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Sample records for affects hepatic metabolism

  1. In Ovo injection of betaine affects hepatic cholesterol metabolism through epigenetic gene regulation in newly hatched chicks.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yun; Sun, Qinwei; Li, Xiaoliang; Wang, Min; Cai, Demin; Li, Xi; Zhao, Ruqian

    2015-01-01

    Betaine is reported to regulate hepatic cholesterol metabolism in mammals. Chicken eggs contain considerable amount of betaine, yet it remains unknown whether and how betaine in the egg affects hepatic cholesterol metabolism in chicks. In this study, eggs were injected with betaine at 2.5 mg/egg and the hepatic cholesterol metabolism was investigated in newly hatched chicks. Betaine did not affect body weight or liver weight, but significantly increased the serum concentration (P < 0.05) and the hepatic content (P < 0.01) of cholesterol. Accordingly, the cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme HMGCR was up-regulated (P < 0.05 for both mRNA and protein), while CYP7A1 which converts cholesterol to bile acids was down-regulated (P < 0.05 for mRNA and P = 0.07 for protein). Moreover, hepatic protein content of the sterol-regulatory element binding protein 1 which regulates cholesterol and lipid biosynthesis, and the mRNA abundance of ATP binding cassette sub-family A member 1 (ABCA1) which mediates cholesterol counter transport were significantly (P < 0.05) increased in betaine-treated chicks. Meanwhile, hepatic protein contents of DNA methyltransferases 1 and adenosylhomocysteinase-like 1 were increased (P < 0.05), which was associated with global genomic DNA hypermethylation (P < 0.05) and diminished gene repression mark histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (P < 0.05). Furthermore, CpG methylation level on gene promoters was found to be increased (P < 0.05) for CYP7A1 yet decreased (P < 0.05) for ABCA1. These results indicate that in ovo betaine injection regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism in chicks through epigenetic mechanisms including DNA and histone methylations.

  2. Exogenous administration of chronic corticosterone affects hepatic cholesterol metabolism in broiler chickens showing long or short tonic immobility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Duan, Yujing; Hu, Yun; Sun, Lili; Wang, Song; Fu, Wenyan; Ni, Yingdong; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-01-01

    Tonic immobility (TI) is an innate characteristic of animals related to fear or stress response. Animals can be classified into long TI (LTI) and short TI (STI) phenotypes based on TI test duration. In this study, effect of TI phenotype, chronic corticosterone administration (CORT), and their interaction on cholesterol metabolism in liver was evaluated in broilers. LTI broilers showed higher level of cholesterol in liver compared to STI chickens (p<0.05), and CORT significantly increased hepatic cholesterol content (p<0.01). Real-time PCR results showed that both TI and CORT potentially altered ABCA1 and CYP7A1 gene expressions (0.05affected hepatic HMGCR protein expression, and LTI broilers showed higher level of HMGCR protein expression in liver than STI (p<0.05). These results indicate that chronic CORT administration causes hepatic cholesterol accumulation in broiler chickens mainly by enhancing cholesterol synthesis and uptake into liver. LTI chickens had higher amount of total cholesterol in liver, which might be associated with an increase of hepatic HMGCR protein expression. However, there is no interaction between TI and CORT on cholesterol metabolism in liver of broilers.

  3. Xenobiotic-contaminated diets affect hepatic lipid metabolism: Implications for liver steatosis in Sparus aurata juveniles.

    PubMed

    Maradonna, F; Nozzi, V; Santangeli, S; Traversi, I; Gallo, P; Fattore, E; Mita, D G; Mandich, A; Carnevali, O

    2015-10-01

    The metabolic effects induced by feed contaminated with a lower or a higher concentration of -nonylpnenol (NP), 4-tert-octylphenol (t-OP) or bisphenol A (BPA), three environmental endocrine disruptors, were assessed in juvenile sea bream liver. Histological analysis demonstrated that all these three xenobiotics induced hepatic lipid accumulation and steatosis. These findings prompted analysis of the expression of the major molecules involved in lipid metabolism: peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (which is encoded by ppars), fatty acid synthase (encoded by fas), lipoprotein lipase (encoded by lpl) and hormone-sensitive lipase (encoded by hsl). The enzymes encoded by ppars and fas are in fact responsible for lipid accumulation, whereas lpl- and hsl- encoded proteins play a pivotal role in fat mobilization. The three xenobiotics modulated ppar mRNA expression: pparα mRNA expression was induced by the higher dose of each contaminant; pparβ mRNA expression was upregulated by the lower doses and in BPA2 fish ppary mRNA overexpression was induced by all pollutants. These data agreed with the lipid accumulation profiles documented by histology. Fas mRNA levels were modulated by the two NP doses and the higher BPA concentration. Lpl mRNA was significantly upregulated in all experimental groups except for BPA1 fish while hsl mRNA was significantly downregulated in all groups except for t-OP2 and BPA1 fish. The plasma concentrations of cortisol, the primary stress biomarker, were correlated with the levels of pepck mRNA level. This gene encodes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase which is one of the key enzymes of gluconeogenesis. Pepck mRNA was significantly overexpressed in fish exposed to NP2 and both t-OP doses. Finally, the genes encoding cyclooxygenase 2 (cox2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5 lox), the products of which are involved in the inflammatory response, transcriptions were significantly upregulated in NP and BPA fish, whereas they were unchanged in t

  4. Increasing levels of dietary crystalline methionine affect plasma methionine profiles, ammonia excretion, and the expression of genes related to the hepatic intermediary metabolism in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Rolland, Marine; Skov, Peter V; Larsen, Bodil K; Holm, Jørgen; Gómez-Requeni, Pedro; Dalsgaard, Johanne

    2016-08-01

    Strictly carnivorous fish with high requirements for dietary protein, such as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are interesting models for studying the role of amino acids as key regulators of intermediary metabolism. Methionine is an essential amino acid for rainbow trout, and works as a signalling factor in different metabolic pathways. The study investigated the effect of increasing dietary methionine intake on the intermediary metabolism in the liver of juvenile rainbow trout. For this purpose, five diets were formulated with increasing methionine levels from 0.60 to 1.29% dry matter. The diets were fed in excess for six weeks before three sampling campaigns carried out successively to elucidate (i) the hepatic expression of selected genes involved in lipid, glucose and amino acid metabolism; (ii) the postprandial ammonia excretion; and (iii) the postprandial plasma methionine concentrations. The transcript levels of enzymes involved in lipid metabolism (fatty acid synthase, glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase and carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 a), gluconeogenesis (fructose-1,6-biphosphatase) and amino acid catabolism (alanine amino transferase and glutamate dehydrogenase) were significantly affected by the increase in dietary methionine. Changes in gene expression reflected to some extent the decrease in ammonia excretion (P=0.022) and in the hepatosomatic index (HSI; P<0.001) when dietary methionine increased. Postprandial plasma methionine concentrations correlated positively with the dietary level (P<0.001) at the different sampling points. The study shows that the expression of several genes related to the hepatic intermediary metabolism in rainbow trout responded in a dose-dependent manner to increasing levels of dietary methionine.

  5. Nicotinamide improves glucose metabolism and affects the hepatic NAD-sirtuin pathway in a rodent model of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Soo Jin; Choi, Jung Mook; Kim, Lisa; Park, Se Eun; Rhee, Eun Jung; Lee, Won Young; Oh, Ki Won; Park, Sung Woo; Park, Cheol-Young

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acid (NA) and nicotinamide (NAM) are major forms of niacin and exert their physiological functions as precursors of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). Sirtuins, which are NAD-dependent deacetylases, regulate glucose and lipid metabolism and are implicated in the pathophysiology of aging, diabetes, and hepatic steatosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two NAD donors, NA and NAM, on glucose metabolism and the hepatic NAD-sirtuin pathway. The effects were investigated in OLETF rats, a rodent model of obesity and type 2 diabetes. OLETF rats were divided into five groups: (1) high fat (HF) diet, (2) HF diet and 10 mg NA/kg body weight (BW)/day (NA 10), (3) HF diet and 100 mg NA/kg BW/day (NA 100), (4) HF diet and 10 mg NAM/kg BW/day (NAM 10), and (5) HF diet and 100 mg NAM/kg BW/day (NAM 100). NA and NAM were delivered via drinking water for four weeks. NAM 100 treatment affected glucose control significantly, as shown by lower levels of accumulative area under the curve during oral glucose tolerance test, serum fasting glucose, serum fasting insulin, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and higher levels of serum adiponectin. With regard to NAD-sirtuin pathway, intracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, NAD, the NAD/NADH ratio, Sirt1, 2, 3, and 6 mRNA expressions, and Sirt1 activity all increased in livers of NAM 100-treated rats. These alterations were accompanied by the increased levels of proliferator-activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1 alpha and mitochondrial DNA. The effect of NA treatment was less evident than that of NAM 100. These results demonstrate that NAM is more effective than NA on the regulation of glucose metabolism and the NAD-sirtuin pathway, which may relate to the altered mitochondrial biogenesis.

  6. Prickly pear (Opuntia sp.) pectin alters hepatic cholesterol metabolism without affecting cholesterol absorption in guinea pigs fed a hypercholesterolemic diet.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, M L; Lin, E C; Trejo, A; McNamara, D J

    1994-06-01

    Prickly pear pectin intake decreases plasma LDL concentrations by increasing hepatic apolipoprotein B/E receptor expression in guinea pigs fed a hypercholesterolemic diet. To investigate whether prickly pear pectin has an effect on cholesterol absorption and on enzymes responsible for hepatic cholesterol homeostasis, guinea pigs were fed one of three semipurified diets, each containing 15 g lard/100 g diet: 1) the lard-basal diet with no added cholesterol or prickly pear pectin (LB diet); 2) the LB diet with 0.25 g added cholesterol/100 g diet (LC diet); or 3) the LC diet containing 2.5 g prickly pear pectin/100 g diet, added at the expense of cellulose (LC-P diet). Animals fed the LB diet had the lowest plasma LDL and hepatic cholesterol concentrations, followed by animals fed the LC-P diet (P < 0.001). Hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase activity was highest in the group fed the LB diet, with similar values for animals in the other two groups. A positive correlation existed between plasma LDL cholesterol concentration and hepatic acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase activity (r = 0.87, P < 0.001). Cholesterol absorption was not different among the three dietary groups. These results indicate that the decreased plasma and hepatic cholesterol concentrations of animals fed prickly pear pectin are not explained by differences in cholesterol absorption but rather are due to mechanisms that alter hepatic cholesterol homeostasis, resulting in lower plasma LDL concentrations.

  7. Maternal Food Restriction during Pregnancy and Lactation Adversely Affect Hepatic Growth and Lipid Metabolism in Three-Week-Old Rat Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangmi; You, Young-Ah; Kwon, Eun Jin; Jung, Sung-Chul; Jo, Inho; Kim, Young Ju

    2016-01-01

    Maternal malnutrition influences the early development of foetal adaptive changes for survival. We explored the effects of maternal undernutrition during gestation and lactation on hepatic growth and function. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a normal or a food-restricted (FR) diet during gestation and/or lactation. We performed analyses of covariance (adjusting for the liver weight/body weight ratio) to compare hepatic growth and lipid metabolism among the offspring. Maternal FR during gestation triggered the development of wide spaces between hepatic cells and increased the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in three-week-old male offspring compared with controls (both p < 0.05). Offspring nursed by FR dams exhibited wider spaces between hepatic cells and a lower liver weight/body weight ratio than control offspring, and increased mTOR expression (p < 0.05). Interestingly, the significant decrease in expression of lipogenic-related genes was dependent on carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein, despite the increased expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1) (p < 0.05). This study demonstrated increased expression of key metabolic regulators (mTOR and SREBP1), alterations in lipid metabolism, and deficits in hepatic growth in the offspring of FR-treated dams. PMID:27983688

  8. Impact of hepatitis B virus infection on hepatic metabolic signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yi-Xian; Huang, Chen-Jie; Yang, Zheng-Gang

    2016-09-28

    A growing body of epidemiologic research has demonstrated that metabolic derangement exists in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, indicating that there are clinical associations between HBV infection and host metabolism. In order to understand the complex interplay between HBV and hepatic metabolism in greater depth, we systematically reviewed these alterations in different metabolic signaling pathways due to HBV infection. HBV infection interfered with most aspects of hepatic metabolic responses, including glucose, lipid, nucleic acid, bile acid and vitamin metabolism. Glucose and lipid metabolism is a particular focus due to the significant promotion of gluconeogenesis, glucose aerobic oxidation, the pentose phosphate pathway, fatty acid synthesis or oxidation, phospholipid and cholesterol biosynthesis affected by HBV. These altered metabolic pathways are involved in the pathological process of not only hepatitis B, but also metabolic disorders, increasing the occurrence of complications, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and liver steatosis. Thus, a clearer understanding of the hepatic metabolic pathways affected by HBV and its pathogenesis is necessary to develop more novel therapeutic strategies targeting viral eradication.

  9. Impact of hepatitis B virus infection on hepatic metabolic signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yi-Xian; Huang, Chen-Jie; Yang, Zheng-Gang

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of epidemiologic research has demonstrated that metabolic derangement exists in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, indicating that there are clinical associations between HBV infection and host metabolism. In order to understand the complex interplay between HBV and hepatic metabolism in greater depth, we systematically reviewed these alterations in different metabolic signaling pathways due to HBV infection. HBV infection interfered with most aspects of hepatic metabolic responses, including glucose, lipid, nucleic acid, bile acid and vitamin metabolism. Glucose and lipid metabolism is a particular focus due to the significant promotion of gluconeogenesis, glucose aerobic oxidation, the pentose phosphate pathway, fatty acid synthesis or oxidation, phospholipid and cholesterol biosynthesis affected by HBV. These altered metabolic pathways are involved in the pathological process of not only hepatitis B, but also metabolic disorders, increasing the occurrence of complications, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and liver steatosis. Thus, a clearer understanding of the hepatic metabolic pathways affected by HBV and its pathogenesis is necessary to develop more novel therapeutic strategies targeting viral eradication. PMID:27688657

  10. Hepatic folate metabolism in the chronic alcoholic monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, T.; Romero, J.J.; Watson, J.E.; Gong, E.J.; Halsted, C.H.

    1981-05-01

    To assess the role of altered hepatic folate metabolism in the pathogenesis of the folate deficiency of chronic alcoholism, the hepatic metabolism of a tracer dose of /sup 3/H-PteGlu was compared in monkeys given 50% of energy as ethanol for 2 years and in control monkeys. Long-term ethanol feeding resulted in mild hepatic injury, with a significant decrease in hepatic folate levels. Chromatographic studies of liver biopsies obtained after the tracer dose indicated that the processes of reduction, methylation, and formylation of reduced folate and the synthesis of polyglutamyl folates were not affected by long-term ethanol feeding. Hepatic tritium levels were significantly decreased in the ethanol-fed group. These studies suggest that the decrease in hepatic folate levels observed after long-term ethanol ingestion is due to a decrease in hepatic folate levels observed after long-term ethanol ingestion is due to a decreased ability to retain folates in the liver, whereas reduction and further metabolism of folates is not affected.

  11. Hepatic Metabolism Affects the Atropselective Disposition of 2,2′,3,3′,6,6′-Hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 136) in Mice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To understand the role of hepatic vs extrahepatic metabolism in the disposition of chiral PCBs, we studied the disposition of 2,2′,3,3′,6,6′-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 136) and its hydroxylated metabolites (HO-PCBs) in mice with defective hepatic metabolism due to the liver-specific deletion of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (KO mice). Female KO and congenic wild type (WT) mice were treated with racemic PCB 136, and levels and chiral signatures of PCB 136 and HO-PCBs were determined in tissues and excreta 3 days after PCB administration. PCB 136 tissue levels were higher in KO compared to WT mice. Feces was a major route of PCB metabolite excretion, with 2,2′,3,3′,6,6′-hexachlorobiphenyl-5-ol being the major metabolite recovered from feces. (+)-PCB 136, the second eluting PCB 136 atropisomers, was enriched in all tissues and excreta. The second eluting atropisomers of the HO-PCBs metabolites were enriched in blood and liver; 2,2′,3,3′,6,6′-hexachlorobiphenyl-5-ol in blood was an exception and displayed an enrichment of the first eluting atropisomers. Fecal HO-PCB levels and chiral signatures changed with time and differed between KO and WT mice, with larger HO-PCB enantiomeric fractions in WT compared to KO mice. Our results demonstrate that hepatic and, possibly, extrahepatic cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes play a role in the disposition of PCBs. PMID:25420130

  12. Leucine metabolism in patients with Hepatic Encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    McGhee, A.S.; Kassouny, M.E.; Matthews, D.E.; Millikan, W.

    1986-03-01

    A primed continuous infusion of (/sup 15/N, 1-/sup 13/C)leucine was used to determine whether increased oxidation and/or protein synthesis of leucine occurs in patients with cirrhosis. Five controls and patients were equilibrated on a metabolic balance diet (0.6 g protein per kg ideal body weight (IBW)). An additional four patients were equilibrated in the same manner with the same type of diet with a protein level of 0.75 g per kg IBW. Plasma leucine and breath CO/sub 2/ enrichments were measured by mass spectrometry. Protein synthesis and leucine metabolism were identical in controls and patients when both were fed a diet with 0.6 g protein/kg IBW. Results indicate that systemic derangements of leucine metabolism are not the cause of Hepatic Encephalopathy.

  13. Moderate Hepatic Impairment Does Not Affect Doravirine Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Khalilieh, Sauzanne; Yee, Ka Lai; Liu, Rachael; Fan, Li; Sanchez, Rosa I; Auger, Patrice; Triantafyllou, Ilias; Stypinski, Daria; Lasseter, Kenneth C; Marbury, Thomas; Iwamoto, Marian

    2016-12-27

    Doravirine is a novel, potent, nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor currently in development for HIV-1 infection treatment. As a substrate for CYP3A-mediated metabolism, doravirine could potentially be affected by liver-function changes. As a portion of the HIV-1-infected population has varying degrees of liver impairment, we investigated the effect of moderate hepatic impairment on the pharmacokinetic profile and tolerability of single-dose doravirine 100 mg in otherwise healthy subjects. A total of 16 subjects aged 44-64 years took part in the open-label, single-dose trial: 8 with moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh score, 7-9; 6 men, 2 women) and 8 healthy individuals (mean age and height matched with the impairment group; 6 men, 2 women). Subjects with hepatic impairment were required to have chronic, stable hepatic impairment with features of cirrhosis of any etiology. Blood sampling revealed that doravirine exposure was similar in both groups. The observed geometric least-squares mean ratio (90% confidence interval; moderately impaired/healthy subjects) was 0.99 (0.72-1.35) for AUC0-∞ , 0.93 (0.74-1.18) for AUC0-24 h , 0.90 (0.66-1.24) for Cmax , and 0.99 (0.74-1.33) for C24 h . Geometric mean apparent terminal t½ was ∼18 hours for both groups, whereas median Tmax was 2 hours (range, 1-6 hours) and 2.5 hours (range, 1-3 hours) for impaired and healthy individuals, respectively. In addition, doravirine was generally well tolerated. The results demonstrate that moderate hepatic impairment does not have a clinically meaningful effect on doravirine pharmacokinetics. Therefore, dose adjustment should not be necessary in patients with both HIV-1 and moderate hepatic impairment.

  14. Regulation of hepatic energy metabolism by the nuclear receptor PXR.

    PubMed

    Hakkola, Jukka; Rysä, Jaana; Hukkanen, Janne

    2016-09-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a nuclear receptor that is traditionally thought to be specialized for sensing xenobiotic exposure. In concurrence with this feature PXR was originally identified to regulate drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. During the last ten years it has become clear that PXR harbors broader functions. Evidence obtained both in experimental animals and humans indicate that ligand-activated PXR regulates hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism and affects whole body metabolic homeostasis. Currently, the consequences of PXR activation on overall metabolic health are not yet fully understood and varying results on the effect of PXR activation or knockout on metabolic disorders and weight gain have been published in mouse models. Rifampicin and St. John's wort, the prototypical human PXR agonists, impair glucose tolerance in healthy volunteers. Chronic exposure to PXR agonists could potentially represent a risk factor for diabetes and metabolic syndrome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie.

  15. Mathematical modelling of hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Adrian C; Wattis, Jonathan A D; Salter, Andrew M

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a mathematical model capable of simulating the metabolic response to a variety of mixed meals in fed and fasted conditions with particular emphasis placed on the hepatic triglyceride element of the model. Model validation is carried out using experimental data for the ingestion of three mixed composition meals over a 24-h period. Comparison with experimental data suggests the model predicts key plasma lipids accurately given a prescribed insulin profile. One counter-intuitive observation to arise from simulations is that liver triglyceride initially decreases when a high fat meal is ingested, a phenomenon potentially explained by the carbohydrate portion of the meal raising plasma insulin.

  16. Dietary Iron Controls Circadian Hepatic Glucose Metabolism Through Heme Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Judith A.; Mitchell, Thomas Creighton; Gao, Yan; Just, Steven F.; Cooksey, Robert; Cox, James; Ajioka, Richard; Jones, Deborah; Lee, Soh-hyun; King, Daniel; Huang, Jingyu

    2015-01-01

    The circadian rhythm of the liver maintains glucose homeostasis, and disruption of this rhythm is associated with type 2 diabetes. Feeding is one factor that sets the circadian clock in peripheral tissues, but relatively little is known about the role of specific dietary components in that regard. We assessed the effects of dietary iron on circadian gluconeogenesis. Dietary iron affects circadian glucose metabolism through heme-mediated regulation of the interaction of nuclear receptor subfamily 1 group d member 1 (Rev-Erbα) with its cosuppressor nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCOR). Loss of regulated heme synthesis was achieved by aminolevulinic acid (ALA) treatment of mice or cultured cells to bypass the rate-limiting enzyme in hepatic heme synthesis, ALA synthase 1 (ALAS1). ALA treatment abolishes differences in hepatic glucose production and in the expression of gluconeogenic enzymes seen with variation of dietary iron. The differences among diets are also lost with inhibition of heme synthesis with isonicotinylhydrazine. Dietary iron modulates levels of peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a transcriptional activator of ALAS1, to affect hepatic heme. Treatment of mice with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine diminishes PGC-1α variation observed among the iron diets, suggesting that iron is acting through reactive oxygen species signaling. PMID:25315005

  17. Ethanol impairs post-prandial hepatic protein metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    De Feo, P; Volpi, E; Lucidi, P; Cruciani, G; Monacchia, F; Reboldi, G; Santeusanio, F; Bolli, G B; Brunetti, P

    1995-01-01

    The effects of acute ethanol ingestion on whole body and hepatic protein metabolism in humans are not known. To simulate social drinking, we compared the effects of the association of a mixed meal (632 kcal, 17% amino acids, 50% glucose, 33% lipids) with a bottle of either table wine (ethanol content 71 g) or water on the estimates ([1-14C]-leucine infusion) of whole body protein breakdown, oxidation, and synthesis, and on the intravascular fractional secretory rates (FSR) of hepatically (albumin, fibrinogen) and extrahepatically (IgG) synthesized plasma proteins in two randomized groups (ethanol n = 7, water n = 7) of healthy nonalcoholic volunteers. Each study was carried out for 8 h. Protein kinetics were measured in the overnight post-absorptive state, over the first 4 h, and during a meal infusion (via a nasogastric feeding tube at constant rate) combined with the oral ingestion of wine or water, over the last 4 h. When compared with water, wine ingestion during the meal reduced (P < 0.03) by 24% the rate of leucine oxidation, did not modify the estimates of whole body protein breakdown and synthesis, reduced (P < 0.01) by approximately 30% the FSR of albumin and fibrinogen, but did not affect IgG FSR. In conclusion, 70 g of ethanol, an amount usual among social drinkers, impairs hepatic protein metabolism. The habitual consumption of such amounts by reducing the synthesis and/or secretion of hepatic proteins might lead to the progressive development of liver injury and to hypoalbuminemia also in the absence of protein malnutrition. PMID:7706451

  18. Hepatic Control of Energy Metabolism via the Autonomic Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Although the human liver comprises approximately 2.8% of the body weight, it plays a central role in the control of energy metabolism. While the biochemistry of energy substrates such as glucose, fatty acids, and ketone bodies in the liver is well understood, many aspects of the overall control system for hepatic metabolism remain largely unknown. These include mechanisms underlying the ascertainment of its energy metabolism status by the liver, and the way in which this information is used to communicate and function together with adipose tissues and other organs involved in energy metabolism. This review article summarizes hepatic control of energy metabolism via the autonomic nervous system. PMID:27592630

  19. Substituting fish oil with crude palm oil in the diet of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) affects muscle fatty acid composition and hepatic fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bell, J Gordon; Henderson, R James; Tocher, Douglas R; McGhee, Fiona; Dick, James R; Porter, Allan; Smullen, Richard P; Sargent, John R

    2002-02-01

    Supplies of marine fish oils (FO) are limited and continued growth in aquaculture production dictates that substitutes must be found that do not compromise fish health and product quality. In this study the suitability of crude palm oil (PO) as a replacement for FO in diets of Atlantic salmon was investigated. Duplicate groups of Atlantic salmon post-smolts were fed four practical-type diets in which the added lipid was either 100% FO and 0% crude PO (0% PO); 75% FO and 25% PO (25% PO); 50% FO and 50% PO (50% PO); and 100% PO, for 30 wk. There were no effects of diet on growth rate or feed conversion ratio nor were any histopathological lesions found in liver, heart or muscle. Lipid deposition was greatest in fish fed 0% PO and was significantly greater than in fish fed 50% and 100% PO. Fatty acid compositions of muscle total lipid were correlated with dietary PO inclusion such that the concentrations of 16:0, 18:1(n-9), 18:2(n-6), total saturated fatty acids and total monoenoic fatty acids increased linearly with increasing dietary PO. The concentration of eicosapentaenoic acid [20:5(n-3)] was reduced significantly with increasing levels of dietary PO but the concentration of docosahexaenoic acid [22:6(n-3)] was significantly reduced only in fish fed 100% PO, compared with the other three treatments. Similar diet-induced changes were seen in liver total lipid fatty acid compositions. Hepatic fatty acid desaturation and elongation activities were approximately 10-fold greater in fish fed 100% PO than in those fed 0% PO. This study suggests that PO can be used successfully as a substitute for FO in the culture of Atlantic salmon in sea water. However, at levels of PO inclusion above 50% of dietary lipid, significant reductions in muscle 20:5(n-3), 22:6(n-3) and the (n-3):(n-6) PUFA ratio occur, resulting in reduced availability of these essential (n-3) highly unsaturated fatty acids to the consumer.

  20. IFNL4 affects clearance of hepatitis C virus

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have discovered a new human interferon gene, Interferon Lambda 4 (IFNL4), that affects clearance of the hepatitis C virus. They also identified an inherited genetic variant within IFNL4 that predicts how people respond to treatment for hepatit

  1. Interaction between hepatitis C virus and metabolic factors.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Yasunori; Mizuta, Toshihiko

    2014-03-21

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection disrupts the normal metabolism processes, but is also influenced by several of the host's metabolic factors. An obvious and significantly detrimental pathophysiological feature of HCV infection is insulin resistance in hepatic and peripheral tissues. Substantial research efforts have been put forth recently to elucidate the molecular mechanism of HCV-induced insulin resistance, and several cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, have been identified as important contributors to the development of insulin resistance in the distant peripheral tissues of HCV-infected patients and animal models. The demonstrated etiologies of HCV-induced whole-body insulin resistance include oxidative stress, lipid metabolism abnormalities, hepatic steatosis and iron overload. In addition, myriad effects of this condition have been characterized, including glucose intolerance, resistance to antiviral therapy, progression of hepatic fibrosis, development of hepatocellular carcinoma, and general decrease in quality of life. Metabolic-related conditions and disorders, such as visceral obesity and diabetes mellitus, have been shown to synergistically enhance HCV-induced metabolic disturbance, and are associated with worse prognosis. Yet, the molecular interactions between HCV-induced metabolic disturbance and host-associated metabolic factors remain largely unknown. The diet and lifestyle recommendations for chronic hepatitis C are basically the same as those for obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Specifically, patients are suggested to restrict their dietary iron intake, abstain from alcohol and tobacco, and increase their intake of green tea and coffee (to attain the beneficial effects of caffeine and polyphenols). While successful clinical management of HCV-infected patients with metabolic disorders has also been achieved with some anti-diabetic (i.e., metformin) and anti-lipid (i.e., statins) medications, it is recommended that

  2. [Affective disorders: endocrine and metabolic comorbidities].

    PubMed

    Cermolacce, M; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Azorin, J-M

    2014-12-01

    Links between affective and endocrine-metabolic disorders are numerous and complex. In this review, we explore most frequent endocrine-metabolic comorbidities. On the one hand, these comorbidities imply numerous iatrogenic effects from antipsychotics (metabolic side-effects) or from lithium (endocrine side-effects). On the other hand, these comorbidities are also associated with affective disorders independently from medication. We will successively examine metabolic syndrome, glycemic disturbances, obesity and thyroid disorders among patients with affective disorders. Endocrinemetabolic comorbidities can be individually encountered, but can also be associated. Therefore, they substantially impact morbidity and mortality by increasing cardiovascular risk factors. Two distinct approaches give an account of processes involved in these comorbidities: common environmental factors (iatrogenic effects, lifestyle), and/or shared physiological vulnerabilities. In conclusion, we provide a synthesis of important results and recommendations related to endocrine-metabolic comorbidities in affective disorders : heavy influence on morbidity and mortality, undertreatment of somatic diseases, importance of endocrine and metabolic side effects from main mood stabilizers, impact from sex and age on the prevalence of comorbidities, influence from previous depressive episodes in bipolar disorders, and relevance of systematic screening for subclinical (biological) disturbances.

  3. Metabolic alterations and hepatitis C: From bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming-Ling

    2016-01-28

    In addition to causing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatitis C virus (HCV) is thought to cause hypolipidemia, hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. The viral life cycle of HCV depends on cholesterol metabolism in host cells. HCV core protein and nonstructural protein 5A perturb crucial lipid and glucose pathways, such as the sterol regulatory element-binding protein pathway and the protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin/S6 kinase 1 pathway. Although several lines of transgenic mice expressing core or full HCV proteins exhibit hepatic steatosis and/or dyslipidemia, whether they completely reflect the metabolic alterations in humans with HCV infection remains unknown. Many cross-sectional studies have demonstrated increased prevalences of metabolic alterations and cardiovascular events in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC); however, conflicting results exist, primarily due to unavoidable individual variations. Utilizing anti-HCV therapy, most longitudinal cohort studies of CHC patients have demonstrated the favorable effects of viral clearance in attenuating metabolic alterations and cardiovascular risks. To determine the risks of HCV-associated metabolic alterations and associated complications in patients with CHC, it is necessary to adjust for crucial confounders, such as HCV genotype and host baseline glucose metabolism, for a long follow-up period after anti-HCV treatment. Adipose tissue is an important endocrine organ due to its release of adipocytokines, which regulate lipid and glucose metabolism. However, most data on HCV infection and adipocytokine alteration are inconclusive. A comprehensive overview of HCV-associated metabolic and adipocytokine alterations, from bench to bedside, is presented in this topic highlight.

  4. Simultaneous in vivo assessment of cardiac and hepatic metabolism in the diabetic rat using hyperpolarized MRS

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Daniel R.; Ball, Vicky; Dodd, Michael S.; Miller, Jack J.; Heather, Lisa C.; Tyler, Damian J.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and assessing diabetic metabolism is vital for monitoring disease progression and improving treatment of patients. In vivo assessments, using MRI and MRS, provide non‐invasive and accurate measurements, and the development of hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopy in particular has been demonstrated to provide valuable metabolic data in real time. Until now, studies have focussed on individual organs. However, diabetes is a systemic disease affecting multiple tissues in the body. Therefore, we have developed a technique to simultaneously measure metabolism in both the heart and liver during a single acquisition. A hyperpolarized 13C MRS protocol was developed to allow acquisition of metabolic data from the heart and liver during a single scan. This protocol was subsequently used to assess metabolism in the heart and liver of seven control male Wistar rats and seven diabetic rats (diabetes was induced by three weeks of high‐fat feeding and a 30 mg/kg injection of streptozotocin). Using our new acquisition, we observed decreased cardiac and hepatic pyruvate dehydrogenase flux in our diabetic rat model. These diabetic rats also had increased blood glucose levels, decreased insulin, and increased hepatic triglycerides. Decreased production of hepatic [1‐13C]alanine was observed in the diabetic group, but this change was not present in the hearts of the same diabetic animals. We have demonstrated the ability to measure cardiac and hepatic metabolism simultaneously, with sufficient sensitivity to detect metabolic alterations in both organs. Further, we have non‐invasively observed the different reactions of the heart and liver to the metabolic challenge of diabetes. PMID:27779334

  5. The Effects of Physiological and Environmental Factors on Hepatic Perfusion and First-Pass Metabolism.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Marlene Woodruff

    The interaction of three important parameters; hepatic blood flow (Q_{rm H} ), plasma protein binding (f), and hepatic intrinsic clearance (CL_{rm int}) determines the disposition of agents undergoing extensive first-pass metabolism. This collection of studies focuses on the interaction of these parameters in man and the rat in the presence and absence of a given physiological and environmental perturbation. Potential mechanisms implicated in the "Food Effect" phenomenon whereby concomitant food intake increases the bioavailability a basic lipophilic drug are examined. These investigations provide insight as to the physiological response of the liver in the face of nutritional, pharmacological and physiological perturbations. The measurement of hepatic blood flow is a necessary endeavor before and understanding of the hepatic circulation or hepatic clearance concepts can be realized. Preliminary studies were performed to improve our understanding of the factors affecting the interpretation of hepatic blood flow estimates. It has been postulated that this food effect is caused at least in part by a transient increase in Q _{rm H} with its associated decrease in hepatic first-pass metabolism. Posture was manipulated in such a manner as to simulate the hepatic blood flow pattern observed in postprandial subjects. Although transient changes in Q_{rm H } comparable in magnitude and duration to those encountered after food consumption were observed, the AUC _{rm oral} for propanolol was not affected. It is important to assess the free concentration being presented to the organ which is highly extracting the drug. Single macronutrient feedings of glucose and vitamin-free casein to male Sprague-Dawley rats did not produce significant changes in the serum protein binding of a model basic lipophilic drug (quinidine) in systemic or hepatic blood. It has been postulated that food intake may have a greater influence on the bioavailability of metoprolol (a high clearance drug

  6. Affective Disorders, Bone Metabolism, and Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the relationship between affective disorders, bone mineral density (BMD), and bone metabolism is unresolved, although there is growing evidence that many medications used to treat affective disorders are associated with low BMD or alterations in neuroendocrine systems that influence bone turnover. The objective of this review is to describe the current evidence regarding the association of unipolar and bipolar depression with BMD and indicators of bone metabolism, and to explore potential mediating and confounding influences of those relationships. The majority of studies of unipolar depression and BMD indicate that depressive symptoms are associated with low BMD. In contrast, evidence regarding the relationship between bipolar depression and BMD is inconsistent. There is limited but suggestive evidence to support an association between affective disorders and some markers of bone turnover. Many medications used to treat affective disorders have effects on physiologic systems that influence bone metabolism, and these conditions are also associated with a range of health behaviors that can influence osteoporosis risk. Future research should focus on disentangling the pathways linking psychotropic medications and their clinical indications with BMD and fracture risk. PMID:23874147

  7. Acute Ethanol Causes Hepatic Mitochondrial Depolarization in Mice: Role of Ethanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhi; Ramshesh, Venkat K.; Rehman, Hasibur; Liu, Qinlong; Theruvath, Tom P.; Krishnasamy, Yasodha; Lemasters, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims An increase of ethanol metabolism and hepatic mitochondrial respiration occurs in vivo after a single binge of alcohol. Here, our aim was to determine how ethanol intake affects hepatic mitochondrial polarization status in vivo in relation to ethanol metabolism and steatosis. Methods Hepatic mitochondrial polarization, permeability transition (MPT), and reduce pyridine nucleotides, and steatosis in mice were monitored by intravital confocal/multiphoton microscopy of the fluorescence of rhodamine 123 (Rh123), calcein, NAD(P)H, and BODIPY493/503, respectively, after gavage with ethanol (1–6 g/kg). Results Mitochondria depolarized in an all-or-nothing fashion in individual hepatocytes as early as 1 h after alcohol. Depolarization was dose- and time-dependent, peaked after 6 to 12 h and maximally affected 94% of hepatocytes. This mitochondrial depolarization was not due to onset of the MPT. After 24 h, mitochondria of most hepatocytes recovered normal polarization and were indistinguishable from untreated after 7 days. Cell death monitored by propidium iodide staining, histology and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was low throughout. After alcohol, mitochondrial NAD(P)H autofluorescence increased and decreased, respectively, in hepatocytes with polarized and depolarized mitochondria. Ethanol also caused steatosis mainly in hepatocytes with depolarized mitochondria. Depolarization was linked to ethanol metabolism, since deficiency of alcohol dehydrogenase and cytochrome-P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), the major ethanol-metabolizing enzymes, decreased mitochondrial depolarization by ∼70% and ∼20%, respectively. Activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase decreased depolarization, whereas inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase enhanced depolarization. Activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase also markedly decreased steatosis. Conclusions Acute ethanol causes reversible hepatic mitochondrial depolarization in vivo that may contribute to

  8. Combined effect of sesamin and soybean phospholipid on hepatic fatty acid metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Ide, Takashi

    2014-05-01

    We studied the combined effect of sesamin (1:1 mixture of sesamin and episesamine) and soybean phospholipid on lipid metabolism in rats. Male rats were fed diets supplemented with 0 or 2 g/kg sesamin, and containing 0 or 50 g/kg soybean phospholipid, for 19 days. Sesamin and soybean phospholipid decreased serum triacylglycerol concentrations and the combination of these compounds further decreased the parameter in an additive fashion. Soybean phospholipid but not sesamin reduced the hepatic concentration of triacylglycerol. The combination failed to cause a strong decrease in hepatic triacylglycerol concentration, presumably due to the up-regulation of Cd36 by sesamin. Combination of sesamin and soybean phospholipid decreased the activity and mRNA levels of hepatic lipogenic enzymes in an additive fashion. Sesamin strongly increased the parameters of hepatic fatty acid oxidation enzymes. Soybean phospholipid increased hepatic activity of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase although it failed to affect the activity of other enzymes involved in fatty acid oxidation. Sesamin strongly increased hepatic concentration of carnitine. Sesamin and soybean phospholipid combination further increased this parameter, accompanying a parallel increase in mRNA expression of carnitine transporter. These changes can account for the strong decrease in serum triacylglycerol in rats fed a diet containing both sesamin and soybean phospholipid.

  9. The autonomic nervous system regulates postprandial hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bruinstroop, Eveline; la Fleur, Susanne E; Ackermans, Mariette T; Foppen, Ewout; Wortel, Joke; Kooijman, Sander; Berbée, Jimmy F P; Rensen, Patrick C N; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2013-05-15

    The liver is a key organ in controlling glucose and lipid metabolism during feeding and fasting. In addition to hormones and nutrients, inputs from the autonomic nervous system are also involved in fine-tuning hepatic metabolic regulation. Previously, we have shown in rats that during fasting an intact sympathetic innervation of the liver is essential to maintain the secretion of triglycerides by the liver. In the current study, we hypothesized that in the postprandial condition the parasympathetic input to the liver inhibits hepatic VLDL-TG secretion. To test our hypothesis, we determined the effect of selective surgical hepatic denervations on triglyceride metabolism after a meal in male Wistar rats. We report that postprandial plasma triglyceride concentrations were significantly elevated in parasympathetically denervated rats compared with control rats (P = 0.008), and VLDL-TG production tended to be increased (P = 0.066). Sympathetically denervated rats also showed a small rise in postprandial triglyceride concentrations (P = 0.045). On the other hand, in rats fed on a six-meals-a-day schedule for several weeks, a parasympathetic denervation resulted in >70% higher plasma triglycerides during the day (P = 0.001), whereas a sympathetic denervation had no effect. Our results show that abolishing the parasympathetic input to the liver results in increased plasma triglyceride levels during postprandial conditions.

  10. Hepatic Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BACKGROUND: Differences in responses to environmental chemicals and drugs between life stages are likely due in part to differences in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters (XMETs). No comprehensive analysis of the mRNA expression of XMETs has been carried out through life stages in any species. RESULTS: Using full-genome arrays, the mRNA expression of all XMETs and their regulatory proteins was examined during fetal (gestation day (GD) 19), neonatal (postnatal day (PND) 7), prepubescent (PND32), middle age (12 months), and old age (18 and 24 months) in the C57BL/6J (C57) mouse liver and compared to adults. Fetal and neonatal life stages exhibited dramatic differences in XMET mRNA expression compared to the relatively minor effects of old age. The total number of XMET probe sets that differed from adults was 636, 500, 84, 5, 43, and 102 for GD19, PND7, PND32, 12 months, 18 months and 24 months, respectively. At all life stages except PND32, under-expressed genes outnumbered over-expressed genes. The altered XMETs included those in all of the major metabolic and transport phases including introduction of reactive or polar groups (Phase I), conjugation (Phase II) and excretion (Phase III). In the fetus and neonate, parallel increases in expression were noted in the dioxin receptor, Nrf2 components and their regulated genes while nuclear receptors and regulated genes were generally down-regulated. Suppression of male-specific XMETs w

  11. Integrative Metabolic Signatures for Hepatic Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Su, Gang; Meng, Fan; Liu, Laibin; Mohney, Robert; Kulkarni, Shilpa; Guha, Chandan

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) is a dose-limiting factor in curative radiation therapy (RT) for liver cancers, making early detection of radiation-associated liver injury absolutely essential for medical intervention. A metabolomic approach was used to determine metabolic signatures that could serve as biomarkers for early detection of RILD in mice. Methods Anesthetized C57BL/6 mice received 0, 10 or 50 Gy Whole Liver Irradiation (WLI) and were contrasted to mice, which received 10 Gy whole body irradiation (WBI). Liver and plasma samples were collected at 24 hours after irradiation. The samples were processed using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry and Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. Results Twenty four hours after WLI, 407 metabolites were detected in liver samples while 347 metabolites were detected in plasma. Plasma metabolites associated with 50 Gy WLI included several amino acids, purine and pyrimidine metabolites, microbial metabolites, and most prominently bradykinin and 3-indoxyl-sulfate. Liver metabolites associated with 50 Gy WLI included pentose phosphate, purine, and pyrimidine metabolites in liver. Plasma biomarkers in common between WLI and WBI were enriched in microbial metabolites such as 3 indoxyl sulfate, indole-3-lactic acid, phenyllactic acid, pipecolic acid, hippuric acid, and markers of DNA damage such as 2-deoxyuridine. Metabolites associated with tryptophan and indoles may reflect radiation-induced gut microbiome effects. Predominant liver biomarkers in common between WBI and WLI were amino acids, sugars, TCA metabolites (fumarate), fatty acids (lineolate, n-hexadecanoic acid) and DNA damage markers (uridine). Conclusions We identified a set of metabolomic markers that may prove useful as plasma biomarkers of RILD and WBI. Pathway analysis also suggested that the unique metabolic changes observed after liver irradiation was an integrative response of the intestine, liver and kidney. PMID:26046990

  12. Ethanol Metabolism Modifies Hepatic Protein Acylation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Kristofer S.; Green, Michelle F.; Petersen, Dennis R.; Hirschey, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein acetylation increases in response to chronic ethanol ingestion in mice, and is thought to reduce mitochondrial function and contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. The mitochondrial deacetylase SIRT3 regulates the acetylation status of several mitochondrial proteins, including those involved in ethanol metabolism. The newly discovered desuccinylase activity of the mitochondrial sirtuin SIRT5 suggests that protein succinylation could be an important post-translational modification regulating mitochondrial metabolism. To assess the possible role of protein succinylation in ethanol metabolism, we surveyed hepatic sub-cellular protein fractions from mice fed a control or ethanol-supplemented diet for succinyl-lysine, as well as acetyl-, propionyl-, and butyryl-lysine post-translational modifications. We found mitochondrial protein propionylation increases, similar to mitochondrial protein acetylation. In contrast, mitochondrial protein succinylation is reduced. These mitochondrial protein modifications appear to be primarily driven by ethanol metabolism, and not by changes in mitochondrial sirtuin levels. Similar trends in acyl modifications were observed in the nucleus. However, comparatively fewer acyl modifications were observed in the cytoplasmic or the microsomal compartments, and were generally unchanged by ethanol metabolism. Using a mass spectrometry proteomics approach, we identified several candidate acetylated, propionylated, and succinylated proteins, which were enriched using antibodies against each modification. Additionally, we identified several acetyl and propionyl lysine residues on the same sites for a number of proteins and supports the idea of the overlapping nature of lysine-specific acylation. Thus, we show that novel post-translational modifications are present in hepatic mitochondrial, nuclear, cytoplasmic, and microsomal compartments and ethanol ingestion, and its associated metabolism, induce specific

  13. Low Hepatic Mg2+ Content promotes Liver dysmetabolism: Implications for the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Voma, Chesinta; Etwebi, Zienab; Soltani, Danial Amir; Croniger, Colleen; Romani, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic Syndrome, a pathological condition affecting approximately 35% of the USA population, is characterized by obesity, insulin resistance, and hypertension. Metabolic syndrome is considered the single most common condition predisposing to the development of various chronic diseases including diabetes and hypertension. Hypomagnesaemia has been consistently observed in association with metabolic syndrome, but it is unclear whether reduced Mg2+ levels are the consequence or a possible cause for the development of the metabolic syndrome and/or its associated pathologies. Research performed in our laboratory showed that rats exposed for 2 weeks to a Mg2+ deficient diet presented decreased glucose accumulation into the hepatocytes together with low Mg2+ level in the circulation and within the liver cells. To better investigate the changes in glucose metabolism, HepG2 were used to mimic in vitro Mg2+ deficiency conditions. HepG2 cells cultured in low extracellular Mg2+ presented a 20% decrease in total cellular Mg2+ content, reduced glucose accumulation, and enhanced glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) transport into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The increased G6P transport was associated with its enhanced hydrolysis by the glucose 6-phosphatase, but also conversion to 6-phosphogluconolactone by the glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. The latter process resulted in the increased generation of NADPH within the ER and the increased conversion of cortisone to cortisol by the 11-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type-1 (11-β-OHSD1). Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence that Mg2+ deficiency precedes and actually promotes some of the hepatic dysmetabolisms typical of the metabolic syndrome. The decrease in intrahepatic Mg2+ content up-regulates G6P entry into the hepatic endoplasmic reticulum and its routing into the pentose shunt pathway for energetic purposes. The associated increased in NADPH production within the ER then stimulates cortisol production

  14. Hepatic and cerebral energy metabolism after neonatal canine alimentation.

    PubMed

    Kliegman, R M; Miettinen, E L; Morton, S K

    1983-04-01

    Intrahepatic and intracerebral metabolic responses to neonatal fasting or enteric carbohydrate alimentation were investigated among newborn dogs. Pups were either fasted or given an intravenous glucose infusion (alimented) before an enteric feeding of physiologic quantities of either glucose or galactose. These pups were also compared to another group which was completely starved throughout the study period. Gastrointestinal carbohydrate feeding resulted in enhanced hepatic glycogen content among pups after a prior state of fasting. Though there were no differences of glycogen content between glucose or galactose feeding in this previously fasted group, combined intravenous glucose and enteric galactose administration produced the greatest effect on hepatic glycogen synthesis. Intrahepatic fructose 1, 6-diphosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate levels were increased among previously fasted pups fed enteric monosaccharides compared to completely starved control pups, whereas intrahepatic phosphoenolpyruvate and pyruvate levels were elevated after combined intravenous and enteric carbohydrate administration. Of greater interest was the observation that hepatic levels of ATP were significantly elevated among all groups given exogenous carbohydrates compared to the completely starved control group. In contrast to the augmented hepatic glycogen and ATP levels, there were no alterations of cerebral glycogen or ATP after alimentation. Nevertheless, cerebral pyruvate and/or phosphoenolpyruvate concentrations were elevated after enteric or combined intravenous and enteric alimentation compared to the totally starved control pups.

  15. Oral MSG administration alters hepatic expression of genes for lipid and nitrogen metabolism in suckling piglets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yuzhe; Liao, Peng; Li, Tiejun; Chen, Lixiang; Yin, Yulong; Wang, Jinquan; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of oral administration of monosodium glutamate (MSG) on expression of genes for hepatic lipid and nitrogen metabolism in piglets. A total of 24 newborn pigs were assigned randomly into one of four treatments (n = 6/group). The doses of oral MSG administration, given at 8:00 and 18:00 to sow-reared piglets between 0 and 21 days of age, were 0 (control), 0.06 (low dose), 0.5 (intermediate dose), and 1 (high dose) g/kg body weight/day. At the end of the 3-week treatment, serum concentrations of total protein and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the intermediate dose group were elevated than those in the control group (P < 0.05). Hepatic mRNA levels for fatty acid synthase, acetyl-coA carboxylase, insulin-like growth factor-1, glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase, and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase were higher in the middle-dose group (P < 0.05), compared with the control group. MSG administration did not affect hepatic mRNA levels for hormone-sensitive lipase or carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1. We conclude that oral MSG administration alters hepatic expression of certain genes for lipid and nitrogen metabolism in suckling piglets.

  16. Caveolin-1 is necessary for hepatic oxidative lipid metabolism: evidence for crosstalk between caveolin-1 and bile acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rojo, Manuel A; Gongora, Milena; Fitzsimmons, Rebecca L; Martel, Nick; Martin, Sheree D; Nixon, Susan J; Brooks, Andrew J; Ikonomopoulou, Maria P; Martin, Sally; Lo, Harriet P; Myers, Stephen A; Restall, Christina; Ferguson, Charles; Pilch, Paul F; McGee, Sean L; Anderson, Robin L; Waters, Michael J; Hancock, John F; Grimmond, Sean M; Muscat, George E O; Parton, Robert G

    2013-07-25

    Caveolae and caveolin-1 (CAV1) have been linked to several cellular functions. However, a model explaining their roles in mammalian tissues in vivo is lacking. Unbiased expression profiling in several tissues and cell types identified lipid metabolism as the main target affected by CAV1 deficiency. CAV1-/- mice exhibited impaired hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)-dependent oxidative fatty acid metabolism and ketogenesis. Similar results were recapitulated in CAV1-deficient AML12 hepatocytes, suggesting at least a partial cell-autonomous role of hepatocyte CAV1 in metabolic adaptation to fasting. Finally, our experiments suggest that the hepatic phenotypes observed in CAV1-/- mice involve impaired PPARα ligand signaling and attenuated bile acid and FXRα signaling. These results demonstrate the significance of CAV1 in (1) hepatic lipid homeostasis and (2) nuclear hormone receptor (PPARα, FXRα, and SHP) and bile acid signaling.

  17. Cocoa butter and safflower oil elicit different effects on hepatic gene expression and lipid metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Carolina; Parini, Paolo; Ostojic, Jovanca; Cheung, Louisa; Hu, Jin; Zadjali, Fahad; Tahir, Faheem; Brismar, Kerstin; Norstedt, Gunnar; Tollet-Egnell, Petra

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of cocoa butter and safflower oil on hepatic transcript profiles, lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity in healthy rats. Cocoa butter-based high-fat feeding for 3 days did not affect plasma total triglyceride (TG) levels or TG-rich VLDL particles or hepatic insulin sensitivity, but changes in hepatic gene expression were induced that might lead to increased lipid synthesis, lipotoxicity, inflammation and insulin resistance if maintained. Safflower oil increased hepatic beta-oxidation, was beneficial in terms of circulating TG-rich VLDL particles, but led to reduced hepatic insulin sensitivity. The effects of safflower oil on hepatic gene expression were partly overlapping with those exerted by cocoa butter, but fewer transcripts from anabolic pathways were altered. Increased hepatic cholesterol levels and increased expression of hepatic CYP7A1 and ABCG5 mRNA, important gene products in bile acid production and cholesterol excretion, were specific effects elicited by safflower oil only. Common effects on gene expression included increased levels of p8, DIG-1 IGFBP-1 and FGF21, and reduced levels of SCD-1 and SCD-2. This indicates that a lipid-induced program for hepatic lipid disposal and cell survival was induced by 3 days of high-fat feeding, independent on the lipid source. Based on the results, we speculate that hepatic TG infiltration leads to reduced expression of SCD-1, which might mediate either neutral, beneficial or unfavorable effects on hepatic metabolism upon high-fat feeding, depending on which fatty acids were provided by the diet.

  18. Colostrum yield and piglet growth during lactation are related to gilt metabolic and hepatic status prepartum.

    PubMed

    Loisel, F; Farmer, C; Ramaekers, P; Quesnel, H

    2014-07-01

    It was hypothesized that colostrum production could be influenced by sow peripartum endocrine, metabolic, and hepatic status. The plant extract silymarin was shown to influence endocrine and hepatic status in several species. The aims of the present study were to investigate the effects of silymarin intake during late pregnancy on sow hormonal and hepatic status and to determine whether relations exist between sow hepatic and metabolic status during the peripartum period and colostrum yield and piglet performances during lactation. From d 107 of pregnancy until farrowing, nulliparous sows were either fed 12 g/d of silymarin (SIL; n = 15) or no treatment (Control; n = 12). Piglet BW was recorded directly after birth, 24 h after birth of the first piglet, and at 7, 14, and 21 d of lactation. Blood samples were collected from sows on d 107 and 109 of pregnancy, daily from d 111 of pregnancy until d 2 of lactation, and on d 7 and 21 of lactation. They were assayed for endocrine, metabolic, and hepatic variables. Colostrum yield was estimated during 24 h starting at the onset of farrowing. Silymarin did not influence colostrum yield (3.7 ± 0.3 kg) or gross composition (P > 0.10), nor did it affect serum prolactin concentrations or plasma concentrations of progesterone, estradiol-17β, or cortisol (P > 0.10). Mean litter BW gain was lower (P < 0.05) during the first week and tended (P < 0.10) to be lower during the second week of lactation in litters from SIL sows. Silymarin had no effect on plasma concentrations of aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, γ-glutamyl transferase (γ-GT), alkaline phosphatase, or total cholesterol (P > 0.10). Colostrum yield was positively correlated with urea (r = 0.50; P = 0.01) and creatinine (r = 0.43; P = 0.03) concentrations in sows on the day before farrowing. Mean litter BW gain over 2 wk was negatively correlated with concentrations of β-hydroxybutyric acid (r = -0.50; P = 0.01) and γ-GT (r = -0.42; P = 0.03) on the day

  19. Brain metabolism in patients with hepatic encephalopathy studied by PET and MR.

    PubMed

    Keiding, Susanne; Pavese, Nicola

    2013-08-15

    We review PET- and MR studies on hepatic encephalopathy (HE) metabolism in human subjects from the point of views of methods, methodological assumptions and use in studies of cirrhotic patients with clinically overt HE, cirrhotic patients with minimal HE, cirrhotic patients with no history of HE and healthy subjects. Key results are: (1) Cerebral oxygen uptake and blood flow are reduced to 2/3 in cirrhotic patients with clinically overt HE but not in cirrhotic patients with minimal HE or no HE compared to healthy subjects. (2) Cerebral ammonia metabolism is enhanced due to increased blood ammonia in cirrhotic patients but the kinetics of cerebral ammonia uptake and metabolism is not affected by hyperammonemia. (3) Recent advantages in MR demonstrate low-grade cerebral oedema not only in astrocytes but also in the white matter in cirrhotic patients with HE.

  20. Exposure to a Northern Contaminant Mixture (NCM) Alters Hepatic Energy and Lipid Metabolism Exacerbating Hepatic Steatosis in Obese JCR Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mailloux, Ryan J.; Florian, Maria; Chen, Qixuan; Yan, Jin; Petrov, Ivan; Coughlan, Melanie C.; Laziyan, Mahemuti; Caldwell, Don; Lalande, Michelle; Patry, Dominique; Gagnon, Claude; Sarafin, Kurtis; Truong, Jocelyn; Chan, Hing Man; Ratnayake, Nimal; Li, Nanqin; Willmore, William G.; Jin, Xiaolei

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), defined by the American Liver Society as the buildup of extra fat in liver cells that is not caused by alcohol, is the most common liver disease in North America. Obesity and type 2 diabetes are viewed as the major causes of NAFLD. Environmental contaminants have also been implicated in the development of NAFLD. Northern populations are exposed to a myriad of persistent organic pollutants including polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, flame retardants, and toxic metals, while also affected by higher rates of obesity and alcohol abuse compared to the rest of Canada. In this study, we examined the impact of a mixture of 22 contaminants detected in Inuit blood on the development and progression of NAFLD in obese JCR rats with or without co-exposure to10% ethanol. Hepatosteatosis was found in obese rat liver, which was worsened by exposure to 10% ethanol. NCM treatment increased the number of macrovesicular lipid droplets, total lipid contents, portion of mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids in the liver. This was complemented by an increase in hepatic total cholesterol and cholesterol ester levels which was associated with changes in the expression of genes and proteins involved in lipid metabolism and transport. In addition, NCM treatment increased cytochrome P450 2E1 protein expression and decreased ubiquinone pool, and mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit ATP5A and Complex IV activity. Despite the changes in mitochondrial physiology, hepatic ATP levels were maintained high in NCM-treated versus control rats. This was due to a decrease in ATP utilization and an increase in creatine kinase activity. Collectively, our results suggest that NCM treatment decreases hepatic cholesterol export, possibly also increases cholesterol uptake from circulation, and promotes lipid accumulation and alters ATP homeostasis which exacerbates the existing hepatic steatosis in genetically obese JCR rats with or without co

  1. Exposure to a northern contaminant mixture (NCM) alters hepatic energy and lipid metabolism exacerbating hepatic steatosis in obese JCR rats.

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Florian, Maria; Chen, Qixuan; Yan, Jin; Petrov, Ivan; Coughlan, Melanie C; Laziyan, Mahemuti; Caldwell, Don; Lalande, Michelle; Patry, Dominique; Gagnon, Claude; Sarafin, Kurtis; Truong, Jocelyn; Chan, Hing Man; Ratnayake, Nimal; Li, Nanqin; Willmore, William G; Jin, Xiaolei

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), defined by the American Liver Society as the buildup of extra fat in liver cells that is not caused by alcohol, is the most common liver disease in North America. Obesity and type 2 diabetes are viewed as the major causes of NAFLD. Environmental contaminants have also been implicated in the development of NAFLD. Northern populations are exposed to a myriad of persistent organic pollutants including polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, flame retardants, and toxic metals, while also affected by higher rates of obesity and alcohol abuse compared to the rest of Canada. In this study, we examined the impact of a mixture of 22 contaminants detected in Inuit blood on the development and progression of NAFLD in obese JCR rats with or without co-exposure to 10% ethanol. Hepatosteatosis was found in obese rat liver, which was worsened by exposure to 10% ethanol. NCM treatment increased the number of macrovesicular lipid droplets, total lipid contents, portion of mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids in the liver. This was complemented by an increase in hepatic total cholesterol and cholesterol ester levels which was associated with changes in the expression of genes and proteins involved in lipid metabolism and transport. In addition, NCM treatment increased cytochrome P450 2E1 protein expression and decreased ubiquinone pool, and mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit ATP5A and Complex IV activity. Despite the changes in mitochondrial physiology, hepatic ATP levels were maintained high in NCM-treated versus control rats. This was due to a decrease in ATP utilization and an increase in creatine kinase activity. Collectively, our results suggest that NCM treatment decreases hepatic cholesterol export, possibly also increases cholesterol uptake from circulation, and promotes lipid accumulation and alters ATP homeostasis which exacerbates the existing hepatic steatosis in genetically obese JCR rats with or without co

  2. The hepatic circadian clock modulates xenobiotic metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    DeBruyne, Jason P; Weaver, David R; Dallmann, Robert

    2014-08-01

    The circadian clock generates daily cycles of gene expression that regulate physiological processes. The liver plays an important role in xenobiotic metabolism and also has been shown to possess its own cell-based clock. The liver clock is synchronized by the master clock in the brain, and a portion of rhythmic gene expression can be driven by behavior of the organism as a whole even when the hepatic clock is suppressed. So far, however, there is relatively little evidence indicating whether the liver clock is functionally important in modulating xenobiotic metabolism. Thus, mice lacking circadian clock function in the whole body or specifically in liver were challenged with pentobarbital and acetaminophen, and pentobarbital sleep time (PBST) and acetaminophen toxicity, respectively, was assessed at different times of day in mutant and control mice. The results suggest that the liver clock is essential for rhythmic changes in xenobiotic detoxification. Surprisingly, it seems that the way in which the clock is disrupted determines the rate of xenobiotic metabolism in the liver. CLOCK-deficient mice are remarkably resistant to acetaminophen and exhibit a longer PBST, while PERIOD-deficient mice have a short PBST. These results indicate an essential role of the tissue-intrinsic peripheral circadian oscillator in the liver in regulating xenobiotic metabolism.

  3. Montelukast and irbesartan ameliorate metabolic and hepatic disorders in fructose-induced metabolic syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed A; Amin, Entesar F; Ibrahim, Salwa A; Abdelzaher, Walaa Y; Abdelrahman, Aly M

    2014-02-05

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a global health problem. Elucidation of the role of 5- lipooxygenase/leukotriene pathway and renin angiotensin system in the pathogenesis of MetS suggests a variety of potential therapies worthy of testing. The present work investigated the effect of montelukast, a leukotriene antagonist and/or irbesartan, an angiotensin II-receptor blocker, in the prevention of fructose-induced MetS in rats. Rats were allocated into 9 groups and treated for 6 weeks as follow: normal control; MetS group (received 20% fructose); MetS+montelukast groups (treated with montelukast, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg/day, respectively); MetS+irbesartan groups (treated withirbesartan 15, 30, and 45 mg/kg/day, respectively); and MetS+montelukast+irbesartan group (co treated with montelukast 5 mg/kg plus irbesartan 15 mg/g). Metabolic parameters (visceral fat index, liver index, insulin resistance, and serum lipid profile), oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde, reduced glutathione, and catalase), and inflammatory mediators (tumor necrosis factor-α, and uric acid) were measured. Expression of caspase-3 in hepatic tissues was detected by immunohistochemistry. Liver injury was evaluated by histopathological examination and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Montelukast, irbesartan, and their combination caused significant attenuation in metabolic and hepatic disorders. Their effect was associated with attenuation of oxidative stress markers, inflammatory mediators, and caspase-3 expression. This study highlighted the protective effects of montelukast and irbesartan against fructose-induced metabolic and hepatic disorders. The protective effect of either drug relies, at least in part, on their antioxidant and antiinflammatory effect, as well as on the reduction of caspase-3 expression in hepatic tissue.

  4. Hepatically-metabolized and -excreted artificial oxygen carrier, hemoglobin vesicles, can be safely used under conditions of hepatic impairment

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, Kazuaki; Miyasato, Mayumi; Ujihira, Hayato; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kadowaki, Daisuke; Sakai, Hiromi; Tsuchida, Eishun; Horinouchi, Hirohisa; Kobayashi, Koichi; Maruyama, Toru; Otagiri, Masaki

    2010-11-01

    The hemoglobin vesicle (HbV) is an artificial oxygen carrier in which a concentrated Hb solution is encapsulated in lipid vesicles. Our previous studies demonstrated that HbV is metabolized by the mononuclear phagocyte system, and the lipid components are excreted from the liver. It is well-known that many hepatically-metabolized and -excreted drugs show altered pharmaceutics under conditions of liver impairment, which results in adverse effects. The aim of this study was to determine whether the administration of HbV causes toxicity in rats with carbon tetrachloride induced liver cirrhosis. Changes in plasma biochemical parameters, histological staining and the pharmacokinetic distribution of HbV were evaluated after an HbV injection of the above model rats at a putative clinical dose (1400 mgHb/kg). Plasma biochemical parameters were not significantly affected, except for a transient elevation of lipase, lipid components and bilirubin, which recovered within 14 days after an HbV infusion. Negligible morphological changes were observed in the kidney, liver, spleen, lung and heart. Hemosiderin, a marker of iron accumulation in organs, was observed in the liver and spleen up to 14 days after HbV treatment, but no evidence of oxidative stress in the plasma and liver were observed. HbV is mainly distributed in the liver and spleen, and the lipid components are excreted into feces within 7 days. In conclusion, even under conditions of hepatic cirrhosis, HbV and its components exhibit the favorable metabolic and excretion profile at the putative clinical dose. These findings provide further support for the safety and effectiveness of HbV in clinical settings.

  5. Hepatic arachidonic acid metabolism is disrupted after hexachlorobenzene treatment.

    PubMed

    Billi de Catabbi, Silvia C; Faletti, Alicia; Fuentes, Federico; San Martín de Viale, Leonor C; Cochón, Adriana C

    2005-04-15

    Hexaclorobenzene (HCB), one of the most persistent environmental pollutants, can cause a wide range of toxic effects including cancer in animals, and hepatotoxicity and porphyria both in humans and animals. In the present study, liver microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism, hepatic PGE production, and cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) activity were investigated in an experimental model of porphyria cutanea tarda induced by HCB. Female Wistar rats were treated with a single daily dose of HCB (100 mg kg(-1) body weight) for 5 days and were sacrificed 3, 10, 17, and 52 days after the last dose. HCB treatment induced the accumulation of hepatic porphyrins from day 17 and increased the activities of liver ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), methoxyresorufin O-demethylase (MROD), and aminopyrine N-demethylase (APND) from day 3 after the last dose. Liver microsomes from control and HCB-treated rats generated, in the presence of NADPH, hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), 11,12-Di HETE, and omega-OH/omega-1-OH AA. HCB treatment caused an increase in total NADPH CYP-dependent AA metabolism, with a higher response at 3 days after the last HCB dose than at the other time points studied. In addition, HCB treatment markedly enhanced PGE production and release in liver slices. This HCB effect was time dependent and reached its highest level after 10 days. At this time cPLA2 activity was shown to be increased. Unexpectedly, HCB produced a significant decrease in cPLA2 activity on the 17th and 52nd day. Our results demonstrated for the first time that HCB induces both the cyclooxygenase and CYP-dependent AA metabolism. The effects of HCB on AA metabolism were previous to the onset of a marked porphyria and might contribute to different aspects of HCB-induced liver toxicity such as alterations of membrane fluidity and membrane-bound protein function. Observations also suggested that a possible role of cPLA2

  6. Stereoselective propranolol metabolism in two drug induced rat hepatic microsomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zeng, Su

    2000-02-01

    AIM:To study the influence of inducers BNF and PB on the stereoselective metabolism of propranolol in rat hepatic microsomes.METHODS:Phase I metabolism of propranolol was studied by using the microsomes induced by BNF and PB and the non induced microsome as the control.The enzymatic kinetic parameters of propranolol enantiomers were calculated by regression analysis of Lineweaver-Burk plots. Propranolol concentrations were assayed by HPLC.RESULTS:A RP-HPLC method was developed to determine propranolol concentration in rat hepatic microsomes. The linearity equations for R(+)propranolol and S(-) propranolol were A = 705.7C+311.2C (R = 0.9987) and a = 697.2C+311.4C (R = 0.9970) respectively. Recoveries of each enantiomer were 98.9%, 99.5%, 101.0% at 60&mgr;mol/L, 120&mgr;mol/L, 240&mgr;mol/L respectively. At the concentration level of 120&mgr;mol/L, propranolol enantiomers were metabolized at different rates in different microsomes. The concentration ratio R(+)/S(-) of control and PB induced microsomes increased with time, whereas that of microsome induced by BNF decreased. The assayed enzyme parameters were: 1. Km. Control group: R(+)30 plus minus 8, S(-)18 plus minus 5; BNF group: R(+)34 plus minus 3, S(-)39 plus minus 7; PB group: R(+)38 plus minus 17, S(-)36 plus minus 10. 2. Vmax. Control group: R(+)1.5 plus minus 0.2, S(-)2.9 plus minus 0.3; BNF group: R(+)3.8 plus minus 0.3, S(-)3.3 plus minus 0.5; PB group: R(+)0.07 plus minus 0.03, S(-)1.94 plus minus 0.07. 3. Clint. Control group: R(+)60 plus minus 3, S(-)170 plus minus 30; BNF group: R(+)111.0 plus minus 1, S(-) 84 plus minus 5; PB group: R(+)2.0 plus minus 2, S(-)56.0 plus minus 1. The enzyme parameters compared with unpaired t tests showed that no stereoselectivity was observed in enzymatic affinity of three microsomes to enantiomers and their catalytic abilities were quite different and had stereoselectivities.Compared with the control, microsome induced by BNF enhanced enzyme activity to propranolol R

  7. Hepatic intralobular mapping of fructose metabolism in the rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, S P; Murphy, H C; Iles, R A; Bailey, R A; Cohen, R D

    2000-01-01

    Detailed mapping of glucose and lactate metabolism along the radius of the hepatic lobule was performed in situ in rat livers perfused with 1.5 mM lactate before and during the addition of 5 mM fructose. The majority of fructose uptake occurred in the periportal region; 45% of fructose taken up in the periportal half of the lobular volume being converted into glucose. Periportal lactate uptake was markedly decreased by addition of fructose. Basal perivenous lactate output, which was derived from glucose synthesized periportally, was increased in the presence of fructose. During fructose infusion there was a small decrease in cell pH periportally, but acidification of up to 0.5 pH units perivenously. The evidence suggests that in situ the apparent direct conversion of fructose into lactate represents, to a substantial extent, the result of periportal conversion of fructose into glucose and the subsequent uptake and glycolysis to lactate in the perivenous zone of some of that glucose. (31)P NMR spectroscopy showed that the cellular concentration of phosphomonoesters changes very little periportally during fructose infusion, but there was an approximate twofold increase perivenously, presumably due to the accumulation of fructose 1-phosphate. It may be inferred that fructokinase activity is expressed throughout the hepatic lobule. PMID:10880353

  8. Mapping Metabolic Brain Activity in Three Models of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Marta; Fidalgo, Camino; Aller, María Ángeles; Arias, Jaime; Arias, Jorge L.

    2013-01-01

    Cirrhosis is a common disease in Western countries. Liver failure, hyperammonemia, and portal hypertension are the main factors that contribute to human cirrhosis that frequently leads to a neuropsychiatric disorder known as hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In this study, we examined the differential contribution of these leading factors to the oxidative metabolism of diverse brain limbic system regions frequently involved in memory process by histochemical labelling of cytochrome oxidase (COx). We have analyzed cortical structures such as the infralimbic and prelimbic cotices, subcortical structures such as hippocampus and ventral striatum, at thalamic level like the anterodorsal, anteroventral, and mediodorsal thalamus, and, finally, the hypothalamus, where the mammillary nuclei (medial and lateral) were measured. The severest alteration is found in the model that mimics intoxication by ammonia, followed by the thioacetamide-treated group and the portal hypertension group. No changes were found at the mammillary bodies for any of the experimental groups. PMID:23573412

  9. Interaction between dietary lipids and gut microbiota regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Caesar, Robert; Nygren, Heli; Orešič, Matej; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2016-03-01

    The gut microbiota influences many aspects of host metabolism. We have previously shown that the presence of a gut microbiota remodels lipid composition. Here we investigated how interaction between gut microbiota and dietary lipids regulates lipid composition in the liver and plasma, and gene expression in the liver. Germ-free and conventionally raised mice were fed a lard or fish oil diet for 11 weeks. We performed lipidomics analysis of the liver and serum and microarray analysis of the liver. As expected, most of the variation in the lipidomics dataset was induced by the diet, and abundance of most lipid classes differed between mice fed lard and fish oil. However, the gut microbiota also affected lipid composition. The gut microbiota increased hepatic levels of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters in mice fed lard, but not in mice fed fish oil. Serum levels of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters were not affected by the gut microbiota. Genes encoding enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis were downregulated by the gut microbiota in mice fed lard and were expressed at a low level in mice fed fish oil independent of microbial status. In summary, we show that gut microbiota-induced regulation of hepatic cholesterol metabolism is dependent on dietary lipid composition.

  10. Interaction between dietary lipids and gut microbiota regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism1[S

    PubMed Central

    Caesar, Robert; Nygren, Heli; Orešič, Matej; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota influences many aspects of host metabolism. We have previously shown that the presence of a gut microbiota remodels lipid composition. Here we investigated how interaction between gut microbiota and dietary lipids regulates lipid composition in the liver and plasma, and gene expression in the liver. Germ-free and conventionally raised mice were fed a lard or fish oil diet for 11 weeks. We performed lipidomics analysis of the liver and serum and microarray analysis of the liver. As expected, most of the variation in the lipidomics dataset was induced by the diet, and abundance of most lipid classes differed between mice fed lard and fish oil. However, the gut microbiota also affected lipid composition. The gut microbiota increased hepatic levels of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters in mice fed lard, but not in mice fed fish oil. Serum levels of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters were not affected by the gut microbiota. Genes encoding enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis were downregulated by the gut microbiota in mice fed lard and were expressed at a low level in mice fed fish oil independent of microbial status. In summary, we show that gut microbiota-induced regulation of hepatic cholesterol metabolism is dependent on dietary lipid composition. PMID:26783361

  11. Hepatic serine and alanine metabolism during endotoxin-induced fever in sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Southorn, B G; Thompson, J R

    1987-01-01

    Time course changes in plasma amino acid concentrations and the hepatic metabolism of serine and alanine were measured in six mature wethers during endotoxin-induced fever. In separate trials, the animals' responses to injections of saline and endotoxin were measured. The endotoxin was from Escherichia coli serotype 055:B5 and was injected intravenously (4 micrograms/kg body weight). Liver biopsies were obtained from the sheep at 6 h postinjection during both endotoxin and saline injection trials. Rectal temperature in the endotoxin treated animals was increased (P less than 0.05, above that in control animals from 4.25 h to 9 h postinjection, with a maximum rise of 2.43 degrees C at 5.5 h postinjection. Glucose concentration in jugular plasma decreased (P less than 0.05) by 3 h postinjection and remained depressed throughout the 24 h postinjection sampling period. Plasma serine concentration was decreased (P less than 0.05) by 3 h postinjection. Plasma alanine concentration was decreased significantly (P less than 0.05) only at 24 h postinjection. Endotoxin injection increased (P less than 0.05) hepatic oxidation of 14C-serine (162%) and the net incorporation of 14C-serine carbon into hepatic protein (173%) and glycogen (275%). The net incorporation of 14C-alanine carbon into hepatic protein (172%) and glycogen (323%) were increased (P less than 0.05) by endotoxin injection, while alanine oxidation was not affected by endotoxin treatment (P greater than 0.05). The increased hepatic use of serine may explain, in part, the dramatic decrease in plasma concentrations of this amino acid following endotoxin injection into sheep. PMID:3115552

  12. The Role of Gastrointestinal Hormones in Hepatic Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mells, Jamie Eugene; Anania, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular accumulation of free fatty acids (FFAs) in the form of triglycerides constitutes the metabolic basis for the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Recent data demonstrate that excess FFA hepatocyte storage is likely to lead to lipotoxicity and hepatocyte apoptosis. Hence, FFA-mediated hepatocyte injury is a key contributor to the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, obesity, type 2 diabetes, essential hypertension, and other common medical problems together comprise metabolic syndrome. Evidence suggests that peptide hormones from the L cells of the distal small intestine, which comprise the core of the enteroendocrine system (EES), play two key roles, serving either as incretins, or as mediators of appetite and satiety in the central nervous system. Recent data related to glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and other known L-cell hormones have accumulated due to the increasing frequency of bariatric surgery, which increase delivery of bile salts to the hindgut. Bile acids are a key stimulus for the TGR5 receptor of the L cells. Enhanced bile-salt flow and subsequent EES stimulation may be central to elimination of hepatic steatosis following bariatric surgery. Although GLP-1 is a clinically relevant pharmacological analogue that drives pancreatic β-cell insulin output, GLP-1 analogues also have independent benefits via their effects on hepatocellular FFA metabolism. The authors also discuss recent data regarding the role of the major peptides released by the EES, which promote satiety and modulate energy homeostasis and utilization, as well as those that control fat absorption and intestinal permeability. Taken together, elucidating novel functions for EES-related peptides and pharmacologic development of peptide analogues offer potential far-ranging treatment for obesity-related human disease. PMID:24222092

  13. Cyclin D1 regulates hepatic estrogen and androgen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mullany, Lisa K; Hanse, Eric A; Romano, Andrea; Blomquist, Charles H; Mason, J Ian; Delvoux, Bert; Anttila, Chelsea; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2010-06-01

    Cyclin D1 is a cell cycle control protein that plays an important role in regenerating liver and many types of cancer. Previous reports have shown that cyclin D1 can directly enhance estrogen receptor activity and inhibit androgen receptor activity in a ligand-independent manner and thus may play an important role in hormone-responsive malignancies. In this study, we examine a distinct mechanism by which cyclin D1 regulates sex steroid signaling, via altered metabolism of these hormones at the tissue and cellular level. In male mouse liver, ectopic expression of cyclin D1 regulated genes involved in the synthesis and degradation of sex steroid hormones in a pattern that would predict increased estrogen and decreased androgen levels. Indeed, hepatic expression of cyclin D1 led to increased serum estradiol levels, increased estrogen-responsive gene expression, and decreased androgen-responsive gene expression. Cyclin D1 also regulated the activity of several key enzymatic reactions in the liver, including increased oxidation of testosterone to androstenedione and decreased conversion of estradiol to estrone. Similar findings were seen in the setting of physiological cyclin D1 expression in regenerating liver. Knockdown of cyclin D1 in HuH7 cells produced reciprocal changes in steroid metabolism genes compared with cyclin D1 overexpression in mouse liver. In conclusion, these studies establish a novel link between the cell cycle machinery and sex steroid metabolism and provide a distinct mechanism by which cyclin D1 may regulate hormone signaling. Furthermore, these results suggest that increased cyclin D1 expression, which occurs in liver regeneration and liver diseases, may contribute to the feminization seen in these settings.

