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Sample records for affects cerebral cytochrome

  1. Responsiveness of cerebral and hepatic cytochrome P450s in rat offspring prenatally exposed to lindane

    SciTech Connect

    Johri, Ashu; Yadav, Sanjay; Dhawan, Alok; Parmar, Devendra

    2008-08-15

    ABSTRACT: Prenatal exposure to low doses of lindane has been shown to affect the ontogeny of xenobiotic metabolizing cytochrome P450s (CYPs), involved in the metabolism and neurobehavioral toxicity of lindane. Attempts were made in the present study to investigate the responsiveness of CYPs in offspring prenatally exposed to lindane (0.25 mg/kg b. wt.; 1/350th of LD{sub 50}; p. o. to mother) when challenged with 3-methylcholanthrene (MC) or phenobarbital (PB), inducers of CYP1A and 2B families or a sub-convulsant dose of lindane (30 mg/kg b. wt., p. o.) later in life. Prenatal exposure to lindane was found to produce an increase in the mRNA and protein expression of CYP1A1, 1A2, 2B1, 2B2 isoforms in brain and liver of the offspring at postnatal day 50. The increased expression of the CYPs in the offspring suggests the sensitivity of the CYPs during postnatal development, possibly, to low levels of lindane, which may partition into mother's milk. A higher increase in expression of CYP1A and 2B isoenzymes and their catalytic activity was observed in animals pretreated prenatally with lindane and challenged with MC (30 mg/kg, i. p. x 5 days) or PB (80 mg/kg, i. p. x 5 days) when young at age (approx. 7 weeks) compared to animals exposed to MC or PB alone. Further, challenge of the control and prenatally exposed offspring with a single sub-convulsant dose of lindane resulted in an earlier onset and increased incidence of convulsions in the offspring prenatally exposed to lindane have demonstrated sensitivity of the CYPs in the prenatally exposed offspring. Our data assume significance as the subtle changes in the expression profiles of hepatic and cerebral CYPs in rat offspring during postnatal development could modify the adult response to a later exposure to xenobiotics.

  2. Coexistence of translocated cytochrome c and nitrated protein in neurons of the rat cerebral cortex after oxygen and glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Alonso, D; Encinas, J M; Uttenthal, L O; Boscá, L; Serrano, J; Fernández, A P; Castro-Blanco, S; Santacana, M; Bentura, M L; Richart, A; Fernández-Vizarra, P; Rodrigo, J

    2002-01-01

    Changes in the distribution of immunoreactive cytochrome c and protein nitration were studied in the rat cerebral cortex after oxygen and glucose deprivation by bright field, confocal and electron microscopy. In control cerebral cortex, nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity indicating protein nitration was found mostly in the neuronal nuclear region, with only a small amount distributed in the cytosol, whereas cytochrome c immunoreactivity was found at the inner membrane and in the intermembrane space of the mitochondria. During the recovery phase after oxygen and glucose deprivation, cytochrome c immunoreactivity was released from the intermembrane space of swollen mitochondria into the surrounding cytosol. The cytosol now also displayed nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity, which had diminished in the nuclear region. Both immunoreactivities were dispersed throughout the soma and processes of the cortical neurons. These changes were largely prevented by the administration of cyclosporin A, which inhibits both the mitochondrial permeability transition and the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase while blocking the induction of the inducible isoform. Ischemia/reperfusion injury increases the production of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species and intracellular factors that damage the mitochondria and liberate apoptotic factors. We suggest that translocation of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol, which has been shown to precede the mitochondrial permeability transition, could result from peroxynitrite-mediated nitration. This phenomenon is attenuated by cyclosporin A administration, suggesting a neuroprotective role for this agent.

  3. Interrelationship Between Broadband NIRS Measurements of Cerebral Cytochrome C Oxidase and Systemic Changes Indicates Injury Severity in Neonatal Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Bale, Gemma; Mitra, Subhabrata; de Roever, Isabel; Chan, Marcus; Caicedo-Dorado, Alexander; Meek, Judith; Robertson, Nicola; Tachtsidis, Ilias

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) is associated with severe neurodevelopmental problems and mortality. There is a clinical need for techniques to provide cotside assessment of the injury extent. This study aims to use non-invasive cerebral broadband near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in combination with systemic physiology to assess the severity of HIE injury. Broadband NIRS is used to measure the changes in haemodynamics, oxygenation and the oxidation state of cytochrome c oxidase (oxCCO). We used canonical correlation analysis (CCA), a multivariate statistical technique, to measure the relationship between cerebral broadband NIRS measurements and systemic physiology. A strong relationship between the metabolic marker, oxCCO, and systemic changes indicated severe brain injury; if more than 60 % of the oxCCO signal could be explained by the systemic variations, then the neurodevelopmental outcome was poor. This boundary has high sensitivity and specificity (100 and 83 %, respectively). Broadband NIRS measured concentration changes of the oxidation state of cytochrome c oxidase has the potential to become a useful cotside tool for assessment of injury severity following hypoxic ischaemic brain injury. PMID:27526141

  4. Cytochrome c551 and the cytochrome c maturation pathway affect virulence gene expression in Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579.

    PubMed

    Han, Hesong; Sullivan, Thomas; Wilson, Adam C

    2015-02-01

    Loss of the cytochrome c maturation system in Bacillus cereus results in increased transcription of the major enterotoxin genes nhe, hbl, and cytK and the virulence regulator plcR. Increased virulence factor production occurs at 37°C under aerobic conditions, similar to previous findings in Bacillus anthracis. Unlike B. anthracis, much of the increased virulence gene expression can be attributed to loss of only c551, one of the two small c-type cytochromes. Additional virulence factor expression occurs with loss of resBC, encoding cytochrome c maturation proteins, independently of the presence of the c-type cytochrome genes. Hemolytic activity of strains missing either cccB or resBC is increased relative to that in the parental strain, while sporulation efficiency is unaffected in the mutants. Increased virulence gene expression in the ΔcccB and ΔresBC mutants occurs only in the presence of an intact plcR gene, indicating that this process is PlcR dependent. These findings suggest a new mode of regulation of B. cereus virulence and reveal intriguing similarities and differences in virulence regulation between B. cereus and B. anthracis.

  5. Imprinting of cerebral and hepatic cytochrome p450s in rat offsprings exposed prenatally to low doses of cypermethrin.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anshuman; Yadav, Sanjay; Srivastava, Vikas; Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, Dhirendra; Sethumadhavan, Rao; Parmar, Devendra

    2013-08-01

    Oral administration of low doses (1.25 or 2.5 or 5 mg/kg) corresponding to 1/200th or 1/100th or 1/50th of LD50 of cypermethrin, a synthetic type II pyrethroid, to pregnant Wistar rats from gestation day 5 to 21 produced a dose-dependent increase in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A-, 2B- and 2E1 in the brain and liver of offsprings postnatally at 3 weeks that persisted up to 12 weeks. This persistent increase in CYPs was associated with alterations in circulating concentrations of testosterone, luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone, spontaneous locomotor activity and accumulation of cypermethrin in the brain of exposed offsprings. Rechallenge of exposed offsprings at adulthood (12 weeks old) with cypermethrin (p.o., 10 mg/kg × 6 days) led to a much higher increase in the expression of CYPs in the exposed offsprings when compared to the control offsprings treated with cypermethrin. Further, bioinformatic analysis demonstrating absence of specific short interspersed elements in CYPs suggests that persistence in the increase in CYPs in exposed offsprings could be attributed to the imprinting of the cerebral and hepatic CYPs following prenatal exposure to low doses of cypermethrin. This imprinting could be of toxicological relevance as it may modify the response of drugs or environmental exposures in exposed offsprings particularly for those chemicals which require CYP-mediated metabolism to produce their beneficial or toxic effects. PMID:23447098

  6. Cytochrome c oxidase response to changes in cerebral oxygen delivery in the adult brain shows higher brain-specificity than haemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Kolyva, Christina; Ghosh, Arnab; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Highton, David; Cooper, Chris E; Smith, Martin; Elwell, Clare E

    2014-01-15

    The redox state of cerebral mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy (Δ[oxCCO]) is a signal with strong potential as a non-invasive, bedside biomarker of cerebral metabolic status. We hypothesised that the higher mitochondrial density of brain compared to skin and skull would lead to evidence of brain-specificity of the Δ[oxCCO] signal when measured with a multi-distance near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system. Measurements of Δ[oxCCO] as well as of concentration changes in oxygenated (Δ[HbO2]) and deoxygenated haemoglobin (Δ[HHb]) were taken at multiple source-detector distances during systemic hypoxia and hypocapnia (decrease in cerebral oxygen delivery), and hyperoxia and hypercapnia (increase in cerebral oxygen delivery) from 15 adult healthy volunteers. Increasing source-detector spacing is associated with increasing light penetration depth and thus higher sensitivity to cerebral changes. An increase in Δ[oxCCO] was observed during the challenges that increased cerebral oxygen delivery and the opposite was observed when cerebral oxygen delivery decreased. A consistent pattern of statistically significant increasing amplitude of the Δ[oxCCO] response with increasing light penetration depth was observed in all four challenges, a behaviour that was distinctly different from that of the haemoglobin chromophores, which did not show this statistically significant depth gradient. This depth-dependence of the Δ[oxCCO] signal corroborates the notion of higher concentrations of CCO being present in cerebral tissue compared to extracranial components and highlights the value of NIRS-derived Δ[oxCCO] as a brain-specific signal of cerebral metabolism, superior in this aspect to haemoglobin. PMID:23707584

  7. Cytochrome c oxidase response to changes in cerebral oxygen delivery in the adult brain shows higher brain-specificity than haemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Kolyva, Christina; Ghosh, Arnab; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Highton, David; Cooper, Chris E; Smith, Martin; Elwell, Clare E

    2014-01-15

    The redox state of cerebral mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy (Δ[oxCCO]) is a signal with strong potential as a non-invasive, bedside biomarker of cerebral metabolic status. We hypothesised that the higher mitochondrial density of brain compared to skin and skull would lead to evidence of brain-specificity of the Δ[oxCCO] signal when measured with a multi-distance near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system. Measurements of Δ[oxCCO] as well as of concentration changes in oxygenated (Δ[HbO2]) and deoxygenated haemoglobin (Δ[HHb]) were taken at multiple source-detector distances during systemic hypoxia and hypocapnia (decrease in cerebral oxygen delivery), and hyperoxia and hypercapnia (increase in cerebral oxygen delivery) from 15 adult healthy volunteers. Increasing source-detector spacing is associated with increasing light penetration depth and thus higher sensitivity to cerebral changes. An increase in Δ[oxCCO] was observed during the challenges that increased cerebral oxygen delivery and the opposite was observed when cerebral oxygen delivery decreased. A consistent pattern of statistically significant increasing amplitude of the Δ[oxCCO] response with increasing light penetration depth was observed in all four challenges, a behaviour that was distinctly different from that of the haemoglobin chromophores, which did not show this statistically significant depth gradient. This depth-dependence of the Δ[oxCCO] signal corroborates the notion of higher concentrations of CCO being present in cerebral tissue compared to extracranial components and highlights the value of NIRS-derived Δ[oxCCO] as a brain-specific signal of cerebral metabolism, superior in this aspect to haemoglobin.

  8. Dynamic touch is affected in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Ocarino, Juliana M; Fonseca, Sergio T; Silva, Paula L P; Gonçalves, Gabriela G P; Souza, Thales R; Mancini, Marisa C

    2014-02-01

    Children with developmental disorders such as cerebral palsy have limited opportunities for effortful interactions with objects and tools. The goal of the study was to investigate whether children with cerebral palsy have deficits in their ability to perceive object length by dynamic touch when compared to typically developing children. Fourteen children with typical development and 12 children with cerebral palsy were asked to report the length of hand-held rods after wielding them out of sight. Multilevel regression models indicated that I1 (maximum principal moment of inertia) was a significant predictor of perceived length - LP (p<.0001). The effect of I1 on LP was significantly different among children (p=.001) and the presence of cerebral palsy (group factor) partially explained such variance (p=.002). In addition, accuracy and reliability of the length judgments made by children with cerebral palsy were significantly lower than the typically developing children (p<.05). Theoretical and clinical implications of these results were identified and discussed.

  9. Cytochrome P450 and matrix metalloproteinase genetic modifiers of disease severity in Cerebral Cavernous Malformation type 1

    PubMed Central

    Choquet, Hélène; Trapani, Eliana; Goitre, Luca; Trabalzini, Lorenza; Akers, Amy; Fontanella, Marco; Hart, Blaine L.; Morrison, Leslie A.; Pawlikowska, Ludmila; Kim, Helen; Retta, Saverio Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Background Familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformation type 1 (CCM1) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in the Krev Interaction Trapped 1 (KRIT1/CCM1) gene, and characterized by multiple brain lesions. CCM lesions manifest across a range of different phenotypes, including wide differences in lesion number, size and susceptibility to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Oxidative stress plays an important role in cerebrovascular disease pathogenesis, raising the possibility that inter-individual variability in genes related to oxidative stress may contribute to the phenotypic differences observed in CCM1 disease. Here, we investigated whether candidate oxidative stress-related cytochrome P450 (CYP) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) genetic markers grouped by superfamilies, families or genes, or analyzed individually influence the severity of CCM1 disease. Methods Clinical assessment and cerebral susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (SWI) were performed to determine total and large (≥5 mm in diameter) lesion counts as well as ICH in 188 Hispanic CCM1 patients harboring the founder KRIT1/CCM1 ‘common Hispanic mutation’ (CCM1–CHM). Samples were genotyped on the Affymetrix Axiom Genome-Wide LAT1 Human Array. We analyzed 1,122 genetic markers (both single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion/deletions) grouped by CYP and MMP superfamily, family or gene for association with total or large lesion count and ICH adjusted for age at enrollment and gender. Genetic markers bearing the associations were then analyzed individually. Results The CYP superfamily showed a trend toward association with total lesion count (P=0.057) and large lesion count (P=0.088) in contrast to the MMP superfamily. The CYP4 and CYP8 families were associated with either large lesion count or total lesion count (P=0.014), and two other families (CYP46 and the MMP Stromelysins) were associated with ICH (P=0.011 and 0.007, respectively). CYP4F12 rs11085971, CYP8A

  10. Apaf-1, Bcl-xL, cytochrome c, and caspase-9 form the critical elements for cerebral vascular protection by erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Chong, Zhao Zhong; Kang, Jing-Qiong; Maiese, Kenneth

    2003-03-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) plays a prominent role in the regulation of the hematopoietic system, but the potential function of this trophic factor as a cytoprotectant in the cerebral vascular system is not known. The authors examined the ability of EPO to modulate a series of death-related cellular pathways during free radical-induced injury in cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (ECs). Endothelial cell injury was evaluated by trypan blue, DNA fragmentation, membrane phosphatidylserine exposure, apoptotic protease-activating factor-1 (Apaf-1), and Bcl-XL expression, mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release, and cysteine protease activity. They show that constitutive EPO is present in ECs but is insufficient to prevent cellular injury. Signaling through the EPO receptor, however, remains biologically responsive to exogenous EPO administration to offer significant protection against nitric oxide-induced injury. Exogenous EPO maintains both genomic DNA integrity and cellular membrane asymmetry through parallel pathways that prevent the induction of Apaf-1 and preserve mitochondrial membrane potential in conjunction with enhanced Bcl-XL expression. Consistent with the modulation of Apaf-1 and the release of cytochrome c, EPO also inhibits the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3-like activities. Identification of novel cytoprotective pathways used by EPO may serve as therapeutic targets for cerebral vascular disease.

  11. Cytochrome P450 differences in normal and imposex-affected female whelk Buccinum undatum from the open North Sea.

    PubMed

    Santos, M M; ten Hallers-Tjabbes, C C; Vieira, N; Boon, J P; Porte, C

    2002-01-01

    Normal and imposex-affected female Buccinum undatum were sampled from the open North Sea at three locations, one with low, and two with high shipping densities. Cytochrome P450 components and P450 aromatase activity were determined in the microsomal fractions isolated from pooled digestive gland/gonads. Cytochrome P450 aromatase activity was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in normal females collected in the low shipping density area (1,325 +/- 295 fmol/h/mg protein) than levels from imposex animals from a high shipping density area (620 +/- 287 fmol/h/mg protein). A negative correlation was found between aromatase activity and organotin body burden (r = -0.99). Levels of CYP450, cytochrome b5 and NADPH cytochrome c reductase activity did not show differences among groups. This is the first field evidence of depressed aromatase activity in imposex affected females, although additional research under laboratory controlled conditions is required to fully understand the mechanisms underlying the development of imposex in this species.

  12. Factors affecting daily activities of patients with cerebral infarction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Zhou, Cheng-ye; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yun-feng; Zou, Chang-lin

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke is the leading cause of death and long-term disability. This study was undertaken to investigate the factors influencing daily activities of patients with cerebral infarction so as to take interventional measures earlier to improve their daily activities. METHODS: A total of 149 patients with first-episode cerebral infarction were recruited into this prospective study. They were admitted to the Encephalopathy Center, Department of Neurology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College in Zhejiang Province from August 2008 to December 2008. The baseline characteristics of the patients and cerebral infarction risk factors on the first day of admission were recorded. White blood cell (WBC) count, plasma glucose (PG), and many others of laboratory targets were collected in the next morning. Barthel index (BI) was calculated at 2 weeks and 3 months respectively after onset of the disease at the outpatient clinic or by telephone call. Lung infection, urinary tract infection and atrial fibrillation if any were recorded on admission. The National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores and the GCS scores were recorded within 24 hours on and after admission, at the second week, and at the third month after the onset of cerebral infarction respectively. RESULTS: The factors of BI at 2 weeks and 3 months after onset were the initial PG level, WBC count and initial NIHSS scores. Besides, urinary tract infection on admission was also the factor for BI at 3 months. CONCLUSION: Active measures should be taken to control these factors to improve the daily activities of patients with cerebral infarction. PMID:25214953

  13. Overexpression of cerebral and hepatic cytochrome P450s alters behavioral activity of rat offspring following prenatal exposure to lindane

    SciTech Connect

    Johri, Ashu; Yadav, Sanjay; Dhawan, Alok; Parmar, Devendra

    2007-12-15

    Oral administration of different doses (0.0625, 0.125 or 0.25 mg/kg corresponding to 1/1400th, 1/700th or 1/350th of LD{sub 50}) of lindane to the pregnant Wistar rats from gestation days 5 to 21 were found to produce a dose-dependent increase in the activity of cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), 7-pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (PROD) and N-nitrosodimethylamine demethylase (NDMA-d) in brain and liver of offspring postnatally at 3 weeks. The increase in the activity of CYP monooxygenases was found to be associated with the increase in the mRNA and protein expression of xenobiotic metabolizing CYP1A, 2B and 2E1 isoenzymes in the brain and liver of offspring. Dose-dependent alterations in the parameters of spontaneous locomotor activity in the offspring postnatally at 3 weeks have suggested that increase in CYP activity may possibly lead to the formation of metabolites to the levels that may be sufficient to alter the behavioral activity of the offspring. Interestingly, the inductive effect on cerebral and hepatic CYPs was found to persist postnatally up to 6 weeks in the offspring at the relatively higher doses (0.125 and 0.25 mg/kg) of lindane and up to 9 weeks at the highest dose (0.25 mg/kg), though the magnitude of induction was less than that observed at 3 weeks. Alterations in the parameters of spontaneous locomotor activity in the offspring postnatally at 6 and 9 weeks, though significant only in the offspring at 3 and 6-week of age, have further indicated that due to the reduced activity of the CYPs during the ontogeny, lindane and its metabolites may not be effectively cleared from the brain. The data suggest that low dose prenatal exposure to the pesticide has the potential to produce overexpression of xenobiotic metabolizing CYPs in brain and liver of the offspring which may account for the behavioral changes observed in the offspring.

  14. Effect of chronic stress on behavior and cerebral oxidative metabolism in rats with high or low positive affect.

    PubMed

    Mällo, T; Matrov, D; Kõiv, K; Harro, J

    2009-12-15

    The 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) in rats have been associated with positive affect and rewarding experience. We have previously reported that stable inter-individual differences exist in the expression of these USVs (chirps). We have examined the effect of four weeks of chronic variable stress on cerebral oxidative metabolism, and depression and anxiety related behavior in male and female high (HC) and low (LC) chirping rats. Significant differences in regional oxidative metabolic activity as measured by cytochrome c oxidase (COX) histochemistry were found between male and female rats: Females had lower oxidative metabolism in several brainstem areas such as dorsal and median raphe and pontine nucleus, some cortical areas, and reward-related forebrain regions such as striatum and nucleus accumbens, but higher oxidative metabolism in amygdala and related limbic regions. Chronic stress increased oxidative metabolism in several depression-related brain regions in male but not female LC-rats such as amygdala, hippocampus and anterior thalamus. No systematic behavioral effect of stress was evident in females. In LC males, stress elicited increased levels of 22-kHz USVs, earlier and more stable reduction of weight gain, persistently lower sucrose intake and preference, and higher levels of immobility in the forced swimming test. These behavioral changes, accompanied by increased oxidative metabolism in limbic brain regions, indicate greater vulnerability to stress of male LC-rats, and suggest that in males low inherent positive affectivity predisposes to anxiety and affective disorders.

  15. Does Intellectual Disability Affect the Development of Dental Caries in Patients with Cerebral Palsy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreira, Rafaela Nogueira; Alcantara, Carlos Eduardo Pinto; Mota-Veloso, Isabella; Marinho, Sandra Aparecida; Ramos-Jorge, Maria L.; Oliveira-Ferreira, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if the severity of intellectual disability is a factor that affects the development of dental cavities in patients with cerebral palsy. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 165 individuals who were selected from a physical rehabilitation center, a special public school and a regular public school. Of…

  16. Effectiveness of Adaptive Pretend Play on Affective Expression and Imagination of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Hsieh-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) have difficulty participating in role-pretending activities. The concept of adaptive play makes play accessible by modifying play materials for different needs or treatment goals for children with CP. This study examines the affective expressions and imagination in children with CP as a function of…

  17. Metallothionein 2A affects the cell respiration by suppressing the expression of mitochondrial protein cytochrome c oxidase subunit II.

    PubMed

    Bragina, Olga; Gurjanova, Karina; Krishtal, Jekaterina; Kulp, Maria; Karro, Niina; Tõugu, Vello; Palumaa, Peep

    2015-06-01

    Metallothioneins (MT) are involved in a broad range of cellular processes and play a major role in protection of cells towards various stressors. Two functions of MTs, namely the maintaining of the homeostasis of transition metal ions and the redox balance, are directly linked to the functioning of mitochondria. Dyshomeostasis of MTs is often related with malfunctioning of mitochondria; however, the mechanism by which MTs affect the mitochondrial respiratory chain is still unknown. We demonstrated that overexpression of MT-2A in HEK cell line decreased the oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the cells. HEK cells overexpressing MT-2A demonstrated reduced oxygen consumption and lower cellular ATP levels. MT-2A did not affect the number of mitochondria, but reduced specifically the level of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II protein, which resulted in lower activity of the complex IV.

  18. Development affects in vitro vascular tone and calcium sensitivity in ovine cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Geary, Greg G; Osol, George J; Longo, Lawrence D

    2004-01-01

    We have shown recently that development from neonatal to adult life affects cerebrovascular tone of mouse cerebral arteries through endothelium-derived vasodilatory mechanisms. The current study tested the hypothesis that development from fetal to adult life affects cerebral artery vascular smooth muscle (VSM) [Ca2+]i sensitivity and tone through a mechanism partially dependent upon endothelium-dependent signalling. In pressurized resistance sized cerebral arteries (∼150 μm) from preterm (95 ± 2 days gestation (95 d)) and near-term (140 ± 2 days gestation (140 d)) fetuses, and non-pregnant adults, we measured vascular diameter (μm) and [Ca2+]i (nm) as a function of intravascular pressure. We repeated these studies in the presence of inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS; with l-NAME), cyclo-oxygenase (COX; with indomethacin) and endothelium removal (E–). Cerebrovasculature tone (E+) was greater in arteries from 95 d fetuses and adults compared to 140 d sheep. Ca2+ sensitivity was similar in 95 d fetuses and adults, but much lower in 140 d fetuses. Removal of endothelium resulted in a reduction in lumen diameter as a function of pressure (greater tone) in all treatment groups. [Ca2+]i sensitivity differences among groups were magnified after E–. NOS inhibition decreased diameter as a function of pressure in each age group, with a significant increase in [Ca2+]i to pressure ratio only in the 140 d fetuses. Indomethacin increased tone and increased [Ca2+]i in the 140 d fetuses, but not the other age groups. Development from near-term to adulthood uncovered an interaction between NOS- and COX-sensitive substances that functioned to modulate artery diameter but not [Ca2+]i. This study suggests that development is associated with significant alterations in cerebral vascular smooth muscle (VSM), endothelium, NOS and COX responses to intravascular pressure. We speculate that these changes have important implications in the regulation of cerebral blood flow in

  19. Significant proteins affecting cerebral vasospasm using complementary ICPMS and MALDI-MS.

    PubMed

    Easter, Renee N; Barry, Colin G; Pyne-Geithman, Gail; Caruso, Joseph A

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CV) following subarachnoid hemorrhagic stroke affects more than one million people each year. The etiology and prevention of CV is currently of great interest to researchers in various fields of medical science. More recently, the idea that selenium could be playing a major role in the onset of cerebral vasospasm has come into the spotlight. This study focused on using newly established metallomics techniques in order to explore the proteome associated with CV and if selenium might affect the discovered proteins. Size exclusion chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, along with LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF were both essential in determining protein identifications in three different sample types; a control (normal, healthy patient, CSF control), SAH stroke patients (no vasospasm, CSF C) and SAH CV patients (CSF V). The results of this study, although preliminary, indicate the current methods are applicable and warrant further application to these clinically important targets.

  20. Neither respiration nor cytochrome c oxidase affects mitochondrial morphology in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Church, C; Poyton, R O

    1998-06-01

    Previous studies have reported that mitochondrial morphology and volume in yeast cells are linked to cellular respiratory capacity. These studies revealed that mitochondrial morphology in glucose-repressed or anaerobically grown cells, which lack or have reduced levels of respiration, is different from that in fully respiring cells. Although both oxygen deprivation and glucose repression decrease the levels of respiratory chain proteins, they decrease the expression of many non-mitochondrial proteins as well, making it difficult to determine whether it is a defect in respiration or something else that effects mitochondrial morphology. To determine whether mitochondrial morphology is dependent on respiration per se, we used a strain with a null mutation in PET100, a nuclear gene that is specifically required for the assembly of cytochrome c oxidase. Although this strain lacks respiration, the mitochondrial morphology and volumes are both comparable to those found in its respiration-proficient parent. These findings indicate that respiration is not involved in the establishment or maintenance of yeast mitochondrial morphology, and that the previously observed effects of oxygen availability and glucose repression on mitochondrial morphology are not exerted through the respiratory chain. By applying the principle of symmorphosis to these findings, we conclude that the shape and size of the mitochondrial reticulum found in respiring yeast cells is maintained for reasons other than respiration.

  1. Does light scattering affect the OCT quantitation of redox state of cytochrome oxidase in bone tissue?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiangqun; Wang, Ruikang K.; El Haj, Alicia

    2002-06-01

    In our previous report, we have presented the possibility of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to monitor the redox state of mitochondria enzyme Cytochrome oxidase (CytOx) in bone tissue. The previous results showed that reduction of the enzyme in periosteal tissue leads to a change in attenuation coefficient of 1.68 +/- 0.67mm-1 by OCT measurements. The new results from cultured cells fixed in 300 (mu) l agarose plug showed the difference in attenuation coefficient is 0.26+-0.10 mm-1 (n = 9) for 7x106 astrocytoma cells and 0.28+-0.13 mm-1 (n = 7) for 20x106 astrocytoma cells in agarose plug, respectively between cells with oxidised and reduced enzyme at 820nm. A decrease in attenuation coefficient of 0.35+-0.09 mm-1 (n = 4) for 10 million SKMES cells in agarose was also observed with the redox shift of CytOx. The absorption coefficient of the oxidized-reduced form of CytOx is measured approximately 8.4+-1.5x10-3/mm (n=3) and 8.2+-1.0x10-3/mm (n=3) at 820nm for astrocytoma cells and rat periosteum respectively by means of a biochemical assay. Thereby it can be seen that the change in attenuation coefficient of cultured cells with redox shift of CytOx mainly results from the scattering change.

  2. Disruption of a hydrogen bond network in human versus spider monkey cytochrome c affects heme crevice stability.

    PubMed

    Goldes, Matthew E; Jeakins-Cooley, Margaret E; McClelland, Levi J; Mou, Tung-Chung; Bowler, Bruce E

    2016-05-01

    The hypothesis that the recent rapid evolution of primate cytochromes c, which primarily involves residues in the least stable Ω-loop (Ω-loop C, residues 40-57), stabilizes the heme crevice of cytochrome c relative to other mammals, is tested. To accomplish this goal, we have compared the properties of human and spider monkey cytochrome c and a set of four variants produced in the process of converting human cytochrome c into spider monkey cytochrome c. The global stability of all variants has been measured by guanidine hydrochloride denaturation. The stability of the heme crevice has been assessed with the alkaline conformational transition. Structural insight into the effects of the five amino acid substitutions needed to convert human cytochrome c into spider monkey cytochrome c is provided by a 1.15Å resolution structure of spider monkey cytochrome c. The global stability for all variants is near 9.0kcal/mol at 25°C and pH7, which is higher than that observed for other mammalian cytochromes c. The heme crevice stability is more sensitive to the substitutions required to produce spider monkey cytochrome c with decreases of up to 0.5 units in the apparent pKa of the alkaline conformational transition relative to human cytochrome c. The structure of spider monkey cytochrome c indicates that the Y46F substitution destabilizes the heme crevice by disrupting an extensive hydrogen bond network that connects three surface loops including Ω-loop D (residues 70-85), which contains the Met80 heme ligand.

  3. Motor, cognitive, and affective areas of the cerebral cortex influence the adrenal medulla

    PubMed Central

    Dum, Richard P.; Levinthal, David J.; Strick, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Modern medicine has generally viewed the concept of “psychosomatic” disease with suspicion. This view arose partly because no neural networks were known for the mind, conceptually associated with the cerebral cortex, to influence autonomic and endocrine systems that control internal organs. Here, we used transneuronal transport of rabies virus to identify the areas of the primate cerebral cortex that communicate through multisynaptic connections with a major sympathetic effector, the adrenal medulla. We demonstrate that two broad networks in the cerebral cortex have access to the adrenal medulla. The larger network includes all of the cortical motor areas in the frontal lobe and portions of somatosensory cortex. A major component of this network originates from the supplementary motor area and the cingulate motor areas on the medial wall of the hemisphere. These cortical areas are involved in all aspects of skeletomotor control from response selection to motor preparation and movement execution. The second, smaller network originates in regions of medial prefrontal cortex, including a major contribution from pregenual and subgenual regions of anterior cingulate cortex. These cortical areas are involved in higher-order aspects of cognition and affect. These results indicate that specific multisynaptic circuits exist to link movement, cognition, and affect to the function of the adrenal medulla. This circuitry may mediate the effects of internal states like chronic stress and depression on organ function and, thus, provide a concrete neural substrate for some psychosomatic illness. PMID:27528671

  4. Motor, cognitive, and affective areas of the cerebral cortex influence the adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Dum, Richard P; Levinthal, David J; Strick, Peter L

    2016-08-30

    Modern medicine has generally viewed the concept of "psychosomatic" disease with suspicion. This view arose partly because no neural networks were known for the mind, conceptually associated with the cerebral cortex, to influence autonomic and endocrine systems that control internal organs. Here, we used transneuronal transport of rabies virus to identify the areas of the primate cerebral cortex that communicate through multisynaptic connections with a major sympathetic effector, the adrenal medulla. We demonstrate that two broad networks in the cerebral cortex have access to the adrenal medulla. The larger network includes all of the cortical motor areas in the frontal lobe and portions of somatosensory cortex. A major component of this network originates from the supplementary motor area and the cingulate motor areas on the medial wall of the hemisphere. These cortical areas are involved in all aspects of skeletomotor control from response selection to motor preparation and movement execution. The second, smaller network originates in regions of medial prefrontal cortex, including a major contribution from pregenual and subgenual regions of anterior cingulate cortex. These cortical areas are involved in higher-order aspects of cognition and affect. These results indicate that specific multisynaptic circuits exist to link movement, cognition, and affect to the function of the adrenal medulla. This circuitry may mediate the effects of internal states like chronic stress and depression on organ function and, thus, provide a concrete neural substrate for some psychosomatic illness. PMID:27528671

  5. A new broadband near-infrared spectroscopy system for in-vivo measurements of cerebral cytochrome-c-oxidase changes in neonatal brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Gemma; Mitra, Subhabrata; Meek, Judith; Robertson, Nicola; Tachtsidis, Ilias

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel lens-based broadband near-infrared spectroscopy system to simultaneously measure cerebral changes in tissue oxygenation and haemodynamics via estimation of the changes in haemoglobin concentration; in addition to oxygen utilization via the measurement of the oxidation state of cytochrome-c-oxidase (CCO). We demonstrate the use of the system in a cohort of 6 newborn infants with neonatal encephalopathy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit for continuous measurement periods of up to 5 days. NIRS data was collected from above the frontal lobe on the left and right hemispheres simultaneously with systemic data to allow multimodal data analysis. This allowed us to study the NIRS variables in response to global pathophysiological events and we focused our analysis to spontaneous oxygen desaturations. We identified changes from the NIRS variables during 236 oxygen desaturations from over 212 hours of data with a change from the baseline to nadir of −12 ± 3%. There was a consistent negative change in the Δ[HbD] (= oxygenated – deoxygenated haemoglobin) and Δ[oxCCO] measurements, mean decreases were 3.0 ± 1.7μM and 0.22 ± 0.11μM, and a positive change in the Δ[HbT] (= oxygenated + deoxygenated haemoglobin) measurements across all subjects, mean increase was 0.85 ± 0.58μM. We have shown with a feasibility study that the relationship between haemoglobin oxygenation changes and CCO oxidation changes during these desaturation events was significantly associated with a magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)-measured biomarker of injury severity (r = 0.91, p<0.01). PMID:25360364

  6. How measurement artifacts affect cerebral autoregulation outcomes: A technical note on transfer function analysis.

    PubMed

    Meel-van den Abeelen, Aisha S S; de Jong, Daan L K; Lagro, Joep; Panerai, Ronney B; Claassen, Jurgen A H R

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral autoregulation (CA) is the mechanism that aims to maintain adequate cerebral perfusion during changes in blood pressure (BP). Transfer function analysis (TFA), the most reported method in literature to quantify CA, shows large between-study variability in outcomes. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of measurement artifacts in this variation. Specifically, the role of distortion in the BP and/or CBFV measurementon TFA outcomes was investigated. The influence of three types of artifacts on TFA outcomes was studied: loss of signal, motion artifacts, and baseline drifts. TFA metrics of signals without the simulated artifacts were compared with those of signals with artifacts. TFA outcomes scattered highly when more than 10% of BP signal or over 8% of the CBFV signal was lost, or when measurements contained one or more artifacts resulting from head movement. Furthermore, baseline drift affected interpretation of TFA outcomes when the power in the BP signal was 5 times the power in the LF band. In conclusion, loss of signal in BP and loss in CBFV, affects interpretation of TFA outcomes. Therefore, it is vital to validate signal quality to the defined standards before interpreting TFA outcomes. PMID:26935320

  7. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  8. Altered Cerebral Perfusion in Executive, Affective, and Motor Networks During Adolescent Depression

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tiffany C.; Wu, Jing; Shin, David D.; Liu, Thomas T.; Tapert, Susan F.; Yang, Guang; Connolly, Colm G.; Frank, Guido K.W.; Max, Jeffrey E.; Wolkowitz, Owen; Eisendrath, Stuart; Hoeft, Fumiko; Banerjee, Dipavo; Hood, Korey; Hendren, Robert L.; Paulus, Martin P.; Simmons, Alan N.; Yang, Tony T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective While substantial literature has reported regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) abnormalities in adults with depression, these studies commonly necessitated the injection of radioisotopes into subjects. The recent development of arterial spin labeling (ASL), however, allows for noninvasive measurements of rCBF. Currently, no published ASL studies have examined cerebral perfusion in adolescents with depression. Thus, the aim of the present study was to examine baseline cerebral perfusion in adolescent depression using a newly developed ASL technique: pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL). Method 25 medication-naive adolescents (ages 13–17 years) diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 26 well-matched controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging. Baseline rCBF was measured via a novel PCASL method that optimizes tagging efficiency. Results Voxel-based whole brain analyses revealed significant frontal, limbic, paralimbic, and cingulate hypoperfusion in the group with depression (p<0.05, corrected). Hyperperfusion was also observed within the subcallosal cingulate, putamen, and fusiform gyrus (p<0.05, corrected). Similarly, region-of-interest analyses revealed amygdalar and insular hypoperfusion in the group with depression, as well as hyperperfusion in the putamen and superior insula (p<0.05, corrected). Conclusions Adolescents with depression and healthy adolescents appear to differ on rCBF in executive, affective, and motor networks. Dysfunction in these regions may contribute to the cognitive, emotional, and psychomotor symptoms commonly present in adolescent depression. These findings point to possible biomarkers for adolescent depression that could inform early interventions and treatments and establishes a methodology for using PCASL to noninvasively measure rCBF in clinical and healthy adolescent populations. PMID:24074474

  9. Cerebral White Matter Lesions and Affective Episodes Correlate in Male Individuals with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Birner, Armin; Seiler, Stephan; Lackner, Nina; Bengesser, Susanne A.; Queissner, Robert; Fellendorf, Frederike T.; Platzer, Martina; Ropele, Stefan; Enzinger, Christian; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Mangge, Harald; Pirpamer, Lukas; Deutschmann, Hannes; McIntyre, Roger S.; Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter; Reininghaus, Bernd; Reininghaus, Eva Z.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cerebral white matter lesions (WML) have been found in normal aging, vascular disease and several neuropsychiatric conditions. Correlations of WML with clinical parameters in BD have been described, but not with the number of affective episodes, illness duration, age of onset and Body Mass Index in a well characterized group of euthymic bipolar adults. Herein, we aimed to evaluate the associations between bipolar course of illness parameters and WML measured with volumetric analysis. Methods In a cross-sectional study 100 euthymic individuals with BD as well as 54 healthy controls (HC) were enrolled to undergo brain magnetic resonance imaging using 3T including a FLAIR sequence for volumetric assessment of WML-load using FSL-software. Additionally, clinical characteristics and psychometric measures including Structured Clinical Interview according to DSM-IV, Hamilton-Depression, Young Mania Rating Scale and Beck’s Depression Inventory were evaluated. Results Individuals with BD had significantly more (F = 3.968, p < .05) WML (Mdn = 3710mm3; IQR = 2961mm3) than HC (Mdn = 2185mm3; IQR = 1665mm3). BD men (Mdn = 4095mm3; IQR = 3295mm3) and BD women (Mdn = 3032mm3; IQR = 2816mm3) did not significantly differ as to the WML-load or the number and type of risk factors for WML. However, in men only, the number of manic/hypomanic episodes (r = 0.72; p < .001) as well as depressive episodes (r = 0.51; p < .001) correlated positively with WML-load. Conclusions WML-load strongly correlated with the number of manic episodes in male BD patients, suggesting that men might be more vulnerable to mania in the context of cerebral white matter changes. PMID:26252714

  10. Reduced short term adaptation to robot generated dynamic environment in children affected by Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is known that healthy adults can quickly adapt to a novel dynamic environment, generated by a robotic manipulandum as a structured disturbing force field. We suggest that it may be of clinical interest to evaluate to which extent this kind of motor learning capability is impaired in children affected by cerebal palsy. Methods We adapted the protocol already used with adults, which employs a velocity dependant viscous field, and compared the performance of a group of subjects affected by Cerebral Palsy (CP group, 7 subjects) with a Control group of unimpaired age-matched children. The protocol included a familiarization phase (FA), during which no force was applied, a force field adaptation phase (CF), and a wash-out phase (WO) in which the field was removed. During the CF phase the field was shut down in a number of randomly selected "catch" trials, which were used in order to evaluate the "learning index" for each single subject and the two groups. Lateral deviation, speed and acceleration peaks and average speed were evaluated for each trajectory; a directional analysis was performed in order to inspect the role of the limb's inertial anisotropy in the different experimental phases. Results During the FA phase the movements of the CP subjects were more curved, displaying greater and variable directional error; over the course of the CF phase both groups showed a decreasing trend in the lateral error and an after-effect at the beginning of the wash-out, but the CP group had a non significant adaptation rate and a lower learning index, suggesting that CP subjects have reduced ability to learn to compensate external force. Moreover, a directional analysis of trajectories confirms that the control group is able to better predict the force field by tuning the kinematic features of the movements along different directions in order to account for the inertial anisotropy of arm. Conclusions Spatial abnormalities in children affected by cerebral palsy may be

  11. Cytochrome P4503A activity affects the gender difference in the development of steroid-induced osteonecrosis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Motomura, Goro; Yamaguchi, Ryosuke; Zhao, Garida; Iwasaki, Kenyu; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate cytochrome P4503A activity and its correlation with the development of osternecrosis (ON) among male and female steroid-treated rabbits. Forty adult rabbits (male, n = 20; female, n = 20) were injected once with 20 mg/kg of methylprednisolone intramuscularly. Haematologically, cytochrome P4503A activity was measured by plasma 1'-hydroxymidazolam-to-midazolam (1'-OH-MDZ/MDZ) ratio just before and 48 h after the steroid injection. We also measured the levels of oestradiol every week. Both femora and humeri were histopathologically examined for the presence of ON. Fifteen of 20 male rabbits (75%) developed ON, while 6 of 20 female rabbits (30%) did so. There was a significant difference in the rate of incidence of ON between male and female rabbits (P = 0.010). The 1'-OH-MDZ/MDZ ratio in female rabbits just before, as well as 48 h after the steroid injection was significantly higher than that in male rabbits (P = 0.039 and P = 0.001 respectively). In addition, 1'-OH-MDZ/MDZ ratio in female rabbits significantly increased in 48 h after the steroid injection (P = 0.044), while that in male rabbits did not so (P = 0.978). The levels of oestradiol in female rabbits were significantly higher than those in male rabbits during the experimental period (P = 0.008). In conclusion, this study indicates that the gender difference in cytochrome P4503A activity may be one of the important factors for the development of steroid-induced ON, possibly due to the effects of oestradiol.

  12. Subtle Change in the Charge Distribution of Surface Residues May Affect the Secondary Functions of Cytochrome c*

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Simanta Sarani; Sil, Pallabi; Haldar, Shubhasis; Mitra, Samaresh; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2015-01-01

    Although the primary function of cytochrome c (cyt c) is electron transfer, the protein caries out an additional secondary function involving its interaction with membrane cardiolipin (CDL), its peroxidase activity, and the initiation of apoptosis. Whereas the primary function of cyt c is essentially conserved, its secondary function varies depending on the source of the protein. We report here a detailed experimental and computational study, which aims to understand, at the molecular level, the difference in the secondary functions of cyt c obtained from horse heart (mammalian) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast). The conformational landscape of cyt c has been found to be heterogeneous, consisting of an equilibrium between the compact and extended conformers as well as the oligomeric species. Because the determination of relative populations of these conformers is difficult to obtain by ensemble measurements, we used fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a method that offers single-molecule resolution. The population of different species is found to depend on multiple factors, including the protein source, the presence of CDL and urea, and their concentrations. The complex interplay between the conformational distribution and oligomerization plays a crucial role in the variation of the pre-apoptotic regulation of cyt c observed from different sources. Finally, computational studies reveal that the variation in the charge distribution at the surface and the charge reversal sites may be the key determinant of the conformational stability of cyt c. PMID:25873393

  13. Does Surgical Management of the Hand in Children with Spastic Unilateral Cerebral Palsy Affect Functional Outcome?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Munster, Judith C.; Maathuis, Karel G. B.; Haga, Nienke; Verheij, Nienke P.; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this review was to examine the literature on the effects of surgery of the spastic hand in children with cerebral palsy on functional outcome and muscle coordination. We performed a search of the relevant literature in Medline, Embase, and Biological Abstracts from 1966 to June 2006. The search resulted in eight studies on the effect of…

  14. Imagery use and affective responses during exercise: an examination of cerebral hemodynamics using near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tempest, Gavin; Parfitt, Gaynor

    2013-10-01

    Imagery, as a cognitive strategy, can improve affective responses during moderate-intensity exercise. The effects of imagery at higher intensities of exercise have not been examined. Further, the effect of imagery use and activity in the frontal cortex during exercise is unknown. Using a crossover design (imagery and control), activity of the frontal cortex (reflected by changes in cerebral hemodynamics using near-infrared spectroscopy) and affective responses were measured during exercise at intensities 5% above the ventilatory threshold (VT) and the respiratory compensation point (RCP). Results indicated that imagery use influenced activity of the frontal cortex and was associated with a more positive affective response at intensities above VT, but not RCP to exhaustion (p < .05). These findings provide direct neurophysiological evidence of imagery use and activity in the frontal cortex during exercise at intensities above VT that positively impact affective responses. PMID:24197718

  15. Imagery use and affective responses during exercise: an examination of cerebral hemodynamics using near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tempest, Gavin; Parfitt, Gaynor

    2013-10-01

    Imagery, as a cognitive strategy, can improve affective responses during moderate-intensity exercise. The effects of imagery at higher intensities of exercise have not been examined. Further, the effect of imagery use and activity in the frontal cortex during exercise is unknown. Using a crossover design (imagery and control), activity of the frontal cortex (reflected by changes in cerebral hemodynamics using near-infrared spectroscopy) and affective responses were measured during exercise at intensities 5% above the ventilatory threshold (VT) and the respiratory compensation point (RCP). Results indicated that imagery use influenced activity of the frontal cortex and was associated with a more positive affective response at intensities above VT, but not RCP to exhaustion (p < .05). These findings provide direct neurophysiological evidence of imagery use and activity in the frontal cortex during exercise at intensities above VT that positively impact affective responses.

  16. Do GSM 900MHz signals affect cerebral blood circulation? A near-infrared spectrophotometry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Martin; Haensse, Daniel; Morren, Geert; Froehlich, Juerg

    2006-06-01

    Effects of GSM 900MHz signals (EMF) typical for a handheld mobile phone on the cerebral blood circulation were investigated using near-infrared spectrophotometry (NIRS) in a three armed (12W/kg, 1.2W/kg, sham), double blind, randomized crossover trial in 16 healthy volunteers. During exposure we observed borderline significant short term responses of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentration, which correspond to a decrease of cerebral blood flow and volume and were smaller than regular physiological changes. Due to the relatively high number of statistical tests, these responses may be spurious and require further studies. There was no detectable dose-response relation or long term response within 20min. The detection limit was a fraction of the regular physiological changes elicited by functional activation. Compared to previous studies using PET, NIRS provides a much higher time resolution, which allowed investigating the short term effects efficiently, noninvasively, without the use of radioactive tracers and with high sensitivity.

  17. Use of an optical technique to evaluate the cerebral vascular effects of alcohol (A): Effects on deoxyhemoglobin (DH) and levels of reduced cytochrome oxidase (rCO)

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, R.L.; Gebiewold, A.; Altura, B.M. )

    1992-02-26

    The dose-response effects of acute A infusion were studied to examine the suggestion that A can induce stroke-like events as a consequence of cerebral vasospasm. By employing a single sending and receiving fiber, an optical backscatter measurement was employed to monitor the levels in DH and rCO in a closed cranium preparation. Anesthetized rats were prepared by cannulating a branch of the internal carotid artery and subjected to either a bolus infusion (BI) or to a constant infusion (CI) of 5 or 10% A at various rates. Results showed that low BI doses of A typically produced a slight increase in the oxyhemoglobin signal indicating that vasodilation had probably occurred. Higher BI doses, however, produced a prompt and significant reduction in the hemoglobin signal with a rise in rCO suggesting a vasoconstrictor response leading to ischemia, followed by recovery within 3-5 min. CI of A produced a similar cerebral vascular response, in a dose-related manner, but of a more sustained nature. At 30-50% of the BI dose levels, a global blanching of the brain surface occurred; rCO levels increased by 50-90% with a corresponding decline in levels of oxyhemoglobin. Control experiments using identical volumes/flow rates of Ringers solution failed to produce any alterations in the optical spectrum. Overall, these data indicate that, depending on dose, (a) A can induce vasodilatory or vasoconstrictor effects in the intact brain; (b) the more pronounced effects involve vasospasm in the cortical microcirculation leading to global ischemia as determined by elevated levels of rCO and DH; (c) optical measurements permit direct noninvasive assessment of the cerebral vascular effects of substances of abuse.

  18. Cerebral palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... with pain and spasticity Place feeding tubes Release joint contractures ... the hip joint Injuries from falls Pressure sores Joint ... of the people who are affected by cerebral palsy) Social stigma

  19. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of disorders that affect a ... ability to move and maintain balance and posture. CP is the most common motor disability in childhood. ...

  20. Expression of TaCYP78A3, a gene encoding cytochrome P450 CYP78A3 protein in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), affects seed size.

    PubMed

    Ma, Meng; Wang, Qian; Li, Zhanjie; Cheng, Huihui; Li, Zhaojie; Liu, Xiangli; Song, Weining; Appels, Rudi; Zhao, Huixian

    2015-07-01

    Several studies have described quantitative trait loci (QTL) for seed size in wheat, but the relevant genes and molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we report the functional characterization of the wheat TaCYP78A3 gene and its effect on seed size. TaCYP78A3 encoded wheat cytochrome P450 CYP78A3, and was specifically expressed in wheat reproductive organs. TaCYP78A3 activity was positively correlated with the final seed size. Its silencing caused a reduction of cell number in the seed coat, resulting in an 11% decrease in wheat seed size, whereas TaCYP78A3 over-expression induced production of more cells in the seed coat, leading to an 11-48% increase in Arabidopsis seed size. In addition, the cell number in the final seed coat was determined by the TaCYP78A3 expression level, which affected the extent of integument cell proliferation in the developing ovule and seed. Unfortunately, TaCYP78A3 over-expression in Arabidopsis caused a reduced seed set due to an ovule developmental defect. Moreover, TaCYP78A3 over-expression affected embryo development by promoting embryo integument cell proliferation during seed development, which also ultimately affected the final seed size in Arabidopsis. In summary, our results indicated that TaCYP78A3 plays critical roles in influencing seed size by affecting the extent of integument cell proliferation. The present study provides direct evidence that TaCYP78A3 affects seed size in wheat, and contributes to an understanding of the cellular basis of the gene influencing seed development.

  1. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome in a patient affected of spontaneous frontoparietal subdural haematoma.

    PubMed

    Cerdá-Esteve, Mariaina; Badia, Mariona; Trujillano, Javier; Vilanova, Cecília; Maravall, Javier; Mauricio, Dídac

    2009-01-01

    Ever since cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSW) was first described in 1950, there have been debates over its existence and whether it has an important place in the differential diagnosis of hyponatraemia. We report the case of a neurosurgical patient with sustained hyponatraemia and abnormally high sodium loss in the urine, with signs of fluid volume depletion. Hyponatraemia was not corrected after an intravenous infusion of saline solution. Stable concentrations of blood sodium above 130 mmol/l were achieved with the administration of 100 mg of hydrocortisone daily, with an ensuing reduction in sodium elimination through the urine.

  2. Children with cerebral palsy and periventricular white matter injury: does gestational age affect functional outcome?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Adrienne R; Randall, Melinda; Reid, Susan M; Lee, Katherine J; Imms, Christine; Rodda, Jillian; Eldridge, Beverley; Orsini, Francesca; Reddihough, Dinah

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to determine differences in functional profiles and movement disorder patterns in children aged 4-12 years with cerebral palsy (CP) and periventricular white matter injury (PWMI) born >34 weeks gestation compared with those born earlier. Eligible children born between 1999 and 2006 were recruited through the Victorian CP register. Functional profiles were determined using the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), Manual Abilities Classification System (MACS), Communication Function Classification System (CFCS), Functional Mobility Scale (FMS) and Bimanual Fine Motor Function (BFMF). Movement disorder and topography were classified using the Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe (SCPE) classification. 49 children born >34 weeks (65% males, mean age 8 y 9 mo [standard deviation (SD) 2 y 2 mo]) and 60 children born ≤ 34 weeks (62% males, mean age 8 y 2 mo [SD 2 y 2 mo]) were recruited. There was evidence of differences between the groups for the GMFCS (p=0.003), FMS 5, 50 and 500 (p=0.003, 0.002 and 0.012), MACS (p=0.04) and CFCS (p=0.035), with a greater number of children born ≤ 34 weeks more severely impaired compared with children born later. Children with CP and PWMI born >34 weeks gestation had milder limitations in gross motor function, mobility, manual ability and communication compared with those born earlier.

  3. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Graham, H Kerr; Rosenbaum, Peter; Paneth, Nigel; Dan, Bernard; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Damiano, Diane L; Becher, Jules G; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Colver, Allan; Reddihough, Dinah S; Crompton, Kylie E; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-01-07

    Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of childhood-onset, lifelong physical disability in most countries, affecting about 1 in 500 neonates with an estimated prevalence of 17 million people worldwide. Cerebral palsy is not a disease entity in the traditional sense but a clinical description of children who share features of a non-progressive brain injury or lesion acquired during the antenatal, perinatal or early postnatal period. The clinical manifestations of cerebral palsy vary greatly in the type of movement disorder, the degree of functional ability and limitation and the affected parts of the body. There is currently no cure, but progress is being made in both the prevention and the amelioration of the brain injury. For example, administration of magnesium sulfate during premature labour and cooling of high-risk infants can reduce the rate and severity of cerebral palsy. Although the disorder affects individuals throughout their lifetime, most cerebral palsy research efforts and management strategies currently focus on the needs of children. Clinical management of children with cerebral palsy is directed towards maximizing function and participation in activities and minimizing the effects of the factors that can make the condition worse, such as epilepsy, feeding challenges, hip dislocation and scoliosis. These management strategies include enhancing neurological function during early development; managing medical co-morbidities, weakness and hypertonia; using rehabilitation technologies to enhance motor function; and preventing secondary musculoskeletal problems. Meeting the needs of people with cerebral palsy in resource-poor settings is particularly challenging.

  4. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Graham, H Kerr; Rosenbaum, Peter; Paneth, Nigel; Dan, Bernard; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Damiano, Diane L; Becher, Jules G; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Colver, Allan; Reddihough, Dinah S; Crompton, Kylie E; Lieber, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of childhood-onset, lifelong physical disability in most countries, affecting about 1 in 500 neonates with an estimated prevalence of 17 million people worldwide. Cerebral palsy is not a disease entity in the traditional sense but a clinical description of children who share features of a non-progressive brain injury or lesion acquired during the antenatal, perinatal or early postnatal period. The clinical manifestations of cerebral palsy vary greatly in the type of movement disorder, the degree of functional ability and limitation and the affected parts of the body. There is currently no cure, but progress is being made in both the prevention and the amelioration of the brain injury. For example, administration of magnesium sulfate during premature labour and cooling of high-risk infants can reduce the rate and severity of cerebral palsy. Although the disorder affects individuals throughout their lifetime, most cerebral palsy research efforts and management strategies currently focus on the needs of children. Clinical management of children with cerebral palsy is directed towards maximizing function and participation in activities and minimizing the effects of the factors that can make the condition worse, such as epilepsy, feeding challenges, hip dislocation and scoliosis. These management strategies include enhancing neurological function during early development; managing medical co-morbidities, weakness and hypertonia; using rehabilitation technologies to enhance motor function; and preventing secondary musculoskeletal problems. Meeting the needs of people with cerebral palsy in resource-poor settings is particularly challenging. PMID:27188686

  5. Effect of prenatal exposure of lindane on alterations in the expression of cerebral cytochrome P450s and neurotransmitter receptors in brain regions.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shikha; Singh, Anshuman; Shukla, Rajendra K; Khanna, Vinay K; Parmar, Devendra

    2015-03-01

    Prenatal exposure to low doses (0.0625- or 0.125- or 0.25 mg/kg b. wt., orally) of lindane, an organochlorine insecticide, from gestation day (GD) 5-21 was found to produce a dose-dependent increase in the mRNA expression of cytochrome P450s (CYPs) and associated transcription factors in frontal cortex, cerebellum and corpus striatum isolated from the offsprings. Though the increase in the expression persisted up to postnatal day 60, the increase was significant at postnatal days 21-, and 45- in the offsprings exposed prenatally to relatively higher doses (0.125- or 0.25 mg/kg) of lindane and even up to postnatal day 60 in the offsprings exposed prenatally to the highest dose of lindane. A similar increase in the expression of dopamine D2, 5HT2A and GABAA receptors and associated neurotransmitter receptor binding was observed in the brain regions of the exposed offsprings. Scatchard analysis also suggested an increase in the levels of these neurotransmitter receptors in offsprings prenatally exposed to lindane. The data indicating similarities in the alterations of neurotransmitter receptors and CYPs in brain regions in prenatally exposed offsprings have suggested that neurotransmission processes and CYPs are closely linked that will eventually help in understanding the developmental neurotoxicity of lindane. PMID:25572523

  6. Autoantibodies against Cytochrome P450 Side-Chain Cleavage Enzyme in Dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) Affected with Hypoadrenocorticism (Addison's Disease).

    PubMed

    Boag, Alisdair M; Christie, Michael R; McLaughlin, Kerry A; Syme, Harriet M; Graham, Peter; Catchpole, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Canine hypoadrenocorticism likely arises from immune-mediated destruction of adrenocortical tissue, leading to glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid deficiency. In humans with autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) or autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS), circulating autoantibodies have been demonstrated against enzymes associated with adrenal steroid synthesis. The current study investigates autoantibodies against steroid synthesis enzymes in dogs with spontaneous hypoadrenocorticism. Coding regions of canine CYP21A2 (21-hydroxylase; 21-OH), CYP17A1 (17-hydroxylase; 17-OH), CYP11A1 (P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme; P450scc) and HSD3B2 (3β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase; 3βHSD) were amplified, cloned and expressed as 35S-methionine radiolabelled recombinant protein. In a pilot study, serum samples from 20 dogs with hypoadrenocorticism and four unaffected control dogs were screened by radio-immunoprecipitation assay. There was no evidence of reactivity against 21-OH, 17-OH or 3βHSD, but five dogs with hypoadrenocorticism showed immunoreactivity to P450scc compared with controls. Serum samples were subsequently obtained from 213 dogs diagnosed with hypoadrenocorticism and 110 dogs from a hospital control population. Thirty control dogs were randomly selected to establish a threshold for antibody positivity (mean + 3 × standard deviation). Dogs with hypoadrenocorticism were more likely to be P450scc autoantibody positive than hospital controls (24% vs. 1.2%, respectively; p = 0.0016). Sex was significantly associated with the presence of P450scc autoantibodies in the case population, with 30% of females testing positive compared with 17% of males (p = 0.037). Significant associations with breed (p = 0.015) and DLA-type (DQA1*006:01 allele; p = 0.017) were also found. This cross-sectional study indicates that P450scc autoantibodies are present in a proportion of dogs affected with hypoadrenocorticism.

  7. Autoantibodies against Cytochrome P450 Side-Chain Cleavage Enzyme in Dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) Affected with Hypoadrenocorticism (Addison's Disease).

    PubMed

    Boag, Alisdair M; Christie, Michael R; McLaughlin, Kerry A; Syme, Harriet M; Graham, Peter; Catchpole, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Canine hypoadrenocorticism likely arises from immune-mediated destruction of adrenocortical tissue, leading to glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid deficiency. In humans with autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) or autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS), circulating autoantibodies have been demonstrated against enzymes associated with adrenal steroid synthesis. The current study investigates autoantibodies against steroid synthesis enzymes in dogs with spontaneous hypoadrenocorticism. Coding regions of canine CYP21A2 (21-hydroxylase; 21-OH), CYP17A1 (17-hydroxylase; 17-OH), CYP11A1 (P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme; P450scc) and HSD3B2 (3β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase; 3βHSD) were amplified, cloned and expressed as 35S-methionine radiolabelled recombinant protein. In a pilot study, serum samples from 20 dogs with hypoadrenocorticism and four unaffected control dogs were screened by radio-immunoprecipitation assay. There was no evidence of reactivity against 21-OH, 17-OH or 3βHSD, but five dogs with hypoadrenocorticism showed immunoreactivity to P450scc compared with controls. Serum samples were subsequently obtained from 213 dogs diagnosed with hypoadrenocorticism and 110 dogs from a hospital control population. Thirty control dogs were randomly selected to establish a threshold for antibody positivity (mean + 3 × standard deviation). Dogs with hypoadrenocorticism were more likely to be P450scc autoantibody positive than hospital controls (24% vs. 1.2%, respectively; p = 0.0016). Sex was significantly associated with the presence of P450scc autoantibodies in the case population, with 30% of females testing positive compared with 17% of males (p = 0.037). Significant associations with breed (p = 0.015) and DLA-type (DQA1*006:01 allele; p = 0.017) were also found. This cross-sectional study indicates that P450scc autoantibodies are present in a proportion of dogs affected with hypoadrenocorticism. PMID:26618927

  8. Acute Physical Exercise Affects Cognitive Functioning in Children With Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Maltais, Désirée B; Gane, Claire; Dufour, Sophie-Krystale; Wyss, Dominik; Bouyer, Laurent J; McFadyen, Bradford J; Zabjek, Karl; Andrysek, Jan; Voisen, Julien I

    2016-05-01

    Little is known about the effects of acute exercise on the cognitive functioning of children with cerebral palsy (CP). Selected cognitive functions were thus measured using a pediatric version of the Stroop test before and after maximal, locomotor based aerobic exercise in 16 independently ambulatory children (8 children with CP), 6-15 years old. Intense exercise had: 1) a significant, large, positive effect on reaction time (RT) for the CP group (preexercise: 892 ± 56.5 ms vs. postexercise: 798 ± 45.6 ms, p < .002, d = 1.87) with a trend for a similar but smaller response for the typically developing (TD) group (preexercise: 855 ± 56.5 ms vs. postexercise: 822 ± 45.6 ms, p < .08, d = 0.59), and 2) a significant, medium, negative effect on the interference effect for the CP group (preexercise: 4.5 ± 2.5%RT vs. postexercise: 13 ± 2.9%RT, p < .04, d = 0.77) with no significant effect for the TD group (preexercise: 7.2 ± 2.5%RT vs. postexercise: 6.9 ± 2.9%RT, p > .4, d = 0.03). Response accuracy was high in both groups pre- and postexercise (>96%). In conclusion, intense exercise impacts cognitive functioning in children with CP, both by increasing processing speed and decreasing executive function. PMID:26502458

  9. Early life stress affects cerebral glucose metabolism in adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Parr, Lisa A; Boudreau, Matthew; Hecht, Erin; Winslow, James T; Nemeroff, Charles B; Sánchez, Mar M

    2012-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) is a risk factor for anxiety, mood disorders and alterations in stress responses. Less is known about the long-term neurobiological impact of ELS. We used [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG-PET) to assess neural responses to a moderate stress test in adult monkeys that experienced ELS as infants. Both groups of monkeys showed hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis stress-induced activations and cardiac arousal in response to the stressor. A whole brain analysis detected significantly greater regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCGM) in superior temporal sulcus, putamen, thalamus, and inferotemporal cortex of ELS animals compared to controls. Region of interest (ROI) analyses performed in areas identified as vulnerable to ELS showed greater activity in the orbitofrontal cortex of ELS compared to control monkeys, but greater hippocampal activity in the control compared to ELS monkeys. Together, these results suggest hyperactivity in emotional and sensory processing regions of adult monkeys with ELS, and greater activity in stress-regulatory areas in the controls. Despite these neural responses, no group differences were detected in neuroendocrine, autonomic or behavioral responses, except for a trend towards increased stillness in the ELS monkeys. Together, these data suggest hypervigilance in the ELS monkeys in the absence of immediate danger. PMID:22682736

  10. Variables that affect the middle cerebral artery peak systolic velocity in fetuses with anemia and intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Farhan; Drennan, Kathrin; Mari, Giancarlo

    2007-09-01

    We have previously reported that the fetal middle cerebral artery (MCA) peak systolic velocity (PSV) increases in anemic fetuses and in fetuses with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). We hypothesized that the pathophysiology for the increased MCA PSV is different in anemic and IUGR fetuses. Thus the aim of this study was to determine the factor(s) among fetal umbilical vein blood pH, Po2, Pco2, and hemoglobin that might affect the MCA PSV in fetuses with anemia and IUGR. This study included two groups of fetuses. The first group included fetuses at risk for anemia because of red cell alloimmunization, whereas the second group included IUGR fetuses. For both groups of fetuses, we determined hemoglobin, umbilical vein blood gases -- at cordocentesis in anemic fetuses and immediately after cesarean delivery in IUGR fetuses -- and MCA PSV before cordocentesis, or before delivery. The relationship between MCA PSV and the hemoglobin, Po2, Pco2, and pH values for the anemic and the IUGR fetuses were assessed by regression analysis using multiples of the mean. There were 14 fetuses in the first group and 22 fetuses in the second group. In the first group, the only parameter that was related to MCA PSV was the fetal hemoglobin (R2 = 0.34; p < 0.05); in fetuses with IUGR, the Pco2 (R2 = 0.36; p < 0.01) and the PO2 (R2 = 0.30; p < 0.01) correlated well with the MCA PSV, whereas no relationship was found between the MCA PSV and the hemoglobin. The data indicate that the mechanism of high MCA PSV is different in anemic and nonanemic IUGR fetuses, and suggest that the process of cerebral autoregulation is present in the preterm IUGR fetus.

  11. Do Sustained Lung Inflations during Neonatal Resuscitation Affect Cerebral Blood Volume in Preterm Infants? A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Schwaberger, Bernhard; Pichler, Gerhard; Avian, Alexander; Binder-Heschl, Corinna; Baik, Nariae; Urlesberger, Berndt

    2015-01-01

    Background Sustained lung inflations (SLI) during neonatal resuscitation may promote alveolar recruitment in preterm infants. While most of the studies focus on respiratory outcome, the impact of SLI on the brain hasn’t been investigated yet. Objective Do SLI affect cerebral blood volume (CBV) in preterm infants? Methods Preterm infants of gestation 28 weeks 0 days to 33 weeks 6 days with requirement for respiratory support (RS) were included in this randomized controlled pilot trial. Within the first 15 minutes after birth near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements using ‘NIRO-200-NX’ (Hamamatsu, Japan) were performed to evaluate changes in CBV and cerebral tissue oxygenation. Two groups were compared based on RS: In SLI group RS was given by applying 1–3 SLI (30 cmH2O for 15 s) continued by respiratory standard care. Control group received respiratory standard care only. Results 40 infants (20 in each group) with mean gestational age of 32 weeks one day (±2 days) and birth weight of 1707 (±470) g were included. In the control group ΔCBV was significantly decreasing, whereas in SLI group ΔCBV showed similar values during the whole period of 15 minutes. Comparing both groups within the first 15 minutes ΔCBV showed a tendency toward different overall courses (p = 0.051). Conclusion This is the first study demonstrating an impact of SLI on CBV. Further studies are warranted including reconfirmation of the present findings in infants with lower gestational age. Future investigations on SLI should not only focus on respiratory outcome but also on the consequences on the developing brain. Trial Registration German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00005161 https://drks-neu.uniklinik-freiburg.de/drks_web/setLocale_EN.do PMID:26406467

  12. Restricted Arm Swing Affects Gait Stability and Increased Walking Speed Alters Trunk Movements in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Delabastita, Tijs; Desloovere, Kaat; Meyns, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Observational research suggests that in children with cerebral palsy, the altered arm swing is linked to instability during walking. Therefore, the current study investigates whether children with cerebral palsy use their arms more than typically developing children, to enhance gait stability. Evidence also suggests an influence of walking speed on gait stability. Moreover, previous research highlighted a link between walking speed and arm swing. Hence, the experiment aimed to explore differences between typically developing children and children with cerebral palsy taking into account the combined influence of restricting arm swing and increasing walking speed on gait stability. Spatiotemporal gait characteristics, trunk movement parameters and margins of stability were obtained using three dimensional gait analysis to assess gait stability of 26 children with cerebral palsy and 24 typically developing children. Four walking conditions were evaluated: (i) free arm swing and preferred walking speed; (ii) restricted arm swing and preferred walking speed; (iii) free arm swing and high walking speed; and (iv) restricted arm swing and high walking speed. Double support time and trunk acceleration variability increased more when arm swing was restricted in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children and children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Trunk sway velocity increased more when walking speed was increased in children with unilateral cerebral palsy compared to children with bilateral cerebral palsy and typically developing children and in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. Trunk sway velocity increased more when both arm swing was restricted and walking speed was increased in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. It is proposed that facilitating arm swing during gait rehabilitation can improve gait stability and decrease trunk movements in

  13. Restricted Arm Swing Affects Gait Stability and Increased Walking Speed Alters Trunk Movements in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Delabastita, Tijs; Desloovere, Kaat; Meyns, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Observational research suggests that in children with cerebral palsy, the altered arm swing is linked to instability during walking. Therefore, the current study investigates whether children with cerebral palsy use their arms more than typically developing children, to enhance gait stability. Evidence also suggests an influence of walking speed on gait stability. Moreover, previous research highlighted a link between walking speed and arm swing. Hence, the experiment aimed to explore differences between typically developing children and children with cerebral palsy taking into account the combined influence of restricting arm swing and increasing walking speed on gait stability. Spatiotemporal gait characteristics, trunk movement parameters and margins of stability were obtained using three dimensional gait analysis to assess gait stability of 26 children with cerebral palsy and 24 typically developing children. Four walking conditions were evaluated: (i) free arm swing and preferred walking speed; (ii) restricted arm swing and preferred walking speed; (iii) free arm swing and high walking speed; and (iv) restricted arm swing and high walking speed. Double support time and trunk acceleration variability increased more when arm swing was restricted in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children and children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Trunk sway velocity increased more when walking speed was increased in children with unilateral cerebral palsy compared to children with bilateral cerebral palsy and typically developing children and in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. Trunk sway velocity increased more when both arm swing was restricted and walking speed was increased in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. It is proposed that facilitating arm swing during gait rehabilitation can improve gait stability and decrease trunk movements in

  14. Plantarflexor training affects propulsive force generation during gait in children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Misako; Higuchi, Yumi; Yonetsu, Ryo; Kitajima, Hiromi

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this preliminary study was to assess the trade-off relationship between the hip and ankle joints after plantarflexor training in children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP). [Subjects and Methods] Three boys aged 9, 10, and 13 years with spastic hemiplegic CP participated in the study. Gait analysis was performed using a three-dimensional motion analysis device and a floor reaction force detection device before and after plantarflexor training. Data on gait speed and stride length for both sides were collected. Peak hip and ankle powers in the sagittal plane and ankle-to-hip power ratio (A2/H3 ratio) were calculated. Plantarflexor training comprised heel raises and exercise band resistance at the participant's home (3 times/week for 12 weeks). [Results] The A2/H3 ratio increased significantly on both sides in two of three subjects after training. Peak A2 power increased significantly on both sides in subject 3 and on the affected side of subject 2. Peak H3 power decreased significantly on the non-affected side of subjects 1 and 2. [Conclusion] This study confirmed that two of three subjects demonstrated a trade-off relationship between the hip and ankle joints during gait after plantarflexor training.

  15. Cerebral Paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, I

    1975-01-01

    The first case of cerebral paragonimiasis was reported by Otani in Japan in 1887. This was nine years after Kerbert's discovery of the fluke in the lungs of Bengal tigers and seven years after a human pulmonary infection by the fluke was demonstrated by Baelz and Manson. The first case was a 26-year-old man who had been suffering from cough and hemosputum for one year. The patient developed convulsive seizures with subsequent coma and died. The postmortem examination showed cystic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobes. An adult fluke was found in the occipital lesion and another was seen in a gross specimen of normal brain tissue around the affected occipital lobe. Two years after Otani's discovery, at autopsy a 29-year-old man with a history of Jacksonian seizure was reported as having cerebral paragonimiasis. Some time later, however, it was confirmed that the case was actually cerebral schistosomiasis japonica. Subsequently, cases of cerebral paragonimiasis were reported. However, the majority of these cases were not confirmed histologically. It was pointed out that some of these early cases were probably not Paragonimus infection. After World War II, reviews as well as case reports were published. Recently, investigations have been reported from Korea, with a clinicla study on 62 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis seen at the Neurology Department of the National Medical Center, Seoul, between 1958 and 1964. In 1971 Higashi described a statistical study on 105 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis that had been treated surgically in Japan.

