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Sample records for affects mitochondrial respiration

  1. Loss of mitochondrial exo/endonuclease EXOG affects mitochondrial respiration and induces ROS-mediated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Tigchelaar, Wardit; Yu, Hongjuan; de Jong, Anne Margreet; van Gilst, Wiek H; van der Harst, Pim; Westenbrink, B Daan; de Boer, Rudolf A; Silljé, Herman H W

    2015-01-15

    Recently, a locus at the mitochondrial exo/endonuclease EXOG gene, which has been implicated in mitochondrial DNA repair, was associated with cardiac function. The function of EXOG in cardiomyocytes is still elusive. Here we investigated the role of EXOG in mitochondrial function and hypertrophy in cardiomyocytes. Depletion of EXOG in primary neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVCs) induced a marked increase in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Depletion of EXOG, however, did not result in loss of mitochondrial DNA integrity. Although EXOG depletion did not induce fetal gene expression and common hypertrophy pathways were not activated, a clear increase in ribosomal S6 phosphorylation was observed, which readily explains increased protein synthesis. With the use of a Seahorse flux analyzer, it was shown that the mitochondrial oxidative consumption rate (OCR) was increased 2.4-fold in EXOG-depleted NRVCs. Moreover, ATP-linked OCR was 5.2-fold higher. This increase was not explained by mitochondrial biogenesis or alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential. Western blotting confirmed normal levels of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes. The increased OCR was accompanied by a 5.4-fold increase in mitochondrial ROS levels. These increased ROS levels could be normalized with specific mitochondrial ROS scavengers (MitoTEMPO, mnSOD). Remarkably, scavenging of excess ROS strongly attenuated the hypertrophic response. In conclusion, loss of EXOG affects normal mitochondrial function resulting in increased mitochondrial respiration, excess ROS production, and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

  2. Antibacterial peptides and mitochondrial presequences affect mitochondrial coupling, respiration and protein import.

    PubMed

    Hugosson, M; Andreu, D; Boman, H G; Glaser, E

    1994-08-01

    Cecropins A and P1, antibacterial peptides from insects and from pig and some related peptides released respiratory control, inhibited protein import and at higher concentrations also inhibited respiration. However, PR-39, an antibacterial peptide from pig intestine, was found to be almost inert towards mitochondria. The concentrations at which the three mitochondrial functions were effected varied for different peptides. Melittin, magainin and Cecropin-A-(1,13)-Melittin(1,13)-NH2, a hybrid between cecropin A and melittin, were most potent, while the two cecropins acted at higher concentrations. The biosynthesis of cecropin A is known and the intermediates are synthesized. We have used four peptides from this pathway to investigate their effects on coupling, respiration and protein import into mitochondria. Mature cecropin A followed by the preproprotein were most aggressive whereas the intermediates were less active or inert. The efficiency of different derivatives of cecropin A as uncouplers correlates well with their capacity to release membrane potential measured as fluorescence quenching of Rhodamine 123. Inhibition of respiration was found to be dependent on membrane potential and was most pronounced with mature cecropin A, less so with its three precursors. We also found that three peptides derived from mitochondrial presequences showed antibacterial activity. It is concluded that, there are similarities in the functions of antibacterial peptides and mitochondrial presequences, uncoupling activity in mitochondria cannot be correlated with the antibacterial activity (contrary to a previous suggestion), the processing of preprocecropin A may have evolved in such a way that there is a minimum of membrane damage from the intermediates in the pathway, and peptides produced for delivery outside of an animal have evolved to be more aggressive against mitochondria than peptides for delivery inside of the animal.

  3. Mitochondrial respiration is sensitive to cytoarchitectural breakdown.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Judith; Angelin, Alessia A; Wallace, Douglas C; Eckmann, David M

    2016-11-07

    An abundance of research suggests that cellular mitochondrial and cytoskeletal disruption are related, but few studies have directly investigated causative connections between the two. We previously demonstrated that inhibiting microtubule and microfilament polymerization affects mitochondrial motility on the whole-cell level in fibroblasts. Since mitochondrial motility can be indicative of mitochondrial function, we now further characterize the effects of these cytoskeletal inhibitors on mitochondrial potential, morphology and respiration. We found that although they did not reduce mitochondrial inner membrane potential, cytoskeletal toxins induced significant decreases in basal mitochondrial respiration. In some cases, basal respiration was only affected after cells were pretreated with the calcium ionophore A23187 in order to stress mitochondrial function. In most cases, mitochondrial morphology remained unaffected, but extreme microfilament depolymerization or combined intermediate doses of microtubule and microfilament toxins resulted in decreased mitochondrial lengths. Interestingly, these two particular exposures did not affect mitochondrial respiration in cells not sensitized with A23187, indicating an interplay between mitochondrial morphology and respiration. In all cases, inducing maximal respiration diminished differences between control and experimental groups, suggesting that reduced basal respiration originates as a largely elective rather than pathological symptom of cytoskeletal impairment. However, viability experiments suggest that even this type of respiration decrease may be associated with cell death.

  4. Endothelial cell respiration is affected by the oxygen tension during shear exposure: role of mitochondrial peroxynitrite.

    PubMed

    Jones, Charles I; Han, Zhaosheng; Presley, Tennille; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; Zweier, Jay L; Ilangovan, Govindasamy; Alevriadou, B Rita

    2008-07-01

    Cultured vascular endothelial cell (EC) exposure to steady laminar shear stress results in peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) formation intramitochondrially and inactivation of the electron transport chain. We examined whether the "hyperoxic state" of 21% O(2), compared with more physiological O(2) tensions (Po(2)), increases the shear-induced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and mitochondrial superoxide (O(2)(*-)) generation leading to ONOO(-) formation and suppression of respiration. Electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry was used to measure O(2) consumption rates of bovine aortic ECs sheared (10 dyn/cm(2), 30 min) at 5%, 10%, or 21% O(2) or left static at 5% or 21% O(2). Respiration was inhibited to a greater extent when ECs were sheared at 21% O(2) than at lower Po(2) or left static at different Po(2). Flow in the presence of an endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) inhibitor or a ONOO(-) scavenger abolished the inhibitory effect. EC transfection with an adenovirus that expresses manganese superoxide dismutase in mitochondria, and not a control virus, blocked the inhibitory effect. Intracellular and mitochondrial O(2)(*-) production was higher in ECs sheared at 21% than at 5% O(2), as determined by dihydroethidium and MitoSOX red fluorescence, respectively, and the latter was, at least in part, NO-dependent. Accumulation of NO metabolites in media of ECs sheared at 21% O(2) was modestly increased compared with ECs sheared at lower Po(2), suggesting that eNOS activity may be higher at 21% O(2). Hence, the hyperoxia of in vitro EC flow studies, via increased NO and mitochondrial O(2)(*-) production, leads to enhanced ONOO(-) formation intramitochondrially and suppression of respiration.

  5. Metabolic depression during warm torpor in the Golden spiny mouse (Acomys russatus) does not affect mitochondrial respiration and hydrogen peroxide release.

    PubMed

    Grimpo, Kirsten; Kutschke, Maria; Kastl, Anja; Meyer, Carola W; Heldmaier, Gerhard; Exner, Cornelia; Jastroch, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Small mammals actively decrease metabolism during daily torpor and hibernation to save energy. Recently, depression of mitochondrial substrate oxidation in isolated liver mitochondria was observed and associated to hypothermic/hypometabolic states in Djungarian hamsters, mice and hibernators. We aimed to clarify whether hypothermia or hypometabolism causes mitochondrial depression during torpor by studying the Golden spiny mouse (Acomys russatus), a desert rodent which performs daily torpor at high ambient temperatures of 32°C. Notably, metabolic rate but not body temperature is significantly decreased under these conditions. In isolated liver, heart, skeletal muscle or kidney mitochondria we found no depression of respiration. Moderate cold exposure lowered torpor body temperature but had minor effects on minimal metabolic rate in torpor. Neither decreased body temperature nor metabolic rate impacted mitochondrial respiration. Measurements of mitochondrial proton leak kinetics and determination of P/O ratio revealed no differences in mitochondrial efficiency. Hydrogen peroxide release from mitochondria was not affected. We conclude that interspecies differences of mitochondrial depression during torpor do not support a general relationship between mitochondrial respiration, body temperature and metabolic rate. In Golden spiny mice, reduction of metabolic rate at mild temperatures is not triggered by depression of substrate oxidation as found in liver mitochondria from other cold-exposed rodents.

  6. Mitochondrial respiration without ubiquinone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Hekimi, Siegfried

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquinone (UQ), a.k.a. coenzyme Q, is a redox-active lipid that participates in several cellular processes, in particular mitochondrial electron transport. Primary UQ deficiency is a rare but severely debilitating condition. Mclk1 (a.k.a. Coq7) encodes a conserved mitochondrial enzyme that is necessary for UQ biosynthesis. We engineered conditional Mclk1 knockout models to study pathogenic effects of UQ deficiency and to assess potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of UQ deficiencies. We found that Mclk1 knockout cells are viable in the total absence of UQ. The UQ biosynthetic precursor DMQ9 accumulates in these cells and can sustain mitochondrial respiration, albeit inefficiently. We demonstrated that efficient rescue of the respiratory deficiency in UQ-deficient cells by UQ analogues is side chain length dependent, and that classical UQ analogues with alkyl side chains such as idebenone and decylUQ are inefficient in comparison with analogues with isoprenoid side chains. Furthermore, Vitamin K2, which has an isoprenoid side chain, and has been proposed to be a mitochondrial electron carrier, had no efficacy on UQ-deficient mouse cells. In our model with liver-specific loss of Mclk1, a large depletion of UQ in hepatocytes caused only a mild impairment of respiratory chain function and no gross abnormalities. In conjunction with previous findings, this surprisingly small effect of UQ depletion indicates a nonlinear dependence of mitochondrial respiratory capacity on UQ content. With this model, we also showed that diet-derived UQ10 is able to functionally rescue the electron transport deficit due to severe endogenous UQ deficiency in the liver, an organ capable of absorbing exogenous UQ. PMID:23847050

  7. Effects of cadmium on heart mitochondrial respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Kisling, G.M.; Kopp, S.J.; Paulson, D.J.; Tow, J.P.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the direct effect of cadmium on isolated heart mitochondrial respiration. Mitochondria were rapidly prepared by polytroning hearts from male Sprague-Dawley rats in a 0.25 M Sucrose, 4 mM Tris, 1 mM EGTA, 0.2% BSA buffer (pH 7.4), followed by a two-part differential centrifugation. Mitochondria were resuspended in this same Tris-sucrose-BSA buffer minus EGTA and mitochondrial respiration was assayed using a Clark oxygen electrode system at a concentration of 0.5 mg total mitochondrial protein/ml assay buffer. At 5 x 10/sup -6/ M cadmium, mitochondrial state 3 respiration (pyruvate plus malate) was reduced to a level 74.8% of the control value. A 50% reduction in state 3 respiratory rate was achieved at a cadmium concentration of 8.75 x 10/sup -6/ M. The respiratory control ratio did not change significantly but at higher cadmium concentrations (< greater than or equal to 1.25 x 10/sup -5/ M) the ADP/O ratio was increased. None of the cadmium concentrations tested, from 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -4/ M, demonstrated an uncoupling response. These data suggest that cadmium acts strictly as an inhibitor of heart mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. These results contrast those of earlier work involving liver mitochondria in which cadmium was reported to uncouple mitochondrial respiration.

  8. Metallothionein 2A affects the cell respiration by suppressing the expression of mitochondrial protein cytochrome c oxidase subunit II.

    PubMed

    Bragina, Olga; Gurjanova, Karina; Krishtal, Jekaterina; Kulp, Maria; Karro, Niina; Tõugu, Vello; Palumaa, Peep

    2015-06-01

    Metallothioneins (MT) are involved in a broad range of cellular processes and play a major role in protection of cells towards various stressors. Two functions of MTs, namely the maintaining of the homeostasis of transition metal ions and the redox balance, are directly linked to the functioning of mitochondria. Dyshomeostasis of MTs is often related with malfunctioning of mitochondria; however, the mechanism by which MTs affect the mitochondrial respiratory chain is still unknown. We demonstrated that overexpression of MT-2A in HEK cell line decreased the oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the cells. HEK cells overexpressing MT-2A demonstrated reduced oxygen consumption and lower cellular ATP levels. MT-2A did not affect the number of mitochondria, but reduced specifically the level of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II protein, which resulted in lower activity of the complex IV.

  9. Cisplatin cytotoxicity is dependent on mitochondrial respiration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Inapurapu, Santhi priya; Kudle, Karunakar Rao; Bodiga, Sreedhar; Bodiga, Vijaya Lakshmi

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): To understand the role of mitochondrial respiration in cisplatin sensitivity, we have employed wild-type and mitochondrial DNA depleted Rho0 yeast cells. Materials and Methods: Wild type and Rho0 yeast cultured in fermentable and non-fermentable sugar containing media, were studied for their sensitivity against cisplatin by monitoring growth curves, oxygen consumption, pH changes in cytosol/mitochondrial compartments, reactive oxygen species production and respiratory control ratio. Results: Wild-type yeast grown on glycerol exhibited heightened sensitivity to cisplatin than yeast grown on glucose. Cisplatin (100 μM), although significantly reduced the growth of wild- type cells, only slightly altered the growth rate of Rho0 cells. Cisplatin treatment decreased both pHcyt and pHmit to a similar extent without affecting the pH difference. Cisplatin dose-dependently increased the oxidative stress in wild-type, but not in respiration-deficient Rho0 strain. Cisplatin decreased the respiratory control ratio. Conclusion: These results suggest that cisplatin toxicity is influenced by the respiratory capacity of the cells and the intracellular oxidative burden. Although cisplatin per se slightly decreased the respiration of yeast cells grown in glucose, it did not disturb the mitochondrial chemiosmotic gradient. PMID:28133529

  10. Mitochondrial respiration in hearts of copper-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bode, A.M.; Saari, J.T. USDA/ARS, Grand Forks, ND )

    1991-03-11

    Morphological observations indicate that dietary copper deficiency causes structural damage of cardiac mitochondria. The purpose of this study was to determine whether mitochondrial function is impaired as well. Male, weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed diets deficient or sufficient in copper for 4 wks. Copper deficiency was verified by measurement of plasma (ND (CuD) vs 0.46 {plus minus} 0.15 {mu}g/ml (CuS)) and kidney copper. Mitochondria were isolated and P/O ratio, state 3 and state 4 respiration rate and acceptor control index (ACI) were determined using succinate or pyruvate/malate as substrate. Determinations were made polarographically at 30C in a reaction medium consisting of 0.25 M sucrose, 0.1 mM EDTA, 200 mM MgCl and 200 mM sodium phosphate buffer. State 3 respiration rate in mitochondria from CuD hearts was 30% lower than in CuS mitochondria when succinate was used as substrate and 28% lower when pyruvate/malate was used. Copper deficiency reduced state 4 respiration rate by 31% when succinate was used and 16% when pyruvate/malate was used. P/O ratio and ACI were not significantly affected by copper deficiency. The observed decreases in respiration rates are consistent with decreased cytochrome c oxidase activity shown by others to occur in mitochondria isolated from hearts of copper-deficient rats.

  11. Effect of Simvastatin, Coenzyme Q10, Resveratrol, Acetylcysteine and Acetylcarnitine on Mitochondrial Respiration.

    PubMed

    Fišar, Z; Hroudová, J; Singh, N; Kopřivová, A; Macečková, D

    2016-01-01

    Some therapeutic and/or adverse effects of drugs may be related to their effects on mitochondrial function. The effects of simvastatin, resveratrol, coenzyme Q10, acetylcysteine, and acetylcarnitine on Complex I-, Complex II-, or Complex IV-linked respiratory rate were determined in isolated brain mitochondria. The protective effects of these biologically active compounds on the calcium-induced decrease of the respiratory rate were also studied. We observed a significant inhibitory effect of simvastatin on mitochondrial respiration (IC50 = 24.0 μM for Complex I-linked respiration, IC50 = 31.3 μM for Complex II-linked respiration, and IC50 = 42.9 μM for Complex IV-linked respiration); the inhibitory effect of resveratrol was found at very high concentrations (IC50 = 162 μM for Complex I-linked respiration, IC50 = 564 μM for Complex II-linked respiration, and IC50 = 1454 μM for Complex IV-linked respiration). Concentrations required for effective simvastatin- or resveratrol-induced inhibition of mitochondrial respiration were found much higher than concentrations achieved under standard dosing of these drugs. Acetylcysteine and acetylcarnitine did not affect the oxygen consumption rate of mitochondria. Coenzyme Q10 induced an increase of Complex I-linked respiration. The increase of free calcium ions induced partial inhibition of the Complex I+II-linked mitochondrial respiration, and all tested drugs counteracted this inhibition. None of the tested drugs showed mitochondrial toxicity (characterized by respiratory rate inhibition) at drug concentrations achieved at therapeutic drug intake. Resveratrol, simvastatin, and acetylcarnitine had the greatest neuroprotective potential (characterized by protective effects against calcium-induced reduction of the respiratory rate).

  12. Mitochondrial respiration in blood platelets of depressive patients.

    PubMed

    Hroudová, Jana; Fišar, Zdeněk; Kitzlerová, Eva; Zvěřová, Martina; Raboch, Jiří

    2013-11-01

    Recent evidences include mitochondrial dysfunctions in pathophysiology of mood disorders. We examined association between depressive disorders and mitochondrial respiration using both intact and permeabilized blood platelets. In intact platelets, physiological respiration, maximal capacity of electron transport system and respiratory rate after complex I inhibition were decreased in depressive patients, who reached partial remission, compared to healthy controls. Respiratory rates were unchanged in several respiratory states in permeabilized platelets. Results indicate that changes in respiratory rate in intact platelets can be used as biological marker of depressive disorder. The hypothesis that decreased mitochondrial respiratory rate participate in pathophysiology of depression was supported.

  13. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and tissue respiration of pea leaves under clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brykov, Vasyl

    2016-07-01

    Respiration is essential for growth, maintenance, and carbon balance of all plant cells. Mitochondrial respiration in plants provides energy for biosynthesis, and its balance with photosynthesis determines the rate of plant biomass accumulation (production). Mitochondria are not only the energetic organelles in a cell but they play an essential regulatory role in many basic cellular processes. As plants adapt to real and simulated microgravity, it is very important to understand the state of mitochondria in these conditions. Disturbance of respiratory metabolism can significantly affect the productivity of plants in long-term space flights. We have established earlier that the rate of respiration in root apices of pea etiolated seedlings rose after 7 days of clinorotation. These data indicate the oxygen increased requirement by root apices under clinorotation, that confirms the necessity of sufficient substrate aeration in space greenhouses to provide normal respiratory metabolism and supply of energy for root growth. In etiolated seedlings, substrate supply of mitochondria occurs at the expense of the mobilization of cotyledon nutrients. A goal of our work was to study the ultrastructure and respiration of mitochondria in pea leaves after 12 days of clinorotation during (2 rpm/min). Plants grew at a light level of 180 μµmol m ^{-2} s ^{-1} PAR and a photoperiod of 16 h light/4 h dark. It was showed an essential increase in the mitochondrion area on 53% in palisade parenchyma cells at the sections. Such phenomenon can not be described as swelling of mitochondria, since enlarged mitochondria contained a more quantity of crista 1.76 times. In addition, the cristae total area per organelle also increased in comparison with that in control. An increase in a size of mitochondria in the experimental conditions is supposed to occur by a partial alteration of the chondriom. Thus, a size of 49% mitochondria in control was 0.1 - 0.3 μµm ^{2}, whereas only 26

  14. Betaine is a positive regulator of mitochondrial respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Icksoo

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • Betaine enhances cytochrome c oxidase activity and mitochondrial respiration. • Betaine increases mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular energy levels. • Betaine’s anti-tumorigenic effect might be due to a reversal of the Warburg effect. - Abstract: Betaine protects cells from environmental stress and serves as a methyl donor in several biochemical pathways. It reduces cardiovascular disease risk and protects liver cells from alcoholic liver damage and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Its pretreatment can rescue cells exposed to toxins such as rotenone, chloroform, and LiCl. Furthermore, it has been suggested that betaine can suppress cancer cell growth in vivo and in vitro. Mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes generate the mitochondrial membrane potential, which is essential to produce cellular energy, ATP. Reduced mitochondrial respiration and energy status have been found in many human pathological conditions including aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative disease. In this study we investigated whether betaine directly targets mitochondria. We show that betaine treatment leads to an upregulation of mitochondrial respiration and cytochrome c oxidase activity in H2.35 cells, the proposed rate limiting enzyme of ETC in vivo. Following treatment, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and cellular energy levels were elevated. We propose that the anti-proliferative effects of betaine on cancer cells might be due to enhanced mitochondrial function contributing to a reversal of the Warburg effect.

  15. Mitochondrial respiration regulates adipogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmin; Marsboom, Glenn; Toth, Peter T; Rehman, Jalees

    2013-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult multipotent stem cells which can be isolated from bone marrow, adipose tissue as well as other tissues and have the capacity to differentiate into a variety of mesenchymal cell types such as adipocytes, osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Differentiation of stem cells into mature cell types is guided by growth factors and hormones, but recent studies suggest that metabolic shifts occur during differentiation and can modulate the differentiation process. We therefore investigated mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial respiration and the mitochondrial membrane potential during adipogenic differentiation of human MSCs. In addition, we inhibited mitochondrial function to assess its effects on adipogenic differentiation. Our data show that mitochondrial biogenesis and oxygen consumption increase markedly during adipogenic differentiation, and that reducing mitochondrial respiration by hypoxia or by inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain significantly suppresses adipogenic differentiation. Furthermore, we used a novel approach to suppress mitochondrial activity using a specific siRNA-based knockdown of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), which also resulted in an inhibition of adipogenic differentiation. Taken together, our data demonstrates that increased mitochondrial activity is a prerequisite for MSC differentiation into adipocytes. These findings suggest that metabolic modulation of adult stem cells can maintain stem cell pluripotency or direct adult stem cell differentiation.

  16. Mitochondrial flash as a novel biomarker of mitochondrial respiration in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Guohua; Liu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Huiliang; Sheu, Shey-Shing

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration through electron transport chain (ETC) activity generates ATP and reactive oxygen species in eukaryotic cells. The modulation of mitochondrial respiration in vivo or under physiological conditions remains elusive largely due to the lack of appropriate approach to monitor ETC activity in a real-time manner. Here, we show that ETC-coupled mitochondrial flash is a novel biomarker for monitoring mitochondrial respiration under pathophysiological conditions in cultured adult cardiac myocyte and perfused beating heart. Through real-time confocal imaging, we follow the frequency of a transient bursting fluorescent signal, named mitochondrial flash, from individual mitochondria within intact cells expressing a mitochondrial matrix-targeted probe, mt-cpYFP (mitochondrial-circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein). This mt-cpYFP recorded mitochondrial flash has been shown to be composed of a major superoxide signal with a minor alkalization signal within the mitochondrial matrix. Through manipulating physiological substrates for mitochondrial respiration, we find a close coupling between flash frequency and the ETC electron flow, as measured by oxygen consumption rate in cardiac myocyte. Stimulating electron flow under physiological conditions increases flash frequency. On the other hand, partially block or slowdown electron flow by inhibiting the F0F1 ATPase, which represents a pathological condition, transiently increases then decreases flash frequency. Limiting electron entrance at complex I by knocking out Ndufs4, an assembling subunit of complex I, suppresses mitochondrial flash activity. These results suggest that mitochondrial electron flow can be monitored by real-time imaging of mitochondrial flash. The mitochondrial flash frequency could be used as a novel biomarker for mitochondrial respiration under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26276820

  17. Mitochondrial flash as a novel biomarker of mitochondrial respiration in the heart.

    PubMed

    Gong, Guohua; Liu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Huiliang; Sheu, Shey-Shing; Wang, Wang

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial respiration through electron transport chain (ETC) activity generates ATP and reactive oxygen species in eukaryotic cells. The modulation of mitochondrial respiration in vivo or under physiological conditions remains elusive largely due to the lack of appropriate approach to monitor ETC activity in a real-time manner. Here, we show that ETC-coupled mitochondrial flash is a novel biomarker for monitoring mitochondrial respiration under pathophysiological conditions in cultured adult cardiac myocyte and perfused beating heart. Through real-time confocal imaging, we follow the frequency of a transient bursting fluorescent signal, named mitochondrial flash, from individual mitochondria within intact cells expressing a mitochondrial matrix-targeted probe, mt-cpYFP (mitochondrial-circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein). This mt-cpYFP recorded mitochondrial flash has been shown to be composed of a major superoxide signal with a minor alkalization signal within the mitochondrial matrix. Through manipulating physiological substrates for mitochondrial respiration, we find a close coupling between flash frequency and the ETC electron flow, as measured by oxygen consumption rate in cardiac myocyte. Stimulating electron flow under physiological conditions increases flash frequency. On the other hand, partially block or slowdown electron flow by inhibiting the F0F1 ATPase, which represents a pathological condition, transiently increases then decreases flash frequency. Limiting electron entrance at complex I by knocking out Ndufs4, an assembling subunit of complex I, suppresses mitochondrial flash activity. These results suggest that mitochondrial electron flow can be monitored by real-time imaging of mitochondrial flash. The mitochondrial flash frequency could be used as a novel biomarker for mitochondrial respiration under physiological and pathological conditions.

  18. Mitochondrial respiration controls lysosomal function during inflammatory T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Dolores Ledesma, Maria; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4+ T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration-deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward pro-inflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD+ levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify novel strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:26299452

  19. Mitochondrial Respiration Controls Lysosomal Function during Inflammatory T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2015-09-01

    The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4(+) T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation, and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward proinflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD(+) levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases.

  20. Betaine is a positive regulator of mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Icksoo

    2015-01-09

    Betaine protects cells from environmental stress and serves as a methyl donor in several biochemical pathways. It reduces cardiovascular disease risk and protects liver cells from alcoholic liver damage and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Its pretreatment can rescue cells exposed to toxins such as rotenone, chloroform, and LiCl. Furthermore, it has been suggested that betaine can suppress cancer cell growth in vivo and in vitro. Mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes generate the mitochondrial membrane potential, which is essential to produce cellular energy, ATP. Reduced mitochondrial respiration and energy status have been found in many human pathological conditions including aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative disease. In this study we investigated whether betaine directly targets mitochondria. We show that betaine treatment leads to an upregulation of mitochondrial respiration and cytochrome c oxidase activity in H2.35 cells, the proposed rate limiting enzyme of ETC in vivo. Following treatment, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and cellular energy levels were elevated. We propose that the anti-proliferative effects of betaine on cancer cells might be due to enhanced mitochondrial function contributing to a reversal of the Warburg effect.

