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Sample records for affects cardiac function

  1. Cardiac tamponade as an independent condition affecting the relationship between the plasma B-type natriuretic peptide levels and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Minai, Kosuke; Komukai, Kimiaki; Arase, Satoshi; Nagoshi, Tomohisa; Matsuo, Seiichiro; Ogawa, Kazuo; Kayama, Yosuke; Inada, Keiichi; Tanigawa, Shin-Ichi; Takemoto, Tomoyuki; Sekiyama, Hiroshi; Date, Taro; Ogawa, Takayuki; Taniguchi, Ikuo; Yoshimura, Michihiro

    2013-07-01

    Plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is finely regulated by the cardiac function and several extracardiac factors. Therefore, the relationship between the plasma BNP levels and the severity of heart failure sometimes seems inconsistent. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the plasma BNP levels in patients with cardiac tamponade and their changes after pericardial drainage. This study included 14 patients with cardiac tamponade who underwent pericardiocentesis. The cardiac tamponade was due to malignant diseases in 13 patients and uremia in 1 patient. The plasma BNP levels were measured before and 24-48 h after drainage. Although the patients reported severe symptoms of heart failure, their plasma BNP levels were only 71.2 ± 11.1 pg/ml before drainage. After appropriate drainage, the plasma BNP levels increased to 186.0 ± 22.5 pg/ml, which was significantly higher than that before drainage (P = 0.0002). In patients with cardiac tamponade, the plasma BNP levels were low, probably because of impaired ventricular stretching, and the levels significantly increased in response to the primary condition after drainage. This study demonstrates an additional condition that affects the relationship between the plasma BNP levels and cardiac function. If inconsistency is seen in the relationship between the plasma BNP levels and clinical signs of heart failure, the presence of cardiac tamponade should therefore be considered.

  2. Cardiac function and survival are affected by crude oil in larval red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus.

    PubMed

    Khursigara, Alexis J; Perrichon, Prescilla; Martinez Bautista, Naim; Burggren, Warren W; Esbaugh, Andrew J

    2017-02-01

    Following exposure to weathered and non-weathered oil, lethal and sub-lethal impacts on red drum larvae were assessed using survival, morphological, and cardiotoxicity assays. The LC50 for red drum ranged from 14.6 (10.3-20.9) to 21.3 (19.1-23.8) μgl(-1) ΣPAH with no effect of exposure timing during the pre-hatch window or oil weathering. Similarly, morphological deformities showed dose responses in the low ppb range. Cardiac output showed similar sensitivity resulting in a major 70% reduction after exposure to 2.6μgl(-1) ΣPAH. This cardiac failure was driven by reduced stroke volume rather than bradycardia, meaning that in some species, cardiac function is more sensitive than previously thought. After the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, much of this type of work has primarily focused on pelagic species with little known about fast developing estuarine species. These results demonstrate similarity sensitivity of the red drum as their pelagic counter parts, and more importantly, that cardiac function is dramatically reduced in concert with pericardial edema.

  3. Atrial natriuretic peptide affects cardiac remodeling, function, heart failure, and survival in a mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Gladysheva, Inna P; Fan, Tai-Hwang M; Sullivan, Ryan; Houng, Aiilyan K; Reed, Guy L

    2014-03-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a frequent cause of heart failure and death. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a biomarker of dilated cardiomyopathy, but there is controversy whether ANP modulates the development of heart failure. Therefore, we examined whether ANP affects heart failure, cardiac remodeling, function, and survival in a well-characterized, transgenic model of dilated cardiomyopathy. Mice with dilated cardiomyopathy with normal ANP levels survived longer than mice with partial ANP (P<0.01) or full ANP deficiency (P<0.001). In dilated cardiomyopathy mice, ANP protected against the development of heart failure as indicated by reduced lung water, alveolar congestion, pleural effusions, etc. ANP improved systolic function and reduced cardiomegaly. Pathological cardiac remodeling was diminished in mice with normal ANP as indicated by decreased ventricular interstitial and perivascular fibrosis. Mice with dilated cardiomyopathy and normal ANP levels had better systolic function (P<0.001) than mice with dilated cardiomyopathy and ANP deficiency. Dilated cardiomyopathy was associated with diminished cardiac transcripts for NP receptors A and B in mice with normal ANP and ANP deficiency, but transcripts for NP receptor C and C-type natriuretic peptide were selectively altered in mice with dilated cardiomyopathy and ANP deficiency. Taken together, these data indicate that ANP has potent effects in experimental dilated cardiomyopathy that reduce the development of heart failure, prevent pathological remodeling, preserve systolic function, and reduce mortality. Despite the apparent overlap in physiological function between the NPs, these data suggest that the role of ANP in dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure is not compensated physiologically by other NPs.

  4. Impairment of diastolic function in adult patients affected by osteogenesis imperfecta clinically asymptomatic for cardiac disease: casuality or causality?

    PubMed

    Migliaccio, Silvia; Barbaro, Giuseppe; Fornari, Rachele; Di Lorenzo, Gabriella; Celli, Mauro; Lubrano, Carla; Falcone, Stefania; Fabbrini, Elisa; Greco, Emanuela; Zambrano, Anna; Brama, Marina; Prossomariti, Giancarlo; Marzano, Sara; Marini, Mario; Conti, Francesco; D'Eufemia, Patrizia; Spera, Giovanni

    2009-01-09

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare inherited connective disorder causing increased bone fragility and low bone mass. OI includes severe bone fragility, impaired dentinogenesis, with less common alterations in the joints, blood vessels, heart valves, skin. Interestingly, description of left ventricular rupture, aortic dissection and heart valves incompetence has been previously described. Death may occur in OI patients for cardiac disease in asyntomatic subjects. Aim of our study has been to evaluate the presence of potential subclinical cardiac disorders and to characterize cardiac functional parameters by echocardiography in adults with OI in absence of cardiac symptoms. Forty patients (21 females and 19 males) affected by type I, III, IV OI and 40 control subjects (20 females and 20 males) were evaluated in the study. Patients and controls underwent clinical examination, screening for endocrine and metabolic disorders, 12-lead electrocardiogram and echocardiogram. In particular, all subjects were evaluated by two-dimensional echocardiography with continuous- and pulse-wave Doppler. Patients and controls belonged to NYHA class I and no significant electrocardiographic alteration was documented in both groups. Thirty-eight patients (95%) showed valvular regurgitation compared to one control subject (2.5%; P<0.001). As regards the diastolic function parameters, in OI patients E wave velocity was reduced by 23% (95% CI: 9% to 29%; P<0.001), E/A ratio was reduced by 17% (95% CI: 15% to 26%; P<0.001) while isovolumetric relaxation time (IRT) was increased by 47% (95% CI: 26% to 53%; P<0.001) and E wave deceleration time (DT) was increased by 18% (95% CI: 13% to 26%; P<0.001) compared to controls. In conclusion, our data indicate that adult patients affected by OI have an altered diastolic function in absence of other metabolic alterations. These diastolic echocardiographic parameters might worsen over time, especially if other cardiovascular risk factors (e

  5. Biomechanics of Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Voorhees, Andrew P.; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-01-01

    The heart pumps blood to maintain circulation and ensure the delivery of oxygenated blood to all the organs of the body. Mechanics play a critical role in governing and regulating heart function under both normal and pathological conditions. Biological processes and mechanical stress are coupled together in regulating myocyte function and extracellular matrix structure thus controlling heart function. Here we offer a brief introduction to the biomechanics of left ventricular function and then summarize recent progress in the study of the effects of mechanical stress on ventricular wall remodeling and cardiac function as well as the effects of wall mechanical properties on cardiac function in normal and dysfunctional hearts. Various mechanical models to determine wall stress and cardiac function in normal and diseased hearts with both systolic and diastolic dysfunction are discussed. The results of these studies have enhanced our understanding of the biomechanical mechanism in the development and remodeling of normal and dysfunctional hearts. Biomechanics provide a tool to understand the mechanism of left ventricular remodeling in diastolic and systolic dysfunction and guidance in designing and developing new treatments. PMID:26426462

  6. Timing of obstetrical assistance affects peripartal cardiac autonomic function and early maternal behavior of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Levente; Kézér, Fruzsina Luca; Ruff, Ferenc; Szenci, Ottó

    2016-10-15

    Peripartal autonomic nervous system function and early maternal behavior were investigated in 79 multiparous Holstein-Friesian cows. Animals were allocated into four groups based on the technology of calving management: 1) unassisted calving in a group pen (UCG; N=19), 2) unassisted calving in an individual pen (UCI; N=21), 3) assisted calving with appropriately timed obstetrical assistance (ACA; N=20), and 4) assisted calving with premature obstetrical assistance (ACP; N=19). Heart rate, the high frequency (HF) component of heart rate variability (HRV) as a measure of vagal activity and the ratio between the low frequency (LF) and HF components (LF/HF ratio) as a parameter of sympathetic nervous system activity were calculated. Heart rate and HRV parameters were presented as areas under the curves (AUC) for the following periods: 1) prepartum period (between 96h before the onset of calving restlessness and the onset of restlessness), 2) parturition (between the onset calving restlessness and delivery), and 3) postpartum period (during a 48-h period after delivery). Pain-related behaviors were recorded during parturition (i.e., the occurrence of vocalization and stretching the neck towards the abdomen) and during a 2-h observation period after calving (i.e., the occurrence of vocalization, stretching the neck towards the abdomen and the duration of standing with an arched back). Early maternal behavior was observed during the first 2h following calving as follows: 1) latency and duration of sniffing calf's head/body, and 2) latency and duration of licking calf's head/body. No difference was found across groups in autonomic function before the onset of calving restlessness. Area under the heart rate curve was higher in ACP cows during parturition (39.6±2.5beats/min×h) compared to UCG, UCI and ACA animals (AUC=13.1±0.9beats/min×h, AUC=22.3±1.4beats/min×h and AUC=25.0±2.1beats/min×h, respectively). Area under the heart rate curve did not differ across the UCG

  7. Endogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism affects quality of life and cardiac morphology and function in young and middle-aged patients.

    PubMed

    Biondi, B; Palmieri, E A; Fazio, S; Cosco, C; Nocera, M; Saccà, L; Filetti, S; Lombardi, G; Perticone, F

    2000-12-01

    To determine the clinical impact of endogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism, specific symptoms and signs of thyroid hormone excess and quality of life were assessed in 23 patients (3 males and 20 females; mean age, 43 +/- 9 yr) and 23 age-, sex-, and lifestyle-matched normal subjects by using the Symptoms Rating Scale and the Short Form 36 Health Survey questionnaires. Because the heart is one of the main target organs of the thyroid hormone, cardiac morphology and function were also investigated by means of standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG), 24-h Holter ECG, and complete Doppler echocardiography. Stable endogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism had been diagnosed in all patients at least 6 months before the study (TSH, 0.15 +/- 0.1 mU/L; free T(3), 6.9 +/- 1.1, pmol/L; free T(4), 17.2 +/- 2.3, pmol/L). Fifteen patients were affected by multinodular goiter, and eight patients by autonomously functioning thyroid nodule. The mean Symptoms Rating Scale score (9. 8 +/- 5.5 vs. 4.3 +/- 2.2, P: < 0.001) and both the mental (36.1 +/- 9.5 vs. 50.0 +/- 8.5, P: < 0.001) and physical (42.6 +/- 8.0 vs. 55. 6 +/- 4.1, P: < 0.001) component scores of Short Form 36 Health Survey documented a significant prevalence of specific symptoms and signs of thyroid hormone excess and notable impairment of quality of life in patients. Holter ECG showed a higher prevalence of atrial premature beats in endogenous subclinical hyperthyroid patients than in the controls, but the difference was not statistically significant, although the average heart rate was significantly increased in the patients (P: < 0.001). An increase of left ventricular mass (162 +/- 24 vs. 132 +/- 22 g, P: < 0.001) due to the increase of septal (P: = 0.025) and posterior wall (P: = 0.004) thickness was observed in patients. Systolic function was enhanced in patients as shown by the significant increase of both fractional shortening (P: = 0.005) and mean velocity of heart rate-adjusted circumferential fiber shortening

  8. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-01-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  9. GPCR signaling and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Capote, Leany A; Mendez Perez, Roberto; Lymperopoulos, Anastasios

    2015-09-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), such as β-adrenergic and angiotensin II receptors, located in the membranes of all three major cardiac cell types, i.e. myocytes, fibroblasts and endothelial cells, play crucial roles in regulating cardiac function and morphology. Their importance in cardiac physiology and disease is reflected by the fact that, collectively, they represent the direct targets of over a third of the currently approved cardiovascular drugs used in clinical practice. Over the past few decades, advances in elucidation of their structure, function and the signaling pathways they elicit, specifically in the heart, have led to identification of an increasing number of new molecular targets for heart disease therapy. Here, we review these signaling modalities employed by GPCRs known to be expressed in the cardiac myocyte membranes and to directly modulate cardiac contractility. We also highlight drugs and drug classes that directly target these GPCRs to modulate cardiac function, as well as molecules involved in cardiac GPCR signaling that have the potential of becoming novel drug targets for modulation of cardiac function in the future.

  10. Ultrasound assessment of fetal cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Crispi, Fàtima; Valenzuela‐Alcaraz, Brenda; Cruz‐Lemini, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Fetal heart evaluation with US is feasible and reproducible, although challenging due to the smallness of the heart, the high heart rate and limited access to the fetus. However, some cardiac parameters have already shown a strong correlation with outcomes and may soon be incorporated into clinical practice. Materials and Methods: Cardiac function assessment has proven utility in the differential diagnosis of cardiomyopathies or prediction of perinatal mortality in congenital heart disease. In addition, some cardiac parameters with high sensitivity such as MPI or annular peak velocities have shown promising results in monitoring and predicting outcome in intrauterine growth restriction or congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Conclusion: Cardiac function can be adequately evaluated in most fetuses when appropriate expertise, equipment and time are available. Fetal cardiac function assessment is a promising tool that may soon be incorporated into clinical practice to diagnose, monitor or predict outcome in some fetal conditions. Thus, more research is warranted to further define specific protocols for each fetal condition that may affect cardiac function. PMID:28191192

  11. Return of Viable Cardiac Function After Sonographic Cardiac Standstill in Pediatric Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Katherine; Thompson, W Reid; Pustavoitau, Aliaksei; Su, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Sonographic cardiac standstill during adult cardiac arrest is associated with failure to get return to spontaneous circulation. This report documents 3 children whose cardiac function returned after standstill with extracorporeal membranous oxygenation. Sonographic cardiac standstill may not predict cardiac death in children.

  12. Normal cardiac function in mice with supraphysiological cardiac creatine levels.

    PubMed

    Santacruz, Lucia; Hernandez, Alejandro; Nienaber, Jeffrey; Mishra, Rajashree; Pinilla, Miguel; Burchette, James; Mao, Lan; Rockman, Howard A; Jacobs, Danny O

    2014-02-01

    Creatine and phosphocreatine levels are decreased in heart failure, and reductions in myocellular phosphocreatine levels predict the severity of the disease and portend adverse outcomes. Previous studies of transgenic mouse models with increased creatine content higher than two times baseline showed the development of heart failure and shortened lifespan. Given phosphocreatine's role in buffering ATP content, we tested the hypothesis whether elevated cardiac creatine content would alter cardiac function under normal physiological conditions. Here, we report the creation of transgenic mice that overexpress the human creatine transporter (CrT) in cardiac muscle under the control of the α-myosin heavy chain promoter. Cardiac transgene expression was quantified by qRT-PCR, and human CrT protein expression was documented on Western blots and immunohistochemistry using a specific anti-CrT antibody. High-energy phosphate metabolites and cardiac function were measured in transgenic animals and compared with age-matched, wild-type controls. Adult transgenic animals showed increases of 5.7- and 4.7-fold in the content of creatine and free ADP, respectively. Phosphocreatine and ATP levels were two times as high in young transgenic animals but declined to control levels by the time the animals reached 8 wk of age. Transgenic mice appeared to be healthy and had normal life spans. Cardiac morphometry, conscious echocardiography, and pressure-volume loop studies demonstrated mild hypertrophy but normal function. Based on our characterization of the human CrT protein expression, creatine and phosphocreatine content, and cardiac morphometry and function, these transgenic mice provide an in vivo model for examining the therapeutic value of elevated creatine content for cardiac pathologies.

  13. Treatment of affective disorders in cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Mavrides, Nicole; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2015-06-01

    Patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) commonly have syndromal major depression, and depression has been associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Prevalence of depression is between 17% and 47% in CVD patients. Pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic interventions have long been studied, and in general are safe and somewhat efficacious in decreasing depressive symptoms in patients with CVD. The impact on cardiac outcomes remains unclear. The evidence from randomized controlled clinical trials indicates that antidepressants, especially selective serotonin uptake inhibitors, are overwhelmingly safe, and likely to be effective in the treatment of depression in patients with CVD. This review describes the prevalence of depression in patients with CVD, the physiological links between depression and CVD, the treatment options for affective disorders, and the clinical trials that demonstrate efficacy and safety of antidepressant medications and psychotherapy in this patient population. Great progress has been made in understanding potential mediators between major depressive disorder and CVD--both health behaviors and shared biological risks such as inflammation.

  14. Treatment of affective disorders in cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Mavrides, Nicole; Nemeroff, Charles B.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) commonly have syndromal major depression, and depression has been associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Prevalence of depression is between 17% and 47% in CVD patients. Pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic interventions have long been studied, and in general are safe and somewhat efficacious in decreasing depressive symptoms in patients with CVD. The impact on cardiac outcomes remains unclear. The evidence from randomized controlled clinical trials indicates that antidepressants, especially selective serotonin uptake inhibitors, are overwhelmingly safe, and likely to be effective in the treatment of depression in patients with CVD. This review describes the prevalence of depression in patients with CVD, the physiological links between depression and CVD, the treatment options for affective disorders, and the clinical trials that demonstrate efficacy and safety of antidepressant medications and psychotherapy in this patient population. Great progress has been made in understanding potential mediators between major depressive disorder and CVD—both health behaviors and shared biological risks such as inflammation. PMID:26246788

  15. Cardiac ferroportin regulates cellular iron homeostasis and is important for cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Lakhal-Littleton, Samira; Wolna, Magda; Carr, Carolyn A.; Miller, Jack J. J.; Christian, Helen C.; Ball, Vicky; Santos, Ana; Diaz, Rebeca; Biggs, Daniel; Stillion, Richard; Holdship, Philip; Clarke, Kieran; Davies, Benjamin; Robbins, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential to the cell. Both iron deficiency and overload impinge negatively on cardiac health. Thus, effective iron homeostasis is important for cardiac function. Ferroportin (FPN), the only known mammalian iron-exporting protein, plays an essential role in iron homeostasis at the systemic level. It increases systemic iron availability by releasing iron from the cells of the duodenum, spleen, and liver, the sites of iron absorption, recycling, and storage respectively. However, FPN is also found in tissues with no known role in systemic iron handling, such as the heart, where its function remains unknown. To explore this function, we generated mice with a cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Fpn. We show that these animals have severely impaired cardiac function, with a median survival of 22 wk, despite otherwise unaltered systemic iron status. We then compared their phenotype with that of ubiquitous hepcidin knockouts, a recognized model of the iron-loading disease hemochromatosis. The phenotype of the hepcidin knockouts was far milder, with normal survival up to 12 mo, despite far greater iron loading in the hearts. Histological examination demonstrated that, although cardiac iron accumulates within the cardiomyocytes of Fpn knockouts, it accumulates predominantly in other cell types in the hepcidin knockouts. We conclude, first, that cardiomyocyte FPN is essential for intracellular iron homeostasis and, second, that the site of deposition of iron within the heart determines the severity with which it affects cardiac function. Both findings have significant implications for the assessment and treatment of cardiac complications of iron dysregulation. PMID:25713362

  16. Mathematical Models of Cardiac Pacemaking Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pan; Lines, Glenn T.; Maleckar, Mary M.; Tveito, Aslak

    2013-10-01

    Over the past half century, there has been intense and fruitful interaction between experimental and computational investigations of cardiac function. This interaction has, for example, led to deep understanding of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling; how it works, as well as how it fails. However, many lines of inquiry remain unresolved, among them the initiation of each heartbeat. The sinoatrial node, a cluster of specialized pacemaking cells in the right atrium of the heart, spontaneously generates an electro-chemical wave that spreads through the atria and through the cardiac conduction system to the ventricles, initiating the contraction of cardiac muscle essential for pumping blood to the body. Despite the fundamental importance of this primary pacemaker, this process is still not fully understood, and ionic mechanisms underlying cardiac pacemaking function are currently under heated debate. Several mathematical models of sinoatrial node cell membrane electrophysiology have been constructed as based on different experimental data sets and hypotheses. As could be expected, these differing models offer diverse predictions about cardiac pacemaking activities. This paper aims to present the current state of debate over the origins of the pacemaking function of the sinoatrial node. Here, we will specifically review the state-of-the-art of cardiac pacemaker modeling, with a special emphasis on current discrepancies, limitations, and future challenges.

  17. Gender differences in cardiac patients: a longitudinal investigation of exercise, autonomic anxiety, negative affect and depression.

    PubMed

    Hunt-Shanks, Tiffany; Blanchard, Christopher; Reid, Robert D

    2009-05-01

    Female cardiac patients frequently experience greater anxiety and depression and engage in less exercise when compared with their male counterparts. This study considered whether exercise had similar effects on male and female cardiac patients' autonomic anxiety, negative affect and depression, and whether exercise behavior explained the gender difference in their affective functioning (e.g. autonomic anxiety, negative affect and depression). Eight hundred one participants completed the Hospital and Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS) and the leisure score index (LSI) of the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire at baseline, 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months. Female cardiac patients had greater autonomic anxiety, negative affect and depression and reduced exercise when compared with male cardiac patients at all time points. Although exercise was significantly related to affective outcomes at various time points for both men and women, gender did not moderate any of the exercise/affective relationships, and exercise did not mediate any of the gender/affective relationships. Further research is needed to clarify the complex relationships between gender, exercise, and the affective functioning of cardiac patients.

  18. Functions of Autophagy in Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenhua; Wang, Jian; Yang, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy is the response of heart to various biomechanical and physiopathological stimuli, such as aging, myocardial ischemia and hypertension. However, a long-term exposure to the stress makes heart progress to heart failure. Autophagy is a dynamic self-degradative process necessary for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Accumulating evidence has revealed a tight link between cardiomyocyte autophagy and cardiac hypertrophy. Sophisticatedly regulated autophagy protects heart from various physiological and pathological stimuli by degradating and recycling of protein aggregates, lipid drops, or organelles. Here we review the recent progresses concerning the functions of autophagy in cardiac hypertrophy induced by various hypertrophic stimuli. Moreover, the therapeutic strategies targeting autophagy for cardiac hypertrophy will also be discussed. PMID:25999790

  19. Biohybrid cardiac ECM-based hydrogels improve long term cardiac function post myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Efraim, Yael; Sarig, Hadar; Cohen Anavy, Noa; Sarig, Udi; de Berardinis, Elio; Chaw, Su-Yin; Krishnamoorthi, Muthukumar; Kalifa, Jérôme; Bogireddi, Hanumakumar; Duc, Thang Vu; Kofidis, Theodoros; Baruch, Limor; Boey, Freddy Y C; Venkatraman, Subbu S; Machluf, Marcelle

    2017-03-01

    Injectable scaffolds for cardiac tissue regeneration are a promising therapeutic approach for progressive heart failure following myocardial infarction (MI). Their major advantage lies in their delivery modality that is considered minimally invasive due to their direct injection into the myocardium. Biomaterials comprising such scaffolds should mimic the cardiac tissue in terms of composition, structure, mechanical support, and most importantly, bioactivity. Nonetheless, natural biomaterial-based gels may suffer from limited mechanical strength, which often fail to provide the long-term support required by the heart for contraction and relaxation. Here we present newly-developed injectable scaffolds, which are based on solubilized decellularized porcine cardiac extracellular matrix (pcECM) cross-linked with genipin alone or engineered with different amounts of chitosan to better control the gel's mechanical properties while still leveraging the ECM biological activity. We demonstrate that these new biohybrid materials are naturally remodeled by mesenchymal stem cells, while supporting high viabilities and affecting cell morphology and organization. They exhibit neither in vitro nor in vivo immunogenicity. Most importantly, their application in treating acute and long term chronic MI in rat models clearly demonstrates the significant therapeutic potential of these gels in the long-term (12weeks post MI). The pcECM-based gels enable not only preservation, but also improvement in cardiac function eight weeks post treatment, as measured using echocardiography as well as hemodynamics. Infiltration of progenitor cells into the gels highlights the possible biological remodeling properties of the ECM-based platform.

  20. Digoxin Induces Cardiac Hypertrophy Without Negative Effects on Cardiac Function and Physical Performance in Trained Normotensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Neves, Claodete Hasselstrom; Tibana, Ramires Alsamir; Prestes, Jonato; Voltarelli, Fabricio Azevedo; Aguiar, Andreo Fernando; Ferreira Mota, Gustavo Augusto; de Sousa, Sergio Luiz Borges; Leopoldo, Andre Soares; Leopoldo, Ana Paula Lima; Mueller, Andre; Aguiar, Danilo Henrique; Navalta, James Wilfred; Sugizaki, Mario Mateus

    2017-04-01

    Cardiotonic drugs and exercise training promote cardiac inotropic effects, which may affect training-induced cardiac adaptations. This study investigated the effects of long-term administration of digoxin on heart structure and function, and physical performance of rats submitted to high-intensity interval training (HIIT). Male Wistar rats, 60 days old, were divided into control (C), digoxin (DIGO), trained (T), and trained with digoxin (TDIGO). Digoxin was administered by gavage (30 µg/kg/day) for 75 days. The HIIT program consisted of treadmill running 60 min/day (8 min at 80% of the maximum speed (MS) and 2 min at 20% of the MS), 5 days per week during 60 days. The main cardiac parameters were evaluated by echocardiograph and cardiomyocyte area was determined by histology. There were no group x time effects of digoxin, HIIT or interactions (digoxin and HIIT) on functional echocardiographic parameters (heart rate; ejection fraction) or in the maximum exercise test. There was a group x time interaction, as evidenced by observed cardiac hypertrophy in the TDIGO group evaluated by ratio of left ventricle weight to body weight (p<0.002) and cardiomyocyte area (p<0.000002). Long-term administration of digoxin promoted cardiac hypertrophy without affecting cardiac function and physical performance in rats submitted to HIIT.

  1. Cardiac Function Remains Impaired Despite Reversible Cardiac Remodeling after Acute Experimental Viral Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Gotzhein, Frauke; Escher, Felicitas; Blankenberg, Stefan; Westermann, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Background. Infection with Coxsackievirus B3 induces myocarditis. We aimed to compare the acute and chronic phases of viral myocarditis to identify the immediate effects of cardiac inflammation as well as the long-term effects after resolved inflammation on cardiac fibrosis and consequently on cardiac function. Material and Methods. We infected C57BL/6J mice with Coxsackievirus B3 and determined the hemodynamic function 7 as well as 28 days after infection. Subsequently, we analyzed viral burden and viral replication in the cardiac tissue as well as the expression of cytokines and matrix proteins. Furthermore, cardiac fibroblasts were infected with virus to investigate if viral infection alone induces profibrotic signaling. Results. Severe cardiac inflammation was determined and cardiac fibrosis was consistently colocalized with inflammation during the acute phase of myocarditis. Declined cardiac inflammation but no significantly improved hemodynamic function was observed 28 days after infection. Interestingly, cardiac fibrosis declined to basal levels as well. Both cardiac inflammation and fibrosis were reversible, whereas the hemodynamic function remains impaired after healed viral myocarditis in C57BL/6J mice. PMID:28352641

  2. Altered cardiac autonomic nervous function in depression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. Autonomic instability may play a mediating or moderating role in this relationship; however this is not well understood. The objective of this study was to explore cardiac autonomic function and cardiac arrhythmia in depression, the correlation between depression severity and Heart Rate Variability (HRV) related indices, and the prevalence of arrhythmia. Methods Individuals (n = 53) with major depression as assessed by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, who had a Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD) score ≥20 and a Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale score > 53 were compared to 53 healthy individuals, matched for age and gender. Multichannel Electrocardiograph ECG-92C data were collected over 24 hours. Long-term changes in HRV were used to assess the following vagally mediated changes in autonomic tone, expressed as time domain indices: Standard deviation of the NN intervals (SDNN), standard deviation of 5 min averaged NN intervals (SDANN), Root Mean Square of the Successive Differences (RMSSD) and percentage of NN intervals > 50 ms different from preceding interval (pNN50). Pearson’s correlations were conducted to explore the strength of the association between depression severity (using the SDS and HRV related indices, specifically SDNN and low frequency domain / high frequency domain (LF/HF)). Results The values of SDNN, SDANN, RMSSD, PNN50 and HF were lower in the depression group compared to the control group (P<.05). The mean value of the LF in the depression group was higher than the in control group (P<.05). Furthermore the ratio of LF/HF was higher among the depression group than the control group (P<.05). A linear relationship was shown to exist between the severity of the depression and HRV indices. In the depression group, the prevalence of arrhythmia was significantly higher than in the control group (P<.05), particularly

  3. Cytoskeletal Basis of Ion Channel Function in Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Vatta, Matteo; Faulkner, Georgine

    2009-01-01

    Summary The heart is a force-generating organ that responds to self-generated electrical stimuli from specialized cardiomyocytes. This function is modulated by sympathetic and parasympathetic activity. In order to contract and accommodate the repetitive morphological changes induced by the cardiac cycle, cardiomyocytes depend on their highly evolved and specialized cytoskeletal apparatus. Defects in components of the cytoskeleton, in the long term, affect the ability of the cell to compensate at both functional and structural levels. In addition to the structural remodeling, the myocardium becomes increasingly susceptible to altered electrical activity leading to arrhythmogenesis. The development of arrhythmias secondary to structural remodeling defects has been noted, although the detailed molecular mechanisms are still elusive. Here I will review the current knowledge of the molecular and functional relationships between the cytoskeleton and ion channels and, I will discuss the future impact of new data on molecular cardiology research and clinical practice. PMID:19774097

  4. Cardiac myosin-binding protein C decorates F-actin: Implications for cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Whitten, Andrew E.; Jeffries, Cy M.; Harris, Samantha P.; Trewhella, Jill

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) is an accessory protein of striated muscle sarcomeres that is vital for maintaining regular heart function. Its 4 N-terminal regulatory domains, C0-C1-m-C2 (C0C2), influence actin and myosin interactions, the basic contractile proteins of muscle. Using neutron contrast variation data, we have determined that C0C2 forms a repeating assembly with filamentous actin, where the C0 and C1 domains of C0C2 attach near the DNase I-binding loop and subdomain 1 of adjacent actin monomers. Direct interactions between the N terminus of cMyBP-C and actin thereby provide a mechanism to modulate the contractile cycle by affecting the regulatory state of the thin filament and its ability to interact with myosin. PMID:19011110

  5. Effect of prolonged space flight on cardiac function and dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, W. L.; Epstein, S. E.; Griffith, J. M.; Goldstein, R. E.; Redwood, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    By taking advantage of the capabilities of echocardiography to measure noninvasively left ventricular volume, stroke volume, and ejection fraction, and of the fact that the astronauts were routinely subjected to lower body negative pressure (whereby cardiac filling is progressively decreased), it was possible to construct classic ventricular function curves noninvasively, thereby obviating the difficulties encountered in comparing cardiac function at different end-diastolic volumes preflight and postflight. In this manner, the effect of an 84-day period of weightlessness on cardiac structure and function was evaluated in the Skylab 4 astronauts.

  6. Operation Everest II: Preservation of Cardiac Function at Extreme Altitude,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    environmental control. The exercise intensity was measured in terms of both physical work and oxygen uptake. Oxygen uptakes at submaximal work loads were...at high altitude could depress cardiac function and decrease exercise capacity. If so, impaired cardiac function should occur with the extreme...chronic hypoxemia of the 40-day simulated climb of Mt. Everest (8840m, PB 240 mmHg, PIO 2 43 mmHg). In the five subjects having resting and exercise

  7. Cardiac function adaptations in hibernating grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis).

    PubMed

    Nelson, O Lynne; Robbins, Charles T

    2010-03-01

    Research on the cardiovascular physiology of hibernating mammals may provide insight into evolutionary adaptations; however, anesthesia used to handle wild animals may affect the cardiovascular parameters of interest. To overcome these potential biases, we investigated the functional cardiac phenotype of the hibernating grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) during the active, transitional and hibernating phases over a 4 year period in conscious rather than anesthetized bears. The bears were captive born and serially studied from the age of 5 months to 4 years. Heart rate was significantly different from active (82.6 +/- 7.7 beats/min) to hibernating states (17.8 +/- 2.8 beats/min). There was no difference from the active to the hibernating state in diastolic and stroke volume parameters or in left atrial area. Left ventricular volume:mass was significantly increased during hibernation indicating decreased ventricular mass. Ejection fraction of the left ventricle was not different between active and hibernating states. In contrast, total left atrial emptying fraction was significantly reduced during hibernation (17.8 +/- 2.8%) as compared to the active state (40.8 +/- 1.9%). Reduced atrial chamber function was also supported by reduced atrial contraction blood flow velocities and atrial contraction ejection fraction during hibernation; 7.1 +/- 2.8% as compared to 20.7 +/- 3% during the active state. Changes in the diastolic cardiac filling cycle, especially atrial chamber contribution to ventricular filling, appear to be the most prominent macroscopic functional change during hibernation. Thus, we propose that these changes in atrial chamber function constitute a major adaptation during hibernation which allows the myocardium to conserve energy, avoid chamber dilation and remain healthy during a period of extremely low heart rates. These findings will aid in rational approaches to identifying underlying molecular mechanisms.

  8. Assessment of cardiac parameters in evaluation of cardiac functions in patients with thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Oztarhan, Kazim; Delibas, Yavuz; Salcioglu, Zafer; Kaya, Guldemet; Bakari, Suleyman; Bornaun, Helen; Aydogan, Gonul

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate cardiac function and early cardiac dysfunction of patients followed as thalassemia major. In this study, the authors compared 100 patients, diagnosed as thalassemia major with mean age 11.84 ± 4.35, with 60 healthy control subjects at the same age between 2008 and 2011. Early diagnosis of iron overload that may occur after repeated transfusions is important in this patient group. To detect early iron accumulation, the authors compared ferritin with the echo findings, the 24-hour Holter, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2* values in the patients of same age and sex, treated with chelators, without heart failure, nonsplenectomized, and do not differ in the presence of hepatitis C. Ferritin levels, left ventricular systolic functions (ejection fraction [EF], shortening fraction [SF]), left ventricular measurements, left ventricular diastolic functions, T2* image on cardiac magnetic resonance, heart rate variables in 24 hours, and Holter rhythm were evaluated to show the early failure of cardiac functions. In this study the authors confirmed that iron-related cardiac toxicity damages electrical activity earlier than myocardial contractility. Left ventricular diastolic diameter (LVDd), left ventricular mass (LVM), and LV systolic diameter (LVDs) levels were significantly higher in the patient group with ectopia. Patients with ectopia are the ones in whom LVM and LVDd are increased. In thalassemia major patients with ectopia, LF/HF ratio was markedly increased, QTc dispersion was clearly found higher in patients with ectopia rather than nonectopic patients. The standard deviation all normal RR interval series (SDNN) was found clearly lower in thalassemia major group with ectopia than control group because it is assumed that increase in cardiac sympathetic neuronal activity is related to exposure to chronic diastolic and systolic failure.

  9. Seasonal Temperature Changes Do Not Affect Cardiac Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Schildt, Jukka; Loimaala, Antti; Hippeläinen, Eero; Nikkinen, Päivi; Ahonen, Aapo

    2015-01-01

    FDG-PET/CT is widely used to diagnose cardiac inflammation such as cardiac sarcoidosis. Physiological myocardial FDG uptake often creates a problem when assessing the possible pathological glucose metabolism of the heart. Several factors, such as fasting, blood glucose, and hormone levels, influence normal myocardial glucose metabolism. The effect of outdoor temperature on myocardial FDG uptake has not been reported before. We retrospectively reviewed 29 cancer patients who underwent PET scans in warm summer months and again in cold winter months. We obtained myocardial, liver, and mediastinal standardized uptake values (SUVs) as well as quantitative cardiac heterogeneity and the myocardial FDG uptake pattern. We also compared age and body mass index to other variables. The mean myocardial FDG uptake showed no significant difference between summer and winter months. Average outdoor temperature did not correlate significantly with myocardial SUVmax in either summer or winter. The heterogeneity of myocardial FDG uptake did not differ significantly between seasons. Outdoor temperature seems to have no significant effect on myocardial FDG uptake or heterogeneity. Therefore, warming the patients prior to attending cardiac PET studies in order to reduce physiological myocardial FDG uptake seems to be unnecessary. PMID:26858844

  10. Cardiac I-1c overexpression with reengineered AAV improves cardiac function in swine ischemic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Fish, Kenneth M; Tilemann, Lisa; Rapti, Kleopatra; Aguero, Jaume; Santos-Gallego, Carlos G; Lee, Ahyoung; Karakikes, Ioannis; Xie, Chaoqin; Akar, Fadi G; Shimada, Yuichi J; Gwathmey, Judith K; Asokan, Aravind; McPhee, Scott; Samulski, Jade; Samulski, Richard Jude; Sigg, Daniel C; Weber, Thomas; Kranias, Evangelia G; Hajjar, Roger J

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac gene therapy has emerged as a promising option to treat advanced heart failure (HF). Advances in molecular biology and gene targeting approaches are offering further novel options for genetic manipulation of the cardiovascular system. The aim of this study was to improve cardiac function in chronic HF by overexpressing constitutively active inhibitor-1 (I-1c) using a novel cardiotropic vector generated by capsid reengineering of adeno-associated virus (BNP116). One month after a large anterior myocardial infarction, 20 Yorkshire pigs randomly received intracoronary injection of either high-dose BNP116.I-1c (1.0 × 10(13) vector genomes (vg), n = 7), low-dose BNP116.I-1c (3.0 × 10(12) vg, n = 7), or saline (n = 6). Compared to baseline, mean left ventricular ejection fraction increased by 5.7% in the high-dose group, and by 5.2% in the low-dose group, whereas it decreased by 7% in the saline group. Additionally, preload-recruitable stroke work obtained from pressure-volume analysis demonstrated significantly higher cardiac performance in the high-dose group. Likewise, other hemodynamic parameters, including stroke volume and contractility index indicated improved cardiac function after the I-1c gene transfer. Furthermore, BNP116 showed a favorable gene expression pattern for targeting the heart. In summary, I-1c overexpression using BNP116 improves cardiac function in a clinically relevant model of ischemic HF.

  11. EANM/ESC guidelines for radionuclide imaging of cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Hesse, B; Lindhardt, T B; Acampa, W; Anagnostopoulos, C; Ballinger, J; Bax, J J; Edenbrandt, L; Flotats, A; Germano, G; Stopar, T Gmeiner; Franken, P; Kelion, A; Kjaer, A; Le Guludec, D; Ljungberg, M; Maenhout, A F; Marcassa, C; Marving, J; McKiddie, F; Schaefer, W M; Stegger, L; Underwood, R

    2008-04-01

    Radionuclide imaging of cardiac function represents a number of well-validated techniques for accurate determination of right (RV) and left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) and LV volumes. These first European guidelines give recommendations for how and when to use first-pass and equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography, gated myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, gated PET, and studies with non-imaging devices for the evaluation of cardiac function. The items covered are presented in 11 sections: clinical indications, radiopharmaceuticals and dosimetry, study acquisition, RV EF, LV EF, LV volumes, LV regional function, LV diastolic function, reports and image display and reference values from the literature of RVEF, LVEF and LV volumes. If specific recommendations given cannot be based on evidence from original, scientific studies, referral is given to "prevailing or general consensus". The guidelines are designed to assist in the practice of referral to, performance, interpretation and reporting of nuclear cardiology studies for the evaluation of cardiac performance.

  12. Functional Effects of Hyperthyroidism on Cardiac Papillary Muscle in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Fabricio Furtado; Olivoto, Robson Ruiz; da Silva, Priscyla Oliveira; Francisco, Julio Cesar; Fogaça, Rosalvo Tadeu Hochmuller

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyperthyroidism is currently recognized to affect the cardiovascular system, leading to a series of molecular and functional changes. However, little is known about the functional influence of hyperthyroidism in the regulation of cytoplasmic calcium and on the sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX) in the cardiac muscle. Objectives To evaluate the functional changes in papillary muscles isolated from animals with induced hyperthyroidism. Methods We divided 36 Wistar rats into a group of controls and another of animals with hyperthyroidism induced by intraperitoneal T3 injection. We measured in the animals' papillary muscles the maximum contraction force, speed of contraction (+df/dt) and relaxation (-df/dt), contraction and relaxation time, contraction force at different concentrations of extracellular sodium, post-rest potentiation (PRP), and contraction force induced by caffeine. Results In hyperthyroid animals, we observed decreased PRP at all rest times (p < 0.05), increased +df/dt and -df/dt (p < 0.001), low positive inotropic response to decreased concentration of extracellular sodium (p < 0.001), reduction of the maximum force in caffeine-induced contraction (p < 0.003), and decreased total contraction time (p < 0.001). The maximal contraction force did not differ significantly between groups (p = 0.973). Conclusion We hypothesize that the changes observed are likely due to a decrease in calcium content in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, caused by calcium leakage, decreased expression of NCX, and increased expression of a-MHC and SERCA2.

  13. Liver Function Tests Following Open Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Faraji, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The cardiopulmonary bypass may have multiple systemic effects on the body organs as liver. This prospective study was planned to explore further the incidence and significance of this change. Methods: Two hundred patients with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), were randomly selected for the study. Total and indirect bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase were measured preoperatively and at 24, 48 and 72 hours, following coronary artery bypass grafting. Postoperative value of the liver function tests with respect to hypothermia or hypotension were compared by one way analysis of variance for repeated measure and compared with t test. Patient’s characteristics with bilirubin value (≤1.5 mg or >1.5 mg) were compared with t test. Results: A significant increase of total bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase were noted in the third postoperative day. Significant relation was seen between hypotension and alkaline phosphatase, and aspartate aminotransferase change but hypothermia had not affected alanine aminotransferase, total bilirubin and indirect bilirubin change. Pump time, alanine aminotransferase in third postoperative day and direct bilirubin in first and second day of postoperative period had significant relation with pre and post-operative bilirubin change. Conclusion: Transient but not permanent alterations of hepatic enzymes after coronary artery bypass grafting presumably attributed to the decreased hepatic flow, hypoxia, or pump-induced inflammation. PMID:26191391

  14. Mammalian enabled (Mena) is a critical regulator of cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Frédérick; Belmonte, Stephen L; Ram, Rashmi; Noujaim, Sami F; Dunaevsky, Olga; Protack, Tricia L; Jalife, Jose; Todd Massey, H; Gertler, Frank B; Blaxall, Burns C

    2011-05-01

    Mammalian enabled (Mena) of the Drosophila enabled/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein gene family is a cytoskeletal protein implicated in actin regulation and cell motility. Cardiac Mena expression is enriched in intercalated discs (ICD), the critical intercellular communication nexus between adjacent muscle cells. We previously identified Mena gene expression to be a key predictor of human and murine heart failure (HF). To determine the in vivo function of Mena in the heart, we assessed Mena protein expression in multiple HF models and characterized the effects of genetic Mena deletion on cardiac structure and function. Immunoblot analysis revealed significant upregulation of Mena protein expression in left ventricle tissue from patients with end-stage HF, calsequestrin-overexpressing mice, and isoproterenol-infused mice. Characterization of the baseline cardiac function of adult Mena knockout mice (Mena(-/-)) via echocardiography demonstrated persistent cardiac dysfunction, including a significant reduction in percent fractional shortening compared with wild-type littermates. Electrocardiogram PR and QRS intervals were significantly prolonged in Mena(-/-) mice, manifested by slowed conduction on optical mapping studies. Ultrastructural analysis of Mena(-/-) hearts revealed disrupted organization and widening of ICD structures, mislocalization of the gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) to the lateral borders of cardiomyoycytes, and increased Cx43 expression. Furthermore, the expression of vinculin (an adherens junction protein) was significantly reduced in Mena(-/-) mice. We report for the first time that genetic ablation of Mena results in cardiac dysfunction, highlighted by diminished contractile performance, disrupted ICD structure, and slowed electrical conduction.

  15. Control of cardiac function and venous return in thyrotoxic calves.

    PubMed

    Gay, R; Lee, R W; Appleton, C; Olajos, M; Martin, G V; Morkin, E; Goldman, S

    1987-03-01

    The mechanisms responsible for maintenance of the high-output state associated with thyrotoxicosis have been investigated by measurement of cardiac-function curves and venous compliance during ganglionic blockade with trimethaphan. Thirteen calves were injected daily with L-thyroxine (200 micrograms/kg) for 12-14 days. Thyroxine treatment increased heart rate (70%), left ventricular systolic pressure (22%), cardiac output (120%), left ventricular maximum rate of pressure development (dP/dt) (56%), and total blood volume (18%) and decreased systemic vascular resistance (39%). These hemodynamic changes persisted during ganglionic blockade or autonomic blockade with atropine and propranolol. Cardiac-function curves in conscious thyrotoxic calves were displaced upward and to the left. Mean circulatory filling pressure (MCFP), measured during anesthesia, was increased from 8 +/- 1 to 12 +/- 1 mmHg. During autonomic and ganglionic blockade MCFP remained elevated after treatment with thyroxine. Venous compliance decreased from 2.1 +/- 0.2 to 1.3 +/- 0.1 ml X mmHg-1 X kg-1 after thyroxine. Unstressed vascular volume was increased from 52.3 +/- 1.1 to 67.1 +/- 0.9 ml/kg. Thus the elevated cardiac output and new cardiac-function curve in thyrotoxicosis are associated with a combination of increased inotropic state, increased blood volume, and decreased venous compliance. These effects are not the result of autonomic influences and may represent direct actions of thyroid hormone on the heart and peripheral venous circulation.

  16. Impairment of cardiac function and energetics in experimental renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Raine, A E; Seymour, A M; Roberts, A F; Radda, G K; Ledingham, J G

    1993-01-01

    Cardiac function and energetics in experimental renal failure in the rat (5/6 nephrectomy) have been investigated by means of an isolated perfused working heart preparation and an isometric Langendorff preparation using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR). 4 wk after nephrectomy cardiac output of isolated hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer was significantly lower (P < 0.0001) at all levels of preload and afterload in the renal failure groups than in the pair-fed sham operated control group. In control hearts, cardiac output increased with increases in perfusate calcium from 0.73 to 5.61 mmol/liter whereas uremic hearts failed in high calcium perfusate. Collection of 31P NMR spectra from hearts of renal failure and control animals during 30 min normoxic Langendorff perfusion showed that basal phosphocreatine was reduced by 32% to 4.7 mumol/g wet wt (P < 0.01) and the phosphocreatine to ATP ratio was reduced by 32% (P < 0.01) in uremic hearts. During low flow ischemia, there was a substantial decrease in phosphocreatine in the uremic hearts and an accompanying marked increase in release of inosine into the coronary effluent (14.9 vs 6.1 microM, P < 0.01). We conclude that cardiac function is impaired in experimental renal failure, in association with abnormal cardiac energetics and increased susceptibility to ischemic damage. Disordered myocardial calcium utilization may contribute to these derangements. PMID:8254048

  17. Cardiac function in long-term survivors of childhood lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Mark K; Solt, Ido; Weyl-Ben-Arush, Myriam; Braver, Yulia; Lorber, Avraham

    2011-01-20

    Objectives. We studied long-term effects of therapy for childhood lymphoma on cardiac function. Design and patients. We prospectively evaluated 45 survivors of childhood lymphoma, using clinical parameters, electrocardiography and echocardiography. Further comparisons were made between lymphoma subgroups and between males and females. Results. Mean age at diagnosis was 9.1 years. Mean followup duration was 10.9 years. The NYHA functional class was I in 43 patients and II in 2 patients. A prolonged QTc interval (>0.44 msec) was found in 8 patients. Left ventricular (LV) systolic function and compliance were normal (LV shortening fraction 40 ± 5.6%; cardiac index 2.84 ± 1.13 L/min/m(2); E/A wave ratio 2.5 ± 1.3; mean ± S.D.), LV mass was normal (97 ± 40 grams/m(2), mean ± S.D.). Mitral regurgitation was observed in 7/45 patients (16%). Asymptomatic pericardial effusions were found in 3/45 (7%) patients. Conclusions. Long-term follow-up shows that most parameters of cardiac function are normal in survivors of childhood lymphoma. This is likely due to relatively low doses of anthracyclines in modern protocol modalities. Abnormalities in mitral valve flow, QTc prolongation and in a small proportion of survivors, and functional capacity necessitate long-term cardiac follow-up of these patients.

  18. EPAC expression and function in cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Olmedo, Ivonne; Muñoz, Claudia; Guzmán, Nancy; Catalán, Mabel; Vivar, Raúl; Ayala, Pedro; Humeres, Claudio; Aránguiz, Pablo; García, Lorena; Velarde, Victoria; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2013-10-15

    In the heart, cardiac fibroblasts (CF) and cardiac myofibroblasts (CMF) are the main cells responsible for wound healing after cardiac insult. Exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) is a downstream effector of cAMP, and it has been not completely studied on CF. Moreover, in CMF, which are the main cells responsible for cardiac healing, EPAC expression and function are unknown. We evaluated in both CF and CMF the effect of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) on EPAC-1 expression. We also studied the EPAC involvement on collagen synthesis, adhesion, migration and collagen gel contraction. Method: Rat neonatal CF and CMF were treated with TGF-β1 at different times and concentrations. EPAC-1 protein levels and Rap1 activation were measured by western blot and pull down assay respectively. EPAC cellular functions were determined by adhesion, migration and collagen gel contraction assay; and collagen expression was determined by western blot. Results: TGF-β1 through Smad and JNK significantly reduced EPAC-1 expression in CF, while in CMF this cytokine increased EPAC-1 expression through ERK1/2, JNK, p38, AKT and Smad3. EPAC activation was able to induce higher Rap1-GTP levels in CMF than in CF. EPAC and PKA, both cAMP effectors, promoted CF and CMF adhesion on fibronectin, as well as CF migration; however, this effect was not observed in CMF. EPAC but not PKA activation mediated collagen gel contraction in CF, while in CMF both PKA and EPAC mediated collagen gel contraction. Finally, the EPAC and PKA activation reduced collagen synthesis in CF and CMF. Conclusion: TGF-β1 differentially regulates the expression of EPAC in CF and CMF; and EPAC regulates differentially CF and CMF functions associated with cardiac remodeling. - Highlights: • TGF-β1 regulates EPAC-1 expression in cardiac fibroblast and myofibroblast. • Rap-1GTP levels are higher in cardiac myofibroblast than fibroblast. • EPAC-1 controls adhesion, migration and collagen synthesis in cardiac

  19. Is Affect Aversive to Young Children with Autism: Behavioral and Cardiac Responses to Experimenter Distress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corona, Rosalie; Dissanayake, Cheryl; Arbelle, Shoshana; Wellington, Peter; Sigman, Marian

    1998-01-01

    Compared attention, behavioral reaction, facial affect, and cardiac responses of 22 autistic and 22 mentally retarded preschoolers to emotional displays. Found that both groups looked more at the experimenter and displayed more interest and concern when the experimenter showed strong distress than when she showed neutral affect. Autistic…

  20. Cardiac nuclear receptors: architects of mitochondrial structure and function.

    PubMed

    Vega, Rick B; Kelly, Daniel P

    2017-04-03

    The adult heart is uniquely designed and equipped to provide a continuous supply of energy in the form of ATP to support persistent contractile function. This high-capacity energy transduction system is the result of a remarkable surge in mitochondrial biogenesis and maturation during the fetal-to-adult transition in cardiac development. Substantial evidence indicates that nuclear receptor signaling is integral to dynamic changes in the cardiac mitochondrial phenotype in response to developmental cues, in response to diverse postnatal physiologic conditions, and in disease states such as heart failure. A subset of cardiac-enriched nuclear receptors serve to match mitochondrial fuel preferences and capacity for ATP production with changing energy demands of the heart. In this Review, we describe the role of specific nuclear receptors and their coregulators in the dynamic control of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism in the normal and diseased heart.

  1. Differential Regulation of Cardiac Function and Intracardiac Cytokines by Rapamycin in Healthy and Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Luck, Christian; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Mahmood, Abuzar; Gavini, Madhavi P.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is comorbid with cardiovascular disease and impaired immunity. Rapamycin improves cardiac functions and extends lifespan by inhibiting the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). However, in diabetic murine models, Rapamycin elevates hyperglycemia and reduces longevity. Since Rapamycin is an immunosuppressant, we examined whether Rapamycin (750 μg/kg/day) modulates intracardiac cytokines, which affect the cardiac immune response, and cardiac function in male lean (ZL) and diabetic obese Zucker (ZO) rats. Rapamycin suppressed levels of fasting triglycerides, insulin, and uric acid in ZO but increased glucose. Although Rapamycin improved multiple diastolic parameters (E/E′, E′/A′, E/Vp) initially, these improvements were reversed or absent in ZO at the end of treatment, despite suppression of cardiac fibrosis and phosphoSer473Akt. Intracardiac cytokine protein profiling and Ingenuity® Pathway Analysis indicated suppression of intracardiac immune defense in ZO, in response to Rapamycin treatment in both ZO and ZL. Rapamycin increased fibrosis in ZL without increasing phosphoSer473Akt and differentially modulated anti-fibrotic IL-10, IFNγ, and GM-CSF in ZL and ZO. Therefore, fundamental difference in intracardiac host defense between diabetic ZO and healthy ZL, combined with differential regulation of intracardiac cytokines by Rapamycin in ZO and ZL hearts, underlies differential cardiac outcomes of Rapamycin treatment in health and diabetes.

  2. Propofol Induction's Effect on Cardiac Function

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-31

    This Study Was Focused to Evaluate Feasibility of Doppler Tissue Monitoring During the Induction Anesthesia,; and Evaluate Routine Propofol Induction's Effect on Myocardial Tissue Motion, Using Non-invasive Doppler Tissue and 2D Speckle Tracking Imaging.; This is the First Study, to Our Knowledge, Which Has Evaluated the Possible Impact of Propofol Induction on LV Function.

  3. Associations between attention, affect and cardiac activity in a single yoga session for female cancer survivors: an enactive neurophenomenology-based approach.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Michael J; Carlson, Linda E; Paskevich, David M; Ekkekakis, Panteleimon; Wurz, Amanda J; Wytsma, Kathryn; Krenz, Katie A; McAuley, Edward; Culos-Reed, S Nicole

    2014-07-01

    Yoga practice is reported to lead to improvements in quality of life, psychological functioning, and symptom indices in cancer survivors. Importantly, meditative states experienced within yoga practice are correlated to neurophysiological systems that moderate both focus of attention and affective valence. The current study used a mixed methods approach based in neurophenomenology to investigate associations between attention, affect, and cardiac activity during a single yoga session for female cancer survivors. Yoga practice was associated with a linear increase in associative attention and positive affective valence, while shifts in cardiac activity were related to the intensity of each yoga sequence. Changes in attention and affect were predicted by concurrently assessed cardiac activity. Awareness of breathing, physical movement, and increased relaxation were reported by participants as potential mechanisms for yoga's salutary effects. While yoga practice shares commonalities with exercise and relaxation training, yoga may serve primarily as a promising meditative attention-affect regulation training methodology.

  4. Skeletal and cardiac muscle pericytes: Functions and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Murray, Iain R; Baily, James E; Chen, William C W; Dar, Ayelet; Gonzalez, Zaniah N; Jensen, Andrew R; Petrigliano, Frank A; Deb, Arjun; Henderson, Neil C

    2017-03-01

    Pericytes are periendothelial mesenchymal cells residing within the microvasculature. Skeletal muscle and cardiac pericytes are now recognized to fulfill an increasing number of functions in normal tissue homeostasis, including contributing to microvascular function by maintaining vessel stability and regulating capillary flow. In the setting of muscle injury, pericytes contribute to a regenerative microenvironment through release of trophic factors and by modulating local immune responses. In skeletal muscle, pericytes also directly enhance tissue healing by differentiating into myofibers. Conversely, pericytes have also been implicated in the development of disease states, including fibrosis, heterotopic ossication and calcification, atherosclerosis, and tumor angiogenesis. Despite increased recognition of pericyte heterogeneity, it is not yet clear whether specific subsets of pericytes are responsible for individual functions in skeletal and cardiac muscle homeostasis and disease.

  5. Disruption of ROCK1 gene attenuates cardiac dilation and improves contractile function in pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianjian; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Summers, Lelia J; Dorn, Gerald W; Wei, Lei

    2008-03-01

    The development of left ventricular cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in response to increased hemodynamic load and neurohormonal stress is initially a compensatory response. However, persistent stress eventually leads to dilated heart failure, which is a common cause of heart failure in human hypertensive and valvular heart disease. We have recently reported that Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1) homozygous knockout mice exhibited reduced cardiac fibrosis and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, while displaying a preserved compensatory hypertrophic response to pressure overload. In this study, we have tested the effects of ROCK1 deficiency on cardiac hypertrophy, dilation, and dysfunction. We have shown that ROCK1 deletion attenuated left ventricular dilation and contractile dysfunction, but not hypertrophy, in a transgenic model of Galphaq overexpression-induced hypertrophy which represents a well-characterized and highly relevant genetic mouse model of pathological hypertrophy. Although the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was not affected, ROCK1 deletion in Galphaq mice resulted in a concentric hypertrophic phenotype associated with reduced induction of hypertrophic markers indicating that ROCK1 deletion could favorably modify hypertrophy without inhibiting it. Furthermore, ROCK1 deletion also improved contractile response to beta-adrenergic stimulation in Galphaq transgenic mice. Consistent with this observation, ROCK1 deletion prevented down-regulation of type V/VI adenylyl cyclase expression, which is associated with the impaired beta-adrenergic signaling in Galphaq mice. The present study establishes for the first time a role for ROCK1 in cardiac dilation and contractile dysfunction.

  6. Factors affecting survival in pediatric cardiac tamponade caused by central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Kayashima, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric central venous catheter (CVC) placement is useful but associated with complications such as cardiac tamponade. We aimed to identify risk factors for death in cardiac tamponade. Published articles on pediatric CVC-associated cardiac tamponade were obtained by searching PubMed and Google and retrospectively reviewed to analyze risk factors for death. Factors examined for their effect on mortality risk included patient age, weight, CVC size, days from CVC insertion to tamponade occurrence, substances administered, insertion site, treatment, CVC material, and initial CVC tip position. Of 110 patients reported in 62 articles, 69 survived and 41 died. Among survivors, 55 of 69 patients were treated; among deaths, only 7 of 38 (OR 537.9, 95% CI 29.3-9,877, p < 0.0001). Multiple regression analysis in 44 cases showed that treatment (p < 0.0001) and initial CVC tip position (p = 0.020) were independent predictive factors related to improved cardiac tamponade survival. Past studies have mainly discussed how to avoid pediatric cardiac tamponade; by contrast, the present study focused on how to avoid deaths. The findings of this review suggest that cardiac tamponade survival is better when tamponade is detected early and treated promptly and might be affected by initial CVC tip position.

  7. Placebo Sleep Affects Cognitive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draganich, Christina; Erdal, Kristi

    2014-01-01

    The placebo effect is any outcome that is not attributed to a specific treatment but rather to an individual's mindset (Benson & Friedman, 1996). This phenomenon can extend beyond its typical use in pharmaceutical drugs to involve aspects of everyday life, such as the effect of sleep on cognitive functioning. In 2 studies examining whether…

  8. Impaired regulation of cardiac function in sepsis, SIRS, and MODS.

    PubMed

    Werdan, Karl; Schmidt, Hendrik; Ebelt, Henning; Zorn-Pauly, Klaus; Koidl, Bernd; Hoke, Robert Sebastian; Heinroth, Konstantin; Müller-Werdan, Ursula

    2009-04-01

    In sepsis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and multiorgan dysfunction syndrome (MODS), a severe prognostically relevant cardiac autonomic dysfunction exists, as manifested by a strong attenuation of sympathetically and vagally mediated heart rate variability (HRV). The mechanisms underlying this attenuation are not limited to the nervous system. They also include alterations of the cardiac pacemaker cells on a cellular level. As shown in human atrial cardiomyocytes, endotoxin interacts with cardiac hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels, which mediate the pacemaker current If and play an important role in transmitting sympathetic and vagal signals on heart rate and HRV. Moreover, endotoxin sensitizes cardiac HCN channels to sympathetic signals. These findings identify endotoxin as a pertinent modulator of the autonomic nervous regulation of heart function. In MODS, the vagal pathway of the autonomic nervous system is particularly compromised, leading to an attenuation of the cholinergic antiinflammatory reflex. An amelioration of the blunted vagal activity appears to be a promising novel therapeutic target to achieve a suppression of the inflammatory state and thereby an improvement of prognosis in MODS patients. Preliminary data revealed therapeutic benefits (increased survival rates and improvements of the depressed vagal activity) of the administration of statins, beta-blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in patients with MODS.

  9. Subclinical hypothyroidism affects mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Kvetny, J; Wilms, L; Pedersen, P L; Larsen, J

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine mitochondrial function in cells from persons with subclinical hypothyroidism and euthyroid controls. The participating persons were examined clinically and had basal oxygen consumption (VO(2)) determined. The concentrations of thyroid hormones and thyrotropine stimulating hormone were determined, and mitochondrial function in isolated mononuclear blood cells was examined by enzymatic methods [citrate synthase activity (CS)] and by flow cytometry (mitochondrial membrane potential by TMRM fluorescence and mitochondrial mass by MTG fluorescence). The ratio of T(4)/T(3) was lowered in subclinical hypothyroidism patients compared to controls (2.5+/-0.5 vs. 2.9+/-0.4, p=0.005). VO(2) was increased in persons with subclinical hypothyroidism compared to controls (adolescents: 134+/-27 ml O(2)/min*m(2) vs. 119+/-27 ml O(2)/min*m(2), p=0.006, adults: 139+/-14 ml O(2)/min*m(2) vs. 121+/-17 ml O(2)/min*m(2), p=0.001). The mitochondrial function, represented by citrate synthase activity, MTG, and TMRM fluorescence were all increased (CS in subclinical hypothyroidism vs. controls: 0.074+/-0.044 nmol/mg*min vs. 0.056+/-0.021 nmol/mg*min, p=0.005; MTG fluorescence in subclinical hypothyroidism vs. controls: 7,482+/-1,733 a.u. vs. 6,391+/-2,171 a.u., p=0.027; TMRM fluorescence in subclinical hypothyroidism vs. controls: 13,449+/-3,807 a.u. vs. 11,733+/-4,473 a.u, p=0.04). Our results indicate an increased mitochondrial stimulation, eventually caused by increased deiodination of T(4) to intracellular bioactive iodothyronines in adults and adolescents with subclinical hypothyroidism.

  10. Strength Training Does Not Affect Vagal-cardiac Control or Cardiovagal Baroreflex Sensitivity in Young Healthy Subjects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE William H. Cooke Æ Jason R. Carter Strength training does not affect vagal– cardiac control or cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity in...to test the hypothesis that high-intensity strength training in- creases vagal– cardiac control and cardiovagal barore- flex sensitivity. Twenty-two...adaptations to resistance training, our results demonstrate that resistance train- ing does not affect vagal– cardiac control or cardiovagal baroreflex

  11. Cardiac Structure and Function in Cushing's Syndrome: A Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Charles; Salenave, Sylvie; Kachenoura, Nadjia; Raissouni, Zainab; Macron, Laurent; Guignat, Laurence; Jublanc, Christel; Azarine, Arshid; Brailly, Sylvie; Young, Jacques; Mousseaux, Elie; Chanson, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with Cushing's syndrome have left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and dysfunction on echocardiography, but echo-based measurements may have limited accuracy in obese patients. No data are available on right ventricular (RV) and left atrial (LA) size and function in these patients. Objectives: The objective of the study was to evaluate LV, RV, and LA structure and function in patients with Cushing's syndrome by means of cardiac magnetic resonance, currently the reference modality in assessment of cardiac geometry and function. Methods: Eighteen patients with active Cushing's syndrome and 18 volunteers matched for age, sex, and body mass index were studied by cardiac magnetic resonance. The imaging was repeated in the patients 6 months (range 2–12 mo) after the treatment of hypercortisolism. Results: Compared with controls, patients with Cushing's syndrome had lower LV, RV, and LA ejection fractions (P < .001 for all) and increased end-diastolic LV segmental thickness (P < .001). Treatment of hypercortisolism was associated with an improvement in ventricular and atrial systolic performance, as reflected by a 15% increase in the LV ejection fraction (P = .029), a 45% increase in the LA ejection fraction (P < .001), and an 11% increase in the RV ejection fraction (P = NS). After treatment, the LV mass index and end-diastolic LV mass to volume ratio decreased by 17% (P < .001) and 10% (P = .002), respectively. None of the patients had late gadolinium myocardial enhancement. Conclusion: Cushing's syndrome is associated with subclinical biventricular and LA systolic dysfunctions that are reversible after treatment. Despite skeletal muscle atrophy, Cushing's syndrome patients have an increased LV mass, reversible upon correction of hypercortisolism. PMID:25093618

  12. Mesodermal iPSC–derived progenitor cells functionally regenerate cardiac and skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Quattrocelli, Mattia; Swinnen, Melissa; Giacomazzi, Giorgia; Camps, Jordi; Barthélemy, Ines; Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Caluwé, Ellen; Grosemans, Hanne; Thorrez, Lieven; Pelizzo, Gloria; Muijtjens, Manja; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Blot, Stephane; Janssens, Stefan; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2015-01-01

    Conditions such as muscular dystrophies (MDs) that affect both cardiac and skeletal muscles would benefit from therapeutic strategies that enable regeneration of both of these striated muscle types. Protocols have been developed to promote induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to differentiate toward cardiac or skeletal muscle; however, there are currently no strategies to simultaneously target both muscle types. Tissues exhibit specific epigenetic alterations; therefore, source-related lineage biases have the potential to improve iPSC-driven multilineage differentiation. Here, we determined that differential myogenic propensity influences the commitment of isogenic iPSCs and a specifically isolated pool of mesodermal iPSC-derived progenitors (MiPs) toward the striated muscle lineages. Differential myogenic propensity did not influence pluripotency, but did selectively enhance chimerism of MiP-derived tissue in both fetal and adult skeletal muscle. When injected into dystrophic mice, MiPs engrafted and repaired both skeletal and cardiac muscle, reducing functional defects. Similarly, engraftment into dystrophic mice of canine MiPs from dystrophic dogs that had undergone TALEN-mediated correction of the MD-associated mutation also resulted in functional striatal muscle regeneration. Moreover, human MiPs exhibited the same capacity for the dual differentiation observed in murine and canine MiPs. The findings of this study suggest that MiPs should be further explored for combined therapy of cardiac and skeletal muscles. PMID:26571398

  13. On the mechanics of cardiac function of Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mingming; Sato, Thomas N

    2008-01-01

    The heart is a vital organ that provides essential circulation throughout the body. Malfunction of cardiac pumping, thus, leads to serious and most of the times, to fatal diseases. Mechanics of cardiac pumping is a complex process, and many experimental and theoretical approaches have been undertaken to understand this process. We have taken advantage of the simplicity of the embryonic heart of an invertebrate, Drosophila melanogaster, to understand the fundamental mechanics of the beating heart. We applied a live imaging technique to the beating embryonic heart combined with analytical imaging tools to study the dynamic mechanics of the pumping. Furthermore, we have identified one mutant line that exhibits aberrant pumping mechanics. The Drosophila embryonic heart consists of only 104 cardiac cells forming a simple straight tube that can be easily accessed for real-time imaging. Therefore, combined with the wealth of available genetic tools, the embryonic Drosophila heart may serve as a powerful model system for studies of human heart diseases, such as arrhythmia and congenital heart diseases. We, furthermore, believe our mechanistic data provides important information that is useful for our further understanding of the design of biological structure and function and for engineering the pumps for medical uses.

  14. Cardiac baroreflex function and dynamic cerebral autoregulation in elderly Masters athletes.

    PubMed

    Aengevaeren, Vincent L; Claassen, Jurgen A H R; Levine, Benjamin D; Zhang, Rong

    2013-01-15

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is stably maintained through the combined effects of blood pressure (BP) regulation and cerebral autoregulation. Previous studies suggest that aerobic exercise training improves cardiac baroreflex function and beneficially affects BP regulation, but may negatively affect cerebral autoregulation. The purpose of this study was to reveal the impact of lifelong exercise on cardiac baroreflex function and dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA) in older adults. Eleven Masters athletes (MA) (8 men, 3 women; mean age 73 ± 6 yr; aerobic training >15 yr) and 12 healthy sedentary elderly (SE) (7 men, 5 women; mean age 71 ± 6 yr) participated in this study. BP, CBF velocity (CBFV), and heart rate were measured during resting conditions and repeated sit-stand maneuvers to enhance BP variability. Baroreflex gain was assessed using transfer function analysis of spontaneous changes in systolic BP and R-R interval in the low frequency range (0.05-0.15 Hz). Dynamic CA was assessed during sit-stand-induced changes in mean BP and CBFV at 0.05 Hz (10 s sit, 10 s stand). Cardiac baroreflex gain was more than doubled in MA compared with SE (MA, 7.69 ± 7.95; SE, 3.18 ± 1.29 ms/mmHg; P = 0.018). However, dynamic CA was similar in the two groups (normalized gain: MA, 1.50 ± 0.56; SE, 1.56 ± 0.42% CBFV/mmHg; P = 0.792). These findings suggest that lifelong exercise improves cardiac baroreflex function, but does not alter dynamic CA. Thus, beneficial effects of exercise training on BP regulation can be achieved in older adults without compromising dynamic regulation of CBF.

  15. Isosmotic media prevent edema in amphibian larvae without cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Smith, S C

    2000-03-01

    The absence of cardiac and circulatory function causes severe edema in amphibian embryos. Analyzing the roles of embryonic and larval circulation in respiration may thus be confounded by the increased diffusion distance and decreased surface area/volume ratio caused by edema. Similarly, detailed morphological analyses of embryos/larvae with defective circulatory or renal function is difficult or impossible due to the gross morphological anomalies engendered by edematous swelling. To circumvent these problems, two media have been developed which are isosmotic with the plasma of a common experimental amphibian species (Ambystoma mexicanun). These media are remarkably effective in preventing fluid accumulation in embryos and larvae lacking heart function and, when used in slightly lower concentrations, cause no apparent harm to embryos and larvae with normal circulation for periods up to 3 weeks. These media should prove useful for a variety of studies on the developmental physiology of the circulatory system and possibly also when examining the development of renal function and ionoregulation.

  16. Engineered hybrid cardiac patches with multifunctional electronics for online monitoring and regulation of tissue function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiner, Ron; Engel, Leeya; Fleischer, Sharon; Malki, Maayan; Gal, Idan; Shapira, Assaf; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Dvir, Tal

    2016-06-01

    In cardiac tissue engineering approaches to treat myocardial infarction, cardiac cells are seeded within three-dimensional porous scaffolds to create functional cardiac patches. However, current cardiac patches do not allow for online monitoring and reporting of engineered-tissue performance, and do not interfere to deliver signals for patch activation or to enable its integration with the host. Here, we report an engineered cardiac patch that integrates cardiac cells with flexible, freestanding electronics and a 3D nanocomposite scaffold. The patch exhibited robust electronic properties, enabling the recording of cellular electrical activities and the on-demand provision of electrical stimulation for synchronizing cell contraction. We also show that electroactive polymers containing biological factors can be deposited on designated electrodes to release drugs in the patch microenvironment on demand. We expect that the integration of complex electronics within cardiac patches will eventually provide therapeutic control and regulation of cardiac function.

  17. Engineered hybrid cardiac patches with multifunctional electronics for online monitoring and regulation of tissue function

    PubMed Central

    Feiner, Ron; Engel, Leeya; Fleischer, Sharon; Malki, Maayan; Gal, Idan; Shapira, Assaf; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Dvir, Tal

    2016-01-01

    In cardiac tissue engineering approaches to treat myocardial infarction, cardiac cells are seeded within three-dimensional porous scaffolds to create functional cardiac patches. However, current cardiac patches do not allow for online monitoring and reporting of engineered-tissue performance, and do not interfere to deliver signals for patch activation or to enable its integration with the host. Here, we report an engineered cardiac patch that integrates cardiac cells with flexible, free-standing electronics and a 3D nanocomposite scaffold. The patch exhibited robust electronic properties, enabling the recording of cellular electrical activities and the on-demand provision of electrical stimulation for synchronizing cell contraction. We also show that electroactive polymers containing biological factors can be deposited on designated electrodes to release drugs in the patch microenvironment on-demand. We expect that the integration of complex electronics within cardiac patches will eventually provide therapeutic control and regulation of cardiac function. PMID:26974408

  18. Effect of prolonged space flight on cardiac function and dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, W. L.; Epstein, S. E.; Griffith, J. M.; Goldstein, R. E.; Redwood, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    Echocardiographic studies were performed preflight 5 days before launch and on recovery day and 1, 2, 4, 11, 31 and 68 days postflight. From these echocardiograms measurements were made. From these primary measurements, left ventricular end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, stroke volume, and mass were derived using the accepted assumptions. Findings in the Scientist Pilot and Pilot resemble those seen in trained distance runners. Wall thickness measurements were normal in all three crewmembers preflight. Postflight basal studies were unchanged in the Commander on recovery day through 68 days postflight in both the Scientist Pilot and Pilot, however, the left ventricular end-diastolic volume, stroke volume, and mass were decreased slightly. Left ventricular function curves were constructed for the Commander and Pilot by plotting stroke volume versus end-diastolic volume. In both astronauts, preflight and postflight data fell on the same straight line demonstrating that no deterioration in cardiac function had occurred. These data indicate that the cardiovascular system adapts well to prolonged weightlessness and suggest that alterations in cardiac dimensions and function are unlikely to limit man's future in space.