  14. Factors affecting metabolic syndrome by lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Ki, Nam-Kyun; Lee, Hae-Kag; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Seon-Chil; Kim, Nak-Sang

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to explore lifestyle factors in relation to metabolic syndrome so as to be able to utilize the results as baseline data for the furtherance of health-care and medical treatment. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted with patients who visited a health care center located in Seoul and had abdominal ultrasonography between 2 March 2013 and 28 February, 2014. Heights, weights, and blood pressures were measured by automatic devices. Three radiologists examined the patients using abdominal ultrasonography for gallstone diagnosis. The statuses of patients with regard to smoking, alcohol, coffee, and physical activities were explored for the lifestyle investigation. For investigating baseline demographics, we first used descriptive statistics. We then used the χ2 test to analyze lifestyles and gallstone prevalence with regard to the presence of metabolic syndrome. Lastly, logistic regression analysis was conducted to discover the risk factors of metabolic syndrome. [Results] For men, body mass index, maximum gallstone size, and waist circumference were revealed as risk factors for metabolic syndrome, in descending order of the degree of risk. For females, gallstone presence was the most significant risk factor, followed by waist circumference. [Conclusion] Metabolic disease mainly presents itself along with obesity, and we should become more focused on preventing and treating this disease. A large-scale prospective study is needed in the future, as the cause of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis remained unclear in this study. PMID:26957725

  15. Does chronic hepatitis B infection affect the clinical course of acute hepatitis A?

    PubMed

    Shin, Su Rin; Moh, In Ho; Jung, Sung Won; Kim, Jin Bae; Park, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyoung Su; Jang, Myung Kuk; Lee, Myung Seok

    2013-01-01

    The impact of chronic hepatitis B on the clinical outcome of acute hepatitis A remains controversial. The aim of present study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics of acute hepatitis A in cases with underlying chronic hepatitis B compared to cases of acute hepatitis A alone. Data on 758 patients with acute hepatitis A admitted at two university-affiliated hospitals were reviewed. Patients were classified into three groups: group A, patients with both acute hepatitis A and underlying chronic hepatitis B (n = 27); group B, patients infected by acute hepatitis A alone whose sexes and ages were matched with patients in group A (n  = 54); and group C, patients with acute hepatitis A alone (n = 731). None of the demographic features of group A were significantly different from those of group B or C, except for the proportion of males and body weight, which differed from group C. When comparing to group B, clinical symptoms were more frequent, and higher total bilirubin and lower albumin levels were observed in group A. When comparing to group C, the albumin levels were lower in group A. There were no differences in the duration of hospital stay, occurrence of acute kidney injury, acute liver failure, prolonged cholestasis, or relapsing hepatitis. This study revealed that clinical symptoms and laboratory findings were less favorable for patients with acute hepatitis A and chronic hepatitis B compared to those with acute hepatitis A alone. However, there were no differences in fatal outcomes or serious complications.

  16. Metabolic responses to dietary leucine restriction involve remodeling of adipose tissue and enhanced hepatic insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Wanders, Desiree; Stone, Kirsten P; Dille, Kelly; Simon, Jacob; Pierse, Alicia; Gettys, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    Dietary leucine was incrementally restricted to test whether limiting this essential amino acid (EAA) would fully reproduce the beneficial responses produced by dietary methionine restriction. Restricting leucine by 85% increased energy intake and expenditure within 5 to 7 days of its introduction and reduced overall accumulation of adipose tissue. Leucine restriction (LR) also improved glucose tolerance, increased hepatic release of fibroblast growth factor 21 into the blood stream, and enhanced insulin-dependent activation of Akt in liver. However, LR had no effect on hepatic lipid levels and failed to lower lipogenic gene expression in the liver. LR did affect remodeling of white and brown adipose tissues, increasing expression of both thermogenic and lipogenic genes. These findings illustrate that dietary LR reproduces many but not all of the physiological responses of methionine restriction. The primary differences occur in the liver, where methionine and LR cause opposite effects on tissue lipid levels and expression of lipogenic genes. Altogether, these findings suggest that the sensing systems which detect and respond to dietary restriction of EAAs act through mechanisms that both leucine and methionine are able to engage, and in the case of hepatic lipid metabolism, may be unique to specific EAAs such as methionine.

  17. The role of hepatic mitochondria in the regulation of glucose metabolism in BHE rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The interacting effects of dietary fat source and thyroxine treatment on the hepatic mitochondrial function and glucose metabolism were studied. In the first study, three different sources of dietary fatty acids and thyroxine treatment were used to investigate the hepatic mitochondrial thermotropic behavior in two strains of rat. The NIDDM BHE and Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Feeding coconut oil increased serum T{sub 4} levels and T{sub 4} treatment increased serum T{sub 3} levels in the BHE rats. In the mitochondria from BHE rats fed coconut oil and treated with T{sub 4}, the transition temperature disappeared due to a decoupling of succinate supported respiration. This was not observed in the Sprague-Dawley rats. In the second study, two different sources of dietary fat and T{sub 4} treatment were used to investigate hepatic mitochondrial function. Coconut oil feeding increased Ca{sup ++}Mg{sup ++}ATPase and Mg{sup ++}ATPase. T{sub 4} treatment had potentiated this effect. T{sub 4} increased the malate-aspartate shuttle and {alpha}-glycerophosphate shuttle activities. In the third study, the glucose turnover rate from D-({sup 14}C-U)/(6-{sup 3}H)-glucose and gluconeogeneis from L-({sup 14}C-U)-alanine was examined. Dietary fat or T{sub 4} did not affect the glucose mass. T{sub 4} increased the irreversible fractional glucose turnover rate.

  18. METABOLIC RESPONSES TO DIETARY LEUCINE RESTRICTION INVOLVE REMODELING OF ADIPOSE TISSUE AND ENHANCED HEPATIC INSULIN SIGNALING

    PubMed Central

    Wanders, Desiree; Stone, Kirsten P.; Dille, Kelly; Simon, Jacob; Pierse, Alicia; Gettys, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary leucine was incrementally restricted to test whether limiting this essential amino acid (EAA) would fully reproduce the beneficial responses produced by dietary methionine restriction. Restricting leucine by 85% increased energy intake and expenditure within five to seven days of its introduction and reduced overall accumulation of adipose tissue. Leucine restriction (LR) also improved glucose tolerance, increased hepatic release of FGF21 into the blood stream, and enhanced insulin-dependent activation of Akt in liver. However, LR had no effect on hepatic lipid levels and failed to lower lipogenic gene expression in the liver. LR did affect remodeling of white and brown adipose tissue, increasing expression of both thermogenic and lipogenic genes. These findings illustrate that dietary LR reproduces many but not all of the physiological responses of methionine restriction. The primary differences occur in the liver, where methionine and leucine restriction cause opposite effects on tissue lipid levels and expression of lipogenic genes. Together these findings suggest that the sensing systems which detect and respond to dietary restriction of EAAs act through mechanisms that both leucine and methionine are able to engage, and in the case of hepatic lipid metabolism, may be unique to specific EAAs such as methionine. PMID:26643647

  19. Hepatic Transporter Expression in Metabolic Syndrome: Phenotype, Serum Metabolic Hormones, and Transcription Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Donepudi, Ajay C; Cheng, Qiuqiong; Lu, Zhenqiang James; Cherrington, Nathan J; Slitt, Angela L

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a multifactorial disease associated with obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, and the alteration of multiple metabolic hormones. Obesity rates have been rising worldwide, which increases our need to understand how this population will respond to drugs and exposure to other chemicals. The purpose of this study was to determine in lean and obese mice the ontogeny of clinical biomarkers such as serum hormone and blood glucose levels as well as the physiologic markers that correlate with nuclear receptor- and transporter-related pathways. Livers from male and female wild-type (WT) (C57BL/6) and ob/ob mice littermates were collected before, during, and after the onset of obesity. Serum hormone and mRNA levels were analyzed. Physiologic changes and gene expression during maturation and progression to obesity were performed and correlation analysis was performed using canonical correlations. Significant ontogenic changes in both WT and ob/ob mice were observed and these ontogenic changes differ in ob/ob mice with the development of obesity. In males and females, the ontogenic pattern of the expression of genes such as Abcc3, 4, Abcg2, Cyp2b10, and 4a14 started to differ from week 3, and became significant at weeks 4 and 8 in ob/ob mice compared with WT mice. In obese males, serum resistin, glucagon, and glucose levels correlated with the expression of most hepatic ATP-binding cassette (Abc) transporters, whereas in obese females, serum glucagon-like peptide 1 levels were correlated with most hepatic uptake transporters and P450 enzymes. Overall, the correlation between physiologic changes and gene expression indicate that metabolism-related hormones may play a role in regulating the genes involved in drug metabolism and transport.

  20. In vivo study of hepatitis B vaccine effects on inflammation and metabolism gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hamza, Heyam; Cao, Jianhua; Li, Xinyun; Zhao, Shuhong

    2012-03-01

    Pharmaceutical companies usually perform safety testing of vaccines, but all requirements of the World Health Organization and drug pharmacopoeias depend on general toxicity testing, and the gene expression study of hepatitis B vaccine is not done routinely to test vaccine quality. In this study, we applied a new technique of gene expression analysis to detect the inflammation and metabolism genes that might be affected by hepatitis B vaccine in mouse liver. Mice were used and divided into three groups: the first and second groups were treated with one or two human doses of vaccine, respectively, and the third group was used as a control. A microarray test showed that expression of 144 genes in the liver was significantly changed after 1 day of vaccination. Seven of these genes, which were related to inflammation and metabolism, were chosen and confirmed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) at 1, 4 and 7 days. The expression level of these genes can be considered as a biomarker for the effects of the vaccine.

  1. Paternal nicotine exposure alters hepatic xenobiotic metabolism in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Vallaster, Markus P; Kukreja, Shweta; Bing, Xin Y; Ngolab, Jennifer; Zhao-Shea, Rubing; Gardner, Paul D; Tapper, Andrew R; Rando, Oliver J

    2017-01-01

    Paternal environmental conditions can influence phenotypes in future generations, but it is unclear whether offspring phenotypes represent specific responses to particular aspects of the paternal exposure history, or a generic response to paternal ‘quality of life’. Here, we establish a paternal effect model based on nicotine exposure in mice, enabling pharmacological interrogation of the specificity of the offspring response. Paternal exposure to nicotine prior to reproduction induced a broad protective response to multiple xenobiotics in male offspring. This effect manifested as increased survival following injection of toxic levels of either nicotine or cocaine, accompanied by hepatic upregulation of xenobiotic processing genes, and enhanced drug clearance. Surprisingly, this protective effect could also be induced by a nicotinic receptor antagonist, suggesting that xenobiotic exposure, rather than nicotinic receptor signaling, is responsible for programming offspring drug resistance. Thus, paternal drug exposure induces a protective phenotype in offspring by enhancing metabolic tolerance to xenobiotics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24771.001 PMID:28196335

  2. [Thiamine metabolism in experimental hepatitis and the intake of Naftusia mineral water].

    PubMed

    Leus, N F

    1986-01-01

    The level and metabolism of vitamin B1 and its coenzymic form were studied in the tissues and subcellular structures of the internal organs of white rats with experimental toxic hepatitis, receiving mineral water naphtusya. It was found that naphtusya given per os stimulated the metabolism of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), enhanced its concentration in the hepatic tissue and intestinal mucosa, producing a stabilizing effect on the TPP activity. It is concluded that the mineral water naphtusya can be used for enteral correction of vitamin balance in hepatitis patients.

  3. Targeted Induction of Ceramide Degradation Leads to Improved Systemic Metabolism and Reduced Hepatic Steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Kusminski, Christine M.; Sun, Kai; Sharma, Ankit X.; Pearson, Mackenzie J.; Sifuentes, Angelika J.; McDonald, Jeffrey G.; Gordillo, Ruth; Scherer, Philipp E.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids have garnered attention for their role in insulin resistance and lipotoxic cell death. Aberrant accumulation of ceramides correlates with hepatic insulin resistance and steatosis. To further investigate the tissue-specific effects of local changes in ceramidase activity, we have developed transgenic mice inducibly expressing acid ceramidase, to trigger the deacylation of ceramides. This represents the first inducible genetic model that acutely manipulates ceramides in adult mouse tissues. Hepatic overexpression of acid ceramidase prevents hepatic steatosis and prompts improvements in insulin action in liver and adipose tissue. Conversely, overexpression of acid ceramidase within adipose tissue prevents hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. Induction of ceramidase activity in either tissue promotes a lowering of hepatic ceramides and reduced activation of the ceramide-activated protein kinase C isoform PKC-zeta. These observations suggest the existence of a rapidly acting "crosstalk" between liver and adipose tissue sphingolipids, critically regulating glucose metabolism and hepatic lipid uptake. PMID:26190650

  4. Caloric restriction of db/db mice reverts hepatic steatosis and body weight with divergent hepatic metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Eun; Jung, Youngae; Min, Soonki; Nam, Miso; Heo, Rok Won; Jeon, Byeong Tak; Song, Dae Hyun; Yi, Chin-ok; Jeong, Eun Ae; Kim, Hwajin; Kim, Jeonghyun; Jeong, Seon-Yong; Kwak, Woori; Ryu, Do Hyun; Horvath, Tamas L.; Roh, Gu Seob; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most frequent causes of liver disease and its prevalence is a serious and growing clinical problem. Caloric restriction (CR) is commonly recommended for improvement of obesity-related diseases such as NAFLD. However, the effects of CR on hepatic metabolism remain unknown. We investigated the effects of CR on metabolic dysfunction in the liver of obese diabetic db/db mice. We found that CR of db/db mice reverted insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis, body weight and adiposity to those of db/m mice. 1H-NMR- and UPLC-QTOF-MS-based metabolite profiling data showed significant metabolic alterations related to lipogenesis, ketogenesis, and inflammation in db/db mice. Moreover, western blot analysis showed that lipogenesis pathway enzymes in the liver of db/db mice were reduced by CR. In addition, CR reversed ketogenesis pathway enzymes and the enhanced autophagy, mitochondrial biogenesis, collagen deposition and endoplasmic reticulum stress in db/db mice. In particular, hepatic inflammation-related proteins including lipocalin-2 in db/db mice were attenuated by CR. Hepatic metabolomic studies yielded multiple pathological mechanisms of NAFLD. Also, these findings showed that CR has a therapeutic effect by attenuating the deleterious effects of obesity and diabetes-induced multiple complications. PMID:27439777

  5. Quantification of hepatic carbohydrate metabolism in conscious mice using serial blood and urine spots.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Theo H; Boer, Theo S; Havinga, Rick; Stellaard, Frans; Kuipers, Folkert; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan

    2003-11-01

    In vivo studies of hepatic carbohydrate metabolism in (genetically modified) conscious mice are hampered by limitations of blood and urine sample sizes. We developed and validated methods to quantify stable isotope dilution and incorporation in small blood and urine samples spotted onto filter paper. Blood glucose and urinary paracetamol-glucuronic acid were extracted from filter paper spots reproducibly and with high yield. Fractional isotopomer distributions of glucose and paracetamol-glucuronic acid when extracted from filter paper spots were almost identical to those isolated from the original body fluids. Rates of infusion of labeled compounds could be adjusted without perturbing hepatic glucose metabolism. This approach was used in mice to find the optimal metabolic condition for the study of hepatic carbohydrate metabolism. In fed mice, no isotopic steady state was observed during a 6-h label-infusion experiment. In 9-h-fasted mice, isotopic steady state was reached after 3 h of label infusion and important parameters in hepatic glucose metabolism could be calculated. The rate of de novo glucose-6-phosphate synthesis was 143 +/- 17 micromol kg(-1) min(-1) and partitioning to plasma glucose was 79.0 +/- 5.2%. In 24-h-fasted mice, abrupt changes were noticed in whole body and in hepatic glucose metabolism at the end of the experiment.

  6. Hepatic Farnesoid X-Receptor Isoforms α2 and α4 Differentially Modulate Bile Salt and Lipoprotein Metabolism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boesjes, Marije; Bloks, Vincent W.; Hageman, Jurre; Bos, Trijnie; van Dijk, Theo H.; Havinga, Rick; Wolters, Henk; Jonker, Johan W.; Kuipers, Folkert; Groen, Albert K.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear receptor FXR acts as an intracellular bile salt sensor that regulates synthesis and transport of bile salts within their enterohepatic circulation. In addition, FXR is involved in control of a variety of crucial metabolic pathways. Four FXR splice variants are known, i.e. FXRα1-4. Although these isoforms show differences in spatial and temporal expression patterns as well as in transcriptional activity, the physiological relevance hereof has remained elusive. We have evaluated specific roles of hepatic FXRα2 and FXRα4 by stably expressing these isoforms using liver-specific self-complementary adeno-associated viral vectors in total body FXR knock-out mice. The hepatic gene expression profile of the FXR knock-out mice was largely normalized by both isoforms. Yet, differential effects were also apparent; FXRα2 was more effective in reducing elevated HDL levels and transrepressed hepatic expression of Cyp8b1, the regulator of cholate synthesis. The latter coincided with a switch in hydrophobicity of the bile salt pool. Furthermore, FXRα2-transduction caused an increased neutral sterol excretion compared to FXRα4 without affecting intestinal cholesterol absorption. Our data show, for the first time, that hepatic FXRα2 and FXRα4 differentially modulate bile salt and lipoprotein metabolism in mice. PMID:25506828

  7. Dysregulated Hepatic Methionine Metabolism Drives Homocysteine Elevation in Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Pacana, Tommy; Cazanave, Sophie; Verdianelli, Aurora; Patel, Vaishali; Min, Hae-Ki; Mirshahi, Faridoddin; Quinlivan, Eoin; Sanyal, Arun J

    2015-01-01

    Methionine metabolism plays a central role in methylation reactions, production of glutathione and methylarginines, and modulating homocysteine levels. The mechanisms by which these are affected in NAFLD are not fully understood. The aim is to perform a metabolomic, molecular and epigenetic analyses of hepatic methionine metabolism in diet-induced NAFLD. Female 129S1/SvlmJ;C57Bl/6J mice were fed a chow (n = 6) or high-fat high-cholesterol (HFHC) diet (n = 8) for 52 weeks. Metabolomic study, enzymatic expression and DNA methylation analyses were performed. HFHC diet led to weight gain, marked steatosis and extensive fibrosis. In the methionine cycle, hepatic methionine was depleted (30%, p< 0.01) while s-adenosylmethionine (SAM)/methionine ratio (p< 0.05), s-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) (35%, p< 0.01) and homocysteine (25%, p< 0.01) were increased significantly. SAH hydrolase protein levels decreased significantly (p <0.01). Serine, a substrate for both homocysteine remethylation and transsulfuration, was depleted (45%, p< 0.01). In the transsulfuration pathway, cystathionine and cysteine trended upward while glutathione decreased significantly (p< 0.05). In the transmethylation pathway, levels of glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT), the most abundant methyltransferase in the liver, decreased. The phosphatidylcholine (PC)/ phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) ratio increased significantly (p< 0.01), indicative of increased phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase (PEMT) activity. The protein levels of protein arginine methytransferase 1 (PRMT1) increased significantly, but its products, monomethylarginine (MMA) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), decreased significantly. Circulating ADMA increased and approached significance (p< 0.06). Protein expression of methionine adenosyltransferase 1A, cystathionine β-synthase, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase, and methionine synthase remained unchanged. Although gene expression of the DNA

  8. Comprehensive insights into microcystin-LR effects on hepatic lipid metabolism using cross-omics technologies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zongyao; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Wu, Bing; Yin, Jinbao; Yu, Yunjiang; Yang, Liuyan

    2016-09-05

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) can induce hepatic tissue damages and molecular toxicities, but its effects on lipid metabolism remain unknown. This study investigated the effects of MC-LR exposure on mice lipid metabolism and uncovered the underlying mechanism through metabonomic, transcriptomic and metagenomic analyses after administration of mice with MC-LR by gavage for 28 d. Increased liver weight and abdominal fat weight, and evident hepatic lipid vacuoles accumulation were observed in the mice fed with 0.2mg/kg/d MC-LR. Serum nuclear magnetic resonance analysis showed that MC-LR treatment altered the levels of serum metabolites including triglyceride, unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) and very low density lipoprotein. Digital Gene Expression technology was used to reveal differential expression of hepatic transcriptomes, demonstrating that MC-LR treatment disturbed hepatic UFA biosynthesis and activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) signaling pathways via Pparγ, Fabp1 and Fabp2 over-expression. Metagenomic analyses of gut microbiota revealed that MC-LR exposure also increased abundant ratio of Firmicutes vs. Bacteroidetes in gut and altered biosynthetic pathways of various microbial metabolic and pro-inflammatory molecules. In conclusion, oral MC-LR exposure can induce hepatic lipid metabolism disorder mediated by UFA biosynthesis and PPAR activation, and gut microbial community shift may play an important role in the metabolic disturbance.

  9. Dietary carbohydrate and lipid source affect cholesterol metabolism of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) juveniles.

    PubMed

    Castro, Carolina; Corraze, Geneviève; Pérez-Jiménez, Amalia; Larroquet, Laurence; Cluzeaud, Marianne; Panserat, Stéphane; Oliva-Teles, Aires

    2015-10-28

    Plant feedstuffs (PF) are rich in carbohydrates, which may interact with lipid metabolism. Thus, when considering dietary replacement of fishery by-products with PF, knowledge is needed on how dietary lipid source (LS) and carbohydrates affect lipid metabolism and other metabolic pathways. For that purpose, a 73-d growth trial was performed with European sea bass juveniles (IBW 74 g) fed four diets differing in LS (fish oil (FO) or a blend of vegetable oils (VO)) and carbohydrate content (0 % (CH-) or 20 % (CH+) gelatinised starch). At the end of the trial no differences among diets were observed on growth and feed utilisation. Protein efficiency ratio was, however, higher in the CH+ groups. Muscle and liver fatty acid profiles reflected the dietary LS. Dietary carbohydrate promoted higher plasma cholesterol and phospholipids (PL), whole-body and hepatic (mainly 16 : 0) lipids and increased muscular and hepatic glycogen. Except for PL, which were higher in the FO groups, no major alterations between FO and VO groups were observed on plasma metabolites (glucose, TAG, cholesterol, PL), liver and muscle glycogen, and lipid and cholesterol contents. Activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme - lipogenesis-related enzymes - increased with carbohydrate intake. Hepatic expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism was up-regulated with carbohydrate (HMGCR and CYP3A27) and VO (HMGCR and CYP51A1) intake. No dietary regulation of long-chain PUFA biosynthesis at the transcriptional level was observed. Overall, very few interactions between dietary carbohydrates and LS were observed. However, important insights on the direct relation between dietary carbohydrate and the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway in European sea bass were demonstrated.

  10. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A Hepatitis A Hepatitis A is a contagious viral infection that can easily affect children and adults. It is one of the most common types of hepatitis virus. Often when you hear about hepatitis A ...

  11. Hepatitis C virus core protein impairs metabolic disorder of liver cell via HOTAIR-Sirt1 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi-qin; Gu, Xin-yu; Hu, Jin-xing; Ping, Yu; Li, Hua; Yan, Jing-ya; Li, Juan; Sun, Ran; Yu, Zu-jing; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is associated with metabolic disorders of liver cell. However, the precise mechanism is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to explore the impact of HCV core protein on hepatocyte metabolism by HepG2 and the possible involvement of long non-coding (lnc) RNAs in this process. The effect of HCV core protein on lncRNAs expression was examined with quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). Manipulation of HVC core protein and lncRNA HOTAIR was to evaluate the role of interaction between them on cell metabolism-related gene expression and cellular metabolism. The potential downstream Sirt1 signal was examined by western blotting and qRT-PCR. Our data suggested that suppression of HOTAIR abrogates HCV core protein-induced reduction in Sirt1 and differential expression of glucose- and lipid-metabolism-related genes. Also it benefits for metabolic homoeostasis of hepatocyte indicated by restoration of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and NAD/NADH ratio. By manipulation of HOTAIR, we concluded that HOTAIR negatively regulates Sirt1 expression through affecting its promotor methylation. Moreover, overexpression of Sirt1 reverses pcDNA-HOTAIR-induced glucose- and lipid-metabolism-related gene expression. Our study suggests that HCV core protein causes dysfunction of glucose and lipid metabolism in liver cells through HOTAIR-Sirt1 signalling pathway. PMID:27129296

  12. Evaluation of hepatic metabolism and pharmacokinetics of ibuprofen in rats under chronic hypobaric hypoxia for targeted therapy at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Gola, Shefali; Gupta, Asheesh; Keshri, Gaurav K; Nath, Madhu; Velpandian, Thirumurthy

    2016-03-20

    With studies indicative of altered drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK) under high altitude (HA)-induced hypobaric hypoxia, consideration of better therapeutic approaches has continuously been aimed in research for HA related illness management. DMPK of drugs like ibuprofen may get affected under hypoxia which establishes the requirement of different therapeutic dose regimen to ensure safe and effective therapy at HA. This study examined the effects of the chronic hypobaric hypoxia (CHH) on hepatic DMPK of ibuprofen in rats. Experimental animals were exposed to simulated altitude of 7620 m (∼25,000 ft) for CHH exposure (7 or 14 days) in decompression chamber and administered with ibuprofen (80 mg/kg, body weight, p.o.). Results demonstrated that CHH significantly altered PK variables of ibuprofen and activities of both phase-I and II hepatic metabolic enzymes as compared to the animals under normoxic conditions. Hepatic histopathological observations also revealed marked alterations. Increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines viz. IL-1β, IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α exhibited close relevance with diminished CYP2C9 expression under CHH. Moreover, the down-regulated CYP2C9 level further supported the underlying mechanism for reduced metabolism of ibuprofen and as a result, increased retention of parent drug in the system. Increased mean retention time, Vd, T½ of ibuprofen, and decreased AUC, Cmax and clearance during CHH further strengthened the present findings. In conclusion, CHH exposure significantly affects hepatic DMPK of ibuprofen, which may further influence the usual therapeutic dose-regimen. Further, there is requirement of human studies to evaluate their susceptibility toward hypobaric hypoxia.

  13. Gender and Species-Mediated Differences in the In Vitro Metabolism of Triadimefon by Rodent Hepatic Microsomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding how metabolism kinetics differ between genders and species is important in developing informative pharmacokinetic models and accurately assessing risk. Metabolism of the conazole fungicide Triadimefon (TDN) was studied in hepatic microsomes of SD rats and CD-1 mice...

  14. Hepatic gene expression involved in glucose and lipid metabolism in transition cows: effects of fat mobilization during early lactation in relation to milk performance and metabolic changes.

    PubMed

    Weber, C; Hametner, C; Tuchscherer, A; Losand, B; Kanitz, E; Otten, W; Sauerwein, H; Bruckmaier, R M; Becker, F; Kanitz, W; Hammon, H M

    2013-09-01

    gene expression depending on LFC after parturition. Correlations between hepatic gene expression and performance data and plasma concentrations of metabolites and hormones showed time-specific relations during the transition period. Elevated body fat mobilization during early lactation affected gene expression involved in gluconeogenesis to a greater extent than gene expression involved in lipid metabolism, indicating the dependence of hepatic glucose metabolism on hepatic lipid status and fat mobilization during early lactation.

  15. Glycine prevents metabolic steatohepatitis in diabetic KK-Ay mice through modulation of hepatic innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Shiori; Ikejima, Kenichi; Arai, Kumiko; Yokokawa, Junko; Kon, Kazuyoshi; Yamashina, Shunhei; Watanabe, Sumio

    2016-12-01

    Strategies for prevention and treatment of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis remain to be established. We evaluated the effect of glycine on metabolic steatohepatitis in genetically obese, diabetic KK-A(y) mice. Male KK-A(y) mice were fed a diet containing 5% glycine for 4 wk, and liver pathology was evaluated. Hepatic mRNA levels for lipid-regulating molecules, cytokines/chemokines, and macrophage M1/M2 markers were determined by real-time RT-PCR. Hepatic expression of natural killer (NK) T cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. Body weight gain was significantly blunted and development of hepatic steatosis and inflammatory infiltration were remarkably prevented in mice fed the glycine-containing diet compared with controls. Indeed, hepatic induction levels of molecules related to lipogenesis were largely blunted in the glycine diet-fed mice. Elevations of hepatic mRNA levels for TNFα and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 were also remarkably blunted in the glycine diet-fed mice. Furthermore, suppression of hepatic NK T cells was reversed in glycine diet-fed KK-A(y) mice, and basal hepatic expression levels of NK T cell-derived cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-13, were increased. Moreover, hepatic mRNA levels of arginase-1, a marker of macrophage M2 transformation, were significantly increased in glycine diet-fed mice. In addition, dietary glycine improved glucose tolerance and hyperinsulinemia in KK-A(y) mice. These observations clearly indicate that glycine prevents maturity-onset obesity and metabolic steatohepatitis in genetically diabetic KK-A(y) mice. The underlying mechanisms most likely include normalization of hepatic innate immune responses involving NK T cells and M2 transformation of Kupffer cells. It is proposed that glycine is a promising immunonutrient for prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome-related nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

  16. Dynamical modeling of liver Aquaporin-9 expression and glycerol permeability in hepatic glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gena, Patrizia; Buono, Nicoletta Del; D'Abbicco, Marcello; Mastrodonato, Maria; Berardi, Marco; Svelto, Maria; Lopez, Luciano; Calamita, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Liver is crucial in the homeostasis of glycerol, an important metabolic intermediate. Plasma glycerol is imported by hepatocytes mainly through Aquaporin-9 (AQP9), an aquaglyceroporin channel negatively regulated by insulin in rodents. AQP9 is of critical importance in glycerol metabolism since hepatic glycerol utilization is rate-limited at the hepatocyte membrane permeation step. Glycerol kinase catalyzes the initial step for the conversion of the imported glycerol into glycerol-3-phosphate, a major substrate for de novo synthesis of glucose (gluconeogenesis) and/or triacyglycerols (lipogenesis). A model addressing the glucose-insulin system to describe the hepatic glycerol import and metabolism and the correlation with the glucose homeostasis is lacking so far. Here we consider a system of first-order ordinary differential equations delineating the relevance of hepatocyte AQP9 in liver glycerol permeability. Assuming the hepatic glycerol permeability as depending on the protein levels of AQP9, a mathematical function is designed describing the time course of the involvement of AQP9 in mouse hepatic glycerol metabolism in different nutritional states. The resulting theoretical relationship is derived fitting experimental data obtained with murine models at the fed, fasted or re-fed condition. While providing useful insights into the dynamics of liver AQP9 involvement in male rodent glycerol homeostasis our model may be adapted to the human liver serving as an important module of a whole body-model of the glucose metabolism both in health and metabolic diseases.

  17. Bioenergetic cues shift FXR splicing towards FXRα2 to modulate hepatic lipolysis and fatty acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Jorge C.; Massart, Julie; de Boer, Jan Freark; Porsmyr-Palmertz, Margareta; Martínez-Redondo, Vicente; Agudelo, Leandro Z.; Sinha, Indranil; Meierhofer, David; Ribeiro, Vera; Björnholm, Marie; Sauer, Sascha; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zierath, Juleen R.; Groen, Albert K.; Ruas, Jorge L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays a prominent role in hepatic lipid metabolism. The FXR gene encodes four proteins with structural differences suggestive of discrete biological functions about which little is known. Methods We expressed each FXR variant in primary hepatocytes and evaluated global gene expression, lipid profile, and metabolic fluxes. Gene delivery of FXR variants to Fxr−/− mouse liver was performed to evaluate their role in vivo. The effects of fasting and physical exercise on hepatic Fxr splicing were determined. Results We show that FXR splice isoforms regulate largely different gene sets and have specific effects on hepatic metabolism. FXRα2 (but not α1) activates a broad transcriptional program in hepatocytes conducive to lipolysis, fatty acid oxidation, and ketogenesis. Consequently, FXRα2 decreases cellular lipid accumulation and improves cellular insulin signaling to AKT. FXRα2 expression in Fxr−/− mouse liver activates a similar gene program and robustly decreases hepatic triglyceride levels. On the other hand, FXRα1 reduces hepatic triglyceride content to a lesser extent and does so through regulation of lipogenic gene expression. Bioenergetic cues, such as fasting and exercise, dynamically regulate Fxr splicing in mouse liver to increase Fxrα2 expression. Conclusions Our results show that the main FXR variants in human liver (α1 and α2) reduce hepatic lipid accumulation through distinct mechanisms and to different degrees. Taking this novel mechanism into account could greatly improve the pharmacological targeting and therapeutic efficacy of FXR agonists. PMID:26909306

  18. Hepatic fibroblast growth factor 21 is regulated by PPARalpha and is a key mediator of hepatic lipid metabolism in ketotic states.

    PubMed

    Badman, Michael K; Pissios, Pavlos; Kennedy, Adam R; Koukos, George; Flier, Jeffrey S; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria

    2007-06-01

    Mice fed a high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) exhibit marked changes in hepatic metabolism and energy homeostasis. Here, we identify liver-derived fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) as an endocrine regulator of the ketotic state. Hepatic expression and circulating levels of FGF21 are induced by both KD and fasting, are rapidly suppressed by refeeding, and are in large part downstream of PPARalpha. Importantly, adenoviral knockdown of hepatic FGF21 in KD-fed mice causes fatty liver, lipemia, and reduced serum ketones, due at least in part to altered expression of key genes governing lipid and ketone metabolism. Hence, induction of FGF21 in liver is required for the normal activation of hepatic lipid oxidation, triglyceride clearance, and ketogenesis induced by KD. These findings identify hepatic FGF21 as a critical regulator of lipid homeostasis and identify a physiological role for this hepatic hormone.

  19. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Teens > Hepatitis Print A A A ... to a liver condition called hepatitis . What Is Hepatitis? The liver is one of the body's powerhouses. ...

  20. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Kids > Hepatitis Print A A A ... an important digestive liquid called bile . What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation (say: in-fluh-MAY- ...

  1. Korean pine nut oil replacement decreases intestinal lipid uptake while improves hepatic lipid metabolism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shuang; Park, Soyoung; Lim, Yeseo; Shin, Sunhye

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Consumption of pine nut oil (PNO) was shown to reduce weight gain and attenuate hepatic steatosis in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). The aim of this study was to examine the effects of PNO on both intestinal and hepatic lipid metabolism in mice fed control or HFD. MATERIALS/METHODS Five-week-old C57BL/6 mice were fed control diets containing 10% energy fat from either Soybean Oil (SBO) or PNO, or HFD containing 15% energy fat from lard and 30% energy fat from SBO or PNO for 12 weeks. Expression of genes related to intestinal fatty acid (FA) uptake and channeling (Cd36, Fatp4, Acsl5, Acbp), intestinal chylomicron synthesis (Mtp, ApoB48, ApoA4), hepatic lipid uptake and channeling (Lrp1, Fatp5, Acsl1, Acbp), hepatic triacylglycerol (TAG) lipolysis and FA oxidation (Atgl, Cpt1a, Acadl, Ehhadh, Acaa1), as well as very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) assembly (ApoB100) were determined by real-time PCR. RESULTS In intestine, significantly lower Cd36 mRNA expression (P < 0.05) and a tendency of lower ApoA4 mRNA levels (P = 0.07) was observed in PNO-fed mice, indicating that PNO consumption may decrease intestinal FA uptake and chylomicron assembly. PNO consumption tended to result in higher hepatic mRNA levels of Atgl (P = 0.08) and Cpt1a (P = 0.05). Significantly higher hepatic mRNA levels of Acadl and ApoB100 were detected in mice fed PNO diet (P < 0.05). These results suggest that PNO could increase hepatic TAG metabolism; mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and VLDL assembly. CONCLUSIONS PNO replacement in the diet might function in prevention of excessive lipid uptake by intestine and improve hepatic lipid metabolism in both control diet and HFD fed mice. PMID:27698954

  2. Nur77 modulates hepatic lipid metabolism through suppression of SREBP1c activity

    SciTech Connect

    Pols, Thijs W.H.; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Vos, Mariska; Levels, Johannes H.M.; Quax, Paul H.A.; Meijers, Joost C.M.; Pannekoek, Hans; Groen, Albert K.; Vries, Carlie J.M. de

    2008-02-22

    NR4A nuclear receptors are induced in the liver upon fasting and regulate hepatic gluconeogenesis. Here, we studied the role of nuclear receptor Nur77 (NR4A1) in hepatic lipid metabolism. We generated mice expressing hepatic Nur77 using adenoviral vectors, and demonstrate that these mice exhibit a modulation of the plasma lipid profile and a reduction in hepatic triglyceride. Expression analysis of >25 key genes involved in lipid metabolism revealed that Nur77 inhibits SREBP1c expression. This results in decreased SREBP1c activity as is illustrated by reduced expression of its target genes stearoyl-coA desaturase-1, mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, fatty acid synthase and the LDL receptor, and provides a mechanism for the physiological changes observed in response to Nur77. Expression of LXR target genes Abcg5 and Abcg8 is reduced by Nur77, and may suggest involvement of LXR in the inhibitory action of Nur77 on SREBP1c expression. Taken together, our study demonstrates that Nur77 modulates hepatic lipid metabolism through suppression of SREBP1c activity.

  3. Effect of hepatoprotectors on lipid metabolism in hepatitis induced by carbon tetrachloride

    SciTech Connect

    Vengerovskii, A.I.; Chuchalin, V.S.; Paul's; O.V.; Saratikov, A.S.

    1987-09-01

    The authors study the effect of the widely used hepatoprotective agents- the flavonoid silybinin and the phosphatidylcholine-containing substance essentiale - on the combination of disturbances of lipid metabolism present in severe toxic hepatitis induced by carbon tetrachloride in rats. It was found that CCl/sub 4/ caused a profound disturbance of lipid metabolism. The hepatoprotective effect of silybinin and essentiale is due to their antioxidant action and to normalization of function of the liver phospholipids.

  4. Hepatic injury induces contrasting response in liver and kidney to chemicals that are metabolically activated: Role of male sex hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young C. Yim, Hye K.; Jung, Young S.; Park, Jae H.; Kim, Sung Y.

    2007-08-15

    Injury to liver, resulting in loss of its normal physiological/biochemical functions, may adversely affect a secondary organ. We examined the response of the liver and kidney to chemical substances that require metabolic activation for their toxicities in mice with a preceding liver injury. Carbon tetrachloride treatment 24 h prior to a challenging dose of carbon tetrachloride or acetaminophen decreased the resulting hepatotoxicity both in male and female mice as determined by histopathological examination and increases in serum enzyme activities. In contrast, the renal toxicity of the challenging toxicants was elevated markedly in male, but not in female mice. Partial hepatectomy also induced similar changes in the hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity of a challenging toxicant, suggesting that the contrasting response of male liver and kidney was associated with the reduction of the hepatic metabolizing capacity. Carbon tetrachloride pretreatment or partial hepatectomy decreased the hepatic xenobiotic-metabolizing enzyme activities in both sexes but elevated the renal p-nitrophenol hydroxylase, p-nitroanisole O-demethylase and aminopyrine N-demethylase activities significantly only in male mice. Increases in Cyp2e1 and Cyp2b expression were also evident in male kidney. Castration of males or testosterone administration to females diminished the sex-related differences in the renal response to an acute liver injury. The results indicate that reduction of the hepatic metabolizing capacity induced by liver injury may render secondary target organs susceptible to chemical substances activated in these organs. This effect may be sex-specific. It is also suggested that an integrated approach should be taken for proper assessment of chemical hazards.

  5. Diurnal locomotor activity and oxidative metabolism of the suprachiasmatic nucleus in two models of hepatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Laudino; Cimadevilla, Jose M; Aller, Maria A; Arias, Jaime; Nava, M Paz; Arias, Jorge L

    2003-08-15

    Subjects with hepatic cirrhosis develop alterations of several rhythmic behavioural and biochemical patterns. Since most cirrhotic patients combine portal hypertension and hepatic impairment, our work aims to assess the extent to which rhythmical changes can be due to hepatic insufficiency or portal hypertension. This was done using two experimental models in rats, portacaval shunt model (PC) and portal hypertension by a triple stenosing ligature of the portal vein (PH). We assess diurnal locomotor activity and determine the oxidative metabolism of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) by histochemical determination of cytochrome oxidase (COX). The results show that animals with PC have altered diurnal locomotor rhythm compared to control and PH rats (p<0.001). They also present lower COX activity in the SCN (p<0.05). We conclude that rhythmic alterations are due to hepatic insufficiency and not to portal hypertension.

  6. An Essential Role for Liver ERα in Coupling Hepatic Metabolism to the Reproductive Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Della Torre, Sara; Mitro, Nico; Fontana, Roberta; Gomaraschi, Monica; Favari, Elda; Recordati, Camilla; Lolli, Federica; Quagliarini, Fabiana; Meda, Clara; Ohlsson, Claes; Crestani, Maurizio; Uhlenhaut, Nina Henriette; Calabresi, Laura; Maggi, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Summary Lipoprotein synthesis is controlled by estrogens, but the exact mechanisms underpinning this regulation and the role of the hepatic estrogen receptor α (ERα) in cholesterol physiology are unclear. Utilizing a mouse model involving selective ablation of ERα in the liver, we demonstrate that hepatic ERα couples lipid metabolism to the reproductive cycle. We show that this receptor regulates the synthesis of cholesterol transport proteins, enzymes for lipoprotein remodeling, and receptors for cholesterol uptake. Additionally, ERα is indispensable during proestrus for the generation of high-density lipoproteins efficient in eliciting cholesterol efflux from macrophages. We propose that a specific interaction with liver X receptor α (LXRα) mediates the broad effects of ERα on the hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:27050513

  7. Leucine improves protein nutritional status and regulates hepatic lipid metabolism in calorie-restricted rats.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, João Alfredo B; Nishimura, Luciana Sigueta; de Matos-Neto, Emídio Marques; Donato, Jose; Tirapegui, Julio

    2014-06-01

    Several studies have highlighted the potential of leucine supplementation for the treatment of metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes and obesity. Caloric restriction is a common approach to improve the health in diabetic and obese subjects. However, very few studies assessed the effects of leucine supplementation in calorie-restricted animals. Rats were subjected to a 30% calorie-restricted diet for 6 weeks to study the effects of leucine supplementation on protein status markers and lipid metabolism. Caloric restriction reduced the body weight. However, increased leucine intake preserved body lean mass and protein mass and improved protein anabolism as indicated by the increased circulating levels of albumin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and the liver expression of albumin and IGF-1 messenger RNA. Leucine supplementation also increased the circulating levels of interleukin-6 and leptin but did not affect the tumour necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 concentrations. Ketone bodies were increased in rats consuming a leucine-rich diet, but we observed no changes in cholesterol or triglycerides concentrations. Caloric restriction reduced the liver expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α and glucose-6-phosphatase, whereas leucine supplementation increased the liver expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA) reductase and sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor 1. A leucine-rich diet during caloric restriction preserved whole body protein mass and improved markers of protein anabolism. In addition, leucine modulated the hepatic lipid metabolism. These results indicate that increased leucine intake may be useful in preventing excessive protein waste in conditions of large weight loss.

  8. Main target of minimal hepatic encephalopathy: Morphophysiological, inflammatory and metabolic view.

    PubMed

    Arias, Natalia; Méndez, Marta; Gómez-Lázaro, Eneritz; Azpiroz, Arantxa; Arias, Jorge L

    2015-10-01

    Although often not considered clinically relevant and, therefore, not diagnosed or treated, minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) has been shown to affect daily functioning, quality of life, driving and overall mortality. To discover early impairments involved in MHE, we studied one of its precipitating factors, portal hypertension. Rats were trained on a stimulus-response task using the Morris water maze. Two groups of animals were used: a SHAM (sham-operated) group (n= 13) and a portal hypertension (PH) group (n= 13). The triple portal vein ligation method was used to create an animal model of an early developmental phase of HE. Brain metabolic activity was studied with cytochrome c-oxidase histochemistry (C.O.). Neuronal nuclear volume was assessed by nucleator probe; the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein-immunoreactive astrocytes (GFAP-IR) and proinflammatory mediators was measured. The results revealed that the PH group was not able to reach the behavioural criterion, in contrast to the SHAM group. The metabolic brain consumption revealed decreased C.O. activity in the ventral striatum. The PH group showed lower density of GFAP-IR and an increase in the tumour necrotic factor-α (TNF-α). The PH group showed decreased neuronal nuclear volume in the dorsal striatum. On the contrary, increased neuronal nuclear volume was found in the ventral striatum. For the first time, a relationship has been established between inflammation, astrocytic and neural damage, and brain metabolic impairment in a model of MHE. Disruption of the striatum and related structures was highlighted as the main target in early stages of HE. Finally, a simple task was presented to assess the subtle impairments found in the clinic, which could provide fresh insights into the development of new tools for the assessment of MHE.

  9. Abnormal folate metabolism in foetuses affected by neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Dunlevy, Louisa P E; Chitty, Lyn S; Burren, Katie A; Doudney, Kit; Stojilkovic-Mikic, Taita; Stanier, Philip; Scott, Rosemary; Copp, Andrew J; Greene, Nicholas D E

    2007-04-01

    Folic acid supplementation can prevent many cases of neural tube defects (NTDs), whereas suboptimal maternal folate status is a risk factor, suggesting that folate metabolism is a key determinant of susceptibility to NTDs. Despite extensive genetic analysis of folate cycle enzymes, and quantification of metabolites in maternal blood, neither the protective mechanism nor the relationship between maternal folate status and susceptibility are understood in most cases. In order to investigate potential abnormalities in folate metabolism in the embryo itself, we derived primary fibroblastic cell lines from foetuses affected by NTDs and subjected them to the dU suppression test, a sensitive metabolic test of folate metabolism. Significantly, a subset of NTD cases exhibited low scores in this test, indicative of abnormalities in folate cycling that may be causally linked to the defect. Susceptibility to NTDs may be increased by suppression of the methylation cycle, which is interlinked with the folate cycle. However, reduced efficacy in the dU suppression test was not associated with altered abundance of the methylation cycle intermediates, s-adenosylmethionine and s-adenosylhomocysteine, suggesting that a methylation cycle defect is unlikely to be responsible for the observed abnormality of folate metabolism. Genotyping of samples for known polymorphisms in genes encoding folate-associated enzymes did not reveal any correlation between specific genotypes and the observed abnormalities in folate metabolism. These data suggest that as yet unrecognized genetic variants result in embryonic abnormalities of folate cycling that may be causally related to NTDs.

  10. Coordinated changes in hepatic amino acid metabolism and endocrine signals support hepatic glucose production during fetal hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Houin, Satya S; Rozance, Paul J; Brown, Laura D; Hay, William W; Wilkening, Randall B; Thorn, Stephanie R

    2015-02-15

    Reduced fetal glucose supply, induced experimentally or as a result of placental insufficiency, produces an early activation of fetal glucose production. The mechanisms and substrates used to fuel this increased glucose production rate remain unknown. We hypothesized that in response to hypoglycemia, induced experimentally with maternal insulin infusion, the fetal liver would increase uptake of lactate and amino acids (AA), which would combine with hormonal signals to support hepatic glucose production. To test this hypothesis, metabolic studies were done in six late gestation fetal sheep to measure hepatic glucose and substrate flux before (basal) and after [days (d)1 and 4] the start of hypoglycemia. Maternal and fetal glucose concentrations decreased by 50% on d1 and d4 (P < 0.05). The liver transitioned from net glucose uptake (basal, 5.1 ± 1.5 μmol/min) to output by d4 (2.8 ± 1.4 μmol/min; P < 0.05 vs. basal). The [U-¹³C]glucose tracer molar percent excess ratio across the liver decreased over the same period (basal: 0.98 ± 0.01, vs. d4: 0.89 ± 0.01, P < 0.05). Total hepatic AA uptake, but not lactate or pyruvate uptake, increased by threefold on d1 (P < 0.05) and remained elevated throughout the study. This AA uptake was driven largely by decreased glutamate output and increased glycine uptake. Fetal plasma concentrations of insulin were 50% lower, while cortisol and glucagon concentrations increased 56 and 86% during hypoglycemia (P < 0.05 for basal vs. d4). Thus increased hepatic AA uptake, rather than pyruvate or lactate uptake, and decreased fetal plasma insulin and increased cortisol and glucagon concentrations occur simultaneously with increased fetal hepatic glucose output in response to fetal hypoglycemia.

  11. Coordinated changes in hepatic amino acid metabolism and endocrine signals support hepatic glucose production during fetal hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Houin, Satya S.; Rozance, Paul J.; Brown, Laura D.; Hay, William W.; Wilkening, Randall B.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced fetal glucose supply, induced experimentally or as a result of placental insufficiency, produces an early activation of fetal glucose production. The mechanisms and substrates used to fuel this increased glucose production rate remain unknown. We hypothesized that in response to hypoglycemia, induced experimentally with maternal insulin infusion, the fetal liver would increase uptake of lactate and amino acids (AA), which would combine with hormonal signals to support hepatic glucose production. To test this hypothesis, metabolic studies were done in six late gestation fetal sheep to measure hepatic glucose and substrate flux before (basal) and after [days (d)1 and 4] the start of hypoglycemia. Maternal and fetal glucose concentrations decreased by 50% on d1 and d4 (P < 0.05). The liver transitioned from net glucose uptake (basal, 5.1 ± 1.5 μmol/min) to output by d4 (2.8 ± 1.4 μmol/min; P < 0.05 vs. basal). The [U-13C]glucose tracer molar percent excess ratio across the liver decreased over the same period (basal: 0.98 ± 0.01, vs. d4: 0.89 ± 0.01, P < 0.05). Total hepatic AA uptake, but not lactate or pyruvate uptake, increased by threefold on d1 (P < 0.05) and remained elevated throughout the study. This AA uptake was driven largely by decreased glutamate output and increased glycine uptake. Fetal plasma concentrations of insulin were 50% lower, while cortisol and glucagon concentrations increased 56 and 86% during hypoglycemia (P < 0.05 for basal vs. d4). Thus increased hepatic AA uptake, rather than pyruvate or lactate uptake, and decreased fetal plasma insulin and increased cortisol and glucagon concentrations occur simultaneously with increased fetal hepatic glucose output in response to fetal hypoglycemia. PMID:25516551

  12. Metformin and metabolic diseases: a focus on hepatic aspects.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Juan; Woo, Shih-Lung; Hu, Xiang; Botchlett, Rachel; Chen, Lulu; Huo, Yuqing; Wu, Chaodong

    2015-06-01

    Metformin has been widely used as a first-line anti-diabetic medicine for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). As a drug that primarily targets the liver, metformin suppresses hepatic glucose production (HGP), serving as the main mechanism by which metformin improves hyperglycemia of T2D. Biochemically, metformin suppresses gluconeogenesis and stimulates glycolysis. Metformin also inhibits glycogenolysis, which is a pathway that critically contributes to elevated HGP. While generating beneficial effects on hyperglycemia, metformin also improves insulin resistance and corrects dyslipidemia in patients with T2D. These beneficial effects of metformin implicate a role for metformin in managing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. As supported by the results from both human and animal studies, metformin improves hepatic steatosis and suppresses liver inflammation. Mechanistically, the beneficial effects of metformin on hepatic aspects are mediated through both adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent and AMPK-independent pathways. In addition, metformin is generally safe and may also benefit patients with other chronic liver diseases.

  13. The formation, disposition, and hepatic metabolism of dimethylnitrosamine in the pig.

    PubMed

    Harrington, G W; Magee, P N; Pylypiw, H M; Kozeniauskas, R; Bevill, R F; Nelson, D R; Thurmon, J C

    1990-01-01

    The disposition, metabolism, and endogenous formation of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) from nitrosatable precursors was studied in the intact pig and in animals with cannulated hepatic and portal veins and catheterized bile ducts. Rates of disappearance of NDMA from peripheral venous and arterial blood after iv injections were virtually identical and the compound appeared in bile after a lag time of about 1 hr, with a subsequent decline in biliary concentration at about the same rate as in circulating blood. Measurements of NDMA in portal and hepatic vein blood after oral doses of 10, 1.0 and 0.1 mg/kg, respectively, showed progressively greater hepatic extraction with levels in the hepatic vein approaching the limits of detection after the lowest dose. Both halothane and ethanol virtually abolished the hepatic extraction of NDMA, presumably due to their known inhibitory action on its metabolism in the liver. Endogenous formation of NDMA and N-nitrosomorpholine after oral doses of the amines plus nitrite was demonstrated by their detection and measurement in the portal vein blood. Morpholine was nitrosated more effectively than dimethylamine and inhibited the nitrosation of the latter when the two amines were given together. NDMA was found in the portal blood after sequential oral administration of aminopyrine and nitrite, the concentration being considerably greater after fasting for 24 hr than after a 2-hr fast when much food was present in the stomach.

  14. Calcium ions affect the hepatitis B virus core assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yongwook; Gyoo Park, Sung; Yoo, Jun-hi; Jung, Guhung . E-mail: drjung@snu.ac.kr

    2005-02-05

    Previous report showed that cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} induced by hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) promotes HBV replication. In this study, in vitro experiments showed that (i) HBV core assembly in vitro was promoted by Ca{sup 2+} through the sucrose density gradient and the analytical ultracentrifuge analysis. Also (ii) transmission electron microscope analysis demonstrated these assembled HBV core particles were the capsids. Ex vivo experiments showed that the treatment of BAPTA-AM and cyclosporine A (CsA) reduced HBV capsids in the transfected HepG2 cells. In addition to that, the treatment of Thapsigargin (TG) increased HBV capsids in the transfected HepG2 cells. Furthermore, we investigated the increased HBV core assembly by HBx. The results show that the increased cytosolic calcium ions by HBx promote the HBV core assembly.

  15. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... clotting problems or chronic liver disease. previous continue Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Although hep A is a ... does — through direct contact with infected body fluids. Hepatitis B and C are even more easily passed in ...

  16. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A if they've been vaccinated against it. Hepatitis B Hepatitis B is a more serious infection. It may lead ... of which cause severe illness and even death. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is transmitted from person to person ...

  17. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Hepatitis Page Content Article Body Hepatitis means “inflammation of ... it has been associated with drinking contaminated water. Hepatitis Viruses Type Transmission Prognosis A Fecal-oral (stool ...

  18. Capsaicin affects brain function in a model of hepatic encephalopathy associated with fulminant hepatic failure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Avraham, Y; Grigoriadis, NC; Magen, I; Poutahidis, T; Vorobiav, L; Zolotarev, O; Ilan, Y; Mechoulam, R; Berry, EM

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hepatic encephalopathy is a neuropsychiatric syndrome caused by liver failure. In view of the effects of cannabinoids in a thioacetamide-induced model of hepatic encephalopathy and liver disease and the beneficial effect of capsaicin (a TRPV1 agonist) in liver disease, we assumed that capsaicin may also affect hepatic encephalopathy. Experimental approach: Fulminant hepatic failure was induced in mice by thioacetamide and 24 h later, the animals were injected with one of the following compound(s): 2-arachidonoylglycerol (CB1, CB2 and TRPV1 receptor agonist); HU308 (CB2 receptor agonist), SR141716A (CB1 receptor antagonist); SR141716A+2-arachidonoylglycerol; SR144528 (CB2 receptor antagonist); capsaicin; and capsazepine (TRPV1 receptor agonist and antagonist respectively). Their neurological effects were evaluated on the basis of activity in the open field, cognitive function in an eight-arm maze and a neurological severity score. The mice were killed 3 or 14 days after thioacetamide administration. 2-arachidonoylglycerol and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, respectively. Results: Capsaicin had a neuroprotective effect in this animal model as shown by the neurological score, activity and cognitive function. The effect of capsaicin was blocked by capsazepine. Thioacetamide induced astrogliosis in the hippocampus and the cerebellum and raised brain 5-hydroxytryptamine levels, which were decreased by capsaicin, SR141716A and HU-308. Thioacetamide lowered brain 2-arachidonoylglycerol levels, an effect reversed by capsaicin. Conclusions: Capsaicin improved both liver and brain dysfunction caused by thioacetamide, suggesting that both the endocannabinoid and the vanilloid systems play important roles in hepatic encephalopathy. Modulation of these systems may have therapeutic value. PMID:19764982

  19. Aronia melanocarpa Extract Ameliorates Hepatic Lipid Metabolism through PPARγ2 Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Hee; Lee, Eun Byul; Hur, Wonhee; Kwon, Oh-Joo; Park, Hyoung-Jin; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2017-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. Studies have demonstrated that anthocyanin-rich foods may improve hyperlipidemia and ameliorate hepatic steatosis. Here, effects of Aronia melanocarpa (AM), known to be rich of anthocyanins, on hepatic lipid metabolism and adipogenic genes were determined. AM was treated to C57BL/6N mice fed with high fat diet (HFD) or to FL83B cells treated with free fatty acid (FFA). Changes in levels of lipids, enzymes and hormones were observed, and expressions of adipogenic genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism were detected by PCR, Western blotting and luciferase assay. In mice, AM significantly reduced the body and liver weight, lipid accumulation in the liver, and levels of biochemical markers such as fatty acid synthase, hepatic triglyceride and leptin. Serum transaminases, indicators for hepatocyte injury, were also suppressed, while superoxide dismutase activity and liver antioxidant capacity were significantly increased. In FL83B cells, AM significantly reduced FFA-induced lipid droplet accumulation. Protein synthesis of an adipogenic transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ2 (PPARγ2) was inhibited in vivo. Furthermore, transcriptional activity of PPARγ2 was down-regulated in vitro, and mRNA expression of PPARγ2 and its downstream target genes, adipocyte protein 2 and lipoprotein lipase were down-regulated by AM both in vitro and in vivo. These results show beneficial effects of AM against hepatic lipid accumulation through the inhibition of PPARγ2 expression along with improvements in body weight, liver functions, lipid profiles and antioxidant capacity suggesting the potential therapeutic efficacy of AM on NAFLD. PMID:28081181

  20. Lysine post-translational modification of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase regulates hepatic and systemic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bond, Simon T; Howlett, Kirsten F; Kowalski, Greg M; Mason, Shaun; Connor, Timothy; Cooper, Adrian; Streltsov, Victor; Bruce, Clinton R; Walder, Ken R; McGee, Sean L

    2017-03-03

    Reciprocal regulation of hepatic glycolysis and gluconeogenesis contributes to systemic metabolic homeostasis. Recent evidence from lower order organisms has found that reversible post-translational modification of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), particularly acetylation, contributes to the reciprocal regulation of glycolysis/gluconeogenesis. However, whether this occurs in mammalian hepatocytes in vitro or in vivo is unknown. Several proteomics studies have identified 4 lysine residues in critical regions of mammalian GAPDH that are altered by multiple post-translational modifications. In FAO hepatoma cells, mutation of all 4 lysine residues (4K-R GAPDH) to mimic their unmodified state reduced GAPDH glycolytic activity and glycolytic flux and increased gluconeogenic GAPDH activity and glucose production. Hepatic expression of 4K-R GAPDH in mice increased GAPDH gluconeogenic activity and the contribution of gluconeogenesis to endogenous glucose production in the unfed state. Consistent with the increased reliance on the energy-consuming gluconeogenic pathway, plasma free fatty acids and ketones were elevated in mice expressing 4K-R GAPDH, suggesting enhanced lipolysis and hepatic fatty acid oxidation. In normal mice, food withholding and refeeding, as well as hormonal regulators of reciprocal glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, such as insulin, glucagon, and norepinephrine, had no effect on global GAPDH acetylation. However, GAPDH acetylation was reduced in obese and type 2 diabetic db/db mice. These findings show that post-translational modification of GAPDH lysine residues regulates hepatic and systemic metabolism, revealing an unappreciated role for hepatic GAPDH in substrate selection and utilization.-Bond, S. T., Howlett, K. F., Kowalski, G. M., Mason, S., Connor, T., Cooper, A., Streltsov, V., Bruce, C. R., Walder, K. R., McGee, S. L. Lysine post-translational modification of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase regulates hepatic and systemic

  1. Propionate Increases Hepatic Pyruvate Cycling and Anaplerosis and Alters Mitochondrial Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Perry, Rachel J; Borders, Candace B; Cline, Gary W; Zhang, Xian-Man; Alves, Tiago C; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Rothman, Douglas L; Kibbey, Richard G; Shulman, Gerald I

    2016-06-03

    In mammals, pyruvate kinase (PK) plays a key role in regulating the balance between glycolysis and gluconeogenesis; however, in vivo regulation of PK flux by gluconeogenic hormones and substrates is poorly understood. To this end, we developed a novel NMR-liquid chromatography/tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to directly assess pyruvate cycling relative to mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism (VPyr-Cyc/VMito) in vivo using [3-(13)C]lactate as a tracer. Using this approach, VPyr-Cyc/VMito was only 6% in overnight fasted rats. In contrast, when propionate was infused simultaneously at doses previously used as a tracer, it increased VPyr-Cyc/VMito by 20-30-fold, increased hepatic TCA metabolite concentrations 2-3-fold, and increased endogenous glucose production rates by 20-100%. The physiologic stimuli, glucagon and epinephrine, both increased hepatic glucose production, but only glucagon suppressed VPyr-Cyc/VMito These data show that under fasting conditions, when hepatic gluconeogenesis is stimulated, pyruvate recycling is relatively low in liver compared with VMito flux and that liver metabolism, in particular pyruvate cycling, is sensitive to propionate making it an unsuitable tracer to assess hepatic glycolytic, gluconeogenic, and mitochondrial metabolism in vivo.

  2. Tribbles-1: a novel regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism in humans.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Robert C; Yenilmez, Batuhan O; Rader, Daniel J

    2015-10-01

    The protein tribbles-1, encoded by the gene TRIB1, is increasingly recognized as a major regulator of multiple cellular and physiological processes in humans. Recent human genetic studies, as well as molecular biological approaches, have implicated this intriguing protein in the aetiology of multiple human diseases, including myeloid leukaemia, Crohn's disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), dyslipidaemia and coronary artery disease (CAD). Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have repeatedly identified variants at the genomic TRIB1 locus as being significantly associated with multiple plasma lipid traits and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in humans. The involvement of TRIB1 in hepatic lipid metabolism has been validated through viral-mediated hepatic overexpression of the gene in mice; increasing levels of TRIB1 decreased plasma lipids in a dose-dependent manner. Additional studies have implicated TRIB1 in the regulation of hepatic lipogenesis and NAFLD. The exact mechanisms of TRIB1 regulation of both plasma lipids and hepatic lipogenesis remain undetermined, although multiple signalling pathways and transcription factors have been implicated in tribbles-1 function. Recent reports have been aimed at developing TRIB1-based lipid therapeutics. In summary, tribbles-1 is an important modulator of human energy metabolism and metabolic syndromes and worthy of future studies aimed at investigating its potential as a therapeutic target.

  3. Propionate Increases Hepatic Pyruvate Cycling and Anaplerosis and Alters Mitochondrial Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Rachel J.; Borders, Candace B.; Cline, Gary W.; Zhang, Xian-Man; Alves, Tiago C.; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Rothman, Douglas L.; Kibbey, Richard G.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, pyruvate kinase (PK) plays a key role in regulating the balance between glycolysis and gluconeogenesis; however, in vivo regulation of PK flux by gluconeogenic hormones and substrates is poorly understood. To this end, we developed a novel NMR-liquid chromatography/tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to directly assess pyruvate cycling relative to mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism (VPyr-Cyc/VMito) in vivo using [3-13C]lactate as a tracer. Using this approach, VPyr-Cyc/VMito was only 6% in overnight fasted rats. In contrast, when propionate was infused simultaneously at doses previously used as a tracer, it increased VPyr-Cyc/VMito by 20–30-fold, increased hepatic TCA metabolite concentrations 2–3-fold, and increased endogenous glucose production rates by 20–100%. The physiologic stimuli, glucagon and epinephrine, both increased hepatic glucose production, but only glucagon suppressed VPyr-Cyc/VMito. These data show that under fasting conditions, when hepatic gluconeogenesis is stimulated, pyruvate recycling is relatively low in liver compared with VMito flux and that liver metabolism, in particular pyruvate cycling, is sensitive to propionate making it an unsuitable tracer to assess hepatic glycolytic, gluconeogenic, and mitochondrial metabolism in vivo. PMID:27002151

  4. Global control of hepatitis B virus: does treatment-induced antigenic change affect immunization?

    PubMed

    Clements, C John; Coghlan, Ben; Creati, Mick; Locarnini, Stephen; Tedder, Richard S; Torresi, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Since its widespread introduction, the hepatitis B vaccine has become an essential part of infant immunization programmes globally. The vaccine has been particularly important for countries where the incidence of hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma is high. Effective treatment options for individuals with chronic hepatitis B infection were limited until 1998 when lamivudine, the first nucleoside analogue drug, was introduced. As a single treatment agent, however, lamivudine has a significant drawback: it induces lamivudine-resistant hepatitis B virus strains that may pose a risk to the global hepatitis B immunization programme. Mutations associated with drug treatment can cause changes to the surface antigen protein, the precise part of the virus that the hepatitis B vaccine mimics. However, the emergence of antiviral drug-associated potential vaccine escape mutants (ADAP-VEMs) in treated patients does not necessarily pose a significant, imminent threat to the global hepatitis B immunization programme. Nonetheless, there is already evidence that current treatment regimens have resulted in the selection of stable ADAP-VEMs. Treatment is currently intended to prevent the long-term complications of hepatitis B virus infection, with little consideration given to potential adverse public health impacts. To address individual and public health concerns, trials are urgently needed to find the optimal combination of existing drugs that are effective but do not induce the emergence of ADAP-VEMs. This paper examines the mechanism of antiviral drug-selected changes in the portion of the viral genome that also affects the surface antigen, and explores their potential impact on current hepatitis B immunization programmes.

  5. Dietary fenofibrate reduces hepatic lipid deposition by regulating lipid metabolism in yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco exposed to waterborne Zn.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jia-Lang; Luo, Zhi; Hu, Wei; Pan, Ya-Xiong; Zhuo, Mei-Qing

    2015-04-01

    Fenofibrate is known to possess lipid-lowering effects by regulation of gene transcription involved in lipid metabolism. Waterborne Zn exposure induces lipid deposition in yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco. Thus, the present working hypothesis is that dietary fenofibrate addition will reduce hepatic lipids in yellow catfish exposed to waterborne Zn. To this end, juvenile yellow catfish were exposed to 0.04 (control), 0.35 mg/L waterborne Zn, 0.15% dietary fenofibrate, and 0.35 mg Zn/l + 0.15% dietary fenofibrate for 8 weeks. Growth performance, lipid deposition and metabolism in the liver were determined. Dietary fenofibrate promoted growth performance and reduced hepatic lipid content of yellow catfish exposed to waterborne Zn. However, these effects did not appear in fish in normal water. The lipid-lowering effect of fenofibrate on fish exposed to waterborne Zn was associated with increased lipolysis, as indicated by increased CPT I activities and expression of lipolytic genes PPARα, CPT IA, ATGL and HSL, and with reduced lipogenesis as indicated by reduced activities of G6PD, 6PGD, ME and ICDH. Dietary fenofibrate significantly increased mRNA levels of FAS, LPL and ACCα, but reduced mRNA levels of ACCβ and PPARγ in fish exposed to waterborne Zn. Pearson correlations between transcriptional factors expression, and activities and expression of several enzymes were observed, indicating that changes at the molecular and enzymatic levels may underlie the patterns of lipid metabolism and accordingly affect hepatic fat storage. Taken together, our results suggest that the lipid-lowering effect of fenofibrate was attributed, in part, to the down-regulation of lipogenesis and up-regulation of fatty acid oxidation.

  6. Characterizing the Network of Drugs and Their Affected Metabolic Subpathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Han, Junwei; Wang, Shuyuan; Yao, Qianlan; Wang, Yingying; Zhang, Yunpeng; Zhang, Chunlong; Xu, Yanjun; Jiang, Wei; Li, Xia

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental issue in biology and medicine is illustration of the overall drug impact which is always the consequence of changes in local regions of metabolic pathways (subpathways). To gain insights into the global relationship between drugs and their affected metabolic subpathways, we constructed a drug–metabolic subpathway network (DRSN). This network included 3925 significant drug–metabolic subpathway associations representing drug dual effects. Through analyses based on network biology, we found that if drugs were linked to the same subpathways in the DRSN, they tended to share the same indications and side effects. Furthermore, if drugs shared more subpathways, they tended to share more side effects. We then calculated the association score by integrating drug-affected subpathways and disease-related subpathways to quantify the extent of the associations between each drug class and disease class. The results showed some close drug–disease associations such as sex hormone drugs and cancer suggesting drug dual effects. Surprisingly, most drugs displayed close associations with their side effects rather than their indications. To further investigate the mechanism of drug dual effects, we classified all the subpathways in the DRSN into therapeutic and non-therapeutic subpathways representing drug therapeutic effects and side effects. Compared to drug side effects, the therapeutic effects tended to work through tissue-specific genes and these genes tend to be expressed in the adrenal gland, liver and kidney; while drug side effects always occurred in the liver, bone marrow and trachea. Taken together, the DRSN could provide great insights into understanding the global relationship between drugs and metabolic subpathways. PMID:23112813

  7. Haem arginate improves hepatic oxidative metabolism in variegate porphyria.

    PubMed Central

    Tokola, O; Mustajoki, P; Himberg, J J

    1988-01-01

    1. The elimination of antipyrine was investigated before and after intravenous administration of haem arginate (3 mg haem kg-1 day-1 on three or four successive days) to six patients with variegate porphyria in remission. 2. Haem arginate decreased the faecal content of protoporphyrin from 557 +/- 91 to 118 +/- 32 (mean +/- s.e. mean) and of coproporphyrin from 144 +/- 19 to 19 +/- 3 nmol g-1 dry weight. 3. Before haem treatment antipyrine elimination half-life was long (30.5 +/- 5.6 h), but the treatment decreased it to 6.3 +/- 0.8 h. Antipyrine clearance increased from 0.25 +/- 0.05 to 1.03 +/- 0.11 ml min-1 kg-1 (P less than 0.001), being 4.6 times higher after haem arginate infusions. 4. The volume of distribution of antipyrine did not change. 5. The severe impairment of hepatic mixed function oxidase activity even in the symptomless stage of porphyria indicates cautious dosage of drugs primarily eliminated by hepatic oxidative reactions. PMID:3242580

  8. Mediated effect of endotoxin and lead upon hepatic metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Kuttner, R.E.; Ebata, T.; Schumer, W.

    1984-10-01

    A test was made of the possibility that gram-negative bacterial cell wall lipopolysaccharides acted directly on key glucoregulatory enzymes in rat liver cytosol to cause the characteristic hypoglycemia of severe endotoxemia. Fasted male rats were sensitized to endotoxin by the simultaneous intravenous injection of lead acetate. The minimum systemic dosage of endotoxin necessary to perturb the normal pattern of hepatic glycolytic intermediates was determined by serial testing with diminishing dosages of endotoxin. The hepatocyte concentration of endotoxin was then calculated from this minimum dosage by use of literature data on the fraction of endotoxin delivered to liver cells after a systemic intravenous injection of radiochromium labeled lipopolysaccharides. Accepting a molecular weight of 118,000 daltons for the smallest endotoxin monomer capable of evoking a physiologic response, the molar amount of endotoxin present in 1 gram of hepatocytes was readily calculated. The concentration of glucoregulatory enzymes in parenchymal cells was then estimated from other literature sources. It was found that the amount of endotoxin in the hepatocytes was insufficient to combine directly with even 1 per cent of the quantity of a single key glucoregulatory enzyme in liver parenchyma. Since a one to one stoichiometric reaction between endotoxin and enzyme could not occur in the liver cytosol, a direct interaction mechanism between agonist and biocatalyst can be ruled out. It is concluded that bacterial endotoxin must act on hepatic glucoregulation by an indirect mechanism presumably based upon the release and operation of mediators.

  9. Farnesoid X Receptor Signaling Shapes the Gut Microbiota and Controls Hepatic Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Limin; Xie, Cen; Nichols, Robert G.; Chan, Siu H. J.; Jiang, Changtao; Hao, Ruixin; Smith, Philip B.; Cai, Jingwei; Simons, Margaret N.; Hatzakis, Emmanuel; Maranas, Costas D.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gut microbiota modulates obesity and associated metabolic phenotypes in part through intestinal farnesoid X receptor (FXR) signaling. Glycine-β-muricholic acid (Gly-MCA), an intestinal FXR antagonist, has been reported to prevent or reverse high-fat diet (HFD)-induced and genetic obesity, insulin resistance, and fatty liver; however, the mechanism by which these phenotypes are improved is not fully understood. The current study investigated the influence of FXR activity on the gut microbiota community structure and function and its impact on hepatic lipid metabolism. Predictions about the metabolic contribution of the gut microbiota to the host were made using 16S rRNA-based PICRUSt (phylogenetic investigation of communities by reconstruction of unobserved states), then validated using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics, and results were summarized by using genome-scale metabolic models. Oral Gly-MCA administration altered the gut microbial community structure, notably reducing the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes and its PICRUSt-predicted metabolic function, including reduced production of short-chain fatty acids (substrates for hepatic gluconeogenesis and de novo lipogenesis) in the ceca of HFD-fed mice. Metabolic improvement was intestinal FXR dependent, as revealed by the lack of changes in HFD-fed intestine-specific Fxr-null (FxrΔIE) mice treated with Gly-MCA. Integrative analyses based on genome-scale metabolic models demonstrated an important link between Lactobacillus and Clostridia bile salt hydrolase activity and bacterial fermentation. Hepatic metabolite levels after Gly-MCA treatment correlated with altered levels of gut bacterial species. In conclusion, modulation of the gut microbiota by inhibition of intestinal FXR signaling alters host liver lipid metabolism and improves obesity-related metabolic dysfunction. IMPORTANCE The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays an important role in mediating the dialog between the host

  10. In Vitro Rat Hepatic and Intestinal Metabolism of the Organophosphate Pesticides Chlorpyrifos and Diazinon

    SciTech Connect

    Poet, Torka S. ); Wu, Hong ); Kousba, Ahmed A. ); Timchalk, Charles

    2003-04-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) and diazinon (DZN) are thionophosphorus organophosphate, insecticides; their toxicity is mediated through CYP450 metabolism to CPF-oxon and DZN-oxon, respectively. Conversely, CYP450s also detoxify these OPs to trichloropyridinol (TCP) and 2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-hydroxypyrimidine (IMHP), respectively. In addition, A-esterase metabolism of CPF- and DZN-oxon also form TCP and IMHP. This study evaluated the role intestinal and hepatic metabolism may play in the first-pass elimination of CPF and DZN. Similar CYP450- and A-esterase-mediated metabolic profiles were demonstrated in microsomes from liver or isolated intestinal enterocytes. In enterocyte microsomes, the CYP450 metabolic efficiency (Vmax/Km) for metabolism to the oxon metabolites was~5-fold greater for CPF than DZN. Compared on a per nmol P450 basis, the Vmax for CPF in enterocytes was~2-3 times higher than in liver microsomes for the production of CPF-oxon and TCP. The affinity (Km) for the metabolism of CPF to CPF-oxon was comparable in liver and enterocyte microsomes, however the enterocyte Km for TCP production was higher (lower affinity). The smaller volume of intestine, lower amount of CYP450, and higher Km for TCP in the enterocyte microsomes, resulted in a lower catalytic efficiency (2 and 62 times) than in liver for oxon and TCP. A-esterase-mediated metabolism of CPF- and DZN-oxon was also demonstrated in liver and enterocyte microsomes. Although A-esterase affinity for the substrates were comparable in hepatic and enterocyte microsomes, the Vmax were 48 - to 275-fold, in the liver. These results suggest that intestinal metabolism may impact first-pass metabolism of CPF and DZN, especially following low-dose oral exposures.

  11. Biogeochemical interactions affecting hepatic trace element levels in aquatic birds

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, G.