  1. Respiration and Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Germinating Embryos of Maize 1

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Brambl, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Function of the cyanide-sensitive mitochondrial electron transport system was required for germination of the Zea mays embryo. Respiration of the standard electron transport system (rather than the alternate oxidase) began immediately upon initiation of imbibition. This respiration depended upon cytochrome c oxidase and ATPase that were conserved in an active form in the quiescent embryo rather than upon newly synthesized or assembled enzyme complexes. Immunoprecipitation of radiolabeled subunits of these enzymes showed that the initiation of mitochondrial biogenetic activities, including de novo synthesis of nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded enzyme subunit peptides, was strongly induced after 6 hours of embryo germination. Undetectable or very low levels of transcripts for subunits 1 and 2 of the F1-ATPase and subunit 2 of cytochrome c oxidase were present in the quiescent embryo; these transcripts accumulated rapidly between 6 and 12 hours of germination and their translation products were rapidly synthesized between 6 and 24 hours. An exception was the gene for subunit 9 of the ATPase; transcripts of this mitochondrial gene were abundant in the dry embryo and rapidly accumulated further upon initiation of imbibition; they were translated actively during the first 6 hours. We isolated and sequenced a near full-length cDNA for subunit 2 (beta) of the F1-ATPase, and we compared the deduced protein sequence with related sequences of other organisms. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:16667450

  2. The role of mitochondrial respiration in physiological and evolutionary adaptation.

    PubMed

    Das, Jayatri

    2006-09-01

    Aerobic mitochondria serve as the power sources of eukaryotes by producing ATP through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). The enzymes involved in OXPHOS are multisubunit complexes encoded by both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Thus, regulation of respiration is necessarily a highly coordinated process that must organize production, assembly and function of mitochondria to meet an organism's energetic needs. Here I review the role of OXPHOS in metabolic adaptation and diversification of higher animals. On a physiological timescale, endocrine-initiated signaling pathways allow organisms to modulate respiratory enzyme concentration and function under changing environmental conditions. On an evolutionary timescale, mitochondrial enzymes are targets of natural selection, balancing cytonuclear coevolutionary constraints against physiological innovation. By synthesizing our knowledge of biochemistry, physiology and evolution of respiratory regulation, I propose that we can now explore questions at the interface of these fields, from molecular translation of environmental cues to selection on mitochondrial haplotype variation.

  3. Quadriceps exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the potential role of altered skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Jayson R; Trinity, Joel D; Layec, Gwenael; Garten, Ryan S; Park, Song-Young; Rossman, Matthew J; Larsen, Steen; Dela, Flemming; Richardson, Russell S

    2015-10-15

    This study sought to determine if qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration, associated with decreased mitochondrial efficiency, contribute to exercise intolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Using permeabilized muscle fibers from the vastus lateralis of 13 patients with COPD and 12 healthy controls, complex I (CI) and complex II (CII)-driven State 3 mitochondrial respiration were measured separately (State 3:CI and State 3:CII) and in combination (State 3:CI+CII). State 2 respiration was also measured. Exercise tolerance was assessed by knee extensor exercise (KE) time to fatigue. Per milligram of muscle, State 3:CI+CII and State 3:CI were reduced in COPD (P < 0.05), while State 3:CII and State 2 were not different between groups. To determine if this altered pattern of respiration represented qualitative changes in mitochondrial function, respiration states were examined as percentages of peak respiration (State 3:CI+CII), which revealed altered contributions from State 3:CI (Con 83.7 ± 3.4, COPD 72.1 ± 2.4%Peak, P < 0.05) and State 3:CII (Con 64.9 ± 3.2, COPD 79.5 ± 3.0%Peak, P < 0.05) respiration, but not State 2 respiration in COPD. Importantly, a diminished contribution of CI-driven respiration relative to the metabolically less-efficient CII-driven respiration (CI/CII) was also observed in COPD (Con 1.28 ± 0.09, COPD 0.81 ± 0.05, P < 0.05), which was related to exercise tolerance of the patients (r = 0.64, P < 0.05). Overall, this study indicates that COPD is associated with qualitative alterations in skeletal muscle mitochondria that affect the contribution of CI and CII-driven respiration, which potentially contributes to the exercise intolerance associated with this disease.

  4. Imeglimin prevents human endothelial cell death by inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Detaille, D; Vial, G; Borel, A-L; Cottet-Rouselle, C; Hallakou-Bozec, S; Bolze, S; Fouqueray, P; Fontaine, E

    2016-01-01

    Imeglimin is the first in a new class of oral glucose-lowering agents, having recently completed its phase 2b trial. As Imeglimin did show a full prevention of β-cell apoptosis, and since angiopathy represents a major complication of diabetes, we studied Imeglimin protective effects on hyperglycemia-induced death of human endothelial cells (HMEC-1). These cells were incubated in several oxidative stress environments (exposure to high glucose and oxidizing agent tert-butylhydroperoxide) which led to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) opening, cytochrome c release and cell death. These events were fully prevented by Imeglimin treatment. This protective effect on cell death occurred without any effect on oxygen consumption rate, on lactate production and on cytosolic redox or phosphate potentials. Imeglimin also dramatically decreased reactive oxygen species production, inhibiting specifically reverse electron transfer through complex I. We conclude that Imeglimin prevents hyperglycemia-induced cell death in HMEC-1 through inhibition of PTP opening without inhibiting mitochondrial respiration nor affecting cellular energy status. Considering the high prevalence of macrovascular and microvascular complications in type 2 diabetic subjects, these results together suggest a potential benefit of Imeglimin in diabetic angiopathy. PMID:27551496

  5. Fluoride decreased the sperm ATP of mice through inhabiting mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zilong; Zhang, Wen; Xue, Xingchen; Zhang, Yuliang; Niu, Ruiyan; Li, Xuying; Li, Baojun; Wang, Xiaowen; Wang, Jundong

    2016-02-01

    Fluoride-induced low sperm motility was observed in accumulated investigations. However, the effect of fluoride exposure on ATP generation which is essential to sperm motility remains to be elucidated. In this study, 120 healthy male mice were orally administrated with 0, 25, 50, and 100 mg L(-1) NaF for 90 d. Results showed that compared with controls, fluoride ingestion significantly reduced sperm count, survival, as well as mobility and total ATP level in sperm untreated with carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) or pyruvate, which was used to establish glycolysis or mitochondrial respiration model, respectively. Data further revealed that sperm mobility and ATP level under mitochondrial respiration condition were significantly suppressed, while no statistical difference occurred in the model of glycolysis, indicating ATP derived from mitochondria was affected. Moreover, mRNA expressions of mitochondrial cytochrome b (mt-Cytb) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 (mt-COX2), two important molecules in mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), were down-regulated in all fluoride treatment groups. Mitochondria in sperm of mice exposed to 100 mg L(-1) NaF appeared to be irregular and vacuolated. These findings suggested that decreased sperm motility induced by fluoride may result from low ATP generation due to the disturbed ETC in sperm mitochondrial.

  6. Dynamics of enhanced mitochondrial respiration in female compared with male rat cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Rutkai, Ibolya; Dutta, Somhrita; Katakam, Prasad V; Busija, David W

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial respiration has never been directly examined in intact cerebral arteries. We tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial energetics of large cerebral arteries ex vivo are sex dependent. The Seahorse XFe24 analyzer was used to examine mitochondrial respiration in isolated cerebral arteries from adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. We examined the role of nitric oxide (NO) on mitochondrial respiration under basal conditions, using N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, and following pharmacological challenge using diazoxide (DZ), and also determined levels of mitochondrial and nonmitochondrial proteins using Western blot, and vascular diameter responses to DZ. The components of mitochondrial respiration including basal respiration, ATP production, proton leak, maximal respiration, and spare respiratory capacity were elevated in females compared with males, but increased in both male and female arteries in the presence of the NOS inhibitor. Although acute DZ treatment had little effect on mitochondrial respiration of male arteries, it decreased the respiration in female arteries. Levels of mitochondrial proteins in Complexes I-V and the voltage-dependent anion channel protein were elevated in female compared with male cerebral arteries. The DZ-induced vasodilation was greater in females than in males. Our findings show that substantial sex differences in mitochondrial respiratory dynamics exist in large cerebral arteries and may provide the mechanistic basis for observations that the female cerebral vasculature is more adaptable after injury.

  7. The stimulation of the mitochondrial respiration by citrulline synthesis.

    PubMed

    Letko, G; Markefski, M; Bohnensack, R

    1979-01-01

    1. The influence of ammonia and ornithine on the oxygen uptake and the formation of citrulline was investigated with isolated rat liver mitochondria. The experiments were performed in a cytosol-like saline medium at 38 degrees C. 2. Under these conditions an increase of the respiration rate by ammonia and ornithine was observed, but a small response to external ADP, only. The missing stimulation by ADP was due to a partial inhibition of the respiratory chain by traces of zinc (approximately 1 microM) present in the medium. This inhibition was only detected at low concentrations of mitochondria. 3. For activation of respiration by ammonia plus ornithine two different processes were responsible: (i) chelation of the inhibiting zinc by ornithine, which could be prevented by EDTA; (ii) ADP production in the matrix space during formation of carbamoyl phosphate, which could be prevented by oligomycin but not by carboxyatractyloside. 4. This stimulus of the carbamoyl phosphate formation and of the equivalent citrulline synthesis on the mitochondrial respiration ran to 12% of that increase caused by phosphorylation of external ADP. The maximum rate of citrulline formation was limited by the activity of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase. 5. Added ADP suppresses the production of citrulline probably by the exchange of extramitochondrial ADP versus intramitochondrial ATP. The data suggest a common adenine nucleotide pool delivering ATP to the adenine nucleotide translocase as well as to the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase.

  8. Tributyltin (TBT) and mitochondrial respiration in mussel digestive gland.

    PubMed

    Nesci, Salvatore; Ventrella, Vittoria; Trombetti, Fabiana; Pirini, Maurizio; Pagliarani, Alessandra

    2011-06-01

    The toxicity of organotins and especially tri-n-butyltin (TBT) on mitochondria is well known. However as far as we are aware, effects on mitochondrial respiration are unexplored in mollusks. In this work mitochondria isolated from the digestive gland of Mytilus galloprovincialis and susceptive to the classical respiratory chain inhibitors, were assayed in the presence of micromolar TBT concentrations to investigate mitochondrial respiratory activities. Intact and freeze-thawed mitochondria were used. TBT significantly inhibited oxygen consumption in the presence of glutamate/malate or succinate as substrates. Conversely cytochrome c oxidase activity (complex IV), assayed both polarographically and spectrophotometrically, was unaffected. The addition of 1,4-dithioerythritol (DTE) decreased the TBT-driven inhibition of complexes I and III. The TBT capability of covalent binding to thiol groups of mitochondrial proteins in a dose-dependent manner was confirmed by the aid of Ellman's reagent. Data strongly suggests that TBT may prevent the electron transfer from complexes I and III to downhill respiratory chain complexes by binding to critical SH residues.

  9. Thyrsiferol Inhibits Mitochondrial Respiration and HIF-1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Fakhri; Falkenberg, Miriam; Ioannou, Efstathia; Roussis, Vassilios; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G.

    2010-01-01

    The cytotoxic marine red algal metabolite thyrsiferol (1) was found to inhibit hypoxia-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activation in T47D human breast tumor cells (66% inhibition at 3 μM). Compound 1 also suppressed hypoxic induction of HIF-1 target genes (VEGF, GLUT-1) at the mRNA level, and displayed tumor cell line-selective time-dependent inhibition of cell viability/proliferation. Mechanistic studies revealed that 1 selectively suppressed mitochondrial respiration at Complex I (IC50 3 μM). Thyrsiferol represents a prototypical, structurally unique electron transport chain inhibitor. The apparent rotenone-like activity may contribute to the observed cytotoxicity of 1 and play an important role in Laurencia chemical defense. PMID:21785662

  10. Insulin resistance in HIV-infected youth is associated with decreased mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Jody K.; Miller, Tracie L.; Wang, Jiajia; Jacobson, Denise L.; Geffner, Mitchell E.; Van Dyke, Russell B.; Gerschenson, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To identify relationships between insulin resistance (IR) and mitochondrial respiration in perinatally HIV-infected youth. Design: Case–control study. Methods: Mitochondrial respiration was assessed in perinatally HIV-infected youth in Tanner stages 2–5, 25 youth with IR (IR+) and 50 without IR (IR−) who were enrolled in the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study. IR was defined as a homeostatic model of assessment for IR value at least 4.0. A novel, high-throughput oximetry method was used to evaluate cellular respiration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Unadjusted and adjusted differences in mitochondrial respiration markers between IR+ and IR− were evaluated, as were correlations between mitochondrial respiration markers and biochemical measurements. Results: IR+ and IR− youth were similar on age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Mean age was 16.5 and 15.6 years in IR+ and IR−, respectively. The IR+ group had significantly higher mean BMI and metabolic analytes (fasting glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, and venous lactate and pyruvate) compared with the IR−. Mitochondrial respiration markers were, on average, lower in the IR+ compared with IR−, including basal respiration (417.5 vs. 597.5 pmol, P = 0.074), ATP production (11 513 vs. 15 202 pmol, P = 0.078), proton leak (584.6 vs. 790.0 pmol, P = 0.033), maximal respiration (1815 vs. 2399 pmol, P = 0.025), and spare respiration capacity (1162 vs. 2017 pmol, P = 0.032). Nonmitochondrial respiration did not differ by IR status. The results did not change when adjusted for age. Conclusion: HIV-infected youth with IR have lower mitochondrial respiration markers when compared to youth without IR. Disordered mitochondrial respiration may be a potential mechanism for IR in this population. PMID:27755108

  11. In Vitro Effects of Cognitives and Nootropics on Mitochondrial Respiration and Monoamine Oxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namrata; Hroudová, Jana; Fišar, Zdeněk

    2016-09-23

    Impairment of mitochondrial metabolism, particularly the electron transport chain (ETC), as well as increased oxidative stress might play a significant role in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Some effects of drugs used for symptomatic AD treatment may be related to their direct action on mitochondrial function. In vitro effects of pharmacologically different cognitives (galantamine, donepezil, rivastigmine, 7-MEOTA, memantine) and nootropic drugs (latrepirdine, piracetam) were investigated on selected mitochondrial parameters: activities of ETC complexes I, II + III, and IV, citrate synthase, monoamine oxidase (MAO), oxygen consumption rate, and hydrogen peroxide production of pig brain mitochondria. Complex I activity was decreased by galantamine, donepezil, and memantine; complex II + III activity was increased by galantamine. None of the tested drugs caused significant changes in the rate of mitochondrial oxygen consumption, even at high concentrations. Except galantamine, all tested drugs were selective MAO-A inhibitors. Latrepirdine, donepezil, and 7-MEOTA were found to be the most potent MAO-A inhibitors. Succinate-induced mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide production was not significantly affected by the drugs tested. The direct effect of cognitives and nootropics used in the treatment of AD on mitochondrial respiration is relatively small. The safest drugs in terms of disturbing mitochondrial function appear to be piracetam and rivastigmine. The MAO-A inhibition by cognitives and nootropics may also participate in mitochondrial neuroprotection. The results support the future research aimed at measuring the effects of currently used drugs or newly synthesized drugs on mitochondrial functioning in order to understand their mechanism of action.

  12. Metabolic Characterization of Intact Cells Reveals Intracellular Amyloid Beta but Not Its Precursor Protein to Reduce Mitochondrial Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Patrick M.; von Einem, Bjoern; Walther, Paul; Calzia, Enrico; von Arnim, Christine A. F.

    2016-01-01

    One hallmark of Alzheimer´s disease are senile plaques consisting of amyloid beta (Aβ), which derives from the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer´s disease and both Aβ and APP have been reported to affect mitochondrial function in isolated systems. However, in intact cells, considering a physiological localization of APP and Aβ, it is pending what triggers the mitochondrial defect. Thus, the aim of this study was to dissect the impact of APP versus Aβ in inducing mitochondrial alterations with respect to their subcellular localization. We performed an overexpression of APP or beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), increasing APP and Aβ levels or Aβ alone, respectively. Conducting a comprehensive metabolic characterization we demonstrate that only APP overexpression reduced mitochondrial respiration, despite lower extracellular Aβ levels compared to BACE overexpression. Surprisingly, this could be rescued by a gamma secretase inhibitor, oppositionally indicating an Aβ-mediated mitochondrial toxicity. Analyzing Aβ localization revealed that intracellular levels of Aβ and an increased spatial association of APP/Aβ with mitochondria are associated with reduced mitochondrial respiration. Thus, our data provide marked evidence for a prominent role of intracellular Aβ accumulation in Alzheimer´s disease associated mitochondrial dysfunction. Thereby it highlights the importance of the localization of APP processing and intracellular transport as a decisive factor for mitochondrial function, linking two prominent hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28005987

  13. Mitochondrial respiration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells correlates with depressive subsymptoms and severity of major depression.

    PubMed

    Karabatsiakis, A; Böck, C; Salinas-Manrique, J; Kolassa, S; Calzia, E; Dietrich, D E; Kolassa, I-T

    2014-06-10

    Mitochondrial dysfunction might have a central role in the pathophysiology of depression. Phenotypically, depression is characterized by lack of energy, concentration problems and fatigue. These symptoms might be partially explained by reduced availability of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a consequence of impaired mitochondrial functioning. This study investigated mitochondrial respiration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), an established model to investigate the pathophysiology of depression. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed in intact PBMCs in 22 individuals with a diagnosis of major depression (MD) compared with 22 healthy age-matched controls using high-resolution respirometry. Individuals with MD showed significantly impaired mitochondrial functioning: routine and uncoupled respiration as well as spare respiratory capacity, coupling efficiency and ATP turnover-related respiration were significantly lower in the MD compared with the control group. Furthermore, mitochondrial respiration was significantly negatively correlated with the severity of depressive symptoms, in particular, with loss of energy, difficulties concentrating and fatigue. The results suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the biomolecular pathophysiology of depressive symptoms. The decreased immune capability observed in MD leading to a higher risk of comorbidities could be attributable to impaired energy supply due to mitochondrial dysfunction. Thus mitochondrial respiration in PBMCs and its functional consequences might be an interesting target for new therapeutical approaches in the treatment of MD and immune-related comorbidities.

  14. Pig Brain Mitochondria as a Biological Model for Study of Mitochondrial Respiration.

    PubMed

    Fišar, Z; Hroudová, J

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation is a key process of intracellular energy transfer by which mitochondria produce ATP. Isolated mitochondria serve as a biological model for understanding the mitochondrial respiration control, effects of various biologically active substances, and pathophysiology of mitochondrial diseases. The aim of our study was to evaluate pig brain mitochondria as a proper biological model for investigation of activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Oxygen consumption rates of isolated pig brain mitochondria were measured using high-resolution respirometry. Mitochondrial respiration of crude mitochondrial fraction, mitochondria purified in sucrose gradient, and mitochondria purified in Percoll gradient were assayed as a function of storage time. Oxygen flux and various mitochondrial respiratory control ratios were not changed within two days of mitochondria storage on ice. Leak respiration was found higher and Complex I-linked respiration lower in purified mitochondria compared to the crude mitochondrial fraction. Damage to both outer and inner mitochondrial membrane caused by the isolation procedure was the greatest after purification in a sucrose gradient. We confirmed that pig brain mitochondria can serve as a biological model for investigation of mitochondrial respiration. The advantage of this biological model is the stability of respiratory parameters for more than 48 h and the possibility to isolate large amounts of mitochondria from specific brain areas without the need to kill laboratory animals. We suggest the use of high-resolution respirometry of pig brain mitochondria for research of the neuroprotective effects and/or mitochondrial toxicity of new medical drugs.

  15. Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase lowers leaf respiration and alters photorespiration and plant growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tomaz, Tiago; Bagard, Matthieu; Pracharoenwattana, Itsara; Lindén, Pernilla; Lee, Chun Pong; Carroll, Adam J; Ströher, Elke; Smith, Steven M; Gardeström, Per; Millar, A Harvey

    2010-11-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) catalyzes a reversible NAD(+)-dependent-dehydrogenase reaction involved in central metabolism and redox homeostasis between organelle compartments. To explore the role of mitochondrial MDH (mMDH) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), knockout single and double mutants for the highly expressed mMDH1 and lower expressed mMDH2 isoforms were constructed and analyzed. A mmdh1mmdh2 mutant has no detectable mMDH activity but is viable, albeit small and slow growing. Quantitative proteome analysis of mitochondria shows changes in other mitochondrial NAD-linked dehydrogenases, indicating a reorganization of such enzymes in the mitochondrial matrix. The slow-growing mmdh1mmdh2 mutant has elevated leaf respiration rate in the dark and light, without loss of photosynthetic capacity, suggesting that mMDH normally uses NADH to reduce oxaloacetate to malate, which is then exported to the cytosol, rather than to drive mitochondrial respiration. Increased respiratory rate in leaves can account in part for the low net CO(2) assimilation and slow growth rate of mmdh1mmdh2. Loss of mMDH also affects photorespiration, as evidenced by a lower postillumination burst, alterations in CO(2) assimilation/intercellular CO(2) curves at low CO(2), and the light-dependent elevated concentration of photorespiratory metabolites. Complementation of mmdh1mmdh2 with an mMDH cDNA recovered mMDH activity, suppressed respiratory rate, ameliorated changes to photorespiration, and increased plant growth. A previously established inverse correlation between mMDH and ascorbate content in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) has been consolidated in Arabidopsis and may potentially be linked to decreased galactonolactone dehydrogenase content in mitochondria in the mutant. Overall, a central yet complex role for mMDH emerges in the partitioning of carbon and energy in leaves, providing new directions for bioengineering of plant growth rate and a new insight into the molecular mechanisms

  16. The role of p38 in mitochondrial respiration in male and female mice.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xiaohua; Wen, Yi; Metzger, Daniel; Jung, Marianna

    2013-06-07

    p38 is a mitogen-activated protein kinase and mediates cell growth, cell differentiation, and synaptic plasticity. The aim of this study is to determine the extent to which p38 plays a role in maintaining mitochondrial respiration in male and female mice under a normal condition. To achieve this aim, we have generated transgenic mice that lack p38 in cerebellar Purkinje neurons by crossing Pcp2 (Purkinje cell protein 2)-Cre mice with p38(loxP/loxP) mice. Mitochondria from cerebellum were then isolated from the transgenic and wild-type mice to measure mitochondrial respiration using XF24 respirometer. The mRNA and protein expression of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in cerebellum were also measured using RT-PCR and immunoblot methods. Separately, HT22 cells were used to determine the involvement of 17β-estradiol (E2) and COX in mitochondrial respiration. The genetic knockout of p38 in Purkinje neurons suppressed the mitochondrial respiration only in male mice and increased COX expression only in female mice. The inhibition of COX by sodium azide (SA) sharply suppressed mitochondrial respiration of HT22 cells in a manner that was protected by E2. These data suggest that p38 is required for the mitochondrial respiration of male mice. When p38 is below a normal level, females may maintain mitochondrial respiration through COX up-regulation.

  17. Mitochondrial aerobic respiration is activated during hair follicle stem cell differentiation, and its dysfunction retards hair regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yan; Luo, Binping; Deng, Zhili; Wang, Ben; Liu, Fangfen; Li, Jinmao; Shi, Wei; Xie, Hongfu; Hu, Xingwang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Emerging research revealed the essential role of mitochondria in regulating stem/progenitor cell differentiation of neural progenitor cells, mesenchymal stem cells and other stem cells through reactive oxygen species (ROS), Notch or other signaling pathway. Inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis results in hair loss upon injury. However, alteration of mitochondrial morphology and metabolic function during hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) differentiation and how they affect hair regeneration has not been elaborated upon. Methods. We compared the difference in mitochondrial morphology and activity between telogen bulge cells and anagen matrix cells. Expression levels of mitochondrial ROS and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) were measured to evaluate redox balance. In addition, the level of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) were estimated to present the change in energetic metabolism during differentiation. To explore the effect of the mitochondrial metabolism on regulating hair regeneration, hair growth was observed after application of a mitochondrial respiratory inhibitor upon hair plucking. Results. During HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria became elongated with more abundant organized cristae and showed higher activity in differentiated cells. SOD2 was enhanced for redox balance with relatively stable ROS levels in differentiated cells. PDK increased in HFSCs while differentiated cells showed enhanced PDH, indicating that respiration switched from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation during differentiation. Inhibiting mitochondrial respiration in differentiated hair follicle cells upon hair plucking repressed hair regeneration in vivo. Conclusions. Upon HFSCs differentiation, mitochondria are elongated with more abundant cristae and show higher activity, accompanying with activated aerobic respiration in differentiated cells for higher energy supply. Also, dysfunction of mitochondrial respiration delays hair

  18. Mitochondrial respiration links TOR Complex 2 signaling to calcium regulation and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Vlahakis, Ariadne; Lopez Muniozguren, Nerea; Powers, Ted

    2017-03-21

    The Target of Rapamycin (TOR) kinase is a conserved regulator of cell growth and functions within 2 different protein complexes, TORC1 and TORC2, where TORC2 positively controls macroautophagy/autophagy during amino acid starvation. Under these conditions, TORC2 signaling inhibits the activity of the calcium-regulated phosphatase calcineurin and promotes the general amino acid control (GAAC) response and autophagy. Here we demonstrate that TORC2 regulates calcineurin by controlling the respiratory activity of mitochondria. In particular, we find that mitochondrial oxidative stress affects the calcium channel regulatory protein Mid1, which we show is an essential upstream activator of calcineurin. Thus, these findings describe a novel regulation for autophagy that involves TORC2 signaling, mitochondrial respiration, and calcium homeostasis.

  19. Effect of the antitumoral alkylating agent 3-bromopyruvate on mitochondrial respiration: role of mitochondrially bound hexokinase.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Ferreira, Clara; da Silva, Ana Paula Pereira; Galina, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    The alkylating agent 3-Bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) has been used as an anti-tumoral drug due to its anti-proliferative property in hepatomas cells. This propriety is believed to disturb glycolysis and respiration, which leads to a decreased rate of ATP synthesis. In this study, we evaluated the effects of the alkylating agent 3-BrPA on the respiratory states and the metabolic steps of the mitochondria of mice liver, brain and in human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2. The mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)), O(2) consumption and dehydrogenase activities were rapidly dissipated/or inhibited by 3-BrPA in respiration medium containing ADP and succinate as respiratory substrate. 3-BrPA inhibition was reverted by reduced glutathione (GSH). Respiration induced by yeast soluble hexokinase (HK) was rapidly inhibited by 3-BrPA. Similar results were observed using mice brain mitochondria that present HK naturally bound to the outer mitochondrial membrane. When the adenine nucleotide transporter (ANT) was blocked by the carboxyatractiloside, the 3-BrPA effect was significantly delayed. In permeabilized human hepatoma HepG2 cells that present HK type II bound to mitochondria (mt-HK II), the inhibiting effect occurred faster when the endogenous HK activity was activated by 2-deoxyglucose (2-DOG). Inhibition of mt-HK II by glucose-6-phosphate retards the mitochondria to react with 3-BrPA. The HK activities recovered in HepG2 cells treated or not with 3-BrPA were practically the same. These results suggest that mitochondrially bound HK supporting the ADP/ATP exchange activity levels facilitates the 3-BrPA inhibition reaction in tumors mitochondria by a proton motive force-dependent dynamic equilibrium between sensitive and less sensitive SDH in the electron transport system.