  16. Cerebral Paragonimiasis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, I

    1975-01-01

    The first case of cerebral paragonimiasis was reported by Otani in Japan in 1887. This was nine years after Kerbert's discovery of the fluke in the lungs of Bengal tigers and seven years after a human pulmonary infection by the fluke was demonstrated by Baelz and Manson. The first case was a 26-year-old man who had been suffering from cough and hemosputum for one year. The patient developed convulsive seizures with subsequent coma and died. The postmortem examination showed cystic lesions in the right frontal and occipital lobes. An adult fluke was found in the occipital lesion and another was seen in a gross specimen of normal brain tissue around the affected occipital lobe. Two years after Otani's discovery, at autopsy a 29-year-old man with a history of Jacksonian seizure was reported as having cerebral paragonimiasis. Some time later, however, it was confirmed that the case was actually cerebral schistosomiasis japonica. Subsequently, cases of cerebral paragonimiasis were reported. However, the majority of these cases were not confirmed histologically. It was pointed out that some of these early cases were probably not Paragonimus infection. After World War II, reviews as well as case reports were published. Recently, investigations have been reported from Korea, with a clinicla study on 62 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis seen at the Neurology Department of the National Medical Center, Seoul, between 1958 and 1964. In 1971 Higashi described a statistical study on 105 cases of cerebral paragonimiasis that had been treated surgically in Japan. PMID:1095292

  17. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  18. Dehydration affects cerebral blood flow but not its metabolic rate for oxygen during maximal exercise in trained humans.

    PubMed

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Stock, Christopher G; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Secher, Niels H; González-Alonso, José

    2014-07-15

    Intense exercise is associated with a reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), but regulation of CBF during strenuous exercise in the heat with dehydration is unclear. We assessed internal (ICA) and common carotid artery (CCA) haemodynamics (indicative of CBF and extra-cranial blood flow), middle cerebral artery velocity (MCA Vmean), arterial-venous differences and blood temperature in 10 trained males during incremental cycling to exhaustion in the heat (35°C) in control, dehydrated and rehydrated states. Dehydration reduced body mass (75.8 ± 3 vs. 78.2 ± 3 kg), increased internal temperature (38.3 ± 0.1 vs. 36.8 ± 0.1°C), impaired exercise capacity (269 ± 11 vs. 336 ± 14 W), and lowered ICA and MCA Vmean by 12-23% without compromising CCA blood flow. During euhydrated incremental exercise on a separate day, however, exercise capacity and ICA, MCA Vmean and CCA dynamics were preserved. The fast decline in cerebral perfusion with dehydration was accompanied by increased O2 extraction (P < 0.05), resulting in a maintained cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2). In all conditions, reductions in ICA and MCA Vmean were associated with declining cerebral vascular conductance, increasing jugular venous noradrenaline, and falling arterial carbon dioxide tension (P aCO 2) (R(2) ≥ 0.41, P ≤ 0.01) whereas CCA flow and conductance were related to elevated blood temperature. In conclusion, dehydration accelerated the decline in CBF by decreasing P aCO 2 and enhancing vasoconstrictor activity. However, the circulatory strain on the human brain during maximal exercise does not compromise CMRO2 because of compensatory increases in O2 extraction.

  19. Dehydration affects cerebral blood flow but not its metabolic rate for oxygen during maximal exercise in trained humans

    PubMed Central

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Stock, Christopher G; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Secher, Niels H; González-Alonso, José

    2014-01-01

    Intense exercise is associated with a reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), but regulation of CBF during strenuous exercise in the heat with dehydration is unclear. We assessed internal (ICA) and common carotid artery (CCA) haemodynamics (indicative of CBF and extra-cranial blood flow), middle cerebral artery velocity (MCA Vmean), arterial–venous differences and blood temperature in 10 trained males during incremental cycling to exhaustion in the heat (35°C) in control, dehydrated and rehydrated states. Dehydration reduced body mass (75.8 ± 3 vs. 78.2 ± 3 kg), increased internal temperature (38.3 ± 0.1 vs. 36.8 ± 0.1°C), impaired exercise capacity (269 ± 11 vs. 336 ± 14 W), and lowered ICA and MCA Vmean by 12–23% without compromising CCA blood flow. During euhydrated incremental exercise on a separate day, however, exercise capacity and ICA, MCA Vmean and CCA dynamics were preserved. The fast decline in cerebral perfusion with dehydration was accompanied by increased O2 extraction (P < 0.05), resulting in a maintained cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2). In all conditions, reductions in ICA and MCA Vmean were associated with declining cerebral vascular conductance, increasing jugular venous noradrenaline, and falling arterial carbon dioxide tension () (R2 ≥ 0.41, P ≤ 0.01) whereas CCA flow and conductance were related to elevated blood temperature. In conclusion, dehydration accelerated the decline in CBF by decreasing and enhancing vasoconstrictor activity. However, the circulatory strain on the human brain during maximal exercise does not compromise CMRO2 because of compensatory increases in O2 extraction. PMID:24835170

  20. Resting-state cerebellar-cerebral networks are differently affected in first-episode, drug-naive schizophrenia patients and unaffected siblings.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenbin; Liu, Feng; Chen, Jindong; Wu, Renrong; Zhang, Zhikun; Yu, Miaoyu; Xiao, Changqing; Zhao, Jingping

    2015-11-26

    Dysconnectivity hypothesis posits that schizophrenia is a disorder with dysconnectivity of the cortico-cerebellar-thalamic-cortical circuit (CCTCC). However, it remains unclear to the changes of the cerebral connectivity with the cerebellum in schizophrenia patients and unaffected siblings. Forty-nine patients with first-episode, drug-naive schizophrenia patients, 46 unaffected siblings of schizophrenia patients and 46 healthy controls participated in the study. Seed-based resting-state functional connectivity approach was employed to analyze the data. Compared with the controls, the patients and the siblings share increased default-mode network (DMN) seed - right Crus II connectivity. The patients have decreased right dorsal attention network (DAN) seed - bilateral cerebellum 4,5 connectivity relative to the controls. By contrast, the siblings exhibit increased FC between the right DAN seed and the right cerebellum 6 and right cerebellum 4,5 compared to the controls. No other abnormal connectivities (executive control network and salience network) are observed in the patients/siblings relative to the controls. There are no correlations between abnormal cerebellar-cerebral connectivities and clinical variables. Cerebellar-cerebral connectivity of brain networks within the cerebellum are differently affected in first-episode, drug-naive schizophrenia patients and unaffected siblings. Increased DMN connectivity with the cerebellum may serve as potential endophenotype for schizophrenia.

  1. Resting-state cerebellar-cerebral networks are differently affected in first-episode, drug-naive schizophrenia patients and unaffected siblings

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wenbin; Liu, Feng; Chen, Jindong; Wu, Renrong; Zhang, Zhikun; Yu, Miaoyu; Xiao, Changqing; Zhao, Jingping

    2015-01-01

    Dysconnectivity hypothesis posits that schizophrenia is a disorder with dysconnectivity of the cortico-cerebellar-thalamic-cortical circuit (CCTCC). However, it remains unclear to the changes of the cerebral connectivity with the cerebellum in schizophrenia patients and unaffected siblings. Forty-nine patients with first-episode, drug-naive schizophrenia patients, 46 unaffected siblings of schizophrenia patients and 46 healthy controls participated in the study. Seed-based resting-state functional connectivity approach was employed to analyze the data. Compared with the controls, the patients and the siblings share increased default-mode network (DMN) seed – right Crus II connectivity. The patients have decreased right dorsal attention network (DAN) seed – bilateral cerebellum 4,5 connectivity relative to the controls. By contrast, the siblings exhibit increased FC between the right DAN seed and the right cerebellum 6 and right cerebellum 4,5 compared to the controls. No other abnormal connectivities (executive control network and salience network) are observed in the patients/siblings relative to the controls. There are no correlations between abnormal cerebellar-cerebral connectivities and clinical variables. Cerebellar-cerebral connectivity of brain networks within the cerebellum are differently affected in first-episode, drug-naive schizophrenia patients and unaffected siblings. Increased DMN connectivity with the cerebellum may serve as potential endophenotype for schizophrenia. PMID:26608842

  2. Filaria martis Gmelin 1790 (Spirurida, Filariidae) affecting beech marten (Martes foina): morphological description and molecular characterisation of the cytochrome oxidase c subunit I.

    PubMed

    Otranto, Domenico; Lia, Riccardo Paolo; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Brianti, Emanuele; Traversa, Donato; Giannetto, Salvatore

    2007-09-01

    Filaria martis causes a poorly known subcutaneous filariosis in mustelids. Few information is available about lesions that F. martis causes in beech martens, on its morphology, biology and the occurrence of the infection. From 1997 to 2006, 29 beech martens from two sites of southern Italy (Sites A and B) have been necropsied. Ectoparasites and nematodes were collected and morphologically identified. A variable region of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) of F. martis has been characterised to compare females presenting caudal tips smooth without spines (i.e. Morphotype 1-Mrph. 1) and with spines (i.e. Mrph. 2). All ticks collected were identified as Haemaphysalis erinacei. Eleven animals from Site A were found infected by F. martis nematodes in subcutaneous tissue in both membranous capsules or free under the inner skin surface. The most important morphological characters of F. martis have been reported and discussed. The molecular analysis showed 100% homology among cox1 sequences from Mrph. 1 and 2 thus indicating that the shape of female posterior edge may vary among specimens of F. martis. The results here presented provide new insights into the biology, ecology and morphological characteristics of this scantly known nematode.

  3. Cerebral blood flow velocity in two patients with neonatal cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Nishimaki, S; Seki, K; Yokota, S

    2001-04-01

    Cerebral blood flow velocity was measured in the middle cerebral artery of two patients who exhibited unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction during the neonatal period. Doppler studies demonstrated increases in cerebral blood flow velocity but decreases in the resistance index on the affected side of the middle cerebral artery in the neonate who developed hemiplegia with cystic encephalomalacia, although the neonate with normal neurologic outcome exhibited symmetric cerebral blood flow velocity and resistance index. The asymmetry in cerebral blood flow velocity measurements of both middle cerebral arteries may be useful to evaluate the severity of brain damage and predict the neurodevelopmental prognosis of unilateral neonatal cerebral infarction. PMID:11377112

  4. Cerebral Hypoxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Hypoxia Information Page Synonym(s): Hypoxia, Anoxia Table of Contents ( ... Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Cerebral Hypoxia? Cerebral hypoxia refers to a condition in which ...

  5. Cerebral Hemispheric Lateralization Associated with Hippocampal Sclerosis May Affect Interictal Cardiovascular Autonomic Functions in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Ghchime, Rokia; Benjelloun, Halima; Kiai, Hajar; Belaidi, Halima; Lahjouji, Fatiha; Ouazzani, Reda

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is linked to the autonomic nervous system dysfunctions. Seizures alter the function of different systems such as the respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and urogenital systems. The aim of this work was to evaluate the possible factors which may be involved in interictal cardiovascular autonomic function in temporal lobe epilepsy with complex partial seizures, and with particular attention to hippocampal sclerosis. The study was conducted in 30 patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (19 with left hippocampal sclerosis, 11 with right hippocampal sclerosis). All subjects underwent four tests of cardiac autonomic function: heart rate changes in response to deep breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure variations throughout resting activity and during hand grip, mental stress, and orthostatic tests. Our results show that the right cerebral hemisphere predominantly modulates sympathetic activity, while the left cerebral hemisphere mainly modulates parasympathetic activity, which mediated tachycardia and excessive bradycardia counterregulation, both of which might be involved as a mechanism of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy patients (SUDEP). PMID:27006827

  6. Spontaneous pre-existing hypoxia does not affect brain damage after global cerebral ischaemia in late-gestation fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Joanne O; Yuill, Caroline A; Wassink, Guido; Bennet, Laura; Gunn, Alistair J

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that a mild, non-injurious insult can protect (precondition) against a subsequent injurious insult. Typically, protection is seen when the gap between insults is several days to a week. However, the effect of mild but persistent hypoxia is unknown. In this study we examined the hypothesis that mild pre-existing hypoxia (PaO2<17 mm Hg) would reduce neural injury in chronically instrumented late-gestation (0.85 gestation) fetal sheep exposed to 30 min of global cerebral ischaemia induced by bilateral carotid artery occlusion (normoxia: n=9 vs. pre-existing hypoxia: n=9) or normoxia plus sham ischaemia (sham controls: n=9). Histopathology was assessed after 7 days of recovery. Fetuses with pre-existing hypoxia had lower PaO2 values (16.1±0.6 vs. 26.0±1.1 mm Hg) and were lighter at post-mortem (4,033±412 vs. 5,261±238 g) compared to normoxic fetuses. Cerebral ischaemia was associated with secondary cortical oedema and seizures, reduced final EEG power, loss of sleep state cycling, and significant loss of neurons and oligodendrocytes, with no significant effect of pre-existing hypoxia. Pre-existing hypoxia was associated with a significantly attenuated rise in mean arterial pressure between 18 and 36 h and slower resolution of cortical oedema between 96 and 150 h after ischaemia. These data suggest that chronic hypoxia is not associated with a significant preconditioning effect.

  7. Humeral external rotation handling by using the Bobath concept approach affects trunk extensor muscles electromyography in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Grazziotin Dos Santos, C; Pagnussat, Aline S; Simon, A S; Py, Rodrigo; Pinho, Alexandre Severo do; Wagner, Mário B

    2014-10-20

    This study aimed to investigate the electromyographic activity of cervical and trunk extensors muscles in children with cerebral palsy during two handlings according to the Bobath concept. A crossover trial involving 40 spastic diplegic children was conducted. Electromyography (EMG) was used to measure muscular activity at sitting position (SP), during shoulder internal rotation (IR) and shoulder external rotation (ER) handlings, which were performed using the elbow joint as key point of control. Muscle recordings were performed at the fourth cervical (C4) and at the tenth thoracic (T10) vertebral levels. The Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) was used to assess whether muscle activity would vary according to different levels of severity. Humeral ER handling induced an increase on EMG signal of trunk extensor muscles at the C4 (P=0.007) and T10 (P<0.001) vertebral levels. No significant effects were observed between SP and humeral IR handling at C4 level; However at T10 region, humeral IR handling induced an increase of EMG signal (P=0.019). Humeral ER resulted in an increase of EMG signal at both levels, suggesting increase of extensor muscle activation. Furthermore, the humeral ER handling caused different responses on EMG signal at T10 vertebra level, according to the GMFCS classification (P=0.017). In summary, an increase of EMG signal was observed during ER handling in both evaluated levels, suggesting an increase of muscle activation. These results indicate that humeral ER handling can be used for diplegic CP children rehabilitation to facilitate cervical and trunk extensor muscles activity in a GMFCS level-dependent manner. PMID:25462474

  8. Hemispheric specialization in affective responses, cerebral dominance for language, and handedness: Lateralization of emotion, language, and dexterity.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Elsa Yolanda; Villarreal, Mirta; Drucaroff, Lucas Javier; Ortiz-Villafañe, Manuel; Castro, Mariana Nair; Goldschmidt, Micaela; Wainsztein, Agustina Edith; Ladrón-de-Guevara, María Soledad; Romero, Carlos; Brusco, Luis Ignacio; Camprodon, Joan A; Nemeroff, Charles; Guinjoan, Salvador Martín

    2015-07-15

    Hemispheric specialization in affective responses has received little attention in the literature. This is a fundamental variable to understand circuit dynamics of networks subserving emotion. In this study we put to test a modified "valence" hypothesis of emotion processing, considering that sadness and happiness are processed by each hemisphere in relation to dominance for language and handedness. Mood induction and language activation during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were used in 20 right-handed and 20 nonright-handed subjects, focusing on interconnected regions known to play critical roles in affective responses: subgenual cingulate cortex, amygdala, and anterior insular cortex. We observed a consistent relationship between lateralization of affective processing, motor dexterity, and language in individuals with clear right-handedness. Sadness induces a greater activation of right-hemisphere cortical structures in right-handed, left-dominant individuals, which is not evident in nonright-handed subjects who show no consistent hemispheric dominance for language. In anterior insula, right-handed individuals displayed reciprocal activation of either hemisphere depending upon mood valence, whereas amygdala activation was predominantly left-sided regardless of mood valence. Nonright-handed individuals exhibited less consistent brain lateralization of affective processing regardless of language and motor dexterity lateralization. In contrast with traditional views on emotion processing lateralization, hemispheric specialization in affective responses is not a unitary process but is specific to the brain structure being activated.

  9. Prolonged Antegrade Cerebral Perfusion via Right Axillary Artery (≥60 min) Does Not Affect Early Outcomes in a Repair of Type A Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Saji, Yoshiaki; Kanemitsu, Hideo; Koyama, Tadaaki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We aim to investigate whether the duration of antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) via right axillary artery with an 8-mm prosthetic graft affects early outcomes in a repair of type A acute aortic dissection (AAD). Methods: Over the 24 months from April 2010, a repair of AAD under ACP via the right axillary artery and mild hypothermic circulatory arrest (rectum temperature, 28–30°C) was performed in 34 patients. Mean age was 64.5 ± 13.7 years of age. Preoperative shock status was in three due to cardiac tamponade. Organ malperfusion occurred in 11 patients preoperatively. Mean follow-up period was 9.6 ± 8.4 months and follow-up rate was 100%. Results: Hospital mortality rate was 8.8%. No newly required hemodialysis and new onset of temporary or permanent neurologic deficits were present in survivors. There were no statistically significant differences of mortality rate, new onset of permanent or temporary neurologic deficits and distal organ dysfunction between ACP duration <60 min and ≥60 min. The 12-month survival was 84.4% ± 6.4%. And, freedom from aorta-related events at 12 and 18 months were 100% ± 0.0% and 88.9% ± 10.5%, respectively. Conclusions: The duration of ACP via right axillary artery does not affect early outcomes following a repair of AAD. PMID:26062579

  10. Autoantibodies against Cytochrome P450 Side-Chain Cleavage Enzyme in Dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) Affected with Hypoadrenocorticism (Addison’s Disease)

    PubMed Central

    Boag, Alisdair M.; Christie, Michael R.; McLaughlin, Kerry A.; Syme, Harriet M.; Graham, Peter; Catchpole, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Canine hypoadrenocorticism likely arises from immune-mediated destruction of adrenocortical tissue, leading to glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid deficiency. In humans with autoimmune Addison’s disease (AAD) or autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS), circulating autoantibodies have been demonstrated against enzymes associated with adrenal steroid synthesis. The current study investigates autoantibodies against steroid synthesis enzymes in dogs with spontaneous hypoadrenocorticism. Coding regions of canine CYP21A2 (21-hydroxylase; 21-OH), CYP17A1 (17-hydroxylase; 17-OH), CYP11A1 (P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme; P450scc) and HSD3B2 (3β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase; 3βHSD) were amplified, cloned and expressed as 35S-methionine radiolabelled recombinant protein. In a pilot study, serum samples from 20 dogs with hypoadrenocorticism and four unaffected control dogs were screened by radio-immunoprecipitation assay. There was no evidence of reactivity against 21-OH, 17-OH or 3βHSD, but five dogs with hypoadrenocorticism showed immunoreactivity to P450scc compared with controls. Serum samples were subsequently obtained from 213 dogs diagnosed with hypoadrenocorticism and 110 dogs from a hospital control population. Thirty control dogs were randomly selected to establish a threshold for antibody positivity (mean + 3 × standard deviation). Dogs with hypoadrenocorticism were more likely to be P450scc autoantibody positive than hospital controls (24% vs. 1.2%, respectively; p = 0.0016). Sex was significantly associated with the presence of P450scc autoantibodies in the case population, with 30% of females testing positive compared with 17% of males (p = 0.037). Significant associations with breed (p = 0.015) and DLA-type (DQA1*006:01 allele; p = 0.017) were also found. This cross-sectional study indicates that P450scc autoantibodies are present in a proportion of dogs affected with hypoadrenocorticism. PMID:26618927

  11. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... the things that kids do every day. What's CP? Some kids with CP use wheelchairs and others ...

  12. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Cerebral palsy Cerebral palsy E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... movement problems a child has. What is spastic CP? Spastic means tight or stiff muscles, or muscles ...

  13. Cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Postels, Douglas G; Birbeck, Gretchen L

    2013-01-01

    Malaria, the most significant parasitic disease of man, kills approximately one million people per year. Half of these deaths occur in those with cerebral malaria (CM). The World Health Organization (WHO) defines CM as an otherwise unexplained coma in a patient with malarial parasitemia. Worldwide, CM occurs primarily in African children and Asian adults, with the vast majority (greater than 90%) of cases occurring in children 5 years old or younger in sub-Saharan Africa. The pathophysiology of the disease is complex and involves infected erythrocyte sequestration, cerebral inflammation, and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier. A recently characterized malarial retinopathy is visual evidence of Plasmodium falciparum's pathophysiological processes occurring in the affected patient. Treatment consists of supportive care and antimalarial administration. Thus far, adjuvant therapies have not been shown to improve mortality rates or neurological outcomes in children with CM. For those who survive CM, residual neurological abnormalities are common. Epilepsy, cognitive impairment, behavioral disorders, and gross neurological deficits which include motor, sensory, and language impairments are frequent sequelae. Primary prevention strategies, including bed nets, vaccine development, and chemoprophylaxis, are in varied states of development and implementation. Continuing efforts to find successful primary prevention options and strategies to decrease neurological sequelae are needed. PMID:23829902

  14. Simulation of multihaem cytochromes.

    PubMed

    Soares, Cláudio M; Baptista, António M

    2012-03-01

    This article presents an overview of the simulation studies of the behaviour of multihaem cytochromes using theoretical/computational methodologies, with an emphasis on cytochrome c(3). It starts with the first studies using rigid molecules and continuum electrostatic models, where protonation and redox events were treated as independent. The gradual addition of physical details is then described, from the inclusion of proton isomerism, to the proper treatment of the thermodynamics of electron-proton coupling, to the explicit inclusion of the solvent and protein structural reorganization into the models, culminating with the method for molecular dynamics simulations at constant pH and reduction potential, where the solvation, conformational, protonation and redox features are all simulated in a fully integrated and coupled way. We end with a discussion of the strategies used to study the interaction between multihaem cytochromes, taking into account the further coupling effect introduced by the molecular association.

  15. Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Palsy Information Page Clinical Trials Trial of Erythropoietin Neuroprotection ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Palsy? The term cerebral palsy refers to a group ...

  16. Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Information Page Synonym(s): Aneurysm, Brain Aneurysm Condensed from ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Cerebral Aneurysms? A cerebral aneurysm is a weak or thin ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... P450 oxidoreductase deficiency is a disorder of hormone production. This condition specifically affects steroid hormones, which are ... activity of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase, which disrupts the production of steroid hormones. Changes in sex hormones such ...

  18. Strain on the gastrocnemii and hamstrings affecting standing balance on an inclined plane in spastic cerebral palsy. A study using a geometric model.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, N; Mita, K; Watakabe, M; Akataki, K; Okagawa, T; Kimizuka, M

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use an non-invasive method to determine whether strain on the gastrocnemii and hamstrings influences postural balance in spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Changes in alignment during standing posture with subjects positioned on a platform that was gradually inclined were measured in 10 normal children and 11 children with CP. The changes in postural alignment were plotted and geometric models used to determine the lines where the gastrocnemii and hamstrings were maximally stretched. In this way the relationship between postural alignment and the amount of strain on the gastrocnemii and hamstrings was investigated. On the inclined platform, which caused ankle joints to become dorsiflexed as the inclination angle increased, the gastrocnemii began to be strained and the hip joints began to be flexed (trunk bent forward) at the same time. In the children with CP, the gastrocnemii were more strained by smaller degrees of inclination. Furthermore, there was one child with CP whose hamstrings were also strained on the inclined platform. We confirmed that postural balance was affected by strain on the gastrocnemii and hamstrings.

  19. Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Rak, Malgorzata; Bénit, Paule; Chrétien, Dominique; Bouchereau, Juliette; Schiff, Manuel; El-Khoury, Riyad; Tzagoloff, Alexander; Rustin, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    As with other mitochondrial respiratory chain components, marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity is observed in patients with a cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. This constitutes a considerable diagnostic challenge and raises a number of puzzling questions. So far, pathological mutations have been reported in more than 30 genes, in both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, affecting either structural subunits of the enzyme or proteins involved in its biogenesis. In this review, we discuss the possible causes of the discrepancy between the spectacular advances made in the identification of the molecular bases of cytochrome oxidase deficiency and the lack of any efficient treatment in diseases resulting from such deficiencies. This brings back many unsolved questions related to the frequent delay of clinical manifestation, variable course and severity, and tissue-involvement often associated with these diseases. In this context, we stress the importance to study different models of these diseases, but also discuss the limitations encountered in most available disease models. In the future, with the possible exception of replacement therapy using genes, cells or organs, a better understanding of underlying mechanism(s) of these mitochondrial diseases is presumably required to develop efficient therapy. PMID:26846578

  20. Mitochondrial cytochrome c biogenesis: no longer an enigma

    PubMed Central

    Babbitt, Shalon E.; Sutherland, Molly C.; Francisco, Brian San; Mendez, Deanna L.; Kranz, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochromes c and c1are heme proteins that are essential for aerobic respiration. Release of cytochrome c from mitochondria is an important signal in apoptosis initiation. Biogenesis of c-type cytochromes involves covalent attachment of heme to two cysteines (at a conserved CXXCH sequence) in the apocytochrome. Heme attachment is catalyzed in most mitochondria by holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS), which is also necessary for import of apocytochrome c. Thus, HCCS affects cellular levels of cytochrome c, impacting mitochondrial physiology and cell death. Here, we review the mechanisms of HCCS function and the roles played by heme and residues in the CXXCH motif. Additionally, we consider concepts emerging within the two prokaryotic cytochrome c biogenesis pathways. PMID:26073510

  1. Function of copper in cytochrome production in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Connelly, J.L.; Mattoon, J.R.; Ortegon, V.

    1986-05-01

    Investigations which are attempting to elucidate the nature of the involvement of copper (Cu) in hemoprotein production in yeast have disclosed that the syntheses of cytochromes aa/sub 3/, b and c are influenced differentially by the absence of Cu. Cells are grown in minimal media (29/sup 0/C, 200 rpm, 48-72 hrs) +/- bathocuproine disulfonate (BC), a specific Cu chelator; spectra of standardized samples are compared for evaluation of porphyrin and hemoprotein production. The use of mutants helped localize the effect of BC (or Cu) along the biosynthesis pathway. Mutants included the parent (D28), which provided a general reference point, D28/F8, deficient in ferrochelatase, which accumulated protoporphyrin, B231/C1, deficient in uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase, which accumulated uroporphyrins and GT38/7A, deficient in amino levulinic acid (ALA) synthetase, which synthesized cytochromes in proportion to the ALA added. In each case BC lowered porphyrin and cytochrome production. Cytochrome production in GT 38/7A and D28 was differentially affected by BC. Cytochrome aa/sub 3/ was eliminated by low levels as expected. Cytochrome b was eliminated by 50X and Cytochrome c was decreased markedly but not eliminated by 100X BC. These observations suggest (1) that porphyrin biosynthesis may be influenced but not blocked (2) a function of Cu in the mitochondrial production (assembly) of Cytochrome b and (3) a possible function of Cu in the transport, across mitochondrial membranes, of hemoprotein or porphyrin intermediates.

  2. Electronic and vibrational spectroscopy of the cytochrome c:cytochrome c oxidase complexes from bovine and Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, S. R.; Copeland, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    The 1:1 complex between horse heart cytochrome c and bovine cytochrome c oxidase, and between yeast cytochrome c and Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c oxidase have been studied by a combination of second derivative absorption, circular dichroism (CD), and resonance Raman spectroscopy. The second derivative absorption and CD spectra reveal changes in the electronic transitions of cytochrome a upon complex formation. These results could reflect changes in ground state heme structure or changes in the protein environment surrounding the chromophore that affect either the ground or excited electronic states. The resonance Raman spectrum, on the other hand, reflects the heme structure in the ground electronic state only and shows no significant difference between cytochrome a vibrations in the complex or free enzyme. The only major difference between the Raman spectra of the free enzyme and complex is a broadening of the cytochrome a3 formyl band of the complex that is relieved upon complex dissociation at high ionic strength. These data suggest that the differences observed in the second derivative and CD spectra are the result of changes in the protein environment around cytochrome a that affect the electronic excited state. By analogy to other protein-chromophore systems, we suggest that the energy of the Soret pi* state of cytochrome a may be affected by (1) changes in the local dielectric, possibly brought about by movement of a charged amino acid side chain in proximity to the heme group, or (2) pi-pi interactions between the heme and aromatic amino acid residues. PMID:1338946

  3. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Wimalasundera, Neil; Stevenson, Valerie L

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral palsy has always been known as a disorder of movement and posture resulting from a non-progressive injury to the developing brain; however, more recent definitions allow clinicians to appreciate more than just the movement disorder. Accurate classification of cerebral palsy into distribution, motor type and functional level has advanced research. It also facilitates appropriate targeting of interventions to functional level and more accurate prognosis prediction. The prevalence of cerebral palsy remains fairly static at 2-3 per 1000 live births but there have been some changes in trends for specific causal groups. Interventions for cerebral palsy have historically been medical and physically focused, often with limited evidence to support their efficacy. The use of more appropriate outcome measures encompassing quality of life and participation is helping to deliver treatments which are more meaningful for people with cerebral palsy and their carers.

  4. An investigation of the factors affecting handwriting articulation of school aged children with cerebral palsy based on the international classification of functioning, disability and health.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was designed to identify factors influencing handwriting articulation based on the international classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF) and to recommend effective evaluation and intervention strategies to improve the handwriting of children with cerebral palsy. [Subjects] The subjects were 96 elementary school children with cerebral palsy and the study was conducted from 04/07/2011 to 29/08/2011. [Methods] Factors related to handwriting articulation were investigated based on the ICF model. [Results] Wrist lateral deviation, upper-extremity speed of body function and education of personal factor were significantly associated with handwriting articulation. [Conclusion] Efforts to manage and improve the handwriting articulation of children with cerebral palsy should focus on wrist lateral deviation, upper-extremity speed, and education.

  5. An investigation of the factors affecting handwriting articulation of school aged children with cerebral palsy based on the international classification of functioning, disability and health

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was designed to identify factors influencing handwriting articulation based on the international classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF) and to recommend effective evaluation and intervention strategies to improve the handwriting of children with cerebral palsy. [Subjects] The subjects were 96 elementary school children with cerebral palsy and the study was conducted from 04/07/2011 to 29/08/2011. [Methods] Factors related to handwriting articulation were investigated based on the ICF model. [Results] Wrist lateral deviation, upper-extremity speed of body function and education of personal factor were significantly associated with handwriting articulation. [Conclusion] Efforts to manage and improve the handwriting articulation of children with cerebral palsy should focus on wrist lateral deviation, upper-extremity speed, and education. PMID:27065517

  6. An investigation of the factors affecting handwriting articulation of school aged children with cerebral palsy based on the international classification of functioning, disability and health.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was designed to identify factors influencing handwriting articulation based on the international classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF) and to recommend effective evaluation and intervention strategies to improve the handwriting of children with cerebral palsy. [Subjects] The subjects were 96 elementary school children with cerebral palsy and the study was conducted from 04/07/2011 to 29/08/2011. [Methods] Factors related to handwriting articulation were investigated based on the ICF model. [Results] Wrist lateral deviation, upper-extremity speed of body function and education of personal factor were significantly associated with handwriting articulation. [Conclusion] Efforts to manage and improve the handwriting articulation of children with cerebral palsy should focus on wrist lateral deviation, upper-extremity speed, and education. PMID:27065517

  7. Effect of the hinge protein on the heme iron site of cytochrome c sub 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.H.; Yencha, A.J.; Bunker, G.; Zhang, G.; Chance, B.; King, T.E. )

    1989-02-21

    X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) studies on cytochrome c{sub 1} from beef heart mitochondria were conducted to identify the effect of the hinge protein on the structure of the heme site in cytochrome c{sub 1}. A comparison of XAS data of highly purified one-band and two-band cytochrome c{sub 1} demonstrates that the hinge protein exerts a rather pronounced effect on the heme environment of the cytochrome c{sub 1}: a conformational change occurs within a radius of approximately 5 {angstrom} from the heme iron in cytochrome c{sub 1} when the hinge protein is bound to cytochrome c{sub 1}. This result may be correlated with the previous observations that the structure and reactivity of cytochrome c{sub 1} are affected by the hinge protein.

  8. Structure of the Zymomonas mobilis respiratory chain: oxygen affinity of electron transport and the role of cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Balodite, Elina; Strazdina, Inese; Galinina, Nina; McLean, Samantha; Rutkis, Reinis; Poole, Robert K; Kalnenieks, Uldis

    2014-09-01

    The genome of the ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis encodes a bd-type terminal oxidase, cytochrome bc1 complex and several c-type cytochromes, yet lacks sequences homologous to any of the known bacterial cytochrome c oxidase genes. Recently, it was suggested that a putative respiratory cytochrome c peroxidase, receiving electrons from the cytochrome bc1 complex via cytochrome c552, might function as a peroxidase and/or an alternative oxidase. The present study was designed to test this hypothesis, by construction of a cytochrome c peroxidase mutant (Zm6-perC), and comparison of its properties with those of a mutant defective in the cytochrome b subunit of the bc1 complex (Zm6-cytB). Disruption of the cytochrome c peroxidase gene (ZZ60192) caused a decrease of the membrane NADH peroxidase activity, impaired the resistance of growing culture to exogenous hydrogen peroxide and hampered aerobic growth. However, this mutation did not affect the activity or oxygen affinity of the respiratory chain, or the kinetics of cytochrome d reduction. Furthermore, the peroxide resistance and membrane NADH peroxidase activity of strain Zm6-cytB had not decreased, but both the oxygen affinity of electron transport and the kinetics of cytochrome d reduction were affected. It is therefore concluded that the cytochrome c peroxidase does not terminate the cytochrome bc1 branch of Z. mobilis, and that it is functioning as a quinol peroxidase.

  9. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Allroggen, H.; Abbott, R.

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a challenging condition because of its variability of clinical symptoms and signs. It is very often unrecognised at initial presentation. All age groups can be affected. Large sinuses such as the superior sagittal sinus are most frequently involved. Extensive collateral circulation within the cerebral venous system allows for a significant degree of compensation in the early stages of thrombus formation. Systemic inflammatory diseases and inherited as well as acquired coagulation disorders are frequent causes, although in up to 30% of cases no underlying cause can be identified. The oral contraceptive pill appears to be an important additional risk factor. The spectrum of clinical presentations ranges from headache with papilloedema to focal deficit, seizures and coma. Magnetic resonance imaging with venography is the investigation of choice; computed tomography alone will miss a significant number of cases. It has now been conclusively shown that intravenous heparin is the first-line treatment for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis because of its efficacy, safety and feasability. Local thrombolysis may be indicated in cases of deterioration, despite adequate heparinisation. This should be followed by oral anticoagulation for 3-6 months. The prognosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is generally favourable. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed to diagnose this uncommon condition so that appropriate treatment can be initiated.


Keywords: cerebral venous sinus thrombosis PMID:10622773

  10. Cerebral Arteriosclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cerebral arteriosclerosis is the result of thickening and hardening of the walls of the arteries in the ... cause an ischemic stroke. When the thickening and hardening is uneven, arterial walls can develop bulges (called ...

  11. Cerebral hypoxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... death. Treatment depends on the cause of the hypoxia. Basic life support is most important. Treatment involves: Breathing ... Complications of cerebral hypoxia include a prolonged vegetative ... sleep-wake cycle, and eye opening, but the person is not alert ...

  12. Cytochromes P450

    PubMed Central

    Bak, Søren; Beisson, Fred; Bishop, Gerard; Hamberger, Björn; Höfer, René; Paquette, Suzanne; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle

    2011-01-01

    There are 244 cytochrome P450 genes (and 28 pseudogenes) in the Arabidopsis genome. P450s thus form one of the largest gene families in plants. Contrary to what was initially thought, this family diversification results in very limited functional redundancy and seems to mirror the complexity of plant metabolism. P450s sometimes share less than 20% identity and catalyze extremely diverse reactions leading to the precursors of structural macromolecules such as lignin, cutin, suberin and sporopollenin, or are involved in biosynthesis or catabolism of all hormone and signaling molecules, of pigments, odorants, flavors, antioxidants, allelochemicals and defense compounds, and in the metabolism of xenobiotics. The mechanisms of gene duplication and diversification are getting better understood and together with co-expression data provide leads to functional characterization. PMID:22303269

  13. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Parents > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... kids who are living with the condition. About Cerebral Palsy Cerebral palsy is one of the most common ...

  14. Cerebral palsy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cerebral palsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cerebral palsy : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/cerebral_palsy/cerebral_palsy. ...

  15. Cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Colver, Allan; Fairhurst, Charles; Pharoah, Peter O D

    2014-04-01

    The syndrome of cerebral palsy encompasses a large group of childhood movement and posture disorders. Severity, patterns of motor involvement, and associated impairments such as those of communication, intellectual ability, and epilepsy vary widely. Overall prevalence has remained stable in the past 40 years at 2-3·5 cases per 1000 livebirths, despite changes in antenatal and perinatal care. The few studies available from developing countries suggest prevalence of comparable magnitude. Cerebral palsy is a lifelong disorder; approaches to intervention, whether at an individual or environmental level, should recognise that quality of life and social participation throughout life are what individuals with cerebral palsy seek, not improved physical function for its own sake. In the past few years, the cerebral palsy community has learned that the evidence of benefit for the numerous drugs, surgery, and therapies used over previous decades is weak. Improved understanding of the role of multiple gestation in pathogenesis, of gene environment interaction, and how to influence brain plasticity could yield significant advances in treatment of the disorder. Reduction in the prevalence of post-neonatal cerebral palsy, especially in developing countries, should be possible through improved nutrition, infection control, and accident prevention.

  16. Cox26 is a novel stoichiometric subunit of the yeast cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Levchenko, Maria; Wuttke, Jan-Moritz; Römpler, Katharina; Schmidt, Bernhard; Neifer, Klaus; Juris, Lisa; Wissel, Mirjam; Rehling, Peter; Deckers, Markus

    2016-07-01

    The cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain. The complex accepts electrons from cytochrome c and passes them onto molecular oxygen. This process contributes to energy capture in the form of a membrane potential across the inner membrane. The enzyme complex assembles in a stepwise process from the three mitochondria-encoded core subunits Cox1, Cox2 and Cox3, which associate with nuclear-encoded subunits and cofactors. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cytochrome c oxidase associates with the bc1-complex into supercomplexes, allowing efficient energy transduction. Here we report on Cox26 as a protein found in respiratory chain supercomplexes containing cytochrome c oxidase. Our analyses reveal Cox26 as a novel stoichiometric structural subunit of the cytochrome c oxidase. A loss of Cox26 affects cytochrome c oxidase activity and respirasome organization.

  17. The cytochrome p450 homepage.

    PubMed

    Nelson, David R

    2009-10-01

    The Cytochrome P450 Homepage is a universal resource for nomenclature and sequence information on cytochrome P450 ( CYP ) genes. The site has been in continuous operation since February 1995. Currently, naming information for 11,512 CYPs are available on the web pages. The P450 sequences are manually curated by David Nelson, and the nomenclature system conforms to an evolutionary scheme such that members of CYP families and subfamilies share common ancestors. The organisation and content of the Homepage are described.

  18. Cerebral Palsy Litigation

    PubMed Central

    Sartwelle, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    The cardinal driver of cerebral palsy litigation is electronic fetal monitoring, which has continued unabated for 40 years. Electronic fetal monitoring, however, is based on 19th-century childbirth myths, a virtually nonexistent scientific foundation, and has a false positive rate exceeding 99%. It has not affected the incidence of cerebral palsy. Electronic fetal monitoring has, however, increased the cesarian section rate, with the expected increase in mortality and morbidity risks to mothers and babies alike. This article explains why electronic fetal monitoring remains endorsed as efficacious in the worlds’ labor rooms and courtrooms despite being such a feeble medical modality. It also reviews the reasons professional organizations have failed to condemn the use of electronic fetal monitoring in courtrooms. The failures of tort reform, special cerebral palsy courts, and damage limits to stem the escalating litigation are discussed. Finally, the authors propose using a currently available evidence rule—the Daubert doctrine that excludes “junk science” from the courtroom—as the beginning of the end to cerebral palsy litigation and electronic fetal monitoring’s 40-year masquerade as science. PMID:25183322

  19. Cerebral White Matter

    PubMed Central

    Schmahmann, Jeremy D.; Smith, Eric E.; Eichler, Florian S.; Filley, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Lesions of the cerebral white matter (WM) result in focal neurobehavioral syndromes, neuropsychiatric phenomena, and dementia. The cerebral WM contains fiber pathways that convey axons linking cerebral cortical areas with each other and with subcortical structures, facilitating the distributed neural circuits that subserve sensorimotor function, intellect, and emotion. Recent neuroanatomical investigations reveal that these neural circuits are topographically linked by five groupings of fiber tracts emanating from every neocortical area: (1) cortico-cortical association fibers; (2) corticostriatal fibers; (3) commissural fibers; and cortico-subcortical pathways to (4) thalamus and (5) pontocerebellar system, brain stem, and/or spinal cord. Lesions of association fibers prevent communication between cortical areas engaged in different domains of behavior. Lesions of subcortical structures or projection/striatal fibers disrupt the contribution of subcortical nodes to behavior. Disconnection syndromes thus result from lesions of the cerebral cortex, subcortical structures, and WM tracts that link the nodes that make up the distributed circuits. The nature and the severity of the clinical manifestations of WM lesions are determined, in large part, by the location of the pathology: discrete neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms result from focal WM lesions, whereas cognitive impairment across multiple domains—WM dementia—occurs in the setting of diffuse WM disease. We present a detailed review of the conditions affecting WM that produce these neurobehavioral syndromes, and consider the pathophysiology, clinical effects, and broad significance of the effects of aging and vascular compromise on cerebral WM, in an attempt to help further the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of these disorders. PMID:18990132

  20. Cerebral vascular findings in PAPA syndrome: cerebral arterial vasculopathy or vasculitis and a posterior cerebral artery dissecting aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Khatibi, Kasra; Heit, Jeremy J; Telischak, Nicholas A; Elbers, Jorina M; Do, Huy M

    2015-06-24

    A young patient with PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne) syndrome developed an unusual cerebral arterial vasculopathy/vasculitis (CAV) that resulted in subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dissecting posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysm. This aneurysm was successfully treated by endovascular coil sacrifice of the affected segment of the PCA. The patient made an excellent recovery with no significant residual neurologic deficit.

  1. Isolation of Rhizobium phaseoli Tn5-induced mutants with altered expression of cytochrome terminal oxidases o and aa3.

    PubMed Central

    Soberón, M; Membrillo-Hernández, J; Aguilar, G R; Sánchez, F

    1990-01-01

    Two Rhizobium phaseoli mutants affected in cytochrome expression were obtained by Tn5-mob mutagenesis of the wild-type strain (CE3). Mutant strain CFN031 expressed sevenfold less cytochrome o in culture, expressed cytochrome aa3 under microaerophilic culture conditions, in contrast to strain CE3, and was affected in its vegetative growth properties and proliferation inside plant host cells. Mutant CFN037 expressed cytochrome aa3 under microaerophilic culture conditions, while bacteroid development and nitrogen fixation occurred earlier than in strain CE3. Images FIG. 2 PMID:2155209

  2. The Cytochrome P450 Homepage

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The Cytochrome P450 Homepage is a universal resource for nomenclature and sequence information on cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes. The site has been in continuous operation since February 1995. Currently, naming information for 11,512 CYPs are available on the web pages. The P450 sequences are manually curated by David Nelson, and the nomenclature system conforms to an evolutionary scheme such that members of CYP families and subfamilies share common ancestors. The organisation and content of the Homepage are described. PMID:19951895

  3. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information About ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  4. Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS ... I get more information? What is a cerebral aneurysm? A cerebral aneurysm (also known as an intracranial ...

  5. Evolution of the couple cytochrome c and cytochrome c oxidase in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Pierron, Denis; Wildman, Derek E.; Hüttemann, Maik; Letellier, Thierry; Grossman, Lawrence I.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial energy metabolism has been affected by a broad set of ancient and recent evolutionary events. The oldest example is the endosymbiosis theory that led to mitochondria and a recently proposed example is adaptation to cold climate by anatomically modern human lineages. Mitochondrial energy metabolism has also been associated with an important area in anthropology and evolutionary biology, brain enlargement in human evolution. Indeed, several studies have pointed to the need for a major metabolic rearrangement to supply a sufficient amount of energy for brain development in primates. The gene encoding for the coupled cytochrome c (cyt c) / cytochrome c oxidase (COX, complex IV, EC 1.9.3.1) seems to have an exceptional pattern of evolution in the anthropoid lineage. It has been proposed that this evolution was linked to the rearrangement of energy metabolism needed for brain enlargement. This hypothesis is reinforced by the fact that the COX enzyme was proposed to have a large role in control of the respiratory chain and thereby global energy production. After summarizing major events that occurred during the evolution of COX and cytochrome c on the primate lineage, we review the different evolutionary forces that could have influenced primate COX evolution and discuss the probable causes and consequence of this evolution. Finally, we discuss and review the co-occurring primate phenotypic evolution. PMID:22729859

  6. An Arginine to Lysine Mutation in the Vicinity of the Heme Propionates Affects the Redox Potentials of the Hemes and Associated Electron and Proton Transfer in Cytochrome c Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Denise A.; Geren, Lois; Hiser, Carrie; Schmidt, Bryan; Durham, Bill; Millett, Francis; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2008-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase pumps protons across a membrane using energy from electron transfer and reduction of oxygen to water. It is postulated that an element of the energy transduction mechanism is the movement of protons to the vicinity of the hemes upon reduction, to favor charge neutrality. Possible sites on which protons could reside, in addition to the conserved carboxylate E286, are the propionate groups of heme a and/or heme a3. A highly conserved pair of arginines (R481/R482) interact with these propionates through ionic and hydrogen bonds. This study shows that the conservative mutant, R481K, although fully as active as wild-type under many conditions, exhibits a significant decrease in the midpoint redox potential of heme a relative to CuA of Em ≅ 40 mV, has lowered activity under conditions of high pH or in the presence of a membrane potential and has a slowed heme a3 reduction with dithionite. Another mutant, D132A, that strongly inhibits proton uptake from the internal side of the membrane, has <4 % the activity of wild-type and appears dependent on proton uptake from the outside. A double mutation, D132A/R481K, is even more strongly inhibited (~1 % wild-type). The more-than-additive effect supports the concept that R481K not only lowers the midpoint potential of heme a but also limits a supply route for protons from the outside of the membrane used by the D132 mutant. The results are consistent with an important role of R481 and heme a/a3 propionates in proton movement in a reversible exit path. PMID:16060654

  7. Cytochrome P-450 revealed: the effect of the respiratory cytochromes on the spectrum of bacterial cytochrome P-450.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, P M; Ruettinger, R T; Fulco, A J

    1983-05-16

    Soluble extracts of Bacillus megaterium ATCC 14581 prepared by centrifuging a sonicated cell suspension at 40,000 xg for 30 min apparently contained no cytochrome P-450 unless the culture had been grown in the presence of an inducer: a reduced+CO minus reduced spectrum was used to measure cytochrome P-450 concentration. When the 40,000 xg supernatants from the uninduced cultures were recentrifuged at 105,000 xg the respiratory cytochromes, including one like cytochrome a1, were sedimented, and cytochrome P-450 was observed to be 100 nM or 30 +/- 9 p mol cytochrome P-450/mg protein (n=9). Measurements of cytochrome P-450 in cultures induced with phenobarbital were always higher after ultracentrifugation. There was soluble cytochrome o in all extracts. When cytochrome a1 was present a deep trough at 441 nm developed in the reduced +CO minus reduced difference spectrum of the 40,000 xg supernatant of both the uninduced and the induced cultures. The 40,000 xg supernatant obtained after lysing protoplasts of B. megaterium did not contain cytochrome a1 and always gave a good measure of cytochrome P-450. PMID:6405752

  8. Cerebral Microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Young, Bethany; Kalanuria, Atul; Kumar, Monisha; Burke, Kathryn; Balu, Ramani; Amendolia, Olivia; McNulty, Kyle; Marion, BethAnn; Beckmann, Brittany; Ciocco, Lauren; Miller, Kimberly; Schuele, Donnamarie; Maloney-Wilensky, Eileen; Frangos, Suzanne; Wright, Danielle

    2016-03-01

    A variety of neuromonitoring techniques are available to aid in the care of neurocritically ill patients. However, traditional monitors lack the ability to measure brain biochemistry and may provide inadequate warning of potentially reversible deleterious conditions. Cerebral microdialysis (CMD) is a safe, novel method of monitoring regional brain biochemistry. Analysis of CMD analytes as part of a multimodal approach may help inform clinical decision making, guide medical treatments, and aid in prognostication of patient outcome. Its use is most frequently documented in traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Incorporating CMD into clinical practice is a multidisciplinary effort.

  9. Liposome effect on the cytochrome c-catalyzed peroxidation of carbonyl substrates to triplet species.

    PubMed

    Nantes, I L; Faljoni-Alario, A; Vercesi, A E; Santos, K E; Bechara, E J

    1998-09-01

    Cytochrome c exhibits peroxidase activity on diphenylacetaldehyde (DPAA) and 3-methylacetoacetone (MAA), which is greatly affected by the presence and nature of charged liposome or micelle interfaces interacting with the enzyme. The ferricytochrome c reaction with DPAA is accelerated when the enzyme is attached to negatively charged interfaces. Whatever the medium, bulk solution or negatively charged dicetylphosphate (DCP), phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylethanolamine/cardiolipin (PC/PE/CL) liposomes, this chemiluminescent reaction is accompanied by reduction of cytochrome c to its ferrous form. In turn, MAA is oxidized by cytochrome c exclusively when bound to DCP liposomes. Contrary to DPAA oxidation, the MAA reaction is followed by bleaching of cytochrome c, reflecting damage to the hemeprotein chromophore. The cytochrome-c-catalyzed oxidation of either DPAA or MAA leads to concomitant disappearance of the enzyme charge transfer absorption band at 695 nm. This suggests that the peroxidase activity of cytochrome c involves substrate-induced loss of the methionine ligand at the iron sixth coordination position, which is favored by interaction of cytochrome c with negatively charged interfaces. Accordingly, a decrease and blue shift of the charge transfer band could be observed in cytochrome-c-containing negatively charged DCP, PC/PE/CL liposomes or lysophosphatidylethanolamine micelles in the presence of DPAA or MAA. PMID:9741591

  10. [Cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Malagón Valdez, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    The term cerebral palsy (CP), is used for a great number of clinical neurological syndromes. The syndromes are characterized by having a common cause, motor defects. It is important, because they can cause a brain damage by presenting motor defects and some associated deficiencies, such as mental deficiency, epilepsy, language and visual defects and pseudobulbar paralysis, with the non-evolving fact. Some authors prefer using terms such as "non-evolving encephalopathies". In the treatment the utility of prevention programs of early stimulation and special rehabilitation methods, and treatment of associated deficiencies such as epilepsy, mental deficiency, language, audition and visual problems, and the attention deficit improve the prognosis in an important way. The prognosis depends on the severity of the disease and the associated manifestations. PMID:18422084

  11. Cytochromes P450 in Nanodiscs

    PubMed Central

    Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2010-01-01

    Nanodiscs have proven to be a versatile tool for the study all types of membrane proteins, including receptors, transporters, enzymes and viral antigens. The self-assembled Nanodisc system provides a robust and common means for rendering these targets soluble in aqueous media while providing a native like bilayer environment that maintains functional activity. This system has thus provided a means for studying the extensive collection of membrane bound cytochromes P450 with the same biochemical and biophysical tools that have been previously limited to use with the soluble P450s. These include a plethora of spectroscopic, kinetic and surface based methods. Significant improvements in homogeneity and stability of these preparations open new possibilities for detailed analysis of equilibrium and steady-state kinetic characteristics of catalytic mechanisms of human cytochromes P450 involved in xenobiotic metabolism and in steroid biosynthesis. The experimental methods developed for physico-chemical and functional studies of membrane cytochromes P450 incorporated in Nanodiscs allow for more detailed understanding of the scientific questions along the lines pioneered by Professor Klaus Ruckpaul and his array of colleagues and collaborators. PMID:20685623

  12. Cytochrome allelic variants and clopidogrel metabolism in cardiovascular diseases therapy.

    PubMed

    Jarrar, Mohammed; Behl, Shalini; Manyam, Ganiraju; Ganah, Hany; Nazir, Mohammed; Nasab, Reem; Moustafa, Khaled

    2016-06-01

    Clopidogrel and aspirin are among the most prescribed dual antiplatelet therapies to treat the acute coronary syndrome and heart attacks. However, their potential clinical impacts are a subject of intense debates. The therapeutic efficiency of clopidogrel is controlled by the actions of hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYPs) enzymes and impacted by individual genetic variations. Inter-individual polymorphisms in CYPs enzymes affect the metabolism of clopidogrel into its active metabolites and, therefore, modify its turnover and clinical outcome. So far, clinical trials fail to confirm higher or lower adverse cardiovascular effects in patients treated with combinations of clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors, compared with clopidogrel alone. Such inconclusive findings may be due to genetic variations in the cytochromes CYP2C19 and CYP3A4/5. To investigate potential interactions/effects of these cytochromes and their allele variants on the treatment of acute coronary syndrome with clopidogrel alone or in combination with proton pump inhibitors, we analyze recent literature and discuss the potential impact of the cytochrome allelic variants on cardiovascular events and stent thrombosis treated with clopidogrel. The diversity of CYP2C19 polymorphisms and prevalence span within various ethnic groups, subpopulations and demographic areas are also debated. PMID:27072373

  13. Vectorially oriented monolayers of the cytochrome c/cytochrome oxidase bimolecular complex.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A M; Blasie, J K; Bean, J C

    1998-01-01

    Vectorially oriented monolayers of yeast cytochrome c and its bimolecular complex with bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase have been formed by self-assembly from solution. Both quartz and Ge/Si multilayer substrates were chemical vapor deposited with an amine-terminated alkylsiloxane monolayer that was then reacted with a hetero-bifunctional cross-linking reagent, and the resulting maleimide endgroup surface then provided for covalent interactions with the naturally occurring single surface cysteine 102 of the yeast cytochrome c. The bimolecular complex was formed by further incubating these cytochrome c monolayers in detergent-solubilized cytochrome oxidase. The sequential formation of such monolayers and the vectorially oriented nature of the cytochrome oxidase was studied via meridional x-ray diffraction, which directly provided electron density profiles of the protein(s) along the axis normal to the substrate plane. The nature of these profiles is consistent with previous work performed on vectorially oriented monolayers of either cytochrome c or cytochrome oxidase alone. Furthermore, optical spectroscopy has indicated that the rate of binding of cytochrome oxidase to the cytochrome c monolayer is an order of magnitude faster than the binding of cytochrome oxidase to an amine-terminated surface that was meant to mimic the ring of lysine residues around the heme edge of cytochrome c, which are known to be involved in the binding of this protein to cytochrome oxidase. PMID:9512031

  14. Mutations in CYC1, Encoding Cytochrome c1 Subunit of Respiratory Chain Complex III, Cause Insulin-Responsive Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Gaignard, Pauline; Menezes, Minal; Schiff, Manuel; Bayot, Aurélien; Rak, Malgorzata; Ogier de Baulny, Hélène; Su, Chen-Hsien; Gilleron, Mylene; Lombes, Anne; Abida, Heni; Tzagoloff, Alexander; Riley, Lisa; Cooper, Sandra T.; Mina, Kym; Sivadorai, Padma; Davis, Mark R.; Allcock, Richard J.N.; Kresoje, Nina; Laing, Nigel G.; Thorburn, David R.; Slama, Abdelhamid; Christodoulou, John; Rustin, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Many individuals with abnormalities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex III remain genetically undefined. Here, we report mutations (c.288G>T [p.Trp96Cys] and c.643C>T [p.Leu215Phe]) in CYC1, encoding the cytochrome c1 subunit of complex III, in two unrelated children presenting with recurrent episodes of ketoacidosis and insulin-responsive hyperglycemia. Cytochrome c1, the heme-containing component of complex III, mediates the transfer of electrons from the Rieske iron-sulfur protein to cytochrome c. Cytochrome c1 is present at reduced levels in the skeletal muscle and skin fibroblasts of affected individuals. Moreover, studies on yeast mutants and affected individuals’ fibroblasts have shown that exogenous expression of wild-type CYC1 rescues complex III activity, demonstrating the deleterious effect of each mutation on cytochrome c1 stability and complex III activity. PMID:23910460

  15. Canine cytochrome P-450 pharmacogenetics.

    PubMed

    Court, Michael H

    2013-09-01

    The cytochrome P-450 (CYP) drug metabolizing enzymes are essential for the efficient elimination of many clinically used drugs. These enzymes typically display high interindividual variability in expression and function resulting from enzyme induction, inhibition, and genetic polymorphism thereby predisposing patients to adverse drug reactions or therapeutic failure. There are also substantial species differences in CYP substrate specificity and expression that complicate direct extrapolation of information from humans to veterinary species. This article reviews the available published data regarding the presence and impact of genetic polymorphisms on CYP-dependent drug metabolism in dogs in the context of known human-dog CYP differences.

  16. The roles of c-type cytochromes in algal photosynthesis. Extraction from algae of a cytochrome similar to higher plant cytochrome f.

    PubMed

    Wood, P M

    1977-02-01

    A membrane-bound cytochrome resembling higher plant cytochrome f in many respects has been extracted from the algae Chlamydomonas. Euglena and Anacystis, and partially purified. The spectra of the cytochromes from Chlamydomonas and Euglena are virtually identical to that of parsley cytochrome f, with alpha-band maxima near 554 nm, very asymmetrical beta-bands, and gamma-band maxima at 421 nm. The cytochrome from Anacystis had alpha and gamma-bands both shifted to slightly longer wavelengths. The redox potential of the cytochrome from Chlamydomonas was determined as +350 mV, and its minimum molecular weight in sodium dodecyl sulphate as 31 000. The cytochrome from Euglena showed a rate of reaction with higher plant plastocyanin at least 100 times that of the soluble Euglena cytochrome c-552, and was unaffected by Euglena cytochrome c-552 antiserum. A very fast rate of electron transfer occurred between this cytochrome purified from Euglena and cytochrome c-552. The roles of the membrane-bound and soluble c-type cytochromes in algal photosynthesis are discussed, and it is recommended that the name cytochrome f should be reserved for the membrane-bound cytochrome (to emphasize its affinity with higher plant cytochrome f), while the soluble one should be named by its alpha-band (c-552, c-553, etc.) to make clear its distinctness from higher plant cytochrome f and homology with mitochondrial cytochrome c.

  17. Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stretch Additional Content Medical News Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations By James E. Wilberger, MD, Derrick A. Dupre, ... a direct, strong blow to the head. Cerebral lacerations are tears in brain tissue, caused by a ...

  18. Cerebral aneurysm (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... area within the vessel wall. If a cerebral (brain) aneurysm ruptures, the escaping blood within the brain may cause severe neurologic complications or death. A person who has a ruptured cerebral aneurysm may complain of the sudden onset of "the ...

  19. United Cerebral Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... be sure to follow us on Twitter . United Cerebral Palsy UCP educates, advocates and provides support services to ... Partners Merz Logo Sprint Relay Copyright © 2015 United Cerebral Palsy 1825 K Street NW Suite 600 Washington, DC ...

  20. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  1. Crystallization of Mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Takayuki; Tanaka, Masashi; Wakabayashi, Takashi

    1982-12-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (ferrocytochrome c:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.9.3.1) was purified from beef heart mitochondria. By washing the oxidase with detergent on a hydrophobic interaction column, phospholipids were depleted to the level of 1 mol of cardiolipin per mol of heme a. Hydrophobic impurities and partially denatured oxidase were separated from the intact oxidase on an affinity column with cytochrome c as the specific ligand. The final preparation of the oxidase contained seven distinct polypeptides. The molecular weight of the oxidase was estimated to be 130,000 from its specific heme a and copper content and from the subunit composition. Crystals of the oxidase were obtained by slow removal of the detergent from the buffer in which the oxidase was dissolved. The needle-shaped crystals were 100 μ m in average length and 5 μ m in width, and they strongly polarized visible light. Electron diffraction patterns were obtained with an unstained glutaraldehyde-fixed single crystal by electron microscopy using 1,000-kV electrons. From electron micrographs and the diffraction patterns of the crystal, it was concluded that the crystal is monoclinic in the space group P21, with unit cell dimensions a = 92 angstrom, b = 84 angstrom, and c = 103 angstrom, and α =β 90 degrees, γ = 126 degrees.

  2. Aging and Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Networker, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This special edition of "The Networker" contains several articles focusing on aging and cerebral palsy (CP). "Aging and Cerebral Palsy: Pathways to Successful Aging" (Jenny C. Overeynder) reports on the National Invitational Colloquium on Aging and Cerebral Palsy held in April 1993. "Observations from an Observer" (Kathleen K. Barrett) describes…

  3. The role of porcine cytochrome b5A and cytochrome b5B in the regulation of cytochrome P45017A1 activities.

    PubMed

    Billen, M J; Squires, E J

    2009-01-01

    Male pigs are routinely castrated to prevent the accumulation of testicular 16-androstene steroids, in particular 5alpha-androst-16-en-3-one (5alpha-androstenone), which contribute to an off-odour and off-flavour known as boar taint. Cytochrome P450C17 (CYP17A1) catalyses the key regulatory step in the formation of the 16-androstene steroids from pregnenolone by the andien-beta synthase reaction or the synthesis of the glucocorticoid and sex steroids via 17alpha-hydroxylase and C17,20 lyase pathways respectively. We have expressed CYP17A1, along with cytochrome P450 reductase (POR), cytochrome b5 reductase (CYB5R3) and cytochrome b5 (CYB5) in HEK-293FT cells to investigate the importance of the two forms of porcine CYB5, CYB5A and CYB5B, in both the andien-beta synthase as well as the 17alpha-hydroxylase and C17,20 lyase reactions. Increasing the ratio of CYB5A to CYP17A1 caused a decrease in 17alpha-hydroxylase (p<0.013), a transient increase in C17,20 lyase, and an increase in andien-beta synthase activity (p<0.0001). Increasing the ratio of CYB5B to CYP17A1 also decreased 17alpha-hydroxylase, but did not affect the andien-beta synthase activity; however, the C17,20 lyase, was significantly increased. These results demonstrate the differential effects of two forms of CYB5 on the three activities of porcine CYP17A1 and show that CYB5B does not stimulate the andien-beta synthase activity of CYP17A1. PMID:19101629

  4. Oxidative titrations of reduced cytochrome aa3: influence of cytochrome c and carbon monoxide on the midpoint potential values.

    PubMed

    Schroedl, N A; Hartzell, C R

    1977-11-15

    Oxidative titrations were performed on the electrostatic complex formed between cytochrome c and cytochrome aa3 at low ionic strength. Midpoint potentials of the redox centers in the proteins in 1:1 and 2:1 complexes were compared with those in mixtures of the cytochromes at high ionic strength. Computer simulations of all titrations yielded midpoint potentials for the components of cytochrome aa3 which were consistent with literature values for isolated cytochrome aa3 or mixture of cytochromes c and aa3. However, the unequal heme extinction coefficients observed previously (Schroedl, N.A., and Hartzell, C.R. (1977), Biochemistry 16, 1327) during oxidative titrations of cytochrome aa3 became equal in magnitude under these experimental conditions. The binding of cytochrome c to cytochrome aa3 changed the midpoint potentials of cytochrome aa3 by 15-20 mV, while the midpoint potentials for cytochrome c were altered by 50-60 mV. Careful analysis of these titrations including computer simulation revealed that cytochrome c was able to bind to cytochrome aa3 only after cytochrome aL2+ had become oxidized. When bound to cytochrome aa3, the midpoint potential of cytochrome c was 210 7V. Titrations performed under a carbon monoxide atmosphere revealed cytochrome aa3 midpoint potentials unchanged from reported values. Cytochrome c again exhibited a midpoint potential of 210 mV after binding to cytochrome aa3.

  5. Effect of ageing and ischemia on enzymatic activities linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain, glutamate and aminoacids metabolism of free and intrasynaptic mitochondria of cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Villa, Roberto Federico; Gorini, Antonella; Hoyer, Siegfried

    2009-12-01

    The effect of ageing and the relationships between the catalytic properties of enzymes linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain, glutamate and aminoacid metabolism of cerebral cortex, a functional area very sensitive to both age and ischemia, were studied on mitochondria of adult and aged rats, after complete ischemia of 15 minutes duration. The maximum rate (Vmax) of the following enzyme activities: citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase for Krebs' cycle; NADH-cytochrome c reductase as total (integrated activity of Complex I-III), rotenone sensitive (Complex I) and cytochrome oxidase (Complex IV) for electron transfer chain; glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamate-oxaloacetate-and glutamate-pyruvate transaminases for glutamate metabolism were assayed in non-synaptic, perikaryal mitochondria and in two populations of intra-synaptic mitochondria, i.e., the light and heavy mitochondrial fraction. The results indicate that in normal, steady-state cerebral cortex, the value of the same enzyme activity markedly differs according (a) to the different populations of mitochondria, i.e., non-synaptic or intra-synaptic light and heavy, (b) and respect to ageing. After 15 min of complete ischemia, the enzyme activities of mitochondria located near the nucleus (perikaryal mitochondria) and in synaptic structures (intra-synaptic mitochondria) of the cerebral tissue were substantially modified by ischemia. Non-synaptic mitochondria seem to be more affected by ischemia in adult and particularly in aged animals than the intra-synaptic light and heavy mitochondria. The observed modifications in enzyme activities reflect the metabolic state of the tissue at each specific experimental condition, as shown by comparative evaluation with respect to the content of energy-linked metabolites and substrates. The derangements in enzyme activities due to ischemia is greater in aged than in adult animals and especially the non-synaptic and the intra-synaptic light

  6. Outer-membrane cytochrome-c, OmcF from Geobacter sulfurreducens: high structural similarity to an algal cytochrome c6.

    SciTech Connect

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Londer, Y. Y.; Wood, S. J.; Duke, N. E. C.; Morgado, L.; Salgueiro, C. A.; Schiffer, M.; Biosciences Division; Univ. Nova de Lisboa

    2009-01-01

    Putative outer membrane c-type cytochromes have been implicated in metal ion reducing properties of Geobacter sulfurreducens. OmcF (GSU2432), OmcB (GSU2731), and OmcC (GSU2737) are three such proteins that have predicted lipid anchors. OmcF is a monoheme cytochrome, whereas OmcB and OmcC are multiheme cytochromes. Deletion of OmcF was reported to affect the expression of OmcB and OmcC in G. sulfurreducens. The OmcF deficient strain was impaired in its ability to both reduce and grow on Fe(III) citrate probably because the expression of OmcB, which is crucial for iron reduction, is low in this strain. U(VI) reduction activity of this bacterium is also lower on deletion of OmcB or OmcF. The U(VI) reduction activity is affected more by the deletion of OmcF than by the deletion of OmcB. The soluble part of OmcF (residues 20-104, referred to as OmcF{sub S} hereafter) has sequence similarity to soluble cytochromes c{sub 6} of photosynthetic algae and cyanobacteria. The cytochrome c{sub 6} proteins in algae and cyanobacteria are electron transport proteins that mediate the transfer of electrons from cytochrome b{sub 6}f to photosystem I and have high reduction potentials of about +350 mV and low pI. The structures of seven cytochromes c{sub 6} have been previously determined. Further, a c{sub 6}-like cytochrome (PetJ2) of unknown function was recently identified in Synechoccus sp. PCC 7002 with a reduction potential of +148 mV and high pI. Here, we report the structure of OmcF{sub S} and its remarkable structural similarity to that of cytochrome c{sub 6} from the green alga, Monoraphidium braunii. To our knowledge, OmcF{sub S} is the first example of a cytochrome c{sub 6}-like structure from a nonphotosynthetic organism.

  7. Cytochrome a1 of acetobacter aceti is a cytochrome ba functioning as ubiquinol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, K; Shinagawa, E; Adachi, O; Ameyama, M

    1990-12-01

    Cytochrome a1 is a classic cytochrome that in the 1930s had already been detected in Acetobacter strains and in the 1950s was identified as a terminal oxidase. However, recent studies did not substantiate the previous observations. We have detected a cytochrome a1-like chromophore in Acetobacter aceti, which was purified and characterized in this study. The cytochrome was solubilized from membranes of the strain with octyl beta-D-glucopyranoside and was purified by single column chromatography. The purified cytochrome exhibited a broad alpha peak around 600-610 nm, which turned to a sharp peak at 589 nm in the presence of cyanide. Carbon monoxide difference spectra of the cytochrome indicated the presence of an alpha-type cytochrome. The cytochrome contained 1 mol each of hemes b and a and probably one copper ion. These results suggest that the cytochrome purified from A. aceti is the so-called cytochrome a1, and thus the existence of the classic cytochrome has been reconfirmed. The purified enzyme consisted of four polypeptides of 55, 35, 22, and 18 kDa, and it showed a sedimentation coefficient of 6.3 S in the native form. The enzyme had a high ubiquinol oxidase activity (140-160 mumol of ubiquinol-2 oxidized per min per mg of protein). When reconstituted into proteoliposomes, the cytochrome could generate an electrochemical proton gradient during oxidation of ubiquinol. Thus, cytochrome a1 of A. aceti has been shown to be a cytochrome ba terminal oxidase capable of generating an electrochemical proton gradient concomitant with ubiquinol oxidation.

  8. Simultaneous near-IR spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging to assess cerebral oxygenation and brain water during hypoxia-ischemia in two-week-old rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, R. A.; Tuor, U. I.; Foniok, T.; Bascaramurty, S.; Ringland, K.; McKenzie, E.; Qiao, M.; Tomanek, B.; Mantsch, Henry H.

    2001-10-01

    Cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy can potentially probe several parameters related to the onset of stroke and the ensuing tissue damage. One obvious marker of ischemia is cerebral oxygenation, which can be lowered sharply in stroke-affected tissue. Also commonly assessed, though less straightforward to recover, is the redox state of the cytochrome aa3 copper center. Finally, parameters that are in principle available but seldom recovered from in vivo near-IR spectra are changes in water concentration and scattering properties of the tissue. We have evaluated the potential for near-IR spectroscopy to detect relevant changes in cerebral oxygenation, blood volume, water content, and scattering properties in an infant rat stroke model that is well characterized by magnetic resonance imaging methods. The specific aim was to acquire near-IR spectra simultaneously with MR images and to correlate stroke-associated changes detected via these two modalities prior to, during and after a hypoxia-ischemia episode within this stroke model. Presented here are results from the design and testing of a near-IR illumination/detection system that is compatible with an MR imaging system, and the recovery of trends in the near-IR spectra that complement the hypoxic-ischemic changes observed in the MR images. Unexpectedly large intensity changes observed for the in vivo near-IR water absorptions are ascribed to hypoxia-induced variations in effective optical pathlength, suggesting that the water absorptions may prove generally useful as a means to track such changes.

  9. Reduction of zinc accumulation in mitochondria contributes to decreased cerebral ischemic injury by normobaric hyperoxia treatment in an experimental stroke model.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wen; Qi, Zhifeng; Liang, Jia; Shi, Wenjuan; Zhao, Yongmei; Luo, Yumin; Ji, Xunming; Liu, Ke Jian

    2015-10-01

    Cerebral ischemia interrupts oxygen supply to the affected tissues. Our previous studies have reported that normobaric hyperoxia (NBO) can maintain interstitial partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) in the penumbra of ischemic stroke rats at the physiological level, thus affording significant neuroprotection. However, the mechanisms that are responsible for the penumbra rescue by NBO treatment are not fully understood. Recent studies have shown that zinc, an important mediator of intracellular and intercellular neuronal signaling, accumulates in neurons and leads to ischemic neuronal injury. In this study, we investigate whether NBO could regulate zinc accumulation in the penumbra and prevent mitochondrial damage in penumbral tissue using a transient cerebral ischemic rat model. Our results showed that NBO significantly reduced zinc-staining positive cells and zinc-staining intensity in penumbral tissues, but not in the ischemic core. Moreover, ischemia-induced zinc accumulation in mitochondria, isolated from penumbral tissues, was greatly attenuated by NBO or a zinc-specific chelator, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN). NBO or TPEN administration stabilized the mitochondrial membrane potential in the penumbra after cerebral ischemia. Finally, ischemia-induced cytochrome c release from mitochondria in penumbral tissues was significantly reduced by NBO or TPEN treatment. These findings demonstrate a novel mechanism for NBO's neuroprotection, especially to penumbral tissues, providing further evidence for the potential clinical benefit of NBO for acute ischemic stroke.