    1996-07-01

    Knowledge of elemental interactions is important to the toxicological assessment of wildlife in the geochemical environment. This study determines the concentrations of Al, As, B, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Li, Mg, Mn, Hg, Mo, Ni, Se, Ag, V, and Zn in aquatic bird liver, fish liver, whole bivalves, insects, and waters in several aquatic ecosystems in northern California. There is evidence of strong in vivo and environmental interactions, including the observation of manganese as a possible cofactor or indicator in selenium bioaccumulation. The nearest neighbor selenium correlation in aquatic bird liver tissue that results from this work is Cd-Mn-Se-Hg-As. The correlation of liver selenium to manganese in vivo and the result that the majority of the variance in liver selenium concentration is contained in the manganese term of the regression model relating Se to Cd, Mn, and Hg is new knowledge in the study of aquatic birds. A linear relationship between liver selenium and environmental manganese (water and sediment) is found in the data, suggesting a water chemistry compartmentalization or activation of toxicants. Alternatively, the hepatic concentrations of selenium, manganese, and iron suggest induction of enzymes in response to oxidative stress.

  12. A MED13-dependent skeletal muscle gene program controls systemic glucose homeostasis and hepatic metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Amoasii, Leonela; Holland, William; Sanchez-Ortiz, Efrain; Baskin, Kedryn K.; Pearson, Mackenzie; Burgess, Shawn C.; Nelson, Benjamin R.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2016-01-01

    The Mediator complex governs gene expression by linking upstream signaling pathways with the basal transcriptional machinery. However, how individual Mediator subunits may function in different tissues remains to be investigated. Through skeletal muscle-specific deletion of the Mediator subunit MED13 in mice, we discovered a gene regulatory mechanism by which skeletal muscle modulates the response of the liver to a high-fat diet. Skeletal muscle-specific deletion of MED13 in mice conferred resistance to hepatic steatosis by activating a metabolic gene program that enhances muscle glucose uptake and storage as glycogen. The consequent insulin-sensitizing effect within skeletal muscle lowered systemic glucose and insulin levels independently of weight gain and adiposity and prevented hepatic lipid accumulation. MED13 suppressed the expression of genes involved in glucose uptake and metabolism in skeletal muscle by inhibiting the nuclear receptor NURR1 and the MEF2 transcription factor. These findings reveal a fundamental molecular mechanism for the governance of glucose metabolism and the control of hepatic lipid accumulation by skeletal muscle. Intriguingly, MED13 exerts opposing metabolic actions in skeletal muscle and the heart, highlighting the customized, tissue-specific functions of the Mediator complex. PMID:26883362

  13. A MED13-dependent skeletal muscle gene program controls systemic glucose homeostasis and hepatic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Amoasii, Leonela; Holland, William; Sanchez-Ortiz, Efrain; Baskin, Kedryn K; Pearson, Mackenzie; Burgess, Shawn C; Nelson, Benjamin R; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2016-02-15

    The Mediator complex governs gene expression by linking upstream signaling pathways with the basal transcriptional machinery. However, how individual Mediator subunits may function in different tissues remains to be investigated. Through skeletal muscle-specific deletion of the Mediator subunit MED13 in mice, we discovered a gene regulatory mechanism by which skeletal muscle modulates the response of the liver to a high-fat diet. Skeletal muscle-specific deletion of MED13 in mice conferred resistance to hepatic steatosis by activating a metabolic gene program that enhances muscle glucose uptake and storage as glycogen. The consequent insulin-sensitizing effect within skeletal muscle lowered systemic glucose and insulin levels independently of weight gain and adiposity and prevented hepatic lipid accumulation. MED13 suppressed the expression of genes involved in glucose uptake and metabolism in skeletal muscle by inhibiting the nuclear receptor NURR1 and the MEF2 transcription factor. These findings reveal a fundamental molecular mechanism for the governance of glucose metabolism and the control of hepatic lipid accumulation by skeletal muscle. Intriguingly, MED13 exerts opposing metabolic actions in skeletal muscle and the heart, highlighting the customized, tissue-specific functions of the Mediator complex.

  14. Sexual Dimorphism of Adipose and Hepatic Aquaglyceroporins in Health and Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Amaia; Marinelli, Raul A.; Tesse, Angela; Frühbeck, Gema; Calamita, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gender differences in the relative risk of developing metabolic complications, such as insulin resistance or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), have been reported. The deregulation of glycerol metabolism partly contributes to the onset of these metabolic diseases, since glycerol constitutes a key substrate for the synthesis of triacylglycerols (TAGs) as well as for hepatic gluconeogenesis. The present mini-review covers the sex-­related differences in glycerol metabolism and aquaglyceroporins (AQPs) and its impact in the control of adipose and hepatic fat accumulation as well as in whole-body glucose homeostasis. Plasma glycerol concentrations are increased in women compared to men probably due to the higher lipolytic rate and larger AQP7 amounts in visceral fat as well as the well-known sexual dimorphism in fat mass with women showing higher adiposity. AQP9 represents the primary route for glycerol uptake in hepatocytes, where glycerol is converted by the glycerol-kinase enzyme into glycerol-3-phosphate, a key substrate for de novo synthesis of glucose and TAG. In spite of showing similar hepatic AQP9 protein, women exhibit lower hepatocyte glycerol permeability than men, which might contribute to their lower prevalence of insulin resistance and NAFLD. PMID:26594198

  15. Chronic ethanol consumption disrupts diurnal rhythms of hepatic glycogen metabolism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Udoh, Uduak S.; Swain, Telisha M.; Filiano, Ashley N.; Gamble, Karen L.; Young, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption has been shown to significantly decrease hepatic glycogen content; however, the mechanisms responsible for this adverse metabolic effect are unknown. In this study, we examined the impact chronic ethanol consumption has on time-of-day-dependent oscillations (rhythms) in glycogen metabolism processes in the liver. For this, male C57BL/6J mice were fed either a control or ethanol-containing liquid diet for 5 wk, and livers were collected every 4 h for 24 h and analyzed for changes in various genes and proteins involved in hepatic glycogen metabolism. Glycogen displayed a robust diurnal rhythm in the livers of mice fed the control diet, with the peak occurring during the active (dark) period of the day. The diurnal glycogen rhythm was significantly altered in livers of ethanol-fed mice, with the glycogen peak shifted into the inactive (light) period and the overall content of glycogen decreased compared with controls. Chronic ethanol consumption further disrupted diurnal rhythms in gene expression (glycogen synthase 1 and 2, glycogenin, glucokinase, protein targeting to glycogen, and pyruvate kinase), total and phosphorylated glycogen synthase protein, and enzyme activities of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase, the rate-limiting enzymes of glycogen metabolism. In summary, these results show for the first time that chronic ethanol consumption disrupts diurnal rhythms in hepatic glycogen metabolism at the gene and protein level. Chronic ethanol-induced disruption in these daily rhythms likely contributes to glycogen depletion and disruption of hepatic energy homeostasis, a recognized risk factor in the etiology of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:25857999

  16. Dietary L-carnitine affects periparturient nutrient metabolism and lactation in multiparous cows.

    PubMed

    Carlson, D B; McFadden, J W; D'Angelo, A; Woodworth, J C; Drackley, J K

    2007-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of dietary L-carnitine supplementation on liver lipid accumulation, hepatic nutrient metabolism, and lactation in multiparous cows during the periparturient period. Cows were assigned to treatments at d -25 relative to expected calving date and remained on the experiment until 56 d in milk. Treatments were 4 amounts of supplemental dietary carnitine: control (0 g/d of L-carnitine; n = 14); low carnitine (LC, 6 g/d; n = 11); medium carnitine (MC, 50 g/d; n = 12); and high carnitine (HC, 100 g/d; n = 12). Carnitine was supplied by mixing a feed-grade carnitine supplement with 113.5 g of ground corn and 113.5 g of dried molasses, which was then fed twice daily as a topdress to achieve desired daily carnitine intakes. Carnitine supplementation began on d -14 relative to expected calving and continued until 21 d in milk. Liver and muscle carnitine concentrations were markedly increased by MC and HC treatments. Milk carnitine concentrations were elevated by all amounts of carnitine supplementation, but were greater for MC and HC than for LC during wk 2 of lactation. Dry matter intake and milk yield were decreased by the HC treatment. The MC and HC treatments increased milk fat concentration, although milk fat yield was unaffected. All carnitine treatments decreased liver total lipid and triacylglycerol accumulation on d 10 after calving. In addition, carnitine-supplemented cows had higher liver glycogen during early lactation. In general, carnitine supplementation increased in vitro palmitate beta-oxidation by liver slices, with MC and HC treatments affecting in vitro palmitate metabolism more potently than did LC. In vitro conversion of Ala to glucose by liver slices was increased by carnitine supplementation independent of dose. The concentration of nonesterified fatty acids in serum was not affected by carnitine. As a result of greater hepatic fatty acid beta-oxidation, plasma beta-hydroxybutyric acid was

  17. Nicotinamide N-methyltransferase regulates hepatic nutrient metabolism through Sirt1 protein stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Shangyu; Moreno-Navarrete, Jose M; Wei, Xiaojing; Kikukawa, Yusuke; Tzameli, Iphigenia; Prasad, Deepthi; Lee, Yoonjin; Asara, John M; Fernandez-Real, Jose Manuel; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria; Pissios, Pavlos

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (Nnmt) methylates nicotinamide, a form of vitamin B3, to produce N1-methylnicotinamide (MNAM). Nnmt is an emerging metabolic regulator in adipocytes but its role in the liver, a tissue with the strongest Nnmt expression, is not known. In spite of its overall high expression, here we find that hepatic expression of Nnmt is highly variable and correlates with multiple metabolic parameters in mice and in humans. Further, we find that suppression of hepatic Nnmt expression in vivo alters glucose and cholesterol metabolism and that the metabolic effects of Nnmt in the liver are mediated by its product MNAM. Supplementation of high fat diet with MNAM decreases serum and liver cholesterol and liver triglycerides levels in mice. Mechanistically, increasing Nnmt expression or MNAM levels stabilizes sirtuin 1 protein, an effect, which is required for their metabolic benefits. In summary, we describe a novel regulatory pathway for vitamin B3 that could provide a new opportunity for metabolic disease therapy. PMID:26168293

  18. Metabolism and binding of cyclophosphamide and its metabolite acrolein to rat hepatic microsomal cytochrome P-450

    SciTech Connect

    Marinello, A.J.; Bansal, S.K.; Paul, B.; Koser, P.L.; Love, J.; Struck, R.F.; Gurtoo, H.L.

    1984-10-01

    The hepatic cytochrome P-450-mediated metabolism and metabolic activation of (chloroethyl-3H)cyclophosphamide (( chloroethyl-3H)CP) and (4-14C)cyclophosphamide (( 4-14C)CP) were investigated in vitro in the reconstituted system containing cytochrome P-450 isolated from phenobarbital-treated rats. In addition, hepatic microsomal binding and the hepatic microsome-mediated metabolism of (14C)acrolein, a metabolite of (4-14C)CP, were also investigated. The metabolism of (chloroethyl-3H)CP and (4-14C)CP to polar metabolites was found to depend on the presence of NADPH and showed concentration dependence with respect to cytochrome P-450 and NADPH:cytochrome P-450 reductase. Km and Vmax values were essentially similar. The patterns of inhibition by microsomal mixed-function oxidase inhibitors, anti-cytochrome P-450 antibody, and heat denaturation of the cytochrome P-450 were essentially similar, with subtle differences between (4-14C)CP and (chloroethyl-3H)CP metabolism. The in vitro metabolic activation of CP in the reconstituted system demonstrated predominant binding of (chloroethyl-3H)CP to nucleic acids and almost exclusive binding of (4-14C)CP to proteins. Gel electrophoresis-fluorography of the proteins in the reconstituted system treated with (4-14C)CP demonstrated localization of the 14C label in the cytochrome P-450 region. To examine this association further, hepatic microsomes were modified with (14C)acrolein in the presence and the absence of NADPH. The results confirmed covalent association between (14C)acrolein and cytochrome P-450 in the microsomes and also demonstrated further metabolism of (14C)acrolein, apparently to an epoxide, which is capable of binding covalently to proteins. The results of these investigations not only confirm the significance of primary metabolism but also emphasize the potential role of the secondary metabolism of cyclophosphamide in some of its toxic manifestations.

  19. Altered metal metabolism in patients with HCV-related cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Marano, Massimo; Vespasiani Gentilucci, Umberto; Altamura, Claudia; Siotto, Mariacristina; Squitti, Rosanna; Bucossi, Serena; Quintiliani, Livia; Migliore, Simone; Greco, Federico; Scarciolla, Laura; Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Picardi, Antonio; Vernieri, Fabrizio

    2015-12-01

    Dysfunctional metal homeostasis contributes to oxidative stress and neuronal damage. These have been implicated in hepatic encephalopathy pathogenesis. To investigate whether altered metal metabolism is associated with hepatic encephalopathy. Twenty-one controls and 34 HCV-cirrhotic patients (ENC/NEC patients according to presence/absence of previous overt episodes of hepatic encephalopathy) and a control group were studied. Serum iron, copper, ceruloplasmin, ceruloplasmin activity, transferrin, and ceruloplasmin/transferrin ratio were determined. Neuropsychological tests were performed by the repeatable battery of neuropsychological status. Magnetic resonance assessed basal ganglia volumes and metal deposition (pallidal index and T2*). Cirrhotic patients performed worse than controls at cognitive tests, especially ENC patients,. At biochemical analysis copper concentrations, ceruloplasmin activity and transferrin levels were lower in ENC than in NEC patients and controls (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). Ceruloplasmin/transferrin ratio was higher in ENC compared to NEC patients (p < 0.05), and controls (p < 0.01). By brain magnetic resonance, ENC patients showed reduced caudate and globus pallidus volumes compared to controls (p < 0.05), and ENC and NEC patients an increased pallidal index compared to controls (p < 0.01). In ENC patients, ceruloplasmin activity correlated with caudate volume and pallidal index (ρ = 0.773 and ρ = -0.683, p < 0.05). Altered metal metabolism likely contributes to cirrhotic hepatic encephalopathy.

  20. A circadian rhythm orchestrated by histone deacetylase 3 controls hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Feng, Dan; Liu, Tao; Sun, Zheng; Bugge, Anne; Mullican, Shannon E; Alenghat, Theresa; Liu, X Shirley; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2011-03-11

    Disruption of the circadian clock exacerbates metabolic diseases, including obesity and diabetes. We show that histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) recruitment to the genome displays a circadian rhythm in mouse liver. Histone acetylation is inversely related to HDAC3 binding, and this rhythm is lost when HDAC3 is absent. Although amounts of HDAC3 are constant, its genomic recruitment in liver corresponds to the expression pattern of the circadian nuclear receptor Rev-erbα. Rev-erbα colocalizes with HDAC3 near genes regulating lipid metabolism, and deletion of HDAC3 or Rev-erbα in mouse liver causes hepatic steatosis. Thus, genomic recruitment of HDAC3 by Rev-erbα directs a circadian rhythm of histone acetylation and gene expression required for normal hepatic lipid homeostasis.

  1. Hepatic growth hormone and glucocorticoid receptor signaling in body growth, steatosis and metabolic liver cancer development.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Kristina M; Themanns, Madeleine; Friedbichler, Katrin; Kornfeld, Jan-Wilhelm; Esterbauer, Harald; Tuckermann, Jan P; Moriggl, Richard

    2012-09-25

    Growth hormone (GH) and glucocorticoids (GCs) are involved in the control of processes that are essential for the maintenance of vital body functions including energy supply and growth control. GH and GCs have been well characterized to regulate systemic energy homeostasis, particular during certain conditions of physical stress. However, dysfunctional signaling in both pathways is linked to various metabolic disorders associated with aberrant carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. In liver, GH-dependent activation of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5 controls a variety of physiologic functions within hepatocytes. Similarly, GCs, through activation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), influence many important liver functions such as gluconeogenesis. Studies in hepatic Stat5 or GR knockout mice have revealed that they similarly control liver function on their target gene level and indeed, the GR functions often as a cofactor of STAT5 for GH-induced genes. Gene sets, which require physical STAT5-GR interaction, include those controlling body growth and maturation. More recently, it has become evident that impairment of GH-STAT5 signaling in different experimental models correlates with metabolic liver disease, ranging from hepatic steatosis to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). While GH-activated STAT5 has a protective role in chronic liver disease, experimental disruption of GC-GR signaling rather seems to ameliorate metabolic disorders under metabolic challenge. In this review, we focus on the current knowledge about hepatic GH-STAT5 and GC-GR signaling in body growth, metabolism, and protection from fatty liver disease and HCC development.

  2. Hepatitis C eradication with sofosbuvir leads to significant metabolic changes

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Amilcar L; Junga, Zachary; Singla, Manish B; Sjogren, Maria; Torres, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess the effect of sofosbuvir (SOF) based regimens on glycemic and lipid control. METHODS This is a retrospective analysis of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients treated and cured with a SOF regimen [SOF/ribavirin/interferon, SOF/simeprevir, or SOF/ledipasvir (LDV) ± ribavirin] from January 2014 to March 2015. Patients with hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) and lipid panels within six months before and six months after therapy were identified and included in our study. Due to the known hemolytic effect of ribavirin, HbA1C was obtained a minimum of three months post-treatment for the patients treated with a ribavirin regimen. Medical history, demographics, HCV genotype, pre-therapy RNA, and liver biopsies were included in our analysis. The patients who started a new medication or had an adjustment of baseline medical management for hyperlipidemia or diabetes mellitus (DM) were excluded from our analysis. RESULTS Two hundred and thirty-four patients were reviewed, of which 60 patients met inclusion criteria. Sixty-three point three percent were male, 26.7% were Caucasian, 41.7% were African American and 91.7% were infected with hepatitis C genotype 1. Mean age was 60.6 ± 6.7 years. Thirty-nine patients had HbA1C checked before and after treatment, of which 22 had the diagnosis of DM type 2. HbA1C significantly decreased with treatment of HCV (pretreatment 6.66% ± 0.95% vs post-treatment 6.14% ± 0.65%, P < 0.005). Those treated with SOF/LDV had a lower HbA1C response than those treated with other regimens (0.26% ± 0.53% vs 0.71% ± 0.83%, P = 0.070). Fifty-two patients had pre- and post-treatment lipid panels; there was a significant increase in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and total cholesterol (TC) after treatment (LDL: 99.5 ± 28.9 mg/dL vs 128.3 ± 34.9 mg/dL, P < 0.001; TC: 171.6 ± 32.5 mg/dL vs 199.7 ± 40.0 mg/dL, P < 0.001). Pre-treatment body-mass index (BMI) did not differ from post-treatment BMI (P = 0.684). CONCLUSION Eradication of HCV with a

  3. Molecular changes in hepatic metabolism and transport in cirrhosis and their functional importance

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph G; Götze, Oliver; Geier, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is the common endpoint of many hepatic diseases and represents a relevant risk for liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. The progress of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis is accompanied by deteriorating liver function. This review summarizes the regulatory and functional changes in phase I and phase II metabolic enzymes as well as transport proteins and provides an overview regarding lipid and glucose metabolism in cirrhotic patients. Interestingly, phase I enzymes are generally downregulated transcriptionally, while phase II enzymes are mostly preserved transcriptionally but are reduced in their function. Transport proteins are regulated in a specific way that resembles the molecular changes observed in obstructive cholestasis. Lipid and glucose metabolism are characterized by insulin resistance and catabolism, leading to the disturbance of energy expenditure and wasting. Possible non-invasive tests, especially breath tests, for components of liver metabolism are discussed. The heterogeneity and complexity of changes in hepatic metabolism complicate the assessment of liver function in individual patients. Additionally, studies in humans are rare, and species differences preclude the transferability of data from rodents to humans. In clinical practice, some established global scores or criteria form the basis for the functional evaluation of patients with liver cirrhosis, but difficult treatment decisions such as selection for transplantation or resection require further research regarding the application of existing non-invasive tests and the development of more specific tests. PMID:26755861

  4. Hepatic mTORC1 controls locomotor activity, body temperature, and lipid metabolism through FGF21.

    PubMed

    Cornu, Marion; Oppliger, Wolfgang; Albert, Verena; Robitaille, Aaron M; Trapani, Francesca; Quagliata, Luca; Fuhrer, Tobias; Sauer, Uwe; Terracciano, Luigi; Hall, Michael N

    2014-08-12

    The liver is a key metabolic organ that controls whole-body physiology in response to nutrient availability. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a nutrient-activated kinase and central controller of growth and metabolism that is negatively regulated by the tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (TSC1). To investigate the role of hepatic mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in whole-body physiology, we generated liver-specific Tsc1 (L-Tsc1 KO) knockout mice. L-Tsc1 KO mice displayed reduced locomotor activity, body temperature, and hepatic triglyceride content in a rapamycin-sensitive manner. Ectopic activation of mTORC1 also caused depletion of hepatic and plasma glutamine, leading to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α)-dependent fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) expression in the liver. Injection of glutamine or knockdown of PGC-1α or FGF21 in the liver suppressed the behavioral and metabolic defects due to mTORC1 activation. Thus, mTORC1 in the liver controls whole-body physiology through PGC-1α and FGF21. Finally, mTORC1 signaling correlated with FGF21 expression in human liver tumors, suggesting that treatment of glutamine-addicted cancers with mTOR inhibitors might have beneficial effects at both the tumor and whole-body level.

  5. Hepatic mTORC1 controls locomotor activity, body temperature, and lipid metabolism through FGF21

    PubMed Central

    Cornu, Marion; Oppliger, Wolfgang; Albert, Verena; Robitaille, Aaron M.; Trapani, Francesca; Quagliata, Luca; Fuhrer, Tobias; Sauer, Uwe; Terracciano, Luigi; Hall, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a key metabolic organ that controls whole-body physiology in response to nutrient availability. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a nutrient-activated kinase and central controller of growth and metabolism that is negatively regulated by the tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (TSC1). To investigate the role of hepatic mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in whole-body physiology, we generated liver-specific Tsc1 (L-Tsc1 KO) knockout mice. L-Tsc1 KO mice displayed reduced locomotor activity, body temperature, and hepatic triglyceride content in a rapamycin-sensitive manner. Ectopic activation of mTORC1 also caused depletion of hepatic and plasma glutamine, leading to peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α)–dependent fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) expression in the liver. Injection of glutamine or knockdown of PGC-1α or FGF21 in the liver suppressed the behavioral and metabolic defects due to mTORC1 activation. Thus, mTORC1 in the liver controls whole-body physiology through PGC-1α and FGF21. Finally, mTORC1 signaling correlated with FGF21 expression in human liver tumors, suggesting that treatment of glutamine-addicted cancers with mTOR inhibitors might have beneficial effects at both the tumor and whole-body level. PMID:25082895

  6. Adiponectin regulates expression of hepatic genes critical for glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingqing; Yuan, Bingbing; Lo, Kinyui Alice; Patterson, Heide Christine; Sun, Yutong; Lodish, Harvey F

    2012-09-04

    The effects of adiponectin on hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism at transcriptional level are largely unknown. We profiled hepatic gene expression in adiponectin knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice by RNA sequencing. Compared with WT mice, adiponectin KO mice fed a chow diet exhibited decreased mRNA expression of rate-limiting enzymes in several important glucose and lipid metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty-acid activation and synthesis, triglyceride synthesis, and cholesterol synthesis. In addition, binding of the transcription factor Hnf4a to DNAs encoding several key metabolic enzymes was reduced in KO mice, suggesting that adiponectin might regulate hepatic gene expression via Hnf4a. Phenotypically, adiponectin KO mice possessed smaller epididymal fat pads and showed reduced body weight compared with WT mice. When fed a high-fat diet, adiponectin KO mice showed significantly reduced lipid accumulation in the liver. These lipogenic defects are consistent with the down-regulation of lipogenic genes in the KO mice.

  7. Lipoic acid entrains the hepatic circadian clock and lipid metabolic proteins that have been desynchronized with advanced age

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Dove; Finlay, Liam; Butler, Judy; Gómez, Luis; Smith, Eric; Moreau, Régis; Hagen, Tory

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that lipid metabolism is controlled, in part, by circadian clocks. However, circadian clocks lose temporal precision with age and correlates with elevated incidence in dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome in older adults. Because our lab has shown that lipoic acid (LA) improves lipid homeostasis in aged animals, we hypothesized that LA affects the circadian clock to achieve these results. We fed 24 month old male F344 rats a diet supplemented with 0.2% (w/w) LA for 2 weeks prior to sacrifice and quantified hepatic circadian clock protein levels and clock-controlled lipid metabolic enzymes. LA treatment caused a significant phase-shift in the expression patterns of the circadian clock proteins Period (Per) 2, Brain and Muscle Arnt-Like1 (BMAL1), and Reverse Erythroblastosis virus (Rev-erb) β without altering the amplitude of protein levels during the light phase of the day. LA also significantly altered the oscillatory patterns of clock-controlled proteins associated with lipid metabolism. The level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α was significantly increased and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were both significantly reduced, suggesting that the LA-supplemented aged animals are in a catabolic state. We conclude that LA remediates some of the dyslipidemic processes associated with advanced age, and this mechanism may be at least partially through entrainment of circadian clocks. PMID:24944020

  8. Leucine metabolism in cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    McGhee, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether increased oxidation of or protein synthesis requiring leucine occurs in cirrhotic patients. Five control subjects and four subjects with cirrhosis were equilibrated on a baseline diet (0.6 g protein per kg ideal body weight (IBW)) with sufficient nonprotein calories to preclude negative nitrogen balance. An additional four patients were equilibrated on the same type of diet with a higher protein level (0.75 g per kg IBW). Control subjects and the patients were then studied during continuous infusion of L-(/sup 15/N, 1-/sup 13/C) leucine in the fasted state and, in the fed state, with a Propac diet which had the same distribution of energy nutrients as the baseline diets. Plasma levels of L-(/sup 15/N, 1-/sup 13/C), L-(1-/sup 13/C) and L-(/sup 15/N) leucine were measured during isotopic steady state by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and fractional excretion of /sup 13/CO/sup 2/ in breath samples were analyzed by isotopic ratio mass spectrometry. During the fasted and fed states leucine metabolism was measured to quantitate rates of nitrogen flux (Q/sub N/), carbon flux (Q/sub c/) and oxidation to carbon dioxide and water (C). From these measured values, proteins breakdown (B), protein synthesis (S), deamination (X/sup 0/) and reamination (X/sub N/) were calculated. The results showed that protein synthesis and leucine metabolism were identical in controls and patients when both were fed a diet with 0.6 g protein/kg IBW and maintenance level of nonprotein calories. The data also showed that leucine metabolism can be quantitatively and reproducibly measured in subjects with cirrhosis.

  9. Fermentation and Hydrogen Metabolism Affect Uranium Reduction by Clostridia

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Weimin; Francis, Arokiasamy J.

    2013-01-01

    Previously, it has been shown that not only is uranium reduction under fermentation condition common among clostridia species, but also the strains differed in the extent of their capability and the pH of the culture significantly affected uranium(VI) reduction. In this study, using HPLC and GC techniques, metabolic properties of those clostridial strains active in uranium reduction under fermentation conditions have been characterized and their effects on capability variance of uranium reduction discussed. Then, the relationship between hydrogen metabolism and uranium reduction has been further explored and the important role played by hydrogenase in uranium(VI) and iron(III) reduction by clostridia demonstrated. When hydrogen was provided as the headspace gas, uranium(VI) reduction occurred in the presence of whole cells of clostridia. This is in contrast to that of nitrogen as the headspace gas. Without clostridia cells, hydrogen alone could not result in uranium(VI) reduction. In alignment with this observation, it was also found that either copper(II) addition or iron depletion in the medium could compromise uranium reduction by clostridia. In the end, a comprehensive model was proposed to explain uranium reduction by clostridia and its relationship to the overall metabolism especially hydrogen (H2) production.

  10. Fermentation and Hydrogen Metabolism Affect Uranium Reduction by Clostridia

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Weimin; Francis, Arokiasamy J.

    2013-01-01

    Previously, it has been shown that not only is uranium reduction under fermentation condition common among clostridia species, but also the strains differed in the extent of their capability and the pH of the culture significantly affected uranium(VI) reduction. In this study, using HPLC and GC techniques, metabolic properties of those clostridial strains active in uranium reduction under fermentation conditions have been characterized and their effects on capability variance of uranium reduction discussed. Then, the relationship between hydrogen metabolism and uranium reduction has been further explored and the important role played by hydrogenase in uranium(VI) and iron(III) reduction by clostridia demonstrated. When hydrogen was provided as the headspace gas, uranium(VI) reduction occurred in the presence of whole cells of clostridia. This is in contrast to that of nitrogen as the headspace gas. Without clostridia cells, hydrogen alone could not result in uranium(VI) reduction. In alignment with this observation, it was also found that either copper(II) addition or iron depletion in the medium could compromise uranium reduction by clostridia. In the end, a comprehensive model was proposed to explain uranium reduction by clostridia and its relationship to the overall metabolism especially hydrogen (H2) production. PMID:25937978

  11. Fermentation and Hydrogen Metabolism Affect Uranium Reduction by Clostridia

    DOE PAGES

    Gao, Weimin; Francis, Arokiasamy J.

    2013-01-01

    Previously, it has been shown that not only is uranium reduction under fermentation condition common among clostridia species, but also the strains differed in the extent of their capability and the pH of the culture significantly affected uranium(VI) reduction. In this study, using HPLC and GC techniques, metabolic properties of those clostridial strains active in uranium reduction under fermentation conditions have been characterized and their effects on capability variance of uranium reduction discussed. Then, the relationship between hydrogen metabolism and uranium reduction has been further explored and the important role played by hydrogenase in uranium(VI) and iron(III) reduction bymore » clostridia demonstrated. When hydrogen was provided as the headspace gas, uranium(VI) reduction occurred in the presence of whole cells of clostridia. This is in contrast to that of nitrogen as the headspace gas. Without clostridia cells, hydrogen alone could not result in uranium(VI) reduction. In alignment with this observation, it was also found that either copper(II) addition or iron depletion in the medium could compromise uranium reduction by clostridia. In the end, a comprehensive model was proposed to explain uranium reduction by clostridia and its relationship to the overall metabolism especially hydrogen (H 2 ) production.« less

  12. Respiration, metabolic balance, and attention in affective picture processing.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Patrick; Shafy, Samiha; Danuser, Brigitta

    2008-05-01

    The respiratory behavior during affective states is not completely understood. We studied breathing pattern responses to picture series in 37 participants. We also measured end-tidal pCO2 (EtCO2) to determine if ventilation is in balance with metabolic demands and spontaneous eye-blinking to investigate the link between respiration and attention. Minute ventilation (MV) and inspiratory drive increased with self-rated arousal. These relationships reflected increases in inspiratory volume rather than shortening of the time parameters. EtCO2 covaried with pleasantness but not arousal. Eye-blink rate decreased with increasing unpleasantness in line with a negativity bias in attention. This study confirms that respiratory responses to affective stimuli are organized to a certain degree along the dimensions of valence and arousal. It shows, for the first time, that during picture viewing, ventilatory increases with increasing arousal are in balance with metabolic activity and that inspiratory volume is modulated by arousal. MV emerges as the most reliable respiratory index of self-perceived arousal.

  13. Interactions between dietary boron and thiamine affect lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Herbel, J.L.; Hunt, C.D. )

    1991-03-15

    An experiment was designed to test the hypothesis that dietary boron impacts upon the function of various coenzymes involved in energy metabolism. In a 2 {times} 7 factorially-arranged experiment, weanling, vitamin D{sub 3}-deprived rats were fed a ground corn-casein-corn oil based diet supplemented with 0 or 2 mg boron/kg and 50% of the requirement for thiamine (TM), riboflavin (RF), pantothenic acid (PA) or pyridoxine (PX); 0% for folic acid (FA) or nicotinic acid (NA). All vitamins were supplemented in adequate amounts in the control diet. At 8 weeks of age, the TM dietary treatment was the one most affected by supplemental dietary boron (SDB). In rats that were fed 50% TM, SDB increased plasma concentrations of triglyceride (TG) and activity of alanine transaminase (ALT), and the liver to body weight (L/B) ratio. However, in the SDB animals, adequate amounts of TM decreased the means of those variables to near that observed in non-SDB rats fed 50% TM. The findings suggest that an interaction between dietary boron and TM affects lipid metabolism.

  14. Osteoid osteoma is an osteocalcinoma affecting glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Confavreux, C B; Borel, O; Lee, F; Vaz, G; Guyard, M; Fadat, C; Carlier, M-C; Chapurlat, R; Karsenty, G

    2012-05-01

    Osteocalcin is a hormone secreted by osteoblasts, which regulates energy metabolism by increasing β-cell proliferation, insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity, and energy expenditure. This has been demonstrated in mice, but to date, the evidence implicating osteocalcin in the regulation of energy metabolism in humans are indirect. To address this question more directly, we asked whether a benign osteoblastic tumor, such as osteoma osteoid in young adults, may secrete osteocalcin. The study was designed to assess the effect of surgical resection of osteoid osteoma on osteocalcin and blood glucose levels in comparison with patients undergoing knee surgery and healthy volunteers. Blood collections were performed the day of surgery and the following morning after overnight fasting. Patients and controls were recruited in the orthopedic surgery department of New York Presbiterian Hospital, NY-USA and Hospices Civils de Lyon, France. Seven young males were included in the study: two had osteoid osteoma, two underwent knee surgery, and three were healthy volunteers. After resection of the osteoid osteomas, we observed a decrease of osteocalcin by 62% and 30% from the initial levels. Simultaneously, blood glucose increased respectively by 32% and 15%. Bone turnover markers were not affected. This case study shows for the first time that osteocalcin in humans affects blood glucose level. This study also suggests that ostoid osteoma may be considered, at least in part, as an osteocalcinoma.

  15. Chronic central leptin infusion modulates the glycemia response to insulin administration in male rats through regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Canelles, Sandra; Rodríguez, Amaia; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Frago, Laura M; Chowen, Julie A; Frühbeck, Gema; Argente, Jesús; Barrios, Vicente

    2015-11-05

    Leptin and insulin use overlapping signaling mechanisms to modify hepatic glucose metabolism, which is critical in maintaining normal glycemia. We examined the effect of an increase in central leptin and insulin on hepatic glucose metabolism and its influence on serum glucose levels. Chronic leptin infusion increased serum leptin and reduced hepatic SH-phosphotyrosine phosphatase 1, the association of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 to the insulin receptor in liver and the rise in glycemia induced by central insulin. Leptin also decreased hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase levels and increased insulin's ability to phosphorylate insulin receptor substrate-1, Akt and glycogen synthase kinase on Ser9 and to stimulate glucose transporter 2 and glycogen levels. Peripheral leptin treatment reproduced some of these changes, but to a lesser extent. Our data indicate that leptin increases the hepatic response to a rise in insulin, suggesting that pharmacological manipulation of leptin targets may be of interest for controlling glycemia.

  16. Splanchnic and hepatic metabolism of somatostatin: a study in cirrhotic patients with a portacaval shunt.

    PubMed

    Webb, S; Kravetz, D; Bosch, J; Wass, J A; Evans, J; Gomis, R; Rees, L H; Rodés, J

    1983-01-01

    Experimental data suggest that somatostatin is metabolized by both liver and kidneys. Results in humans are conflicting. By studying a group of cirrhotic patients with surgically induced end-to-side portacaval shunts, basally and during a somatostatin infusion, we have been able to analyze separately the hepatic and splanchnic metabolism of this peptide. After catheterization, samples were obtained from the pulmonary artery, portal and hepatic veins. Basal pulmonary artery immunoreactive somatostatin (IRS) was significantly higher (p less than 0.001) in the cirrhotic patients (96 +/- 11 pg per ml) than in a sex- and age-matched control group (31.4 +/- 5.8 pg per ml). During the infusion of exogenous somatostatin, IRS values were higher in arterial (12,269 +/- 1,198 pg per ml) than in hepatic venous blood (7,648 +/- 1,234 pg per ml), indicating hepatic extraction of the peptide; but there was also a substantial splanchnic extraction demonstrated by higher arterial (12,269 +/- 1,532 pg per ml) than portal values (6,754 +/- 1,040 pg per ml) of IRS. During the somatostatin infusion, at very high circulation IRS levels, the liver was able to extract 38% of the peptide. This suggests that the high basal IRS levels found in liver cirrhosis are not likely to be due to hepatic failure. Possible mechanisms may involve increased somatostatin secretion, predominance of high molecular weight moieties of IRS which may not be as effectively removed by the liver, and/or portal-systemic shunting.

  17. Ursodeoxycholic acid treatment of hepatic steatosis: a (13)C NMR metabolic study.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Patrícia M; Jones, John G; Rolo, Anabela P; Palmeira, Carlos M M; Carvalho, Rui A

    2011-11-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is commonly used for the treatment of hepatobiliary disorders. In this study, we tested whether a 4-week treatment with this bile acid (12-15 mg/kg/day) could improve hepatic fatty acid oxidation in obese Zucker rats - a model for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and steatosis. After 24 h of fasting, livers were perfused with physiological concentrations of [U-(13) C]nonesterified fatty acids and [3-(13) C]lactate/[3-(13) C]pyruvate. Steatosis was associated with abundant intracellular glucose, lactate, alanine and methionine, and low concentrations of choline and betaine. Steatotic livers also showed the highest output of glucose and lactate. Glucose and glycolytic products were mostly unlabeled, indicating active glycogenolysis and glycolysis after 24 h of fasting. UDCA treatment resulted in a general amelioration of liver metabolic abnormalities with a decrease in intracellular glucose and lactate, as well as their output. Hepatic betaine and methionine were also normalized after UDCA treatment, suggesting the amelioration of anti-oxidative defenses. Choline levels were not affected by the bile acid, which may indicate a deficient synthesis of very-low-density lipoproteins. The percentage contribution of [U-(13) C]nonesterified fatty acids to acetyl-coenzyme A entering the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was significantly lower in livers from Zucker obese rats relative to control rats: 23.1 ± 4.9% versus 44.1 ± 2.7% (p < 0.01). UDCA treatment did not alter significantly fatty acid oxidation in control rats, but improved significantly oxidation in Zucker obese rats to 46.0 ± 6.1% (p > 0.05), comparable with control group values. The TCA cycle activity subsequent to fatty acid oxidation was reduced in steatotic livers and improved when UDCA was administered (0.24 ± 0.04 versus 0.37 ± 0.05, p = 0.05). We further suggest that the mechanism of action of UDCA is either related to the activity of the

  18. Experimental nonalcoholic steatohepatitis compromises ureagenesis, an essential hepatic metabolic function.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Karen Louise; Grønbæk, Henning; Glavind, Emilie; Hebbard, Lionel; Jessen, Niels; Clouston, Andrew; George, Jacob; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2014-08-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is increasing in prevalence, yet its consequences for liver function are unknown. We studied ureagenesis, an essential metabolic liver function of importance for whole body nitrogen homeostasis, in a rodent model of diet-induced NASH. Rats were fed a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet for 4 and 16 wk, resulting in early and advanced experimental NASH, respectively. We examined the urea cycle enzyme mRNAs in liver tissue, the hepatocyte urea cycle enzyme proteins, and the in vivo capacity of urea-nitrogen synthesis (CUNS). Early NASH decreased all of the urea cycle mRNAs to an average of 60% and the ornithine transcarbamylase protein to 10%, whereas the CUNS remained unchanged. Advanced NASH further decreased the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase protein to 63% and, in addition, decreased the CUNS by 20% [from 5.65 ± 0.23 to 4.58 ± 0.30 μmol × (min × 100 g)(-1); P = 0.01]. Early NASH compromised the genes and enzyme proteins involved in ureagenesis, whereas advanced NASH resulted in a functional reduction in the capacity for ureagenesis. The pattern of urea cycle perturbations suggests a prevailing mitochondrial impairment by NASH. The decrease in CUNS has consequences for the ability of the body to adjust to changes in the requirements for nitrogen homeostasis e.g., at stressful events. NASH, thus, in terms of metabolic consequences, is not an innocuous lesion, and the manifestations of the damage seem to be a continuum with increasing disease severity.

  19. Quantifying the contribution of the liver to glucose homeostasis: a detailed kinetic model of human hepatic glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    König, Matthias; Bulik, Sascha; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2012-01-01

    Despite the crucial role of the liver in glucose homeostasis, a detailed mathematical model of human hepatic glucose metabolism is lacking so far. Here we present a detailed kinetic model of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism in human hepatocytes integrated with the hormonal control of these pathways by insulin, glucagon and epinephrine. Model simulations are in good agreement with experimental data on (i) the quantitative contributions of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and glycogen metabolism to hepatic glucose production and hepatic glucose utilization under varying physiological states. (ii) the time courses of postprandial glycogen storage as well as glycogen depletion in overnight fasting and short term fasting (iii) the switch from net hepatic glucose production under hypoglycemia to net hepatic glucose utilization under hyperglycemia essential for glucose homeostasis (iv) hormone perturbations of hepatic glucose metabolism. Response analysis reveals an extra high capacity of the liver to counteract changes of plasma glucose level below 5 mM (hypoglycemia) and above 7.5 mM (hyperglycemia). Our model may serve as an important module of a whole-body model of human glucose metabolism and as a valuable tool for understanding the role of the liver in glucose homeostasis under normal conditions and in diseases like diabetes or glycogen storage diseases.

  20. Metabolic changes in flatfish hepatic tumours revealed by NMR-based metabolomics and metabolic correlation networks.

    PubMed

    Southam, Andrew D; Easton, John M; Stentiford, Grant D; Ludwig, Christian; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Viant, Mark R

    2008-12-01

    Histopathologically well-characterized fish liver was analyzed by 800 MHz 1H NMR metabolomics to identify metabolic changes between healthy and tumor tissue. Data were analyzed by multivariate statistics and metabolic correlation networks, and results revealed elevated anaerobic metabolism and reduced choline metabolism in tumor tissue. Significant negative correlations were observed between alanine-acetate (p = 3.0 x 10(-5)) and between proline-acetate (p = 0.003) in tumors only, suggesting alanine and proline are utilized as alternative energy sources in flatfish liver tumors.

  1. Impact of fasting time on hepatic lipid metabolism in nutritional animal studies.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Ikuo; Metoki, Kanae; Yamahira, Takashi; Kato, Masaki; Inoue, Nao; Nagao, Koji; Yanagita, Teruyoshi; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Komai, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Many animal studies on improvement of lipid metabolism, using dietary components, fast the animals on the final day of the feeding. Although fasting has a significant impact on lipid metabolism, its time-dependent influence is not fully understood. We examined the effects of several fasting times on lipid metabolism. Rats fed with a semisynthetic diet for 2 wk were killed after 0 (9:00 am), 6 (7:00 am-1:00 pm), 9 (0:00 am-9:00 am), and 13 h (8:00 pm-9:00 am) of fasting. Compared to the 0 h group, marked reduction of liver weight and hepatic triacylglycerol content was observed in the 9 and 13 h groups. Activities of hepatic enzymes involved in fatty acid synthesis gradually decreased during fasting. In contrast, drastic time-dependent reduction of gene expression, of the enzymes, was observed. Expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase mRNA was higher in the fasting groups than in the 0 h group. Our study showed that fasting has a significant impact on several parameters related to lipid metabolism in rat liver.

  2. The roles of nuclear receptors CAR and PXR in hepatic energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Konno, Yoshihiro; Negishi, Masahiko; Kodama, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear receptors constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) were originally characterized as transcription factors regulating the hepatic genes that encode drug metabolizing enzymes. Recent works have now revealed that these nuclear receptors also play the critical roles in modulating hepatic energy metabolism. While CAR and PXR directly bind to their response sequences phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module (PBREM) and xenobiotic responsive enhancer module (XREM) in the promoter of target genes to increase drug metabolism, the receptors also cross talk with various hormone responsive transcription factors such as forkhead box O1 (FoxO1), forkhead box A2 (FoxA2), cAMP-response element binding protein, and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC 1alpha) to decrease energy metabolism through down-regulating gluconeogenesis, fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis and up-regulating lipogenesis. In addition, CAR modulates thyroid hormone activity by regulating type 1 deiodinase in the regenerating liver. Thus, CAR and PXR are now placed at the crossroad where both xenobiotics and endogenous stimuli co-regulate liver function.

  3. The metabolic activator FOXO1 binds hepatitis B virus DNA and activates its transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Shlomai, Amir; Shaul, Yosef

    2009-04-17

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a small DNA virus that targets the liver and infects humans worldwide. Recently we have shown that the metabolic regulator PGC-1{alpha} coactivates HBV transcription thereby rendering the virus susceptible to fluctuations in the nutritional status of the liver. PGC-1{alpha} coactivation of HBV is mediated through the liver-enriched nuclear receptor HNF4{alpha} and through another yet unknown transcription factor(s). Here we show that the forkhead transcription factor FOXO1, a known target for PGC-1{alpha} coactivation and a central mediator of glucose metabolism in the liver, binds HBV core promoter and activates its transcription. This activation is further enhanced in the presence of PGC-1{alpha}, implying that FOXO1 is a target for PGC-1{alpha} coactivation of HBV transcription. Thus, our results identify another key metabolic regulator as an activator of HBV transcription, thereby supporting the principle that HBV gene expression is regulated in a similar way to key hepatic metabolic genes.

  4. Hyperoxia exposure alters hepatic eicosanoid metabolism in newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Lynette K; Tipple, Trent E; Britt, Rodney D; Welty, Stephen E

    2010-02-01

    Prematurely born infants are often treated with supraphysiologic amounts of oxygen, which is associated with lung injury and the development of diseases such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Complimentary responses between the lung and liver during the course of hyperoxic lung injury have been studied in adult animals, but little is known about this relationship in neonates. These studies tested the hypothesis that oxidant stress occurs in the livers of newborn mice in response to continuous hyperoxia exposure. Greater levels of glutathione disulfide and nitrotyrosine were detected in lung tissues but not liver tissues from newborn mice exposed to hyperoxia than in room air-exposed controls. However, early increases in 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenases-2 protein levels and increases in total hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and prostaglandin levels were observed in the liver tissues of hyperoxia-exposed pups. These studies indicate that free radical oxidation occurs in the lungs of newborn pups exposed to hyperoxia, and alterations in lipid metabolism could be a primary response in the liver tissues. The findings of this study identify possible new mechanisms associated with hyperoxic lung injury in a newborn model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and thus open opportunities for research.

  5. Interplay between hepatic mitochondria-associated membranes, lipid metabolism and caveolin-1 in mice.

    PubMed

    Sala-Vila, Aleix; Navarro-Lérida, Inmaculada; Sánchez-Alvarez, Miguel; Bosch, Marta; Calvo, Carlos; López, Juan Antonio; Calvo, Enrique; Ferguson, Charles; Giacomello, Marta; Serafini, Annalisa; Scorrano, Luca; Enriquez, José Antonio; Balsinde, Jesús; Parton, Robert G; Vázquez, Jesús; Pol, Albert; Del Pozo, Miguel A

    2016-06-06

    The mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM) is a specialized subdomain of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) which acts as an intracellular signaling hub. MAM dysfunction has been related to liver disease. We report a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomics characterization of MAMs from mouse liver, which portrays them as an extremely complex compartment involved in different metabolic processes, including steroid metabolism. Interestingly, we identified caveolin-1 (CAV1) as an integral component of hepatic MAMs, which determine the relative cholesterol content of these ER subdomains. Finally, a detailed comparative proteomics analysis between MAMs from wild type and CAV1-deficient mice suggests that functional CAV1 contributes to the recruitment and regulation of intracellular steroid and lipoprotein metabolism-related processes accrued at MAMs. The potential impact of these novel aspects of CAV1 biology on global cell homeostasis and disease is discussed.

  6. Interplay between hepatic mitochondria-associated membranes, lipid metabolism and caveolin-1 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sala-Vila, Aleix; Navarro-Lérida, Inmaculada; Sánchez-Alvarez, Miguel; Bosch, Marta; Calvo, Carlos; López, Juan Antonio; Calvo, Enrique; Ferguson, Charles; Giacomello, Marta; Serafini, Annalisa; Scorrano, Luca; Enriquez, José Antonio; Balsinde, Jesús; Parton, Robert G.; Vázquez, Jesús; Pol, Albert; Del Pozo, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM) is a specialized subdomain of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) which acts as an intracellular signaling hub. MAM dysfunction has been related to liver disease. We report a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomics characterization of MAMs from mouse liver, which portrays them as an extremely complex compartment involved in different metabolic processes, including steroid metabolism. Interestingly, we identified caveolin-1 (CAV1) as an integral component of hepatic MAMs, which determine the relative cholesterol content of these ER subdomains. Finally, a detailed comparative proteomics analysis between MAMs from wild type and CAV1-deficient mice suggests that functional CAV1 contributes to the recruitment and regulation of intracellular steroid and lipoprotein metabolism-related processes accrued at MAMs. The potential impact of these novel aspects of CAV1 biology on global cell homeostasis and disease is discussed. PMID:27272971

  7. Lysine Acetylation of CREBH Regulates Fasting-Induced Hepatic Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunbae; Mendez, Roberto; Chen, Xuequn; Fang, Deyu

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein 3-like 3, hepatocyte specific (CREBH), is a hepatic transcription factor that functions as a key regulator of energy homeostasis. Here, we defined a regulatory CREBH posttranslational modification process, namely, lysine-specific acetylation, and its functional involvement in fasting-induced hepatic lipid metabolism. Fasting induces CREBH acetylation in mouse livers in a time-dependent manner, and this event is critical for CREBH transcriptional activity in regulating hepatic lipid homeostasis. The histone acetyltransferase PCAF-mediated acetylation and the deacetylase sirtuin-1-mediated deacetylation coexist to maintain CREBH acetylation states under fasting conditions. Site-directed mutagenesis and functional analyses revealed that the lysine (K) residue at position 294 (K294) within the bZIP domain of the CREBH protein is the site where fasting-induced acetylation/deacetylation occurs. Introduction of the acetylation-deficient (K294R) or acetylation-mimicking (K294Q) mutation inhibited or enhanced CREBH transcriptional activity, respectively. Importantly, CREBH acetylation at lysine 294 was required for the interaction and synergy between CREBH and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) in activating their target genes upon fasting or glucagon stimulation. Introduction of the CREBH lysine 294 mutation in the liver leads to hepatic steatosis and hyperlipidemia in animals under prolonged fasting. In summary, our study reveals a molecular mechanism by which fasting or glucagon stimulation modulates lipid homeostasis through acetylation of CREBH. PMID:26438600

  8. FGF15/FGFR4 integrates growth factor signaling with hepatic bile acid metabolism and insulin action.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong-Ju; Osborne, Timothy F

    2009-04-24

    The current studies show FGF15 signaling decreases hepatic forkhead transcription factor 1 (FoxO1) activity through phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase-dependent phosphorylation. The bile acid receptor FXR (farnesoid X receptor) activates expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 15 in the intestine, which acts through hepatic FGFR4 to suppress cholesterol-7alpha hydroxylase (CYP7A1) and limit bile acid production. Because FoxO1 activity and CYP7A1 gene expression are both increased by fasting, we hypothesized CYP7A1 might be a FoxO1 target gene. Consistent with recently reported results, we show CYP7A1 is a direct target of FoxO1. Additionally, we show that the PI 3-kinase pathway is key for both the induction of CYP7A1 by fasting and the suppression by FGF15. FGFR4 is the major hepatic FGF receptor isoform and is responsible for the hepatic effects of FGF15. We also show that expression of FGFR4 in liver was decreased by fasting, increased by insulin, and reduced by streptozotocin-induced diabetes, implicating FGFR4 as a primary target of insulin regulation. Because insulin and FGF both target the PI 3-kinase pathway, these observations suggest FoxO1 is a key node in the convergence of FGF and insulin signaling pathways and functions as a key integrator for the regulation of glucose and bile acid metabolism.

  9. Lysine Acetylation of CREBH Regulates Fasting-Induced Hepatic Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunbae; Mendez, Roberto; Chen, Xuequn; Fang, Deyu; Zhang, Kezhong

    2015-12-01

    Cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein 3-like 3, hepatocyte specific (CREBH), is a hepatic transcription factor that functions as a key regulator of energy homeostasis. Here, we defined a regulatory CREBH posttranslational modification process, namely, lysine-specific acetylation, and its functional involvement in fasting-induced hepatic lipid metabolism. Fasting induces CREBH acetylation in mouse livers in a time-dependent manner, and this event is critical for CREBH transcriptional activity in regulating hepatic lipid homeostasis. The histone acetyltransferase PCAF-mediated acetylation and the deacetylase sirtuin-1-mediated deacetylation coexist to maintain CREBH acetylation states under fasting conditions. Site-directed mutagenesis and functional analyses revealed that the lysine (K) residue at position 294 (K294) within the bZIP domain of the CREBH protein is the site where fasting-induced acetylation/deacetylation occurs. Introduction of the acetylation-deficient (K294R) or acetylation-mimicking (K294Q) mutation inhibited or enhanced CREBH transcriptional activity, respectively. Importantly, CREBH acetylation at lysine 294 was required for the interaction and synergy between CREBH and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) in activating their target genes upon fasting or glucagon stimulation. Introduction of the CREBH lysine 294 mutation in the liver leads to hepatic steatosis and hyperlipidemia in animals under prolonged fasting. In summary, our study reveals a molecular mechanism by which fasting or glucagon stimulation modulates lipid homeostasis through acetylation of CREBH.

  10. Glucose absorption, hormonal release and hepatic metabolism after guar gum ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoes Nunes, C.; Malmlof, K.

    1992-01-01

    Six non-anaesthetized Large White pigs (mean body weight 59 +/- 1.7 kg) were fitted with permanent catheters in the portal vein, the brachiocephalic artery and the right hepatic vein and with electromagnetic flow probes around the portal vein and the hepatic artery. The animals were provided a basal none-fibre diet (diet A) alone or together with 6% guar gum (diet B) or 15% purified cellulose (diet C). The diets were given for 1 week and according to a replicated 3 x 3 latin-square design. On the last day of each adaptation period test meals of 800 g were given prior to blood sampling. The sampling was continued for 8 h. Guar gum strongly reduced the glucose absorption as well as the insulin, gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) production. However, the reduction in peripheral blood insulin levels caused by guar gum was not associated with a change in hepatic insulin extraction. IGF-1 appeared to be strongly produced by the gut. The liver had a net uptake of the peptide. Ingestion of guar gum increased the hepatic extraction coefficient of gut produced IGF-1. Guar gum ingestion also appeared to decrease pancreatic glucagon secretion. Cellulose at the level consumed had very little effect on the parameters considered. It is suggested that the modulation of intestinal mechanisms by guar gum was sufficient to mediate the latter internal metabolic effects.

  11. Hepatic drug metabolizing profile of Flinders Sensitive Line rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Kotsovolou, Olga; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Lang, Matti A; Marselos, Marios; Overstreet, David H; Papadopoulou-Daifoti, Zoi; Johanson, Inger; Fotopoulos, Andrew; Konstandi, Maria

    2010-08-16

    The Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rat model of depression exhibits some behavioral, neurochemical, and pharmacological features that have been reported in depressed patients and has been very effective in screening antidepressants. Major factor that determines the effectiveness and toxicity of a drug is the drug metabolizing capacity of the liver. Therefore, in order to discriminate possible differentiation in the hepatic drug metabolism between FSL rats and Sprague-Dawley (SD) controls, their hepatic metabolic profile was investigated in this study. The data showed decreased glutathione (GSH) content and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and lower expression of certain major CYP enzymes, including the CYP2B1, CYP2C11 and CYP2D1 in FSL rats compared to SD controls. In contrast, p-nitrophenol hydroxylase (PNP), 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD) and 16alpha-testosterone hydroxylase activities were higher in FSL rats. Interestingly, the wide spread environmental pollutant benzo(alpha)pyrene (B(alpha)P) induced CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B1/2 and ALDH3c at a lesser extend in FSL than in SD rats, whereas the antidepressant mirtazapine (MIRT) up-regulated CYP1A1/2, CYP2C11, CYP2D1, CYP2E1 and CYP3A1/2, mainly, in FSL rats. The drug also further increased ALDH3c whereas suppressed GSH content in B(alpha)P-exposed FSL rats. In conclusion, several key enzymes of the hepatic biotransformation machinery are differentially expressed in FSL than in SD rats, a condition that may influence the outcome of drug therapy. The MIRT-induced up-regulation of several drug-metabolizing enzymes indicates the critical role of antidepressant treatment that should be always taken into account in the designing of treatment and interpretation of insufficient pharmacotherapy or drug toxicity.

  12. Comprehensive Analysis of PPARα-Dependent Regulation of Hepatic Lipid Metabolism by Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Sanderson, Linda M.; Matilainen, Merja; Stienstra, Rinke; Carlberg, Carsten; de Groot, Philip J.; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2007-01-01

    PPARα is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of nutrient metabolism and inflammation. Although much is already known about the function of PPARα in hepatic lipid metabolism, many PPARα-dependent pathways and genes have yet to be discovered. In order to obtain an overview of PPARα-regulated genes relevant to lipid metabolism, and to probe for novel candidate PPARα target genes, livers from several animal studies in which PPARα was activated and/or disabled were analyzed by Affymetrix GeneChips. Numerous novel PPARα-regulated genes relevant to lipid metabolism were identified. Out of this set of genes, eight genes were singled out for study of PPARα-dependent regulation in mouse liver and in mouse, rat, and human primary hepatocytes, including thioredoxin interacting protein (Txnip), electron-transferring-flavoprotein β polypeptide (Etfb), electron-transferring-flavoprotein dehydrogenase (Etfdh), phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (Pctp), endothelial lipase (EL, Lipg), adipose triglyceride lipase (Pnpla2), hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL, Lipe), and monoglyceride lipase (Mgll). Using an in silico screening approach, one or more PPAR response elements (PPREs) were identified in each of these genes. Regulation of Pnpla2, Lipe, and Mgll, which are involved in triglyceride hydrolysis, was studied under conditions of elevated hepatic lipids. In wild-type mice fed a high fat diet, the decrease in hepatic lipids following treatment with the PPARα agonist Wy14643 was paralleled by significant up-regulation of Pnpla2, Lipe, and Mgll, suggesting that induction of triglyceride hydrolysis may contribute to the anti-steatotic role of PPARα. Our study illustrates the power of transcriptional profiling to uncover novel PPARα-regulated genes and pathways in liver. PMID:18288265

  13. Comprehensive analysis of PPARalpha-dependent regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism by expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Sanderson, Linda M; Matilainen, Merja; Stienstra, Rinke; Carlberg, Carsten; de Groot, Philip J; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2007-01-01

    PPARalpha is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of nutrient metabolism and inflammation. Although much is already known about the function of PPARalpha in hepatic lipid metabolism, many PPARalpha-dependent pathways and genes have yet to be discovered. In order to obtain an overview of PPARalpha-regulated genes relevant to lipid metabolism, and to probe for novel candidate PPARalpha target genes, livers from several animal studies in which PPARalpha was activated and/or disabled were analyzed by Affymetrix GeneChips. Numerous novel PPARalpha-regulated genes relevant to lipid metabolism were identified. Out of this set of genes, eight genes were singled out for study of PPARalpha-dependent regulation in mouse liver and in mouse, rat, and human primary hepatocytes, including thioredoxin interacting protein (Txnip), electron-transferring-flavoprotein beta polypeptide (Etfb), electron-transferring-flavoprotein dehydrogenase (Etfdh), phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (Pctp), endothelial lipase (EL, Lipg), adipose triglyceride lipase (Pnpla2), hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL, Lipe), and monoglyceride lipase (Mgll). Using an in silico screening approach, one or more PPAR response elements (PPREs) were identified in each of these genes. Regulation of Pnpla2, Lipe, and Mgll, which are involved in triglyceride hydrolysis, was studied under conditions of elevated hepatic lipids. In wild-type mice fed a high fat diet, the decrease in hepatic lipids following treatment with the PPARalpha agonist Wy14643 was paralleled by significant up-regulation of Pnpla2, Lipe, and Mgll, suggesting that induction of triglyceride hydrolysis may contribute to the anti-steatotic role of PPARalpha. Our study illustrates the power of transcriptional profiling to uncover novel PPARalpha-regulated genes and pathways in liver.

  14. Effects of atrazine on hepatic metabolism and endocrine homeostasis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Salaberria, Iurgi; Hansen, Bjørn Henrik; Asensio, Vega; Olsvik, Pål A; Andersen, Rolf A; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro

    2009-01-01

    The herbicide atrazine (ATZ) is one of the most widely used pesticides in the world and is now under scrutiny for its alleged capacity to disrupt the endocrine system. Exhibiting negligible interaction with the estrogen receptor (ER), ATZ's mode of action remains to be elucidated. ATZ may act as an inducer of the enzyme aromatase, which converts androgens to estrogens, although other mechanisms should also be taken into consideration such as impairment of hepatic metabolism. Therefore we administered juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) a dose of either 2 or 200 microg ATZ/kg, or of carrier control phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and we measured plasma concentrations of testosterone (T), 17beta-estradiol (E2) and vitellogenin (Vtg) 6 days after exposure. Simultaneously we analyzed hepatic gene expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A and pi-class glutathione S-transferase (GST-P), and catalase (CAT) activity. Although sex steroid levels showed no significant alterations, we found a dose-dependent increase in Vtg and a concomitant decrease in CYP1A. There was no effect of ATZ on GST-P mRNA levels but GST-P was positively correlated with CYP1A. Also, CYP1A was negatively correlated with liver CAT and E2, and varied with T concentrations in a hormetic manner. The results showed that ATZ can alter hepatic metabolism, induce estrogenic effects and oxidative stress in vivo, and that these effects are linked.

  15. Effects of atrazine on hepatic metabolism and endocrine homeostasis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    SciTech Connect

    Salaberria, Iurgi Hansen, Bjorn Henrik; Asensio, Vega; Olsvik, Pal A.; Andersen, Rolf A.; Jenssen, Bjorn Munro

    2009-01-01

    The herbicide atrazine (ATZ) is one of the most widely used pesticides in the world and is now under scrutiny for its alleged capacity to disrupt the endocrine system. Exhibiting negligible interaction with the estrogen receptor (ER), ATZ's mode of action remains to be elucidated. ATZ may act as an inducer of the enzyme aromatase, which converts androgens to estrogens, although other mechanisms should also be taken into consideration such as impairment of hepatic metabolism. Therefore we administered juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) a dose of either 2 or 200 {mu}g ATZ/kg, or of carrier control phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and we measured plasma concentrations of testosterone (T), 17beta-estradiol (E2) and vitellogenin (Vtg) 6 days after exposure. Simultaneously we analyzed hepatic gene expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A and pi-class glutathione S-transferase (GST-P), and catalase (CAT) activity. Although sex steroid levels showed no significant alterations, we found a dose-dependent increase in Vtg and a concomitant decrease in CYP1A. There was no effect of ATZ on GST-P mRNA levels but GST-P was positively correlated with CYP1A. Also, CYP1A was negatively correlated with liver CAT and E2, and varied with T concentrations in a hormetic manner. The results showed that ATZ can alter hepatic metabolism, induce estrogenic effects and oxidative stress in vivo, and that these effects are linked.

  16. Molecular Differences in Hepatic Metabolism between AA Broiler and Big Bone Chickens: A Proteomic Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guohua; Yue, Ying; Li, Jianke; Zhang, Shu; Cai, Huiyi; Yang, Aijun; Chen, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the metabolic differences in the livers of modern broilers and local chicken breeds is important for understanding their biological characteristics, and many proteomic changes in their livers are not well characterized. We therefore analyzed the hepatic protein profiles of a commercial breed, Arbor Acres (AA) broilers, and a local dual purpose breed, Big Bone chickens, using two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with liquid chromatography-chip/electrospray ionization-quadruple time-of-flight/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A total of 145 proteins were identified as having differential abundance in the two breeds at three growth stages. Among them, 49, 63 and 54 belonged to 2, 4, and 6 weeks of age, respectively. The higher abundance proteins in AA broilers were related to the energy production pathways suggesting enhanced energy metabolism and lipid biosynthesis. In contrast, the higher abundance proteins in Big Bone chickens showed enhanced lipid degradation, resulting in a reduction in the abdominal fat percentage. Along with the decrease in fat deposition, flavor substance synthesis in the meat of the Big Bone chickens may be improved by enhanced abundance of proteins involved in glycine metabolism. In addition, the identified proteins in nucleotide metabolism, antioxidants, cell structure, protein folding and transporters may be critically important for immune defense, gene transcription and other biological processes in the two breeds. These results indicate that selection pressure may have shaped the two lines differently resulting in different hepatic metabolic capacities and extensive metabolic differences in the liver. The results from this study may help provide the theoretical basis for chicken breeding. PMID:27760160

  17. Molecular Differences in Hepatic Metabolism between AA Broiler and Big Bone Chickens: A Proteomic Study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Aijuan; Chang, Wenhuan; Liu, Guohua; Yue, Ying; Li, Jianke; Zhang, Shu; Cai, Huiyi; Yang, Aijun; Chen, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the metabolic differences in the livers of modern broilers and local chicken breeds is important for understanding their biological characteristics, and many proteomic changes in their livers are not well characterized. We therefore analyzed the hepatic protein profiles of a commercial breed, Arbor Acres (AA) broilers, and a local dual purpose breed, Big Bone chickens, using two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with liquid chromatography-chip/electrospray ionization-quadruple time-of-flight/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A total of 145 proteins were identified as having differential abundance in the two breeds at three growth stages. Among them, 49, 63 and 54 belonged to 2, 4, and 6 weeks of age, respectively. The higher abundance proteins in AA broilers were related to the energy production pathways suggesting enhanced energy metabolism and lipid biosynthesis. In contrast, the higher abundance proteins in Big Bone chickens showed enhanced lipid degradation, resulting in a reduction in the abdominal fat percentage. Along with the decrease in fat deposition, flavor substance synthesis in the meat of the Big Bone chickens may be improved by enhanced abundance of proteins involved in glycine metabolism. In addition, the identified proteins in nucleotide metabolism, antioxidants, cell structure, protein folding and transporters may be critically important for immune defense, gene transcription and other biological processes in the two breeds. These results indicate that selection pressure may have shaped the two lines differently resulting in different hepatic metabolic capacities and extensive metabolic differences in the liver. The results from this study may help provide the theoretical basis for chicken breeding.

  18. The Choice of Euthanasia Method Affects Metabolic Serum Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Paula, Pierozan; Fredrik, Jernerén; Yusuf, Ransome; Oskar, Karlsson

    2017-02-28

    The impact of euthanasia methods on endocrine and metabolic parameters in rodent tissues and biological fluids is highly relevant for the accuracy and reliability of the data collected. However, few studies concerning this issue are found in the literature. We compared the effects of three euthanasia methods currently used in animal experimentation (i.e. decapitation, CO2 inhalation, and pentobarbital injection) on the serum levels of corticosterone, insulin, glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol and a range of free fatty acids in rats. The corticosterone and insulin levels were not significantly affected by the euthanasia protocol used. However, euthanasia by an overdose of pentobarbital (120 mg/kg intraperitoneal injection) increased the serum levels of glucose, and decreased cholesterol, stearic and arachidonic acids levels compared with euthanasia by CO2 inhalation and decapitation. CO2 inhalation appears to increase the serum levels of triglycerides, while euthanasia by decapitation induced no individual discrepant biomarker level. We conclude that choice of the euthanasia methods are critical for the reliability of serum biomarkers and indicate the importance of selecting adequate euthanasia methods for metabolic analysis in rodents. Decapitation without anaesthesia may be the most adequate method of euthanasia when taking both animal welfare and data quality in consideration. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Maternal metabolic stress may affect oviduct gatekeeper function.

    PubMed

    Jordaens, Lies; Van Hoeck, Veerle; Maillo, Veronica; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Marei, Waleed Fawzy A; Vlaeminck, Bruno; Thys, Sofie; Sturmey, Roger G S; Bols, Peter; Leroy, Jo

    2017-03-03

    We hypothesized that elevated non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) modify in vitro bovine oviduct epithelial cell (BOEC) metabolism and barrier function. Hereto, BOECs were studied in a polarized system with 24h-treatments at day 9: 1) CONTROL (0µM NEFA + 0%EtOH), 2) SOLVENT CONTROL (0µM NEFA + 0.45%EtOH), 3) BASAL NEFA (720µM NEFA + 0.45%EtOH in the basal compartment), 4) APICAL NEFA (720µM NEFA + 0.45%EtOH in the apical compartment). FITC-albumin was used for monolayer permeability assessment, and related to Transepithelial Electric Resistance (TER). Fatty acid (FA), glucose, lactate and pyruvate concentrations were measured in spent medium. Intracellular lipid droplets (LD) and FA-uptake were studied using Bodipy 493/503 and immunolabelling of FA-transporters (FAT/CD36, FABP3 and caveolin1). BOEC-mRNA was retrieved for qRT-PCR. Results revealed that APICAL NEFA reduced relative TER-increase (46.85%) during treatment, and increased FITC-albumin flux (27.59%) compared to other treatments. In BASAL NEFA, FAs were transferred to the apical compartment as free FAs: mostly palmitic and oleic acid increased, respectively 56.0 % and 33.5% of initial FA-concentrations. APICAL NEFA allowed no FA-transfer, but induced LD-accumulation and upregulated FA-transporter expression (↑CD36, ↑FABP3, ↑CAV1-protein-expression). Gene expression in APICAL NEFA indicated increased anti-apoptotic (↑BCL2) and anti-oxidative (↑SOD1) capacity, upregulated lipid metabolism (↑CPT1, ↑ACSL1 and ↓ACACA), and FA-uptake (↑CAV1). All treatments had similar carbohydrate metabolism and oviduct function specific gene expression (=OVGP1, ESR1, FOXJ1). Overall, elevated NEFAs affected BOEC-metabolism and barrier function differently depending on NEFA-exposure side. Data substantiate the concept of the oviduct as a gatekeeper that may actively alter early embryonic developmental conditions.

  20. [Metabolic disturbances in liver cirrhosis (part 1)--hepatic osteopathy and malnutrition].

    PubMed

    Gundling, F; Seidl, H; Löffler, N; Strassen, I; Schepp, W

    2009-11-01

    Medical treatment of patients with liver cirrhosis consists mainly of symptomatic therapy of associated complications. Apart from the classical complications of cirrhosis, e. g. ascites, portal hypertension or hepatic encephalopathy, other frequent complications are neglected in everyday medicine. The incidence of metabolic disturbances seems to be similar to the prevalence of classical complications of liver cirrhosis, such as portal hypertension or ascites. Osteoporosis is an important manifestation of hepatic osteopathy, especially in chronic cholestatic diseases and in candidates for liver transplantation, which necessitates timely adequate diagnostic test (e. g. osteodensitometry) and treatment (pre-emptive and causal). Malnutrition, especially when related to protein- and energy supply, is very common in patients with liver cirrhosis and has prognostic significance regarding mortality and complication rates. A sufficient daily energy and protein supply should be ensured, one which is higher than that for the normal population. Additional substitution of vitamins and trace elements is indicated when symptoms of deficiency became apparent.

  1. The effects of choline and inositol on hepatic lipid metabolism and the incidence of the fatty liver and kidney syndrome in broilers.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J

    1975-11-01

    1. Diets high in wheat and low in protein (18%) produced 5 to 6% mortality from fatty liver and kidney syndrome (FLKS) in broiler chicks whereas there were no deaths from FLKS in birds fed on a maize/barley diet containing 20% protein. 2. Supplementation of the wheat-based diets with choline or inositol (2-5 g additive/kg diet) did not affect the incidence of FLKS or liver lipid metabolism. 3. The wheat-based diet did not significantly affect the activities of hepatic lipogenic enzymes suggesting that hepatic lipid biosynthesis is not a cause of the syndrome. 4. The biotin contents of the wheat and maize/barley diets were little different, which may suggest that factors other than this are implicated in FLKS.

  2. Methanethiol metabolism and its role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy in rats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Blom, H J; Chamuleau, R A; Rothuizen, J; Deutz, N E; Tangerman, A

    1990-04-01

    The metabolism of methanethiol was studied in rats. Administration of a noncomatogenic dose of methanethiol through inspired air or injection into the upper colon resulted in an elevation of the concentrations of methanethiol mixed disulfides in serum (protein--S--S--CH3 and X--S--S--CH3, X yet unknown) and in urine (X--S--S--CH3). The concentrations of methanethiol mixed disulfides proved to be a relative measure of exposure to methanethiol. The levels of volatile sulfur compounds methanethiol, dimethylsulfide and dimethyldisulfide in the air expired by rats exposed to a noncomatogenic dose of methanethiol through the colon were also elevated. Rats with acute hepatic encephalopathy caused by liver ischemia also showed elevation of methanethiol mixed disulfide levels on challenge of methanethiol through the colon or inspired air, but to a significantly smaller extent than did the corresponding sham-operated rats. This suggests that the liver is at least partly responsible for formation of methanethiol mixed disulfides. No additional toxic effects were observed in the rats with ischemic livers on methanethiol exposition when compared with normal rats, suggesting that the liver does not play an essential role in methanethiol detoxification. Metabolism of methanethiol by blood to sulfate, for example, might be more important. In rats with acute hepatic encephalopathy caused by liver ischemia and in dogs suffering from hepatic encephalopathy resulting from chronic liver disease, large and significant increases in ammonia levels were measured. However, the mean levels of methanethiol mixed disulfides in rats and dogs with hepatic encephalopathy were not different from the mean normal levels in these animals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Lipoic acid entrains the hepatic circadian clock and lipid metabolic proteins that have been desynchronized with advanced age

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, Dove; Finlay, Liam; Butler, Judy; Gómez, Luis; Smith, Eric; Moreau, Régis; Hagen, Tory

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • 24 month old rats were supplemented with 0.2% lipoic acid in the diet for 2 weeks. • Lipoic acid shifts phase of core circadian clock proteins. • Lipoic acid corrects age-induced desynchronized lipid metabolism rhythms. - Abstract: It is well established that lipid metabolism is controlled, in part, by circadian clocks. However, circadian clocks lose temporal precision with age and correlates with elevated incidence in dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome in older adults. Because our lab has shown that lipoic acid (LA) improves lipid homeostasis in aged animals, we hypothesized that LA affects the circadian clock to achieve these results. We fed 24 month old male F344 rats a diet supplemented with 0.2% (w/w) LA for 2 weeks prior to sacrifice and quantified hepatic circadian clock protein levels and clock-controlled lipid metabolic enzymes. LA treatment caused a significant phase-shift in the expression patterns of the circadian clock proteins Period (Per) 2, Brain and Muscle Arnt-Like1 (BMAL1), and Reverse Erythroblastosis virus (Rev-erb) β without altering the amplitude of protein levels during the light phase of the day. LA also significantly altered the oscillatory patterns of clock-controlled proteins associated with lipid metabolism. The level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α was significantly increased and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were both significantly reduced, suggesting that the LA-supplemented aged animals are in a catabolic state. We conclude that LA remediates some of the dyslipidemic processes associated with advanced age, and this mechanism may be at least partially through entrainment of circadian clocks.

  4. The effects of cyclopropane carboxylate on hepatic pyruvate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Steinhelper, M E; Olson, M S

    1985-11-15

    The effects of cyclopropane carboxylate on gluconeogenesis and pyruvate decarboxylation from [1-14C]-labeled pyruvate and lactate were investigated in perfused livers from fasted rats. With high concentrations of pyruvate (greater than or equal to 0.5 mM) in the perfusion medium, infusion of cyclopropane carboxylate inhibited pyruvate decarboxylation and gluconeogenesis by 30 and 40%, respectively. With low, more physiological concentrations of pyruvate (50 microM) or with lactate (1 mM), cyclopropane carboxylate, at a concentration which elicits maximal inhibition of pyruvate decarboxylation from pyruvate (greater than or equal to 0.5 mM), did not affect either pyruvate decarboxylation or gluconeogenesis. Evidence is presented for the rapid formation of the coenzyme-A ester of cyclopropane carboxylate in perfused livers. Infusion of l-(-)carnitine (20 mM) prevented the inhibitory effects of cyclopropane carboxylate on pyruvate decarboxylation and gluconeogenesis from pyruvate (greater than or equal to 0.5 mM). Interestingly, no decrease in the tissue level of cyclopropanecarboxyl-CoA occurs under these conditions. The present study suggests that cyclopropane carboxylate, through a presently ill-defined mediator, inhibits pyruvate decarboxylation and gluconeogenesis by interfering with the pyruvate----oxalacetate----phosphoenolpyruvate----pyruvate cycle when pyruvate (greater than or equal to 0.5mM) supports gluconeogenesis.