  20. Is cell aging caused by respiration-dependent injury to the mitochondrial genome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, J. E.; Yengoyan, L. S.; Miquel, J.; Cottrell, S. F.; Economos, A. C.

    1982-01-01

    Though intrinsic mitochondrial aging has been considered before as a possible cause of cellular senescence, the mechanisms of such mitochondrial aging have remained obscure. In this article, the hypothesis of free-radical-induced inhibition of mitochondrial replenishment in fixed postmitotic cells is expanded. It is maintained that the respiration-dependent production of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals may not be fully counteracted, leading to a continuous production of lipoperoxides and malonaldehyde in actively respiring mitochondria. These compounds, in turn, can easily react with the mitochondrial DNA which is in close spatial relationship with the inner mitochondrial membrane, producing an injury that the mitochondria may be unable to counteract because of their apparent lack of adequate repair mechanisms. Mitochondrial division may thus be inhibited leading to age-related reduction of mitochondrial numbers, a deficit in energy production with a concomitant decrease in protein synthesis, deterioration of physiological performance, and, therefore, of organismic performance.

  1. Impaired ALDH2 activity decreases the mitochondrial respiration in H9C2 cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Mali, Vishal R; Deshpande, Mandar; Pan, Guodong; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Palaniyandi, Suresh S

    2016-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated reactive aldehydes induce cellular stress. In cardiovascular diseases such as ischemia-reperfusion injury, lipid-peroxidation derived reactive aldehydes such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4HNE) are known to contribute to the pathogenesis. 4HNE is involved in ROS formation, abnormal calcium handling and more importantly defective mitochondrial respiration. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) superfamily contains NAD(P)(+)-dependent isozymes which can detoxify endogenous and exogenous aldehydes into non-toxic carboxylic acids. Therefore we hypothesize that 4HNE afflicts mitochondrial respiration and leads to cell death by impairing ALDH2 activity in cultured H9C2 cardiomyocyte cell lines. H9C2 cardiomyocytes were treated with 25, 50 and 75 μM 4HNE and its vehicle, ethanol as well as 25, 50 and 75 μM disulfiram (DSF), an inhibitor of ALDH2 and its vehicle (DMSO) for 4 h. 4HNE significantly decreased ALDH2 activity, ALDH2 protein levels, mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial respiratory reserve capacity, and increased 4HNE adduct formation and cell death in cultured H9C2 cardiomyocytes. ALDH2 inhibition by DSF and ALDH2 siRNA attenuated ALDH2 activity besides reducing ALDH2 levels, mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial respiratory reserve capacity and increased cell death. Our results indicate that ALDH2 impairment can lead to poor mitochondrial respiration and increased cell death in cultured H9C2 cardiomyocytes.

  2. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration: are all mitochondria created equal?

    PubMed

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Trinity, Joel D; Hyngstrom, John R; Garten, Ryan S; Diakos, Nikolaos A; Ives, Stephen J; Dela, Flemming; Larsen, Steen; Drakos, Stavros; Richardson, Russell S

    2014-08-01

    Unlike cardiac and skeletal muscle, little is known about vascular smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration. Therefore, the present study examined mitochondrial respiratory rates in smooth muscle of healthy human feed arteries and compared with that of healthy cardiac and skeletal muscles. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscles were harvested from a total of 22 subjects (53 ± 6 yr), and mitochondrial respiration was assessed in permeabilized fibers. Complex I + II, state 3 respiration, an index of oxidative phosphorylation capacity, fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (54 ± 1, 39 ± 4, and 15 ± 1 pmol·s(-1)·mg(-1), P < 0.05, respectively). Citrate synthase (CS) activity, an index of mitochondrial density, also fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (222 ± 13, 115 ± 2, and 48 ± 2 μmol·g(-1)·min(-1), P < 0.05, respectively). Thus, when respiration rates were normalized by CS (respiration per mitochondrial content), oxidative phosphorylation capacity was no longer different between the three muscle types. Interestingly, complex I state 2 normalized for CS activity, an index of nonphosphorylating respiration per mitochondrial content, increased progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles, such that the respiratory control ratio, state 3/state 2 respiration, fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (5.3 ± 0.7, 3.2 ± 0.4, and 1.6 ± 0.3 pmol·s(-1)·mg(-1), P < 0.05, respectively). Thus, although oxidative phosphorylation capacity per mitochondrial content in cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscles suggest all mitochondria are created equal, the contrasting respiratory control ratio and nonphosphorylating respiration highlight the existence of intrinsic functional differences between these muscle mitochondria. This likely influences the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation and could potentially alter ROS production.

  3. Essential role of Drosophila black-pearl is mediated by its effects on mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Soumit; Short, Mary K.; Stanley, E. Richard; Jubinsky, Paul T.

    2012-01-01

    Black-pearl (Blp) is a highly conserved, essential inner-mitochondrial membrane protein. The yeast Blp homologue, Magmas/Pam16, is required for mitochondrial protein transport, growth, and survival. Our purpose was to determine the role of Drosophila Blp in mitochondrial function, cell survival, and proliferation. To this end, we performed mitotic recombination in Drosophila melanogaster, RNAi-mediated knockdown, MitoTracker staining, measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS), flow cytometry, electron transport chain complex assays, and hemocyte isolation from Drosophila larvae. Proliferation-defective, Blp-deficient Drosophila Schneider cells exhibited mitochondrial membrane depolarization, a 60% decrease in ATP levels, increased amounts of ROS (3.5-fold), cell cycle arrest, and activation of autophagy that were associated with a selective 65% reduction of cytochrome c oxidase activity. N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) rescued Blp-RNAi-treated cells from cell cycle arrest, indicating that increased production of ROS is the primary cause of the proliferation and survival defects in Blp-depleted cells. blp hypomorph larvae had a 35% decreased number of plasmatocytes with a 45% reduced active mitochondrial staining and their viability was increased 2-fold by administration of NAC, which blocked melanotic lesions. Loss of Blp decreases cytochrome c oxidase activity and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation, causing ROS production, which selectively affects mitochondria-rich plasmatocyte survival and function, leading to melanotic lesions in Blp-deficient flies.—Roy, S., Short, M. K., Stanley, E. R., Jubinsky, P. T. Essential role of Drosophila black-pearl is mediated by its effects on mitochondrial respiration. PMID:22700875

  4. Nek5 interacts with mitochondrial proteins and interferes negatively in mitochondrial mediated cell death and respiration.

    PubMed

    Melo Hanchuk, Talita D; Papa, Priscila Ferreira; La Guardia, Paolo G; Vercesi, Anibal E; Kobarg, Jörg

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria are involved in energy supply, signaling, cell death and cellular differentiation and have been implicated in several human diseases. Neks (NIMA-related kinases) represent a family of mammal protein kinases that play essential roles in cell-cycle progression, but other functions have recently been related. A yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screen was performed to identify and characterize Nek5 interaction partners and the mitochondrial proteins Cox11, MTX-2 and BCLAF1 were retrieved. Apoptosis assay showed protective effects of stable hNek5 expression from Hek293-T's cell death after thapsigargin treatment (2 μM). Nek5 silenced cells as well as cells expressing a "kinase dead" version of Nek5, displayed an increase in ROS formation after 4 h of thapsigargin treatment. Mitochondrial respiratory chain activity was found decreased upon stable hNek5expression. Cells silenced for hNek5 on the other hand presented 1.7 fold increased basal rates of respiration, especially at the electrons transfer steps from TMPD to cytochrome c and at the complex II. In conclusion, our data suggest for the first time mitochondrial localization and functions for Nek5 and its participation in cell death and cell respiration regulation. Stable expression of hNek5 in Hek293T cells resulted in enhanced cell viability, decreased cell death and drug resistance, while depletion of hNek5by shRNA overcame cancer cell drug resistance and induced apoptosis in vitro. Stable expression of hNek5 also inhibits thapsigargin promoted apoptosis and the respiratory chain complex IV in HEK293T cells.

  5. Mitochondrial respiration deficits driven by reactive oxygen species in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Shane; Liang, Li-Ping; Fulton, Ruth; Shimizu, Takahiko; Day, Brian; Patel, Manisha

    2015-03-01

    Metabolic alterations have been implicated in the etiology of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), but whether or not they have a functional impact on cellular energy producing pathways (glycolysis and/or oxidative phosphorylation) is unknown. The goal of this study was to determine if alterations in cellular bioenergetics occur using real-time analysis of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and glycolytic rates in an animal model of TLE. We hypothesized that increased steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) initiated by epileptogenic injury result in impaired mitochondrial respiration. We established methodology for assessment of bioenergetic parameters in isolated synaptosomes from the hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats at various times in the kainate (KA) model of TLE. Deficits in indices of mitochondrial respiration were observed at time points corresponding with the acute and chronic phases of epileptogenesis. We asked if mitochondrial bioenergetic dysfunction occurred as a result of increased mitochondrial ROS and if it could be attenuated in the KA model by pharmacologically scavenging ROS. Increased steady-state ROS in mice with forebrain-specific conditional deletion of manganese superoxide dismutase (Sod2(fl/fl)NEX(Cre/Cre)) in mice resulted in profound deficits in mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Pharmacological scavenging of ROS with a catalytic antioxidant restored mitochondrial respiration deficits in the KA model of TLE. Together, these results demonstrate that mitochondrial respiration deficits occur in experimental TLE and ROS mechanistically contribute to these deficits. Furthermore, this study provides novel methodology for assessing cellular metabolism during the entire time course of disease development.

  6. Microchambers with Solid-State Phosphorescent Sensor for Measuring Single Mitochondrial Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Ted D.; Wallace, Douglas C.; Burke, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    It is now well established that, even within a single cell, multiple copies of the mitochondrial genome may be present (genetic heteroplasmy). It would be interesting to develop techniques to determine if and to what extent this genetic variation results in functional variation from one mitochondrion to the next (functional heteroplasmy). Measuring mitochondrial respiration can reveal the organelles’ functional capacity for Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and determine mitochondrial damage that may arise from genetic or age related defects. However, available technologies require significant quantities of mitochondria. Here, we develop a technology to assay the respiration of a single mitochondrion. Our “micro-respirometer” consists of micron sized chambers etched out of borofloat glass substrates and coated with an oxygen sensitive phosphorescent dye Pt(II) meso-tetra(pentafluorophenyl)porphine (PtTFPP) mixed with polystyrene. The chambers are sealed with a polydimethylsiloxane layer coated with oxygen impermeable Viton rubber to prevent diffusion of oxygen from the environment. As the mitochondria consume oxygen in the chamber, the phosphorescence signal increases, allowing direct determination of the respiration rate. Experiments with coupled vs. uncoupled mitochondria showed a substantial difference in respiration, confirming the validity of the microchambers as single mitochondrial respirometers. This demonstration could enable future high-throughput assays of mitochondrial respiration and benefit the study of mitochondrial functional heterogeneity, and its role in health and disease. PMID:27409618

  7. Selective inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis in human leukaemic leucocytes by methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Biswas, S; Ray, M; Misra, S; Dutta, D P; Ray, S

    1997-04-15

    The effect of methylglyoxal on the oxygen consumption of mitochondria of both normal and leukaemic leucocytes was tested by using different respiratory substrates and complex specific artificial electron donors and inhibitors. The results indicate that methylglyoxal strongly inhibits mitochondrial respiration in leukaemic leucocytes, whereas, at a much higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit mitochondrial respiration in normal leucocytes. Methylglyoxal strongly inhibits ADP-stimulated alpha-oxoglutarate and malate plus NAD+-dependent respiration, whereas, at a higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit succinate and alpha-glycerophosphate-dependent respiration. Methylglyoxal also fails to inhibit respiration which is initiated by duroquinone and cannot inhibit oxygen consumption when the N,N,N', N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine by-pass is used. NADH oxidation by sub-mitochondrial particles of leukaemic leucocytes is also inhibited by methylglyoxal. Lactaldehyde, a catabolite of methylglyoxal, can exert a protective effect on the inhibition of leukaemic leucocyte mitochondrial respiration by methylglyoxal. Methylglyoxal also inhibits l-lactic acid formation by intact leukaemic leucocytes and critically reduces the ATP level of these cells, whereas methylglyoxal has no effect on normal leucocytes. We conclude that methylglyoxal inhibits glycolysis and the electron flow through mitochondrial complex I of leukaemic leucocytes. This is strikingly similar to our previous studies on mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis and ATP levels in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells [Ray, Dutta, Halder and Ray (1994) Biochem. J. 303, 69-72; Halder, Ray and Ray (1993) Int. J. Cancer 54, 443-449], which strongly suggests that the inhibition of electron flow through complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and inhibition of glycolysis by methylglyoxal may be common characteristics of all malignant cells.

  8. Selective inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis in human leukaemic leucocytes by methylglyoxal.

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, S; Ray, M; Misra, S; Dutta, D P; Ray, S

    1997-01-01

    The effect of methylglyoxal on the oxygen consumption of mitochondria of both normal and leukaemic leucocytes was tested by using different respiratory substrates and complex specific artificial electron donors and inhibitors. The results indicate that methylglyoxal strongly inhibits mitochondrial respiration in leukaemic leucocytes, whereas, at a much higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit mitochondrial respiration in normal leucocytes. Methylglyoxal strongly inhibits ADP-stimulated alpha-oxoglutarate and malate plus NAD+-dependent respiration, whereas, at a higher concentration, methylglyoxal fails to inhibit succinate and alpha-glycerophosphate-dependent respiration. Methylglyoxal also fails to inhibit respiration which is initiated by duroquinone and cannot inhibit oxygen consumption when the N,N,N', N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine by-pass is used. NADH oxidation by sub-mitochondrial particles of leukaemic leucocytes is also inhibited by methylglyoxal. Lactaldehyde, a catabolite of methylglyoxal, can exert a protective effect on the inhibition of leukaemic leucocyte mitochondrial respiration by methylglyoxal. Methylglyoxal also inhibits l-lactic acid formation by intact leukaemic leucocytes and critically reduces the ATP level of these cells, whereas methylglyoxal has no effect on normal leucocytes. We conclude that methylglyoxal inhibits glycolysis and the electron flow through mitochondrial complex I of leukaemic leucocytes. This is strikingly similar to our previous studies on mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis and ATP levels in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells [Ray, Dutta, Halder and Ray (1994) Biochem. J. 303, 69-72; Halder, Ray and Ray (1993) Int. J. Cancer 54, 443-449], which strongly suggests that the inhibition of electron flow through complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and inhibition of glycolysis by methylglyoxal may be common characteristics of all malignant cells. PMID:9163322

  9. Mitochondrial respiration and genomic analysis provide insight into the influence of the symbiotic bacterium on host trypanosomatid oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Martins, A C; Machado, A C L; Klein, C C; Ciapina, L; Gonzaga, L; Vasconcelos, A T R; Sagot, M F; DE Souza, W; Einicker-Lamas, M; Galina, A; Motta, M C M

    2015-02-01

    Certain trypanosomatids co-evolve with an endosymbiotic bacterium in a mutualistic relationship that is characterized by intense metabolic exchanges. Symbionts were able to respire for up to 4 h after isolation from Angomonas deanei. FCCP (carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone) similarly increased respiration in wild-type and aposymbiotic protozoa, though a higher maximal O2 consumption capacity was observed in the symbiont-containing cells. Rotenone, a complex I inhibitor, did not affect A. deanei respiration, whereas TTFA (thenoyltrifluoroacetone), a complex II activity inhibitor, completely blocked respiration in both strains. Antimycin A and cyanide, inhibitors of complexes III and IV, respectively, abolished O2 consumption, but the aposymbiotic protozoa were more sensitive to both compounds. Oligomycin did not affect cell respiration, whereas carboxyatractyloside (CAT), an inhibitor of the ADP-ATP translocator, slightly reduced O2 consumption. In the A. deanei genome, sequences encoding most proteins of the respiratory chain are present. The symbiont genome lost part of the electron transport system (ETS), but complex I, a cytochrome d oxidase, and FoF1-ATP synthase remain. In conclusion, this work suggests that the symbiont influences the mitochondrial respiration of the host protozoan.

  10. Simultaneous high-resolution measurement of mitochondrial respiration and hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Krumschnabel, Gerhard; Fontana-Ayoub, Mona; Sumbalova, Zuzana; Heidler, Juliana; Gauper, Kathrin; Fasching, Mario; Gnaiger, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration is associated with the formation of reactive oxygen species, primarily in the form of superoxide (O2 (•-)) and particularly hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Since H2O2 plays important roles in physiology and pathology, measurement of hydrogen peroxide has received considerable attention over many years. Here we describe how the well-established Amplex Red assay can be used to detect H2O2 production in combination with the simultaneous assessment of mitochondrial bioenergetics by high-resolution respirometry. Fundamental instrumental and methodological parameters were optimized for analysis of the effects of various substrate, uncoupler, and inhibitor titrations (SUIT) on respiration versus H2O2 production. The sensitivity of the H2O2 assay was strongly influenced by compounds contained in different mitochondrial respiration media, which also exerted significant effects on chemical background fluorescence changes. Near linearity of the fluorescence signal was restricted to narrow ranges of accumulating resorufin concentrations independent of the nature of mitochondrial respiration media. Finally, we show an application example using isolated mouse brain mitochondria as an experimental model for the simultaneous measurement of mitochondrial respiration and H2O2 production in SUIT protocols.

  11. JNK interaction with Sab mediates ER stress induced inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Win, S; Than, T A; Fernandez-Checa, J C; Kaplowitz, N

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to better understand the mechanism and importance of sustained c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and effects of ER stress on mitochondria by determining the role of mitochondrial JNK binding protein, Sab. Tunicamycin or brefeldin A induced a rapid and marked decline in basal mitochondrial respiration and reserve-capacity followed by delayed mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Knockdown of mitochondrial Sab prevented ER stress-induced sustained JNK activation, impaired respiration, and apoptosis, but did not alter the magnitude or time course of activation of ER stress pathways. P-JNK plus adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) added to isolated liver mitochondria promoted superoxide production, which was amplified by addition of calcium and inhibited by a blocking peptide corresponding to the JNK binding site on Sab (KIM1). This peptide also blocked tunicamycin-induced inhibition of cellular respiration. In conclusion, ER stress triggers an interaction of JNK with mitochondrial Sab, which leads to impaired respiration and increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, sustaining JNK activation culminating in apoptosis. PMID:24407242

  12. JNK interaction with Sab mediates ER stress induced inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and cell death.

    PubMed

    Win, S; Than, T A; Fernandez-Checa, J C; Kaplowitz, N

    2014-01-09

    Our aim was to better understand the mechanism and importance of sustained c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and effects of ER stress on mitochondria by determining the role of mitochondrial JNK binding protein, Sab. Tunicamycin or brefeldin A induced a rapid and marked decline in basal mitochondrial respiration and reserve-capacity followed by delayed mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Knockdown of mitochondrial Sab prevented ER stress-induced sustained JNK activation, impaired respiration, and apoptosis, but did not alter the magnitude or time course of activation of ER stress pathways. P-JNK plus adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) added to isolated liver mitochondria promoted superoxide production, which was amplified by addition of calcium and inhibited by a blocking peptide corresponding to the JNK binding site on Sab (KIM1). This peptide also blocked tunicamycin-induced inhibition of cellular respiration. In conclusion, ER stress triggers an interaction of JNK with mitochondrial Sab, which leads to impaired respiration and increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, sustaining JNK activation culminating in apoptosis.

  13. Fast kinase domain-containing protein 3 is a mitochondrial protein essential for cellular respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Simarro, Maria; Gimenez-Cassina, Alfredo; Kedersha, Nancy; Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Adelmant, Guillaume O.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Rhee, Kirsten; Tisdale, Sarah; Danial, Nika; Benarafa, Charaf; Orduna, Anonio; Anderson, Paul

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Five members of the FAST kinase domain-containing proteins are localized to mitochondria in mammalian cells. {yields} The FASTKD3 interactome includes proteins involved in various aspects of mitochondrial metabolism. {yields} Targeted knockdown of FASTKD3 significantly reduces basal and maximal mitochondrial oxygen consumption. -- Abstract: Fas-activated serine/threonine phosphoprotein (FAST) is the founding member of the FAST kinase domain-containing protein (FASTKD) family that includes FASTKD1-5. FAST is a sensor of mitochondrial stress that modulates protein translation to promote the survival of cells exposed to adverse conditions. Mutations in FASTKD2 have been linked to a mitochondrial encephalomyopathy that is associated with reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity, an essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We have confirmed the mitochondrial localization of FASTKD2 and shown that all FASTKD family members are found in mitochondria. Although human and mouse FASTKD1-5 genes are expressed ubiquitously, some of them are most abundantly expressed in mitochondria-enriched tissues. We have found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of FASTKD3 severely blunts basal and stress-induced mitochondrial oxygen consumption without disrupting the assembly of respiratory chain complexes. Tandem affinity purification reveals that FASTKD3 interacts with components of mitochondrial respiratory and translation machineries. Our results introduce FASTKD3 as an essential component of mitochondrial respiration that may modulate energy balance in cells exposed to adverse conditions by functionally coupling mitochondrial protein synthesis to respiration.

  14. Meclizine inhibits mitochondrial respiration through direct targeting of cytosolic phosphoethanolamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gohil, Vishal M; Zhu, Lin; Baker, Charli D; Cracan, Valentin; Yaseen, Abbas; Jain, Mohit; Clish, Clary B; Brookes, Paul S; Bakovic, Marica; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2013-12-06

    We recently identified meclizine, an over-the-counter drug, as an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration. Curiously, meclizine blunted respiration in intact cells but not in isolated mitochondria, suggesting an unorthodox mechanism. Using a metabolic profiling approach, we now show that treatment with meclizine leads to a sharp elevation of cellular phosphoethanolamine, an intermediate in the ethanolamine branch of the Kennedy pathway of phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis. Metabolic labeling and in vitro enzyme assays confirmed direct inhibition of the cytosolic enzyme CTP:phosphoethanolamine cytidylyltransferase (PCYT2). Inhibition of PCYT2 by meclizine led to rapid accumulation of its substrate, phosphoethanolamine, which is itself an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration. Our work identifies the first pharmacologic inhibitor of the Kennedy pathway, demonstrates that its biosynthetic intermediate is an endogenous inhibitor of respiration, and provides key mechanistic insights that may facilitate repurposing meclizine for disorders of energy metabolism.

  15. Evidence of an alternative oxidase pathway for mitochondrial respiration in the scuticociliate Philasterides dicentrarchi.

    PubMed

    Mallo, Natalia; Lamas, Jesús; Leiro, José Manuel

    2013-11-01

    The presence of an alternative oxidase (AOX) in the mitochondria of the scuticociliate P. dicentrarchi was investigated. The mitochondrial oxygen consumption was measured in the presence of KCN, an inhibitor of cytochrome pathway (CP) respiration and salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM), a specific inhibitor of alternative pathway (AP) respiration. AOX expression was monitored by western blotting with an AOX polyclonal antibody. The results showed that P. dicentrarchi possesses a branched mitochondrial electron transport chain with both cyanide-sensitive and -insensitive oxygen consumption. Mitochondrial respiration was partially inhibited by cyanide and completely inhibited by the combination of cyanide and SHAM, which is direct evidence for the existence of an AP in this ciliate. SHAM significantly inhibited in vitro growth of trophozoites both under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. AOX is a 42kD monomeric protein inducible by hypoxic conditions in experimental infections and by CP inhibitors such as cyanide and antimycin A, or by AP inhibitors such as SHAM. CP respiration was greatly stimulated during the exponential growth phase, while AP respiration increased during the stationary phase, in which AOX expression is induced. As the host does not possess AOX, and because during infection P. dicentrarchi respires via AP, it may be possible to develop inhibitors targeting the AP as a novel anti-scuticociliate therapy.

  16. Subclinical hypothyroidism affects mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Kvetny, J; Wilms, L; Pedersen, P L; Larsen, J

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine mitochondrial function in cells from persons with subclinical hypothyroidism and euthyroid controls. The participating persons were examined clinically and had basal oxygen consumption (VO(2)) determined. The concentrations of thyroid hormones and thyrotropine stimulating hormone were determined, and mitochondrial function in isolated mononuclear blood cells was examined by enzymatic methods [citrate synthase activity (CS)] and by flow cytometry (mitochondrial membrane potential by TMRM fluorescence and mitochondrial mass by MTG fluorescence). The ratio of T(4)/T(3) was lowered in subclinical hypothyroidism patients compared to controls (2.5+/-0.5 vs. 2.9+/-0.4, p=0.005). VO(2) was increased in persons with subclinical hypothyroidism compared to controls (adolescents: 134+/-27 ml O(2)/min*m(2) vs. 119+/-27 ml O(2)/min*m(2), p=0.006, adults: 139+/-14 ml O(2)/min*m(2) vs. 121+/-17 ml O(2)/min*m(2), p=0.001). The mitochondrial function, represented by citrate synthase activity, MTG, and TMRM fluorescence were all increased (CS in subclinical hypothyroidism vs. controls: 0.074+/-0.044 nmol/mg*min vs. 0.056+/-0.021 nmol/mg*min, p=0.005; MTG fluorescence in subclinical hypothyroidism vs. controls: 7,482+/-1,733 a.u. vs. 6,391+/-2,171 a.u., p=0.027; TMRM fluorescence in subclinical hypothyroidism vs. controls: 13,449+/-3,807 a.u. vs. 11,733+/-4,473 a.u, p=0.04). Our results indicate an increased mitochondrial stimulation, eventually caused by increased deiodination of T(4) to intracellular bioactive iodothyronines in adults and adolescents with subclinical hypothyroidism.