  10. A world of cytochrome P450s.

    PubMed

    Nelson, David R

    2013-02-19

    The world we live in is a biosphere influenced by all organisms who inhabit it. It is also an ecology of genes, with some having rather startling effects. The premise put forth in this issue is cytochrome P450 is a significant player in the world around us. Life and the Earth itself would be visibly different and diminished without cytochrome P450s. The contributions to this issue range from evolution on the billion year scale to the colour of roses, from Darwin to Rachel Carson; all as seen through the lens of cytochrome P450.

  11. A world of cytochrome P450s

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, David R.

    2013-01-01

    The world we live in is a biosphere influenced by all organisms who inhabit it. It is also an ecology of genes, with some having rather startling effects. The premise put forth in this issue is cytochrome P450 is a significant player in the world around us. Life and the Earth itself would be visibly different and diminished without cytochrome P450s. The contributions to this issue range from evolution on the billion year scale to the colour of roses, from Darwin to Rachel Carson; all as seen through the lens of cytochrome P450. PMID:23297353

  12. Sulfide inhibition of and metabolism by cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Peter; Marshall, Doug C; Cooper, Chris E; Wilson, Mike T

    2013-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a classic cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor, is also an in vitro oxidase substrate and an in vivo candidate hormonal ('gasotransmitter') species affecting sleep and hibernation. H2S, nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) share some common features. All are low-molecular-mass physiological effectors and also oxidase inhibitors, capable of binding more than one enzyme site, and each is an oxidizable 'substrate'. The oxidase oxidizes CO to CO2, NO to nitrite and sulfide to probable persulfide species. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase in an aerobic steady state with ascorbate and cytochrome c is rapidly inhibited by sulfide in a biphasic manner. At least two successive inhibited species are involved, probably partially reduced. The oxidized enzyme, in the absence of turnover, occurs in at least two forms: the 'pulsed' and 'resting' states. The pulsed form reacts aerobically with sulfide to form two intermediates, 'P' and 'F', otherwise involved in the reaction of oxygen with reduced enzyme. Sulfide can directly reduce the oxygen-reactive a3CuB binuclear centre in the pulsed state. The resting enzyme does not undergo such a step, but only a very slow one-electron reduction of the electron-transferring haem a. In final reactivation phases, both the steady-state inhibition of catalysis and the accumulation of P and F states are reversed by slow sulfide oxidation. A model for this complex reaction pattern is presented. PMID:24059525

  13. Intracomplex electron transfer between ruthenium-cytochrome c derivatives and cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Pan, L P; Hibdon, S; Liu, R Q; Durham, B; Millett, F

    1993-08-24

    The reactions of bovine cytochrome c oxidase with horse cytochrome c derivatives labeled at specific lysine amino groups with (dicarboxybipyridine)bis(bipyridine)ruthenium (II) were studied by laser flash photolysis. All of the derivatives form complexes with cytochrome c oxidase at low ionic strength (5 mM sodium phosphate, pH 7). Excitation of Ru(II) to Ru(II*) with a short laser flash resulted in rapid electron transfer to the ferric heme group of cytochrome c, followed by electron transfer to cytochrome c oxidase. The photoreduced heme Fe(II) in the cytochrome c derivative modified at lysine 25 on the periphery of the heme crevice domain transferred an electron to CuA with a rate constant of 1.1 x 10(4) s-1. CuA then transferred an electron to cytochrome a with a rate constant of 2.3 x 10(4) s-1. The derivatives modified at lysines 7, 39, 55, and 60 remote from the heme crevice domain of cytochrome c have nearly the same kinetics. The rate constant for electron transfer from the cytochrome c heme to CuA is greater than 10(5) s-1, and the rate constant for electron transfer from CuA to cytochrome a is 2 x 10(4) s-1. The cytochrome c derivatives modified at lysines 13 and 27 in the heme crevice domain react much more slowly than the other derivatives, with intracomplex rate constants for oxidation of cytochrome c ranging from 1000 to 6000 s-1. The bulky ruthenium group at the heme crevice domain of these derivatives apparently alters the binding orientation, leading to smaller electron-transfer rates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Resonance Raman fingerprinting of multiheme cytochromes from the cytochrome c3 family.

    PubMed

    Di Paolo, Roberto E; Pereira, Patrícia M; Gomes, Inês; Valente, Filipa M A; Pereira, Inês A C; Franco, Ricardo

    2006-03-01

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy was used to investigate conformational characteristics of the hemes of several ferricytochromes of the cytochrome c3 family, electron transfer proteins isolated from the periplasm and membranes of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Our analysis concentrated on the low-frequency region of the RR spectra, a fingerprint region that includes vibrations for heme-protein C-S bonds [nu(C(a)S)]. It has been proposed that these bonds are directly involved in the electron transfer process. The three groups of tetraheme cytochrome c3 analyzed, namely Type I cytochrome c (3) (TpIc (3)s), Type II cytochrome c (3) (TpIIc (3)s) and Desulfomicrobium cytochromes c3, display different frequency separations for the two nu(C(a)S) lines that are similar among members of each group. These spectral differences correlate with differences in protein structure observed among the three groups of cytochromes c3. Two larger cytochromes of the cytochrome c3 family display RR spectral characteristics for the nu(C(a)S) lines that are closer to TpIIc3 than to TpIc3. Two other multiheme cytochromes from Desulfovibrio that do not belong to the cytochrome c3 family display nu(C(a)S) lines with reverse relative areas in comparison with the latter family. This RR study shows that the small differences in protein structure observed among these cytochrome c3 correlate to differences on the heme-protein bonds, which are likely to have an impact upon the protein function, making RR spectroscopy a sensitive and useful tool for characterizing these cytochromes.

  15. Mammalian cytochromes P-450: Volume I and Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Guengerich, F.P.

    1987-01-01

    This two volume set summarizes the current knowledge of mammalian cytochromes. Ten chapters cover the current understanding of the enzymology of rat, rabbit, and human liver cytochromes P-450, extrahepatic cytochromes P-450, the diversity of substrates for the individual cytochromes P0-450 proteins, the metabolism of pro-toxicants and -carcinogens by cytochrome P-450, the degradation of cytochrome P-450 proteins, and the regulation of cytochrome P-450 activities in vitro and in vivo. The individual chapters outline the historical development of each area, the approaches which are applied, the current state of knowledge, and future directions towards unresolved questions; and index.

  16. The dynamic complex of cytochrome c6 and cytochrome f studied with paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Moreno, Irene; Hulsker, Rinske; Skubak, Pavol; Foerster, Johannes M; Cavazzini, Davide; Finiguerra, Michelina G; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Moreno-Beltrán, Blas; Rossi, Gian-Luigi; Ullmann, G Matthias; Pannu, Navraj S; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Ubbink, Marcellus

    2014-08-01

    The rapid transfer of electrons in the photosynthetic redox chain is achieved by the formation of short-lived complexes of cytochrome b6f with the electron transfer proteins plastocyanin and cytochrome c6. A balance must exist between fast intermolecular electron transfer and rapid dissociation, which requires the formation of a complex that has limited specificity. The interaction of the soluble fragment of cytochrome f and cytochrome c6 from the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7119 was studied using NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The crystal structures of wild type, M58H and M58C cytochrome c6 were determined. The M58C variant is an excellent low potential mimic of the wild type protein and was used in chemical shift perturbation and paramagnetic relaxation NMR experiments to characterize the complex with cytochrome f. The interaction is highly dynamic and can be described as a pure encounter complex, with no dominant stereospecific complex. Ensemble docking calculations and Monte-Carlo simulations suggest a model in which charge-charge interactions pre-orient cytochrome c6 with its haem edge toward cytochrome f to form an ensemble of orientations with extensive contacts between the hydrophobic patches on both cytochromes, bringing the two haem groups sufficiently close to allow for rapid electron transfer. This model of complex formation allows for a gradual increase and decrease of the hydrophobic interactions during association and dissociation, thus avoiding a high transition state barrier that would slow down the dissociation process.

  17. Cytochromes P460 and c'-beta; a new family of high-spin cytochromes c.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Bradley O; Bergmann, David J; Klotz, Martin G; Hooper, Alan B

    2007-03-01

    Cytochromes-P460 of Nitrosomonas europaea and Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), and the cytochrome c' of M. capsulatus, believed to be involved in binding or transformation of N-oxides, are shown to represent an evolutionarily related new family of monoheme, approximately 17kDa, cytochromes c found in the genomes of diverse Proteobacteria. All members of this family have a predicted secondary structure predominantly of beta-sheets in contrast to the predominantly alpha-helical cytochromes c' found in photoheterotrophic and denitrifying Proteobacteria.

  18. The dynamic complex of cytochrome c6 and cytochrome f studied with paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Moreno, Irene; Hulsker, Rinske; Skubak, Pavol; Foerster, Johannes M; Cavazzini, Davide; Finiguerra, Michelina G; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Moreno-Beltrán, Blas; Rossi, Gian-Luigi; Ullmann, G Matthias; Pannu, Navraj S; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Ubbink, Marcellus

    2014-08-01

    The rapid transfer of electrons in the photosynthetic redox chain is achieved by the formation of short-lived complexes of cytochrome b6f with the electron transfer proteins plastocyanin and cytochrome c6. A balance must exist between fast intermolecular electron transfer and rapid dissociation, which requires the formation of a complex that has limited specificity. The interaction of the soluble fragment of cytochrome f and cytochrome c6 from the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7119 was studied using NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The crystal structures of wild type, M58H and M58C cytochrome c6 were determined. The M58C variant is an excellent low potential mimic of the wild type protein and was used in chemical shift perturbation and paramagnetic relaxation NMR experiments to characterize the complex with cytochrome f. The interaction is highly dynamic and can be described as a pure encounter complex, with no dominant stereospecific complex. Ensemble docking calculations and Monte-Carlo simulations suggest a model in which charge-charge interactions pre-orient cytochrome c6 with its haem edge toward cytochrome f to form an ensemble of orientations with extensive contacts between the hydrophobic patches on both cytochromes, bringing the two haem groups sufficiently close to allow for rapid electron transfer. This model of complex formation allows for a gradual increase and decrease of the hydrophobic interactions during association and dissociation, thus avoiding a high transition state barrier that would slow down the dissociation process. PMID:24685428

  19. A cytochrome cbb3 (cytochrome c) terminal oxidase in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 supports microaerobic growth.

    PubMed

    Marchal, K; Sun, J; Keijers, V; Haaker, H; Vanderleyden, J

    1998-11-01

    Spectral analysis indicated the presence of a cytochrome cbb3 oxidase under microaerobic conditions in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 cells. The corresponding genes (cytNOQP) were isolated by using PCR. These genes are organized in an operon, preceded by a putative anaerobox. The phenotype of an A. brasilense cytN mutant was analyzed. Under aerobic conditions, the specific growth rate during exponential phase (mu(e)) of the A. brasilense cytN mutant was comparable to the wild-type specific growth rate (m(e) of approximately 0.2 h-1). In microaerobic NH4+-supplemented conditions, the low respiration of the A. brasilense cytN mutant affected its specific growth rate (mu(e) of approximately 0.02 h-1) compared to the wild-type specific growth rate (mu(e) of approximately 0.2 h-1). Under nitrogen-fixing conditions, both the growth rates and respiration of the wild type were significantly diminished in comparison to those under NH4+-supplemented conditions. Differences in growth rates and respiration between the wild type and the A. brasilense cytN mutant were less pronounced under these nitrogen-fixing conditions (mu(e) of approximately 0.03 h-1 for the wild type and 0.02 h-1 for the A. brasilense cytN mutant). The nitrogen-fixing capacity of the A. brasilense cytN mutant was still approximately 80% of that determined for the wild-type strain. This leads to the conclusion that the A. brasilense cytochrome cbb3 oxidase is required under microaerobic conditions, when a high respiration rate is needed, but that under nitrogen-fixing conditions the respiration rate does not seem to be a growth-limiting factor.

  20. Statins and cerebral hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Marshall, Randolph S

    2012-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are associated with improved stroke outcome. This observation has been attributed in part to the palliative effect of statins on cerebral hemodynamics and cerebral autoregulation (CA), which are mediated mainly through the upregulation of endothelium nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Several animal studies indicate that statin pretreatment enhances cerebral blood flow after ischemic stroke, although this finding is not further supported in clinical settings. Cerebral vasomotor reactivity, however, is significantly improved after long-term statin administration in most patients with severe small vessel disease, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, or impaired baseline CA. PMID:22929438

  1. Luminogenic cytochrome P450 assays.

    PubMed

    Cali, James J; Ma, Dongping; Sobol, Mary; Simpson, Daniel J; Frackman, Susan; Good, Troy D; Daily, William J; Liu, David

    2006-08-01

    Luminogenic cytochrome P450 (CYP) assays couple CYP enzyme activity to firefly luciferase luminescence in a technology called P450-Glo(TM) (Promega). Luminogenic substrates are used in assays of human CYP1A1, -1A2, -1B1, -2C8, -2C9, -2C19, -2D6, -2J2, -3A4, -3A7, -4A11, -4F3B, -4F12 and -19. The assays detect dose-dependent CYP inhibition by test compounds against recombinant CYP enzymes or liver microsomes. Induction or inhibition of CYP activities in cultured hepatocytes is measured in a nonlytic approach that leaves cells intact for additional analysis. Luminogenic CYP assays offer advantages of speed and safety over HPLC and radiochemical-based methods. Compared with fluorogenic methods the approach offers advantages of improved sensitivity and decreased interference between optical properties of test compound and CYP substrate. These homogenous assays are sensitive and robust tools for high-throughput CYP screening in early drug discovery. PMID:16859410

  2. Islet secretory granules contain cytochrome b561.

    PubMed

    Mackin, R B; Jones, D P; Noe, B D

    1986-08-01

    A cytochrome has been detected in secretory granules prepared from anglerfish islets of Langerhans. The heme moiety was determined to be of the b type, and the dithionite-reduced cytochrome exhibited an alpha-band maximum at 561 nm with an extinction coefficient of 13.8 mM-1 X cm-1. The protein was present at a concentration of 40 +/- 4 pmol/mg of secretory granule protein. The cytochrome was found to be an integral membrane protein and to be reduced by ascorbic acid but not by NADH, NADPH, reduced glutathione (GSH), or succinate. Because of the similarity to previously characterized secretory granule cytochrome b561's from neuroendocrine tissues, this cytochrome is also referred to as cytochrome b561. Although its function has not yet been elucidated, the apparent specificity for ascorbate suggests that it may be a component of the ascorbate-dependent peptidyl-glycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase system that functions in the amidation of islet hormones. PMID:3525285

  3. Cytochrome bd Displays Significant Quinol Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Al-Attar, Sinan; Yu, Yuanjie; Pinkse, Martijn; Hoeser, Jo; Friedrich, Thorsten; Bald, Dirk; de Vries, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome bd is a prokaryotic terminal oxidase that catalyses the electrogenic reduction of oxygen to water using ubiquinol as electron donor. Cytochrome bd is a tri-haem integral membrane enzyme carrying a low-spin haem b558, and two high-spin haems: b595 and d. Here we show that besides its oxidase activity, cytochrome bd from Escherichia coli is a genuine quinol peroxidase (QPO) that reduces hydrogen peroxide to water. The highly active and pure enzyme preparation used in this study did not display the catalase activity recently reported for E. coli cytochrome bd. To our knowledge, cytochrome bd is the first membrane-bound quinol peroxidase detected in E. coli. The observation that cytochrome bd is a quinol peroxidase, can provide a biochemical basis for its role in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide and may explain the frequent findings reported in the literature that indicate increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and decreased virulence in mutants that lack the enzyme. PMID:27279363

  4. Cerebral blood flow variations in CNS lupus

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, M.J.; Tobin, M.; Fazekas, F.; Chawluk, J.; Jamieson, D.; Freundlich, B.; Grenell, S.; Freemen, L.; Reivich, M. )

    1990-01-01

    We studied the patterns of cerebral blood flow (CBF), over time, in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and varying neurologic manifestations including headache, stroke, psychosis, and encephalopathy. For 20 paired xenon-133 CBF measurements, CBF was normal during CNS remissions, regardless of the symptoms. CBF was significantly depressed during CNS exacerbations. The magnitude of change in CBF varied with the neurologic syndrome. CBF was least affected in patients with nonspecific symptoms such as headache or malaise, whereas patients with encephalopathy or psychosis exhibited the greatest reductions in CBF. In 1 patient with affective psychosis, without clinical or CT evidence of cerebral ischemia, serial SPECT studies showed resolution of multifocal cerebral perfusion defects which paralleled clinical recovery.

  5. Cerebral Asymmetries and Reading Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirozzolo, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed are historical developments regarding the concepts of cerebral localization, and analyzed are implications of current research on the role of the cerebral hemispheres in reading disorders. (CL)

  6. Simultaneous purification and characterization of cytochrome b5 reductase and cytochrome b5 from sheep liver.

    PubMed

    Arinç, E; Cakir, D

    1999-02-01

    Cytochrome b5 was purified from detergent solubilized sheep liver microsomes by using three successive DEAE-cellulose, and Sephadex G-100 column chromatographies. It was purified 54-fold and the yield was 23.5% with respect to microsomes. The apparent Mr of cytochrome b5 was estimated to be 16,200 +/- 500 by SDS-PAGE. Absolute absorption spectrum of the purified cytochrome b5 showed maximal absorption at 412 nm and dithionite-reduced cytochrome b5 gave peaks at 557, 526.5 and 423 nm. The ability of the purified sheep liver cytochrome b5 to transfer electrons from NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase to cytochrome c was investigated. The K(m) and Vmax values were calculated to be 0.088 microM cytochrome b5 and 315.8 microM cytochrome c reduced/min/mg enzyme, respectively. Also the reduction of cytochrome b5 by reductase was studied and K(m) and Vmax values were determined to be 5 microM cytochrome b5 and 5200 nmol cytochrome b5 reduced/min/mg enzyme, respectively. The K(m) and Vmax values for the cofactor NADH in the presence of saturating concentration of cytochrome b5 were found to be 0.0017 mM NADH and 6944 nmol cytochrome b5 reduced/min/mg enzyme, respectively. NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase was also partially purified from the same source, detergent solubilized sheep liver microsomes, by using two successive DEAE-cellulose, and 5'-ADP-agarose affinity column chromatographies. It was purified 144-fold and the yield was 7% with respect to microsomes. The apparent monomer Mr of reductase was estimated to be 34,000 by SDS-PAGE. When ferricyanide was used as an electron acceptor, reductase showed maximum activity between 6.8 and 7.5. The K(m) and Vmax values of the enzyme for ferricyanide were calculated as 0.024 mM ferricyanide and 673 mumol ferricyanide reduced/min/mg enzyme, respectively. The K(m) and Vmax values for the cofactor NADH in the presence of saturating amounts of ferricyanide were found to be 0.020 mM NADH and 699 mumol ferricyanide reduced/min/mg enzyme

  7. Bone age in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Eduardo Régis de Alencar Bona; Palmieri, Maurício D'arc; de Assumpção, Rodrigo Montezuma César; Yamada, Helder Henzo; Rancan, Daniela Regina; Fucs, Patrícia Maria de Moraes Barros

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the chronological age and bone age among cerebral palsy patients in the outpatient clinic and its correlation with the type of neurological involvement, gender and functional status. Methods 401 patients with spastic cerebral palsy, and ages ranging from three months to 20 years old, submitted to radiological examination for bone age and analyzed by two independent observers according Greulich & Pyle. Results In the topographic distribution, there was a significant delay (p<0.005) in tetraparetic (17.7 months), hemiparetic (10.1 months), and diparetic patients (7.9 months). In the hemiparetic group, the mean bone age in the affected side was 96.88 months and the uncompromised side was 101.13 months (p<0.005). Regarding functional status, the ambulatory group showed a delay of 18.73 months in bone age (p<0.005). Comparing bone age between genders, it was observed a greater delay in males (13.59 months) than in females (9.63 months), but not statistically significant (p = 0.54). Conclusion There is a delay in bone age compared to chronological age influenced by the topography of spasticity, functional level and gender in patients with cerebral palsy. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453693

  8. The role of cytochrome b5 structural domains in interaction with cytochromes P450.

    PubMed

    Sergeev, G V; Gilep, A A; Usanov, S A

    2014-05-01

    To understand the role of the structural elements of cytochrome b5 in its interaction with cytochrome P450 and the catalysis performed by this heme protein, we carried out comparative structural and functional analysis of the two major mammalian forms of membrane-bound cytochrome b5 - microsomal and mitochondrial, designed chimeric forms of the heme proteins in which the hydrophilic domain of one heme protein is replaced by the hydrophilic domain of another one, and investigated the effect of the highly purified native and chimeric heme proteins on the enzymatic activity of recombinant cytochromes P4503A4 and P45017A1 (CYP3A4 and CYP17A1). We show that the presence of a hydrophobic domain in the structure of cytochrome b5 is necessary for its effective interaction with its redox partners, while the nature of the hydrophobic domain has no significant effect on the ability of cytochrome b5 to stimulate the activity of cytochrome P450-catalyzed reactions. Thus, the functional properties of cytochrome b5 are mainly determined by the structure of the heme-binding domain.

  9. Cytochrome c1 exhibits two binding sites for cytochrome c in plants.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Beltrán, Blas; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; González-Arzola, Katiuska; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Díaz-Moreno, Irene

    2014-10-01

    In plants, channeling of cytochrome c molecules between complexes III and IV has been purported to shuttle electrons within the supercomplexes instead of carrying electrons by random diffusion across the intermembrane bulk phase. However, the mode plant cytochrome c behaves inside a supercomplex such as the respirasome, formed by complexes I, III and IV, remains obscure from a structural point of view. Here, we report ab-initio Brownian dynamics calculations and nuclear magnetic resonance-driven docking computations showing two binding sites for plant cytochrome c at the head soluble domain of plant cytochrome c1, namely a non-productive (or distal) site with a long heme-to-heme distance and a functional (or proximal) site with the two heme groups close enough as to allow electron transfer. As inferred from isothermal titration calorimetry experiments, the two binding sites exhibit different equilibrium dissociation constants, for both reduced and oxidized species, that are all within the micromolar range, thus revealing the transient nature of such a respiratory complex. Although the docking of cytochrome c at the distal site occurs at the interface between cytochrome c1 and the Rieske subunit, it is fully compatible with the complex III structure. In our model, the extra distal site in complex III could indeed facilitate the functional cytochrome c channeling towards complex IV by building a "floating boat bridge" of cytochrome c molecules (between complexes III and IV) in plant respirasome.

  10. Cytochrome c1 exhibits two binding sites for cytochrome c in plants.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Beltrán, Blas; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; González-Arzola, Katiuska; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Díaz-Moreno, Irene

    2014-10-01

    In plants, channeling of cytochrome c molecules between complexes III and IV has been purported to shuttle electrons within the supercomplexes instead of carrying electrons by random diffusion across the intermembrane bulk phase. However, the mode plant cytochrome c behaves inside a supercomplex such as the respirasome, formed by complexes I, III and IV, remains obscure from a structural point of view. Here, we report ab-initio Brownian dynamics calculations and nuclear magnetic resonance-driven docking computations showing two binding sites for plant cytochrome c at the head soluble domain of plant cytochrome c1, namely a non-productive (or distal) site with a long heme-to-heme distance and a functional (or proximal) site with the two heme groups close enough as to allow electron transfer. As inferred from isothermal titration calorimetry experiments, the two binding sites exhibit different equilibrium dissociation constants, for both reduced and oxidized species, that are all within the micromolar range, thus revealing the transient nature of such a respiratory complex. Although the docking of cytochrome c at the distal site occurs at the interface between cytochrome c1 and the Rieske subunit, it is fully compatible with the complex III structure. In our model, the extra distal site in complex III could indeed facilitate the functional cytochrome c channeling towards complex IV by building a "floating boat bridge" of cytochrome c molecules (between complexes III and IV) in plant respirasome. PMID:25091281

  11. Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Pop Quiz: Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Sandy is the parent of a child with cerebral palsy and the Board President of Gio’s Garden , a ...

  12. Hemihyperhidrosis in cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Faruqi, Shoaib; Redmond, Gemma; Ram, Pusbar; Owens, Val B; Sangster, Graeme; Barrett, James A

    2004-09-01

    Increased sweating on the hemiparetic side in cerebral infarcts is not a common clinical finding. The onset, severity and duration of symptoms can vary. The structural lesion responsible for this is a subject of conjecture. We present the case of a 66-year-old man who developed hemihyperhidrosis secondary to a cerebral infarct. PMID:15315923

  13. The cytochrome bd respiratory oxygen reductases

    PubMed Central

    Borisov, Vitaliy B.; Gennis, Robert B.; Hemp, James; Verkhovsky, Michael I.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cytochrome bd is a respiratory quinol:O2 oxidoreductase found in many prokaryotes, including a number of pathogens. The main bioenergetic function of the enzyme is the production of a proton motive force by the vectorial charge transfer of protons. The sequences of cytochromes bd are not homologous to those of the other respiratory oxygen reductases, i.e., the heme-copper oxygen reductases or alternative oxidases (AOX). Generally, cytochromes bd are noteworthy for their high affinity for O2 and resistance to inhibition by cyanide. In E. coli, for example, cytochrome bd (specifically, cytochrome bd-I) is expressed under O2-limited conditions. Among the members of the bd-family are the so-called cyanide-insensitive quinol oxidases (CIO) which often have a low content of the eponymous heme d but, instead, have heme b in place of heme d in at least a majority of the enzyme population. However, at this point, no sequence motif has been identified to distinguish cytochrome bd (with a stoichiometric complement of heme d) from an enzyme designated as CIO. Members of the bd-family can be subdivided into those which contain either a long or a short hydrophilic connection between transmembrane helices 6 and 7 in subunit I, designated as the Q-loop. However, it is not clear whether there is a functional consequence of this difference. This review summarizes current knowledge on the physiological functions, genetics, structural and catalytic properties of cytochromes bd. Included in this review are descriptions of the intermediates of the catalytic cycle, the proposed site for the reduction of O2, evidence for a proton channel connecting this active site to the bacterial cytoplasm, and the molecular mechanism by which a membrane potential is generated. PMID:21756872

  14. The cytochrome bd respiratory oxygen reductases.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Vitaliy B; Gennis, Robert B; Hemp, James; Verkhovsky, Michael I

    2011-11-01

    Cytochrome bd is a respiratory quinol: O₂ oxidoreductase found in many prokaryotes, including a number of pathogens. The main bioenergetic function of the enzyme is the production of a proton motive force by the vectorial charge transfer of protons. The sequences of cytochromes bd are not homologous to those of the other respiratory oxygen reductases, i.e., the heme-copper oxygen reductases or alternative oxidases (AOX). Generally, cytochromes bd are noteworthy for their high affinity for O₂ and resistance to inhibition by cyanide. In E. coli, for example, cytochrome bd (specifically, cytochrome bd-I) is expressed under O₂-limited conditions. Among the members of the bd-family are the so-called cyanide-insensitive quinol oxidases (CIO) which often have a low content of the eponymous heme d but, instead, have heme b in place of heme d in at least a majority of the enzyme population. However, at this point, no sequence motif has been identified to distinguish cytochrome bd (with a stoichiometric complement of heme d) from an enzyme designated as CIO. Members of the bd-family can be subdivided into those which contain either a long or a short hydrophilic connection between transmembrane helices 6 and 7 in subunit I, designated as the Q-loop. However, it is not clear whether there is a functional consequence of this difference. This review summarizes current knowledge on the physiological functions, genetics, structural and catalytic properties of cytochromes bd. Included in this review are descriptions of the intermediates of the catalytic cycle, the proposed site for the reduction of O₂, evidence for a proton channel connecting this active site to the bacterial cytoplasm, and the molecular mechanism by which a membrane potential is generated.

  15. Thermal stability of the polyheme cytochrome c3 superfamily.

    PubMed

    Florens, L; Bianco, P; Haladjian, J; Bruschi, M; Protasevich, I; Makarov, A

    1995-10-16

    The cytochrome c3 superfamily includes Desulfovibrio polyheme cytochromes c. We report the characteristic thermal stability parameters of the Desulfovibrio desulfuricans Norway (D.d.N.) cytochromes c3 (M(r) 13,000 and M(r) 26,000) and the Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (D.v.H.) cytochrome c3 (M(r) 13,000) and high molecular mass cytochrome c (Hmc), as obtained with the help of electronic spectroscopy, voltammetric techniques and differential scanning calorimetry. The polyheme cytochromes are denatured over a wide range of temperatures: the D.v.H. cytochrome c3 is highly thermostable (Td = 121 degrees C) contrary to the D.d.N. protein (Td = 73 degrees C). The thermostability of the polyheme cytochromes is redox state dependent. The results are discussed in the light of the structural and functional relationships within the cytochrome c3 superfamily. PMID:7589483

  16. Intracomplex electron transfer between ruthenium-cytochrome c derivatives and cytochrome c1.

    PubMed

    Heacock, D H; Liu, R Q; Yu, C A; Yu, L; Durham, B; Millett, F

    1993-12-25

    The reactions of a beef heart cytochrome c1 preparation containing the hinge protein with horse cytochrome c derivatives labeled at specific lysine amino groups with (dicarboxybipyridine)(bisbipyridine)ruthenium(II) (Ru(II)) were studied by flash photolysis. All of the ruthenium-cytochrome c derivatives formed complexes with cytochrome c1 in low ionic strength buffer (5 mM sodium phosphate, pH 7). Excitation of Ru(II) to Ru(II*) with a 0.4-microseconds laser flash resulted in rapid electron transfer to the ferric heme group in cytochrome c, followed by electron transfer from the ferrous heme group of cytochrome c to the ferric heme group of cytochrome c1. The kinetic difference spectra displayed maxima at 546 nm and minima at 554 nm characteristic of electron transfer between the two cytochromes. The rate constants were independent of concentration at low ionic strength, indicating intracomplex electron transfer. The rate constants were 4,800, 6,800, 22,000, and 22,000 s-1 for cytochrome c derivatives modified at lysines 13, 27, 25, and 72, respectively. The observed rate constants were independent of ionic strength up to about 50 nM and then decreased progressively with further increases in ionic strength indicating dissociation of the complex. Second-order kinetics were observed at 310 mM ionic strength, with rate constants of 1.0 x 10(6), 1.6 x 10(7), 1.2 x 10(8), and 3.0 x 10(7) M-1 s-1 for the derivatives modified at lysines 13, 27, 25, and 72, respectively. The ionic strength dependence of the second-order rate constants is comparable to that involving native horse cytochrome c and is consistent with electron transfer reactions between oppositely charged proteins.

  17. Label-free photoacoustic microscopy of cytochromes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Yao, Da-Kang; Xia, Younan; Wang, Lihong V

    2013-02-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has achieved submicron lateral resolution in showing subcellular structures; however, relatively few endogenous subcellular contrasts have so far been imaged. Given that the hemeprotein, mostly cytochromes in general cells, is optically absorbing around the Soret peak (~420 nm), we implemented label-free PAM of cytochromes in cytoplasm for the first time. By measuring the photoacoustic spectra of the oxidized and reduced states of fibroblast lysate and fitting the difference spectrum with three types of cytochromes, we found that the three cytochromes account for more than half the optical absorption in the cell lysate at 420 nm wavelength. Fixed fibroblasts on slides were imaged by PAM at 422 and 250 nm wavelengths to reveal cytoplasms and nuclei, respectively, as confirmed by standard staining histology. PAM was also applied to label-free histology of mouse ear sections by showing cytoplasms and nuclei of various cells. PAM of cytochromes in cytoplasm is expected to be a high-throughput, label-free technique for studying live cell functions, which cannot be accomplished by conventional histology.

  18. Yeast mutants overproducing iso-cytochromes c

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, F.; Cardillo, T.S.; Errede, B.; Friedman, L.; McKnight, G.; Stiles, J.I.

    1980-01-01

    For over 15 years, the iso-cytochrome c system in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used to investigate a multitude of problems in genetics and molecular biology. More recently, attention has been focused on using mutants for examining translation and transcriptional processes and for probing regulatory regions governing gene expression. In an effort to explore regulatory mechanisms and to investigate mutational alterations that lead to increased levels of gene products, we have isolated and characterized mutants that overproduce cytochrome c. In this paper we have briefly summarized background information of some essential features of the iso-cytochrome c system and we have described the types of mutants that overproduce iso-1-cytochrome c or iso-2-cytochrome c. Genetic procedures and recombinant DNA procedures were used to demonstrate that abnormally high amounts of gene products occur in mutants as result of duplications of gene copies or of extended alteration of regulatory regions. The results summarized in this paper point out the requirements of gross mutational changes or rearrangements of chromosomal segments for augmenting gene products.

  19. Cytochrome P450 monooxygenase system in echinoderms.

    PubMed

    den Besten, P J

    1998-11-01

    The results of a limited number of studies on echinoderms provide evidence for the presence of a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase system in representatives of three classes of the phylum Echinodermata: the asteroids (sea stars), holothuroids (sea cucumbers) and echinoids (sea urchins). The monooxygenase system has been demonstrated to be involved in the metabolism of xenobiotic compounds, but is assumed to have its primary function in the metabolism of endogenous substrates, such as steroids. Available data on P450 cofactor requirement, P450-dependent metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene, studies with classical inhibitors of P450, specificity of P450 induction by planar compounds, and the changes in the benzo[a]pyrene metabolite profile in induced animals suggest similarities with the MO system present in vertebrates. However, the relatively high capacity of the monooxygenase system in sea stars to catalyse reactions with organic hydroperoxide as donor for activated oxygen, and the low induceability during exposure to xenobiotics indicate also important differences between the echinoderm cytochrome P450 monooxygenase system and that of vertebrates. Some evidence was found for the existence of different forms of cytochrome P450 in sea stars. Catalytic functions of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase system of sea stars in the metabolism of steroids may be suppressed as a result of the induction of cytochrome P450 by xenobiotics. PMID:9972455

  20. Affinity Chromatography Purification of Cytochrome c Binding Enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzi, Angelo; Bill, Kurt; Broger, Clemens

    1982-04-01

    An efficient affinity chromatography procedure for the isolation of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase and reductase is described. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cytochrome c was used as a ligand, bound to a thiol-Sepharose 4B gel through cysteine-107. In this way, the site of interaction of cytochrome c with cytochrome oxidase and reductase remained unmodified and available for binding to a number of partner enzymes. The procedure is adequate for the purification of all those proteins having in common the property of binding with high affinity to cytochrome c--e.g., cytochrome c oxidase, reductase, and peroxidase, sulfite oxidase, and reaction centers of photosynthetic bacteria.

  1. Two-dimensional crystallization of monomeric bovine cytochrome c oxidase with bound cytochrome c in reconstituted lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Osuda, Yukiho; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Tani, Kazutoshi; Maeda, Shintaro; Yoshikawa, Shinya; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Gerle, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase utilizes electrons provided by cytochrome c for the active vectorial transport of protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane through the reduction of molecular oxygen to water. Direct structural evidence on the transient cytochrome c oxidase–cytochrome c complex thus far, however, remains elusive and its physiological relevant oligomeric form is unclear. Here, we report on the 2D crystallization of monomeric bovine cytochrome c oxidase with tightly bound cytochrome c at a molar ratio of 1:1 in reconstituted lipid membranes at the basic pH of 8.5 and low ionic strength. PMID:26754561

  2. Role of Protein–Protein Interactions in Cytochrome P450-Mediated Drug Metabolism and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Through their unique oxidative chemistry, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs) catalyze the elimination of most drugs and toxins from the human body. Protein–protein interactions play a critical role in this process. Historically, the study of CYP–protein interactions has focused on their electron transfer partners and allosteric mediators, cytochrome P450 reductase and cytochrome b5. However, CYPs can bind other proteins that also affect CYP function. Some examples include the progesterone receptor membrane component 1, damage resistance protein 1, human and bovine serum albumin, and intestinal fatty acid binding protein, in addition to other CYP isoforms. Furthermore, disruption of these interactions can lead to altered paths of metabolism and the production of toxic metabolites. In this review, we summarize the available evidence for CYP protein–protein interactions from the literature and offer a discussion of the potential impact of future studies aimed at characterizing noncanonical protein–protein interactions with CYP enzymes. PMID:25133307

  3. Role of cytochrome P sub 450 in the control of the production of erythropoietin

    SciTech Connect

    Fandrey, J.; Seydel, F.P.; Siegers, C.P.; Jelkmann, W. )

    1990-01-01

    Effects of agents affecting cytochrome P{sub 450} were studied on the production of erythropoietin (Epo) in cultures of the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. Epo was measured by radioimmunoassay of the culture media after 24 h of incubation. The addition of phenobarbital or 3-methylcholanthrene, which induce cytochrome P{sub 450}, significantly enhanced the formation of Epo. Likewise, the thyroid hormones T{sub 3} and T{sub 4} stimulated the rate of the production of Epo. On the other hand, the formation of Epo was lowered following the addition of diethyl-dithiocarbamate or cysteamine chloride, which inhibit cytochrome P{sub 450}. These findings support the idea that O{sub 2} sensitive hemoproteins of the microsomal mixed-functional oxidases play a role in the control of the synthesis of Epo.

  4. Control of insulin secretion by cytochrome C and calcium signaling in islets with impaired metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rountree, Austin M; Neal, Adam S; Lisowski, Mark; Rizzo, Norma; Radtke, Jared; White, Sarah; Luciani, Dan S; Kim, Francis; Hampe, Christiane S; Sweet, Ian R

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the relative control of insulin secretion rate (ISR) by calcium influx and signaling from cytochrome c in islets where, as in diabetes, the metabolic pathways are impaired. This was achieved either by culturing isolated islets at low (3 mm) glucose or by fasting rats prior to the isolation of the islets. Culture in low glucose greatly reduced the glucose response of cytochrome c reduction and translocation and ISR, but did not affect the response to the mitochondrial fuel α-ketoisocaproate. Unexpectedly, glucose-stimulated calcium influx was only slightly reduced in low glucose-cultured islets and was not responsible for the impairment in glucose-stimulated ISR. A glucokinase activator acutely restored cytochrome c reduction and translocation and ISR, independent of effects on calcium influx. Islets from fasted rats had reduced ISR and cytochrome c reduction in response to both glucose and α-ketoisocaproate despite normal responses of calcium. Our data are consistent with the scenario where cytochrome c reduction and translocation are essential signals in the stimulation of ISR, the loss of which can result in impaired ISR even when calcium response is normal.

  5. Reactive Intermediates in Cytochrome P450 Catalysis*

    PubMed Central

    Krest, Courtney M.; Onderko, Elizabeth L.; Yosca, Timothy H.; Calixto, Julio C.; Karp, Richard F.; Livada, Jovan; Rittle, Jonathan; Green, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we reported the spectroscopic and kinetic characterizations of cytochrome P450 compound I in CYP119A1, effectively closing the catalytic cycle of cytochrome P450-mediated hydroxylations. In this minireview, we focus on the developments that made this breakthrough possible. We examine the importance of enzyme purification in the quest for reactive intermediates and report the preparation of compound I in a second P450 (P450ST). In an effort to bring clarity to the field, we also examine the validity of controversial reports claiming the production of P450 compound I through the use of peroxynitrite and laser flash photolysis. PMID:23632017

  6. Assessment of the hand in cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Praveen; Sabapathy, S. Raja

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is the musculoskeletal manifestation of a nonprogressive central nervous system lesion that usually occurs due to a perinatal insult to the brain. Though the cerebral insult is static the musculoskeletal pathology is progressive. Some patients with cerebral palsy whose hands are affected can be made better by surgery. The surgical procedures as such are not very technically demanding but the assessment, decision-making, and selecting the procedures for the given patient make this field challenging. When done well, the results are rewarding not only in terms of improvement in hand function but also in appearance and personal hygiene, which leads to better self-image and permits better acceptance in the society. This article focuses on the clinical examination, patient selection, and decision-making while managing these patients. PMID:22022045

  7. Genetic characterization of Bagarius species using cytochrome c oxidase I and cytochrome b genes.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Muniyandi; Raja, Manikam; Vikram, Potnuru

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we first inferred the genetic variability of two Bagarius bagarius populations collected from Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers of India using two mtDNA markers. Sequence analysis of COI gene did not show significant differences between two populations whereas cytochrome b gene showed significant differences between two populations. Followed by, genetic relationship of B. bagarius and B. yarrielli was analyzed using COI and cytochrome b gene and the results showed a higher level genetic variation between two species. The present study provides support for the suitability of COI and cytochrome b genes for the identification of B. bagarius and B. yarrielli.

  8. Effects of cerebral ischemia on neuronal hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    He, Yangdong; Hua, Ya; Liu, Wenquan; Hu, Haitao; Keep, Richard F.; Xi, Guohua

    2009-01-01

    Summary The present study examined whether or not neuronal hemoglobin (Hb) is present in rats. It then examined whether cerebral ischemia or ischemic preconditioning (IPC) affects neuronal Hb levels in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either 15 minutes of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion with 24 hours of reperfusion, an IPC stimulus, or 24 hours of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO), or IPC followed three days later by 24 hours of pMCAO. In vitro, primary cultured neurons were exposed to 2 hours of oxygen-glucose deprivation with 22 hours of reoxygenation. Results showed that Hb is widely expressed in rat cerebral neurons but not astrocytes. Hb expression was significantly upregulated in the ipsilateral caudate and the cortical core of the middle cerebral artery territory after IPC. Hb levels also increased in more penumbral cortex and the contralateral hemisphere 24 hours after pMCAO, but expression in the ipsilateral caudate and cortical core area were decreased. Ischemic preconditioning modified pMCAO-induced brain Hb changes. Neuronal Hb levels in vitro were increased by 2 hours of oxygen-glucose deprivation and 22 hours of reoxygenation. These results indicate that Hb is synthesized in neurons and can be upregulated by ischemia. PMID:19066615

  9. Neoplastic lesions of the human liver in relation to the activity of the cytochrome P-450 dependent monooxygenase system.

    PubMed

    Plewka, D; Plewka, A; Nowaczyk, G; Kamiński, M; Rutkowski, T; Ludyga, T; Ziaja, K

    2000-01-01

    We studied the activity of Mixed function oxidase (MFO) in human livers affected by cancer. We determined the content of cytochrome P-450 and b5, as well as the activity of their corresponding reductases, according to generally accepted methods. Liver fragments corresponding with a) healthy tissue, b) tissue at the cancer border and, c) cancerous tissue were collected during surgery from patients with liver cancer. We noted that the developing liver cancer decreased the level of cytochrome P-450, even by a magnitude order. The activity of its corresponding reductase was higher in cancerous than in healthy tissues. Cytochrome b5 behaved in an analogous manner, although the decrease in its content was less significant. NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase activity changes were insignificant.

  10. Definition of the interaction domain for cytochrome c on cytochrome c oxidase. Ii. Rapid kinetic analysis of electron transfer from cytochrome c to Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome oxidase surface mutants.

    PubMed

    Wang, K; Zhen, Y; Sadoski, R; Grinnell, S; Geren, L; Ferguson-Miller, S; Durham, B; Millett, F

    1999-12-31

    The reaction between cytochrome c (Cc) and Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) was studied using a cytochrome c derivative labeled with ruthenium trisbipyridine at lysine 55 (Ru-55-Cc). Flash photolysis of a 1:1 complex between Ru-55-Cc and CcO at low ionic strength results in electron transfer from photoreduced heme c to Cu(A) with an intracomplex rate constant of k(a) = 4 x 10(4) s(-1), followed by electron transfer from Cu(A) to heme a with a rate constant of k(b) = 9 x 10(4) s(-1). The effects of CcO surface mutations on the kinetics follow the order D214N > E157Q > E148Q > D195N > D151N/E152Q approximately D188N/E189Q approximately wild type, indicating that the acidic residues Asp(214), Glu(157), Glu(148), and Asp(195) on subunit II interact electrostatically with the lysines surrounding the heme crevice of Cc. Mutating the highly conserved tryptophan residue, Trp(143), to Phe or Ala decreased the intracomplex electron transfer rate constant k(a) by 450- and 1200-fold, respectively, without affecting the dissociation constant K(D). It therefore appears that the indole ring of Trp(143) mediates electron transfer from the heme group of Cc to Cu(A). These results are consistent with steady-state kinetic results (Zhen, Y., Hoganson, C. W., Babcock, G. T., and Ferguson-Miller, S. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 38032-38041) and a computational docking analysis (Roberts, V. A., and Pique, M. E. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 38051-38060).

  11. Role of cytochrome B in the processing of the subunits of complex III in the yeast mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, K.G.

    1986-01-01

    The work described in this dissertation deals with the effect of cytochrome b on the biogenesis and assembly of the subunits of complex III in the mitochondrial membrane of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The cytochrome b-mutants (Box mutants of S. cerevisiae form an excellent system to study such a role of cytochome B. The amounts of cytochrome c/sub 1/ in the mitochrondria, as determined both spectroscopically and immunologically, were not affected by the absence of cytochrome b. Pulse labelling of the cells with (/sup 35/S) methionine in the presence of CCCP showed the accumulation of the precursors to the core protein I and the iron-sulfur protein in similar amounts in the mutant Box 6-2 and the wild type cells. Synthesis of the iron sulfur protein and the cytochrome c/sub 1/ by in vitro translation of mRNA isolated from wild type and mutant Box 6-2 in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system, also confirmed that the synthesis of the nuclear encoded subunits was not affected in the mutants. Pulse labeling of the cells in the absence of CCCP and subsequent chase with cold methionine, however, showed much less of the mature subunits of core protein I and the iron-sulfur protein in the mitochrondria of the mutant cells relative to the wild type. These results indicate that cytochrome b is necessary for the proper processing of certain subunits of complex III.

  12. Identification of 42 possible cytochrome C genes in the Shewanella oneidensis genome and characterization of six soluble cytochromes.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Terry E; Tsapin, Alexandre I; Vandenberghe, Isabel; de Smet, Lina; Frishman, Dmitrij; Nealson, Kenneth H; Cusanovich, Michael A; van Beeumen, Jozef J

    2004-01-01

    Through pattern matching of the cytochrome c heme-binding site (CXXCH) against the genome sequence of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, we identified 42 possible cytochrome c genes (27 of which should be soluble) out of a total of 4758. However, we found only six soluble cytochromes c in extracts of S. oneidensis grown under several different conditions: (1) a small tetraheme cytochrome c, (2) a tetraheme flavocytochrome c-fumarate reductase, (3) a diheme cytochrome c4, (4) a monoheme cytochrome c5, (5) a monoheme cytochrome c', and (6) a diheme bacterial cytochrome c peroxidase. These cytochromes were identified either through N-terminal or complete amino acid sequence determination combined with mass spectroscopy. All six cytochromes were about 10-fold more abundant when cells were grown at low than at high aeration, whereas the flavocytochrome c-fumarate reductase was specifically induced by anaerobic growth on fumarate. When adjusted for the different heme content, the monoheme cytochrome c5 is as abundant as are the small tetraheme cytochrome and the tetraheme fumarate reductase. Published results on regulation of cytochromes from DNA microarrays and 2D-PAGE differ somewhat from our results, emphasizing the importance of multifaceted analyses in proteomics.

  13. Acquired Cerebral Trauma: Epilogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    The article summarizes a series of articles concerning acquired cerebral trauma. Reviewed are technological advances, treatment, assessment, potential innovative therapies, long-term outcome, family impact of chronic brain injury, and prevention. (DB)

  14. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed.

  15. Cytochrome C: A Biochemistry Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, John B.; Woski, Stephen A.

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory course called cytochrome c that focuses on the theme of biochemical research is presented. The students follow this course by incorporating team-investigation and self-directed experimentation that provides them an opportunity to experience the excitement of research.

  16. Revealing the cerebral regions and networks mediating vulnerability to depression: oxidative metabolism mapping of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Harro, Jaanus; Kanarik, Margus; Kaart, Tanel; Matrov, Denis; Kõiv, Kadri; Mällo, Tanel; Del Río, Joaquin; Tordera, Rosa M; Ramirez, Maria J

    2014-07-01

    The large variety of available animal models has revealed much on the neurobiology of depression, but each model appears as specific to a significant extent, and distinction between stress response, pathogenesis of depression and underlying vulnerability is difficult to make. Evidence from epidemiological studies suggests that depression occurs in biologically predisposed subjects under impact of adverse life events. We applied the diathesis-stress concept to reveal brain regions and functional networks that mediate vulnerability to depression and response to chronic stress by collapsing data on cerebral long term neuronal activity as measured by cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry in distinct animal models. Rats were rendered vulnerable to depression either by partial serotonergic lesion or by maternal deprivation, or selected for a vulnerable phenotype (low positive affect, low novelty-related activity or high hedonic response). Environmental adversity was brought about by applying chronic variable stress or chronic social defeat. Several brain regions, most significantly median raphe, habenula, retrosplenial cortex and reticular thalamus, were universally implicated in long-term metabolic stress response, vulnerability to depression, or both. Vulnerability was associated with higher oxidative metabolism levels as compared to resilience to chronic stress. Chronic stress, in contrast, had three distinct patterns of effect on oxidative metabolism in vulnerable vs. resilient animals. In general, associations between regional activities in several brain circuits were strongest in vulnerable animals, and chronic stress disrupted this interrelatedness. These findings highlight networks that underlie resilience to stress, and the distinct response to stress that occurs in vulnerable subjects.

  17. Design of ruthenium-cytochrome c derivatives to measure electron transfer to cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Liu, R Q; Geren, L; Anderson, P; Fairris, J L; Peffer, N; McKee, A; Durham, B; Millet, F

    1995-01-01

    A new technique has been introduced to measure interprotein electron transfer which involves photoexcitation of a tris(bipyridine)ruthenium (Ru) complex covalently attached to one of the proteins. Four different strategies have been developed to specifically attach Ru to protein lysine amino groups, histidine imidazole groups, and cysteine sulhydryl groups. These strategies have been used to prepare more than 20 different singly-labeled Ru-cytochrome c derivatives. The new ruthenium photoexcitation technique has been used to study the mechanism for electron transfer between cytochrome c and cytochrome c peroxidase. Laser excitation of a complex between Ru-cytochrome c and cytochrome c peroxidase compound I results in formation of Ru(II*) which is a strong reducing agent, and rapidly transfers an electron to heme c Fe(III) to form Fe(II). The heme c Fe(II) then rapidly transfers an electron to the Trp-191 radical cation in CMPI. The rate constant for this reaction is 6 x 10(4) s-1 for a horse Ru-cytochrome c derivative labeled at lysine 27, and greater than 10(6) s-1 for yeast Ru-cytochrome c derivatives. A second laser flash results in electron transfer from heme c to the oxyferryl heme in cytochrome c peroxidase compound II with a rate constant of 350 s-1. The ruthenium photoreduction technique has been used to study the interaction domain between the two proteins, the pathway for electron transfer to the radical cation and the oxyferryl heme, and the specific residues in the heme crevice which control the electron transfer properties of the Trp-191 radical cation and the oxyferryl heme.

  18. Biogenesis of respiratory cytochromes in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Thöny-Meyer, L

    1997-01-01

    Biogenesis of respiratory cytochromes is defined as consisting of the posttranslational processes that are necessary to assemble apoprotein, heme, and sometimes additional cofactors into mature enzyme complexes with electron transfer functions. Different biochemical reactions take place during maturation: (i) targeting of the apoprotein to or through the cytoplasmic membrane to its subcellular destination; (ii) proteolytic processing of precursor forms; (iii) assembly of subunits in the membrane and oligomerization; (iv) translocation and/or modification of heme and covalent or noncovalent binding to the protein moiety; (v) transport, processing, and incorporation of other cofactors; and (vi) folding and stabilization of the protein. These steps are discussed for the maturation of different oxidoreductase complexes, and they are arranged in a linear pathway to best account for experimental findings from studies concerning cytochrome biogenesis. The example of the best-studied case, i.e., maturation of cytochrome c, appears to consist of a pathway that requires at least nine specific genes and more general cellular functions such as protein secretion or the control of the redox state in the periplasm. Covalent attachment of heme appears to be enzyme catalyzed and takes place in the periplasm after translocation of the precursor through the membrane. The genetic characterization and the putative biochemical functions of cytochrome c-specific maturation proteins suggest that they may be organized in a membrane-bound maturase complex. Formation of the multisubunit cytochrome bc, complex and several terminal oxidases of the bo3, bd, aa3, and cbb3 types is discussed in detail, and models for linear maturation pathways are proposed wherever possible. PMID:9293186

  19. Enhancement of DMNQ-induced hepatocyte toxicity by cytochrome P450 inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Shiba, Dai; Shimamoto, Norio . E-mail: n-shimamoto@kph.bunri-u.ac.jp

    2006-07-15

    Two mechanisms have been proposed to explain quinone cytotoxicity: oxidative stress via the redox cycle and the arylation of intracellular nucleophiles. As the redox cycle is catalyzed by NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase, cytochrome P450 systems are expected to be related to the cytotoxicity induced by redox-cycling quinones. Thus, we investigated the relationship between cytochrome P450 systems and quinone toxicity for rat primary hepatocytes using an arylator, 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ), and a redox cycler, 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ). The hepatocyte toxicity of both BQ and DMNQ increased in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with cytochrome P450 inhibitors, such as SKF-525A (SKF), ketoconazole and 2-methy-1,2-di-3-pyridyl-1-propanone, enhanced the hepatocyte toxicity induced by DMNQ but did not affect BQ-induced hepatocyte toxicity. The production of superoxide anion and the levels of glutathione disulfide and thiobarbituric-acid-reactive substances were increased by treatment with DMNQ, and SKF pretreatment further enhanced their increases. In addition, NADPH oxidation in microsomes was increased by treatment with DMNQ and further augmented by pretreatment with SKF, and a NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase inhibitor, diphenyleneiodonium chloride completely suppressed NADPH oxidations increased by treatment with either DMNQ- or DMNQ + SKF. Pretreatment with antioxidants, such as {alpha}-tocopherol, reduced glutathione, N-acetyl cysteine or an iron ion chelator deferoxamine, totally suppressed DMNQ- and DMNQ + SKF-induced hepatocyte toxicity. These results indicate that the hepatocyte toxicity of redox-cycling quinones is enhanced under cytochrome P450 inhibition, and that this enhancement is caused by the potentiation of oxidative stress.

  20. Copper-dependent inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase by Abeta(1-42) requires reduced methionine at residue 35 of the Abeta peptide.

    PubMed

    Crouch, Peter J; Barnham, Kevin J; Duce, James A; Blake, Rachel E; Masters, Colin L; Trounce, Ian A

    2006-10-01

    By altering key amino acid residues of the Alzheimer's disease-associated amyloid-beta peptide, we investigated the mechanism through which amyloid-beta inhibits cytochrome c oxidase (EC 1.9.3.1). Native amyloid-beta inhibited cytochrome oxidase by up to 65%, and the level of inhibition was determined by the period of amyloid-beta ageing before the cytochrome oxidase assay. Substituting tyrosine-10 with alanine did not affect maximal enzyme inhibition, but the altered peptide required a longer period of ageing. By contrast, oxidizing the sulfur of methionine-35 to a sulfoxide, or substituting methionine-35 with valine, completely abrogated the peptide's inhibitory potential towards cytochrome oxidase. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that the loss of inhibitory potential towards cytochrome oxidase with the methionine-35-altered peptides did not correlate with a substantially different distribution of amyloid-beta oligomeric species. Although the amyloid-beta-mediated inhibition of cytochrome oxidase was completely dependent on the presence of divalent Cu2+, it was not supported by monovalent Cu+, and experiments with catalase and H2O2 indicated that the mechanism of cytochrome oxidase inhibition does not involve amyloid-beta-mediated H2O2 production. We propose that amyloid-beta-mediated inhibition of cytochrome oxidase is dependent on the peptide's capacity to bind, then reduce Cu2+, and that it may involve the formation of a redox active amyloid-beta-methionine radical. PMID:16987248

  1. Interaction with membranes of cytochrome c554 from Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    McTavish, H; Arciero, D M; Hooper, A B

    1995-12-01

    Two c-cytochromes extrinsically bound to the membranes of Nitrosomonas europaea have been identified. One is the tetraheme cytochrome c554, a protein previously described as soluble and periplasmic. Depending on the concentration of Fe and Cu in the growth medium, from 50 to 100% of the total cellular cytochrome c554 is membrane-associated. The cytochromes c554 found in the soluble or membrane fractions are identical in the spectroscopic, chromatographic, or primary structural properties examined. The interaction of cytochrome c554 with membranes is ionic in nature; it is disrupted by high concentrations of salt. Both membrane-derived and periplasmic forms of cytochrome c554 rebind tightly to membranes which have been washed free of the cytochrome. Cytochrome c554 binds to phospholipid vesicles, suggesting that phospholipids may play a role in the interaction of this cytochrome with the membrane. During the oxidation of NH2OH, the ability of the soluble hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) to transfer electrons to its natural electron acceptor, cytochrome c554, is substantially impaired when the latter is bound to phospholipid vesicles. The second c-cytochrome associated with membranes in N. europaea is identified as HAO based on its catalytic activity and the presence of a 464-nm ferrous absorption band. A small fraction of HAO is found to be membrane-bound and only in cells grown under low Fe/low Cu. This subpopulation of HAO can be released from the membranes without detergents. PMID:7503559

  2. Cocaine-induced changes in the expression of apoptosis-related genes in the fetal mouse cerebral wall.

    PubMed

    Novikova, Svetlana I; He, Fang; Bai, Jie; Badan, Irina; Lidow, Irina A; Lidow, Michael S

    2005-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that exposure to cocaine increases cell death in the fetal CNS. To examine the molecular mechanisms of this effect, we employed mouse oligo microarrays followed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) to compare expressions of apoptosis-related genes in the cerebral wall of 18-day-old (E18) fetuses from cocaine-treated (20 mg/kg cocaine, s.c., b.i.d., E8th-E18th) and drug-naive (saline, s.c.) mice. Out of approximately 400 relevant genes in the arrays, 53 showed alterations in expression in cocaine-exposed fetuses. Upregulation was observed in 35 proapoptotic and 8 antiapoptotic genes; 4 proapoptotic and 6 antiapoptotic genes were down-regulated. The affected genes encode a wide range of apoptosis-related proteins, including death receptors (NTF-R1, NTF-R2, DR3, DR5, LTbeta-R, GITR, P57 TR-1) and their adaptor and regulatory proteins (MASGE-D1, TRAF-2, SIVA, MET, FLIP, FAIM, IAP1, ATFA), members of transcription regulatory pathways (JNK, NF-kappaB, P53), members of BCL-2 family of proteins (BID, BAD, BAX, BIK, NIP21, NIP3, NIX, BCL-2), DNA damage sensor (PARP-1), caspases and their substrates and regulatory proteins (caspases 8, 4, 9, and 3, ACINUS, CIDE-A, CIDE-B, GAS2), mitochondrially released factors (cytochrome c, AIF, PRG3), specific endoplasmic reticulum- and oxidative stress-associated factors (BACH2, ABL1, ALG2, CHOP), members of cell survival AKT and HSP70 pathways (PIK3GA, PTEN, HSP70, BAG1, BAG2), and others. This suggests that cocaine affects survival of developing cerebral cells via multiple apoptosis-regulating mechanisms.

  3. Cocaine-induced changes in the expression of apoptosis-related genes in the fetal mouse cerebral wall.

    PubMed

    Novikova, Svetlana I; He, Fang; Bai, Jie; Badan, Irina; Lidow, Irina A; Lidow, Michael S

    2005-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that exposure to cocaine increases cell death in the fetal CNS. To examine the molecular mechanisms of this effect, we employed mouse oligo microarrays followed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) to compare expressions of apoptosis-related genes in the cerebral wall of 18-day-old (E18) fetuses from cocaine-treated (20 mg/kg cocaine, s.c., b.i.d., E8th-E18th) and drug-naive (saline, s.c.) mice. Out of approximately 400 relevant genes in the arrays, 53 showed alterations in expression in cocaine-exposed fetuses. Upregulation was observed in 35 proapoptotic and 8 antiapoptotic genes; 4 proapoptotic and 6 antiapoptotic genes were down-regulated. The affected genes encode a wide range of apoptosis-related proteins, including death receptors (NTF-R1, NTF-R2, DR3, DR5, LTbeta-R, GITR, P57 TR-1) and their adaptor and regulatory proteins (MASGE-D1, TRAF-2, SIVA, MET, FLIP, FAIM, IAP1, ATFA), members of transcription regulatory pathways (JNK, NF-kappaB, P53), members of BCL-2 family of proteins (BID, BAD, BAX, BIK, NIP21, NIP3, NIX, BCL-2), DNA damage sensor (PARP-1), caspases and their substrates and regulatory proteins (caspases 8, 4, 9, and 3, ACINUS, CIDE-A, CIDE-B, GAS2), mitochondrially released factors (cytochrome c, AIF, PRG3), specific endoplasmic reticulum- and oxidative stress-associated factors (BACH2, ABL1, ALG2, CHOP), members of cell survival AKT and HSP70 pathways (PIK3GA, PTEN, HSP70, BAG1, BAG2), and others. This suggests that cocaine affects survival of developing cerebral cells via multiple apoptosis-regulating mechanisms. PMID:15681117

  4. The cytochrome b5 reductase HPO-19 is required for biosynthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuru; Wang, Haizhen; Zhang, Jingjing; Hu, Ying; Zhang, Linqiang; Wu, Xiaoyun; Su, Xiong; Li, Tingting; Zou, Xiaoju; Liang, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are fatty acids with backbones containing more than one double bond, which are introduced by a series of desaturases that insert double bonds at specific carbon atoms in the fatty acid chain. It has been established that desaturases need flavoprotein-NADH-dependent cytochrome b5 reductase (simplified as cytochrome b5 reductase) and cytochrome b5 to pass through electrons for activation. However, it has remained unclear how this multi-enzyme system works for distinct desaturases. The model organism Caenorhabditis elegans contains seven desaturases (FAT-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -6, -7) for the biosynthesis of PUFAS, providing an excellent model in which to characterize different desaturation reactions. Here, we show that RNAi inactivation of predicted cytochrome b5 reductases hpo-19 and T05H4.4 led to increased levels of C18:1n-9 but decreased levels of PUFAs, small lipid droplets, decreased fat accumulation, reduced brood size and impaired development. Dietary supplementation with different fatty acids showed that HPO-19 and T05H4.4 likely affect the activity of FAT-1, FAT-2, FAT-3, and FAT-4 desaturases, suggesting that these four desaturases use the same cytochrome b5 reductase to function. Collectively, these findings indicate that cytochrome b5 reductase HPO-19/T05H4.4 is required for desaturation to biosynthesize PUFAs in C. elegans. PMID:26806391

  5. The cytochrome b5 reductase HPO-19 is required for biosynthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuru; Wang, Haizhen; Zhang, Jingjing; Hu, Ying; Zhang, Linqiang; Wu, Xiaoyun; Su, Xiong; Li, Tingting; Zou, Xiaoju; Liang, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are fatty acids with backbones containing more than one double bond, which are introduced by a series of desaturases that insert double bonds at specific carbon atoms in the fatty acid chain. It has been established that desaturases need flavoprotein-NADH-dependent cytochrome b5 reductase (simplified as cytochrome b5 reductase) and cytochrome b5 to pass through electrons for activation. However, it has remained unclear how this multi-enzyme system works for distinct desaturases. The model organism Caenorhabditis elegans contains seven desaturases (FAT-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -6, -7) for the biosynthesis of PUFAS, providing an excellent model in which to characterize different desaturation reactions. Here, we show that RNAi inactivation of predicted cytochrome b5 reductases hpo-19 and T05H4.4 led to increased levels of C18:1n-9 but decreased levels of PUFAs, small lipid droplets, decreased fat accumulation, reduced brood size and impaired development. Dietary supplementation with different fatty acids showed that HPO-19 and T05H4.4 likely affect the activity of FAT-1, FAT-2, FAT-3, and FAT-4 desaturases, suggesting that these four desaturases use the same cytochrome b5 reductase to function. Collectively, these findings indicate that cytochrome b5 reductase HPO-19/T05H4.4 is required for desaturation to biosynthesize PUFAs in C. elegans.

  6. Cerebral phaeohyphomycosis by Exophiala dermatitidis.

    PubMed

    Sood, S; Vaid, V K; Sharma, M; Bhartiya, H

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral phaeohyphomycosis is a rare and frequently fatal disease. We report a case of cerebral phaeohyphomycosis caused by Exophiala dermatitidis in a young immuno competent male presenting to a tertiary care hospital in Jaipur. PMID:24713913

  7. Cytochrome c maturation and the physiological role of c-type cytochromes in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Braun, Martin; Thöny-Meyer, Linda

    2005-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae lives in different habitats, varying from aquatic ecosystems to the human intestinal tract. The organism has acquired a set of electron transport pathways for aerobic and anaerobic respiration that enable adaptation to the various environmental conditions. We have inactivated the V. cholerae ccmE gene, which is required for cytochrome c biogenesis. The resulting strain is deficient of all c-type cytochromes and allows us to characterize the physiological role of these proteins. Under aerobic conditions in rich medium, V. cholerae produces at least six c-type cytochromes, none of which is required for growth. Wild-type V. cholerae produces active fumarate reductase, trimethylamine N-oxide reductase, cbb3 oxidase, and nitrate reductase, of which only the fumarate reductase does not require maturation of c-type cytochromes. The reduction of nitrate in the medium resulted in the accumulation of nitrite, which is toxic for the cells. This suggests that V. cholerae is able to scavenge nitrate from the environment only in the presence of other nitrite-reducing organisms. The phenotypes of cytochrome c-deficient V. cholerae were used in a transposon mutagenesis screening to search for additional genes required for cytochrome c maturation. Over 55,000 mutants were analyzed for nitrate reductase and cbb3 oxidase activity. No transposon insertions other than those within the ccm genes for cytochrome c maturation and the dsbD gene, which encodes a disulphide bond reductase, were found. In addition, the role of a novel CcdA-like protein in cbb3 oxidase assembly is discussed.

  8. Neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Namura, Shobu; Ooboshi, Hiroaki; Liu, Jialing; Yenari, Midori A.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia, a focal or global insufficiency of blood flow to the brain, can arise through multiple mechanisms, including thrombosis and arterial hemorrhage. Ischemia is a major driver of stroke, one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. While the general etiology of cerebral ischemia and stroke has been known for some time, the conditions have only recently been considered treatable. This report describes current research in this field seeking to fully understand the pathomechanisms underlying stroke; to characterize the brain’s intrinsic injury, survival, and repair mechanisms; to identify putative drug targets as well as cell-based therapies; and to optimize the delivery of therapeutic agents to the damaged cerebral tissue. PMID:23488559

  9. Role of cytochrome P450 in drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bibi, Zakia

    2008-01-01

    Drug-drug interactions have become an important issue in health care. It is now realized that many drug-drug interactions can be explained by alterations in the metabolic enzymes that are present in the liver and other extra-hepatic tissues. Many of the major pharmacokinetic interactions between drugs are due to hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) enzymes being affected by previous administration of other drugs. After coadministration, some drugs act as potent enzyme inducers, whereas others are inhibitors. However, reports of enzyme inhibition are very much more common. Understanding these mechanisms of enzyme inhibition or induction is extremely important in order to give appropriate multiple-drug therapies. In future, it may help to identify individuals at greatest risk of drug interactions and adverse events. PMID:18928560

  10. Oxidation state-dependent conformational changes in cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Berghuis, A M; Brayer, G D

    1992-02-20

    High-resolution three-dimensional structural analyses of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c have now been completed in both oxidation states using isomorphous crystalline material and similar structure determination methodologies. This approach has allowed a comprehensive comparison to be made between these structures and the elucidation of the subtle conformational changes occurring between oxidation states. The structure solution of reduced yeast iso-1-cytochrome c has been published and the determination of the oxidized protein and a comparison of these structures are reported herein. Our data show that oxidation state-dependent changes are expressed for the most part in terms of adjustments to heme structure, movement of internally bound water molecules and segmental thermal parameter changes along the polypeptide chain, rather than as explicit polypeptide chain positional shifts, which are found to be minimal. This result is emphasized by the retention of all main-chain to main-chain hydrogen bond interactions in both oxidation states. Observed thermal factor changes primarily affect four segments of polypeptide chain. Residues 37-39 show less mobility in the oxidized state, with Arg38 and its side-chain being most affected. In contrast, residues 47-59, 65-72 and 81-85 have significantly higher thermal factors, with maximal increases being observed for Asn52, Tyr67 and Phe82. The side-chains of two of these residues are hydrogen bonded to the internally bound water molecule, Wat166, which shows a large 1.7 A displacement towards the positively charged heme iron atom in the oxidized protein. Further analyses suggest that Wat166 is a major factor in stabilizing both oxidation states of the heme through differential orientation of dipole moment, shift in distance to the heme iron atom and alterations in the surrounding hydrogen bonding network. It also seems likely that Wat166 movement leads to the disruption of the hydrogen bond from the side-chain of Tyr67 to the Met80

  11. Regulation of cerebral blood flow during exercise.

    PubMed

    Querido, Jordan S; Sheel, A William

    2007-01-01

    Constant cerebral blood flow (CBF) is vital to human survival. Originally thought to receive steady blood flow, the brain has shown to experience increases in blood flow during exercise. Although increases have not consistently been documented, the overwhelming evidence supporting an increase may be a result of an increase in brain metabolism. While an increase in metabolism may be the underlying causative factor for the increase in CBF during exercise, there are many modulating variables. Arterial blood gas tensions, most specifically the partial pressure of carbon dioxide, strongly regulate CBF by affecting cerebral vessel diameter through changes in pH, while carbon dioxide reactivity increases from rest to exercise. Muscle mechanoreceptors may contribute to the initial increase in CBF at the onset of exercise, after which exercise-induced hyperventilation tends to decrease flow by pial vessel vasoconstriction. Although elite athletes may benefit from hyperoxia during intense exercise, cerebral tissue is well protected during exercise, and cerebral oxygenation does not appear to pose a limiting factor to exercise performance. The role of arterial blood pressure is important to the increase in CBF during exercise; however, during times of acute hypotension such as during diastole at high-intensity exercise or post-exercise hypotension, cerebral autoregulation may be impaired. The impairment of an increase in cardiac output during exercise with a large muscle mass similarly impairs the increase in CBF velocity, suggesting that cardiac output may play a key role in the CBF response to exercise. Glucose uptake and CBF do not appear to be related; however, there is growing evidence to suggest that lactate is used as a substrate when glucose levels are low. Traditionally thought to have no influence, neural innervation appears to be a protective mechanism to large increases in cardiac output. Changes in middle cerebral arterial velocity are independent of changes in

  12. Probing the cytochrome c' folding landscape.

    PubMed

    Pletneva, Ekaterina V; Zhao, Ziqing; Kimura, Tetsunari; Petrova, Krastina V; Gray, Harry B; Winkler, Jay R

    2007-11-01

    The folding kinetics of R. palustris cytochrome c' (cyt c') have been monitored by heme absorption and native Trp72 fluorescence at pH 5. The Trp72 fluorescence burst signal suggests early compaction of the polypeptide ensemble. Analysis of heme transient absorption spectra reveals deviations from two-state behavior, including a prominent slow phase that is accelerated by the prolyl isomerase cyclophilin. A nonnative proline configuration (Pro21) likely interferes with the formation of the helical bundle surrounding the heme.

  13. Unusual Cerebral Emboli.

    PubMed

    Zakhari, Nader; Castillo, Mauricio; Torres, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    The heart and the carotid arteries are the most common sites of origin of embolic disease to the brain. Clots arising from these locations are the most common types of brain emboli. Less common cerebral emboli include air, fat, calcium, infected vegetations, and tumor cells as well as emboli originating in the venous system. Although infarcts can be the final result of any type of embolism, described herein are the ancillary and sometimes unique imaging features of less common types of cerebral emboli that may allow for a specific diagnosis to be made or at least suspected in many patients.

  14. Lever arm dysfunction in cerebral palsy gait.

    PubMed

    Theologis, Tim

    2013-11-01

    Skeletal structures act as lever arms during walking. Muscle activity and the ground reaction against gravity exert forces on the skeleton, which generate torque (moments) around joints. These lead to the sequence of movements which form normal human gait. Skeletal deformities in cerebral palsy (CP) affect the function of bones as lever arms and compromise gait. Lever arm dysfunction should be carefully considered when contemplating treatment to improve gait in children with CP.

