captures the coauthors' contribution to a publication as perceived by the scientific community, reproducing the informal collective credit allocation of science. We validate the method by identifying the authors of Nobel-winning papers that are credited for the discovery, independent of their positions in the author list. The method can also compare the relative impact of researchers working in the same field, even if they did not publish together. The ability to accurately measure the relative credit of researchers could affect many aspects of credit allocation in science, potentially impacting hiring, funding, and promotion decisions.

  19. Collective credit allocation in science

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua-Wei; Barabási, Albert-László

    2014-01-01

    Collaboration among researchers is an essential component of the modern scientific enterprise, playing a particularly important role in multidisciplinary research. However, we continue to wrestle with allocating credit to the coauthors of publications with multiple authors, because the relative contribution of each author is difficult to determine. At the same time, the scientific community runs an informal field-dependent credit allocation process that assigns credit in a collective fashion to each work. Here we develop a credit allocation algorithm that captures the coauthors’ contribution to a publication as perceived by the scientific community, reproducing the informal collective credit allocation of science. We validate the method by identifying the authors of Nobel-winning papers that are credited for the discovery, independent of their positions in the author list. The method can also compare the relative impact of researchers working in the same field, even if they did not publish together. The ability to accurately measure the relative credit of researchers could affect many aspects of credit allocation in science, potentially impacting hiring, funding, and promotion decisions. PMID:25114238

  20. Land use affects the resistance and resilience of carbon dynamics of mountain grassland to extreme drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingrisch, Johannes; Karlowsky, Stefan; Hasibeder, Roland; Anadon-Rosell, Alba; Augusti, Angela; Scheld, Sarah; König, Alexander; Gleixner, Gerd; Bahn, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Climatic extremes like droughts are expected to occur more frequently and to be more severe in a future climate and have been shown to strongly affect the carbon (C) cycle. Few studies have so far explored how the management intensity of ecosystems and land-use changes alter C cycle responses to extreme climatic events. In many mountain areas land-use changes have been taking place at a rapid pace and have altered plant species composition and biogeochemical cycles. It is still unknown whether and how abandonment of mountain grasslands affects the resistance and the resilience of carbon dynamics to extreme drought. We carried out an in situ experiment to test the hypothesis that abandonment increases the resistance of grassland C dynamics to extreme drought, but decreases its resilience (i.e. post-drought recovery). In a common garden experiment at a mountain meadow in the Austrian Central Alps we exposed large intact monoliths from the meadow and a nearby abandoned grassland to extreme drought conditions during the main growth period in late spring. We measured above- and belowground productivity and net ecosystem exchange and its components over the course of the drought and during the recovery to assess and quantify their resistance and resilience. Furthermore, we analysed the coupling of the two major ecosystem CO2 fluxes, photosynthesis and soil respiration, as based on 13CO2 pulse labelling campaigns at peak drought and during post-drought recovery using isotope laser spectroscopy. Four weeks of early season drought induced a strong decrease of aboveground biomass at the mountain meadow, whereas no effect was observed for the abandoned grassland. At peak drought gross primary productivity was reduced at both grasslands compared to the respective controls, but with a stronger decrease at the meadow (80%) compared to the abandoned grassland (60%). The same pattern was observed for ecosystem respiration. However, the effect was less pronounced compared to carbon

  1. Cysteine 295 indirectly affects Ni coordination of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase-II C-cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Takahiro; Takao, Kyosuke; Yoshida, Takashi; Wada, Kei; Daifuku, Takashi; Yoneda, Yasuko; Fukuyama, Keiichi; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •CODH-II harbors a unique [Ni-Fe-S] cluster. •We substituted the ligand residues of Cys{sup 295} and His{sup 261}. •Dramatic decreases in Ni content upon substitutions were observed. •All substitutions did not affect Fe-S clusters assembly. •CO oxidation activity was decreased by the substitutions. -- Abstract: A unique [Ni–Fe–S] cluster (C-cluster) constitutes the active center of Ni-containing carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (CODHs). His{sup 261}, which coordinates one of the Fe atoms with Cys{sup 295}, is suggested to be the only residue required for Ni coordination in the C-cluster. To evaluate the role of Cys{sup 295}, we constructed CODH-II variants. Ala substitution for the Cys{sup 295} substitution resulted in the decrease of Ni content and didn’t result in major change of Fe content. In addition, the substitution had no effect on the ability to assemble a full complement of [Fe–S] clusters. This strongly suggests Cys{sup 295} indirectly and His{sup 261} together affect Ni-coordination in the C-cluster.

  2. Flooding affects uptake and distribution of carbon and nitrogen in citrus seedlings.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Alcántara, Belén; Jover, Sara; Quiñones, Ana; Forner-Giner, María Ángeles; Rodríguez-Gamir, Juan; Legaz, Francisco; Primo-Millo, Eduardo; Iglesias, Domingo J

    2012-08-15

    Soil flooding has been widely reported to affect large areas of the world. In this work, we investigated the effect of waterlogging on citrus carbon and nitrogen pools and partitioning. Influence on their uptake and translocation was also studied through ¹⁵N and ¹³C labeling to provide insight into the physiological mechanisms underlying the responses. The data indicated that flooding severely reduced photosynthetic activity and affected growth and biomass partitioning. Total nitrogen content and concentration in the plant also progressively decreased throughout the course of the experiment. After 36 days of treatment, nitrogen content of flooded plants had decreased more than 2.3-fold compared to control seedlings, and reductions in nitrogen concentration ranged from 21 to 55% (in roots and leaves, respectively). Specific absorption rate and transport were also affected, leading to important changes in the distribution of this element inside the plant. Additionally, experiments involving labeled nitrogen revealed that ¹⁵N uptake rate and accumulation were drastically decreased at the end of the experiment (93% and 54%, respectively). ¹³CO₂ assimilation into the plant was strongly reduced by flooding, with δ¹³C reductions ranging from 22 to 37% in leaves and roots, respectively. After 36 days, the relative distribution of absorbed ¹³C was also altered. Thus, ¹³C recovery in flooded leaves increased compared to controls, whereas roots exhibited the opposite pattern. Interestingly, when carbohydrate partitioning was examined, the data revealed that sucrose concentration was augmented significantly in roots (37-56%), whereas starch was reduced. In leaves, a marked increase in sucrose was detected from the first sampling onwards (36-66%), and the same patter was observed for starch. Taken together, these results indicate that flooding altered carbon and nitrogen pools and partitioning in citrus. On one hand, reduced nitrogen concentration appears to

  3. Quantifying the effect size of changing environmental controls on carbon release from permafrost-affected soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaedel, C.; Bader, M. K. F.; Schuur, E. A. G.; Bracho, R. G.; Capek, P.; De Baets, S. L.; Diakova, K.; Ernakovich, J. G.; Hartley, I. P.; Iversen, C. M.; Kane, E. S.; Knoblauch, C.; Lupascu, M.; Natali, S.; Norby, R. J.; O'Donnell, J. A.; Roy Chowdhury, T.; Santruckova, H.; Shaver, G. R.; Sloan, V. L.; Treat, C. C.; Waldrop, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    High-latitude surface air temperatures are rising twice as fast as the global mean, causing permafrost to thaw and thereby exposing large quantities of previously frozen organic carbon (C) to microbial decomposition. Increasing temperatures in high latitude ecosystems not only increase C emissions from previously frozen C in permafrost but also indirectly affect the C cycle through changes in regional and local hydrology. Warmer temperatures increase thawing of ice-rich permafrost, causing land surface subsidence where soils become waterlogged, anoxic conditions prevail and C is released in form of anaerobic CO2 and CH4. Although substrate quality, physical protection, and nutrient availability affect C decomposition, increasing temperatures and changes in surface and sub-surface hydrology are likely the dominant factors affecting the rate and form of C release from permafrost; however, their effect size on C release is poorly quantified. We have compiled a database of 24 incubation studies with soils from active layer and permafrost from across the entire permafrost zone to quantify a) the effect size of increasing temperatures and b) the changes from aerobic to anaerobic environmental soil conditions on C release. Results from two different meta-analyses show that a 10°C increase in temperature increased C release by a factor of two in boreal forest, peatland and tundra ecosystems. Under aerobic incubation conditions, soils released on average three times more C than under anaerobic conditions with large variation among the different ecosystems. While peatlands showed similar amounts of C release under aerobic and anaerobic soil conditions, tundra and boreal forest ecosystems released up to 8 times more C under anoxic conditions. This pan-arctic synthesis shows that boreal forest and tundra soils will have a larger impact on climate change when newly thawed permafrost C decomposes in an aerobic environment compared to an anaerobic environment even when

  4. Carbon allocation, gas exchange, and needle morphology of Pinus ponderosa genotypes known to differ in growth and survival under imposed drought.

    PubMed

    Cregg, B. M.

    1994-01-01

    Seedlings from 27 open-pollinated families of ponderosa pine representing nine geographically diverse origins were screened for drought tolerance based on survival and growth under imposed drought. Seedlings that had been preconditioned to drought survived 14 days longer than seedlings that had been well watered before being subjected to drought. Seed sources varied in their ability to survive drought and this variation was accentuated by drought preconditioning. Seedlings from a South Dakota source and a Nebraska source generally survived the longest under drought. Seedlings from a Montana source and a New Mexico source succumbed the fastest after water was withheld. Significant family within source variation in drought survival was observed for some sources. In general, drought survival was poorly correlated to climate indices of the seed sources. Allocation of biomass to roots, stems, and needles varied significantly among the seed sources with the most drought-sensitive sources (Montana and New Mexico) showing the most divergent allocation patterns. The relation between drought survival and shoot/root ratio suggested that there is an optimum pattern of allocation for drought survival. A comparison of the most and least drought-tolerant sources indicated that needle gas exchange (net photosynthesis and needle conductance to water vapor) and predawn needle water potential were similar among the sources regardless of their relative ability to survive drought. Needle morphology traits often associated with variation in drought tolerance, such as stomatal density and specific leaf area, did not differ among the seed sources. However, seedlings from the drought-tolerant sources had shorter needles, less surface area per needle, and fewer stomata per needle than seedlings from the drought-sensitive sources. The results suggest that drought tolerance of ponderosa pine may be improved through seed source selection and, within certain sources, family selection

  5. Are carbon and nitrogen exchange between fungi and the orchid Goodyera repens affected by irradiance?

    PubMed Central

    Liebel, Heiko T.; Bidartondo, Martin I.; Gebauer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The green orchid Goodyera repens has been shown to transfer carbon to its mycorrhizal partner, and this flux may therefore be affected by light availability. This study aimed to test whether the C and N exchange between plant and fungus is dependent on light availability, and in addition addressed the question of whether flowering and/or fruiting individuals of G. repens compensate for changes in leaf chlorophyll concentration with changes in C and N flows from fungus to plant. Methods The natural abundances of stable isotopes of plant C and N were used to infer changes in fluxes between orchid and fungus across natural gradients of irradiance at five sites. Mycorrhizal fungi in the roots of G. repens were identified by molecular analyses. Chlorophyll concentrations in the leaves of the orchid and of reference plants were measured directly in the field. Key Results Leaf δ13C values of G. repens responded to changes in light availability in a similar manner to autotrophic reference plants, and different mycorrhizal fungal associations also did not affect the isotope abundance patterns of the orchid. Flowering/fruiting individuals had lower leaf total N and chlorophyll concentrations, which is most probably explained by N investments to form flowers, seeds and shoot. Conclusions The results indicate that mycorrhizal physiology is relatively fixed in G. repens, and changes in the amount and direction of C flow between plant and fungus were not observed to depend on light availability. The orchid may instead react to low-light sites through increased clonal growth. The orchid does not compensate for low leaf total N and chlorophyll concentrations by using a 13C- and 15N-enriched fungal source. PMID:25538109

  6. Grazing intensity significantly affects belowground carbon and nitrogen cycling in grassland ecosystems: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guiyao; Zhou, Xuhui; He, Yanghui; Shao, Junjiong; Hu, Zhenhong; Liu, Ruiqiang; Zhou, Huimin; Hosseinibai, Shahla

    2017-03-01

    Livestock grazing activities potentially alter ecosystem carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles in grassland ecosystems. Despite the fact that numerous individual studies and a few meta-analyses had been conducted, how grazing, especially its intensity, affects belowground C and N cycling in grasslands remains unclear. In this study, we performed a comprehensive meta-analysis of 115 published studies to examine the responses of 19 variables associated with belowground C and N cycling to livestock grazing in global grasslands. Our results showed that, on average, grazing significantly decreased belowground C and N pools in grassland ecosystems, with the largest decreases in microbial biomass C and N (21.62% and 24.40%, respectively). In contrast, belowground fluxes, including soil respiration, soil net N mineralization and soil N nitrification increased by 4.25%, 34.67% and 25.87%, respectively, in grazed grasslands compared to ungrazed ones. More importantly, grazing intensity significantly affected the magnitude (even direction) of changes in the majority of the assessed belowground C and N pools and fluxes, and C : N ratio as well as soil moisture. Specifically,light grazing contributed to soil C and N sequestration whereas moderate and heavy grazing significantly increased C and N losses. In addition, soil depth, livestock type and climatic conditions influenced the responses of selected variables to livestock grazing to some degree. Our findings highlight the importance of the effects of grazing intensity on belowground C and N cycling, which may need to be incorporated into regional and global models for predicting effects of human disturbance on global grasslands and assessing the climate-biosphere feedbacks.

  7. Developmental changes in carbon and nitrogen metabolism affect tea quality in different leaf position.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Xin; Yang, Wei-Jun; Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Shen, Chen; Yan, Peng; Li, Xin; Han, Wen-Yan

    2016-09-01

    Leaf position represents a specific developmental stage that influences both photosynthesis and respiration. However, the precise relationships between photosynthesis and respiration in different leaf position that affect tea quality are largely unknown. Here, we show that the effective quantum yield of photosystem II [ΦPSⅡ] as well as total chlorophyll concentration (TChl) of tea leaves increased gradually with leaf maturity. Moreover, respiration rate (RR) together with total nitrogen concentration (TN) decreased persistently, but total carbon remained unchanged during leaf maturation. Analyses of major N-based organic compounds revealed that decrease in TN was attributed to a significant decrease in the concentration of caffeine and amino acids (AA) in mature leaves. Furthermore, soluble sugar (SS) decreased, but starch concentration increased with leaf maturity, indicating that source-sink relationship was altered during tea leaf development. Detailed correlation analysis showed that ΦPSⅡ was negatively correlated with RR, SS, starch, tea polyphenol (TP), total catechins and TN, but positively correlated with TChl; while RR was positively correlated with TN, SS, TP and caffeine, but negatively correlated with TChl and starch concentrations. Our results suggest that biosynthesis of chlorophyll, catechins and polyphenols is closely associated with photosynthesis and respiration in different leaf position that greatly influences the relationship between primary and secondary metabolism in tea plants.

  8. The Dispersion State of Tangled Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Affects Their Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Chika; Haniu, Hisao; Ajima, Kumiko; Tanaka, Manabu; Sobajima, Atsushi; Ishida, Haruka; Tsukahara, Tamotsu; Matsuda, Yoshikazu; Aoki, Kaoru; Kato, Hiroyuki; Saito, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    The medical applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have garnered much attention. However, evaluating the safety of CNTs remains difficult, and no consensus has been reached. Moreover, assessing the biosafety of multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs), which can become tangled during manufacturing, is challenging because they do not readily disperse. We studied how the dispersion state of tangled MWCNTs affects their cytotoxicity, using three sonicators. Flotube 9110 (FT9110), tangled MWCNTs, were dispersed in two dispersants (fetal bovine serum and polysorbate 80) using a new type of sonicator (PR-1) and two conventional sonicators. The size and cytotoxicity of the dispersed FT9110 were measured using the BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cell line. The PR-1 dispersed the FT9110 to agglomerates <200 nm in diameter; FT9110 dispersed with the PR-1 did not show cytotoxicity regardless of dispersant. The other sonicators dispersed the FT9110 to particles >1000 nm in diameter, and cytotoxicity depended on the dispersant. We found that excluding cells adhered to agglomerated FT9110 before evaluating cytotoxicity can lead to false-positive results. The PR-1 sonicator dispersed tangled FT9110 to many single fibers, which showed lower cytotoxicity than conventionally-sonicated MWCNTs. We suggest that dispersion state should be accounted for when evaluating the cytotoxicity of MWCNTs. PMID:28335347

  9. Burning management in the tallgrass prairie affects root decomposition, soil food web structure and carbon flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, E. A.; Denef, K.; Milano de Tomasel, C.; Cotrufo, M. F.; Wall, D. H.

    2015-09-01

    Root litter decomposition is a major component of carbon (C) cycling in grasslands, where it provides energy and nutrients for soil microbes and fauna. This is especially important in grasslands where fire is a common management practice and removes aboveground litter accumulation. In this study, we investigated whether fire affects root decomposition and C flow through the belowground food web. In a greenhouse experiment, we applied 13C-enriched big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) root litter to intact tallgrass prairie soil cores collected from annually burned (AB) and infrequently burned (IB) treatments at the Konza Prairie Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site. Incorporation of 13C into microbial phospholipid fatty acids and nematode trophic groups was measured on six occasions during a 180-day decomposition study to determine how C was translocated through the soil food web. Results showed significantly different soil communities between treatments and higher microbial abundance for IB. Root decomposition occurred rapidly and was significantly greater for AB. Microbes and their nematode consumers immediately assimilated root litter C in both treatments. Root litter C was preferentially incorporated in a few groups of microbes and nematodes, but depended on burn treatment: fungi, Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungivore nematodes for AB and only omnivore nematodes for IB. The overall microbial pool of root litter-derived C significantly increased over time but was not significantly different between burn treatments. The nematode pool of root litter-derived C also significantly increased over time, and was significantly higher for the AB treatment at 35 and 90 days after litter addition. In conclusion, the C flow from root litter to microbes to nematodes is not only measurable, but significant, indicating that higher nematode trophic levels are critical components of C flow during root decomposition which, in turn, is significantly

  10. Fire affects root decomposition, soil food web structure, and carbon flow in tallgrass prairie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, E. Ashley; Denef, Karolien; Milano de Tomasel, Cecilia; Cotrufo, M. Francesca; Wall, Diana H.

    2016-05-01

    Root litter decomposition is a major component of carbon (C) cycling in grasslands, where it provides energy and nutrients for soil microbes and fauna. This is especially important in grasslands where fire is common and removes aboveground litter accumulation. In this study, we investigated whether fire affects root decomposition and C flow through the belowground food web. In a greenhouse experiment, we applied 13C-enriched big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) root litter to intact tallgrass prairie soil cores collected from annually burned (AB) and infrequently burned (IB) treatments at the Konza Prairie Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site. Incorporation of 13C into microbial phospholipid fatty acids and nematode trophic groups was measured on six occasions during a 180-day decomposition study to determine how C was translocated through the soil food web. Results showed significantly different soil communities between treatments and higher microbial abundance for IB. Root decomposition occurred rapidly and was significantly greater for AB. Microbes and their nematode consumers immediately assimilated root litter C in both treatments. Root litter C was preferentially incorporated in a few groups of microbes and nematodes, but depended on burn treatment: fungi, Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungivore nematodes for AB and only omnivore nematodes for IB. The overall microbial pool of root-litter-derived C significantly increased over time but was not significantly different between burn treatments. The nematode pool of root-litter-derived C also significantly increased over time, and was significantly higher for the AB treatment at 35 and 90 days after litter addition. In conclusion, the C flow from root litter to microbes to nematodes is not only measurable but also significant, indicating that higher nematode trophic levels are critical components of C flow during root decomposition, which, in turn, is significantly affected by fire. Not

  11. Carbon consequences of droughts, fires, bark beetles, and harvests affecting forests of the United States: comparative analysis and synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C. A.; Ghimire, B.; Schwalm, C.; Collatz, G. J.; Masek, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    Weather and climate extremes and ecosystem disturbances can profoundly alter the structure and function of forests with long lasting carbon legacies. The nature of these legacies varies with disturbance severity and type. The associated complexity presents a significant challenge in assessing the current state of the global carbon cycle. Here we offer a detailed comparative analysis of the unique carbon legacies following severe droughts, fires, insect outbreaks, and harvest disturbances affecting forests of the United States. We document the frequency of each disturbance type over the past three decades, explore their trends and interannual variability, illustrate their regional spatial distributions, and discuss how these agents of change combine to influence the U.S. carbon budget now and into the future. We also identify observational approaches for addressing key uncertainties.

  12. Elevated CO2 levels affect the activity of nitrate reductase and carbonic anhydrase in the calcifying rhodophyte Corallina officinalis

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Laurie C.

    2013-01-01

    The concentration of CO2 in global surface ocean waters is increasing due to rising atmospheric CO2 emissions, resulting in lower pH and a lower saturation state of carbonate ions. Such changes in seawater chemistry are expected to impact calcification in calcifying marine organisms. However, other physiological processes related to calcification might also be affected, including enzyme activity. In a mesocosm experiment, macroalgal communities were exposed to three CO2 concentrations (380, 665, and 1486 µatm) to determine how the activity of two enzymes related to inorganic carbon uptake and nutrient assimilation in Corallina officinalis, an abundant calcifying rhodophyte, will be affected by elevated CO2 concentrations. The activity of external carbonic anhydrase, an important enzyme functioning in macroalgal carbon-concentrating mechanisms, was inversely related to CO2 concentration after long-term exposure (12 weeks). Nitrate reductase, the enzyme responsible for reduction of nitrate to nitrite, was stimulated by CO2 and was highest in algae grown at 665 µatm CO2. Nitrate and phosphate uptake rates were inversely related to CO2, while ammonium uptake was unaffected, and the percentage of inorganic carbon in the algal skeleton decreased with increasing CO2. The results indicate that the processes of inorganic carbon and nutrient uptake and assimilation are affected by elevated CO2 due to changes in enzyme activity, which change the energy balance and physiological status of C. officinalis, therefore affecting its competitive interactions with other macroalgae. The ecological implications of the physiological changes in C. officinalis in response to elevated CO2 are discussed. PMID:23314813

  13. Elevated CO2 levels affect the activity of nitrate reductase and carbonic anhydrase in the calcifying rhodophyte Corallina officinalis.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Laurie C; Straub, Sandra; Bischof, Kai

    2013-02-01

    The concentration of CO(2) in global surface ocean waters is increasing due to rising atmospheric CO(2) emissions, resulting in lower pH and a lower saturation state of carbonate ions. Such changes in seawater chemistry are expected to impact calcification in calcifying marine organisms. However, other physiological processes related to calcification might also be affected, including enzyme activity. In a mesocosm experiment, macroalgal communities were exposed to three CO(2) concentrations (380, 665, and 1486 µatm) to determine how the activity of two enzymes related to inorganic carbon uptake and nutrient assimilation in Corallina officinalis, an abundant calcifying rhodophyte, will be affected by elevated CO(2) concentrations. The activity of external carbonic anhydrase, an important enzyme functioning in macroalgal carbon-concentrating mechanisms, was inversely related to CO(2) concentration after long-term exposure (12 weeks). Nitrate reductase, the enzyme responsible for reduction of nitrate to nitrite, was stimulated by CO(2) and was highest in algae grown at 665 µatm CO(2). Nitrate and phosphate uptake rates were inversely related to CO(2), while ammonium uptake was unaffected, and the percentage of inorganic carbon in the algal skeleton decreased with increasing CO(2). The results indicate that the processes of inorganic carbon and nutrient uptake and assimilation are affected by elevated CO(2) due to changes in enzyme activity, which change the energy balance and physiological status of C. officinalis, therefore affecting its competitive interactions with other macroalgae. The ecological implications of the physiological changes in C. officinalis in response to elevated CO(2) are discussed.

  14. Do Forest Age and Soil Depth Affect Carbon and Nitrogen Adsorption in Mineral Horizons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, P. G.; Lovett, G. M.; Fuss, C. B.; Goodale, C. L.; Lang, A.; Fahey, T.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral soils retain large amounts of organic matter through sorption on the surfaces of mineral soils, the largest pools of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in the forests of the northeastern U.S. In addition to determining organic matter storage, adsorption and desorption processes are important controllers of runoff chemistry. We are studying adsorption dynamics of mineral soils collected from a chronosequence of hardwood forest sites in the White Mountains, NH to determine how soils vary in their DOM adsorption capacities as a function of effective C and N saturation. We hypothesize that forest age determines proximity to saturation because young forests may need to mine soil organic matter (SOM) in mineral soils to obtain nitrogen to meet growth demands, while the soils of older forests have had time to reaccumulate SOM, eventually reaching C and N saturation. Consequently, we expect adsorption capacities to first increase with forest age in young forests, as the trees mine C and N from mineral surfaces. They will then decrease with forest age in older forests as mining slows and C and N begin to re-accumulate. Batch experiments were conducted with mineral soil samples and dilutions of forest floor leachate. However, preliminary results from a mature forest site (about 100 years old), which we predicted to be a low point of C and N saturation from decades of mining, contradict expectations. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) adsorption in its shallow mineral soil layers (0-3 cm below E or A horizons) are lower than younger sites ranging from 20 to about 40 years old. In addition to forest age, soil depths also affect N retention dynamics in forest soils. We hypothesized that deeper mineral soils might have greater adsorption capacities due to the fact that they are exposed to less DOC and DON leaching from organic layers and therefore less saturated. Results from the same mature forest site confirm this. Soils from 3-10 cm depth have more potential to adsorb DOC and

  15. The soil carbon/nitrogen ratio and moisture affect microbial community structures in alkaline permafrost-affected soils with different vegetation types on the Tibetan plateau.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinfang; Xu, Shijian; Li, Changming; Zhao, Lin; Feng, Huyuan; Yue, Guangyang; Ren, Zhengwei; Cheng, Guogdong

    2014-01-01

    In the Tibetan permafrost region, vegetation types and soil properties have been affected by permafrost degradation, but little is known about the corresponding patterns of their soil microbial communities. Thus, we analyzed the effects of vegetation types and their covariant soil properties on bacterial and fungal community structure and membership and bacterial community-level physiological patterns. Pyrosequencing and Biolog EcoPlates were used to analyze 19 permafrost-affected soil samples from four principal vegetation types: swamp meadow (SM), meadow (M), steppe (S) and desert steppe (DS). Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria dominated bacterial communities and the main fungal phyla were Ascomycota, Basidiomycota and Mucoromycotina. The ratios of Proteobacteria/Acidobacteria decreased in the order: SM>M>S>DS, whereas the Ascomycota/Basidiomycota ratios increased. The distributions of carbon and nitrogen cycling bacterial genera detected were related to soil properties. The bacterial communities in SM/M soils degraded amines/amino acids very rapidly, while polymers were degraded rapidly by S/DS communities. UniFrac analysis of bacterial communities detected differences among vegetation types. The fungal UniFrac community patterns of SM differed from the others. Redundancy analysis showed that the carbon/nitrogen ratio had the main effect on bacteria community structures and their diversity in alkaline soil, whereas soil moisture was mainly responsible for structuring fungal communities. Thus, microbial communities and their functioning are probably affected by soil environmental change in response to permafrost degradation.