  17. Altered Mitochondrial Respiration and Other Features of Mitochondrial Function in Parkin-Mutant Fibroblasts from Parkinson's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Swart, Chrisna; van der Westhuizen, Francois; van Dyk, Hayley; van der Merwe, Lize; van der Merwe, Celia; Loos, Ben; Carr, Jonathan; Kinnear, Craig; Bardien, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the parkin gene are the most common cause of early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is involved in respiratory chain function, mitophagy, and mitochondrial dynamics. Human cellular models with parkin null mutations are particularly valuable for investigating the mitochondrial functions of parkin. However, published results reporting on patient-derived parkin-mutant fibroblasts have been inconsistent. This study aimed to functionally compare parkin-mutant fibroblasts from PD patients with wild-type control fibroblasts using a variety of assays to gain a better understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. To this end, dermal fibroblasts were obtained from three PD patients with homozygous whole exon deletions in parkin and three unaffected controls. Assays of mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial network integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell growth were performed as informative markers of mitochondrial function. Surprisingly, it was found that mitochondrial respiratory rates were markedly higher in the parkin-mutant fibroblasts compared to control fibroblasts (p = 0.0093), while exhibiting more fragmented mitochondrial networks (p = 0.0304). Moreover, cell growth of the parkin-mutant fibroblasts was significantly higher than that of controls (p = 0.0001). These unanticipated findings are suggestive of a compensatory mechanism to preserve mitochondrial function and quality control in the absence of parkin in fibroblasts, which warrants further investigation. PMID:27034887

  18. Protective effect of creatine against inhibition by methylglyoxal of mitochondrial respiration of cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Soumya Sinha; Biswas, Swati; Ray, Manju; Ray, Subhankar

    2003-06-01

    Previous publications from our laboratory have shown that methylglyoxal inhibits mitochondrial respiration of malignant and cardiac cells, but it has no effect on mitochondrial respiration of other normal cells [Biswas, Ray, Misra, Dutta and Ray (1997) Biochem. J. 323, 343-348; Ray, Biswas and Ray (1997) Mol. Cell. Biochem. 171, 95-103]. However, this inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal is not significant in cardiac tissue slices. Moreover, post-mitochondrial supernatant (PMS) of cardiac cells could almost completely protect the mitochondrial respiration against the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal. A systematic search indicated that creatine present in cardiac cells is responsible for this protective effect. Glutathione has also some protective effect. However, creatine phosphate, creatinine, urea, glutathione disulphide and beta-mercaptoethanol have no protective effect. The inhibitory and protective effects of methylglyoxal and creatine respectively on cardiac mitochondrial respiration were studied with various concentrations of both methylglyoxal and creatine. Interestingly, neither creatine nor glutathione have any protective effect on the inhibition by methylglyoxal on the mitochondrial respiration of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells. The creatine and glutathione contents of several PMS, which were tested for the possible protective effect, were measured. The activities of two important enzymes, namely glyoxalase I and creatine kinase, which act upon glutathione plus methylglyoxal and creatine respectively, were also measured in different PMS. Whether mitochondrial creatine kinase had any role in the protective effect of creatine had also been investigated using 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, an inhibitor of creatine kinase. The differential effect of creatine on mitochondria of cardiac and malignant cells has been discussed with reference to the therapeutic potential of methylglyoxal.

  19. Sodium valproate induces mitochondrial respiration dysfunction in HepG2 in vitro cell model.

    PubMed

    Komulainen, Tuomas; Lodge, Tiffany; Hinttala, Reetta; Bolszak, Maija; Pietilä, Mika; Koivunen, Peppi; Hakkola, Jukka; Poulton, Joanna; Morten, Karl J; Uusimaa, Johanna

    2015-05-04

    Sodium valproate (VPA) is a potentially hepatotoxic antiepileptic drug. Risk of VPA-induced hepatotoxicity is increased in patients with mitochondrial diseases and especially in patients with POLG1 gene mutations. We used a HepG2 cell in vitro model to investigate the effect of VPA on mitochondrial activity. Cells were incubated in glucose medium and mitochondrial respiration-inducing medium supplemented with galactose and pyruvate. VPA treatments were carried out at concentrations of 0-2.0mM for 24-72 h. In both media, VPA caused decrease in oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial membrane potential. VPA exposure led to depleted ATP levels in HepG2 cells incubated in galactose medium suggesting dysfunction in mitochondrial ATP production. In addition, VPA exposure for 72 h increased levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), but adversely decreased protein levels of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase SOD2, suggesting oxidative stress caused by impaired elimination of mitochondrial ROS and a novel pathomechanism related to VPA toxicity. Increased cell death and decrease in cell number was detected under both metabolic conditions. However, immunoblotting did not show any changes in the protein levels of the catalytic subunit A of mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ, the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes I, II and IV, ATP synthase, E3 subunit dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase of pyruvate dehydrogenase, 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase and glutathione peroxidase. Our results show that VPA inhibits mitochondrial respiration and leads to mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and increased cell death, thus suggesting an essential role of mitochondria in VPA-induced hepatotoxicity.

  20. Structure-activity relationships for perfluoroalkane-induced in vitro interference with rat liver mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Wallace, K B; Kissling, G E; Melnick, R L; Blystone, C R

    2013-10-09

    Perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs) represent a broad class of commercial products designed primarily for the coatings industry. However, detection of residues globally in a variety of species led to the discontinuation of production in the U.S. Although PFAAs cause activation of the PPARα and CAR nuclear receptors, interference with mitochondrial bioenergetics has been implicated as an alternative mechanism of cytotoxicity. Although the mechanisms by which the eight carbon chain PFAAs interfere with mitochondrial bioenergetics are fairly well described, the activities of the more highly substituted or shorter chain PFAAs are far less well characterized. The current investigation was designed to explore structure-activity relationships by which PFAAs interfere with mitochondrial respiration in vitro. Freshly isolated rat liver mitochondria were incubated with one of 16 different PFAAs, including perfluorinated carboxylic, acetic, and sulfonic acids, sulfonamides and sulfamido acetates, and alcohols. The effect on mitochondrial respiration was measured at five concentrations and dose-response curves were generated to describe the effects on state 3 and 4 respiration and respiratory control. With the exception of PFOS, all PFAAs at sufficiently high concentrations (>20μM) stimulated state 4 and inhibited state 3 respiration. Stimulation of state 4 respiration was most pronounced for the carboxylic acids and the sulfonamides, which supports prior evidence that the perfluorinated carboxylic and acetic acids induce the mitochondrial permeability transition, whereas the sulfonamides are protonophoric uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. In both cases, potency increased with increasing carbon number, with a prominent inflection point between the six and eight carbon congeners. The results provide a foundation for classifying PFAAs according to specific modes of mitochondrial activity and, in combination with toxicokinetic considerations, establishing structure

  1. Impaired Lung Mitochondrial Respiration Following Perinatal Nicotine Exposure in Rats.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Daniel T; Liu, Jie; Sakurai, Reiko; Rossiter, Harry B; Rehan, Virender K

    2016-04-01

    Perinatal smoke/nicotine exposure predisposes to chronic lung disease and morbidity. Mitochondrial abnormalities may contribute as the PPARγ pathway is involved in structural and functional airway deficits after perinatal nicotine exposure. We hypothesized perinatal nicotine exposure results in lung mitochondrial dysfunction that can be rescued by rosiglitazone (RGZ; PPARγ receptor agonist). Sprague-Dawley dams received placebo (CON), nicotine (NIC, 1 mg kg(-1)), or NIC + RGZ (3 mg kg(-1)) daily from embryonic day 6 to postnatal day 21. Parenchymal lung (~10 mg) was taken from adult male offspring for mitochondrial assessment in situ. ADP-stimulated O2 consumption was less in NIC and NIC + RGZ compared to CON (F[2,14] = 17.8; 4.5 ± 0.8 and 4.1 ± 1.4 vs. 8.8 ± 2.5 pmol s mg(-1); p < 0.05). The respiratory control ratio for ADP, an index of mitochondrial coupling, was reduced in NIC and remediated in NIC + RGZ (F[2,14] = 3.8; p < 0.05). Reduced mitochondrial oxidative capacity and abnormal coupling were evident after perinatal nicotine exposure. RGZ improved mitochondrial function through tighter coupling of oxidative phosphorylation.

  2. Sab (Sh3bp5) dependence of JNK mediated inhibition of mitochondrial respiration in palmitic acid induced hepatocyte lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Win, Sanda; Than, Tin Aung; Le, Bao Han Allison; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernandez-Checa, Jose C; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Sustained JNK activation by saturated fatty acids plays a role in lipotoxicity and the pathogenesis of NASH. We have reported that the interaction of JNK with mitochondrial Sab leads to inhibition of respiration, increased ROS, cell death and hepatotoxicity. We tested whether this pathway underlies palmitic acid (PA)-induced lipotoxicity in hepatocytes. Methods Primary mouse hepatocytes from adeno-shlacZ or adeno-shSab treated mice and Huh7 cells were used. Results In PMH, PA dose dependently up to 1mM stimulated oxygen consumption rate (OCR) due to mitochondrial β-oxidation. At ≥ 1.5mM, PA gradually reduced OCR, followed by cell death. Inhibition of JNK, caspases or treatment with antioxidant butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) protected PMH against cell death. Sab knockdown or a membrane permeable Sab blocking peptide prevented PA-induced mitochondrial impairment, but inhibited only the late phase of both JNK activation (beyond 4 hours) and cell death. PA increased P-PERK and downstream target CHOP in PMH but failed to activate the IRE-1α arm of the UPR. However, Sab silencing did not affect PA-induced PERK activation. Conversely, specific inhibition of PERK prevented JNK activation and cell death, indicating a major role upstream of JNK activation. Conclusions The effect of P-JNK on mitochondria plays a key role in PA-mediated lipotoxicity. The interplay of P-JNK with mitochondrial Sab leads to impaired respiration, ROS production, sustained JNK activation, and apoptosis. PMID:25666017

  3. Statin-induced changes in mitochondrial respiration in blood platelets in rats and human with dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Vevera, J; Fišar, Z; Nekovářová, T; Vrablík, M; Zlatohlávek, L; Hroudová, J; Singh, N; Raboch, J; Valeš, K

    2016-11-23

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) are widely used drugs for lowering blood lipid levels and preventing cardiovascular diseases. However, statins can have serious adverse effects, which may be related to development of mitochondrial dysfunctions. The aim of study was to demonstrate the in vivo effect of high and therapeutic doses of statins on mitochondrial respiration in blood platelets. Model approach was used in the study. Simvastatin was administered to rats at a high dose for 4 weeks. Humans were treated with therapeutic doses of rosuvastatin or atorvastatin for 6 weeks. Platelet mitochondrial respiration was measured using high-resolution respirometry. In rats, a significantly lower physiological respiratory rate was found in intact platelets of simvastatin-treated rats compared to controls. In humans, no significant changes in mitochondrial respiration were detected in intact platelets; however, decreased complex I-linked respiration was observed after statin treatment in permeabilized platelets. We propose that the small in vivo effect of statins on platelet energy metabolism can be attributed to drug effects on complex I of the electron transport system. Both intact and permeabilized platelets can be used as a readily available biological model to study changes in cellular energy metabolism in patients treated with statins.

  4. Investigation of mitochondrial dysfunction by sequential microplate-based respiration measurements from intact and permeabilized neurons.

    PubMed

    Clerc, Pascaline; Polster, Brian M

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a component of many neurodegenerative conditions. Measurement of oxygen consumption from intact neurons enables evaluation of mitochondrial bioenergetics under conditions that are more physiologically realistic compared to isolated mitochondria. However, mechanistic analysis of mitochondrial function in cells is complicated by changing energy demands and lack of substrate control. Here we describe a technique for sequentially measuring respiration from intact and saponin-permeabilized cortical neurons on single microplates. This technique allows control of substrates to individual electron transport chain complexes following permeabilization, as well as side-by-side comparisons to intact cells. To illustrate the utility of the technique, we demonstrate that inhibition of respiration by the drug KB-R7943 in intact neurons is relieved by delivery of the complex II substrate succinate, but not by complex I substrates, via acute saponin permeabilization. In contrast, methyl succinate, a putative cell permeable complex II substrate, failed to rescue respiration in intact neurons and was a poor complex II substrate in permeabilized cells. Sequential measurements of intact and permeabilized cell respiration should be particularly useful for evaluating indirect mitochondrial toxicity due to drugs or cellular signaling events which cannot be readily studied using isolated mitochondria.

  5. Coordinated activation of mitochondrial respiration and exocytosis mediated by PKC signaling in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Santo-Domingo, Jaime; Chareyron, Isabelle; Dayon, Loïc; Núñez Galindo, Antonio; Cominetti, Ornella; Pilar Giner Giménez, María; De Marchi, Umberto; Canto, Carles; Kussmann, Martin; Wiederkehr, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Mitochondria play a central role in pancreatic β-cell nutrient sensing by coupling their metabolism to plasma membrane excitability and insulin granule exocytosis. Whether non-nutrient secretagogues stimulate mitochondria as part of the molecular mechanism to promote insulin secretion is not known. Here, we show that PKC signaling, which is employed by many non-nutrient secretagogues, augments mitochondrial respiration in INS-1E (rat insulinoma cell line clone 1E) and human pancreatic β cells. The phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, accelerates mitochondrial respiration at both resting and stimulatory glucose concentrations. A range of inhibitors of novel PKC isoforms prevent phorbol ester-induced respiration. Respiratory response was blocked by oligomycin that demonstrated PKC-dependent acceleration of mitochondrial ATP synthesis. Enhanced respiration was observed even when glycolysis was bypassed or fatty acid transport was blocked, which suggested that PKC regulates mitochondrial processes rather than upstream catabolic fluxes. A phosphoproteome study of phorbol ester-stimulated INS-1E cells maintained under resting (2.5 mM) glucose revealed a large number of phosphorylation sites that were altered during short-term activation of PKC signaling. The data set was enriched for proteins that are involved in gene expression, cytoskeleton remodeling, secretory vesicle transport, and exocytosis. Interactome analysis identified PKC, C-Raf, and ERK1/2 as the central phosphointeraction cluster. Prevention of ERK1/2 signaling by using a MEK1 inhibitor caused a marked decreased in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced mitochondrial respiration. ERK1/2 signaling module therefore links PKC activation to downstream mitochondrial activation. We conclude that non-nutrient secretagogues act, in part, via PKC and downstream ERK1/2 signaling to stimulate mitochondrial energy production to compensate for energy expenditure that is linked to β-cell activation

  6. The effect of age on mitochondrial enzymes and respiration.

    PubMed

    Wilson, P D; Hill, B T; Franks, L M

    1975-01-01

    There was no significant difference between the levels of cytochrome oxidase and malate dehydrogenase in whole liver homogenates or in mitochondria isolated from the livers of 6-month-old and 30-month-old C57/BL mice. Little change with age was found in the cytochemical localisation of either enzyme. There were no significant changes in endogenous, state III or state IV respiration of mitochondria isolated from the livers of young and old mice.

  7. D-β-Hydroxybutyrate rescues mitochondrial respiration and mitigates features of Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Tieu, Kim; Perier, Celine; Caspersen, Casper; Teismann, Peter; Wu, Du-Chu; Yan, Shi-Du; Naini, Ali; Vila, Miquel; Jackson-Lewis, Vernice; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Przedborski, Serge

    2003-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a loss of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons accompanied by a deficit in mitochondrial respiration. 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) is a neurotoxin that causes dopaminergic neurodegeneration and a mitochondrial deficit reminiscent of PD. Here we show that the infusion of the ketone body D-β-hydroxybutyrate (DβHB) in mice confers partial protection against dopaminergic neurodegeneration and motor deficits induced by MPTP. These effects appear to be mediated by a complex II–dependent mechanism that leads to improved mitochondrial respiration and ATP production. Because of the safety record of ketone bodies in the treatment of epilepsy and their ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier, DβHB may be a novel neuroprotective therapy for PD. PMID:12975474

  8. Newly identified protein Imi1 affects mitochondrial integrity and glutathione homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kowalec, Piotr; Grynberg, Marcin; Pająk, Beata; Socha, Anna; Winiarska, Katarzyna; Fronk, Jan; Kurlandzka, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Glutathione homeostasis is crucial for cell functioning. We describe a novel Imi1 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affecting mitochondrial integrity and involved in controlling glutathione level. Imi1 is cytoplasmic and, except for its N-terminal Flo11 domain, has a distinct solenoid structure. A lack of Imi1 leads to mitochondrial lesions comprising aberrant morphology of cristae and multifarious mtDNA rearrangements and impaired respiration. The mitochondrial malfunctioning is coupled to significantly decrease the level of intracellular reduced glutathione without affecting oxidized glutathione, which decreases the reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio. These defects are accompanied by decreased cadmium sensitivity and increased phytochelatin-2 level.

  9. Inhibition of uncoupled respiration in tumor cells. A possible role of mitochondrial Ca2+ efflux.

    PubMed

    Gabai, V L

    1993-08-23

    Uncouplers CCCP (2-4 microM) or DNP (200-400 microM) when added to EL-4 thymoma or Ehrlich carcinoma ascites cells initially stimulated endogenous respiration about 2-fold but then inhibited it to a first-order rate 20-25% of controls. This inhibition was accelerated by intracellular acidification or by A23187, a Ca2+/H(+)-antiporter (i.e. when mitochondrial Ca2+ efflux was stimulated) whereas Ruthenium red, an inhibitor of uniporter-driven Ca2+ efflux, significantly slowed down the effect of uncouplers. The respiratory inhibition was associated with NAD(P)H oxidation and was partially reversed by exogenous substrates (glutamine or glucose). In the permeabilized cells, endogenous and glutamine-supported respiration was inhibited by EGTA, while succinate-supported respiration was Ca2+ independent. It is suggested that mitochondrial Ca2+ is necessary for NADH-dependent respiration of tumor cells, and uncouplers inhibit it by activation of mitochondrial Ca2+ efflux.

  10. Down-regulation of tumor necrosis factor receptors by blockade of mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Alcázar, J A; Hernández, I; De la Torre, M P; García, I; Santiago, E; Muñoz-Yagüe, M T; Solís-Herruzo, J A

    1995-10-13

    We have studied the effect of blockade of mitochondrial respiration on the binding of human 125I-TNF alpha to L929 cell receptors. Specific TNF alpha binding was decreased to about 20-40% of controls by blocking mitochondrial respiration. This effect was dose- and time-related and was observed independently of the level at which the respiration was blocked (respiratory chain, proton backflow, ATPase, anaerobiosis). This blockade had no effect on the half-life of the specific TNF alpha binding, the internalization or degradation of TNF alpha-receptor complexes, or the number of TNF alpha-binding sites. Scatchard analysis of TNF alpha binding data indicated a 2-4-fold decrease in the affinity of these binding sites. These effects did not appear to be related to the protein kinase C activity or to reactive oxygen radicals, since they were not antagonized by pretreatment of cells with oxygen radical scavengers, deferoxamine, or inhibitors of protein kinase C. Decrease in TNF alpha binding capacity correlated significantly with cellular ATP content (r = 0.94; p < 0.01) and with the cytocidal activity of TNF alpha against L929 cells. These findings suggest that blockade of mitochondrial respiration down-regulates the binding of TNF alpha to cells, most likely by changing the affinity of receptors for this cytokine. This down-regulation may increase the resistance of cells to TNF alpha cytotoxicity.

  11. Cell respiration under hypoxia: facts and artefacts in mitochondrial oxygen kinetics.

    PubMed

    Scandurra, Francesca M; Gnaiger, Erich

    2010-01-01

    When oxygen supply to tissues is limiting, mitochondrial respiration and ATP production are compromised. To assess the bioenergetic consequences under normoxia and hypoxia, quantitative evaluation of mitochondrial oxygen kinetics is required. Using high-resolution respirometry, the "apparent K (m)" for oxygen or p (50) of respiration in 32D cells was determined at 0.05 +/- 0.01 kPa (0.4 mmHg, 0.5 microM, 0.25% air saturation). Close agreement with p (50) of isolated mitochondria indicates that intracellular gradients are small in small cells at routine activity. At intracellular p (O2) <2 kPa (15 mmHg, 10% air saturation) in various tissues under normoxia, respiration is limited by >2% with a p (50) of 0.05 kPa. Over-estimation of p (50) at 0.4 kPa (3 mmHg) would imply significant (>17%) oxygen limitation of respiration under intracellular normoxia. Based on a critical review, we conclude that p (50) ranges from 0.01 to 0.10 kPa in mitochondria and small cells in the absence of inhibitors of cytochrome c oxidase, whereas experimental artefacts explain the controversial >200-fold range of p (50) in the literature on mitochondrial oxygen kinetics.

  12. Pyruvate fuels mitochondrial respiration and proliferation of breast cancer cells: effect of monocarboxylate transporter inhibition.

    PubMed

    Diers, Anne R; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Chang, Ching-Fang; Hogg, Neil

    2012-06-15

    Recent studies have highlighted the fact that cancer cells have an altered metabolic phenotype, and this metabolic reprogramming is required to drive the biosynthesis pathways necessary for rapid replication and proliferation. Specifically, the importance of citric acid cycle-generated intermediates in the regulation of cancer cell proliferation has been recently appreciated. One function of MCTs (monocarboxylate transporters) is to transport the citric acid cycle substrate pyruvate across the plasma membrane and into mitochondria, and inhibition of MCTs has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy to target metabolic pathways in cancer. In the present paper, we examined the effect of different metabolic substrates (glucose and pyruvate) on mitochondrial function and proliferation in breast cancer cells. We demonstrated that cancer cells proliferate more rapidly in the presence of exogenous pyruvate when compared with lactate. Pyruvate supplementation fuelled mitochondrial oxygen consumption and the reserve respiratory capacity, and this increase in mitochondrial function correlated with proliferative potential. In addition, inhibition of cellular pyruvate uptake using the MCT inhibitor α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid impaired mitochondrial respiration and decreased cell growth. These data demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial metabolism in proliferative responses and highlight a novel mechanism of action for MCT inhibitors through suppression of pyruvate-fuelled mitochondrial respiration.

  13. A mitochondrial-targeted ubiquinone modulates muscle lipid profile and improves mitochondrial respiration in obesogenic diet-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Coudray, Charles; Fouret, Gilles; Lambert, Karen; Ferreri, Carla; Rieusset, Jennifer; Blachnio-Zabielska, Agnieszka; Lecomte, Jérôme; Ebabe Elle, Raymond; Badia, Eric; Murphy, Michael P; Feillet-Coudray, Christine

    2016-04-14

    The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome components including abdominal obesity, dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance is increasing in both developed and developing countries. It is generally accepted that the development of these features is preceded by, or accompanied with, impaired mitochondrial function. The present study was designed to analyse the effects of a mitochondrial-targeted lipophilic ubiquinone (MitoQ) on muscle lipid profile modulation and mitochondrial function in obesogenic diet-fed rats. For this purpose, twenty-four young male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups and fed one of the following diets: (1) control, (2) high fat (HF) and (3) HF+MitoQ. After 8 weeks, mitochondrial function markers and lipid metabolism/profile modifications in skeletal muscle were measured. The HF diet was effective at inducing the major features of the metabolic syndrome--namely, obesity, hepatic enlargement and glucose intolerance. MitoQ intake prevented the increase in rat body weight, attenuated the increase in adipose tissue and liver weights and partially reversed glucose intolerance. At the muscle level, the HF diet induced moderate TAG accumulation associated with important modifications in the muscle phospholipid classes and in the fatty acid composition of total muscle lipid. These lipid modifications were accompanied with decrease in mitochondrial respiration. MitoQ intake corrected the lipid alterations and restored mitochondrial respiration. These results indicate that MitoQ protected obesogenic diet-fed rats from some features of the metabolic syndrome through its effects on muscle lipid metabolism and mitochondrial activity. These findings suggest that MitoQ is a promising candidate for future human trials in the metabolic syndrome prevention.

  14. Nitrite-nitric oxide control of mitochondrial respiration at the frontier of anoxia.

    PubMed

    Benamar, Abdelilah; Rolletschek, Hardy; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Avelange-Macherel, Marie-Hélène; Curien, Gilles; Mostefai, H Ahmed; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Macherel, David

    2008-10-01

    Actively respiring animal and plant tissues experience hypoxia because of mitochondrial O(2) consumption. Controlling oxygen balance is a critical issue that involves in mammals hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) mediated transcriptional regulation, cytochrome oxidase (COX) subunit adjustment and nitric oxide (NO) as a mediator in vasodilatation and oxygen homeostasis. In plants, NO, mainly derived from nitrite, is also an important signalling molecule. We describe here a mechanism by which mitochondrial respiration is adjusted to prevent a tissue to reach anoxia. During pea seed germination, the internal atmosphere was strongly hypoxic due to very active mitochondrial respiration. There was no sign of fermentation, suggesting a down-regulation of O(2) consumption near anoxia. Mitochondria were found to finely regulate their surrounding O(2) level through a nitrite-dependent NO production, which was ascertained using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping of NO within membranes. At low O(2), nitrite is reduced into NO, likely at complex III, and in turn reversibly inhibits COX, provoking a rise to a higher steady state level of oxygen. Since NO can be re-oxidized into nitrite chemically or by COX, a nitrite-NO pool is maintained, preventing mitochondrial anoxia. Such an evolutionarily conserved mechanism should have an important role for oxygen homeostasis in tissues undergoing hypoxia.

  15. Effects of low-level laser therapy on mitochondrial respiration and nitrosyl complex content.

    PubMed

    Buravlev, Evgeny A; Zhidkova, Tatyana V; Vladimirov, Yury A; Osipov, Anatoly N

    2014-11-01

    Among the photochemical reactions responsible for therapeutic effects of low-power laser radiation, the photolysis of nitrosyl iron complexes of iron-containing proteins is of primary importance. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of blue laser radiation on the respiration rate and photolysis of nitrosyl complexes of iron-sulfur clusters (NO-FeS) in mitochondria, subjected to NO as well as the possibility of NO transfer from NO-FeS to hemoglobin. It was shown that mitochondrial respiration in State 3 (V3) and State 4 (V4), according to Chance, dramatically decreased in the presence of 3 mM NO, but laser radiation (λ = 442 nm, 30 J/cm(2)) restored the respiration rates virtually to the initial level. At the same time, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra showed that laser irradiation decomposed nitrosyl complexes produced by the addition of NO to mitochondria. EPR signal of nitrosyl complexes of FeS-clusters, formed in the presence of 3 mM NO, was maximal in hypoxic mitochondria, and disappeared in a dose-dependent manner, almost completely at the irradiation dose 120 J/cm(2). EPR measurements showed that the addition of lysed erythrocytes to mitochondria decreased the amount of nitrosyl complexes in iron-sulfur clusters and produced the accumulation of NO-hemoglobin. On the other hand, the addition of lysed erythrocytes to mitochondria, preincubated with nitric oxide, restored mitochondrial respiration rates V3 and V4 to initial levels. We may conclude that there are two possible ways to destroy FeS nitrosyl complexes in mitochondria and recover mitochondrial respiration inhibited by NO: laser irradiation and ample supply of the compounds with high affinity to nitric oxide, including hemoglobin.