  15. [Cerebral hemorrhage associated with the use phenylpropanolamine].

    PubMed

    Barinagarrementería, F; Méndez, A; Vega, F

    1990-10-01

    Phenylpropanolamine is a sympatheticomimetic agent which is widely used in pharmacologic preparations to treat nasal congestion, and to produce and anorexigenic or stimulant action. In the last years complications affecting the nervous system or the general condition have been reported. There is still controversy with regard to the safety of this pharmacologic agent. In this study we report two cases of parenchymal cerebral hemorrhage secondary to phenylpropanolamine administration. In the second case we observed angiographic findings of a reversible vasculopathy.

  16. MicroRNAs Regulate Mitochondrial Function in Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yue; Deng, Hao; Xu, Shixin; Zhang, Junping

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury involves multiple independently fatal terminal pathways in the mitochondria. These pathways include the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation caused by changes in mitochondrial membrane potential and calcium overload, resulting in apoptosis via cytochrome c (Cyt c) release. In addition, numerous microRNAs are associated with the overall process. In this review, we first briefly summarize the mitochondrial changes in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion and then describe the possible molecular mechanism of miRNA-regulated mitochondrial function, which likely includes oxidative stress and energy metabolism, as well as apoptosis. On the basis of the preceding analysis, we conclude that studies of microRNAs that regulate mitochondrial function will expedite the development of treatments for cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:26492239

  17. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and blood flow in human cerebral ischemic infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Lenzi, G.L.; Frackowiak, R.S.; Jones, T.

    1982-09-01

    Fifteen patients with acute cerebral hemispheric infarcts have been studied with positron emission tomography and the /sup 15/O steady-state inhalation technique. Thirteen follow-up studies were also performed. The values of cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO/sub 2/), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and oxygen extraction ration (OER) have been calculated for the infarcted regions, their borders, the symmetrical regions in contralateral cerebral hemispheres, and the cerebellar hemispheres. This study demonstrates that in the completed stroke there are thresholds for regional CMRO/sub 2/ and regional CBF below which the general clinical outcome of the patients is usually poor. The ischaemic lesions invariably produce an uncoupling between the greatly decreased metabolic demand and the less affected blood supply, with very frequent instances of relative hyperperfusion. Remote effects of the hemispheric infarcts have been demonstrated, such as crossed cerebellar diaschisis and contralateral transhemispheric depression. The level of consciousness correlates with oxygen uptake and blood flow both in the posterior fossa and in the contralateral cerebral hemispheres. The follow-up studies of individual patients underline the high variability of metabolism-to-flow balance during the acute phase of the illness, and stress the need for more studies focused on repeated assessments of homogeneous patient populations.

  18. Tumors of the cerebral aqueduct.

    PubMed

    Ho, K L

    1982-01-01

    Two cases of tumor of the cerebral aqueduct are described. Case 1 is a pilocytic astrocytoma in a 16-year-old girl with a two-year history of intermittent increase of intracranial pressure. The tumor was completely confined within the lumen of the aqueduct. Case 2 is a subependymoma of a 68-year-old man. The tumor extended beyond the aqueduct to the periaqueductal gray matter and produced signs and symptoms suggesting normal pressure hydrocephalus. The literature contains 18 other cases of tumor of the aqueduct: 13 gliomas and five vascular malformations. All, except one, produced clinical manifestations of generalized hydrocephalus lasting from 20 days to six years. The result generally did not correspond to the histologic type of the tumor. Like gliomas of the brainstem in general, those in the aqueduct tend to occur in childhood and adolescence and affect male more than female patients.

  19. Inhibition of the synthesis of a cytochrome-c-oxidase subunit isoform by antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Sandonà, D; Bisson, R

    1994-02-01

    To investigate the role of subunit VIIe, an oxygen-regulated subunit isoform of Dictyostelium discoideum cytochrome-c oxidase, the full-length cDNA was inserted into an expression vector under the control of an actin promoter in the sense and antisense orientation. The DNA constructs were used for stable transformation of the slime mold amoebae. In most of the 28 antisense clones tested, the concentration of cytochrome-c oxidase was lowered compared to the wild type, while no significant changes were found in the sense mutants. Antisense RNA was abundantly expressed, leading to a drastic reduction of the steady-state level of the endogenous subunit VIIe mRNA, which was decreased up to 20-30% the level observed in parent cells. In these transformants, the amount of the target polypeptide and cytochrome c oxidase was 40-50% and 60-70% of control, respectively. A similar decrease was found in the level of the remaining nuclear and mitochondrial subunits. Unexpectedly, these changes affected neither basal nor uncoupled cell respiration suggesting an increase of the enzyme specific activity. Hypoxia completely relieved the cytochrome-c-oxidase deficit. These results indicate that subunit VII is needed for an efficient assembly of the protein complex and provide evidence for its involvement in the modulation of the enzyme activity. PMID:8112318

  20. Cytochrome cbb3 of Thioalkalivibrio is a Na+-pumping cytochrome oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Muntyan, Maria S.; Cherepanov, Dmitry A.; Malinen, Anssi M.; Bloch, Dmitry A.; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Severina, Inna I.; Ivashina, Tatiana V.; Lahti, Reijo; Muyzer, Gerard; Skulachev, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidases (Coxs) are the basic energy transducers in the respiratory chain of the majority of aerobic organisms. Coxs studied to date are redox-driven proton-pumping enzymes belonging to one of three subfamilies: A-, B-, and C-type oxidases. The C-type oxidases (cbb3 cytochromes), which are widespread among pathogenic bacteria, are the least understood. In particular, the proton-pumping machinery of these Coxs has not yet been elucidated despite the availability of X-ray structure information. Here, we report the discovery of the first (to our knowledge) sodium-pumping Cox (Scox), a cbb3 cytochrome from the extremely alkaliphilic bacterium Thioalkalivibrio versutus. This finding offers clues to the previously unknown structure of the ion-pumping channel in the C-type Coxs and provides insight into the functional properties of this enzyme. PMID:26056262

  1. Effects of charged amino-acid mutation on the solution structure of cytochrome b5 and binding between cytochrome b5 and cytochrome c

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Chengmin; Yao, Yong; Ye, Keqiong; Wang, Jinfeng; Tang, Wenxia; Wang, Yunhua; Wang, Wenhu; Lu, Junxia; Xie, Yi; Huang, Zhongxian

    2001-01-01

    The solution structure of oxidized bovine microsomal cytochrome b5 mutant (E48, E56/A, D60/A) has been determined through 1524 meaningful nuclear Overhauser effect constraints together with 190 pseudocontact shift constraints. The final family of 35 conformers has rmsd values with respect to the mean structure of 0.045±0.009 nm and 0.088±0.011 nm for backbone and heavy atoms, respectively. A characteristic of this mutant is that of having no significant changes in the whole folding and secondary structure compared with the X-ray and solution structures of wild-type cytochrome b5. The binding of different surface mutants of cytochrome b5 with cytochrome c shows that electrostatic interactions play an important role in maintaining the stability and specificity of the protein complex formed. The differences in association constants demonstrate the electrostatic contributions of cytochrome b5 surface negatively charged residues, which were suggested to be involved in complex formation in the Northrup and Salemme models, have cumulative effect on the stability of cyt c-cyt b5 complex, and the contribution of Glu48 is a little higher than that of Glu44. Moreover, our result suggests that the docking geometry proposed by Northrup, which is involved in the participation of Glu48, Glu56, Asp60, and heme propionate of cytochrome b5, do occur in the association between cytochrome b5 and cytochrome c. PMID:11714912

  2. Cerebral Folate Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) is associated with low levels of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with normal folate levels in the plasma and red blood cells. The onset of symptoms caused by the deficiency of folates in the brain is at around 4 to 6 months of age. This is followed by delayed development, with deceleration…

  3. Kinetic evidence for the re-definition of electron transfer pathways from cytochrome c to O2 within cytochrome oxidase.

    PubMed

    Hill, B C; Greenwood, C

    1984-01-30

    The reaction with O2 of equimolar mixtures of cytochrome c and cytochrome c oxidase in high and low ionic strength buffers has been examined by flow-flash spectrophotometry at room temperature. In low ionic strength media where cytochrome c and the oxidase are bound in an electrostatic, 1:1 complex some of the cytochrome c is oxidised at a faster rate than a metal centre of the oxidase. In contrast, when cytochrome c and cytochrome c oxidase are predominantly dissociated at high ionic strength cytochrome c oxidation occurs only slowly (t1/2 = 5 s) following the complete oxidation of the oxidase. These results demonstrate that maximal rates of electron transfer from cytochrome c to O2 occur when both substrates are present on the enzyme. The heterogeneous oxidation of cytochrome c observed in the complex implies more than one route for electron transfer within the enzyme. Possibilities for new electron transfer pathways from cytochrome c to O2 are proposed.

  4. Biogenesis of cytochrome b6 in photosynthetic membranes

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Marcoux, Denis; Wollman, Francis-André

    2009-01-01

    In chloroplasts, binding of a c′-heme to cytochrome b6 on the stromal side of the thylakoid membranes requires a specific mechanism distinct from the one at work for c-heme binding to cytochromes f and c6 on the lumenal side of membranes. Here, we show that the major protein components of this pathway, the CCBs, are bona fide transmembrane proteins. We demonstrate their association in a series of hetero-oligomeric complexes, some of which interact transiently with cytochrome b6 in the process of heme delivery to the apoprotein. In addition, we provide preliminary evidence for functional assembly of cytochrome b6f complexes even in the absence of c′-heme binding to cytochrome b6. Finally, we present a sequential model for apo- to holo-cytochrome b6 maturation integrated within the assembly pathway of b6f complexes in the thylakoid membranes. PMID:19564403

  5. Purification and characterization of cytochrome c' from Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Huston, W M; Lowe, E C; Butler, C S; Moir, J W B

    2005-02-01

    Cytochrome c', a c-type cytochrome with unique spectroscopic and magnetic properties, has been characterized in a variety of denitrifying and photosynthetic bacteria. Cytochrome c' has a role in defence and/or removal of NO but the mechanism of action is not clear. To examine the function of cytochrome c' from Neisseria meningitidis, the protein was purified after heterologous overexpression in Escherichia coli. The electronic spectra of the oxidized c' demonstrated a pH-dependent transition (over the pH range of 6-10) typical of known c'-type cytochromes. Interestingly, the form in which NO is supplied determines the redox state of the resultant haem-nitrosyl complex. Fe(III)-NO complexes were formed when Fe(II) or Fe(III) cytochrome c' was sparged with NO gas, whereas an Fe(II)-NO complex was generated when NO was supplied using DEA NONOate (diazeniumdiolate).

  6. Marked and variable inhibition by chemical fixation of cytochrome oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase in single motoneurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chalmers, G. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of tissue fixation on succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase activity in single motoneurons of the rat was demonstrated using a computer image processing system. Inhibition of enzyme activity by chemical fixation was variable, with some motoneurons being affected more than others. It was concluded that quantification of enzymatic activity in chemically fixed tissue provides an imprecise estimate of enzyme activities found in fresh-frozen tissues.

  7. Role of Histamine and Its Receptors in Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Histamine is recognized as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the brain, and it plays a major role in the pathogenic progression after cerebral ischemia. Extracellular histamine increases gradually after ischemia, and this may come from histaminergic neurons or mast cells. Histamine alleviates neuronal damage and infarct volume, and it promotes recovery of neurological function after ischemia; the H1, H2, and H3 receptors are all involved. Further studies suggest that histamine alleviates excitotoxicity, suppresses the release of glutamate and dopamine, and inhibits inflammation and glial scar formation. Histamine may also affect cerebral blood flow by targeting to vascular smooth muscle cells, and promote neurogenesis. Moreover, endogenous histamine is an essential mediator in the cerebral ischemic tolerance. Due to its multiple actions, affecting neurons, glia, vascular cells, and inflammatory cells, histamine is likely to be an important target in cerebral ischemia. But due to its low penetration of the blood-brain barrier and its wide actions in the periphery, histamine-related agents, like H3 antagonists and carnosine, show potential for cerebral ischemia therapy. However, important questions about the molecular aspects and pathophysiology of histamine and related agents in cerebral ischemia remain to be answered to form a solid scientific basis for therapeutic application. PMID:22860191

  8. Evaluation of postural stability in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kenis-Coskun, Ozge; Giray, Esra; Eren, Beyhan; Ozkok, Ozlem; Karadag-Saygi, Evrim

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Postural stability is the ability of to maintain the position of the body within the support area. This function is affected in cerebral palsy. The aim of the present study was to compare static and dynamic postural stability between children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy and healthy controls. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven children between the ages of 5 and 14 diagnosed with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (19 right, 18 left) and 23 healthy gender- and age-matched controls were included in the study. Postural stability was evaluated in both of the groups using a Neurocom Balance. Sway velocity was measured both with the eyes open and closed. Sit to stand and turning abilities were also assessed. [Results] The sway velocities with the eyes open and closed were significantly different between the groups. The weight transfer time in the Sit to Stand test was also significantly slower in children with cerebral palsy. Children with cerebral palsy also showed slower turning times and greater sway velocities during the Step and Quick Turn test on a force plate compared with their healthy counterparts. [Conclusion] Both static and dynamic postural stability parameters are affected in hemiplegic cerebral palsy. Further research is needed to define rehabilitation interventions to improve these parameters in patients. PMID:27313338

  9. Evaluation of postural stability in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Kenis-Coskun, Ozge; Giray, Esra; Eren, Beyhan; Ozkok, Ozlem; Karadag-Saygi, Evrim

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Postural stability is the ability of to maintain the position of the body within the support area. This function is affected in cerebral palsy. The aim of the present study was to compare static and dynamic postural stability between children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy and healthy controls. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-seven children between the ages of 5 and 14 diagnosed with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (19 right, 18 left) and 23 healthy gender- and age-matched controls were included in the study. Postural stability was evaluated in both of the groups using a Neurocom Balance. Sway velocity was measured both with the eyes open and closed. Sit to stand and turning abilities were also assessed. [Results] The sway velocities with the eyes open and closed were significantly different between the groups. The weight transfer time in the Sit to Stand test was also significantly slower in children with cerebral palsy. Children with cerebral palsy also showed slower turning times and greater sway velocities during the Step and Quick Turn test on a force plate compared with their healthy counterparts. [Conclusion] Both static and dynamic postural stability parameters are affected in hemiplegic cerebral palsy. Further research is needed to define rehabilitation interventions to improve these parameters in patients.

  10. Deeply branching c6-like cytochromes of cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Bialek, Wojciech; Nelson, Matthew; Tamiola, Kamil; Kallas, Toivo; Szczepaniak, Andrzej

    2008-05-20

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 carries two genes, petJ1 and petJ2, for proteins related to soluble, cytochrome c6 electron transfer proteins. PetJ1 was purified from the cyanobacterium, and both cytochromes were expressed with heme incorporation in Escherichia coli. The expressed PetJ1 displayed spectral and biochemical properties virtually identical to those of PetJ1 from Synechococcus. PetJ1 is a typical cytochrome c6 but contains an unusual KDGSKSL insertion. PetJ2 isolated from E. coli exhibited absorbance spectra characteristic of cytochromes, although the alpha, beta, and gamma bands were red-shifted relative to those of PetJ1. Moreover, the surface electrostatic properties and redox midpoint potential of PetJ2 (pI 9.7; E(m,7) = 148 +/- 1.7 mV) differed substantially from those of PetJ1 (pI 3.8; E(m,7) = 319 +/- 1.6 mV). These data indicate that the PetJ2 cytochrome could not effectively replace PetJ1 as an electron acceptor for the cytochrome bf complex in photosynthesis. Phylogenetic comparisons against plant, algal, bacterial, and cyanobacterial genomes revealed two novel and widely distributed clusters of previously uncharacterized, cyanobacterial c 6-like cytochromes. PetJ2 belongs to a group that is distinct from both c6 cytochromes and the enigmatic chloroplast c 6A cytochromes. We tentatively designate the PetJ2 group as c6C cytochromes and the other new group as c6B cytochromes. Possible functions of these cytochromes are discussed.

  11. Prevalence of cerebral aneurysm in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Oshino, Satoru; Nishino, Akio; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Arita, Hideyuki; Tateishi, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Katsumi; Shimokawa, Toshio; Kinoshita, Manabu; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Saitoh, Youichi

    2013-06-01

    The prevalence of cerebral aneurysm was retrospectively investigated in 208 patients with acromegaly relative to the rate of cerebral aneurysm in a group of control subjects. Neuroradiological examinations of the cerebral vascular system were conducted in 208 acromegaly patients (101 men; mean age, 48.8 years). The prevalence of cerebral aneurysm in the acromegaly patients was compared to that in a control group consisting of 7,390 subjects who underwent "brain checkup" between 2006 and 2008 (mean age, 51.6 years). In the acromegaly group, cerebral aneurysm was detected in 4.3 % of patients. By sex, the prevalence was 6.9 % in males, a significantly proportion than that in the control group with an odds ratio of 4.40. The prevalence in females did not differ between the two groups. In the acromegaly group, the rate of hypertension was significantly higher in the patients with aneurysm compared to those without aneurysm. Multiple logistic regression identified acromegaly as a significant factor related to the prevalence of cerebral aneurysm in all male subjects; other factors, such as age, hypertension and smoking, were not found to be significant. A significantly higher prevalence of cerebral aneurysm was detected in male patients with acromegaly. This finding indicates that excess growth hormone or insulin-like growth factor 1 affects the cerebral vascular wall, resulting in aneurysm formation. In addition to known systematic complications in the cardiovascular, respiratory, metabolic, and other systems, the risk of cerebral aneurysm should be considered in the management of acromegaly.

  12. Cerebral hemodynamics during graded Valsalva maneuvers

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Blake G.; Cotter, James D.; Mejuto, Gaizka; Mündel, Toby; Lucas, Samuel J. E.

    2014-01-01

    The Valsalva maneuver (VM) produces large and abrupt changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) that challenge cerebral blood flow and oxygenation. We examined the effect of VM intensity on middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAv) and cortical oxygenation responses during (phases I–III) and following (phase IV) a VM. Healthy participants (n = 20 mean ± SD: 27 ± 7 years) completed 30 and 90% of their maximal VM mouth pressure for 10 s (order randomized) whilst standing. Beat-to-beat MCAv, cerebral oxygenation (NIRS) and MAP across the different phases of the VM are reported as the difference from standing baseline. There were significant interaction (phase * intensity) effects for MCAv, total oxygenation index (TOI) and MAP (all P < 0.01). MCAv decreased during phases II and III (P < 0.01), with the greatest decrease during phase III (−5 ± 8 and −19 ± 15 cm·s−1 for 30 and 90% VM, respectively). This pattern was also evident in TOI (phase III: −1 ± 1 and −5 ± 4%, both P < 0.05). Phase IV increased MCAv (22 ± 15 and 34 ± 23 cm·s−1), MAP (15 ± 14 and 24 ± 17 mm Hg) and TOI (5 ± 6 and 7 ± 5%) relative to baseline (all P < 0.05). Cerebral autoregulation, indexed, as the %MCAv/%MAP ratio, showed a phase effect only (P < 0.001), with the least regulation during phase IV (2.4 ± 3.0 and 3.2 ± 2.9). These data illustrate that an intense VM profoundly affects cerebral hemodynamics, with a reactive hyperemia occurring during phase IV following modest ischemia during phases II and III. PMID:25309449

  13. Structure of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe cytochrome c gene

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, P.R.; Hall, B.D.

    1982-02-01

    The cytochrome c gene of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been cloned by using the Saccharomyces cerevisiae iso-1-cytochrome c gene as a molecular hybridization probe. The DNA sequence and the 5' termini of the mRNA transcripts of the gene have been determined. The DNA sequence has confirmed, with two exceptions, the previously determined protein sequence. The nonrandom distribution of silent third base differences which was observed between the two cytochrome c genes of S. cerevisiae does not extend to the S. pombe cytochrome c gene, suggesting that there are no constraints other than protein function and codon usage which have acted to conserve the cytochrome c DNA sequences of the two yeasts. Introduction of the S. pombe cytochrome c gene on a yeast plasmid into a S. cerevisiae mutant which lacked functional cytochrome c transformed that recipient strain for the ability to grow on a nonfermentable carbon source. This implies that the S. pombe cytochrome c gene has all the regulatory signals which are required for its expression in S. cerevisiae, and that none of the amino acid differences between the cytochrome c proteins of the two yeasts has a drastic effect on the function of the protein in vivo.

  14. Reduction of uranium by cytochrome c3 of Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Widman, P.K.; Woodward, J.C.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanism for U(VI) reduction by Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) was investigated. The H2-dependent U(VI) reductase activity in the soluble fraction of the cells was lost when the soluble fraction was passed over a cationic exchange column which extracted cytochrome c3. Addition of cytochrome c3 back to the soluble fraction that had been passed over the cationic exchange column restored the U(VI)-reducing capacity. Reduced cytochrome c3 was oxidized by U(VI), as was a c-type cytochrome(s) in whole-cell suspensions. When cytochrome c3 was combined with hydrogenase, its physiological electron donor, U(VI) was reduced in the presence of H2. Hydrogenase alone could not reduce U(VI). Rapid U(VI) reduction was followed by a subsequent slow precipitation of the U(IV) mineral uraninite. Cytochrome c3 reduced U(VI) in a uranium-contaminated surface water and groundwater. Cytochrome c3 provides the first enzyme model for the reduction and biomineralization of uranium in sedimentary environments. Furthermore, the finding that cytochrome c3 can catalyze the reductive precipitation of uranium may aid in the development of fixed-enzyme reactors and/or organisms with enhanced U(VI)-reducing capacity for the bioremediation of uranium- contaminated waters and waste streams.

  15. Reduction of uranium by cytochrome c3 of Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Lovley, D R; Widman, P K; Woodward, J C; Phillips, E J

    1993-11-01

    The mechanism for U(VI) reduction by Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) was investigated. The H2-dependent U(VI) reductase activity in the soluble fraction of the cells was lost when the soluble fraction was passed over a cationic exchange column which extracted cytochrome c3. Addition of cytochrome c3 back to the soluble fraction that had been passed over the cationic exchange column restored the U(VI)-reducing capacity. Reduced cytochrome c3 was oxidized by U(VI), as was a c-type cytochrome(s) in whole-cell suspensions. When cytochrome c3 was combined with hydrogenase, its physiological electron donor, U(VI) was reduced in the presence of H2. Hydrogenase alone could not reduce U(VI). Rapid U(VI) reduction was followed by a subsequent slow precipitation of the U(IV) mineral uraninite. Cytochrome c3 reduced U(VI) in a uranium-contaminated surface water and groundwater. Cytochrome c3 provides the first enzyme model for the reduction and biomineralization of uranium in sedimentary environments. Furthermore, the finding that cytochrome c3 can catalyze the reductive precipitation of uranium may aid in the development of fixed-enzyme reactors and/or organisms with enhanced U(VI)-reducing capacity for the bioremediation of uranium-contaminated waters and waste streams.

  16. Aldehyde Reduction by Cytochrome P450

    PubMed Central

    Amunom, Immaculate; Srivastava, Sanjay; Prough, Russell A.

    2011-01-01

    This protocol describes the procedure for measuring the relative rates of metabolism of the α,β-unsaturated aldehydes, 9-anthracene aldehyde (9-AA) and 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (4-HNE); specifically the aldehyde reduction reactions of cytochrome P450s (CYPs). These assays can be performed using either liver microsomal or other tissue fractions, spherosome preparations of recombinant CYPs, or recombinant CYPs from other sources. The method used here to study the reduction of a model α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, 9-AA, by CYPs was adapted from the assay used to investigate 9-anthracene oxidation as reported by Marini et al. (Marini et al., 2003). For experiments measuring reduction of the endogenous aldehyde, 4-HNE, the substrate was incubated with CYP in the presence of oxygen and NADPH and the metabolites were separated by High Pressure Liquid Chromatograpy (HPLC), using an adaptation of the method of Srivastava et al. (Srivastava et al., 2010). For study of 9-AA and 4-HNE reduction, the first step involves incubation of the substrate with the CYP in appropriate media, followed by quantification of metabolites through either spectrofluorimetry or analysis by HPLC coupled with a radiometric assay, respectively. Metabolite identification can be achieved by HPLC GC-mass spectrometric analysis. Inhibitors of cytochrome P450 function can be utilized to show the role of the hemoprotein or other enzymes in these reduction reactions. The reduction reactions for CYP’s were not inhibited by either anaerobiosis or inclusion of CO in the gaseous phase of the reaction mixture. These character of these reactions are similar to those reported for some cytochrome P450-catalyzed azo reduction reactions. PMID:21553396

  17. PUMA is invovled in ischemia/reperfusion-induced apoptosis of mouse cerebral astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Tian, M; Jin, L; Jia, H; Jin, Y

    2015-01-22

    PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis), a BH3-only member of the Bcl-2 protein family, is required for p53-dependent and p53-independent forms of apoptosis. PUMA has been invovled in the onset and progress of several diseases, including cancer, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and ischemic brain disease. Although many studies have shown that ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) can induce the apoptosis of astrocytes, the role of PUMA in I/R-mediated apoptosis of cerebral astrocyte apoptosis remains unclear. To mimic in vivo I/R conditions, primary mouse cerebral astrocytes were incubated in a combinational cultural condition of oxygen, glucose, and serum deprivation (OSGD) for 1 h followed by reperfusion (OSGD/R). Cell death determination assays and cell viability assays indicated that OSGD and OSGD/R induce the apoptosis of primary cerebral astrocytes. The expression of PUMA was significantly elevated in primary cerebral astrocytes during OSGD/R. Moreover, targeted down-regulation of PUMA by siRNA transfection significantly decreased the OSGD/R-induced apoptosis of primary cerebral astrocytes. We also found that OSGD and OSGD/R triggered the release of cytochrome c in astrocytes, indicating the dependence on a mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was extremely generated during OSGD and OSGD/R, and the elimination of ROS by treated with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) remarkably inhibited the expression of PUMA and the apoptosis of primary cerebral astrocytes. The activation of Caspase 3 and Caspase 9 was extremely elevated in primary cerebral astrocytes during OSGD. In addition, we found that knockdown of PUMA led to the depressed expression of Bax, cleaved caspase-9 and caspase-3 during OSGD/R. These results indicate that PUMA is invovled in the apoptosis of cerebral astrocytes upon I/R injury.

  18. Intensive Dysarthria Therapy for Older Children with Cerebral Palsy: Findings from Six Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Lindsay; Smallman, Claire; Farrier, Faith

    2006-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy often have speech, language and communication difficulties that affect their access to social and educational activities. Speech and language therapy to improve the intelligibility of the speech of children with cerebral palsy has long been advocated, but there is a dearth of research investigating therapy…

  19. A role for cytochrome b5 in the in vivo disposition of anti-cancer and cytochrome P450 probe drugs in mice

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Colin J.; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Finn, Robert D.; Ronseaux, Sebastien; Kapelyukh, Yury; Wolf, C. Roland

    2014-01-01

    The role of microsomal cytochrome b5 (Cyb5) in defining the rate of drug metabolism and disposition has been intensely debated for several decades. Recently we described mouse models involving the hepatic or global deletion of Cyb5, demonstrating its central role in in vivo drug disposition. We have now used the cytochrome b5 complete null (BCN) model to determine the role of Cyb5 in the metabolism of ten pharmaceuticals metabolised by a range of cytochrome P450s, including five anti-cancer drugs, in vivo and in vitro. The extent to which metabolism was significantly affected by the absence of Cyb5 was substrate-dependent, with AUC increased (75-245%), and clearance decreased (35-72%), for phenacetin, metoprolol and chlorzoxazone. Tolbutamide disposition was not significantly altered by Cyb5 deletion, while for midazolam clearance was decreased by 66%. The absence of Cyb5 had no effect on gefitinib and paclitaxel disposition, while significant changes in the in vivo pharmacokinetics of cyclophosphamide were measured (Cmax and terminal half-life increased 55% and 40%, respectively), tamoxifen (AUClast and Cmax increased 370% and 233%, respectively) and anastrozole (AUC and terminal half-life increased 125% and 62%, respectively; clearance down 80%). These data from provide strong evidence that both hepatic and extra-hepatic Cyb5 levels are an important determinant of in vivo drug disposition catalysed by a range of cytochrome P450s, including currently-prescribed anti-cancer agents, and that individuality in Cyb5 expression could be a significant determinant in rates of drug disposition in man. PMID:24115751

  20. Cerebral and Tissue Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Steppan, Jochen; Hogue, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    The use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been increasingly adopted in cardiac surgery to measure regional cerebral oxygen saturation. This method takes advantage of the fact that light in the near-infrared spectrum penetrates tissue, including bone and muscle. Sensors are placed at fixed distances from a light emitter, and algorithms subtract superficial light absorption from deep absorption to provide an index of tissue oxygenation. Although the popularity of NIRS monitoring is growing, definitive data that prove outcome benefits with its use remain sparse. Therefore, widespread, routine use of NIRS as a standard-of-care monitor cannot be recommended at present. Recent investigations have focused on the use of NIRS in subgroups that may benefit from NIRS monitoring, such as pediatric patients. Furthermore, a novel application of processed NIRS information for monitoring cerebral autoregulation and tissue oxygenation (e.g., kidneys and the gut) is promising. PMID:25480772

  1. Music and cerebral hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Marinoni, M; Grassi, E; Latorraca, S; Caruso, A; Sorbi, S

    2000-09-01

    Previous studies performed by positron emission tomography and Transcranial Doppler (TCD) found a different cerebral activation during musical stimuli in musicians compared to non-musicians. The aim of our study is to evaluate by means of TCD, possible different pattern of cerebral activation during the performance of different musical tasks in musicians, non-musicians and lyrical singers. Our findings show a left hemispheric activation in musicians and a right one in non-musicians. Preliminary data on lyrical singers' activation patterns need further confirmation with a larger population. These data could be related to a different approach to music listening in musicians (analytical) and non-musicians who are supposed to have an emotional approach to music. PMID:10942664

  2. Cerebral localization in antiquity.

    PubMed

    Rose, F Clifford

    2009-07-01

    Fragments of neurology can be found in the oldest medical writings in antiquity. Recognizable cerebral localization is seen in Egyptian medical papyri. Most notably, the Edwin Smith papyrus describes hemiplegia after a head injury. Similar echoes can be seen in Homer, the Bible, and the pre-Hippocratic writer Alcmaeon of Croton. While Biblical writers thought that the heart was the seat of the soul, Hippocratic writers located it in the head. Alexandrian anatomists described the nerves, and Galen developed the ventricular theory of cognition whereby mental functions are classified and localized in one of the cerebral ventricles. Medieval scholars, including the early Church Fathers, modified Galenic ventricular theory so as to make it a dynamic model of cognition. Physicians in antiquity subdivided the brain into separate areas and attributed to them different functions, a phenomenon that connects them with modern neurologists. PMID:20183203

  3. Production of recombinant multiheme cytochromes c in Wolinella succinogenes.

    PubMed

    Kern, Melanie; Simon, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory nitrogen cycle processes like nitrification, nitrate reduction, denitrification, nitrite ammonification, or anammox involve a variety of dissimilatory enzymes and redox-active cofactors. In this context, an intriguing protein class are cytochromes c, that is, enzymes containing one or more covalently bound heme groups that are attached to heme c binding motifs (HBMs) of apo-cytochromes. The key enzyme of the corresponding maturation process is cytochrome c heme lyase (CCHL), an enzyme that catalyzes the formation of two thioether linkages between two vinyl side chains of a heme and two cysteine residues arranged in the HBM. In recent years, many multiheme cytochromes c involved in nitrogen cycle processes, such as hydroxylamine oxidoreductase and cytochrome c nitrite reductase, have attracted particular interest. Structurally, these enzymes exhibit conserved heme packing motifs despite displaying very different enzymic properties and largely unrelated primary structures. The functional and structural characterization of cytochromes c demands their purification in sufficient amounts as well as the feasibility to generate site-directed enzyme variants. For many interesting organisms, however, such systems are not available, mainly hampered by genetic inaccessibility, slow growth rates, insufficient cell yields, and/or a low capacity of cytochrome c formation. Efficient heterologous cytochrome c overproduction systems have been established using the unrelated proteobacterial species Escherichia coli and Wolinella succinogenes. In contrast to E. coli, W. succinogenes uses the cytochrome c biogenesis system II and contains a unique set of three specific CCHL isoenzymes that belong to the unusual CcsBA-type. Here, W. succinogenes is presented as host for cytochrome c overproduction focusing on a recently established gene expression system designed for large-scale production of multiheme cytochromes c.

  4. Production of recombinant multiheme cytochromes c in Wolinella succinogenes.

    PubMed

    Kern, Melanie; Simon, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory nitrogen cycle processes like nitrification, nitrate reduction, denitrification, nitrite ammonification, or anammox involve a variety of dissimilatory enzymes and redox-active cofactors. In this context, an intriguing protein class are cytochromes c, that is, enzymes containing one or more covalently bound heme groups that are attached to heme c binding motifs (HBMs) of apo-cytochromes. The key enzyme of the corresponding maturation process is cytochrome c heme lyase (CCHL), an enzyme that catalyzes the formation of two thioether linkages between two vinyl side chains of a heme and two cysteine residues arranged in the HBM. In recent years, many multiheme cytochromes c involved in nitrogen cycle processes, such as hydroxylamine oxidoreductase and cytochrome c nitrite reductase, have attracted particular interest. Structurally, these enzymes exhibit conserved heme packing motifs despite displaying very different enzymic properties and largely unrelated primary structures. The functional and structural characterization of cytochromes c demands their purification in sufficient amounts as well as the feasibility to generate site-directed enzyme variants. For many interesting organisms, however, such systems are not available, mainly hampered by genetic inaccessibility, slow growth rates, insufficient cell yields, and/or a low capacity of cytochrome c formation. Efficient heterologous cytochrome c overproduction systems have been established using the unrelated proteobacterial species Escherichia coli and Wolinella succinogenes. In contrast to E. coli, W. succinogenes uses the cytochrome c biogenesis system II and contains a unique set of three specific CCHL isoenzymes that belong to the unusual CcsBA-type. Here, W. succinogenes is presented as host for cytochrome c overproduction focusing on a recently established gene expression system designed for large-scale production of multiheme cytochromes c. PMID:21185447

  5. Cytochrome P450-2D6 Screening Among Elderly Using Antidepressants (CYSCE)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    Depression; Depressive Disorder; Poor Metabolizer Due to Cytochrome P450 CYP2D6 Variant; Intermediate Metabolizer Due to Cytochrome P450 CYP2D6 Variant; Ultrarapid Metabolizer Due to Cytochrome P450 CYP2D6 Variant

  6. Metabolic consequences of the cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in brain of copper-deficient Mo(vbr) mice.

    PubMed

    Kunz, W S; Kuznetsov, A V; Clark, J F; Tracey, I; Elger, C E

    1999-04-01

    Biochemical micromethods were used for the investigation of changes in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation associated with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in brain cortex from Mo(vbr) (mottled viable brindled) mice, an animal model of Menkes' copper deficiency syndrome. Enzymatic analysis of cortex homogenates from Mo(vbr) mice showed an approximately twofold decrease in cytochrome c oxidase and a 1.4-fold decrease in NADH:cytochrome c reductase activities as compared with controls. Assessment of mitochondrial respiratory function was performed using digitonin-treated homogenates of the cortex, which exhibited the main characteristics of isolated brain mitochondria. Despite the substantial changes in respiratory chain enzyme activities, no significant differences were found in maximal pyruvate or succinate oxidation rates of brain cortex homogenates from Mo(vbr) and control mice. Inhibitor titrations were used to determine flux control coefficients of NADH:CoQ oxidoreductase and cytochrome c oxidase on the rate of mitochondrial respiration. Application of amobarbital to titrate the activity of NADH:CoQ oxidoreductase showed very similar flux control coefficients for control and mutant animals. Alternately, titration of respiration with azide revealed for Mo(vbr) mice significantly sharper inhibition curves than for controls, indicating a more than twofold elevated flux control coefficient of cytochrome c oxidase. Owing to the reserve capacity of respiratory chain enzymes, the reported changes in activities do not seem to affect whole-brain high-energy phosphates, as observed in a previous study using 31P NMR.

  7. What You Should Know about Cerebral Aneurysms

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Stroke What You Should Know About Cerebral Aneurysms Updated:Jun 13,2014 About Cerebral Aneurysms Diagnosis ... to view an animation What is a cerebral aneurysm? An aneurysm is a weak area in a ...

  8. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Stokum, Jesse A; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2016-03-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  9. Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema

    PubMed Central

    Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema. PMID:26661240

  10. Polymer phase partition in the purification of cytochrome P-450 and cytochrome b5 from the yeast Brettanomyces anomalus.

    PubMed

    Kärenlampi, S O; Nikkilä, H; Hynninen, P H

    1986-02-01

    About 0.5% of the total cellular protein in the yeast Brettanomyces anomalus is membrane-bound cytochrome P-450, when this yeast is grown in the presence of 5% glucose as the main carbon and energy source. A partial purification of cytochrome P-450 by phase partition is described. Breakdown of yeast cell walls with microbial enzyme preparations led to extensive losses of this hemoprotein. Instead, by a carefully controlled mechanical breakage as much as 50% of the total cellular cytochrome P-450 could be recovered. During the solubilization of cytochrome P-450 from the cell homogenate with Triton X-100, the protective agents dithiothreitol, EDTA, and butylated hydroxytoluene prevented major losses of the hemoprotein. Applying a three-phase partition system (polyethylene glycol-Ficoll-dextran) to the solubilized whole cell homogenate in the presence of 1 M sodium chloride, followed by a precipitation of the top "oily layer" with 25% polyethylene glycol, a 25- to 60-fold enrichment of cytochrome P-450 was obtained. This corresponds to a specific content of 0.8-2.2 nmol of cytochrome P-450 per milligram of protein. Cytochrome b5 enriched (41%) to the PEG-Ficoll interphase, and NADPH-cytochrome c reductase and "cytochromes P-420" to the Ficoll and dextran phases. The polymer phase partition system thus serves as an excellent initial purification step of cytochrome P-450 without a need for the preparation of the microsomal fraction. Another advantage of the method is that it allows the simultaneous partial purification of cytochrome b5. PMID:3828082

  11. c-Type Cytochrome Assembly Is a Key Target of Copper Toxicity within the Bacterial Periplasm

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Anne; Azzouzi, Asma; Bourbon, Marie-Line; Steunou, Anne-Soisig; Liotenberg, Sylviane; Maeshima, Akinori; Astier, Chantal; Argentini, Manuela; Saito, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the absence of a tight control of copper entrance into cells, bacteria have evolved different systems to control copper concentration within the cytoplasm and the periplasm. Central to these systems, the Cu+ ATPase CopA plays a major role in copper tolerance and translocates copper from the cytoplasm to the periplasm. The fate of copper in the periplasm varies among species. Copper can be sequestered, oxidized, or released outside the cells. Here we describe the identification of CopI, a periplasmic protein present in many proteobacteria, and show its requirement for copper tolerance in Rubrivivax gelatinosus. The ΔcopI mutant is more susceptible to copper than the Cu+ ATPase copA mutant. CopI is induced by copper, localized in the periplasm and could bind copper. Interestingly, copper affects cytochrome c membrane complexes (cbb3 oxidase and photosystem) in both ΔcopI and copA-null mutants, but the causes are different. In the copA mutant, heme and chlorophyll synthesis are affected, whereas in ΔcopI mutant, the decrease is a consequence of impaired cytochrome c assembly. This impact on c-type cytochromes would contribute also to the copper toxicity in the periplasm of the wild-type cells when they are exposed to high copper concentrations. PMID:26396241

  12. Homology in the structure and the prosthetic groups between two different terminal ubiquinol oxidases, cytochrome a1 and cytochrome o, of Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, K; Ebisuya, H; Adachi, O

    1992-12-01

    Acetobacter aceti produces two different terminal oxidases dependent on the culture conditions, shaking and static cultures. Cells grown on shaking culture contain cytochrome a1, while cytochrome o is present in cells grown on static culture. Cytochrome a1 and cytochrome o of A. aceti were compared especially with respect to the protein structure and the prosthetic groups. Cytochrome a1 exhibited lower CN sensitivity and higher affinity for O2 than cytochrome o. Both terminal oxidases consisted of four nonidentical polypeptides of which the molecular sizes were identical between both enzymes. Cytochrome a1 cross-reacted with an antibody raised against cytochrome o at the same level as cytochrome o did, and an antibody elicited against cytochrome a1 cross-reacted with both cytochrome o and cytochrome a1 at the same intensity, which indicates that both oxidases are indistinguishable immunochemically. Furthermore, almost the same peptide mapping pattern with chymotrypsin was observed in subunit I and in subunit II between both terminal oxidases, and the amino-terminal sequences in the subunit II of both oxidases were identical at least in their 10 amino acids. As for the prosthetic groups, both oxidases were shown to contain two heme-irons and one copper atom. Further, high performance liquid chromatography analysis of the heme moieties extracted from both the purified enzymes indicated that cytochrome a1 contains hemes b and a at a ratio of 1 to 1, whereas cytochrome o contains the same amounts of hemes b and o. Thus, data indicate that cytochrome a1 and cytochrome o of A. aceti are cytochrome ba and cytochrome bo ubiquinol oxidases, respectively, and that both oxidases have a closely similar protein structure and prosthetic groups, in which only heme a in the heme/copper binuclear center of cytochrome a1 is replaced by heme o in that of cytochrome o.

  13. Enhanced global mathematical model for studying cerebral venous blood flow.

    PubMed

    Müller, Lucas O; Toro, Eleuterio F

    2014-10-17

    Here we extend the global, closed-loop, mathematical model for the cardiovascular system in Müller and Toro (2014) to account for fundamental mechanisms affecting cerebral venous haemodynamics: the interaction between intracranial pressure and cerebral vasculature and the Starling-resistor like behaviour of intracranial veins. Computational results are compared with flow measurements obtained from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), showing overall satisfactory agreement. The role played by each model component in shaping cerebral venous flow waveforms is investigated. Our results are discussed in light of current physiological concepts and model-driven considerations, indicating that the Starling-resistor like behaviour of intracranial veins at the point where they join dural sinuses is the leading mechanism. Moreover, we present preliminary results on the impact of neck vein strictures on cerebral venous hemodynamics. These results show that such anomalies cause a pressure increment in intracranial cerebral veins, even if the shielding effect of the Starling-resistor like behaviour of cerebral veins is taken into account. PMID:25169660

  14. Cerebral vascular regulation and brain injury in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Brew, Nadine; Walker, David; Wong, Flora Y

    2014-06-01

    Cerebrovascular lesions, mainly germinal matrix hemorrhage and ischemic injury to the periventricular white matter, are major causes of adverse neurodevelopmental outcome in preterm infants. Cerebrovascular lesions and neuromorbidity increase with decreasing gestational age, with the white matter predominantly affected. Developmental immaturity in the cerebral circulation, including ongoing angiogenesis and vasoregulatory immaturity, plays a major role in the severity and pattern of preterm brain injury. Prevention of this injury requires insight into pathogenesis. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is low in the preterm white matter, which also has blunted vasoreactivity compared with other brain regions. Vasoreactivity in the preterm brain to cerebral perfusion pressure, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and neuronal metabolism is also immature. This could be related to immaturity of both the vasculature and vasoactive signaling. Other pathologies arising from preterm birth and the neonatal intensive care environment itself may contribute to impaired vasoreactivity and ineffective CBF regulation, resulting in the marked variations in cerebral hemodynamics reported both within and between infants depending on their clinical condition. Many gaps exist in our understanding of how neonatal treatment procedures and medications have an impact on cerebral hemodynamics and preterm brain injury. Future research directions for neuroprotective strategies include establishing cotside, real-time clinical reference values for cerebral hemodynamics and vasoregulatory capacity and to demonstrate that these thresholds improve long-term outcomes for the preterm infant. In addition, stimulation of vascular development and repair with growth factor and cell-based therapies also hold promise.

  15. Thermal stability of cytochrome c' from mesophilic Shewanella amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuki; Fujii, Sotaro; Kuribayashi, Taka-aki; Masanari, Misa; Sambongi, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome c' (SACP) from mesophilic Shewanella amazonensis, growing optimally at 37 °C, was thermally more stable than cytochrome c' (AVCP) from mesophilic Allochromatium vinosum, growing optimally at 25 °C. In contrast, SACP was less stable than cytochrome c' (PHCP) from thermophilic Hydrogenophilus thermoluteolus, growing optimally at 52 °C. Although only 28% of the SACP amino acid sequence was identical to those of AVCP and PHCP, the latter two being 55% identical, the overall main chain structures of the three cytochromes c' were similar, and SACP exhibited thermal stability intermediate between those of AVCP and PHCP. For these three proteins, the higher the stability is, the lesser the number of Gly residues in the putative α-helical regions is. Cytochromes c' including the present three are suitable for examining the protein stabilization mechanisms, because they are structurally similar and available from environments with a wide range of temperatures.

  16. Changes in Cerebral Oxidative Metabolism during Neonatal Seizures Following Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Subhabrata; Bale, Gemma; Mathieson, Sean; Uria-Avellanal, Cristina; Meek, Judith; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Robertson, Nicola J

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common following hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in newborn infants. Prolonged or recurrent seizures have been shown to exacerbate neuronal damage in the developing brain; however, the precise mechanism is not fully understood. Cytochrome-c-oxidase is responsible for more than 90% of ATP production inside mitochondria. Using a novel broadband near-infrared spectroscopy system, we measured the concentration changes in the oxidation state of cerebral cytochrome-c-oxidase (Δ[oxCCO]) and hemodynamics during recurrent neonatal seizures following hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in a newborn infant. A rapid increase in Δ[oxCCO] was noted at the onset of seizures along with a rise in the baseline of amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram. Cerebral oxygenation and cerebral blood volume fell just prior to the seizure onset but recovered rapidly during seizures. Δ[oxCCO] during seizures correlated with changes in mean electroencephalogram voltage indicating an increase in neuronal activation and energy demand. The progressive decline in the Δ[oxCCO] baseline during seizures suggests a progressive decrease of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. PMID:27559538

  17. Changes in Cerebral Oxidative Metabolism during Neonatal Seizures Following Hypoxic–Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Subhabrata; Bale, Gemma; Mathieson, Sean; Uria-Avellanal, Cristina; Meek, Judith; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Robertson, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common following hypoxic–ischemic brain injury in newborn infants. Prolonged or recurrent seizures have been shown to exacerbate neuronal damage in the developing brain; however, the precise mechanism is not fully understood. Cytochrome-c-oxidase is responsible for more than 90% of ATP production inside mitochondria. Using a novel broadband near-infrared spectroscopy system, we measured the concentration changes in the oxidation state of cerebral cytochrome-c-oxidase (Δ[oxCCO]) and hemodynamics during recurrent neonatal seizures following hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy in a newborn infant. A rapid increase in Δ[oxCCO] was noted at the onset of seizures along with a rise in the baseline of amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram. Cerebral oxygenation and cerebral blood volume fell just prior to the seizure onset but recovered rapidly during seizures. Δ[oxCCO] during seizures correlated with changes in mean electroencephalogram voltage indicating an increase in neuronal activation and energy demand. The progressive decline in the Δ[oxCCO] baseline during seizures suggests a progressive decrease of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. PMID:27559538

  18. Familial risk of cerebral palsy: population based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Allen J; Lie, Rolv T; Moster, Dag

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate risks of recurrence of cerebral palsy in family members with various degrees of relatedness to elucidate patterns of hereditability. Design Population based cohort study. Setting Data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway, linked to the Norwegian social insurance scheme to identify cases of cerebral palsy and to databases of Statistics Norway to identify relatives. Participants 2 036 741 Norwegians born during 1967-2002, 3649 of whom had a diagnosis of cerebral palsy; 22 558 pairs of twins, 1 851 144 pairs of first degree relatives, 1 699 856 pairs of second degree relatives, and 5 165 968 pairs of third degree relatives were identified. Main outcome measure Cerebral palsy. Results If one twin had cerebral palsy, the relative risk of recurrence of cerebral palsy was 15.6 (95% confidence interval 9.8 to 25) in the other twin. In families with an affected singleton child, risk was increased 9.2 (6.4 to 13)-fold in a subsequent full sibling and 3.0 (1.1 to 8.6)-fold in a half sibling. Affected parents were also at increased risk of having an affected child (6.5 (1.6 to 26)-fold). No evidence was found of differential transmission through mothers or fathers, although the study had limited power to detect such differences. For people with an affected first cousin, only weak evidence existed for an increased risk (1.5 (0.9 to 2.7)-fold). Risks in siblings or cousins were independent of sex of the index case. After exclusion of preterm births (an important risk factor for cerebral palsy), familial risks remained and were often stronger. Conclusions People born into families in which someone already has cerebral palsy are themselves at elevated risk, depending on their degree of relatedness. Elevated risk may extend even to third degree relatives (first cousins). The patterns of risk suggest multifactorial inheritance, in which multiple genes interact with each other and with environmental factors. These data offer additional

  19. Purification and characterization of an NADPH-cytochrome P450 (cytochrome c) reductase from spearmint (Mentha spicata) glandular trichomes.

    PubMed

    Ponnamperuma, K; Croteau, R

    1996-05-01

    Solubilized NADPH-cytochrome c (P450) reductase was purified to homogeneity from an extract of spearmint (Mentha spicata) glandular trichomes by dye-ligand interaction chromatography on Matrex-Gel Red A and affinity chromatography on 2', 5'-adenosine diphosphate agarose. SDS-PAGE of the purified enzyme preparation revealed the presence of two similar proteins with masses of 82 kDa (major) and 77 kDa (minor) that crossreacted on immunoblot analysis with polyclonal antibodies directed against NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase from Jerusalem artichoke and from mung bean. Complete immunoinhibition of reductase activity was observed with both types of polyclonal antibodies, while only partial inhibition of activity resulted using a family of monoclonal antibodies directed against the Jerusalem artichoke cytochrome P450 reductase. Inhibition of the spearmint oil gland cytochrome c reductase was also observed with the diphenyliodonium ion. The K(m) values for the cosubstrates NADPH and cytochrome c were 6.2 and 3.7 microM, respectively, and the pH optimum for activity was at 8.5. The NADPH-cytochrome c reductase reconstituted NADPH-dependent (-)-4S-limonene-6-hydroxylase activity in the presence of cytochrome P450, purified from the microsomal fraction of spearmint oil gland cells and dilauroyl phosphatidyl choline. These characteristics establish the identity of the purified enzyme as a NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase.

  20. Cerebral Hemodynamics and Vascular Reactivity in Mild and Severe Ischemic Rodent Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Stroke Models

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Jeongeun; Jo, Areum; Kang, Bok-Man; Lee, Sohee; Bang, Oh Young; Heo, Chaejeong; Jhon, Gil-Ja; Lee, Youngmi

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia can cause decreased cerebral neurovascular coupling, leading to a failure in the autoregulation of cerebral blood flow. This study aims to investigate the effect of varying degrees of ischemia on cerebral hemodynamic reactivity using in vivo real-time optical imaging. We utilized direct cortical stimulation to elicit hyper-excitable neuronal activation, which leads to induced hemodynamic changes in both the normal and middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) ischemic stroke groups. Hemodynamic measurements from optical imaging accurately predict the severity of occlusion in mild and severe MCAO animals. There is neither an increase in cerebral blood volume nor in vessel reactivity in the ipsilateral hemisphere (I.H) of animals with severe MCAO. The pial artery in the contralateral hemisphere (C.H) of the severe MCAO group reacted more slowly than both hemispheres in the normal and mild MCAO groups. In addition, the arterial reactivity of the I.H in the mild MCAO animals was faster than the normal animals. Furthermore, artery reactivity is tightly correlated with histological and behavioral results in the MCAO ischemic group. Thus, in vivo optical imaging may offer a simple and useful tool to assess the degree of ischemia and to understand how cerebral hemodynamics and vascular reactivity are affected by ischemia. PMID:27358581

  1. Cytochrome oxidase heme-protein dynamics: a transient Raman study of carbon monoxide photolysis from cytochrome a

    SciTech Connect

    Findsen, E.W.; Ondrias, M.R.

    1984-09-19

    Data are reported on results of initial efforts to probe the mechanism of cytochrome oxidase function by utilizing time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy. Preparation of the reduced beef-heart cytochrome oxidase sample and cytochrome oxidase-CO sample is described. At the laser powers and concentrations employed, the reduced cytochrome oxidase-CO sample underwent almost complete photolysis during the laser pulse. Principal conclusions drawn from spectral analysis are that time-resolved resonance Raman investigation of the transient heme species generated by ligand photolysis is a viable technique for the study of heme-ligand dynamics in proteins other than hemoglobin. A transient proximal geometry leading to a strengthened iron-histidine bond is present in these. The interplay of porphyrin core size, pi electron density, and Fe-His bonding as modulated by heme-protein dynamics is different for the ligand binding sites of hemoglobin and cytochrome oxidase. 17 references, 1 figure.

  2. Middle Cerebral Artery Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Liou, Michelle; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Liu, Hua-Shan; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chou, Ming-Chung; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Huang, Guo-Shu; Hsu, Hsian-He; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Calcification of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) is uncommon in the healthy elderly. Whether calcification of the MCA is associated with cerebral ischemic stroke remains undetermined. We intended to investigate the association using Agatston calcium scoring of the MCA. This study retrospectively included 354 subjects with ischemic stroke in the MCA territory and 1518 control subjects who underwent computed tomography (CT) of the brain. We recorded major known risk factors for ischemic stroke, including age, gender, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, hyperlipidemia, and obesity, along with the MCA calcium burden, measured with the Agatston calcium scoring method. Univariate and modified logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the association between the MCA calcification and ischemic stroke. The univariate analyses showed significant associations of ischemic stroke with age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, total MCA Agatston score, and the presence of calcification on both or either side of the MCA. Subjects with the presence of MCA calcification on both or either side of the MCA were 8.46 times (95% confidence interval, 4.93–14.53; P < 0.001) more likely to have a cerebral infarct than subjects without MCA calcification after adjustment for the major known risk factors, including age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and smoking. However, a higher degree of MCA calcification reflected by the Agatston score was not associated with higher risk of MCA ischemic stroke after adjustment for the confounding factors and presence of MCA calcification. These results suggest that MCA calcification is associated with ischemic stroke in the MCA territory. Further prospective studies are required to verify the clinical implications of the MCA calcification. PMID:26683969

  3. Flower colour and cytochromes P450.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Brugliera, Filippa

    2013-02-19

    Cytochromes P450 play important roles in biosynthesis of flavonoids and their coloured class of compounds, anthocyanins, both of which are major floral pigments. The number of hydroxyl groups on the B-ring of anthocyanidins (the chromophores and precursors of anthocyanins) impact the anthocyanin colour, the more the bluer. The hydroxylation pattern is determined by two cytochromes P450, flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H) and flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H) and thus they play a crucial role in the determination of flower colour. F3'H and F3'5'H mostly belong to CYP75B and CYP75A, respectively, except for the F3'5'Hs in Compositae that were derived from gene duplication of CYP75B and neofunctionalization. Roses and carnations lack blue/violet flower colours owing to the deficiency of F3'5'H and therefore lack the B-ring-trihydroxylated anthocyanins based upon delphinidin. Successful redirection of the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway to delphinidin was achieved by expressing F3'5'H coding regions resulting in carnations and roses with novel blue hues that have been commercialized. Suppression of F3'5'H and F3'H in delphinidin-producing plants reduced the number of hydroxyl groups on the anthocyanidin B-ring resulting in the production of monohydroxylated anthocyanins based on pelargonidin with a shift in flower colour to orange/red. Pelargonidin biosynthesis is enhanced by additional expression of a dihydroflavonol 4-reductase that can use the monohydroxylated dihydrokaempferol (the pelargonidin precursor). Flavone synthase II (FNSII)-catalysing flavone biosynthesis from flavanones is also a P450 (CYP93B) and contributes to flower colour, because flavones act as co-pigments to anthocyanins and can cause blueing and darkening of colour. However, transgenic plants expression of a FNSII gene yielded paler flowers owing to a reduction of anthocyanins because flavanones are precursors of anthocyanins and flavones.

  4. Characterization of Cytochrome 579, an Unusual Cytochrome Isolated from an Iron-Oxidizing Microbial Community

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Steven; Chan, Clara S; Zemla, Adam; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hwang, Mona; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.; Thelen, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Proteogenomic studies of Fe(II)-oxidizing microbial biofilms collected from an extremely acidic environment have identified a novel, soluble cytochrome as one of the most abundant proteins produced by these communities. This red cytochrome, extracted from biofilms with dilute sulfuric acid and purified by cation exchange chromatography, has an unusual visible spectral signature at 579 nm. Fe(II)-dependent reduction of Cyt579 was thermodynamically favorable at pH>3, raising the possibility that Cyt579 acts as an accessory protein for electron transfer. Transmission electron microscopy of immuno-gold labeled biofilm indicated that the Cyt579 is localized near the bacterial cell surface, consistent with periplasmic localization. Further protein analysis of Cyt579, using preparative chromatofocusing and SDS-PAGE, revealed three forms of the protein that correspond to different N-terminal truncations of the amino acid sequence. Intact protein analysis corroborated the post-translational modifications of these forms and identified a genomically uncharacterized Cyt579 variant. Homology modeling was used to predict the overall cytochrome structure and heme binding site; positions of nine amino acid substitutions found in 3 Cyt579 variants all map to the surface of the protein and away from the heme group. Based on this detailed characterization of Cyt579, we propose that Cyt579 acts an electron transfer protein shuttling electrons derived from Fe(II) oxidation to support critical metabolic functions in the acidophilic microbial community.

  5. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uygun, M A; Ozkal, E; Acar, O; Erongun, U

    1996-01-01

    Hyponatremia following acute or chronic central nervous system injury which is due to excessive Na+ loss in the urine without an increase in the body fluid, has been described as Cerebral Salt Wasting Syndrome (CSWS). This syndrome is often confused with dilutional hyponatremia secondary to inappropriate ADH secretion. Accurate diagnosis and management are mandatory for to improve the course of the disease. In this study a patient with CSW Syndrome is presented and the treatment and diagnosis of this syndrome are discussed in view of the literature.

  6. Hemodynamics of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan Raul

    2009-01-01

    The initiation and progression of cerebral aneurysms are degenerative processes of the arterial wall driven by a complex interaction of biological and hemodynamic factors. Endothelial cells on the artery wall respond physiologically to blood-flow patterns. In normal conditions, these responses are associated with nonpathological tissue remodeling and adaptation. The combination of abnormal blood patterns and genetics predisposition could lead to the pathological formation of aneurysms. Here, we review recent progress on the basic mechanisms of aneurysm formation and evolution, with a focus on the role of hemodynamic patterns. PMID:19784385

  7. Cerebral Microinfarcts Associated with Severe Cerebral β-Amyloid Angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Soontornniyomkij, Virawudh; Lynch, Matthew D.; Mermash, Sherin; Pomakian, Justine; Badkoobehi, Haleh; Clare, Ryan; Vinters, Harry V.

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is common in elderly individuals, especially those affected with Alzheimer's disease. To investigate whether the presence of severe CAA (SCAA) in the brains of demented patients was associated with a higher burden of old microinfarcts than those with mild CAA (MCAA), 18 brains with SCAA were compared to 21 brains with MCAA. Immunohistochemistry for CD68 was employed to highlight old microinfarcts in tissue blocks from various brain regions. Old microinfarcts, manually counted by light microscopy, were present in 14 of 18 SCAA brains, and in 7 of 21 MCAA brains (P = 0.01, 2-tailed Fisher’s exact test). The average number of old microinfarcts across geographic regions in each brain ranged from 0 to 1.95 (mean rank 24.94, sum of ranks 449) in the SCAA group, and from 0 to 0.35 (mean rank 15.76, sum of ranks 331) in the MCAA group (P = 0.008, 2-tailed Mann-Whitney U test). Frequent old microinfarcts in demented individuals with severe CAA may contribute a vascular component to the cognitive impairment in these patients. PMID:19725828

  8. First Case of Human Cerebral Taenia martis Cysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Benoilid, Aurélien; Kremer, Stéphane; Dalvit, Constanza; Lefebvre, Nicolas; Hansmann, Yves; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Mathieu, Bruno; Grimm, Felix; Deplazes, Peter; Pfaff, Alexander W.; Abou-Bacar, Ahmed; Marescaux, Christian; Candolfi, Ermanno

    2015-01-01

    Taenia martis is a tapeworm affecting mustelids, with rodents serving as intermediate hosts. The larval stage (cysticercus) has been found before only rarely in humans or primates. We hereby describe a case of cerebral T. martis cysticercosis in a French immunocompetent patient, confirmed by DNA analyses of biopsy material. PMID:26019196

  9. Effects of portal vein ligation on sex hormone metabolism in male rats: relationship to lowered hepatic cytochrome P450 levels.

    PubMed

    Farrell, G C; Koltai, A; Zaluzny, L; Murray, M

    1986-02-01

    Hepatic cytochrome P450 levels in male rats fall after portal vein ligation, a procedure that produces total hepatic bypass of portal blood. The present study was undertaken to examine whether changes in sex hormone metabolism could account for these lowered cytochrome P450 levels. Portal vein ligation resulted in testicular atrophy and low serum testosterone concentrations. Serum luteinizing hormone levels were also reduced, suggesting that testicular atrophy was secondary to suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Serum estrone and estradiol concentrations were significantly increased after portal vein ligation, while the magnitude and delayed onset of increases in urinary total estrogen excretion suggested that this was due largely to increased estrogen production. In male rats, both castration (at 12 wk) and exogenous estrogen administration resulted in changes in hepatic cytochrome P450 levels and ethylmorphine N-demethylase activity that were qualitatively similar to those seen after portal vein ligation. In female and castrated male rats, however, cytochrome P450 was not affected by portal vein ligation. Testosterone supplementation corrected the changes of cytochrome P450 levels in castrated male rats but did not have this effect in portal vein-ligated male rats. It is concluded that changes in sex hormone metabolism do occur after portal vein ligation and may contribute to alterations in cytochrome P450 and drug-metabolizing enzyme activity. Decreased levels of serum testosterone, however, do not alone account for the changes in hepatic drug metabolism in this model, and suppression of a hypothalamic-pituitary factor appears to be important.

  10. alpha-Tocopherol acetate supplementation enhances rat hepatic cytochrome PROD activity in the presence of phenobarbital induction.

    PubMed

    Lii, C K; Sung, W C; Ko, Y J; Chen, H W

    1998-01-01

    Hepatic cytochrome P-450 enzymes play important roles in bioactivation of chemical carcinogens, biotransformation of many endogenous compounds, and detoxification of numerous xenobiotics. These enzyme activities have been shown to be regulated by various dietary factors. In our previous study, hepatic cytochrome pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylase (PROD) activity was decreased in rats fed an alpha-tocopherol acetate-deficient diet compared with rats fed alpha-tocopherol acetate-adequate or -supplemented diets. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether the modulatory effect of dietary alpha-tocopherol acetate on hepatic cytochrome PROD activity is influenced by the presence of phenobarbital. Weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed the AIN-76 diet for four days, fasted for two days, then fed semipurified diets that were alpha-tocopherol acetate deficient, adequate, or supplemented with 5 and 15 g/kg alpha-tocopherol acetate for four days. Liver and plasma alpha-tocopherol concentrations were dose dependently regulated by dietary alpha-tocopherol acetate level. Inhibition of lipid peroxidation by dietary alpha-tocopherol acetate was dose dependent. Hepatic total cytochrome P-450 content was significantly greater in rats fed diets supplemented with 5 and 15 g/kg alpha-tocopherol acetate than in rats fed an alpha-tocopherol-adequate diet (p < 0.05). Hepatic cytochrome PROD activity was significantly greater in rats fed diets supplemented with 5 and 15 g/kg alpha-tocopherol acetate than in rats fed alpha-tocopherol acetate-deficient and -adequate diets (p < 0.05). These results suggest that, in the presence of phenobarbital, dietary alpha-tocopherol acetate efficiently affects tissue alpha-tocopherol levels and inhibits lipid peroxidation and that diets supplemented with 5 or 15 g/kg alpha-tocopherol acetate enhance hepatic cytochrome PROD activity compared with alpha-tocopherol acetate-deficient or -adequate diets.

  11. Cerebral cartography and connectomics.

    PubMed

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-05-19

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamics of functional brain connectivity, the definition of areal parcellations and their hierarchical organization into large-scale networks, the extension of whole-brain connectivity to cellular-scale networks, and the mapping of structure/function relations in empirical recordings and computational models. Successfully addressing these challenges will require extensions of methods and tools from network science to the mapping and analysis of human brain connectivity data. The emerging view that the brain is more than a collection of areas, but is fundamentally operating as a complex networked system, will continue to drive the creation of ever more detailed and multi-modal network maps as tools for on-going exploration and discovery in human connectomics.

  12. [Noradrenaline and cerebral aging].

    PubMed

    Jouvet, M; Albarede, J L; Lubin, S; Meyrignac, C

    1991-01-01

    The central functions of norepinephrine (NE) are a recent discovery: regulation of alertness and of the wakefulness-sleep cycle, maintenance of attention, memory and learning, cerebral plasticity and neuro-protection. The anatomical, histological, biochemical and physiological properties of the central noradrenergic system: extreme capacity for ramification and arborization; slow conduction, non-myelinized axons with extrasynaptic varicosities producing and releasing NE; frequency of co-transmission phenomena, and; neuromodulation with fiber effect responsible for improvement in the signal over background noise ratio and selection of significant stimuli form a true interface between the outside world and the central nervous system, notably for the neocortex in the context of the cognitive treatment of information. This central noradrenergic system is involved in the neurophysiology and the clinical features of cerebral aging (ideation-motor and cognitive function slowing down, loss of behavioral adjustment), neuro-degenerative disorders (SDAT, Parkinson's disease), certain aspects of depression and less obvious conditions (head injuries, sequelae of cerebrovascular accidents, sub-cortical dementia). The recent development of medications improving alertness (adrafinil, modafinil) with a pure central action and specifically noradrenergic, may contribute to an improvement in these multifactorial disorders. PMID:1864252

  13. What constitutes cerebral palsy?

    PubMed

    Badawi, N; Watson, L; Petterson, B; Blair, E; Slee, J; Haan, E; Stanley, F

    1998-08-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a term of convenience applied to a group of motor disorders of central origin defined by clinical description. It is not a diagnosis in that its application infers nothing about pathology, aetiology, or prognosis. It is an umbrella term covering a wide range of cerebral disorders which result in childhood motor impairment. The precise inclusion criteria vary with the objectives for using the term. For meaningful comparison of rates of CP, as performed by and between CP registers, it is important that the rates should be generated using the same criteria. As generally understood there must be motor impairment, and this impairment must stem from a malfunction of the brain (rather than spinal cord or muscles). Furthermore, the brain malfunction must be non-progressive and it must be manifest early in life. For the purposes of comparisons of rates across time even when the condition meets all the above criteria, it must not historically have been excluded from the category of CP. This paper addresses the problem of standardizing the inclusion criteria for selecting people included on CP registers with particular reference to this last criterion. PMID:9746004

  14. Multilayered Polyelectrolyte Microcapsules: Interaction with the Enzyme Cytochrome C Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Pastorino, Laura; Dellacasa, Elena; Noor, Mohamed R.; Soulimane, Tewfik; Bianchini, Paolo; D'Autilia, Francesca; Antipov, Alexei; Diaspro, Alberto; Tofail, Syed A. M.; Ruggiero, Carmelina

    2014-01-01

    Cell-sized polyelectrolyte capsules functionalized with a redox-driven proton pump protein were assembled for the first time. The interaction of polyelectrolyte microcapsules, fabricated by electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly, with cytochrome c oxidase molecules was investigated. We found that the cytochrome c oxidase retained its functionality, that the functionalized microcapsules interacting with cytochrome c oxidase were permeable and that the permeability characteristics of the microcapsule shell depend on the shell components. This work provides a significant input towards the fabrication of an integrated device made of biological components and based on specific biomolecular functions and properties. PMID:25372607

  15. Metabolic engineering of light-driven cytochrome P450 dependent pathways into Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Wlodarczyk, Artur; Gnanasekaran, Thiyagarajan; Nielsen, Agnieszka Zygadlo; Zulu, Nodumo Nokolunga; Mellor, Silas Busck; Luckner, Manja; Thøfner, Jens Frederik Bang; Olsen, Carl Erik; Mottawie, Mohammed Saddik; Burow, Meike; Pribil, Mathias; Feussner, Ivo; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    Solar energy provides the energy input for the biosynthesis of primary and secondary metabolites in plants and other photosynthetic organisms. Some secondary metabolites are high value compounds, and typically their biosynthesis requires the involvement of cytochromes P450s. In this proof of concept work, we demonstrate that the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is an eminent heterologous host for expression of metabolically engineered cytochrome P450-dependent pathways exemplified by the dhurrin pathway from Sorghum bicolor comprising two membrane bound cytochromes P450s (CYP79A1 and CYP71E1) and a soluble glycosyltransferase (UGT85B1). We show that it is possible to express multiple genes incorporated into a bacterial-like operon by using a self-replicating expression vector in cyanobacteria. We demonstrate that eukaryotic P450s that typically reside in the endoplasmic reticulum membranes can be inserted in the prokaryotic membranes without affecting thylakoid membrane integrity. Photosystem I and ferredoxin replaces the native P450 oxidoreductase enzyme as an efficient electron donor for the P450s both in vitro and in vivo. The engineered strains produced up to 66mg/L of p-hydroxyphenylacetaldoxime and 5mg/L of dhurrin in lab-scale cultures after 3 days of cultivation and 3mg/L of dhurrin in V-shaped photobioreactors under greenhouse conditions after 9 days cultivation. All the metabolites were found to be excreted to the growth media facilitating product isolation.

  16. Interactions of phospholipase D and cytochrome P450 protein stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C.; Fan, Yang-Yi; Chapkin, Robert S.

    2004-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested a relationship between cytochrome P450 (P450) 3A (CYP3A) conformation and the phospholipid composition of the associated membrane. In this study, we utilized a novel microsomal incubation system that mimics many of the characteristics of CYP3A degradation pathway that have been observed in vivo and in cultured cells to study the effects of phospholipid composition on protein stability. We found that addition of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase D (PLD) stabilized CYP3A in this system, but that phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PLC) was without effect. Addition of phosphatidic acid also stabilized CYP3A protein in the microsomes. The use of 1,10-phenanthroline (phenanthroline), an inhibitor of PLD activity, decreased CYP3A stability in incubated microsomes. Similarly, 6-h treatment of primary cultures of rat hepatocytes with phenanthroline resulted in nearly complete loss of CYP3A protein. Treatment of rats with nicardipine or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), which have been shown to affect CYP3A stability, altered the phospholipid composition of hepatic microsomes. It did not appear, though, that the changes in phospholipid composition that resulted from these in vivo treatments accounted for the change in CYP3A stability observed in hepatic microsomes from these animals.

  17. Effect of natamycin on cytochrome P450 enzymes in rats.

    PubMed

    Martínez, María Aránzazu; Martínez-Larrañaga, María Rosa; Castellano, Victor; Martínez, Marta; Ares, Irma; Romero, Alejandro; Anadón, Arturo

    2013-12-01

    Natamycin is a polyene macrolide antibiotic widely used in the food industry as a feed additive to prevent mold contamination of foods. There are many contradictory results on the genotoxic effects of macrolides which could suggest a potential risk for humans. In the present study, the effects of natamycin on the activities of some drug metabolizing enzymes in rat liver microsomes were determined in vivo. Rats were treated orally with natamycin at doses of 0.3, 1, 3 and 10 mg/kg body weight (bw)/day for 6 days. Determinations of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme activities were carried out in hepatic microsomes isolated from rats treated. The activities of CYP2E1, CYP1A1/2 CYP2B1/2 and CYP4A1/2 enzymes significantly decreased after treatment with 1, 3 and 10 mg/kg bw/day, in a dose-dependent manner as compared to control. This effect was not observed after natamycin treatment at dose of 0.3 mg/kg bw/day. Our results suggest that natamycin may not potentiate the toxicity of many xenobiotics via metabolic activation and/or accumulation of reactive metabolites but also might affect the clearance of other xenobiotics detoxified by the studied CYP enzymes.