  5. Chronic unpredictive mild stress leads to altered hepatic metabolic profile and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hong-mei; Li, Qi; Zhou, Chao; Yu, Meng; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Hong-wu; Ding, Gang; Shang, Hai; Zou, Zhong-mei

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a complex disease characterized by a series of pathological changes. Research on depression is mainly focused on the changes in brain, but not on liver. Therefore, we initially explored the metabolic profiles of hepatic extracts from rats treated with chronic unpredictive mild stress (CUMS) by UPLC-Q-TOF/MS. Using multivariate statistical analysis, a total of 26 altered metabolites distinguishing CUMS-induced depression from normal control were identified. Using two-stage receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, 18 metabolites were recognized as potential biomarkers related to CUMS-induced depression via 12 metabolic pathways. Subsequently, we detected the mRNA expressions levels of apoptosis-associated genes such as Bax and Bcl-2 and four key enzymes including Pla2g15, Pnpla6, Baat and Gad1 involved in phospholipid and primary bile acid biosynthesis in liver tissues of CUMS rats by real-time qRT-PCR assay. The expression levels of Bax, Bcl-2, Pla2g15, Pnpla6 and Gad1 mRNA were 1.43,1.68, 1.74, 1.67 and 1.42-fold higher, and those of Baat, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio mRNA were 0.83, 0.85-fold lower in CUMS rats compared with normal control. Results of liver-targeted metabonomics and mRNA expression demonstrated that CUMS-induced depression leads to variations in hepatic metabolic profile and gene expression, and ultimately results in liver injury. PMID:27006086

  6. Hepatitis C virus infection triggers a tumor-like glutamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lévy, Pierre L; Duponchel, Sarah; Eischeid, Hannah; Molle, Jennifer; Michelet, Maud; Diserens, Gaëlle; Vermathen, Martina; Vermathen, Peter; Dufour, Jean-Francois; Dienes, Hans-Peter; Steffen, Hans-Michael; Odenthal, Margarete; Zoulim, Fabien; Bartosch, Birke

    2017-03-01

    Chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the main causes of hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the molecular mechanisms linking the infection to cancer development remain poorly understood. Here we used HCV-infected cells and liver biopsies to study how HCV modulates the glutaminolysis pathway, which is known to play an important role in cellular energetics, stress defense, and neoplastic transformation. Transcript levels of glutaminolytic factors were quantified in Huh7.5 cells or primary human hepatocytes infected with the Japanese fulminant hepatitis 1 HCV strain as well as in biopsies of chronic HCV patients. Nutrient deprivation, biochemical analysis, and metabolite quantification were performed with HCV-infected Huh7.5 cells. Furthermore, short hairpin RNA vectors and small molecule inhibitors were used to investigate the dependence of HCV replication on metabolic changes. We show that HCV modulates the transcript levels of key enzymes of glutamine metabolism in vitro and in liver biopsies of chronic HCV patients. Consistently, HCV infection increases glutamine use and dependence. We finally show that inhibiting glutamine metabolism attenuates HCV infection and the oxidative stress associated with HCV infection.

  7. Chronic unpredictive mild stress leads to altered hepatic metabolic profile and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hong-Mei; Li, Qi; Zhou, Chao; Yu, Meng; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Hong-Wu; Ding, Gang; Shang, Hai; Zou, Zhong-Mei

    2016-03-23

    Depression is a complex disease characterized by a series of pathological changes. Research on depression is mainly focused on the changes in brain, but not on liver. Therefore, we initially explored the metabolic profiles of hepatic extracts from rats treated with chronic unpredictive mild stress (CUMS) by UPLC-Q-TOF/MS. Using multivariate statistical analysis, a total of 26 altered metabolites distinguishing CUMS-induced depression from normal control were identified. Using two-stage receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, 18 metabolites were recognized as potential biomarkers related to CUMS-induced depression via 12 metabolic pathways. Subsequently, we detected the mRNA expressions levels of apoptosis-associated genes such as Bax and Bcl-2 and four key enzymes including Pla2g15, Pnpla6, Baat and Gad1 involved in phospholipid and primary bile acid biosynthesis in liver tissues of CUMS rats by real-time qRT-PCR assay. The expression levels of Bax, Bcl-2, Pla2g15, Pnpla6 and Gad1 mRNA were 1.43,1.68, 1.74, 1.67 and 1.42-fold higher, and those of Baat, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio mRNA were 0.83, 0.85-fold lower in CUMS rats compared with normal control. Results of liver-targeted metabonomics and mRNA expression demonstrated that CUMS-induced depression leads to variations in hepatic metabolic profile and gene expression, and ultimately results in liver injury.

  8. Effects of petroleum on adrenocortical activity and on hepatic naphthalene-metabolizing activity in mallard ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorsline, J.; Holmes, W.N.

    1981-01-01

    Unstressed mallard ducks (Anas platyrhychos), given uncontaminated food and maintained on a short photoperiod, show two daily maxima in plasma corticosterone concentration ([B]); one occurring early in the light phase and a second just before the onset of darkness. After one week of exposure to food containing 3% (v/w) South Louisiana crude oil, plasma [B] were significantly lowered throughout the day. Similar abrupt declines in plasma [B] also occurred during the first 10 days of exposure to food containing 1% and 0.5% crude oil. Although the plasma [B] in birds consuming food contaminated with 0.5% crude oil increased between 10 and 50 days of exposure, the concentration after 50 days was still lower than normal. During the same interval, normal plasma [B] were restored in birds consuming food containing 1% and 3% crude oil. Significant increases occurred in the naphthalene-metabolizing properties of hepatic microsomes prepared from birds acutely exposed to all levels of petroleum-contaminated food and elevated levels were sustained throughout the first 50 days of exposure. Birds given food containing 3% crude oil for more than 50 days, however, showed steady declines in hepatic naphthalene-metabolizing activity. After 500 days, the activity was similar to that found in contemporaneous controls. During the same interval, the plasma [B] increased until the levels were higher than normal after 500 days of exposure; at this time, an inverse relationship, similar to that seen during the first week of exposure to contaminated food, was once more established between plasma [B] and the concomitant hepatic naphthalene-metabolizing activity.

  9. Folate deficiency disturbs hepatic methionine metabolism and promotes liver injury in the ethanol-fed micropig.

    PubMed

    Halsted, Charles H; Villanueva, Jesus A; Devlin, Angela M; Niemelä, Onni; Parkkila, Seppo; Garrow, Timothy A; Wallock, Lynn M; Shigenaga, Mark K; Melnyk, Stepan; James, S Jill

    2002-07-23

    Alcoholic liver disease is associated with abnormal hepatic methionine metabolism and folate deficiency. Because folate is integral to the methionine cycle, its deficiency could promote alcoholic liver disease by enhancing ethanol-induced perturbations of hepatic methionine metabolism and DNA damage. We grouped 24 juvenile micropigs to receive folate-sufficient (FS) or folate-depleted (FD) diets or the same diets containing 40% of energy as ethanol (FSE and FDE) for 14 wk, and the significance of differences among the groups was determined by ANOVA. Plasma homocysteine levels were increased in all experimental groups from 6 wk onward and were greatest in FDE. Ethanol feeding reduced liver methionine synthase activity, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), and glutathione, and elevated plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and alanine transaminase. Folate deficiency decreased liver folate levels and increased global DNA hypomethylation. Ethanol feeding and folate deficiency acted together to decrease the liver SAM/S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) ratio and to increase liver SAH, DNA strand breaks, urinary 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine [oxo(8)dG]/mg of creatinine, plasma homocysteine, and aspartate transaminase by more than 8-fold. Liver SAM correlated positively with glutathione, which correlated negatively with plasma MDA and urinary oxo(8)dG. Liver SAM/SAH correlated negatively with DNA strand breaks, which correlated with urinary oxo(8)dG. Livers from ethanol-fed animals showed increased centrilobular CYP2E1 and protein adducts with acetaldehyde and MDA. Steatohepatitis occurred in five of six pigs in FDE but not in the other groups. In summary, folate deficiency enhances perturbations in hepatic methionine metabolism and DNA damage while promoting alcoholic liver injury.

  10. Multiple dietary supplements do not affect metabolic and cardiovascular health

    PubMed Central

    Holloszy, John O.; Fontana, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Dietary supplements are widely used for health purposes. However, little is known about the metabolic and cardiovascular effects of combinations of popular over-the-counter supplements, each of which has been shown to have anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and pro-longevity properties in cell culture or animal studies. This study was a 6-month randomized, single-blind controlled trial, in which 56 non-obese (BMI 21.0-29.9 kg/m2) men and women, aged 38 to 55 yr, were assigned to a dietary supplement (SUP) group or control (CON) group, with a 6-month follow-up. The SUP group took 10 dietary supplements each day (100 mg of resveratrol, a complex of 800 mg each of green, black, and white tea extract, 250 mg of pomegranate extract, 650 mg of quercetin, 500 mg of acetyl-l-carnitine, 600 mg of lipoic acid, 900 mg of curcumin, 1 g of sesamin, 1.7 g of cinnamon bark extract, and 1.0 g fish oil). Both the SUP and CON groups took a daily multivitamin/mineral supplement. The main outcome measures were arterial stiffness, endothelial function, biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress, and cardiometabolic risk factors. Twenty-four weeks of daily supplementation with 10 dietary supplements did not affect arterial stiffness or endothelial function in nonobese individuals. These compounds also did not alter body fat measured by DEXA, blood pressure, plasma lipids, glucose, insulin, IGF-1, and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress. In summary, supplementation with a combination of popular dietary supplements has no cardiovascular or metabolic effects in non-obese relatively healthy individuals. PMID:24659610

  11. Cerebral glucose metabolism after portacaval shunting in the rat. Patterns of metabolism and implications for the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, A H; Ginsberg, M D; Rhoades, H M; Gutierrez, M T

    1986-01-01

    The regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose was measured in normal and portacaval shunted rats and the effects of unilateral carotid infusions of "threshold" amounts of ammonia were assessed. 8 wk after shunting the glucose metabolic rate was increased in all 20 brain regions sampled. Effects on subcortical and phylogenetically older regions of the brain were most pronounced with a 74% increase observed in the reticular formation at the collicular level. Increases in the cerebral cortex ranged from 12 to 18%. Unilateral infusions of ammonia did not affect behavior but altered the electroencephalogram and selectively increased the glucose metabolic rate in the thalamus, hypothalamus, and substantia nigra in half of the animals, a pattern similar to that seen after a portacaval shunt, suggesting hyperammonemia as the cause of postshunt increases in glucose metabolism. Visual inspection of autoradiograms, computed correlation coefficients relating interregional metabolism, and principal component analysis suggest that normal cerebral metabolic and functional interrelationships are altered by shunting. Ammonia stimulation of the hypothalamic satiety centers may suppress appetite and lead to cachexia. Reductions in the ammonia detoxification capacity of skeletal muscle may increase the probability of developing future episodes of hyperammonemia, perpetuating the process. Direct effects of ammonia on specific brain centers such as the dorsomedial hypothalamus and reticular activating system may combine with global disruptions of cerebral metabolic-functional relationships to produce the protean manifestations of portal-systemic encephalopathy. Images PMID:3722388

  12. Hepatic cholesterol metabolism following a chronic ingestion of cesium-137 starting at fetal stage in rats.

    PubMed

    Racine, Radjini; Grandcolas, Line; Blanchardon, Eric; Gourmelon, Patrick; Veyssiere, Georges; Souidi, Maamar

    2010-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident released many radionuclides in the environment. Some are still contaminating the ground and thus the people through dietary intake. The long-term sanitary consequences of this disaster are still unclear and several biological systems remain to be investigated. Cholesterol metabolism is of particular interest, with regard to the link established between atherosclerosis and exposure to high-dose ionizing radiations. This study assesses the effect of cesium-137 on cholesterol metabolism in rats, after a chronic exposure since fetal life. To achieve this, rat dams were contaminated with cesium-137-supplemented water from two weeks before mating until the weaning of the pups. Thereafter, the weaned rats were given direct access to the contaminated drinking water until the age of 9 months. After the sacrifice, cholesterol metabolism was investigated in the liver at gene expression and protein level. The cholesterolemia was preserved, as well as the cholesterol concentration in the liver. At molecular level, the gene expressions of ACAT 2 (a cholesterol storage enzyme), of Apolipoprotein A-I and of RXR (a nuclear receptor involved in cholesterol metabolism) were significantly decreased. In addition, the enzymatic activity of CYP27A1, which catabolizes cholesterol, was increased. The results indicate that the rats seem to adapt to the cesium-137 contamination and display modifications of hepatic cholesterol metabolism only at molecular level and within physiological range.

  13. The Role of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Intestinal and Hepatic Fructose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Iizuka, Katsumi

    2017-01-01

    Many articles have discussed the relationship between fructose consumption and the incidence of obesity and related diseases. Fructose is absorbed in the intestine and metabolized in the liver to glucose, lactate, glycogen, and, to a lesser extent, lipids. Unabsorbed fructose causes bacterial fermentation, resulting in irritable bowl syndrome. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying intestinal and hepatic fructose metabolism is important for the treatment of metabolic syndrome and fructose malabsorption. Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) is a glucose-activated transcription factor that controls approximately 50% of de novo lipogenesis in the liver. ChREBP target genes are involved in glycolysis (Glut2, liver pyruvate kinase), fructolysis (Glut5, ketohexokinase), and lipogenesis (acetyl CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase). ChREBP gene deletion protects against high sucrose diet-induced and leptin-deficient obesity, because Chrebp−/− mice cannot consume fructose or sucrose. Moreover, ChREBP contributes to some of the physiological effects of fructose on sweet taste preference and glucose production through regulation of ChREBP target genes, such as fibroblast growth factor-21 and glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunits. Thus, ChREBP might play roles in fructose metabolism. Restriction of excess fructose intake will be beneficial for preventing not only metabolic syndrome but also irritable bowl syndrome. PMID:28241431

  14. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of digoxin- and beta-methyl-digoxin-12aplha-3 H in patients with acute hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Zilly, W; Richter, E; Rietbrock, N

    1975-03-01

    Pharmocokinetics and metabolism of digoxin and beta-methyldigoxin have been studied in patients with acute hepatits after intravenous administration of both H-labeled glycosides. In contrast to digoxin, the rate of decline of radioactivity after administration of beta-methyldigoxin was significantly retarded in patients with acute hepatitis. The increase in plasma concentration after beta-methyldigoxin to patients with acute hepatitis is probably related to decreased demethylation.

  15. Glucoraphasatin and glucoraphenin, a redox pair of glucosinolates of brassicaceae, differently affect metabolizing enzymes in rats.

    PubMed

    Barillari, Jessica; Iori, Renato; Broccoli, Massimiliano; Pozzetti, Laura; Canistro, Donatella; Sapone, Andrea; Bonamassa, Barbara; Biagi, Gian Luigi; Paolini, Moreno

    2007-07-11

    Brassica vegetables are an important dietary source of glucosinolates (GLs), whose breakdown products exhibit anticancer activity. The protective properties of Brassicaceae are believed to be due to the inhibition of Phase-I or induction of Phase-II xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), thus enhancing carcinogen clearance. To study whether GLs affect XMEs and the role of their chemical structure, we focused on two alkylthio GLs differing in the oxidation degree of the side chain sulfur. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were supplemented (per oral somministration by gavage) with either glucoraphasatin (4-methylthio-3-butenyl GL; GRH) or glucoraphenin (4-methylsulfinyl-3-butenyl GL; GRE), at 24 or 120 mg/kg body weight in a single or repeated fashion (daily for four consecutive days), and hepatic microsomes were prepared for XME analyses. Both GLs were able to induce XMEs, showing different induction profiles. While the inductive effect was stronger after multiple administration of the higher GRH dosage, the single lower GRE dose was the most effective in boosting cytochrome P-450 (CYP)-associated monooxygenases and the postoxidative metabolism. CYP3A1/2 were the most affected isoforms by GRH treatment, whereas GRE induced mainly CYP1A2 supported oxidase. Glutathione S-transferase increased up to approximately 3.2-fold after a single (lower) GRE dose and UDP-glucuronosyl transferase up to approximately 2-fold after four consecutive (higher) GRH doses. In conclusion, the induction profile of these GLs we found is not in line with the chemopreventive hypothesis. Furthermore, the oxidation degree of the side chain sulfur of GLs seems to exert a crucial role on XME modulation.

  16. Metabolically active extracellular vesicles released from hepatocytes under drug-induced liver-damaging conditions modify serum metabolome and might affect different pathophysiological processes.

    PubMed

    Royo, Felix; Palomo, Laura; Mleczko, Justyna; Gonzalez, Esperanza; Alonso, Cristina; Martínez, Ibon; Pérez-Cormenzana, Miriam; Castro, Azucena; Falcon-Perez, Juan M

    2017-02-15

    Hepatocytes are involved in the endogenous and drug metabolism; many of the enzymes involved in those processes are incorporated into extracellular vesicles and secreted into the bloodstream. Liver-damaging conditions modify the molecular cargo of those vesicles significantly. However, no information about the effect of these hepatic vesicles on the extracellular environment is available. Drug-induced liver damage increases the number of circulating extracellular vesicles and affects the release and content of hepatocyte-derived vesicles. In this work, we evaluated the metabolic effect of these vesicles on the composition of the serum. We performed a targeted ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS) metabolomics analysis of serum samples. The samples had been first incubated with hepatic extracellular vesicles from hepatocytes challenged with acetaminophen or diclofenac. The incubation affected the serum levels of 67 metabolites, such as amino acids and different species of lipids. The metabolites included various species of phosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylethanolamines. These compounds are the components of biological membranes; our observations suggest that the vesicles might take part in remodelling and maintenance of the membranes. Alterations in the levels of some other serum metabolites might have deleterious consequences, for example, the tetracosanoic acid with its cardiovascular effects. However, some of the metabolites whose levels were increased, including alpha-linoleic and tauroursodeoxycholic acids, have been reported to have a protective effect. Our targeted metabolomics analysis indicated that the hepatic extracellular vesicles act as nano-metabolic machines supplying the extracellular environment with the means to integrate diverse tissue responses. In conclusion, we show that the hepatic extracellular vesicles are metabolically active and might play a role in the physiopathological response to hepatic insults

  17. Hydrogen sulfide differentially affects the hepatic vasculature in response to phenylephrine and endothelin 1 during endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Norris, Eric J; Larion, Sebastian; Culberson, Catherine R; Clemens, Mark G

    2013-02-01

    Despite being protective in many disease states, hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) contributes to organ injury in sepsis. Like the other gasotransmitters, nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, H(2)S is a modulator of the microcirculation. Because microcirculatory dysfunction is a main cause of organ injury during sepsis, the present study was designed to test the effect of H(2)S on microvascular dysfunction in isolated perfused livers. In most microcirculatory beds, endotoxin activates the endothelium, resulting in hyporesponsiveness to catecholamines and a derangement in blood flow distribution. We demonstrate that H(2)S treatment attenuates the increase in portal pressure during infusion of the α1 adrenergic agonist, phenylephrine (PE) (P < 0.01). Hydrogen sulfide almost completely negated the increase in portal pressure in livers isolated from endotoxemic rats. Treatment with an inhibitor of endogenous H(2)S, DL-propargylglycine (PAG), reversed lipopolysaccharide-induced hyporesponsiveness to PE. Because hepatic microcirculatory dysfunction is associated with excessive sinusoidal vasoconstriction and not dilation, we investigated whether H(2)S affects endothelin 1 (ET-1)-induced vasoconstriction in isolated livers. Contrary to PE treatment, H(2)S did not affect the increase in portal pressure during infusion of ET-1, nor did it attenuate the hypersensitization of the liver to ET-1 during endotoxemia. Hepatic resistance in control rats was increased by PAG treatment during ET-1 infusion, but this increase was not exacerbated during endotoxemia. We monitored hepatic O(2) consumption to assess the effect of vascular changes on oxygen consumption following ET-1 treatment. Low-dose ET-1 infusion caused an increase in hepatic O(2)consumption, whereas low-dose ET-1 infusion decreased O(2) consumption in endotoxemic livers. Interestingly, whereas we observed no effect of PAG on the vascular response to ET-1 infusion during endotoxemia, PAG treatment did maintain O(2), suggesting a

  18. From whole body to cellular models of hepatic triglyceride metabolism: man has got to know his limitations

    PubMed Central

    Green, Charlotte J.; Pramfalk, Camilla; Morten, Karl J.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a main metabolic organ in the human body and carries out a vital role in lipid metabolism. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common liver diseases, encompassing a spectrum of conditions from simple fatty liver (hepatic steatosis) through to cirrhosis. Although obesity is a known risk factor for hepatic steatosis, it remains unclear what factor(s) is/are responsible for the primary event leading to retention of intrahepatocellular fat. Studying hepatic processes and the etiology and progression of disease in vivo in humans is challenging, not least as NAFLD may take years to develop. We present here a review of experimental models and approaches that have been used to assess liver triglyceride metabolism and discuss their usefulness in helping to understand the aetiology and development of NAFLD. PMID:25352434

  19. Targeting host lipid synthesis and metabolism to inhibit dengue and hepatitis C viruses.

    PubMed

    Villareal, Valerie A; Rodgers, Mary A; Costello, Deirdre A; Yang, Priscilla L

    2015-12-01

    Lipids are necessary for every step in the replication cycle of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and dengue virus (DENV), members of the family Flaviviridae. Recent studies have demonstrated that discrete steps in the replication cycles of these viruses can be inhibited by pharmacological agents that target host factors mediating lipid synthesis, metabolism, trafficking, and signal transduction. Despite this, targeting host lipid metabolism and trafficking as an antiviral strategy by blockade of entire pathways may be limited due to host toxicity. Knowledge of the molecular details of lipid structure and function in replication and the mechanisms whereby specific lipids are generated and trafficked to the relevant sites may enable more targeted antiviral strategies without global effects on the host cell. In this review, we discuss lipids demonstrated to be critical to the replication cycles of HCV and DENV and highlight potential areas for anti-viral development. This review article forms part of a symposium on flavivirus drug discovery in Antiviral Research.

  20. Hepatic Glucocorticoid Receptor Plays a Greater Role Than Adipose GR in Metabolic Syndrome Despite Renal Compensation.

    PubMed

    Bose, Sandip K; Hutson, Irina; Harris, Charles A

    2016-12-01

    Exogenous glucocorticoid administration results in hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, hepatic dyslipidemia, and hypertension, a constellation of findings known as Cushing's syndrome. These effects are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Because GR activation in liver and adipose has been implicated in metabolic syndrome (MS), we wanted to determine the role of GR in these tissues in the development of MS. Because GR knockout (KO) mice (whole-body KO) exhibit perinatal lethality due to respiratory failure, we generated tissue-specific (liver or adipose) GRKO mice using cre-lox technology. Real-time PCR analysis of liver mRNA from dexamethasone-treated wildtype (WT) and liver GRKO mice indicated that hepatic GR regulates the expression of key genes involved in gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism. Interestingly, we have observed that liver-specific deletion of GR resulted in a significant increase in mRNA expression of key genes involved in gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism in kidney tissue, indicating a compensatory mechanism to maintain glucose homeostasis. We have also observed that GR plays an important role in regulating the mRNA expression of key genes involved in lipid metabolism. Liver GRKO mice demonstrated decreased fat mass and liver glycogen content compared with WT mice administered dexamethasone for 2 weeks. Adipose-specific deletion of GR did not alter glucose tolerance or insulin sensitivity of adipose GRKO mice compared with WT mice administrated dexamethasone. This indicates that liver GR might be more important in development of MS in dexamethasone-treated mice, whereas adipose GR plays a little role in these paradigms.

  1. Prediction of human drug clearance by multiple metabolic pathways: integration of hepatic and intestinal microsomal and cytosolic data.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Helen E; Houston, J Brian; Galetin, Aleksandra

    2011-05-01

    The current study assesses hepatic and intestinal glucuronidation, sulfation, and cytochrome P450 (P450) metabolism of raloxifene, quercetin, salbutamol, and troglitazone using different in vitro systems. The fraction metabolized by conjugation and P450 metabolism was estimated in liver and intestine, and the importance of multiple metabolic pathways on accuracy of clearance prediction was assessed. In vitro intrinsic sulfation clearance (CL(int, SULT)) was determined in human intestinal and hepatic cytosol and compared with hepatic and intestinal microsomal glucuronidation (CL(int, UGT)) and P450 clearance (CL(int, CYP)) expressed per gram of tissue. Hepatic and intestinal cytosolic scaling factors of 80.7 mg/g liver and 18 mg/g intestine were estimated from published data. Scaled CL(int, SULT) ranged between 0.7 and 11.4 ml · min(-1) · g(-1) liver and 0.1 and 3.3 ml · min(-1) · g(-1) intestine (salbutamol and quercetin were the extremes). Salbutamol was the only compound with a high extent of sulfation (51 and 28% of total CL(int) for liver and intestine, respectively) and also significant renal clearance (26-57% of observed plasma clearance). In contrast, the clearance of quercetin was largely accounted for by glucuronidation. Drugs metabolized by multiple pathways (raloxifene and troglitazone) demonstrated improved prediction of intravenous clearance using data from all hepatic pathways (44-86% of observed clearance) compared with predictions based only on the primary pathway (22-36%). The assumption of no intestinal first pass resulted in underprediction of oral clearance for raloxifene, troglitazone, and quercetin (3-22% of observed, respectively). Accounting for the intestinal contribution to oral clearance via estimated intestinal availability improved prediction accuracy for raloxifene and troglitazone (within 2.5-fold of observed). Current findings emphasize the importance of both hepatic and intestinal conjugation for in vitro-in vivo extrapolation

  2. Effects of naturally occurring coumarins on hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes inmice

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiner, Heather E. Xia, Xiaojun; Sonoda, Junichiro; Zhang, Jun; Pontius, Elizabeth; Abey, Jane; Evans, Ronald M.; Moore, David D.; DiGiovanni, John

    2008-10-15

    Cytochromes P450 (P450s) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute two important enzyme families involved in carcinogen metabolism. Generally, P450s play activation or detoxifying roles while GSTs act primarily as detoxifying enzymes. We previously demonstrated that oral administration of the linear furanocoumarins, isopimpinellin and imperatorin, modulated P450 and GST activities in various tissues of mice. The purpose of the present study was to compare a broader range of naturally occurring coumarins (simple coumarins, and furanocoumarins of the linear and angular type) for their abilities to modulate hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes when administered orally to mice. We now report that all of the different coumarins tested (coumarin, limettin, auraptene, angelicin, bergamottin, imperatorin and isopimpinellin) induced hepatic GST activities, whereas the linear furanocoumarins possessed the greatest abilities to induce hepatic P450 activities, in particular P450 2B and 3A. In both cases, this corresponded to an increase in protein expression of the enzymes. Induction of P4502B10, 3A11, and 2C9 by xenobiotics often is a result of activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and/or constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Using a pregnane X receptor reporter system, our results demonstrated that isopimpinellin activated both PXR and its human ortholog SXR by recruiting coactivator SRC-1 in transfected cells. In CAR transfection assays, isopimpinellin counteracted the inhibitory effect of androstanol on full-length mCAR, a Gal4-mCAR ligand-binding domain fusion, and restored coactivator binding. Orally administered isopimpinellin induced hepatic mRNA expression of Cyp2b10, Cyp3a11, and GSTa in CAR(+/+) wild-type mice. In contrast, the induction of Cyp2b10 mRNA by isopimpinellin was attenuated in the CAR(-/-) mice, suggesting that isopimpinellin induces Cyp2b10 via the CAR receptor. Overall, the current data indicate that naturally occurring coumarins have

  3. Palmitic acid induces central leptin resistance and impairs hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism in male mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Licai; Yu, Yinghua; Szabo, Alexander; Wu, Yizhen; Wang, Hongqin; Camer, Danielle; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2015-05-01

    The consumption of diets rich in saturated fat largely contributes to the development of obesity in modern societies. A diet high in saturated fats can induce inflammation and impair leptin signaling in the hypothalamus. However, the role of saturated fatty acids on hypothalamic leptin signaling, and hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism remains largely undiscovered. In this study, we investigated the effects of intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of a saturated fatty acid, palmitic acid (PA, C16:0), on central leptin sensitivity, hypothalamic leptin signaling, inflammatory molecules and hepatic energy metabolism in C57BL/6J male mice. We found that the icv administration of PA led to central leptin resistance, evidenced by the inhibition of central leptin's suppression of food intake. Central leptin resistance was concomitant with impaired hypothalamic leptin signaling (JAK2-STAT3, PKB/Akt-FOXO1) and a pro-inflammatory response (TNF-α, IL1-β, IL-6 and pIκBa) in the mediobasal hypothalamus and paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei. Furthermore, the pre-administration of icv PA blunted the effect of leptin-induced decreases in mRNA expression related to gluconeogenesis (G6Pase and PEPCK), glucose transportation (GLUT2) and lipogenesis (FAS and SCD1) in the liver of mice. Therefore, elevated central PA concentrations can induce pro-inflammatory responses and leptin resistance, which are associated with disorders of energy homeostasis in the liver as a result of diet-induced obesity.

  4. Anti-insulin effects of amylin and calcitonin-gene-related peptide on hepatic glycogen metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Foix, A M; Rodriguez-Gil, J E; Guinovart, J J

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of amylin and calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP) as anti-insulin agents in hepatic tissue, we have studied whether these two agents counteracted the action of insulin on glycogen metabolism in isolated rat hepatocytes. In this system insulin stimulates [14C]glucose incorporation into glycogen and activates glycogen synthase. Incubation of the cells with insulin in the presence of amylin or CGRP markedly blocked the insulin stimulation of these two parameters, whereas amylin or CGRP acting alone did not induce any effect. We also examined the ability of amylin and CGRP to modify the anti-glucagon effects of insulin. In the presence of 100 nM-amylin or -CGRP, 10 nM-insulin was almost unable to counteract the inactivation of glycogen synthase and the activation of phosphorylase induced by glucagon. In contrast, neither amylin nor CGRP modified the effect of glucagon on these two enzymes. Our results indicate that amylin and CGRP are able to impair the action of insulin on hepatic glycogen metabolism. PMID:1905922

  5. Modulation of hepatic lipid metabolism by olive oil and its phenols in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Priore, Paola; Cavallo, Alessandro; Gnoni, Antonio; Damiano, Fabrizio; Gnoni, Gabriele V; Siculella, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents the most common chronic liver disease in western countries, being considered the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. Cumulative lines of evidence suggest that olive oil, used as primary source of fat by Mediterranean populations, may play a key role in the observed health benefits on NAFLD. In this review, we summarize the state of the art of the knowledge on the protective role of both major and minor components of olive oil on lipid metabolism during NAFLD. In particular, the biochemical mechanisms responsible for the increase or decrease in hepatic lipid content are critically analyzed, taking into account that several studies have often provided different and/or conflicting results in animal models fed on olive oil-enriched diet. In addition, new findings that highlight the hypolipidemic and the antisteatotic actions of olive oil phenols are presented. As mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD, the targeting of these organelles with olive oil phenols as a powerful therapeutic approach is also discussed.

  6. Associated Factors for Metabolic Syndrome in the Older Adults with Chronic Virus Hepatitis in the Community

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yuan-Hung; Tsai, Ming-Chao; Kee, Kwong-Ming; Chang, Kuo-Chin; Wang, Jing-Houng; Lin, Chun-Yin; Lin, Sheng-Che; Lu, Sheng-Nan

    2016-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and chronic virus hepatitis elders in the community. Those subjects with positive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and/or anti-hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) screened in the community before were invited to this study and 451 responded. All participants underwent anthropometric measurements, blood tests, ultrasound and fibroscan examinations. The cut-off of liver stiffness measurement-liver cirrhosis (LSM-LC) was 10 kPa for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients and 12 kPa for chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients, respectively. Among 451 responders, 56 were excluded due to negative HBsAg or anti-HCV. Three hundreds and ninety-five subjects included 228 CHB patients, 156 CHC patients and 11 dual hepatitis patients, had a mean age of 62±12.6 years. Fifty-four (23.7%) CHB patients coexisted with MetS whereas 40 (25.6%) CHC patients also had MetS. Those patients with MetS had more LSM-LC cases than those without (20.4% vs 9.8%, p = 0.04 in CHB patients; 28.2% vs 13.5%, p = 0.037 in CHC patients, respectively). In multivariate logistic analysis, detectable viremia was reversely associated with MetS in CHB patients after adjustment for age, gender and body mass index (odds ratio (OR): 0.42; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.18–0.99; p = 0.047). Regarding CHC patients, higher LSM level was the only factor contributed to MetS (OR: 1.1; 95% CI: 1.02–1.19; p = 0.012). In conclusion, elder CHB patients coexisted with MetS might experience an inactive virus replication but have an advanced liver fibrosis. In elder CHC patients, only higher LSM level was associated with MetS. PMID:27177024

  7. Oral Exposure of Mice to Carbendazim Induces Hepatic Lipid Metabolism Disorder and Gut Microbiota Dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yuanxiang; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Songbin; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-09-01

    Carbendazim (CBZ) has been considered as an endocrine disruptor that caused mammalian toxicity in different endpoints. Here, we revealed that oral administrations with CBZ at 100 and 500 mg/kg body weight for 28 days induced hepatic lipid metabolism disorder which was characterized by significant increases of hepatic lipid accumulation and triglyceride (TG) levels in mice. The serum cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein levels also increased after CBZ exposure. Correspondingly, the relative mRNA levels of some key genes related to lipogenesis and TG synthesis increased significantly both in the liver and fat. Moreover, the increase in serum IL-1β and IL-6 levels by the treatment of CBZ indicated the occurring of inflammation. Furthermore, the levels of bioaccumulation of CBZ in the liver and gut were very low as compared in the feces, indicating that most of CBZ stayed in gastrointestinal tract and interacted with gut microbiota until excreted. At phylum level, the amounts of the Bacteroidetes decreased significantly in the feces after 5 days CBZ exposure. High throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene V3-V4 region revealed a significant reduction in richness and diversity of gut microbiota in the cecum of CBZ-treated mice. UniFrac principal coordinates analysis observed a marked shift of the gut microbiota structure in CBZ-treated mice away from that of the controls. More deeply, operational taxonomic units' analysis identified that a total of 361 gut microbes were significant changed. In CBZ-treated groups, the relative abundance of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria increased and that of Bacteroidetes decreased. Our findings suggested that CBZ could lead hepatic lipid metabolism disorder and gut microbiota dysbiosis in mice.

  8. Fetal hepatic propranolol metabolism. Studies in the isolated perfused fetal sheep liver.

    PubMed

    Ring, J A; Ghabrial, H; Ching, M S; Shulkes, A; Smallwood, R A; Morgan, D J

    1995-02-01

    We have used an isolated perfused fetal sheep liver preparation to study the fetal hepatic metabolism of propranolol in vitro in the intact organ. Eight livers were perfused in situ via the umbilical vein in an oxygenated recirculating system at 300 ml/min. Radiolabeled 15-microns microspheres were used to quantify the hepatic ductus venosus shunt. Propranolol (4 mg) was dosed into the reservoir as a single bolus and perfusate and bile sampled over 150 min. Propranolol, 4-hydroxy propranolol (4OHP), 5-hydroxy propranolol (5OHP), desisopropylpropranolol (DIP), naphthoxylactic acid (NLA), and alpha-naphthoxyacetic acid (NAA) were assayed by HPLC, before and after deconjugation by enzyme hydrolysis. Mean age was 125 +/- 10 days, and mean liver weight was 66.1 +/- 18.8 g. Oxygen consumption (1.10 +/- 1.03 mumol/g/min), bile flow (0.51 +/- 0.18 microliters/g/min), and perfusion pressure (8.7 +/- 3.3 mm Hg) were stable. Ductus venosus shunt was 41.6 +/- 17.4% of umbilical vein flow. Propranolol clearance was 26.2 +/- 13.4 ml/min, and shunt-corrected extraction of propranolol was 0.26 +/- 0.13. The relative amounts of metabolites in perfusate after 150 min were: 4OHP (25.1%), 5OHP (5.08%) (ring-oxidation products), DIP (6.57%), and NLA (4.33%) (side-chain oxidation products). No alpha NAA (a product of N-dealkylation of NLA) was detected. Except for NLA, metabolites were present predominantly as conjugates. Biliary excretion of unchanged drug and metabolites accounted for a further 1.33% of the propranolol dose. These data indicate that, although the hepatic clearance and extraction of propranolol are low, the fetal sheep liver can metabolize propranolol by both ring- and side-chain oxidation reactions and can conjugate these metabolites.

  9. Acute Liver Injury Induces Nucleocytoplasmic Redistribution of Hepatic Methionine Metabolism Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Miguel; Garrido, Francisco; Pérez-Miguelsanz, Juliana; Pacheco, María; Partearroyo, Teresa; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The discovery of methionine metabolism enzymes in the cell nucleus, together with their association with key nuclear processes, suggested a putative relationship between alterations in their subcellular distribution and disease. Results: Using the rat model of d-galactosamine intoxication, severe changes in hepatic steady-state mRNA levels were found; the largest decreases corresponded to enzymes exhibiting the highest expression in normal tissue. Cytoplasmic protein levels, activities, and metabolite concentrations suffered more moderate changes following a similar trend. Interestingly, galactosamine treatment induced hepatic nuclear accumulation of methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) α1 and S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase tetramers, their active assemblies. In fact, galactosamine-treated livers showed enhanced nuclear MAT activity. Acetaminophen (APAP) intoxication mimicked most galactosamine effects on hepatic MATα1, including accumulation of nuclear tetramers. H35 cells that overexpress tagged-MATα1 reproduced the subcellular distribution observed in liver, and the changes induced by galactosamine and APAP that were also observed upon glutathione depletion by buthionine sulfoximine. The H35 nuclear accumulation of tagged-MATα1 induced by these agents correlated with decreased glutathione reduced form/glutathione oxidized form ratios and was prevented by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and glutathione ethyl ester. However, the changes in epigenetic modifications associated with tagged-MATα1 nuclear accumulation were only prevented by NAC in galactosamine-treated cells. Innovation: Cytoplasmic and nuclear changes in proteins that regulate the methylation index follow opposite trends in acute liver injury, their nuclear accumulation showing potential as disease marker. Conclusion: Altogether these results demonstrate galactosamine- and APAP-induced nuclear accumulation of methionine metabolism enzymes as active oligomers and unveil the implication of

  10. Characterization of the sea bass melanocortin 5 receptor: a putative role in hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, E; Rubio, V C; Cerdá-Reverter, J M

    2009-12-01

    The melanocortin 5 receptor (MC5R) plays a key role in the regulation of exocrine secretion in mammalian species. This receptor has also been characterized in some fish species but its function is unknown. We report the molecular and pharmacological characterization, as well as the tissue expression pattern, of sea bass MC5R. Cloning of five active alleles showing different levels of sensitivity to endogenous melanocortin and one non-functional allele demonstrate the allelic complexity of the MC5R locus. The sea bass receptor was activated by all the melanocortins tested, with ACTH and desacetyl-MSH and beta-MSH showing the lowest efficiency. The acetylation of the MSH isoforms seems to be critical for the effectiveness of the agonist. Agouti-related protein had no effect on basal or agonist-stimulated activation of the receptor. SbMC5R was mainly expressed in the brain but lower expression levels were found in several peripheral tissues, including liver. Progressive fasting did not induce up- or downregulation of hypothalamic MC5R expression, suggesting that central MC5R is not involved in the regulation of food intake in the sea bass. MTII, a sbMC5R agonist, stimulated hepatic lipolysis in vitro, measured as free fatty acid release into the culture medium after melanocortin agonist exposure of liver fragments, suggesting that MC5R is involved in the regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism. Taken together, the data suggest that different allelic combinations may confer differential sensitivity to endogenous melanocortin in tissues where MC5R is expressed and, by extension, in hepatic lipid metabolism.

  11. Lipid Droplet Accumulation and Impaired Fat Efflux in Polarized Hepatic Cells: Consequences of Ethanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    McVicker, Benita L.; Rasineni, Karuna; Tuma, Dean J.; McNiven, Mark A.; Casey, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Steatosis, an early manifestation in alcoholic liver disease, is associated with the accumulation of hepatocellular lipid droplets (LDs). However, the role ethanol metabolism has in LD formation and turnover remains undefined. Here, we assessed LD dynamics following ethanol and oleic acid treatment to ethanol-metabolizing WIF-B cells (a hybrid of human fibroblasts (WI 38) and Fao rat hepatoma cells). An OA dose-dependent increase in triglyceride and stained lipids was identified which doubled (P < 0.05) in the presence of ethanol. This effect was blunted with the inclusion of an alcohol metabolism inhibitor. The ethanol/ OA combination also induced adipophilin, LD coat protein involved in the attenuation of lipolysis. Additionally, ethanol treatment resulted in a significant reduction in lipid efflux. These data demonstrate that the metabolism of ethanol in hepatic cells is related to LD accumulation, impaired fat efflux, and enhancements in LD-associated proteins. These alterations in LD dynamics may contribute to ethanol-mediated defects in hepatocellular LD regulation and the formation of steatosis. PMID:22506128

  12. Intensity-dependent and sex-specific alterations in hepatic triglyceride metabolism in mice following acute exercise.

    PubMed

    Tuazon, Marc A; McConnell, Taylor R; Wilson, Gabriel J; Anthony, Tracy G; Henderson, Gregory C

    2015-01-01

    Precise regulation of hepatic triglyceride (TG) metabolism and secretion is critical for health, and exercise could play a significant role. We compared one session of high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) vs. continuous exercise (CE) on hepatic TG metabolism. Female and male mice were assigned to CE, HIIE, or sedentary control (CON). HIIE was a 30-min session of 30-s running intervals (30 m/min) interspersed with 60-s walking periods (5 m/min). CE was a distance- and duration-matched run at 13.8 m/min. Hepatic content of TG and TG secretion rates, as well as expression of relevant genes/proteins, were measured at 3 h (day 1) and 28 h (day 2) postexercise. On day 1, hepatic [TG] in CE and HIIE were both elevated vs. CON in both sexes with an approximately twofold greater elevation in HIIE vs. CE in females. In both sexes, hepatic perilipin 2 (PLIN2) protein on day 1 was increased significantly by both exercise types with a significantly greater increase with HIIE than CE, whereas the increase in mRNA reached significance only after HIIE. On day 2 in both sexes the increases in hepatic TG and PLIN2 with exercise declined toward CON levels. Only HIIE on day 2 resulted in reduced hepatic TG secretion by ∼20% in females with no effect in males. Neither exercise modality altered AMPK signaling or microsomal triglyceride transfer protein expression. Females exhibited higher hepatic TG secretion than males in association with different expression levels of related metabolic enzymes. These intensity-dependent and sex-specific alterations following exercise may have implications for sex-based exercise prescription.

  13. Quercetin regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism by promoting cholesterol-to-bile acid conversion and cholesterol efflux in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Xie, Zongkai; Gao, Weina; Pu, Lingling; Wei, Jingyu; Guo, Changjiang

    2016-03-01

    Quercetin, a common member of the flavonoid family, is widely present in plant kingdom. Despite that quercetin is implicated in regulating cholesterol metabolism, the molecular mechanism is poorly understood. We hypothesized that quercetin regulates cholesterol homeostasis through regulating the key enzymes involved in hepatic cholesterol metabolism. To test this hypothesis, we compared the profile of key enzymes and transcription factors involved in the hepatic cholesterol metabolism in rats with or without quercetin supplementation. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control and quercetin-supplemented groups. Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and total bile acids in feces and bile were measured. Hepatic enzymatic activities were determined by activity assay kit and high-performance liquid chromatography-based analyses. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expressions were determined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses, respectively. The results showed that the activity of hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, a critical enzyme in the conversion of cholesterol to bile acids, was significantly elevated by quercetin. The expression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, as well as liver X receptor α, an important transcription factor, was also increased at both mRNA and protein levels by quercetin. However, quercetin exposure had no impact on the activity of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase, a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of cholesterol. We also found that quercetin treatment significantly increased ATP binding cassette transporter G1 mRNA and protein expression in the liver, suggesting that quercetin may increase hepatic cholesterol efflux. Collectively, the results presented here indicate that quercetin regulates hepatic cholesterol metabolism mainly through the pathways that promote cholesterol-to-bile acid conversion and

  14. Metabolic syndrome in chronic hepatitis C infection: does it still matter in the era of directly acting antiviral therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Lim, TR

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is prevalent in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Given the pandemic spread of HCV infection and metabolic syndrome, the burden of their interaction is a major public health issue. The presence of metabolic syndrome accelerates the progression of liver disease in patients with HCV infection. New drug development in HCV has seen an unprecedented rise in the last year, which resulted in better efficacy, better tolerance, and a shorter treatment duration. This review describes the underlying mechanisms and clinical effects of metabolic syndrome in HCV infection, as well as their importance in the era of new directly acting antiviral therapy. PMID:25506251

  15. Is hepatic lipid metabolism of beef cattle influenced by breed and dietary silage level?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In ruminants, unsaturated dietary fatty acids are biohydrogenated in the rumen and are further metabolised in various tissues, including liver, which has an important role in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. Therefore, manipulation of muscle fatty acid composition should take into account liver metabolism. In the present study, the influence of breed and diet on liver lipid composition and gene expression was investigated in order to clarify the role of this organ in the lipid metabolism of ruminants. Forty purebred young bulls from two phylogenetically distant autochthonous cattle breeds, Alentejana and Barrosã, were assigned to two different diets (low vs. high silage) and slaughtered at 18 months of age. Liver fatty acid composition, mRNA levels of enzymes and transcription factors involved in lipid metabolism, as well as the plasma lipid profile, were assessed. Results In spite of similar plasma non-esterified fatty acids levels, liver triacylglycerols content was higher in Barrosã than in Alentejana bulls. Moreover, the fatty acid composition of liver was clearly distinct from the remaining tissues involved in fatty acid metabolism of ruminants, as shown by Principal Components Analysis. The hepatic tissue is particularly rich in α-linolenic acid and their products of desaturation and elongation. Results indicate that DGAT1, ELOVL2, FADS1 and FADS2 genes influence the fatty acid composition of the liver the most. Moreover, genes such as DGAT1 and ELOVL2 appear to be more sensitive to genetic background than to dietary manipulation, whereas genes encoding for desaturases, such as FADS1, appear to be modulated by dietary silage level. Conclusions Our results indicate that liver plays an important role in the biosynthesis of n-3 LC-PUFA. It is also suggested that dietary silage level influences the hepatic fatty acid metabolism in a breed-dependent manner, through changes in the expression of genes encoding for enzymes associated with the

  16. Does iodine biofortification affect oxidative metabolism in lettuce plants?

    PubMed

    Blasco, Begoña; Ríos, Juan Jose; Leyva, Rocío; Cervilla, Luis Miguel; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Eva; Rubio-Wilhelmi, María Mar; Rosales, Miguel Angel; Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Romero, Luis

    2011-09-01

    Plants produce low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which form part of basic cell chemical communication; however, different types of stress can lead to an overexpression of ROS that can damage macromolecules essential for plant growth and development. Iodine is vital to human health, and iodine biofortification programs help improve the human intake through plant consumption. This biofortification process has been shown to influence the antioxidant capacity of lettuce plants, suggesting that the oxidative metabolism of the plant may be affected. The results of this study demonstrate that the response to oxidative stress is variable and depends on the form of iodine applied. Application of iodide (I(-)) to lettuce plants produces a reduction in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and an increase in catalase (CAT) and L-galactono dehydrogenase enzyme activities and in the activity of antioxidant compounds such as ascorbate (AA) and glutathione. This did not prove a very effective approach since a dose of 80 μM produced a reduction in the biomass of the plants. For its part, application of iodate (IO (3) (-) ) produced an increase in the activities of SOD, ascorbate peroxidase, and CAT, the main enzymes involved in ROS detoxification; it also increased the concentration of AA and the regenerative activities of the Halliwell-Asada cycle. These data confirm the non-phytotoxicity of IO (3) (-) since there is no lipid peroxidation or biomass reduction. According to our results, the ability of IO (3) (-) to induce the antioxidant system indicates that application of this form of iodine may be an effective strategy to improve the response of plants to different types of stress.

  17. Endotoxin administration to humans inhibits hepatic cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Shedlofsky, S I; Israel, B C; McClain, C J; Hill, D B; Blouin, R A

    1994-01-01

    In experimental animals, injection of gram-negative endotoxin (LPS) decreases hepatic cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism. To evaluate this phenomenon in a human model of gram-negative sepsis, LPS was administered on two consecutive days to healthy male volunteers during which time a cocktail of antipyrine (AP-250 mg), hexobarbital (HB-500 mg), and theophylline (TH-150 mg) was ingested and the apparent oral clearance of each drug determined. Each subject had a control drug clearance study with saline injections. In the first experiment, six subjects received the drug cocktail 0.5 h after the first dose of LPS. In the second experiment, another six subjects received the drug cocktail 0.5 h after the second dose of LPS. In both experiments, LPS caused the expected physiologic responses of inflammation including fever with increases in serum concentrations of TNF alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6, and acute phase reactants. In the first experiment, only minor decreases in clearances of the probe drugs were observed (7-12%). However in the second experiment, marked decreases in the clearances of AP (35, 95% CI 18-48%), HB (27, 95% CI 14-34%), and TH (22, 95% CI 12-32%) were seen. The decreases in AP clearance correlated with initial peak values of TNF alpha (r = 0.82) and IL-6 (r = 0.86). These data show that in humans the inflammatory response to even a very low dose of LPS significantly decreases hepatic cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism and this effect evolves over a 24-h period. It is likely that septic patients with much higher exposures to LPS have more profound inhibition of drug metabolism. PMID:7989576

  18. The fatty liver dystrophy (fld) mutation: Developmentally related alterations in hepatic triglyceride metabolism and protein expression

    SciTech Connect

    Reue, K.; Rehnmark, S.; Cohen, R.D.; Leete, T.H.; Doolittle, M.H. |; Giometti, C.S.; Mishler, K.; Slavin, B.G.

    1997-07-01

    Fatty liver dystrophy (fld) is an autosomal recessive mutation in mice characterized by hypertriglyceridemia and development of a fatty liver in the early neonatal period. Also associated with the fld phenotype is a tissue-specific deficiency in the expression of lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase, as well as elevations in hepatic apolipoprotein A-IV and apolipoprotein C-II mRNA levels. Although these lipid abnormalities resolve at the age of weaning, adult mutant mice exhibit a peripheral neuropathy associated with abnormal myelin formation. The fatty liver in fld/fld neonates is characterized by the accumulation of large triglyceride droplets within the parenchymal cells, and these droplets persist within isolated hepatocytes maintained in culture for several days. To identify the metabolic defect that leads to lipid accumulation, the authors investigated several aspects of cellular triglyceride metabolism. The mutant mice exhibited normal activity of acid triacylglycerol lipase, an enzyme thought to be responsible for hydrolysis of dietary triglycerides in the liver. Metabolic labeling studies performed with oleic acid revealed that free fatty acids accumulate in the liver of 3 day old fld/fld mice, but not in adults. This accumulation in liver was mirrored by elevated free fatty acid levels in plasma of fld/fld neonates, with levels highest in very young mice and returning to normal by the age of one month. Quantitation of fatty acid oxidation in cells isolated from fld/fld neonates revealed that oxidation rate is reduced 60% in hepatocytes and 40% in fibroblasts; hepatocytes from adult fld/fld mice exhibited an oxidation rate similar to those from wild-type mice.

  19. Effect of stress on hepatic 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity and its influence on carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Altuna, María Eugenia; Lelli, Sandra Marcela; San Martín de Viale, Leonor C; Damasco, María Cristina

    2006-10-01

    Stress activates the synthesis and secretion of catecholamines and adrenal glucocorticoids, increasing their circulating levels. In vivo, hepatic 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (HSD1) stimulates the shift of 11-dehydrocorticosterone to corticosterone, enhancing active glucocorticoids at tissue level. We studied the effect of 3 types of stress, 1 induced by bucogastric overload with 200 mmol/L HCl causing metabolic acidosis (HCl), the second induced by bucogastric overload with 0.45% NaCl (NaCl), and the third induced by simulated overload (cannula), on the kinetics of hepatic HSD1 of rats and their influence on the activity of the gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, glycemia, and glycogen deposition. Compared with unstressed controls, all types of stress significantly increased HSD1 activity (146% cannula, 130% NaCl, and 253% HCl), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity (51% cannula, 48% NaCl, and 86% HCl), and glycemia (29% cannula, 30% NaCl, and 41% HCl), but decreased hepatic glycogen (68% cannula, 68% NaCl, and 78% HCl). Owing to these results, we suggest the following events occur when stress is induced: an increase in hepatic HSD1 activity, augmented active glucocorticoid levels, increased gluconeogenesis, and glycemia. Also involved are the multiple events indirectly related to glucocorticoids, which lead to the depletion of hepatic glycogen deposits, thereby contributing to increased glycemia. This new approach shows that stress increments the activity of hepatic HSD1 and suggests that this enzyme could be involved in the development of the Metabolic Syndrome.

  20. Acute-phase protein concentration and metabolic status affect the outcome of treatment in cows with clinical and subclinical endometritis.

    PubMed

    Heidarpour, M; Mohri, M; Fallah-Rad, A H; Dehghan Shahreza, F; Mohammadi, M

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of acute-phase protein concentration and metabolic status in the establishment and resistance of clinical endometritis (CE) and subclinical endometritis (SE) in dairy cows. We also characterised the treatment-related changes in the concentration of acute-phase proteins and metabolic variables in dairy cows affected by CE and SE. Cows of the SE and CE groups presented a significantly higher β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), haptoglobin and total sialic acid (TSA) concentrations compared with a healthy group of animals. A significantly lower serum calcium concentration, and a significantly higher serum aspartate aminotransferase activity in the CE group, were observed when compared with SE and healthy groups. The comparison of parameters before treatment indicated that cows suffering from CE or SE with lower concentrations of hepatic and inflammatory markers showed a better response to further treatment, and endometritis was not detected in the second examination. Moreover, decreased concentrations of BHB, acute-phase proteins and hepatic markers were observed after successful treatment for endometritis in CE and SE cows. The results obtained in this study suggest that improved liver function and a decrease in the acute-phase protein concentration might favour the resolution of endometritis after treatment.

  1. Antiviral treatment of hepatitis C virus infection and factors affecting efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan; Chen, Song

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the leading cause of chronic liver-related diseases, including cirrhosis, liver failure, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Currently, no effective vaccine is available for HCV infection. Polyethylene glycol interferon-α (PegIFN-α) in combination with ribavirin (RBV) is the standard of care (SOC) for chronic hepatitis C. However, the efficacy of PegIFN-α and RBV combination therapy is less than 50% for genotype 1 HCV, which is the dominant virus in humans. In addition, IFN and RBV have several severe side effects. Therefore, strategies to improve sustained virological response (SVR) rates have been an important focus for clinical physicians. The serine protease inhibitors telaprevir and boceprevir were approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration in 2011. The addition of HCV protease inhibitors to the SOC has significantly improved the efficacy of treatments for HCV infection. Several direct-acting antiviral drugs currently in late-stage clinical trials, both with and without peg-IFN and RBV, have several advantages over the previous SOC, including higher specificity and efficacy, fewer side effects, and the ability to be administered orally, and might be optimal regimens in the future. Factors affecting the efficacy of anti-HCV treatments based on IFN-α include the HCV genotype, baseline viral load, virological response during treatment, host IL28B gene polymorphisms and hepatic steatosis. However, determining the effect of the above factors on DAA therapy is necessary. In this review, we summarize the development of anti-HCV agents and assess the main factors affecting the efficacy of antiviral treatments. PMID:24379621

  2. Quercetin ameliorates cardiovascular, hepatic, and metabolic changes in diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Panchal, Sunil K; Poudyal, Hemant; Brown, Lindsay

    2012-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We investigated the responses to the flavonol, quercetin, in male Wistar rats (8-9 wk old) divided into 4 groups. Two groups were given either a corn starch-rich (C) or high-carbohydrate, high-fat (H) diet for 16 wk; the remaining 2 groups were given either a C or H diet for 8 wk followed by supplementation with 0.8 g/kg quercetin in the food for the following 8 wk (CQ and HQ, respectively). The H diet contained ~68% carbohydrates, mainly as fructose and sucrose, and ~24% fat from beef tallow; the C diet contained ~68% carbohydrates as polysaccharides and ~0.7% fat. Compared with the C rats, the H rats had greater body weight and abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia, higher systolic blood pressure, impaired glucose tolerance, cardiovascular remodeling, and NAFLD. The H rats had lower protein expressions of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-related factor-2 (Nrf2), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) with greater expression of NF-κB in both the heart and the liver and less expression of caspase-3 in the liver than in C rats. HQ rats had higher expression of Nrf2, HO-1, and CPT1 and lower expression of NF-κB than H rats in both the heart and the liver. HQ rats had less abdominal fat and lower systolic blood pressure along with attenuation of changes in structure and function of the heart and the liver compared with H rats, although body weight and dyslipidemia did not differ between the H and HQ rats. Thus, quercetin treatment attenuated most of the symptoms of metabolic syndrome, including abdominal obesity, cardiovascular remodeling, and NAFLD, with the most likely mechanisms being decreases in oxidative stress and inflammation.

  3. Fasting-induced changes in hepatic thyroid hormone metabolism in male rats are independent of autonomic nervous input to the liver.

    PubMed

    de Vries, E M; Eggels, L; van Beeren, H C; Ackermans, M T; Kalsbeek, A; Fliers, E; Boelen, A

    2014-12-01

    During fasting, profound changes in the regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis occur in order to save energy and limit catabolism. In this setting, serum T3 and T4 are decreased without an appropriate TSH and TRH response reflecting central down-regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. Hepatic thyroid hormone (TH) metabolism is also affected by fasting, because type 3 deiodinase (D3) is increased, which is mediated by serum leptin concentrations. A recent study showed that fasting-induced changes in liver TH sulfotransferases (Sults) and uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (Ugts) depend on a functional melanocortin system in the hypothalamus. However, the pathways connecting the hypothalamus and the liver that induce these changes are currently unknown. In the present study, we investigated in rats whether the fasting-induced changes in hepatic TH metabolism are regulated by the autonomic nervous system. We selectively cut either the sympathetic or the parasympathetic input to the liver. Serum and liver TH concentrations, deiodinase expression, and activity and Sult and Ugt expression were measured in rats that had been fasted for 36 hours or were fed ad libitum. Fasting decreased serum T3 and T4 concentrations, whereas intrahepatic TH concentrations remained unchanged. D3 expression and activity increased, as was the expression of constitutive androstane receptor, Sult1b1, and Ugt1a1, whereas liver D1 was unaffected. Neither sympathetic nor parasympathetic denervation affected the fasting-induced alterations. We conclude that fasting-induced changes in liver TH metabolism are not regulated via the hepatic autonomic input in a major way and more likely reflect a direct effect of humoral factors on the hepatocyte.

  4. Chronic Activation of Hepatic Nrf2 Has No Major Effect on Fatty Acid and Glucose Metabolism in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Winkel, Angelika F.; Polack, James; Tang, Hui; Brachs, Maria; Margerie, Daniel; Brunner, Bodo; Jahn-Hofmann, Kerstin; Ruetten, Hartmut; Spranger, Joachim; Schmoll, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) induces cytoprotective genes, but has also been linked to the regulation of hepatic energy metabolism. In order to assess the pharmacological potential of hepatic Nrf2 activation in metabolic disease, Nrf2 was activated over 7 weeks in mice on Western diet using two different siRNAs against kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), the inhibitory protein of Nrf2. Whole genome expression analysis followed by pathway analysis demonstrated successful knock-down of Keap1 expression and induction of Nrf2-dependent genes involved in anti-oxidative stress defense and biotransformation, proving the activation of Nrf2 by the siRNAs against Keap1. Neither the expression of fatty acid- nor carbohydrate-handling proteins was regulated by Keap1 knock-down. Metabolic profiling of the animals did also not show effects on plasma and hepatic lipids, energy expenditure or glucose tolerance. The data indicate that hepatic Keap1/Nrf2 is not a major regulator of glucose or lipid metabolism in mice. PMID:27814396

  5. In vitro metabolic clearance of pyrethroid pesticides by rat and human hepatic microsomes and cytochrome P450 isoforms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Species differences in the intrinsic clearance (CLint) and the enzymes involved in the metabolism of pyrethroid pesticides were examined in rat and human hepatic microsomes. The pyrethroids bifenthrin, S-bioallethrin, bioresmethrin, β-cyfluthrin, cypermethrin, cis-per...

  6. A Role for Timp3 in Microbiota-Driven Hepatic Steatosis and Metabolic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mavilio, Maria; Marchetti, Valentina; Fabrizi, Marta; Stöhr, Robert; Marino, Arianna; Casagrande, Viviana; Fiorentino, Loredana; Cardellini, Marina; Kappel, Ben; Monteleone, Ivan; Garret, Celine; Mauriello, Alessandro; Monteleone, Giovanni; Farcomeni, Alessio; Burcelin, Remy; Menghini, Rossella; Federici, Massimo

    2016-07-19

    The effect of gut microbiota on obesity and insulin resistance is now recognized, but the underlying host-dependent mechanisms remain poorly undefined. We find that tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 knockout (Timp3(-/-)) mice fed a high-fat diet exhibit gut microbiota dysbiosis, an increase in branched chain and aromatic (BCAA) metabolites, liver steatosis, and an increase in circulating soluble IL-6 receptors (sIL6Rs). sIL6Rs can then activate inflammatory cells, such as CD11c(+) cells, which drive metabolic inflammation. Depleting the microbiota through antibiotic treatment significantly improves glucose tolerance, hepatic steatosis, and systemic inflammation, and neutralizing sIL6R signaling reduces inflammation, but only mildly impacts glucose tolerance. Collectively, our results suggest that gut microbiota is the primary driver of the observed metabolic dysfunction, which is mediated, in part, through IL-6 signaling. Our findings also identify an important role for Timp3 in mediating the effect of the microbiota in metabolic diseases.

  7. The metabolic sensors FXRα, PGC-1α, and SIRT1 cooperatively regulate hepatitis B virus transcription.

    PubMed

    Curtil, Claire; Enache, Liviu S; Radreau, Pauline; Dron, Anne-Gaëlle; Scholtès, Caroline; Deloire, Alexandre; Roche, Didier; Lotteau, Vincent; André, Patrice; Ramière, Christophe

    2014-03-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome transcription is highly dependent on liver-enriched, metabolic nuclear receptors (NRs). Among others, NR farnesoid X receptor α (FXRα) enhances HBV core promoter activity and pregenomic RNA synthesis. Interestingly, two food-withdrawal-induced FXRα modulators, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and deacetylase SIRT1, have been found to be associated with HBV genomes ex vivo. Whereas PGC-1α induction was shown to increase HBV replication, the effect of SIRT1 on HBV transcription remains unknown. Here, we showed that, in hepatocarcinoma-derived Huh-7 cells, combined activation of FXRα by GW4064 and SIRT1 by activator 3 increased HBV core promoter-controlled luciferase expression by 25-fold, compared with a 10-fold increase with GW4064 alone. Using cell lines differentially expressing FXRα in overexpression and silencing experiments, we demonstrated that SIRT1 activated the core promoter in an FXRα- and PGC-1α-dependent manner. Maximal activation (>150-fold) was observed in FXRα- and PGC-1α-overexpressing Huh-7 cells treated with FXRα and SIRT1 activators. Similarly, in cells transfected with full-length HBV genomes, maximal induction (3.5-fold) of core promoter-controlled synthesis of 3.5-kb RNA was observed in the same conditions of transfection and treatments. Thus, we identified a subnetwork of metabolic factors regulating HBV replication, strengthening the hypothesis that transcription of HBV and metabolic genes is similarly controlled.

  8. Pharmaceutical Metabolism in Fish: Using a 3-D Hepatic In Vitro Model to Assess Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Matthew G.; Mintram, Kate S.; Owen, Stewart F.; Hetheridge, Malcolm J.; Moody, A. John; Purcell, Wendy M.; Jackson, Simon K.; Jha, Awadhesh N.

    2017-01-01

    At high internal doses, pharmaceuticals have the potential for inducing biological/pharmacological effects in fish. One particular concern for the environment is their potential to bioaccumulate and reach pharmacological levels; the study of these implications for environmental risk assessment has therefore gained increasing attention. To avoid unnecessary testing on animals, in vitro methods for assessment of xenobiotic metabolism could aid in the ecotoxicological evaluation. Here we report the use of a 3-D in vitro liver organoid culture system (spheroids) derived from rainbow trout to measure the metabolism of seven pharmaceuticals using a substrate depletion assay. Of the pharmaceuticals tested, propranolol, diclofenac and phenylbutazone were metabolised by trout liver spheroids; atenolol, metoprolol, diazepam and carbamazepine were not. Substrate depletion kinetics data was used to estimate intrinsic hepatic clearance by this spheroid model, which was similar for diclofenac and approximately 5 fold higher for propranolol when compared to trout liver microsomal fraction (S9) data. These results suggest that liver spheroids could be used as a relevant and metabolically competent in vitro model with which to measure the biotransformation of pharmaceuticals in fish; and propranolol acts as a reproducible positive control. PMID:28045944

  9. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Can Strike Anyone

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis Can Strike Anyone Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table ... from all walks of life are affected by hepatitis, especially hepatitis C, the most common form of ...

  10. Influence of Neonatal Hypothyroidism on Hepatic Gene Expression and Lipid Metabolism in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Bocos, Carlos; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A.; Kahlon, Nusrat; Herrera, Emilio; Norstedt, Gunnar; Parini, Paolo; Flores-Morales, Amilcar; Fernández-Pérez, Leandro

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are required for normal growth and development in mammals. Congenital-neonatal hypothyroidism (CH) has a profound impact on physiology, but its specific influence in liver is less understood. Here, we studied how CH influences the liver gene expression program in adulthood. Pregnant rats were given the antithyroid drug methimazole (MMI) from GD12 until PND30 to induce CH in male offspring. Growth defects due to CH were evident as reductions in body weight and tail length from the second week of life. Once the MMI treatment was discontinued, the feed efficiency increased in CH, and this was accompanied by significant catch-up growth. On PND80, significant reductions in body mass, tail length, and circulating IGF-I levels remained in CH rats. Conversely, the mRNA levels of known GH target genes were significantly upregulated. The serum levels of thyroid hormones, cholesterol, and triglycerides showed no significant differences. In contrast, CH rats showed significant changes in the expression of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism, including an increased transcription of PPARα and a reduced expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol uptake, cellular sterol efflux, triglyceride assembly, bile acid synthesis, and lipogenesis. These changes were associated with a decrease of intrahepatic lipids. Finally, CH rats responded to the onset of hypothyroidism in adulthood with a reduction of serum fatty acids and hepatic cholesteryl esters and to T3 replacement with an enhanced activation of malic enzyme. In summary, we provide in vivo evidence that neonatal hypothyroidism influences the hepatic transcriptional program and tissue sensitivity to hormone treatment in adulthood. This highlights the critical role that a euthyroid state during development plays on normal liver physiology in adulthood. PMID:22666351

  11. Interspecies differences in metabolism of deoxypodophyllotoxin in hepatic microsomes from human, monkey, rat, mouse and dog.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qiushi; Chen, Yang; Liu, Fei; Zhong, Zeyu; Zhao, Kaijing; Ling, Zhaoli; Wang, Fan; Tang, Xiange; Wang, Zhongjian; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiaodong

    2016-08-01

    Deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT) is a natural lignan product which has drawn much attention due to its pharmacological properties including antitumor effect. The purpose of this study was to investigate interspecies differences in metabolism of DPT in hepatic microsomes from human (HLM), cynomolgus monkey (CyLM), rat (RLM), mouse (MLM) and dog (DLM). Incubation of DPT with hepatic microsomes from five species in the presence of NADPH resulted in formation of seven metabolites, five of which were compared with the synthetic standards. M2 was the most abundant metabolite in microsomes from all species. Rank order of intrinsic clearance for M2 formation was RLM > CyLM > MLM > HLM > DLM. In HLM, sulfaphenazole showed the strongest inhibition effect on M2 formation, but neither ticlopidine nor ketoconazole inhibited M2 formation in HLM. Results from cDNA-expressed human CYP450s experiments showed that clearance of M2 formation was much higher in CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 than that in CYP3A4. Contributions of the three CYP450 isoforms to M2 formation in HLM were estimated using relative activity factor (RAF) method or correction by amount of CYP450 isoforms in HLM. M2 formation in HLM was mainly attributed to CYP2C9, followed by CYP2C19. Involvement of CYP3A4 was minor.

  12. Association between interferon use and reduced metabolic and vascular complications among patients with hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Chirikov, Viktor V; Shaya, Fadia T; Howell, Charles D

    2014-11-01

    We examined whether interferon treatment is associated with reduced metabolic/vascular complications in hepatitis C virus patients. The study had historical prospective cohort design using Maryland Medicaid administrative data (2006-2009). The end point was the incidence rate of mild, severe and combined mild/severe events from the Diabetes Complications Severity Index (DCSI). Interferon-treated and -untreated hepatitis C virus patients were matched on baseline covariates. Using multivariate counting process Cox regressions, we modeled the association between interferon receipt of at least 24 weeks and DCSI events incidence rate. Treated whites had similar rate of mild DCSI events, significantly 64% (p < 0.01) lower rate of severe DCSI events, and overall 29% (p = 0.14) lower rate of mild/severe DCSI events, compared with untreated whites. Compared with untreated blacks, treated blacks had a similar rate of DSCI events. Future studies should confirm our findings and should include important clinical variables such as viral genotype, virologic count and achieving sustained virologic response.

  13. AMPK-dependent modulation of hepatic lipid metabolism by nesfatin-1.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yue; Li, Ziru; Gao, Ling; Li, Yin; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Weizhen

    2015-12-05

    The aim of this study was to characterize the mechanism by which peripheral nesfatin-1 regulates hepatic lipid metabolism. Continuous peripheral infusion of nesfatin-1 reduced adiposity and plasma levels of triglyceride and cholesterol. In mice fed high fat diet, peripheral nesfatin-1 significantly decreased hepatic steatosis measured by triglyceride content and oil red staining area and diameter. These alterations were associated with a significant reduction in lipogenesis-related transcriptional factors PPARγ and SREBP1, as well as rate-limited enzyme genes such as acaca, fasn, gpam, dgat1 and dgat2. In primary hepatocytes, nesfatin-1 inhibited both basal and oleic acid stimulated triglyceride accumulation, which was accompanied by a decrement in lipogenesis-related genes and an increase in β-oxidation-related genes. In cultured hepatocytes, nesfatin-1 increased levels of AMPK phosphorylation. Inhibition of AMPK by compound C blocked the reduction of triglyceride content elicited by nesfatin-1. Our studies demonstrate that nesfatin-1 attenuates lipid accumulation in hepatocytes by an AMPK-dependent mechanism.

  14. Differential impact of hepatic deficiency and total body inhibition of MTP on cholesterol metabolism and RCT in mice.

    PubMed

    Dikkers, Arne; Annema, Wijtske; de Boer, Jan Freark; Iqbal, Jahangir; Hussain, M Mahmood; Tietge, Uwe J F

    2014-05-01

    Because apoB-containing lipoproteins are pro-atherogenic and their secretion by liver and intestine largely depends on microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) activity, MTP inhibition strategies are actively pursued. How decreasing the secretion of apoB-containing lipoproteins affects intracellular rerouting of cholesterol is unclear. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the effects of reducing either systemic or liver-specific MTP activity on cholesterol metabolism and reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) using a pharmacological MTP inhibitor or a genetic model, respectively. Plasma total cholesterol and triglyceride levels were decreased in both MTP inhibitor-treated and liver-specific MTP knockout (L-Mttp(-/-)) mice (each P < 0.001). With both inhibition approaches, hepatic cholesterol as well as triglyceride content was consistently increased (each P < 0.001), while biliary cholesterol and bile acid secretion remained unchanged. A small but significant decrease in fecal bile acid excretion was observed in inhibitor-treated mice (P < 0.05), whereas fecal neutral sterol excretion was substantially increased by 75% (P < 0.001), conceivably due to decreased intestinal absorption. In contrast, in L-Mttp(-/-) mice both fecal neutral sterol and bile acid excretion remained unchanged. However, while total RCT increased in inhibitor-treated mice (P < 0.01), it surprisingly decreased in L-Mttp(-/-) mice (P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that: i) pharmacological MTP inhibition increases RCT, an effect that might provide additional clinical benefit of MTP inhibitors; and ii) decreasing hepatic MTP decreases RCT, pointing toward a potential contribution of hepatocyte-derived VLDLs to RCT.

  15. Ionizing Radiation Impairs T Cell Activation by Affecting Metabolic Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Li, Heng-Hong; Wang, Yi-Wen; Chen, Renxiang; Zhou, Bin; Ashwell, Jonathan D; Fornace, Albert J

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has a variety of acute and long-lasting adverse effects on the immune system. Whereas measureable effects of radiation on immune cell cytotoxicity and population change have been well studied in human and animal models, little is known about the functional alterations of the surviving immune cells after ionizing radiation. The objective of this study was to delineate the effects of radiation on T cell function by studying the alterations of T cell receptor activation and metabolic changes in activated T cells isolated from previously irradiated animals. Using a global metabolomics profiling approach, for the first time we demonstrate that ionizing radiation impairs metabolic reprogramming of T cell activation, which leads to substantial decreases in the efficiency of key metabolic processes required for activation, such as glucose uptake, glycolysis, and energy metabolism. In-depth understanding of how radiation impacts T cell function highlighting modulation of metabolism during activation is not only a novel approach to investigate the pivotal processes in the shift of T cell homeostasis after radiation, it also may lead to new targets for therapeutic manipulation in the combination of radiotherapy and immune therapy. Given that appreciable effects were observed with as low as 10 cGy, our results also have implications for low dose environmental exposures.

  16. MKR mice have increased dynamic glucose disposal despite metabolic inflexibility, and hepatic and peripheral insulin insensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Vaitheesvaran, B.; LeRoith, D.

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Recent work has shown that there can be significant differences when glucose disposal is assessed for high-fat induced insulin resistance by static clamp methods vs dynamic assessment during a stable isotope i.p. glucose tolerance test. MKR mice, though lean, have severe insulin resistance and decreased muscle fatty acid oxidation. Our goal was to assess dynamic vs static glucose disposal in MKR mice, and to correlate glucose disposal and muscle–adipose–liver flux interactions with metabolic flexibility (indirect calorimetry) and muscle characteristics. Methods Stable isotope flux phenotyping was performed using [6,6-2H2]glucose, [U-13C6]glucose and [2-13C]glycerol. Muscle triacylglycerol (TAG) and diacylglycerol (DAG) content was assessed by thin layer chromatography, and histological determination of fibre type and cytochrome c activity performed. Metabolic flexibility was assessed by indirect calorimetry. Results Indirect calorimetry showed that MKR mice used more glucose than FVB/N mice during fasting (respiratory exchange ratio [RER] 0.88 vs 0.77, respectively). Compared with FVB/N mice, MKR mice had faster dynamic glucose disposal, despite increased whole-muscle DAG and TAG, and similar hepatic glucose production with higher fasting insulin and unchanged basal glucose. Fed MKR muscle had more glycogen, and increased levels of GLUT1 and GLUT4 than FVB/N muscle. Histology indicated that MKR soleus had mildly decreased cytochrome c activity overall and more type II (glycolytic) fibres compared with that in FVB/N mice. Conclusions/interpretation MKR muscle adapts to using glucose, with more type II fibres present in red muscle. Fasting RER is elevated and glucose disposal during an i.p. glucose tolerance test is accelerated despite increased muscle DAG and TAG. Metabolic inflexibility may result from the compensatory use of fuel that can be best utilised for energy requirements; static vs dynamic glucose disposal assessments may measure

  17. Systematic analysis of the regulatory functions of microRNAs in chicken hepatic lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Ma, Zheng; Jia, Lijuan; Li, Yanmin; Xu, Chunlin; Wang, Taian; Han, Ruili; Jiang, Ruirui; Li, Zhuanjian; Sun, Guirong; Kang, Xiangtao; Liu, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Laying performance is an important economic trait in hens, and this physiological process is largely influenced by the liver function. The livers of hens at 20- and 30-week-old stages were investigated using the next generation sequencing to identify the differences of microRNA expression profiles. Compared with the 20-week-old hens, 67 down- and 13 up-regulated microRNAs were verified to be significant differentially expressed (false discovery rate, FDR ≤ 0.05) (SDE) in the 30-week-old. We also identified 13 down- and 6 up-regulated novel differentially expressed (DE) microRNAs. miR-22-3p and miR-146b-5p, which exhibit critical roles in mammalian lipid metabolism, showed the most abundant expression and the highest fold-change, respectively. A total of 648 potential target genes of the SDE microRNAs were identified through an integrated analysis of microRNAs and the DE genes obtained in previous RNA-sequencing, including FADS1, FADS2, ELOVL6 and ACSL5, which are critical lipid metabolism-related regulators. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that target genes were mainly enriched in lipid-related metabolism processes. This work provides the first study of the expression patterns of hepatic microRNAs between 20- and 30-week old hens. The findings may serve as a fundamental resource for understanding the detailed functions of microRNAs in the molecular regulatory systems of lipid metabolism. PMID:27535581

  18. Multi-omics analyses reveal metabolic alterations regulated by hepatitis B virus core protein in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qi; Fan, Fengxu; Wei, Wei; Liu, Yang; Xu, Zhongwei; Zhai, Linhui; Qi, Yingzi; Ye, Bingyu; Zhang, Yao; Basu, Sumit; Zhao, Zhihu; Wu, Junzhu; Xu, Ping

    2017-01-23

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is partly responsible for hepatitis, fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HBV core protein (HBc), encoded by the HBV genome, may play a significant role in HBV life cycle. However, the function of HBc in the occurrence and development of liver disease is still unclear. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, HBc-transfected HCC cells were characterized by multi-omics analyses. Combining proteomics and metabolomics analyses, our results showed that HBc promoted the expression of metabolic enzymes and the secretion of metabolites in HCC cells. In addition, glycolysis and amino acid metabolism were significantly up-regulated by HBc. Moreover, Max-like protein X (MLX) might be recruited and enriched by HBc in the nucleus to regulate glycolysis pathways. This study provides further insights into the function of HBc in the molecular pathogenesis of HBV-induced diseases and indicates that metabolic reprogramming appears to be a hallmark of HBc transfection.