  16. Parkin loss leads to PARIS-dependent declines in mitochondrial mass and respiration

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Daniel A.; Lee, Yunjong; Kang, Ho Chul; Lee, Byoung Dae; Lee, Yun-Il; Bower, Aaron; Jiang, Haisong; Kang, Sung-Ung; Andrabi, Shaida A.; Dawson, Valina L.; Shin, Joo-Ho; Dawson, Ted M.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in parkin lead to early-onset autosomal recessive Parkinson’s disease (PD) and inactivation of parkin is thought to contribute to sporadic PD. Adult knockout of parkin in the ventral midbrain of mice leads to an age-dependent loss of dopamine neurons that is dependent on the accumulation of parkin interacting substrate (PARIS), zinc finger protein 746 (ZNF746), and its transcriptional repression of PGC-1α. Here we show that adult knockout of parkin in mouse ventral midbrain leads to decreases in mitochondrial size, number, and protein markers consistent with a defect in mitochondrial biogenesis. This decrease in mitochondrial mass is prevented by short hairpin RNA knockdown of PARIS. PARIS overexpression in mouse ventral midbrain leads to decreases in mitochondrial number and protein markers and PGC-1α–dependent deficits in mitochondrial respiration. Taken together, these results suggest that parkin loss impairs mitochondrial biogenesis, leading to declining function of the mitochondrial pool and cell death. PMID:26324925

  17. Mitochondrial alternative oxidase maintains respiration and preserves photosynthetic capacity during moderate drought in Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Keshav; Wang, Jia; Martyn, Greg D; Rahimy, Farkhunda; Vanlerberghe, Greg C

    2014-11-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain includes an alternative oxidase (AOX) that is hypothesized to aid photosynthetic metabolism, perhaps by acting as an additional electron sink for photogenerated reductant or by dampening the generation of reactive oxygen species. Gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosystem I (PSI) absorbance, and biochemical and protein analyses were used to compare respiration and photosynthesis of Nicotiana tabacum 'Petit Havana SR1' wild-type plants with that of transgenic AOX knockdown (RNA interference) and overexpression lines, under both well-watered and moderate drought-stressed conditions. During drought, AOX knockdown lines displayed a lower rate of respiration in the light than the wild type, as confirmed by two independent methods. Furthermore, CO2 and light response curves indicated a nonstomatal limitation of photosynthesis in the knockdowns during drought, relative to the wild type. Also relative to the wild type, the knockdowns under drought maintained PSI and PSII in a more reduced redox state, showed greater regulated nonphotochemical energy quenching by PSII, and displayed a higher relative rate of cyclic electron transport around PSI. The origin of these differences may lie in the chloroplast ATP synthase amount, which declined dramatically in the knockdowns in response to drought. None of these effects were seen in plants overexpressing AOX. The results show that AOX is necessary to maintain mitochondrial respiration during moderate drought. In its absence, respiration rate slows and the lack of this electron sink feeds back on the photosynthetic apparatus, resulting in a loss of chloroplast ATP synthase that then limits photosynthetic capacity.

  18. Co-regulation of mitochondrial respiration by proline dehydrogenase/oxidase and succinate.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Chad N; Liu, Wei; Alvord, W Gregory; Phang, James M

    2016-03-01

    Proline dehydrogenase/oxidase (PRODH/POX) is a mitochondrial protein critical to multiple stress pathways. Because of the roles of PRODH/POX in signaling, and its shared localization to the mitochondrial inner membrane with the electron transport chain (ETC), we investigated whether there was a direct relationship between PRODH/POX and regulation of the ETC. We found that PRODH/POX binds directly to CoQ1 and that CoQ1-dependent PRODH/POX activity required functional Complex III and Complex IV. PRODH/POX supported respiration in living cells during nutrient stress; however, expression of PRODH/POX resulted in an overall decrease in respiratory fitness. Effects on respiratory fitness were inhibited by DHP and NAC, indicating that these effects were mediated by PRODH/POX-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. PRODH/POX expression resulted in a dose-dependent down-regulation of Complexes I-IV of the ETC, and this effect was also mitigated by the addition of DHP and NAC. We found that succinate was an uncompetitive inhibitor of PRODH/POX activity, inhibited ROS generation by PRODH/POX, and alleviated PRODH/POX effects on respiratory fitness. The findings demonstrate novel cross-talk between proline and succinate respiration in vivo and provide mechanistic insights into observations from previous animal studies. Our results suggest a potential regulatory loop between PRODH/POX and succinate in regulation of mitochondrial respiration.

  19. Mitochondrial respiration in muscle and liver from cold-acclimated hypothyroid rats.

    PubMed

    Zaninovich, Angel A; Rebagliati, Ines; Raices, Marcela; Ricci, Conrado; Hagmuller, Karl

    2003-10-01

    The effects of long-term cold exposure on muscle and liver mitochondrial oxygen consumption in hypothyroid and normal rats were examined. Thyroid ablation was performed after 8-wk acclimation to 4 degrees C. Hypothyroid and normal controls remained in the cold for an additional 8 wk. At the end of 16-wk cold exposure, all hypothyroid rats were alive and normothermic and had normal body weight. At ambient temperature (24 degrees C), thyroid ablation induced a 65% fall in muscle mitochondrial oxygen consumption, which was reversed by thyroxine but not by norepinephrine administration. After cold acclimation was reached, suppression of thyroid function reduced muscle mitochondrial respiration by 30%, but the hypothyroid values remained about threefold higher than those in hypothyroid muscle in the warm. Blockade of beta- and alpha1-adrenergic receptors in both hypothyroid and normal rats produced hypothermia in vivo and a fall in muscle, liver, and brown adipose tissue mitochondria respiration in vitro. In normal rats, cold acclimation enhanced muscle respiration by 35%, in liver 18%, and in brown adipose tissue 450% over values in the warm. The results demonstrate that thyroid hormones, in the presence of norepinephrine, are major determinants of thermogenic activity in muscle and liver of cold-acclimated rats. After thyroid ablation, cold-induced nonshivering thermogenesis replaced 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine-induced thermogenesis, and normal body temperature was maintained.

  20. Simvastatin impairs ADP-stimulated respiration and increases mitochondrial oxidative stress in primary human skeletal myotubes.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hyo-Bum; Thalacker-Mercer, Anna; Anderson, Ethan J; Lin, Chien-Te; Kane, Daniel A; Lee, Nam-Sihk; Cortright, Ronald N; Bamman, Marcas M; Neufer, P Darrell

    2012-01-01

    Statins, the widely prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, cause adverse skeletal muscle side effects ranging from fatigue to fatal rhabdomyolysis. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of simvastatin on mitochondrial respiration, oxidative stress, and cell death in differentiated primary human skeletal muscle cells (i.e., myotubes). Simvastatin induced a dose-dependent decrease in viability of proliferating and differentiating primary human muscle precursor cells, and a similar dose-dependent effect was noted in differentiated myoblasts and myotubes. Additionally, there were decreases in myotube number and size following 48 h of simvastatin treatment (5 μM). In permeabilized myotubes, maximal ADP-stimulated oxygen consumption, supported by palmitoylcarnitine+malate (PCM, complex I and II substrates) and glutamate+malate (GM, complex I substrates), was 32-37% lower (P<0.05) in simvastatin-treated (5 μM) vs control myotubes, providing evidence of impaired respiration at complex I. Mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide generation were significantly greater in the simvastatin-treated human skeletal myotube cultures compared to control. In addition, simvastatin markedly increased protein levels of Bax (proapoptotic, +53%) and Bcl-2 (antiapoptotic, +100%, P<0.05), mitochondrial PTP opening (+44%, P<0.05), and TUNEL-positive nuclei in human skeletal myotubes, demonstrating up-regulation of mitochondrial-mediated myonuclear apoptotic mechanisms. These data demonstrate that simvastatin induces myotube atrophy and cell loss associated with impaired ADP-stimulated maximal mitochondrial respiratory capacity, mitochondrial oxidative stress, and apoptosis in primary human skeletal myotubes, suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction may underlie human statin-induced myopathy.

  1. The axon-protective WLD(S) protein partially rescues mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis after axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Godzik, Katharina; Coleman, Michael P

    2015-04-01

    The axon-protective Wallerian degeneration slow (WLD(S)) protein can ameliorate the decline in axonal ATP levels after neurite transection. Here, we tested the hypothesis that this effect is associated with maintenance of mitochondrial respiration and/or glycolysis. We used isolated neurites of superior cervical ganglion (SCG) cultures in the Seahorse XF-24 Metabolic Flux Analyser to determine mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis under different conditions. We observed that both mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis declined significantly during the latent phase of Wallerian degeneration. WLD(S) partially reduced the decline both in glycolysis and in mitochondrial respiration. In addition, we found that depleting NAD levels in uncut cultures led to changes in mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis similar to those rescued by WLD(S) after cut, suggesting that the maintenance of NAD levels in Wld(S) neurites after axonal injury at least partially underlies the maintenance of ATP levels. However, by using another axon-protective mutation (Sarm1(-/-)), we could demonstrate that rescue of basal ECAR (and hence probably glycolysis) rather than basal OCR (mitochondrial respiration) may be part of the protective phenotype to delay Wallerian degeneration. These findings open new routes to study glycolysis and the connection between NAD and ATP levels in axon degeneration, which may help to eventually develop therapeutic strategies to treat neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Toxins in botanical dietary supplements: blue cohosh components disrupt cellular respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sandipan; Mahdi, Fakhri; Ali, Zulfiqar; Jekabsons, Mika B; Khan, Ikhlas A; Nagle, Dale G; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-24

    Certain botanical dietary supplements have been associated with idiosyncratic organ-specific toxicity. Similar toxicological events, caused by drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, have forced the withdrawal or U.S. FDA "black box" warnings of major pharmaceuticals. To assess the potential mitochondrial liability of botanical dietary supplements, extracts from 352 authenticated plant samples used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western herbal medicine were evaluated for the ability to disrupt cellular respiration. Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) methanol extract exhibited mitochondriotoxic activity. Used by some U.S. midwives to help induce labor, blue cohosh has been associated with perinatal stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, multiple organ injury, and neonatal shock. The potential link between mitochondrial disruption and idiosyncratic herbal intoxication prompted further examination. The C. thalictroides methanol extract and three saponins, cauloside A (1), saponin PE (2), and cauloside C (3), exhibited concentration- and time-dependent mitochondriotoxic activities. Upon treatment, cell respiration rate rapidly increased and then dramatically decreased within minutes. Mechanistic studies revealed that C. thalictroides constituents impair mitochondrial function by disrupting membrane integrity. These studies provide a potential etiological link between this mitochondria-sensitive form of cytotoxicity and idiosyncratic organ damage.

  3. Toxins in Botanical Dietary Supplements: Blue Cohosh Components Disrupt Cellular Respiration and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sandipan; Mahdi, Fakhri; Ali, Zulfiqar; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Certain botanical dietary supplements have been associated with idiosyncratic organ-specific toxicity. Similar toxicological events, caused by drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, have forced the withdrawal or U.S. FDA “Black Box” warnings of major pharmaceuticals. To assess the potential mitochondrial liability of botanical dietary supplements, extracts from 352 authenticated plant samples used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western herbal medicine were evaluated for the ability to disrupt cellular respiration. Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) methanol extract exhibited mitochondriotoxic activity. Used by some U.S. midwives to help induce labor, blue cohosh has been associated with perinatal stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, multiple organ injury, and neonatal shock. The potential link between mitochondrial disruption and idiosyncratic herbal intoxication prompted further examination. The C. thalictroides methanol extract and three saponins, cauloside A (1), saponin PE (2), and cauloside C (3) exhibited concentration- and time-dependent mitochondriotoxic activities. Upon treatment, cell respiration rate rapidly increased and then dramatically decreased within minutes. Mechanistic studies revealed that C. thalictroides constituents impair mitochondrial function by disrupting membrane integrity. These studies provide a potential etiological link between this mitochondria-sensitive form of cytotoxicity and idiosyncratic organ damage. PMID:24328138

  4. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heung M; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H; Englander, Ella W

    2009-03-01

    Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase alpha subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

  5. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Heung M.; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H.; Englander, Ella W.

    2009-03-01

    Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase {alpha} subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

  6. Stem CO2 release under illumination: corticular photosynthesis, photorespiration or inhibition of mitochondrial respiration?

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Christiane; Pfanz, Hardy; Loreto, Francesco; Centritto, Mauro; Pietrini, Fabrizio; Alessio, Giorgio

    2006-06-01

    In illuminated stems and branches, CO2 release is often reduced. Many light-triggered processes are thought to contribute to this reduction, namely photorespiration, corticular photosynthesis or even an inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. In this study, we investigated these processes with the objective to discriminate their influence to the overall reduction of branch CO2 release in the light. CO2 gas-exchange measurements of young birch (Betula pendula Roth.) branches (< 1.5 cm) performed under photorespiratory (20% O2) and non-photorespiratory (< 2%) conditions revealed that photorespiration does not play a pre-dominant role in carbon exchange. This suppression of photorespiration was attributed to the high CO2 concentrations (C(i)) within the bark tissues (1544 +/- 227 and 618 +/- 43 micromol CO2 mol(-1) in the dark and in the light, respectively). Changes in xylem CO2 were not likely to explain the observed decrease in stem CO2 release as gas-exchange measurements before and after cutting of the branches did not effect CO2 efflux to the atmosphere. Combined fluorescence and gas-exchange measurements provided evidence that the light-dependent reduction in CO2 release can pre-dominantly be attributed to corticular refixation, whereas an inhibition of mitochondrial respiration in the light is unlikely to occur. Corticular photosynthesis was able to refix up to 97% of the CO2 produced by branch respiration, although it rarely led to a positive net photosynthetic rate.

  7. Characterization of the respiration-induced yeast mitochondrial permeability transition pore.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Patrick C; Pfeiffer, Douglas R

    2013-12-01

    When isolated mitochondria from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae oxidize respiratory substrates in the absence of phosphate and ADP, the yeast mitochondrial unselective channel, also called the yeast permeability transition pore (yPTP), opens in the inner membrane, dissipating the electrochemical gradient. ATP also induces yPTP opening. yPTP opening allows mannitol transport into isolated mitochondria of laboratory yeast strains, but mannitol is not readily permeable through the yPTP in an industrial yeast strain, Yeast Foam. The presence of oligomycin, an inhibitor of ATP synthase, allowed for respiration-induced mannitol permeability in mitochondria from this strain. Potassium (K+) had varied effects on the respiration-induced yPTP, depending on the concentration of the respiratory substrate added. At low respiratory substrate concentrations K+ inhibited respiration-induced yPTP opening, while at high substrate concentrations this effect diminished. However, at the high respiratory substrate concentrations, the presence of K+ partially prevented phosphate inhibition of yPTP opening. Phosphate was found to inhibit respiration-induced yPTP opening by binding a site on the matrix space side of the inner membrane in addition to its known inhibitory effect of donating protons to the matrix space to prevent the pH change necessary for yPTP opening. The respiration-induced yPTP was also inhibited by NAD, Mg2+, NH4 + or the oxyanion vanadate polymerized to decavanadate. The results demonstrate similar effectors of the respiration-induced yPTP as those previously described for the ATP-induced yPTP and reconcile previous strain-dependent differences in yPTP solute selectivity.

  8. Augmentation of aerobic respiration and mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle by hypoxia preconditioning with cobalt chloride.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Saurabh; Shukla, Dhananjay; Bansal, Anju

    2012-11-01

    High altitude/hypoxia training is known to improve physical performance in athletes. Hypoxia induces hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and its downstream genes that facilitate hypoxia adaptation in muscle to increase physical performance. Cobalt chloride (CoCl₂), a hypoxia mimetic, stabilizes HIF-1, which otherwise is degraded in normoxic conditions. We studied the effects of hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl₂ supplementation on physical performance, glucose metabolism, and mitochondrial biogenesis using rodent model. The results showed significant increase in physical performance in cobalt supplemented rats without (two times) or with training (3.3 times) as compared to control animals. CoCl₂ supplementation in rats augmented the biological activities of enzymes of TCA cycle, glycolysis and cytochrome c oxidase (COX); and increased the expression of glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) in muscle showing increased glucose metabolism by aerobic respiration. There was also an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle observed by increased mRNA expressions of mitochondrial biogenesis markers which was further confirmed by electron microscopy. Moreover, nitric oxide production increased in skeletal muscle in cobalt supplemented rats, which seems to be the major reason for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) induction and mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, in conclusion, we state that hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl₂ supplementation in rats increases mitochondrial biogenesis, glucose uptake and metabolism by aerobic respiration in skeletal muscle, which leads to increased physical performance. The significance of this study lies in understanding the molecular mechanism of hypoxia adaptation and improvement of work performance in normal as well as extreme conditions like hypoxia via hypoxia preconditioning.

  9. NF-κB controls energy homeostasis and metabolic adaptation by upregulating mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Claudio; Leow, Shi Chi; Anso, Elena; Rocha, Sonia; Thotakura, Anil K; Tornatore, Laura; Moretti, Marta; De Smaele, Enrico; Beg, Amer A; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Chandel, Navdeep S; Franzoso, Guido

    2011-08-28

    Cell proliferation is a metabolically demanding process. It requires active reprogramming of cellular bioenergetic pathways towards glucose metabolism to support anabolic growth. NF-κB/Rel transcription factors coordinate many of the signals that drive proliferation during immunity, inflammation and oncogenesis, but whether NF-κB regulates the metabolic reprogramming required for cell division during these processes is unknown. Here, we report that NF-κB organizes energy metabolism networks by controlling the balance between the utilization of glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. NF-κB inhibition causes cellular reprogramming to aerobic glycolysis under basal conditions and induces necrosis on glucose starvation. The metabolic reorganization that results from NF-κB inhibition overcomes the requirement for tumour suppressor mutation in oncogenic transformation and impairs metabolic adaptation in cancer in vivo. This NF-κB-dependent metabolic pathway involves stimulation of oxidative phosphorylation through upregulation of mitochondrial synthesis of cytochrome c oxidase 2 (SCO2; ref. ). Our findings identify NF-κB as a physiological regulator of mitochondrial respiration and establish a role for NF-κB in metabolic adaptation in normal cells and cancer.

  10. Growth and mitochondrial respiration of mungbeans (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.) germinated at low pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrave, M. E.; Gerth, W. A.; Scheld, H. W.; Strain, B. R.

    1988-01-01

    Mungbean (Phaseolus aureus Roxb.) seedlings were grown hypobarically to assess the effects of low pressure (21-24 kilopascals) on growth and mitochondrial respiration. Control seedlings grown at ambient pressure (101 kilopascals) were provided amounts of O2 equivalent to those provided experimental seedlings at reduced pressure to factor out responses to O2 concentration and to total pressure. Respiration was assayed using washed mitochondria, and was found to respond only to O2 concentration. Regardless of total pressure, seedlings grown at 2 millimoles O2 per liter had higher state 3 respiration rates and decreased percentages of alternative respiration compared to ambient (8.4 millimoles O2 per liter) controls. In contrast, seedling growth responded to total pressure but not to O2 concentration. Seedlings were significantly larger when grown under low pressure. While low O2 (2 millimoles O2 per liter) diminished growth at ambient pressure, growth at low pressure in the same oxygen concentration was enhanced. Respiratory development and growth of mungbean seedlings under low pressure is unimpaired whether oxygen or air is used as the chamber gas, and further, low pressure can improve growth under conditions of poor aeration.

  11. Augmentation of aerobic respiration and mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle by hypoxia preconditioning with cobalt chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Saurabh; Shukla, Dhananjay; Bansal, Anju

    2012-11-01

    High altitude/hypoxia training is known to improve physical performance in athletes. Hypoxia induces hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and its downstream genes that facilitate hypoxia adaptation in muscle to increase physical performance. Cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}), a hypoxia mimetic, stabilizes HIF-1, which otherwise is degraded in normoxic conditions. We studied the effects of hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl{sub 2} supplementation on physical performance, glucose metabolism, and mitochondrial biogenesis using rodent model. The results showed significant increase in physical performance in cobalt supplemented rats without (two times) or with training (3.3 times) as compared to control animals. CoCl{sub 2} supplementation in rats augmented the biological activities of enzymes of TCA cycle, glycolysis and cytochrome c oxidase (COX); and increased the expression of glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) in muscle showing increased glucose metabolism by aerobic respiration. There was also an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle observed by increased mRNA expressions of mitochondrial biogenesis markers which was further confirmed by electron microscopy. Moreover, nitric oxide production increased in skeletal muscle in cobalt supplemented rats, which seems to be the major reason for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) induction and mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, in conclusion, we state that hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl{sub 2} supplementation in rats increases mitochondrial biogenesis, glucose uptake and metabolism by aerobic respiration in skeletal muscle, which leads to increased physical performance. The significance of this study lies in understanding the molecular mechanism of hypoxia adaptation and improvement of work performance in normal as well as extreme conditions like hypoxia via hypoxia preconditioning. -- Highlights: ► We supplemented rats with CoCl{sub 2} for 15 days along with training. ► Co

  12. Respiration, metabolic balance, and attention in affective picture processing.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Patrick; Shafy, Samiha; Danuser, Brigitta

    2008-05-01

    The respiratory behavior during affective states is not completely understood. We studied breathing pattern responses to picture series in 37 participants. We also measured end-tidal pCO2 (EtCO2) to determine if ventilation is in balance with metabolic demands and spontaneous eye-blinking to investigate the link between respiration and attention. Minute ventilation (MV) and inspiratory drive increased with self-rated arousal. These relationships reflected increases in inspiratory volume rather than shortening of the time parameters. EtCO2 covaried with pleasantness but not arousal. Eye-blink rate decreased with increasing unpleasantness in line with a negativity bias in attention. This study confirms that respiratory responses to affective stimuli are organized to a certain degree along the dimensions of valence and arousal. It shows, for the first time, that during picture viewing, ventilatory increases with increasing arousal are in balance with metabolic activity and that inspiratory volume is modulated by arousal. MV emerges as the most reliable respiratory index of self-perceived arousal.

  13. Elevation of Pollen Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number by WHIRLY2: Altered Respiration and Pollen Tube Growth in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qiang; Guo, Liang; Shen, Zhao-Rui; Wang, Dan-Yang; Zhang, Quan; Sodmergen

    2015-01-01

    In plants, the copy number of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can be much lower than the number of mitochondria. The biological significance and regulatory mechanisms of this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here, using the pollen vegetative cell, we examined the role of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mtDNA-binding protein WHIRLY2 (AtWHY2). AtWHY2 decreases during pollen development, in parallel with the rapid degradation of mtDNA; to examine the importance of this decrease, we used the pollen vegetative cell-specific promoter Lat52 to express AtWHY2. The transgenic plants (LWHY2) had very high mtDNA levels in pollen, more than 10 times more than in the wild type (ecotype Columbia-0). LWHY2 plants were fertile, morphologically normal, and set seeds; however, reciprocal crosses with heterozygous plants showed reduced transmission of LWHY2-1 through the male and slower growth of LWHY2-1 pollen tubes. We found that LWHY2-1 pollen had significantly more reactive oxygen species and less ATP compared with the wild type, indicating an effect on mitochondrial respiration. These findings reveal that AtWHY2 affects mtDNA copy number in pollen and suggest that low mtDNA copy numbers might be the normal means by which plant cells maintain mitochondrial genetic information. PMID:26195569

  14. Mitochondrial Respiration after One Session of Calf Raise Exercise in Patients with Peripheral Vascular Disease and Healthy Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wohlwend, Martin; Rognmo, Øivind; Mattsson, Erney J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mitochondria are essential for energy production in the muscle cell and for this they are dependent upon a sufficient supply of oxygen by the circulation. Exercise training has shown to be a potent stimulus for physiological adaptations and mitochondria play a central role. Whether changes in mitochondrial respiration are seen after exercise in patients with a reduced circulation is unknown. The aim of the study was to evaluate the time course and whether one session of calf raise exercise stimulates mitochondrial respiration in the calf muscle of patients with peripheral vascular disease. Methods One group of patients with peripheral vascular disease (n = 11) and one group of healthy older adults (n = 11) were included. Patients performed one session of continuous calf raises followed by 5 extra repetitions after initiation of pain. Healthy older adults performed 100 continuous calf raises. Gastrocnemius muscle biopsies were collected at baseline and 15 minutes, one hour, three hours and 24 hours after one session of calf raise exercise. A multi substrate (octanoylcarnitine, malate, adp, glutamate, succinate, FCCP, rotenone) approach was used to analyze mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized fibers. Mixed-linear model for repeated measures was used for statistical analyses. Results Patients with peripheral vascular disease have a lower baseline respiration supported by complex I and they increase respiration supported by complex II at one hour post-exercise. Healthy older adults increase respiration supported by electron transfer flavoprotein and complex I at one hour and 24 hours post-exercise. Conclusion Our results indicate a shift towards mitochondrial respiration supported by complex II as being a pathophysiological component of peripheral vascular disease. Furthermore exercise stimulates mitochondrial respiration already after one session of calf raise exercise in patients with peripheral vascular disease and healthy older adults. Trial

  15. Over-expression of COQ10 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae inhibits mitochondrial respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Zampol, Mariana A.; Busso, Cleverson; Gomes, Fernando; Ferreira-Junior, Jose Ribamar; Tzagoloff, Alexander; Barros, Mario H.

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} COQ10 deletion elicits a defect in mitochondrial respiration correctable by addition of coenzyme Q{sub 2}, a synthetic diffusible ubiquinone. {yields} The significance that purified Coq10p contains bound Q{sub 6} was examined by testing over-expression of Coq10p on respiration. {yields} Inhibition of CoQ function due to Coq10p excess strength our hypothesis of Coq10p function in CoQ delivery. {yields} Respiratory deficiency caused by more Coq10p was specific and restored by Q{sub 2} in mitochondria or by Coq8p in cells. {yields} Coq8p over-production on other coq mutants revealed a surprisingly higher stability of other Coq proteins. -- Abstract: COQ10 deletion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae elicits a defect in mitochondrial respiration correctable by addition of coenzyme Q{sub 2}. Rescue of respiration by Q{sub 2} is a characteristic of mutants blocked in coenzyme Q{sub 6} synthesis. Unlike Q{sub 6} deficient mutants, mitochondria of the coq10 null mutant have wild-type concentrations of Q{sub 6}. The physiological significance of earlier observations that purified Coq10p contains bound Q{sub 6} was examined in the present study by testing the in vivo effect of over-expression of Coq10p on respiration. Mitochondria with elevated levels of Coq10p display reduced respiration in the bc1 span of the electron transport chain, which can be restored with exogenous Q{sub 2}. This suggests that in vivo binding of Q{sub 6} by excess Coq10p reduces the pool of this redox carrier available for its normal function in providing electrons to the bc1 complex. This is confirmed by observing that extra Coq8p relieves the inhibitory effect of excess Coq10p. Coq8p is a putative kinase, and a high-copy suppressor of the coq10 null mutant. As shown here, when over-produced in coq mutants, Coq8p counteracts turnover of Coq3p and Coq4p subunits of the Q-biosynthetic complex. This can account for the observed rescue by COQ8 of the respiratory defect in strains

  16. Sulfide-inhibition of mitochondrial respiration at very low oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Matallo, J; Vogt, J; McCook, O; Wachter, U; Tillmans, F; Groeger, M; Szabo, C; Georgieff, M; Radermacher, P; Calzia, E

    2014-09-15

    Our aim was to study the ability of an immortalized cell line (AMJ2-C11) to sustain aerobic cell respiration at decreasing oxygen concentrations under continuous sulfide exposure. We assumed that the rate of elimination of sulfide through the pathway linked to the mitochondrial respiratory chain and therefore operating under aerobic conditions, should decrease with limiting oxygen concentrations. Thus, sulfide's inhibition of cellular respiration would occur faster under continuous sulfide exposure when the oxygen concentration is in the very low range. The experiments were performed with an O2K-oxygraph (Oroboros Instruments) by suspending 0.5-1×10(6) cells in 2 ml of continuously stirred respiration medium at 37 °C and calculating the oxygen flux (JO2) as the negative derivative of the oxygen concentration in the medium. The cells were studied in two different metabolic states, namely under normal physiologic respiration (1) and after uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration (2). Oxygen concentration was controlled by means of a titration-injection pump, resulting in average concentration values of 0.73±0.05 μM, 3.1±0.2 μM, and 6.2±0.2 μM. Simultaneously we injected a 2 mM Na2S solution at a continuous rate of 10 μl/s in order to quantify the titration-time required to reduce the JO2 to 50% of the initial respiratory activity. Under the lowest oxygen concentration this effect was achieved after 3.5 [0.3;3.5] and 11.7 [6.2;21.2]min in the uncoupled and coupled state, respectively. This time was statistically significantly shorter when compared to the intermediate and the highest O2 concentrations tested, which yielded values of 24.6 [15.5;28.1]min (coupled) and 35.9 [27.4;59.2]min (uncoupled), as well as 42.4 [27.5;42.4]min (coupled) and 51.5 [46.4;51.7]min (uncoupled). All data are medians [25%, and 75% percentiles]. Our results confirm that the onset of inhibition of cell respiration by sulfide occurs earlier under a continuous exposure when approaching

  17. SDF-1/CXCL12 modulates mitochondrial respiration of immature blood cells in a bi-phasic manner.

    PubMed

    Messina-Graham, Steven; Broxmeyer, Hal

    2016-05-01

    SDF-1/CXCL12 is a potent chemokine required for the homing and engraftment of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Previous data from our group has shown that in an SDF-1/CXCL12 transgenic mouse model, lineage(-) Sca-1(+) c-Kit(+) (LSK) bone marrow cells have reduced mitochondrial membrane potential versus wild-type. These results suggested that SDF-1/CXCL12 may function to keep mitochondrial respiration low in immature blood cells in the bone marrow. Low mitochondrial metabolism helps to maintain low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can influence differentiation. To test whether SDF-1/CXCL12 regulates mitochondrial metabolism, we employed the human leukemia cell line HL-60, that expresses high levels of the SDF-1/CXCL12 receptor, CXCR4, as a model of hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro. We treated HL-60 cells with SDF-1/CXCL12 for 2 and 24h. Oxygen consumption rates (OCR), mitochondrial-associated ATP production, mitochondrial mass, and mitochondrial membrane potential of HL-60 cells were significantly reduced at 2h and increased at 24h as compared to untreated control cells. These biphasic effects of SDF-1/CXCL12 were reproduced with lineage negative primary mouse bone marrow cells, suggesting a novel function of SDF-1/CXCL12 in modulating mitochondrial respiration by regulating mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, ATP production and mitochondrial content.