  18. Ab initio dynamics of the cytochrome P450 hydroxylation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Elenewski, Justin E.; Hackett, John C

    2015-02-14

    The iron(IV)-oxo porphyrin π-cation radical known as Compound I is the primary oxidant within the cytochromes P450, allowing these enzymes to affect the substrate hydroxylation. In the course of this reaction, a hydrogen atom is abstracted from the substrate to generate hydroxyiron(IV) porphyrin and a substrate-centered radical. The hydroxy radical then rebounds from the iron to the substrate, yielding the hydroxylated product. While Compound I has succumbed to theoretical and spectroscopic characterization, the associated hydroxyiron species is elusive as a consequence of its very short lifetime, for which there are no quantitative estimates. To ascertain the physical mechanism underlying substrate hydroxylation and probe this timescale, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations are performed for a model of Compound I catalysis. Semiclassical estimates based on these calculations reveal the hydrogen atom abstraction step to be extremely fast, kinetically comparable to enzymes such as carbonic anhydrase. Using an ensemble of ab initio simulations, the resultant hydroxyiron species is found to have a similarly short lifetime, ranging between 300 fs and 3600 fs, putatively depending on the enzyme active site architecture. The addition of tunneling corrections to these rates suggests a strong contribution from nuclear quantum effects, which should accelerate every step of substrate hydroxylation by an order of magnitude. These observations have strong implications for the detection of individual hydroxylation intermediates during P450 catalysis.

  19. Partial inactivation of cytochrome c oxidase by nonpolar mercurial reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, A.J.; Auer, H.E.

    1980-01-25

    Purified beef heart cytochrome c oxidase is inactivated to the extent of 35 to 50% by the nonpolar mercurial reagents mercuric chloride and ethylmercuric chloride. The inactivation is complete within 5 min. In titrations of activity, the plateau level of inactivation is attained at added ethylmercuric chloride:heme a ratios of about 1:1. Up to 3 mercury atoms/heme a are bound to the oxidase, although only the first of these affects its enzymatic activity. Incubation of the ethylmercury-modified oxidase with sulfhydryl compounds reverses the inactivation, with 2,3-dimercaptopropanol being most effective of the reagents tested. Spectrophotometric and polarographic assays of enzymatic activity show that K/sub m/ values for the native and the ethylmercury-modified enzymes are practically indistinguishable, and that the partial inactivation observed for the latter is reflected exclusively in a lower value of V/sub max/ compared to that of the native enzyme. Based on these results, we propose that ethylmercuric chloride reacts with a single crucial--SH group per heme a, and that electron transfer processes in the modified product are partially inhibited.

  20. Heterologous synthesis of cytochrome c' by Escherichia coli is not dependent on the System I cytochrome c biogenesis machinery.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroki; Wakai, Satoshi; Nishihara, Hirofumi; Sambongi, Yoshihiro

    2011-07-01

    Hydrogenophilus thermoluteolus cytochrome c' (PHCP) has typical spectral properties previously observed for other cytochromes c', which comprise Ambler's class II cytochromes c. The PHCP protein sequence (135 amino acids) deduced from the cloned gene is the most homologous (55% identity) to that of cytochrome c' from Allochromatium vinosum (AVCP). These findings indicate that PHCP forms a four-helix bundle structure, similar to AVCP. Strikingly, PHCP with a covalently bound heme was heterologously synthesized in the periplasm of Escherichia coli strains deficient in the DsbD protein, a component of the System I cytochrome c biogenesis machinery. The heterologous synthesis of PHCP by aerobically growing E. coli also occurred without a plasmid carrying the genes for Ccm proteins, other components of the System I machinery. Unlike Ambler's class I general cytochromes c, the synthesis of PHCP is not dependent on the System I machinery and exhibits similarity to that of E. coli periplasmic cytochrome b(562), a 106-residue four-helix bundle.

  1. Isolation and Characterization of a Hybrid Respiratory Supercomplex Consisting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cytochrome bcc and Mycobacterium smegmatis Cytochrome aa3*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Sun; Jang, Jichan; AB Rahman, Nurlilah Binte; Pethe, Kevin; Berry, Edward A.; Huang, Li-Shar

    2015-01-01

    Recently, energy production pathways have been shown to be viable antitubercular drug targets to combat multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and eliminate pathogen in the dormant state. One family of drugs currently under development, the imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine derivatives, is believed to target the pathogen's homolog of the mitochondrial bc1 complex. This complex, denoted cytochrome bcc, is highly divergent from mitochondrial Complex III both in subunit structure and inhibitor sensitivity, making it a good target for drug development. There is no soluble cytochrome c in mycobacteria to transport electrons from the bcc complex to cytochrome oxidase. Instead, the bcc complex exists in a “supercomplex” with a cytochrome aa3-type cytochrome oxidase, presumably allowing direct electron transfer. We describe here purification and initial characterization of the mycobacterial cytochrome bcc-aa3 supercomplex using a strain of M. smegmatis that has been engineered to express the M. tuberculosis cytochrome bcc. The resulting hybrid supercomplex is stable during extraction and purification in the presence of dodecyl maltoside detergent. It is hoped that this purification procedure will potentiate functional studies of the complex as well as crystallographic studies of drug binding and provide structural insight into a third class of the bc complex superfamily. PMID:25861988

  2. Pediatric traumatic carotid, vertebral and cerebral artery dissections: a review.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Martin M; Verma, Ketan; Tubbs, R Shane; Harrigan, Mark

    2011-12-01

    Traumatic cerebral dissections are rare but potentially dangerous conditions that through improved diagnostics have recently gained increased interest. However, there is still a significant lack of knowledge on the natural history, as well as on the best treatment options. Most of the literature on this topic consists of case reports and retrospective studies with no prospective randomized controlled studies. In our review, we highlight the fact that there is no level 1 evidence for the natural history of cerebral dissections or for the best treatment. We present 26 case studies derived from 70 pediatric patients affected by dissections, occlusions, and pseudoaneurysms.

  3. Flower colour and cytochromes P450†

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Brugliera, Filippa

    2013-01-01

    Cytochromes P450 play important roles in biosynthesis of flavonoids and their coloured class of compounds, anthocyanins, both of which are major floral pigments. The number of hydroxyl groups on the B-ring of anthocyanidins (the chromophores and precursors of anthocyanins) impact the anthocyanin colour, the more the bluer. The hydroxylation pattern is determined by two cytochromes P450, flavonoid 3′-hydroxylase (F3′H) and flavonoid 3′,5′-hydroxylase (F3′5′H) and thus they play a crucial role in the determination of flower colour. F3′H and F3′5′H mostly belong to CYP75B and CYP75A, respectively, except for the F3′5′Hs in Compositae that were derived from gene duplication of CYP75B and neofunctionalization. Roses and carnations lack blue/violet flower colours owing to the deficiency of F3′5′H and therefore lack the B-ring-trihydroxylated anthocyanins based upon delphinidin. Successful redirection of the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway to delphinidin was achieved by expressing F3′5′H coding regions resulting in carnations and roses with novel blue hues that have been commercialized. Suppression of F3′5′H and F3′H in delphinidin-producing plants reduced the number of hydroxyl groups on the anthocyanidin B-ring resulting in the production of monohydroxylated anthocyanins based on pelargonidin with a shift in flower colour to orange/red. Pelargonidin biosynthesis is enhanced by additional expression of a dihydroflavonol 4-reductase that can use the monohydroxylated dihydrokaempferol (the pelargonidin precursor). Flavone synthase II (FNSII)-catalysing flavone biosynthesis from flavanones is also a P450 (CYP93B) and contributes to flower colour, because flavones act as co-pigments to anthocyanins and can cause blueing and darkening of colour. However, transgenic plants expression of a FNSII gene yielded paler flowers owing to a reduction of anthocyanins because flavanones are precursors of anthocyanins and flavones. PMID:23297355

  4. Closed versus open endotracheal suctioning in preterm infants: effects on cerebral oxygenation and blood volume.

    PubMed

    Mosca, F A; Colnaghi, M; Lattanzio, M; Bray, M; Pugliese, S; Fumagalli, M

    1997-01-01

    The aim of our study was to compare, using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), the effects on cerebral intracellular oxygenation and cerebral blood volume (CBV) of closed endotracheal suctioning (CS), which permits continuous ventilation of the patient, with open endotracheal suctioning (OS), which requires disconnection from the ventilator. Eleven preterm infants were studied. Each patient underwent one CS, followed, after 60 min, by one OS, or vice versa, three times during the same day. Modifications in CBV and oxidized cytochrome oxidase (CytO2) were continuously detected by NIRS; arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) heart rate (HR), transcutaneous carbon dioxide tension and mean arterial blood pressure were simultaneously recorded. Significant reductions in HR and SaO2 were observed following OS; the magnitude and duration of these negative effects of suctioning were significantly reduced with CS. In addition, the decrease in CBV was more pronounced than following CS. No changes in CytO2 concentration were seen.

  5. Exercise increases mitochondrial glutamate oxidation in the mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Eric A F; Holloway, Graham P

    2016-07-01

    The present study investigated the impact of acute exercise on stimulating mitochondrial respiratory function in mouse cerebral cortex. Where pyruvate-stimulated respiration was not affected by acute exercise, glutamate respiration was enhanced following the exercise bout. Additional assessment revealed that this affect was dependent on the presence of malate and did not occur when substituting glutamine for glutamate. As such, our results suggest that glutamate oxidation is enhanced with acute exercise through activation of the malate-aspartate shuttle. PMID:27184881

  6. Activation of Oxygen by Cytochrome P-450 and Other Haemoproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metelitsa, D. I.

    1982-11-01

    Data on the activation of molecular oxygen by the full microsomal hydroxylating system containing cytochrome P-450 as the terminal oxygenase are examined. The nature of the hydroxylating agent, which is the oxenoid Fe3+O, is analysed. The autoxidation reactions of cytochrome P-450 from various sources, haemoglobin, myoglobin, and peroxidases are compared and the role of the axial ligands of the haem iron and the structure of the active centres of the haemoproteins in this process is demonstrated. The possible mechanisms of the oxidation of organic compounds by peroxides with participation of cytochrome P-450, cytochrome c, haemoglobin, and catalase are examined critically. Haemoproteins have been divided into three groups in terms of the type of peroxide oxidation reactions. The relative contributions of the radical and two-electron reactions in the oxidation of compounds by peroxides with participation of different haemoproteins are analysed. The bibliography includes 184 references.

  7. Comparative study of hops-containing products on human cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism.

    PubMed

    Foster, Brian C; Arnason, John T; Saleem, Ammar; Tam, Teresa W; Liu, Rui; Mao, Jingqin; Desjardins, Suzanne

    2011-05-11

    The potential for 15 different ales (6), ciders (2 apple and 1 pear), and porters (6) and 2 non-alcoholic products to affect cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated biotransformation and P-glycoprotein-mediated efflux of rhodamine was examined. As in our previous study, a wide range of recovered nonvolatile suspended solids dry weights were noted. Aliquots were also found to have varying effects on biotransformation and efflux. Distinct differences in product ability to affect the safety and efficacy of therapeutic products confirmed our initial findings that some porters (stouts) have a potential to affect the safety and efficacy of health products metabolized by CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 isozymes. Most products, except 2 of the ciders and the 2 non-alcoholic products, also have the potential to affect the safety of CYP2C9 metabolized medications and supplements. Further studies are required to determine the clinical significance of these findings. PMID:21476568

  8. Cerebral venous thrombosis-a primer for the haematologist.

    PubMed

    Thorell, Sofia E; Parry-Jones, Adrian R; Punter, Martin; Hurford, Robert; Thachil, Jecko

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a condition that can affect all age groups and can often be difficult to diagnose and treat. The difficulties in diagnosis are mainly due to the non-specific presenting features of CVT, which can range from isolated headache and visual or auditory problems, to serious symptoms such as hemiparesis and coma. Therefore, it can present to various specialists including general physicians, obstetricians and neurologists. In recent years, more widespread use of cerebral imaging has led to the diagnosis being made more often. Since thrombosis is the key component, haematologists are consulted in the management of these patients including for identification of a causative factor for CVT. In this regard, the pivotal International Study on Cerebral Vein and Dural Sinus Thrombosis (ISCVT) has shed more light on its epidemiology and management options. This review aims to provide guidance to haematologists when faced with a patient with CVT, based on the currently available evidence. PMID:25282690

  9. Reversible cerebral shrinkage in kwashiorkor: an MRI study.

    PubMed

    Gunston, G D; Burkimsher, D; Malan, H; Sive, A A

    1992-08-01

    Protein energy malnutrition is associated with cerebral atrophy which may be detrimental to intellectual development. The aim of this study was to document the anatomical abnormalities which lead to the appearance of cerebral atrophy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute stage of kwashiorkor and to monitor changes during nutritional rehabilitation. Twelve children aged 6 to 37 months requiring admission to hospital for the treatment of kwashiorkor were studied. The children were evaluated clinically, biochemically, and by MRI of their brains on admission and 30 and 90 days later. Brain shrinkage was present in every child on admission. White and grey matter appeared equally affected and the myelination was normal for age. At 90 days, the cerebral changes had resolved in nine and improved substantially in the remainder, by which time serum proteins and weight for age were within the normal range. The findings of this study suggest that brain shrinkage associated with kwashiorkor reverses rapidly with nutritional rehabilitation.

  10. Role of lysines in cytochrome c-cardiolipin interaction.

    PubMed

    Sinibaldi, Federica; Howes, Barry D; Droghetti, Enrica; Polticelli, Fabio; Piro, Maria Cristina; Di Pierro, Donato; Fiorucci, Laura; Coletta, Massimo; Smulevich, Giulietta; Santucci, Roberto

    2013-07-01

    Cytochrome c undergoes structural variations during the apoptotic process; such changes have been related to modifications occurring in the protein when it forms a complex with cardiolipin, one of the phospholipids constituting the mitochondrial membrane. Although several studies have been performed to identify the site(s) of the protein involved in the cytochrome c-cardiolipin interaction, to date the location of this hosting region(s) remains unidentified and is a matter of debate. To gain deeper insight into the reaction mechanism, we investigate the role that the Lys72, Lys73, and Lys79 residues play in the cytochrome c-cardiolipin interaction, as these side chains appear to be critical for cytochrome c-cardiolipin recognition. The Lys72Asn, Lys73Asn, Lys79Asn, Lys72/73Asn, and Lys72/73/79Asn mutants of horse heart cytochrome c were produced and characterized by circular dichroism, ultraviolet-visible, and resonance Raman spectroscopies, and the effects of the mutations on the interaction of the variants with cardiolipin have been investigated. The mutants are characterized by a subpopulation with non-native axial coordination and are less stable than the wild-type protein. Furthermore, the mutants lacking Lys72 and/or Lys79 do not bind cardiolipin, and those lacking Lys73, although they form a complex with the phospholipid, do not show any peroxidase activity. These observations indicate that the Lys72, Lys73, and Lys79 residues stabilize the native axial Met80-Fe(III) coordination as well as the tertiary structure of cytochrome c. Moreover, while Lys72 and Lys79 are critical for cytochrome c-cardiolipin recognition, the simultaneous presence of Lys72, Lys73, and Lys79 is necessary for the peroxidase activity of cardiolipin-bound cytochrome c.

  11. The reactivity of cytochrome c with soft ligands.

    PubMed

    Schejter, A; Plotkin, B; Vig, I

    1991-03-25

    The spectral changes caused by binding soft ligands to the cytochrome c iron and their correlation to ligand affinities support the hypothesis that the iron-methionine sulfur bond of this heme protein is enhanced by delocalization of the metal t2g electrons into the empty 3d orbitals of the ligand atom. These findings also explain the unique spectrum of cytochrome c in the far red.

  12. Anesthesia and cerebral apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Brée, B; Gourdin, M; De Kock, M

    2008-01-01

    General anesthetics interact with targets at the cellular and molecular levels. They have the potential to induce changes in the body and the brain. Usually, these interactions are thought to be short lasting. In contrast, recent evidences suggest that alcohol, a toxic sharing many mechanisms with general anesthetics, induces long term effect at these levels. This is particularly evident in the period of synaptogenesis during which alcohol can induce excessive cerebral apoptosis (histopathologic changes) in juvenile animal models. Even if the vast majority of our patients seems to completely restore homeostasis after general anesthesia, we don't know if the changes induced at the brain level in animal models exist in human. This article intends to supply biological, pharmacological and experimental basis for a possible long term effect of general anesthetics on the human developing brain. PMID:19051443

  13. Genotyping for cytochrome P450 polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ann K; King, Barry P; Leathart, Julian B S

    2006-01-01

    Protocols for the extraction of DNA from human blood and for genotyping for a number of common cytochrome P450 polymorphisms using either polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism or PCR-single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis are described. Rapid high-throughput techniques are also available for analyses of this type, but they require access to specialized equipment and are not considered here. General guidelines for performing amplification using PCR are described together with electrophoresis protocols for analysis of restriction digests of PCR products with agarose and polyacrylamide gels including the use of polyacrylamide-based gels for SSCP analysis. Protocols for the following specific isoforms and alleles are also provided: CYP1A1 (*2B and *4 alleles), CYP2C8 (*3 and *4 alleles), CYP2C9 (*2, *3, and *11 alleles), CYP2C19 (*2 and *3 alleles), CYP2D6 (*3, *4, *5, and *6 alleles), CYP2E1 (*5A, *5B, and *6 alleles), and CYP3A5 (*3 allele).

  14. Geometrical analysis of cytochrome c unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urie, Kristopher G.; Pletneva, Ekaterina; Gray, Harry B.; Winkler, Jay R.; Kozak, John J.

    2011-01-01

    A geometrical model has been developed to study the unfolding of iso-1 cytochrome c. The model draws on the crystallographic data reported for this protein. These data were used to calculate the distance between specific residues in the folded state, and in a sequence of extended states defined by n = 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, and 15 residue units. Exact calculations carried out for each of the 103 residues in the polypeptide chain demonstrate that different regions of the chain have different unfolding histories. Regions where there is a persistence of compact structures can be identified, and this geometrical characterization is fully consistent with analyses of time-resolved fluorescence energy-transfer (TrFET) data using dansyl-derivatized cysteine side-chain probes at positions 39, 50, 66, 85, and 99. The calculations were carried out assuming that different regions of the polypeptide chain unfold synchronously. To test this assumption, lattice Monte Carlo simulations were performed to study systematically the possible importance of asynchronicity. Calculations show that small departures from synchronous dynamics can arise if displacements of residues in the main body of the chain are much more sluggish than near-terminal residues.

  15. Cytochrome P450 expression in oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, G I; Shaw, D; Weaver, R J; McKay, J A; Ewen, S W; Melvin, W T; Burke, M D

    1994-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 superfamily of enzymes play a central part in the metabolism of carcinogens and anti-cancer drugs. The expression, cellular localisation, and distribution of different forms of P450 and the functionally associated enzymes epoxide hydrolase and glutathione S-transferases have been investigated in oesophageal cancer and non-neoplastic oesophageal tissue using immunohistochemistry. Expression of the different enzymes was confined to epithelial cells in both non-neoplastic samples and tumour samples except the CYP3A was also identified in mast cells and glutathione S-transferase pi was present in chronic inflammatory cells. CYP1A was present in a small percentage of non-neoplastic samples but both CYP2C and CYP3A were absent. Epoxide hydrolase was present in half of the non-neoplastic samples and the different classes of glutathione S-transferase were present in a low number of samples. In carcinomas CYP1A, CYP3A, epoxide hydrolase, and glutathione S-transferase pi were expressed in at least 60% of samples. The expression of glutathione S-transferases alpha and mu were significantly less in adenocarcinoma compared with squamous carcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8200549

  16. Novel extrahepatic cytochrome P450s

    SciTech Connect

    Karlgren, Maria . E-mail: Maria.Karlgren@imm.ki.se; Miura, Shin-ichi; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2005-09-01

    The cytochrome P450 enzymes are highly expressed in the liver and are involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics. Because of the initiatives associated with the Human Genome Project, a great progress has recently been seen in the identification and characterization of novel extrahepatic P450s, including CYP2S1, CYP2R1, CYP2U1 and CYP2W1. Like the hepatic enzymes, these P450s may play a role in the tissue-specific metabolism of foreign compounds, but they may also have important endogenous functions. CYP2S1 has been shown to metabolize all-trans retinoic acid and CYP2R1 is a major vitamin D 25-hydroxylase. Regarding their metabolism of xenobiotics, much remains to be established, but CYP2S1 metabolizes naphthalene and it is likely that these P450s are responsible for metabolic activation of several different kinds of xenobiotic chemicals and contribute to extrahepatic toxicity and carcinogenesis.

  17. Genotyping for cytochrome P450 polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ann K; King, Barry P; Leathart, Julian B S

    2006-01-01

    Protocols for the extraction of DNA from human blood and for genotyping for a number of common cytochrome P450 polymorphisms using either polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism or PCR-single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis are described. Rapid high-throughput techniques are also available for analyses of this type, but they require access to specialized equipment and are not considered here. General guidelines for performing amplification using PCR are described together with electrophoresis protocols for analysis of restriction digests of PCR products with agarose and polyacrylamide gels including the use of polyacrylamide-based gels for SSCP analysis. Protocols for the following specific isoforms and alleles are also provided: CYP1A1 (*2B and *4 alleles), CYP2C8 (*3 and *4 alleles), CYP2C9 (*2, *3, and *11 alleles), CYP2C19 (*2 and *3 alleles), CYP2D6 (*3, *4, *5, and *6 alleles), CYP2E1 (*5A, *5B, and *6 alleles), and CYP3A5 (*3 allele). PMID:16719392

  18. Crystallization of beef heart cytochrome c oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Shinya; Shinzawa, Kyoko; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Abe, Toshio; Caughey, Winslow S.

    1991-03-01

    The three-dimensional structure of cytochrome c oxidase, a complex (multimetal, multisubunit) membrane protein is critical to elucidation of the mechanism of the enzymic reactions and their control. Our recent developments in the crystallization of the enzyme isolated from beef hearts are presented. The crystals appeared more readily at higher protein concentration, lower ionic strength, higher detergent concentration (Brij-35) and lower temperature. Large crystals were obtained by changing one of these parameters to the crystallization point as slowly as possible, keeping the other parameters constant. Increasing the detergent concentration was the most successful method, producing green crystals of the resting oxidized form as hexagonal bipyramids with typical dimensions of 0.6 mm. The usual procedures for crystallization of water soluble proteins, such as increasing ionic strength by vapor diffusion, were not applicable for this enzyme. Crystals of the resting oxidized enzyme belong to a space group of P6 2 or P6 4 with cell dimensions, a = b = 208.7 Å and c = 282.3 Å. The Patterson function shows that the crystal exhibited a non-crystallographic two-fold axis parallel to the c-axis in the asymmetric unit.

  19. Urinary kallidinogenase for the treatment of cerebral arterial stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liandong; Zhao, Ying; Wan, Qi; Zhang, Haijun

    2015-01-01

    Aim Urinary kallidinogenase (UK) has shown promise in improving cerebral perfusion. This study aimed to examine how UK affects cognitive status and serum levels of amyloid betas (Aβs) 1-40 and 1-42 in patients with cerebral arterial stenosis. Methods Ninety patients with cerebral arterial stenosis were enrolled, of whom 45 patients received UK + conventional treatment (UK group), and 45 patients received conventional treatment alone as control group. Cognitive status and Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 serum levels were determined before treatment and at 4 weeks and 8 weeks after treatment. Results At 4 weeks after treatment, cognitive status in patients treated with UK clearly improved accompanied by Aβ1-40 serum levels decreasing while there was no change of Aβ1-42. Cognitive status in patients receiving UK continued to improve, Aβ1-40 serum levels declined further as well as Aβ1-42 serum levels began to decrease dramatically at 8 weeks after treatment. Conclusion UK could improve cognitive status and decrease both Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 serum levels to prevent ischemic cerebral injury, which represents a good option for patients with cerebral arterial stenosis. PMID:26508834

  20. Dielectric measurement of cerebral water content using a Network Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Kramer, G G; Cardoso, E R; Shwedyk, E

    1992-06-01

    At present, no practical method exists for monitoring the progression and severity of cerebral oedema in a clinical setting on a continuous basis. In search for such a method, we investigated the electrical characteristics of cerebral tissue at microwave frequencies to quantify cerebral oedema. The dielectric constants of normal and oedematous canine cerebral white matter were measured using a Network Analyzer and then compared to the tissue's water content. In addition, salt infiltration and time elapsed after excision of the tissue were examined to determine their effects on the measurements. The water content and dielectric constant of the white matter were linearly related (correlation coefficient, r = 0.903), comparable to results obtained with a Time Domain Reflectometer in previous research. The Network Analyzer, however, is a more robust measurement device and, because of this, can potentially be used for long term measurements. Further, it was found that neither an increased tissue salt content nor the amount of time after excision of the tissue significantly affected the results. This indicates that the dielectric constant of cerebral white matter is mainly a function of the tissue's water content.

  1. Heterogeneity of amino acid sequence in hippopotamus cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R B; Borden, D; Tarr, G E; Margoliash, E

    1978-12-25

    The amino acid sequences of chymotryptic and tryptic peptides of Hippopotamus amphibius cytochrome c were determined by a recent modification of the manual Edman sequential degradation procedure. They were ordered by comparison with the structure of the hog protein. The hippopotamus protein differs in three positions: serine, alanine, and glutamine replace alanine, glutamic acid, and lysine in positions 43, 92, and 100, respectively. Since the artiodactyl suborders diverged in the mid-Eocene some 50 million years ago, the fact that representatives of some of them show no differences in their cytochromes c (cow, sheep, and hog), while another exhibits as many as three such differences, verifies that even in relatively closely related lines of descent the rate at which cytochrome c changes in the course of evolution is not constant. Furthermore, 10.6% of the hippopotamus cytochrome c preparation was shown to contain isoleucine instead of valine at position 3, indicating that one of the four animals from which the protein was obtained was heterozygous in the cytochrome c gene. Such heterogeneity is a necessary condition of evolutionary variation and has not been previously observed in the cytochrome c of a wild mammalian population.

  2. Methionine ligand lability of homologous monoheme cytochromes c.

    PubMed

    Levin, Benjamin D; Walsh, Kelly A; Sullivan, Kristal K; Bren, Kara L; Elliott, Sean J

    2015-01-01

    Direct electrochemical analysis of adsorbed bacterial monoheme cytochromes c has revealed a phenomenological loss of the axial methionine when examined using pyrolytic "edge-plane" graphite (EPG) electrodes. While prior findings have reported that the Met-loss state may be quantitatively understood using the cytochrome c from Hydrogenobacter thermophilus as a model system, here we demonstrate that the formation of the Met-loss state upon EPG electrodes can be observed for a range of cytochrome orthologs. Through an electrochemical comparison of the wild-type proteins from organisms of varying growth temperature optima, we establish that Met-ligand losses at graphite surfaces have similar energetics to the "foldons" for known protein folding pathways. Furthermore, a downward shift in reduction potential to approximately -100 mV vs standard hydrogen electrode was observed, similar to that of the alkaline transition found in mitochondrial cytochromes c. Pourbaix diagrams for the Met-loss forms of each cytochrome, considered here in comparison to mutants where the Met-ligand has been substituted to His or Ala, suggest that the nature of the Met-loss state is distinct from either a His-/aquo- or a bis-His-ligated heme center, yet more closely matches the pKa values found for bis-His-ligated hemes., We find the propensity for adoption of the Met-loss state in bacterial monoheme cytochromes c scales with their overall thermal stability, though not with the specific stability of the Fe-Met bond.

  3. Enhanced metabolic capacity of the frontal cerebral cortex after Pavlovian conditioning.

    PubMed

    Bruchey, A K; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    2008-03-18

    While Pavlovian conditioning alters stimulus-evoked metabolic activity in the cerebral cortex, less is known about the effects of Pavlovian conditioning on neuronal metabolic capacity. Pavlovian conditioning may increase prefrontal cortical metabolic capacity, as suggested by evidence of changes in cortical synaptic strengths, and evidence for a shift in memory initially processed in subcortical regions to more distributed prefrontal cortical circuits. Quantitative cytochrome oxidase histochemistry was used to measure cumulative changes in brain metabolic capacity associated with both cued and contextual Pavlovian conditioning in rats. The cued conditioned group received tone-foot-shock pairings to elicit a conditioned freezing response to the tone conditioned stimulus, while the contextually conditioned group received pseudorandom tone-foot-shock pairings in an excitatory context. Untrained control group was handled daily, but did not receive any tone presentations or foot shocks. The cued conditioned group had higher cytochrome oxidase activity in the infralimbic and anterior cingulate cortex, and lower cytochrome oxidase activity in dorsal hippocampus than the other two groups. A significant increase in cytochrome oxidase activity was found in anterior cortical areas (medial, dorsal and lateral frontal cortex; agranular insular cortex; lateral and medial orbital cortex and prelimbic cortex) in both conditioned groups, as compared with the untrained control group. In addition, no differences in cytochrome oxidase activity in the somatosensory regions and the amygdala were detected among all groups. The findings indicate that cued and contextual Pavlovian conditioning induces sustained increases in frontal cortical neuronal metabolic demand resulting in regional enhancement in the metabolic capacity of anterior cortical regions. Enhanced metabolic capacity of these anterior cortical areas after Pavlovian conditioning suggests that the frontal cortex may play a

  4. Cerebral Laterality and Verbal Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Jay L.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Research suggests that we process information by way of two distinct and functionally separate coding systems. Their location, somewhat dependent on cerebral laterality, varies in right- and left-handed persons. Tests this dual coding model. (Editor/RK)

  5. Coordination effects on the electronic structure of the CuA site of cytochrome c oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Kenichi; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Okuyama, Orio; Nakamura, Haruki; Takano, Yu

    2012-04-01

    The CuA site is the electron mediator in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), providing an appropriate electronic structure for rapid electron transfer. We have studied the coordinating effects of His, Met, and the peptide carbonyl group of Glu of the CuA site, using the density functional theory. Our computation demonstrates that the His ligation provides strong orbital and electrostatic effects on the electronic structure of the CuA site, while that the Met coordination gives weak orbital and electrostatic effects. A coordination of the peptide carbonyl group affects the electronic structure of the CuA site only electrostatically.

  6. Suppressive effect of accumulated aluminum trichloride on the hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 enzyme system in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanzhu; Han, Yanfei; Zhao, Hansong; Li, Jing; Hu, Chongwei; Li, Yanfei; Zhang, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) is a low toxicological metal and can accumulate in the liver. The hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 enzyme system (CYPS) plays important role in the transformation of the toxic materials. It is not clear if the CYPS is affected by Al exposure. Thus, the aim of this study is to investigate the effects of aluminum trichloride (AlCl(3)) on CYPS in rats. Forty male Wistar rats (5weeks old) weighing 110-120g were randomly allocated and orally exposed to 0, 64.18, 128.36 and 256.72mg/kg body weight (BW) AlCl(3) in drinking water for 120days. The body weight (BW) of rats, hepatosomatic index (HSI), hepatic Al content, the concentrations of cytochrome P450 (CYP450), cytochrome B5 (B5), microsomal protein and the activities of NADPH-cytochrome c reductase (CR), aminopyrin N-demethylase (AND), erythromycin N-demethylase (ERND) and aniline-4-hydeoxylase (AH) were assessed at the end of the experiment. The results showed that the increase in Al concentration decreased BW, HIS, concentrations of CYP450, B5, microsomal protein and the activity of CR, AND, ERND and AH in hepatic microsomes. The results revealed that exposure to AlCl(3) inhibited the microsomal CYP450 dependent enzyme system of liver. Our findings suggest that long term daily exposure of AlCl(3) exerts the suppressive effects and thus may cause dysfunction of hepatic CYP450 dependent enzyme system of rat.

  7. Dual role of cerebral blood flow in regional brain temperature control in the healthy newborn infant.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Sachiko; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Takashima, Sachio; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Robertson, Nicola J; Iwata, Osuke

    2014-10-01

    Small shifts in brain temperature after hypoxia-ischaemia affect cell viability. The main determinants of brain temperature are cerebral metabolism, which contributes to local heat production, and brain perfusion, which removes heat. However, few studies have addressed the effect of cerebral metabolism and perfusion on regional brain temperature in human neonates because of the lack of non-invasive cot-side monitors. This study aimed (i) to determine non-invasive monitoring tools of cerebral metabolism and perfusion by combining near-infrared spectroscopy and echocardiography, and (ii) to investigate the dependence of brain temperature on cerebral metabolism and perfusion in unsedated newborn infants. Thirty-two healthy newborn infants were recruited. They were studied with cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy, echocardiography, and a zero-heat flux tissue thermometer. A surrogate of cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured using superior vena cava flow adjusted for cerebral volume (rSVC flow). The tissue oxygenation index, fractional oxygen extraction (FOE), and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen relative to rSVC flow (CMRO₂ index) were also estimated. A greater rSVC flow was positively associated with higher brain temperatures, particularly for superficial structures. The CMRO₂ index and rSVC flow were positively coupled. However, brain temperature was independent of FOE and the CMRO₂ index. A cooler ambient temperature was associated with a greater temperature gradient between the scalp surface and the body core. Cerebral oxygen metabolism and perfusion were monitored in newborn infants without using tracers. In these healthy newborn infants, cerebral perfusion and ambient temperature were significant independent variables of brain temperature. CBF has primarily been associated with heat removal from the brain. However, our results suggest that CBF is likely to deliver heat specifically to the superficial brain. Further studies are required to assess the

  8. Identification of a small tetraheme cytochrome c and a flavocytochrome c as two of the principal soluble cytochromes c in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsapin, A. I.; Vandenberghe, I.; Nealson, K. H.; Scott, J. H.; Meyer, T. E.; Cusanovich, M. A.; Harada, E.; Kaizu, T.; Akutsu, H.; Leys, D.; Van Beeumen, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    Two abundant, low-redox-potential cytochromes c were purified from the facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1 grown anaerobically with fumarate. The small cytochrome was completely sequenced, and the genes coding for both proteins were cloned and sequenced. The small cytochrome c contains 91 residues and four heme binding sites. It is most similar to the cytochromes c from Shewanella frigidimarina (formerly Shewanella putrefaciens) NCIMB400 and the unclassified bacterial strain H1R (64 and 55% identity, respectively). The amount of the small tetraheme cytochrome is regulated by anaerobiosis, but not by fumarate. The larger of the two low-potential cytochromes contains tetraheme and flavin domains and is regulated by anaerobiosis and by fumarate and thus most nearly corresponds to the flavocytochrome c-fumarate reductase previously characterized from S. frigidimarina to which it is 59% identical. However, the genetic context of the cytochrome genes is not the same for the two Shewanella species, and they are not located in multicistronic operons. The small cytochrome c and the cytochrome domain of the flavocytochrome c are also homologous, showing 34% identity. Structural comparison shows that the Shewanella tetraheme cytochromes are not related to the Desulfovibrio cytochromes c(3) but define a new folding motif for small multiheme cytochromes c.

  9. Cerebral blood flow in patients with congestive heart failure treated with captopril

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, O.B.; Jarden, J.O.; Godtfredsen, J.; Vorstrup, S.

    1984-05-31

    The effect of captopril on cerebral blood flow was studied in five patients with severe congestive heart failure and in five control subjects. Cerebral blood flow was measured by inhalation of /sup 133/xenon and registration of its uptake and washout from the brain by single photon emission computer tomography. In addition, cerebral (internal jugular) venous oxygen tension was determined in the controls. The measurements were made before and 15, 60, and 180 minutes after a single oral dose of captopril (6.25 mg in patients with congestive heart failure and 25 mg in controls). Despite a marked decrease in blood pressure, cerebral blood flow increased slightly in the patients with severe congestive heart failure. When a correction was applied to take account of a change in arterial carbon dioxide tension, however, cerebral blood flow was unchanged after captopril administration even in patients with the greatest decrease in blood pressure, in whom a decrease in cerebral blood flow might have been expected. In the controls, blood pressure was little affected by captopril, whereas a slight, but not statistically significant, decrease in cerebral blood flow was observed. The cerebral venous oxygen tension decreased concomitantly.

  10. Impact of Intraoperative Events on Cerebral Tissue Oximetry in Patients Undergoing Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Ševerdija, Ervin E; Vranken, Nousjka P A; Teerenstra, Steven; Ganushchak, Yuri M; Weerwind, Patrick W

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies showed that decreased cerebral saturation during cardiac surgery is related to adverse postoperative outcome. Therefore, we investigated the influence of intraoperative events on cerebral tissue saturation in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). A total of 52 adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery using pulsatile CPB were included in this prospective explorative study. Cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (SctO2) was measured in both the left and right cerebral hemisphere. Intraoperative events, involving interventions performed by anesthesiologist, surgeon, and clinical perfusionist, were documented. Simultaneously, in-line hemodynamic parameters (partial oxygen pressure, partial carbon dioxide pressure, hematocrit, arterial blood pressure, and CPB flow rates) were recorded. Cerebral tissue saturation was affected by anesthetic induction (p < .001), placement of the sternal retractor (p < .001), and initiation (p < .001) as well as termination of CPB (p < .001). Placement (p < .001) and removal of the aortic cross-clamp (p = .026 for left hemisphere, p = .048 for right hemisphere) led to changes in cerebral tissue saturation. In addition, when placing the aortic crossclamp, hematocrit (p < .001) as well as arterial (p = .007) and venous (p < .001) partial oxygen pressures changed. Cerebral tissue oximetry effectively identifies changes related to surgical events or vulnerable periods during cardiac surgery. Future studies are needed to identify methods of mitigating periods of reduced cerebral saturation.

  11. Cardiolipin-cytochrome c complex: Switching cytochrome c from an electron-transfer shuttle to a myoglobin- and a peroxidase-like heme-protein.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Coletta, Massimo; Wilson, Michael T; Fiorucci, Laura; Marino, Maria; Polticelli, Fabio; Sinibaldi, Federica; Santucci, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    Cytochrome c (cytc) is a small heme-protein located in the space between the inner and the outer membrane of the mitochondrion that transfers electrons from cytc-reductase to cytc-oxidase. The hexa-coordinated heme-Fe atom of cytc displays a very low reactivity toward ligands and does not exhibit significant catalytic properties. However, upon cardiolipin (CL) binding, cytc achieves ligand binding and catalytic properties reminiscent of those of myoglobin and peroxidase. In particular, the peroxidase activity of the cardiolipin-cytochrome c complex (CL-cytc) is critical for the redistribution of CL from the inner to the outer mitochondrial membranes and is essential for the execution and completion of the apoptotic program. On the other hand, the capability of CL-cytc to bind NO and CO and the heme-Fe-based scavenging of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species may affect apoptosis. Here, the ligand binding and catalytic properties of CL-cytc are analyzed in parallel with those of CL-free cytc, myoglobin, and peroxidase to dissect the potential mechanisms of CL in modulating the pro- and anti-apoptotic actions of cytc.

  12. Cardiolipin-cytochrome c complex: Switching cytochrome c from an electron-transfer shuttle to a myoglobin- and a peroxidase-like heme-protein.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Coletta, Massimo; Wilson, Michael T; Fiorucci, Laura; Marino, Maria; Polticelli, Fabio; Sinibaldi, Federica; Santucci, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    Cytochrome c (cytc) is a small heme-protein located in the space between the inner and the outer membrane of the mitochondrion that transfers electrons from cytc-reductase to cytc-oxidase. The hexa-coordinated heme-Fe atom of cytc displays a very low reactivity toward ligands and does not exhibit significant catalytic properties. However, upon cardiolipin (CL) binding, cytc achieves ligand binding and catalytic properties reminiscent of those of myoglobin and peroxidase. In particular, the peroxidase activity of the cardiolipin-cytochrome c complex (CL-cytc) is critical for the redistribution of CL from the inner to the outer mitochondrial membranes and is essential for the execution and completion of the apoptotic program. On the other hand, the capability of CL-cytc to bind NO and CO and the heme-Fe-based scavenging of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species may affect apoptosis. Here, the ligand binding and catalytic properties of CL-cytc are analyzed in parallel with those of CL-free cytc, myoglobin, and peroxidase to dissect the potential mechanisms of CL in modulating the pro- and anti-apoptotic actions of cytc. PMID:25857294

  13. A Brownian dynamics study of the effects of cytochrome f structure and deletion of its small domain in interactions with cytochrome c6 and plastocyanin in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Haddadian, Esmael J; Gross, Elizabeth L

    2006-01-15

    The availability of seven different structures of cytochrome f (cyt f) from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii allowed us, using Brownian dynamics simulations, to model interactions between these molecules and their redox partners, plastocyanin (PC) and cytochrome c6 (cyt c6) in the same species to study the effect of cyt f structure on its function. Our results showed that different cyt f structures, which are very similar, produced different reaction rates in interactions with PC and cyt c6. We were able to attribute this to structural differences among these molecules, particularly to a small flexible loop between A-184 and G-191 (which has some of the highest crystallographic temperature factors in all of the cyt f structures) on the cyt f small domain. We also showed that deletion of the cyt f small domain affected cyt c6 more than PC, due to their different binding positions on cyt f. One function of the small domain in cyt f may be to guide PC or cyt c6 to a uniform dock with cyt f, especially due to electrostatic interactions with K-188 and K-189 on this domain. Our results could serve as a good guide for future experimental work on these proteins to understand better the electron transfer process between them. Also, these results demonstrated the sensitivity and the power of the Brownian dynamics simulations in the study of molecular interactions. PMID:16239335

  14. Multiple fusiform cerebral aneurysms – case report

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Katarzyna; Dołowy, Joanna; Kuśmierska, Małgorzata; Kuniej, Tomasz; Jaźwiec, Przemysław

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: A true aneurysym is a dilation of arterial lumen as a consequence of congenital or acquired abnormalities leading to a reduction of mechanical resistance of vascular wall, most commonly caused by its defected structure in the form of absence or weakening of the muscular and/or elastic layer. From the pathophysiological point of view, cerebral aneurysms can be classified as ‘saccular’ – most commonly occurring, and ‘other types’, including fusiform/dolichoectatic, dissecting, serpentine, posttraumatic, mycotic and giant aneurysms with or without intra-aneurysmal thrombosis. Case Report: We present a rare case of a patient with multiple fusiform dilations of cerebral vessels and giant fusiform aneurysm in supraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery. The patient presented to hospital because of sudden, severe vertigo with nausea, impaired balance and disturbed vision. Vascular anomalies were detected on CT scanning without contrast. The diagnostic work-up was complemented by CT angiography, MRI and cerebral angiography. Conclusions: Aneurysm located within the intracranial arteries is one of the most common vascular defects of the brain. The number, size and location of aneurysms are highly variable. Aneurysms can have either supra- or infratentorial location, affecting a single or multiple arteries within one or both brain hemispheres. There is often a correlation between the location of the aneurysm and its etiology, as in case of so-called mirror-image aneurysms. Symmetrically located aneurysms may indicate a defect in vascular structure. Asymmetric location, as in the patient described above, is more likely due to acquired causes, mainly atherosclerosis, but also septic emboli or blood disorders. PMID:22802866

  15. Mitochondrial disease-related mutations at the cytochrome b-iron-sulfur protein (ISP) interface: Molecular effects on the large-scale motion of ISP and superoxide generation studied in Rhodobacter capsulatus cytochrome bc1.

    PubMed

    Ekiert, Robert; Borek, Arkadiusz; Kuleta, Patryk; Czernek, Justyna; Osyczka, Artur

    2016-08-01

    One of the important elements of operation of cytochrome bc1 (mitochondrial respiratory complex III) is a large scale movement of the head domain of iron-sulfur protein (ISP-HD), which connects the quinol oxidation site (Qo) located within the cytochrome b, with the outermost heme c(1) of cytochrome c(1). Several mitochondrial disease-related mutations in cytochrome b are located at the cytochrome b-ISP-HD interface, thus their molecular effects can be associated with altered motion of ISP-HD. Using purple bacterial model, we recently showed that one of such mutations - G167P shifts the equilibrium position of ISP-HD towards positions remote from the Qo site as compared to the native enzyme [Borek et al., J. Biol. Chem. 290 (2015) 23781-23792]. This resulted in the enhanced propensity of the mutant to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) which was explained on the basis of the model evoking "semireverse" electron transfer from heme bL to quinone. Here we examine another mutation from that group - G332D (G290D in human), finding that it also shifts the equilibrium position of ISP-HD in the same direction, however displays less of the enhancement in ROS production. We provide spectroscopic indication that G332D might affect the electrostatics of interaction between cytochrome b and ISP-HD. This effect, in light of the measured enzymatic activities and electron transfer rates, appears to be less severe than structural distortion caused by proline in G167P mutant. Comparative analysis of the effects of G332D and G167P confirms a general prediction that mutations located at the cytochrome b-ISP-HD interface influence the motion of ISP-HD and indicates that "pushing" ISP-HD away from the Qo site is the most likely outcome of this influence. It can also be predicted that an increase in ROS production associated with the "pushing" effect is quite sensitive to overall severity of this change with more active mutants being generally more protected against elevated ROS

  16. Electrostatic control of the tryptophan radical in cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Tiffany P; Bhaskar, B; Poulos, Thomas L

    2004-07-13

    Previously a K(+)-binding site, analogous to that found in ascorbate peroxidase (APX), was engineered into cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) to test the hypothesis that the bound K(+) influences the stability of the Trp191 cation radical formed during the CcP catalytic cycle (Bonagura et al., (1996) Biochemistry 35, 6107 and Bonagura et al., (1999) Biochemistry 38, 5528). Characterization of this mutant, designated CcPK2, showed that the stability of the Trp191 cation radical is dependent on the occupancy of the engineered K(+) site and that the Trp191 radical was much less stable in this mutant than in wild-type CcP. The mutations Met230Leu, Met231Gln, and Met172Ser have now been constructed on the CcPK2 mutant template to test if the Met residues also contribute to the stabilization of the Trp191 cation radical. Crystal structures show that the mutations affect only the local structure near the sites of mutation. Removal of these electronegative residues located less than 8 A from the Trp radical results in a further destabilization of the Trp radical. The characteristic EPR signal associated with the Trp radical is significantly narrowed and is characteristic of a tyrosine radical signal. Double-mixing stopped-flow experiments, where the delay time between the formation of CcP compound I and its mixing with horse heart ferrocytochrome c is varied, show that the stability of the Trp radical decreases as the Met residues are removed from the proximal cavity. When taken together, these results demonstrate a strong correlation between the experimentally determined stability of the Trp191 radical, the enzyme activity, and the calculated electrostatic stabilization of the Trp191 radical. PMID:15236591

  17. Cytochrome P450-Dependent Metabolism of Caffeine in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Alexandra; Fraichard, Stephane; Le Goff, Gaëlle; Faure, Philippe; Artur, Yves; Ferveur, Jean-François; Heydel, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine (1, 3, 7-trimethylxanthine), an alkaloid produced by plants, has antioxidant and insecticide properties that can affect metabolism and cognition. In vertebrates, the metabolites derived from caffeine have been identified, and their functions have been characterized. However, the metabolites of caffeine in insects remain unknown. Thus, using radiolabelled caffeine, we have identified some of the primary caffeine metabolites produced in the body of Drosophila melanogaster males, including theobromine, paraxanthine and theophylline. In contrast to mammals, theobromine was the predominant metabolite (paraxanthine in humans; theophylline in monkeys; 1, 3, 7-trimethyluric acid in rodents). A transcriptomic screen of Drosophila flies exposed to caffeine revealed the coordinated variation of a large set of genes that encode xenobiotic-metabolizing proteins, including several cytochromes P450s (CYPs) that were highly overexpressed. Flies treated with metyrapone—an inhibitor of CYP enzymes—showed dramatically decreased caffeine metabolism, indicating that CYPs are involved in this process. Using interference RNA genetic silencing, we measured the metabolic and transcriptomic effect of three candidate CYPs. Silencing of CYP6d5 completely abolished theobromine synthesis, whereas CYP6a8 and CYP12d1 silencing induced different consequences on metabolism and gene expression. Therefore, we characterized several metabolic products and some enzymes potentially involved in the degradation of caffeine. In conclusion, this pioneer approach to caffeine metabolism in insects opens novel perspectives for the investigation of the physiological effects of caffeine metabolites. It also indicates that caffeine could be used as a biomarker to evaluate CYP phenotypes in Drosophila and other insects. PMID:25671424

  18. How Hydrogen Peroxide Is Metabolized by Oxidized Cytochrome c Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the absence of external electron donors, oxidized bovine cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) exhibits the ability to decompose excess H2O2. Depending on the concentration of peroxide, two mechanisms of degradation were identified. At submillimolar peroxide concentrations, decomposition proceeds with virtually no production of superoxide and oxygen. In contrast, in the millimolar H2O2 concentration range, CcO generates superoxide from peroxide. At submillimolar concentrations, the decomposition of H2O2 occurs at least at two sites. One is the catalytic heme a3–CuB center where H2O2 is reduced to water. During the interaction of the enzyme with H2O2, this center cycles back to oxidized CcO via the intermediate presence of two oxoferryl states. We show that at pH 8.0 two molecules of H2O2 react with the catalytic center accomplishing one cycle. In addition, the reactions at the heme a3–CuB center generate the surface-exposed lipid-based radical(s) that participates in the decomposition of peroxide. It is also found that the irreversible decline of the catalytic activity of the enzyme treated with submillimolar H2O2 concentrations results specifically from the decrease in the rate of electron transfer from heme a to the heme a3–CuB center during the reductive phase of the catalytic cycle. The rates of electron transfer from ferrocytochrome c to heme a and the kinetics of the oxidation of the fully reduced CcO with O2 were not affected in the peroxide-modified CcO. PMID:24840065

  19. How hydrogen peroxide is metabolized by oxidized cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Jancura, Daniel; Stanicova, Jana; Palmer, Graham; Fabian, Marian

    2014-06-10

    In the absence of external electron donors, oxidized bovine cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) exhibits the ability to decompose excess H2O2. Depending on the concentration of peroxide, two mechanisms of degradation were identified. At submillimolar peroxide concentrations, decomposition proceeds with virtually no production of superoxide and oxygen. In contrast, in the millimolar H2O2 concentration range, CcO generates superoxide from peroxide. At submillimolar concentrations, the decomposition of H2O2 occurs at least at two sites. One is the catalytic heme a3-CuB center where H2O2 is reduced to water. During the interaction of the enzyme with H2O2, this center cycles back to oxidized CcO via the intermediate presence of two oxoferryl states. We show that at pH 8.0 two molecules of H2O2 react with the catalytic center accomplishing one cycle. In addition, the reactions at the heme a3-CuB center generate the surface-exposed lipid-based radical(s) that participates in the decomposition of peroxide. It is also found that the irreversible decline of the catalytic activity of the enzyme treated with submillimolar H2O2 concentrations results specifically from the decrease in the rate of electron transfer from heme a to the heme a3-CuB center during the reductive phase of the catalytic cycle. The rates of electron transfer from ferrocytochrome c to heme a and the kinetics of the oxidation of the fully reduced CcO with O2 were not affected in the peroxide-modified CcO.

  20. Cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism of caffeine in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Alexandra; Fraichard, Stephane; Le Goff, Gaëlle; Faure, Philippe; Artur, Yves; Ferveur, Jean-François; Heydel, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine (1, 3, 7-trimethylxanthine), an alkaloid produced by plants, has antioxidant and insecticide properties that can affect metabolism and cognition. In vertebrates, the metabolites derived from caffeine have been identified, and their functions have been characterized. However, the metabolites of caffeine in insects remain unknown. Thus, using radiolabelled caffeine, we have identified some of the primary caffeine metabolites produced in the body of Drosophila melanogaster males, including theobromine, paraxanthine and theophylline. In contrast to mammals, theobromine was the predominant metabolite (paraxanthine in humans; theophylline in monkeys; 1, 3, 7-trimethyluric acid in rodents). A transcriptomic screen of Drosophila flies exposed to caffeine revealed the coordinated variation of a large set of genes that encode xenobiotic-metabolizing proteins, including several cytochromes P450s (CYPs) that were highly overexpressed. Flies treated with metyrapone--an inhibitor of CYP enzymes--showed dramatically decreased caffeine metabolism, indicating that CYPs are involved in this process. Using interference RNA genetic silencing, we measured the metabolic and transcriptomic effect of three candidate CYPs. Silencing of CYP6d5 completely abolished theobromine synthesis, whereas CYP6a8 and CYP12d1 silencing induced different consequences on metabolism and gene expression. Therefore, we characterized several metabolic products and some enzymes potentially involved in the degradation of caffeine. In conclusion, this pioneer approach to caffeine metabolism in insects opens novel perspectives for the investigation of the physiological effects of caffeine metabolites. It also indicates that caffeine could be used as a biomarker to evaluate CYP phenotypes in Drosophila and other insects. PMID:25671424

  1. Cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism of caffeine in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Alexandra; Fraichard, Stephane; Le Goff, Gaëlle; Faure, Philippe; Artur, Yves; Ferveur, Jean-François; Heydel, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine (1, 3, 7-trimethylxanthine), an alkaloid produced by plants, has antioxidant and insecticide properties that can affect metabolism and cognition. In vertebrates, the metabolites derived from caffeine have been identified, and their functions have been characterized. However, the metabolites of caffeine in insects remain unknown. Thus, using radiolabelled caffeine, we have identified some of the primary caffeine metabolites produced in the body of Drosophila melanogaster males, including theobromine, paraxanthine and theophylline. In contrast to mammals, theobromine was the predominant metabolite (paraxanthine in humans; theophylline in monkeys; 1, 3, 7-trimethyluric acid in rodents). A transcriptomic screen of Drosophila flies exposed to caffeine revealed the coordinated variation of a large set of genes that encode xenobiotic-metabolizing proteins, including several cytochromes P450s (CYPs) that were highly overexpressed. Flies treated with metyrapone--an inhibitor of CYP enzymes--showed dramatically decreased caffeine metabolism, indicating that CYPs are involved in this process. Using interference RNA genetic silencing, we measured the metabolic and transcriptomic effect of three candidate CYPs. Silencing of CYP6d5 completely abolished theobromine synthesis, whereas CYP6a8 and CYP12d1 silencing induced different consequences on metabolism and gene expression. Therefore, we characterized several metabolic products and some enzymes potentially involved in the degradation of caffeine. In conclusion, this pioneer approach to caffeine metabolism in insects opens novel perspectives for the investigation of the physiological effects of caffeine metabolites. It also indicates that caffeine could be used as a biomarker to evaluate CYP phenotypes in Drosophila and other insects.

  2. Engineering cytochrome c peroxidase into cytochrome P450: a proximal effect on heme-thiolate ligation.

    PubMed

    Sigman, J A; Pond, A E; Dawson, J H; Lu, Y

    1999-08-24

    In an effort to investigate factors required to stabilize heme-thiolate ligation, key structural components necessary to convert cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) into a thiolate-ligated cytochrome P450-like enzyme have been evaluated and the H175C/D235L CcP double mutant has been engineered. The UV-visible absorption, magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra for the double mutant at pH 8.0 are reported herein. The close similarity between the spectra of ferric substrate-bound cytochrome P450cam and those of the exogenous ligand-free ferric state of the double mutant with all three techniques support the conclusion that the latter has a pentacoordinate, high-spin heme with thiolate ligation. Previous efforts to prepare a thiolate-ligated mutant of CcP with the H175C single mutant led to Cys oxidation to cysteic acid [Choudhury et al. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 25656-25659]. Therefore it is concluded that changing the proximal Asp235 residue to Leu is critical in forming a stable heme-thiolate ligation in the resting state of the enzyme. To further probe the versatility of the CcP double mutant as a ferric P450 model, hexacoordinate low-spin complexes have also been prepared. Addition of the neutral ligand imidazole or of the anionic ligand cyanide results in formation of hexacoordinate adducts that retain thiolate ligation as determined by spectral comparison to the analogous derivatives of ferric P450cam. The stability of these complexes and their similarity to the analogous forms of P450cam illustrates the potential of the H175C/D235L CcP double mutant as a model for ferric P450 enzymes. This study marks the first time a stable cyanoferric complex of a model P450 has been made and demonstrates the importance of the environment around the primary coordination ligands in stabilizing metal-ligand ligation. PMID:10460168

  3. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of human liver cytochrome(s) P450

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivas, Kamlesh; Mindaye, Samuel T.; Getie-Kebtie, Melkamu; Alterman, Michail A.

    2013-02-15

    The major objective of personalized medicine is to select optimized drug therapies and to a large degree such mission is determined by the expression profiles of cytochrome(s) P450 (CYP). Accordingly, a proteomic case study in personalized medicine is provided by the superfamily of cytochromes P450. Our knowledge about CYP isozyme expression on a protein level is very limited and based exclusively on DNA/mRNA derived data. Such information is not sufficient because transcription and translation events do not lead to correlated levels of expressed proteins. Here we report expression profiles of CYPs in human liver obtained by mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic approach. We analyzed 32 samples of human liver microsomes (HLM) of different sexes, ages and ethnicity along with samples of recombinant human CYPs. We have experimentally confirmed that each CYP isozyme can be effectively differentiated by their unique isozyme-specific tryptic peptide(s). Trypsin digestion patterns for almost 30 human CYP isozymes were established. Those findings should assist in selecting tryptic peptides suitable for MS-based quantitation. The data obtained demonstrate remarkable differences in CYP expression profiles. CYP2E1, CYP2C8 and CYP4A11 were the only isozymes found in all HLM samples. Female and pediatric HLM samples revealed much more diverse spectrum of expressed CYPs isozymes compared to male HLM. We have confirmed expression of a number of “rare” CYP (CYP2J2, CYP4B1, CYP4V2, CYP4F3, CYP4F11, CYP8B1, CYP19A1, CYP24A1 and CYP27A1) and obtained first direct experimental data showing expression of such CYPs as CYP2F1, CYP2S1, CYP2W1, CYP4A22, CYP4X1, and CYP26A1 on a protein level. - Highlights: ► First detailed proteomic analysis of CYP isozymes expression in human liver ► Trypsin digestion patterns for almost 30 human CYP isozymes established ► The data obtained demonstrate remarkable differences in CYP expression profiles. ► Female HLM samples revealed more

  4. Endothelial glycocalyx on brain endothelial cells is lost in experimental cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Casper; Hyttel, Poul; Kurtzhals, Jørgen A L

    2014-07-01

    We hypothesized that the glycocalyx, which is important for endothelial integrity, is lost in severe malaria. C57BL/6 mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA, resulting in cerebral malaria, or P. chabaudi AS, resulting in uncomplicated malaria. We visualized the glycocalyx with transmission electron microscopy and measured circulating glycosaminoglycans by dot blot and ELISA. The glycocalyx was degraded in brain vasculature in cerebral and to a lesser degree uncomplicated malaria. It was affected on both intact and apoptotic endothelial cells. Circulating glycosaminoglycan levels suggested that glycocalyx disruption preceded cerebral manifestations. The contribution of this loss to pathogenesis should be studied further.

  5. Homotropic cooperativity of monomeric cytochrome P450 3A4

    SciTech Connect

    Baas, Bradley J.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2010-11-16

    Mechanistic studies of mammalian cytochrome P450s are often obscured by the phase heterogeneity of solubilized preparations of membrane enzymes. The various protein-protein aggregation states of microsomes, detergent solubilized cytochrome or a family of aqueous multimeric complexes can effect measured substrate binding events as well as subsequent steps in the reaction cycle. In addition, these P450 monooxygenases are normally found in a membrane environment and the bilayer composition and dynamics can also effect these catalytic steps. Here, we describe the structural and functional characterization of a homogeneous monomeric population of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP 3A4) in a soluble nanoscale membrane bilayer, or Nanodisc [Nano Lett. 2 (2002) 853]. Cytochrome P450 3A4:Nanodisc assemblies were formed and purified to yield a 1:1 ratio of CYP 3A4 to Nanodisc. Solution small angle X-ray scattering was used to structurally characterize this monomeric CYP 3A4 in the membrane bilayer. The purified CYP 3A4:Nanodiscs showed a heretofore undescribed high level of homotropic cooperativity in the binding of testosterone. Soluble CYP 3A4:Nanodisc retains its known function and shows prototypic hydroxylation of testosterone when driven by hydrogen peroxide. This represents the first functional characterization of a true monomeric preparation of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase in a phospholipid bilayer and elucidates new properties of the monomeric form.

  6. Energy-Dependent Reversal of the Cytochrome Oxidase Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikstrom, Marten

    1981-07-01

    Energization of isolated rat liver mitochondria with ATP under conditions in which cytochrome c is poised in a highly oxidized state shifts the state of cytochrome oxidase (cytochrome c oxidase; ferrocytochrome c:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.9.3.1) from fully oxidized to two new spectroscopically distinguishable states depending on the applied phosphorylation potential and redox potential at cytochrome c. Both new states are spectrally similar or identical to two previously described intermediates in the reaction between reduced enzyme and O2. The data suggest that the energy-dependent transitions are due to reversed electron transfer from water to ferricytochrome c linked to accumulation of intermediates of O2 reduction at the catalytic heme a3/copper center. Titrations with redox potential indicate that each transition is a one-electron step, a finding that would identify the second observed compound as enzyme-bound peroxide or its equivalent. This is consistent with this compound being spectrally identical to ``Compound C,'' previously described as the reaction product between half-reduced oxidase (two electrons) and O2. On the basis of these data a catalytic scheme of O2 reduction is proposed for the heme a3/copper center of cytochrome oxidase.

  7. Electrochemical investigations on the oxygen activation by cytochrome P-450.

    PubMed

    Scheller, F; Renneberg, R; Schwarze, W; Strnad, G; Pommerening, K; Prümke, H J; Mohr, P

    1979-01-01

    The application of cytochrome P-450 in substrate conversion is complicated both due to the limited stability and the cofactor regeneration problems. To overcome the disadvantages of NADPH consumption the transfer of the reduction equivalents from an electrode into the cytochrome P-450-system was studied: 1. NADPH was cathodically reduced at a mercury pool electrode. By immobilization of NADP on dialdehyde Sephadex the reductive recycling was possible. 2. Different forms of reduced oxygen were produced by the cathode: a) The reaction of O2- with deoxycorticosterone yields a carboxylic acid derivative. In contrast the cytochrome P-450 catalyzed NADPH-dependent reaction with the same substrate gives corticosterone, O2- represents only an intermediate in the activation of oxygen and is not the "activated oxygen" species. b) Molecular oxygen was reduced to HO2- and H2O2, respectively. The interaction of adsorbed cytochrome P-450 on the electrode surface with the reduced oxygen species in the absence of NADPH was studied. The electrochemically generated peroxide seems to be more active than added H2O2. 3. In a model of electro-enzyme-reactor several substrates were hydroxylated by microsomal cytochrome P-450 with cathodically reduced oxygen which substitutes NADPH.

  8. Cardiolipin modulates allosterically peroxynitrite detoxification by horse heart cytochrome c

    SciTech Connect

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Ciaccio, Chiara; Sinibaldi, Federica; Santucci, Roberto; Coletta, Massimo

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Cardiolipin binding to cytochrome c. {yields} Cardiolipin-dependent peroxynitrite isomerization by cytochrome c. {yields} Cardiolipin-cytochrome c complex plays pro-apoptotic effects. {yields} Cardiolipin-cytochrome c complex plays anti-apoptotic effects. -- Abstract: Upon interaction with bovine heart cardiolipin (CL), horse heart cytochrome c (cytc) changes its tertiary structure disrupting the heme-Fe-Met80 distal bond, reduces drastically the midpoint potential out of the range required for its physiological role, binds CO and NO with high affinity, and displays peroxidase activity. Here, the effect of CL on peroxynitrite isomerization by ferric cytc (cytc-Fe(III)) is reported. In the absence of CL, hexa-coordinated cytc does not catalyze peroxynitrite isomerization. In contrast, CL facilitates cytc-Fe(III)-mediated isomerization of peroxynitrite in a dose-dependent fashion inducing the penta-coordination of the heme-Fe(III)-atom. The value of the second order rate constant for CL-cytc-Fe(III)-mediated isomerization of peroxynitrite (k{sub on}) is (3.2 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The apparent dissociation equilibrium constant for CL binding to cytc-Fe(III) is (5.1 {+-} 0.8) x 10{sup -5} M. These results suggest that CL-cytc could play either pro-apoptotic or anti-apoptotic effects facilitating lipid peroxidation and scavenging of reactive nitrogen species, such as peroxynitrite, respectively.

  9. Reduction of Heavy Metals by Cytochrome c(3)

    SciTech Connect

    ABDELOUAS,A.; GONG,W.L.; LUTZE,W.; NUTTALL,E.H.; SPRAGUE,F.; SHELNUTT,JOHN A.; STRIETELMEIER,B.A.; FRANCO,R.; MOURA,I.; MOURA,J.J.G.

    2000-01-18

    We report on reduction and precipitation of Se(VI), Pb(II), CU(II), U(VI), Mo(VI), and Cr(VI) in water by cytochrome c{sub 3} isolated from Desulfomicrobium baczdatum [strain 9974]. The tetraheme protein cytochrome c{sub 3} was reduced by sodium dithionite. Redox reactions were monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy of cytochrome c{sub 3}. Analytical electron microscopy work showed that Se(VI), Pb(II), and CU(II) were reduced to the metallic state, U(W) and Mo(W) to U(IV) and Mo(IV), respectively, and Cr(VI) probably to Cr(III). U(IV) and Mo(W) precipitated as oxides and Cr(III) as an amorphous hydroxide. Cytochrome c{sub 3} was used repeatedly in the same solution without loosing its effectiveness. The results suggest usage of cytochrome c{sub 3} to develop innovative and environmentally benign methods to remove heavy metals from waste- and groundwater.

  10. Perinatal cortical infarction within middle cerebral artery trunks

    PubMed Central

    Govaert, P.; Matthys, E.; Zecic, A.; Roelens, F.; Oostra, A.; Vanzieleghem, B.

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To define neonatal pial middle cerebral artery infarction.
METHODS—A retrospective study was made of neonates in whom focal arterial infarction had been detected ultrasonographically. A detailed study was made of cortical middle cerebral artery infarction subtypes.
RESULTS—Forty infarctions, with the exception of those in a posterior cerebral artery, were detected ultrasonographically over a period of 10 years. Most were confirmed by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Factor V Leiden heterozygosity was documented in three. The onset was probably antepartum in three, and associated with fetal distress before labour in one. There were 19 cases of cortical middle cerebral artery stroke. The truncal type (n=13) was more common than complete (n = 5) middle cerebral artery infarction. Of six infarcts in the anterior trunk, four were in term infants and five affected the right hemisphere. Clinical seizures were part of the anterior truncal presentation in three. One of these infants, with involvement of the primary motor area, developed a severe motor hemisyndrome. The Bayley Mental Developmental Index was above 80 in all of three infants tested with anterior truncal infarction. Of seven patients with posterior truncal infarction, six were at or near term. Six of these lesions were left sided. Clinical seizures were observed in three. A mild motor hemisyndrome developed in at least three of these infants due to involvement of parieto-temporal non-primary cortex.
CONCLUSIONS—Inability to differentiate between truncal and complete middle cerebral artery stroke is one of the explanations for the reported different outcomes. Severe motor hemisyndrome can be predicted from neonatal ultrasonography on the basis of primary motor cortex involvement. Clinical seizures were recognised in less than half of the patients with truncal infarction; left sided presentation was present in the posterior, but not the anterior truncal type of infarction

  11. Radical formation in cytochrome c oxidase☆

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Michelle A.; Egawa, Tsuyoshi; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Yoshikawa, Shinya; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Denis L.; Gerfen, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of radicals in bovine cytochrome c oxidase (bCcO), during the O2 redox chemistry and proton translocation, is an unresolved controversial issue. To determine if radicals are formed in the catalytic reaction of bCcO under single turnover conditions, the reaction of O2 with the enzyme, reduced by either ascorbate or dithionite, was initiated in a custom-built rapid freeze quenching (RFQ) device and the products were trapped at 77 K at reaction times ranging from 50 µs to 6 ms. Additional samples were hand mixed to attain multiple turnover conditions and quenched with a reaction time of minutes. X-band (9 GHz) continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) spectra of the reaction products revealed the formation of a narrow radical with both reductants. D-band (130 GHz) pulsed EPR spectra allowed for the determination of the g-tensor principal values and revealed that when ascorbate was used as the reductant the dominant radical species was localized on the ascorbyl moiety, and when dithionite was used as the reductant the radical was the SO2•− ion. When the contributions from the reductants are subtracted from the spectra, no evidence for a protein-based radical could be found in the reaction of O2 with reduced bCcO. As a surrogate for radicals formed on reaction intermediates, the reaction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with oxidized bCcO was studied at pH 6 and pH 8 by trapping the products at 50 µs with the RFQ device to determine the initial reaction events. For comparison, radicals formed after several minutes of incubation were also examined, and X-band and D-band analysis led to the identification of radicals on Tyr-244 and Tyr-129. In the RFQ measurements, a peroxyl (R – O – O•) species was formed, presumably by the reaction between O2 and an amino acid-based radical. It is postulated that Tyr-129 may play a central role as a proton loading site during proton translocation by ejecting a proton upon formation of the radical

  12. Congenital Unilateral Deafness Affects Cerebral Organization of Reading

    PubMed Central

    Adorni, Roberta; Manfredi, Mirella; Proverbio, Alice Mado

    2013-01-01

    It is known that early sensory deprivation modifies brain functional structure and connectivity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the neuro-functional organization of reading in a patient with profound congenital unilateral deafness. Using event-related potentials (ERPs), we compared cortical networks supporting the processing of written words in patient RA (completely deaf in the right ear since birth) and in a group of control volunteers. We found that congenital unilateral hearing deprivation modifies neural mechanisms of word reading. Indeed, while written word processing was left-lateralized in controls, we found a strong right lateralization of the fusiform and inferior occipital gyri activation in RA. This finding goes in the same direction of recent proposals that the ventral occipito-temporal activity in word reading seem to lateralize to the same hemisphere as the one involved in spoken language processing. PMID:24961430

  13. Simultaneous measurement of cerebral and muscle tissue parameters during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosrati, Reyhaneh; Ramadeen, Andrew; Hu, Xudong; Woldemichael, Ermias; Kim, Siwook; Dorian, Paul; Toronov, Vladislav

    2015-03-01

    In this series of animal experiments on resuscitation after cardiac arrest we had a unique opportunity to measure hyperspectral near-infrared spectroscopy (hNIRS) parameters directly on the brain dura, or on the brain through the intact pig skull, and simultaneously the muscle hNIRS parameters. Simultaneously the arterial blood pressure and carotid and femoral blood flow were recorded in real time using invasive sensors. We used a novel hyperspectral signalprocessing algorithm to extract time-dependent concentrations of water, hemoglobin, and redox state of cytochrome c oxidase during cardiac arrest and resuscitation. In addition in order to assess the validity of the non-invasive brain measurements the obtained results from the open brain was compared to the results acquired through the skull. The comparison of hNIRS data acquired on brain surface and through the adult pig skull shows that in both cases the hemoglobin and the redox state cytochrome c oxidase changed in similar ways in similar situations and in agreement with blood pressure and flow changes. The comparison of simultaneously measured brain and muscle changes showed expected differences. Overall the results show feasibility of transcranial hNIRS measurements cerebral parameters including the redox state of cytochrome oxidase in human cardiac arrest patients.

  14. The Effect of Vinpocetine on Human Cytochrome P450 Isoenzymes by Using a Cocktail Method

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lingti; Song, Chunli; Ye, Linhu; Guo, Daohua; Yu, Meiling; Xing, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Vinpocetine is a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, which had been prescribed for chronic cerebral vascular ischemia and acute ischemic stroke or used as a dietary supplement for its several different mechanisms of biological activities. However, information on the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme-mediated drug metabolism has not been previously studied. The present study was performed to investigate the effects of vinpocetine on CYPs activity, and cocktail method was used, respectively. To evaluate the effects of vinpocetine on the activity of human CYP3A4, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP2E1, human liver microsomes were utilized to incubate with the mixed CYPs probe substrates and the target components. The results indicate that vinpocetine exhibited weak inhibitory effect on the CYP2C9, where the IC50 value is 68.96 μM, whereas the IC50 values for CYP3A4, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP2E1 were all over range of 100 μM, which showed that vinpocetine had no apparent inhibitory effects on these CYPs. In conclusion, the results indicated that drugs metabolized by CYP2C9 coadministrated with vinpocetine may require attention or dose adjustment. PMID:27006677

  15. Cytochrome P450 aromatase expression in canine nervous tissue: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Karahan, S; Yarim, M; Harada, N

    2008-01-01

    The enzyme cytochrome P450 aromatase is responsible for conversion of androgens to estrogens. Estrogens have been implicated in neurophysiology and neuropathology. The present study investigated the presence of aromatase immunoreactivity in the temporal, parietal and occipital cortices, olfactory bulb, cerebellum, and choroid plexus of the normal dog. Aromatase immunoreactivity was localized exclusively in neurons in the cortices and olfactory bulb. Immunoreactivity was also present in a small number of astrocytes in the substantia alba of the cerebellum. In the cortical regions, immunoreactive neurons, morphologically identified as pyramidal cells, were found throughout Layer II down to Layer VI, but not all pyramidal neurons were immunoreactive. In the olfactory bulb, immunoreactive neurons were mainly observed in mitral cells and inner granular cell layers. In the cerebellum, immunoreactivity was present in neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei and in some neurons of the molecular and granular cell layers. Immunoreactivity was also present in endothelial cells of the subarachnoid vessels and those adjacent to ventricles in the cortex. The presence of well defined cytoplasmic aromatase immunoreactivity in neurons, some astrocytes, and endothelial cells suggests estrogen involvement in CNS physiology and function in the dog. The presence of aromatase in ependymal cells lining cerebral ventricles and choroid epithelial cells suggests that these cells may be partially responsible for estrogen concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid.