  19. Treadmill performance and cardiac function in selected patients with coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    McKirnan, M.D.; Sullivan, M.; Jensen, D.; Froelicher, V.F.

    1984-02-01

    To investigate the cardiac determinants of treadmill performance in patients able to exercise to volitional fatigue, 88 patients with coronary heart disease free of angina pectoris were tested. The exercise tests included supine bicycle radionuclide ventriculography, thallium scintigraphy and treadmill testing with expired gas analysis. The number of abnormal Q wave locations, ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, cardiac output, exercise-induced ST segment depression and thallium scar and ischemia scores were the cardiac variables considered. Rest and exercise ejection fractions were highly correlated to thallium scar score (r . -0.72 to -0.75, p less than 0.001), but not to maximal oxygen consumption (r . 0.19 to 0.25, p less than 0.05). Fifty-five percent of the variability in predicting treadmill time or estimated maximal oxygen consumption was explained by treadmill test-induced change in heart rate (39%), thallium ischemia score (12%) and cardiac output at rest (4%). The change in heart rate induced by the treadmill test explained only 27% of the variability in measured maximal oxygen consumption. Myocardial damage predicted ejection fraction at rest and the ability to increase heart rate with treadmill exercise appeared as an essential component of exercise capacity. Exercise capacity was only minimally affected by asymptomatic ischemia and was relatively independent of ventricular function.

  20. Individual differences in behavioral activation and cardiac vagal control influence affective startle modification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao; Friedman, Bruce H

    2017-04-01

    The startle response (SR) has a close relationship with stress responses. Startle modification (SRM) has been widely used to study stress disorders (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder). The framework of the behavioral inhibition and activation systems (BIS/BAS) has been thought to correspond with withdrawal and approach motivational processes underlying affective SRM and can influence stress reactivity. Vagally-mediated cardiac activity as indexed by heart rate variability (HRV) has been associated with SRM and regulatory processes during stress. In the present study, the influence of individual differences in the BIS/BAS and resting HRV on affective SRM were examined. Eighty-six subjects viewed affective pictures while acoustic SR stimuli were delivered. Individual differences in motivation were measured by the BIS/BAS scales. The magnitude of SR was assessed as electromyographic activity of the SR eyeblink during pictures of different valences. Resting HRV was derived from electrocardiography. In contrast to previous studies, the present results showed that startle inhibition and potentiation were related to BAS and HRV, but not to BIS. There was also an interaction of BAS and HRV, indicating that the relationship between HRV and SRM strengthened as BAS scores decreased. The present findings suggest that BAS may relate to both withdrawal and approach, and trait stress reactivity is influenced by BAS and cardiac vagal activity. In addition, BAS moderates the relationship between cardiac vagal activity and SRM. These findings have both theoretical and practical implications for the study of SRM, stress disorders, and health.

  1. The effect of childhood obesity on cardiac functions.

    PubMed

    Üner, Abdurrahman; Doğan, Murat; Epcacan, Zerrin; Epçaçan, Serdar

    2014-03-01

    Obesity is a metabolic disorder defined as excessive accumulation of body fat, which is made up of genetic, environmental, and hormonal factors and has various social, psychological, and medical complications. Childhood obesity is a major indicator of adult obesity. The aim of this study is to evaluate the cardiac functions via electrocardiography (ECG), echocardiography (ECHO), and treadmill test in childhood obesity. A patient group consisting of 30 obese children and a control group consisting of 30 non-obese children were included in the study. The age range was between 8 and 17 years. Anthropometric measurements, physical examination, ECG, ECHO, and treadmill test were done in all patients. P-wave dispersion (PD) was found to be statistically significantly high in obese patients. In ECHO analysis, we found that end-diastolic diameter, end-systolic diameter, left ventricle posterior wall thickness, and interventricular septum were significantly greater in obese children. In treadmill test, exercise capacity was found to be significantly lower and the hemodynamic response to exercise was found to be defective in obese children. Various cardiac structural and functional changes occur in childhood obesity and this condition includes important cardiovascular risks. PD, left ventricle end-systolic and end-diastolic diameter, left ventricle posterior wall thickness, interventricular septum thickness, exercise capacity, and hemodynamic and ECG measurements during exercise testing are useful tests to determine cardiac dysfunctions and potential arrhythmias even in early stages of childhood obesity. Early recognition and taking precautions for obesity during childhood is very important to intercept complications that will occur in adulthood.

  2. Cardiac Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases: Function, Regulation, and Therapeutic Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Knight, W. E.; Yan, C.

    2014-01-01

    The second messengers cAMP and cGMP exist in multiple discrete compartments and regulate a variety of biological processes in the heart. The cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases, by catalyzing the hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP, play crucial roles in controlling the amplitude, duration, and compartmentalization of cyclic nucleotide signaling. Over 60 phosphodiesterase isoforms, grouped into 11 families, have been discovered to date. In the heart, both cAMP- and cGMP-hydrolyzing phosphodiesterases play important roles in physiology and pathology. At least 7 of the 11 phosphodiesterase family members appear to be expressed in the myocardium, and evidence supports phosphodiesterase involvement in regulation of many processes important for normal cardiac function including pacemaking and contractility, as well as many pathological processes including remodeling and myocyte apoptosis. Pharmacological inhibitors for a number of phosphodiesterase families have also been used clinically or preclinically to treat several types of cardiovascular disease. In addition, phosphodiesterase inhibitors are also being considered for treatment of many forms of disease outside the cardiovascular system, raising the possibility of cardiovascular side effects of such agents. This review will discuss the roles of phosphodiesterases in the heart, in terms of expression patterns, regulation, and involvement in physiological and pathological functions. Additionally, the cardiac effects of various phosphodiesterase inhibitors, both potentially beneficial and detrimental, will be discussed. PMID:22951903

  3. Histamine H3 activation depresses cardiac function in experimental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Eschun, G; Bose, D; Jacobs, H; Yang, J J; Light, R B; Mink, S N

    1998-11-01

    In the heart, histamine (H3) receptors may function as inhibitory presynaptic receptors that decrease adrenergic norepinephrine release in conditions of enhanced sympathetic neural activity. We hypothesized that H3-receptor blockade might improve cardiovascular function in sepsis. In a canine model of Escherichia coli sepsis, we found that H3-receptor blockade increased cardiac output (3.6 to 5.3 l/min, P < 0.05), systemic blood pressure (mean 76 to 96 mmHg, P < 0.05), and left ventricular contractility compared with pretreatment values. Plasma histamine concentrations increased modestly in the H3-blocker-sepsis group compared with values obtained in a nonsepsis-time-control group. In an in vitro preparation, histamine H3 activation could be identified under conditions of septic plasma. We conclude that activation of H3 receptors may contribute to cardiovascular collapse in sepsis.

  4. Functional Cardiac Lipolysis in Mice Critically Depends on Comparative Gene Identification-58*

    PubMed Central

    Zierler, Kathrin A.; Jaeger, Doris; Pollak, Nina M.; Eder, Sandra; Rechberger, Gerald N.; Radner, Franz P. W.; Woelkart, Gerald; Kolb, Dagmar; Schmidt, Albrecht; Kumari, Manju; Preiss-Landl, Karina; Pieske, Burkert; Mayer, Bernd; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim; Zechner, Rudolf; Haemmerle, Guenter

    2013-01-01

    Efficient catabolism of cellular triacylglycerol (TG) stores requires the TG hydrolytic activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL). The presence of comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) strongly increased ATGL-mediated TG catabolism in cell culture experiments. Mutations in the genes coding for ATGL or CGI-58 in humans cause neutral lipid storage disease characterized by TG accumulation in multiple tissues. ATGL gene mutations cause a severe phenotype especially in cardiac muscle leading to cardiomyopathy that can be lethal. In contrast, CGI-58 gene mutations provoke severe ichthyosis and hepatosteatosis in humans and mice, whereas the role of CGI-58 in muscle energy metabolism is less understood. Here we show that mice lacking CGI-58 exclusively in muscle (CGI-58KOM) developed severe cardiac steatosis and cardiomyopathy linked to impaired TG catabolism and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. The marked increase in ATGL protein levels in cardiac muscle of CGI-58KOM mice was unable to compensate the lack of CGI-58. The addition of recombinant CGI-58 to cardiac lysates of CGI-58KOM mice completely reconstituted TG hydrolytic activities. In skeletal muscle, the lack of CGI-58 similarly provoked TG accumulation. The addition of recombinant CGI-58 increased TG hydrolytic activities in control and CGI-58KOM tissue lysates, elucidating the limiting role of CGI-58 in skeletal muscle TG catabolism. Finally, muscle CGI-58 deficiency affected whole body energy homeostasis, which is caused by impaired muscle TG catabolism and increased cardiac glucose uptake. In summary, this study demonstrates that functional muscle lipolysis depends on both CGI-58 and ATGL. PMID:23413028

  5. Low-dose dasatinib rescues cardiac function in Noonan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jae-Sung; Huang, Yan; Kwaczala, Andrea T.; Kuo, Ivana Y.; Ehrlich, Barbara E.; Campbell, Stuart G.; Giordano, Frank J.; Bennett, Anton M.

    2016-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is a common autosomal dominant disorder that presents with short stature, craniofacial dysmorphism, and cardiac abnormalities. Activating mutations in the PTPN11 gene encoding for the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP2) causes approximately 50% of NS cases. In contrast, NS with multiple lentigines (NSML) is caused by mutations that inactivate SHP2, but it exhibits some overlapping abnormalities with NS. Protein zero-related (PZR) is a SHP2-binding protein that is hyper-tyrosyl phosphorylated in the hearts of mice from NS and NSML, suggesting that PZR and the tyrosine kinase that catalyzes its phosphorylation represent common targets for these diseases. We show that the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, dasatinib, at doses orders of magnitude lower than that used for its anticancer activities inhibited PZR tyrosyl phosphorylation in the hearts of NS mice. Low-dose dasatinib treatment of NS mice markedly improved cardiomyocyte contractility and functionality. Remarkably, a low dose of dasatinib reversed the expression levels of molecular markers of cardiomyopathy and reduced cardiac fibrosis in NS and NSML mice. These results suggest that PZR/SHP2 signaling is a common target of both NS and NSML and that low-dose dasatinib may represent a unifying therapy for the treatment of PTPN11-related cardiomyopathies. PMID:27942593

  6. The Transfer Functions of Cardiac Tissue during Stochastic Pacing

    PubMed Central

    de Lange, Enno; Kucera, Jan P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The restitution properties of cardiac action potential duration (APD) and conduction velocity (CV) are important factors in arrhythmogenesis. They determine alternans, wavebreak, and the patterns of reentrant arrhythmias. We developed a novel approach to characterize restitution using transfer functions. Transfer functions relate an input and an output quantity in terms of gain and phase shift in the complex frequency domain. We derived an analytical expression for the transfer function of interbeat intervals (IBIs) during conduction from one site (input) to another site downstream (output). Transfer functions can be efficiently obtained using a stochastic pacing protocol. Using simulations of conduction and extracellular mapping of strands of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, we show that transfer functions permit the quantification of APD and CV restitution slopes when it is difficult to measure APD directly. We find that the normally positive CV restitution slope attenuates IBI variations. In contrast, a negative CV restitution slope (induced by decreasing extracellular [K+]) amplifies IBI variations with a maximum at the frequency of alternans. Hence, it potentiates alternans and renders conduction unstable, even in the absence of APD restitution. Thus, stochastic pacing and transfer function analysis represent a powerful strategy to evaluate restitution and the stability of conduction. PMID:19134481

  7. Targeted inhibition of Focal Adhesion Kinase Attenuates Cardiac Fibrosis and Preserves Heart Function in Adverse Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Fan, Guangpu; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Fei; Zhang, Peide; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Xu; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis in post-myocardial infarction (MI), seen in both infarcted and non-infarcted myocardium, is beneficial to the recovery of heart function. But progressively pathological fibrosis impairs ventricular function and leads to poor prognosis. FAK has recently received attention as a potential mediator of fibrosis, our previous study reported that pharmacological inhibition of FAK can attenuate cardiac fibrosis in post MI models. However, the long-term effects on cardiac function and adverse cardiac remodelling were not clearly investigated. In this study, we tried to determine the preliminary mechanisms in regulating CF transformation to myofibroblasts and ECM synthesis relevant to the development of adverse cardiac remolding in vivo and in vitro. Our study provides even more evidence that FAK is directly related to the activation of CF in hypoxia condition in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Pharmacological inhibition of FAK significantly reduces myofibroblast differentiation; our in vivo data demonstrated that a FAK inhibitor significantly decreases fibrotic score, and preserves partial left ventricular function. Both PI3K/AKT signalling and ERK1/2 are necessary for hypoxia-induced CF differentiation and ECM synthesis; this process also involves lysyl oxidase (LOX). These findings suggest that pharmacological inhibition of FAK may become an effective therapeutic strategy against adverse fibrosis. PMID:28225063

  8. Smyd1b is required for skeletal and cardiac muscle function in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiqing; Zhong, Yongwang; Wang, Zengfeng; Gao, Jie; Xu, Jin; Chu, Wuying; Zhang, Jianshe; Fang, Shenyun; Du, Shao Jun

    2013-01-01

    Smyd1b is a member of the Smyd family that is specifically expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Smyd1b plays a key role in thick filament assembly during myofibrillogenesis in skeletal muscles of zebrafish embryos. To better characterize Smyd1b function and its mechanism of action in myofibrillogenesis, we analyzed the effects of smyd1b knockdown on myofibrillogenesis in skeletal and cardiac muscles of zebrafish embryos. The results show that knockdown of smyd1b causes significant disruption of myofibril organization in both skeletal and cardiac muscles of zebrafish embryos. Microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analyses show that knockdown of smyd1b up-regulates heat shock protein 90 (hsp90) and unc45b gene expression. Biochemical analysis reveals that Smyd1b can be coimmunoprecipitated with heat shock protein 90 α-1 and Unc45b, two myosin chaperones expressed in muscle cells. Consistent with its potential function in myosin folding and assembly, knockdown of smyd1b significantly reduces myosin protein accumulation without affecting mRNA expression. This likely results from increased myosin degradation involving unc45b overexpression. Together these data support the idea that Smyd1b may work together with myosin chaperones to control myosin folding, degradation, and assembly into sarcomeres during myofibrillogenesis. PMID:24068325

  9. Modeling the relation between cardiac pump function and myofiber mechanics.

    PubMed

    Arts, T; Bovendeerd, P; Delhaas, T; Prinzen, F

    2003-05-01

    Complexity of the geometry and structure of the heart hampers easy modeling of cardiac mechanics. The modeling can however be simplified considerably when using the hypothesis that in the normal heart myofiber structure and geometry adapt, until load is evenly distributed. A simple and realistic relationship is found between the hemodynamic variables cavity pressure and volume, and myofiber load parameters stress and strain. The most important geometric parameter in the latter relation is the ratio of cavity volume to wall volume, while actual geometry appears practically irrelevant. Applying the found relationship, a realistic maximum is set to left ventricular pressure after chronic pressure load. Pressures exceeding this level are likely to cause decompensation and heart failure. Furthermore, model is presented to simulate left and right ventricular pump function with left-right interaction.

  10. Regulation of cardiac function during a cold pressor test in athletes and untrained subjects.

    PubMed

    Ifuku, Hirotoshi; Moriyama, Kayo; Arai, Kuniko; Shiraishi-Hichiwa, Yumiko

    2007-09-01

    By using (dP/dt)/P of carotid artery pulse, a non-invasive index of cardiac contractility, we examined the regulatory mechanism of cardiac function during a cold pressor test in athletes and untrained subjects. Twenty-four healthy subjects (9 athletes, 8 untrained subjects, and 7 hyperreactors of 4 athletes and 3 untrained subjects with a rise of 15 mmHg or greater in systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure) underwent the cold pressor test according to Hines and Brown (Am Heart J 11:1-9, 1936): immersion of the right hand in 4 degrees C water for 1 min. Although mean blood pressure increased during the cold stress in all the groups, cardiac function differed. In athletes, heart rate and cardiac contractility caused cardiac output to increase while total peripheral resistance (TPR) did not change. In untrained subjects, however, heart rate and cardiac contractility tended to decrease cardiac output and thus TPR increased. In hyperreactors, heart rate and cardiac contractility increased during cold stress, and also TPR increased. After the end of the test, heart rate and cardiac contractility decreased only in untrained group. The findings that during a cold pressor test heart rate and cardiac contractility are enhanced in athletes but depressed in untrained subjects indicate that the state of physical training influences cardiac sympathetic neural reactivity to cold stress, except for hyperreactors.

  11. In vivo assessment of cardiac metabolism and function in the abdominal aortic banding model of compensated cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Anne-Marie L.; Giles, Lucia; Ball, Vicky; Miller, Jack J.; Clarke, Kieran; Carr, Carolyn A.; Tyler, Damian J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Left ventricular hypertrophy is an adaptive response of the heart to chronic mechanical overload and can lead to functional deterioration and heart failure. Changes in cardiac energy metabolism are considered as key to the hypertrophic remodelling process. The concurrence of obesity and hypertrophy has been associated with contractile dysfunction, and this work therefore aimed to investigate the in vivo structural, functional, and metabolic remodelling that occurs in the hypertrophied heart in the setting of a high-fat, high-sucrose, Western diet (WD). Methods and results Following induction of cardiac hypertrophy through abdominal aortic banding, male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to either a standard diet or a WD (containing 45% fat and 16% sucrose) for up to 14 weeks. Cardiac structural and functional characteristics were determined by CINE MRI, and in vivo metabolism was investigated using hyperpolarized 13C-labelled pyruvate. Cardiac hypertrophy was observed at all time points, irrespective of dietary manipulation, with no evidence of cardiac dysfunction. Pyruvate dehydrogenase flux was unchanged in the hypertrophied animals at any time point, but increased incorporation of the 13C label into lactate was observed by 9 weeks and maintained at 14 weeks, indicative of enhanced glycolysis. Conclusion Hypertrophied hearts revealed little evidence of a switch towards increased glucose oxidation but rather an uncoupling of glycolytic metabolism from glucose oxidation. This was maintained under conditions of dietary stress provided by a WD but, at this compensated phase of hypertrophy, did not result in any contractile dysfunction. PMID:25750189

  12. Beta2-adrenergic signaling affects the phenotype of human cardiac progenitor cells through EMT modulation.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Francesca; Angelini, Francesco; Siciliano, Camilla; Tasciotti, Julia; Mangino, Giorgio; De Falco, Elena; Carnevale, Roberto; Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Frati, Giacomo; Chimenti, Isotta

    2017-01-15

    Human cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) offer great promises to cardiac cell therapy for heart failure. Many in vivo studies have shown their therapeutic benefits, paving the way for clinical translation. The 3D model of cardiospheres (CSs) represents a unique niche-like in vitro microenvironment, which includes CPCs and supporting cells. CSs have been shown to form through a process mediated by epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). β2-Adrenergic signaling significantly affects stem/progenitor cells activation and mobilization in multiple tissues, and crosstalk between β2-adrenergic signaling and EMT processes has been reported. In the present study, we aimed at investigating the biological response of CSs to β2-adrenergic stimuli, focusing on EMT modulation in the 3D culture system of CSs. We treated human CSs and CS-derived cells (CDCs) with the β2-blocker butoxamine (BUT), using either untreated or β2 agonist (clenbuterol) treated CDCs as control. BUT-treated CS-forming cells displayed increased migration capacity and a significant increase in their CS-forming ability, consistently associated with increased expression of EMT-related genes, such as Snai1. Moreover, long-term BUT-treated CDCs contained a lower percentage of CD90+ cells, and this feature has been previously correlated with higher cardiogenic and therapeutic potential of the CDCs population. In addition, long-term BUT-treated CDCs had an increased ratio of collagen-III/collagen-I gene expression levels, and showed decreased release of inflammatory cytokines, overall supporting a less fibrosis-prone phenotype. In conclusion, β2 adrenergic receptor block positively affected the stemness vs commitment balance within CSs through the modulation of type1-EMT (so called "developmental"). These results further highlight type-1 EMT to be a key process affecting the features of resident cardiac progenitor cells, and mediating their response to the microenvironment.

  13. The effect of age on the relationship between cardiac and vascular function.

    PubMed

    Houghton, David; Jones, Thomas W; Cassidy, Sophie; Siervo, Mario; MacGowan, Guy A; Trenell, Michael I; Jakovljevic, Djordje G

    2016-01-01

    Age-related changes in cardiac and vascular function are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. The aim of the present study was to define the effect of age on the relationship between cardiac and vascular function. Haemodynamic and gas exchange measurements were performed at rest and peak exercise in healthy individuals. Augmentation index was measured at rest. Cardiac power output, a measure of overall cardiac function, was calculated as the product of cardiac output and mean arterial blood pressure. Augmentation index was significantly higher in older than younger participants (27.7 ± 10.1 vs. 2.5 ± 10.1%, P<0.01). Older people demonstrated significantly higher stroke volume and mean arterial blood pressure (P<0.05), but lower heart rate (145 ± 13 vs. 172 ± 10 beats/min, P<0.01) and peak oxygen consumption (22.5 ± 5.2 vs. 41.2 ± 8.4 ml/kg/min, P<0.01). There was a significant negative relationship between augmentation index and peak exercise cardiac power output (r=-0.73, P=0.02) and cardiac output (r=-0.69, P=0.03) in older participants. Older people maintain maximal cardiac function due to increased stroke volume. Vascular function is a strong predictor of overall cardiac function in older but in not younger people.

  14. Cardiac Atrophy and Diastolic Dysfunction During and After Long Duration Spaceflight: Functional Consequences for Orthostatic Intolerance, Exercise Capability and Risk for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Benjamin D.; Bungo, Michael W.; Platts, Steven H.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Johnston, Smith L.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac Atrophy and Diastolic Dysfunction During and After Long Duration Spaceflight: Functional Consequences for Orthostatic Intolerance, Exercise Capability and Risk for Cardiac Arrhythmias (Integrated Cardiovascular) will quantify the extent of long-duration space flightassociated cardiac atrophy (deterioration) on the International Space Station crewmembers.

  15. Physiologically inspired cardiac scaffolds for tailored in vivo function and heart regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Nicholas J; Coulombe, Kareen L K

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering is well suited for the treatment of cardiac disease due to the limited regenerative capacity of native cardiac tissue and the loss of function associated with endemic cardiac pathologies, such as myocardial infarction and congenital heart defects. However, the physiological complexity of the myocardium imposes extensive requirements on tissue therapies intended for these applications. In recent years, the field of cardiac tissue engineering has been characterized by great innovation and diversity in the fabrication of engineered tissue scaffolds for cardiac repair and regeneration to address these problems. From early approaches that attempted only to deliver cardiac cells in a hydrogel vessel, significant progress has been made in understanding the role of each major component of cardiac living tissue constructs (namely cells, scaffolds, and signaling mechanisms) as they relate to mechanical, biological, and electrical in vivo performance. This improved insight, accompanied by modern material science techniques, allows for the informed development of complex scaffold materials that are optimally designed for cardiac applications. This review provides a background on cardiac physiology as it relates to critical cardiac scaffold characteristics, the degree to which common cardiac scaffold materials fulfill these criteria, and finally an overview of recent in vivo studies that have employed this type of approach. PMID:25970645

  16. High Interleukin 17 Expression Is Correlated With Better Cardiac Function in Human Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Luisa M. D.; Villani, Fernanda N. A.; Nunes, Maria do Carmo P.; Gollob, Kenneth J.; Rocha, Manoel O. C.; Dutra, Walderez O.

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether the expression of interleukin 17 (IL-17) is associated with the indeterminate or cardiac clinical forms of Chagas disease and whether IL-17 expression can be correlated with patients' cardiac function. Our results demonstrated that cardiac Chagas patients have a lower intensity of expression of IL-17 by total lymphocytes and lower frequency of circulating T helper 17 cells. Correlative analysis showed that high IL-17 expression was associated with better cardiac function, as determined by left ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular diastolic diameter values. Therefore, IL-17 expression can be a protective factor to prevent myocardial damage in human Chagas disease. PMID:23204182

  17. Inhalation of Simulated Smog Affects Cardiac Function in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: The health effects of individual criteria air pollutants have been well investigated. Little is known about health effects of inhaled multi-pollutant mixtures that more realistically represent environmental exposures. The present study was designed to evaluate the card...

  18. Long-term wheel running compromises diaphragm function but improves cardiac and plantarflexor function in the mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Selsby, Joshua T; Acosta, Pedro; Sleeper, Meg M; Barton, Elisabeth R; Sweeney, H Lee

    2013-09-01

    Dystrophin-deficient muscles suffer from free radical injury, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, and inflammation, among other pathologies that contribute to muscle fiber injury and loss, leading to wheelchair confinement and death in the patient. For some time, it has been appreciated that endurance training has the potential to counter many of these contributing factors. Correspondingly, numerous investigations have shown improvements in limb muscle function following endurance training in mdx mice. However, the effect of long-term volitional wheel running on diaphragm and cardiac function is largely unknown. Our purpose was to determine the extent to which long-term endurance exercise affected dystrophic limb, diaphragm, and cardiac function. Diaphragm specific tension was reduced by 60% (P < 0.05) in mice that performed 1 yr of volitional wheel running compared with sedentary mdx mice. Dorsiflexor mass (extensor digitorum longus and tibialis anterior) and function (extensor digitorum longus) were not altered by endurance training. In mice that performed 1 yr of volitional wheel running, plantarflexor mass (soleus and gastrocnemius) was increased and soleus tetanic force was increased 36%, while specific tension was similar in wheel-running and sedentary groups. Cardiac mass was increased 15%, left ventricle chamber size was increased 20% (diastole) and 18% (systole), and stroke volume was increased twofold in wheel-running compared with sedentary mdx mice. These data suggest that the dystrophic heart may undergo positive exercise-induced remodeling and that limb muscle function is largely unaffected. Most importantly, however, as the diaphragm most closely recapitulates the human disease, these data raise the possibility of exercise-mediated injury in dystrophic skeletal muscle.

  19. Developmental stage-dependent effects of cardiac fibroblasts on function of stem cell-derived engineered cardiac tissues

    PubMed Central

    Liau, Brian; Jackman, Christopher P.; Li, Yanzhen; Bursac, Nenad

    2017-01-01

    We investigated whether the developmental stage of mouse cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) influences the formation and function of engineered cardiac tissues made of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (mESC-CMs). Engineered cardiac tissue patches were fabricated by encapsulating pure mESC-CMs, mESC-CMs + adult CFs, or mESC-CMs + fetal CFs in fibrin-based hydrogel. Tissue patches containing fetal CFs exhibited higher velocity of action potential propagation and contractile force amplitude compared to patches containing adult CFs, while pure mESC-CM patches did not form functional syncytium. The functional improvements in mESC-CM + fetal CF patches were associated with differences in structural remodeling and increased expression of proteins involved in cardiac function. To determine role of paracrine signaling, we cultured pure mESC-CMs within miniature tissue “micro-patches” supplemented with media conditioned by adult or fetal CFs. Fetal CF-conditioned media distinctly enhanced CM spreading and contractile activity, which was shown by pathway inhibitor experiments and Western blot analysis to be mediated via MEK-ERK signaling. In mESC-CM monolayers, CF-conditioned media did not alter CM spreading or MEK-ERK activation. Collectively, our studies show that 3D co-culture of mESC-CMs with embryonic CFs is superior to co-culture with adult CFs for in vitro generation of functional myocardium. Ensuring consistent developmental stages of cardiomyocytes and supporting non-myocytes may be a critical factor for promoting functional maturation of engineered cardiac tissues. PMID:28181589

  20. Cardiac Autonomic Function in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Cheng-Yu; Kung, Woon-Man; Chou, Yi-Sheng; Wang, Yao-Chin; Tai, Hsu-Chih; Wei, James Cheng-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease involing spine and enthesis. The primary aim of this study is to investigate the autonomic nervous system (ANS) function and the association between ANS and the functional status or disease activity in AS. The study included 42 AS patients, all fulfilling the modified New York criteria. All the patients are totally symptom free for ANS involvement and had normal neurological findings. These AS patients and 230 healthy volunteers receive analysis of 5 minutes heart rate variability (HRV) in lying posture. In addition, disease activity and functional status of these AS patients are assessed by Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Global Score (BAS-G). Both groups were age and sex-matched. Although the HRV analysis indicates that the peaks of total power (TP, 0–0.5 Hz) and high-frequency power (HF, 0.15–0.40 Hz) are similar in both groups, the activities of low-frequency power (LF, 0.04–0.15 Hz), LF in normalized units (LF%), and the ratio of LF to HF (LF/HF) in AS patients are obviously lower than healthy controls. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein revealed negative relationship with HF. The AS patients without peripheral joint disease have higher LF, TP, variance, LF%, and HF than the patients with peripheral joint disease. The AS patients without uvetis have higher HF than the patients with uvetis. The total scores of BASDI, BASFI, and BAS-G do not show any association to HRV parameters. AS patients have significantly abnormal cardiac autonomic regulation. This is closely related with some inflammatory activities. Reduced autonomic function may be one of the factors of high cardiovascular risk in AS patients. PMID:27227940

  1. Early Effects of Prolonged Cardiac Arrest and Ischemic Postconditioning during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation on Cardiac and Brain Mitochondrial Function in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Timothy R; Bartos, Jason A; Tsangaris, Adamantios; Shekar, Kadambari Chandra; Olson, Matthew D; Riess, Matthias L; Bienengraeber, Martin; Aufderheide, Tom P; Neumar, Robert W; Rees, Jennifer N; McKnite, Scott H; Dikalova, Anna E; Dikalov, Sergey I; Douglas, Hunter F; Yannopoulos, Demetris

    2017-04-10

    Background Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) is a prevalent medical crisis resulting in severe injury to the heart and brain and an overall survival of less than 10 percent. Mitochondrial dysfunction is predicted to be a key determinant of poor outcomes following prolonged CA. However, the onset and severity of mitochondrial dysfunction during CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is not fully understood. Ischemic postconditioning (IPC), controlled pauses during the initiation of CPR, has been shown to improve cardiac function and neurologically favorable outcomes after fifteen minutes of CA. We tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction develops during prolonged CA and can be rescued with IPC during CPR (IPC-CPR).

  2. Haemoglobin, blood volume, cardiac function, and aerobic power.

    PubMed

    Gledhill, N; Warburton, D; Jamnik, V

    1999-02-01

    Alterations in [Hb], which are mediated through changes in arterial oxygen content, and alterations in BV, which are mediated through changes in cardiac output (Q), have a significant effect on both VO2max and aerobic performance. If BV is held constant, a decrease in [Hb] (anaemia) causes a decrease in VO2max and aerobic performance, while an increase in [Hb] (blood doping) causes an increase in VO2max and aerobic performance. If [Hb] is held constant, an increase in BV can cause and increase in both VO2max and aerobic performance, while a decrease in BV can cause a decrease in VO2max and aerobic performance. In addition, an increase in BV can compensate for moderate reductions in [Hb] through increase in Q, allowing VO2max to remain unchanged or even increase. Also, a large portion of the difference in the enhanced cardiovascular function of endurance athletes is due to their high BV and the resultant enhancement of diastolic function. Hence, optimizing both [Hb] and BV is a very important consideration for endurance performance.

  3. Metoprolol Improves Endothelial Function in Patients with Cardiac Syndrome X

    PubMed Central

    Majidinia, Maryam; Rasmi, Yousef; Khadem Ansari, Mohammad Hassan; Seyed-Mohammadzad, MirHossein; Saboory, Ehsan; Shirpoor, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction which is manifested by the loss of nitric oxide bioavailability, is an increasingly recognized cause of cardiac syndrome X (CSX) and beta blockers are used for the treatment of this syndrome. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate effects of metoprolol, as a beta blocker, on endothelial function in CSX patients. The study included 25 CSX patients (20 female/ 5 male, mean age: 55.36±10.31 years) who received metoprolol (50 mg BID) for one month. In addition, 25 healthy controls (20 female/ 5 male, mean age: 54.32 ±9.27 years) were enrolled. Levels of endothelin-1, E-selectin, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in controls and CSX patients were measured, both at the baseline and after the treatment, by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In CSX patients, at the baseline, levels of E-selectin and VCAM-1 were significantly higher than those of the controls. In addition, levels of these biomarkers in CSX patients after the treatment significantly decreased compared to the baseline. In spite of similar tendency, these differences were not significant for endothelin-1. In conclusion, metoprolol therapy improves endothelial function. Thus, it may be a suggested choice for CSX treatment. However, further studies are needed to confirm the clinical significance of metoprolol therapy for CSX patients. PMID:27980592

  4. The heart's ‘little brain’ controlling cardiac function in the rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Brack, Kieran E

    2015-01-01

    New Findings •What is the topic of this review? The topic of the review is the intrinsic cardiac nervous system in the rabbit. •What advances does it highlight? The anatomy of rabbit intrinsic ganglia is similar to that of other species, including humans. Immunohistochemistry confirms the presence of cholinergic and adrenergic neurones, with a striking arrangement of neuronal nitric oxide synthase-positive cell bodies. Activation of atrial ganglia produces effects on local and remote regions. Heart disease is a primary cause of mortality in the developed world, and it is well recognized that neural mechanisms play an important role in many cardiac pathologies. The role of extrinsic autonomic nerves has traditionally attracted the most attention. However, there is a rich intrinsic innervation of the heart, including numerous cardiac ganglia (ganglionic plexuses), that has the potential to affect cardiac function independently as well as to influence the actions of the extrinsic nerves. To investigate this, an isolated, perfused, innervated rabbit Langendorff heart preparation was considered the best option. Although ganglionic plexuses have been well described for several species, there was no full description of the anatomy and histochemistry of rabbit hearts. To this end, rabbit intrinsic ganglia were located using acetylcholinesterase histology (n = 33 hearts). This revealed six generalized ganglionic regions, defined as a left neuronal complex above the left pulmonary vein, a right neuronal complex around the base of right cranial vein, three scattered in the dorsal right atrium and a region containing numerous ventricular ganglia located on the conus arteriosus. Using immunohistochemistry, neurons were found to contain choline acetyltransferase or tyrosine hydroxylase and/or neuronal nitric oxide synthase in differing amounts (choline acetyltransferase > tyrosine hydroxylase > neuronal nitric oxide synthase). The function of rabbit intrinsic ganglia

  5. Reduced Right Ventricular Function Predicts Long-Term Cardiac Re-Hospitalization after Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, Yulia; Chan, Jacqueline; Iskandir, Marina; Gulkarov, Iosif; Tortolani, Anthony; Brener, Sorin J.; Sacchi, Terrence J.; Heitner, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Background The significance of right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF), independent of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), following isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and valve procedures remains unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the significance of abnormal RVEF by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), independent of LVEF in predicting outcomes of patients undergoing isolated CABG and valve surgery. Methods From 2007 to 2009, 109 consecutive patients (mean age, 66 years; 38% female) were referred for pre-operative CMR. Abnormal RVEF and LVEF were considered <35% and <45%, respectively. Elective primary procedures include CABG (56%) and valve (44%). Thirty-day outcomes were perioperative complications, length of stay, cardiac re-hospitalizations and early mortaility; long-term (> 30 days) outcomes included, cardiac re-hospitalization, worsening congestive heart failure and mortality. Mean clinical follow up was 14 months. Findings Forty-eight patients had reduced RVEF (mean 25%) and 61 patients had normal RVEF (mean 50%) (p<0.001). Fifty-four patients had reduced LVEF (mean 30%) and 55 patients had normal LVEF (mean 59%) (p<0.001). Patients with reduced RVEF had a higher incidence of long-term cardiac re-hospitalization vs. patients with normal RVEF (31% vs.13%, p<0.05). Abnormal RVEF was a predictor for long-term cardiac re-hospitalization (HR 3.01 [CI 1.5-7.9], p<0.03). Reduced LVEF did not influence long-term cardiac re-hospitalization. Conclusion Abnormal RVEF is a stronger predictor for long-term cardiac re-hospitalization than abnormal LVEF in patients undergoing isolated CABG and valve procedures. PMID:26197273

  6. Cardiac Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors: Novel Aspects of Expression, Signaling Mechanisms, Physiologic Function, and Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Timothy D.; Jensen, Brian C.; Baker, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Adrenergic receptors (AR) are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that have a crucial role in cardiac physiology in health and disease. Alpha1-ARs signal through Gαq, and signaling through Gq, for example, by endothelin and angiotensin receptors, is thought to be detrimental to the heart. In contrast, cardiac alpha1-ARs mediate important protective and adaptive functions in the heart, although alpha1-ARs are only a minor fraction of total cardiac ARs. Cardiac alpha1-ARs activate pleiotropic downstream signaling to prevent pathologic remodeling in heart failure. Mechanisms defined in animal and cell models include activation of adaptive hypertrophy, prevention of cardiac myocyte death, augmentation of contractility, and induction of ischemic preconditioning. Surprisingly, at the molecular level, alpha1-ARs localize to and signal at the nucleus in cardiac myocytes, and, unlike most GPCRs, activate “inside-out” signaling to cause cardioprotection. Contrary to past opinion, human cardiac alpha1-AR expression is similar to that in the mouse, where alpha1-AR effects are seen most convincingly in knockout models. Human clinical studies show that alpha1-blockade worsens heart failure in hypertension and does not improve outcomes in heart failure, implying a cardioprotective role for human alpha1-ARs. In summary, these findings identify novel functional and mechanistic aspects of cardiac alpha1-AR function and suggest that activation of cardiac alpha1-AR might be a viable therapeutic strategy in heart failure. PMID:24368739

  7. Intracellular sodium affects ouabain interaction with the Na/K pump in cultured chick cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Whether a given dose of ouabain will produce inotropic or toxic effects depends on factors that affect the apparent affinity (K0.5) of the Na/K pump for ouabain. To accurately resolve these factors, especially the effect of intracellular Na concentration (Nai), we have applied three complementary techniques for measuring the K0.5 for ouabain in cultured embryonic chick cardiac myocytes. Under control conditions with 5.4 mM Ko, the value of the K0.5 for ouabain was 20.6 +/- 1.2, 12.3 +/- 1.7, and 6.6 +/- 0.4 microM, measured by voltage-clamp, Na-selective microelectrode, and equilibrium [3H]ouabain-binding techniques, respectively. A significant difference in the three techniques was the time of exposure to ouabain (30 s-30 min). Since increased duration of exposure to ouabain would increase Nai, monensin was used to raise Nai to investigate what effect Nai might have on the apparent affinity of block by ouabain. Monensin enhanced the rise in Na content induced by 1 microM ouabain. In the presence of 1 microM [3H]ouabain, total binding was found to be a saturating function of Na content. Using the voltage- clamp method, we found that the value of the K0.5 for ouabain was lowered by nearly an order of magnitude in the presence of 3 microM monensin to 2.4 +/- 0.2 microM and the magnitude of the Na/K pump current was increased about threefold. Modeling the Na/K pump as a cyclic sequence of states with a single state having high affinity for ouabain shows that changes in Nai alone are sufficient to cause a 10- fold change in K0.5. These results suggest that Nai reduces the value of the apparent affinity of the Na/K pump for ouabain in 5.4 mM Ko by increasing its turnover rate, thus increasing the availability of the conformation of the Na/K pump that binds ouabain with high affinity. PMID:2299333

  8. ANGPTL2 activity in cardiac pathologies accelerates heart failure by perturbing cardiac function and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zhe; Miyata, Keishi; Kadomatsu, Tsuyoshi; Horiguchi, Haruki; Fukushima, Hiroyuki; Tohyama, Shugo; Ujihara, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Takahiro; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Zhao, Jiabin; Endo, Motoyoshi; Morinaga, Jun; Sato, Michio; Sugizaki, Taichi; Zhu, Shunshun; Terada, Kazutoyo; Sakaguchi, Hisashi; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Takeya, Motohiro; Takeda, Naoki; Araki, Kimi; Manabe, Ichiro; Fukuda, Keiichi; Otsu, Kinya; Wada, Jun; Murohara, Toyoaki; Mohri, Satoshi; Yamashita, Jun K.; Sano, Motoaki; Oike, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    A cardioprotective response that alters ventricular contractility or promotes cardiomyocyte enlargement occurs with increased workload in conditions such as hypertension. When that response is excessive, pathological cardiac remodelling occurs, which can progress to heart failure, a leading cause of death worldwide. Mechanisms underlying this response are not fully understood. Here, we report that expression of angiopoietin-like protein 2 (ANGPTL2) increases in pathologically-remodeled hearts of mice and humans, while decreased cardiac ANGPTL2 expression occurs in physiological cardiac remodelling induced by endurance training in mice. Mice overexpressing ANGPTL2 in heart show cardiac dysfunction caused by both inactivation of AKT and sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA)2a signalling and decreased myocardial energy metabolism. Conversely, Angptl2 knockout mice exhibit increased left ventricular contractility and upregulated AKT-SERCA2a signalling and energy metabolism. Finally, ANGPTL2-knockdown in mice subjected to pressure overload ameliorates cardiac dysfunction. Overall, these studies suggest that therapeutic ANGPTL2 suppression could antagonize development of heart failure. PMID:27677409

  9. Invasive surgery reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function in a porcine model of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    van Hout, Gerardus PJ; Teuben, Michel PJ; Heeres, Marjolein; de Maat, Steven; de Jong, Renate; Maas, Coen; Kouwenberg, Lisanne HJA; Koenderman, Leo; van Solinge, Wouter W; de Jager, Saskia CA; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Hoefer, Imo E

    2015-01-01

    Reperfusion injury following myocardial infarction (MI) increases infarct size (IS) and deteriorates cardiac function. Cardioprotective strategies in large animal MI models often failed in clinical trials, suggesting translational failure. Experimentally, MI is induced artificially and the effect of the experimental procedures may influence outcome and thus clinical applicability. The aim of this study was to investigate if invasive surgery, as in the common open chest MI model affects IS and cardiac function. Twenty female landrace pigs were subjected to MI by transluminal balloon occlusion. In 10 of 20 pigs, balloon occlusion was preceded by invasive surgery (medial sternotomy). After 72 hrs, pigs were subjected to echocardiography and Evans blue/triphenyl tetrazoliumchloride double staining to determine IS and area at risk. Quantification of IS showed a significant IS reduction in the open chest group compared to the closed chest group (IS versus area at risk: 50.9 ± 5.4% versus 69.9 ± 3.4%, P = 0.007). End systolic LV volume and LV ejection fraction measured by echocardiography at follow-up differed significantly between both groups (51 ± 5 ml versus 65 ± 3 ml, P = 0.033; 47.5 ± 2.6% versus 38.8 ± 1.2%, P = 0.005). The inflammatory response in the damaged myocardium did not differ between groups. This study indicates that invasive surgery reduces IS and preserves cardiac function in a porcine MI model. Future studies need to elucidate the effect of infarct induction technique on the efficacy of pharmacological therapies in large animal cardioprotection studies. PMID:26282710

  10. Cardiac Metabolic Pathways Affected in the Mouse Model of Barth Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Powers, Corey; Madala, Satish K.; Greis, Kenneth D.; Haffey, Wendy D.; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Purevjav, Enkhsaikhan; Javadov, Sabzali; Strauss, Arnold W.; Khuchua, Zaza

    2015-01-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a mitochondrial phospholipid essential for electron transport chain (ETC) integrity. CL-deficiency in humans is caused by mutations in the tafazzin (Taz) gene and results in a multisystem pediatric disorder, Barth syndrome (BTHS). It has been reported that tafazzin deficiency destabilizes mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and affects supercomplex assembly. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of Taz-knockdown on the mitochondrial proteomic landscape and metabolic processes, such as stability of respiratory chain supercomplexes and their interactions with fatty acid oxidation enzymes in cardiac muscle. Proteomic analysis demonstrated reduction of several polypeptides of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, including Rieske and cytochrome c1 subunits of complex III, NADH dehydrogenase alpha subunit 5 of complex I and the catalytic core-forming subunit of F0F1-ATP synthase. Taz gene knockdown resulted in upregulation of enzymes of folate and amino acid metabolic pathways in heart mitochondria, demonstrating that Taz-deficiency causes substantive metabolic remodeling in cardiac muscle. Mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes are destabilized in CL-depleted mitochondria from Taz knockdown hearts resulting in disruption of the interactions between ETC and the fatty acid oxidation enzymes, very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, potentially affecting the metabolic channeling of reducing equivalents between these two metabolic pathways. Mitochondria-bound myoglobin was significantly reduced in Taz-knockdown hearts, potentially disrupting intracellular oxygen delivery to the oxidative phosphorylation system. Our results identify the critical pathways affected by the Taz-deficiency in mitochondria and establish a future framework for development of therapeutic options for BTHS. PMID:26030409

  11. Cardiac metabolic pathways affected in the mouse model of barth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Powers, Corey; Madala, Satish K; Greis, Kenneth D; Haffey, Wendy D; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Purevjav, Enkhsaikhan; Javadov, Sabzali; Strauss, Arnold W; Khuchua, Zaza

    2015-01-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a mitochondrial phospholipid essential for electron transport chain (ETC) integrity. CL-deficiency in humans is caused by mutations in the tafazzin (Taz) gene and results in a multisystem pediatric disorder, Barth syndrome (BTHS). It has been reported that tafazzin deficiency destabilizes mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and affects supercomplex assembly. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of Taz-knockdown on the mitochondrial proteomic landscape and metabolic processes, such as stability of respiratory chain supercomplexes and their interactions with fatty acid oxidation enzymes in cardiac muscle. Proteomic analysis demonstrated reduction of several polypeptides of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, including Rieske and cytochrome c1 subunits of complex III, NADH dehydrogenase alpha subunit 5 of complex I and the catalytic core-forming subunit of F0F1-ATP synthase. Taz gene knockdown resulted in upregulation of enzymes of folate and amino acid metabolic pathways in heart mitochondria, demonstrating that Taz-deficiency causes substantive metabolic remodeling in cardiac muscle. Mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes are destabilized in CL-depleted mitochondria from Taz knockdown hearts resulting in disruption of the interactions between ETC and the fatty acid oxidation enzymes, very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, potentially affecting the metabolic channeling of reducing equivalents between these two metabolic pathways. Mitochondria-bound myoglobin was significantly reduced in Taz-knockdown hearts, potentially disrupting intracellular oxygen delivery to the oxidative phosphorylation system. Our results identify the critical pathways affected by the Taz-deficiency in mitochondria and establish a future framework for development of therapeutic options for BTHS.

  12. New developments in paediatric cardiac functional ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    de Korte, Chris L; Nillesen, Maartje M; Saris, Anne E C M; Lopata, Richard G P; Thijssen, Johan M; Kapusta, Livia

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasound imaging can be used to estimate the morphology as well as the motion and deformation of tissues. If the interrogated tissue is actively deforming, this deformation is directly related to its function and quantification of this deformation is normally referred as 'strain imaging'. Tissue can also be deformed by applying an internal or external force and the resulting, induced deformation is a function of the mechanical tissue characteristics. In combination with the load applied, these strain maps can be used to estimate or reconstruct the mechanical properties of tissue. This technique was named 'elastography' by Ophir et al. in 1991. Elastography can be used for atherosclerotic plaque characterisation, while the contractility of the heart or skeletal muscles can be assessed with strain imaging. Rather than using the conventional video format (DICOM) image information, radio frequency (RF)-based ultrasound methods enable estimation of the deformation at higher resolution and with higher precision than commercial methods using Doppler (tissue Doppler imaging) or video image data (2D speckle tracking methods). However, the improvement in accuracy is mainly achieved when measuring strain along the ultrasound beam direction, so it has to be considered a 1D technique. Recently, this method has been extended to multiple directions and precision further improved by using spatial compounding of data acquired at multiple beam steered angles. Using similar techniques, the blood velocity and flow can be determined. RF-based techniques are also beneficial for automated segmentation of the ventricular cavities. In this paper, new developments in different techniques of quantifying cardiac function by strain imaging, automated segmentation, and methods of performing blood flow imaging are reviewed and their application in paediatric cardiology is discussed.

  13. Metformin improves cardiac function in a nondiabetic rat model of post-MI heart failure.

    PubMed

    Yin, Meimei; van der Horst, Iwan C C; van Melle, Joost P; Qian, Cheng; van Gilst, Wiek H; Silljé, Herman H W; de Boer, Rudolf A

    2011-08-01

    Metformin is the first choice drug for the treatment of patients with diabetes, but its use is debated in patients with advanced cardiorenal disease. Epidemiological data suggest that metformin may reduce cardiac events, in patients both with and without heart failure. Experimental evidence suggests that metformin reduces cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury. It is unknown whether metformin improves cardiac function (remodeling) in a long-term post-MI remodeling model. We therefore studied male, nondiabetic, Sprague-Dawley rats that were subjected to either myocardial infarction (MI) or sham operation. Animals were randomly allocated to treatment with normal water or metformin-containing water (250 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)). At baseline, 6 wk, and 12 wk, metabolic parameters were analyzed and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) were performed. Echocardiography and hemodynamic parameters were assessed 12 wk after MI. In the MI model, infarct size was significantly smaller after 12-wk metformin treatment (29.6 ± 3.2 vs. 38.0 ± 2.2%, P < 0.05). Moreover, metformin resulted in less left ventricular dilatation (6.0 ± 0.4 vs. 7.6 ± 0.6 mm, P < 0.05) and preservation of left ventricular ejection fraction (65.8 ± 3.7% vs. 48.6 ± 5.6%, P < 0.05) compared with MI control. The improved cardiac function was associated with decreased atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA levels in the metformin-treated group (50% reduction compared with MI, P < 0.05). Insulin resistance did not occur during cardiac remodeling (as indicated by normal OGTT) and fasting glucose levels and the pattern of the OGTT were not affected by metformin. Molecular analyses suggested that altered AMP kinase phosphorylation status and low insulin levels mediate the salutary effects of metformin. Altogether our results indicate that metformin may have potential to attenuate heart failure development after myocardial infarction, in the absence of diabetes and independent of systemic glucose levels.

  14. The functional morphology and role of cardiac telocytes in myocardium regeneration.

    PubMed

    Varga, Ivan; Danisovic, Lubos; Kyselovic, Jan; Gazova, Andrea; Musil, Peter; Miko, Michal; Polak, Stefan

    2016-05-19

    Key morphological discoveries in recent years have included the discovery of new cell populations inside the heart called cardiac telocytes. These newly described cells of the connective tissue have extremely long cytoplasmic processes through which they form functionally connected three-dimensional networks that connect cells of the immune system, nerve fibers, cardiac stem cells, and cardiac muscle cells. Based on their functions, telocytes are also referred to as "connecting cells" or "nurse cells" for cardiac progenitor stem cells. In this critical review, we provide a summary of the latest research on cardiac telocytes localized in all layers of the heart - from the historical background of their discovery, through ultrastructural, immunohistochemical, and functional characterizations, to the application of this knowledge to the fields of cardiology, stem cell research, and regenerative medicine.

  15. Effects of Obesity on Cardiovascular Hemodynamics, Cardiac Morphology, and Ventricular Function.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Martin A; Omran, Jad; Bostick, Brian P

    2016-12-01

    Obesity produces a variety of hemodynamic alterations that may cause changes in cardiac morphology which predispose to left and right ventricular dysfunction. Various neurohormonal and metabolic alterations commonly associated with obesity may contribute to these abnormalities of cardiac structure and function. These changes in cardiovascular hemodynamics, cardiac morphology, and ventricular function may, in severely obese patients, predispose to heart failure, even in the absence of other forms of heart disease (obesity cardiomyopathy). In normotensive obese patients, cardiac involvement is commonly characterized by elevated cardiac output, low peripheral vascular resistance, and increased left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic pressure. Sleep-disordered breathing may lead to pulmonary arterial hypertension and, in association with left heart failure, may contribute to elevation of right heart pressures. These alterations, in association with various neurohormonal and metabolic abnormalities, may produce LV hypertrophy; impaired LV diastolic function; and less commonly, LV systolic dysfunction. Many of these alterations are reversible with substantial voluntary weight loss.

  16. Respiratory and cardiac function in congenital muscular dystrophies with alpha dystroglycan deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pane, M; Messina, S; Vasco, G; Foley, A R; Morandi, L; Pegoraro, E; Mongini, T; D'Amico, A; Bianco, F; Lombardo, M E; Scalise, R; Bruno, C; Berardinelli, A; Pini, A; Moroni, I; Mora, M; Toscano, A; Moggio, M; Comi, G; Santorelli, F M; Bertini, E; Muntoni, F; Mercuri, E

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess respiratory and cardiac function in a large cohort of patients with congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) with reduced glycosylation of alphadystroglycan (α-DG). Thirteen of the 115 patients included in the study died between the age of 1 month and 20 years. The age at last follow up of the surviving 102 ranged between 1 year and 68 years (median: 9.3 years). Cardiac involvement was found in 7 of the 115 (6%), 5 with dilated cardiomyopathy, 1 cardiac conductions defects and 1 mitral regurgitation. Respiratory function was impaired in 14 (12%). Ten of the 14 required non invasive nocturnal respiratory support, while the other four required invasive ventilation. Cardiac or respiratory involvement was found in patients with mutations in FKRP, POMT1, POMT2. All of the patients in whom mutation in POMGnT1 were identified had normal cardiac and respiratory function.

  17. Qishen Yiqi Drop Pill improves cardiac function after myocardial ischemia

    PubMed Central

    JianXin, Chen; Xue, Xu; ZhongFeng, Li; Kuo, Gao; FeiLong, Zhang; ZhiHong, Li; Xian, Wang; HongCai, Shang

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia (MI) is one of the leading causes of death, while Qishen Yiqi Drop Pill (QYDP) is a representative traditional Chinese medicine to treat this disease. Unveiling the pharmacological mechanism of QYDP will provide a great opportunity to promote the development of novel drugs to treat MI. 64 male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into four groups: MI model group, sham operation group, QYDP treatment group and Fosinopril treatment group. Echocardiography results showed that QYDP exhibited significantly larger LV end-diastolic dimension (LVEDd) and LV end-systolic dimension (LVEDs), compared with the MI model group, indicating the improved cardiac function by QYDP. 1H-NMR based metabonomics further identify 9 significantly changed metabolites in the QYDP treatment group, and the QYDP-related proteins based on the protein-metabolite interaction networks and the corresponding pathways were explored, involving the pyruvate metabolism pathway, the retinol metabolism pathway, the tyrosine metabolism pathway and the purine metabolism pathway, suggesting that QYDP was closely associated with blood circulation. ELISA tests were further employed to identify NO synthase (iNOS) and cathepsin K (CTSK) in the networks. For the first time, our work combined experimental and computational methods to study the mechanism of the formula of traditional Chinese medicine. PMID:27075394

  18. Foetal bovine serum-derived exosomes affect yield and phenotype of human cardiac progenitor cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Francesco; Ionta, Vittoria; Rossi, Fabrizio; Miraldi, Fabio; Messina, Elisa; Giacomello, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) represent a powerful tool in cardiac regenerative medicine. Pre-clinical studies suggest that most of the beneficial effects promoted by the injected cells are due to their paracrine activity exerted on endogenous cells and tissue. Exosomes are candidate mediators of this paracrine effects. According to their potential, many researchers have focused on characterizing exosomes derived from specific cell types, but, up until now, only few studies have analyzed the possible in vitro effects of bovine serum-derived exosomes on cell proliferation or differentiation. Methods: The aim of this study was to analyse, from a qualitative and quantitative point of view, the in vitro effects of bovine serum exosomes on human CPCs cultured either as cardiospheres or as monolayers of cardiosphere-forming cells. Results: Effects on proliferation, yield and molecular patterning were detected. We show, for the first time, that exogenous bovine exosomes support the proliferation and migration of human cardiosphere-forming cells, and that their depletion affects cardiospheres formation, in terms of size, yield and extra-cellular matrix production. Conclusion: These results stress the importance of considering differential biological effects of exogenous cell culture supplements on the final phenotype of primary human cell cultures. PMID:27340620

  19. Progressive Dystrophic Pathology in Diaphragm and Impairment of Cardiac Function in FKRP P448L Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Blaeser, Anthony; Awano, Hiroyuki; Wu, Bo; Lu, Qi-Long

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene for fukutin-related protein represent a subset of muscular dystrophies known as dystroglycanopathies characterized by loss of functionally-glycosylated-alpha-dystroglycan and a wide range of dystrophic phenotypes. Mice generated by our lab containing the P448L mutation in the fukutin-related protein gene demonstrate the dystrophic phenotype similar to that of LGMD2I. Here we examined the morphology of the heart and diaphragm, focusing on pathology of diaphragm and cardiac function of the mutant mice for up to 12 months. Both diaphragm and heart lack clear expression of functionally-glycosylated-alpha-dystroglycan throughout the observed period. The diaphragm undergoes progressive deterioration in histology with increasing amount of centranucleation and inflammation. Large areas of mononuclear cell infiltration and fibrosis of up to 60% of tissue area were detected as early as 6 months of age. Despite a less severe morphology with only patches of mononuclear cell infiltration and fibrosis of ~5% by 12 months of age in the heart, cardiac function is clearly affected. High frequency ultrasound reveals a smaller heart size up to 10 months of age. There are significant increases in myocardial thickness and decrease in cardiac output through 12 months. Dysfunction in the heart represents a key marker for evaluating experimental therapies aimed at cardiac muscle. PMID:27711214

  20. Emotion Risk-Factor in Patients With Cardiac Diseases: The Role of Cognitive Emotion Regulation Strategies, Positive Affect and Negative Affect (A Case-Control Study)

    PubMed Central

    Bahremand, Mostafa; Alikhani, Mostafa; Zakiei, Ali; Janjani, Parisa; Aghaei, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Application of psychological interventions is essential in classic treatments for patient with cardiac diseases. The present study compared cognitive emotion regulation strategies, positive affect, and negative affect for cardiac patients with healthy subjects. This study was a case-control study. Fifty subjects were selected using convenient sampling method from cardiac (coronary artery disease) patients presenting in Imam Ali medical center of Kermanshah, Iran in the spring 2013. Fifty subjects accompanied the patients to the medical center, selected as control group, did not have any history of cardiac diseases. For collecting data, the cognitive emotion regulation questionnaire and positive and negative affect scales were used. For data analysis, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was applied using the SPSS statistical software (ver. 19.0). In all cognitive emotion regulation strategies, there was a significant difference between the two groups. A significant difference was also detected regarding positive affect between the two groups, but no significant difference was found regarding negative affect. We found as a result that, having poor emotion regulation strategies is a risk factor for developing heart diseases. PMID:26234976

  1. Maternal high-fat diet impairs cardiac function in offspring of diabetic pregnancy through metabolic stress and mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mdaki, Kennedy S.; Larsen, Tricia D.; Wachal, Angela L.; Schimelpfenig, Michelle D.; Weaver, Lucinda J.; Dooyema, Samuel D. R.; Louwagie, Eli J.

    2016-01-01

    Offspring of diabetic pregnancies are at risk of cardiovascular disease at birth and throughout life, purportedly through fuel-mediated influences on the developing heart. Preventative measures focus on glycemic control, but the contribution of additional offenders, including lipids, is not understood. Cellular bioenergetics can be influenced by both diabetes and hyperlipidemia and play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of adult cardiovascular disease. This study investigated whether a maternal high-fat diet, independently or additively with diabetes, could impair fuel metabolism, mitochondrial function, and cardiac physiology in the developing offspring's heart. Sprague-Dawley rats fed a control or high-fat diet were administered placebo or streptozotocin to induce diabetes during pregnancy and then delivered offspring from four groups: control, diabetes exposed, diet exposed, and combination exposed. Cardiac function, cellular bioenergetics (mitochondrial stress test, glycolytic stress test, and palmitate oxidation assay), lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial histology, and copy number were determined. Diabetes-exposed offspring had impaired glycolytic and respiratory capacity and a reduced proton leak. High-fat diet-exposed offspring had increased mitochondrial copy number, increased lipid peroxidation, and evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction. Combination-exposed pups were most severely affected and demonstrated cardiac lipid droplet accumulation and diastolic/systolic cardiac dysfunction that mimics that of adult diabetic cardiomyopathy. This study is the first to demonstrate that a maternal high-fat diet impairs cardiac function in offspring of diabetic pregnancies through metabolic stress and serves as a critical step in understanding the role of cellular bioenergetics in developmentally programmed cardiac disease. PMID:26801311

  2. Cell number per spheroid and electrical conductivity of nanowires influence the function of silicon nanowired human cardiac spheroids.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yu; Richards, Dylan; Coyle, Robert C; Yao, Jenny; Xu, Ruoyu; Gou, Wenyu; Wang, Hongjun; Menick, Donald R; Tian, Bozhi; Mei, Ying

    2017-03-15

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) provide an unlimited cell source to treat cardiovascular diseases, the leading cause of death worldwide. However, current hiPSC-CMs retain an immature phenotype that leads to difficulties for integration with adult myocardium after transplantation. To address this, we recently utilized electrically conductive silicon nanowires (e-SiNWs) to facilitate self-assembly of hiPSC-CMs to form nanowired hiPSC cardiac spheroids. Our previous results showed addition of e-SiNWs effectively enhanced the functions of the cardiac spheroids and improved the cellular maturation of hiPSC-CMs. Here, we examined two important factors that can affect functions of the nanowired hiPSC cardiac spheroids: (1) cell number per spheroid (i.e., size of the spheroids), and (2) the electrical conductivity of the e-SiNWs. To examine the first factor, we prepared hiPSC cardiac spheroids with four different sizes by varying cell number per spheroid (∼0.5k, ∼1k, ∼3k, ∼7k cells/spheroid). Spheroids with ∼3k cells/spheroid was found to maximize the beneficial effects of the 3D spheroid microenvironment. This result was explained with a semi-quantitative theory that considers two competing factors: 1) the improved 3D cell-cell adhesion, and 2) the reduced oxygen supply to the center of spheroids with the increase of cell number. Also, the critical role of electrical conductivity of silicon nanowires has been confirmed in improving tissue function of hiPSC cardiac spheroids. These results lay down a solid foundation to develop suitable nanowired hiPSC cardiac spheroids as an innovative cell delivery system to treat cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Respiratory, metabolic and cardiac functions are altered by disinhibition of subregions of the medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Sarah F; Cornish, Jennifer L; Goodchild, Ann K

    2013-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is referred to as the visceral motor cortex; however, little is known about whether this region influences respiratory or metabolic outflows. The aim of this study was to describe simultaneous changes in respiratory, metabolic and cardiovascular functions evoked by disinhibition of the medial PFC (mPFC) and adjacent lateral septal nucleus (LSN). In urethane-anaesthetized rats, bicuculline methiodide was microinjected (2 mm; GABA-A receptor antagonist) into 90 sites in the mPFC at 0.72–4.00 mm from bregma. Phrenic nerve amplitude and frequency, arterial pressure, heart rate, splanchnic and lumbar sympathetic nerve activities (SNA), expired CO2, and core and brown adipose tissue temperatures were measured. Novel findings included disturbances to respiratory rhythm evoked from all subregions of the mPFC. Injections into the cingulate cortex evoked reductions in central respiratory function exclusively, whereas in ventral sites, particularly the infralimbic region, increases in respiratory drive and frequency, and metabolic and cardiac outflows were evoked. Disinhibition of sites in surrounding regions revealed that the LSN could evoke cardiovascular changes accompanied by distinct oscillations in SNA, as well as increases in respiratory amplitude. We show that activation of neurons within the mPFC and LSN influence respiratory, metabolic and cardiac outflows in a site-dependent manner. This study has implications with respect to the altered PFC neuronal activity seen in stress-related and mental health disorders, and suggests how basic physiological systems may be affected. PMID:24042503

  4. Ablation of the ability to control the right-to-left cardiac shunt does not affect oxygen uptake, specific dynamic action or growth in the rattlesnake Crotalus durissus.

    PubMed

    Leite, Cleo A C; Taylor, Edwin W; Wang, Tobias; Abe, Augusto S; de Andrade, Denis O V

    2013-05-15

    The morphologically undivided ventricle of the heart in non-crocodilian reptiles permits the mixing of oxygen-rich blood returning from the lungs and oxygen-poor blood from the systemic circulation. A possible functional significance for this intra-cardiac shunt has been debated for almost a century. Unilateral left vagotomy rendered the single effective pulmonary artery of the South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus, unable to adjust the magnitude of blood flow to the lung. The higher constant perfusion of the lung circulation and the incapability of adjusting the right-left shunt in left-denervated snakes persisted over time, providing a unique model for investigation of the long-term consequences of cardiac shunting in a squamate. Oxygen uptake recorded at rest and during spontaneous and forced activity was not affected by removing control of the cardiac shunt. Furthermore, metabolic rate and energetic balance during the post-prandial metabolic increment, plus the food conversion efficiency and growth rate, were all similarly unaffected. These results show that control of cardiac shunting is not associated with a clear functional advantage in adjusting metabolic rate, effectiveness of digestion or growth rates.

  5. Everyday cognitive functioning in cardiac patients: relationships between self-report, report of a significant other and cognitive test performance.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Peter C; Smith, Geoff; Ernest, Christine S; Murphy, Barbara M; Worcester, Marian U C; Higgins, Rosemary O; Le Grande, Michael R; Goble, Alan J; Andrewes, David; Tatoulis, James

    2010-01-01

    Candidates for cardiac bypass surgery often experience cognitive decline. Such decline is likely to affect their everyday cognitive functioning. The aim of the present study was to compare cardiac patients' ratings of their everyday cognitive functioning against significant others' ratings and selected neuropsychological tests. Sixty-nine patients completed a battery of standardised cognitive tests. Patients and significant others also completed the Everyday Function Questionnaire independently of each other. Patient and significant other ratings of patients' everyday cognitive difficulties were found to be similar. Despite the similarities in ratings of difficulties, some everyday cognitive tasks were attributed to different processes. Patients' and significant others' ratings were most closely associated with the neuropsychological test of visual memory. Tests of the patients' verbal memory and fluency were only related to significant others' ratings. Test scores of attention and planning were largely unrelated to ratings by either patients or their significant others.

  6. The effect of age on the relationship between cardiac and vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, David; Jones, Thomas W.; Cassidy, Sophie; Siervo, Mario; MacGowan, Guy A.; Trenell, Michael I.; Jakovljevic, Djordje G.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related changes in cardiac and vascular function are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. The aim of the present study was to define the effect of age on the relationship between cardiac and vascular function. Haemodynamic and gas exchange measurements were performed at rest and peak exercise in healthy individuals. Augmentation index was measured at rest. Cardiac power output, a measure of overall cardiac function, was calculated as the product of cardiac output and mean arterial blood pressure. Augmentation index was significantly higher in older than younger participants (27.7 ± 10.1 vs. 2.5 ± 10.1%, P < 0.01). Older people demonstrated significantly higher stroke volume and mean arterial blood pressure (P < 0.05), but lower heart rate (145 ± 13 vs. 172 ± 10 beats/min, P < 0.01) and peak oxygen consumption (22.5 ± 5.2 vs. 41.2 ± 8.4 ml/kg/min, P < 0.01). There was a significant negative relationship between augmentation index and peak exercise cardiac power output (r = −0.73, P = 0.02) and cardiac output (r = −0.69, P = 0.03) in older participants. Older people maintain maximal cardiac function due to increased stroke volume. Vascular function is a strong predictor of overall cardiac function in older but in not younger people. PMID:26590322

  7. Cardiac resynchronization therapy improves the uptake of MIBI-99mTc and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Simone Cristina Soares; Giorgi, Maria Clementina; Nishioka, Silvana D'Orio; Martinelli Filho, Martino; Soares, José; Meneghetti, José Cláudio

    2008-09-01

    This case shows the improvement promoted by cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) on myocardial perfusion and left ventricular (LV) performance assessed by gated myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. The patient had idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, left bundle branch block and severe heart failure despite optimized medical treatment. After CRT, clinical improvement, QRS reduction and improvement of previously hypoperfused anterior and septal walls were observed. There was also decrease in LV end-diastolic and systolic volumes and increase in LV ejection fraction.

  8. Effects of interleukin-37 on cardiac function after myocardial infarction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Daoying; Wang, Aiqin; Jiang, Fengqin; Hu, Junhong; Zhang, Xiuzhou

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interleukin-37 (IL-37) is a new discovered member of the interleukin family and plays anti-inflammatory effect in some inflammatory disease. A recent study found that IL-37 elevated significantly in peripheral blood of patients with acute myocardial infarction. We aimed to explore the effect IL-37 on cardiac function after mice myocardial infarction (MI) and its mechanism. Methods: Acute MI mouse model was established and divided into three groups: sham group, MI group and IL-37 treatment group. MPO expression was detected by immunohistochemistry; NF-κB signaling pathway was tested by Western blot; and cardiac function was measured by echocardiography. Results: Compared with MI mice, IL-37 treatment showed an obvious decrease of MPO expression, suppression of p-p65 expression, and improved cardiac function by decreasing left ventricular shortening fraction (LVFS). Conclusion: IL-37 may improve MI mice cardiac function via inhibition of inflammatory NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26191225

  9. Diastolic Function in Paced Children with Cardiac Defects: Septum vs Apex

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Michel Cabrera; Morejon, Adel Eladio Gonzalez; Serrano, Giselle Ricardo; Ramos, Dunia Barbara Benitez

    2015-01-01

    In children with structural congenital heart disease (CHD), the effects of chronic ventricular pacing on diastolic function are not well known. On the other hand, the beneficial effect of septal pacing over apical pacing is still controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different right ventricular (RV) pacing site on left ventricular (LV) diastolic function in children with cardiac defects. Twenty-nine pediatric patients with complete atrioventricular block (CAVB) and CHD undergoing permanent pacing were prospectively studied. Pacing sites were RV apex (n = 16) and RV septum (n = 13). Echocardiographic assessment was performed before pacemaker implantation and after it, during a mean follow‑up of 4.9 years. Compared to RV septum, transmitral E-wave was significantly affected in RV apical pacing (95.38 ± 9.19 vs 83 ± 18.75, p = 0.038). Likewise, parameters at the lateral annular tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) were significantly affected in children paced at the RV apex. The E´ wave correlated inversely with TDI lateral myocardial performance index (Tei index) (R2= 0.9849, p ≤ 0.001). RV apex pacing (Odds ratio, 0.648; confidence interval, 0.067-0.652; p = 0.003) and TDI lateral Tei index (Odds ratio, 31.21; confidence interval, 54.6-177.4; p = 0.025) predicted significantly decreased LV diastolic function. Of the two sites studied, RV septum prevents pacing-induced reduction of LV diastolic function. PMID:26352178

  10. Systemic and Cardiac Depletion of M2 Macrophage through CSF-1R Signaling Inhibition Alters Cardiac Function Post Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Leblond, Anne-Laure; Klinkert, Kerstin; Martin, Kenneth; Turner, Elizebeth C; Kumar, Arun H; Browne, Tara; Caplice, Noel M

    2015-01-01

    The heart hosts tissue resident macrophages which are capable of modulating cardiac inflammation and function by multiple mechanisms. At present, the consequences of phenotypic diversity in macrophages in the heart are incompletely understood. The contribution of cardiac M2-polarized macrophages to the resolution of inflammation and repair response following myocardial infarction remains to be fully defined. In this study, the role of M2 macrophages was investigated utilising a specific CSF-1 receptor signalling inhibition strategy to achieve their depletion. In mice, oral administration of GW2580, a CSF-1R kinase inhibitor, induced significant decreases in Gr1lo and F4/80hi monocyte populations in the circulation and the spleen. GW2580 administration also induced a significant depletion of M2 macrophages in the heart after 1 week treatment as well as a reduction of cardiac arginase1 and CD206 gene expression indicative of M2 macrophage activity. In a murine myocardial infarction model, reduced M2 macrophage content was associated with increased M1-related gene expression (IL-6 and IL-1β), and decreased M2-related gene expression (Arginase1 and CD206) in the heart of GW2580-treated animals versus vehicle-treated controls. M2 depletion was also associated with a loss in left ventricular contractile function, infarct enlargement, decreased collagen staining and increased inflammatory cell infiltration into the infarct zone, specifically neutrophils and M1 macrophages. Taken together, these data indicate that CSF-1R signalling is critical for maintaining cardiac tissue resident M2-polarized macrophage population, which is required for the resolution of inflammation post myocardial infarction and, in turn, for preservation of ventricular function.

  11. Exercise Type Affects Cardiac Vagal Autonomic Recovery After a Resistance Training Session.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Xián; Iglesias-Soler, Eliseo; Fariñas-Rodríguez, Juán; Fernández-Del-Olmo, Miguel; Kingsley, J Derek

    2016-09-01

    Mayo, X, Iglesias-Soler, E, Fariñas-Rodríguez, J, Fernández-del-Olmo, M, and Kingsley, JD. Exercise type affects cardiac vagal autonomic recovery after a resistance training session. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2565-2573, 2016-Resistance training sessions involving different exercises and set configurations may affect the acute cardiovascular recovery pattern. We explored the interaction between exercise type and set configuration on the postexercise cardiovagal withdrawal measured by heart rate variability and their hypotensive effect. Thirteen healthy participants (10 repetitions maximum [RM] bench press: 56 ± 10 kg; parallel squat: 91 ± 13 kg) performed 6 sessions corresponding to 2 exercises (Bench press vs. Parallel squat), 2 set configurations (Failure session vs. Interrepetition rest session), and a Control session of each exercise. Load (10RM), volume (5 sets), and rest (720 seconds) were equated between exercises and set configurations. Parallel squat produced higher reductions in cardiovagal recovery vs. Bench press (p = 0.001). These differences were dependent on the set configuration, with lower values in Parallel squat vs. Bench press for Interrepetition rest session (1.816 ± 0.711 vs. 2.399 ± 0.739 Ln HF/IRR × 10, p = 0.002), but not for Failure session (1.647 ± 0.904 vs. 1.808 ± 0.703 Ln HF/IRR × 10, p > 0.05). Set configuration affected the cardiovagal recovery, with lower values in Failure session in comparison with Interrepetition rest (p = 0.027) and Control session (p = 0.022). Postexercise hypotension was not dependent on the exercise type (p > 0.05) but was dependent on the set configuration, with lower values of systolic (p = 0.004) and diastolic (p = 0.011) blood pressure after the Failure session but not after an Interrepetition rest session in comparison with the Control session (p > 0.05). These results suggest that the exercise type and an Interrepetition rest design could blunt the decrease of cardiac vagal activity after

  12. Echocardiographic assessment of cardiac function in shocked very low birthweight infants.

    PubMed Central

    Gill, A B; Weindling, A M

    1993-01-01

    The contribution of abnormal cardiac function to hypotension and metabolic acidosis, which affect approximately 40% of ventilated very low birthweight infants in the first 24 hours after birth was assessed using M mode, two dimensional, and Doppler echocardiography in 75 very low birthweight infants during the first few hours after birth. Thirty four infants whose blood pressure was less than the 10th centile or who had a metabolic acidosis in the first 24 hours were compared with 41 who showed neither feature. The median shortening fraction was significantly lower in the hypotensive/acidotic (shocked) group than in the controls. In 16 of 34 (47%) shocked infants left ventricular contractility and output were significantly worse than in the control subjects. One and five minute Apgar scores were also significantly lower in the shock group when compared with controls. Cardiac dysfunction was an important feature in the shocked very low birthweight infants. It is speculated that volume expansion may not always be the most appropriate first line treatment for such infants. PMID:8439190

  13. Acute-phase proteins, oxidative stress biomarkers, proinflammatory cytokines, and cardiac troponin in Arabian mares affected with pyometra.