  18. Evolutionary implications of mitochondrial genetic variation: mitochondrial genetic effects on OXPHOS respiration and mitochondrial quantity change with age and sex in fruit flies.

    PubMed

    Wolff, J N; Pichaud, N; Camus, M F; Côté, G; Blier, P U; Dowling, D K

    2016-04-01

    The ancient acquisition of the mitochondrion into the ancestor of modern-day eukaryotes is thought to have been pivotal in facilitating the evolution of complex life. Mitochondria retain their own diminutive genome, with mitochondrial genes encoding core subunits involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Traditionally, it was assumed that there was little scope for genetic variation to accumulate and be maintained within the mitochondrial genome. However, in the past decade, mitochondrial genetic variation has been routinely tied to the expression of life-history traits such as fertility, development and longevity. To examine whether these broad-scale effects on life-history trait expression might ultimately find their root in mitochondrially mediated effects on core bioenergetic function, we measured the effects of genetic variation across twelve different mitochondrial haplotypes on respiratory capacity and mitochondrial quantity in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. We used strains of flies that differed only in their mitochondrial haplotype, and tested each sex separately at two different adult ages. Mitochondrial haplotypes affected both respiratory capacity and mitochondrial quantity. However, these effects were highly context-dependent, with the genetic effects contingent on both the sex and the age of the flies. These sex- and age-specific genetic effects are likely to resonate across the entire organismal life-history, providing insights into how mitochondrial genetic variation may contribute to sex-specific trajectories of life-history evolution.

  19. Effect of endogenous nitric oxide on mitochondrial respiration of rat hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, J.; Curran, R.D.; Ochoa, J.B.; Harbrecht, B.G.; Hoffman, R.A.; Simmons, R.L.; Billiar, T.R. )

    1991-02-01

    Nitric oxide, a highly reactive radical, was recently identified as an intermediate of L-arginine metabolism in mammalian cells. We have shown that nitric oxide synthesis is induced in vitro in cultured hepatocytes by supernatants from activated Kupffer cells or in vivo by injecting rats with nonviable Corynebacterium parvum. In both cases, nitric oxide biosynthesis in hepatocytes was associated with suppression of total protein synthesis. This study attempts to determine the effect of nitric oxide biosynthesis on the activity of specific hepatocytic mitochondrial enzymes and to determine whether inhibition of protein synthesis is caused by suppression of energy metabolism. Exposure of hepatocytes to supernatants from activated Kupffer cells led to a 30% decrease of aconitase (Krebs cycle) and complex I (mitochondrial electron transport chain) activity. Using NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis, we demonstrated that the inhibition of mitochondrial aconitase activity was due, in part, to the action of nitric oxide. In contrast, in vivo nitric oxide synthesis of hepatocytes from Corynebacterium parvum-treated animals had no effect on mitochondrial respiration. This suggests that inhibition of protein synthesis by nitric oxide is not likely to be mediated by inhibition of energy metabolism.

  20. Stat3 promotes mitochondrial transcription and oxidative respiration during maintenance and induction of naive pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Carbognin, Elena; Betto, Riccardo M; Soriano, Maria E; Smith, Austin G; Martello, Graziano

    2016-03-15

    Transcription factor Stat3 directs self-renewal of pluripotent mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells downstream of the cytokine leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Stat3 upregulates pivotal transcription factors in the ES cell gene regulatory network to sustain naïve identity. Stat3 also contributes to the rapid proliferation of ES cells. Here, we show that Stat3 increases the expression of mitochondrial-encoded transcripts and enhances oxidative metabolism. Chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals that Stat3 binds to the mitochondrial genome, consistent with direct transcriptional regulation. An engineered form of Stat3 that localizes predominantly to mitochondria is sufficient to support enhanced proliferation of ES cells, but not to maintain their undifferentiated phenotype. Furthermore, during reprogramming from primed to naïve states of pluripotency, Stat3 similarly upregulates mitochondrial transcripts and facilitates metabolic resetting. These findings suggest that the potent stimulation of naïve pluripotency by LIF/Stat3 is attributable to parallel and synergistic induction of both mitochondrial respiration and nuclear transcription factors.

  1. Altered Glycolysis and Mitochondrial Respiration in a Zebrafish Model of Dravet Syndrome123

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Maneesh G.; Rowley, Shane; Fulton, Ruth; Dinday, Matthew T.; Baraban, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Altered metabolism is an important feature of many epileptic syndromes but has not been reported in Dravet syndrome (DS), a catastrophic childhood epilepsy associated with mutations in a voltage-activated sodium channel, Nav1.1 (SCN1A). To address this, we developed novel methodology to assess real-time changes in bioenergetics in zebrafish larvae between 4 and 6 d postfertilization (dpf). Baseline and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) stimulated glycolytic flux and mitochondrial respiration were simultaneously assessed using a Seahorse Biosciences extracellular flux analyzer. Scn1Lab mutant zebrafish showed a decrease in baseline glycolytic rate and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) compared to controls. A ketogenic diet formulation rescued mutant zebrafish metabolism to control levels. Increasing neuronal excitability with 4-AP resulted in an immediate increase in glycolytic rates in wild-type zebrafish, whereas mitochondrial OCR increased slightly and quickly recovered to baseline values. In contrast, scn1Lab mutant zebrafish showed a significantly slower and exaggerated increase of both glycolytic rates and OCR after 4-AP. The underlying mechanism of decreased baseline OCR in scn1Lab mutants was not because of altered mitochondrial DNA content or dysfunction of enzymes in the electron transport chain or tricarboxylic acid cycle. Examination of glucose metabolism using a PCR array identified five glycolytic genes that were downregulated in scn1Lab mutant zebrafish. Our findings in scn1Lab mutant zebrafish suggest that glucose and mitochondrial hypometabolism contribute to the pathophysiology of DS. PMID:27066534

  2. Cadmium exposure affects mitochondrial bioenergetics and gene expression of key mitochondrial proteins in the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica Gmelin (Bivalvia: Ostreidae).

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Inna M; Sokolov, Eugene P; Ponnappa, Kavita M

    2005-07-01

    Cadmium is a ubiquitous and extremely toxic metal, which strongly affects mitochondrial function of aquatic organisms in vitro; however, nothing is known about the in vivo effects of sublethal concentrations of this metal on mitochondrial bioenergetics. We have studied the effects of exposure to 0 (control) or 25 microg L-1 (Cd-exposed) Cd2+ on mitochondrial function and gene expression of key mitochondrial proteins in the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica. Cadmium exposure in vivo resulted in considerable accumulation of cadmium in oyster mitochondria and in a significant decrease of ADP-stimulated respiration (state 3) by 30% indicating impaired capacity for ATP production. The decrease in state 3 respiration was similar to the level of inhibition expected from the direct effects of cadmium accumulated in oyster mitochondria. On the other hand, while no effect on proton leak was expected based on the mitochondrial accumulation of cadmium, Cd-exposed oysters in fact showed a significant decline of the proton leak rate (state 4+respiration) by 40%. This suggested a downregulation of proton leak, which correlated with a decrease in mRNA expression of a mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP6 and two other potential uncouplers, mitochondrial substrate carriers MSC-1 and MSC-2. Expression of other key mitochondrial proteins including cytochrome c oxidase, adenine nucleotide transporter and voltage dependent anion channel was not affected by cadmium exposure. Adenylate energy charge (AEC) was significantly lower in Cd-exposed oysters; however, this was due to higher steady state ADP levels and not to the decrease in tissue ATP levels. Our data show that adjustment of the proton leak in cadmium-exposed oysters may be a compensatory mechanism, which allows them to maintain normal mitochondrial coupling and ATP levels despite the cadmium-induced inhibition of capacity for ATP production.

  3. Fatty acid nitroalkenes induce resistance to ischemic cardiac injury by modulating mitochondrial respiration at complex II

    PubMed Central

    Koenitzer, Jeffrey R.; Bonacci, Gustavo; Woodcock, Steven R.; Chen, Chen-Shan; Cantu-Medellin, Nadiezhda; Kelley, Eric E.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FA) are metabolic and inflammatory-derived electrophiles that mediate pleiotropic signaling actions. It was hypothesized that NO2-FA would impact mitochondrial redox reactions to induce tissue-protective metabolic shifts in cells. Nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) reversibly inhibited complex II-linked respiration in isolated rat heart mitochondria in a pH-dependent manner and suppressed superoxide formation. Nitroalkylation of Fp subunit was determined by BME capture and the site of modification by OA-NO2 defined by mass spectrometric analysis. These effects translated into reduced basal and maximal respiration and favored glycolytic metabolism in H9C2 cardiomyoblasts as assessed by extracellular H+ and O2 flux analysis. The perfusion of NO2-FA induced acute cardioprotection in an isolated perfused heart ischemia/reperfusion (IR) model as evidenced by significantly higher rate-pressure products. Together these findings indicate that NO2-FA can promote cardioprotection by inducing a shift from respiration to glycolysis and suppressing reactive species formation in the post-ischemic interval. PMID:26722838

  4. Sulfide-Inhibition of Mitochondrial Respiration at Very Low Oxygen Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Matallo, J; Vogt, J; McCook, O; Wachter, U; Tillmans, F; Groeger, M; Szabo, C; Georgieff, M; Radermacher, P; Calzia, E

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to study the capacity of an immortalized cell line (AMJ2-C11) to sustain aerobic cell respiration at decreasing oxygen concentrations under continuous sulfide exposure. We assumed that the capacity of the pathway metabolizing and eliminating sulfide, which is linked to the mitochondrial respiratory chain and therefore operates under aerobic conditions, should decrease with limiting oxygen concentrations. Thus, sulfide’s inhibition of cellular respiration would be dependent of the oxygen concentration in the very low range. The experiments were performed with an O2K-oxygraph (Oroboros Instruments) by suspending 0.5 – 1 × 106 cells in 2 ml of continuously stirred respiration medium at 37°C and calculating the oxygen flux (JO2) as the negative derivative of the oxygen concentration in the medium. The cells were studied in two different metabolic states, namely under normal physiologic respiration (1) and after uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration (2). Oxygen concentration was controlled by means of a titration-injection pump, resulting in average concentration values of 0.73 ± 0.05 μM, 3.1 ± 0.2 μM, and 6.2 ± 0.2 μM. Simultaneously we injected a 2 mM Na2S solution at a continuous rate of 10 μl/s in order to quantify the titration-time required to reduce the JO2 to 50% of the initial respiratory activity. Under the lowest oxygen concentration this effect was achieved after 3.5 [0.3; 3.5] and 11.7 [6.2;21.2] min in the uncoupled and coupled state, respectively. This time was statistically significantly shorter when compared to the intermediate and the highest O2 concentrations tested, which yielded values of 24.6[15.5;28.1] min (coupled) and 35.9[27.4;59.2] min (uncoupled), as well as 42.4 [27.5;42.4] min (coupled) and 51.5 [46.4;51.7] min (uncoupled). All data are medians [25%, and 75% percentiles]. Our results suggest that elimination of sulfide in these cells is limited by oxygen availability when approaching the anoxic condition. This

  5. Short-term training alters the control of mitochondrial respiration rate before maximal oxidative ATP synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Layec, Gwenael; Haseler, Luke J.; Hoff, Jan; Hart, Corey R.; Liu, Xin; Le Fur, Yann; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Richardson, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    Aim Short-term exercise training may induce metabolic and performance adaptations before any changes in mitochondrial enzyme potential. However, there has not been a study that has directly assessed changes in mitochondrial oxidative capacity or metabolic control as a consequence of such training in vivo. Therefore, we used 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) to examine the effect of short-term plantar flexion exercise training on phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery kinetics and the control of respiration rate. Method To this aim, we investigated 12 healthy men, experienced with this exercise modality (TRA), and 7 time-control subjects (TC). Results After 5 days of training, maximum work rate during incremental plantar flexion exercise was significantly improved (P < 0.01). During the recovery period, the maximal rate of oxidative ATP synthesis (PRE: 28 ± 13 mM.min−1; POST: 26 ± 15 mM.min−1) and the PCr recovery time constant (PRE: 31 ± 19 s; POST: 29 ± 16) were not significantly altered. In contrast, the Hill coefficient (nH) describing the cooperativity between respiration rate and ADP was significantly increased in TRA (PRE:nH = 2.7 ± 1.4; POST: nH = 3.4 ± 1.9, P < 0.05). Meanwhile, there were no systematic variations in any of these variables in TC. Conclusion This study reveals that 5 days of training induces rapid adaptation in the allosteric control of respiration rate by ADP before any substantial improvement in muscle oxidative capacity occurs. PMID:23582030

  6. Comparison of the response of bacterial luminescence and mitochondrial respiration to the effluent of an oil refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Riisberg, M.; Bratlie, E.; Stenersen, J.

    1996-04-01

    The effects of oil refinery effluents on rat mitochondrial respiration and on the luminescence of the bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum were compared. Mitochondria from male Wistar rat livers were exposed to different concentrations of refinery effluents in a semiclosed 3-ml reaction vessel. Respiration was measured polarographically with an oxygen electrode. Effects on P. phosphoreum were measured by the standard test developed by Microbics. The mitochondrial method showed EC50s in the range from 1 to 7.5%, while Microtox gave EC50 in the range from 30 to 42%. The higher sensitivity of mitochondria may be exploited in the development of a sensitive biosensor for toxicity of oil refinery effluents.

  7. Mammalian liver cytochrome c is tyrosine-48 phosphorylated in vivo, inhibiting mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Lee, Icksoo; Salomon, Arthur R; Yu, Kebing; Hüttemann, Maik

    2008-01-01

    Cytochrome c (Cyt c) is part of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), accepting electrons from bc(1) complex and transferring them to cytochrome c oxidase (CcO). The ETC generates the mitochondrial membrane potential, which is used by ATP synthase to produce ATP. In addition, the release of Cyt c from the mitochondria often commits a cell to undergo apoptosis. Considering its central role in life (respiration) and death (apoptosis) decisions one would expect tight regulation of Cyt c function. Reversible phosphorylation is a main cellular regulatory mechanism, but the effect of cell signaling targeting the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system is not well understood, and only a small number of proteins that can be phosphorylated have been identified to date. We have recently shown that Cyt c isolated from cow heart tissue is phosphorylated on tyrosine 97 in vivo, which leads to inhibition of respiration in the reaction with CcO. In this study we isolated Cyt c from a different organ, cow liver, under conditions preserving the physiological phosphorylation state. Western analysis with a phosphotyrosine specific antibody suggested that liver Cyt c is phosphorylated. Surprisingly, the phosphorylation site was unambiguously assigned to Tyr-48 by immobilized metal affinity chromatography/nano-liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (IMAC/nano-LC/ESI-MS), and not to the previously identified phospho-Tyr-97 in cow heart. As is true of Tyr-97, Tyr-48 is conserved in eukaryotes. As one possible consequence of Tyr-48 phosphorylation we analyzed the in vitro reaction kinetics with isolated cow liver CcO revealing striking differences. Maximal turnover of Tyr-48 phosphorylated Cyt c was 3.7 s(-1) whereas dephosphorylation resulted in a 2.2 fold increase in activity to 8.2 s(-1). Effects of Tyr-48 phosphorylation based on the Cyt c crystal structure are discussed.

  8. Adaptive aneuploidy protects against thiol peroxidase deficiency by increasing respiration via key mitochondrial proteins.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Alaattin; Gerashchenko, Maxim V; Seim, Inge; Labarre, Jean; Toledano, Michel B; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2015-08-25

    Aerobic respiration is a fundamental energy-generating process; however, there is cost associated with living in an oxygen-rich environment, because partially reduced oxygen species can damage cellular components. Organisms evolved enzymes that alleviate this damage and protect the intracellular milieu, most notably thiol peroxidases, which are abundant and conserved enzymes that mediate hydrogen peroxide signaling and act as the first line of defense against oxidants in nearly all living organisms. Deletion of all eight thiol peroxidase genes in yeast (∆8 strain) is not lethal, but results in slow growth and a high mutation rate. Here we characterized mechanisms that allow yeast cells to survive under conditions of thiol peroxidase deficiency. Two independent ∆8 strains increased mitochondrial content, altered mitochondrial distribution, and became dependent on respiration for growth but they were not hypersensitive to H2O2. In addition, both strains independently acquired a second copy of chromosome XI and increased expression of genes encoded by it. Survival of ∆8 cells was dependent on mitochondrial cytochrome-c peroxidase (CCP1) and UTH1, present on chromosome XI. Coexpression of these genes in ∆8 cells led to the elimination of the extra copy of chromosome XI and improved cell growth, whereas deletion of either gene was lethal. Thus, thiol peroxidase deficiency requires dosage compensation of CCP1 and UTH1 via chromosome XI aneuploidy, wherein these proteins support hydroperoxide removal with the reducing equivalents generated by the electron transport chain. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of adaptive aneuploidy counteracting oxidative stress.

  9. Epigenetic regulation of the nuclear-coded GCAT and SHMT2 genes confers human age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Osamu; Ohnishi, Sakiko; Mito, Takayuki; Shimizu, Akinori; Ishikawa, Kaori; Iashikawa, Kaori; Nakada, Kazuto; Soda, Manabu; Mano, Hiroyuki; Togayachi, Sumie; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Okita, Keisuke; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-05-22

    Age-associated accumulation of somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been proposed to be responsible for the age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects found in elderly human subjects. We carried out reprogramming of human fibroblast lines derived from elderly subjects by generating their induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and examined another possibility, namely that these aging phenotypes are controlled not by mutations but by epigenetic regulation. Here, we show that reprogramming of elderly fibroblasts restores age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects, indicating that these aging phenotypes are reversible and are similar to differentiation phenotypes in that both are controlled by epigenetic regulation, not by mutations in either the nuclear or the mitochondrial genome. Microarray screening revealed that epigenetic downregulation of the nuclear-coded GCAT gene, which is involved in glycine production in mitochondria, is partly responsible for these aging phenotypes. Treatment of elderly fibroblasts with glycine effectively prevented the expression of these aging phenotypes.

  10. Epigenetic regulation of the nuclear-coded GCAT and SHMT2 genes confers human age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, Osamu; Ohnishi, Sakiko; Mito, Takayuki; Shimizu, Akinori; Ishikawa, Kaori; Nakada, Kazuto; Soda, Manabu; Mano, Hiroyuki; Togayachi, Sumie; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Okita, Keisuke; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Age-associated accumulation of somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been proposed to be responsible for the age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects found in elderly human subjects. We carried out reprogramming of human fibroblast lines derived from elderly subjects by generating their induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and examined another possibility, namely that these aging phenotypes are controlled not by mutations but by epigenetic regulation. Here, we show that reprogramming of elderly fibroblasts restores age-associated mitochondrial respiration defects, indicating that these aging phenotypes are reversible and are similar to differentiation phenotypes in that both are controlled by epigenetic regulation, not by mutations in either the nuclear or the mitochondrial genome. Microarray screening revealed that epigenetic downregulation of the nuclear-coded GCAT gene, which is involved in glycine production in mitochondria, is partly responsible for these aging phenotypes. Treatment of elderly fibroblasts with glycine effectively prevented the expression of these aging phenotypes. PMID:26000717

  11. Calcium channel regulator Mid1 links TORC2-mediated changes in mitochondrial respiration to autophagy.

    PubMed

    Vlahakis, Ariadne; Lopez Muniozguren, Nerea; Powers, Ted

    2016-12-19

    Autophagy is a catabolic process that recycles cytoplasmic contents and is crucial for cell survival during stress. The target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase regulates autophagy as part of two distinct protein complexes, TORC1 and TORC2. TORC1 negatively regulates autophagy according to nitrogen availability. In contrast, TORC2 functions as a positive regulator of autophagy during amino acid starvation, via its target kinase Ypk1, by repressing the activity of the calcium-dependent phosphatase calcineurin and promoting the general amino acid control (GAAC) response. Precisely how TORC2-Ypk1 signaling regulates calcineurin within this pathway remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that activation of calcineurin requires Mid1, an endoplasmic reticulum-localized calcium channel regulatory protein implicated in the oxidative stress response. We find that normal mitochondrial respiration is perturbed in TORC2-Ypk1-deficient cells, which results in the accumulation of mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species that signal to Mid1 to activate calcineurin, thereby inhibiting the GAAC response and autophagy. These findings describe a novel pathway involving TORC2, mitochondrial oxidative stress, and calcium homeostasis for autophagy regulation.

  12. Reprofiling a classical anthelmintic, pyrvinium pamoate, as an anti-cancer drug targeting mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Isao; Harada, Yasuo; Kasahara, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Pyrvinium pamoate (PP) is an FDA-approved classical anthelmintic, but is now attracting particular attention as an anti-cancer drug after recent findings of its potent cytotoxicity against various cancer cell lines only during glucose starvation, as well as its anti-tumor activity against hypovascular pancreatic cancer cells transplanted in mice. The molecular mechanisms by which PP promotes such preferential toxicity against cancer cells are currently under extensive investigation. PP suppressed the NADH-fumarate reductase system that mediates a reverse reaction of the mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex II in anaerobic organisms such as parasitic helminthes or mammalian cells under tumor microenvironment-mimicking hypoglycemic/hypoxic conditions, thereby inhibiting efficient ATP production. PP also inhibited the unfolded protein response induced by glucose starvation, thereby inhibiting the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. Even under normoglycemic/normoxic conditions, PP suppressed the mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex I and thereby STAT3, inhibiting the proliferation of myeloma/erythroleukemia cells. Here, we review accumulating knowledge on its working mechanisms and evaluate PP as a novel anti-cancer drug that targets mitochondrial respiration. PMID:23061049

  13. Reprofiling a classical anthelmintic, pyrvinium pamoate, as an anti-cancer drug targeting mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Isao; Harada, Yasuo; Kasahara, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Pyrvinium pamoate (PP) is an FDA-approved classical anthelmintic, but is now attracting particular attention as an anti-cancer drug after recent findings of its potent cytotoxicity against various cancer cell lines only during glucose starvation, as well as its anti-tumor activity against hypovascular pancreatic cancer cells transplanted in mice. The molecular mechanisms by which PP promotes such preferential toxicity against cancer cells are currently under extensive investigation. PP suppressed the NADH-fumarate reductase system that mediates a reverse reaction of the mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex II in anaerobic organisms such as parasitic helminthes or mammalian cells under tumor microenvironment-mimicking hypoglycemic/hypoxic conditions, thereby inhibiting efficient ATP production. PP also inhibited the unfolded protein response induced by glucose starvation, thereby inhibiting the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. Even under normoglycemic/normoxic conditions, PP suppressed the mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex I and thereby STAT3, inhibiting the proliferation of myeloma/erythroleukemia cells. Here, we review accumulating knowledge on its working mechanisms and evaluate PP as a novel anti-cancer drug that targets mitochondrial respiration.

  14. Susceptibility to simvastatin-induced toxicity is partly determined by mitochondrial respiration and phosphorylation state of Akt.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Peter J; Zahno, Anja; Lindinger, Peter; Maseneni, Swarna; Felser, Andrea; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Brecht, Karin

    2011-12-01

    Statins are widely used to prevent cardiovascular diseases. They are well-tolerated, with side-effects mainly seen in skeletal muscle. How these side-effects are caused is unknown. We compared isolated primary mouse skeletal muscle myocytes, C2C12 myotubes and liver HepG2 cells to detect differences that could uncover why statins are toxic in skeletal muscle but less so in the liver. 10μM simvastatin caused a decrease in mitochondrial respiration in the primary mouse myocytes and C2C12 myotubes, but had no effect in the HepG2 cells. Mitochondrial integrity is maintained by multiple signaling pathways. One of these pathways, Igf-1/Akt signaling, is also heavily implicated in causing statin-induced toxicity by upregulating atrogin-1. We found that phosphorylated Akt was reduced in C2C12 myotubes but not in HepG2 cells. HepG2 mitochondrial respiration became susceptible to simvastatin-treatment after Akt inhibition, and mitochondrial respiration was rescued in Igf-1-treated C2C12 myotubes. These results suggest that disruption of Igf-1/Akt signaling is a causative factor in simvastatin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in C2C12 myotubes, whereas HepG2 cells are protected by maintaining Igf-1/Akt signaling. We conclude that phosphorylation of Akt is a key indicator of susceptibility to statin-induced toxicity. How statins can disrupt Igf-1/Akt signaling is unknown. Statins reduce geranylgeranylation of small GTPases, such as Rap1. Previous studies implicate Rap1 as a link between cAMP/Epac and Igf-1/Akt signaling. Transient transfection of constitutively active Rap1 into C2C12 myotubes led to a partial rescue of simvastatin-induced inhibition of mitochondrial respiration, providing a novel link between signaling and respiration.