  16. Modeling Sugar Allocations in Plants using Radioisotope Tracer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Mingru

    2013-10-01

    The allocations of carbon and nitrogen are major factors in determining growth priorities in plants. The mechanisms that regulate resource allocation in plants are poorly understood. We use radiotracer techniques to identify and quantify dynamical feedback responses of plants to changes in environmental conditions. A major goal of this research is to investigate shifts in sugar allocations as part of the plant's response to changes in environmental conditions. These observations are used to develop mechanistic models that simulate the feedback for adjustments to resource allocations based on the environment-plant interface. By writing a software module in C + + based on the models, we are able to conduct a computer simulation of plant's intake of carbon dioxide and sugar allocation inside plant body. By comparing and matching the simulation results and experimental data through adjusting model parameters, we are able to gain knowledge of the mechanisms that regulate resource allocation in plants.

  17. ABA and GA3 increase carbon allocation in different organs of grapevine plants by inducing accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates in leaves, enhancement of phloem area and expression of sugar transporters.

    PubMed

    Murcia, Germán; Pontin, Mariela; Reinoso, Herminda; Baraldi, Rita; Bertazza, Gianpaolo; Gómez-Talquenca, Sebastián; Bottini, Rubén; Piccoli, Patricia N

    2016-03-01

    Grape quality for winemaking depends on sugar accumulation and metabolism in berries. Abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellins (GAs) have been reported to control sugar allocation in economically important crops, although the mechanisms involved are still unknown. The present study tested if ABA and gibberellin A3 (GA3) enhance carbon allocation in fruits of grapevines by modifying phloem loading, phloem area and expression of sugar transporters in leaves and berries. Pot-grown Vitis vinifera cv. Malbec plants were sprayed with ABA and GA3 solutions. The amount of soluble sugars in leaves and berries related to photosynthesis were examined at three points of berry growth: pre-veraison, full veraison and post-veraison. Starch levels and amylase activity in leaves, gene expression of sugar transporters in leaves and berries and phloem anatomy were examined at full veraison. Accumulation of glucose and fructose in berries was hastened in ABA-treated plants at the stage of full veraison, which was correlated with enhancement of Vitis vinifera HEXOSE TRANSPORTER 2 (VvHT2) and Vitis vinifera HEXOSE TRANSPORTER 6 (VvHT6) gene expression, increases of phloem area and sucrose content in leaves. On the other hand, GA3 increased the quantity of photoassimilates delivered to the stem thus increasing xylem growth. In conclusion, stimulation of sugar transport by ABA and GA3 to berries and stems, respectively, was due to build-up of non-structural carbohydrates in leaves, modifications in phloem tissue and modulation in gene expression of sugar transporters.

  18. Land-use and hydroperiod affect kettle hole sediment carbon and nitrogen biogeochemistry.

    PubMed

    Nitzsche, Kai Nils; Kalettka, Thomas; Premke, Katrin; Lischeid, Gunnar; Gessler, Arthur; Kayler, Zachary Eric

    2017-01-01

    Kettle holes are glaciofluvially created depressional wetlands that collect organic matter (OM) and nutrients from their surrounding catchment. Kettle holes mostly undergo pronounced wet-dry cycles. Fluctuations in water table, land-use, and management can affect sediment biogeochemical transformations and perhaps threaten the carbon stocks of these unique ecosystems. We investigated sediment and water of 51 kettle holes in NE Germany that differ in hydroperiod (i.e. the duration of the wet period of a kettle hole) and land-use. Our objectives were 1) to test if hydroperiod and land management were imprinted on the isotopic values (δ(13)C, δ(15)N) and C:N ratios of the sediment OM, and 2) to characterize water loss dynamics and kettle hole-groundwater connectivity by measuring the stable δ(18)O and δD isotope values of kettle hole water over several years. We found the uppermost sediment layer reflected recent OM inputs and short-term processes in the catchment, including land-use and management effects. Deeper sediments recorded the degree to which OM is processed within the kettle hole related to the hydroperiod. We see clear indications for the effects of wet-dry cycles for all kettle holes, which can lead to the encroachment of terrestrial plants. We found that the magnitude of evaporation depended on the year, season, and land-use type, that kettle holes are temporarily coupled to shallow ground water, and, as such, kettle holes are described best as partially-closed to open systems.

  19. Channel Allocation Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Robert S.

    The Frequency Allocation Subcommittee of the Coordinating Committee for Cable Communication Systems, Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, was formed to produce a background report on the general problems of frequency allocation and assignments in cable television. The present paper, based on the subcommittee's interim report,…

  20. Land Use Affects Carbon Sources to the Pelagic Food Web in a Small Boreal Lake

    PubMed Central

    Rinta, Päivi; van Hardenbroek, Maarten; Jones, Roger I.; Kankaala, Paula; Rey, Fabian; Szidat, Sönke; Wooller, Matthew J.; Heiri, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Small humic forest lakes often have high contributions of methane-derived carbon in their food webs but little is known about the temporal stability of this carbon pathway and how it responds to environmental changes on longer time scales. We reconstructed past variations in the contribution of methanogenic carbon in the pelagic food web of a small boreal lake in Finland by analyzing the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C values) of chitinous fossils of planktivorous invertebrates in sediments from the lake. The δ13C values of zooplankton remains show several marked shifts (approx. 10 ‰), consistent with changes in the proportional contribution of carbon from methane-oxidizing bacteria in zooplankton diets. The results indicate that the lake only recently (1950s) obtained its present state with a high contribution of methanogenic carbon to the pelagic food web. A comparison with historical and palaeobotanical evidence indicates that this most recent shift coincided with agricultural land-use changes and forestation of the lake catchment and implies that earlier shifts may also have been related to changes in forest and land use. Our study demonstrates the sensitivity of the carbon cycle in small forest lakes to external forcing and that the effects of past changes in local land use on lacustrine carbon cycling have to be taken into account when defining environmental and ecological reference conditions in boreal headwater lakes. PMID:27487044

  1. [Storage and allocation of carbon and nitrogen in Pinus tabuliformis plantations on the south slope of the East Qinling Mountains, China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing-yan; Chen, Yun-ming; Cao, Yang; Wu, Xu

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to study carbon and nitrogen storages and distributions in Pinus tabuliformis plantations along an age chronosequence of 8-, 25-, 35-, 42- and 61-year-old on the south slope of the East Qinling Mountains; China. Results showed that the carbon content and nitrogen contents ranged from 441.40 to 526.21 g . kg-1 and from 3.13 to 3.99 g . kg-1 in arbor layer, from 426.06 to 447.25 g . kg-1 and from 10.62 to 12.45 g . kg-1 in shrub layer, from 301.37 to 401.52 g . kg-1 and from 10.35 to 13.33 g kg-1 in herb layer, from 382.83 to 424.71 g . kg-1, and from 8.69 to 11.90 g . kg-1 in litter layer, and from 1.51 to 18.17 g . kg-1 and from 0.29 to 1.45 g . kg-1 in soil layer (0-100 cm) , respectively. The largest carbon and nitrogen storages in arbor layer were trunks and branches, which made up 48.5% to 62.7% and 39.2% to 48.4% of the total storage, respectively. Carbon and nitrogen storages of P. tabuliformis plantations were obviously age-dependent. Carbon storage at first increased with stand Age before the stand was ripe. It was the highest (146.06 t . hm-2) when the stand was 35 year-old, after which the carbon storage de- creased. The nitrogen storage reached the peak value of 10.99 t . hm-2 at 25 year-old. The average carbon and nitrogen storages were 45.33 t . hm-2 and 568.55 kg . hm-2 in the plant layer and, 73.12 and 8.57 t . hm-2 in soil layer, respectively. Moreover, carbon and nitrogen were accumulated at higher levels in the surface soil layer. In addition, the storages of carbon and nitrogen were mainly distributed in soil layer and arbor layer in this region. The average carbon storage in different components followed an order as soil layer (64.1%) > arbor layer (30.0%) > shrub-herb and litter layers (5.9%), while the nitrogen storage followed as: soil layer (93.2%) > arbor layer (5.3%) > shrub-herb and litter layers (1.5%).

  2. Elevated pressure of carbon dioxide affects growth of thermophilic Petrotoga sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakoczy, Jana; Gniese, Claudia; Schippers, Axel; Schlömann, Michael; Krüger, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is considered a promising new technology which reduces carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere and thereby decelerates global warming. During CCS, carbon dioxide is captured from emission sources (e.g. fossil fuel power plants or other industries), pressurised, and finally stored in deep geological formations, such as former gas or oil reservoirs as well as saline aquifers. However, with CCS being a very young technology, there are a number of unknown factors that need to be investigated before declaring CCS as being safe. Our research investigates the effect of high carbon dioxide concentrations and pressures on an indigenous microorganism that colonises a potential storage site. Growth experiments were conducted using the thermophilic thiosulphate-reducing bacterium Petrotoga sp., isolated from formation water of the gas reservoir Schneeren (Lower Saxony, Germany), situated in the Northern German Plain. Growth (OD600) was monitored over one growth cycle (10 days) at different carbon dioxide concentrations (50%, 100%, and 150% in the gas phase), and was compared to control cultures grown with 20% carbon dioxide. An additional growth experiment was performed over a period of 145 days with repeated subcultivation steps in order to detect long-term effects of carbon dioxide. Cultivation over 10 days at 50% and 100% carbon dioxide slightly reduced cell growth. In contrast, long-term cultivation at 150% carbon dioxide reduced cell growth and finally led to cell death. This suggested a more pronounced effect of carbon dioxide at prolonged cultivation and stresses the need for a closer consideration of long-term effects. Experiments with supercritical carbon dioxide at 100 bar completely inhibited growth of freshly inoculated cultures and also caused a rapid decrease of growth of a pre-grown culture. This demonstrated that supercritical carbon dioxide had a sterilising effect on cells. This effect was not observed in control cultures

  3. PDF Weaving - Linking Inventory Data and Monte Carlo Uncertainty Analysis in the Study of how Disturbance Affects Forest Carbon Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healey, S. P.; Patterson, P.; Garrard, C.

    2014-12-01

    Altered disturbance regimes are likely a primary mechanism by which a changing climate will affect storage of carbon in forested ecosystems. Accordingly, the National Forest System (NFS) has been mandated to assess the role of disturbance (harvests, fires, insects, etc.) on carbon storage in each of its planning units. We have developed a process which combines 1990-era maps of forest structure and composition with high-quality maps of subsequent disturbance type and magnitude to track the impact of disturbance on carbon storage. This process, called the Forest Carbon Management Framework (ForCaMF), uses the maps to apply empirically calibrated carbon dynamics built into a widely used management tool, the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS). While ForCaMF offers locally specific insights into the effect of historical or hypothetical disturbance trends on carbon storage, its dependence upon the interaction of several maps and a carbon model poses a complex challenge in terms of tracking uncertainty. Monte Carlo analysis is an attractive option for tracking the combined effects of error in several constituent inputs as they impact overall uncertainty. Monte Carlo methods iteratively simulate alternative values for each input and quantify how much outputs vary as a result. Variation of each input is controlled by a Probability Density Function (PDF). We introduce a technique called "PDF Weaving," which constructs PDFs that ensure that simulated uncertainty precisely aligns with uncertainty estimates that can be derived from inventory data. This hard link with inventory data (derived in this case from FIA - the US Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis program) both provides empirical calibration and establishes consistency with other types of assessments (e.g., habitat and water) for which NFS depends upon FIA data. Results from the NFS Northern Region will be used to illustrate PDF weaving and insights gained from ForCaMF about the role of disturbance in carbon

  4. Response of oxidative enzyme activities to nitrogen deposition affects soil concentrations of dissolved organic carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldrop, M.P.; Zak, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that atmospheric nitrate (NO3- ) deposition can alter soil carbon (C) storage by directly affecting the activity of lignin-degrading soil fungi. In a laboratory experiment, we studied the direct influence of increasing soil NO 3- concentration on microbial C cycling in three different ecosystems: black oak-white oak (BOWO), sugar maple-red oak (SMRO), and sugar maple-basswood (SMBW). These ecosystems span a broad range of litter biochemistry and recalcitrance; the BOWO ecosystem contains the highest litter lignin content, SMRO had intermediate lignin content, and SMBW leaf litter has the lowest lignin content. We hypothesized that increasing soil solution NO 3- would reduce lignolytic activity in the BOWO ecosystem, due to a high abundance of white-rot fungi and lignin-rich leaf litter. Due to the low lignin content of litter in the SMBW, we further reasoned that the NO3- repression of lignolytic activity would be less dramatic due to a lower relative abundance of white-rot basidiomycetes; the response in the SMRO ecosystem should be intermediate. We increased soil solution NO3- concentrations in a 73-day laboratory incubation and measured microbial respiration and soil solution dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and phenolics concentrations. At the end of the incubation, we measured the activity of ??-glucosidase, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, phenol oxidase, and peroxidase, which are extracellular enzymes involved with cellulose and lignin degradation. We quantified the fungal biomass, and we also used fungal ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) to gain insight into fungal community composition. In the BOWO ecosystem, increasing NO 3- significantly decreased oxidative enzyme activities (-30% to -54%) and increased DOC (+32% upper limit) and phenolic (+77% upper limit) concentrations. In the SMRO ecosystem, we observed a significant decrease in phenol oxidase activity (-73% lower limit) and an increase in soluble phenolic concentrations

  5. Structural characteristics of activated carbons and ibuprofen adsorption affected by bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Melillo, M; Gun'ko, V M; Tennison, S R; Mikhalovska, L I; Phillips, G J; Davies, J G; Lloyd, A W; Kozynchenko, O P; Malik, D J; Streat, M; Mikhalovsky, S V

    2004-03-30

    Structural characteristics of a series of MAST carbons were studied using scanning electron microscopy images and the nitrogen adsorption isotherms analyzed with several models of pores and different adsorption equations. A developed model of pores as a mixture of gaps between spherical nanoparticles and slitlike pores was found appropriate for MAST carbons. Adsorption of ibuprofen [2-(4-isobutylphenyl)propionic acid] on activated carbons possessing different pore size distributions in protein-free and bovine serum albumin (BSA)-containing aqueous solutions reveals the importance of the contribution of mesopores to the total porosity of adsorbents. The influence of the mesoporosity increases when considering the removal of the drug from the protein-containing solution. Cellulose-coated microporous carbon Norit RBX adsorbs significantly smaller amounts of ibuprofen than uncoated micro/mesoporous MAST carbons whose adsorption capability increases with increasing mesoporosity and specific surface area, burnoff dependent variable. A similar effect of broad pores is observed on adsorption of fibrinogen on the same carbons. Analysis of the ibuprofen adsorption data using Langmuir and D'Arcy-Watt equations as the kernel of the Fredholm integral equation shows that the nonuniformity of ibuprofen adsorption complexes diminishes with the presence of BSA. This effect may be explained by a partial adsorption of ibuprofen onto protein molecules immobilized on carbon particles and blocking of a portion of narrow pores.

  6. Foliar nitrogen concentrations and natural abundance of (15)N suggest nitrogen allocation patterns of Douglas-fir and mycorrhizal fungi during development in elevated carbon dioxide concentration and temperature.

    PubMed

    Hobbie, E A; Olszyk, D M; Rygiewicz, P T; Tingey, D T; Johnson, M G

    2001-09-01

    Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco (Douglas-fir) seedlings were grown in a 2 x 2 factorial design in enclosed mesocosms at ambient temperature or 3.5 degrees C above ambient, and at ambient CO2 concentration ([CO2]) or 179 ppm above ambient. Two additional mesocosms were maintained as open controls. We measured the extent of mycorrhizal infection, foliar nitrogen (N) concentrations on both a weight basis (%N) and area basis (Narea), and foliar delta15N signatures (15N/14N ratios) from summer 1993 through summer 1997. Mycorrhizal fungi had colonized nearly all root tips across all treatments by spring 1994. Elevated [CO2] lowered foliar %N but did not affect N(area), whereas elevated temperature increased both foliar %N and Narea. Foliar delta15N was initially -1 per thousand and dropped by the final harvest to between -4 and -5 per thousand in the enclosed mesocosms, probably because of transfer of isotopically depleted N from mycorrhizal fungi. Based on the similarity in foliar delta15N among treatments, we conclude that mycorrhizal fungi had similar N allocation patterns across CO2 and temperature treatments. We combined isotopic and Narea data for 1993-94 to calculate fluxes of N for second- and third-year needles. Yearly N influxes were higher in second-year needles than in third-year needles (about 160 and 50% of initial leaf N, respectively), indicating greater sink strength in the younger needles. Influxes of N in second-year needles increased in response to elevated temperature, suggesting increased N supply from soil relative to plant N demands. In the elevated temperature treatments, N effluxes from third-year needles were higher in seedlings in elevated [CO2] than in ambient [CO2], probably because of increased N allocation below ground. We conclude that N allocation patterns shifted in response to the elevated temperature and [CO2] treatments in the seedlings but not in their fungal symbionts.

  7. Advances in liver transplantation allocation systems.

    PubMed

    Schilsky, Michael L; Moini, Maryam

    2016-03-14

    With the growing number of patients in need of liver transplantation, there is a need for adopting new and modifying existing allocation policies that prioritize patients for liver transplantation. Policy should ensure fair allocation that is reproducible and strongly predictive of best pre and post transplant outcomes while taking into account the natural history of the potential recipients liver disease and its complications. There is wide acceptance for allocation policies based on urgency in which the sickest patients on the waiting list with the highest risk of mortality receive priority. Model for end-stage liver disease and Child-Turcotte-Pugh scoring system, the two most universally applicable systems are used in urgency-based prioritization. However, other factors must be considered to achieve optimal allocation. Factors affecting pre-transplant patient survival and the quality of the donor organ also affect outcome. The optimal system should have allocation prioritization that accounts for both urgency and transplant outcome. We reviewed past and current liver allocation systems with the aim of generating further discussion about improvement of current policies.

  8. Advances in liver transplantation allocation systems

    PubMed Central

    Schilsky, Michael L; Moini, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    With the growing number of patients in need of liver transplantation, there is a need for adopting new and modifying existing allocation policies that prioritize patients for liver transplantation. Policy should ensure fair allocation that is reproducible and strongly predictive of best pre and post transplant outcomes while taking into account the natural history of the potential recipients liver disease and its complications. There is wide acceptance for allocation policies based on urgency in which the sickest patients on the waiting list with the highest risk of mortality receive priority. Model for end-stage liver disease and Child-Turcotte-Pugh scoring system, the two most universally applicable systems are used in urgency-based prioritization. However, other factors must be considered to achieve optimal allocation. Factors affecting pre-transplant patient survival and the quality of the donor organ also affect outcome. The optimal system should have allocation prioritization that accounts for both urgency and transplant outcome. We reviewed past and current liver allocation systems with the aim of generating further discussion about improvement of current policies. PMID:26973389

  9. Carbon Cycling in Alpine and Arctic watersheds affected by permafrost degradation: An insight from Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehm, C. L.; Giesler, R.; Karlsson, J.

    2009-05-01

    Linking the processes and dynamics acting within and between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems is crucial in order to understand the impacts of environmental change on the re-distribution and transformation of energy within watersheds. Nearly 1300 Pg of carbon are stored in permafrost soils in boreal and arctic ecosystems. Permafrost degradation can result in the loss of significant amounts of terrestrial carbon, both through the release to the atmosphere in the form of carbon dioxide and methane, or through export downstream to lakes and rivers. The fate and effects of this carbon in lake ecosystems is poorly understood. We investigated the capacity of lake bacteria to utilize carbon from different adjacent mire soils in a discontinuous permafrost region of northern Sweden. We, additionally, studied other lake ecosystems by using organic matter quality as a proxy for the state of permafrost degradation within the watershed. Finally, we propose simple predictive models for the bioavailability of soils to aquatic bacteria. Our study identified three distinctive time sensitive pools of bacterial respiration whose carbon availability varied according to chemical characteristics. Soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was rapidly consumed by lake bacteria with nearly 85% consumed within the first 24 hours. Bacterial production was higher in the soil bioassays and increased in a lag fashion relative to bacterial respiration, resulting in increasing bacterial growth efficiencies over time as a function of C pool and soil type. The mean DOC consumption by lake bacteria was 0.087 mg C L-1 d-1 and varied between 0.382 mg L-1 d-1 and 0.491 mg L-1 d-1 when supplied with terrestrial DOC. The lake water bacterial respiration could explain a varying degree of pCO2 saturation in lakes as a function of both carbon quality and course. Carbon quality and end members can be used as proxies for the degree of permafrost degradation within the watershed. The data clearly show that export

  10. Zinc oxide nanoparticles affect carbon and nitrogen mineralization of Phoenix dactylifera leaf litter in a sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Muhammad Imtiaz; Shahzad, Tanvir; Shahid, Muhammad; Ismail, Iqbal M I; Shah, Ghulam Mustafa; Almeelbi, Talal

    2017-02-15

    We investigated the impact of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs; 1000mgkg(-1) soil) on soil microbes and their associated soil functions such as date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) leaf litter (5gkg(-1) soil) carbon and nitrogen mineralization in mesocosms containing sandy soil. Nanoparticles application in litter-amended soil significantly decreased the cultivable heterotrophic bacterial and fungal colony forming units (cfu) compared to only litter-amended soil. The decrease in cfu could be related to lower microbial biomass carbon in nanoparticles-litter amended soil. Likewise, ZnO NPs also reduced CO2 emission by 10% in aforementioned treatment but this was higher than control (soil only). Labile Zn was only detected in the microbial biomass of nanoparticles-litter applied soil indicating that microorganisms consumed this element from freely available nutrients in the soil. In this treatment, dissolved organic carbon and mineral nitrogen were 25 and 34% lower respectively compared to litter-amended soil. Such toxic effects of nanoparticles on litter decomposition resulted in 130 and 122% lower carbon and nitrogen mineralization efficiency respectively. Hence, our results entail that ZnO NPs are toxic to soil microbes and affect their function i.e., carbon and nitrogen mineralization of applied litter thus confirming their toxicity to microbial associated soil functions.

  11. Oral calcium carbonate affects calcium but not phosphorus balance in stage 3-4 chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kathleen M; Martin, Berdine R; Wastney, Meryl E; McCabe, George P; Moe, Sharon M; Weaver, Connie M; Peacock, Munro

    2013-05-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are given calcium carbonate to bind dietary phosphorus, reduce phosphorus retention, and prevent negative calcium balance; however, data are limited on calcium and phosphorus balance during CKD to support this. Here, we studied eight patients with stage 3 or 4 CKD (mean estimated glomerular filtration rate 36 ml/min) who received a controlled diet with or without a calcium carbonate supplement (1500 mg/day calcium) during two 3-week balance periods in a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over design. All feces and urine were collected during weeks 2 and 3 of each balance period and fasting blood, and urine was collected at baseline and at the end of each week. Calcium kinetics were determined using oral and intravenous (45)calcium. Patients were found to be in neutral calcium and phosphorus balance while on the placebo. Calcium carbonate supplementation produced positive calcium balance, did not affect phosphorus balance, and produced only a modest reduction in urine phosphorus excretion compared with placebo. Calcium kinetics demonstrated positive net bone balance but less than overall calcium balance, suggesting soft-tissue deposition. Fasting blood and urine biochemistries of calcium and phosphate homeostasis were unaffected by calcium carbonate. Thus, the positive calcium balance produced by calcium carbonate treatment within 3 weeks cautions against its use as a phosphate binder in patients with stage 3 or 4 CKD, if these findings can be extrapolated to long-term therapy.

  12. Allocation of Scarce Resources: Some Problems

    PubMed Central

    Secundy, Marian G.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of current philosophical perspectives and societal trends in relation to allocation of scarce resources. An analysis and comparative assessment of various positions of current philosophers, theologians, and bioethicists is provided. Currently proposed cost containment measures at the federal level require that black health professionals particularly pay attention to these proposals specifically as related to allocation of resources. The ways in which cost containment and/ or modification of resource allocation will affect health care delivery, specifically for the black community, must be carefully examined. This article may suggest some approaches for individual and group response to the continuing dialogue and to the allocation process itself. The equitable distribution of health care, particularly scarce new technologies, will be one of the greatest problems facing society in the next 20 years. PMID:7265284

  13. How surface fire in Siberian Scots pine forests affects soil organic carbon in the forest floor: Stocks, molecular structure, and conversion to black carbon (charcoal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czimczik, Claudia I.; Preston, Caroline M.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef

    2003-03-01

    In boreal forests, fire is a frequent disturbance and converts soil organic carbon (OC) to more degradation-resistant aromatic carbon, i.e., black carbon (BC) which might act as a long-term atmospheric-carbon sink. Little is known on the effects of fires on boreal soil OC stocks and molecular composition. We studied how a surface fire affected the composition of the forest floor of Siberian Scots pine forests by comparing the bulk elemental composition, molecular structure (13C-MAS NMR), and the aromatic carbon fraction (BC and potentially interfering constituents like tannins) of unburned and burned forest floor. Fire reduced the mass of the forest floor by 60%, stocks of inorganic elements (Si, Al, Fe, K, Ca, Na, Mg, Mn) by 30-50%, and of OC, nitrogen, and sulfur by 40-50%. In contrast to typical findings from temperate forests, unburned OC consisted mainly of (di-)O-alkyl (polysaccharides) and few aromatic structures, probably due to dominant input of lichen biomass. Fire converted OC into alkyl and aromatic structures, the latter consisting of heterocyclic macromolecules and small clusters of condensed carbon. The small cluster size explained the small BC concentrations determined using a degradative molecular marker method. Fire increased BC stocks (16 g kg-1 OC) by 40% which translates into a net-conversion rate of 0.7% (0.35% of net primary production) unburned OC to BC. Here, however, BC was not a major fraction of soil OC pool in unburned or burned forest floor, either due to rapid in situ degradation or relocation.

