Science.gov

Sample records for affects endothelial function

  1. How mental stress affects endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Toda, Noboru; Nakanishi-Toda, Megumi

    2011-12-01

    Mental stress is an important factor contributing to recognized mechanisms underlying cardiovascular events. Among these, stress-related endothelial dysfunction is an early risk factor that predicts future development of severe cardiovascular disorders. Acute mental stress by a variety of tests impairs endothelial function in humans, although the opposite results have been reported by some investigators. Chronic stress always deteriorates endothelial function in humans and experimental animals. Stress hormones, such as glucocorticoids and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and endothelin-1 liberated in response to mental stress participate in endothelial dysfunction possibly via downregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression, eNOS inactivation, decreased nitric oxide (NO) actions, and increased NO degradation, together with vasoconstriction counteracting against NO-induced vasodilatation. Catecholamines do not directly affect endothelial function but impair its function when blood pressure elevation by the amines is sustained. Endogenous opioids favorably affect endothelial function, which counteract deteriorating effects of other stress hormones and mediators. Inhibition of cortisol and endothelin-1 production, prevention of pro-inflammatory mediator accumulation, hypnotics, mirthful laughter, humor orientation, and lifestyle modification would contribute to the prevention and treatment for stress-related endothelial dysfunction and future serious cardiovascular disease. PMID:21947555

  2. SIRT1 reduces endothelial activation without affecting vascular function in ApoE-/- mice

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Sokrates; Schäfer, Nicola; Breitenstein, Alexander; Besler, Christian; Winnik, Stephan; Lohmann, Christine; Heinrich, Kathrin; Brokopp, Chad E.; Handschin, Christoph; Landmesser, Ulf; Tanner, Felix C.; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Matter, Christian M.

    2010-01-01

    Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) contributes to progression of atherosclerosis, at least in part by causing endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory activation. The class III histone deacetylase SIRT1 has been implicated in extension of lifespan. In the vasculature,SIRT1 gain-of-function using SIRT1 overexpression or activation has been shown to improve endothelial function in mice and rats via stimulation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS). However, the effects of SIRT1 loss-of-function on the endothelium in atherosclerosis remain to be characterized. Thus, we have investigated the endothelial effects of decreased endogenous SIRT1 in hypercholesterolemic ApoE-/- mice. We observed no difference in endothelial relaxation and eNOS (Ser1177) phosphorylation between 20-week old male atherosclerotic ApoE-/- SIRT1+/- and ApoE-/- SIRT1+/+ mice. However, SIRT1 prevented endothelial superoxide production, inhibited NF-κB signaling, and diminished expression of adhesion molecules. Treatment of young hypercholesterolemic ApoE-/- SIRT1+/- mice with lipopolysaccharide to boost NF-κB signaling led to a more pronounced endothelial expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 as compared to ApoE-/- SIRT1+/+ mice. In conclusion, endogenous SIRT1 diminishes endothelial activation in ApoE-/- mice, but does not affect endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. PMID:20606253

  3. Wine and endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Caimi, G; Carollo, C; Lo Presti, R

    2003-01-01

    In recent years many studies have focused on the well-known relationship between wine consumption and cardiovascular risk. Wine exerts its protective effects through various changes in lipoprotein profile, coagulation and fibrinolytic cascades, platelet aggregation, oxidative mechanisms and endothelial function. The last has earned more attention for its implications in atherogenesis. Endothelium regulates vascular tone by a delicate balancing among vasorelaxing (nitric oxide [NO]) and vasoconstrincting (endothelins) factors produced by endothelium in response to various stimuli. In rat models, wine and other grape derivatives exerted an endothelium-dependent vasorelaxing capacity especially associated with the NO-stimulating activity of their polyphenol components. In experimental conditions, reservatrol (a stilbene polyphenol) protected hearts and kidneys from ischemia-reperfusion injury through antioxidant activity and upregulation of NO production. Wine polyphenols are also able to induce the expression of genes involved in the NO pathway within the arterial wall. The effects of wine on endothelial function in humans are not yet clearly understood. A favorable action of red wine or dealcoholized wine extract or purple grape juice on endothelial function has been observed by several authors, but discrimination between ethanol and polyphenol effects is controversial. It is, however likely that regular and prolonged moderate wine drinking positively affects endothelial function. The beneficial effects of wine on cardiovascular health are greater if wine is associated with a healthy diet. The most recent nutritional and epidemiologic studies show that the ideal diet closely resembles the Mediterranean diet. PMID:15134380

  4. Soy provides modest benefits on endothelial function without affecting inflammatory biomarkers in adults at cardiometabolic risk

    PubMed Central

    Reverri, Elizabeth J.; LaSalle, Colette D.; Franke, Adrian A.; Steinberg, Francene M.

    2015-01-01

    Scope Systemic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and oxidative stress are involved in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Epidemiological evidence supports an association between whole soy food consumption and reduced risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The objective of this randomized, controlled, crossover study was to evaluate the effects of soy nut consumption on inflammatory biomarkers and endothelial function and to assess whether isoflavone metabolism to secondary products, equol and/or O-desmethylangolensin (ODMA), modifies these responses. Methods and Results n=17 adults at cardiometabolic risk were randomly assigned to the order of two snack interventions, soy nuts and macronutrient-matched control snack, for four weeks each, separated by a two week washout period. Outcome measures included biomarkers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and glycemic control (ELISA and clinical analyzers), endothelial function and arterial stiffness (peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT)), and isoflavone metabolites (LC-MS/MS). Results revealed that consuming soy nuts improved arterial stiffness as assessed by the augmentation index using PAT (P=0.03), despite lack of improvement in inflammatory biomarkers. Addition of equol and/ODMA production status as covariates did not significantly change these results. Conclusions Soy nuts when added to a usual diet for one month provide some benefit on arterial stiffness in adults at cardiometabolic risk. PMID:25351805

  5. [Endothelial function test].

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Hirofumi

    2015-11-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is thought to have pivotal roles for the development of hypertension, initiation/progression of hypertensive organ damages, and prognosis. In clinical setting, flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) of brachial artery is used as a marker of endothelial function. However, well-trained sonographer is needed to conduct FMD measurement, and therefore, FMD has not been fully standardized (i.e., the reference value of FMD has not been established). Even so, FMD predicts future cardiovascular events. Lifestyle modifications (i.e., smoking cessation, exercise, or weight loss) and antihypertensive medication provide beneficial effects on endothelial function. Thus, FMD have a potential as a useful surrogate marker for the management of hypertension. PMID:26619655

  6. Endothelial RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function

    SciTech Connect

    Asdonk, Tobias; Nickenig, Georg; Zimmer, Sebastian

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation alters HCAEC biology in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPC function is affected by RIG-I stimulation in vitro. -- Abstract: Background: Endothelial dysfunction is a crucial part of the chronic inflammatory atherosclerotic process and is mediated by innate and acquired immune mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that pattern recognition receptors (PRR) specialized in immunorecognition of nucleic acids may play an important role in endothelial biology in a proatherogenic manner. Here, we analyzed the impact of endothelial retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) activation upon vascular endothelial biology. Methods and results: Wild type mice were injected intravenously with 32.5 {mu}g of the RIG-ligand 3pRNA (RNA with triphosphate at the 5 Prime end) or polyA control every other day for 7 days. In 3pRNA-treated mice, endothelium-depended vasodilation was significantly impaired, vascular oxidative stress significantly increased and circulating endothelial microparticle (EMP) numbers significantly elevated compared to controls. To gain further insight in RIG-I dependent endothelial biology, cultured human coronary endothelial cells (HCAEC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) were stimulated in vitro with 3pRNA. Both cells types express RIG-I and react with receptor upregulation upon stimulation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation is enhanced in both cell types, whereas apoptosis and proliferation is not significantly affected in HCAEC. Importantly, HCAEC release significant amounts of proinflammatory cytokines in response to RIG-I stimulation. Conclusion: This study shows that activation of the cytoplasmatic nucleic acid receptor RIG-I leads to endothelial dysfunction. RIG-I induced endothelial damage could therefore be an important pathway in atherogenesis.

  7. Endothelial function and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kinlay, S; Libby, P; Ganz, P

    2001-08-01

    The endothelium produces a number of vasodilator and vasoconstrictor substances that not only regulate vasomotor tone, but also the recruitment and activity of inflammatory cells and the propensity towards thrombosis. Endothelial vasomotor function is a convenient way to assess these other functions, and is related to the long-term risk of cardiovascular disease. Lipids (particularly low density lipoprotein cholesterol) and oxidant stress play a major role in impairing these functions, by reducing the bioavailability of nitric oxide and activating pro-inflammatory signalling pathways such as nuclear factor kappa B. Biomechanical forces on the endothelium, including low shear stress from disturbed blood flow, also activate the endothelium increasing vasomotor dysfunction and promoting inflammation by upregulating pro-atherogenic genes. In contrast, normal laminar shear stress promotes the expression of genes that may protect against atherosclerosis. The sub-cellular structure of endothelial cells includes caveolae that play an integral part in regulating the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Low density lipoprotein cholesterol and oxidant stress impair caveolae structure and function and adversely affect endothelial function. Lipid-independent pathways of endothelial cell activation are increasingly recognized, and may provide new therapeutic targets. Endothelial vasoconstrictors, such as endothelin, antagonize endothelium-derived vasodilators and contribute to endothelial dysfunction. Some but not all studies have linked certain genetic polymorphisms of the nitric oxide synthase enzyme to vascular disease and impaired endothelial function. Such genetic heterogeneity may nonetheless offer new insights into the variability of endothelial function. PMID:11507322

  8. Analysis of endothelial barrier function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuping; Alexander, J Steven

    2011-01-01

    Increased microvascular solute permeability underlies many forms of pathophysiological conditions, including inflammation. Endothelial monolayer cultures provide an excellent model system which allows systemic and mechanistic study of endothelial barrier function and paracellular permeability in vitro. The endothelial-specific complexus adherens junction protein VE-cadherin and their intracellular complex form pericellular structures along the cell borders which are critical to regulate endothelial barrier function by controlling pericellular permeability of vasculature. Here, we describe methods for both visualizing and quantifying junctional permeability and barrier changes in endothelial monolayers in vitro. PMID:21874457

  9. The RNA-binding protein quaking maintains endothelial barrier function and affects VE-cadherin and β-catenin protein expression

    PubMed Central

    de Bruin, Ruben G.; van der Veer, Eric P.; Prins, Jurriën; Lee, Dae Hyun; Dane, Martijn J. C.; Zhang, Huayu; Roeten, Marko K.; Bijkerk, Roel; de Boer, Hetty C.; Rabelink, Ton J.; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; van Gils, Janine M.

    2016-01-01

    Proper regulation of endothelial cell-cell contacts is essential for physiological functioning of the endothelium. Interendothelial junctions are actively involved in the control of vascular leakage, leukocyte diapedesis, and the initiation and progression of angiogenesis. We found that the RNA-binding protein quaking is highly expressed by endothelial cells, and that its expression was augmented by prolonged culture under laminar flow and the transcription factor KLF2 binding to the promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that quaking directly binds to the mRNA of VE-cadherin and β-catenin and can induce mRNA translation mediated by the 3′UTR of these genes. Reduced quaking levels attenuated VE-cadherin and β-catenin expression and endothelial barrier function in vitro and resulted in increased bradykinin-induced vascular leakage in vivo. Taken together, we report that quaking is essential in maintaining endothelial barrier function. Our results provide novel insight into the importance of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling vascular integrity. PMID:26905650

  10. The RNA-binding protein quaking maintains endothelial barrier function and affects VE-cadherin and β-catenin protein expression.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Ruben G; van der Veer, Eric P; Prins, Jurriën; Lee, Dae Hyun; Dane, Martijn J C; Zhang, Huayu; Roeten, Marko K; Bijkerk, Roel; de Boer, Hetty C; Rabelink, Ton J; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; van Gils, Janine M

    2016-01-01

    Proper regulation of endothelial cell-cell contacts is essential for physiological functioning of the endothelium. Interendothelial junctions are actively involved in the control of vascular leakage, leukocyte diapedesis, and the initiation and progression of angiogenesis. We found that the RNA-binding protein quaking is highly expressed by endothelial cells, and that its expression was augmented by prolonged culture under laminar flow and the transcription factor KLF2 binding to the promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that quaking directly binds to the mRNA of VE-cadherin and β-catenin and can induce mRNA translation mediated by the 3'UTR of these genes. Reduced quaking levels attenuated VE-cadherin and β-catenin expression and endothelial barrier function in vitro and resulted in increased bradykinin-induced vascular leakage in vivo. Taken together, we report that quaking is essential in maintaining endothelial barrier function. Our results provide novel insight into the importance of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling vascular integrity. PMID:26905650

  11. The challenging environment on board the International Space Station affects endothelial cell function by triggering oxidative stress through thioredoxin interacting protein overexpression: the ESA-SPHINX experiment.

    PubMed

    Versari, Silvia; Longinotti, Giulia; Barenghi, Livia; Maier, Jeanette Anne Marie; Bradamante, Silvia

    2013-11-01

    Exposure to microgravity generates alterations that are similar to those involved in age-related diseases, such as cardiovascular deconditioning, bone loss, muscle atrophy, and immune response impairment. Endothelial dysfunction is the common denominator. To shed light on the underlying mechanism, we participated in the Progress 40P mission with Spaceflight of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs): an Integrated Experiment (SPHINX), which consisted of 12 in-flight and 12 ground-based control modules and lasted 10 d. Postflight microarray analysis revealed 1023 significantly modulated genes, the majority of which are involved in cell adhesion, oxidative phosphorylation, stress responses, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Thioredoxin-interacting protein was the most up-regulated (33-fold), heat-shock proteins 70 and 90 the most down-regulated (5.6-fold). Ion channels (TPCN1, KCNG2, KCNJ14, KCNG1, KCNT1, TRPM1, CLCN4, CLCA2), mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and focal adhesion were widely affected. Cytokine detection in the culture media indicated significant increased secretion of interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β. Nitric oxide was found not modulated. Our data suggest that in cultured HUVECs, microgravity affects the same molecular machinery responsible for sensing alterations of flow and generates a prooxidative environment that activates inflammatory responses, alters endothelial behavior, and promotes senescence. PMID:23913861

  12. Novel regulators of endothelial barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Krishnan; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial barrier function is an essential and tightly regulated process that ensures proper compartmentalization of the vascular and interstitial space, while allowing for the diffusive exchange of small molecules and the controlled trafficking of macromolecules and immune cells. Failure to control endothelial barrier integrity results in excessive leakage of fluid and proteins from the vasculature that can rapidly become fatal in scenarios such as sepsis or the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding on the regulation of endothelial permeability, with a specific focus on the endothelial glycocalyx and endothelial scaffolds, regulatory intracellular signaling cascades, as well as triggers and mediators that either disrupt or enhance endothelial barrier integrity, and provide our perspective as to areas of seeming controversy and knowledge gaps, respectively. PMID:25381026

  13. Blood cells and endothelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Stephen F; Granger, D Neil

    2015-01-01

    The barrier properties of endothelial cells are critical for the maintenance of water and protein balance between the intravascular and extravascular compartments. An impairment of endothelial barrier function has been implicated in the genesis and/or progression of a variety of pathological conditions, including pulmonary edema, ischemic stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, angioedema, sepsis and cancer. The altered barrier function in these conditions is often linked to the release of soluble mediators from resident cells (e.g., mast cells, macrophages) and/or recruited blood cells. The interaction of the mediators with receptors expressed on the surface of endothelial cells diminishes barrier function either by altering the expression of adhesive proteins in the inter-endothelial junctions, by altering the organization of the cytoskeleton, or both. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteolytic enzymes (e.g., matrix metalloproteinase, elastase), oncostatin M, and VEGF are part of a long list of mediators that have been implicated in endothelial barrier failure. In this review, we address the role of blood borne cells, including, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and platelets, in the regulation of endothelial barrier function in health and disease. Attention is also devoted to new targets for therapeutic intervention in disease states with morbidity and mortality related to endothelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:25838983

  14. Blood cells and endothelial barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Stephen F; Granger, D Neil

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The barrier properties of endothelial cells are critical for the maintenance of water and protein balance between the intravascular and extravascular compartments. An impairment of endothelial barrier function has been implicated in the genesis and/or progression of a variety of pathological conditions, including pulmonary edema, ischemic stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, angioedema, sepsis and cancer. The altered barrier function in these conditions is often linked to the release of soluble mediators from resident cells (e.g., mast cells, macrophages) and/or recruited blood cells. The interaction of the mediators with receptors expressed on the surface of endothelial cells diminishes barrier function either by altering the expression of adhesive proteins in the inter-endothelial junctions, by altering the organization of the cytoskeleton, or both. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteolytic enzymes (e.g., matrix metalloproteinase, elastase), oncostatin M, and VEGF are part of a long list of mediators that have been implicated in endothelial barrier failure. In this review, we address the role of blood borne cells, including, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and platelets, in the regulation of endothelial barrier function in health and disease. Attention is also devoted to new targets for therapeutic intervention in disease states with morbidity and mortality related to endothelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:25838983

  15. Endothelial microparticles: Sophisticated vesicles modulating vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Anne M; Edelberg, Jay; Jonas, Rebecca; Rogers, Wade T; Moore, Jonni S; Syed, Wajihuddin; Mohler, Emile R

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial microparticles (EMPs) belong to a family of extracellular vesicles that are dynamic, mobile, biological effectors capable of mediating vascular physiology and function. The release of EMPs can impart autocrine and paracrine effects on target cells through surface interaction, cellular fusion, and, possibly, the delivery of intra-vesicular cargo. A greater understanding of the formation, composition, and function of EMPs will broaden our understanding of endothelial communication and may expose new pathways amenable for therapeutic manipulation. PMID:23892447

  16. Coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is expressed in lymphatic vessels in human skin and affects lymphatic endothelial cell function in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Vigl, Benjamin; Zgraggen, Claudia; Rehman, Nadia; Banziger-Tobler, Nadia E.; Detmar, Michael; Halin, Cornelia

    2009-01-15

    Lymphatic vessels play an important role in tissue fluid homeostasis, intestinal fat absorption and immunosurveillance. Furthermore, they are involved in pathologic conditions, such as tumor cell metastasis and chronic inflammation. In comparison to blood vessels, the molecular phenotype of lymphatic vessels is less well characterized. Performing comparative gene expression analysis we have recently found that coxsackie- and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is significantly more highly expressed in cultured human, skin-derived lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), as compared to blood vascular endothelial cells. Here, we have confirmed these results at the protein level, using Western blot and FACS analysis. Immunofluorescence performed on human skin confirmed that CAR is expressed at detectable levels in lymphatic vessels, but not in blood vessels. To address the functional significance of CAR expression, we modulated CAR expression levels in cultured LECs in vitro by siRNA- and vector-based transfection approaches. Functional assays performed with the transfected cells revealed that CAR is involved in distinct cellular processes in LECs, such as cell adhesion, migration, tube formation and the control of vascular permeability. In contrast, no effect of CAR on LEC proliferation was observed. Overall, our data suggest that CAR stabilizes LEC-LEC interactions in the skin and may contribute to lymphatic vessel integrity.

  17. The endothelial glycocalyx: composition, functions, and visualization

    PubMed Central

    Reitsma, Sietze; Slaaf, Dick W.; Vink, Hans; van Zandvoort, Marc A. M. J.

    2007-01-01

    This review aims at presenting state-of-the-art knowledge on the composition and functions of the endothelial glycocalyx. The endothelial glycocalyx is a network of membrane-bound proteoglycans and glycoproteins, covering the endothelium luminally. Both endothelium- and plasma-derived soluble molecules integrate into this mesh. Over the past decade, insight has been gained into the role of the glycocalyx in vascular physiology and pathology, including mechanotransduction, hemostasis, signaling, and blood cell–vessel wall interactions. The contribution of the glycocalyx to diabetes, ischemia/reperfusion, and atherosclerosis is also reviewed. Experimental data from the micro- and macrocirculation alludes at a vasculoprotective role for the glycocalyx. Assessing this possible role of the endothelial glycocalyx requires reliable visualization of this delicate layer, which is a great challenge. An overview is given of the various ways in which the endothelial glycocalyx has been visualized up to now, including first data from two-photon microscopic imaging. PMID:17256154

  18. Effect of Orthostasis on Endothelial Function: A Gender Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Nandu; Gorur, Paavan; Pilsl, Ulrike; Anyaehie, Bond; Green, David A.; Bondarenko, Alexander I.; Roessler, Andreas; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut G.

    2013-01-01

    As the vascular endothelium has multiple functions, including regulation of vascular tone, it may play a role in the pathophysiology of orthostatic intolerance. We investigated the effect of orthostasis on endothelial function using EndoPAT®, a non-invasive and user-independent method, and across gender. As sex steroid hormones are known to affect endothelial function, this study examined the potential effect of these hormones on the endothelial response to orthostasis by including females at different phases of the menstrual cycle (follicular and luteal—where the hormone balance differs), and females taking an oral contraceptive. A total of 31 subjects took part in this study (11 males, 11 females having normal menstrual cycles and 9 females taking oral contraceptive). Each subject made two visits for testing; in the case of females having normal menstrual cycles the first session was conducted either 1–7 (follicular) or 14–21 days (luteal) after the start of menstruation, and the second session two weeks later, i.e., during the other phase, respectively. Endothelial function was assessed at baseline and following a 20-min orthostatic challenge (active standing). The EndoPAT® index increased from 1.71 ± 0.09 (mean ± SEM) at baseline to 2.07 ± 0.09 following orthostasis in females (p<0.001). In males, the index increased from 1.60 ± 0.08 to 1.94 ± 0.13 following orthostasis (p<0.001). There were no significant differences, however, in the endothelial response to orthostasis between females and males, menstrual cycle phases and the usage of oral contraceptive. Our results suggest an increased vasodilatatory endothelial response following orthostasis in both females and males. The effect of gender and sex hormones on the endothelial response to orthostasis appears limited. Further studies are needed to determine the potential role of this post orthostasis endothelial response in the pathophysiology of orthostatic intolerance. PMID:24147147

  19. N-3 Polyunsaturated fatty acid therapy improves endothelial function and affects adiponectin and resistin balance in the first month after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Mizia-Stec, Katarzyna; Haberka, Maciej; Mizia, Magdalena; Chmiel, Artur; Gieszczyk, Klaudia; Lasota, Bartosz; Janowska, Joanna; Zahorska-Markiewicz, Barbara; Gąsior, Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    Introduction N-3 Polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) exert clinical beneficial effects in patients after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, their exact mechanisms of action are not well recognized yet. Our aim was to evaluate effects of early introduced n-3 PUFA supplementation on endothelial function and serum adipokine concentrations in patients with AMI. Material and methods Thirty-eight patients with AMI and successful coronary stent implantation were randomized to the study group (PUFA group: n = 19; standard therapy + PUFA 1 g daily) and the control group (control group: n = 19; standard therapy). The study group patients were given n-3 PUFA (Omacor 1 g daily) starting from the 3rd day of AMI. Ultrasound vascular indexes (flow-mediated dilatation [FMD], nitroglycerine-mediated dilation [NMD]) and serum concentrations of adiponectin and resistin (ELISA) were evaluated before and after 30 days of pharmacotherapy. Results Comparison of the mean delta values (baseline/after 30 days of therapy) between groups revealed significant differences for delta FMD (PUFA 7.6 ±12.4% vs. control –1.7 ±10.5%, p = 0.019) and delta resistin concentrations (PUFA 1.0 ±3.8pg/ml vs. control –1.6 ±2.9pg/ml, p = 0.028). Multiple linear regression analysis for all subjects revealed the n-3 PUFA supplementation (r = 10.933, p = 0.004) and waist circumference (r = –0.467, p = 0.01) as independent factors associated with delta FMD values (R-adjusted 0.29; p = 0.002). Conclusions Early and short-term n-3 PUFA supplementation in AMI with successful primary PCI and optimal pharmacotherapy improves endothelial function. However, increased resistin serum levels observed after 1-month n-3 PUFA supplementation merits further investigations. PMID:22291823

  20. Aging and vascular endothelial function in humans

    PubMed Central

    SEALS, Douglas R.; JABLONSKI, Kristen L.; DONATO, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Advancing age is the major risk factor for the development of CVD (cardiovascular diseases). This is attributable, in part, to the development of vascular endothelial dysfunction, as indicated by reduced peripheral artery EDD (endothelium-dependent dilation) in response to chemical [typically ACh (acetylcholine)] or mechanical (intravascular shear) stimuli. Reduced bioavailability of the endothelium-synthesized dilating molecule NO (nitric oxide) as a result of oxidative stress is the key mechanism mediating reduced EDD with aging. Vascular oxidative stress increases with age as a consequence of greater production of reactive oxygen species (e.g. superoxide) without a compensatory increase in antioxidant defences. Sources of increased superoxide production include up-regulation of the oxidant enzyme NADPH oxidase, uncoupling of the normally NO-producing enzyme, eNOS (endothelial NO synthase) (due to reduced availability of the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin) and increased mitochondrial synthesis during oxidative phosphorylation. Increased bioactivity of the potent endothelial-derived constricting factor ET-1 (endothelin-1), reduced endothelial production of/responsiveness to dilatory prostaglandins, the development of vascular inflammation, formation of AGEs (advanced glycation end-products), an increased rate of endothelial apoptosis and reduced expression of oestrogen receptor α (in postmenopausal females) also probably contribute to impaired EDD with aging. Several lifestyle and biological factors modulate vascular endothelial function with aging, including regular aerobic exercise, dietary factors (e.g. processed compared with non-processed foods), body weight/fatness, vitamin D status, menopause/oestrogen deficiency and a number of conventional and non-conventional risk factors for CVD. Given the number of older adults now and in the future, more information is needed on effective strategies for the prevention and treatment of vascular endothelial aging. PMID

  1. Chromogranin A and the endothelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Corti, A; Ferrero, E

    2012-01-01

    Chromogranin A (CgA) is an acidic glycoprotein belonging to a family of regulated secretory proteins stored in the dense core granules of many neuroendocrine cells and neurons. This protein is produced, in certain conditions also by cardiomyocytes, keratinocytes and granulocytes. Upon secretion CgA is released in the extracellular environment and then in circulation. Increased levels of circulating CgA have been detected in patients with cancer, heart failure, hypertension, atrophic gastritis, renal failure, giant cell artheritis, rheumatoid arthritis, sepsis and other inflammatory diseases. Endothelial cells, either those located in the close proximity of secretory cells or in distant tissues, may be exposed, therefore, to variable levels of CgA. In this review we discuss recent findings that implicate CgA and its fragments as a modulators of the physiology of endothelial cells in normal and in pathological conditions. In particular, we review data that suggest that CgA and its N-terminal fragment, called vasostatin-1, are important modulators of the endothelial barrier function and potent inhibitors of the endothelial cell activation caused by inflammatory and pro-angiogenic cytokines, with potential implications in angiogenesis, inflammation and cancer. PMID:22834794

  2. Arterial endothelial function measurement method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Budinger, Thomas F

    2014-03-04

    A "relaxoscope" (100) detects the degree of arterial endothelial function. Impairment of arterial endothelial function is an early event in atherosclerosis and correlates with the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. An artery (115), such as the brachial artery (BA) is measured for diameter before and after several minutes of either vasoconstriction or vasorelaxation. The change in arterial diameter is a measure of flow-mediated vasomodification (FMVM). The relaxoscope induces an artificial pulse (128) at a superficial radial artery (115) via a linear actuator (120). An ultrasonic Doppler stethoscope (130) detects this pulse 10-20 cm proximal to the point of pulse induction (125). The delay between pulse application and detection provides the pulse transit time (PTT). By measuring PTT before (160) and after arterial diameter change (170), FMVM may be measured based on the changes in PTT caused by changes in vessel caliber, smooth muscle tone and wall thickness.

  3. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Leopold, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism has been associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular reactivity in patients with hypertension or congestive heart failure. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists spironolactone and eplerenone have been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality, in part, by ameliorating the adverse effects of aldosterone on vascular function. Although spironolactone and eplerenone are increasingly utilized in patients with cardiovascular disease, widespread clinical use is limited by the development of gynecomastia with spironolactone and hyperkalemia with both agents. This suggests that the development of newer agents with favorable side effect profiles is warranted. PMID:18729003

  4. The relationship between oxidised LDL, endothelial progenitor cells and coronary endothelial function in patients with CHD

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Jonathan; Kennedy, Simon; Ahmed, Nadeem; Hayhurst, James; McClure, John D; Berry, Colin; Wadsworth, Roger M; Oldroyd, Keith G

    2016-01-01

    Objective The balance between coronary endothelial dysfunction and repair is influenced by many protective and deleterious factors circulating in the blood. We studied the relationship between oxidised low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and coronary endothelial function in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods 33 patients with stable CHD were studied. Plasma oxLDL was measured using ELISA, coronary endothelial function was assessed using intracoronary acetylcholine infusion and EPCs were quantified using flow cytometry for CD34+/KDR+ cells. Results Plasma oxLDL correlated positively with the number of EPCs in the blood (r=0.46, p=0.02). There was a positive correlation between the number of circulating EPCs and coronary endothelial function (r=0.42, p=0.04). There was no significant correlation between oxLDL and coronary endothelial function. Conclusions Plasma levels of oxLDL are associated with increased circulating EPCs in the blood of patients with CHD, which may reflect a host-repair response to endothelial injury. Patients with stable CHD had a high prevalence of coronary endothelial dysfunction, which was associated with lower numbers of circulating EPCs, suggesting a mechanistic link between endothelial dysfunction and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:26848395

  5. The role of BMPs in endothelial cell function and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Laura A; Pi, Xinchun; Patterson, Cam

    2014-09-01

    The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family of proteins has a multitude of roles throughout the body. In embryonic development, BMPs promote endothelial specification and subsequent venous differentiation. The BMP pathway also plays important roles in the adult vascular endothelium, promoting angiogenesis and mediating shear and oxidative stress. The canonical BMP pathway functions through the Smad transcription factors; however, other intracellular signaling cascades can be activated, and receptor complexes beyond the traditional type I and type II receptors add additional layers of regulation. Dysregulated BMP signaling has been linked to vascular diseases including pulmonary hypertension and atherosclerosis. This review addresses recent advances in the roles of BMP signaling in the endothelium and how BMPs affect endothelial dysfunction and human disease. PMID:24908616

  6. Structure and function of endothelial caveolae.

    PubMed

    Stan, Radu-Virgil

    2002-06-01

    Caveolae are spherical invaginations of the plasma membrane and associated vesicles that are found at high surface densities in most cells, endothelia included. Their structural framework has been shown to consist of oligomerized caveolin molecules interacting with cholesterol and sphingolipids. Caveolae have been involved in many cellular functions such as endocytosis, signal transduction, mechano-transduction, potocytosis, and cholesterol trafficking. Some confusion still persists in the field with respect to the relationship between caveolae and the lipid rafts, which have been involved in many of the above functions. In addition to all these, endothelial caveolae have been involved in capillary permeability by their participation in the process of transcytosis. This short review will focus on their structure and components, methods used to determine these components, and the role of caveolae in the transendothelial exchanges between blood plasma and the interstitial fluid. PMID:12112442

  7. [Vasomotor Endothelial Function in Healthy Individuals: Contact Types of Character].

    PubMed

    Kirichuk, V F; Olenko, E S; Kodochigova, A I; Barylnik, Y B; Deeva, M A; Bazhenov, V A

    2015-01-01

    We studied the vascular endothelial vasomotor function in healthy young individuals, depending on the type of character accentuation, levels of neuroticism, depression and anxiety. It is shown that the types of character accentuation effect on endothelial vasomotor function in healthy men and women. Personality characteristics of a person can be a significant risk factor for disease, the pathogenesis of which is the starting element of endothelial vasomotor dysfunction. PMID:26237954

  8. MicroRNAs and Endothelial (Dys) Function.

    PubMed

    Santulli, Gaetano

    2016-08-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that microRNAs (miRs)-non-coding RNAs that can regulate gene expression via translational repression and/or post-transcriptional degradation-are becoming one of the most fascinating areas of physiology, given their fundamental roles in countless pathophysiological processes. The relative roles of different miRs in vascular biology as direct or indirect post-transcriptional regulators of fundamental genes implied in vascular remodeling designate miRs as potential biomarkers and/or promising drug targets. The mechanistic importance of miRs in modulating endothelial cell (EC) function in physiology and in disease is addressed here. Drawbacks of currently available therapeutic options are also discussed, pointing at the challenges and clinical opportunities provided by miR-based treatments. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1638-1644, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26627535

  9. Immunological functions of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Knolle, Percy A; Wohlleber, Dirk

    2016-05-01

    Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) line the liver sinusoids and separate passenger leukocytes in the sinusoidal lumen from hepatocytes. LSECs further act as a platform for adhesion of various liver-resident immune cell populations such as Kupffer cells, innate lymphoid cells or liver dendritic cells. In addition to having an extraordinary scavenger function, LSECs possess potent immune functions, serving as sentinel cells to detect microbial infection through pattern recognition receptor activation and as antigen (cross)-presenting cells. LSECs cross-prime naive CD8 T cells, causing their rapid differentiation into memory T cells that relocate to secondary lymphoid tissues and provide protection when they re-encounter the antigen during microbial infection. Cross-presentation of viral antigens by LSECs derived from infected hepatocytes triggers local activation of effector CD8 T cells and thereby assures hepatic immune surveillance. The immune function of LSECs complements conventional immune-activating mechanisms to accommodate optimal immune surveillance against infectious microorganisms while preserving the integrity of the liver as a metabolic organ. PMID:27041636

  10. Non-Smoking Tobacco Affects Endothelial Function in Healthy Men in One of the Largest Health Studies Ever Performed; The Nord-Trøndelag Health Study in Norway; HUNT3

    PubMed Central

    Aspenes, Stian Thoresen; Ellingsen, Øyvind

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral tobacco (snuff) is taking a large market share in Scandinavia, especially with young users. However, long-term health effects are unknown. Small studies show association between snuff and reduced endothelial function, representing an early stage of vascular injury that often precedes manifest cardiovascular disease by several years. We therefore determined the associations between snuff and endothelial function in a large sample of healthy Norwegian men. Methods and Design In the Fitness substudy of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT3), endothelial function was measured by flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Aerobic fitness was measured by peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak). A cross-sectional design including 1 592 self-reported healthy men compared these observations with records of present tobacco use, standard cardiovascular risk factors, and socioeconomic status, using general linear models. Results FMD was lower in snuff users (FMD: 4.12%, 3.63, 4.61) compared to non-users (FMD: 4.52%, 4.27, 4.78) after adjustment for age (difference: -0.57%, -1.12, -0.01). After further adjustment for potential confounders, FMD still tended to be lower in snuff users than in non-users (difference: -0.53%, -1.09, 0.02). This difference was even more pronounced in the inactive snuff users (-0.83%, -1.59, -0.06) and in the low fit snuff users (-0.74%, CI -0.55, 0.079). Conclusions Oral tobacco is associated with a tendency towards reduced endothelial function, indicating vascular changes that precede cardiovascular disease. The strongest associations were found in men with low physical activity or reduced aerobic fitness. PMID:27490361

  11. Metformin restores endothelial function in aorta of diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Sena, Cristina M; Matafome, Paulo; Louro, Teresa; Nunes, Elsa; Fernandes, Rosa; Seiça, Raquel M

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The effects of metformin, an antidiabetic agent that improves insulin sensitivity, on endothelial function have not been fully elucidated. This study was designed to assess the effect of metformin on impaired endothelial function, oxidative stress, inflammation and advanced glycation end products formation in type 2 diabetes mellitus. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, an animal model of nonobese type 2 diabetes, fed with normal and high-fat diet during 4 months were treated with metformin for 4 weeks before evaluation. Systemic oxidative stress, endothelial function, insulin resistance, nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, glycation and vascular oxidative stress were determined in the aortic rings of the different groups. A pro-inflammatory biomarker the chemokine CCL2 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) was also evaluated. KEY RESULTS High-fat fed GK rats with hyperlipidaemia showed increased vascular and systemic oxidative stress and impaired endothelial-dependent vasodilatation. Metformin treatment significantly improved glycation, oxidative stress, CCL2 levels, NO bioavailability and insulin resistance and normalized endothelial function in aorta. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Metformin restores endothelial function and significantly improves NO bioavailability, glycation and oxidative stress in normal and high-fat fed GK rats. This supports the concept of the central role of metformin as a first-line therapeutic to treat diabetic patients in order to protect against endothelial dysfunction associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:21250975

  12. Effects of metformin on endothelial function in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    WU, SONGLIN; LI, XIAOYAN; ZHANG, HONGMING

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of metformin on endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In total, 93 patients with T2DM and dissatisfactory glycemic control were randomly assigned to the metformin and pioglitazone groups and changes in vascular endothelial function were subsequently observed. Blood sugar levels and the insulin resistance (IR) index of the patients prior to treatment were lower than those following 12 months of treatment. In addition, fasting and postprandial insulin levels and the insulin function index were higher compared with those obtained following 12 months of treatment (P<0.05). Following 12 months of treatment, the body mass index (BMI) in the metformin group was lower than that in the pioglitazone group (P<0.05). Vascular endothelial function had improved in the groups following 12 months of treatment, when compared with the levels prior to treatment (P<0.05). Following 12 months of treatment, endothelial function in the metformin group had improved markedly compared with that in the pioglitazone group (P<0.05). Therefore, the administration of metformin and pioglitazone in patients with T2DM may improve insulin function, reduce the role of IR and improve endothelial function. Metformin is more successful than pioglitazone in reducing BMI and improving endothelial function. PMID:24940437

  13. Vascular endothelial function of patients with stable coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Yang, Xinchun; Cai, Jun; Shi, Hui; Zhong, Guangzhen; Chi, Hongjie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate vascular endothelial function and contributing factors in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients. Methods: One hundred twenty six CHD outpatients were randomly recruited. Reactive hyperemia index (RHI) <1.67 indicates endothelial dysfunction. Correlation between RHI and different biochemical parameters was evaluated. Results: RHI in patients receiving statins treatment was significantly higher than patients without statins treatment (P<0.05). RHI in patients with more than 3 risk factors for CHD was also markedly lower than that in patients with ≤2 risk factors (P<0.05). Patients with lesions at several branches of coronary artery had a markedly lower RHI when compared with those with coronary lesions at a single branch (P<0.05). For patients without statins treatment, RHI increased significantly after statins treatment for 1 month (P=0.01). In patients with endothelial dysfunction, FBG, HbA1C, hs-CRP and Hcy were significantly higher than those in patients with normal endothelial function (P<0.05 for all). Smokers with CHD had a remarkably lower RHI when compared with non-smokers (P<0.05). Conclusions: Smoking, FBG, HbA1C, Hcy and hs-CRP are significantly associated with endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial dysfunction is also related to the numbers of risk factors for CHD, degree of coronary lesions and statins. Statins treatment may significantly improve the endothelial function of CHD patients. PMID:26150839

  14. Regulation of brain endothelial barrier function by microRNAs in health and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Ramirez, Miguel Alejandro; Reijerkerk, Arie; de Vries, Helga E; Romero, Ignacio Andres

    2016-08-01

    Brain endothelial cells constitute the major cellular element of the highly specialized blood-brain barrier (BBB) and thereby contribute to CNS homeostasis by restricting entry of circulating leukocytes and blood-borne molecules into the CNS. Therefore, compromised function of brain endothelial cells has serious consequences for BBB integrity. This has been associated with early events in the pathogenesis of several disorders that affect the CNS, such as multiple sclerosis, HIV-associated neurologic disorder, and stroke. Recent studies demonstrate that brain endothelial microRNAs play critical roles in the regulation of BBB function under normal and neuroinflammatory conditions. This review will focus on emerging evidence that indicates that brain endothelial microRNAs regulate barrier function and orchestrate various phases of the neuroinflammatory response, including endothelial activation in response to cytokines as well as restoration of inflamed endothelium into a quiescent state. In particular, we discuss novel microRNA regulatory mechanisms and their contribution to cellular interactions at the neurovascular unit that influence the overall function of the BBB in health and during neuroinflammation.-Lopez-Ramirez, M. A., Reijerkerk, A., de Vries, H. E., Romero, I. A. Regulation of brain endothelial barrier function by microRNAs in health and neuroinflammation. PMID:27118674

  15. Mechanotransduction at the basis of endothelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Gulino-Debrac, Danielle

    2013-04-01

    Destabilization of cell-cell contacts involved in the maintenance of endothelial barrier function can lead to increased endothelial permeability. This increase in endothelial permeability results in an anarchical movement of fluid, solutes and cells outside the vasculature and into the surrounding tissues, thereby contributing to various diseases such as stroke or pulmonary edema. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating endothelial cell junction integrity is required for developing new therapies for these diseases. In this review, we describe the mechanotransduction mechanism at the basis of adherens junction strengthening at endothelial cell-cell contacts. More particularly, we report on the emerging role of α-catenin and EPLIN that act as a mechanotransmitter of myosin-IIgenerated traction forces. The interplay between α-catenin, EPLIN and the myosin-II machinery initiates the junctional recruitment of vinculin and α-actinin leading to a drastic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton and to cortical actin ring reshaping. The pathways initiated by tyrosine phosphorylation of VE-cadherin at the basis of endothelial cell-cell junction remodeling is also reported, as it may be interrelated to α-catenin/ EPLIN-mediated mechanotransduction mechanisms. We also describe the junctional mechanosensory complex composed of PECAM-1, VE-cadherin and VEGFR2 that is able to transmit signaling pathway under the onset of shear stress. This mechanosensing mechanism, involved in the earliest events promoting atherogenesis, is required for endothelial cell alignment along flow direction. PMID:24665386

  16. Endothelial Jagged1 promotes solid tumor growth through both pro-angiogenic and angiocrine functions

    PubMed Central

    Pedrosa, Ana-Rita; Trindade, Alexandre; Carvalho, Catarina; Graça, José; Carvalho, Sandra; Peleteiro, Maria C.; Adams, Ralf H.; Duarte, António

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential process required for tumor growth and progression. The Notch signaling pathway has been identified as a key regulator of the neo-angiogenic process. Jagged-1 (Jag1) is a Notch ligand required for embryonic and retinal vascular development, which direct contribution to the regulation of tumor angiogenesis remains to be fully characterized. The current study addresses the role of endothelial Jagged1-mediated Notch signaling in the context of tumoral angiogenesis in two different mouse tumor models: subcutaneous Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumor transplants and the autochthonous Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP). The role of endothelial Jagged1 in tumor growth and neo-angiogenesis was investigated with endothelial-specific Jag1 gain- and loss-of-function mouse mutants (eJag1OE and eJag1cKO). By modulating levels of endothelial Jag1, we observed that this ligand regulates tumor vessel density, branching, and perivascular maturation, thus affecting tumor vascular perfusion. The pro-angiogenic function is exerted by its ability to positively regulate levels of Vegfr-2 while negatively regulating Vegfr-1. Additionally, endothelial Jagged1 appears to exert an angiocrine function possibly by activating Notch3/Hey1 in tumor cells, promoting proliferation, survival and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), potentiating tumor development. These findings provide valuable mechanistic insights into the role of endothelial Jagged1 in promoting solid tumor development and support the notion that it may constitute a promising target for cancer therapy. PMID:26213336

  17. Lonidamine Causes Inhibition of Angiogenesis-Related Endothelial Cell Functions1

    PubMed Central

    Del Bufalo, Donatella; Trisciuoglio, Daniela; Scarsella, Marco; D'Amati, Giulia; Candiloro, Antonio; Iervolino, Angela; Leonetti, Carlo; Zupi, Gabriella

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to assess whether lonidamine (LND) interferes with some steps in angiogenesis progression. We report here, for the first time, that LND inhibited angiogenic-related endothelial cell functions in a dose-dependent manner (1–50 µg/ml). In particular, LND decreased proliferation, migration, invasion, and morphogenesis on matrigel of different endothelial cell lines. Zymographic and Western blot analysis assays showed that LND treatment produced a reduction in the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase- 2 and metalloproteinase-9 by endothelial cells. Vessel formation in a matrigel plug was also reduced by LND. The viability, migration, invasion, and matrix metalloproteinase production of different tumor cell lines were not affected by low doses of LND (1–10 µg/ml), whereas 50 µg/ml LND, which corresponds to the dose used in clinical management of tumors, triggered apoptosis both in endothelial and tumor cells. Together, these data demonstrate that LND is a compound that interferes with endothelial cell functions, both at low and high doses. Thus, the effect of LND on endothelial cell functions, previously undescribed, may be a significant contributor to the antitumor effect of LND observed for clinical management of solid tumors. PMID:15548359

  18. Endothelial Jagged1 promotes solid tumor growth through both pro-angiogenic and angiocrine functions.

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Ana-Rita; Trindade, Alexandre; Carvalho, Catarina; Graça, José; Carvalho, Sandra; Peleteiro, Maria C; Adams, Ralf H; Duarte, António

    2015-09-15

    Angiogenesis is an essential process required for tumor growth and progression. The Notch signaling pathway has been identified as a key regulator of the neo-angiogenic process. Jagged-1 (Jag1) is a Notch ligand required for embryonic and retinal vascular development, which direct contribution to the regulation of tumor angiogenesis remains to be fully characterized. The current study addresses the role of endothelial Jagged1-mediated Notch signaling in the context of tumoral angiogenesis in two different mouse tumor models: subcutaneous Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumor transplants and the autochthonous Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP). The role of endothelial Jagged1 in tumor growth and neo-angiogenesis was investigated with endothelial-specific Jag1 gain- and loss-of-function mouse mutants (eJag1OE and eJag1cKO). By modulating levels of endothelial Jag1, we observed that this ligand regulates tumor vessel density, branching, and perivascular maturation, thus affecting tumor vascular perfusion. The pro-angiogenic function is exerted by its ability to positively regulate levels of Vegfr-2 while negatively regulating Vegfr-1. Additionally, endothelial Jagged1 appears to exert an angiocrine function possibly by activating Notch3/Hey1 in tumor cells, promoting proliferation, survival and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), potentiating tumor development. These findings provide valuable mechanistic insights into the role of endothelial Jagged1 in promoting solid tumor development and support the notion that it may constitute a promising target for cancer therapy. PMID:26213336

  19. New thiazolidinediones affect endothelial cell activation and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rudnicki, Martina; Tripodi, Gustavo L; Ferrer, Renila; Boscá, Lisardo; Pitta, Marina G R; Pitta, Ivan R; Abdalla, Dulcineia S P

    2016-07-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonists used in treating type 2 diabetes that may exhibit beneficial pleiotropic effects on endothelial cells. In this study, we characterized the effects of three new TZDs [GQ-32 (3-biphenyl-4-ylmethyl-5-(4-nitro-benzylidene)-thiazolidine-2,4-dione), GQ-169 (5-(4-chloro-benzylidene)-3-(2,6-dichloro-benzyl)-thiazolidine-2,4-dione), and LYSO-7 (5-(5-bromo-1H-indol-3-ylmethylene)-3-(4-chlorobenzyl)-thiazolidine-2,4-dione)] on endothelial cells. The effects of the new TZDs were evaluated on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), cell migration, tube formation and the gene expression of adhesion molecules and angiogenic mediators in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). PPARγ activation by new TZDs was addressed with a reporter gene assay. The three new TZDs activated PPARγ and suppressed the tumor necrosis factor α-induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1. GQ-169 and LYSO-7 also inhibited the glucose-induced ROS production. Although NO production assessed with 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein-FM probe indicated that all tested TZDs enhanced intracellular levels of NO, only LYSO-7 treatment significantly increased the release of NO from HUVEC measured by chemiluminescence analysis of culture media. Additionally, GQ-32 and GQ-169 induced endothelial cell migration and tube formation by the up-regulation of angiogenic molecules expression, such as vascular endothelial growth factor A and interleukin 8. GQ-169 also increased the mRNA levels of basic fibroblast growth factor, and GQ-32 enhanced transforming growth factor-β expression. Together, the results of this study reveal that these new TZDs act as partial agonists of PPARγ and modulate endothelial cell activation and endothelial dysfunction besides to stimulate migration and tube formation. PMID:27108791

  20. Diverse Functions of Endothelial NO Synthases System: NO and EDH

    PubMed Central

    Godo, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Endothelium-dependent relaxations are predominantly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) in large conduit arteries and by endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH) in small resistance vessels. Although the nature of EDH factors varies depending on species and vascular beds, we have previously demonstrated that endothelial NO synthases (eNOS)-derived hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an EDH factor in animals and humans. This vessel size-dependent contribution of NO and EDH is, at least in part, attributable to the diverse roles of endothelial NOSs system; in large conduit arteries, eNOS mainly serves as a NO-generating system to elicit soluble guanylate cyclase–cyclic guanosine monophosphate-mediated relaxations, whereas in small resistance vessels, it serves as a superoxide-generating system to cause EDH/H2O2-mediated relaxations. Endothelial caveolin-1 may play an important role for the diverse roles of NOSs. Although reactive oxygen species are generally regarded harmful, the physiological roles of H2O2 have attracted much attention as accumulating evidence has shown that endothelium-derived H2O2 contributes to cardiovascular homeostasis. The diverse functions of endothelial NOSs system with NO and EDH/H2O2 could account for a compensatory mechanism in the setting of endothelial dysfunction. In this review, we will briefly summarize the current knowledge on the diverse functions of endothelial NOSs system: NO and EDH/H2O2. PMID:26647119

  1. Diverse Functions of Endothelial NO Synthases System: NO and EDH.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Godo, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Endothelium-dependent relaxations are predominantly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) in large conduit arteries and by endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH) in small resistance vessels. Although the nature of EDH factors varies depending on species and vascular beds, we have previously demonstrated that endothelial NO synthases (eNOS)-derived hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an EDH factor in animals and humans. This vessel size-dependent contribution of NO and EDH is, at least in part, attributable to the diverse roles of endothelial NOSs system; in large conduit arteries, eNOS mainly serves as a NO-generating system to elicit soluble guanylate cyclase-cyclic guanosine monophosphate-mediated relaxations, whereas in small resistance vessels, it serves as a superoxide-generating system to cause EDH/H2O2-mediated relaxations. Endothelial caveolin-1 may play an important role for the diverse roles of NOSs. Although reactive oxygen species are generally regarded harmful, the physiological roles of H2O2 have attracted much attention as accumulating evidence has shown that endothelium-derived H2O2 contributes to cardiovascular homeostasis. The diverse functions of endothelial NOSs system with NO and EDH/H2O2 could account for a compensatory mechanism in the setting of endothelial dysfunction. In this review, we will briefly summarize the current knowledge on the diverse functions of endothelial NOSs system: NO and EDH/H2O2. PMID:26647119

  2. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 affects endothelial progenitor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Colleselli, Daniela; Bijuklic, Klaudija; Mosheimer, Birgit A.; Kaehler, Christian M. . E-mail: C.M.Kaehler@uibk.ac.at

    2006-09-10

    Growing evidence indicates that inducible cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders and various types of cancer. Endothelial progenitor cells recruited from the bone marrow have been shown to be involved in the formation of new vessels in malignancies and discussed for being a key point in tumour progression and metastasis. However, until now, nothing is known about an interaction between COX and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Expression of COX-1 and COX-2 was detected by semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot. Proliferation kinetics, cell cycle distribution and rate of apoptosis were analysed by MTT test and FACS analysis. Further analyses revealed an implication of Akt phosphorylation and caspase-3 activation. Both COX-1 and COX-2 expression can be found in bone-marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells in vitro. COX-2 inhibition leads to a significant reduction in proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells by an increase in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. COX-2 inhibition leads further to an increased cleavage of caspase-3 protein and inversely to inhibition of Akt activation. Highly proliferating endothelial progenitor cells can be targeted by selective COX-2 inhibition in vitro. These results indicate that upcoming therapy strategies in cancer patients targeting COX-2 may be effective in inhibiting tumour vasculogenesis as well as angiogenic processes.

  3. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome, Endothelial Function and Markers of Endothelialization. Changes after CPAP

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez Armengol, Angeles; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Caballero-Eraso, Candela; Macher, Hada C.; Villar, Jose; Merino, Ana M; Castell, Javier; Capote, Francisco; Stiefel, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Study objectives This study tries to assess the endothelial function in vivo using flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and several biomarkers of endothelium formation/restoration and damage in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) syndrome at baseline and after three months with CPAP therapy. Design Observational study, before and after CPAP therapy. Setting and Patients We studied 30 patients with apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) >15/h that were compared with themselves after three months of CPAP therapy. FMD was assessed non-invasively in vivo using the Laser-Doppler flowmetry. Circulating cell-free DNA (cf-DNA) and microparticles (MPs) were measured as markers of endothelial damage and the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was determined as a marker of endothelial restoration process. Measurements and results After three month with CPAP, FMD significantly increased (1072.26 ± 483.21 vs. 1604.38 ± 915.69 PU, p< 0.005) cf-DNA and MPs significantly decreased (187.93 ± 115.81 vs. 121.28 ± 78.98 pg/ml, p<0.01, and 69.60 ± 62.60 vs. 39.82 ± 22.14 U/μL, p<0.05, respectively) and VEGF levels increased (585.02 ± 246.06 vs. 641.11 ± 212.69 pg/ml, p<0.05). These changes were higher in patients with more severe disease. There was a relationship between markers of damage (r = -0.53, p<0.005) but not between markers of damage and restoration, thus suggesting that both types of markers should be measured together. Conclusions CPAP therapy improves FMD. This improvement may be related to an increase of endothelial restoration process and a decrease of endothelial damage. PMID:25815511

  4. Mineralocorticoid Receptors Modulate Vascular Endothelial Function in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Luttrell, Meredith; Kim, Han-Kyul; Meade, Thomas H.; English, Mark; Segal, Mark S.; Christou, Demetra D.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity increases linearly with age and is associated with impaired vascular endothelial function and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) contribute to impaired vascular endothelial function in cardiovascular disease; however, their role in uncomplicated human obesity is unknown. Because plasma aldosterone levels are elevated in obesity and adipocytes may be a source of aldosterone, we hypothesized that MR modulate vascular endothelial function in older adults in an adiposity-dependent manner. To test this hypothesis, we administered MR blockade (Eplerenone; 100 mg/day) for 1 month in a balanced, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study to 22 older adults (10 men, 55–79 years) varying widely in adiposity (body mass index: 20–45 kg/m2) but who were free from overt cardiovascular disease. We evaluated vascular endothelial function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation [FMD] via ultrasonography) and oxidative stress (plasma F2-isoprostanes and vascular endothelial cell protein expression of nitrotyrosine and NADPH oxidase p47phox) during placebo and MR blockade. In the whole group, oxidative stress (P>0.05) and FMD did not change with MR blockade (6.39±0.67 vs. 6.23±0.73 %, P=0.7, placebo vs. Eplerenone). However, individual improvements in FMD in response to Eplerenone were associated with higher total body fat (body mass index: r=0.45, P=0.02 and DXA-derived % body fat: r=0.50, P=0.009) and abdominal fat (total: r=0.61, P=0.005, visceral: r=0.67, P=0.002 and subcutaneous: r=0.48, P=0.03). In addition, greater improvements in FMD with Eplerenone were related with higher baseline fasting glucose (r=0.53, P=0.01). MR influence vascular endothelial function in an adiposity-dependent manner in healthy older adults. PMID:23786536

  5. Endothelial Outgrowth Cells: Function and Performance in Vascular Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    The clinical need for vascular grafts continues to grow. Tissue engineering strategies have been employed to develop vascular grafts for patients lacking sufficient autologous vessels for grafting. Restoring a functional endothelium on the graft lumen has been shown to greatly improve the long-term patency of small-diameter grafts. However, obtaining an autologous source of endothelial cells for in vitro endothelialization is invasive and often not a viable option. Endothelial outgrowth cells (EOCs), derived from circulating progenitor cells in peripheral blood, provide an alternative cell source for engineering an autologous endothelium. This review aims at highlighting the role of EOCs in the regulation of processes that are central to vascular graft performance. To characterize EOC performance in vascular grafts, this review identifies the characteristics of EOCs, defines functional performance criteria for EOCs in vascular grafts, and summarizes the existing work in developing vascular grafts with EOCs. PMID:24004404

  6. Assessing vascular endothelial function using frequency and rank order statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hsien-Tsai; Hsu, Po-Chun; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Liu, An-Bang; Lin, Zong-Lin; Tang, Chieh-Ju; Lo, Men-Tzung

    2013-08-01

    Using frequency and rank order statistics (FROS), this study analyzed the fluctuations in arterial waveform amplitudes recorded from an air pressure sensing system before and after reactive hyperemia (RH) induction by temporary blood flow occlusion to evaluate the vascular endothelial function of aged and diabetic subjects. The modified probability-weighted distance (PWD) calculated from the FROS was compared with the dilatation index (DI) to evaluate its validity and sensitivity in the assessment of vascular endothelial function. The results showed that the PWD can provide a quantitative determination of the structural changes in the arterial pressure signals associated with regulation of vascular tone and blood pressure by intact vascular endothelium after the application of occlusion stress. Our study suggests that the use of FROS is a reliable noninvasive approach to the assessment of vascular endothelial degeneration in aging and diabetes.

  7. The natural antioxidants, pomegranate extract and soy isoflavones, favourably modulate canine endothelial cell function.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner-Parzer, Sabina M; Waldenberger, Ferdinand Rudolf; Freudenthaler, Angelika; Ginouvès-Guerdoux, Amandine; McGahie, David; Gatto, Hugues

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease, preceded by vascular endothelial dysfunction, is a prominent cause of death in dogs. L-carnitine and taurine, well known for their antioxidative capacity, beneficially affect cardiovascular disease as well as certain dog cardiomyopathies. It is well established that vascular endothelial dysfunction precedes cardiovascular disease and that "vasoprotective factors" (NO and antioxidants) prevent apoptosis, whereas "risk factors" such as oxidized LDL, hyperglycemia, and free fatty acids trigger it in cultured human vascular endothelial cells. Whereas human vascular cell in vitro models are widely established and used for the characterisation of potential vasoprotective substances, such models are not available for canine endothelial cells. In the present study we therefore developed an in vitro model, which allows the testing of the effects of different substances on proliferation and apoptosis in canine aortic endothelial cells. This model was used to test L-carnitine, taurine, pomegranate extract, and Soy Isoflavones in comparison to reference substances (glutathione and pioglitazone) previously shown to modulate human endothelial cell function. L-carnitine and taurine neither exhibited antiproliferative nor antiapoptotic activities in the context of this study. However extracts from pomegranate and soy isoflavones dramatically reduced proliferation and apoptosis in a dose dependent fashion, being in line with a vasoprotective activity in dogs. PMID:23762588

  8. Caveolae, Caveolins, Cavins, and Endothelial Cell Function: New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Grzegorz

    2012-01-01

    Caveolae are cholesterol and glycosphingolipid-rich flask-shaped invaginations of the plasma membrane which are particularly abundant in vascular endothelium and present in all other cell types of the cardiovascular system, including vascular smooth-muscle cells, macrophages, cardiac myocytes, and fibroblasts. Caveolins and the more recently discovered cavins are the major protein components of caveolae. When caveolae were discovered, their functional role was believed to be limited to transport across the endothelial cell barrier. Since then, however, a large body of evidence has accumulated, suggesting that these microdomains are very important in regulating many other important endothelial cell functions, mostly due to their ability to concentrate and compartmentalize various signaling molecules. Over the course of several years, multiple studies involving knockout mouse and small interfering RNA approaches have considerably enhanced our understanding of the role of caveolae and caveolin-1 in regulating many cardiovascular functions. New findings have been reported implicating other caveolar protein components in endothelial cell signaling and function, such as the understudied caveolin-2 and newly discovered cavin proteins. The aim of this review is to focus primarily on molecular and cellular aspects of the role of caveolae, caveolins, and cavins in endothelial cell signaling and function. In addition, where appropriate, the possible implications for the cardiovascular and pulmonary physiology and pathophysiology will be discussed. PMID:22232608

  9. Senescence affects endothelial cells susceptibility to dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    AbuBakar, Sazaly; Shu, Meng-Hooi; Johari, Jefree; Wong, Pooi-Fong

    2014-01-01

    Alteration in the endothelium leading to increased vascular permeability contributes to plasma leakage seen in dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). An earlier study showed that senescent endothelial cells (ECs) altered the ECs permeability. Here we investigated the susceptibility of senescing human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to dengue virus infection and determined if dengue virus infection induces HUVECs senescence. Our results suggest that DENV type-2 (DENV-2) foci forming unit (FFU) and extracellular virus RNA copy number were reduced by at least 35% and 85% in infection of the intermediate young and early senescent HUVECs, respectively, in comparison to infection of young HUVECs. No to low infectivity was recovered from infection of late senescent HUVECs. DENV infection also increases the percentage of HUVECs expressing senescence-associated (SA)-β-gal, cells arrested at the G2/M phase or 4N DNA content stage and cells with enlarged morphology, indicative of senescing cells. Alteration of HUVECs morphology was recorded using impedance-based real-time cell analysis system following DENV-2 infection. These results suggest that senescing HUVECs do not support DENV infection and DENV infection induces HUVECs senescence. The finding highlights the possible role of induction of senescence in DENV infection of the endothelial cells. PMID:24782642

  10. Involvement of Local Lamellipodia in Endothelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Breslin, Jerome W.; Zhang, Xun E.; Worthylake, Rebecca A.; Souza-Smith, Flavia M.

    2015-01-01

    Recently we observed that endothelial cells cultured in tightly confluent monolayers display frequent local lamellipodia, and that thrombin, an agent that increases endothelial permeability, reduces lamellipodia protrusions. This led us to test the hypothesis that local lamellipodia contribute to endothelial barrier function. Movements of subcellular structures containing GFP-actin or VE-cadherin-GFP expressed in endothelial cells were recorded using time-lapse microscopy. Transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) served as an index of endothelial barrier function. Changes in both lamellipodia dynamics and TER were assessed during baseline and after cells were treated with either the barrier-disrupting agent thrombin, or the barrier-stabilizing agent sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). The myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin was used to selectively block lamellipodia formation, and was used to test their role in the barrier function of endothelial cell monolayers and isolated, perfused rat mesenteric venules. Myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Rac1 and RhoA activation were evaluated using G-LISA assays. The role of Rac1 was tested with the specific inhibitor NSC23766 or by expressing wild-type or dominant negative GFP-Rac1. The results show that thrombin rapidly decreased both TER and the lamellipodia protrusion frequency. S1P rapidly increased TER in association with increased protrusion frequency. Blebbistatin nearly abolished local lamellipodia protrusions while cortical actin fibers and stress fibers remained intact. Blebbistatin also significantly decreased TER of cultured endothelial cells and increased permeability of isolated rat mesenteric venules. Both thrombin and S1P increased MLC phosphorylation and activation of RhoA. However, thrombin and S1P had differential impacts on Rac1, correlating with the changes in TER and lamellipodia protrusion frequency. Overexpression of Rac1 elevated, while NSC23766 and

  11. Involvement of local lamellipodia in endothelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Jerome W; Zhang, Xun E; Worthylake, Rebecca A; Souza-Smith, Flavia M

    2015-01-01

    Recently we observed that endothelial cells cultured in tightly confluent monolayers display frequent local lamellipodia, and that thrombin, an agent that increases endothelial permeability, reduces lamellipodia protrusions. This led us to test the hypothesis that local lamellipodia contribute to endothelial barrier function. Movements of subcellular structures containing GFP-actin or VE-cadherin-GFP expressed in endothelial cells were recorded using time-lapse microscopy. Transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) served as an index of endothelial barrier function. Changes in both lamellipodia dynamics and TER were assessed during baseline and after cells were treated with either the barrier-disrupting agent thrombin, or the barrier-stabilizing agent sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). The myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin was used to selectively block lamellipodia formation, and was used to test their role in the barrier function of endothelial cell monolayers and isolated, perfused rat mesenteric venules. Myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Rac1 and RhoA activation were evaluated using G-LISA assays. The role of Rac1 was tested with the specific inhibitor NSC23766 or by expressing wild-type or dominant negative GFP-Rac1. The results show that thrombin rapidly decreased both TER and the lamellipodia protrusion frequency. S1P rapidly increased TER in association with increased protrusion frequency. Blebbistatin nearly abolished local lamellipodia protrusions while cortical actin fibers and stress fibers remained intact. Blebbistatin also significantly decreased TER of cultured endothelial cells and increased permeability of isolated rat mesenteric venules. Both thrombin and S1P increased MLC phosphorylation and activation of RhoA. However, thrombin and S1P had differential impacts on Rac1, correlating with the changes in TER and lamellipodia protrusion frequency. Overexpression of Rac1 elevated, while NSC23766 and

  12. Improved Endothelial Function of Endothelial Cell Monolayer on the Soft Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Film with Matrix-Bound Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hao; Hu, Mi; Zhang, He; Ren, Ke-Feng; Li, Bo-Chao; Li, Huan; Wang, Li-Mei; Lei, Wen-Xi; Ji, Jian

    2016-06-15

    Endothelialization on the vascular implants is of great importance for prevention of undesired postimplantation symptoms. However, endothelial dysfunction of regenerated endothelial cell (EC) monolayer has been frequently observed, leading to severe complications, such as neointimal hyperplasia, late thrombosis, and neoatherosclerosis. It has significantly impeded long-term success of the therapy. So far, very little attention has been paid on endothelial function of EC monolayer. Bioinspired by the microenvironment of the endothelium in a blood vessel, this study described a soft polyelectrolyte multilayer film (PEM) through layer-by-layer assembly of poly(l-lysine) (PLL) and hyaluronan (HA). The (PLL/HA) PEM was chemically cross-linked and further incorporated with vascular endothelial growth factor. It demonstrated that this approach could promote EC adhesion and proliferation, further inducing formation of EC monolayer. Further, improved endothelial function of the EC monolayer was achieved as shown with the tighter integrity, higher production of nitric oxide, and expression level of endothelial function related genes, compared to EC monolayers on traditional substrates with high stiffness (e.g., glass, tissue culture polystyrene, and stainless steel). Our findings highlighted the influence of substrate stiffness on endothelial function of EC monolayer, giving a new strategy in the surface design of vascular implants. PMID:27223460

  13. Genistein attenuates low temperature induced pulmonary hypertension in broiler chicks by modulating endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Gao, Mingyu; Wu, Zhenlong; Guo, Yuming

    2010-12-15

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is characterized by high pulmonary blood pressure, vascular remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy. In the present study, we investigated whether genistein would prevent the development of low temperature-induced pulmonary hypertension in broilers. Hemodynamic parameters, vascular remodeling, the expression of endothelial nitric oxide and endothelin-1 content in lung tissue were evaluated. The results demonstrated that genistein significantly reduced pulmonary arterial hypertension and suppressed pulmonary arterial vascular remodeling without affecting broilers' performance. The beneficial effects appeared to be mediated by restoring endothelial function especially endothelial nitric oxide and endothelin-1, two critical vasoactive molecules that associated with the development of hypertension. Genistein supplementation might be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:20854807

  14. R-Ras interacts with filamin a to maintain endothelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, G S; Grundl, M; Allen, J S; Matter, M L

    2011-09-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating vascular barrier integrity remain incompletely elucidated. We have previously reported an association between the GTPase R-Ras and repeat 3 of Filamin A (FLNa). Loss of FLNa has been linked to increased vascular permeability. We sought to determine whether FLNa's association with R-Ras affects endothelial barrier function. We report that in endothelial cells endogenous R-Ras interacts with endogenous FLNa as determined by co-immunoprecipitations and pulldowns with the FLNa-GST fusion protein repeats 1-10. Deletion of FLNa repeat 3 (FLNaΔ3) abrogated this interaction. In these cells FLNa and R-Ras co-localize at the plasma membrane. Knockdown of R-Ras and/or FLNa by siRNA promotes vascular permeability, as determined by TransEndothelial Electrical Resistance and FITC-dextran transwell assays. Re-expression of FLNa restored endothelial barrier function in cells lacking FLNa whereas re-expression of FLNaΔ3 did not. Immunostaining for VE-Cadherin in cells with knocked down R-Ras and FLNa demonstrated a disorganization of VE-Cadherin at adherens junctions. Loss of R-Ras and FLNa or blocking R-Ras function via GGTI-2133, a selective R-Ras inhibitor, induced vascular permeability and increased phosphorylation of VE-Cadherin (Y731) and Src (Y416). Expression of dominant negative R-Ras promoted vascular permeability that was blocked by the Src inhibitor PP2. These findings demonstrate that maintaining endothelial barrier function is dependent upon active R-Ras and association between R-Ras and FLNa and that loss of this interaction promotes VE-Cadherin phosphorylation and changes in downstream effectors that lead to endothelial leakiness. PMID:21660952

  15. Effects of sodium and potassium supplementation on endothelial function: a fully controlled dietary intervention study.

    PubMed

    Gijsbers, Lieke; Dower, James I; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Kusters, Yvo H A M; Bakker, Stephan J L; Hollman, Peter C H; Geleijnse, Johanna M

    2015-11-14

    High Na and low K intakes have adverse effects on blood pressure, which increases the risk for CVD. The role of endothelial dysfunction and inflammation in this pathophysiological process is not yet clear. In a randomised placebo-controlled cross-over study in untreated (pre)hypertensives, we examined the effects of Na and K supplementation on endothelial function and inflammation. During the study period, subjects were provided with a diet that contained 2·4 g/d of Na and 2·3 g/d of K for a 10 460 kJ (2500 kcal) intake. After 1-week run-in, subjects received capsules with supplemental Na (3·0 g/d), supplemental K (2·8 g/d) or placebo, for 4 weeks each, in random order. After each intervention, circulating biomarkers of endothelial function and inflammation were measured. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and skin microvascular vasomotion were assessed in sub-groups of twenty-two to twenty-four subjects. Of thirty-seven randomised subjects, thirty-six completed the study. Following Na supplementation, serum endothelin-1 was increased by 0·24 pg/ml (95 % CI 0·03, 0·45), but no change was seen in other endothelial or inflammatory biomarkers. FMD and microvascular vasomotion were unaffected by Na supplementation. K supplementation reduced IL-8 levels by 0·28 pg/ml (95 % CI 0·03, 0·53), without affecting other circulating biomarkers. FMD was 1·16 % (95% CI 0·37, 1·96) higher after K supplementation than after placebo. Microvascular vasomotion was unaffected. In conclusion, a 4-week increase in Na intake increased endothelin-1, but had no effect on other endothelial or inflammatory markers. Increased K intake had a beneficial effect on FMD and possibly IL-8, without affecting other circulating endothelial or inflammatory biomarkers. PMID:26343780

  16. Non-invasive assessment of microvascular and endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cynthia; Daskalakis, Constantine; Falkner, Bonita

    2013-01-01

    The authors have utilized capillaroscopy and forearm blood flow techniques to investigate the role of microvascular dysfunction in pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Capillaroscopy is a non-invasive, relatively inexpensive methodology for directly visualizing the microcirculation. Percent capillary recruitment is assessed by dividing the increase in capillary density induced by postocclusive reactive hyperemia (postocclusive reactive hyperemia capillary density minus baseline capillary density), by the maximal capillary density (observed during passive venous occlusion). Percent perfused capillaries represents the proportion of all capillaries present that are perfused (functionally active), and is calculated by dividing postocclusive reactive hyperemia capillary density by the maximal capillary density. Both percent capillary recruitment and percent perfused capillaries reflect the number of functional capillaries. The forearm blood flow (FBF) technique provides accepted non-invasive measures of endothelial function: The ratio FBF(max)/FBF(base) is computed as an estimate of vasodilation, by dividing the mean of the four FBF(max) values by the mean of the four FBFbase values. Forearm vascular resistance at maximal vasodilation (FVR(max)) is calculated as the mean arterial pressure (MAP) divided by FBF(max). Both the capillaroscopy and forearm techniques are readily acceptable to patients and can be learned quickly. The microvascular and endothelial function measures obtained using the methodologies described in this paper may have future utility in clinical patient cardiovascular risk-reduction strategies. As we have published reports demonstrating that microvascular and endothelial dysfunction are found in initial stages of hypertension including prehypertension, microvascular and endothelial function measures may eventually aid in early identification, risk-stratification and prevention of end-stage vascular pathology, with its potentially fatal

  17. XIAP reverses various functional activities of FRNK in endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Sunyoung; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Chi, Sung-Gil; Park, Heonyong

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FRNK domain is recruited into focal adhesion (FA), controlling endothelial cell adhesion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XIAP binds the FRNK domain of FAK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XIAP inhibits recruitment of FRNK into Fas and FRNK-promoted cell adhesion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XIAP plays a key role in vascular functions of FRNK or FRNK domain-mediated vascular functions of FAK. -- Abstract: In endothelial cells, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) regulates cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, and shear-stimulated activation of MAPK. We recently found that FAK is recruited into focal adhesion (FA) sites through interactions with XIAP (X-chromosome linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein) and activated by Src kinase in response to shear stress. In this study, we examined which domain(s) of FAK is(are) important for various vascular functions such as FA recruiting, XIAP-binding and shear stress-stimulated ERK activation. Through a series of experiments, we determined that the FRNK domain is recruited into FA sites and promotes endothelial cell adhesion. Interestingly, XIAP knockdown was shown to reduce FA recruitment of FRNK and the cell adhesive effect of FRNK. In addition, we found that XIAP interacts with FRNK, suggesting cross-talk between XIAP and FRNK. We also demonstrated that FRNK inhibits endothelial cell migration and shear-stimulated ERK activation. These inhibitory effects of FRNK were reversed by XIAP knockdown. Taken together, we can conclude that XIAP plays a key role in vascular functions of FRNK or FRNK domain-mediated vascular functions of FAK.