  15. Lactate as substrate for mitochondrial respiration in alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    PubMed

    Lottes, Robyn G; Newton, Danforth A; Spyropoulos, Demetri D; Baatz, John E

    2015-05-01

    Because of the many energy-demanding functions they perform and their physical location in the lung, alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cells have a rapid cellular metabolism and the potential to influence substrate availability and bioenergetics both locally in the lung and throughout the body. A thorough understanding of ATII cell metabolic function in the healthy lung is necessary for determining how metabolic changes may contribute to pulmonary disease pathogenesis; however, lung metabolism is poorly understood at the cellular level. Here, we examine lactate utilization by primary ATII cells and the ATII model cell line, MLE-15, and link lactate consumption directly to mitochondrial ATP generation. ATII cells cultured in lactate undergo mitochondrial respiration at near-maximal levels, two times the rates of those grown in glucose, and oxygen consumption under these conditions is directly linked to mitochondrial ATP generation. When both lactate and glucose are available as metabolic substrate, the presence of lactate alters glucose metabolism in ATII to favor reduced glycolytic function in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that lactate is used in addition to glucose when both substrates are available. Lactate use by ATII mitochondria is dependent on monocarboxylate transporter (MCT)-mediated import, and ATII cells express MCT1, the isoform that mediates lactate import by cells in other lactate-consuming tissues. The balance of lactate production and consumption may play an important role in the maintenance of healthy lung homeostasis, whereas disruption of lactate consumption by factors that impair mitochondrial metabolism, such as hypoxia, may contribute to lactic acid build-up in disease.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in mutator mice confer respiration defects and B-cell lymphoma development.

    PubMed

    Mito, Takayuki; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Akinori; Hashizume, Osamu; Katada, Shun; Imanishi, Hirotake; Ota, Azusa; Kato, Yukina; Nakada, Kazuto; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutator mice are proposed to express premature aging phenotypes including kyphosis and hair loss (alopecia) due to their carrying a nuclear-encoded mtDNA polymerase with a defective proofreading function, which causes accelerated accumulation of random mutations in mtDNA, resulting in expression of respiration defects. On the contrary, transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ carrying mtDNA with a large-scale deletion mutation (ΔmtDNA) also express respiration defects, but not express premature aging phenotypes. Here, we resolved this discrepancy by generating mtDNA mutator mice sharing the same C57BL/6J (B6J) nuclear background with that of mito-miceΔ. Expression patterns of premature aging phenotypes are very close, when we compared between homozygous mtDNA mutator mice carrying a B6J nuclear background and selected mito-miceΔ only carrying predominant amounts of ΔmtDNA, in their expression of significant respiration defects, kyphosis, and a short lifespan, but not the alopecia. Therefore, the apparent discrepancy in the presence and absence of premature aging phenotypes in mtDNA mutator mice and mito-miceΔ, respectively, is partly the result of differences in the nuclear background of mtDNA mutator mice and of the broad range of ΔmtDNA proportions of mito-miceΔ used in previous studies. We also provided direct evidence that mtDNA abnormalities in homozygous mtDNA mutator mice are responsible for respiration defects by demonstrating the co-transfer of mtDNA and respiration defects from mtDNA mutator mice into mtDNA-less (ρ(0)) mouse cells. Moreover, heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice had a normal lifespan, but frequently developed B-cell lymphoma, suggesting that the mtDNA abnormalities in heterozygous mutator mice are not sufficient to induce a short lifespan and aging phenotypes, but are able to contribute to the B-cell lymphoma development during their prolonged lifespan.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA Mutations in Mutator Mice Confer Respiration Defects and B-Cell Lymphoma Development

    PubMed Central

    Mito, Takayuki; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Akinori; Hashizume, Osamu; Katada, Shun; Imanishi, Hirotake; Ota, Azusa; Kato, Yukina; Nakada, Kazuto; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutator mice are proposed to express premature aging phenotypes including kyphosis and hair loss (alopecia) due to their carrying a nuclear-encoded mtDNA polymerase with a defective proofreading function, which causes accelerated accumulation of random mutations in mtDNA, resulting in expression of respiration defects. On the contrary, transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ carrying mtDNA with a large-scale deletion mutation (ΔmtDNA) also express respiration defects, but not express premature aging phenotypes. Here, we resolved this discrepancy by generating mtDNA mutator mice sharing the same C57BL/6J (B6J) nuclear background with that of mito-miceΔ. Expression patterns of premature aging phenotypes are very close, when we compared between homozygous mtDNA mutator mice carrying a B6J nuclear background and selected mito-miceΔ only carrying predominant amounts of ΔmtDNA, in their expression of significant respiration defects, kyphosis, and a short lifespan, but not the alopecia. Therefore, the apparent discrepancy in the presence and absence of premature aging phenotypes in mtDNA mutator mice and mito-miceΔ, respectively, is partly the result of differences in the nuclear background of mtDNA mutator mice and of the broad range of ΔmtDNA proportions of mito-miceΔ used in previous studies. We also provided direct evidence that mtDNA abnormalities in homozygous mtDNA mutator mice are responsible for respiration defects by demonstrating the co-transfer of mtDNA and respiration defects from mtDNA mutator mice into mtDNA-less (ρ0) mouse cells. Moreover, heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice had a normal lifespan, but frequently developed B-cell lymphoma, suggesting that the mtDNA abnormalities in heterozygous mutator mice are not sufficient to induce a short lifespan and aging phenotypes, but are able to contribute to the B-cell lymphoma development during their prolonged lifespan. PMID:23418460

  18. Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors Are Localized in Striated Muscle Mitochondria and Regulate Mitochondrial Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Melser, Su; Bénard, Giovanni; Ramos, Almudena; Reguero, Leire; Arrabal, Sergio; Elezgarai, Izaskun; Gerrikagoitia, Inmaculada; Suarez, Juan; Rodríguez De Fonseca, Fernando; Puente, Nagore; Marsicano, Giovanni; Grandes, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor is widely distributed in the brain and peripheral organs where it regulates cellular functions and metabolism. In the brain, CB1 is mainly localized on presynaptic axon terminals but is also found on mitochondria (mtCB1), where it regulates cellular respiration and energy production. Likewise, CB1 is localized on muscle mitochondria, but very little is known about it. The aim of this study was to further investigate in detail the distribution and functional role of mtCB1 in three different striated muscles. Immunoelectron microscopy for CB1 was used in skeletal muscles (gastrocnemius and rectus abdominis) and myocardium from wild-type and CB1-KO mice. Functional assessments were performed in mitochondria purified from the heart of the mice and the mitochondrial oxygen consumption upon application of different acute delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) concentrations (100 nM or 200 nM) was monitored. About 26% of the mitochondrial profiles in gastrocnemius, 22% in the rectus abdominis and 17% in the myocardium expressed CB1. Furthermore, the proportion of mtCB1 versus total CB1 immunoparticles was about 60% in the gastrocnemius, 55% in the rectus abdominis and 78% in the myocardium. Importantly, the CB1 immunolabeling pattern disappeared in muscles of CB1-KO mice. Functionally, acute 100 nM or 200 nM THC treatment specifically decreased mitochondria coupled respiration between 12 and 15% in wild-type isolated mitochondria of myocardial muscles but no significant difference was noticed between THC treated and vehicle in mitochondria isolated from CB1-KO heart. Furthermore, gene expression of key enzymes involved in pyruvate synthesis, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and mitochondrial respiratory chain was evaluated in the striated muscle of CB1-WT and CB1-KO. CB1-KO showed an increase in the gene expression of Eno3, Pkm2, and Pdha1, suggesting an increased production of pyruvate. In contrast, no significant difference was

  19. Rotenone induces cell death in primary dopaminergic culture by increasing ROS production and inhibiting mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Radad, Khaled; Rausch, Wolf-Dieter; Gille, Gabriele

    2006-09-01

    Although the definite etiology of Parkinson's disease is still unclear, increasing evidence has suggested an important role for environmental factors such as exposure to pesticides in increasing the risk of developing Parkinson's disease. In the present study, primary cultures prepared from embryonic mouse mesencephala were applied to investigate the toxic effects and underlying mechanisms of rotenone-induced neuronal cell death relevant to Parkinson's disease. Results revealed that rotenone destroyed dopaminergic neurons in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Consistent with the cytotoxic effect of rotenone as evidenced by dopaminergic cell loss, it significantly increased the release of lactate dehydrogenase into the culture medium, the number of necrotic cells in the culture and the number of nuclei showing apoptotic features. Rotenone exerted toxicity by decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential, increasing reactive oxygen species production and shifting respiration to a more anaerobic state.

  20. Enhanced heme function and mitochondrial respiration promote the progression of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hooda, Jagmohan; Cadinu, Daniela; Alam, Md Maksudul; Shah, Ajit; Cao, Thai M; Sullivan, Laura A; Brekken, Rolf; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality, and about 85% of the cases are non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Importantly, recent advance in cancer research suggests that altering cancer cell bioenergetics can provide an effective way to target such advanced cancer cells that have acquired mutations in multiple cellular regulators. This study aims to identify bioenergetic alterations in lung cancer cells by directly measuring and comparing key metabolic activities in a pair of cell lines representing normal and NSCLC cells developed from the same patient. We found that the rates of oxygen consumption and heme biosynthesis were intensified in NSCLC cells. Additionally, the NSCLC cells exhibited substantially increased levels in an array of proteins promoting heme synthesis, uptake and function. These proteins include the rate-limiting heme biosynthetic enzyme ALAS, transporter proteins HRG1 and HCP1 that are involved in heme uptake, and various types of oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins such as cytoglobin and cytochromes. Several types of human tumor xenografts also displayed increased levels of such proteins. Furthermore, we found that lowering heme biosynthesis and uptake, like lowering mitochondrial respiration, effectively reduced oxygen consumption, cancer cell proliferation, migration and colony formation. In contrast, lowering heme degradation does not have an effect on lung cancer cells. These results show that increased heme flux and function are a key feature of NSCLC cells. Further, increased generation and supply of heme and oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins in cancer cells will lead to intensified oxygen consumption and cellular energy production by mitochondrial respiration, which would fuel cancer cell proliferation and progression. The results show that inhibiting heme and respiratory function can effectively arrest the progression of lung cancer cells. Hence, understanding heme function can positively impact on research in lung cancer

  1. Intramyocellular ceramides and skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration are partially regulated by Toll-like receptor 4 during hindlimb unloading.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Sung; Nelson, Daniel S; Barrows, Katherine M; O'Connell, Ryan M; Drummond, Micah J

    2016-11-01

    Physical inactivity and disuse result in skeletal muscle metabolic disruption, including insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. The role of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway in contributing to metabolic decline with muscle disuse is unknown. Therefore, our goal was to determine whether TLR4 is an underlying mechanism of insulin resistance, mitochondrial dysfunction, and skeletal muscle ceramide accumulation following muscle disuse in mice. To address this hypothesis, we subjected (n = 6-8/group) male WT and TLR4(-/-) mice to 2 wk of hindlimb unloading (HU), while a second group of mice served as ambulatory wild-type controls (WT CON, TLR4(-/-) CON). Mice were assessed for insulin resistance [homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), glucose tolerance], and hindlimb muscles (soleus and gastrocnemius) were used to assess muscle sphingolipid abundance, mitochondrial respiration [respiratory control ratio (RCR)], and NF-κB signaling. The primary finding was that HU resulted in insulin resistance, increased total ceramides, specifically Cer18:0 and Cer20:0, and decreased skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration. Importantly, TLR4(-/-) HU mice were protected from insulin resistance and altered NF-κB signaling and were partly resistant to muscle atrophy, ceramide accumulation, and decreased RCR. Skeletal muscle ceramides and RCR were correlated with insulin resistance. We conclude that TLR4 is an upstream regulator of insulin sensitivity, while partly upregulating muscle ceramides and worsening mitochondrial respiration during 2 wk of HU.

  2. A Novel Malate Dehydrogenase 2 Inhibitor Suppresses Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1 by Regulating Mitochondrial Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Kusik; Kim, Inhyub; Kim, Bo-Kyung; Lee, Kyeong; Won, Misun

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 inhibitor LW6, an aryloxyacetylamino benzoic acid derivative, inhibits malate dehydrogenase 2 (MDH2) activity during the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. In this study, we present a novel MDH2 inhibitor compound 7 containing benzohydrazide moiety, which was identified through structure-based virtual screening of chemical library. Similar to LW6, compound 7 inhibited MDH2 activity in a competitive fashion, thereby reducing NADH level. Consequently, compound 7 reduced oxygen consumption and ATP production during the mitochondrial respiration cycle, resulting in increased intracellular oxygen concentration. Therefore, compound 7 suppressed the accumulation of HIF-1α and expression of its target genes, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1). Moreover, reduction in ATP content activated AMPK, thereby inactivating ACC and mTOR the downstream pathways. As expected, compound 7 exhibited significant growth inhibition of human colorectal cancer HCT116 cells. Compound 7 demonstrated substantial anti-tumor efficacy in an in vivo xenograft assay using HCT116 mouse model. Taken together, a novel MDH2 inhibitor, compound 7, suppressed HIF-1α accumulation via reduction of oxygen consumption and ATP production, integrating metabolism into anti-cancer efficacy in cancer cells. PMID:27611801

  3. Isolation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants with altered mitochondrial respiration by chlorophyll fluorescence measurement.

    PubMed

    Massoz, Simon; Larosa, Véronique; Horrion, Bastien; Matagne, René F; Remacle, Claire; Cardol, Pierre

    2015-12-10

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model organism for studying energetic metabolism. Most mitochondrial respiratory-deficient mutants characterized to date have been isolated on the basis of their reduced ability to grow in heterotrophic conditions. Mitochondrial deficiencies are usually partly compensated by adjustment of photosynthetic activity and more particularly by transition to state 2. In this work, we explored the opportunity to select mutants impaired in respiration and/or altered in dark metabolism by measuring maximum photosynthetic efficiency by chlorophyll fluorescence analyses (FV/FM). Out of about 2900 hygromycin-resistant insertional mutants generated from wild type or from a mutant strain deficient in state transitions (stt7 strain), 22 were found to grow slowly in heterotrophic conditions and 8 of them also showed a lower FV/FM value. Several disrupted coding sequences were identified, including genes coding for three different subunits of respiratory-chain complex I (NUO9, NUOA9, NUOP4) or for isocitrate lyase (ICL1). Overall, the comparison of respiratory mutants obtained in wild-type or stt7 genetic backgrounds indicated that the FV/FM value can be used to isolate mutants severely impaired in dark metabolism.

  4. A somatic T15091C mutation in the Cytb gene of mouse mitochondrial DNA dominantly induces respiration defects.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Chisato; Takibuchi, Gaku; Shimizu, Akinori; Mito, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Kaori; Nakada, Kazuto; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-08-07

    Our previous studies provided evidence that mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations that cause mitochondrial respiration defects behave in a recessive manner, because the induction of respiration defects could be prevented with the help of a small proportion (10%-20%) of mtDNA without the mutations. However, subsequent studies found the induction of respiration defects by the accelerated accumulation of a small proportion of mtDNA with various somatic mutations, indicating the presence of mtDNA mutations that behave in a dominant manner. Here, to provide the evidence for the presence of dominant mutations in mtDNA, we used mouse lung carcinoma P29 cells and examined whether some mtDNA molecules possess somatic mutations that dominantly induce respiration defects. Cloning and sequence analysis of 40-48 mtDNA molecules from P29 cells was carried out to screen for somatic mutations in protein-coding genes, because mutations in these genes could dominantly regulate respiration defects by formation of abnormal polypeptides. We found 108 missense mutations existing in one or more of 40-48 mtDNA molecules. Of these missense mutations, a T15091C mutation in the Cytb gene was expected to be pathogenic due to the presence of its orthologous mutation in mtDNA from a patient with cardiomyopathy. After isolation of many subclones from parental P29 cells, we obtained subclones with various proportions of T15091C mtDNA, and showed that the respiration defects were induced in a subclone with only 49% T15091C mtDNA. Because the induction of respiration defects could not be prevented with the help of the remaining 51% mtDNA without the T15091C mutation, the results indicate that the T15091C mutation in mtDNA dominantly induced the respiration defects.

  5. Depression of mitochondrial respiration during daily torpor of the Djungarian hamster, Phodopus sungorus, is specific for liver and correlates with body temperature.

    PubMed

    Kutschke, Maria; Grimpo, Kirsten; Kastl, Anja; Schneider, Sandra; Heldmaier, Gerhard; Exner, Cornelia; Jastroch, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Small mammals actively decrease metabolism during daily torpor and hibernation to save energy. Increasing evidence suggests depression of mitochondrial respiration during daily torpor of the Djungarian hamster but tissue-specificity and relation to torpor depth is unknown. We first confirmed a previous study by Brown and colleagues reporting on the depressed substrate oxidation in isolated liver mitochondria of the Djungarian hamster (Phodopus sungorus) during daily torpor. Next, we show that mitochondrial respiration is not depressed in kidneys, skeletal muscle and heart. In liver mitochondria, we found that state 3 and state 4 respirations correlate with body temperature, suggesting inhibition related to torpor depth and to metabolic rate. We conclude that molecular events leading to depression of mitochondrial respiration during daily torpor are specific to liver and linked to a decrease in body temperature. Different tissue-specificity of mitochondrial depression may assist to compare and identify the molecular nature of mitochondrial alterations during torpor.

  6. CNTF-ACM promotes mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in cortical neurons through upregulating L-type calcium channel activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meiqun; Liu, Hongli; Xu, Huanbai; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaojing

    2016-09-01

    A specialized culture medium termed ciliary neurotrophic factor-treated astrocyte-conditioned medium (CNTF-ACM) allows investigators to assess the peripheral effects of CNTF-induced activated astrocytes upon cultured neurons. CNTF-ACM has been shown to upregulate neuronal L-type calcium channel current activity, which has been previously linked to changes in mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate CNTF-ACM's effects upon mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in rat cortical neurons. Cortical neurons, CNTF-ACM, and untreated control astrocyte-conditioned medium (UC-ACM) were prepared from neonatal Sprague-Dawley rat cortical tissue. Neurons were cultured in either CNTF-ACM or UC-ACM for a 48-h period. Changes in the following parameters before and after treatment with the L-type calcium channel blocker isradipine were assessed: (i) intracellular calcium levels, (ii) mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), (iii) oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) formation, (iv) intracellular nitric oxide (NO) levels, (v) mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and (vi) susceptibility to the mitochondrial complex I toxin rotenone. CNTF-ACM neurons displayed the following significant changes relative to UC-ACM neurons: (i) increased intracellular calcium levels (p < 0.05), (ii) elevation in ΔΨm (p < 0.05), (iii) increased OCR and ATP formation (p < 0.05), (iv) increased intracellular NO levels (p < 0.05), (v) increased mitochondrial ROS production (p < 0.05), and (vi) increased susceptibility to rotenone (p < 0.05). Treatment with isradipine was able to partially rescue these negative effects of CNTF-ACM (p < 0.05). CNTF-ACM promotes mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in cortical neurons through elevating L-type calcium channel activity.

  7. Exercise and Weight Loss Improve Muscle Mitochondrial Respiration, Lipid Partitioning, and Insulin Sensitivity After Gastric Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Coen, Paul M.; Menshikova, Elizabeth V.; Distefano, Giovanna; Zheng, Donghai; Tanner, Charles J.; Standley, Robert A.; Helbling, Nicole L.; Dubis, Gabriel S.; Ritov, Vladimir B.; Xie, Hui; Desimone, Marisa E.; Smith, Steven R.; Stefanovic-Racic, Maja; Toledo, Frederico G.S.; Houmard, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Both Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery and exercise can improve insulin sensitivity in individuals with severe obesity. However, the impact of RYGB with or without exercise on skeletal muscle mitochondria, intramyocellular lipids, and insulin sensitivity index (SI) is unknown. We conducted a randomized exercise trial in patients (n = 101) who underwent RYGB surgery and completed either a 6-month moderate exercise (EX) or a health education control (CON) intervention. SI was determined by intravenous glucose tolerance test. Mitochondrial respiration and intramyocellular triglyceride, sphingolipid, and diacylglycerol content were measured in vastus lateralis biopsy specimens. We found that EX provided additional improvements in SI and that only EX improved cardiorespiratory fitness, mitochondrial respiration and enzyme activities, and cardiolipin profile with no change in mitochondrial content. Muscle triglycerides were reduced in type I fibers in CON, and sphingolipids decreased in both groups, with EX showing a further reduction in a number of ceramide species. In conclusion, exercise superimposed on bariatric surgery–induced weight loss enhances mitochondrial respiration, induces cardiolipin remodeling, reduces specific sphingolipids, and provides additional improvements in insulin sensitivity. PMID:26293505

  8. Alteration of dark respiration and reduction of phototrophic growth in a mitochondrial DNA deletion mutant of Chlamydomonas lacking cob, nd4, and the 3' end of nd5.

    PubMed Central

    Duby, F; Matagne, R F

    1999-01-01

    We describe here a new type of mitochondrial mutation (dum24; for dark uniparental minus inheritance) of the unicellular photosynthetic alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The mutant fails to grow under heterotrophic conditions and displays reduced growth under both photoautotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. In reciprocal crosses between mutant and wild-type cells, the meiotic progeny only inherit the phenotype of the mating-type minus parent, indicating that the dum24 mutation exclusively affects the mitochondrial genome. Digestion with various restriction enzymes followed by DNA gel blot hybridizations with specific probes demonstrated that dum24 cells contain four types of altered mitochondrial genomes: deleted monomers lacking cob, nd4, and the 3' end of the nd5 gene; deleted monomers deprived of cob, nd4, nd5, and the 5' end of the cox1 coding sequence; and two types of dimers produced by end-to-end fusions between monomers similarly or differently deleted. Due to these mitochondrial DNA alterations, complex I activity, the cytochrome pathway of respiration, and presumably, the three phosphorylation sites associated with these enzyme activities are lacking in the mutant. The low respiratory rate of the dum24 cells results from the activities of rotenone-resistant NADH dehydrogenase, complex II, and alternative oxidase, with none of these enzymes being coupled to ATP production. To our knowledge, this type of mitochondrial mutation has never been described for photosynthetic organisms or more generally for obligate aerobes. PMID:9878636

  9. Factors affecting the location and shape of face seal leak sites on half-mask respirators.

    PubMed

    Oestenstad, Riedar Kent; Bartolucci, Alfred A

    2010-06-01

    While there have been a number of studies on the effect of leak site and shape on the magnitude of measured leakage through respirator face seals, there have been very few studies to identify the location and size of these leaks. In a previous study we used a method of identifying the location and shape of respirator leaks on a half-mask respirator by the deposition of a fluorescent tracer during a fit test, and testing for their association with facial dimensions. The purpose of this study was to apply that methodology to conduct multiple fit tests to determine if gender, respirator brand, repeated fit tests, and test exercises affected the location and shape of face seal leak sites. Categorical analysis found that none of these factors had a significant effect on the location and shape of leaks. General linear model analysis found some significant effects of the study factors on leaks, but facial dimensions had a greater effect, and there were significant differences between facial dimensions of subjects with a leak and those without. Significant differences in leak site distributions between this and the previous study may have been due to differences in facial dimensions and racial/ethnic composition. Twice as many diffuse leaks as point leaks were observed in both studies, indicating that slit-like leaks would be most appropriate on mannequins used in laboratory respirator leakage studies, and in respirator flow and penetration models. That the study factors had no significant effects in the categorical analysis, significant effects for facial dimensions were found in the linear analysis, and leak site distribution differences between this and our previous study may have been affected by differences in facial dimensions, indicate that, in addition to size, the shape of an individual's face may be an important determinant of leak sites on a half-mask respirator. This would have implications for the design of respirator facepieces and in the selection of

  10. Effects of anionic xenobiotics on rat kidney. I--Tissue and mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, J B; Krall, A R; Silverthorn, S U

    1982-01-15

    The polar 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) metabolite, 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)acetic acid (DDA), and the phenoxyacetic acid herbicides, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T), were previously shown to be accumulated to high levels in liver and kidney via the organic acid transport system, raising the possibility of organ-specific toxicity secondary to transport. In these studies, accumulation of DDA was shown to depress oxygen consumption by renal cortical slices at high doses (0.1 and 1mM). Isolated renal and hepatic mitochondria were uncoupled by low doses of DDA (5-10 nmoles/mg mitochondrial protein. Maximal uncoupling was seen at 50-70 nmoles/mg. 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T also produced uncoupling, but at doses of 70 nmoles/mg or higher. All agents were more effective with alpha-ketoglutarate or pyruvate-malate), all three agents also depressed State 3 (ADP-stimulated) respiration. Again, DDA was more effective than 2,4-D or 2,4,5-T. These results suggest that accumulation of these or other anionic xenobiotics may lead to toxicity in those tissues possessing the organic anion transport system.

  11. Selection of rodent species appropriate for mtDNA transfer to generate transmitochondrial mito-mice expressing mitochondrial respiration defects.

    PubMed

    Enoki, Shunkei; Shimizu, Akinori; Hayashi, Chisato; Imanishi, Hirotake; Hashizume, Osamu; Mekada, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Nakada, Kazuto; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that transmitochondrial mito-mice with nuclear DNA from Mus musculus and mtDNA from M. spretus do not express respiration defects, whereas those with mtDNA from Rattus norvegicus cannot be generated from ES cybrids with mtDNA from R. norvegicus due to inducing significant respiration defects and resultant losing multipotency. Here, we isolated transmitochondrial cybrids with mtDNA from various rodent species classified between M. spretus and R. norvegicus, and compared the O2 consumption rates. The results showed a strong negative correlation between phylogenetic distance and reduction of O2 consumption rates, which would be due to the coevolution of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes and the resultant incompatibility between the nuclear genome from M. musculus and the mitochondrial genome from the other rodent species. These observations suggested that M. caroli was an appropriate mtDNA donor to generate transmitochondrial mito-mice with nuclear DNA from M. musculus. Then, we generated ES cybrids with M. caroli mtDNA, and found that these ES cybrids expressed respiration defects without losing multipotency and can be used to generate transmitochondrial mito-mice expressing mitochondrial disorders.

  12. The essential oils component p-cymene induces proton leak through Fo-ATP synthase and uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration

    PubMed Central

    Custódio, José BA; Ribeiro, Mariana V; Silva, Filomena SG; Machado, Marisa; Sousa, M Céu

    2011-01-01

    Essential oils can be used as antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticarcinogenic agents or to preserve and give flavors to foods. The activity of phenolic-rich essential oils has been observed in fractions containing thymol and carvacrol which show synergistic effects with their precursor p-cymene. Their mode of action is related to several targets in the cell but specific mechanisms of activity and cytotoxic effects remain poorly characterized. Given the importance of mitochondria for cellular functions and their critical role in a vast number of diseases, this work evaluated the effects of p-cymene on mitochondrial functions. It was observed that p-cymene did not change the oxygen consumption by respiratory chain (state 2 respiration). However, p-cymene decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ), depressed the rate of ADP phosphorylation (state 3), and stimulated the oxygen consumption after phosphorylation of ADP (state 4). The respiratory control ratio (state 3/state 4) was decreased as a consequence of the inhibition of state 3 and stimulation of state 4 respiration but the ADP/O index remained unaltered as well as the mitochondrial Ca2+ fluxes. Moreover, p-cymene did not induce mitochondrial membrane disruption but depressed the Δψ, and the stimulatory effect observed on state 4, similar to the effect observed on state 2 respiration plus ATP, was inhibited by oligomycin. These effects suggest that p-cymene allows a proton leak through the Fo fraction of the phosphorylative system, changing the mitochondrial proton motive force and ATP synthesis capacity. Therefore, these data suggest mitochondria as a target for p-cymene toxicity action mechanisms. PMID:27186111

  13. Formation of a Snf1-Mec1-Atg1 Module on Mitochondria Governs Energy Deprivation-Induced Autophagy by Regulating Mitochondrial Respiration.