    PubMed

    El-Bahr, S M; El-Deeb, W M

    2016-09-01

    New biomarkers are essential for diagnosis of pyometra in mares. In this context, 12 subfertile Arabian mares suffered from pyometra were admitted to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital. The basis for diagnosis of pyometra was positive findings of clinical examination and rectal palpation. Blood samples were collected from diseased animals and from five Arabian healthy mares, which were considered as control group. Acute-phase proteins (APP), oxidative stress biomarkers, proinflammatory cytokines, and cardiac troponin I were estimated in the harvested sera of both groups. Clinical examination revealed purulent yellowish fluid discharged from vagina of affected animals and rectal palpation of the reproductive tract revealed uterine distention. The biochemical analysis of the serum revealed significant increase in cardiac troponin I, creatin kinase, alkaline phosphatase, malondialdehyde, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukins 6, prostaglandin F2α, haptoglobin, and serum amyloid A and significant decrease in reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase (SOD), total antioxidant capacity, and nitric oxide (NO) of mares affected with pyometra compare to control. Cardiac troponin I was positively correlated with aspartate aminotransferase, creatin kinase, malondialdehyde, alkaline phosphatase, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukins 6, prostaglandin F2α, haptoglobin and serum amyloid A and negatively correlated with glutathione, superoxide dismutase, total antioxidant capacity and nitric oxide in serum of mares affected with pyometra. Moreover, there was high positive correlation between proinflammatory cytokines and APP in serum of mares affected with pyometra. The present study suggests cardiac troponin I together with APP, proinflammatory cytokines, and oxidative stress parameters as biomarkers for pyometra in Arabian mares.

  14. A portable cadmium telluride multidetector probe for cardiac function monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arntz, Y.; Chambron, J.; Dumitresco, B.; Eclancher, B.; Prat, V.

    1999-06-01

    A new nuclear stethoscope based on a matrix of small CdTe semiconductor detectors has been developed for studying the cardiac performance by gamma ventriculography at the equilibrium, in rest and stress conditions, in the early and recovery phases of the coronary disease and to follow the long-term therapy. The light-weight probe consists of an array of 64 detectors 5×5×2 mm grouped in 16 independent units in a lead shielded aluminum box including 16 preamplifiers. The probe is connected to an electronic box containing DC power supply, 16 channel amplifiers, discriminators and counters, two analog-triggering ECG channels, and interface to a PC. The left ventricle activity is, preferentially, detected by using a low-resolution matching convergent collimator. A physical evaluation of the probe has been performed, both with static tests and dynamically with a hydraulic home-built model of beating heart ventricle paced by a rhythm simulator. The sum of the 16 detectors activity provided a radiocardiogram (RCG) which well depicted the filling and ejection of the cardiac beats, allowing to compare the clinically relevant parameters of the cardiac performance, proportional variables of the stroke volume (SV), ejection fraction (EF) and ventricular flow-rate with the known absolute values programmed on the model. The portable system is now in operation for clinical assessment of cardiac patients.

  15. Anesthetics alter the physical and functional properties of the Ca-ATPase in cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Karon, B S; Geddis, L M; Kutchai, H; Thomas, D D

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the effects of the local anesthetic lidocaine, and the general anesthetic halothane, on the function and oligomeric state of the CA-ATPase in cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Oligomeric changes were detected by time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy (TPA). Lidocaine inhibited and aggregated the Ca-ATPase in cardiac SR. Micromolar calcium or 0.5 M lithium chloride protected against lidocaine-induced inhibition, indicating that electrostatic interactions are essential to lidocaine inhibition of the Ca-ATPase. The phospholamban (PLB) antibody 2D12, which mimics PLB phosphorylation, had no effect on lidocaine inhibition of the Ca-ATPase in cardiac SR. Inhibition and aggregation of the Ca-ATPase in cardiac SR occurred at lower concentrations of lidocaine than necessary to inhibit and aggregate the Ca-ATPase in skeletal SR, suggesting that the cardiac isoform of the enzyme has a higher affinity for lidocaine. Halothane inhibited and aggregated the Ca-ATPase in cardiac SR. Both inhibition and aggregation of the Ca-ATPase by halothane were much greater in the presence of PLB antibody or when PLB was phosphorylated, indicating a protective effect of PLB on halothane-induced inhibition and aggregation. The effects of halothane on cardiac SR are opposite from the effects of halothane observed in skeletal SR, where halothane activates and dissociates the Ca-ATPase. These results underscore the crucial role of protein-protein interactions on Ca-ATPase regulation and anesthetic perturbation of cardiac SR. PMID:7756557

  16. Rationally engineered Troponin C modulates in vivo cardiac function and performance in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Shettigar, Vikram; Zhang, Bo; Little, Sean C.; Salhi, Hussam E.; Hansen, Brian J.; Li, Ning; Zhang, Jianchao; Roof, Steve R.; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Brunello, Lucia; Lerch, Jessica K.; Weisleder, Noah; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Accornero, Federica; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A.; Gyorke, Sandor; Janssen, Paul M. L.; Biesiadecki, Brandon J.; Ziolo, Mark T.; Davis, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for heart disease, the leading cause of death in the world, has progressed little for several decades. Here we develop a protein engineering approach to directly tune in vivo cardiac contractility by tailoring the ability of the heart to respond to the Ca2+ signal. Promisingly, our smartly formulated Ca2+-sensitizing TnC (L48Q) enhances heart function without any adverse effects that are commonly observed with positive inotropes. In a myocardial infarction (MI) model of heart failure, expression of TnC L48Q before the MI preserves cardiac function and performance. Moreover, expression of TnC L48Q after the MI therapeutically enhances cardiac function and performance, without compromising survival. We demonstrate engineering TnC can specifically and precisely modulate cardiac contractility that when combined with gene therapy can be employed as a therapeutic strategy for heart disease. PMID:26908229

  17. Tetralogy of Fallot Cardiac Function Evaluation and Intelligent Diagnosis Based on Dual-Source Computed Tomography Cardiac Images.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ken; Rongqian, Yang; Li, Lihua; Xie, Zi; Ou, Shanxing; Chen, Yuke; Dou, Jianhong

    2016-05-01

    Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is the most common complex congenital heart disease (CHD) of the cyanotic type. Studies on ventricular functions have received an increasing amount of attention as the development of diagnosis and treatment technology for CHD continues to advance. Reasonable options for imaging examination and accurate assessment of preoperative and postoperative left ventricular functions of TOF patients are important in improving the cure rate of TOF radical operation, therapeutic evaluation, and judgment prognosis. Therefore, with the aid of dual-source computed tomography (DSCT), cardiac images with high temporal resolution and high definition, we measured the left ventricular time-volume curve using image data and calculating the left ventricular function parameters to conduct the preliminary evaluation on TOF patients. To comprehensively evaluate the cardiac function, the segmental ventricular wall function parameters were measured, and the measurement results were mapped to a bull's eye diagram to realize the standardization of segmental ventricular wall function evaluation. Finally, we introduced a new clustering method based on auto-regression model parameters and combined this method with Euclidean distance measurements to establish an intelligent diagnosis of TOF. The results of this experiment show that the TOF evaluation and the intelligent diagnostic methods proposed in this article are feasible.

  18. Scaffold Proteins Regulating Extracellular Regulated Kinase Function in Cardiac Hypertrophy and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yan; Sheikh, Farah

    2016-01-01

    The mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK)-extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathway is a central downstream signaling pathway that is activated in cardiac muscle cells during mechanical and agonist-mediated hypertrophy. Studies in genetic mouse models deficient in ERK-associated MAPK components pathway have further reinforced a direct role for this pathway in stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and disease. However, more recent studies have highlighted that these signaling pathways may exert their regulatory functions in a more compartmentalized manner in cardiac muscle. Emerging data has uncovered specific MAPK scaffolding proteins that tether MAPK/ERK signaling specifically at the sarcomere and plasma membrane in cardiac muscle and show that deficiencies in these scaffolding proteins alter ERK activity and phosphorylation, which are then critical in altering the cardiac myocyte response to stress-induced hypertrophy and disease progression. In this review, we provide insights on ERK-associated scaffolding proteins regulating cardiac myofilament function and their impact on cardiac hypertrophy and disease. PMID:26973524

  19. Cardiac tamponade in a neonate: a dreadful condition—need for functional echo

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Venkatesh Harohalli Aswathanarayana; Sharma, Deepa Mohan; Charki, Siddhu; Mohanty, Pankaj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade is a clinical emergency. Detection of a swinging heart rate is one of the earliest markers of large pericardial effusion, in which the four cardiac chambers are free to float in a phasic manner. We present a case of a preterm baby, one of the twins, who developed sudden onset of deterioration in the form of swinging heart rate, fluctuation in blood pressure and desaturation, requiring emergency intubation and inotropic support. Bedside functional echo was performed, which demonstrated cardiac tamponade; an immediate echocardiography-guided tap was initiated and fluid was aspirated from the pericardial space. PMID:25535228

  20. Hyperinsulinemia adversely affects lung structure and function.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suchita; Bodas, Manish; Bhatraju, Naveen K; Pattnaik, Bijay; Gheware, Atish; Parameswaran, Praveen Kolumam; Thompson, Michael; Freeman, Michelle; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Gosens, Reinoud; Ghosh, Balaram; Pabelick, Christina; Linneberg, Allan; Prakash, Y S; Agrawal, Anurag

    2016-05-01

    There is limited knowledge regarding the consequences of hyperinsulinemia on the lung. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, insulin resistance, and epidemiological associations with asthma, this is a critical lacuna, more so with inhaled insulin on the horizon. Here, we demonstrate that insulin can adversely affect respiratory health. Insulin treatment (1 μg/ml) significantly (P < 0.05) increased the proliferation of primary human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and induced collagen release. Additionally, ASM cells showed a significant increase in calcium response and mitochondrial respiration upon insulin exposure. Mice administered intranasal insulin showed increased collagen deposition in the lungs as well as a significant increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. PI3K/Akt mediated activation of β-catenin, a positive regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis, was observed in the lungs of insulin-treated mice and lung cells. Our data suggests that hyperinsulinemia may have adverse effects on airway structure and function. Insulin-induced activation of β-catenin in lung tissue and the contractile effects on ASM cells may be causally related to the development of asthma-like phenotype.

  1. Analysis of Cardiac Myocyte Maturation Using CASAAV, A Platform for Rapid Dissection of Cardiac Myocyte Gene Function In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuxuan; VanDusen, Nathan J; Zhang, Lina; Gu, Weiliang; Sethi, Isha; Guatimosim, Silvia; Ma, Qing; Jardin, Blake D; Ai, Yulan; Zhang, Donghui; Chen, Biyi; Guo, Ang; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Song, Long-Sheng; Pu, William T

    2017-03-29

    Rationale: Loss-of-function studies in cardiac myocytes (CMs) are currently limited by the need for appropriate conditional knockout alleles. The factors that regulate CM maturation are poorly understood. Prior studies on CM maturation have been confounded by heart dysfunction caused by whole organ gene inactivation. Objective: To develop a new technical platform to rapidly characterize cell-autonomous gene function in postnatal murine CMs and apply it to identify genes that regulate T-tubules, a hallmark of mature cardiac myocytes. Methods and Results: We developed CASAAV (CRISPR/Cas9-AAV9-based somatic mutagenesis), a platform in which AAV9 delivers tandem guide RNAs targeting a gene of interest and cardiac troponin T promoter (cTNT)-driven Cre to Rosa(Cas9GFP/Cas9GFP) neonatal mice. When directed against junctophilin-2 (Jph2), a gene previously implicated in T-tubule maturation, we achieved efficient, rapid, and CM-specific JPH2 depletion. High-dose AAV9 ablated JPH2 in 64% CMs and caused lethal heart failure, whereas low-dose AAV9 ablated JPH2 in 22% CMs and preserved normal heart function. In the context of preserved heart function, CMs lacking JPH2 developed T-tubules that were nearly morphologically normal, indicating that JPH2 does not have a major, cell-autonomous role in T-tubule maturation. However, in hearts with severe dysfunction, both AAV-transduced and non-transduced CMs exhibited T-tubule disruption, which was more severe in the transduced subset. These data indicate that cardiac dysfunction disrupts T-tubule structure, and that JPH2 protects T-tubules in this context. We then used CASAAV to screen 8 additional genes for required, cell-autonomous roles in T-tubule formation. We identified ryanodine receptor 2 (RYR2) as a novel, cell-autonomously required T-tubule maturation factor. Conclusions: CASAAV is a powerful tool to study cell-autonomous gene functions. Genetic mosaics are invaluable to accurately define cell-autonomous gene function. JPH2

  2. Does the use of the Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System affect cardiac arrest detection?

    PubMed Central

    Heward, A; Damiani, M; Hartley-Sharpe, C

    2004-01-01

    Methods: A two stage study was undertaken. The first, compared cases coded as "cardiac arrest" and found by the responding ambulance to be in cardiac arrest before the implementation of AMPDS. This was compared with cases triaged as "cardiac arrest" and found to be in cardiac arrest across three years after AMPDS implementation. The second stage compared AMPDS compliance, over a 32 month period against the percentage of cardiac arrest calls that were found to be cardiac arrest upon the ambulance arrival. The correlation coefficient was calculated and analysed for statistical significance. Findings: AMPDS resulted in a 200% rise in the number of patients accurately identified as suffering from cardiac arrest. A relation was identified between identification and AMPDS compliance (r2 = 0.65, p = 0.001). Discussion: The implementation of AMPDS increased accurate identification of patients in cardiac arrest. Additionally, the relation between factors identified suggests compliance with protocol is an important factor in the accurate recognition of patient conditions. PMID:14734398

  3. Effects of Kaempferia parviflora Wall. Ex. Baker and sildenafil citrate on cGMP level, cardiac function, and intracellular Ca2+ regulation in rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Weerateerangkul, Punate; Palee, Siripong; Chinda, Kroekkiat; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2012-09-01

    Although Kaempferia parviflora extract (KPE) and its flavonoids have positive effects on the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, its mechanisms on the heart are still unclear. Because our previous studies demonstrated that KPE decreased defibrillation efficacy in swine similar to that of sildenafil citrate, the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, it is possible that KPE may affect the cardiac NO signaling pathway. In the present study, the effects of KPE and sildenafil citrate on cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) level, modulation of cardiac function, and Ca transients in ventricular myocytes were investigated. In a rat model, cardiac cGMP level, cardiac function, and Ca transients were measured before and after treatment with KPE and sildenafil citrate. KPE significantly increased the cGMP level and decreased cardiac function and Ca transient. These effects were similar to those found in the sildenafil citrate-treated group. Furthermore, the nonspecific NOS inhibitor could abolish the effects of KPE and sildenafil citrate on Ca transient. KPE has positive effect on NO signaling in the heart, resulting in an increased cGMP level, similar to that of sildenafil citrate. This effect was found to influence the physiology of normal heart via the attenuation of cardiac function and the reduction of Ca transient in ventricular myocytes.

  4. Use of cardiac biomarkers in neonatology.

    PubMed

    Vijlbrief, Daniel C; Benders, Manon J N L; Kemperman, Hans; van Bel, Frank; de Vries, Willem B

    2012-10-01

    Cardiac biomarkers are used to identify cardiac disease in term and preterm infants. This review discusses the roles of natriuretic peptides and cardiac troponins. Natriuretic peptide levels are elevated during atrial strain (atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)) or ventricular strain (B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP)). These markers correspond well with cardiac function and can be used to identify cardiac disease. Cardiac troponins are used to assess cardiomyocyte compromise. Affected cardiomyocytes release troponin into the bloodstream, resulting in elevated levels of cardiac troponin. Cardiac biomarkers are being increasingly incorporated into clinical trials as indicators of myocardial strain. Furthermore, cardiac biomarkers can possibly be used to guide therapy and improve outcome. Natriuretic peptides and cardiac troponins are potential tools in the diagnosis and treatment of neonatal disease that is complicated by circulatory compromise. However, clear reference ranges need to be set and validation needs to be carried out in a population of interest.

  5. Early postnatal rat ventricle resection leads to long‐term preserved cardiac function despite tissue hypoperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Zogbi, Camila; Saturi de Carvalho, Ana E. T.; Nakamuta, Juliana S.; Caceres, Viviane de M.; Prando, Silvana; Giorgi, Maria C. P.; Rochitte, Carlos E.; Meneghetti, Jose C.; Krieger, Jose E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract One‐day‐old mice display a brief capacity for heart regeneration after apex resection. We sought to examine this response in a different model and to determine the impact of this early process on long‐term tissue perfusion and overall cardiac function in response to stress. Apical resection of postnatal rats at day 1 (P1) and 7 (P7) rendered 18 ± 1.0% and 16 ± 1.3% loss of cardiac area estimated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), respectively (P > 0.05). P1 was associated with evidence of cardiac neoformation as indicated by Troponin I and Connexin 43 expression at 21 days postresection, while in the P7 group mainly scar tissue replacement ensued. Interestingly, there was an apparent lack of uniform alignment of newly formed cells in P1, and we detected cardiac tissue hypoperfusion for both groups at 21 and 60 days postresection using SPECT scanning. Direct basal cardiac function at 60 days, when the early lesion is undetectable, was preserved in all groups, whereas under hemodynamic stress the degree of change on LVDEP, Stroke Volume and Stroke Work indicated diminished overall cardiac function in P7 (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the End‐Diastolic Pressure–Volume relationship and increased interstitial collagen deposition in P7 is consistent with increased chamber stiffness. Taken together, we provide evidence that early cardiac repair response to apex resection in rats also leads to cardiomyocyte neoformation and is associated to long‐term preservation of cardiac function despite tissue hypoperfusion. PMID:25168870

  6. c-Cbl Inhibition Improves Cardiac function and Survival in Response to Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Rafiq, Khadija; Kolpakov, Mikhail A; Seqqat, Rachid; Guo, Jianfen; Guo, Xinji; Qi, Zhao; Yu, Daohai; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Zutshi, Neha; An, Wei; Band, Hamid; Sanjay, Archana; Houser, Steven R; Sabri, Abdelkarim

    2014-01-01

    Background The proto-oncogene Casitas b-lineage lymphoma (c-Cbl) is an adaptor protein with an intrinsic E3 ubiquitin ligase activity that targets receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases, resulting in their ubiquitination and down-regulation. However, the function of c-Cbl in the control of cardiac function is currently unknown. In this study, we examined the role of c-Cbl in myocyte death and cardiac function after myocardial ischemia. Methods and Results We show increased c-Cbl expression in human ischemic and dilated cardiomyopathy hearts and in response to pathological stress stimuli in mice. c-Cbl deficient mice demonstrated a more robust functional recovery after myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury, as well as significantly reduced myocyte apoptosis and improved cardiac function. Ubiquitination and downregulation of key survival c-Cbl targets, epidermal growth factor receptors and focal adhesion kinase, were significantly reduced in c-Cbl knockout mice. Inhibition of c-Cbl expression or its ubiquitin ligase activity in cardiac myocytes offered protection against H2O2 stress. Interestingly, c-Cbl deletion reduced the risk of death and increased cardiac functional recovery after chronic myocardial ischemia. This beneficial effect of c-Cbl deletion was associated with enhanced neoangiogenesis and increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-a and VEGF receptor type 2 in the infarcted region. Conclusions c-Cbl activation promotes myocyte apoptosis, inhibits angiogenesis and causes adverse cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction. These findings point to c-Cbl as a potential therapeutic target for the maintenance of cardiac function and remodeling after myocardial ischemia. PMID:24583314

  7. Cardiac function and tolerance to ischemia–reperfusion injury in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuczmarski, James M.; Martens, Christopher R.; Lennon-Edwards, Shannon L.; Edwards, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac dysfunction is an independent risk factor of ischemic heart disease and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, yet the relationship between impaired cardiac function and tolerance to ischemia–reperfusion (IR) injury in experimental CKD remains unclear. Methods Cardiac function was assessed in 5/6 ablation–infarction (AI) and sham male Sprague–Dawley rats at 20 weeks of age, 8 weeks post-surgery using an isolated working heart system. This included measures taken during manipulation of preload and afterload to produce left ventricular (LV) function curves as well as during reperfusion following a 15-min ischemic bout. In addition, LV tissue was used for biochemical tissue analysis. Results Cardiac function was impaired in AI animals during preload and afterload manipulations. Cardiac functional impairments persisted post-ischemia in the AI animals, and 36% of AI animals did not recover sufficiently to achieve aortic overflow following ischemia (versus 0% of sham animals). However, for those animals able to withstand the ischemic perturbation, no difference was observed in percent recovery of post-ischemic cardiac function between groups. Urinary NOx (nitrite + nitrate) excretion was lower in AI animals and accompanied by reduced LV endothelial nitric oxide synthase and NOx. LV antioxidants superoxide dismutase-1 and -2 were reduced in AI animals, whereas glutathione peroxidase-1/2 as well as NADPH-oxidase-4 and H2O2 were increased in these animals. Conclusions Impaired cardiac function appears to predispose AI rats to poor outcomes following short-duration ischemic insult. These findings could be, in part, mediated by increased oxidative stress via nitric oxide-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PMID:24151020

  8. The profound effects of microcystin on cardiac antioxidant enzymes, mitochondrial function and cardiac toxicity in rat.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Tong; Xie, Ping; Liu, Ying; Li, Guangyu; Xiong, Qian; Hao, Le; Li, Huiying

    2009-03-04

    Deaths from microcystin toxication have widely been attributed to hypovolemic shock due to hepatic interstitial hemorrhage, while some recent studies suggest that cardiogenic complication is also involved. So far, information on cardiotoxic effects of MC has been rare and the underlying mechanism is still puzzling. The present study examined toxic effects of microcystins on heart muscle of rats intravenously injected with extracted MC at two doses, 0.16LD(50) (14 microg MC-LReq kg(-1) body weight) and 1LD(50) (87 microg MC-LReq kg(-1) body weight). In the dead rats, both TTC staining and maximum elevations of troponin I levels confirmed myocardial infarction after MC exposure, besides a serious interstitial hemorrhage in liver. In the 1LD(50) dose group, the coincident falls in heart rate and blood pressure were related to mitochondria dysfunction in heart, while increases in creatine kinase and troponin I levels indicated cardiac cell injury. The corresponding pathological alterations were mainly characterized as loss of adherence between cardiac myocytes and swollen or ruptured mitochondria at the ultrastructural level. MC administration at a dose of 1LD(50) not only enhanced activities and up-regulated mRNA transcription levels of antioxidant enzymes, but also increased GSH content. At both doses, level of lipid peroxides increased obviously, suggesting serious oxidative stress in mitochondria. Simultaneously, complex I and III were significantly inhibited, indicating blocks in electron flow along the mitochondrial respiratory chain in heart. In conclusion, the findings of this study implicate a role for MC-induced cardiotoxicity as a potential factor that should be considered when evaluating the mechanisms of death associated with microcystin intoxication in Brazil.

  9. Hindlimb unweighting affects rat vascular capacitance function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, S. L.; Tamhidi, L.; Berkowitz, D. E.; Shoukas, A. A.

    2001-01-01

    Microgravity is associated with an impaired stroke volume and, therefore, cardiac output response to orthostatic stress. We hypothesized that a decreased venous filling pressure due to increased venous compliance may be an important contributing factor in this response. We used a constant flow, constant right atrial pressure cardiopulmonary bypass procedure to measure total systemic vascular compliance (C(T)), arterial compliance (C(A)), and venous compliance (C(V)) in seven control and seven 21-day hindlimb unweighted (HLU) rats. These compliance values were calculated under baseline conditions and during an infusion of 0.2 microg*kg(-1)*min(-1) norepinephrine (NE). The change in reservoir volume, which reflects changes in unstressed vascular volume (DeltaV(0)) that occurred upon infusion of NE, was also measured. C(T) and C(V) were larger in HLU rats both at baseline and during the NE infusion (P < 0.05). Infusion of NE decreased C(T) and C(V) by 20% in both HLU and control rats (P < 0.01). C(A) was also significantly decreased in both groups of rats by NE (P < 0.01), but values of C(A) were similar between HLU and control rats both at baseline and during the NE infusion. Additionally, the NE-induced DeltaV(0) was attenuated by 53% in HLU rats compared with control rats (P < 0.05). The larger C(V) and attenuated DeltaV(0) in HLU rats could contribute to a decreased filling pressure during orthostasis and thus may partially underlie the mechanism leading to the exaggerated fall in stroke volume and cardiac output seen in astronauts during an orthostatic stress after exposure to microgravity.

  10. Obesity alters molecular and functional cardiac responses to ischemia/reperfusion and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonism.

    PubMed

    Sassoon, Daniel J; Goodwill, Adam G; Noblet, Jillian N; Conteh, Abass M; Herring, B Paul; McClintick, Jeanette N; Tune, Johnathan D; Mather, Kieren J

    2016-07-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that obesity alters the cardiac response to ischemia/reperfusion and/or glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activation, and that these differences are associated with alterations in the obese cardiac proteome and microRNA (miRNA) transcriptome. Ossabaw swine were fed normal chow or obesogenic diet for 6 months. Cardiac function was assessed at baseline, during a 30-minutes coronary occlusion, and during 2 hours of reperfusion in anesthetized swine treated with saline or exendin-4 for 24 hours. Cardiac biopsies were obtained from normal and ischemia/reperfusion territories. Fat-fed animals were heavier, and exhibited hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Plasma troponin-I concentration (index of myocardial injury) was increased following ischemia/reperfusion and decreased by exendin-4 treatment in both groups. Ischemia/reperfusion produced reductions in systolic pressure and stroke volume in lean swine. These indices were higher in obese hearts at baseline and relatively maintained throughout ischemia/reperfusion. Exendin-4 administration increased systolic pressure in lean swine but did not affect the blood pressure in obese swine. End-diastolic volume was reduced by exendin-4 following ischemia/reperfusion in obese swine. These divergent physiologic responses were associated with obesity-related differences in proteins related to myocardial structure/function (e.g. titin) and calcium handling (e.g. SERCA2a, histidine-rich Ca(2+) binding protein). Alterations in expression of cardiac miRs in obese hearts included miR-15, miR-27, miR-130, miR-181, and let-7. Taken together, these observations validate this discovery approach and reveal novel associations that suggest previously undiscovered mechanisms contributing to the effects of obesity on the heart and contributing to the actions of GLP-1 following ischemia/reperfusion.

  11. Cardiac autonomic function in patients with diabetes improves with practice of comprehensive yogic breathing program

    PubMed Central

    Jyotsna, Viveka P.; Ambekar, Smita; Singla, Rajiv; Joshi, Ansumali; Dhawan, Anju; Kumar, Neeta; Deepak, K. K.; Sreenivas, V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to observe the effect comprehensive yogic breathing (Sudarshan Kriya Yoga [SKY] and Pranayam) had on cardiac autonomic functions in patients with diabetes. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled intervention trial. Cardiac autonomic functions were assessed in 64 diabetics. Patients were randomized into two groups, one group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and the other group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and comprehensive yogic breathing program. Standard therapy included dietary advice, brisk walking for 45 min daily, and administration of oral antidiabetic drugs. Comprehensive yogic breathing program was introduced to the participants through a course of 12 h spread over 3 days. It was an interactive session in which SKY, a rhythmic cyclical breathing, preceded by Pranayam is taught under the guidance of a certified teacher. Cardiac autonomic function tests were done before and after 6 months of intervention. Results: In the intervention group, after practicing the breathing techniques for 6 months, the improvement in sympathetic functions was statistically significant (P 0.04). The change in sympathetic functions in the standard therapy group was not significant (P 0.75). Parasympathetic functions did not show any significant change in either group. When both parasympathetic and sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions were considered, there was a trend toward improvement in patients following comprehensive yogic breathing program (P 0.06). In the standard therapy group, no change in cardiac autonomic functions was noted (P 0.99). Conclusion: Cardiac autonomic functions improved in patients with diabetes on standard treatment who followed the comprehensive yogic breathing program compared to patients who were on standard therapy alone. PMID:23869306

  12. Characterization and Reduction of Cardiac- and Respiratory-Induced Noise as a Function of the Sampling Rate (TR) in fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Cordes, Dietmar; Nandy, Rajesh R.; Schafer, Scott; Wager, Tor D.

    2014-01-01

    It has recently been shown that both high-frequency and low-frequency cardiac and respiratory noise sources exist throughout the entire brain and can cause significant signal changes in fMRI data. It is also known that the brainstem, basal forebrain and spinal cord area are problematic for fMRI because of the magnitude of cardiac-induced pulsations at these locations. In this study, the physiological noise contributions in the lower brain areas (covering the brainstem and adjacent regions) are investigated and a novel method is presented for computing both low-frequency and high-frequency physiological regressors accurately for each subject. In particular, using a novel optimization algorithm that penalizes curvature (i.e. the second derivative) of the physiological hemodynamic response functions, the cardiac -and respiratory-related response functions are computed. The physiological noise variance is determined for each voxel and the frequency-aliasing property of the high-frequency cardiac waveform as a function of the repetition time (TR) is investigated. It is shown that for the brainstem and other brain areas associated with large pulsations of the cardiac rate, the temporal SNR associated with the low-frequency range of the BOLD response has maxima at subject-specific TRs. At these values, the high-frequency aliased cardiac rate can be eliminated by digital filtering without affecting the BOLD-related signal. PMID:24355483

  13. Evaluation of cardiac function using transthoracic echocardiography in patients with myocardial injury secondary to methomyl poisoning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Keon; Cho, Nam Hyub; Kim, Oh Hyun; Go, Jin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Cha, Kyoung Chul; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kang Hyun; Hwang, Sung Oh; Cha, Yong Sung

    2015-07-01

    Generally, the mortality rate for cases of carbamate poisoning is low, but fatalities secondary to methomyl poisoning have been reported including a case report of cardiac toxicity following short-term exposure to methomyl. There have been no reports, however, regarding patterns of cardiac toxicity after exposure to methomyl. Therefore, we investigated the prevalence and patterns of myocardial injury using a biochemical marker, troponin I (TnI), and evaluated cardiac function using transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). We conducted a retrospective review of 14 consecutive methomyl poisoning cases that were diagnosed and treated at the emergency department of the Wonju Severance Christian Hospital between January 2009 and December 2013. On ECG analysis, ST depression and T-wave inversion were seen in five patients (35.7%) and one patient (7.1%), respectively. On cardiac biochemical marker analysis, initial TnI was elevated in 11 patients (78.6%). TTE was performed in nine patients among the 11 patients in whom TnI was found to be elevated. Of the nine patients that underwent TTE, three patients (33.3%) showed a reduced ejection fraction (EF), and RWMA was noted in two patients. There were two patients (22.2%) that had both reduced systolic function and RWMA. One patient did not regain normal systolic function on admission. None of the three patients with reduced EF received any specific treatment to support cardiac function. One patient expired due to pneumonia, and one patient was transferred as moribund. We followed up on 12 patients who survived to discharge for 6-44 months. One patient (8.3%) was died to follow-up, and 11 patients survived without any further complications. Methomyl exposure can cause direct myocardial injury and reversible cardiac dysfunction. Monitoring of TnI levels and TTE for evaluation of cardiac function may be useful in the workup of patients suffering from methomyl poisoning.

  14. Electromechanical Conditioning of Adult Progenitor Cells Improves Recovery of Cardiac Function After Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Llucià-Valldeperas, Aida; Soler-Botija, Carolina; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Roura, Santiago; Prat-Vidal, Cristina; Perea-Gil, Isaac; Sanchez, Benjamin; Bragos, Ramon; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2017-03-01

    Cardiac cells are subjected to mechanical and electrical forces, which regulate gene expression and cellular function. Therefore, in vitro electromechanical stimuli could benefit further integration of therapeutic cells into the myocardium. Our goals were (a) to study the viability of a tissue-engineered construct with cardiac adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells (cardiac ATDPCs) and (b) to examine the effect of electromechanically stimulated cardiac ATDPCs within a myocardial infarction (MI) model in mice for the first time. Cardiac ATDPCs were electromechanically stimulated at 2-millisecond pulses of 50 mV/cm at 1 Hz and 10% stretching during 7 days. The cells were harvested, labeled, embedded in a fibrin hydrogel, and implanted over the infarcted area of the murine heart. A total of 39 animals were randomly distributed and sacrificed at 21 days: groups of grafts without cells and with stimulated or nonstimulated cells. Echocardiography and gene and protein analyses were also carried out. Physiologically stimulated ATDPCs showed increased expression of cardiac transcription factors, structural genes, and calcium handling genes. At 21 days after implantation, cardiac function (measured as left ventricle ejection fraction between presacrifice and post-MI) increased up to 12% in stimulated grafts relative to nontreated animals. Vascularization and integration with the host blood supply of grafts with stimulated cells resulted in increased vessel density in the infarct border region. Trained cells within the implanted fibrin patch expressed main cardiac markers and migrated into the underlying ischemic myocardium. To conclude, synchronous electromechanical cell conditioning before delivery may be a preferred alternative when considering strategies for heart repair after myocardial infarction. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:970-981.

  15. Embryonic stem cells improve cardiac function in Doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy mediated through multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Singla, Dinender K; Ahmed, Aisha; Singla, Reetu; Yan, Binbin

    2012-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is an effective antineoplastic agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Unfortunately, its use is limited as this drug induces cardiotoxicity and heart failure as a side effect. There is no report that describes whether transplanted embryonic stem (ES) cells or their conditioned medium (CM) in DOX-induced cardiomyopathy (DIC) can repair and regenerate myocardium. Therefore, we transplanted ES cells or CM in DIC to examine apoptosis, fibrosis, cytoplasmic vacuolization, and myofibrillar loss and their associated Akt and ERK pathway. Moreover, we also determined activation of endogenous c-kit(+ve) cardiac stem cells (CSCs), levels of HGF and IGF-1, growth factors required for c-kit cell activation, and their differentiation into cardiac myocytes, which also contributes in cardiac regeneration and improved heart function. We generated DIC in C57Bl/6 mice (cumulative dose of DOX 12 mg/kg body weight, IP), and animals were treated with ES cells, CM, or cell culture medium in controls. Two weeks post-DIC, ES cells or CM transplanted hearts showed a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in cardiac apoptotic nuclei and their regulation with Akt and ERK pathway. Cardiac fibrosis observed in the ES cell or CM groups was significantly less compared with DOX and cell culture medium groups (p < 0.05). Next, cytoplasmic vacuolization and myofibrillar loss was reduced (p < 0.05) following treatment with ES cells or CM. Moreover, our data also demonstrated increased levels of c-kit(+ve) CSCs in ES cells or CM hearts and differentiated cardiac myocytes from these CSCs, suggesting endogenous cardiac regeneration. Importantly, the levels of HFG and IGF-1 were significantly increased in ES cells or CM transplanted hearts. In conclusion, we reported that transplanted ES cells or CM in DIC hearts significantly decreases various adverse pathological mechanisms as well as enhances cardiac regeneration that effectively contributes to improved heart function.

  16. Nicotine depresses the functions of multiple cardiac potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Shi, H; Wang, Z

    1999-01-01

    Nicotine is the main constituent of tobacco smoke responsible for the elevated risk of the cardiovascular disease and sudden coronary death associated with smoking, presumably by provoking cardiac arrhythmias. The cellular mechanisms may be related to the ability of nicotine to prolong action potentials and to depolarize membrane potential. However, the underlying ionic mechanisms remained unknown. We showed here that nicotine blocked multiple types of K+ currents, including the native currents in canine ventricular myocytes and the cloned channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes: A-type K+ currents (I(to)/Kv4.3), delayed rectifier K+ currents (I(Kr)/HERG) and inward rectifier K+ currents (I(K1)/Kir2.1). Most noticeably, nicotine at a concentration as low as of 10 nM significantly suppressed I(to) and Kv4.3 by approximately 20%. The effects of nicotine were independent of nicotinic receptor simulation or catecholamine release. Our results indicate that nicotine is a non-specific blocker of K+ channels and the inhibitory effects are the consequence of direct interactions between nicotine molecules and the channel proteins. Our study provided for the first time the evidence for the direct inhibition of cardiac K+ channels by nicotine and established a novel aspect of nicotine pharmacology.

  17. Metabolomics-assisted proteomics identifies succinylation and SIRT5 as important regulators of cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Sadhukhan, Sushabhan; Liu, Xiaojing; Ryu, Dongryeol; Nelson, Ornella D.; Stupinski, John A.; Li, Zhi; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Sheng; Weiss, Robert S.; Auwerx, Johan; Lin, Hening

    2016-01-01

    Cellular metabolites, such as acyl-CoA, can modify proteins, leading to protein posttranslational modifications (PTMs). One such PTM is lysine succinylation, which is regulated by sirtuin 5 (SIRT5). Although numerous proteins are modified by lysine succinylation, the physiological significance of lysine succinylation and SIRT5 remains elusive. Here, by profiling acyl-CoA molecules in various mouse tissues, we have discovered that different tissues have different acyl-CoA profiles and that succinyl-CoA is the most abundant acyl-CoA molecule in the heart. This interesting observation has prompted us to examine protein lysine succinylation in different mouse tissues in the presence and absence of SIRT5. Protein lysine succinylation predominantly accumulates in the heart when Sirt5 is deleted. Using proteomic studies, we have identified many cardiac proteins regulated by SIRT5. Our data suggest that ECHA, a protein involved in fatty acid oxidation, is a major enzyme that is regulated by SIRT5 and affects heart function. Sirt5 knockout (KO) mice have lower ECHA activity, increased long-chain acyl-CoAs, and decreased ATP in the heart under fasting conditions. Sirt5 KO mice develop hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, as evident from the increased heart weight relative to body weight, as well as reduced shortening and ejection fractions. These findings establish that regulating heart metabolism and function is a major physiological function of lysine succinylation and SIRT5. PMID:27051063

  18. A Novel Human Tissue-Engineered 3-D Functional Vascularized Cardiac Muscle Construct

    PubMed Central

    Valarmathi, Mani T.; Fuseler, John W.; Davis, Jeffrey M.; Price, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    Organ tissue engineering, including cardiovascular tissues, has been an area of intense investigation. The major challenge to these approaches has been the inability to vascularize and perfuse the in vitro engineered tissue constructs. Attempts to provide oxygen and nutrients to the cells contained in the biomaterial constructs have had varying degrees of success. The aim of this current study is to develop a three-dimensional (3-D) model of vascularized cardiac tissue to examine the concurrent temporal and spatial regulation of cardiomyogenesis in the context of postnatal de novo vasculogenesis during stem cell cardiac regeneration. In order to achieve the above aim, we have developed an in vitro 3-D functional vascularized cardiac muscle construct using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived embryonic cardiac myocytes (hiPSC-ECMs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). First, to generate the prevascularized scaffold, human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (hCMVECs) and hMSCs were co-cultured onto a 3-D collagen cell carrier (CCC) for 7 days under vasculogenic culture conditions. In this milieu, hCMVECs/hMSCs underwent maturation, differentiation, and morphogenesis characteristic of microvessels, and formed extensive plexuses of vascular networks. Next, the hiPSC-ECMs and hMSCs were co-cultured onto this generated prevascularized CCCs for further 7 or 14 days in myogenic culture conditions. Finally, the vascular and cardiac phenotypic inductions were analyzed at the morphological, immunological, biochemical, molecular, and functional levels. Expression and functional analyses of the differentiated cells revealed neo-angiogenesis and neo-cardiomyogenesis. Thus, our unique 3-D co-culture system provided us the apt in vitro functional vascularized 3-D cardiac patch that can be utilized for cellular cardiomyoplasty. PMID:28194397

  19. A Novel Human Tissue-Engineered 3-D Functional Vascularized Cardiac Muscle Construct.

    PubMed

    Valarmathi, Mani T; Fuseler, John W; Davis, Jeffrey M; Price, Robert L

    2017-01-01

    Organ tissue engineering, including cardiovascular tissues, has been an area of intense investigation. The major challenge to these approaches has been the inability to vascularize and perfuse the in vitro engineered tissue constructs. Attempts to provide oxygen and nutrients to the cells contained in the biomaterial constructs have had varying degrees of success. The aim of this current study is to develop a three-dimensional (3-D) model of vascularized cardiac tissue to examine the concurrent temporal and spatial regulation of cardiomyogenesis in the context of postnatal de novo vasculogenesis during stem cell cardiac regeneration. In order to achieve the above aim, we have developed an in vitro 3-D functional vascularized cardiac muscle construct using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived embryonic cardiac myocytes (hiPSC-ECMs) and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). First, to generate the prevascularized scaffold, human cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (hCMVECs) and hMSCs were co-cultured onto a 3-D collagen cell carrier (CCC) for 7 days under vasculogenic culture conditions. In this milieu, hCMVECs/hMSCs underwent maturation, differentiation, and morphogenesis characteristic of microvessels, and formed extensive plexuses of vascular networks. Next, the hiPSC-ECMs and hMSCs were co-cultured onto this generated prevascularized CCCs for further 7 or 14 days in myogenic culture conditions. Finally, the vascular and cardiac phenotypic inductions were analyzed at the morphological, immunological, biochemical, molecular, and functional levels. Expression and functional analyses of the differentiated cells revealed neo-angiogenesis and neo-cardiomyogenesis. Thus, our unique 3-D co-culture system provided us the apt in vitro functional vascularized 3-D cardiac patch that can be utilized for cellular cardiomyoplasty.

  20. Anatomical variations affect radial artery spasm and procedural achievement of transradial cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Numasawa, Yohei; Kawamura, Akio; Kohsaka, Shun; Takahashi, Masashi; Endo, Ayaka; Arai, Takahide; Ohno, Yohei; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Maekawa, Yuichiro; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Transradial cardiac catheterization (TRCC) has unique technical challenges such as access difficulty related to anatomical variations and/or radial artery (RA) spasm. We sought to evaluate the incidence of anatomical variations of the RA and whether they would affect RA spasm and procedural achievement of TRCC. A total of 744 consecutive patients who underwent TRCC were analyzed by routine radial arteriography. Anatomical variations were defined as abnormal origin of the RA and/or radioulnar loop and/or tortuous configuration. RA spasm was defined as >75 % stenosis at first radial arteriography. Overall, anatomical variations were noted in 68 patients (9.1 %), including 39 cases of abnormal origin (5.2 %), 11 cases of radioulnar loop (1.5 %), and 42 cases of tortuous configuration (5.6 %). Transradial procedures failed in 26 patients (3.5 %), and more frequently in patients with anatomical variation than in those with normal anatomy (23.5 % vs 1.5 %, P < 0.001). Importantly, on multivariate analysis the presence of anatomical variation was a distinct predictor of transradial procedure failure (odds ratio (OR) 17.80; 95 % CI 7.55-43.73; P < 0.001). RA spasm was observed in 83 patients (11.2 %), and more frequently in patients with anatomical variation than in those with normal anatomy (35.3 % vs 8.7 %, P < 0.001). Anatomical variation (OR 4.74; 95 % CI 2.61-8.47; P < 0.001) and female gender (OR 2.23; 95 % CI 1.01-4.73; P = 0.041) were distinct predictors of RA spasm. Anatomical variations were observed in 9.1 % of the patients, and strongly correlated with RA spasm and procedural achievement of TRCC.

  1. Evaluation of Neurodevelopment and Factors Affecting it in Children With Acyanotic Congenital Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ozmen, Ayten; Terlemez, Semiha; Tunaoglu, Fatma Sedef; Soysal, Sebnem; Pektas, Ayhan; Cilsal, Erman; Koca, Ulker; Kula, Serdar; Deniz Oguz, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    Background: The rate of congenital heart disease is 0.8% in all live births. The majority of this, however, is acyanotic congenital heart disease. The survival rate of children with cardiac disease has increased with the developments provided in recent years and their lifetime is extended. Objectives: This study aims to evaluate neurodevelopment of children with uncomplicated acyanotic congenital heart disease in preschool period and determine the factors affecting their neurodevelopmental process. Patients and Methods: 132 children with acyanotic congenital heart disease aged 6 - 72 months were involved in the study. Mental development and intelligence levels of patients under 2 years old were assessed by using Bayley Development Scale-III, and Stanford Binet Intelligence test was employed for patients over 2 years old. Denver Developmental Screening Test II was applied to all patients for their personal-social, fine motor, gross motor and language development. Results: The average age of patients (67 girls, 65 boys) included in the study was 35.2 ± 19.6 months. It was determined that there were subnormal mental level in 13 (10%) patients and at least one specific developmental disorder in 33 (25%) patients. Bayley Mental Development Scale score of patients who had received incubator care in perinatal period was found significantly low (88 ± 4.2) compared to those with no incubator care (93.17 ± 8.5) (P = 0.028). Low educational level of father was established to be linked with low mental development scores at the age of 2 and following that age (P < 0.05). Iron deficiency anemia was discovered to be related to low psychometric test scores at every age (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Neurodevelopmental problems in children with acyanotic congenital heart disease were found higher compared to those in society. Mental development and intelligence levels of patients were determined to be closely associated with receiving incubator care, father’s educational level and

  2. Cardiac function after acute support with direct mechanical ventricular actuation in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Patrick I; Anstadt, Mark P; Del Rio, Carlos L; Preston, Thomas J; Ueyama, Yukie; Youngblood, Brad L

    2014-01-01

    Direct mechanical ventricular actuation (DMVA) exerts direct cardiac compression/decompression and does not require blood contact. The safety and effects of DMVA support in chronically dysfunctional beating hearts in vivo have not been established. This study evaluated hemodynamics and load-independent systolic/diastolic cardiac function before/after acute support (2 hours) using DMVA in small hearts with induced chronic failure. Chronic heart failure was created in seven small dogs (15 ± 2 kg) via either serial coronary microembolizations or right-ventricular overdrive pacing. Dogs were instrumented to measure cardiac output, hemodynamic pressures, left ventricular volumes for pressure-volume analysis via preload reduction. Temporary cardiac support using a DMVA device was instituted for 2 hours. Hemodynamic and mechanical assessments, including dobutamine dose-responses, were compared both before and after support. Hemodynamic indices were preserved with support. Both left-ventricular systolic and diastolic function were improved postsupport, as the slopes of the preload-recruitable stroke work (+29 ± 7%, p < 0.05) and the end-diastolic pressure-volume relationship (EDPVR: -28 ± 9%, p < 0.05) improved post-DMVA support. Diastolic/systolic myocardial reserve, as assessed by responsiveness to dobutamine challenges, was preserved after DMVA support. Short-term DMVA support can safely and effectively sustain hemodynamics, whereas triggering favorable effects on cardiac function in the setting of chronic heart failure. In particular, DMVA support preserved load-independent diastolic function and reserve.

  3. Older Adults in Cardiac Rehabilitation: A New Strategy for Enhancing Physical Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rejeski, W. Jack; Foy, Capri Gabrielle; Brawley, Lawrence R.; Brubaker, Peter H.; Focht, Brian C.; Norris, James L., III; Smith, Marci L.

    2002-01-01

    Contrasted the effect of a group-mediated cognitive- behavioral intervention (GMCB) versus traditional cardiac rehabilitation (CRP) upon changes in objective and self-reported physical function of older adults after 3 months of exercise therapy. Both groups improved significantly. Adults with lower function at the outset of the intervention…

  4. Chronic fatigue syndrome: illness severity, sedentary lifestyle, blood volume and evidence of diminished cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Barry E; Coryell, Virginia T; Parker, Meela; Martin, Pedro; Laperriere, Arthur; Klimas, Nancy G; Sfakianakis, George N; Bilsker, Martin S

    2009-10-19

    The study examined whether deficits in cardiac output and blood volume in a CFS (chronic fatigue syndrome) cohort were present and linked to illness severity and sedentary lifestyle. Follow-up analyses assessed whether differences in cardiac output levels between CFS and control groups were corrected by controlling for cardiac contractility and TBV (total blood volume). The 146 participants were subdivided into two CFS groups based on symptom severity data, severe (n=30) and non-severe (n=26), and two healthy non-CFS control groups based on physical activity, sedentary (n=58) and non-sedentary (n=32). Controls were matched to CFS participants using age, gender, ethnicity and body mass. Echocardiographic measures indicated that the severe CFS participants had 10.2% lower cardiac volume (i.e. stroke index and end-diastolic volume) and 25.1% lower contractility (velocity of circumferential shortening corrected by heart rate) than the control groups. Dual tag blood volume assessments indicated that the CFS groups had lower TBV, PV (plasma volume) and RBCV (red blood cell volume) than control groups. Of the CFS subjects with a TBV deficit (i.e. > or = 8% below ideal levels), the mean+/-S.D. percentage deficit in TBV, PV and RBCV were -15.4+/-4.0, -13.2+/-5.0 and -19.1+/-6.3% respectively. Lower cardiac volume levels in CFS were substantially corrected by controlling for prevailing TBV deficits, but were not affected by controlling for cardiac contractility levels. Analyses indicated that the TBV deficit explained 91-94% of the group differences in cardiac volume indices. Group differences in cardiac structure were offsetting and, hence, no differences emerged for left ventricular mass index. Therefore the findings indicate that lower cardiac volume levels, displayed primarily by subjects with severe CFS, were not linked to diminished cardiac contractility levels, but were probably a consequence of a co-morbid hypovolaemic condition. Further study is needed to address

  5. The effect of encapsulation of cardiac stem cells within matrix-enriched hydrogel capsules on cell survival, post-ischemic cell retention and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Mayfield, Audrey E; Tilokee, Everad L; Latham, Nicholas; McNeill, Brian; Lam, Bu-Khanh; Ruel, Marc; Suuronen, Erik J; Courtman, David W; Stewart, Duncan J; Davis, Darryl R

    2014-01-01

    Transplantation of ex vivo proliferated cardiac stem cells (CSCs) is an emerging therapy for ischemic cardiomyopathy but outcomes are limited by modest engraftment and poor long-term survival. As such, we explored the effect of single cell microencapsulation to increase CSC engraftment and survival after myocardial injection. Transcript and protein profiling of human atrial appendage sourced CSCs revealed strong expression the pro-survival integrin dimers αVβ3 and α5β1- thus rationalizing the integration of fibronectin and fibrinogen into a supportive intra-capsular matrix. Encapsulation maintained CSC viability under hypoxic stress conditions and, when compared to standard suspended CSC, media conditioned by encapsulated CSCs demonstrated superior production of pro-angiogenic/cardioprotective cytokines, angiogenesis and recruitment of circulating angiogenic cells. Intra-myocardial injection of encapsulated CSCs after experimental myocardial infarction favorably affected long-term retention of CSCs, cardiac structure and function. Single cell encapsulation prevents detachment induced cell death while boosting the mechanical retention of CSCs to enhance repair of damaged myocardium.

  6. Short-Term Effects of Transjugular Intrahepatic Shunt on Cardiac Function Assessed by Cardiac MRI: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kovacs, A.; Schepke, M.; Heller, J.; Schild, H. H.; Flacke, S.

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess short-term effects of transjugular intrahepatic shunt (TIPS) on cardiac function with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with liver cirrhosis. Eleven patients (six males and five females) with intractable esophageal varices or refractory ascites were imaged with MRI at 1.5 T prior to, within 24 h after, and 4-6 months after TIPS creation (n = 5). Invasive pressures were registered during TIPS creation. MRI consisted of a stack of contiguous slices as well as phase contrast images at all four valve planes and perpendicular to the portal vein. Imaging data were analyzed through time-volume curves and first derivatives. The portoatrial pressure gradient decreased from 19.8 {+-} 2.3 to 6.6 {+-} 2.3, accompanied by a nearly two fold increase in central pressures and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure immediately after TIPS creation. Left and right end diastolic volumes and stroke volumes increased by 11, 13, and 24%, respectively (p < 0.001), but dropped back to baseline at follow-up. End systolic volumes remained unchanged. E/A ratios remained within normal range. During follow-up the left ventricular mass was larger than baseline values in all patients, with an average increase of 7.9 g (p < 0.001). In conclusion, the increased volume load shunted to the heart after TIPS creation transiently exceeded the preload reserve of the right and left ventricle, leading to significantly increased pulmonary wedge pressures and persistent enlargement of the left and right atria. Normalization of cardiac dimensions was observed after months together with mild left ventricular hypertrophy.

  7. Restoring the impaired cardiac calcium homeostasis and cardiac function in iron overload rats by the combined deferiprone and N-acetyl cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Wongjaikam, Suwakon; Kumfu, Sirinart; Khamseekaew, Juthamas; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C.; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i dysregulation plays an important role in the pathophysiology of iron overload cardiomyopathy. Although either iron chelators or antioxidants provide cardioprotection, a comparison of the efficacy of deferoxamine (DFO), deferiprone (DFP), deferasirox (DFX), N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or a combination of DFP plus NAC on cardiac [Ca2+]i homeostasis in chronic iron overload has never been investigated. Male Wistar rats were fed with either a normal diet or a high iron (HFe) diet for 4 months. At 2 months, HFe rats were divided into 6 groups and treated with either a vehicle, DFO (25 mg/kg/day), DFP (75 mg/kg/day), DFX (20 mg/kg/day), NAC (100 mg/kg/day), or combined DFP plus NAC. At 4 months, the number of cardiac T-type calcium channels was increased, whereas cardiac sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) was decreased, leading to cardiac iron overload and impaired cardiac [Ca2+]i homeostasis. All pharmacological interventions restored SERCA levels. Although DFO, DFP, DFX or NAC alone shared similar efficacy in improving cardiac [Ca2+]i homeostasis, only DFP + NAC restored cardiac [Ca2+]i homeostasis, leading to restoring left ventricular function in the HFe-fed rats. Thus, the combined DFP + NAC was more effective than any monotherapy in restoring cardiac [Ca2+]i homeostasis, leading to restored myocardial contractility in iron-overloaded rats. PMID:28287621

  8. Gravity Reception and Cardiac Function in the Spider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finck, A.

    1985-01-01

    The following features of the arachnid gravity system were studied. (1) the absolute threshold to hyper-gz is quite low indicating fine proprioreceptive properties of the lyriform organ, the Gz/vibration detector; (2) the neurogenic heart of the spider is a good dependent variable for assessing its behavior to Gz and other stimuli which produce mechanical effects on the exoskeleton; (3) Not only is the cardiac response useful but it is now understood to be an integral part of the system which compensates for the consequences of gravity in the spider (an hydraulic leg extension); and (4) a theoretical model was proposed in which a mechanical amplifier, the leg lever, converts a weak force (at the tarsus) to a strong force (at the patella), capable of compressing the exoskeleton and consequently the lyriform receptor.

  9. Does iron deficiency anemia affect olfactory function?

    PubMed

    Dinc, Mehmet Emre; Dalgic, Abdullah; Ulusoy, Seckin; Dizdar, Denizhan; Develioglu, Omer; Topak, Murat

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion This study found a negative effect of IDA on olfactory function. IDA leads to a reduction in olfactory function, and decreases in hemoglobin levels result in further reduction in olfactory function. Objective This study examined the effects of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) on olfactory function. Method The study enrolled 50 IDA patients and 50 healthy subjects. Olfactory function was evaluated using the Sniffin' Sticks olfactory test. The diagnosis of IDA was made according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Results Patients with IDA had a significantly lower threshold, discrimination, and identification (TDI) value, and a lower threshold compared with the control group. However, there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of smell selectivity values.

  10. How the 2008 stock market crash and seasons affect total and cardiac deaths in Los Angeles County.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Bryan Glen; Pezzullo, John Christopher; McDonald, Scott Andrew; Poole, William Kenneth; Kloner, Robert Alan

    2012-05-15

    Various stressors trigger cardiac death. The objective was to investigate a possible relation between a stock market crash and cardiac death in a large population within the United States. We obtained daily stock market data (Dow Jones Industrial Average Index), death certificate data for daily deaths in Los Angeles County (LA), and annual LA population estimates for 2005 through 2008. The 4 years death rate curves (2005 through 2008) were averaged into a single curve to illustrate annual trends. Data were "deseasonalized" by subtracting from the daily observed value the average value for that day of year. There was marked seasonal variation in total and cardiac death rates. Even in the mild LA climate, death rates were higher in winter versus summer including total death (+17%), circulatory death (+24%), coronary heart disease death (+28%), and myocardial infarction death (+38%) rates (p <0.0001 for each). Absolute coronary heart disease death rates have decreased since 1985. After accounting for seasonal variation, the large stock market crash in October 2008 did not affect death rates in LA. Death rates remained at or below seasonal averages during the stock market crash. In conclusion, after correcting for seasonal variation, the stock market crash in October 2008 was not associated with an increase in total or cardiac death in LA. Annual coronary heart disease death rates continue to decrease. However, seasonal variation (specifically winter) remains a trigger for death and coronary heart disease death even in LA where winters are mild.

  11. Transplantation of multipotent Isl1+ cardiac progenitor cells preserves infarcted heart function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunpeng; Tian, Shuo; Lei, Ienglam; Liu, Liu; Ma, Peter; Wang, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Cell-based cardiac therapy is a promising therapeutic strategy to restore heart function after myocardial infarction (MI). However, the cell type selection and ensuing effects remain controversial. Here, we intramyocardially injected Isl1+ cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) derived from EGFP/luciferase double-tagged mouse embryonic stem (dt-mES) cells with vehicle (fibrin gel) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) into the infarcted area in nude mice to assess the contribution of CPCs to the recovery of cardiac function post-MI. Our results showed that Isl1+ CPCs differentiated normally into three cardiac lineages (cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells) both on cell culture plates and in fibrin gel. Cell retention was significantly increased when the transplanted cells were injected with vehicle. Importantly, 28 days after injection, CPCs were observed to differentiate into CMs within the infarcted area. Moreover, numerous CD31+ endothelial cells derived from endogenous revascularization and differentiation of the injected CPCs were detected. SMMHC-, Ki67- and CX-43-positive cells were identified in the injected CPC population, further demonstrating the proliferation, differentiation and integration of the transplanted CPCs in host cells. Furthermore, animal hearts injected with CPCs showed increased angiogenesis, decreased infarct size, and improved heart function. In conclusion, our studies showed that Isl1+ CPCs, when combined with a suitable vehicle, can produce notable therapeutic effects in the infarcted heart, suggesting that CPCs might be an ideal cell source for cardiac therapy. PMID:28386378

  12. Transplantation of multipotent Isl1+ cardiac progenitor cells preserves infarcted heart function in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunpeng; Tian, Shuo; Lei, Ienglam; Liu, Liu; Ma, Peter; Wang, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Cell-based cardiac therapy is a promising therapeutic strategy to restore heart function after myocardial infarction (MI). However, the cell type selection and ensuing effects remain controversial. Here, we intramyocardially injected Isl1+ cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) derived from EGFP/luciferase double-tagged mouse embryonic stem (dt-mES) cells with vehicle (fibrin gel) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) into the infarcted area in nude mice to assess the contribution of CPCs to the recovery of cardiac function post-MI. Our results showed that Isl1+ CPCs differentiated normally into three cardiac lineages (cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells) both on cell culture plates and in fibrin gel. Cell retention was significantly increased when the transplanted cells were injected with vehicle. Importantly, 28 days after injection, CPCs were observed to differentiate into CMs within the infarcted area. Moreover, numerous CD31+ endothelial cells derived from endogenous revascularization and differentiation of the injected CPCs were detected. SMMHC-, Ki67- and CX-43-positive cells were identified in the injected CPC population, further demonstrating the proliferation, differentiation and integration of the transplanted CPCs in host cells. Furthermore, animal hearts injected with CPCs showed increased angiogenesis, decreased infarct size, and improved heart function. In conclusion, our studies showed that Isl1+ CPCs, when combined with a suitable vehicle, can produce notable therapeutic effects in the infarcted heart, suggesting that CPCs might be an ideal cell source for cardiac therapy.

  13. The modulation of cardiac progenitor cell function by hydrogel-dependent Notch1 activation.

    PubMed

    Boopathy, Archana V; Che, Pao Lin; Somasuntharam, Inthirai; Fiore, Vincent F; Cabigas, E Bernadette; Ban, Kiwon; Brown, Milton E; Narui, Yoshie; Barker, Thomas H; Yoon, Young-Sup; Salaita, Khalid; García, Andrés J; Davis, Michael E

    2014-09-01

    Myocardial infarction is the leading cause of death worldwide and phase I clinical trials utilizing cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) have shown promising outcomes. Notch1 signaling plays a critical role in cardiac development and in the survival, cardiogenic lineage commitment, and differentiation of cardiac stem/progenitor cells. In this study, we functionalized self-assembling peptide (SAP) hydrogels with a peptide mimic of the Notch1 ligand Jagged1 (RJ) to evaluate the therapeutic benefit of CPC delivery in the hydrogels in a rat model of myocardial infarction. The behavior of CPCs cultured in the 3D hydrogels in vitro including gene expression, proliferation, and growth factor production was evaluated. Interestingly, we observed Notch1 activation to be dependent on hydrogel polymer density/stiffness with synergistic increase in presence of RJ. Our results show that RJ mediated Notch1 activation depending on hydrogel concentration differentially regulated cardiogenic gene expression, proliferation, and growth factor production in CPCs in vitro. In rats subjected to experimental myocardial infarction, improvement in acute retention and cardiac function was observed following cell therapy in RJ hydrogels compared to unmodified or scrambled peptide containing hydrogels. This study demonstrates the potential therapeutic benefit of functionalizing SAP hydrogels with RJ for CPC based cardiac repair.

  14. Cardiac autonomic denervation and functional response to neurotoxins during acute experimental Chagas' disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, A L; Fontoura, B F; Freire-Maia, L; Chiari, E; Machado, C R; Teixeira, M M; Camargos, E R

    2001-06-20

    Severe cardiac autonomic denervation occurs in the acute Chagas' disease in rats. The present study aims at verifying whether this denervation was accompanied by impairment of heart function. Scorpionic (Tityus serrulatus) crude venom was used for neurotransmitter release in isolated hearts (Langendorff's preparation). In control hearts, the venom induced significant bradycardia followed by tachycardia. In infected animals, despite the severe (sympathetic) or moderate (parasympathetic) cardiac denervation, the venom provoked similar bradycardia but the tachycardia was higher. The hearts of infected animals beat at significantly lower rate. Atropine prevented this lower rate. Our results demonstrated sympathetic dysfunction during the acute phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in rats, the parasympathetic function being spared.

  15. Engineering the heart: evaluation of conductive nanomaterials for improving implant integration and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jin; Chen, Jun; Sun, Hongyu; Qiu, Xiaozhong; Mou, Yongchao; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yuwei; Li, Xia; Han, Yao; Duan, Cuimi; Tang, Rongyu; Wang, Chunlan; Zhong, Wen; Liu, Jie; Luo, Ying; Mengqiu Xing, Malcolm; Wang, Changyong

    2014-01-16

    Recently, carbon nanotubes together with other types of conductive materials have been used to enhance the viability and function of cardiomyocytes in vitro. Here we demonstrated a paradigm to construct ECTs for cardiac repair using conductive nanomaterials. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were incorporated into gelatin hydrogel scaffolds to construct three-dimensional ECTs. We found that SWNTs could provide cellular microenvironment in vitro favorable for cardiac contraction and the expression of electrochemical associated proteins. Upon implantation into the infarct hearts in rats, ECTs structurally integrated with the host myocardium, with different types of cells observed to mutually invade into implants and host tissues. The functional measurements showed that SWNTs were essential to improve the performance of ECTs in inhibiting pathological deterioration of myocardium. This work suggested that conductive nanomaterials hold therapeutic potential in engineering cardiac tissues to repair myocardial infarction.

  16. Engineering the heart: Evaluation of conductive nanomaterials for improving implant integration and cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jin; Chen, Jun; Sun, Hongyu; Qiu, Xiaozhong; Mou, Yongchao; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yuwei; Li, Xia; Han, Yao; Duan, Cuimi; Tang, Rongyu; Wang, Chunlan; Zhong, Wen; Liu, Jie; Luo, Ying; (Mengqiu) Xing, Malcolm; Wang, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, carbon nanotubes together with other types of conductive materials have been used to enhance the viability and function of cardiomyocytes in vitro. Here we demonstrated a paradigm to construct ECTs for cardiac repair using conductive nanomaterials. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were incorporated into gelatin hydrogel scaffolds to construct three-dimensional ECTs. We found that SWNTs could provide cellular microenvironment in vitro favorable for cardiac contraction and the expression of electrochemical associated proteins. Upon implantation into the infarct hearts in rats, ECTs structurally integrated with the host myocardium, with different types of cells observed to mutually invade into implants and host tissues. The functional measurements showed that SWNTs were essential to improve the performance of ECTs in inhibiting pathological deterioration of myocardium. This work suggested that conductive nanomaterials hold therapeutic potential in engineering cardiac tissues to repair myocardial infarction. PMID:24429673

  17. Engineering the heart: Evaluation of conductive nanomaterials for improving implant integration and cardiac function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jin; Chen, Jun; Sun, Hongyu; Qiu, Xiaozhong; Mou, Yongchao; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yuwei; Li, Xia; Han, Yao; Duan, Cuimi; Tang, Rongyu; Wang, Chunlan; Zhong, Wen; Liu, Jie; Luo, Ying; (Mengqiu) Xing, Malcolm; Wang, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, carbon nanotubes together with other types of conductive materials have been used to enhance the viability and function of cardiomyocytes in vitro. Here we demonstrated a paradigm to construct ECTs for cardiac repair using conductive nanomaterials. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were incorporated into gelatin hydrogel scaffolds to construct three-dimensional ECTs. We found that SWNTs could provide cellular microenvironment in vitro favorable for cardiac contraction and the expression of electrochemical associated proteins. Upon implantation into the infarct hearts in rats, ECTs structurally integrated with the host myocardium, with different types of cells observed to mutually invade into implants and host tissues. The functional measurements showed that SWNTs were essential to improve the performance of ECTs in inhibiting pathological deterioration of myocardium. This work suggested that conductive nanomaterials hold therapeutic potential in engineering cardiac tissues to repair myocardial infarction.

  18. Chitosan hydrogel improves mesenchymal stem cell transplant survival and cardiac function following myocardial infarction in rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bin; Li, Yang; Deng, Bo; Liu, Xiaojing; Wang, Lin; Zhu, Qing-Lei

    2017-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) remains the leading cause of cardiovascular-associated mortality and morbidity. Improving the retention rate, survival and cardiomyocyte differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is important in improving the treatment of patients with MI. In the present study, temperature-responsive chitosan hydrogel, an injectable scaffold, was used to deliver MSCs directly into the infarcted myocardium of rats following MI. Histopathology and immunohistochemical staining were used to evaluate cardiac cell survival and regeneration, and cardiac function was assessed using an echocardiograph. It was demonstrated that chitosan hydrogel increased graft size and cell retention in the ischemic heart, promoted MSCs to differentiate into cardiomyocytes and increased the effects of MSCs on neovasculature formation. Furthermore, chitosan hydrogel enhanced the effect of MSCs on the improvement of cardiac function and hemodynamics in the infarcted area of rats following MI. These findings suggest that chitosan hydrogel is an appropriate material to deliver MSCs into infarcted myocardium. PMID:28352335

  19. Time Course of Atrophic Remodeling: Effects of Exercise on Cardiac Morpology and Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, J. M.; Martin, D.; Caine, T.; Matz, T.; Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.

    2014-01-01

    Early and consistent evaluation of cardiac morphology and function throughout an atrophic stimulus is critically important for the design and optimization of interventions. Exercise training is one intervention that has been shown to confer favorable improvements in LV mass and function during unloading. However, the format and intensity of exercise required to induce optimal cardiac improvements has not been investigated. PURPOSE: This randomized, controlled trial was designed to 1) comprehensively characterize the time course of unloading-induced morpho-functional remodeling, and 2) examine the effects of high intensity exercise training on cardiac structural and functional parameters during unloading. METHODS: Twenty six subjects completed 70 days of head down tilt bed rest (HDBR): 17 were randomized to exercise training (ExBR) and 9 remained sedentary. Exercise consisted of integrated high intensity, continuous, and resistance exercise. We assessed cardiac morphology (left ventricular mass; LVM) and function (speckle-tracking assessment of longitudinal, radial, and circumferential strain and twist) before (BR-2), during (BR7,21,31,70), and following (BR+0, +3) HDBR. Cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max) was evaluated before (BR- 3), during (BR4,25,46,68) and following (BR+0) HDBR. RESULTS: Sedentary HDBR resulted in a progressive decline in LVM, longitudinal, radial, and circumferential strain, and an increase in twist. ExBR mitigated decreases in LVM and function. Change in twist was significantly related to change in VO2max (R=0.68, p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Alterations in cardiac morphology and function begin early during unloading. High-intensity exercise attenuates atrophic morphological and functional remodeling.

  20. Ethanol exposure alters early cardiac function in the looping heart: a mechanism for congenital heart defects?

    PubMed

    Karunamuni, Ganga; Gu, Shi; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Peterson, Lindsy M; Mai, Katherine; McHale, Quinn; Jenkins, Michael W; Linask, Kersti K; Rollins, Andrew M; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-02-01

    Alcohol-induced congenital heart defects are frequently among the most life threatening and require surgical correction in newborns. The etiology of these defects, collectively known as fetal alcohol syndrome, has been the focus of much study, particularly involving cellular and molecular mechanisms. Few studies have addressed the influential role of altered cardiac function in early embryogenesis because of a lack of tools with the capability to assay tiny beating hearts. To overcome this gap in our understanding, we used optical coherence tomography (OCT), a nondestructive imaging modality capable of micrometer-scale resolution imaging, to rapidly and accurately map cardiovascular structure and hemodynamics in real time under physiological conditions. In this study, we exposed avian embryos to a single dose of alcohol/ethanol at gastrulation when the embryo is sensitive to the induction of birth defects. Late-stage hearts were analyzed using standard histological analysis with a focus on the atrio-ventricular valves. Early cardiac function was assayed using Doppler OCT, and structural analysis of the cardiac cushions was performed using OCT imaging. Our results indicated that ethanol-exposed embryos developed late-stage valvuloseptal defects. At early stages, they exhibited increased regurgitant flow and developed smaller atrio-ventricular cardiac cushions, compared with controls (uninjected and saline-injected embryos). The embryos also exhibited abnormal flexion/torsion of the body. Our evidence suggests that ethanol-induced alterations in early cardiac function have the potential to contribute to late-stage valve and septal defects, thus demonstrating that functional parameters may serve as early and sensitive gauges of cardiac normalcy and abnormalities.

  1. In vivo imaging of cardiac development and function in zebrafish using light sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael; Huisken, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Detailed studies of heart development and function are crucial for our understanding of cardiac failures and pave the way for better diagnostics and treatment. However, the constant motion and close incorporation into the cardiovascular system prevent in vivo studies of the living, unperturbed heart. The complementary strengths of the zebrafish model and light sheet microscopy provide a useful platform to fill this gap. High-resolution images of the embryonic vertebrate heart are now recorded from within the living animal: deep inside the unperturbed heart we can follow cardiac contractions and measure action potentials and calcium transients. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the entire beating heart with cellular resolution give new insights into its ever-changing morphology and facilitate studies into how individual cells form the complex cardiac network. In addition, cardiac dynamics and robustness are now examined with targeted optical manipulation. Overall, the combination of zebrafish and light sheet microscopy represents a promising addition for cardiac research and opens the door to a better understanding of heart function and development.