  18. A single air dive reduces arterial endothelial function in man.

    PubMed

    Brubakk, A O; Duplancic, D; Valic, Z; Palada, I; Obad, A; Bakovic, D; Wisloff, U; Dujic, Z

    2005-08-01

    During and after decompression from dives, gas bubbles are regularly observed in the right ventricular outflow tract. A number of studies have documented that these bubbles can lead to endothelial dysfunction in the pulmonary artery but no data exist on the effect of diving on arterial endothelial function. The present study investigated if diving or oxygen breathing would influence endothelial arterial function in man. A total of 21 divers participated in this study. Nine healthy experienced male divers with a mean age of 31 +/- 5 years were compressed in a hyperbaric chamber to 280 kPa at a rate of 100 kPa min(-1) breathing air and remaining at pressure for 80 min. The ascent rate during decompression was 9 kPa min(-1) with a 7 min stop at 130 kPa (US Navy procedure). Another group of five experienced male divers (31 +/- 6 years) breathed 60% oxygen (corresponding to the oxygen tension of air at 280 kPa) for 80 min. Before and after exposure, endothelial function was assessed in both groups as flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) by ultrasound in the brachial artery. The results were compared to data obtained from a group of seven healthy individuals of the same age who had never dived. The dive produced few vascular bubbles, but a significant arterial diameter increase from 4.5 +/- 0.7 to 4.8 +/- 0.8 mm (mean +/- s.d.) and a significant reduction of FMD from 9.2 +/- 6.9 to 5.0 +/- 6.7% were observed as an indication of reduced endothelial function. In the group breathing oxygen, arterial diameter increased significantly from 4.4 +/- 0.3 mm to 4.7 +/- 0.3 mm, while FMD showed an insignificant decrease. Oxygen breathing did not decrease nitroglycerine-induced dilatation significantly. In the normal controls the arterial diameter and FMD were 4.1 +/- 0.4 mm and 7.7 +/- 0.2.8%, respectively. This study shows that diving can lead to acute arterial endothelial dysfunction in man and that oxygen breathing will increase arterial diameter after return to breathing air. Further

  19. A single air dive reduces arterial endothelial function in man

    PubMed Central

    Brubakk, AO; Duplancic, D; Valic, Z; Palada, I; Obad, A; Bakovic, D; Wisloff, U; Dujic, Z

    2005-01-01

    During and after decompression from dives, gas bubbles are regularly observed in the right ventricular outflow tract. A number of studies have documented that these bubbles can lead to endothelial dysfunction in the pulmonary artery but no data exist on the effect of diving on arterial endothelial function. The present study investigated if diving or oxygen breathing would influence endothelial arterial function in man. A total of 21 divers participated in this study. Nine healthy experienced male divers with a mean age of 31 ± 5 years were compressed in a hyperbaric chamber to 280 kPa at a rate of 100 kPa min−1 breathing air and remaining at pressure for 80 min. The ascent rate during decompression was 9 kPa min−1 with a 7 min stop at 130 kPa (US Navy procedure). Another group of five experienced male divers (31 ± 6 years) breathed 60% oxygen (corresponding to the oxygen tension of air at 280 kPa) for 80 min. Before and after exposure, endothelial function was assessed in both groups as flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) by ultrasound in the brachial artery. The results were compared to data obtained from a group of seven healthy individuals of the same age who had never dived. The dive produced few vascular bubbles, but a significant arterial diameter increase from 4.5 ± 0.7 to 4.8 ± 0.8 mm (mean ± s.d.) and a significant reduction of FMD from 9.2 ± 6.9 to 5.0 ± 6.7% were observed as an indication of reduced endothelial function. In the group breathing oxygen, arterial diameter increased significantly from 4.4 ± 0.3 mm to 4.7 ± 0.3 mm, while FMD showed an insignificant decrease. Oxygen breathing did not decrease nitroglycerine-induced dilatation significantly. In the normal controls the arterial diameter and FMD were 4.1 ± 0.4 mm and 7.7 ± 0.2.8%, respectively. This study shows that diving can lead to acute arterial endothelial dysfunction in man and that oxygen breathing will increase arterial diameter after return to breathing air. Further studies

  20. Functional impairment of endothelial cells by the antimycotic amphotericin B.

    PubMed

    Pelzmann, Brigitte; Di Giuro, Cristiana M L; Zorn-Pauly, Klaus; Rossmann, Christine; Hallström, Seth; Groschner, Klaus; Fameli, Nicola

    2016-03-25

    We set out to determine the membrane potential (Vm) of the endothelial cell line EA.hy926 and its sensitivity to the antimycotic amphotericin B (AmB), a commonly used antifungal component in cell culture media. We measured the endothelial Vm under various experimental conditions by patch clamp technique and found that Vm of AmB-treated cells is (-12.1 ± 9.3) mV, while in AmB-untreated (control) cells it is (-57.1 ± 4.1) mV. In AmB-free extracellular solutions, Vm recovered toward control levels and this gain in Vm rapidly dissipated upon re-addition of AmB, demonstrating a rapid and reversible effect of AmB on endothelial Vm. The consequences of AmB dependent alterations in endothelial transmembrane potential were tested at the levels of Ca(2+) signaling, of nucleotide concentrations, and energy metabolism. In AmB-treated cells we found substantially reduced Ca(2+) entry (to about 60% of that in control cells) in response to histamine induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) depletion, and diminished the ATP-to-ADP ratio (by >30%). Our data demonstrate a marked and experimentally relevant dependence of basic functional parameters of cultured endothelial cells on the presence of the ionophoric antimycotic AmB. The profound and reversible effects of the widely used culture media component AmB need careful consideration when interpreting experimental data obtained under respective culture conditions. PMID:26902113

  1. Effect of exercise on postprandial endothelial function in adolescent boys.

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, Matthew J; Morris, John G; Nevill, Mary E; Tolfrey, Keith; Nevill, Alan; Barrett, Laura A

    2013-07-28

    The ingestion of high-fat meals induces a state of endothelial dysfunction in adults. This dysfunction is attenuated by prior exercise. The response of young people to these nutritional and physiological stressors has not been established. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to investigate if a bout of moderate-intensity exercise influenced endothelial function (as indicated by flow-mediated dilation (FMD)) following the ingestion of a high-fat breakfast and lunch in adolescent boys (aged 12·6-14·3 years). Two, 2 d main trials (control and exercise) were completed by thirteen adolescent boys in a counter-balanced, cross-over design. Participants were inactive on day 1 of the control trial, but completed 60 min of walking at 60 % peak oxygen uptake in the exercise trial. On day 2, endothelial function was assessed via FMD prior to, and following, ingestion of a high-fat breakfast and lunch. There was no difference in fasting FMD between the control and exercise trial (P= 0·449). In the control trial, FMD was reduced by 32 % following consumption of the high-fat breakfast and by 24 % following lunch. In the exercise trial, the corresponding reductions were 6 and 10 %, respectively (main effect trial, P= 0·002). These results demonstrate that moderate-intensity exercise can attenuate the decline in FMD seen following the consumption of high-fat meals in adolescent boys. PMID:23218136

  2. Bioglass promotes wound healing by affecting gap junction connexin 43 mediated endothelial cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; He, Jin; Yu, Hongfei; Green, Colin R; Chang, Jiang

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that gap junctions play an important role in wound healing, and bioactive glass (BG) has been shown to help healing when applied as a wound dressing. However, the effects of BG on gap junctional communication between cells involved in wound healing is not well understood. We hypothesized that BG may be able to affect gap junction mediated cell behavior to enhance wound healing. Therefore, we set out to investigate the effects of BG on gap junction related behavior of endothelial cells in order to elucidate the mechanisms through which BG is operating. In in vitro studies, BG ion extracts prevented death of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) following hypoxia in a dose dependent manner, possibly through connexin hemichannel modulation. In addition, BG showed stimulatory effects on gap junction communication between HUVECs and upregulated connexin43 (Cx43) expression. Furthermore, BG prompted expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor as well as their receptors, and vascular endothelial cadherin in HUVECs, all of which are beneficial for vascularization. In vivo wound healing results showed that the wound closure of full-thickness excisional wounds of rats was accelerated by BG with reduced inflammation during initial stages of healing and stimulated angiogenesis during the proliferation stage. Therefore, BG can stimulate wound healing through affecting gap junctions and gap junction related endothelial cell behaviors, including prevention of endothelial cell death following hypoxia, stimulation of gap junction communication and upregulation of critical vascular growth factors, which contributes to the enhancement of angiogenesis in the wound bed and finally to accelerate wound healing. Although many studies have reported that BG stimulates angiogenesis and wound healing, this work reveals the relationship between BG and gap junction connexin 43 mediated endothelial cell behavior and elucidates

  3. Abnormalities of endothelial function in patients with predialysis renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Thambyrajah, J; Landray, M; McGlynn, F; Jones, H; Wheeler, D; Townend, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Endothelial dysfunction plays an important role in the development of atherosclerotic vascular disease, which is the leading cause of mortality in patients with chronic renal failure.
OBJECTIVE—To examine the relation between predialysis renal failure and endothelial function.
DESIGN—Two groups were studied: 80 patients with non-diabetic chronic renal failure and 26 healthy controls, with similar age and sex distributions. Two indices of endothelial function were assessed: high resolution ultrasonography to measure flow mediated endothelium dependent dilatation of the brachial artery following reactive hyperaemia, and plasma concentration of von Willebrand factor. Endothelium independent dilatation was also assessed following sublingual glyceryl trinitrate. The patients were divided into those with and without overt atherosclerotic vascular disease.
RESULTS—Although patients with chronic renal failure had significantly impaired endothelium dependent dilatation compared with controls (median (interquartile range), 2.6% (0.7% to 4.8%) v 6.5% (4.8% to 8.3%); p < 0.001) and increased von Willebrand factor (254 (207 to 294) v 106 (87 to 138) iu/dl; p < 0.001), there was no difference between renal failure patients with and without atherosclerotic vascular disease. Within the chronic renal failure group, endothelium dependent dilatation and von Willebrand factor were similar in patients in the upper and lower quartiles of glomerular filtration rate (2.7% (0.7% to 6.7%) v 2.8% (1.1% to 5.0%); and 255 (205 to 291) v 254 (209 to 292) iu/dl, respectively). Endothelium independent dilatation did not differ between the renal failure or control groups and was also similar in patients with renal failure irrespective of the degree of renal failure or the presence of atherosclerotic vascular disease.
CONCLUSIONS—Endothelial function is abnormal in chronic renal failure, even in patients with mild renal insufficiency and those without

  4. RASA1 functions in EPHB4 signaling pathway to suppress endothelial mTORC1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Jun; Aegerter, Sandrine; Fevurly, R. Dawn; Mammoto, Akiko; Mammoto, Tadanori; Sahin, Mustafa; Mably, John D.; Fishman, Steven J.; Chan, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Vascular malformations are linked to mutations in RAS p21 protein activator 1 (RASA1, also known as p120RasGAP); however, due to the global expression of this gene, it is unclear how these mutations specifically affect the vasculature. Here, we tested the hypothesis that RASA1 performs a critical effector function downstream of the endothelial receptor EPHB4. In zebrafish models, we found that either RASA1 or EPHB4 deficiency induced strikingly similar abnormalities in blood vessel formation and function. Expression of WT EPHB4 receptor or engineered receptors with altered RASA1 binding revealed that the ability of EPHB4 to recruit RASA1 is required to restore blood flow in EPHB4-deficient animals. Analysis of EPHB4-deficient zebrafish tissue lysates revealed that mTORC1 is robustly overactivated, and pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1 in these animals rescued both vessel structure and function. Furthermore, overexpression of mTORC1 in endothelial cells exacerbated vascular phenotypes in animals with reduced EPHB4 or RASA1, suggesting a functional EPHB4/RASA1/mTORC1 signaling axis in endothelial cells. Tissue samples from patients with arteriovenous malformations displayed strong endothelial phospho-S6 staining, indicating increased mTORC1 activity. These results indicate that deregulation of EPHB4/RASA1/mTORC1 signaling in endothelial cells promotes vascular malformation and suggest that mTORC1 inhibitors, many of which are approved for the treatment of certain cancers, should be further explored as a potential strategy to treat patients with vascular malformations. PMID:24837431

  5. Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acids and 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid on Endothelial and Vascular Function.

    PubMed

    Imig, J D

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial and vascular smooth cells generate cytochrome P450 (CYP) arachidonic acid metabolites that can impact endothelial cell function and vascular homeostasis. The objective of this review is to focus on the physiology and pharmacology of endothelial CYP metabolites. The CYP pathway produces two types of eicosanoid products: epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), formed by CYP epoxygenases, and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), formed by CYP hydroxylases. Advances in CYP enzymes, EETs, and 20-HETE by pharmacological and genetic means have led to a more complete understanding of how these eicosanoids impact on endothelial cell function. Endothelial-derived EETs were initially described as endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factors. It is now well recognized that EETs importantly contribute to numerous endothelial cell functions. On the other hand, 20-HETE is the predominant CYP hydroxylase synthesized by vascular smooth muscle cells. Like EETs, 20-HETE acts on endothelial cells and impacts importantly on endothelial and vascular function. An important aspect for EETs and 20-HETE endothelial actions is their interactions with hormonal and paracrine factors. These include interactions with the renin-angiotensin system, adrenergic system, puringeric system, and endothelin. Alterations in CYP enzymes, 20-HETE, or EETs contribute to endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases such as ischemic injury, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. Recent advances have led to the development of potential therapeutics that target CYP enzymes, 20-HETE, or EETs. Thus, future investigation is required to obtain a more complete understanding of how CYP enzymes, 20-HETE, and EETs regulate endothelial cell function. PMID:27451096

  6. Functional CB1 cannabinoid receptors in human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Gao, B; Mirshahi, F; Sanyal, A J; Khanolkar, A D; Makriyannis, A; Kunos, G

    2000-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor mRNA was detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in endothelial cells from human aorta and hepatic artery and in the ECV304 cell line derived from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. CB1 receptor-binding sites were detected by the high-affinity antagonist radioligand [(125)I]AM-251. In ECV304 cells, both the highly potent synthetic cannabinoid agonist HU-210 and the endogenous ligand anandamide induce activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, and the effect of HU-210 was completely blocked, whereas the effect of anandamide was partially inhibited by SR141716A, a selective CB1 receptor antagonist. Transfection of ECV304 cells with CB1 receptor antisense, but not sense, oligonucleotides caused the same pattern of inhibition as SR141716A. This provides more definitive evidence for the involvement of CB1 receptors in MAP kinase activation and suggests that anandamide may also activate MAP kinase via an additional, CB1 receptor-independent, SR141716A-resistant mechanism. The MAP kinase activation by anandamide in ECV304 cells requires genistein-sensitive tyrosine kinases and protein kinase C (PKC), and anandamide also activates p38 kinase and c-Jun kinase. These findings indicate that CB1 receptors located in human vascular endothelium are functionally coupled to the MAP kinase cascade. Activation of protein kinase cascades by anandamide may be involved in the modulation of endothelial cell growth and proliferation. PMID:10698714

  7. Relationship between Microtubule Network Structure and Intracellular Transport in Cultured Endothelial Cells Affected by Shear Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Susumu; Ikezawa, Kenji; Ikeda, Mariko; Tanishita, Kazuo

    Endothelial cells (ECs) that line the inner surface of blood vessels are barriers to the transport of various substances into or from vessel walls, and are continuously exposed to shear stress induced by blood flow in vivo. Shear stress affects the cytoskeleton (e.g., microtubules, microfilaments, intermediate filaments), and affects the transport of macromolecules. Here, the relationship between the microtubule network structure and this transport process for albumin uptake within cultured aortic endothelial cells affected by shear stress was studied. Based on fluorescent images of albumin uptake obtained by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), both the microtubule network and albumin uptake in ECs were disrupted by colchicine and were affected by shear stress loading.

  8. Sub-micron lateral topography affects endothelial migration by modulation of focal adhesion dynamics.

    PubMed

    Antonini, S; Meucci, S; Jacchetti, E; Klingauf, M; Beltram, F; Poulikakos, D; Cecchini, M; Ferrari, A

    2015-06-01

    Through the interaction with topographical features, endothelial cells tune their ability to populate target substrates, both in vivo and in vitro. Basal textures interfere with the establishment and maturation of focal adhesions (FAs) thus inducing specific cell-polarization patterns and regulating a plethora of cell activities that govern the overall endothelial function. In this study, we analyze the effect of topographical features on FAs in primary human endothelial cells. Reported data demonstrate a functional link between FA dynamics and cell polarization and spreading on structured substrates presenting variable lateral feature size. Our results reveal that gratings with 2 µm lateral periodicity maximize contact guidance. The effect is linked to the dynamical state of FAs. We argue that these results are readily applicable to the rational design of active surfaces at the interface with the blood stream. PMID:26106866

  9. Microbubbles shunting via a patent foramen ovale impair endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Fok, Henry; Jiang, Benyu; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Exposure to intravascular microbubbles after diving and during medical procedures alters endothelial function. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a patent foramen ovale altered forearm endothelial function by facilitating microbubbles transfer. Design Patients attended on two separate visits, at least seven days apart receiving agitated saline or no active intervention in random order. On both days, flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery was measured using vascular ultrasound. On the intervention visit, agitated saline was injected and the passage of microbubbles into the arterial circulation was confirmed by echocardiography. Serial flow-mediated dilatation measurements were made after agitated saline and at the same time points after no intervention. Setting St Thomas’ Hospital in London. Participants Patients with a patent foramen ovale (PFO+n = 14, 9 male, mean ± SD age 42.2 ± 10.5 years) and patients without a patent foramen ovale (PFO− n = 10, 7 male, mean ± SD age 49.4 ± 18.4 years) were recruited. Main outcome measures Change in brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation. Results In patent foramen ovale + patients, flow-mediated dilatation did not change significantly on the control day but after agitated saline reduced by 2.3 ± 0.3%, 20 minutes after bubble injection (P < 0.005 vs. corresponding change in flow-mediated dilatation during control study). There was no significant change in flow-mediated dilatation for patent foramen ovale− patients at either visit. Conclusion These results suggest that the presence of a patent foramen ovale facilitated impairment of endothelial function acutely by the transfer of microbubbles into the arterial circulation. As a patent foramen ovale is a common condition, this may be relevant to microbubbles exposure in medical procedures and in decompression illness. PMID:26668739

  10. Effect of losartan therapy on endothelial function in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Canache, Beatriz; Hernández-Hernández, Rafael; Armas-Padilla, María Cristina; Armas-Hernández, María José; Cammarata-Segura, Rosalba; Pacheco, Beatriz; Guerrero, Jaime; Israili, Zafar H; Valasco, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of losartan therapy on endothelial function by measuring serum nitric oxide (NO) levels and urinary excretion of NO in patients with essential hypertension. A group of 30 untreated stage 2 hypertensive patients (15 males and 15 females; age, 51.3 +/- 1.5 years) were included in the study. Office systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) was measured by using a mercury sphygmomanometer according to phase I and V of Korotkoff sounds. NO levels in serum and 24-hour urine were determined at baseline and after 6 weeks of daily dosing with losartan (50-100 mg). Losartan therapy resulted in a significant fall in systolic/diastolic BP (from 169.7 +/- 4.1/105 +/- 1.8 mm Hg at baseline to 146 +/- 2.7/91 +/- 1.9 mm Hg at the end of losartan treatment; P < 0.001). The therapy also caused significant increases in both serum NO level (32.74 +/- 3.01 microM/L at baseline versus 79.04 +/- 5.17 microM/L; P < 0.001 after therapy) and urinary NO excretion (58.21 +/- 3.72 microM/L at baseline versus 113.21 +/- 8.63 microM/L; P < 0.001 after therapy). Losartan therapy also reduced serum malondialdehyde (MDA), which is a measure of oxidative stress, by 0.201 nM (15.3%; P = 0.009). Losartan at a dose of 50 to 100 mg per day was effective in reducing elevated BP. The increase in serum NO levels and urinary NO excretion and a decrease in serum MDA levels by losartan treatment indicate a reduction in oxidative stress and enhances NO availability, both of which improve endothelial function. Thus, losartan therapy improves endothelial function in hypertensive patients with essential hypertension. PMID:17414585

  11. Inhibition of endothelial cell functions by novel potential cancer chemopreventive agents.

    PubMed

    Bertl, Elisabeth; Becker, Hans; Eicher, Theophil; Herhaus, Christian; Kapadia, Govind; Bartsch, Helmut; Gerhäuser, Clarissa

    2004-12-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) play a major role in tumor-induced neovascularization and bridge the gap between a microtumor and growth factors such as nutrients and oxygen supply required for expansion. Immortalized human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) were utilized to assess anti-endothelial effects of 10 novel potential cancer chemopreventive compounds from various sources that we have investigated previously in a human in vitro anti-angiogenic assay. These include the monoacylphloroglucinol isoaspidinol B, 1,2,5,7-tetrahydroxy-anthraquinone, peracetylated carnosic acid (PCA), isoxanthohumol, 2,2',4'-trimethoxychalcone, 3'-bromo-2,4-dimethoxychalcone as well as four synthetic derivatives of lunularic acid, a bibenzyl found in mosses [Int. J. Cancer Prev. 1 (2004) 47]. EC proliferation was inhibited with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations from 0.3 to 49.6muM, whereas EC migration was affected by most compounds at sub-micromolar concentrations. PCA and the bibenzyl derivative EC 1004 potently prevented differentiation of HMEC-1 into tubule-like structures. Overall, our data indicate that inhibition of endothelial cell function contributes to various extents to the chemopreventive or anti-angiogenic potential of these lead compounds. PMID:15522231

  12. Perivascular Adipose Tissue Inhibits Endothelial Function of Rat Aortas via Caveolin-1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michelle Hui-Hsin; Chen, Shiu-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT)-derived factors have been proposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1), occupying the calcium/calmodulin binding site of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and then inhibiting nitric oxide (NO) production, is also involved in the development of atherosclerosis. Thus, we investigated whether PVAT regulated vascular tone via Cav-1 and/or endothelial NO pathways. Isometric tension studies were carried out in isolated thoracic aortas from Wistar rats in the presence and absence of PVAT. Concentration-response curves of phenylephrine, acetylcholine, and sodium nitroprusside were illustrated to examine the vascular reactivity and endothelial function. The protein expressions of eNOS and Cav-1 were also examined in aortic homogenates. Our results demonstrated that PVAT significantly enhanced vasoconstriction and inhibited vasodilatation via endothelium-dependent mechanism. The aortic NO production was diminished after PVAT treatment, whereas protein expression and activity of eNOS were not significantly affected. In addition, Cav-1 protein expression was significantly increased in aortas with PVAT transfer. Furthermore, a caveolae depleter methyl-β-cyclodextrin abolished the effect of PVAT on the enhancement of vasoconstriction, and reversed the impairment of aortic NO production. In conclusion, unknown factor(s) released from PVAT may inhibit endothelial NO production and induce vasocontraction via an increase of Cav-1 protein expression. PMID:24926683

  13. Inhibition of Monocyte Adhesion to Brain-Derived Endothelial Cells by Dual Functional RNA Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Xiao, Feng; Hao, Xin; Bai, Shuhua; Hao, Jiukuan

    2014-01-01

    Because adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells is the first step of vascular-neuronal inflammation, inhibition of adhesion and recruitment of leukocytes to vascular endothelial cells will have a beneficial effect on neuroinflammatory diseases. In this study, we used the pRNA of bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor to construct a novel RNA nanoparticle for specific targeting to transferrin receptor (TfR) on the murine brain-derived endothelial cells (bEND5) to deliver ICAM-1 siRNA. This RNA nanoparticle (FRS-NPs) contained a FB4 aptamer targeting to TfR and a siRNA moiety for silencing the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Our data indicated that this RNA nanoparticle was delivered into murine brain-derived endothelial cells. Furthermore, the siRNA was released from the FRS-NPs in the cells and knocked down ICAM-1 expression in the TNF-α–stimulated cells and in the cells under oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R) condition. The functional end points of the study indicated that FRS-NPs significantly inhibited monocyte adhesion to the bEND5 cells induced by TNF-α and OGD/R. In conclusion, our approach using RNA nanotechnology for siRNA delivery could be potentially applied for inhibition of inflammation in ischemic stroke and other neuroinflammatory diseases, or diseases affecting endothelium of vasculature. PMID:25368913

  14. A novel approach to the assessment of vascular endothelial function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathasivam, S.; Phababpha, S.; Sengmeuan, P.; Detchaporn, P.; Siddiqui, Z.; Kukongviriyapan, U.; Greenwald, S.

    2011-08-01

    Impaired endothelial function (EF) is associated with atherogenesis, and its quantitative assessment has prognostic value. Currently, methods based on assessing flow-mediated dilation (FMD) are technically difficult and expensive. We tested a novel way of assessing EF by measuring the time difference between pulses arriving at the middle fingers of each hand (f-fΔT), whilst FMD is induced in one arm. We compared f-fΔT with standard methods in healthy and diseased subjects. Our findings suggest that the proposed simple and inexpensive technique gives comparable results and has the potential to qualitatively assess EF in the clinical setting, although further work is required.

  15. Angiocrine functions of organ-specific endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Shahin; Butler, Jason M; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Preface Endothelial cells lining blood vessel capillaries are not just passive conduits for delivering blood. Tissue-specific endothelium establish specialized vascular niches that deploy specific sets of growth factors, known as angiocrine factors, which actively participate in inducing, specifying, patterning, and guiding organ regeneration and maintaining homeostasis and metabolism. Angiocrine factors upregulated in response to injury orchestrates self-renewal and differentiation of tissue-specific repopulating resident stem and progenitor cells into functional organs. Uncovering the precise mechanisms whereby physiological-levels of angiocrine factors are spatially and temporally produced, and distributed by organotypic endothelium to repopulating cells, will lay the foundation for driving organ repair without scarring. PMID:26791722

  16. Angiocrine functions of organ-specific endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rafii, Shahin; Butler, Jason M; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-01-21

    Endothelial cells that line capillaries are not just passive conduits for delivering blood. Tissue-specific endothelium establishes specialized vascular niches that deploy sets of growth factors, known as angiocrine factors. These cues participate actively in the induction, specification, patterning and guidance of organ regeneration, as well as in the maintainance of homeostasis and metabolism. When upregulated following injury, they orchestrate self-renewal and differentiation of tissue-specific resident stem and progenitor cells into functional organs. Uncovering the mechanisms by which organotypic endothelium distributes physiological levels of angiocrine factors both spatially and temporally will lay the foundation for clinical trials that promote organ repair without scarring. PMID:26791722

  17. Does L-carnitine improve endothelial function in hemodialysis patients?

    PubMed Central

    Sabri, Mohammad Reza; Fahimi, Farnaz; Hajialiasgar, Soheila; Etminan, Abbas; Nazemi, Sarir; Salehi, Farzaneh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death in hemodialysis patients. These patients are also very prone to L-carnitine deficiency due to kidney disease. In this clinical trial, we investigated the effect of oral L-carnitine on endothelial function of these patients. Materials ans Methods: We studied 31 adult chronic hemodialysis patients in our center and divided them into two groups. The first group (n = 20) received 1500 mg/dialysis interval (every other day) oral L-carnitine. The control group (n = 11) received placebo for one month. Ultrasonographic measurements of flow mediated dilation and carotid intima-media thickness were performed before and after one month of L-carnitine and placebo therapy. Results: This study showed that after one month of L-carnitine or placebo therapy there was no significant improvement in flow mediated dilation (p = 0.80 and p = 0.59, respectively) or decrease in carotid intima-media thickness (p = 0.12 and p = 0.50, respectively). Conclusions: Our study revealed that one month of oral L-carnitine therapy did not improve endothelial function in hemodialysis patients. Long-term studies with large sample size using intravenous form and higher doses of the drug are required to clarify the questionable role of L-carnitine in hemodialysis patients. PMID:23626603

  18. Brief Exposure to Secondhand Smoke Reversibly Impairs Endothelial Vasodilatory Function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We sought to determine the effects of brief exposures to low concentrations of tobacco secondhand smoke (SHS) on arterial flow-mediated dilation (FMD, a nitric oxide-dependent measure of vascular endothelial function), in a controlled animal model never before exposed to smoke. In humans, SHS exposure for 30min impairs FMD. It is important to gain a better understanding of the acute effects of exposure to SHS at low concentrations and for brief periods of time. Methods: We measured changes in FMD in rats exposed to a range of real-world levels of SHS for durations of 30min, 10min, 1min, and 4 breaths (roughly 15 s). Results: We observed a dose-response relationship between SHS particle concentration over 30min and post-exposure impairment of FMD, which was linear through the range typically encountered in smoky restaurants and then saturated at higher concentrations. One min of exposure to SHS at moderate concentrations was sufficient to impair FMD. Conclusions: Brief SHS exposure at real-world levels reversibly impairs FMD. Even 1min of SHS exposure can cause reduction of endothelial function. PMID:24302638

  19. Exercise training improves endothelial function in young prehypertensives

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Darren T; Casey, Darren P; Martin, Jeffrey S; Emerson, Blaze D; Braith, Randy W

    2015-01-01

    Prehypertensives exhibit marked endothelial dysfunction, a risk factor for future cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the ability of exercise to ameliorate endothelial dysfunction in prehypertensives is grossly underinvestigated. This prospective randomized and controlled study examined the separate effects of resistance and endurance training on conduit artery endothelial function in young prehypertensives. Forty-three unmedicated prehypertensive (systolic blood pressure [SBP]=120–139 mmHg; diastolic blood pressure [DBP]=80–89 mmHg) but otherwise healthy men and women and 15 normotensive matched time-controls (NMTC); n = 15) between 18 and 35 y of age met screening requirements and participated in the study. Prehypertensive subjects were randomly assigned to either a resistance exercise training (PHRT; n = 15), endurance exercise training (PHET; n = 13) or time-control group (PHTC; n = 15). The treatment groups performed exercise training three days per week for eight weeks. The control groups did not initiate exercise programs throughout the study. Flow mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery, biomarkers of enodothelial function and peripheral blood pressure were evaluated before and after exercise intervention or time-matched control. PHRT and PHET reduced resting SBP (9.6 ± 3.6 and 11.9 ± 3.4 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05) and DBP (8.0 ± 5.1 and 7.2 ± 3.4 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05). Exercise training improved brachial artery FMD absolute diameter, percent dilation and normalized percent dilation by 30%, 34% and 19% for PHRT, P < 0.05; and by 54%, 63% and 75% for PHET, P < 0.05; respectively. PHRT and PHET increased plasma concentrations of 6-keto prostaglandin F1α (19% and 22%, respectively; P < 0.05), NOx (19% and 23%, respectively; P < 0.05), and reduced endothelin-1 by (16% and 24%, respectively; P < 0.01). This study provides novel evidence that resistance and endurance exercise separately have beneficial effects on resting

  20. Exercise training improves endothelial function in young prehypertensives.

    PubMed

    Beck, Darren T; Casey, Darren P; Martin, Jeffrey S; Emerson, Blaze D; Braith, Randy W

    2013-04-01

    Prehypertensives exhibit marked endothelial dysfunction, a risk factor for future cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the ability of exercise to ameliorate endothelial dysfunction in prehypertensives is grossly underinvestigated. This prospective randomized and controlled study examined the separate effects of resistance and endurance training on conduit artery endothelial function in young prehypertensives. Forty-three unmedicated prehypertensive (systolic blood pressure [SBP]=120-139 mmHg; diastolic blood pressure [DBP]=80-89 mmHg) but otherwise healthy men and women and 15 normotensive matched time-controls (NMTC); n = 15) between 18 and 35 y of age met screening requirements and participated in the study. Prehypertensive subjects were randomly assigned to either a resistance exercise training (PHRT; n = 15), endurance exercise training (PHET; n = 13) or time-control group (PHTC; n = 15). The treatment groups performed exercise training three days per week for eight weeks. The control groups did not initiate exercise programs throughout the study. Flow mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery, biomarkers of enodothelial function and peripheral blood pressure were evaluated before and after exercise intervention or time-matched control. PHRT and PHET reduced resting SBP (9.6 ± 3.6 and 11.9 ± 3.4 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05) and DBP (8.0 ± 5.1 and 7.2 ± 3.4 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05). Exercise training improved brachial artery FMD absolute diameter, percent dilation and normalized percent dilation by 30%, 34% and 19% for PHRT, P < 0.05; and by 54%, 63% and 75% for PHET, P < 0.05; respectively. PHRT and PHET increased plasma concentrations of 6-keto prostaglandin F1α (19% and 22%, respectively; P < 0.05), NO x (19% and 23%, respectively; P < 0.05), and reduced endothelin-1 by (16% and 24%, respectively; P < 0.01). This study provides novel evidence that resistance and endurance exercise separately have beneficial effects on resting

  1. [Regulation of endothelial cells functions by ultrasonic supernatant of Streptococcus pyogenes].

    PubMed

    Starikova, É A; Lebedeva, A M; Burova, L A; Freĭdlin, I S

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis and vascular remodeling are vital components of inflammation. As an inflammation evolves, vessels expand to supply nutrients and inflammatory mediators, sustaining the accumulation of activated immune cells in the affected tissues. This study demonstrates that ultrasonic supernatant of Streptoccocus pyogenes has anti-angiogenic properties: inhibit EA.hy 926 human endothelial cells metabolism, adhesion, migration, proliferation. At the same time Streptococcal components inhibit signaling pathways that involve FAK and ERK1/2. These effects are not associated with necrosis or apoptosis in cell culture. Taking together, our results suggest that impairing angiogenic function of endothelial cells might contribute to the reduced tissue perfusion, hypoxia, and subsequent regional tissue necrosis caused by Streptococci group A. PMID:22567900

  2. IDH2 deficiency impairs mitochondrial function in endothelial cells and endothelium-dependent vasomotor function.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Bum; Nagar, Harsha; Choi, Sujeong; Jung, Saet-Byel; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Kang, Shin Kwang; Lee, Jun Wan; Lee, Jin Hyup; Park, Jeen-Woo; Irani, Kaikobad; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Song, Hee-Jung; Kim, Cuk-Seong

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH2) plays an essential role protecting cells against oxidative stress-induced damage. A deficiency in IDH2 leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiomyocytes and cancer cells. However, the function of IDH2 in vascular endothelial cells is mostly unknown. In this study the effects of IDH2 deficiency on mitochondrial and vascular function were investigated in endothelial cells. IDH2 knockdown decreased the expression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes I, II and III, which lead to increased mitochondrial superoxide. In addition, the levels of fission and fusion proteins (Mfn-1, OPA-1, and Drp-1) were significantly altered and MnSOD expression also was decreased by IDH2 knockdown. Furthermore, knockdown of IDH2 decreased eNOS phosphorylation and nitric oxide (NO) concentration in endothelial cells. Interestingly, treatment with Mito-TEMPO, a mitochondrial-specific superoxide scavenger, recovered mitochondrial fission-fusion imbalance and blunted mitochondrial superoxide production, and reduced the IDH2 knockdown-induced decrease in MnSOD expression, eNOS phosphorylation and NO production in endothelial cells. Endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation was impaired, and the concentration of bioavailable NO decreased in the aortic ring in IDH2 knockout mice. These findings suggest that IDH2 deficiency induces endothelial dysfunction through the induction of dynamic mitochondrial changes and impairment in vascular function. PMID:26898144

  3. Structural and functional characterization of endothelial microparticles released by cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Serban, Karina A; Rezania, Samin; Petrusca, Daniela N; Poirier, Christophe; Cao, Danting; Justice, Matthew J; Patel, Milan; Tsvetkova, Irina; Kamocki, Krzysztof; Mikosz, Andrew; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Jacobson, Sean; Cardoso, Angelo; Carlesso, Nadia; Hubbard, Walter C; Kechris, Katerina; Dragnea, Bogdan; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; McClintock, Jeanette; Petrache, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Circulating endothelial microparticles (EMPs) are emerging as biomarkers of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in individuals exposed to cigarette smoke (CS), but their mechanism of release and function remain unknown. We assessed biochemical and functional characteristics of EMPs and circulating microparticles (cMPs) released by CS. CS exposure was sufficient to increase microparticle levels in plasma of humans and mice, and in supernatants of primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. CS-released EMPs contained predominantly exosomes that were significantly enriched in let-7d, miR-191; miR-126; and miR125a, microRNAs that reciprocally decreased intracellular in CS-exposed endothelium. CS-released EMPs and cMPs were ceramide-rich and required the ceramide-synthesis enzyme acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) for their release, an enzyme which was found to exhibit significantly higher activity in plasma of COPD patients or of CS-exposed mice. The ex vivo or in vivo engulfment of EMPs or cMPs by peripheral blood monocytes-derived macrophages was associated with significant inhibition of efferocytosis. Our results indicate that CS, via aSMase, releases circulating EMPs with distinct microRNA cargo and that EMPs affect the clearance of apoptotic cells by specialized macrophages. These targetable effects may be important in the pathogenesis of diseases linked to endothelial injury and inflammation in smokers. PMID:27530098

  4. Structural and functional characterization of endothelial microparticles released by cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Serban, Karina A.; Rezania, Samin; Petrusca, Daniela N.; Poirier, Christophe; Cao, Danting; Justice, Matthew J.; Patel, Milan; Tsvetkova, Irina; Kamocki, Krzysztof; Mikosz, Andrew; Schweitzer, Kelly S.; Jacobson, Sean; Cardoso, Angelo; Carlesso, Nadia; Hubbard, Walter C.; Kechris, Katerina; Dragnea, Bogdan; Berdyshev, Evgeny V.; McClintock, Jeanette; Petrache, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Circulating endothelial microparticles (EMPs) are emerging as biomarkers of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in individuals exposed to cigarette smoke (CS), but their mechanism of release and function remain unknown. We assessed biochemical and functional characteristics of EMPs and circulating microparticles (cMPs) released by CS. CS exposure was sufficient to increase microparticle levels in plasma of humans and mice, and in supernatants of primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. CS-released EMPs contained predominantly exosomes that were significantly enriched in let-7d, miR-191; miR-126; and miR125a, microRNAs that reciprocally decreased intracellular in CS-exposed endothelium. CS-released EMPs and cMPs were ceramide-rich and required the ceramide-synthesis enzyme acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) for their release, an enzyme which was found to exhibit significantly higher activity in plasma of COPD patients or of CS-exposed mice. The ex vivo or in vivo engulfment of EMPs or cMPs by peripheral blood monocytes-derived macrophages was associated with significant inhibition of efferocytosis. Our results indicate that CS, via aSMase, releases circulating EMPs with distinct microRNA cargo and that EMPs affect the clearance of apoptotic cells by specialized macrophages. These targetable effects may be important in the pathogenesis of diseases linked to endothelial injury and inflammation in smokers. PMID:27530098

  5. Endothelial PECAM-1 and its function in vascular physiology and atherogenic pathology.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-06-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) is highly expressed in vascular cells such as endothelial cells (ECs) and blood-borne cells like platelets and leukocytes. In ECs, this molecule controls junctional and adhesive properties. In physiological conditions, PECAM-1 supports the endothelial barrier function. In inflammation that is observed in vessels affected by atherosclerosis, the function of PECAM-1 is impaired, an event that leads to increased adhesion of neutrophils and other leukocytes to ECs, decreased vascular integrity, and higher leukocyte transmigration to the intima media. PECAM-1 has six extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains that support attraction and adhesion of leukocytes to ECs. The cytoplasmic tail of PECAM-1 contains two tyrosine residues (Tyr-663 and Tyr-686) that could be phosphorylated by Src family protein kinases is involved in the intracellular signaling. Actually, those tyrosines are the part of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motifs (ITIMs) that inhibit inflammation. However, in atherosclerosis, the PECAM-1-dependent immune suppression is disturbed. This in turn facilitates recruitment of leukocytes and supports proatherogenic inflammation. PMID:27079772

  6. Effect of paricalcitol on endothelial function and inflammation in type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Thethi, Tina K.; Bajwa, Muhammad A.; Ghanim, Husam; Jo, Chanhee; Weir, Monica; Goldfine, Allison B.; Umpierrez, Guillermo; Desouza, Cyrus; Dandona, Paresh; Fang-Hollingsworth, Ying; Raghavan, Vasudevan; Fonseca, Vivian A.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) have impaired endothelial function. Vitamin D and its analogs may play a role in regulation of endothelial function and inflammation. We studied effects of paricalcitol compared to placebo on endothelial function and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress in patients with T2DM and CKD. Methods A double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in 60 patients with T2DM and stage 3 or 4 CKD. Paricalcitol 1 mcg or placebo was administered orally once daily for three months. Brachial artery flow mediated dilatation (FMD), nitroglycerine mediated dilation (NMD), and plasma concentrations of inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor –α and interleukin-6, highly-sensitive C-reactive protein; endothelial surface proteins, intercellular adhesion molecule –1 and monocyte chemo attractant protein-1, and plasma glucose, insulin, free fatty acids, and urinary isoprostane were measured at baseline and end of three months. Results 27 patients in the paricalcitol group and 28 patients in the control group completed the study, though analysis of FMD at both time points was possible in 23 patients in each group. There was no significant difference in the change in FMD, NMD or the biomarkers examined after paricalcitol or placebo treatment. Conclusions Treatment with paricalcitol at this dose and duration did not affect brachial artery FMD or biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress. The lack of significance may be due to the fact that the study patients had advanced CKD and that effects of paricalcitol are not additive to the effects of glycemic, lipid and anti-hypertensive therapies. PMID:25633573

  7. Teneligliptin improves left ventricular diastolic function and endothelial function in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hashikata, Takehiro; Yamaoka-Tojo, Minako; Kakizaki, Ryota; Nemoto, Teruyoshi; Fujiyoshi, Kazuhiro; Namba, Sayaka; Kitasato, Lisa; Hashimoto, Takuya; Kameda, Ryo; Maekawa, Emi; Shimohama, Takao; Tojo, Taiki; Ako, Junya

    2016-08-01

    Incretin hormones have been reported to have cytoprotective actions in addition to their glucose-lowering effects. We evaluated whether teneligliptin, a novel dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, affects left ventricular (LV) function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Twenty-nine T2DM patients not receiving any incretin-based drugs were enrolled and prescribed with teneligliptin for 3 months. Compared to baseline levels, hemoglobin A1c levels decreased (7.6 ± 1.0 % to 6.9 ± 0.7 %, p < 0.01) and 1,5-anhydro-D-glucitol levels increased (9.6 ± 7.2 μg/mL to 13.5 ± 8.7 μg/mL, p < 0.01) after treatment. Clinical parameters, including body mass index and blood pressure, did not show any difference before and after treatment. Three months after treatment, there were improvements in LV systolic and diastolic function [LV ejection fraction, 62.0 ± 6.5 % to 64.5 ± 5.0 %, p = 0.01; peak early diastolic velocity/basal septal diastolic velocity (E/e') ratio, 13.3 ± 4.1 to 11.9 ± 3.3, p = 0.01]. Moreover, there was an improvement in endothelial function (reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry [RH-PAT] index; 1.58 ± 0.47 to 2.01 ± 0.72, p < 0.01). There was a significant negative correlation between changes in the E/e' ratio and RH-PAT values. Furthermore, circulating adiponectin levels increased (27.0 ± 38.5 pg/mL to 42.7 ± 33.2 pg/mL, p < 0.01) without changes in patient body weight. Teneligliptin treatment was associated with improvements in LV function and endothelial functions, and an increase in serum adiponectin levels. These results support the cardio-protective effects of teneligliptin in T2DM patients and increase in serum adiponectin levels. PMID:26266630

  8. Structure-function analysis of Leishmania lipophosphoglycan. Distinct domains that mediate binding and inhibition of endothelial cell function.

    PubMed

    Ho, J L; Kim, H K; Sass, P M; He, S; Geng, J; Xu, H; Zhu, B; Turco, S J; Lo, S K

    1996-10-01

    We have shown that Leishmania lipophosphoglycan (LPG) inhibits IL-1 beta gene expression in human monocytes. Here, we show that LPG can bind in a time-dependent manner and suppress endothelial cell activation, possibly via specific LPG domains. Endotoxin (10 ng/ml, 4 h) consistently caused endothelium to increase monocyte adhesion (approximately 20-fold). LPG pretreatment (2 microM, 2 h) completely blocked endotoxin-mediated monocyte adhesion. LPG did not grossly suppress endothelial functions because TNF-alpha- and IL-1 beta-mediated adhesion toward monocytes were not affected. Using four highly purified LPG fragments (namely, repeating phosphodisaccharide (PGM), phosphoglycan, phosphosaccharide core-lyso-alkyl-phosphatidylinositol (core-PI), and lyso-alkyl-phosphatidylinositol (lyso-PI)), we examined whether these fragments can independently inhibit endothelial adhesion. In contrast to that of intact LPG, neither the four LPG fragments (2 microM, 2 h) independently nor the co-addition of phosphoglycan and core-P1 fragments blocked the endotoxin-mediated adhesion to monocytes. To determine whether the fragments can reverse the effect of intact LPG, endothelial cells were first pretreated with the LPG fragments (10 microM, 15 min), followed by the addition of LPG (2 microM). All four LPG fragments fully reversed the effect of LPG. Simultaneous addition of LPG fragments and intact LPG caused only partial suppression (approximately 45%), while the addition of LPG fragments 14 min later had no reversal effect. Flow cytometry revealed that only core-P1 and lyso-P1 competitively inhibited (approximately 30%) LPG binding. Conversely, LPG competed with the binding of [3H]lyso-P1 (approximately 30%). Furthermore, mAb against the PGM reversed (approximately 70%) the effect of LPG. Thus, the lyso-P1 domain on LPG mediates binding to endothelial cells, whereas the PGM domain mediates the cell inhibitory effect. PMID:8816410

  9. microRNAs as Pharmacological Targets in Endothelial Cell Function and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chamorro-Jorganes, Aránzazu; Araldi, Elisa; Suárez, Yajaira

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cell dysfunction is a term which implies the dysregulation of normal endothelial cell functions, including impairment of the barrier functions, control of vascular tone, disturbance of proliferative, migratory and morphogenic capacities of endothelial cells, as well as control of leukocyte trafficking. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression acting predominantly at the post-transcriptional level. This review summarizes the latest insights in the identification of endothelial-specific miRNAs and their targets, as well as their roles in controlling endothelial cell functions in both autocrine and paracrine manner. In addition, we discuss the therapeutic potential for the treatment of endothelial cell dysfunction and associated vascular pathophysiological conditions. PMID:23603154

  10. A Role for the Long Noncoding RNA SENCR in Commitment and Function of Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boulberdaa, Mounia; Scott, Elizabeth; Ballantyne, Margaret; Garcia, Raquel; Descamps, Betty; Angelini, Gianni D; Brittan, Mairi; Hunter, Amanda; McBride, Martin; McClure, John; Miano, Joseph M; Emanueli, Costanza; Mills, Nicholas L; Mountford, Joanne C; Baker, Andrew H

    2016-01-01

    Despite the increasing importance of long noncoding RNA in physiology and disease, their role in endothelial biology remains poorly understood. Growing evidence has highlighted them to be essential regulators of human embryonic stem cell differentiation. SENCR, a vascular-enriched long noncoding RNA, overlaps the Friend Leukemia Integration virus 1 (FLI1) gene, a regulator of endothelial development. Therefore, we wanted to test the hypothesis that SENCR may contribute to mesodermal and endothelial commitment as well as in endothelial function. We thus developed new differentiation protocols allowing generation of endothelial cells from human embryonic stem cells using both directed and hemogenic routes. The expression of SENCR was markedly regulated during endothelial commitment using both protocols. SENCR did not control the pluripotency of pluripotent cells; however its overexpression significantly potentiated early mesodermal and endothelial commitment. In human umbilical endothelial cell (HUVEC), SENCR induced proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis. SENCR expression was altered in vascular tissue and cells derived from patients with critical limb ischemia and premature coronary artery disease compared to controls. Here, we showed that SENCR contributes to the regulation of endothelial differentiation from pluripotent cells and controls the angiogenic capacity of HUVEC. These data give novel insight into the regulatory processes involved in endothelial development and function. PMID:26898221

  11. Comparison of Morphological and Functional Endothelial Cell Changes after Cataract Surgery: Phacoemulsification Versus Manual Small-Incision Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ganekal, Sunil; Nagarajappa, Ashwini

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the morphological (cell density, coefficient of variation and standard deviation) and functional (central corneal thickness) endothelial changes after phacoemulsification versus manual small-incision cataract surgery (MSICS). Design: Prospective randomized control study. Materials and Methods: In this prospective randomized control study, patients were randomly allocated to undergo phacoemulsification (Group 1, n = 100) or MSICS (Group 2, n = 100) using a random number Table. The patients underwent complete ophthalmic evaluation and specular microscopy preoperatively and at 1and 6 weeks postoperatively. Functional and morphological endothelial evaluation was Noncon ROBO PACHY SP-9000 specular microscope. Phacoemulsification was performed, the chop technique and MSICS, by the viscoexpression technique. Results: The mean difference in central corneal thickness at baseline and 1 week between Group 1 and Group 2 was statistically significant (P = 0.027). However, this difference at baseline when compared to 6 week and 1 week, 6 weeks was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The difference in mean endothelial cell density between groups at 1 week and 6 weeks was statistically significant (P = 0.016). The mean coefficient of variation and mean standard deviation between groups were not statistically significant (P > 0.05, both comparisons). Conclusion: The central corneal thickness, coefficient of variation, and standard deviation were maintained in both groups indicating that the function and morphology of endothelial cells was not affected despite an initial reduction in endothelial cell number in MSICS. Thus, MSICS remains a safe option in the developing world. PMID:24669147

  12. Hyaluronic acid hydrogel stiffness and oxygen tension affect cancer cell fate and endothelial sprouting

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yu-I; Abaci, Hasan E.; Krupsi, Yoni; Weng, Lien-Chun; Burdick, Jason A.; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissue culture models may recapitulate aspects of the tumorigenic microenvironment in vivo, enabling the study of cancer progression in vitro. Both hypoxia and matrix stiffness are known to regulate tumor growth. Using a modular culture system employing an acrylated hyaluronic acid (AHA) hydrogel, three hydrogel matrices with distinctive degrees of viscoelasticity — soft (78±16 Pa), medium (309± 57 Pa), and stiff (596± 73 Pa) — were generated using the same concentration of adhesion ligands. Oxygen levels within the hydrogel in atmospheric (21 %), hypoxic (5 %), and severely hypoxic (1 %) conditions were assessed with a mathematical model. HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells, encapsulated within the AHA hydrogels in high densities, generated nonuniform oxygen distributions, while lower cell densities resulted in more uniform oxygen distributions in the atmospheric and hypoxic environments. When we examined how varying viscoelasticity in atmospheric and hypoxic environments affects cell cycles and the expression of BNIP3 and BNIP3L (autophagy and apoptosis genes), and GLUT-1 (a glucose transport gene), we observed that HT1080 cells in 3D hydrogel adapted better to hypoxic conditions than those in a Petri dish, with no obvious correlation to matrix viscoelasticity, by recovering rapidly from possible autophagy/apoptotic events and alternating metabolism mechanisms. Further, we examined how HT1080 cells cultured in varying viscoelasticity and oxygen tension conditions affected endothelial sprouting and invasion. We observed that increased matrix stiffness reduced endothelial sprouting and invasion in atmospheric conditions; however, we observed increased endothelial sprouting and invasion under hypoxia at all levels of matrix stiffness with the upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoeitin-1 (ANG-1). Overall, HT1080 cells encapsulated in the AHA hydrogels under hypoxic stress recovered better from apoptosis and

  13. Impact of extracellular RNA on endothelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Silvia; Cabrera-Fuentes, Hector A; Noll, Thomas; Preissner, Klaus T

    2014-03-01

    Different types of high and low molecular weight extracellular RNA (eRNA) are liberated from cells upon conditions of tissue damage or vascular diseases and have been demonstrated in vivo and in vitro to influence the integrity and barrier function of the vascular endothelium. Among the types of self eRNA studied in this respect, ribosomal RNA appears to engage cytokines to promote hyperpermeability, while counteracting RNase1 serves as a potent vessel-protective factor. Different microRNAs may change the expression program of endothelial cells with consequences for cellular contacts and stability. Non-self viral RNAs are recognized by Toll-like receptors that transmit intracellular inflammation signals to disturb the vascular barrier function, largely in connection with infectious diseases. Although derived from the same nucleotide building blocks, the various forms of eRNA exhibit a multitude of molecular interactions with the endothelium that may drastically change its phenotypical characteristics. The impact of eRNA on vascular integrity in health and disease is summarized in this concise review. PMID:24626811

  14. Effects of irrigation solutions on corneal endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Yagoubi, M I; Armitage, W J; Diamond, J; Easty, D L

    1994-04-01

    Rabbit corneas were perfused in vitro with an irrigation solution for 90 minutes. This was followed by 6 hours of perfusion with tissue culture medium TC199 during which endothelial function was assessed by monitoring rates of swelling during a period of perfusion in the absence of bicarbonate ions, and subsequent rates of thinning when bicarbonate ions were restored to the perfusate. Corneal thickness (measured with an ultrasonic pachymeter) immediately following excision was 401 microns (SD 19, n = 23). During the 90 minute perfusion at 35 degrees C, corneas exposed to balanced salt solution (BSS), Hartmann's solution or 0.9% NaCl (all initially at room temperature) swelled, respectively, at 14 (SD 2.3, n = 4), 11 (SD 2.6, n = 4), and 70 (SD 4.3, n = 4) microns/h. Cold Hartmann's solution (initially at 4 degrees C) caused corneas to swell at 9 (SD 2.3, n = 4) microns/h. On the other hand, corneas perfused with BSS Plus thinned at 9 (SD 3.4, n = 4) microns/h and TC199 with Earle's salts had little effect on thickness. Rates of swelling and thinning during the following assessment perfusion showed no apparent effects of prior exposure to any of the irrigation solutions on the barrier properties or pump function of the endothelium. Despite this, the increased thickness of corneas exposed initially to BSS, cold Hartmann's solution, or 0.9% NaCl was not fully reversed, even by the end of the 6 hour assessment perfusion. In contrast, the swelling observed in corneas exposed to Hartmann's solution at room temperature was reversed and these corneas had returned to their normal thickness by the end of the assessment period. All corneas, even those exposed to 0.9% NaCl, had an intact endothelial mosaic with no evidence of damage or cell loss, although morphological differences in cell shape and the appearance of cell borders were evident compared with freshly isolated cornea. PMID:8199119

  15. Endothelial function and chronic exposure to air pollution in normal male subjects.

    PubMed

    Briet, Marie; Collin, Cédric; Laurent, Stéphane; Tan, Alice; Azizi, Michel; Agharazii, Mohsen; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Alhenc-Gelas, François; Boutouyrie, Pierre

    2007-11-01

    Exposure to urban air pollution, ultrafine particles or gases, is associated with acute cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. We investigated the effect of ambient air pollution on endothelial function in 40 healthy white male nonsmokers spontaneously breathing ambient air in Paris, France. Air pollutant levels (nitrogen, sulfur and carbon oxides, and particulate matter) were averaged during the 5 days preceding arterial measurements. Brachial artery endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilatation and reactive hyperemia induced by hand ischemia and endothelium-independent glyceryl trinitrate dilatation were measured using a radiofrequency-based echo-tracking device at 2-week intervals. Flow-mediated dilatation was independently and negatively correlated with the average levels of sulfur dioxide (P<0.001) and nitrogen monoxide (P<0.01). Sulfur dioxide levels explained 19% of the variance of flow-mediated dilatation. An increase in gaseous pollutants, 2 weeks apart, was significantly associated with a decreased in flow-mediated dilatation. No association was found between air pollutants and glyceryl trinitrate-induced vasodilatation. Reactive hyperemia was significantly and positively correlated with particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters <10 microm and <2.5 microm (P<0.0001 and P<0.001, respectively) and nitrogen dioxide (P<0.01). An increase in particulate matter, 2 weeks apart, was significantly correlated with an increase in reactive hyperemia. Endothelial function was impaired by ordinary levels of pollution in healthy young males, in an urban area, and may be reduced by 50% between the least and the most polluted day. Gaseous pollutants affect large artery endothelial function, whereas particulate matter exaggerates the dilatory response of small arteries to ischemia. PMID:17875820

  16. Surface Projections of Titanium Substrates Increase Antithrombotic Endothelial Function in Response to Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jantzen, Alexandra E.; Achneck, Hardean E.; Truskey, George A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the therapeutic benefits of both mechanical circulatory assist devices and nitinol stents with titanium (Ti) outer surfaces, problems remain with thrombosis at the blood-contacting surface. Covering these surfaces with a layer of endothelium would mimic the native lining of the cardiovascular system, potentially decreasing thrombotic complications. Since surface topography is known to affect the phenotype of a seeded cell layer and since stents and ventricular assist devices exhibit surface protrusions, we tested the hypothesis that endothelial cells (ECs) have altered function on Ti surfaces with protrusions of 1.25, 3, and 5 μm height, compared to smooth Ti surfaces. ECs and nuclei were more aligned and ECs were more elongated on all patterned surfaces. Cell area was reduced on the 3 and 5 μm features. Expression of eNOS and COX2 was not altered by patterned surfaces, but expression of KLF-2 was higher on 1.25 and 5 μm features. Nitric oxide production following exposure to flow was higher on the 5 μm features. These results show that some antithrombogenic functions of ECs are significantly enhanced for ECs cultured on surface protrusions, and no functions are diminished, informing the future design of implant surfaces for endothelialization. PMID:23554161

  17. Associations of endothelial function and air temperature in diabetic subjects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background and Objective: Epidemiological studies consistently show that air temperature is associated with changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the biological mechanisms underlying the association remain largely unknown. As one index of endothelial functio...

  18. Impairment of Endothelial Function by Little Cigar Secondhand Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiangtao; Wang, Xiaoyin; Narayan, Shilpa; Glantz, Stanton A.; Schick, Suzaynn F.; Springer, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Little cigars and cigarillos are gaining in popularity as cigarette use wanes, mainly due to relaxed regulatory standards that make them cheaper, easier to buy individually, and available in a variety of flavors not allowed in cigarettes. To address whether they should be regulated as strictly as cigarettes, we investigated whether little cigar secondhand smoke (SHS) decreases vascular endothelial function like that of cigarettes. Methods We exposed rats to SHS from little cigars, cigarettes, or chamber air, for 10 minutes and measured the resulting acute impairment of arterial flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Results SHS from both little cigars and cigarettes impaired FMD. Impairment was greater after exposure to little cigar SHS than by cigarette SHS relative to pre-exposure values, although the post-exposure FMD values were not significantly different from each other. Conclusions Exposure to little cigar SHS leads to impairment of FMD that is at least equal to that resulting from similar levels of cigarette SHS. Our findings support the need to prevent even brief exposure to little cigar SHS, and support tobacco control policies that regulate little cigars as strictly as cigarettes. PMID:26753171

  19. Assessments of Arterial Stiffness and Endothelial Function Using Pulse Wave Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, Lee; Young, Joanna M.; Fryer, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Conventionally, the assessments of endothelial function and arterial stiffness require different sets of equipment, making the inclusion of both tests impractical for clinical and epidemiological studies. Pulse wave analysis (PWA) provides useful information regarding the mechanical properties of the arterial tree and can also be used to assess endothelial function. PWA is a simple, valid, reliable, and inexpensive technique, offering great clinical and epidemiological potential. The current paper will outline how to measure arterial stiffness and endothelial function using this technique and include discussion of validity and reliability. PMID:22666595

  20. Impairment of endothelial progenitor cell function and vascularization capacity by aldosterone in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Thum, Thomas; Schmitter, Kerstin; Fleissner, Felix; Wiebking, Volker; Dietrich, Bernd; Widder, Julian D.; Jazbutyte, Virginija; Hahner, Stefanie; Ertl, Georg; Bauersachs, Johann

    2011-01-01

    Aims Hyperaldosteronism is associated with vascular injury and increased cardiovascular events. Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important role in endothelial repair and vascular homeostasis. We hypothesized that hyperaldosteronism impairs EPC function and vascularization capacity in mice and humans. Methods and results We characterized the effects of aldosterone and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) blockade on EPC number and function as well as vascularization capacity and endothelial function. Treatment of human EPC with aldosterone induced translocation of the MR and impaired multiple cellular functions of EPC, such as differentiation, migration, and proliferation in vitro. Impaired EPC function was rescued by pharmacological blockade or genetic ablation of the MR. Aldosterone protein kinase A (PKA) dependently increased reactive oxygen species formation in EPC. Aldosterone infusion in mice impaired EPC function, EPC homing to vascular structures and vascularization capacity in a MR-dependent but blood pressure-independent manner. Endothelial progenitor cells from patients with primary hyperaldosteronism compared with controls of similar age displayed reduced migratory potential. Impaired EPC function was associated with endothelial dysfunction. MR blockade in patients with hyperaldosteronism improved EPC function and arterial stiffness. Conclusion Endothelial progenitor cells express a MR that mediates functional impairment by PKA-dependent increase of reactive oxygen species. Normalization of EPC function may represent a novel mechanism contributing to the beneficial effects of MR blockade in cardiovascular disease prevention and treatment. PMID:20926363

  1. Functional behavior and gene expression of magnetic nanoparticle-loaded primary endothelial cells for targeting vascular stents

    PubMed Central

    Tuj Zohra, Fatema; Medved, Mikhail; Lazareva, Nina; Polyak, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Aim To assess functional competence and gene expression of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP)-loaded primary endothelial cells (ECs) as potential cell-based therapy vectors. Materials & methods A quantitative tube formation, nitric oxide and adhesion assays were conducted to assess functional potency of the MNP-loaded ECs. A quantitative real-time PCR was used to profile genes in both MNP-loaded at static conditions and in vitro targeted ECs. Results Functional behavior of MNP-loaded and unloaded cells was comparable. MNPs induce expression of genes involved in EC growth and survival, while repress genes involved in coagulation. Conclusion MNPs do not adversely affect cellular function. Gene expression indicates that targeting MNP-loaded ECs to vascular stents may potentially stimulate re-endothelialization of an implant and attenuate neointimal hyperplasia. PMID:25996117

  2. Exercise training improves endothelial function in resistance arteries of young prehypertensives.

    PubMed

    Beck, D T; Martin, J S; Casey, D P; Braith, R W

    2014-05-01

    Prehypertension is associated with reduced conduit artery endothelial function and perturbation of oxidant/antioxidant status. It is unknown whether endothelial dysfunction persists to resistance arteries and whether exercise training affects oxidant/antioxidant balance in young prehypertensives. We examined resistance artery function using venous occlusion plethysmography measurement of forearm (FBF) and calf blood flow (CBF) at rest and during reactive hyperaemia (RH), as well as lipid peroxidation (8-iso-PGF2α) and antioxidant capacity (Trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity; TEAC) before and after exercise intervention or time control. Forty-three unmedicated prehypertensive and 15 matched normotensive time controls met screening requirements and participated in the study (age: 21.1±0.8 years). Prehypertensive subjects were randomly assigned to resistance exercise training (PHRT; n=15), endurance exercise training (PHET; n=13) or time-control groups (PHTC; n=15). Treatment groups exercised 3 days per week for 8 weeks. Peak and total FBF were lower in prehypertensives than normotensives (12.7±1.2 ml min(-1) per100 ml tissue and 89.1±7.7 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue vs 16.3±1.0 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue and 123.3±6.4 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue, respectively; P<0.05). Peak and total CBF were lower in prehypertensives than normotensives (15.3±1.2 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue and 74±8.3 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue vs 20.9±1.4 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue and 107±9.2 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue, respectively; P<0.05). PHRT and PHET improved humoral measures of TEAC (+24 and +30%) and 8-iso-PGF2α (-43 and -40%, respectively; P < or = 0.05). This study provides evidence that young prehypertensives exhibit reduced resistance artery endothelial function and that short-term (8 weeks) resistance or endurance training are effective in improving resistance artery endothelial function and oxidant

  3. Endothelial Microparticle-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species: Role in Endothelial Signaling and Vascular Function.

    PubMed

    Burger, Dylan; Turner, Maddison; Munkonda, Mercedes N; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial microparticles are effectors of endothelial damage; however mechanisms involved are unclear. We examined the effects of eMPs on cultured endothelial cells (ECs) and isolated vessels and investigated the role of eMP-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox signaling in these processes. eMPs were isolated from EC media and their ability to directly produce ROS was assessed by lucigenin and liquid chromatography. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox) subunits were probed by Western blot. ECs were treated with eMPs and effects on kinase signaling, superoxide anion (O2 (∙-)) generation, and nitric oxide (NO) production were examined. Acetylcholine-mediated vasorelaxation was assessed by myography in eMP-treated mesenteric arteries. eMPs contained Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, p47(phox), p67(phox), and p22(phox) and they produced ROS which was inhibited by the Nox inhibitor, apocynin. eMPs increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Src, increased O2 (∙-) production, and decreased A23187-induced NO production in ECs. Pretreatment of eMPs with apocynin diminished eMP-mediated effects on ROS and NO production but had no effect on eMP-mediated kinase activation or impairment in vasorelaxation. Our findings identify a novel mechanism whereby eMP-derived ROS contributes to MP bioactivity. These interactions may be important in conditions associated with vascular injury and increased eMP formation. PMID:27313830

  4. Endothelial Microparticle-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species: Role in Endothelial Signaling and Vascular Function

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Dylan; Turner, Maddison; Munkonda, Mercedes N.; Touyz, Rhian M.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial microparticles are effectors of endothelial damage; however mechanisms involved are unclear. We examined the effects of eMPs on cultured endothelial cells (ECs) and isolated vessels and investigated the role of eMP-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox signaling in these processes. eMPs were isolated from EC media and their ability to directly produce ROS was assessed by lucigenin and liquid chromatography. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox) subunits were probed by Western blot. ECs were treated with eMPs and effects on kinase signaling, superoxide anion (O2∙−) generation, and nitric oxide (NO) production were examined. Acetylcholine-mediated vasorelaxation was assessed by myography in eMP-treated mesenteric arteries. eMPs contained Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, p47phox, p67phox, and p22phox and they produced ROS which was inhibited by the Nox inhibitor, apocynin. eMPs increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Src, increased O2∙− production, and decreased A23187-induced NO production in ECs. Pretreatment of eMPs with apocynin diminished eMP-mediated effects on ROS and NO production but had no effect on eMP-mediated kinase activation or impairment in vasorelaxation. Our findings identify a novel mechanism whereby eMP-derived ROS contributes to MP bioactivity. These interactions may be important in conditions associated with vascular injury and increased eMP formation. PMID:27313830

  5. Placebo Sleep Affects Cognitive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draganich, Christina; Erdal, Kristi

    2014-01-01

    The placebo effect is any outcome that is not attributed to a specific treatment but rather to an individual's mindset (Benson & Friedman, 1996). This phenomenon can extend beyond its typical use in pharmaceutical drugs to involve aspects of everyday life, such as the effect of sleep on cognitive functioning. In 2 studies examining whether…

  6. Prohibitin-1 maintains the angiogenic capacity of endothelial cells by regulating mitochondrial function and senescence

    PubMed Central

    Schleicher, Michael; Shepherd, Benjamin R.; Suarez, Yajaira; Fernandez-Hernando, Carlos; Yu, Jun; Pan, Yong; Acevedo, Lisette M.; Shadel, Gerald S.; Sessa, William C.

    2008-01-01

    Prohibitin 1 (PHB1) is a highly conserved protein that is mainly localized to the inner mitochondrial membrane and has been implicated in regulating mitochondrial function in yeast. Because mitochondria are emerging as an important regulator of vascular homeostasis, we examined PHB1 function in endothelial cells. PHB1 is highly expressed in the vascular system and knockdown of PHB1 in endothelial cells increases mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species via inhibition of complex I, which results in cellular senescence. As a direct consequence, both Akt and Rac1 are hyperactivated, leading to cytoskeletal rearrangements and decreased endothelial cell motility, e.g., migration and tube formation. This is also reflected in an in vivo angiogenesis assay, where silencing of PHB1 blocks the formation of functional blood vessels. Collectively, our results provide evidence that PHB1 is important for mitochondrial function and prevents reactive oxygen species–induced senescence and thereby maintains the angiogenic capacity of endothelial cells. PMID:18195103

  7. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Modulates Skeletal Myoblast Function

    PubMed Central

    Germani, Antonia; Di Carlo, Anna; Mangoni, Antonella; Straino, Stefania; Giacinti, Cristina; Turrini, Paolo; Biglioli, Paolo; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.

    2003-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression is enhanced in ischemic skeletal muscle and is thought to play a key role in the angiogenic response to ischemia. However, it is still unknown whether, in addition to new blood vessel growth, VEGF modulates skeletal muscle cell function. In the present study immunohistochemical analysis showed that, in normoperfused mouse hindlimb, VEGF and its receptors Flk-1 and Flt-1 were expressed mostly in quiescent satellite cells. Unilateral hindlimb ischemia was induced by left femoral artery ligation. At day 3 and day 7 after the induction of ischemia, Flk-1 and Flt-1 were expressed in regenerating muscle fibers and VEGF expression by these fibers was markedly enhanced. Additional in vitro experiments showed that in growing medium both cultured satellite cells and myoblast cell line C2C12 expressed VEGF and its receptors. Under these conditions, Flk-1 receptor exhibited constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation that was increased by VEGF treatment. During myogenic differentiation Flk-1 and Flt-1 were down-regulated. In a modified Boyden Chamber assay, VEGF enhanced C2C12 myoblasts migration approximately fivefold. Moreover, VEGF administration to differentiating C2C12 myoblasts prevented apoptosis, while inhibition of VEGF signaling either with selective VEGF receptor inhibitors (SU1498 and CB676475) or a neutralizing Flk-1 antibody, enhanced cell death approximately 3.5-fold. Finally, adenovirus-mediated VEGF165 gene transfer inhibited ischemia-induced apoptosis in skeletal muscle. These results support a role for VEGF in myoblast migration and survival, and suggest a novel autocrine role of VEGF in skeletal muscle repair during ischemia. PMID:14507649

  8. Evaluation of the Effects of Different Energy Drinks and Coffee on Endothelial Function.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Janos; Somberg, John C

    2015-11-01

    Endothelial function plays an important role in circulatory physiology. There has been differing reports on the effect of energy drink on endothelial function. We set out to evaluate the effect of 3 energy drinks and coffee on endothelial function. Endothelial function was evaluated in healthy volunteers using a device that uses digital peripheral arterial tonometry measuring endothelial function as the reactive hyperemia index (RHI). Six volunteers (25 ± 7 years) received energy drink in a random order at least 2 days apart. Drinks studied were 250 ml "Red Bull" containing 80 mg caffeine, 57 ml "5-hour Energy" containing 230 mg caffeine, and a can of 355 ml "NOS" energy drink containing 120 mg caffeine. Sixteen volunteers (25 ± 5 years) received a cup of 473 ml coffee containing 240 mg caffeine. Studies were performed before drink (baseline) at 1.5 and 4 hours after drink. Two of the energy drinks (Red Bull and 5-hour Energy) significantly improved endothelial function at 4 hours after drink, whereas 1 energy drink (NOS) and coffee did not change endothelial function significantly. RHI increased by 82 ± 129% (p = 0.028) and 63 ± 37% (p = 0.027) after 5-hour Energy and Red Bull, respectively. The RHI changed after NOS by 2 ± 30% (p = 1.000) and by 7 ± 30% (p = 1.000) after coffee. In conclusion, some energy drinks appear to significantly improve endothelial function. Caffeine does not appear to be the component responsible for these differences. PMID:26341184

  9. ELIMINATION OF VITAMIN D RECEPTOR IN VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELLS ALTERS VASCULAR FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Wei; Watts, Stephanie W.; Ng, Michael; Chen, Songcang; Glenn, Denis J.; Gardner, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with cardiovascular dysfunction. We evaluated the role of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in vascular endothelial function, a marker of cardiovascular health, at baseline and in the presence of angiotensin II, using an endothelial-specific knockout of the murine VDR gene. In the absence of endothelial VDR, acetylcholine-induced aortic relaxation was significantly impaired (maximal relaxation, endothelial-specific VDR knockout =58% vs. control=73%, p<0.05). This was accompanied by a reduction in eNOS expression and phospho-vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein levels in aortae from the endothelial-specific VDR knockout vs. control mice. While blood pressure levels at baseline were comparable at 12 and 24 weeks of age, the endothelial VDR knockout mice demonstrated increased sensitivity to the hypertensive effects of angiotensin II compared to control mice (after 1-week infusion: knockout = 155±15 mmHg vs. control = 133±7 mmHg, p<0.01; after 2-week infusion: knockout = 164±9 mmHg vs. control = 152±13 mmHg, p<0.05). By the end of two weeks, angiotensin II infusion-induced, hypertrophy-sensitive myocardial gene expression was higher in endothelial-specific VDR knockout mice (fold change compared to saline-infused control mice, ANP: knockout mice = 3.12 vs. control= 1.7, p<0.05; BNP: knockout mice= 4.72 vs. control= 2.68, p<0.05). These results suggest that endothelial VDR plays an important role in endothelial cell function and blood pressure control and imply a potential role for VDR agonists in the management of cardiovascular disease associated with endothelial dysfunction. PMID:25201890

  10. Nogo-B regulates endothelial sphingolipid homeostasis to control vascular function and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Cantalupo, Anna; Zhang, Yi; Kothiya, Milankumar; Galvani, Sylvain; Obinata, Hideru; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Giordano, Frank J; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Hla, Timothy; Di Lorenzo, Annarita

    2015-09-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a critical factor in many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. Although lipid signaling has been implicated in endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, specific molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we report that Nogo-B, a membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum, regulates endothelial sphingolipid biosynthesis with direct effects on vascular function and blood pressure. Nogo-B inhibits serine palmitoyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme of the de novo sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway, thereby controlling production of endothelial sphingosine 1-phosphate and autocrine, G protein-coupled receptor-dependent signaling by this metabolite. Mice lacking Nogo-B either systemically or specifically in endothelial cells are hypotensive, resistant to angiotensin II-induced hypertension and have preserved endothelial function and nitric oxide release. In mice that lack Nogo-B, pharmacological inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase with myriocin reinstates endothelial dysfunction and angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Our study identifies Nogo-B as a key inhibitor of local sphingolipid synthesis and shows that autocrine sphingolipid signaling within the endothelium is critical for vascular function and blood pressure homeostasis. PMID:26301690

  11. Nogo-B regulates endothelial sphingolipid homeostasis to control vascular function and blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kothiya, Milankumar; Galvani, Sylvain; Obinata, Hideru; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Giordano, Frank J; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Hla, Timothy; Di Lorenzo, Annarita

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a critical factor in many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. Although lipid signaling has been implicated in endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, specific molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we report that Nogo-B, a membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum, regulates endothelial sphingolipid biosynthesis with direct effects on vascular function and blood pressure. Nogo-B inhibits serine palmitoyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme of the de novo sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway, thereby controlling production of endothelial sphingosine 1-phosphate and autocrine, G protein–coupled receptor–dependent signaling by this metabolite. Mice lacking Nogo-B either systemically or specifically in endothelial cells are hypotensive, resistant to angiotensin II–induced hypertension and have preserved endothelial function and nitric oxide release. In mice that lack Nogo-B, pharmacological inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase with myriocin reinstates endothelial dysfunction and angiotensin II–induced hypertension. Our study identifies Nogo-B as a key inhibitor of local sphingolipid synthesis and shows that autocrine sphingolipid signaling within the endothelium is critical for vascular function and blood pressure homeostasis. PMID:26301690

  12. Mutant LRP6 Impairs Endothelial Cell Functions Associated with Familial Normolipidemic Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian; Li, Yang; Ren, Yi-Hong; Sun, Zhijun; Dong, Jie; Yan, Han; Xu, Yujun; Wang, Dao Wen; Zheng, Gu-Yan; Du, Jie; Tian, Xiao-Li

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the genes low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein-6 (LRP6) and myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A) were reported in families with coronary artery disease (CAD). We intend to determine the mutational spectrum of these genes among hyperlipidemic and normolipidemic CAD families. Forty probands with early-onset CAD were recruited from 19 hyperlipidemic and 21 normolipidemic Chinese families. We sequenced all exons and intron-exon boundaries of LRP6 and MEF2A, and found a novel heterozygous variant in LRP6 from a proband with normolipidemic CAD. This variant led to a substitution of histidine to tyrosine (Y418H) in an evolutionarily conserved domain YWTD in exon 6 and was not found in 1025 unrelated healthy individuals. Co-segregated with CAD in the affected family, LRP6Y418H significantly debilitated the Wnt3a-associated signaling pathway, suppressed endothelial cell proliferation and migration, and decreased anti-apoptotic ability. However, it exhibited no influences on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol uptake. Thus, mutation Y418H in LRP6 likely contributes to normolipidemic familial CAD via impairing endothelial cell functions and weakening the Wnt3a signaling pathway. PMID:27455246

  13. PECAM-1 isoform-specific functions in PECAM-1-deficient brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    DiMaio, Terri A; Sheibani, Nader

    2008-03-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) is alternatively spliced generating eight isoforms that only differ in the length of their cytoplasmic domain. Multiple isoforms of PECAM-1 are present in the endothelium and their expression levels are regulated during vascular development and angiogenesis. However, the functional significance of PECAM-1 isoforms during these processes remains largely unknown. We recently showed that mouse brain endothelial (bEND) cells prepared from PECAM-1-deficient (PECAM-1-/-) mice differ in their cell adhesive and migratory properties compared to PECAM-1+/+ bEND cells. Here we demonstrate that the restoration of PECAM-1 expression in these cells affects their adhesive and migratory properties in an isoform-specific manner. Expression of Delta14&15 PECAM-1, the predominant isoform present in the mouse endothelium, in PECAM-1-/- bEND cells activated MAPK/ERKs, disrupted adherens junctions, and enhanced cell migration and capillary morphogenesis in Matrigel. In contrast, expression of Delta15 PECAM-1 in PECAM-1-/- bEND cells had minimal effects on their activation of MAPK/ERKs, migration, and capillary morphogenesis. The effects of PECAM-1 on cell adhesive and migratory properties were mediated in an isoform-specific manner, at least in part, through its interactions with intracellular signaling proteins, including SHP-2 and Src. These results suggest that the impact of PECAM-1 on EC adhesion, migration, and capillary morphogenesis is modulated by alternative splicing of its cytoplasmic domain. PMID:18029285

  14. Thrombospondin-4 knockout in hypertension protects small-artery endothelial function but induces aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Palao, Teresa; Rippe, Catarina; van Veen, Henk; VanBavel, Ed; Swärd, Karl; Bakker, Erik N T P

    2016-06-01

    Thrombospondin-4 (TSP-4) is a multidomain calcium-binding protein that has both intracellular and extracellular functions. As an extracellular matrix protein, it is involved in remodeling processes. Previous work showed that, in the cardiovascular system, TSP-4 expression is induced in the heart in response to experimental pressure overload and infarction injury. Intracellularly, it mediates the endoplasmic reticulum stress response in the heart. In this study, we explored the role of TSP-4 in hypertension. For this purpose, wild-type and TSP-4 knockout (Thbs4(-/-)) mice were treated with angiotensin II (ANG II). Hearts from ANG II-treated Thbs4(-/-) mice showed an exaggerated hypertrophic response. Interestingly, aortas from Thbs4(-/-) mice treated with ANG II showed a high incidence of aneurysms. In resistance arteries, ANG II-treated wild-type mice showed impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation. This was not observed in ANG II-treated Thbs4(-/-) mice or in untreated controls. No differences were found in the passive pressure-diameter curves or stress-strain relationships, although ANG II-treated Thbs4(-/-) mice showed a tendency to be less stiff, associated with thicker diameters of the collagen fibers as revealed by electron microscopy. We conclude that TSP-4 plays a role in hypertension, affecting cardiac hypertrophy, aortic aneurysm formation, as well as endothelial-dependent relaxation in resistance arteries. PMID:26968543

  15. Mutant LRP6 Impairs Endothelial Cell Functions Associated with Familial Normolipidemic Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jian; Li, Yang; Ren, Yi-Hong; Sun, Zhijun; Dong, Jie; Yan, Han; Xu, Yujun; Wang, Dao Wen; Zheng, Gu-Yan; Du, Jie; Tian, Xiao-Li

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the genes low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein-6 (LRP6) and myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A) were reported in families with coronary artery disease (CAD). We intend to determine the mutational spectrum of these genes among hyperlipidemic and normolipidemic CAD families. Forty probands with early-onset CAD were recruited from 19 hyperlipidemic and 21 normolipidemic Chinese families. We sequenced all exons and intron-exon boundaries of LRP6 and MEF2A, and found a novel heterozygous variant in LRP6 from a proband with normolipidemic CAD. This variant led to a substitution of histidine to tyrosine (Y418H) in an evolutionarily conserved domain YWTD in exon 6 and was not found in 1025 unrelated healthy individuals. Co-segregated with CAD in the affected family, LRP6Y418H significantly debilitated the Wnt3a-associated signaling pathway, suppressed endothelial cell proliferation and migration, and decreased anti-apoptotic ability. However, it exhibited no influences on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol uptake. Thus, mutation Y418H in LRP6 likely contributes to normolipidemic familial CAD via impairing endothelial cell functions and weakening the Wnt3a signaling pathway. PMID:27455246

  16. Role of epithelial Na+ channels in endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dongqing; Liang, Shenghui; Wang, Su; Tang, Chengchun; Yao, Bin; Wan, Wenhui; Zhang, Hailing; Jiang, Hui; Ahmed, Asif; Zhang, Zhiren; Gu, Yuchun

    2016-01-15

    An increasing number of mechano-sensitive ion channels in endothelial cells have been identified in response to blood flow and hydrostatic pressure. However, how these channels respond to flow under different physiological and pathological conditions remains unknown. Our results show that epithelial Na(+) channels (ENaCs) colocalize with hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) and hemeoxygenase-2 (HO-2) within the caveolae on the apical membrane of endothelial cells and are sensitive to stretch pressure and shear stress. ENaCs exhibited low levels of activity until their physiological environment was changed; in this case, the upregulation of HO-1, which in turn facilitated heme degradation and hence increased the carbon monoxide (CO) generation. CO potently increased the bioactivity of ENaCs, releasing the channel from inhibition. Endothelial cells responded to shear stress by increasing the Na(+) influx rate. Elevation of intracellular Na(+) concentration hampered the transportation of l-arginine, resulting in impaired nitric oxide (NO) generation. Our data suggest that ENaCs that are endogenous to human endothelial cells are mechano-sensitive. Persistent activation of ENaCs could inevitably lead to endothelium dysfunction and even vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. PMID:26621031

  17. [Endothelial function in contact lens-induced deep corneal opacities].