  14. How Human and Natural Disturbance Affects the U.S. Carbon Sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felzer, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    Gridded datasets of Net Ecosystem Exchange derived from eddy covariance and remote sensing measurements (EC-MOD and FLUXNET-MTE) provide a means of validating Net Ecosystem Productivity (NEP, opposite of NEE) from terrestrial ecosystem models. While most forested regions in the U.S. are observed to be moderate to strong carbon sinks, models not including human or natural disturbances will tend to be more carbon neutral, which is expected of mature ecosystems. I have developed the Terrestrial Ecosystems Model Hydro version (TEM-Hydro) to include both human and natural disturbances to compare against gridded NEP datasets. Human disturbances are based on the Hurtt et al. land use transition dataset and include transient agricultural (crops and pasture) conversion and abandonment and timber harvest. Natural disturbances include tropical storms and hurricane and fires based on stochastic return intervals. Model results indicate that forests are the largest carbon sink, seconded by croplands and pastures, if not accounting for decomposition of agricultural products and animal respiration. Grasslands and shrublands are both small sinks or carbon neutral. The NEP of forests in EC-MOD from 2001-2006 is 240 gCm2yr-1 and for FLUXNET-MTE from 1982-2007 is 375 gCm-2yr-1. With potential vegetation, the respective forest sinks for those two time periods are 54 and 62 gCm-2yr-1, respectively. Including the effects of human disturbance increases the sinks to 154 and 147 gCm-2yr-1. The effect of stochastic fire and storms is to reduce the NEP to 114 and 108 gCm-2yr-1. While the positive carbon sink today is the result of past land use disturbance, net carbon sequestration, including product decomposition, conversion fluxes, and animal respiration, has not yet returned to predisturbance levels as seen in the potential vegetation. Differences in response to disturbance have to do with the type, frequency, and intensity of disturbance. Fire, in particular, is seen to have a net

  15. Solubility and Leaching Risks of Organic Carbon in Paddy Soils as Affected by Irrigation Managements

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shihong; Wei, Qi; Gao, Xiaoli

    2013-01-01

    Influence of nonflooding controlled irrigation (NFI) on solubility and leaching risk of soil organic carbon (SOC) were investigated. Compared with flooding irrigation (FI) paddies, soil water extractable organic carbon (WEOC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in NFI paddies increased in surface soil but decreased in deep soil. The DOC leaching loss in NFI field was 63.3 kg C ha−1, reduced by 46.4% than in the FI fields. It indicated that multi-wet-dry cycles in NFI paddies enhanced the decomposition of SOC in surface soils, and less carbon moved downward to deep soils due to less percolation. That also led to lower SOC in surface soils in NFI paddies than in FI paddies, which implied that more carbon was released into the atmosphere from the surface soil in NFI paddies. Change of solubility of SOC in NFI paddies might lead to potential change in soil fertility and sustainability, greenhouse gas emission, and bioavailability of trace metals or organic pollutants. PMID:23935423

  16. Solubility and leaching risks of organic carbon in paddy soils as affected by irrigation managements.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junzeng; Yang, Shihong; Peng, Shizhang; Wei, Qi; Gao, Xiaoli

    2013-01-01

    Influence of nonflooding controlled irrigation (NFI) on solubility and leaching risk of soil organic carbon (SOC) were investigated. Compared with flooding irrigation (FI) paddies, soil water extractable organic carbon (WEOC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in NFI paddies increased in surface soil but decreased in deep soil. The DOC leaching loss in NFI field was 63.3 kg C ha⁻¹, reduced by 46.4% than in the FI fields. It indicated that multi-wet-dry cycles in NFI paddies enhanced the decomposition of SOC in surface soils, and less carbon moved downward to deep soils due to less percolation. That also led to lower SOC in surface soils in NFI paddies than in FI paddies, which implied that more carbon was released into the atmosphere from the surface soil in NFI paddies. Change of solubility of SOC in NFI paddies might lead to potential change in soil fertility and sustainability, greenhouse gas emission, and bioavailability of trace metals or organic pollutants.

  17. Factors affecting stress assisted corrosion cracking of carbon steel under industrial boiler conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong

    Failure of carbon steel boiler tubes from waterside has been reported in the utility boilers and industrial boilers for a long time. In industrial boilers, most waterside tube cracks are found near heavy attachment welds on the outer surface and are typically blunt, with multiple bulbous features indicating a discontinuous growth. These types of tube failures are typically referred to as stress assisted corrosion (SAC). For recovery boilers in the pulp and paper industry, these failures are particularly important as any water leak inside the furnace can potentially lead to smelt-water explosion. Metal properties, environmental variables, and stress conditions are the major factors influencing SAC crack initation and propagation in carbon steel boiler tubes. Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were conducted under boiler water conditions to study the effect of temperature, oxygen level, and stress conditions on crack initation and propagation on SA-210 carbon steel samples machined out of boiler tubes. Heat treatments were also performed to develop various grain size and carbon content on carbon steel samples, and SSRTs were conducted on these samples to examine the effect of microstructure features on SAC cracking. Mechanisms of SAC crack initation and propagation were proposed and validated based on interrupted slow strain tests (ISSRT). Water chemistry guidelines are provided to prevent SAC and fracture mechanics model is developed to predict SAC failure on industrial boiler tubes.

  18. Atmospheric CO2 level affects plants' carbon use efficiency: insights from a 13C labeling experiment on sunflower stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiaoying; Schäufele, Rudi; Schnyder, Hans

    2015-04-01

    The increase of atmospheric CO2 concentration has been shown to stimulate plant photosynthesis and (to a lesser extent) growth, thereby acting as a possible sink for the additional atmospheric CO2. However, this effect is dependent on the efficiency with which plants convert atmospheric carbon into biomass carbon, since a considerable proportion of assimilated carbon is returned to the atmosphere via plant respiration. As a core parameter for carbon cycling, carbon use efficiency of plants (CUE, the ratio of net primary production to gross primary production) quantifies the proportion of assimilated carbon that is incorporated into plant biomass. CUE has rarely been assessed based on measurements of complete carbon balance, due to methodological difficulties in measuring respiration rate of plants in light. Moreover, foliar respiration is known to be inhibited in light, thus foliar respiration rate is generally lower in light than in dark. However, this phenomenon, termed as inhibition of respiration in light (IRL), has rarely been assessed at the stand-scale and been incorporated into the calculation of CUE. Therefore, how CUE responses to atmospheric CO2 levels is still not clear. We studied CUE of sunflower stands grown at sub-ambient CO2 level (200 μmol mol-1) and elevated CO2 level (1000 μmol mol-1) using mesocosm-scale gas exchange facilities which enabled continuous measurements of 13CO2/12CO2 exchange. Appling steady-state 13C labeling, fluxes of respiration and photosynthesis in light were separated, and tracer kinetic in respiration was analyzed. This study provides the first data on CUE at a mesocosm-level including respiration in light in different CO2 environments. We found that CUE of sunflower was lower at an elevated CO2 level than at a sub-ambient CO2 level; and the ignorance of IRL lead to erroneous estimations of CUE. Variation in CUE at atmospheric CO2 levels was attributed to several mechanisms. In this study, CO2 enrichment i) affected the

  19. [Carbon source metabolic diversity of soil microbial community under different climate types in the area affected by Wenchuan earthquake].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang-Shuai; Lin, Yong-Ming; Ma, Rui-Feng; Deng, Hao-Jun; Du, Kun; Wu, Cheng-Zhen; Hong, Wei

    2015-02-01

    The MS8.0 Wenchuan earthquake in 2008 led to huge damage to land covers in northwest Sichuan, one of the critical fragile eco-regions in China which can be divided into Semi-arid dry hot climate zone (SDHC) and Subtropical humid monsoon climate zone (SHMC). Using the method of Bilog-ECO-microplate technique, this paper aimed to determine the functional diversity of soil microbial community in the earthquake-affected areas which can be divided into undamaged area (U), recover area (R) and damaged area without recovery (D) under different climate types, in order to provide scientific basis for ecological recovery. The results indicated that the average-well-color-development (AWCD) in undamaged area and recovery area showed SDHC > SHMC, which was contrary to the AWCD in the damaged area without recovery. The AWCD of damaged area without recovery was the lowest in both climate zones. The number of carbon source utilization types of soil microbial in SHMC zone was significantly higher than that in SDHC zone. The carbon source utilization types in both climate zones presented a trend of recover area > undamaged area > damaged area without recovery. The carbon source metabolic diversity characteristic of soil microbial community was significantly different in different climate zones. The diversity index and evenness index both showed a ranking of undamaged area > recover area > damaged area without recovery. In addition, the recovery area had the highest richness index. The soil microbial carbon sources metabolism characteristic was affected by soil nutrient, aboveground vegetation biomass and vegetation coverage to some extent. In conclusion, earthquake and its secondary disasters influenced the carbon source metabolic diversity characteristic of soil microbial community mainly through the change of aboveground vegetation and soil environmental factors.

  20. Effects of light and nutrient availability on the growth, allocation, carbon/nitrogen balance, phenolic chemistry, and resistance to herbivory of two freshwater macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Greg; Lodge, David M

    2003-09-01

    Phenotypic responses of Potamogeton amplifolius and Nuphar advena to different light (7% and 35% of surface irradiance) and nutrient environments were assessed with field manipulation experiments. Higher light and nutrient availability enhanced the growth of P. amplifolius by 154% and 255%, respectively. Additionally, biomass was allocated differently depending on the resource: high light availability resulted in a higher root/shoot ratio, whereas high nutrient availability resulted in a lower root/shoot ratio. Low light availability and high nutrient availability increased the nitrogen content of leaf tissue by 53% and 40% respectively, resulting in a 37% and 31% decrease in the C/N ratio. Root nitrogen content was also increased by low light and high nutrient availability, by 50% (P=0.0807) and 77% respectively, resulting in a 20% and 40% decrease in root C/N ratio. Leaf phenolics were significantly increased 72% by high light and 31% by high nutrient availability, but root phenolic concentrations were not altered significantly. None of these changes in tissue constituents resulted in altered palatability to crayfish. N. advena was killed by the same high nutrient treatment that stimulated growth in P. amplifolius, preventing assessment of phenotypic responses to nutrient availability. However, high light availability increased overall growth by 24%, but this was mainly due to increased growth of the rhizome (increased 100%), resulting in a higher root/shoot ratio. High light tended to increase the production of floating leaves (P=0.09) and significantly decreased the production of submersed leaves. High light availability decreased the nitrogen content by 15% and 25% and increased the phenolic concentration by 88% and 255% in floating and submersed leaves, respectively. These differences in leaf traits did not result in detectable differences in damage by herbivores.

  1. Investigating the Fundamental Scientific Issues Affecting the Long-term Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Spangler, Lee; Cunningham, Alfred; Barnhart, Elliot; Lageson, David; Nall, Anita; Dobeck, Laura; Repasky, Kevin; Shaw, Joseph; Nugent, Paul; Johnson, Jennifer; Hogan, Justin; Codd, Sarah; Bray, Joshua; Prather, Cody; McGrail, B.; Oldenburg, Curtis; Wagoner, Jeff; Pawar, Rajesh

    2014-12-19

    The Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) collaborative was formed to address basic science and engineering knowledge gaps relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. The original funding round of ZERT (ZERT I) identified and addressed many of these gaps. ZERT II has focused on specific science and technology areas identified in ZERT I that showed strong promise and needed greater effort to fully develop.

  2. Sub-surface soil carbon changes affects biofuel greenhouse gas emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in direct soil organic carbon (SOC) can have a major impact on overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from biofuels when using life-cycle assessment (LCA). Estimated changes in SOC, when accounted for in an LCA, are typically derived from near-surface soil depths (<30 cm). Changes in subsurf...

  3. Soil profile organic carbon as affected by tillage and cropping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reports on the long-term effects of tillage and cropping systems on soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration in the entire rooting profile are limited. A long-term experiment with three cropping systems [continuous corn (CC), continuous soybean (CSB), and soybean-corn (SB-C)] in six primary tillage s...

  4. Processes Affecting Carbon Fluxes of Grassland Ecosystems Under Elevated CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Owensby, C.E.; Ham, J.M.; Rice, C.W.; Knapp, A.K.

    1998-03-14

    Final report of a project which exposed native tallgrass prairie to twice-ambient atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Improved water use efficiency increased biomass production and increased soil organic matter. Twice ambient CO{sub 2} decreased canopy evapotranspiration by 22%, but, maintained an increased net carbon sequestration.

  5. How do changes in bulk soil organic carbon content affect carbon concentrations in individual soil particle fractions?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, X. M.; Drury, C. F.; Reynolds, W. D.; Yang, J. Y.

    2016-01-01

    We test the common assumption that organic carbon (OC) storage occurs on sand-sized soil particles only after the OC storage capacity on silt- and clay-sized particles is saturated. Soil samples from a Brookston clay loam in Southwestern Ontario were analysed for the OC concentrations in bulk soil, and on the clay (<2 μm), silt (2–53 μm) and sand (53–2000 μm) particle size fractions. The OC concentrations in bulk soil ranged from 4.7 to 70.8 g C kg−1 soil. The OC concentrations on all three particle size fractions were significantly related to the OC concentration of bulk soil. However, OC concentration increased slowly toward an apparent maximum on silt and clay, but this maximum was far greater than the maximum predicted by established C sequestration models. In addition, significant increases in OC associated with sand occurred when the bulk soil OC concentration exceeded 30 g C kg−1, but this increase occurred when the OC concentration on silt + clay was still far below the predicted storage capacity for silt and clay fractions. Since the OC concentrations in all fractions of Brookston clay loam soil continued to increase with increasing C (bulk soil OC content) input, we concluded that the concept of OC storage capacity requires further investigation. PMID:27251365

  6. Biological Filtration Limits Carbon Availability and Affects Downstream Biofilm Formation and Community Structure†

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Chee Meng; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2006-01-01

    Carbon removal strategies have gained popularity in the mitigation of biofouling in water reuse processes, but current biofilm-monitoring practices based on organic-carbon concentrations may not provide an accurate representation of the in situ biofilm problem. This study evaluated a submerged microtiter plate assay for direct and rapid monitoring of biofilm formation by subjecting the plates to a continuous flow of either secondary effluent (SE) or biofilter-treated secondary effluent (BF). This method was very robust, based on a high correlation (R2 = 0.92) between the biomass (given by the A600 in the microtiter plate assay) and the biovolume (determined from independent biofilms developed on glass slides under identical conditions) measurements, and revealed that the biomasses in BF biofilms were consistently lower than those in SE biofilms. The influence of the organic-carbon content on the biofilm community composition and succession was further evaluated using molecular tools. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S rRNA genes revealed a group of pioneer colonizers, possibly represented by Sphingomonadaceae and Caulobacter organisms, to be common in both SE and BF biofilms. However, differences in organic-carbon availabilities in the two water samples eventually led to the selection of distinct biofilm communities. Alphaproteobacterial populations were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization to be enriched in SE biofilms, while Betaproteobacteria were dominant in BF biofilms. Cloning analyses further demonstrated that microorganisms adapted for survival under low-substrate conditions (e.g., Aquabacterium, Caulobacter, and Legionella) were preferentially selected in the BF biofilm, suggesting that carbon limitation strategies may not achieve adequate biofouling control in the long run. PMID:16957184

  7. Atmospheric CO2 mole fraction affects stand-scale carbon use efficiency of sunflower by stimulating respiration in light.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiao Ying; Schäufele, Rudi; Lehmeier, Christoph Andreas; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Schnyder, Hans

    2017-03-01

    Plant carbon-use-efficiency (CUE), a key parameter in carbon cycle and plant growth models, quantifies the fraction of fixed carbon that is converted into net primary production rather than respired. CUE has not been directly measured, partly because of the difficulty of measuring respiration in light. Here, we explore if CUE is affected by atmospheric CO2 . Sunflower stands were grown at low (200 μmol mol(-1) ) or high CO2 (1000 μmol mol(-1) ) in controlled environment mesocosms. CUE of stands was measured by dynamic stand-scale (13) C labelling and partitioning of photosynthesis and respiration. At the same plant age, growth at high CO2 (compared with low CO2 ) led to 91% higher rates of apparent photosynthesis, 97% higher respiration in the dark, yet 143% higher respiration in light. Thus, CUE was significantly lower at high (0.65) than at low CO2 (0.71). Compartmental analysis of isotopic tracer kinetics demonstrated a greater commitment of carbon reserves in stand-scale respiratory metabolism at high CO2 . Two main processes contributed to the reduction of CUE at high CO2 : a reduced inhibition of leaf respiration by light and a diminished leaf mass ratio. This work highlights the relevance of measuring respiration in light and assessment of the CUE response to environment conditions.

  8. Sink-source characteristics of two distinctly different forest species as affected by elevated carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Pushnik, J.C.; Florv, W.B.; Demaree, R.S. ); Anderson, P.D.; Houpis J.L.J. )

    1993-05-01

    The basic physiology and biochemistry of photosynthesis is being correlated with the leaf level processes and morphology of the Sierra Nevada varieties of Taxus brevifolia and Pinus ponderosa in an attempt to identify control mechanisms of carbohydrate partitioning. We are evaluating sink/source relationships in terms of carbon assimilation (gas-exchange (A[ci] curves and temperature effects); RuBPCase activity, chloroplast structure, integrity, and distributions, stomatal densities, internal leaf organization); transport functions (sucrose-phosphate synthetase (SPS) activity); long-term sink (immunoelectron microscopic detection of taxol). The results of these investigations suggest carbon acquisition characteristics are similar among the conifers, but with distinct differences in carboxylation efficiencies, SPS activity, needle starch content/chloroplast, and vascular tissue areas. These baseline characteristics are currently being evaluated in response to elevated CO[sub 2].

  9. Microbial biomass and carbon mineralization in agricultural soils as affected by pesticide addition.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anjani; Nayak, A K; Shukla, Arvind K; Panda, B B; Raja, R; Shahid, Mohammad; Tripathi, Rahul; Mohanty, Sangita; Rath, P C

    2012-04-01

    A laboratory study was conducted with four pesticides, viz. a fungicide (carbendazim), two insecticides (chlorpyrifos and cartap hydrochloride) and an herbicide (pretilachlor) applied to a sandy clay loam soil at a field rate to determine their effect on microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and carbon mineralization (C(min)). The MBC content of soil increased with time up to 30 days in cartap hydrochloride as well as chlorpyrifos treated soil. Thereafter, it decreased and reached close to the initial level by 90th day. However, in carbendazim treated soil, the MBC showed a decreasing trend up to 45 days and subsequently increased up to 90 days. In pretilachlor treated soil, MBC increased through the first 15 days, and thereafter decreased to the initial level. Application of carbendazim, chlorpyrifos and cartap hydrochloride decreased C(min) for the first 30 days and then increased afterwards, while pretilachlor treated soil showed an increasing trend.

  10. Latitudinal variation in carbon storage can help predict changes in swamps affected by global warming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, Beth A.; McKee, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Plants may offer our best hope of removing greenhouse gases (gases that contribute to global warming) emitted to the atmosphere from the burning of fossil fuels. At the same time, global warming could change environments so that natural plant communities will either need to shift into cooler climate zones, or become extirpated (Prasad and Iverson, 1999; Crumpacker and others, 2001; Davis and Shaw, 2001). It is impossible to know the future, but studies combining field observation of production and modeling can help us make predictions about what may happen to these wetland communities in the future. Widespread wetland types such as baldcypress (Taxodium distichum) swamps in the southeastern portion of the United States could be especially good at carbon sequestration (amount of CO2 stored by forests) from the atmosphere. They have high levels of production and sometimes store undecomposed dead plant material in wet conditions with low oxygen, thus keeping gases stored that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere (fig. 1). To study the ability of baldcypress swamps to store carbon, our project has taken two approaches. The first analysis looked at published data to develop an idea (hypothesis) of how production levels change across a temperature gradient in the baldcypress region (published data study). The second study tested this idea by comparing production levels across a latitudinal range by using swamps in similar field conditions (ongoing carbon storage study). These studies will help us make predictions about the future ability of baldcypress swamps to store carbon in soil and plant biomass, as well as the ability of these forests to shift northward with global warming.

  11. Time of day affects chemoreflex sensitivity and the carbon dioxide reserve during NREM sleep in participants with sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    El-Chami, Mohamad; Shaheen, David; Ivers, Blake; Syed, Ziauddin; Badr, M Safwan; Lin, Ho-Sheng; Mateika, Jason H

    2014-11-15

    Our investigation was designed to determine whether the time of day affects the carbon dioxide reserve and chemoreflex sensitivity during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Ten healthy men with obstructive sleep apnea completed a constant routine protocol that consisted of sleep sessions in the evening (10 PM to 1 AM), morning (6 AM to 9 AM), and afternoon (2 PM to 5 PM). Between sleep sessions, the participants were awake. During each sleep session, core body temperature, baseline levels of carbon dioxide (PET(CO2)) and minute ventilation, as well as the PET(CO2) that demarcated the apneic threshold and hypocapnic ventilatory response, were measured. The nadir of core body temperature during sleep occurred in the morning and was accompanied by reductions in minute ventilation and PetCO2 compared with the evening and afternoon (minute ventilation: 5.3 ± 0.3 vs. 6.2 ± 0.2 vs. 6.1 ± 0.2 l/min, P < 0.02; PET(CO2): 39.7 ± 0.4 vs. 41.4 ± 0.6 vs. 40.4 ± 0.6 Torr, P < 0.02). The carbon dioxide reserve was reduced, and the hypocapnic ventilatory response increased in the morning compared with the evening and afternoon (carbon dioxide reserve: 2.1 ± 0.3 vs. 3.6 ± 0.5 vs. 3.5 ± 0.3 Torr, P < 0.002; hypocapnic ventilatory response: 2.3 ± 0.3 vs. 1.6 ± 0.2 vs. 1.8 ± 0.2 l·min(-1)·mmHg(-1), P < 0.001). We conclude that time of day affects chemoreflex properties during sleep, which may contribute to increases in breathing instability in the morning compared with other periods throughout the day/night cycle in individuals with sleep apnea.

  12. Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Matteo; Hwa, Terence; Martin, Olivier C.

    2016-01-01

    New experimental results on bacterial growth inspire a novel top-down approach to study cell metabolism, combining mass balance and proteomic constraints to extend and complement Flux Balance Analysis. We introduce here Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis, CAFBA, in which the biosynthetic costs associated to growth are accounted for in an effective way through a single additional genome-wide constraint. Its roots lie in the experimentally observed pattern of proteome allocation for metabolic functions, allowing to bridge regulation and metabolism in a transparent way under the principle of growth-rate maximization. We provide a simple method to solve CAFBA efficiently and propose an “ensemble averaging” procedure to account for unknown protein costs. Applying this approach to modeling E. coli metabolism, we find that, as the growth rate increases, CAFBA solutions cross over from respiratory, growth-yield maximizing states (preferred at slow growth) to fermentative states with carbon overflow (preferred at fast growth). In addition, CAFBA allows for quantitatively accurate predictions on the rate of acetate excretion and growth yield based on only 3 parameters determined by empirical growth laws. PMID:27355325

  13. Shifts in vegetation affect organic carbon quality in a coastal marsh along the Hudson River Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, A. H.; Corbett, J. E.; Tfaily, M. M.; Martin, I.; Ho, L.; Sun, E.; Sevilla, L.; Vincent, S.; Newton, R.; Peteet, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    To better understand carbon storage in coastal salt marshes, samples were collected from Piermont Marsh, NY (40 ̊00' N, 73 ̊55'W) located within the Hudson River Estuary. Porewater from three different vegetation sites was analyzed to compare the quality of the dissolved organic carbon. Sites contained either native or invasive vegetation with variations in live plant root depth. Porewater was taken from 0-3m in 50cm intervals, and sites were dominated either by invasive Phragmites australis, native Eleocharis , or native mixed vegetation (Spartina patens, Scirpus, and Typha angustifolia). Sites dominated by invasive Phragmites australis were found to have lower dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations, lower cDOM absorption values, and more labile organic carbon compounds. The molecular composition of the DOC was determined with Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Labile DOC components were defined as proteins, carbohydrates, and amino sugars while recalcitrant DOC components were defined as lipids, unsaturated hydrocarbons, lignins, tannins, and condensed hydrocarbons. For the Phragmites, Eleocharis, and mixed vegetation sites, average DOC concentrations with depth were found to be 1.71 ± 1.06, 4.64 ± 1.73, and 4.62 ± 3.5 (mM), respectively and cDOM absorption values with depth were found to be 13.22 ± 4.81, 49.42 ± 10.8, and 35.74 ± 17.49 (m-1). Additionally, DOC concentrations increased with depth in the mixed vegetation and Eleocharis sites, but remained relatively constant in the Phragmites site. The percent of labile compounds in the surface samples were found to be 19.02, 14.64, and 14.07% for the Phragmites, Eleocharis, and mixed vegetation sites, respectively. These findings suggest that sites dominated by Phragmites may have more reactive DOC substrates than sites dominated by native vegetation. These results indicate that the carbon storage in marshes invaded by Phragmites would be expected to decrease over time.

  14. Carbon allocation, osmotic adjustment, antioxidant capacity and growth in cotton under long-term soil drought during flowering and boll-forming period.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Gao, Min; Ji, Shu; Wang, Shanshan; Meng, Yali; Zhou, Zhiguo

    2016-10-01

    Responses of plant to drought largely depend on the intensity, duration and developmental stage at which water stress occurs. The purpose of this study was to analyze the dynamic of cotton physiology response to different levels sustained soil water deficit during reproductive growth stage at leaf basis. Three levels of steady-state water regimes [soil relative water content (SRWC) maintained at (75 ± 5)%, (60 ± 5)% and (45 ± 5)%] were imposed when the white flowers had opened on the first fruiting position of the 6-7th fruiting branches (FB6-7), which was the first day post anthesis (i.e. 1 DPA) and lasted to 50 DPA. Results showed decreasing SRWC slowed cotton growth on the base of biomass and leaf area. However, carbon metabolites levels were globally increased under drought despite of notably inhibited photosynthesis throughout the treatment period. Clear diurnal pattern of sucrose and starch concentrations was obtained and sucrose levels were evaluated while starch concentration was reduced with decreasing soil water content during a 24-h cycle. Osmotic adjustment (OA) was observed at most of the sampling dates throughout the drought period. K(+) was the main contributor to osmotic adjustment (OA) at 10 and 24 DPA then turned out to be amino acid at 38 and 50 DPA. The stressed cotton gradually failed to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) with increasing days post anthesis, primarily due to the permanent decrease in SOD activity. Elevated carbohydrates levels suggest cotton growth was more inhibited by other factors than carbon assimilation. OA and antioxidant could be important protective mechanisms against soil water deficit in this species, and transition of these mechanisms was observed with drought intensity and duration increased.

  15. Intraseasonal carbon sequestration and allocation in larch trees growing on permafrost in Siberia after (13)C labeling (two seasons of 2013-2014 observation).

    PubMed

    Masyagina, Oxana; Prokushkin, Anatoly; Kirdyanov, Alexander; Artyukhov, Aleksey; Udalova, Tatiana; Senchenkov, Sergey; Rublev, Aleksey

    2016-12-01

    This research is an attempt to study seasonal translocation patterns of photoassimilated carbon within trees of one of the high latitudes widespread deciduous conifer species Larix gmelinii (Rupr. Rupr). For this purpose, we applied whole-tree labeling by (13)CO2, which is a powerful and effective tool for tracing newly developed assimilates translocation to tissues and organs of a tree. Experimental plot has been established in a mature 105-year-old larch stand located within the continuous permafrost area near Tura settlement (Central Siberia, 64°17'13″N, 100°11'55″E, 148 m a.s.l.). Measurements of seasonal photosynthetic activity and foliage parameters (i.e., leaf length, area, biomass, etc.), and sampling were arranged from early growing season (June 8, 2013; May 14, 2014) until yellowing and senescence of needles (September 17, 2013; September 14, 2014). Labeling by (13)C of the tree branch (June 2013, for 3 branch replicates in 3 different trees) and the whole tree was conducted at early (June 2014), middle (July 2014), and late (August 2013) phase of growing season (for different trees in 3 replicates each time) by three pulses [(CO2)max = 3000-4000 ppmv, (13)CO2 (30 % v/v)]. We found at least two different patterns of carbon translocation associated with larch CO2 assimilation depending on needle phenology. In early period of growing season (June), (13)C appearing in newly developed needles is a result of remobilized storage material use for growth purposes. Then approximately at the end of June, growth processes is switching to storage processes lasting to the end of growing season.

  16. Temporal dynamics of groundwater-dissolved inorganic carbon beneath a drought-affected braided stream: Platte River case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, Audrey R.; Gates, John B.