  2. Cardiac systolic regional function and synchrony in endurance trained and untrained females

    PubMed Central

    Hedman, Kristofer; Tamás, Éva; Bjarnegård, Niclas; Brudin, Lars; Nylander, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Background Most studies on cardiac function in athletes describe overall heart function in predominately male participants. We aimed to compare segmental, regional and overall myocardial function and synchrony in female endurance athletes (ATH) and in age-matched sedentary females (CON). Methods In 46 ATH and 48 CON, echocardiography was used to measure peak longitudinal systolic strain and myocardial velocities in 12 left ventricular (LV) and 2 right ventricular (RV) segments. Regional and overall systolic function were calculated together with four indices of dyssynchrony. Results There were no differences in regional or overall LV systolic function between groups, or in any of the four dyssynchrony indices. Peak systolic velocity (s′) was higher in the RV of ATH than in CON (9.7±1.5 vs 8.7±1.5 cm/s, p=0.004), but not after indexing by cardiac length (p=0.331). Strain was similar in ATH and CON in 8 of 12 LV myocardial segments. In septum and anteroseptum, basal and mid-ventricular s′ was 6–7% and 17–19% higher in ATH than in CON (p<0.05), respectively, while s′ was 12% higher in CON in the basal LV lateral wall (p=0.013). After indexing by cardiac length, s′ was only higher in ATH in the mid-ventricular septum (p=0.041). Conclusions We found differences between trained and untrained females in segmental systolic myocardial function, but not in global measures of systolic function, including cardiac synchrony. These findings give new insights into cardiac adaptation to endurance training and could also be of use for sports cardiologists evaluating female athletes. PMID:27900120

  3. Overexpressing Superoxide Dismutase 2 Induces a Supernormal Cardiac Function by Enhancing Redox-dependent Mitochondrial Function and Metabolic Dilation*

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Patrick T.; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Ohanyan, Vahagn; Luther, Daniel J.; Meszaros, J. Gary; Chilian, William M.; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2015-01-01

    During heightened cardiac work, O2 consumption by the heart benefits energy production via mitochondria. However, some electrons leak from the respiratory chain and yield superoxide, which is rapidly metabolized into H2O2 by SOD2. To understand the systemic effects of the metabolic dilator, H2O2, we studied mice with cardiac-specific SOD2 overexpression (SOD2-tg), which increases the H2O2 produced by cardiac mitochondria. Contrast echocardiography was employed to evaluate cardiac function, indicating that SOD2-tg had a significantly greater ejection fraction and a lower mean arterial pressure (MAP) that was partially normalized by intravenous injection of catalase. Norepinephrine-mediated myocardial blood flow (MBF) was significantly enhanced in SOD2-tg mice. Coupling of MBF to the double product (Heart Rate × MAP) was increased in SOD2-tg mice, indicating that the metabolic dilator, “spilled” over, inducing systemic vasodilation. The hypothesis that SOD2 overexpression effectively enhances mitochondrial function was further evaluated. Mitochondria of SOD2-tg mice had a decreased state 3 oxygen consumption rate, but maintained the same ATP production flux under the basal and L-NAME treatment conditions, indicating a higher bioenergetic efficiency. SOD2-tg mitochondria produced less superoxide, and had lower redox activity in converting cyclic hydroxylamine to stable nitroxide, and a lower GSSG concentration. EPR analysis of the isolated mitochondria showed a significant decrease in semiquinones at the SOD2-tg Qi site. These results support a more reductive physiological setting in the SOD2-tg murine heart. Cardiac mitochondria exhibited no significant differences in the respiratory control index between WT and SOD2-tg. We conclude that SOD2 overexpression in myocytes enhances mitochondrial function and metabolic vasodilation, leading to a phenotype of supernormal cardiac function. PMID:26374996

  4. Overexpressing superoxide dismutase 2 induces a supernormal cardiac function by enhancing redox-dependent mitochondrial function and metabolic dilation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Patrick T; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Ohanyan, Vahagn; Luther, Daniel J; Meszaros, J Gary; Chilian, William M; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2015-11-01

    During heightened cardiac work, O2 consumption by the heart benefits energy production via mitochondria. However, some electrons leak from the respiratory chain and yield superoxide, which is rapidly metabolized into H2O2 by SOD2. To understand the systemic effects of the metabolic dilator, H2O2, we studied mice with cardiac-specific SOD2 overexpression (SOD2-tg), which increases the H2O2 produced by cardiac mitochondria. Contrast echocardiography was employed to evaluate cardiac function, indicating that SOD2-tg had a significantly greater ejection fraction and a lower mean arterial pressure (MAP) that was partially normalized by intravenous injection of catalase. Norepinephrine-mediated myocardial blood flow (MBF) was significantly enhanced in SOD2-tg mice. Coupling of MBF to the double product (Heart Rate×MAP) was increased in SOD2-tg mice, indicating that the metabolic dilator, "spilled" over, inducing systemic vasodilation. The hypothesis that SOD2 overexpression effectively enhances mitochondrial function was further evaluated. Mitochondria of SOD2-tg mice had a decreased state 3 oxygen consumption rate, but maintained the same ATP production flux under the basal and L-NAME treatment conditions, indicating a higher bioenergetic efficiency. SOD2-tg mitochondria produced less superoxide, and had lower redox activity in converting cyclic hydroxylamine to stable nitroxide, and a lower GSSG concentration. EPR analysis of the isolated mitochondria showed a significant decrease in semiquinones at the SOD2-tg Qi site. These results support a more reductive physiological setting in the SOD2-tg murine heart. Cardiac mitochondria exhibited no significant differences in the respiratory control index between WT and SOD2-tg. We conclude that SOD2 overexpression in myocytes enhances mitochondrial function and metabolic vasodilation, leading to a phenotype of supernormal cardiac function.

  5. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  6. Cardiac Morphology and Function, and Blood Gas Transport in Aquaporin-1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Al-Samir, Samer; Wang, Yong; Meissner, Joachim D.; Gros, Gerolf; Endeward, Volker

    2016-01-01

    We have studied cardiac and respiratory functions of aquaporin-1-deficient mice by the Pressure-Volume-loop technique and by blood gas analysis. In addition, the morphological properties of the animals' hearts were analyzed. In anesthesia under maximal dobutamine stimulation, the mice exhibit a moderately elevated heart rate of < 600 min−1 and an O2 consumption of ~0.6 ml/min/g, which is about twice the basal rate. In this state, which is similar to the resting state of the conscious animal, all cardiac functions including stroke volume and cardiac output exhibited resting values and were identical between deficient and wildtype animals. Likewise, pulmonary and peripheral exchange of O2 and CO2 were normal. In contrast, several morphological parameters of the heart tissue of deficient mice were altered: (1) left ventricular wall thickness was reduced by 12%, (2) left ventricular mass, normalized to tibia length, was reduced by 10–20%, (3) cardiac muscle fiber cross sectional area was decreased by 17%, and (4) capillary density was diminished by 10%. As the P-V-loop technique yielded normal end-diastolic and end-systolic left ventricular volumes, the deficient hearts are characterized by thin ventricular walls in combination with normal intraventricular volumes. The aquaporin-1-deficient heart thus seems to be at a disadvantage compared to the wild-type heart by a reduced left-ventricular wall thickness and an increased diffusion distance between blood capillaries and muscle mitochondria. While under the present quasi-resting conditions these morphological alterations have no consequences for cardiac function, we expect that the deficient hearts will show a reduced maximal cardiac output. PMID:27252655

  7. Body adiposity dictates different mechanisms of increased coronary reactivity related to improved in vivo cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Saturated fatty acid-rich high fat (HF) diets trigger abdominal adiposity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and cardiac dysfunction. This study was aimed at evaluating the effects of nascent obesity on the cardiac function of animals fed a high-fat diet and at analyzing the mechanisms by which these alterations occurred at the level of coronary reserve. Materials and methods Rats were fed a control (C) or a HF diet containing high proportions of saturated fatty acids for 3 months. Thereafter, their cardiac function was evaluated in vivo using a pressure probe inserted into the cavity of the left ventricle. Their heart was isolated, perfused iso-volumetrically according to the Langendorff mode and the coronary reserve was evaluated by determining the endothelial-dependent (EDV) and endothelial-independent (EIV) vasodilatations in the absence and presence of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase inhibitors (L-NAME and indomethacin). The fatty acid composition of cardiac phospholipids was then evaluated. Results Although all the HF-fed rats increased their abdominal adiposity, some of them did not gain body weight (HF- group) compared to the C group whereas other ones had a higher body weight (HF+). All HF rats displayed a higher in vivo cardiac activity associated with an increased EDV. In the HF- group, the improved EDV was due to an increase in the endothelial cell vasodilatation activity whereas in the HF+ group, the enhanced EDV resulted from an improved sensitivity of coronary smooth muscle cells to nitric oxide. Furthermore, in the HF- group the main pathway implicated in the EDV was the NOS pathway while in the HF+ group the COX pathway. Conclusions Nascent obesity-induced improvement of cardiac function may be supported by an enhanced coronary reserve occurring via different mechanisms. These mechanisms implicate either the endothelial cells activity or the smooth muscle cells sensitivity depending on the body adiposity of

  8. Teaching Cardiac Autonomic Function Dynamics Employing the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) Maneuver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junqueira, Luiz Fernando, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    In this report, a brief history of the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) maneuver is outlined, followed by an explanation on the use of this approach for the evaluation of cardiac autonomic function based on underlying heart rate changes. The most important methodological and interpretative aspects of the Valsalva-Weber maneuver are critically updated,…

  9. Cardiac Autonomic Function during Submaximal Treadmill Exercise in Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendonca, Goncalo V.; Pereira, Fernando D.; Fernhall, Bo

    2011-01-01

    This study determined whether the cardiac autonomic function of adults with Down syndrome (DS) differs from that of nondisabled persons during submaximal dynamic exercise. Thirteen participants with DS and 12 nondisabled individuals performed maximal and submaximal treadmill tests with metabolic and heart rate (HR) measurements. Spectral analysis…

  10. Inspiratory Muscle Training and Functional Capacity in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, André Luiz Lisboa; de Melo, Thiago Araújo; Neves, Daniela; Luna, Julianne; Esquivel, Mateus Souza; Guimarães, André Raimundo França; Borges, Daniel Lago; Petto, Jefferson

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac surgery is a highly complex procedure which generates worsening of lung function and decreased inspiratory muscle strength. The inspiratory muscle training becomes effective for muscle strengthening and can improve functional capacity. Objective To investigate the effect of inspiratory muscle training on functional capacity submaximal and inspiratory muscle strength in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods This is a clinical randomized controlled trial with patients undergoing cardiac surgery at Instituto Nobre de Cardiologia. Patients were divided into two groups: control group and training. Preoperatively, were assessed the maximum inspiratory pressure and the distance covered in a 6-minute walk test. From the third postoperative day, the control group was managed according to the routine of the unit while the training group underwent daily protocol of respiratory muscle training until the day of discharge. Results 50 patients, 27 (54%) males were included, with a mean age of 56.7±13.9 years. After the analysis, the training group had significant increase in maximum inspiratory pressure (69.5±14.9 vs. 83.1±19.1 cmH2O, P=0.0073) and 6-minute walk test (422.4±102.8 vs. 502.4±112.8 m, P=0.0031). Conclusion We conclude that inspiratory muscle training was effective in improving functional capacity submaximal and inspiratory muscle strength in this sample of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:27556313

  11. c-Myc Alters Substrate Utilization and O-GlcNAc Protein Posttranslational Modifications without Altering Cardiac Function during Early Aortic Constriction

    PubMed Central

    Ledee, Dolena; Smith, Lincoln; Bruce, Margaret; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A.; Olson, Aaron K.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic stimuli cause transcription of the proto-oncogene c-Myc (Myc). Prior work showed that myocardial knockout of c-Myc (Myc) attenuated hypertrophy and decreased expression of metabolic genes after aortic constriction. Accordingly, we assessed the interplay between Myc, substrate oxidation and cardiac function during early pressure overload hypertrophy. Mice with cardiac specific, inducible Myc knockout (MycKO-TAC) and non-transgenic littermates (Cont-TAC) were subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC; n = 7/group). Additional groups underwent sham surgery (Cont-Sham and MycKO-Sham, n = 5 per group). After two weeks, function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate with 13C labeled mixed fatty acids, lactate, ketone bodies and unlabeled glucose and insulin. Cardiac function was similar between groups after TAC although +dP/dT and -dP/dT trended towards improvement in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC. In sham hearts, Myc knockout did not affect cardiac function or substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle. However, Myc knockout altered fractional contributions during TAC. The unlabeled fractional contribution increased in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC, whereas ketone and free fatty acid fractional contributions decreased. Additionally, protein posttranslational modifications by O-GlcNAc were significantly greater in Cont-TAC versus both Cont-Sham and MycKO-TAC. In conclusion, Myc alters substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during early pressure overload hypertrophy without negatively affecting cardiac function. Myc also affects protein posttranslational modifications by O-GlcNAc during hypertrophy, which may regulate Myc-induced metabolic changes. PMID:26266538

  12. Evolutionary diversification in stickleback affects ecosystem functioning.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Luke J; Matthews, Blake; Des Roches, Simone; Chase, Jonathan M; Shurin, Jonathan B; Schluter, Dolph

    2009-04-30

    Explaining the ecological causes of evolutionary diversification is a major focus of biology, but surprisingly little has been said about the effects of evolutionary diversification on ecosystems. The number of species in an ecosystem and their traits are key predictors of many ecosystem-level processes, such as rates of productivity, biomass sequestration and decomposition. Here we demonstrate short-term ecosystem-level effects of adaptive radiation in the threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) over the past 10,000 years. These fish have undergone recent parallel diversification in several lakes in coastal British Columbia, resulting in the formation of two specialized species (benthic and limnetic) from a generalist ancestor. Using a mesocosm experiment, we demonstrate that this diversification has strong effects on ecosystems, affecting prey community structure, total primary production, and the nature of dissolved organic materials that regulate the spectral properties of light transmission in the system. However, these ecosystem effects do not simply increase in their relative strength with increasing specialization and species richness; instead, they reflect the complex and indirect consequences of ecosystem engineering by sticklebacks. It is well known that ecological factors influence adaptive radiation. We demonstrate that adaptive radiation, even over short timescales, can have profound effects on ecosystems.

  13. Generation of Functional Human Cardiac Progenitor Cells by High-Efficiency Protein Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Hong; Li, Qianqian; Jiang, Lin; Deng, Chunyu; Liu, Zaiyi; Fu, Yongheng; Zhang, Mengzhen; Tan, Honghong; Feng, Yuliang; Shan, Zhixin

    2015-01-01

    The reprogramming of fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells raises the possibility that somatic cells could be directly reprogrammed to cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). The present study aimed to assess highly efficient protein-based approaches to reduce or eliminate the genetic manipulations to generate CPCs for cardiac regeneration therapy. A combination of QQ-reagent-modified Gata4, Hand2, Mef2c, and Tbx5 and three cytokines rapidly and efficiently reprogrammed human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) into CPCs. This reprogramming process enriched trimethylated histone H3 lysine 4, monoacetylated histone H3 lysine 9, and Baf60c at the Nkx2.5 cardiac enhancer region by the chromatin immunoprecipitation quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay. Protein-induced CPCs transplanted into rat hearts after myocardial infarction improved cardiac function, and this was related to differentiation into cardiomyocyte-like cells. These findings demonstrate that the highly efficient protein-transduction method can directly reprogram HDFs into CPCs. This protein reprogramming strategy lays the foundation for future refinements both in vitro and in vivo and might provide a source of CPCs for regenerative approaches. Significance The findings from the present study have demonstrated an efficient protein-transduction method of directly reprogramming fibroblasts into cardiac progenitor cells. These results have great potential in cell-based therapy for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26564862

  14. MT1-MMP-dependent remodeling of cardiac extracellular matrix structure and function following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Gerald C; Rowe, R Grant; Day, Sharlene M; Sabeh, Farideh; Atkinson, Jeffrey J; Cooke, Kenneth R; Weiss, Stephen J

    2012-05-01

    The myocardial extracellular matrix (ECM), an interwoven meshwork of proteins, glycoproteins, proteoglycans, and glycosaminoglycans that is dominated by polymeric fibrils of type I collagen, serves as the mechanical scaffold on which myocytes are arrayed for coordinated and synergistic force transduction. Following ischemic injury, cardiac ECM remodeling is initiated via localized proteolysis, the bulk of which has been assigned to matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family members. Nevertheless, the key effector(s) of myocardial type I collagenolysis both in vitro and in vivo have remained unidentified. In this study, using cardiac explants from mice deficient in each of the major type I collagenolytic MMPs, including MMP-13, MMP-8, MMP-2, MMP-9, or MT1-MMP, we identify the membrane-anchored MMP, MT1-MMP, as the dominant collagenase that is operative within myocardial tissues in vitro. Extending these observations to an in vivo setting, mice heterozygous for an MT1-MMP-null allele display a distinct survival advantage and retain myocardial function relative to wild-type littermates in an experimental model of myocardial infarction, effects associated with preservation of the myocardial type I collagen network as a consequence of the decreased collagenolytic potential of cardiac fibroblasts. This study identifies MT1-MMP as a key MMP responsible for effecting postinfarction cardiac ECM remodeling and cardiac dysfunction.

  15. Maturation status of sarcomere structure and function in human iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Bedada, Fikru B; Wheelwright, Matthew; Metzger, Joseph M

    2016-07-01

    Human heart failure due to myocardial infarction is a major health concern. The paucity of organs for transplantation limits curative approaches for the diseased and failing adult heart. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac myocytes (hiPSC-CMs) have the potential to provide a long-term, viable, regenerative-medicine alternative. Significant progress has been made with regard to efficient cardiac myocyte generation from hiPSCs. However, directing hiPSC-CMs to acquire the physiological structure, gene expression profile and function akin to mature cardiac tissue remains a major obstacle. Thus, hiPSC-CMs have several hurdles to overcome before they find their way into translational medicine. In this review, we address the progress that has been made, the void in knowledge and the challenges that remain. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  16. A flatness-based control approach to drug infusion for cardiac function regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigatos, Gerasimos; Zervos, Nikolaos; Melkikh, Alexey

    2016-12-01

    A new control method based on differential flatness theory is developed in this article, aiming at solving the problem of regulation of haemodynamic parameters, Actually control of the cardiac output (volume of blood pumped out by heart per unit of time) and of the arterial blood pressure is achieved through the administered infusion of cardiovascular drugs, such as dopamine and sodium nitroprusside. Time delays between the control inputs and the system's outputs are taken into account. Using the principle of dynamic extension, which means that by considering certain control inputs and their derivatives as additional state variables, a state-space description for the heart's function is obtained. It is proven that the dynamic model of the heart is a differentially flat one. This enables its transformation into a linear canonical and decoupled form, for which the design of a stabilizing feedback controller becomes possible. The proposed feedback controller is of proven stability and assures fast and accurate tracking of the reference setpoints by the outputs of the heart's dynamic model. Moreover, by using a Kalman Filter-based disturbances' estimator, it becomes possible to estimate in real-time and compensate for the model uncertainty and external perturbation inputs that affect the heart's model.

  17. Myocardial damage in dogs affected by heartworm disease (Dirofilaria immitis): immunohistochemical study of cardiac myoglobin and troponin I in naturally infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Carretón, E; Grandi, G; Morchón, R; Simón, F; Passeri, B; Cantoni, A M; Kramer, L; Montoya-Alonso, J A

    2012-10-26

    It has recently been reported that dogs affected by canine heartworm disease (Dirofilaria immitis) can show an increase in plasma levels of myoglobin and cardiac troponin I, two markers of muscle/myocardial injury. In order to determine if this increase is due to myocardial damage, the right ventricle of 24 naturally infected dogs was examined by routine histology and immunohistochemistry with anti-myoglobin and anti-cardiac troponin I antibodies. Microscopic lesions included necrosis and myocyte vacuolization, and were associated with loss of staining for one or both proteins. Results confirm that increased levels of myoglobin and cardiac troponin I are indicative of myocardial damage in dogs affected by heartworm disease.

  18. Advancing functional engineered cardiac tissues toward a preclinical model of human myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Irene C.; Karakikes, Ioannis; Serrao, Gregory W.; Backeris, Peter; Lee, Jia-Jye; Xie, Chaoqin; Senyei, Grant; Gordon, Ronald E.; Li, Ronald A.; Akar, Fadi G.; Hajjar, Roger J.; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Costa, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac experimental biology and translational research would benefit from an in vitro surrogate for human heart muscle. This study investigated structural and functional properties and interventional responses of human engineered cardiac tissues (hECTs) compared to human myocardium. Human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs, >90% troponin-positive) were mixed with collagen and cultured on force-sensing elastomer devices. hECTs resembled trabecular muscle and beat spontaneously (1.18±0.48 Hz). Microstructural features and mRNA expression of cardiac-specific genes (α-MHC, SERCA2a, and ACTC1) were comparable to human myocardium. Optical mapping revealed cardiac refractoriness with loss of 1:1 capture above 3 Hz, and cycle length dependence of the action potential duration, recapitulating key features of cardiac electrophysiology. hECTs reconstituted the Frank-Starling mechanism, generating an average maximum twitch stress of 660 μN/mm2 at Lmax, approaching values in newborn human myocardium. Dose-response curves followed exponential pharmacodynamics models for calcium chloride (EC50 1.8 mM) and verapamil (IC50 0.61 μM); isoproterenol elicited a positive chronotropic but negligible inotropic response, suggesting sarcoplasmic reticulum immaturity. hECTs were amenable to gene transfer, demonstrated by successful transduction with Ad.GFP. Such 3-D hECTs recapitulate an early developmental stage of human myocardium and promise to offer an alternative preclinical model for cardiology research.—Turnbull, I. C., Karakikes, I., Serrao, G. W., Backeris, P., Lee, J.-J., Xie, C., Senyei, G., Gordon, R. E., Li, R. A., Akar, F. G., Hajjar, R. J., Hulot, J.-S., Costa, K. D. Advancing functional engineered cardiac tissues toward a preclinical model of human myocardium. PMID:24174427

  19. Modulating Beta-Cardiac Myosin Function at the Molecular and Tissue Levels

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wanjian; Blair, Cheavar A.; Walton, Shane D.; Málnási-Csizmadia, András; Campbell, Kenneth S.; Yengo, Christopher M.

    2017-01-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies are a common form of heart disease that are caused by mutations in sarcomeric proteins with beta cardiac myosin (MYH7) being one of the most frequently affected genes. Since the discovery of the first cardiomyopathy associated mutation in beta-cardiac myosin, a major goal has been to correlate the in vitro myosin motor properties with the contractile performance of cardiac muscle. There has been substantial progress in developing assays to measure the force and velocity properties of purified cardiac muscle myosin but it is still challenging to correlate results from molecular and tissue-level experiments. Mutations that cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are more common than mutations that lead to dilated cardiomyopathy and are also often associated with increased isometric force and hyper-contractility. Therefore, the development of drugs designed to decrease isometric force by reducing the duty ratio (the proportion of time myosin spends bound to actin during its ATPase cycle) has been proposed for the treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Para-Nitroblebbistatin is a small molecule drug proposed to decrease the duty ratio of class II myosins. We examined the impact of this drug on human beta cardiac myosin using purified myosin motor assays and studies of permeabilized muscle fiber mechanics. We find that with purified human beta-cardiac myosin para-Nitroblebbistatin slows actin-activated ATPase and in vitro motility without altering the ADP release rate constant. In permeabilized human myocardium, para-Nitroblebbistatin reduces isometric force, power, and calcium sensitivity while not changing shortening velocity or the rate of force development (ktr). Therefore, designing a drug that reduces the myosin duty ratio by inhibiting strong attachment to actin while not changing detachment can cause a reduction in force without changing shortening velocity or relaxation. PMID:28119616

  20. Cross talk between cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts: from multiscale investigative approaches to mechanisms and functional consequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Su, J; Mende, U

    2012-12-15

    The heart is comprised of a syncytium of cardiac myocytes (CM) and surrounding nonmyocytes, the majority of which are cardiac fibroblasts (CF). CM and CF are highly interspersed in the myocardium with one CM being surrounded by one or more CF. Bidirectional cross talk between CM and CF plays important roles in determining cardiac mechanical and electrical function in both normal and diseased hearts. Genetically engineered animal models and in vitro studies have provided evidence that CM and CF can regulate each other's function. Their cross talk contributes to structural and electrical remodeling in both atria and ventricles and appears to be involved in the pathogenesis of various heart diseases that lead to heart failure and arrhythmia disorders. Mechanisms of CM-CF cross talk, which are not yet fully understood, include release of paracrine factors, direct cell-cell interactions via gap junctions and potentially adherens junctions and nanotubes, and cell interactions with the extracellular matrix. In this article, we provide an overview of the existing multiscale experimental and computational approaches for the investigation of cross talk between CM and CF and review recent progress in our understanding of the functional consequences and underlying mechanisms. Targeting cross talk between CM and CF could potentially be used therapeutically for the modulation of the cardiac remodeling response in the diseased heart and may lead to new strategies for the treatment of heart failure or rhythm disturbances.

  1. Heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation enhances cardiac function and longevity

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Zachary A.; Hsieh, Jo-Lin; Li, Andrew; Wang, William; Bhatt, Dhelni T.; Lee, Angela; Kim, Sae Yeon; Fan, David; Shah, Veevek; Siddiqui, Emaad; Ragam, Radhika; Park, Kristen; Ardeshna, Dev; Park, Kunwoo; Wu, Rachel; Parikh, Hardik; Parikh, Ayush; Lin, Yuh-Ru; Park, Yongkyu

    2015-01-01

    Downregulation of Rpd3, a homologue of mammalian Histone Deacetylase 1 (HDAC1), extends lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster. Once revealed that long-lived fruit flies exhibit limited cardiac decline, we investigated whether Rpd3 downregulation would improve stress resistance and/or lifespan when targeted in the heart. Contested against three different stressors (oxidation, starvation and heat), heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation significantly enhanced stress resistance in flies. However, these higher levels of resistance were not observed when Rpd3 downregulation was targeted in other tissues or when other long-lived flies were tested in the heart-specific manner. Interestingly, the expressions of anti-aging genes such as sod2, foxo and Thor, were systemically increased as a consequence of heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation. Showing higher resistance to oxidative stress, the heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation concurrently exhibited improved cardiac functions, demonstrating an increased heart rate, decreased heart failure and accelerated heart recovery. Conversely, Rpd3 upregulation in cardiac tissue reduced systemic resistance against heat stress with decreased heart function, also specifying phosphorylated Rpd3 levels as a significant modulator. Continual downregulation of Rpd3 throughout aging increased lifespan, implicating that Rpd3 deacetylase in the heart plays a significant role in cardiac function and longevity to systemically modulate the fly's response to the environment. PMID:26399365

  2. Embryonic stem cell-based cardiopatches improve cardiac function in infarcted rats.

    PubMed

    Vallée, Jean-Paul; Hauwel, Mathieu; Lepetit-Coiffé, Matthieu; Bei, Wang; Montet-Abou, Karin; Meda, Paolo; Gardier, Stephany; Zammaretti, Prisca; Kraehenbuehl, Thomas P; Herrmann, Francois; Hubbell, Jeffrey A; Jaconi, Marisa E

    2012-03-01

    Pluripotent stem cell-seeded cardiopatches hold promise for in situ regeneration of infarcted hearts. Here, we describe a novel cardiopatch based on bone morphogenetic protein 2-primed cardiac-committed mouse embryonic stem cells, embedded into biodegradable fibrin matrices and engrafted onto infarcted rat hearts. For in vivo tracking of the engrafted cardiac-committed cells, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were magnetofected into the cells, thus enabling detection and functional evaluation by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Six weeks after transplantation into infarcted rat hearts, both local (p < .04) and global (p < .015) heart function, as well as the left ventricular dilation (p < .0011), were significantly improved (p < .001) as compared with hearts receiving cardiopatches loaded with iron nanoparticles alone. Histological analysis revealed that the fibrin scaffolds had degraded over time and clusters of myocyte enhancer factor 2-positive cardiac-committed cells had colonized most of the infarcted myocardium, including the fibrotic area. De novo CD31-positive blood vessels were formed in the vicinity of the transplanted cardiopatch. Altogether, our data provide evidence that stem cell-based cardiopatches represent a promising therapeutic strategy to achieve efficient cell implantation and improved global and regional cardiac function after myocardial infarction.

  3. Update on the slow delayed rectifier potassium current (I(Ks)): role in modulating cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2012-01-01

    The slow delayed rectifier current (I(Ks)) is the slow component of cardiac delayed rectifier current and is critical for the late phase repolarization of cardiac action potential. This current is also an important target for Sympathetic Nervous System (SNS) to regulate the cardiac electivity to accommodate to heart rate alterations in response to exercise or emotional stress and can be up-regulated by β- adrenergic or other signal molecules. I(Ks) channel is originated by the co-assembly of pore-forming KCNQ1 α-subunit and accessory KCNE1 β-subunit. Mutations in any subunit can bring about severe long QT syndrome (LQT-1, LQT-5) as characterized by deliquium, seizures and sudden death. This review summarizes the normal physiological functions and molecular basis of I(Ks) channels, as well as illustrates up-to-date development on its blockers and activators. Therefore, the current extensive survey should generate fundamental understanding of the role of I(Ks) channel in modulating cardiac function and donate some instructions to the progression of I(Ks) blockers and activators as potential antiarrhythmic agents or pharmacological tools to determine the physiological and pathological function of I(Ks).

  4. High-Resolution MRI of Cardiac Function With Projection Reconstruction and Steady-State Free Precession

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Dana C.; Ennis, Daniel B.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the trabecular structure of the endocardial wall of the living human heart, and the effect of that structure on the measurement of myocardial function using MRI. High-resolution MR images (0.8 × 0.8 × 8 mm voxels) of cardiac function were obtained in five volunteers using a combination of undersampled projection reconstruction (PR) and steady-state free precession (SSFP) contrast in ECG-gated breath-held scans. These images provide movies of cardiac function with new levels of endocardial detail. The trabecular-papillary muscle complex, consisting of a mixture of blood and endocardial structures, is measured to constitute as much as 50% of the myocardial wall in some sectors. Myocardial wall strain measurements derived from tagged MR images show correlation between regions of trabeculae and papillary muscles and regions of high strain, leading to an overestimation of function in the lateral wall. PMID:12111934

  5. Accumulation of Mitochondrial DNA Mutations Disrupts Cardiac Progenitor Cell Function and Reduces Survival.

    PubMed

    Orogo, Amabel M; Gonzalez, Eileen R; Kubli, Dieter A; Baptista, Igor L; Ong, Sang-Bing; Prolla, Tomas A; Sussman, Mark A; Murphy, Anne N; Gustafsson, Åsa B

    2015-09-04

    Transfer of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) improves cardiac function in heart failure patients. However, CPC function is reduced with age, limiting their regenerative potential. Aging is associated with numerous changes in cells including accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations, but it is unknown how this impacts CPC function. Here, we demonstrate that acquisition of mtDNA mutations disrupts mitochondrial function, enhances mitophagy, and reduces the replicative and regenerative capacities of the CPCs. We show that activation of differentiation in CPCs is associated with expansion of the mitochondrial network and increased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Interestingly, mutant CPCs are deficient in mitochondrial respiration and rely on glycolysis for energy. In response to differentiation, these cells fail to activate mitochondrial respiration. This inability to meet the increased energy demand leads to activation of cell death. These findings demonstrate the consequences of accumulating mtDNA mutations and the importance of mtDNA integrity in CPC homeostasis and regenerative potential.

  6. RNA splicing regulated by RBFOX1 is essential for cardiac function in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Frese, Karen S; Meder, Benjamin; Keller, Andreas; Just, Steffen; Haas, Jan; Vogel, Britta; Fischer, Simon; Backes, Christina; Matzas, Mark; Köhler, Doreen; Benes, Vladimir; Katus, Hugo A; Rottbauer, Wolfgang

    2015-08-15

    Alternative splicing is one of the major mechanisms through which the proteomic and functional diversity of eukaryotes is achieved. However, the complex nature of the splicing machinery, its associated splicing regulators and the functional implications of alternatively spliced transcripts are only poorly understood. Here, we investigated the functional role of the splicing regulator rbfox1 in vivo using the zebrafish as a model system. We found that loss of rbfox1 led to progressive cardiac contractile dysfunction and heart failure. By using deep-transcriptome sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR, we show that depletion of rbfox1 in zebrafish results in an altered isoform expression of several crucial target genes, such as actn3a and hug. This study underlines that tightly regulated splicing is necessary for unconstrained cardiac function and renders the splicing regulator rbfox1 an interesting target for investigation in human heart failure and cardiomyopathy.

  7. Massive nitrogen loss in critical surgical illness: effect on cardiac mass and function.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, A A; Plank, L D; Finn, P J; Whalley, G A; Sharpe, N; Clark, M A; Hill, G L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors measured cardiac mass and function to determine whether these changed in patients who were critically ill who were losing large amounts of nitrogen from the body. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The large losses of body nitrogen that occur in patients with protein-energy malnutrition are associated with a loss of cardiac mass and function. It is not known if this also occurs in patients who were critically ill who are losing massive amounts of nitrogen. METHODS: Once hemodynamically stable, 13 patients who were critically ill underwent sequential measurements of left ventricular mass (LVM) and function, total body nitrogen (TBN), total body potassium, body weight, fat-free mass, and limb muscle mass. RESULTS: Over a 21-day study period, there was no change in LVM or function despite falls of 14% and 21% in TBN and total body potassium, respectively, a 21% fall in limb muscle mass, and a deterioration in skeletal muscle function by approximately 40%. CONCLUSIONS: In patients who were critically ill, cardiac mass does not decrease and function does not deteriorate after hemodynamic stability has been achieved despite massive losses of protein from the body. PMID:9296513

  8. Improved cardiac function and exercise capacity following correction of pectus excavatum: a review of current literature.

    PubMed

    Maagaard, Marie; Heiberg, Johan

    2016-09-01

    Patients with pectus excavatum (PE) often describe improvements in exercise stamina following corrective surgery. Studies have investigated the surgical effect on physiological parameters; still, no consensus has yet been reached. Therefore, the aim of this literature review was to describe the cardiac outcome after surgical correction, both at rest and during exercise. In February 2016, a detailed search of the databases PubMed, Medline, and EMBASE was performed. We assessed clinical studies that described cardiac outcomes both before and after surgical correction of PE. We only included studies reporting either pre-defined echocardiographic or exercise test parameters. No exclusion criteria or statistical analyses were applied. Twenty-one full-text articles, published between 1972 and 2016, were selected, with cohort-ranges of 3-168 patients, mean age-ranges of 5-33 years, and mean follow-up-ranges from immediately to 4 years after surgery. Twelve studies described resting cardiac parameters. Four studies measured cardiac output, where one described 36% immediate increase after surgery, one reported 15% increase after Nuss-bar removal and two found no difference. Three studies demonstrated improvement in mean stroke volume ranges of 22-34% and two studies found no difference. Fifteen studies investigated exercise capacity, with 11 considering peak O2 pr. kg, where five studies demonstrated improvements with the mean ranging from 8% to 15% after surgery, five studies demonstrated no difference, and one saw a decrease of 19% 3 months after Nuss-bar implantation. A measurable increase in exercise capacity exists following surgery, which may be caused by multiple factors. This may be owed to the relief of compressed cardiac chambers with the increased anterior-posterior thoracic dimensions, which could facilitate an improved filling of the heart. With these results, the positive physiological impact of the surgery is emphasized and the potential gain in cardiac

  9. Improved cardiac function and exercise capacity following correction of pectus excavatum: a review of current literature

    PubMed Central

    Heiberg, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Patients with pectus excavatum (PE) often describe improvements in exercise stamina following corrective surgery. Studies have investigated the surgical effect on physiological parameters; still, no consensus has yet been reached. Therefore, the aim of this literature review was to describe the cardiac outcome after surgical correction, both at rest and during exercise. In February 2016, a detailed search of the databases PubMed, Medline, and EMBASE was performed. We assessed clinical studies that described cardiac outcomes both before and after surgical correction of PE. We only included studies reporting either pre-defined echocardiographic or exercise test parameters. No exclusion criteria or statistical analyses were applied. Twenty-one full-text articles, published between 1972 and 2016, were selected, with cohort-ranges of 3–168 patients, mean age-ranges of 5–33 years, and mean follow-up-ranges from immediately to 4 years after surgery. Twelve studies described resting cardiac parameters. Four studies measured cardiac output, where one described 36% immediate increase after surgery, one reported 15% increase after Nuss-bar removal and two found no difference. Three studies demonstrated improvement in mean stroke volume ranges of 22–34% and two studies found no difference. Fifteen studies investigated exercise capacity, with 11 considering peak O2 pr. kg, where five studies demonstrated improvements with the mean ranging from 8% to 15% after surgery, five studies demonstrated no difference, and one saw a decrease of 19% 3 months after Nuss-bar implantation. A measurable increase in exercise capacity exists following surgery, which may be caused by multiple factors. This may be owed to the relief of compressed cardiac chambers with the increased anterior-posterior thoracic dimensions, which could facilitate an improved filling of the heart. With these results, the positive physiological impact of the surgery is emphasized and the potential gain in cardiac

  10. Functional and hemodynamic cardiac determinants of exercise capacity in patients with systolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Yoran M; Bugatti, Silvia; Damman, Kevin; Willemsen, Suzan; Hartog, Jasper W L; Metra, Marco; Sipkens, Johannes S; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Voors, Adriaan A

    2012-11-01

    Decreased exercise capacity is the main symptom in patients with heart failure (HF). We assessed the association among noninvasively determined maximal cardiac output at exercise, systolic and diastolic cardiac functions at rest, and peak oxygen uptake (pVo(2)) exercise capacity in patients with congestive HF. We studied 102 patients 62 ± 11 years of age with New York Heart Association class II to IV stable HF and left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction <45%. All patients underwent echocardiography and a treadmill cardiopulmonary exercise test for evaluation of pVo(2) corrected for fat-free mass. During the cardiopulmonary exercise test, cardiac output was estimated noninvasively and continuously using Nexfin HD. Fat-free mass-corrected pVo(2) was associated in an univariate linear regression analysis with peak exercise cardiac index (CI) (beta 0.511, p <0.001), LV end-diastolic pressure estimates (peak early diastolic filling velocity/early diastolic tissue velocity [E/e'], beta -0.363, p = 0.001), and right ventricular function (tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion, beta 0.393, p <0.001). In multivariate analysis peak exercise CI (beta 0.380, p = 0.001), but not cardiac output or LV ejection fraction at rest, was an independent predictor of pVo(2). Other independent predictors of pVo(2) were E/e' (beta -0.276, p = 0.009) and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (beta 0.392, p <0.001), also when adjusted for age and gender. In conclusion, peak CI is an independent predictor of fat-free mass-corrected pVo(2) in patients with systolic HF. Of all echocardiographic parameters at rest, right ventricular function and E/e' were independently and significantly associated with pVo(2), whereas LV ejection fraction at rest was not.

  11. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Patients with Preserved Left Ventricular Systolic Function: A Clinical Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Navinder; Narayan, Sanjiv M.

    2009-01-01

    Stratifying the risk for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in individuals with preserved systolic function remains a pressing public health problem. Current guidelines for the implantation of cardiac defibrillators largely ignore patients with preserved systolic function, even though they account for the majority of cases. However, risk stratification for such individuals is increasingly feasible. Notably, most individuals who experience SCA have structural heart disease, even if undiagnosed. Thus, clinical risk scores have been developed to identify high risk. Moreover, there are now promising data that T-Wave Alternans (TWA), alone and in combination with other indices, effectively predicts SCA in this population. This article presents our current understanding of SCA due to ventricular arrhythmias in patients with preserved LV systolic function, and attempts to build a framework to predict risk in this population. PMID:19251226

  12. Effect of hypokinesia on contractile function of cardiac muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyerson, F. Z.; Kapelko, V. I.; Trikhpoyeva, A. M.; Gorina, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    Rats were subjected to hypokinesia for two months and the contractile function of isolated papillary muscle was studied. Hypokinesia reduced significantly the isotonic contraction rate which depended on the ATPase activity of the myofibrils; it also reduced the rate and index of relaxation which depended on the functional capacity of the Ca(++) pump of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The maximum force of isometric contraction determined by the quantity of actomyosin bridges in the myofibrils did not change after hypokinesia. This complex of changes is contrary to that observed in adaptation to exercise when the rate of isotonic contraction and relaxation increases while the force of isometric contraction does not change. The possible mechanism of this stability of the contractile force during adaptation and readaptation of the heart is discussed.

  13. Automatic functional analysis of left ventricle in cardiac cine MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ying-Li; Connelly, Kim A.; Dick, Alexander J.; Wright, Graham A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale and objectives A fully automated left ventricle segmentation method for the functional analysis of cine short axis (SAX) magnetic resonance (MR) images was developed, and its performance evaluated with 133 studies of subjects with diverse pathology: ischemic heart failure (n=34), non-ischemic heart failure (n=30), hypertrophy (n=32), and healthy (n=37). Materials and methods The proposed automatic method locates the left ventricle (LV), then for each image detects the contours of the endocardium, epicardium, papillary muscles and trabeculations. Manually and automatically determined contours and functional parameters were compared quantitatively. Results There was no significant difference between automatically and manually determined end systolic volume (ESV), end diastolic volume (EDV), ejection fraction (EF) and left ventricular mass (LVM) for each of the four groups (paired sample t-test, α=0.05). The automatically determined functional parameters showed high correlations with those derived from manual contours, and the Bland-Altman analysis biases were small (1.51 mL, 1.69 mL, –0.02%, –0.66 g for ESV, EDV, EF and LVM, respectively). Conclusions The proposed technique automatically and rapidly detects endocardial, epicardial, papillary muscles’ and trabeculations’ contours providing accurate and reproducible quantitative MRI parameters, including LV mass and EF. PMID:24040616

  14. Subclinical Cardiac Abnormalities and Kidney Function Decline: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shlipak, Michael G.; Katz, Ronit; Agarwal, Subhashish; Ix, Joachim H.; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Peralta, Carmen A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Clinical heart failure (HF) is associated with CKD and faster rates of kidney function decline. Whether subclinical abnormalities of cardiac structure are associated with faster kidney function decline is not known. The association between cardiac concentricity and kidney function decline was evaluated. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This is a longitudinal study of 3866 individuals from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (2000–2007) who were free of clinical cardiovascular disease, with an estimated GFR (eGFR) ≥60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 at baseline and 5 years of follow-up. Concentricity, a measurement of abnormal cardiac size, was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and evaluated as a continuous measurement and in quartiles. GFR was estimated by creatinine (eGFRcr) and cystatin C (eGFRcys). The association of concentricity with annual eGFR decline, incident CKD, and rapid kidney function decline (>5% per year) was investigated using linear mixed models as well as Poisson and logistic regression, respectively. Analyses adjusted for demographics, BP, diabetes, and inflammatory markers. Results Median decline was −0.8 (interquartile range, −3.1, −0.5) by eGFRcr. Compared with the lowest quartile of concentricity, persons in the highest quartile had an additional 21% (9%–32%) decline in mean eGFRcr in fully adjusted models. Concentricity was also associated with incident CKD and with rapid kidney function decline after adjustment. Conclusions Subclinical abnormalities in cardiac structure are associated with longitudinal kidney function decline independent of diabetes and hypertension. Future studies should examine mechanisms to explain these associations. PMID:22580783

  15. The Modulation of Cardiac Contractile Function by the Pharmacological and Toxicological Effects of Urocortin2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Si; Wang, Zhenhua; Xu, Bo; Mi, Xiangquan; Sun, Wanqing; Quan, Nanhu; Wang, Lin; Chen, Xingchi; Liu, Quan; Zheng, Yang; Leng, Jiyan; Li, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Urocortin2 (Ucn2) has been revealed to enhance cardiac function in heart failure. However, the pharmacological and toxicological effects of Ucn2 on cardiomyocytes are incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the possible mechanisms of Ucn2 on mediating the contractility of cardiomyocytes. Mechanical properties and intracellular Ca2+ properties were measured in isolated cardiomyocytes from different treatment groups. The stress signaling was evaluated using Western blot. The results demonstrated that Ucn2 induced maximal velocity of shortening (+dL/dt), peak height, peak shortening (PS) amplitude, maximal velocity of relengthening (−dL/dt), accompanied by a significant rise in intracellular Ca2+ level and a fall of the mean time constant of Ca2+ transient decay (Tau) in WT cardiomyocytes. However, these effects were abolished by preincubation of type 2 CRF receptors (CRFR2) antagonist anti-sauvagine 30 (a-SVG-30). We also found that Ucn2 treatment activated the AMPK pathway in isolated cardiomyocytes via CRFR2. Furthermore, Ucn2 induced protein kinase A (PKA) and phospholamban (PLN) phosphorylation. Pretreatment of PKA inhibitor H89 reduced the inotropic and lusitropic effects of Ucn2 as well as decreased the intracellular Ca2+ load and slowed down the Ca2+ transient decay. We also showed that preincubation of Compound C, an inhibitor of AMPK, inhibited the phosphorylation of PKA and the intracellular Ca2+ level in cardiomyocytes without affecting the contractile function and the Tau of cardiomyocytes. Taken together, it suggests that Ucn2 facilitate the contractility of cardiomyocytes via activating both AMPK and PKA. PMID:26342213

  16. Benefit Finding in Cardiac Patients: Relationships with Emotional Well-Being and Resources after Controlling for Physical Functional Impairment.

    PubMed

    Sanjuán, Pilar; García-Zamora, Cristina; Ruiz, M Ángeles; Rueda, Beatriz; Arranz, Henar; Castro, Almudena

    2016-09-19

    Benefit finding (BF) is defined as the individual's perception of positive change as a result of coping with an adverse life event. The beneficial effects of BF on well-being could be because BF favors the improvement of resources like self-efficacy, social support and effective coping. The main objective of this longitudinal 8 week study was to explore, in a sample of cardiac patients (n = 51), the combined contribution of BF and these resources to the positive affect. Moreover, we wanted to check whether these resources were derived from BF or, on the contrary, these resources were antecedents of BF. Results showed that after controlling for functional capacity, only effective coping could predict the positive affect at Time 1 (β = .32, p < .05), while the BF predicted it at Time 2 (β = .23, p < .001). Only social support predicted BF (β = .26, p < .05), but not the opposite. We discussed the desirability of promoting these processes to improve the emotional state of cardiac patients.

  17. Standardized echocardiographic assessment of cardiac function in normal adult zebrafish and heart disease models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Louis W; Huttner, Inken G; Santiago, Celine F; Kesteven, Scott H; Yu, Ze-Yan; Feneley, Michael P; Fatkin, Diane

    2017-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an increasingly popular model organism in cardiovascular research. Major insights into cardiac developmental processes have been gained by studies of embryonic zebrafish. However, the utility of zebrafish for modeling adult-onset heart disease has been limited by a lack of robust methods for in vivo evaluation of cardiac function. We established a physiological protocol for underwater zebrafish echocardiography using high frequency ultrasound, and evaluated its reliability in detecting altered cardiac function in two disease models. Serial assessment of cardiac function was performed in wild-type zebrafish aged 3 to 12 months and the effects of anesthetic agents, age, sex and background strain were evaluated. There was a varying extent of bradycardia and ventricular contractile impairment with different anesthetic drugs and doses, with tricaine 0.75 mmol l(-1) having a relatively more favorable profile. When compared with males, female fish were larger and had more measurement variability. Although age-related increments in ventricular chamber size were greater in females than males, there were no sex differences when data were normalized to body size. Systolic ventricular function was similar in both sexes at all time points, but differences in diastolic function were evident from 6 months onwards. Wild-type fish of both sexes showed a reliance on atrial contraction for ventricular diastolic filling. Echocardiographic evaluation of adult zebrafish with diphtheria toxin-induced myocarditis or anemia-induced volume overload accurately identified ventricular dilation and altered contraction, with suites of B-mode, ventricular strain, pulsed-wave Doppler and tissue Doppler indices showing concordant changes indicative of myocardial hypocontractility or hypercontractility, respectively. Repeatability, intra-observer and inter-observer correlations for echocardiographic measurements were high. We demonstrate that high frequency

  18. Standardized echocardiographic assessment of cardiac function in normal adult zebrafish and heart disease models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Louis W.; Huttner, Inken G.; Santiago, Celine F.; Kesteven, Scott H.; Yu, Ze-Yan; Feneley, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an increasingly popular model organism in cardiovascular research. Major insights into cardiac developmental processes have been gained by studies of embryonic zebrafish. However, the utility of zebrafish for modeling adult-onset heart disease has been limited by a lack of robust methods for in vivo evaluation of cardiac function. We established a physiological protocol for underwater zebrafish echocardiography using high frequency ultrasound, and evaluated its reliability in detecting altered cardiac function in two disease models. Serial assessment of cardiac function was performed in wild-type zebrafish aged 3 to 12 months and the effects of anesthetic agents, age, sex and background strain were evaluated. There was a varying extent of bradycardia and ventricular contractile impairment with different anesthetic drugs and doses, with tricaine 0.75 mmol l−1 having a relatively more favorable profile. When compared with males, female fish were larger and had more measurement variability. Although age-related increments in ventricular chamber size were greater in females than males, there were no sex differences when data were normalized to body size. Systolic ventricular function was similar in both sexes at all time points, but differences in diastolic function were evident from 6 months onwards. Wild-type fish of both sexes showed a reliance on atrial contraction for ventricular diastolic filling. Echocardiographic evaluation of adult zebrafish with diphtheria toxin-induced myocarditis or anemia-induced volume overload accurately identified ventricular dilation and altered contraction, with suites of B-mode, ventricular strain, pulsed-wave Doppler and tissue Doppler indices showing concordant changes indicative of myocardial hypocontractility or hypercontractility, respectively. Repeatability, intra-observer and inter-observer correlations for echocardiographic measurements were high. We demonstrate that high

  19. Beating heart on a chip: a novel microfluidic platform to generate functional 3D cardiac microtissues.

    PubMed

    Marsano, Anna; Conficconi, Chiara; Lemme, Marta; Occhetta, Paola; Gaudiello, Emanuele; Votta, Emiliano; Cerino, Giulia; Redaelli, Alberto; Rasponi, Marco

    2016-02-07

    In the past few years, microfluidic-based technology has developed microscale models recapitulating key physical and biological cues typical of the native myocardium. However, the application of controlled physiological uniaxial cyclic strains on a defined three-dimension cellular environment is not yet possible. Two-dimension mechanical stimulation was particularly investigated, neglecting the complex three-dimensional cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. For this purpose, we developed a heart-on-a-chip platform, which recapitulates the physiologic mechanical environment experienced by cells in the native myocardium. The device includes an array of hanging posts to confine cell-laden gels, and a pneumatic actuation system to induce homogeneous uniaxial cyclic strains to the 3D cell constructs during culture. The device was used to generate mature and highly functional micro-engineered cardiac tissues (μECTs), from both neonatal rat and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM), strongly suggesting the robustness of our engineered cardiac micro-niche. Our results demonstrated that the cyclic strain was effectively highly uniaxial and uniformly transferred to cells in culture. As compared to control, stimulated μECTs showed superior cardiac differentiation, as well as electrical and mechanical coupling, owing to a remarkable increase in junction complexes. Mechanical stimulation also promoted early spontaneous synchronous beating and better contractile capability in response to electric pacing. Pacing analyses of hiPSC-CM constructs upon controlled administration of isoprenaline showed further promising applications of our platform in drug discovery, delivery and toxicology fields. The proposed heart-on-a-chip device represents a relevant step forward in the field, providing a standard functional three-dimensional cardiac model to possibly predict signs of hypertrophic changes in cardiac phenotype by mechanical and biochemical co-stimulation.

  20. Effect of monomeric adiponectin on cardiac function and perfusion in anesthetized pig.

    PubMed

    Grossini, Elena; Prodam, Flavia; Walker, Gillian Elisabeth; Sigaudo, Lorenzo; Farruggio, Serena; Bellofatto, Kevin; Marotta, Patrizia; Molinari, Claudio; Mary, David; Bona, Gianni; Vacca, Giovanni

    2014-07-01

    Adiponectin, the most abundant adipokine released by adipose tissue, appears to play an important role in the regulation of vascular endothelial and cardiac function. To date, however, the physiological effects of human monomeric adiponectin on the coronary vasculature and myocardial systo-diastolic function, as well as on parasympathetic/sympathetic involvement and nitric oxide (NO) release, have not yet been investigated. Thus, we planned to determine the primary in vivo effects of human monomeric adiponectin on coronary blood flow and cardiac contractility/relaxation and the related role of autonomic nervous system, adiponectin receptors, and NO. In 30 anesthetized pigs, human monomeric adiponectin was infused into the left anterior descending coronary artery at constant heart rate and arterial blood pressure, and the effects on coronary blood flow, left ventricular systo-diastolic function, myocardial oxygen metabolism, and NO release were examined. The mechanisms of the observed hemodynamic responses were also analyzed by repeating the highest dose of human monomeric adiponectin infusion after autonomic nervous system and NO blockade, and after specific adiponectin 1 receptor antagonist administration. Intracoronary human monomeric adiponectin caused dose-related increases of coronary blood flow and cardiac function. Those effects were accompanied by increased coronary NO release and coronary adiponectin levels. Moreover, the vascular effects of the peptide were prevented by blockade of β2-adrenoceptors and NO synthase, whereas all effects of human monomeric adiponectin were prevented by adiponectin 1 receptor inhibitor. In conclusion, human monomeric adiponectin primarily increased coronary blood flow and cardiac systo-diastolic function through the involvement of specific receptors, β2-adrenoceptors, and NO release.

  1. Motion corrected LV quantification based on 3D modelling for improved functional assessment in cardiac MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Y. M.; McLaughlin, R. A.; Chan, B. T.; Aziz, Y. F. Abdul; Chee, K. H.; Ung, N. M.; Tan, L. K.; Lai, K. W.; Ng, S.; Lim, E.

    2015-04-01

    Cine MRI is a clinical reference standard for the quantitative assessment of cardiac function, but reproducibility is confounded by motion artefacts. We explore the feasibility of a motion corrected 3D left ventricle (LV) quantification method, incorporating multislice image registration into the 3D model reconstruction, to improve reproducibility of 3D LV functional quantification. Multi-breath-hold short-axis and radial long-axis images were acquired from 10 patients and 10 healthy subjects. The proposed framework reduced misalignment between slices to subpixel accuracy (2.88 to 1.21 mm), and improved interstudy reproducibility for 5 important clinical functional measures, i.e. end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, ejection fraction, myocardial mass and 3D-sphericity index, as reflected in a reduction in the sample size required to detect statistically significant cardiac changes: a reduction of 21-66%. Our investigation on the optimum registration parameters, including both cardiac time frames and number of long-axis (LA) slices, suggested that a single time frame is adequate for motion correction whereas integrating more LA slices can improve registration and model reconstruction accuracy for improved functional quantification especially on datasets with severe motion artefacts.

  2. Systems analysis of the mechanisms of cardiac diastolic function changes after microgravity exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Richard; Coleman, Thomas; Steven, Platts; Martin, David

    Detailed information concerning cardiac function was collected by two-dimensional and M-mode echocardiography at 10 days before flight and 3h after landing in astronauts returning from shuttle missions. A comparative analysis of this data suggests that cardiac diastolic function is reduced after microgravity exposure with little or no change in systolic function as measured by ejection fraction However, the mechanisms responsible for these adaptations have not been determined. In this study, an integrative computer model of human physiology that forms the framework for the Digital Astronaut Project (Guyton/Coleman/Summers Model) was used in a systems analysis of the echocardiographic data in the context of general cardiovascular physiologic functioning. The physiologic mechanisms involved in the observed changes were then determined by a dissection of model interrelationships. The systems analysis of possible physiologic mechanisms involved reveals that a loss of fluid from the myocardial interstitial space may lead to a stiffening of the myocardium and could potentially result in some of the cardiac diastolic dysfunction seen postflight. The cardiovascular dynamics may be different during spaceflight.

  3. c-Myc alters substrate utilization and O-GlcNAc protein posttranslational modifications without altering cardiac function during early aortic constriction

    SciTech Connect

    Ledee, Dolena; Smith, Lincoln; Bruce, Margaret; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A.; Olson, Aaron K.; Bertrand, Luc

    2015-08-12

    Pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy alters substrate metabolism. Prior work showed that myocardial inactivation of c-Myc (Myc) attenuated hypertrophy and decreased expression of metabolic genes after aortic constriction. Accordingly, we hypothesize that Myc regulates substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during pressure overload hypertrophy from transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and that these metabolic changes impact cardiac function and growth. To test this hypothesis, we subjected mice with cardiac specific, inducible Myc inactivation (MycKO-TAC) and non-transgenic littermates (Cont-TAC) to transverse aortic constriction (TAC; n=7/group). A separate group underwent sham surgery (Sham, n=5). After two weeks, function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate with 13C labeled mixed fatty acids, lactate, ketone bodies and unlabeled glucose and insulin. Cardiac function was similar between groups after TAC although +dP/dT and -dP/dT trended towards improvement in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC. Compared to Sham, Cont-TAC had increased free fatty acid fractional contribution with a concurrent decrease in unlabeled (predominately glucose) contribution. The changes in free fatty acid and unlabeled fractional contributions were abrogated by Myc inactivation during TAC (MycKO-TAC). Additionally, protein posttranslational modification by O-GlcNAc was significantly greater in Cont-TAC versus both Sham and MycKO-TAC. Lastly, Myc alters substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during early pressure overload hypertrophy without negatively affecting cardiac function. Myc also affects protein posttranslational modifications by O-GlcNAc during hypertrophy.

  4. c-Myc alters substrate utilization and O-GlcNAc protein posttranslational modifications without altering cardiac function during early aortic constriction

    DOE PAGES

    Ledee, Dolena; Smith, Lincoln; Bruce, Margaret; ...

    2015-08-12

    Pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy alters substrate metabolism. Prior work showed that myocardial inactivation of c-Myc (Myc) attenuated hypertrophy and decreased expression of metabolic genes after aortic constriction. Accordingly, we hypothesize that Myc regulates substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during pressure overload hypertrophy from transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and that these metabolic changes impact cardiac function and growth. To test this hypothesis, we subjected mice with cardiac specific, inducible Myc inactivation (MycKO-TAC) and non-transgenic littermates (Cont-TAC) to transverse aortic constriction (TAC; n=7/group). A separate group underwent sham surgery (Sham, n=5). After two weeks, function was measured in isolated workingmore » hearts along with substrate fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate with 13C labeled mixed fatty acids, lactate, ketone bodies and unlabeled glucose and insulin. Cardiac function was similar between groups after TAC although +dP/dT and -dP/dT trended towards improvement in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC. Compared to Sham, Cont-TAC had increased free fatty acid fractional contribution with a concurrent decrease in unlabeled (predominately glucose) contribution. The changes in free fatty acid and unlabeled fractional contributions were abrogated by Myc inactivation during TAC (MycKO-TAC). Additionally, protein posttranslational modification by O-GlcNAc was significantly greater in Cont-TAC versus both Sham and MycKO-TAC. Lastly, Myc alters substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during early pressure overload hypertrophy without negatively affecting cardiac function. Myc also affects protein posttranslational modifications by O-GlcNAc during hypertrophy.« less

  5. Integrative computed tomographic imaging of cardiac structure, function, perfusion, and viability.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Christian; Hanley, Michael; Bastarrika, Gorka; Ruzsics, Balazs; Schoepf, U Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) technology have created new opportunities in cardiac imaging and provided new insights into a variety of disease states. Use of 64-slice coronary computed tomography angiography has been validated for the evaluation of clinically relevant coronary artery stenosis with high negative predictive values for ruling out significant obstructive disease. This technology has also advanced the care of patients with acute chest pain by simultaneous assessment of acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary embolism, and acute aortic syndrome ("triple rule out"). Although MDCT has been instrumental in the advancement of cardiac imaging, there are still limitations in patients with high or irregular heart rates. Newer MDCT scanner generations hold promise to improve some of these limitations for noninvasive cardiac imaging. The evaluation of coronary artery stenosis remains the primary clinical indication for cardiac computed tomography angiography. However, the use of MDCT for simultaneous assessment of coronary artery stenosis, atherosclerotic plaque formation, ventricular function, myocardial perfusion, and viability with a single modality is under intense investigation. Recent technical developments hold promise for accomplishing this goal and establishing MDCT as a comprehensive stand-alone test for integrative imaging of coronary heart disease.

  6. Effects of active chronic cocaine use on cardiac sympathetic neuronal function assessed by carbon-11-hydroxyephedrine

    SciTech Connect

    Melon, P.G.; Boyd, C.J.; McVey, S. |

    1997-03-01

    Cardiac toxicity of cocaine has been linked to its inhibitory effect on norepinephrine reuptake by sympathetic nerve terminals of the heart. Carbon-11-hydroxyephedrine is a positron-emitting tracer that has been validated as a highly specific marker for norepinephrine transporter activity of the sympathetic nerve terminals and thus makes possible in vivo assessment of the effect of cocaine on norepinephrine reuptake and storage in the cardiac sympathetic nerve terminals. The aim of the study was to use the catecholamine analog {sup 11}C-hydroxyephedrine with PET to determine whether active chronic use of cocaine in women modifies the function of sympathetic nerve terminals of the heart. Six normal female volunteers and nine female active chronic cocaine users were studied. Cardiac regional {sup 11}C-hydroxyephedrine uptake and blood flow, as assessed with {sup 13}N-ammonia, were determined using semi-quantitative polar map analysis of myocardial tracer distribution. Carbon-11-hydroxyephedrine cardiac retention was quantified using dynamic data acquisition and kinetic analysis of blood and tissue activity. 27 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL BASES OF CARDIAC FIBRILLATION. DIFFERENCES AND SIMILARITIES BETWEEN ATRIA AND VENTRICLES

    PubMed Central

    Filgueiras-Rama, David; Jalife, José

    2016-01-01

    Evidence accumulated over the last 25 years suggests that, whether in the atria or ventricles, fibrillation may be explained by the self-organization of the cardiac electrical activity into rapidly spinning rotors giving way to spiral waves that break intermittently and result in fibrillatory conduction. The dynamics and frequency of such rotors depend on the ion channel composition, excitability and refractory properties of the tissues involved, as well as on the thickness and respective three-dimensional fiber structure of the atrial and ventricular chambers. Therefore, improving the understanding of fibrillation has required the use of multidisciplinary research approaches, including optical mapping, patch clamping and molecular biology, and the application of concepts derived from the theory of wave propagation in excitable media. Moreover, translation of such concepts to the clinic has recently opened new opportunities to apply novel mechanistic approaches to therapy, particularly during atrial fibrillation ablation. Here we review the current understanding of the manner in which the underlying myocardial structure and function influence rotor initiation and maintenance during cardiac fibrillation. We also examine relevant underlying differences and similarities between atrial fibrillation and ventricular fibrillation and evaluate the latest clinical mapping technologies used to identify rotors in either arrhythmia. Altogether, the data being discussed have significantly improved our understanding of the cellular and structural bases of cardiac fibrillation and pointed toward potentially exciting new avenues for more efficient and effective identification and therapy of the most complex cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:27042693

  8. STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL BASES OF CARDIAC FIBRILLATION. DIFFERENCES AND SIMILARITIES BETWEEN ATRIA AND VENTRICLES.

    PubMed

    Filgueiras-Rama, David; Jalife, José

    2016-02-01

    Evidence accumulated over the last 25 years suggests that, whether in the atria or ventricles, fibrillation may be explained by the self-organization of the cardiac electrical activity into rapidly spinning rotors giving way to spiral waves that break intermittently and result in fibrillatory conduction. The dynamics and frequency of such rotors depend on the ion channel composition, excitability and refractory properties of the tissues involved, as well as on the thickness and respective three-dimensional fiber structure of the atrial and ventricular chambers. Therefore, improving the understanding of fibrillation has required the use of multidisciplinary research approaches, including optical mapping, patch clamping and molecular biology, and the application of concepts derived from the theory of wave propagation in excitable media. Moreover, translation of such concepts to the clinic has recently opened new opportunities to apply novel mechanistic approaches to therapy, particularly during atrial fibrillation ablation. Here we review the current understanding of the manner in which the underlying myocardial structure and function influence rotor initiation and maintenance during cardiac fibrillation. We also examine relevant underlying differences and similarities between atrial fibrillation and ventricular fibrillation and evaluate the latest clinical mapping technologies used to identify rotors in either arrhythmia. Altogether, the data being discussed have significantly improved our understanding of the cellular and structural bases of cardiac fibrillation and pointed toward potentially exciting new avenues for more efficient and effective identification and therapy of the most complex cardiac arrhythmias.

  9. Effects of cardiotrophin-1 on haemodynamics and cardiac function in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Jin, H; Yang, R; Ko, A; Pennica, D; Wood, W I; Paoni, N F

    1998-01-01

    Cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1), a newly discovered cytokine, has been shown to induce cardiac hypertrophy in vitro and in vivo. The present study examined the effects of CT-1 on haemodynamics and cardiac function. The measurements of haemodynamic parameters were made using in-dwelling catheters and flow probes in conscious, unrestrained rats. Intravenous administration of CT-1 caused a dose-dependent decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP), and an increase in heart rate (HR). CT-1 (100 micrograms/kg) significantly elevated cardiac output and HR, and decreased MAP and systemic vascular resistance. Stroke volume was unaltered, suggesting that the CT-1 induced increase in cardiac output was secondary to increased HR. There was no significant difference in left ventricular maximal dP/dt between the CT-1-treated and vehicle-treated groups, suggesting that CT-1 might not induce a meaningful change in ventricular contractility. Pretreatment with intravenous N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a specific inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, significantly attenuated the depressor and tachycardic responses to CT-1. These results indicate that nitric oxide plays an important role in mediating the haemodynamic effects of CT-1.

  10. Mechanography: a non-invasive technique for the evaluation of cardiac function in children

    PubMed Central

    Spitaels, Silja; Fouron, Jean-Claude; Davignon, André

    1972-01-01

    Experience in the pediatric age group with mechanography, an indirect method of cardiovascular investigation, is described with emphasis on the recording technique and on the analysis of the tracings. A few examples are presented with comments on the morphological aspects and the time characteristics of the pulse curves, showing how much information about cardiac disease and especially myocardial function in children may be obtained. PMID:4640813

  11. Cardiac mitochondrial biogenesis in endotoxemia is not accompanied by mitochondrial function recovery.

    PubMed

    Vanasco, Virginia; Saez, Trinidad; Magnani, Natalia D; Pereyra, Leonardo; Marchini, Timoteo; Corach, Alejandra; Vaccaro, María Inés; Corach, Daniel; Evelson, Pablo; Alvarez, Silvia

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis emerges as a compensatory mechanism involved in the recovery process in endotoxemia and sepsis. The aim of this work was to analyze the time course of the cardiac mitochondrial biogenesis process occurring during endotoxemia, with emphasis on the quantitative analysis of mitochondrial function. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (45 days old) were ip injected with LPS (10 mg/kg). Measurements were performed at 0-24 h after LPS administration. PGC-1α and mtTFA expression for biogenesis and p62 and LC3 expression for autophagy were analyzed by Western blot; mitochondrial DNA levels by qPCR, and mitochondrial morphology by transmission electron microscopy. Mitochondrial function was evaluated as oxygen consumption and respiratory chain complex activity. PGC-1α and mtTFA expression significantly increased in every time point analyzed, and mitochondrial mass was increased by 20% (P<0.05) at 24 h. p62 expression was significantly decreased in a time-dependent manner. LC3-II expression was significantly increased at all time points analyzed. Ultrastructurally, mitochondria displayed several abnormalities (internal vesicles, cristae disruption, and swelling) at 6 and 18 h. Structures compatible with fusion/fission processes were observed at 24 h. A significant decrease in state 3 respiration was observed in every time point analyzed (LPS 6h: 20%, P<0.05). Mitochondrial complex I activity was found decreased by 30% in LPS-treated animals at 6 and 24h. Complex II and complex IV showed decreased activity only at 24 h. The present results show that partial restoration of cardiac mitochondrial architecture is not accompanied by improvement of mitochondrial function in acute endotoxemia. The key implication of our study is that cardiac failure due to bioenergetic dysfunction will be overcome by therapeutic interventions aimed to restore cardiac mitochondrial function.

  12. Pravastatin ameliorates placental vascular defects, fetal growth, and cardiac function in a model of glucocorticoid excess.

    PubMed

    Wyrwoll, Caitlin S; Noble, June; Thomson, Adrian; Tesic, Dijana; Miller, Mark R; Rog-Zielinska, Eva A; Moran, Carmel M; Seckl, Jonathan R; Chapman, Karen E; Holmes, Megan C

    2016-05-31

    Fetoplacental glucocorticoid overexposure is a significant mechanism underlying fetal growth restriction and the programming of adverse health outcomes in the adult. Placental glucocorticoid inactivation by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2) plays a key role. We previously discovered that Hsd11b2(-/-) mice, lacking 11β-HSD2, show marked underdevelopment of the placental vasculature. We now explore the consequences for fetal cardiovascular development and whether this is reversible. We studied Hsd11b2(+/+), Hsd11b2(+/-), and Hsd11b2(-/-) littermates from heterozygous (Hsd11b(+/-)) matings at embryonic day (E)14.5 and E17.5, where all three genotypes were present to control for maternal effects. Using high-resolution ultrasound, we found that umbilical vein blood velocity in Hsd11b2(-/-) fetuses did not undergo the normal gestational increase seen in Hsd11b2(+/+) littermates. Similarly, the resistance index in the umbilical artery did not show the normal gestational decline. Surprisingly, given that 11β-HSD2 absence is predicted to initiate early maturation, the E/A wave ratio was reduced at E17.5 in Hsd11b2(-/-) fetuses, suggesting impaired cardiac function. Pravastatin administration from E6.5, which increases placental vascular endothelial growth factor A and, thus, vascularization, increased placental fetal capillary volume, ameliorated the aberrant umbilical cord velocity, normalized fetal weight, and improved the cardiac function of Hsd11b2(-/-) fetuses. This improved cardiac function occurred despite persisting indications of increased glucocorticoid exposure in the Hsd11b2(-/-) fetal heart. Thus, the pravastatin-induced enhancement of fetal capillaries within the placenta and the resultant hemodynamic changes correspond with restored fetal cardiac function. Statins may represent a useful therapeutic approach to intrauterine growth retardation due to placental vascular hypofunction.

  13. Pravastatin ameliorates placental vascular defects, fetal growth, and cardiac function in a model of glucocorticoid excess

    PubMed Central

    Wyrwoll, Caitlin S.; Noble, June; Thomson, Adrian; Tesic, Dijana; Miller, Mark R.; Rog-Zielinska, Eva A.; Moran, Carmel M.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Chapman, Karen E.; Holmes, Megan C.

    2016-01-01

    Fetoplacental glucocorticoid overexposure is a significant mechanism underlying fetal growth restriction and the programming of adverse health outcomes in the adult. Placental glucocorticoid inactivation by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2) plays a key role. We previously discovered that Hsd11b2−/− mice, lacking 11β-HSD2, show marked underdevelopment of the placental vasculature. We now explore the consequences for fetal cardiovascular development and whether this is reversible. We studied Hsd11b2+/+, Hsd11b2+/−, and Hsd11b2−/− littermates from heterozygous (Hsd11b+/−) matings at embryonic day (E)14.5 and E17.5, where all three genotypes were present to control for maternal effects. Using high-resolution ultrasound, we found that umbilical vein blood velocity in Hsd11b2−/− fetuses did not undergo the normal gestational increase seen in Hsd11b2+/+ littermates. Similarly, the resistance index in the umbilical artery did not show the normal gestational decline. Surprisingly, given that 11β-HSD2 absence is predicted to initiate early maturation, the E/A wave ratio was reduced at E17.5 in Hsd11b2−/− fetuses, suggesting impaired cardiac function. Pravastatin administration from E6.5, which increases placental vascular endothelial growth factor A and, thus, vascularization, increased placental fetal capillary volume, ameliorated the aberrant umbilical cord velocity, normalized fetal weight, and improved the cardiac function of Hsd11b2−/− fetuses. This improved cardiac function occurred despite persisting indications of increased glucocorticoid exposure in the Hsd11b2−/− fetal heart. Thus, the pravastatin-induced enhancement of fetal capillaries within the placenta and the resultant hemodynamic changes correspond with restored fetal cardiac function. Statins may represent a useful therapeutic approach to intrauterine growth retardation due to placental vascular hypofunction. PMID:27185937

  14. Alkaline Phosphatase: A Biomarker of Cardiac Function in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Makil, Elizabeth S; Tang, Xinyu; Frazier, Elizabeth A; Collins, R Thomas

    2017-02-09

    Myocardial dysfunction and heart failure are common in pediatric patients with congenital and acquired heart disease. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) has been suggested as a biomarker for myocardial dysfunction after Fontan operation. We hypothesized that pediatric patients with myocardial dysfunction requiring orthotopic heart transplant (OHT) have diminished AP compared to normal. A retrospective review was performed in all patients who underwent OHT at Arkansas Children's Hospital between January 2007 and October 2012. Anatomic diagnoses, therapeutic interventions, and ventricular ejection fraction (EF) were recorded. Z scores for AP levels in the study group were determined by comparing the observed AP levels to age- and gender-matched normative values. T tests were performed to compare the mean AP Z score prior to and after OHT. p values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. During the study period, 124 OHTs were performed. Complete study data were available and analyzed from 71/124 patients (mean age at OHT 3.9 years; 51% female). The mean AP Z score was significantly lower in the study group prior to OHT compared to normal (p < 0.0001). The initiation of ACE inhibitor therapy prior to OHT was associated with a significant increase in AP and the ventricular EF (p < 0.001 for both). Treatment with milrinone was associated with an increase in EF. AP is significantly lower in pediatric patients with myocardial dysfunction prior to OHT compared to normal. AP increases significantly after the initiation of therapies to improve myocardial function. Diminished AP is an indicator of myocardial dysfunction in pediatric patients.

  15. Carnitine levels and cardiac functions in children with solid malignancies receiving doxorubicin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Khositseth, Anant; Jirasakpisarn, Suwadee; Pakakasama, Samart; Choubtuym, Lulin; Wattanasirichaigoon, Duangrurdee

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Previous studies demonstrated l-carnitine decreasing doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. Our objectives were to study carnitine levels and cardiac functions in children treated with doxorubicin and the effect of short-term l-carnitine supplements. Materials and Methods: Serial carnitine levels and cardiac functions were obtained in children with newly diagnosed solid malignancies before doxorubicin, after cumulative doses of ≥150 mg/m2 and ≥300 mg/m2, respectively. Oral l-carnitine 100 mg/kg/day for 3 days were given to the children treated with doxorubicin at cumulative doses of ≥150 mg/m2 and ≥300 mg/m2. Carnitine levels and cardiac functions were also obtained in those children before and after short-term oral l-carnitine at each cumulative dose of doxorubicin. Results: Five children (3 females), median age of 9.1 years (range 1.5–13 years) with newly diagnosed solid malignancies were enrolled in the study. Free carnitine (FC) tended to decrease while acyl-carnitine (AC) increased making AC/FC ratio increased after cumulative dose of ≥150 and ≥300 mg/m2 but the statistics was not significant. Left ventricular (LV) systolic function was not significantly changed. Interestingly, LV global function (LV myocardial performance index) was significantly increased after 150 mg/m2 (median 0.39, 0.27–0.51) and 300 mg/2 (median 0.46, 0.27–0.50) when compared to baseline (median 0.28, 0.14–0.48) (P=0.05). Carnitine levels and cardiac functions were not significantly changed after oral l-carnitine supplement at cumulative dose of ≥150 mg/m2 (n=6) and ≥300 mg/m2 (n=9). Conclusions: Carnitine levels tended to decrease after doxorubicin treatment. LV global dysfunction was documented early after doxorubicin. However, short-term l-carnitine supplement did not improve cardiac function. PMID:21731215

  16. About Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More About Cardiac Arrest Updated:Mar 10,2017 What is cardiac arrest? Cardiac arrest is the abrupt loss of heart function in a person who may or may not have diagnosed heart ...