    PubMed

    Göbbels, M; Wähning, A; Spitznas, M

    1989-01-01

    Deep stromal and preendothelial corneal opacities have been described to be a problem of growing importance in contact lens wearers, above all in those with a more than ten-year-old history of contact lens wearing. In the present study the corneal endothelial permeability of 21 patients with a more than ten-year-old history of contact lens (HEMA 38%) wearing has been determined and compared with that of an age-matched group of 8 healthy individuals without ocular disease. The corneal endothelial permeability has been measured by a computerized automated fluorophotometer (Coherent Radiation Fluorotron Master) after topical application of a Na-fluorescein solution according to the method described by Jones and Maurice. The corneal endothelial permeability of contact lens wearers with deep corneal opacities has been found to be significantly (p = 0.05) increased when compared with contact lens wearers without corneal opacities. Contact lens wearers without corneal opacities showed no significant increase of their endothelial permeability in comparison to the control group. PMID:2583637

  18. Phenotypic, genotypic, and functional characterization of normal and acute myeloid leukemia-derived marrow endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Russell J; Azadniv, Mitra; Guo, Naxin; Acklin, Joshua; Lacagnina, Kimberly; Coppage, Myra; Liesveld, Jane L

    2016-05-01

    In addition to participation in homing, egress, and transmigration of hematopoietic cells, marrow endothelium also contributes to cell proliferation and survival. Endothelial cells from multiple vascular beds are able to prevent spontaneous or therapy-induced apoptosis in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) blasts. Marrow-derived endothelial cells from leukemia patients have not been well-characterized, and in this work, endothelial cells were purified from marrow aspirates from normal subjects or from newly diagnosed AML patients to compare these cells phenotypically and functionally. By reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, these cells express CD31, Tie-2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), supporting endothelial origin. They take up acetyl low-density lipoprotein and are able to form tubular structures. Culture of AML cells with endothelial cells from both normal and AML subjects supported adhesion, transmigration, and leukemia colony-forming unit outgrowth. RNA-sequencing analysis revealed 130 genes significantly up- or downregulated in AML-derived endothelial cells as compared with those derived from normal marrow. The genes differentially expressed (p < 0.001) were included in biological function categories involving cancer, cell development, cell growth and proliferation, cell signaling, inflammatory response, and cell death and survival. Further pathway analysis revealed upregulation of c-Fos and genes involved in chemotaxis such as CXCL16. AML-derived endothelial cells are similar in phenotype and function to their normal marrow-derived counterparts, but genomic analysis suggests a differential signature with altered expression of genes, which could play a role in leukemogenesis or leukemia cell maintenance in the marrow microenvironment. PMID:26851308

  19. Functional analysis of the cytoplasmic domain of the integrin {alpha}1 subunit in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abair, Tristin D; Bulus, Nada; Borza, Corina; Sundaramoorthy, Munirathinam; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2008-10-15

    Integrin alpha1beta1, the major collagen type IV receptor, is expressed by endothelial cells and plays a role in both physiologic and pathologic angiogenesis. Because the molecular mechanisms whereby this collagen IV receptor mediates endothelial cell functions are poorly understood, truncation and point mutants of the integrin alpha1 subunit cytoplasmic tail (amino acids 1137-1151) were generated and expressed into alpha1-null endothelial cells. We show that alpha1-null endothelial cells expressing the alpha1 subunit, which lacks the entire cytoplasmic tail (mutant alpha1-1136) or expresses all the amino acids up to the highly conserved GFFKR motif (mutant alpha1-1143), have a similar phenotype to parental alpha1-null cells. Pro(1144) and Leu(1145) were shown to be necessary for alpha1beta1-mediated endothelial cell proliferation; Lys(1146) for adhesion, migration, and tubulogenesis and Lys(1147) for tubulogenesis. Integrin alpha1beta1-dependent endothelial cell proliferation is primarily mediated by ERK activation, whereas migration and tubulogenesis require both p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt activation. Thus, distinct amino acids distal to the GFFKR motif of the alpha1 integrin cytoplasmic tail mediate activation of selective downstream signaling pathways and specific endothelial cell functions. PMID:18647959

  20. Microcapsules functionalized with neuraminidase can enter vascular endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weizhi; Wang, Xiaocong; Bai, Ke; Lin, Miao; Sukhorukov, Gleb; Wang, Wen

    2014-12-01

    Microcapsules made of polyelectrolyte multilayers exhibit no or low toxicity, appropriate mechanical stability, variable controllable degradation and can incorporate remote release mechanisms triggered by various stimuli, making them well suited for targeted drug delivery to live cells. This study investigates interactions between microcapsules made of synthetic (i.e. polystyrenesulfonate sodium salt/polyallylamine hydrochloride) or natural (i.e. dextran sulfate/poly-L-arginine) polyelectrolyte and human umbilical vein endothelial cells with particular focus on the effect of the glycocalyx layer on the intake of microcapsules by endothelial cells. Neuraminidase cleaves N-acetyl neuraminic acid residues of glycoproteins and targets the sialic acid component of the glycocalyx on the cell membrane. Three-dimensional confocal images reveal that microcapsules, functionalized with neuraminidase, can be internalized by endothelial cells. Capsules without neuraminidase are blocked by the glycocalyx layer. Uptake of the microcapsules is most significant in the first 2 h. Following their internalization by endothelial cells, biodegradable DS/PArg capsules rupture by day 5; however, there is no obvious change in the shape and integrity of PSS/PAH capsules within the period of observation. Results from the study support our hypothesis that the glycocalyx functions as an endothelial barrier to cross-membrane movement of microcapsules. Neuraminidase-loaded microcapsules can enter endothelial cells by localized cleavage of glycocalyx components with minimum disruption of the glycocalyx layer and therefore have high potential to act as drug delivery vehicles to reach tissues beyond the endothelial barrier of blood vessels. PMID:25339691

  1. Role of specific microRNAs for endothelial function and angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Fusheng; Yang, Zeran; Li, Guohong

    2009-09-04

    Accumulating evidence indicates that various aspects of angiogenesis, such as proliferation, migration, and morphogenesis of endothelial cells, can be regulated by specific miRNAs in an endothelial-specific manner. As novel molecular targets, miRNAs have a potential value for treatment of angiogenesis-associated diseases such as cancers, inflammation, and vascular diseases. In this article, we review the latest advances in the identification and validation of angiogenesis-regulatory miRNAs and their targets, and discuss their roles and mechanisms in regulating endothelial cell function and angiogenesis.

  2. Generation of functional endothelial-like cells from adult mouse germline-derived pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Julee; Eligehausen, Sarah; Stehling, Martin; Nikol, Sigrid; Ko, Kinarm; Waltenberger, Johannes; Klocke, Rainer

    2014-01-10

    Functional endothelial cells and their progenitors are required for vascular development, adequate vascular function, vascular repair and for cell-based therapies of ischemic diseases. Currently, cell therapy is limited by the low abundance of patient-derived cells and by the functional impairment of autologous endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). In the present study, murine germline-derived pluripotent stem (gPS) cells were evaluated as a potential source for functional endothelial-like cells. Cells displaying an endothelial cell-like morphology were obtained from gPS cell-derived embryoid bodies using a combination of fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based selection of CD31-positive cells and their subsequent cultivation on OP9 stromal cells in the presence of VEGF-A. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, FACS analysis and immunofluorescence staining showed that the gPS cell-derived endothelial-like cells (gPS-ECs) expressed endothelial cell-specific markers including von Willebrand Factor, Tie2, VEGFR2/Flk1, intercellular adhesion molecule 2 and vascular endothelial-cadherin. The high expression of ephrin B2, as compared to Eph B4 and VEGFR3, suggests an arterial rather than a venous or lymphatic differentiation. Their capability to take up Dil-conjugated acetylated low-density lipoprotein and to form capillary-like networks on matrigel confirmed their functionality. We conclude that gPS cells could be a novel source of endothelial cells potentially suitable for regenerative cell-based therapies for ischemic diseases. PMID:24333870

  3. Role of heme oxygenase in modulating endothelial function in mesenteric small resistance arteries of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Porteri, Enzo; Rodella, Luigi F; Rezzani, Rita; Rizzoni, Damiano; Paiardi, Silvia; de Ciuceis, Carolina; Boari, Gianluca E M; Foglio, Eleonora; Favero, Gaia; Rizzardi, Nicola; Platto, Caterina; Agabiti Rosei, Enrico

    2009-10-01

    It has been proposed that endothelial dysfunction is due to the excessive degradation of nitric oxide (NO) by oxidative stress. The enzyme heme-oxygenase (HO) seems to exert a protective effect on oxidative stress in the vasculature, both in animal models and in humans. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of inhibition or activation of HO on endothelial function in mesenteric small resistance arteries of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Six SHR were treated with cobalt protoporphyrin IX 50 mg/Kg (CoPP), an activator of HO; six SHR with stannous mesoporphyrin 30 mg/Kg (SnMP), an inhibitor of HO, and six SHR with saline. As controls, six Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) were treated with CoPP, six WKY with SnMP, and six WKY with saline. Drugs were injected in the peritoneum once a week for 2 weeks. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured (tail cuff method) before and after treatment. Mesenteric small resistance arteries were mounted on a micromyograph. Endothelial function was evaluated as a cumulative concentration-response curve to acetylcholine (ACH), before and after preincubation with N(G)-methyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA, inhibitor of NO synthase), and to bradykinin (BK). In SHR treatment with CoPP, improved ACH-and BK-induced vasodilatation (ANOVA p < 0.001) and this improvement was abolished by L-NMMA (ANOVA p < 0.001). SnMP was devoid of effects on endothelial function. In WKY, both activation and inhibition of HO did not substantially affect endothelium-mediated vasodilatation. The stimulation of HO seems to induce an improvement of endothelial dysfunction in SHR by possibly reducing oxidative stress and increasing NO availability. PMID:19886854

  4. You're Only as Old as Your Arteries: Translational Strategies for Preserving Vascular Endothelial Function with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Kaplon, Rachelle E.; Gioscia-Ryan, Rachel A.; LaRocca, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction develops with age and increases the risk of age-associated vascular disorders. Nitric oxide insufficiency, oxidative stress, and chronic low-grade inflammation, induced by upregulation of adverse cellular signaling processes and imbalances in stress resistance pathways, mediate endothelial dysfunction with aging. Healthy lifestyle behaviors preserve endothelial function with aging by inhibiting these mechanisms, and novel nutraceutical compounds that favorably modulate these pathways hold promise as a complementary approach for preserving endothelial health. PMID:24985329

  5. Polyphenolic composition of grape stem extracts affects antioxidant activity in endothelial and muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Goutzourelas, Nikolaos; Stagos, Dimitrios; Spanidis, Ypatios; Liosi, Maria; Apostolou, Anna; Priftis, Alexandros; Haroutounian, Serko; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Kouretas, Demetrios

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was the assessment of the antioxidant effects of polyphenolic extracts derived from the stems of three Greek grape varieties (Moshomayro, Mavrotragano and Mandilaria) in endothelial (EA.hy926) and muscle (C2C12) cells. We also investigated the effects of the polyphenolic composition on the antioxidant effects of the grape stem extracts. For this purpose, the endothelial and muscle cells were treated with low non-cytotoxic concentrations of the extracts for 24 h in order to assess the effects of the extracts on cellular redox status using oxidative stress biomarkers. The oxidative stress markers were thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), protein carbonyl (CARB) levels, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and glutathione (GSH) levels. The results revealed that treatment of the EA.hy926 cells with Mandilaria extract significantly decreased the TBARS levels by 14.8% and the CARB levels by 25.9 %, while it increased the GSH levels by 15.8% compared to the controls. Moreover, treatment of the EA.hy926 cells with Mavrotragano extract significantly increased the GSH levels by 20.2%, while it significantly decreased the TBARS and CARB levels by 12.5% and 16.6%, respectively. Treatment of the C2C12 cells with Mandilaria extract significantly decreased the TBARS levels by 47.3 %, the CARB levels by 39.0 % and the ROS levels by 21.8%, while it increased the GSH levels by 22.6% compared to the controls. Moreover, treatment of the C2C12 cells with Mavrotragano significantly decreased the TBARS, CARB and ROS levels by 36.2%, 35.9% and 16.5%, respectively. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledgel, our results demonstrate for the first time that treatment with grape stem extracts at low concentrations improves the redox status of endothelial and muscle cells. Thus, grape stem extracts may be used for developing antioxidant food supplements or biofunctional foods. However, it was also found that the polyphenolic composition of grape stem

  6. Polyphenolic composition of grape stem extracts affects antioxidant activity in endothelial and muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    GOUTZOURELAS, NIKOLAOS; STAGOS, DIMITRIOS; SPANIDIS, YPATIOS; LIOSI, MARIA; APOSTOLOU, ANNA; PRIFTIS, ALEXANDROS; HAROUTOUNIAN, SERKO; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.; KOURETAS, DEMETRIOS

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was the assessment of the antioxidant effects of polyphenolic extracts derived from the stems of three Greek grape varieties (Moshomayro, Mavrotragano and Mandilaria) in endothelial (EA.hy926) and muscle (C2C12) cells. We also investigated the effects of the polyphenolic composition on the antioxidant effects of the grape stem extracts. For this purpose, the endothelial and muscle cells were treated with low non-cytotoxic concentrations of the extracts for 24 h in order to assess the effects of the extracts on cellular redox status using oxidative stress biomarkers. The oxidative stress markers were thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), protein carbonyl (CARB) levels, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and glutathione (GSH) levels. The results revealed that treatment of the EA.hy926 cells with Mandilaria extract significantly decreased the TBARS levels by 14.8% and the CARB levels by 25.9 %, while it increased the GSH levels by 15.8% compared to the controls. Moreover, treatment of the EA.hy926 cells with Mavrotragano extract significantly increased the GSH levels by 20.2%, while it significantly decreased the TBARS and CARB levels by 12.5% and 16.6%, respectively. Treatment of the C2C12 cells with Mandilaria extract significantly decreased the TBARS levels by 47.3 %, the CARB levels by 39.0 % and the ROS levels by 21.8%, while it increased the GSH levels by 22.6% compared to the controls. Moreover, treatment of the C2C12 cells with Mavrotragano significantly decreased the TBARS, CARB and ROS levels by 36.2%, 35.9% and 16.5%, respectively. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledgel, our results demonstrate for the first time that treatment with grape stem extracts at low concentrations improves the redox status of endothelial and muscle cells. Thus, grape stem extracts may be used for developing antioxidant food supplements or biofunctional foods. However, it was also found that the polyphenolic composition of grape stem

  7. Phenotypic and Functional Changes of Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cells in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Malashicheva, Anna; Kostina, Daria; Kostina, Aleksandra; Irtyuga, Olga; Voronkina, Irina; Smagina, Larisa; Ignatieva, Elena; Gavriliuk, Natalia; Uspensky, Vladimir; Moiseeva, Olga; Vaage, Jarle; Kostareva, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm develops as a result of complex series of events that alter the cellular structure and the composition of the extracellular matrix of the aortic wall. The purpose of the present work was to study the cellular functions of endothelial and smooth muscle cells from the patients with aneurysms of the thoracic aorta. We studied endothelial and smooth muscle cells from aneurysms in patients with bicuspid aortic valve and with tricuspid aortic valve. The expression of key markers of endothelial (CD31, vWF, and VE-cadherin) and smooth muscle (SMA, SM22α, calponin, and vimentin) cells as well extracellular matrix and MMP activity was studied as well as and apoptosis and cell proliferation. Expression of functional markers of endothelial and smooth muscle cells was reduced in patient cells. Cellular proliferation, migration, and synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins are attenuated in the cells of the patients. We show for the first time that aortic endothelial cell phenotype is changed in the thoracic aortic aneurysms compared to normal aortic wall. In conclusion both endothelial and smooth muscle cells from aneurysms of the ascending aorta have downregulated specific cellular markers and altered functional properties, such as growth rate, apoptosis induction, and extracellular matrix synthesis. PMID:26904289

  8. Phenotypic and Functional Changes of Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cells in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Malashicheva, Anna; Kostina, Daria; Kostina, Aleksandra; Irtyuga, Olga; Voronkina, Irina; Smagina, Larisa; Ignatieva, Elena; Gavriliuk, Natalia; Uspensky, Vladimir; Moiseeva, Olga; Vaage, Jarle; Kostareva, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm develops as a result of complex series of events that alter the cellular structure and the composition of the extracellular matrix of the aortic wall. The purpose of the present work was to study the cellular functions of endothelial and smooth muscle cells from the patients with aneurysms of the thoracic aorta. We studied endothelial and smooth muscle cells from aneurysms in patients with bicuspid aortic valve and with tricuspid aortic valve. The expression of key markers of endothelial (CD31, vWF, and VE-cadherin) and smooth muscle (SMA, SM22α, calponin, and vimentin) cells as well extracellular matrix and MMP activity was studied as well as and apoptosis and cell proliferation. Expression of functional markers of endothelial and smooth muscle cells was reduced in patient cells. Cellular proliferation, migration, and synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins are attenuated in the cells of the patients. We show for the first time that aortic endothelial cell phenotype is changed in the thoracic aortic aneurysms compared to normal aortic wall. In conclusion both endothelial and smooth muscle cells from aneurysms of the ascending aorta have downregulated specific cellular markers and altered functional properties, such as growth rate, apoptosis induction, and extracellular matrix synthesis. PMID:26904289

  9. Genetic variants of ApoE and ApoER2 differentially modulate endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Victoria; Konaniah, Eddy S.; Herz, Joachim; Gerard, Robert D.; Jung, Eunjeong; Yuhanna, Ivan S.; Ahmed, Mohamed; Hui, David Y.; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W.

    2014-01-01

    It is poorly understood why there is greater cardiovascular disease risk associated with the apolipoprotein E4 (apoE) allele vs. apoE3, and also greater risk with the LRP8/apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (ApoER2) variant ApoER2-R952Q. Little is known about the function of the apoE–ApoER2 tandem outside of the central nervous system. We now report that in endothelial cells apoE3 binding to ApoER2 stimulates endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and endothelial cell migration, and it also attenuates monocyte–endothelial cell adhesion. However, apoE4 does not stimulate eNOS or endothelial cell migration or dampen cell adhesion, and alternatively it selectively antagonizes apoE3/ApoER2 actions. The contrasting endothelial actions of apoE4 vs. apoE3 require the N-terminal to C-terminal interaction in apoE4 that distinguishes it structurally from apoE3. Reconstitution experiments further reveal that ApoER2-R952Q is a loss-of-function variant of the receptor in endothelium. Carotid artery reendothelialization is decreased in ApoER2−/− mice, and whereas adenoviral-driven apoE3 expression in wild-type mice has no effect, apoE4 impairs reendothelialization. Moreover, in a model of neointima formation invoked by carotid artery endothelial denudation, ApoER2−/− mice display exaggerated neointima development. Thus, the apoE3/ApoER2 tandem promotes endothelial NO production, endothelial repair, and endothelial anti-inflammatory properties, and it prevents neointima formation. In contrast, apoE4 and ApoER2-R952Q display dominant-negative action and loss of function, respectively. Thus, genetic variants of apoE and ApoER2 impact cardiovascular health by differentially modulating endothelial function. PMID:25197062

  10. Engineering of Surface Functionality onto Polystyrene Microcarriers for the Attachment and Growth of Human Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Gordon M.; Foord, John S.; Griffiths, Jon-Paul; Parker, Emily M.; Moloney, Mark G.; Choong, Cleo

    2014-08-01

    This work reports the effects of introducing diverse chemical functionalities onto the surface of polystyrene microcarrier beads on their ability to function as injectable cell carriers. Cellular adhesion and proliferation, as well as cellular outgrowths from microcarrier surfaces, using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), were examined in detail. It was observed that initial cell adhesion appeared to be most significantly decreased by hydrophobicity, whilst cell proliferation appeared to be improved in most chemical functional groups over unmodified polystyrene. Overall, our study highlights the importance of surface chemistry in directing the growth and function of human endothelial cells.

  11. Endothelial function in pre-pubertal children at risk of developing cardiomyopathy: a new frontier

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Aline Cristina; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides; Guimarães, Guilherme Veiga

    2012-01-01

    Although it is known that obesity, diabetes, and Kawasaki's disease play important roles in systemic inflammation and in the development of both endothelial dysfunction and cardiomyopathy, there is a lack of data regarding the endothelial function of pre-pubertal children suffering from cardiomyopathy. In this study, we performed a systematic review of the literature on pre-pubertal children at risk of developing cardiomyopathy to assess the endothelial function of pre-pubertal children at risk of developing cardiomyopathy. We searched the published literature indexed in PubMed, Bireme and SciELO using the keywords ‘endothelial', ‘children', ‘pediatric' and ‘infant' and then compiled a systematic review. The end points were age, the pubertal stage, sex differences, the method used for the endothelial evaluation and the endothelial values themselves. No studies on children with cardiomyopathy were found. Only 11 papers were selected for our complete analysis, where these included reports on the flow-mediated percentage dilatation, the values of which were 9.80±1.80, 5.90±1.29, 4.50±0.70, and 7.10±1.27 for healthy, obese, diabetic and pre-pubertal children with Kawasaki's disease, respectively. There was no significant difference in the dilatation, independent of the endothelium, either among the groups or between the genders for both of the measurements in children; similar results have been found in adolescents and adults. The endothelial function in cardiomyopathic children remains unclear because of the lack of data; nevertheless, the known dysfunctions in children with obesity, type 1 diabetes and Kawasaki's disease may influence the severity of the cardiovascular symptoms, the prognosis, and the mortality rate. The results of this study encourage future research into the consequences of endothelial dysfunction in pre-pubertal children. PMID:22473410

  12. Preserved Microvascular Endothelial Function in Young, Obese Adults with Functional Loss of Nitric Oxide Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Harrell, John W.; Johansson, Rebecca E.; Evans, Trent D.; Sebranek, Joshua J.; Walker, Benjamin J.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.; Serlin, Ronald C.; Schrage, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Data indicate endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) may be preserved in the skeletal muscle microcirculation of young, obese adults. Preserved EDD might be mediated by compensatory mechanisms, impeding insight into preclinical vascular dysfunction. We aimed to determine the functional roles of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) toward EDD in younger obese adults. We first hypothesized EDD would be preserved in young, obese adults. Further, we hypothesized a reduced contribution of NOS in young, obese adults would be replaced by increased COX signaling. Microvascular EDD was assessed with Doppler ultrasound and brachial artery infusion of acetylcholine (ACh) in younger (27 ± 1 year) obese (n = 29) and lean (n = 46) humans. Individual and combined contributions of NOS and COX were examined with intra-arterial infusions of l-NMMA and ketorolac, respectively. Vasodilation was quantified as an increase in forearm vascular conductance (ΔFVC). Arterial endothelial cell biopsies were analyzed for protein expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). ΔFVC to ACh was similar between groups. After l-NMMA, ΔFVC to ACh was greater in obese adults (p < 0.05). There were no group differences in ΔFVC to ACh with ketorolac. With combined NOS-COX inhibition, ΔFVC was greater in obese adults at the intermediate dose of ACh. Surprisingly, arterial endothelial cell eNOS and phosphorylated eNOS were similar between groups. Younger obese adults exhibit preserved EDD and eNOS expression despite functional dissociation of NOS-mediated vasodilation and similar COX signaling. Compensatory NOS- and COX-independent vasodilatory mechanisms conceal reduced NOS contributions in otherwise healthy obese adults early in life, which may contribute to vascular dysfunction. PMID:26733880

  13. Association of Kidney Function with Changes in the Endothelial Surface Layer

    PubMed Central

    Dane, Martijn J.C.; Khairoun, Meriem; Lee, Dae Hyun; van den Berg, Bernard M.; Eskens, Bart J.M.; Boels, Margien G.S.; van Teeffelen, Jurgen W.G.E.; Rops, Angelique L.W.M.M.; van der Vlag, Johan; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Reinders, Marlies E.J.; Vink, Hans; Rabelink, Ton J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives ESRD is accompanied by endothelial dysfunction. Because the endothelial glycocalyx (endothelial surface layer) governs interactions between flowing blood and the vessel wall, perturbation could influence disease progression. This study used a novel noninvasive sidestream–darkfield imaging method, which measures the accessibility of red blood cells to the endothelial surface layer in the microcirculation (perfused boundary region), to investigate whether renal function is associated with endothelial surface layer dimensions. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Perfused boundary region was measured in control participants (n=10), patients with ESRD (n=23), participants with normal kidney function after successful living donor kidney transplantation (n=12), and patients who developed interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy after kidney transplantation (n=10). In addition, the endothelial activation marker angiopoietin-2 and shed endothelial surface layer components syndecan-1 and soluble thrombomodulin were measured using ELISA. Results Compared with healthy controls (1.82±0.16 µm), ESRD patients had a larger perfused boundary region (+0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.46 to <0.01; P<0.05), which signifies loss of endothelial surface layer dimensions. This large perfused boundary region was accompanied by higher circulating levels of syndecan-1 (+57.71; 95% confidence interval, 17.38 to 98.04; P<0.01) and soluble thrombomodulin (+12.88; 95% confidence interval, 0.29 to 25.46; P<0.001). After successful transplantation, the perfused boundary region was indistinguishable from healthy controls (without elevated levels of soluble thrombomodulin or syndecan-1). In contrast, however, patients who developed interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy showed a large perfused boundary region (+0.36; 95% confidence interval, 0.09 to 0.63; P<0.01) and higher levels of endothelial activation markers. In addition, a significant correlation

  14. Targeting of Rho Kinase Ameliorates Impairment of Diabetic Endothelial Function in Intrarenal Artery

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hongping; Ru, Hailong; Yu, Liping; Kang, Yanhua; Lin, Guohua; Liu, Chuanfei; Sun, Lixian; Shi, Liyun; Sun, Qinghua; Liu, Cuiqing

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction in kidney vasculature is the initial and key element for nephropathy in diabetes mellitus. Accumulating evidence suggests the protective role of Rho kinase inhibitors in endothelial dysfunction via modulating eNOS activity and NO production. However, the role of Rho kinase in diabetes-related endothelial dysfunction in kidney vasculature and the relevant mechanisms remain unknown. We assessed whether pharmacological inhibition of Rho kinase attenuates endothelial dysfunction in intrarenal arteries from type 1 diabetic rats. Fasudil, a Rho kinase inhibitor effectively decreased the phosphorylated level of MYPT1 without affecting the expression of ROCKs in the kidney. Fasudil treatment showed no improvement in diabetes-related abnormality in metabolic indices, but it significantly ameliorated endothelial dysfunction in intrarenal arteries and lessened the mesangial matrix expansion in the kidney cortex. Mechanistically, superoxide production in the intrarenal artery and NOX4 member of NADPH oxidase in the renal cortex that contribute to diabetic nephropathy were also prevented by the Rho kinase inhibitor. In conclusion, the present results indicate that Rho kinase is involved in endothelial dysfunction in type 1 diabetes via enhancement of oxidative stress and provides new evidence for Rho kinase inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24129169

  15. The Presence of VEGF Receptors on the Luminal Surface of Endothelial Cells Affects VEGF Distribution and VEGF Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Stefanini, Marianne O.; Wu, Florence T. H.; Mac Gabhann, Feilim; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2009-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent cytokine that binds to specific receptors on the endothelial cells lining blood vessels. The signaling cascade triggered eventually leads to the formation of new capillaries, a process called angiogenesis. Distributions of VEGF receptors and VEGF ligands are therefore crucial determinants of angiogenic events and, to our knowledge, no quantification of abluminal vs. luminal receptors has been performed. We formulate a molecular-based compartment model to investigate the VEGF distribution in blood and tissue in humans and show that such quantification would lead to new insights on angiogenesis and VEGF-dependent diseases. Our multiscale model includes two major isoforms of VEGF (VEGF121 and VEGF165), as well as their receptors (VEGFR1 and VEGFR2) and the non-signaling co-receptor neuropilin-1 (NRP1). VEGF can be transported between tissue and blood via transendothelial permeability and the lymphatics. VEGF receptors are located on both the luminal and abluminal sides of the endothelial cells. In this study, we analyze the effects of the VEGF receptor localization on the endothelial cells as well as of the lymphatic transport. We show that the VEGF distribution is affected by the luminal receptor density. We predict that the receptor signaling occurs mostly on the abluminal endothelial surface, assuming that VEGF is secreted by parenchymal cells. However, for a low abluminal but high luminal receptor density, VEGF binds predominantly to VEGFR1 on the abluminal surface and VEGFR2 on the luminal surface. Such findings would be pertinent to pathological conditions and therapies related to VEGF receptor imbalance and overexpression on the endothelial cells and will hopefully encourage experimental receptor quantification for both luminal and abluminal surfaces on endothelial cells. PMID:20041209

  16. Endothelium-Derived 5-Methoxytryptophan Protects Endothelial Barrier Function by Blocking p38 MAPK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ling-Yun; Wang, Yi-Fu; Cheng, Huei-Hsuan; Kuo, Cheng-Chin; Wu, Kenneth K.

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial junction is tightly controlled to restrict the passage of blood cells and solutes. Disruption of endothelial barrier function by bacterial endotoxins, cytokines or growth factors results in inflammation and vascular damage leading to vascular diseases. We have identified 5-methoxytryptophan (5-MTP) as an anti-inflammatory factor by metabolomic analysis of conditioned medium of human fibroblasts. Here we postulated that endothelial cells release 5-MTP to protect the barrier function. Conditioned medium of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) prevented endothelial hyperpermeability and VE-cadherin downregulation induced by VEGF, LPS and cytokines. We analyzed the metabolomic profile of HUVEC conditioned medium and detected 5-MTP but not melatonin, serotonin or their catabolites, which was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Addition of synthetic pure 5-MTP preserved VE-cadherin and maintained barrier function despite challenge with pro-inflammatory mediators. Tryptophan hydroxylase-1, an enzyme required for 5-MTP biosynthesis, was downregulated in HUVECs by pro-inflammatory mediators and it was accompanied by reduction of 5-MTP. 5-MTP protected VE-cadherin and prevented endothelial hyperpermeability by blocking p38 MAPK activation. A chemical inhibitor of p38 MAPK, SB202190, exhibited a similar protective effect as 5-MTP. To determine whether 5-MTP prevents vascular hyperpermeability in vivo, we evaluated the effect of 5-MTP administration on LPS-induced murine microvascular permeability with Evans blue. 5-MTP significantly prevented Evans blue dye leakage. Our findings indicate that 5-MTP is a new class of endothelium-derived molecules which protects endothelial barrier function by blocking p38 MAPK. PMID:27002329

  17. Examining Endothelial Function and Platelet Reactivity in Patients with Depression before and after SSRI Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Tye; Barton, David A; Lambert, Elisabeth A; Eikelis, Nina; Lambert, Gavin W

    2016-01-01

    Although it is recognized that patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) the mechanisms responsible remain unknown. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the first signs of CVD. Using two techniques, flow-mediated dilatation in response to reactive hyperemia and laser Doppler velocimetry with iontophoresis, we examined endothelial function in the forearm before and after serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment in 31 patients with MDD. Measurement of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, soluble P-selectin, and noradrenaline in plasma was also performed. Prior to treatment, markers of endothelial and vascular function and platelet reactivity were within the normal range. Following SSRI therapy (95 ± 5 days) symptoms of depression were reduced (paired difference between pre- and post-treatment Hamilton rating -18 ± 1, P < 0.001) with 19 patients recovered and 4 remitted. There occurred no significant change in markers of endothelial or vascular function following SSRI therapy. The improvement in Hamilton depression rating in response to therapy could be independently predicted by the baseline arterial plasma noradrenaline concentration (r (2) = 0.36, P = 0.003). In this cohort of patients with MDD, SSRI therapy did not influence endothelial function or markers of vascular or platelet reactivity. Patient response to SSRI therapy could be predicted by the initial circulating level of noradrenaline, with noradrenaline levels being lower in responders. PMID:26924994

  18. Restoration of Endothelial Function in Pparα−/− Mice by Tempol

    PubMed Central

    Silswal, Neerupma; Parelkar, Nikhil; Andresen, Jon; Wacker, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is one of the PPAR isoforms belonging to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily that regulates genes involved in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. PPARα is present in the vascular wall and is thought to be involved in protection against vascular disease. To determine if PPARα contributes to endothelial function, conduit and cerebral resistance arteries were studied in Pparα−/− mice using isometric and isobaric tension myography, respectively. Aortic contractions to PGF2α and constriction of middle cerebral arteries to phenylephrine were not different between wild type (WT) and Pparα−/−; however, relaxation/dilation to acetylcholine (ACh) was impaired. There was no difference in relaxation between WT and Pparα−/− aorta to treatment with a nitric oxide (NO) surrogate indicating impairment in endothelial function. Endothelial NO levels as well as NO synthase expression were reduced in Pparα−/− aortas, while superoxide levels were elevated. Two-week feeding with the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, tempol, normalized ROS levels and rescued the impaired endothelium-mediated relaxation in Pparα−/− mice. These results suggest that Pparα−/− mice have impaired endothelial function caused by decreased NO bioavailability. Therefore, activation of PPARα receptors may be a therapeutic target for maintaining endothelial function and protection against cardiovascular disease. PMID:26649033

  19. Examining Endothelial Function and Platelet Reactivity in Patients with Depression before and after SSRI Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dawood, Tye; Barton, David A.; Lambert, Elisabeth A.; Eikelis, Nina; Lambert, Gavin W.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is recognized that patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) the mechanisms responsible remain unknown. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the first signs of CVD. Using two techniques, flow-mediated dilatation in response to reactive hyperemia and laser Doppler velocimetry with iontophoresis, we examined endothelial function in the forearm before and after serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment in 31 patients with MDD. Measurement of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, soluble P-selectin, and noradrenaline in plasma was also performed. Prior to treatment, markers of endothelial and vascular function and platelet reactivity were within the normal range. Following SSRI therapy (95 ± 5 days) symptoms of depression were reduced (paired difference between pre- and post-treatment Hamilton rating −18 ± 1, P < 0.001) with 19 patients recovered and 4 remitted. There occurred no significant change in markers of endothelial or vascular function following SSRI therapy. The improvement in Hamilton depression rating in response to therapy could be independently predicted by the baseline arterial plasma noradrenaline concentration (r2 = 0.36, P = 0.003). In this cohort of patients with MDD, SSRI therapy did not influence endothelial function or markers of vascular or platelet reactivity. Patient response to SSRI therapy could be predicted by the initial circulating level of noradrenaline, with noradrenaline levels being lower in responders. PMID:26924994

  20. Percutaneous Mitral Valve Repair in Mitral Regurgitation Reduces Cell-Free Hemoglobin and Improves Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Rammos, Christos; Zeus, Tobias; Balzer, Jan; Kubatz, Laura; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B.; Veulemans, Verena; Hellhammer, Katharina; Totzeck, Matthias; Luedike, Peter; Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Endothelial dysfunction is predictive for cardiovascular events and may be caused by decreased bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO). NO is scavenged by cell-free hemoglobin with reduction of bioavailable NO up to 70% subsequently deteriorating vascular function. While patients with mitral regurgitation (MR) suffer from an impaired prognosis, mechanisms relating to coexistent vascular dysfunctions have not been described yet. Therapy of MR using a percutaneous mitral valve repair (PMVR) approach has been shown to lead to significant clinical benefits. We here sought to investigate the role of endothelial function in MR and the potential impact of PMVR. Methods and Results Twenty-seven patients with moderate-to-severe MR treated with the MitraClip® device were enrolled in an open-label single-center observational study. Patients underwent clinical assessment, conventional echocardiography, and determination of endothelial function by measuring flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery using high-resolution ultrasound at baseline and at 3-month follow-up. Patients with MR demonstrated decompartmentalized hemoglobin and reduced endothelial function (cell-free plasma hemoglobin in heme 28.9±3.8 μM, FMD 3.9±0.9%). Three months post-procedure, PMVR improved ejection fraction (from 41±3% to 46±3%, p = 0.03) and NYHA functional class (from 3.0±0.1 to 1.9±1.7, p<0.001). PMVR was associated with a decrease in cell free plasma hemoglobin (22.3±2.4 μM, p = 0.02) and improved endothelial functions (FMD 4.8±1.0%, p<0.0001). Conclusion We demonstrate here that plasma from patients with MR contains significant amounts of cell-free hemoglobin, which is accompanied by endothelial dysfunction. PMVR therapy is associated with an improved hemoglobin decompartmentalization and vascular function. PMID:26986059

  1. Tetrahydrobiopterin Improves Endothelial Function in Cardiovascular Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiongying; Yang, Mina; Xu, Han; Yu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Background. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is a cofactor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability is reduced during the early stage of vascular diseases, such as coronary artery disease, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and diabetic vasculopathy, and even throughout the entire progression of atherosclerosis. Methods. A literature search was performed using electronic databases (up to January 31, 2014), including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), using an established strategy. Results. Fourteen articles were selected with a total of 370 patients. Ten of the fourteen studies showed a significant improvement in the endothelial dysfunction of various cardiovascular disease groups with BH4 supplementation compared with the control groups or placebos. Three studies showed no positive outcome, and one study showed that low-dose BH4 had no effect but that high-dose BH4 did have a significantly different result. Conclusions. This review concludes that supplementation with BH4 and/or augmentation of the endogenous levels of BH4 will be a novel approach to improve the endothelial dysfunction observed in various cardiovascular diseases. BH4 might be considered to be a new therapeutic agent to prevent the initiation and progression of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25548592

  2. STIM1 Controls Endothelial Barrier Function Independently of Orai1 and Ca2+ Entry

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, Arti V.; Motiani, Rajender K.; Zhang, Xuexin; Abdullaev, Iskandar F.; Adam, Alejandro P.; González-Cobos, José C.; Zhang, Wei; Matrougui, Khalid; Vincent, Peter A.; Trebak, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial barrier function is critical for tissue fluid homeostasis and its disruption contributes to various pathologies, including inflammation and sepsis. Thrombin is an endogenous agonist that impairs endothelial barrier function. Here, we showed that the thrombin-induced decrease in transendothelial electric resistance of cultured human endothelial cells required the endoplasmic reticulum-localized, calcium-sensing protein STIM1, but was independent of Ca2+ entry across the plasma membrane and the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ channel protein Orai1, which is the target of STIM1 in the store-operated calcium entry pathway. We found that STIM1 coupled the thrombin receptor to activation of the guanosine triphosphatase RhoA, stimulation of myosin light chain phosphorylation, formation of actin stress fibers, and loss of cell-cell adhesion. Thus, STIM1 functions in pathways that are dependent and independent of Ca2+entry. PMID:23512989

  3. ETS transcription factor ETV2 directly converts human fibroblasts into functional endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Morita, Rimpei; Suzuki, Mayu; Kasahara, Hidenori; Shimizu, Nana; Shichita, Takashi; Sekiya, Takashi; Kimura, Akihiro; Sasaki, Ken-ichiro; Yasukawa, Hideo; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of endothelial cells (ECs) is a promising therapeutic approach for ischemic disorders. In addition, the generation of ECs has become increasingly important for providing vascular plexus to regenerated organs, such as the liver. Although many attempts have been made to generate ECs from pluripotent stem cells and nonvascular cells, the minimum number of transcription factors that specialize in directly inducing vascular ECs remains undefined. Here, by screening 18 transcription factors that are important for both endothelial and hematopoietic development, we demonstrate that ets variant 2 (ETV2) alone directly converts primary human adult skin fibroblasts into functional vascular endothelial cells (ETVECs). In coordination with endogenous FOXC2 in fibroblasts, transduced ETV2 elicits expression of multiple key endothelial development factors, including FLI1, ERG, and TAL1, and induces expression of endothelial functional molecules, including EGFL7 and von Willebrand factor. Consequently, ETVECs exhibits EC characteristics in vitro and forms mature functional vasculature in Matrigel plugs transplanted in NOD SCID mice. Furthermore, ETVECs significantly improve blood flow recovery in a hind limb ischemic model using BALB/c-nu mice. Our study indicates that the creation of ETVECs provides further understanding of human EC development induced by ETV2. PMID:25540418

  4. Measurement of brachial artery endothelial function using a standard blood pressure cuff.

    PubMed

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Tison, Geoffrey H; Alley, Hugh F; Budinger, Thomas F; Owens, Christopher D; Olgin, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    The integrity of endothelial function in major arteries (EFMA) is a powerful independent predictor of heart attack and stroke. Existing ultrasound-based non-invasive assessment methods are technically challenging and suitable only for laboratory settings. EFMA, like blood pressure (BP), is both acutely and chronically affected by factors such as lifestyle and medication. Consequently, laboratory-based measurements cannot fully gauge the effects of medical interventions on EFMA. EFMA and BP have, arguably, comparable (but complementary) value in the assessment of cardiovascular health. Widespread deployment of EFMA assessment is thus a desirable clinical goal. To this end, we propose a device based on modifying the measurement protocol of a standard electronic sphygmomanometer. The protocol involves inflating the cuff to sub-diastolic levels to enable recording of the pulse waveform before and after vasodilatory stimulus. The mechanical unloading of the arterial wall provided by the cuff amplifies the distension that occurs with each pulse, which is measured as a pressure variation in the cuff. We show that the height of the rising edge of each pulse is proportional to the change in lumen area between diastole and systole. This allows the effect of vasodilatory stimuli on the artery to be measured with high sensitivity. We compare the proposed cuff flow-mediated dilation (cFMD) method to ultrasound flow-mediated dilation (uFMD). We find significant correlation (r = 0.55, p = 0.003, N = 27) between cFMD- and uFMD-based metrics obtained when the release of a 5 min cuff occlusion is employed to induce endothelial stimulus via reactive hyperemia. cFMD is approximately proportional to the square of uFMD, representing a typical increase in sensitivity to vasodilation of 300-600%. This study illustrates the potential for an individual to conveniently measure his/her EFMA by using a low-cost reprogrammed home sphygmomanometer. PMID:26393958

  5. Endothelial Functioning and Hemodynamic Parameters in Rats with Subclinical Hypothyroid and the Effects of Thyroxine Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Guo, Qian; Tian, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) and its associations with atherosclerosis (AS) and cardiovascular disease remain controversial. The purpose of our study was to observe changes in endothelial functioning and hemodynamics in rats with SCH and to determine whether L-thyroxine (L-T4) administration affects these changes. Methods In total, sixty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into the following three groups with 20 rats each: control euthyroid rats, SCH rats and SCH rats that had been treated with thyroxine (SCH+T4). The SCH rats were induced by administration of 10 mg.kg-1.d-1 methimazole (MMI) once daily by gavage for 3 months. The SCH+T4 rats were administered the same dose of MMI for three months in addition to 2 μg.kg-1.d-1 L-T4 once daily by gavage after 45 days of MMI administration. The control rats received physiological saline via gavage. Results The SCH group had significantly higher thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and endothelin (ET) levels and a lower nitric oxide (NO) level than the control and SCH+T4 groups. The tail and carotid artery blood pressures, left ventricular systolic pressure, heart rate and aorta ventralis blood flow were significantly lower in the SCH group than in the control and SCH+T4 groups. ACH treatment caused concentration-dependent relaxation, which was reduced in the SCH arteries compared with the control and SCH+T4 arteries. Histopathological examination revealed the absence of pathological changes in the SCH rat arteries. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that L-T4 treatment ameliorates endothelial dysfunction and hemodynamic changes in SCH rats. PMID:26158620

  6. Measurement of brachial artery endothelial function using a standard blood pressure cuff

    PubMed Central

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Tison, Geoffrey H; Alley, Hugh F; Budinger, Thomas F; Owens, Christopher D; Olgin, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The integrity of endothelial function in major arteries (EFMA) is a powerful independent predictor of heart attack and stroke. Existing ultrasound-based non-invasive assessment methods are technically challenging and suitable only for laboratory settings. EFMA, like blood pressure (BP), is both acutely and chronically affected by factors such as lifestyle and medication. Consequently, lab-based measurements cannot fully gauge the effects of medical interventions on EFMA. EFMA and BP have, arguably, comparable (but complementary) value in the assessment of cardiovascular health. Widespread deployment of EFMA assessment is thus a desirable clinical goal. To this end, we propose a device based on modifying the measurement protocol of a standard electronic sphygmomanometer. Methods The protocol involves inflating the cuff to sub-diastolic levels to enable recording of the pulse waveform before and after vasodilatory stimulus. The mechanical unloading of the arterial wall provided by the cuff amplifies the distension that occurs with each pulse, which is measured as a pressure variation in the cuff. We show that the height of the rising edge of each pulse is proportional to the change in lumen area between diastole and systole. This allows the effect of vasodilatory stimuli on the artery to be measured with high sensitivity. We compare the proposed cuff flow-mediated dilation (cFMD) method to ultrasound FMD (uFMD). Results We find significant correlation (r=0.55, p = 0.003, N=27) between cFMD- and uFMD-based metrics obtained when the release of a 5-minute cuff occlusion is employed to induce endothelial stimulus via reactive hyperemia. cFMD is approximately proportional to the square of uFMD, representing a typical increase in sensitivity to vasodilation of 300–600%. Conclusion This study illustrates the potential for an individual to conveniently measure his/her EFMA by using a low-cost reprogrammed home sphygmomanometer. PMID:26393958

  7. Hibiscus sabdariffa extract lowers blood pressure and improves endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Joven, Jorge; March, Isabel; Espinel, Eugenia; Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Aragonès, Gerard; Beltrán-Debón, Raúl; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Rios, Lidia; Martin-Paredero, Vicente; Menendez, Javier A; Micol, Vicente; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Camps, Jordi

    2014-06-01

    Polyphenols from Hibiscus sabdariffa calices were administered to patients with metabolic syndrome (125 mg/kg/day for 4 wk, n = 31) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (125 or 60 mg/kg in a single dose or daily for 1 wk, n = 8 for each experimental group). The H. sabdariffa extract improved metabolism, displayed potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities, and significantly reduced blood pressure in both humans and rats. Diuresis and inhibition of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme were found to be less important mechanisms than those related to the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and endothelium-dependent effects to explain the beneficial actions. Notably, polyphenols induced a favorable endothelial response that should be considered in the management of metabolic cardiovascular risks. PMID:24668839

  8. Androgen Modulates Functions of Endothelial Progenitor Cells through Activated Egr1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yizhou; Li, Xizhe; Zhang, You; Shen, Zhenya; Yang, Junjie

    2016-01-01

    Researches show that androgens have important effects on migration of endothelial cells and endothelial protection in coronary heart disease. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) as a progenitor cell type that can differentiate into endothelial cells, have a critical role in angiogenesis and endothelial protection. The relationship between androgen and the functions of EPCs has animated much interest and controversy. In this study, we investigated the angiogenic and migratory functions of EPCs after treatment by dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and the molecular mechanisms as well. We found that DHT treatment enhanced the incorporation of EPCs into tubular structures formed by HUVECs and the migratory activity of EPCs in the transwell assay dose dependently. Moreover, microarray analysis was performed to explore how DHT changes the gene expression profiles of EPCs. We found 346 differentially expressed genes in androgen-treated EPCs. Angiogenesis-related genes like Egr-1, Vcan, Efnb2, and Cdk2ap1 were identified to be regulated upon DHT treatment. Furthermore, the enhanced angiogenic and migratory abilities of EPCs after DHT treatment were inhibited by Egr1-siRNA transfection. In conclusion, our findings suggest that DHT markedly enhances the vessel forming ability and migration capacity of EPCs. Egr1 signaling may be a possible pathway in this process. PMID:26697079

  9. Effect of Vitamins C and E on Endothelial Function in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Cazeau, Rachel-Marie; Huang, Hong; Bauer, John A.; Hoffman, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives. Endothelial dysfunction due to hyperglycemia-induced oxidative damage is an important predictor of future cardiovascular risk in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and is present in adolescent T1DM. We hypothesized that combined treatment with the antioxidant vitamins C and E might improve endothelial function (EF) and other biochemical risk factors in adolescents with T1DM. Subjects/Methods. Open-label antioxidant supplementation was given for six weeks with endpoint measurements collected at baseline and study completion. Endpoints measured included EF and plasma measurements of biochemical endothelial risk. Results. Two males and 7 females were studied. Mean age was 12.9 ± 0.9 yrs; mean T1DM duration was 5.5 ± 2.5 yrs; mean BMI was 22.1 ± 3.8 kg/m2; and mean hemoglobin A1c was 9.3 ± 1.1%. No differences were found for EF, high sensitivity CRP, total antioxidant capacity, adiponectin, or endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) between before and after combined vitamin C and E therapy. Conclusions. Our negative study results do not support previous findings of decreased oxidative damage, improved endothelial function, and increased vascular repair capacity with antioxidant therapy. Longer term studies may be needed to determine the effects, if any, of combined antioxidant therapy on EPCs, EF, and markers of micro- and macrovascular complications in T1DM. PMID:26783536

  10. Change in properties of the glycocalyx affects the shear rate and stress distribution on endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen

    2007-06-01

    The endothelial glycocalyx mediates interactions between the blood flow and the endothelium. This study aims to evaluate, quantitatively, effects of structural change of the glycocalyx on stress distribution and shear rate on endothelial cells. In the study, the endothelial glycocalyx is modeled as a surface layer of fiber matrix and when exposed to laminar shear flow, the matrix deforms. Fluid velocity and stress distribution inside the matrix and on cell membranes are studied based on a binary mixture theory. Parameters, such as the height and porosity of the matrix and the drag coefficient between fluid and matrix fibrils, are based on available data and estimation from experiments. Simple theoretical solutions are achieved for fluid velocity and stress distribution in the surface matrix. Degradation of the matrix, e.g., by enzyme digestion, is represented by reductions in the volume fraction of fibrils, height, and drag coefficient. From a force balance, total stress on endothelial surface remains constant regardless of structural alteration of the glycocalyx. However, the stress that is transmitted to endothelial cells by direct "pulling" of fiber branches of the glycocalyx is reduced significantly. Fluid shear rate at the cell membrane, on the other hand, increases. The study gives quantitative insight into the effect of the structural change of the glycocalyx on the shear rate and pulling stress on the endothelium. Results can be used to interpret experiments on effects of the glycocalyx in shear induced endothelial responses. PMID:17536899

  11. Evaluation of endothelial function by flow mediated dilation: methodological issues and clinical importance.

    PubMed

    Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Salvetti, Massimo; Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Taddei, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    Endothelium plays a primary role in the control of vascular function and structure by protective properties of nitric oxide, which have stimulated the development of methods to assess of endothelial function. Flow-mediated dilation is the most widely used method to test endothelial function since it is non-invasive, and measures by ultrasounds the response to increased shear stress, commonly in the brachial artery. This review focuses on available evidence on FMD, which has been tested for the association with risk factors, target organ damage and the predictive value for future cardiovascular events. FMD has been studied widely in clinical research as it enables serial evaluation, also testing the effect of lifestyle and pharmacological interventions on endothelial function at an early preclinical stage, when the disease process is most likely to be reversible. Despite these advantages, endothelial tests, including FMD, are not yet recommended by guidelines for cardiovascular prevention, for the absence of clear additional prognostic value and particularly the poorly standardized non-invasive methodology. However, recent multicenter studies suggest that accurate methodology ensures reproducible FMD measurements, which can be used in future clinical research to test whether interventions ameliorating FMD function are associated to better cardiovascular prognosis. PMID:24619864

  12. Loss of functional endothelial connexin40 results in exercise-induced hypertension in mice.

    PubMed

    Morton, Susan K; Chaston, Daniel J; Howitt, Lauren; Heisler, Jillian; Nicholson, Bruce J; Fairweather, Stephen; Bröer, Stefan; Ashton, Anthony W; Matthaei, Klaus I; Hill, Caryl E

    2015-03-01

    During activity, coordinated vasodilation of microcirculatory networks with upstream supply vessels increases blood flow to skeletal and cardiac muscles and reduces peripheral resistance. Endothelial dysfunction in humans attenuates activity-dependent vasodilation, resulting in exercise-induced hypertension in otherwise normotensive individuals. Underpinning activity-dependent hyperemia is an ascending vasodilation in which the endothelial gap junction protein, connexin (Cx)40, plays an essential role. Because exercise-induced hypertension is proposed as a forerunner to clinical hypertension, we hypothesized that endothelial disruption of Cx40 function in mice may create an animal model of this condition. To this end, we created mice in which a mutant Cx40T152A was expressed alongside wildtype Cx40 selectively in the endothelium. Expression of the Cx40T152A transgene in Xenopus oocytes and mouse coronary endothelial cells in vitro impaired both electric and chemical conductance and acted as a dominant-negative against wildtype Cx40, Cx43, and Cx45, but not Cx37. Endothelial expression of Cx40T152A in Cx40T152ATg mice attenuated ascending vasodilation, without effect on radial coupling through myoendothelial gap junctions. Using radiotelemetry, Cx40T152ATg mice showed an activity-dependent increase in blood pressure, which was significantly greater than in wildtype mice, but significantly less than in chronically hypertensive, Cx40knockout mice. The increase in heart rate with activity was also greater than in wildtype or Cx40knockout mice. We conclude that the endothelial Cx40T152A mutation attenuates activity-dependent vasodilation, producing a model of exercise-induced hypertension. These data highlight the importance of endothelial coupling through Cx40 in regulating blood pressure during activity. PMID:25547341

  13. MDA-5 activation by cytoplasmic double-stranded RNA impairs endothelial function and aggravates atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Asdonk, Tobias; Steinmetz, Martin; Krogmann, Alexander; Ströcker, Christine; Lahrmann, Catharina; Motz, Inga; Paul-Krahe, Kathrin; Flender, Anna; Schmitz, Theresa; Barchet, Winfried; Hartmann, Gunther; Nickenig, Georg; Zimmer, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the relevance of viral nucleic acid immunorecognition by pattern recognition receptors in atherogenesis. Melanoma differentiation associated gene 5 (MDA-5) belongs to the intracellular retinoic acid inducible gene-I like receptors and its activation promotes pro-inflammatory mechanisms. Here, we studied the effect of MDA-5 stimulation in vascular biology. To gain insights into MDA-5 dependent effects on endothelial function, cultured human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) were transfected with the synthetic MDA-5 agonist polyIC (long double-stranded RNA). Human coronary endothelial cell expressed MDA-5 and reacted with receptor up-regulation upon stimulation. Reactive oxygen species formation, apoptosis and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines was enhanced, whereas migration was significantly reduced in response to MDA-5 stimulation. To test these effects in vivo, wild-type mice were transfected with 32.5 μg polyIC/JetPEI or polyA/JetPEI as control every other day for 7 days. In polyIC-treated wild-type mice, endothelium-dependent vasodilation and re-endothelialization was significantly impaired, vascular oxidative stress significantly increased and circulating endothelial microparticles and circulating endothelial progenitor cells significantly elevated compared to controls. Importantly, these effects could be abrogated by MDA-5 deficiency in vivo. Finally, chronic MDA-5 stimulation in Apolipoprotein E/toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) double(-) deficient (ApoE(-/-) /TLR3(-/-) ) mice-enhanced atherosclerotic plaque formation. This study demonstrates that MDA-5 stimulation leads to endothelial dysfunction, and has the potential to aggravate atherosclerotic plaque burden in murine atherosclerosis. Thus, the spectrum of relevant innate immune receptors in vascular diseases and atherogenesis might not be restricted to TLRs but also encompasses the group of RLRs including MDA-5. PMID:27130701

  14. Effects of altered ventilatory patterns of rabbit pulmonary endothelial angiotensin converting enzyme function, in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Toivonen, H.J.; Catravas, J.D.

    1986-03-01

    Because alveolar pressure can influence pulmonary blood flow, volume and surface area, the authors have studied the effects of airway pressure on endothelial angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) function in rabbit lungs in vivo, utilizing indicator dilution techniques with /sup 3/H-Benzoyl-Phe-Ala-Pro (BPAP) as substate. Static inclation of the lungs to a pressure of 0 or 5 mmHg did not change percent transpulmonary metabolism and Amax/Km ratio in comparison to control measurements during conventional mechanical ventilation. When the inflation pressure was increased to 10 mmHg, percent metabolism of /sup 3/H-BPAP remained unaltered but Amax/Km decreased over 40% from control. This decrease was in close relation to the reduction in pulmonary blood flow. Addition of 5 cm H/sub 2/O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to the mechanical ventilation also decreased Amax/Km values and pulmonary blood flow but did not influence percent metabolism of /sup 3/H-BPAP. These results suggest that the detected alterations in ACE kinetics were more likely due to hemodynamic changes than enzyme dysfunction. The authors propose that high static alveolar pressures as well as PEEP did not affect angiotensin converting enzyme function, but reduced the fraction of perfused microvessels reflected in changes in Amax/Km ratios.

  15. The role of Hath6, a newly identified shear-stress-responsive transcription factor, in endothelial cell differentiation and function

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Fang; Wasserman, Scott M.; Torres-Vazquez, Jesus; Weinstein, Brant; Cao, Feng; Li, Zongjin; Wilson, Kitchener D.; Yue, Wen; Wu, Joseph C.; Xie, Xiaoyan; Pei, Xuetao

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The key regulators of endothelial differentiation that is induced by shear stress are mostly unclear. Human atonal homolog 6 (Hath6 or ATOH8) is an endothelial-selective and shear-stress-responsive transcription factor. In this study, we sought to elucidate the role of Hath6 in the endothelial specification of embryonic stem cells. In a stepwise human embryonic stem cell to endothelial cell (hESC-EC) induction system, Hath6 mRNA was upregulated synchronously with endothelial determination. Subsequently, gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies of Hath6 were performed using the hESC-EC induction model and endothelial cell lines. The overexpression of Hath6, which mimics shear stress treatment, resulted in an increased CD45−CD31+KDR+ population, a higher tubular-structure-formation capacity and increased endothelial-specific gene expression. By contrast, the knockdown of Hath6 mRNA markedly decreased endothelial differentiation. Hath6 also facilitated the maturation of endothelial cells in terms of endothelial gene expression, tubular-structure formation and cell migration. We further demonstrated that the gene encoding eNOS is a direct target of Hath6 through a reporter system assay and western blot analysis, and that the inhibition of eNOS diminishes hESC-EC differentiation. These results suggest that eNOS plays a key role in linking Hath6 to the endothelial phenotype. Further in situ hybridization studies in zebrafish and mouse embryos indicated that homologs of Hath6 are involved in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. This study provides the first confirmation of the positive impact of Hath6 on human embryonic endothelial differentiation and function. Moreover, we present a potential signaling pathway through which shear stress stimulates endothelial differentiation. PMID:24463812

  16. The role of Hath6, a newly identified shear-stress-responsive transcription factor, in endothelial cell differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Wasserman, Scott M; Torres-Vazquez, Jesus; Weinstein, Brant; Cao, Feng; Li, Zongjin; Wilson, Kitchener D; Yue, Wen; Wu, Joseph C; Xie, Xiaoyan; Pei, Xuetao

    2014-04-01

    The key regulators of endothelial differentiation that is induced by shear stress are mostly unclear. Human atonal homolog 6 (Hath6 or ATOH8) is an endothelial-selective and shear-stress-responsive transcription factor. In this study, we sought to elucidate the role of Hath6 in the endothelial specification of embryonic stem cells. In a stepwise human embryonic stem cell to endothelial cell (hESC-EC) induction system, Hath6 mRNA was upregulated synchronously with endothelial determination. Subsequently, gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies of Hath6 were performed using the hESC-EC induction model and endothelial cell lines. The overexpression of Hath6, which mimics shear stress treatment, resulted in an increased CD45(-)CD31(+)KDR(+) population, a higher tubular-structure-formation capacity and increased endothelial-specific gene expression. By contrast, the knockdown of Hath6 mRNA markedly decreased endothelial differentiation. Hath6 also facilitated the maturation of endothelial cells in terms of endothelial gene expression, tubular-structure formation and cell migration. We further demonstrated that the gene encoding eNOS is a direct target of Hath6 through a reporter system assay and western blot analysis, and that the inhibition of eNOS diminishes hESC-EC differentiation. These results suggest that eNOS plays a key role in linking Hath6 to the endothelial phenotype. Further in situ hybridization studies in zebrafish and mouse embryos indicated that homologs of Hath6 are involved in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. This study provides the first confirmation of the positive impact of Hath6 on human embryonic endothelial differentiation and function. Moreover, we present a potential signaling pathway through which shear stress stimulates endothelial differentiation. PMID:24463812

  17. FBW7 regulates endothelial functions by targeting KLF2 for ubiquitination and degradation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Wang, Yan; Liu, Ning; Ren, Chunguang; Jiang, Cong; Zhang, Kai; Yu, Su; Chen, Yunfei; Tang, Hui; Deng, Qi; Fu, Cong; Wang, Yingcong; Li, Rong; Liu, Mingyao; Pan, Weijun; Wang, Ping

    2013-01-01

    F-box and WD repeat domain-containing 7 (FBW7), the substrate-binding subunit of E3 ubiquitin ligase SCFFBW7 (a complex of SKP1, cullin-1 and FBW7), plays important roles in various physiological and pathological processes. Although FBW7 is required for vascular development, its function in the endothelium remains to be investigated. In this study, we show that FBW7 is an important regulator of endothelial functions, including angiogenesis, leukocyte adhesion and the endothelial barrier integrity. Using RNA interference, we found that the depletion of FBW7 markedly impairs angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. We identified the zinc finger transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) as a physiological target of FBW7 in endothelial cells. Knockdown of FBW7 expression resulted in the accumulation of endogenous KLF2 protein in endothelial cells. FBW7-mediated KLF2 destruction was shown to depend on the phosphorylation of KLF2 via glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) at two conserved phosphodegrons. Mutating these phosphodegron motifs abolished the FBW7-mediated degradation and ubiquitination of KLF2. The siRNA-mediated knockdown of FBW7 showed that KLF2 is an essential target of FBW7 in the regulation of endothelial functions. Moreover, FBW7-mediated KLF2 degradation was shown to be critical for angiogenesis in teratomas and in zebrafish development. Taken together, our study suggests a role for FBW7 in the processes of endothelial cell migration, angiogenesis, inflammation and barrier integrity, and provides novel insights into the regulation of KLF2 stability in vivo. PMID:23507969

  18. p21-Activated Kinase 2 Regulates Endothelial Development and Function through the Bmk1/Erk5 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Radu, Maria; Lyle, Karen; Hoeflich, Klaus P.; Villamar-Cruz, Olga; Koeppen, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (Paks) have been shown to regulate cytoskeleton rearrangements, cell proliferation, attachment, and migration in a variety of cellular contexts, including endothelial cells. However, the role of endothelial Pak in embryo development has not been reported, and currently, there is no consensus on the endothelial function of individual Pak isoforms, in particular p21-activated kinase 2 (Pak2), the main Pak isoform expressed in endothelial cells. In this work, we employ genetic and molecular studies that show that Pak2, but not Pak1, is a critical mediator of development and maintenance of endothelial cell function. Endothelial depletion of Pak2 leads to early embryo lethality due to flawed blood vessel formation in the embryo body and yolk sac. In adult endothelial cells, Pak2 depletion leads to severe apoptosis and acute angiogenesis defects, and in adult mice, endothelial Pak2 deletion leads to increased vascular permeability. Furthermore, ubiquitous Pak2 deletion is lethal in adult mice. We show that many of these defects are mediated through a newly unveiled Pak2/Bmk1 pathway. Our results demonstrate that endothelial Pak2 is essential during embryogenesis and also for adult blood vessel maintenance, and they also pinpoint the Bmk1/Erk5 pathway as a critical mediator of endothelial Pak2 signaling. PMID:26391956

  19. Pre-Analytical Parameters Affecting Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Measurement in Plasma: Identifying Confounders

    PubMed Central

    Walz, Johanna M.; Boehringer, Daniel; Deissler, Heidrun L.; Faerber, Lothar; Goepfert, Jens C.; Heiduschka, Peter; Kleeberger, Susannah M.; Klettner, Alexa; Krohne, Tim U.; Schneiderhan-Marra, Nicole; Ziemssen, Focke; Stahl, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is intensively investigated in various medical fields. However, comparing VEGF-A measurements is difficult because sample acquisition and pre-analytic procedures differ between studies. We therefore investigated which variables act as confounders of VEGF-A measurements. Methods Following a standardized protocol, blood was taken at three clinical sites from six healthy participants (one male and one female participant at each center) twice one week apart. The following pre-analytical parameters were varied in order to analyze their impact on VEGF-A measurements: analyzing center, anticoagulant (EDTA vs. PECT / CTAD), cannula (butterfly vs. neonatal), type of centrifuge (swing-out vs. fixed-angle), time before and after centrifugation, filling level (completely filled vs. half-filled tubes) and analyzing method (ELISA vs. multiplex bead array). Additionally, intrapersonal variations over time and sex differences were explored. Statistical analysis was performed using a linear regression model. Results The following parameters were identified as statistically significant independent confounders of VEGF-A measurements: analyzing center, anticoagulant, centrifuge, analyzing method and sex of the proband. The following parameters were no significant confounders in our data set: intrapersonal variation over one week, cannula, time before and after centrifugation and filling level of collection tubes. Conclusion VEGF-A measurement results can be affected significantly by the identified pre-analytical parameters. We recommend the use of CTAD anticoagulant, a standardized type of centrifuge and one central laboratory using the same analyzing method for all samples. PMID:26730574

  20. Ultrasound-stimulated microbubble enhancement of radiation treatments: endothelial cell function and mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mahrouki, Azza A.; Wong, Emily; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cell death caused by novel microbubble-enhanced ultrasound cancer therapy leads to secondary tumour cell death. In order to characterize and optimize these treatments, the molecular mechanisms resulting from the interaction with endothelial cells were investigated here. Endothelial cells (HUVEC) were treated with ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles (US/MB), radiation (XRT), or a combination of US/MB+XRT. Effects on cells were evaluated at 0, 3, 6, and 24 hours after treatment. Experiments took place in the presence of modulators of sphingolipid-based signalling including ceramide, fumonisin B1, monensin, and sphingosine-1-phosphate. Experimental outcomes were evaluated using histology, TUNEL, clonogenic survival methods, immuno-fluorescence, electron microscopy, and endothelial cell blood-vessel-like tube forming assays. Fewer cells survived after treatment using US/MB+XRT compared to either the control or XRT. The functional ability to form tubes was only reduced in the US/ MB+XRT condition in the control, the ceramide, and the sphingosine-1-phosphate treated groups. The combined treatment had no effect on tube forming ability in either the fumonisin B1 or in the monensin exposed groups, since both interfere with ceramide production at different cellular sites. In summary, experimental results supported the role of ceramide signalling as a key element in cell death initiation with treatments using US/MB+XRT to target endothelial cells. PMID:26909363

  1. Effect of bevacizumab (Avastin™) on mitochondrial function of in vitro retinal pigment epithelial, neurosensory retinal and microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Luthra, Saurabh; Sharma, Ashish; Dong, Joyce; Neekhra, Aneesh; Gramajo, Ana L; Seigel, Gail M; Kenney, M Cristina; Kuppermann, Baruch D

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of bevacizumab on the mitochondrial function of human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19), rat neurosensory retinal (R28) and human microvascular endothelial (HMVEC) cells in culture. Materials and Methods: ARPE-19 and R28 cells were treated with 0.125, 0.25, 0.50 and 1 mg/ml of bevacizumab. The HMVEC cultures were treated with 0.125, 0.25, 0.50 and 1 mg/ml of bevacizumab or 1 mg/ml of immunoglobulin G (control). Mitochondrial function assessed by mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity (MDA) was determined using the WST-1 assay. Results: Bevacizumab doses of 0.125 to 1 mg/ml for 5 days did not significantly affect the MDA of ARPE-19 cells. Bevacizumab treatment at 0.125 and 0.25 mg/ml (clinical dose) did not significantly affect the MDA of R28 cells; however, 0.50 and 1 mg/ml doses significantly reduced the R28 cell mitochondrial function. All doses of bevacizumab significantly reduced the MDA of proliferating and non-proliferating HMVEC. Conclusion: Bevacizumab exposure for 5 days was safe at clinical doses in both ARPE-19 and R28 retinal neurosensory cells in culture. By contrast, bevacizumab exposure at all doses show a significant dose-dependent decrease in mitochondrial activity in both the proliferating and non-proliferating HMVEC in vitro. This suggests a selective action of bevacizumab on endothelial cells at clinical doses. PMID:24413824

  2. Hyaluronic acid concentration-mediated changes in structure and function of porous carriers for corneal endothelial cell sheet delivery.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jui-Yang

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the effects of hyaluronic acid (HA) concentrations (0.05-1.25wt.%) on the properties of porous carriers for corneal endothelial tissue engineering were investigated. The pore size and porosity gradually increased with decreasing solid content. However, at relatively low HA concentration (i.e., 0.05wt.%), the material samples contained small interior pores and a dense surface skin layer, probably due to no gas bubble effect on the stirring processing of porous microstructures of freeze-dried polysaccharide hydrogels. The carriers prepared from 0.25wt.% HA solution had the highest freezable water content and oxygen and glucose permeability among the samples evaluated. Results of cell viability assays and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that the HA concentration-related alteration of porous microstructure dictates the compatibility of biopolymer carriers with corneal endothelial cell (CEC) cultures. In vivo studies demonstrated that the CEC sheet/HA carrier construct implants are therapeutically efficacious in the reconstruction of endothelial scrape-wounded corneas. It is concluded that the polysaccharide concentration is the major factor for affecting the processing of carriers and their structure and function. Porous hydrogels prepared from 0.25wt.% HA solution are capable of delivering bioengineered CEC sheets to the posterior surface of cornea. PMID:26652391

  3. Effects of Fe particle irradiation on human endothelial barrier structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Preety; Guida, Peter; Grabham, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Space travel involves exposure to biologically effective heavy ion radiation and there is consequently a concern for possible degenerative disorders in humans. A significant target for radiation effects is the microvascular system, which is crucial to healthy functioning of the tissues. Its pathology is linked to disrupted endothelial barrier function and is not only a primary event in a range of degenerative diseases but also an important influencing factor in many others. Thus, an assessment of the effects of heavy ion radiation on endothelial barrier function would be useful for estimating the risks of space travel. This study was aimed at understanding the effects of high LET Fe particles (1 GeV/n) and is the first investigation of the effects of charged particles on the function of the human endothelial barrier. We used a set of established and novel endpoints to assess barrier function after exposure. These include, trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER), morphological effects, localization of adhesion and cell junction proteins (in 2D monolayers and in 3D tissue models), and permeability of molecules through the endothelial barrier. A dose of 0.50 Gy was sufficient to cause a progressive reduction in TEER measurements that were significant 48 hours after exposure. Concurrently, there were morphological changes and a 14% loss of cells from monolayers. Gaps also appeared in the normally continuous cell-border localization of the tight junction protein - ZO-1 but not the Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) in both monolayers and in 3D vessel models. Disruption of barrier function was confirmed by increased permeability to 3 kDa and 10 kDa dextran molecules. A dose of 0.25 Gy caused no detectible change in cell number, morphology, or TEER, but did cause barrier disruption since there were gaps in the cell border localization of ZO-1 and an increased permeability to 3 kDa dextran. These results indicate that Fe particles potently have

  4. Advanced glycation end products impair function of late endothelial progenitor cells through effects on protein kinase Akt and cyclooxygenase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qin; Dong Li; Wang Lian; Kang Lina; Xu Biao

    2009-04-03

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) exhibit impaired function in the context of diabetes, and advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which accumulate in diabetes, may contribute to this. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism by which AGEs impair late EPC function. EPCs from human umbilical cord blood were isolated, and incubated with AGE-modified albumin (AGE-albumin) at different concentrations found physiologically in plasma. Apoptosis, migration, and tube formation assays were used to evaluate EPC function including capacity for vasculogenesis, and expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE), Akt, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) were determined. Anti-RAGE antibody was used to block RAGE function. AGE-albumin concentration-dependently enhanced apoptosis and depressed migration and tube formation, but did not affect proliferation, of late EPCs. High AGE-albumin increased RAGE mRNA and protein expression, and decreased Akt and COX-2 protein expression, whilst having no effect on eNOS mRNA or protein in these cells. These effects were inhibited by co-incubation with anti-RAGE antibody. These results suggest that RAGE mediates the AGE-induced impairment of late EPC function, through down-regulation of Akt and COX-2 in these cells.

  5. Endothelial Function in the Time of the Giants: Paul M. Vanhoutte Lecture

    PubMed Central

    Heistad, Donald D.