  19. Multi-omics analyses reveal metabolic alterations regulated by hepatitis B virus core protein in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qi; Fan, Fengxu; Wei, Wei; Liu, Yang; Xu, Zhongwei; Zhai, Linhui; Qi, Yingzi; Ye, Bingyu; Zhang, Yao; Basu, Sumit; Zhao, Zhihu; Wu, Junzhu; Xu, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is partly responsible for hepatitis, fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HBV core protein (HBc), encoded by the HBV genome, may play a significant role in HBV life cycle. However, the function of HBc in the occurrence and development of liver disease is still unclear. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, HBc-transfected HCC cells were characterized by multi-omics analyses. Combining proteomics and metabolomics analyses, our results showed that HBc promoted the expression of metabolic enzymes and the secretion of metabolites in HCC cells. In addition, glycolysis and amino acid metabolism were significantly up-regulated by HBc. Moreover, Max-like protein X (MLX) might be recruited and enriched by HBc in the nucleus to regulate glycolysis pathways. This study provides further insights into the function of HBc in the molecular pathogenesis of HBV-induced diseases and indicates that metabolic reprogramming appears to be a hallmark of HBc transfection. PMID:28112229

  20. Basis of aggravated hepatic lipid metabolism by chronic stress in high-fat diet-fed rat.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying; Lin, Min; Wang, Xiaobin; Guo, Keke; Wang, Shanshan; Sun, Mengfei; Wang, Jiao; Han, Xiaoyu; Fu, Ting; Hu, Yang; Fu, Jihua

    2015-03-01

    Our previous study has demonstrated that long-term stress, known as chronic stress (CS), can aggravate nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed rat. In this study, we tried to figure out which lipid metabolic pathways were impacted by CS in the HFD-fed rat. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (6 weeks of age, n = 8 per group) were fed with either standard diet or HFD with or without CS exposure for 8 weeks. Hepatic lipidosis, biochemical, hormonal, and lipid profile markers in serum and liver, and enzymes involved in de novo lipogenesis (DNL) of fatty acids (FAs) and cholesterol, β-oxidation, FAs uptake, triglycerides synthesis, and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) assembly in the liver were detected. CS exposure reduced hepatic lipidosis but further elevated hepatic VLDL content with aggravated dyslipidemia in the HFD-fed rats. There was a synergism between CS and HFD on VLDL production and dyslipidemia. PCR and western blot assays showed that CS exposure significantly promoted hepatic VLDL assembly in rats, especially in the HFD-fed rats, while it had little impact on DNL, β-oxidation, FAs uptake, and triglycerides synthesis in the HFD-fed rats. This phenomenon was in accordance with elevated serum glucocorticoid level. The critical influence of CS exposure on hepatic lipid metabolism in the HFD-fed rats is VLDL assembly which might be regulated by glucocorticoid.

  1. Hepatocyte-specific Deletion of SIRT1 Alters Fatty Acid Metabolism and Results in Hepatic Steatosis and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Purushotham, Aparna; Schug, Thaddeus T.; Xu, Qing; Surapureddi, Sailesh; Guo, Xiumei; Li, Xiaoling

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatic metabolic derangements are key components in the development of fatty liver, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. SIRT1, a NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase, is an important regulator of energy homeostasis in response to nutrient availability. Here we demonstrate that hepatic SIRT1 regulates lipid homeostasis by positively regulating PPARα, a nuclear receptor that mediates the adaptive response to fasting and starvation. Hepatocyte-specific deletion of SIRT1 impairs PPARα signaling and decreases fatty acid β-oxidation, whereas overexpression of SIRT1 induces the expression of PPARα targets. SIRT1 interacts with PPARα and is required to activate PPARα co-activator PGC-1α. When challenged with a high-fat diet, liver-specific SIRT1 knockout mice develop hepatic steatosis, hepatic inflammation, and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Taken together, our data indicate that SIRT1 plays a vital role in the regulation of hepatic lipid homeostasis, and that pharmacological activation of SIRT1 may be important for the prevention of obesity-associated metabolic diseases. PMID:19356714

  2. Effects of Liver Resection on Hepatic Short-Chain Fatty Acid Metabolism in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Neis, Evelien P. J. G.; Bloemen, Johanne G.; Rensen, Sander S.; van der Vorst, Joost R.; van den Broek, Maartje A.; Venema, Koen; Buurman, Wim A.; Dejong, Cornelis H. C.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To determine whether acute loss of liver tissue affects hepatic short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) clearance. Methods Blood was sampled from the radial artery, portal vein, and hepatic vein before and after hepatic resection in 30 patients undergoing partial liver resection. Plasma SCFA levels were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. SCFA exchange across gut and liver was calculated from arteriovenous differences and plasma flow. Liver volume was estimated by CT liver volumetry. Results The gut produced significant amounts of acetate, propionate, and butyrate (39.4±13.5, 6.2±1.3, and 9.5±2.6 μmol·kgbw-1·h-1), which did not change after partial hepatectomy (p = 0.67, p = 0.59 and p = 0.24). Hepatic propionate uptake did not differ significantly before and after resection (-6.4±1.4 vs. -8.4±1.5 μmol·kgbw-1·h-1, p = 0.49). Hepatic acetate and butyrate uptake increased significantly upon partial liver resection (acetate: -35.1±13.0 vs. -39.6±9.4 μmol·kgbw-1·h-1, p = 0.0011; butyrate: -9.9±2.7 vs. -11.5±2.4 μmol·kgbw-1·h-1, p = 0.0006). Arterial SCFA concentrations were not different before and after partial liver resection (acetate: 176.9±17.3 vs. 142.3±12.5 μmol/L, p = 0.18; propionate: 7.2±1.4 vs. 5.6±0.6 μmol/L, p = 0.38; butyrate: 4.3±0.7 vs. 3.6±0.6 μmol/L, p = 0.73). Conclusion The liver maintains its capacity to clear acetate, propionate, and butyrate from the portal blood upon acute loss of liver tissue. PMID:27835668

  3. Natural toxins that affect plant amino acid metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A diverse range of natural compounds interfere with the synthesis and other aspects of amino acid metabolism. Some are amino acid analogues, but most are not. This review covers a number of specific natural phytotoxic compounds by molecular target site. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase is of part...

  4. Maternal dietary betaine supplementation modifies hepatic expression of cholesterol metabolic genes via epigenetic mechanisms in newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Cai, Demin; Jia, Yimin; Lu, Jingyu; Yuan, Mengjie; Sui, Shiyan; Song, Haogang; Zhao, Ruqian

    2014-11-14

    To elucidate the effects of maternal dietary betaine supplementation on hepatic expression of cholesterol metabolic genes in newborn piglets and the involved epigenetic mechanisms, we fed gestational sows with control or betaine-supplemented diets (3 g/kg) throughout pregnancy. Neonatal piglets born to betaine-supplemented sows had higher serum methionine concentration and hepatic content of betaine, which was associated with significantly up-regulated hepatic expression of glycine N-methyltransferase. Prenatal betaine exposure increased hepatic cholesterol content and modified the hepatic expression of cholesterol metabolic genes in neonatal piglets. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 was down-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels, while 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGCR) was down-regulated at the mRNA level, but up-regulated at the protein level, in betaine-exposed piglets. The transcriptional repression of HMGCR was associated with CpG island hypermethylation and higher repressive histone mark H3K27me3 (histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation) on the promoter, whereas increased HMGCR protein content was associated with significantly decreased expression of miR-497. Furthermore, LDL receptor was significantly down-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels in the liver of betaine-exposed piglets, which was associated with promoter CpG hypermethylation. In addition, the expression of cholesterol-27α-hydroxylase (CYP27α1) was up-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels, while the expression of cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase (CYP7α1) was increased at the mRNA level, but unchanged at the protein level associated with increased expression of miR-181. These results indicate that maternal betaine supplementation increases hepatic cholesterol content in neonatal piglets through epigenetic regulations of cholesterol metabolic genes, which involve alterations in DNA and histone methylation and in the expression of microRNA targeting these genes.

  5. Identification of a novel human long non-coding RNA that regulates hepatic lipid metabolism by inhibiting SREBP-1c

    PubMed Central

    Li, Duan; Cheng, Min; Niu, Yuqiang; Chi, Xiaojing; Liu, Xiuying; Fan, Jingjing; Fan, Heng; Chang, Yongsheng; Yang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) are master regulators of hepatic lipid homeostasis. Aberrant expression of SREBPs frequently leads to lipid metabolism dysregulation. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified with diverse biological functions, but the effects of lncRNAs on lipid metabolism are rarely reported. Here, we identified a novel human specific lncRNA, lncHR1, as a negative regulator of SREBP-1c expression. Overexpression of lncHR1 inhibited expression of SREBP-1c and fatty acid synthase (FAS) and then repressed oleic acid-induced hepatic cell triglyceride (TG) and lipid droplet (LD) accumulation. In vivo, the data of established transgenic animals showed that mice with lncHR1 expression had less hepatic expression of SREBP-1c, FAS, Acetyl-CoA carboxylase α (ACCα), and less hepatic and plasma TG after being fed a high-fat diet. Therefore, we report a novel lncRNA which can decrease lipid metabolism by repressing SREBP-1c gene expression. PMID:28367099

  6. Attenuation of insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and hepatic oxidative stress by resveratrol in fructose-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Bagul, Pankaj K; Middela, Harish; Matapally, Saidulu; Padiya, Raju; Bastia, Tanmay; Madhusudana, K; Reddy, B Raghunath; Chakravarty, Sumana; Banerjee, Sanjay K

    2012-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome and oxidative stress are common complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The present study was designed to determine whether resveratrol, a widely used nutritional supplement, can improve insulin sensitivity, metabolic complication as well as hepatic oxidative stress in fructose-fed rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats (180-200 g) were divided into four groups with 8 animals each. Fructose-fed insulin resistant group (Dia) animals were fed 65% fructose (Research diet, USA) for a period of 8 weeks, whereas control group (Con) animals were fed 65% cornstarch (Research Diet, USA). Resveratrol, 10 mg/kg/day (Dia+Resv) or metformin 300 mg/kg/day (Dia+Met) were administered orally to the 65% fructose-fed rats for 8 weeks. At the end of the feeding schedule, Dia group had insulin resistance along with increased blood glucose, triglyceride, uric acid and nitric oxide (NO) levels. Significant (p<0.05) increase in hepatic TBARS and conjugated dienes, and significant (p<0.05) decrease in hepatic SOD and vitamin C was observed in Dia group compared to Con group. Administration of metformin or resveratrol significantly (p<0.05) normalized all the altered metabolic parameters. However, a marked insulin sensitizing action was only observed in the Dia+Resv group. Similarly, while metformin administration failed to normalize the increased TBARS levels and decreased SOD activity, resveratrol showed a more promising effect of all oxidative stress parameters measured in the present study. Attenuation of hepatic oxidative stress in fructose-fed rat liver after resveratrol administration was associated with significant (p<0.05) increase in nuclear level of NRF2 compared with other groups. The present study demonstrates that resveratrol is more effective than metformin in improving insulin sensitivity, and attenuating metabolic syndrome and hepatic oxidative stress in fructose-fed rats.

  7. Berberine improves glucose metabolism in diabetic rats by inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xuan; Yan, Jinhua; Shen, Yunfeng; Tang, Kuanxiao; Yin, Jun; Zhang, Yanhua; Yang, Dongjie; Liang, Hua; Ye, Jianping; Weng, Jianping

    2011-02-03

    Berberine (BBR) is a compound originally identified in a Chinese herbal medicine Huanglian (Coptis chinensis French). It improves glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetic patients. The mechanisms involve in activation of adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) and improvement of insulin sensitivity. However, it is not clear if BBR reduces blood glucose through other mechanism. In this study, we addressed this issue by examining liver response to BBR in diabetic rats, in which hyperglycemia was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by high fat diet. We observed that BBR decreased fasting glucose significantly. Gluconeogenic genes, Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), were decreased in liver by BBR. Hepatic steatosis was also reduced by BBR and expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS) was inhibited in liver. Activities of transcription factors including Forkhead transcription factor O1 (FoxO1), sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1) and carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) were decreased. Insulin signaling pathway was not altered in the liver. In cultured hepatocytes, BBR inhibited oxygen consumption and reduced intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) level. The data suggest that BBR improves fasting blood glucose by direct inhibition of gluconeogenesis in liver. This activity is not dependent on insulin action. The gluconeogenic inhibition is likely a result of mitochondria inhibition by BBR. The observation supports that BBR improves glucose metabolism through an insulin-independent pathway.

  8. Hepatic lipid metabolism changes in short- and long-term prehepatic portal hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Aller, Maria-Angeles; Vara, Elena; García, Cruz; Nava, Maria-Paz; Angulo, Alejandra; Sánchez-Patán, Fernando; Calderón, Ana; Vergara, Patri; Arias, Jaime

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To verify the impairment of the hepatic lipid metabolism in prehepatic portal hypertension. METHODS: The concentrations of free fatty acids, diacylglycerol, triglycerides, and phospholipids were assayed by using D-[U-14C] glucose incorporation in the different lipid fractions and thin-layer chromatography and cholesterol was measured by spectrophotometry, in liver samples of Wistar rats with partial portal vein ligation at short- (1 mo) and long-term (1 year) (i.e. portal hypertensive rats) and the control rats. RESULTS: In the portal hypertensive rats, liver phospholipid synthesis significantly decreased (7.42 ± 0.50 vs 4.70 ± 0.44 nCi/g protein; P < 0.01) and was associated with an increased synthesis of free fatty acids (2.08 ± 0.14 vs 3.36 ± 0.33 nCi/g protein; P < 0.05), diacylglycerol (1.93 ± 0.2 vs 2.26 ± 0.28 nCi/g protein), triglycerides (2.40 ± 0.30 vs 4.49 ± 0.15 nCi/g protein) and cholesterol (24.28 ± 2.12 vs 57.66 ± 3.26 mg/g protein; P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Prehepatic portal hypertension in rats impairs the liver lipid metabolism. This impairment consists in an increase in lipid deposits (triglycerides, diacylglycerol and cholesterol) in the liver, accompanied by a decrease in phospholipid synthesis. PMID:17106932

  9. Prevention of Hepatic Fibrosis in a Murine Model of Metabolic Syndrome with Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    DeLeve, Laurie D.; Wang, Xiangdong; Kanel, Gary C.; Atkinson, Roscoe D.; McCuskey, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    The endocannabinoid pathway plays an important role in the regulation of appetite and body weight, hepatic lipid metabolism, and fibrosis. Blockade of the endocannabinoid receptor CB1 with SR141716 promotes weight loss, reduces hepatocyte fatty acid synthesis, and is antifibrotic. D-4F, an apolipoprotein A-1 mimetic with antioxidant properties, is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of atherosclerosis. C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet for 7 months, followed by a 2.5-month treatment with either SR141716 or D-4F. SR141716 markedly improved body weight, liver weight, serum transaminases, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, hyperleptinemia, and oxidative stress, accompanied by the significant prevention of fibrosis progression. D-4F improved hypercholesterolemia and hyperleptinemia without improvement in body weight, steatohepatitis, insulin resistance, or oxidative stress, and yet, there was significant prevention of fibrosis. D-4F prevented culture-induced activation of stellate cells in vitro. In summary, C57BL/6J mice given a high-fat diet developed features of metabolic syndrome with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and fibrosis. Both SR141716 and D-4F prevented progression of fibrosis after onset of steatohepatitis, ie, a situation comparable to a common clinical scenario, with D-4F seeming to have a more general antifibrotic effect. Either compound therefore has the potential to be of clinical benefit. PMID:18772330

  10. Effects of maternal treatment of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on serum lipid profile and hepatic lipid metabolism-related gene expression in embryonic chickens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Tang, Xue; Zhang, Yuanshu; Ma, Haitian; Zou, Sixiang

    2010-04-01

    Over the last decade, much evidence emerged to suggest that alterations in maternal diets during pregnancy may irreversibly affect aspects of physiological and biochemical functions in the fetus. To explore the effects of maternal dietary treatments with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on lipid metabolism in the embryo, we investigated serum lipid profile and hepatic lipid metabolism-related gene expression in the maternal and embryonic chicken. Sixteen-week-old pullets were allocated into 3 groups (n=30), and after laying, they were provided with a commercial diet supplemented with DHEA at 0, 20 or 100mg/kg diet. Eggs were collected after DHEA treatment and incubated at 37.5 degrees C and a relative humidity of 60%. Blood and liver samples were collected from hens and embryonic chickens. DHEA treatment resulted in decreased body weight and increased relative liver weight in both maternal and embryonic chickens, while the concentrations of blood triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) were significantly lower in the 20mg DHEA/kg group as compared to the control group during embryonic development. The expression of acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC) and carnitine palmitoyl transferase I (CPTI) gene was also reduced following treatment with 20mg DHEA/kg at hatching. However, blood TC, and hepatic fatty acid synthase (FAS) and hydroxy methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) gene expression were significantly up-regulated in the 100mg DHEA/kg group during embryonic development and hatching. Overall, the results of this study indicate that maternal dietary treatment with DHEA regulates serum lipid metabolism and hepatic gene expression.

  11. Glucagon regulates hepatic lipid metabolism via cAMP and Insig-2 signaling: implication for the pathogenesis of hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai; Zhao, Miaoyun; Sud, Neetu; Christian, Patricia; Shen, Jing; Song, Yongyan; Pashaj, Anjeza; Zhang, Kezhong; Carr, Timothy; Su, Qiaozhu

    2016-01-01

    Insulin induced gene-2 (Insig-2) is an ER-resident protein that inhibits the activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). However, cellular factors that regulate Insig-2 expression have not yet been identified. Here we reported that cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein H (CREBH) positively regulates mRNA and protein expression of a liver specific isoform of Insig-2, Insig-2a, which in turn hinders SREBP-1c activation and inhibits hepatic de novo lipogenesis. CREBH binds to the evolutionally conserved CRE-BP binding elements located in the enhancer region of Insig-2a and upregulates its mRNA and protein expression. Metabolic hormone glucagon and nutritional fasting activated CREBH, which upregulated expression of Insig-2a in hepatocytes and inhibited SREBP-1c activation. In contrast, genetic depletion of CREBH decreased Insig-2a expression, leading to the activation of SREBP-1c and its downstream lipogenic target enzymes. Compromising CREBH-Insig-2 signaling by siRNA interference against Insig-2 also disrupted the inhibitory effect of this signaling pathway on hepatic de novo triglyceride synthesis. These actions resulted in the accumulation of lipid droplets in hepatocytes and systemic hyperlipidemia. Our study identified CREBH as the first cellular protein that regulates Insig-2a expression. Glucagon activated the CREBH-Insig-2a signaling pathway to inhibit hepatic de novo lipogenesis and prevent the onset of hepatic steatosis and hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:27582413

  12. Fusion and metabolism of plant cells as affected by microgravity.

    PubMed

    Hampp, R; Hoffmann, E; Schönherr, K; Johann, P; De Filippis, L

    1997-01-01

    Plant cell protoplasts derived from leaf tissue of two different tobacco species (Nicotiana tabacum., N. rustica L.) were exposed to short-term (sounding rocket experiments) and long-term (spacelab) microgravity environments in order to study both (electro) cell fusion and cell metabolism during early and later stages of tissue regeneration. The period of exposure to microgravity varied from 10 min (sounding rocket) to 10 d (space shuttle). The process of electro fusion of protoplasts was improved under conditions of microgravity: the time needed to establish close membrane contact between protoplasts (alignment time) was reduced (5 as compared to 15 s under 1 g) and numbers of fusion products between protoplasts of different specific density were increased by a factor of about 10. In addition, viability of fusion products, as shown by the ability to form callus, increased from about 60% to more than 90%. Regenerated fusion products obtained from both sounding-rocket and spacelab experiments showed a wide range of intermediate properties between the two parental plants. This was verified by isozyme analysis and random amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR). In order to address potential metabolic responses, more general markers such as the overall energy state (ATP/ADP ratio), the redox charge of the diphosphopyridine nucleotide system (NADH/NAD ratio), and the pool size of fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (Fru 2,6 bisp), a regulator of the balance between glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, were determined. Responses of these parameters were different with regard to short-term and long-term exposure. Shortly after transition to reduced gravitation (sounding rocket) ratios of ATP/ADP exhibited strong fluctuation while the pool size of NAD decreased (indicating an increased NADH/NAD ratio) and that of Fru 2,6 bisp increased. As similar changes can be observed under stress conditions, this response is probably indicative of a metabolic stress

  13. Infectious, inflammatory, and metabolic diseases affecting the athlete's spine.

    PubMed

    Metz, Lionel N; Wustrack, Rosanna; Lovell, Alberto F; Sawyer, Aenor J

    2012-07-01

    Sports and weight-bearing activities can have a positive effect on bone health in the growing, mature, or aging athlete. However, certain athletic activities and training regimens may place the athlete at increased risk for stress fractures in the spine. In addition, some athletes have an underlying susceptibility to fracture due to either systemic or focal abnormalities. It is important to identify and treat these athletes in order to prevent stress fractures and reduce the risk of osteoporosis in late adulthood. Therefore, the pre-participation physical examination offers a unique opportunity to screen athletes for metabolic bone disease through the history and physical examination. Positive findings warrant a thorough workup including a metabolic bone laboratory panel, and possibly a DEXA scan, which includes a lateral spine view.

  14. Hepatic glutathione metabolism and lipid peroxidation in response to excess dietary selenomethionine and selenite in mallard ducklings. [Anas platyrhynchos

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.; Krynitsky, A.J. )

    1989-01-01

    Studies were conducted with mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings to determine the effects of excess dietary selenium (Se) on hepatic glatathione concentration and associated enzymes, and lipid peroxidation. Day-old ducklings were fed 0.1, 10, 20, or 40 ppm Se as seleno-DL-methionine or sodium selenite for 6 wk. Selenium from selenomethionine accumulated in a dose-dependent manner in the liver, resulting in a decrease in the concentration of hepatic-reduced glutathione (GSH) and total hepatic thiols (SH). These effects were accompanied by a dose-dependent increase in the ratio of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) to GSH, and an increase in malondialdehyde concentration as evidence of lipid peroxidation. Hepatic and plasma GSH peroxidase activity was initially elevated at 10 ppm Se as selenomethionine, whereas GSSG reductase activity was elevated at higher concentrations of Se. Selenium from sodium selenite accumulated in the liver to an apparent maximum at 10 ppm in the diet, resulting in an increase in hepatic GSH and GSSG accompanied by a small decrease in total hepatic SH. Sodium selenite resulted in an increase in hepatic GSSG reductase activity at 10 ppm and in plasm GSSG reductase activity at 40 ppm. A small increase in lipid peroxidation occurred at 40 ppm. These findings indicate that excess dietary Se as selenomethionine has a more pronounced effect on hepatic glutathione metabolism and lipid peroxidation in ducklings than dose selenite, which may be related to the pattern of accumulation. Effects of Se as selenite appear to be less pronounced in ducklings than reported in laboratory rodents. The effects of selenomethionine, which occurs in vegetation, are of particular interest with respect to the health of wild aquatic birds in seleniferous locations.

  15. Hepatic and Whole-Body Insulin Metabolism during Proestrus and Estrus in Mongrel Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Erin NZ; Winnick, Jason J; Edgerton, Dale S; Scott, Melanie F; Smith, Marta S; Farmer, Ben; Williams, Phillip E; Cherrington, Alan D; Moore, Mary Courtney

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance occurs during various stages of the estrus cycle in dogs. To quantify the effects of proestrus–estrus (PE) and determine whether PE affects liver insulin sensitivity, 11 female mongrel dogs were implanted with sampling and intraportal infusion catheters. Five of the dogs (PE group) entered proestrus after surgery; those remaining in anestrus were controls. The dogs were fasted overnight, [3-3H]glucose and somatostatin were infused through peripheral veins, and glucagon was infused intraportally. Insulin was infused intraportally, with the rate adjusted to maintain arterial plasma glucose at basal levels (PE, 294 ± 25 µU/kg/min; control, 223 ± 21 µU/kg/min). Subsequently the insulin infusion rate was increased by 0.2 mU/kg/min for 120 min (P1) and then to 1.5 mU/kg/min for the last 120 min (P2); glucose was infused peripherally as needed to maintain euglycemia. Insulin concentrations did not differ between groups at any time; they increased 3 µU/mL over baseline during P1 and to 3 times baseline during P2. The glucose infusion rate in PE dogs during P2 was 63% of that in control dogs. Net hepatic glucose output and the endogenous glucose production rate declined 40% to 50% from baseline in both groups during P1; during P2, both groups exhibited a low rate of net hepatic glucose uptake with full suppression of endogenous glucose production. The glucose disappearance rate during P1 and P2 was 35% greater in control than PE dogs. Therefore, PE in canines is associated with loss of nonhepatic (primarily muscle) but not hepatic insulin sensitivity. PMID:27298249

  16. Metabolic Activation of the Anti-Hepatitis C Virus Nucleotide Prodrug PSI-352938

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Congrong; Tolstykh, Tatiana; Bao, Haiying; Park, Yeojin; Babusis, Darius; Lam, Angela M.; Bansal, Shalini; Du, Jinfa; Chang, Wonsuk; Reddy, P. Ganapati; Zhang, Hai-Ren; Woolley, Joseph; Wang, Li-Quan; Chao, Piyun B.; Ray, Adrian S.; Otto, Michael J.; Sofia, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    PSI-352938 is a novel cyclic phosphate prodrug of β-d-2′-deoxy-2′-α-fluoro-2′-β-C-methylguanosine-5′-monophosphate with potent anti-HCV activity. In order to inhibit the NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, PSI-352938 must be metabolized to the active triphosphate form, PSI-352666. During in vitro incubations with PSI-352938, significantly larger amounts of PSI-352666 were formed in primary hepatocytes than in clone A hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicon cells. Metabolism and biochemical assays were performed to define the molecular mechanism of PSI-352938 activation. The first step, removal of the isopropyl group on the 3′,5′-cyclic phosphate moiety, was found to be cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 dependent, with other CYP isoforms unable to catalyze the reaction. The second step, opening of the cyclic phosphate ring, was catalyzed by phosphodiesterases (PDEs) 2A1, 5A, 9A, and 11A4, all known to be expressed in the liver. The role of these enzymes in the activation of PSI-352938 was confirmed in primary human hepatocytes, where prodrug activation was reduced by inhibitors of CYP3A4 and PDEs. The third step, removal of the O6-ethyl group on the nucleobase, was shown to be catalyzed by adenosine deaminase-like protein 1. The resulting monophosphate was consecutively phosphorylated to the diphosphate and to the triphosphate PSI-352666 by guanylate kinase 1 and nucleoside diphosphate kinase, respectively. In addition, formation of nucleoside metabolites was observed in primary hepatocytes, and ecto-5′-nucleotidase was able to dephosphorylate the monophosphate metabolites. Since CYP3A4 is highly expressed in the liver, the CYP3A4-dependent metabolism of PSI-352938 makes it an effective liver-targeted prodrug, in part accounting for the potent antiviral activity observed clinically. PMID:22526308

  17. Low-dose food contaminants trigger sex-specific, hepatic metabolic changes in the progeny of obese mice.

    PubMed

    Naville, Danielle; Pinteur, Claudie; Vega, Nathalie; Menade, Yoan; Vigier, Michèle; Le Bourdais, Alexandre; Labaronne, Emmanuel; Debard, Cyrille; Luquain-Costaz, Céline; Bégeot, Martine; Vidal, Hubert; Le Magueresse-Battistoni, Brigitte

    2013-09-01

    Environmental contaminants are suspected to be involved in the epidemic incidence of metabolic disorders, food ingestion being a primarily route of exposure. We hypothesized that life-long consumption of a high-fat diet that contains low doses of pollutants will aggravate metabolic disorders induced by obesity itself. Mice were challenged from preconception throughout life with a high-fat diet containing pollutants commonly present in food (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, polychlorinated biphenyl 153, diethylhexyl phthalate, and bisphenol A), added at low doses in the tolerable daily intake range. We measured several blood parameters, glucose and insulin tolerance, hepatic lipid accumulation, and gene expression in adult mice. Pollutant-exposed mice exhibited significant sex-dependent metabolic disorders in the absence of toxicity and weight gain. In males, pollutants increased the expression of hepatic genes (from 36 to 88%) encoding proteins related to cholesterol biosynthesis and decreased (40%) hepatic total cholesterol levels. In females, there was a marked deterioration of glucose tolerance, which may be related to the 2-fold induction of estrogen sulfotransferase and reduced expression of estrogen receptor α (25%) and estrogen target genes (>34%). Because of the very low doses of pollutants used in the mixture, these findings may have strong implications in terms of understanding the potential role of environmental contaminants in food in the development of metabolic diseases.

  18. Dynamic regulation of hepatic lipid droplet properties by diet.

    PubMed

    Crunk, Amanda E; Monks, Jenifer; Murakami, Aya; Jackman, Matthew; Maclean, Paul S; Ladinsky, Mark; Bales, Elise S; Cain, Shannon; Orlicky, David J; McManaman, James L

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic lipid droplets (CLD) are organelle-like structures that function in neutral lipid storage, transport and metabolism through the actions of specific surface-associated proteins. Although diet and metabolism influence hepatic CLD levels, how they affect CLD protein composition is largely unknown. We used non-biased, shotgun, proteomics in combination with metabolic analysis, quantitative immunoblotting, electron microscopy and confocal imaging to define the effects of low- and high-fat diets on CLD properties in fasted-refed mice. We found that the hepatic CLD proteome is distinct from that of CLD from other mammalian tissues, containing enzymes from multiple metabolic pathways. The hepatic CLD proteome is also differentially affected by dietary fat content and hepatic metabolic status. High fat feeding markedly increased the CLD surface density of perilipin-2, a critical regulator of hepatic neutral lipid storage, whereas it reduced CLD levels of betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase, an enzyme regulator of homocysteine levels linked to fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. Collectively our data demonstrate that the hepatic CLD proteome is enriched in metabolic enzymes, and that it is qualitatively and quantitatively regulated by diet and metabolism. These findings implicate CLD in the regulation of hepatic metabolic processes, and suggest that their properties undergo reorganization in response to hepatic metabolic demands.

  19. Dynamic Regulation of Hepatic Lipid Droplet Properties by Diet

    PubMed Central

    Crunk, Amanda E.; Monks, Jenifer; Murakami, Aya; Jackman, Matthew; MacLean, Paul S.; Ladinsky, Mark; Bales, Elise S.; Cain, Shannon; Orlicky, David J.; McManaman, James L.

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic lipid droplets (CLD) are organelle-like structures that function in neutral lipid storage, transport and metabolism through the actions of specific surface-associated proteins. Although diet and metabolism influence hepatic CLD levels, how they affect CLD protein composition is largely unknown. We used non-biased, shotgun, proteomics in combination with metabolic analysis, quantitative immunoblotting, electron microscopy and confocal imaging to define the effects of low- and high-fat diets on CLD properties in fasted-refed mice. We found that the hepatic CLD proteome is distinct from that of CLD from other mammalian tissues, containing enzymes from multiple metabolic pathways. The hepatic CLD proteome is also differentially affected by dietary fat content and hepatic metabolic status. High fat feeding markedly increased the CLD surface density of perilipin-2, a critical regulator of hepatic neutral lipid storage, whereas it reduced CLD levels of betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase, an enzyme regulator of homocysteine levels linked to fatty liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. Collectively our data demonstrate that the hepatic CLD proteome is enriched in metabolic enzymes, and that it is qualitatively and quantitatively regulated by diet and metabolism. These findings implicate CLD in the regulation of hepatic metabolic processes, and suggest that their properties undergo reorganization in response to hepatic metabolic demands. PMID:23874434

  20. Cholesterol metabolism, transport, and hepatic regulation in dairy cows during transition and early lactation.

    PubMed

    Kessler, E C; Gross, J J; Bruckmaier, R M; Albrecht, C

    2014-09-01

    The transition from the nonlactating to the lactating state represents a critical period for dairy cow lipid metabolism because body reserves have to be mobilized to meet the increasing energy requirements for the initiation of milk production. The purpose of this study was to provide a comprehensive overview on cholesterol homeostasis in transition dairy cows by assessing in parallel plasma, milk, and hepatic tissue for key factors of cholesterol metabolism, transport, and regulation. Blood samples and liver biopsies were taken from 50 multiparous Holstein dairy cows in wk 3 antepartum (a.p.), wk 1 postpartum (p.p.), wk 4 p.p., and wk 14 p.p. Milk sampling was performed in wk 1, 4, and 14 p.p. Blood and milk lipid concentrations [triglycerides (TG), cholesterol, and lipoproteins], enzyme activities (phospholipid transfer protein and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase) were analyzed using enzymatic assays. Hepatic gene expression patterns of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMGC) synthase 1 (HMGCS1) and HMGC reductase (HMGCR), sterol regulatory element-binding factor (SREBF)-1 and -2, microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP), ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABC) A1 and ABCG1, liver X receptor (LXR) α and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) α and γ were measured using quantitative RT-PCR. Plasma TG, cholesterol, and lipoprotein concentrations decreased from wk 3 a.p. to a minimum in wk 1 p.p., and then gradually increased until wk 14 p.p. Compared with wk 4 p.p., phospholipid transfer protein activity was increased in wk 1 p.p., whereas lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase activity was lowest at this period. Total cholesterol concentration and mass, and cholesterol concentration in the milk fat fraction decreased from wk 1 p.p. to wk 4 p.p. Both total and milk fat cholesterol concentration were decreased in wk 4 p.p. compared with wk 1 and 14 p.p. The mRNA abundance of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis (SREBF-2, HMGCS1, and

  1. Hepatitis B virus and microRNAs: Complex interactions affecting hepatitis B virus replication and hepatitis B virus-associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Lamontagne, Jason; Steel, Laura F; Bouchard, Michael J

    2015-06-28

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the leading risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). With nearly 750000 deaths yearly, hepatocellular carcinoma is the second highest cause of cancer-related death in the world. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the development of HBV-associated HCC remain incompletely understood. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs), a family of small non-coding RNAs that play a role primarily in post-transcriptional gene regulation, have been recognized as important regulators of cellular homeostasis, and altered regulation of miRNA expression has been suggested to play a significant role in virus-associated diseases and the development of many cancers. With this in mind, many groups have begun to investigate the relationship between miRNAs and HBV replication and HBV-associated disease. Multiple findings suggest that some miRNAs, such as miR-122, and miR-125 and miR-199 family members, are playing a role in HBV replication and HBV-associated disease, including the development of HBV-associated HCC. In this review, we discuss the current state of our understanding of the relationship between HBV and miRNAs, including how HBV affects cellular miRNAs, how these miRNAs impact HBV replication, and the relationship between HBV-mediated miRNA regulation and HCC development. We also address the impact of challenges in studying HBV, such as the lack of an effective model system for infectivity and a reliance on transformed cell lines, on our understanding of the relationship between HBV and miRNAs, and propose potential applications of miRNA-related techniques that could enhance our understanding of the role miRNAs play in HBV replication and HBV-associated disease, ultimately leading to new therapeutic options and improved patient outcomes.

  2. How aneuploidy affects metabolic control and causes cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Rasnick, D; Duesberg, P H

    1999-01-01

    The complexity and diversity of cancer-specific phenotypes, including de-differentiation, invasiveness, metastasis, abnormal morphology and metabolism, genetic instability and progression to malignancy, have so far eluded explanation by a simple, coherent hypothesis. However, an adaptation of Metabolic Control Analysis supports the 100-year-old hypothesis that aneuploidy, an abnormal number of chromosomes, is the cause of cancer. The results demonstrate the currently counter-intuitive principle that it is the fraction of the genome undergoing differential expression, not the magnitude of the differential expression, that controls phenotypic transformation. Transforming the robust normal phenotype into cancer requires a twofold increase in the expression of thousands of normal gene products. The massive change in gene dose produces highly non-linear (i.e. qualitative) changes in the physiology and metabolism of cells and tissues. Since aneuploidy disrupts the natural balance of mitosis proteins, it also explains the notorious genetic instability of cancer cells as a consequence of the perpetual regrouping of chromosomes. In view of this and the existence of non-cancerous aneuploidy, we propose that cancer is the phenotype of cells above a certain threshold of aneuploidy. This threshold is reached either by the gradual, stepwise increase in the level of aneuploidy as a consequence of the autocatalysed genetic instability of aneuploid cells or by tetraploidization followed by a gradual loss of chromosomes. Thus the initiation step of carcinogenesis produces aneuploidy below the threshold for cancer, and the promotion step increases the level of aneuploidy above this threshold. We conclude that aneuploidy offers a simple and coherent explanation for all the cancer-specific phenotypes. Accordingly, the gross biochemical abnormalities, abnormal cellular size and morphology, the appearance of tumour-associated antigens, the high levels of secreted proteins responsible for

  3. Hormonal control of hepatic glycogen metabolism in food-deprived, continuously swimming coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vijayan, M.M.; Maule, A.G.; Schreck, C.B.; Moon, T.W.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma cortisol concentration and liver cytosolic glucocorticoid receptor activities of continuously swimming, food-deprived coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) did not differ from those of resting, fed fish. Plasma glucose concentration was significantly higher in the exercising, starved fish, but there were no significant differences in either hepatic glycogen concentration or hepatic activities of glycogen phosphorylase, glycogen synthase, pyruvate kinase, or lactate dehydrogenase between the two groups. Total glucose production by hepatocytes did not differ significantly between the two groups; glycogen breakdown accounted for all the glucose produced in the resting, fed fish whereas it explained only 59% of the glucose production in the exercised animals. Epinephrine and glucagon stimulation of glucose production by hepatocytes was decreased in the exercised fish without significantly affecting hepatocyte glycogen breakdown in either group. Insulin prevented glycogen breakdown and enhanced glycogen deposition in exercised fish. The results indicate that food-deprived, continuously swimming coho salmon conserve glycogen by decreasing the responsiveness of hepatocytes to catabolic hormones and by increasing the responsiveness to insulin (anabolic hormone).

  4. Citrus Flavanones Affect Hepatic Fatty Acid Oxidation in Rats by Acting as Prooxidant Agents

    PubMed Central

    Constantin, Rodrigo Polimeni; do Nascimento, Gilson Soares; Constantin, Renato Polimeni; Salgueiro, Clairce Luzia; Bracht, Adelar; Ishii-Iwamoto, Emy Luiza; Yamamoto, Nair Seiko

    2013-01-01

    Citrus flavonoids have a wide range of biological activities and positive health effects on mammalian cells because of their antioxidant properties. However, they also act as prooxidants and thus may interfere with metabolic pathways. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effects of three citrus flavanones, hesperidin, hesperetin, and naringenin, on several parameters linked to fatty acid oxidation in mitochondria, peroxisomes, and perfused livers of rats. When exogenous octanoate was used as substrate, hesperetin and naringenin reduced the mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ ratio and stimulated the citric acid cycle without significant changes on oxygen uptake or ketogenesis. When fatty acid oxidation from endogenous sources was evaluated, hesperetin and naringenin strongly reduced the mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ ratio. They also inhibited both oxygen uptake and ketogenesis and stimulated the citric acid cycle. Hesperidin, on the other hand, had little to no effect on these parameters. These results confirm the hypothesis that citrus flavanones are able to induce a more oxidised state in liver cells, altering parameters related to hepatic fatty acid oxidation. The prooxidant effect is most likely a consequence of the ability of these substances to oxidise NADH upon production of phenoxyl radicals in the presence of peroxidases and hydrogen peroxide. PMID:24288675

  5. Orally Administered Berberine Modulates Hepatic Lipid Metabolism by Altering Microbial Bile Acid Metabolism and the Intestinal FXR Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Runbin; Yang, Na; Kong, Bo; Cao, Bei; Feng, Dong; Yu, Xiaoyi; Ge, Chun; Huang, Jingqiu; Shen, Jianliang; Wang, Pei; Feng, Siqi; Fei, Fei; Guo, Jiahua; He, Jun; Aa, Nan; Chen, Qiang; Pan, Yang; Schumacher, Justin D; Yang, Chung S; Guo, Grace L; Aa, Jiye; Wang, Guangji

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies suggest that the lipid-lowering effect of berberine (BBR) involves actions on the low-density lipoprotein receptor and the AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. However, the implication of these mechanisms is unclear because of the low bioavailability of BBR. Because the main action site of BBR is the gut and intestinal farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of lipid metabolism, we hypothesized that the effects of BBR on intestinal FXR signaling pathway might account for its pharmacological effectiveness. Using wild type (WT) and intestine-specific FXR knockout (FXR(int-/-)) mice, we found that BBR prevented the development of high-fat-diet-induced obesity and ameliorated triglyceride accumulation in livers of WT, but not FXR(int-/-) mice. BBR increased conjugated bile acids in serum and their excretion in feces. Furthermore, BBR inhibited bile salt hydrolase (BSH) activity in gut microbiota, and significantly increased the levels of tauro-conjugated bile acids, especially tauro-cholic acid(TCA), in the intestine. Both BBR and TCA treatment activated the intestinal FXR pathway and reduced the expression of fatty-acid translocase Cd36 in the liver. These results indicate that BBR may exert its lipid-lowering effect primarily in the gut by modulating the turnover of bile acids and subsequently the ileal FXR signaling pathway. In summary, we provide the first evidence to suggest a new mechanism of BBR action in the intestine that involves, sequentially, inhibiting BSH, elevating TCA, and activating FXR, which lead to the suppression of hepatic expression of Cd36 that results in reduced uptake of long-chain fatty acids in the liver.

  6. Seasonal Temperature Changes Do Not Affect Cardiac Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Schildt, Jukka; Loimaala, Antti; Hippeläinen, Eero; Nikkinen, Päivi; Ahonen, Aapo

    2015-01-01

    FDG-PET/CT is widely used to diagnose cardiac inflammation such as cardiac sarcoidosis. Physiological myocardial FDG uptake often creates a problem when assessing the possible pathological glucose metabolism of the heart. Several factors, such as fasting, blood glucose, and hormone levels, influence normal myocardial glucose metabolism. The effect of outdoor temperature on myocardial FDG uptake has not been reported before. We retrospectively reviewed 29 cancer patients who underwent PET scans in warm summer months and again in cold winter months. We obtained myocardial, liver, and mediastinal standardized uptake values (SUVs) as well as quantitative cardiac heterogeneity and the myocardial FDG uptake pattern. We also compared age and body mass index to other variables. The mean myocardial FDG uptake showed no significant difference between summer and winter months. Average outdoor temperature did not correlate significantly with myocardial SUVmax in either summer or winter. The heterogeneity of myocardial FDG uptake did not differ significantly between seasons. Outdoor temperature seems to have no significant effect on myocardial FDG uptake or heterogeneity. Therefore, warming the patients prior to attending cardiac PET studies in order to reduce physiological myocardial FDG uptake seems to be unnecessary. PMID:26858844

  7. Cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of triclosan attenuates its cytotoxicity in hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanfeng; Chitranshi, Priyanka; Loukotková, Lucie; Gamboa da Costa, Gonçalo; Beland, Frederick A; Zhang, Jie; Fang, Jia-Long

    2016-11-28

    sulfonation of triclosan are detoxification pathways. Among the 18 CYP-overexpressing cell lines, an inverse correlation was observed between cell viability and the level of triclosan in the culture medium. In conclusion, human CYP isoforms that metabolize triclosan were identified, and the metabolism of triclosan by CYPs, UGTs, and SULTs decreased its cytotoxicity in hepatic cells.

  8. Effect and mechanism of waterborne prolonged Zn exposure influencing hepatic lipid metabolism in javelin goby Synechogobius hasta.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Luo, Zhi; Hogstrand, Christer; Chen, Feng; Shi, Xi; Chen, Qi-Liang; Song, Yu-Feng; Pan, Ya-Xiong

    2016-07-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effect and mechanism of waterborne Zn exposure influencing hepatic lipid deposition and metabolism in javelin goby Synechogobius hasta. S. hasta were exposed to four waterborne Zn concentrations (Zn 0.005 [control], 0.18, 0.36 and 0.55 mg l(-1) , respectively) for 60 days. Sampling occurred at days 20, 40 and 60, respectively. Zn exposure increased Zn content, declined hepatic lipid content and reduced viscerosomatic and hepatosomatic indices and lipogenic enzyme activities, including 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), malic enzyme (ME) and fatty acid synthase (FAS). At days 20 and 60, Zn exposure decreased hepatic mRNA levels of 6PGD, G6PD, ME, FAS, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC)α, ACCβ, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL)a, HSLb, sterol-regulator element-binding protein (SREBP)-1, peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR)α and PPARγ. However, the mRNA levels of CPT 1 and adipose triglyceride lipase increased following Zn exposure. On day 40, Zn exposure reduced hepatic mRNA expression of 6PGD, G6PD, ME, FAS, ACCα, ACCβ, HSLa, HSLb, SREBP-1 and PPARγ but increased mRNA expression of CPT 1, adipose triglyceride lipase and PPARα. General speaking, Zn exposure reduced hepatic lipid content by inhibiting lipogenesis and stimulating lipolysis. For the first time, the present study provided evidence that chronic Zn exposure differentially influenced mRNA expression and activities of genes and enzymes involved in lipogenic and lipolytic metabolism in a duration-dependent manner, and provided new insight into the relationship between metal elements and lipid metabolism. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Anti-hepatitis C virus seropositivity is not associated with metabolic syndrome irrespective of age, gender and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-Lung; Wang, Yuan-Chen; Lan, Keng-Hsin; Huo, Teh-Ia; Huang, Yi-Hsiang; Su, Chien-Wei; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Wu, Jaw-Ching; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Although many studies have tried to clarify the association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and metabolic syndrome, few studies have comprehensively assessed their relationship stratified by different demographic characteristics. We aimed to investigate the correlation between metabolic syndrome and anti-HCV seropositivity in Taiwan. This study enrolled consecutive subjects who had received health check-up services at Taipei Veterans General Hospital from 2002 to 2009. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed according to the criteria defined by the International Diabetes Federation Task Force on Epidemiology and Prevention. Among the 30616 subjects enrolled in this study, the prevalence of positive anti-HCV serology was 2.7%, and 28.8% were diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. By multivariate analysis, metabolic syndrome was associated with higher body mass index, older age, male sex, a higher level of alanine aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyltransferase, platelet count and the presence of fatty liver whereas anti-HCV seropositivity was not an independent variable for metabolic syndrome. Further stratifying the subjects by age and sex, and there was still no significant difference in HCV status between those with and without metabolic syndrome. Moreover, the stage of liver fibrosis represented by aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index was also not correlated with metabolic syndrome in the subjects with anti-HCV seropositivity. In conclusion, although subjects with anti-HCV seropositivity had higher fasting glucose levels and lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels compared to those with negative anti-HCV test, anti-HCV seropositivity was not associated with metabolic syndrome based on the current diagnostic criteria irrespective of age, gender and the stage of hepatic fibrosis.

  10. Trans-10,cis-12-CLA dysregulate lipid and glucose metabolism and induce hepatic NR4A receptors.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Maria A; Badimon, Lina; Rodriguez, Cristina; Arnal, Carmen; Noone, Enda J; Roche, Helen M; Osada, Jesus; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jose

    2010-01-01

    Our aim was to assess the effect of two isomers of conjugated linoleic acids (CLA), cis-9,trans-11-CLA (c9,t11-CLA) and trans-10,cis-12-CLA (t10,c12-CLA), on glucose metabolism and hepatic expression of NR4A receptors, key transcription factors regulating gluconeogenesis. ApoE-deficient mice were fed isocaloric, isonitrogenous westernized diets enriched with c9,t11-CLA, t10,c12-CLA or linoleic acid (control diet). Plasma glucose, NEFA, triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations were significantly higher in the t10,c12-CLA group compared with c9,t11-CLA or control group. Plasma insulin concentrations were lowered by c9,t11-CLA compared with either control or t10,c12-CLA group. Hepatic expression of NR4A receptors (Nur77, Nurr1 and NOR-1) was induced by t10,c12-CLA while c9,t11-CLA had not effect. Consistently t10,c12-CLA up-regulated key genes involved in gluconeogenesis including glucose-6-phosphatase, enolase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and pyruvate carboxylase. Hepatic expression of NR4A receptors correlated with plasma NEFA, with the expression of their target gene fatty acid transporter (FAT)/CD36 and with the accumulation of fat in the liver. These results suggest that t10,c12-CLA promote dysregulation of lipid and glucose metabolism, at least in part, by an isomer-specific modulation of hepatic expression of NR4A receptors.

  11. Comparison of rate of hepatic metabolism in vitro and half-life for antipyrine in vivo in three species.

    PubMed

    McManus, M E; Ilett, K F

    1979-02-01

    1. A radiometric assay for the total metabolism of antipyrine in vitro by hepatic microsomal preparations has been developed. 2. Apparent Km and V values for the process were determined in rats, rabbits and in a marsupial (the quokka; Setomix brachyurus). Km values were similar in rats and rabbits (3.5 and 5 mM respectively) but were somewhat lower in quokkas (1.4--1.5 mM). Estimates of V ranged from 49--64 nmol/mg microsomal protein/10 min and were similar in all three species. Pretreatment of rabbits with phenobarbitone significantly increased V without change in Km. 3. Studies in individual rabbits and quokkas showed a good correlation between rate of hepatic microsomal metabolism of antipyrine in vitro and its half-life in vivo.

  12. Loading-induced changes in synovial fluid affect cartilage metabolism.

    PubMed

    van de Lest, C H; van den Hoogen, B M; van Weeren, P R

    2000-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine whether changes in the synovial fluid (SF) induced by in vivo loading can alter the metabolic activity of chondrocytes in vitro, and, if so, whether insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is responsible for this effect. Therefore, SF was collected from ponies after a period of box rest and after they had been exercised for a week. Normal, unloaded articular cartilage explants were cultured in 20% solutions of these SFs for 4 days and chondrocyte bioactivity was determined by glycosaminoglycan (GAG) turnover (i.e., the incorporation of 35SO4 into GAG and the release of GAG into the medium). Furthermore, the extent to which the bioactivity is IGF-I-dependent was determined in a cartilage explant culture in 20% SF, in the presence and absence of anti-IGF-I antibodies. In explants cultured in post-exercise SF, GAG synthesis was enhanced and GAG release was diminished when compared to cultures in pre-exercise SF. SF analysis showed that IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels were increased in post-exercise SF. There was a positive correlation between IGF-I levels and proteoglycan synthesis, but no correlation between IGF-I levels and proteoglycan release. Addition of anti-IGF-I antibodies significantly inhibited stimulation of proteoglycan synthesis in explants cultured in SF with 40%. However, there was no difference in inhibition of proteoglycan synthesis between pre- and post-exercise SF which indicated that the relative contribution of IGF-I in the stimulating effect of SF did not change. Proteoglycan release was not influenced by the presence of anti-IGF-I antibodies. It is concluded that chondrocyte metabolic activity is at least partially regulated by changes in the SF induced by in vivo loading. Exercise altered the SF in a way that it had a favourable effect on cartilage PG content by enhancing the PG synthesis and reducing the PG breakdown. IGF-I is an important contributor to the overall stimulating effect of SF on cartilage

  13. Can Cholesterol Metabolism Modulation Affect Brain Function and Behavior?

    PubMed

    Cartocci, Veronica; Servadio, Michela; Trezza, Viviana; Pallottini, Valentina

    2017-02-01

    Cholesterol is an important component for cell physiology. It regulates the fluidity of cell membranes and determines the physical and biochemical properties of proteins. In the central nervous system, cholesterol controls synapse formation and function and supports the saltatory conduction of action potential. In recent years, the role of cholesterol in the brain has caught the attention of several research groups since a breakdown of cholesterol metabolism has been associated with different neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases, and interestingly also with psychiatric conditions. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge about the connection between cholesterol dysregulation and various neurologic and psychiatric disorders based on clinical and preclinical studies. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 281-286, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. How does fish metamorphosis affect aromatic amino acid metabolism?

    PubMed

    Pinto, Wilson; Figueira, Luís; Dinis, Maria Teresa; Aragão, Cláudia

    2009-02-01

    Aromatic amino acids (AAs, phenylalanine and tyrosine) may be specifically required during fish metamorphosis, since they are the precursors of thyroid hormones which regulate this process. This project attempted to evaluate aromatic AA metabolism during the ontogenesis of fish species with a marked (Senegalese sole; Solea senegalensis) and a less accentuated metamorphosis (gilthead seabream; Sparus aurata). Fish were tube-fed with three L-[U-14C] AA solutions at pre-metamorphic, metamorphic and post-metamorphic stages of development: controlled AA mixture (Mix), phenylalanine (Phe) and tyrosine (Tyr). Results showed a preferential aromatic AA retention during the metamorphosis of Senegalese sole, rather than in gilthead seabream. Senegalese sole's highly accentuated metamorphosis seems to increase aromatic AA physiological requirements, possibly for thyroid hormone production. Thus, Senegalese sole seems to be especially susceptible to dietary aromatic AA deficiencies during the metamorphosis period, and these findings may be important for physiologists, fish nutritionists and the flatfish aquaculture industry.

  15. Ghrelin: a metabolic signal affecting the reproductive system.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Teresa; Meli, Rosaria; Marzioni, Daniela; Morroni, Manrico; Baragli, Alessandra; Castellucci, Mario; Gualillo, Oreste; Muccioli, Giampiero

    2009-04-01

    Ghrelin, an acylated 28 amino acid gastric peptide, was isolated from the stomach as an endogenous ligand for growth hormone (GH) secretagogue receptor in 1999. Circulating ghrelin is mainly produced by specific cells in the stomach's oxyntic glands. Ghrelin potently stimulates GH release and food intake and exhibits diverse effects, including ones on glucose metabolism and on secretion and motility of the gastrointestinal tract. Besides these effects on food intake and energy homeostasis, ghrelin is also involved in controlling reproductive functions, and a role for it as a novel regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis is clearly emerging. We review recent ghrelin research with emphasis on its roles in the reproductive axis.

  16. Alterations of Hepatic Metabolism in Chronic Kidney Disease via D-box-binding Protein Aggravate the Renal Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, Kengo; Matsunaga, Naoya; Ikeda, Eriko; Kondo, Hideaki; Ikeyama, Hisako; Tokushige, Kazutaka; Itcho, Kazufumi; Furuichi, Yoko; Yoshida, Yuya; Matsuda, Masaki; Yasuda, Kaori; Doi, Atsushi; Yokota, Yoshifumi; Amamoto, Toshiaki; Aramaki, Hironori; Irino, Yasuhiro; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-03-04

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with an increase in serum retinol; however, the underlying mechanisms of this disorder are poorly characterized. Here, we found that the alteration of hepatic metabolism induced the accumulation of serum retinol in 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6Nx) mice. The liver is the major organ responsible for retinol metabolism; accordingly, microarray analysis revealed that the hepatic expression of most CYP genes was changed in 5/6Nx mice. In addition, D-box-binding protein (DBP), which controls the expression of several CYP genes, was significantly decreased in these mice. Cyp3a11 and Cyp26a1, encoding key proteins in retinol metabolism, showed the greatest decrease in expression in 5/6Nx mice, a process mediated by the decreased expression of DBP. Furthermore, an increase of plasma transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in 5/6Nx mice led to the decreased expression of the Dbp gene. Consistent with these findings, the alterations of retinol metabolism and renal dysfunction in 5/6Nx mice were ameliorated by administration of an anti-TGF-β1 antibody. We also show that the accumulation of serum retinol induced renal apoptosis in 5/6Nx mice fed a normal diet, whereas renal dysfunction was reduced in mice fed a retinol-free diet. These findings indicate that constitutive Dbp expression plays an important role in mediating hepatic dysfunction under CKD. Thus, the aggravation of renal dysfunction in patients with CKD might be prevented by a recovery of hepatic function, potentially through therapies targeting DBP and retinol.

  17. Olive leaf extract attenuates cardiac, hepatic, and metabolic changes in high carbohydrate-, high fat-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Poudyal, Hemant; Campbell, Fiona; Brown, Lindsay

    2010-05-01

    Olive oil, an important component of the Mediterranean diet, produces cardioprotective effects, probably due to both oleic acid and the polyphenols such as oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol. Our aim in this study was to assess whether a polyphenol-enriched extract from the leaves of Olea europaea L. with oleuropein as the major component attenuated the cardiovascular, hepatic, and metabolic signs of a high-carbohydrate, high-fat (HCHF) diet (carbohydrate, 52%; fat, 24%, 25% fructose in drinking water) in rats. Male Wistar rats were fed either a cornstarch diet (CS) or a HCHF diet for a total of 16 wk. Diets of the treatment groups [CS+olive leaf extract (OLE) and HCHF+OLE] were supplemented with 3% OLE after 8 wk of being fed their respective CS or HCHF diets for a further 8 wk. After 16 wk, HCHF rats developed signs of metabolic syndrome, including elevated abdominal and hepatic fat deposition, collagen deposition in heart and liver, cardiac stiffness, and oxidative stress markers (plasma malondialdehyde and uric acid concentrations), with diminished aortic ring reactivity, abnormal plasma lipid profile, impaired glucose tolerance, and hypertension. Compared with HCHF rats, those in the HCHF+OLE group had improved or normalized cardiovascular, hepatic, and metabolic signs with the exception of elevated blood pressure. These results strongly suggest that an OLE containing polyphenols such as oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol reverses the chronic inflammation and oxidative stress that induces the cardiovascular, hepatic, and metabolic symptoms in this rat model of diet-induced obesity and diabetes without changing blood pressure.

  18. Metabolic differences in temperamental Brahman cattle can affect productivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many factors may adversely affect the growth and productivity of livestock. These include stressors associated with management practices, such as weaning, handling relative to transportation, and vaccination, that can modulate growth through the production of stress-related hormones (i.e., cortisol,...

  19. Tissue lipid metabolism and hepatic metabolomic profiling in response to supplementation of fermented cottonseedmeal in the diets of broiler chickens*

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Cun-xi; Zhang, Wen-ju; Wang, Yong-qiang; Liu, Yan-feng; Ge, Wen-xia; Liu, Jian-cheng

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of fermented cottonseed meal (FCSM) on lipid metabolites, lipid metabolism-related gene expression in liver tissues and abdominal adipose tissues, and hepatic metabolomic profiling in broiler chickens. One hundred and eighty 21-d-old broiler chickens were randomly divided into three diet groups with six replicates of 10 birds in each group. The three diets consisted of a control diet supplemented with unfermented cottonseed meal, an experimental diet of cottonseed meal fermented by Candida tropicalis, and a second experimental diet of cottonseed meal fermented by C. tropicalis plus Saccharomyces cerevisae. The results showed that FCSM intake significantly decreased the levels of abdominal fat and hepatic triglycerides (P<0.05 for both). Dietary FCSM supplementation down-regulated the mRNA expression of fatty acid synthase and acetyl CoA carboxylase in liver tissues and the lipoprotein lipase expression in abdominal fat tissues (P<0.05 for both). FCSM intake resulted in significant metabolic changes of multiple pathways in the liver involving the tricarboxylic acid cycle, synthesis of fatty acids, and the metabolism of glycerolipid and amino acids. These findings indicated that FCSM regulated lipid metabolism by increasing or decreasing the expression of the lipid-related gene and by altering multiple endogenous metabolites. Lipid metabolism regulation is a complex process, this discovery provided new essential information about the effects of FCSM diets in broiler chickens and demonstrated the great potential of nutrimetabolomics in researching complex nutrients added to animal diets. PMID:26055906

  20. Retrospective study of the associations between hepatitis C virus infection and metabolic factors

    PubMed Central

    Yair-Sabag, Shira; Nussinson, Elchanan; Ben-Assuli, Ofir; Shibli, Fahmi; Shahbari, Azmi; Zelber-Sagi, Shira

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the bidirectional association between metabolic syndrome (MS) components and antiviral treatment response for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. METHODS This retrospective cohort study included 119 HCV + patients treated with pegylated-interferon-α and ribavirin. Metabolic characteristics and laboratory data were collected from medical records. Differences in baseline clinical and demographic risk factors between responders and non-responders were assessed using independent samples t-tests or χ2 tests. The effects of sustained viral response (SVR) to antiviral treatment on de novo impairments in MS components, including impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), were assessed using univariable and multivariable logistic regression analysis, while the effect of MS components on SVR was assessed using univariable logistic regression analysis. RESULTS Of the 119 patients, 80 (67%) developed SVR over the average 54 ± 13 mo follow-up. The cumulative risks for de novo T2DM and IFG were 5.07- (95%CI: 1.261-20.4, P = 0.022) and 3.87-fold higher (95%CI: 1.484-10.15, P = 0.006), respectively for non-responders than responders, when adjusted for the baseline risk factors age, sex, HCV genotype, high viral load, and steatosis. Post-treatment triglyceride levels were significantly lower in non-responders than in responders (OR = 0.27; 95%CI: 0.069-0.962, P = 0.044). Age and HCV genotype 3 were significantly different between responders and non-responders, and MS components were not significantly associated with SVR. Steatosis tended to attenuate SVR (OR = 0.596; 95%CI: 0.331-1.073, P = 0.08). CONCLUSION SVR was associated with lower de novo T2DM and IFG incidence and higher triglyceride levels. Patients infected with HCV should undergo T2DM screening and antidiabetic treatment. PMID:27843537

  1. Hepatic alteration of tryptophan metabolism in an acute porphyria model Its relation with gluconeogenic blockage.

    PubMed

    Lelli, Sandra M; Mazzetti, Marta B; San Martín de Viale, Leonor C

    2008-02-01

    This study focuses on the alterations suffered by the serotoninergic and kinurenergic routes of tryptophan (TRP) metabolism in liver, and their relation with gluconeogenic phosphoenolpyruvate-carboxykinase (PEPCK) blockage in experimental acute porphyria. This porphyria was induced in rats by a combined treatment of 2-allyl-2-isopropylacetamide (100, 250, 500 mg/kg bw) and 3,5-dietoxicarbonil 1,4-dihydrocollidine (constant 50 mg/kg bw dose). Results showed a marked dose-dependent increase of all TRP pyrrolase (TRPp) forms, active (holo, total) and inactive (apo), and a decrease in the degree of enzyme saturation by heme. Increases for holo, total, and apo-TRPp were 90, 150, and 230%, respectively, at the highest dose assayed (H). The treatment also impaired the serotoninergic route of TRP metabolism in liver, causing a decrease in serotonin level (H, 38%), and a concomitant enhancement in TRP content (H, 23%). The porphyrinogenic treatment promoted a blockage in PEPCK activity (H, 30%). This occurred in correlation to the development of porphyria, to TRPp alterations and to the production of hepatic microsomal thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Porphyria was estimated through increases in 5-aminolevulinic acid-synthase (ALA-S) activity, ALA and porphobilinogen contents, and a decrease in ferrochelatase activity. Thus, the TRP kynurenine route was augmented whereas the serotoninergic route was reduced. PEPCK blockage could be partly attributed to quinolinate generated from TRP by the increase of TRPp activity, which would be due to the effect of porphyrinogenic drugs on TRP. The contribution of ROS to PEPCK blockage is analyzed. Likewise, the implication of these results in the control of porphyrias by glucose is discussed.

  2. Ameliorating effect of chromium administration on hepatic glucose metabolism in streptozotocin-induced experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Bhuvaneshwari; Singhal, Kirti; Sandhir, Rajat

    2012-01-01

    Chromium has been recognized as an essential trace element that plays an important role in carbohydrate metabolism. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in its action are not clear. This study was undertaken to understand the mechanism of chromium action in experimental diabetes. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals were administered chromium as chromium picolinate (CrP) at a daily dose of 1 mg/kg body weight for a period of 4 weeks. It was observed that chromium complexed with picolinate was effective in lowering plasma glucose levels as well as was able to alleviate polyphagia, polydipsia, and weight loss in diabetic animals. Administration of chromium was also found to normalize glycogen content in liver of diabetic animals to near control levels. The reduction in plasma glucose levels by chromium was accompanied by increase in activity of glycolytic enzymes (e.g., glucokinase, phosphofructokinase, and pyruvate kinase) and by suppression in activity of gluconeogenic enzymes (e.g., glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) in liver. Hepatic glucose uptake was found to be increased by chromium supplementation as demonstrated by decrease in Km and increase in Vmax values in diabetic animals. Chromium levels were lower in the liver of diabetic rats when compared with that of control rats. A negative correlation was observed between plasma glucose and chromium concentration in patients with diabetes. The data suggests that chromium supplementation as CrP is beneficial in correcting hyperglycemia, implying that the modulation of the glucose metabolism by chromium may be therapeutically beneficial in the treatment of diabetes.

  3. [Metabolic studies in brothers affected by alcaptonuria (ochronosis)].

    PubMed

    Pugge, H R; Orozco, M; Toledo, A; Ripoll, J; Katz, J; Toledo, I; Pellanda, R

    1978-01-01

    The case of two brothers affected by alcaptonurie is reported. The activity of the homogenthisycasa enzyme has been determined by the material obtained through percutaneous biopsy. Concentrations of the aminoacids producing fenilalanina and thiroxina in their parents' blood have been investigated, the tests showing lack of liver enzyme and normal concentration of the amount of aminoacids in blood. Some aspects of skin lesion have been briefly reported and methods for treatment presented.

  4. Oxidative metabolism of astrocytes is not reduced in hepatic encephalopathy: a PET study with [11C]acetate in humans

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, Peter; Mouridsen, Kim; Hansen, Mikkel B.; Jensen, Svend B.; Sørensen, Michael; Bak, Lasse K.; Waagepetersen, Helle S.; Schousboe, Arne; Ott, Peter; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Keiding, Susanne; Gjedde, Albert

    2014-01-01

    In patients with impaired liver function and hepatic encephalopathy (HE), consistent elevations of blood ammonia concentration suggest a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HE. Ammonia and acetate are metabolized in brain both primarily in astrocytes. Here, we used dynamic [11C]acetate PET of the brain to measure the contribution of astrocytes to the previously observed reduction of brain oxidative metabolism in patients with liver cirrhosis and HE, compared to patients with cirrhosis without HE, and to healthy subjects. We used a new kinetic model to estimate uptake from blood to astrocytes and astrocyte metabolism of [11C]acetate. No significant differences of the rate constant of oxidation of [11C]acetate (k3) were found among the three groups of subjects. The net metabolic clearance of [11C]acetate from blood was lower in the group of patients with cirrhosis and HE than in the group of healthy subjects (P < 0.05), which we interpret to be an effect of reduced cerebral blood flow rather than a reflection of low [11C]acetate metabolism. We conclude that the characteristic decline of whole-brain oxidative metabolism in patients with cirrhosis with HE is not due to malfunction of oxidative metabolism in astrocytes. Thus, the observed decline of brain oxidative metabolism implicates changes of neurons and their energy turnover in patients with HE. PMID:25404890

  5. MAPK1/3 regulate hepatic lipid metabolism via ATG7-dependent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuzhong; Liu, Hao; Yu, Junjie; Zhao, Zilong; Xiao, Fei; Xia, Tingting; Wang, Chunxia; Li, Kai; Deng, Jiali; Guo, Yajie; Chen, Shanghai; Chen, Yan; Guo, Feifan

    2016-01-01

    Although many biological functions of MAPK1/ERK2-MAPK3/ERK1 (mitogen-activated protein kinase 1/3) have been reported, a direct effect of MAPK1/3 on hepatic lipid metabolism remains largely unknown. We recently showed that activation of MAPK1/3 ameliorates liver steatosis in LEPR (leptin receptor)-deficient (db/db) mice, a classic animal model for liver steatosis. Consistent with these results, knockdown of MAPK1/3 promotes liver steatosis in C57/B6J wild-type (WT) mice. Autophagic flux and ATG7 (autophagy related 7) levels are increased by MAPK1/3 activation or decreased by MAPK1/3 knockdown in livers and primary hepatocytes. Blockade of autophagic flux by chloroquine (CQ) or ATG7 knockdown reverses the ameliorated liver steatosis in MAPK1/3-activated db/db mice. Together, these findings identify a beneficial role for MAPK1/3 in liver steatosis that is mediated by ATG7-dependent autophagy, which provides novel insights into the mechanisms underlying liver steatosis and create a rationale for targeting MAPK1/3 in the treatment of liver steatosis.

  6. Comparison of the in vitro and in vivo hepatic metabolism of the carcinogen 1-nitropyrene.

    PubMed

    Howard, P C; Flammang, T J; Beland, F A

    1985-02-01

    [4,5,9,10(-3)H]1-nitropyrene was incubated with NADH- or NADPH-fortified rat liver microsomes under an argon atmosphere. Residual substrate and metabolites were extracted with ethyl acetate and analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography. Both reduced and oxidized products were formed: namely, 1-aminopyrene, trans-4,5-dihydroxy-4,5-dihydro-1-nitropyrene, and 3-, 6- and 8-hydroxy-1-nitropyrene. When incubations were conducted with rat liver cytosol, only the reduced products 1-nitrosopyrene and 1-aminopyrene were detected. In parallel experiments, [4,5, 9,10-3H]1-nitropyrene was administered to rats by intravenous injection or gavage and the bile was collected. After 4 h, approximately one-third of the intravenously-administered compound appeared in the bile as O-glucuronides of 3-, 6- and 8-hydroxy-1-nitropyrene, the O-glucuronide of trans-4,5-dihydroxy-4,5-dihydro-1-nitropyrene, and unidentified glutathione conjugates. The same metabolites were found in rats treated with 1-nitropyrene by gavage; however, only 10% of the dose appeared in the bile within 12 h. These studies indicate that both nitroreduction and ring oxidation are involved in the hepatic metabolism of 1-nitropyrene. The importance of these pathways in the etiology of 1-nitropyrene tumorigenesis is discussed.

  7. CREB controls hepatic lipid metabolism through nuclear hormone receptor PPAR-gamma.

    PubMed

    Herzig, Stephan; Hedrick, Susan; Morantte, Ianessa; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Galimi, Francesco; Montminy, Marc

    2003-11-13

    Fasting triggers a series of hormonal cues that promote energy balance by inducing glucose output and lipid breakdown in the liver. In response to pancreatic glucagon and adrenal cortisol, the cAMP-responsive transcription factor CREB activates gluconeogenic and fatty acid oxidation programmes by stimulating expression of the nuclear hormone receptor coactivator PGC-1 (refs 2-5). In parallel, fasting also suppresses lipid storage and synthesis (lipogenic) pathways, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here we show that mice deficient in CREB activity have a fatty liver phenotype and display elevated expression of the nuclear hormone receptor PPAR-gamma, a key regulator of lipogenic genes. CREB inhibits hepatic PPAR-gamma expression in the fasted state by stimulating the expression of the Hairy Enhancer of Split (HES-1) gene, a transcriptional repressor that is shown here to be a mediator of fasting lipid metabolism in vivo. The coordinate induction of PGC-1 and repression of PPAR-gamma by CREB during fasting provides a molecular rationale for the antagonism between insulin and counter-regulatory hormones, and indicates a potential role for CREB antagonists as therapeutic agents in enhancing insulin sensitivity in the liver.

  8. Direct imaging of the disruption of hepatitis C virus replication complexes by inhibitors of lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Lyn, Rodney K.; Kennedy, David C.; Sagan, Selena M.; Blais, David R.; Rouleau, Yanouchka; Pegoraro, Adrian F.; Xie, X. Sunney; Stolow, Albert; Pezacki, John Paul

    2009-11-10

    Here we have simultaneously characterized the influence of inhibitors of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) and the mevalonate pathway on hepatocyte lipid metabolism and the subcellular localization of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA using two-photon fluorescence (TPF) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. Using this approach, we demonstrate that modulators of PPARalpha signaling rapidly cause the dispersion of HCV RNA from replication sites and simultaneously induce lipid storage and increases in lipid droplet size. We demonstrate that reductions in the levels of cholesterol resulting from inhibition of the mevalonate pathway upregulates triglyceride levels. We also show that the rate of dispersion of HCV RNA is very rapid when using a PPARalpha antagonist. This occurs with a faster rate to that of direct inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) using lovastatin in living cells, demonstrating the potential therapeutic value of modulating host cell pathways as part of a strategy to eliminate chronic HCV infection.

  9. Evidence for pre-hepatic metabolism of oral cyclosporine in children.

    PubMed Central

    Hoppu, K; Koskimies, O; Holmberg, C; Hirvisalo, E L

    1991-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine were investigated before renal transplantation in 20 children aged 1.1 to 16.8 years. Cyclosporine was given as a single oral dose (10 mg kg-1) or as a 4 h i.v. infusion (3 mg kg-1). 2. The blood drug concentration was measured by both specific and nonspecific monoclonal radioimmunoassays. 3. The mean oral availability of cyclosporine was 20.6% (range 10.8-34.1%). 4. The mean ratio of AUCs measured by nonspecific and specific r.i.a. was 1.96 (range 1.4-2.7) after oral administration and 1.43 (range 1.1-2.0) after i.v. administration. The mean difference between the ratios was 38.5% (P = 0.0001). The ratio of AUCnonspecific to AUCspecific was inversely related to blood drug clearance (r = 0.57; P = 0.009). 5. The findings are suggestive of presystemic, pre-hepatic metabolism of cyclosporine which could contribute to the low, and highly variable bioavailability of this drug. PMID:1958443

  10. Loading-induced changes in synovial fluid affect cartilage metabolism.

    PubMed

    Van den Hoogen, B M; van de Lest, C H; van Weeren, P R; Lafeber, F P; Lopes-Cardozo, M; van Golde, L M; Barneveld, A

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether changes in the synovial fluid (SF) induced by in vivo loading can induce an alteration in the metabolic activity of chondrocytes in vitro. Therefore, SF was collected from ponies after a period of box rest and after they had exercise for a week. Normal, unloaded articular cartilage explants were cultured in 20% solutions of these SFs for 4 days and chondrocyte activity was determined by glycosaminoglycan (GAG) turnover. In explants cultured in post-exercise SF, GAG synthesis was enhanced and GAG release was diminished when compared to cultures in pre-exercise SF. SF analysis showed that levels of insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) tended to be higher in post-exercise SF, while no differences were found in metalloproteinase activity, hyaluronic acid and protein concentrations. This study showed that anabolic effects of joint loading on cartilage are, at least partially, mediated by alterations in the SF.

  11. Childhood obesity affects adult metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yajun; Hou, Dongqing; Zhao, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Liang; Hu, Yuehua; Liu, Junting; Cheng, Hong; Yang, Ping; Shan, Xinying; Yan, Yinkun; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Mi, Jie

    2015-09-01

    We seek to observe the association between childhood obesity by different measures and adult obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and diabetes. Thousand two hundred and nine subjects from "Beijing Blood Pressure Cohort Study" were followed 22.9 ± 0.5 years in average from childhood to adulthood. We defined childhood obesity using body mass index (BMI) or left subscapular skinfold (LSSF), and adult obesity as BMI ≥ 28 kg/m(2). MetS was defined according to the joint statement of International Diabetes Federation and American Heart Association with modified waist circumference (≥ 90/85 cm for men/women). Diabetes was defined as fasting plasma glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/L or blood glucose 2 h after oral glucose tolerance test ≥ 11.1 mmol/L or currently using blood glucose-lowering agents. Multiple linear and logistic regression models were used to assess the association. The incidence of adult obesity was 13.4, 60.0, 48.3, and 65.1 % for children without obesity, having obesity by BMI only, by LSSF only, and by both, respectively. Compared to children without obesity, children obese by LSSF only or by both had higher risk of diabetes. After controlling for adult obesity, childhood obesity predicted independently long-term risks of diabetes (odds ratio 2.8, 95 % confidence interval 1.2-6.3) or abdominal obesity (2.7, 1.6-4.7) other than MetS as a whole (1.2, 0.6-2.4). Childhood obesity predicts long-term risk of adult diabetes, and the effect is independent of adult obesity. LSSF is better than BMI in predicting adult diabetes.