    2015-05-01

    Impacts of environmental changes on groundwater carbon cycling are poorly understood despite their potentially high relevance to terrestrial carbon budgets. This study focuses on streambed groundwater chemistry during a period of drought-induced river drying and consequent disconnection between surface water and groundwater. Shallow groundwater underlying vegetated and bare portions of a braided streambed in the Platte River (Nebraska, USA) was monitored during drought conditions in summer 2012. Water temperature and dissolved inorganic carbon (dominated by HCO3-) in streambed groundwater were correlated over a 3 month period coinciding with a decline in river discharge from 35 to 0 m3 s-1. Physical, chemical, and isotopic parameters were monitored to investigate mechanisms affecting the HCO3- trend. Equilibrium thermodynamic modeling suggests that an increase of pCO2 near the water table, coupled with carbonate mineral weathering, can explain the trend. Stronger temporal trends in Ca2+ and Mg2+ compared to Cl- are consistent with carbonate mineral reequilibria rather than evaporative concentration as the primary mechanism of the increased HCO3-. Stable isotope trends are not apparent, providing further evidence of thermodynamic controls rather than evaporation from the water table. A combination of increased temperature and O2 in the dewatered portion of the streambed is the most likely driver of increased pCO2 near the water table. Results of this study highlight potential linkages between surface environmental changes and groundwater chemistry and underscore the need for high-resolution chemical monitoring of alluvial groundwater in order to identify environmental change impacts.

  17. Agricultural management and labile carbon additions affect soil microbial community structure and interact with carbon and nitrogen cycling.

    PubMed

    Berthrong, Sean T; Buckley, Daniel H; Drinkwater, Laurie E

    2013-07-01

    We investigated how conversion from conventional agriculture to organic management affected the structure and biogeochemical function of soil microbial communities. We hypothesized the following. (1) Changing agricultural management practices will alter soil microbial community structure driven by increasing microbial diversity in organic management. (2) Organically managed soil microbial communities will mineralize more N and will also mineralize more N in response to substrate addition than conventionally managed soil communities. (3) Microbial communities under organic management will be more efficient and respire less added C. Soils from organically and conventionally managed agroecosystems were incubated with and without glucose ((13)C) additions at constant soil moisture. We extracted soil genomic DNA before and after incubation for TRFLP community fingerprinting of soil bacteria and fungi. We measured soil C and N pools before and after incubation, and we tracked total C respired and N mineralized at several points during the incubation. Twenty years of organic management altered soil bacterial and fungal community structure compared to continuous conventional management with the bacterial differences caused primarily by a large increase in diversity. Organically managed soils mineralized twice as much NO3 (-) as conventionally managed ones (44 vs. 23 μg N/g soil, respectively) and increased mineralization when labile C was added. There was no difference in respiration, but organically managed soils had larger pools of C suggesting greater efficiency in terms of respiration per unit soil C. These results indicate that the organic management induced a change in community composition resulting in a more diverse community with enhanced activity towards labile substrates and greater capacity to mineralize N.

  18. Carbon Stocks in Permafrost-Affected Soils of the Lena River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubrzycki, S.; Kutzbach, L.; Grosse, G.; Desyatkin, A.; Pfeiffer, E.

    2012-12-01

    The soil organic carbon stock (SSOC) of soils in arctic permafrost regions is known to be significant but is insufficiently investigated so far. Previous SSOC studies report mainly the gravimetric carbon (C) contents and are limited to the active layer depth at the time of sampling. Since C deposits in permafrost regions are likely to become a future C source, more detailed investigations of the presently frozen likely carbon-rich sediment and soil layers are of importance. Our investigations were performed on Samoylov Island in the southern-central part of the Lena River Delta (32,000 km2) which is the largest arctic delta and the fifth largest delta worldwide. Samoylov Island is representative for the Lena River Delta's first terrace and the active floodplains. Within this study a new portable Snow-Ice-Permafrost-Research-Establishment (SIPRE) auger was used during a spring field session to obtain 1 m deep frozen soil cores (n = 29) distributed over all known soil and vegetation units. These cores are analyzed for bulk contents of nitrogen (N) and C, ice content and bulk density (BD) and to determine the SSOC including the rarely investigated currently permanently frozen layers up to 1 m depth on Samoylov Island. Our study provides evidence for high SSOC for a depth of 1 m for the investigated area ranging between 7 kg m-2 and 48 kg m-2. Considering the spatial extent of different soil units on the two geomorphological units of Samoylov Island, the area-weighted average SSOC were 29 kg m-2 (n = 22) for the first terrace and 14 kg m-2 (n = 7) for the active floodplain. For the correspondent soil units of Turbels and Orthels in circumpolar permafrost regions a mean SSOC of 27 kg m-2 (min: 0.1 kg m-2, max: 126 kg m-2) for a depth of 1 m was reported [1]. For up-scaling solely over the soil-covered areas of the Lena River Delta, we excluded all water bodies >3,600 m2 from the geomorphological units studied (first river terrace and the active floodplains) and

  19. Oceanic acidification affects marine carbon pump and triggers extended marine oxygen holes.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Matthias; Schellnhuber, Hans-Joachim

    2009-03-03

    Rising atmospheric CO(2) levels will not only drive future global mean temperatures toward values unprecedented during the whole Quaternary but will also lead to massive acidification of sea water. This constitutes by itself an anthropogenic planetary-scale perturbation that could significantly modify oceanic biogeochemical fluxes and severely damage marine biota. As a step toward the quantification of such potential impacts, we present here a simulation-model-based assessment of the respective consequences of a business-as-usual fossil-fuel-burning scenario where a total of 4,075 Petagrams of carbon is released into the atmosphere during the current millennium. In our scenario, the atmospheric pCO(2) level peaks at approximately 1,750 microatm in the year 2200 while the sea-surface pH value drops by >0.7 units on global average, inhibiting the growth of marine calcifying organisms. The study focuses on quantifying 3 major concomitant effects. The first one is a significant (climate-stabilizing) negative feedback on rising pCO(2) levels as caused by the attenuation of biogenic calcification. The second one is related to the biological carbon pump. Because mineral ballast, notably CaCO(3), is found to play a dominant role in carrying organic matter through the water column, a reduction of its export fluxes weakens the strength of the biological carbon pump. There is, however, a third effect with severe consequences: Because organic matter is oxidized in shallow waters when mineral-ballast fluxes weaken, oxygen holes (hypoxic zones) start to expand considerably in the oceans in our model world--with potentially harmful impacts on a variety of marine ecosystems.

  20. Light Levels Affect Carbon Utilisation in Tropical Seagrass under Ocean Acidification

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Under future ocean acidification (OA), increased availability of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in seawater may enhance seagrass productivity. However, the ability to utilise additional DIC could be regulated by light availability, often reduced through land runoff. To test this, two tropical seagrass species, Cymodocea serrulata and Halodule uninervis were exposed to two DIC concentrations (447 μatm and 1077 μatm pCO2), and three light treatments (35, 100, 380 μmol m-2 s-1) for two weeks. DIC uptake mechanisms were separately examined by measuring net photosynthetic rates while subjecting C. serrulata and H. uninervis to changes in light and addition of bicarbonate (HCO3-) use inhibitors (carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide) and TRIS buffer (pH 8.0). We observed a strong dependence on energy driven H+-HCO3- co-transport (TRIS, which disrupts H+ extrusion) in C. serrulata under all light levels, indicating greater CO2 dependence in low light. This was confirmed when, after two weeks exposure, DIC enrichment stimulated maximum photosynthetic rates (Pmax) and efficiency (α) more in C. serrulata grown under lower light levels (36–60% increase) than for those in high light (4% increase). However, C. serrulata growth increased with both DIC enrichment and light levels. Growth, NPP and photosynthetic responses in H. uninervis increased with higher light treatments and were independent of DIC availability. Furthermore, H. uninervis was found to be more flexible in HCO3- uptake pathways. Here, light availability influenced productivity responses to DIC enrichment, via both carbon fixation and acquisition processes, highlighting the role of water quality in future responses to OA. PMID:26938454

  1. Light Levels Affect Carbon Utilisation in Tropical Seagrass under Ocean Acidification.

    PubMed

    Ow, Yan X; Uthicke, Sven; Collier, Catherine J

    2016-01-01

    Under future ocean acidification (OA), increased availability of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in seawater may enhance seagrass productivity. However, the ability to utilise additional DIC could be regulated by light availability, often reduced through land runoff. To test this, two tropical seagrass species, Cymodocea serrulata and Halodule uninervis were exposed to two DIC concentrations (447 μatm and 1077 μatm pCO2), and three light treatments (35, 100, 380 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) for two weeks. DIC uptake mechanisms were separately examined by measuring net photosynthetic rates while subjecting C. serrulata and H. uninervis to changes in light and addition of bicarbonate (HCO3-) use inhibitors (carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide) and TRIS buffer (pH 8.0). We observed a strong dependence on energy driven H+-HCO3- co-transport (TRIS, which disrupts H+ extrusion) in C. serrulata under all light levels, indicating greater CO2 dependence in low light. This was confirmed when, after two weeks exposure, DIC enrichment stimulated maximum photosynthetic rates (Pmax) and efficiency (α) more in C. serrulata grown under lower light levels (36-60% increase) than for those in high light (4% increase). However, C. serrulata growth increased with both DIC enrichment and light levels. Growth, NPP and photosynthetic responses in H. uninervis increased with higher light treatments and were independent of DIC availability. Furthermore, H. uninervis was found to be more flexible in HCO3- uptake pathways. Here, light availability influenced productivity responses to DIC enrichment, via both carbon fixation and acquisition processes, highlighting the role of water quality in future responses to OA.

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Major Factors Affecting Black Carbon Transport and Concentrations in the Unique Atmospheric Structures of Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Marissa Shuang

    Black carbon (BC) from vehicular emission in transportation is a principal component of particulate matters ≤ 2.5 mum (PM2.5). PM2.5 and other diesel emission pollutants (e.g., NOx) are regulated by the Clean Air Act (CAA) according to the National Ambient Air Quality standards (NAAQS). This doctoral dissertation details a study on transport behaviors of black carbon and PM2.5 from transportation routes, their relations with the atmospheric structure of an urban formation, and their relations with the use of biodiesel fuels. The results have implications to near-road risk assessment and to the development of sustainable transportation solutions in urban centers. The first part of study quantified near-roadside black carbon transport as a function of particulate matter (PM) size and composition, as well as microclimatic variables (temperature and wind fields) at the interstate highway I-75 in northern Cincinnati, Ohio. Among variables examined, wind speed and direction significantly affect the roadside transport of black carbon and hence its effective emission factor. Observed non-Gaussian dispersion occurred during low wind and for wind directions at acute angles or upwind to the receptors, mostly occurring in the morning hours. Meandering of air pollutant mass under thermal inversion is likely the driving force. In contrary, Gaussian distribution predominated in daytime of strong downwinds. The roles of urban atmospheric structure, wind fields, and the urban heat island (UHI) effects were further examined on pollutant dispersion and transport. Spatiotemporal variations of traffic flow, atmospheric structure, ambient temperature and PM2.5 concentration data from 14 EPA-certified NAAQS monitoring stations, were analyzed in relation to land-use in the Cincinnati metropolitan area. The results show a decade-long UHI effects with higher interior temperature than that in exurban, and a prominent nocturnal thermal inversion frequent in urban boundary layer. The

  3. Physiological factors affecting carbon tetrachloride dehalogenation by the denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain KC.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, T A; Crawford, R L

    1993-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain KC was grown on a medium with a low content of transition metals in order to examine the conditions for carbon tetrachloride (CT) transformation. Several carbon sources, including acetate, glucose, glycerol, and glutamate, were able to support CT transformation. The chelators 2,2'-dipyridyl and 1,10-phenanthroline stimulated CT transformation in a rich medium that otherwise did not support this activity. Low (< 10 microM) additions of dissolved iron(II), iron(III), and cobalt(II), as well as an insoluble iron(III) compound, ferric oxyhydroxide, inhibited CT transformation. The addition of 50 microM iron to actively growing cultures resulted in delayed inhibition of CT transformation. CT transformation was seen in aerobic cultures of KC, but with reduced efficiency compared with denitrifying cultures. Inhibition of CT transformation by iron was also seen in aerobically grown cultures. Optimal conditions were used in searching for effective CT transformation activity among denitrifying enrichments grown from samples of aquifer material. No activity comparable to that of Pseudomonas sp. strain KC was found among 16 samples tested. PMID:8517754

  4. Landscape-scale analysis of aboveground tree carbon stocks affected by mountain pine beetles in Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, B. C.; Hicke, J. A.; Hudak, A. T.

    2012-12-01

    Bark beetle outbreaks kill billions of trees in western North America, and the resulting tree mortality can significantly impact local and regional carbon cycling. However, substantial variability in mortality occurs within outbreak areas. Our objective was to quantify landscape-scale effects of beetle infestations on aboveground carbon (AGC) stocks using field observations and remotely sensed data across a 5054 ha study area that had experienced a mountain pine beetle outbreak. Tree mortality was classified using multispectral imagery that separated green, red, and gray trees, and models relating field observations of AGC to LiDAR data were used to map AGC. We combined mortality and AGC maps to quantify AGC in beetle-killed trees. Thirty-nine per cent of the forested area was killed by beetles, with large spatial variability in mortality severity. For the entire study area, 40-50% of AGC was contained in beetle-killed trees. When considered on a per-hectare basis, 75-89% of the study area had >25% AGC in killed trees and 3-6% of the study area had >75% of the AGC in killed trees. Our results show that despite high variability in tree mortality within an outbreak area, bark beetle epidemics can have a large impact on AGC stocks at the landscape scale.

  5. ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLE (UFCP) INHALATION AFFECTS CARDIOVASCULAR PERFORMANCE IN HYPERTENSIVE RATS (SHR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhaled UfCP affect cardiovascular performance in healthy rats (Harder et al. Inhal Toxicol 2005; 17:29-42) without apparent pulmonary damage. To assess whether geriatric cardiovascular compromised rats are more susceptible to UfCP effects, male adult (6months) and geriatric (13m...

  6. Effects of soil type, fertilization and drought on carbon allocation to root growth and partitioning between secondary metabolism and ectomycorrhizae of Betula papyrifera.

    PubMed

    Kleczewski, Nathan M; Herms, Daniel A; Bonello, Pierluigi

    2010-07-01

    Paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh) seedlings were grown in a greenhouse in either subsoil or topsoil in factorial combination with two fertilization and drought regimes to investigate how different soil environments and nutrient availability drive belowground partitioning between growth, secondary metabolism and ectomycorrhizal (EM) associations, and impact drought tolerance of paper birch. Root and total seedling dry biomass, starch, soluble sugars, soluble phenolics, lignin and EM abundance were quantified. In unfertilized topsoil, total plant biomass and root biomass were approximately nine times higher than in unfertilized subsoil, but the root weight ratios did not differ between soils. Root soluble phenolics and lignin were higher in unfertilized subsoil than in unfertilized topsoil, whereas EM abundance was significantly higher in unfertilized topsoil than in unfertilized subsoil. In topsoil, fertilization decreased root biomass and EM abundance and increased root phenolics and lignin. In contrast, fertilization of subsoil increased root biomass but decreased root phenolics and lignin, while EM abundance was unaffected. In both soil types, fertilization reduced root weight ratios. Across soil types, EM abundance was negatively correlated with root soluble sugars, root phenolics and lignin, but this was driven mainly by the responses in the topsoil treatment. Our results show that soil fertility mediates carbon tradeoffs among defense, growth and EM associations.

  7. Approaches to Resource Allocation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dressel, Paul; Simon, Lou Anna Kimsey

    1976-01-01

    Various budgeting patterns and strategies are currently in use, each with its own particular strengths and weaknesses. Neither cost-benefit analysis nor cost-effectiveness analysis offers any better solution to the allocation problem than do the unsupported contentions of departments or the historical unit costs. An operable model that performs…

  8. Top-down control of carbon sequestration: grazing affects microbial structure and function in salt marsh soils.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Peter; Granse, Dirk; Nolte, Stefanie; Do, Hai Thi; Weingartner, Magdalena; Hoth, Stefan; Jensen, Kai

    2017-03-20

    Tidal wetlands have been increasingly recognized as long-term carbon sinks in recent years. Work on carbon sequestration and decomposition processes in tidal wetlands focused so far mainly on effects of global-change factors such as sea-level rise and increasing temperatures. However, little is known about effects of land use, such as livestock grazing, on organic matter decomposition and ultimately carbon sequestration. The present work aims at understanding the mechanisms by which large herbivores can affect organic matter decomposition in tidal wetlands. This was achieved by studying both direct animal-microbe interactions and indirect animal-plant-microbe interactions in grazed and ungrazed areas of two long-term experimental field sites at the German North Sea coast. We assessed bacterial and fungal gene abundance using quantitative PCR, as well as the activity of microbial exo-enzymes by conducting fluorometric assays. We demonstrate that grazing can have a profound impact on the microbial community structure of tidal wetland soils, by consistently increasing the fungi-to-bacteria ratio by 38-42%, and therefore potentially exerts important control over carbon turnover and sequestration. The observed shift in the microbial community was primarily driven by organic matter source, with higher contributions of recalcitrant autochthonous (terrestrial) vs. easily degradable allochthonous (marine) sources in grazed areas favoring relative fungal abundance. We propose a novel and indirect form of animal-plant-microbe interaction: top-down control of aboveground vegetation structure determines the capacity of allochthonous organic matter trapping during flooding and thus the structure of the microbial community. Furthermore, our data provide the first evidence that grazing slows down microbial exo-enzyme activity and thus decomposition through changes in soil redox chemistry. Activities of enzymes involved in C cycling were reduced by 28-40%, while activities of

  9. Assessing Soil Organic Carbon Stocks in Fire-Affected Pinus Palustris Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butnor, J. R.; Johnsen, K. H.; Jackson, J. A.; Anderson, P. H.; Samuelson, L. J.; Lorenz, K.

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to quantify the vertical distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) and its biochemically resistant fraction (SOCR; defined as residual SOC following H2O2 treatment and dilute HNO3 digestion) in managed longleaf pine (LLP) stands located at Fort Benning, Georgia, USA (32.38 N., 84.88 W.). Although it is unclear how to increase SOCR via land management, it is a relatively stable carbon (C) pool that is important for terrestrial C sequestration. SOC concentration declines with soil depth on upland soils without a spodic horizon; however, the portion that is SOCR and the residence time of this fraction on LLP stands is unknown. Soils were collected by depth at five sites with common land use history, present use for active military training and a three-year prescribed fire return cycle. Soils were treated with H2O2 and dilute HNO3 to isolate SOCR. In the upper 1-m of soil SOC stocks averaged 72.1 ± 6.6 Mg C ha-1 and SOCR averaged 25.8 ± 3.2 Mg C ha-1. Depending on the site, the ratio of SOCR:SOC ranged from 0.25 to 0.50 in the upper 1-m of soil. On clayey soils the ratio of SOCR:SOC increased with soil depth. One site containing 33% clay at 50 to 100 cm depth had a SOCR:SOC ratio of 0.68. The radiocarbon age of SOCR increased with soil depth, ranging from approximately 2,000 years before present (YBP) at 0 to 10 cm to over 5,500 YBP at 50 to 100 cm depth. Across all sites, SOCR makes up a considerable portion of SOC. What isn't clear is the proportion of SOCR that is of pyrogenic origin (black carbon), versus SOCR that is stabilized by association with the mineral phase. Ongoing analysis with 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy will provide data on the degree of aromaticity of the SOCR and some indication of the nature of its biochemical stability.

  10. Prerequisite for highly efficient isoprenoid production by cyanobacteria discovered through the over-expression of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase and carbon allocation analysis.

    PubMed

    Kudoh, Kai; Kawano, Yusuke; Hotta, Shingo; Sekine, Midori; Watanabe, Takafumi; Ihara, Masaki

    2014-07-01

    Cyanobacteria have recently been receiving considerable attention owing to their potential as photosynthetic producers of biofuels and biomaterials. Here, we focused on the production of isoprenoids by cyanobacteria, and aimed to provide insight into metabolic engineering design. To this end, we examined the over-expression of a key enzyme in 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway, 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. In the DXS-over-expression strain (Dxs_ox), the mRNA and protein levels of DXS were 4-times and 1.5-times the levels in the wild-type (WT) strain, respectively. The carotenoid content of the Dxs_ox strain (8.4 mg/g dry cell weight [DCW]) was also up to 1.5-times higher than that in the WT strain (5.6 mg/g DCW), whereas the glycogen content dramatically decreased to an undetectable level. These observations suggested that the carotenoid content in the Dxs_ox strain was increased by consuming glycogen, which is a C-storage compound in cyanobacteria. We also quantified the total sugar (145 and 104 mg/g DCW), total fatty acids (31 and 24 mg/g DCW) and total protein (200 and 240 mg/g DCW) content in the WT and Dxs_ox strains, respectively, which were much higher than the carotenoid content. In particular, approximately 54% of the proteins were phycobiliproteins. This study demonstrated the major destinations of carbon flux in cyanobacteria, and provided important insights into metabolic engineering. Target yield can be improved through optimization of gene expression, the DXS protein stabilization, cell propagation depression and restriction of storage compound synthesis.

  11. Investigation on process parameters affecting blanking of AISI 1006 low carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Annibale, Antonello; El Mehtedi, Mohamad; Panaccio, Lorenzo; Di Ilio, Antoniomaria; Gabrielli, Filippo

    2016-10-01

    A blanking apparatus was designed and built in order to study the effects of the process parameters on blanking low carbon steel disks, with particular reference to the study of punch-die gap influence and Brozzo's damage criterion by keeping punch and die fillet radii constant. The goal of the shearing tests was to optimize the gap between punch and die, according to the material damage and the force curves obtained by experimental tests. By using a 2D axis-symmetry FE model, the authors studied a set of parameters in order to reduce damage. After studying the material damage by a first simulation series, a second series was carried out in order to evaluate the punch-die gap effects on force-stroke trend; good results in term of external surface finish were obtained in the geometry of the final workpiece.

  12. Soil Fauna Affects Dissolved Carbon and Nitrogen in Foliar Litter in Alpine Forest and Alpine Meadow.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shu; Yang, Wanqin; Tan, Yu; Peng, Yan; Li, Jun; Tan, Bo; Wu, Fuzhong

    2015-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) are generally considered important active biogeochemical pools of total carbon and nitrogen. Many studies have documented the contributions of soil fauna to litter decomposition, but the effects of the soil fauna on labile substances (i.e., DOC and TDN) in litter during early decomposition are not completely clear. Therefore, a field litterbag experiment was carried out from 13th November 2013 to 23rd October 2014 in an alpine forest and an alpine meadow located on the eastern Tibetan Plateau. Litterbags with different mesh sizes were used to provide access to or prohibit the access of the soil fauna, and the concentrations of DOC and TDN in the foliar litter were measured during the winter (the onset of freezing, deep freezing and thawing stage) and the growing season (early and late). After one year of field incubation, the concentration of DOC in the litter significantly decreased, whereas the TDN concentration in the litter increased. Similar dynamic patterns were detected under the effects of the soil fauna on both DOC and TDN in the litter between the alpine forest and the alpine meadow. The soil fauna showed greater positive effects on decreasing DOC concentration in the litter in the winter than in the growing season. In contrast, the dynamics of TND in the litter were related to seasonal changes in environmental factors, rather than the soil fauna. In addition, the soil fauna promoted a decrease in litter DOC/TDN ratio in both the alpine forest and the alpine meadow throughout the first year of decomposition, except for in the late growing season. These results suggest that the soil fauna can promote decreases in DOC and TDN concentrations in litter, contributing to early litter decomposition in these cold biomes.

  13. Do microorganism stoichiometric alterations affect carbon sequestration in paddy soil subjected to phosphorus input?

    PubMed

    Zhang, ZhiJian; Li, HongYi; Hu, Jiao; Li, Xia; He, Qiang; Tian, GuangMing; Wang, Hang; Wang, ShunYao; Wang, Bei

    2015-04-01

    Ecological stoichiometry provides a powerful tool for integrating microbial biomass stoichiometry with ecosystem processes, opening far-reaching possibilities for linking microbial dynamics to soil carbon (C) metabolism in response to agricultural nutrient management. Despite its importance to crop yield, the role of phosphorus (P) with respect to ecological stoichiometry and soil C sequestration in paddy fields remains poorly understood, which limits our ability to predict nutrient-related soil C cycling. Here, we collected soil samples from a paddy field experiment after seven years of superphosphate application along a gradient of 0, 30, 60, and 90 (P-0 through P-90, respectively) kg.ha-1.yr-1 in order to evaluate the role of exogenous P on soil C sequestration through regulating microbial stoichiometry. P fertilization increased soil total organic C and labile organic C by 1-14% and 4-96%, respectively, while rice yield is a function of the activities of soil β-1,4-glucosidase (BG), acid phosphatase (AP), and the level of available soil P through a stepwise linear regression model. P input induced C limitation, as reflected by decreases in the ratios of C:P in soil and microbial biomass. An eco-enzymatic ratio indicating microbial investment in C vs. P acquisition, i.e., ln(BG): ln(AP), changed the ecological function of microbial C acquisition, and was stoichiometrically related to P input. This mechanism drove a shift in soil resource availability by increasing bacterial community richness and diversity, and stimulated soil C sequestration in the paddy field by enhancing C-degradation-related bacteria for the breakdown of plant-derived carbon sources. Therefore, the decline in the C:P stoichiometric ratio of soil microorganism biomass under P input was beneficial for soil C sequestration, which offered a "win-win" relationship for the maximum balance point between C sequestration and P availability for rice production in the face of climate change.

  14. Factors affecting the isotopic composition of organic matter. (1) Carbon isotopic composition of terrestrial plant materials.

    PubMed

    Yeh, H W; Wang, W M

    2001-07-01

    The stable isotope composition of the light elements (i.e., H, C, N, O and S) of organic samples varies significantly and, for C, is also unique and distinct from that of inorganic carbon. This is the result of (1) the isotope composition of reactants, (2) the nature of the reactions leading to formation and post-formational modification of the samples, (3) the environmental conditions under which the reactions took place, and (4) the relative concentration of the reactants compared to that of the products (i.e., [products]/[reactants] ratio). This article will examine the carbon isotope composition of terrestrial plant materials and its relationship with the above factors. delta13C(PDB) values of terrestrial plants range approximately from -8 to -38%, inclusive of C3-plants (-22 to -38%), C4-plants (-8 to -15%) and CAM-plants (-13 to -30%). Thus, the delta13C(PDB) values largely reflect the photosynthesis pathways of a plant as well as the genetics (i.e., species difference), delta13C(PDB) values of source CO2, relevant humidity, CO2/O2 ratios, wind and light intensity etc. Significant variations in these values also exist among different tissues, different portions of a tissue and different compounds. This is mainly a consequence of metabolic reactions. Animals mainly inherit the delta13C(PDB) values of the foods they consume; therefore, their delta13C(PDB) values are similar. The delta13C(PDB) values of plant materials, thus, contain information regarding the inner workings of the plants, the environmental conditions under which they grow, the delta13C(PDB) values of CO2 sources etc., and are unique. Furthermore, this uniqueness is passed on to their derivative matter, such as animals, humus etc. Hence, they are very powerful tools in many areas of research, including the ecological and environmental sciences.

  15. How Seasonal Drought Affect Carbon and Water Fluxes of Alternative Energy Crops in the US?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, E.; Hussain, M. Z.; Zeri, M.; Masters, M.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; DeLucia, E. H.; Bernacchi, C.