    2010-01-01

    Paul Vanhoutte is one of the fathers of vascular biology. Among his great contributions, he demonstrated that endothelium modulates vasomotor response to vasoactive products (including serotonin) that are released when platelets aggregate in an artery. He found in arteries ex vivo that when endothelium is dysfunctional, in atherosclerosis or hypertension, normal relaxation to aggregation of platelets is impaired, and vessels may contract. He proposed that this mechanism may predispose to vasospasm. Our experiments in vivo indicated that atherosclerosis greatly potentiates vasoconstrictor responses to serotonin in the limb, brain, and eye of monkeys. We proposed that transient ischemic attacks may be mediated by platelet-induced vasospasm. We observed endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerotic monkeys, with improvement of endothelial function when hypercholesterolemia was corrected. Recently, we have studied the aortic valve (which has unique endothelium) in hypercholesterolemic mice, to examine the pathophysiology of aortic valvular stenosis. Oxidative stress is increased in stenotic valves, and severe aortic stenosis develops in about one-third of old, hypercholesterolemic mice. In stenotic aortic valves from humans, there is increased oxidative stress near calcified regions of the valves. Oxidative stress may trigger expression of pro-calcific genes in the aortic valve. Finally, we have used gene transfer of extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD) to study endothelial effects of oxidative stress. Gene transfer of normal ecSOD improves endothelial dysfunction in several disease states, but gene transfer of ecSODR213G, a gene variant of ecSOD that is common in humans, fails to improve endothelial function. Gene transfer approaches may be useful to study mechanisms by which gene variants predispose to endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease. PMID:19033817

  6. Sex differences in endothelial function of aged hypertriglyceridemic rats – effect of atorvastatin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bacova, Barbora; Vlkovicova, Jana; Navarova, Jana; Tribulova, Narcis

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that the effect of atorvastatin on endothelium-dependent relaxation of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) may differ in male vs. female aged hypertriglyceridemic rats (HTGs). Experiments were performed on 11-month-old male and female Prague hereditary HTGs. Atorvastatin (ATO) was administered p.o. in the dose of 0.30 mg/100g/day. Controls received vehiculum. After two months of ATO administration blood pressure, serum triglycerides (TG) and total cholesterol (CHOL) were determined. Endothelial function of SMA was studied in vitro using evaluation of relaxant responses of precontracted SMA to acetylcholine. The serum TG of control male HTGs were found to be statistically higher than those of female controls, while CHOL and blood pressure did not share gender differences. Responses of SMA of female control HTGs were statistically decreased compared to their male counterparts. ATO treatment induced decrease in blood pressure and TG of both males and females, yet CHOL values were reduced only in females. The protective effect of ATO on SMA endothelial function was much more pronounced in females compared to males. We conclude that vascular endothelial dysfunction of aged HTG rats is more severe and more attenuated by ATO in females compared to males. The protective effect of ATO on vascular endothelial function does not seem to depend solely on its lipid lowering action. PMID:23554556

  7. Functional characterization of late outgrowth endothelial progenitor cells in patients with end-stage renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Bolton, Eleanor M; Randle, Lucy; Bradley, John Andrew; Lever, Andrew M L

    2014-01-01

    Renal transplantation is potentially curative in renal failure, but long-term efficacy is limited by untreatable chronic rejection. Endothelial damage contributes to chronic rejection and is potentially repairable by circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). The frequency and function of EPC are variably influenced by end-stage renal failure (ESRF). Here, we isolated and functionally characterized the late outgrowth EPC (LO-EPC) from ESRF patients to investigate their potential for endothelial repair. Patients with ESRF generated more LO-EPC colonies than healthy controls and had higher plasma levels of IL-1rα, IL-16, IL-6, MIF, VEGF, Prolactin, and PLGF. Patients' LO-EPC displayed normal endothelial cell morphology, increased secretion of PLGF, MCP-1, and IL-1β, and normal network formation in vitro and in vivo. They demonstrated decreased adhesion to extracellular matrix. Integrin gene profiles and protein expression were comparable in patients and healthy volunteers. In some patients, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were co-isolated and could be differentiated into adipocytes and osteocytes in vitro. This is the first study to characterize LO-EPC from patients with ESRF. Their behavior in vitro reflects the presence of elevated trophic factors; their ability to proliferate in vitro and angiogenic function makes them candidates for prevention of chronic rejection. Their impaired adhesion and the presence of MSC are areas for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:24471420

  8. Assessments of endothelial function and arterial stiffness are reproducible in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Miguelez, Paula; Seigler, Nichole; Bass, Leon; Dillard, Thomas A; Harris, Ryan A

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated cardiovascular disease risk is observed in patients with COPD. Non-invasive assessments of endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness have recently emerged to provide mechanistic insight into cardiovascular disease risk in COPD; however, the reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness has yet to be investigated in this patient population. Objectives This study sought to examine the within-day and between-day reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness in patients with COPD. Methods Baseline diameter, peak diameter, flow-mediated dilation, augmentation index, augmentation index at 75 beats per minute, and pulse wave velocity were assessed three times in 17 patients with COPD (six males, eleven females, age range 47–75 years old; forced expiratory volume in 1 second =51.5% predicted). Session A and B were separated by 3 hours (within-day), whereas session C was conducted at least 7 days following session B (between-day). Reproducibility was assessed by: 1) paired t-tests, 2) coefficients of variation, 3) coefficients of variation prime, 4) intra-class correlation coefficient, 5) Pearson’s correlations (r), and 6) Bland–Altman plots. Five acceptable assessments were required to confirm reproducibility. Results Six out of six within-day criteria were met for endothelial function and arterial stiffness outcomes. Six out of six between-day criteria were met for baseline and peak diameter, augmentation index and pulse wave velocity, whereas five out of six criteria were met for flow-mediated dilation. Conclusion The present study provides evidence for within-day and between-day reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness in patients with COPD. PMID:26396509

  9. Cannabinoids alter endothelial function in the Zucker rat model of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Christopher P; Wheal, Amanda J; Randall, Michael D; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E

    2013-11-15

    Circulating levels of anandamide are increased in diabetes, and cannabidiol ameliorates a number of pathologies associated with diabetes. The aim of the present study was to examine how exposure to anandamide or cannabidiol might affect endothelial dysfunction associated with Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats. Age-matched Zucker Diabetic Fatty and Zucker lean rats were killed by cervical dislocation and their arteries mounted on a myograph at 37 °C. Arteries were incubated for 2h with anandamide, cannabidiol or vehicle, contracted, and cumulative concentration-response curves to acetylcholine were constructed. Anandamide (10 µM, 2h) significantly improved the vasorelaxant responses to acetylcholine in aortae and femoral arteries from Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats but not Zucker lean rats. By contrast, anandamide (1 µM, 2h) significantly blunted acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation in third-order mesenteric arteries (G3) from Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats. Cannabidiol incubation (10 µM, 2h) improved acetylcholine responses in the arteries of Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats (aorta and femoral) and Zucker lean (aorta, femoral and G3 mesenteric), and this effect was greater in the Zucker Diabetic Fatty rat. These studies suggest that increased circulating endocannabinoids may alter vascular function both positively and negatively in type 2 diabetes, and that part of the beneficial effect of cannabidiol in diabetes may be due to improved endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. PMID:24120371

  10. Primary tumor- and metastasis-derived colon cancer cells differently modulate connexin expression and function in human capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Thuringer, Dominique; Berthenet, Kevin; Cronier, Laurent; Solary, Eric; Garrido, Carmen

    2015-10-01

    A gradual loss of functional gap junction between tumor cells has been reported with colorectal cancer (CRC) progression. Here, we explored if colon cancer cells could also affect gap junctions in blood capillary cells. Human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC) were cultured with two CRC cell lines established from a unique patient. SW480 cells, derived from the primary tumor, migrate much faster across HMEC monolayer than SW620 cells derived from a metastatic site. The motile SW480 cells highly express and release HSP27 that increases gap junction formation with HMEC. Soluble HSP27 phosphorylates the connexin Cx43 on serine residues and induces its interaction with the oncoprotein 14-3-3, which promotes Cx43 delivery at the plasma membrane. The factors secreted by less motile SW620 cells do not affect Cx43 expression but up-regulate the expression of the connexin Cx32 through an activation of the chemokine receptor CXCR2. In turn, SW620 secreted factors induce tubulogenesis and ATP release. Altogether, cell lines derived from CRC primary tumor and metastasis differentially adapt endothelial cell functions by modulating connexin expression through released mediators. PMID:26320187

  11. Preserved endothelial function in human obesity in the absence of insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Insulin resistance (IR) is frequently associated with endothelial dysfunction and has been proposed to play a major role in cardiovascular disease (CVD). On the other hand, obesity has long been related to IR and increased CVD. However it is not known if IR is a necessary condition for endothelial dysfunction in human obesity, allowing for preserved endothelial function in obese people when absent. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to assess the relationship between IR and endothelial dysfunction in human obesity and the mechanisms involved. Methods Twenty non-insulin resistant morbid obese (NIR-MO), 32 insulin resistant morbid obese (IR-MO), and 12 healthy subjects were included. Serum concentrations of glucose, insulin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), resistin and adiponectin were determined. IR was evaluated by HOMA-index. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to bradykinin (BK) in mesenteric microvessels was assessed in wire myograph. Results Serum IL-6, and TNF-α levels were elevated only in IR-MO patients while resistin was elevated and adiponectin reduced in all MO individuals. Mesenteric arteries from IR-MO, but not from NIR-MO subjects displayed blunted relaxation to BK. Vasodilatation was improved in IR-MO arteries by the superoxide scavenger, superoxide dismutase (SOD) or the mitochondrial-targeted SOD mimetic, mito-TEMPO. NADPH oxidase inhibitors (apocynin and VAS2870) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) cofactor, tetrahydrobiopterin failed to modify BK-induced vasodilatations. Superoxide generation was higher in vessels from IR-MO subjects and reduced by mito-TEMPO. Blockade of TNF-α with infliximab, but not inhibition of inducible NOS or cyclooxygenase, improved endothelial relaxation and decreased superoxide formation. Conclusions Endothelial dysfunction is observed in human morbid obesity only when insulin resistance is present. Mechanisms involved include augmented mitochondrial superoxide generation, and

  12. Korean Red Ginseng Water Extract Restores Impaired Endothelial Function by Inhibiting Arginase Activity in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kwanhoon; Yoon, Jeongyeon

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the prime cause of morbidity and mortality and the population ages that may contribute to increase in the occurrence of cardiovascular disease. Arginase upregulation is associated with impaired endothelial function in aged vascular system and thus may contribute to cardiovascular disease. According to recent research, Korean Red Ginseng water extract (KRGE) may reduce cardiovascular disease risk by improving vascular system health. The purpose of this study was to examine mechanisms contributing to age-related vascular endothelial dysfunction and to determine whether KRGE improves these functions in aged mice. Young (10±3 weeks) and aged (55±5 weeks) male mice (C57BL/6J) were orally administered 0, 10, or 20 mg/mouse/day of KRGE for 4 weeks. Animals were sacrificed and the aortas were removed. Endothelial arginase activity, nitric oxide (NO) generation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) coupling, vascular tension, and plasma peroxynitrite production were measured. KRGE attenuated arginase activity, restored nitric oxide (NO) generation, reduced ROS production, and enhanced eNOS coupling in aged mice. KRGE also improved vascular tension in aged vessels, as indicated by increased acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation and improved phenylephrine-stimulated vasoconstriction. Furthermore, KRGE prevented plasma peroxynitrite formation in aged mice, indicating reduced lipid peroxidation. These results suggest KRGE exerts vasoprotective effects by inhibiting arginase activity and augmenting NO signaling and may be a useful treatment for age-dependent vascular diseases. PMID:24757370

  13. Can pain intensity in osteoarthritis joint be indicator of the impairment of endothelial function?

    PubMed

    Laskarin, Gordana; Persic, Viktor; Kukic, Sandra Rusac; Massari, Drazen; Legovic, Anita; Boban, Marko; Miskulin, Rajko; Rogoznica, Marija; Kehler, Tatjana

    2016-09-01

    We propose that pathological remodeling in joint tissues of osteoarthritis (OA) patients persistently stimulates local secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators, which overflow into the blood, activating leukocytes that impair endothelial function and accelerate the atherosclerotic process. During periods of pain, endothelial dysfunction progresses more aggressively due to elevated secretion of these pro-inflammatory mediators, which are involved in both atherosclerosis and the sensation of pain. Concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines and their antagonists, activating and decoy receptors of the broad interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-17 families, IL-15, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 should be measured in peripheral blood samples of OA patients and compared with (I) OA clinical severity; (II) subclinical parameters of atherosclerosis; (III) ischemic heart disease risk factors; (IV) soluble factors indicating endothelial dysfunction; (V) degree of bone destruction; and (VI) results of a six-minute walk test. Arthroscopy and joint replacement surgery provide an opportunity to estimate mRNA and protein expression of inflammatory mediators in specimens of synovial fluid, synovial membrane, cartilage, and/or subarticular bone. A range of methods, including questionnaires, X-ray, computed tomography, ultrasound, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunohistology, immunofluorescence, and reverse transcription and in situ polymerase chain reaction are available. Understanding the inflammatory and immune mechanisms underlying OA may allow the early identification of patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease, independently of classical coronary risk factors. Pain may constitute an extrinsic indicator of currently worsening endothelial function. PMID:27515191

  14. Investigating surface topology and cyclic-RGD peptide functionalization on vascular endothelialization.

    PubMed

    McNichols, Colton; Wilkins, Justin; Kubota, Atsutoshi; Shiu, Yan T; Aouadi, Samir M; Kohli, Punit

    2014-02-01

    The advantages of endothelialization of a stent surface in comparison with the bare metal and drug-eluting stents used today include reduced late-stent restenosis and in-stent thrombosis. In this article, we study the effect of surface topology and functionalization of tantalum (Ta) with cyclic-(arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-d-phenylalanine-lysine) (cRGDfK) on the attachment, spreading, and growth of vascular endothelial cells. Self-assembled nanodimpling on Ta surfaces was performed using a one-step electropolishing technique. Next, cRGDfK was covalently bonded onto the surface using silane chemistry. Our results suggest that nanotexturing alone was sufficient to enhance cell spreading, but the combination of a nanodimpled surfaces along with the cRGDfK peptide may produce a better endothelialization coating on the surface in terms of higher cell density, better cell spreading, and more cell-cell interactions, when compared to using cRGDfK peptide functionalization alone or nanotexturing alone. We believe that future research should look into how to implement both modifications (topographic and chemical modifications) to optimize the stent surface for endothelialization. PMID:23505215

  15. Comparative evaluation of the impact on endothelial cells induced by different nanoparticle structures and functionalization.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, Lisa; Müller, Ines; Ernst, Peter; Schäfer, Miriam; Rosman, Christina; Schick, Isabel; Köhler, Oskar; Oehring, Hartmut; Breus, Vladimir V; Basché, Thomas; Sönnichsen, Carsten; Tremel, Wolfgang; Hilger, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    In the research field of nanoparticles, many studies demonstrated a high impact of the shape, size and surface charge, which is determined by the functionalization, of nanoparticles on cell viability and internalization into cells. This work focused on the comparison of three different nanoparticle types to give a better insight into general rules determining the biocompatibility of gold, Janus and semiconductor (quantum dot) nanoparticles. Endothelial cells were subject of this study, since blood is the first barrier after intravenous nanoparticle application. In particular, stronger effects on the viability of endothelial cells were found for nanoparticles with an elongated shape in comparison to spherical ones. Furthermore, a positively charged nanoparticle surface (NH2, CyA) leads to the strongest reduction in cell viability, whereas neutral and negatively charged nanoparticles are highly biocompatible to endothelial cells. These findings are attributed to a rapid internalization of the NH2-functionalized nanoparticles in combination with the damage of intracellular membranes. Interestingly, the endocytotic pathway seems to be a size-dependent process whereas nanoparticles with a size of 20 nm are internalized by caveolae-mediated endocytosis and nanoparticles with a size of 40 nm are taken up by clathrin-mediated internalization and macropinocytosis. Our results can be summarized to formulate five general rules, which are further specified in the text and which determine the biocompatibility of nanoparticles on endothelial cells. Our findings will help to design new nanoparticles with optimized properties concerning biocompatibility and uptake behavior with respect to the respective intended application. PMID:25821668

  16. TNFα-Damaged-HUVECs Microparticles Modify Endothelial Progenitor Cell Functional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Carlos; Carmona, Andrés; Alique, Matilde; Carracedo, Julia; Ramirez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have an important role in the maintenance of vascular integrity and homeostasis. While there are many studies that explain EPCs mechanisms action, there are few studies that demonstrate how they interact with other emerging physiological elements such as Endothelial Microparticles (EMPs). EMPs are membranous structures with a size between 100 and 1000 nm that act as molecular information transporter in biological systems and are known as an important elements in develop different pathologies; moreover a lot of works explains that are novel biomarkers. To elucidate these interactions, we proposed an in vitro model of endothelial damage mediated by TNFalpha, in which damaged EMPs and EPCs are in contact to assess EPCs functional effects. We have observed that damaged EMPs can modulate several EPCs classic factors as colony forming units (CFUs), contribution to repair a physically damaged endothelium (wound healing), binding to mature endothelium, and co-adjuvants to the formation of new vessels in vitro (angiogenesis). All of these in a dose-dependent manner. Damaged EMPs at a concentration of 103 MPs/ml have an activating effect of these capabilities, while at concentrations of 105 MPs/ml these effects are attenuated or reduced. This in vitro model helps explain that in diseases where there is an imbalance between these two elements (EPCs and damaged EMPs), the key cellular elements in the regeneration and maintenance of vascular homeostasis (EPCs) are not fully functional, and could explain, at least in part, endothelial dysfunction associated in various pathologies. PMID:26733886

  17. Comparative evaluation of the impact on endothelial cells induced by different nanoparticle structures and functionalization

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Ines; Ernst, Peter; Schäfer, Miriam; Rosman, Christina; Schick, Isabel; Köhler, Oskar; Oehring, Hartmut; Breus, Vladimir V; Basché, Thomas; Sönnichsen, Carsten; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Summary In the research field of nanoparticles, many studies demonstrated a high impact of the shape, size and surface charge, which is determined by the functionalization, of nanoparticles on cell viability and internalization into cells. This work focused on the comparison of three different nanoparticle types to give a better insight into general rules determining the biocompatibility of gold, Janus and semiconductor (quantum dot) nanoparticles. Endothelial cells were subject of this study, since blood is the first barrier after intravenous nanoparticle application. In particular, stronger effects on the viability of endothelial cells were found for nanoparticles with an elongated shape in comparison to spherical ones. Furthermore, a positively charged nanoparticle surface (NH2, CyA) leads to the strongest reduction in cell viability, whereas neutral and negatively charged nanoparticles are highly biocompatible to endothelial cells. These findings are attributed to a rapid internalization of the NH2-functionalized nanoparticles in combination with the damage of intracellular membranes. Interestingly, the endocytotic pathway seems to be a size-dependent process whereas nanoparticles with a size of 20 nm are internalized by caveolae-mediated endocytosis and nanoparticles with a size of 40 nm are taken up by clathrin-mediated internalization and macropinocytosis. Our results can be summarized to formulate five general rules, which are further specified in the text and which determine the biocompatibility of nanoparticles on endothelial cells. Our findings will help to design new nanoparticles with optimized properties concerning biocompatibility and uptake behavior with respect to the respective intended application. PMID:25821668

  18. Investigating Surface Topology and Cyclic-RGD Peptide functionalization on Vascular Endothelialization

    PubMed Central

    McNichols, Colton; Wilkins, Justin; Kubota, Atsu; Shiu, Yan T.; Aouadi, Samir M.; Kohli, Punit

    2013-01-01

    The advantages of endothelialization of a stent surface in comparison with the bare metal and drug eluting stents used today include reduced late-stent restenosis and in-stent thrombosis. In this paper, we study the effect of surface topology and functionalization of tantalum (Ta) with cyclic-(arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-D-phenylalanine-lysine (cRGDfK)) on the attachment, spreading, and growth of vascular endothelial cells. Self-assembled nano-dimpling on Ta surfaces was performed using a one-step electropolishing technique. Next, cRGDfK was covalently bonded onto the surface using silane chemistry. Our results suggest that nano-texturing alone was sufficient to enhance cell spreading, but the combination of a nano-dimpled surfaces along with the cRGDfK peptide may produce a better endothelialization coating on the surface in terms of higher cell density, better cell spreading, and more cell-cell interactions, when compared to using cRGDfK peptide functionalization alone or nano-texturing alone. We believe that future research should look into how to implement both modifications (topographic and chemical modifications) to optimize the stent surface for endothelialization. PMID:23505215

  19. Coniferyl Aldehyde Attenuates Radiation Enteropathy by Inhibiting Cell Death and Promoting Endothelial Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Son, Yeonghoon; Jang, Jun-Ho; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kim, Sung-Ho; Ko, Young-Gyo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Hae-June

    2015-01-01

    Radiation enteropathy is a common complication in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether radiation-induced intestinal injury could be alleviated by coniferyl aldehyde (CA), an HSF1-inducing agent that increases cellular HSP70 expression. We systemically administered CA to mice with radiation enteropathy following abdominal irradiation (IR) to demonstrate the protective effects of CA against radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury. CA clearly alleviated acute radiation-induced intestinal damage, as reflected by the histopathological data and it also attenuated sub-acute enteritis. CA prevented intestinal crypt cell death and protected the microvasculature in the lamina propria during the acute and sub-acute phases of damage. CA induced HSF1 and HSP70 expression in both intestinal epithelial cells and endothelial cells in vitro. Additionally, CA protected against not only the apoptotic cell death of both endothelial and epithelial cells but also the loss of endothelial cell function following IR, indicating that CA has beneficial effects on the intestine. Our results provide novel insight into the effects of CA and suggest its role as a therapeutic candidate for radiation-induced enteropathy due to its ability to promote rapid re-proliferation of the intestinal epithelium by the synergic effects of the inhibition of cell death and the promotion of endothelial cell function. PMID:26029925

  20. Post-Exercise Ankle-Brachial Pressure Index Demonstrates Altered Endothelial Function in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shinji; Masami, Kozue; Otsuki, Shingo; Tanaka, Shiro; Nakayama, Noriko; Makita, Shigeru; Koshiyama, Hiroyuki; Nohara, Ryuji

    2011-01-01

    Background: The ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI), the ratio of the systolic blood pressure of the ankle to the systolic brachial pressure, is commonly measured at rest, but ABI values post-exercise enhance the sensitivity of the test and can be used to identify atherosclerotic vascular damage. However, it has not been established whether or not enhanced post-exercise ABI is also associated with endothelial dysfunction. We hypothesized that a decrease in post-exercise ABI is related to impaired endothelial function. Purpose: To investigate alterations in post-exercise ABI values and endothelial dysfunction in the elderly. Methods: The study population comprised 35 men and women aged 51–77 years (mean age: 66 years). Patients with peripheral arterial disease or a history of heart failure were excluded. The ABI was estimated at rest and immediately after exercise. The exercise protocol comprised 2.5 min of active pedal flexion exercises at a speed of 60 times/min. Endothelial function was assessed by measuring flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) in the brachial artery using ultrasound imaging. Results: No correlation was found between FMD and the ABI at rest. However, a weak correlation was found between FMD and post-exercise ABI (r = 0.46, P = 0.06). A strong correlation was observed between FMD and a decrease in post-exercise ABI compared to baseline readings (r = −0.52, P = 0.01). Multiple linear regression analysis was used to generate a prediction equation for FMD using the percentage decrease in post-exercise ABI. Significant correlations were observed between the ultrasound imaging-measured FMD and the predicted FMD (R2 = 0.27, P = 0.001). Conclusions: Post-exercise ABI appears to be a simple surrogate marker for endothelial function in the elderly, although larger studies are required for validation. PMID:23885186

  1. Effects of Recombinant Human Erythropoietin on Resistance Artery Endothelial Function in Stage 4 Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Briet, Marie; Barhoumi, Tlili; Mian, Muhammad Oneeb Rehman; Sierra, Cristina; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Davidman, Michael; Bercovitch, David; Nessim, Sharon J.; Frisch, Gershon; Paradis, Pierre; Lipman, Mark L.; Schiffrin, Ernesto L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies have raised concern about the safety of erythropoiesis‐stimulating agents because of evidence of increased risk of hypertension and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. In the present study, we investigated the effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) on endothelial function of gluteal subcutaneous resistance arteries isolated from 17 stage 4 patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate 21.9±7.4 mL/min per 1.73 m2) aged 63±13 years. Methods and Results Arteries were mounted on a pressurized myograph. EPO impaired endothelium‐dependent relaxation in a concentration‐dependent manner. The maximal response to acetylcholine with EPO at 1, 10, and 20 IU/mL was reduced by 12%, 34%, and 43%, respectively, compared with the absence of EPO (P<0.001). EPO‐induced endothelial dysfunction was significantly associated with carotid stiffness and history of cardiovascular events. EPO had no effect on norepinephrine‐induced vasoconstriction or sodium nitroprusside–induced relaxation. ABT‐627, an endothelin type A receptor antagonist, and tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic, partially reversed the altered endothelial function in the presence of EPO (P<0.01). Increased expression of endothelin‐1 was found in the vessel wall after incubation with EPO. Conclusions EPO alters endothelial function of resistance arteries in CKD patients via a mechanism involving in part oxidative stress and signaling through an endothelin type A receptor. EPO‐induced endothelial dysfunction could contribute to deleterious effects of EPO described in large interventional trials. PMID:23584809

  2. Endothelial function is unaffected by changing between carvedilol and metoprolol in patients with heart failure-a randomized study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Carvedilol has been shown to be superior to metoprolol tartrate to improve clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure (HF), yet the mechanisms responsible for these differences remain unclear. We examined if there were differences in endothelial function, insulin stimulated endothelial function, 24 hour ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate during treatment with carvedilol, metoprolol tartrate and metoprolol succinate in patients with HF. Methods Twenty-seven patients with mild HF, all initially treated with carvedilol, were randomized to a two-month treatment with carvedilol, metoprolol tartrate or metoprolol succinate. Venous occlusion plethysmography, 24-hour blood pressure and heart rate measurements were done before and after a two-month treatment period. Results Endothelium-dependent vasodilatation was not affected by changing from carvedilol to either metoprolol tartrate or metoprolol succinate. The relative forearm blood flow at the highest dose of serotonin was 2.42 ± 0.33 in the carvedilol group at baseline and 2.14 ± 0.24 after two months continuation of carvedilol (P = 0.34); 2.57 ± 0.33 before metoprolol tartrate treatment and 2.42 ± 0.55 after treatment (p = 0.74) and in the metoprolol succinate group 1.82 ± 0.29 and 2.10 ± 0.37 before and after treatment, respectively (p = 0.27). Diurnal blood pressures as well as heart rate were also unchanged by changing from carvedilol to metoprolol tartrate or metoprolol succinate. Conclusion Endothelial function remained unchanged when switching the beta blocker treatment from carvedilol to either metoprolol tartrate or metoprolol succinate in this study, where blood pressure and heart rate also remained unchanged in patients with mild HF. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials NCT00497003 PMID:21999413

  3. Estrogen treatment affects brain functioning after menopause.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Ulrike; Hausmann, Markus

    2011-12-01

    Sex hormones have powerful neuromodulatory effects on functional brain organization and cognitive functioning. This paper reviews findings from studies investigating the influence of sex hormones in postmenopausal women with and without hormone therapy (HT). Functional brain organization was investigated using different behavioural tasks in postmenopausal women using either estrogen therapy or combined estrogen plus gestagen therapy and age- and IQ-matched postmenopausal women not taking HT. The results revealed HT-related modulations in specific aspects of functional brain organization including functional cerebral asymmetries and interhemispheric interaction. In contrast to younger women during the menstrual cycle, however, it seems that HT, and especially estrogen therapy, after menopause affects intrahemispheric processing rather than interhemispheric interaction. This might be explained by a faster and more pronounced age-related decline in intrahemispheric relative to interhemispheric functioning, which might be associated with higher sensitivity to HT. Taken together, the findings suggest that the female brain retains its plasticity even after reproductive age and remains susceptible to the effects of sex hormones throughout the lifetime, which might help to discover new clinical approaches in the hormonal treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:22120942

  4. Long-term, regular remote ischemic preconditioning improves endothelial function in patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Liang, Y; Li, Y P; He, F; Liu, X Q; Zhang, J Y

    2015-06-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPre) can prevent myocardial injury. The purpose of this study was to assess the beneficial effects of long-term regular RIPre on human arteries. Forty patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery were assigned randomly to a RIPre group (n=20) or coronary heart disease (CHD) group (n=20). Twenty patients scheduled for mastectomy were enrolled as a control group. RIPre was achieved by occluding arterial blood flow 5 min with a mercury sphygmomanometer followed by a 5-min reperfusion period, and this was repeated 4 times. The RIPre procedure was repeated 3 times a day for 20 days. In all patients, arterial fragments discarded during surgery were collected to evaluate endothelial function by flow-mediated dilation (FMD), CD34(+) monocyte count, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS expression). Phosphorylation levels of STAT-3 and Akt were also assayed to explore the underlying mechanisms. Compared with the CHD group, long-term regular RIPre significantly improved FMD after 20 days (8.5±2.4 vs 4.9±4.2%, P<0.05) and significantly reduced troponin after CABG surgery (0.72±0.31 and 1.64±0.19, P<0.05). RIPre activated STAT-3 and increased CD34(+) endothelial progenitor cell counts found in arteries. Long-term, regular RIPre improved endothelial function in patients with CHD, possibly due to STAT-3 activation, and this may have led to an increase in endothelial progenitor cells. PMID:25923462

  5. Geraniol improves endothelial function by inhibiting NOX-2 derived oxidative stress in high fat diet fed mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Shiqi; Su, Mengqi; Sun, Li; Zhang, Song; Wang, Dingyu; Liu, Zhaorui; Yuan, Yue; Liu, Yang; Li, Yue

    2016-05-20

    Endothelial dysfunction occurs in obese patients and high-fat diet (HFD) fed experimental animals. While geraniol has been reported to ameliorate inflammation and oxidative stress, inhibit tumor cell proliferation, and improve atherosclerosis, its direct effect on endothelial function remains uncharacterized. The present study therefore investigated the effect of geraniol on endothelial function in HFD mice and its underlying mechanisms. C57 BL/6 mice were fed an HFD (n = 40) or a normal diet (n = 20) for 8 weeks. HFD fed mice then were randomized to intraperitoneal treatment with geraniol (n = 20) or vehicle (n = 20) for another 6 weeks. Acetylcholine (Ach)-induced endothelial dependent vasorelaxation was measured on wire myography; reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was assessed by fluorescence imaging, and NADPH oxidases (NOXs) and adhesive molecules VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 protein expression by western blotting. Geraniol improved endothelial function in HFD fed mice, as evidenced by its: 1. restoring endothelial dependent vasorelaxation induced by Ach, and reversing increased VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression; 2. attenuating HFD induced increased serum TBARS and aortic ROS generation; and 3. downregulating aortic NOX-2 expression in both HFD fed mice and in palmitic acid treated endothelial cells. Geraniol therefore protects against endothelial dysfunction induced by HFD through reducing NOX-2 associated ROS generation. PMID:27107694

  6. Hepatocyte growth factor enhances the barrier function in primary cultures of rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Narumi; Nakagawa, Shinsuke; Horai, Shoji; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Deli, Maria A; Yatsuhashi, Hiroshi; Niwa, Masami

    2014-03-01

    The effects of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on barrier functions were investigated by a blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro model comprising a primary culture of rat brain capillary endothelial cells (RBEC). In order to examine the response of the peripheral endothelial cells to HGF, human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) were also treated with HGF. HGF decreased the permeability of RBEC to sodium fluorescein and Evans blue albumin, and dose-dependently increased transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) in RBEC. HGF altered the immunochemical staining pattern of F-actin bands and made ZO-1 staining more distinct on the linear cell borders in RBEC. In contrast, HGF increased sodium fluorescein and Evans blue albumin permeability in HMVEC and HUVEC, and decreased TEER in HMVEC. In HMVEC, HGF reduced cortical actin bands and increased stress fiber density, and increased the zipper-like appearance of ZO-1 staining. Western blot analysis showed that HGF significantly increased the amount of ZO-1 and VE-cadherin. HGF seems to act on the BBB to strengthen BBB integrity. These findings indicated that cytoskeletal rearrangement and cell-cell adhesion, such as through VE-cadherin and ZO-1, are candidate mechanisms for the influence of HGF on the BBB. The possibility that HGF has therapeutic significance in protecting the BBB from damage needs to be considered. PMID:24370951

  7. Effects of erythritol on endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Flint, Nir; Hamburg, Naomi M; Holbrook, Monika; Dorsey, Pamela G; LeLeiko, Rebecca M; Berger, Alvin; de Cock, Peter; Bosscher, Douwina; Vita, Joseph A

    2014-01-01

    Sugar substitutes are important in the dietary management of diabetes mellitus. Erythritol is a non-caloric dietary bulk sweetener that reverses endothelial dysfunction in diabetic rats. We completed a pilot study to examine the effects of erythritol on vascular function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Participants (n = 24) consumed erythritol 36 g/day as an orange-flavored beverage for 4 weeks and a single dose of 24 g during the baseline and final visits. We assessed vascular function before and after acute (2 h) and chronic (4 weeks) erythritol consumption. Acute erythritol improved endothelial function measured by fingertip peripheral arterial tonometry (0.52 ± 0.48 to 0.87 ± 0.29 au, P = 0.005). Chronic erythritol decreased central pulse pressure (47 ± 13 to 41 ± 9 mmHg, P = 0.02) and tended to decrease carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (P = 0.06). Thus, erythritol consumption acutely improved small vessel endothelial function, and chronic treatment reduced central aortic stiffness. Erythritol may be a preferred sugar substitute for patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:24366423

  8. Atherosclerosis differentially affects calcium signalling in endothelial cells from aortic arch and thoracic aorta in Apolipoprotein E knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, Clodagh; Quayle, John; Burdyga, Theodor; Wray, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Apolipoprotein‐E knockout (ApoE−/−) mice develop hypercholesterolemia and are a useful model of atherosclerosis. Hypercholesterolemia alters intracellular Ca2+ signalling in vascular endothelial cells but our understanding of these changes, especially in the early stages of the disease process, is limited. We therefore determined whether carbachol‐mediated endothelial Ca2+ signals differ in plaque‐prone aortic arch compared to plaque‐resistant thoracic aorta, of wild‐type and ApoE−/− mice, and how this is affected by age and the presence of hypercholesterolemia. The extent of plaque development was determined using en‐face staining with Sudan IV. Tissues were obtained from wild‐type and ApoE−/− mice at 10 weeks (pre‐plaques) and 24 weeks (established plaques). We found that even before development of plaques, significantly increased Ca2+ responses were observed in arch endothelial cells. Even with aging and plaque formation, ApoE−/− thoracic responses were little changed, however a significantly enhanced Ca2+ response was observed in arch, both adjacent to and away from lesions. In wild‐type mice of any age, 1–2% of cells had oscillatory Ca2+ responses. In young ApoE−/− and plaque‐free regions of older ApoE−/−, this is unchanged. However a significant increase in oscillations (~13–15%) occurred in thoracic and arch cells adjacent to lesions in older mice. Our data suggest that Ca2+ signals in endothelial cells show specific changes both before and with plaque formation, that these changes are greatest in plaque‐prone aortic arch cells, and that these changes will contribute to the reported deterioration of endothelium in atherosclerosis. PMID:25344475

  9. The Interaction between Fluid Wall Shear Stress and Solid Circumferential Strain Affects Endothelial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Amaya, Ronny; Pierides, Alexis; Tarbell, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells lining the walls of blood vessels are exposed simultaneously to wall shear stress (WSS) and circumferential stress (CS) that can be characterized by the temporal phase angle between WSS and CS (stress phase angle – SPA). Regions of the circulation with highly asynchronous hemodynamics (SPA close to -180°) such as coronary arteries are associated with the development of pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia whereas more synchronous regions (SPA closer to 0°) are spared of disease. The present study evaluates endothelial cell gene expression of 42 atherosclerosis-related genes under asynchronous hemodynamics (SPA=-180 °) and synchronous hemodynamics (SPA=0 °). This study used a novel bioreactor to investigate the cellular response of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECS) exposed to a combination of pulsatile WSS and CS at SPA=0 or SPA=-180. Using a PCR array of 42 genes, we determined that BAECS exposed to non-reversing sinusoidal WSS (10±10 dyne/cm2) and CS (4 ± 4 %) over a 7 hour testing period displayed 17 genes that were up regulated by SPA = -180 °, most of them pro-atherogenic, including NFκB and other NFκB target genes. The up regulation of NFκB p50/p105 and p65 by SPA =-180° was confirmed by Western blots and immunofluorescence staining demonstrating the nuclear translocation of NFκB p50/p105 and p65. These data suggest that asynchronous hemodynamics (SPA=-180 °) can elicit proatherogenic responses in endothelial cells compared to synchronous hemodynamics without shear stress reversal, indicating that SPA may be an important parameter characterizing arterial susceptibility to disease. PMID:26147292

  10. Endothelial and Microcirculatory Function and Dysfunction in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Colbert, James F; Schmidt, Eric P

    2016-06-01

    The microcirculation is a series of arterioles, capillaries, and venules that performs essential functions of oxygen and nutrient delivery, customized to the unique physiologic needs of the supplied organ. The homeostatic microcirculatory response to infection can become harmful if overactive and/or dysregulated. Pathologic microcirculatory dysfunction can be directly visualized by intravital microscopy or indirectly measured via detection of circulating biomarkers. Although several treatments have been shown to protect the microcirculation during sepsis, they have not improved patient outcomes when applied indiscriminately. Future outcomes-oriented studies are needed to test sepsis therapeutics when personalized to a patient's microcirculatory dysfunction. PMID:27229643

  11. Renin-Angiotensin System Blockade Associated with Statin Improves Endothelial Function in Diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg; Bedirian, Ricardo; Pozzobon, Cesar Romaro; Ladeira, Márcia Cristina; Oigman, Wille; Neves, Mário Fritsch

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that statins have pleiotropic effects, such as reduction in blood pressure, and improvement in endothelial function and vascular stiffness. Objective To analyze if prior statin use influences the effect of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors on blood pressure, endothelial function, and vascular stiffness. Methods Patients with diabetes and hypertension with office systolic blood pressure ≥ 130 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥ 80 mmHg had their antihypertensive medications replaced by amlodipine during 6 weeks. They were then randomized to either benazepril or losartan for 12 additional weeks while continuing on amlodipine. Blood pressure (assessed with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring), endothelial function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation), and vascular stiffness (pulse wave velocity) were evaluated before and after the combined treatment. In this study, a post hoc analysis was performed to compare patients who were or were not on statins (SU and NSU groups, respectively). Results The SU group presented a greater reduction in the 24-hour systolic blood pressure (from 134 to 122 mmHg, p = 0.007), and in the brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (from 6.5 to 10.9%, p = 0.003) when compared with the NSU group (from 137 to 128 mmHg, p = 0.362, and from 7.5 to 8.3%, p = 0.820). There was no statistically significant difference in pulse wave velocity (SU group: from 9.95 to 9.90 m/s, p = 0.650; NSU group: from 10.65 to 11.05 m/s, p = 0.586). Conclusion Combined use of statins, amlodipine, and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors improves the antihypertensive response and endothelial function in patients with hypertension and diabetes. PMID:26465872

  12. Acute Effect of High-Intensity Eccentric Exercise on Vascular Endothelial Function in Young Men.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngju; Akazawa, Nobuhiko; Zempo-Miyaki, Asako; Ra, Song-Gyu; Shiraki, Hitoshi; Ajisaka, Ryuichi; Maeda, Seiji

    2016-08-01

    Choi, Y, Akazawa, N, Zempo-Miyaki, A, Ra, S-G, Shiraki, H, Ajisaka, R, and Maeda, S. Acute effect of high-intensity eccentric exercise on vascular endothelial function in young men. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2279-2285, 2016-Increased central arterial stiffness is as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence regarding the effects of high-intensity resistance exercise on vascular endothelial function and central arterial stiffness is conflicting. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of acute high-intensity eccentric exercise on vascular endothelial function and central arterial stiffness. We evaluated the acute changes in endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation (FMD), low-flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC), and arterial stiffness after high-intensity eccentric exercise. Seven healthy, sedentary men (age, 24 ± 1 year) performed maximal eccentric elbow flexor exercise using their nondominant arm. Before and 45 minutes after eccentric exercise, carotid arterial compliance and brachial artery FMD and L-FMC in the nonexercised arm were measured. Carotid arterial compliance was significantly decreased, and β-stiffness index significantly increased after eccentric exercise. Brachial FMD was significantly reduced after eccentric exercise, whereas there was no significant difference in brachial L-FMC before and after eccentric exercise. A positive correlation was detected between change in arterial compliance and change in FMD (r = 0.779; p ≤ 0.05), and a negative correlation was detected between change in β-stiffness index and change in FMD (r = -0.891; p < 0.01) with eccentric exercise. In this study, acute high-intensity eccentric exercise increased central arterial stiffness; this increase was accompanied by a decrease in endothelial function caused by reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation but not by a change in endothelium-dependent vasoconstriction. PMID:24832967

  13. MicroRNA-21 Exhibits Antiangiogenic Function by Targeting RhoB Expression in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bovy, Nicolas; Deroanne, Christophe; Lambert, Vincent; Gonzalez, Maria-Luz Alvarez; Colige, Alain; Rakic, Jean-Marie; Noël, Agnès; Martial, Joseph A.; Struman, Ingrid

    2011-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenously expressed small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at post-transcriptional level. The recent discovery of the involvement of these RNAs in the control of angiogenesis renders them very attractive in the development of new approaches for restoring the angiogenic balance. Whereas miRNA-21 has been demonstrated to be highly expressed in endothelial cells, the potential function of this miRNA in angiogenesis has never been investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings We first observed in endothelial cells a negative regulation of miR-21 expression by serum and bFGF, two pro-angiogenic factors. Then using in vitro angiogenic assays, we observed that miR-21 acts as a negative modulator of angiogenesis. miR-21 overexpression reduced endothelial cell proliferation, migration and the ability of these cells to form tubes whereas miR-21 inhibition using a LNA-anti-miR led to opposite effects. Expression of miR-21 in endothelial cells also led to a reduction in the organization of actin into stress fibers, which may explain the decrease in cell migration. Further mechanistic studies showed that miR-21 targets RhoB, as revealed by a decrease in RhoB expression and activity in miR-21 overexpressing cells. RhoB silencing impairs endothelial cell migration and tubulogenesis, thus providing a possible mechanism for miR-21 to inhibit angiogenesis. Finally, the therapeutic potential of miR-21 as an angiogenesis inhibitor was demonstrated in vivo in a mouse model of choroidal neovascularization. Conclusions/Significance Our results identify miR-21 as a new angiogenesis inhibitor and suggest that inhibition of cell migration and tubulogenesis is mediated through repression of RhoB. PMID:21347332

  14. Evaluation of Endothelial Function on Atherosclerosis using Perfusion Index from Pulse Oximeter

    PubMed Central

    de Menezes, Igor Alexandre Côrtes; Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana; da Cunha, Cláudio Leinig Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Background Endothelial dysfunction is vascular phenomenon that plays an important role in atherosclerosis development. With the purpose of improving the prevention and treatment of atherosclerotic diseases, the searching for accurate, practical and cheaper methods for evaluating endothelial function have become of interest. Objectives Verify the potential of Peripheral Perfusion Index from pulse oximetry (IPP) as a method of endothelial dysfunction evaluation in patients with atherosclerotic diseases. Methods There were recruited 18 control patients and 24 patients with atherosclerotic diseases under optimized treatment, in basic health units. The values of IPP were evaluated before and after an endothelial-dependent stimulus, the reactive hyperemia. The values of IPP were also evaluated in period which the major contribution of Nitric Oxide (NO) for the vasodilation occurs (IPP90-120). The results of IPP were discussed using the literature and estimating their diagnostic and prognostic potential Results The endothelium-dependent vasodilatory response measured by IPP was significantly lower in patients with atherosclerosis compared to control group, since 45 seconds after reactive hyperemia. Also, the values of IPP90-120 were significantly lower in patients with atherosclerosis [35% (4 - 53%) vs 73% (55 - 169%); p<0,001]. Similarly, the IPP values were lower in atherosclerosis group when it was separated by gender. Conclusion The results of this study, in association with the low cost of pulse oximeter, suggest a good potential for IPP as an endothelial dysfunction evaluation method. New studies must be done in order to clarify this potential and possibly contribute with the prevention and treatment of atherosclerotic diseases. PMID:24676228

  15. Total Sleep Deprivation Alters Endothelial Function in Rats: A Nonsympathetic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sauvet, Fabien; Florence, Geneviève; Van Beers, Pascal; Drogou, Catherine; Lagrume, Christophe; Chaumes, Cyrielle; Ciret, Sylvain; Leftheriotis, Georges; Chennaoui, Mounir

    2014-01-01

    cyclooxygenase pathway alterations. Citation: Sauvet F; Florence G; Van Beers P; Drogou C; Lagrume C; Chaumes C; Ciret S; Leftheriotis G; Chennaoui M. Total sleep deprivation alters endothelial function in rats: a nonsympathetic mechanism. SLEEP 2014;37(3):465-473. PMID:24587568

  16. Associations of Self-Reported Erectile Function with Non-Invasive Measurements of Endothelial Function: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jong Kyou; Lee, Joo Yong; Jung, Hae Do; Oh, Cheol Kyu; Choi, Young Deuk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the association of self-reported erectile function and endothelial function using the EndoPAT device. Materials and Methods We prospectively enrolled 76 men (age≥40 years) after obtaining a complete medical history and a self-reported questionnaire (International Index of Erectile Function-5 [IIEF-5], SEP Q2, Q3). Endothelial function was noninvasively measured with an EndoPAT 2000, recorded as the reactive hyperemia index (RHI), and analyzed according to the patients' baseline characteristics. Results The mean patient age and IIEF-5 score were 62.50±8.56 years and 11.20±6.36, respectively. In comparing the RHI according to erectile dysfunction (ED) risk factors, the RHI was significantly lower in older subjects (p=0.004). There was no difference in the RHI according to age, body mass index, waist circumference, obesity, smoking habit, or other comorbidities. When the subjects were divided into four groups according to the severity of ED, no statistical differences in the RHI value were found among the groups. There was no difference in IIEF-5 according to the RHI when categorized according to the normal cutoff value or quartile ranges. The second subdomain of IIEF-5 (erection firmness) was significantly correlated with the RHI value (R=0.309, p=0.007); however, this was not the case with the other IIEF-5 subdomains. Self-assessment showed a tendency toward a negative correlation with the RHI value (R=-0.202, p=0.080). Conclusions The role of endothelial function measurement by the EndoPAT in the evaluation and management of ED patients remains inconclusive. However, further studies are needed to validate the role of endothelial function measurement, by the EndoPAT or any other device. PMID:26770937

  17. Ultrasound Assessment of Endothelial Function: A Technical Guideline of the Flow-mediated Dilation Test.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Miguelez, Paula; Seigler, Nichole; Harris, Ryan A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the primary cause of mortality and a major cause of disability worldwide. The dysfunction of the vascular endothelium is a pathological condition characterized mainly by a disruption in the balance between vasodilator and vasoconstrictor substances and is proposed to play an important role in the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Therefore, a precise evaluation of endothelial function in humans represents an important tool that could help better understand the etiology of multiple cardio-centric pathologies. Over the past twenty-five years, many methodological approaches have been developed to provide an assessment of endothelial function in humans. Introduced in 1989, the FMD test incorporates a forearm occlusion and subsequent reactive hyperemia that promotes nitric oxide production and vasodilation of the brachial artery. The FMD test is now the most widely utilized, non-invasive, ultrasonic assessment of endothelial function in humans and has been associated with future cardiovascular events. Although the FMD test could have clinical utility, it is a physiological assessment that has inherited several confounding factors that need to be considered. This article describes a standardized protocol for determining FMD including the recommended methodology to help minimize the physiological and technical issues and improve the precision and reproducibility of the assessment. PMID:27167596

  18. Influence of circadian blood pressure profile on endothelial function in patients with and without arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rekhviashvili, A; Giorgobiani, T; Minashvili, A; Baganashvili, E

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about the relationship between the circadian BP rhythm and endothelial function in patients with essential hypertension. Consequently, we have hypothesized, that hypertensive patients with non-dipper circadian BP profile have more deteriorated endothelial function, than those with dipper BP profile. 57 untreated hypertensive patients and 17 normotensive controls were undergone to the anthropometrical measurements, physical examinations, review of their medical histories, 24-hour ABPM and vascular doppler-echography with high resolution ultrasound. Circadian BP profile was not independent from the BP level; namely, dipper profile was more frequent in normotensives. Independent from hypertension, dipper patients had significantly higher FMD%. In the whole study population, FMD showed strong negative correlation with 24-hour SBP, DBP and PP. Our study confirms the presence of disturbed endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in AH. Furthermore, our study showed that non-dipper circadian BP rhythm is associated with the significant impairment of endothelial function. Consequently, we can suggest that patients with non-dipper circadian BP profile could be assessed as a high risk group, which might need permanent supervising for avoiding of future cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications. PMID:25879555

  19. Effects of Different Therapeutic Ultrasound Waveforms on Endothelial Function in Healthy Volunteers: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Jeferson Mendes; Hauck, Melina; Cardoso Pereira, Ana Paula; Moraes, Maicon Borges; Martins, Cassio Noronha; da Silva Paulitsch, Felipe; Plentz, Rodrigo Della Méa; Peres, William; Vargas da Silva, Antônio Marcos; Signori, Luis Ulisses

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of different therapeutic 1-MHz ultrasound waveforms on endothelial function before and after cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition. Forty-two healthy volunteers aged 27.2 ± 3.8 y underwent interventions and an evaluation for endothelial function (n = 15; with COX inhibition, n = 15; duration of the vasodilator effect, n = 12) by technique flow-mediated dilation. Continuous ultrasound therapy (0.4 W/cm(2 SATA)), pulsed ultrasound therapy (20% duty cycle, 0.08 W/cm(2 SATA)) or placebo (equipment power off) was randomly applied over the brachial artery for 5 min. COX inhibition (aspirin) was carried out 30 min before treatments. In relation to the placebo, flow-mediated dilation increased by 4.8% using continuous ultrasound and by 3.4% using pulsed ultrasound. After COX, flow-mediated dilation was enhanced by 2.1% by continuous ultrasound and 2.6% by pulsed ultrasound. This vasodilation persisted for 20 min. Continuous and pulsed therapeutic 1-MHz ultrasound waveforms improved endothelial function in humans, which provided them with anti-inflammatory vascular effects. PMID:26578361

  20. Effect of soy isoflavone supplementation on vascular endothelial function and oxidative stress in postmenopausal women: a community randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pusparini; Dharma, Rahayuningsih; Suyatna, Fransiscus D; Mansyur, Muchtaruddin; Hidajat, Adi

    2013-01-01

    A 12-month randomized double blind controlled trial was conducted among 182 Indonesian postmenopausal women aged 47 to 60 years to determine the effect of 100 mg/day soy isoflavone supplementation on vascular endothelial function such as vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), nitric oxide (NO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) as oxidative stress marker. The subjects were randomized to the intervention group receiving tablets consisting of 100 mg soy isoflavones and calcium carbonate 500 mg, and to the control group receiving 500 mg calcium carbonate. The concentrations of VCAM-1, NO and MDA were measured at baseline, and postsupplementation at 6 months and 12 months. After supplementation, the MDA concentrations were significantly lower in the soy isoflavone group compared with the control group (p=0.001). The concentrations of VCAM-1 and NO were not affected (p=0.992 and p=0.759, respectively). In all group the MDA concentration increased compared with baseline concentrations but the relative change of MDA concentrations was significantly lower in the soy isoflavone group compared with the control group. This study demonstrates that supplemental intake of soy isoflavones for 6 months and 12 months had an effect on oxidative stress by decreasing MDA concentration, but did not improve vascular endothelial function. PMID:23945405

  1. The impact of decreases in air temperature and increases in ozone on markers of endothelial function in individuals having type-2 diabetes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several studies have reported an association between air pollution and endothelial dysfunction, especially in individuals having diabetes. However, very few studies have examined the impact of air temperature on endothelial function. The objective of this analysis was to investig...

  2. Endothelial Function and Serum Concentration of Toxic Metals in Frequent Consumers of Fish

    PubMed Central

    Buscemi, Silvio; Vasto, Sonya; Di Gaudio, Francesca; Grosso, Giuseppe; Bergante, Sonia; Galvano, Fabio; Massenti, Fatima Maria; Amodio, Emanuele; Rosafio, Giuseppe; Verga, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Background Endothelial dysfunction is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Consumption of fish is associated with reduced cardiovascular risk, but there is paucity of data concerning its effect on endothelial function. Furthermore, investigation of the effects of fish consumption on health must take into account the ingestion of contaminants, including transition metals and some metalloids, which may have unfavorable effects on health, including those on the cardiovascular system. We investigated the association between fish consumption, endothelial function (flow mediated dilation of the brachial artery), and serum concentration of some toxic metals in apparently healthy people. Methods Twenty-nine high fish consumers (at least 3 portions a week) were compared with 25 low fish consumers (less than 1 portion a week). All participants were free of diabetes, cardiovascular or other systemic diseases. Serum metal (antimonium, arsenic, mercury, lead, cobalt, copper, zinc, selenium, strontium) concentrations were measured in subgroups of 24 high fish consumers and 19 low fish consumers. Results Both groups exhibited similar habitual dietary patterns, age and anthropometric characteristics. The high fish consumers had higher flow mediated dilation (9.7±1.8 vs. 7.3±1.9%; P<0.001), but also higher serum concentrations of mercury (5.87±2.69 vs. 1.65±1.10 mcg/L; P<0.001) and arsenic (6.04±3.25 vs. 2.30±1.58 mcg/L; P<0.001). The fasting plasma glucose concentrations were significantly correlated with both mercury (r = 0.39; P = 0.01) and arsenic concentrations (r = 0.55; P<0.001). Conclusions Habitual consumption of high amounts of fish is associated with better endothelial function despite higher serum concentrations of mercury and arsenic. PMID:25401695

  3. CD34+ Cells Represent Highly Functional Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Murine Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junjie; Ii, Masaaki; Kamei, Naosuke; Alev, Cantas; Kwon, Sang-Mo; Kawamoto, Atsuhiko; Akimaru, Hiroshi; Masuda, Haruchika; Sawa, Yoshiki; Asahara, Takayuki

    2011-01-01

    Background Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were shown to have angiogenic potential contributing to neovascularization. However, a clear definition of mouse EPCs by cell surface markers still remains elusive. We hypothesized that CD34 could be used for identification and isolation of functional EPCs from mouse bone marrow. Methodology/Principal Findings CD34+ cells, c-Kit+/Sca-1+/Lin− (KSL) cells, c-Kit+/Lin− (KL) cells and Sca-1+/Lin− (SL) cells were isolated from mouse bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) using fluorescent activated cell sorting. EPC colony forming capacity and differentiation capacity into endothelial lineage were examined in the cells. Although CD34+ cells showed the lowest EPC colony forming activity, CD34+ cells exhibited under endothelial culture conditions a more adherent phenotype compared with the others, demonstrating the highest mRNA expression levels of endothelial markers vWF, VE-cadherin, and Flk-1. Furthermore, a dramatic increase in immediate recruitment of cells to the myocardium following myocardial infarction and systemic cell injection was observed for CD34+ cells comparing with others, which could be explained by the highest mRNA expression levels of key homing-related molecules Integrin β2 and CXCR4 in CD34+ cells. Cell retention and incorporation into the vasculature of the ischemic myocardium was also markedly increased in the CD34+ cell-injected group, giving a possible explanation for significant reduction in fibrosis area, significant increase in neovascularization and the best cardiac functional recovery in this group in comparison with the others. Conclusion These findings suggest that mouse CD34+ cells may represent a functional EPC population in bone marrow, which could benefit the investigation of therapeutic EPC biology. PMID:21655289

  4. Effect of Meditation on Endothelial Function in Black Americans with Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vaccarino, Viola; Kondwani, Kofi A.; Kelley, Mary E.; Murrah, Nancy V.; Boyd, Linda; Ahmed, Yusuf; Meng, Yuan X.; Gibbons, Gary H.; Hooper, W. Craig; De Staercke, Christine; Quyyumi, Arshed A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Psychological stress may play a role in metabolic syndrome. A consequence of metabolic syndrome is endothelial dysfunction, which is also influenced by psychological stress. We sought to compare the effect of consciously resting meditation (CRM), a sound (mantra)-based meditation, with a control intervention of health education (HE) on endothelial function in the setting of metabolic syndrome. Methods Sixty-eight black Americans with metabolic system risk factors (age 30 to 65 years) were randomized to either CRM (N=33), or to HE (N=35); interventions were matched for frequency and duration of sessions and lasted 12 months. Endothelial function was assessed by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD%) at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Arterial elasticity, metabolic risk factors, psychosocial and behavioral variables were secondary endpoints. Results Although FMD % improved in the CRM group over 12 months, this increase was not significantly higher than in the HE group (p=0.51 for the interaction between group and time). Non-endothelium dependent dilation and arterial elasticity did not change in either group. Most metabolic syndrome risk factors showed beneficial trends in the CRM group only. A risk factor score counting the number of metabolic syndrome components decreased in the CRM group but not in the control HE group (p=0.049 for the interaction between treatment group and time). Conclusions Among black Americans with metabolic syndrome risk factors, CRM, a sound-based meditation, did not improve endothelial function significantly more than a control intervention of health education. CRM resulted in favorable trends in metabolic syndrome risk factors which were examined as secondary outcomes. PMID:23788695

  5. Intermedin Stabilized Endothelial Barrier Function and Attenuated Ventilator-induced Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Redetzky, Holger Christian; Kummer, Wolfgang; Pfeil, Uwe; Hellwig, Katharina; Will, Daniel; Paddenberg, Renate; Tabeling, Christoph; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background Even protective ventilation may aggravate or induce lung failure, particularly in preinjured lungs. Thus, new adjuvant pharmacologic strategies are needed to minimize ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Intermedin/Adrenomedullin-2 (IMD) stabilized pulmonary endothelial barrier function in vitro. We hypothesized that IMD may attenuate VILI-associated lung permeability in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (HPMVEC) monolayers were incubated with IMD, and transcellular electrical resistance was measured to quantify endothelial barrier function. Expression and localization of endogenous pulmonary IMD, and its receptor complexes composed of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) and receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) 1–3 were analyzed by qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence in non ventilated mouse lungs and in lungs ventilated for 6 h. In untreated and IMD treated mice, lung permeability, pulmonary leukocyte recruitment and cytokine levels were assessed after mechanical ventilation. Further, the impact of IMD on pulmonary vasoconstriction was investigated in precision cut lung slices (PCLS) and in isolated perfused and ventilated mouse lungs. IMD stabilized endothelial barrier function in HPMVECs. Mechanical ventilation reduced the expression of RAMP3, but not of IMD, CRLR, and RAMP1 and 2. Mechanical ventilation induced lung hyperpermeability, which was ameliorated by IMD treatment. Oxygenation was not improved by IMD, which may be attributed to impaired hypoxic vasoconstriction due to IMD treatment. IMD had minor impact on pulmonary leukocyte recruitment and did not reduce cytokine levels in VILI. Conclusions/Significance IMD may possibly provide a new approach to attenuate VILI. PMID:22563471

  6. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Endothelial Function in Women

    PubMed Central

    Czarkowski, Kathryn A.; Child, Josiah; Howes, Christopher; Epperson, C. Neill

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Among women worldwide, major depression (MDD) and heart disease rank first and second, respectively, in burden of disease. Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are frequently prescribed, possible inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) function has caused concerns about their effects on protective vascular mechanisms. Our study aimed to determine the effect of SSRIs on flow-mediated vascular dilatation (FMD), platelet aggregation, and platelet NO production among women. Methods: Women (n=28) without known cardiovascular disease were recruited prior to undergoing SSRI treatment for MDD, postpartum depression (PPD), or premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Symptoms were quantified using the Hamilton Depression/Anxiety and Beck Depression scales. FMD, platelet aggregation, and platelet NO production were measured before and after 1 month of SSRI (sertraline, fluoxetine, or paroxetine) therapy. Results: Depression and anxiety symptoms decreased significantly with SSRI treatment (ps <0.01). FMD and platelet aggregation did not differ between pre- and posttreatment, although FMD rose to the normal range (≥8%) in two of three women with abnormal FMD prior to SSRI treatment. We observed a 21% decrease (p=0.024) in platelet NO production. Conclusions: SSRI treatment had little effect on FMD or platelet aggregation. The health impact of decreased NO production is unclear, particularly in this relatively young group of women without cardiovascular disease, but should be considered in future studies focusing on SSRI safety in patients with cardiovascular disease. PMID:24886268

  7. Adiponectin, ghrelin, and leptin differentially influence human platelet and human vascular endothelial cell functions: implication in obesity-associated cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Elbatarny, Hisham S; Netherton, Stuart J; Ovens, Jeffrey D; Ferguson, Alastair V; Maurice, Donald H

    2007-03-01

    A very strong epidemiological link exists between obesity, the metabolic syndrome, diabetes and diabetes-associated cardiovascular pathologies. For this reason the peripheral effects of the centrally-acting satiety adipokines, adiponectin and leptin, and of non-adipose-derived hormones with similar effects, like ghrelin, have received considerable attention. In this report, we have extended our previous studies of the pro-thrombotic effects of leptin and determined the effects of adiponectin or ghrelin on human platelet activation. Thus, while leptin stimulated human platelet aggregation and adhesion, addition of adiponectin or of ghrelin did not affect either aggregation or adhesion of these cells; even at supra-physiological concentrations. In addition, we compared the impact of these three important hormones on microvascular endothelial cell permeability, an important parameter of endothelial function that when impaired contributes to several vascular pathologies. While physiologically relevant concentrations of either leptin or adiponectin increased the integrity of the diffusion barrier formed by a monolayer of human microvascular endothelial cells, only supra-physiological concentrations of ghrelin had this effect. None of these agents reduced microvascular endothelial barrier function. Taken together, our data are consistent with the ideas that leptin activates human platelets and limits transendothelial cell diffusion but that adiponectin only influences endothelial cell permeability. In contrast, ghrelin had neither of these effects. We propose that these data identify important differences in the effects of leptin, adiponectin or ghrelin on microvascular endothelial cells and platelets and may provide a basis on which to pharmacologically manipulate the selective effects of these peptides on these cell types in human cardiovascular or thrombotic diseases associated with obesity. PMID:17207790

  8. Anthocyanin Bioavailability from Acute Cranberry Juice Consumption and Evidence of Effects on Endothelial Function in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiologic studies suggest an inverse correlation between intake of flavonoidcontaining foods and cardiovascular risk. Multiple health beneficial effect of flavonoids have been proposed to account for this observation, including effects on endothelial function. Cranberries contain relatively high...

  9. Grape polyphenols do not affect vascular function in healthy men.

    PubMed

    van Mierlo, Linda A J; Zock, Peter L; van der Knaap, Henk C M; Draijer, Richard

    2010-10-01

    Data suggest that polyphenol-rich products may improve endothelial function and other cardiovascular health risk factors. Grape and wine contain high amounts of polyphenols, but effects of these polyphenols have hardly been investigated in isolation in randomized controlled studies. Our objective in this study was to test the chronic effect of polyphenol-rich solids derived from either a wine grape mix or grape seed on flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Blood pressure and other vascular function measures, platelet function, and blood lipids were secondary outcomes. Thirty-five healthy males were randomized in a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study consisting of three 2-wk intervention periods separated by 1-wk washout periods. The test products, containing 800 mg of polyphenols, were consumed as capsules. At the end of each intervention period, effects were measured after consumption of a low-fat breakfast (~751 kJ, 25% fat) and a high-fat lunch (~3136 kJ, 78% fat). After the low-fat breakfast, the treatments did not significantly affect FMD. The absolute difference after the wine grape solid treatment was -0.4% (95% CI = -1.8 to 0.9; P = 0.77) and after grape seed solids, 0.2% (95% CI = -1.2 to 1.5; P = 0.94) compared with after the placebo treatment. FMD effects after the high-fat lunch and effects on secondary outcomes also showed no consistent differences between both of the grape solids and placebo treatment. In conclusion, consumption of grape polyphenols has no major impact on FMD in healthy men. Future studies should address whether grape polyphenols can improve FMD and other cardiovascular health risk factors in populations with increased cardiovascular risk. PMID:20702747

  10. Endothelial function in women of the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study

    PubMed Central

    Kling, J. M.; Lahr, B. A.; Bailey, K. R.; Harman, S. M.; Mulvagh, S. L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Endothelial dysfunction occurs early in the atherosclerotic disease process, often preceding clinical symptoms. Use of menopausal hormone treatment (MHT) to reduce cardiovascular risk is controversial. This study evaluated effects of 4 years of MHT on endothelial function in healthy, recently menopausal women. Methods Endothelial function was determined by pulse volume digital tonometry providing a reactive hyperemia index (RHI) in a subset of women enrolled in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study. RHI was measured before and annually after randomization to daily oral conjugated equine estrogen (oCEE, 0.45 mg), weekly transdermal 17β-estradiol (tE2, 50 μg) each with intermittent progesterone (200 mg daily 12 days of the month) or placebo pills and patch. Results At baseline, RHI averaged 2.39 ± 0.69 (mean ± standard deviation; n = 83), and over follow-up did not differ significantly among groups: oCEE, 2.26 ± 0.48 (n = 26); tE2, 2.26 ± 0.45 (n = 24); and placebo, 2.37 ± 0.37 (n = 33). Changes in RHI did not correlate with changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors, but may inversely correlate with carotid intima medial thickness (Spearman correlation coefficient ρ = −0.268, p = 0.012). Conclusion In this 4-year prospective assessment of recently menopausal women, MHT did not significantly alter RHI when compared to placebo. PMID:25417709

  11. The Association between Circulating MicroRNA Levels and Coronary Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, R. Jay; Chung, Woo-Young; Herrmann, Joerg; Jordan, Kyra L.; Lerman, Lilach O.; Lerman, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Human microRNAs (miRs) have been implicated in human diseases presumably through the downregulation and silencing of targeted genes via post-translational modifications. However, their role in the early stage of coronary atherosclerosis is not known. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that patients with early atherosclerosis and coronary endothelial dysfunction (CED) have alterations in transcoronary miR gradients. Patients underwent coronary angiography and endothelial function testing in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Patients were divided into abnormal (n = 26) and normal (n = 22) microvascular coronary endothelial function based on intracoronary response to infused acetylcholine measured as a percent change in coronary blood flow (CBF) and arterial diameter. Blood samples were obtained simultaneously from the aorta and coronary sinus at the time of catheterization for RNA isolation, and miR subsequently assessed. Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. Patients with microvascular CED displayed transcoronary gradients significantly elevated in miR-92a and miR-133 normalized to C-elegans-39 miR. Percent change in CBF and the transcoronary gradient of miR-133 displayed a significant inverse correlation (r2 = 0.11, p = 0.03). Thus, we present novel data whereupon selected miRs demonstrate elevated transcoronary gradients in patients with microvascular CED. The current findings support further studies on the mechanistic role of miRs in coronary atherosclerosis and in humans. PMID:25310838

  12. Adaptation of β-Cell and Endothelial Function to Carbohydrate Loading: Influence of Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Barry E; Schneiderman, Neil; Marks, Jennifer B; Mendez, Armando J; Gonzalez, Alex; Llabre, Maria M; Smith, Steven R; Bizzotto, Roberto; Santini, Eleonora; Manca, Maria Laura; Skyler, Jay S; Mari, Andrea; Ferrannini, Ele

    2015-07-01

    High-carbohydrate diets have been associated with β-cell strain, dyslipidemia, and endothelial dysfunction. We examined how β-cell and endothelial function adapt to carbohydrate overloading and the influence of insulin resistance. On sequential days in randomized order, nondiabetic subjects (classified as insulin-sensitive [IS] [n = 64] or insulin-resistant [IR] [n = 79] by euglycemic clamp) received four mixed meals over 14 h with either standard (300 kcal) or double carbohydrate content. β-Cell function was reconstructed by mathematical modeling; brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was measured before and after each meal. Compared with IS, IR subjects showed higher glycemia and insulin hypersecretion due to greater β-cell glucose and rate sensitivity; potentiation of insulin secretion, however, was impaired. Circulating free fatty acids (FFAs) were less suppressed in IR than IS subjects. Baseline FMD was reduced in IR, and postprandial FMD attenuation occurred after each meal, particularly with high carbohydrate, similarly in IR and IS. Throughout the two study days, higher FFA levels were significantly associated with lower (incretin-induced) potentiation and impaired FMD. In nondiabetic individuals, enhanced glucose sensitivity and potentiation upregulate the insulin secretory response to carbohydrate overloading. With insulin resistance, this adaptation is impaired. Defective suppression of endogenous FFA is one common link between impaired potentiation and vascular endothelial dysfunction. PMID:25754957

  13. Adaptation of β-Cell and Endothelial Function to Carbohydrate Loading: Influence of Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Barry E.; Schneiderman, Neil; Marks, Jennifer B.; Mendez, Armando J.; Gonzalez, Alex; Llabre, Maria M.; Smith, Steven R.; Bizzotto, Roberto; Santini, Eleonora; Manca, Maria Laura; Skyler, Jay S.; Mari, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    High-carbohydrate diets have been associated with β-cell strain, dyslipidemia, and endothelial dysfunction. We examined how β-cell and endothelial function adapt to carbohydrate overloading and the influence of insulin resistance. On sequential days in randomized order, nondiabetic subjects (classified as insulin-sensitive [IS] [n = 64] or insulin-resistant [IR] [n = 79] by euglycemic clamp) received four mixed meals over 14 h with either standard (300 kcal) or double carbohydrate content. β-Cell function was reconstructed by mathematical modeling; brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was measured before and after each meal. Compared with IS, IR subjects showed higher glycemia and insulin hypersecretion due to greater β-cell glucose and rate sensitivity; potentiation of insulin secretion, however, was impaired. Circulating free fatty acids (FFAs) were less suppressed in IR than IS subjects. Baseline FMD was reduced in IR, and postprandial FMD attenuation occurred after each meal, particularly with high carbohydrate, similarly in IR and IS. Throughout the two study days, higher FFA levels were significantly associated with lower (incretin-induced) potentiation and impaired FMD. In nondiabetic individuals, enhanced glucose sensitivity and potentiation upregulate the insulin secretory response to carbohydrate overloading. With insulin resistance, this adaptation is impaired. Defective suppression of endogenous FFA is one common link between impaired potentiation and vascular endothelial dysfunction. PMID:25754957

  14. Instrumental noise estimates stabilize and quantify endothelial cell micro-impedance barrier function parameter estimates

    SciTech Connect

    English, Anthony E; Moy, Alan B; Kruse, Kara L; Ward, Richard C; Kirkpatrick, Stacy S; GoldmanM.D., Mitchell H

    2009-04-01

    A novel transcellular micro-impedance biosensor, referred to as the electric cell-substrate impedance sensor or ECIS, has become increasingly applied to the study and quantification of endothelial cell physiology. In principle, frequency dependent impedance measurements obtained from this sensor can be used to estimate the cell cell and cell matrix impedance components of endothelial cell barrier function based on simple geometric models. Few studies, however, have examined the numerical optimization of these barrier function parameters and established their error bounds. This study, therefore, illustrates the implementation of a multi-response Levenberg Marquardt algorithm that includes instrumental noise estimates and applies it to frequency dependent porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cell impedance measurements. The stability of cell cell, cell matrix and membrane impedance parameter estimates based on this approach is carefully examined, and several forms of parameter instability and refinement illustrated. Including frequency dependent noise variance estimates in the numerical optimization reduced the parameter value dependence on the frequency range of measured impedances. The increased stability provided by a multi-response non-linear fit over one-dimensional algorithms indicated that both real and imaginary data should be used in the parameter optimization. Error estimates based on single fits and Monte Carlo simulations showed that the model barrier parameters were often highly correlated with each other. Independently resolving the different parameters can, therefore, present a challenge to the experimentalist and demand the use of non-linear multivariate statistical methods when comparing different sets of parameters.

  15. Improved endothelialization of NiTi alloy by VEGF functionalized nanocoating.

    PubMed

    Shen, Weixing; Cai, Kaiyong; Yang, Zaixiang; Yan, Ying; Yang, Weihu; Liu, Peng

    2012-06-01

    To improve surface endothelialization of NiTi alloy substrate, a nano-structured coating functionalized with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was fabricated via polydopamine (PDOP) as intermediate layer. The successful preparation of VEGF conjugated nanocoating was demonstrated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) test showed that the formed nanocoating significantly reduced the release of Ni ion from NiTi alloy in simulated body fluid. The biological behaviors of endothelial cells adhered to modified NiTi alloy substrates, including cell proliferation, cell spreading and production of nitric oxide and prostacyclin were investigated in vitro. The results suggest that surface functionalization of NiTi alloy substrate with VEGF is beneficial for cell growth. The approach presented here affords an alternative for surface modification of NiTi implants applied as heart and vascular implant devices. PMID:22387019

  16. Magnitude-dependent regulation of pulmonary endothelial cell barrier function by cyclic stretch.

    PubMed

    Birukov, Konstantin G; Jacobson, Jeffrey R; Flores, Alejandro A; Ye, Shui Q; Birukova, Anna A; Verin, Alexander D; Garcia, Joe G N

    2003-10-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury syndromes are characterized by profound increases in vascular leakiness and activation of inflammatory processes. To explore whether excessive cyclic stretch (CS) directly causes vascular barrier disruption or enhances endothelial cell sensitivity to edemagenic agents, human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAEC) were exposed to physiologically (5% elongation) or pathologically (18% elongation) relevant levels of strain. CS produced rapid (10 min) increases in myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, activation of p38 and extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 MAP kinases, and actomyosin remodeling. Acute (15 min) and chronic (48 h) CS markedly enhanced thrombin-induced MLC phosphorylation (2.1-fold and 3.2-fold for 15-min CS at 5 and 18% elongation and 2.1-fold and 3.1-fold for 48-h CS at 5 and 18% elongation, respectively). HPAEC preconditioned at 18% CS, but not at 5% CS, exhibited significantly enhanced thrombin-induced reduction in transendothelial electrical resistance but did not affect barrier protective effect of sphingosine-1-phosphate (0.5 microM). Finally, expression profiling analysis revealed a number of genes, including small GTPase rho, apoptosis mediator ZIP kinase, and proteinase activated receptor-2, to be regulated by CS in an amplitude-dependent manner. Thus our study demonstrates a critical role for the magnitude of CS in regulation of agonist-mediated pulmonary endothelial cell permeability and strongly suggests phenotypic regulation of HPAEC barrier properties by CS. PMID:12639843

  17. Thyroid hormone affects both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells in rat arteries.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yin; Manio, Michael M; Leung, George P H; Xu, Aimin; Tang, Eva H C; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2015-01-15

    Hypothyroidism impairs endothelium-dependent dilatations, while hyperthyroidism augments the production of endothelial nitric oxide. Thus, experiments were designed to determine if thyroid hormone causes endothelium-dependent responses, or alleviates diabetic endothelial dysfunction. Isometric tension was measured in rings with or without endothelium of arteries from normal and diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats. Release of 6-keto prostaglandin F1α and thromboxane B2 were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and protein levels [endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), cyclooxygenases (COX)] by immunoblotting. Triiodothyronine (T3) caused concentration-dependent (3×10(-6)-3×10(-5)M) relaxations in mesenteric (pEC50, 4.96±0.19) and femoral (pEC50, 4.57±0.35) arteries without endothelium. In femoral arteries of rats with diabetes, 5-methylamino-2-[[(2S,3R,5R,8S,9S)-3,5,9-trimethyl-2-(1-oxo-(1H-pyrrol-2- -yl)propan-2-yl)-1,7-dioxaspiro-(5,5)undecan-8-yl]methyl]benzooxazole-4-carboxylic acid (A23187, 3×10(-7) to 10(-6)M) caused partly endothelium-dependent contractions. After chronic T3-treatment with (10μg/kg/day; four weeks), the contractions to A23187 of preparations with and without endothelium were comparable, the thromboxane B2-release was reduced (by 38.1±9.2%). The pEC50 of 9, 11-dideoxy-11α, 9α-epoxymethanoprostaglandin F2α (U46619, TP-receptor agonist) was increased in T3-treated diabetic rats compared with controls (8.53±0.06 vs 7.94±0.09). The protein expression of eNOS increased (by 228%) but that of COX-1 decreased (by 35%) after chronic T3 treatment. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells incubated for one week with T3 (10(-10)-10(-7)M) in the presence but not in the absence of interleukin-1β (1ng/ml), the expression of eNOS was increased compared to control. In conclusion, thyroid hormone acutely relaxes mesenteric and femoral vascular smooth muscle, but given chronically reduces the release of endothelium-derived vasoconstrictor

  18. Can lifestyle modification affect men's erectile function?

    PubMed

    Hehemann, Marah C; Kashanian, James A

    2016-04-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition affecting millions of men worldwide. The pathophysiology and epidemiologic links between ED and risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) are well-established. Lifestyle modifications such as smoking cessation, weight reduction, dietary modification, physical activity, and psychological stress reduction have been increasingly recognized as foundational to the prevention and treatment of ED. The aim of this review is to outline behavioral choices which may increase ones risk of developing ED, to present relevant studies addressing lifestyle factors correlated with ED, and to highlight proposed mechanisms for intervention aimed at improving erectile function in men with ED. These recommendations can provide a framework for counseling patients with ED about lifestyle modification. PMID:27141445

  19. Endothelial function in a cardiovascular risk population with borderline ankle–brachial index

    PubMed Central

    Syvänen, Kari; Korhonen, Päivi; Partanen, Auli; Aarnio, Pertti

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) can be made by measuring the ankle–brachial index (ABI). Traditionally ABI values > 1.00–1.40 have been considered normal and ABI ≤ 0.90 defines PAD. Recent studies, however, have shown that individuals with ABI values between 0.90–1.00 are also at risk of cardiovascular events. We studied this cardiovascular risk population subgroup in order to determine their endothelial function using peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT). Methods: We selected 66 individuals with cardiovascular risk and borderline ABI. They all had hypertension, newly diagnosed glucose disorder, metabolic syndrome, obesity, or a ten year risk of cardiovascular disease death of 5% or more according to the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation System (SCORE). Subjects with previously diagnosed diabetes or cardiovascular disease were excluded. Endothelial function was assessed by measuring the reactive hyperemia index (RHI) from fingertips using an Endo-PAT device. Results: The mean ABI was 0.95 and mean RHI 2.11. Endothelial dysfunction, defined as RHI < 1.67, was detected in 15/66 (23%) of the subjects. There were no statistically significant differences in RHI values between subjects with different cardiovascular risk factors. The only exception was that subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) had slightly lower RHI values (mean RHI 1.91) than subjects without IFG (mean RHI 2.24) (P = 0.02). Conclusions: In a cardiovascular risk population with borderline ABI nearly every fourth subject had endothelial dysfunction, indicating an elevated risk of cardiovascular events. This might point out a subgroup of individuals in need of more aggressive treatment for their risk factors. PMID:21415923

  20. The Relationship between Proliferative Scars and Endothelial Function in Surgically Revascularized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ziyrek, Murat; Şahin, Sinan; Acar, Zeydin; Şen, Onur

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proliferative scars are benign fibrotic proliferations which demonstrate abnormal wound healing in response to skin injuries. As postulated in the “response to injury hypothesis”, atherosclerosis is also triggered by an endothelial injury. Keloid and atherosclerotic processes have many pathophysiological and cytological features in common. Aims: In this study, we investigated the relationship between proliferative scars and endothelial function in surgically revascularized patients. We aimed to test the hypothesis that atherosclerosis is a wound healing abnormality. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Consecutive patients who were admitted to the cardiology outpatient clinic with a history of coronary artery bypass grafting operation were evaluated. Thirty-three patients with proliferative scars at the median sternotomy site formed the keloid group, and 36 age- and sex-matched patients with no proliferative scar at the median sternotomy site formed the control group. Endothelial function was evaluated by flow-mediated vasodilatation of the brachial artery via ultrasonograhic examination. Results: There is no signicant difference according to the demographic data, biochemical parameters, clinical parameters and number of grafts between keloid and control groups. Endothelial-dependent vasodila-tory response was lower in the keloid group than the control group (9.30±3.5 and 18.68±8.2, respectively; p=0.001). Conclusion: This study showed that endothalial dysfunction, which is strongly correlated with atherosclerosis, was more prominent in patients with proliferative scars. As proliferative scars and atherosclerosis have many features in common, we might conclude that atherosclerosis is a wound healing abnormality. PMID:26740897

  1. Peptide Bβ15-42 Preserves Endothelial Barrier Function in Shock

    PubMed Central

    Ignatyev, George; Matt, Ulrich; Knapp, Sylvia; Atrasheuskaya, Alena; Bukin, Eugenij; Friedl, Peter; Zinkl, Daniela; Hofer-Warbinek, Renate; Zacharowski, Kai; Petzelbauer, Peter; Reingruber, Sonja

    2009-01-01

    Loss of vascular barrier function causes leak of fluid and proteins into tissues, extensive leak leads to shock and death. Barriers are largely formed by endothelial cell-cell contacts built up by VE-cadherin and are under the control of RhoGTPases. Here we show that a natural plasmin digest product of fibrin, peptide Bß15-42 (also called FX06), significantly reduces vascular leak and mortality in animal models for Dengue shock syndrome. The ability of Bß15-42 to preserve endothelial barriers is confirmed in rats i.v.-injected with LPS. In endothelial cells, Bß15-42 prevents thrombin-induced stress fiber formation, myosin light chain phosphorylation and RhoA activation. The molecular key for the protective effect of Bß15-42 is the src kinase Fyn, which associates with VE-cadherin-containing junctions. Following exposure to Bß15-42 Fyn dissociates from VE-cadherin and associates with p190RhoGAP, a known antagonists of RhoA activation. The role of Fyn in transducing effects of Bß15-42 is confirmed in Fyn−/− mice, where the peptide is unable to reduce LPS-induced lung edema, whereas in wild type littermates the peptide significantly reduces leak. Our results demonstrate a novel function for Bß15-42. Formerly mainly considered as a degradation product occurring after fibrin inactivation, it has now to be considered as a signaling molecule. It stabilizes endothelial barriers and thus could be an attractive adjuvant in the treatment of shock. PMID:19401765

  2. Differential function and regulation of orphan nuclear receptor TR3 isoforms in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lei; Cui, Pengfei; Zhao, Shengqiang; Ye, Taiyang; Li, Yan; Peng, Jin; Niu, Gengming; Zhao, Dezheng

    2016-01-01

    TR3 has been reported to be an excellent target for angiogenesis therapies. We reported three TR3 transcript variant messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) and are differentially regulated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). TR3 transcript variant 1 (TR3-TV1) and variant 2 (TR3-TV2) encoding the same TR3 isoform 1 protein (TR3-iso1) that was named TR3 has been extensively studied. However, the function of TR3 isoform 2 protein (TR3-iso2) encoded by TR3 transcript variant 3 (TR3-TV3) is still not known. Here, we clone and express the novel TR3-iso2 protein and find that expression of TR3-iso2, in contrast to TR3-iso1, inhibits en-dothelial cell proliferation induced by VEGF-A, histamine, and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). The differential function of TR3-iso2 correlates with the down-regulation of cyclin D1. However, TR3-iso2 plays similar roles in endothelial cell migration and monolayer permeability as TR3-iso1. We further demonstrate that several intracellular signaling pathways are involved in histamine-induced TR3 transcript variants, including histamine receptor H1-mediated phospholipase C (PLC)/calcium/calcineurin/protein kinase C (PKC)/ protein kinase D (PKD) pathway and ERK pathway, as well as histamine receptor H3-mediated PKC-ERK pathway. Further, expressions of TR3-TV1, TR3-TV2, and TR3-TV3 by VEGF and histamine are regulated by different promoters, but not by their mRNA stability. PMID:26440050

  3. Spatial segregation of transport and signalling functions between human endothelial caveolae and lipid raft proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Sprenger, Richard R.; Fontijn, Ruud D.; van Marle, Jan; Pannekoek, Hans; Horrevoets, Anton J. G.