  17. Cell-cell junction remodeling in the heart: possible role in cardiac conduction system function and arrhythmias?

    PubMed

    Mezzano, Valeria; Sheikh, Farah

    2012-02-27

    Anchoring cell-cell junctions (desmosomes, fascia adherens) play crucial roles in maintaining mechanical integrity of cardiac muscle cells and tissue. Genetic mutations and/or loss of critical components in these macromolecular structures are increasingly being associated with arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathies; however, their specific roles have been primarily attributed to effects within the working (ventricular) cardiac muscle. Growing evidence also points to a key role for anchoring cell-cell junction components in cardiac muscle cells of the cardiac conduction system. This is not only evidenced by the molecular and ultra-structural presence of anchoring cell junctions in specific compartments/structures of the cardiac conduction system (sinoatrial node, atrioventricular node, His-Purkinje system), but also because conduction system-related arrhythmias can be found in humans and mouse models of cardiomyopathies harboring defects and/or mutations in key anchoring cell-cell junction proteins. These studies emphasize the clinical need to understand the molecular and cellular role(s) for anchoring cell-cell junctions in cardiac conduction system function and arrhythmias. This review will focus on (i) experimental findings that underline an important role for anchoring cell-cell junctions in the cardiac conduction system, (ii) insights regarding involvement of these structures in age-related cardiac remodeling of the conduction system, (iii) summarizing available genetic mouse models that can target cardiac conduction system structures and (iv) implications of these findings on future therapies for arrhythmogenic heart diseases.

  18. Assessment of Cardiac Functions in Infants with Cow’s Milk Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Ece, İbrahim; Demirören, Kaan; Demir, Nihat; Uner, Abdurrahman; Balli, Sevket

    2014-01-01

    Background Cow’s milk allergy is the most common food allergy in children, with rates estimated at 1.9% to 4.9%. Clinical phenotypes of cow’s milk allergy are varied and involve 1 or more target organs, with the main targets being the skin, respiratory system, and gastrointestinal tract. To date, no studies have investigated detailed cardiac function in children with cow’s milk allergy. The current study aimed to investigate cardiac function in infants with cow’s milk allergy. Material/Methods We studied 42 infants with cow’s milk allergy and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. Cardiac functions were evaluated by M-mode, pulsed-wave, and tissue Doppler echocardiography. Results There were no significant differences in ejection fraction or mitral and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion between the 2 groups. Pulsed-wave Doppler-derived E/A ratios in mitral and tricuspid valves were similar in both groups. Ea/Aa ratios in the left ventricle posterior wall and right ventricle free wall were lower in patients with cow’s milk allergy than in the control group. The E/Ea ratio in the left ventricle, isovolumic relaxation time, deceleration time, and right and left ventricular myocardial performance indices were higher in patients in the study group. Conclusions Our study identified reduced early diastolic tissue Doppler velocities in infants with cow’s milk allergy. PMID:25098395

  19. Echocardiographic evaluation of the effects of dexmedetomidine on cardiac function during total intravenous anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Choi, Y S; Hong, G R; Oh, Y J

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of dexmedetomidine on biventricular systolic and diastolic function using transoesophageal echocardiography. Cardiac function was assessed in 30 healthy patients who received total intravenous anaesthesia with propofol and remifentanil. The echocardiographic examinations were performed just before and 20, 40 and 60 min after dexmedetomidine or saline administration. Patients who received dexmedetomidine, compared with saline after 20 min, had a lower mean (SD) heart rate (56.7 (5.2) vs. 67.1 (7.1) beats.min(-1) ), higher systolic blood pressure (125.7 (18.9) vs. 109 (7.9) mmHg), and lower cardiac output (2.9 (0.5) vs. 3.7 (1.0) l.min(-1) ), respectively (all p < 0.05). In contrast, no changes were observed in biventricular systolic and diastolic indices in either group, and there were no inter-group differences at any time point. Dexmedetomidine, as an adjuvant to total intravenous anaesthesia, does not impair biventricular systolic and diastolic function in healthy patients, but decreases cardiac output by reducing heart rate.

  20. The Probability of Inconstancy in Assessment of Cardiac Function Post-Myocardial Infarction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiqiu; Hammoudi, Nadjib; Benard, Ludovic; Ceholski, Delaine K; Zhang, Shihong; Lebeche, Djamel; Hajjar, Roger J

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we explore the inherent variability that leads to overlaps in cardiac functional parameters between control and post-myocardial infarction (MI) mice. Heart failure was induced by Left Coronary Artery (LCA) ligation in mice. Average Ejection Fraction (EF) measured by echocardiography was lower in MI mice compared to control, but exhibited higher Standard Deviation (SD) and Standard Error (SEM), notably in 2D mode. Fractional Shortening (FS) showed a higher degree of overlap between MI and control mice even though the mean values were significantly different. Hemodynamic measurements of EF resulted in greater SD, SEM, ± 95% confidence intervals, and effect size. In comparing echocardiography at different time points, EF and FS were consistent by mean, but had apparent fluctuation in individual tracks, which were more obvious in MI than control mice. Hemodynamic measurements showed more complexity in data collection in mice in vivo. MI size showed variability that correlated with severity of cardiac function. These studies show that there is inherent variability in functional cardiac parameters after induction of heart failure by MI in mice. Analysis of these parameters by traditional statistical methods is insufficient, and we propose a more robust statistical analysis for proper data interpretation. PMID:27917392

  1. Endothelin-1 critically influences cardiac function via superoxide-MMP9 cascade.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, Catherine K; Grant, Ruriko; Hagaman, John R; Hiller, Sylvia; Li, Feng; Xu, Longquan; Chang, Albert S; Madden, Victoria J; Bagnell, C Robert; Rojas, Mauricio; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Wu, Bingruo; Zhou, Bin; Smithies, Oliver; Kakoki, Masao

    2015-04-21

    We have generated low-expressing and high-expressing endothelin-1 genes (L and H) and have bred mice with four levels of expression: L/L, ∼20%; L/+, ∼65%; +/+ (wild type), 100%; and H/+, ∼350%. The hypomorphic L allele can be spatiotemporally switched to the hypermorphic H allele by Cre-loxP recombination. Young adult L/L and L/+ mice have dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertension, and increased plasma volumes, together with increased ventricular superoxide levels, increased matrix metalloproteinase 9 (Mmp9) expression, and reduced ventricular stiffness. H/+ mice have decreased plasma volumes and significantly heavy stiff hearts. Global or cardiomyocyte-specific switching expression from L to H normalized the abnormalities already present in young adult L/L mice. An epithelial sodium channel antagonist normalized plasma volume and blood pressure, but only partially corrected the cardiomyopathy. A superoxide dismutase mimetic made superoxide levels subnormal, reduced Mmp9 overexpression, and substantially improved cardiac function. Genetic absence of Mmp9 also improved cardiac function, but increased superoxide remained. We conclude that endothelin-1 is critical for maintaining normal contractile function, for controlling superoxide and Mmp9 levels, and for ensuring that the myocardium has sufficient collagen to prevent overstretching. Even a modest (∼35%) decrease in endothelin-1 gene (Edn1) expression is sufficient to cause cardiac dysfunction.

  2. Endothelin-1 critically influences cardiac function via superoxide-MMP9 cascade

    PubMed Central

    Hathaway, Catherine K.; Grant, Ruriko; Hagaman, John R.; Hiller, Sylvia; Li, Feng; Xu, Longquan; Chang, Albert S.; Madden, Victoria J.; Bagnell, C. Robert; Rojas, Mauricio; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Wu, Bingruo; Zhou, Bin; Smithies, Oliver; Kakoki, Masao

    2015-01-01

    We have generated low-expressing and high-expressing endothelin-1 genes (L and H) and have bred mice with four levels of expression: L/L, ∼20%; L/+, ∼65%; +/+ (wild type), 100%; and H/+, ∼350%. The hypomorphic L allele can be spatiotemporally switched to the hypermorphic H allele by Cre-loxP recombination. Young adult L/L and L/+ mice have dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertension, and increased plasma volumes, together with increased ventricular superoxide levels, increased matrix metalloproteinase 9 (Mmp9) expression, and reduced ventricular stiffness. H/+ mice have decreased plasma volumes and significantly heavy stiff hearts. Global or cardiomyocyte-specific switching expression from L to H normalized the abnormalities already present in young adult L/L mice. An epithelial sodium channel antagonist normalized plasma volume and blood pressure, but only partially corrected the cardiomyopathy. A superoxide dismutase mimetic made superoxide levels subnormal, reduced Mmp9 overexpression, and substantially improved cardiac function. Genetic absence of Mmp9 also improved cardiac function, but increased superoxide remained. We conclude that endothelin-1 is critical for maintaining normal contractile function, for controlling superoxide and Mmp9 levels, and for ensuring that the myocardium has sufficient collagen to prevent overstretching. Even a modest (∼35%) decrease in endothelin-1 gene (Edn1) expression is sufficient to cause cardiac dysfunction. PMID:25848038

  3. Electroacupuncture improves cardiac function and remodeling by inhibition of sympathoexcitation in chronic heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Luyao; Cui, Baiping; Shao, Yongfeng; Ni, Buqing; Zhang, Weiran; Luo, Yonggang; Zhang, Shijiang

    2014-05-15

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, mainly as a result of neurohumoral activation. Acupuncture has been used to treat a wide range of diseases and conditions. In this study, we investigated the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on the sympathetic nerve activity, heart function, and remodeling in CHF rats after ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. CHF rats were randomly selected to EA and control groups for acute and chronic experiments. In the acute experiment, both the renal sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex elicited by epicardial application of capsaicin were recorded. In the chronic experiment, we performed EA for 30 min once a day for 1 wk to test the long-term EA effects on heart function, remodeling, as well as infarct size in CHF rats. The results show EA significantly decreased the renal sympathetic nerve activity effectively, inhibited cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex, and lowered the blood pressure of CHF rats. Treating CHF rats with EA for 1 wk dramatically increased left ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular fraction shortening, reversed the enlargement of left ventricular end-systolic dimension and left ventricular end-diastolic dimension, and shrunk the infarct size. In this experiment, we demonstrated EA attenuates sympathetic overactivity. Additionally, long-term EA improves cardiac function and remodeling and reduces infarct size in CHF rats. EA is a novel and potentially useful therapy for treating CHF.

  4. A role for matrix stiffness in the regulation of cardiac side population cell function.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yiling; Bayomy, Ahmad F; Gomez, Marcus V; Bauer, Michael; Du, Ping; Yang, Yanfei; Zhang, Xin; Liao, Ronglih

    2015-05-01

    The mechanical properties of the local microenvironment may have important influence on the fate and function of adult tissue progenitor cells, altering the regenerative process. This is particularly critical following a myocardial infarction, in which the normal, compliant myocardial tissue is replaced with fibrotic, stiff scar tissue. In this study, we examined the effects of matrix stiffness on adult cardiac side population (CSP) progenitor cell behavior. Ovine and murine CSP cells were isolated and cultured on polydimethylsiloxane substrates, replicating the elastic moduli of normal and fibrotic myocardium. Proliferation capacity and cell cycling were increased in CSP cells cultured on the stiff substrate with an associated reduction in cardiomyogeneic differentiation and accelerated cell ageing. In addition, culture on stiff substrate stimulated upregulation of extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins gene expression in CSP cells. Collectively, we demonstrate that microenvironment properties, including matrix stiffness, play a critical role in regulating progenitor cell functions of endogenous resident CSP cells. Understanding the effects of the tissue microenvironment on resident cardiac progenitor cells is a critical step toward achieving functional cardiac regeneration.

  5. Effects of the association of diabetes and pulmonary emphysema on cardiac structure and function in rats.

    PubMed

    Di Petta, Antonio; Simas, Rafael; Ferreira, Clebson L; Capelozzi, Vera L; Salemi, Vera M C; Moreira, Luiz F P; Sannomiya, Paulina

    2015-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is often associated with chronic comorbid conditions of cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus and hypertension. This study aimed to investigate the effects of the association of diabetes and pulmonary emphysema on cardiac structure and function in rats. Wistar rats were divided into control non-diabetic instilled with saline (CS) or elastase (CE), diabetic instilled with saline (DS) or elastase (DE), DE treated with insulin (DEI) groups and echocardiographic measurements, morphometric analyses of the heart and lungs, and survival analysis conducted 50 days after instillation. Diabetes mellitus was induced [alloxan, 42 mg/kg, intravenously (iv)] 10 days before the induction of emphysema (elastase, 0.25 IU/100 g). Rats were treated with NPH insulin (4 IU before elastase plus 2 IU/day, 50 days). Both CE and DE exhibited similar increases in mean alveolar diameter, which are positively correlated with increases in right ventricular (RV) wall thickness (P = 0.0022), cavity area (P = 0.0001) and cardiomyocyte thickness (P = 0.0001). Diabetic saline group demonstrated a reduction in left ventricular (LV) wall, interventricular (IV) septum, cardiomyocyte thickness and an increase in cavity area, associated with a reduction in LV fractional shortening (P < 0.05), and an increase in LViv relaxation time (P < 0.05). Survival rate decreased from 80% in DS group to 40% in DE group. In conclusion, alloxan diabetes did not affect RV hypertrophy secondary to chronic emphysema, even in the presence of insulin. Diabetes per se induced left ventricular dysfunction, which was less evident in the presence of RV hypertrophy. Survival rate was substantially reduced as a consequence, at least in part, of the coexistence of RV hypertrophy and diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  6. Radiographic and electrocardiographic evaluation of cardiac morphology and function in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Juergen; Snyder, Patti; Citino, Scott B; Bennett, R Avery; Dvorak, Laura D

    2003-12-01

    In a prospective study, eight (four males and four females) healthy, adult captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) were immobilized with a combination of tiletamine-zolazepam (4 mg/kg, i.m.), administered with a remote drug delivery system, to define normal cardiac morphology and function. Standard lateral and ventrodorsal (VD) radiographs were then taken to measure heart and thorax using a metric and vertebral scale system. Standard six-lead electrocardiograms were obtained with the animals in right lateral recumbency under isoflurane anesthesia. Mean chest depth and width was 18.7 +/- 1.3 cm and 13.0 +/- 0.6 cm, respectively. The mean lateral cardiac short axis (X) was 9.1 +/- 0.6 cm. the mean cardiac long axis (Y) was 13.6 +/- 0.7 cm, and the mean lateral heart sum (X + Y) was 22.6 +/- 1.2 cm. In the VD projection, mean cardiac short axis (V) was 10.1 +/- 0.7 cm, mean cardiac long axis (W) was 14.9 +/- 1.2 cm, and the heart sum (V + W) was 24.9 +/- 1.8 cm. The vertebral heart size was 8.2 +/- 0.9. All cheetahs had sinus rhythm, and no arrhythmias were noted. Mean heart rate was 126 +/- 15 beats/min, and the mean electrical axis was 82 + 5 degrees. P waves were always positive on lead II and had a width of 0.04 +/- 0.01 sec and a height between 0.1 and 0.3 mV. PR intervals were 0.11 +/- 0.01 sec. The height of the QRS complex was 1.25 +/- 0.24 mV and the width 0.06 +/- 0.01 sec. The ST segment was 0.04 sec, and the T wave (height: 0.25 +/- 0.05 mV) was positive in all cheetahs examined. Although these cardiac and thoracic measurements were larger than those of domestic cats (Felis catus), ratios of cardiac parameters were similar in both species. Electrocardiographic findings were similar to those reported from domestic cats.

  7. Functional Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the Assessment of Myocardial Viability and Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness safety and cost-effectiveness of using functional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction. Results Functional MRI has become increasingly investigated as a noninvasive method for assessing myocardial viability and perfusion. Most patients in the published literature have mild to moderate impaired LV function. It is possible that the severity of LV dysfunction may be an important factor that can alter the diagnostic accuracy of imaging techniques. There is some evidence of comparable or better performance of functional cardiac MRI for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion compared with other imaging techniques. However limitations to most of the studies included: Functional cardiac MRI studies that assess myocardial viability and perfusion have had small sample sizes. Some studies assessed myocardial viability/perfusion in patients who had already undergone revascularization, or excluded patients with a prior MI (Schwitter et al., 2001). Lack of explicit detail of patient recruitment. Patients with LVEF >35%. Interstudy variability in post MI imaging time(including acute or chronic MI), when patients with a prior MI were included. Poor interobserver agreement (kappa statistic) in the interpretation of the results. Traditionally, 0.80 is considered “good”. Cardiac MRI measurement of myocardial perfusion to as an adjunct tool to help diagnose CAD (prior to a definitive coronary angiography) has also been examined in some studies, with methodological limitations, yielding comparable results. Many studies examining myocardial viability and perfusion report on the accuracy of imaging methods with limited data on long-term patient outcome and management. Kim et al. (2000) revealed that the transmural

  8. Distinct conformational and functional effects of two adjacent pathogenic mutations in cardiac troponin I at the interface with troponin T.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Shirin; Jin, J-P

    2015-01-01

    The α-helix in troponin I (TnI) at the interface with troponin T (TnT) is a highly conserved structure. A point mutation in this region, A116G, was found in human cardiac TnI in a case of cardiomyopathy. An adjacent dominantly negative mutation found in turkey cardiac TnI (R111C, equivalent to K117C in human and K118C in mouse) decreased diastolic function and blunted beta-adrenergic response in transgenic mice. To investigate the functional importance of the TnI-TnT interface and pathological impact of the cardiac TnI mutations, we engineered K118C and A117G mutations in mouse cardiac TnI for functional studies. Despite their adjacent locations, A117G substitution results in faster mobility of cardiac TnI in SDS-PAGE whereas K118C decreases gel mobility, indicating significant and distinct changes in overall protein conformation. Consistently, monoclonal antibody epitope analysis demonstrated distinct local and remote conformational alterations in the two mutant proteins. Protein binding assays showed that K118C, but not A117G, decreased the relative binding affinity of cardiac TnI for TnT. K118C mutation decreased binding affinity for troponin C in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, whereas A117G had a similar but less profound effect. Protein kinase A phosphorylation or truncation to remove the cardiac specific N-terminal extension of cardiac TnI resulted in similar conformational changes in the region interfacing with TnT and minimized the functional impacts of the mutations. The data demonstrate potent conformational and functional impacts of the TnT-interfacing helix in TnI and suggest a role of the N-terminal extension of cardiac TnI in modulating TnI-TnT interface functions.

  9. Mathematical models based on transfer functions to estimate tissue temperature during RF cardiac ablation in real time.

    PubMed

    Alba-Martínez, Jose; Trujillo, Macarena; Blasco-Gimenez, Ramon; Berjano, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency cardiac ablation (RFCA) has been used to treat certain types of cardiac arrhythmias by producing a thermal lesion. Even though a tissue temperature higher than 50ºC is required to destroy the target, thermal mapping is not currently used during RFCA. Our aim was thus to develop mathematical models capable of estimating tissue temperature from tissue characteristics acquired or estimated at the beginning of the procedure (electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, specific heat and density) and the applied voltage at any time. Biological tissue was considered as a system with an input (applied voltage) and output (tissue temperature), and so the mathematical models were based on transfer functions relating these variables. We used theoretical models based on finite element method to verify the mathematical models. Firstly, we solved finite element models to identify the transfer functions between the temperature at a depth of 4 mm and a constant applied voltage using a 7Fr and 4 mm electrode. The results showed that the relationships can be expressed as first-order transfer functions. Changes in electrical conductivity only affected the static gain of the system, while specific heat variations produced a change in the dynamic system response. In contrast, variations in thermal conductivity modified both the static gain and the dynamic system response. Finally, to assess the performance of the transfer functions obtained, we conducted a new set of computer simulations using a controlled temperature protocol and considering the temperature dependence of the thermal and electrical conductivities, i.e. conditions closer to those found in clinical use. The results showed that the difference between the values estimated from transfer functions and the temperatures obtained from finite element models was less than 4ºC, which suggests that the proposed method could be used to estimate tissue temperature in real time.

  10. Novel approaches to determine contractile function of the isolated adult zebrafish ventricular cardiac myocyte

    PubMed Central

    Dvornikov, Alexey V; Dewan, Sukriti; Alekhina, Olga V; Pickett, F Bryan; de Tombe, Pieter P

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has been used extensively in cardiovascular biology, but mainly in the study of heart development. The relative ease of its genetic manipulation may indicate the suitability of this species as a cost-effective model system for the study of cardiac contractile biology. However, whether the zebrafish heart is an appropriate model system for investigations pertaining to mammalian cardiac contractile structure–function relationships remains to be resolved. Myocytes were isolated from adult zebrafish hearts by enzymatic digestion, attached to carbon rods, and twitch force and intracellular Ca2+ were measured. We observed the modulation of twitch force, but not of intracellular Ca2+, by both extracellular [Ca2+] and sarcomere length. In permeabilized cells/myofibrils, we found robust myofilament length-dependent activation. Moreover, modulation of myofilament activation–relaxation and force redevelopment kinetics by varied Ca2+ activation levels resembled that found previously in mammalian myofilaments. We conclude that the zebrafish is a valid model system for the study of cardiac contractile structure–function relationships. PMID:24591576

  11. Dysregulation of cardiac autonomic function in offspring exposed to alcohol during antenatal period.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Sajish; Abhishekh, Hulegar A; Murthy, Pratima; Raju, Trichur R; Sathyaprabha, Talakad N

    2015-10-01

    Several lines of investigations have shown the deleterious effect of an alcohol on the autonomic nervous system. Recent evidence shows that infants exposed to alcohol during the antenatal period displayed aberration in the cardiac autonomic function after the birth. However, there is dearth of literature on the long term influence of antenatal alcohol exposure. In this study we measured the cardiac autonomic functions in children who were exposed to alcohol in the antenatal period and compared them with non-exposed control children. Twenty eight children (age: 9±2 years) in the antenatal alcohol exposed group and age, gender matched 30 non exposed healthy volunteers as a control (age: 10±2 years) were recruited. Electrocardiogram was recorded in all subjects at rest in the supine position. HRV parameters were analyzed in the time and frequency domains using customized software. The average heart rate was similar between both the groups. There was no statistical significant difference in the time domain measures between the groups. However, the low frequency power, normalized units and low frequency to high frequency ratio were significantly higher in the antenatal alcohol exposed children compared to the controls. This suggests sympathetic predominance in children who were exposed to alcohol in the antenatal period. In this study we provide evidence for the deleterious long lasting effect of antenatal exposure of alcohol on cardiac autonomic regulation. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm the causal relationship between antenatal alcohol exposure and autonomic dysregulation.

  12. Effects of Allicin on Hypertension and Cardiac Function in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    García-Trejo, Ehécatl M A; Arellano-Buendía, Abraham S; Argüello-García, Raúl; Loredo-Mendoza, María L; García-Arroyo, Fernando E; Arellano-Mendoza, Mónica G; Castillo-Hernández, María C; Guevara-Balcázar, Gustavo; Tapia, Edilia; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Osorio-Alonso, Horacio

    2016-01-01

    This work was performed to study the effect of allicin on hypertension and cardiac function in a rat model of CKD. The groups were control, CKD (5/6 nephrectomy), and CKD-allicin treated (CKDA) (40 mg/kg day/p.o.). Blood pressure was monitored (weekly/6 weeks). The cardiac function, vascular response to angiotensin II, oxidative stress, and heart morphometric parameters were determined. The CKD group showed hypertension and proteinuria. The coronary perfusion and left ventricular pressures were decreased in CKD group. In contrast, the vascular response to angiotensin II and expression of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) were increased. These data were associated with the increment in morphometric parameters (weight of heart and left ventricle, heart/BW and left ventricular mass index, and wall thickness). Concurrently, the oxidative stress was increased and correlated inversely with the expression of Nrf2, Keap1, and antioxidant enzymes Nrf2-regulated. Allicin treatment attenuated hypertension and improved the renal and the cardiac dysfunctions; furthermore, it decreased the vascular reactivity to angiotensin II, AT1R overexpression, and preserved morphometric parameters. Allicin also downregulated Keap1 and increased Nrf2 expression, upregulated the antioxidant enzymes, and reduced oxidative stress. In conclusion, allicin showed an antihypertensive, nephroprotective, cardioprotective, and antioxidant effects, likely through downregulation of AT1R and Keap1 expression.

  13. Effects of Allicin on Hypertension and Cardiac Function in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guevara-Balcázar, Gustavo; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G.

    2016-01-01

    This work was performed to study the effect of allicin on hypertension and cardiac function in a rat model of CKD. The groups were control, CKD (5/6 nephrectomy), and CKD-allicin treated (CKDA) (40 mg/kg day/p.o.). Blood pressure was monitored (weekly/6 weeks). The cardiac function, vascular response to angiotensin II, oxidative stress, and heart morphometric parameters were determined. The CKD group showed hypertension and proteinuria. The coronary perfusion and left ventricular pressures were decreased in CKD group. In contrast, the vascular response to angiotensin II and expression of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) were increased. These data were associated with the increment in morphometric parameters (weight of heart and left ventricle, heart/BW and left ventricular mass index, and wall thickness). Concurrently, the oxidative stress was increased and correlated inversely with the expression of Nrf2, Keap1, and antioxidant enzymes Nrf2-regulated. Allicin treatment attenuated hypertension and improved the renal and the cardiac dysfunctions; furthermore, it decreased the vascular reactivity to angiotensin II, AT1R overexpression, and preserved morphometric parameters. Allicin also downregulated Keap1 and increased Nrf2 expression, upregulated the antioxidant enzymes, and reduced oxidative stress. In conclusion, allicin showed an antihypertensive, nephroprotective, cardioprotective, and antioxidant effects, likely through downregulation of AT1R and Keap1 expression. PMID:27990229

  14. Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Improves the Functional Properties of Cardiac Mesoangioblasts.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Aurora; Pérez, Laura M; De Lucas, Beatriz; Martín, Nuria San; Kadow-Romacker, Anke; Plaza, Gustavo; Raum, Kay; Gálvez, Beatriz G

    2015-12-01

    Cell-based therapy is a promising approach for many diseases, including ischemic heart disease. Cardiac mesoangioblasts are committed vessel-associated progenitors that can restore to a significant, although partial, extent, heart structure and function in a murine model of myocardial infarction. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) is a non-invasive form of mechanical energy that can be delivered into biological tissues as acoustic pressure waves, and is widely used for clinical applications including bone fracture healing. We hypothesized that the positive effects of LIPUS on bone and soft tissue, such as increased cell differentiation and cytoskeleton reorganization, could be applied to increase the therapeutic potential of mesoangioblasts for heart repair. In this work, we show that LIPUS stimulation of cardiac mesoangioblasts isolated from mouse and human heart results in significant cellular modifications that provide beneficial effects to the cells, including increased malleability and improved motility. Additionally, LIPUS stimulation increased the number of binucleated cells and induced cardiac differentiation to an extent comparable with 5'-azacytidine treatment. Mechanistically, LIPUS stimulation activated the BMP-Smad signalling pathway and increased the expression of myosin light chain-2 together with upregulation of β1 integrin and RhoA, highlighting a potentially important role for cytoskeleton reorganization. Taken together, these results provide functional evidence that LIPUS might be a useful tool to explore in the field of heart cell therapy.

  15. Slowed Dynamics of Thin Filament Regulatory Units Reduces Ca2+-Sensitivity of Cardiac Biomechanical Function

    PubMed Central

    Loong, Campion K. P.; Takeda, Aya K.; Badr, Myriam A.; Rogers, Jordan S.; Chase, P. Bryant

    2013-01-01

    Actomyosin kinetics in both skinned skeletal muscle fibers at maximum Ca2+-activation and unregulated in vitro motility assays are modulated by solvent microviscosity in a manner consistent with a diffusion limited process. Viscosity might also influence cardiac thin filament Ca2+-regulatory protein dynamics. In vitro motility assays were conducted using thin filaments reconstituted with recombinant human cardiac troponin and tropomyosin; solvent microviscosity was varied by addition of sucrose or glucose. At saturating Ca2+, filament sliding speed (s) was inversely proportional to viscosity. Ca2+-sensitivity (pCa50) of s decreased markedly with elevated viscosity (η/η0 ≥ ~1.3). For comparison with unloaded motility assays, steady-state isometric force (F) and kinetics of isometric tension redevelopment (kTR) were measured in single, permeabilized porcine cardiomyocytes when viscosity surrounding the myofilaments was altered. Maximum Ca2+-activated F changed little for sucrose ≤ 0.3 M (η/η0 ~1.4) or glucose ≤ 0.875 M (η/η0 ~1.66), but decreased at higher concentrations. Sucrose (0.3 M) or glucose (0.875 M) decreased pCa50 for F. kTR at saturating Ca2+ decreased steeply and monotonically with increased viscosity but there was little effect on kTR at sub-maximum Ca2+. Modeling indicates that increased solutes affect dynamics of cardiac muscle Ca2+-regulatory proteins to a much greater extent than actomyosin cross-bridge cycling. PMID:23833690

  16. Impact of dispersed fuel oil on cardiac mitochondrial function in polar cod Boreogadus saida.

    PubMed

    Dussauze, Matthieu; Camus, Lionel; Le Floch, Stéphane; Pichavant-Rafini, Karine; Geraudie, Perrine; Coquillé, Nathalie; Amérand, Aline; Lemaire, Philippe; Theron, Michael

    2014-12-01

    In this study, impact of dispersed oil on cardiac mitochondrial function was assessed in a key species of Arctic marine ecosystem, the polar cod Boreogadus saida. Mature polar cod were exposed during 48 h to dispersed oil (mechanically and chemically) and dispersants alone. The increase observed in ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolites in bile indicated no difference in contamination level between fish exposed to chemical or mechanical dispersion of oil. Oil induced alterations of O2 consumption of permeabilised cardiac fibres showing inhibitions of complexes I and IV of the respiratory chain. Oil did not induce any modification of mitochondrial proton leak. Dispersants did not induce alteration of mitochondrial activity and did not increase oil toxicity. These data suggest that oil exposure may limit the fitness of polar cod and consequently could lead to major disruption in the energy flow of polar ecosystem.

  17. Teaching cardiac autonomic function dynamics employing the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) maneuver.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Luiz Fernando

    2008-03-01

    In this report, a brief history of the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) maneuver is outlined, followed by an explanation on the use of this approach for the evaluation of cardiac autonomic function based on underlying heart rate changes. The most important methodological and interpretative aspects of the Valsalva-Weber maneuver are critically updated, and some guidelines are established for simple application of the maneuver in a teaching or research laboratory setting. These include the hemodynamic and cardiac autonomic mechanisms involved, technical aspects such as the intensity and duration of the expiratory straining, frequency of maneuver sessions, training and posture of the individuals tested, different time- and grade change-dependent indexes of heart interval variation, and clinical application of the maneuver.

  18. How Does Maternal Employment Affect Children's Socioemotional Functioning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Gigi

    2015-01-01

    The maternal employment becomes an irreversible trend across the globe. The effect of maternal employment on children's socioemotional functioning is so pervasive that it warrants special attention to investigate into the issue. A trajectory of analytical framework of how maternal employment affects children's socioemotional functioning originates…

  19. The functional diversity of essential genes required for mammalian cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Clowes, Christopher; Boylan, Michael G S; Ridge, Liam A; Barnes, Emma; Wright, Jayne A; Hentges, Kathryn E

    2014-08-01

    Genes required for an organism to develop to maturity (for which no other gene can compensate) are considered essential. The continuing functional annotation of the mouse genome has enabled the identification of many essential genes required for specific developmental processes including cardiac development. Patterns are now emerging regarding the functional nature of genes required at specific points throughout gestation. Essential genes required for development beyond cardiac progenitor cell migration and induction include a small and functionally homogenous group encoding transcription factors, ligands and receptors. Actions of core cardiogenic transcription factors from the Gata, Nkx, Mef, Hand, and Tbx families trigger a marked expansion in the functional diversity of essential genes from midgestation onwards. As the embryo grows in size and complexity, genes required to maintain a functional heartbeat and to provide muscular strength and regulate blood flow are well represented. These essential genes regulate further specialization and polarization of cell types along with proliferative, migratory, adhesive, contractile, and structural processes. The identification of patterns regarding the functional nature of essential genes across numerous developmental systems may aid prediction of further essential genes and those important to development and/or progression of disease.

  20. Determinants of biventricular cardiac function: a mathematical model study on geometry and myofiber orientation.

    PubMed

    Pluijmert, Marieke; Delhaas, Tammo; de la Parra, Adrián Flores; Kroon, Wilco; Prinzen, Frits W; Bovendeerd, Peter H M

    2017-04-01

    In patient-specific mathematical models of cardiac electromechanics, usually a patient-specific geometry and a generic myofiber orientation field are used as input, upon which myocardial tissue properties are tuned to clinical data. It remains unclear to what extent deviations in myofiber orientation and geometry between model and patient influence model predictions on cardiac function. Therefore, we evaluated the sensitivity of cardiac function for geometry and myofiber orientation in a biventricular (BiV) finite element model of cardiac mechanics. Starting out from a reference geometry in which myofiber orientation had no transmural component, two new geometries were defined with either a 27 % decrease in LV short- to long-axis ratio, or a 16 % decrease of RV length, but identical LV and RV cavity and wall volumes. These variations in geometry caused differences in both local myofiber and global pump work below 6 %. Variation of fiber orientation was induced through adaptive myofiber reorientation that caused an average change in fiber orientation of [Formula: see text] predominantly through the formation of a component in transmural direction. Reorientation caused a considerable increase in local myofiber work [Formula: see text] and in global pump work [Formula: see text] in all three geometries, while differences between geometries were below 5 %. The findings suggest that implementing a realistic myofiber orientation is at least as important as defining a patient-specific geometry. The model for remodeling of myofiber orientation seems a useful approach to estimate myofiber orientation in the absence of accurate patient-specific information.

  1. Cardiac resynchronization therapy modulation of exercise left ventricular function and pulmonary O₂ uptake in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tomczak, Corey R; Paterson, Ian; Haykowsky, Mark J; Lawrance, Richard; Martellotto, Andres; Pantano, Alfredo; Gulamhusein, Sajad; Haennel, Robert G

    2012-06-15

    To better understand the mechanisms contributing to improved exercise capacity with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), we studied the effects of 6 mo of CRT on pulmonary O(2) uptake (Vo(2)) kinetics, exercise left ventricular (LV) function, and peak Vo(2) in 12 subjects (age: 56 ± 15 yr, peak Vo(2): 12.9 ± 3.2 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), ejection fraction: 18 ± 3%) with heart failure. We hypothesized that CRT would speed Vo(2) kinetics due to an increase in stroke volume secondary to a reduction in LV end-systolic volume (ESV) and that the increase in peak Vo(2) would be related to an increase in cardiac output reserve. We found that Vo(2) kinetics were faster during the transition to moderate-intensity exercise after CRT (pre-CRT: 69 ± 21 s vs. post-CRT: 54 ± 17 s, P < 0.05). During moderate-intensity exercise, LV ESV reserve (exercise - resting) increased 9 ± 7 ml (vs. a 3 ± 9-ml decrease pre-CRT, P < 0.05), and steady-state stroke volume increased (pre-CRT: 42 ± 8 ml vs. post-CRT: 61 ± 12 ml, P < 0.05). LV end-diastolic volume did not change from rest to steady-state exercise post-CRT (P > 0.05). CRT improved heart rate, measured as a lower resting and steady-state exercise heart rate and as faster heart rate kinetics after CRT (pre-CRT: 89 ± 12 s vs. post-CRT: 69 ± 21 s, P < 0.05). For peak exercise, cardiac output reserve increased significantly post-CRT and was 22% higher at peak exercise post-CRT (both P < 0.05). The increase in cardiac output was due to both a significant increase in peak and reserve stroke volume and to a nonsignificant increase in heart rate reserve. Similar patterns in LV volumes as moderate-intensity exercise were observed at peak exercise. Cardiac output reserve was related to peak Vo(2) (r = 0.48, P < 0.05). These findings demonstrate the chronic CRT-mediated cardiac factors that contribute, in part, to the speeding in Vo(2) kinetics and increase in peak Vo(2) in clinically stable heart failure patients.

  2. Impaired contractile function due to decreased cardiac myosin binding protein C content in the sarcomere

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Y.; Wan, X.; McElfresh, T. A.; Chen, X.; Gresham, K. S.; Rosenbaum, D. S.; Chandler, M. P.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in cardiac myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C) are a common cause of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). The majority of MyBP-C mutations are expected to reduce MyBP-C expression; however, the consequences of MyBP-C deficiency on the regulation of myofilament function, Ca2+ homeostasis, and in vivo cardiac function are unknown. To elucidate the effects of decreased MyBP-C expression on cardiac function, we employed MyBP-C heterozygous null (MyBP-C+/−) mice presenting decreases in MyBP-C expression (32%) similar to those of FHC patients carrying MyBP-C mutations. The levels of MyBP-C phosphorylation were reduced 53% in MyBP-C+/− hearts compared with wild-type hearts. Skinned myocardium isolated from MyBP-C+/− hearts displayed decreased cross-bridge stiffness at half-maximal Ca2+ activations, increased steady-state force generation, and accelerated rates of cross-bridge recruitment at low Ca2+ activations (<15% and <25% of maximum, respectively). Protein kinase A treatment abolished basal differences in rates of cross-bridge recruitment between MyBP-C+/− and wild-type myocardium. Intact ventricular myocytes from MyBP-C+/− hearts displayed abnormal sarcomere shortening but unchanged Ca2+ transient kinetics. Despite a lack of left ventricular hypertrophy, MyBP-C+/− hearts exhibited elevated end-diastolic pressure and decreased peak rate of LV pressure rise, which was normalized following dobutamine infusion. Furthermore, electrocardiogram recordings in conscious MyBP-C+/− mice revealed prolonged QRS and QT intervals, which are known risk factors for cardiac arrhythmia. Collectively, our data show that reduced MyBP-C expression and phosphorylation in the sarcomere result in myofilament dysfunction, contributing to contractile dysfunction that precedes compensatory adaptations in Ca2+ handling, and chamber remodeling. Perturbations in mechanical and electrical activity in MyBP-C+/− mice could increase their susceptibility to cardiac

  3. Enrollment in clinical trials: institutional factors affecting enrollment in the cardiac arrhythmia suppression trial (CAST).

    PubMed

    Shea, S; Bigger, J T; Campion, J; Fleiss, J L; Rolnitzky, L M; Schron, E; Gorkin, L; Handshaw, K; Kinney, M R; Branyon, M

    1992-12-01

    Recruitment and Enrollment Assessment in Clinical Trials (REACT), an NHLBI-sponsored substudy of the Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trial (CAST), was conducted to assess factors associated with enrollment in clinical trials. We report on the relationships of institutional factors at CAST sites to patient enrollment. The proportion of CAST-eligible patients enrolling at each CAST site during the REACT study period was defined as the number of subjects enrolled divided by the sum of (1) the number enrolled plus (2) the number of eligibles who refused plus (3) the number of eligibles whose physicians refused to permit CAST personnel to attempt to enroll them. A questionnaire that included 78 questions regarding factors hypothesized to be associated with enrollment was completed between August 1988 and February 1990 by the nurse coordinators at all 112 CAST sites in the United States and Canada. Sixteen items were unanalyzable, and 37 of the remaining 62 were grouped into seven scales. The remaining items were analyzed individually. Enrollment proportions varied widely across the 112 CAST sites (mean 32.7% SD 22.6). Five variables or scales were included in the final multiple regression model (multiple R2 = .39). The most important of these was the proportion of eligible patients at a site cared for by medical staff other than private attending physicians (multiple R2 for this variable alone, .26). This proportion tended to be high in teaching hospitals. Other variables in this model that were associated with higher enrollment proportions included the number of days per week a nurse coordinator was present at the site, the number of nurse coordinator full-time equivalents at the site, fewer other clinical trials for which the nurse coordinator was responsible, and fewer perceived obstacles to enrollment. These findings indicate that enrollment was more successful at hospitals with higher proportions of eligible subjects cared for by fellows, housestaff, and service

  4. On site assessment of cardiac function and neural regulation in amateur half marathon runners

    PubMed Central

    Dalla Vecchia, Laura; Traversi, Egidio; Porta, Alberto; Lucini, Daniela; Pagani, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Strenuous exercise variably modifies cardiovascular function. Only few data are available on intermediate levels of effort. We therefore planned a study in order to address the hypothesis that a half marathon distance would result in transient changes of cardiac mechanics, neural regulation and biochemical profile suggestive of a complex, integrated adaptation. Methods We enrolled 35 amateur athletes (42±7 years). Supine and standing heart rate variability and a complete echocardiographic evaluation were assessed on site after the completion of a half marathon (postrace) and about 1 month after (baseline). Biochemical tests were also measured postrace. Results Compared to baseline, the postrace left ventricular end-diastolic volume was smaller, peak velocity of E wave was lower, peak velocity of A wave higher, and accordingly the E/A ratio lower. The postrace heart and respiratory rate were higher and variance of RR interval lower, together with a clear shift towards a sympathetic predominance in supine position and a preserved response to orthostasis. At baseline, athletes were characterised by a lower, although still predominant, sympathetic drive with a preserved physiological response to standing. Conclusions Immediately after a half marathon there are clear marks that an elevated sympathetic cardiac drive outlasts the performance, together with decreased left ventricular diastolic volumes and slight modifications of the left ventricular filling pattern without additional signs of diastolic dysfunction or indices of transient left or right ventricular systolic abnormalities. Furthermore, no biochemical indices of any permanent cardiac damage were found. PMID:25332775

  5. Cardiac structure and function in humans: a new cardiovascular physiology laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Song, Su; Burleson, Paul D.; Passo, Stanley; Messina, Edward J.; Levine, Norman; Thompson, Carl I.; Belloni, Francis L.; Recchia, Fabio A.; Ojaimi, Caroline; Kaley, Gabor

    2009-01-01

    As the traditional cardiovascular control laboratory has disappeared from the first-year medical school curriculum, we have recognized the need to develop another “hands-on” experience as a vehicle for wide-ranging discussions of cardiovascular control mechanisms. Using an echocardiograph, an automatic blood pressure cuff, and a reclining bicycle, we developed protocols to illustrate the changes in cardiac and vascular function that occur with changes in posture, venous return, and graded exercise. We use medical student volunteers and a professional echocardiographer to generate and acquire data, respectively. In small-group sessions, we developed an interactive approach to discuss the data and to make a large number of calculations from a limited number of measurements. The sequence of cardiac events and cardiac structure in vivo were illustrated with the volunteers lying down, standing, and then with their legs raised passively above the heart to increase venous return. Volunteers were then asked to peddle the bicycle to achieve steady-state heart rates of 110 and 150 beats/min. Data were collected in all these states, and calculations were performed and used as the basis of a small-group discussion to illustrate physiological principles. Information related to a surprisingly large number of cardiovascular control mechanisms was derived, and its relevance to cardiovascular dysfunction was explored. This communication describes our experience in developing a new cardiovascular control laboratory to reinforce didactic material presented in lectures and small-group sessions. PMID:19745049

  6. Critical Care Management Focused on Optimizing Brain Function After Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Ryuta; Hifumi, Toru; Kawakita, Kenya; Okazaki, Tomoya; Egawa, Satoshi; Inoue, Akihiko; Seo, Ryutaro; Inagaki, Nobuhiro; Kuroda, Yasuhiro

    2017-03-24

    The discussion of neurocritical care management in post-cardiac arrest syndrome (PCAS) has generally focused on target values used for targeted temperature management (TTM). There has been less attention paid to target values for systemic and cerebral parameters to minimize secondary brain damage in PCAS. And the neurologic indications for TTM to produce a favorable neurologic outcome remain to be determined. Critical care management of PCAS patients is fundamental and essential for both cardiologists and general intensivists to improve neurologic outcome, because definitive therapy of PCAS includes both special management of the cause of cardiac arrest, such as coronary intervention to ischemic heart disease, and intensive management of the results of cardiac arrest, such as ventilation strategies to avoid brain ischemia. We reviewed the literature and the latest research about the following issues and propose practical care recommendations. Issues are (1) prediction of TTM candidate on admission, (2) cerebral blood flow and metabolism and target value of them, (3) seizure management using continuous electroencephalography, (4) target value of hemodynamic stabilization and its method, (5) management and analysis of respiration, (6) sedation and its monitoring, (7) shivering control and its monitoring, and (8) glucose management. We hope to establish standards of neurocritical care to optimize brain function and produce a favorable neurologic outcome.

  7. Shrink-induced biomimetic wrinkled substrates for functional cardiac cell alignment and culture.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Nicole; Tu, Roger; Chen, Aaron; Lee, Eugene; Khine, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The anisotropic alignment of cardiomyocytes in native myocardium tissue is a functional feature that is absent in traditional in vitro cardiac cell culture. Microenvironmental factors cue structural organization of the myocardium, which promotes the mechanical contractile properties and electrophysiological patterns seen in mature cardiomyocytes. Current nano- and microfabrication techniques, such as photolithography, generate simplified cell culture topographies that are not truly representative of the multifaceted and multi-scale fibrils of the cardiac extracellular matrix. In addition, such technologies are costly and require a clean room for fabrication. This chapter offers an easy, fast, robust, and inexpensive fabrication of biomimetic multi-scale wrinkled surfaces through the process of plasma treating and shrinking prestressed thermoplastic. Additionally, this chapter includes techniques for culturing stem cells and their cardiac derivatives on these substrates. Importantly, this wrinkled cell culture platform is compatible with both fluorescence and bright-field imaging; real-time physiological monitoring of CM action potential propagation and contraction properties can elucidate cardiotoxicity drug effects.

  8. Detection of Cardiac Function Abnormality from MRI Images Using Normalized Wall Thickness Temporal Patterns.

    PubMed

    Wael, Mai; Ibrahim, El-Sayed H; Fahmy, Ahmed S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To develop a method for identifying abnormal myocardial function based on studying the normalized wall motion pattern during the cardiac cycle. Methods. The temporal pattern of the normalized myocardial wall thickness is used as a feature vector to assess the cardiac wall motion abnormality. Principal component analysis is used to reduce the feature dimensionality and the maximum likelihood method is used to differentiate between normal and abnormal features. The proposed method was applied on a dataset of 27 cases from normal subjects and patients. Results. The developed method achieved 81.5%, 85%, and 88.5% accuracy for identifying abnormal contractility in the basal, midventricular, and apical slices, respectively. Conclusions. A novel feature vector, namely, the normalized wall thickness, has been introduced for detecting myocardial regional wall motion abnormality. The proposed method provides assessment of the regional myocardial contractility for each cardiac segment and slice; therefore, it could be a valuable tool for automatic and fast determination of regional wall motion abnormality from conventional cine MRI images.

  9. Relationship of radionuclide indexes of cardiac function during interventions: volume loading, afterload stress, exercise, and pacing

    SciTech Connect

    Slutsky, R.A.

    1983-04-01

    We compared three radionuclide index of cardiac function: 1) the ejection fraction (EF), 2) the mean ejection rate (ER), and 3) the mean velocity of circumferential fiber shortening (MVCF) during volume loading, phenylephrine hydrochloride stress, exercise, and atrial pacing. All behaved in a similar (linear) fashion, allowing appropriate hemodynamic conclusions to be drawn using either index. During atrial pacing, the ejection fraction declined when velocity indexes increased, suggesting that the ejection fraction may not be a suitable index to characterize alterations in inotropic state during rapid alterations in heart rate, particular in the absence of angina pectoris. This may result from the reductions in cardiac volume for the duration of pacing, where the velocity index is preserved. In most circumstances excluding atrial pacing, ejection fraction during interventions is an adequate index of the change of myocardial contractile state. Overall, radionuclide angiography is an excellent technique to characterize acute hemodynamic interventions, with ejection fraction, in general, the simplest and most reliable of cardiac indexes during stress interventions.

  10. Effect of aerobic training on baroreflex regulation of cardiac and sympathetic function.

    PubMed

    Sheldahl, L M; Ebert, T J; Cox, B; Tristani, F E

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the effect of aerobic exercise training on baroreflex regulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and cardiac R-R intervals in a middle-aged to older population, 10 healthy men > 40 yr of age underwent tests of autonomic function before and after 12 wk of high-intensity training. Cardiac and peripheral baroslopes were determined from the R-R interval vs. mean arterial pressure (MAP) and peroneal MSNA vs. diastolic pressure relationships, respectively, during sequential bolus injections of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. Maximal oxygen uptake increased (P < 0.05) 17% with training. Resting R-R interval increased (881 +/- 23 to 956 +/- 38 ms, P < 0.05), MAP decreased (96 +/- 2 to 91 +/- 3 mmHg, P < 0.05), and MSNA was unaltered (23.1 +/- 2.3 to 23.6 +/- 1.9 bursts/min) with training. Before and after training, respectively, cardiac baroslopes determined with decreasing (8.7 +/- 0.9 to 9.9 +/- 5.5 ms/mmHg) and increasing MAP (9.6 +/- 2.1 to 9.9 +/- 2.2 ms/mmHg) and the peripheral sympathetic baroslope (-3.3 +/- 0.4 to -3.5 +/- 0.6 bursts.min-1 x mmHg-1) did not differ. The results suggest that short-term aerobic training does not alter resting MSNA or neurocirculatory responses to baroreceptor challenges in middle-aged and older men.

  11. Longitudinal changes of cardiac structure and function in CKD (CASCADE study).

    PubMed

    Cai, Qi-Zhe; Lu, Xiu-Zhang; Lu, Ye; Wang, Angela Yee-Moon

    2014-07-01

    Little is known regarding the natural longitudinal changes in cardiac structure and function in CKD. We hypothesized that baseline CKD stage is associated with progressive worsening in cardiac structure and function. We conducted a prospective longitudinal study, recruiting 300 patients with stages 3-5 CKD from a major regional tertiary center and university teaching hospital in Hong Kong. Baseline CKD stages were studied in relation to natural longitudinal changes in echocardiographic and tissue Doppler imaging-derived parameters. Over 1 year, the prevalence of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy increased from 40.3% to 48.9%, median left atrial volume index increased 4.8 (interquartile range [IQR], 2.1, 7.7) ml/m(2) (P<0.001), peak systolic mitral annular velocity decreased 0.5 (IQR, -1.5, 0.5) cm/s (P<0.001), early diastolic mitral annular velocity decreased 0.5 (IQR, -1.5, 0.5) cm/s (P<0.001), and eGFR declined 2.0 (IQR, -5.0, 0.0) ml/min per 1.73 m(2). CKD stages 4 and 5 were associated with more baseline abnormalities in cardiac structure and function and predicted greater longitudinal progression in LV mass index (odds ratio [OR], 3.02; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.39 to 6.58), volume index (OR, 2.58; 95% CI, 1.18 to 5.62), and left atrial volume index (OR, 2.61; 95% CI, 1.20 to 5.69) and worse diastolic dysfunction grade (OR, 3.17; 95% CI, 1.16 to 8.69) compared with stage 3a in the fully adjusted analysis. In conclusion, more advanced CKD at baseline may be associated with larger longitudinal increases in LV mass and volume and greater deterioration in diastolic function.

  12. The effects of pre-pregnancy obesity on fetal cardiac functions.

    PubMed

    Ece, Ibrahim; Uner, Abdurrahman; Balli, Sevket; Kibar, Ayse Esin; Oflaz, Mehmet Burhan; Kurdoglu, Mertihan

    2014-06-01

    Obesity is a substantial public health problem with a rapidly increasing prevalence in numerous industrialized nations. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of maternal pre-pregnancy obesity on fetal cardiac functions. We studied 55 fetuses of obese mothers and 44 fetuses of healthy mothers at 26-38 weeks of gestation. Cardiac functions were evaluated by M-mode, pulsed-wave, and tissue Doppler echocardiography. The two groups were similar in terms of maternal age, gravidity, parity, gestational age, estimated birth weight, serum lipids, and systolic-diastolic blood pressure. Fetal heart rate, diameters of the aortic and pulmonary valve annulus, aortic and pulmonary peak systolic velocities, ventricular systolic function, and cardiothoracic ratio were similar in the two groups. Pulsed-wave Doppler-derived E/A ratios in the mitral and tricuspid valves were similar in the two groups. The deceleration time of early mitral inflow was prolonged in the fetuses of the obese mothers. In the interventricular septum, left ventricle posterior wall, and right ventricle free wall, the E a and A a were higher, and E a/A a ratios were significantly lower in the study group than in the control group. The E/E a ratio was higher in the obese group than in the control group. The isovolumic relaxation time and the right and left ventricle myocardial performance indices were higher in the fetuses of the obese mothers than in the fetuses of the healthy mothers. We believe that maternal obesity has an important influence on fetal cardiac diastolic functions.

  13. Cardiac function and myocardial perfusion immediately following maximal treadmill exercise inside the MRI room

    PubMed Central

    Jekic, Mihaela; Foster, Eric L; Ballinger, Michelle R; Raman, Subha V; Simonetti, Orlando P

    2008-01-01

    Treadmill exercise stress testing is an essential tool in the prevention, detection, and treatment of a broad spectrum of cardiovascular disease. After maximal exercise, cardiac images at peak stress are typically acquired using nuclear scintigraphy or echocardiography, both of which have inherent limitations. Although CMR offers superior image quality, the lack of MRI-compatible exercise and monitoring equipment has prevented the realization of treadmill exercise CMR. It is critical to commence imaging as quickly as possible after exercise to capture exercise-induced cardiac wall motion abnormalities. We modified a commercial treadmill such that it could be safely positioned inside the MRI room to minimize the distance between the treadmill and the scan table. We optimized the treadmill exercise CMR protocol in 20 healthy volunteers and successfully imaged cardiac function and myocardial perfusion at peak stress, followed by viability imaging at rest. Imaging commenced an average of 30 seconds after maximal exercise. Real-time cine of seven slices with no breath-hold and no ECG-gating was completed within 45 seconds of exercise, immediately followed by stress perfusion imaging of three short-axis slices which showed an average time to peak enhancement within 57 seconds of exercise. We observed a 3.1-fold increase in cardiac output and a myocardial perfusion reserve index of 1.9, which agree with reported values for healthy subjects at peak stress. This study successfully demonstrates in-room treadmill exercise CMR in healthy volunteers, but confirmation of feasibility in patients with heart disease is still needed. PMID:18272005

  14. Improved hepatic arterial fraction estimation using cardiac output correction of arterial input functions for liver DCE MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, Manil D.; Bainbridge, Alan; Atkinson, David; Punwani, Shonit; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P.; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Taylor, Stuart A.

    2017-02-01

    Liver dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI pharmacokinetic modelling could be useful in the assessment of diffuse liver disease and focal liver lesions, but is compromised by errors in arterial input function (AIF) sampling. In this study, we apply cardiac output correction to arterial input functions (AIFs) for liver DCE MRI and investigate the effect on dual-input single compartment hepatic perfusion parameter estimation and reproducibility. Thirteen healthy volunteers (28.7  ±  1.94 years, seven males) underwent liver DCE MRI and cardiac output measurement using aortic root phase contrast MRI (PCMRI), with reproducibility (n  =  9) measured at 7 d. Cardiac output AIF correction was undertaken by constraining the first pass AIF enhancement curve using the indicator-dilution principle. Hepatic perfusion parameters with and without cardiac output AIF correction were compared and 7 d reproducibility assessed. Differences between cardiac output corrected and uncorrected liver DCE MRI portal venous (PV) perfusion (p  =  0.066), total liver blood flow (TLBF) (p  =  0.101), hepatic arterial (HA) fraction (p  =  0.895), mean transit time (MTT) (p  =  0.646), distribution volume (DV) (p  =  0.890) were not significantly different. Seven day corrected HA fraction reproducibility was improved (mean difference 0.3%, Bland–Altman 95% limits-of-agreement (BA95%LoA)  ±27.9%, coefficient of variation (CoV) 61.4% versus 9.3%, ±35.5%, 81.7% respectively without correction). Seven day uncorrected PV perfusion was also improved (mean difference 9.3 ml min‑1/100 g, BA95%LoA  ±506.1 ml min‑1/100 g, CoV 64.1% versus 0.9 ml min‑1/100 g, ±562.8 ml min‑1/100 g, 65.1% respectively with correction) as was uncorrected TLBF (mean difference 43.8 ml min‑1/100 g, BA95%LoA  ±586.7 ml min‑1/ 100 g, CoV 58.3% versus 13.3 ml min‑1/100 g, ±661.5 ml min‑1/100 g, 60

  15. Frequency components of systolic blood pressure variability reflect vasomotor and cardiac sympathetic functions in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Takahiko; Eguchi, Kunihiro; Sakurai, Hiroki; Ohmichi, Yusuke; Hashimoto, Tatsuyuki; Ohmichi, Mika; Morimoto, Atsuko; Yamaguchi, Yoshiko; Ushida, Takahiro; Iwase, Satoshi; Sugenoya, Junichi; Kumazawa, Takao

    2011-09-01

    In this study, after confirming the suppression of autonomic nervous function by isoflurane anesthesia using autonomic antagonists, we pharmacologically investigated the involvement of vasomotor and cardiac sympathetic functions in systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) frequency components in conscious rats at rest and during exposure to low-ambient temperature (LT-exposure, 9°C for 90 min). Under unanesthesia, phentolamine administration (α-adrenoceptor antagonist, 10 mg/kg) decreased the mid-frequency component (MF 0.33-0.73 Hz) and inversely increased the high-frequency component (HF 1.3-2.5 Hz). The increased HF was suppressed by subsequent treatment with atenolol (β-adrenoceptor antagonist, 10 mg/kg), but not with atropine (muscarinic receptor antagonist, 10 mg/kg). Moreover, phentolamine administration after atenolol decreased MF, but did not increase HF. LT-exposure increased MF and HF; however, phentolamine pretreatment suppressed the increased MF during LT-exposure, and atenolol pretreatment dose-dependently decreased the increased HF. These results suggest that MF and HF of SBPV may reflect α-adrenoceptor-mediated vasomotor function and β-adrenoceptor-mediated cardiac sympathetic function, respectively, in the conscious state.

  16. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  17. Drive time to cardiac rehabilitation: at what point does it affect utilization?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A 30 minute drive time threshold has often been cited as indicative of accessible health services. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a chronic disease management program designed to enhance and maintain cardiovascular health, and geographic barriers to utilization are often cited. The purpose of this study was to empirically test the drive time threshold for CR utilization. Methods A prospective study, using a multi-level design of coronary artery disease outpatients nested within 97 cardiologists. Participants completed a baseline sociodemographic survey, and reported CR referral, enrollment and participation in a second survey 9 months later. CR utilization was verified with CR sites. Geographic information systems were used to generate drive times at 60, 80 and 100% of the speed limit to the closest CR site from participants' homes, to take into consideration various traffic conditions. Bivariate analysis was used to test for differences in CR referral, enrollment and degree of participation by drive time. Logistic regression was used to test drive time increments where significant differences were found. Results Drive times were generated for 1209 outpatients. Overall, CR referral was verified for 523 (43.3%) outpatients, with verified enrollment for 444 (36.7%) participating in a mean of 86.4 ± 25.7% of prescribed sessions. There were significant differences in CR referral and enrollment by drive time (ps < .01), but not degree of participation. Logistic regression analysis (ps < .001) revealed that the drive time threshold at 80% of the posted speed limit for physician referral may be 60 minutes (OR = .26, 95% CI: 0.13-0.55), and the threshold for patient CR enrollment may also be 60 minutes (OR = .11, 95% CI: 0.04-0.33). Conclusions Physicians may be taking geography into consideration when referring patients to CR. Empirical consideration also reveals that patients are significantly less likely to enroll in CR where they must drive 60 minutes or

  18. The TRPM4 channel is functionally important for the beneficial cardiac remodeling induced by endurance training.

    PubMed

    Gueffier, Mélanie; Zintz, Justin; Lambert, Karen; Finan, Amanda; Aimond, Franck; Chakouri, Nourdine; Hédon, Christophe; Granier, Mathieu; Launay, Pierre; Thireau, Jérôme; Richard, Sylvain; Demion, Marie

    2017-02-21

    Cardiac hypertrophy (CH) is an adaptive process that exists in two distinct forms and allows the heart to adequately respond to an organism's needs. The first form of CH is physiological, adaptive and reversible. The second is pathological, irreversible and associated with fibrosis and cardiomyocyte death. CH involves multiple molecular mechanisms that are still not completely defined but it is now accepted that physiological CH is associated more with the PI3-K/Akt pathway while the main signaling cascade activated in pathological CH involves the Calcineurin-NFAT pathway. It was recently demonstrated that the TRPM4 channel may act as a negative regulator of pathological CH by regulating calcium entry and thus the Cn-NFAT pathway. In this study, we examined if the TRPM4 channel is involved in the physiological CH process. We evaluated the effects of 4 weeks endurance training on the hearts of Trpm4 (+/+) and Trpm4 (-/-) mice. We identified an elevated functional expression of the TRPM4 channel in cardiomyocytes after endurance training suggesting a potential role for the channel in physiological CH. We then observed that Trpm4 (+/+) mice displayed left ventricular hypertrophy after endurance training associated with enhanced cardiac function. By contrast, Trpm4 (-/-) mice did not develop these adaptions. While Trpm4 (-/-) mice did not develop gross cardiac hypertrophy, the cardiomyocyte surface area was larger and associated with an increase of Tunel positive cells. Endurance training in Trpm4 (+/+) mice did not increase DNA fragmentation in the heart. Endurance training in Trpm4 (+/+) mice was associated with activation of the classical physiological CH Akt pathway while Trpm4 (-/-) favored the Calcineurin pathway. Calcium studies demonstrated that TRPM4 channel negatively regulates calcium entry providing support for activation of the Cn-NFAT pathway in Trpm4 (-/-) mice. In conclusion, we provide evidence for the functional expression of TRPM4 channel in response

  19. Reduction of Leukocyte Counts by Hydroxyurea Improves Cardiac Function in Rats with Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guiyue; Yao, Yucai; Pan, Lingyun; Zhu, Wei; Yan, Suhua

    2015-12-17

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to decrease leukocytes counts by hydroxyurea (Hu) in an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) rat model and examine its effect on the inflammatory response of myocardial infarction and cardiac functions. MATERIAL AND METHODS AMI was successfully caused in 36 rats, and 12 control rats received sham operation. Rats in the AMI group were then randomly divided into Hu and vehicle group with 18 rats each. Rats in the Hu AMI group received Hu (200 mg/kg) intragastrically while vehicle AMI group received saline. Leukocytes counts, cardiac functions, myocardial tissue morphology, and levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM), P-selectin and platelet activating factor (PAF) were measured and compared among the three groups four weeks after AMI induction. RESULTS Leukocytes, neutrophils, and leukomonocyte counts in vehicle AMI rats were significantly higher than that of the normal control group (p<0.05). However, Hu treatment decreased their counts significantly (p<0.05). sICAM, P-selectin, and PAF level in vehicle AMI group were significantly higher than those of the normal group, and their level was also decreased by Hu treatment (p<0.05). Echocardiography analysis showed that Hu treatment increased left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and left ventricular fractional shortening (LVFS) compared to that of vehicle AMI group (p<0.05). Histopathological examination showed that Hu significantly reduced the swelling of the heart muscle fiber in necrotic foci and the number of inflammatory cells infiltrated into myocardial interstitium compared to vehicle AMI group. CONCLUSIONS Decrease leukocytes counts by Hu significantly reduced inflammatory reaction and improved cardiac functions in AMI rats.

  20. Adaptive responses of cardiac function to fetal postural change as gestational age increases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Jin; Choi, Hye Jin; Yang, Sun Young; Koo, Boo Hae; Ahn, Ki Hoon; Hong, Soon Cheol; Oh, Min-Jeong; Kim, Hai-Joong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The cardiovascular system maintains homeostasis through a series of adaptive responses to physiological requirements. However, little is known about the adaptation of fetal cardiac function to gravity, according to gestational age. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the adaptive responses of cardiac function to postural changes, using Tei index measurements. Methods Fetal echocardiography and Doppler examination were performed on 114 women with vertex singleton pregnancies at 19 to 40 weeks' gestation. Participants were placed in an upright seated position, and the Tei index for fetal left ventricular cardiac function was measured. The women were then moved into a supine position and the Tei index was re-measured. Results The mean Tei index when measured in an upright seated position was significantly lower than that measured in a supine positioning for all fetuses (0.528±0.103 vs. 0.555±0.106, P=0.014, respectively). This difference was also noted in fetuses with a gestational age of 28–40 weeks (0.539±0.107 vs. 0.574±0.102, P=0.011, respectively). However, there was no difference in the Tei index between an upright seated and a supine position among fetuses with a gestational age of <28 weeks (0.505±0.091 vs. 0.516±0.103, P=0.571, respectively). Conclusion Postural changes from an upright seated to a supine position result in an increased Tei index after a gestational age of 28 weeks. This appears to reflect maturation in the adaptive responses of the fetal cardiovascular system to postural changes. PMID:27896244

  1. Contributions of Ca2+-Independent Thin Filament Activation to Cardiac Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Aboelkassem, Yasser; Bonilla, Jordan A.; McCabe, Kimberly J.; Campbell, Stuart G.

    2015-01-01

    Although Ca2+ is the principal regulator of contraction in striated muscle, in vitro evidence suggests that some actin-myosin interaction is still possible even in its absence. Whether this Ca2+-independent activation (CIA) occurs under physiological conditions remains unclear, as does its potential impact on the function of intact cardiac muscle. The purpose of this study was to investigate CIA using computational analysis. We added a structurally motivated representation of this phenomenon to an existing myofilament model, which allowed predictions of CIA-dependent muscle behavior. We found that a certain amount of CIA was essential for the model to reproduce reported effects of nonfunctional troponin C on myofilament force generation. Consequently, those data enabled estimation of ΔGCIA, the energy barrier for activating a thin filament regulatory unit in the absence of Ca2+. Using this estimate of ΔGCIA as a point of reference (∼7 kJ mol−1), we examined its impact on various aspects of muscle function through additional simulations. CIA decreased the Hill coefficient of steady-state force while increasing myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity. At the same time, CIA had minimal effect on the rate of force redevelopment after slack/restretch. Simulations of twitch tension show that the presence of CIA increases peak tension while profoundly delaying relaxation. We tested the model’s ability to represent perturbations to the Ca2+ regulatory mechanism by analyzing twitch records measured in transgenic mice expressing a cardiac troponin I mutation (R145G). The effects of the mutation on twitch dynamics were fully reproduced by a single parameter change, namely lowering ΔGCIA by 2.3 kJ mol−1 relative to its wild-type value. Our analyses suggest that CIA is present in cardiac muscle under normal conditions and that its modulation by gene mutations or other factors can alter both systolic and diastolic function. PMID:26588569

  2. Molecular mechanisms of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in cardiac function and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin Hua; Jin, Chun Zi; Jang, Ji Hyun; Wang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS or NOS1) is the major endogenous source of myocardial nitric oxide (NO), which facilitates cardiac relaxation and modulates contraction. In the healthy heart it regulates intracellular Ca2+, signalling pathways and oxidative homeostasis and is upregulated from early phases upon pathogenic insult. nNOS plays pivotal roles in protecting the myocardium from increased oxidative stress, systolic/diastolic dysfunction, adverse structural remodelling and arrhythmias in the failing heart. Here, we show that the downstream target proteins of nNOS and underlying post-transcriptional modifications are shifted during disease progression from Ca2+-handling proteins [e.g. PKA-dependent phospholamban phosphorylation (PLN-Ser16)] in the healthy heart to cGMP/PKG-dependent PLN-Ser16 with acute angiotensin II (Ang II) treatment. In early hypertension, nNOS-derived NO is involved in increases of cGMP/PKG-dependent troponin I (TnI-Ser23/24) and cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMBP-C-Ser273). However, nNOS-derived NO is shown to increase S-nitrosylation of various Ca2+-handling proteins in failing myocardium. The spatial compartmentation of nNOS and its translocation for diverse binding partners in the diseased heart or various nNOS splicing variants and regulation in response to pathological stress may be responsible for varied underlying mechanisms and functions. In this review, we endeavour to outline recent advances in knowledge of the molecular mechanisms mediating the functions of nNOS in the myocardium in both normal and diseased hearts. Insights into nNOS gene regulation in various tissues are discussed. Overall, nNOS is an important cardiac protector in the diseased heart. The dynamic localization and various mediating mechanisms of nNOS ensure that it is able to regulate functions effectively in the heart under stress. PMID:24756636

  3. Serotonin and Dopamine: Unifying Affective, Activational, and Decision Functions

    PubMed Central

    Cools, Roshan; Nakamura, Kae; Daw, Nathaniel D

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin, like dopamine (DA), has long been implicated in adaptive behavior, including decision making and reinforcement learning. However, although the two neuromodulators are tightly related and have a similar degree of functional importance, compared with DA, we have a much less specific understanding about the mechanisms by which serotonin affects behavior. Here, we draw on recent work on computational models of dopaminergic function to suggest a framework by which many of the seemingly diverse functions associated with both DA and serotonin—comprising both affective and activational ones, as well as a number of other functions not overtly related to either—can be seen as consequences of a single root mechanism. PMID:20736991

  4. Improvement of early postburn cardiac function by use of Panax notoginseng and immediate total eschar excision in one operation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y S; Yang, Z C; Yan, B G; Hu, X C; Li, A N; Crowther, R S

    1999-02-01

    Cardiac dysfunction development in the early stage postburn has been an important problem in burn treatment. However, no effective therapies are available for use in clinical practice. In this study, we sought to determine whether early total eschar excision (EEE) in one operation and the traditional Chinese herb Panax notoginseng (PNS) would be helpful in improving early postburn cardiac function. 160 Wistar rats were randomly divided into burn (burn group, n = 50), burn treated with EEE (EEE group, n = 50), burn treated with PNS (PNS group, n = 50) groups and normal controls (n = 10). All rats except the normal control were given a 30% TBSA full skin thickness burn and resuscitated with Ringer's lactate. EEE was performed immediately after the burn group received the first intraperitoneal injection of Ringer's lactate. The wound was covered with homoskin from normal rats. In the PNS group, two doses of PNS (200 mg/kg for each dose) were given intraperitoneally immediately and 4 h postburn. Cardiac contractile function and cardiac troponin T (TnT) were determined at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h postburn. Results showed that cardiac contractile parameters including AOSP, AODP, LVSP and +dp/dt(max) all declined and were still significantly lower than the control values at 24 h postburn. Cardiac TnT was elevated markedly and reached a level 25 times higher than control at 12 h postburn. In EEE and PNS groups, the reduction of cardiac contractile function was limited as compared with that in the burn group. Levels of TnT in both EEE and PNS groups were significantly lower than in the burn group 6 h postburn later. The findings of this study demonstrated that both EEE and PNS were effective in improving early postburn cardiac function.

  5. Beneficial Effects of Schisandrin B on the Cardiac Function in Mice Model of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pengsheng; Pang, Sisi; Yang, Naiquan; Meng, Haoyu; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Ningtian; Zhang, Min; Xu, Zhihui; Gao, Wei; Chen, Bo; Tao, Zhengxian; Wang, Liansheng; Yang, Zhijian

    2013-01-01

    The fruit of Schisandra chinensis has been used in the traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years. Accumulating evidence suggests that Schisandrin B (Sch B) has cardioprotection effect on myocardial ischemia in vitro. However, it is unclear whether Sch B has beneficial effects on continuous myocardial ischemia in vivo. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether Sch B could improve cardiac function and attenuate myocardial remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI) in mice. Mice model of MI was established by permanent ligation of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery. Then the MI mice were randomly treated with Sch B or vehicle alone. After treatment for 3 weeks, Sch B could increase survival rate, improve heart function and decrease infarct size compared with vehicle. Moreover, Sch B could down-regulate some inflammatory cytokines, activate eNOS pathway, inhibit cell apoptosis, and enhance cell proliferation. Further in vitro study on H9c2 cells showed similar effects of Sch B on prevention of hypoxia-induced inflammation and cell apoptosis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Sch B can reduce inflammation, inhibit apoptosis, and improve cardiac function after ischemic injury. It represents a potential novel therapeutic approach for treatment of ischemic heart disease. PMID:24260217

  6. Functional Coupling of Ca2+ Channels and Ryanodine Receptors in Cardiac Myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, James S. K.; Cleemann, Lars; Morad, Martin

    1995-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, dihydropyridine receptors are functionally coupled to ryanodine receptors of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in triadic or diadic junctional complexes. In cardiac muscle direct physical or functional couplings have not been demonstrated. We have tested the hypothesis of functional coupling of L-type Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptors in rat cardiac myocytes by comparing the efficacies of Ca2+ in triggering Ca2+ release when the ion enters the cell via the Ca2+ channels or the Na^+/Ca2+ exchanger. Ca2+ transported through the Ca2+ channels was 20-160 times more effective than Ca2+ influx via the Na^+/Ca2+ exchanger in gating Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, suggesting privileged communication between Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptors. In support of this hypothesis we found that Ca2+ channels were inactivated by Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, even though the myoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations were buffered with 10 mM EGTA. The data thus suggest privileged cross signaling between the dihydropyridine and ryanodine receptors such that Ca2+ flux through either the Ca2+ channel or the ryanodine receptor alters the gating kinetics of the other channel.