  16. Hydrostatic determinants of cerebral perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, E.M.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    We examined the cerebral blood flow response to alterations in perfusion pressure mediated through decreases in mean arterial pressure, increases in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, and increases in jugular venous (JV) pressure in 42 pentobarbital anesthetized dogs. Each of these three pressures was independently controlled. Cerebral perfusion pressure was defined as mean arterial pressure minus JV or CSF pressure, depending on which was greater. Mean hemispheric blood flow was measured with the radiolabeled microsphere technique. Despite 30-mm Hg reductions in mean arterial pressure or increases in CSF or JV pressure, CBF did not change as long as the perfusion pressure remained greater than approximately 60 mm Hg. However, whenever perfusion pressure was reduced to an average of 48 mm Hg, cerebral blood flow decreased 27% to 33%. These results demonstrate the capacity of the cerebral vascular bed to respond similarly to changes in the perfusion pressure gradient obtained by decreasing mean arterial pressure, increasing JV pressure or increasing CSF pressure, and thereby support the above definition of cerebral perfusion pressure.

  17. A spectroscopic study of uranyl-cytochrome b5/cytochrome c interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mei-Hui; Liu, Shuang-Quan; Du, Ke-Jie; Nie, Chang-Ming; Lin, Ying-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Uranium is harmful to human health due to its radiation damage and the ability of uranyl ion (UO22+) to interact with various proteins and disturb their biological functions. Cytochrome b5 (cyt b5) is a highly negatively charged heme protein and plays a key role in mediating cytochrome c (cyt c) signaling in apoptosis by forming a dynamic cyt b5-cyt c complex. In previous molecular modeling study in combination with UV-Vis studies, we found that UO22+ is capable of binding to cyt b5 at surface residues, Glu37 and Glu43. In this study, we further investigated the structural consequences of cyt b5 and cyt c, as well as cyt b5-cyt c complex, upon uranyl binding, by fluorescence spectroscopic and circular dichroism techniques. Moreover, we proposed a uranyl binding site for cyt c at surface residues, Glu66 and Glu69, by performing a molecular modeling study. It was shown that uranyl binds to cyt b5 (KD = 10 μM), cyt c (KD = 87 μM), and cyt b5-cyt c complex (KD = 30 μM) with a different affinity, which slightly alters the protein conformation and disturbs the interaction of cyt b5-cyt c complex. Additionally, we investigated the functional consequences of uranyl binding to the protein surface, which decreases the inherent peroxidase activity of cyt c. The information of uranyl-cyt b5/cyt c interactions gained in this study likely provides a clue for the mechanism of uranyl toxicity.

  18. The cytochrome P450 genesis locus: the origin and evolution of animal cytochrome P450s.

    PubMed

    Nelson, David R; Goldstone, Jared V; Stegeman, John J

    2013-02-19

    The neighbourhoods of cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes in deuterostome genomes, as well as those of the cnidarians Nematostella vectensis and Acropora digitifera and the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens were examined to find clues concerning the evolution of CYP genes in animals. CYP genes created by the 2R whole genome duplications in chordates have been identified. Both microsynteny and macrosynteny were used to identify genes that coexisted near CYP genes in the animal ancestor. We show that all 11 CYP clans began in a common gene environment. The evidence implies the existence of a single locus, which we term the 'cytochrome P450 genesis locus', where one progenitor CYP gene duplicated to create a tandem set of genes that were precursors of the 11 animal CYP clans: CYP Clans 2, 3, 4, 7, 19, 20, 26, 46, 51, 74 and mitochondrial. These early CYP genes existed side by side before the origin of cnidarians, possibly with a few additional genes interspersed. The Hox gene cluster, WNT genes, an NK gene cluster and at least one ARF gene were close neighbours to this original CYP locus. According to this evolutionary scenario, the CYP74 clan originated from animals and not from land plants nor from a common ancestor of plants and animals. The CYP7 and CYP19 families that are chordate-specific belong to CYP clans that seem to have originated in the CYP genesis locus as well, even though this requires many gene losses to explain their current distribution. The approach to uncovering the CYP genesis locus overcomes confounding effects because of gene conversion, sequence divergence, gene birth and death, and opens the way to understanding the biodiversity of CYP genes, families and subfamilies, which in animals has been obscured by more than 600 Myr of evolution.

  19. A Fatal Outcome of Rhino-orbito-cerebral Mucormycosis Following Tooth Extraction: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Motaleb, Hesham Y Abdel; Mohamed, Mostafa S; Mobarak, Fahmy A

    2015-01-01

    Rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis is an uncommon aggressive life-threatening opportunistic fungal infection that affects mainly the immunocompromised population with mortality rate up to 50%. Due to its aggressive nature, early detection and prompt management are of great importance for a good prognosis. Our report describes a fatal outcome of a case of rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis following tooth extraction in an uncontrolled non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patient after 14 days of admission. PMID:26225109

  20. Cytochrome P450 2C9 gene polymorphism in phenytoin induced gingival enlargement: A case report.

    PubMed

    Babu, S P K Kennedy; Ramesh, V; Samidorai, Agila; Charles, N S C

    2013-07-01

    Gingival enlargement comprises any clinical condition in which an increase in the size of the gingiva is observed. Among the drugs that induce gingival enlargement, the antiepileptic agent phenytoin has been widely related to this condition. The Cytochrome P450(CYP) superfamily is the most commonly involved enzymes in metabolism of drugs. Common coding region CYP variants that affects drug elimination and response has been studied in great detail. Pharmacogenetic influences on drug metabolism have been widely reviewed and gene polymorphism of cytochrome P450 2C9 appeared to be responsible for much of the interindividual variability on drug elimination. Genetic variation in the CYP2C9 gene can affect metabolism, leading to altered phenotypes. Individuals with poor metaboliser alleles of CYP2C9 gene were shown to have a reduced metabolism of phenytoin compared with wild-type alleles. Thus identification of patients genotype prior to anti-epileptic drug administration could potentially prevent higher serum drug concentrations leading to adverse side effects such as gingival enlargement. This case report addresses the influence of CYP2C9 genetic polymorphism on Phenytoin drug metabolism thereby causing gingival enlargement. PMID:24082701

  1. Cytochrome c catalyzes the in vitro synthesis of arachidonoyl glycine.

    PubMed

    McCue, Jeffrey M; Driscoll, William J; Mueller, Gregory P

    2008-01-11

    Long chain fatty acyl glycines are an emerging class of biologically active molecules that occur naturally and produce a wide array of physiological effects. Their biosynthetic pathway, however, remains unknown. Here we report that cytochrome c catalyzes the synthesis of N-arachidonoyl glycine (NAGly) from arachidonoyl coenzyme A and glycine in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The identity of the NAGly product was verified by isotope labeling and mass analysis. Other heme-containing proteins, hemoglobin and myoglobin, were considerably less effective in generating arachidonoyl glycine as compared to cytochrome c. The reaction catalyzed by cytochrome c in vitro points to its potential role in the formation of NAGly and other long chain fatty acyl glycines in vivo.

  2. Cytochrome c catalyzes the in vitro synthesis of arachidonoyl glycine

    SciTech Connect

    McCue, Jeffrey M.; Driscoll, William J.; Mueller, Gregory P.

    2008-01-11

    Long chain fatty acyl glycines are an emerging class of biologically active molecules that occur naturally and produce a wide array of physiological effects. Their biosynthetic pathway, however, remains unknown. Here we report that cytochrome c catalyzes the synthesis of N-arachidonoyl glycine (NAGly) from arachidonoyl coenzyme A and glycine in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The identity of the NAGly product was verified by isotope labeling and mass analysis. Other heme-containing proteins, hemoglobin and myoglobin, were considerably less effective in generating arachidonoyl glycine as compared to cytochrome c. The reaction catalyzed by cytochrome c in vitro points to its potential role in the formation of NAGly and other long chain fatty acyl glycines in vivo.

  3. The mechanism of cytochrome C oxidase inhibition by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Fernando; Cadenas, Enrique

    2007-01-01

    The basic biochemistry of the inhibition of cytochrome oxidase by NO is reviewed. Three possible mechanisms that include the binding of NO to the fully reduced Fe(a3)-Cu(B) site, to the semi-reduced Fe(a3)-Cu(B) site, and to the fully oxidized Fe(a3)-Cu(B) site are confronted with the experimental data. Mathematical models are used to facilitate the analysis and to solve puzzling observations concerning the NO inhibition of cytochrome oxidase. It is concluded that the inhibition of cytochrome oxidase by NO is mixed, having both competitive and uncompetitive components, but under physiological electron flows the competitive component is largely predominant. The physiological and pathological relevance of this inhibition is briefly discussed.

  4. In vitro synthesis of arachidonoyl amino acids by cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    McCue, Jeffrey M; Driscoll, William J; Mueller, Gregory P

    2009-11-01

    Arachidonoyl amino acids are a class of endogenous lipid messengers that are expressed in the mammalian central nervous system and peripherally. While several of their prominent pharmacologic effects have been documented, the mechanism by which arachidonoyl amino acids are biosynthesized has not been defined. We have previously observed that the mitochondrial protein, cytochrome c, is capable of catalyzing the formation of the prototypic arachidonoyl amino acid, arachidonoyl glycine, utilizing arachidonoyl CoA and glycine as substrates, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Here we report that cytochrome c is similarly able to catalyze the formation of N-arachidonoyl serine, N-arachidonoyl alanine, and N-arachidonoyl gamma aminobutyric acid from arachidonoyl CoA and the respective amino acids. The identities of the arachidonoyl amino acid products were verified by mass spectral fragmentation pattern analysis. The synthetic reactions exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics and continued favorably at physiologic temperature and pH. Spectral data indicate that both cytochrome c protein structure and a +3 heme iron oxidation state are required for the reaction mechanism to proceed optimally. Reactions designed to catalyze the formation of N-arachidonoyl dopamine were not efficient due to the rapid oxidation of dopamine substrate by hydrogen peroxide, consuming both reactants. Finally, under standard assay conditions, arachidonoyl CoA and ethanolamine were found to react spontaneously to form anandamide, independent of cytochrome c and hydrogen peroxide. Accordingly, it was not possible to demonstrate a potential role for cytochrome c in the biosynthetic mechanism for either arachidonoyl dopamine or anandamide. However, the ability of cytochrome c to effectively catalyze the formation of N-arachidonoyl serine, N-arachidonoyl alanine, and N-arachidonoyl gamma aminobutyric acid in vitro highlights its potential role for the generation of these lipid messengers in vivo.

  5. Cytochrome bd from Escherichia coli catalyzes peroxynitrite decomposition.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Vitaliy B; Forte, Elena; Siletsky, Sergey A; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2015-02-01

    Cytochrome bd is a prokaryotic respiratory quinol oxidase phylogenetically unrelated to heme-copper oxidases, that was found to promote virulence in some bacterial pathogens. Cytochrome bd from Escherichia coli was previously reported to contribute not only to proton motive force generation, but also to bacterial resistance to nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here, we investigated the interaction of the purified enzyme with peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), another harmful reactive species produced by the host to kill invading microorganisms. We found that addition of ONOO(-) to cytochrome bd in turnover with ascorbate and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) causes the irreversible inhibition of a small (≤15%) protein fraction, due to the NO generated from ONOO(-) and not to ONOO(-) itself. Consistently, addition of ONOO(-) to cells of the E. coli strain GO105/pTK1, expressing cytochrome bd as the only terminal oxidase, caused only a minor (≤5%) irreversible inhibition of O2 consumption, without measurable release of NO. Furthermore, by directly monitoring the kinetics of ONOO(-) decomposition by stopped-flow absorption spectroscopy, it was found that the purified E. coli cytochrome bd in turnover with O2 is able to metabolize ONOO(-) with an apparent turnover rate as high as ~10 mol ONOO(-) (mol enzyme)(-1) s(-1) at 25°C. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the kinetics of ONOO(-) decomposition by a terminal oxidase has been investigated. These results strongly suggest a protective role of cytochrome bd against ONOO(-) damage.

  6. Role of Cytochrome P450s in Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Christmas, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 epoxygenases and hydroxylases play a regulatory role in the activation and suppression of inflammation by generating or metabolizing bioactive mediators. CYP2C and CYP2J epoxygenases convert arachidonic acid to anti-inflammatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, which have protective effects in a variety of disorders including cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. CYP4A and CYP4F hydroxylases have the ability to metabolize multiple substrates related to the regulation of inflammation and lipid homeostasis, and it is a challenge to determine which substrates are physiologically relevant for each enzyme; the best-characterized activities include generation of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and inactivation of leukotriene B4. The expression of hepatic drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450s is modulated by cytokines during inflammation, resulting in changes to the pharmacokinetics of prescribed medications. Cytochrome P450s are therefore the focus of intersecting challenges in the pharmacology of inflammation: not only do they represent targets for development of new anti-inflammatory drugs but they also contribute to variability in drug efficacy or toxicity in inflammatory disease. Animal models and primary hepatocytes have been used extensively to study the effects of cytokines on cytochrome P450 expression and activity. However, it is difficult to predict changes in drug exposure in patients because the response to inflammation varies depending on the disease state, its time course, and the cytochrome P450 involved. In these circumstances, the development of endogenous markers of cytochrome P450 metabolism might provide a useful tool to reevaluate drug dosage and choice of therapy.

  7. Increased Number of White Matter Lesions in Patients with Familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Michael J.; Morrison, Leslie A.; Kim, Helen; Hart, Blaine L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGKROUND AND PURPOSE Familial cerebral cavernous malformations, an autosomal dominant disorder, result in excess morbidity and mortality in affected patients. The disorder is most prevalent in the Southwest United States, where the affected families are most often carriers of the CCM1-KRIT1 Common Hispanic Mutation. The brain and spinal cord parenchyma in these individuals is usually affected by multiple cavernous malformations. Previous studies have shown abnormalities of endothelial cell junctions and the blood-brain barrier in cerebral cavernous malformations. Endothelial cell abnormalities have also been described in pathologic studies of white matter hyperintensities. We compared the prevalence of white matter hyperintensities in a population with known familial cerebral cavernous malformations. MATERIALS AND METHODS We examined 191 subjects with familial cerebral cavernous malformations who were enrolled into an institutional review board-approved study. All carry the same Common Hispanic Mutation in the CCM1 gene. Each subject underwent 3TMR imaging, including gradient recalled-echo, SWI, and FLAIR sequences. The number of cavernous malformations and the number of nonhemorrhagic white matter hyperintensities were counted. Subjects older than 60 yearsof age were excluded due to the high prevalence of white matter lesions in this population, and children younger than 6 were excluded due to potential sedation requirements. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the prevalence of abnormal white matter hyperintensities in those with familial cerebral cavernous malformations compared with healthy controls or those with sporadic cerebral cavernous malformation within the familial cerebral cavernous malformations group; it was also performed to evaluate the associations between abnormal white matter hyperintensities and age, sex, headaches, thyroid disease, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, seizure history, or modified Rankin Scale score

  8. Cerebral vasculitis associated with cocaine abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, B.R.; Fainstat, M.

    1987-10-16

    A case of cerebral vasculitis in a previously healthy 22-year-old man with a history of cocaine abuse is described. Cerebral angiograms showed evidence of vasculitis. A search for possible causes other than cocaine produced no results. The authors include cocaine with methamphetamines, heroin, and ephedrine as illicit drugs that can cause cerebral vasculitis.

  9. A case of cerebral gigantism and hepatocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, G I; Heuser, E T; Reed, W B

    1977-06-01

    A 14-year-old boy, who had the physical and neurological characteristics of cerebral gigantism (Sotos syndrome), developed hepatocarcinoma. This tumor is rare in children and has never, to our knowledge, been recorded in a patient with cerebral gigantism. An autopsy was performed, the first we are aware of in a patient with cerebral gigantism without increased size in ventricles.

  10. Neuroevolutional Approach to Cerebral Palsy and Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mysak, Edward D.

    Intended for cerebral palsy specialists, the book emphasizes the contribution that a neuroevolutional approach to therapy can make to habilitation goals of the child with cerebral palsy and applies the basic principles of the Bobath approach to therapy. The first section discusses cerebral palsy as a reflection of disturbed neuro-ontogenisis and…

  11. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Nidhi; Bansal, Kalpana; Chopra, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Special and medically compromised patients present a unique population that challenges the dentist’s skill and knowledge. Providing oral care to people with cerebral palsy (CP) requires adaptation of the skills we use everyday. In fact, most people with mild or moderate forms of CP can be treated successfully in the general practice setting. This article is to review various dental considerations and management of a CP patient. How to cite this article: Sehrawat N, Marwaha M, Bansal K, Chopra R. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):109-118. PMID:25356010

  12. Cerebral radionecrosis: is surgery necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Woo, E; Lam, K; Yu, Y L; Lee, P W; Huang, C Y

    1987-01-01

    Seven patients with cerebral necrosis after radiotherapy for carcinoma of the nasopharynx are presented. The clinical features included seizures and a varying degree of intellectual impairment. In spite of significant mass effect on CT scan, the patients remained alert, ambulatory and independent. We believe that some cases of cerebral necrosis following radiotherapy for extra-cranial neoplasms present in a more benign fashion than has been portrayed in the literature, and in the absence of clinical evidence of raised intracranial pressure, surgical intervention is unnecessary. The importance of careful fractionation of an optimum radiation dose as a preventive measure is emphasised. Images PMID:3694200

  13. Impaired cerebral development in fetuses with congenital cardiovascular malformations: Is it the result of inadequate glucose supply?

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Abraham M

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral development may be impaired in fetuses with congenital cardiovascular malformations, particularly hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) and aortopulmonary transposition (APT). The decreased cerebral arterial pusatility index observed in some of these fetuses led to the belief that cerebral vascular resistance was reduced as a result of arterial hypoxemia and cerebral hypoxia is thought to be responsible for impaired cerebral growth. However, other hemodynamic factors could affect pulsatility index. I propose that cerebral blood flow is reduced in fetuses with HLHS and that reduced glucose, rather than oxygen, delivery interferes with cerebral development. This is based on the fact that most of these fetuses do not have lactate accumulation in the brain.In fetuses with APT, umbilical venous blood, containing oxygen and glucose derived across the placenta, is distributed to the lungs and lower body; venous blood, with low oxygen and glucose content, is delivered to the ascending aorta and brain. Oxygen and glucose delivery may further be reduced by decreased cerebral blood flow resulting from run-off of aortic blood through the ductus arteriosus to the pulmonary circulation during diastole. In APT fetuses, lack of lactate in the brain also supports my proposal that glucose deficiency interferes with cerebral development. PMID:27055190

  14. Cytochrome P450 system proteins reside in different regions of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Won; Reed, James R; Brignac-Huber, Lauren M; Backes, Wayne L

    2014-12-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) function is dependent on the ability of these enzymes to successfully interact with their redox partners, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and cytochrome b5, in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Because the ER is heterogeneous in lipid composition, membrane microdomains with different characteristics are formed. Ordered microdomains are more tightly packed, and enriched in saturated fatty acids, sphingomyelin and cholesterol, whereas disordered regions contain higher levels of unsaturated fatty acids. The goal of the present study was to determine whether the P450 system proteins localize to different regions of the ER. The localization of CYP1A2, CYP2B4 and CYP2E1 within the ER was determined by partial membrane solubilization with Brij 98, centrifugation on a discontinuous sucrose gradient and immune blotting of the gradient fractions to identify ordered and disordered microdomains. CYP1A2 resided almost entirely in the ordered regions of the ER with CPR also localized predominantly to this region. CYP2B4 was equally distributed between the ordered and disordered domains. In contrast, CYP2E1 localized to the disordered membrane regions. Removal of cholesterol (an important constituent of ordered domains) led to the relocation of CYP1A2, CYP2B4 and CPR to the disordered regions. Interestingly, CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 localized to different membrane microdomains, despite their high degree of sequence similarity. These data demonstrate that P450 system enzymes are organized in specific membrane regions, and their localization can be affected by depletion of membrane cholesterol. The differential localization of different P450 in specific membrane regions may provide a novel mechanism for modulating P450 function. PMID:25236845

  15. Cytochrome P-450 complex formation in rat liver by the antibiotic tiamulin.

    PubMed Central

    Witkamp, R F; Nijmeijer, S M; van Miert, A S

    1996-01-01

    Tiamulin is a semisynthetic diterpene antibiotic frequently used in farm animals. The drug has been shown to produce clinically important--often lethal--interactions with other compounds. It has been suggested that this is caused by a selective inhibition of oxidative drug metabolism via the formation of a cytochrome P-450 metabolic intermediate complex. In the present study, rats were treated orally for 6 days with tiamulin at two different doses: 40 and 226 mg/kg of body weight. For comparison, another group received 300 mg of triacetyloleandomycin (TAO) per kg, which is equivalent to the 226-mg/kg tiamulin group. Subsequently, microsomal P-450 contents, P-450 enzyme activities, metabolic intermediate complex spectra, and P-450 apoprotein concentrations were assessed. In addition, effects on individual microsomal P-450 activities were studied in control microsomes at different tiamulin and substrate concentrations. In the rats treated with tiamulin, a dose-dependent complex formation as evidenced by its absorption spectrum and an increase in cytochrome P-4503A1/2 contents as assessed by Western blotting (immunoblotting) were found. The effects were comparable to those of TAO. Tiamulin induced microsomal P-450 content, testosterone 6 beta-hydroxylation rate, erythromycin N-demethylation rate, and the ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation activity. Other activities were not affected or decreased. When tiamulin was added to microsomes of control rats, the testosterone 6 beta-hydroxylation rate and the erythromycin N-demethylation were strongly inhibited. It is concluded that tiamulin is a potent and selective inducer-inhibitor of cytochrome P-450. Though not belonging to the macrolides, the compound produces an effect on P-450 similar to those of TAO and related compounds. PMID:8787878

  16. Environmentally persistent free radicals inhibit cytochrome P450 activity in rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Reed, James R; Cawley, George F; Ardoin, Taylor G; Dellinger, Barry; Lomnicki, Slawomir M; Hasan, Farhana; Kiruri, Lucy W; Backes, Wayne L

    2014-06-01

    Combustion processes generate particulate matter that affects human health. When incineration fuels include components that are highly enriched in aromatic hydrocarbons (especially halogenated varieties) and redox-active metals, ultrafine particulate matter containing air-stable, environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) is generated. The exposure to fine EPFRs (less than 2.5 μm in diameter) has been shown to negatively influence pulmonary and cardiovascular functions in living organisms. The goal of this study was to determine if these EPFRs have a direct effect on cytochrome P450 function. This was accomplished by direct addition of the EPFRs to rat liver microsomal preparations and measurement of several P450 activities using form-selective substrates. The EPFRs used in this study were formed by heating vapors from an organic compound (either monochlorophenol (MCP230) or 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB230)) and 5% copper oxide supported on silica (approximately 0.2 μm in diameter) to 230°C under vacuum. Both types of EPFRs (but not silica, physisorbed silica, or silica impregnated with copper oxide) dramatically inhibited the activities of CYP1A, CYP2B, CYP2E1, CYP2D2 and CYP3A when incubated at concentrations less than 0.1 mg/ml with microsomes and NADPH. Interestingly, at the same concentrations, the EPFRs did not inhibit HO-1 activity or the reduction of cytochrome c by NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase. CYP2D2-selective metabolism by rat liver microsomes was examined in more detail. The inhibition of CYP2D2-selective metabolism by both DCB230- and MCP230-EPFRs appeared to be largely noncompetitive and was attenuated in the presence of catalase suggesting that reactive oxygen species may be involved in the mechanism of inhibition.

  17. c-Type Cytochrome-Dependent Formation of U(IV) Nanoparticles by Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Matthew J.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kennedy, David W.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Lai, Barry; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Simonson, Cody J.; Saffarini, Daad; Romine, Margaret F.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2006-08-08

    Modern approaches for bioremediation of radionuclide contaminated environments are based on the ability of microorganisms to effectively catalyze changes in the oxidation states of metals that in turn influence their solubility. Although microbial metal reduction has been identified as an effective means for immobilizing highly-soluble uranium(VI) complexes in situ, the biomolecular mechanisms of U(VI) reduction are not well understood. Here, we show that c-type cytochromes of a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are essential for the reduction of U(VI) and formation of extracelluar UO2 nanoparticles. In particular, the outer membrane (OM) decaheme cytochrome MtrC, previously implicated in Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction, directly transferred electrons to U(VI). Additionally, deletions of mtrC and/or omcA significantly affected the in vivo U(VI) reduction rate relative to wild type MR-1. Similar to the wild type, the mutants accumulated UO2 nanoparticles extracellularly to high densities in association with an exopolymeric substance (EPS). In wild type cells, this UO2-EPS matrix exhibited glycocalyx-like properties, contained multiple elements of the OM, polysaccharide, and heme containing proteins. Using a novel combination of methods including synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy and high resolution immune-electron microscopy, we demonstrate a close association of the extracellular UO2 nanoparticles with MtrC and OmcA. This is the first study to directly localize the OM-associated cytochromes with EPS, which contains biogenic UO2 nanoparticles. In the environment, such association of UO2 nanoparticles with biopolymers may exert a strong influence on subsequent behavior including susceptibility to oxidation by O2 or transport in soils and sediments.

  18. Optimization of a cytochrome P450 oxidation system for enhancing protopanaxadiol production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fanglong; Bai, Peng; Liu, Ting; Li, Dashuai; Zhang, Xiangmei; Lu, Wenyu; Yuan, Yingjin

    2016-08-01

    Ginsenosides, the major bioactive components of Panax ginseng, are regarded as promising high-value pharmaceutical compounds. In ginseng, ginsenosides are produced from their precursor protopanaxadiol. Recently, an artificial biosynthetic pathway of protopanaxadiol was built in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by introducing a P. ginseng dammarenediol-II synthase, a P. ginseng cytochrome P450-type protopanaxadiol synthase (PPDS), and a Arabidopsis thaliana NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (ATR1). In this engineered yeast strain, however, the low metabolic flux through PPDS resulted in a low productivity of protopanaxadiol. Moreover, health of the yeast cells was significantly affected by reactive oxygen species released by the pool coupling between PPDS and ATR1. To overcome the obstacles in protopanaxadiol production, PPDS was modified through transmembrane domain truncation and self-sufficient PPDS-ATR1 fusion construction in this study. The fusion enzymes conferred approximately 4.5-fold increase in catalytic activity, and 71.1% increase in protopanaxadiol production compared with PPDS and ATR1 co-expression. Our in vivo experiment indicated that the engineered yeast carrying fusion protein effectively converted 96.8% of dammarenediol-II into protopanaxadiol. Protopanaxadiol production in a 5 L bioreactor in fed-batch fermentation reached 1436.6 mg/L. Our study not only improved protopanaxadiol production in yeast, but also provided a generic method to improve activities of plant cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. This method is promising to be applied to other P450 systems in yeast. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1787-1795. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26757342

  19. Musk xylene is a novel specific inducer of cytochrome P-450IA2.

    PubMed

    Iwata, N; Minegishi, K; Suzuki, K; Ohno, Y; Kawanishi, T; Takahashi, A

    1992-04-15

    The effect of musk xylene on contents of both cytochrome P-450IA1 and cytochrome P-450IA2 in rat liver was investigated using Western blotting analysis. Rats were treated i.p. for five consecutive days with either 50, 100 or 200 mg musk xylene/kg body weight. Musk xylene increased both total cytochrome P-450 and cytochrome b5 contents in rat liver microsomes. Musk xylene induced cytochrome P-450IA2 (384 pmol/mg protein) strongly and preferentially and the ratio of cytochrome P450IA2/P-450IA1 was about 12 at the lowest dose tested. Musk xylene also induced the cytochrome P-450IA1 dose-dependently, but these extents were very small (32-174 pmol/mg protein). These results suggest that musk xylene may be a more specific inducer for cytochrome P-450IA2 than any other inducers reported.

  20. Sensor sensationalism? Alternative views on the nature and role of 'cytochrome a1' in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Poole, R K; Baines, B S; Williams, H D

    1985-01-01

    Replying to a recent proposal that 'cytochrome a1' functions as an oxygen sensor, we argue that this speculation is flawed by the failure to appreciate that cytochrome a1-like haemoproteins are a diverse group of haemoproteins. PMID:3939981

  1. An Engineered Cytochrome b6c1 Complex with a Split Cytochrome b Is Able To Support Photosynthetic Growth of Rhodobacter capsulatus

    PubMed Central

    Saribas, A. Sami; Mandaci, Sevnur; Daldal, Fevzi

    1999-01-01

    The ubihydroquinone-cytochrome c oxidoreductase (or the cytochrome bc1 complex) from Rhodobacter capsulatus is composed of the Fe-S protein, cytochrome b, and cytochrome c1 subunits encoded by petA(fbcF), petB(fbcB), and petC(fbcC) genes organized as an operon. In the work reported here, petB(fbcB) was split genetically into two cistrons, petB6 and petBIV, which encoded two polypeptides corresponding to the four amino-terminal and four carboxyl-terminal transmembrane helices of cytochrome b, respectively. These polypeptides resembled the cytochrome b6 and su IV subunits of chloroplast cytochrome b6f complexes, and together with the unmodified subunits of the cytochrome bc1 complex, they formed a novel enzyme, named cytochrome b6c1 complex. This membrane-bound multisubunit complex was functional, and despite its smaller amount, it was able to support the photosynthetic growth of R. capsulatus. Upon further mutagenesis, a mutant overproducing it, due to a C-to-T transition at the second base of the second codon of petBIV, was obtained. Biochemical analyses, including electron paramagnetic spectroscopy, with this mutant revealed that the properties of the cytochrome b6c1 complex were similar to those of the cytochrome bc1 complex. In particular, it was highly sensitive to inhibitors of the cytochrome bc1 complex, including antimycin A, and the redox properties of its b- and c-type heme prosthetic groups were unchanged. However, the optical absorption spectrum of its cytochrome bL heme was modified in a way reminiscent of that of a cytochrome b6f complex. Based on the work described here and that with Rhodobacter sphaeroides (R. Kuras, M. Guergova-Kuras, and A. R. Crofts, Biochemistry 37:16280–16288, 1998), it appears that neither the inhibitor resistance nor the redox potential differences observed between the bacterial (or mitochondrial) cytochrome bc1 complexes and the chloroplast cytochrome b6f complexes are direct consequences of splitting cytochrome b into

  2. Variant c-type cytochromes as probes of the substrate specificity of the E. coli cytochrome c maturation (Ccm) apparatus.

    PubMed

    Allen, James W A; Sawyer, Elizabeth B; Ginger, Michael L; Barker, Paul D; Ferguson, Stuart J

    2009-04-01

    c-type cytochromes are normally characterized by covalent attachment of the iron cofactor haem to protein through two thioether bonds between the vinyl groups of the haem and the thiol groups of a CXXCH (Cys-Xaa-Xaa-Cys-His) motif. In cells, the haem attachment is an enzyme-catalysed post-translational modification. We have previously shown that co-expression of a variant of Escherichia coli cytochrome b(562) containing a CXXCH haem-binding motif with the E. coli Ccm (cytochrome c maturation) proteins resulted in homogeneous maturation of a correctly formed c-type cytochrome. In contrast, in the absence of the Ccm apparatus, the product holocytochrome was heterogeneous, the main species having haem inverted and attached through only one thioether bond. In the present study we use further variants of cytochrome b(562) to investigate the substrate specificity of the E. coli Ccm apparatus. The system can mature c-type cytochromes with CCXXCH, CCXCH, CXCCH and CXXCHC motifs, even though these are not found naturally and the extra cysteine residue might, in principle, disrupt the biogenesis proteins which must interact intricately with disulfide-bond oxidizing and reducing proteins in the E. coli periplasm. The Ccm proteins can also attach haem to motifs of the type CX(n)CH where n ranges from 2 to 6. For n=3 and 4, the haem attachment was correct and homogeneous, but for higher values of n the holocytochromes displayed oxidative addition of sulfur and/or oxygen atoms associated with the covalent haem-attachment process. The implications of our observations for the haem-attachment reaction, for genome analyses and for the substrate specificity of the Ccm system, are discussed.

  3. Cerebral palsy litigation: change course or abandon ship.

    PubMed

    Sartwelle, Thomas P; Johnston, James C

    2015-06-01

    The cardinal driver of cerebral palsy litigation is electronic fetal monitoring, which has continued unabated for 40 years. Electronic fetal monitoring, however, is based on 19th-century childbirth myths, a virtually nonexistent scientific foundation, and has a false positive rate exceeding 99%. It has not affected the incidence of cerebral palsy. Electronic fetal monitoring has, however, increased the cesarian section rate, with the expected increase in mortality and morbidity risks to mothers and babies alike. This article explains why electronic fetal monitoring remains endorsed as efficacious in the worlds' labor rooms and courtrooms despite being such a feeble medical modality. It also reviews the reasons professional organizations have failed to condemn the use of electronic fetal monitoring in courtrooms. The failures of tort reform, special cerebral palsy courts, and damage limits to stem the escalating litigation are discussed. Finally, the authors propose using a currently available evidence rule-the Daubert doctrine that excludes "junk science" from the courtroom-as the beginning of the end to cerebral palsy litigation and electronic fetal monitoring's 40-year masquerade as science.

  4. Cytochrome c4 is required for siderophore expression by Legionella pneumophila, whereas cytochromes c1 and c5 promote intracellular infection.

    PubMed

    Yip, Emily S; Burnside, Denise M; Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2011-03-01

    A panel of cytochrome c maturation (ccm) mutants of Legionella pneumophila displayed a loss of siderophore (legiobactin) expression, as measured by both the chrome azurol S assay and a Legionella-specific bioassay. These data, coupled with the finding that ccm transcripts are expressed by wild-type bacteria grown in deferrated medium, indicate that the Ccm system promotes siderophore expression by L. pneumophila. To determine the basis of this newfound role for Ccm, we constructed and tested a set of mutants specifically lacking individual c-type cytochromes. Whereas ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase (petC) mutants specifically lacking cytochrome c(1) and cycB mutants lacking cytochrome c(5) had normal siderophore expression, cyc4 mutants defective for cytochrome c(4) completely lacked legiobactin. These data, along with the expression pattern of cyc4 mRNA, indicate that cytochrome c(4) in particular promotes siderophore expression. In intracellular infection assays, petC mutants and cycB mutants, but not cyc4 mutants, had a reduced ability to infect both amoebae and macrophage hosts. Like ccm mutants, the cycB mutants were completely unable to grow in amoebae, highlighting a major role for cytochrome c(5) in intracellular infection. To our knowledge, these data represent both the first direct documentation of the importance of a c-type cytochrome in expression of a biologically active siderophore and the first insight into the relative importance of c-type cytochromes in intracellular infection events.

  5. [Cerebral arachnoiditis in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis].

    PubMed

    Gushchin, A N

    1994-01-01

    The examination and treatment of 66 patients with rhinosinusogenic cerebral arachnoiditis (RCA) were performed using otorhinolaryngological and neurological tests with special emphasis on pneumoencephalography to provide objective assessment of the brain layers and ventricles. It is shown that RCA occurs most frequently in subjects suffering from chronic purulent axillary sinusitis or recurrent polysinusitis. RCA manifestations depend on the duration of rhinosinusitis and its recurrence rate. RCA onset is usually not acute and takes place at the time of rhinosinusitis exacerbation. There are also mild frontal headaches, pathological changes in the coats of the anterior cranial fossa. The above abnormalities were most pronounced at the side of rhinosinusitis or most affected sinus. The treatment should be first of all oriented on elimination of maxillary infection in line with pathogenetic treatment of RCA. An individual approach to treatment policy is advocated.

  6. How a Cerebral Hemorrhage Altered My Art

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    “How a Cerebral Hemorrhage Altered My Art” examines how a massive stroke affected my art practice. The paralysis that ensued forced me to switch hands and become a left-handed painter. It was postulated by several neuroscientists that the “interpreter” in my brain was severely damaged during my CVA. This has had a profoundly liberating effect on my work. Whereas my pre-stroke period had the tendency to be over-intellectualized and forced, my post-stroke art is less self-conscious, more urgent and expressive. The primary subject matter of both periods is the brain. In my practice as an artist, my stroke is a challenge and an opportunity rather than a loss. PMID:22493572

  7. Cerebral hypometabolism in progressive supranuclear palsy studied with positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, N.L.; Gilman, S.; Berent, S.; Morin, E.M.; Brown, M.B.; Koeppe, R.A.

    1988-09-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is characterized by supranuclear palsy of gaze, axial dystonia, bradykinesia, rigidity, and a progressive dementia. Pathological changes in this disorder are generally restricted to subcortical structures, yet the type and range of cognitive deficits suggest the involvement of many cerebral regions. We examined the extent of functional impairment to cerebral cortical and subcortical structures as measured by the level of glucose metabolic activity at rest. Fourteen patients with PSP were compared to 21 normal volunteers of similar age using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and positron emission tomography. Glucose metabolism was reduced in the caudate nucleus, putamen, thalamus, pons, and cerebral cortex, but not in the cerebellum in the patients with PSP as compared to the normal subjects. Analysis of individual brain regions revealed significant declines in cerebral glucose utilization in most regions throughout the cerebral cortex, particularly those in the superior half of the frontal lobe. Declines in the most affected regions of cerebral cortex were greater than those in any single subcortical structure. Although using conventional neuropathological techniques the cerebral cortex appears to be unaffected in PSP, significant and pervasive functional impairments in both cortical and subcortical structures are present. These observations help to account for the constellation of cognitive symptoms in individual patients with PSP and the difficulty encountered in identifying a characteristic psychometric profile for this group of patients.

  8. Caffeine induced changes in cerebral circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, R.J.; Wilson, W.H.

    1985-09-01

    While the caffeine induced cerebral vasoconstriction is well documented, the effects of oral ingestion of the drug in a dose range comparable to the quantities in which it is usually consumed and the intensity and duration of the associated reduction in cerebral circulation are unknown. Cerebral blood flow was measured via the TTXenon inhalation technique before and thirty and ninety minutes after the oral administration of 250 mg of caffeine or a placebo, under double-blind conditions. Caffeine ingestion was found to be associated with significant reductions in cerebral perfusion thirty and ninety minutes later. The placebo group showed no differences between the three sets of cerebral blood flow values.

  9. Reductive detoxification of arylhydroxylamine carcinogens by human NADH cytochrome b5 reductase and cytochrome b5.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Joseph R; Chin, Nathaniel A; Longlais, Brett J; Hayes, Kristie L; Trepanier, Lauren A

    2006-10-01

    Heterocyclic and aromatic amine carcinogens are thought to lead to tumor initiation via the formation of DNA adducts, and bioactivation to arylhydroxylamine metabolites is necessary for reactivity with DNA. Carcinogenic arylhydroxylamine metabolites are cleared by a microsomal, NADH-dependent, oxygen-insensitive reduction pathway in humans, which may be a source of interindividual variability in response to aromatic amine carcinogens. The purpose of this study was to characterize the identity of this reduction pathway in human liver. On the basis of our findings with structurally similar arylhydroxylamine metabolites of therapeutic drugs, we hypothesized that the reductive detoxification of arylhydroxylamine carcinogens was catalyzed by NADH cytochrome b5 reductase (b5R) and cytochrome b5 (cyt b5). We found that reduction of the carcinogenic hydroxylamines of the aromatic amine 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP; found in cigarette smoke) and the heterocyclic amine 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b] pyridine (PhIP; found in grilled meats) was indeed catalyzed by a purified system containing only human b5R and cyt b5. Specific activities were 56-346-fold higher in the purified system as compared to human liver microsomes (HLM), with similar Michaelis-Menten constants (K(m) values) in both systems. The stoichiometry for b5R and cyt b5 that yielded the highest activity in the purified system was also similar to that found in native HLM ( approximately 1:8 to 1:10). Polyclonal antisera to either b5R or cyt b5 significantly inhibited N-hydroxy-4-aminobiphenyl (NHOH-4-ABP) reduction by 95 and 89%, respectively, and immunoreactive cyt b5 protein content in individual HLM was significantly correlated with individual reduction of both NHOH-4-ABP and N-hydroxy-PhIP (NHOH-PhIP). Finally, titration of HLM into the purified b5R/cyt b5 system did not enhance the efficiency of reduction activity. We conclude that b5R and cyt b5 are together solely capable of the reduction of

  10. Cytochrome b5 and NADH cytochrome b5 reductase: genotype-phenotype correlations for hydroxylamine reduction

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, James C.; Trepanier, Lauren A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives NADH cytochrome b5 reductase (b5R) and cytochrome b5 (b5) catalyze the reduction of sulfamethoxazole hydroxylamine (SMX-HA), which can contribute to sulfonamide hypersensitivity, to the parent drug sulfamethoxazole. Variability in hydroxylamine reduction could thus play a role in adverse drug reactions. The aim of this study was to characterize variability in SMX-HA reduction in 111 human livers, and investigate its association with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in b5 and b5R cDNA. Methods Liver microsomes were assayed for SMX-HA reduction activity, and b5 and b5R expression was semi-quantified by immunoblotting. The coding regions of the b5 (CYB5A) and b5R (CYB5R3) genes were resequenced. Results Hepatic SMX-HA reduction displayed a 19-fold range of individual variability (0.06–1.11 nmol/min/mg protein), and a 17-fold range in efficiency (Vmax/Km) among outliers. SMX-HA reduction was positively correlated with b5 and b5R protein content (p < 0.0001, r = 0.42; p = 0.01, r = 0.23, respectively), and expression of both proteins correlated with one another (p < 0.0001; r = 0.74). A novel cSNP in CYB5A (S5A) was associated with very low activity and protein expression. Two novel CYB5R3 SNPs, R59H and R297H, displayed atypical SMX-HA reduction kinetics and decreased SMX-HA reduction efficiency. Conclusion These studies indicate that while novel cSNPs in CYB5A and CYB5R3 are associated with significantly altered protein expression and/or hydroxylamine reduction activities, these low frequency cSNPs only appear to minimally impact overall observed phenotypic variability. Work is underway to characterize polymorphisms in other regions of these genes to further account for individual variability in hydroxylamine reduction. PMID:19997042

  11. Magnetic Circular Dichroism Studies XXV. A Preliminary Investigation of Microsomal Cytochromes*

    PubMed Central

    Dolinger, Peter M.; Kielczewski, Michael; Trudell, James R.; Barth, Günter; Linder, Robert E.; Bunnenberg, Edward; Djerassi, Carl

    1974-01-01

    The application of magnetic circular dichroism as an optical probe for simultaneous identification and determination of at least two microsomal cytochromes is demonstrated. The assignments of the bands in the spectra of microsomal suspensions are made from the spectra of soluble preparations of cytochrome P-450 obtained from Pseudomonas putida and of cytochrome b5 obtained from rat livers. PMID:4521811

  12. Concentration and function of membrane-bound cytochromes in cyanobacterial heterocysts

    SciTech Connect

    Houchins, J.P.; Hind, G.

    1984-10-01

    Membranes isolated from heterocysts and vegetative cells of Anabaena 7120 were assayed for content of cytochrome f, cytochrome b-563, cytochrome b-559/sub HP/, cytochrome b-559/sub LP/, and cytochrome aa/sub 3/ by use of reduced-minus-oxidized difference spectra. The level of cytochrome aa/sub 3/ in heterocyst membranes was 4 to 100 times higher than that in vegetative cells of Anabaena 7120 or other species of cyanobacteria. Heterocyst membranes lack cytochrome b-559/sub HP/ but contain cytochrome b-559/sub LP/ (E/sub m7.5/ = +77 millivolts, n = 1) at approximately the same concentration as cytochrome f. The role of cytochrome b-559/sub LP/ in the hydrogenase-dependent electron transfer pathway was investigated with the inhibitor 2-(n-heptyl)-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide which blocks electron flow from hydrogenase to acceptors reacting with the plastoquinone pool. Addition of inhibitor elicited no change in the reduction level of cytochrome b-559/sub LP/ indicating that this cytochrome is not directly involved in this pathway. 30 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  13. Investigating cerebral oedema using poroelasticity.

    PubMed

    Vardakis, John C; Chou, Dean; Tully, Brett J; Hung, Chang C; Lee, Tsong H; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral oedema can be classified as the tangible swelling produced by expansion of the interstitial fluid volume. Hydrocephalus can be succinctly described as the abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the brain which ultimately leads to oedema within specific sites of parenchymal tissue. Using hydrocephalus as a test bed, one is able to account for the necessary mechanisms involved in the interaction between oedema formation and cerebral fluid production, transport and drainage. The current state of knowledge about integrative cerebral dynamics and transport phenomena indicates that poroelastic theory may provide a suitable framework to better understand various diseases. In this work, Multiple-Network Poroelastic Theory (MPET) is used to develop a novel spatio-temporal model of fluid regulation and tissue displacement within the various scales of the cerebral environment. The model is applied through two formats, a one-dimensional finite difference - Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) coupling framework, as well as a two-dimensional Finite Element Method (FEM) formulation. These are used to investigate the role of endoscopic fourth ventriculostomy in alleviating oedema formation due to fourth ventricle outlet obstruction (1D coupled model) in addition to observing the capability of the FEM template in capturing important characteristics allied to oedema formation, like for instance in the periventricular region (2D model).

  14. Confusional state and cerebral infarcts.

    PubMed Central

    García-Albea, E.

    1989-01-01

    Thirteen patients with confusional state and cerebral infarction were studied. Seven patients had optic pathway alterations. On computed tomographic scan, 2 patients had multiple infarctions and 10 had single infarctions, predominantly located in the temporo-occipital associative cortex. One patient had a normal scan. Reduction of 'selective attention', 'release' hallucinations, amnesic syndrome and secondary individual adjustment could explain the confusional state. PMID:2608563

  15. Neuropathology of Acquired Cerebral Trauma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D.

    1987-01-01

    To help educators understand the cognitive and behavioral sequelae of cerebral injury, the neuropathology of traumatic brain injury and the main neuropathological features resulting from trauma-related brain damage are reviewed. A glossary with definitions of 37 neurological terms is appended. (Author/DB)

  16. Molecular dynamics in cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra deconvolution

    SciTech Connect

    Bossis, Fabrizio; Palese, Luigi L.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase molecular dynamics serve to predict Moessbauer lineshape widths. {yields} Half height widths are used in modeling of Lorentzian doublets. {yields} Such spectral deconvolutions are useful in detecting the enzyme intermediates. -- Abstract: In this work low temperature molecular dynamics simulations of cytochrome c oxidase are used to predict an experimentally observable, namely Moessbauer spectra width. Predicted lineshapes are used to model Lorentzian doublets, with which published cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra were simulated. Molecular dynamics imposed constraints to spectral lineshapes permit to obtain useful information, like the presence of multiple chemical species in the binuclear center of cytochrome c oxidase. Moreover, a benchmark of quality for molecular dynamic simulations can be obtained. Despite the overwhelming importance of dynamics in electron-proton transfer systems, limited work has been devoted to unravel how much realistic are molecular dynamics simulations results. In this work, molecular dynamics based predictions are found to be in good agreement with published experimental spectra, showing that we can confidently rely on actual simulations. Molecular dynamics based deconvolution of Moessbauer spectra will lead to a renewed interest for application of this approach in bioenergetics.

  17. Isolation of a cytochrome aa3 gene from Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    O'Brian, Mark R.; Maier, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Bradyhizobium japonicum strain LO501 is a Tn5-induced mutant that does not express the terminal oxidase cytochrome aa3 (cytochrome-c oxidase, EC 1.9.3.1). Two and one-half kilobase pairs of LO501 genomic DNA that flanks the transposon was isolated and used as a hybridization probe to obtain the wild-type gene from a cosmid library. Two subcloned fragments from two of the isolated cosmids were ligated into broad host range vectors, and restriction maps of these fragments were generated. The resultant plasmids, pCA1 and pBL33, each contained DNA homologous to that mutated in strain LO501. The two plasmids were each introduced into strain LO501 by conjugal transfer, and it was found that pCA1, but not pBL33, complemented the oxidase mutant. The transconjugant strain LO501[pCA1] expressed wild-type levels of cytochrome aa3, as discerned spectrophotometrically, and had restored N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine oxidase activity. Furthermore, the frequency of complementation of LO501 cells that received pCA1 by conjugation was 1.0, demonstrating that pCA1 complemented the mutant in trans. The results show that pCA1 contains the entire wild-type gene that was mutated in strain LO501, and this gene is required for cytochrome aa3 expression. Images PMID:16593835

  18. Relationship between horn fly infestation and polymorphisms in cytochrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Individual animal variation occurs regarding external parasite infestation in beef cattle. Our objective was to determine if horn flies infestations present on beef cattle are associated with the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; T-318C) in the cytochrome P450 gene (CYP3A28) and the prolactin (PR...

  19. Low cytochrome b variation in bream Abramis brama.

    PubMed

    Hayden, B; Coscia, I; Mariani, S

    2011-05-01

    Variability in cytochrome b (cytb) in European populations of bream Abramis brama was assessed. The cytb gene was found to be strongly conserved in A. brama relative to other cyprinid taxa. This limits the usefulness of this marker in examining geographical genetic structure in this species and raises interesting questions as to the recent evolutionary history of the species.

  20. Direct simulation of plastocyanin and cytochrome f interactions in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, I. B.; Abaturova, A. M.; Gromov, P. A.; Ustinin, D. M.; Grachev, E. A.; Riznichenko, G. Yu; Rubin, A. B.

    2006-06-01

    Most biological functions, including photosynthetic activity, are mediated by protein interactions. The proteins plastocyanin and cytochrome f are reaction partners in a photosynthetic electron transport chain. We designed a 3D computer simulation model of diffusion and interaction of spinach plastocyanin and turnip cytochrome f in solution. It is the first step in simulating the electron transfer from cytochrome f to photosystem 1 in the lumen of thylakoid. The model is multiparticle and it can describe the interaction of several hundreds of proteins. In our model the interacting proteins are represented as rigid bodies with spatial fixed charges. Translational and rotational motion of proteins is the result of the effect of stochastic Brownian force and electrostatic force. The Poisson-Boltzmann formalism is used to determine the electrostatic potential field generated around the proteins. Using this model we studied the kinetic characteristics of plastocyanin-cytochrome f complex formation for plastocyanin mutants at pH 7 and a variety of ionic strength values.

  1. Environmentally persistent free radicals inhibit cytochrome P450 activity in rat liver microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, James R.; Cawley, George F.; Ardoin, Taylor G.; Dellinger, Barry; Lomnicki, Slawomir M.; Hasan, Farhana; Kiruri, Lucy W.; Backes, Wayne L.

    2014-06-01

    Combustion processes generate particulate matter that affects human health. When incineration fuels include components that are highly enriched in aromatic hydrocarbons (especially halogenated varieties) and redox-active metals, ultrafine particulate matter containing air-stable, environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) is generated. The exposure to fine EPFRs (less than 2.5 μm in diameter) has been shown to negatively influence pulmonary and cardiovascular functions in living organisms. The goal of this study was to determine if these EPFRs have a direct effect on cytochrome P450 function. This was accomplished by direct addition of the EPFRs to rat liver microsomal preparations and measurement of several P450 activities using form-selective substrates. The EPFRs used in this study were formed by heating vapors from an organic compound (either monochlorophenol (MCP230) or 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB230)) and 5% copper oxide supported on silica (approximately 0.2 μm in diameter) to 230 °C under vacuum. Both types of EPFRs (but not silica, physisorbed silica, or silica impregnated with copper oxide) dramatically inhibited the activities of CYP1A, CYP2B, CYP2E1, CYP2D2 and CYP3A when incubated at concentrations less than 0.1 mg/ml with microsomes and NADPH. Interestingly, at the same concentrations, the EPFRs did not inhibit HO-1 activity or the reduction of cytochrome c by NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase. CYP2D2-selective metabolism by rat liver microsomes was examined in more detail. The inhibition of CYP2D2-selective metabolism by both DCB230- and MCP230-EPFRs appeared to be largely noncompetitive and was attenuated in the presence of catalase suggesting that reactive oxygen species may be involved in the mechanism of inhibition. - Highlights: • Combustion of organic pollutants generates long-lived particulate radicals (EPFRs). • EPFRs inhibit metabolism by all cytochromes P450 tested in rat liver microsomes. • EPFR-mediated inhibition is related to

  2. Modeling of Anopheles minimus Mosquito NADPH-Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase (CYPOR) and Mutagenesis Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sarapusit, Songklod; Lertkiatmongkol, Panida; Duangkaew, Panida; Rongnoparut, Pornpimol

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most dangerous mosquito-borne diseases in many tropical countries, including Thailand. Studies in a deltamethrin resistant strain of Anopheles minimus mosquito, suggest cytochrome P450 enzymes contribute to the detoxification of pyrethroid insecticides. Purified A. minimus CYPOR enzyme (AnCYPOR), which is the redox partner of cytochrome P450s, loses flavin-adenosine di-nucleotide (FAD) and FLAVIN mono-nucleotide (FMN) cofactors that affect its enzyme activity. Replacement of leucine residues at positions 86 and 219 with phenylalanines in FMN binding domain increases FMN binding, enzyme stability, and cytochrome c reduction activity. Membrane-Bound L86F/L219F-AnCYPOR increases A. minimus P450-mediated pyrethroid metabolism in vitro. In this study, we constructed a comparative model structure of AnCYPOR using a rat CYPOR structure as a template. Overall model structure is similar to rat CYPOR, with some prominent differences. Based on primary sequence and structural analysis of rat and A. minimus CYPOR, C427R, W678A, and W678H mutations were generated together with L86F/L219F resulting in three soluble Δ55 triple mutants. The C427R triple AnCYPOR mutant retained a higher amount of FAD binding and increased cytochrome c reduction activity compared to wild-type and L86F/L219F-Δ55AnCYPOR double mutant. However W678A and W678H mutations did not increase FAD and NAD(P)H bindings. The L86F/L219F double and C427R triple membrane-bound AnCYPOR mutants supported benzyloxyresorufin O-deakylation (BROD) mediated by mosquito CYP6AA3 with a two-to three-fold increase in efficiency over wild-type AnCYPOR. The use of rat CYPOR in place of AnCYPOR most efficiently supported CYP6AA3-mediated BROD compared to all AnCYPORs. PMID:23325047

  3. Cytochrome P450-Mediated Phytoremediation using Transgenic Plants: A Need for Engineered Cytochrome P450 Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Jin, Mengyao; Weemhoff, James L

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for versatile and ubiquitous Cytochrome P450 (CYP) biocatalysts for biotechnology, medicine, and bioremediation. In the last decade there has been an increase in realization of the power of CYP biocatalysts for detoxification of soil and water contaminants using transgenic plants. However, the major limitations of mammalian CYP enzymes are that they require CYP reductase (CPR) for their activity, and they show relatively low activity, stability, and expression. On the other hand, bacterial CYP enzymes show limited substrate diversity and usually do not metabolize herbicides and industrial contaminants. Therefore, there has been a considerable interest for biotechnological industries and the scientific community to design CYP enzymes to improve their catalytic efficiency, stability, expression, substrate diversity, and the suitability of P450-CPR fusion enzymes. Engineered CYP enzymes have potential for transgenic plants-mediated phytoremediation of herbicides and environmental contaminants. In this review we discuss: 1) the role of CYP enzymes in phytoremediation using transgenic plants, 2) problems associated with wild-type CYP enzymes in phytoremediation, and 3) examples of engineered CYP enzymes and their potential role in transgenic plant-mediated phytoremediation. PMID:25298920

  4. Cytochrome Oxidase I (COI) sequence conservation and variation patterns in the yellowfin and longtail tunas.

    PubMed

    Kunal, Swaraj Priyaranjan; Kumar, Girish

    2013-01-01

    Tunas are commercially important fishery worldwide. There are at least 13 species of tuna belonging to three genera, out of which genus Thunnus has maximum eight species. On the basis of their availability, they can be characterised as oceanic such as Thunnus albacares (yellowfin tuna) or coastal such as Thunnus tonggol (longtail tuna). Although these two are different species, morphological differentiation can only be seen in mature individuals, hence misidentification may result in erroneous data set, which ultimately affect conservation strategies. The mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase c subunit 1 (COI) gene is one of the most popular markers for population genetic and phylogeographic studies across the animal kingdom. The present study aims to study the sequence conservation and variation in mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase I (COI) between these two species of tuna. COI sequence analysis of yellowfin and longtail revealed the close relationship between them in Thunnus genera. The present study is the first direct comparison of mitochondrial COI sequences of these two tuna species. PMID:23649742

  5. Modulation of the Rat Hepatic Cytochrome P4501A Subfamily Using Biotin Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Ronquillo-Sánchez, M. D.; Camacho-Carranza, R.; Fernandez-Mejia, C.; Hernández-Ojeda, S.; Elinos-Baez, M.; Espinosa-Aguirre, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Studies have found that biotin favors glucose and lipid metabolism, and medications containing biotin have been developed. Despite the use of biotin as a pharmacological agent, few studies have addressed toxicity aspects including the possible interaction with cytochrome P450 enzyme family. This study analyzed the effects of pharmacological doses of biotin on the expression and activity of the cytochrome P4501A subfamily involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics. Wistar rats were treated daily with biotin (2 mg/kg, i.p.), while the control groups were treated with saline. All of the rats were sacrificed by cervical dislocation after 1, 3, 5, or 7 days of treatment. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 mRNAs were modified by biotin while enzyme activity and protein concentration were not affected. The lack of an effect of biotin on CYP1A activity was confirmed using other experimental strategies, including (i) cotreatment of the animals with biotin and a known CYP1A inducer; (ii) the addition of biotin to the reaction mixtures for the measurement of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 activities; and (iii) the use of an S9 mixture that was prepared from control and biotin-treated rats to analyze the activation of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) into mutagenic metabolites using the Ames test. The results suggest that biotin does not influence the CYP1A-mediated metabolism of xenobiotics. PMID:23984390

  6. Immunological studies on beef-heart ubiquinol--cytochrome c reductase (complex III)

    PubMed

    Nelson, B D; Mendel-Hartvig, I

    1977-10-17

    Antibodies against isolated beef-heart ubiquinol--cytochrome c reductase (complex III) have been characterized. Antibodies to complex III react strongly with isolated beef heart complex III and intact beef heart mitochondria, as shown by immunodiffusion and rocket electrophoresis experiments. The complex III content of intact mitochondria can be quantitated with rocket electrophoresis using isolated complex III as a standard. Antibodies to complex III also react with beef liver mitochondria and with both heart and liver mitochondria from rats. The latter are very weak antigens compared to beef heart material. Antibodies to complex III do not react with respiratory chain complexes I and IV, or F1-ATPase from beef heart mitochondria, but gives a slight, but variable, reaction with complex II and the membrane fraction isolated from complex V (oligomycin-sensitive ATPase). Antigenic sites are located on at least five of the seven peptides of complex III. These peptides are presumably lacking in respiratory chain complexes which do not react with antibodies to complex III, and are assumed to be uniquely located in complex III. Antiserum against complex III inhibitis duroquinol--cytochrome c reductase activity in isolated complex III and in complex III incorporated into phospholipid vesicles. Oxidation of NADH and succinate is not affected in submitochondrial particles treated with 6-times more antibody than required for complete inhibition of enzyme activity in free complex III or in complex III-phospholipid vesicles.

  7. Treatment of the spasticity in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Meholjić-Fetahović, Ajsa

    2007-11-01

    Botulinum toxin is a natural purified protein and one of the strongest biological poisons--neurotoxin. It is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. Its medical usage started in USA in 1981 and in Europe in 1992. There are seven different immune types of the toxin: A, B, C1, D, E, F and G. Toxin types A and B are used to decrease muscular spasticity. Botulinum toxin prevents the formation of acetylcholine from cholinergic nerve tissues in muscles, which in the end irreversibly destroys neuromuscular synapses. It is called temporary local chemodenervation. It does not affect the synthesis of acetylcholine. As it affects neuromuscular bond it also affects one of the symptoms of cerebral palsy--spasticity. Decreasing the spasticity of children with cerebral palsy leads to the improvement of conscious movements, muscles are less toned, passive mobility is improved, orthosis tolerance is also improved, and the child is enabled to perform easier and better motor functions such as crawling, standing and walking. Since the action of Botulinum toxin is limited to 2-6 months, new neural collaterals are formed and neuromuscular conductivity is reestablished which in the end once again develops a muscular spasm. This leads to a conclusion that botulinum toxin should again be applied into spastic muscles. It is very important for good effect of Botulinum toxin to set the goals of the therapy in advance. The goals include improvement of a function, prevention of contractions and deformities, ease of care and decrease of pain for children with cerebral palsy. After application of botulinum toxin, it is necessary to perform adequate and intensive physical treatment with regular monitoring of effects. This work shows a case of a boy with spastic form of cerebral palsy. After being rehabilitated using Vojta therapy and Bobath concept and the conduct of certain physical procedures, botulinum toxin is administered into his lower limbs' muscles and kinesiotherapy is

  8. Effect of plasma exchange on blood viscosity and cerebral blood flow.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M M; Marshall, J

    1982-01-01

    The effects of plasma exchange using a low viscosity plasma substitute on blood viscosity and cerebral blood flow were investigated in eight subjects with normal cerebral vasculature. Plasma exchange resulted in significant reductions in plasma viscosity, whole blood viscosity, globulin and fibrinogen concentration without affecting packed cell volume. The reduction in whole blood viscosity was more pronounced at low shear rates suggesting an additional effect on red cell aggregation. Despite the fall in viscosity there was no significant change in cerebral blood flow. The results support the metabolic theory of autoregulation. Although changes in blood viscosity appear not to alter the level of cerebral blood flow under these circumstances, plasma exchange could still be of benefit in the management of acute cerebrovascular disease. PMID:6805689

  9. Cerebral Malaria in Children Is Associated With Long-term Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    John, Chandy C.; Bangirana, Paul; Byarugaba, Justus; Opoka, Robert O.; Idro, Richard; Jurek, Anne M.; Wu, Baolin; Boivin, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Cerebral malaria affects >785 000 African children every year. We previously documented an increased frequency of cognitive impairment in children with cerebral malaria 6 months after their initial malaria episode. This study was conducted to determine the long-term effects of cerebral malaria on the cognitive function of these children. METHODS Children who were 5 to 12 years of age and presented to Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda, with cerebral malaria (n = 44) or uncomplicated malaria (n = 54), along with healthy, asymptomatic community children (n = 89), were enrolled in a prospective cohort study of cognition. Cognitive testing was performed at enrollment and 2 years later. The primary outcome was presence of a deficit in ≥1 of 3 cognitive areas tested. RESULTS At 2-year follow-up testing, 26.3% of children with cerebral malaria and 12.5% with uncomplicated malaria had cognitive deficits in ≥1 area, as compared with 7.6% of community children. Deficits in children with cerebral malaria were primarily in the area of attention (cerebral malaria, 18.4%, vs community children, 2.5%). After adjustment for age, gender, nutrition, home environment, and school level, children with cerebral malaria had a 3.67-fold increased risk for a cognitive deficit compared with community children. Cognitive impairment at 2-year follow-up was associated with hyporeflexia on admission and neurologic deficits 3 months after discharge. CONCLUSIONS Cerebral malaria is associated with long-term cognitive impairments in 1 of 4 child survivors. Future studies should investigate the mechanisms involved so as to develop interventions aimed at prevention and rehabilitation. PMID:18541616

  10. Cytochrome P450 enzyme mediated herbal drug interactions (Part 2)

    PubMed Central

    Wanwimolruk, Sompon; Phopin, Kamonrat; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2014-01-01

    To date, a number of significant herbal drug interactions have their origins in the alteration of cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity by various phytochemicals. Among the most noteworthy are those involving St. John's wort and drugs metabolized by human CYP3A4 enzyme. This review article is the continued work from our previous article (Part 1) published in this journal (Wanwimolruk and Prachayasittikul, 2014[ref:133]). This article extends the scope of the review to six more herbs and updates information on herbal drug interactions. These include black cohosh, ginseng, grape seed extract, green tea, kava, saw palmetto and some important Chinese medicines are also presented. Even though there have been many studies to determine the effects of herbs and herbal medicines on the activity of CYP, most of them were in vitro and in animal studies. Therefore, the studies are limited in predicting the clinical relevance of herbal drug interactions. It appeared that the majority of the herbal medicines have no clear effects on most of the CYPs examined. For example, the existing clinical trial data imply that black cohosh, ginseng and saw palmetto are unlikely to affect the pharmacokinetics of conventional drugs metabolized by human CYPs. For grape seed extract and green tea, adverse herbal drug interactions are unlikely when they are concomitantly taken with prescription drugs that are CYP substrates. Although there were few clinical studies on potential CYP-mediated interactions produced by kava, present data suggest that kava supplements have the ability to inhibit CYP1A2 and CYP2E1 significantly. Therefore, caution should be taken when patients take kava with CYP1A2 or CYP2E1 substrate drugs as it may enhance their therapeutic and adverse effects. Despite the long use of traditional Chinese herbal medicines, little is known about the potential drug interactions with these herbs. Many popularly used Chinese medicines have been shown in vitro to significantly change the

  11. Regulation of nitrite resistance of the cytochrome cbb3 oxidase by cytochrome c ScyA in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jianhua; Jin, Miao; Zhang, Haiyan; Ju, Lili; Zhang, Lili; Gao, Haichun

    2015-02-01

    Cytochrome c proteins, as enzymes to exchange electrons with substrates or as pure electron carriers to shuttle electrons, play vital roles in bacterial respiration and photosynthesis. In Shewanella oneidensis, a research model for the respiratory diversity, at least 42 c-type cytochromes are predicted to be encoded in the genome and are regarded to be the foundation of its highly branched electron transport pathways. However, only a small number of c-type cytochromes have been extensively studied. In this study, we identify soluble cytochrome c ScyA as an important factor influencing the nitrite resistance of a strain devoid of the bd oxidase by utilizing a newly developed transposon mutagenesis vector, which enables overexpression of the gene(s) downstream of the insertion site. We show that when in overabundance ScyA facilitates growth against nitrite inhibition by enhancing nitrite resistance of the cbb3 oxidase. Based on the data presented in this study, we suggest two possible mechanisms underlying the observed effect of ScyA: (1) ScyA increases electron flow to the cbb3 oxidase; (2) ScyA promotes nitrite resistance of the cbb3 oxidase, possibly by direct interaction.

  12. Cytochrome P450 polymorphism--molecular, metabolic and pharmacogenetic aspects. I. Mechanisms of activity of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Pachecka, Jan; Tomaszewski, Piotr; Kubiak-Tomaszewska, Grazyna

    2008-01-01

    Cytochrome P450, initially perceived as a type of cell pigment, was soon identified as a hemoprotein with an enzymatic activity characteristic for monooxygenases with an affinity for differentiated endo- or exogenous substrates, including drugs. So far in the human organism 58 CYP isoenzymes belonging to 18 families have been described. Most from the CYP monooxygenases superfamily turned out to be integral elements of hepatocytic reticular monooxygenase complexes which also contain NADPH-dependent cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR). Later investigations indicated the possibility of the participation in electron transport for reticular CYP isoenzymes, alternative NADH-dependent reticular system composed of cytochrome b5 reductase (CBR) and cytochrome b5. The demonstration of the activity of some CYP superfamily isoenzymes not only in hepatocytes but also in many other cells of the human organism, numerous plant and animal tissues and even in cells of fungi, protists and prokaryotes has contributed to the significantly increased understanding of the role of CYP in biological systems. In addition, some CYP isoenzymes were found to be characteristic for the inner mitochondrial membrane monooxygenase complexes which contain NADPH-dependent adrenodoxin reductase (AR) and adrenodoxin (Ad), which is identical with ferredoxin-1 (Fd-1) and hepatoredoxin (Hd).

  13. Effect of cytochrome P450 and aldo-keto reductase inhibitors on progesterone inactivation in primary bovine hepatic cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Lemley, C O; Wilson, M E

    2010-10-01

    Progesterone is required for maintenance of pregnancy, and peripheral concentrations of progesterone are affected by both production and inactivation. Hepatic cytochrome P450 (EC 1.14.14.1) and aldo-keto reductase (EC 1.1.1.145-151) enzymes play a pivotal role in the first step of steroid inactivation, which involves the addition of hydroxyl groups to various sites of the cyclopentanoperhydrophenanthrene nucleus. The current objective was to discern the proportional involvement of hepatic progesterone inactivating enzymes on progesterone decay using specific enzyme inhibitors. Ticlopidine, diltiazem, curcumin, dicumarol, and naproxen were used because of their selective inhibition of cytochrome P450s, aldo-keto reductases, and glucuronosyltransferases. Liver biopsies were collected from 6 lactating Holstein dairy cows, and cells were dissociated using a nonperfusion technique. Confluent wells were preincubated for 4 h with enzyme inhibitor and then challenged with progesterone for 1 h. Cell viability was unaffected by inhibitor treatment and averaged 84±1%. In control wells, 50% of the progesterone had been inactivated after a 1-h challenge with 5 ng/mL of progesterone. Preincubation with curcumin, ticlopidine, or naproxen caused the greatest reduction in progesterone inactivation compared with controls and averaged 77, 39, or 37%, respectively. Hydroxylation of 4-nitrophenol to 4-nitrocatechol in intact cells was inhibited by approximately 65% after treatment with curcumin or ticlopidine. Glucuronidation of phenol red or 4-nitrocatechol in intact cells was inhibited by treatment with curcumin, dicumarol, or naproxen. In cytoplasmic preparations, aldo-keto reductase 1C activity was inhibited by curcumin, dicumarol, or naproxen treatment. Microsomal cytochrome P450 2C activity was inhibited by treatment with curcumin or ticlopidine, whereas cytochrome P450 3A activity was inhibited by treatment with curcumin or diltiazem. The contribution of cytochrome P450 2C and

  14. Therapeutic doses of SkQ1 do not induce cytochromes P450 in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Myasoedova, K N; Silachev, D N

    2014-10-01

    The effect of SkQ1 (a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant) on the level of cytochromes P450 in rat liver was studied. It was found that administration of therapeutic dose of SkQ1 with drinking water for 5 days (250 nmol/kg of body weight per day) did not alter the level of cytochromes P450. Under the same conditions, the standard dose of phenobarbital used for the induction of cytochromes P450 caused the 2.7-fold increase in the content of these cytochromes. We conclude that therapeutic doses of SkQ1 do not induce cytochromes P450 in rats.

  15. Binding of ferulic acid to cytochrome c enhances stability of the protein at physiological pH and inhibits cytochrome c-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang; Zhou, Bing-Rui; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Yan-Feng; Chen, Jie; Liang, Yi

    2007-12-15

    Ferulic acid (FA) is one of the most effective components of a traditional Chinese medicine, angelica, and cytochrome c plays a vital role in apoptosis. Here we report the application of fluorescence spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and circular dichroism (CD) to investigate the mechanism for the interaction of bovine heart cytochrome c with FA and the effect of the binding on native state stability of the protein at physiological pH. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies together with ITC measurements indicate that FA binds to cytochrome c with moderate affinity and quenches the intrinsic fluorescence of the protein in a static way. ITC experiments show that the interaction of cytochrome c with FA is driven by a moderately favorable entropy increase in combination with a less favorable enthalpy decrease for the first binding site of the protein. The melting temperature of cytochrome c in the presence of FA measured by DSC and CD increases 4.0 and 5.0 degrees C, respectively, compared with that in the absence of FA. Taken together, these results indicate that FA binds to and stabilizes cytochrome c at physiological pH. Furthermore, binding of FA to cytochrome c inhibits cytochrome c-induce apoptosis of human hepatoma cell line SMMC-7721. Our data provide insight into the mechanism of drug-protein interactions, and will be helpful to the understanding of the mechanism for FA-inhibited and cytochrome c-induced apoptosis.