    2006-01-01

    Lipid rafts and caveolae are biochemically similar, specialized domains of the PM (plasma membrane) that cluster specific proteins. However, they are morphologically distinct, implying different, possibly complementary functions. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis preceding identification of proteins by MS was used to compare the relative abundance of proteins in DRMs (detergent-resistant membranes) isolated from HUVEC (human umbilical-vein endothelial cells), and caveolae immunopurified from DRM fractions. Various signalling and transport proteins were identified and additional cell-surface biotinylation revealed the majority to be exposed, demonstrating their presence at the PM. In resting endothelial cells, the scaffold of immunoisolated caveolae consists of only few resident proteins, related to structure [CAV1 (caveolin-1), vimentin] and transport (V-ATPase), as well as the GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol)-linked, surface-exposed protein CD59. Further quantitative characterization by immunoblotting and confocal microscopy of well-known [eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase) and CAV1], less known [SNAP-23 (23 kDa synaptosome-associated protein) and BASP1 (brain acid soluble protein 1)] and novel [C8ORF2 (chromosome 8 open reading frame 2)] proteins showed different subcellular distributions with none of these proteins being exclusive to either caveolae or DRM. However, the DRM-associated fraction of the novel protein C8ORF2 (∼5% of total protein) associated with immunoseparated caveolae, in contrast with the raft protein SNAP-23. The segregation of caveolae from lipid rafts was visually confirmed in proliferating cells, where CAV1 was spatially separated from eNOS, SNAP-23 and BASP1. These results provide direct evidence for the previously suggested segregation of transport and signalling functions between specialized domains of the endothelial plasma membrane. PMID:16886909

  4. The relation of arterial stiffness to endothelial function in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Wright, C I; Brouwer-de Cock, K A J; Kroner, C I; Hoeks, A P G; Draijer, R

    2007-05-01

    Local wall stiffness affects endothelial responsiveness but how global measures affect responsiveness is unanswered. We assessed this by comparing reactive hyperaemic responses of brachial diameter (RHRBD) with central (heart-to-brachial artery pulse wave velocity (PWV); large (C1)) and peripheral (C2) arterial stiffness. Twelve healthy subjects were investigated. RHRBD was induced via an upper- or forearm occluding cuff. Arterial diameter changes were measured using echo ultrasound. Arterial stiffness and RHRBD were compared using a Pearson correlation coefficient (r) and Bland-Altman analysis of Z-scores (indicated as 95% confidence intervals (CI) and expressed in units of standard deviation (SD) from the mean). Weak relations were found between upper-arm RHRBD responses and C2 (r = 0.56, P = 0.06; 95% CI +/- 1.84 SDs) and C1 (r = 0.55, P = 0.06; 95% CI +/- 1.86 SDs). An inverse relation was found between upper-arm RHRBD responses and PWV (r = -0.55, P = 0.06), but Bland-Altman plots revealed no agreement between these parameters (P > 0.05; 95% CI +/- 3.46 SDs). Forearm RHRBD were not related to PWV, C1 or C2 (P > 0.05; 95% CI > 2 SDs). The weak relation between upper-arm endothelial responses and C2 and C1 seems to suggest that C2, and also C1, is not a good and reliable method for assessments of endothelial health. Furthermore, if anything, upper-arm mediated RHRBD responses are more affected by arterial stiffness than forearm responses. PMID:17470989

  5. Cyclic Stretch Affects Pulmonary Endothelial Cell Control of Pulmonary Smooth Muscle Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, Cristhiaan D.; Baker, Haven; Hasak, Stephen; Matyal, Robina; Salam, Aleya; Hales, Charles A.; Hancock, William; Quinn, Deborah A.

    2008-01-01

    Endothelial cells are subjected to mechanical forces in the form of cyclic stretch resulting from blood pulsatility. Pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) produce factors that stimulate and inhibit pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) growth. We hypothesized that PAECs exposed to cyclic stretch secrete proteins that inhibit PASMC growth. Media from PAECs exposed to cyclic stretch significantly inhibited PASMC growth in a time-dependent manner. Lyophilized material isolated from stretched PAEC-conditioned media significantly inhibited PASMC growth in a dose-dependent manner. This inhibition was reversed by trypsin inactivation, which is consistent with the relevant factor being a protein(s). To identify proteins that inhibited cell growth in conditioned media from stretched PAECs, we used proteomic techniques and found that thrombospondin (TSP)-1, a natural antiangiogenic factor, was up-regulated by stretch. In vitro, exogenous TSP-1 inhibited PASMC growth. TSP-1–blocking antibodies reversed conditioned media–induced inhibition of PASMC growth. Cyclic stretched PAECs secrete protein(s) that inhibit PASMC proliferation. TSP-1 may be, at least in part, responsible for this inhibition. The complete identification and understanding of the secreted proteome of stretched PAECs may lead to new insights into the pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular remodeling. PMID:18314539

  6. The Role of Vitamin D in Blood Pressure, Endothelial and Renal Function in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhao-Min; Woo, Jean; Wu, Sheng-Hui; Ho, Suzanne C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D is a pro-hormone that plays an essential role in the vasculature and in kidney function. Aims: To review the extra-skeletal effects of vitamin D on blood pressure, endothelial and renal function with emphasis on recent findings in postmenopausal women. Methods: Included in this review was a PubMed database search for English language articles through March 2013. This review discussed the physiology and definition of vitamin D deficiency, the recent evidence for the role vitamin D in blood pressure, vascular and renal function. Results: Experimental and epidemiological data suggest that vitamin D plays an important role in the vasculature and in kidney function. Low vitamin D concentrations appear to significantly associate with hypertension, endothelial and renal dysfunction. However, the results of clinical trials have generally been mixed. Studies specifically conducted among postmenopausal women are limited and findings are still inconsistent. Conclusions: Definitive studies are warranted to elucidate the effects of vitamin D supplementation on vascular and renal function and a more detailed work is needed to outline the route, duration and optimal dose of supplementation. It is premature to recommend vitamin D as a therapeutic option in the improvement of vascular and renal function at the current stage. PMID:23839167

  7. In vitro effects of waterpipe smoke condensate on endothelial cell function: A potential risk factor for vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Rammah, Mayyasa; Dandachi, Farah; Salman, Rola; Shihadeh, Alan; El-Sabban, Marwan

    2013-01-01

    Aim Despite its increasing popularity, little is known about the health effects of waterpipe smoking (WPS), particularly on the cardiovascular system. To investigate the role of WPS as a risk factor for vascular disease, we evaluated its effect on endothelial cell function, which is an early event in vascular disease pathogenesis. We assessed the changes in cell viability, ROS generation, inflammatory and vasodilatory markers and in vitro angiogenesis of human aortic endothelial cells in response to waterpipe smoke condensate exposure. Methods and results Mainstream waterpipe smoke condensate (WSC) was generated using a standard laboratory machine protocol. Compared to control, WSC induced cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and oxidative stress in human primary endothelial cells. In addition, we assayed for impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation and induced inflammation by studying the effect of WPS on the content and activity of AMPK, eNOS proteins and NF-κB p65 ser536 phosphorylation, respectively. WSC inhibited AMPK/eNOS phosphorylation and induced phosphorylation of p65. Moreover, we evaluated endothelial cells repair mechanism related properties that include migration/invasion and in vitro tube formation upon treatment with WSC. WSC reduced the motility and inhibited angiogenic potential of HAEC cells. Conclusions WPS induced endothelial cell dysfunction as evident by exerting oxidative stress, inflammation, and impaired endothelial vasodilatory function and repair mechanisms. All together these data provide evidence for the potential contribution of WPS to endothelial dysfunction and thus to vascular disease. PMID:23454654

  8. Modulation of cerebral endothelial cell function by TGF-β in glioblastoma: VEGF-dependent angiogenesis versus endothelial mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Shanmugarajan; Szabo, Emese; Burghardt, Isabel; Frei, Karl; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh; Weller, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Glioblastoma are among the most angiogenic tumors. The molecular mechanisms that control blood vessel formation by endothelial cells (EC) in glioblastoma remain incompletely understood. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a key regulatory cytokine that has proinvasive and stemness-maintaining autocrine properties in glioblastoma and confers immunosuppression to the tumor microenvironment. Here we characterize potential pro- and anti-angiogenic activities of TGF-β in the context of glioblastoma in vitro, using human brain-derived microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) and glioblastoma-derived endothelial cells (GMEC) as model systems. We find that TGF-β induces vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placental growth factor (PlGF) mRNA expression and protein release in a TGF-β receptor (TβR) II / activin-like kinase (ALK)-5-dependent manner under normoxia and hypoxia, defining potential indirect proangiogenic activity of TGF-β in glioblastoma. In parallel, exogenous TGF-β has also inhibitory effects on EC properties and induces endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) in hCMEC and GMEC. Accordingly, direct inhibition of endogenous TGF-β/ALK-5 signalling increases EC properties such as tube formation, von-Willebrand factor (vWF) and claudin (CLDN) 5 expression. Yet, the supernatant of TGF-β-stimulated hCMEC and GMEC strongly promotes EC-related gene expression and tube formation in a cediranib-sensitive manner. These observations shed light on the complex pro- and anti-angiogenic pathways involving the cross-talk between TGF-β and VEGF/PLGF signalling in glioblastoma which may involve parallel stimulation of angiogenesis and EndMT in distinct target cell populations. PMID:26090865

  9. Modulation of cerebral endothelial cell function by TGF-β in glioblastoma: VEGF-dependent angiogenesis versus endothelial mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Shanmugarajan; Szabo, Emese; Burghardt, Isabel; Frei, Karl; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh; Weller, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma are among the most angiogenic tumors. The molecular mechanisms that control blood vessel formation by endothelial cells (EC) in glioblastoma remain incompletely understood. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a key regulatory cytokine that has proinvasive and stemness-maintaining autocrine properties in glioblastoma and confers immunosuppression to the tumor microenvironment. Here we characterize potential pro- and anti-angiogenic activities of TGF-β in the context of glioblastoma in vitro, using human brain-derived microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) and glioblastoma-derived endothelial cells (GMEC) as model systems. We find that TGF-β induces vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placental growth factor (PlGF) mRNA expression and protein release in a TGF-β receptor (TβR) II / activin-like kinase (ALK)-5-dependent manner under normoxia and hypoxia, defining potential indirect proangiogenic activity of TGF-β in glioblastoma. In parallel, exogenous TGF-β has also inhibitory effects on EC properties and induces endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) in hCMEC and GMEC. Accordingly, direct inhibition of endogenous TGF-β/ALK-5 signalling increases EC properties such as tube formation, von-Willebrand factor (vWF) and claudin (CLDN) 5 expression. Yet, the supernatant of TGF-β-stimulated hCMEC and GMEC strongly promotes EC-related gene expression and tube formation in a cediranib-sensitive manner. These observations shed light on the complex pro- and anti-angiogenic pathways involving the cross-talk between TGF-β and VEGF/PLGF signalling in glioblastoma which may involve parallel stimulation of angiogenesis and EndMT in distinct target cell populations. PMID:26090865

  10. Nuclear Countermeasure Activity of TP508 Linked to Restoration of Endothelial Function and Acceleration of DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Olszewska-Pazdrak, Barbara; McVicar, Scott D.; Rayavara, Kempaiah; Moya, Stephanie M.; Kantara, Carla; Gammarano, Chris; Olszewska, Paulina; Fuller, Gerald M.; Sower, Laurie E.; Carney, Darrell H.

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that radiation-induced damage to endothelial cells and loss of endothelial function may contribute to both acute radiation syndromes and long-term effects of whole-body nuclear irradiation. Therefore, several drugs are being developed to mitigate the effects of nuclear radiation, most of these drugs will target and protect or regenerate leukocytes and platelets. Our laboratory has demonstrated that TP508, a 23-amino acid thrombin peptide, activates endothelial cells and stem cells to revascularize and regenerate tissues. We now show that TP508 can mitigate radiation-induced damage to endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro results demonstrate that human endothelial cells irradiation attenuates nitric oxide (NO) signaling, disrupts tube formation and induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). TP508 treatment reverses radiation effects on NO signaling, restores tube formation and accelerates the repair of radiation-induced DSB. The radiation-mitigating effects of TP508 on endothelial cells were also seen in CD-1 mice where systemic injection of TP508 stimulated endothelial cell sprouting from aortic explants after 8 Gy irradiation. Systemic doses of TP508 that mitigated radiation-induced endothelial cell damage, also significantly increased survival of CD-1 mice when injected 24 h after 8.5 Gy exposure. These data suggest that increased survival observed with TP508 treatment may be due to its effects on vascular and microvascular endothelial cells. Our study supports the usage of a regenerative drug such as TP508 to activate endothelial cells as a countermeasure for mitigating the effects of nuclear radiation. PMID:27388041

  11. Endothelial Cords Promote Tumor Initial Growth prior to Vascular Function through a Paracrine Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chengjian; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Yuwei; Yang, Yun; Luo, Hui; Ji, Gaili; Dong, E; Deng, Hongxing; Lin, Shuo; Wei, Yuquan; Yang, Hanshuo

    2016-01-01

    The angiogenic switch is an important oncogenic step that determines whether microtumors remain dormant or progresses further. It has been generally perceived that the primary function of this tumorgenic event is to supply oxygen and nutrients through blood circulation. Using in vivo imaging of zebrafish and mouse tumor models, we showed that endothelial cords aggressively penetrated into microtumors and remained non-circulatory for several days before undergoing vascular blood perfusion. Unexpectedly, we found that initial tumor growth in both models was significantly reduced if endothelial cords were removed by blocking VEGF-VEGFR2 signaling or using a vascular deficient zebrafish mutant. It was further shown that soluble factors including IL-8, secreted by endothelial cells (ECs) were responsible for stimulating tumor cells proliferation. These findings establish that tumor angiogenesis play a much earlier and broader role in promoting tumor growth, which is independent of vascular circulation. Understanding this novel mechanism of angiogenic tumor progression offers new entry points for cancer therapeutics. PMID:26762853

  12. Boldine protects endothelial function in hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress through an antioxidant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yeh Siang; Tian, Xiao Yu; Huang, Yu; Murugan, Dharmani; Achike, Francis I; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2013-02-01

    Increased oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis and progression of diabetes. Antioxidants are therapeutically beneficial for oxidative stress-associated diseases. Boldine ([s]-2,9-dihydroxy-1,10-dimethoxyaporphine) is a major alkaloid present in the leaves and bark of the boldo tree (Peumus boldus Molina), with known an antioxidant activity. This study examined the protective effects of boldine against high glucose-induced oxidative stress in rat aortic endothelial cells (RAEC) and its mechanisms of vasoprotection related to diabetic endothelial dysfunction. In RAEC exposed to high glucose (30 mM) for 48 h, pre-treatment with boldine reduced the elevated ROS and nitrotyrosine formation, and preserved nitric oxide (NO) production. Pre-incubation with β-NAPDH reduced the acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation; this attenuation was reversed by boldine. Compared with control, endothelium-dependent relaxation in the aortas of streptozotocin (STZ)-treated diabetic rats was significantly improved by both acute (1 μM, 30 min) and chronic (20mg/kg/daily, i.p., 7 days) treatment with boldine. Intracellular superoxide and peroxynitrite formation measured by DHE fluorescence or chemiluminescence assay were higher in sections of aortic rings from diabetic rats compared with control. Chronic boldine treatment normalized ROS over-production in the diabetic group and this correlated with reduction of NAD(P)H oxidase subunits, NOX2 and p47(phox). The present study shows that boldine reversed the increased ROS formation in high glucose-treated endothelial cells and restored endothelial function in STZ-induced diabetes by inhibiting oxidative stress and thus increasing NO bioavailability. PMID:23178655

  13. Functional consequences of prolactin signalling in endothelial cells: a potential link with angiogenesis in pathophysiology?

    PubMed Central

    Reuwer, Anne Q; Nowak-Sliwinska, Patrycja; Mans, Laurie A; van der Loos, Chris M; von der Thüsen, Jan H; Twickler, Marcel Th B; Spek, C Arnold; Goffin, Vincent; Griffioen, Arjan W; Borensztajn, Keren S

    2012-01-01

    Prolactin is best known as the polypeptide anterior pituitary hormone, which regulates the development of the mammary gland. However, it became clear over the last decade that prolactin contributes to a broad range of pathologies, including breast cancer. Prolactin is also involved in angiogenesis via the release of pro-angiogenic factors by leukocytes and epithelial cells. However, whether prolactin also influences endothelial cells, and whether there are functional consequences of prolactin-induced signalling in the perspective of angiogenesis, remains so far elusive. In the present study, we show that prolactin induces phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and STAT5 and induces tube formation of endothelial cells on Matrigel. These effects are blocked by a specific prolactin receptor antagonist, del1-9-G129R-hPRL. Moreover, in an in vivo model of the chorioallantoic membrane of the chicken embryo, prolactin enhances vessel density and the tortuosity of the vasculature and pillar formation, which are hallmarks of intussusceptive angiogenesis. Interestingly, while prolactin has only little effect on endothelial cell proliferation, it markedly stimulates endothelial cell migration. Again, migration was reverted by del1-9-G129R-hPRL, indicating a direct effect of prolactin on its receptor. Immunohistochemistry and spectral imaging revealed that the prolactin receptor is present in the microvasculature of human breast carcinoma tissue. Altogether, these results suggest that prolactin may directly stimulate angiogenesis, which could be one of the mechanisms by which prolactin contributes to breast cancer progression, thereby providing a potential tool for intervention. PMID:22128761

  14. Irisin Increased the Number and Improved the Function of Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Diabetes Mellitus Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinxiang; Song, Mingbao; Zhou, Fang; Fu, Dagan; Ruan, Guangping; Zhu, Xiangqing; Bai, Yinyin; Huang, Lan; Pang, Rongqing; Kang, Huali

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: The dysfunction of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) was found to be associated with vascular complications in diabetes mellitus (DM) patients. Previous studies found that regular exercise could improve the function of EPCs in DM patients, but the underling mechanism was unclear. Irisin, a newly identified myokine, was induced by exercise and has been demonstrated to mediate some of the positive effects of exercise. In this study, we hypothesize that irisin may have direct effects on EPC function in DM mice. These data showed for the first time that irisin increased the number of EPCs in peripheral blood of DM mice and improved the function of EPCs derived from DM mice bone marrow. The mechanism for the effect of irisin is related to the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway. Furthermore, irisin was demonstrated to improve endothelial repair in DM mice that received EPC transplants after carotid artery injury. The results of this study indicate a novel effect of irisin in regulating the number and function of EPCs via the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway, suggesting a potential for the administration of exogenous irisin as a succedaneum to improve EPC function in diabetic patients who fail to achieve such improvements through regular exercise. PMID:27002278

  15. Endothelial lipid phosphate phosphatase-3 deficiency that disrupts the endothelial barrier function is a modifier of cardiovascular development

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Ishita; Baruah, Jugajyoti; Lurie, Erin E.; Wary, Kishore K.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Lipid phosphate phosphatase-3 (LPP3) is expressed at high levels in endothelial cells (ECs). Although LPP3 is known to hydrolyse the phosphate group from lysolipids such as spingosine-1-phosphate and its structural homologues, the function of Lpp3 in ECs is not completely understood. In this study, we investigated how tyrosine-protein kinase receptor (TEK or Tie2) promoter–dependent deletion of Lpp3 alters EC activities. Methods and results Lpp3fl/fl mice were crossed with the tg.Tie2Cre transgenic line. Vasculogenesis occurred normally in embryos with Tie2Cre-mediated deletion of Lpp3 (called Lpp3ECKO), but embryonic lethality occurred in two waves, the first wave between E8.5 and E10.5, while the second between E11.5 and E13.5. Lethality in Lpp3ECKO embryos after E11.5 was accompanied by vascular leakage and haemorrhage, which likely resulted in insufficient cardiovascular development. Analyses of haematoxylin- and eosin-stained heart sections from E11.5 Lpp3ECKO embryos showed insufficient heart growth associated with decreased trabeculation, reduced growth of the compact wall, and absence of cardiac cushions. Staining followed by microscopic analyses of Lpp3ECKO embryos revealed the presence of apoptotic ECs. Furthermore, Lpp3-deficient ECs showed decreased gene expression and protein levels of Cyclin-D1, VE-cadherin, Fibronectin, Klf2, and Klf4. To determine the underlying mechanisms of vascular leakage and barrier disruption, we performed knockdown and rescue experiments in cultured ECs. LPP3 knockdown decreased transendothelial electrical resistance and increased permeability. Re-expression of β-catenin cDNA in LPP3-knockdown ECs partially restored the effect of the LPP3 loss, whereas re-expression of p120ctn cDNA did not. Conclusion These findings demonstrate the essential roles of LPP3 in the maturation of EC barrier integrity and normal cardiovascular development. PMID:27125875

  16. Oral trehalose supplementation improves resistance artery endothelial function in healthy middle-aged and older adults.

    PubMed

    Kaplon, Rachelle E; Hill, Sierra D; Bispham, Nina Z; Santos-Parker, Jessica R; Nowlan, Molly J; Snyder, Laura L; Chonchol, Michel; LaRocca, Thomas J; McQueen, Matthew B; Seals, Douglas R

    2016-06-01

    We hypothesized that supplementation with trehalose, a disaccharide that reverses arterial aging in mice, would improve vascular function in middle-aged and older (MA/O) men and women. Thirty-two healthy adults aged 50-77 years consumed 100 g/day of trehalose (n=15) or maltose (n=17, isocaloric control) for 12 weeks (randomized, double-blind). In subjects with Δbody mass less than 2.3kg (5 lb.), resistance artery endothelial function, assessed by forearm blood flow to brachial artery infusion of acetylcholine (FBFACh), increased ~30% with trehalose (13.3±1.0 vs. 10.5±1.1 AUC, P=0.02), but not maltose (P=0.40). This improvement in FBFACh was abolished when endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production was inhibited. Endothelium-independent dilation, assessed by FBF to sodium nitroprusside (FBFSNP), also increased ~30% with trehalose (155±13 vs. 116±12 AUC, P=0.03) but not maltose (P=0.92). Changes in FBFACh and FBFSNP with trehalose were not significant when subjects with Δbody mass ≥ 2.3kg were included. Trehalose supplementation had no effect on conduit artery endothelial function, large elastic artery stiffness or circulating markers of oxidative stress or inflammation (all P>0.1) independent of changes in body weight. Our findings demonstrate that oral trehalose improves resistance artery (microvascular) function, a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, in MA/O adults, possibly through increasing NO bioavailability and smooth muscle sensitivity to NO. PMID:27208415

  17. Oral trehalose supplementation improves resistance artery endothelial function in healthy middle-aged and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Kaplon, Rachelle E.; Hill, Sierra D.; Bispham, Nina Z.; Santos-Parker, Jessica R.; Nowlan, Molly J.; Snyder, Laura L.; Chonchol, Michel; LaRocca, Thomas J.; McQueen, Matthew B.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that supplementation with trehalose, a disaccharide that reverses arterial aging in mice, would improve vascular function in middle-aged and older (MA/O) men and women. Thirty-two healthy adults aged 50-77 years consumed 100 g/day of trehalose (n=15) or maltose (n=17, isocaloric control) for 12 weeks (randomized, double-blind). In subjects with Δbody mass<2.3kg (5 lb.), resistance artery endothelial function, assessed by forearm blood flow to brachial artery infusion of acetylcholine (FBFACh), increased ∼30% with trehalose (13.3±1.0 vs. 10.5±1.1 AUC, P=0.02), but not maltose (P=0.40). This improvement in FBFACh was abolished when endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production was inhibited. Endothelium-independent dilation, assessed by FBF to sodium nitroprusside (FBFSNP), also increased ∼30% with trehalose (155±13 vs. 116±12 AUC, P=0.03) but not maltose (P=0.92). Changes in FBFACh and FBFSNP with trehalose were not significant when subjects with Δbody mass≥2.3kg were included. Trehalose supplementation had no effect on conduit artery endothelial function, large elastic artery stiffness or circulating markers of oxidative stress or inflammation (all P>0.1) independent of changes in body weight. Our findings demonstrate that oral trehalose improves resistance artery (microvascular) function, a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, in MA/O adults, possibly through increasing NO bioavailability and smooth muscle sensitivity to NO. PMID:27208415

  18. Interplay between FAK, PKCδ, and p190RhoGAP in the Regulation of Endothelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Grinnell, Katie L.; Harrington, Elizabeth O.

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of either intercellular or extracellular junctions involved in maintaining endothelial barrier function can result in increased endothelial permeability. Increased endothelial permeability, in turn, allows for the unregulated movement of fluid and solutes out of the vasculature and into the surrounding connective tissue, contributing to a number of disease states, including stroke and pulmonary edema (Ermert et al., 1995; Lee and Slutsky, 2010; van Hinsbergh, 1997; Waller et al., 1996; Warboys et al., 2010). Thus, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which endothelial cell junction integrity is controlled is necessary for development of therapies aimed at treating such conditions. In this review, we will discuss the functions of three signaling molecules known to be involved in regulation of endothelial permeability: focal adhesion kinase (FAK), protein kinase C delta (PKCδ), and p190RhoGAP (p190). We will discuss the independent functions of each protein, as well as the interplay that exists between them and the effects of such interactions on endothelial function. PMID:21549132

  19. Extracellular S100A4 affects endothelial cell integrity and stimulates transmigration of A375 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Herwig, Nadine; Belter, Birgit; Pietzsch, Jens

    2016-09-01

    High extracellular S100A4 level proves a specific characteristic of some cancer cases, including malignant melanoma. Concerning the latter, extracellular S100A4 in an autocrine manner was shown to promote prometastatic activation of A375 cells by interaction with the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE). We hypothesized that interaction of extracellular S100A4 with RAGE in a paracrine manner will affect endothelial cell (EC) integrity thus further promoting melanoma metastasis. We investigated the influence of recombinant and cell (A375)-derived S100A4 on junction protein expression and EC (hCMEC/D3) integrity by measuring transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER). Decrease of TEER and diminished expression of both occludin and VE-cadherin revealed the loss of EC integrity. Transmigration of transgenic A375 cells (A375-hS100A4/A375-hRAGE) through the EC monolayer was significantly higher compared to wild-type A375 cells, and was substantially decreased by sRAGE. A pilot study in mice, intracardially injected with A375-hS100A4 or A375-hRAGE cells, showed lower survival rates and a higher incidence of metastases compared to wild-type A375 cells. Tumor development was mostly located in the brain, bones, and ovaries. These findings provide further evidence on extracellular S100A4 as paracrine mediator of prometastatic endothelial dysfunction involving its interaction with RAGE. PMID:27387233

  20. Hyperinsulinemia adversely affects lung structure and function.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suchita; Bodas, Manish; Bhatraju, Naveen K; Pattnaik, Bijay; Gheware, Atish; Parameswaran, Praveen Kolumam; Thompson, Michael; Freeman, Michelle; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Gosens, Reinoud; Ghosh, Balaram; Pabelick, Christina; Linneberg, Allan; Prakash, Y S; Agrawal, Anurag

    2016-05-01

    There is limited knowledge regarding the consequences of hyperinsulinemia on the lung. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, insulin resistance, and epidemiological associations with asthma, this is a critical lacuna, more so with inhaled insulin on the horizon. Here, we demonstrate that insulin can adversely affect respiratory health. Insulin treatment (1 μg/ml) significantly (P < 0.05) increased the proliferation of primary human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and induced collagen release. Additionally, ASM cells showed a significant increase in calcium response and mitochondrial respiration upon insulin exposure. Mice administered intranasal insulin showed increased collagen deposition in the lungs as well as a significant increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. PI3K/Akt mediated activation of β-catenin, a positive regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis, was observed in the lungs of insulin-treated mice and lung cells. Our data suggests that hyperinsulinemia may have adverse effects on airway structure and function. Insulin-induced activation of β-catenin in lung tissue and the contractile effects on ASM cells may be causally related to the development of asthma-like phenotype. PMID:26919895

  1. Decreased Endothelial Nitric Oxide Bioavailability, Impaired Microvascular Function, and Increased Tissue Oxygen Consumption in Children with Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Tsin W.; Lampah, Daniel A.; Kenangalem, Enny; Tjitra, Emiliana; Weinberg, J. Brice; Granger, Donald L.; Price, Ric N.; Anstey, Nicholas M.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, microvascular function, and host oxygen consumption have not been assessed in pediatric malaria. We measured NO-dependent endothelial function by using peripheral artery tonometry to determine the reactive hyperemia index (RHI), and microvascular function and oxygen consumption (VO2) using near infrared resonance spectroscopy in 13 Indonesian children with severe falciparum malaria and 15 with moderately severe falciparum malaria. Compared with 19 controls, children with severe malaria and those with moderately severe malaria had lower RHIs (P = .03); 12% and 8% lower microvascular function, respectively (P = .03); and 29% and 25% higher VO2, respectively. RHIs correlated with microvascular function in all children with malaria (P < .001) and all with severe malaria (P < .001). Children with malaria have decreased endothelial and microvascular function and increased oxygen consumption, likely contributing to the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:24879801

  2. Fenofibrate Improves Vascular Endothelial Function by Reducing Oxidative Stress While Increasing eNOS in Healthy Normolipidemic Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ashley E; Kaplon, Rachelle E; Lucking, Sara Marian S; Russell-Nowlan, Molly J; Eckel, Robert H; Seals, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction develops with aging, as indicated by impaired endothelium-dependent dilation(EDD), and is related to increased cardiovascular disease risk. We hypothesized that short-term treatment with fenofibrate, a lipid-lowering agent with potential pleiotropic effects, would improve EDD in middle-aged and older normolipidemic adults by reducing oxidative stress. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), a measure of EDD, was assessed in 22healthy adults aged 50-77 years before and after 7days of fenofibrate (145 mg/d; n=12/7M) or placebo (n=10/5M). Brachial FMD was unchanged with placebo, but improved after 2 and 7 days of fenofibrate (5.1±0.7 vs. 2d: 6.0±0.7 and 7d: 6.4±0.6 %Δ; both P<0.005). The improvements in FMD after 7 days remained significant (P<0.05) after accounting for modest changes in plasma total and LDL-cholesterol. Endothelium-independent dilation was not affected by fenofibrate or placebo (P>0.05). Infusion (i.v.) of the antioxidant vitamin C improved brachial FMD at baseline in both groups and during placebo treatment (P<0.05), but not after 2 and 7 days of fenofibrate (P>0.05). Fenofibrate treatment also reduced plasma oxidized LDL, a systemic marker of oxidative stress, compared with placebo (P<0.05). In vascular endothelial cells sampled from peripheral veins of the subjects, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein expression was unchanged with placebo and after 2 days of fenofibrate, but was increased after 7 days of fenofibrate (0.54±0.03 vs. 2d: 0.52±0.04 and 7d: 0.76±0.11 intensity/HUVEC control; P<0.05 7d). Short-term treatment with fenofibrate improves vascular endothelial function in healthy normolipidemic middle-aged/older adults by reducing oxidative stress and induces increases in eNOS. PMID:23108655

  3. In vitro modeling of endothelial interaction with macrophages and pericytes demonstrates Notch signaling function in the vascular microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, Ian W; Du, Jing; Cong, Zhuangzhuang; Cho, Bennet S; Klein, Alyssa M; Dieck, Chelsea L; Chaudhri, Reyhaan A; Cuervo, Henar; Herts, James H; Kitajewski, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Angiogenesis is regulated by complex interactions between endothelial cells and support cells of the vascular microenvironment, such as tissue myeloid cells and vascular mural cells. Multicellular interactions during angiogenesis are difficult to study in animals and challenging in a reductive setting. We incorporated stromal cells into an established bead-based capillary sprouting assay to develop assays that faithfully reproduce major steps of vessel sprouting and maturation. We observed that macrophages enhance angiogenesis, increasing the number and length of endothelial sprouts, a property we have dubbed "angiotrophism." We found that polarizing macrophages toward a pro-inflammatory profile further increased their angiotrophic stimulation of vessel sprouting, and this increase was dependent on macrophage Notch signaling. To study endothelial/pericyte interactions, we added vascular pericytes directly to the bead-bound endothelial monolayer. These pericytes formed close associations with the endothelial sprouts, causing increased sprout number and vessel caliber. We found that Jagged1 expression and Notch signaling are essential for the growth of both endothelial cells and pericytes and may function in their interaction. We observed that combining endothelial cells with both macrophages and pericytes in the same sprouting assay has multiplicative effects on sprouting. These results significantly improve bead-capillary sprouting assays and provide an enhanced method for modeling interactions between the endothelium and the vascular microenvironment. Achieving this in a reductive in vitro setting represents a significant step toward a better understanding of the cellular elements that contribute to the formation of mature vasculature. PMID:26965898

  4. Hemodialysis improves endothelial venous function in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Silva, A M V; Signori, L U; Plentz, R D M; Moreno Jr, H; Barros, E; Belló-Klein, A; Schaan, B D; Irigoyen, M C

    2008-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the acute effect of hemodialysis on endothelial venous function and oxidative stress. We studied 9 patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), 36.8 +/- 3.0 years old, arterial pressure 133.8 +/- 6.8/80.0 +/- 5.0 mmHg, time on dialysis 55.0 +/- 16.6 months, immediately before and after a hemodialysis session, and 10 healthy controls matched for age and gender. Endothelial function was assessed by the dorsal hand vein technique using graded local infusion of acetylcholine (endothelium-dependent venodilation, EDV) and sodium nitroprusside (endothelium-independent venodilation). Oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring protein oxidative damage (carbonyls) and antioxidant defense (total radical trapping antioxidant potential - TRAP) in blood samples. All patients were receiving recombinant human erythropoietin for at least 3 months and were not taking nitrates or a-receptor antagonists. EDV was significantly lower in ESRD patients before hemodialysis (65.6 +/- 10.5) vs controls (109.6 +/- 10.8; P = 0.010) and after hemodialysis (106.6 +/- 15.7; P = 0.045). Endothelium-independent venodilation was similar in all comparisons performed. The hemodialysis session significantly decreased TRAP (402.0 +/- 53.5 vs 157.1 +/- 28.3 U Trolox/microL plasma; P = 0.001). There was no difference in protein damage comparing ESRD patients before and after hemodialysis. The magnitude of change in the EDV was correlated negatively with the magnitude of change in TRAP (r = -0.70; P = 0.037). These results suggest that a hemodialysis session improves endothelial venous function, in association with an antioxidant effect. PMID:18622493

  5. Cord blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cell function is disrupted in congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Fujinaga, Hideshi; Fujinaga, Hiroko; Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Kato, Tomoko; Tamano, Moe; Terao, Miho; Takada, Shuji; Ito, Yushi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Kuroda, Masahiko

    2016-06-01

    Vascular growth is necessary for normal lung development. Although endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important role in vascularization, little is known about EPC function in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), a severe neonatal condition that is associated with pulmonary hypoplasia. We hypothesized that the function of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), a type of EPC, is impaired in CDH. Cord blood (CB) was collected from full-term CDH patients and healthy controls. We assessed CB progenitor cell populations as well as plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF1α) levels. CB ECFC clonogenicity; growth kinetics; migration; production of VEGF, SDF1α, and nitric oxide (NO); vasculogenic capacity; and mRNA expression of VEGF-A, fms-related tyrosine kinase 1 (FLT1), kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), nitric oxide synthase (NOS) 1-3, SDF1, and chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) were also assessed. Compared with controls, CB ECFCs were decreased in CDH. CDH ECFCs had reduced potential for self-renewal, clonogenicity, proliferation, and migration. Their capacity for NO production was enhanced but their response to VEGF was blunted in CDH ECFCs. In vivo potential for de novo vasculogenesis was reduced in CDH ECFCs. There was no difference in CB plasma VEGF and SDF1α concentrations, VEGF and SDF1α production by ECFCs, and ECFC mRNA expression of VEGF-A, FLT1, KDR, NOS1-3, SDF1, and CXCR4 between CDH and control subjects. In conclusion, CB ECFC function is disrupted in CDH, but these changes may be caused by mechanisms other than alteration of VEGF-NO and SDF1-CXCR4 signaling. PMID:27130531

  6. Successive deep dives impair endothelial function and enhance oxidative stress in man.

    PubMed

    Obad, Ante; Marinovic, Jasna; Ljubkovic, Marko; Breskovic, Toni; Modun, Darko; Boban, Mladen; Dujic, Zeljko

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of successive deep dives on endothelial function of large conduit arteries and plasma pro-oxidant and antioxidant activity. Seven experienced divers performed six dives in six consecutive days using a compressed mixture of oxygen, helium and nitrogen (trimix) with diving depths ranging from 55 to 80 m. Before and after first, third and sixth dive, venous gas emboli formation and brachial artery function (flow-mediated dilation, FMD) was assessed by ultrasound. In addition, plasma antioxidant capacity (AOC) was measured by ferric reducing antioxidant power, and the level of oxidative stress was assessed by thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) method. Although the FMD was reduced to a similar extent after each dive, the comparison of predive FMD showed a reduction from 8.6% recorded before the first dive to 6.3% before the third (P = 0.03) and 5.7% before the sixth dive (P = 0.003). A gradual shift in baseline was also detected with TBARS assay, with malondialdehyde values increasing from 0.10 ± 0.02 μmol l⁻¹ before the first dive to 0.16 ± 0.03 before the sixth (P = 0.005). Predive plasma AOC values also showed a decreasing trend from 0.67 ± 0.20 mmol l⁻¹ trolox equivalents (first day) to 0.56 ± 0.12 (sixth day), although statistical significance was not reached (P = 0.08). This is the first documentation of acute endothelial dysfunction in the large conduit arteries occurring after successive deep trimix dives. Both endothelial function and plasma pro-oxidant and antioxidant activity did not return to baseline during the course of repetitive dives, indicating possible cumulative and longer lasting detrimental effects. PMID:20718805

  7. EXERCISE TRAINING IMPROVES ENDOTHELIAL FUNCTION IN RESISTANCE ARTERIES OF YOUNG PREHYPERTENSIVES

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Darren T.; Martin, Jeffrey S.; Casey, Darren P.; Braith, Randy W.

    2013-01-01

    Prehypertension is associated with reduced conduit artery endothelial function and perturbation of oxidant/antioxidant status. It is unknown if endothelial dysfunction persists to resistance arteries and if exercise training effects oxidant/antioxidant balance in young prehypertensives. We examined resistance artery function using venous occlusion plethysmography measurement of forearm (FBF) and calf blood flow (CBF) at rest and during reactive hyperemia, as well as lipid peroxidation (8-iso-PGF2α) and antioxidant capacity (Trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity; TEAC) before and after exercise intervention or time-control. Forty-three unmedicated prehypertensive and fifteen matched normotensive time-controls met screening requirements and participated in the study (age: 21.1±0.8 years). Prehypertensive subjects were randomly assigned to resistance exercise training (PHRT; n=15), endurance exercise training (PHET; n=13) or time-control groups (PHTC; n=15). Treatment groups exercised 3 days per week for 8 weeks. Peak and total FBF were lower in prehypertensives than normotensives (12.7±1.2 ml/min/100ml tissue and 89.1±7.7 ml/min/100ml tissue vs. 16.3±1.0 ml/min/100ml tissue and 123.3±6.4 ml/min/100ml tissue, respectively; p<0.05). Peak and total CBF were lower in prehypertensives than normotensives (15.3±1.2 ml/min/100ml tissue and 74±8.3 ml/min/100ml tissue vs. 20.9±1.4 ml/min/100ml tissue and 107±9.2 ml/min/100ml tissue, respectively; p<0.05). PHRT and PHET improved humoral measures of Trolox-equivalent antioxidant-capacity (TEAC) (+24% and +30%) and 8-iso-PGF2α (−43% and −40%, respectively; p<0.05). This study provides evidence that young prehypertensives exhibit reduced resistance artery endothelial function and that short term (8weeks) resistance or endurance training are effective in improving resistance artery endothelial function and oxidant/antioxidant balance in young prehypertensives. PMID:24172292

  8. Acute Effects of Hemodiafiltration Versus Conventional Hemodialysis on Endothelial Function and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Ping; Jin, Wei; Teng, Jie; Zhang, Hao; Zou, Jianzhou; Liu, Zhonghua; Shen, Bo; Cao, Xuesen; Ding, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endothelial dysfunction and chronic inflammatory process are prevalent in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on maintenance hemodialysis (HD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute and short-term effects of online hemodiafiltration (OL-HDF) versus conventional HD on endothelial function and inflammation. A prospective, randomized, crossover trial. Twenty stable ESRD patients undergoing chronic HD treatments were randomly assigned with a 1:1 ratio to conventional HD and to OL-HDF both for 2 weeks (either HD followed by OL-HDF or OL-HDF followed by HD). Markers of endothelial dysfunction such as flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery, soluble endothelial protein C receptor (sEPCR), and soluble thrombomodulin (sTM) were measured at baseline, after the first dialysis session and after 2 weeks. Meanwhile, serum interleukin 6 (IL-6) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels were measured as well. Both a single OL-HDF session and 2-week OL-HDF significantly improved brachial FMD% (18.7 ± 6.9% at baseline; 21.5 ± 5.4% after the first dialysis; 21.5 ± 5.7% after 2 weeks; P < 0.05 vs baseline), decreased the levels of sEPCR (from 394.4 [297.9–457.0] ng/ml at baseline to 234.7 [174.1–345.5] ng/ml after the first dialysis, and to 191.5 [138.2–255.0] ng/ml after 2 weeks; P < 0.01 vs baseline) and sTM. In contrast, HD did not change FMD%, even increased the levels of sEPCR and sTM. A reduction in IL-6 level was observed in OL-HDF patients after 2-week dialysis, while IL-6 did not change in HD patients. There was no significant difference in change of hs-CRP level between the OL-HDF and HD treatments. OL-HDF has both acute and short-term beneficial effects on endothelial dysfunction compared to conventional HD. PMID:27100440

  9. Acute Effects of Hemodiafiltration Versus Conventional Hemodialysis on Endothelial Function and Inflammation: A Randomized Crossover Study.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ping; Jin, Wei; Teng, Jie; Zhang, Hao; Zou, Jianzhou; Liu, Zhonghua; Shen, Bo; Cao, Xuesen; Ding, Xiaoqiang

    2016-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and chronic inflammatory process are prevalent in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on maintenance hemodialysis (HD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute and short-term effects of online hemodiafiltration (OL-HDF) versus conventional HD on endothelial function and inflammation.A prospective, randomized, crossover trial.Twenty stable ESRD patients undergoing chronic HD treatments were randomly assigned with a 1:1 ratio to conventional HD and to OL-HDF both for 2 weeks (either HD followed by OL-HDF or OL-HDF followed by HD). Markers of endothelial dysfunction such as flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery, soluble endothelial protein C receptor (sEPCR), and soluble thrombomodulin (sTM) were measured at baseline, after the first dialysis session and after 2 weeks. Meanwhile, serum interleukin 6 (IL-6) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels were measured as well.Both a single OL-HDF session and 2-week OL-HDF significantly improved brachial FMD% (18.7 ± 6.9% at baseline; 21.5 ± 5.4% after the first dialysis; 21.5 ± 5.7% after 2 weeks; P < 0.05 vs baseline), decreased the levels of sEPCR (from 394.4 [297.9-457.0] ng/ml at baseline to 234.7 [174.1-345.5] ng/ml after the first dialysis, and to 191.5 [138.2-255.0] ng/ml after 2 weeks; P < 0.01 vs baseline) and sTM. In contrast, HD did not change FMD%, even increased the levels of sEPCR and sTM. A reduction in IL-6 level was observed in OL-HDF patients after 2-week dialysis, while IL-6 did not change in HD patients. There was no significant difference in change of hs-CRP level between the OL-HDF and HD treatments.OL-HDF has both acute and short-term beneficial effects on endothelial dysfunction compared to conventional HD. PMID:27100440

  10. Exposure to Inhaled Nickel Nanoparticles Causes a Reduction in Number and Function of Bone Marrow Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liberda, Eric N; Cuevas, Azita K; Gillespie, Patricia A; Grunig, Gabriele; Qu, Qingshan; Chen, Lung Chi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Particulate matter (PM), specifically nickel (Ni) found on or in PM, has been associated with an increased risk of mortality in human population studies and significant increases in vascular inflammation, generation of reactive oxygen species, altered vasomotor tone, and potentiated atherosclerosis in murine exposures. Recently, murine inhalation of Ni nanoparticles have been shown to cause pulmonary inflammation which affects cardiovascular tissue and potentiates atherosclerosis. These adverse cardiovascular outcomes may be due to the effects of Ni on endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), endogenous semi-pluripotent stem cells that aid in endothelial repair. Thus, we hypothesize that Ni nanoparticle exposures decrease cell count and cause impairments in function which may ultimately have significant effects on various cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. Methods Experiments involving inhaled Ni nanoparticle exposures(2 days/5 hrs/day at ~1000 μg/m3, 3 days/5 hrs/day at ~1000 μg/m3, and 5days/5 hrs/day at ~100 μg/m3), were performed in order to quantify bone marrow resident EPCs using flow cytometry in C57BL/6 mice. Plasma levels of SDF-1α and VEGF were assessed by ELISA and in vitro functional assessments of cultured EPCs were conducted. Results and Conclusions Significant EPC count differences between exposure and control groups for Ni nanoparticle exposures were observed. Differences in EPC tube formation and chemotaxis were also observed for the Ni nanoparticle exposed group. Plasma VEGF and SDF-1α differences were not statistically significant. In conclusion, this study shows that inhalation of Ni nanoparticles results in functionally impaired EPCs and reduced number in the bone marrow, which may lead to enhanced progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:20936915

  11. Polyphenol-rich Cranberry Juice has a neutral effect on endothelial function but decreases the fraction of osteocalcin expressing endothelial progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Flammer, Andreas J.; Martin, Elizabeth; Gossl, Mario; Widmer, R Jay; Lennon, Ryan; Sexton, Jasmine A.; Loeffler, Darrell; Khosla, Sundeep; Lerman, Lilach O.; Lerman, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cranberry juice (CJ) contains a remarkably high concentration of polyphenols, considered to be beneficial for cardiovascular and bone health. The current double-blind, randomized study was designed to test whether daily consumption of double-strength Ocean Spray light CJ (2×230ml) over 4 months has beneficial effects on vascular function and on endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), EPCs carrying the osteoblastic marker osteocalcin in particular. Methods 84 participants (49.5±16.2yrs.) with peripheral endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular risk factors were enrolled in this double-blind, randomized, controlled trial (69 completed the four month protocol - 32 in the CJ group and 37 in the placebo group - respectively). Vascular responses to reactive hyperemia were measured non-invasively by peripheral arterial tonometry (EndoPAT). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stained for EPC markers, as well as osteocalcin, and counted by flow-cytometry. Results Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. The effect of CJ on peripheral endothelial function and on circulating EPC counts (CD34+/CD133+/KDR+) did not change during the study. A high percentage of EPCs expressed osteocalcin (59.4±35.7%). CJ, as compared to placebo, induced a decrease in the fraction of EPCs expressing osteocalcin (-8.64±48.98 and 19.13±46.11%, respectively, p=0.019). Systemic levels of the adhesion marker ICAM correlated significantly with the number of EPCs expressing osteocalcin. Conclusions The study demonstrated that long term supplementation of polyphenol-rich CJ did not improve peripheral endothelial function. However, the decrease in the fraction of osteocalcin+ EPCs suggests a potential beneficial effect of polyphenol-rich CJ. PMID:22382203

  12. Effect of CPAP therapy on endothelial function in obstructive sleep apnoea: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Esther I; Puhan, Milo A; Schlatzer, Christian; Stradling, John R; Kohler, Malcolm

    2015-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a prevalent sleep-related breathing disorder associated with adverse cardiovascular outcome. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the proposed mechanistic links between OSA and the increased cardiovascular risk. Treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) may reverse this detrimental pathophysiological consequence of OSA. Most studies on the effect of CPAP on endothelial function in OSA are limited by their low sample size. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the effect CPAP therapy on endothelial function in patients with OSA. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis searching literature databases up to August 2013 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effect of CPAP on endothelial function in OSA, assessed by flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and other validated techniques. The primary outcome for the meta-analysis (DerSimonian/Laird random-effects method) was the treatment effect on FMD. Eight RCTs comparing the effects of therapeutic CPAP versus subtherapeutic CPAP (or no intervention) on endothelial function involving 245 OSA patients were included in the systematic review. The studies are consistent in effect direction, showing an improvement of endothelial function by CPAP. Four RCTs involving 150 patients could be used for the meta-analysis. Compared to the control group, CPAP therapy (range 2-24 weeks) significantly increased absolute % FMD by 3.87% (95% confidence interval: 1.93-5.80, P < 0.001). In patients with OSA, CPAP therapy improves endothelial function significantly and to a clinically important extent. PMID:26073295

  13. Prox1 physically and functionally interacts with COUP-TFII to specify lymphatic endothelial cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sunju; Kang, Jinjoo; Yoo, Jaehyuk; Ganesan, Sathish K.; Cook, Sarah C.; Aguilar, Berenice; Ramu, Swapnika; Lee, Juneyong

    2009-01-01

    Specification of endothelial cell (EC) fate during vascular development is controlled by distinct key regulators. While Notch plays an essential role in induction of arterial phenotypes, COUP-TFII is required to maintain the venous EC identity. Homeodomain transcription factor Prox1 functions to reprogram venous ECs to lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). Here, we report that the venous EC fate regulator COUP-TFII is expressed in LECs throughout development and physically interacts with Prox1 to form a stable complex in various cell types including LECs. We found that COUP-TFII functions as a coregulator of Prox1 to control several lineage-specific genes including VEGFR-3, FGFR-3, and neuropilin-1 and is required along with Prox1 to maintain LEC phenotype. Together, we propose that the physical and functional interactions of the 2 proteins constitute an essential part in the program specifying LEC fate and may provide the molecular basis for the hypothesis of venous EC identity being the prerequisite for LEC specification. PMID:18815287

  14. Effect of the transdermal low-level laser therapy on endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Szymczyszyn, Alicja; Doroszko, Adrian; Szahidewicz-Krupska, Ewa; Rola, Piotr; Gutherc, Radosław; Jasiczek, Jakub; Mazur, Grzegorz; Derkacz, Arkadiusz

    2016-09-01

    The effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the cardiovascular system is not fully established. Since the endothelium is an important endocrine element, establishing the mechanisms of LLLT action is an important issue.The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of transdermal LLLT on endothelial function.In this study, healthy volunteers (n = 40, age = 20-40 years) were enrolled. N = 30 (14 female, 16 male, mean age 30 ± 5 years) constituted the laser-irradiated group (LG). The remaining 10 subjects (6 women, 4 men, mean age 28 ± 5 years) constituted the control group (CG). Participants were subjected to LLLT once a day for three consecutive days. Blood for biochemical assessments was drawn before the first irradiation and 24 h after the last session. In the LG, transdermal illumination of radial artery was conducted (a semiconductor laser λ = 808 nm, irradiation 50 mW, energy density 1.6 W/cm(2) and a dose 20 J/day, a total dose of 60 J). Biochemical parameters (reflecting angiogenesis: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), angiostatin; antioxidative status: glutathione (GSH) and the nitric oxide metabolic pathway: symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and L-arginine) were assessed. In the LG, a significant increase in GSH levels and considerable decrease in angiostatin concentration following the LLLT were observed. No significant differences in levels of the VEGF, FGF, SDMA, ADMA were observed.LLLT modifies vascular endothelial function by increasing its antioxidant and angiogenic potential. We found no significant differences in levels of the nitric oxide pathway metabolites within 24 h following the LLLT irradiation. PMID:27299570

  15. Predictive Value of Endothelial Function by Non-invasive Peripheral Arterial Tonometry for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzawa, Yasushi; Li, Jing; Aoki, Tatsuo; Guddeti, Raviteja R.; Kwon, Taek-Geun; Cilluffo, Rebecca; Widmer, R. Jay.; Gulati, Rajiv; Lennon, Ryan J.; Lerman, Lilach O.; Lerman, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Background Endothelial dysfunction is a key step in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular complications. We examined whether peripheral endothelial function, as assessed by fingertip reactive hyperemia-peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT) can provide additional clinical value to traditional risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in predicting coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods We included 118 stable patients who were referred for coronary angiography for chest pain evaluation or abnormal stress test. A natural logarithmic value of RH-PAT index (Ln_RHI) was obtained before cardiac catheterization by an independent operator. Significant CAD was defined as luminal stenosis ≥70% (≥50% at left main) and/or fractional flow reserve ≤0.80 in one or more major coronary arteries or their major branches. Results Levels of Ln_RHI were significantly lower in patients with CAD (n=60) compared to patients without CAD (n=58) (0.69±0.29 vs. 0.88±0.27, p<0.001). Ln_RHI was significantly associated with CAD independent from traditional risk factors (odds ratio [OR] for 0.1 decrease in Ln_RHI 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04 to 1.52, p=0.01). The net reclassification index was improved when Ln_RHI was added to traditional risk factors (0.62, 95% CI: 0.27 to 0.97, p=0.001). Conclusions Peripheral endothelial function, as assessed by RH-PAT, improved risk stratification when added to traditional risk factors. RH-PAT is potentially useful for identifying patients at high risk for CAD. PMID:25503420

  16. Isolation of Functional Human Endothelial Cells from Small Volumes of Umbilical Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Do Kang, Sa; Carlon, Tim A.; Jantzen, Alexandra E.; Lin, Fu-Hsiung; Ley, Melissa M.; Allen, Jason D.; Stabler, Thomas V.; Haley, N. Rebecca; Truskey, George A.; Achneck, Hardean E.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) isolated from endothelial progenitor cells in blood have great potential as a therapeutic tool to promote vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and treat cardiovascular diseases. However, current methods to isolate ECs are limited by a low yield with few colonies appearing during isolation. In order to utilize blood-derived ECs for therapeutic applications, a simple method is needed that can produce a high yield of ECs from small volumes of blood without the addition of animal-derived products. For the first time, we show that human endothelial cells can be isolated without the prior separation of blood components through the technique of diluted whole blood incubation (DWBI) utilizing commercially available human serum. We isolated ECs from small volumes of blood (~ 10 ml) via DWBI and characterized them with flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and uptake of DiI-labeled acetylated low density lipoprotein (DiI-Ac-LDL). These ECs are functional as demonstrated by their ability to form tubular networks in Matrigel, adhere and align with flow under physiological fluid shear stress, and produce increased nitric oxide under fluid flow. An average of 7.0 ± 2.5 EC colonies that passed all functional tests described above were obtained per 10 ml of blood as compared to only 0.3 ± 0.1 colonies with the traditional method based on density centrifugation. The time until first colony appearance was 8.3 ± 1.2 days for ECs isolated with the DWBI method and 12 ± 1.4 days for ECs isolated with the traditional isolation method. A simplified method, such as DWBI, in combination with advances in isolation yield could enable the use of blood-derived ECs in clinical practice. PMID:23604849

  17. Functional role of NF-κB in expression of human endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu-Sun; Kim, Joohwan; Kwak, Su-Nam; Lee, Kwang-Soon; Lee, Dong-Keon; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Won, Moo-Ho; Jeoung, Dooil; Lee, Hansoo; Kwon, Young-Guen; Kim, Young-Myeong

    2014-05-23

    The transcription factor NF-κB has an essential role in inflammation in endothelial cells. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived nitric oxide (NO) prevents vascular inflammation. However, the molecular mechanism underlying NF-κB-mediated regulation of eNOS expression has not been clearly elucidated. We here found that NF-κB-activating stimuli, such as lipopolysaccharide, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-1β, suppressed eNOS mRNA and protein levels by decreasing mRNA stability, without affecting promoter activity. TNF-α-mediated suppression of eNOS expression, mRNA stability, and 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) activity were inhibited by NF-κB inhibitors and Dicer knockdown, but not by p38 MAPK and MEK inhibitors, suggesting the involvement of NF-κB-responsive miRNAs in eNOS expression. Moreover, TNF-α increased MIR155HG expression and promoter activity as well as miR-155 biogenesis, and these increases were blocked by NF-κB inhibitors. Transfection with antagomiR-155 blocked TNF-α-mediated suppression of eNOS 3'UTR activity, eNOS mRNA and protein levels, and NO and cGMP production. These data provide evidence that NF-κB is a negative regulator of eNOS expression via upregulation of miR-155 under inflammatory conditions. These results suggest that NF-κB is a potential therapeutic target for preventing vascular inflammation and endothelial dysfunction induced by suppression of miR-155-mediated eNOS expression. PMID:24769202

  18. [Possibilities of pharmacotherapy for chronic venous insufficiency with diosmin preparations from the position of the endothelial functional state].

    PubMed

    Kalinin, R E; Suchkov, I A; Pshennikov, A S; Mzhavanadze, N D

    2015-01-01

    Despite a high level of the development of modern angiology and vascular surgery, the problem of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) complicating the course of various venous diseases seems to have no tendency towards being solved, thus calling forth permanent search for optimization of methods of treatment and rehabilitation of patients presenting with the above-mentioned syndrome. The article presents a review of contemporary studies dedicated to the problem of correcting CVI. Special attention is paid to the endothelial state in CVI and possibilities of correcting endothelial dysfunction with the use of bioflavonoids, in particular, diosmin. Also presented herein are the results of an original experimental study dedicated to peculiarities of the endothelial functional state, endothelial dysfunction, and correction thereof on the background of the existing CVI. PMID:26355927

  19. Endothelial cell micropatterning: Methods, effects, and applications

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deirdre E.J.; Hinds, Monica T.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of flow on endothelial cells have been widely examined for the ability of fluid shear stress to alter cell morphology and function; however, the effects of endothelial cell morphology without flow have only recently been observed. An increase in lithographic techniques in cell culture spurred a corresponding increase in research aiming to confine cell morphology. These studies lead to a better understanding of how morphology and cytoskeletal configuration affect the structure and function of the cells. This review examines endothelial cell micropatterning research by exploring both the many alternative methods used to alter endothelial cell morphology and the resulting changes in cellular shape and phenotype. Micropatterning induced changes in endothelial cell proliferation, apoptosis, cytoskeletal organization, mechanical properties, and cell functionality. Finally, the ways these cellular manipulation techniques have been applied to biomedical engineering research, including angiogenesis, cell migration, and tissue engineering, is discussed. PMID:21761242

  20. Metoprolol compared to carvedilol deteriorates insulin-stimulated endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes - a randomized study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Aim Studies of beta blockade in patients with type 2 diabetes have shown inferiority of metoprolol treatment compared to carvedilol on indices of insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of metoprolol versus carvedilol on endothelial function and insulin-stimulated endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes. Method 24 patients with type 2 diabetes were randomized to receive either 200 mg metoprolol succinate or 50 mg carvedilol daily. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was assessed by using venous occlusion plethysmography with increasing doses of intra-arterial infusions of the agonist serotonin. Insulin-stimulated endothelial function was assessed after co-infusion of insulin for sixty minutes. Vaso-reactivity studies were done before and after the two-month treatment period. Results Insulin-stimulated endothelial function was deteriorated after treatment with metoprolol, the percentage change in forearm blood-flow was 60.19% ± 17.89 (at the highest serotonin dosages) before treatment and -33.80% ± 23.38 after treatment (p = 0.007). Treatment with carvedilol did not change insulin-stimulated endothelial function. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation without insulin was not changed in either of the two treatment groups. Conclusion This study shows that vascular insulin sensitivity was preserved during treatment with carvedilol while blunted during treatment with metoprolol in patients with type 2 diabetes. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials NCT00497003 PMID:20500877

  1. Effect of chronic treatment with the vasopeptidase inhibitor AVE 7688 and ramipril on endothelial function in atherogenic diet rabbits.

    PubMed

    Weckler, Nadine; Leitzbach, Daniela; Kalinowski, Leszek; Malinski, Tadeusz; Busch, Andreas E; Linz, Wolfgang; Kalinowski, Ludmila

    2003-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of death in Western nations, although improved possibilities regarding diagnosis and therapy now exist. Endothelial dysfunction is triggered by cardiovascular risk factors such as hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension, adiposity and smoking, contributing to the common endpoint of atherosclerosis. This study examined the pharmacological effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and combined ACE-neutral endopeptidase (NEP) (vasopeptidase) inhibitors on endothelial dysfunction in the model of hyperlipidaemic rabbits. The focus of the study was to assess endothelial function after treatment with the ACE-NEP inhibitor AVE 7688 (30 mg/kg/day) in comparison to the ACE inhibitor (ACE-I) ramipril (1 mg/kg/day). Different parameters, such as endothelial function, blood pressure (BP), expansion of plaques, endothelial nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide (O2-) release and plasma levels of various lipidaemic parameters were analysed. Control groups consisted of one group fed only with normal diet, one group fed only with atherogenic diet and the direct control group fed with varied diets (six weeks atherogenic diet followed by 12 weeks normal diet). Since for the treatment of atherosclerosis, a change in feeding is absolutely necessary, in the present study, at the start of the treatments with AVE 7688 and ramipril, the rabbits food was changed to a normal diet. At the end of the study, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was measured in the anaesthetised animals. The values in standard, atherogenic and varied diet-fed rabbits were around 73 2 mmHg. Angiotensin I (Ang I) given intravenous (i.v.) induced a strong increase in MAP of about 20%. In both the treated groups Ang I-induced BP increase was inhibited. In contrast, i.v. bradykinin led to a strong reduction in MAP in both the treated groups of around 50%. Six weeks feeding with an atherogenic diet in the rabbits induced an enduring endothelial dysfunction despite the food

  2. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) deficiency affects energy metabolism pattern in murine oxidative skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Momken, Iman; Fortin, Dominique; Serrurier, Bernard; Bigard, Xavier; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Veksler, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    Oxidative capacity of muscles correlates with capillary density and with microcirculation, which in turn depend on various regulatory factors, including NO generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). To determine the role of eNOS in patterns of regulation of energy metabolism in various muscles, we studied mitochondrial respiration in situ in saponin-permeabilized fibres as well as the energy metabolism enzyme profile in the cardiac, soleus (oxidative) and gastrocnemius (glycolytic) muscles isolated from mice lacking eNOS (eNOS(-/-)). In soleus muscle, the absence of eNOS induced a marked decrease in both basal mitochondrial respiration without ADP (-32%; P <0.05) and maximal respiration in the presence of ADP (-29%; P <0.05). Furthermore, the eNOS(-/-) soleus muscle showed a decrease in total creatine kinase (-29%; P <0.05), citrate synthase (-31%; P <0.01), adenylate kinase (-27%; P <0.05), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (-43%; P <0.01) and pyruvate kinase (-26%; P <0.05) activities. The percentage of myosin heavy chains I (slow isoform) was significantly increased from 24.3+/-1.5% in control to 30.1+/-1.1% in eNOS(-/-) soleus muscle ( P <0.05) at the expense of a slight non-significant decrease in the three other (fast) isoforms. Besides, eNOS(-/-) soleus showed a 28% loss of weight. Interestingly, we did not find differences in any parameters in cardiac and gastrocnemius muscles compared with respective controls. These results show that eNOS knockout has an important effect on muscle oxidative capacity as well on the activities of energy metabolism enzymes in oxidative (soleus) muscle. The absence of such effects in cardiac and glycolytic (gastrocnemius) muscle suggests a specific role for eNOS-produced NO in oxidative skeletal muscle. PMID:12123418

  3. Beyond membrane integrity: Assessing the functionality of human umbilical vein endothelial cells after cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Marquez-Curtis, Leah A; Sultani, A Billal; McGann, Locksley E; Elliott, Janet A W

    2016-06-01

    Assessment of cell membrane integrity is one of the most widely used methods to measure post-cryopreservation viability of cells such as human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). However, an evaluation of cell function provides a better measure of cell quality following cryopreservation. The tube formation assay mimics angiogenesis in vitro and can be used to quantitate the ability of endothelial cells to form capillary-like tubular structures when cultured on reconstituted basement membrane (Matrigel). We compared the membrane integrity (measured by flow cytometry) and tube forming ability of HUVEC suspensions exposed to 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO), cooled at 1 °C/min to various sub-zero temperatures, plunged directly into liquid nitrogen, stored for an hour, and thawed rapidly. We found that as membrane integrity increased so did the various parameters associated with the extent of in vitro angiogenesis; however, in comparison to fresh cells with a similar percentage of membrane-intact cells, the extent of tube formation, expressed as total tube length, is significantly lower in previously frozen cells for the lower range of post-thaw membrane integrities. Our findings underscore the value of an assay that quantifies a specific function that a cell is known to perform in vivo to measure the success of cryopreservation protocols. PMID:27182035

  4. Effects of Exercise Intensity on Postexercise Endothelial Function and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    McClean, Conor; Harris, Ryan A.; Brown, Malcolm; Brown, John C.; Davison, Gareth W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To measure endothelial function and oxidative stress immediately, 90 minutes, and three hours after exercise of varying intensities. Methods. Sixteen apparently healthy men completed three exercise bouts of treadmill running for 30 minutes at 55% V˙O2max (mild); 20 minutes at 75% V˙O2max (moderate); or 5 minutes at 100% V˙O2max (maximal) in random order. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was assessed with venous blood samples drawn for measurement of endothelin-1 (ET-1), lipid hydroperoxides (LOOHs), and lipid soluble antioxidants. Results. LOOH increased immediately following moderate exercise (P < 0.05). ET-1 was higher immediately after exercise and 3 hours after exercise in the mild trial compared to maximal one (P < 0.05). Transient decreases were detected for ΔFMD/ShearAUC from baseline following maximal exercise, but it normalised at 3 hours after exercise (P < 0.05). Shear rate was higher immediately after exercise in the maximal trial compared to mild exercise (P < 0.05). No changes in baseline diameter, peak diameter, absolute change in diameter, or FMD were observed following any of the exercise trials (P > 0.05). Conclusions. Acute exercise at different intensities elicits varied effects on oxidative stress, shear rate, and ET-1 that do not appear to mediate changes in endothelial function measured by FMD. PMID:26583061

  5. Characterization of endothelial function in the brachial artery via affine registration of ultrasonographic image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamata, Pablo; Laclaustra, Martin; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2003-05-01

    The assessment and characterization of the endothelial function is a current research topic as it may play an important role in the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. Flow mediated dilatation may be used to investigate endothelial function, and B-mode ultrasonography is a cheap and non-invasive way to assess the vasodilation response. Computerized analysis techniques are very desirable to give higher accuracy and objectivity to the measurements. A new method is presented that solves some limitations of existing methods, which in general depend on accurate edge detection of the arterial wall. This method is based on a global image analysis strategy. The arterial vasodilation between two frames is modeled by a superposition of a rigid motion model and a stretching perpendicular to the artery. Both transformation models are recovered using an image registration algorithm based on normalized mutual information and a multi-resolution search framework. Temporal continuity of in the variation of the registration parameters is enforced with a Kalman filter, since the dilation process is known to be a gradual and continuous physiological phenomenon. The proposed method presents a negligible bias when compared with manual assessment. It also eliminates artifacts introduced by patient and probe motion, thus improving the accuracy of the measurements. Finally, it is also robust to typical problems of ultrasound, like speckle noise and poor image quality.

  6. Immortalized Functional Endothelial Progenitor Cell Lines from Umbilical Cord Blood for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sobhan, Praveen K.; Seervi, Mahendra; Joseph, Jeena; Varghese, Saneesh; Pillai, Prakash Rajappan; Sivaraman, Divya Mundackal; James, Jackson; George, Roshin Elizabeth; Elizabeth, K.E.; Pillai, M. Radhakrishna

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a significant role in multiple biological processes such as vascular homeostasis, regeneration, and tumor angiogenesis. This makes them a promising cell of choice for studying a variety of biological processes, toxicity assays, biomaterial–cell interaction studies, as well as in tissue-engineering applications. In this study, we report the generation of two clones of SV40-immortalized EPCs from umbilical cord blood. These cells retained most of the functional features of mature endothelial cells and showed no indication of senescence after repeated culture for more than 240 days. Extensive functional characterization of the immortalized cells by western blot, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence studies substantiated that these cells retained their ability to synthesize nitric oxide, von Willebrand factor, P-Selectin etc. These cells achieved unlimited proliferation potential subsequent to inactivation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, but failed to form colonies on soft agar. We also show their enhanced growth and survival on vascular biomaterials compared to parental cultures in late population doubling. These immortalized EPCs can be used as a cellular model system for studying the biology of these cells, gene manipulation experiments, cell–biomaterial interactions, as well as a variety of tissue-engineering applications. PMID:22889128

  7. Functional interaction of endothelial nitric oxide synthase with a voltage-dependent anion channel

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianxin; Liao, James K.

    2002-01-01

    Endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) is an important regulator of vascular function. NO is produced by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) whose function is modulated, in part, by specific protein interactions. By coimmunoprecipitation experiments followed by MS analyses, we identified a human voltage-dependent anion/cation channel or porin as a binding partner of eNOS. The interaction between porin and eNOS was demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation studies in nontransfected human endothelial cells and Cos-7 cells transiently transfected with eNOS and porin cDNAs. In vitro binding studies with glutathione S-transferase–porin indicated that porin binds directly to eNOS and that this interaction augmented eNOS activity. The calcium ionophore, A23187, and bradykinin, which are known to activate eNOS, markedly increased porin–eNOS interaction, suggesting a potential role of intracellular Ca2+ in mediating this interaction. Theses results indicate that the interaction between a voltage-dependent membrane channel and eNOS may be important for regulating eNOS activity. PMID:12228731

  8. Heparan Sulfate Modulates Neutrophil and Endothelial Function in Antibacterial Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ding; Olson, Joshua; Cole, Jason N.; van Wijk, Xander M.; Brinkmann, Volker; Zychlinsky, Arturo; Nizet, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we showed that endothelial heparan sulfate facilitates entry of a bacterial pathogen into the central nervous system. Here, we show that normal bactericidal activity of neutrophils is influenced by the sulfation pattern of heparan sulfate. Inactivation of heparan sulfate uronyl 2-O-sulfotransferase (Hs2st) in neutrophils substantially reduced their bactericidal activity, and Hs2st deficiency rendered mice more susceptible to systemic infection with the pathogenic bacterium group B Streptococcus. Specifically, altered sulfation of heparan sulfate in mutant neutrophils affected formation of neutrophil extracellular traps while not influencing phagocytosis, production of reactive oxygen species, or secretion of granular proteases. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan(s) is present in neutrophil extracellular traps, modulates histone affinity, and modulates their microbial activity. Hs2st-deficient brain endothelial cells show enhanced binding to group B Streptococcus and are more susceptible to apoptosis, likely contributing to the observed increase in dissemination of group B Streptococcus into the brain of Hs2st-deficient mice following intravenous challenge. Taken together, our data provide strong evidence that heparan sulfate from both neutrophils and the endothelium plays important roles in modulating innate immunity. PMID:26150541

  9. Heparan Sulfate Modulates Neutrophil and Endothelial Function in Antibacterial Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ding; Olson, Joshua; Cole, Jason N; van Wijk, Xander M; Brinkmann, Volker; Zychlinsky, Arturo; Nizet, Victor; Esko, Jeffrey D; Chang, Yung-Chi

    2015-09-01

    Recently, we showed that endothelial heparan sulfate facilitates entry of a bacterial pathogen into the central nervous system. Here, we show that normal bactericidal activity of neutrophils is influenced by the sulfation pattern of heparan sulfate. Inactivation of heparan sulfate uronyl 2-O-sulfotransferase (Hs2st) in neutrophils substantially reduced their bactericidal activity, and Hs2st deficiency rendered mice more susceptible to systemic infection with the pathogenic bacterium group B Streptococcus. Specifically, altered sulfation of heparan sulfate in mutant neutrophils affected formation of neutrophil extracellular traps while not influencing phagocytosis, production of reactive oxygen species, or secretion of granular proteases. Heparan sulfate proteoglycan(s) is present in neutrophil extracellular traps, modulates histone affinity, and modulates their microbial activity. Hs2st-deficient brain endothelial cells show enhanced binding to group B Streptococcus and are more susceptible to apoptosis, likely contributing to the observed increase in dissemination of group B Streptococcus into the brain of Hs2st-deficient mice following intravenous challenge. Taken together, our data provide strong evidence that heparan sulfate from both neutrophils and the endothelium plays important roles in modulating innate immunity. PMID:26150541

  10. Sparstolonin B Inhibits Pro-Angiogenic Functions and Blocks Cell Cycle Progression in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Henry R.; Liang, Qiaoli; Fan, Daping; Rodriguez, Vanessa; Lessner, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Sparstolonin B (SsnB) is a novel bioactive compound isolated from Sparganium stoloniferum, an herb historically used in Traditional Chinese Medicine as an anti-tumor agent. Angiogenesis, the process of new capillary formation from existing blood vessels, is dysregulated in many pathological disorders, including diabetic retinopathy, tumor growth, and atherosclerosis. In functional assays, SsnB inhibited endothelial cell tube formation (Matrigel method) and cell migration (Transwell method) in a dose-dependent manner. Microarray experiments with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) demonstrated differential expression of several hundred genes in response to SsnB exposure (916 and 356 genes, respectively, with fold change ≥2, p<0.05, unpaired t-test). Microarray data from both cell types showed significant overlap, including genes associated with cell proliferation and cell cycle. Flow cytometric cell cycle analysis of HUVECs treated with SsnB showed an increase of cells in the G1 phase and a decrease of cells in the S phase. Cyclin E2 (CCNE2) and Cell division cycle 6 (CDC6) are regulatory proteins that control cell cycle progression through the G1/S checkpoint. Both CCNE2 and CDC6 were downregulated in the microarray data. Real Time quantitative PCR confirmed that gene expression of CCNE2 and CDC6 in HUVECs was downregulated after SsnB exposure, to 64% and 35% of controls, respectively. The data suggest that SsnB may exert its anti-angiogenic properties in part by downregulating CCNE2 and CDC6, halting progression through the G1/S checkpoint. In the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay, SsnB caused significant reduction in capillary length and branching number relative to the vehicle control group. Overall, SsnB caused a significant reduction in angiogenesis (ANOVA, p<0.05), demonstrating its ex vivo efficacy. PMID:23940584

  11. Sparstolonin B inhibits pro-angiogenic functions and blocks cell cycle progression in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Henry R; Liang, Qiaoli; Fan, Daping; Rodriguez, Vanessa; Lessner, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    Sparstolonin B (SsnB) is a novel bioactive compound isolated from Sparganium stoloniferum, an herb historically used in Traditional Chinese Medicine as an anti-tumor agent. Angiogenesis, the process of new capillary formation from existing blood vessels, is dysregulated in many pathological disorders, including diabetic retinopathy, tumor growth, and atherosclerosis. In functional assays, SsnB inhibited endothelial cell tube formation (Matrigel method) and cell migration (Transwell method) in a dose-dependent manner. Microarray experiments with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) demonstrated differential expression of several hundred genes in response to SsnB exposure (916 and 356 genes, respectively, with fold change ≥2, p<0.05, unpaired t-test). Microarray data from both cell types showed significant overlap, including genes associated with cell proliferation and cell cycle. Flow cytometric cell cycle analysis of HUVECs treated with SsnB showed an increase of cells in the G1 phase and a decrease of cells in the S phase. Cyclin E2 (CCNE2) and Cell division cycle 6 (CDC6) are regulatory proteins that control cell cycle progression through the G1/S checkpoint. Both CCNE2 and CDC6 were downregulated in the microarray data. Real Time quantitative PCR confirmed that gene expression of CCNE2 and CDC6 in HUVECs was downregulated after SsnB exposure, to 64% and 35% of controls, respectively. The data suggest that SsnB may exert its anti-angiogenic properties in part by downregulating CCNE2 and CDC6, halting progression through the G1/S checkpoint. In the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay, SsnB caused significant reduction in capillary length and branching number relative to the vehicle control group. Overall, SsnB caused a significant reduction in angiogenesis (ANOVA, p<0.05), demonstrating its ex vivo efficacy. PMID:23940584

  12. The Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Cediranib (Recentin; AZD2171) Inhibits Endothelial Cell Function and Growth of Human Renal Tumor Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, Dietmar W. Brazelle, W.D.; Juergensmeier, Juliane M.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to examine the therapeutic potential of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling inhibitor cediranib in a human model of renal cell carcinoma (Caki-1). Methods and Materials: The effects of cediranib treatment on in vitro endothelial cell function (proliferation, migration, and tube formation), as well as in vivo angiogenesis and tumor growth, were determined. Results: In vitro, cediranib significantly impaired the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells and their ability to form tubes, but had no effect on the proliferation of Caki-1 tumor cells. In vivo, cediranib significantly reduced Caki-1 tumor cell-induced angiogenesis, reduced tumor perfusion, and inhibited the growth of Caki-1 tumor xenografts. Conclusions: The present results are consistent with the notion that inhibition of VEGF signaling leads to an indirect (i.e., antiangiogenic) antitumor effect, rather than a direct effect on tumor cells. These results further suggest that inhibition of VEGF signaling with cediranib may impair the growth of renal cell carcinoma.