  7. Antioxidant treatment improves neonatal survival and prevents impaired cardiac function at adulthood following neonatal glucocorticoid therapy

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Youguo; Herrera, Emilio A; Evans, Rhys D; Giussani, Dino A

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are widely used to treat chronic lung disease in premature infants but their longer-term adverse effects on the cardiovascular system raise concerns. We reported that neonatal dexamethasone treatment in rats induced in the short term molecular indices of cardiac oxidative stress and cardiovascular tissue remodelling at weaning, and that neonatal combined antioxidant and dexamethasone treatment was protective at this time. In this study, we investigated whether such effects of neonatal dexamethasone have adverse consequences for NO bioavailability and cardiovascular function at adulthood, and whether neonatal combined antioxidant and dexamethasone treatment is protective in the adult. Newborn rat pups received daily i.p. injections of a human-relevant tapering dose of dexamethasone (D; n= 8; 0.5, 0.3, 0.1 μg g−1) or D with vitamins C and E (DCE; n= 8; 200 and 100 mg kg−1, respectively) on postnatal days 1–3 (P1–3); vitamins were continued from P4 to P6. Controls received equal volumes of vehicle from P1 to P6 (C; n= 8). A fourth group received vitamins alone (CCE; n= 8). At P100, plasma NO metabolites (NOx) was measured and isolated hearts were assessed under both Working and Langendorff preparations. Relative to controls, neonatal dexamethasone therapy increased mortality by 18% (P < 0.05). Surviving D pups at adulthood had lower plasma NOx concentrations (10.6 ± 0.8 vs. 28.0 ± 1.5 μm), an increased relative left ventricular (LV) mass (70 ± 2 vs. 63 ± 1%), enhanced LV end-diastolic pressure (14 ± 2 vs. 8 ± 1 mmHg) and these hearts failed to adapt output with increased preload (Δcardiac output: 2.9 ± 2.0 vs. 10.6 ± 1.2 ml min−1) or afterload (Δcardiac output: −5.3 ± 2.0 vs.1.4 ± 1.2 ml min−1); all P < 0.05. Combined neonatal dexamethasone with antioxidant vitamins improved postnatal survival, restored plasma NOx and protected against cardiac dysfunction at adulthood. In conclusion, neonatal dexamethasone therapy promotes

  8. Effects of onabotulinumtoxinA on cardiac function following intradetrusor injections.

    PubMed

    Mehnert, Ulrich; de Kort, Laetitia M; Wöllner, Jens; Kozomara, Marko; van Koeveringe, Gommert A; Kessler, Thomas M

    2016-11-01

    OnabotulinumtoxinA intradetrusor injections are considered a highly effective localized therapy for refractory detrusor overactivity. However, despite evidence for distant systemic effects of onabotulinumtoxinA, little is known on potential systemic side effects following intradetrusor injections. Given that onabotulinumtoxinA is a highly potent toxin this is an important safety issue specifically with regard to repeat injections and parallel treatments with botulinum toxin. Hence, it was the purpose of this prospective study to investigate, using heart rate variability (HRV) analysis, whether onabotulinumtoxinA causes systemic effects on cardiac function following intradetrusor injections. Patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and age-matched healthy controls were recruited. Concomitant medication and diseases affecting the cardio-vascular system were exclusion criteria. A 3-channel resting electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded in supine position for 15min during four consecutive visits: 1) 2weeks prior onabotulinumtoxinA intradetrusor injections, 2) 10min prior injections, 3) 30min after injections, and 4) 6weeks after injections. NDO patients received intradetrusor injections (300units Botox®) between visits 2 and 3. The control group had no intervention. Short-term (5min) HRV analysis included assessment of frequency and time domain parameters. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA with repeated measures and the t-test. Due to multiple comparisons, α was corrected to 0.0125 (Bonferroni method). Twelve healthy volunteers (5♀, 7♂; 46±12years old) and 12 NDO patients (5♀, 7♂; 46±13years old) completed all measurements. Comparing both groups, resting heart rate was significantly higher in the patients group at visit 4 only. No further significant differences in time and frequency domain parameters were discovered. Within the NDO group, standard deviation of the normal to normal intervals (SDNN) in the ECG demonstrated a

  9. Translating golden retriever muscular dystrophy microarray findings to novel biomarkers for cardiac/skeletal muscle function in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Galindo, Cristi L.; Soslow, Jonathan H.; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L.; Gupte, Manisha; Smith, Holly M.; Sengsayadeth, Seng; Sawyer, Douglas B.; Benson, D. Woodrow; Kornegay, Joe N.; Markham, Larry W.

    2016-01-01

    Background In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), abnormal cardiac function is typically preceded by a decade of skeletal muscle disease. Molecular reasons for differences in onset and progression of these muscle groups are unknown. Human biomarkers are lacking. Methods We analyzed cardiac and skeletal muscle microarrays from normal and golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs (ages 6, 12, or 47+ months) to gain insight into muscle dysfunction and to identify putative DMD biomarkers. These biomarkers were then measured using human DMD blood samples. Results We identified GRMD candidate genes that might contribute to the disparity between cardiac and skeletal muscle disease, focusing on brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) and osteopontin (OPN/SPP1). BDNF was elevated in cardiac muscle of younger GRMD but was unaltered in skeletal muscle, while SPP1 was increased only in GRMD skeletal muscle. In human DMD, circulating levels of BDNF were inversely correlated with ventricular function and fibrosis, while SPP1 levels correlated with skeletal muscle function. Conclusion These results highlight gene expression patterns that could account for differences in cardiac and skeletal disease in GRMD. Most notably, animal model-derived data were translated to DMD and support use of BDNF and SPP1 as biomarkers for cardiac and skeletal muscle involvement, respectively. PMID:26672735

  10. Acute effects of intravenous dronedarone on electrocardiograms, hemodynamics and cardiac functions in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Saengklub, Nakkawee; Limprasutr, Vudhiporn; Sawangkoon, Suwanakiet; Buranakarl, Chollada; Hamlin, Robert L; Kijtawornrat, Anusak

    2016-02-01

    Dronedarone is a class III antiarrhythmic that has been used for management of atrial fibrillation in humans, but limited information was found in dogs. The objective of this study was to determine the acute effects of escalating concentrations of dronedarone on electrocardiograms (ECG), hemodynamics and cardiac mechanics in healthy dogs. A total of 7 beagle dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane and instrumented to obtain lead II ECG, pressures at ascending aorta, right atrium, pulmonary artery and left ventricle, and left ventricular pressure-volume relationship. Five dogs were given vehicle and followed by escalating doses of dronedarone (0.5, 1.0 and 2.5 mg/kg, 15 min for each dose), and two dogs were used as a vehicle-treated control. All parameters were measured at 15 min after the end of each dose. The results showed that all parameters in vehicle-treated dogs were unaltered. Dronedarone at 2.5 mg/kg significantly lengthened PQ interval (P<0.01), reduced cardiac output (P<0.01) and increased systemic vascular resistance (P<0.01). Dronedarone produced negative inotropy assessed by significantly lowered end-systolic pressure-volume relationship, preload recruitable stroke work, contractility index and dP/dtmax. It also impaired diastolic function by significantly increased end-diastolic pressure-volume relationship, tau and dP/dtmin. These results suggested that acute effects of dronedarone produced negative dromotropy, inotropy and lusitropy in anesthetized dogs. Care should be taken when given dronedarone to dogs, especially when the patients have impaired cardiac function.

  11. Increased epicardial fat thickness is associated with cardiac functional changes in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Kilicaslan, Baris; Ozdogan, Oner; Aydin, Mehmet; Dursun, Huseyin; Susam, Ibrahim; Ertas, Faruk

    2012-01-01

    Epicardial fat tissue is a visceral fat depot with anatomical and functional contiguity to the myocardium and coronary arteries. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between epicardial fat thickness (EFT) and cardiac changes in healthy female subjects. The study population consisted of ninety-six consecutive healthy female (mean age 31.1 ± 6.7 years) who underwent transthoracic echocardiography. EFT was measured by echocardiography. Subjects were divided into two groups according to the EFT; EFT < 6 mm and EFT ≥ 6 mm. The cardiac structural changes, increased left atrial volume indices (LAVI) (41.2 ± 9.9 vs. 52.6 ± 12.5, p = 0.001) and left ventricular mass indices (LVMI) (129.6 ± 32.1 vs. 155.6 ± 31.6 p < 0.05), were observed in patients with increased EFT. Myocardial tei index (MTI), which was used to evaluate both systolic and diastolic functions, was higher with increased EFT (0.44 ± 0.07 vs. 0.48 ± 0.08, p = 0.02). The correlation analysis revealed significant correlation between EFT and each of LAVI (r = 0.312, p = 0.002), LVMI (r = 0.301, p = 0.003), body mass index (BMI) (r = 0.8, p < 0.001), and MTI (r = 0.27, p = 0.005). Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that EFT was associated with BMI (t = 5.28, p = 0.001), MTI (r = 2.39, p = 0.019), LVMI (r = 2.16, p = 0.01), and LAVI (r = 3.21, p = 0.002). In conclusion, EFT is an important predictor of cardiac alterations in women who are prone to obesity.

  12. Effects of avertin versus xylazine-ketamine anesthesia on cardiac function in normal mice.

    PubMed

    Hart, C Y; Burnett, J C; Redfield, M M

    2001-11-01

    Anesthetic regimens commonly administered during studies that assess cardiac structure and function in mice are xylazine-ketamine (XK) and avertin (AV). While it is known that XK anesthesia produces more bradycardia in the mouse, the effects of XK and AV on cardiac function have not been compared. We anesthetized normal adult male Swiss Webster mice with XK or AV. Transthoracic echocardiography and closed-chest cardiac catheterization were performed to assess heart rate (HR), left ventricular (LV) dimensions at end diastole and end systole (LVDd and LVDs, respectively), fractional shortening (FS), LV end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), the time constant of isovolumic relaxation (tau), and the first derivatives of LV pressure rise and fall (dP/dt(max) and dP/dt(min), respectively). During echocardiography, HR was lower in XK than AV mice (250 +/- 14 beats/min in XK vs. 453 +/- 24 beats/min in AV, P < 0.05). Preload was increased in XK mice (LVDd: 4.1 +/- 0.08 mm in XK vs. 3.8 +/- 0.09 mm in AV, P < 0.05). FS, a load-dependent index of systolic function, was increased in XK mice (45 +/- 1.2% in XK vs. 40 +/- 0.8% in AV, P < 0.05). At LV catheterization, the difference in HR with AV (453 +/- 24 beats/min) and XK (342 +/- 30 beats/min, P < 0.05) anesthesia was more variable, and no significant differences in systolic or diastolic function were seen in the group as a whole. However, in XK mice with HR <300 beats/min, LVEDP was increased (28 +/- 5 vs. 6.2 +/- 2 mmHg in mice with HR >300 beats/min, P < 0.05), whereas systolic (LV dP/dt(max): 4,402 +/- 798 vs. 8,250 +/- 415 mmHg/s in mice with HR >300 beats/min, P < 0.05) and diastolic (tau: 23 +/- 2 vs. 14 +/- 1 ms in mice with HR >300 beats/min, P < 0.05) function were impaired. Compared with AV, XK produces profound bradycardia with effects on loading conditions and ventricular function. The disparate findings at echocardiography and LV catheterization underscore the importance of comprehensive assessment of LV function in

  13. Modifications of myofilament protein phosphorylation and function in response to cardiac arrest induced in a swine model

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Mike; Previs, Michael J.; Mader, Timothy J.; Debold, Edward P.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrest is a prevalent condition with a poor prognosis, attributable in part to persistent myocardial dysfunction following resuscitation. The molecular basis of this dysfunction remains unclear. We induced cardiac arrest in a porcine model of acute sudden death and assessed the impact of ischemia and reperfusion on the molecular function of isolated cardiac contractile proteins. Cardiac arrest was electrically induced, left untreated for 12 min, and followed by a resuscitation protocol. With successful resuscitations, the heart was reperfused for 2 h (IR2) and the muscle harvested. In failed resuscitations, tissue samples were taken following the failed efforts (IDNR). Actin filament velocity, using myosin isolated from IR2 or IDNR cardiac tissue, was nearly identical to myosin from the control tissue in a motility assay. However, both maximal velocity (25% faster than control) and calcium sensitivity (pCa50 6.57 ± 0.04 IDNR vs. 6.34 ± 0.07 control) were significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced using native thin filaments (actin+troponin+tropomyosin) from IDNR samples, suggesting that the enhanced velocity is mediated through an alteration in muscle regulatory proteins (troponin+tropomyosin). Mass spectrometry analysis showed that only samples from the IR2 had an increase in total phosphorylation levels of troponin (Tn) and tropomyosin (Tm), but both IR2 and IDNR samples demonstrated a significant shift from mono-phosphorylated to bis-phosphorylated forms of the inhibitory subunit of Tn (TnI) compared to control. This suggests that the shift to bis-phosphorylation of TnI is associated with the enhanced function in IDNR, but this effect may be attenuated when phosphorylation of Tm is increased in tandem, as observed for IR2. There are likely many other molecular changes induced following cardiac arrest, but to our knowledge, these data provide the first evidence that this form cardiac arrest can alter the in vitro function of the cardiac contractile proteins

  14. Can Functional Cardiac Age be Predicted from ECG in a Normal Healthy Population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd; Starc, Vito; Leban, Manja; Sinigoj, Petra; Vrhovec, Milos

    2011-01-01

    In a normal healthy population, we desired to determine the most age-dependent conventional and advanced ECG parameters. We hypothesized that changes in several ECG parameters might correlate with age and together reliably characterize the functional age of the heart. Methods: An initial study population of 313 apparently healthy subjects was ultimately reduced to 148 subjects (74 men, 84 women, in the range from 10 to 75 years of age) after exclusion criteria. In all subjects, ECG recordings (resting 5-minute 12-lead high frequency ECG) were evaluated via custom software programs to calculate up to 85 different conventional and advanced ECG parameters including beat-to-beat QT and RR variability, waveform complexity, and signal-averaged, high-frequency and spatial/spatiotemporal ECG parameters. The prediction of functional age was evaluated by multiple linear regression analysis using the best 5 univariate predictors. Results: Ignoring what were ultimately small differences between males and females, the functional age was found to be predicted (R2= 0.69, P < 0.001) from a linear combination of 5 independent variables: QRS elevation in the frontal plane (p<0.001), a new repolarization parameter QTcorr (p<0.001), mean high frequency QRS amplitude (p=0.009), the variability parameter % VLF of RRV (p=0.021) and the P-wave width (p=0.10). Here, QTcorr represents the correlation between the calculated QT and the measured QT signal. Conclusions: In apparently healthy subjects with normal conventional ECGs, functional cardiac age can be estimated by multiple linear regression analysis of mostly advanced ECG results. Because some parameters in the regression formula, such as QTcorr, high frequency QRS amplitude and P-wave width also change with disease in the same direction as with increased age, increased functional age of the heart may reflect subtle age-related pathologies in cardiac electrical function that are usually hidden on conventional ECG.

  15. Structure and function of cardiac troponin C (TNNC1): Implications for heart failure, cardiomyopathies, and troponin modulating drugs.

    PubMed

    Li, Monica X; Hwang, Peter M

    2015-10-25

    In striated muscle, the protein troponin complex turns contraction on and off in a calcium-dependent manner. The calcium-sensing component of the complex is troponin C, which is expressed from the TNNC1 gene in both cardiac muscle and slow-twitch skeletal muscle (identical transcript in both tissues) and the TNNC2 gene in fast-twitch skeletal muscle. Cardiac troponin C (cTnC) is made up of two globular EF-hand domains connected by a flexible linker. The structural C-domain (cCTnC) contains two high affinity calcium-binding sites that are always occupied by Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) under physiologic conditions, stabilizing an open conformation that remains anchored to the rest of the troponin complex. In contrast, the regulatory N-domain (cNTnC) contains a single low affinity site that is largely unoccupied at resting calcium concentrations. During muscle activation, calcium binding to cNTnC favors an open conformation that binds to the switch region of troponin I, removing adjacent inhibitory regions of troponin I from actin and allowing muscle contraction to proceed. Regulation of the calcium binding affinity of cNTnC is physiologically important, because it directly impacts the calcium sensitivity of muscle contraction. Calcium sensitivity can be modified by drugs that stabilize the open form of cNTnC, post-translational modifications like phosphorylation of troponin I, or downstream thin filament protein interactions that impact the availability of the troponin I switch region. Recently, mutations in cTnC have been associated with hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy. A detailed understanding of how calcium sensitivity is regulated through the troponin complex is necessary for explaining how mutations perturb its function to promote cardiomyopathy and how post-translational modifications in the thin filament affect heart function and heart failure. Troponin modulating drugs are being developed for the treatment of cardiomyopathies and heart failure.

  16. Salvianolic acid B functioned as a competitive inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and efficiently prevented cardiac remodeling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Infarct-induced left ventricular (LV) remodeling is a deleterious consequence after acute myocardial infarction (MI) which may further advance to congestive heart failure. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies to attenuate the effects of LV remodeling are urgently needed. Salvianolic acid B (SalB) from Salviae mitiorrhizae, which has been widely used in China for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, is a potential candidate for therapeutic intervention of LV remodeling targeting matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Results Molecular modeling and LIGPLOT analysis revealed in silico docking of SalB at the catalytic site of MMP-9. Following this lead, we expressed truncated MMP-9 which contains only the catalytic domain, and used this active protein for in-gel gelatin zymography, enzymatic analysis, and SalB binding by Biacore. Data generated from these assays indicated that SalB functioned as a competitive inhibitor of MMP-9. In our rat model for cardiac remodeling, western blot, echocardiography, hemodynamic measurement and histopathological detection were used to detect the effects and mechanism of SalB on cardio-protection. Our results showed that in MI rat, SalB selectively inhibited MMP-9 activities without affecting MMP-9 expression while no effect of SalB was seen on MMP-2. Moreover, SalB treatment in MI rat could efficiently increase left ventricle wall thickness, improve heart contractility, and decrease heart fibrosis. Conclusions As a competitive inhibitor of MMP-9, SalB presents significant effects on preventing LV structural damage and preserving cardiac function. Further studies to develop SalB and its analogues for their potential for cardioprotection in clinic are warranted. PMID:20735854

  17. Structure and Function of Cardiac Troponin C (TNNC1): Implications for Heart Failure, Cardiomyopathies, and Troponin Modulating Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Monica X.; Hwang, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    In striated muscle, the protein troponin complex turns contraction on and off in a calcium-dependent manner. The calcium-sensing component of the complex is troponin C, which is expressed from the TNNC1 gene in both cardiac muscle and slow-twitch skeletal muscle (identical transcript in both tissues) and the TNNC2 gene in fast-twitch skeletal muscle. Cardiac troponin C (cTnC) is made up of two globular EF-hand domains connected by a flexible linker. The structural C-domain (cCTnC) contains two high affinity calcium-binding sites that are always occupied by Ca2+ or Mg2+ under physiologic conditions, stabilizing an open conformation that remains anchored to the rest of the troponin complex. In contrast, the regulatory N-domain (cNTnC) contains a single low affinity site that is largely unoccupied at resting calcium concentrations. During muscle activation, calcium binding to cNTnC favors an open conformation that binds to the switch region of troponin I, removing adjacent inhibitory regions of troponin I from actin and allowing muscle contraction to proceed. Regulation of the calcium binding affinity of cNTnC is physiologically important, because it directly impacts the calcium sensitivity of muscle contraction. Calcium sensitivity can be modified by drugs that stabilize the open form of cNTnC, post-translational modifications like phosphorylation of troponin I, or downstream thin filament protein interactions that impact the availability of the troponin I switch region. Recently, mutations in cTnC have been associated with hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy. A detailed understanding of how calcium sensitivity is regulated through the troponin complex is necessary for explaining how mutations perturb its function to promote cardiomyopathy and how post-translational modifications in the thin filament affect heart function and heart failure. Troponin modulating drugs are being developed for the treatment of cardiomyopathies and heart failure. PMID:26232335

  18. Central-peripheral neural network interactions evoked by vagus nerve stimulation: functional consequences on control of cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Ardell, Jeffrey L; Rajendran, Pradeep S; Nier, Heath A; KenKnight, Bruce H; Armour, J Andrew

    2015-11-15

    Using vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), we sought to determine the contribution of vagal afferents to efferent control of cardiac function. In anesthetized dogs, the right and left cervical vagosympathetic trunks were stimulated in the intact state, following ipsilateral or contralateral vagus nerve transection (VNTx), and then following bilateral VNTx. Stimulations were performed at currents from 0.25 to 4.0 mA, frequencies from 2 to 30 Hz, and a 500-μs pulse width. Right or left VNS evoked significantly greater current- and frequency-dependent suppression of chronotropic, inotropic, and lusitropic function subsequent to sequential VNTx. Bradycardia threshold was defined as the current first required for a 5% decrease in heart rate. The threshold for the right vs. left vagus-induced bradycardia in the intact state (2.91 ± 0.18 and 3.47 ± 0.20 mA, respectively) decreased significantly with right VNTx (1.69 ± 0.17 mA for right and 3.04 ± 0.27 mA for left) and decreased further following bilateral VNTx (1.29 ± 0.16 mA for right and 1.74 ± 0.19 mA for left). Similar effects were observed following left VNTx. The thresholds for afferent-mediated effects on cardiac parameters were 0.62 ± 0.04 and 0.65 ± 0.06 mA with right and left VNS, respectively, and were reflected primarily as augmentation. Afferent-mediated tachycardias were maintained following β-blockade but were eliminated by VNTx. The increased effectiveness and decrease in bradycardia threshold with sequential VNTx suggest that 1) vagal afferents inhibit centrally mediated parasympathetic efferent outflow and 2) the ipsilateral and contralateral vagi exert a substantial buffering capacity. The intact threshold reflects the interaction between multiple levels of the cardiac neural hierarchy.

  19. Central-peripheral neural network interactions evoked by vagus nerve stimulation: functional consequences on control of cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Pradeep S.; Nier, Heath A.; KenKnight, Bruce H.; Armour, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Using vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), we sought to determine the contribution of vagal afferents to efferent control of cardiac function. In anesthetized dogs, the right and left cervical vagosympathetic trunks were stimulated in the intact state, following ipsilateral or contralateral vagus nerve transection (VNTx), and then following bilateral VNTx. Stimulations were performed at currents from 0.25 to 4.0 mA, frequencies from 2 to 30 Hz, and a 500-μs pulse width. Right or left VNS evoked significantly greater current- and frequency-dependent suppression of chronotropic, inotropic, and lusitropic function subsequent to sequential VNTx. Bradycardia threshold was defined as the current first required for a 5% decrease in heart rate. The threshold for the right vs. left vagus-induced bradycardia in the intact state (2.91 ± 0.18 and 3.47 ± 0.20 mA, respectively) decreased significantly with right VNTx (1.69 ± 0.17 mA for right and 3.04 ± 0.27 mA for left) and decreased further following bilateral VNTx (1.29 ± 0.16 mA for right and 1.74 ± 0.19 mA for left). Similar effects were observed following left VNTx. The thresholds for afferent-mediated effects on cardiac parameters were 0.62 ± 0.04 and 0.65 ± 0.06 mA with right and left VNS, respectively, and were reflected primarily as augmentation. Afferent-mediated tachycardias were maintained following β-blockade but were eliminated by VNTx. The increased effectiveness and decrease in bradycardia threshold with sequential VNTx suggest that 1) vagal afferents inhibit centrally mediated parasympathetic efferent outflow and 2) the ipsilateral and contralateral vagi exert a substantial buffering capacity. The intact threshold reflects the interaction between multiple levels of the cardiac neural hierarchy. PMID:26371171

  20. Interspecies Differences in Virus Uptake versus Cardiac Function of the Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Freiberg, Fabian; Sauter, Martina; Pinkert, Sandra; Govindarajan, Thirupugal; Kaldrack, Joanna; Thakkar, Meghna; Fechner, Henry; Klingel, Karin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a cell contact protein with an important role in virus uptake. Its extracellular immunoglobulin domains mediate the binding to coxsackievirus and adenovirus as well as homophilic and heterophilic interactions between cells. The cytoplasmic tail links CAR to the cytoskeleton and intracellular signaling cascades. In the heart, CAR is crucial for embryonic development, electrophysiology, and coxsackievirus B infection. Noncardiac functions are less well understood, in part due to the lack of suitable animal models. Here, we generated a transgenic mouse that rescued the otherwise embryonic-lethal CAR knockout (KO) phenotype by expressing chicken CAR exclusively in the heart. Using this rescue model, we addressed interspecies differences in coxsackievirus uptake and noncardiac functions of CAR. Survival of the noncardiac CAR KO (ncKO) mouse indicates an essential role for CAR in the developing heart but not in other tissues. In adult animals, cardiac activity was normal, suggesting that chicken CAR can replace the physiological functions of mouse CAR in the cardiomyocyte. However, chicken CAR did not mediate virus entry in vivo, so that hearts expressing chicken instead of mouse CAR were protected from infection and myocarditis. Comparison of sequence homology and modeling of the D1 domain indicate differences between mammalian and chicken CAR that relate to the sites important for virus binding but not those involved in homodimerization. Thus, CAR-directed anticoxsackievirus therapy with only minor adverse effects in noncardiac tissue could be further improved by selectively targeting the virus-host interaction while maintaining cardiac function. IMPORTANCE Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is one of the most common human pathogens causing myocarditis. Its receptor, the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), not only mediates virus uptake but also relates to cytoskeletal organization and intracellular signaling

  1. Pressor response to intravenous tyramine is a marker of cardiac, but not vascular, adrenergic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meck, Janice V.; Martin, David S.; D'Aunno, Dominick S.; Waters, Wendy W.

    2003-01-01

    Intravenous injections of the indirect sympathetic amine, tyramine, are used as a test of peripheral adrenergic function. The authors measured the time course of increases in ejection fraction, heart rate, systolic and diastolic pressure, popliteal artery flow, and greater saphenous vein diameter before and after an injection of 4.0 mg/m(2) body surface area of tyramine in normal human subjects. The tyramine caused moderate, significant increases in systolic pressure and significant decreases in total peripheral resistance. The earliest changes were a 30% increase in ejection fraction and a 16% increase in systolic pressure, followed by a 60% increase in popliteal artery flow and a later 11% increase in greater saphenous vein diameter. There were no changes in diastolic pressure or heart rate. These results suggest that pressor responses during tyramine injections are primarily due to an inotropic response that increases cardiac output and pressure and causes a reflex decrease in vascular resistance. Thus, tyramine pressor tests are a measure of cardiac, but not vascular, sympathetic function.

  2. Strategies for the chemical and biological functionalization of scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering: a review

    PubMed Central

    Tallawi, Marwa; Rosellini, Elisabetta; Barbani, Niccoletta; Cascone, Maria Grazia; Rai, Ranjana; Saint-Pierre, Guillaume; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2015-01-01

    The development of biomaterials for cardiac tissue engineering (CTE) is challenging, primarily owing to the requirement of achieving a surface with favourable characteristics that enhances cell attachment and maturation. The biomaterial surface plays a crucial role as it forms the interface between the scaffold (or cardiac patch) and the cells. In the field of CTE, synthetic polymers (polyglycerol sebacate, polyethylene glycol, polyglycolic acid, poly-l-lactide, polyvinyl alcohol, polycaprolactone, polyurethanes and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)) have been proven to exhibit suitable biodegradable and mechanical properties. Despite the fact that they show the required biocompatible behaviour, most synthetic polymers exhibit poor cell attachment capability. These synthetic polymers are mostly hydrophobic and lack cell recognition sites, limiting their application. Therefore, biofunctionalization of these biomaterials to enhance cell attachment and cell material interaction is being widely investigated. There are numerous approaches for functionalizing a material, which can be classified as mechanical, physical, chemical and biological. In this review, recent studies reported in the literature to functionalize scaffolds in the context of CTE, are discussed. Surface, morphological, chemical and biological modifications are introduced and the results of novel promising strategies and techniques are discussed. PMID:26109634

  3. Strategies for the chemical and biological functionalization of scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering: a review.

    PubMed

    Tallawi, Marwa; Rosellini, Elisabetta; Barbani, Niccoletta; Cascone, Maria Grazia; Rai, Ranjana; Saint-Pierre, Guillaume; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2015-07-06

    The development of biomaterials for cardiac tissue engineering (CTE) is challenging, primarily owing to the requirement of achieving a surface with favourable characteristics that enhances cell attachment and maturation. The biomaterial surface plays a crucial role as it forms the interface between the scaffold (or cardiac patch) and the cells. In the field of CTE, synthetic polymers (polyglycerol sebacate, polyethylene glycol, polyglycolic acid, poly-l-lactide, polyvinyl alcohol, polycaprolactone, polyurethanes and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)) have been proven to exhibit suitable biodegradable and mechanical properties. Despite the fact that they show the required biocompatible behaviour, most synthetic polymers exhibit poor cell attachment capability. These synthetic polymers are mostly hydrophobic and lack cell recognition sites, limiting their application. Therefore, biofunctionalization of these biomaterials to enhance cell attachment and cell material interaction is being widely investigated. There are numerous approaches for functionalizing a material, which can be classified as mechanical, physical, chemical and biological. In this review, recent studies reported in the literature to functionalize scaffolds in the context of CTE, are discussed. Surface, morphological, chemical and biological modifications are introduced and the results of novel promising strategies and techniques are discussed.

  4. Ginsenoside Rg3 Improves Cardiac Function after Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion via Attenuating Apoptosis and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-ping; Jiang, Yi-chuan; Yu, Xiao-feng; Xu, Hua-li; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Ginsenoside Rg3 is one of the ginsenosides which are the main constituents isolated from Panax ginseng. Previous study demonstrated that ginsenoside Rg3 had a protective effect against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion- (I/R-) induced injury. Objective. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of ginsenoside Rg3 on cardiac function impairment induced by myocardial I/R in rats. Methods. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to myocardial I/R. Echocardiographic and hemodynamic parameters and histopathological examination were carried out. The expressions of P53, Bcl-2, Bax, and cleaved caspase-3 and the levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in the left ventricles were measured. Results. Ginsenoside Rg3 increased a left ventricular fractional shortening and left ventricular ejection fraction. Treatment with ginsenoside Rg3 also alleviated increases of left ventricular end diastolic pressure and decreases of left ventricular systolic pressure and ±dp/dt in myocardial I/R-rats. Ginsenoside Rg3 decreased apoptosis cells through inhibiting the activation of caspase-3. Ginsenoside Rg3 also caused significant reductions of the contents of TNF-α and IL-1β in left ventricles of myocardial I/R-rats. Conclusion. The findings suggested that ginsenoside Rg3 possessed the effect of improving myocardial I/R-induced cardiac function impairment and that the mechanism of pharmacological action of ginsenoside Rg3 was related to its properties of antiapoptosis and anti-inflammation. PMID:28105061

  5. Morphological and Functional Evaluation of Quadricuspid Aortic Valves Using Cardiac Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Song, Inyoung; Park, Jung Ah; Choi, Bo Hwa; Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Keun; Kim, Jun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to identify the morphological and functional characteristics of quadricuspid aortic valves (QAV) on cardiac computed tomography (CCT). Materials and Methods We retrospectively enrolled 11 patients with QAV. All patients underwent CCT and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), and 7 patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). The presence and classification of QAV assessed by CCT was compared with that of TTE and intraoperative findings. The regurgitant orifice area (ROA) measured by CCT was compared with severity of aortic regurgitation (AR) by TTE and the regurgitant fraction (RF) by CMR. Results All of the patients had AR; 9 had pure AR, 1 had combined aortic stenosis and regurgitation, and 1 had combined subaortic stenosis and regurgitation. Two patients had a subaortic fibrotic membrane and 1 of them showed a subaortic stenosis. One QAV was misdiagnosed as tricuspid aortic valve on TTE. In accordance with the Hurwitz and Robert's classification, consensus was reached on the QAV classification between the CCT and TTE findings in 7 of 10 patients. The patients were classified as type A (n = 1), type B (n = 3), type C (n = 1), type D (n = 4), and type F (n = 2) on CCT. A very high correlation existed between ROA by CCT and RF by CMR (r = 0.99) but a good correlation existed between ROA by CCT and regurgitant severity by TTE (r = 0.62). Conclusion Cardiac computed tomography provides comprehensive anatomical and functional information about the QAV. PMID:27390538

  6. Cardiac function in an endothermic fish: cellular mechanisms for overcoming acute thermal challenges during diving

    PubMed Central

    Shiels, H. A.; Galli, G. L. J.; Block, B. A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the physiology of vertebrate thermal tolerance is critical for predicting how animals respond to climate change. Pacific bluefin tuna experience a wide range of ambient sea temperatures and occupy the largest geographical niche of all tunas. Their capacity to endure thermal challenge is due in part to enhanced expression and activity of key proteins involved in cardiac excitation–contraction coupling, which improve cardiomyocyte function and whole animal performance during temperature change. To define the cellular mechanisms that enable bluefin tuna hearts to function during acute temperature change, we investigated the performance of freshly isolated ventricular myocytes using confocal microscopy and electrophysiology. We demonstrate that acute cooling and warming (between 8 and 28°C) modulates the excitability of the cardiomyocyte by altering the action potential (AP) duration and the amplitude and kinetics of the cellular Ca2+ transient. We then explored the interactions between temperature, adrenergic stimulation and contraction frequency, and show that when these stressors are combined in a physiologically relevant way, they alter AP characteristics to stabilize excitation–contraction coupling across an acute 20°C temperature range. This allows the tuna heart to maintain consistent contraction and relaxation cycles during acute thermal challenges. We hypothesize that this cardiac capacity plays a key role in the bluefin tunas' niche expansion across a broad thermal and geographical range. PMID:25540278

  7. Exposure to occupational air pollution and cardiac function in workers of the Esfahan Steel Industry, Iran.

    PubMed

    Golshahi, Jafar; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Saqira, Mohammad; Zavar, Reihaneh; Sadeghifar, Mostafa; Roohafza, Hamidreza

    2016-06-01

    Air pollution is recognized as an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We investigated association of exposure to occupational air pollution and cardiac function in the workers of the steel industry. Fifty male workers of the agglomeration and coke-making parts of the Esfahan Steel Company were randomly selected (n = 50). Workers in the administrative parts were studied as controls (n = 50). Those with known history of hypertension, dyslipidemia, or diabetes, and active smokers were not included. Data of age, body mass index, employment duration, blood pressure, fasting blood sugar, and lipid profile were gathered. Echocardiography was performed to evaluate cardiac function. Left ventricular ejection fraction was lower in workers of the agglomeration/coke-making parts than in controls (mean difference = 5 to 5.5 %, P < 0.001). Mild right ventricular dilatation and grade I pulmonary hypertension were present in three (12 %) workers of the coke-making part, but none of the controls (P = 0.010). According to these results, occupational air pollution exposure in workers of the steel industry is associated with left heart systolic dysfunction. Possible right heart insults due to air pollution exposure warrant further investigations.

  8. Nitric oxide control of cardiac function: is neuronal nitric oxide synthase a key component?

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Claire E; Ashley, Euan A; Casadei, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to regulate cardiac function, both in physiological conditions and in disease states. However, several aspects of NO signalling in the myocardium remain poorly understood. It is becoming increasingly apparent that the disparate functions ascribed to NO result from its generation by different isoforms of the NO synthase (NOS) enzyme, the varying subcellular localization and regulation of NOS isoforms and their effector proteins. Some apparently contrasting findings may have arisen from the use of non-isoform-specific inhibitors of NOS, and from the assumption that NO donors may be able to mimic the actions of endogenously produced NO. In recent years an at least partial explanation for some of the disagreements, although by no means all, may be found from studies that have focused on the role of the neuronal NOS (nNOS) isoform. These data have shown a key role for nNOS in the control of basal and adrenergically stimulated cardiac contractility and in the autonomic control of heart rate. Whether or not the role of nNOS carries implications for cardiovascular disease remains an intriguing possibility requiring future study. PMID:15306414

  9. PPARα augments heart function and cardiac fatty acid oxidation in early experimental polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Standage, Stephen W; Bennion, Brock G; Knowles, Taft O; Ledee, Dolena R; Portman, Michael A; McGuire, John K; Liles, W Conrad; Olson, Aaron K

    2017-02-01

    Children with sepsis and multisystem organ failure have downregulated leukocyte gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα), a nuclear hormone receptor transcription factor that regulates inflammation and lipid metabolism. Mouse models of sepsis have likewise demonstrated that the absence of PPARα is associated with decreased survival and organ injury, specifically of the heart. Using a clinically relevant mouse model of early sepsis, we found that heart function increases in wild-type (WT) mice over the first 24 h of sepsis, but that mice lacking PPARα (Ppara(-/-)) cannot sustain the elevated heart function necessary to compensate for sepsis pathophysiology. Left ventricular shortening fraction, measured 24 h after initiation of sepsis by echocardiography, was higher in WT mice than in Ppara(-/-) mice. Ex vivo working heart studies demonstrated greater developed pressure, contractility, and aortic outflow in WT compared with Ppara(-/-) mice. Furthermore, cardiac fatty acid oxidation was increased in WT but not in Ppara(-/-) mice. Regulatory pathways controlling pyruvate incorporation into the citric acid cycle were inhibited by sepsis in both genotypes, but the regulatory state of enzymes controlling fatty acid oxidation appeared to be permissive in WT mice only. Mitochondrial ultrastructure was not altered in either genotype indicating that severe mitochondrial dysfunction is unlikely at this stage of sepsis. These data suggest that PPARα expression supports the hyperdynamic cardiac response early in the course of sepsis and that increased fatty acid oxidation may prevent morbidity and mortality.

  10. Evaluation of cardiac function during left ventricular assist by a centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Kikugawa, D

    2000-08-01

    In this study, the effects on varying cardiac function during a left ventricular (LV) bypass from the apex to the descending aorta using a centrifugal blood pump were evaluated by analyzing the left ventricular pressure and the motor current of the centrifugal pump in a mock circulatory loop. Failing heart models (preload 15 mm Hg, afterload 40 mm Hg) and normal heart models (preload 5 mm Hg, afterload 100 mm Hg) were simulated by adjusting the contractility of the latex rubber left ventricle. In Study 1, the bypass flow rate, left ventricular pressure, aortic pressure, and motor current levels were measured in each model as the centrifugal pump rpm were increased from 1,000 to 1,500 to 2,000. In Study 2, the pump rpm were fixed at 1,300, 1,500, and 1,700, and at each rpm, the left ventricular peak pressure was increased from 40 to 140 mm Hg by steps of 20 mm Hg. The same measurements as in Study 1 were performed. In Study 1, the bypass flow rate and mean aortic pressure both increased with the increase in pump rpm while the mean left ventricular pressure decreased. In Study 2, a fairly good correlation between the left ventricular pressure and the motor current of the centrifugal pump was obtained. These results suggest that cardiac function as indicated by left ventricular pressure may be estimated from a motor current analysis of the centrifugal blood pump during left heart bypass.

  11. Skeletal myoblasts for heart regeneration and repair: state of the art and perspectives on the mechanisms for functional cardiac benefits.

    PubMed

    Formigli, L; Zecchi-Orlandini, S; Meacci, E; Bani, D

    2010-01-01

    Until recently, skeletal myoblasts (SkMBs) have been the most widely used cells in basic research and clinical trials of cell based therapy for cardiac repair and regeneration. Although SkMB engraftment into the post-infarcted heart has been consistently found to improve cardiac contractile function, the underlying therapeutic mechanisms remain still a matter of controversy and debate. This is basically because SkMBs do not attain a cardiac-like phenotype once homed into the diseased heart nor they form a contractile tissue functionally coupled with the surrounding viable myocardium. This issue of concern has generated the idea that the cardiotropic action of SkMBs may depend on the release of paracrine factors. However, the paracrine hypothesis still remains ill-defined, particularly concerning the identification of the whole spectrum of cell-derived soluble factors and details on their cardiac effects. In this context, the possibility to genetically engineering SkMBs to potentate their paracrine attitudes appears particularly attractive and is actually raising great expectation. Aim of the present review is not to cover all the aspects of cell-based therapy with SkMBs, as this has been the object of previous exhaustive reviews in this field. Rather, we focused on novel aspects underlying the interactions between SkMBs and the host cardiac tissues which may be relevant for directing the future basic and applied research on SkMB transplantation for post ischemic cardiac dysfunction.

  12. The Natural History of Cardiac and Pulmonary Function Decline in Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Rolando; Fritz, Anto; Hagar, Yolanda; Boice, Braden; Skalsky, Andrew; Hwang, HoSun; Beckett, Laurel; McDonald, Craig; Gupta, Munish

    2010-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review of scoliosis progression, pulmonary and cardiac function in a series of patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Objective To determine whether operative treatment of scoliosis decreases the rate of pulmonary function loss in patients with DMD. Summary of Background Data It is generally accepted that surgical intervention should be undertaken in DMD scoliosis once curve sizes reach 35 degrees to allow intervention before critical respiratory decline has occurred. There are conflicting reports, however, regarding the effect of scoliosis stabilization on the rate of pulmonary function decline when compared to non operative cohorts. Methods We reviewed spinal radiographs, echocardiograms, and spirometry, hospital, and operative records of all patients seen at our tertiary referral center from July 1, 1992 to June 1, 2007 Data was recorded to Microsoft Excel and analyzed with SAS and R statistical processing software. Results The percent predicted forced vital capacity (PPFVC) decreased 5% /year prior to operation. The mean PPFVC was 54% (sd=21%) prior to operation with a mean postoperative PPFVC of 43% (sd=14%). Surgical treatment was associated with a 12% decline in PPFVC independent of other treatment variables. PPFVC after operation declined at a rate of 1% per year and while this rate was lower, it was not significantly different than the rate of decline present prior to operation (p=0.18). Cardiac function as measured by left ventricular fractional shortening declined at a rate of 1%/year with most individuals exhibiting an LVFS rate of >30 prior to operation. Conclusion Operative treatment of scoliosis in DMD using the Luque Galveston method was associated with a reduction of FVC related to operation. The rate of pulmonary function decline after operation was not significantly reduced when compared to the rate of preoperative FVC decline. PMID:21289561

  13. Distinct Functional Roles of Cardiac Mitochondrial Subpopulations Revealed by a 3D Simulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Hatano, Asuka; Okada, Jun-ichi; Washio, Takumi; Hisada, Toshiaki; Sugiura, Seiryo

    2015-01-01

    Experimental characterization of two cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations, namely, subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) and interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM), has been hampered by technical difficulties, and an alternative approach is eagerly awaited. We previously developed a three-dimensional computational cardiomyocyte model that integrates electrophysiology, metabolism, and mechanics with subcellular structure. In this study, we further developed our model to include intracellular oxygen diffusion, and determined whether mitochondrial localization or intrinsic properties cause functional variations. For this purpose, we created two models: one with equal SSM and IFM properties and one with IFM having higher activity levels. Using these two models to compare the SSM and IFM responses of [Ca2+], tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, [NADH], and mitochondrial inner membrane potential to abrupt changes in pacing frequency (0.25–2 Hz), we found that the reported functional differences between these subpopulations appear to be mostly related to local [Ca2+] heterogeneity, and variations in intrinsic properties only serve to augment these differences. We also examined the effect of hypoxia on mitochondrial function. Under normoxic conditions, intracellular oxygen is much higher throughout the cell than the half-saturation concentration for oxidative phosphorylation. However, under limited oxygen supply, oxygen is mostly exhausted in SSM, leaving the core region in an anoxic condition. Reflecting this heterogeneous oxygen environment, the inner membrane potential continues to decrease in IFM, whereas it is maintained to nearly normal levels in SSM, thereby ensuring ATP supply to this region. Our simulation results provide clues to understanding the origin of functional variations in two cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations and their differential roles in maintaining cardiomyocyte function as a whole. PMID:26039174

  14. Nuclear cardiac

    SciTech Connect

    Slutsky, R.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear medicine and cardiology has continued to produce a surfeit of interesting, illuminating, and important reports involving the analysis of cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism. To simplify the presentation, this review is broken down into three major subheadings: analysis of myocardial perfusion; imaging of the recent myocardial infarction; and the evaluation of myocardial function. There appears to be an increasingly important relationship between cardiology, particularly cardiac physiology, and nuclear imaging techniques. (KRM)

  15. Evaluation of Cardiac Functions in Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    M Abd-El Aziz, Faten; Abdelghaffar, Shereen; M Hussien, Eman

    2017-01-01

    Background Cardiac dysfunction in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) represents one of the serious complications. To evaluate the cardiac function in children with T1D by conventional echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging (TDI). Methods The study included 40 T1D patients (age between 6 and 16 years) with > 5 years duration of diabetes and 42 healthy control children. The patients were subjected to clinical evaluation and laboratory investigations [glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), serum lipids and lipoproteins]. Conventional echocardiography and TDI were performed to patients and controls. Results The patients had lower early diastolic filling velocity (E wave) of the tricuspid valve and mitral valves with a p value of (0.000 and 0.006, respectively). TDI revealed that patients had lower S′velocity of the T1D, shorter isovolumic contraction time, longer isovolumic relaxation time and lower E/E′ of the right ventricle than controls (p value 0.002, 0.001, 0.004, 0.003, and 0.016, respectively). The left ventricle (LV)-T1D of the patients was significantly higher (p value 0.02). Twenty eight patients had poor glycemic control without significant differences between them and those with good glycemic control regarding echocardiographic data. Patients with dyslipidemia (13 patients) had higher late diastolic filling velocity of the mitral valve (A) and the lower LV late tissue velocity (A′) (p wave 0.047 and 0.015). No correlation existed between the duration of illness or the level of HbA1c and the echocardiographic parameters. Conclusion Diabetic children have evidence of echocardiographic diastolic dysfunctions. Periodic cardiac evaluation with both conventional and tissue Doppler echocardiography is recommended for early detection of this dysfunction.

  16. Intraoperative Magnesium Administration Does Not Improve Neurocognitive Function Following Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Joseph P.; White, William D.; Schinderle, David B.; Podgoreanu, Mihai V.; Berger, Miles; Milano, Carmelo A.; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Stafford-Smith, Mark; Blumenthal, James A.; Newman, Mark F.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Neurocognitive decline occurs frequently after cardiac surgery and persists in a significant number of patients. Magnesium is thought to provide neuroprotection through preservation of cellular energy metabolism, blockade of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, diminution of the inflammatory response, and inhibition of platelet activation. We therefore hypothesized that intraoperative magnesium administration would decrease postoperative cognitive impairment. Methods Following IRB approval, 389 patients undergoing cardiac surgery were enrolled into this prospective, randomized, double-blinded placebo controlled clinical trial. Subjects were randomized to receive: 1) Magnesium as a 50 mg/kg bolus followed by another 50 mg/kg infusion over 3 hours or 2) Placebo bolus and infusion. Cognitive function was assessed preoperatively and again at 6 weeks postoperatively using a standardized test battery. Mean CD11b fluorescence and percentage of platelets expressing CD62P, markers of leukocyte and platelet activation respectively, were assessed by flow cytometry as a secondary outcome. The effect of magnesium on postoperative cognition was tested using multivariable regression modeling, adjusting for age, years of education, baseline cognition, gender, race and weight. Results Among the 389 allocated subjects (Magnesium: N=198; Placebo: N=191), the incidence of cognitive deficit in the magnesium group was 44.4% compared to 44.9% in the placebo group (p=0.93). The cognitive change score and platelet and leukocyte activation were also not different between groups. Multivariable analysis revealed a marginal interaction between treatment group and weight, such that heavier subjects receiving magnesium were less likely to suffer cognitive deficit (p=0.06). Conclusions Magnesium administered intravenously during cardiac surgery does not reduce postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Clinical Trials Registration–URL http://clinicaltrials.gov/ Unique identifier

  17. Maximal exercise limitation in functionally overreached triathletes: role of cardiac adrenergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Le Meur, Yann; Louis, Julien; Aubry, Anaël; Guéneron, Jacques; Pichon, Aurélien; Schaal, Karine; Corcuff, Jean-Benoît; Hatem, Stéphane N; Isnard, Richard; Hausswirth, Christophe

    2014-08-01

    Functional overreaching (F-OR) induced by heavy load endurance training programs has been associated with reduced heart rate values both at rest and during exercise. Because this phenomenon may reflect an impairment of cardiac response, this research was conducted to test this hypothesis. Thirty-five experienced male triathletes were tested (11 control and 24 overload subjects) before overloading (Pre), immediately after overloading (Mid), and after a 2-wk taper period (Post). Physiological responses were assessed during an incremental cycling protocol to volitional exhaustion, including catecholamines release, oxygen uptake (V̇o2), arteriovenous O2 difference, cardiac output (Q̇), and systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). Twelve subjects of the overload group developed signs of F-OR at Mid (decreased performance with concomitant high perceived fatigue), while 12 others did not [acute fatigue group (AF)]. V̇o2max was reduced only in F-OR subjects at Mid. Lower Q̇ and SBP values with greater arteriovenous O2 difference were reported in F-OR subjects at all exercising intensities, while no significant change was observed in the control and AF groups. A concomitant decrease in epinephrine excretion was reported only in the F-OR group. All values returned to baseline at Post. Following an overload endurance training program leading to F-OR, the cardiac response to exhaustive exercise is transiently impaired, possibly due to reduced epinephrine excretion. This finding is likely to explain the complex process of underperformance syndrome experienced by F-OR endurance athletes during heavy load programs.

  18. Factors affecting the quality of anticoagulation with warfarin: experience of one cardiac centre

    PubMed Central

    Ciurus, Tomasz; Cichocka-Radwan, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The risk of complications in anticoagulation therapy can be reduced by maximising the percentage of time spent by the patient in the optimal therapeutic range (TTR). However, little is known about the predictors of anticoagulation control. The aim of this paper was to assess the quality of anticoagulant therapy in patients on warfarin and to identify the factors affecting its deterioration. Material and methods We studied 149 patients who required anticoagulant therapy with warfarin due to non-valvular atrial fibrillation and/or venous thromboembolism. Each patient underwent proper training regarding the implemented treatment and remained under constant medical care. Results The mean age of the patients was 68.8 ± 12.6 years, and 59% were male. A total of 2460 international normalised ratio (INR) measurements were collected during the 18-month period. The mean TTR in the studied cohort was 76 ± 21%, and the median was 80%. The level at which high-quality anticoagulation was recorded for this study was based on TTR values above 80%. Seventy-five patients with TTR ≥ 80% were included in the stable anticoagulation group (TTR ≥ 80%); the remaining 74 patients constituted the unstable anticoagulation group (TTR < 80%). According to multivariate stepwise regression analysis, the independent variables increasing the risk of deterioration of anticoagulation quality were: arterial hypertension (OR 2.74 [CI 95%: 1.06-7.10]; p = 0.038), amiodarone therapy (OR 4.22 [CI 95%: 1.30-13.70]; p = 0.017), and obesity (OR 1.11 [CI 95%: 1.02-1.21]; p = 0.013). Conclusions The presence of obesity, hypertension, or amiodarone therapy decreases the quality of anticoagulation with warfarin. High quality of anticoagulation can be achieved through proper monitoring and education of patients. PMID:26855650

  19. A novel urotensin II receptor antagonist, KR-36996, improved cardiac function and attenuated cardiac hypertrophy in experimental heart failure.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kwang-Seok; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yi, Kyu Yang; Lim, Chae Jo; Park, Byung Kil; Seo, Ho Won; Lee, Byung Ho

    2017-03-15

    Urotensin II and its receptor are thought to be involved in various cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and atherosclerosis. Since the regulation of the urotensin II/urotensin II receptor offers a great potential for therapeutic strategies related to the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, the study of selective and potent antagonists for urotensin II receptor is more fascinating. This study was designed to determine the potential therapeutic effects of a newly developed novel urotensin II receptor antagonist, N-(1-(3-bromo-4-(piperidin-4-yloxy)benzyl)piperidin-4-yl)benzo[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide (KR-36996), in experimental models of heart failure. KR-36996 displayed a high binding affinity (Ki=4.44±0.67nM) and selectivity for urotensin II receptor. In cell-based study, KR-36996 significantly inhibited urotensin II-induced stress fiber formation and cellular hypertrophy in H9c2UT cells. In transverse aortic constriction-induced cardiac hypertrophy model in mice, the daily oral administration of KR-36996 (30mg/kg) for 14 days significantly decreased left ventricular weight by 40% (P<0.05). In myocardial infarction-induced chronic heart failure model in rats, repeated echocardiography and hemodynamic measurements demonstrated remarkable improvement of the cardiac performance by KR-36996 treatment (25 and 50mg/kg/day, p.o.) for 12 weeks. Moreover, KR-36996 decreased interstitial fibrosis and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in the infarct border zone. These results suggest that potent and selective urotensin II receptor antagonist could efficiently attenuate both cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction in experimental heart failure. KR-36996 may be useful as an effective urotensin II receptor antagonist for pharmaceutical or clinical applications.

  20. Novel MRI-derived quantitative biomarker for cardiac function applied to classifying ischemic cardiomyopathy within a Bayesian rule learning framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Prahlad G.; Morris, Lailonny; Staines, Mara; Lima, Joao; Lee, Daniel C.; Gopalakrishnan, Vanathi

    2014-03-01

    Characterization of regional left ventricular (LV) function may have application in prognosticating timely response and informing choice therapy in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. The purpose of this study is to characterize LV function through a systematic analysis of 4D (3D + time) endocardial motion over the cardiac cycle in an effort to define objective, clinically useful metrics of pathological remodeling and declining cardiac performance, using standard cardiac MRI data for two distinct patient cohorts accessed from CardiacAtlas.org: a) MESA - a cohort of asymptomatic patients; and b) DETERMINE - a cohort of symptomatic patients with a history of ischemic heart disease (IHD) or myocardial infarction. The LV endocardium was segmented and a signed phase-to-phase Hausdorff distance (HD) was computed at 3D uniformly spaced points tracked on segmented endocardial surface contours, over the cardiac cycle. An LV-averaged index of phase-to-phase endocardial displacement (P2PD) time-histories was computed at each tracked point, using the HD computed between consecutive cardiac phases. Average and standard deviation in P2PD over the cardiac cycle was used to prepare characteristic curves for the asymptomatic and IHD cohort. A novel biomarker of RMS error between mean patient-specific characteristic P2PD over the cardiac cycle for each individual patient and the cumulative P2PD characteristic of a cohort of asymptomatic patients was established as the RMS-P2PD marker. The novel RMS-P2PD marker was tested as a cardiac function based feature for automatic patient classification using a Bayesian Rule Learning (BRL) framework. The RMS-P2PD biomarker indices were significantly different for the symptomatic patient and asymptomatic control cohorts (p<0.001). BRL accurately classified 83.8% of patients correctly from the patient and control populations, with leave-one-out cross validation, using standard indices of LV ejection fraction (LV-EF) and LV end-systolic volume

  1. Endurance training prevents negative effects of the hypoxia mimetic dimethyloxalylglycine on cardiac and skeletal muscle function.

    PubMed

    Favier, Francois B; Britto, Florian A; Ponçon, Benjamin; Begue, Gwenaelle; Chabi, Beatrice; Reboul, Cyril; Meyer, Gregory; Py, Guillaume

    2016-02-15

    Hypoxic preconditioning is a promising strategy to prevent hypoxia-induced damages to several tissues. This effect is related to prior stabilization of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α via inhibition of the prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs), which are responsible for its degradation under normoxia. Although PHD inhibition has been shown to increase endurance performance in rodents, potential side effects of such a therapy have not been explored. Here, we investigated the effects of 1 wk of dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) treatment (150 mg/kg) on exercise capacity, as well as on cardiac and skeletal muscle function in sedentary and endurance-trained rats. DMOG improved maximal aerobic velocity and endurance in both sedentary and trained rats. This effect was associated with an increase in red blood cells without significant alteration of skeletal muscle contractile properties. In sedentary rats, DMOG treatment resulted in enhanced left ventricle (LV) weight together with impairment in diastolic function, LV relaxation, and pulse pressure. Moreover, DMOG decreased maximal oxygen uptake (state 3) of isolated mitochondria from skeletal muscle. Importantly, endurance training reversed the negative effects of DMOG treatment on cardiac function and restored maximal mitochondrial oxygen uptake to the level of sedentary placebo-treated rats. In conclusion, we provide here evidence that the PHD inhibitor DMOG has detrimental influence on myocardial and mitochondrial function in healthy rats. However, one may suppose that the deleterious influence of PHD inhibition would be potentiated in patients with already poor physical condition. Therefore, the present results prompt us to take into consideration the potential side effects of PHD inhibitors when administrated to patients.

  2. A generalized activating function for predicting virtual electrodes in cardiac tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Sobie, E A; Susil, R C; Tung, L

    1997-01-01

    To fully understand the mechanisms of defibrillation, it is critical to know how a given electrical stimulus causes membrane polarizations in cardiac tissue. We have extended the concept of the activating function, originally used to describe neuronal stimulation, to derive a new expression that identifies the sources that drive changes in transmembrane potential. Source terms, or virtual electrodes, consist of either second derivatives of extracellular potential weighted by intracellular conductivity or extracellular potential gradients weighted by derivatives of intracellular conductivity. The full response of passive tissue can be considered, in simple cases, to be a convolution of this "generalized activating function" with the impulse response of the tissue. Computer simulations of a two-dimensional sheet of passive myocardium under steady-state conditions demonstrate that this source term is useful for estimating the effects of applied electrical stimuli. The generalized activating function predicts oppositely polarized regions of tissue when unequally anisotropic tissue is point stimulated and a monopolar response when a point stimulus is applied to isotropic tissue. In the bulk of the myocardium, this new expression is helpful for understanding mechanisms by which virtual electrodes can be produced, such as the hypothetical "sawtooth" pattern of polarization, as well as polarization owing to regions of depressed conductivity, missing cells or clefts, changes in fiber diameter, or fiber curvature. In comparing solutions obtained with an assumed extracellular potential distribution to those with fully coupled intra- and extracellular domains, we find that the former provides a reliable estimate of the total solution. Thus the generalized activating function that we have derived provides a useful way of understanding virtual electrode effects in cardiac tissue. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:9284308

  3. Low-dose radiation affects cardiac physiology: gene networks and molecular signaling in cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Matthew A.; Sasi, Sharath P.; Onufrak, Jillian; Natarajan, Mohan; Manickam, Krishnan; Schwab, John; Muralidharan, Sujatha; Peterson, Leif E.; Alekseyev, Yuriy O.; Yan, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    There are 160,000 cancer patients worldwide treated with particle radiotherapy (RT). With the advent of proton, and high (H) charge (Z) and energy (E) HZE ionizing particle RT, the cardiovascular diseases risk estimates are uncertain. In addition, future deep space exploratory-type missions will expose humans to unknown but low doses of particle irradiation (IR). We examined molecular responses using transcriptome profiling in left ventricular murine cardiomyocytes isolated from mice that were exposed to 90 cGy, 1 GeV proton (1H) and 15 cGy, 1 GeV/nucleon iron (56Fe) over 28 days after exposure. Unsupervised clustering analysis of gene expression segregated samples according to the IR response and time after exposure, with 56Fe-IR showing the greatest level of gene modulation. 1H-IR showed little differential transcript modulation. Network analysis categorized the major differentially expressed genes into cell cycle, oxidative responses, and transcriptional regulation functional groups. Transcriptional networks identified key nodes regulating expression. Validation of the signal transduction network by protein analysis and gel shift assay showed that particle IR clearly regulates a long-lived signaling mechanism for ERK1/2, p38 MAPK signaling and identified NFATc4, GATA4, STAT3, and NF-κB as regulators of the response at specific time points. These data suggest that the molecular responses and gene expression to 56Fe-IR in cardiomyocytes are unique and long-lasting. Our study may have significant implications for the efforts of National Aeronautics and Space Administration to develop heart disease risk estimates for astronauts and for patients receiving conventional and particle RT via identification of specific HZE-IR molecular markers. PMID:26408534

  4. Low-dose radiation affects cardiac physiology: gene networks and molecular signaling in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Matthew A; Sasi, Sharath P; Onufrak, Jillian; Natarajan, Mohan; Manickam, Krishnan; Schwab, John; Muralidharan, Sujatha; Peterson, Leif E; Alekseyev, Yuriy O; Yan, Xinhua; Goukassian, David A

    2015-12-01

    There are 160,000 cancer patients worldwide treated with particle radiotherapy (RT). With the advent of proton, and high (H) charge (Z) and energy (E) HZE ionizing particle RT, the cardiovascular diseases risk estimates are uncertain. In addition, future deep space exploratory-type missions will expose humans to unknown but low doses of particle irradiation (IR). We examined molecular responses using transcriptome profiling in left ventricular murine cardiomyocytes isolated from mice that were exposed to 90 cGy, 1 GeV proton ((1)H) and 15 cGy, 1 GeV/nucleon iron ((56)Fe) over 28 days after exposure. Unsupervised clustering analysis of gene expression segregated samples according to the IR response and time after exposure, with (56)Fe-IR showing the greatest level of gene modulation. (1)H-IR showed little differential transcript modulation. Network analysis categorized the major differentially expressed genes into cell cycle, oxidative responses, and transcriptional regulation functional groups. Transcriptional networks identified key nodes regulating expression. Validation of the signal transduction network by protein analysis and gel shift assay showed that particle IR clearly regulates a long-lived signaling mechanism for ERK1/2, p38 MAPK signaling and identified NFATc4, GATA4, STAT3, and NF-κB as regulators of the response at specific time points. These data suggest that the molecular responses and gene expression to (56)Fe-IR in cardiomyocytes are unique and long-lasting. Our study may have significant implications for the efforts of National Aeronautics and Space Administration to develop heart disease risk estimates for astronauts and for patients receiving conventional and particle RT via identification of specific HZE-IR molecular markers.

  5. Fetal cardiac scanning today.

    PubMed

    Allan, Lindsey

    2010-07-01

    The ability to examine the structure of the fetal heart in real-time started over 30 years ago now. The field has seen very great advances since then, both in terms of technical improvements in ultrasound equipment and in dissemination of operator skills. A great deal has been learnt about normal cardiac function in the human fetus throughout gestation and how it is affected by pathologies of pregnancy. There is increasing recognition of abnormal heart structure during routine obstetric scanning, allowing referral for specialist diagnosis and counselling. It is now possible to make accurate diagnosis of cardiac malformations as early as 12 weeks of gestation. Early diagnosis of a major cardiac malformation in the fetus can provide the parents with a comprehensive prognosis, enabling them to make the most informed choice about the management of the pregnancy.

  6. Lexical and Affective Prosody in Children with High Functioning Autism

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Ruth B.; Bemis, Rhyannon H.; Skwerer, Daniela Plesa; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We investigated perception and production of lexical stress and processing of affective prosody in adolescents with high functioning autism (HFA). We hypothesized preserved processing of lexical and affective prosody, but atypical lexical prosody production. Method 16 children with HFA and 15 typically developing (TD) peers participated in three experiments: 1. Perception of affective prosody, 2. Lexical stress perception, 3. Lexical stress production. In Experiment 1, participants labeled sad, happy, and neutral spoken sentences that were low-pass filtered, to eliminate verbal content. In Experiment 2 participants disambiguated word meanings based on lexical stress (HOTdog, vs. hotDOG). In Experiment 3 participants produced these words in a sentence completion task. Productions were analyzed using acoustic measures. Results Accuracy levels showed no group differences. Participants with HFA could determine affect from filtered sentences and disambiguate words based on lexical stress. They produced appropriately differentiated lexical stress patterns but demonstrated atypically long productions indicating reduced ability in natural prosody production. Conclusions Children with HFA were as capable as their TD peers in receptive tasks of lexical stress and affective prosody. Prosody productions were atypically long, despite accurate differentiation of lexical stress patterns. Future research should use larger samples and spontaneous vs. elicited productions. PMID:20530388

  7. miR-300 mediates Bmi1 function and regulates differentiation in primitive cardiac progenitors.

    PubMed

    Cruz, F M; Tomé, M; Bernal, J A; Bernad, A

    2015-10-29

    B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 (Bmi1) is a polycomb-family transcriptional factor critical for self-renewal in many adult stem cells and human neoplasia. We sought to identify microRNAs regulated by Bmi1 that could play a role in multipotent cardiac progenitor cell (CPC) decisions. We found that miR-300, a poorly characterized microRNA mapping in the Dlk1-Dio3 microRNA cluster, was positively regulated by Bmi1 in CPCs. Forced expression of miR-300 in CPCs promoted an improved stemness signature with a significant increase in Oct4 levels, a reduction in senescence progression and an enhanced proliferative status via p19 activation and inhibition of p16 accumulation. Endothelial and cardiogenic differentiation were clearly compromised by sustained miR-300 expression. Additionally, RNA and protein analysis revealed a significant reduction in key cardiac transcription factors, including Nkx2.5 and Tbx5. Collectively, these results suggest that some functions attributed to Bmi1 are due to induction of miR-300, which decreases the cardiogenic differentiation potential of multipotent CPCs in vitro and promotes self-renewal.

  8. Sustaining Cardiac Claudin-5 Levels Prevents Functional Hallmarks of Cardiomyopathy in a Muscular Dystrophy Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Delfín, Dawn A; Xu, Ying; Schill, Kevin E; Mays, Tessily A; Canan, Benjamin D; Zang, Kara E; Barnum, Jamie A; Janssen, Paul ML; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A

    2012-01-01

    Identification of new molecular targets in heart failure could ultimately have a substantial positive impact on both the health and financial aspects of treating the large heart failure population. We originally identified reduced levels of the cell junction protein claudin-5 specifically in heart in the dystrophin/utrophin-deficient (Dmdmdx;Utrn−/−) mouse model of muscular dystrophy and cardiomyopathy, which demonstrates physiological hallmarks of heart failure. We then showed that at least 60% of cardiac explant samples from patients with heart failure resulting from diverse etiologies also have reduced claudin-5 levels. These claudin-5 reductions were independent of changes in other cell junction proteins previously linked to heart failure. The goal of this study was to determine whether sustaining claudin-5 levels is sufficient to prevent the onset of histological and functional indicators of heart failure. Here, we show the proof-of-concept rescue experiment in the Dmdmdx;Utrn−/− model, in which claudin-5 reductions were originally identified. Expression of claudin-5 4 weeks after a single administration of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) containing a claudin-5 expression cassette prevented the onset of physiological hallmarks of cardiomyopathy and improved histological signs of cardiac damage. This experiment demonstrates that claudin-5 may represent a novel treatment target for prevention of heart failure. PMID:22547149

  9. Sustaining cardiac claudin-5 levels prevents functional hallmarks of cardiomyopathy in a muscular dystrophy mouse model.

    PubMed

    Delfín, Dawn A; Xu, Ying; Schill, Kevin E; Mays, Tessily A; Canan, Benjamin D; Zang, Kara E; Barnum, Jamie A; Janssen, Paul M L; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A

    2012-07-01

    Identification of new molecular targets in heart failure could ultimately have a substantial positive impact on both the health and financial aspects of treating the large heart failure population. We originally identified reduced levels of the cell junction protein claudin-5 specifically in heart in the dystrophin/utrophin-deficient (Dmd(mdx);Utrn(-/-)) mouse model of muscular dystrophy and cardiomyopathy, which demonstrates physiological hallmarks of heart failure. We then showed that at least 60% of cardiac explant samples from patients with heart failure resulting from diverse etiologies also have reduced claudin-5 levels. These claudin-5 reductions were independent of changes in other cell junction proteins previously linked to heart failure. The goal of this study was to determine whether sustaining claudin-5 levels is sufficient to prevent the onset of histological and functional indicators of heart failure. Here, we show the proof-of-concept rescue experiment in the Dmd(mdx);Utrn(-/-) model, in which claudin-5 reductions were originally identified. Expression of claudin-5 4 weeks after a single administration of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) containing a claudin-5 expression cassette prevented the onset of physiological hallmarks of cardiomyopathy and improved histological signs of cardiac damage. This experiment demonstrates that claudin-5 may represent a novel treatment target for prevention of heart failure.

  10. A Tocotrienol-Enriched Formulation Protects against Radiation-Induced Changes in Cardiac Mitochondria without Modifying Late Cardiac Function or Structure

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tripathi, Preeti; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Krager, Kimberly J; Sharma, Sunil K.; Moros, Eduardo G.; Melnyk, Stepan B.; Pavliv, Oleksandra; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Boerma, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a common and sometimes severe late side effect of radiation therapy for intrathoracic and chest wall tumors. We have previously shown that local heart irradiation in a rat model caused prolonged changes in mitochondrial respiration and increased susceptibility to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening. Because tocotrienols are known to protect against oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, in this study, we examined the effects of tocotrienols on radiation-induced alterations in mitochondria, and structural and functional manifestations of RIHD. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received image-guided localized X irradiation to the heart to a total dose of 21 Gy. Twenty-four hours before irradiation, rats received a tocotrienol-enriched formulation or vehicle by oral gavage. Mitochondrial function and mitochondrial membrane parameters were studied at 2 weeks and 28 weeks after irradiation. In addition, cardiac function and histology were examined at 28 weeks. A single oral dose of the tocotrienol-enriched formulation preserved Bax/Bcl2 ratios and prevented mPTP opening and radiation-induced alterations in succinate-driven mitochondrial respiration. Nevertheless, the late effects of local heart irradiation pertaining to myocardial function and structure were not modified. Our studies suggest that a single dose of tocotrienols protects against radiation-induced mitochondrial changes, but these effects are not sufficient against long-term alterations in cardiac function or remodeling. PMID:25710576

  11. Inhibition of leukotriene B4 receptor 1 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced cardiac dysfunction: role of AMPK-regulated mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meng; Wang, Rui; Han, Qinghua

    2017-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4)-mediated leukocyte recruitment and inflammatory cytokine production make crucial contributions to chronic inflammation and sepsis; however, the role of LTB4 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cardiac dysfunction remains unclear. Therefore, the present study addressed this issue using an LTB4 receptor 1 (BLT1) inhibitor. Administration of LPS to mice resulted in decreased cardiovascular function. Inhibition of LTB4/BLT1 with the BLT1 inhibitor U75302 significantly improved survival and attenuated the LPS-induced acute cardiac dysfunction. During LPS challenge, the phosphorylated AMPK/ACC signaling pathway was slightly activated, and this effect was enhanced by U75302. Additionally, pNF-κB, Bax and cleaved caspase-3 were upregulated by LPS, and Bcl-2, IκB-α, mitochondrial complex I, complex II, and OPA1 were downregulated; however, these effects were reversed by U75302. The results indicated that the BLT1 antagonist suppressed cardiac apoptosis, inflammation, and mitochondrial impairment. Furthermore, the protection provided by the BLT1 inhibitor against LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction was significantly reversed by the AMPK inhibitor Compound C. In conclusion, inhibiting the LTB4/BLT1 signaling pathway via AMPK activation is a potential treatment strategy for septic cardiac dysfunction because it efficiently attenuates cardiac apoptosis, which may occur via the inhibition of inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:28290498

  12. Cardiac Non-myocyte Cells Show Enhanced Pharmacological Function Suggestive of Contractile Maturity in Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocyte Microtissues

    PubMed Central

    Ravenscroft, Stephanie M.; Pointon, Amy; Williams, Awel W.; Cross, Michael J.; Sidaway, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The immature phenotype of stem cell derived cardiomyocytes is a significant barrier to their use in translational medicine and pre-clinical in vitro drug toxicity and pharmacological analysis. Here we have assessed the contribution of non-myocyte cells on the contractile function of co-cultured human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) in spheroid microtissue format. Microtissues were formed using a scaffold free 96-well cell suspension method from hESC-CM cultured alone (CM microtissues) or in combination with human primary cardiac microvascular endothelial cells and cardiac fibroblasts (CMEF microtissues). Contractility was characterized with fluorescence and video-based edge detection. CMEF microtissues displayed greater Ca2+ transient amplitudes, enhanced spontaneous contraction rate and remarkably enhanced contractile function in response to both positive and negative inotropic drugs, suggesting a more mature contractile phenotype than CM microtissues. In addition, for several drugs the enhanced contractile response was not apparent when endothelial cell or fibroblasts from a non-cardiac tissue were used as the ancillary cells. Further evidence of maturity for CMEF microtissues was shown with increased expression of genes that encode proteins critical in cardiac Ca2+ handling (S100A1), sarcomere assembly (telethonin/TCAP) and β-adrenergic receptor signalling. Our data shows that compared with single cell-type cardiomyocyte in vitro models, CMEF microtissues are superior at predicting the inotropic effects of drugs, demonstrating the critical contribution of cardiac non-myocyte cells in mediating functional cardiotoxicity. PMID:27125969

  13. Connective Tissue Growth Factor Regulates Cardiac Function and Tissue Remodeling in a Mouse Model of Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Koshman, Yevgeniya E.; Sternlicht, Mark D.; Kim, Taehoon; O'Hara, Christopher P.; Koczor, Christopher A.; Lewis, William; Seeley, Todd W.; Lipson, Kenneth E.; Samarel, Allen M.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac structural changes associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) include cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis. Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) has been associated with tissue remodeling and is highly expressed in failing hearts. Our aim was to test if inhibition of CTGF would alter the course of cardiac remodeling and preserve cardiac function in the protein kinase Cε (PKCε) mouse model of DCM. Transgenic mice expressing constitutively active PKCε in cardiomyocytes develop cardiac dysfunction that was evident by 3 months of age, and that progressed to cardiac fibrosis, heart failure, and increased mortality. Beginning at 3 months of age, PKCε mice were treated with a neutralizing monoclonal antibody to CTGF (FG-3149) for an additional 3 months. CTGF inhibition significantly improved left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic function in PKCε mice, and slowed the progression of LV dilatation. Using gene arrays and quantitative PCR, the expression of many genes associated with tissue remodeling were elevated in PKCε mice, but significantly decreased by CTGF inhibition. However total collagen deposition was not attenuated. The observation of significantly improved LV function by CTGF inhibition in PKCε mice suggests that CTGF inhibition may benefit patients with DCM. Additional studies to explore this potential are warranted. PMID:26549358

  14. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (ogg1) maintains the function of cardiac progenitor cells during heart formation in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Lifeng; Zhou, Yong; Yu, Shanhe; Ji, Guixiang; Liu, Wei; Gu, Aihua

    2013-11-15

    Genomic damage may devastate the potential of progenitor cells and consequently impair early organogenesis. We found that ogg1, a key enzyme initiating the base-excision repair, was enriched in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. So far, little is known about DNA repair in cardiogenesis. Here, we addressed the critical role of ogg1 in cardiogenesis for the first time. ogg1 mainly expressed in the anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALPM), the primary heart tube, and subsequently the embryonic myocardium by in situ hybridisation. Loss of ogg1 resulted in severe cardiac morphogenesis and functional abnormalities, including the short heart length, arrhythmia, decreased cardiomyocytes and nkx2.5{sup +} cardiac progenitor cells. Moreover, the increased apoptosis and repressed proliferation of progenitor cells caused by ogg1 deficiency might contribute to the heart phenotype. The microarray analysis showed that the expression of genes involved in embryonic heart tube morphogenesis and heart structure were significantly changed due to the lack of ogg1. Among those, foxh1 is an important partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage. Our work demonstrates the requirement of ogg1 in cardiac progenitors and heart development in zebrafish. These findings may be helpful for understanding the aetiology of congenital cardiac deficits. - Highlights: • A key DNA repair enzyme ogg1 is expressed in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. • We found that ogg1 is essential for normal cardiac morphogenesis in zebrafish. • The production of embryonic cardiomyocytes requires appropriate ogg1 expression. • Ogg1 critically regulated proliferation of cardiac progenitor cells in zebrafish. • foxh1 is a partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage.