    2014-12-01

    The cellulosic biomass of Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), Miscanthus (Miscanthus giganteus) and native prairie are considered candidate second-generation biofuels, potentially resulting in partial replacement annual row crops within the Midwestern US. There is an increasing focus to study the environmental impact of agricultural crops, however not much is known on the influence on the energy, carbon and water cycles of energy crops, especially under drought conditions. This study compares the impact of drought episodes (in 2011 and 2012) on evapotranspiration (ET), net ecosystem productivity (NEP) and water use efficiency (WUE; equals to NEP/ET) for Switchgrass (SW), Miscanthus (MXG), Maize (MZ) and native prairie (NP) grown in Central Illinois using the eddy covariance technique. Due to the prolonged drought and the rapid growth development with increasing ET of MXG in 2012, large water deficit (precipitation-ET) was observed for each species up to the highest deficit of -360 mm for this species. The gross primary production (GPP) of MZ was radically decreased by the drought in 2011 and 2012, while SW and NP were not influenced. MXG increased NEP throughout the typically wet and drought years, mainly due to the decrease in respiration and by the largest GPP upon the drought in 2012. Despite having the largest water deficit, MXG showed an enhanced WUE of 12.8 and 11.4 Kg C ha-1mm-1 in 2011 and 2012, respectively, in comparison to years typical to the region with WUE of 3.7-7.3 Kg C ha-1mm-1. Other species did not show a significant enhancement of WUE. Therefore we conclude that out of the studied species, MXG has more access to water, and uses this water the most efficiently to store carbon, under drought conditions.

  16. Soil Fauna Affects Dissolved Carbon and Nitrogen in Foliar Litter in Alpine Forest and Alpine Meadow

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Shu; Yang, Wanqin; Tan, Yu; Peng, Yan; Li, Jun; Tan, Bo; Wu, Fuzhong

    2015-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) are generally considered important active biogeochemical pools of total carbon and nitrogen. Many studies have documented the contributions of soil fauna to litter decomposition, but the effects of the soil fauna on labile substances (i.e., DOC and TDN) in litter during early decomposition are not completely clear. Therefore, a field litterbag experiment was carried out from 13th November 2013 to 23rd October 2014 in an alpine forest and an alpine meadow located on the eastern Tibetan Plateau. Litterbags with different mesh sizes were used to provide access to or prohibit the access of the soil fauna, and the concentrations of DOC and TDN in the foliar litter were measured during the winter (the onset of freezing, deep freezing and thawing stage) and the growing season (early and late). After one year of field incubation, the concentration of DOC in the litter significantly decreased, whereas the TDN concentration in the litter increased. Similar dynamic patterns were detected under the effects of the soil fauna on both DOC and TDN in the litter between the alpine forest and the alpine meadow. The soil fauna showed greater positive effects on decreasing DOC concentration in the litter in the winter than in the growing season. In contrast, the dynamics of TND in the litter were related to seasonal changes in environmental factors, rather than the soil fauna. In addition, the soil fauna promoted a decrease in litter DOC/TDN ratio in both the alpine forest and the alpine meadow throughout the first year of decomposition, except for in the late growing season. These results suggest that the soil fauna can promote decreases in DOC and TDN concentrations in litter, contributing to early litter decomposition in these cold biomes. PMID:26406249

  17. Factors affecting carbon-14 activity of unsaturated zone CO2 and implications for groundwater dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Cameron; Cook, Peter G.; Harrington, Glenn A.; Meredith, Karina; Kipfer, Rolf

    2014-11-01

    Unsaturated zone processes may influence the carbon-14 (14C) activity of infiltrating groundwater and thus introduce error in derived groundwater residence times. However unsaturated zone 14C activities are rarely measured and there is little understanding of how they may vary spatially in a groundwater basin. In this study we measured 14C activity in unsaturated zone gas at five sites with different watertable depths (8.2-31.5 m) in the arid Ti Tree Basin, central Australia. We observed a relatively uniform decrease in 14C activity of unsaturated zone gas with depth at most sites, with variation in unsaturated zone depths leading to variation in 14C activities directly above the watertable at each site (ranging from 54 to 106 percent Modern Carbon (pMC)). Through modelling we show that the profiles are influenced by CO2 production at different depths from sources with different isotopic ratios, including production of ‘modern' CO2 in the root zone and production of ‘old' CO2 above the watertable. Scenario modelling showed that these processes are independent of recharge when recharge is low (0-10 mm y-1) but that higher recharge rates (>100 mm y-1) result in more advective transport of atmospheric CO2 to the watertable. The variation in 14C above the watertable was more sensitive to watertable depth and shallow and deep CO2 production rates. These findings offer insight into how unsaturated zone 14C activities may vary spatially and provide guidance as to when 14C depletion in unsaturated zone CO2 may become important for groundwater dating, particularly in arid settings.

  18. Soluble organic carbon and pH of organic amendments affect metal mobility and chemical speciation in mine soils.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Esteban, Javier; Escolástico, Consuelo; Masaguer, Alberto; Vargas, Carmen; Moliner, Ana

    2014-05-01

    We evaluated the effects of pH and soluble organic carbon affected by organic amendments on metal mobility to find out the optimal conditions for their application in the stabilization of metals in mine soils. Soil samples (pH 5.5-6.2) were mixed with 0, 30 and 60 th a(-1) of sheep-horse manure (pH 9.4) and pine bark compost (pH 5.7). A single-step extraction procedure was performed using 0.005 M CaCl2 adjusted to pH 4.0-7.0 and metal speciation in soil solution was simulated using NICA-Donnan model. Sheep-horse manure reduced exchangeable metal concentrations (up to 71% Cu, 75% Zn) due to its high pH and degree of maturity, whereas pine bark increased them (32% Cu, 33% Zn). However, at increasing dose and hence pH, sheep-horse manure increased soluble Cu because of higher soluble organic carbon, whereas soluble Cu and organic carbon increased at increasing dose and correspondingly decreasing pH in pine bark and non-amended treatments. Near the native pH of these soils (at pH 5.8-6.3), with small doses of amendments, there was minimum soluble Cu and organic carbon. Pine bark also increased Zn solubility, whereas sheep-horse manure reduced it as soluble Zn always decreased with increasing pH. Sheep-horse manure also reduced the proportion of free metals in soil solution (from 41% to 4% Cu, from 97% to 94% Zn), which are considered to be more bioavailable than organic species. Sheep-horse manure amendment could be efficiently used for the stabilization of metals with low risk of leaching to groundwater at low doses and at relatively low pH, such as the native pH of mine soils.

  19. Task mapping for non-contiguous allocations.

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Vitus Joseph; Bunde, David P.; Ebbers, Johnathan; Price, Nicholas W.; Swank, Matthew.; Feer, Stefan P.; Rhodes, Zachary D.

    2013-02-01

    This paper examines task mapping algorithms for non-contiguously allocated parallel jobs. Several studies have shown that task placement affects job running time for both contiguously and non-contiguously allocated jobs. Traditionally, work on task mapping either uses a very general model where the job has an arbitrary communication pattern or assumes that jobs are allocated contiguously, making them completely isolated from each other. A middle ground between these two cases is the mapping problem for non-contiguous jobs having a specific communication pattern. We propose several task mapping algorithms for jobs with a stencil communication pattern and evaluate them using experiments and simulations. Our strategies improve the running time of a MiniApp by as much as 30% over a baseline strategy. Furthermore, this improvement increases markedly with the job size, demonstrating the importance of task mapping as systems grow toward exascale.

  20. Climate, soil texture, and soil types affect the contributions of fine-fraction-stabilized carbon to total soil organic carbon in different land uses across China.

    PubMed

    Cai, Andong; Feng, Wenting; Zhang, Wenju; Xu, Minggang

    2016-05-01

    Mineral-associated organic carbon (MOC), that is stabilized by fine soil particles (i.e., silt plus clay, <53 μm), is important for soil organic carbon (SOC) persistence and sequestration, due to its large contribution to total SOC (TSOC) and long turnover time. Our objectives were to investigate how climate, soil type, soil texture, and agricultural managements affect MOC contributions to TSOC in China. We created a dataset from 103 published papers, including 1106 data points pairing MOC and TSOC across three major land use types: cropland, grassland, and forest. Overall, the MOC/TSOC ratio ranged from 0.27 to 0.80 and varied significantly among soil groups in cropland, grassland, and forest. Croplands and forest exhibited significantly higher median MOC/TSOC ratios than in grassland. Moreover, forest and grassland soils in temperate regions had higher MOC/TSOC ratios than in subtropical regions. Furthermore, the MOC/TSOC ratio was much higher in ultisol, compared with the other soil types. Both the MOC content and MOC/TSOC ratio were positively correlated with the amount of fine fraction (silt plus clay) in soil, highlighting the importance of soil texture in stabilizing organic carbon across various climate zones. In cropland, different fertilization practices and land uses (e.g., upland, paddy, and upland-paddy rotation) significantly altered MOC/TSOC ratios, but not in cropping systems (e.g., mono- and double-cropping) characterized by climatic differences. This study demonstrates that the MOC/TSOC ratio is mainly driven by soil texture, soil types, and related climate and land uses, and thus the variations in MOC/TSOC ratios should be taken into account when quantitatively estimating soil C sequestration potential of silt plus clay particles on a large scale.

  1. CO2 gradient affects on deep subsurface microbial ecology during carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliver, D.; Gregory, K.

    2011-12-01

    Geological carbon sequestration is likely to be part of a comprehensive strategy to minimize the release of greenhouse gasses into the atmosphere. Reservoir storage capacities and long-term security of these deposits will be dependent on the trapping mechanisms and mineral transformation in the deep subsurface. Therefore, a critical need exists to understand the evolution of microbial populations that may influence the biogeochemistry in the reservoirs. As the CO2 front moves through the storage aquifer, microbial communities may preside in residual brine left behind in cracks, dead flow zones, and upstream to the front; this brine will have a gradient of dissolved CO2 in which microbial interaction may behave differently, depending on the distance from the CO2 front. The evolution of microbial ecology along this CO2 gradient was investigated using fluid-slurry samples obtained from the prospective carbon sequestration site, the Arbuckle saline aquifer at the Wellington oil field, KS. The native species of these samples were investigated with a series of batch reactors under constant temperature of 40 °C, constant total pressure of 2,000 psi, and varying CO2 partial pressures of 0 psi, 20 psi, 200 psi, and 2,000 psi. After 1 day, 7 days, and 56 days of exposure in the batch reactors, fluid samples were centrifuged and the resulting pellet was biologically analyzed. Clone libraries and quantitative PCR determined that the bacterial diversity and population of the native microbial community was dependant on both the duration of exposure and the CO2 partial pressure. For example, the microbial community of 0 psi CO2 and 20 psi CO2 was predominantly related to the families halomonadaceae and marinilabiaceae while at 2,000 psi CO2 the community was predominantly in the family psychromonadaceae. The population size at 2,000 psi CO2 was also found to decrease by 3 orders of magnitude after only 7 days of CO2 exposure. Although these experiments were relatively short

  2. Physical and Chemical Processes Affecting Permeability during Geologic Carbon Sequestration in Arkose and Dolostone: Experimental Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, A. J.; Kong, X.; Tutolo, B. M.; Saar, M. O.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2012-12-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration in saline sedimentary basins provides a promising option to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions. We are conducting experiments using a novel flow system at elevated temperatures and pressures to better understand the physical and chemical processes that result from CO2 injection into these basins and the effects of these processes on system permeability. Here we present experimental results on arkose (primarily K-feldspar and quartz) and dolostone, focusing on CO2 exsolution and fluid-mineral reactions. Following heating-induced CO2 exsolution in an arkose sediment (90-125 μm) core, XRCT scans revealed abundant pores several times larger than the average grain size. The pores likely grew as exsolved CO2 accumulated in the pores and exerted outspread forces on the surrounding grains. These trapped CO2 accumulations blocked flow pathways, reducing measured permeability by 10,000 times. Another reported experiment on a solid arkose core and water with aqueous CO2 concentrations at 80% saturation dissolved K-feldspar, as evidenced by 3 to 1 ratios of Si to K in sampled fluids, and precipitated an Al-rich mineral, likely gibbsite. SEM images revealed extensive clay precipitation on K-feldspar mineral surfaces. Alteration reduced permeability from 5 × 10-14 m2 to 3 × 10-14 m2 during this 52-day experiment. The third reported experiment on a dolostone core and 1 molal NaCl brine with an aqueous CO2 concentration at 75% saturation caused extensive dissolution and a large increase in permeability. This three-day experiment produced a wormhole of 2 mm in diameter that penetrated the entire 2.6 cm long core with a diameter of 1.3 cm. High, initial Ca and Mg fluid concentrations that quickly receded imply early formation of the wormhole that grew in diameter with time. Our experimental results show that formation permeability can change dramatically from both physical and chemical processes, and these changes should be accounted for during

  3. Coated or doped carbon nanotube network sensors as affected by environmental parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Methods for using modified single wall carbon nanotubes ("SWCNTs") to detect presence and/or concentration of a gas component, such as a halogen (e.g., Cl.sub.2), hydrogen halides (e.g., HCl), a hydrocarbon (e.g., C.sub.nH.sub.2n+2), an alcohol, an aldehyde or a ketone, to which an unmodified SWCNT is substantially non-reactive. In a first embodiment, a connected network of SWCNTs is coated with a selected polymer, such as chlorosulfonated polyethylene, hydroxypropyl cellulose, polystyrene and/or polyvinylalcohol, and change in an electrical parameter or response value (e.g., conductance, current, voltage difference or resistance) of the coated versus uncoated SWCNT networks is analyzed. In a second embodiment, the network is doped with a transition element, such as Pd, Pt, Rh, Ir, Ru, Os and/or Au, and change in an electrical parameter value is again analyzed. The parameter change value depends monotonically, not necessarily linearly, upon concentration of the gas component. Two general algorithms are presented for estimating concentration value(s), or upper or lower concentration bounds on such values, from measured differences of response values.

  4. Sucrose synthase affects carbon partitioning to increase cellulose production and altered cell wall ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Heather D; Yan, Jimmy; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2009-08-04

    Overexpression of the Gossypium hirsutum sucrose synthase (SuSy) gene under the control of 2 promoters was examined in hybrid poplar (Populus alba x grandidentata). Analysis of RNA transcript abundance, enzyme activity, cell wall composition, and soluble carbohydrates revealed significant changes in the transgenic lines. All lines showed significantly increased SuSy enzyme activity in developing xylem. This activity manifested in altered secondary cell wall cellulose content per dry weight in all lines, with increases of 2% to 6% over control levels, without influencing plant growth. The elevated concentration of cellulose was associated with an increase in cell wall crystallinity but did not alter secondary wall microfibril angle. This finding suggests that the observed increase in crystallinity is a function of altered carbon partitioning to cellulose biosynthesis rather than the result of tension wood formation. Furthermore, the augmented deposition of cellulose in the transgenic lines resulted in thicker xylem secondary cell wall and consequently improved wood density. These findings clearly implicate SuSy as a key regulator of sink strength in poplar trees and demonstrate the tight association of SuSy with cellulose synthesis and secondary wall formation.

  5. Black carbon absorption at the global scale is affected by particle-scale diversity in composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierce, Laura; Bond, Tami C.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Mena, Francisco; Riemer, Nicole

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) exerts a strong, but uncertain, warming effect on the climate. BC that is coated with non-absorbing material absorbs more strongly than the same amount of BC in an uncoated particle, but the magnitude of this absorption enhancement (Eabs) is not well constrained. Modelling studies and laboratory measurements have found stronger absorption enhancement than has been observed in the atmosphere. Here, using a particle-resolved aerosol model to simulate diverse BC populations, we show that absorption is overestimated by as much as a factor of two if diversity is neglected and population-averaged composition is assumed across all BC-containing particles. If, instead, composition diversity is resolved, we find Eabs=1-1.5 at low relative humidity, consistent with ambient observations. This study offers not only an explanation for the discrepancy between modelled and observed absorption enhancement, but also demonstrates how particle-scale simulations can be used to develop relationships for global-scale models.

  6. Black Carbon Absorption at the Global Scale Is Affected by Particle-Scale Diversity in Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fierce, Laura; Bond, Tami C.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Mena, Francisco; Riemer, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) exerts a strong, but uncertain, warming effect on the climate. BC that is coated with non-absorbing material absorbs more strongly than the same amount of BC in an uncoated particle, but the magnitude of this absorption enhancement (E(sub abs)) is not well constrained. Modelling studies and laboratory measurements have found stronger absorption enhancement than has been observed in the atmosphere. Here, using a particle-resolved aerosol model to simulate diverse BC populations, we show that absorption is overestimated by as much as a factor of two if diversity is neglected and population-averaged composition is assumed across all BC-containing particles. If, instead, composition diversity is resolved, we find E(sub abs) = 1 - 1.5 at low relative humidity, consistent with ambient observations. This study offers not only an explanation for the discrepancy between modelled and observed absorption enhancement, but also demonstrates how particle-scale simulations can be used to develop relationships for global-scale models.

  7. Biochar affects carbon composition and stability in soil: a combined spectroscopy-microscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Soriano, Maria C.; Kerré, Bart; Kopittke, Peter M.; Horemans, Benjamin; Smolders, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The use of biochar can contribute to carbon (C) storage in soil. Upon addition of biochar, there is a spatial reorganization of C within soil particles, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we used Fourier transformed infrared-microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine this reorganization. A silty-loam soil was amended with three different organic residues and with the biochar produced from these residues and incubated for 237 d. Soil respiration was lower in biochar-amended soils than in residue-amended soils. Fluorescence analysis of the dissolved organic matter revealed that biochar application increased a humic-like fluorescent component, likely associated with biochar-C in solution. The combined spectroscopy-microscopy approach revealed the accumulation of aromatic-C in discrete spots in the solid-phase of microaggregates and its co-localization with clay minerals for soil amended with raw residue or biochar.The co-localization of aromatic-C:polysaccharides-C was consistently reduced upon biochar application. We conclude that reduced C metabolism is an important mechanism for C stabilization in biochar-amended soils. PMID:27113269

  8. Black carbon absorption at the global scale is affected by particle-scale diversity in composition

    PubMed Central

    Fierce, Laura; Bond, Tami C.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Mena, Francisco; Riemer, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) exerts a strong, but uncertain, warming effect on the climate. BC that is coated with non-absorbing material absorbs more strongly than the same amount of BC in an uncoated particle, but the magnitude of this absorption enhancement (Eabs) is not well constrained. Modelling studies and laboratory measurements have found stronger absorption enhancement than has been observed in the atmosphere. Here, using a particle-resolved aerosol model to simulate diverse BC populations, we show that absorption is overestimated by as much as a factor of two if diversity is neglected and population-averaged composition is assumed across all BC-containing particles. If, instead, composition diversity is resolved, we find Eabs=1−1.5 at low relative humidity, consistent with ambient observations. This study offers not only an explanation for the discrepancy between modelled and observed absorption enhancement, but also demonstrates how particle-scale simulations can be used to develop relationships for global-scale models. PMID:27580627

  9. The microbe-mediated mechanisms affecting topsoil carbon stock in Tibetan grasslands.

    PubMed

    Yue, Haowei; Wang, Mengmeng; Wang, Shiping; Gilbert, Jack A; Sun, Xin; Wu, Linwei; Lin, Qiaoyan; Hu, Yigang; Li, Xiangzhen; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2015-09-01

    Warming has been shown to cause soil carbon (C) loss in northern grasslands owing to accelerated microbial decomposition that offsets increased grass productivity. Yet, a multi-decadal survey indicated that the surface soil C stock in Tibetan alpine grasslands remained relatively stable. To investigate this inconsistency, we analyzed the feedback responses of soil microbial communities to simulated warming by soil transplant in Tibetan grasslands. Whereas microbial functional diversity decreased in response to warming, microbial community structure did not correlate with changes in temperature. The relative abundance of catabolic genes associated with nitrogen (N) and C cycling decreased with warming, most notably in genes encoding enzymes associated with more recalcitrant C substrates. By contrast, genes associated with C fixation increased in relative abundance. The relative abundance of genes associated with urease, glutamate dehydrogenase and ammonia monoxygenase (ureC, gdh and amoA) were significantly correlated with N2O efflux. These results suggest that unlike arid/semiarid grasslands, Tibetan grasslands maintain negative feedback mechanisms that preserve terrestrial C and N pools. To examine whether these trends were applicable to the whole plateau, we included these measurements in a model and verified that topsoil C stocks remained relatively stable. Thus, by establishing linkages between microbial metabolic potential and soil biogeochemical processes, we conclude that long-term C loss in Tibetan grasslands is ameliorated by a reduction in microbial decomposition of recalcitrant C substrates.

  10. The microbe-mediated mechanisms affecting topsoil carbon stock in Tibetan grasslands

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Haowei; Wang, Mengmeng; Wang, Shiping; Gilbert, Jack A.; Sun, Xin; Wu, Linwei; Lin, Qiaoyan; Hu, Yigang; Li, Xiangzhen; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2015-02-17

    Warming has been shown to cause soil carbon (C) loss in northern grasslands owing to accelerated microbial decomposition that offsets increased grass productivity. Yet, a multi-decadal survey indicated that the surface soil C stock in Tibetan alpine grasslands remained relatively stable. To investigate this inconsistency, we analyzed the feedback responses of soil microbial communities to simulated warming by soil transplant in Tibetan grasslands. Microbial functional diversity decreased in response to warming, whereas microbial community structure did not correlate with changes in temperature. The relative abundance of catabolic genes associated with nitrogen (N) and C cycling decreased with warming, most notably in genes encoding enzymes associated with more recalcitrant C substrates. By contrast, genes associated with C fixation increased in relative abundance. The relative abundance of genes associated with urease, glutamate dehydrogenase and ammonia monoxygenase (ureC, gdh and amoA) were significantly correlated with N2O efflux. These results suggest that unlike arid/semiarid grasslands, Tibetan grasslands maintain negative feedback mechanisms that preserve terrestrial C and N pools. To examine whether these trends were applicable to the whole plateau, we included these measurements in a model and verified that topsoil C stocks remained relatively stable. Thus, by establishing linkages between microbial metabolic potential and soil biogeochemical processes, we conclude that long-term C loss in Tibetan grasslands is ameliorated by a reduction in microbial decomposition of recalcitrant C substrates.

  11. Biochar affects carbon composition and stability in soil: a combined spectroscopy-microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Soriano, Maria C.; Kerré, Bart; Kopittke, Peter M.; Horemans, Benjamin; Smolders, Erik

    2016-04-01

    The use of biochar can contribute to carbon (C) storage in soil. Upon addition of biochar, there is a spatial reorganization of C within soil particles, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we used Fourier transformed infrared-microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine this reorganization. A silty-loam soil was amended with three different organic residues and with the biochar produced from these residues and incubated for 237 d. Soil respiration was lower in biochar-amended soils than in residue-amended soils. Fluorescence analysis of the dissolved organic matter revealed that biochar application increased a humic-like fluorescent component, likely associated with biochar-C in solution. The combined spectroscopy-microscopy approach revealed the accumulation of aromatic-C in discrete spots in the solid-phase of microaggregates and its co-localization with clay minerals for soil amended with raw residue or biochar.The co-localization of aromatic-C:polysaccharides-C was consistently reduced upon biochar application. We conclude that reduced C metabolism is an important mechanism for C stabilization in biochar-amended soils.

  12. The microbe-mediated mechanisms affecting topsoil carbon stock in Tibetan grasslands

    DOE PAGES

    Yue, Haowei; Wang, Mengmeng; Wang, Shiping; ...

    2015-02-17

    Warming has been shown to cause soil carbon (C) loss in northern grasslands owing to accelerated microbial decomposition that offsets increased grass productivity. Yet, a multi-decadal survey indicated that the surface soil C stock in Tibetan alpine grasslands remained relatively stable. To investigate this inconsistency, we analyzed the feedback responses of soil microbial communities to simulated warming by soil transplant in Tibetan grasslands. Microbial functional diversity decreased in response to warming, whereas microbial community structure did not correlate with changes in temperature. The relative abundance of catabolic genes associated with nitrogen (N) and C cycling decreased with warming, most notablymore » in genes encoding enzymes associated with more recalcitrant C substrates. By contrast, genes associated with C fixation increased in relative abundance. The relative abundance of genes associated with urease, glutamate dehydrogenase and ammonia monoxygenase (ureC, gdh and amoA) were significantly correlated with N2O efflux. These results suggest that unlike arid/semiarid grasslands, Tibetan grasslands maintain negative feedback mechanisms that preserve terrestrial C and N pools. To examine whether these trends were applicable to the whole plateau, we included these measurements in a model and verified that topsoil C stocks remained relatively stable. Thus, by establishing linkages between microbial metabolic potential and soil biogeochemical processes, we conclude that long-term C loss in Tibetan grasslands is ameliorated by a reduction in microbial decomposition of recalcitrant C substrates.« less

  13. Carboxyl-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes negatively affect bacterial growth and denitrification activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Wei, Yuanyuan; Huang, Haining

    2014-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been used in a wide range of fields, and the surface modification via carboxyl functionalization can further improve their physicochemical properties. However, whether carboxyl-modified SWNT poses potential risks to microbial denitrification after its release into the environment remains unknown. Here we present the possible effects of carboxyl-modified SWNT on the growth and denitrification activity of Paracoccus denitrificans (a model denitrifying bacterium). It was found that carboxyl-modified SWNT were present both outside and inside the bacteria, and thus induced bacterial growth inhibition at the concentrations of 10 and 50 mg/L. After 24 h of exposure, the final nitrate concentration in the presence of 50 mg/L carboxyl-modified SWNT was 21-fold higher than that in its absence, indicating that nitrate reduction was substantially suppressed by carboxyl-modified SWNT. The transcriptional profiling revealed that carboxyl-modified SWNT led to the transcriptional activation of the genes encoding ribonucleotide reductase in response to DNA damage and also decreased the gene expressions involved in glucose metabolism and energy production, which was an important reason for bacterial growth inhibition. Moreover, carboxyl-modified SWNT caused the significant down-regulation and lower activity of nitrate reductase, which was consistent with the decreased efficiency of nitrate reduction.

  14. Legume adaptation to sulfur deficiency revealed by comparing nutrient allocation and seed traits in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Hélène; Poignavent, Germain; Le Signor, Christine; Aimé, Delphine; Vieren, Eric; Tadla, Charlène; Lugan, Raphaël; Belghazi, Maya; Labas, Valérie; Santoni, Anne-Lise; Wipf, Daniel; Buitink, Julia; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Salon, Christophe; Gallardo, Karine

    2013-12-01

    Reductions in sulfur dioxide emissions and the use of sulfur-free mineral fertilizers are decreasing soil sulfur levels and threaten the adequate fertilization of most crops. To provide knowledge regarding legume adaptation to sulfur restriction, we subjected Medicago truncatula, a model legume species, to sulfur deficiency at various developmental stages, and compared the yield, nutrient allocation and seed traits. This comparative analysis revealed that sulfur deficiency at the mid-vegetative stage decreased yield and altered the allocation of nitrogen and carbon to seeds, leading to reduced levels of major oligosaccharides in mature seeds, whose germination was dramatically affected. In contrast, during the reproductive period, sulfur deficiency had little influence on yield and nutrient allocation, but the seeds germinated slowly and were characterized by low levels of a biotinylated protein, a putative indicator of germination vigor that has not been previously related to sulfur nutrition. Significantly, plants deprived of sulfur at an intermediary stage (flowering) adapted well by remobilizing nutrients from source organs to seeds, ensuring adequate quantities of carbon and nitrogen in seeds. This efficient remobilization of photosynthates may be explained by vacuolar sulfate efflux to maintain leaf metabolism throughout reproductive growth, as suggested by transcript and metabolite profiling. The seeds from these plants, deprived of sulfur at the floral transition, contained normal levels of major oligosaccharides but their germination was delayed, consistent with low levels of sucrose and the glycolytic enzymes required to restart seed metabolism during imbibition. Overall, our findings provide an integrative view of the legume response to sulfur deficiency.