  13. Vascular endothelial growth factor antagonism restores epithelial barrier dysfunction via affecting zonula occludens proteins

    PubMed Central

    YUKSEL, HASAN; YILMAZ, OZGE; KARAMAN, MERAL; FIRINCI, FATIH; TURKELI, AHMET; KANIK, ESRA TOPRAK; INAN, SEVINC

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial barrier dysfunction is important in the pathogenesis of asthma and allergic responses, and is therefore a therapeutic target. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of dexamethasone, a classic therapeutic agent, an anti-tumor necrosis factor agent (etanercept), which is used to treat difficult cases of asthma, and an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agent (bevacizumab), which is an angiogenesis inhibitor, on zonula occludens (ZO) proteins in an experimental asthma model. The experimental model of asthma was developed using intraperitoneal (IP) and inhaled administration of ovalbumin in 38 BALB/c mice, which were divided into four groups. The control group (n=6) did not receive any treatment, while the four remaining groups (n=8 per group) received an IP injection of saline, etanercept, bevacizumab or dexamethasone, respectively. Occludin, claudin and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM) were immunohistochemically stained in the left middle lobe samples using an indirect avidin-peroxidase method, after which the staining was semiquantified with H-scores. Statistically significant differences were observed in the occludin, claudin and JAM H-scores among the four groups (P<0.001). In the untreated asthma, etanercept, bevacizumab and dexamethasone groups, the median H-scores for occludin were 93, 177, 280 and 198, respectively, while the H-scores for claudin were 82, 193.5, 274 and 202.5, respectively, and the median H-scores for JAM were 130, 210, 288 and 210, respectively. Pairwise comparisons revealed that all three ZO protein H-scores were significantly lower in the saline group when compared with each treatment group. However, the H-scores of the ZO proteins were not significantly different between the etanercept and dexamethasone groups. Furthermore, the bevacizumab group exhibited higher H-scores for all the proteins compared with the dexamethasone group. Therefore, antagonism of VEGF with bevacizumab restores the

  14. Effects of nano-scaled particles on endothelial cell function in vitro: studies on viability, proliferation and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Peters, Kirsten; Unger, Ronald E; Kirkpatrick, C James; Gatti, Antonietta M; Monari, Emanuela

    2004-04-01

    Recent studies give support for a connection between the presence of inorganic particles (of microm and nm size) in different organs and tissues and the development of inflammatory foci, called granulomas. As the potential source of particles (e.g. porcelain dental bridges) and the location of particle detection were topographically far apart, a distribution via the blood stream appears highly probable. Thus, endothelial cells, which line the inner surface of blood vessels, would come into direct contact with these particles, making particle-endothelial interactions potentially pathogenically relevant. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects that five different nano-scaled particles (PVC, TiO2, SiO2, Co, Ni) have on endothelial cell function and viability. Therefore, human endothelial cells were exposed to different amounts of the above-mentioned particles. Although most particle types are shown to be internalised (except Ni-particles), only Co-particles possessed cytotoxic effects. Furthermore, an impairment of the proliferative activity and a pro-inflammatory stimulation of endothelial cells were induced by exposure to Co- and, to a lesser extent, by SiO2-particles. If a pro-inflammatory stimulation of endothelial cells occurs in vivo, a chronic inflammation could be a possible consequence. PMID:15332593

  15. A Novel Molecular and Functional Stemness Signature Assessing Human Cord Blood-Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cell Immaturity

    PubMed Central

    Pascaud, Juliette; Driancourt, Catherine; Boyer-Di-Ponio, Julie; Uzan, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFCs), a distinct population of Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs) progeny, display phenotypic and functional characteristics of endothelial cells while retaining features of stem/progenitor cells. Cord blood-derived ECFCs (CB-ECFCs) have a high clonogenic and proliferative potentials and they can acquire different endothelial phenotypes, this requiring some plasticity. These properties provide angiogenic and vascular repair capabilities to CB-ECFCs for ischemic cell therapies. However, the degree of immaturity retained by EPCs is still confused and poorly defined. Consequently, to better characterize CB-ECFC stemness, we quantified their clonogenic potential and demonstrated that they were reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) more efficiently and rapidly than adult endothelial cells. Moreover, we analyzed the transcriptional profile of a broad gene panel known to be related to stem cells. We showed that, unlike mature endothelial cells, CB-ECFCs expressed genes involved in the maintenance of embryonic stem cell properties such as DNMT3B, GDF3 or SOX2. Thus, these results provide further evidence and tools to appreciate EPC-derived cell stemness. Moreover this novel stem cell transcriptional signature of ECFCs could help better characterizing and ranging EPCs according to their immaturity profile. PMID:27043207

  16. Rescue of Brain Function Using Tunneling Nanotubes Between Neural Stem Cells and Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Yu, Xiaowen; Xie, Chong; Tan, Zijian; Tian, Qi; Zhu, Desheng; Liu, Mingyuan; Guan, Yangtai

    2016-05-01

    Evidence indicates that neural stem cells (NSCs) can ameliorate cerebral ischemia in animal models. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying one of the neuroprotective effects of NSCs: tunneling nanotube (TNT) formation. We addressed whether the control of cell-to-cell communication processes between NSCs and brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) and, particularly, the control of TNT formation could influence the rescue function of stem cells. In an attempt to mimic the cellular microenvironment in vitro, a co-culture system consisting of terminally differentiated BMECs from mice in a distressed state and NSCs was constructed. Additionally, engraftment experiments with infarcted mouse brains revealed that control of TNT formation influenced the effects of stem cell transplantation in vivo. In conclusion, our findings provide the first evidence that TNTs exist between NSCs and BMECs and that regulation of TNT formation alters cell function. PMID:26041660

  17. Does iron deficiency anemia affect olfactory function?

    PubMed

    Dinc, Mehmet Emre; Dalgic, Abdullah; Ulusoy, Seckin; Dizdar, Denizhan; Develioglu, Omer; Topak, Murat

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion This study found a negative effect of IDA on olfactory function. IDA leads to a reduction in olfactory function, and decreases in hemoglobin levels result in further reduction in olfactory function. Objective This study examined the effects of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) on olfactory function. Method The study enrolled 50 IDA patients and 50 healthy subjects. Olfactory function was evaluated using the Sniffin' Sticks olfactory test. The diagnosis of IDA was made according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Results Patients with IDA had a significantly lower threshold, discrimination, and identification (TDI) value, and a lower threshold compared with the control group. However, there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of smell selectivity values. PMID:26963317

  18. Nanoscale patterning of extracellular matrix alters endothelial function under shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Karina H.; Surya, Vinay N.; Gole, Monica; Walker, Travis; Yang, Weiguang; Lai, Edwina S.; Ostrowski, Maggie; Fuller, Gerald G.; Dunn, Alexander R.; Huang, Ngan F.

    2016-01-01

    The role of nanotopographical extracellular matrix (ECM) cues on vascular endothelial cell (EC) organization and function is not well-understood, despite the composition of nano- to micro-scale fibrillar ECMs within blood vessels. Instead, the predominant modulator of EC organization and function is traditionally thought to be hemodynamic shear stress, in which uniform shear stress induces parallel-alignment of ECs with anti-inflammatory function, whereas disturbed flow induce pro-inflammatory cells in disorganized configuration. Since shear stress acts on ECs by applying a mechanical force concomitant with inducing spatial patterning of the cells, we sought to decouple the effects of shear stress using parallel-aligned nanofibrillar collagen films that induce parallel EC alignment prior to stimulation with disturbed flow resulting from spatial wall shear stress gradients. Using real time live-cell imaging, we tracked the alignment, migration trajectories, proliferation, and anti-inflammatory behavior of ECs when they were cultured on parallel-aligned or randomly oriented nanofibrillar films. Intriguingly, ECs cultured on aligned nanofibrillar films remained well-aligned and migrated predominantly along the direction of aligned nanofibrils, despite exposure to shear stress orthogonal to the direction of the aligned nanofibrils. Furthermore, in stark contrast to ECs cultured on randomly oriented films, ECs on aligned nanofibrillar films exposed to disturbed flow had significantly reduced inflammation and proliferation, while maintaining intact intercellular junctions. This work reveals fundamental insights into the importance of nanoscale ECM interactions in the maintenance of endothelial function. Importantly, it provides new insight into how ECs respond to opposing cues derived from nanotopography and mechanical shear force, and has strong implications in the design of polymeric conduits and bioengineered tissues. PMID:26670737

  19. Platelet Consumption by Arterial Prostheses: The Effects of Endothelialization and Pharmacologic Inhibition of Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Harker, Laurence A.; Slichter, Sherrill J.; Sauvage, Lester R.

    1977-01-01

    The thrombogenic mechanism of arterial grafts has been studied by determining the relative utilization of platelets, fibrinogen and plasminogen by human arterial prostheses, and by direct examination of arterial grafts in a baboon model. Forty-one survival and turnover measurements of 51Crplatelets, 131I-fibrinogen and 125I-plasminogen in ten patients with aortofemoral knitted Dacron prostheses demonstrated platelet consumption after graft placement (platelet survival 4.2 days ± 0.5 and turnover 68,000 plat/ul/day ±10,000 compared with 8.2 days ± 0.3 and 35,000 plat/ul/day ± 5,000 respectively for control subjects with stable vascular disease, p < 0.01). In vitro platelet function test results were normal. Platelet consumption was interrupted by dipyridamole or a combination of dipyridamole and acetylsalicylic acid, and platelet survival normalized spontaneously during nine months postoperatively. No significantly increased consumption of fibrinogen or plasminogen was found in these patients with arterial grafts. Placement of impervious knitted Dacron velour aortic grafts in baboons reproduced platelet consumption that progressively normalized over six weeks postoperatively. Platelet survival measurements correlated directly with endothelial cell coverage of the graft luminal surface in these animals implying that endothelialization of the graft surface was also occurring postoperatively in patients. ImagesFig. 4.Fig. 5. PMID:411428

  20. Basal neutrophil function in human aging: Implications in endothelial cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Nogueira-Neto, Joes; Cardoso, André S C; Monteiro, Hugo P; Fonseca, Fernando L A; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Junqueira, Virginia B C; Simon, Karin A

    2016-07-01

    Much attention has been drawn to the pro-inflammatory condition that accompanies aging. This study compared parameters from non-stimulated neutrophils, obtained from young (18-30 years old [y.o.]) and elderly (65-80 y.o.) human volunteers. Measured as an inflammatory marker, plasmatic concentration of hs-CRP was found higher in elderly individuals. Non-stimulated neutrophil production of ROS and NO was, respectively, 38 and 29% higher for the aged group. From the adhesion molecules evaluated, only CD11b expression was elevated in neutrophils from the aged group, whereas no differences were found for CD11a, CD18, or CD62. A 69% higher non-stimulated in vitro neutrophil/endothelial cell adhesion was observed for neutrophils isolated from elderly donors. Our results suggest that with aging, neutrophils may be constitutively producing more reactive species in closer proximity to endothelial cells of vessel walls, which may both contribute to vascular damage and reflect a neutrophil intracellular disrupted redox balance, altering neutrophil function in aging. PMID:27109745

  1. Effect of vitamin C on endothelial function of children with chronic renal failure: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Sabri, Mohammad Reza; Tavana, Esfandiar Najafi; Ahmadi, Alireza; Gheissari, Alaleh

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is well established that improvement of endothelial dysfunction (ED) could prevent or delay the occurrence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its related morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this study we investigated whether administration of vitamin C could be effective by improving brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and intima media thickness (IMT), two surrogate markers of ED, in children with CKD or chronic renal failure (CRF). Materials and Methods: In this analytic-experimental study children aged 3-18 years with a diagnosis of CRF and a group of healthy children were enrolled. Vitamin C (250 mg/day) administrated for the two studied groups for 1 month. Endothelial function was evaluated by FMD and IMT measurement using vascular Doppler ultrasonography, before and after trial. Results: In this study 18 patients with CRF and 19 normal children as the control group were studied. At baseline mean of IMT and FMD was not different in the two studied groups (P > 0.05). After vitamin C administration IMT decreased significantly in the two studied groups (P < 0.05). FMD increased in the two studied groups but the difference was significant in the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The findings of this interventional trial have demonstrated that vitamin C could have protective effect on ED of patients with CRF possibly in those with severe form of the disease but for obtaining more conclusive results larger sample size is needed. PMID:26918242

  2. Monitoring of pulmonary endothelial enzyme function: an animal model for a simplified clinically applicable procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Toivonen, H.J.; Makari, N.; Catravas, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a simple and clinically applicable method for the serial monitoring of pulmonary microvascular enzyme function in vivo. This method requires the intravenous injection of trace amounts of a radiolabelled substrate and the collection of a single arterial blood sample. Simultaneous measurement of pulmonary blood flow, (e.g., by dye- or thermo-dilution) and the determination of blood hematocrit are also needed for the calculations. This method was compared to the multiple blood sample indicator dilution method in normal anesthesized rabbits. Both methods gave identical results for the metabolism of the synthetic, hemodynamically inactive tripeptide, /sup 3/H-benzoyl-Phe-Ala-Pro (/sup 3/H-BPAP), by pulmonary microvascular endothelial angiotensin converting enzyme. The parameters measured were: 1) substrate utilization, expressed linearly and logarithmically, and 2) the apparent first order reaction constant. The new method was also used for the simultaneous measurement of single pass, transpulmonary metabolism of /sup 3/H-BPAP by angiotensin converting enzyme and of 5'-adenosine monophosphate by 5'-nucleotidase in rabbits in vivo. The authors propose that similar enzyme kinetic measurements could be used in clinical studies to test their usefulness as an aid in the early diagnosis of incipient pulmonary endothelial dysfunction, e.g., adult respiratory distress syndrome.

  3. [Expression and function of receptors for advanced glycation end products in bovine corneal endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Kaji, Yuichi

    2005-11-01

    Corneal endothelial cell loss is a change that occurs with age, but its mechanism is still unclear. We postulated that interaction between advanced glycation end product(AGE) and its receptors is implicated in the corneal endothelial cell loss with age. We investigated the expression of AGE receptors: receptors for AGE(RAGE) and galectin-3 in bovine corneal endothelial cells by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. In addition, we investigated the effect of AGE on the cultured corneal endothelial cells. Expression of RAGE and galectin-3 was detected in bovine corneal endothelial cells. Galectin-3 was important in the internalization of AGE. In contrast, RAGE was important in the generation of reactive oxygen species and induction of apoptosis. Based on these data, the interaction of AGE in aqueous humor and AGE receptors expressed on the corneal endothelial cells was speculated to have a role in the corneal endothelial cell loss with age. PMID:16363662

  4. Oxidized High-Density Lipoprotein Impairs Endothelial Progenitor Cells' Function by Activation of CD36-MAPK-TSP-1 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianxiang; He, Zhiqing; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Feng; Ding, Ru; Ren, Yusheng; Jiang, Qijun; Fan, Min

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: High-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels inversely correlate with cardiovascular events due to the protective effects on vascular wall and stem cells, which are susceptible to oxidative modifications and then lead to potential pro-atherosclerotic effects. We proposed that oxidized HDL (ox-HDL) might lead to endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) dysfunction and investigated underlying mechanisms. Results: ox-HDL was shown to increase apoptosis and intracellular reactive oxygen species levels, but to reduce migration, angiogenesis, and cholesterol efflux of EPCs in a dose-dependent manner. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF-κB were activated after ox-HDL stimulation, which also upregulated thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) expression without affecting vascular endothelial growth factor. Effects caused by ox-HDL could be significantly attenuated by pretreatment with short hairpin RNA-mediated CD36 knockdown or probucol. Data of in vivo experiments and the inverse correlation of ox-HDL and circulating EPC numbers among patients with coronary artery diseases (CAD) or CAD and type 2 diabetes also supported it. Meanwhile, HDL separated from such patients could significantly increase cultured EPC's caspase 3 activity, further supporting our proposal. Innovation: This is the most complete study to date of how ox-HDL would impair EPCs function, which was involved with activation of CD36-p38 MAPK-TSP-1 pathways and proved by not only the inverse relationship between ox-HDL and circulating EPCs in clinic but also pro-apoptotic effects of HDL separated from patients' serum. Conclusion: Activation of CD36-p38 MAPK-TSP-1 pathways contributes to the pathological effects of ox-HDL on EPCs' dysfunction, which might be one of the potential etiological factors responsible for the disturbed neovascularization in chronic ischemic disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 308–324. PMID:25313537

  5. Effects of α-lipoic acid on endothelial function in aged diabetic and high-fat fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Sena, C M; Nunes, E; Louro, T; Proença, T; Fernandes, R; Boarder, M R; Seiça, R M

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study was conducted to investigate the effects of α-lipoic acid (α-LA) on endothelial function in diabetic and high-fat fed animal models and elucidate the potential mechanism underlying the benefits of α-LA. Experimental approach: Plasma metabolites reflecting glucose and lipid metabolism, endothelial function, urinary albumin excretion (UAE), plasma and aortic malondialdehyde (MDA) and urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were assessed in non-diabetic controls (Wistar rats), untreated Goto-Kakizaki (GK) diabetic and high-fat fed GK rats (fed with atherogenic diet only, treated with α-LA and treated with vehicle, for 3 months). Vascular eNOS, nitrotyrosine, carbonyl groups and superoxide anion were also assessed in the different groups. Key results: α-LA and soybean oil significantly reduced both total and non-HDL serum cholesterol and triglycerides induced by atherogenic diet. MDA, carbonyl groups, vascular superoxide and 8-OHdG levels were higher in GK and high-fat fed GK groups and fully reversed with α-LA treatment. High-fat fed GK diabetic rats showed significantly reduced endothelial function and increased UAE, effects ameliorated with α-LA. This endothelial dysfunction was associated with decreased NO production, decreased expression of eNOS and increased vascular superoxide production and nitrotyrosine expression. Conclusions and implications: α-LA restores endothelial function and significantly improves systemic and local oxidative stress in high-fat fed GK diabetic rats. Improved endothelial function due to α-LA was at least partially attributed to recoupling of eNOS and increased NO bioavailability and represents a pharmacological approach to prevent major complications associated with type 2 diabetes. PMID:17906683

  6. Exercise improves endothelial function: a local analysis of production of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Leonardo Yuji; Bechara, Luiz Roberto Grassmann; dos Santos, Adriana Marques; Jordão, Camila Paixão; de Sousa, Luís Gustavo Oliveira; Bartholomeu, Teresa; Ventura, Laura Inês; Laurindo, Francisco Rafael Martins; Ramires, Paulo Rizzo

    2015-02-15

    This study aimed at investigating the acute effects of aerobic exercise on endothelium-dependent vasomotor function of rat aorta, as well as mechanisms involved in endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity. Wistar rats were assigned to either a resting control (C, n = 21) or acutely exercised (E, n = 21) groups (60 min, 55-60% of maximum speed). After exercise, thoracic aorta was excised and cut into rings. Two rings were promptly applied to evaluate vasomotor function and the rest of aorta was used for additional measurements. Acute exercise significantly improved maximum ACh-induced relaxation (C, 91.6 ± 1.2 vs. E, 102.4 ± 1.7%, p < 0.001) and sensitivity to ACh (C, -7.3 ± 0.06 vs. E, -7.3 ± 0.02 log M, p < 0.01), and was accompanied by significantly increases on serine1177 eNOS phosphorylation, reflecting its enhanced activation. However, acute exercise also enhanced both superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production, as assayed by dihydroethidium oxidation, lucigenin chemiluminescence and Amplex Red assays. We also provided evidence for Nox2 NADPH oxidase (Nox) activation through gp91dstat-mediated inhibition of superoxide signals. Enhanced arterial relaxations associated with acute exercise were nearly-completely prevented by catalase, suggesting a role for paracrine hydrogen peroxide. Despite increased detectable oxidant generation, cellular oxidative stress was not evident, as suggested by unaltered GSH:GSSG ratio and lipid hydroperoxides. Collectively, these results demonstrate that one bout of moderate aerobic exercise improves endothelial function by increasing NO bioavailability, while superoxide and hydrogen peroxide are generated in a controlled fashion. PMID:25619203

  7. Influence of Adjuvant Therapy in Cancer Survivors on Endothelial Function and Skeletal Muscle Deoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Ederer, Austin K; Didier, Kaylin D; Reiter, Landon K; Brown, Michael; Hardy, Rachel; Caldwell, Jacob; Black, Christopher D; Larson, Rebecca D; Ade, Carl J

    2016-01-01

    The cardiotoxic effects of adjuvant cancer treatments (i.e., chemotherapy and radiation treatment) have been well documented, but the effects on peripheral cardiovascular function are still unclear. We hypothesized that cancer survivors i) would have decreased resting endothelial function; and ii) altered muscle deoxygenation response during moderate intensity cycling exercise compared to cancer-free controls. A total of 8 cancer survivors (~70 months post-treatment) and 9 healthy controls completed a brachial artery FMD test, an index of endothelial-dependent dilation, followed by an incremental exercise test up to the ventilatory threshold (VT) on a cycle ergometer during which pulmonary V̇O2 and changes in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-derived microvascular tissue oxygenation (TOI), total hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]total), and muscle deoxygenation ([HHb] ≈ fractional O2 extraction) were measured. There were no significant differences in age, height, weight, and resting blood pressure between cancer survivors and control participants. Brachial artery FMD was similar between groups (P = 0.98). During exercise at the VT, TOI was similar between groups, but [Hb]total and [HHb] were significantly decreased in cancer survivors compared to controls (P < 0.01) The rate of change for TOI (ΔTOIΔ/V̇O2) and [HHb] (Δ[HHb]/ΔV̇O2) relative to ΔV̇O2 were decreased in cancer survivors compared to controls (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03 respectively). In cancer survivors, a decreased skeletal muscle microvascular function was observed during moderate intensity cycling exercise. These data suggest that adjuvant cancer therapies have an effect on the integrated relationship between O2 extraction, V̇O2 and O2 delivery during exercise. PMID:26807572

  8. Influence of Adjuvant Therapy in Cancer Survivors on Endothelial Function and Skeletal Muscle Deoxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Ederer, Austin K.; Didier, Kaylin D.; Reiter, Landon K.; Brown, Michael; Hardy, Rachel; Caldwell, Jacob; Black, Christopher D.; Larson, Rebecca D.; Ade, Carl J.

    2016-01-01

    The cardiotoxic effects of adjuvant cancer treatments (i.e., chemotherapy and radiation treatment) have been well documented, but the effects on peripheral cardiovascular function are still unclear. We hypothesized that cancer survivors i) would have decreased resting endothelial function; and ii) altered muscle deoxygenation response during moderate intensity cycling exercise compared to cancer-free controls. A total of 8 cancer survivors (~70 months post-treatment) and 9 healthy controls completed a brachial artery FMD test, an index of endothelial-dependent dilation, followed by an incremental exercise test up to the ventilatory threshold (VT) on a cycle ergometer during which pulmonary V˙O2 and changes in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-derived microvascular tissue oxygenation (TOI), total hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]total), and muscle deoxygenation ([HHb] ≈ fractional O2 extraction) were measured. There were no significant differences in age, height, weight, and resting blood pressure between cancer survivors and control participants. Brachial artery FMD was similar between groups (P = 0.98). During exercise at the VT, TOI was similar between groups, but [Hb]total and [HHb] were significantly decreased in cancer survivors compared to controls (P < 0.01) The rate of change for TOI (ΔTOIΔ/V˙O2) and [HHb] (Δ[HHb]/ΔV˙O2) relative to ΔV˙O2 were decreased in cancer survivors compared to controls (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03 respectively). In cancer survivors, a decreased skeletal muscle microvascular function was observed during moderate intensity cycling exercise. These data suggest that adjuvant cancer therapies have an effect on the integrated relationship between O2 extraction, V˙O2 and O2 delivery during exercise. PMID:26807572

  9. Vitamin D improves endothelial dysfunction and restores myeloid angiogenic cell function via reduced CXCL-10 expression in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, John A; Haque, Sahena; Williamson, Kate; Ray, David W; Alexander, M Yvonne; Bruce, Ian N

    2016-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have accelerated cardiovascular disease and dysfunctional endothelial repair mechanisms. Myeloid angiogenic cells (MACs), derived from circulating monocytes, augment vascular repair by paracrine secretion of pro-angiogenic factors. We observed that SLE MACs are dysfunctional and secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines. We also found that the vitamin D receptor was transiently expressed during MAC differentiation and that in vitro, calcitriol increased differentiation of monocytes into MACs in both SLE and in a model using the prototypic SLE cytokine, interferon-alpha. The active form of vitamin D (calcitriol) restored the SLE MAC phenotype towards that of healthy subjects with reduced IL-6 secretion, and normalised surface marker expression. Calcitriol also augmented the angiogenic capacity of MACs via the down-regulation of CXCL-10. In SLE patients treated with cholecalciferol for 12 weeks, the improvement in endothelial function correlated with increase in serum 25(OH)D concentrations independently of disease activity. We also show that MACs were able to positively modulate eNOS expression in human endothelial cells in vitro, an effect further enhanced by calcitriol treatment of SLE MACs. The results demonstrate that vitamin D can positively modify endothelial repair mechanisms and thus endothelial function in a population with significant cardiovascular risk. PMID:26930567

  10. Role of Epac1, an Exchange Factor for Rap GTPases, in Endothelial Microtubule Dynamics and Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Seema; Cullere, Xavier; Patel, Sunita; Italiano, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Rap1 GTPase activation by its cAMP responsive nucleotide exchange factor Epac present in endothelial cells increases endothelial cell barrier function with an associated increase in cortical actin. Here, Epac1 was shown to be responsible for these actin changes and to colocalize with microtubules in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Importantly, Epac activation with a cAMP analogue, 8-pCPT-2′O-Me-cAMP resulted in a net increase in the length of microtubules. This did not require cell–cell interactions or Rap GTPase activation, and it was attributed to microtubule growth as assessed by time-lapse microscopy of human umbilical vein endothelial cell expressing fluorophore-linked microtubule plus-end marker end-binding protein 3. An intact microtubule network was required for Epac-mediated changes in cortical actin and barrier enhancement, but it was not required for Rap activation. Finally, Epac activation reversed microtubule-dependent increases in vascular permeability induced by tumor necrosis factor-α and transforming growth factor-β. Thus, Epac can directly promote microtubule growth in endothelial cells. This, together with Rap activation leads to an increase in cortical actin, which has functional significance for vascular permeability. PMID:18172027

  11. Vitamin D improves endothelial dysfunction and restores myeloid angiogenic cell function via reduced CXCL-10 expression in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, John A.; Haque, Sahena; Williamson, Kate; Ray, David W.; Alexander, M. Yvonne; Bruce, Ian N.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have accelerated cardiovascular disease and dysfunctional endothelial repair mechanisms. Myeloid angiogenic cells (MACs), derived from circulating monocytes, augment vascular repair by paracrine secretion of pro-angiogenic factors. We observed that SLE MACs are dysfunctional and secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines. We also found that the vitamin D receptor was transiently expressed during MAC differentiation and that in vitro, calcitriol increased differentiation of monocytes into MACs in both SLE and in a model using the prototypic SLE cytokine, interferon-alpha. The active form of vitamin D (calcitriol) restored the SLE MAC phenotype towards that of healthy subjects with reduced IL-6 secretion, and normalised surface marker expression. Calcitriol also augmented the angiogenic capacity of MACs via the down-regulation of CXCL-10. In SLE patients treated with cholecalciferol for 12 weeks, the improvement in endothelial function correlated with increase in serum 25(OH)D concentrations independently of disease activity. We also show that MACs were able to positively modulate eNOS expression in human endothelial cells in vitro, an effect further enhanced by calcitriol treatment of SLE MACs. The results demonstrate that vitamin D can positively modify endothelial repair mechanisms and thus endothelial function in a population with significant cardiovascular risk. PMID:26930567

  12. Functional and Transcriptional Characterization of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Endothelial Cells for Treatment of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zongjin; Wilson, Kitchener D.; Smith, Bryan; Kraft, Daniel L.; Jia, Fangjun; Huang, Mei; Xie, Xiaoyan; Robbins, Robert C.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Weissman, Irving L.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells (hESC-ECs) has the potential to provide an unlimited source of cells for novel transplantation therapies of ischemic diseases by supporting angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. However, the endothelial differentiation efficiency of the conventional embryoid body (EB) method is low while the 2-dimensional method of co-culturing with mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) require animal product, both of which can limit the future clinical application of hESC-ECs. Moreover, to fully understand the beneficial effects of stem cell therapy, investigators must be able to track the functional biology and physiology of transplanted cells in living subjects over time. Methodology In this study, we developed an extracellular matrix (ECM) culture system for increasing endothelial differentiation and free from contaminating animal cells. We investigated the transcriptional changes that occur during endothelial differentiation of hESCs using whole genome microarray, and compared to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We also showed functional vascular formation by hESC-ECs in a mouse dorsal window model. Moreover, our study is the first so far to transplant hESC-ECs in a myocardial infarction model and monitor cell fate using molecular imaging methods. Conclusion Taken together, we report a more efficient method for derivation of hESC-ECs that express appropriate patterns of endothelial genes, form functional vessels in vivo, and improve cardiac function. These studies suggest that hESC-ECs may provide a novel therapy for ischemic heart disease in the future. PMID:20046878

  13. The impact of tetrahydrobiopterin administration on endothelial function before and after smoking cessation in chronic smokers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Beth A; Zaleski, Amanda L; Dornelas, Ellen A; Thompson, Paul D

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease mortality is reduced following smoking cessation but the reversibility of specific atherogenic risk factors such as endothelial dysfunction is less established. We assessed brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in 57 chronic smokers and 15 healthy controls, alone and after oral tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) administration, to assess the extent to which reduced bioactivity of BH4, a cofactor for the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme (eNOS), contributes to smoking-associated reductions in FMD. Thirty-four smokers then ceased cigarette and nicotine use for 1 week, after which FMD (±BH4 administration) was repeated. Brachial artery FMD was calculated as the peak dilatory response observed relative to baseline (%FMD). Endothelium-independent dilation was assessed by measuring the dilatory response to sublingual nitroglycerin (%NTG). Chronic smokers exhibited reduced %FMD relative to controls: (5.6±3.0% vs. 8.1±3.7%; P<0.01) and %NTG was not different between groups (P=0.22). BH4 administration improved FMD in both groups (P=0.03) independent of smoking status (P=0.78) such that FMD was still lower in smokers relative to controls (6.6±3.3% vs. 9.8±3.2%; P<0.01). With smoking cessation, FMD increased significantly (from 5.0±2.9 to 7.8±3.2%;P<0.01); %NTG was not different (P=0.57) and BH4 administration did not further improve FMD (P=0.33). These findings suggest that the blunted FMD observed in chronic smokers, likely due at least in part to reduced BH4 bioactivity and eNOS uncoupling, can be restored with smoking cessation. Post-cessation BH4 administration does not further improve endothelial function in chronic smokers, unlike the effect observed in nonsmokers, indicating a longer-term impact of chronic smoking on vascular function that is not acutely reversible. PMID:26606877

  14. Lipoproteins as modulators of atherothrombosis: From endothelial function to primary and secondary coagulation.

    PubMed

    Ouweneel, Amber B; Van Eck, Miranda

    2016-07-01

    Atherothrombosis is a complication of atherosclerosis that causes acute cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Circulating lipid levels are highly correlated with atherosclerotic plaque development. In addition, experimental evidence suggests that lipids also directly influence thrombosis and influence the risk and the outcome of acute cardiovascular events. Plasma lipoproteins influence three aspects important to atherothrombosis: endothelial function, platelet aggregation (primary coagulation) and secondary coagulation. Overall, VLDL, LDL and oxLDL promote thrombus formation, whereas HDL shows antithrombotic actions. In this review we will address the current knowledge about modulation of atherothrombosis by lipoproteins, summarizing findings from in vitro and in vivo animal studies, as well as from observational and interventional studies in humans. We will conclude with future perspectives for lipid modulation in the prevention of atherothrombosis. PMID:26545626

  15. Highly active antiretroviral therapy-related mechanisms of endothelial and platelet function alterations.

    PubMed

    Gresele, Paolo; Falcinelli, Emanuela; Momi, Stefania; Francisci, Daniela; Baldelli, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has transformed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection into a chronic condition, which has allowed the infected population to age and become prone to chronic degenerative diseases common to the general population, including atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, and coronary artery disease (CAD). Possible causative mechanisms of HIV-associated CAD are related to classic cardiovascular risk factors, such as dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and fat redistribution, which may be due to either HIV infection or to HAART-associated toxicity. However, other mechanisms are emerging as crucial for the cardiovascular complication of HIV and HAART. This article analyzes the effects of HIV and HAART on endothelial function, endothelium-leukocyte interactions, and platelets as possible mechanisms of enhanced cardiovascular risk. PMID:24987863

  16. Acute exercise improves endothelial function despite increasing vascular resistance during stress in smokers and nonsmokers.

    PubMed

    Rooks, Cherie R; McCully, Kevin K; Dishman, Rod K

    2011-09-01

    The present study examined the effect of acute exercise on flow mediated dilation (FMD) and reactivity to neurovascular challenges among female smokers and nonsmokers. FMD was determined by arterial diameter, velocity, and blood flow measured by Doppler ultrasonography after forearm occlusion. Those measures and blood pressure and heart rate were also assessed in response to forehead cold and the Stroop Color-Word Conflict Test (CWT) before and after 30 min of rest or an acute bout of cycling exercise (∼50% VO₂ peak). Baseline FMD and stress responses were not different between smokers and nonsmokers. Compared to passive rest, exercise increased FMD and decreased arterial velocity and blood flow responses during the Stroop CWT and forehead cold in both groups. Overall, acute exercise improved endothelial function among smokers and nonsmokers despite increasing vascular resistance and reducing limb blood flow during neurovascular stress. PMID:21457274

  17. Acidic Fibroblast Growth Factor Promotes Endothelial Progenitor Cells Function via Akt/FOXO3a Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuqiang; Cao, Qing; Sang, Tiantian; Liu, Fang; Chen, Shuyan

    2015-01-01

    Acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF1) has been suggested to enhance the functional activities of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The Forkhead homeobox type O transcription factors (FOXOs), a key substrate of the survival kinase Akt, play important roles in regulation of various cellular processes. We previously have shown that FOXO3a is the main subtype of FOXOs expressed in EPCs. Here, we aim to determine whether FGF1 promotes EPC function through Akt/FOXO3a pathway. Human peripheral blood derived EPCs were transduced with adenoviral vectors either expressing a non-phosphorylable, constitutively active triple mutant of FOXO3a (Ad-TM-FOXO3a) or a GFP control (Ad-GFP). FGF1 treatment improved functional activities of Ad-GFP transduced EPCs, including cell viability, proliferation, antiapoptosis, migration and tube formation, whereas these beneficial effects disappeared by Akt inhibitor pretreatment. Moreover, EPC function was declined by Ad-TM-FOXO3a transduction and failed to be attenuated even with FGF1 treatment. FGF1 upregulated phosphorylation levels of Akt and FOXO3a in Ad-GFP transduced EPCs, which were repressed by Akt inhibitor pretreatment. However, FGF1 failed to recover Ad-TM-FOXO3a transduced EPCs from dysfunction. These data indicate that FGF1 promoting EPC function is at least in part mediated through Akt/FOXO3a pathway. Our study may provide novel ideas for enhancing EPC angiogenic ability and optimizing EPC transplantation therapy in the future. PMID:26061278

  18. Kidney Function, Endothelial Activation and Atherosclerosis in Black and White Africans with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Dessein, Patrick H.; Hsu, Hon-Chun; Tsang, Linda; Millen, Aletta M. E.; Woodiwiss, Angela J.; Norton, Gavin R.; Solomon, Ahmed; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether kidney function independently relates to endothelial activation and ultrasound determined carotid atherosclerosis in black and white Africans with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods We calculated the Jelliffe, 5 Cockcroft-Gault equations, Salazar-Corcoran, Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) estimated glomerular filtration rate (EGFR) equations in 233 (112 black) RA patients. Results The CKD-EPI eGFR was <90 ml/min/1.73m2 in 49.1% and 30.6% of black and white patients, respectively (odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 2.19 (1.28–3.75), p = 0.004). EGFRs were overall consistently associated with monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and angiopoietin 2 concentrations in white patients, and with carotid intima-media thickness and plaque in black participants. Amongst black patients, plaque prevalence was 36.7% and the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was not associated with plaque presence for the MDRD equation (p = 0.3), whereas the respective relationship was significant or borderline significant (p = 0.003 to 0.08) and of similar extent (p>0.1 for comparisons of AUC (SE)) for the other 8 equations. Based on optimal eGFR cutoff values with sensitivities and specificities ranging from 42 to 60% and 70 to 91% respectively, as determined in ROC curve analysis, a low eGFR increased the odds ratio for plaque 2.2 to 4.0 fold. Conclusion Reduced kidney function is independently associated with atherosclerosis and endothelial activation in black and white Africans with RA, respectively. CKD is highly prevalent in black Africans with RA. Apart from the MDRD, eGFR equations are useful in predicting carotid plaque presence, a coronary heart disease equivalent, amongst black African RA patients. PMID:25806966

  19. Vascular Endothelial Function and Blood Pressure Regulation in Afferent Autonomic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Jelani, Qurat-ul-ain; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a rare hereditary disease characterized by loss of afferent autonomic neural fiber signaling and consequent profound impairment of arterial baroreflex function and blood pressure regulation. Whether vascular endothelial dysfunction contributes to defective vasomotor control in this form of afferent autonomic failure is not known. METHODS We assessed blood pressure response to orthostatic stress and vascular endothelial function with brachial artery reactivity testing in 34 FD subjects with afferent autonomic failure and 34 healthy control subjects. RESULTS Forty-four percent of the afferent autonomic failure subjects had uncontrolled hypertension at supine rest (median systolic blood pressure = 148mm Hg, interquartile range (IQR) = 144–155mm Hg; median diastolic blood pressure = 83mm Hg, IQR = 78–105mm Hg), and 88% had abnormal response to orthostatic stress (median decrease in systolic blood pressure after upright tilt = 48mm Hg, IQR = 29–61mm Hg). Flow-mediated brachial artery reactivity did not differ in subjects with afferent autonomic failure vs. healthy control subjects (median = 6.00%, IQR = 1.86–11.77%; vs. median = 6.27%, IQR = 4.65–9.34%; P = 0.75). In afferent autonomic failure subjects, brachial artery reactivity was not associated with resting blood pressure or the magnitude of orthostatic hypotension but was decreased in association with reduced glomerular filtration rate (r = 0.62; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Brachial artery reactivity was preserved in subjects with afferent autonomic failure despite the presence of marked blood pressure dysregulation. Comorbid renal dysfunction was associated with reduced brachial artery reactivity. PMID:25128693

  20. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of SUT-1, a sulfate transporter from human high endothelial venules

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Jean-Philippe; Baekkevold, Espen S.; Feliu, Jacques; Brandtzaeg, Per; Amalric, François

    1999-01-01

    High endothelial venules (HEV) are specialized postcapillary venules found in lymphoid organs and chronically inflamed tissues that support high levels of lymphocyte extravasation from the blood. One of the major characteristics of HEV endothelial cells (HEVEC) is their capacity to incorporate large amounts of sulfate into sialomucin-type counter-receptors for the lymphocyte homing receptor L-selectin. Here, we show that HEVEC express two functional classes of sulfate transporters defined by their differential sensitivity to the anion-exchanger inhibitor 4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid (DIDS), and we report the molecular characterization of a DIDS-resistant sulfate transporter from human HEVEC, designated SUT-1. SUT-1 belongs to the family of Na+-coupled anion transporters and exhibits 40–50% amino acid identity with the rat renal Na+/sulfate cotransporter, NaSi-1, as well as with the human and rat Na+/dicarboxylate cotransporters, NaDC-1/SDCT1 and NaDC-3/SDCT2. Functional expression studies in cRNA-injected Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that SUT-1 mediates high levels of Na+-dependent sulfate transport, which is resistant to DIDS inhibition. The SUT-1 gene mapped to human chromosome 7q33. Northern blotting analysis revealed that SUT-1 exhibits a highly restricted tissue distribution, with abundant expression in placenta. Reverse transcription–PCR analysis indicated that SUT-1 and the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTD), one of the two known human DIDS-sensitive sulfate transporters, are coexpressed in HEVEC. SUT-1 and DTD could correspond, respectively, to the DIDS-resistant and DIDS-sensitive components of sulfate uptake in HEVEC. Together, these results demonstrate that SUT-1 is a distinct human Na+-coupled sulfate transporter, likely to play a major role in sulfate incorporation in HEV. PMID:10535998

  1. Long-term Successful Weight Loss Improves Vascular Endothelial Function in Severely Obese Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Bigornia, Sherman J.; Mott, Melanie M.; Hess, Donald T.; Apovian, Caroline M.; McDonnell, Marie E.; Duess, Mai-Ann; Kluge, Matthew A.; Fiscale, Antonino J.; Vita, Joseph A.; Gokce, Noyan

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Although short-term weight loss improves vascular endothelial function, longer term outcomes have not been widely investigated. We examined brachial artery endothelium-dependent vasodilation and metabolic parameters in 29 severely obese subjects who lost ≥10% body weight (age 45 ± 13 years; BMI 48 ± 9 kg/m2) at baseline and after 12 months of dietary and/or surgical intervention. We compared these parameters to 14 obese individuals (age 49 ± 11 years; BMI 39 ± 7 kg/m2) who failed to lose weight. For the entire group, mean brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was impaired at 6.7 ± 4.1%. Following sustained weight loss, FMD increased significantly from 6.8 ± 4.2 to 10.0 ± 4.7%, but remained blunted in patients without weight decline from 6.5 ± 4.0 to 5.7 ± 4.1%, P = 0.013 by ANOVA. Endothelium-independent, nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (NMD) was unaltered. BMI fell by 13 ± 7 kg/m2 following successful weight intervention and was associated with reduced total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, glucose, hemoglobin A1c, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP). Vascular improvement correlated most strongly with glucose levels (r = −0.51, P = 0.002) and was independent of weight change. In this cohort of severely obese subjects, sustained weight loss at 1 year improved vascular function and metabolic parameters. The findings suggest that reversal of endothelial dysfunction and restoration of arterial homeostasis could potentially reduce cardiovascular risk. The results also demonstrate that metabolic changes in association with weight loss are stronger determinants of vascular phenotype than degree of weight reduction. PMID:20057371

  2. Coffee polyphenol consumption improves postprandial hyperglycemia associated with impaired vascular endothelial function in healthy male adults.

    PubMed

    Jokura, Hiroko; Watanabe, Isamu; Umeda, Mika; Hase, Tadashi; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that habitual coffee consumption lowers the risk of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Postprandial hyperglycemia is a direct and independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We previously demonstrated that coffee polyphenol ingestion increased secretion of Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), which has been shown to exhibit anti-diabetic and cardiovascular effects. We hypothesized coffee polyphenol consumption may improve postprandial hyperglycemia and vascular endothelial function by increasing GLP-1 release and/or reducing oxidative stress. To examine this hypothesis, we conducted a randomized, acute, crossover, intervention study in healthy male adults, measuring blood parameters and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) after ingestion of a meal with or without coffee polyphenol extract (CPE). Nineteen subjects consumed a test meal with either a placebo- or CPE-containing beverage. Blood biomarkers and FMD were measured at fasting and up to 180 minutes postprandially. The CPE beverage led to a significantly lower peak postprandial increase in blood glucose and diacron-reactive oxygen metabolite, and significantly higher postprandial FMD than the placebo beverage. Postprandial blood GLP-1 increase tended to be higher after ingestion of the CPE beverage, compared with placebo. Subclass analysis revealed that the CPE beverage significantly improved postprandial blood GLP-1 response and reduced blood glucose increase in the subjects with a lower insulinogenic index. Correlation analysis showed postprandial FMD was negatively associated with blood glucose increase after ingestion of the CPE beverage. In conclusion, these results suggest that coffee polyphenol consumption improves postprandial hyperglycemia and vascular endothelial function, which is associated with increased GLP-1 secretion and decreased oxidative stress in healthy humans. PMID:26337017

  3. Acute effects of chlorogenic acids on endothelial function and blood pressure in healthy men and women.

    PubMed

    Ward, Natalie C; Hodgson, Jonathan M; Woodman, Richard J; Zimmermann, Diane; Poquet, Laure; Leveques, Antoine; Actis-Goretta, Lucas; Puddey, Ian B; Croft, Kevin D

    2016-05-18

    Coffee is a rich source of polyphenols, primarily chlorogenic acids (CGA). Certain polyphenols and polyphenol-rich foods and beverages have been shown to improve endothelial function and lower blood pressure (BP). The aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effect of two doses of CGA (5-CGA) on endothelial function and BP. In a cross-over study, 16 healthy men and women received: (i) 0 mg purified 5-CGA (control group); (ii) 450 mg purified 5-CGA; (iii) 900 mg purified 5-CGA; and (iv) 200 mg purified (-)-epicatechin (positive control) in random order one week apart. Peak and continuous mean (60 to 240 s post ischaemia) flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was measured at baseline, 1 h and 4 h. BP was measured at baseline and every 30 min to 4 h. Plasma CGA and epicatechin levels were significantly increased at both 1 h and 4 h post their respective treatments. Peak FMD was not significantly altered by either dose of 5-CGA or the epicatechin, relative to control (p > 0.05). Relative to control, effects on continuous mean FMD response following 450 mg 5-CGA and 900 mg of 5-CGA (0.47 ± 0.16%, p = 0.016 and 0.65 ± 0.16%, p < 0.001, respectively) at 1 h and (0.18 ± 0.17%, p = 0.99 and 0.44 ± 0.16%, p < 0.05, respectively) at 4 h. There was no significant effect of any of the treatments on BP. In conclusion, the present study has found no significant effect of 5-CGA, at 450 and 900 mg, on peak FMD response. However, there were significant improvements in mean post-ischaemic FMD response, particularly at the 1 h time point in this group of healthy individuals. PMID:27109860

  4. Endothelial Angiogenesis and Barrier Function in Response to Thrombin Require Ca2+ Influx through the Na+/Ca2+ Exchanger.

    PubMed

    Andrikopoulos, Petros; Kieswich, Julius; Harwood, Steven M; Baba, Akemichi; Matsuda, Toshio; Barbeau, Olivier; Jones, Keith; Eccles, Suzanne A; Yaqoob, Muhammad M

    2015-07-24

    Thrombin acts on the endothelium by activating protease-activated receptors (PARs). The endothelial thrombin-PAR system becomes deregulated during pathological conditions resulting in loss of barrier function and a pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic endothelial phenotype. We reported recently that the ion transporter Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) operating in the Ca(2+)-influx (reverse) mode promoted ERK1/2 activation and angiogenesis in vascular endothelial growth factor-stimulated primary human vascular endothelial cells. Here, we investigated whether Ca(2+) influx through NCX was involved in ERK1/2 activation, angiogenesis, and endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to thrombin. Reverse-mode NCX inhibitors and RNAi-mediated NCX1 knockdown attenuated ERK1/2 phosphorylation in response to thrombin or an agonist of PAR-1, the main endothelial thrombin receptor. Conversely, promoting reverse-mode NCX by suppressing Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity enhanced ERK1/2 activation. Reverse-mode NCX inhibitors and NCX1 siRNA suppressed thrombin-induced primary human vascular endothelial cell angiogenesis, quantified as proliferation and tubular differentiation. Reverse-mode NCX inhibitors or NCX1 knockdown preserved barrier integrity upon thrombin stimulation in vitro. Moreover, the reverse-mode NCX inhibitor SEA0400 suppressed Evans' blue albumin extravasation to the lung and kidneys and attenuated edema formation and ERK1/2 activation in the lungs of mice challenged with a peptide activator of PAR-1. Mechanistically, thrombin-induced ERK1/2 activation required NADPH oxidase 2-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and reverse-mode NCX inhibitors and NCX1 siRNA suppressed thrombin-induced ROS production. We propose that reverse-mode NCX is a novel mechanism contributing to thrombin-induced angiogenesis and hyperpermeability by mediating ERK1/2 activation in a ROS-dependent manner. Targeting reverse-mode NCX could be beneficial in pathological conditions

  5. The long-term ingestion of a diet high in extra virgin olive oil produces obesity and insulin resistance but protects endothelial function in rats: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been hypothesized that fatty acids derived from a diet high in saturated fat may negatively affect endothelial function more significantly than a diet high in unsaturated fat; nevertheless, the effects of the long-term ingestion of monounsaturated fatty acids on endothelial function have been poorly studied. Methods To examine the chronic effects of monounsaturated (e.g., extra virgin olive oil (EVOO)) or saturated (e.g., margarine (M)) fatty acid-rich diets on the development of insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction in rats, three groups of rats were fed control, high-EVOO or high-M diets for 20 weeks. Body weight, energy consumption, insulin resistance, lipid peroxidation and in vitro vascular reactivity with and without metformin were assessed during the study period. Results Both high-fat diets produced obesity and insulin resistance. EVOO-fed rats showed smaller increases in total cholesterol and arterial lipid peroxidation when compared with M-fed rats. Vascular reactivity to phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside was not modified, but the vasodilating effect of carbachol was especially reduced in the M-fed rats compared with the EVOO-fed or control groups. Metformin addition to the incubation media decreased the vascular response to phenylephrine; decrease that was lower in rats fed with both high fat diets, and increased the carbachol and nitroprusside effects, but the metformin-enhanced response to carbachol was lower in the M group. Conclusions Our results suggest that feeding rats with high quantities of EVOO, despite producing obesity and insulin resistance, produces low levels of circulating cholesterol and arterial lipoperoxidation compared to M fed rats and shows a preserved endothelial response to carbachol, effect that is significantly enhanced by metformin only in rats fed with control and EVOO diets. PMID:24330822

  6. Intake of cooked tomato sauce preserves coronary endothelial function and improves apolipoprotein A-I and apolipoprotein J protein profile in high-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Vilahur, Gemma; Cubedo, Judit; Padró, Teresa; Casaní, Laura; Mendieta, Guiomar; González, Alicia; Badimon, Lina

    2015-07-01

    Intake of tomatoes has been linked with healthy diets (eg, Mediterranean diet). However, it remains unknown whether tomato intake exerts protective effects on the vasculature. The aim of this study was to determine whether medium-term supplementation with cooked tomato sauce (CTS) Mediterranean style (sofrito) attenuates diet-induced coronary endothelial dysfunction in an animal model with clinical impact and explore the mechanisms behind the effects. Pigs (N = 18) were fed a 10-day hypercholesterolemic diet. Half of the animals were given a supplement of 100 g/d of CTS (21.5 mg lycopene per day). Coronary responses to escalating doses of vasoactive drugs (acetylcholine, calcium ionophore, and sodium nitroprusside) and L-NG-monomethylarginine (endothelial nitric oxide synthase [eNOS] inhibitor) were measured using flow Doppler. In the coronary arteries, we investigated eNOS gene expression and activation, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) expression, and oxidative DNA damage. In the circulation, we investigated lipoprotein resistance to oxidation and the differential proteomic protein profile. In dyslipidemic animals, CTS intake prevented diet-induced impairment of receptor-operated and nonreceptor-operated endothelial-dependent coronary vasodilation. These beneficial effects were associated with enhanced eNOS transcription and activation and diminished DNA damage in the coronary arteries. CTS-fed animals showed lower lipid peroxidation, higher high-density lipoprotein (HDL) antioxidant potential and plasma lycopene levels of 0.16 mg/L. Interestingly, improved HDL functionality was associated with protein profile changes in apolipoprotein A-I and apolipoprotein J. Lipids levels and MCP-1 expression were not affected by CTS. We report that CTS intake protects against low-density lipoprotein-induced coronary endothelial dysfunction by reducing oxidative damage, enhancing eNOS expression and activity, and improving HDL functionality. PMID:25514506

  7. Hyperglycemia Does Not Affect Iron Mediated Toxicity of Cultured Endothelial and Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells: Influence of L-Carnosine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiqi; Ntasis, Emmanouil; Kabtni, Sarah; van den Born, Jaap; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Yard, Benito A.; Hauske, Sibylle J.

    2016-01-01

    Iron has been suggested to affect the clinical course of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) as accompanying increased intracellular iron accumulation may provide an alternative source for reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although carnosine has proven its therapeutic efficacy in rodent models of T2DM, little is known about its efficacy to protect cells from iron toxicity. We sought to assess if high glucose (HG) exposure makes cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTECs) more susceptible to metal induced toxicity and if this is ameliorated by L-carnosine. HUVECs and PTECs, cultured under normal glucose (5 mM, NG) or HG (30 mM), were challenged for 24 h with FeCl3. Cell viability was not impaired under HG conditions nor did HG increase susceptibility to FeCl3. HG did not change the expression of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), ferroportin (IREG), and transferrin receptor protein 1 (TFRC). Irrespective of glucose concentrations L-carnosine prevented toxicity in a dose-dependent manner, only if it was present during the FeCl3 challenge. Hence our study indicates that iron induced cytotoxicity is not enhanced under HG conditions. L-Carnosine displayed a strong protective effect, most likely by chelation of iron mediated toxicity. PMID:26788523

  8. Hyperglycemia Does Not Affect Iron Mediated Toxicity of Cultured Endothelial and Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells: Influence of L-Carnosine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiqi; Ntasis, Emmanouil; Kabtni, Sarah; van den Born, Jaap; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan J L; Krämer, Bernhard K; Yard, Benito A; Hauske, Sibylle J

    2016-01-01

    Iron has been suggested to affect the clinical course of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) as accompanying increased intracellular iron accumulation may provide an alternative source for reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although carnosine has proven its therapeutic efficacy in rodent models of T2DM, little is known about its efficacy to protect cells from iron toxicity. We sought to assess if high glucose (HG) exposure makes cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTECs) more susceptible to metal induced toxicity and if this is ameliorated by L-carnosine. HUVECs and PTECs, cultured under normal glucose (5 mM, NG) or HG (30 mM), were challenged for 24 h with FeCl3. Cell viability was not impaired under HG conditions nor did HG increase susceptibility to FeCl3. HG did not change the expression of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), ferroportin (IREG), and transferrin receptor protein 1 (TFRC). Irrespective of glucose concentrations L-carnosine prevented toxicity in a dose-dependent manner, only if it was present during the FeCl3 challenge. Hence our study indicates that iron induced cytotoxicity is not enhanced under HG conditions. L-Carnosine displayed a strong protective effect, most likely by chelation of iron mediated toxicity. PMID:26788523

  9. Different effect of hormone replacement therapy, DHEAS and tibolone on endothelial function in postmenopausal women with increased cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Antonello; Gambacciani, Marco; Vitale, Cristiana; Monteleone, Patrizia; Ciaponi, Massimo; Fini, Massimo; Genazzani, Andrea R; Mercuro, Giuseppe; Rosano, Giuseppe M C

    2005-04-11

    Menopause is associated with an increased cardiovascular risk and with a decrease in endothelial function. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) improves endothelial function in post-menopausal women (PMW) without established atherosclerosis. New alternative treatments, among which tibolone (T) and DHEAS have been suggested to reduce postmenopausal cardiovascular risk. Although, in vitro animal studies have suggested that T and DHEAS improve endothelial function, their effect in humans has never been tested. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of HRT (continuous combined 0.625 mg conjugated equine estrogen plus 2.5 mg/d medoxyprogesterone) DHEAS and T on endothelium-dependent flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD), plasma nitrite, nitrate and endothelin-1 levels in 16 PMW with increased cardiovascular risk in a double-blinded, double-crossover study. Women were randomized and treated for 4 weeks with HRT, T or DHEAS. Brachial artery diameter, FMD, endothelin-1 and plasma nitrite and nitrate levels were measured at baseline and after each treatment phase. Brachial artery diameters remained unchanged after each treatment phase. HRT significantly improved FMD compared to both baseline and to T and DHEAS therapies while no effect of T or DHEAS on FMD was noted. In conclusion, HRT, but neither T nor DHEAS, improves endothelial function and reduces plasma levels of endothelin-1 in PMW at risk of CAD. PMID:15780531

  10. Plasma Biomarkers of Inflammation, Endothelial Function and Hemostasis in Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wiseman, Stewart J; Doubal, Fergus N; Chappell, Francesca M; Valdés-Hernández, Maria C; Wang, Xi; Rumley, An; Lowe, Gordon D.O; Dennis, Martin S; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2015-01-01

    Background The cause of lacunar ischemic stroke, a clinical feature of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), is largely unknown. Inflammation and endothelial dysfunction have been implicated. Plasma biomarkers could provide mechanistic insights but current data are conflicting. White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) are an important imaging biomarker of SVD. It is unknown if plasma biomarkers add predictive capacity beyond age and vascular risk factors in explaining WMH. Methods We prospectively recruited patients presenting with non-disabling ischemic stroke, classifying them clinically and with the help of MRI as lacunar or cortical. We measured biomarkers of inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and hemostasis for >1 month after stroke and compared biomarker levels between stroke subtypes. We quantitatively calculated WMH. We used multiple linear regression analysis to model WMH as a function of age, sex, hypertension and smoking (the baseline model). We fitted exploratory models using plasma biomarkers as predictor variables to assess model improvement over baseline. Results We recruited 125 patients. The lacunar group (n = 65) had lower tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) levels in unadjusted (7.39 vs. 8.59 ng/ml, p = 0.029) and adjusted (p = 0.035) analyses compared with the cortical group (n = 60). There were no significant differences in the other plasma biomarkers. The results for t-PA were consistent with an updated meta-analysis, although the effect remains non-significant (standardized mean difference −0.08 (95% CI −0.25 to 0.09)). The baseline regression model explained 29% of the variance in quantitative WMH (R2 0.289). Inflammatory biomarkers showed minor improvement over baseline (R2 0.291), but the other plasma biomarkers did not improve the baseline model. Conclusion Plasma t-PA levels appear to differ between lacunar and cortical stroke subtypes, late after stroke, independent of age, sex and vascular risk factors and may reflect endothelial

  11. Natakalim improves post-infarction left ventricular remodeling by restoring the coordinated balance between endothelial function and cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong-Min; Zhong, Ming-Li; Zhang, Yan-Fang; Cui, Wen-Yu; Long, Chao-Liang; Wang, Hai

    2014-11-01

    Endothelial dysfunction can lead to congestive heart failure and the activation of endothelial ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels may contribute to endothelial protection. Therefore, the present study was carried out to investigate the hypothesis that natakalim, a novel K(ATP) channel opener, ameliorates post-infarction left ventricular remodeling and failure by correcting endothelial dysfunction. The effects of myocardial infarction were assessed 8 weeks following left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion in male Wistar rats. Depressed blood pressure, cardiac dysfunction, evidence of left ventricular remodeling and congestive heart failure were observed in the rats with myocardial infarction. Treatment with natakalim at daily oral doses of 1, 3 or 9 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks prevented these changes. Natakalim also prevented the progression to cardiac failure, which was demonstrated by the increase in right ventricular weight/body weight (RVW/BW) and relative lung weight, signs of cardiac dysfunction, as well as the overexpression of atrial and brain natriuretic peptide mRNAs. Our results also demonstrated that natakalim enhanced the downregulation of endothelium-derived nitric oxide, attenuated the upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide (NO), inhibited the upregulated endothelin system and corrected the imbalance between prostacyclin and thromboxane A(2). Overall, our findings suggest that natakalim prevents post-infarction hypertrophy and cardiac failure by restoring the coordinated balance between endothelial function and cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:25215478

  12. Pregnancy, programming and preeclampsia: gap junctions at the nexus of pregnancy-induced adaptation of endothelial function and endothelial adaptive failure in PE.

    PubMed

    Bird, I M; Boeldt, D S; Krupp, J; Grummer, M A; Yi, F X; Magness, R R

    2013-09-01

    The challenge of pregnancy to the mother requires that her own metabolic and endocrine needs be met while also taking on the literally growing demands of the unborn child. While all of the mother's organs require continued support, the uterus and now added placenta must also develop substantially. One critical area of adaptation is thus the ability to provide added blood flow over and above that already serving the preexisting maternal organs. Previous reviews have covered in detail how this is achieved from an endocrine or indeed vascular physiology standpoint and we will not repeat that here. Suffice it to say in addition to new vessel growth, there is also the need to achieve reduced vascular resistance through maintenance of endothelial vasodilation, particularly through NO and PGI2 production in response to multiple agonists and their associated cell signaling systems. In this review, we continue our focus on pregnancy adaptive changes at the level of cell signaling, with a particular emphasis now on the developing story of the critical role of gap junctions. Remapping of cell signaling itself beyond changes in individual hormones and respective receptors brings about global changes in cell function, and recent studies have revealed that such post-receptor changes in cell signaling are equally if not more important in the process of pregnancy adaptation of endothelial function than the upregulated expression of vasodilator synthetic pathways themselves. The principle significance, however, of reviewing this aspect of pregnancy adaptation of endothelial cell function is that these same gap junction proteins that mediate pregnancy-adapted changes in vasodilatory signaling function may also be the focal point of failure in diseased pregnancy, and clues as to how and why are given by comparing studies of Cx43 functional suppression at wound sites with studies of preeclamptic pregnancy. If preeclamptic pregnancy is indeed a pregnancy misconstrued by the body in

  13. The association between functional and morphological assessments of endothelial function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). One of the earliest manifestations of CVD is endothelial dysfunction (ED), which can lead to functional and morphological vascular abnormalities. Several non-invasive assessments of vascular function and morphology can be utilised to assess vascular health, but little is known about the association between each of these assessments in patients with RA, and they tend to be used interchangeably in the literature. The objective of the present study was to examine associations between measures of vascular function and morphology in patients with RA. Methods A total of 201 RA patients (155 females, median (25th to 75th percentile) age: 67 (59 to 73)) underwent assessments of microvascular endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent function (laser Doppler imaging with iontophoresis of acetylcholine and sodium-nitroprusside respectively), macrovascular endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent function (flow-mediated dilatation and glyceryl-trinitrate-mediated dilation respectively), and vascular morphology (pulse wave analysis, carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), and carotid plaque). Results Spearman's correlations revealed that from the functional parameters, only macrovascular endothelium-independent function was inversely associated with cIMT (-0.294 (P < 0.001)) after applying the Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. For carotid plaque, t tests showed that macrovascular endothelium-independent function was lower in patients with plaque than without (15.5 ± 8.3 vs. 23.1 ± 9.1%, P = 0.002, respectively). Conclusions With the exception of macrovascular endothelium-independent function, all other measures of vascular function were not associated with vascular morphology. This suggests that different assessments of vascular function and morphology in patients with RA reflect quite distinct mechanisms and phases of the

  14. How cholesterol regulates endothelial biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zhongkui; Staiculescu, Marius C.; Hampel, Paul; Levitan, Irena; Forgacs, Gabor

    2012-01-01

    As endothelial cells form the barrier between blood flow and surrounding tissue, many of their functions depend on mechanical integrity, in particular those of the plasma membrane. As component and organizer of the plasma membrane, cholesterol is a regulator of cellular mechanical properties. Disruption of cholesterol balance leads to impairment of endothelial functions and eventually to disease. The mechanical properties of the membrane are strongly affected by the cytoskeleton. As Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) is a key mediator between the membrane and cytoskeleton, it also affects cellular biomechanical properties. Typically, PIP2 is concentrated in cholesterol-rich microdomains, such as caveolae and lipid rafts, which are particularly abundant in the endothelial plasma membrane. We investigated the connection between cholesterol and PIP2 by extracting membrane tethers from bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) at different cholesterol levels and PIP2 conditions. Our results suggest that in BAEC the role of PIP2, as a mediator of membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion, is regulated by cholesterol. Our findings confirm the specific role of cholesterol in endothelial cells and may have implications for cholesterol-dependent vascular pathologies. PMID:23162471

  15. Molecular and functional characterization of riboflavin specific transport system in rat brain capillary endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mitesh; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2012-01-01

    Riboflavin is an important water soluble vitamin (B2) required for metabolic reactions, normal cellular growth, differentiation and function. Mammalian brain cells cannot synthesize riboflavin and must import from systemic circulation. However, the uptake mechanism, cellular translocation and intracellular trafficking of riboflavin in brain capillary endothelial cells are poorly understood. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the existence of riboflavin-specific transport system and delineate the uptake and intracellular regulation of riboflavin in immortalized rat brain capillary endothelial cells (RBE4). The uptake of [3H]-Riboflavin is sodium, temperature and energy dependent but pH independent. [3H]-Riboflavin uptake is saturable with Km and Vmax values of 19 ± 3 µM and 0.235 ± 0.012 picomoles/min/mg protein, respectively. The uptake process is inhibited by unlabelled structural analogs (lumiflavin, lumichrome) but not by structurally unrelated vitamins. Ca++/calmodulin and protein kinase A (PKA) pathways are found to play an important role in the intracellular regulation of [3H]-Riboflavin. Apical and baso-lateral uptake of [3H]-Riboflavin clearly indicate that riboflavin specific transport system is predominantly localized on the apical side of RBE4 cells. A 628 bp band corresponding to riboflavin transporter is revealed in RT-PCR analysis. These findings, for the first time report the existence of a specialized and high affinity transport system for riboflavin in RBE4 cells. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle limiting drug transport inside the brain as it regulates drug permeation from systemic circulation. This transporter can be utilized for targeted delivery in enhancing brain permeation of highly potent drugs on systemic administration. PMID:22683359

  16. Molecular and functional characterization of riboflavin specific transport system in rat brain capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mitesh; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2012-08-15

    Riboflavin is an important water soluble vitamin (B2) required for metabolic reactions, normal cellular growth, differentiation and function. Mammalian brain cells cannot synthesize riboflavin and must import from systemic circulation. However, the uptake mechanism, cellular translocation and intracellular trafficking of riboflavin in brain capillary endothelial cells are poorly understood. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the existence of a riboflavin-specific transport system and delineate the uptake and intracellular regulation of riboflavin in immortalized rat brain capillary endothelial cells (RBE4). The uptake of [3H]-riboflavin is sodium, temperature and energy dependent but pH independent. [3H]-Riboflavin uptake is saturable with K(m) and V(max) values of 19 ± 3 μM and 0.235 ± 0.012 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively. The uptake process is inhibited by unlabelled structural analogs (lumiflavin, lumichrome) but not by structurally unrelated vitamins. Ca(++)/calmodulin and protein kinase A (PKA) pathways are found to play an important role in the intracellular regulation of [3H]-riboflavin. Apical and baso-lateral uptake of [3H]-riboflavin clearly indicates that a riboflavin specific transport system is predominantly localized on the apical side of RBE4 cells. A 628 bp band corresponding to a riboflavin transporter is revealed in RT-PCR analysis. These findings, for the first time report the existence of a specialized and high affinity transport system for riboflavin in RBE4 cells. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle limiting drug transport inside the brain as it regulates drug permeation from systemic circulation. This transporter can be utilized for targeted delivery in enhancing brain permeation of highly potent drugs on systemic administration. PMID:22683359

  17. Association Between Peripheral Vascular Endothelial Function and Progression of Open-Angle Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Hsiu; Su, Wei-Wen; Shie, Shian-Sen; Cheng, Shih-Tsung; Su, Cheng-Wen; Ho, Wang-Jing

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the relationship between Humphrey visual field progression and peripheral vascular endothelial function in patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG), assessed by noninvasive endothelium-dependent flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD).Forty OAG patients, among which 22 had normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) and 18 had primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) were enrolled. Each enrolled patient underwent a thorough ophthalmological examination including the Humphrey visual field test and measurement of FMD via high-resolution 2-dimensional ultrasonographic imaging of the brachial artery. Blood samples were evaluated for biochemistry and lipid profiles as well as levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). The annual change of threshold sensitivity of the visual field in each test location were analyzed with pointwise linear regression. The correlation between long-term visual field progression and FMD was evaluated.A mean follow-up of 7.47 ± 1.84 years revealed a faster progression rate over the superior visual field in all 40 OAG patients (superior field -0.24 ± 0.67 dB/y, inferior field -0.10 ± 0.59 dB/y, P = 0.37). However, only the annual sensitivity change of the inferior peripheral field showed correlation with baseline FMD. There was no significant difference in the change slope of visual field between NTG and POAG patients.A correlation between baseline brachial artery FMD and visual field progression was observed in the inferior peripheral field in patients with NTG and POAG. This result suggests that peripheral vascular endothelial dysfunction may be related to glaucoma progression. PMID:26962832

  18. CYP1B1 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase combine to sustain proangiogenic functions of endothelial cells under hyperoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yixin; Scheef, Elizabeth A.; Gurel, Zafer; Sorenson, Christine M.; Jefcoate, Colin R.

    2010-01-01

    We have recently shown that deletion of constitutively expressed CYP1B1 is associated with attenuation of retinal endothelial cell (EC) capillary morphogenesis (CM) in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. This was largely caused by increased intracellular oxidative stress and increased production of thrombospondin-2, an endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that endothelium nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression is dramatically decreased in the ECs prepared from retina, lung, heart, and aorta of CYP1B1-deficient (CYP1B1−/−) mice compared with wild-type (CYP1B1+/+) mice. The eNOS expression was also decreased in retinal vasculature of CYP1B1−/− mice. Inhibition of eNOS activity in cultured CYP1B1+/+ retinal ECs blocked CM and was concomitant with increased oxidative stress, like in CYP1B1−/− retinal ECs. In addition, expression of eNOS in CYP1B1−/− retinal ECs or their incubation with a nitric oxide (NO) donor enhanced NO levels, lowered oxidative stress, and improved cell migration and CM. Inhibition of CYP1B1 activity in the CYP1B1+/+ retinal ECs resulted in reduced NO levels and attenuation of CM. In contrast, expression of CYP1B1 increased NO levels and enhanced CM of CYP1B1−/− retinal ECs. Furthermore, attenuation of CYP1B1 expression with small interfering RNA proportionally lowered eNOS expression and NO levels in wild-type cells. Together, our results link CYP1B1 metabolism in retinal ECs with sustained eNOS activity and NO synthesis and/or bioavailability and low oxidative stress and thrombospondin-2 expression. Thus CYP1B1 and eNOS cooperate in different ways to lower oxidative stress and thereby to promote CM in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:20032512

  19. Genetic Variation in Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A and Lung Function

    PubMed Central

    Custovic, Adnan; Tepper, Robert; Graves, Penelope; Stern, Debra A.; Jones, Marcus; Hankinson, Jenny; Curtin, John A.; Wu, Jiakai; Blekic, Mario; Bukvic, Blazenka Kljaic; Aberle, Neda; Marinho, Susana; Belgrave, Danielle; Morgan, Wayne J.; Martinez, Fernando D.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Given the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in lung development, we hypothesized that polymorphisms in VEGF-A may be associated with lung function. Objectives: The current study was designed to assess the role of genetic variants in VEGF-A as determinants of airway function from infancy through early adulthood. Methods: Association between five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in VEGF-A and lung function were assessed longitudinally in two unselected birth cohorts and cross-sectionally among infants. Replication with two SNPs was conducted in adults and children with asthma. We investigated the functionality of the SNP most consistently associated with lung function (rs3025028) using Western blotting to measure the ratio of plasma VEGF-A165b/panVEGF-A165 among homozygotes. Measurements and Main Results: In two populations in infancy, C-allele homozygotes of rs3025028 had significantly higher VmaxFRC, forced expiratory flow50, and forced expiratory flow25–75 compared with other genotype groups. Among preschool children (age 3 yr), C allele of rs3025028 was associated with significantly higher specific airway conductance, with similar findings observed for lung function in school-age children. For FEV1/FVC ratio similar findings were observed among adolescents and young adults (birth cohort), and then replicated in adults and schoolchildren with asthma (cross-sectional studies). For rs3025038, plasma VEGF-A165b/panVEGF-A165 was significantly higher among CC versus GG homozygotes (P ≤ 0.02) at birth, in school-age children, and in adults. Conclusions: We report significant associations between VEGF-A SNP rs3025028 and parameters of airway function measured throughout childhood, with the effect persisting into adulthood. We propose that the mechanism may be mediated through the ratios of active and inhibitory isoforms of VEGF-A165, which may be determined by alternative splicing. PMID:22461367

  20. Endothelial function does not improve with high-intensity continuous exercise training in SHR: implications of eNOS uncoupling.

    PubMed

    Battault, Sylvain; Singh, François; Gayrard, Sandrine; Zoll, Joffrey; Reboul, Cyril; Meyer, Grégory

    2016-02-01

    Exercise training is a well-recognized way to improve vascular endothelial function by increasing nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. However, in hypertensive subjects, unlike low- and moderate-intensity exercise training, the beneficial effects of continuous high-intensity exercise on endothelial function are not clear, and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of high-intensity exercise on vascular function, especially on the NO pathway, in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR). These effects were studied on WKY, sedentary SHR and SHR that exercised at moderate (SHR-MOD) and high intensity (SHR-HI) on a treadmill (1 h per day; 5 days per week for 6 weeks at 55% and 80% of their maximal aerobic velocity, respectively). Endothelial function and specific NO contributions to acetylcholine-mediated relaxation were evaluated by measuring the aortic ring isometric forces. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and phosphorylation (ser1177) were evaluated by western blotting. The total aortic and eNOS-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was assessed using electron paramagnetic resonance in aortic tissue. Although the aortas of SHR-HI had increased eNOS levels without alteration of eNOS phosphorylation, high-intensity exercise had no beneficial effect on endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, unlike moderate exercise. This result was associated with increased eNOS-dependent ROS production in the aortas of SHR-HI. Notably, the use of the recoupling agent BH4 or a thiol-reducing agent blunted eNOS-dependent ROS production in the aortas of SHR-HI. In conclusion, the lack of a positive effect of high-intensity exercise on endothelial function in SHR was mainly explained by redox-dependent eNOS uncoupling, resulting in a switch from NO to O2(-) generation. PMID:26537830

  1. Expression of a functional extracellular calcium-sensing receptor in human aortic endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegelstein, Roy C.; Xiong Yali; He Chaoxia; Hu Qinghua . E-mail: qinghuaa@jhmi.edu

    2006-03-31

    Extracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}) regulates the functions of many cell types through a G protein-coupled [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}-sensing receptor (CaR). Whether the receptor is functionally expressed in vascular endothelial cells is largely unknown. In cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC), RT-PCR yielded the expected 555-bp product corresponding to the CaR, and CaR protein was demonstrated by fluorescence immunostaining and Western blot. RT-PCR also demonstrated the expression in HAEC of alternatively spliced variants of the CaR lacking exon 5. Although stimulation of fura 2-loaded HAEC by several CaR agonists (high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}, neomycin, and gadolinium) failed to increase intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}), the CaR agonist spermine stimulated an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} that was diminished in buffer without Ca{sup 2+} and was abolished after depletion of an intracellular Ca{sup 2+} pool with thapsigargin or after blocking IP{sub 3}- and ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca{sup 2+} release with xestospongin C and with high concentration ryanodine, respectively. Spermine stimulated an increase in DAF-FM fluorescence in HAEC, consistent with NO production. Both the increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and in NO production were reduced or absent in HAEC transfected with siRNA specifically targeted to the CaR. HAEC express a functional CaR that responds to the endogenous polyamine spermine with an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}, primarily due to release of IP{sub 3}- and ryanodine-sensitive intracellular Ca{sup 2+} stores, leading to the production of NO. Expression of alternatively spliced variants of the CaR may result in the absence of a functional response to other known CaR agonists in HAEC.