  12. Hepatic biotransformation pathways and ruminal metabolic stability of the novel anthelmintic monepantel in sheep and cattle.

    PubMed

    Ballent, M; Virkel, G; Maté, L; Viviani, P; Lanusse, C; Lifschitz, A

    2016-10-01

    Monepantel (MNP) is a new amino-acetonitrile derivative anthelmintic drug used for the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes in sheep. The present work investigated the main enzymatic pathways involved in the hepatic biotransformation of MNP in sheep and cattle. The metabolic stability in ruminal fluid of both the parent drug and its main metabolite (monepantel sulphone, MNPSO2 ) was characterized as well. Additionally, the relative distribution of both anthelmintic molecules between the fluid and particulate phases of the ruminal content was studied. Liver microsomal fractions from six (6) rams and five (5) steers were incubated with a 40 μm of MNP. Heat pretreatment (50 °C for 2 min) of liver microsomes was performed for inactivation of the flavin-monooxygenase (FMO) system. Additionally, MNP was incubated in the presence of 4, 40, and 80 μm of methimazole (MTZ), a FMO inhibitor, or equimolar concentrations of piperonyl butoxide (PBx), a well-known general cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibitor. In both ruminant species, MNPSO2 was the main metabolite detected after MNP incubation with liver microsomes. The conversion rate of MNP into MNPSO2 was fivefold higher (P < 0.05) in sheep (0.15 ± 0.08 nmol/min·mg) compared to cattle. In sheep, the relative involvement of both FMO and CYP systems (FMO/CYP) was 36/64. Virtually, only the CYP system appeared to be involved in the production of MNPSO2 in cattle liver. Methimazole significantly reduced (41 to 79%) the rate of MNPSO2 production in sheep liver microsomes whereas it did not inhibit MNP oxidation in cattle liver microsomes. On the other hand, PBx inhibited the production of MNPSO2 in liver microsomes of both sheep (58 to 98%, in a dose-dependent manner) and cattle (almost 100%, independently of the PBx concentration added). The incubation of MNP and MNPSO2 with ruminal contents of both species showed a high chemical stability without evident metabolism and/or degradation as well as an extensive

  13. [Dosing time based on molecular mechanism of biological clock of hepatic drug metabolic enzyme].

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Naoya

    2009-11-01

    The mammalian circadian pacemaker stays in the paired suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). Recent several studies reveal that the circadian rhythms of physiology and behavior are controlled by clock genes. In addition, the effectiveness and toxicity of many drugs vary depending on dosing time associated with 24-h rhythms of biochemical, physiological, and behavioral processes under the control of the circadian clock. Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used analgesic drug, and is mainly biotransformed and eliminated as nontoxic conjugates with glucuronic acid and sulfuric acid. Only a small portion of the dose is mainly bioactivated by CYP2E1 to N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), a reactive toxic intermediate. For APAP overdose, glucuronidation and sulfation are saturated and the formation of NAPQI increases. However, the exact mechanisms underlying the chronotoxicity of APAP have not been clarified yet. In the present study, we have clarified that there was a significant dosing time-dependent difference in hepatotoxicity induced by APAP in mice. The mechanism may be related to the rhythmicity of CYP2E1 activity and GSH conjugation. In additon, we investigated whether the liver transcription factor hepatic nuclear factor-1alpha (HNF-1alpha) and clock genes undergoing astriking 24-h rhythm in mouse liver contribute to the 24-h regulation of CYP2E1 activity. A significant 24-h rhythmicity was demonstrated for CYP2E1 activity, protein levels and mRNA levels. HNF-1alpha and clock genes may contribute to produce the 24-h rhythm of CYP2E1 mRNA levels. Metabolism by CYP and GSH conjugation are common metabolic pathways for many drugs such as APAP. These findings support the concept that choosing the most appropriate time of day to administer the drugs associated with metabolic rhythmicity such as CYP and GSH conjugation may reduce hepatotoxicity in experimental and clinical situations. 24-h rhythm of CYP2E1 activity was controlled by HNF-1alpha and clock gene, in a

  14. The effects of fenvalerate on hepatic and cerebral xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in selenium and/or iodine deficient rats

    PubMed Central

    Caglayan, Aydan; Kocer-Gumusel, Belma; Erkekoglu, Pinar; Hincal, Filiz

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Particularly in developing countries, selenium and/or iodine deficiencies are encountered and use of pesticides in agriculture are not well-controlled. Fenvalerate is a pyrethroid insectide used in agriculture and has applications against a wide range of pests. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of fenvalerate on hepatic and cerebral xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities in the presence of iodine and/or selenium deficiency on a rat model. Materials and Methods: Iodine and/or selenium deficiency was induced by feeding three-week-old Wistar rats with a diet containing <0.005 mg selenium kg-1, and/or administering 1% sodium perchlorate in drinking water for 7 weeks. Test groups received fenvalerate (100 mg kg-1 BW IP) for the last 7 days. Hepatic and cerebral microsomal aniline hydroxylase (CYP2E1) and cytosolic glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities were determined. Besides, hepatic NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (P450R), ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD, CYP1A1/1A2) and penthoxyresorufin O-depenthylase (PROD, CYP2B1/2B2), activities were also measured. Results: Fenvalerate had a general inductive effect on the hepatic and cerebral xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities. Moreover, enzyme activities were also altered by iodine and/or selenium deficiency, but the effects seemed to be enzyme- and tissue-specific. Conclusion: The inductive effect of fenvalerate, particularly in high dose exposures, may change the metabolism of several xenobiotics, including drugs, as well as endogenous substrates. The effects may vary depending on the selenium and/or iodine status of individual. PMID:27872699

  15. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM affects vitamin E acetate metabolism and intestinal bile acid signature in monocolonized mice.

    PubMed

    Roager, Henrik M; Sulek, Karolina; Skov, Kasper; Frandsen, Henrik L; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Wilcks, Andrea; Skov, Thomas H; Villas-Boas, Silas G; Licht, Tine R

    2014-01-01

    Monocolonization of germ-free (GF) mice enables the study of specific bacterial species in vivo. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM(TM) (NCFM) is a probiotic strain; however, many of the mechanisms behind its health-promoting effect remain unknown. Here, we studied the effects of NCFM on the metabolome of jejunum, cecum, and colon of NCFM monocolonized (MC) and GF mice using liquid chromatography coupled to mass-spectrometry (LC-MS). The study adds to existing evidence that NCFM in vivo affects the bile acid signature of mice, in particular by deconjugation. Furthermore, we confirmed that carbohydrate metabolism is affected by NCFM in the mouse intestine as especially the digestion of oligosaccharides (penta- and tetrasaccharides) was increased in MC mice. Additionally, levels of α-tocopherol acetate (vitamin E acetate) were higher in the intestine of GF mice than in MC mice, suggesting that NCFM affects the vitamin E acetate metabolism. NCFM did not digest vitamin E acetate in vitro, suggesting that direct bacterial metabolism was not the cause of the altered metabolome in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that NCFM affects intestinal carbohydrate metabolism, bile acid metabolism and vitamin E metabolism, although it remains to be investigated whether this effect is unique to NCFM.

  16. PPARα/γ antagonists reverse the ameliorative effects of osthole on hepatic lipid metabolism and inflammatory response in steatohepatitic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xi; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Ruijun; Zhu, Zengyan; Xie, Meilin

    2017-02-25

    Our previous studies have indicated that osthole may ameliorate the hepatic lipid metabolism and inflammatory response in nonalcoholic steatohepatitic rats, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study aimed to determine whether the effects of osthole were mediated by the activation of hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α/γ (PPARα/γ). A rat model with steatohepatitis was induced by orally feeding high-fat and high-sucrose emulsion for 6 weeks. These experimental rats were then treated with osthole (20 mg/kg), PPARα antagonist MK886 (1 mg/kg) plus osthole (20 mg/kg), PPARγ antagonist GW9662 (1 mg/kg) plus osthole (20 mg/kg) and MK886 (1 mg/kg) plus GW9662 (1 mg/kg) plus osthole (20 mg/kg) for 4 weeks. The results showed that after osthole treatment, the hepatic triglycerides, free fatty acids, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8 and liver index decreased by 52.3, 31.0, 32.4, 28.9, 36.3, 29.3 and 29.9%, respectively, and the score of steatohepatitis also decreased by 70.0%, indicating that osthole improved the hepatic steatosis and inflammation. However, these effects of osthole were reduced or abrogated after simultaneous addition of the specific PPARα antagonist MK886 or/and the PPARγ antagonist GW9662, especially in the co-PPARα/γ antagonists-treated group. Importantly, the osthole-induced hepatic expressions of PPARα/γ proteins were decreased, and the osthole-regulated hepatic expressions of lipogenic and inflammatory gene proteins were also reversed by PPARα/γ antagonist treatment. These findings demonstrated that the ameliorative effect of osthole on nonalcoholic steatohepatitis was mediated by PPARα/γ activation, and osthole might be a natural dual PPARα/γ activator.

  17. A Computational Model of Hepatic Energy Metabolism: Understanding Zonated Damage and Steatosis in NAFLD

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, William B.; Bogle, I. David L.

    2016-01-01

    In non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), lipid build-up and the resulting damage is known to occur more severely in pericentral cells. Due to the complexity of studying individual regions of the sinusoid, the causes of this zone specificity and its implications on treatment are largely ignored. In this study, a computational model of liver glucose and lipid metabolism is presented which treats the sinusoid as the repeating unit of the liver rather than the single hepatocyte. This allows for inclusion of zonated enzyme expression by splitting the sinusoid into periportal to pericentral compartments. By simulating insulin resistance (IR) and high intake diets leading to the development of steatosis in the model, we identify key differences between periportal and pericentral cells accounting for higher susceptibility to pericentral steatosis. Secondly, variation between individuals is seen in both susceptibility to steatosis and in its development across the sinusoid. Around 25% of obese individuals do not show excess liver fat, whilst 16% of lean individuals develop NAFLD. Furthermore, whilst pericentral cells tend to show higher lipid levels, variation is seen in the predominant location of steatosis from pericentral to pan-sinusoidal or azonal. Sensitivity analysis was used to identify the processes which have the largest effect on both total hepatic triglyceride levels and on the sinusoidal location of steatosis. As is seen in vivo, steatosis occurs when simulating IR in the model, predominantly due to increased uptake, along with an increase in de novo lipogenesis. Additionally, concentrations of glucose intermediates including glycerol-3-phosphate increased when simulating IR due to inhibited glycogen synthesis. Several differences between zones contributed to a higher susceptibility to steatosis in pericentral cells in the model simulations. Firstly, the periportal zonation of both glycogen synthase and the oxidative phosphorylation enzymes meant that the

  18. Correction of metabolic abnormalities in a rodent model of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus by inhibitors of hepatic protein kinase C-ι.

    PubMed

    Sajan, Mini P; Nimal, Sonali; Mastorides, Stephen; Acevedo-Duncan, Mildred; Kahn, C Ronald; Fields, Alan P; Braun, Ursula; Leitges, Michael; Farese, Robert V

    2012-04-01

    Excessive activity of hepatic atypical protein kinase (aPKC) is proposed to play a critical role in mediating lipid and carbohydrate abnormalities in obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In previous studies of rodent models of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, adenoviral-mediated expression of kinase-inactive aPKC rapidly reversed or markedly improved most if not all metabolic abnormalities. Here, we examined effects of 2 newly developed small-molecule PKC-ι/λ inhibitors. We used the mouse model of heterozygous muscle-specific knockout of PKC-λ, in which partial deficiency of muscle PKC-λ impairs glucose transport in muscle and thereby causes glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia, which, via hepatic aPKC activation, leads to abdominal obesity, hepatosteatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypercholesterolemia. One inhibitor, 1H-imidazole-4-carboxamide, 5-amino-1-[2,3-dihydroxy-4-[(phosphonooxy)methyl]cyclopentyl-[1R-(1a,2b,3b,4a)], binds to the substrate-binding site of PKC-λ/ι, but not other PKCs. The other inhibitor, aurothiomalate, binds to cysteine residues in the PB1-binding domains of aPKC-λ/ι/ζ and inhibits scaffolding. Treatment with either inhibitor for 7 days inhibited aPKC, but not Akt, in liver and concomitantly improved insulin signaling to Akt and aPKC in muscle and adipocytes. Moreover, both inhibitors diminished excessive expression of hepatic, aPKC-dependent lipogenic, proinflammatory, and gluconeogenic factors; and this was accompanied by reversal or marked improvements in hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, abdominal obesity, hepatosteatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypercholesterolemia. Our findings highlight the pathogenetic importance of insulin signaling to hepatic PKC-ι in obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus and suggest that 1H-imidazole-4-carboxamide, 5-amino-1-[2,3-dihydroxy-4-[(phosphonooxy)methyl]cyclopentyl-[1R-(1a,2b,3b,4a)] and aurothiomalate or similar agents that

  19. Hepatic SH2B1 and SH2B2 regulate liver lipid metabolism and VLDL secretion in mice.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Liang; Liu, Yan; Jiang, Lin; Chen, Zheng; Zhou, Yingjiang; Cho, Kae Won; Rui, Liangyou

    2013-01-01

    SH2B1 is an SH2 and PH domain-containing adaptor protein. Genetic deletion of SH2B1 results in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and fatty liver diseases in mice. Mutations in SH2B1 are linked to obesity in humans. SH2B1 in the brain controls energy balance and body weight at least in part by enhancing leptin sensitivity in the hypothalamus. SH2B1 in peripheral tissues also regulates glucose and lipid metabolism, presumably by enhancing insulin sensitivity in peripheral metabolically-active tissues. However, the function of SH2B1 in individual peripheral tissues is unknown. Here we generated and metabolically characterized hepatocyte-specific SH2B1 knockout (HKO) mice. Blood glucose and plasma insulin levels, glucose tolerance, and insulin tolerance were similar between HKO, albumin-Cre, and SH2B1(f/f) mice fed either a normal chow diet or a high fat diet (HFD). Adult-onset deletion of SH2B1 in the liver either alone or in combination with whole body SH2B2 knockout also did not exacerbate HFD-induced insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Adult-onset, but not embryonic, deletion of SH2B1 in the liver attenuated HFD-induced hepatic steatosis. In agreement, adult-onset deletion of hepatic SH2B1 decreased the expression of diacylglycerol acyltransferase-2 (DGAT2) and increased the expression of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL). Furthermore, deletion of liver SH2B1 in SH2B2 null mice attenuated very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) secretion. These data indicate that hepatic SH2B1 is not required for the maintenance of normal insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism; however, it regulates liver triacylglycerol synthesis, lipolysis, and VLDL secretion.

  20. G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor plays a key role in bile acid metabolism and fasting-induced hepatic steatosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Donepudi, Ajay C; Boehme, Shannon; Li, Feng; Chiang, John Y L

    2017-03-01

    Bile acids are signaling molecules that play a critical role in regulation of hepatic metabolic homeostasis by activating nuclear farnesoid X receptor (Fxr) and membrane G-protein-coupled receptor (Takeda G-protein-coupled receptor 5; Tgr5). The role of FXR in regulation of bile acid synthesis and hepatic metabolism has been studied extensively. However, the role of TGR5 in hepatic metabolism has not been explored. The liver plays a central role in lipid metabolism, and impaired response to fasting and feeding contributes to steatosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver and obesity. We have performed a detailed analysis of gallbladder bile acid and lipid metabolism in Tgr5(-/-) mice in both free-fed and fasted conditions. Lipid profiles of serum, liver and adipose tissues, bile acid composition, energy metabolism, and messenger RNA and protein expression of the genes involved in lipid metabolism were analyzed. Results showed that deficiency of the Tgr5 gene in mice alleviated fasting-induced hepatic lipid accumulation. Expression of liver oxysterol 7α-hydroxylase in the alternative bile acid synthesis pathway was reduced. Analysis of gallbladder bile acid composition showed marked increase of taurocholic acid and decrease of tauro-α and β-muricholic acid in Tgr5(-/-) mice. Tgr5(-/-) mice had increased hepatic fatty acid oxidation rate and decreased hepatic fatty acid uptake. Interestingly, fasting induction of fibroblast growth factor 21 in liver was attenuated. In addition, fasted Tgr5(-/-) mice had increased activation of hepatic growth hormone-signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (GH-Stat5) signaling compared to wild-type mice.

  1. Dietary copper level affects copper metabolism during lipopolysaccharide-induced immunological stress in chicks.

    PubMed

    Koh, T S; Peng, R K; Klasing, K C

    1996-07-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine the effect of dietary Cu level on Cu metabolism during the acute phase response in broiler chicks with adequate (Experiment 1) or deficient (Experiment 2) Cu. Diets based on cornstarch and isolated soybean protein were used to formulate a basal diet, and basal diet plus either 5, 10, or 15 mg/kg additional Cu as either CuO or CuSO4. Each diet was fed to six pens of five chicks per pen (Experiment 1) or eight pens of five chicks (Experiment 2). Half of the chicks on each diet were injected with Salmonella typhymurium lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on alternate days. In Experiment 1, LPS significantly decreased daily gain, feed intake, and feed efficiency (P < 0.01) and increased the concentration of Cu in blood plasma (P < 0.01). In the uninjected birds, adding 5, 10, or 15 mg/kg Cu as CuO or 15 mg/kg Cu as CuSO4 increased the rate of gain over that of chicks fed the basal diet. In the birds challenged with LPS, 10 mg/kg Cu as CuO increased the rate of gain and efficiency compared to those of chicks fed the basal diet. Addition of CuSO4 to the diet of chicks challenged with LPS did not affect gain, intake, or feed efficiency compared to those of chicks fed the basal diet. Ceruloplasmin levels were higher in chicks challenged with LPS than in control chicks (P = 0.03), and this difference tended to be greater in chickens fed CuO than in chickens fed CuSO4 (P = 0.07). In chicks challenged with LPS, feeding CuO at all levels and feeding CuSO4 to give 10 or 15 mg/kg Cu increased ceruloplasmin levels above that of chicks fed the basal diet. Hepatic Mn superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Cu/Zn SOD were not influenced by dietary Cu level or source or LPS. Results of Experiment 2 were similar to those of Experiment 1 except that supplemental CuSO4 and CuO gave similar increases in gain and CuSO4 was more effective at increasing ceruloplasmin levels. Chicks given supplemental Cu had higher ceruloplasmin levels following challenge with LPS than

  2. Variation in genes related to hepatic lipid metabolism and changes in waist circumference and body weight.

    PubMed

    Meidtner, Karina; Fisher, Eva; Angquist, Lars; Holst, Claus; Vimaleswaran, Karani S; Boer, Jolanda M A; Halkjær, Jytte; Masala, Giovanna; Ostergaard, Jane N; Mortensen, Lotte M; van der A, Daphne L; Tjønneland, Anne; Palli, Domenico; Overvad, Kim; Wareham, Nicholas J; Loos, Ruth J F; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Boeing, Heiner

    2014-03-01

    We analysed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging the genetic variability of six candidate genes (ATF6, FABP1, LPIN2, LPIN3, MLXIPL and MTTP) involved in the regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism, an important regulatory site of energy balance for associations with body mass index (BMI) and changes in weight and waist circumference. We also investigated effect modification by sex and dietary intake. Data of 6,287 individuals participating in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition were included in the analyses. Data on weight and waist circumference were followed up for 6.9 ± 2.5 years. Association of 69 tagSNPs with baseline BMI and annual changes in weight as well as waist circumference were investigated using linear regression analysis. Interactions with sex, GI and intake of carbohydrates, fat as well as saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids were examined by including multiplicative SNP-covariate terms into the regression model. Neither baseline BMI nor annual weight or waist circumference changes were significantly associated with variation in the selected genes in the entire study population after correction for multiple testing. One SNP (rs1164) in LPIN2 appeared to be significantly interacting with sex (p = 0.0003) and was associated with greater annual weight gain in men (56.8 ± 23.7 g/year per allele, p = 0.02) than in women (-25.5 ± 19.8 g/year per allele, p = 0.2). With respect to gene-nutrient interaction, we could not detect any significant interactions when accounting for multiple testing. Therefore, out of our six candidate genes, LPIN2 may be considered as a candidate for further studies.

  3. The effect of Smallanthus sonchifolius leaf extracts on rat hepatic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Valentová, K; Moncion, A; de Waziers, I; Ulrichová, J

    2004-03-01

    Smallanthus sonchifolius (yacon), originating from South America, has become popular in Japan and in New Zealand for its tubers which contain beta-1,2-oligofructans as the main saccharides. The plant is also successfully cultivated in Central Europe in the Czech Republic in particular. Its aerial part is used in Japan and in Brazil as a component in medicinal teas; while aqueous leaf extracts have been studied for their hypoglycemic activity in normal and diabetic rats. We have already demonstrated the high content of phenolic compounds in yacon leaf extracts and their in vitro antioxidant activity. In this paper, we present the effects of two organic fractions and two aqueous extracts from the leaves of S. sonchifolius on rat hepatocyte viability, on oxidative damage induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BH) and allyl alcohol (AA), and on glucose metabolism and their insulin-like effect on the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) mRNA. All the extracts tested exhibited strong protective effect against oxidative damage to rat hepatocyte primary cultures in concentrations ranging from 1 to 1000 microg/ml, reduced hepatic glucose production via gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis at 1000 microg/ml. Moreover, the effects of the organic fractions (200 and 250 microg/ml) and to a lesser extent, the tea infusion (500 microg/ml) on rat CYP2B and CYP2E mRNA expression, were comparable to those observed with insulin. The combination of radical scavenging, cytoprotective and anti-hyperglycemic activity predetermine S. sonchifolius leaves for use in prevention and treatment of chronic diseases involving oxidative stress, particularly diabetes.

  4. In vivo and in vitro studies of hepatic lipid metabolism in lean and reobese fetal pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Hausman, G.J.; Trusty, C.D.; Martin, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    Fetuses were removed from pregnant (110 days of gestation) sows and 80 to 120 mg liver slices were prepared for two hour incubations with /sup 14/C-palmitate (1 ..mu..Ci/ml) or /sup 3/H/sub 2/O (1 mCi/ml). In vivo studies were conducted by injecting a single bolus of 0.5 or 10 ml of Liposyn (a 10% safflower oil emulsion) into fetuses (umbilical vein). One hour post injection (Liposyn) fetuses were removed from the uterus. Subsequently liver lipids were extracted and gas chromatographic analysis for 16:0, 18:0, 18:1, 18:2 and 20:4 were performed. Incorporation of C/sup 14/-palmitate into total lipids was higher in lean livers whereas incorporation into CO/sub 2/ was independent of fetal strain. Incorporation of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O into triglyceride fatty acids was similar in lean and obese livers. Fatty acid composition of livers indicated strain differences (obese versus lean for 16:0 = 52 vs 27.8%; 18:0 = 20 vs 16.8%; 18:1 = 16.3 vs 32.6%; 20:4 = 8.8 vs 17.6%). There was a similar Liposyn dose dependent increase in the amount of 18:2 in chromatographs of lean (n = 7) and obese (n = 7) livers. Administration of Liposyn caused a significant increase in the amount of 18:1 and 20:4 in lean livers (least squares means +/- SEM, 0 vs 0.5 ml for 20:4 = .31 +/- .03 vs .48 +/- .04) but no increase in preobese livers. These studies illustrate significant alterations in hepatic lipid metabolism in the preobese state.

  5. Carboxyl ester lipase overexpression in rat hepatoma cells and CEL deficiency in mice have no impact on hepatic uptake or metabolism of chylomicron-retinyl ester.

    PubMed

    van Bennekum, A M; Li, L; Piantedosi, R; Shamir, R; Vogel, S; Fisher, E A; Blaner, W S; Harrison, E H

    1999-03-30

    To study the role of carboxyl ester lipase (CEL) in hepatic retinoid (vitamin A) metabolism, we investigated uptake and hydrolysis of chylomicron (CM)-retinyl esters (RE) by rat hepatoma (McArdle-RH7777) cells stably transfected with a rat CEL cDNA. We also studied tissue uptake of CM-RE in CEL-deficient mice generated by targeted disruption of the CEL gene. CEL-transfected cells secreted active enzyme into the medium. However, both control and CEL-transfected cells accumulated exogenously added CM-RE or CM remnant (CMR)-derived RE in equal amounts. Serum clearance of intravenously injected CM-RE and cholesteryl ester were not different between wild-type and CEL-deficient mice. Also, the uptake of the two compounds by the liver and other tissues did not differ. These data indicate that the lack of CEL expression does not affect the uptake of dietary CM-RE by the liver or other tissues. Moreover, the percentage of retinol formed in the liver after CM-RE uptake, the levels of retinol and retinol-binding protein in serum, and retinoid levels in various tissues did not differ, indicating that CEL deficiency does not affect hepatic retinoid metabolism and retinoid distribution throughout the body. Surprisingly, in both pancreas and liver of wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous CEL-deficient mice, the levels of bile salt-dependent retinyl ester hydrolase (REH) activity were similar. This indicates that in the mouse pancreas and liver an REH enzyme activity, active in the presence of bile salt and distinct from CEL, is present, compatible with the results from our accompanying paper that the intestinal processing and absorption of RE were unimpaired in CEL-deficient mice.

  6. Can chronic maternal drug therapy alter the nursing infant's hepatic drug metabolizing enzyme pattern?

    PubMed

    Toddywalla, V S; Patel, S B; Betrabet, S S; Kulkarni, R D; Kombo, I; Saxena, B N

    1995-10-01

    This study was carried out to investigate whether minute quantities of maternal drugs ingested over an extended period of time by a breast-feeding infant can alter the activity pattern of the infant's hepatic drug metabolizing enzyme (HDME). The HDME activity patterns of 12 breast-fed infants whose mothers were not on drug therapy were compared with those of 11 infants whose mothers had been taking 30 micrograms levo-norgesterel daily for 90 to 195 days (oral contraceptives group) and of 10 infants whose mothers had been taking ethambutol and isoniazid daily since pregnancy (tuberculosis group). As 6 beta hydroxycortisol in urine is considered to be a good and acceptable reflector of HDME activity, it was estimated from the infants' urine using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. A comparison of the patterns between 90 days of age and 195 days of age of the infants in the control group and the two study groups indicated an increase from 36.6 ng/mL to 58.4 ng/mL at 195 days in the control group. An initial decrease from 36.6 ng/mL to 26.2 ng/mL was noted with commencement of maternal levo-norgesterel therapy, followed by a slow and steady rise to 47.8 ng/mL at 195 days of age, with a shift in the peak from 120 to 135 days of infants age in the oral contraceptive group. A suppressed pattern with decreased levels of 6 beta hydroxycortisol ranging from 19.3 ng/mL to 26.5 ng/mL at 195 days was found in the tuberculosis group. The data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) coupled with Duncan's Multiple range test. Both treatment group showed significant differences from the control group at the 0.050 level. The HDME plays an important role in determining the final outcome of any drug in humans, as it controls the metabolism of drugs. Hence, alterations in its activity caused by the transfer of maternal drugs over a prolonged period of time could pose a serious problem to nurslings when they require drugs for their own benefit.

  7. Vitamin C modulates the metabolic and cytokine profiles, alleviates hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress, and increases the life span of Gulo−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Aumailley, Lucie; Warren, Alessandra; Garand, Chantal; Dubois, Marie Julie; Paquet, Eric R.; Le Couteur, David G.; Marette, André; Cogger, Victoria C.; Lebel, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Suboptimal intake of dietary vitamin C (ascorbate) increases the risk of several chronic diseases but the exact metabolic pathways affected are still unknown. In this study, we examined the metabolic profile of mice lacking the enzyme gulonolactone oxidase (Gulo) required for the biosynthesis of ascorbate. Gulo−/− mice were supplemented with 0%, 0.01%, and 0.4% ascorbate (w/v) in drinking water and serum was collected for metabolite measurements by targeted mass spectrometry. We also quantified 42 serum cytokines and examined the levels of different stress markers in liver. The metabolic profiles of Gulo−/− mice treated with ascorbate were different from untreated Gulo−/− and normal wild type mice. The cytokine profiles of Gulo−/− mice, in return, overlapped the profile of wild type animals upon 0.01% or 0.4% vitamin C supplementation. The life span of Gulo−/− mice increased with the amount of ascorbate in drinking water. It also correlated significantly with the ratios of serum arginine/lysine, tyrosine/phenylalanine, and the ratio of specific species of saturated/unsaturated phosphatidylcholines. Finally, levels of hepatic phosphorylated endoplasmic reticulum associated stress markers IRE1α and eIF2α correlated inversely with serum ascorbate and life span suggesting that vitamin C modulates endoplasmic reticulum stress response and longevity in Gulo−/− mice. PMID:26922388

  8. Foetal life protein provision of mink (Neovison vison) changes the relative mRNA abundance of some hepatic enzymes regulating fat metabolism.

    PubMed

    Matthiesen, Connie Frank; Casañas, Maria Arantzazu Aguinaga; Tauson, Anne-Helene

    2014-01-01

    The nutrient provision to pregnant females has high impact on the growth and metabolism of their offspring. The objective was to investigate if the expression of hepatic enzymes regulating the fat metabolism was affected in foetuses and adult female mink born by dams fed either a low or an adequate level of protein during late gestation. The relative abundances of acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS) and carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1) mRNA were determined by qualitative polymerase chain reaction in the livers of F₀- and F₁-generation dams and in F₁-generation foetuses. Low protein provision during foetal life resulted in a lower expression of FAS in foetal liver but a tendency towards increased expression in the liver of adult dams. There was a tendency towards an effect of life stage of the animal on the expression of ACC resulting in a higher expression among F₁ foetuses exposed to low protein during foetal life than F₀ dams fed a low protein diet during late gestation. The expression of CPT1 was significantly lower among dams exposed to low protein provision during foetal life than controls, possibly indicating a lower rate of mitochondrial β-oxidation. Further investigations are needed to clarify the consequences of these changes for the fat metabolism.

  9. Investigation of a Novel Hepatitis B Virus Surface Antigen (HBsAg) Escape Mutant Affecting Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md. Golzar; Ueda, Keiji

    2017-01-01

    Mutation in the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) may affect the efficiency of diagnostic immunoassays or success of vaccinations using HBsAg. Thus, antigenicity and immunogenicity analyses of the mutated HBsAg are necessary to develop novel diagnostic tools and efficient vaccinations. Here, the in vitro antigenicity of three wild-type HBsAg open reading frames (ORFs) (adr4, W1S [subtype adr] and W3S [subtype adr]) isolated from clinically infected patients and nineteen synthesized single/double/multiple amino acid-substituted mutants were tested with commercial ELISA kits. Immunofluorescence staining of transfected cells and Western blot analysis confirmed that these ORFs were expressed at comparable levels in HEK-293 cells. W1S and adr4 were clearly detected, whereas W3S could not be detected. Using the same commercial immunoassay kit, we found that the single mutants, K120P and D123T, were marginally reactive, whereas W3S-aW1S and the double mutant, K120P/D123T, exhibited antigenicity roughly equivalent to the wild-type wako1S. On the other hand, the single mutants of W1S, P120K and T123D, significantly impaired the reactivity, while W1S-aW3S and the double mutant of W1S, P120K/T123D, resulted in a complete loss of antigenicity. In addition, ELISA revealed reduced HBs antigenicity of two mutants, W1S N146G and W1S Q129R/G145R. These commercial ELISA-based antigenic reactivities of HBsAg were also strongly correlated with the predicted Ai alterations of affected amino acids due to the specific mutation. In conclusion, this study showed for the first time that lysine (K120) and aspartate (D123) simultaneously affected HBsAg antigenicity, leading to diagnostic failure. These findings will improve diagnostic assays and vaccine development. PMID:28045894

  10. Reduction of liver fructokinase expression and improved hepatic inflammation and metabolism in liquid fructose-fed rats after atorvastatin treatment.

    PubMed

    Vilà, Laia; Rebollo, Alba; Ađalsteisson, Gunnar S; Alegret, Marta; Merlos, Manuel; Roglans, Nuria; Laguna, Juan C

    2011-02-15

    Consumption of beverages that contain fructose favors the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndrome alterations in humans, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Although the only effective treatment for NAFLD is caloric restriction and weight loss, existing data show that atorvastatin, a hydroxymethyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor, can be used safely in patients with NAFLD and improves hepatic histology. To gain further insight into the molecular mechanisms of atorvastatin's therapeutic effect on NAFLD, we used an experimental model that mimics human consumption of fructose-sweetened beverages. Control, fructose (10% w/v solution) and fructose+atorvastatin (30 mg/kg/day) Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed after 14 days. Plasma and liver tissue samples were obtained to determine plasma analytes, liver histology, and the expression of liver proteins that are related to fatty acid synthesis and catabolism, and inflammatory processes. Fructose supplementation induced hypertriglyceridemia and hyperleptinemia, hepatic steatosis and necroinflammation, increased the expression of genes related to fatty acid synthesis and decreased fatty acid β-oxidation activity. Atorvastatin treatment completely abolished histological signs of necroinflammation, reducing the hepatic expression of metallothionein-1 and nuclear factor kappa B binding. Furthermore, atorvastatin reduced plasma (x 0.74) and liver triglyceride (x 0.62) concentrations, decreased the liver expression of carbohydrate response element binding protein transcription factor (x 0.45) and its target genes, and increased the hepatic activity of the fatty acid β-oxidation system (x 1.15). These effects may be related to the fact that atorvastatin decreased the expression of fructokinase (x 0.6) in livers of fructose-supplemented rats, reducing the metabolic burden on the liver that is imposed by continuous fructose ingestion.

  11. Factors affecting the decision of nursing students in Taiwan to be vaccinated against hepatitis B infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, W C; Ball, C

    1997-04-01

    Compliance with Hepatitis B vaccination for nurses has been reported to be low in Taiwan. Therefore, a study of nursing students' view was conducted in Taiwan to discover possible reasons. As complex decision-making was involved in taking the vaccine, a four-level utility decision model underpinned by the Multi-Attribute Utility theory was proposed to ascertain the relative contribution of the specific components of attitude and beliefs to the final decision and experience of being vaccinated against Hepatitis B infection. Results indicated that the 'personal value of Hepatitis B vaccination', in particular for 'concern about the efficacy of the Hepatitis B vaccine', 'fear of pain from repeated injections', 'time' and 'money', were the main determinants in relation to the uptake of the Hepatitis B vaccination. Such results were consistent with earlier findings based on the Health Belief Model. It appears that the greater the experience gained in nursing care the lower the rate of vaccination; the important items under the concept of 'Personal value of Hepatitis B vaccination' varied by 'experience in nursing care'. The overall predictive validity was 67%, based on the utility decision model. When stratified by 'experience in nursing care', the prediction improved, ranging from 89% to 100%. Based on these findings, a specific intervention programme should be provided to change behaviour and improve the vaccination rate.

  12. Bisphenol A Exposure May Induce Hepatic Lipid Accumulation via Reprogramming the DNA Methylation Patterns of Genes Involved in Lipid Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Zhang-Hong; Pan, Jie-Xue; Jin, Lu-Yang; Xu, Hai-Yan; Yu, Tian-Tian; Ullah, Kamran; Rahman, Tanzil Ur; Ren, Jun; Cheng, Yi; Dong, Xin-Yan; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role of bisphenol A (BPA) in metabolic disorders. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Using a mouse BPA exposure model, we investigated the effects of long-term BPA exposure on lipid metabolism and the underlying mechanisms. The male mice exposed to BPA (0.5 μg BPA /kg/day, a human relevant dose) for 10 months exhibited significant hepatic accumulation of triglycerides and cholesterol. The liver cells from the BPA-exposed mice showed significantly increased expression levels of the genes related to lipid synthesis. These liver cells showed decreased DNA methylation levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2, and increased expression levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2 that may upregulate the genes related to lipid synthesis. The expression levels of DNA methyltransferases were decreased in BPA-exposed mouse liver. Hepa1-6 cell line treated with BPA showed decreased expression levels of DNA methyltransferases and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. DNA methyltransferase knockdown in Hepa1-6 led to hypo-methylation and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. Our results suggest that long-term BPA exposure could induce hepatic lipid accumulation, which may be due to the epigenetic reprogramming of the genes involved in lipid metabolism, such as the alterations of DNA methylation patterns.

  13. Comparative effects of cadmium, zinc, and lead in vitro on pulmonary, adrenal, and hepatic microsomal metabolism in the guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Colby, H.D.; Johnson, P.B.; Zulkoski, J.S.; Pope, M.R.; Miles, P.R.

    1981-11-01

    The in vitro effects of Cd, Zn, and Pb on pulmonary, adrenal, and hepatic microsomal enzyme activities in guinea pigs were compared. Cd and Zn produced concentration-dependent (20-200 ..mu..M) decreases in benzphetamine demethylase and biphenyl hydrozylase activities in adrenal, liver, and lung. Pb had no significant effect on either enzyme in any of the tissues studied. Adrenal and pulmonary enzymes were more sensitive to the effects of Cd and Zn than were hepatic enzymes. Benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylase and ethoxycoumarin demethylase activities were decreased by Zn, Cd and Pb in adrenal, liver, and lung microsomes. The inhibitory effects on benzo(a)pyrene and ethoxycoumarin methabolism were far greater than those on benzphetamine or biphenyl metabolism. The relative potencies of the metals as inhibitors of xenobiotic metabolism were Zn > Cd > Pb. Cd and Zn also inhibited steroid 21-hydroxylase activity in adrenal microsomes, but Pb had no effect on steroid metabolism. In addition, microsomal epoxide hydratase activity in adrenal, liver, and lung was inhibited by Cd but not by Zn or Pb. The results demonstrate that adrenal and pulmonary microsomal enzyme, like those in liver, are inhibited by various metals. Inhibition of mixed-function oxidases by metals in vitro is apparently not related to changes in cytochrome P-450 levels or substrate binding to cytochrome P-450. In addition, the actions of Cd, Zn, and Pb in each tissue are highly dependent on the substrates employed.

  14. Hepatic IRE1α regulates fasting-induced metabolic adaptive programs through the XBP1s-PPARα axis signalling.

    PubMed

    Shao, Mengle; Shan, Bo; Liu, Yang; Deng, Yiping; Yan, Cheng; Wu, Ying; Mao, Ting; Qiu, Yifu; Zhou, Yubo; Jiang, Shan; Jia, Weiping; Li, Jingya; Li, Jia; Rui, Liangyou; Yang, Liu; Liu, Yong

    2014-03-27

    Although the mammalian IRE1α-XBP1 branch of the cellular unfolded protein response has been implicated in glucose and lipid metabolism, the exact metabolic role of IRE1α signalling in vivo remains poorly understood. Here we show that hepatic IRE1α functions as a nutrient sensor that regulates the metabolic adaptation to fasting. We find that prolonged deprivation of food or consumption of a ketogenic diet activates the IRE1α-XBP1 pathway in mouse livers. Hepatocyte-specific abrogation of Ire1α results in impairment of fatty acid β-oxidation and ketogenesis in the liver under chronic fasting or ketogenic conditions, leading to hepatosteatosis; liver-specific restoration of XBP1s reverses the defects in IRE1α null mice. XBP1s directly binds to and activates the promoter of PPARα, the master regulator of starvation responses. Hence, our results demonstrate that hepatic IRE1α promotes the adaptive shift of fuel utilization during starvation by stimulating mitochondrial β-oxidation and ketogenesis through the XBP1s-PPARα axis.

  15. Bisphenol A Exposure May Induce Hepatic Lipid Accumulation via Reprogramming the DNA Methylation Patterns of Genes Involved in Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Zhang-Hong; Pan, Jie-Xue; Jin, Lu-Yang; Xu, Hai-Yan; Yu, Tian-Tian; Ullah, Kamran; Rahman, Tanzil Ur; Ren, Jun; Cheng, Yi; Dong, Xin-Yan; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role of bisphenol A (BPA) in metabolic disorders. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Using a mouse BPA exposure model, we investigated the effects of long-term BPA exposure on lipid metabolism and the underlying mechanisms. The male mice exposed to BPA (0.5 μg BPA /kg/day, a human relevant dose) for 10 months exhibited significant hepatic accumulation of triglycerides and cholesterol. The liver cells from the BPA-exposed mice showed significantly increased expression levels of the genes related to lipid synthesis. These liver cells showed decreased DNA methylation levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2, and increased expression levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2 that may upregulate the genes related to lipid synthesis. The expression levels of DNA methyltransferases were decreased in BPA-exposed mouse liver. Hepa1-6 cell line treated with BPA showed decreased expression levels of DNA methyltransferases and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. DNA methyltransferase knockdown in Hepa1-6 led to hypo-methylation and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. Our results suggest that long-term BPA exposure could induce hepatic lipid accumulation, which may be due to the epigenetic reprogramming of the genes involved in lipid metabolism, such as the alterations of DNA methylation patterns. PMID:27502578

  16. The metabolic responses to hepatitis B virus infection shed new light on pathogenesis and targets for treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongde; Zhu, Wandi; Zhang, Leike; Lei, Hehua; Wu, Xiangyu; Guo, Lin; Chen, Xinwen; Wang, Yulan; Tang, Huiru

    2015-01-01

    Chronic infection caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV), is strongly associated with hepatitis, fatty liver and hepatocellular carcinoma. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, we characterize the metabolic features of host cells infected with the virus using systems biological approach. The results show that HBV replication induces systematic metabolic alterations in host cells. HBV infection up-regulates the biosynthesis of hexosamine and phosphatidylcholine by activating glutamine-fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase 1 (GFAT1) and choline kinase alpha (CHKA) respectively, which were reported for the first time for HBV infection. Importantly suppressing hexosamine biosynthesis and phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis can inhibit HBV replication and expression. In addition, HBV induces oxidative stress and stimulates central carbon metabolism and nucleotide synthesis. Our results also indicate that HBV associated hepatocellular carcinoma could be attributed to GFAT1 activated hexosamine biosynthesis and CHKA activated phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. This study provides further insights into the pathogenesis of HBV-induced diseases, and sheds new light on drug target for treating HBV infection. PMID:25672227

  17. Synergic hypocholesterolaemic effect of n-3 PUFA and oestrogen by modulation of hepatic cholesterol metabolism in female rats.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yuna; Jin, Youri; Park, Yongsoon

    2015-12-14

    n-3 PUFA such as EPA and DHA as well as oestrogen have been reported to decrease blood levels of cholesterol, but their underlying mechanism is unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the combination of n-3 PUFA supplementation and oestrogen injection on hepatic cholesterol metabolism. Rats were fed a modified AIN-93G diet with 0, 1 or 2 % n-3 PUFA (EPA+DHA) relative to the total energy intake for 12 weeks. Rats were surgically ovariectomised at week 8, and, after 1-week recovery, rats were injected with 17β-oestradiol-3-benzoate (E2) or maize oil for the last 3 weeks. Supplementation with n-3 PUFA and E2 injection significantly increased the ratio of the hepatic expression of phosphorylated AMP activated protein kinase (p-AMPK):AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) and decreased sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9. Supplementation with n-3 PUFA increased hepatic expression of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), sterol 12α-hydroxylase (CYP8B1) and sterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1); however, E2 injection decreased CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 but not CYP27A1. Additionally, E2 injection increased hepatic expression of oestrogen receptor-α and β. In conclusion, n-3 PUFA supplementation and E2 injection had synergic hypocholesterolaemic effects by down-regulating hepatic cholesterol synthesis (n-3 PUFA and oestrogen) and up-regulating bile acid synthesis (n-3 PUFA) in ovariectomised rats.

  18. Effects of guar gum and cellulose on glucose absorption, hormonal release and hepatic metabolism in the pig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, C. S.; Malmlof, K.

    1992-01-01

    Six Large White pigs (mean body-weight 59 (SE 1.7) kg) were surgically fitted with permanent catheters in the portal vein, the brachiocephalic artery and the right hepatic vein, as well as with electromagnetic flow probes around the portal vein and the hepatic artery, and allowed to recover. The non-anaesthetized animals were given a basal non-fibre diet (diet A) alone or together with 60 g guar gum/kg (diet B) or 150 g purified cellulose/kg (diet C) by substitution for mica. The diets were given for weekly periods and according to a replicated 3 x 3 Latin square design. On the last day of each such adaptation period, test meals of 800 g were given before blood sampling. Sampling was continued for 8 h. Guar gum strongly reduced glucose apparent absorption without changing the absorption and the hepatic uptake profiles. Production rates of insulin, gastric inhibitory polypeptide and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were lowest after guar gum ingestion. However, the reductions in peripheral blood insulin levels caused by guar gum were not associated with a change in hepatic insulin extraction. IGF-1 appeared to be strongly secreted by the gut, whereas the liver had a net uptake of the peptide. Ingestion of guar gum increased the hepatic extraction coefficient of gut-produced IGF-1. Guar gum ingestion appeared also to decrease glucagon secretion. Cellulose at the level consumed had very few effects on the variables considered. It is suggested that the modulation of intestinal mechanisms by guar gum was sufficient to mediate the metabolic effects described.

  19. Three Conazoles Increase Hepatic Microsomal Retinoic Acid Metabolism and Decrease Mouse Hepatic Retinoic Acid Levels In Vivo

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are fungicides used in agriculture and as pharmaceuticals. In a previous toxicogenomic study of triazole-containing conazoles we found gene expression changes consistent with the alteration of the metabolism of all trans-retinoic acid (atRA), a vitamin A metabolite with...

  20. Reduction of liver fructokinase expression and improved hepatic inflammation and metabolism in liquid fructose-fed rats after atorvastatin treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Vila, Laia; Rebollo, Alba; Adalsteisson, Gunnar S.; Alegret, Marta; Merlos, Manuel; Roglans, Nuria; Laguna, Juan C.

    2011-02-15

    Consumption of beverages that contain fructose favors the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndrome alterations in humans, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Although the only effective treatment for NAFLD is caloric restriction and weight loss, existing data show that atorvastatin, a hydroxymethyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor, can be used safely in patients with NAFLD and improves hepatic histology. To gain further insight into the molecular mechanisms of atorvastatin's therapeutic effect on NAFLD, we used an experimental model that mimics human consumption of fructose-sweetened beverages. Control, fructose (10% w/v solution) and fructose + atorvastatin (30 mg/kg/day) Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed after 14 days. Plasma and liver tissue samples were obtained to determine plasma analytes, liver histology, and the expression of liver proteins that are related to fatty acid synthesis and catabolism, and inflammatory processes. Fructose supplementation induced hypertriglyceridemia and hyperleptinemia, hepatic steatosis and necroinflammation, increased the expression of genes related to fatty acid synthesis and decreased fatty acid {beta}-oxidation activity. Atorvastatin treatment completely abolished histological signs of necroinflammation, reducing the hepatic expression of metallothionein-1 and nuclear factor kappa B binding. Furthermore, atorvastatin reduced plasma (x 0.74) and liver triglyceride (x 0.62) concentrations, decreased the liver expression of carbohydrate response element binding protein transcription factor (x0.45) and its target genes, and increased the hepatic activity of the fatty acid {beta}-oxidation system (x 1.15). These effects may be related to the fact that atorvastatin decreased the expression of fructokinase (x 0.6) in livers of fructose-supplemented rats, reducing the metabolic burden on the liver that is imposed by continuous fructose ingestion. - Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted Research Highlights

  1. Effect of Traumatic Brain Injury, Erythropoietin, and Anakinra on Hepatic Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters in an Experimental Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gail D; Peterson, Todd C; Vonder Haar, Cole; Farin, Fred M; Bammler, Theo K; MacDonald, James W; Kantor, Eric D; Hoane, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    In contrast to considerable data demonstrating a decrease in cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity in inflammation and infection, clinically, traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in an increase in CYP and UDP glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of TBI alone and with treatment with erythropoietin (EPO) or anakinra on the gene expression of hepatic inflammatory proteins, drug-metabolizing enzymes, and transporters in a cortical contusion impact (CCI) injury model. Microarray-based transcriptional profiling was used to determine the effect on gene expression at 24 h, 72 h, and 7 days post-CCI. Plasma cytokine and liver protein concentrations of CYP2D4, CYP3A1, EPHX1, and UGT2B7 were determined. There was no effect of TBI, TBI + EPO, or TBI + anakinra on gene expression of the inflammatory factors shown to be associated with decreased expression of hepatic metabolic enzymes in models of infection and inflammation. IL-6 plasma concentrations were increased in TBI animals and decreased with EPO and anakinra treatment. There was no significant effect of TBI and/or anakinra on gene expression of enzymes or transporters known to be involved in drug disposition. TBI + EPO treatment decreased the gene expression of Cyp2d4 at 72 h with a corresponding decrease in CYP2D4 protein at 72 h and 7 days. CYP3A1 protein was decreased at 24 h. In conclusion, EPO treatment may result in a significant decrease in the metabolism of Cyp-metabolized drugs. In contrast to clinical TBI, there was not a significant effect of experimental TBI on CYP or UGT metabolic enzymes.

  2. Effect of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin administration and high-fat diet on the body weight and hepatic estrogen metabolism in female C3H/HeN mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Baoting Gallo, Michael A. Burger, Conney W.; Meeker, Robert J.; Cai, May Xiaoxin; Xu Shiyao; Conney, Allan H.

    2008-01-15

    We studied the effect of administration of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) by i.p. injection once every 2 weeks in combination with a high-fat (HF) diet for 8 or 16 weeks on the body and organ weight changes as well as on the hepatic enzyme activity for estrogen metabolism in C3H/HeN female mice. Administration of TCDD at 100 {mu}g/kg b.w. once every 2 weeks for 8 weeks increased the body weight by 46% in the HF diet-fed animals, but not in the regular diet-fed animals. This is the first observation suggesting that TCDD at a high dose (100 {mu}g/kg b.w.), but not at lower doses (1 or 10 {mu}g/kg b.w.), may have a strong obesity-inducing effect in C3H/HeN mice fed an HF diet. While TCDD increased liver weight and decreased thymus weight in animals, these effects were enhanced by feeding animals an HF diet. Metabolism studies showed that TCDD administration for 8 or 16 weeks increased the liver microsomal activity for the 2- and 4-hydroxylation of 17{beta}-estradiol in animals fed a control diet, but surprisingly not in animals fed an HF diet. Treatment with TCDD dose-dependently increased the hepatic activity for the O-methylation of catechol estrogens in both control and HF diet-fed animals, and it also decreased the levels of liver microsomal sulfatase activity for hydrolysis of estrone-3-sulfate. TCDD did not significantly affect the hepatic enzyme activity for the glucuronidation or esterification of endogenous estrogens. It is suggested that enhanced metabolic inactivation of endogenous estrogens by hepatic estrogen-metabolizing enzymes in TCDD-treated, control diet-fed animals contributes importantly to the reduced incidence of estrogen-associated tumors in animals treated with TCDD.

  3. Metabolic syndrome - the consequence of lifelong treatment of bipolar affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Dadić-Hero, Elizabeta; Ruzić, Klementina; Grahovac, Tanja; Petranović, Duska; Graovac, Mirjana; Palijan, Tija Zarković

    2010-06-01

    Mood disturbances are characteristic and dominant feature of Mood disorders. Bipolar Affective Disorder (BAD) is a mood disorder which occurs equally in both sexes. BAD may occur in co morbidity with other mental diseases and disorders such as: Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, Attention Deficit, Panic Disorder and Social Phobia. However, medical disorders (one or more) can also coexist with BAD. Metabolic syndrome is a combination of metabolic disorders that increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. A 61-year old female patient has been receiving continuous and systematic psychiatric treatment for Bipolar Affective Disorder for the last 39 years. The first episode was a depressive one and it occurred after a child delivery. Seventeen years ago the patient developed diabetes (diabetes type II), and twelve years ago arterial hypertension was diagnosed. High cholesterol and triglyceride levels as well as weight gain were objective findings. During the last nine years she has been treated for lower leg ulcer. Since metabolic syndrome includes abdominal obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, increased cholesterol and serum triglyceride levels, the aforesaid patient can be diagnosed with Metabolic Syndrome. When treating Bipolar Affective Disorder, the antipsychotic drug choice should be careful and aware of its side-effects in order to avoid the development or aggravation of metabolic syndrome.

  4. Effect of a negative energy balance induced by feed restriction in lactating sows on hepatic lipid metabolism, milk production and development of litters.

    PubMed

    Gessner, Denise K; Gröne, Birthe; Rosenbaum, Susann; Most, Erika; Hillen, Sonja; Becker, Sabrina; Erhardt, Georg; Reiner, Gerald; Ringseis, Robert; Eder, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    In rodents, forced activation of hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) by administration of exogenous PPARα activators during lactation leads to a reduction of milk triacylglycerol (TAG) production. Herein, we investigated whether a negative energy balance (NEB) induced by feed restriction (about 18% lower feed and energy intake) during lactation by increasing the release of fatty acids, which act as PPARα agonists, causes a disruption of hepatic lipid metabolism and thereby impairs milk TAG production in sows. Nutrient and energy content of the milk on day 20 of lactation and gains of litters during the first 14 d and the whole 21 d suckling period did not differ between Control and feed-restricted sows. The mRNA concentrations of several sterol regulatory element-binding protein target genes involved in lipid synthesis in the liver and the plasma concentration of TAG were reduced in the feed-restricted sows, whereas the mRNA concentrations of PPARα target genes involved in fatty acid oxidation in liver and skeletal muscle were not different between groups. In conclusion, it was shown that an NEB during lactation does not adversely affect milk composition and gains of litters, despite inhibiting hepatic expression of genes involved in lipid synthesis and reducing plasma TAG concentration. The finding that PPARα target genes involved in fatty acid utilisation in liver and muscle of sows are not induced by the NEB during lactation may explain that fatty acid availability in the mammary gland is sufficient to maintain milk TAG production and to allow normal litter gain.

  5. Early Life Exposure to Fructose Alters Maternal, Fetal and Neonatal Hepatic Gene Expression and Leads to Sex-Dependent Changes in Lipid Metabolism in Rat Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Zoe E.; Vickers, Mark H.; Bernal, Angelica; Yap, Cassandra; Sloboda, Deborah M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Fructose consumption is associated with altered hepatic function and metabolic compromise and not surprisingly has become a focus for perinatal studies. We have previously shown that maternal fructose intake results in sex specific changes in fetal, placental and neonatal outcomes. In this follow-up study we investigated effects on maternal, fetal and neonatal hepatic fatty acid metabolism and immune modulation. Methods Pregnant rats were randomised to either control (CON) or high-fructose (FR) diets. Fructose was given in solution and comprised 20% of total caloric intake. Blood and liver samples were collected at embryonic day 21 (E21) and postnatal day (P)10. Maternal liver samples were also collected at E21 and P10. Liver triglyceride and glycogen content was measured with standard assays. Hepatic gene expression was measured with qPCR. Results Maternal fructose intake during pregnancy resulted in maternal hepatic ER stress, hepatocellular injury and increased levels of genes that favour lipogenesis. These changes were associated with a reduction in the NLRP3 inflammasome. Fetuses of mothers fed a high fructose diet displayed increased hepatic fructose transporter and reduced fructokinase mRNA levels and by 10 days of postnatal age, also have hepatic ER stress, and elevated IL1β mRNA levels. At P10, FR neonates demonstrated increased hepatic triglyceride content and particularly in males, associated changes in the expression of genes regulating beta oxidation and the NLRP3 inflammasome. Further, prenatal fructose results in sex-dependant changes in levels of key clock genes. Conclusions Maternal fructose intake results in age and sex-specific alterations in maternal fetal and neonatal free fatty acid metabolism, which may be associated in disruptions in core clock gene machinery. How these changes are associated with hepatic inflammatory processes is still unclear, although suppression of the hepatic inflammasome, as least in mothers and male neonates may

  6. Paternal B Vitamin Intake Is a Determinant of Growth, Hepatic Lipid Metabolism and Intestinal Tumor Volume in Female Apc1638N Mouse Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Sabet, Julia A.; Park, Lara K.; Iyer, Lakshmanan K.; Tai, Albert K.; Koh, Gar Yee; Pfalzer, Anna C.; Parnell, Laurence D.; Mason, Joel B.; Liu, Zhenhua; Byun, Alexander J.; Crott, Jimmy W.

    2016-01-01

    Background The importance of maternal nutrition to offspring health and risk of disease is well established. Emerging evidence suggests paternal diet may affect offspring health as well. Objective In the current study we sought to determine whether modulating pre-conception paternal B vitamin intake alters intestinal tumor formation in offspring. Additionally, we sought to identify potential mechanisms for the observed weight differential among offspring by profiling hepatic gene expression and lipid content. Methods Male Apc1638N mice (prone to intestinal tumor formation) were fed diets containing replete (control, CTRL), mildly deficient (DEF), or supplemental (SUPP) quantities of vitamins B2, B6, B12, and folate for 8 weeks before mating with control-fed wild type females. Wild type offspring were euthanized at weaning and hepatic gene expression profiled. Apc1638N offspring were fed a replete diet and euthanized at 28 weeks of age to assess tumor burden. Results No differences in intestinal tumor incidence or burden were found between male Apc1638N offspring of different paternal diet groups. Although in female Apc1638N offspring there were no differences in tumor incidence or multiplicity, a stepwise increase in tumor volume with increasing paternal B vitamin intake was observed. Interestingly, female offspring of SUPP and DEF fathers had a significantly lower body weight than those of CTRL fed fathers. Moreover, hepatic trigylcerides and cholesterol were elevated 3-fold in adult female offspring of SUPP fathers. Weanling offspring of the same fathers displayed altered expression of several key lipid-metabolism genes. Hundreds of differentially methylated regions were identified in the paternal sperm in response to DEF and SUPP diets. Aside from a few genes including Igf2, there was a striking lack of overlap between these genes differentially methylated in sperm and differentially expressed in offspring. Conclusions In this animal model, modulation of

  7. β-aminoisobutyric acid attenuates hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in mice with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chang-Xiang; Zhao, Ming-Xia; Shu, Xiao-Dong; Xiong, Xiao-Qing; Wang, Jue-Jin; Gao, Xing-Ya; Chen, Qi; Li, Yue-Hua; Kang, Yu-Ming; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    β-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA) is a nature thymine catabolite, and contributes to exercise-induced protection from metabolic diseases. Here we show the therapeutical effects of BAIBA on hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in diabetes. Type 2 diabetes was induced by combined streptozotocin (STZ) and high-fat diet (HFD) in mice. Oral administration of BAIBA for 4 weeks reduced blood glucose and lipids levels, hepatic key enzymes of gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis expressions, attenuated hepatic insulin resistance and lipid accumulation, and improved insulin signaling in type 2 diabetic mice. BAIBA reduced hepatic ER stress and apoptosis in type 2 diabetic mice. Furthermore, BAIBA alleviated ER stress in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells with glucosamine-induced insulin resistance. Hepatic AMPK phosphorylation was reduced in STZ/HFD mice and glucosamine-treated HepG2 cells, which were restored by BAIBA treatment. The suppressive effects of BAIBA on glucosamine-induced ER stress were reversed by knockdown of AMPK with siRNA. In addition, BAIBA prevented thapsigargin- or tunicamycin-induced ER stress, and tunicamycin–induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. These results indicate that BAIBA attenuates hepatic ER stress, apoptosis and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in mice with type 2 diabetes. AMPK signaling is involved to the role of BAIBA in attenuating ER stress. PMID:26907958

  8. β-aminoisobutyric acid attenuates hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in mice with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chang-Xiang; Zhao, Ming-Xia; Shu, Xiao-Dong; Xiong, Xiao-Qing; Wang, Jue-Jin; Gao, Xing-Ya; Chen, Qi; Li, Yue-Hua; Kang, Yu-Ming; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2016-02-24

    β-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA) is a nature thymine catabolite, and contributes to exercise-induced protection from metabolic diseases. Here we show the therapeutical effects of BAIBA on hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in diabetes. Type 2 diabetes was induced by combined streptozotocin (STZ) and high-fat diet (HFD) in mice. Oral administration of BAIBA for 4 weeks reduced blood glucose and lipids levels, hepatic key enzymes of gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis expressions, attenuated hepatic insulin resistance and lipid accumulation, and improved insulin signaling in type 2 diabetic mice. BAIBA reduced hepatic ER stress and apoptosis in type 2 diabetic mice. Furthermore, BAIBA alleviated ER stress in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells with glucosamine-induced insulin resistance. Hepatic AMPK phosphorylation was reduced in STZ/HFD mice and glucosamine-treated HepG2 cells, which were restored by BAIBA treatment. The suppressive effects of BAIBA on glucosamine-induced ER stress were reversed by knockdown of AMPK with siRNA. In addition, BAIBA prevented thapsigargin- or tunicamycin-induced ER stress, and tunicamycin-induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. These results indicate that BAIBA attenuates hepatic ER stress, apoptosis and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in mice with type 2 diabetes. AMPK signaling is involved to the role of BAIBA in attenuating ER stress.

  9. Extra-hepatic metabolism of 7-ketocholesterol occurs by esterification to fatty acids via cPLA2α and SOAT1 followed by selective efflux to HDL.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Wha; Huang, Jiahn-Dar; Rodriguez, Ignacio R

    2015-05-01

    Accumulation of 7-ketocholesterol (7KCh) in tissues has been previously associated with various chronic aging diseases. Orally ingested 7KCh is readily metabolized by the liver and does not pose a toxicity threat. However, 7KCh formed in situ, usually associated with lipoprotein deposits, can adversely affect surrounding tissues by causing inflammation and cytotoxicity. In this study we have investigated various mechanisms for extra-hepatic metabolism of 7KCh (e.g. hydroxylation, sulfation) and found only esterification to fatty acids. The esterification of 7KCh to fatty acids involves the combined action of cytosolic phospholipase A2 alpha (cPLA2α) and sterol O-acyltransferase (SOAT1). Inhibition of either one of these enzymes ablates 7KCh-fatty acid ester (7KFAE) formation. The 7KFAEs are not toxic and do not induce inflammatory responses. However, they can be unstable and re-release 7KCh. The higher the degree of unsaturation, the more unstable the 7KFAE (e.g. 18:0>18:1>18:2>18:3≫20:4). Biochemical inhibition and siRNA knockdown of SOAT1 and cPLA2α ablated the 7KFAE synthesis in cultured ARPE19 cells, but had little effect on the 7KCh-induced inflammatory response. Overexpression of SOAT1 reduced the 7KCh-induced inflammatory response and provided some protection from cell death. This effect is likely due to the increased conversion of 7KCh to 7KFAEs, which reduced the intracellular 7KCh levels. Addition of HDL selectively increased the efflux of 7KFAEs and enhanced the effect of SOAT1 overexpression. Our data suggests an additional function for HDL in aiding extra-hepatic tissues to eliminate 7KCh by returning 7KFAEs to the liver for bile acid formation.

  10. Effect of taurine supplementation on hepatic metabolism and alleviation of cadmium toxicity and bioaccumulation in a marine teleost, red sea bream, Pagrus major.

    PubMed

    Hano, Takeshi; Ito, Katsutoshi; Kono, Kumiko; Ito, Mana; Ohkubo, Nobuyuki; Mochida, Kazuhiko

    2017-02-01

    This study was performed to unravel the mechanism of the beneficial action of taurine on marine teleost fish, red sea bream (Pagrus major), by analyzing the hepatic metabolism. Moreover, the ameliorative effects of the nutrient against cadmium toxicity and bioaccumulation were further evaluated. The fish were fed a diet containing 0 % (TAU0 %), 0.5 % (TAU0.5 %), or 5.0 % (TAU5.0 %) taurine for 40-55 days (d) and subjected to cadmium acute toxicity and bioaccumulation tests. Taurine deficiency in feed severely affected growth and the hepatic metabolic profiles of the fish, including a remarkable increase in myo-inositol, aspartate, and ß-alanine in the TAU0 % group, which indicates a complementary physiological response to taurine deficiency. For the acute toxicity test, fish were fed the test diets for 55 d and were then exposed to different dose of cadmium ranging from 0 to 5.6 mg/L for 96 h. Fish fed taurine had a higher tolerance to cadmium than those not fed taurine. For the bioaccumulation test, fish were fed the test diets for 40 d and then were chronically exposed to 0.2 mg/L of cadmium for 28 d followed by depuration for 21 d. Cadmium concentrations in the liver and muscle of fish fed TAU5.0 % were significantly lower than those of fish fed TAU0 % for the first 7 d of exposure and the first 7 d of elimination. Our findings suggest a possible mechanism for the beneficial role played by taurine and that the inclusion of taurine in fish aquaculture feed may reduce cadmium contamination of fish intended for human consumption.

  11. A High Phosphorus Diet Affects Lipid Metabolism in Rat Liver: A DNA Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Sunwoo; Bamba, Takeshi; Suyama, Tatsuya; Ishijima, Tomoko; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Abe, Keiko; Nakai, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    A high phosphorus (HP) diet causes disorders of renal function, bone metabolism, and vascular function. We previously demonstrated that DNA microarray analysis is an appropriate method to comprehensively evaluate the effects of a HP diet on kidney dysfunction such as calcification, fibrillization, and inflammation. We reported that type IIb sodium-dependent phosphate transporter is significantly up-regulated in this context. In the present study, we performed DNA microarray analysis to investigate the effects of a HP diet on the liver, which plays a pivotal role in energy metabolism. DNA microarray analysis was performed with total RNA isolated from the livers of rats fed a control diet (containing 0.3% phosphorus) or a HP diet (containing 1.2% phosphorus). Gene Ontology analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) revealed that the HP diet induced down-regulation of genes involved in hepatic amino acid catabolism and lipogenesis, while genes related to fatty acid β-oxidation process were up-regulated. Although genes related to fatty acid biosynthesis were down-regulated in HP diet-fed rats, genes important for the elongation and desaturation reactions of omega-3 and -6 fatty acids were up-regulated. Concentrations of hepatic arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid were increased in HP diet-fed rats. These essential fatty acids activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), a transcription factor for fatty acid β-oxidation. Evaluation of the upstream regulators of DEGs using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis indicated that PPARα was activated in the livers of HP diet-fed rats. Furthermore, the serum concentration of fibroblast growth factor 21, a hormone secreted from the liver that promotes fatty acid utilization in adipose tissue as a PPARα target gene, was higher (p = 0.054) in HP diet-fed rats than in control diet-fed rats. These data suggest that a HP diet enhances energy expenditure through the utilization of free fatty acids

  12. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation of the liver.” This inflammation can be caused by a wide variety of toxins, drugs, and metabolic diseases, as well as infection. There are at least 5 hepatitis viruses. Hepatitis A is contracted when a child eats food or drinks water that is contaminated with the virus or has ...

  13. A Recipe Composed of Chinese Herbal Active Components Regulates Hepatic Lipid Metabolism of NAFLD In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Sheng-xi; Liu, Qian; Tang, Ya-jun; Wang, Wen-jing; Zheng, Qing-shan; Tian, Hua-jie; Yao, Dong-sheng; Liu, Lin; Peng, Jing-hua; Zhao, Yu; Hu, Yi-yang; Feng, Qin

    2016-01-01

    This study is to investigate the therapeutic effects of the recipe composed of Atractylodes macrocephala polysaccharide, chlorogenic acid, and geniposide (named ACG) on experimental nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL). The research was divided into two parts as screening experiment and verification experiment. In the screening experiment, we used high-fat diet (HFD) induced NAFL rat model and uniform design to get the recipe from five Chinese herbal active components. In the verification experiment, HFD induced fatty liver rat and mouse NAFL models and free fatty acid (FFA) induced HepG2 cell model were used to verify the effects of ACG. According to the multiple regression equation of the hepatic triglyceride (TG) contents of each group in the screening experiment, the recipe ACG was obtained and the doses of Atractylodes macrocephala polysaccharide, chlorogenic acid, and geniposide for rats were 266.67, 3.33, and 45 mg/kg, respectively. The results of verification experiment verified that ACG could significantly reduce hepatic TG contents of NAFL rats and mice, as well as the cellular TG content of FFA-induced HepG2 cells. ACG could also improve HOMA-IR and hepatic mitochondrial ultrastructure of NAFL mice. Our study verified that ACG recipe could regulate lipid metabolism of NAFL in vivo and in vitro. PMID:27069915

  14. Naltrexone changes the expression of lipid metabolism-related proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum stress induced hepatic steatosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Moslehi, Azam; Nabavizadeh, Fatemeh; Zekri, Ali; Amiri, Fatemeh

    2017-02-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is closely associated with several chronic diseases such as obesity, atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, and hepatic steatosis. Steatosis in hepatocytes may also lead to disorders such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis, and possibly cirrhosis. Opioid peptides are involved in triglyceride and cholesterol dysregulation. Naltrexone also attenuates ER stress induced hepatic steatosis in mice. In this study, we evaluated the effects of naltrexone on the expression of lipid metabolism-related nuclear factors and enzymes in the ER stress induced hepatic steatosis. C57/BL6 mice received saline, DMSO and naltrexone as control groups. In a fourth group, ER stress was induced by tunicamycin (TM) injection and in the last group, naltrexone was given before TM administration. Histopathological evaluations, real-time RT-PCR and western blot were performed. We found that GRP78, IRE1α, PERK and ATF6 gene expression and steatosis significantly reduced in naltrexone treated animals. Naltrexone alleviated the gene and protein expression of SREBP1c. Expression of ACAT1, apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and PPARα also increased after naltrexone treatment. In conclusion, this study, for the first time, shows that naltrexone has a considerable role in attenuation of ER stress-induced liver injury.

  15. Quantitative Assessment of Population Variability in Hepatic Drug Metabolism Using a Perfused Three-Dimensional Human Liver Microphysiological System

    PubMed Central

    Tsamandouras, N.; Kostrzewski, T.; Stokes, C. L.; Griffith, L. G.; Hughes, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we first describe the population variability in hepatic drug metabolism using cryopreserved hepatocytes from five different donors cultured in a perfused three-dimensional human liver microphysiological system, and then show how the resulting data can be integrated with a modeling and simulation framework to accomplish in vitro–in vivo translation. For each donor, metabolic depletion profiles of six compounds (phenacetin, diclofenac, lidocaine, ibuprofen, propranolol, and prednisolone) were measured, along with metabolite formation, mRNA levels of 90 metabolism-related genes, and markers of functional viability [lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, albumin, and urea production]. Drug depletion data were analyzed with mixed-effects modeling. Substantial interdonor variability was observed with respect to gene expression levels, drug metabolism, and other measured hepatocyte functions. Specifically, interdonor variability in intrinsic metabolic clearance ranged from 24.1% for phenacetin to 66.8% for propranolol (expressed as coefficient of variation). Albumin, urea, LDH, and cytochrome P450 mRNA levels were identified as significant predictors of in vitro metabolic clearance. Predicted clearance values from the liver microphysiological system were correlated with the observed in vivo values. A population physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed for lidocaine to illustrate the translation of the in vitro output to the observed pharmacokinetic variability in vivo. Stochastic simulations with this model successfully predicted the observed clinical concentration-time profiles and the associated population variability. This is the first study of population variability in drug metabolism in the context of a microphysiological system and has important implications for the use of these systems during the drug development process. PMID:27760784

  16. The in vitro metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene by polychlorinated and polybrominated biphenyl induced rat hepatic microsomal monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Haake, J M; Merrill, J C; Safe, S

    1985-09-01

    The metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene by halogenated biphenyl-induced rat hepatic microsomal monooxygenases was determined using a high pressure liquid chromatographic assay system. Incubation of benzo[a]pyrene with microsomes from rats pretreated with phenobarbitone or phenobarbitone-type inducers (2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl, 2,2',4,4',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl, 2,2',5,5'-tetrachlorobiphenyl, 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromobiphenyl, and 2,2',5,5'-tetrabromobiphenyl) resulted in increased overall metabolism of the hydrocarbon (less than fourfold) into phenolic, quinone, and diol metabolites, with the most striking increase observed in the formation of 4,5-dihydro-4,5-dihydroxybenzo[a]pyrene. In contrast, the metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene by microsomes from rats induced with 3-methylcholanthrene or 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl resulted in a greater than 10-fold increase in overall benzo[a]pyrene metabolism, with the largest increases observed in the formation of the trans-7,8- and -9,10-dihydrodiol metabolites of benzo[a]pyrene. However, in comparison to control and phenobarbitone-induced microsomes, the oxidative conversion of benzo[a]pyrene by microsomes induced with 3-methylcholanthrene and 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl into the 6,12-quinone was substantially inhibited. Previous reports have shown that the commercial halogenated biphenyl mixtures, fireMaster BP-6, and Aroclor 1254 are mixed-type inducers and that microsomes from rats pretreated with these mixtures markedly enhance the overall metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene. Not surprisingly, the metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene by microsomes from rats pretreated with the mixed-type inducers, 2,3,3',4,4'-penta-,2,3,3',4,4',5-hexa-, and 2',3,3',4,4',5-hexa- chlorobiphenyl was also increased and the metabolic profile was similar to that observed with fireMaster BP-6 and Aroclor 1254 induced microsomes.

  17. t-10, c-12 CLA dietary supplementation inhibits atherosclerotic lesion development despite adverse cardiovascular and hepatic metabolic marker profiles.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Patricia L; Karakach, Tobias K; Currie, Deborah L; McLeod, Roger S

    2012-01-01

    Animal and human studies have indicated that fatty acids such as the conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) found in milk could potentially alter the risk of developing metabolic disorders including diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Using susceptible rodent models (apoE(-/-) and LDLr(-/-) mice) we investigated the interrelationship between mouse strain, dietary conjugated linoleic acids and metabolic markers of CVD. Despite an adverse metabolic risk profile, atherosclerosis (measured directly by lesion area), was significantly reduced with t-10, c-12 CLA and mixed isomer CLA (Mix) supplementation in both apoE(-/-) (p<0.05, n = 11) and LDLr(-/-) mice (p<0.01, n = 10). Principal component analysis was utilized to delineate the influence of multiple plasma and tissue metabolites on the development of atherosclerosis. Group clustering by dietary supplementation was evident, with the t-10, c-12 CLA supplemented animals having distinct patterns, suggestive of hepatic insulin resistance, regardless of mouse strain. The effect of CLA supplementation on hepatic lipid and fatty acid composition was explored in the LDLr(-/-) strain. Dietary supplementation with t-10, c-12 CLA significantly increased liver weight (p<0.05, n = 10), triglyceride (p<0.01, n = 10) and cholesterol ester content (p<0.01, n = 10). Furthermore, t-10, c-12 CLA also increased the ratio of 18∶1 to 18∶0 fatty acid in the liver suggesting an increase in the activity of stearoyl-CoA desaturase. Changes in plasma adiponectin and liver weight with t-10, c-12 CLA supplementation were evident within 3 weeks of initiation of the diet. These observations provide evidence that the individual CLA isomers have divergent mechanisms of action and that t-10, c-12 CLA rapidly changes plasma and liver markers of metabolic syndrome, despite evidence of reduction in atherosclerosis.

  18. Functional proteomic analysis of corticosteroid pharmacodynamics in rat liver: Relationship to hepatic stress, signaling, energy regulation, and drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ayyar, Vivaswath S; Almon, Richard R; DuBois, Debra C; Sukumaran, Siddharth; Qu, Jun; Jusko, William J

    2017-03-14

    Corticosteroids (CS) are anti-inflammatory agents that cause extensive pharmacogenomic and proteomic changes in multiple tissues. An understanding of the proteome-wide effects of CS in liver and its relationships to altered hepatic and systemic physiology remains incomplete. Here, we report the application of a functional pharmacoproteomic approach to gain integrated insight into the complex nature of CS responses in liver in vivo. An in-depth functional analysis was performed using rich pharmacodynamic (temporal-based) proteomic data measured over 66h in rat liver following a single dose of methylprednisolone (MPL). Data mining identified 451 differentially regulated proteins. These proteins were analyzed on the basis of temporal regulation, cellular localization, and literature-mined functional information. Of the 451 proteins, 378 were clustered into six functional groups based on major clinically-relevant effects of CS in liver. MPL-responsive proteins were highly localized in the mitochondria (20%) and cytosol (24%). Interestingly, several proteins were related to hepatic stress and signaling processes, which appear to be involved in secondary signaling cascades and in protecting the liver from CS-induced oxidative damage. Consistent with known adverse metabolic effects of CS, several rate-controlling enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism, gluconeogenesis, and fatty-acid metabolism were altered by MPL. In addition, proteins involved in the metabolism of endogenous compounds, xenobiotics, and therapeutic drugs including cytochrome P450 and Phase-II enzymes were differentially regulated. Proteins related to the inflammatory acute-phase response were up-regulated in response to MPL. Functionally-similar proteins showed large diversity in their temporal profiles, indicating complex mechanisms of regulation by CS.