  16. Mechanistic Scrutiny Identifies a Kinetic Role for Cytochrome b5 Regulation of Human Cytochrome P450c17 (CYP17A1, P450 17A1)

    PubMed Central

    Simonov, Alexandr N.; Holien, Jessica K.; Yeung, Joyee Chun In; Nguyen, Ann D.; Corbin, C. Jo; Zheng, Jie; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L.; Auchus, Richard J.; Conley, Alan J.; Bond, Alan M.; Parker, Michael W.; Rodgers, Raymond J.; Martin, Lisandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450c17 (P450 17A1, CYP17A1) is a critical enzyme in the synthesis of androgens and is now a target enzyme for the treatment of prostate cancer. Cytochrome P450c17 can exhibit either one or two physiological enzymatic activities differentially regulated by cytochrome b5. How this is achieved remains unknown. Here, comprehensive in silico, in vivo and in vitro analyses were undertaken. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer analysis showed close interactions within living cells between cytochrome P450c17 and cytochrome b5. In silico modeling identified the sites of interaction and confirmed that E48 and E49 residues in cytochrome b5 are essential for activity. Quartz crystal microbalance studies identified specific protein-protein interactions in a lipid membrane. Voltammetric analysis revealed that the wild type cytochrome b5, but not a mutated, E48G/E49G cyt b5, altered the kinetics of electron transfer between the electrode and the P450c17. We conclude that cytochrome b5 can influence the electronic conductivity of cytochrome P450c17 via allosteric, protein-protein interactions. PMID:26587646

  17. Modulation of ligand-heme reactivity by binding pocket residues demonstrated in cytochrome c' over the femtosecond-second temporal range.

    PubMed

    Russell, Henry J; Hardman, Samantha J O; Heyes, Derren J; Hough, Michael A; Greetham, Gregory M; Towrie, Michael; Hay, Sam; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2013-12-01

    The ability of hemoproteins to discriminate between diatomic molecules, and the subsequent affinity for their chosen ligand, is fundamental to the existence of life. These processes are often controlled by precise structural arrangements in proteins, with heme pocket residues driving reactivity and specificity. One such protein is cytochrome c', which has the ability to bind nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) on opposite faces of the heme, a property that is shared with soluble guanylate cycle. Like soluble guanylate cyclase, cytochrome c' also excludes O2 completely from the binding pocket. Previous studies have shown that the NO binding mechanism is regulated by a proximal arginine residue (R124) and a distal leucine residue (L16). Here, we have investigated the roles of these residues in maintaining the affinity for NO in the heme binding environment by using various time-resolved spectroscopy techniques that span the entire femtosecond-second temporal range in the UV-vis spectrum, and the femtosecond-nanosecond range by IR spectroscopy. Our findings indicate that the tightly regulated NO rebinding events following excitation in wild-type cytochrome c' are affected in the R124A variant. In the R124A variant, vibrational and electronic changes extend continuously across all time scales (from fs-s), in contrast to wild-type cytochrome c' and the L16A variant. Based on these findings, we propose a NO (re)binding mechanism for the R124A variant of cytochrome c' that is distinct from that in wild-type cytochrome c'. In the wider context, these findings emphasize the importance of heme pocket architecture in maintaining the reactivity of hemoproteins towards their chosen ligand, and demonstrate the power of spectroscopic probes spanning a wide temporal range.

  18. Cerebral autoregulation with changes in arterial and cerebral venous pressure

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, R.W.; Traystman, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of cerebral venous pressure (Pcv) elevation on cerebral autoregulation has been incompletely studied. The authors compared the effect of decreased cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) by elevated Pcv and decreased arterial pressure (Pa) on cerebral blood flow (CBF) in a canine modified bypass model. CPP of 80, 70, 60, 50, 40 and 30 mmHg were produced by decreasing Pa with intracranial pressure (ICP) and Pcv maintained at 0 mmHg (group 1, n = 5), or by elevating Pcv as Pa was maintained at 80 mmHg (group 2, n = 5. CBF was measured using radiolabeled microspheres, and CMRO/sub 2/ = CBF times arterial-sagittal sinus O/sub 2/ content difference. Cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) = CPP/CBF. In group 1 CBF (ml/100 gm/min) was unchanged from control (36 +/- 4) as CPP was decreased from 80 to 40 mmHg. As CPP was decreased to 30 mmHg, CBF decreased to 28 +/- 1. CVR (mmHg/ml/min/100 gm) was 2.3 +/- 0.3 and progressively decreased to 1.0 +/- 0.1 at CPP of 30 mmHg. In group 2 CBF was 34 +/- 3 and was unchanged as CPP decreased to 50 mmHg. At CPP of 40 and 30 mmHg CBF decreased to 25 +/- 3 and 22 +/- 2 respectively. Control CRV was 2.4 +/- 0.2 and progressively decreased to 1.4 +/- 0.1 as CPP decreased to 30 mmHg. CMRO/sub 2/ was unchanged from control in both groups. Thus, CBF is maintained to low CPP regardless of whether vascular transmural pressure was decreased (decrease Pa) or increased (increased Pcv) demonstrating that the myogenic mechanism of autoregulation may be unimportant in normoxic dogs.

  19. Production, isolation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to cytochromes c of beef heart and Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Kuo, L M; Davies, H C

    1983-08-01

    Hybridoma cell lines secreting monoclonal antibodies which bind beef heart cytochrome c or Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c have been produced using spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with cytochrome c. Immunization was performed with either the native cytochrome c, succinylated hemocyanin-conjugated cytochrome c, or beef heart cytochrome c polymerized with glutaraldehyde. Of 10 such fusions, the hybridization frequency ranged from 0 to 42%. The cell fusion efficiency, the possible factors involved in the cell fusion efficiency and the frequency of antibody producing hybridomas are described. The percentage of hybridomas positive for anti-cytochrome c antibody production as screened for by radioimmunoassay or ELISA was 2%. Of the antibodies from 12 hybridoma cell lines which resulted from 10 fusions, three were specific to beef heart cytochrome c, another three were specific to P. denitrificans cytochrome c, and the remainder reacted with both cytochromes c. These groups of monoclonal antibodies react to different sets of sites on these two cytochromes c. The monoclonal antibodies from ten representative clones have been isolated and characterized by different methods.

  20. Cytochrome P450 responses and PCB congeners in pipping heron embryos from Virginia, the Great Lakes and San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Melancon, M.J.; Custer, T.W.; Tillett, D.E.; Woodin, Bruce R.; Stegeman, John J.

    1992-01-01

    Pipping black-crowned night-heron (Nvcticorax nvcticorax) embryos were collected from undisturbed (Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge VA; CNWR) and industrialized (Cat Island, Green Bay WI and San Francisco Bay, CA; SFB) locations. Hepatic monooxygenases (AHH, EROD, BROD, ECOD) were induced up to 100-fold, and were correlated (r=0.50 to 0.72) with total PCB burdens (N =61 embryos). A subset of 30 embryos have now been analyzed by GC/MS for 12 AHH-active PCB congeners and by Western blot for cytochromes P450lA and P450llB. At Cat Island, concentrations of 8 congeners were greater (P <0.05) than at CNWR. P450lA and P450llB were detected in 44% and 100% of the Cat Island embryos compared to 8% and 33% of the CNWR + SFB embryos. Cytochrome P450 parameters were correlated with the total PCBs (r =0.44 to 0.67) and with at least 9 PCB congeners (r =0.39 to 0.77). Since P450 responses might be affected by other contaminants, sample extract potency in the H411E rat hepatoma bioassay is being determined to study relationships among dioxin equivalents and cytochrome P450 parameters.

  1. Functional characterization of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase from Bactrocera dorsalis: Possible involvement in susceptibility to malathion

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong; Lu, Xue-Ping; Wang, Luo-Luo; Wei, Dong; Feng, Zi-Jiao; Zhang, Qi; Xiao, Lin-Fan; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2015-01-01

    NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) is essential for cytochrome P450 catalysis, which is important in the detoxification and activation of xenobiotics. In this study, two transcripts of Bactrocera dorsalis CPR (BdCPR) were cloned, and the deduced amino-acid sequence had an N-terminus membrane anchor for BdCPR-X1 and three conserved binding domains (FMN, FAD, and NADP), as well as an FAD binding motif and catalytic residues for both BdCPR-X1 and BdCPR-X2. BdCPR-X1 was detected to have the high expression levels in adults and in Malpighian tubules, fat bodies, and midguts of adults, but BdCPR-X2 expressed lowly in B. dorsalis. The levels of BdCPRs were similar in malathion-resistant strain compared to susceptible strain. However, injecting adults with double-stranded RNA against BdCPR significantly reduced the transcript levels of the mRNA, and knockdown of BdCPR increased adult susceptibility to malathion. Expressing complete BdCPR-X1 cDNA in Sf9 cells resulted in high activity determined by cytochrome c reduction and these cells had higher viability after exposure to malathion than control. The results suggest that BdCPR could affect the susceptibility of B. dorsalis to malathion and eukaryotic expression of BdCPR would lay a solid foundation for further investigation of P450 in B. dorsalis. PMID:26681597

  2. Telencephalic Flexure and Malformations of the Lateral Cerebral (Sylvian) Fissure.

    PubMed

    Sarnat, Harvey B; Flores-Sarnat, Laura

    2016-10-01

    After sagittal division of the prosencephalon at 4.5 weeks of gestation, the early fetal cerebral hemisphere bends or rotates posteroventrally from seven weeks of gestation. The posterior pole of the telencephalon thus becomes not the occipital but the temporal lobe as the telencephalic flexure forms the operculum and finally the lateral cerebral or Sylvian fissure. The ventral part is infolded to become the insula. The frontal and temporal lips of the Sylvian fissure, as well as the insula, all derive from the ventral margin of the primitive telencephalon, hence may be influenced by genetic mutations with a ventrodorsal gradient of expression. The telencephalic flexure also contributes to a shift of the hippocampus from a dorsal to a ventral position, the early rostral pole of the hippocampus becoming caudal and dorsal becoming ventral. The occipital horn is the most recent recess of the lateral ventricle, hence most vulnerable to anatomic variations that affect the calcarine fissure. Many major malformations include lack of telencephalic flexure (holoprosencephaly, extreme micrencephaly) or dysplastic Sylvian fissure (lissencephalies, hemimegalencephaly, schizencephaly). Although fissures and sulci are genetically programmed, mechanical forces of growth and volume expansion are proposed to be mainly extrinsic (including ventricles) for fissures and intrinsic for sulci. In fetal hydrocephalus, the telencephalic flexure is less affected because ventricular dilatation occurs later in gestation. Flexures can be detected prenatally by ultrasound and fetal magnetic resonance imaging and should be described neuropathologically in cerebral malformations. PMID:27590993

  3. Assembly factors monitor sequential hemylation of cytochrome b to regulate mitochondrial translation

    PubMed Central

    Hildenbeutel, Markus; Hegg, Eric L.; Stephan, Katharina; Gruschke, Steffi; Meunier, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes convert chemical energy into a membrane potential by connecting electron transport with charge separation. Electron transport relies on redox cofactors that occupy strategic positions in the complexes. How these redox cofactors are assembled into the complexes is not known. Cytochrome b, a central catalytic subunit of complex III, contains two heme bs. Here, we unravel the sequence of events in the mitochondrial inner membrane by which cytochrome b is hemylated. Heme incorporation occurs in a strict sequential process that involves interactions of the newly synthesized cytochrome b with assembly factors and structural complex III subunits. These interactions are functionally connected to cofactor acquisition that triggers the progression of cytochrome b through successive assembly intermediates. Failure to hemylate cytochrome b sequesters the Cbp3–Cbp6 complex in early assembly intermediates, thereby causing a reduction in cytochrome b synthesis via a feedback loop that senses hemylation of cytochrome b. PMID:24841564

  4. Cytochrome c-553 is not required for photosynthetic activity in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus.

    PubMed Central

    Laudenbach, D E; Herbert, S K; McDowell, C; Fork, D C; Grossman, A R; Straus, N A

    1990-01-01

    In cyanobacteria, the water-soluble cytochrome c-553 functions as a mobile carrier of electrons between the membrane-bound cytochrome b6-f complex and P-700 reaction centers of Photosystem I. The structural gene for cytochrome c-553 (designated cytA) of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 was cloned, and the deduced amino acid sequence was shown to be similar to known cyanobacterial cytochrome c-553 proteins. A deletion mutant was constructed that had no detectable cytochrome c-553 based on spectral analyses and tetramethylbenzidine-hydrogen peroxide staining of proteins resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The mutant strain was not impaired in overall photosynthetic activity. However, this mutant exhibited a decreased efficiency of cytochrome f oxidation. These results indicate that cytochrome c-553 is not an absolute requirement for reducing Photosystem I reaction centers in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942. PMID:1967057

  5. Comparative study of hop-containing products on human cytochrome p450-mediated metabolism.

    PubMed

    Foster, Brian C; Kearns, Nikia; Arnason, John T; Saleem, Ammar; Ogrodowczyk, Carolina; Desjardins, Suzanne

    2009-06-10

    Thirty-five national and international brands of beer were examined for their potential to affect human cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated metabolism. They represented the two main categories of beer, ales and lagers, and included a number of specialty products including bitter (porter, stout), coffee, ice, wheat, Pilsner, and hemp seed. Aliquots were examined for nonvolatile soluble solids, effect on CYP metabolism and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) transport, and major alpha- and beta-hop acids. Wide variance was detected in contents of alcohol, nonvolatile suspended solids, and hop acids and in the potential to affect CYP-mediated metabolism and Pgp-mediated efflux transport. Many of the products affected CYP2C9-mediated metabolism, and only two (NRP 306 and 307) markedly affected CYP3A4; hence, some products have the capacity to affect drug safety. CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP3A7, and CYP19 (aromatase) inhibition to the log concentration of beta-acid content was significant with r(2) > 0.37, suggesting that these components can account for some of the variation in inhibition of CYP metabolism.

  6. Sequence Polymorphism of Cytochrome b Gene in Theileria annulata Tunisian Isolates and Its Association with Buparvaquone Treatment Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mhadhbi, Moez; Chaouch, Melek; Ajroud, Kaouthar; Darghouth, Mohamed Aziz; BenAbderrazak, Souha

    2015-01-01

    Background Buparvaquone (BW 720C) is the major hydroxynaphtoquinone active against tropical theileriosis (Theileria annulata infection). Previous studies showed that buparvaquone, similarly to others hydroxynaphtoquinone, probably acts by binding to cytochrome b (cyt b) inhibiting the electron transport chain in the parasite. Several observations suggested that T. annulata is becoming resistant to buparvaquone in many endemic regions (Tunisia, Turkey and Iran), which may hinder the development of bovine livestock in these areas. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study we sought to determine whether point mutations in T. annulata cytochrome b gene could be associated to buparvaquone resistance. A total of 28 clones were studied in this work, 19 of which were obtained from 3 resistant isolates (ST2/12, ST2/13 and ST2/19) collected at different time after treatment, from a field treatment failure and nine clones isolated from 4 sensitive stocks of T. annulata (Beja, Battan, Jed4 and Sousse). The cytochrome b gene was amplified and sequenced. We identified five point mutations at the protein sequences (114, 129, 253, 262 and 347) specific for the clones isolated from resistant stocks. Two of them affecting 68% (13/19) of resistant clones, are present in the drug-binding site Q02 region at the position 253 in three resistant clones and at the position 262 in 11 out of 19 resistant clones. These two mutations substitute a neutral and hydrophobic amino acids by polar and hydrophilic ones which could interfere with the drug binding capabilities. When we compared our sequences to the Iranian ones, the phylogenetic tree analyses show the presence of a geographical sub-structuring in the population of T. annulata. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, our results suggest that the cytochrome b gene may be used as a tool to discriminate between different T. annulata genotypes and also as a genetic marker to characterize resistant isolates of T. annulata. PMID

  7. Effects of ion/ion proton transfer reactions on conformation of gas-phase cytochrome c ions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qin; Schieffer, Gregg M; Soyk, Matthew W; Anderson, Timothy J; Houk, R S; Badman, Ethan R

    2010-07-01

    Positive ions from cytochrome c are studied in a 3-D ion trap/ion mobility (IM)/quadrupole-time-of-flight (TOF) instrument with three independent ion sources. The IM separation allows measurement of the cross section of the ions. Ion/ion reactions in the 3-D ion trap that remove protons cause the cytochrome c ions to refold gently without other degradation of protein structure, i.e., fragmentation or loss of heme group or metal ion. The conformation(s) of the product ions generated by ion/ion reactions in a given charge state are similar regardless of whether the cytochrome c ions are originally in +8 or +9 charge states. In the lower charge states (+1 to +5) cytochrome c ions made by the ion/ion reaction yield a single IM peak with cross section of approximately 1110 to 1180 A(2), even if the original +8 ion started with multiple conformations. The conformation expands slightly when the charge state is reduced from +5 to +1. For product ions in the +6 to +8 charge states, ions created from higher charge states (+9 to +16) by ion/ion reaction produce more compact conformation(s) in somewhat higher abundances compared with those produced directly by the electrospray ionization (ESI) source. For ions in intermediate charge states that have a variety of resolvable conformers, the voltage used to inject the ions into the drift tube, and the voltage and duration of the pulse that extracts ions from the ion trap, can affect the observed abundances of various conformers.

  8. Effects of transmembrane potential and pH gradient on the cytochrome c-promoted fusion of mitochondrial mimetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Cintia; Pessoto, Felipe S; Graves, Catharine V; Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; Nantes, Iseli L

    2013-08-01

    The present study investigated the effects of ΔΨ and ΔpH (pH gradient) on the interaction of cytochrome c with a mitochondrial mimetic membrane composed of phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and cardiolipin (CL) leading to vesicle fusion. ΔpH generated by lowered bulk pH (pH(out)) of PCPECL liposomes, with an internal pH (pH(in)) of 8.0, favored vesicle fusion with a titration sigmoidal profile (pK(a) ~ 6.9). Conversely, ΔpH generated by enhanced pH(in) of PCPECL at a pH(out) of 6.0 favored the fusion of vesicles with a linear profile. We did not observe a significant amount of liposome fusion when ΔpH was generated by lowered pH(in) at a pH(out) of 8.0. At bulk acidic pH, ΔΨ generated by Na⁺ gradient also favored cyt c-promoted vesicle fusion. At acidic and alkaline pH(out), the presence of ΔpH and ΔΨ did not affect cytochrome c binding affinity measured by pyrene quenching. Therefore, cytochrome c-mediated PC/PE/CL vesicle fusion is dependent of ionization of the protein site L (acidic pH) and the presence of transmembrane potential. The effect of transmembrane potential is probably related to the generation of defects on the lipid bilayer. These results are consistent with previous reports showing that cytochrome c release prior to the dissipation of the ΔΨ(M) blocks inner mitochondrial membrane fusion during apoptosis.

  9. [Congenital afibrinogenemia complicated by spontaneous cerebral hemorrhages: a case report].

    PubMed

    Tovone, X G; Rasamoelisoa, J M; Rakotomalala, S; Rabesiaka, F; Rakotoarimanana, D R; Ramialiharisoa, A

    1999-01-01

    Congenital afibrinogenemia is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by markedly reduced or absent synthesis of fibrinogen. Consanguinity is common in affected family. Clinical manifestations range to minimal or moderate bleeding to catastrophic haemorrhage. Bleedings are often post-traumatic, sometimes spontaneous. Diagnosis is established by laboratory tests presenting trace or absence of fibrinogen. Substitutive treatment with fibrinogen concentrates or fresh frozen plasma is used. The authors reported the case of a 41-year-old male with congenital afibrinogenemia with fatal spontaneous cerebral haemorrhage. Diagnosis was made upon history, bleeding history, clinical examination, blood coagulation tests and radiography. Cerebral haemorrhage must be suspected in any patient presenting blood coagulation disorders with bleeding history. Drug therapy must be installed immediately and continued before obtention of specific radiology images which are often late in relation to clinical signs.

  10. A case study on the Ayurvedic management of cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Bhinde, Sagar Mahendrabhai

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the leading cause of childhood disability affecting function and development. CP is defined as a nonprogressive neuromotor disorder of cerebral origin. It cannot be correlated with any single disease or condition in Ayurveda, as it is a multi-factorial disease with clinical features of a wide variation. According to Vāgbhaṭa, it is classified in the disease categories of sahaja (hereditary) and garbhaja (congenital) and jātaja (psychosomatic) type of diseases. Of the many types and subtypes of CP, none has any known “cure.” Here, an effort was made to treat a 3-year-old male child with spastic type of CP using multiple Ayurveda treatment modalities. At the end of 94 days of treatment, Pañcakarma procedures along with internal medication resulted in 10–15% improvement in the overall effect of therapy. PMID:26120232

  11. Time evolution and hemodynamics of cerebral aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher; Tateshima, Satoshi; Viñuela, Fernando; Cebral, Juan

    2011-03-01

    Cerebral aneurysm rupture is a leading cause of hemorrhagic strokes. Because they are being more frequently diagnosed before rupture and the prognosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage is poor, clinicians are often required to judge which aneurysms are prone to progression and rupture. Unfortunately, the processes of aneurysm initiation, growth and rupture are not well understood. Multiple factors associated to these processes have been identified. Our goal is to investigate two of them, arterial hemodynamics (using computational fluid dynamics) and the peri-aneurysmal environment, by studying a group of growing cerebral aneurysms that are followed longitudinally in time. Six patients with unruptured untreated brain aneurysms which exhibited growth during the observation period were selected for the study. Vascular models of each aneurysm at each observation time were constructed from the corresponding computed tomography angiography (CTA) images. Subsequently, models were aligned, and geometrical differences quantified. Blood flow was modeled with the 3D unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equation for a Newtonian fluid, and wall shear stress distribution and flow patterns were calculated and visualized. Analysis of the simulations and changes in geometry revealed asymmetric growth patterns and suggests that areas subject to vigorous flows, i.e. relative high wall shear stress and concentrated streamlines patterns; correspond to regions of aneurysm growth. Furthermore, in some cases the geometrical evolution of aneurysms is clearly affected by contacts with bone structures and calcifications in the wall, and as a consequence the hemodynamics is greatly modified. Thus, in these cases the peri-aneurysmal environment must be considered when analyzing aneurysm evolution.

  12. Cerebral cortex structure in prodromal Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Nopoulos, Peggy C; Aylward, Elizabeth H; Ross, Christopher A; Johnson, Hans J; Magnotta, Vincent A; Juhl, Andrew R; Pierson, Ronald K; Mills, James; Langbehn, Douglas R; Paulsen, Jane S

    2010-12-01

    Neuroimaging studies of subjects who are gene-expanded for Huntington Disease, but not yet diagnosed (termed prodromal HD), report that the cortex is "spared," despite the decrement in striatal and cerebral white-matter volume. Measurement of whole-cortex volume can mask more subtle, but potentially clinically relevant regional changes in volume, thinning, or surface area. The current study addressed this limitation by evaluating cortical morphology of 523 prodromal HD subjects. Participants included 693 individuals enrolled in the PREDICT-HD protocol. Of these participants, 523 carried the HD gene mutation (prodromal HD group); the remaining 170 were non gene-expanded and served as the comparison group. Based on age and CAG repeat length, gene-expanded subjects were categorized as "Far from onset," "Midway to onset," "Near onset," and "already diagnosed." MRI scans were processed using FreeSurfer. Cortical volume, thickness, and surface area were not significantly different between the Far from onset group and controls. However, beginning in the Midway to onset group, the cortex showed significant volume decrement, affecting most the posterior and superior cerebral regions. This pattern progressed when evaluating the groups further into the disease process. Areas that remained mostly unaffected included ventral and medial regions of the frontal and temporal cortex. Morphologic changes were mostly in thinning as surface area did not substantially change in most regions. Early in the course of HD, the cortex shows changes that are manifest as cortical thinning and are most robust in the posterior and superior regions of the cerebrum. PMID:20688164

  13. Animal models of cerebral ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodanovich, M. Yu.; Kisel, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral ischemia remains one of the most frequent causes of death and disability worldwide. Animal models are necessary to understand complex molecular mechanisms of brain damage as well as for the development of new therapies for stroke. This review considers a certain range of animal models of cerebral ischemia, including several types of focal and global ischemia. Since animal models vary in specificity for the human disease which they reproduce, the complexity of surgery, infarct size, reliability of reproduction for statistical analysis, and adequate models need to be chosen according to the aim of a study. The reproduction of a particular animal model needs to be evaluated using appropriate tools, including the behavioral assessment of injury and non-invasive and post-mortem control of brain damage. These problems also have been summarized in the review.

  14. [Cerebral syndromes in premature children].

    PubMed

    Edel'shteĭn, E A; Bandarenko, E S

    1983-01-01

    Cerebral disturbances observed in premature infants are analyzed. These disturbances are a consequence of developmental slowdown and are associated with the pathological immaturity of the brain structures. On condition an active pathogenetic therapy is given these disturbances may gradually regress. On the basis of long-term observations of 600 prematurely born infants the authors describe the following clinical syndromes: muscular hypotonicity lasting up to 4-5 months and followed with a rise of the tone; the syndrome of "paretic hands" observed during the first two months of life; a hypertensive-hydrocephalic syndrome combined with a rise of the neuro-reflectory excitability; the syndrome of psychomotor development retardation followed at an age of over 1.5 to 2 years by complete recovery or minimal cerebral insufficiency with belated development of motor speech and neurosis-like reactions. PMID:6880498

  15. Control of DegP-dependent degradation of c-type cytochromes by heme and the cytochrome c maturation system in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tao; O'Brian, Mark R

    2007-09-01

    c-Type cytochromes are located partially or completely in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria, and the heme prosthetic group is covalently bound to the protein. The cytochrome c maturation (Ccm) multiprotein system is required for transport of heme to the periplasm and its covalent linkage to the peptide. Other cytochromes and hemoglobins contain a noncovalently bound heme and do not require accessory proteins for assembly. Here we show that Bradyrhizobium japonicum cytochrome c550 polypeptide accumulation in Escherichia coli was heme dependent, with very low levels found in heme-deficient cells. However, apoproteins of the periplasmic E. coli cytochrome b562 or the cytosolic Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (Vhb) accumulated independently of the heme status. Mutation of the heme-binding cysteines of cytochrome c550 or the absence of Ccm also resulted in a low apoprotein level. These levels were restored in a degP mutant strain, showing that apocytochrome c550 is degraded by the periplasmic protease DegP. Introduction of the cytochrome c heme-binding motif CXXCH into cytochrome b562 (c-b562) resulted in a c-type cytochrome covalently bound to heme in a Ccm-dependent manner. This variant polypeptide was stable in heme-deficient cells but was degraded by DegP in the absence of Ccm. Furthermore, a Vhb variant containing a periplasmic signal peptide and a CXXCH motif did not form a c-type cytochrome, but accumulation was Ccm dependent nonetheless. The data show that the cytochrome c heme-binding motif is an instability element and that stabilization by Ccm does not require ligation of the heme moiety to the protein.

  16. [Cerebral artery thrombosis in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sanchez, V E; Hernandez Gutierrez-Manchon, O; Quesada Villar, J; Bonmatí García, L; Rubio Postigo, G

    2015-11-01

    A 28 year old woman, ASA I, who, in the final stages of her pregnancy presented with signs of neural deficit that consisted of distortion of the oral commissure, dysphagia, dysarthria, and weakness on the left side of the body. She was diagnosed with thrombosis in a segment of the right middle cerebral artery which led to an ischemic area in the right frontal lobe. Termination of pregnancy and conservative treatment was decided, with good resolution of the symptoms. PMID:25698610

  17. [Cerebral artery thrombosis in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sanchez, V E; Hernandez Gutierrez-Manchon, O; Quesada Villar, J; Bonmatí García, L; Rubio Postigo, G

    2015-11-01

    A 28 year old woman, ASA I, who, in the final stages of her pregnancy presented with signs of neural deficit that consisted of distortion of the oral commissure, dysphagia, dysarthria, and weakness on the left side of the body. She was diagnosed with thrombosis in a segment of the right middle cerebral artery which led to an ischemic area in the right frontal lobe. Termination of pregnancy and conservative treatment was decided, with good resolution of the symptoms.

  18. [Pathogenesis of infantile cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Semenova, K A

    1980-01-01

    Some causes of the pathological activity of postural reflexes and other motor disturbances underlying the clinical picture of infantile cerebral paralysis are considered. It is shown that disturbed metabolism of corticosteroids observed in that disease, as well as impaired functional activity of T lymphocytes promote the development of both inflammatory and neuroimmune processes in the brain, mainly in large hemispheres--and this may be one of the causes of the pathological postural activity. PMID:6969015

  19. Hydrocephalus in cerebral venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Zuurbier, Susanna M; van den Berg, René; Troost, Dirk; Majoie, Charles B; Stam, Jan; Coutinho, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Increased intracranial pressure is common in cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), but hydrocephalus is rarely reported in these patients. We examined the frequency, pathophysiology and associated clinical manifestations of hydrocephalus in patients with CVT admitted to our hospital between 2000 and 2010 (prospectively since July 2006). Hydrocephalus was defined as a bicaudate index larger than the 95th percentile for age, and/or a radial width of the temporal horn of ≥ 5 mm. We excluded patients in whom hydrocephalus was caused by a disease other than CVT or if it was iatrogenic. 20 out of 99 patients with CVT had hydrocephalus. 6 patients with hydrocephalus were excluded from the analysis. Patients with hydrocephalus more often had focal neurological deficits (86 vs. 49%, p = 0.02) and were more frequently comatose (43 vs. 16%, p = 0.06), as compared to patients without hydrocephalus. Deep cerebral venous thrombosis (64 vs. 9%, p < 0.001) and edema of the basal ganglia and thalami (64 vs. 4%, p < 0.001) were more common in patients with hydrocephalus. Intraventricular hemorrhage was present in 1 patient with hydrocephalus, compared to none among patients without hydrocephalus (7 vs. 0%, p = 0.15). Outcome at follow-up was worse in patients with hydrocephalus (mRS 0-1, 36 vs. 68%, p = 0.02; mortality 29 vs. 9%, p = 0.07). Hydrocephalus occurs more frequently in cerebral venous thrombosis than previously believed, especially in patients with deep cerebral venous thrombosis and edema of the basal ganglia. The presence of hydrocephalus is associated with a worse clinical outcome, but a direct causal relation is unlikely. Routine shunting procedures are not advisable.

  20. The relationship between cerebral palsy and cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Smith, J A; Hutson, J M; Beasley, S W; Reddihough, D S

    1989-12-01

    This study examined the reported association between cerebral palsy and cryptorchidism. A comparison was made among 25 boys with cerebral palsy under the age of 2 years and 6 months, 25 boys with cerebral palsy aged between 5 and 10 years, and age-matched controls. The testes remained in the same position with age in boys with cerebral palsy, whereas in normal children the testes were slightly lower initially (P less than .005) and became lower still with growth (P less than .001). This result, taken in conjunction with previous studies, casts doubts on the theories of early damage to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis as the cause of maldescent in cerebral palsy. It is postulated that any apparent increase in cryptorchidism in older patients with cerebral palsy may be caused by spasticity of the cremaster muscle leading to pathologic retraction of the testis out of the scrotum.

  1. Biological activity of phenolic compounds. Hepatic cytochrome P-450, cytochrome b/sub 5/ and NADPH cytochrome c reductase in chicks and rats fed phenolic monomers, polymers, and glycosides

    SciTech Connect

    Klasing, S.A.; Mora, M.I.; Wilson, W.C.; Fahey, G.C. Jr.; Garst, J.E.

    1985-09-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine effects of a phenolic polymer (Kraft wood lignin, Indulin), phenolic glycosides (cane molasses and wood molasses), and phenolic monomers (vanillin, vanillic acid, ferulic acid, and p-coumaric acid) on liver cytochromes P-450, cytochrome b/sub 5/, and NADPH cytochrome c reductase in chicks and rats. Chicks fed 6.0% lignin had a higher cytochromes P-450 content than did chicks fed 0% fiber, 6.0% wood cellulose, or 6.0% arenaceous flour. Chicks fed 12.0% wood molasses had a higher cytochromes P-450 level than did chicks fed 0% fiber or 6.0% wood molasses. Cane molasses incorporated at both 6.0 and 12.0% of the diet induced cytochromes P-450 content over those of control-fed birds. Chicks fed 6.0% lignin, with or without antibiotic, had a higher cytochromes P-450 level than did chicks fed control diets, with or without antibiotic. Additionally, chicks fed 6.0% lignin had lower intestinal diaminopimelic acid (DAP) levels than did chicks fed 0% fiber. Rats fed 0% fiber, 6.0% wood cellulose, 6.0% arenaceous flour, or 6.0% lignin exhibited no difference in cytochrome level or activity among treatments. Chicks fed 0.5% vanillin, 0.5% vanillic acid, 0.5% ferulic acid, or 0.5% p-coumaric acid had comparable cytochromes level and activity compared with chicks fed no phenolics. Chicks fed 0.5% p-coumaric acid had lower rates of gain than did chicks fed control or other phenolic-containing diets. Rats fed these phenolics had similar cytochromes P-450 content among treatments.

  2. Mutations in Gamma Adducin are Associated With Inherited Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kruer, Michael C; Jepperson, Tyler; Dutta, Sudeshna; Steiner, Robert D; Cottenie, Ellen; Sanford, Lynn; Merkens, Mark; Russman, Barry S; Blasco, Peter A; Fan, Guang; Pollock, Jeffrey; Green, Sarah; Woltjer, Randall L; Mooney, Catherine; Kretzschmar, Doris; Paisán-Ruiz, Coro; Houlden, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Objective Cerebral palsy is estimated to affect nearly 1 in 500 children, and although prenatal and perinatal contributors have been well characterized, at least 20% of cases are believed to be inherited. Previous studies have identified mutations in the actin-capping protein KANK1 and the adaptor protein-4 complex in forms of inherited cerebral palsy, suggesting a role for components of the dynamic cytoskeleton in the genesis of the disease. Methods We studied a multiplex consanguineous Jordanian family by homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing, then used patient-derived fibroblasts to examine functional consequences of the mutation we identified in vitro. We subsequently studied the effects of adducin loss of function in Drosophila. Results We identified a homozygous c.1100G>A (p.G367D) mutation in ADD3, encoding gamma adducin in all affected members of the index family. Follow-up experiments in patient fibroblasts found that the p.G367D mutation, which occurs within the putative oligomerization critical region, impairs the ability of gamma adducin to associate with the alpha subunit. This mutation impairs the normal actin-capping function of adducin, leading to both abnormal proliferation and migration in cultured patient fibroblasts. Loss of function studies of the Drosophila adducin ortholog hts confirmed a critical role for adducin in locomotion. Interpretation Although likely a rare cause of cerebral palsy, our findings indicate a critical role for adducins in regulating the activity of the actin cytoskeleton, suggesting that impaired adducin function may lead to neuromotor impairment and further implicating abnormalities of the dynamic cytoskeleton as a pathogenic mechanism contributing to cerebral palsy. PMID:23836506

  3. Cerebral ischaemia: A neuroradiological study

    SciTech Connect

    Bories, J.

    1985-01-01

    After a brief clinical and pathophysiological approach, the papers presented in this book are devoted to CT and angiography. Concerning CT, a particular study has been made of cerebral arterial territories on cuts parallel to the orbito-meatal line: these are very important in making the differential diagnosis from some tumors. Also concerning CT, a paper has been devoted to cerebral ''lacunae.'' The term ''lacuna'' as far as CT imaging is concerned, should be reserved only for those hypodense areas corresponding to small cavities containing fluid, which are sequelae of infarcts in the territory of penetrating arteries. Before this sequellar state come all the evolutive states of a small deep infarct. The angiographic study specifies the indications of angiography in the study of cerebral ischemia, and the techniques to be used. It shows the main etiologic aspects. Because of the important place of vascular surgery today, it seemed necessary to show also the main post operative angiographic aspects. After CT and angiography, some pages are reserved to more modern techniques. Finally, some pages are devoted to certain particular associations and etiologies: childhood, cardiopathies, migraine, oral contraception and end with venous infarction.

  4. Ocular cytochrome P450s and transporters: roles in disease and endobiotic and xenobiotic disposition

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Mariko; Lockhart, Catherine M.; Kelly, Edward J.; Rettie, Allan E.

    2015-01-01

    Drug metabolism and transport processes in the liver, intestine and kidney that affect the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of therapeutic agents have been studied extensively. In contrast, comparatively little research has been conducted on these topics as they pertain to the eye. Recently, however, catalytic functions of ocular cytochrome P450 enzymes have gained increasing attention, in large part due to the roles of CYP1B1 and CYP4V2 variants in primary congenital glaucoma and Bietti’s corneoretinal crystalline dystrophy, respectively. In this review, we discuss challenges to ophthalmic drug delivery, including Phase I drug metabolism and transport in the eye, and the role of three specific P450s, CYP4B1, CYP1B1 and CYP4V2 in ocular inflammation and genetically determined ocular disease. PMID:24856391

  5. Protein camouflage in cytochrome c-calixarene complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, Róise E.; Fernandes, Humberto; Khan, Amir R.; Power, Nicholas P.; Crowley, Peter B.

    2012-07-01

    Small molecules that recognize protein surfaces are important tools for modifying protein interaction properties. Since the 1980s, several thousand studies concerning calixarenes and host-guest interactions have been published. Although there is growing interest in protein-calixarene interactions, only limited structural information has been available to date. We now report the crystal structure of a protein-calixarene complex. The water-soluble p-sulfonatocalix[4]arene is shown to bind the lysine-rich cytochrome c at three different sites. Binding curves obtained from NMR titrations reveal an interaction process that involves two or more binding sites. Together, the data indicate a dynamic complex in which the calixarene explores the surface of cytochrome c. In addition to providing valuable information on protein recognition, the data also indicate that the calixarene is a mediator of protein-protein interactions, with potential applications in generating assemblies and promoting crystallization.

  6. Computer-aided design of aptamers for cytochrome p450.

    PubMed

    Shcherbinin, Dmitrii S; Gnedenko, Oksana V; Khmeleva, Svetlana A; Usanov, Sergey A; Gilep, Andrei A; Yantsevich, Aliaksei V; Shkel, Tatsiana V; Yushkevich, Ivan V; Radko, Sergey P; Ivanov, Alexis S; Veselovsky, Alexander V; Archakov, Alexander I

    2015-08-01

    Aptamers are short single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that can bind to their targets with high affinity and specificity. Usually, they are experimentally selected using the SELEX method. Here, we describe an approach toward the in silico selection of aptamers for proteins. This approach involves three steps: finding a potential binding site, designing the recognition and structural parts of the aptamers and evaluating the experimental affinity. Using this approach, a set of 15-mer aptamers for cytochrome P450 51A1 was designed using docking and molecular dynamics simulation. An experimental evaluation of the synthesized aptamers using SPR biosensor showed that these aptamers interact with cytochrome P450 51A1 with Kd values in the range of 10(-6)-10(-7) M. PMID:26166326

  7. Lansoprazole is an antituberculous prodrug targeting cytochrome bc1

    PubMed Central

    Rybniker, Jan; Vocat, Anthony; Sala, Claudia; Busso, Philippe; Pojer, Florence; Benjak, Andrej; Cole, Stewart T.

    2015-01-01

    Better antibiotics capable of killing multi-drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis are urgently needed. Despite extensive drug discovery efforts, only a few promising candidates are on the horizon and alternative screening protocols are required. Here, by testing a panel of FDA-approved drugs in a host cell-based assay, we show that the blockbuster drug lansoprazole (Prevacid), a gastric proton-pump inhibitor, has intracellular activity against M. tuberculosis. Ex vivo pharmacokinetics and target identification studies reveal that lansoprazole kills M. tuberculosis by targeting its cytochrome bc1 complex through intracellular sulfoxide reduction to lansoprazole sulfide. This novel class of cytochrome bc1 inhibitors is highly active against drug-resistant clinical isolates and spares the human H+K+-ATPase thus providing excellent opportunities for targeting the major pathogen M. tuberculosis. Our finding provides proof of concept for hit expansion by metabolic activation, a powerful tool for antibiotic screens. PMID:26158909

  8. Redox processes controlling the biogenesis of c-type cytochromes.

    PubMed

    Bonnard, Géraldine; Corvest, Vincent; Meyer, Etienne H; Hamel, Patrice P

    2010-11-01

    In mitochondria, two mono heme c-type cytochromes are essential electron shuttles of the respiratory chain. They are characterized by the covalent attachment of their heme C to a CXXCH motif in the apoproteins. This post-translational modification occurs in the intermembrane space compartment. Dedicated assembly pathways have evolved to achieve this chemical reaction that requires a strict reducing environment. In mitochondria, two unrelated machineries operate, the rather simple System III in yeast and animals and System I in plants and some protozoans. System I is also found in bacteria and shares some common features with System II that operates in bacteria and plastids. This review aims at presenting how different systems control the chemical requirements for the heme ligation in the compartments where cytochrome c maturation takes place. A special emphasis will be given on the redox processes that are required for the heme attachment reaction onto apocytochromes c.

  9. Positron emission tomography in the newborn: extensive impairment of regional cerebral blood flow with intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, J.J.; Herscovitch, P.; Perlman, J.M.; Raichle, M.E.

    1983-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) now provides the capability of measuring regional cerebral blood flow with high resolution and little risk. In this study, we utilized PET in six premature infants (920 to 1,200 g) with major intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement to measure regional cerebral blood flow during the acute period (5 to 17 days of age). Cerebral blood flow was determined after intravenous injection of H/sub 2/O, labeled with the positron-emitting isotope, /sup 15/O. Findings were similar and dramatic in all six infants. In the area of hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement, little or no cerebral blood flow was detected. However, in addition, surprisingly, a marked two- to fourfold reduction in cerebral blood flow was observed throughout the affected hemisphere, well posterior and lateral to the intracerebral hematoma, including cerebral white matter and, to a lesser extent, frontal, temporal, and parietal cortex. In the one infant studied a second time, ie, at 3 months of age, the extent and severity of the decreased cerebral blood flows in the affected hemisphere were similar to those observed on the study during the neonatal period. At the three autopsies, the affected left hemisphere showed extensive infarction, corroborating the PET scans. These observations, the first demonstration of the use of PET in the determination of regional cerebral blood flow in the newborn, show marked impairments in regional cerebral blood flow in the hemisphere containing an apparently restricted intracerebral hematoma, indicating that the hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement is only a component of a much larger lesion, ischemic in basic nature, ie, an infarction. This large ischemic lesion explains the poor neurologic outcome in infants with intraventricular hemorrhage and hemorrhagic intracerebral involvement.

  10. Cerebral Palsy. Fact Sheet = La Paralisis Cerebral. Hojas Informativas Sobre Discapacidades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet on cerebral palsy is written in both English and Spanish. First, it provides a definition of cerebral palsy and considers various causes (e.g., an insufficient amount of oxygen reaching the fetal or newborn brain). The fact sheet then offers incidence figures and explains characteristics of the three main types of cerebral palsy:…

  11. Parasympathetic tonic dilatory influences on cerebral vessels.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Nicholas C; Dragon, Deidre Nitschke; Talman, William T

    2009-05-11

    Parasympathetic nerves from the pterygopalatine ganglia may participate in development of cluster headaches, in vascular responses to hypertension and in modulation of damage due to stroke. Stimulation of the nerves elicits cerebral vasodilatation, but it is not known if the nerves tonically influence cerebrovascular tone. We hypothesized that parasympathetics provide a tonic vasodilator influence and tested that hypothesis by measuring cerebral blood flow in anesthetized rats before and after removal of a pterygopalatine ganglion. Ganglion removal led to reduced cerebral blood flow without changing blood pressure. Thus, parasympathetic nerves provide tonic vasodilatory input to cerebral blood vessels. PMID:19195933

  12. Molecular evolution of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 5A gene in primates

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Many electron transport chain (ETC) genes show accelerated rates of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions in anthropoid primate lineages, yet in non-anthropoid lineages the ETC proteins are typically highly conserved. Here, we test the hypothesis that COX5A, the ETC gene that encodes cytochrome c oxidase subunit 5A, shows a pattern of anthropoid-specific adaptive evolution, and investigate the distribution of this protein in catarrhine brains. Results In a dataset comprising 29 vertebrate taxa, including representatives from all major groups of primates, there is nearly 100% conservation of the COX5A amino acid sequence among extant, non-anthropoid placental mammals. The most recent common ancestor of these species lived about 100 million years (MY) ago. In contrast, anthropoid primates show markedly elevated rates of nonsynonymous evolution. In particular, branch site tests identify five positively selected codons in anthropoids, and ancestral reconstructions infer that substitutions in these codons occurred predominantly on stem lineages (anthropoid, ape and New World monkey) and on the human terminal branch. Examination of catarrhine brain samples by immunohistochemistry characterizes for the first time COX5A protein distribution in the primate neocortex, and suggests that the protein is most abundant in the mitochondria of large-size projection neurons. Real time quantitative PCR supports previous microarray results showing COX5A is expressed in cerebral cortical tissue at a higher level in human than in chimpanzee or gorilla. Conclusion Taken together, these results suggest that both protein structural and gene regulatory changes contributed to COX5A evolution during humankind's ancestry. Furthermore, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that adaptations in ETC genes contributed to the emergence of the energetically expensive anthropoid neocortex. PMID:18197981

  13. Rhythmic expression of cytochrome P450 epoxygenases CYP4x1 and CYP2c11 in the rat brain and vasculature.

    PubMed

    Carver, Koryn A; Lourim, David; Tryba, Andrew K; Harder, David R

    2014-12-01

    Mammals have circadian variation in blood pressure, heart rate, vascular tone, thrombotic tendency, and cerebral blood flow (CBF). These changes may be in part orchestrated by circadian variation in clock gene expression within cells comprising the vasculature that modulate blood flow (e.g., fibroblasts, cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells, astrocytes, and endothelial cells). However, the downstream mechanisms that underlie circadian changes in blood flow are unknown. Cytochrome P450 epoxygenases (Cyp4x1 and Cyp2c11) are expressed in the brain and vasculature and metabolize arachidonic acid (AA) to form epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs). EETs are released from astrocytes, neurons, and vascular endothelial cells and act as potent vasodilators, increasing blood flow. EETs released in response to increases in neural activity evoke a corresponding increase in blood flow known as the functional hyperemic response. We examine the hypothesis that Cyp2c11 and Cyp4x1 expression and EETs production vary in a circadian manner in the rat brain and cerebral vasculature. RT-PCR revealed circadian/diurnal expression of clock and clock-controlled genes as well as Cyp4x1 and Cyp2c11, within the rat hippocampus, middle cerebral artery, inferior vena cava, hippocampal astrocytes and rat brain microvascular endothelial cells. Astrocyte and endothelial cell culture experiments revealed rhythmic variation in Cyp4x1 and Cyp2c11 gene and protein expression with a 12-h period and parallel rhythmic production of EETs. Our data suggest there is circadian regulation of Cyp4x1 and Cyp2c11 gene expression. Such rhythmic EETs production may contribute to circadian changes in blood flow and alter risk of adverse cardiovascular events throughout the day.

  14. Structural Changes and Proton Transfer in Cytochrome c Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Vilhjálmsdóttir, Jóhanna; Johansson, Ann-Louise; Brzezinski, Peter

    2015-08-27

    In cytochrome c oxidase electron transfer from cytochrome c to O2 is linked to transmembrane proton pumping, which contributes to maintaining a proton electrochemical gradient across the membrane. The mechanism by which cytochrome c oxidase couples the exergonic electron transfer to the endergonic proton translocation is not known, but it presumably involves local structural changes that control the alternating proton access to the two sides of the membrane. Such redox-induced structural changes have been observed in X-ray crystallographic studies at residues 423-425 (in the R. sphaeroides oxidase), located near heme a. The aim of the present study is to investigate the functional effects of these structural changes on reaction steps associated with proton pumping. Residue Ser425 was modified using site-directed mutagenesis and time-resolved spectroscopy was used to investigate coupled electron-proton transfer upon reaction of the oxidase with O2. The data indicate that the structural change at position 425 propagates to the D proton pathway, which suggests a link between redox changes at heme a and modulation of intramolecular proton-transfer rates.

  15. Cytochrome C Biosensor—A Model for Gas Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Hulko, Michael; Hospach, Ingeborg; Krasteva, Nadejda; Nelles, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    This work is about gas biosensing with a cytochrome c biosensor. Emphasis is put on the analysis of the sensing process and a mathematical model to make predictions about the biosensor response. Reliable predictions about biosensor responses can provide valuable information and facilitate biosensor development, particularly at an early development stage. The sensing process comprises several individual steps, such as phase partition equilibrium, intermediate reactions, mass-transport, and reaction kinetics, which take place in and between the gas and liquid phases. A quantitative description of each step was worked out and finally combined into a mathematical model. The applicability of the model was demonstrated for a particular example of methanethiol gas detection by a cytochrome c biosensor. The model allowed us to predict the optical readout response of the biosensor from tabulated data and data obtained in simple liquid phase experiments. The prediction was experimentally verified with a planar three-electrode electro-optical cytochrome c biosensor in contact with methanethiol gas in a gas tight spectroelectrochemical measurement cell. PMID:22163937

  16. Using Cytochrome c{sub 3} to Make Selenium Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    ABDELOUAS,A.; FRANCO,R.; GONG,W.L.; LUTZE,W.; MOURA,I.; SHELNUTT,JOHN A.

    1999-11-24

    We report on a new method to make nanostructures, in this case selenium nanowires, in aqueous solution at room temperature. We used the protein cytochrome c{sub 3} to reduce selenate (SeO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) to selenium (Se{sup 0}). Cytochrome c{sub 3} is known for its ability to catalyze reduction of metals including U{sup VI} {yields} U{sup IV}, Cr{sup VI} {yields} Cr{sup III}, Mo{sup VI} {yields} Mo{sup IV}, Cu{sup II} {yields} Cu{sup 0}, Pb{sup II} {yields} Pb{sup 0}, Hg{sup II} {yields} Hg{sup 0}. Nanoparticles of Se{sup 0} precipitated from an aqueous solution at room temperature, followed by spontaneous self-assembling into nanowires. Cytochrome c{sub 3} was extracted from the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris (strain Holdenborough) and isolated by the procedure of DerVartanian and Legall.

  17. Enhanced expression of cytochrome P450 in stomach cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, G. I.; Taylor, M. C.; Burke, M. D.; Melvin, W. T.

    1998-01-01

    The cytochromes P450 have a central role in the oxidative activation and detoxification of a wide range of xenobiotics, including many carcinogens and several anti-cancer drugs. Thus the cytochrome P450 enzyme system has important roles in both tumour development and influencing the response of tumours to chemotherapy. Stomach cancer is one of the commonest tumours of the alimentary tract and environmental factors, including dietary factors, have been implicated in the development of this tumour. This type of tumour has a poor prognosis and responds poorly to current therapies. In this study, the presence and cellular localization of several major forms of P450, CYP1A, CYP2E1 and CYP3A have been investigated in stomach cancer and compared with their expression in normal stomach. There was enhanced expression of CYP1A and CYP3A in stomach cancer with CYP1A present in 51% and CYP3A present in 28% of cases. In contrast, no P450 was identified in normal stomach. The presence of CYP1A and CYP3A in stomach cancer provides further evidence for the enhanced expression of specific forms of cytochrome P450 in tumours and may be important therapeutically for the development of anti-cancer drugs that are activated by these forms of P450. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9569036

  18. Formation of putative chloroplast cytochromes in isolated developing pea chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thaver, S.S.; Bhava, D.; Castelfranco, P.A.

    1986-04-01

    In addition to chlorophyll-protein complexes, other proteins were labeled when isolated developing pea chloroplasts were incubated with (/sup 14/C)-5-aminolevulinic acid (/sup 14/C)-ALA. The major labeled band (M/sub r/ = 43 kDa by LDS-PAGE) was labeled even in the presence of chloramphenicol. Heme-dependent peroxidase activity (as detected by the tetramethyl benzidine-H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ stain) was not visibly associated with this band. The radioactive band was stable to heat, 5% HCl in acetone, and was absent if the incubation with (/sup 14/C)-5-aminolevulinic acid was carried out in the presence of N-methyl protoporphyrin IX dimethyl ester (a specific inhibitor of ferrochelatase). Organic solvent extraction procedures for the enrichment of cytochrome f from chloroplast membranes also extracted this unknown labeled product. It was concluded that this labeled product was probably a c-type cytochrome. The effect of exogenous iron, iron chelators, gabaculine (an inhibitor of ALA synthesis) and other incubation conditions upon the in vitro formation of putative chloroplast cytochromes will be discussed.

  19. Evolution of the primate cytochrome c oxidase subunit II gene.

    PubMed

    Adkins, R M; Honeycutt, R L

    1994-03-01

    We examined the nucleotide and amino acid sequence variation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) gene from 25 primates (4 hominoids, 8 Old World monkeys, 2 New World monkeys, 2 tarsiers, 7 lemuriforms, 2 lorisiforms). Marginal support was found for three phylogenetic conclusions: (1) sister-group relationship between tarsiers and a monkey/ape clade, (2) placement of the aye-aye (Daubentonia) sister to all other strepsirhine primates, and (3) rejection of a sister-group relationship of dwarf lemurs (i.e., Cheirogaleus) with lorisiform primates. Stronger support was found for a sister-group relationship between the ring-tail lemur (Lemur catta) and the gentle lemurs (Hapalemur). In congruence with previous studies on COII, we found that the monkeys and apes have undergone a nearly two-fold increase in the rate of amino acid replacement relative to other primates. Although functionally important amino acids are generally conserved among all primates, the acceleration in amino acid replacements in higher primates is associated with increased variation in the amino terminal end of the protein. Additionally, the replacement of two carboxyl-bearing residues (glutamate and aspartate) at positions 114 and 115 may provide a partial explanation for the poor enzyme kinetics in cross-reactions between the cytochromes c and cytochrome c oxidases of higher primates and other mammals. PMID:8006990

  20. Engineering Cytochrome P450 Biocatalysts for Biotechnology, Medicine, and Bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh

    2009-01-01

    Importance of the field: Cytochrome P450 enzymes comprise a superfamily of heme monooxygenases that are of considerable interest for the: 1) synthesis of novel drugs and drug metabolites, 2) targeted cancer gene therapy, 3) biosensor design, and 4) bioremediation. However, their applications are limited because cytochrome P450, especially mammalian P450 enzymes, show a low turnover rate and stability, and require a complex source of electrons through cytochrome P450 reductase and NADPH. Areas covered in this review: In this review, we discuss the recent progress towards the use of P450 enzymes in a variety of above-mentioned applications. We also present alternate and cost-effective ways to perform P450-mediated reaction, especially using peroxides. Furthermore, we expand upon the current progress in P450 engineering approaches describing several recent examples that are utilized to enhance heterologous expression, stability, catalytic efficiency, and utilization of alternate oxidants. What the reader will gain: The review will provide a comprehensive knowledge in the design of P450 biocatalysts for potentially practical purposes. Finally, we provide a prospective on the future aspects of P450 engineering and its applications in biotechnology, medicine, and bioremediation. Take home message: Because of its wide applications, academic and pharmaceutical researchers, environmental scientists, and health care providers are expected to gain current knowledge and future prospects of the practical use of P450 biocatalysts. PMID:20064075

  1. Rational redesign of the biodegradative enzyme cytochrome P450 cam:

    SciTech Connect

    Ornstein, R.; Paulsen, M.; Bass, M.; Arnold, G.

    1991-03-01

    Cytochromes P450, a superfamily of monooxygenase enzymes present in all kingdoms of living organisms, are very versatile with respect to substrate range and catalytic functionality. Many recalcitrant halogenated hydrocarbons, on DOE sites and throughout the nation, result in serious environmental impact. Cytochromes P450 have been shown to be catalytically capable of, at least partial, dehalogenation of some such compounds. Clearly, however, their active site stereochemistry and related functional components are not well suited for this role because the rates of dehalogenation are generally rather modest. The evolution of modified active site and access channel structures may proceed very slowly if multiple genetic changes are simultaneously required for enzyme adaptation. Since each mutational event is by itself a rare event, a basic premise of our research is that designing multiple changes into an enzyme may be more timely than waiting for them to occur biologically either via natural selection or under laboratory-controlled conditions. Starting with available high-resolution x-ray crystal structures, molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations have been used to probe the basic structure/function principles and conformational fluctuations of the biodegradative enzyme, cytochrome P450cam (camphor hydroxylase from Pseudomonas putida) and active site mutants, to provide the fundamental understanding necessary for rational engineering of the enzyme for modified substrate specificity. In the present paper, we review our progress to data, in the area of molecular dynamics simulations and active site redesign of P450cam. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Cytochrome c(2) Exit Strategy: Dissociation Studies and Evolutionary Implications.

    PubMed

    Pogorelov, Taras V; Autenrieth, Felix; Roberts, Elijah; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida A

    2007-01-25

    Small, water-soluble, type c cytochromes form a transient network connecting major bioenergetic membrane protein complexes in both photosynthesis and respiration. In the photosynthesis cycle of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, cytochrome c2 (cyt c2) docks to the reaction center (RC), undergoes electron transfer, and exits for the cytochrome bc1 complex. Translations of cyt c2 about the RC-cyt c2 docking interface and surrounding membrane reveal possible exit pathways. A pathway at a minimal elevation allowed by the architecture of the RC is analyzed using both an all-atom steered molecular dynamics simulation of the RC-cyt c2 complex and a bioinformatic analysis of the structures and sequences of cyt c. The structure-based phylogenetic analysis allows for the identification of structural elements that have evolved to satisfy the requirements of having multiple functional partners. The patterns of evolutionary variation obtained from the phylogenetic analysis of both docking partners of cyt c2 reveal conservation of key residues involved in the interaction interfaces that would be candidates for further experimental studies. Additionally, using the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area method we calculate that the binding free energy of reduced cyt c2 to the RC is nearly 6 kcal/mol more favorable than with oxidized cyt c2. The redox-dependent variations lead to changes in structural flexibility, behavior of the interfacial water molecules, and eventually changes in the binding free energy of the complex. PMID:17228920

  3. Different residues in periplasmic domains of the CcmC inner membrane protein of Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17400 are critical for cytochrome c biogenesis and pyoverdine-mediated iron uptake.

    PubMed

    Gaballa, A; Baysse, C; Koedam, N; Muyldermans, S; Cornelis, P

    1998-11-01

    The inner membrane protein CcmC (CytA) of Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC17400, which has homologues in several bacteria and plant mitochondria, is needed for the biogenesis of cytochrome c. A CcmC-deficient mutant is also compromised in the production and utilization of pyoverdine, the high-affinity fluorescent siderophore. A topological model for CcmC, based on the analysis of alkaline phosphatase fusions, predicts six membrane-spanning regions with three periplasmic loops. Site-directed mutagenesis was used in order to assess the importance of some periplasm-exposed residues, conserved in all CcmC homologues, for cytochrome c biogenesis, and pyoverdine production/utilization. Despite the conservation of the residues His-61, Val-62 and Pro-63 in the first periplasmic loop, and Leu-184, His-185 and Gln-186 in the third periplasmic loop, their simultaneous replacement with Ala only partially affected cytochrome c biogenesis and pyoverdine production/utilization. Simultaneous replacements of residues Trp-115 and Gly-116 in the second periplasmic loop substantially affected pyoverdine production/utilization but not cytochrome c production. An Ala substitution of Asp-127, in the second periplasmic loop, resulted in decreased production of cytochrome c, slower growth in conditions of anaerobiosis and reduced pyoverdine production. On the other hand, a mutation in Trp-126, also in the second periplasmic loop, totally suppressed the production of cytochrome c, whereas it had no effect on the production and utilization of pyoverdine. These results show a differential involvement of amino acid residues in periplasmic domains of CcmC in cytochrome c biogenesis and pyoverdine production/utilization. PMID:9822820

  4. Asiatic Acid, a Pentacyclic Triterpene From Centella asiatica, Is Neuroprotective in a Mouse Model of Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Rajanikant G.; Senut, Marie-Claude; Zemke, Daniel; Min, Jiangyong; Frenkel, Mark B.; Greenberg, Eric J.; Yu, Seong-Woon; Ahn, Nick; Goudreau, John; Kassab, Mounzer; Panickar, Kiran S.; Majid, Arshad

    2010-01-01

    Asiatic acid, a triterpenoid derivative from Centella asiatica, has shown biological effects such as antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and protection against glutamate- or β-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity. We investigated the neuroprotective effect of asiatic acid in a mouse model of permanent cerebral ischemia. Various doses of asiatic acid (30, 75, or 165 mg/kg) were administered orally at 1 hr pre- and 3, 10, and 20 hr postischemia, and infarct volume and behavioral deficits were evaluated at day 1 or 7 postischemia. IgG (blood–brain barrier integrity) and cytochrome c (apoptosis) immunostaining was carried out at 24 hr postischemia. The effect of asiatic acid on stress-induced cytochrome c release was examined in isolated mitochondrial fractions. Furthermore, its effects on cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential were studied in HT-22 cells exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation. Asiatic acid significantly reduced the infarct volume by 60% at day 1 and by 26% at day 7 postischemia and improved neurological outcome at 24 hr postischemia. Our studies also showed that the neuroprotective properties of asiatic acid might be mediated in part through decreased blood–brain barrier permeability and reduction in mitochondrial injury. The present study suggests that asiatic acid may be useful in the treatment of cerebral ischemia. PMID:19382233

  5. Importance of the redox state of cytochrome c during caspase activation in cytosolic extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, M B; Zhivotovsky, B; Slater, A F; Burgess, D H; Orrenius, S

    1998-01-01

    The export of cytochrome c from mitochondria to the cytoplasm has been detected during apoptosis. Addition of cytochrome c to cytosolic extracts can activate the caspases, suggesting that this export could be an important intracellular signal for initiating the apoptotic programme. We have investigated the mechanism of caspase activation by cytochrome c. Mitochondrial cytochrome c normally shuttles electrons between complexes III and IV of the electron transport chain. Interaction with these complexes is dependent on electrostatic interactions via a polylysine binding pocket. Cytosolic caspase activation was only observed with intact holocytochrome c, and increasing the ionic composition of the extracts prevented activation, suggesting that stringent allosteric interactions between cytochrome c and other cytoplasmic factors are necessary. Cytochrome c was fully reduced within 5 min of addition to the cytosolic extracts. Potassium ferricyanide could maintain cytochrome c in an oxidized state, but care was taken to use ferricyanide at concentrations where its polyanion effect did not cause interference. The oxidized form of cytochrome c was able to activate the caspases. We conclude that reduced cytochrome c will function in the cytoplasm; however, its reduction is not a critical step, and electron transfer from cytochrome c to its cytoplasmic-binding partner(s) is not necessary in the pathway leading to apoptosis. PMID:9405280

  6. Structural and Functional Analysis of Novel Human Cytochrome c Targets in Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Fábregas, Jonathan; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; González-Arzola, Katiuska; Janocha, Simon; Navarro, José A.; Hervás, Manuel; Bernhardt, Rita; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; De la Rosa, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    Since the first description of apoptosis four decades ago, great efforts have been made to elucidate, both in vivo and in vitro, the molecular mechanisms involved in its regulation. Although the role of cytochrome c during apoptosis is well established, relatively little is known about its participation in signaling pathways in vivo due to its essential role during respiration. To obtain a better understanding of the role of cytochrome c in the onset of apoptosis, we used a proteomic approach based on affinity chromatography with cytochrome c as bait in this study. In this approach, novel cytochrome c interaction partners were identified whose in vivo interaction and cellular localization were facilitated through bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Modeling of the complex interface between cytochrome c and its counterparts indicated the involvement of the surface surrounding the heme crevice of cytochrome c, in agreement with the vast majority of known redox adducts of cytochrome c. However, in contrast to the high turnover rate of the mitochondrial cytochrome c redox adducts, those occurring under apoptosis led to the formation of stable nucleo-cytoplasmic ensembles, as inferred mainly from surface plasmon resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, which permitted us to corroborate the formation of such complexes in vitro. The results obtained suggest that human cytochrome c interacts with pro-survival, anti-apoptotic proteins following its release into the cytoplasm. Thus, cytochrome c may interfere with cell survival pathways and unlock apoptosis in order to prevent the spatial and temporal coexistence of antagonist signals. PMID:24643968

  7. Structural and functional analysis of novel human cytochrome C targets in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Fábregas, Jonathan; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; González-Arzola, Katiuska; Janocha, Simon; Navarro, José A; Hervás, Manuel; Bernhardt, Rita; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; De la Rosa, Miguel A

    2014-06-01

    Since the first description of apoptosis four decades ago, great efforts have been made to elucidate, both in vivo and in vitro, the molecular mechanisms involved in its regulation. Although the role of cytochrome c during apoptosis is well established, relatively little is known about its participation in signaling pathways in vivo due to its essential role during respiration. To obtain a better understanding of the role of cytochrome c in the onset of apoptosis, we used a proteomic approach based on affinity chromatography with cytochrome c as bait in this study. In this approach, novel cytochrome c interaction partners were identified whose in vivo interaction and cellular localization were facilitated through bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Modeling of the complex interface between cytochrome c and its counterparts indicated the involvement of the surface surrounding the heme crevice of cytochrome c, in agreement with the vast majority of known redox adducts of cytochrome c. However, in contrast to the high turnover rate of the mitochondrial cytochrome c redox adducts, those occurring under apoptosis led to the formation of stable nucleo-cytoplasmic ensembles, as inferred mainly from surface plasmon resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, which permitted us to corroborate the formation of such complexes in vitro. The results obtained suggest that human cytochrome c interacts with pro-survival, anti-apoptotic proteins following its release into the cytoplasm. Thus, cytochrome c may interfere with cell survival pathways and unlock apoptosis in order to prevent the spatial and temporal coexistence of antagonist signals.

  8. Reaction of cytochrome c2 with photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodopseudomonas viridis.

    PubMed

    Knaff, D B; Willie, A; Long, J E; Kriauciunas, A; Durham, B; Millett, F

    1991-02-01

    The reactions of Rhodopseudomonas viridis cytochrome c2 and horse cytochrome c with Rps. viridis photosynthetic reaction centers were studied by using both single- and double-flash excitation. Single-flash excitation of the reaction centers resulted in rapid photooxidation of cytochrome c-556 in the cytochrome subunit of the reaction center. The photooxidized cytochrome c-556 was subsequently reduced by electron transfer from ferrocytochrome c2 present in the solution. The rate constant for this reaction had a hyperbolic dependence on the concentration of cytochrome c2, consistent with the formation of a complex between cytochrome c2 and the reaction center. The dissociation constant of the complex was estimated to be 30 microM, and the rate of electron transfer within the 1:1 complex was 270 s-1. Double-flash experiments revealed that ferricytochrome c2 dissociated from the reaction center with a rate constant of greater than 100 s-1 and allowed another molecule of ferrocytochrome c2 to react. When both cytochrome c-556 and cytochrome c-559 were photooxidized with a double flash, the rate constant for reduction of both components was the same as that observed for cytochrome c-556 alone. The observed rate constant decreased by a factor of 14 as the ionic strength was increased from 5 mM to 1 M, indicating that electrostatic interactions contributed to binding. Molecular modeling studies revealed a possible cytochrome c2 binding site on the cytochrome subunit of the reaction center involving the negatively charged residues Glu-93, Glu-85, Glu-79, and Glu-67 which surround the heme crevice of cytochrome c-554.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. In-silico Assessment of Protein-Protein Electron Transfer. A Case Study: Cytochrome c Peroxidase – Cytochrome c

    PubMed Central

    Wallrapp, Frank H.; Voityuk, Alexander A.; Guallar, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The fast development of software and hardware is notably helping in closing the gap between macroscopic and microscopic data. Using a novel theoretical strategy combining molecular dynamics simulations, conformational clustering, ab-initio quantum mechanics and electronic coupling calculations, we show how computational methodologies are mature enough to provide accurate atomistic details into the mechanism of electron transfer (ET) processes in complex protein systems, known to be a significant challenge. We performed a quantitative study of the ET between Cytochrome c Peroxidase and its redox partner Cytochrome c. Our results confirm the ET mechanism as hole transfer (HT) through residues Ala194, Ala193, Gly192 and Trp191 of CcP. Furthermore, our findings indicate the fine evolution of the enzyme to approach an elevated turnover rate of 5.47×106 s−1 for the ET between Cytc and CcP through establishment of a localized bridge state in Trp191. PMID:23555224

  10. Upper limb functional assessment of children with cerebral palsy using a sorting box.

    PubMed

    Quijano-Gonzalez, Y; Melendez-Calderon, A; Burdet, E; Chong-Quero, J E; Villanueva-Ayala, D; Perez-Moreno, J C

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the use of a sorting box to obtain a quantitative assessment of upper limb motor function in children with cerebral palsy. In our study, children with and without cerebral palsy placed and removed geometrical objects of a sorting-box while their wrist position was monitored by a camera-based, motion-tracking system. We analyzed three different smoothness metrics (logarithmic dimensionless jerk, spectral arc-length and number of peaks) together with time to task completion. Our results suggest that smoothness metrics are an effective tool to distinguish between impaired and non-impaired subjects, as well as to quantify differences between the affected and less-affected sides in children with hemiparetic cerebral palsy.

  11. Role of hypotension in decreasing cerebral blood flow in porcine endotoxemia

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.F.; Breslow, M.J.; Shapiro, R.M.; Traystman, R.J. )

    1987-10-01

    The role of reduced arterial blood pressure (MAP) in decreasing cerebral blood flow (CBF) during endotoxemia was studied in pentobarbital-anesthetized pigs. Microspheres were used to measure regional CBF changes during MAP manipulations in animals with and without endotoxin. Endotoxin decreased MAP to 50 mmHg and decreased blood flow to the cortex and cerebellum without affecting cerebral cortical oxygen consumption (CMRo{sub 2}). Elevating MAP from 50 to 70 mmHg during endotoxemia with norepinephrine did not change cortical blood flow or CMRo{sub 2} but increased cerebellar blood flow. Brain stem blood flow was not affected by endotoxin or norepinephrine. When MAP was decreased to 50 mmHg by hemorrhage without endotoxin, no change in blood flow to cortex, cerebellum, or brain stem was observed from base-line levels. These results suggest that decreased MAP below a lower limit for cerebral autoregulation does not account for the decreased CBF observed after endotoxin.

  12. Upper limb functional assessment of children with cerebral palsy using a sorting box.

    PubMed

    Quijano-Gonzalez, Y; Melendez-Calderon, A; Burdet, E; Chong-Quero, J E; Villanueva-Ayala, D; Perez-Moreno, J C

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the use of a sorting box to obtain a quantitative assessment of upper limb motor function in children with cerebral palsy. In our study, children with and without cerebral palsy placed and removed geometrical objects of a sorting-box while their wrist position was monitored by a camera-based, motion-tracking system. We analyzed three different smoothness metrics (logarithmic dimensionless jerk, spectral arc-length and number of peaks) together with time to task completion. Our results suggest that smoothness metrics are an effective tool to distinguish between impaired and non-impaired subjects, as well as to quantify differences between the affected and less-affected sides in children with hemiparetic cerebral palsy. PMID:25570455

  13. Breakthrough: new guidance for silent cerebral ischemia and infarction in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Charles T

    2014-12-01

    Silent cerebral infarction (SCI) is a highly prevalent and morbid condition in sickle cell disease (SCD). SCI can occur beginning in the first year of life and becomes more common with increasing age. Potentially modifiable risk factors for SCI include anemia and blood pressure. Headache does not appear to be associated with SCI, so neurologically normal children with headache do not necessarily warrant screening MRI for SCI. SCI does affect cognition, but biological determinants of cognition are not more important than socioeconomic factors. The recent identification of acute silent cerebral ischemic events indicates that the total burden of ischemic injury to the brain in SCD is far greater than previously realized. Acute anemic events appear to increase the risk of acute silent cerebral ischemic events and SCI dramatically. The medical management of SCI is not yet defined, but documentation of the presence of SCI may qualify affected individuals for special resources because comprehensive interventions are needed to optimize patients' academic and vocational outcomes.