  2. Renal endothelial function is associated with the anti-proteinuric effect of ACE inhibition in 5/6 nephrectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Vettoretti, Simone; Vavrinec, Peter; Ochodnicky, Peter; Deelman, Leo E; De Zeeuw, Dick; Henning, Rob H; Buikema, Hendrik

    2016-05-01

    In healthy rats, the physiological variation of baseline endothelial function of intrarenal arteries correlates with the severity of renal damage in response to a subsequent specific renal injury. However, whether such a variation in endothelial function may also condition or predict the variable response to angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibiting treatment in these individuals has not been addressed before. To study this, 5/6 nephrectomy was performed to induce renal injury and chronic kidney disease in a group of healthy Wistar rats. At the time of nephrectomy, interlobar arteries were obtained from the extirpated right kidney and studied in vitro for endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine. Six weeks thereafter, treatment with lisinopril was started (n = 11) and continued for 9 wk. Proteinuria (metabolic cages) and systolic blood pressure (SBP; tail cuff) were evaluated weekly, and these were analyzed in relation to renal endothelial function at baseline. 5/6 Nephrectomy induced an increase in SBP and progressive proteinuria. Treatment with lisinopril reduced SBP and slowed proteinuria, albeit to a variable degree among individuals. The acetylcholine-induced renal artery dilation at baseline negatively correlated with lisinopril-induced reduction of proteinuria (r(2) = 0.648, P = 0.003) and with the decrease in SBP (r(2) = 0.592, P = 0.006). Our data suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitor attenuates the progression of renal damage the most in those individuals with decreased basal renal endothelial-mediated vasodilation. PMID:26911850

  3. [Effect of sanatorium treatment on endothelial function in children with primary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Ianina, T Iu

    2014-01-01

    To study the effect of sanatorium treatment (ST) using sodium chloride baths and metabolic drug mildronat on the dynamics of the ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), markers of endothelial function in children with primary arterial hypertension (PAH). ABPM and held defined level of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), endothelin-1 (ET-1) and nitric oxide (NO) in the serum of 114 children with PAH aged 12-17. The positive dynamics of ABPM in all groups, but significantly (P < 0.05) decrease in mean BP was noted in the group with combined ST using sodium chloride baths. When analyzing the level of NO a positive trend (P < 0.01) in the group was using metabolic therapy, but significantly (P < 0.001) pronounced effect was observed when it is combined balneotherapy and metabolic therapy. Analysis of ET-1 and ADMA at ST in conjunction with therapy and metabolic rate of sodium chloride baths there was a significant (P < 0.01) decrease in these parameters in comparison with those before treatment. In children with PAH have been identified violations of the functional activity of the endothelium, which is reflected in increased levels of ET-1, ADMA and reducing NO. Conducting rehabilitation inclusion complex balneotherapy and metabolic therapy helps to reduce average daily blood pressure, normalization of functional activity of the endothelium as a normalization of the synthesis of NO (P < 0.,001), a significant decrease of ET-1 (P < 0.01) and ADMA (P < 0.01). PMID:24908958

  4. Endothelial Cell Death, Angiogenesis, and Microvascular Function after Castration in an Androgen-Dependent Tumor: Role of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rakesh K.; Safabakhsh, Nina; Sckell, Axel; Chen, Yi; Jiang, Ping; Benjamin, Laura; Yuan, Fan; Keshet, Eli

    1998-09-01

    The sequence of events that leads to tumor vessel regression and the functional characteristics of these vessels during hormone--ablation therapy are not known. This is because of the lack of an appropriate animal model and monitoring technology. By using in vivo microscopy and in situ molecular analysis of the androgen-dependent Shionogi carcinoma grown in severe combined immunodeficient mice, we show that castration of these mice leads to tumor regression and a concomitant decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. Androgen withdrawal is known to induce apoptosis in Shionogi tumor cells. Surprisingly, tumor endothelial cells begin to undergo apoptosis before neoplastic cells, and rarefaction of tumor vessels precedes the decrease in tumor size. The regressing vessels begin to exhibit normal phenotype, i.e., lower diameter, tortuosity, vascular permeability, and leukocyte adhesion. Two weeks after castration, a second wave of angiogenesis and tumor growth begins with a concomitant increase in VEGF expression. Because human tumors often relapse following hormone--ablation therapy, our data suggest that these patients may benefit from combined anti-VEGF therapy.

  5. Increased plasma neopterin levels are associated with reduced endothelial function and arterial elasticity in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y-Y; Tong, X-Z; Xia, W-H; Xie, W-L; Yu, B-B; Zhang, B; Chen, L; Tao, J

    2016-07-01

    Inflammation has been shown to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis and development of hypertensive vascular injury. Neopterin is a novel marker of immune activation produced mainly by activated macrophages. Few data are available to show the association between neopterin and vascular function in hypertension. The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between neopterin levels related to arterial stiffness and endothelial function in patients with hypertension, and their changes after blood pressure-lowering treatment. Twenty-four hypertensive patients and 30 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers were recruited. Plasma neopterin levels were higher in hypertensive patients compared with their counterparts (log-neopterin: 0.77±0.18 versus 0.61±0.16, P=0.003). Increased neopterin levels were correlated with increased brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV; control: r=0.659, P<0.001; hypertension: r=0.487, P=0.021), and inversely associated with impaired brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD; control: r=-0.735, P<0.001; hypertension: r=-0.557, P=0.005). Fifteen hypertensives received 3 months of standard antihypertensive treatment. Three months later, their plasma neopterin levels decreased (log-neopterin: 0.63±0.17 versus 0.50±0.19, P=0.001), whereas arterial elasticity (baPWV: 1764±101 versus 1685±96 cm s(-1), P=0.272) and endothelial function (FMD: 5.92±1.43% versus 7.73±1.31%, P<0.05) were improved. The decline in neopterin levels was linearly correlated with baPWV decrease (r=0.800, P<0.001), FMD improvement (r=0.670, P=0.006) and blood pressure reduction (r=0.548, P=0.042). Our present study demonstrated for the first time that neopterin is closely correlated with vascular dysfunctions, and measurement of plasma neopterin levels might be used as a surrogate biomarker for the clinical evaluation of vascular damage and risk stratification of future atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in patients with hypertension. PMID

  6. The Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Linagliptin Preserves Endothelial Function in Mesenteric Arteries from Type 1 Diabetic Rats without Decreasing Plasma Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Salheen, Salheen M.; Panchapakesan, Usha; Pollock, Carol A.; Woodman, Owen L.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of the DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin on the mechanism(s) of endothelium-dependent relaxation in mesenteric arteries from STZ-induced diabetic rats. Both normal and diabetic animals received linagliptin (2 mg/kg) daily by oral gavage for a period of 4 weeks. To measure superoxide generation in mesenteric arteries, lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence was used. ACh-induced relaxation of mesenteric arteries was assessed using organ bath techniques and Western blotting was used to investigate protein expression. Pharmacological tools (1μM TRAM-34, 1μM apamin, 100 nM Ibtx, 100 μM L-NNA, 10 μM ODQ) were used to distinguish between NO and EDH-mediated relaxation. Linagliptin did not affect plasma glucose, but did decrease vascular superoxide levels. Diabetes reduced responses to ACh but did not affect endothelium-independent responses to SNP. Linagliptin improved endothelial function indicated by a significant increase in responses to ACh. Diabetes impaired the contribution of both nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH) to endothelium-dependent relaxation and linagliptin treatment significantly enhanced the contribution of both relaxing factors. Western blotting demonstrated that diabetes also increased expression of Nox2 and decreased expression and dimerization of endothelial NO synthase, effects that were reversed by linagliptin. These findings demonstrate treatment of type 1 diabetic rats with linagliptin significantly reduced vascular superoxide levels and preserved both NO and EDH-mediated relaxation indicating that linagliptin can improve endothelial function in diabetes independently of any glucose lowering activity. PMID:26618855

  7. Functions of Müller cell-derived vascular endothelial growth factor in diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan-Juan; Zhu, Meili; Le, Yun-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Müller cells are macroglia and play many essential roles as supporting cells in the retina. To respond to pathological changes in diabetic retinopathy (DR), a major complication in the eye of diabetic patients, retinal Müller glia produce a high level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF or VEGF-A). As VEGF is expressed by multiple retinal cell-types and Müller glia comprise only a small portion of cells in the retina, it has been a great challenge to reveal the function of VEGF or other globally expressed proteins produced by Müller cells. With the development of conditional gene targeting tools, it is now possible to dissect the function of Müller cell-derived VEGF in vivo. By using conditional gene targeting approach, we demonstrate that Müller glia are a major source of retinal VEGF in diabetic mice and Müller cell-derived VEGF plays a significant role in the alteration of protein expression and peroxynitration, which leads to retinal inflammation, neovascularization, vascular leakage, and vascular lesion, key pathological changes in DR. Therefore, Müller glia are a potential cellular target for the treatment of DR, a leading cause of blindness. PMID:26069721

  8. Protein phosphatase 2A activity is required for functional adherent junctions in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kása, Anita; Czikora, István; Verin, Alexander D; Gergely, Pál; Csortos, Csilla

    2013-09-01

    Reversible Ser/Thr phosphorylation of cytoskeletal and adherent junction (AJ) proteins has a critical role in the regulation of endothelial cell (EC) barrier function. We have demonstrated earlier that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity is important in EC barrier integrity. In the present work, macro- and microvascular EC were examined and we provided further evidence on the significance of PP2A in the maintenance of EC cytoskeleton and barrier function with special focus on the Bα (regulatory) subunit of PP2A. Immunofluorescent staining revealed that the inhibition of PP2A results in changes in the organization of EC cytoskeleton as microtubule dissolution and actin re-arrangement were detected. Depletion of Bα regulatory subunit of PP2A had similar effect on the cytoskeleton structure of the cells. Furthermore, transendothelial electric resistance measurements demonstrated significantly slower barrier recovery of Bα depleted EC after thrombin treatment. AJ proteins, VE-cadherin and β-catenin, were detected along with Bα in pull-down assay. Also, the inhibition of PP2A (by okadaic acid or fostriecin) or depletion of Bα caused β-catenin translocation from the membrane to the cytoplasm in parallel with its phosphorylation on Ser552. In conclusion, our data suggest that the A/Bα/C holoenzyme form of PP2A is essential in EC barrier integrity both in micro- and macrovascular EC. PMID:23721711

  9. Regulation of the endothelial barrier function: a filum granum of cellular forces, Rho-GTPase signaling and microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Amado-Azevedo, Joana; Valent, Erik T; Van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P

    2014-03-01

    Although the endothelium is an extremely thin single-cell layer, it performs exceedingly well in preventing blood fluids from leaking into the surrounding tissues. However, specific pathological conditions can affect this cell layer, compromising the integrity of the barrier. Vascular leakage is a hallmark of many cardiovascular diseases and despite its medical importance, no specialized therapies are available to prevent it or reduce it. Small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) of the Rho family are known to be key regulators of various aspects of cell behavior and studies have shown that they can exert both positive and negative effects on endothelial barrier integrity. Moreover, extracellular matrix stiffness has now been implicated in the regulation of Rho-GTPase signaling, which has a direct impact on the integrity of endothelial junctions. However, knowledge about both the precise mechanism of this regulation and the individual contribution of the specific regulatory proteins remains fragmentary. In this review, we discuss recent findings concerning the balanced activities of Rho-GTPases and, in particular, aspects of the regulation of the endothelial barrier. We highlight the role of Rho-GTPases in the intimate relationships between biomechanical forces, microenvironmental influences and endothelial intercellular junctions, which are all interwoven in a beautiful filigree-like fashion. PMID:24633925

  10. Serum From Advanced Heart Failure Patients Promotes Angiogenic Sprouting and Affects the Notch Pathway in Human Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Pannella, Micaela; Caliceti, Cristiana; Fortini, Francesca; Aquila, Giorgio; Vieceli Dalla Sega, Francesco; Pannuti, Antonio; Fortini, Cinzia; Morelli, Marco Bruno; Fucili, Alessandro; Francolini, Gloria; Voltan, Rebecca; Secchiero, Paola; Dinelli, Giovanni; Leoncini, Emanuela; Ferracin, Manuela; Hrelia, Silvana; Miele, Lucio; Rizzo, Paola

    2016-12-01

    It is unknown whether components present in heart failure (HF) patients' serum provide an angiogenic stimulus. We sought to determine whether serum from HF patients affects angiogenesis and its major modulator, the Notch pathway, in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In cells treated with serum from healthy subjects or from patients at different HF stage we determined: (1) Sprouting angiogenesis, by measuring cells network (closed tubes) in collagen gel. (2) Protein levels of Notch receptors 1, 2, 4, and ligands Jagged1, Delta-like4. We found a higher number of closed tubes in HUVECs treated with advanced HF patients serum in comparison with cells treated with serum from mild HF patients or controls. Furthermore, as indicated by the reduction of the active form of Notch4 (N4IC) and of Jagged1, advanced HF patients serum inhibited Notch signalling in HUVECs in comparison with mild HF patients' serum and controls. The circulating levels of NT-proBNP (N-terminal of the pro-hormone brain natriuretic peptide), a marker for the detection and evalutation of HF, were positively correlated with the number of closed tubes (r = 0.485) and negatively with Notch4IC and Jagged1 levels in sera-treated cells (r = -0.526 and r = -0.604, respectively). In conclusion, we found that sera from advanced HF patients promote sprouting angiogenesis and dysregulate Notch signaling in HUVECs. Our study provides in vitro evidence of an angiogenic stimulus arising during HF progression and suggests a role for the Notch pathway in it. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2700-2710, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26987674

  11. Nucleoside transporter subtype expression and function in rat skeletal muscle microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Archer, Richard G E; Pitelka, Václav; Hammond, James R

    2004-09-01

    1. Microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) form a barrier between circulating metabolites, such as adenosine, and the surrounding tissue. We hypothesize that MVECs have a high capacity for the accumulation of nucleosides, such that inhibition of the endothelial nucleoside transporters (NT) would profoundly affect the actions of adenosine in the microvasculature. 2. We assessed the binding of [(3)H]nitrobenzylmercaptopurine riboside (NBMPR), a specific probe for the inhibitor-sensitive subtype of equilibrative NT (es), and the uptake of [(3)H]formycin B (FB), by MVECs isolated from rat skeletal muscle. The cellular expression of equilibrative (ENT1, ENT2, ENT3) and concentrative (CNT1, CNT2, CNT3) NT subtypes was also determined using both qualitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction techniques. 3. In the absence of Na(+), MVECs accumulated [(3)H]FB with a V(max) of 21+/-1 pmol microl(-1) s(-1). This uptake was mediated equally by es (K(m) 260+/-70 microm) and ei (equilibrative inhibitor-insensitive; K(m) 130+/-20 microm) NTs. 4. A minor component of Na(+)-dependent cif (concentrative inhibitor-insensitive FB transporter)/CNT2-mediated [(3)H]FB uptake (V(i) 0.008+/-0.005 pmol microl(-1) s(-1) at 10 microm) was also observed at room temperature upon inhibition of ENTs with dipyridamole (2,6-bis(diethanolamino)-4,8-dipiperidinopyrimido-[5,4-d]pyrimidine)/NBMPR. 5. MVECs had 122,000 high-affinity (K(d) 0.10 nm) [(3)H]NBMPR binding sites (representing es transporters) per cell. A lower-affinity [(3)H]NBMPR binding component (K(d) 4.8 nm) was also observed that may be related to intracellular es-like proteins. 6. Rat skeletal muscle MVECs express es/ENT1, ei/ENT2, and cif/CNT2 transporters with characteristics typical of rat tissues. This primary cell culture model will enable future studies on factors influencing NT subtype expression, and the consequent effect on adenosine bioactivity, in the microvasculature. PMID:15289294

  12. Nucleoside transporter subtype expression and function in rat skeletal muscle microvascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Richard G E; Pitelka, Václav; Hammond, James R

    2004-01-01

    Microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) form a barrier between circulating metabolites, such as adenosine, and the surrounding tissue. We hypothesize that MVECs have a high capacity for the accumulation of nucleosides, such that inhibition of the endothelial nucleoside transporters (NT) would profoundly affect the actions of adenosine in the microvasculature. We assessed the binding of [3H]nitrobenzylmercaptopurine riboside (NBMPR), a specific probe for the inhibitor-sensitive subtype of equilibrative NT (es), and the uptake of [3H]formycin B (FB), by MVECs isolated from rat skeletal muscle. The cellular expression of equilibrative (ENT1, ENT2, ENT3) and concentrative (CNT1, CNT2, CNT3) NT subtypes was also determined using both qualitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction techniques. In the absence of Na+, MVECs accumulated [3H]FB with a Vmax of 21±1 pmol μl−1 s−1. This uptake was mediated equally by es (Km 260±70 μM) and ei (equilibrative inhibitor-insensitive; Km 130±20 μM) NTs. A minor component of Na+-dependent cif (concentrative inhibitor-insensitive FB transporter)/CNT2-mediated [3H]FB uptake (Vi 0.008±0.005 pmol μl−1 s−1 at 10 μM) was also observed at room temperature upon inhibition of ENTs with dipyridamole (2,6-bis(diethanolamino)-4,8-dipiperidinopyrimido-[5,4-d]pyrimidine)/NBMPR. MVECs had 122,000 high-affinity (Kd 0.10 nM) [3H]NBMPR binding sites (representing es transporters) per cell. A lower-affinity [3H]NBMPR binding component (Kd 4.8 nM) was also observed that may be related to intracellular es-like proteins. Rat skeletal muscle MVECs express es/ENT1, ei/ENT2, and cif/CNT2 transporters with characteristics typical of rat tissues. This primary cell culture model will enable future studies on factors influencing NT subtype expression, and the consequent effect on adenosine bioactivity, in the microvasculature. PMID:15289294

  13. Molecular mechanisms associated with diabetic endothelial-erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Castela, Ângela; Costa, Carla

    2016-05-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common complication of diabetes, affecting up to 75% of all diabetic men. Although the aetiology of diabetic ED is multifactorial, endothelial dysfunction is recognized as a mainstay in the pathophysiology of the disease. Endothelial dysfunction is induced by the detrimental actions of high glucose levels and increased oxidative stress on endothelial cells that make up the vascular lining. Besides directly injuring the endothelium, diabetes might also hamper vascular repair mechanisms of angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. These states exacerbate and maintain endothelial dysfunction, impairing vasorelaxation events and cavernosal blood perfusion, which are crucial for normal erectile function. PMID:26878803

  14. Changes of Number and Function of Late Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Peripheral Blood of COPD Patients Combined with Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei; Zhang, Hongmei; Liu, Jianxin; Sheng, Chunfeng; Zhang, Linlin; Zeng, Yanjun

    2016-06-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the changes of number and function of late endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in peripheral blood of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients combined with pulmonary hypertension. Subjects and Methods The study enrolled 120 cases including 40 non-COPD and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patients (non-COPD group), 40 COPD non-PAH patients (COPD group), and 40 COPD patients combined with PAH (COPD + PAH group). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were separated by density gradient centrifugation, cultured for 21 days, and then identified as late endothelial progenitor cells. The cell colonies were counted. MTT assay, modified Boyden chamber assay, and human fibronectin plates were used to measure the proliferation, migration, and adhesion functions of the late endothelial progenitor cells, respectively. Results Compared with non-COPD and COPD groups, the number of peripheral blood late EPCs in COPD + PAH group was significantly reduced, and the proliferation, adhesion, and migration capacities were significantly lowered; the differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). The number and function of late EPCs decreased with the increase of pulmonary artery pressure (p < 0.05). Conclusion The number of late EPCs in COPD patients combined with pulmonary hypertension was reduced, which implies the impaired cell functions. The changes of number and function were negatively correlated with the severity of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25226359

  15. Functional Imaging of Working Memory and Peripheral Endothelial Function in Middle-Aged Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Mitzi M.; Tarumi, Takashi; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Sugawara, Jun; Swann-Sternberg, Tali; Goudarzi, Katayoon; Haley, Andreana P.

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined the relationship between a prognostic indicator of vascular health, flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and working memory-related brain activation in healthy middle-aged adults. Forty-two participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while completing a 2-Back working memory task. Brachial artery…

  16. Impact of circulating esterified eicosanoids and other oxylipins on endothelial function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eicosanoids including epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic (HETEs) and other oxylipins derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids have emerging roles in endothelial inflammation and its atherosclerotic consequences. Unlike many eicosanoids, they are known to be esterified in c...

  17. Social functioning and age across affective and non-affective psychoses

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Elizabeth A.; Öngür, Dost; Cohen, Bruce M.; Lewandowski, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Both non-affective and affective psychoses are associated with deficits in social functioning across the course of the illness. However, it is not clear how social functioning varies among diagnostic groups as a function of age. The current study examined the relationship between social functioning and age in schizophrenia (SZ), schizoaffective disorder (SZA), and psychotic bipolar disorder (PBD). We found that individuals with PBD had the highest functioning while individuals with SZ had the poorest. The functioning of individuals with SZA fell in between the other groups. We also found that older ages were associated with poorer functioning. Although there was not a significant diagnostic group by age interaction, visual inspection of our data suggests a subtly steeper trajectory of decline in PBD. These results indicate that a decline in social functioning with may be an important area of unmet need in treatment across psychotic disorders. PMID:25503785

  18. ZLM-7 exhibits anti-angiogenic effects via impaired endothelial cell function and blockade of VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Su, Min; Huang, Jingjia; Li, Jijia; Qin, Xiyuan; Tang, Xiaoning; Jin, Fang; Chen, Shali; Jiang, Chuanming; Zou, Zizheng; Peng, Kunjian; Nuruzzaman, Mohammed; Zhang, Jianting; Luo, Junli; Liu, Suyou; Luo, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of angiogenesis is a promising therapeutic strategy against cancer. In this study, we reported that ZLM-7, a combretastain A-4 (CA-4) derivative, exhibited anti-angiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, ZLM-7 induced microtubule cytoskeletal disassembly. It decreased VEGF-induced proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation in endothelial cells, which are critical steps in angiogenesis. In vivo, ZLM-7 significantly inhibited neovascularization in a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model and reduced the microvessel density in tumor tissues of MCF-7 xenograft mouse model. ZLM-7 also displayed comparable antiangiogenic and anti-tumor activities associated with the lead compound CA-4, but exhibited lower toxicity compared with CA-4. The anti-angiogenic effect of ZLM-7 was exerted via blockade of VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling. ZLM-7 treatment suppressed the expression and secretion of VEGF in endothelial cells and MCF-7 cells under hypoxia. Further, ZLM-7 suppressed the VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR-2 and its downstream signaling mediators including activated AKT, MEK and ERK in endothelial cells. Overall, these results demonstrate that ZLM-7 exhibits anti-angiogenic activities by impairing endothelial cell function and blocking VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling, suggesting that ZLM-7 might be a potential angiogenesis inhibitor. PMID:26967559

  19. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3-dependent microvascular endothelial cell barrier function is disrupted under septic conditions.

    PubMed

    Arpino, Valerie; Mehta, Sanjay; Wang, Lefeng; Bird, Ryan; Rohan, Marta; Pape, Cynthia; Gill, Sean E

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis is associated with dysfunction of microvascular endothelial cells (MVEC) leading to tissue edema and multiple organ dysfunction. Metalloproteinases can regulate MVEC function through processing of cell surface proteins, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3 (TIMP3) regulates metalloproteinase activity in the lung following injury. We hypothesize that TIMP3 promotes normal pulmonary MVEC barrier function through inhibition of metalloproteinase activity. Naive Timp3(-/-) mice had significantly higher basal pulmonary microvascular Evans blue (EB) dye-labeled albumin leak vs. wild-type (WT) mice. Additionally, cecal-ligation/perforation (CLP)-induced sepsis significantly increased pulmonary microvascular EB-labeled albumin leak in WT but not Timp3(-/-) mice. Similarly, PBS-treated isolated MVEC monolayers from Timp3(-/-) mice displayed permeability barrier dysfunction vs. WT MVEC, evidenced by lower transendothelial electrical resistance and greater trans-MVEC flux of fluorescein-dextran and EB-albumin. Cytomix (equimolar interferon γ, tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 1β) treatment of WT MVEC induced significant barrier dysfunction (by all three methods), and was associated with a time-dependent decrease in TIMP3 mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, basal Timp3(-/-) MVEC barrier dysfunction was associated with disrupted MVEC surface VE-cadherin localization, and both barrier dysfunction and VE-cadherin localization were rescued by treatment with GM6001, a synthetic metalloproteinase inhibitor. TIMP3 promotes normal MVEC barrier function, at least partially, through inhibition of metalloproteinase-dependent disruption of adherens junctions, and septic downregulation of TIMP3 may contribute to septic MVEC barrier dysfunction. PMID:26993226

  20. Genetic and structure-function studies of missense mutations in human endothelial lipase.

    PubMed

    Razzaghi, Hamid; Tempczyk-Russell, Anna; Haubold, Kurt; Santorico, Stephanie A; Shokati, Touraj; Christians, Uwe; Churchill, Mair E A

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) plays a pivotal role in HDL metabolism. We sought to characterize EL and its interaction with HDL as well as its natural variants genetically, functionally and structurally. We screened our biethnic population sample (n = 802) for selected missense mutations (n = 5) and identified T111I as the only common variant. Multiple linear regression analyses in Hispanic subjects revealed an unexpected association between T111I and elevated LDL-C (p-value = 0.012) and total cholesterol (p-value = 0.004). We examined lipase activity of selected missense mutants (n = 10) and found different impacts on EL function, ranging from normal to complete loss of activity. EL-HDL lipidomic analyses indicated that EL has a defined remodeling of HDL without exhaustion of the substrate and a distinct and preference for several fatty acids that are lipid mediators and known for their potent pro- and anti-inflammatory properties. Structural studies using homology modeling revealed a novel α/β motif in the C-domain, unique to EL. The EL dimer was found to have the flexibility to expand and to bind various sizes of HDL particles. The likely impact of the all known missense mutations (n = 18) on the structure of EL was examined using molecular modeling and the impact they may have on EL lipase activity using a novel structure-function slope based on their structural free energy differences. The results of this multidisciplinary approach delineated the impact of EL and its variants on HDL. Moreover, the results suggested EL to have the capacity to modulate vascular health through its role in fatty acid-based signaling pathways. PMID:23536757

  1. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Prevents Apoptosis and Preserves Contractile Function in Hypertrophied Infant Heart

    PubMed Central

    Friehs, Ingeborg; Barillas, Rodrigo; Vasilyev, Nikolay V.; Roy, Nathalie; McGowan, Francis X.; del Nido, Pedro J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cardiac hypertrophy is an adaptive response to increased workload that, if unrelieved, leads to heart failure. It has been reported that cardiomyocyte apoptosis contributes to failure, and that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) treatment of hypertrophied myocardium increases capillary density and improves myocardial perfusion. In this study we hypothesized that VEGF treatment reduces cardiomyocyte apoptosis and thereby preserves myocardial contractile function. Methods and Results Newborn rabbits underwent aortic banding. At 4 and 6 weeks of age, hypertrophied animals were treated with intrapericardial administration of recombinant VEGF protein. Three groups of animals were investigated: age-matched controls (C), untreated hypertrophied (H), and VEGF-treated hypertrophied hearts (T). Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was determined by TUNEL staining and PARP cleavage (immunoblotting of nuclear extracts) and cardiac function by transthoracic echocardiography. Death attributable to severe heart failure occurred in 14 of 43 untreated and 2 of 29 VEGF-treated animals (P<0.01). TUNEL-positive cardiomyocyte nuclei (n/1000 nuclei) were significantly increased in untreated hearts at 5 weeks (H: 10±1.8 versus T: 3±0.7) and at 7 weeks (H: 13±3.6 versus T: 5±1.5; P<0.05). Increased apoptosis in untreated hypertrophy was also confirmed by the presence of PARP cleavage (H: 74±7 versus T: 41±4 arbitrary densitometry units; P<0.05). VEGF treatment preserved left ventricular mass, prevented dilation (T: 1.01±0.06 versus H: 0.77±0.07; P<0.05), and preserved contractility indices compared with untreated hearts. Conclusions Lack of adaptive capillary growth impairs myocardial perfusion and substrate delivery in hypertrophying myocardium. VEGF treatment reduces myocardial apoptosis and prolongs survival in a model of severe progressive left ventricular hypertrophy. Promoting capillary growth with VEGF reduces apoptosis, preserves myocardial contractile function, and

  2. Functional Mineralocorticoid Receptors in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells Regulate ICAM-1 Expression and Promote Leukocyte Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Caprio, Massimiliano; Newfell, Brenna G.; la Sala, Andrea; Baur, Wendy; Fabbri, Andrea; Rosano, Giuseppe; Mendelsohn, Michael E.; Jaffe, Iris Z.

    2008-01-01

    In clinical trials, aldosterone antagonists decrease cardiovascular mortality and ischemia by unknown mechanisms. The steroid hormone aldosterone acts by binding to the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), a ligand-activated transcription factor. In humans, aldosterone causes MR-dependent endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction and in animal models, aldosterone increases vascular macrophage infiltration and atherosclerosis. MR antagonists inhibit these effects without changing blood pressure, suggesting a direct role for vascular MR in EC function and atherosclerosis. Whether human vascular EC express functional MR is not known. Here we show that human coronary artery and aortic EC express MR mRNA and protein and that EC MR mediates aldosterone-dependent gene transcription. Human EC also express the enzyme 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2(11βHSD2) and inhibition of 11βHSD2 in aortic EC enhances gene transactivation by cortisol, supporting that EC 11βHSD2 is functional. Furthermore, aldosterone stimulates transcription of the proatherogenic leukocyte-EC adhesion molecule Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1(ICAM1) gene and protein expression on human coronary artery EC, an effect inhibited by the MR antagonist spironolactone and by MR knock-down with siRNA. Cell adhesion assays demonstrate that aldosterone promotes leukocyte-EC adhesion, an effect that is inhibited by spironolactone and ICAM1 blocking antibody, supporting that aldosterone induction of EC ICAM1 surface expression via MR mediates leukocyte-EC adhesion. These data show that aldosterone activates endogenous EC MR and proatherogenic gene expression in clinically important human EC. These studies describe a novel mechanism by which aldosterone may influence ischemic cardiovascular events and support a new explanation for the decrease in ischemic events in patients treated with aldosterone antagonists. PMID:18467630

  3. Effects of Storage-Aged RBC Transfusions on Endothelial Function in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Robert; Hayek, Salim; Rahman, Ayaz; Poole, Joseph C.; Menon, Vivek; Sher, Salman; Newman, James L.; Karatela, Sulaiman; Polhemus, David; Lefer, David J.; De Staercke, Christine; Hooper, Craig; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Roback, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical and animal studies indicate that transfusions of older stored RBCs impair clinical outcomes as compared to fresh RBC transfusions. It has been suggested that this effect is due to inhibition of NO-mediated vasodilation following transfusion of older RBC units. However, to date this effect has not been identified in human transfusion recipients. Study Design and Methods Forty-three hospitalized patients with transfusion orders were randomized to receive either fresh (< 14 days) or older stored (> 21 days) RBC units. Prior to transfusion, and at selected time points after the start of transfusion, endothelial function was assessed using non-invasive flow-mediated dilation assays. Results Following transfusion of older RBC units, there was a significant reduction in NO-mediated vasodilation at 24 hours after transfusion (p=0.045), while fresh RBC transfusions had no effect (p=0.231). Conclusions The present study suggests for the first time a significant inhibitory effect of transfused RBC units stored > 21 days on NO-mediated vasodilation in anemic hospitalized patients. This finding lends further support to the hypothesis that deranged NO signaling mediates adverse clinical effects of older RBC transfusions. Future investigations will be necessary to address possible confounding factors and confirm these results. PMID:25393772

  4. VEGF-functionalized dextran has longer intracellular bioactivity than VEGF in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Maia, João; Vazão, Helena; Pedroso, Dora C S; Jesus, Catarina S H; Brito, Rui M M; Grãos, Mário; Gil, Maria H; Ferreira, Lino

    2012-09-10

    Herein, we report that VEGF-functionalized dextran (dexOx-VEGF) is comparatively superior to free VEGF in prolonging the phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR-2). Both dexOx-VEGF and free VEGF activate VEGFR-2, and the complexes are internalized into early endosomes (EEA1(+) vesicles) and then transported to lysosomes (Rab7(+) vesicles). However, after cell activation, dexOx-VEGF is preferentially colocalized in early endosomes where VEGF signaling is still active while free VEGF is preferentially transported to late endosomes or lysosomes. We further show that dexOx-VEGF after phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 induces an increase of intracellular Ca(2+) and activates VEGF downstream effectors such as Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) proteins. Under specific conditions, the activation level is different from the one observed for free VEGF, thus suggesting mechanistic differences, which is illustrated by cell migration and cord-like formation studies. DexOx-VEGF can be cross-linked with adipic acid dihydrazide to form a degradable gel, which in turn can be incorporated in a fibrin gel containing endothelial cells (ECs) to modulate their activity. We envision that these constructs might be beneficial to extend the pro-angiogenic activity of VEGF in ischemic tissues and to modulate the biological activity of vascular cells. PMID:22901277

  5. Occurring of In Vitro Functional Vasculogenic Pericytes from Human Circulating Early Endothelial Precursor Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Francesca; Galletti, Margherita; Galiè, Nazzareno; Ventura, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Pericytes are periendothelial cells of the microcirculation which contribute to tissue homeostasis and hemostasis by regulating microvascular morphogenesis and stability. Because of their multipotential ex vivo differentiation capabilities, pericytes are becoming very interesting in regenerative medicine field. Several studies address this issue by attempting to isolate pericyte/mesenchymal-like cells from peripheral blood; however the origin of these cells and their culture conditions are still debated. Here we showed that early Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs) expressing CD45+/CD146+/CD31+ can be a source of cells with pericyte/mesenchymal phenotype and function, identified as human Progenitor Perivascular Cells (hPPCs). We provided evidence that hPPCs have an immunophenotype consistent with Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) from human adipose tissue (hASCs) and fetal membranes of term placenta (FM-hMSCs). In addition, hPPCs can be subcultured and exhibit expression of pluripotent genes (OCT-4, KLF-4, and NANOG) as well as a remarkable vasculogenic potential. Our findings could be helpful to develop innovative cell-based therapies for future clinical applications with distinct therapeutic purposes. PMID:26064139

  6. Ultrasound assessment of endothelial function in real-time (Honorable Mention Poster Award)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faita, Francesco; Gemignani, Vincenzo; Demi, Marcello

    2005-04-01

    The characterization of the endothelial function is one of the most attractive research topics in modern vascular medicine. The evaluation of the flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) of the brachial artery is a widely used measurement technique. Despite its widespread use, this technique has some limitations due to the difficulties in obtaining an accurate measurement of such a small vessel (3 to 5 mm) by using ultrasounds. The system we present in this paper can automatically measure the diameter of the artery with high accuracy on each image of a video sequence. Furthermore, it processes the data in real-time, thus providing the physician with an immediate response while the examination is still in progress. The main part of the system is a video processing board based on a state-of-the-art digital signal processor (DSP). The board acquires the video signal generated by the ultrasound equipment which furnishes a longitudinal section of the artery vessel. For each image, the DSP automatically locates the two borders of the vessel and subsequently computes the diameter. The algorithm used to automatically locate the borders of the vessel is based on a new operator of edge detection which was derived from the first absolute central moment. Tests in many clinical centers proved that the system provides very accurate measurements and is a remarkable step forward toward a more systematic evaluation of the FMD.

  7. The nitric oxide donor pentaerythritol tetranitrate can preserve endothelial function in established atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Andreas; Müller, Senta; Meyer, Wilfried; Kojda, Georg

    2001-01-01

    Recent results suggested that long-term treatment with a low dose of the organic nitrate pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN, 6 mg kg−1 per day) for 16 weeks slightly decreases aortic superoxide production in normal rabbits. We sought to determine if PETN can preserve endothelium dependent relaxation (EDR) in atherosclerotic rabbits.Three groups of 9 – 10 New Zealand White rabbits received a cholesterol chow (0.75%) for 16 weeks. One group (CHOL16) served as control and two groups were fed for another 16 weeks a cholesterol-chow without (CHOL32) or with 6 mg PETN kg−1 per day (PETN32).Isolated aortic rings of CHOL16 showed a typical impairment of EDR with a maximal relaxation at 1 μM acetylcholine of 28±16%. In CHOL32-rings EDR was completely impaired. In striking contrast, EDR in PETN32 (24±15%) was similar to that of CHOL16 indicating a protective effect of PETN on endothelial function. Vascular superoxide production measured with the lucigenin method was not different between the groups.Aortic lesion formation in PETN32 was smaller than in CHOL32 (P<0.008). The onset of copper-induced LDL-oxidation (lag-time) after 16 weeks of cholesterol feeding (214±9 min) was reduced in CHOL32 (168±24 min, P=0.035) but not in PETN32 (220±21 min). This indicates prevention of increased LDL oxidation by PETN.The halfmaximal effective vasodilator concentrations of PETN (in −logM) were identical in CHOL16 (7.9±0.1), CHOL32 (7.6±0.2) and PETN32 (7.7±0.2). Similar results were obtained with S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine.These data suggest that PETN can reduce the progression of lesion formation, endothelial dysfunction and of LDL-oxidation in established atherosclerosis. PMID:11309242

  8. Influence of heavy ions on cell survival, cytogenetic damage and mitochondrial function of human endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Sylvia; Helm, Alexander; Lee, Ryonfa; Pollet, Dieter; Durante, Marco

    There is increasing evidence that there is an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease among atomic bomb survivors and radiotherapy patients, typically developing with a long latency. However, essentially no information is available on the potential cardiovascular risks associated with space radiation, in particular heavy ions. To address this issue, we have chosen human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) as a model system. Cells at an early passage number were irradiated with 0.1 to 4 Gy of either 9.8 MeV/u C-ions (LET=170 keV/µm), 91 MeV/u C-ions (LET=29 keV/µm) or 250 kV X-rays. Cells were regularly subcultured up to 40 days (20 population doublings) post-irradiation. Immediately after exposure cell inactivation was deter-mined by the colony forming assay. Furthermore, at selected time-points cytogenetic damage (formation of micronuclei in binucleated cells) and the mitochondrial membrane potential ΨM (flow cytometric analysis following JC-1 staining) were assessed. Measurement of the directly induced radiation damage showed that 9.8 MeV/u and 91 MeV/u C-ions were more effective than X-rays (i.e. about 3 and 2 times, respectively) with respect to cell inactivation or the in-duction of cytogenetic damage. At the subsequent days in the irradiated cultures the number of cells with micronuclei declined to the control level (3-5Altogether our data indicate that under the applied radiation conditions the integrity of mitochondria which play a significant role in the regulation of cardiovascular cell function is not impaired. With respect to directly induced genetic damage C-ions are more effective than X-rays as observed in other cell systems. If the effectiveness of charged particles for the occurrence of late chromosomal damage in endothelial cells is higher than that of sparsely ionizing radiation needs further clarification. The data obtained up to now indicate that sophisticated cytogenetic techniques have to be applied in order to draw any firm

  9. Angiomotin like-1 is a novel component of the N-cadherin complex affecting endothelial/pericyte interaction in normal and tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yujuan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Barutello, Giuseppina; Chiu, Kungchun; Arigoni, Maddalena; Giampietro, Costanza; Cavallo, Federica; Holmgren, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Transmission of mechanical force via cell junctions is an important component that molds cells into shapes consistent with proper organ function. Of particular interest are the cadherin transmembrane proteins, which play an essential role in connecting cell junctions to the intra-cellular cytoskeleton. Understanding how these biomechanical complexes orchestrate intrinsic and extrinsic forces is important for our understanding of the underlying mechanisms driving morphogenesis. We have previously identified the Amot protein family, which are scaffold proteins that integrate polarity, junctional, and cytoskeletal cues to modulate cellular shape in endothelial as well as epithelial cells. In this report, we show that AmotL1 is a novel partner of the N-cadherin protein complex. We studied the role of AmotL1 in normal retinal as well as tumor angiogenesis using inducible endothelial-specific knock-out mice. We show that AmotL1 is essential for normal establishment of vascular networks in the post-natal mouse retina as well as in a transgenic breast cancer model. The observed phenotypes were consistent with a non-autonomous pericyte defect. We show that AmotL1 forms a complex with N-cadherin present on both endothelial cells and pericytes. We propose that AmotL1 is an essential effector of the N-cadherin mediated endothelial/pericyte junctional complex. PMID:27464479

  10. Rapamycin inhibits re-endothelialization after percutaneous coronary intervention by impeding the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells and inducing apoptosis of endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Tao; Li, Fei; Wang, Wen-Yong; Li, Xiao-Jing; Liu, Yi-Meng; Wang, Rui-An; Guo, Wen-Yi; Wang, Hai-Chang

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial-cell function is important in the healing of damaged endothelium after percutaneous coronary artery damage. In 3 different animal models, we sought to determine whether rapamycin (sirolimus) affects the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells and endothelial progenitor cells. First, after we implanted stents in dogs, we found that re-endothelialization was impeded more by drug-eluting stents than by bare-metal stents, 30 days after percutaneous coronary intervention. Second, in vitro in rats, we found that 1-100 ng/mL of rapamycin time- and dose-dependently inhibited proliferation over 72 hr (with effects evident as early as 24 hr) and also dose-dependently induced endothelial progenitor-cell apoptosis. Finally, in vivo in rats, we observed that vascular endothelial growth factor expression was decreased after 5 days of rapamycin treatment. We conclude that rapamycin impedes re-endothelialization after drug-eluting stent implantation by inhibiting the proliferation and migration of coronary endothelial cells, inducing endothelial progenitor-cell apoptosis, and decreasing vascular endothelial growth factor expression in the circulation. PMID:20401293

  11. Impact of an endothelial progenitor cell capturing stent on coronary microvascular function: comparison with drug-eluting stents

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Woong Gil; Kim, Soo Hyun; Yoon, Hyung Seok; Lee, Eun Joo

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Although drug-eluting stents (DESs) effectively reduce restenosis following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), they also delay re-endothelialization and impair microvascular function, resulting in adverse clinical outcomes. Endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) capturing stents, by providing a functional endothelial layer on the stent, have beneficial effects on microvascular function. However, data on coronary microvascular function in patients with EPC stents versus DESs are lacking. Methods Seventy-four patients who previously underwent PCI were enrolled in this study. Microvascular function was evaluated 6 months after PCI based on the index of microvascular resistance (IMR) and the coronary flow reserve (CFR). IMR was calculated as the ratio of the mean distal coronary pressure at maximal hyperemia to the inverse of the hyperemic mean transit time (hTmn). The CFR was calculated by dividing the hTmn by the baseline mean transit time. Results Twenty-one patients (age, 67.2 ± 9.6 years; male:female, 15:6) with an EPC stent and 53 patients (age, 61.5 ± 14.7 years; male:female, 40:13) with second-generation DESs were included in the study. There were no significant differences in the baseline clinical and angiographic characteristics of the two groups. Angiography performed 6 months postoperatively did not show significant differences in their CFR values. However, patients with the EPC stent had a significantly lower IMR than patients with second-generation DESs (median, 25.5 [interquartile range, 12.85 to 28.18] vs. 29.0 [interquartile range, 15.42 to 39.23]; p = 0.043). Conclusions Microvascular dysfunction was significantly improved after 6 months in patients with EPC stents compared to those with DESs. The complete re-endothelialization achieved with the EPC stent may provide clinical benefits over DESs, especially in patients with microvascular dysfunction. PMID:25589834

  12. Identification and functional analysis of endothelial tip cell–enriched genes

    PubMed Central

    del Toro, Raquel; Prahst, Claudia; Mathivet, Thomas; Siegfried, Geraldine; Kaminker, Joshua S.; Larrivee, Bruno; Breant, Christiane; Duarte, Antonio; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Penninger, Josef

    2010-01-01

    Sprouting of developing blood vessels is mediated by specialized motile endothelial cells localized at the tips of growing capillaries. Following behind the tip cells, endothelial stalk cells form the capillary lumen and proliferate. Expression of the Notch ligand Delta-like-4 (Dll4) in tip cells suppresses tip cell fate in neighboring stalk cells via Notch signaling. In DLL4+/− mouse mutants, most retinal endothelial cells display morphologic features of tip cells. We hypothesized that these mouse mutants could be used to isolate tip cells and so to determine their genetic repertoire. Using transcriptome analysis of retinal endothelial cells isolated from DLL4+/− and wild-type mice, we identified 3 clusters of tip cell–enriched genes, encoding extracellular matrix degrading enzymes, basement membrane components, and secreted molecules. Secreted molecules endothelial-specific molecule 1, angiopoietin 2, and apelin bind to cognate receptors on endothelial stalk cells. Knockout mice and zebrafish morpholino knockdown of apelin showed delayed angiogenesis and reduced proliferation of stalk cells expressing the apelin receptor APJ. Thus, tip cells may regulate angiogenesis via matrix remodeling, production of basement membrane, and release of secreted molecules, some of which regulate stalk cell behavior. PMID:20705756

  13. Sunitinib inhibits lymphatic endothelial cell functions and lymph node metastasis in a breast cancer model through inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Metastasis is a common event and the main cause of death in cancer patients. Lymphangiogenesis refers to the formation of new lymphatic vessels and is thought to be involved in the development of metastasis. Sunitinib is a multi-kinase inhibitor that blocks receptor tyrosine kinase activity, including that of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs). Although sunitinib is a clinically available angiogenesis inhibitor, its effects on lymphangiogenesis and lymph node metastasis remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of sunitinib on vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (VEGFR-3) and a related event, lymphangiogenesis. Methods The effects of sunitinib on the degree of phosphorylation of VEGFR-2/3 and other signaling molecules was examined in lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) treated with the drug; VEGF-induced LEC growth, migration, and tube formation were also examined. For the in vivo study, luciferase-expressing breast cancer cells were transplanted into mammary fat pads of mice; the microvessel and lymphatic vessel density was then measured after treatment with sunitinib and anti-VEGFR-2 antibody. Results First, in human LECs, sunitinib blocked both VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3 phosphorylation induced by VEGF-C or VEGF-D, and abrogated the activation of the downstream molecules extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt. Furthermore, sunitinib attenuated the cell-proliferation activity induced by VEGF-C/D and prevented VEGF-C-induced migration and tube formation of the LECs; however, anti-VEGFR2 treatment shows only a partial effect on the growth and functions of the LECs. We used a breast cancer cell line expressing luciferase as a metastatic cancer model. Sunitinib treatment (40 mg/kg/day) inhibited the growth of the primary tumor transplanted in the mammary fat pad of the mice and significantly reduced the number of blood and lymphatic vessels in the tumor. Furthermore, the development

  14. Endothelial Microparticles (EMP) for the Assessment of Endothelial Function: An In Vitro and In Vivo Study on Possible Interference of Plasma Lipids

    PubMed Central

    van Ierssel, Sabrina H.; Hoymans, Vicky Y.; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M.; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F.; Vrints, Christiaan J.; Jorens, Philippe G.; Conraads, Viviane M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Circulating endothelial microparticles (EMP) reflect the condition of the endothelium and are of increasing interest in cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. Recently, increased numbers of EMP following oral fat intake, possibly due to acute endothelial injury, have been reported. On the other hand, the direct interference of lipids with the detection of EMP has been suggested. This study aimed to investigate the effect of lipid-rich solutions, commonly administered in clinical practice, on the detection, both in vitro and in vivo, of EMP. Methods For the in vitro assessment, several lipid-rich solutions were added to whole blood of healthy subjects (n = 8) and patients with coronary heart disease (n = 5). EMP (CD31+/CD42b−) were detected in platelet poor plasma by flow cytometry. For the in vivo study, healthy volunteers were evaluated on 3 different study-days: baseline evaluation, following lipid infusion and after a NaCl infusion. EMP quantification, lipid measurements and peripheral arterial tonometry were performed on each day. Results Both in vitro addition and in vivo administration of lipids significantly decreased EMP (from 198.6 to 53.0 and from 272.6 to 90.6/µl PPP, respectively, p = 0.001 and p = 0.012). The EMP number correlated inversely with the concentration of triglycerides, both in vitro and in vivo (r = −0.707 and −0.589, p<0.001 and p = 0.021, respectively). The validity of EMP as a marker of endothelial function is supported by their inverse relationship with the reactive hyperemia index (r = −0.758, p = 0.011). This inverse relation was confounded by the intravenous administration of lipids. Conclusion The confounding effect of high circulating levels of lipids, commonly found in patients that receive intravenous lipid-based solutions, should be taken into account when flow cytometry is used to quantify EMP. PMID:22359595

  15. Essential Roles of EphB Receptors and EphrinB Ligands in Endothelial Cell Function and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Salvucci, Ombretta; Tosato, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their Ephrin ligands represent an important signaling system with widespread roles in cell physiology and disease. Receptors and ligands in this family are anchored to the cell surface; thus Eph/Ephrin interactions mainly occur at sites of cell-to-cell contact. EphB4 and EphrinB2 are the Eph/Ephrin molecules that play essential roles in vascular development and postnatal angiogenesis. Analysis of expression patterns and function has linked EphB4/EphrinB2 to endothelial cell growth, survival, migration, assembly, and angiogenesis. Signaling from these molecules is complex, with the potential for being bidirectional, emanating both from the Eph receptors (forward signaling) and from the Ephrin ligands (reverse signaling). In this review, we describe recent advances on the roles of EphB/EphrinB protein family in endothelial cell function and outline potential approaches to inhibit pathological angiogenesis based on this understanding. PMID:22588055

  16. Nitrosylated Hemoglobin Levels in Human Venous Erythrocytes Correlate with Vascular Endothelial Function Measured by Digital Reactive Hyperemia

    PubMed Central

    Lobysheva, Irina I.; Biller, Pauline; Gallez, Bernard; Beauloye, Christophe; Balligand, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Impaired nitric oxide (NO)–dependent endothelial function is associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. We hypothesized that erythrocyte levels of nitrosylated hemoglobin (HbNO-heme) may reflect vascular endothelial function in vivo. We developed a modified subtraction method using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to identify the 5-coordinate α-HbNO (HbNO) concentration in human erythrocytes and examined its correlation with endothelial function assessed by peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT). Changes in digital pulse amplitude were measured by PAT during reactive hyperemia following brachial arterial occlusion in a group of healthy volunteers (50 subjects). Erythrocyte HbNO levels were measured at baseline and at the peak of hyperemia. We digitally subtracted an individual model EPR signal of erythrocyte free radicals from the whole EPR spectrum to unmask and quantitate the HbNO EPR signals. Results Mean erythrocyte HbNO concentration at baseline was 219+/−12 nmol/L (n = 50). HbNO levels and reactive hyperemia (RH) indexes were higher in female (free of contraceptive pills) than male subjects. We observed a dynamic increase of HbNO levels in erythrocytes isolated at 1–2 min of post-occlusion hyperemia (120+/−8% of basal levels); post-occlusion HbNO levels were correlated with basal levels. Both basal and post-occlusion HbNO levels were significantly correlated with reactive hyperemia (RH) indexes (r = 0.58; P<0.0001 for basal HbNO). Conclusion The study demonstrates quantitative measurements of 5-coordinate α-HbNO in human venous erythrocytes, its dynamic physiologic regulation and correlation with endothelial function measured by tonometry during hyperemia. This opens the way to further understanding of in vivo determinants of NO bioavailability in human circulation. PMID:24130774

  17. Functional significance of thermosensitive transient receptor potential melastatin channel 8 (TRPM8) expression in immortalized human corneal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mergler, Stefan; Mertens, Charlotte; Valtink, Monika; Reinach, Peter S; Székely, Violeta Castelo; Slavi, Nefeli; Garreis, Fabian; Abdelmessih, Suzette; Türker, Ersal; Fels, Gabriele; Pleyer, Uwe

    2013-11-01

    Human corneal endothelial cells (HCEC) maintain appropriate tissue hydration and transparency by eliciting net ion transport coupled to fluid egress from the stroma into the anterior chamber. Such activity offsets tissue swelling caused by stromal imbibition of fluid. As corneal endothelial (HCE) transport function is modulated by temperature changes, we probed for thermosensitive transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) functional activity in immortalized human corneal endothelial cells (HCEC-12) and freshly isolated human corneal endothelial cells (HCEC) as a control. This channel is either activated upon lowering to 28 °C or by menthol, eucalyptol and icilin. RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) verified TRPM8 gene expression. Ca(2+) transients induced by either menthol (500 μmol/l), eucalyptol (3 mmol/l), or icilin (2-60 μmol/l) were identified using cell fluorescence imaging. The TRP channel blocker lanthanum III chloride (La(3+), 100 μmol/l) as well as the TRPM8 blockers BCTC (10 μmol/l) and capsazepine (CPZ, 10 μmol/l) suppressed icilin-induced Ca(2+) increases. In and outward currents induced by application of menthol (500 μmol/l) or icilin (50 μmol/l) were detected using the planar patch-clamp technique. A thermal transition from room temperature to ≈ 18 °C led to Ca(2+) increases that were inhibited by a TRPM8 blocker BCTC (10 μmol/l). Other thermosensitive TRP pathways whose heterogeneous Ca(2+) response patterns are suggestive of other Ca(2+) handling pathways were also detected upon strong cooling (≈10 °C). Taken together, functional TRPM8 expression in HCEC-12 and freshly dissociated HCEC suggests that HCE function can adapt to thermal variations through activation of this channel subtype. PMID:24135298

  18. Endothelial Markers May Link Kidney Function to Cardiovascular Events in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Christina; Clodi, Martin; Neuhold, Stephanie; Resl, Michael; Elhenicky, Marie; Prager, Rudolf; Moertl, Deddo; Strunk, Guido; Luger, Anton; Struck, Joachim; Pacher, Richard; Hülsmann, Martin

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The increased cardiovascular risk in diabetes has been linked to endothelial and renal dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of stable fragments of the precursors of adrenomedullin, endothelin-1, vasopressin, and atrial natriuretic peptide in progression of cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a prospective, observational study design with a composite end point (death or unexpected admission to hospital due to a cardiovascular event) on 781 patients with type 2 diabetes (54 events, median duration of observation 15 months). The four stable precursor peptides midregional adrenomedullin (MR-proADM), midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), COOH-terminal proendothelin-1 (CT-proET-1), and COOH-terminal provasopressin or copeptin (CT-proAVP) were determined at baseline, and their association to renal function and cardiovascular events was studied using stepwise linear and Cox logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic analysis, respectively. RESULTS MR-proADM, CT-proET-1, CT-proAVP, and MR-proANP were all elevated in patients with future cardiovascular events and independently correlated to serum creatinine. MR-proADM and MR-proANP were significant predictors of a future cardiovascular event, with MR-proANP being the stronger (area under the curve 0.802 ± 0.034, sensitivity 0.833, specificity 0.576, positive predictive value 0.132, and negative predictive value 0.978 with a cutoff value of 75 pmol/l). CONCLUSIONS The four serum markers of vasoactive and natriuretic peptides are related to both kidney function and cardiovascular events, thus linking two major complications of diabetes, diabetic nephropathy and cardiovascular disease. PMID:19564455

  19. Functional role of endothelial adhesion molecules in the early stages of brain metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Manuel Sarmiento; Serres, Sébastien; Anthony, Daniel C.; Sibson, Nicola R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs), which are normally associated with leukocyte trafficking, have also been shown to play an essential role in tumor metastasis to non-CNS sites. However, the role played by CAMs in brain metastasis is largely unexplored. It is known that leukocyte recruitment to the brain is very atypical and that mechanisms of disease in peripheral tissues cannot be extrapolated to the brain. Here, we have established the spatiotemporal expression of 12 key CAMs in the initial phases of tumor seeding in 2 different models of brain metastasis. Methods BALB/c or SCID mice were injected intracardially (105 cells/100 μL phosphate-buffered saline with either 4T1-GFP or MDA231BR-GFP cells, respectively (n = 4–6/group), and expression of the CAMs was determined by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence colocalisation. Results Endothelial expression of E-selectin, VCAM-1, ALCAM, ICAM-1, VLA-4, and β4 integrin was markedly increased early in tumor seeding. At the same time, the natural ligands to these adhesion molecules were highly expressed on the metastatic tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. Two of these ligands showed particularly high tumor cell expression (ALCAM and VLA-4), and consequently their functional role in tumor seeding was determined. Antibody neutralization of either ALCAM or VLA-4 significantly reduced tumor seeding within the brain (>60% decrease in tumor number/mm2 brain; P < .05–0.01). Conclusions These findings suggest that ALCAM/ALCAM and VLA-4/VCAM-1 interactions play an important functional role in the early stages of metastasis seeding in the brain. Moreover, this work identifies a specific subset of ligand-receptor interactions that may yield new therapeutic and diagnostic targets for brain metastasis. PMID:24311639

  20. Nicotine improves the functional activity of late endothelial progenitor cells via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Min; Liu, Qian; Sun, Jing; Yi, Kaihong; Wu, Libiao; Tan, Xuerui

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are involved in the modulation of functional activity of late endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) induced by nicotine. Total mononuclear cells (MNCs) were isolated from human umbilical cord blood by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation, and then the cells were plated on fibronectin-coated culture plates. Late EPCs were positive for 1,1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3-tetramethylindocarbocyanine-labeled acetylated low-density lipoprotein (DiI-acLDL) uptake and fluorescein-isothiocyanate-conjugated Ulex europaeus agglutinin lectin (UEA-1) binding. Expression of von Willbrand factor (vWF), kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), and α7 nAChR was detected by indirect immunofluorescence staining. Late EPCs of 3-5 passages were treated for 32 h with either vehicle or nicotine with or without pre-incubation of nAChR antagonism, mecamylamine, or α-bungarotoxin. The viability, migration, and in vitro vasculogenesis activity of late EPCs were assayed with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, modified Boyden chamber assay, and in vitro angiogenesis assay, respectively. Late EPCs adhesion assay was performed by replating cells on fibronectin-coated plates, and then adherent cells were counted. Incubation with 10 nmol/L nicotine enhanced viable, migratory, adhesive, and in vitro vasculogenesis capacity of late EPCs. The effect of nicotine on late EPCs can be attenuated by mecamylamine or α-bungarotoxin. In conclusion, nicotine improves the functional activity of late EPCs via nAChRs. PMID:21774635

  1. Effects of N-acetyl-cysteine on endothelial function and inflammation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Jeremias, Allen; Soodini, Geetha; Gelfand, Eli; Xu, Yizhen; Stanton, Robert C.; Horton, Edward S.; Cohen, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been associated with premature vascular disease. There is increasing data that N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) may prevent or improve endothelial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of NAC on endothelial function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, a population at high risk for endothelial dysfunction. Twenty-four patients with diabetes mellitus were assigned randomly to initial therapy with either 900 mg NAC or placebo twice daily in a double-blind, cross-over study design. Flowmediated vasodilation (FMD) of the brachial artery was assessed at baseline, after four weeks of therapy, after a four-week wash-out period, and after another four weeks on the opposite treatment. Plasma and red blood cell glutathione levels and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured at all four visits. At baseline, FMD was moderately impaired (3.7±2.9%). There was no significant change in FMD after four weeks of NAC therapy as compared to placebo (0.1±3.6% vs. 1.2±4.2%). Similarly, there was no significant change in glutathione levels. However, median CRP decreased from 2.35 to 2.14 mg/L during NAC therapy (p=0.04), while it increased from 2.24 to 2.65 mg/L with placebo. No side effects were noted during the treatment period. In this double-blind, randomized cross-over study, four weeks of oral NAC therapy failed to improve endothelial dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus. However, NAC therapy decreased CRP levels, suggesting that this compound may have some efficacy in reducing systemic inflammation. PMID:21977284

  2. Novel Form of Curcumin Improves Endothelial Function in Young, Healthy Individuals: A Double-Blind Placebo Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, Lee; Rowlands, David S.; Caldwell, Aaron R.; Sanders, Elizabeth; Kreutzer, Andreas; Mitchell, Joel B.; Purpura, Martin; Jäger, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, a turmeric extract, may protect against cardiovascular diseases by enhancing endothelial function. In this randomized controlled double-blind parallel prospective study, fifty-nine healthy adults were assigned to placebo, 50 mg (50 mg), or 200 mg (200 mg) curcumin, for 8 weeks. The higher curcumin (200 mg) supplementation produced a dose-mediated improvement in endothelial function measured by flow-mediated dilation (FMD). The outcome was a clinically substantial 3.0% increase (90% CI 0.7 to 5.3%, p = 0.032; benefit : harm odds ratio 546 : 1) with the 200 mg dose, relative to placebo. The 50 mg dose also increased FMD relative to placebo by 1.7% (−0.6 to 4.0%, p = 0.23; 25 : 1), but the outcome was not clinically decisive. In apparently healthy adults, 8 weeks of 200 mg oral curcumin supplementation resulted in a clinically meaningful improvement in endothelial function as measured by FMD. Oral curcumin supplementation may present a simple lifestyle strategy for decreasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. This trial was registered at ISRCTN registry (ISRCTN90184217).

  3. Novel non-invasive method of measurement of endothelial function: enclosed-zone flow-mediated dilatation (ezFMD).

    PubMed

    Ukawa, Teiji; Takayanagi, Tsuneo; Morimoto, Haruka; Higashi, Yukihito; Idei, Naomi; Yoshizumi, Masao; Tsuji, Toshio

    2012-12-01

    Measurement of flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) is the conventional non-invasive method for assessment of endothelial function; however, it requires an expensive ultrasound system and high levels of technical skill. Therefore, we developed a novel method for measurement of endothelial function, namely, measurement of ezFMD. ezFMD estimates the degree of vasodilatation from the oscillation signals transmitted to a sphygmomanometer cuff attached to the upper arm. The objective of this study was to validate the principle underlying the measurement of ezFMD, and to evaluate the repeatability of the ezFMD measurements. We observed the blood vessel behavior and oscillometric pattern in ten subjects. When the cuff was inflated to the level of the mean blood pressure, the oscillation amplitude increased with increasing degree of vasodilatation. In experiment to evaluate the repeatability of the ezFMD measurement, the average difference between the paired measurements was 3.7 %, the standard deviation was 11.5 %, and the average coefficient of variation value for the 11 paired measurements was 23.7 %. These results suggest the validity of the principle underlying the measurement of the ezFMD for the assessment of endothelial function. And, this study suggests that the repeatability of the ezFMD measurements is superior to that of the conventional measurement of FMD. PMID:23054376

  4. Loss-of-function variants in endothelial lipase are a cause of elevated HDL cholesterol in humans

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Andrew C.; Brown, Robert J.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Demissie, Serkalem; Manning, Alisa Knodle; Jensen, Majken K.; Rimm, Eric B.; Wang, Jian; Rodrigues, Amrith; Bamba, Vaneeta; Khetarpal, Sumeet A.; Wolfe, Megan L.; DerOhannessian, Stephanie; Li, Mingyao; Reilly, Muredach P.; Aberle, Jens; Evans, David; Hegele, Robert A.; Rader, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentrations of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) are associated with protection from atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Animal models indicate that decreased expression of endothelial lipase (LIPG) is inversely associated with HDL-C levels, and genome-wide association studies have identified LIPG variants as being associated with HDL-C levels in humans. We hypothesized that loss-of-function mutations in LIPG may result in elevated HDL-C and therefore performed deep resequencing of LIPG exons in cases with elevated HDL-C levels and controls with decreased HDL-C levels. We identified a significant excess of nonsynonymous LIPG variants unique to cases with elevated HDL-C. In vitro lipase activity assays demonstrated that these variants significantly decreased endothelial lipase activity. In addition, a meta-analysis across 5 cohorts demonstrated that the low-frequency Asn396Ser variant is significantly associated with increased HDL-C, while the common Thr111Ile variant is not. Functional analysis confirmed that the Asn396Ser variant has significantly decreased lipase activity both in vitro and in vivo, while the Thr111Ile variant has normal lipase activity. Our results establish that loss-of-function mutations in LIPG lead to increased HDL-C levels and support the idea that inhibition of endothelial lipase may be an effective mechanism to raise HDL-C. PMID:19287092

  5. How Does Maternal Employment Affect Children's Socioemotional Functioning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Gigi

    2015-01-01

    The maternal employment becomes an irreversible trend across the globe. The effect of maternal employment on children's socioemotional functioning is so pervasive that it warrants special attention to investigate into the issue. A trajectory of analytical framework of how maternal employment affects children's socioemotional functioning originates…

  6. Acid Sphingomyelinase-Derived Ceramide Regulates ICAM-1 Function during T Cell Transmigration across Brain Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lopes Pinheiro, Melissa A; Kroon, Jeffrey; Hoogenboezem, Mark; Geerts, Dirk; van Het Hof, Bert; van der Pol, Susanne M A; van Buul, Jaap D; de Vries, Helga E

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disorder of the CNS characterized by immune cell infiltration across the brain vasculature into the brain, a process not yet fully understood. We previously demonstrated that the sphingolipid metabolism is altered in MS lesions. In particular, acid sphingomyelinase (ASM), a critical enzyme in the production of the bioactive lipid ceramide, is involved in the pathogenesis of MS; however, its role in the brain vasculature remains unknown. Transmigration of T lymphocytes is highly dependent on adhesion molecules in the vasculature such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). In this article, we hypothesize that ASM controls T cell migration by regulating ICAM-1 function. To study the role of endothelial ASM in transmigration, we generated brain endothelial cells lacking ASM activity using a lentiviral shRNA approach. Interestingly, although ICAM-1 expression was increased in cells lacking ASM activity, we measured a significant decrease in T lymphocyte adhesion and consequently transmigration both in static and under flow conditions. As an underlying mechanism, we revealed that upon lack of endothelial ASM activity, the phosphorylation of ezrin was perturbed as well as the interaction between filamin and ICAM-1 upon ICAM-1 clustering. Functionally this resulted in reduced microvilli formation and impaired transendothelial migration of T cells. In conclusion, in this article, we show that ASM coordinates ICAM-1 function in brain endothelial cells by regulating its interaction with filamin and phosphorylation of ezrin. The understanding of these underlying mechanisms of T lymphocyte transmigration is of great value to develop new strategies against MS lesion formation. PMID:26597010

  7. A Comparison of Measures of Endothelial Function in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease and Age and Gender Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Richard B.; Vun, Simon V.; Spark, J. Ian

    2016-01-01

    This study compared flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), peripheral artery tonometry (PAT), and serum nitric oxide (NO) measures of endothelial function in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) against age/gender matched controls. 25 patients (mean age: 72.4 years, M : F 18 : 7) with established PAD and an age/gender matched group of 25 healthy controls (mean age: 72.4 years, M : F 18 : 7) were studied. Endothelial function was measured using the % FMD, reactive hyperemia index (RHI) using PAT and serum NO (μmol). Difference for each method between PAD and control patients and correlation between the methods were investigated. FMD and RHI were lower in patients with PAD (median FMD for PAD = 2.16% versus control = 3.77%, p = 0.034 and median RHI in PAD = 1.64 versus control = 1.92, p = 0.005). NO levels were not significantly different between the groups (PAD median = 7.70 μmol, control median = 13.05 μmol, p = 0.662). These results were obtained in elderly patients and cannot be extrapolated to younger individuals. FMD and PAT both demonstrated a lower hyperaemic response in patients with PAD; however, FMD results in PAD patients were unequivocally reduced whereas half the PAD patients had RHI values above the established threshold for endothelial dysfunction. This suggests that FMD is a more appropriate method for the measurement of NO-mediated endothelial function. PMID:26942010

  8. ACE Inhibition and Endothelial Function: Main Findings of PERFECT, a Sub-Study of the EUROPA Trial

    PubMed Central

    Remme, W. J.; Lüscher, T. F.; Fox, K. M.; Bertrand, M.; Ferrari, R.; Simoons, M. L.; Grobbee, D. E.

    2007-01-01

    Background ACE inhibition results in secondary prevention of coronary artery disease (CAD) through different mechanisms including improvement of endothelial dysfunction. The Perindopril-Function of the Endothelium in Coronary artery disease Trial (PERFECT) evaluated whether long-term administration of perindopril improves endothelial dysfunction. Methods PERFECT is a 3-year double blind randomised placebo controlled trial to determine the effect of perindopril 8 mg once daily on brachial artery endothelial function in patients with stable CAD without clinical heart failure. Endothelial function in response to ischaemia was assessed using ultrasound. Primary endpoint was difference in flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) assessed at 36 months. Results In 20 centers, 333 patients randomly received perindopril or matching placebo. Ischemia-induced FMD was 2.7% (SD 2.6). In the perindopril group FMD went from 2.6% at baseline to 3.3% at 36 months and in the placebo group from 2.8 to 3.0%. Change in FMD after 36 month treatment was 0.55% (95% confidence interval −0.36, 1.47; p = 0.23) higher in perindopril than in placebo group. The rate of change in FMD per 6 months was 0.14% (SE 0.05, p = 0.02) in perindopril and 0.02% (SE 0.05, p = 0.74) in placebo group (0.12% difference in rate of change p = 0.07). Conclusion Perindopril resulted in a modest, albeit not statistically significant, improvement in FMD. PMID:17657599

  9. Impact of the DASH diet on endothelial function, exercise capacity, and quality of life in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Pisano, Carol; Hayden, Janel; Sulo, Suela; Silver, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been recognized as a pathophysiologic mechanism in the progression of heart failure (HF). However, little attention has been given to the ability of dietary approaches to improve endothelial function. This study examined the effects of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet on endothelial function, exercise capacity, and quality of life in patients with chronic symptomatic (stage C) HF. Forty-eight patients were randomized to follow the DASH diet (n = 24) or the general HF dietary recommendations (n = 24). Endothelial function was assessed by measuring large and small arterial elasticity (LAE and SAE) at rest. Exercise capacity (measured with the 6-minute walk test) and quality of life (measured with the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire) at baseline and 3 months were also evaluated. Patients were older adults with an average HF duration of 5 years. LAE at 1 month improved significantly in the DASH diet group (P < 0.01). Overall LAE and SAE scores at 3 months also improved; however, the net changes were not statistically significant. The DASH group had better exercise capacity (292 m vs 197 m; P = 0.018) and quality of life scores (21 vs 39; P = 0.006) over time, while sodium intake levels at 1, 2, and 3 months were comparable between the groups. Adhering to the DASH diet improved arterial compliance initially and improved exercise capacity and quality of life scores at 3 months. The DASH diet may be an important adjunctive therapy for patients with symptomatic HF. PMID:25829641

  10. G alpha12 interaction with alphaSNAP induces VE-cadherin localization at endothelial junctions and regulates barrier function.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, Alexandra V; Kutuzov, Mikhail A; Vaiskunaite, Rita; Profirovic, Jasmina; Meigs, Thomas E; Predescu, Sanda; Malik, Asrar B; Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Tatyana

    2005-08-26

    The involvement of heterotrimeric G proteins in the regulation of adherens junction function is unclear. We identified alphaSNAP as an interactive partner of G alpha12 using yeast two-hybrid screening. Glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays showed the selective interaction of alphaSNAP with G alpha12 in COS-7 as well as in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Using domain swapping experiments, we demonstrated that the N-terminal region of G alpha12 (1-37 amino acids) was necessary and sufficient for its interaction with alphaSNAP. G alpha13 with its N-terminal extension replaced by that of G alpha12 acquired the ability to bind to alphaSNAP, whereas G alpha12 with its N terminus replaced by that of G alpha13 lost this ability. Using four point mutants of alphaSNAP, which alter its ability to bind to the SNARE complex, we determined that the convex rather than the concave surface of alphaSNAP was involved in its interaction with G alpha12. Co-transfection of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with G alpha12 and alphaSNAP stabilized VE-cadherin at the plasma membrane, whereas down-regulation of alphaSNAP with siRNA resulted in the loss of VE-cadherin from the cell surface and, when used in conjunction with G alpha12 overexpression, decreased endothelial barrier function. Our results demonstrate a direct link between the alpha subunit of G12 and alphaSNAP, an essential component of the membrane fusion machinery, and implicate a role for this interaction in regulating the membrane localization of VE-cadherin and endothelial barrier function. PMID:15980433

  11. Sonic hedgehog derived from human pancreatic cancer cells augments angiogenic function of endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Madoka; Nakamura, Kazumasa; Mizukami, Yusuke; Ii, Masaaki; Sasajima, Junpei; Sugiyama, Yoshiaki; Nishikawa, Tomoya; Nakano, Yasuhiro; Yanagawa, Nobuyuki; Sato, Kazuya; Maemoto, Atsuo; Tanno, Satoshi; Okumura, Toshikatsu; Karasaki, Hidenori; Kono, Toru; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Ashida, Toshifumi; Chung, Daniel C; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2008-06-01

    Hedgehog signaling is important in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer. Several recent observations suggest the involvement of sonic hedgehog (SHH) in postnatal neovascularization. We identified a novel role for SHH in tumor-associated angiogenesis in pancreatic cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that patched homolog 1 (PTCH1), both a receptor for and transcriptional target of hedgehog signaling, was expressed in a small fraction of endothelial cells within pancreatic cancer, but not in normal pancreatic tissue. When endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) isolated from human peripheral blood were cultured with supernatant from SHH-transfected 293 cells or pancreatic cancer cells, mRNA levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), stromal cell-derived factor-1 and angiopoietin-1 were significantly increased, whereas no such induction was observed in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cell (HMVEC). HUVEC tube formation was stimulated when cocultured with EPC, and preconditioning EPC with supernatant from KP-1 N pancreatic cancer cells highly expressing SHH significantly enhanced the effect. The effect was partially attenuated by specific inhibition of SHH with cyclopamine or a neutralizing antibody. These findings suggest that tumor-derived SHH can induce angiogenesis, and this is mediated by its effects on EPC specifically. Targeting SHH would be a novel therapeutic approach that can inhibit not only proliferation of cancer cells but also EPC-mediated angiogenesis. PMID:18422746

  12. Pitavastatin subacutely improves endothelial function and reduces inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in patients with hypercholesterolaemia

    PubMed Central

    Takase, Bonpei; Hattori, Hidemi; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Nagata, Masayoshi; Ishihara, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    Background Pitavastatin is a statin with strong pleiotropic effects, but the effects of pitavastatin on endothelial cell function (ECF) and both inflammatory cytokines and chemokines have not been fully investigated. Material and methods We simultaneously measured brachial artery (BA) flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) and nitroglycerin-mediated vasodilatation (NMD), as well as plasma biomarkers of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, in patients with hypercholesterolaemia and other atherosclerotic risk factors who were treated with pitavastatin. Sixty-five hypercholesterolaemic patients (age, 66±11 years) with conventional coronary risk factors were enrolled. BA FMD, BA NMD and serum biomarkers (tumour necrosis factor, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, IL-8, P-selectin, E-selectin, soluble intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (s-ICAM1)) were measured before and after 4 weeks of treatment with pitavastatin (2 mg/day). Results Pitavastatin treatment resulted in an increase from baseline to post-treatment in FMD (3.22±1.72 vs 3.97±2.18%, p<0.05) but not in NMD. Furthermore, pitavastatin treatment led to a decrease from baseline to post-treatment in E-selectin (51±27 vs 46±29 pg/mL, p<0.05) and s-ICAM1 (276±86 vs 258±91 pg/mL, p<0.05). Changes in FMD in response to pitavastatin treatment did not correlate with those of E-selectin or s-ICAM1. Conclusions Pitavastatin treatment resulted in a subacute improvement in ECF and a decrease in chemokine levels. These results suggest that pitavastatin might improve long-term outcomes in patients with atherosclerotic disorders. PMID:27326130

  13. Resistance Exercise Restores Endothelial Function and Reduces Blood Pressure in Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Marcelo Mendonça; da Silva, Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga; Fontes, Milene Tavares; Barreto, André Sales; Araújo, João Eliakim dos Santos; de Oliveira, Antônio Cesar Cabral; Wichi, Rogério Brandão; Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance exercise effects on cardiovascular parameters are not consistent. Objectives The effects of resistance exercise on changes in blood glucose, blood pressure and vascular reactivity were evaluated in diabetic rats. Methods Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control group (n = 8); sedentary diabetic (n = 8); and trained diabetic (n = 8). Resistance exercise was carried out in a squat device for rats and consisted of three sets of ten repetitions with an intensity of 50%, three times per week, for eight weeks. Changes in vascular reactivity were evaluated in superior mesenteric artery rings. Results A significant reduction in the maximum response of acetylcholine-induced relaxation was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (78.1 ± 2%) and an increase in the trained diabetic group (95 ± 3%) without changing potency. In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was significantly reduced in the control and trained diabetic groups, but not in the sedentary diabetic group. Furthermore, a significant increase (p < 0.05) in mean arterial blood pressure was observed in the sedentary diabetic group (104.9 ± 5 to 126.7 ± 5 mmHg) as compared to that in the control group. However, the trained diabetic group showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in the mean arterial blood pressure levels (126.7 ± 5 to 105.1 ± 4 mmHg) as compared to the sedentary diabetic group. Conclusions Resistance exercise could restore endothelial function and prevent an increase in arterial blood pressure in type 1 diabetic rats. PMID:25120082

  14. Effects of disturbed blood flow during exercise on endothelial function: a time course analysis

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, F.M.; Vianna, L.C.; Fernandes, I.A.; Nóbrega, A.C.; Lima, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the time course of endothelial function after a single handgrip exercise session combined with blood flow restriction in healthy young men. Nine participants (28±5.8 years) completed a single session of bilateral dynamic handgrip exercise (20 min with 60% of the maximum voluntary contraction). To induce blood flow restriction, a cuff was placed 2 cm below the antecubital fossa in the experimental arm. This cuff was inflated to 80 mmHg before initiation of exercise and maintained through the duration of the protocol. The experimental arm and control arm were randomly selected for all subjects. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and blood flow velocity profiles were assessed using Doppler ultrasonography before initiation of the exercise, and at 15 and 60 min after its cessation. Blood flow velocity profiles were also assessed during exercise. There was a significant increase in FMD 15 min after exercise in the control arm compared with before exercise (64.09%±16.59%, P=0.001), but there was no change in the experimental arm (-12.48%±12.64%, P=0.252). FMD values at 15 min post-exercise were significantly higher for the control arm in comparison to the experimental arm (P=0.004). FMD returned to near baseline values at 60 min after exercise, with no significant difference between arms (P=0.424). A single handgrip exercise bout provoked an acute increase in FMD 15 min after exercise, returning to near baseline values at 60 min. This response was blunted by the addition of an inflated pneumatic cuff to the exercising arm. PMID:26909789

  15. Clinical trial to assess the effect of physical exercise on endothelial function and insulin resistance in pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Preeclampsia (PE) is a common maternal disease that complicates 5 to 10% of pregnancies and remains as the major cause of maternal and neonatal mortality. Cost-effective interventions aimed at preventing the development of preeclampsia are urgently needed. However, the pathogenesis of PE is not well known. Multiple mechanisms such as oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance may contribute to its development. Regular aerobic exercise recovers endothelial function; improves insulin resistance and decreases oxidative stress. Therefore the purpose of this clinical trial is to determine the effect of regular aerobic exercise on endothelial function, on insulin resistance and on pregnancy outcome. Methods and design 64 pregnant women will be included in a blind, randomized clinical trial, and parallel assignment. The exercise group will do regular aerobic physical exercise: walking (10 minutes), aerobic exercise (30 minutes), stretching (10 minutes) and relaxation exercise (10 minutes) in three sessions per week. Control group will do the activities of daily living (bathing, dressing, eating, and walking) without counselling from a physical therapist. Trial registration NCT00741312. PMID:19919718

  16. Expression, Regulation and Function of Atypical Chemerin Receptor CCRL2 on Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Monnier, Justin; Lewén, Susanna; O’Hara, Edward; Huang, Kexin; Tu, Hua; Butcher, Eugene C; Zabel, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    CC-chemokine receptor-like 2 (CCRL2) binds leukocyte chemoattractant chemerin and can regulate local levels of the attractant, but does not itself support cell migration. Here we show that CCRL2 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) are upregulated on cultured human and mouse vascular endothelial cells (EC) and cell lines by pro-inflammatory stimuli. CCRL2 induction is dependent on NF-κB and JAK/STAT signaling pathways, and activated endothelial cells specifically bind chemerin. In vivo, CCRL2 is constitutively expressed at high levels by lung endothelial cells and at lower levels by liver endothelium; and liver but not lung EC respond to systemic LPS injection by further upregulation of the receptor. Plasma levels of total chemerin are elevated in CCRL2−/− mice, and are significantly enhanced after systemic LPS treatment in CCRL2−/− mice compared to WT. Following acute LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation in vivo, CMKLR1+ NK cell recruitment to the airways is significantly impaired in CCRL2−/− mice compared to WT. In vitro, chemerin binding to CCRL2 on endothelial cells triggers robust adhesion of chemokine-like receptor-1 (CMKLR1)-positive lymphoid cells through an α4β1/VCAM-1-dependent mechanism. In conclusion CCRL2 is expressed by endothelial cells in a tissue and activation-dependent fashion; regulates circulating chemerin levels and its bioactivity; and enhances chemerin and CMKLR1-dependent lymphocyte-endothelial cell adhesion in vitro and recruitment to inflamed airways in vivo. Its expression and/or induction on EC by proinflammatory stimuli provide a novel and specific mechanism for the local enrichment of chemerin at inflammatory sites, regulating the recruitment of CMKLR1+ cells. PMID:22696441

  17. Functional effects of endothelial nitric oxide synthase genetic polymorphisms on haemorheological parameters in healthy human individuals.