  15. Nutrient omission in Bt cotton affects soil organic carbon and nutrients status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aladakatti, Y. R.; Biradar, D. P.; Satyanarayana, T.; Majumdar, K.; Shivamurthy, D.

    2012-04-01

    Studies carried out at the University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad, India, in medium black soils assessed the effect of nutrient omission in Bt cotton and its effect on the soil organic carbon (SOC) and available nutrients at the end of second consecutive year of nutrient omission. The study also assessed the extent of contribution of the macro and micronutrients towards seed cotton yield. The experiment consisting 11 treatments omitting a nutrient in each treatment including an absolute control without any nutrients was conducted in a Randomised Block Design with three replications. Cotton crop sufficiently fertilized with macro and micro nutrients (165 : 75 : 120 NPK kg ha-1 and 20 kg each of CaSO4, and MgSO4, 10 kg of S, 20 kg each of ZnSO4, FeSO4 and 0.1 per cent Boron twice as foliar spray) was taken as a standard check to assess the contribution of each nutrient in various nutrient omission treatments. Soils of each treatment were analysed initially and after each crop of cotton for SOC and available nutrient status. Results indicated that the SOC decreased after each crop of cotton in absolute control where no nutrients were applied (0.50 % to 0.38 %) and also in the N omission treatment (0.50 % to 0.35 %). But there was no significant impact of omission of P, K and other nutrients on soil organic carbon. Soil available N, P and K in the soil were reduced as compared to the initial soil status after first and second crop of cotton in the respective treatment where these nutrients were omitted. The soil available N, P and K were reduced to the extent of 61 kg ha-1, 7.1 kg ha-1 and 161.9 kg ha-1 in the respective nutrient omission treatment at end of second crop of cotton as compared to the initial status of these nutrients in the soil. This might be due to the mining of these nutrients from the soil nutrient pool with out addition of these nutrients extraneously. The nutrient status of N, P and K remained almost similar in omission of other nutrients

  16. Constrained control allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Wayne C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the allocation of several flight controls to the generation of specified body-axis moments. The number of controls is greater than the number of moments being controlled, and the ranges of the controls are constrained to certain limits. The controls are assumed to be individually linear in their effect throughout their ranges of motion, and independent of one another in their effects. The geometries of the subset of the constrained controls and of its image in moment space are examined. A direct method of allocating these several controls is presented, that guarantees the maximum possible moment is generated within the constraints of the controls. The results are illustrated by an example problem involving three controls and two moments.

  17. Soil organic carbon dynamics as affected by topography in southern California hillslopes systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fissore, C.; Dalzell, B. J.; Berhe, A. A.; Evans, M.; Voegtle, M.; Wu, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Active topography is a predominant feature of Southern California's landscapes where intense erosion and depositional processes can influence SOC translocation and accumulation and where changes in chemical, physical, and topographic conditions may affect long-term stability of SOC. Considering the large variability in SOC content across areas with active topography, it is necessary to develop landscape-scale stratifications of sampling that capture SOC variability due to erosion and deposition processes at different topographic locations. To achieve this goal, landscape SOC needs to be assessed based on more than just slope position by taking into account specific topographic indices, such as slope class, curvature, and catchment area. In this work, we used a series of analytical approaches, including total and water extractable C fractions, ultraviolet absorbance, infrared spectroscopy and a radio-isotope tracer (137Cs) in combination with GIS and digital terrain attributes analyses to investigate the quality and distribution of SOC along the sloping landscape of Puente Hills Preserve, in Whittier, CA. The complex interaction of terrain attributes on erosion and depositional processes was evident from 137Cs analysis, which allowed us to identify depositional and eroding areas. Our findings indicate that greater SOC accumulation is associated with concave profile and plane curvature, when combined with low slope class. Slope appears to be the terrain attribute that most affects SOC content and slope effects persist at depth. Ultraviolet absorbance of water extractable OC and infrared spectroscopy of SOC allowed the identification of different levels of aromaticity and distribution of SOC moieties that have been correlated to rates of mineralization. Southern California, like other Mediterranean regions around the world, is expected to experience increasingly severe droughts, more intense erosion and more frequent fire perturbation - which can exacerbate erosion

  18. Myrmics Memory Allocator

    SciTech Connect

    Lymperis, S.

    2011-09-23

    MMA is a stand-alone memory management system for MPI clusters. It implements a shared Partitioned Global Address Space, where multiple MPI processes request objects from the allocator and the latter provides them with system-wide unique memory addresses for each object. It provides applications with an intuitive way of managing the memory system in a unified way, thus enabling easier writing of irregular application code.

  19. Long term trends of carbon dioxide exchange in a tundra ecosystem affected by permafrost thaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuur, E. A.; Bracho, R. G.; Belshe, F.; Crummer, K. G.; Hicks Pries, C.; Krapek, J.; Natali, S.; Pegoraro, E.; Salmon, V.; Trucco, C.; Vogel, J. G.; Webb, E.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic warming has led to permafrost degradation and ground subsidence as a result of ground ice melting. Frozen soil organic matter that thaws can increase carbon (C) emissions to the atmosphere via respiration, but this can be offset in part by increases in plant growth. The balance of plant and microbial processes, and how they change through time, will determine how permafrost ecosystems influence future climate change via the C cycle. This study addressed this question both on short (interannual) and longer (decadal) time periods by measuring C fluxes over a ten-year period at three sites that represent a gradient of time since permafrost thaw. All three sites are upland tundra ecosystems located in Interior Alaska but differed in the extent of permafrost thaw and ground subsidence. Results showed an increasing growing season (May - September) trend in gross primary productivity, net ecosystem exchange, aboveground net primary productivity, and annual net ecosystem exchange at all sites over the study period from 2004-2013. In contrast, there was no directional change in annual and growing season ecosystem respiration, or mass loss from decomposition of a common cellulose substrate. The increasing trends over time as well as inter site differences most closely followed variation in growing season thaw depth over the same time period. During the study period, sites with more permafrost degradation (deeper seasonal thaw) had significantly greater gross primary productivity compared to where degradation was least, but also greater growing season ecosystem respiration. Adding in winter respiration decreased, in part, the summer C sink and left the site with the most permafrost degradation near C neutral, with the other sites annual C sinks. However, annual C balance was strongly dependent on winter respiration, which, compared to the growing season, was relatively data-poor due to extreme environmental conditions. Measurements of growing season and annual C

  20. Distribution of organic carbon in physical fractions of soils as affected by agricultural management

    SciTech Connect

    Sindhu, Jagadamma; Lal, Dr. Rattan

    2010-08-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is distributed heterogeneously among different-sized primary particles and aggregates. Further, the SOC associated with different physical fractions respond differently to managements. Therefore, this study was conducted with the objective to quantify the SOC associated with all the three structural levels of SOC (particulate organic matter, soil separates and aggregate-size fractions) as influenced by long-term change in management. The study also aims at reevaluating the concept that the SOC sink capacity of individual size-fractions is limited. Long-term tillage and crop rotation effects on distribution of SOC among fractions were compared with soil from adjacent undisturbed area under native vegetation for the mixed, mesic, Typic Fragiudalf of Wooster, OH. Forty five years of no-till (NT) management resulted in more SOC accumulation in soil surface (0 7.5 cm) than in chisel tillage and plow tillage (PT) treatments. However, PT at this site resulted in a redistribution of SOC from surface to deeper soil layers. The soils under continuous corn accumulated significantly more SOC than those under corn soybean rotation at 7.5 45 cm depth. Although soil texture was dominated by the silt-sized particles, most of the SOC pool was associated with the clay fraction. Compared to PT, the NT treatment resulted in (i) significantly higher proportion of large macroaggregates (>2,000 m) and (ii) 1.5 2.8 times higher SOC concentrations in all aggregate-size classes. A comparative evaluation using radar graphs indicated that among the physical fractions, the SOC associated with sand and silt fractions quickly changed with a land use conversion from native vegetation to agricultural crops. A key finding of this study is the assessment of SOC sink capacity of individual fractions, which revealed that the clay fraction of agricultural soils continues to accumulate more SOC, albeit at a slower rate, with progressive increase in total SOC concentration

  1. Does temperature of charcoal creation affect subsequent mineralization of soil carbon and nitrogen?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier-Bergeron, S.; Bradley, R.; Munson, A. D.

    2012-04-01

    Forest fire is the most common form of natural disturbance of boreal forest ecosystems and has primordial influence on successional processes. This may be due in part to the pre-disturbance vegetation development stage and species composition, but these successional pathways could also vary with differences in fire behavior and consequently in fire intensity, defined as the energy released during various phases of a fire. Fire intensity may also affect soil C and N cycling by affecting the quality of the charcoal that is produced. For example, the porosity of coal tends to increase with increasing temperature at which it is produced Higher porosity would logically increase the surface area to which dissolved soil molecules, such as tannins and other phenolics, may be adsorbed. We report on a microcosm study in which mineral and organic soils were jointly incubated for eight weeks with a full factorial array of treatments that included the addition of Kalmia tannins, protein, and wood charcoal produced at five different temperatures. A fourth experimental factor comprised the physical arrangement of the material (stratified vs. mixed), designed to simulate the effect of soil scarification after fire and salvage harvest. We examined the effects of these treatments on soil C and N mineralisation and soil microbial biomass. The furnace temperature at which the charcoal was produced had a significant effect on its physico-chemical properties; increasing furnace temperatures corresponded to a significant increase in % C (P<0.001), and a significant decrease in %O (P<0.001) and %H (P<0.001). Temperature also had significant impacts on microporosity (surface area and volume). Temperature of production had no effect (P=0.1355) on soil microbial biomass. We observed a linear decreasing trend (P<0.001) in qCO2 with increasing temperature of production, which was mainly reflected in a decline in basal respiration. Finally, we found a significant interaction (P=0.010) between

  2. Microstructures relevant to brittle fracture initiation at the heat-affected zone of weldment of a low carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ohya, K.; Kim, J.; Yokoyama, K.; Nagumo, M.

    1996-09-01

    Charpy toughness of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of weldment of a low carbon steel has been investigated by means of an instrumented Charpy test and fractographic analysis. Microstructures were varied with thermal cycles simulating double-pass welding. The ductile-brittle transition temperature is the most deteriorated at an intermediate second-cycle heating temperature. The origin of the difference in the transition temperatures has been analyzed to exist in the brittle fracture initiation stage. Fractographic examination correlating with microstructural features has revealed that the brittle fracture initiation site is associated with the intersection of bainitic ferrite areas with different orientations rather than the martensite-austenite constituents. The role of the constraint of plastic deformation on the brittle fracture initiation is discussed.

  3. Interactions between Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides Species in Cofermentations Are Affected by Carbon Sources, Including Exopolysaccharides Produced by Bifidobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rios-Covian, David; Arboleya, Silvia; Hernandez-Barranco, Ana M.; Alvarez-Buylla, Jorge R.; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Cocultures of strains from two Bifidobacterium and two Bacteroides species were performed with exopolysaccharides (EPS) previously purified from bifidobacteria, with inulin, or with glucose as the carbon source. Bifidobacterium longum NB667 and Bifidobacterium breve IPLA20004 grew in glucose but showed poor or no growth in complex carbohydrates (inulin, EPS E44, and EPS R1), whereas Bacteroides grew well in the four carbon sources tested. In the presence of glucose, the growth of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron DSM-2079 was inhibited by B. breve, whereas it remained unaffected in the presence of B. longum. Ba. fragilis DSM-2151 contributed to a greater survival of B. longum, promoting changes in the synthesis of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and organic acids in coculture with respect to monocultures. In complex carbohydrates, cocultures of bifidobacterium strains with Ba. thetaiotaomicron did not modify the behavior of Bacteroides nor improve the poor growth of bifidobacteria. The metabolic activity of Ba. fragilis in coculture with bifidobacteria was not affected by EPS, but greater survival of bifidobacteria at late stages of incubation occurred in cocultures than in monocultures, leading to a higher production of acetic acid than in monocultures. Therefore, cocultures of Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides can behave differently against fermentable carbohydrates as a function of the specific characteristics of the strains from each species. These results stress the importance of considering specific species and strain interactions and not simply higher taxonomic divisions in the relationship among intestinal microbial populations and their different responses to probiotics and prebiotics. PMID:24077708

  4. Production possibility frontiers in phototroph:heterotroph symbioses: trade-offs in allocating fixed carbon pools and the challenges these alternatives present for understanding the acquisition of intracellular habitats

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Malcolm S.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular habitats have been invaded by a remarkable diversity of organisms, and strategies employed to successfully reside in another species' cellular space are varied. Common selective pressures may be experienced in symbioses involving phototrophic symbionts and heterotrophic hosts. Here I refine and elaborate the Arrested Phagosome Hypothesis that proposes a mechanism that phototrophs use to gain access to their host's intracellular habitat. I employ the economic concept of production possibility frontiers (PPF) as a useful heuristic to clearly define the trade-offs that an intracellular phototroph is likely to face as it allocates photosynthetically-derived pools of energy. Fixed carbon can fuel basic metabolism/respiration, it can support mitotic division, or it can be translocated to the host. Excess photosynthate can be stored for future use. Thus, gross photosynthetic productivity can be divided among these four general categories, and natural selection will favor phenotypes that best match the demands presented to the symbiont by the host cellular habitat. The PPF highlights trade-offs that exist between investment in growth (i.e., mitosis) or residency (i.e., translocating material to the host). Insights gained from this perspective might help explain phenomena such as coral bleaching because deficits in photosynthetic production are likely to diminish a symbiont's ability to “afford” the costs of intracellular residency. I highlight deficits in our current understanding of host:symbiont interactions at the molecular, genetic, and cellular level, and I also discuss how semantic differences among scientists working with different symbiont systems may diminish the rate of increase in our understanding of phototrophic-based associations. I argue that adopting interdisciplinary (in this case, inter-symbiont-system) perspectives will lead to advances in our general understanding of the phototrophic symbiont's intracellular niche. PMID:25101064

  5. Decreased carbon limitation of litter respiration in a mortality-affected piñon-juniper woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryman, E.; Marshall, J. D.; Rahn, T.; Litvak, M.; Butnor, J.

    2013-03-01

    Microbial respiration depends on microclimatic variables and carbon (C) substrate availability, all of which are altered when ecosystems experience major disturbance. Widespread tree mortality, currently affecting piñon-juniper ecosystems in southwestern North America, may affect C substrate availability in several ways, for example, via litterfall pulses and loss of root exudation. To determine piñon mortality effects on C and water limitation of microbial respiration, we applied field amendments (sucrose and water) to two piñon-juniper sites in central New Mexico, USA: one with a recent (< 1 yr), experimentally induced mortality event and a nearby site with live canopy. We monitored the respiration response to water and sucrose applications to the litter surface and to the underlying mineral soil surface, testing the following hypotheses: (1) soil respiration in a piñon-juniper woodland is water- and labile C-limited in both the litter layer and mineral soil; (2) piñon mortality reduces the C limitation of litter respiration; and (3) piñon mortality enhances the C limitation of mineral soil respiration. Litter respiration at both sites responded to increased water availability, yet surprisingly, mineral soil respiration was not limited by water. Consistent with hypothesis 2, C limitation of litter respiration was lower at the recent mortality site compared to the intact canopy site. Applications to the mineral soil showed evidence of reduction in CO2 flux on the girdled site and a non-significant increase on the control. We speculate that the reduction may have been driven by water-induced carbonate dissolution, which serves as a sink for CO2 and would reduce the net flux. Widespread piñon mortality may decrease labile C limitation of litter respiration, at least during the first growing season following mortality.

  6. Decreased carbon limitation of litter respiration in a mortality-affected piñon-juniper woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryman, E.; Marshall, J. D.; Rahn, T.; Litvak, M.; Butnor, J.

    2012-10-01

    Microbial respiration depends on microclimatic variables and carbon (C) substrate availability, all of which are altered when ecosystems experience major disturbance. Widespread tree mortality, currently affecting piñon-juniper ecosystems in Southwestern North America, may affect C substrate availability in several ways; for example, via litterfall pulses and loss of root exudation. To determine piñon mortality effects on C and water limitation of microbial respiration, we applied field amendments (sucrose and water) to two piñon-juniper sites in central New Mexico, USA: one with a recent (< 1 yr), experimentally-induced mortality event and a nearby site with live canopy. We monitored the respiration response to water and sucrose applications to the litter surface and to the underlying mineral soil surface, testing the following hypotheses: (1) soil respiration in a piñon-juniper woodland is water- and labile C-limited in both the litter layer and mineral soil; (2) water and sucrose applications increase temperature sensitivity of respiration; (3) the mortality-affected site will show a reduction in C limitation in the litter; (4) the mortality-affected site will show an enhancement of C limitation in the mineral soil. Litter respiration at both sites responded to increased water availability, yet surprisingly, mineral soil respiration was not limited by water. Temperature sensitivity was enhanced by some of the sucrose and water treatments. Consistent with hypothesis 3, C limitation of litter respiration was lower at the recent mortality site compared to the intact canopy site. Results following applications to the mineral soil suggest the presence of abiotic effects of increasing water availability, precluding our ability to measure labile C limitation in soil. Widespread piñon mortality may decrease labile C limitation of litter respiration, at least during the first growing season following mortality.

  7. Resource allocation in an annual herb: Effects of light, mycorrhizal fungi, and defoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Chama, Ana; Guevara, Roger

    2016-02-01

    Concurrent interactions and the availability of resources (e.g., light) affect the cost/benefit balance during mutualistic and antagonistic interactions, as well as plant resource allocation patterns. Mycorrhizal interactions and herbivory concur in most plants, where mycorrhizae can enhance the uptake of soil nutrients by plants as well as consuming a large fraction of the plant's carbon, and defoliation usually reduces light interception and photosynthesis, thereby causing direct losses to the hosts of mycorrhizal fungi. Both types of interactions affect the carbon budget of their host plants and thus we predict that the relative costs of herbivory and mycorrhizal colonization will increase when photosynthesis is reduced, for instance in light limited environments. We conducted a greenhouse experiment using Datura stramonium to investigate the effects of defoliation and mycorrhizal inoculation on the resource allocation patterns in two different light environments. Defoliated plants overcompensated in terms of leaf mass in both light environments, but total seed mass per fruit was negatively affected by defoliation in both light environments. Mycorrhizal inoculation had a positive effect on vegetative growth and the leaf nitrogen content, but defoliation negates the benefit of mycorrhizal interactions in terms of the leaf nitrogen content. In general, D. stramonium compensated for the relative costs of concurrent mycorrhizal interactions and defoliation; plants that lacked both interactions exhibited the same performance as plants with both types of interactions.

  8. 45 CFR 95.509 - Cost allocation plan amendments and certifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... plan become outdated because of organizational changes, changes in Federal law or regulations, or significant changes in program levels, affecting the validity of the approved cost allocation procedures. (2...) Other changes occur which make the allocation basis or procedures in the approval cost allocation...

  9. CO2-induced shift in microbial activity affects carbon trapping and water quality in anoxic bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Matthew F.; Santillan, Eugenio F. U.; Sanford, Robert A.; Altman, Susan J.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial activity is a potentially important yet poorly understood control on the fate and environmental impact of CO2 that leaks into aquifers from deep storage reservoirs. In this study we examine how variation in CO2 abundance affected competition between Fe(III) and SO42--reducers in anoxic bioreactors inoculated with a mixed-microbial community from a freshwater aquifer. We performed two sets of experiments: one with low CO2 partial pressure (∼0.02 atm) in the headspace of the reactors and one with high CO2 partial pressure (∼1 atm). A fluid residence time of 35 days was maintained in the reactors by replacing one-fifth of the aqueous volume with fresh medium every seven days. The aqueous medium was composed of groundwater amended with small amounts of acetate (250 μM), phosphate (1 μM), and ammonium (50 μM) to stimulate microbial activity. Synthetic goethite (1 mmol) and SO42- (500 μM influent concentration) were also available in each reactor to serve as electron acceptors. Results of this study show that higher CO2 abundance increased the ability of Fe(III) reducers to compete with SO42- reducers, leading to significant shifts in CO2 trapping and water quality. Mass-balance calculations and pyrosequencing results demonstrate that SO42- reducers were dominant in reactors with low CO2 content. They consumed 85% of the acetate after acetate consumption reached steady state while Fe(III) reducers consumed only 15% on average. In contrast, Fe(III) reducers were dominant during that same interval in reactors with high CO2 content, consuming at least 90% of the acetate while SO42- reducers consumed a negligible amount (<1%). The higher rate of Fe(III) reduction in the high-CO2 bioreactors enhanced CO2 solubility trapping relative to the low-CO2 bioreactors by increasing alkalinity generation (6X). Hence, the shift in microbial activity we observed was a positive feedback on CO2 trapping. More rapid Fe(III) reduction degraded water quality, however, by

  10. Factors Affecting the Rate of Penetration of Large-Scale Electricity Technologies: The Case of Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    James R. McFarland; Howard J. Herzog

    2007-05-14

    This project falls under the Technology Innovation and Diffusion topic of the Integrated Assessment of Climate Change Research Program. The objective was to better understand the critical variables that affect the rate of penetration of large-scale electricity technologies in order to improve their representation in integrated assessment models. We conducted this research in six integrated tasks. In our first two tasks, we identified potential factors that affect penetration rates through discussions with modeling groups and through case studies of historical precedent. In the next three tasks, we investigated in detail three potential sets of critical factors: industrial conditions, resource conditions, and regulatory/environmental considerations. Research to assess the significance and relative importance of these factors involved the development of a microeconomic, system dynamics model of the US electric power sector. Finally, we implemented the penetration rate models in an integrated assessment model. While the focus of this effort is on carbon capture and sequestration technologies, much of the work will be applicable to other large-scale energy conversion technologies.

  11. Geographic variation in resource allocation to the abdomen in geometrid moths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelä, Sami M.; Välimäki, Panu; Carrasco, David; Mäenpää, Maarit I.; Mänttäri, Satu

    2012-08-01

    A resource allocation trade-off is expected when resources from a common pool are allocated to two or more traits. In holometabolous insects, resource allocation to different functions during metamorphosis relies completely on larval-derived resources. At adult eclosion, resource allocation to the abdomen at the expense of other body parts can be seen as a rough estimate of resource allocation to reproduction. Theory suggests geographic variation in resource allocation to the abdomen, but there are currently no empirical data on it. We measured resource allocation to the abdomen at adult eclosion in four geometrid moths along a latitudinal gradient. Resource (total dry material, carbon, nitrogen) allocation to the abdomen showed positive allometry with body size. We found geographic variation in resource allocation to the abdomen in each species, and this variation was independent of allometry in three species. Geographic variation in resource allocation to the abdomen was complex. Resource allocation to the abdomen was relatively high in partially bivoltine populations in two species, which fits theoretical predictions, but the overall support for theory is weak. This study indicates that the geographic variation in resource allocation to the abdomen is not an allometric consequence of geographic variation in resource acquisition (i.e., body size). Thus, there is a component of resource allocation that can evolve independently of resource acquisition. Our results also suggest that there may be intraspecific variation in the degree of capital versus income breeding.

  12. Computationally efficient control allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Wayne (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A computationally efficient method for calculating near-optimal solutions to the three-objective, linear control allocation problem is disclosed. The control allocation problem is that of distributing the effort of redundant control effectors to achieve some desired set of objectives. The problem is deemed linear if control effectiveness is affine with respect to the individual control effectors. The optimal solution is that which exploits the collective maximum capability of the effectors within their individual physical limits. Computational efficiency is measured by the number of floating-point operations required for solution. The method presented returned optimal solutions in more than 90% of the cases examined; non-optimal solutions returned by the method were typically much less than 1% different from optimal and the errors tended to become smaller than 0.01% as the number of controls was increased. The magnitude of the errors returned by the present method was much smaller than those that resulted from either pseudo inverse or cascaded generalized inverse solutions. The computational complexity of the method presented varied linearly with increasing numbers of controls; the number of required floating point operations increased from 5.5 i, to seven times faster than did the minimum-norm solution (the pseudoinverse), and at about the same rate as did the cascaded generalized inverse solution. The computational requirements of the method presented were much better than that of previously described facet-searching methods which increase in proportion to the square of the number of controls.

  13. TRANSFORMATION AND ALLELOPATHY OF NATURAL DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON AND TANNIC ACID ARE AFFECTED BY SOLAR RADIATION AND BACTERIA(1).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Nadine; Zwirnmann, Elke; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Hilt, Sabine

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether abiotic and biotic factors may affect allelopathic properties. Therefore, we investigated how solar radiation and bacteria influence allelopathic effects of the plant-derived, polyphenolic tannic acid (TA) on microalgae. Using a block design, lake water samples with and without TA were exposed to solar radiation or kept in darkness with or without bacteria for 3 weeks. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), specific size fractions of DOC analyzed by chromatography-organic carbon detection (LC-OCD), and concentrations of total phenolic compounds (TPC) were measured to follow the fate of TA in lake water with natural DOC exposed to photolytic and microbial degradation. DOC and TPC decreased in dark-incubated lake water with TA and bacteria indicating microbial degradation. In contrast, exposure to solar radiation of lake water with TA and bacteria did not decrease DOC. Chromatographic analyses documented an accumulation of DOC mean size fraction designated as humic substances (HS) in sunlit water samples with TA. The recalcitrance of the humic fraction indicates that photolytic degradation may contribute to a DOC less available for bacterial degradation. Subsequent growth tests with Desmodesmus armatus (Chodat) E. Hegewald showed low but reproducible difference in algal growth with lower algal growth rate cultured in photolytically and microbially degraded TA in lake water than cultured in respective dark treatments. This finding highlights the importance of photolytic processes and microbial degradation influencing allelopathic effects and may explain the high potential of allelochemicals for structuring the phytoplankton community composition in naturally illuminated surface waters.