  19. Effects of recombinant human growth hormone on hepatic lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in HIV-infected patients with fat accumulation.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Jean-Marc; Mulligan, Kathleen; Lee, Jeongae; Lo, Joan C; Wen, Michael; Noor, Mustafa A; Grunfeld, Carl; Schambelan, Morris

    2002-02-01

    We recently reported that treatment with a pharmacologic dose of recombinant human growth hormone (GH) resulted in a significant loss of body fat and gain in lean tissue in HIV-infected patients with syndromes of fat accumulation. However, insulin-mediated glucose disposal decreased transiently after one month of GH therapy. The present paper focuses on the changes of hepatic carbohydrate and fat metabolism associated with GH treatment in the same subjects. We assessed hepatic insulin sensitivity under both fasting and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp conditions prior to and after one and six months of GH treatment (3 mg/day) in five patients using stable isotope tracer techniques. Indirect calorimetry, and measurements of lipid concentrations. Fasting endogenous glucose production (EGP) increased significantly at one month (12.0 +/- 0.7 to 14.9 +/- 0.9 micromol/kg/min, P < 0.03), and the increase was sustained at six months of GH treatment (14.0 +/- 1.1 micromol/kg/min, NS). This increase in EGP was driven in part by increased glucogenesis (GNG) (3.5 +/- 0.9 to 5.2 +/- 0.9 and 5.8 +/-1.2 micromol/kg/min, n = 4, P < 0.01 and P < 0.01 at one and six months, respectively); small changes in hepatic glycogenolysis also contributed. Sustained increases in lipolysis and progressive decreases in hepatic fractional de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and triglyceride concentrations occurred with GH treatment. These changes were accompanied by an improved lipid profile with a significant increase in HDL cholesterol and significant decreases in total and LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels, the latter consistent with the decrease in hepatic DNL. During a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic glucose clamp, EGP and GNG were markedly suppressed compared to the corresponding time points under fasting conditions, albeit less so when measured after one month of GH treatment. Thus, in HIV-infected patients with abnormal fat distribution, pharmacologic doses of GH improved the overall lipid

  20. The Hepatitis B Virus Genotype Affects the Persistence of Viral Replication in Immunodeficient NOG Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Yoshinobu; Miyagi, Takuya; Hikita, Hayato; Yoshioka, Teppei; Mukai, Kaori; Nawa, Takatoshi; Sakamori, Ryotaro; Ohkawa, Kazuyoshi; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Takahashi, Takeshi; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Ryo, Akihide; Tatsumi, Tomohide; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims At least eight genotypes of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) have been identified. HBV genotype C is the most common genotype in Japan, although the incidence of HBV genotype A is increasing. The reason underlying the differences in viral multiplication of the HBV genotypes is unclear, especially in vivo. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the differences in HBV load and the persistence of viremia in vivo between genotypes A and C. Methods Immunodeficient NOG mice were transfected by hydrodynamic injection with the HBV expression plasmids pHBA1.2 or pHBC1.2, which contain overlength (1.2-mer) copies of the genomes of HBV genotype A or C, respectively. Results One day after transfection, the number of HBcAg-positive hepatocytes and serum HBV DNA levels were similar between mice transfected with pHBA1.2 and pHBC1.2. Serum levels of HBV DNA, HBsAg and HBeAg in mice transfected with pHBA1.2 were maintained over 5 months. In contrast, those in mice with pHBC1.2 gradually decreased over time and reached undetectable levels within 3 months after transfection. HBcAg-stained hepatocytes were detected in mice transfected with pHBA1.2, but not pHBC1.2, 5 months post-transfection. Double-staining immunohistochemistry revealed that the number of cleaved caspase3-stained, HBcAg-positive hepatocytes in the pHBC1.2-transfected mice was higher than in the pHBA1.2-transfected mice 3 days post-transfection. Moreover, the plasmid DNA and covalently closed circular DNA levels were decreased in the livers of pHBC1.2-transfected mice. These results suggested that hepatocytes expressing HBV genotype C were eliminated by apoptosis in the absence of immune cells more often than in hepatocytes expressing HBV genotype A. Conclusions Immunodeficient mice transfected with HBV genotype A develop persistent viremia, whereas those transfected with HBV genotype C exhibit transient viremia accompanied by apoptosis of HBV-expressing hepatocytes. This differences may affect the

  1. Are the testing needs of key European populations affected by hepatitis B and hepatitis C being addressed? A scoping review of testing studies in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, Jeffrey V; Sperle, Ida; Spina, Alexander; Rockstroh, Jürgen K

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate whether or not key populations affected by hepatitis B and hepatitis C are being tested sufficiently for these diseases throughout the European region. Methods We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for studies on HBV and HCV testing in the 53 Member States of the World Health Organization European Region following PRISMA criteria. Results 136 English-language studies from 24 countries published between January 2007 and June 2013 were found. Most studies took place in 6 countries: France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. 37 studies (27%) addressed HBV, 46 (34%) HCV, and 53 (39%) both diseases. The largest categories of study populations were people who use drugs (18%) and health care patient populations (17%). Far fewer studies focused on migrants, prison inmates, or men who have sex with men. Conclusions The overall evidence base on HBV and HCV testing has considerable gaps in terms of the countries and populations represented and validity of testing uptake data. More research is needed throughout Europe to guide efforts to provide testing to certain key populations. PMID:27815935

  2. Increased hepatic oxidative metabolism distinguishes the action of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ from Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ in the ob/ob mouse

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors and members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. The PPAR family consists of three members: PPARα, PPARγ, and PPARδ. PPARδ controls the transcription of genes involved in multiple physiological pathways, including cellular differentiation, lipid metabolism and energy homeostasis. The receptor is expressed almost ubiquitously, with high expression in liver and skeletal muscle. Although the physiological ligands of PPARδ remain undefined, a number of high affinity synthetic ligands have been developed for the receptor as a therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and the metabolic syndrome. Methods In this study, the metabolic role of PPARδ activation has been investigated in liver, skeletal muscle, blood serum and white adipose tissue from ob/ob mice using a high affinity synthetic ligand and contrasted with PPARγ activation. To maximize the analytical coverage of the metabolome, 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) were used to examine metabolites from tissue extracts. Results Analysis by multivariate statistics demonstrated that PPARδ activation profoundly affected glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, the TCA cycle and linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid essential fatty acid pathways. Conclusions Although activation of both PPARδ and PPARγ lead to increased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, PPARδ activation was functionally distinct from PPARγ activation, and was characterized by increased hepatic and peripheral fatty acid oxidative metabolism, demonstrating the distinctive catabolic role of this receptor compared with PPARγ. PMID:19968882

  3. Absence of cumulus cells during in vitro maturation affects lipid metabolism in bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Auclair, Sylvain; Uzbekov, Rustem; Elis, Sébastien; Sanchez, Laura; Kireev, Igor; Lardic, Lionel; Dalbies-Tran, Rozenn; Uzbekova, Svetlana

    2013-03-15

    Cumulus cells (CC) surround the oocyte and are coupled metabolically through regulation of nutrient intake. CC removal before in vitro maturation (IVM) decreases bovine oocyte developmental competence without affecting nuclear meiotic maturation. The objective was to investigate the influence of CC on oocyte cytoplasmic maturation in relation to energy metabolism. IVM with either cumulus-enclosed (CEO) or -denuded (DO) oocytes was performed in serum-free metabolically optimized medium. Transmission electron microscopy revealed different distribution of membrane-bound vesicles and lipid droplets between metaphase II DO and CEO. By Nile Red staining, a significant reduction in total lipid level was evidenced in DO. Global transcriptomic analysis revealed differential expression of genes regulating energy metabolism, transcription, and translation between CEO and DO. By Western blot, fatty acid synthase (FAS) and hormone-sensitive phospholipase (HSL) proteins were detected in oocytes and in CC, indicating a local lipogenesis and lypolysis. FAS protein was significantly less abundant in DO that in CEO and more highly expressed in CC than in the oocytes. On the contrary, HSL protein was more abundant in oocytes than in CC. In addition, active Ser⁵⁶³-phosphorylated HSL was detected in the oocytes only after IVM, and its level was similar in CEO and DO. In conclusion, absence of CC during IVM affected lipid metabolism in the oocyte and led to suboptimal cytoplasmic maturation. Thus, CC may influence the oocyte by orienting the consumption of nutritive storage via regulation of local fatty acid synthesis and lipolysis to provide energy for maturation.

  4. The Dual Role of Nrf2 in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Regulation of Antioxidant Defenses and Hepatic Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chambel, Sílvia S; Santos-Gonçalves, Andreia; Duarte, Tiago L

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a progressive liver disease with ever-growing incidence in the industrialized world. It starts with the simple accumulation of lipids in the hepatocyte and can progress to the more severe nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which is associated with inflammation, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. There is increasing awareness that reactive oxygen species and electrophiles are implicated in the pathogenesis of NASH. Transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a positive regulator of the expression of a battery of genes involved in the protection against oxidative/electrophilic stress. In rodents, Nrf2 is also known to participate in hepatic fatty acid metabolism, as a negative regulator of genes that promote hepatosteatosis. We review relevant evidence in the literature that these two mechanisms may contribute to the protective role of Nrf2 in the development of hepatic steatosis and in the progression to steatohepatitis, particularly in young animals. We propose that age may be a key to explain contradictory findings in the literature. In summary, Nrf2 mediates the crosstalk between lipid metabolism and antioxidant defense mechanisms in experimental models of NAFLD, and the nutritional or pharmacological induction of Nrf2 represents a promising potential new strategy for its prevention and treatment.

  5. Altered hepatic lipid metabolism in mice lacking both the melanocortin type 4 receptor and low density lipoprotein receptor

    PubMed Central

    Garten, Antje; Popkova, Yulia; Penke, Melanie; Franke, Christin; Ricken, Albert; Schulz, Angela; Kiess, Wieland; Huster, Daniel; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schiller, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is often associated with dyslipidemia and hepatosteatosis. A number of animal models of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are established but they significantly differ in the molecular and biochemical changes depending on the genetic modification and diet used. Mice deficient for melanocortin type 4 receptor (Mc4rmut) develop hyperphagia, obesity, and subsequently NAFLD already under regular chow and resemble more closely the energy supply-driven obesity found in humans. This animal model was used to assess the molecular and biochemical consequences of hyperphagia-induced obesity on hepatic lipid metabolism. We analyzed transcriptome changes in Mc4rmut mice by RNA sequencing and used high resolution 1H magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to assess changes in the lipid composition. On the transcriptomic level we found significant changes in components of the triacylglycerol metabolism, unsaturated fatty acids biosynthesis, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathways, and lipid transport and storage compared to the wild-type. These findings were supported by increases in triacylglycerol, monounsaturated fatty acid, and arachidonic acid levels. The transcriptome signatures significantly differ from those of other NAFLD mouse models supporting the concept of hepatic subphenotypes depending on the genetic background and diet. Comparative analyses of our data with previous studies allowed for the identification of common changes and genotype-specific components and pathways involved in obesity-associated NAFLD. PMID:28207798

  6. The Dual Role of Nrf2 in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Regulation of Antioxidant Defenses and Hepatic Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chambel, Sílvia S.; Santos-Gonçalves, Andreia; Duarte, Tiago L.

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a progressive liver disease with ever-growing incidence in the industrialized world. It starts with the simple accumulation of lipids in the hepatocyte and can progress to the more severe nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which is associated with inflammation, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. There is increasing awareness that reactive oxygen species and electrophiles are implicated in the pathogenesis of NASH. Transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a positive regulator of the expression of a battery of genes involved in the protection against oxidative/electrophilic stress. In rodents, Nrf2 is also known to participate in hepatic fatty acid metabolism, as a negative regulator of genes that promote hepatosteatosis. We review relevant evidence in the literature that these two mechanisms may contribute to the protective role of Nrf2 in the development of hepatic steatosis and in the progression to steatohepatitis, particularly in young animals. We propose that age may be a key to explain contradictory findings in the literature. In summary, Nrf2 mediates the crosstalk between lipid metabolism and antioxidant defense mechanisms in experimental models of NAFLD, and the nutritional or pharmacological induction of Nrf2 represents a promising potential new strategy for its prevention and treatment. PMID:26120584

  7. Stretching Your Energetic Budget: How Tendon Compliance Affects the Metabolic Cost of Running

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Thomas K.; Hicks, Jennifer L.; Dembia, Christopher L.; Delp, Scott L.

    2016-01-01

    Muscles attach to bones via tendons that stretch and recoil, affecting muscle force generation and metabolic energy consumption. In this study, we investigated the effect of tendon compliance on the metabolic cost of running using a full-body musculoskeletal model with a detailed model of muscle energetics. We performed muscle-driven simulations of running at 2–5 m/s with tendon force–strain curves that produced between 1 and 10% strain when the muscles were developing maximum isometric force. We computed the average metabolic power consumed by each muscle when running at each speed and with each tendon compliance. Average whole-body metabolic power consumption increased as running speed increased, regardless of tendon compliance, and was lowest at each speed when tendon strain reached 2–3% as muscles were developing maximum isometric force. When running at 2 m/s, the soleus muscle consumed less metabolic power at high tendon compliance because the strain of the tendon allowed the muscle fibers to operate nearly isometrically during stance. In contrast, the medial and lateral gastrocnemii consumed less metabolic power at low tendon compliance because less compliant tendons allowed the muscle fibers to operate closer to their optimal lengths during stance. The software and simulations used in this study are freely available at simtk.org and enable examination of muscle energetics with unprecedented detail. PMID:26930416

  8. Which molecular features affect the intrinsic hepatic clearance rate of ionizable organic chemicals in fish?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Greater knowledge of biotransformation rates for ionizable organic compounds (IOCs) in fish is required to properly assess the bioaccumulation potential of many environmentally relevant contaminants. In this study we measured in vitro hepatic clearance rates for 50 IOCs using a p...

  9. N-Acetylgalactosamine-Targeted Delivery of Dendrimer-Doxorubicin Conjugates Influences Doxorubicin Cytotoxicity and Metabolic Profile in Hepatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuruvilla, Sibu P; Tiruchinapally, Gopinath; ElAzzouny, Mahmoud; ElSayed, Mohamed E H

    2017-03-01

    This study describes the development of targeted, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded generation 5 (G5) polyamidoamine dendrimers able to achieve cell-specific DOX delivery and release into the cytoplasm of hepatic cancer cells. G5 is functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) brushes displaying N-acetylgalactosamine (NAcGal) ligands to target hepatic cancer cells. DOX is attached to G5 through one of two aromatic azo-linkages, L3 or L4, achieving either P1 ((NAcGalβ -PEGc)16.6 -G5-(L3-DOX)11.6 ) or P2 ((NAcGalβ -PEGc)16.6 -G5-(L4-DOX)13.4 ) conjugates. After confirming the conjugates' biocompatibility, flow cytometry studies show P1/P2 achieve 100% uptake into hepatic cancer cells at 30-60 × 10(-9) m particle concentration. This internalization correlates with cytotoxicity against HepG2 cells with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) values of 24.8, 1414.0, and 237.8 × 10(-9) m for free DOX, P1, and P2, respectively. Differences in cytotoxicity prompted metabolomics analysis to identify the intracellular release behavior of DOX. Results show that P1/P2 release alternative DOX metabolites than free DOX. Stable isotope tracer studies show that the different metabolites induce different effects on metabolic cycles. Namely, free DOX reduces glycolysis and increases fatty acid oxidation, while P1/P2 increase glycolysis, likely as a response to high oxidative stress. Overall, P1/P2 conjugates offer a platform drug delivery technology for improving hepatic cancer therapy.

  10. Hepatic MiR-291b-3p Mediated Glucose Metabolism by Directly Targeting p65 to Upregulate PTEN Expression

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun; Dou, Lin; Meng, Xiangyu; Chen, Zhenzhen; Yang, Weili; Fang, Weiwei; Yang, Chunxiao; Huang, Xiuqing; Tang, Weiqing; Yang, Jichun; Li, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have suggested an important role of miR-291b-3p in the development of embryonic stem cells. In previous study, we found that the expression of miR-291b-3p was significantly upregulated in the liver of db/db mice. However, the role of miR-291b-3p in glucose metabolism and its underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that miR-291b-3p was abundantly expressed in the liver. Of note, hepatic miR-291b-3p expression was upregulated in HFD-fed mice and induced by fasting in C57BL/6 J normal mice. Importantly, hepatic inhibition miR-291b-3p expression ameliorated hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in HFD-fed mice, whereas hepatic overexpression of miR-291b-3p led to hyperglycemia and insulin resistance in C57BL/6 J normal mice. Further study revealed that miR-291b-3p suppressed insulin-stimulated AKT/GSK signaling and increased the expression of gluconeogenic genes in hepatocytes. Moreover, we identified that p65, a subunit of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), is a target of miR-291b-3p by bioinformatics analysis and luciferase reporter assay. Silencing of p65 significantly augmented the expression of PTEN and impaired AKT activation. In conclusion, we found novel evidence suggesting that hepatic miR-291b-3p mediated glycogen synthesis and gluconeogenesis through targeting p65 to regulate PTEN expression. Our findings indicate the therapeutic potential of miR-291b-3p inhibitor in hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. PMID:28054586

  11. Xylitol affects the intestinal microbiota and metabolism of daidzein in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Motoi; Hoshi, Chigusa; Hori, Sachiko

    2013-12-10

    This study examined the effects of xylitol on mouse intestinal microbiota and urinary isoflavonoids. Xylitol is classified as a sugar alcohol and used as a food additive. The intestinal microbiota seems to play an important role in isoflavone metabolism. Xylitol feeding appears to affect the gut microbiota. We hypothesized that dietary xylitol changes intestinal microbiota and, therefore, the metabolism of isoflavonoids in mice. Male mice were randomly divided into two groups: those fed a 0.05% daidzein with 5% xylitol diet (XD group) and those fed a 0.05% daidzein-containing control diet (CD group) for 28 days. Plasma total cholesterol concentrations were significantly lower in the XD group than in the CD group (p < 0.05). Urinary amounts of equol were significantly higher in the XD group than in the CD group (p < 0.05). The fecal lipid contents (% dry weight) were significantly greater in the XD group than in the CD group (p < 0.01). The cecal microbiota differed between the two dietary groups. The occupation ratios of Bacteroides were significantly greater in the CD than in the XD group (p < 0.05). This study suggests that xylitol has the potential to affect the metabolism of daidzein by altering the metabolic activity of the intestinal microbiota and/or gut environment. Given that equol affects bone health, dietary xylitol plus isoflavonoids may exert a favorable effect on bone health.

  12. Ethanol Enhances Hepatitis C Virus Replication through Lipid Metabolism and Elevated NADH/NAD+*

    PubMed Central

    Seronello, Scott; Ito, Chieri; Wakita, Takaji; Choi, Jinah

    2010-01-01

    Ethanol has been suggested to elevate HCV titer in patients and to increase HCV RNA in replicon cells, suggesting that HCV replication is increased in the presence and absence of the complete viral replication cycle, but the mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we use Huh7 human hepatoma cells that naturally express comparable levels of CYP2E1 as human liver to demonstrate that ethanol, at subtoxic and physiologically relevant concentrations, enhances complete HCV replication. The viral RNA genome replication is affected for both genotypes 2a and 1b. Acetaldehyde, a major product of ethanol metabolism, likewise enhances HCV replication at physiological concentrations. The potentiation of HCV replication by ethanol is suppressed by inhibiting CYP2E1 or aldehyde dehydrogenase and requires an elevated NADH/NAD+ ratio. In addition, acetate, isopropyl alcohol, and concentrations of acetone that occur in diabetics enhance HCV replication with corresponding increases in the NADH/NAD+. Furthermore, inhibiting the host mevalonate pathway with lovastatin or fluvastatin and fatty acid synthesis with 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid or cerulenin significantly attenuates the enhancement of HCV replication by ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, as well as acetate, whereas inhibiting β-oxidation with β-mercaptopropionic acid increases HCV replication. Ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, and acetate increase the total intracellular cholesterol content, which is attenuated with lovastatin. In contrast, both endogenous and exogenous ROS suppress the replication of HCV genotype 2a, as previously shown with genotype 1b. Conclusion: Therefore, lipid metabolism and alteration of cellular NADH/NAD+ ratio are likely to play a critical role in the potentiation of HCV replication by ethanol rather than oxidative stress. PMID:19910460

  13. Developmental Profile and effects of perinatal PBDE exposure in Hepatic Phase I, II, III and deiodinase I gene expression involved in thyroid hormone metabolism in male rat pups

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies demonstrated that perinatal exposure to PBDEs, a major class of brominated flame retardants, may affect thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations by inducing hepatic uridinediphosphate-glucoronosyltransferases (UGTs). This study further examines effects of the commerc...

  14. Niclosamide reduces glucagon sensitivity via hepatic PKA inhibition in obese mice: Implications for glucose metabolism improvements in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Md. Kamrul Hasan; Turner, Nigel; Bentley, Nicholas L.; Das, Abhirup; Wu, Lindsay E.; Richani, Dulama; Bustamante, Sonia; Gilchrist, Robert B.; Morris, Margaret J.; Shepherd, Peter R.; Smith, Greg C.

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a global pandemic. Currently, the drugs used to treat T2D improve hyperglycemic symptom of the disease but the underlying mechanism causing the high blood glucose levels have not been fully resolved. Recently published data showed that salt form of niclosamide improved glucose metabolism in high fat fed mice via mitochondrial uncoupling. However, based on our previous work we hypothesised that niclosamide might also improve glucose metabolism via inhibition of the glucagon signalling in liver in vivo. In this study, mice were fed either a chow or high fat diet containing two different formulations of niclosamide (niclosamide ethanolamine salt - NENS or niclosamide - Nic) for 10 weeks. We identified both forms of niclosamide significantly improved whole body glucose metabolism without altering total body weight or body composition, energy expenditure or insulin secretion or sensitivity. Our study provides evidence that inhibition of the glucagon signalling pathway contributes to the beneficial effects of niclosamide (NENS or Nic) on whole body glucose metabolism. In conclusion, our results suggest that the niclosamide could be a useful adjunctive therapeutic strategy to treat T2D, as hepatic glucose output is elevated in people with T2D and current drugs do not redress this adequately. PMID:28054648

  15. [Metabolism of hexobarbital in patients with acute hepatitis and cirrhosis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Richter, E; Gallenkamp, H; Keller, B; Brachtel, D; Zilly, W; Breimer, D D

    1977-06-01

    16 patients with acute hepatitis, 18 patients with cirrhosis and a total of 21 volunteers and patients with normal liver function received 7.32 mg/kg hexobarbital by linear intravenous infusion within 60 min. Hexobarbital was determined gaschromatographically in serial blood samples and the hexobarbital-clearance was calculated from the plasma concentration curve versus time. Additional experiments were performed in rats suffering from so called "galactosamine hepatitis". In half of the patients with acute hepatitis a normal hexobarbital clearance could be found. In the other patients this was distinctly reduced but not correlation was found to other liver function tests. Patients with cirrhosis were subdivided into two groups. The patients in group 1 were well compensated. The patients in group 2 had a decompensated state with ascites and oesophageal varices. In nearly all patients with cirrhosis the hexobarbital-clearance was diminished. This was more pronounced in group 2. Ketohexobarbital excretion in healthy subjects was in the range of 40-60% of dose. Patients with acute hepatitis excreted only 10-20% of dose and patients with liver cirrhosis only about 5% of dose. In rats with "galactosamine hepatitis" hexobarbital clearance in vivo was distinctly reduced and this could be explained by diminished microsomal cytochrome p 45- and hexobarbital oxidation rate.

  16. The environmental light influences the circulatory levels of retinoic acid and associates with hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wenqiang; Li, Chunying; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Shiming; Dong, Wei; Jiang, Pengjiu; Zhang, Jianfa

    2008-12-01

    Environmental light is involved in the regulation of photochemical reaction in mouse retina. It remains unclear whether light-mediated increase in all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) synthesis in retina will result in altering the circulatory levels of ATRA and regulating downstream gene expression and physiological function. Here we showed circulatory levels of ATRA decreased in mice under constant darkness and elevated by light exposure. Fat gene pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (mPlrp2) and its partner procolipase (mClps), but not hepatic lipase (mHl), activated in livers for responding to lack of light illuminating. Light-triggered alterations in circulatory ATRA levels regulated ecto-5'-nucleotidase gene expression by retinoic acid receptor retinoic acid receptor-alpha and modulated 5'-AMP levels in blood and were associated with mPlrp2 and mClps expression in the livers. Mice deficient in adenosine receptors displayed mPlrp2 and mClps expression in livers under 12-h light, 12-h dark cycles. Caffeine blocked adenosine receptors and induced hepatic mPlrp2 and mClps expression in wild-type mice. Mice activated in hepatic mPlrp2 and mClps expression lowered hepatic and serum lipid levels and markedly elevated circulatory levels of all-trans retinol. Our results suggest environmental light influence hepatic lipid homeostasis by light-modulated retinoic acid signaling associated with mPlrp2 and mClps gene expression in livers.

  17. Microbiota-Dependent Hepatic Lipogenesis Mediated by Stearoyl CoA Desaturase 1 (SCD1) Promotes Metabolic Syndrome in TLR5-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vishal; Chassaing, Benoit; Zhang, Limin; San Yeoh, Beng; Xiao, Xia; Kumar, Manish; Baker, Mark T; Cai, Jingwei; Walker, Rachel; Borkowski, Kamil; Harvatine, Kevin J; Singh, Nagendra; Shearer, Gregory C; Ntambi, James M; Joe, Bina; Patterson, Andrew D; Gewirtz, Andrew T; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2015-12-01

    The gut microbiota plays a key role in host metabolism. Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5), a flagellin receptor, is required for gut microbiota homeostasis. Accordingly, TLR5-deficient (T5KO) mice are prone to develop microbiota-dependent metabolic syndrome. Here we observed that T5KO mice display elevated neutral lipids with a compositional increase of oleate [C18:1 (n9)] relative to wild-type littermates. Increased oleate contribution to hepatic lipids and liver SCD1 expression were both microbiota dependent. Analysis of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and (13)C-acetate label incorporation revealed elevated SCFA in ceca and hepatic portal blood and increased liver de novo lipogenesis in T5KO mice. Dietary SCFAs further aggravated metabolic syndrome in T5KO mice. Deletion of hepatic SCD1 not only prevented hepatic neutral lipid oleate enrichment but also ameliorated metabolic syndrome in T5KO mice. Collectively, these results underscore the key role of the gut microbiota-liver axis in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases.

  18. Antidiabetic efficacy of citronellol, a citrus monoterpene by ameliorating the hepatic key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Subramani; Muruganathan, Udaiyar

    2016-04-25

    Diabetes mellitus is a clinically complex disease characterized by chronic hyperglycemia with metabolic disturbances. During diabetes, endogenous hepatic glucose production is increased as a result of impaired activities of the key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the antidiabetic efficacy of citronellol, a citrus monoterpene in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes mellitus was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of STZ (40 mg/kg b.w). STZ induced diabetic rats received citronellol orally at the doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg b.w for 30 days. In this study the levels of plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin (Hb), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), glycogen, and the activities of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes, liver and kidney markers were evaluated. Oral administration of citronellol (50 mg/kg) for 30 days dose dependently improved the levels of insulin, Hb and hepatic glycogen with significant decrease in glucose and HbA1C levels. The altered activities of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes, hepatic and kidney markers were restored to near normal. Citronellol supplement was found to be effective in preserving the normal histological appearance of hepatic cells and insulin-positive β-cells in STZ-rats. Our results suggest that administration of citronellol attenuates the hyperglycemia in the STZ-induced diabetic rats by ameliorating the key carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and could be developed as a functional and nutraceutical ingredient in combating diabetes mellitus.

  19. Low protein provision during the first year of life, but not during foetal life, affects metabolic traits, organ mass development and growth in male mink (Neovison vison).

    PubMed

    Vesterdorf, K; Blache, D; Harrison, A; Matthiesen, C F; Tauson, A-H

    2014-04-01

    Low protein provision in utero and post-partum may induce metabolic disorders in adulthood. Studies in mink have mainly focused on short-term consequences of low protein provision in utero whereas the long-term responses to low protein (LP) provision in metabolically programmed mink are unknown. We investigated whether low protein provision in utero affects the long-term response to adequate (AP) or LP provision after weaning in male mink. Eighty-six male mink were exposed to low (19% of ME from CP; crude protein) or adequate (31% of ME from CP) protein provision in utero, and to LP (~20% of ME from CP) or AP (30-42% of ME from CP) provision post-weaning. Being metabolically programmed by low protein provision in utero did not affect the response to post-weaning diets. Dietary protein content in the LP feed after weaning was below requirements; evidenced by lower nitrogen retention (p < 0.001) preventing LP mink from attaining their growth potential (p < 0.02). LP mink had a lower liver, pancreas and kidney weight (p < 0.05) as well as lower plasma IGF-1 concentrations at 8 and 25 (p < 0.05) weeks, and a higher incidence of hepatic lipidosis at 25 weeks (p < 0.05). Furthermore, LP mink had a higher body fat (p < 0.05) and lower body CP content (p < 0.05) at 50 weeks of age. It is concluded that some effects of low protein provision in utero can be alleviated by an adequate nutrient supply post-partum. However, long-term exposure to low protein provision in mink reduces their growth potential and induces transient hepatic lipidosis and modified body composition.

  20. Transcription Interference and ORF Nature Strongly Affect Promoter Strength in a Reconstituted Metabolic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Carquet, Marie; Pompon, Denis; Truan, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Fine tuning of individual enzyme expression level is necessary to alleviate metabolic imbalances in synthetic heterologous pathways. A known approach consists of choosing a suitable combination of promoters, based on their characterized strengths in model conditions. We questioned whether each step of a multiple-gene synthetic pathway could be independently tunable at the transcription level. Three open reading frames, coding for enzymes involved in a synthetic pathway, were combinatorially associated to different promoters on an episomal plasmid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We quantified the mRNA levels of the three genes in each strain of our generated combinatorial metabolic library. Our results evidenced that the ORF nature, position, and orientation induce strong discrepancies between the previously reported promoters’ strengths and the observed ones. We conclude that, in the context of metabolic reconstruction, the strength of usual promoters can be dramatically affected by many factors. Among them, transcriptional interference and ORF nature seem to be predominant. PMID:25767795

  1. Olanzapine and aripiprazole differentially affect glucose uptake and energy metabolism in human mononuclear blood cells.

    PubMed

    Stapel, Britta; Kotsiari, Alexandra; Scherr, Michaela; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Bleich, Stefan; Frieling, Helge; Kahl, Kai G

    2017-05-01

    The use of antipsychotics carries the risk of metabolic side effects, such as weight gain and new onset type-2 diabetes mellitus. The mechanisms of the observed metabolic alterations are not fully understood. We compared the effects of two atypical antipsychotics, one known to favor weight gain (olanzapine), the other not (aripiprazole), on glucose metabolism. Primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated and stimulated with olanzapine or aripiprazole for 72 h. Cellular glucose uptake was analyzed in vitro by 18F-FDG uptake. Further measurements comprised mRNA expression of glucose transporter (GLUT) 1 and 3, GLUT1 protein expression, DNA methylation of GLUT1 promoter region, and proteins involved in downstream glucometabolic processes. We observed a 2-fold increase in glucose uptake after stimulation with aripiprazole. In contrast, olanzapine stimulation decreased glucose uptake by 40%, accompanied by downregulation of the cellular energy sensor AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK). GLUT1 protein expression increased, GLUT1 mRNA expression decreased, and GLUT1 promoter was hypermethylated with both antipsychotics. Pyruvat-dehydrogenase (PDH) complex activity decreased with olanzapine only. Our findings suggest that the atypical antipsychotics olanzapine and aripiprazole differentially affect energy metabolism in PBMC. The observed decrease in glucose uptake in olanzapine stimulated PBMC, accompanied by decreased PDH point to a worsening in cellular energy metabolism not compensated by AMKP upregulation. In contrast, aripiprazole stimulation lead to increased glucose uptake, while not affecting PDH complex expression. The observed differences may be involved in the different metabolic profiles observed in aripiprazole and olanzapine treated patients.

  2. Cardiac Metabolic Pathways Affected in the Mouse Model of Barth Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Powers, Corey; Madala, Satish K.; Greis, Kenneth D.; Haffey, Wendy D.; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Purevjav, Enkhsaikhan; Javadov, Sabzali; Strauss, Arnold W.; Khuchua, Zaza

    2015-01-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a mitochondrial phospholipid essential for electron transport chain (ETC) integrity. CL-deficiency in humans is caused by mutations in the tafazzin (Taz) gene and results in a multisystem pediatric disorder, Barth syndrome (BTHS). It has been reported that tafazzin deficiency destabilizes mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and affects supercomplex assembly. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of Taz-knockdown on the mitochondrial proteomic landscape and metabolic processes, such as stability of respiratory chain supercomplexes and their interactions with fatty acid oxidation enzymes in cardiac muscle. Proteomic analysis demonstrated reduction of several polypeptides of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, including Rieske and cytochrome c1 subunits of complex III, NADH dehydrogenase alpha subunit 5 of complex I and the catalytic core-forming subunit of F0F1-ATP synthase. Taz gene knockdown resulted in upregulation of enzymes of folate and amino acid metabolic pathways in heart mitochondria, demonstrating that Taz-deficiency causes substantive metabolic remodeling in cardiac muscle. Mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes are destabilized in CL-depleted mitochondria from Taz knockdown hearts resulting in disruption of the interactions between ETC and the fatty acid oxidation enzymes, very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, potentially affecting the metabolic channeling of reducing equivalents between these two metabolic pathways. Mitochondria-bound myoglobin was significantly reduced in Taz-knockdown hearts, potentially disrupting intracellular oxygen delivery to the oxidative phosphorylation system. Our results identify the critical pathways affected by the Taz-deficiency in mitochondria and establish a future framework for development of therapeutic options for BTHS. PMID:26030409

  3. Cardiac metabolic pathways affected in the mouse model of barth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Powers, Corey; Madala, Satish K; Greis, Kenneth D; Haffey, Wendy D; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Purevjav, Enkhsaikhan; Javadov, Sabzali; Strauss, Arnold W; Khuchua, Zaza

    2015-01-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a mitochondrial phospholipid essential for electron transport chain (ETC) integrity. CL-deficiency in humans is caused by mutations in the tafazzin (Taz) gene and results in a multisystem pediatric disorder, Barth syndrome (BTHS). It has been reported that tafazzin deficiency destabilizes mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and affects supercomplex assembly. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of Taz-knockdown on the mitochondrial proteomic landscape and metabolic processes, such as stability of respiratory chain supercomplexes and their interactions with fatty acid oxidation enzymes in cardiac muscle. Proteomic analysis demonstrated reduction of several polypeptides of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, including Rieske and cytochrome c1 subunits of complex III, NADH dehydrogenase alpha subunit 5 of complex I and the catalytic core-forming subunit of F0F1-ATP synthase. Taz gene knockdown resulted in upregulation of enzymes of folate and amino acid metabolic pathways in heart mitochondria, demonstrating that Taz-deficiency causes substantive metabolic remodeling in cardiac muscle. Mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes are destabilized in CL-depleted mitochondria from Taz knockdown hearts resulting in disruption of the interactions between ETC and the fatty acid oxidation enzymes, very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, potentially affecting the metabolic channeling of reducing equivalents between these two metabolic pathways. Mitochondria-bound myoglobin was significantly reduced in Taz-knockdown hearts, potentially disrupting intracellular oxygen delivery to the oxidative phosphorylation system. Our results identify the critical pathways affected by the Taz-deficiency in mitochondria and establish a future framework for development of therapeutic options for BTHS.

  4. Hepatic Microenvironment Affects Oval Cell Localization in Albumin-Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Kristin M.; Thompson, Anne W.; Sandgren, Eric P.

    2003-01-01

    Mice carrying an albumin-urokinase type plasminogen activator transgene (AL-uPA) develop liver disease secondary to uPA expression in hepatocytes. Transgene-expressing parenchyma is replaced gradually by clones of cells that have deleted transgene DNA and therefore are not subject to uPA-mediated damage. Diseased liver displays several abnormalities, including hepatocyte vacuolation and changes in nonparenchymal tissue. The latter includes increases in laminin protein within parenchyma and the appearance of cytokeratin 19-positive bile ductule-like cells (oval cells) both in portal regions and extending into the hepatic parenchyma. In this study, we subjected AL-uPA mice to two-thirds partial hepatectomy to identify the response of these livers to additional growth stimulation. We observed several changes in hepatic morphology. First, the oval cells increased in number and often formed ductules in the parenchyma. Second, this cellular change was accompanied by a further increase in laminin associated with single or clusters of oval cells. Third, desmin-positive Ito cells increased in number and maintained close association with oval cells. Fourth, these changes were localized precisely to uPA-expressing areas of liver. Regenerating clones of uPA-deficient cells appeared to be unaffected both by stromal and cellular alterations. Thus, additional growth stimulation of diseased uPA-expressing liver induces an oval cell-like response, as observed in other models of severe hepatic injury, but the localization of this response seems to be highly regulated by the hepatic microenvironment. PMID:12507902

  5. Bromochloromethane, a Methane Analogue, Affects the Microbiota and Metabolic Profiles of the Rat Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Xiang; Mu, Chun-Long; Luo, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Bromochloromethane (BCM), an inhibitor of methanogenesis, has been used in animal production. However, little is known about its impact on the intestinal microbiota and metabolic patterns. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of BCM on the colonic bacterial community and metabolism by establishing a Wistar rat model. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups (control and treated with BCM) and raised for 6 weeks. Bacterial fermentation products in the cecum were determined, and colonic methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were quantified. The colonic microbiota was analyzed by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes, and metabolites were profiled by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The results showed that BCM did not affect body weight and feed intake, but it did significantly change the intestinal metabolic profiles. Cecal protein fermentation was enhanced by BCM, as methylamine, putrescine, phenylethylamine, tyramine, and skatole were significantly increased. Colonic fatty acid and carbohydrate concentrations were significantly decreased, indicating the perturbation of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism by BCM. BCM treatment decreased the abundance of methanogen populations, while SRB were increased in the colon. BCM did not affect the total colonic bacterial counts but significantly altered the bacterial community composition by decreasing the abundance of actinobacteria, acidobacteria, and proteobacteria. The results demonstrated that BCM treatment significantly altered the microbiotic and metabolite profiles in the intestines, which may provide further information on the use of BCM in animal production. PMID:26567308

  6. Leucine metabolism regulates TRI6 expression and affects deoxynivalenol production and virulence in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Rajagopal; Narayanan, Swara; Walkowiak, Sean; Wang, Li; Joshi, Manisha; Rocheleau, Hélène; Ouellet, Thérèse; Harris, Linda J

    2015-11-01

    TRI6 is a positive regulator of the trichothecene gene cluster and the production of trichothecene mycotoxins [deoxynivalenol (DON)] and acetylated forms such as 15-Acetyl-DON) in the cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum. As a global transcriptional regulator, TRI6 expression is modulated by nitrogen-limiting conditions, sources of nitrogen and carbon, pH and light. However, the mechanism by which these diverse environmental factors affect TRI6 expression remains underexplored. In our effort to understand how nutrients affect TRI6 regulation, comparative digital expression profiling was performed with a wild-type F. graminearum and a Δtri6 mutant strain, grown in nutrient-rich conditions. Analysis showed that TRI6 negatively regulates genes of the branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolic pathway. Feeding studies with deletion mutants of MCC, encoding methylcrotonyl-CoA-carboxylase, one of the key enzymes of leucine metabolism, showed that addition of leucine specifically down-regulated TRI6 expression and reduced 15-ADON accumulation. Constitutive expression of TRI6 in the Δmcc mutant strain restored 15-ADON production. A combination of cellophane breach assays and pathogenicity experiments on wheat demonstrated that disrupting the leucine metabolic pathway significantly reduced disease. These findings suggest a complex interaction between one of the primary metabolic pathways with a global regulator of mycotoxin biosynthesis and virulence in F. graminearum.

  7. [Immune response in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus infection].

    PubMed

    Chalupa, P; Holub, M; Davidová, A; Arientová, S; Beran, O

    2015-10-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is regulated by the host immunity and several metabolic factors affecting liver metabolism, including oxidative stress, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis. Both innate and adaptive immunity play an important role in HCV infection. Cytotoxic lymphocytes have a crucial role in viral eradication or viral persistence. Major cause of viral persistence during HCV infection could be the development of a weak antiviral immune response to the viral antigens, with corresponding inability to eradicate infected cells.

  8. In vitro hepatic metabolism of cediranib, a potent vascular endothelial growth factor tyrosine kinase inhibitor: interspecies comparison and human enzymology.

    PubMed

    Schulz-Utermoehl, Timothy; Spear, Michael; Pollard, Christopher R J; Pattison, Christine; Rollison, Helen; Sarda, Sunil; Ward, Michelle; Bushby, Nick; Jordan, Angela; Harrison, Mike

    2010-10-01

    The in vitro metabolism of cediranib (4-[(4-fluoro-2-methyl-1H-indol-5-yl)oxy]-6-methoxy-7-[3-(1-pyrrolidinyl)propoxy]quinazoline), a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) of all three VEGF receptors in late-stage development for the treatment of colorectal cancer and recurrent glioblastoma was investigated in hepatic proteins from preclinical species and humans using radiolabeled material. In human hepatocyte cultures, oxidative and conjugative metabolic pathways were identified, with pyrrolidine N(+)-glucuronidation being the major route. The primary oxidative pathways were di-and trioxidations and pyrrolidine N-oxidation. All metabolites with the exception of the N(+)-glucuronide metabolite were observed in rat and cynomolgus monkey hepatocyte preparations. Additional metabolism studies in liver microsomes from these or other preclinical species (CD-1 mouse, Han Wistar rat, Dunkin Hartley guinea pig, Göttingen mini-pig, New Zealand White rabbit, beagle dog, and cynomolgus and rhesus monkey) indicated that the N(+)-glucuronide metabolite was not formed in these additional species. Incubations with recombinant flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes and inhibition studies using the nonselective cytochrome P450 (P450) chemical inhibitor 1-aminobenzotriazole in human hepatocytes indicated that FMO1 and FMO3 contributed to cediranib N-oxidation, whereas UGT1A4 had a major role in cediranib N(+)-glucuronidation. P450 enzymes had only a minor role in the metabolism of cediranib. In conclusion, species differences in the formation of the N(+)-glucuronide metabolite of cediranib were observed. All other metabolites of cediranib found in humans were also detected in rat and cynomolgus monkey. Non-P450 enzymes are predominantly involved in the metabolism of cediranib, and this suggests that clinical drug interactions involving other coadministered drugs are unlikely.

  9. In vitro metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene and dibenzo[def,p]chrysene in rodent and human hepatic microsomes.

    PubMed

    Crowell, S R; Hanson-Drury, S; Williams, D E; Corley, R A

    2014-07-03

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous and often carcinogenic contaminants released into the environment during natural and anthropogenic combustion processes. Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is the prototypical carcinogenic PAH, and dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC) is a less prevalent, but highly potent transplacental carcinogenic PAH. Both are metabolically activated by isoforms of the cytochrome P450 enzyme superfamily to form reactive carcinogenic and cytotoxic metabolites. Metabolism of B[a]P and DBC was studied in hepatic microsomes of male Sprague-Dawley rats, naïve and pregnant female B6129SF1/J mice, and female humans, corresponding to available pharmacokinetic data. Michaelis-Menten saturation kinetic parameters including maximum rates of metabolism (VMAX, nmol/min/mg microsomal protein), affinity constants (KM, μM), and rates of intrinsic clearance (CLINT, ml/min/kg body weight) were calculated from substrate depletion data. CLINT was also estimated from substrate depletion data using the alternative in vitro half-life method. VMAX and CLINT were higher for B[a]P than DBC, regardless of species. Clearance for both B[a]P and DBC was highest in naïve female mice and lowest in female humans. Clearance rates of B[a]P and DBC in male rat were more similar to female human than to female mice. Clearance of DBC in liver microsomes from pregnant mice was reduced compared to naïve mice, consistent with reduced active P450 protein levels and elevated tissue concentrations and residence times for DBC observed in previous in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. These findings suggest that rats are a more appropriate model organism for human PAH metabolism, and that pregnancy's effects on metabolism should be further explored.

  10. Hepatic metabolism of glucose and linoleic acid varies in relation to susceptibility to fatty liver in ad libitum-fed Muscovy and Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Saez, Gladys; Baéza, Elisabeth; Davail, Stéphane; Durand, Denys; Bauchart, Dominique; Gruffat, Dominique

    2009-02-01

    The susceptibility to develop hepatic steatosis is known to differ between duck species, especially between Muscovy and Pekin ducks. This difference could be explained by either differential responses of species to overfeeding or genetic differences in hepatic lipid metabolism. The aim of the present study was to compare the intensities of the different hepatic pathways (oxidation, lipogenesis, esterification, secretion, etc.) of the two main nutrients (glucose and linoleic acid (LA)) reaching the liver of ad libitum-fed Muscovy (n 6) and Pekin (n 6) ducks using the ex vivo method of liver slices incubated for 16 h with [U-14C]glucose, [1-14C]LA and [35S]methionine added to the survival medium. In such experimental conditions, the lipogenesis pathway from glucose was 2-fold higher (P<0.05) in the liver of the Muscovy duck than in that of the Pekin duck. Furthermore, the hepatic uptake of LA was 2-fold higher (P<0.05) in the Muscovy duck than in the Pekin duck leading to a 2-fold higher (P<0.05) esterification of this fatty acid in the liver of the Muscovy duck. The hepatic secretion of VLDL was higher (P<0.01) in the Muscovy duck than in the Pekin duck but insufficient to prevent lipid accumulation in the liver of the Muscovy duck. In conclusion, these results show the influence of the species on the hepatic metabolism of ducks in relation to their susceptibility to develop fatty liver. These results should shed light on the metabolic regulations that might underlie susceptibility to hepatic steatosis in the the human liver.

  11. Chemical Knockout of Pantothenate Kinase Reveals the Metabolic and Genetic Program Responsible for Hepatic Coenzyme A Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Mei; Chohnan, Shigeru; Virga, Kristopher G.; Stevens, Robert D.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Wenner, Brett R.; Bain, James R.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Lee, Richard E.; Rock, Charles O.; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    Summary Coenzyme A (CoA) is the major acyl group carrier in intermediary metabolism. Hopantenate (HoPan), a competitive inhibitor of the pantothenate kinases, was used to chemically antagonize CoA biosynthesis. HoPan dramatically reduced liver CoA levels and the mice developed severe hypoglycemia. Insulin and corticosterone levels were reduced, glucagon levels were elevated in HoPan-treated mice and fasting accelerated the HoPan-induced hypoglycemia. Metabolic profiling revealed a large increase in carnitine, particularly acetylcarnitine, illustrating the role of carnitine in buffering acyl groups to maintain the unesterified CoASH level. HoPan treatment triggered significant changes in hepatic gene expression that substantially increased the thioesterases, which liberate CoASH from acyl-CoA, and increased pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1, which prevents the conversion of CoASH to acetyl-CoA. These results identify the metabolic re-arrangements that maintain the CoASH pool which is critical to mitochondrial functions, including gluconeogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, and the tricarboxylic acid and urea cycles. PMID:17379144

  12. SUMO-specific protease 3 is a key regulator for hepatic lipid metabolism in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuhan; Yu, Fudong; Han, Yan; Li, Qing; Cao, Zhujun; Xiang, Xiaogang; Jiang, Shaowen; Wang, Xiaolin; Lu, Jie; Lai, Rongtao; Wang, Hui; Cai, Wei; Bao, Shisan; Xie, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by excessive lipid accumulation in hepatocytes. The role of SENP3 in lipid metabolism, particularly NAFLD, is unclear. Our results showed that hepatic SENP3 was up-regulated in NAFLD patients and an animal model in vivo and after loading hepatocytes with free fatty acids (FFA) in vitro. Intracellular lipid accumulation was determined in SENP3 silenced or overexpressed hepatocytes with/without FFA in vitro. Confirming a role for SENP3, gene silencing was associated in vitro with amelioration of lipid accumulation and overexpression with enhancement of lipid accumulation. SENP3 related genes in NAFLD were determined in vitro using RNA-Seq. Eleven unique genes closely associated with lipid metabolism were generated using bioinformatics. Three selected genes (apoe, a2m and tnfrsf11b) were verified in vitro, showing apoe, a2m and tnfrsf11b were regulated by SENP3 with FFA stimulation. Intrahepatic and circulating APOE, A2M and TNFRSF11B were elevated in NAFLD compared with controls. These data demonstrate the important role of SENP3 in lipid metabolism during the development of NAFLD via downstream genes, which may be useful information in the development of NAFLD. The precise role of SENP3 in NAFLD will be investigated using liver-specific conditional knockout mice in future studies. PMID:27853276

  13. SUMO-specific protease 3 is a key regulator for hepatic lipid metabolism in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuhan; Yu, Fudong; Han, Yan; Li, Qing; Cao, Zhujun; Xiang, Xiaogang; Jiang, Shaowen; Wang, Xiaolin; Lu, Jie; Lai, Rongtao; Wang, Hui; Cai, Wei; Bao, Shisan; Xie, Qing

    2016-11-17

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by excessive lipid accumulation in hepatocytes. The role of SENP3 in lipid metabolism, particularly NAFLD, is unclear. Our results showed that hepatic SENP3 was up-regulated in NAFLD patients and an animal model in vivo and after loading hepatocytes with free fatty acids (FFA) in vitro. Intracellular lipid accumulation was determined in SENP3 silenced or overexpressed hepatocytes with/without FFA in vitro. Confirming a role for SENP3, gene silencing was associated in vitro with amelioration of lipid accumulation and overexpression with enhancement of lipid accumulation. SENP3 related genes in NAFLD were determined in vitro using RNA-Seq. Eleven unique genes closely associated with lipid metabolism were generated using bioinformatics. Three selected genes (apoe, a2m and tnfrsf11b) were verified in vitro, showing apoe, a2m and tnfrsf11b were regulated by SENP3 with FFA stimulation. Intrahepatic and circulating APOE, A2M and TNFRSF11B were elevated in NAFLD compared with controls. These data demonstrate the important role of SENP3 in lipid metabolism during the development of NAFLD via downstream genes, which may be useful information in the development of NAFLD. The precise role of SENP3 in NAFLD will be investigated using liver-specific conditional knockout mice in future studies.

  14. Peculiarities of One-Carbon Metabolism in the Strict Carnivorous Cat and the Role in Feline Hepatic Lipidosis

    PubMed Central

    Verbrugghe, Adronie; Bakovic, Marica

    2013-01-01

    Research in various species has indicated that diets deficient in labile methyl groups (methionine, choline, betaine, folate) produce fatty liver and links to steatosis and metabolic syndrome, but also provides evidence of the importance of labile methyl group balance to maintain normal liver function. Cats, being obligate carnivores, rely on nutrients in animal tissues and have, due to evolutionary pressure, developed several physiological and metabolic adaptations, including a number of peculiarities in protein and fat metabolism. This has led to specific and unique nutritional requirements. Adult cats require more dietary protein than omnivorous species, maintain a consistently high rate of protein oxidation and gluconeogenesis and are unable to adapt to reduced protein intake. Furthermore, cats have a higher requirement for essential amino acids and essential fatty acids. Hastened use coupled with an inability to conserve certain amino acids, including methionine, cysteine, taurine and arginine, necessitates a higher dietary intake for cats compared to most other species. Cats also seemingly require higher amounts of several B-vitamins compared to other species and are predisposed to depletion during prolonged inappetance. This carnivorous uniqueness makes cats more susceptible to hepatic lipidosis. PMID:23877091

  15. Developmental changes in hepatic glucose metabolism in a newborn piglet model: A comparative analysis for suckling period and early weaning period.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chunyan; Wang, Qinhua; Wang, Jing; Tan, Bie; Fan, Zhiyong; Deng, Ze-yuan; Wu, Xin; Yin, Yulong

    2016-02-19

    The liver glucose metabolism, supplying sufficient energy for glucose-dependent tissues, is important in suckling or weaned animals, although there are few studies with piglet model. To better understand the development of glucose metabolism in the piglets during suckling period and early weaning period, we determined the hepatic glycogen content, and investigated the relative protein expression of key enzymes of glucogenesis (GNG) and mRNA levels of some glucose metabolism-related genes. During suckling period, the protein level of G6Pase in the liver of suckling piglets progressively declined with day of age compared with that of newborn piglets (at 1 day of age), whereas the PEPCK level stabilized until day 21 of age, indicating that hepatic GNG capacity gradually weakened in suckling piglets. The synthesis of hepatic glycogen, which was consistent with the fluctuation of glycolytic key genes PFKL and PKLR that gradually decreased after birth and was more or less steady during latter suckling period, although both the mRNA levels of GCK and key glucose transporter GLUT2 presented uptrend in suckling piglets. However, early weaning significantly suppressed the hepatic GNG in the weaned piglets, especially at d 3-5 of weaning period, then gradually recovered at d 7 of weaning period. Meanwhile, PFKL, PKLR and GLUT2 showed the similar trend during weaning period. On the contrast, the hepatic glycogen reached the maximum value when the G6Pase and PEPCK protein expression were at the lowest level, although the GCK level maintained increasing through 7 days of weaning period. Altogether, our study provides evidence that hepatic GNG and glycolysis in newborn piglets were more active than other days during suckling period, and early weaning could significantly suppressed glucose metabolism in liver, but this inhibition would progressively recover at day 7 after weaning.

  16. Therapeutic Role of Ursolic Acid on Ameliorating Hepatic Steatosis and Improving Metabolic Disorders in High-Fat Diet-Induced Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Rats

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanyu; Wang, Yemei; Sun, Zongxiang; Guo, Fuchuan; Li, Xiaoxia; Meng, Man; Li, Ying; Sun, Changhao

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most prevalent liver diseases around the world, and is closely associated with obesity, diabetes, and insulin resistance. Ursolic acid (UA), an ubiquitous triterpenoid with multifold biological roles, is distributed in various plants. This study was conducted to investigate the therapeutic effect and potential mechanisms of UA against hepatic steatosis in a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) rat model. Methodology/Principal Findings Obese NAFLD model was established in Sprague-Dawley rats by 8-week HFD feeding. Therapeutic role of UA was evaluated using 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5% UA-supplemented diet for another 6 weeks. The results from both morphologic and histological detections indicated that UA significantly reversed HFD-induced hepatic steatosis and liver injury. Besides, hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α was markedly up-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels by UA. Knocking down PPAR-α significantly inhibited the anti-steatosis role of UA in vitro. HFD-induced adverse changes in the key genes, which participated in hepatic lipid metabolism, were also alleviated by UA treatment. Furthermore, UA significantly ameliorated HFD-induced metabolic disorders, including insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrated that UA effectively ameliorated HFD-induced hepatic steatosis through a PPAR-α involved pathway, via improving key enzymes in the controlling of lipids metabolism. The metabolic disorders were accordingly improved with the decrease of hepatic steatosis. Thereby, UA could be a promising candidate for the treatment of NAFLD. PMID:24489777

  17. Regulatory effect and mechanisms of carbon monoxide-releasing molecule II on hepatic energy metabolism in septic mice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Feng; Cao, Jie; Qin, Wei-Ting; Wang, Xu; Qiu, Xue-Feng; Sun, Bing-Wei

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the possible mechanisms of exogenous carbon monoxide-releasing molecule II (CORM-2) intervention on hepatic energy metabolism in experimental sepsis. METHODS: Forty-eight C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into four groups (n = 12): sham group; cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) group; CLP + CORM-2 group and CLP + iCORM-2 (inactive CORM-2) group. Survival rates were determined after 72 h. Twenty-four similarly treated mice (n = 6 in each group) were assayed for post-operative continuous blood glucose in the first 36 h. Thirty-six similarly treated mice (n = 9 in each group) underwent micro-positron emission tomography (PET) scanning after tail vein injection of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) 24 h after operation. Plasma and liver specimens were collected for assay of liver pathology, alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) activities. Hepatic glucokinase activity, lactic acid levels and mitochondrial swelling were also determined. RESULTS: Improved survival was observed in CORM-2 treated mice. Both the CLP and CLP + CORM-2 groups had sustained low blood glucose levels within the first post-operative 36 h. 18F-FDG micro-PET images showed abnormally high levels of hepatic glucose metabolism (standardized uptake value) in the CLP group (2.76 ± 0.39 vs 0.84 ± 0.14, P < 0.01), which declined to normal levels after CORM-2 intervention (1.29 ± 0.32 vs 2.76 ± 0.39, P < 0.05). glucokinase activity was markedly increased in the CLP group (6.38 ± 0.56 U/g vs 4.60 ± 0.21 U/g, P < 0.01), but was normal after CORM-2 intervention (4.74 ± 0.14 U/g vs 6.38 ± 0.56 U/g, P < 0.05). CORM-2 suppressed plasma lactic acid levels (4.02 ± 0.02 mmol/L vs 7.72 ± 2.37 mmol/L, P < 0.05) and protected hepatic mitochondria in CLP mice. CORM-2 intervention also reduced elevated plasma AST (199.67 ± 11.08 U/L vs 379.67 ± 16.34 U/L, P < 0.05) and ALT (63.67 ± 12.23 U/L vs 112.67 ± 9.74 U/L, P < 0.05) activities in CLP mice. CONCLUSION: The release

  18. Helenalin attenuates alcohol-induced hepatic fibrosis by enhancing ethanol metabolism, inhibiting oxidative stress and suppressing HSC activation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xing; Zhang, Shijun; Huang, Renbin; Wei, Ling; Tan, Shimei; Liang, Shuang; Tian, Yuanchun; Wu, Xiaoyan; Lu, Zhongpeng; Huang, Quanfang

    2014-06-01

    A compound was isolated from Centipeda minima using bioassay-guided screening. The structure of this compound was elucidated based on its spectral data, and it was identified as helenalin. The hepatoprotective effect of helenalin was evaluated using a liver fibrosis model induced by intragastric administration with alcohol within 24 weeks in rats. The results revealed that helenalin significantly prevented alcohol-induced hepatic injury and fibrogenesis, as evidenced by the decrease in serum aminotransferase, the attenuation of histopathological changes, and the inhibition of the hepatic fibrosis indicators, such as hyaluronic acid, type III precollagen, laminin, hydroxyproline and collagen α type I. Mechanistically, studies showed that helenalin expedited ethanol metabolism by enhancing the alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities. Furthermore, helenalin alleviated lipid peroxidation, recruited the antioxidative defense system, inhibited CYP2E1 activity, and reduced the inflammatory mediators, including TGF-β1, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β and myeloperoxidase, via down-regulation of NF-κB. Helenalin significantly decreased collagen deposition by reducing the profibrotic cytokines like transforming growth factor-β, platelet-derived growth factor-β and connective tissue growth factor, and promoted extracellular matrix degradation by modulating the levels of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 and matrix metalloproteinase-9. In addition, helenalin inhibited HSC activation as evidenced by the down-regulation of α-SMA and TGF-β levels. In conclusion, helenalin had a significant protective effect on chronic ethanol-induced hepatic fibrosis and may be a major bioactive ingredient of C. minima.

  19. Obesity-induced diet leads to weight gain, systemic metabolic alterations, adipose tissue inflammation, hepatic steatosis, and oxidative stress in gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus)

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Luciana L.A.; Fortes, Nathália C.L.; Santiago, Helton C.; Caliari, Marcelo V.; Gomes, Maria A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Nowadays, the number of obese people in the world has reached alarming proportions. During the expansion of adipose tissue, a number of functions such as activation and release of cytokines and hormones may be affected. This leads the body to a pro-inflammatory pattern, which may affect the proper functioning of many tissues. Thus, studying the mechanisms by which obesity induces physiological disorders is necessary, and may be facilitated by the use of animal models, in particular rodents. We sought to characterize the metabolic and adipose tissue changes resulting from a diet rich in fats and simple sugars in gerbils. Methods We divided 14 gerbils into two experimental groups that received a diet rich in simple carbohydrates and fats with 5,86 kcal/g (OB, n = 7) or a standard diet with 4.15 kcal/g (CT; n = 7) for 11 weeks. The animals had free access to water and food. The animal weight and food consumption were measured weekly. Blood, adipose tissue and liver of each animal were collected at the end of experiment. The following parameters were determined: cholesterol (COL), triglycerides (TGL) and glycemia (GLI) in the plasma; cytokines (IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α) and hormones (adiponectin and leptin) in adipose tissue; activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), extraction and differentiation of fat and histology in liver. Results The consumption of a diet rich in simple carbohydrates and fats led to increased total body weight and increased relative weights of liver and adipose tissue. In addition, we observed increased fasting glucose levels and circulating triglycerides, along with high TNF-α production in adipose tissue and increased total fat, cholesterol and triglyceride contents in the liver, contributing to higher intensity of hepatic steatosis. On the other hand, the animals of this group showed depletion in the enzyme activity of SOD and CAT in the liver, as well as reduction of IL-10 and adiponectin levels in adipose

  20. Effects of feeding dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on the hepatic metabolism of 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Prasanna, H.R.; Schwartz, A.; Hacobian, N.; Magee, P.N.

    1987-05-01

    The possibility that the anticarcinogenic action of the naturally occurring steroid DHEA could arise from its interference in the metabolic activation of DMBA was investigated. Young mature male Sprague Dawley rats were fed for 14 days with a diet containing a nontoxic dose of DHEA in the diet. Control rats were pairfed and received the same diet except DHEA. The animals were given interperitoneally 120 ..mu..Ci of (/sup 3/H)DMBA in DMSO. After 48 hours the rats were sacrificed. Liver weights at sacrifice were 11.7 +/- 0.9 g and 7.1 g +/- 0.6 g for DHEA fed and control animals respectively. Protein content of whole liver and hepatic microsomal protein was significantly higher in DHEA fed animals. Binding of DMBA to hepatic DNA was 6688 +/- 1308 and 4070 +/- 890 dpm/mg DNA for control and DHEA fed animals respectively. Furthermore the excretion of DMBA derived radioactivity in urine was 2.3 fold more in DHEA fed animals. These results suggest that DHEA could protect rats from the carcinogenic manifestations of DMBA by interfering at the biotransformation step of the carcinogen.

  1. Lead Optimization in Discovery Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics/Case study: The Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Protease Inhibitor SCH 503034.

    PubMed

    Cheng, K-C; Korfmacher, Walter A; White, Ronald E; Njoroge, F George

    2007-06-26

    Lead optimization using drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK) parameters has become one of the primary focuses of research organizations involved in drug discovery in the last decade. Using a combination of rapid in vivo and in vitro DMPK screening procedures on a large array of compounds during the lead optimization process has resulted in development of compounds that have acceptable DMPK properties. In this review, we present a general screening paradigm that is currently being used as part of drug discovery at Schering-Plough and we describe a case study using the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) protease inhibitor program as an example. By using the DMPK optimization tools, a potent HCV protease inhibitor, SCH 503034, was selected for development as a candidate drug.

  2. A novel role for the dioxin receptor in fatty acid metabolism and hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hoon; Wada, Taira; Febbraio, Maria; He, Jinhan; Matsubara, Tsutomu; Lee, Min Jae; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Xie, Wen

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a PAS domain transcription factor previously known as the “dioxin receptor” or “xenobiotic receptor.” The goal of this study is to determine the endobiotic role of AhR in hepatic steatosis. Methods Wild type, constitutively activated AhR (CA-AhR) transgenic, AhR null (AhR-/-), and fatty acid translocase CD36/FAT null (CD36-/-) mice were used to investigate the role of AhR in steatosis and the involvement of CD36 in the steatotic effect of AhR. The promoters of the mouse and human CD36 genes were cloned and their regulation by AhR was analyzed. Results Activation of AhR induced spontaneous hepatic steatosis characterized by the accumulation of triglycerides. The steatotic effect of AhR is likely due to the combined upregulation of CD36 and fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs), suppression of fatty acid oxidation, inhibition of hepatic export of triglycerides, increase in peripheral fat mobilization, and increased hepatic oxidative stress. Promoter analysis established CD36 as a novel transcriptional target of AhR. Activation of AhR in liver cells induced CD36 gene expression and enhanced fatty acid uptake. The steatotic effect of an AhR agonist was inhibited in CD36-/- mice. Conclusions Our study reveals a novel link between AhR-induced steatosis and the expression of CD36. Industrial or military exposures to dioxin and related compounds have been linked to increased prevalence of fatty liver in humans. Results from this study may help to establish AhR and its target CD36 as novel therapeutic and preventive targets for fatty liver disease. PMID:20303349

  3. Genetic modification of iron metabolism in mice affects the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Buhnik-Rosenblau, Keren; Moshe-Belizowski, Shirly; Danin-Poleg, Yael; Meyron-Holtz, Esther G

    2012-10-01

    The composition of the gut microbiota is affected by environmental factors as well as host genetics. Iron is one of the important elements essential for bacterial growth, thus we hypothesized that changes in host iron homeostasis, may affect the luminal iron content of the gut and thereby the composition of intestinal bacteria. The iron regulatory protein 2 (Irp2) and one of the genes mutated in hereditary hemochromatosis Hfe , are both proteins involved in the regulation of systemic iron homeostasis. To test our hypothesis, fecal metal content and a selected spectrum of the fecal microbiota were analyzed from Hfe-/-, Irp2-/- and their wild type control mice. Elevated levels of iron as well as other minerals in feces of Irp2-/- mice compared to wild type and Hfe-/- mice were observed. Interestingly significant variation in the general fecal-bacterial population-patterns was observed between Irp2-/- and Hfe-/- mice. Furthermore the relative abundance of five species, mainly lactic acid bacteria, was significantly different among the mouse lines. Lactobacillus (L.) murinus and L. intestinalis were highly abundant in Irp2-/- mice, Enterococcus faecium species cluster and a species most similar to Olsenella were highly abundant in Hfe-/- mice and L. johnsonii was highly abundant in the wild type mice. These results suggest that deletion of iron metabolism genes in the mouse host affects the composition of its intestinal bacteria. Further studying the relationship between gut microbiota and genetic mutations affecting systemic iron metabolism in human should lead to clinical implications.

  4. Extrapolation of systemic bioavailability assessing skin absorption and epidermal and hepatic metabolism of aromatic amine hair dyes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Manwaring, John; Rothe, Helga; Obringer, Cindy; Foltz, David J.; Baker, Timothy R.; Troutman, John A.; Hewitt, Nicola J.; Goebel, Carsten

    2015-09-01

    Approaches to assess the role of absorption, metabolism and excretion of cosmetic ingredients that are based on the integration of different in vitro data are important for their safety assessment, specifically as it offers an opportunity to refine that safety assessment. In order to estimate systemic exposure (AUC) to aromatic amine hair dyes following typical product application conditions, skin penetration and epidermal and systemic metabolic conversion of the parent compound was assessed in human skin explants and human keratinocyte (HaCaT) and hepatocyte cultures. To estimate the amount of the aromatic amine that can reach the general circulation unchanged after passage through the skin the following toxicokinetically relevant parameters were applied: a) Michaelis–Menten kinetics to quantify the epidermal metabolism; b) the estimated keratinocyte cell abundance in the viable epidermis; c) the skin penetration rate; d) the calculated Mean Residence Time in the viable epidermis; e) the viable epidermis thickness and f) the skin permeability coefficient. In a next step, in vitro hepatocyte K{sub m} and V{sub max} values and whole liver mass and cell abundance were used to calculate the scaled intrinsic clearance, which was combined with liver blood flow and fraction of compound unbound in the blood to give hepatic clearance. The systemic exposure in the general circulation (AUC) was extrapolated using internal dose and hepatic clearance, and C{sub max} was extrapolated (conservative overestimation) using internal dose and volume of distribution, indicating that appropriate toxicokinetic information can be generated based solely on in vitro data. For the hair dye, p-phenylenediamine, these data were found to be in the same order of magnitude as those published for human volunteers. - Highlights: • An entirely in silico/in vitro approach to predict in vivo exposure to dermally applied hair dyes • Skin penetration and epidermal conversion assessed in human

  5. Characterization of human hepatic and extrahepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes involved in the metabolism of classic cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Anna; Lichti, Cheryl F; Prather, Paul L; Zielinska, Agnieszka K; Bratton, Stacie M; Gallus-Zawada, Anna; Finel, Moshe; Miller, Grover P; Radomińska-Pandya, Anna; Moran, Jeffery H

    2009-07-01

    Tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the primary psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, is subject to cytochrome P450 oxidation and subsequent UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)-dependent glucuronidation. Many studies have shown that CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 are the primary enzymes responsible for these cytochrome P450-dependent oxidations, but little work has been done to characterize phase II metabolic pathways. In this study, we test the hypothesis that there are specific human UGTs responsible for classic cannabinoid metabolism. The activities of 12 human recombinant UGTs toward classic cannabinoids [cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD), (-)-Delta(8)-THC, (-)-Delta(9)-THC, (+/-)-11-hydroxy-Delta(9)-THC (THC-OH), and (-)-11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-THC (THC-COOH)] were evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and labeling assays. Despite activity by UGT1A1, 1A3, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, and 2B7 toward CBN, CBD, THC-OH, and THC-COOH, only selected UGTs demonstrate sufficient activity for further characterization of steady-state kinetics. CBN was the most recognized substrate as evidenced by activities from hepatic UGT1A9 and extrahepatic UGT1A7, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10. These results may reflect the introduction of an aromatic ring to Delta(9)-THC, leading to favorable pi stacking with phenylalanines in the UGT active site. Likewise, oxidation of Delta(9)-THC to THC-OH results in UGT1A9 and UGT1A10 activity toward the cannabinoid. Further oxidation to THC-COOH surprisingly leads to a loss in metabolism by UGT1A9 and UGT1A10, while creating a substrate recognized by UGT1A1 and UGT1A3. The resulting glucuronide of THC-COOH is the main metabolite found in urine, and thus these hepatic enzymes play a critical role in the metabolic clearance of cannabinoids. Taken together, glucuronidation of cannabinoids depends on upstream processing including enzymes such as CYP2C9 and CYP3A4.

  6. Characterization of Human Hepatic and Extrahepatic UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase Enzymes Involved in the Metabolism of Classic Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, Anna; Lichti, Cheryl F.; Prather, Paul L.; Zielinska, Agnieszka K.; Bratton, Stacie M.; Gallus-Zawada, Anna; Finel, Moshe; Miller, Grover P.; Radomińska-Pandya, Anna; Moran, Jeffery H.

    2009-01-01

    Tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), the primary psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, is subject to cytochrome P450 oxidation and subsequent UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)-dependent glucuronidation. Many studies have shown that CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 are the primary enzymes responsible for these cytochrome P450-dependent oxidations, but little work has been done to characterize phase II metabolic pathways. In this study, we test the hypothesis that there are specific human UGTs responsible for classic cannabinoid metabolism. The activities of 12 human recombinant UGTs toward classic cannabinoids [cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD), (–)-Δ8-THC, (–)-Δ9-THC, (±)-11-hydroxy-Δ9-THC (THC-OH), and (–)-11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-THC (THC-COOH)] were evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and labeling assays. Despite activity by UGT1A1, 1A3, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, and 2B7 toward CBN, CBD, THC-OH, and THC-COOH, only selected UGTs demonstrate sufficient activity for further characterization of steady-state kinetics. CBN was the most recognized substrate as evidenced by activities from hepatic UGT1A9 and extrahepatic UGT1A7, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10. These results may reflect the introduction of an aromatic ring to Δ9-THC, leading to favorable π stacking with phenylalanines in the UGT active site. Likewise, oxidation of Δ9-THC to THC-OH results in UGT1A9 and UGT1A10 activity toward the cannabinoid. Further oxidation to THC-COOH surprisingly leads to a loss in metabolism by UGT1A9 and UGT1A10, while creating a substrate recognized by UGT1A1 and UGT1A3. The resulting glucuronide of THC-COOH is the main metabolite found in urine, and thus these hepatic enzymes play a critical role in the metabolic clearance of cannabinoids. Taken together, glucuronidation of cannabinoids depends on upstream processing including enzymes such as CYP2C9 and CYP3A4. PMID:19339377

  7. Rhynchophorus ferrugineus attack affects a group of compounds rather than rearranging Phoenix canariensis metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Giovino, Antonio; Martinelli, Federico; Saia, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    The red palm weevil (RPW; Rhynchophorus ferrugineus) is spreading worldwide and severely harming many palm species. However, most studies on RPW focused on insect biology, and little information is available about the plant response to the attack. In the present experiment, we used metabolomics to study the alteration of the leaf metabolome of Phoenix canariensis at initial (1st stage) or advanced (2nd stage) attack by RPW compared with healthy (unattacked) plants. The leaf metabolome significantly varied among treatments. At the 1st stage of attack, plants showed a reprogramming of carbohydrate and organic acid metabolism; in contrast, peptides and lipid metabolic pathways underwent more changes during the 2nd than 1st stage of attack. Enrichment metabolomics analysis indicated that RPW attack mostly affected a particular group of compounds rather than rearranging plant metabolic pathways. Some compounds selectively affected during the 1st rather than 2nd stage (e.g. phenylalanine; tryptophan; cellobiose; xylose; quinate; xylonite; idonate; and iso-threonate; cellobiotol and arbutine) are upstream events in the phenylpropanoid, terpenoid and alkaloid biosynthesis. These compounds could be designated as potential markers of initial RPW attack. However, further investigation is needed to determine efficient early screening methods of RPW attack based on the concentrations of these molecules.

  8. Epigallocatechin gallate affects glucose metabolism and increases fitness and lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Anika E; Piegholdt, Stefanie; Rabe, Doerte; Baenas, Nieves; Schloesser, Anke; Eggersdorfer, Manfred; Stocker, Achim; Rimbach, Gerald

    2015-10-13

    In this study, we tested whether a standardized epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) rich green tea extract (comprising > 90% EGCG) affects fitness and lifespan as well as parameters of glucose metabolism and energy homeostasis in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Following the application of the green tea extract a significant increase in the mean lifespan (+ 3.3 days) and the 50% survival (+ 4.3 days) as well as improved fitness was detected. These effects went along an increased expression of Spargel, the homolog of mammalian PGC1α, which has been reported to affect lifespan in flies. Intriguingly, in flies, treatment with the green tea extract decreased glucose concentrations, which were accompanied by an inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase activity. Computational docking analysis proved the potential of EGCG to dock into the substrate binding pocket of α-amylase and to a greater extent into α-glucosidase. Furthermore, we demonstrate that EGCG downregulates insulin-like peptide 5 and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, major regulators of glucose metabolism, as well as the Drosophila homolog of leptin, unpaired 2. We propose that a decrease in glucose metabolism in connection with an upregulated expression of Spargel contribute to the better fitness and the extended lifespan in EGCG-treated flies.