  14. Sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy: An important cause of cerebral hemorrhage in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Bano, Shahina; Yadav, Sachchida Nand; Garga, Umesh Chandra; Chaudhary, Vikas

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is an important cause of primary intracerebral hemorrhage (PICH) in the elderly. Although there are no pathognomic clinical features of CAA-related PICH, the association of white matter changes with lobar, recurrent, or multiple simultaneous hemorrhages in older patients should raise the suspicion of its diagnosis. A definitive diagnosis of CAA requires pathologic examination of the affected tissue. However, with modern imaging techniques, it is possible to diagnose the "probable CAA" in patients presenting with PICH. Gradient-echo magnetic resonance imaging is a very sensitive, noninvasive technique for identifying microhemorrhages in life. The diagnosis of CAA is important because of the likely implication it has on future management targeted to reduce risk of future bleeding. PMID:21716867

  15. Inducing effect of oxfendazole on cytochrome P450IA2 in rabbit liver. Consequences on cytochrome P450 dependent monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Gleizes, C; Eeckhoutte, C; Pineau, T; Alvinerie, M; Galtier, P

    1991-06-15

    Male New Zealand rabbits were dosed with either 0.9, 4.5 or 22.5 mg/kg/day of oxfendazole by gastric intubation for 10 days. Oxfendazole administered at the therapeutic dose (4.5 mg/kg) and at the highest dose (22.5 mg/kg) increased 1.54- and 2.36-fold the total liver microsomal cytochrome P450 and more particularly the isoenzyme P450IA2 (95 and 184% increases) as demonstrated by western blotting. Increases in ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation and hydroxylations of benzopyrene and acetanilide occurred in livers of the same animals without any change in N-demethylation of aminopyrine, benzphetamine or erythromycin. Because of the unchanged level of mRNA specific to cytochrome P450IA2, as shown by northern blot analysis of poly mRNA, an enzyme stabilization rather than a transcriptional activation of IA2 genes should be involved in the P450IA2 regulation mechanisms. Oxfendazole bound strongly to cytochrome P450, giving rise to a type II spectrum, and inhibited noncompetitively the ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and acetanilide hydroxylase activities, this confirmed that oxfendazole interacts only with the P450IA2 family. On the basis of a comparison of the enzymatic activities induced by various imidazole drugs, it was concluded that oxfendazole, like omeprazole and albendazole, behaved as a 3-methylcholanthrene-type inducer. These three benzimidazoles did not all belong to the same category of cytochrome P450 inducers as the antifungal drugs miconazole, clotrimazole and ketoconazole.

  16. Inhibition of cytochrome c release by 10-N-nonyl acridine orange, a cardiolipin-specific dye, during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Xing; Kimura, Shoji; Murao, Koji; Obata, Koji; Matsuyoshi, Hiroko; Takaki, Miyako

    2010-02-01

    The release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol is a critical step for downstream caspase-mediated apoptotic signal transduction in ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced myocardial tissue injury. 10-N-nonyl acridine orange (NAO), a cardiolipin-specific dye, has been shown to inhibit Bid-mediated cytochrome c release from isolated mitochondria in vitro; however, the possible protective effects of NAO and the mechanisms underlying the protection from myocardial I/R-induced tissue injury in a rat model are unknown. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a 30-min coronary arterial occlusion followed by reperfusion. All rats received either vehicle or NAO (100 microg/kg iv) 10 min before the occlusion. The infarct size in the heart at 24 h after reperfusion was significantly reduced in NAO-treated rats compared with vehicle-treated rats. NAO treatment significantly reduced the cytosolic cytochrome c contents and caspase-9 activity in the ischemic region but did not affect caspase-8 activity. Furthermore, NAO treatment markedly suppressed the translocation of truncated Bid, a proapoptotic Bcl-2 family member, to the mitochondrial fraction. NAO also suppressed the mitochondrial swelling and oxygen uptake stimulated by calcium overload. The results suggest that NAO possesses protective effects against myocardial I/R injury, which may be due to the suppression of cytochrome c release through blockade of truncated Bid translocation to mitochondria and inhibition of the opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pores.

  17. Effect of heat treatment on oxidase activity and proton-pumping capability of proteoliposome-incorporated beef heart cytochrome aa3

    SciTech Connect

    Sone, N.; Nicholls, P.

    1984-12-18

    By incubating beef heart cytochrome c oxidase at 43-45 degrees C, selective inactivation of the H+-pumping function is possible without affecting cytochrome c oxidase activity; proteoliposomes reconstituted with heated enzyme (43.5 degrees C for 60 min at pH 7.0) showed an apparent H+/e- ratio of only 0.3 and a turnover with cytochrome c plus ferrocyanide as substrate of 20 s-1, while those with the intact enzyme showed an apparent H+/e- ratio somewhat greater than 1.0 and a turnover of 19 s-1. This decrease in the H+/e- ratio could not be attributed to a stimulation of H+ permeability upon heating, since the respiratory control ratio and the magnitude of membrane potential formation remained almost the same in the two cases. A pH-dependent Em (midpoint redox potential) change of cytochrome a in the presence of cyanide was still observed after the heat treatment. Heating induced a small spectral shift in the Soret region of the oxidized (resting) enzyme; the peak of the heated enzyme was at 421 nm, while that of the intact enzyme was at 419 nm. The spectral shift obtained by pulsing the enzyme with oxygen under turnover conditions is also altered.

  18. Cytochrome c biogenesis in Campylobacter jejuni requires cytochrome c6 (CccA; Cj1153) to maintain apocytochrome cysteine thiols in a reduced state for haem attachment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang-Wei; Kelly, David J

    2015-06-01

    The microaerophilic food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni uses complex cytochrome-rich respiratory chains for growth and host colonisation. Cytochrome c biogenesis requires haem ligation to reduced apocytochrome cysteines, catalysed by the cytochrome c synthase, CcsBA. While ccsBA could not be deleted, we showed that the thiol reductase DsbD and the CcsX homologue Cj1207 are involved in, but not essential for, cytochromes c biogenesis. Mutant phenotypic analyses and biochemical studies with purified proteins revealed that the mono-haem c-type cytochromes Cj1153 (CccA) and Cj1020 (CccB) and the di-haem Cj0037 (CccC) are electron donors to the cb-oxidase (CcoNOQP), with CccC being more efficient than CccA. Remarkably, cccA deletion or site-directed mutagenesis resulted in an almost complete loss of all other c-type cytochromes. Cytochrome c structural and biogenesis genes were still transcribed in the cccA deletion mutant and the quinol oxidase genes (cioAB) were up-regulated. Cytochrome c production could be rescued in this mutant by growth with exogenous dithiothreitol or L-cysteine, suggesting that in the absence of CccA, apocytochrome c haem binding motifs become oxidised, preventing haem attachment. Our results identify CccA, the most abundant periplasmic c-type cytochrome in C. jejuni, as a novel and unexpected protein required for cytochrome c biogenesis in this pathogen.

  19. New Arabidopsis thaliana Cytochrome c Partners: A Look Into the Elusive Role of Cytochrome c in Programmed Cell Death in Plants*

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Fábregas, Jonathan; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; González-Arzola, Katiuska; Janocha, Simon; Navarro, José A.; Hervás, Manuel; Bernhardt, Rita; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; De la Rosa, Miguel Á.

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death is an event displayed by many different organisms along the evolutionary scale. In plants, programmed cell death is necessary for development and the hypersensitive response to stress or pathogenic infection. A common feature in programmed cell death across organisms is the translocation of cytochrome c from mitochondria to the cytosol. To better understand the role of cytochrome c in the onset of programmed cell death in plants, a proteomic approach was developed based on affinity chromatography and using Arabidopsis thaliana cytochrome c as bait. Using this approach, ten putative new cytochrome c partners were identified. Of these putative partners and as indicated by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, nine of them bind the heme protein in plant protoplasts and human cells as a heterologous system. The in vitro interaction between cytochrome c and such soluble cytochrome c-targets was further corroborated using surface plasmon resonance. Taken together, the results obtained in the study indicate that Arabidopsis thaliana cytochrome c interacts with several distinct proteins involved in protein folding, translational regulation, cell death, oxidative stress, DNA damage, energetic metabolism, and mRNA metabolism. Interestingly, some of these novel Arabidopsis thaliana cytochrome c-targets are closely related to those for Homo sapiens cytochrome c (Martínez-Fábregas et al., unpublished). These results indicate that the evolutionarily well-conserved cytosolic cytochrome c, appearing in organisms from plants to mammals, interacts with a wide range of targets on programmed cell death. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000280. PMID:24019145

  20. High-altitude cerebral edema with absence of headache.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Oyvind; Skaiaa, Sven Chr

    2007-01-01

    Headache is the cardinal symptom of acute mountain sickness (AMS). The headache normally worsens, with increased cerebral affection and the development of high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE). A Norwegian expedition aimed to climb Baruntse (7129 m) in Nepal in 2003. At 5400 m a 35-year-old man felt exhausted. The next day he aborted his attempt at further climbing as a result of extreme fatigue. Over the next 24 hours he developed cough, dyspnea, and severe hypoxia before progressing to ataxia and blurred vision. At no point did he experience headache or nausea. The patient was evacuated by helicopter. He improved immediately after descent and recovered completely within a week. The speed of progression from AMS to HACE varies. Abrupt onset of HACE is occasionally reported. High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) may induce severe hypoxia that can lead to rapid development of HACE. High-altitude cerebral edema in the setting of HAPE was the most likely diagnosis despite the unusual lack of headache. Rapid onset of HAPE with subsequent severe desaturation should raise awareness of the development of HACE, even in the absence of headache. PMID:17447714

  1. Prevalence of dental trauma in patients with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Costa, Mariana Machado Teixeira de Moraes; Afonso, Rebeca Lima; Ruviére, Denise Belucio; Aguiar, Sandra Maria Herondina Coelho Avila

    2008-01-01

    This study presents the findings of a record review that evaluated the prevalence of dental trauma in patients with cerebral palsy and evaluated its possible relationship with age, type of palsy, and epilepsy. The dental records of 2,200 patients with special needs admitted to the special care clinic of the School of Dentistry of Araçatuba/UNESP, Brazil, between 1998 and 2003 were reviewed. Of the records that were analyzed, 500 patients who had cerebral palsy were selected for this study. Information regarding age, gender, type of palsy and dental trauma was collected and statistically analyzed. It was observed that 10.6% of the subjects (n = 53) had sustained dental trauma. The number of traumatized teeth was 84. Enamel or enamel/dentin fractures were the most frequent types of traumatic injury (84.9%). The permanent maxillary central incisors were the most commonly affected teeth (50%). The frequency of traumatic injuries showed no significant correlation (p> .05) with the type of cerebral palsy or gender and they were more frequent in subjects between the ages of 0 and 12 years. Having epilepsy was not a statistically significant risk factor (p> .05) for dental trauma.

  2. Pentoxifylline as an adjunct therapy in children with cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pentoxifylline (PTX) affects many processes that may contribute to the pathogenesis of severe malaria and it has been shown to reduce the duration of coma in children with cerebral malaria. This pilot study was performed to assess pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy of PTX in African children with cerebral malaria. Methods Ten children admitted to the high dependency unit of the Kilifi District Hospital in Kenya with cerebral malaria (Blantyre coma score of 2 or less) received quinine plus a continuous infusion of 10 mg/kg/24 hours PTX for 72 hours. Five children were recruited as controls and received normal saline instead of PTX. Plasma samples were taken for PTX and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) levels. Blantyre Coma Score, parasitemia, hematology and vital signs were assessed 4 hourly. Results One child (20%) in the control group died, compared to four children (40%) in the PTX group. This difference was not significant (p = 0.60). Laboratory parameters and clinical data were comparable between groups. TNF levels were lower in children receiving PTX. Conclusions The small sample size does not permit definitive conclusions, but the mortality rate was unexpectedly high in the PTX group. PMID:21176151

  3. Induction of brain cytochrome P450 2E1 boosts the locomotor-stimulating effects of ethanol in mice.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, Juan Carlos; Miquel, Marta; Pascual, María; Guerri, Consuelo; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2014-10-01

    In the central nervous system ethanol (EtOH) is metabolized into acetaldehyde by different enzymes. Brain catalase accounts for 60% of the total production of EtOH-derived acetaldehyde, whereas cerebral cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP 2E1) produces 20% of this metabolite. Acetaldehyde formed by the activity of central catalase has been implicated in some of the neurobehavioral properties of EtOH, yet the contribution of CYP 2E1 to the pharmacological actions of this drug has not been investigated. Here we assessed the possible participation of CYP 2E1 in the behavioral effects of EtOH. Thus, we induced CYP 2E1 activity and expression by exposing mice to chronic acetone intake (1% v/v for 10 days) and examined its consequences on the stimulating and uncoordinating effects of EtOH (0-3.2 g/kg) injected intraperitoneally. Our data showed that 24 h after withdrawal of acetone brain expression and activity of CYP 2E1 was induced. Furthermore, the locomotion produced by EtOH was boosted over the same interval of time. Locomotor stimulation produced by amphetamine or tert-butanol was unchanged by previous treatment with acetone. EtOH-induced motor impairment as evaluated in a Rota-Rod apparatus was unaffected by the preceding exposure to acetone. These results indicate that cerebral CYP 2E1 activity could contribute to the locomotor-stimulating effects of EtOH, and therefore we suggest that centrally produced acetaldehyde might be a possible mediator of some EtOH-induced pharmacological effects.

  4. The structure of an electron transfer complex containing a cytochrome c and a peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, G W; Prazeres, S; Costa, C; Palma, N; Krippahl, L; Moura, I; Moura, J J

    1999-04-16

    Efficient biological electron transfer may require a fluid association of redox partners. Two noncrystallographic methods (a new molecular docking program and 1H NMR spectroscopy) have been used to study the electron transfer complex formed between the cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) of Paracoccus denitrificans and cytochromes c. For the natural redox partner, cytochrome c550, the results are consistent with a complex in which the heme of a single cytochrome lies above the exposed electron-transferring heme of the peroxidase. In contrast, two molecules of the nonphysiological but kinetically competent horse cytochrome bind between the two hemes of the peroxidase. These dramatically different patterns are consistent with a redox active surface on the peroxidase that may accommodate more than one cytochrome and allow lateral mobility. PMID:10196231

  5. Participation of NADPH-cytochrome C reductase in thyroid hormone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; DeGroot, L J

    1975-04-01

    Purified rat liver NADPH-cytochrome c reductase supports iodination of tyrosine in a system including NADPH, cytochrome c and thyroid perioxidase. Catalase inhibits the iodination of tyrosine, while superoxide dismutase has no effect. Antibody developed in the rabbit against purified rat liver NADPH-cytochrome c reductase inhibits both reduction of cytochrome c and tyrosine iodination supported by the enzyme. The antibody forms a single precipitation line with thyroid extract, and inhibits NADPH cytochrome c reductase activity of the thyroid. The antibody partially inhibits iodination in a thyroid mitochondrial-microsomal fraction, but does not inhibit NADH-dependent iodination. The immunochemical studies indicate the participation of NADPH-cytochrome c reductase in thyroidal H2O generation, and the independent existence of NADPH-dependent and NADH-dependent H2O2 generation mechanisms in the thyroid. PMID:235416

  6. Hemodynamic Intervention of Cerebral Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is a pathological vascular response to hemodynamic stimuli. Endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms essentially alters the blood flow to stop them from continued growth and eventual rupture. Compared to surgical clipping, endovascular methods are minimally invasive and hence rapidly gaining popularity. However, they are not always effective with risks of aneurysm regrowth and various complications. We aim at developing a Virtual Intervention (VI) platform that allows: patient-specific flow calculation and risk prediction as well as recommendation of tailored intervention based on quantitative analysis. This is a lofty goal requiring advancement in three areas of research: (1). Advancement of image-based CFD; (2) Understanding the biological/pathological responses of tissue to hemodynamic factors in the context of cerebral aneurysms; and (3) Capability of designing and testing patient-specific endovascular devices. We have established CFD methodologies based on anatomical geometry obtained from 3D angiographic or CT images. To study the effect of hemodynamics on aneurysm development, we have created a canine model of a vascular bifurcation anastomosis to provide the hemodynamic environment similar to those in CA. Vascular remodeling was studied using histology and compared against the flow fields obtained from CFD. It was found that an intimal pad, similar to those frequently seen clinically, developed at the flow impingement site, bordering with an area of `groove' characteristic of an early stage of aneurysm, where the micro environment exhibits an elevated wall shear stresses. To further address the molecular mechanisms of the flow-mediated aneurysm pathology, we are also developing in vitro cell culture systems to complement the in vivo study. Our current effort in endovascular device development focuses on novel stents that alters the aneurysmal flow to promote thrombotic occlusion as well as favorable remodeling. Realization of an

  7. Restenosis After Balloon Angioplasty for Cerebral Vasospasm

    SciTech Connect

    Sedat, J. Chau, Y.; Popolo, M.; Gindre, S.; Rami, L.; Orban, J. C.

    2009-03-15

    Transluminal balloon dilatation for symptomatic vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage is effective, and clinical studies have shown that it achieves long-lasting dilatation of spastic cerebral arteries. Delayed arterial renarrowing has not been reported. Here we report the case of a 58-year-old woman who presented asymptomatic and permanent restenosis after angioplasty for cerebral vasospasm.

  8. Primary cerebral alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma in adult

    PubMed Central

    Pirillo, Vania; Cipriano Cecchi, Paolo; Tripodi, Massimo; Maier, Klaus; Rizzo, Paolo; Schwarz, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Primary cerebral rhabdomyosarcomas are very rare and malignant tumors that occur predominantly in the posterior fossa of pediatric patients. We report a rare case of primary cerebral rhabdomyosarcoma located in the supratentorial compartment of a 51 year-old woman together with a review of the pertinent Literature especially regarding the histological diagnosis and pitfalls. PMID:21769325

  9. Neurotransmitter Receptor Binding in Bovine Cerebral Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Reinhard, John F.; Synder, Solomon H.

    1980-05-01

    Purified preparations of microvessels from bovine cerebral cortex contain substantial levels of alpha-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, and histamine 1 receptor binding sites but only negligible serotonin, muscarinic cholinergic, opiate, and benzodiazepine receptor binding. Norepinephrine and histamine may be endogenous regulators of the cerebral microcirculation at the observed receptors.

  10. Sumatriptan and cerebral perfusion in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Scott, A K; Grimes, S; Ng, K; Critchley, M; Breckenridge, A M; Thomson, C; Pilgrim, A J

    1992-04-01

    1. The effect of sumatriptan on regional cerebral perfusion was studied in healthy volunteers. 2. Intravenous sumatriptan (2 mg) had no detectable effect on regional cerebral perfusion as measured using a SPECT system with 99technetiumm labelled hexemethylpropyleneamineoxime. 3. Sumatriptan had no effect on pulse, blood pressure or ECG indices. 4. All six volunteers experienced minor adverse effects during the intravenous infusion.

  11. Mobility Experiences of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palisano, Robert J.; Shimmell, Lorie J.; Stewart, Debra; Lawless, John J.; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Russell, Dianne J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how youth with cerebral palsy experience mobility in their daily lives using a phenomenological approach. The participants were 10 youth with cerebral palsy, 17 to 20 years of age, selected using purposeful sampling with maximum variation strategies. A total of 14 interviews were completed. Transcripts…

  12. Basal ganglia germinoma with progressive cerebral hemiatrophy.

    PubMed

    Liu, E; Robertson, R L; du Plessis, A; Pomeroy, S L

    1999-04-01

    The authors describe a 7-year-old Chinese-American female with a germinoma of the basal ganglia who presented with progressive hemiparesis and cerebral hemiatrophy. The additional finding of markedly elevated antiphospholipid antibodies suggests the possibility of an autoimmune pathogenesis for the progressive cerebral atrophy, as well as the later development of cognitive decline, tics, and obsessive-compulsive behaviors. PMID:10328283

  13. [The developing profile of cerebral ischemia].

    PubMed

    Martí-Vilalta, J L; Martí-Fábregas, J

    1999-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia, which may be silently manifested as transitory ischemia attacks or cerebral infarction, is not a stable, but rather, a moving process. In cerebral infarctions the initial ischemic area may change or move in a high percentage of patients and may involve a significant volume (mean of 32%) of neuronal tissue. The negative changes of initial cerebral ischemia which produce a worsening of the same may be due to the progression of the thrombus, appearance of new embolisms, cerebral edema, hemorrhage, blood reperfusion and systemias causes. These changes may determine the conversion of the shaded ischemic area into a definitive, irreversible infarction. The negative changes may also be produced some distance from the initial ischemic area, either because of microthromboembolisms or diaschisis. The positive changes of initial cerebral ischemia which produce as improvement of the same, may be due to collateral circulation, lysis or fragmentation of the embolism and a decrease in cerebral edema. Clinical changes with no evident clinical manifestations may also be produced and may be diagnosed with the use of clinical scales, imaging techniques, ultrasound and hematological and biochemical markers. Acknowledgement of these cerebral ischemia changes in the acute phase may determine the salvation of a part of the brain, and thereby modify the future clinical situation of the patient.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral cavernous malformation

    MedlinePlus

    ... R, Awad IA, Ginsberg MH. Cerebral cavernous malformations proteins inhibit Rho kinase to stabilize vascular integrity. J Exp Med. 2010 Apr 12;207(4):881-96. doi: 10.1084/jem.20091258. Epub 2010 Mar 22. Citation on ... CCM1 and CCM2 protein interactions in cell signaling: implications for cerebral cavernous ...

  15. Cerebral oximetry: a replacement for pulse oximetry?

    PubMed

    Frost, Elizabeth A M

    2012-10-01

    Cerebral oximetry has been around for some 3 decades but has had a somewhat checkered history regarding application and reliability. More recently several monitors have been approved in the United States and elsewhere and the technique is emerging as a useful tool for assessing not only adequate cerebral oxygenation but also tissue oxygenation and perfusion in other organs.

  16. Variations in Writing Posture and Cerebral Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Jerre; Reid, Marylou

    1976-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between hand writing posture and cerebral dominance of 48 left handed writers and 25 right handed writers. Determined that cerebral dominance is related to handedness and to whether or not the writing hand posture is normal or inverted. (SL)

  17. Cerebral lymphoma presenting as a leukoencephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ayuso-Peralta, L; Orti-Pareja, M; Zurdo-Hernandez, M; Jimenez-Jimenez, F; Tejeiro-Martinez, J; Ricoy, J; de la Lama, A; Bernardo, A

    2001-01-01

    Cerebral lymphoma is infrequent in immunocompetent patients. This tumour usually appears on CT and MRI as a single lesion or as multiple lesions with mass effect and homogeneous enhancement after contrast administration. A patient is described with a cerebral lymphoma, confirmed by histopathological examination, who presented as a progressive leukoencephalopathy.

 PMID:11459903

  18. Anterior cerebral artery velocity changes in disease of the middle cerebral artery stem.

    PubMed

    Brass, L M; Duterte, D L; Mohr, J P

    1989-12-01

    Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography can map the changes in blood velocity that result from stenosis or occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. To evaluate patterns of collateral blood flow in disease of the middle cerebral artery stem, we used both cerebral angiography and transcranial Doppler ultrasonography to study the systolic blood velocities in both anterior cerebral arteries in 10 consecutive patients with middle cerebral artery stenosis or occlusion. Five patients had no evidence of hemodynamically significant carotid disease and good-quality measurements of systolic velocity in each anterior cerebral artery. Two of the five patients had middle cerebral artery stem stenosis and the other three had occlusion. The ratios of mean blood velocity in the normal compared with the abnormal side for the five patients (mean 1.34 +/- 0.23, range 1.15-1.74) were significantly higher than ratios for 10 controls (mean 1.04 +/- 0.12, range 0.76 +/- 1.19) using an unpaired t test (t = 3.492, 0.0005 less than p less than 0.005). Our results suggest that transcranial Doppler ultrasound measurements of anterior cerebral artery blood velocity may be a useful index of collateral blood flow from the anterior cerebral artery territory into the middle cerebral artery territory. Changes in mean velocity ratio may document the evolution and adequacy of collateral blood flow over the cerebral convexity in middle cerebral artery stem disease. In addition, the changes in anterior cerebral artery blood velocity appear to be an important corroborative finding for middle cerebral artery stem occlusion. PMID:2688197

  19. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome: review.

    PubMed

    Cerdà-Esteve, M; Cuadrado-Godia, E; Chillaron, J J; Pont-Sunyer, C; Cucurella, G; Fernández, M; Goday, A; Cano-Pérez, J F; Rodríguez-Campello, A; Roquer, J

    2008-06-01

    Hyponatremia is the most frequent electrolyte disorder in critically neurological patients. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSW) is defined as a renal loss of sodium during intracranial disease leading to hyponatremia and a decrease in extracellular fluid volume. The pathogenesis of this disorder is still not completely understood. Sympathetic responses as well as some natriuretic factors play a role in this syndrome. Distinction between SIADH and CSW might be difficult. The essential point is the volemic state. It is necessary to rule out other intermediate causes. Treatment requires volume replacement and maintenance of a positive salt balance. Mineral corticoids may be useful in complicated cases.

  20. Phase dynamics in cerebral autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Latka, Miroslaw; Turalska, Malgorzata; Glaubic-Latka, Marta; Kolodziej, Waldemar; Latka, Dariusz; West, Bruce J

    2005-11-01

    Complex continuous wavelet transforms are used to study the dynamics of instantaneous phase difference delta phi between the fluctuations of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in a middle cerebral artery. For healthy individuals, this phase difference changes slowly over time and has an almost uniform distribution for the very low-frequency (0.02-0.07 Hz) part of the spectrum. We quantify phase dynamics with the help of the synchronization index gamma = (sin delta phi)2 + (cos delta phi)2 that may vary between 0 (uniform distribution of phase differences, so the time series are statistically independent of one another) and 1 (phase locking of ABP and CBFV, so the former drives the latter). For healthy individuals, the group-averaged index gamma has two distinct peaks, one at 0.11 Hz [gamma = 0.59 +/- 0.09] and another at 0.33 Hz (gamma = 0.55 +/- 0.17). In the very low-frequency range (0.02-0.07 Hz), phase difference variability is an inherent property of an intact autoregulation system. Consequently, the average value of the synchronization parameter in this part of the spectrum is equal to 0.13 +/- 0.03. The phase difference variability sheds new light on the nature of cerebral hemodynamics, which so far has been predominantly characterized with the help of the high-pass filter model. In this intrinsically stationary approach, based on the transfer function formalism, the efficient autoregulation is associated with the positive phase shift between oscillations of CBFV and ABP. However, the method is applicable only in the part of the spectrum (0.1-0.3 Hz) where the coherence of these signals is high. We point out that synchrony analysis through the use of wavelet transforms is more general and allows us to study nonstationary aspects of cerebral hemodynamics in the very low-frequency range where the physiological significance of autoregulation is most strongly pronounced. PMID:16024579

  1. Apraxia in deep cerebral lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Agostoni, E; Coletti, A; Orlando, G; Tredici, G

    1983-01-01

    In a series of 50 patients with cerebrovascular lesions (demonstrated with CT scan), seven patients had lesions located in the basal ganglia and/or thalamus. All these seven patients were apractic. Ideomotor apraxia was present in all patients; five also had constructional apraxia, and one had bucco-facial apraxia. None of the patients had utilisation apraxia. These observations indicated that apraxia is not only a "high cerebral (cortical) function", but may depend also on the integrity of subcortical circuits and structures. PMID:6619888

  2. Cerebral Asymmetry in Insomnia Sufferers

    PubMed Central

    St-Jean, Geneviève; Turcotte, Isabelle; Bastien, Célyne H.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral asymmetry is used to describe the differences in electroencephalographic activity between regions of the brain. The objective of this study was to document frontal, central, and parietal asymmetry in psychophysiological (Psy-I) and paradoxical (Para-I) insomnia sufferers as well as good sleeper (GS) controls, and to compare their patterns of asymmetry to others already found in anxiety and depression. Additionally, asymmetry variations between nights were assessed. Participants were 17 Psy-I, 14 Para-I, and 19 GS (mean age = 40 years, SD = 9.4). They completed three nights of polysomnography (PSG) recordings following a clinical evaluation in a sleep laboratory. All sleep cycles of Nights 2 and 3 were retained for power spectral analysis. The absolute activity in frequency bands (0.00–125.00 Hz) was computed at multiple frontal, central, and parietal sites in rapid eye movement and non-rapid eye movement sleep to provide cerebral asymmetry measures. Mixed model ANOVAs were computed to assess differences between groups and nights. Correlations were performed with asymmetry and symptoms of depression and anxiety from self-reported questionnaires. Over the course of the two nights, Para-I tended to present hypoactivation of their left frontal region but hyperactivation of their right one compared with GS. As for Psy-I, they presented increased activation of their right parietal region compared with Para-I. Asymmetry at frontal, central, and parietal region differed between nights. On a more disrupted night of sleep, Psy-I had increased activity in their right parietal region while Para-I presented a decrease in cerebral activity in the right central region on their less disrupted night of sleep. Anxious and depressive symptoms did not correlate with asymmetry at any region. Therefore, Psy-I and Para-I present unique patterns of cerebral asymmetry that do not relate to depression or anxiety, and asymmetry varies between nights, maybe as a

  3. [Cerebral oedema: new therapeutic ways].

    PubMed

    Quintard, H; Ichai, C

    2014-06-01

    Cerebral oedema (CO) after brain injury can occur from different ways. The vasogenic and cytotoxic oedema are usually described but osmotic and hydrostatic CO, respectively secondary to plasmatic hypotonia or increase in blood pressure, can also be encountered. Addition of these several mechanisms can worsen injuries. Consequences are major, leading quickly to death secondary to intracerebral hypertension and later to neuropsychic sequelae. So therapeutic care to control this phenomenon is essential and osmotherapy is actually the only way. A better understanding of physiopathological disorders, particularly energetic ways (lactate), aquaporine function, inflammation lead to new therapeutic hopes. The promising experimental results need now to be confirmed by clinical data.

  4. [Orthotic management in cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Ofluoğlu, Demet

    2009-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) may have many musculoskeletal deformities depending on the type of CP. These deformities may result from (i) lack of motor control, (ii) abnormal biomechanical alignment, (iii) impairment in timing of muscle activation, (iv) impairment in normal agonist/antagonist muscle balance, (v) lack of power generation, and (vi) balance disorder. Rehabilitation, orthopedic surgical intervention, and additional orthotic management can prevent and correct these deformities. In this review, mainly lower extremity orthoses are described, with brief explanation on upper and spinal orthotic applications. PMID:19448357

  5. Isolation of a Rhizobium phaseoli cytochrome mutant with enhanced respiration and symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed Central

    Soberón, M; Williams, H D; Poole, R K; Escamilla, E

    1989-01-01

    Cultured cells of a Rhizobium phaseoli wild-type strain (CE2) possess b-type and c-type cytochromes and two terminal oxidases: cytochromes o and aa3. Cytochrome aa3 was partially expressed when CE2 cells were grown on minimal medium, during symbiosis, and in well-aerated liquid cultures in a complex medium (PY2). Two cytochrome mutants of R. phaseoli were obtained and characterized. A Tn5-mob-induced mutant, CFN4201, expressed diminished amounts of b-type and c-type cytochromes, showed an enhanced expression of cytochrome oxidases, and had reduced levels of N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine, succinate, and NADH oxidase activities. Nodules formed by this strain had no N2 fixation activity. The other mutant, CFN4205, which was isolated by nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis, had reduced levels of cytochrome o and higher succinate oxidase activity but similar NADH and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine oxidase activities when compared with the wild-type strain. Strain CFN4205 expressed a fourfold-higher cytochrome aa3 content when cultured on minimal and complex media and had twofold-higher cytochrome aa3 levels during symbiosis when compared with the wild-type strain. Nodules formed by strain CFN4205 fixed 33% more N2 than did nodules formed by the wild-type strain, as judged by the total nitrogen content found in plants nodulated by these strains. Finally, low-temperature photodissociation spectra of whole cells from strains CE2 and CFN4205 reveal cytochromes o and aa3. Both cytochromes react with O2 at -180 degrees C to give a light-insensitive compound. These experiments identify cytochromes o and aa3 as functional terminal oxidases in R. phaseoli. PMID:2644201

  6. Neonatal brain injury as a consequence of insufficient cerebral oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Placha, Katerina; Luptakova, Dominika; Baciak, Ladislav; Ujhazy, Eduard; Juranek, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal brain hypoxic-ischemic injury represents a serious health care and socio-economical problem since it is one of the most common causes of mortality and morbidity of newborns. Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is often associated with signs of perinatal asphyxia, with an incidence of about 2-4 per 1,000 live births and mortality rate up to 20%. In about one half of survivors, cerebral hypoxic-ischemic insult may result in more or less pronounced neuro-psychological sequelae of immediate or delayed nature, such as seizures, cerebral palsy or behavioural and learning disabilities, including attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Hypoxic-ischemic injury develops as a consequence of transient or permanent restriction of blood supply to the brain. Severity of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy varies depending on the intensity and duration of hypoxia-ischemia, on the type and size of the brain region affected, and on the maturity of the foetal/neonatal brain. Though a primary cause of hypoxic-ischemic injury is lack of oxygen in the neonatal brain, underlying mechanisms of subsequent events that are critical for developing hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy are less understood. Their understanding is however necessary for elaborating effective management for newborns that underwent cerebral hypoxic-ischemic insult and thus are at risk of a negative outcome. The present paper summarizes current knowledge on cerebral hypoxic-ischemic injury of the neonate, fundamental processes involved in etiopathogenesis, with a special focus on cellular and molecular mechanisms and particular attention on certain controversial aspects of oxidative stress involvement. PMID:27179569

  7. Multiple phenotypic alterations caused by a c-type cytochrome maturation ccmC gene mutation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Baert, Barbara; Baysse, Christine; Matthijs, Sandra; Cornelis, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    In some Proteobacteria biogenesis of c-type cytochromes depends on the products of the ccmABCDEFG(H) genes, which encode inner-membrane proteins. Inactivation of some ccm genes, in particular ccmC, has an impact on other processes as well, including siderophore production and utilization. Non-polar insertions were generated in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa ccmA, ccmC, ccmE, ccmF and ccmH genes, and their impacts on different phenotypes were compared. Only in the case of the ccmC mutant was cytochrome c production totally abrogated. The ccmC mutant, and to a lesser extent the ccmF mutant, showed a range of other phenotypic changes. The production of the siderophore pyoverdine was very low and growth under the condition of iron limitation was severely restricted, but production of the second siderophore, pyochelin, was increased. Interestingly, other traits were also strongly affected by the ccmC mutation, including the production of pyocyanin, swarming and twitching motility, and rhamnolipid production. The production of N-acyl homoserine lactones or the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) was, however, not affected in the ccmC and ccmF mutants. The ccmC mutant was also found to accumulate porphyrins, and catalase production was undetectable, consistent with the increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Finally, reduction in the content of [Fe-S] clusters was evidenced in both ccmC and ccmF mutants. Wild-type phenotypes were restored by complementation with a ccmC gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17400. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that CcmC is a key determinant for cytochrome c biogenesis, pyoverdine maturation, and expression of some quorum sensing-regulated traits. PMID:18174132

  8. Domains of the catalytically self-sufficient cytochrome P-450 BM-3. Genetic construction, overexpression, purification and spectroscopic characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Miles, J S; Munro, A W; Rospendowski, B N; Smith, W E; McKnight, J; Thomson, A J

    1992-01-01

    1. The gene CYP102 encoding cytochrome P-450 BM-3 and subgenes encoding the cytochrome P-450 and cytochrome P-450 reductase domains have been cloned in Escherichia coli. 2. The protein products of these genes have been overexpressed and purified to homogeneity. 3. The cytochrome P-450 domain is purified in the ferric low-spin state, but is readily converted into the high-spin state by addition of the substrate palmitate (Ks = 1 microM). The cytochrome P-450 reductase domain readily reduces cytochrome c. Mixing the two domains reconstitutes only about one-thousandth of the fatty acid hydroxylase activity associated with the intact cytochrome P-450 BM-3. 4. The X-band e.p.r. spectra of both the cytochrome P-450 domain and intact cytochrome P-450 BM-3 give g-values indicating low-spin ferric haem. The spectra are virtually identical with those of the equivalent form of cytochrome P-450 cam indicating that the haem ligation in cytochrome P-450 BM-3 is identical with that of cytochrome P-450 cam. 5. Resonance Raman spectra of the substrate-free and substrate-bound forms of the cytochrome P-450 domain are given. Spectral differences in comparison with cytochrome P-450 cam may reflect subtle electronic differences between the respective haem environments. Images Fig. 1. PMID:1334408

  9. The Use of Standing Frames for Contracture Management for Nonmobile Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Susan K.; Sprod, Judy A.; Maher, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether static weight-bearing in a standing frame affected hamstring length and ease of activities of daily living (ADLs) in nonambulant children with cerebral palsy (CP). A convenient sample of nonambulant children with CP was recruited for this one-group quasi-experimental study. Participants stood in…

  10. Menstrual Cycle-Related Changes of Functional Cerebral Asymmetries in Fine Motor Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Ulrike; Hausmann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuating sex hormone levels during the menstrual cycle have been shown to affect functional cerebral asymmetries in cognitive domains. These effects seem to result from the neuromodulatory properties of sex hormones and their metabolites on interhemispheric processing. The present study was carried out to investigate whether functional cerebral…

  11. A Neurocognitive Perspective on Developmental Disregard in Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houwink, Annemieke; Aarts, Pauline B. M.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Steenbergen, Bert

    2011-01-01

    A common problem in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) is the asymmetrical development of arm and hand capacity caused by the lack of use of the affected upper limb, or developmental disregard. In this paper, we provide a neuropsychological model that relates developmental disregard to attentional processes and motor learning. From this…

  12. Control of Angular Momentum during Walking in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Kaat, Desloovere; Duysens, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Children with hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (CP) walk with marked asymmetries. For instance, we have recently shown that they have less arm swing on the affected side, and more arm swing at the unaffected side. Such an increase in arm swing at the unaffected side may be aimed at controlling total body angular momentum about the vertical axis,…

  13. Dysarthria in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: Clinical Presentation and Impacts on Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schölderle, Theresa; Staiger, Anja; Lampe, Renée; Strecker, Katrin; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although dysarthria affects the large majority of individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) and can substantially complicate everyday communication, previous research has provided an incomplete picture of its clinical features. We aimed to comprehensively describe characteristics of dysarthria in adults with CP and to elucidate the impact of…

  14. Structural characterization of a monoclonal antibody immunopurified pulmonary cytochrome P-450 from 3-methylcholanthrenetreated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, R.C.; Cheng, K.C.; Park, S.S.; Gelboin, H.V.; Friedman, F.K.

    1986-05-01

    Extrahepatic cytochromes P-450 have not been as extensively studied as the hepatic forms, owing to the low concentrations of these enzymes in extrahepatic tissues. A cytochrome P-450 was purified from lung microsomes of 3-methylcholanthrene (MC)-treated rats by immunoaffinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody to the major MC-inducible form of rat liver cytochrome P-450. The lung cytochrome P-450 is related to this liver form by at least two common epitopes, recognized by monoclonal antibodies 1-7-1 and 1-31-2. The isolated pulmonary cytochrome P-450 is MC-inducible and has an apparent molecular weight of 57 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The molecular weight as well as the NH/sub 2/-terminal sequence of the pulmonary cytochrome P-450 is identical to that of the major MC-inducible form of rat liver cytochrome P-450. In addition, limited proteolytic digestion of both cytochromes P-450 generates the same peptide patterns on SDS-PAGE. By several criteria, treatment of rats with MC thus induces a pulmonary cytochrome P-450 which is structurally identical to the MC-induced hepatic enzyme.

  15. Cytochrome c release from mitochondria proceeds by a two-step process

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Martin; Robertson, John D.; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Orrenius, Sten

    2002-01-01

    Cytochrome c is often released from mitochondria during the early stages of apoptosis, although the precise mechanisms regulating this event remain unclear. In this study, with isolated liver mitochondria, we demonstrate that cytochrome c release requires a two-step process. Because cytochrome c is present as loosely and tightly bound pools attached to the inner membrane by its association with cardiolipin, this interaction must first be disrupted to generate a soluble pool of this protein. Specifically, solubilization of cytochrome c involves a breaching of the electrostatic and/or hydrophobic affiliations that this protein usually maintains with cardiolipin. Once cytochrome c is solubilized, permeabilization of the outer mitochondrial membrane by Bax is sufficient to allow the extrusion of this protein into the extramitochondrial environment. Neither disrupting the interaction of cytochrome c with cardiolipin, nor permeabilizing the outer membrane with Bax, alone, is sufficient to trigger this protein's release. This mechanism also extends to conditions of mitochondrial permeability transition insofar as cytochrome c release is significantly depressed when the electrostatic interaction between cytochrome c and cardiolipin remains intact. Our results indicate that the release of cytochrome c involves a distinct two-step process that is undermined when either step is compromised. PMID:11818574

  16. Kinetics of the photoreduction of cytochrome b-559 by photosystem II in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Whitmarsh, J; Cramer, W A

    1977-05-11

    The kinetics of the photoreduction of cytochrome b-559 and plastoquinone were measured using well-coupled spinach chloroplasts. High potential (i.e, hydroquinone reducible) cytochrome b-559 was oxidized with low intensity far-red light in the presence of N-methyl phenazonium methosulfate or after preillumination with high intensity light. Using long flashes of red light, the half-reduction time of cytochrome b-559 was found to be 100 +/- 10 ms, compared to 6-10 ms for the photoreduction of the plastoquinone pool. Light saturation of the photoreduction of cytochrome b-559 occurred at a light intensity less than one-third of the intensity necessary for the saturation of ferricyanide reduction under identical illumination conditions. The photoreduction of cytochrome b-559 was accelerated in the presence of dibromothymoquinone with a t 1/2 = 25-35 ms. The addition of uncouplers, which caused stimulatory effect on ferricyanide reduction under the same experimental conditions resulted in a decrease in the rate of cytochrome b-559 reduction. The relatively slow photoreduction rate of cytochrome b-559 compared to the plastoquinone pool implies that electrons can be transferred efficiently from Photosystem II to plastoquinone without the involvement of cytochrome b-559 as an intermediate. These results indicate that it is unlikely that high potential cytochrome b-559 functions as an obligatory redox component in the main electron transport chain joining the two photosystems.

  17. Reduction of U(VI) and Toxic Metals by Desulfovibrio Cytochrome c3

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Judy D.

    2003-06-01

    The project, ''Reduction of U(VI) and toxic metals by Desulfovibrio cytochrome c3'', is designed to obtain spectroscopic information for or against a functional interaction of cytochrome c3 and uranium in the whole cells. That is, is the cytochrome c3 the uranium reductase? Our approach has been to start with purified cytochrome and determine any unique spectral disturbances during electron flow to U(VI). Then we will attempt to identify these signals emanating from cells actively reducing uranium. This project is being carried out in collaboration with Dr. William Woodruff at the Los Alamos National Laboratory where the spectral experiments are being carried out.

  18. Fusing two cytochromes b of Rhodobacter capsulatus cytochrome bc1 using various linkers defines a set of protein templates for asymmetric mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Czapla, Monika; Borek, Arkadiusz; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2012-01-01

    Cytochrome bc(1) (mitochondrial complex III), one of the key enzymes of biological energy conversion, is a functional homodimer in which each monomer contains three catalytic subunits: cytochrome c(1), the iron-sulfur subunit and cytochrome b. The latter is composed of eight transmembrane α-helices which, in duplicate, form a hydrophobic core of a dimer. We show that two cytochromes b can be fused into one 16-helical subunit using a number of different peptide linkers that vary in length but all connect the C-terminus of one cytochrome with the N-terminus of the other. The fusion proteins replace two cytochromes b in the dimer defining a set of available protein templates for introducing mutations that allow breaking symmetry of a dimer. A more detailed comparison of the form with the shortest, 3 amino acid, linker to the form with 12 amino acid linker established that both forms display similar level of structural plasticity to accommodate several, but not all, asymmetric patterns of mutations that knock out individual segments of cofactor chains. While the system based on a fused gene does not allow for the assessments of the functionality of electron-transfer paths in vivo, the family of proteins with fused cytochrome b offers attractive model for detailed investigations of molecular mechanism of catalysis at in vitro/reconstitution level.

  19. Folding of horse cytochrome c in the reduced state.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, A K; Udgaonkar, J B

    2001-10-01

    Equilibrium and kinetic folding studies of horse cytochrome c in the reduced state have been carried out under strictly anaerobic conditions at neutral pH, 10 degrees C, in the entire range of aqueous solubility of guanidinium hydrochloride (GdnHCl). Equilibrium unfolding transitions observed by Soret heme absorbance, excitation energy transfer from the lone tryptophan residue to the ferrous heme, and far-UV circular dichroism (CD) are all biphasic and superimposable, implying no accumulation of structural intermediates. The thermodynamic parameters obtained by two-state analysis of these transitions yielded DeltaG(H2O)=18.8(+/-1.45) kcal mol(-1), and C(m)=5.1(+/-0.15) M GdnHCl, indicating unusual stability of reduced cytochrome c. These results have been used in conjunction with the redox potential of native cytochrome c and the known stability of oxidized cytochrome c to estimate a value of -164 mV as the redox potential of the unfolded protein. Stopped-flow kinetics of folding and unfolding have been recorded by Soret heme absorbance, and tryptophan fluorescence as observables. The refolding kinetics are monophasic in the transition region, but become biphasic as moderate to strongly native-like conditions are approached. There also is a burst folding reaction unobservable in the stopped-flow time window. Analyses of the two observable rates and their amplitudes indicate that the faster of the two rates corresponds to apparent two-state folding (U<-->N) of 80-90 % of unfolded molecules with a time constant in the range 190-550 micros estimated by linear extrapolation and model calculations. The remaining 10-20 % of the population folds to an off-pathway intermediate, I, which is required to unfold first to the initial unfolded state, U, in order to refold correctly to the native state, N (I<-->U<-->N). The slower of the two observable rates, which has a positive slope in the linear functional dependence on the denaturant concentration indicating that an

  20. Short-term fasting alters cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism in humans.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Laureen A; Achterbergh, Roos; de Vries, Emmely M; van Nierop, F Samuel; Klümpen, Heinz-Josef; Soeters, Maarten R; Boelen, Anita; Romijn, Johannes A; Mathôt, Ron A A

    2015-06-01

    Experimental studies indicate that short-term fasting alters drug metabolism. However, the effects of short-term fasting on drug metabolism in humans need further investigation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of short-term fasting (36 h) on P450-mediated drug metabolism. In a randomized crossover study design, nine healthy subjects ingested a cocktail consisting of five P450-specific probe drugs [caffeine (CYP1A2), S-warfarin (CYP2C9), omeprazole (CYP2C19), metoprolol (CYP2D6), and midazolam (CYP3A4)] on two occasions (control study after an overnight fast and after 36 h of fasting). Blood samples were drawn for pharmacokinetic analysis using nonlinear mixed effects modeling. In addition, we studied in Wistar rats the effects of short-term fasting on hepatic mRNA expression of P450 isoforms corresponding with the five studied P450 enzymes in humans. In the healthy subjects, short-term fasting increased oral caffeine clearance by 20% (P = 0.03) and decreased oral S-warfarin clearance by 25% (P < 0.001). In rats, short-term fasting increased mRNA expression of the orthologs of human CYP1A2, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 (P < 0.05), and decreased the mRNA expression of the ortholog of CYP2C9 (P < 0.001) compared with the postabsorptive state. These results demonstrate that short-term fasting alters cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism in a nonuniform pattern. Therefore, short-term fasting is another factor affecting cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism in humans.

  1. Scutellarin inhibits cytochrome P450 isoenzyme 1A2 (CYP1A2) in rats.

    PubMed

    Jian, Tun-Yu; He, Jian-Chang; He, Gong-Hao; Feng, En-Fu; Li, Hong-Liang; Bai, Min; Xu, Gui-Li

    2012-08-01

    Scutellarin is the most important flavone glycoside in the herbal drug Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand.-Mazz. It is used frequently in the clinic to treat ischemic vascular diseases in China. However, the direct relationship between scutellarin and cytochrome P450 (CYP450) is unclear. The present study investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of scutellarin on cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP 1A2) metabolism. According to in vitro experiments, scutellarin (10-250 µM) decreased the formation of 4-acetamidophenol in a concentration-dependent manner, with an IC₅₀ value of 108.20 ± 0.657 µM. Furthermore, scutellarin exhibited a weak mixed-type inhibition against the activity of CYP1A2 in rat liver microsomes, with a K(i) value of 95.2 µM. Whereas in whole animal studies, scutellarin treatment for 7 days (at 5, 15, 30 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased the clearance (CL), and increased the T(1/2) (at 15, 30 mg/kg, i.p.), it did not affect the V(d) of phenacetin. Scutellarin treatment (at 5, 15, 30 mg/kg, i.p.) increased the AUC(0-∞) by 14.3%, 67.3% and 159.2%, respectively. Scutellarin at 30 mg/kg also weakly inhibited CYP1A2 activity, in accordance with our in vitro study. Thus, the results indicate that CYP1A2 is inhibited directly, but weakly, by scutellarin in vivo, and provide useful information on the safe and effective use of scutellarin in clinical practice.

  2. Molecular genetic analysis of the cytochrome P450-debrisoquine hydroxylase locus and association with cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C A; Moss, J E; Gough, A C; Spurr, N K; Wolf, C R

    1992-01-01

    The cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases play a central role in the metabolism of chemical carcinogens. The action of these enzymes can lead to either carcinogen detoxication or activation. Differences in P450 expression in animal models give rise to large differences in susceptibility to chemical carcinogens, so genetic polymorphisms in P450 expression may be expected to be an important factor in individual human susceptibility to cancer. Of particular interest is the genetic polymorphism at the cytochrome P450-debrisoquine/sparteine hydroxylase locus (CYP2D6). Although this is a minor liver P450, its polymorphic expression is associated with the abnormal metabolism of at least 30 therapeutic drugs, including beta-blockers and tricyclic antidepressants. Conflicting reports have been made on the association of this polymorphism with cancer susceptibility. This disagreement may be attributable to limitations of the phenotyping assay used to identify affected individuals (poor metabolizers, PMs). In order to clarify these anomalies, we have developed a simple DNA-based assay with which we can identify the majority of PMs. The assay is centered around the primary gene defect responsible for the polymorphism, a G to A transition at the junction of intron 3/exon 4 which results in a frame-shift in the resultant mRNA. The frequency of this mutation is 70-80% in PMs. We have studied the frequency of mutated alleles in a control population and in a wide range of cancer patients. No association between this polymorphism and lung cancer susceptibility was observed; however, in other populations of cancer patients some very interesting shifts were found in the proportion of PMs and heterozygotes from that in the normal population. PMID:1486838

  3. Association of cytochrome P450 genetic polymorphisms with neoadjuvant chemotherapy efficacy in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The enzymes of the cytochrome P450 family (CYPs) play an important role in the metabolism of a great variety of anticancer agents; therefore, polymorphisms in genes encoding for metabolizing enzymes and drugs transporters can affect drug efficacy and toxicity. Methods The genetic polymorphisms of cytochrome P450 were studied in 395 patients with breast cancer by RLFP analysis. Results Here, we studied the association of functionally significant variant alleles of CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 with the clinical response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients. A significant correlation was observed between the CYP2C9*2 polymorphism and chemotherapy resistance (OR = 4.64; CI 95% = 1.01 – 20.91), as well as between CYP2C9*2 heterozygotes and chemotherapy resistance in women with nodal forms of breast cancer and a cancer hereditary load (OR = 15.50; CI 95% = 1.08 – 826.12) when the potential combined effects were examined. No significant association between chemotherapy resistance and the other examined genotypes and the potential combined clinical and tumour-related parameters were discovered. Conclusion In conclusion, CYP2C9*2 was associated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy resistance (OR = 4.64; CI 95% = 1.01 – 20.91) in the population of interest. PMID:22702493

  4. Inhibition of human cytochrome P450 enzymes by hops (Humulus lupulus) and hop prenylphenols

    PubMed Central

    Nikolić, Dejan; Chen, Shao-Nong; Huang, Ke; Li, Guannan; Pauli, Guido F.; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    As hops (Humulus lupulus L.) are used in the brewing of beer and by menopausal women as estrogenic dietary supplements, the potential for hop extracts and hop constituents to cause drug-botanical interactions by inhibiting human cytochrome P450 enzymes was investigated. Inhibition of major human cytochrome P450 enzymes by a standardized hop extract and isolated hop prenylated phenols was evaluated using a fast and efficient assay based on ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The hop extract at 5 μg/mL inhibited CYP2C8 (93%), CYP2C9 (88%), CYP2C19 (70%), and CYP1A2 (27%) with IC50 values of 0.8, 0.9, 3.3, and 9.4 μg/mL, respectively, but time-dependent inactivation was observed only for CYP1A2. Isoxanthohumol from hops was the most potent inhibitor of CYP2C8 with an IC50 of 0.2 μM, whereas 8-prenylnaringenin was the most potent inhibitor of CYP1A2, CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 with IC50 values of 1.1 μM, 1.1 μM and 0.4 μM, respectively. Extracts of hops contain prenylated compounds such as the flavanones isoxanthohumol and 8-prenylnaringenin and the chalcone xanthohumol that can inhibit CYP450s, especially the CYP2C family, which may affect the efficacy and safety of some CYP2C substrate drugs when co-administered. PMID:24342125

  5. Blarina brevicauda as a biological monitor of polychlorinated biphenyls: Evaluation of hepatic cytochrome p450 induction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, J.S.; Halbrook, R.S.; Woolf, A.; French, J.B.; Melancon, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    We assessed the value of short-tailed shrews (Blarina brevicauda) as a possible biomonitor for polychlorinated biphenyl pollution through measurement of the induction of hepatic cytochrome P450 and associated enzyme activities. First, we checked the inducibility of four monooxygenases (benzyloxyresorufin-O-dealkylase [BROD], ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase [EROD], methoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase [MROD], and pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase [PROD]) by measuring the activity of these enzymes in hepatic microsomes prepared from shrews injected with $-naphthoflavone ($NF) or phenobarbital (PB), typical inducers of cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) and CYP2B enzyme families, respectively. Enzyme activity was induced in shrews that received $NF but not in shrews that received PB; PROD was not induced by either exposure. Later, shrews were exposed to a mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (Aroclor 1242:1254, in 1:2 ratio) at 0.6, 9.6, and 150 ppm in food, for 31 d. Induction in these shrews was measured by specific enzyme activity (BROD, EROD, and MROD) in hepatic microsomes, by western blotting of solubilized microsomes against antibodies to CYP1A or CYP2B, and by duration of sodium pentobarbital-induced sleep. These three CYP enzymes were induced in shrews by PCBs at similar levels of exposure as in cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus). Neither sleep time nor the amount of CYP2B family protein were affected by PCB exposure. Blarina brevicauda can be a useful biomonitor of PCBs that induce CYP1A, especially in habitats where they are the abundant small mammal.

  6. Blarina brevicauda as a biological monitor of polychlorinated biphenyls: evaluation of hepatic cytochrome P450 induction.

    PubMed

    Russell, Julie S; Halbrook, Richard S; Woolf, Alan; French, John B; Melancon, Mark J

    2004-08-01

    We assessed the value of short-tailed shrews (Blarina brevicauda) as a possible biomonitor for polychlorinated biphenyl pollution through measurement of the induction of hepatic cytochrome P450 and associated enzyme activities. First, we checked the inducibility of four monooxygenases (benzyloxyresorufin-O-dealkylase [BROD], ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase [EROD], methoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase [MROD], and pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase [PROD]) by measuring the activity of these enzymes in hepatic microsomes prepared from shrews injected with beta-naphthoflavone (betaNF) or phenobarbital (PB), typical inducers of cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) and CYP2B enzyme families, respectively. Enzyme activity was induced in shrews that received betaNF but not in shrews that received PB; PROD was not induced by either exposure. Later, shrews were exposed to a mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (Aroclor 1242:1254, in 1:2 ratio) at 0.6, 9.6, and 150 ppm in food, for 31 d. Induction in these shrews was measured by specific enzyme activity (BROD, EROD, and MROD) in hepatic microsomes, by western blotting of solubilized microsomes against antibodies to CYP1A or CYP2B, and by duration of sodium pentobarbital-induced sleep. These three CYP enzymes were induced in shrews by PCBs at similar levels of exposure as in cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus). Neither sleep time nor the amount of CYP2B family protein were affected by PCB exposure. Blarina brevicauda can be a useful biomonitor of PCBs that induce CYP1A, especially in habitats where they are the abundant small mammal. PMID:15352474

  7. Change of the terminal oxidase from cytochrome a1 in shaking cultures to cytochrome o in static cultures of Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, K; Ebisuya, H; Ameyama, M; Adachi, O

    1992-01-01

    Acetobacter aceti has an ability to grow under two different culture conditions, on shaking submerged cultures and on static pellicle-forming cultures. The respiratory chains of A. aceti grown on shaking and static cultures were compared, especially with respect to the terminal oxidase. Little difference was detected in several oxidase activities and in cytochrome b and c contents between the respiratory chains of both types of cells. Furthermore, the results obtained here suggested that the respiratory chains consist of primary dehydrogenases, ubiquinone, and terminal ubiquinol oxidase, regardless of the culture conditions. There was a remarkable difference, however, in the terminal oxidase, which is cytochrome a1 in cells in shaking culture but cytochrome o in cells grown statically. Change of the culture condition from shaking to static caused a change in the terminal oxidase from cytochrome a1 to cytochrome o, which is concomitant with an increase of pellicle on the surface of the static culture. In contrast, reappearance of cytochrome a1 in A. aceti was attained only after serial successive shaking cultures of an original static culture; cytochrome a1 predominated after the culture was repeated five times. In the culture of A. aceti, two different types of cells were observed; one forms a rough-surfaced colony, and the other forms a smooth-surfaced colony. Cells of the former type predominated in the static culture, while the cells of the latter type predominated in the shaking culture. Thus, data suggest that a change of the culture conditions, from static to shaking or vice versa, results in a change of the cell type, which may be related to the change in the terminal oxidase from cytochrome a1 to cytochrome o in A. aceti.

  8. Simultaneously recorded retinal and cerebral potentials to windmill stimulation.

    PubMed

    Dodt, E; Kuba, M

    1995-01-01

    Visual evoked retinal and cerebral potentials were recorded to onset rotation of an isoluminant sectored disc. While the retinal potentials recorded to onset rotation closely resembled the electroretinogram to a checkerboard or stripe pattern of fixed element size, the visual evoked potential changed interindividually and intraindividually from a fast positive wave at high contrasts, velocities and number of windmill segments to a later negative component at low contrasts, velocities and windmill segments. With change in luminance, contrast, speed and extent of rotation field size and number of disc segments, the visual evoked potential was generally less affected than the electroretinogram.

  9. Toxocariasis: A Rare Cause of Multiple Cerebral Infarction.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyun Hee

    2015-06-01

    Toxocariasis is a parasitic infection caused by the roundworms Toxocara canis or Toxocara cati, mostly due to accidental ingestion of embryonated eggs. Clinical manifestations vary and are classified as visceral larva migrans or ocular larva migrans according to the organs affected. Central nervous system involvement is an unusual complication. Here, we report a case of multiple cerebral infarction and concurrent multi-organ involvement due to T. canis infestation of a previous healthy 39-year-old male who was admitted for right leg weakness. After treatment with albendazole, the patient's clinical and laboratory results improved markedly. PMID:26157596

  10. Central neurogenic diabetes insipidus, syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    John, Cynthia A; Day, Michael W

    2012-04-01

    Central neurogenic diabetes insipidus, syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome are secondary events that affect patients with traumatic brain injury. All 3 syndromes affect both sodium and water balance; however, they have differences in pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Differentiating between hypernatremia (central neurogenic diabetes insipidus) and the 2 hyponatremia syndromes (syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome) is critical for preventing worsening neurological outcomes in patients with head injuries.

  11. Lifetime costs of cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Marie; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Madsen, Mette; Uldall, Peter

    2009-08-01

    This study quantified the lifetime costs of cerebral palsy (CP) in a register-based setting. It was the first study outside the US to assess the lifetime costs of CP. The lifetime costs attributable to CP were divided into three categories: health care costs, productivity costs, and social costs. The population analysed was retrieved from the Danish Cerebral Palsy Register, which covers the eastern part of the country and has registered about half of the Danish population of individuals with CP since 1950. For this study we analysed 2367 individuals with CP, who were born in 1930 to 2000 and were alive in 2000. The prevalence of CP in eastern Denmark was approximately 1.7 per 1000. Information on productivity and the use of health care was retrieved from registers. The lifetime cost of CP was about 860,000 euro for men and about 800,000 euro for women. The largest component was social care costs, particularly during childhood. A sensitivity analysis found that alterations in social care costs had a small effect, whereas lowering the discount rate from 5 to 3 per cent markedly increased total lifetime costs. Discounting decreases the value of costs in the future compared with the present. The high social care costs and productivity costs associated with CP point to a potential gain from labour market interventions that benefit individuals with CP. PMID:19416329

  12. Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Ismail A; Wasay, Mohammad

    2016-03-15

    Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, once a common and deadly disease, has fortunately become rare now. Not only that the incidence has fallen significantly after the antibiotic era, the morbidity and mortality has also decreased substantially. Cavernous sinus thrombosis is by far the commonest form of septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Due to its rare occurrence, a lot of current generation clinicians have not encountered the entity in person. Despite all the advances in diagnostic modalities, a high index of clinical suspicion remains the mainstay in prompt diagnosis and management of this potentially lethal condition. Keeping this in view, the authors have reviewed the subject including the old literature and have summarized the current approach to diagnosis and management. Septic cavernous thrombosis is a fulminant disease with dramatic presentation in most cases comprised of fever, periorbital pain and swelling, associated with systemic symptoms and signs. The preceding infection is usually in the central face or paranasal sinuses. The disease rapidly spreads to contralateral side and if remains undiagnosed and untreated can result in severe complications or even death. Prompt diagnosis using radiological imaging in suspected patient, early use of broad spectrum antibiotics, and judicial use of anticoagulation may save the life and prevent disability. Surgery is used only to treat the nidus of infection. PMID:26944152

  13. [Negative symptoms and cerebral imaging].

    PubMed

    Kaladjian, A; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2015-12-01

    A number of neuroanatomical and neurofonctional abnormalities have been evidenced by cerebral imaging studies in patients suffering from schizophrenia. Nevertheless, those specifically associated with the negative symptoms of this disease are still insufficiently known. This work is a review of selected studies that have assessed the brain correlates of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Approaches using structural imaging have highlighted reduction of gray matter density or cortical thickness associated with negative symptoms, which is rather sparsely distributed within the frontal and temporal regions, localized nevertheless more particularly in the frontal medial and orbitofrontal areas, as well as the amygdalo-hippocampic complex. These deficits are concurrent with a loss of integrity of the principal paths of white matter tracts between frontal and limbic regions. On the other hand, neurofonctional abnormalities associated with negative symptoms involve especially the frontal areas and limbic striatum. A disturbed functioning within the fronto-striatal loops, related to a striatal dopaminergic deficit, may represent a potential explanatory hypothesis of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, as suggested by studies using Positron Emission Tomography on this topic or neuroimaging studies on the effects of antipsychotics. A better identification of the cerebral abnormalities associated with the negative dimension of schizophrenia, with regard to the lateralization of these abnormalities or to their changes during the course of the disease, could offer new therapeutic modalities for the treatment of this dimension which, until now, remains few responsive to conventional pharmacological treatments. PMID:26776387

  14. Cerebral lateralization in simultaneous interpretation.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, F; Gran, L; Basso, G; Bava, A

    1990-07-01

    Cerebral asymmetries for L1 (Italian), L2 (English), and L3 (French, German, Spanish, or Russian) were studied, by using a verbal-manual interference paradigm, in a group of Italian right-handed polyglot female students at the Scuola Superiore di Lingue Moderne per Interpreti e Traduttori (SSLM-School for Interpreters and Translators) of the University of Trieste and in a control group of right-handed monolingual female students at the Medical School of the University of Trieste. In an automatic speech production task no significant cerebral lateralization was found for the mother tongue (L1) either in the interpreting students or in the control group; the interpreting students were not significantly lateralized for the third language (L3), while weak left hemispheric lateralization was shown for L2. A significantly higher degree of verbal-manual interference was found for L1 than for L2 and L3. A significantly higher disruption rate occurred in the meaning-based mode of simultaneous interpretation (from L2 into L1 and vice versa) than in the word-for-word mode (from L2 into L1 and vice versa). No significant overall or hemispheric differences were found during simultaneous interpretation from L1 into L2 or from L2 into L1. PMID:2207622

  15. [Cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Milojević, T M; Baljozović, B V; Rakić, M Lj; Nestorović, B D; Dostanić, M M; Milaković, B D; Kojić, Z Z; Repac, N R; Cvrkota, I S

    2008-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm causes permanent neurolological deficit or death occurance in 13% of clinical cases. Peak frequency is from 8-10th day after SAH. The purpose of this study is factor analysis that may have influence on vasospasm development , as well as predictor determination. The study is prospective and analysis 192 patients treated in Institute of Neurosurgery, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Belgrade. The majority of patients were admitted in hospital in first four days after SAH, and 184 had GCS over 7. Univariate methods of factor analysis were used, and for significance of predictors influence testing multivariante regression analysis was used. Vasospasm occurred in 22,40% of all cases. No relationships have been found between sex, age, previous hypertension, timing of surgery, appearance of hydrocephalus and intracerebral hematoma, hypertermia or mean arterial blood pressure, with occurrence of cerebral vasospasm. Factors with significantly associated with the occurance of vasospasm were: hearth disease, hypernatriemia, Hct, clinical grade on admission as well as preoperative clinical grade and Fisher CT scan grade. In the first four days after SAH, Fisher scan grade, preoperative clinical grade and Hct, appeared as predictors. After four days, clinical grade on admission and hypernatiemia, showed as poredictors. PMID:18792575

  16. Evolution of the cytochrome b gene of mammals.

    PubMed

    Irwin, D M; Kocher, T D; Wilson, A C

    1991-02-01

    With the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and versatile primers that amplify the whole cytochrome b gene (approximately 1140 bp), we obtained 17 complete gene sequences representing three orders of hoofed mammals (ungulates) and dolphins (cetaceans). The fossil record of some ungulate lineages allowed estimation of the evolutionary rates for various components of the cytochrome b DNA and amino acid sequences. The relative rates of substitution at first, second, and third positions within codons are in the ratio 10 to 1 to at least 33. For deep divergences (greater than 5 million years) it appears that both replacements and silent transversions in this mitochondrial gene can be used for phylogenetic inference. Phylogenetic findings include the association of (1) cetaceans, artiodactyls, and perissodactyls to the exclusion of elephants and humans, (2) pronghorn and fallow deer to the exclusion of bovids (i.e., cow, sheep, and goat), (3) sheep and goat to the exclusion of other pecorans (i.e., cow, giraffe, deer, and pronghorn), and (4) advanced ruminants to the exclusion of the chevrotain and other artiodactyls. Comparisons of these cytochrome b sequences support current structure-function models for this membrane-spanning protein. That part of the outer surface which includes the Qo redox center is more constrained than the remainder of the molecule, namely, the transmembrane segments and the surface that protrudes into the mitochondrial matrix. Many of the amino acid replacements within the transmembrane segments are exchanges between hydrophobic residues (especially leucine, isoleucine, and valine). Replacement changes at first and second positions of codons approximate a negative binomial distribution, similar to other protein-coding sequences. At four-fold degenerate positions of codons, the nucleotide substitutions approximate a Poisson distribution, implying that the underlying mutational spectrum is random with respect to position. PMID:1901092

  17. Expression of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c2 structural gene.

    PubMed Central

    Brandner, J P; McEwan, A G; Kaplan, S; Donohue, T J

    1989-01-01

    A Rhodobacter sphaeroides mutant (CYCA1) lacking cytochrome c2 (cyt c2) was previously constructed (T. J. Donohue, A. G. McEwan, S. Van Doren, A. R. Crofts, and S. Kaplan, Biochemistry, 27: 1918-1924, 1988) by a combination of in vivo and in vitro molecular genetic techniques. CYCA1 was incapable of photosynthetic growth (PS-); in this presentation, we show that chemoheterotrophically grown CYCA1 contained significant quantities of a high potential soluble c-type cytochrome(s) with an alpha band of approximately 554 nm which had previously gone undetected under these physiological conditions in wild-type cells. In addition, the PS- phenotype of CYCA1 can be complemented in trans with stable low-copy-number (approximately 5 to 9 per R. sphaeroides genome) broad-host-range plasmids containing the wild-type cyt c2 structural gene (cycA) and upstream regulatory sequences. cyt c2 and cycA-specific mRNA levels were elevated in both the wild type and CYCA1 derivatives harboring intact cycA genes in trans, presumably as a result of increased gene dosage. Although photosynthetically grown wild-type cells contained approximately twofold more cycA-specific transcripts than chemoheterotrophically grown cells, there was an approximately four- to sevenfold increase in cyt c2 levels under photosynthetic conditions. Similarly, complemented CYCA1 strains contained between 1.3- and 2.3-fold more cycA mRNA under photosynthetic conditions than under chemoheterotrophic conditions and had 6- to 12-fold higher steady-state levels of cyt c2 under the same physiological conditions. These data are discussed in terms of possible posttranscriptional control over cyt c2. Images PMID:2536660

  18. Regulation of cytochrome P-450Ia1 gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kamps, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanism by which cytochrome P-450IA1 gene expression is induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and various polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins involves an intracellular protein known as the Ah receptor. Within the past few years, a second protein has been identified which binds to certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) but not to the receptor ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-para-dioxin (TCDD). The protein, named the 4S PAH binding protein, has been reported to bind to a site on the DNA in the 5{prime} regulatory region for the cytochrome P-450IA1 gene. This finding led to the hypothesis that the 4S PAH binding protein may be involved in the trans-regulation of this gene. The work presented in this manuscript addressed this hypothesis by (1) screening animals and cell lines for the presence or absence of the Ah receptor and 4S PAH binding protein, (2) screening polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to identify ligands which specifically bind only the 4S protein, (3) determining dose-response curves for TCDD and 4S protein specific ligands in mammalian cell lines, (4) co-administering a 4S binding protein ligand and TCDD in mammalian cell lines to determine the effects of the 4S protein-ligand complex on TCDD-induced cytochrome P-450IA1 expression, and (5) co-administering TCDD and 6-methyl 1,3,8-trichlorodibenzofuran (MCDF), a compound reported to be an antagonist of TCDD-induced benzo(a)pyrene-3-hydroxylase (AHH) activity, to determine whether antagonism occurs at the transcriptional level. The results of gradient assays show that the Ah receptor and the 4S binding protein were expressed in the rat strains which were studied. In the cell lines, H4IIE cells (rat hepatoma expressed only the receptor whereas Hepa1c1c7 cells mouse hepatoma) expressed both proteins.

  19. Dysfunction of mouse cerebral arteries during early aging

    PubMed Central

    Balbi, Matilde; Ghosh, Mitrajit; Longden, Thomas A; Jativa Vega, Max; Gesierich, Benno; Hellal, Farida; Lourbopoulos, Athanasios; Nelson, Mark T; Plesnila, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    Aging leads to a gradual decline in the fidelity of cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses to neuronal activation, resulting in an increased risk for stroke and dementia. However, it is currently unknown when age-related cerebrovascular dysfunction starts or which vascular components and functions are first affected. The aim of this study was to examine the function of microcirculation throughout aging in mice. Microcirculation was challenged by inhalation of 5% and 10% CO2 or by forepaw stimulation in 6-week, 8-month, and 12-month-old FVB/N mice. The resulting dilation of pial vessels and increase in CBF was measured by intravital fluorescence microscopy and laser Doppler fluxmetry, respectively. Neurovascular coupling and astrocytic endfoot Ca2+ were measured in acute brain slices from 18-month-old mice. We did not reveal any changes in CBF after CO2 reactivity up to an age of 12 months. However, direct visualization of pial vessels by in vivo microscopy showed a significant, age-dependent loss of CO2 reactivity starting at 8 months of age. At the same age neurovascular coupling was also significantly affected. These results suggest that aging does not affect cerebral vessel function simultaneously, but starts in pial microvessels months before global changes in CBF are detectable. PMID:26058694

  20. A Conserved Steroid Binding Site in Cytochrome c Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Ling; Mills, Denise A.; Buhrow, Leann; Hiser, Carrie; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh

    2010-09-02

    Micromolar concentrations of the bile salt deoxycholate are shown to rescue the activity of an inactive mutant, E101A, in the K proton pathway of Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase. A crystal structure of the wild-type enzyme reveals, as predicted, deoxycholate bound with its carboxyl group at the entrance of the K path. Since cholate is a known potent inhibitor of bovine oxidase and is seen in a similar position in the bovine structure, the crystallographically defined, conserved steroid binding site could reveal a regulatory site for steroids or structurally related molecules that act on the essential K proton path.