  14. The choice between allocation principles: amplifying when equality dominates.

    PubMed

    Eek, Daniel; Selart, Marcus

    2009-04-01

    One hundred and ninety participants (95 undergraduates and 95 employees) responded to a factorial survey in which a number of case-based organizational allocation tasks were described. Participants were asked to imagine themselves as employees in fictitious organizations and chose among three allocations of employee-development schemes invested by the manager in different work groups. The allocations regarded how such investments should be allocated between two parties. Participants chose twice, once picking the fairest and once the best allocation. One between-subjects factor varied whether the parties represented social (i.e., choosing among allocations between two different work groups) or temporal comparisons (i.e., choosing among allocations between the present and the following year). Another between-subjects factor varied whether participants' in-group was represented by the parties or not. One allocation maximized the outcome to one party, another maximized the joint outcome received by both parties, and a third provided both parties with equal but lower outcomes. It was predicted that equality, although always deficient to both parties, would be the preferred allocation when parties represented social comparisons and when choices were based on fairness. When parties represented temporal comparisons, and when choices were based on preference, maximizing the joint outcome was hypothesized to be the preferred allocation. Results supported these hypotheses. Against what was predicted, whether the in-group was represented by the parties or not did not moderate the results, indicating that participants' allocation preferences were not affected by self-interest. The main message is that people make sensible distinctions between what they prefer and what they regard as fair. The results were the same for participating students who imagined themselves as being employees and participants who were true employees, suggesting that no serious threats to external

  15. Plants adapted to nutrient limitation allocate less biomass into stems in an arid-hot grassland.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bangguo; Ji, Zhonghua; Fan, Bo; Wang, Xuemei; He, Guangxiong; Shi, Liangtao; Liu, Gangcai

    2016-09-01

    Biomass allocation can exert a great influence on plant resource acquisition and nutrient use. However, the role of biomass allocation strategies in shaping plant community composition under nutrient limitations remains poorly addressed. We hypothesized that species-specific allocation strategies can affect plant adaptation to nutrient limitations, resulting in species turnover and changes in community-level biomass allocations across nutrient gradients. In this study, we measured species abundance and the concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus in leaves and soil nutrients in an arid-hot grassland. We quantified species-specific allocation parameters for stems vs leaves based on allometric scaling relationships. Species-specific stem vs leaf allocation parameters were weighted with species abundances to calculate the community-weighted means driven by species turnover. We found that the community-weighted means of biomass allocation parameters were significantly related to the soil nutrient gradient as well as to leaf stoichiometry, indicating that species-specific allocation strategies can affect plant adaptation to nutrient limitations in the studied grassland. Species that allocate less to stems than leaves tend to dominate nutrient-limited environments. The results support the hypothesis that species-specific allocations affect plant adaptation to nutrient limitations. The allocation trade-off between stems and leaves has the potential to greatly affect plant distribution across nutrient gradients.

  16. Research on allocation efficiency of the daisy chain allocation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jingping; Zhang, Weiguo

    2013-03-01

    With the improvement of the aircraft performance in reliability, maneuverability and survivability, the number of the control effectors increases a lot. How to distribute the three-axis moments into the control surfaces reasonably becomes an important problem. Daisy chain method is simple and easy to be carried out in the design of the allocation system. But it can not solve the allocation problem for entire attainable moment subset. For the lateral-directional allocation problem, the allocation efficiency of the daisy chain can be directly measured by the area of its subset of attainable moments. Because of the non-linear allocation characteristic, the subset of attainable moments of daisy-chain method is a complex non-convex polygon, and it is difficult to solve directly. By analyzing the two-dimensional allocation problems with a "micro-element" idea, a numerical calculation algorithm is proposed to compute the area of the non-convex polygon. In order to improve the allocation efficiency of the algorithm, a genetic algorithm with the allocation efficiency chosen as the fitness function is proposed to find the best pseudo-inverse matrix.

  17. Culture medium type affects endocytosis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in BEAS-2B cells and subsequent biological response.

    PubMed

    Haniu, Hisao; Saito, Naoto; Matsuda, Yoshikazu; Tsukahara, Tamotsu; Maruyama, Kayo; Usui, Yuki; Aoki, Kaoru; Takanashi, Seiji; Kobayashi, Shinsuke; Nomura, Hiroki; Okamoto, Masanori; Shimizu, Masayuki; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2013-09-01

    We examined the cytotoxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and the resulting cytokine secretion in BEAS-2B cells or normal human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEpCs) in two types of culture media (Ham's F12 containing 10% FBS [Ham's F12] and serum-free growth medium [SFGM]). Cellular uptake of MWCNT was observed by fluorescent microscopy and analyzed using flow cytometry. Moreover, we evaluated whether MWCNT uptake was suppressed by 2 types of endocytosis inhibitors. We found that BEAS-2B cells cultured in Ham's F12 and HBEpCs cultured in SFGM showed similar biological responses, but BEAS-2B cells cultured in SFGM did not internalize MWCNTs, and the 50% inhibitory concentration value, i.e., the cytotoxicity, was increased by more than 10-fold. MWCNT uptake was suppressed by a clathrin-mediated endocytosis inhibitor and a caveolae-mediated endocytosis inhibitor in BEAS-2B cells cultured in Ham's F12 and HBEpCs cultured in SFGM. In conclusion, we suggest that BEAS-2B cells cultured in a medium containing serum should be used for the safety evaluation of nanomaterials as a model of normal human bronchial epithelial cells. However, the culture medium composition may affect the proteins that are expressed on the cytoplasmic membrane, which may influence the biological response to MWCNTs.

  18. Granular activated carbon for simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation of toxic oil sands process-affected water organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Shahinoor; Zhang, Yanyan; McPhedran, Kerry N; Liu, Yang; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) released into oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) during bitumen processing in Northern Alberta are problematic for oil sands industries due to their toxicity in the environment and resistance to degradation during conventional wastewater treatment processes. Granular activated carbon (GAC) has shown to be an effective media in removing biopersistent organics from wastewater using a combination of adsorption and biodegradation removal mechanisms. A simultaneous GAC (0.4 g GAC/L) adsorption and biodegradation (combined treatment) study was used for the treatment of raw and ozonated OSPW. After 28 days of batch treatment, classical and oxidized NAs removals for raw OSPW were 93.3% and 73.7%, and for ozonated OSPW were 96.2% and 77.1%, respectively. Synergetic effects of the combined treatment process were observed in removals of COD, the acid extractable fraction, and oxidized NAs, which indicated enhanced biodegradation and bioregeneration in GAC biofilms. A bacteria copy number >10(8) copies/g GAC on GAC surfaces was found using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction after treatment for both raw and ozonated OSPW. A Microtox(®) acute toxicity test (Vibrio fischeri) showed effective toxicity removal (>95.3%) for the combined treatments. Therefore, the simultaneous GAC adsorption and biodegradation treatment process is a promising technology for the elimination of toxic OSPW NAs.

  19. Do plants modulate biomass allocation in response to petroleum pollution?

    PubMed

    Nie, Ming; Yang, Qiang; Jiang, Li-Fen; Fang, Chang-Ming; Chen, Jia-Kuan; Li, Bo

    2010-12-23

    Biomass allocation is an important plant trait that responds plastically to environmental heterogeneities. However, the effects on this trait of pollutants owing to human activities remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the response of biomass allocation of Phragmites australis to petroleum pollution by a ¹³CO₂ pulse-labelling technique. Our data show that plant biomass significantly decreased under petroleum pollution, but the root-shoot ratio for both plant biomass and ¹³C increased with increasing petroleum concentration, suggesting that plants could increase biomass allocation to roots in petroleum-polluted soil. Furthermore, assimilated ¹³C was found to be significantly higher in soil, microbial biomass and soil respiration after soils were polluted by petroleum. These results suggested that the carbon released from roots is rapidly turned over by soil microbes under petroleum pollution. This study found that plants can modulate biomass allocation in response to petroleum pollution.

  20. Valuing certainty in a consensus-based water allocation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Saket; McKee, Mac

    2007-02-01

    We present an interdisciplinary approach to attach economic value to model certainty. The central theme of this paper concerns valuing certainty in water resource management, specifically resource allocation. A conceptual framework is developed to study (1) a hypothetical scenario of three water users attempting to mutually agree on allocation of some fixed amount of water amongst themselves and (2) California water policy negotiations along the lines of Adams et al. (1996). We attempt to answer how uncertainty in a policy variable affects the "allocation solution" in such consensus-based decision-making processes. This study finally evolves into economic valuation of uncertainty reduction and willingness to pay for the same.

  1. Seasonal patterns of carbon allocation to respiratory pools in 60-yr-old deciduous (Fagus sylvatica) and evergreen (Picea abies) trees assessed via whole-tree stable carbon isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Kuptz, Daniel; Fleischmann, Frank; Matyssek, Rainer; Grams, Thorsten E E

    2011-07-01

    • The CO(2) efflux of adult trees is supplied by recent photosynthates and carbon (C) stores. The extent to which these C pools contribute to growth and maintenance respiration (R(G) and R(M), respectively) remains obscure. • Recent photosynthates of adult beech (Fagus sylvatica) and spruce (Picea abies) trees were labeled by exposing whole-tree canopies to (13) C-depleted CO(2). Label was applied three times during the year (in spring, early summer and late summer) and changes in the stable C isotope composition (δ(13) C) of trunk and coarse-root CO(2) efflux were quantified. • Seasonal patterns in C translocation rate (CTR) and fractional contribution of label to CO(2) efflux (F(Label-Max)) were found. CTR was fastest during early summer. In beech, F(Label-Max) was lowest in spring and peaked in trunks during late summer (0.6 ± 0.1, mean ± SE), whereas no trend was observed in coarse roots. No seasonal dynamics in F(Label-Max) were found in spruce. • During spring, the R(G) of beech trunks was largely supplied by C stores. Recent photosynthates supplied growth in early summer and refilled C stores in late summer. In spruce, CO(2) efflux was constantly supplied by a mixture of stored (c. 75%) and recent (c. 25%) C. The hypothesis that R(G) is exclusively supplied by recent photosynthates was rejected for both species.

  2. Resource allocation patterns of two California-Sonoran desert ephemerals.

    PubMed

    Clark, D D; Burk, J H

    1980-07-01

    The patterns of allocation of structural and nonstructural carbon were followed in the co-occurring desert ephemerals Plantago insularis and Camissonia boothii. Patterns of biomass distribution were determined from material harvested at biweekly intervals as were levels of nonstructural sugar and starch. Seasonal patterns of growth and reproduction differed markedly with Plantago allocating significantly more structural and nonstructural carbon to reproduction early in the season. Plantago completed its life cycle in less than 60 days but Camissonia continued both vegetative and reproductive growth to over 100 days. The longer growing season of Camissonia was possible because more energy was allocated to vegetative tissues and storage presumably as investment toward longer life and higher levels of reproduction.

  3. Regional-scale dominance of non-framework building corals on Caribbean reefs affects carbonate production and future reef growth.

    PubMed

    Perry, Chris T; Steneck, Robert S; Murphy, Gary N; Kench, Paul S; Edinger, Evan N; Smithers, Scott G; Mumby, Peter J

    2015-03-01

    Coral cover on Caribbean reefs has declined rapidly since the early 1980's. Diseases have been a major driver, decimating communities of framework building Acropora and Orbicella coral species, and reportedly leading to the emergence of novel coral assemblages often dominated by domed and plating species of the genera Agaricia, Porites and Siderastrea. These corals were not historically important Caribbean framework builders, and typically have much smaller stature and lower calcification rates, fuelling concerns over reef carbonate production and growth potential. Using data from 75 reefs from across the Caribbean we quantify: (i) the magnitude of non-framework building coral dominance throughout the region and (ii) the contribution of these corals to contemporary carbonate production. Our data show that live coral cover averages 18.2% across our sites and coral carbonate production 4.1 kg CaCO3  m(-2)  yr(-1) . However, non-framework building coral species dominate and are major carbonate producers at a high proportion of sites; they are more abundant than Acropora and Orbicella at 73% of sites; contribute an average 68% of the carbonate produced; and produce more than half the carbonate at 79% of sites. Coral cover and carbonate production rate are strongly correlated but, as relative abundance of non-framework building corals increases, average carbonate production rates decline. Consequently, the use of coral cover as a predictor of carbonate budget status, without species level production rate data, needs to be treated with caution. Our findings provide compelling evidence for the Caribbean-wide dominance of non-framework building coral taxa, and that these species are now major regional carbonate producers. However, because these species typically have lower calcification rates, continued transitions to states dominated by non-framework building coral species will further reduce carbonate production rates below 'predecline' levels, resulting in shifts

  4. Carbon Consequences of Positive NDVI Anomalies in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neigh, C. S.; Carvalhais, N.; Collatz, G. J.

    2007-12-01

    We present a modeling approach to investigate the carbon consequences of ecosystem disturbance and land cover dynamics in regions of increasing NDVI in North America, which have altered terrestrial patterns of net ecosystem productivity from 1982-2005. Terrestrial carbon fixation and respiration is substantially affected by components of global change (e.g. land cover land use change, and changes in climate variables e.g. warming and drying). The Carnigie-Ames-Stanford approach (CASA) Biosphere model was run on a monthly time interval to simulate seasonal patterns in net plant carbon fixation, biomass and nutrient allocation, litterfall, soil nitrogen mineralization, and microbial CO2 production. CASA is a bucket type model, which allocates carbon between pools based on logarithmic scalars derived from in situ studies of terrestrial mechanistic processes. Carbon was reallocated between pools based on anthropogenic and abiotic disturbances identified with ancillary and remote sensing data (Landsat, Ikonos, aerial photography, agriculture production statistics, and fire and logging data). We developed modules for CASA and simulated expansion of irrigated agriculture, logging and subsequent recovery, warming in the northern latitudes, and fire with subsequent recovery. Simulations with modules initiated predicted altered carbon allocation in ecosystems with disturbance, and sequestration increased in some of our selected study sites during the 24 year (1982-2005) period while others experienced increased soil respiration. The regions investigated represent spatially complex transient pools of carbon in North America vegetation altered by abiotic and anthropogenic land cover conversions which contributed to the terrestrial Northern Hemisphere sink.

  5. Soil organic carbon sequestration as affected by afforestation: the Darab Kola forest (north of Iran) case study.

    PubMed

    Kooch, Yahya; Hosseini, Seyed Mohsen; Zaccone, Claudio; Jalilvand, Hamid; Hojjati, Seyed Mohammad

    2012-09-01

    Following the ratification of the Kyoto Protocol, afforestation of formerly arable lands and/or degraded areas has been acknowledged as a land-use change contributing to the mitigation of increasing atmospheric CO(2) concentration in the atmosphere. In the present work, we study the soil organic carbon sequestration (SOCS) in 21 year old stands of maple (Acer velutinum Bioss.), oak (Quercus castaneifolia C.A. Mey.), and red pine (Pinus brutia Ten.) in the Darab Kola region, north of Iran. Soil samples were collected at four different depths (0-10, 10-20, 20-30, and 30-40 cm), and characterized with respect to bulk density, water content, electrical conductivity, pH, texture, lime content, total organic C, total N, and earthworm density and biomass. Data showed that afforested stands significantly affected soil characteristics, also raising SOCS phenomena, with values of 163.3, 120.6, and 102.1 Mg C ha(-1) for red pine, oak and maple stands, respectively, vs. 83.0 Mg C ha(-1) for the control region. Even if the dynamics of organic matter (OM) in soil is very complex and affected by several pedo-climatic factors, a stepwise regression method indicates that SOCS values in the studied area could be predicted using the following parameters, i.e., sand, clay, lime, and total N contents, and C/N ratio. In particular, although the chemical and physical stabilization capacity of organic C by soil is believed to be mainly governed by clay content, regression analysis showed a positive correlation between SOCS and sand (R = 0.86(**)), whereas a negative correlation with clay (R = -0.77(**)) was observed, thus suggesting that most of this organic C occurs as particulate OM instead of mineral-associated OM. Although the proposed models do not take into account possible changes due to natural and anthropogenic processes, they represent a simple way that could be used to evaluate and/or monitor the potential of each forest plantation in immobilizing organic C in soil (thus

  6. Separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes on silica gel. Materials morphology and Raman excitation wavelength affect data interpretation.

    PubMed

    Dyke, Christopher A; Stewart, Michael P; Tour, James M

    2005-03-30

    In this report, procedures are discussed for the enrichment of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) types by simple filtration of the functionalized SWNTs through silica gel. This separation uses nanotube sidewall functionalization employing two different strategies. In the first approach, a crude mixture of metallic and semiconducting SWNTs was heavily functionalized with 4-tert-butylphenyl addends to impart solubility to the entire sample of SWNTs. Two major polarity fractions were rapidly filtered through silica gel, with the solvent being removed in vacuo, heated to 700 degrees C to remove the addends, and analyzed spectroscopically. The second approach uses two different aryldiazonium salts (one with a polar grafting group and one nonpolar), appended selectively onto the different SWNTs by means of titration and monitoring by UV analysis throughout the functionalization process. The different addends accentuate the polarity differences between the band-gap-based types permitting their partial separation on silica gel. Thermal treatment regenerated pristine SWNTs in enriched fractions. The processed samples were analyzed and characterized by Raman spectroscopy. A controlled functionalization method using 4-fluorophenyl and 4-iodophenyl addends was performed, and XPS analyses yielded data on the degree of functionalization needed to affect the van Hove singularities in the UV/vis/NIR spectra. Finally, we demonstrate that relative peak intensity changes in Raman spectra can be caused by morphological changes in SWNT bundling based on differing flocculation or deposition methods. Therefore a misleading impression of separations can result, underscoring the care needed in assessing efficacies in SWNT enrichment and the prerequisite use of multiple excitation wavelengths and similar flocculation or deposition methods in comparative analyses.

  7. Pulmonary exposure to single-walled carbon nanotubes does not affect the early immune response against Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) trigger pronounced inflammation and fibrosis in the lungs of mice following administration via pharyngeal aspiration or inhalation. Human exposure to SWCNT in an occupational setting may occur in conjunction with infections and this could yield enhanced or suppressed responses to the offending agent. Here, we studied whether the sequential exposure to SWCNT via pharyngeal aspiration and infection of mice with the ubiquitous intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii would impact on the immune response of the host against the parasite. Methods C57BL/6 mice were pre-exposed by pharyngeal administration of SWCNT (80 + 80 μg/mouse) for two consecutive days followed by intravenous injection with either 1x103 or 1x104 green fluorescence protein and luciferase-expressing T. gondii tachyzoites. The dissemination of T. gondii was monitored by in vivo bioluminescence imaging in real time for 7 days and by plaque formation. The inflammatory response was analysed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and by assessment of morphological changes and immune responses in lung and spleen. Results There were no differences in parasite distribution between mice only inoculated with T. gondii or those mice pre-exposed for 2 days to SWCNT before parasite inoculum. Lung and spleen histology and inflammation markers in BAL fluid reflected the effects of SWCNT exposure and T. gondii injection, respectively. We also noted that CD11c positive dendritic cells but not F4/80 positive macrophages retained SWCNT in the lungs 9 days after pharyngeal aspiration. However, co-localization of T. gondii with CD11c or F4/80 positive cells could not be observed in lungs or spleen. Pre-exposure to SWCNT did not affect the splenocyte response to T. gondii. Conclusions Taken together, our data indicate that pre-exposure to SWCNT does not enhance or suppress the early immune response to T. gondii in mice. PMID:22621311

  8. Stratification and Storage of Soil Organic Carbon and Nitrogen as Affected by Tillage Practices in the North China Plain.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Xue, Jian-Fu; Zhang, Xiang-Qian; Kong, Fan-Lei; Chen, Fu; Lal, Rattan; Zhang, Hai-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Tillage practices can redistribute the soil profiles, and thus affects soil organic carbon (SOC), and its storage. The stratification ratio (SR) can be an indicator of soil quality. This study was conducted to determine tillage effects on the profile distribution of certain soil properties in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and summer maize (Zea mays L.) systems in the North China Plain (NCP). Three tillage treatments, including no till (NT), rotary tillage (RT), and plow tillage (PT), were established in 2001 in Luancheng County, Hebei Province. The concentration, storage, and SR of SOC and soil total nitrogen (TN) were assessed in both the wheat and maize seasons. Compared with RT and PT, the mean SRs for all depth ratios of SOC under NT increased by 7.85% and 30.61% during the maize season, and by 14.67% and 30.91% during the wheat season, respectively. The SR of TN for 0-5:30-50 cm increased by 140%, 161%, and 161% in the maize season, and 266%, 154%, and 122% in the wheat season compared to the SR for 0-5:5-10 cm under NT, RT and PT, respectively. The data indicated that SOC and TN were both concentrated in the surface-soil layers (0-10 cm) under NT but were distributed relatively evenly through the soil profile under PT. Meanwhile, the storage of SOC and TN was higher under NT for the surface soil (0-10 cm) but was higher under PT for the deeper soil (30-50 cm). Furthermore, the storage of SOC and TN was significantly related to SR of SOC and TN along the whole soil profile (P<0.0001). Therefore, SR could be used to explain and indicate the changes in the storage of SOC and TN. Further, NT stratifies SOC and TN, enhances the topsoil SOC storage, and helps to improve SOC sequestration and soil quality.

  9. Variation in tree mortality and regeneration affect forest carbon recovery following fuel treatments and wildfire in the Lake Tahoe Basin, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Forest fuel treatments have been proposed as tools to stabilize carbon stocks in fire-prone forests in the Western U.S.A. Although fuel treatments such as thinning and burning are known to immediately reduce forest carbon stocks, there are suggestions that these losses may be paid back over the long-term if treatments sufficiently reduce future wildfire severity, or prevent deforestation. Although fire severity and post-fire tree regeneration have been indicated as important influences on long-term carbon dynamics, it remains unclear how natural variability in these processes might affect the ability of fuel treatments to protect forest carbon resources. We surveyed a wildfire where fuel treatments were put in place before fire and estimated the short-term impact of treatment and wildfire on aboveground carbon stocks at our study site. We then used a common vegetation growth simulator in conjunction with sensitivity analysis techniques to assess how predicted timescales of carbon recovery after fire are sensitive to variation in rates of fire-related tree mortality, and post-fire tree regeneration. Results We found that fuel reduction treatments were successful at ameliorating fire severity at our study site by removing an estimated 36% of aboveground biomass. Treated and untreated stands stored similar amounts of carbon three years after wildfire, but differences in fire severity were such that untreated stands maintained only 7% of aboveground carbon as live trees, versus 51% in treated stands. Over the long-term, our simulations suggest that treated stands in our study area will recover baseline carbon storage 10–35 years more quickly than untreated stands. Our sensitivity analysis found that rates of fire-related tree mortality strongly influence estimates of post-fire carbon recovery. Rates of regeneration were less influential on recovery timing, except when fire severity was high. Conclusions Our ability to predict the response of forest

  10. Resource Balancing Control Allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Bodson, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Next generation aircraft with a large number of actuators will require advanced control allocation methods to compute the actuator commands needed to follow desired trajectories while respecting system constraints. Previously, algorithms were proposed to minimize the l1 or l2 norms of the tracking error and of the control effort. The paper discusses the alternative choice of using the l1 norm for minimization of the tracking error and a normalized l(infinity) norm, or sup norm, for minimization of the control effort. The algorithm computes the norm of the actuator deflections scaled by the actuator limits. Minimization of the control effort then translates into the minimization of the maximum actuator deflection as a percentage of its range of motion. The paper shows how the problem can be solved effectively by converting it into a linear program and solving it using a simplex algorithm. Properties of the algorithm are investigated through examples. In particular, the min-max criterion results in a type of resource balancing, where the resources are the control surfaces and the algorithm balances these resources to achieve the desired command. A study of the sensitivity of the algorithms to the data is presented, which shows that the normalized l(infinity) algorithm has the lowest sensitivity, although high sensitivities are observed whenever the limits of performance are reached.

  11. Phytoplankton strategies for photosynthetic energy allocation.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Kimberly H; Jones, Bethan M

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton physiology is dynamic and highly responsive to the environment. Phytoplankton acclimate to changing environmental conditions by a complex reallocation of carbon and energy through metabolic pathways to optimize growth. Considering the tremendous diversity of phytoplankton, it is not surprising that different phytoplankton taxa use different strategies to partition carbon and energy resources. It has therefore been satisfying to discover that general principles of energetic stoichiometry appear to govern these complex processes and can be broadly applied to interpret phytoplankton distributions, productivity, and food web dynamics. The expectation of future changes in aquatic environments brought on by climate change warrants gathering knowledge about underlying patterns of photosynthetic energy allocation and their impacts on community structure and ecosystem productivity.

  12. Resource allocation using risk analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, T. F.; Eisenhawer, S. W.

    2003-01-01

    Allocating limited resources among competing priorities is an important problem in management. In this paper we describe an approach to resource allocation using risk as a metric. We call this approach the Logic-Evolved Decision (LED) approach because we use logic-models to generate an exhaustive set of competing options and to describe the often highly complex model used for evaluating the risk reduction achieved by different resource allocations among these options. The risk evaluation then proceeds using probabilistic or linguistic input data.

  13. Collaborative Resource Allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yeou-Fang; Wax, Allan; Lam, Raymond; Baldwin, John; Borden, Chester

    2007-01-01

    Collaborative Resource Allocation Networking Environment (CRANE) Version 0.5 is a prototype created to prove the newest concept of using a distributed environment to schedule Deep Space Network (DSN) antenna times in a collaborative fashion. This program is for all space-flight and terrestrial science project users and DSN schedulers to perform scheduling activities and conflict resolution, both synchronously and asynchronously. Project schedulers can, for the first time, participate directly in scheduling their tracking times into the official DSN schedule, and negotiate directly with other projects in an integrated scheduling system. A master schedule covers long-range, mid-range, near-real-time, and real-time scheduling time frames all in one, rather than the current method of separate functions that are supported by different processes and tools. CRANE also provides private workspaces (both dynamic and static), data sharing, scenario management, user control, rapid messaging (based on Java Message Service), data/time synchronization, workflow management, notification (including emails), conflict checking, and a linkage to a schedule generation engine. The data structure with corresponding database design combines object trees with multiple associated mortal instances and relational database to provide unprecedented traceability and simplify the existing DSN XML schedule representation. These technologies are used to provide traceability, schedule negotiation, conflict resolution, and load forecasting from real-time operations to long-range loading analysis up to 20 years in the future. CRANE includes a database, a stored procedure layer, an agent-based middle tier, a Web service wrapper, a Windows Integrated Analysis Environment (IAE), a Java application, and a Web page interface.

  14. Carbon Sources and Sinks of North America as Affected by Major Drought Events During the Past 30 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekonnen, Z. A.; Grant, R. F.

    2015-12-01

    The North American (NA) terrestrial biosphere has been a long-term carbon sink but impacts of climate extremes such as drought on ecosystem carbon exchange remained largely uncertain. Here, changes in biospheric carbon fluxes with recent climate change and impacts of the major droughts of the past 30 years on continental carbon cycle across NA were studied using a comprehensive mathematical process model, ecosys. In test of these model responses at continental scale, the spatial anomalies from long-term (1980 - 2010) means in modeled leaf area indices (LAI), fully prognostic in the model, during major drought events in 1988 and 2002 agreed well with those in AVHRR NDVI (geographically weighted regression, R2 = 0.84 in 1988, 0.71 in 2002). NA modeled net ecosystem productivity (NEP) declined by 92% (0.50 Pg C yr-1) and 90% (0.49 Pg C yr-1) from the long-term mean (+0.54 Pg C yr-1), in 1988 and 2002 respectively. These significant drops in NEP offset 28% of the long-term carbon gains from the long-term mean over the last three decades. Although, the long-term average modeled terrestrial carbon sink was estimated to offset ~30% of the fossil fuel emissions of NA, only 0.03 and 3.2% were offset in 1988 and 2002 leaving almost all fossil fuel emissions to the atmosphere. These major drought events that may be associated to frequent occurrences of El Niño-Southern Oscillation, controlled much of the continental scale interannual variability and mainly occurred in parts of the Great Plains, southwest US and northern Mexico. Although stronger carbon sinks were modeled in northern ecosystems as a result of greater gross primary productivity with longer growing season, projected increases in frequency and intensity of drought could enhance carbon release hence may reduce net carbon sink of the continent.