  15. Carbon nanotubes instruct physiological growth and functionally mature syncytia: nongenetic engineering of cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Valentina; Cellot, Giada; Toma, Francesca Maria; Long, Carlin S; Caldwell, John H; Zentilin, Lorena; Giacca, Mauro; Turco, Antonio; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura; Mestroni, Luisa

    2013-07-23

    Myocardial tissue engineering currently represents one of the most realistic strategies for cardiac repair. We have recently discovered the ability of carbon nanotube scaffolds to promote cell division and maturation in cardiomyocytes. Here, we test the hypothesis that carbon nanotube scaffolds promote cardiomyocyte growth and maturation by altering the gene expression program, implementing the cell electrophysiological properties and improving networking and maturation of functional syncytia. In our study, we combine microscopy, biological and electrophysiological methodologies, and calcium imaging, to verify whether neonatal rat ventricular myocytes cultured on substrates of multiwall carbon nanotubes acquire a physiologically more mature phenotype compared to control (gelatin). We show that the carbon nanotube substrate stimulates the induction of a gene expression profile characteristic of terminal differentiation and physiological growth, with a 2-fold increase of α-myosin heavy chain (P < 0.001) and upregulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase 2a. In contrast, markers of pathological hypertrophy remain unchanged (β-myosin heavy chain, skeletal α-actin, atrial natriuretic peptide). These modifications are paralleled by an increase of connexin-43 gene expression, gap junctions and functional syncytia. Moreover, carbon nanotubes appear to exert a protective effect against the pathologic stimulus of phenylephrine. Finally, cardiomyocytes on carbon nanotubes demonstrate a more mature electrophysiological phenotype of syncytia and intracellular calcium signaling. Thus, carbon nanotubes interacting with cardiomyocytes have the ability to promote physiological growth and functional maturation. These properties are unique in the current vexing field of tissue engineering, and offer unprecedented perspectives in the development of innovative therapies for cardiac repair.

  16. Sustained delivery of VEGF from designer self-assembling peptides improves cardiac function after myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hai-dong; Cui, Guo-hong; Yang, Jia-jun; Wang, Cun; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Li-sheng; Jiang, Jun; Shao, Shui-jin

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The designer peptide LRKKLGKA could self-assemble into nanofibers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Injection of LRKKLGKA peptides could promote the sustained delivery of VEGF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Injection of VEGF with LRKKLGKA peptides lead to sufficient angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Injection of VEGF with LRKKLGKA peptides improves heart function. -- Abstract: Poor vascularization and insufficient oxygen supply are detrimental to the survival of residual cardiomyocytes or transplanted stem cells after myocardial infarction. To prolong and slow the release of angiogenic factors, which stimulate both angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, we constructed a novel self-assembling peptide by attaching the heparin-binding domain sequence LRKKLGKA to the self-assembling peptide RADA16. This designer self-assembling peptide self-assembled into nanofiber scaffolds under physiological conditions, as observed by atomic force microscopy. The injection of designer self-assembling peptides can efficiently provide the sustained delivery of VEGF for at least 1 month. At 4 weeks after transplantation, cardiac function was improved, and scar size and collagen deposition were markedly reduced in the group receiving VEGF with the LRKKLGKA scaffolds compared with groups receiving VEGF alone, LRKKLGKA scaffolds alone or VEGF with RADA16 scaffolds. The microvessel density in the VEGF with LRKKLGKA group was higher than that in the VEGF with RADA16 group. TUNEL and cleaved caspase-3 expression assays showed that the transplantation of VEGF with LRKKLGKA enhanced cell survival in the infarcted heart. These results present the tailor-made peptide scaffolds as a new generation of sustained-release biomimetic biomaterials and suggest that the use of angiogenic factors along with designer self-assembling peptides can lead to myocardial protection, sufficient angiogenesis, and improvement in cardiac function.

  17. Aging Impairs Myocardial Fatty Acid and Ketone Oxidation and Modifies Cardiac Functional and Metabolic Responses to Insulin in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hyyti, Outi M.; Ledee, Dolena; Ning, Xue-Han; Ge, Ming; Portman, Michael A.

    2010-07-02

    Aging presumably initiates shifts in substrate oxidation mediated in part by changes in insulin sensitivity. Similar shifts occur with cardiac hypertrophy and may contribute to contractile dysfunction. We tested the hypothesis that aging modifies substrate utilization and alters insulin sensitivity in mouse heart when provided multiple substrates. In vivo cardiac function was measured with microtipped pressure transducers in the left ventricle from control (4–6 mo) and aged (22–24 mo) mice. Cardiac function was also measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate and anaplerotic fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle (CAC) by using perfusate containing 13C-labeled free fatty acids (FFA), acetoacetate, lactate, and unlabeled glucose. Stroke volume and cardiac output were diminished in aged mice in vivo, but pressure development was preserved. Systolic and diastolic functions were maintained in aged isolated hearts. Insulin prompted an increase in systolic function in aged hearts, resulting in an increase in cardiac efficiency. FFA and ketone flux were present but were markedly impaired in aged hearts. These changes in myocardial substrate utilization corresponded to alterations in circulating lipids, thyroid hormone, and reductions in protein expression for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)4. Insulin further suppressed FFA oxidation in the aged. Insulin stimulation of anaplerosis in control hearts was absent in the aged. The aged heart shows metabolic plasticity by accessing multiple substrates to maintain function. However, fatty acid oxidation capacity is limited. Impaired insulin-stimulated anaplerosis may contribute to elevated cardiac efficiency, but may also limit response to acute stress through depletion of CAC intermediates.

  18. Dinaciclib potently suppresses MCL-1 and selectively induces the cell death in human iPS cells without affecting the viability of cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    Alsayegh, Khaled; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Sekine, Hidekazu; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells hold great potential for being a major source of cells for regenerative medicine. One major issue that hinders their advancement to clinic is the persistence of undifferentiated iPS cells in iPS-derived tissue. In this report, we show that the CDKs inhibitor, Dinaciclib, selectively eliminates iPS cells without affecting the viability of cardiac cells. We found that low nanomolar concentration of dinaciclib increased DNA damage and p53 protein levels in iPSCs. This was accompanied by negative regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein MCL-1. Gene knockdown experiments revealed that p53 downregulation only increased the threshold of dinaciclib induced apoptosis in iPS cells. Dinaciclib also inhibited the phosphorylation of Serine 2 of the C-terminal domain of RNA Polyemrase II through CDK9 inhibition. This resulted in the inhibition of transcription of MCL-1 and the pluripotency genes, NANOG and c-MYC. Even though dinaciclib caused a slight downregulation of MCL-1 in iPS-derived cardiac cells, the viability of the cells was not significantly affected, and beating iPS-derived cardiac cell sheet could still be fabricated. These findings suggest a difference in tolerance of MCL-1 downregulation between iPSCs and iPS-derived cardiac cells which could be exploited to eliminate remaining iPS cells in bioengineered cell sheet tissues. PMID:28361959

  19. The impact of non-severe burn injury on cardiac function and long-term cardiovascular pathology

    PubMed Central

    O’Halloran, Emily; Shah, Amit; Dembo, Lawrence; Hool, Livia; Viola, Helena; Grey, Christine; Boyd, James; O’Neill, Tomas; Wood, Fiona; Duke, Janine; Fear, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Severe burn injury significantly affects cardiovascular function for up to 3 years. However, whether this leads to long-term pathology is unknown. The impact of non-severe burn injury, which accounts for over 80% of admissions in developed countries, has not been investigated. Using a rodent model of non-severe burn injury with subsequent echocardiography we showed significantly increased left ventricular end systolic diameter (LVESD) and ventricular wall thickness at up to 3 months post-injury. Use of propranolol abrogated the changes in cardiac measures observed. Subsequently we investigated changes in a patient cohort with non-severe injury. Echocardiography measured at baseline and at 3 months post-injury showed increased LVESD at 3 months and significantly decreased posterior wall diameter. Finally, 32 years of Western Australian hospital records were used to investigate the incidence of cardiovascular disease admissions after burn injury. People who had experienced a burn had increased hospital admissions and length of stay for cardiovascular diseases when compared to a matched uninjured cohort. This study presents animal, patient and population data that strongly suggest non-severe burn injury has significant effects on cardiovascular function and long-term morbidity in some burn patients. Identification of patients at risk will promote better intervention and outcomes for burn patients. PMID:27694999

  20. The impact of non-severe burn injury on cardiac function and long-term cardiovascular pathology.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Emily; Shah, Amit; Dembo, Lawrence; Hool, Livia; Viola, Helena; Grey, Christine; Boyd, James; O'Neill, Tomas; Wood, Fiona; Duke, Janine; Fear, Mark

    2016-10-03

    Severe burn injury significantly affects cardiovascular function for up to 3 years. However, whether this leads to long-term pathology is unknown. The impact of non-severe burn injury, which accounts for over 80% of admissions in developed countries, has not been investigated. Using a rodent model of non-severe burn injury with subsequent echocardiography we showed significantly increased left ventricular end systolic diameter (LVESD) and ventricular wall thickness at up to 3 months post-injury. Use of propranolol abrogated the changes in cardiac measures observed. Subsequently we investigated changes in a patient cohort with non-severe injury. Echocardiography measured at baseline and at 3 months post-injury showed increased LVESD at 3 months and significantly decreased posterior wall diameter. Finally, 32 years of Western Australian hospital records were used to investigate the incidence of cardiovascular disease admissions after burn injury. People who had experienced a burn had increased hospital admissions and length of stay for cardiovascular diseases when compared to a matched uninjured cohort. This study presents animal, patient and population data that strongly suggest non-severe burn injury has significant effects on cardiovascular function and long-term morbidity in some burn patients. Identification of patients at risk will promote better intervention and outcomes for burn patients.

  1. Resting cardiac function in adolescent non-suicidal self-injury: The impact of borderline personality disorder symptoms and psychosocial functioning.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Julian; Rinnewitz, Lena; Parzer, Peter; Resch, Franz; Thayer, Julian F; Kaess, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Vagally mediated heart rate variability (vmHRV) is reduced in borderline personality disorder (BPD). Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is associated with comorbid psychopathology, in particular BPD. We aimed to examine differences in cardiac function (vmHRV and heart rate [HR]) comparing adolescents (12-17 years) engaging in NSSI (n=30) and healthy controls (n=30). Further, we aimed to determine clinical concomitants of cardiac function in patients with NSSI. Analyses showed no significant group differences on cardiac function. Controlling for a host of confounding variables resting state HR and vmHRV in adolescents with NSSI were significantly correlated with BPD symptoms and the current level of functioning.

  2. Functional significance of preserved affect recognition in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Fiszdon, Joanna M.; Johannesen, Jason K.

    2009-01-01

    Affect recognition (AR) is a core component of social information processing, thus may be critical to understanding social behavior and functioning in broader aspects of daily living. Deficits in AR are well documented in schizophrenia, however, there is also evidence that many individuals with schizophrenia perform AR tasks at near-normal levels. In the current study, we sought to evaluate the functional significance of AR deficits in schizophrenia by comparing subgroups with normal-range and impaired AR performance on proxy and interviewer-rated measures of real-world functioning. Schizophrenia outpatients were classified as normal-range (N=17) and impaired (N=31) based on a logistic cut point in the sample distribution of BLERT scores, referenced to a normative sample of healthy control subjects (N=56). The derived schizophrenia subgroups were then compared on proxy (UCSD, UPSA, SSPA, MMAA) and interviewer-rated (QLS, ILSS) measures of functioning, as well as battery of neurocognitive tests. Initial analyses indicated superior MMAA and QLS performance in the near-normal AR subgroup. Covariate analyses indicated that group differences in neurocognition fully mediated the observed associations between AR and MMAA and attenuated the observed relationships between AR classification and QLS. These results support three main conclusions. First, AR, like many other domains of psychopathology studied in schizophrenia, is preserved in select subgroups. Second, there is a positive relationship between AR performance and functional outcome measures. Third, neurocognition appears to mediate the relationship between AR and measures of functioning. PMID:20202689

  3. Gestational exposure to diethylstilbestrol alters cardiac structure/function, protein expression and DNA methylation in adult male mice progeny

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, Rami; Kasneci, Amanda; Mepham, Kathryn; Sebag, Igal A.; and others

    2013-01-01

    Pregnant women, and thus their fetuses, are exposed to many endocrine disruptor compounds (EDCs). Fetal cardiomyocytes express sex hormone receptors making them potentially susceptible to re-programming by estrogenizing EDCs. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a proto-typical, non-steroidal estrogen. We hypothesized that changes in adult cardiac structure/function after gestational exposure to the test compound DES would be a proof in principle for the possibility of estrogenizing environmental EDCs to also alter the fetal heart. Vehicle (peanut oil) or DES (0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 μg/kg/da.) was orally delivered to pregnant C57bl/6n dams on gestation days 11.5–14.5. At 3 months, male progeny were left sedentary or were swim trained for 4 weeks. Echocardiography of isoflurane anesthetized mice revealed similar cardiac structure/function in all sedentary mice, but evidence of systolic dysfunction and increased diastolic relaxation after swim training at higher DES doses. The calcium homeostasis proteins, SERCA2a, phospholamban, phospho-serine 16 phospholamban and calsequestrin 2, are important for cardiac contraction and relaxation. Immunoblot analyses of ventricle homogenates showed increased expression of SERCA2a and calsequestrin 2 in DES mice and greater molecular remodeling of these proteins and phospho-serine 16 phospholamban in swim trained DES mice. DES increased cardiac DNA methyltransferase 3a expression and DNA methylation in the CpG island within the calsequestrin 2 promoter in heart. Thus, gestational DES epigenetically altered ventricular DNA, altered cardiac function and expression, and reduced the ability of adult progeny to cardiac remodel when physically challenged. We conclude that gestational exposure to estrogenizing EDCs may impact cardiac structure/function in adult males. -- Highlights: ► Gestational DES changes cardiac SERCA2a and CASQ2 expression. ► Echocardiography identified systolic dysfunction and increased diastolic relaxation. ► DES

  4. Multipotent human stromal cells improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction in mice without long-term engraftment

    SciTech Connect

    Iso, Yoshitaka; Spees, Jeffrey L.; E-mail: Jeffrey.Spees@uvm.edu; Serrano, Claudia; Bakondi, Benjamin; Pochampally, Radhika; Song, Yao-Hua; Sobel, Burton E.; Delafontaine, Patrick; Prockop, Darwin J. . E-mail: dprocko@tulane.edu

    2007-03-16

    The aim of this study was to determine whether intravenously administered multipotent stromal cells from human bone marrow (hMSCs) can improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI) without long-term engraftment and therefore whether transitory paracrine effects or secreted factors are responsible for the benefit conferred. hMSCs were injected systemically into immunodeficient mice with acute MI. Cardiac function and fibrosis after MI in the hMSC-treated group were significantly improved compared with controls. However, despite the cardiac improvement, there was no evident hMSC engraftment in the heart 3 weeks after MI. Microarray assays and ELISAs demonstrated that multiple protective factors were expressed and secreted from the hMSCs in culture. Factors secreted by hMSCs prevented cell death of cultured cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells under conditions that mimicked tissue ischemia. The favorable effects of hMSCs appear to reflect the impact of secreted factors rather than engraftment, differentiation, or cell fusion.

  5. Identification and Functional Characterization of a Novel CACNA1C-Mediated Cardiac Disorder Characterized by Prolonged QT Intervals with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, Congenital Heart Defects, and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Boczek, Nicole J.; Ye, Dan; Jin, Fang; Tester, David J.; Huseby, April; Bos, J. Martijn; Johnson, Aaron J.; Kanter, Ronald; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Background A portion of sudden cardiac deaths (SCD) can be attributed to structural heart diseases such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) or cardiac channelopathies such as long QT syndrome (LQTS); however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are quite distinct. Here, we identify a novel CACNA1C missense mutation with mixed loss-of-function/gain-of-function responsible for a complex phenotype of LQTS, HCM, SCD, and congenital heart defects (CHDs). Methods and Results Whole exome sequencing (WES) in combination with Ingenuity Variant Analysis was completed on three affected individuals and one unaffected individual from a large pedigree with concomitant LQTS, HCM, and CHDs and identified a novel CACNA1C mutation, p.Arg518Cys, as the most likely candidate mutation. Mutational analysis of exon 12 of CACNA1C was completed on 5 additional patients with a similar phenotype of LQTS plus a personal or family history of HCM-like phenotypes, and identified two additional pedigrees with mutations at the same position, p.Arg518Cys/His. Whole cell patch clamp technique was used to assess the electrophysiological effects of the identified mutations in CaV1.2, and revealed a complex phenotype, including loss of current density and inactivation in combination with increased window and late current. Conclusions Through WES and expanded cohort screening, we identified a novel genetic substrate p.Arg518Cys/His-CACNA1C, in patients with a complex phenotype including LQTS, HCM, and CHDs annotated as cardiac-only Timothy syndrome. Our electrophysiological studies, identification of mutations at the same amino acid position in multiple pedigrees, and co-segregation with disease in these pedigrees provides evidence that p.Arg518Cys/His is the pathogenic substrate for the observed phenotype. PMID:26253506

  6. Effect of initial temperature changes on myocardial enzyme levels and cardiac function in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yuanyu; Liu, Jie; Ma, Jinling; Meng, Qingyi; Peng, Chaoying

    2014-07-01

    In the present study, the effect of initial body temperature changes on myocardial enzyme levels and cardiac function in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients was investigated. A total of 315 AMI patients were enrolled and the mean temperature was calculated based on their body temperature within 24 h of admission to hospital. The patients were divided into four groups according to their normal body temperature: Group A, <36.5°C; group B, ≥36.5°C and <37.0°C; group C, ≥37.0°C and <37.5°C and group D, ≥37.5°C. The levels of percutaneous coronary intervention, myocardial enzymes and troponin T (TNT), as well as cardiac ultrasound images, were analyzed. Statistically significant differences in the quantity of creatine kinase at 12 and 24 h following admission were identified between group A and groups C and D (P<0.01). A significant difference in TNT at 12 h following admission was observed between groups A and D (P<0.05), however, this difference was not observed with groups B and C. The difference in TNT between the groups at 24 h following admission was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Significant differences in lactate dehydrogenase at 12 and 24 h following admission were observed between groups A and D (P<0.05), however, differences were not observed with groups B and C (P>0.05). Significant differences in glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase at 12 and 24 h following admission were observed between groups A and D (P<0.05), however, differences were not observed in groups B and C (P>0.05). However, no significant differences were identified in cardiac function index between all the groups. Therefore, the results of the present study indicated that AMI patients with low initial body temperatures exhibited decreased levels of myocardial enzymes and TNT. Thus, the observation of an initially low body temperature may be used as a protective factor for AMI and may improve the existing clinical program.

  7. Extracellular Matrix Mediated Maturation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Cardiac Monolayer Structure and Electrophysiological Function

    PubMed Central

    Herron, Todd J.; Rocha, Andre Monteiro Da; Campbell, Katherine; Ponce-Balbuena, Daniela; Willis, B. Cicero; Guerrero-Serna, Guadalupe; Liu, Qinghua; Klos, Matt; Musa, Hassan; Zarzoso, Manuel; Bizy, Alexandra; Furness, Jamie; Anumonwo, Justus; Mironov, Sergey; Jalife, José

    2016-01-01

    Background Human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hPSC-CMs) monolayers generated to date display an immature embryonic-like functional and structural phenotype that limits their utility for research and cardiac regeneration. In particular, the electrophysiological function of hPSC-CM monolayers and bioengineered constructs used to date are characterized by slow electrical impulse propagation velocity and immature action potential profiles. Methods and Results Here we have identified an optimal extracellular matrix (ECM) for significant electrophysiological and structural maturation of hPSC-CM monolayers. hPSC-CM plated in the optimal ECM combination have impulse propagation velocities ~2X faster than previously reported (43.6±7.0 cm·s−1 n=9) and have mature cardiomyocyte action potential profiles including hyperpolarized diastolic potential and rapid action potential upstroke velocity (146.5±17.7 V/s, N=5 monolayers). In addition the optimal ECM promoted hypertrophic growth of cardiomyocytes and the expression of key mature sarcolemmal (SCN5A, Kir2.1 and Connexin43) and myofilament markers (cTroponin I). The maturation process reported here relies on activation of integrin signaling pathways: neutralization of β1 integrin receptors via blocking antibodies and pharmacological blockade of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation prevented structural maturation. Conclusions Maturation of human stem cell derived cardiomyocyte monolayers is achieved in a one week period by plating cardiomyocytes on PDMS coverslips rather than on conventional 2D cell culture formats such as glass coverslips or plastic dishes. Activation of integrin signaling and FAK are essential for significant maturation of human cardiac monolayers. PMID:27069088

  8. Structural and functional aspects of the myosin essential light chain in cardiac muscle contraction

    SciTech Connect

    Muthu, Priya; Wang, Li; Yuan, Chen-Ching; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Huang, Wenrui; Hernandez, Olga M.; Kawai, Masataka; Irving, Thomas C.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2012-04-02

    The myosin essential light chain (ELC) is a structural component of the actomyosin cross-bridge, but its function is poorly understood, especially the role of the cardiac specific N-terminal extension in modulating actomyosin interaction. Here, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the A57G (alanine to glycine) mutation in the cardiac ELC known to cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). The function of the ELC N-terminal extension was investigated with the Tg-{Delta}43 mouse model, whose myocardium expresses a truncated ELC. Low-angle X-ray diffraction studies on papillary muscle fibers in rigor revealed a decreased interfilament spacing ({approx} 1.5 nm) and no alterations in cross-bridge mass distribution in Tg-A57G mice compared to Tg-WT, expressing the full-length nonmutated ELC. The truncation mutation showed a 1.3-fold increase in I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}, indicating a shift of cross-bridge mass from the thick filament backbone toward the thin filaments. Mechanical studies demonstrated increased stiffness in Tg-A57G muscle fibers compared to Tg-WT or Tg-{Delta}43. The equilibrium constant for the cross-bridge force generation step was smallest in Tg-{Delta}43. These results support an important role for the N-terminal ELC extension in prepositioning the cross-bridge for optimal force production. Subtle changes in the ELC sequence were sufficient to alter cross-bridge properties and lead to pathological phenotypes.

  9. Functional Outcome Trajectories after Out-of Hospital Pediatric Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Faye S; Slomine, Beth; Christensen, James; Holubkov, Richard; Page, Kent; Dean, J. Michael; Moler, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze functional performance measures collected prospectively during the conduct of a clinical trial that enrolled children (up to age 18 years), resuscitated after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, who were at high risk for poor outcomes. Design Children with Glasgow Motor Scales <5, within 6 hours of resuscitation, were enrolled in a clinical trial that compared two targeted temperature management interventions (THAPCA-OH, NCT00878644). The primary outcome, 12-month survival with Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, second edition (VABS-II) score ≥70, did not differ between groups. Setting 38 North American pediatric ICU’s. Participants 295 children were enrolled; 270/295 had baseline VABS-II scores ≥70; 87/270 survived one year. Interventions Targeted temperatures were 33.0°C and 36.8°C for hypothermia and normothermia groups. Measurements and Main Results Baseline measures included VABS-II, Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category(PCPC), and Pediatric Overall Performance Category (POPC). PCPC and POPC were rescored at hospital discharges; all three were scored at 3 and 12 months. In survivors with baseline VABS-II scores ≥70, we evaluated relationships of hospital discharge PCPC with 3 and 12 month scores, and between 3 and 12 month VABS-II scores. Hospital discharge PCPC scores strongly predicted 3 and 12 month PCPC (r=0.82,0.79; p<0.0001) and VABS-II scores (r=−0.81,−0.77; p<0.0001) Three month VABS-II scores strongly predicted 12 month performance (r=0.95, p<0.0001). Hypothermia treatment did not alter these relationships. Conclusions In comatose children, with Glasgow Motor Scales <5 in the initial hours after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest resuscitation, function scores at hospital discharge and at 3 months predicted 12-month performance well in the majority of survivors. PMID:27509385

  10. Age-related decline in cardiac autonomic function is not attenuated with increased physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Njemanze, Hugo; Warren, Charlotte; Eggett, Christopher; MacGowan, Guy A.; Bates, Matthew G D; Siervo, Mario; Ivkovic, Srdjan; Trenell, Michael I.; Jakovljevic, Djordje G.

    2016-01-01

    Age and physical inactivity are important risk factors for cardiovascular mortality. Heart rate response to exercise (HRRE) and heart rate recovery (HRR), measures of cardiac autonomic function, are strong predictors of mortality. The present study defined the effect of age and physical activity on HRRE and HRR. Healthy women (N=72) grouped according to age (young, 20-30 years; middle, 40-50 years; and older, 65-81 years) and daily physical activity (low active <7500, high active >12,500 steps/day) performed a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test. The HRRE was defined as an increase in heart rate from rest to 1, 3 and 5 minutes of exercise and at 1/3 of total exercise time, and HRR as the difference in heart rate between peak exercise and 1, 2, and 3 minutes later. Age was associated with a significant decline in HRRE at 1 min and 1/3 of exercise time (r= − 0.27, p=0.04, and r=−0.39, p=0.02) and HRR at 2 min and 3 min (r=−0.35, p=0.01, and r=−0.31, p=0.02). There was no significant difference in HRRE and HRR between high and low-active middle-age and older women (p>0.05). Increased level of habitual physical activity level appears to have a limited effect on age-related decline in cardiac autonomic function in women. PMID:27705949

  11. Influence of basal nitric oxide secretion on cardiac function in man.

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, P B; Lim, P O; MacDonald, T M

    1995-01-01

    1. Nitric oxide is recognised as an important biological mediator, which is thought to be involved in cardiovascular homeostasis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of basal nitric oxide synthesis on cardiac function in man, by blocking nitric oxide synthesis with NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). 2. Eight normal volunteers were studied on two separate occasions. Measurements of heart rate, blood pressure and echocardiographic indices of left ventricular systolic and diastolic function were made at baseline on each day and every 20 min during incremental infusion of L-NMMA (0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg kg-1 h-1) or placebo. 3. A trend towards reduction in heart rate was observed with L-NMMA infusion although this did not reach statistical significance, whereas significant increases in both systolic blood pressure (at 2.0 mg kg-1 h-1) and systemic vascular resistance index (at 0.5 mg kg-1 h-1) were seen. 4. L-NMMA infusion caused significant reductions in stroke distance and cardiac index, although there was no change in the ratio of end systolic wall stress/end systolic volume index (an afterload independent index of left ventricular systolic performance). 5. The isovolumic relaxation time significantly increased with L-NMMA infusion, together with a significant reduction in the 'E' wave flow velocity integral. Reductions in both peak E/A ratio and E/A flow velocity integral ratio were also seen, although these failed to reach statistical significance. 6. In conclusion, the basal generation of nitric oxide in man appears to maintain a vasodilated state, and modifies left ventricular diastolic filling parameters. PMID:8554930

  12. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Vinicius S.; Fan, Yunxia; Kurita, Hisaka; Wang, Qin; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr-/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr+/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr-/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26555816

  13. Asiatic acid inhibits left ventricular remodeling and improves cardiac function in a rat model of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    HUO, LIANYING; SHI, WENBING; CHONG, LING; WANG, JINLONG; ZHANG, KAI; LI, YUFENG

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular remodeling results in cardiac dysfunction and accounts for the majority of the morbidity and mortality following myocardial infarction (MI). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of asiatic acid (AA) on cardiac function and left ventricular remodeling in a rat model of MI and explore the underlying mechanisms. Rats were subjected to coronary artery ligation to model MI and orally treated with AA. After 4 weeks, cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography. Cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area was recorded, and the expression levels of a number of inflammatory cytokines were detected using ELISA. The degree of interstitial fibrosis was determined by evaluating the mRNA expression levels of collagen II and III. Western blot analysis was performed to detect the expression levels of total and phosphorylated p38 MAPK and ERK1/2, to investigate whether they are involved in the mechanism underlying the effect of AA on the heart. Rats subjected to MI displayed significantly impaired cardiac function compared with those subjected to a sham procedure, while this change was reversed by treatment with AA. Furthermore, AA markedly inhibited cardiac hypertrophy, reduced the mRNA expression levels of inflammatory cytokines and decreased interstitial fibrosis in the infarct border zone of MI model rats compared with those in vehicle-treated MI model rats. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 was blocked by AA in the MI rats but not in the sham rats. In summary, AA treatment preserved cardiac function and inhibited left ventricular remodeling, potentially by blocking the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 in the infarct border zone of the ischemic myocardium, indicating that AA may be a novel candidate for development as a therapy for MI. PMID:26889217

  14. Dietary saturated fat and docosahexaenoic acid differentially effect cardiac mitochondrial phospholipid fatty acyl composition and Ca(2+) uptake, without altering permeability transition or left ventricular function.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Kelly A; Dabkowski, Erinne R; de Fatima Galvao, Tatiana; Xu, Wenhong; Daneault, Caroline; de Rosiers, Christine; Stanley, William C

    2013-06-01

    High saturated fat diets improve cardiac function and survival in rodent models of heart failure, which may be mediated by changes in mitochondrial function. Dietary supplementation with the n3-polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n3) is also beneficial in heart failure and can affect mitochondrial function. Saturated fatty acids and DHA likely have opposing effects on mitochondrial phospholipid fatty acyl side chain composition and mitochondrial membrane function, though a direct comparison has not been previously reported. We fed healthy adult rats a standard low-fat diet (11% of energy intake from fat), a low-fat diet supplemented with DHA (2.3% of energy intake) or a high-fat diet comprised of long chain saturated fatty acids (45% fat) for 6 weeks. There were no differences among the three diets in cardiac mass or function, mitochondrial respiration, or Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial permeability transition. On the other hand, there were dramatic differences in mitochondrial phospholipid fatty acyl side chains. Dietary supplementation with DHA increased DHA from 7% to ∼25% of total phospholipid fatty acids in mitochondrial membranes, and caused a proportional depletion of arachidonic acid (20:4n6). The saturated fat diet increased saturated fat and DHA in mitochondria and decreased linoleate (18:2n6), which corresponded to a decrease in Ca(2+) uptake by isolated mitochondria compared to the other diet groups. In conclusion, despite dramatic changes in mitochondrial phospholipid fatty acyl side chain composition by both the DHA and high saturated fat diets, there were no effects on mitochondrial respiration, permeability transition, or cardiac function.

  15. Effects of pulsatile perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass on biochemical markers and kidney function in patients undergoing cardiac surgeries.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Alireza; Jafari, Naser; Hasanpour, Mohammad; Sahandifar, Soheil; Ghafari, Masoud; Alaei, Vahed

    2013-01-01

    For several years there is no conclusive guideline on the effectiveness of pulsatile or non-pulsatile perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in patients undergoing cardiac surgeries. In this study, we evaluated the effect of pulsatile versus continuous perfusion on the myocardial release of the cardiac biochemical markers including, creatine phosphokinase (CPK), cardiac creatine kinase (CK-MB), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and also kidney function tests including: blood urea nitrogen test (BUN) and creatinine test (Cr) in patients that underwent both pulsatile and non-pulsatile methods before and after heart surgeries. A total of 80 patients were enrolled in this study, 40 patients in each pulsatile and non-pulsatile group. Venous blood samples were drown from each patient in two groups before operation and after operation at, 24, 48, and 72 h and analyzed separately for CPK, its cardiac isoenzyme (CK-MB), LDH, BUN and Cr. There were no significant differences between the two groups with regard to preoperative parameters such as sex, age, and body surface area. Our study shows that the effect of pulsatile perfusion on cardiac and kidney function is better than the non-pulsatile method.

  16. ACP1 Genetic Polymorphism and Coronary Artery Disease: Evidence of Effects on Clinical Parameters of Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Gloria-Bottini, Fulvia; Banci, Maria; Saccucci, Patrizia; Nardi, Paolo; Scognamiglio, Mattia; Papetti, Federica; Adanti, Sara; Magrini, Andrea; Pellegrino, Antonio; Bottini, Egidio; Chiariello, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Background Kinases and phosphatases have an important role in the susceptibility and clinical variability of cardiac diseases. We have recently reported an association between a phosphoprotein phosphatase controlled by Acid Phosphatase locus 1 (ACP1), and Coronary artery disease (CAD) suggesting an effect on the susceptibility to this disease. In the present note we have investigated a possible role of ACP1 in the variability of clinical parameters of cardiac function. Methods We have studied 345 subjects admitted to Valmontone Hospital for cardiovascular diseases: 202 subjects with CAD and 143 without CAD, 53 subjects admitted to Cardiac Surgery Division of Tor Vergata University were also considered. Results In diabetic patients with CAD there is a significant negative association between Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and ACP1 S isoform concentration. Genotypes with high S isoform concentration show a lower value of LVEF as compared to genotypes with low S isoform concentration. We have also found a significant positive association between cNYHA class and ACP1 S isoform. After surgical intervention, in subjects with high S isoform concentration the decrease of LVEF is more marked as compared to subjects with low S isoform concentration. Overall these observations indicate that high S isoform activity has negative effects on cardiac function. The observation in patients undergoing cardiac surgery confirms the negative association between high S isoform activity and LVEF. Conclusions The present study suggests that ACP1 influences both susceptibility to CAD and clinical manifestations of the disease.

  17. Endoplasmic Reticulum Resident Protein 44 (ERp44) Deficiency in Mice and Zebrafish Leads to Cardiac Developmental and Functional Defects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ding‐Yan; Abbasi, Cynthia; El‐Rass, Suzan; Li, Jamie Yuanjun; Dawood, Fayez; Naito, Kotaro; Sharma, Parveen; Bousette, Nicolas; Singh, Shalini; Backx, Peter H.; Cox, Brian; Wen, Xiao‐Yan; Liu, Peter P.; Gramolini, Anthony O.

    2014-01-01

    Background Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident protein 44 (ERp44) is a member of the protein disulfide isomerase family, is induced during ER stress, and may be involved in regulating Ca2+ homeostasis. However, the role of ERp44 in cardiac development and function is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERp44 in cardiac development and function in mice, zebrafish, and embryonic stem cell (ESC)‐derived cardiomyocytes to determine the underlying role of ERp44. Methods and Results We generated and characterized ERp44−/− mice, ERp44 morphant zebrafish embryos, and ERp44−/− ESC‐derived cardiomyocytes. Deletion of ERp44 in mouse and zebrafish caused significant embryonic lethality, abnormal heart development, altered Ca2+ dynamics, reactive oxygen species generation, activated ER stress gene profiles, and apoptotic cell death. We also determined the cardiac phenotype in pressure overloaded, aortic‐banded ERp44+/− mice: enhanced ER stress activation and increased mortality, as well as diastolic cardiac dysfunction with a significantly lower fractional shortening. Confocal and LacZ histochemical staining showed a significant transmural gradient for ERp44 in the adult heart, in which high expression of ERp44 was observed in the outer subepicardial region of the myocardium. Conclusions ERp44 plays a critical role in embryonic heart development and is crucial in regulating cardiac cell Ca2+ signaling, ER stress, ROS‐induced oxidative stress, and activation of the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. PMID:25332179

  18. Abnormal GABAergic function and negative affect in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Stephan F; Demeter, Elise; Phan, K Luan; Tso, Ivy F; Welsh, Robert C

    2014-03-01

    Deficits in the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system have been reported in postmortem studies of schizophrenia, and therapeutic interventions in schizophrenia often involve potentiation of GABA receptors (GABAR) to augment antipsychotic therapy and treat negative affect such as anxiety. To map GABAergic mechanisms associated with processing affect, we used a benzodiazepine challenge while subjects viewed salient visual stimuli. Fourteen stable, medicated schizophrenia/schizoaffective patients and 13 healthy comparison subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging using the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) technique while they viewed salient emotional images. Subjects received intravenous lorazepam (LRZ; 0.01 mg/kg) or saline in a single-blinded, cross-over design (two sessions separated by 1-3 weeks). A predicted group by drug interaction was noted in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) as well as right superior frontal gyrus and left and right occipital regions, such that psychosis patients showed an increased BOLD signal to LRZ challenge, rather than the decreased signal exhibited by the comparison group. A main effect of reduced BOLD signal in bilateral occipital areas was noted across groups. Consistent with the role of the dmPFC in processing emotion, state negative affect positively correlated with the response to the LRZ challenge in the dmPFC for the patients and comparison subjects. The altered response to LRZ challenge is consistent with altered inhibition predicted by postmortem findings of altered GABAR in schizophrenia. These results also suggest that negative affect in schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder is associated-directly or indirectly-with GABAergic function on a continuum with normal behavior.

  19. A functional comparison of cardiac troponin C from representatives of three vertebrate taxa: Linking phylogeny and protein function.

    PubMed

    Sears, Elizabeth J; Gillis, Todd E

    2016-12-01

    The Ca(2+) affinity of cardiac troponin C (cTnC) from rainbow trout is significantly greater than that of cTnC from mammalian species. This high affinity is thought to enable cardiac function in trout at low physiological temperatures and is due to residues Asn(2), Ile(28), Gln(29), and Asp(30) (Gillis et al., 2005, Physiol Genomics, 22, 1-7). Interestingly, the cTnC of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis (frog cTnC) contains Gln(29) and Asp(30) but the residues at positions 2 and 28 are those found in all mammalian cTnC isoforms (Asp(2) and Val(28)). The purpose of this study was to determine the Ca(2+) affinity of frog cTnC, and to determine how these three protein orthologs influence the function of complete troponin complexes. Measurements of Ca(2+) affinity and the rate of Ca(2+) dissociation from the cTnC isoforms and cTn complexes were made by monitoring the fluorescence of anilinonapthalenesulfote iodoacetamide (IAANS) engineered into the cTnC isoforms to report changes in protein conformation. The results demonstrate that the Ca(2+) affinity of frog cTnC is greater than that of trout cTnC and human cTnC. We also found that replacing human cTnC with frog cTnC in a mammalian cTn complex increased the Ca(2+) affinity of the complex by 5-fold, which is also greater than complexes containing trout cTnC. Together these results suggest that frog cTnC has the potential to increase the Ca(2+) sensitivity of force generation by the mammalian heart.

  20. Early treatment with hepatocyte growth factor improves cardiac function in experimental heart failure induced by myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hongkui; Yang, Renhui; Li, Wei; Ogasawara, Annie K; Schwall, Ralph; Eberhard, David A; Zheng, Zhong; Kahn, David; Paoni, Nicholas F

    2003-02-01

    Plasma levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) are increased within hours of cardiac ischemia/reperfusion in rats, and HGF has been shown to be cardioprotective toward acute ischemic injury. Myocardial levels of HGF mRNA and protein are increased for several days after myocardial infarction (MI), however, indicating a possible additional protective effect of HGF toward the progression of MI to heart failure. The purpose of this study was to determine whether HGF administration during the time course of endogenous cardiac HGF induction would lead to long-term improvement in cardiac function in rats with MI. MI was induced by 2-h occlusion of the left coronary artery, followed by reperfusion. HGF was given by intravenous infusion at 0.45 mg/kg/day for 6 days beginning on the day after surgery. Cardiac function and hemodynamic parameters were measured by using indwelling catheters and perivascular flow probes in conscious animals 8 weeks post-MI. Myocardial infarcts were approximately 30% of the left ventricle, and there was no difference in infarct size between the vehicle-treated and HGF-treated groups. Compared with untreated sham-operated rats, vehicle-treated MI animals had significantly lower cardiac index and stroke volume index and higher systemic vascular resistance, indicating heart failure developed. Treatment with HGF caused a significant increase in cardiac index and stroke volume index and a reduction in systemic vascular resistance in rats with MI, restoring these parameters close to those observed in sham-operated control animals. These results provide direct evidence that HGF may be of benefit to cardiovascular function in ischemic cardiomyopathy.

  1. Evaluation of cardiac functions of cirrhotic children using serum brain natriuretic peptide and tissue Doppler imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fattouh, Aya M; El-Shabrawi, Mortada H; Mahmoud, Enas H; Ahmed, Wafaa O

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy (CCM) is described as the presence of cardiac dysfunction in cirrhotic patients. In children with chronic liver disease, CCM has been very rarely investigated. The Aim of the Study: Is to evaluate the cardiac function of cirrhotic children to identify those with CCM. Patients and Methods: Fifty-two cirrhotic patients and 53 age and sex matched controls were assessed using serum brain-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), conventional echocardiography, and tissue Doppler imaging. Results: Patients’ mean ages were 7.66 ± 4.16 years (vs. 6.88 ± 3.04 years for the controls). The study included 27 males and 25 females (28 and 25 respectively for the controls). Patients had larger left atrium and right ventricle (RV) (P value 0.05) and increased LV posterior wall thickness than controls (P value 0.04). They had higher late atrial diastolic filling velocity (A) of tricuspid valve (TV) inflow (0.59 ± 0.17 vs. 0.5 ± 0.1 m/s, P < 0.001) and lower ratios between the early diastolic filling velocity (E) and A wave velocity (E/A) of both mitral valve and TV inflow (1.7 ± 0.35 vs. 1.87 ± 0.34 and 1.3 ± 0.3 vs. 1.5 ± 0.3, P < 0.005 and 0.0008, respectively). Patients had significantly longer isovolumic relaxation time of LV (45.5 ± 11.1 vs. 40.5 ± 7.7 ms P 0.008), higher late diastolic peak myocardial velocity (A’) (11.8 ± 3.6 vs. 9.5 ± 2.7 ms, P 0.0003) and systolic velocity (S’) of the RV (14.5 ± 2.7 vs. 13.2 ± 2.9, P 0.01) and significantly higher myocardial performance index of both LV and RV (P 0.001 and 0.01). BNP levels were significantly higher in cases than controls (5.25 ng/l vs. 3.75 ng/l, P < 0.04) and was correlated with the E wave velocity of the TV (r 0.004) and the E/E’ ratio of the RV (r 0.001). None of the clinical or laboratory data were correlated with the BNP level. Conclusion Cirrhotic children have cardiac dysfunction mainly in the form of diastolic dysfunction. There is a need that CCM be more accurately

  2. EFFECTS OF INSTILLATION OF RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH ON INDICES OF CARDIAC, PULMONARY, AND THERMOREGULATORY FUNCTION IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory


    EFFECTS OF INSTILLED RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH (ROFA) ON INDICES OF CARDIAC, PULMONARY, AND THERMOREGULATORY FUNCTION IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE (SH) RATS. LB Wichers1, JP Nolan2, UP Kodavanti2, MCJ Schladweiler2, R Hauser3, DW Winsett2, DL Costa2, and WP Watkinson2. 1UNC Sch...

  3. Assessment of cardiac function using myocardial perfusion imaging technique on SPECT with 99mTc sestamibi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gani, M. R. A.; Nazir, F.; Pawiro, S. A.; Soejoko, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Suspicion on coronary heart disease can be confirmed by observing the function of left ventricle cardiac muscle with Myocardial Perfusion Imaging techniques. The function perfusion itself is indicated by the uptake of radiopharmaceutical tracer. The 31 patients were studied undergoing the MPI examination on Gatot Soebroto Hospital using 99mTc-sestamibi radiopharmaceutical with stress and rest conditions. Stress was stimulated by physical exercise or pharmacological agent. After two hours, the patient did rest condition on the same day. The difference of uptake percentage between stress and rest conditions will be used to determine the malfunction of perfusion due to ischemic or infarct. Degradation of cardiac function was determined based on the image-based assessment of five segments of left ventricle cardiac. As a result, 8 (25.8%) patients had normal myocardial perfusion and 11 (35.5%) patients suspected for having partial ischemia. Total ischemia occurred to 8 (25.8%) patients with reversible and irreversible ischemia and the remaining 4 (12.9%) patients for partial infarct with characteristic the percentage of perfusion ≤50%. It is concluded that MPI technique of image-based assessment on uptake percentage difference between stress and rest conditions can be employed to predict abnormal perfusion as complementary information to diagnose the cardiac function.

  4. Can the hydrophilicity of functional monomers affect chemical interaction?

    PubMed

    Feitosa, V P; Ogliari, F A; Van Meerbeek, B; Watson, T F; Yoshihara, K; Ogliari, A O; Sinhoreti, M A; Correr, A B; Cama, G; Sauro, S

    2014-02-01

    The number of carbon atoms and/or ester/polyether groups in spacer chains may influence the interaction of functional monomers with calcium and dentin. The present study assessed the chemical interaction and bond strength of 5 standard-synthesized phosphoric-acid ester functional monomers with different spacer chain characteristics, by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), ATR-FTIR, thin-film x-ray diffraction (TF-XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and microtensile bond strength (μTBS). The tested functional monomers were 2-MEP (two-carbon spacer chain), 10-MDP (10-carbon), 12-MDDP (12-carbon), MTEP (more hydrophilic polyether spacer chain), and CAP-P (intermediate hydrophilicity ester spacer). The intensity of monomer-calcium salt formation measured by AAS differed in the order of 12-MDDP=10-MDP>CAP-P>MTEP>2-MEP. FTIR and SEM analyses of monomer-treated dentin surfaces showed resistance to rinsing for all monomer-dentin bonds, except with 2-MEP. TF-XRD confirmed the weaker interaction of 2-MEP. Highest µTBS was observed for 12-MDDP and 10-MDP. A shorter spacer chain (2-MEP) of phosphate functional monomers induced formation of unstable monomer-calcium salts, and lower chemical interaction and dentin bond strength. The presence of ester or ether groups within longer spacer carbon chains (CAP-P and MTEP) may affect the hydrophilicity, μTBS, and also the formation of monomer-calcium salts.

  5. How does temperature affect the function of tissue macrophages?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chen-Ting; Repasky, Elizabeth A.

    2011-03-01

    Macrophages create a major danger signal following injury or infection and upon activation release pro-inflammatory cytokines, which in turn help to generate febrile conditions. Thus, like other cells of the body, tissue macrophages are often exposed to naturally occurring elevations in tissue temperature during inflammation and fever. However, whether macrophages sense and respond to temperature changes in a specific manner which modulates their function is still not clear. In this brief review, we highlight recent studies which have analyzed the effects of temperatures on macrophage function, and summarize the possible underlying molecular mechanisms which have been identified. Mild, physiological range hyperthermia has been shown to have both pro- and anti-inflammatory roles in regulating macrophage inflammatory cytokine production and at the meeting presentation, we will show new data demonstrating that hyperthermia can indeed exert both positive and negative signals to macrophages. While some thermal effects are correlated with the induction of heat shock factors/heat shock proteins, overall it is not clear how mild hyperthermia can exert both pro- and anti-inflammatory functions. We also summarize data which shows that hyperthermia can affect other macrophage effector functions, including the anti-tumor cytotoxicity. Overall, these studies may help us to better understand the immunological role of tissue temperature and may provide important information needed to maximize the application of heat in the treatment of various diseases including cancer.

  6. Modelling passive diastolic mechanics with quantitative MRI of cardiac structure and function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Vicky Y; Lam, H I; Ennis, Daniel B; Cowan, Brett R; Young, Alistair A; Nash, Martyn P

    2009-10-01

    The majority of patients with clinically diagnosed heart failure have normal systolic pump function and are commonly categorized as suffering from diastolic heart failure. The left ventricle (LV) remodels its structure and function to adapt to pathophysiological changes in geometry and loading conditions, which in turn can alter the passive ventricular mechanics. In order to better understand passive ventricular mechanics, a LV finite element (FE) model was customized to geometric data segmented from in vivo tagged magnetic resonance images (MRI) data and myofibre orientation derived from ex vivo diffusion tensor MRI (DTMRI) of a canine heart using nonlinear finite element fitting techniques. MRI tissue tagging enables quantitative evaluation of cardiac mechanical function with high spatial and temporal resolution, whilst the direction of maximum water diffusion in each voxel of a DTMRI directly corresponds to the local myocardial fibre orientation. Due to differences in myocardial geometry between in vivo and ex vivo imaging, myofibre orientations were mapped into the geometric FE model using host mesh fitting (a free form deformation technique). Pressure recordings, temporally synchronized to the tagging data, were used as the loading constraints to simulate the LV deformation during diastole. Simulation of diastolic LV mechanics allowed us to estimate the stiffness of the passive LV myocardium based on kinematic data obtained from tagged MRI. Integrated physiological modelling of this kind will allow more insight into mechanics of the LV on an individualized basis, thereby improving our understanding of the underlying structural basis of mechanical dysfunction under pathological conditions.

  7. Gain-of-function mutation in TASK-4 channels and severe cardiac conduction disorder.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Corinna; Rinné, Susanne; Zumhagen, Sven; Kiper, Aytug K; Silbernagel, Nicole; Netter, Michael F; Stallmeyer, Birgit; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Decher, Niels

    2014-07-01

    Analyzing a patient with progressive and severe cardiac conduction disorder combined with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF), we identified a splice site mutation in the sodium channel gene SCN5A. Due to the severe phenotype, we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) and identified an additional mutation in the KCNK17 gene encoding the K2P potassium channel TASK-4. The heterozygous change (c.262G>A) resulted in the p.Gly88Arg mutation in the first extracellular pore loop. Mutant TASK-4 channels generated threefold increased currents, while surface expression was unchanged, indicating enhanced conductivity. When co-expressed with wild-type channels, the gain-of-function by G88R was conferred in a dominant-active manner. We demonstrate that KCNK17 is strongly expressed in human Purkinje cells and that overexpression of G88R leads to a hyperpolarization and strong slowing of the upstroke velocity of spontaneously beating HL-1 cells. Thus, we propose that a gain-of-function by TASK-4 in the conduction system might aggravate slowed conductivity by the loss of sodium channel function. Moreover, WES supports a second hit-hypothesis in severe arrhythmia cases and identified KCNK17 as a novel arrhythmia gene.

  8. Gain-of-function mutation in TASK-4 channels and severe cardiac conduction disorder

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Corinna; Rinné, Susanne; Zumhagen, Sven; Kiper, Aytug K; Silbernagel, Nicole; Netter, Michael F; Stallmeyer, Birgit; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Decher, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing a patient with progressive and severe cardiac conduction disorder combined with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF), we identified a splice site mutation in the sodium channel gene SCN5A. Due to the severe phenotype, we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) and identified an additional mutation in the KCNK17 gene encoding the K2P potassium channel TASK-4. The heterozygous change (c.262G>A) resulted in the p.Gly88Arg mutation in the first extracellular pore loop. Mutant TASK-4 channels generated threefold increased currents, while surface expression was unchanged, indicating enhanced conductivity. When co-expressed with wild-type channels, the gain-of-function by G88R was conferred in a dominant-active manner. We demonstrate that KCNK17 is strongly expressed in human Purkinje cells and that overexpression of G88R leads to a hyperpolarization and strong slowing of the upstroke velocity of spontaneously beating HL-1 cells. Thus, we propose that a gain-of-function by TASK-4 in the conduction system might aggravate slowed conductivity by the loss of sodium channel function. Moreover, WES supports a second hit-hypothesis in severe arrhythmia cases and identified KCNK17 as a novel arrhythmia gene. PMID:24972929

  9. Affecting Rhomboid-3 Function Causes a Dilated Heart in Adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lin; Lee, Teresa; Lin, Na; Wolf, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    Drosophila is a well recognized model of several human diseases, and recent investigations have demonstrated that Drosophila can be used as a model of human heart failure. Previously, we described that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used to rapidly examine the cardiac function in adult, awake flies. This technique provides images that are similar to echocardiography in humans, and therefore we postulated that this approach could be combined with the vast resources that are available in the fly community to identify new mutants that have abnormal heart function, a hallmark of certain cardiovascular diseases. Using OCT to examine the cardiac function in adult Drosophila from a set of molecularly-defined genomic deficiencies from the DrosDel and Exelixis collections, we identified an abnormally enlarged cardiac chamber in a series of deficiency mutants spanning the rhomboid 3 locus. Rhomboid 3 is a member of a highly conserved family of intramembrane serine proteases and processes Spitz, an epidermal growth factor (EGF)–like ligand. Using multiple approaches based on the examination of deficiency stocks, a series of mutants in the rhomboid-Spitz–EGF receptor pathway, and cardiac-specific transgenic rescue or dominant-negative repression of EGFR, we demonstrate that rhomboid 3 mediated activation of the EGF receptor pathway is necessary for proper adult cardiac function. The importance of EGF receptor signaling in the adult Drosophila heart underscores the concept that evolutionarily conserved signaling mechanisms are required to maintain normal myocardial function. Interestingly, prior work showing the inhibition of ErbB2, a member of the EGF receptor family, in transgenic knock-out mice or individuals that received herceptin chemotherapy is associated with the development of dilated cardiomyopathy. Our results, in conjunction with the demonstration that altered ErbB2 signaling underlies certain forms of mammalian cardiomyopathy, suggest that an

  10. Arterial-cardiac baroreflex function: insights from repeated squat-stand maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Claassen, Jurgen A H R; Shibata, Shigeki; Kilic, Sinem; Martin-Cook, Kristin; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Levine, Benjamin D

    2009-07-01

    To assess baroreflex function under closed-loop conditions, a new approach was used to generate large and physiological perturbations in arterial pressure. Blood pressure (BP) and R-R interval were recorded continuously in 20 healthy young (33 +/- 8 yr) and eight elderly subjects (66 +/- 6 yr). Repeated squat-stand maneuvers at the frequencies of 0.05 and 0.1 Hz were performed to produce periodic oscillations in BP to provoke the baroreflex. To assess the effects of the muscle reflex and/or central command on the baroreflex, passive squat-stand maneuvers were conducted using a pulley system to assist changes in body position. Transfer function between changes in BP and R-R interval was estimated to assess the arterial-cardiac baroreflex. Relative to resting conditions, large and coherent oscillations in BP and R-R interval were produced during both active and passive squat-stand maneuvers. However, changes in BP were smaller during passive than during active maneuvers. Changes in R-R interval were reduced commensurately. Therefore, transfer function gain did not change between the two maneuvers. Compared with the young, transfer function gain was reduced and the phase became more negative in the elderly, demonstrating the well-known effects of aging on reducing baroreflex sensitivity. Collectively, these findings suggest that the changes in R-R interval elicited by BP perturbations during squat-stand maneuvers are mediated primarily by a baroreflex mechanism. Furthermore, baroreflex function can be assessed using the transfer function method during large perturbations in arterial pressure.

  11. Live dynamic OCT imaging of cardiac structure and function in mouse embryos with 43 Hz direct volumetric data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shang; Singh, Manmohan; Lopez, Andrew L.; Wu, Chen; Raghunathan, Raksha; Schill, Alexander; Li, Jiasong; Larin, Kirill V.; Larina, Irina V.

    2016-03-01

    Efficient phenotyping of cardiac dynamics in live mouse embryos has significant implications on understanding of early mammalian heart development and congenital cardiac defects. Recent studies established optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a powerful tool for live embryonic heart imaging in various animal models. However, current four-dimensional (4D) OCT imaging of the beating embryonic heart largely relies on gated data acquisition or postacquisition synchronization, which brings errors when cardiac cycles lack perfect periodicity and is time consuming and computationally expensive. Here, we report direct 4D OCT imaging of the structure and function of cardiac dynamics in live mouse embryos achieved by employing a Fourier domain mode-locking swept laser source that enables ~1.5 MHz A-line rate. Through utilizing both forward and backward scans of a resonant mirror, we obtained a ~6.4 kHz frame rate, which allows for a direct volumetric data acquisition speed of ~43 Hz, around 20 times of the early-stage mouse embryonic heart rate. Our experiments were performed on mouse embryos at embryonic day 9.5. Time-resolved 3D cardiodynamics clearly shows the heart structure in motion. We present analysis of cardiac wall movement and its velocity from the primitive atrium and ventricle. Our results suggest that the combination of ultrahigh-speed OCT imaging with live embryo culture could be a useful embryonic heart phenotyping approach for mouse mutants modeling human congenital heart diseases.

  12. The Function of the MEF2 Family of Transcription Factors in Cardiac Development, Cardiogenomics, and Direct Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Cody A.; Naya, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Proper formation of the mammalian heart requires precise spatiotemporal transcriptional regulation of gene programs in cardiomyocytes. Sophisticated regulatory networks have evolved to not only integrate the activities of distinct transcription factors to control tissue-specific gene programs but also, in many instances, to incorporate multiple members within these transcription factor families to ensure accuracy and specificity in the system. Unsurprisingly, perturbations in this elaborate transcriptional circuitry can lead to severe cardiac abnormalities. Myocyte enhancer factor–2 (MEF2) transcription factor belongs to the evolutionarily conserved cardiac gene regulatory network. Given its central role in muscle gene regulation and its evolutionary conservation, MEF2 is considered one of only a few core cardiac transcription factors. In addition to its firmly established role as a differentiation factor, MEF2 regulates wide variety of, sometimes antagonistic, cellular processes such as cell survival and death. Vertebrate genomes encode multiple MEF2 family members thereby expanding the transcriptional potential of this core transcription factor in the heart. This review highlights the requirement of the MEF2 family and their orthologs in cardiac development in diverse animal model systems. Furthermore, we describe the recently characterized role of MEF2 in direct reprogramming and genome-wide cardiomyocyte gene regulation. A thorough understanding of the regulatory functions of the MEF2 family in cardiac development and cardiogenomics is required in order to develop effective therapeutic strategies to repair the diseased heart. PMID:27630998

  13. Early improvement in cardiac function detected by tissue Doppler and strain imaging after melphalan-dexamethasone therapy in a 51-year old subject with severe cardiac amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Ballo, Piercarlo; Motto, Andrea; Corsini, Francesca; Orlandini, Francesco; Mondillo, Sergio

    2008-11-12

    We report the case of a 51-year old man with symptoms of heart failure due to severe cardiac amyloidosis, in whom treatment with melphalan and dexamethasone yielded significant improvement in clinical status and both systolic and diastolic left ventricular (LV) function over a 12-week follow-up. The improvement in LV performance was detected by Tissue Doppler (TD) and strain analysis, despite no changes in standard indices such as ejection fraction and Doppler pattern of mitral inflow. Color TD-derived myocardial velocity and deformation indices also revealed a reduction in intra-ventricular early diastolic asynchrony after therapy. In addition, an improvement in intra-ventricular systolic synchrony was detected by strain rate and strain, but not by color TD velocity imaging. These findings suggest that treatment with melphalan and dexamethasone may improve symptoms of heart failure and LV performance in subjects with cardiac amyloidosis, and that TD and particularly strain imaging could represent useful techniques to monitor the effect of therapy on LV function in the follow-up of these patients.

  14. Waon therapy improves quality of life as well as cardiac function and exercise capacity in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Sobajima, Mitsuo; Nozawa, Takashi; Fukui, Yasutaka; Ihori, Hiroyuki; Ohori, Takashi; Fujii, Nozomu; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Waon therapy (WT), which in Japanese means soothing warmth, is a repeated sauna therapy that improves cardiac and vascular endothelial function in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We investigated whether WT could improve the quality of life (QOL) of CHF patients in addition to improving cardiac function and exercise capacity.A total of 49 CHF patients (69 ± 14 years old) were treated with a 60°C far infrared-ray dry sauna bath for 15 minutes and then kept in a bed covered with blankets for 30 minutes once a day for 3 weeks. At baseline and 3 weeks after starting WT, cardiac function, 6-minute walk distance (6MWD), flow mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery, and SF36-QOL scores were determined.WT significantly improved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), 6MWD, and FMD (3.6 ± 2.3 to 5.1 ± 2.8%, P < 0.01). Moreover, WT significantly improved not only the physical (PC) but also mental component (MC) of the QOL scores. WT-induced improvement of PC was negatively correlated with changes in BNP (r = -0.327, P < 0.05), but MC improvement was not related directly to changes in BNP, LVEF, or 6MWD. WT-induced changes in MC were not parallel to PC improvement.WT improved QOL as well as cardiac function and exercise capacity in patients with CHF. Mental QOL improved independently of WT-induced improvement of cardiac function and exercise capacity.

  15. Cardiac-Restricted Expression of VCP/TER94 RNAi or Disease Alleles Perturbs Drosophila Heart Structure and Impairs Function

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Meera C.; Blice-Baum, Anna C.; Sang, Tzu-Kang; Cammarato, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Valosin-containing protein (VCP) is a highly conserved mechanoenzyme that helps maintain protein homeostasis in all cells and serves specialized functions in distinct cell types. In skeletal muscle, it is critical for myofibrillogenesis and atrophy. However, little is known about VCP's role(s) in the heart. Its functional diversity is determined by differential binding of distinct cofactors/adapters, which is likely disrupted during disease. VCP mutations cause multisystem proteinopathy (MSP), a pleiotropic degenerative disorder that involves inclusion body myopathy. MSP patients display progressive muscle weakness. They also exhibit cardiomyopathy and die from cardiac and respiratory failure, which are consistent with critical myocardial roles for the enzyme. Nonetheless, efficient models to interrogate VCP in cardiac muscle remain underdeveloped and poorly studied. Here, we investigated the significance of VCP and mutant VCP in the Drosophila heart. Cardiac-restricted RNAi-mediated knockdown of TER94, the Drosophila VCP homolog, severely perturbed myofibrillar organization and heart function in adult flies. Furthermore, expression of MSP disease-causing alleles engendered cardiomyopathy in adults and structural defects in embryonic hearts. Drosophila may therefore serve as a valuable model for examining role(s) of VCP in cardiogenesis and for identifying novel heart-specific VCP interactions, which when disrupted via mutation, contribute to or elicit cardiac pathology. PMID:27500162

  16. Molecular Mechanisms for Exercise Training-Induced Changes in Vascular Structure and Function: Skeletal Muscle, Cardiac Muscle, and the Brain.

    PubMed

    Olver, T Dylan; Ferguson, Brian S; Laughlin, M Harold

    2015-01-01

    Compared with resting conditions, during incremental exercise, cardiac output in humans is elevated from ~5 to 25 L min(-1). In conjunction with this increase, the proportion of cardiac output directed toward skeletal muscle increases from ~20% to 85%, while blood flow to cardiac muscle increases 500% and blood flow to specific brain structures increases nearly 200%. Based on existing evidence, researchers believe that blood flow in these tissues is matched to the increases in metabolic rate during exercise. This phenomenon, the matching of blood flow to metabolic requirement, is often referred to as functional hyperemia. This chapter summarizes mechanical and metabolic factors that regulate functional hyperemia as well as other exercise-induced signals, which are also potent stimuli for chronic adaptations in vascular biology. Repeated exposure to exercise-induced increases in shear stress and the induction of angiogenic factors alter vascular cell gene expression and mediate changes in vascular volume and blood flow control. The magnitude and regulation of this coordinated response appear to be tissue specific and coupled to other factors such as hypertrophy and hyperplasia. The cumulative effects of these adaptations contribute to increased exercise capacity, reduced relative challenge of a given submaximal exercise bout and ameliorated vascular outcomes in patient populations with pathological conditions. In the subsequent discussion, this chapter explores exercise as a regulator of vascular biology and summarizes the molecular mechanisms responsible for exercise training-induced changes in vascular structure and function in skeletal and cardiac muscle as well as the brain.

  17. Association of Cardiac Troponin T With Left Ventricular Structure and Function in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rakesh K.; Li, Yongmei; DeFilippi, Christopher; Fischer, Michael J.; Yang, Wei; Keane, Martin; Chen, Jing; He, Jiang; Kallem, Radhakrishna; Horwitz, Ed; Rafey, Mohammad; Raj, Dominic S.; Go, Alan S.; Shlipak, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Serum cardiac troponin T (cTnT) is associated with increased risk of heart failure and cardiovascular death in several population settings. We evaluated associations of cTnT with cardiac structural and functional abnormalities in a cohort of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients without heart failure. Study Design Cross-sectional. Setting & Participants Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC; N= 3,243) Predictor The primary predictor was cTnT. Secondary predictors included demographic and clinical characteristics, hemoglobin level, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and estimated glomerular filtration rate using cystatin C. Outcomes Echocardiography was used to determine left ventricular (LV) mass and LV systolic and diastolic function. Measurements Circulating cTnT was measured in stored sera using the highly sensitive assay. Logistic and linear regression models were used to examine associations of cTnT with each echocardiographic outcome. Results cTnT was detectable in 2,735 (84%) persons; the median was 13.3 (IQR, 7.7–23.8) pg/mL. Compared with undetectable cTnT (<3.0 pg/mL), the highest quartile (23.9 – 738.7 pg/mL) was associated with approximately two times as likely to experience LV hypertrophy (OR, 2.43; 95% CI, 1.44–4.09) in the fully adjusted model. cTnT had a more modest association with LV systolic dysfunction; as a log-linear variable, a significant association was present in the fully adjusted model (OR of 1.4 [95% CI, 1.1–1.7] per 1-log unit; p<0.01). There was no significant independent association between cTnT and LV diastolic dysfunction. When evaluated as a screening test, cTnT functioned only modestly for LV hypertrophy and concentric hypertrophy detection (area under the curve, 0.64 for both) with weaker areas under the curve for the other outcomes. Limitations The presence of coronary artery disease was not formally assessed using either noninvasive or angiographic techniques in this study. Conclusions In this large CKD

  18. On the averaging of cardiac diffusion tensor MRI data: the effect of distance function selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakidis, Archontis; Melkus, Gerd; Yang, Guang; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) allows a unique insight into the microstructure of highly-directional tissues. The selection of the most proper distance function for the space of diffusion tensors is crucial in enhancing the clinical application of this imaging modality. Both linear and nonlinear metrics have been proposed in the literature over the years. The debate on the most appropriate DT-MRI distance function is still ongoing. In this paper, we presented a framework to compare the Euclidean, affine-invariant Riemannian and log-Euclidean metrics using actual high-resolution DT-MRI rat heart data. We employed temporal averaging at the diffusion tensor level of three consecutive and identically-acquired DT-MRI datasets from each of five rat hearts as a means to rectify the background noise-induced loss of myocyte directional regularity. This procedure is applied here for the first time in the context of tensor distance function selection. When compared with previous studies that used a different concrete application to juxtapose the various DT-MRI distance functions, this work is unique in that it combined the following: (i) metrics were judged by quantitative—rather than qualitative—criteria, (ii) the comparison tools were non-biased, (iii) a longitudinal comparison operation was used on a same-voxel basis. The statistical analyses of the comparison showed that the three DT-MRI distance functions tend to provide equivalent results. Hence, we came to the conclusion that the tensor manifold for cardiac DT-MRI studies is a curved space of almost zero curvature. The signal to noise ratio dependence of the operations was investigated through simulations. Finally, the ‘swelling effect’ occurrence following Euclidean averaging was found to be too unimportant to be worth consideration.

  19. Oral administration of eicosapentaenoic acid or docosahexaenoic acid modifies cardiac function and ameliorates congestive heart failure in male rats.

    PubMed

    Yamanushi, Tomoko T; Kabuto, Hideaki; Hirakawa, Eiichiro; Janjua, Najma; Takayama, Fusako; Mankura, Mitsumasa

    2014-04-01

    This study assessed the effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on normal cardiac function (part 1) and congestive heart failure (CHF) (part 2) through electrocardiogram analysis and determination of EPA, DHA, and arachidonic acid (AA) concentrations in rat hearts. In part 2, pathologic assessments were also performed. For part 1 of this study, 4-wk-old male rats were divided into a control group and 2 experimental groups. The rats daily were orally administered (1 g/kg body weight) saline, EPA-ethyl ester (EPA-Et; E group), or DHA-ethyl ester (DHA-Et; D group), respectively, for 28 d. ECGs revealed that QT intervals were significantly shorter for groups E and D compared with the control group (P ≤ 0.05). Relative to the control group, the concentration of EPA was higher in the E group and concentrations of EPA and DHA were higher in the D group, although AA concentrations were lower (P ≤ 0.05). In part 2, CHF was produced by subcutaneous injection of monocrotaline into 5-wk-old rats. At 3 d before monocrotaline injection, rats were administered either saline, EPA-Et, or DHA-Et as mentioned above and then killed at 21 d. The study groups were as follows: normal + saline (control), CHF + saline (H group), CHF + EPA-Et (HE group), and CHF + DHA-Et (HD group). QT intervals were significantly shorter (P ≤ 0.05) in the control and HD groups compared with the H and HE groups. Relative to the H group, concentrations of EPA were higher in the HE group and those of DHA were higher in the control and HD groups (P ≤ 0.05). There was less mononuclear cell infiltration in the myocytes of the HD group than in the H group (P = 0.06). The right ventricles in the H, HE, and HD groups showed significantly increased weights (P ≤ 0.05) compared with controls. The administration of EPA-Et or DHA-Et may affect cardiac function by modification of heart fatty acid composition, and the administration of DHA-Et may ameliorate CHF.

  20. MicroRNAs affect dendritic cell function and phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Lesley A; Boardman, Dominic A; Tung, Sim L; Lechler, Robert; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) are small, non-coding RNA molecules that have been linked with immunity through regulating/modulating gene expression. A role for these molecules in T-cell and B-cell development and function has been well established. An increasing body of literature now highlights the importance of specific miRNA in dendritic cell (DC) development as well as their maturation process, antigen presentation capacity and cytokine release. Given the unique role of DC within the immune system, linking the innate and adaptive immune responses, understanding how specific miRNA affect DC function is of importance for understanding disease. In this review we summarize recent developments in miRNA and DC research, highlighting the requirement of miRNA in DC lineage commitment from bone marrow progenitors and for the development of subsets such as plasmacytoid DC and conventional DC. In addition, we discuss how infections and tumours modulate miRNA expression and consequently DC function. PMID:25244106

  1. Bisphenol A affects androgen receptor function via multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Teng, Christina; Goodwin, Bonnie; Shockley, Keith; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Norris, John; Merrick, B Alex; Jetten, Anton M; Austin, Christopher P; Tice, Raymond R

    2013-05-25

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is a well-known endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) that affects the normal development and function of the female and male reproductive system, however the mechanisms of action remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of how BPA may affect ten different nuclear receptors, stable cell lines containing individual nuclear receptor ligand binding domain (LBD)-linked to the β-Gal reporter were examined by a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) format in the Tox21 Screening Program of the NIH. The results showed that two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR), are affected by BPA in opposite direction. To confirm the observed effects of BPA on ERα and AR, we performed transient transfection experiments with full-length receptors and their corresponding response elements linked to luciferase reporters. We also included in this study two BPA analogs, bisphenol AF (BPAF) and bisphenol S (BPS). As seen in African green monkey kidney CV1 cells, the present study confirmed that BPA and BPAF act as ERα agonists (half maximal effective concentration EC50 of 10-100 nM) and as AR antagonists (half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 of 1-2 μM). Both BPA and BPAF antagonized AR function via competitive inhibition of the action of synthetic androgen R1881. BPS with lower estrogenic activity (EC50 of 2.2 μM), did not compete with R1881 for AR binding, when tested at 30 μM. Finally, the effects of BPA were also evaluated in a nuclear translocation assays using EGPF-tagged receptors. Similar to 17β-estradiol (E2) which was used as control, BPA was able to enhance ERα nuclear foci formation but at a 100-fold higher concentration. Although BPA was able to bind AR, the nuclear translocation was reduced. Furthermore, BPA was unable to induce functional foci in the nuclei and is consistent with the transient transfection study that BPA is unable to activate AR.

  2. Connecting Teratogen-Induced Congenital Heart Defects to Neural Crest Cells and Their Effect on Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Karunamuni, Ganga H.; Ma, Pei; Gu, Shi; Rollins, Andrew M.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-01-01

    Neural crest cells play many key roles in embryonic development, as demonstrated by the abnormalities that result from their specific absence or dysfunction. Unfortunately, these key cells are particularly sensitive to abnormalities in various intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as genetic deletions or ethanol-exposure that lead to morbidity and mortality for organisms. This review discusses the role identified for a segment of neural crest is in regulating the morphogenesis of the heart and associated great vessels. The paradox is that their derivatives constitute a small proportion of cells to the cardiovascular system. Findings supporting that these cells impact early cardiac function raises the interesting possibility that they indirectly control cardiovascular development at least partially through regulating function. Making connections between insults to the neural crest, cardiac function, and morphogenesis is more approachable with technological advances. Expanding our understanding of early functional consequences could be useful in improving diagnosis and testing therapies. PMID:25220155

  3. Connecting teratogen-induced congenital heart defects to neural crest cells and their effect on cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Karunamuni, Ganga H; Ma, Pei; Gu, Shi; Rollins, Andrew M; Jenkins, Michael W; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-09-01

    Neural crest cells play many key roles in embryonic development, as demonstrated by the abnormalities that result from their specific absence or dysfunction. Unfortunately, these key cells are particularly sensitive to abnormalities in various intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as genetic deletions or ethanol-exposure that lead to morbidity and mortality for organisms. This review discusses the role identified for a segment of neural crest in regulating the morphogenesis of the heart and associated great vessels. The paradox is that their derivatives constitute a small proportion of cells to the cardiovascular system. Findings supporting that these cells impact early cardiac function raises the interesting possibility that they indirectly control cardiovascular development at least partially through regulating function. Making connections between insults to the neural crest, cardiac function, and morphogenesis is more approachable with technological advances. Expanding our understanding of early functional consequences could be useful in improving diagnosis and testing therapies.