  9. Silver nanoparticles affect glucose metabolism in hepatoma cells through production of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Jin; Lee, Seung Jun; Yun, Su Jin; Jang, Ji-Young; Kang, Hangoo; Kim, Kyongmin; Choi, In-Hong; Park, Sun

    2016-01-01

    The silver nanoparticle (AgNP) is a candidate for anticancer therapy because of its effects on cell survival and signaling. Although numerous reports are available regarding their effect on cell death, the effect of AgNPs on metabolism is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of AgNPs on glucose metabolism in hepatoma cell lines. Lactate release from both HepG2 and Huh7 cells was reduced with 5 nm AgNPs as early as 1 hour after treatment, when cell death did not occur. Treatment with 5 nm AgNPs decreased glucose consumption in HepG2 cells but not in Huh7 cells. Treatment with 5 nm AgNPs reduced nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 expression in both cell types without affecting its activation at the early time points after AgNPs’ treatment. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was detected 1 hour after 5 nm AgNPs’ treatment, and lactate release was restored in the presence of an ROS scavenger. Our results suggest that 5 nm AgNPs affect glucose metabolism by producing ROS. PMID:26730190

  10. Epigallocatechin gallate affects glucose metabolism and increases fitness and lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Anika E.; Piegholdt, Stefanie; Rabe, Doerte; Baenas, Nieves; Schloesser, Anke; Eggersdorfer, Manfred; Stocker, Achim; Rimbach, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we tested whether a standardized epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) rich green tea extract (comprising > 90% EGCG) affects fitness and lifespan as well as parameters of glucose metabolism and energy homeostasis in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Following the application of the green tea extract a significant increase in the mean lifespan (+ 3.3 days) and the 50% survival (+ 4.3 days) as well as improved fitness was detected. These effects went along an increased expression of Spargel, the homolog of mammalian PGC1α, which has been reported to affect lifespan in flies. Intriguingly, in flies, treatment with the green tea extract decreased glucose concentrations, which were accompanied by an inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase activity. Computational docking analysis proved the potential of EGCG to dock into the substrate binding pocket of α-amylase and to a greater extent into α-glucosidase. Furthermore, we demonstrate that EGCG downregulates insulin-like peptide 5 and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, major regulators of glucose metabolism, as well as the Drosophila homolog of leptin, unpaired 2. We propose that a decrease in glucose metabolism in connection with an upregulated expression of Spargel contribute to the better fitness and the extended lifespan in EGCG-treated flies. PMID:26375250

  11. Antimicrobial drug resistance affects broad changes in metabolomic phenotype in addition to secondary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Derewacz, Dagmara K.; Goodwin, Cody R.; McNees, C. Ruth; McLean, John A.; Bachmann, Brian O.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria develop resistance to many classes of antibiotics vertically, by engendering mutations in genes encoding transcriptional and translational apparatus. These severe adaptations affect global transcription, translation, and the correspondingly affected metabolism. Here, we characterize metabolome scale changes in transcriptional and translational mutants in a genomically characterized Nocardiopsis, a soil-derived actinomycete, in stationary phase. Analysis of ultra-performance liquid chromatography–ion mobility–mass spectrometry metabolomic features from a cohort of streptomycin- and rifampicin-resistant mutants grown in the absence of antibiotics exhibits clear metabolomic speciation, and loadings analysis catalogs a marked change in metabolic phenotype. Consistent with derepression, up to 311 features are observed in antibiotic-resistant mutants that are not detected in their progenitors. Mutants demonstrate changes in primary metabolism, such as modulation of fatty acid composition and the increased production of the osmoprotectant ectoine, in addition to the presence of abundant emergent potential secondary metabolites. Isolation of three of these metabolites followed by structure elucidation demonstrates them to be an unusual polyketide family with a previously uncharacterized xanthene framework resulting from sequential oxidative carbon skeletal rearrangements. Designated as “mutaxanthenes,” this family can be correlated to a type II polyketide gene cluster in the producing organism. Taken together, these data suggest that biosynthetic pathway derepression is a general consequence of some antibiotic resistance mutations. PMID:23341601

  12. Silver nanoparticles affect glucose metabolism in hepatoma cells through production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Jin; Lee, Seung Jun; Yun, Su Jin; Jang, Ji-Young; Kang, Hangoo; Kim, Kyongmin; Choi, In-Hong; Park, Sun

    2016-01-01

    The silver nanoparticle (AgNP) is a candidate for anticancer therapy because of its effects on cell survival and signaling. Although numerous reports are available regarding their effect on cell death, the effect of AgNPs on metabolism is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of AgNPs on glucose metabolism in hepatoma cell lines. Lactate release from both HepG2 and Huh7 cells was reduced with 5 nm AgNPs as early as 1 hour after treatment, when cell death did not occur. Treatment with 5 nm AgNPs decreased glucose consumption in HepG2 cells but not in Huh7 cells. Treatment with 5 nm AgNPs reduced nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 expression in both cell types without affecting its activation at the early time points after AgNPs' treatment. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was detected 1 hour after 5 nm AgNPs' treatment, and lactate release was restored in the presence of an ROS scavenger. Our results suggest that 5 nm AgNPs affect glucose metabolism by producing ROS.

  13. An investigation into the hepatic cytochrome P-450 catalysed metabolism of the anaesthetic fluroxene (2,2,2-trifluoroethyl vinyl ether).

    PubMed

    Marsh, J A; Ivanetich, K M; Bradshaw, J J; Harrison, G G; Webber, B L; Kaminsky, L S

    1975-01-01

    The role of the different cytochromes P-450 in the metabolism of the anaesthetic agent fluroxene, and the mechanism of production of toxic effects seen after pre-treatment of the animals with pehnobarbital prior to anaesthesia, have been investigated. Male rats were anaesthetized with fluroxene, or with 2,2,2-trifluroethyl ethyl ether, or with ethyl vinyl ether in an attempt to ascertain the in vivo toxic effects of the three anaesthetic agents. The resultant hepatic histology is reported. A study of the binding and metabolism of fluroxene by isolated rat hepatic microsomes was also made. We conclude that it is elevated levels of cytochrome P-450 which potentiate the toxicity of fluroxene anaesthesia in phenobarbital treated animals and that cytochrome P-448 does not bind or metabolize fluroxene. The potential toxicity of the fluroxene molecule is considered to reside in the trifluoroethyl moiety, while the vinyl group of fluroxene appears to play a role in the observed liver damage.

  14. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid affects blood parameters, liver morphology and expression of selected hepatic genes in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Koronowicz, A A; Banks, P; Szymczyk, B; Leszczyńska, T; Master, A; Piasna, E; Szczepański, W; Domagała, D; Kopeć, A; Piątkowska, E; Laidler, P

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this research were to investigate the effect of a conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)-enriched diet on Isa Brown laying hen health status and to provide a comprehensive analysis of changes in blood parameters, liver morphology and selected hepatic gene expression. Hens were allocated to the control and experimental group (diet enriched with 0.75% CLA) for a total period of 4 m. At the end of the experiment half of the hens from each group were slaughtered for analyses. The remaining hens were transferred to an organic farm for the next 5 m and fed on the diet without CLA supplementation. The CLA-enriched diet resulted in significant changes in blood and serum parameters; specifically, haematocrit (HCT), mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and white blood cells (WBC) count were decreased compared to the control. The total cholesterol (TC) was not significantly affected while the triacylglycerol's (TG) concentration was elevated. The activity of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was significantly increased in the CLA-supplemented group, while aspartate aminotransferase (AST) showed an increasing tendency. Liver biopsies showed pathological changes classified as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Additionally, the expression of hepatic genes involved in fatty acids synthesis (ME1, ACLY, ACC, FASN, SCD1), oxidation (CPT1α, PPARA), detoxification processes (Cytochrome P450, CYP, Flavin-containing monooxygenase, FMO3), oxidative stress (NOX4, XbP1) and inflammation (IL6, TNFα) were elevated. Cessation of CLA supplementation for 5 m of organic farming resulted in normalisation of blood and hepatic parameters to the levels observed in control hens. The results of this study indicate that dietary CLA triggers an integrated stress response in laying hens and activates mechanisms involved in liver detoxification.

  15. Medium-chain triglycerides impair lipid metabolism and induce hepatic steatosis in very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD)-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Sara; Primassin, Sonja; Ter Veld, Frank; Spiekerkoetter, Ute

    2010-09-01

    A medium-chain-triglyceride (MCT)-based diet is mainstay of treatment in very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD), a long-chain fatty acid beta-oxidation defect. Beneficial effects have been reported with an MCT-bolus prior to exercise. Little is known about the impact of a long-term MCT diet on hepatic lipid metabolism. Here we investigate the effects of MCT-supplementation on liver and blood lipids in the murine model of VLCADD. Wild-type (WT) and VLCAD-knock-out (KO) mice were fed (1) a long-chain triglyceride (LCT)-diet over 5weeks, (2) an MCT diet over 5 weeks and (3) an LCT diet plus MCT-bolus. Blood and liver lipid content were determined. Expression of genes regulating lipogenesis was analyzed by RT-PCR. Under the LCT diet, VLCAD-KO mice accumulated significantly higher blood cholesterol concentrations compared to WT mice. The MCT-diet induced severe hepatic steatosis, significantly higher serum free fatty acids and impaired hepatic lipid mobilization in VLCAD-KO mice. Expression at mRNA level of hepatic lipogenic genes was up-regulated. The long-term MCT diet stimulates lipogenesis and impairs hepatic lipid metabolism in VLCAD-KO mice. These results suggest a critical reconsideration of a long-term MCT-modified diet in human VLCADD. In contrast, MCT in situations of increased energy demand appears to be a safer treatment alternative.

  16. Early life antibiotic exposure affects pancreatic islet development and metabolic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiaying; Yang, Kaiyuan; Ju, Tingting; Ho, Tracy; McKay, Catharine A.; Gao, Yanhua; Forget, Shay K.; Gartner, Stephanie R.; Field, Catherine J.; Chan, Catherine B.; Willing, Benjamin P.

    2017-01-01

    Childhood antibiotic exposure has been recently linked with increased risk of metabolic disease later in life. A better understanding of this association would potentially provide strategies to reduce the childhood chronic disease epidemic. Therefore, we explored the underlying mechanisms using a swine model that better mimics human infants than rodents, and demonstrated that early life antibiotic exposure affects glucose metabolism 5 weeks after antibiotic withdrawal, which was associated with changes in pancreatic development. Antibiotics exerted a transient impact on postnatal gut microbiota colonization and microbial metabolite production, yet changes in the expression of key genes involved in short-chain fatty acid signaling and pancreatic development were detected in later life. These findings suggest a programming effect of early life antibiotic exposure that merits further investigation. PMID:28150721

  17. L-carnitine administration and withdrawal affect plasma and hepatic carnitine concentrations, plasma lipid and lipoprotein composition, and in vitro hepatic lipogenesis from labeled mevalonate and oleate in normal rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bell, F P; Vidmar, T J; Raymond, T L

    1992-04-01

    Carnitine was administered to normal rabbits to investigate the possible effects of pharmacologic doses on various aspects of normal lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. Carnitine concentrations were measured in the plasma and liver of normal rabbits that received L-carnitine orally [40 mg/(kg.d)] for 21 d and after withdrawal from the carnitine supplement for 21 d. Plasma lipids, plasma lipoprotein composition and in vitro hepatic lipid biosynthesis from [2-14C]mevalonate and [1-14C]oleate were also measured. Threefold elevations in plasma carnitine with carnitine treatment were essentially reversed after 48 h of carnitine withdrawal, but elevated hepatic carnitine accumulation (twofold) persisted for 21 d, suggesting that the accumulated carnitine constituted a pool that is only slowly miscible with plasma. The rabbits withdrawn from L-carnitine for 21 d experienced a 35% decrease in plasma cholesterol, a 50% decrease in VLDL cholesterol, and an increase in the protein content of HDL and of intermediate density lipoprotein + LDL. Additionally, the proportion of [14C]oleate incorporated into hepatic phospholipids increased 35% at the expense of triglyceride and the ratio of hepatic [14C]cholesterol to [14C]squalene derived from [14C]mevalonate increased over twofold following carnitine withdrawal. These studies provide evidence that normal lipid homeostasis can be altered by supplemental carnitine and that the perturbations are reflected by changes in plasma lipids and lipoproteins and in the proportions of the hepatic lipids synthesized.

  18. Dietary electrolyte balance affects growth performance, amylase activity and metabolic response in the meagre (Argyrosomus regius).

    PubMed

    Magnoni, Leonardo J; Salas-Leiton, Emilio; Peixoto, Maria-João; Pereira, Luis; Silva-Brito, Francisca; Fontinha, Filipa; Gonçalves, José F M; Wilson, Jonathan M; Schrama, Johan W; Ozório, Rodrigo O A

    2017-03-16

    Dietary ion content is known to alter the acid-base balance in freshwater fish. The current study investigated the metabolic impact of acid-base disturbances produced by differences in dietary electrolyte balance (DEB) in the meagre (Argyrosomus regius), an euryhaline species. Changes in fish performance, gastric chyme characteristics, pH and ion concentrations in the bloodstream, digestive enzyme activities and metabolic rates were analyzed in meagre fed ad libitum two experimental diets (DEB 200 or DEB 700mEq/kg) differing in the Na2CO3 content for 69days. Fish fed the DEB 200 diet had 60-66% better growth performance than the DEB 700 group. Meagre consuming the DEB 200 diet were 90-96% more efficient than fish fed the DEB 700 diet at allocating energy from feed into somatic growth. The pH values in blood were significantly lower in the DEB 700 group 2h after feeding when compared to DEB 200, indicating that acid-base balance in meagre was affected by electrolyte balance in diet. Osmolality, and Na(+) and K(+) concentrations in plasma did not vary with the dietary treatment. Gastric chyme in the DEB 700 group had higher pH values, dry matter, protein and energy contents, but lower lipid content than in the DEB 200 group. Twenty-four hours after feeding, amylase activity was higher in the gastrointestinal tract of DEB 700 group when compared to the DEB 200 group. DEB 700 group had lower routine metabolic (RMR) and standard metabolic (SMR) rates, indicating a decrease in maintenance energy expenditure 48h after feeding the alkaline diet. The current study demonstrates that feeding meagre with an alkaline diet not only causes acid-base imbalance, but also negatively affects digestion and possibly nutrient assimilation, resulting in decreased growth performance.

  19. A hepatic amino acid/mTOR/S6K-dependent signalling pathway modulates systemic lipid metabolism via neuronal signals

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Kenji; Yamada, Tetsuya; Ishigaki, Yasushi; Imai, Junta; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Sawada, Shojiro; Kaneko, Keizo; Ono, Hiraku; Asano, Tomoichiro; Oka, Yoshitomo; Katagiri, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism is coordinated among tissues and organs via neuronal signals. Levels of circulating amino acids (AAs), which are elevated in obesity, activate the intracellular target of rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1)/S6kinase (S6K) pathway in the liver. Here we demonstrate that hepatic AA/mTORC1/S6K signalling modulates systemic lipid metabolism via a mechanism involving neuronal inter-tissue communication. Hepatic expression of an AA transporter, SNAT2, activates the mTORC1/S6K pathway, and markedly elevates serum triglycerides (TGs), while downregulating adipose lipoprotein lipase (LPL). Hepatic Rheb or active-S6K expression have similar metabolic effects, whereas hepatic expression of dominant-negative-S6K inhibits TG elevation in SNAT2 mice. Denervation, pharmacological deafferentation and β-blocker administration suppress obesity-related hypertriglyceridemia with adipose LPL upregulation, suggesting that signals are transduced between liver and adipose tissue via a neuronal pathway consisting of afferent vagal and efferent sympathetic nerves. Thus, the neuronal mechanism uncovered here serves to coordinate amino acid and lipid levels and contributes to the development of obesity-related hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:26268630

  20. Select nutrients, progesterone, and interferon tau affect conceptus metabolism and development.

    PubMed

    Bazer, Fuller W; Kim, Jingyoung; Song, Gwonhwa; Ka, Hakhyun; Tekwe, Carmen D; Wu, Guoyao

    2012-10-01

    Interferon tau (IFNT), a novel multifunctional type I interferon secreted by trophectoderm, is the pregnancy recognition signal in ruminants that also has antiviral, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory bioactivities. IFNT, with progesterone, affects availability of the metabolic substrate in the uterine lumen by inducing expression of genes for transport of select nutrients into the uterine lumen that activate mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) cell signaling responsible for proliferation, migration, and protein synthesis by conceptus trophectoderm. As an immunomodulatory protein, IFNT induces an anti-inflammatory state affecting metabolic events that decrease adiposity and glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase 1 activity, while increasing insulin sensitivity, nitric oxide production by endothelial cells, and brown adipose tissue in rats. This short review focuses on effects of IFNT and progesterone affecting transport of select nutrients into the uterine lumen to stimulate mTOR cell signaling required for conceptus development, as well as effects of IFNT on the immune system and adiposity in rats with respect to its potential therapeutic value in reducing obesity.

  1. Aging of myelinating glial cells predominantly affects lipid metabolism and immune response pathways.

    PubMed

    Verdier, Valérie; Csárdi, Gábor; de Preux-Charles, Anne-Sophie; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Smit, August B; Verheijen, Mark H G; Bergmann, Sven; Chrast, Roman

    2012-05-01

    Both the central and the peripheral nervous systems are prone to multiple age-dependent neurological deficits, often attributed to still unknown alterations in the function of myelinating glia. To uncover the biological processes affected in glial cells by aging, we analyzed gene expression of the Schwann cell-rich mouse sciatic nerve at 17 time points throughout life, from day of birth until senescence. By combining these data with the gene expression data of myelin mouse mutants carrying deletions of either Pmp22, SCAP, or Lpin1, we found that the majority of age-related transcripts were also affected in myelin mutants (54.4%) and were regulated during PNS development (59.5%), indicating a high level of overlap in implicated molecular pathways. The expression profiles in aging copied the direction of transcriptional changes observed in neuropathy models; however, they had the opposite direction when compared with PNS development. The most significantly altered biological processes in aging involved the inflammatory/immune response and lipid metabolism. Interestingly, both these pathways were comparably changed in the aging optic nerve, suggesting that similar biological processes are affected in aging of glia-rich parts of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Our comprehensive comparison of gene expression in three distinct biological conditions including development, aging, and myelin disease thus revealed a previously unanticipated relationship among themselves and identified lipid metabolism and inflammatory/immune response pathways as potential therapeutical targets to prevent or delay so far incurable age-related and inherited forms of neuropathies.

  2. Evidence for efficacy of drugs affecting bone metabolism in preventing hip fracture.

    PubMed Central

    Kanis, J. A.; Johnell, O.; Gullberg, B.; Allander, E.; Dilşen, G.; Gennari, C.; Lopes Vaz, A. A.; Lyritis, G. P.; Mazzuoli, G.; Miravet, L.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the effects of taking drugs affecting bone metabolism on the risk of hip fracture in women aged over 50 years. DESIGN--Retrospective, population based, case-control study by questionnaire. SETTING--14 centres in six countries in southern Europe. SUBJECTS--2086 women with hip fracture and 3532 control women matched for age. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Number of drugs affecting bone metabolism taken and length taken for. RESULTS--Women taking drugs affecting bone metabolism had a significantly decreased risk of hip fracture. After adjustment for differences in other risk factors, the relative risk of hip fractures was 0.55 (95% confidence interval 0.31 to 0.85) in women taking oestrogens, 0.75 (0.60 to 0.94) in those taking calcium, and 0.69 (0.51 to 0.92) in those taking calcitonin. The fall in risk was not significant for anabolic steroids (0.6 (0.29 to 1.22)). Neither vitamin D nor fluorides were associated with a significant decrease in the risk of hip fracture. The effect on hip fracture risk increased significantly with increasing duration of exposure (risk ratio 0.8 (0.61 to 1.05) for less than median exposure v 0.66 (0.5 to 0.88) for greater than median exposure). Drugs were equally effective in older and younger women, with the exception of oestrogen. CONCLUSIONS--Oestrogen, calcium, and calcitonins significantly decrease the risk of hip fracture. Short term intervention late in the natural course of osteoporosis may have significant effects on the incidence of hip fracture. PMID:1463947

  3. Psammomys obesus, a unique model of metabolic syndrome, inflammation and autophagy in the pathologic development of hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Sihali-Beloui, Ouahiba; El-Aoufi, Salima; Maouche, Boubekeur; Marco, Sergio

    The aim of our transmission electron microscope study was to show, for the first time, the alteration of liver cells involved in the evolution of steatosis to steatohepatitis on a murine model of the diet-induced metabolic syndrome, Psammomys obesus. This pathologic evolution was induced by using the standard laboratory diet during 10 months, and analyzed with metabolic studies and the immunohistochemistry technique. Four months later, hepatocytes charged with lipid vacuoles were involved in autophagy. Furthermore, in the sinusoids, we observed Kupffer cells, neutrophils and macrophages. All those cells were associated with necrotic hepatocytes inducing hepatocellular necrosis. We also noticed a synthesis of extracellular matrix in excess, caused by proliferation and activation of hepatic stellate cells in necrotic areas. We observed as well a fragmentation of the endoplasmic reticulum, which formed isolated membranes (phagophores) surrounding mitochondria. The complex membrane-mitochondria formed like an autophagosome. Thus, a defect in autophagy favored the development and progression of steatohepatitis. In conclusion, our results suggest that P. obesus is very well adapted for experimental research, and could help improve the early therapeutic management of patients and the prevention of autophagic risks in the liver.

  4. Role and mechanism of the AMPK pathway in waterborne Zn exposure influencing the hepatic energy metabolism of Synechogobius hasta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kun; Huang, Chao; Shi, Xi; Chen, Feng; Xu, Yi-Huan; Pan, Ya-Xiong; Luo, Zhi; Liu, Xu

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies have investigated the physiological responses in the liver of Synechogobius hasta exposed to waterborne zinc (Zn). However, at present, very little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms of these responses. In this study, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) was performed to analyse the differences in the hepatic transcriptomes between control and Zn-exposed S. hasta. A total of 36,339 unigenes and 1,615 bp of unigene N50 were detected. These genes were further annotated to the Nonredundant protein (NR), Nonredundant nucleotide (Nt), Swiss-Prot, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) and Gene Ontology (GO) databases. After 60 days of Zn exposure, 708 and 237 genes were significantly up- and down-regulated, respectively. Many differentially expressed genes (DEGs) involved in energy metabolic pathways were identified, and their expression profiles suggested increased catabolic processes and reduced biosynthetic processes. These changes indicated that waterborne Zn exposure increased the energy production and requirement, which was related to the activation of the AMPK signalling pathway. Furthermore, using the primary hepatocytes of S. hasta, we identified the role of the AMPK signalling pathway in Zn-influenced energy metabolism.

  5. Role and mechanism of the AMPK pathway in waterborne Zn exposure influencing the hepatic energy metabolism of Synechogobius hasta

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kun; Huang, Chao; Shi, Xi; Chen, Feng; Xu, Yi-Huan; Pan, Ya-Xiong; Luo, Zhi; Liu, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated the physiological responses in the liver of Synechogobius hasta exposed to waterborne zinc (Zn). However, at present, very little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms of these responses. In this study, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) was performed to analyse the differences in the hepatic transcriptomes between control and Zn-exposed S. hasta. A total of 36,339 unigenes and 1,615 bp of unigene N50 were detected. These genes were further annotated to the Nonredundant protein (NR), Nonredundant nucleotide (Nt), Swiss-Prot, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) and Gene Ontology (GO) databases. After 60 days of Zn exposure, 708 and 237 genes were significantly up- and down-regulated, respectively. Many differentially expressed genes (DEGs) involved in energy metabolic pathways were identified, and their expression profiles suggested increased catabolic processes and reduced biosynthetic processes. These changes indicated that waterborne Zn exposure increased the energy production and requirement, which was related to the activation of the AMPK signalling pathway. Furthermore, using the primary hepatocytes of S. hasta, we identified the role of the AMPK signalling pathway in Zn-influenced energy metabolism. PMID:27934965

  6. Benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) metabolism and in vitro formation of B(a)P-DNA adducts by hepatic microsomes from rats fed diets containing corn and menhaden oils

    SciTech Connect

    Dharwadkar, S.; Bellow, J.; Ramanathan, R.; Wade, A.

    1986-03-01

    Dietary unsaturated fat is required for maximum induction of hepatic mixed function oxidases responsible for activating carcinogens which may bind covalently to DNA. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of dietary fat type on in vitro B(a)P metabolism and B(a)P-DNA adduct formation. Male rats were starved 2 days and refed diet devoid of fat, or containing 20% corn oil (CO) or 20% menhaden oil (MO) for 4 days. Both dietary fats increased Vmax for B(a)P hydroxylation without affecting Km. Phenobarbital (PB) administration increased Vmax in all animals but Km was increased only in rats fed the fat diets. PB resulted in decreased B(a)P metabolism when conducted at 15 =M only in rats fed the two fat diets even in the presence of increased cytochrome P-450 (P-450). This effect was due to a decrease in B(a)P metabolism at low substrate concentrations in PB treated fat-fed animals. Binding of B(a)P to calf-thymus DNA was increased in animals fed both fats which was enhanced further by PB only in rats fed the CO and MO diets. When the data are calculated as B(a)P metabolized per unit of P-450, PB seems to induce a P-450 in fat-fed animals having lower affinity and capacity for B(a)P metabolism and activation.

  7. Maternal undernutrition during late pregnancy in sheep. Its relationship to maternal condition, gestation length, hepatic physiology and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    West, H J

    1996-04-01

    There is a paucity of information on the metabolic effects of undernutrition of the ewe carrying multiple fetuses in late pregnancy. In the present study the effects of induction of ketosis from 132 d gestation in ewes carrying twin fetuses were compared with a control group. The ewes were well fed up to 132 d. Ketotic ewes showed a loss of condition score from 3.7 (SE 0.11) at 130 d gestation to 3.0 (SE 0.15) 10 d later after clinical recovery, compared with control twin-pregnant ewes (P < 0.01). The weight loss during the same time period was from 70.6 (SE 2.7) kg at 130 d to 64.2 (SE 2.7) kg at 140.d gestation. As expected, both groups lost weight and condition score in the first 28 d of lactation. Induction of ketosis caused a significant shortening of the gestation period to 142.8 (SE 0.7) d compared with 150 (SE 0.4) d in normal twin-pregnant ewes (P < 0.001). Ewes with induced ketosis recovered clinically and showed a normal feed intake by 3.4 (SE 0.07) d; three required treatment. Induction of ketosis resulted in reduction of hepatic uptake of bromosulphthalein (P < 0.01) and its biliary excretion (P < 0.05), metabolic clearance rate (P < 0.001), fractional clearance (P < 0.001) and 15 and 30 min retention compared with control twin-pregnant ewes. Most values had returned to normal by the first week of lactation. It is thought that in human pregnancy similar changes in bromosulphthalein clearance may be related to reduced binding sites for bromosulphthalein in the liver caused by increased circulating oestrogens. Induction of ketosis resulted in a significant hypoglycaemic (P < 0.01), ketotic (P < 0.001) state compared with well-fed twin-pregnant ewes. These changes could be correlated with the severity of the clinical signs, together with a significant rise in plasma urea (P < 0.001) and NH3 (P < 0.05) concentrations. Again, the return of most of these values to normal by the first week of lactation lends support to the reversibility of hepatic lesions

  8. Oral administration of nano-titanium dioxide particle disrupts hepatic metabolic functions in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Julin; Luo, Min; Tan, Zhen; Dai, Manyun; Xie, Minzhu; Lin, Jiao; Hua, Huiying; Ma, Qing; Zhao, Jinshun; Liu, Aiming

    2017-01-01

    TiO2 nano-particle (TiO2 NP) is widely used in industrial, household necessities, as well as medicinal products. However, the effect of TiO2 NP on liver metabolic function has not been reported. In this study, after mice were orally administered TiO2 NP (21nm) for 14days, the serum and liver tissues were assayed by biochemical analysis, real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot and transmission electron microscopy. The serum bilirubin was increased in a dose dependent manner. Deposition of TiO2 NP in hepatocytes and the abnormality of microstructures was observed. Expression of metabolic genes involved in the endogenous and exogenous metabolism was modified, supporting the toxic phenotype. Collectively, oral administration of TiO2 NP (21nm) led to deposition of particles in hepatocytes, mitochondrial edema, and the disturbance of liver metabolism function. These data suggested oral administration disrupts liver metabolic functions, which was more sensitive than regular approaches to detect material hepatotoxicity. This study provided useful information for risk analysis and regulation of TiO2 NPs by administration agencies.

  9. Remodeling of Hepatic Metabolism and Hyperaminoacidemia in Mice Deficient in Proglucagon-Derived Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Chika; Seino, Yusuke; Miyahira, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Michiyo; Fukami, Ayako; Ozaki, Nobuaki; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Sato, Jun; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu; Shibata, Katsumi; Oiso, Yutaka; Murata, Yoshiharu; Hayashi, Yoshitaka

    2012-01-01

    Glucagon is believed to be one of the most important peptides for upregulating blood glucose levels. However, homozygous glucagon–green fluorescent protein (gfp) knock-in mice (Gcggfp/gfp: GCGKO) are normoglycemic despite the absence of proglucagon-derived peptides, including glucagon. To characterize metabolism in the GCGKO mice, we analyzed gene expression and metabolome in the liver. The expression of genes encoding rate-limiting enzymes for gluconeogenesis was only marginally altered. On the other hand, genes encoding enzymes involved in conversion of amino acids to metabolites available for the tricarboxylic acid cycle and/or gluconeogenesis showed lower expression in the GCGKO liver. The expression of genes involved in the metabolism of fatty acids and nicotinamide was also altered. Concentrations of the metabolites in the GCGKO liver were altered in manners concordant with alteration in the gene expression patterns, and the plasma concentrations of amino acids were elevated in the GCGKO mice. The insulin concentration in serum and phosphorylation of Akt protein kinase in liver were reduced in GCGKO mice. These results indicated that proglucagon-derived peptides should play important roles in regulating various metabolic pathways, especially that of amino acids. Serum insulin concentration is lowered to compensate the impacts of absent proglucagon-derived peptide on glucose metabolism. On the other hand, impacts on other metabolic pathways are only partially compensated by reduced insulin action. PMID:22187375

  10. Dietary linseed oil in the maternal diet affects immunoglobulins, tissue fatty acid composition and expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in piglets.

    PubMed

    Chen, X L; Wang, N; Tian, M L; Wang, L; Liu, T; Zhang, X W; Shi, B M; Shan, A S

    2016-11-21

    This experiment investigated the effects of supplementing the maternal diet with linseed oil (LSO) and soya bean oil (SBO) on immunoglobulins, the fatty acid composition and hepatic expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in piglets. Multiparous sows (twenty-four per diet) were fed on diets containing a supplement of either SBO or LSO during last week of gestation and lactation. The results indicated that supplementation of maternal diet with LSO could improve the weaning weight of piglets and average daily gain (ADG) (p < 0.05). The concentration of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) was enhanced in sow plasma, colostrum and milk by the addition of LSO (p < 0.05). In addition, the concentration of 18: 3n-3 fatty acids was higher in the milk of LSO sows. Meanwhile, maternal supplementation with LSO increased the levels of plasma IgG, IgA and the tissues n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in piglets (p < 0.05). Correspondingly, the mRNA expression levels of hepatic ∆5-desaturase (D5D) and ∆6-desaturase (D6D) were higher, and fatty acid synthase (FAS) was lower in piglets from LSO-fed sows when compared with that in the SBO group. In conclusion, LSO supplementation of the maternal diet increases immunoglobulins, modifies the fatty acid composition and affects the gene of D5D and D6D expression of piglets.

  11. Metabolism by rat hepatic microsomes of fluorinated ether anesthetics following isoniazid administration.

    PubMed

    Rice, S A; Sbordone, L; Mazze, R I

    1980-12-01

    The possibility that enflurane defluorination is increased following treatment with isoniazid was investigated in male Fischer 344 rats. The effects of various isoniazid dosage regimens on the hepatic microsomal defluorination rates of enflurane were compared with those of several other ether anesthetics, and the conditions for production of maximal enflurane defluorination rates were determined. Seven to ten days of treatment with 50 mg/kg/day isoniazid (Nydrazid) resulted in maximal rates of defluorination of methoxyflurane, enflurane, isoflurane, and sevoflurane with no overt sign of toxicity. Compared with saline treatment of control rats, isoniazid increased defluorination of enflurane 370 per cent, methoxyflurane 259 per cent, sevoflurane 283 per cent, and isoflurane 168 per cent. Previous studies have shown that while the enzyme inducer phenobarbital increased in vitro rates of methoxyflurane defluorination approximately 1000 per cent, the rate of enflurane defluorination remained unchanged or increased by 100 per cent at most. In this study, enhanced hepatic microsomal defluorination was not associated with an increase in cytochrome P-450 per mg protein. Anesthetic defluorination rates were not altered by treatment with chlorobutanol, the preservative contained in Nydrazid.

  12. Hepatic energy metabolism correlated with pathology score in rats chronically fed ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Takahasi, H.; Geoffrion, Y.; Butler, K.W.; French, S.W. )

    1989-02-09

    We repeatedly measured in vivo levels of hepatic phosphorylated metabolites in alcohol-fed rats using non-invasive 31P MRS to evaluate their relation to the severity of the pathologic changes of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Five pairs of Wister rats were pair-fed with a liquid diet plus ethanol or an isocaloric amount of dextrose via an implanted intragastric tube for up to 6 months (mo). For MRS, the rats were sedated, air was provided by a face mask, and the diet was infused to maintain high blood alcohol levels. {sup 31}P MRS spectra were obtained using a CYCLOPS pulse-acquire sequence, 200 scans, and a 2s recycle delay. The inorganic phosphate (Pi)/ATP peak area ratio was found to be consistently higher in the alcohol-fed rats (E) compared to the pair-fed controls (C). The sugar phosphate/ATP ratio tended to be higher in E when compared to C. Cytosolic pH measured by the chemical shift of the Pi peak showed no significant differences between E and C. The monthly liver biopsies from E showed more severe steatosis, necrosis, and fibrosis with time of feeding and the Pi/ATP ratio was positively correlated with the scored histological changes. These results suggest that a low hepatic energetic state is associated with the progression of ALD pathology.

  13. Impact of maternal undernutrition around the time of conception on factors regulating hepatic lipid metabolism and microRNAs in singleton and twin fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Lie, Shervi; Williams-Wyss, Olivia; Suter, Catherine M.; Humphreys, David T.; Ozanne, Susan E.; Zhang, Song; MacLaughlin, Severence M.; Kleemann, David O.; Walker, Simon K.; Roberts, Claire T.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of embryo number and maternal undernutrition imposed either around the time of conception or before implantation on hepatic lipid metabolism in the sheep fetus. We have demonstrated that periconceptional undernutrition and preimplantation undernutrition each resulted in decreased hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation regulators, PGC-1α (P < 0.05), PDK2 (P < 0.01), and PDK4 (P < 0.01) mRNA expression in singleton and twin fetuses at 135–138 days gestation. In singletons, there was also lower hepatic PDK4 (P < 0.01), CPT-1 (P < 0.01), and PKCζ (P < 0.01) protein abundance in the PCUN and PIUN groups and a lower protein abundance of PDPK-1 (P < 0.05) in the PCUN group. Interestingly, in twins, the hepatic protein abundance of p-AMPK (Ser485) (P < 0.01), p-PDPK-1 (Ser41) (P < 0.05), and PKCζ (P < 0.05) was higher in the PCUN and PIUN groups, and hepatic PDK4 (P < 0.001) and CPT-1 (P < 0.05) protein abundance was also higher in the PIUN twin fetus. We also found that the expression of a number of microRNAs was altered in response to PCUN or PIUN and that there is evidence that these changes may underlie the changes in the protein abundance of key regulators of hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation in the PCUN and PIUN groups. Therefore, embryo number and the timing of maternal undernutrition in early pregnancy have a differential impact on hepatic microRNA expression and on the factors that regulate hepatic fatty acid oxidation and lipid synthesis. PMID:26487010

  14. Carboxylation of osteocalcin affects its association with metabolic parameters in healthy children.

    PubMed

    Prats-Puig, Anna; Mas-Parareda, Marta; Riera-Pérez, Elena; González-Forcadell, Dolors; Mier, Concepció; Mallol-Guisset, Montserrat; Díaz, Marta; Bassols, Judit; de Zegher, Francis; Ibáñez, Lourdes; López-Bermejo, Abel

    2010-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Osteocalcin (OC), a bone-derived protein, was recently shown to regulate metabolic pathways in mice. Undercarboxylated OC (ucOC), but not carboxylated OC (cOC), increases adiponectin and insulin secretion. It is unclear if carboxylation of OC affects its association with metabolic parameters in humans. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The associations between ucOC, cOC, total and high-molecular-weight (HMW) adiponectin, and insulin secretion (homeostasis model assessment [HOMA]-beta) were investigated in a population-based sample of healthy prepubertal children (n = 103; 49 boys and 54 girls). RESULTS Weight-dependent associations were observed between the different forms of OC and metabolic parameters. Higher cOC was related to lower HMW adiponectin (with a stronger association in leaner children; P < 0.001). Higher ucOC-to-cOC ratio was associated with higher HOMA-beta (P < 0.01) in leaner children and associated with higher HMW adiponectin (P < 0.001) in heavier children. CONCLUSIONS In a weight-dependent manner, cOC and the proportion of ucOC are differentially related to HMW adiponectin and insulin secretion in healthy children.

  15. Carboxylation of Osteocalcin Affects Its Association With Metabolic Parameters in Healthy Children

    PubMed Central

    Prats-Puig, Anna; Mas-Parareda, Marta; Riera-Pérez, Elena; González-Forcadell, Dolors; Mier, Concepció; Mallol-Guisset, Montserrat; Díaz, Marta; Bassols, Judit; de Zegher, Francis; Ibáñez, Lourdes; López-Bermejo, Abel

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Osteocalcin (OC), a bone-derived protein, was recently shown to regulate metabolic pathways in mice. Undercarboxylated OC (ucOC), but not carboxylated OC (cOC), increases adiponectin and insulin secretion. It is unclear if carboxylation of OC affects its association with metabolic parameters in humans. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The associations between ucOC, cOC, total and high-molecular-weight (HMW) adiponectin, and insulin secretion (homeostasis model assessment [HOMA]-β) were investigated in a population-based sample of healthy prepubertal children (n = 103; 49 boys and 54 girls). RESULTS Weight-dependent associations were observed between the different forms of OC and metabolic parameters. Higher cOC was related to lower HMW adiponectin (with a stronger association in leaner children; P < 0.001). Higher ucOC-to-cOC ratio was associated with higher HOMA-β (P < 0.01) in leaner children and associated with higher HMW adiponectin (P < 0.001) in heavier children. CONCLUSIONS In a weight-dependent manner, cOC and the proportion of ucOC are differentially related to HMW adiponectin and insulin secretion in healthy children. PMID:20009098

  16. Cannibalism Affects Core Metabolic Processes in Helicoverpa armigera Larvae—A 2D NMR Metabolomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Vergara, Fredd; Shino, Amiu; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Cannibalism is known in many insect species, yet its impact on insect metabolism has not been investigated in detail. This study assessed the effects of cannibalism on the metabolism of fourth-instar larvae of the non-predatory insect Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidotera: Noctuidea). Two groups of larvae were analyzed: one group fed with fourth-instar larvae of H. armigera (cannibal), the other group fed with an artificial plant diet. Water-soluble small organic compounds present in the larvae were analyzed using two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and principal component analysis (PCA). Cannibalism negatively affected larval growth. PCA of NMR spectra showed that the metabolic profiles of cannibal and herbivore larvae were statistically different with monomeric sugars, fatty acid- and amino acid-related metabolites as the most variable compounds. Quantitation of 1H-13C HSQC (Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence) signals revealed that the concentrations of glucose, glucono-1,5-lactone, glycerol phosphate, glutamine, glycine, leucine, isoleucine, lysine, ornithine, proline, threonine and valine were higher in the herbivore larvae. PMID:27598144

  17. The fungicide triadimefon affects beer flavor and composition by influencing Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kong, Zhiqiang; Li, Minmin; An, Jingjing; Chen, Jieying; Bao, Yuming; Francis, Frédéric; Dai, Xiaofeng

    2016-09-15

    Despite the fact that beer is produced on a large scale, the effects of pesticide residues on beer have been rarely investigated. In this study, we used micro-brewing settings to determine the effect of triadimefon on the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and beer flavor. The yeast growth in medium was significantly inhibited (45%) at concentrations higher than 5 mg L(-1), reaching 80% and 100% inhibition at 10 mg L(-1) and 50 mg L(-1), respectively. There were significant differences in sensory quality between beer samples fermented with and without triadimefon based on data obtained with an electronic tongue and nose. Such an effect was most likely underlain by changes in yeast fermentation activity, including decreased utilization of maltotriose and most amino acids, reduced production of isobutyl and isoamyl alcohols, and increased ethyl acetate content in the fungicide treated samples. Furthermore, yeast metabolic profiling by phenotype microarray and UPLC/TOF-MS showed that triadimefon caused significant changes in the metabolism of glutathione, phenylalanine and sphingolipids, and in sterol biosynthesis. Thus, triadimefon negatively affects beer sensory qualities by influencing the metabolic activity of S. cerevisiae during fermentation, emphasizing the necessity of stricter control over fungicide residues in brewing by the food industry.

  18. L-carnosine affects the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a metabolism-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Stephanie P; Bill, Roslyn M; Hipkiss, Alan R

    2012-01-01

    The dipeptide L-carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) has been described as enigmatic: it inhibits growth of cancer cells but delays senescence in cultured human fibroblasts and extends the lifespan of male fruit flies. In an attempt to understand these observations, the effects of L-carnosine on the model eukaryote, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, were examined on account of its unique metabolic properties; S. cerevisiae can respire aerobically, but like some tumor cells, it can also exhibit a metabolism in which aerobic respiration is down regulated. L-Carnosine exhibited both inhibitory and stimulatory effects on yeast cells, dependent upon the carbon source in the growth medium. When yeast cells were not reliant on oxidative phosphorylation for energy generation (e.g. when grown on a fermentable carbon source such as 2% glucose), 10-30 mM L-carnosine slowed growth rates in a dose-dependent manner and increased cell death by up to 17%. In contrast, in media containing a non-fermentable carbon source in which yeast are dependent on aerobic respiration (e.g. 2% glycerol), L-carnosine did not provoke cell death. This latter observation was confirmed in the respiratory yeast, Pichia pastoris. Moreover, when deletion strains in the yeast nutrient-sensing pathway were treated with L-carnosine, the cells showed resistance to its inhibitory effects. These findings suggest that L-carnosine affects cells in a metabolism-dependent manner and provide a rationale for its effects on different cell types.

  19. The fungicide triadimefon affects beer flavor and composition by influencing Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Zhiqiang; Li, Minmin; An, Jingjing; Chen, Jieying; Bao, Yuming; Francis, Frédéric; Dai, Xiaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Despite the fact that beer is produced on a large scale, the effects of pesticide residues on beer have been rarely investigated. In this study, we used micro-brewing settings to determine the effect of triadimefon on the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and beer flavor. The yeast growth in medium was significantly inhibited (45%) at concentrations higher than 5 mg L‑1, reaching 80% and 100% inhibition at 10 mg L‑1 and 50 mg L‑1, respectively. There were significant differences in sensory quality between beer samples fermented with and without triadimefon based on data obtained with an electronic tongue and nose. Such an effect was most likely underlain by changes in yeast fermentation activity, including decreased utilization of maltotriose and most amino acids, reduced production of isobutyl and isoamyl alcohols, and increased ethyl acetate content in the fungicide treated samples. Furthermore, yeast metabolic profiling by phenotype microarray and UPLC/TOF-MS showed that triadimefon caused significant changes in the metabolism of glutathione, phenylalanine and sphingolipids, and in sterol biosynthesis. Thus, triadimefon negatively affects beer sensory qualities by influencing the metabolic activity of S. cerevisiae during fermentation, emphasizing the necessity of stricter control over fungicide residues in brewing by the food industry.

  20. Central Metabolic Responses to Ozone and Herbivory Affect Photosynthesis and Stomatal Closure1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Khaling, Eliezer; Lassueur, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved adaptive mechanisms that allow them to tolerate a continuous range of abiotic and biotic stressors. Tropospheric ozone (O3), a global anthropogenic pollutant, directly affects living organisms and ecosystems, including plant-herbivore interactions. In this study, we investigate the stress responses of Brassica nigra (wild black mustard) exposed consecutively to O3 and the specialist herbivore Pieris brassicae. Transcriptomics and metabolomics data were evaluated using multivariate, correlation, and network analyses for the O3 and herbivory responses. O3 stress symptoms resembled those of senescence and phosphate starvation, while a sequential shift from O3 to herbivory induced characteristic plant defense responses, including a decrease in central metabolism, induction of the jasmonic acid/ethylene pathways, and emission of volatiles. Omics network and pathway analyses predicted a link between glycerol and central energy metabolism that influences the osmotic stress response and stomatal closure. Further physiological measurements confirmed that while O3 stress inhibited photosynthesis and carbon assimilation, sequential herbivory counteracted the initial responses induced by O3, resulting in a phenotype similar to that observed after herbivory alone. This study clarifies the consequences of multiple stress interactions on a plant metabolic system and also illustrates how omics data can be integrated to generate new hypotheses in ecology and plant physiology. PMID:27758847

  1. The fungicide triadimefon affects beer flavor and composition by influencing Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Zhiqiang; Li, Minmin; An, Jingjing; Chen, Jieying; Bao, Yuming; Francis, Frédéric; Dai, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that beer is produced on a large scale, the effects of pesticide residues on beer have been rarely investigated. In this study, we used micro-brewing settings to determine the effect of triadimefon on the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and beer flavor. The yeast growth in medium was significantly inhibited (45%) at concentrations higher than 5 mg L−1, reaching 80% and 100% inhibition at 10 mg L−1 and 50 mg L−1, respectively. There were significant differences in sensory quality between beer samples fermented with and without triadimefon based on data obtained with an electronic tongue and nose. Such an effect was most likely underlain by changes in yeast fermentation activity, including decreased utilization of maltotriose and most amino acids, reduced production of isobutyl and isoamyl alcohols, and increased ethyl acetate content in the fungicide treated samples. Furthermore, yeast metabolic profiling by phenotype microarray and UPLC/TOF-MS showed that triadimefon caused significant changes in the metabolism of glutathione, phenylalanine and sphingolipids, and in sterol biosynthesis. Thus, triadimefon negatively affects beer sensory qualities by influencing the metabolic activity of S. cerevisiae during fermentation, emphasizing the necessity of stricter control over fungicide residues in brewing by the food industry. PMID:27629523

  2. Modulators of Hepatic Lipoprotein Metabolism Identified in a Search for Small-Molecule Inducers of Tribbles Pseudokinase 1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Nagiec, Marek M.; Skepner, Adam P.; Negri, Joseph; Eichhorn, Michelle; Kuperwasser, Nicolas; Comer, Eamon; Muncipinto, Giovanni; Subramanian, Aravind; Clish, Clary; Musunuru, Kiran; Duvall, Jeremy R.; Foley, Michael; Perez, Jose R.; Palmer, Michelle A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome wide association studies have linked tribbles pseudokinase 1 (TRIB1) to the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). Based on the observations that increased expression of TRIB1 reduces secretion of VLDL and is associated with lower plasma levels of LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, higher plasma levels of HDL cholesterol and reduced risk for myocardial infarction, we carried out a high throughput phenotypic screen based on quantitative RT-PCR assay to identify compounds that induce TRIB1 expression in human HepG2 hepatoma cells. In a screen of a collection of diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS)-derived compounds, we identified a series of benzofuran-based compounds that upregulate TRIB1 expression and phenocopy the effects of TRIB1 cDNA overexpression, as they inhibit triglyceride synthesis and apoB secretion in cells. In addition, the compounds downregulate expression of MTTP and APOC3, key components of the lipoprotein assembly pathway. However, CRISPR-Cas9 induced chromosomal disruption of the TRIB1 locus in HepG2 cells, while confirming its regulatory role in lipoprotein metabolism, demonstrated that the effects of benzofurans persist in TRIB1-null cells indicating that TRIB1 is sufficient but not necessary to transmit the effects of the drug. Remarkably, active benzofurans, as well as natural products capable of TRIB1 upregulation, also modulate hepatic cell cholesterol metabolism by elevating the expression of LDLR transcript and LDL receptor protein, while reducing the levels of PCSK9 transcript and secreted PCSK9 protein and stimulating LDL uptake. The effects of benzofurans are not masked by cholesterol depletion and are independent of the SREBP-2 regulatory circuit, indicating that these compounds represent a novel class of chemically tractable small-molecule modulators that shift cellular lipoprotein metabolism in HepG2 cells from lipogenesis to scavenging. PMID:25811180

  3. Hepatitis B virus X induces inflammation and cancer in mice liver through dysregulation of cytoskeletal remodeling and lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhongwei; Zhai, Linghui; Yi, Tailong; Gao, Huiying; Fan, Fengxu; Li, Yanchang; Wang, Youliang; Li, Ning; Xing, Xiaohua; Su, Na; Wu, Feilin; Chang, Lei; Chen, Xiuli; Dai, Erhei; Zhao, Chao; Yang, Xiao; Cui, Chunping; Xu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) participates in the occurrence and development processes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as a multifunctional regulation factor. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains obscure. Here, we describe the use of p21HBx/+ mouse and SILAM (Stable Isotope Labeling in Mammals) strategy to define the pathological mechanisms for the occurrence and development of HBx induced liver cancer. We systematically compared a series of proteome samples from regular mice, 12- and 24-month old p21HBx/+ mice representing the inflammation and HCC stages of liver disease respectively and their nontransgenic wild-type (WT) littermates. Totally we identified 22 and 97 differentially expressed proteins out of a total of 2473 quantified proteins. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that the lipid metabolism and CDC42-induced cytoskeleton remodeling pathways were strongly activated by the HBx transgene. Interestingly, the protein-protein interaction MS study revealed that HBx directly interacted with multiple proteins in these two pathways. The same effect of up-regulation of cytoskeleton and lipid metabolism related proteins, including CDC42, CFL1, PPARγ and ADFP, was also observed in the Huh-7 cells transfected with HBx. More importantly, CFL1 and ADFP were specifically accumulated in HBV-associated HCC (HBV-HCC) patient samples, and their expression levels were positively correlated with the severity of HBV-related liver disease. These results provide evidence that HBx induces the dysregulation of cytoskeleton remodeling and lipid metabolism and leads to the occurrence and development of liver cancer. The CFL1 and ADFP might be served as potential biomarkers for prognosis and diagnosis of HBV-HCC. PMID:27708241

  4. Bowman-Birk inhibitor affects pathways associated with energy metabolism in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Li, H-M; Sun, L; Mittapalli, O; Muir, W M; Xie, J; Wu, J; Schemerhorn, B J; Jannasch, A; Chen, J Y; Zhang, F; Adamec, J; Murdock, L L; Pittendrigh, B R

    2010-06-01

    Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI) is toxic when fed to certain insects, including the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Dietary BBI has been demonstrated to slow growth and increase insect mortality by inhibiting the digestive enzymes trypsin and chymotrypsin, resulting in a reduced supply of amino acids. In mammals, BBI influences cellular energy metabolism. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that dietary BBI affects energy-associated pathways in the D. melanogaster midgut. Through microarray and metabolomic analyses, we show that dietary BBI affects energy utilization pathways in the midgut cells of D. melanogaster. In addition, ultrastructure studies indicate that microvilli are significantly shortened in BBI-fed larvae. These data provide further insights into the complex cellular response of insects to dietary protease inhibitors.

  5. Do the noncaffeine ingredients of energy drinks affect metabolic responses to heavy exercise?

    PubMed

    Pettitt, Robert W; Niemeyer, JoLynne D; Sexton, Patrick J; Lipetzky, Amanda; Murray, Steven R

    2013-07-01

    Energy drinks (EDs) such as Red Bull (RB) are marketed to enhance metabolism. Secondary ingredients of EDs (e.g., taurine) have been purported to improve time trial performance; however, little research exists on how such secondary ingredients affect aerobic metabolism during heavy exercise. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the secondary ingredients of RB on aerobic metabolism during and subsequent to heavy exercise. In double-blind, counterbalanced, and crossover fashion, 8 recreationally trained individuals completed a graded exercise test to determine the gas exchange threshold (GET). Subjects returned on 2 separate occasions and ingested either a 245 ml serving of RB or a control (CTRL) drink with the equivalent caffeine before engaging in two 10-minute constant-load cycling bouts, at an intensity equivalent to GET, with 3 minutes of rest between bouts. Accumulated liters of O2 (10 minutes) were higher for the first bout (17.1 ± 3.5 L) vs. the second bout (16.7 ± 3.5 L) but did not differ between drinks. Similarly, excess postexercise oxygen consumption was higher after the initial bout (RB mean, 2.6 ± 0.85 L; CTRL mean, 2.9 ± 0.90 L) vs. the second bout (RB mean, 1.5 ± 0.85 L; CTRL mean, 1.9 ± 0.87 L) but did not differ between drinks. No differences occurred between drinks for measures of heart rate or rating of perceived exertion. These results indicate that the secondary ingredients contained in a single serving of RB do not augment aerobic metabolism during or subsequent to heavy exercise.

  6. Oxygen Affects Gut Bacterial Colonization and Metabolic Activities in a Gnotobiotic Cockroach Model

    PubMed Central

    Tegtmeier, Dorothee; Thompson, Claire L.; Schauer, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota of termites and cockroaches represents complex metabolic networks of many diverse microbial populations. The distinct microenvironmental conditions within the gut and possible interactions among the microorganisms make it essential to investigate how far the metabolic properties of pure cultures reflect their activities in their natural environment. We established the cockroach Shelfordella lateralis as a gnotobiotic model and inoculated germfree nymphs with two bacterial strains isolated from the guts of conventional cockroaches. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both strains specifically colonized the germfree hindgut. In diassociated cockroaches, the facultatively anaerobic strain EbSL (a new species of Enterobacteriaceae) always outnumbered the obligately anaerobic strain FuSL (a close relative of Fusobacterium varium), irrespective of the sequence of inoculation, which showed that precolonization by facultatively anaerobic bacteria does not necessarily favor colonization by obligate anaerobes. Comparison of the fermentation products of the cultures formed in vitro with those accumulated in situ indicated that the gut environment strongly affected the metabolic activities of both strains. The pure cultures formed the typical products of mixed-acid or butyrate fermentation, whereas the guts of gnotobiotic cockroaches accumulated mostly lactate and acetate. Similar shifts toward more-oxidized products were observed when the pure cultures were exposed to oxygen, which corroborated the strong effects of oxygen on the metabolic fluxes previously observed in termite guts. Oxygen microsensor profiles of the guts of germfree, gnotobiotic, and conventional cockroaches indicated that both gut tissue and microbiota contribute to oxygen consumption and suggest that the oxygen status influences the colonization success. PMID:26637604

  7. Oxygen Affects Gut Bacterial Colonization and Metabolic Activities in a Gnotobiotic Cockroach Model.

    PubMed

    Tegtmeier, Dorothee; Thompson, Claire L; Schauer, Christine; Brune, Andreas

    2015-12-04

    The gut microbiota of termites and cockroaches represents complex metabolic networks of many diverse microbial populations. The distinct microenvironmental conditions within the gut and possible interactions among the microorganisms make it essential to investigate how far the metabolic properties of pure cultures reflect their activities in their natural environment. We established the cockroach Shelfordella lateralis as a gnotobiotic model and inoculated germfree nymphs with two bacterial strains isolated from the guts of conventional cockroaches. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both strains specifically colonized the germfree hindgut. In diassociated cockroaches, the facultatively anaerobic strain EbSL (a new species of Enterobacteriaceae) always outnumbered the obligately anaerobic strain FuSL (a close relative of Fusobacterium varium), irrespective of the sequence of inoculation, which showed that precolonization by facultatively anaerobic bacteria does not necessarily favor colonization by obligate anaerobes. Comparison of the fermentation products of the cultures formed in vitro with those accumulated in situ indicated that the gut environment strongly affected the metabolic activities of both strains. The pure cultures formed the typical products of mixed-acid or butyrate fermentation, whereas the guts of gnotobiotic cockroaches accumulated mostly lactate and acetate. Similar shifts toward more-oxidized products were observed when the pure cultures were exposed to oxygen, which corroborated the strong effects of oxygen on the metabolic fluxes previously observed in termite guts. Oxygen microsensor profiles of the guts of germfree, gnotobiotic, and conventional cockroaches indicated that both gut tissue and microbiota contribute to oxygen consumption and suggest that the oxygen status influences the colonization success.

  8. Multi-omic profiles of hepatic metabolism in TPN-fed preterm pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New generation lipid emulsions comprised of fish oil or blends of soybean/fish/medium chain triglyceride/olive oil are emerging that result in favorable clinical metabolic outcomes in pediatric populations. Our aim was to characterize the lipidodomic, metabolomic, and transcriptomic profiles these ...

  9. Gender and Species Differences in Triadimefon Metabolism by Rodent Hepatic Microsomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the potential differences in metabolic capacity and kinetics between various common laboratory species as well as between genders is an important facet of chemical risk assessment that is often overlooked, particularly for chemicals which undergo non-cytochrome P450...

  10. A Txnrd1-dependent metabolic switch alters hepatic lipogenesis, glycogen storage, and detoxification.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Sonya V; Eriksson, Sofi; Xu, Jianqiang; Prigge, Justin R; Talago, Emily A; Meade, Tesia A; Meade, Erin S; Capecchi, Mario R; Arnér, Elias S J; Schmidt, Edward E

    2013-10-01

    Besides helping to maintain a reducing intracellular environment, the thioredoxin (Trx) system impacts bioenergetics and drug metabolism. We show that hepatocyte-specific disruption of Txnrd1, encoding Trx reductase-1 (TrxR1), causes a metabolic switch in which lipogenic genes are repressed and periportal hepatocytes become engorged with glycogen. These livers also overexpress machinery for biosynthesis of glutathione and conversion of glycogen into UDP-glucuronate; they stockpile glutathione-S-transferases and UDP-glucuronyl-transferases; and they overexpress xenobiotic exporters. This realigned metabolic profile suggested that the mutant hepatocytes might be preconditioned to more effectively detoxify certain xenobiotic challenges. Hepatocytes convert the pro-toxin acetaminophen (APAP, paracetamol) into cytotoxic N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). APAP defenses include glucuronidation of APAP or glutathionylation of NAPQI, allowing removal by xenobiotic exporters. We found that NAPQI directly inactivates TrxR1, yet Txnrd1-null livers were resistant to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Txnrd1-null livers did not have more effective gene expression responses to APAP challenge; however, their constitutive metabolic state supported more robust GSH biosynthesis, glutathionylation, and glucuronidation systems. Following APAP challenge, this effectively sustained the GSH system and attenuated damage.

  11. The influence of starvation upon hepatic drug metabolism in rats, mice, and guinea pigs.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furner, R. L.; Feller, D. D.

    1971-01-01

    Male rats, mice, and guinea pigs were starved for 1, 2, or 3 days, and the metabolism of ethylmorphine, p-nitroanisole, and aniline was studied. Results suggest that the oxidative enzyme systems studied are not interdependent, and the pathways studied appear to be species dependent.

  12. Metabolic reprogramming identifies the most aggressive lesions at early phases of hepatic carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Perra, Andrea; Menegon, Silvia; Masgras, Ionica; Trevisan, Elena; Angioni, Maria Maddalena; Fornari, Francesca; Quagliata, Luca; Ledda-Columbano, Giovanna Maria; Gramantieri, Laura; Terracciano, Luigi; Giordano, Silvia; Chiarugi, Paola; Rasola, Andrea; Columbano, Amedeo

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic changes are associated with cancer, but whether they are just bystander effects of deregulated oncogenic signaling pathways or characterize early phases of tumorigenesis remains unclear. Here we show in a rat model of hepatocarcinogenesis that early preneoplastic foci and nodules that progress towards hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are characterized both by inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and by enhanced glucose utilization to fuel the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). These changes respectively require increased expression of the mitochondrial chaperone TRAP1 and of the transcription factor NRF2 that induces the expression of the rate-limiting PPP enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), following miR-1 inhibition. Such metabolic rewiring exclusively identifies a subset of aggressive cytokeratin-19 positive preneoplastic hepatocytes and not slowly growing lesions. No such metabolic changes were observed during non-neoplastic liver regeneration occurring after two/third partial hepatectomy. TRAP1 silencing inhibited the colony forming ability of HCC cells while NRF2 silencing decreased G6PD expression and concomitantly increased miR-1; conversely, transfection with miR-1 mimic abolished G6PD expression. Finally, in human HCC patients increased G6PD expression levels correlates with grading, metastasis and poor prognosis. Our results demonstrate that the metabolic deregulation orchestrated by TRAP1 and NRF2 is an early event restricted to the more aggressive preneoplastic lesions. PMID:27070090

  13. Maternal nutrition during the first 50 days of gestation alters bovine fetal hepatic metabolic transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that maternal nutrition during the first 50 d of gestation would alter the metabolic transcriptome of the bovine fetal liver. Fourteen beef heifers were estrus synchronized and assigned to 2 treatments at breeding (CON, 100% of requirements to gain 0.45kg/d; RES, 60% of CON). Heifers...

  14. Hepatic Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme Gene Expression Through the Life Stages of the Mouse

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Differences in responses to environmental chemicals and drugs between life stages are likely due in part to differences in the expression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and transporters (XMETs). No comprehensive analysis of the mRNA expression of XMETs has been ca...

  15. Integrated Metabolomics, Transcriptomics and Proteomics Identifies Metabolic Pathways Affected by Anaplasma phagocytophilum Infection in Tick Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Margarita; Ayllón, Nieves; Alberdi, Pilar; Moreno, Andrés; Moreno, María; Tobes, Raquel; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Weisheit, Sabine; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; de la Fuente, José

    2015-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis. These intracellular bacteria establish infection by affecting cell function in both the vertebrate host and the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis. Previous studies have characterized the tick transcriptome and proteome in response to A. phagocytophilum infection. However, in the postgenomic era, the integration of omics datasets through a systems biology approach allows network-based analyses to describe the complexity and functionality of biological systems such as host–pathogen interactions and the discovery of new targets for prevention and control of infectious diseases. This study reports the first systems biology integration of metabolomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics data to characterize essential metabolic pathways involved in the tick response to A. phagocytophilum infection. The ISE6 tick cells used in this study constitute a model for hemocytes involved in pathogen infection and immune response. The results showed that infection affected protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum and glucose metabolic pathways in tick cells. These results supported tick–Anaplasma co-evolution by providing new evidence of how tick cells limit pathogen infection, while the pathogen benefits from the tick cell response to establish infection. Additionally, ticks benefit from A. phagocytophilum infection by increasing survival while pathogens guarantee transmission. The results suggested that A. phagocytophilum induces protein misfolding to limit the tick cell response and facilitate infection but requires protein degradation to prevent ER stress and cell apoptosis to survive in infected cells. Additionally, A. phagocytophilum may benefit from the tick cell's ability to limit bacterial infection through PEPCK inhibition leading to decreased glucose metabolism, which also results in the inhibition of cell apoptosis that increases infection of tick cells. These

  16. Integrated Metabolomics, Transcriptomics and Proteomics Identifies Metabolic Pathways Affected by Anaplasma phagocytophilum Infection in Tick Cells.

    PubMed

    Villar, Margarita; Ayllón, Nieves; Alberdi, Pilar; Moreno, Andrés; Moreno, María; Tobes, Raquel; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Weisheit, Sabine; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; de la Fuente, José

    2015-12-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis. These intracellular bacteria establish infection by affecting cell function in both the vertebrate host and the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis. Previous studies have characterized the tick transcriptome and proteome in response to A. phagocytophilum infection. However, in the postgenomic era, the integration of omics datasets through a systems biology approach allows network-based analyses to describe the complexity and functionality of biological systems such as host-pathogen interactions and the discovery of new targets for prevention and control of infectious diseases. This study reports the first systems biology integration of metabolomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics data to characterize essential metabolic pathways involved in the tick response to A. phagocytophilum infection. The ISE6 tick cells used in this study constitute a model for hemocytes involved in pathogen infection and immune response. The results showed that infection affected protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum and glucose metabolic pathways in tick cells. These results supported tick-Anaplasma co-evolution by providing new evidence of how tick cells limit pathogen infection, while the pathogen benefits from the tick cell response to establish infection. Additionally, ticks benefit from A. phagocytophilum infection by increasing survival while pathogens guarantee transmission. The results suggested that A. phagocytophilum induces protein misfolding to limit the tick cell response and facilitate infection but requires protein degradation to prevent ER stress and cell apoptosis to survive in infected cells. Additionally, A. phagocytophilum may benefit from the tick cell's ability to limit bacterial infection through PEPCK inhibition leading to decreased glucose metabolism, which also results in the inhibition of cell apoptosis that increases infection of tick cells. These results

  17. Proteinuria, not altered albumin metabolism, affects hyperlipidemia in the nephrotic rat.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, R W; Staprans, I; Hutchison, F N; Kaysen, G A

    1990-01-01

    It has been established previously that nephrotic hyperlipidemia is characterized by both an increase in lipid synthesis and a defect in removal of lipoproteins. The relationship between these defects and altered albumin metabolism is uncertain. One hypothesis is that hepatic lipogenesis increases in parallel with albumin synthesis. To test this hypothesis, albumin synthesis was increased in nephrotic rats fed an 8.5% protein diet (LPN) by increasing dietary protein to 40% (HPN). Proteinuria was modulated in half of the rats fed 40% protein by enalapril (HPE). Albumin synthesis was the same in both HPN and HPE, but proteinuria was reduced in HPE compared to HPN, and so were serum cholesterol and triglycerides (TG). To examine the effect of serum albumin on lipid clearance in the absence of proteinuria, plasma clearance of chylomicrons (CM) and VLDL was measured in Nagase analbuminemic rats (NAR) and found to be no different than in normal SD rats. When proteinuria was induced in NAR and in SD rats, a severe and identical defect in both CM and VLDL clearance was acquired in both groups and blood lipid levels were increased to a similar degree in both groups. Neither hyperlipidemia nor defective removal of lipoproteins from the circulation are linked to albumin synthesis or serum albumin concentration but result, at least in part, from proteinuria. Postheparin lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was reduced slightly in nephrotic animals compared to nonnephrotic controls, but the most striking finding was a highly significant decrease in postheraprin LPL activity in normal NAR compared to SD rats (P less than 0.001), suggesting that reduced LPL activity is not responsible for reduced clearance of CM and VLDL in nephrotic rats. PMID:2384606

  18. The trans-10,cis-12 isomer of conjugated linoleic acid reduces hepatic triacylglycerol content without affecting lipogenic enzymes in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Zabala, Amaia; Churruca, Itziar; Macarulla, M Teresa; Rodríguez, Víctor M; Fernández-Quintela, Alfredo; Martínez, J Alfredo; Portillo, María P

    2004-09-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) refers to the positional and geometric dienoic isomers of linoleic acid. The dietary intake of CLA has been associated with changes in lipid metabolism. The aim of the present work was to assess the effects of the two main isomers of CLA on sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1a and SREBP-1c mRNA levels, as well as on mRNA levels and the activities of several lipogenic enzymes in liver. For this purpose hamsters were fed an atherogenic diet supplemented with 5 g linoleic acid, cis-9,trans-11 or trans-10,cis-12 CLA/kg diet for 6 weeks. The trans-10,cis-12 isomer intake produced significantly greater liver weight, but also significantly decreased liver fat accumulation. No changes in mRNA levels of SREBP-1a, SREBP-1c and lipogenic enzymes, or in the activities of these enzymes, were observed. There was no effect of feeding cis-9,trans-11 CLA. These results suggest that increased fat accumulation in liver does not occur on the basis of liver enlargement produced by feeding the trans-10,cis-12 isomer of CLA in hamsters. The reduction in hepatic triacylglycerol content induced by this isomer was not attributable to changes in lipogenesis.

  19. Classification and genetic features of neonatal haemochromatosis: a study of 27 affected pedigrees and molecular analysis of genes implicated in iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, A.; Lunt, P.; Rodrigues, F.; Berry, P; Flynn, D.; McKiernan, P.; Kelly, D.; Mieli-Vergani, G.; Cox, T.

    2001-01-01

    Neonatal haemochromatosis (NH) is a severe and newly recognised syndrome of uncertain aetiology, characterised by congenital cirrhosis or fulminant hepatitis and widespread tissue iron deposition. NH occurs in the context of maternal disease including viral infection, as a complication of metabolic disease in the fetus, and sporadically or recurrently, without overt cause, in sibs. Although an underlying genetic basis for NH has been suspected, no test is available for predictive analysis in at risk pregnancies.
  As a first step towards an understanding of the putative genetic basis for neonatal haemochromatosis, we have conducted a systematic study of the mode of transmission of this disorder in a total of 40 infants born to 27 families. We have moreover carried out a molecular analysis of candidate genes (β2-microglobulin, HFE, and haem oxygenases 1 and 2) implicated in iron metabolism. No pathogenic mutations in these genes were identified that segregate consistently with the disease phenotype in multiplex pedigrees. However, excluding four pedigrees with clear evidence of maternal infection associated with NH, a pedigree showing transmission of maternal antinuclear factor and ribonucleoprotein antibodies to the affected infants, and two families with possible matrilineal inheritance of disease in maternal half sibs, a large subgroup of the affected pedigrees point to the inheritance of an autosomal recessive trait. This included 14 pedigrees with affected and unaffected infants and a single pedigree where all four affected infants were the sole offspring of consanguineous but otherwise healthy parents.
  We thus report three distinct patterns of disease transmission in neonatal haemochromatosis. In the differentiation of a large subgroup showing transmission of disease in a manner suggesting autosomal recessive inheritance, we also provide the basis for further genome wide studies to define chromosomal determinants of iron storage disease in the

  20. Potential hepatic toxicity of buprofezin at sublethal concentrations: ROS-mediated conversion of energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaotong; Ku, Tingting; Zhu, Na; Ning, Xia; Wei, Wei; Li, Guangke; Sang, Nan

    2016-12-15

    Buprofezin is known for its broad-spectrum action and environmental safety. The popularity of buprofezin has raised concerns about its potentially adverse effects on human health and risk to the environment. In this study, we first identified the liver as one of the major organs in which buprofezin accumulated, and we detected a severe oxidative stress response. Next, we demonstrated that sublethal concentrations of buprofezin promoted the conversion of energy metabolism from the aerobic tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and oxidative phosphorylation to anaerobic glycolysis. Importantly, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation partially accounted for the shunting of the energy metabolism through the buprofezin-mediated inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase activity. ROS directly perturbed the activities of several key TCA cycle enzymes, stimulated glycolysis, and indirectly disturbed the activity of the respiratory chain complex by altering mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). These findings clarify the potential mechanisms of buprofezin toxicity and provide biomarkers for buprofezin-mediated hepatotoxicity at sublethal concentrations.

  1. Effect of p-xylene metabolites, p-methylbenzyl alcohol and 2,5-dimethylphenol, on rat hepatic and pulmonary microsomal metabolism.

    PubMed

    Day, B J; Carlson, G P

    1992-04-01

    Pulmonary metabolites of p-xylene, p-methylbenzyl alcohol (PMBA) and 2,5-dimethylphenol (DMP), were employed to investigate the divergent effects of p-xylene on pulmonary and hepatic metabolism. Rats were given PMBA, DMP, or 10% cremophore (control) ip daily for 3 days, and effects on hepatic and pulmonary microsomal metabolism were determined 12 hours later. Both PMBA and DMP mimic the decrease in pulmonary benzyloxyresorufin-O-debenzylase activity previously reported for p-xylene, but neither could account for the potent induction of cytochrome P450 in the liver. Only PMBA had a consistent effect on P450IIB apoprotein levels, decreasing them in both the liver and lung. These data suggest that PMBA may have a significant role in the inhibition of pulmonary P450 caused by p-xylene.

  2. The Xbp1s/GalE axis links ER stress to postprandial hepatic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yingfeng; Wang, Zhao V; Tao, Caroline; Gao, Ningguo; Holland, William L; Ferdous, Anwarul; Repa, Joyce J; Liang, Guosheng; Ye, Jin; Lehrman, Mark A; Hill, Joseph A; Horton, Jay D; Scherer, Philipp E

    2013-01-01

    Postprandially, the liver experiences an extensive metabolic reprogramming that is required for the switch from glucose production to glucose assimilation. Upon refeeding, the unfolded protein response (UPR) is rapidly, though only transiently, activated. Activation of the UPR results in a cessation of protein translation, increased chaperone expression, and increased ER-mediated protein degradation, but it is not clear how the UPR is involved in the postprandial switch to alternate fuel sources. Activation of the inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) branch of the UPR signaling pathway triggers expression of the transcription factor Xbp1s. Using a mouse model with liver-specific inducible Xbp1s expression, we demonstrate that Xbp1s is sufficient to provoke a metabolic switch characteristic of the postprandial state, even in the absence of caloric influx. Mechanistically, we identified UDP-galactose-4-epimerase (GalE) as a direct transcriptional target of Xbp1s and as the key mediator of this effect. Our results provide evidence that the Xbp1s/GalE pathway functions as a novel regulatory nexus connecting the UPR to the characteristic postprandial metabolic changes in hepatocytes.

  3. Plant maturity and nitrogen fertilization affected fructan metabolism in harvestable tissues of timothy (Phleum pratense L.).

    PubMed

    Ould-Ahmed, Marouf; Decau, Marie-Laure; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; Lafrenière, Carole; Drouin, Pascal

    2014-10-15

    Timothy (Phleum pratense L.) is an important grass forage used for pasture, hay, and silage in regions with cool and humid growth seasons. One of the factors affecting the nutritive value of this grass is the concentration of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC), mainly represented by fructans. NSC concentration depends on multiple factors, making it hardly predictable. To provide a better understanding of NSC metabolism in timothy, the effects of maturity stage and nitrogen (N) fertilization level on biomass, NSC and N-compound concentrations were investigated in the tissues used for forage (leaf blades and stems surrounded by leaf sheaths) of hydroponically grown plants. Moreover, activities and relative expression level of enzymes involved in fructan metabolism were measured in the same tissues. Forage biomass was not altered by the fertilization level but was strongly modified by the stage of development. It increased from vegetative to heading stages while leaf-to-stem biomass ratio decreased. Total NSC concentration, which was not altered by N fertilization level, increased between heading and anthesis due to an accumulation of fructans in leaf blades. Fructan metabolizing enzyme activities (fructosyltransferase-FT and fructan exohydrolase-FEH) were not or only slightly altered by both maturity stage and N fertilization level. Conversely, the relative transcript levels of genes coding for enzymes involved in fructan metabolism were modified by N supply (PpFT1 and Pp6-FEH1) or maturity stage (PpFT2). The relative transcript level of PpFT1 was the highest in low N plants while that of Pp6-FEH1 was the highest in high N plants. Morevoer, transcript level of PpFT1 was negatively correlated with nitrate concentration while that of PpFT2 was positively correlated with sucrose concentration. This distinct regulation of the two genes coding for 6-sucrose:fructan fructosyltransferase (6-SFT) may allow a fine adequation of C allocation towards fructan synthesis in

  4. Disease progression and health care resource consumption in patients affected by hepatitis C virus in real practice setting

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Valentina; Sangiorgi, Diego; Buda, Stefano; Degli Esposti, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection represents serious health problems worldwide and is a major contributor to end-stage liver disease including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In Italy, ~2% of subjects are infected with HCV. The objective of this study was to describe treatment patterns, disease progression, and resource use in HCV. Methods An observational retrospective cohort analysis based on four Local Health Units administrative and laboratory databases was conducted. HCV-positive patients between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2010 were included and followed-up for 1 year. To explore which covariates were associated to disease progression (cirrhosis, HCC, death for any cause), Cox proportional hazards models were performed. Results A total of 9,514 patients were analyzed of which 55.6% were male, aged 58.1±16.1, and prevalence 0.4%; 5.8% were positive to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, 3.0% to hepatitis B virus (HBV), and 1.6% to HCV+HBV+HIV; 26.1% had cirrhosis and 4.3% HCC. The majority of patients (76%) did not receive an antiviral treatment; the main factors affecting this decision were age, 44.1% of untreated patients being aged >65 years; 31% were affected by cirrhosis, 6.6% had ongoing substance or alcohol abuse, and 5.5% were affected by HCC. Disease progression in the observed timeframe was less frequent among treated patients (incidence rate per 100 patients/year: cirrhosis 2.1±0.7 vs 13.0±1.0, HCC 0.5±0.3 vs 3.6±0.5, death 0.5±0.3 vs 6.4±0.7). The annual expenditure for HCV management (drugs, hospitalizations, outpatient services) was €4,700 per patient. Conclusion This observational, real-life study shows that only a small proportion of patients received antiviral therapy in the territorial services investigated; among patients who were not treated, this is reflected in a disease progression and cost of management higher than treated patients. These results suggest the importance of better

  5. Fine-Mapping and Genetic Analysis of the Loci Affecting Hepatic Iron Overload in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xin; Zhang, Zhuzhen; Zhang, Fan; Tao, Yunlong; An, Peng; Wu, Qian; Wang, Chia-Yu; Knutson, Mitchell D.; Wang, Fudi

    2013-01-01

    The liver, as the major organ for iron storage and production of hepcidin, plays pivotal roles in maintaining mammalian iron homeostasis. A previous study showed that Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) on chromosome 7 (Chr7) and 16 (Chr16) may control hepatic non-heme iron overload in an F2 intercross derived from C57BL/6J (B6) and SWR/J (SWR) mice. In this study, we aimed to validate the existence of these loci and identify the genes responsible for the phenotypic variations by generating congenic mice carrying SWR chromosome segments expanding these QTLs (D7Mit68-D7Mit71 and D16Mit125-D16Mit185, respectively). We excluded involvement of Chr7 based on the lack of iron accumulation in congenic mice. In contrast, liver iron accumulation was observed in Chr16 congenic mice. Through use of a series of subcongenic murine lines the interval on Chr16 was further fine-mapped to a 0.8 Mb segment spanning 11 genes. We found that the mRNA expression pattern in the liver remained unchanged for all 11 genes tested. Most importantly, we detected 4 missense mutations in 3 candidate genes including Sidt1 (P172R), Spice1(R708S), Boc (Q1051R) and Boc (S450-insertion in B6 allele) in the liver of SWR homozygous congenic mice. To further delineate potential modifier gene(s), we reconstituted seven candidate genes, Sidt1, Boc, Zdhhc23, Gramd1c, Atp6v1a, Naa50 and Gtpbp8, in mouse liver through hydrodynamic transfection. However, we were unable to detect significant changes in liver iron levels upon reconstitution of these candidate genes. Taken together, our work provides strong genetic evidence of the existence of iron modifiers on Chr16. Moreover, we were able to delineate the phenotypically responsible region to a 0.8 Mb region containing 11 coding genes, 3 of which harbor missense mutations, using a series of congenic mice. PMID:23675470

  6. Apigenin Ameliorates Dyslipidemia, Hepatic Steatosis and Insulin Resistance by Modulating Metabolic and Transcriptional Profiles in the Liver of H