  15. Symbiodinium community composition in scleractinian corals is not affected by life-long exposure to elevated carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Sam H C; Fabricius, Katharina E; Humphrey, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is expected to negatively affect coral reefs, however little is known about how OA will change the coral-algal symbiosis on which reefs ultimately depend. This study investigated whether there would be differences in coral Symbiodinium types in response to OA, potentially improving coral performance. We used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region of ribosomal DNA to investigate the dominant types of Symbiodinium associating with six species of scleractinian coral that were exposed to elevated partial pressures of carbon dioxide (pCO2) in situ from settlement and throughout their lives. The study was conducted at three naturally occurring volcanic CO2 seeps (pCO2 ∼500 to 900 ppm, pHTotal 7.8 - 7.9) and adjacent control areas (pCO2 ∼390 ppm, pHTotal ∼8.0 - 8.05) in Papua New Guinea. The Symbiodinium associated with corals living in an extreme seep site (pCO2 >1000 ppm) were also examined. Ten clade C types and three clade D types dominated the 443 coral samples. Symbiodinium types strongly contrasted between coral species, however, no differences were observed due to CO2 exposure. Within five species, 85 - 95% of samples exhibited the same Symbiodinium type across all sites, with remaining rare types having no patterns attributable to CO2 exposure. The sixth species of coral displayed site specific differences in Symbiodinium types, unrelated to CO2 exposure. Symbiodinium types from the coral inhabiting the extreme CO2 seep site were found commonly throughout the moderate seeps and control areas. Our finding that symbiotic associations did not change in response to CO2 exposure suggest that, within the six coral hosts, none of the investigated 13 clade C and D Symbiodinium types had a selective advantage at high pCO2. Acclimatisation through changing symbiotic association therefore does not seem to be an option for Indo-Pacific corals to deal with future OA.

  16. Prey risk allocation in a grazing ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Gude, Justin A; Garrott, Robert A; Borkowski, John J; King, Fred

    2006-02-01

    Understanding the behaviorally mediated indirect effects of predators in ecosystems requires knowledge of predator-prey behavioral interactions. In predator-ungulate-plant systems, empirical research quantifying how predators affect ungulate group sizes and distribution, in the context of other influential variables, is particularly needed. The risk allocation hypothesis proposes that prey behavioral responses to predation risk depend on background frequencies of exposure to risk, and it can be used to make predictions about predator-ungulate-plant interactions. We determined non-predation variables that affect elk (Cervus elaphus) group sizes and distribution on a winter range in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) using logistic and log-linear regression on surveys of 513 1-km2 areas conducted over two years. Employing model selection techniques, we evaluated risk allocation and other a priori hypotheses of elk group size and distributional responses to wolf (Canis lupus) predation risk while accounting for influential non-wolf-predation variables. We found little evidence that wolves affect elk group sizes, which were strongly influenced by habitat type and hunting by humans. Following predictions from the risk allocation hypothesis, wolves likely created a more dynamic elk distribution in areas that they frequently hunted, as elk tended to move following wolf encounters in those areas. This response should dilute elk foraging pressure on plant communities in areas where they are frequently hunted by wolves. We predict that this should decrease the spatial heterogeneity of elk impacts on grasslands in areas that wolves frequently hunt. We also predict that this should decrease browsing pressure on heavily browsed woody plant stands in certain areas, which is supported by recent research in the GYE.

  17. Exposure for ultrafine carbon particles at levels below detectable pulmonary inflammation affects cardiovascular performance in spontaneously hypertensive rats*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Exposure to particulate matter is a risk factor for cardiopulmonary disease but the related molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Previously we studied cardiovascular responses in healthy WKY rats following inhalation exposure to ultrafine carbon particles (UfCPs...

  18. Assessment of allowance mechanism China's carbon trading pilots

    DOE PAGES

    Xiong, Ling; Shen, Bo; Qi, Shaozhou; ...

    2015-08-28

    The allowance mechanism is one of the core and sensitive aspects in design of a carbon trading scheme and affects the compliance cost for each company covered under the scheme. By examining China's allowance mechanism from two aspects including allowance allocation and allowance distribution, this paper compares China's carbon trading pilots with the EU Emissions Trading System and California Cap-and-Trade Program, and through the comparison identify issues that affect the efficiency of the pilots. The paper also recommends course of actions to strengthen China's existing pilots and build valuable experiences for the establishment of the national cap-and-trade system in China.

  19. Stratification of carbon fractions and carbon management index in deep soil affected by the Grain-to-Green Program in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fazhu; Yang, Gaihe; Han, Xinhui; Feng, Yongzhong; Ren, Guangxin

    2014-01-01

    Conversion of slope cropland to perennial vegetation has a significant impact on soil organic carbon (SOC) stock in A horizon. However, the impact on SOC and its fraction stratification is still poorly understood in deep soil in Loess Hilly Region (LHR) of China. Samples were collected from three typical conversion lands, Robinia psendoacacia (RP), Caragana Korshinskii Kom (CK), and abandoned land (AB), which have been converted from slope croplands (SC) for 30 years in LHR. Contents of SOC, total nitrogen (TN), particulate organic carbon (POC), and labile organic carbon (LOC), and their stratification ratios (SR) and carbon management indexes (CMI) were determined on soil profiles from 0 to 200 cm. Results showed that the SOC, TN, POC and LOC stocks of RP were significantly higher than that of SC in soil layers of 0-10, 10-40, 40-100 and 100-200 cm (P<0.05). Soil layer of 100-200 cm accounted for 27.38-36.62%, 25.10-32.91%, 21.59-31.69% and 21.08-26.83% to SOC, TN, POC and LOC stocks in lands of RP, CK and AB. SR values were >2.0 in most cases of RP, CK and AB. Moreover, CMI values of RP, CK, and AB increased by 11.61-61.53% in soil layer of 100-200 cm compared with SC. Significant positive correlations between SOC stocks and CMI or SR values of both surface soil and deep soil layers indicated that they were suitable indicators for soil quality and carbon changes evaluation. The Grain-to-Green Program (GTGP) had strong influence on improving quantity and activity of SOC pool through all soil layers of converted lands, and deep soil organic carbon should be considered in C cycle induced by GTGP. It was concluded that converting slope croplands to RP forestlands was the most efficient way for sequestering C in LHR soils.

  20. Short-term Fate of Carbon in two Woody Species Under Contrasting Resources Availability: Insights From a 13CO2 Pulse Labeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mambelli, S.; Dawson, T. E.; Bird, J. A.; Torn, M. S.; Gaudinski, J. B.

    2003-12-01

    In response to the environment, plants adjust allocation patterns to maintain a functional balance between the activities of roots and shoots such that belowground resources are acquired in approximate balance with aboveground resources. Changes in allocation driven by changes in environmental conditions may affect the amount of carbon stored in plant tissues, released by the root system, and ultimately sequestered into the soil. The aim of this study was to quantify the allocation belowground of recently fixed carbon in contrasting species and resources availability. We tested the hypothesis that carbon limitation and high nitrogen supply both negatively affect carbon transport to roots, causing a reduction of the carbon flow into the soil rhizosphere. Two woody species, a conifer (Pinus Ponderosa) and a deciduous tree (Acer Rubrum) were grown in a greenhouse under a factorial of light and nitrogen regimes (full light/shade and limited/excess nitrogen). At the stage of full leaf expansion plants were pulse-labeled by addition of 13CO2 and harvested after 0, 7 and 30 days. During the experiment the treatments affected the pattern of plant biomass allocation. Shade negatively influenced belowground growth and Maple showed a more conservative response than Pine. High supply of nitrogen also reduced allocation to roots but only when plants were grown under light. Preliminary results show that the initial amount of recently fixed carbon into the rhizosphere was in general higher under Pine. However, after 7 and 30 days, the new soil carbon pool increased only in the rhizosphere of carbon limited Pine seedlings. These findings suggest that belowground respiration was negatively affected or, alternatively, that the exudates released were less easily decomposable

  1. [Net carbon exchange and its environmental affecting factors in a forest plantation in Badaling, Beijing of China].

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiang; Chen, Wen-Jing; Li, Chun-Yi; Zha, Tian-Shan; Wu, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Jia, Xin

    2013-11-01

    By using eddy covariance technique, a year-round (November, 2011-October, 2012) continuous measurement of net ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange (NEE) was conducted in a 4-year old mixed forest plantation in Badaling of Beijing. The forest plantation ecosystem was a net carbon sink in July and August, but a carbon source in the rest months. The monthly net carbon loss and uptake were the largest in April and July, respectively. The annual net ecosystem productivity was (-256 +/- 21) g C x m(-2) x a(-1), in which, the ecosystem respiration was (950 +/- 36) g C x m(-2) x a(-1), and the gross ecosystem productivity was (694 +/- 17) g C x m(-2) x a(-1). The nighttime NEE increased exponentially with the soil temperature at 10 cm depth, with the estimated temperature sensitivity of ecosystem respiration (Q10 ) being 2.2. During the growth season (May-September), the daytime NEE increased with photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) as described by the Michaelis-Menten rectangular hyperbola. The ecosystem quantum yield varied seasonally, ranging from 0.0219 micromol CO2 x micromol(-1) in May to 0.0506 micromol CO2 x micromol(-1) in July. The maximum carbon assimilation rate and the average daytime respiration followed the seasonal trends of PAR and air temperature. In July and August, vapor pressure deficit and soil moisture played a significant role in determining daytime NEE.

  2. Factors Affecting 14C Ages of Lacustrine Carbonates: Timing and Duration of the Last Highstand Lake in the Lahontan Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, L.

    1993-01-01

    Two processes contribute to inaccurate 14C age estimates of carbonates precipitated within the Lahontan basin, NevadaCalifornia: low initial 14C/C ratios in lake water (reservoir effect) and addition of modern carbon to calcium carbonate after its precipitation. The mast reliable set of 14C ages on carbonates from elevations > 1310 m in the Pyramid and Walker Lake subbasins indicate that lakes in all seven Lahontan subbasins coalesced ???14,200 14C yr B.P. forming Lake Lahontan. Lake Lahontan achieved its 1330-m highstand elevation by ???13,800 14 C yr B.P. and receded to 1310 m by ???13,700 14C yr B.P. Calculations, based on measured carbonate-accumulation rates, of the amount of time Lake Lahontan exceeded 1310 and 1330 m (500 and 50 yr) are consistent with this chronology. The timing of the Lake Lahontan highstand is of interest because of the linkage of highstand climates with proximity to the polar jet stream. The brevity of the Lahontan highstand is interpreted to indicate that the core of the southern branch of the polar jet stream remained only briefly over the Lahontan basin.

  3. The Role of Snow Cover in Affecting Pan-Arctic Soil Freeze/Thaw and Carbon Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Y.; Kimball, J. S.; Rawlins, M. A.; Moghaddam, M.; Euskirchen, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite data records spanning the past 3 decades indicate widespread reductions (~0.8-1.3 days decade-1) in mean annual snow cover and frozen season duration across the pan-Arctic domain, coincident with regional climate warming. How the northern soil carbon pool responds to these changes will have a large impact on projected regional and global climate trends. The objective of this study was to assess how northern soil thermal and carbon dynamics respond to changes in surface snow cover and freeze/thaw (F/T) cycles indicated from satellite observations. We developed a coupled permafrost, hydrology and carbon model framework to investigate the sensitivity of soil organic carbon stocks and soil decomposition to recent climate variations across the pan-Arctic region from 1982 to 2010. The model simulations were also evaluated against satellite observation records on snow cover and F/T processes. Our results indicate that surface warming promotes wide-spread soil thawing and active layer deepening due to strong control of surface air temperature on upper (<0.5 m) soil temperatures during the warm season. Earlier spring snowmelt and shorter seasonal snow cover duration with regional warming will mostly likely enhance soil warming in warmer climate zones (mean annual Tair>-5°C) and promote permafrost degradation in these areas. Our results also show that seasonal snow cover has a large impact on soil temperatures, whereby increases in snow cover promote deeper (≥0.5 m) soil layer warming and soil respiration, while inhibiting soil decomposition from surface (≤0.2 m) soil layers, especially in colder climate zones (mean annual Tair≤-10 °C). This non-linear relationship between snow cover and soil decomposition is particularly important in permafrost areas, where a large amount of soil carbon is stored in deep perennial frozen soils that are potentially vulnerable to thawing, with resulting mobilization and accelerated carbon losses from near-term climate change.

  4. Applicability and Limitations of Reliability Allocation Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Reliability allocation process may be described as the process of assigning reliability requirements to individual components within a system to attain the specified system reliability. For large systems, the allocation process is often performed at different stages of system design. The allocation process often begins at the conceptual stage. As the system design develops, more information about components and the operating environment becomes available, different allocation methods can be considered. Reliability allocation methods are usually divided into two categories: weighting factors and optimal reliability allocation. When properly applied, these methods can produce reasonable approximations. Reliability allocation techniques have limitations and implied assumptions that need to be understood by system engineers. Applying reliability allocation techniques without understanding their limitations and assumptions can produce unrealistic results. This report addresses weighting factors, optimal reliability allocation techniques, and identifies the applicability and limitations of each reliability allocation technique.

  5. Particle size of calcium carbonate does not affect apparent and standardized total tract digestibility of calcium, retention of calcium, or growth performance of growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Merriman, L A; Stein, H H

    2016-09-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate particle size of calcium carbonate used in diets fed to growing pigs. Experiment 1 was conducted to determine apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD), standardized total tract digestibility (STTD), and retention of Ca among diets containing calcium carbonate produced to different particle sizes, and Exp. 2 was conducted to determine if growth performance of weanling pigs is affected by particle size of calcium carbonate. In Exp. 1, 4 diets based on corn and potato protein isolate were formulated to contain 0.70% Ca and 0.33% standardized total tract digestible P, but the calcium carbonate used in the diets was ground to 4 different particle sizes (200, 500, 700, or 1,125 μm). A Ca-free diet was formulated to determine basal endogenous losses of Ca. In Exp. 2, 4 diets were based on corn and soybean meal and the only difference among diets was that each diet contained calcium carbonate ground to the 4 particle sizes used in Exp. 1. In Exp. 1, 40 barrows (15.42 ± 0.70 kg initial BW) were allotted to the 5 diets with 8 replicate pigs per diet using a randomized complete block design, and in Exp. 2, 128 pigs with an initial BW of 9.61 ± 0.09 kg were randomly allotted to 4 experimental diets. Results of Exp. 1 indicated that basal endogenous losses of Ca were 0.329 g/kg DMI. The ATTD of Ca was 70.0 ± 3.2, 74.3 ± 2.7, 70.0 ± 2.9, and 72.1 ± 2.7 and the STTD of Ca was 74.2 ± 3.2, 78.5 ± 2.7, 74.1 ± 2.9, and 76.2 ± 2.7 for calcium carbonate ground to 200, 500, 700, or 1,125 μm, respectively. Retention of Ca was 67.4 ± 3.1, 70.4 ± 2.6, 63.9 ± 2.8, and 67.2 ± 2.2 for diets containing calcium carbonate ground to 200, 500, 700, or 1,125 μm, respectively. There were no differences among diets for ATTD of Ca, STTD of Ca, or retention of Ca. The ATTD of P was 64.5 ± 1.7, 66.8 ± 2.6, 64.2 ± 3.0, and 63.2 ± 1.7% and retention of P was 61.4 ± 1.4, 63.8 ± 2.8, 61.9 ± 2.8, and 60.9 ± 1.5 for diets containing calcium

  6. Running Title: C and N Allocation in Pine

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, J. Timothy

    1996-12-01

    A long standing challenge has been understanding how plants and ecosystems respond to shifts in the balance of resource availabilities. The continuing rise in atmospheric CO{sub 2} will induce changes in the availability and use of several terrestrial ecosystem resources. We report on the acquisition and allocation of carbon and nitrogen in Pinus ponderosa Laws. seedlings grown at three levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (370, 525, and 700 {micro}mol mol{sup -1}) and three levels of soil nitrogen supply in a controlled environment experiment. Nitrogen was applied (0, 100, and 200 {micro}g N g soil{sup -1}) at planting and again at week 26 of a 58-week, 4-harvest experiment. At the final harvest, plants grown with variety low available soil nitrogen showed no significant response to atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Plants at higher N levels responded positively to CO{sub 2} with the highest biomass at the middle CO{sub 2} level. Plants growing at the lowest N levels immediately allocated a relatively large portion of their nitrogen and biomass to roots. Plants growing at near present ambient CO{sub 2} levels allocated relatively little material to roots when N was abundant but moved both carbon and nitrogen below-ground when N was withheld. Plants growing at higher CO{sub 2} levels, allocated more C and N to roots even when N was abundant, and made only small shifts in allocation patterns when N was no longer supplied. In general, allocation of C and N to roots tended to increase when N supply was restricted and also with increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} level. These allocation responses were consistent with patterns suggesting a functional balance in the acquisition of above-ground versus below-ground resources. In particular, variation in whole tree average nitrogen concentration can explain 68% of the variation ratio of root biomass to shoot biomass across the harvests. The capability to respond to temporal variation in nutrient conditions, the dynamics of nutrient

  7. Task allocation in a distributed computing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Walter D.

    1987-01-01

    A conceptual framework is examined for task allocation in distributed systems. Application and computing system parameters critical to task allocation decision processes are discussed. Task allocation techniques are addressed which focus on achieving a balance in the load distribution among the system's processors. Equalization of computing load among the processing elements is the goal. Examples of system performance are presented for specific applications. Both static and dynamic allocation of tasks are considered and system performance is evaluated using different task allocation methodologies.

  8. Hydraulic redistribution of soil water by roots affects whole-stand evapotranspiration and net ecosystem carbon exchange.

    PubMed

    Domec, Jean-Christophe; King, John S; Noormets, Asko; Treasure, Emrys; Gavazzi, Michael J; Sun, Ge; McNulty, Steven G

    2010-07-01

    *Hydraulic redistribution (HR) of water via roots from moist to drier portions of the soil occurs in many ecosystems, potentially influencing both water use and carbon assimilation. *By measuring soil water content, sap flow and eddy covariance, we investigated the temporal variability of HR in a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantation during months of normal and below-normal precipitation, and examined its effects on tree transpiration, ecosystem water use and carbon exchange. *The occurrence of HR was explained by courses of reverse flow through roots. As the drought progressed, HR maintained soil moisture above 0.15 cm(3) cm(-3) and increased transpiration by 30-50%. HR accounted for 15-25% of measured total site water depletion seasonally, peaking at 1.05 mm d(-1). The understory species depended on water redistributed by the deep-rooted overstory pine trees for their early summer water supply. Modeling carbon flux showed that in the absence of HR, gross ecosystem productivity and net ecosystem exchange could be reduced by 750 and 400 g C m(-2) yr(-1), respectively. *Hydraulic redistribution mitigated the effects of soil drying on understory and stand evapotranspiration and had important implications for net primary productivity by maintaining this whole ecosystem as a carbon sink.

  9. Biomass for biorefining: Resources, allocation, utilization, and policies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The importance of biomass in the development of renewable energy, the availability and allocation of biomass, its preparation for use in biorefineries, and the policies affecting biomass are discussed in this chapter. Bioenergy development will depend on maximizing the amount of biomass obtained fro...

  10. 77 FR 26698 - Allocation of Mortgage Insurance Premiums

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BH84 Allocation of Mortgage Insurance Premiums AGENCY... insurance premiums to determine the amount of the prepaid premium that is treated as qualified residence..., Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization, and Job Creation Act of 2010. The regulations affect taxpayers who...

  11. Non-deforestation fire vs. fossil fuel combustion: the source of CO2 emissions affects the global carbon cycle and climate responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Jean-Sébastien; Damon Matthews, H.

    2016-04-01

    Non-deforestation fire - i.e., fire that is typically followed by the recovery of natural vegetation - is arguably the most influential disturbance in terrestrial ecosystems, thereby playing a major role in carbon exchanges and affecting many climatic processes. The radiative effect from a given atmospheric CO2 perturbation is the same for fire and fossil fuel combustion. However, major differences exist per unit of CO2 emitted between the effects of non-deforestation fire vs. fossil fuel combustion on the global carbon cycle and climate, because (1) fossil fuel combustion implies a net transfer of carbon from geological reservoirs to the atmospheric, oceanic, and terrestrial pools, whereas fire occurring in terrestrial ecosystems does not; (2) the average lifetime of the atmospheric CO2 increase is longer when originating from fossil fuel combustion compared to fire, due to the strong vegetation regrowth following fire disturbances in terrestrial ecosystems; and (3) other impacts, for example on land surface albedo, also differ between fire and fossil fuel combustion. The main purpose of this study is to illustrate the consequences from these fundamental differences between fossil fuel combustion and non-deforestation fires using 1000-year simulations of a coupled climate-carbon model with interactive vegetation. We assessed emissions from both pulse and stable fire regime changes, considering both the gross (carbon released from combustion) and net (fire-caused change in land carbon, also accounting for vegetation decomposition and regrowth, as well as climate-carbon feedbacks) fire CO2 emissions. In all cases, we found substantial differences from equivalent amounts of emissions produced by fossil fuel combustion. These findings suggest that side-by-side comparisons of non-deforestation fire and fossil fuel CO2 emissions - implicitly implying that they have similar effects per unit of CO2 emitted - should therefore be avoided, particularly when these comparisons

  12. Mechanical behavior of laminated carbon fiber composites under pin loading and affecting factors on the bearing strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maikuma, Hironori; Kubomura, Kenji

    1992-07-01

    Results are presented on measurements of the bearing strength of four pitch-based and two PAN-based carbon-fiber composite materials of (0 deg/ +,- 45 deg/ 90 deg)3s laminate specimens. The bearing strength was correlated with the mechanical properties of longitudinal reinforcing fibers, and with observations of microstructural damage. It was found that, in both the high tensile and high modulus carbon-fiber composite materials, the full bearing strength develops when the edge to distance ratio equals to or is larger than 3.0, and the side distance ratio is equal to or is larger than 4.0. As the fiber strain to failure becomes higher and also as the longitudinal compressive strength of unidirectional composites becames higher, the bearing strength becomes higher. No corrrelation was found between the tensile strength of the fiber and the bearing strength.

  13. Regional Disparities in the Allocation of China's Higher Education Resources from the Perspective of Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Bao

    2012-01-01

    This article attempts to analyze the changing circumstances of the regional disparities in the allocation of China's higher educational resources before and after the increase in college enrollments, as well as the mechanisms that have affected these circumstances. The conclusions are that regional disparities in the allocation of China's funding…

  14. Task allocation among multiple intelligent robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasser, L.; Bekey, G.

    1987-01-01

    Researchers describe the design of a decentralized mechanism for allocating assembly tasks in a multiple robot assembly workstation. Currently, the approach focuses on distributed allocation to explore its feasibility and its potential for adaptability to changing circumstances, rather than for optimizing throughput. Individual greedy robots make their own local allocation decisions using both dynamic allocation policies which propagate through a network of allocation goals, and local static and dynamic constraints describing which robots are elibible for which assembly tasks. Global coherence is achieved by proper weighting of allocation pressures propagating through the assembly plan. Deadlock avoidance and synchronization is achieved using periodic reassessments of local allocation decisions, ageing of allocation goals, and short-term allocation locks on goals.

  15. Cr(Vi) reduction capacity of activated sludge as affected by nitrogen and carbon sources, microbial acclimation and cell multiplication.

    PubMed

    Ferro Orozco, A M; Contreras, E M; Zaritzky, N E

    2010-04-15

    The objectives of the present work were: (i) to analyze the capacity of activated sludge to reduce hexavalent chromium using different carbon sources as electron donors in batch reactors, (ii) to determine the relationship between biomass growth and the amount of Cr(VI) reduced considering the effect of the nitrogen to carbon source ratio, and (iii) to determine the effect of the Cr(VI) acclimation stage on the performance of the biological chromium reduction assessing the stability of the Cr(VI) reduction capacity of the activated sludge. The highest specific Cr(VI) removal rate (q(Cr)) was attained with cheese whey or lactose as electron donors decreasing in the following order: cheese whey approximately lactose>glucose>citrate>acetate. Batch assays with different nitrogen to carbon source ratio demonstrated that biological Cr(VI) reduction is associated to the cell multiplication phase; as a result, maximum Cr(VI) removal rates occur when there is no substrate limitation. The biomass can be acclimated to the presence of Cr(VI) and generate new cells that maintain the ability to reduce chromate. Therefore, the activated sludge process could be applied to a continuous Cr(VI) removal process.

  16. Trade, transport, and sinks extend the carbon dioxide responsibility of countries: An editorial essay

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Glen P; Marland, Gregg; Hertwich, Edgar G.; Saikku, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Globalization and the dynamics of ecosystem sinks need be considered in post-Kyoto climate negotiations as they increasingly affect the carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere. Currently, the allocation of responsibility for greenhouse gas mitigation is based on territorial emissions from fossil-fuel combustion, process emissions and some land-use emissions. However, at least three additional factors can significantly alter a country's impact on climate from carbon dioxide emissions. First, international trade causes a separation of consumption from production, reducing domestic pollution at the expense of foreign producers, or vice versa. Second, international transportation emissions are not allocated to countries for the purpose of mitigation. Third, forest growth absorbs carbon dioxide and can contribute to both carbon sequestration and climate change protection. Here we quantify how these three factors change the carbon dioxide emissions allocated to China, Japan, Russia, USA, and European Union member countries. We show that international trade can change the carbon dioxide currently allocated to countries by up to 60% and that forest expansion can turn some countries into net carbon sinks. These factors are expected to become more dominant as fossil-fuel combustion and process emissions are mitigated and as international trade and forest sinks continue to grow. Emission inventories currently in wide-spread use help to understand the global carbon cycle, but for long-term climate change mitigation a deeper understanding of the interaction between the carbon cycle and society is needed. Restructuring international trade and investment flows to meet environmental objectives, together with the inclusion of forest sinks, are crucial issues that need consideration in the design of future climate policies. And even these additional issues do not capture the full impact of changes in the carbon cycle on the global climate system.

  17. The Discipline of Asset Allocation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petzel, Todd E.

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of asset allocation for college/university endowment funds focuses on three levels of risk: (1) the absolute risk of the portfolio (usually leading to asset diversification); (2) the benchmark risk (usually comparison with peer institutions; and (3) personal career risk (which may incline managers toward maximizing short-term returns,…

  18. Administrators' Decisions about Resource Allocation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, William E.; Folkins, John W.; Hakel, Milton D.; Kennell, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    Do academic administrators make decisions about resource allocation differently depending on the discipline receiving the funding? Does an administrator's academic identity influence these decisions? This study explored those questions with a sample of 1,690 academic administrators at doctoral-research universities. Participants used fictional…

  19. Resource Allocation: A Participatory Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Alban E.

    Whether a participatory process for resource allocation in a public community college setting occurs depends upon several key factors: (1) the leadership style of the institutional chief executive officer; (2) the administrative organizational structure of the institution; (3) the relationship which exists between and among members of the various…

  20. Ovariectomy in grassh