    PubMed

    Babaoglu, Melih O; Dikmenoglu, Neslihan; Ileri-Gurel, Esin; Seringec, Nurten; Zoto, Teuta; Yasar, Umit; Kayaalp, S Oguz; Bozkurt, Atilla

    2011-03-01

    The constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays a major role in circulatory homoeostasis and shows genetic polymorphism. eNOS is expressed and functional in blood cells, including erythrocytes. There is limited knowledge about the consequences of eNOS genetic variability in haemorheological parameters and erythrocyte functioning. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of three eNOS genetic polymorphisms, namely exonic G894T (Glu298Asp), intronic VNTR (27-bp repeat) and 5'-flanking T(-786)C polymorphisms on haemorheological variables, such as erythrocyte deformability and erythrocyte aggregation (rouleaux formation) in healthy non-smoking volunteers. Sixty subjects (19 women, 41 men) were examined for genotypes and haemorheological variables. Genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction and restriction analysis. Haemorheological variables were measured by means of a laser-assisted optical rotational cell analyser (LORCA). Erythrocyte aggregation was significantly decreased in individuals with 894TT genotype when compared to subjects with the (G) allele. Aggregation indices (AI) were 54.7±3.2% versus 61.0±0.9% (p=0.026), and the half-lives (t(1/2) ) for aggregation formation were 3.43±0.43 versus 2.55±0.12 sec. (p=0.024), respectively. Similarly, VNTR-bb genotype significantly altered erythrocyte aggregability. AI values were 58.7±1.1% in subjects with VNTR-a allele versus 63.7±1.2% in subjects with bb genotype (p=0.011); t(1/2) values were 2.86±0.16 versus 2.20±0.13 sec., respectively (p=0.016). T(-786)C polymorphism did not change any haemorheological parameters. These findings suggest that eNOS 894TT genotype is associated with decreased erythrocyte aggregation, while VNTR-bb genotype increases aggregability in healthy human individuals. eNOS genetic variants may contribute in the pathogenesis of microvascular disorders by altering erythrocyte functions in human beings. PMID:20977680

  18. Effects of Glucose Control and Variability on Endothelial Function and Repair in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Robert P.; Dye, Amanda S.; Huang, Hong; Bauer, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Endothelial dysfunction and increased inflammation are precursors of cardiovascular disease in type 1 diabetes (T1D) and occur even in adolescents with T1D. The goal of this study was to determine the relationship of endothelial dysfunction to various measures of glycemia. Research Design and Methods. Forearm blood flow (FBF, venous occlusion plethysmography) was measured before and after 5 min of upper arm vascular occlusion in 17 adolescents with uncomplicated type 1 diabetes. Endothelial function was assessed as postocclusion FBF and forearm vascular resistance (FVR, mean arterial pressure/FBF). Fasting glucose, 72 hour mean glucose and standard deviation from continuous glucose monitoring, hemoglobin A1c, and hemoglobin A1c by duration area under the curve were used to assess immediate, short-term, and intermediate- and long-term glycemia. Results. Postocclusion FBF (r = −0.53, P = 0.030) negatively correlated and postocclusion FVR positively correlated (r = 0.52, P = 0.031) with hemoglobin A1c levels. FVR was positively associated with log 3 day mean glucose (r = 0.55, P = 0.027). Postocclusion FBF (2.8 ± 1.1 versus 3.4 ± 0.5 mL/dL/min, mean ± SE, P = 0.084) tended to be lower and FVR (31.4 ± 10.4 versus 23.9 ± 4.4 mmHg dL min/mL, P = 0.015) was significantly higher in subjects with hemoglobin A1c above the median (8.3%) compared to those with lower hemoglobin A1c levels. Conclusions. These results demonstrate that poor intermediate-term glycemic control is associated with impaired endothelial function. PMID:24490081

  19. Pharmacological neutropenia prevents endothelial dysfunction but not smooth muscle functions impairment induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Pétrault, Olivier; Ouk, Thavarak; Gautier, Sophie; Laprais, Maud; Gelé, Patrick; Bastide, Michèle; Bordet, Régis

    2005-01-01

    The polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) activation and mobilization observed in acute cerebral infarction contribute to the brain tissue damage, but PMN could also be involved in postischemic functional injury of ischemied blood vessel. This study was undertaken to investigate whether pharmacological neutropenia could modify the postischemic endothelial dysfunction in comparison to smooth muscle whose impairment is likely more related to reperfusion and oxidative stress. A cerebral ischemia–reperfusion by endoluminal occlusion of right middle cerebral artery (MCA) was performed 4 days after intravenous administration of vinblastine or 12 h after RP-3 anti-rat neutrophils monoclonal antibody (mAb RP-3) injection into the peritoneal cavity, on male Wistar rats with 1-h ischemia then followed by 24-h reperfusion period. Brain infarct volume was measured by histomorphometric analysis and vascular endothelial and smooth muscle reactivity of MCA was analysed using Halpern myograph. Neutropenia induced a neuroprotective effect as demonstrated by a significant decrease of brain infarct size. In parallel to neuroprotection, neutropenia prevented postischemic impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxing response to acetylcholine. In contrast, smooth muscle functional alterations were not prevented by neutropenia. Ischemia–reperfusion-induced myogenic tone impairment remained unchanged in vinblastine and mAb RP-3-treated rats. Postischemic Kir2.x-dependent relaxation impairment was not prevented in neutropenic conditions. The fully relaxation of smooth muscle response to sodium nitroprusside was similar in all groups. Our results evidenced the dissociate prevention of pharmacologically induced neutropenia on postischemic vascular endothelial and smooth muscle impairment. The selective endothelial protection by neutropenia is parallel to a neuroprotective effect suggesting a possible relationship between the two phenomena. PMID:15700030

  20. Effects of glucose control and variability on endothelial function and repair in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert P; Dye, Amanda S; Huang, Hong; Bauer, John A

    2013-01-01

    Background. Endothelial dysfunction and increased inflammation are precursors of cardiovascular disease in type 1 diabetes (T1D) and occur even in adolescents with T1D. The goal of this study was to determine the relationship of endothelial dysfunction to various measures of glycemia. Research Design and Methods. Forearm blood flow (FBF, venous occlusion plethysmography) was measured before and after 5 min of upper arm vascular occlusion in 17 adolescents with uncomplicated type 1 diabetes. Endothelial function was assessed as postocclusion FBF and forearm vascular resistance (FVR, mean arterial pressure/FBF). Fasting glucose, 72 hour mean glucose and standard deviation from continuous glucose monitoring, hemoglobin A1c, and hemoglobin A1c by duration area under the curve were used to assess immediate, short-term, and intermediate- and long-term glycemia. Results. Postocclusion FBF (r = -0.53, P = 0.030) negatively correlated and postocclusion FVR positively correlated (r = 0.52, P = 0.031) with hemoglobin A1c levels. FVR was positively associated with log 3 day mean glucose (r = 0.55, P = 0.027). Postocclusion FBF (2.8 ± 1.1 versus 3.4 ± 0.5 mL/dL/min, mean ± SE, P = 0.084) tended to be lower and FVR (31.4 ± 10.4 versus 23.9 ± 4.4 mmHg dL min/mL, P = 0.015) was significantly higher in subjects with hemoglobin A1c above the median (8.3%) compared to those with lower hemoglobin A1c levels. Conclusions. These results demonstrate that poor intermediate-term glycemic control is associated with impaired endothelial function. PMID:24490081

  1. κ-Opioid Receptor Stimulation Improves Endothelial Function via Akt-stimulated NO Production in Hyperlipidemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fei; Zheng, Xu-Yang; Li, Juan; Zhang, Shu-Miao; Feng, Na; Guo, Hai-Tao; Jia, Min; Wang, Yue-Min; Fan, Rong; Pei, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of U50,488H (a selective κ-opioid receptor agonist) on endothelial function impaired by hyperlipidemia and to determine the role of Akt-stimulated NO production in it. Hyperlipidemic model was established by feeding rats with a high-fat diet for 14 weeks. U50,488H and nor-BNI (a selective κ-opioid receptor antagonist) were administered intraperitoneally. In vitro, the involvement of the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway in the effect of U50,488H was studied using cultured endothelial cells subjected to artificial hyperlipidemia. Serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations dramatically increased after high-fat diet feeding. Administration of U50,488H significantly alleviated endothelial ultrastructural destruction and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation impairment caused by hyperlipidemia. U50,488H also increased Akt/eNOS phosphorylation and serum/medium NO level both in vivo and in vitro. U50,488H increased eNOS activity and suppressed iNOS activity in vivo. The effects of U50,488H were abolished in vitro by siRNAs targeting κ-opioid receptor and Akt or PI3K/Akt/eNOS inhibitors. All effects of U50,488H were blocked by nor-BNI. These results demonstrate that κ-opioid receptor stimulation normalizes endothelial ultrastructure and function under hyperlipidemic condition. Its mechanism is related to the preservation of eNOS phosphorylation through activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and downregulation of iNOS expression/activity. PMID:27226238

  2. κ-Opioid Receptor Stimulation Improves Endothelial Function via Akt-stimulated NO Production in Hyperlipidemic Rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fei; Zheng, Xu-Yang; Li, Juan; Zhang, Shu-Miao; Feng, Na; Guo, Hai-Tao; Jia, Min; Wang, Yue-Min; Fan, Rong; Pei, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of U50,488H (a selective κ-opioid receptor agonist) on endothelial function impaired by hyperlipidemia and to determine the role of Akt-stimulated NO production in it. Hyperlipidemic model was established by feeding rats with a high-fat diet for 14 weeks. U50,488H and nor-BNI (a selective κ-opioid receptor antagonist) were administered intraperitoneally. In vitro, the involvement of the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway in the effect of U50,488H was studied using cultured endothelial cells subjected to artificial hyperlipidemia. Serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations dramatically increased after high-fat diet feeding. Administration of U50,488H significantly alleviated endothelial ultrastructural destruction and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation impairment caused by hyperlipidemia. U50,488H also increased Akt/eNOS phosphorylation and serum/medium NO level both in vivo and in vitro. U50,488H increased eNOS activity and suppressed iNOS activity in vivo. The effects of U50,488H were abolished in vitro by siRNAs targeting κ-opioid receptor and Akt or PI3K/Akt/eNOS inhibitors. All effects of U50,488H were blocked by nor-BNI. These results demonstrate that κ-opioid receptor stimulation normalizes endothelial ultrastructure and function under hyperlipidemic condition. Its mechanism is related to the preservation of eNOS phosphorylation through activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and downregulation of iNOS expression/activity. PMID:27226238

  3. Blueberries improve endothelial function, but not blood pressure, in adults with metabolic syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Stull, April J; Cash, Katherine C; Champagne, Catherine M; Gupta, Alok K; Boston, Raymond; Beyl, Robbie A; Johnson, William D; Cefalu, William T

    2015-06-01

    Blueberry consumption has been shown to have various health benefits in humans. However, little is known about the effect of blueberry consumption on blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity in humans. The present study investigated the role of blueberry consumption on modifying blood pressure in subjects with metabolic syndrome. In addition, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity (secondary measurements) were also assessed. A double-blind and placebo-controlled study was conducted in 44 adults (blueberry, n = 23; and placebo, n = 21). They were randomized to receive a blueberry or placebo smoothie twice daily for six weeks. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity were assessed pre- and post-intervention. The blood pressure and insulin sensitivity did not differ between the blueberry and placebo groups. However, the mean change in resting endothelial function, expressed as reactive hyperemia index (RHI), was improved significantly more in the group consuming the blueberries versus the placebo group (p = 0.024). Even after adjusting for confounding factors, i.e., the percent body fat and gender, the blueberry group still had a greater improvement in endothelial function when compared to their counterpart (RHI; 0.32 ± 0.13 versus -0.33 ± 0.14; p = 0.0023). In conclusion, daily dietary consumption of blueberries did not improve blood pressure, but improved (i.e., increased) endothelial function over six weeks in subjects with metabolic syndrome. PMID:26024297

  4. Zoledronate Inhibits Ischemia-Induced Neovascularization by Impairing the Mobilization and Function of Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shih-Hung; Huang, Po-Hsun; Chang, Wei-Chou; Tsai, Hsiao-Ya; Lin, Chih-Pei; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Wu, Tao-Cheng; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2012-01-01

    Background Bisphosphonates are a class of pharmacologic compounds that are commonly used to treat postmenopausal osteoporosis and malignant osteolytic processes. Studies have shown that bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a significant role in postnatal neovascularization. Whether the nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate zoledronate inhibits ischemia-induced neovascularization by modulating EPC functions remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Unilateral hindlimb ischemia was surgically induced in wild-type mice after 2 weeks of treatment with vehicle or zoledronate (low-dose: 30 μg/kg; high-dose: 100 μg/kg). Doppler perfusion imaging demonstrated that the ischemic limb/normal side blood perfusion ratio was significantly lower in wild-type mice treated with low-dose zoledronate and in mice treated with high-dose zoledronate than in controls 4 weeks after ischemic surgery (control vs. low-dose vs. high-dose: 87±7% vs. *61±18% vs. **49±17%, *p<0.01, **p<0.005 compared to control). Capillary densities were also significantly lower in mice treated with low-dose zoledronate and in mice treated with high-dose zoledronate than in control mice. Flow cytometry analysis showed impaired mobilization of EPC-like cells (Sca-1+/Flk-1+) after surgical induction of ischemia in mice treated with zoledronate but normal levels of mobilization in mice treated with vehicle. In addition, ischemic tissue from mice that received zoledronate treatment exhibited significantly lower levels of the active form of MMP-9, lower levels of VEGF, and lower levels of phosphorylated eNOS and phosphorylated Akt than ischemic tissue from mice that received vehicle. Results of the in vitro studies showed that incubation with zoledronate inhibited the viability, migration, and tube-forming capacities of EPC. Conclusions/Significance Zoledronate inhibited ischemia-induced neovascularization by impairing EPC mobilization and angiogenic functions. These findings suggest

  5. Hyaluronidase 1 Deficiency Preserves Endothelial Function and Glycocalyx Integrity in Early Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dogné, Sophie; Rath, Géraldine; Jouret, François; Caron, Nathalie; Dessy, Chantal; Flamion, Bruno

    2016-09-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a major component of the glycocalyx involved in the vascular wall and endothelial glomerular permeability barrier. Endocytosed hyaluronidase HYAL1 is known to degrade HA into small fragments in different cell types, including endothelial cells. In diabetes, the size and permeability of the glycocalyx are altered. In addition, patients with type 1 diabetes present increased plasma levels of both HA and HYAL1. To investigate the potential implication of HYAL1 in the development of diabetes-induced endothelium dysfunction, we measured endothelial markers, endothelium-dependent vasodilation, arteriolar glycocalyx size, and glomerular barrier properties in wild-type and HYAL1 knockout (KO) mice with or without streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes. We observed that 4 weeks after STZ injections, the lack of HYAL1 1) prevents diabetes-induced increases in soluble P-selectin concentrations and limits the impact of the disease on endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH)-mediated vasorelaxation; 2) increases glycocalyx thickness and maintains glycocalyx structure and HA content during diabetes; and 3) prevents diabetes-induced glomerular barrier dysfunction assessed using the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio and urinary ratio of 70- to 40-kDa dextran. Our findings suggest that HYAL1 contributes to endothelial and glycocalyx dysfunction induced by diabetes. HYAL1 inhibitors could be explored as a new therapeutic approach to prevent vascular complications in diabetes. PMID:27246914

  6. Febuxostat improves endothelial function in hemodialysis patients with hyperuricemia: A randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, Yuki; Kikuchi, Kan; Tsuruta, Yukio; Sasaki, Yuko; Moriyama, Takahito; Itabashi, Mitsuyo; Takei, Takashi; Uchida, Keiko; Akiba, Takashi; Tsuchiya, Ken; Nitta, Kosaku

    2015-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is often found in both hyperuricemia and hemodialysis patients. Recent studies have shown that treating hyperuricemia with allopurinol improves endothelial dysfunction. This study is performed to assess the effect of febuxostat on endothelial dysfunction in hemodialysis patients with hyperuricemia. We randomly assigned 53 hemodialysis patients with hyperuricemia to a febuxostat (10 mg daily) group and a control group and measured flow-mediated dilation, serum uric acid (UA) levels, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein (MDA-LDL), and highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) at baseline and at the end of a 4-week study period. Flow-mediated dilation increased from 5.3% ± 2.4% to 8.9% ± 3.6% in the febuxostat group but did not change significantly in the control group. Treatment with febuxostat resulted in a significant decrease in serum UA level and a significant decrease in MDA-LDL compared with baseline, but no significant difference was observed in hsCRP level or blood pressure. No significant differences were observed in the control group. Febuxostat improved endothelial dysfunction and reduced serum UA levels and oxidative stress in hemodialysis patients with hyperuricemia. PMID:25998500

  7. TREM-1 and Pentraxin-3 Plasma Levels and Their Association with Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Obesity, and Endothelial Function in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinkwan; Gozal, David; Bhattacharjee, Rakesh; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common health problem in children and increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) plays an important role in innate immunity and amplifies inflammatory responses. Pentraxin-3 is predominantly released from macrophages and vascular endothelial cells, plays an important role in atherogenesis, and has emerged as a biomarker of CVD risk. Thus, we hypothesized that plasma TREM-1 and pentraxin-3 levels would be elevated in children with OSA. Methods: One hundred six children (mean age: 8.3 ± 1.6 y) were included after they underwent overnight polysomnographic evaluation and a fasting blood sample was drawn the morning after the sleep study. Endothelial function was assessed with a modified hyperemic test after cuff-induced occlusion of the brachial artery. Plasma TREM-1 and pentraxin-3 levels were assayed using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Circulating microparticles (MPs) were assessed using flow cytometry after staining with cell-specific antibodies. Results: Children with OSA had significantly higher TREM-1 and pentraxin-3 levels (versus controls: P < 0.01, P < 0.05, respectively). Plasma TREM-1 was significantly correlated with both body mass index (BMI)-z score and the obstructive apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) in univariate models. Pentraxin-3 levels were inversely correlated with BMI-z score (r = -0.245, P < 0.01), and positively associated with endothelial MPs and platelet MPs (r = 0.230, P < 0.01 and r = 0.302, P < 0.01). Both plasma TREM-1 and pentraxin-3 levels were independently associated with AHI in multivariate models after controlling for age, sex, race, and BMI-z score (P < 0.001 for TREM-1 and P < 0.001 for pentraxin-3). However, no significant associations emerged between TREM-1, pentraxin-3, and endothelial function. Conclusions: Plasma TREM-1 and pentraxin-3 levels are elevated in pediatric OSA, and may play a role in

  8. Endothelial PI3K-C2α, a class II PI3K, has an essential role in angiogenesis and vascular barrier function.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Kazuaki; Yoshida, Kotaro; Cui, Hong; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Takuwa, Noriko; Okamoto, Yasuo; Du, Wa; Qi, Xun; Asanuma, Ken; Sugihara, Kazushi; Aki, Sho; Miyazawa, Hidekazu; Biswas, Kuntal; Nagakura, Chisa; Ueno, Masaya; Iseki, Shoichi; Schwartz, Robert J; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Takehiko; Matsui, Osamu; Asano, Masahide; Adams, Ralf H; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Takuwa, Yoh

    2012-10-01

    The class II α-isoform of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K-C2α) is localized in endosomes, the trans-Golgi network and clathrin-coated vesicles; however, its functional role is not well understood. Global or endothelial-cell-specific deficiency of PI3K-C2α resulted in embryonic lethality caused by defects in sprouting angiogenesis and vascular maturation. PI3K-C2α knockdown in endothelial cells resulted in a decrease in the number of PI3-phosphate-enriched endosomes, impaired endosomal trafficking, defective delivery of VE-cadherin to endothelial cell junctions and defective junction assembly. PI3K-C2α knockdown also impaired endothelial cell signaling, including vascular endothelial growth factor receptor internalization and endosomal RhoA activation. Together, the effects of PI3K-C2α knockdown led to defective endothelial cell migration, proliferation, tube formation and barrier integrity. Endothelial PI3K-C2α deficiency in vivo suppressed postischemic and tumor angiogenesis and diminished vascular barrier function with a greatly augmented susceptibility to anaphylaxis and a higher incidence of dissecting aortic aneurysm formation in response to angiotensin II infusion. Thus, PI3K-C2α has a crucial role in vascular formation and barrier integrity and represents a new therapeutic target for vascular disease. PMID:22983395

  9. Physiologically Modeled Pulse Dynamics to Improve Function in In Vitro-Endothelialized Small-Diameter Vascular Grafts.

    PubMed

    Uzarski, Joseph S; Cores, Jhon; McFetridge, Peter S

    2015-11-01

    The lack of a functional endothelium on small-diameter vascular grafts leads to intimal hyperplasia and thrombotic occlusion. Shear stress conditioning through controlled hydrodynamics within in vitro perfusion bioreactors has shown promise as a mechanism to drive endothelial cell (EC) phenotype from an activated, pro-inflammatory wound state toward a quiescent functional state that inhibits responses that lead to occlusive failure. As part of an overall design strategy to engineer functional vascular grafts, we present a novel two-phase shear conditioning approach to improve graft endothelialization. Axial rotation was first used to seed uniform EC monolayers onto the lumenal surface of decellularized scaffolds derived from the human umbilical vein. Using computer-controlled perfusion circuits, a flow-ramping paradigm was applied to adapt endothelia to arterial levels of fluid shear stress and pressure without graft denudation. The effects of constant pulse frequencies (CF) on EC quiescence were then compared with pulse frequencies modeled from temporal fluctuations in blood flow observed in vivo, termed physiologically modeled pulse dynamics (PMPD). Constructs exposed to PMPD for 72 h expressed a more functional transcriptional profile, lower metabolic activity (39.8% ± 8.4% vs. 62.5% ± 11.5% reduction, p = 0.012), and higher nitric oxide production (80.42 ± 23.93 vs. 48.75 ± 6.93 nmol/10(5) cells, p = 0.028) than those exposed to CF. By manipulating in vitro flow conditions to mimic natural physiology, endothelialized vascular grafts can be stimulated to express a nonactivated phenotype that would better inhibit peripheral cell adhesion and smooth muscle cell hyperplasia, conditions that typically lead to occlusive failure. Development of robust, functional endothelia on vascular grafts by modulation of environmental conditions within perfusion bioreactors may ultimately improve clinical outcomes in vascular bypass grafting. PMID:25996580

  10. Serotonin and Dopamine: Unifying Affective, Activational, and Decision Functions

    PubMed Central

    Cools, Roshan; Nakamura, Kae; Daw, Nathaniel D

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin, like dopamine (DA), has long been implicated in adaptive behavior, including decision making and reinforcement learning. However, although the two neuromodulators are tightly related and have a similar degree of functional importance, compared with DA, we have a much less specific understanding about the mechanisms by which serotonin affects behavior. Here, we draw on recent work on computational models of dopaminergic function to suggest a framework by which many of the seemingly diverse functions associated with both DA and serotonin—comprising both affective and activational ones, as well as a number of other functions not overtly related to either—can be seen as consequences of a single root mechanism. PMID:20736991

  11. The effect of RGD fluorosurfactant polymer modification of ePTFE on endothelial cell adhesion, growth, and function

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Coby C.; Kligman, Faina; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Marchant, Roger E.

    2007-01-01

    We have synthesized and characterized a novel peptide fluorosurfactant polymer (PFSP) modification that facilitates the adhesion and growth of endothelial cells on ePTFE vascular graft material. This PFSP consists of a poly(vinyl amine) (PVAm) backbone with integrin binding Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides and perfluorocarbon pendant branches for adsorption and stable adhesion to underlying ePTFE. Aqueous PFSP solution was used to modify the surface of fluorocarbon substrates. Following subconfluent seeding, endothelial cell (EC) adhesion and growth on PFSP was assessed by determining cell population at different time points. Spectroscopic results indicated successful synthesis of PFSP. PFSP modification of ePTFE reduced the receding water contact angle measurement from 120° to 6°, indicating successful surface modification. Quantification of cell population demonstrated reduced EC attachment efficiency but increased growth rate on RGD PFSP compared with fibronectin (FN). Actin staining revealed a well-developed cytoskeleton for ECs on RGD PFSP indicative of stable adhesion. Uptake of acetylated low-density lipoprotein and positive staining for VE-Cadherin confirm EC phenotype for adherent cells. Production of prostacyclin, a potent antiplatelet agent, was equivalent between ECs on FN and RGD PFSP surfaces. Our results indicate successful synthesis and surface modification with PFSP; this is a simple, quantitative, and effective approach to modifying ePTFE to encourage endothelial cell attachment, growth, and function. PMID:16762410

  12. Obesity-induced adipokine imbalance impairs mouse pulmonary vascular endothelial function and primes the lung for injury

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Duong, Michelle; Wang, Nadan; Paudyal, Bishnuhari; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Kallen, Caleb B.; Sun, Jianxin; Zhu, Ying; Walsh, Kenneth; Summer, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) but mechanisms mediating this association are unknown. While obesity is known to impair systemic blood vessel function, and predisposes to systemic vascular diseases, its effects on the pulmonary circulation are largely unknown. We hypothesized that the chronic low grade inflammation of obesity impairs pulmonary vascular homeostasis and primes the lung for acute injury. The lung endothelium from obese mice expressed higher levels of leukocyte adhesion markers and lower levels of cell-cell junctional proteins when compared to lean mice. We tested whether systemic factors are responsible for these alterations in the pulmonary endothelium; treatment of primary lung endothelial cells with obese serum enhanced the expression of adhesion proteins and reduced the expression of endothelial junctional proteins when compared to lean serum. Alterations in pulmonary endothelial cells observed in obese mice were associated with enhanced susceptibility to LPS-induced lung injury. Restoring serum adiponectin levels reversed the effects of obesity on the lung endothelium and attenuated susceptibility to acute injury. Our work indicates that obesity impairs pulmonary vascular homeostasis and enhances susceptibility to acute injury and provides mechanistic insight into the increased prevalence of ARDS in obese humans. PMID:26068229

  13. Obesity-induced adipokine imbalance impairs mouse pulmonary vascular endothelial function and primes the lung for injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Duong, Michelle; Wang, Nadan; Paudyal, Bishnuhari; Suratt, Benjamin T; Kallen, Caleb B; Sun, Jianxin; Zhu, Ying; Walsh, Kenneth; Summer, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) but mechanisms mediating this association are unknown. While obesity is known to impair systemic blood vessel function, and predisposes to systemic vascular diseases, its effects on the pulmonary circulation are largely unknown. We hypothesized that the chronic low grade inflammation of obesity impairs pulmonary vascular homeostasis and primes the lung for acute injury. The lung endothelium from obese mice expressed higher levels of leukocyte adhesion markers and lower levels of cell-cell junctional proteins when compared to lean mice. We tested whether systemic factors are responsible for these alterations in the pulmonary endothelium; treatment of primary lung endothelial cells with obese serum enhanced the expression of adhesion proteins and reduced the expression of endothelial junctional proteins when compared to lean serum. Alterations in pulmonary endothelial cells observed in obese mice were associated with enhanced susceptibility to LPS-induced lung injury. Restoring serum adiponectin levels reversed the effects of obesity on the lung endothelium and attenuated susceptibility to acute injury. Our work indicates that obesity impairs pulmonary vascular homeostasis and enhances susceptibility to acute injury and provides mechanistic insight into the increased prevalence of ARDS in obese humans. PMID:26068229

  14. In Vitro Recapitulation of Functional Microvessels for the Study of Endothelial Shear Response, Nitric Oxide and [Ca2+]i

    PubMed Central

    He, Pingnian; Liu, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic technologies enable in vitro studies to closely simulate in vivo microvessel environment with complexity. Such method overcomes certain constrains of the statically cultured endothelial monolayers and enables the cells grow under physiological range of shear flow with geometry similar to microvessels in vivo. However, there are still existing knowledge gaps and lack of convincing evidence to demonstrate and quantify key biological features of the microfluidic microvessels. In this paper, using advanced micromanufacturing and microfluidic technologies, we presented an engineered microvessel model that mimicked the dimensions and network structures of in vivo microvessels with a long-term and continuous perfusion capability, as well as high-resolution and real-time imaging capability. Through direct comparisons with studies conducted in intact microvessels, our results demonstrated that the cultured microvessels formed under perfused conditions recapitulated certain key features of the microvessels in vivo. In particular, primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells were successfully cultured the entire inner surfaces of the microchannel network with well-developed junctions indicated by VE-cadherin staining. The morphological and proliferative responses of endothelial cells to shear stresses were quantified under different flow conditions which was simulated with three-dimensional shear dependent numerical flow model. Furthermore, we successfully measured agonist-induced changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration and nitric oxide production at individual endothelial cell levels using fluorescence imaging. The results were comparable to those derived from individually perfused intact venules. With in vivo validation of its functionalities, our microfluidic model demonstrates a great potential for biological applications and bridges the gaps between in vitro and in vivo microvascular research. PMID:25965067

  15. Endothelial immunomediated reactivity in acute cardiac ischaemia: Role of endothelin 1, interleukin 8 and NT-proBNP in patients affected by unstable angina pectoris.

    PubMed

    Caroselli, Costantino; De Rosa, Rosario; Tanzi, Pietro; Rigatelli, Alberto; Bruno, Guglielmo

    2016-09-01

    The role of endothelium in the progression of atheromasic disease has already been demonstrated. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is released from endothelial cells during acute and chronic vascular damage and it appears to be the strongest vasoconstrictor agent known.The aim of this study is to investigate the amount of endothelial damage in patients with unstable angina (UA), as defined by serum levels of ET-1, to verify a possible correlation with increased ischaemic damage by evaluation of serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and interleukin 8 (IL-8) levels.Serum levels of ET-1, IL-8 and NT-proBNP obtained from 10 patients affected by low-risk UA were compared to those belonging to eight healthy subjects. In order to compare the laboratory data pertaining to the two populations, a Student's t-test and a Mann-Whitney U test were performed.Levels of ET-1, IL-8 and NT-proBNP in samples of peripheral blood of patients affected by UA were significantly elevated, compared with those of the control group. The linear correlation analysis demonstrated a positive and significant correlation between levels of ET-1 and IL-8, between levels of ET-1 and NT-proBNP, and between levels of IL-8 and NT-proBNP in subjects affected by UA.Early elevated levels of ET-1, IL-8 and NT-proBNP in patients with UA show a coexistence between ischaemic insults and endothelial damages. A positive and significant linear correlation between levels of ET-1 and IL-8, between levels of ET-1 and NT-proBNP, and between levels of IL-8 and NT-proBNP confirms that an increased ischaemic insult is correlated to inflammation signs and endothelium damage signs.In patients with UA, ischaemia is always associated with a systemic immuno-mediated activity induced by acute endothelial damage. We suggest early administration of ET-1-selective receptor blockers and anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:26684625

  16. Impact of acute caffeine ingestion on endothelial function in subjects with and without coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Shechter, Michael; Shalmon, Guy; Scheinowitz, Mickey; Koren-Morag, Nira; Feinberg, Micha S; Harats, Dror; Sela, Ben Ami; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Chouraqui, Pierre

    2011-05-01

    Although coffee is a widely used, pharmacologically active beverage, its impact on the cardiovascular system is controversial. To explore the effect of acute caffeine ingestion on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in subjects without coronary artery disease (CAD; controls) and patients with CAD, we prospectively assessed brachial artery FMD in 40 controls and 40 age- and gender-matched patients with documented stable CAD on 2 separate mornings 1 week to 2 weeks apart. After overnight fasting, discontinuation of all medications for ≥12 hours, and absence of caffeine for >48 hours, participants received capsules with caffeine 200 mg or placebo. One hour after drug ingestion, participants underwent brachial artery FMD and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (NTG) using high-resolution ultrasound. As expected, patients with CAD were more often diabetic, hypertensive, obese, dyslipidemic, and smoked more than controls (p <0.01 for all comparisons). Aspirin, Clopidogrel, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, β blockers, and statins were significantly more common in patients with CAD than in controls (p <0.01 for all comparisons). At baseline, FMD, but not NTG, was significantly lower in patients with CAD compared to controls. Acute caffeine ingestion significantly increased FMD (patients with CAD 5.6 ± 5.0% vs 14.6 ± 5.0%, controls 8.4 ± 2.9% vs 18.6 ± 6.8%, p <0.001 for all comparisons) but not NTG (patients with CAD 13.0 ± 5.2% vs 13.8 ± 6.1%, controls 12.9 ± 3.9% vs 13.9 ± 5.8%, p = NS for all comparisons) and significantly decreased high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (patients with CAD 2.6 ± 1.4 vs 1.4 ± 1.2 mg/L, controls 3.4 ± 3.0 vs 1.2 ± 1.0 mg/L, p <0.001 for all comparisons) in the 2 groups compared to placebo. In conclusion, acute caffeine ingestion significantly improved endothelial function assessed by brachial artery FMD in subjects with and without CAD and was associated with lower plasma markers of inflammation. PMID:21349479

  17. 20-HETE Regulates the Angiogenic Functions of Human Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Contributes to Angiogenesis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Ackerman, Rachel; Saleh, Mohamed; Gotlinger, Katherine H.; Kessler, Michael; Mendelowitz, Lawrence G.; Falck, John R.; Arbab, Ali S.; Scicli, A. Guillermo; Schwartzman, Michal L.

    2014-01-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) contribute to postnatal neovascularization. We identified the cytochrome P450 4A/F–20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (CYP4A/F–20-HETE) system as a novel regulator of EPC functions associated with angiogenesis in vitro. Here, we explored cellular mechanisms by which 20-HETE regulates EPC angiogenic functions and assessed its contribution to EPC-mediated angiogenesis in vivo. Results showed that both hypoxia and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induce CYP4A11 gene and protein expression (the predominant 20-HETE synthases in human EPC), and this is accompanied by an increase in 20-HETE production by ∼1.4- and 1.8-fold, respectively, compared with the control levels. Additional studies demonstrated that 20-HETE and VEGF have a synergistic effect on EPC proliferation, whereas 20-HETE antagonist 20-HEDGE or VEGF-neutralizing antibody negated 20-HETE- or VEGF-induced proliferation, respectively. These findings are consistent with the presence of a positive feedback regulation on EPC proliferation between the 20-HETE and the VEGF pathways. Furthermore, we found that 20-HETE induced EPC adhesion to fibronectin and endothelial cell monolayer by 40 ± 5.6 and 67 ± 10%, respectively, which was accompanied by a rapid induction of very late antigen-4 and chemokine receptor type 4 mRNA and protein expression. Basal and 20-HETE-stimulated increases in adhesion were negated by the inhibition of the CYP4A–20-HETE system. Lastly, EPC increased angiogenesis in vivo by 3.6 ± 0.2-fold using the Matrigel plug angiogenesis assay, and these increases were markedly reduced by the local inhibition of 20-HETE system. These results strengthened the notion that 20-HETE regulates the angiogenic functions of EPC in vitro and EPC-mediated angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:24403517

  18. 20-HETE regulates the angiogenic functions of human endothelial progenitor cells and contributes to angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Ackerman, Rachel; Saleh, Mohamed; Gotlinger, Katherine H; Kessler, Michael; Mendelowitz, Lawrence G; Falck, John R; Arbab, Ali S; Scicli, A Guillermo; Schwartzman, Michal L; Yang, Jing; Guo, Austin M

    2014-03-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) contribute to postnatal neovascularization. We identified the cytochrome P450 4A/F-20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (CYP4A/F-20-HETE) system as a novel regulator of EPC functions associated with angiogenesis in vitro. Here, we explored cellular mechanisms by which 20-HETE regulates EPC angiogenic functions and assessed its contribution to EPC-mediated angiogenesis in vivo. Results showed that both hypoxia and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induce CYP4A11 gene and protein expression (the predominant 20-HETE synthases in human EPC), and this is accompanied by an increase in 20-HETE production by ~1.4- and 1.8-fold, respectively, compared with the control levels. Additional studies demonstrated that 20-HETE and VEGF have a synergistic effect on EPC proliferation, whereas 20-HETE antagonist 20-HEDGE or VEGF-neutralizing antibody negated 20-HETE- or VEGF-induced proliferation, respectively. These findings are consistent with the presence of a positive feedback regulation on EPC proliferation between the 20-HETE and the VEGF pathways. Furthermore, we found that 20-HETE induced EPC adhesion to fibronectin and endothelial cell monolayer by 40 ± 5.6 and 67 ± 10%, respectively, which was accompanied by a rapid induction of very late antigen-4 and chemokine receptor type 4 mRNA and protein expression. Basal and 20-HETE-stimulated increases in adhesion were negated by the inhibition of the CYP4A-20-HETE system. Lastly, EPC increased angiogenesis in vivo by 3.6 ± 0.2-fold using the Matrigel plug angiogenesis assay, and these increases were markedly reduced by the local inhibition of 20-HETE system. These results strengthened the notion that 20-HETE regulates the angiogenic functions of EPC in vitro and EPC-mediated angiogenesis in vivo. PMID:24403517

  19. Effects of Olive Oil on Markers of Inflammation and Endothelial Function-A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Schwingshackl, Lukas; Christoph, Marina; Hoffmann, Georg

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present systematic review was to synthesize data from randomized controlled trials investigating the effects of olive oil on markers of inflammation or endothelial function. Literature search in electronic databases Cochrane Trial Register, EMBASE, and MEDLINE was performed. Thirty studies enrolling 3106 participants fulfilled the selection criteria. Pooled effects of different interventions were assessed as mean difference using a random effects model. Olive oil interventions (with daily consumption ranging approximately between 1 mg and 50 mg) resulted in a significantly more pronounced decrease in C-reactive protein (mean difference: -0.64 mg/L, (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.96 to -0.31), p < 0.0001, n = 15 trials) and interleukin-6 (mean difference: -0.29 (95% CI -0.7 to -0.02), p < 0.04, n = 7 trials) as compared to controls, respectively. Values of flow-mediated dilatation (given as absolute percentage) were significantly more increased in individuals subjected to olive oil interventions (mean difference: 0.76% (95% CI 0.27 to 1.24), p < 0.002, n = 8 trials). These results provide evidence that olive oil might exert beneficial effects on endothelial function as well as markers of inflammation and endothelial function, thus representing a key ingredient contributing to the cardiovascular-protective effects of a Mediterranean diet. However, due to the heterogeneous study designs (e.g., olive oil given as a supplement or as part of dietary pattern, variations in control diets), a conservative interpretation of the results is necessary. PMID:26378571

  20. Relationship between chronic tadalafil administration and improvement of endothelial function in men with erectile dysfunction: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aversa, A; Greco, E; Bruzziches, R; Pili, M; Rosano, G; Spera, G

    2007-01-01

    Men with erectile dysfunction (ED) frequently have a disproportionate burden of comorbid vascular disorders including atherosclerotic disease. We investigated whether scheduled tadalafil is better than on-demand (OD) in improving endothelium-dependent vasodilatation of cavernous arteries in men with ED and whether this effect is also exerted on markers of endothelial function. We did an open-label, randomized, crossover study including 20 male outclinic patients aged 18 years or older (mean age 54 years) who had at least a 3-month history of ED of any severity or etiology. Tadalafil (20 mg) on alternate days (ADs) or OD was administered for 4 weeks. Primary end points were variations of basal inflow (peak systolic velocity (PSV)) and flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of cavernous arteries compared with baseline at penile Duplex ultrasound. Secondary end points were variations of Q13-SIEDY scores regarding morning erections and of markers of endothelial function, that is, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM), intercellular cell adhesion molecule, endothelin-1 (ET-1), insulin and C-reactive protein (CRP). PSVs and FMD were higher after AD treatment when compared with OD and baseline, respectively (P=0.0001), and improvements were maintained from 2 weeks after discontinuation (P<0.005). Patients receiving tadalafil AD experienced a significant improvement of morning erections as compared to AD treatment (P<0.0001); ET1, VCAM and CRP showed a robust decrease after chronic vs OD regimes (P<0.05), with concomitant increase in insulin levels (P<0.05), without any variation in blood pressure and other laboratory parameters. Chronic but not OD tadalafil improves endothelial function with sustained effects from its discontinuation. Chronic treatment also produces a dramatic increase in morning erections, which determines better oxygenation to the penis, thus providing a rationale for vascular rehabilitation. PMID:16943794

  1. Catechin averts experimental diabetes mellitus-induced vascular endothelial structural and functional abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Pooja; Khanna, Deepa; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with an induction of vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED), an initial event that could lead to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and hypertension. Previous studies showed that catechin, a key component of green tea, possesses vascular beneficial effects. We investigated the effect of catechin hydrate in diabetes mellitus-induced experimental vascular endothelial abnormalities (VEA). Streptozotocin (50 mg/kg, i.p., once) administration to rats produced diabetes mellitus, which subsequently induced VEA in 8 weeks by markedly attenuating acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation in the isolated aortic ring preparation, decreasing aortic and serum nitrite/nitrate concentrations and impairing aortic endothelial integrity. These abnormalities in diabetic rats were accompanied with elevated aortic superoxide anion generation and serum lipid peroxidation in addition to hyperglycemia. Catechin hydrate treatment (50 mg/kg/day p.o., 3 weeks) markedly prevented diabetes mellitus-induced VEA and vascular oxidative stress. Intriguingly, in vitro incubation of L-NAME (100 μM), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, or Wortmannin (100 nM), a selective inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), markedly prevented catechin hydrate-induced improvement in acetylcholine-provoked endothelium-dependent relaxation in the diabetic rat aorta. Moreover, catechin hydrate treatment considerably reduced the elevated level of serum glucose in diabetic rats. In conclusion, catechin hydrate treatment prevents diabetes mellitus-induced VED through the activation of endothelial PI3K signal and subsequent activation of eNOS and generation of nitric oxide. In addition, reduction in high glucose, vascular oxidative stress, and lipid peroxidation might additionally contribute to catechin hydrate-associated prevention of diabetic VEA. PMID:24048981

  2. Genetic Variation in the Platelet Endothelial Aggregation Receptor 1 Gene Results in Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fisch, Adam S.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Backman, Joshua D.; Wang, Hong; Donnelly, Patrick; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Parihar, Ankita; Pavlovich, Mary A.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Herzog, William; Harman, Christopher R.; Wren, Jonathan D.; Lewis, Joshua P.

    2015-01-01

    Platelet Endothelial Aggregation Receptor 1 (PEAR1) is a newly identified membrane protein reported to be involved in multiple vascular and thrombotic processes. While most studies to date have focused on the effects of this receptor in platelets, PEAR1 is located in multiple tissues including the endothelium, where it is most highly expressed. Our first objective was to evaluate the role of PEAR1 in endothelial function by examining flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery in 641 participants from the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention Heart Study. Our second objective was to further define the impact of PEAR1 on cardiovascular disease computationally through meta-analysis of 75,000 microarrays, yielding insights regarding PEAR1 function, and predictions of phenotypes and diseases affected by PEAR1 dysregulation. Based on the results of this meta-analysis we examined whether genetic variation in PEAR1 influences endothelial function using an ex vivo assay of endothelial cell migration. We observed a significant association between rs12041331 and flow-mediated dilation in participants of the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention Heart Study (P = 0.02). Meta-analysis results revealed that PEAR1 expression is highly correlated with several genes (e.g. ANG2, ACVRL1, ENG) and phenotypes (e.g. endothelial cell migration, angiogenesis) that are integral to endothelial function. Functional validation of these results revealed that PEAR1 rs12041331 is significantly associated with endothelial migration (P = 0.04). Our results suggest for the first time that genetic variation of PEAR1 is a significant determinant of endothelial function through pathways implicated in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26406321

  3. Endothelial Function Increases after a 16-Week Diet and Exercise Intervention in Overweight and Obese Young Women

    PubMed Central

    Cotie, Lisa M.; Josse, Andrea R.; Phillips, Stuart M.; MacDonald, Maureen J.

    2014-01-01

    Weight loss improves endothelial function in overweight individuals. The effects of weight loss through combined aerobic and resistance training and caloric restriction on in vivo vascular measures and blood markers associated with the regulation of endothelial function have not been comprehensively examined. Therefore, we investigated brachial artery endothelial function and potential regulatory blood markers in twenty overweight women (30.3 ± 2.0 years) who participated in 16 weeks of aerobic (5 d/wk) and resistance training (2 d/wk) (combined: ≥250 kcal/d) and caloric restriction (−500 kcal/d versus requirement). Resting brachial artery flow mediated dilation (FMD) and circulating endothelin-1 (ET-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were assessed at baseline and following the intervention. Relative and absolute FMD increased (before: 4.0 ± 0.5% versus after: 6.9 ± 0.6%, P < 0.05, and before: 0.14 ± 0.02 mm versus after: 0.23 ± 0.02 mm, P < 0.05, resp.), while body mass decreased (before: 86.9 ± 2.4 kg versus after: 81.1 ± 2.4 kg, P < 0.05) following the intervention. There were no changes in either blood marker (IL-6: before: 1.5 ± 0.2 pg/mL versus after: 1.5 ± 0.1 pg/mL, P > 0.05, and ET-1: before: 0.55 ± 0.05 pg/mL versus after: 0.59 ± 0.09 pg/mL, P > 0.05). 16 weeks of combined aerobic/resistance training and diet-induced weight loss improved endothelial function in overweight and obese young women, but this increase was not associated with changes in blood markers of vasoconstriction or inflammation. PMID:24772421

  4. Effect of a Tibetan herbal mixture on microvascular endothelial function, heart rate variability and biomarkers of inflammation, clotting and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Daniela; Lambrecht, Julia; Radtke, Thomas; Wilhelm, Matthias; Saner, Hugo

    2015-08-01

    In this 6-week prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled and double-blind study, we investigated the effects of a natural herbal remedy based on a recipe from Tibet (Padma® 28), on microvascular endothelial function, heart rate variability and biomarkers of inflammation, clotting and coagulation in 80 coronary artery disease (CAD) patients (age 66 ± 8 years) on guideline-based medication for secondary prevention. We found no significant effects of Padma 28 and conclude that the addition of Padma 28 to guideline-based secondary prevention treatment of CAD did not lead to significant effects on important surrogate markers in elderly male CAD patients. PMID:25208904

  5. Chinese herbal medicinal ingredients affect secretion of NO, IL-10, ICAM-1 and IL-2 by endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yiyi; He, Kongwang; Zhu, Haodan

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-endotoxin effects of sinomenine, fangchinoline, stachydrine, chuanxionggzine, oxymartrine and evodiamine alkaloids commonly found in Chinese herbal medicines. Porcine endothelial cells were challenged with 1 μg LPS/ml for 3 h and then treated with one of the six alkaloids at three concentrations (1, 5 or 10 μg/ml) for a further 21 h. The supernatants of the cultures were then collected and analyzed for levels of nitric oxide (NO), interleukin (IL)-10, intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and IL-2 using ELISA kits. The results revealed that sinomenine, stachydrine and chuanxionggzine inhibited production of NO; stachydrine and evodiamine inhibited secretion of IL-10; sinomenine and chuanxionggzine down-regulated ICAM-1 expression; oxymartrine and evodiamine decreased production of IL-2 by the LPS-stimulated endothelial cells. Overall, the data from these studies suggested to us that these six alkaloids might effectively reduce inflammatory responses in situ via changes in the formation of these key regulatory molecules/proteins. PMID:25986990

  6. The Effect of Quercus salicina Leaf Extracts on Vascular Endothelial Function: Role of Nitric Oxide.

    PubMed

    Park, Sin-Hee; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Yoon, Jun-Seong; Lee, Hye-Won; Park, Gye-Choon; Yi, Eunyoung; Yoon, Goo; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B; Oak, Min-Ho

    2016-02-01

    Dysfunction of the vascular endothelium is reported as a hallmark of cardiovascular diseases. Many evidences suggest that polyphenols are associated with a decreased global mortality and might be involved in protection against cardiovascular risk. This beneficial effect of polyphenol may be due to many actions as antioxidant that increases bioavailability of nitric oxide, vasodilation or anti-hypertensive properties. To identify new natural medicine candidate for cardiovascular protection, plant extracts used in traditional medicine were evaluated by vascular reactivity system. Porcine coronary artery rings were suspended in organ chambers for the measurement of changes in isometric tension. Screening results indicated that the ethanolic extract of leaf from Quercus salicina (QSE) has been found to exhibit potent vasorelaxant activity. QSE dose-dependently induced endothelium-dependent relaxations, which were abolished by inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (Nomega-nitro-L-arginine). In addition, QSE strongly and dose-dependently activate endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in porcine coronary artery endothelial cell. Taken together, the present study has demonstrated that QSE is a powerful endothelium-dependentvasodilator and that this effect involves increased nitric oxide bioavailability. In conclusion, QSE could be a cardiovascular protective herbal medicine candidate associated with cardiovascular diseases and endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27433730

  7. Hypoxia-Induced Endothelial Progenitor Cell Function Is Blunted in Angiotensinogen Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin-Hwa; Nguyen, Minh-Phuong; Lee, Dongjin; Oh, Goo-Taeg; Lee, You-Mie

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensinogen (AGT), the precursor of angiotensin I, is known to be involved in tumor angiogenesis and associated with the pathogenesis of coronary atherosclerosis. This study was undertaken to determine the role played by AGT in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in tumor progression and metastasis. It was found that the number of EPC colonies formed by AGT heterozygous knockout (AGT+/−) cells was less than that formed by wild-type (WT) cells, and that the migration and tube formation abilities of AGT+/− EPCs were significantly lower than those of WT EPCs. In addition, the gene expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Flk1, angiopoietin (Ang)-1, Ang-2, Tie-2, stromal derived factor (SDF)-1, C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), and of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were suppressed in AGT+/− EPCs. Furthermore, the expressions of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and -2α were downregulated in AGT+/− early EPCs under hypoxic conditions, suggesting a blunting of response to hypoxia. Moreover, the activation of Akt/eNOS signaling pathways induced by VEGF, epithelial growth factor (EGF), or SDF-1α were suppressed in AGT+/− EPCs. In AGT+/− mice, the incorporation of EPCs into the tumor vasculature was significantly reduced, and lung tumor growth and melanoma metastasis were attenuated. In conclusion, AGT is required for hypoxia-induced vasculogenesis. PMID:24938229

  8. AB096. Taurine supplementation improves erectile function in rats with streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes via amelioration of penile fibrosis and endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Yajun; Li, Mingchao; Wang, Tao; Yang, Jun; Rao, Ke; Wang, Shaogang; Yang, Weimin; Liu, Jihong; Ye, Zhangqun

    2016-01-01

    Objective For patients with diabetes, erectile dysfunction (ED) is common and greatly affects quality of life. However, these patients often exhibit a poor response to first-line oral phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. The aim of this study was to investigate whether taurine, a sulfur-containing amino acid, affects diabetic ED (DED). Methods Type 1 diabetes mellitus was induced in male rats using streptozotocin. After 12 weeks, an apomorphine test was conducted to confirm DED. Only rats with DED were administered taurine or vehicle for four weeks. Age-matched nondiabetic rats were administered saline intraperitoneally for four weeks. Erectile function was evaluated by electrical stimulation of the cavernous nerve. Histologic and molecular alterations of the corpus cavernosum also were analyzed. Results Erectile function was significantly reduced in the diabetic rats compared with in the nondiabetic rats, and was ameliorated in the diabetic rats treated with taurine. The corpus cavernosum of the rats with DED exhibited severe fibrosis and decreased smooth muscle content. Deposition of extracellular matrix proteins was increased in the diabetic rats, while expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase/cyclic guanosine monophosphate/nitric oxide pathway–related proteins was reduced. Taurine supplementation restored erectile response as well as histologic and molecular alterations. Conclusions Taurine supplementation improves erectile function in rats with DED probably by potential antifibrotic activity. This finding provides evidence for a potential new therapy for DED.

  9. Lifetime affect and midlife cognitive function: prospective birth cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Richards, M.; Barnett, J. H.; Xu, M. K.; Croudace, T. J.; Gaysina, D.; Kuh, D.; Jones, P. B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recurrent affective problems are predictive of cognitive impairment, but the timing and directionality, and the nature of the cognitive impairment, are unclear. Aims To test prospective associations between life-course affective symptoms and cognitive function in late middle age. Method A total of 1668 men and women were drawn from the Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development (the British 1946 birth cohort). Longitudinal affective symptoms spanning age 13-53 years served as predictors; outcomes consisted of self-reported memory problems at 60-64 years and decline in memory and information processing from age 53 to 60-64 years. Results Regression analyses revealed no clear pattern of association between longitudinal affective symptoms and decline in cognitive test scores, after adjusting for gender, childhood cognitive ability, education and midlife socioeconomic status. In contrast, affective symptoms were strongly, diffusely and independently associated with self-reported memory problems. Conclusions Affective symptoms are more clearly associated with self-reported memory problems in late midlife than with objectively measured cognitive performance. PMID:24357571

  10. Does Subacromial Osteolysis Affect Shoulder Function after Clavicle Hook Plating?

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Siwei; Gan, Minfeng; Sun, Han; Wu, Guizhong; Yang, Huilin; Zhou, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate whether subacromial osteolysis, one of the major complications of the clavicle hook plate procedure, affects shoulder function. Methods. We had performed a retrospective study of 72 patients diagnosed with a Neer II lateral clavicle fracture or Degree-III acromioclavicular joint dislocation in our hospital from July 2012 to December 2013. All these patients had undergone surgery with clavicle hook plate and were divided into two groups based on the occurrence of subacromial osteolysis. By using the Constant-Murley at the first follow-up visit after plates removal, we evaluated patients' shoulder function to judge if it has been affected by subacromial osteolysis. Results. We have analyzed clinical data for these 72 patients, which shows that there is no significant difference between group A (39 patients) and group B (33 patients) in age, gender, injury types or side, and shoulder function (the Constant-Murley scores are 93.38 ± 3.56 versus 94.24 ± 3.60, P > 0.05). Conclusion. The occurrence of subacromial osteolysis is not rare, and also it does not significantly affect shoulder function. PMID:27034937

  11. RhoGDI-1 modulation of the activity of monomeric RhoGTPase RhoA regulates endothelial barrier function in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Gorovoy, Matvey; Neamu, Radu; Niu, Jiaxin; Vogel, Stephen; Predescu, Dan; Miyoshi, Jun; Takai, Yoshimi; Kini, Vidisha; Mehta, Dolly; Malik, Asrar B; Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Tatyana

    2007-07-01

    Rho family GTPases have been implicated in the regulation of endothelial permeability via their actions on actin cytoskeletal organization and integrity of interendothelial junctions. In cell culture studies, activation of RhoA disrupts interendothelial junctions and increases endothelial permeability, whereas activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 enhances endothelial barrier function by promoting the formation of restrictive junctions. The primary regulators of Rho proteins, guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors (GDIs), form a complex with the GDP-bound form of the Rho family of monomeric G proteins, and thus may serve as a nodal point regulating the activation state of RhoGTPases. In the present study, we addressed the in vivo role of RhoGDI-1 in regulating pulmonary microvascular permeability using RhoGDI-1(-/-) mice. We observed that basal endothelial permeability in lungs of RhoGDI-1(-/-) mice was 2-fold greater than wild-type mice. This was the result of opening of interendothelial junctions in lung microvessels which are normally sealed. The activity of RhoA (but not of Rac1 or Cdc42) was significantly increased in RhoGDI-1(-/-) lungs as well as in cultured endothelial cells on downregulation of RhoGDI-1 with siRNA, consistent with RhoGDI-1-mediated modulation RhoA activity. Thus, RhoGDI-1 by repressing RhoA activity regulates lung microvessel endothelial barrier function in vivo. In this regard, therapies augmenting endothelial RhoGDI-1 function may be beneficial in reestablishing the endothelial barrier and lung fluid balance in lung inflammatory diseases such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:17525371

  12. Usefulness of visceral obesity (waist/hip ratio) in predicting vascular endothelial function in healthy overweight adults.

    PubMed

    Brook, R D; Bard, R L; Rubenfire, M; Ridker, P M; Rajagopalan, S

    2001-12-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) is associated with obesity; however, its etiology remains controversial. By determining the predictors of fasting and postprandial endothelial function in overweight adults without other cardiovascular risk factors, we were able to investigate novel mechanisms directly linking obesity to VED. Thirty-two healthy adults (body mass index [BMI] > or =27 kg/m(2)) underwent determination of fasting low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size, high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels, anthropometric measurements, and endothelial function by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery. Postprandial lipemia and FMD were measured 4 hours after ingestion of a high-fat meal. Blood pressures and fasting levels of lipoproteins, glucose, insulin, and fatty acids were within normal limits in all subjects. An abdominal fat pattern, as determined by an increased waist/hip ratio (WHR), was the sole significant predictor of FMD (r = -0.58, p = 0.001), despite no significant correlation between whole body obesity (BMI) and FMD. At comparable levels of BMI, obese subjects with a WHR > or =0.85 had a significantly blunted FMD compared with those with a WHR <0.85 (3.93 +/- 2.85% vs 8.34 +/- 5.47%, p = 0.016). Traditional coronary risk factors, C-reactive protein, postprandial lipemia, and LDL particle size did not predict FMD. We found no appreciable alteration in the postprandial state from fasting FMD (6.31 +/- 4.62% vs 6.25 +/- 5.47%, p = 0.95). The same results were found when women were analyzed alone. Increased abdominal adiposity determined by a simple WHR is a strong independent predictor of VED even in healthy overweight adults; this is a finding unexplained by alterations in conventional risk factors, systemic inflammation, or the atherogenic lipoprotein pattern. PMID:11728354

  13. Depletion of B‐Cells With Rituximab Improves Endothelial Function and Reduces Inflammation Among Individuals With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hsue, Priscilla Y.; Scherzer, Rebecca; Grunfeld, Carl; Imboden, John; Wu, Yuaner; del Puerto, Gus; Nitta, Elaine; Shigenaga, Judy; Schnell Heringer, Amanda; Ganz, Peter; Graf, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, partly due to systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. B‐cells play an important pathogenic role in the inflammatory process that drives RA disease activity. Rituximab, a chimeric murine/human monoclonal antibody that depletes B‐cells, is an effective therapy for RA. The purpose of this study was to determine whether B‐cell depletion with rituximab reduces systemic inflammation and improves macrovascular (brachial artery flow‐mediated dilation, FMD) and microvascular (reactive hyperemia) endothelial function in RA patients. Methods and Results RA patients received a single course of rituximab (1000 mg IV infusion at baseline and on day 15). FMD, reactive hyperemia, inflammatory markers, and clinical assessments were performed at baseline, week 12, and week 24. Twenty patients (95% female, median age 54 years) completed the study. Following treatment, FMD improved from a baseline of 4.5±0.4% to 6.4±0.6% at 12 weeks (mean±SE; P<0.0001), followed by a decline at week 24; a similar pattern was observed for hyperemic velocity. Significant decreases in RA disease scores, high‐sensitivity C‐reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and circulating CD19+ B‐cells were sustained through week 24. Cholesterol and triglycerides became significantly although modestly elevated during the study. Conclusions Depletion of B‐cells with rituximab improved macrovascular and microvascular endothelial function and reduced systemic inflammation, despite modest elevation in lipids. Given these results, rituximab should be evaluated in the future for its possible role in reducing excess cardiovascular risk in RA. Clinical Trial Registration URL http://ClinicalTrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00844714. PMID:25336464

  14. Circulating Endothelial Cells and Endothelial Function predict Major Adverse Cardiac Events and Early Adverse Left Ventricular Remodeling in Patients with ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Magdy, Abdel Hamid; Bakhoum, Sameh; Sharaf, Yasser; Sabry, Dina; El-Gengehe, Ahmed T; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and circulating endothelial cells (CECs) are mobilized from the bone marrow and increase in the early phase after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic significance of CECs and indices of endothelial dysfunction in patients with STEMI. In 78 patients with acute STEMI, characterization of CD34+/VEGFR2+ CECs, and indices of endothelial damage/dysfunction such as brachial artery flow mediated dilatation (FMD) were determined. Blood samples for CECs assessment and quantification were obtained within 24 hours of admission and FMD was assessed during the index hospitalization. At 30 days follow up, the primary composite end point of major cardiac adverse events (MACE) consisting of all-cause mortality, recurrent non-fatal MI, or heart failure and the secondary endpoint of early adverse left ventricular (LV) remodeling were analyzed. The 17 patients (22%) who developed MACE had significantly higher CEC level (P = 0.004), vWF level (P =0.028), and significantly lower FMD (P = 0.006) compared to the remaining patients. Logistic regression analysis showed that CECs level and LV ejection fraction were independent predictors of MACE. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) for CEC level, FMD, and the logistic model with both markers were 0.73, 0.75, and 0.82 respectively for prediction of the MACE. The 16 patients who developed the secondary endpoint had significantly higher CEC level compared to remaining patients (p =0.038). In conclusion, increased circulating endothelial cells and endothelial dysfunction predicted the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events and adverse cardiac remodeling in patients with STEMI. PMID:26864952

  15. Lactate adversely affects the in vitro formation of endothelial cell tubular structures through the action of TGF-{beta}1

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Stephan A. . E-mail: leoni.kunz-schughart@oncoray.de; Gaumann, Andreas; Wondrak, Marit; Eckermann, Christoph; Schulte, Stephanie; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Wheatley, Denys N.; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A.

    2007-07-15

    When lactate accumulation in a tumor microenvironment reaches an average concentration of 10-20 mM, it tends to reflect a high degree of malignancy. However, the hypothesis that tumor-derived lactate has a number of partially adverse biological effects on malignant and tumor-associated host cells requires further evidence. The present study attempted to evaluate the impact of lactate on the process of angiogenesis, in particular on the formation of tubular structures. The endothelial cell (EC) network in desmoplastic breast tumors is primarily located in areas of reactive fibroblastic stroma. We employed a fibroblast-endothelial cell co-culture model as in vitro angiogenesis system normally producing florid in vitro tubule formation to analyze this situation. In contrast to previous studies, we found that lactate significantly reduces EC network formation in a dose-dependent manner as quantified by semi-automated morphometric analyses following immunohistochemical staining. The decrease in CD31-positive tubular structures and the number of intersections was independent of VEGF supplementation and became more pronounced in the presence of protons. The number of cells, primarily of the fibroblast population, was reduced but cell loss could not be attributed to a decrease in proliferative activity or pronounced apoptotic cell death. Treatment with 10 mM lactate was accompanied by enhanced mRNA expression and release of TGF-{beta}1, which also shows anti-angiogenic activity in the model. Both TGF-{beta}1 and lactate induced myofibroblastic differentiation adjacent to the EC tubular structures. The lactate response on the EC network was diminished by TGF-{beta}1 neutralization, indicating a causal relationship between lactate and TGF-{beta}1 in the finely tuned processes of vessel formation and maturation which may also occur in vivo within tumor tissue.

  16. Impact of Hemorheological and Endothelial Factors on Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetti, Vera; Boschi, Letizia; Donati, Giovanni; Trabalzini, Luca; Forconi, Sandro

    Previous studies showed that endothelial alterations caused by physical stress worsened the hemorheological parameters mainly in patients affected by ischemic vascular diseases: major vascular alterations have been found in patients with very high endothelial dysfunction indexes: these indexes are given by the various substances produced by the endothelium, but it is very difficult to have a value which clearly identifies the real state of the endothelial alteration. The function of the NO, an endogenous vasodilator whose synthesis is catalyzed by NOs, can be determined by the Citrulline/Arginine ratio, which represents the level of activity of the enzyme. A very good index of the endothelial dysfunction is asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), a powerful endogenous inhibitor of NOs; in fact several studies have demonstrated a strong relationship between ischemic vascular disease and high levels of plasmatic ADMA. Our recent studies on heart failure and on ischemic cerebrovascular diseases evaluate endothelial dysfunctions and hemorheological parameters.

  17. Pitfalls in assessing microvascular endothelial barrier function: impedance-based devices versus the classic macromolecular tracer assay.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Iris; Hornburger, Michael C; Mayer, Bettina A; Beyerle, Andrea; Wegener, Joachim; Fürst, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The most frequently used parameters to describe the barrier properties of endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro are (i) the macromolecular permeability, indicating the flux of a macromolecular tracer across the endothelium, and (ii) electrical impedance of ECs grown on gold-film electrodes reporting on the cell layer's tightness for ion flow. Due to the experimental differences between these approaches, inconsistent observations have been described. Here, we present the first direct comparison of these assays applied to one single cell type (human microvascular ECs) under the same experimental conditions. The impact of different pharmacological tools (histamine, forskolin, Y-27632, blebbistatin, TRAP) on endothelial barrier function was analyzed by Transwell(®) tracer assays and two commercial impedance devices (xCELLigence(®), ECIS(®)). The two impedance techniques provided very similar results for all compounds, whereas macromolecular permeability readings were found to be partly inconsistent with impedance. Possible reasons for these discrepancies are discussed. We conclude that the complementary combination of both approaches is highly recommended to overcome the restrictions of each assay. Since the nature of the growth support may contribute to the observed differences, structure-function relationships should be based on cells that are consistently grown on either permeable or impermeable growth supports in all experiments. PMID:27025965

  18. Pitfalls in assessing microvascular endothelial barrier function: impedance-based devices versus the classic macromolecular tracer assay

    PubMed Central

    Bischoff, Iris; Hornburger, Michael C.; Mayer, Bettina A.; Beyerle, Andrea; Wegener, Joachim; Fürst, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The most frequently used parameters to describe the barrier properties of endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro are (i) the macromolecular permeability, indicating the flux of a macromolecular tracer across the endothelium, and (ii) electrical impedance of ECs grown on gold-film electrodes reporting on the cell layer’s tightness for ion flow. Due to the experimental differences between these approaches, inconsistent observations have been described. Here, we present the first direct comparison of these assays applied to one single cell type (human microvascular ECs) under the same experimental conditions. The impact of different pharmacological tools (histamine, forskolin, Y-27632, blebbistatin, TRAP) on endothelial barrier function was analyzed by Transwell® tracer assays and two commercial impedance devices (xCELLigence®, ECIS®). The two impedance techniques provided very similar results for all compounds, whereas macromolecular permeability readings were found to be partly inconsistent with impedance. Possible reasons for these discrepancies are discussed. We conclude that the complementary combination of both approaches is highly recommended to overcome the restrictions of each assay. Since the nature of the growth support may contribute to the observed differences, structure-function relationships should be based on cells that are consistently grown on either permeable or impermeable growth supports in all experiments. PMID:27025965

  19. Interaction of Panax quinquefolius Saponin and Dual Antiplatelets on Vascular Endothelial Function in Rats with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baojun; Liu, Yue; Shang, Qinghua; Zhang, Qingxiang; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Jiangang; Shi, Dazhuo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the interaction of Panax quinquefolius saponin (PQS) and dual antiplatelets (aspirin and clopidogrel) on antiplatelet activity and vascular endothelial function in rats with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Forty-eight male SD rats were randomly designed into sham group, model group, dual antiplatelet group, and PQS plus dual antiplatelet group. AMI rats were induced by ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and dual antiplatelet agents and additional PQS to dual antiplatelets were intragastrically administered for 28 days, respectively. The ventricular cavity area and cardiac transverse area ratio in PQS + dual antiplatelet group showed a decreased tendency. PAgT(%) decreased significantly in both dual antiplatelet group and PQS + dual antiplatelet group. TXB2 concentration significantly decreased in dual antiplatelet and PQS + dual antiplatelet groups, whereas 6-keto-PGF1α concentration significantly increased in PQS + dual antiplatelet group. Rats in PQS + dual antiplatelet group demonstrated a significant decrease in plasma ET-1 concentration and an increase in serum NO concentration compared with dual antiplatelet group. The combination therapy of PQS and dual antiplatelets showed some beneficial effects on vascular endothelial function and ventricular remodeling in rats with AMI. PMID:26090462

  20. Endothelial Function and Sleep: Associations of Flow-Mediated Dilation With Perceived Sleep Quality and Rapid Eye Movement (REM) Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Denise C.; Ziegler, Michael G.; Milic, Milos S.; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Mills, Paul J.; Loredo, José S.; von Känel, Roland; Dimsdale, Joel E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Endothelial function typically precedes clinical manifestations of cardiovascular disease and provides a potential mechanism for the associations observed between cardiovascular disease and sleep quality. This study examined how subjective and objective indicators of sleep quality relate to endothelial function, as measured by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD). In a clinical research center, 100 non-shift working adults (mean age: 36 years) completed FMD testing and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, along with a polysomnography assessment to obtain the following measures: slow wave sleep, percentage rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, REM sleep latency, total arousal index, total sleep time, wake after sleep onset, sleep efficiency, and apnea hypopnea index. Bivariate correlations and followup multiple regressions examined how FMD related to subjective (i.e., Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores) and objective (i.e., polysomnography-derived) indicators of sleep quality. After FMD showed bivariate correlations with Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores, percentage REM sleep, and REM latency, further examination with separate regression models indicated that these associations remained significant after adjustments for sex, age, race, hypertension, body mass index, apnea hypopnea index, smoking, and income (p's<0.05). Specifically, as FMD decreased, scores on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index increased (indicating decreased subjective sleep quality) and percentage REM sleep decreased, while REM sleep latency increased (p's<0.05). Poorer subjective sleep quality and adverse changes in REM sleep were associated with diminished vasodilation, which could link sleep disturbances to cardiovascular disease. PMID:24033699

  1. Microfluidic Capture of Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells from Human Adult Peripheral Blood: Phenotypic and Functional Validation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Hatch, Adam; Antontsev, Victor G.; Murthy, Shashi K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are endothelial progenitors that circulate in peripheral blood and are currently the subject of intensive investigation due to their therapeutic potential. However, in adults, ECFCs comprise a very small subset among circulating cells, which makes their isolation a challenge. Materials and Methods: Currently, the standard method for ECFC isolation relies on the separation of mononuclear cells and erythrocyte lysis, steps that are time consuming and known to increase cell loss. Alternatively, we previously developed a novel disposable microfluidic platform containing antibody-functionalized degradable hydrogel coatings that is ideally suited for capturing low-abundance circulating cells from unprocessed blood. In this study, we reasoned that this microfluidic approach could effectively isolate rare ECFCs by virtue of their CD34 expression. Results: We conducted preclinical experiments with peripheral blood from four adult volunteers and demonstrated that the actual microfluidic capture of circulating CD34+ cells from unprocessed blood was compatible with the subsequent differentiation of these cells into ECFCs. Moreover, the ECFC yield obtained with the microfluidic system was comparable to that of the standard method. Importantly, we unequivocally validated the phenotypical and functional properties of the captured ECFCs, including the ability to form microvascular networks following transplantation into immunodeficient mice. Discussion: We showed that the simplicity and versatility of our microfluidic system could be very instrumental for ECFC isolation while preserving their therapeutic potential. We anticipate our results will facilitate additional development of clinically suitable microfluidic devices by the vascular therapeutic and diagnostic industry. PMID:25091645

  2. Low n-6/n-3 PUFA Ratio Improves Lipid Metabolism, Inflammation, Oxidative Stress and Endothelial Function in Rats Using Plant Oils as n-3 Fatty Acid Source.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li Gang; Song, Zhi Xiu; Yin, Hong; Wang, Yan Yan; Shu, Guo Fang; Lu, Hui Xia; Wang, Shao Kang; Sun, Gui Ju

    2016-01-01

    Lipid metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress and endothelial function play important roles in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which may be affected by an imbalance in the n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ratio. This study aimed to investigate the effects of the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio on these cardiovascular risk factors in rats fed a high-fat diet using plant oils as the main n-3 PUFA source. The 1:1 and 5:1 ratio groups had significantly decreased serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and proinflammatory cytokines compared with the 20:1 group (p < 0.05). Additionally, the 20:1 group had significantly increased serum levels of E-Selectin, von Willebrand factor (vWF), and numerous markers of oxidative stress compared with the other groups (p < 0.05). The 1:1 group had a significantly decreased lipid peroxide level compared with the other groups (p < 0.05). Serum levels of malondialdehyde, reactive oxygen species and vWF tended to increase with n-6/n-3 PUFA ratios increasing from 5:1 to 20:1. We demonstrated that low n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio (1:1 and 5:1) had a beneficial effect on cardiovascular risk factors by enhancing favorable lipid profiles, having anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative stress effects, and improving endothelial function. A high n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio (20:1) had adverse effects. Our results indicated that low n-6/n-3 PUFA ratios exerted beneficial cardiovascular effects, suggesting that plant oils could be used as a source of n-3 fatty acids to prevent CVD. They also suggested that we should be aware of possible adverse effects from excessive n-3 PUFA. PMID:26526061

  3. Cytoskeletal mechanisms regulating vascular endothelial barrier function in response to acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kása, Anita; Csortos, Csilla; Verin, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) form a semi-permeable barrier between the interior space of blood vessels and the underlying tissues. In acute lung injury (ALI) the EC barrier is weakened leading to increased vascular permeability. It is widely accepted that EC barrier integrity is critically dependent upon intact cytoskeletal structure and cell junctions. Edemagenic agonists, like thrombin or endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, and EC contractile responses leading to disruption of intercellular contacts and EC permeability increase. The highly clinically-relevant cytoskeletal mechanisms of EC barrier dysfunction are currently under intense investigation and will be described and discussed in the current review. PMID:25838980

  4. Cytoskeletal mechanisms regulating vascular endothelial barrier function in response to acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Kása, Anita; Csortos, Csilla; Verin, Alexander D

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) form a semi-permeable barrier between the interior space of blood vessels and the underlying tissues. In acute lung injury (ALI) the EC barrier is weakened leading to increased vascular permeability. It is widely accepted that EC barrier integrity is critically dependent upon intact cytoskeletal structure and cell junctions. Edemagenic agonists, like thrombin or endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induced cytoskeletal rearrangement, and EC contractile responses leading to disruption of intercellular contacts and EC permeability increase. The highly clinically-relevant cytoskeletal mechanisms of EC barrier dysfunction are currently under intense investigation and will be described and discussed in the current review. PMID:25838980

  5. Tissue Engineering Special Feature: A macroporous hydrogel for the coculture of neural progenitor and endothelial cells to form functional vascular networks in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Millicent C.; Bertram, James P.; Royce Hynes, Sara; Michaud, Michael; Li, Qi; Young, Michael; Segal, Steven S.; Madri, Joseph A.; Lavik, Erin B.

    2006-02-01

    A microvascular network is critical for the survival and function of most tissues. We have investigated the potential of neural progenitor cells to augment the formation and stabilization of microvascular networks in a previously uncharacterized three-dimensional macroporous hydrogel and the ability of this engineered system to develop a functional microcirculation in vivo. The hydrogel is synthesized by cross-linking polyethylene glycol with polylysine around a salt-leached polylactic-co-glycolic acid scaffold that is degraded in a sodium hydroxide solution. An open macroporous network is formed that supports the efficient formation of tubular structures by brain endothelial cells. After subcutaneous implantation of hydrogel cocultures in mice, blood flow in new microvessels was apparent at 2 weeks with perfused networks established on the surface of implants at 6 weeks. Compared to endothelial cells cultured alone, cocultures of endothelial cells and neural progenitor cells had a significantly greater density of tubular structures positive for platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 at the 6-week time point. In implant cross sections, the presence of red blood cells in vessel lumens confirmed a functional microcirculation. These findings indicate that neural progenitor cells promote the formation of endothelial cell tubes in coculture and the development of a functional microcirculation in vivo. We demonstrate a previously undescribed strategy for creating stable microvascular networks to support engineered tissues of desired parenchymal cell origin. microvasculature | neural stem cells | polymer | scaffold

  6. Purinergic glio-endot