  4. Horizontal Long Axis Imaging Plane for Evaluation of Right Ventricular Function on Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Abhishek; Whitnah, Joseph; Maki, Jeffrey H; Baran, Timothy; Mitsumori, Lee M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a horizontal long axis (HLA) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plane aligned to the long axis of the right ventricular (RV) cavity for functional analysis by comparing the measurement variability and time required for the analysis with that using a short-axis (SAX) image orientation. Materials and Methods: Thirty-four cardiac MRI exams with cine balanced steady-state free precession image stacks in both the SAX and the HLA of the RV (RHLA) were evaluated. Two reviewers independently traced RV endocardial borders on each image of the cine stacks. The time required to complete each set of traces was recorded, and the RV end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, and ejection fraction were calculated. Analysis times and RV measurements were compared between the two orientations. Results: Analysis time for each reviewer was significantly shorter for the RHLA stack (reviewer 1 = 6.4 ± 1.8 min, reviewer 2 = 6.0 ± 3.3 min) than for the SAX stack (7.5 ± 2.1 and 6.9 ± 3.6 min, respectively; P < 0.002). Bland–Altman analysis revealed lower mean differences, limits of agreement, and coefficients of variation for RV measurements obtained with the RHLA stack. Conclusions: RV functional analysis using a RHLA stack resulted in shorter analysis times and lower measurement variability than for a SAX stack orientation. PMID:28123842

  5. Functional coupling as a basic mechanism of feedback regulation of cardiac energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Saks, V A; Kuznetsov, A V; Vendelin, M; Guerrero, K; Kay, L; Seppet, E K

    2004-01-01

    In this review we analyze the concepts and the experimental data on the mechanisms of the regulation of energy metabolism in muscle cells. Muscular energetics is based on the force-length relationship, which in the whole heart is expressed as a Frank-Starling law, by which the alterations of left ventricle diastolic volume change linearly both the cardiac work and oxygen consumption. The second basic characteristics of the heart is the metabolic stability--almost constant levels of high energy phosphates, ATP and phosphocreatine, which are practically independent of the workload and the rate of oxygen consumption, in contrast to the fast-twitch skeletal muscle with no metabolic stability and rapid fatigue. Analysis of the literature shows that an increase in the rate of oxygen consumption by order of magnitude, due to Frank-Starling law, is observed without any significant changes in the intracellular calcium transients. Therefore, parallel activation of contraction and mitochondrial respiration by calcium ions may play only a minor role in regulation of respiration in the cells. The effective regulation of the respiration under the effect of Frank-Starling law and metabolic stability of the heart are explained by the mechanisms of functional coupling within supramolecular complexes in mitochondria, and at the subcellular level within the intracellular energetic units. Such a complex structural and functional organisation of heart energy metabolism can be described quantitatively by mathematical models.

  6. Intracoronary secretin increases cardiac perfusion and function in anaesthetized pigs through pathways involving β-adrenoceptors and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Grossini, Elena; Molinari, Claudio; Morsanuto, Vera; Mary, David A S G; Vacca, Giovanni

    2013-05-01

    Secretin has been implicated in cardiovascular regulation through its specific receptors, as well as through β-adrenoceptors and nitric oxide, although data on its direct effect on coronary blood flow and cardiac function have remained scarce. The present study aimed to determine the primary in vivo effect of secretin on cardiac function and perfusion and the mechanisms related to the autonomic nervous system, secretin receptors and NO. In addition, in coronary endothelial cells the intracellular pathways involved in the effects of secretin on NO release were also examined. In 30 pigs, intracoronary secretin infusion at 2.97 pg for each millilitre per minute of coronary blood flow at constant heart rate and aortic blood pressure increased coronary blood flow, maximal rate of change of left ventricular pressure, segmental shortening, cardiac output and coronary NO release (P<0.05). These responses were graded in a further five pigs. Moreover, while blockade of muscarinic cholinoreceptors (n=5) and of α-adrenoceptors (n=5) did not abolish the observed responses to secretin, blockade of β1-adrenoceptors (n=5) prevented the effects of secretin on cardiac function. In addition, blockade of β2-adrenoceptors (n=5) and NO synthase inhibition (n=5) prevented the coronary response and the effect of secretin on NO release. All these effects were abolished by a secretin receptor inhibitor (n=5). In coronary endothelial cells, the increased NO production caused by secretin was found to be related to cAMP/protein kinase A signalling activated as downstream effectors of stimulation of secretin receptors and β2-adrenoceptors. In conclusion, in anaesthetized pigs secretin primarily increased cardiac function and perfusion through the involvement of specific receptors, β-adrenoceptors and NO release.

  7. Can lifestyle modification affect men’s erectile function?

    PubMed Central

    Hehemann, Marah C.

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition affecting millions of men worldwide. The pathophysiology and epidemiologic links between ED and risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) are well-established. Lifestyle modifications such as smoking cessation, weight reduction, dietary modification, physical activity, and psychological stress reduction have been increasingly recognized as foundational to the prevention and treatment of ED. The aim of this review is to outline behavioral choices which may increase ones risk of developing ED, to present relevant studies addressing lifestyle factors correlated with ED, and to highlight proposed mechanisms for intervention aimed at improving erectile function in men with ED. These recommendations can provide a framework for counseling patients with ED about lifestyle modification. PMID:27141445

  8. Scorpion venom components that affect ion-channels function

    PubMed Central

    Quintero-Hernández, V.; Jiménez-Vargas, J.M.; Gurrola, G.B.; Valdivia, H.H.F.; Possani, L.D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The number and types of venom components that affect ion-channel function are reviewed. These are the most important venom components responsible for human intoxication, deserving medical attention, often requiring the use of specific anti-venoms. Special emphasis is given to peptides that recognize Na+-, K+- and Ca++-channels of excitable cells. Knowledge generated by direct isolation of peptides from venom and components deduced from cloned genes, whose amino acid sequences are deposited into databanks are now adays in the order of 1.5 thousands, out of an estimate biodiversity closed to 300,000. Here the diversity of components is briefly reviewed with mention to specific references. Structural characteristic are discussed with examples taken from published work. The principal mechanisms of action of the three different types of peptides are also reviewed. Na+-channel specific venom components usually are modifier of the open and closing kinetic mechanisms of the ion-channels, whereas peptides affecting K+-channels are normally pore blocking agents. The Ryanodine Ca++-channel specific peptides are known for causing sub-conducting stages of the channels conductance and some were shown to be able to internalize penetrating inside the muscle cells. PMID:23891887

  9. Functional roles affect diversity-succession relationships for boreal beetles.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Heloise; Johansson, Therese; Stenbacka, Fredrik; Hjältén, Joakim

    2013-01-01

    Species diversity commonly increases with succession and this relationship is an important justification for conserving large areas of old-growth habitats. However, species with different ecological roles respond differently to succession. We examined the relationship between a range of diversity measures and time since disturbance for boreal forest beetles collected over a 285 year forest chronosequence. We compared responses of "functional" groups related to threat status, dependence on dead wood habitats, diet and the type of trap in which they were collected (indicative of the breadth of ecologies of species). We examined fits of commonly used rank-abundance models for each age class and traditional and derived diversity indices. Rank abundance distributions were closest to the Zipf-Mandelbrot distribution, suggesting little role for competition in structuring most assemblages. Diversity measures for most functional groups increased with succession, but differences in slopes were common. Evenness declined with succession; more so for red-listed species than common species. Saproxylic species increased in diversity with succession while non-saproxylic species did not. Slopes for fungivores were steeper than other diet groups, while detritivores were not strongly affected by succession. Species trapped using emergence traps (log specialists) responded more weakly to succession than those trapped using flight intercept traps (representing a broader set of ecologies). Species associated with microhabitats that accumulate with succession (fungi and dead wood) thus showed the strongest diversity responses to succession. These clear differences between functional group responses to forest succession should be considered in planning landscapes for optimum conservation value, particularly functional resilience.

  10. Dehydration affects brain structure and function in healthy adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kempton, Matthew J; Ettinger, Ulrich; Foster, Russell; Williams, Steven C R; Calvert, Gemma A; Hampshire, Adam; Zelaya, Fernando O; O'Gorman, Ruth L; McMorris, Terry; Owen, Adrian M; Smith, Marcus S

    2011-01-01

    It was recently observed that dehydration causes shrinkage of brain tissue and an associated increase in ventricular volume. Negative effects of dehydration on cognitive performance have been shown in some but not all studies, and it has also been reported that an increased perceived effort may be required following dehydration. However, the effects of dehydration on brain function are unknown. We investigated this question using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 10 healthy adolescents (mean age = 16.8, five females). Each subject completed a thermal exercise protocol and nonthermal exercise control condition in a cross-over repeated measures design. Subjects lost more weight via perspiration in the thermal exercise versus the control condition (P < 0.0001), and lateral ventricle enlargement correlated with the reduction in body mass (r = 0.77, P = 0.01). Dehydration following the thermal exercise protocol led to a significantly stronger increase in fronto-parietal blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) response during an executive function task (Tower of London) than the control condition, whereas cerebral perfusion during rest was not affected. The increase in BOLD response after dehydration was not paralleled by a change in cognitive performance, suggesting an inefficient use of brain metabolic activity following dehydration. This pattern indicates that participants exerted a higher level of neuronal activity in order to achieve the same performance level. Given the limited availability of brain metabolic resources, these findings suggest that prolonged states of reduced water intake may adversely impact executive functions such as planning and visuo-spatial processing.

  11. Cardiac Arrest-Induced Global Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia during Development Affects Spontaneous Activity Organization in Rat Sensory and Motor Thalamocortical Circuits during Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Shoykhet, Michael; Middleton, Jason W

    2016-01-01

    Normal maturation of sensory information processing in the cortex requires patterned synaptic activity during developmentally regulated critical periods. During early development, spontaneous synaptic activity establishes required patterns of synaptic input, and during later development it influences patterns of sensory experience-dependent neuronal firing. Thalamocortical neurons occupy a critical position in regulating the flow of patterned sensory information from the periphery to the cortex. Abnormal thalamocortical inputs may permanently affect the organization and function of cortical neuronal circuits, especially if they occur during a critical developmental window. We examined the effect of cardiac arrest (CA)-associated global brain hypoxia-ischemia in developing rats on spontaneous and evoked firing of somatosensory thalamocortical neurons and on large-scale correlations in the motor thalamocortical circuit. The mean spontaneous and sensory-evoked firing rate activity and variability were higher in CA injured rats. Furthermore, spontaneous and sensory-evoked activity and variability were correlated in uninjured rats, but not correlated in neurons from CA rats. Abnormal activity patterns of ventroposterior medial nucleus (VPm) neurons persisted into adulthood. Additionally, we found that neurons in the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN) in the basal ganglia had lower firing rates yet had higher variability and higher levels of burst firing after injury. Correlated levels of power in local field potentials (LFPs) between the EPN and the motor cortex (MCx) were also disrupted by injury. Our findings indicate that hypoxic-ischemic injury during development leads to abnormal spontaneous and sensory stimulus-evoked input patterns from thalamus to cortex. Abnormal thalamic inputs likely permanently and detrimentally affect the organization of cortical circuitry and processing of sensory information. Hypoxic-ischemic injury also leads to abnormal single neuron and

  12. Cardiac Arrest-Induced Global Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia during Development Affects Spontaneous Activity Organization in Rat Sensory and Motor Thalamocortical Circuits during Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Shoykhet, Michael; Middleton, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    Normal maturation of sensory information processing in the cortex requires patterned synaptic activity during developmentally regulated critical periods. During early development, spontaneous synaptic activity establishes required patterns of synaptic input, and during later development it influences patterns of sensory experience-dependent neuronal firing. Thalamocortical neurons occupy a critical position in regulating the flow of patterned sensory information from the periphery to the cortex. Abnormal thalamocortical inputs may permanently affect the organization and function of cortical neuronal circuits, especially if they occur during a critical developmental window. We examined the effect of cardiac arrest (CA)-associated global brain hypoxia-ischemia in developing rats on spontaneous and evoked firing of somatosensory thalamocortical neurons and on large-scale correlations in the motor thalamocortical circuit. The mean spontaneous and sensory-evoked firing rate activity and variability were higher in CA injured rats. Furthermore, spontaneous and sensory-evoked activity and variability were correlated in uninjured rats, but not correlated in neurons from CA rats. Abnormal activity patterns of ventroposterior medial nucleus (VPm) neurons persisted into adulthood. Additionally, we found that neurons in the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN) in the basal ganglia had lower firing rates yet had higher variability and higher levels of burst firing after injury. Correlated levels of power in local field potentials (LFPs) between the EPN and the motor cortex (MCx) were also disrupted by injury. Our findings indicate that hypoxic-ischemic injury during development leads to abnormal spontaneous and sensory stimulus-evoked input patterns from thalamus to cortex. Abnormal thalamic inputs likely permanently and detrimentally affect the organization of cortical circuitry and processing of sensory information. Hypoxic-ischemic injury also leads to abnormal single neuron and

  13. Acute Radiation Effects on Cardiac Function Detected by Strain Rate Imaging in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Erven, Katrien; Jurcut, Ruxandra; Weltens, Caroline; Giusca, Sorin; Ector, Joris; Wildiers, Hans; Van den Bogaert, Walter; Voigt, Jens-Uwe

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the occurrence of early radiation-induced changes in regional cardiac function using strain rate imaging (SRI) by tissue Doppler echocardiography. Methods and Materials: We included 20 left-sided and 10 right-sided breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) to the breast or chest wall. Standard echocardiography and SRI were performed before RT (baseline), immediately after RT (post-RT), and at 2 months follow-up (FUP) after RT. Regional strain (S) and strain rate (SR) values were obtained from all 18 left ventricular (LV) segments. Data were compared to the regional radiation dose. Results: A reduction in S was observed post-RT and at FUP in left-sided patients (S{sub post-RT}: -17.6 {+-} 1.5%, and S{sub FUP}: -17.4 {+-} 2.3%, vs. S{sub baseline}: -19.5 {+-} 2.1%, p < 0.001) but not in right-sided patients. Within the left-sided patient group, S and SR were significantly reduced after RT in apical LV segments (S{sub post-RT}: -15.3 {+-} 2.5%, and S{sub FUP}: -14.3 {+-} 3.7%, vs. S{sub baseline}: -19.3 {+-} 3.0%, p < 0.01; and SR{sub post-RT}: -1.06 {+-} 0.15 s {sup -1}, and SR{sub FUP}: -1.16 {+-} 0.28 s {sup -1}, vs. SR{sub baseline}: -1.29 {+-} 0.27s {sup -1}, p = 0.01), but not in mid- or basal segments. Furthermore, we observed that segments exposed to more than 3 Gy showed a significant decrease in S after RT (S{sub post-RT}: -16.1 {+-} 1.6%, and S{sub FUP}: -15.8 {+-} 3.4%, vs. S{sub baseline}: -18.9 {+-} 2.6%, p < 0.001). This could not be observed in segments receiving less than 3 Gy. Conclusions: SRI shows a dose-related regional decrease in myocardial function after RT. It might be a useful tool in the evaluation of modern RT techniques, with respect to cardiac toxicity.

  14. To what extent does urbanisation affect fragmented grassland functioning?

    PubMed

    van der Walt, L; Cilliers, S S; Kellner, K; Du Toit, M J; Tongway, D

    2015-03-15

    Urbanisation creates altered environments characterised by increased human habitation, impermeable surfaces, artificial structures, landscape fragmentation, habitat loss, resulting in different resource loss pathways. The vulnerable Rand Highveld Grassland vegetation unit in the Tlokwe Municipal area, South Africa, has been extensively affected and transformed by urbanisation, agriculture, and mining. Grassland fragments in urban areas are often considered to be less species rich and less functional than in the more untransformed or "natural" exurban environments, and are therefore seldom a priority for conservation. Furthermore, urban grassland fragments are often being more intensely managed than exurban areas, such as consistent mowing in open urban areas. Four urbanisation measures acting as indicators for patterns and processes associated with urban areas were calculated for matrix areas surrounding each selected grassland fragment to quantify the position of each grassland remnant along an urbanisation gradient. The grassland fragments were objectively classified into two classes of urbanisation, namely "exurban" and "urban" based on the urbanisation measure values. Grazing was recorded in some exurban grasslands and mowing in some urban grassland fragments. Unmanaged grassland fragments were present in both urban and exurban areas. Fine-scale biophysical landscape function was determined by executing the Landscape Function Analysis (LFA) method. LFA assesses fine-scale landscape patchiness (entailing resource conserving potential and erosion resistance) and 11 soil surface indicators to produce three main LFA parameters (stability, infiltration, and nutrient cycling), which indicates how well a system is functioning in terms of fine-scale biophysical soil processes and characteristics. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of urbanisation and associated management practices on fine-scale biophysical landscape function of urban and exurban

  15. Cardiac function in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with history of breast cancer treated with anthracyclines.

    PubMed

    Barac, Ana; Lynce, Filipa; Smith, Karen L; Mete, Mihriye; Shara, Nawar M; Asch, Federico M; Nardacci, Madeline P; Wray, Lynette; Herbolsheimer, Pia; Nunes, Raquel A; Swain, Sandra M; Warren, Robert; Peshkin, Beth N; Isaacs, Claudine

    2016-01-01

    Animal data suggest that defects in BRCA1/2 genes significantly increase the risk of heart failure and mortality in mice exposed to doxorubicine. Women with BRCA1/2 mutations who develop breast cancer (BC) may receive anthracyclines but their risk of cardiac dysfunction has not been investigated. Our study tested the hypothesis that women with history of BRCA1/2 mutation-associated BC treated with anthracyclines have impaired parameters of cardiac function compared to similarly treated women with history of sporadic BC. Women with history of BC and anthracycline treatment underwent an echocardiographic exam for assessment of primary outcomes, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and global longitudinal strain (GLS). The sample size of 81 provided 79 % power with two-sided two-sample t test and alpha of 0.05 to detect a clinically meaningful difference in cardiac function of absolute 5 % points difference for LVEF and 2 % points difference for GLS. Of 81 normotensive participants, 39 were BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and 42 in the sporadic group. Mean age was 50 ± 9 years in both groups (P = 0.99) but BRCA1/2 mutation carriers had longer anthracycline treatment-to-enrollment time (7.5 ± 5.3 vs. 4.2 ± 3.3 years, P = 0.001). There were no significant differences in LVEF (P = 0.227) or GLS (P = 0.53) between the groups. LVEF was normal in 91 % of women and subclinical cardiac dysfunction defined as absolute GLS value <18.9 % was seen in 4 (10 %) BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and 7 (17 %) sporadic participants. In this first prospective examination of cardiac function in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, we found no significant differences in sensitive echocardiographic parameters of cardiac function between BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and women with history of sporadic BC who received anthracycline treatment. In contrast to laboratory animal data, our findings indicate lack of elevated cardiac risk with the use of standard-doses of adjuvant anthracyclines in treatment of BRCA1

  16. Resveratrol Treatment Reduces Cardiac Progenitor Cell Dysfunction and Prevents Morpho-Functional Ventricular Remodeling in Type-1 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Delucchi, Francesca; Berni, Roberta; Frati, Caterina; Cavalli, Stefano; Graiani, Gallia; Sala, Roberto; Chaponnier, Christine; Gabbiani, Giulio; Calani, Luca; Rio, Daniele Del; Bocchi, Leonardo; Lagrasta, Costanza; Quaini, Federico; Stilli, Donatella

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that both adult cardiac cell and the cardiac stem/progenitor cell (CSPC) compartments are involved in the patho-physiology of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM). We evaluated whether early administration of Resveratrol, a natural antioxidant polyphenolic compound, in addition to improving cardiomyocyte function, exerts a protective role on (i) the progenitor cell pool, and (ii) the myocardial environment and its impact on CSPCs, positively interfering with the onset of DCM phenotype. Adult Wistar rats (n = 128) with streptozotocin-induced type-1 diabetes were either untreated (D group; n = 54) or subjected to administration of trans-Resveratrol (i.p. injection: 2.5 mg/Kg/day; DR group; n = 64). Twenty-five rats constituted the control group (C). After 1, 3 or 8 weeks of hyperglycemia, we evaluated cardiac hemodynamic performance, and cardiomyocyte contractile properties and intracellular calcium dynamics. Myocardial remodeling and tissue inflammation were also assessed by morphometry, immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Eventually, the impact of the diabetic “milieu” on CSPC turnover was analyzed in co-cultures of healthy CSPCs and cardiomyocytes isolated from D and DR diabetic hearts. In untreated animals, cardiac function was maintained during the first 3 weeks of hyperglycemia, although a definite ventricular remodeling was already present, mainly characterized by a marked loss of CSPCs and adult cardiac cells. Relevant signs of ventricular dysfunction appeared after 8 weeks of diabetes, and included: 1) a significant reduction in ±dP/dt in comparison with C group, 2) a prolongation of isovolumic contraction/relaxation times, 3) an impaired contraction of isolated cardiomyocytes associated with altered intracellular calcium dynamics. Resveratrol administration reduced atrial CSPC loss, succeeded in preserving the functional abilities of CSPCs and mature cardiac cells, improved cardiac environment by reducing

  17. Does Ramadan Fasting Adversely Affect Cognitive Function in Young Females?

    PubMed Central

    Ghayour Najafabadi, Mahboubeh; Rahbar Nikoukar, Laya; Memari, Amir; Ekhtiari, Hamed; Beygi, Sara

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of Ramadan fasting on cognitive function in 17 female athletes. Data were obtained from participants of two fasting (n = 9) and nonfasting (n = 8) groups at three periods of the study (before Ramadan, at the third week in Ramadan, and after Ramadan). Digit span test (DST) and Stroop color test were employed to assess short-term memory and inhibition/cognitive flexibility at each time point. There were no significant changes for DST and Stroop task 1 in both groups, whereas Stroop task 2 and task 3 showed significant improvements in Ramadan condition (p < 0.05). Interference indices did not change significantly across the study except in post-Ramadan period of fasting group (p < 0.05). Group × week interaction was significant only for error numbers (p < 0.05). Athletes in nonfasting showed a significant decrease in number of errors in Ramadan compared to baseline (p < 0.05). The results suggest that Ramadan fasting may not adversely affect cognitive function in female athletes. PMID:26697263

  18. Embryonic caffeine exposure acts via A1 adenosine receptors to alter adult cardiac function and DNA methylation in mice.

    PubMed

    Buscariollo, Daniela L; Fang, Xiefan; Greenwood, Victoria; Xue, Huiling; Rivkees, Scott A; Wendler, Christopher C

    2014-01-01

    Evidence indicates that disruption of normal prenatal development influences an individual's risk of developing obesity and cardiovascular disease as an adult. Thus, understanding how in utero exposure to chemical agents leads to increased susceptibility to adult diseases is a critical health related issue. Our aim was to determine whether adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs) mediate the long-term effects of in utero caffeine exposure on cardiac function and whether these long-term effects are the result of changes in DNA methylation patterns in adult hearts. Pregnant A1AR knockout mice were treated with caffeine (20 mg/kg) or vehicle (0.09% NaCl) i.p. at embryonic day 8.5. This caffeine treatment results in serum levels equivalent to the consumption of 2-4 cups of coffee in humans. After dams gave birth, offspring were examined at 8-10 weeks of age. A1AR+/+ offspring treated in utero with caffeine were 10% heavier than vehicle controls. Using echocardiography, we observed altered cardiac function and morphology in adult mice exposed to caffeine in utero. Caffeine treatment decreased cardiac output by 11% and increased left ventricular wall thickness by 29% during diastole. Using DNA methylation arrays, we identified altered DNA methylation patterns in A1AR+/+ caffeine treated hearts, including 7719 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) within the genome and an overall decrease in DNA methylation of 26%. Analysis of genes associated with DMRs revealed that many are associated with cardiac hypertrophy. These data demonstrate that A1ARs mediate in utero caffeine effects on cardiac function and growth and that caffeine exposure leads to changes in DNA methylation.

  19. Intracoronary gastrin 17 increases cardiac perfusion and function through autonomic nervous system, CCK receptors, and nitric oxide in anesthetized pigs.

    PubMed

    Grossini, Elena; Caimmi, Philippe; Molinari, Claudio; Uberti, Francesca; Mary, David; Vacca, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    The release of gastrointestinal hormones has been reported to modulate reflex cardiovascular responses caused by gastric distension, although the role played by gastrin 17 is as yet unknown. The present study was therefore planned to determine the primary in vivo effect of gastrin 17 on coronary blood flow and cardiac function and the involvement of autonomic nervous system, CCK1/2 receptors, and nitric oxide (NO). In 40 anesthetized pigs, gastrin 17 was infused into the left anterior descending coronary artery at constant heart rate and arterial blood pressure. In 35 of the 40 pigs, the mechanisms of the observed hemodynamic responses were analyzed by repeating gastrin 17 infusion after autonomic nervous system and NO blockade, and after specific CCK receptors agonists/antagonists administration. Intracoronary gastrin 17 administration caused dose-related increases of both coronary blood flow and cardiac function. The intracoronary co-administration of CCK33/pentagastrin and gastrin 17 potentiated the coronary effects observed when the above agents were given alone (P <0.05). The potentiation of the cardiac response was observed only with the co-administration of pentagastrin and gastrin 17 (P <0.05). Moreover, blockade of muscarinic cholinoceptors (intravenous atropine) and of α-adrenoceptors (intravenous phentolamine) did not abolish the hemodynamic responses to gastrin 17. The cardiac and vascular effects of the hormone were prevented by blockade of β-adrenoceptors (intravenous atenolol and butoxamine), CCK1/2 receptors (intracoronary lorglumide and CAM-1028), and NO synthase (intracoronary Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester). In conclusion, gastrin 17 primarily increased coronary blood flow and cardiac function through the involvement of CCK receptors, β-adrenoceptors, and NO release.

  20. Functional importance of cardiac enhancer-associated noncoding RNAs in heart development and disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ounzain, Samir; Pezzuto, Iole; Micheletti, Rudi; Burdet, Frédéric; Sheta, Razan; Nemir, Mohamed; Gonzales, Christine; Sarre, Alexandre; Alexanian, Michael; Blow, Matthew J.; May, Dalit; Johnson, Rory; Dauvillier, Jérôme; Pennacchio, Len A.; Pedrazzini, Thierry

    2014-08-19

    We report here that the key information processing units within gene regulatory networks are enhancers. Enhancer activity is associated with the production of tissue-specific noncoding RNAs, yet the existence of such transcripts during cardiac development has not been established. Using an integrated genomic approach, we demonstrate that fetal cardiac enhancers generate long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) during cardiac differentiation and morphogenesis. Enhancer expression correlates with the emergence of active enhancer chromatin states, the initiation of RNA polymerase II at enhancer loci and expression of target genes. Orthologous human sequences are also transcribed in fetal human hearts and cardiac progenitor cells. Through a systematic bioinformatic analysis, we identified and characterized, for the first time, a catalog of lncRNAs that are expressed during embryonic stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and associated with active cardiac enhancer sequences. RNA-sequencing demonstrates that many of these transcripts are polyadenylated, multi-exonic long noncoding RNAs. Moreover, knockdown of two enhancer-associated lncRNAs resulted in the specific downregulation of their predicted target genes. Interestingly, the reactivation of the fetal gene program, a hallmark of the stress response in the adult heart, is accompanied by increased expression of fetal cardiac enhancer transcripts. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that the activity of cardiac enhancers and expression of their target genes are associated with the production of enhancer-derived lncRNAs.

  1. Functional importance of cardiac enhancer-associated noncoding RNAs in heart development and disease

    DOE PAGES

    Ounzain, Samir; Pezzuto, Iole; Micheletti, Rudi; ...

    2014-08-19

    We report here that the key information processing units within gene regulatory networks are enhancers. Enhancer activity is associated with the production of tissue-specific noncoding RNAs, yet the existence of such transcripts during cardiac development has not been established. Using an integrated genomic approach, we demonstrate that fetal cardiac enhancers generate long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) during cardiac differentiation and morphogenesis. Enhancer expression correlates with the emergence of active enhancer chromatin states, the initiation of RNA polymerase II at enhancer loci and expression of target genes. Orthologous human sequences are also transcribed in fetal human hearts and cardiac progenitor cells. Throughmore » a systematic bioinformatic analysis, we identified and characterized, for the first time, a catalog of lncRNAs that are expressed during embryonic stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and associated with active cardiac enhancer sequences. RNA-sequencing demonstrates that many of these transcripts are polyadenylated, multi-exonic long noncoding RNAs. Moreover, knockdown of two enhancer-associated lncRNAs resulted in the specific downregulation of their predicted target genes. Interestingly, the reactivation of the fetal gene program, a hallmark of the stress response in the adult heart, is accompanied by increased expression of fetal cardiac enhancer transcripts. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that the activity of cardiac enhancers and expression of their target genes are associated with the production of enhancer-derived lncRNAs.« less

  2. Functional Roles Affect Diversity-Succession Relationships for Boreal Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, Heloise; Johansson, Therese; Stenbacka, Fredrik; Hjältén, Joakim

    2013-01-01

    Species diversity commonly increases with succession and this relationship is an important justification for conserving large areas of old-growth habitats. However, species with different ecological roles respond differently to succession. We examined the relationship between a range of diversity measures and time since disturbance for boreal forest beetles collected over a 285 year forest chronosequence. We compared responses of “functional” groups related to threat status, dependence on dead wood habitats, diet and the type of trap in which they were collected (indicative of the breadth of ecologies of species). We examined fits of commonly used rank-abundance models for each age class and traditional and derived diversity indices. Rank abundance distributions were closest to the Zipf-Mandelbrot distribution, suggesting little role for competition in structuring most assemblages. Diversity measures for most functional groups increased with succession, but differences in slopes were common. Evenness declined with succession; more so for red-listed species than common species. Saproxylic species increased in diversity with succession while non-saproxylic species did not. Slopes for fungivores were steeper than other diet groups, while detritivores were not strongly affected by succession. Species trapped using emergence traps (log specialists) responded more weakly to succession than those trapped using flight intercept traps (representing a broader set of ecologies). Species associated with microhabitats that accumulate with succession (fungi and dead wood) thus showed the strongest diversity responses to succession. These clear differences between functional group responses to forest succession should be considered in planning landscapes for optimum conservation value, particularly functional resilience. PMID:23977350

  3. Mechano-sensitivity of cardiac pacemaker function: Pathophysiological relevance, experimental implications, and conceptual integration with other mechanisms of rhythmicity

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, T. Alexander; Kohl, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac pacemaker cells exhibit spontaneous, rhythmic electrical excitation, termed automaticity. This automatic initiation of action potentials requires spontaneous diastolic depolarisation, whose rate determines normal rhythm generation in the heart. Pacemaker mechanisms have been split recently into: (i) cyclic changes in trans-sarcolemmal ion flows (termed the ‘membrane-clock’), and (ii) rhythmic intracellular calcium cycling (the ‘calcium-clock’). These two ‘clocks’ undoubtedly interact, as trans-sarcolemmal currents involved in pacemaking include calcium-carrying mechanisms, while intracellular calcium cycling requires trans-sarcolemmal ion flux as the mechanism by which it affects membrane potential. The split into separate ‘clocks’ is, therefore, somewhat arbitrary. Nonetheless, the ‘clock’ metaphor has been conceptually stimulating, in particular since there is evidence to support the view that either ‘clock’ could be sufficient in principle to set the rate of pacemaker activation. Of course, the same has also been shown for sub-sets of ‘membrane-clock’ ion currents, illustrating the redundancy of mechanisms involved in maintaining such basic functionality as the heartbeat, a theme that is common for vital physiological systems. Following the conceptual path of identifying individual groups of sub-mechanisms, it is important to remember that the heart is able to adapt pacemaker rate to changes in haemodynamic load, even after isolation or transplantation, and on a beat-by-beat basis. Neither the ‘membrane-’ nor the ‘calcium-clock’ do, as such, inherently account for this rapid adaptation to circulatory demand (cellular Ca2+ balance changes over multiple beats, while variation of sarcolemmal ion channel presence takes even longer). This suggests that a third set of mechanisms must be involved in setting the pace. These mechanisms are characterised by their sensitivity to the cyclically changing mechanical environment, and

  4. Does Bowel Preparation for Colonoscopy Affect Cognitive Function?

    PubMed Central

    Wadsworth, P.; Blackburne, H.; Dixon, L.; Dobbs, B.; Eglinton, T.; Ing, A.; Mulder, R.; Porter, R.J.; Wakeman, C.; Frizelle, F.A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Colonoscopy is a common procedure used in the diagnosis and treatment of a range of bowel disorders. Prior preparation involving potent laxatives is a necessary stage to ensure adequate visualization of the bowel wall. It is known that the sedatives given to most patients during the colonoscopy cause a temporary impairment in cognitive function; however, the potential for bowel preparation to affect cognitive function has not previously been investigated. To assess the effect of bowel preparation for colonoscopy on cognitive function. This was a prospective, nonrandomized controlled study of cognitive function in patients who had bowel preparation for colonoscopy compared with those having gastroscopy and therefore no bowel preparation. Cognitive function was assessed using the Modified Mini Mental State Examination (MMMSE) and selected tests from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery. Individual test scores and changes between initial and subsequent tests were compared between the groups. Age, gender, and weight were also compared. Forty-three colonoscopy and 25 gastroscopy patients were recruited. The 2 groups were similar for age and gender; however, patients having gastroscopy were heavier. MMMSE scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 28.6 and 29.5 (P = 0.24) at baseline, 28.7 and 29.8 (P = 0.32) at test 2, 28.1 and 28.5 (P = 0.76) at test 3. Motor screening scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 349.3 and 354.1 (P = 0.97) at baseline, 307.5 and 199.7 (P = 0.06) at test 2, 212.0 and 183.2 (P = 0.33) at test 3. Spatial working memory scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 14.4 and 6.7 (P = 0.29) at baseline, 9.7 and 4.3 (P = 0.27) at test 2, 10 and 4.5 (P = 0.33) at test 3. Digit Symbol Substitution Test scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 36.3 and 37.8 (P = 0.84) at baseline, 36.4 and

  5. Injectable biodegradable hydrogels for embryonic stem cell transplantation: improved cardiac remodelling and function of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibin; Liu, Zhiqiang; Li, Dexue; Guo, Xuan; Kasper, F Kurtis; Duan, Cuimi; Zhou, Jin; Mikos, Antonios G; Wang, Changyong

    2012-06-01

    In this study, an injectable, biodegradable hydrogel composite of oligo[poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate] (OPF) was investigated as a carrier of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) for the treatment of myocardial infarction (MI). The OPF hydrogels were used to encapsulate mESCs. The cell differentiation in vitro over 14 days was determined via immunohistochemical examination. Then, mESCs encapsulated in OPF hydrogels were injected into the LV wall of a rat MI model. Detailed histological analysis and echocardiography were used to determine the structural and functional consequences after 4 weeks of transplantation. With ascorbic acid induction, mESCs could differentiate into cardiomyocytes and other cell types in all three lineages in the OPF hydrogel. After transplantation, both the 24-hr cell retention and 4-week graft size were significantly greater in the OPF + ESC group than that of the PBS + ESC group (P < 0.01). Four weeks after transplantation, OPF hydrogel alone significantly reduced the infarct size and collagen deposition and improved the cardiac function. The heart function and revascularization improved significantly, while the infarct size and fibrotic area decreased significantly in the OPF + ESC group compared with that of the PBS + ESC, OPF and PBS groups (P < 0.01). All treatments had significantly reduced MMP2 and MMP9 protein levels compared to the PBS control group, and the OPF + ESC group decreased most by Western blotting. Transplanted mESCs expressed cardiovascular markers. This study suggests the potential of a method for heart regeneration involving OPF hydrogels for stem cell encapsulation and transplantation.

  6. Impaired Cerebrovascular Function in Coronary Artery Disease Patients and Recovery Following Cardiac Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Anazodo, Udunna C.; Shoemaker, J. K.; Suskin, Neville; Ssali, Tracy; Wang, Danny J. J.; St. Lawrence, Keith S.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) poses a risk to the cerebrovascular function of older adults and has been linked to impaired cognitive abilities. Using magnetic resonance perfusion imaging, we investigated changes in resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) to hypercapnia in 34 CAD patients and 21 age-matched controls. Gray matter volume (GMV) images were acquired and used as a confounding variable to separate changes in structure from function. Compared to healthy controls, CAD patients demonstrated reduced CBF in the superior frontal, anterior cingulate (AC), insular, pre- and post-central gyri, middle temporal, and superior temporal regions. Subsequent analysis of these regions demonstrated decreased CVR in the AC, insula, post-central and superior frontal regions. Except in the superior frontal and precentral regions, regional reductions in CBF and CVR were identified in brain areas where no detectable reductions in GMV were observed, demonstrating that these vascular changes were independent of brain atrophy. Because aerobic fitness training can improve brain function, potential changes in regional CBF were investigated in the CAD patients after completion of a 6-months exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation program. Increased CBF was observed in the bilateral AC, as well as recovery of CBF in the dorsal aspect of the right AC, where the magnitude of increased CBF was roughly equal to the reduction in CBF at baseline compared to controls. These exercise-related improvements in CBF in the AC is intriguing given the role of this area in cognitive processing and regulation of cardiovascular autonomic control. PMID:26779011

  7. Cardiac morphology and function in patients with and without residual diuresis on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Salustiano; Lemes, Helton P; Cunha, Danny A; Queiroz, Vinicius S; Nascimento, Daniela D; Ferreira Filho, Sebastião Rodrigues

    2011-03-01

    In patients with chronic renal failure on hemodialysis, left ventricular hypertrophy is related to the increase in total peripheral vascular resistance and volume overload. The presence of residual diuresis enables greater control of the volemia of these. We evaluated the morpho-functional changes of the left ventricle in patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodyalisis treatment with and without residual diuresis. A total of 31 non diabetic patients were studied and they were divided into two groups: with residual diuresis (RD+) (n = 17) and without residual diuresis (RD-) (n = 14). In both groups, RD+ vs. RD-, using data from a Doppler echocardiogram differences were found, respectively, in the cardiac index (3.9 ± 0.2 vs. 3.0 ± 0.2 L/min/m²; p = 0.0056), systolic index (54 ± 2.9 vs. 45 ± 3.3 mL/b/m²; p = 0.04), end diastolic volume (141 ± 6.7 vs. 112 ± 7.6 mL; p = 0.008), end diastolic diameter (52 ± 0.7 vs. 48 ± 1.1 mm; p = 0.0072) and total peripheral resistance index (1121 ± 56 vs. 1529 ± 111 dyne.sec.cm-5; p = 0.001). RD+ had lower relative wall thickness than RD- (0.38 ± 0.01 vs. 0.45 ± 0.01; p = 0.0008). The ejection fraction and the left ventricular mass index were similar in both groups. The urinary 24-hour volume correlated with the relative wall thickness (r = -0.42; p = 0.0186) and with peripheral resistance index (r = -0.48; p = 0.0059). In conclusion, there were distinct ventricular geometric patterns and different functional performances between RD+ and RD- groups. The presence of residual diuresis can be responsible by these modifications in systolic function.

  8. Temporal alterations in cardiac fibroblast function following induction of pressure overload

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, James A.; Massey, Erin P.; Fix, Charity; Zhu, Jinyu; Goldsmith, Edie C.

    2014-01-01

    Increases in cardiovascular load (pressure overload) are known to elicit ventricular remodeling including cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis. While numerous studies have focused on the mechanisms of myocyte hypertrophy, comparatively little is known regarding the response of the interstitial fibroblasts to increased cardiovascular load. Fibroblasts are the most numerous cell type in the mammalian myocardium and have long been recognized as producing the majority of the myocardial extracellular matrix. It is only now becoming appreciated that other aspects of fibroblast behavior are important to overall cardiac function. The present studies were performed to examine the temporal alterations in fibroblast activity in response to increased cardiovascular load. Rat myocardial fibroblasts were isolated at specific time-points (3, 7, 14, and 28 days) after induction of pressure overload by abdominal aortic constriction. Bioassays were performed to measure specific parameters of fibroblast function including remodeling and contraction of 3-dimensional collagen gels, migration, and proliferation. In addition, the expression of extracellular matrix receptors of the integrin family was examined. Myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis were evident within 7 days after constriction of the abdominal aorta. Collagen gel contraction, migration, and proliferation were enhanced in fibroblasts from pressure-overloaded animals compared to fibroblasts from sham animals. Differences in fibroblast function and protein expression were evident within 7 days of aortic constriction, concurrent with the onset of hypertrophy and fibrosis of the intact myocardium. These data provide further support for the idea that rapid and dynamic changes in fibroblast phenotype accompany and contribute to the progression of cardiovascular disease. PMID:20217135

  9. Cardiac autonomic functions and the emergence of violence in a highly realistic model of social conflict in humans

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Jozsef; Raczkevy-Deak, Gabriella; Gyimesine, Katalin P.; Szakmary, Andras; Farkas, Istvan; Vegh, Jozsef

    2014-01-01

    Among the multitude of factors that can transform human social interactions into violent conflicts, biological features received much attention in recent years as correlates of decision making and aggressiveness especially in critical situations. We present here a highly realistic new model of human aggression and violence, where genuine acts of aggression are readily performed and which at the same time allows the parallel recording of biological concomitants. Particularly, we studied police officers trained at the International Training Centre (Budapest, Hungary), who are prepared to perform operations under extreme conditions of stress. We found that aggressive arousal can transform a basically peaceful social encounter into a violent conflict. Autonomic recordings show that this change is accompanied by increased heart rates, which was associated earlier with reduced cognitive complexity of perceptions (“attentional myopia”) and promotes a bias toward hostile attributions and aggression. We also observed reduced heart rate variability in violent subjects, which is believed to signal a poor functioning of prefrontal-subcortical inhibitory circuits and reduces self-control. Importantly, these autonomic particularities were observed already at the beginning of social encounters i.e., before aggressive acts were initiated, suggesting that individual characteristics of the stress-response define the way in which social pressure affects social behavior, particularly the way in which this develops into violence. Taken together, these findings suggest that cardiac autonomic functions are valuable external symptoms of internal motivational states and decision making processes, and raise the possibility that behavior under social pressure can be predicted by the individual characteristics of stress responsiveness. PMID:25374519

  10. Exercise capacity in the Bidirectional Glenn Physiology: coupling cardiac index, ventricular function and oxygen extraction ratio

    PubMed Central

    Vallecilla, Carolina; Khiabani, Reza H.; Trusty, Phillip; Sandoval, Néstor; Fogel, Mark; Briceño, Juan Carlos; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2015-01-01

    In Bi-directional Glenn (BDG) physiology, the superior systemic circulation and pulmonary circulation are in series. Consequently, only blood from the superior vena cava is oxygenated in the lungs. Oxygenated blood then travels to the ventricle where it is mixed with blood returning from the lower body. Therefore, incremental changes in oxygen extraction ratio (OER) could compromise exercise tolerance. In this study, the effect of exercise on the hemodynamic and ventricular performance of BDG physiology was investigated using clinical patient data as inputs for a lumped parameter model coupled with oxygenation equations. Changes in cardiac index, Qp/Qs, systemic pressure, oxygen extraction ratio and ventricular/vascular coupling ratio were calculated for three different exercise levels. The patient cohort (n=29) was sub-grouped by age and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at rest. It was observed that the changes in exercise tolerance are significant in both comparisons, but most significant when sub-grouped by PVR at rest. Results showed that patients over 2 years old with high PVR are above or close to the upper tolerable limit of OER (0.32) at baseline. Patients with high PVR at rest had very poor exercise tolerance while patients with low PVR at rest could tolerate low exercise conditions. In general, ventricular function of SV patients is too poor to increase CI and fulfill exercise requirements. The presented mathematical model provides a framework to estimate the hemodynamic performance of BDG patients at different exercise levels according to patient specific data. PMID:25913242

  11. Effects of adrenaline on circulatory dynamics and cardiac function in rats administered chlorpromazine.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Arisa; Sunada, Katsuhisa

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to elucidate changes in circulatory dynamics and cardiac function during concomitant use of chlorpromazine (CPZ) and adrenaline (AD). An arterial line and left intraventricular pressure-volume measurement catheter were inserted in rats. CPZ 10 mg/kg was administered to the left great adductor muscle, followed by normal saline (NS) or AD 50 μg/kg through the tongue 20 min later. End-diastolic volume (V ed), end-systolic pressure (P es), stroke volume (SV), stroke work (SW), end-systolic volume elastance (E es), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and pulse rate (PR) were measured. Following AD administration, V ed significantly decreased at 2-4 and 10 min than that in control rats; P es significantly decreased at 1 min; E es significantly increased from 2 to 10 min; SV did not change significantly, and SW significantly reduced at 1 and 2 min; SBP and DBP were lower at 1-3 min than in the control; and PR increased at 10 min. These findings suggest that when AD-containing local anesthetics are administered during dental treatment of patients taking CPZ, there is a risk of a temporary drop in blood pressure. However, the blood pressure is recovered a few minutes later by the increase in afterload and the myocardial contractile force.

  12. Astragalus polysaccharide improves cardiac function in doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy through ROS-p38 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liangliang; Chen, Lanping; Wang, Jing; Deng, Yijun

    2015-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is widely used as an antitumor agent, but it is significantly challenged by clinical workers due to the severe and acute cardiotoxitity. Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) is characterized by an anti-inflammation and anti-oxidant features. In the current study, we explored the effects and specific mechanisms of APS on DOX-induced-cardiomyopathy in mouse primary myocardial cells. To explore the effect of DOX on ROS production, DHE staining and flow cytometry analysis were used in primary cardiomyocytes treated with 1 μM DOX for 24 h. MTT assay was applied to determine the effect of DOX on cell viability. The effects of DOX on rat cardiomyocytes apoptosis by Hoechst staining and annexin V-PI staining, while caspase3 activity was determined using an assay kit. Two-dimensional echocardiography of rats was performed to determine left ventricular fraction and relative wall thickness. Activation of p38 and Akt was analyzed using western blot. ROS production was significantly enhanced by DOX stimulation in primary cardiomyocytes. DOX reduced rat cardiomyocytes viability in a time- and dose-dependent manner. DOX induced apoptosis in rat cardiomyocytes via activation of caspase-3. Cardiac function was significantly impaired by enhanced p38 activation. APS treatment reduced DOX-induced rat cardiomyocytes apoptosis by decreasing ROS production. To conclude, APS reduced DOX-induced cell apoptosis and ROS production by reduced activation of p38 signaling pathway. PMID:26885153

  13. Noninvasive ventilation improves cardiac function in patients with chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jing; Liu, Yanping; Li, Guishuang; Zhang, Zhongwen; Ma, Lianyue; Yang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jianmin; Zhang, Kai; Kong, Jing; Dong, Mei; Zhang, Meng; Xu, Xingli; Sui, Wenhai; Wang, Jiali; Shang, Rui; Ji, Xiaoping; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Cheng; Hao, Panpan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) has been shown to be associated with an increased incidence of sleep-disordered breathing. Whether treatment with noninvasivepositive-pressure ventilation (NPPV), including continuous positive airway pressure, bi-level positive airway pressure and adaptive servo-ventilation, improves clinical outcomes of CHF patients is still debated. 2,832 CHF patients were enrolled in our analysis. NPPV was significantly associated with improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction (39.39% vs. 34.24%; WMD, 5.06; 95% CI, 3.30-6.81; P < 0.00001) and plasma brain natriuretic peptide level (268.23 pg/ml vs. 455.55 pg/ml; WMD, −105.66; 95% CI, [−169.19]-[−42.13]; P = 0.001). However, NPPV did not reduce all-cause mortality (0.26% vs. 0.24%; OR, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.93-1.37; P = 0.22) or re-hospitalization rate (57.86% vs. 59.38%; OR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.19-1.19; P = 0.02) as compared with conventional therapy. Despite no benefits on hard endpoints, NPPV may improve cardiac function of CHF patients. These data highlight the important role of NPPV in the therapy of CHF. PMID:27391436

  14. Impaired Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System Function is Associated with Pediatric Hypertension Independent of Adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Ryder, Justin R.; O’Connell, Michael; Bosch, Tyler A.; Chow, Lisa; Rudser, Kyle D.; Dengel, Donald R.; Fox, Claudia K.; Steinberger, Julia; Kelly, Aaron S.

    2015-01-01

    Background We examined whether sympathetic nervous system activity influences hypertension status and systolic blood pressure (SBP) independent of adiposity in youth ranging from normal-weight to severe obesity. Methods We examined the association of heart rate variability (HRV) with hypertension status and SBP among youth (6-18 years old; n = 188; 103 female). Seated SBP was measured using an automated cuff. Pre-hypertension (SBP percentile≤90th-<95th) and hypertension (SBP percentile≤95th) were defined by age-, sex-, and height-norms. Autonomic nervous system activity was measured using HRV via SphygmoCorTM MM3 system and analyzed for time- and frequency-domains. Total body fat was measured via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results Logistic regression models demonstrated lower values in each time-domain HRV measure and larger LF:HF ratio to be significantly associated with higher odds of being pre-hypertensive/hypertensive (11-47% higher odds) independent of total body fat (p<0.05). In linear regression analysis, lower time-domain, but not frequency-domain, HRV measures were significantly associated with higher SBP independent of total body fat (p<0.05). Conclusion These data suggest that impaired cardiac autonomic nervous system function, at rest, is associated with higher odds of being pre-hypertensive/hypertensive and higher SBP which may be independent of adiposity in youth. PMID:26389821

  15. Distinct functional defect of three novel Brugada syndrome related cardiac sodium channel mutations.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Chia-Hsiang; Chen, Wen-Pin; Lin, Jiunn-Lee; Tsai, Chia-Ti; Liu, Yen-Bin; Juang, Jyh-Ming; Tsao, Hsuan-Ming; Su, Ming-Jai; Lai, Ling-Ping

    2009-02-20

    The Brugada syndrome is characterized by ST segment elevation in the right precodial leads V1-V3 on surface ECG accompanied by episodes of ventricular fibrillation causing syncope or even sudden death. The molecular and cellular mechanisms that lead to Brugada syndrome are not yet completely understood. However, SCN5A is the most well known responsible gene that causes Brugada syndrome. Until now, more than a hundred mutations in SCN5A responsible for Brugada syndrome have been described. Functional studies of some of the mutations have been performed and show that a reduction of human cardiac sodium current accounts for the pathogenesis of Brugada syndrome. Here we reported three novel SCN5A mutations identified in patients with Brugada syndrome in Taiwan (p.I848fs, p.R965C, and p.1876insM). Their electrophysiological properties were altered by patch clamp analysis. The p.I848fs mutant generated no sodium current. The p.R965C and p.1876insM mutants produced channels with steady state inactivation shifted to a more negative potential (9.4 mV and 8.5 mV respectively), and slower recovery from inactivation. Besides, the steady state activation of p.1876insM was altered and was shifted to a more positive potential (7.69 mV). In conclusion, the SCN5A channel defect related to Brugada syndrome might be diverse but all resulted in a decrease of sodium current.

  16. Exercise capacity in the Bidirectional Glenn physiology: Coupling cardiac index, ventricular function and oxygen extraction ratio.

    PubMed

    Vallecilla, Carolina; Khiabani, Reza H; Trusty, Phillip; Sandoval, Néstor; Fogel, Mark; Briceño, Juan Carlos; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2015-07-16

    In Bi-directional Glenn (BDG) physiology, the superior systemic circulation and pulmonary circulation are in series. Consequently, only blood from the superior vena cava is oxygenated in the lungs. Oxygenated blood then travels to the ventricle where it is mixed with blood returning from the lower body. Therefore, incremental changes in oxygen extraction ratio (OER) could compromise exercise tolerance. In this study, the effect of exercise on the hemodynamic and ventricular performance of BDG physiology was investigated using clinical patient data as inputs for a lumped parameter model coupled with oxygenation equations. Changes in cardiac index, Qp/Qs, systemic pressure, oxygen extraction ratio and ventricular/vascular coupling ratio were calculated for three different exercise levels. The patient cohort (n=29) was sub-grouped by age and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at rest. It was observed that the changes in exercise tolerance are significant in both comparisons, but most significant when sub-grouped by PVR at rest. Results showed that patients over 2 years old with high PVR are above or close to the upper tolerable limit of OER (0.32) at baseline. Patients with high PVR at rest had very poor exercise tolerance while patients with low PVR at rest could tolerate low exercise conditions. In general, ventricular function of SV patients is too poor to increase CI and fulfill exercise requirements. The presented mathematical model provides a framework to estimate the hemodynamic performance of BDG patients at different exercise levels according to patient specific data.

  17. TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-induced cardiac myofibroblasts are nonproliferating functional cells carrying DNA damages

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, Victor V. Pelt, Jos F. van; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Van Duppen, Viktor J.; Vekemans, Katrien; Fagard, Robert H.; Lijnen, Paul J.

    2008-04-15

    TGF-{beta}{sub 1} induces differentiation and total inhibition of cardiac MyoFb cell division and DNA synthesis. These effects of TGF-{beta}{sub 1} are irreversible. Inhibition of MyoFb proliferation is accompanied with the expression of Smad1, Mad1, p15Ink4B and total inhibition of telomerase activity. Surprisingly, TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-activated MyoFbs are growth-arrested not only at G1-phase but also at S-phase of the cell cycle. Staining with TUNEL indicates that these cells carry DNA damages. However, the absolute majority of MyoFbs are non-apoptotic cells as established with two apoptosis-specific methods, flow cytometry and caspase-dependent cleavage of cytokeratin 18. Expression in MyoFbs of proliferative cell nuclear antigen even in the absence of serum confirms that these MyoFbs perform repair of DNA damages. These results suggest that TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-activated MyoFbs can be growth-arrested by two checkpoints, the G1/S checkpoint, which prevents cells from entering S-phase and the intra-S checkpoint, which is activated by encountering DNA damage during the S phase or by unrepaired damage that escapes the G1/S checkpoint. Despite carrying of the DNA damages TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-activated MyoFbs are highly functional cells producing lysyl oxidase and contracting the collagen matrix.

  18. Inhalation of Photochemically Altered Urban Mixtures Depresses Cardiac Function in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Epidemiological studies have indicated an association between urban air pollution exposure and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The present study was designed to evaluate the cardiac effects of inhaled photochemical products in urban mixtures in a murine model. ...

  19. Gelatin Hydrogel Enhances the Engraftment of Transplanted Cardiomyocytes and Angiogenesis to Ameliorate Cardiac Function after Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kazuaki; Fujita, Jun; Matsui, Makoto; Tohyama, Shugo; Tamura, Noriko; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Seki, Tomohisa; Kishino, Yoshikazu; Hirano, Akinori; Okada, Marina; Tabei, Ryota; Sano, Motoaki; Goto, Shinya; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Cell transplantation therapy will mean a breakthrough in resolving the donor shortage in cardiac transplantation. Cardiomyocyte (CM) transplantation, however, has been relatively inefficient in restoring cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI) due to low engraftment of transplanted CM. In order to ameliorate engraftment of CM, the novel transplantation strategy must be invented. Gelatin hydrogel (GH) is a biodegradable water-soluble polymer gel. Gelatin is made of collagen. Although we observed that collagen strongly induced the aggregation of platelets to potentially cause coronary microembolization, GH did not enhance thrombogenicity. Therefore, GH is a suitable biomaterial in the cell therapy after heart failure. To assess the effect of GH on the improvement of cardiac function, fetal rat CM (5×106 or 1x106 cells) were transplanted with GH (10 mg/ml) to infarcted hearts. We compared this group with sham operated rats, CM in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), only PBS, and only GH-transplanted groups. Three weeks after transplantation, cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiography. The echocardiography confirmed that transplantation of 5×106 CM with GH significantly improved cardiac systolic function, compared with the CM+PBS group (fractional area change: 75.1±3.4% vs. 60.7±5.9%, p<0.05), only PBS, and only GH groups (60.1±6.5%, 65.0±2.8%, p<0.05). Pathological analyses demonstrated that in the CM+GH group, CM were efficiently engrafted in infarcted myocardium (p<0.01) and angiogenesis was significantly enhanced (p<0.05) in both central and peripheral areas of the scar. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR revealed that angiogenic cytokines, such as basic fibroblast growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, and hepatocyte growth factor, were significantly enriched in the CM+GH group (p<0.05). Here, we report that GH confined the CM effectively in infarcted myocardium after transplantation, and that CM transplanted with GH improved cardiac

  20. In vivo assessment of coronary flow and cardiac function after bolus adenosine injection in adenosine receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Teng, Bunyen; Tilley, Stephen L; Ledent, Catherine; Mustafa, S Jamal

    2016-06-01

    Bolus injections of adenosine and the A2A adenosine receptor (AR) selective agonist (regadenoson) are used clinically as a substitute for a stress test in people who cannot exercise. Using isolated tissue preparations, our lab has shown that coronary flow and cardiac effects of adenosine are mostly regulated by the AR subtypes A1, A2A, and A2B In this study, we used ultrasound imaging to measure the in vivo effects of adenosine on coronary blood flow (left coronary artery) and cardiac function in anesthetized wild-type, A1 knockout (KO), A2AKO, A2BKO, A3KO, A1, and A3 double KO (A1/3 DKO) and A2A and A2B double KO (A2A/2B DKO) mice in real time. Echocardiographic and Doppler studies were performed using a Visualsonic Vevo 2100 ultrasound system. Coronary blood flow (CBF) baseline data were obtained when animals were anesthetized with 1% isoflourane. Diameter (D) and velocity time integral (VTI) were measured on the left coronary arteries (CBF = ((π/4) × D(2) × VTI × HR)/1000). CBF changes were the highest within 2 min of injection (about 10 mg/kg). Heart rate, cardiac output, and stroke volume were measured by tracing the left ventricle long axis. Our data support a role for the A2 AR in CBF and further support our conclusions of previous studies from isolated tissues. Adenosine-mediated decreases in cardiac output and stroke volume may be A2B and/or A3 AR-mediated; however, the A1 and A2 ARs also play roles in overall cardiac function. These data further provide a powerful translational tool in studying the cardiovascular effects of adenosine in disease states.

  1. Invasive Hemodynamic Assessment of Cardiac Output State after MitraClip Therapy in Nonanaesthetized Patients with Functional Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Budesinsky, Tomas; Linkova, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Background. Surgical correction of mitral regurgitation (MR) can lead to postoperative low cardiac output state. We aimed to assess the acute hemodynamic changes after percutaneous MitraClip therapy (a unique model without influence of factors linked to surgical procedure) in patients with functional MR without the influence of general anaesthesia. Methods. We studied invasive hemodynamic parameters in 23 patients before procedure (conscious, nonsedated patients), during procedure (intubated patients), and the first day after MitraClip implantation (conscious, extubated patients). Results. Mitral valve clipping significantly increased cardiac index (CI) (from 2.0 ± 0.5 to 3.3 ± 0.6 L/min/m2; p < 0.01). Conversely, there was significant reduction in the mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) (from 18.6 ± 5.7 to 10.5 ± 3.8 mmHg; p < 0.01), mean pulmonary artery pressure (from 29.8 ± 10.9 to 25.2 ± 10.3 mmHg; p = 0.03), and pulmonary vascular resistance index (from 531 ± 359 to 365 ± 193 dyn·s·cm−5/m2; p = 0.03). Conclusions. The functional MR therapy with percutaneous MitraClip device results in significant increase in CI (+66%) and concomitant decrease in PCWP (−42%). None of our patients developed low cardiac output state. Our results support the idea that significant part of low cardiac output state after cardiac surgery is due to surgery related factors rather than due to increase in afterload after MR elimination. PMID:28058260

  2. Dietary omega-6 fatty acid replacement selectively impairs cardiac functional recovery after ischemia in female (but not male) rats.

    PubMed

    Ip, Wendy T K; McAlindon, Andrew; Miller, Sarah E; Bell, James R; Curl, Claire L; Huggins, Catherine E; Mellor, Kimberley M; Raaijmakers, Antonia J A; Bienvenu, Laura A; McLennan, Peter L; Pepe, Salvatore; Delbridge, Lea M D

    2016-09-01

    A definitive understanding of the role of dietary lipids in determining cardioprotection (or cardiodetriment) has been elusive. Randomized trial findings have been variable and sex specificity of dietary interventions has not been determined. In this investigation the sex-selective cardiac functional effects of three diets enriched by omega-3 or omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) or enriched to an equivalent extent in saturated fatty acid components were examined in rats after an 8-wk treatment period. In females the myocardial membrane omega-6:omega-3 PUFA ratio was twofold higher than males in the omega-6 diet replacement group. In diets specified to be high in omega-3 PUFA or in saturated fat, this sex difference was not apparent. Isolated cardiomyocyte and heart Langendorff perfusion experiments were performed, and molecular measures of cell viability were assessed. Under basal conditions the contractile performance of omega-6 fed female cardiomyocytes and hearts was reduced compared with males. Omega-6 fed females exhibited impaired systolic resilience after ischemic insult. This response was associated with increased postischemia necrotic cell damage evaluated by coronary lactate dehydrogenase during reperfusion in omega-6 fed females. Cardiac and myocyte functional parameters were not different between omega-3 and saturated fat dietary groups and within these groups there were no discernible sex differences. Our data provide evidence at both the cardiac and cardiomyocyte levels that dietary saturated fatty acid intake replacement with an omega-6 (but not omega-3) enriched diet has selective adverse cardiac effect in females. This finding has potential relevance in relation to women, cardiac risk, and dietary management.

  3. Patterns and determinants of functional and absolute iron deficiency in patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation following heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Tramarin, Roberto; Pistuddi, Valeria; Maresca, Luigi; Pavesi, Marco; Castelvecchio, Serenella; Menicanti, Lorenzo; de Vincentiis, Carlo; Ranucci, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Background Anaemia and iron deficiency are frequent following major surgery. The present study aims to identify the iron deficiency patterns in cardiac surgery patients at their admission to a cardiac rehabilitation programme, and to determine which perioperative risk factor(s) may be associated with functional and absolute iron deficiency. Design This was a retrospective study on prospectively collected data. Methods The patient population included 339 patients. Functional iron deficiency was defined in the presence of transferrin saturation <20% and serum ferritin ≥100 µg/l. Absolute iron deficiency was defined in the presence of serum ferritin values <100 µg/l. Results Functional iron deficiency was found in 62.9% of patients and absolute iron deficiency in 10% of the patients. At a multivariable analysis, absolute iron deficiency was significantly ( p = 0.001) associated with mechanical prosthesis mitral valve replacement (odds ratio 5.4, 95% confidence interval 1.9-15) and tissue valve aortic valve replacement (odds ratio 4.5, 95% confidence interval 1.9-11). In mitral valve surgery, mitral repair carried a significant ( p = 0.013) lower risk of absolute iron deficiency (4.4%) than mitral valve replacement with tissue valves (8.3%) or mechanical prostheses (22.5%). Postoperative outcome did not differ between patients with functional iron deficiency and patients without iron deficiency; patients with absolute iron deficiency had a significantly ( p = 0.017) longer postoperative hospital stay (median 11 days) than patients without iron deficiency (median nine days) or with functional iron deficiency (median eight days). Conclusions Absolute iron deficiency following cardiac surgery is more frequent in heart valve surgery and is associated with a prolonged hospital stay. Routine screening for iron deficiency at admission in the cardiac rehabilitation unit is suggested.

  4. Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 Functions as a Novel Negative Regulator of Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ding-Sheng; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Heng; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Chen, Ke; Gao, Lu; Peng, Juan; Gong, Hui; Chen, Yingjie; Yang, Qinglin; Liu, Peter P.; Fan, Guo-Chang; Zou, Yunzeng; Li, Hongliang

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a complex pathological process that involves multiple factors including inflammation and apoptosis. Interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) is a multifunctional regulator that participates in immune regulation, cell differentiation, apoptosis, and oncogenesis. However, the role of IRF7 in cardiac hypertrophy remains unclear. We performed aortic banding in cardiac-specific IRF7 transgenic mice, IRF7 knockout mice, and the wild-type littermates of these mice. Our results demonstrated that IRF7 was downregulated in aortic banding–induced animal hearts and cardiomyocytes that had been treated with angiotensin II or phenylephrine for 48 hours. Accordingly, heart-specific overexpression of IRF7 significantly attenuated pressure overload–induced cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and dysfunction, whereas loss of IRF7 led to opposite effects. Moreover, IRF7 protected against angiotensin II–induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro. Mechanistically, we identified that IRF7-dependent cardioprotection was mediated through IRF7 binding to inhibitor of κB kinase-β, and subsequent nuclear factor-κB inactivation. In fact, blocking nuclear factor-κB signaling with cardiac-specific inhibitors of κBαS32A/S36A super-repressor transgene counteracted the adverse effect of IRF7 deficiency. Conversely, activation of nuclear factor-κB signaling via a cardiac-specific conditional inhibitor of κB kinase-βS177E/S181E (constitutively active) transgene negated the antihypertrophic effect of IRF7 overexpression. Our data demonstrate that IRF7 acts as a novel negative regulator of pathological cardiac hypertrophy by inhibiting nuclear factor-κB signaling and may constitute a potential therapeutic target for pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:24396025

  5. Amino-Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes by Using a Factorial Design: Human Cardiac Troponin T Immunosensing Application

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Tatianny A.; Mattos, Alessandra B.; Silva, Bárbara V. M.; Dutra, Rosa F.

    2014-01-01

    A simple amino-functionalization method for carbon nanotubes and its application in an electrochemical immunosensor for detection of the human cardiac troponin T are described. Amino-functionalized carbon nanotubes allow oriented antibodies immobilization via their Fc regions, improving the performance of an immunosensor. Herein multiwalled carbon nanotubes were amino-functionalized by using the ethylenediamine reagent and assays were designed by fractional factorial study associated with Doehlert matrix. Structural modifications in the carbon nanotubes were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. After amino-functionalization the carbon nanotubes were attached to screen-printed carbon electrode and a sandwich-type immunoassay was performed for measuring the cardiac troponin T. The electrochemical measurements were obtained through hydrogen peroxide reaction with peroxidase conjugated to the secondary antibody. Under optimal conditions, troponin T immunosensor was evaluated in serum samples, which showed a broad linear range (0.02 to 0.32 ng mL−1) and a low limit of detection, 0.016 ng mL−1. This amino platform can be properly used as clinical tool for cardiac troponin T detection in the acute myocardial infarction diagnosis. PMID:25133185

  6. A comparative serial echocardiographic analysis of cardiac structure and function in rats subjected to pressure or volume overload.

    PubMed

    Cantor, Elliott J F; Babick, Andrea P; Vasanji, Zainisha; Dhalla, Naranjan S; Netticadan, Thomas

    2005-05-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of death that is reaching epidemic proportions. It is a clinical syndrome attributable to a multitude of factors that begins with a compensatory response known as hypertrophy, followed by a decompensatory response that eventually results in failure. Heart failure can be triggered when the heart is subjected to extended periods of pathological pressure overload (PO) or volume overload (VO). To date there have been no comparative serial echocardiographic studies outlining the progression of hypertrophy in PO versus VO rats. We hypothesized that PO or VO would induce differential cardiac remodeling leading to contractile dysfunction with subsequent heart failure. To address this hypothesis we used echocardiography to study the serial progression of heart structure and function in rat models of both PO- and VO-induced hypertrophy. PO or VO were induced by performing abdominal aortic banding or aortocaval shunt procedures, respectively, while cardiac structure and function were assessed in both models by M-mode and Doppler echocardiography at key time intervals. PO rats showed progressive wall thickening consistent with concentric hypertrophy, while VO rats showed marked left ventricular dilatation consistent with eccentric hypertrophy. Systolic dysfunction occurred early in VO compared to PO. Diastolic dysfunction was evident in PO, while VO showed signs of enhanced diastolic function. PO and VO induced differential changes in cardiac structure and function during the progression of compensated hypertrophy to decompensated heart failure.

  7. Residential Proximity to Major Roadways Is Not Associated with Cardiac Function in African Americans: Results from the Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Anne M.; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Wu, Wen-Chih; Hickson, DeMarc A.; Kamalesh, Masoor; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), including heart failure, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly among African Americans. Exposure to ambient air pollution, such as that produced by vehicular traffic, is believed to be associated with heart failure, possibly by impairing cardiac function. We evaluated the cross-sectional association between residential proximity to major roads, a marker of long-term exposure to traffic-related pollution, and echocardiographic indicators of left and pulmonary vascular function in African Americans enrolled in the Jackson Heart Study (JHS): left ventricular ejection fraction, E-wave velocity, isovolumic relaxation time, left atrial diameter index, and pulmonary artery systolic pressure. We examined these associations using multivariable linear or logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. Of 4866 participants at study enrollment, 106 lived <150 m, 159 lived 150–299 m, 1161 lived 300–999 m, and 3440 lived ≥1000 m from a major roadway. We did not observe any associations between residential distance to major roads and these markers of cardiac function. Results were similar with additional adjustment for diabetes and hypertension, when considering varying definitions of major roadways, or when limiting analyses to those free from cardiovascular disease at baseline. Overall, we observed little evidence that residential proximity to major roads was associated with cardiac function among African Americans. PMID:27304962

  8. Effects of injectable anesthetic combinations on left ventricular function and cardiac morphology in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Carla F; O'Sullivan, M Lynne; Valcour, James E; Sears, William; Johnson, Ron J

    2013-01-01

    Novel anesthetic agents or combinations may provide superior general anesthesia for echocardiography in rodents with the potential for reduced adverse effects. This study sought to characterize the effects of 3 injectable anesthetics on left ventricular (LV) systolic function and cardiac morphology in healthy male and female rats. Rats underwent echocardiographic assessment after general anesthesia via pentobarbital or combinations of ketamine and medetomidine (KME) and ketamine and midazolam (KMI) according to a crossover Latin-square design. Blood samples for serum estradiol measurements were obtained from all females after echocardiography with each anesthetic. Rats given KMI showed superior LV systolic function with the highest values for fractional shortening (FS), ejection fraction (EF) and stroke volume, whereas heart rate was greatest with pentobarbital, followed by KMI and then KME. KME produced the greatest effects on cardiac morphology, most notably during systole, including reduced septal and posterior wall thickness and increased LV chamber dimensions and volumes. In addition, KME had the greatest cardiac-depressing effects on LV systolic function, including reduced FS, EF, and heart rate values. Compared with male rats, female rats had superior LV function with greater EF and FS values, whereas male rats showed higher heart rate. Significant negative correlations were noted between serum estradiol levels and FS and EF values in female rats receiving KME. We conclude that the combination of KMI may be a superior anesthetic for use in male and female rats undergoing echocardiography.

  9. Intramyocardial Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Seeded Hydrogel Preserves Cardiac Function and Attenuates Ventricular Remodeling after Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Eva; Lamirault, Guillaume; Toquet, Claire; Lhommet, Pierre; Rederstorff, Emilie; Sourice, Sophie; Biteau, Kevin; Hulin, Philippe; Forest, Virginie; Weiss, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Background To improve the efficacy of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy targeted to infarcted myocardium, we investigated whether a self-setting silanized hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (Si-HPMC) hydrogel seeded with MSC (MSC+hydrogel) could preserve cardiac function and attenuate left ventricular (LV) remodeling during an 8-week follow-up study in a rat model of myocardial infarction (MI). Methodology/Principal Finding Si-HPMC hydrogel alone, MSC alone or MSC+hydrogel were injected into the myocardium immediately after coronary artery ligation in female Lewis rats. Animals in the MSC+hydrogel group showed an increase in cardiac function up to 28 days after MI and a mid-term prevention of cardiac function alteration at day 56. Histological analyses indicated that the injection of MSC+hydrogel induced a decrease in MI size and an increase in scar thickness and ultimately limited the transmural extent of MI. These findings show that intramyocardial injection of MSC+hydrogel induced short-term recovery of ventricular function and mid-term attenuation of remodeling after MI. Conclusion/Significance These beneficial effects may be related to the specific scaffolding properties of the Si-HPMC hydrogel that may provide the ability to support MSC injection and engraftment within myocardium. PMID:23284842

  10. Implications for Cardiac Function Following Rescue of the Dystrophic Diaphragm in a Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Betts, Corinne A; Saleh, Amer F; Carr, Carolyn A; Muses, Sofia; Wells, Kim E; Hammond, Suzan M; Godfrey, Caroline; McClorey, Graham; Woffindale, Caroline; Clarke, Kieran; Wells, Dominic J; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew J A

    2015-06-26

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by absence of the integral structural protein, dystrophin, which renders muscle fibres susceptible to injury and degeneration. This ultimately results in cardiorespiratory dysfunction, which is the predominant cause of death in DMD patients, and highlights the importance of therapeutic targeting of the cardiorespiratory system. While there is some evidence to suggest that restoring dystrophin in the diaphragm improves both respiratory and cardiac function, the role of the diaphragm is not well understood. Here using exon skipping oligonucleotides we predominantly restored dystrophin in the diaphragm and assessed cardiac function by MRI. This approach reduced diaphragmatic pathophysiology and markedly improved diaphragm function but did not improve cardiac function or pathophysiology, with or without exercise. Interestingly, exercise resulted in a reduction of dystrophin protein and exon skipping in the diaphragm. This suggests that treatment regimens may require modification in more active patients. In conclusion, whilst the diaphragm is an important respiratory muscle, it is likely that dystrophin needs to be restored in other tissues, including multiple accessory respiratory muscles, and of course the heart itself for appropriate therapeutic outcomes. This supports the requirement of a body-wide therapy to treat DMD.

  11. Effect of mediastinal irradiation on cardiac function of patients treated during childhood and adolescence for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.M.; Gingell, R.L.; Pearce, J.; Panahon, A.M.; Ghoorah, J.

    1987-02-01

    To determine the frequency of cardiac dysfunction in patients treated during childhood or adolescence with mediastinal irradiation for Hodgkin's disease (HD), 28 patients underwent cardiac evaluation 19 to 182 months (median, 90 months) after the completion of radiation therapy. No patient had symptoms of cardiac disease. All were normotensive. All patients had a normal cardiothoracic ratio. There were no abnormalities of voltage or rhythm in the ECGs. The left ventricular end diastolic volume was increased in 19.2% of patients, none of whom had evidence of impaired left ventricular function. The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was increased in 15.3% of patients. No patient had a decreased LVEF. Pericardial thickening was demonstrated on echocardiograms from 12 of 28 patients (42.9%). Thickening was more frequent among those patients observed for 72 or more months (47.1%; eight of 17) than among those with shorter periods of follow-up (36.4%; four of 11). This study demonstrates that cardiac dysfunction is an infrequent sequela of mediastinal irradiation following treatment using an equally weighted, anterio