    PubMed

    Yi, Cong; Tong, Jingjing; Lu, Puzhong; Wang, Yizheng; Zhang, Jinxie; Sun, Chen; Yuan, Kangning; Xue, Renyu; Zou, Bing; Li, Nianzhong; Xiao, Shuhua; Dai, Chong; Huang, Yuwei; Xu, Liling; Li, Lin; Chen, She; Miao, Di; Deng, Haiteng; Li, Hongliang; Yu, Li

    2017-04-10

    Autophagy is essential for maintaining glucose homeostasis, but the mechanism by which energy deprivation activates autophagy is not fully understood. We show that Mec1/ATR, a member of the DNA damage response pathway, is essential for glucose starvation-induced autophagy. Mec1, Atg13, Atg1, and the energy-sensing kinase Snf1 are recruited to mitochondria shortly after glucose starvation. Mec1 is recruited through the adaptor protein Ggc1. Snf1 phosphorylates Mec1 on the mitochondrial surface, leading to recruitment of Atg1 to mitochondria. Furthermore, the Snf1-mediated Mec1 phosphorylation and mitochondrial recruitment of Atg1 are essential for maintaining mitochondrial respiration during glucose starvation, and active mitochondrial respiration is required for energy deprivation-activated autophagy. Thus, formation of a Snf1-Mec1-Atg1 module on mitochondria governs energy deprivation-induced autophagy by regulating mitochondrial respiration.

  14. Anaerobic respiration: In vitro efficacy of Nitazoxanide against mitochondriate Acanthamoeba castellanii of the T4 genotype.

    PubMed

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Farooq, Maria; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-10-01

    Acanthamoeba is an opportunistic protist pathogen that is responsible for serious human and animal infection. Being one of the most frequently isolated protists from the environment, it is likely that it readily encounters microaerophilic environments. For respiration under anaerobic or low oxygen conditions in several amitochondriate protists, decarboxylation of pyruvate is catalyzed by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase instead of pyruvate dehydrogenase. In support, Nitazoxanide, an inhibitor of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, is effective and non-mutagenic clinically against a range of amitochondriate protists, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis. The overall aim of the present study was to determine in vitro efficacy of Nitazoxanide against Acanthamoeba castellanii. At micromolar concentrations, the findings revealed that Nitazoxanide neither affected A. castellanii growth or viability nor amoeba-mediated host cell monolayer damage in vitro or extracellular proteolytic activities. Similarly, microaerophilic conditions alone had no significant effects. In contrast, microaerophilic conditions together with Nitazoxanide showed amoebicidal effects and inhibited A. castellanii-mediated host cell monolayer damage as well as extracellular proteases. Using encystation assays, it was observed that Nitazoxanide inhibited trophozoite transformation into cysts both under aerophilic and microaerophilic conditions. Furthermore, pre-treatment of cysts with Nitazoxanide inhibited A. castellanii excystation. These findings are important in the identification of potential targets that could be useful against parasite-specific respiration as well as to understand the basic biology of the life cycle of Acanthamoeba.

  15. Amyloid-beta leads to impaired cellular respiration, energy production and mitochondrial electron chain complex activities in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rhein, V; Baysang, G; Rao, S; Meier, F; Bonert, A; Müller-Spahn, F; Eckert, A

    2009-09-01

    Evidence suggests that amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein is a key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and it has been recently proposed that mitochondria are involved in the biochemical pathway by which Abeta can lead to neuronal dysfunction. Here we investigated the specific effects of Abeta on mitochondrial function under physiological conditions. Mitochondrial respiratory functions and energy metabolism were analyzed in control and in human wild-type amyloid precursor protein (APP) stably transfected human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y). Mitochondrial respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) in vital cells was measured with a high-resolution respirometry system (Oxygraph-2k). In addition, we determined the individual activities of mitochondrial complexes I-IV that compose ETC and ATP cellular levels. While the activities of complexes I and II did not change between cell types, complex IV activity was significantly reduced in APP cells. In contrast, activity of complex III was significantly enhanced in APP cells, as compensatory response in order to balance the defect of complex IV. However, this compensatory mechanism could not prevent the strong impairment of total respiration in vital APP cells. As a result, the respiratory control ratio (state3/state4) together with ATP production decreased in the APP cells in comparison with the control cells. Chronic exposure to soluble Abeta protein may result in an impairment of energy homeostasis due to a decreased respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain which, in turn, may accelerate neurons demise.

  16. Left Ventricular Transmural Gradient in Mitochondrial Respiration Is Associated with Increased Sub-Endocardium Nitric Oxide and Reactive Oxygen Species Productions

    PubMed Central

    Kindo, Michel; Gerelli, Sébastien; Bouitbir, Jamal; Hoang Minh, Tam; Charles, Anne-Laure; Mazzucotelli, Jean-Philippe; Zoll, Joffrey; Piquard, François; Geny, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Left ventricle (LV) transmural gradient in mitochondrial respiration has been recently reported. However, to date, the physiological mechanisms involved in the lower endocardium mitochondrial respiration chain capacity still remain to be determined. Since, nitric oxide (NO) synthase expression in the heart has spatial heterogeneity and might impair mitochondrial function, we investigated a potential association between LV transmural NO and mitochondrial function gradient. Methods: Maximal oxidative capacity (VMax) and relative contributions of the respiratory chain complexes II, III, IV (VSucc) and IV (VTMPD), mitochondrial content (citrate synthase activity), coupling, NO (electron paramagnetic resonance), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (H2O2 and dihydroethidium (DHE) staining) were determined in rat sub-endocardium (Endo) and sub-epicardium (Epi). Further, the effect of a direct NO donor (MAHMA NONOate) on maximal mitochondrial respiratory rates (Vmax) was determined. Results: Mitochondrial respiratory chain activities were reduced in the Endo compared with the Epi (−16.92%; P = 0.04 for Vmax and –18.73%; P = 0.02, for Vsucc, respectively). NO production was two-fold higher in the Endo compared with the Epi (P = 0.002) and interestingly, increasing NO concentration reduced Vmax. Mitochondrial H2O2 and LV ROS productions were significantly increased in Endo compared to Epi, citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial coupling being similar in the two layers. Conclusions: LV mitochondrial respiration transmural gradient is likely related to NO and possibly ROS increased production in the sub-endocardium. PMID:27582709

  17. Different tree species affect soil respiration spatial distribution in a subtropical forest of southern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Po-Neng; Yu, Jui-Chu; Wang, Ya-nan; Lai, Yen-Jen

    2014-05-01

    Global forests contain 69% of total carbon stored in forest soil and litter. But the carbon storage ability and release rate of warming gases of forest soil also affect global climate change. Soil carbon cycling processes are paid much attention by ecological scientists and policy makers because of the possibility of carbon being stored in soil via land use management. Soil respiration contributed large part of terrestrial carbon flux, but the relationship of soil respiration and climate change was still obscurity. Most of soil respiration researches focus on template and tropical area, little was known that in subtropical area. Afforestation is one of solutions to mitigate CO2 increase and to sequestrate CO2 in tree and soil. Therefore, the objective of this study is to clarify the relationship of tree species and soil respiration distribution in subtropical broad-leaves plantation in southern Taiwan. The research site located on southern Taiwan was sugarcane farm before 2002. The sugarcane was removed and fourteen broadleaved tree species were planted in 2002-2005. Sixteen plots (250m*250m) were set on 1 km2 area, each plot contained 4 subplots (170m2). The forest biomass (i.e. tree height, DBH) understory biomass, litter, and soil C were measured and analyzed at 2011 to 2012. Soil respiration measurement was sampled in each subplot in each month. The soil belongs to Entisol with over 60% of sandstone. The soil pH is 5.5 with low base cations because of high sand percentage. Soil carbon storage showed significantly negative relationship with soil bulk density (p<0.001) in research site. The differences of distribution of live tree C pool among 16 plots were affected by growth characteristic of tree species. Data showed that the accumulation amount of litterfall was highest in December to February and lowest in June. Different tree species planted in 16 plots, resulting in high spatial variation of litterfall amount. It also affected total amount of litterfall

  18. Mitochondrial p53 mediates a transcription-independent regulation of cell respiration and interacts with the mitochondrial F₁F0-ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Bergeaud, Marie; Mathieu, Lise; Guillaume, Arnaud; Moll, Ute M; Mignotte, Bernard; Le Floch, Nathalie; Vayssière, Jean-Luc; Rincheval, Vincent

    2013-09-01

    We and others previously reported that endogenous p53 can be located at mitochondria in the absence of stress, suggesting that p53 has a role in the normal physiology of this organelle. The aim of this study was to characterize in unstressed cells the intramitochondrial localization of p53 and identify new partners and functions of p53 in mitochondria. We find that the intramitochondrial pool of p53 is located in the intermembrane space and the matrix. Of note, unstressed HCT116 p53(+/+) cells simultaneously show increased O₂ consumption and decreased mitochondrial superoxide production compared with their p53-null counterpart. This data was confirmed by stable H1299 cell lines expressing low levels of p53 specifically targeted to the matrix. Using immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we identified the oligomycin sensitivity-conferring protein (OSCP), a subunit of the F₁F₀-ATP synthase complex, as a new partner of endogenous p53, specifically interacting with p53 localized in the matrix. Interestingly, this interaction seems implicated in mitochondrial p53 localization. Moreover, p53 localized in the matrix promotes the assembly of F₁F₀-ATP synthase. Taking into account that deregulations of mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species production are tightly linked to cancer development, we suggest that mitochondrial p53 may be an important regulator of normal mitochondrial and cellular physiology, potentially exerting tumor suppression activity inside mitochondria.

  19. Knockout of Drosophila RNase ZL impairs mitochondrial transcript processing, respiration and cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xie; Dubrovsky, Edward B.

    2015-01-01

    RNase ZL is a highly conserved tRNA 3′-end processing endoribonuclease. Similar to its mammalian counterpart, Drosophila RNase ZL (dRNaseZ) has a mitochondria targeting signal (MTS) flanked by two methionines at the N-terminus. Alternative translation initiation yields two protein forms: the long one is mitochondrial, and the short one may localize in the nucleus or cytosol. Here, we have generated a mitochondria specific knockout of the dRNaseZ gene. In this in vivo model, cells deprived of dRNaseZ activity display impaired mitochondrial polycistronic transcript processing, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a switch to aerobic glycolysis compensating for cellular ATP. Damaged mitochondria impose a cell cycle delay at the G2 phase disrupting cell proliferation without affecting cell viability. Antioxidants attenuate genotoxic stress and rescue cell proliferation, implying a critical role for ROS. We suggest that under a low-stress condition, ROS activate tumor suppressor p53, which modulates cell cycle progression and promotes cell survival. Transcriptional profiling of p53 targets confirms upregulation of antioxidant and cycB-Cdk1 inhibitor genes without induction of apoptotic genes. This study implicates Drosophila RNase ZL in a novel retrograde signaling pathway initiated by the damage in mitochondria and manifested in a cell cycle delay before the mitotic entry. PMID:26553808

  20. Correlation between fluidising effects on phospholipid membranes and mitochondrial respiration of propofol and p-nitrosophenol homologues.

    PubMed

    Momo, Federico; Fabris, Sabrina; Wisniewska, Anna; Fiore, Cristina; Bindoli, Alberto; Scutari, Guido; Stevanato, Roberto

    2003-03-25

    Nitrosopropofol (2-6-diisopropyl-4-nitrosophenol) has dramatic consequences for respiration, ATP synthesis and the transmembrane potential of isolated rat liver mitochondria at concentrations at which propofol (2-6-diisopropylphenol) does not cause any apparent effects. These results correlate well with the observation that nitrosopropofol is also a stronger perturbing agent of phospholipid membranes. In this paper we verify the possible biological activity of different phenols and nitrosophenols on mitochondrial respiration. We then discuss their interactions with phospholipid liposomes, studied with differential scanning calorimetry, spin labelling techniques and UV-Vis spectrophotometry, in order to obtain information on drug distribution and the modifications they impose on lipid bilayer. The results of the experiments performed on mitochondria and model membranes prove an interesting correlation between the effects of the molecules on both systems.

  1. Inhibitors of the mitochondrial cytochrome b-c1 complex inhibit the cyanide-insensitive respiration of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Turrens, J F; Bickar, D; Lehninger, A L

    1986-06-01

    The cyanide-insensitive respiration of bloodstream trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma brucei (75 +/- 8 nmol O2 min-1(mg protein)-1) is completely inhibited by the mitochondrial ubiquinone-like inhibitors 2-hydroxy-3-undecyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (UHNQ) and 5-n-undecyl-6-hydroxy-4,7-dioxobenzothiazole (UHDBT). The Ki values for UHDBT (30 nM) and UHNQ (2 microM) are much lower than the reported Ki for salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) (5 microM), a widely used inhibitor of the cyanide-insensitive oxidase. UHNQ also stimulated the glycerol-3-phosphate-dependent reduction of phenazine methosulfate, demonstrating that the site of UHNQ inhibition is on the terminal oxidase of the cyanide-insensitive respiration of T. brucei. These results suggest that a ubiquinone-like compound may act as an electron carrier between the two enzymatic components of the cyanide-insensitive glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase.

  2. Targeting mitochondria by Zn(II)N-alkylpyridylporphyrins: the impact of compound sub-mitochondrial partition on cell respiration and overall photodynamic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Odeh, Ahmad M; Craik, James D; Ezzeddine, Rima; Tovmasyan, Artak; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Benov, Ludmil T

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in aerobic ATP production and redox control. They harness crucial metabolic pathways and control cell death mechanisms, properties that make these organelles essential for survival of most eukaryotic cells. Cancer cells have altered cell death pathways and typically show a shift towards anaerobic glycolysis for energy production, factors which point to mitochondria as potential culprits in cancer development. Targeting mitochondria is an attractive approach to tumor control, but design of pharmaceutical agents based on rational approaches is still not well established. The aim of this study was to investigate which structural features of specially designed Zn(II)N-alkylpyridylporphyrins would direct them to mitochondria and to particular mitochondrial targets. Since Zn(II)N-alkylpyridylporphyrins can act as highly efficient photosensitizers, their localization can be confirmed by photodamage to particular mitochondrial components. Using cultured LS174T adenocarcinoma cells, we found that subcellular distribution of Zn-porphyrins is directed by the nature of the substituents attached to the meso pyridyl nitrogens at the porphyrin ring. Increasing the length of the aliphatic chain from one carbon (methyl) to six carbons (hexyl) increased mitochondrial uptake of the compounds. Such modifications also affected sub-mitochondrial distribution of the Zn-porphyrins. The amphiphilic hexyl derivative (ZnTnHex-2-PyP) localized in the vicinity of cytochrome c oxidase complex, causing its inactivation during illumination. Photoinactivation of critical cellular targets explains the superior efficiency of the hexyl derivative in causing mitochondrial photodamage, and suppressing cellular respiration and survival. Design of potent photosensitizers and redox-active scavengers of free radicals should take into consideration not only selective organelle uptake and localization, but also selective targeting of critical macromolecular structures.

  3. Targeting Mitochondria by Zn(II)N-Alkylpyridylporphyrins: The Impact of Compound Sub-Mitochondrial Partition on Cell Respiration and Overall Photodynamic Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Odeh, Ahmad M.; Craik, James D.; Ezzeddine, Rima; Tovmasyan, Artak; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Benov, Ludmil T.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in aerobic ATP production and redox control. They harness crucial metabolic pathways and control cell death mechanisms, properties that make these organelles essential for survival of most eukaryotic cells. Cancer cells have altered cell death pathways and typically show a shift towards anaerobic glycolysis for energy production, factors which point to mitochondria as potential culprits in cancer development. Targeting mitochondria is an attractive approach to tumor control, but design of pharmaceutical agents based on rational approaches is still not well established. The aim of this study was to investigate which structural features of specially designed Zn(II)N-alkylpyridylporphyrins would direct them to mitochondria and to particular mitochondrial targets. Since Zn(II)N-alkylpyridylporphyrins can act as highly efficient photosensitizers, their localization can be confirmed by photodamage to particular mitochondrial components. Using cultured LS174T adenocarcinoma cells, we found that subcellular distribution of Zn-porphyrins is directed by the nature of the substituents attached to the meso pyridyl nitrogens at the porphyrin ring. Increasing the length of the aliphatic chain from one carbon (methyl) to six carbons (hexyl) increased mitochondrial uptake of the compounds. Such modifications also affected sub-mitochondrial distribution of the Zn-porphyrins. The amphiphilic hexyl derivative (ZnTnHex-2-PyP) localized in the vicinity of cytochrome c oxidase complex, causing its inactivation during illumination. Photoinactivation of critical cellular targets explains the superior efficiency of the hexyl derivative in causing mitochondrial photodamage, and suppressing cellular respiration and survival. Design of potent photosensitizers and redox-active scavengers of free radicals should take into consideration not only selective organelle uptake and localization, but also selective targeting of critical macromolecular structures. PMID

  4. Effects of isoquinoline derivatives structurally related to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) on mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    McNaught, K S; Thull, U; Carrupt, P A; Altomare, C; Cellamare, S; Carotti, A; Testa, B; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D

    1996-06-14

    Isoquinoline derivatives exert 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-like activity as inhibitors of complex I and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase activity in rat brain mitochondrial fragments. We now examine the ability of 19 isoquinoline derivatives and MPP+ to accumulate and inhibit respiration in intact rat liver mitochondria, assessed using polarographic techniques. None of the compounds examined inhibited respiration supported by either succinate + rotenone or tetramethylparaphenylenediamine (TMPD) + ascorbate. However, with glutamate + malate as substrates, 15 isoquinoline derivatives and MPP+ inhibited state 3 and, to a lesser extent, state 4 respiration in a time-dependent manner. None of the isoquinoline derivatives were more potent than MPP+. 6,7-Dimethoxy-1-styryl-3,4-dihydroisoquinoline uncoupled mitochondrial respiration. Qualitative structure-activity relationship studies revealed that isoquinolinium cations were more active than isoquinolines in inhibiting mitochondrial respiration; these, in turn, were more active than dihydroisoquinolines and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolines. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship studies using Comparative Molecular Field Analysis showed that the inhibitory potency of isoquinoline derivatives was determined by steric, rather than electrostatic, properties of the compounds. A hypothetical binding site was identified that may be related to a rate-limiting transport process, rather than to enzyme inhibition. In conclusion, isoquinoline derivatives are less potent in inhibiting respiration in intact mitochondria than impairing complex I activity in mitochondrial fragments. This suggests that isoquinoline derivatives are not accumulated by mitochondria as avidly as MPP+. The activity of charged and neutral isoquinoline derivatives implicates both active and passive processes by which these compounds enter mitochondria, although the quaternary nitrogen moiety of the isoquinolinium cations favours

  5. Fatty acid synthase inhibitors induce apoptosis in non-tumorigenic melan-a cells associated with inhibition of mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Rossato, Franco A; Zecchin, Karina G; La Guardia, Paolo G; Ortega, Rose M; Alberici, Luciane C; Costa, Rute A P; Catharino, Rodrigo R; Graner, Edgard; Castilho, Roger F; Vercesi, Aníbal E

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FASN) is responsible for the endogenous synthesis of palmitate, a saturated long-chain fatty acid. In contrast to most normal tissues, a variety of human cancers overexpress FASN. One such cancer is cutaneous melanoma, in which the level of FASN expression is associated with tumor invasion and poor prognosis. We previously reported that two FASN inhibitors, cerulenin and orlistat, induce apoptosis in B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells via the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. Here, we investigated the effects of these inhibitors on non-tumorigenic melan-a cells. Cerulenin and orlistat treatments were found to induce apoptosis and decrease cell proliferation, in addition to inducing the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and activating caspases-9 and -3. Transfection with FASN siRNA did not result in apoptosis. Mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that treatment with the FASN inhibitors did not alter either the mitochondrial free fatty acid content or composition. This result suggests that cerulenin- and orlistat-induced apoptosis events are independent of FASN inhibition. Analysis of the energy-linked functions of melan-a mitochondria demonstrated the inhibition of respiration, followed by a significant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and the stimulation of superoxide anion generation. The inhibition of NADH-linked substrate oxidation was approximately 40% and 61% for cerulenin and orlistat treatments, respectively, and the inhibition of succinate oxidation was approximately 46% and 52%, respectively. In contrast, no significant inhibition occurred when respiration was supported by the complex IV substrate N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD). The protection conferred by the free radical scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine indicates that the FASN inhibitors induced apoptosis through an oxidative stress-associated mechanism. In combination, the present results demonstrate that cerulenin and orlistat induce

  6. Fatty Acid Synthase Inhibitors Induce Apoptosis in Non-Tumorigenic Melan-A Cells Associated with Inhibition of Mitochondrial Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Rossato, Franco A.; Zecchin, Karina G.; La Guardia, Paolo G.; Ortega, Rose M.; Alberici, Luciane C.; Costa, Rute A. P.; Catharino, Rodrigo R.; Graner, Edgard; Castilho, Roger F.; Vercesi, Aníbal E.

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FASN) is responsible for the endogenous synthesis of palmitate, a saturated long-chain fatty acid. In contrast to most normal tissues, a variety of human cancers overexpress FASN. One such cancer is cutaneous melanoma, in which the level of FASN expression is associated with tumor invasion and poor prognosis. We previously reported that two FASN inhibitors, cerulenin and orlistat, induce apoptosis in B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells via the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. Here, we investigated the effects of these inhibitors on non-tumorigenic melan-a cells. Cerulenin and orlistat treatments were found to induce apoptosis and decrease cell proliferation, in addition to inducing the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and activating caspases-9 and -3. Transfection with FASN siRNA did not result in apoptosis. Mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that treatment with the FASN inhibitors did not alter either the mitochondrial free fatty acid content or composition. This result suggests that cerulenin- and orlistat-induced apoptosis events are independent of FASN inhibition. Analysis of the energy-linked functions of melan-a mitochondria demonstrated the inhibition of respiration, followed by a significant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and the stimulation of superoxide anion generation. The inhibition of NADH-linked substrate oxidation was approximately 40% and 61% for cerulenin and orlistat treatments, respectively, and the inhibition of succinate oxidation was approximately 46% and 52%, respectively. In contrast, no significant inhibition occurred when respiration was supported by the complex IV substrate N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD). The protection conferred by the free radical scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine indicates that the FASN inhibitors induced apoptosis through an oxidative stress-associated mechanism. In combination, the present results demonstrate that cerulenin and orlistat

  7. Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration is associated with mTOR regulation in hepatocytes of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Hagland, Hanne R.; Nilsson, Linn I.H.; Burri, Lena; Nikolaisen, Julie; Berge, Rolf K.; Tronstad, Karl J.

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated mechanisms of mitochondrial regulation in rat hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) was employed to activate mitochondrial oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was confirmed that PPAR target genes were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanism involved activation mTOR. -- Abstract: The hypolipidemic effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) activators has been explained by increasing mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, as observed in livers of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA). PPAR-activation does, however, not fully explain the metabolic adaptations observed in hepatocytes after treatment with TTA. We therefore characterized the mitochondrial effects, and linked this to signalling by the metabolic sensor, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). In hepatocytes isolated from TTA-treated rats, the changes in cellular content and morphology were consistent with hypertrophy. This was associated with induction of multiple mitochondrial biomarkers, including mitochondrial DNA, citrate synthase and mRNAs of mitochondrial proteins. Transcription analysis further confirmed activation of PPAR{alpha}-associated genes, in addition to genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Analysis of mitochondrial respiration revealed that the capacity of both electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation were increased. These effects coincided with activation of the stress related factor, ERK1/2, and mTOR. The protein level and phosphorylation of the downstream mTOR actors eIF4G and 4E-BP1 were induced. In summary, TTA increases mitochondrial respiration by inducing hypertrophy and mitochondrial biogenesis in rat hepatocytes, via adaptive regulation of PPARs as well as mTOR.

  8. From the Cover: Arsenite Uncouples Mitochondrial Respiration and Induces a Warburg-like Effect in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Luz, Anthony L; Godebo, Tewodros R; Bhatt, Dhaval P; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Maurer, Laura L; Hirschey, Matthew D; Meyer, Joel N

    2016-08-01

    Millions of people worldwide are chronically exposed to arsenic through contaminated drinking water. Despite decades of research studying the carcinogenic potential of arsenic, the mechanisms by which arsenic causes cancer and other diseases remain poorly understood. Mitochondria appear to be an important target of arsenic toxicity. The trivalent arsenical, arsenite, can induce mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production, inhibit enzymes involved in energy metabolism, and induce aerobic glycolysis in vitro, suggesting that metabolic dysfunction may be important in arsenic-induced disease. Here, using the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans and a novel metabolic inhibition assay, we report an in vivo induction of aerobic glycolysis following arsenite exposure. Furthermore, arsenite exposure induced severe mitochondrial dysfunction, including altered pyruvate metabolism; reduced steady-state ATP levels, ATP-linked respiration and spare respiratory capacity; and increased proton leak. We also found evidence that induction of autophagy is an important protective response to arsenite exposure. Because these results demonstrate that mitochondria are an important in vivo target of arsenite toxicity, we hypothesized that deficiencies in mitochondrial electron transport chain genes, which cause mitochondrial disease in humans, would sensitize nematodes to arsenite. In agreement with this, nematodes deficient in electron transport chain complexes I, II, and III, but not ATP synthase, were sensitive to arsenite exposure, thus identifying a novel class of gene-environment interactions that warrant further investigation in the human populace.

  9. [Endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit: dependence of respiration of secretory cells on activity of ryanodine- and IP3 - sensitive Ca(2+)-channels].

    PubMed

    Velykopols'ka, O Iu; Man'ko, B O; Man'ko, V V

    2012-01-01

    Using Clark oxygen electrode, dependence of mitochondrial functions on Ca(2+)-release channels activity of Chironomus plumosus L. larvae salivary glands suspension was investigated. Cells were ATP-permeabilized in order to enable penetration of exogenous oxidative substrates. Activation of plasmalemmal P2X-receptors (as well as P2Y-receptors) per se does not modify the endogenous respiration of salivary gland suspension. That is, Ca(2+)-influx from extracellular medium does not influence functional activity of mitochondria, although they are located along the basal part of the plasma membrane. Activation of RyRs intensifies endogenous respiration and pyruvate-malate-stimulated respiration, but not succinate-stimulated respiration. Neither activation of IP3Rs (via P2Y-receptors activation), nor their inhibition alters endogenous respiration. Nevertheless, IP3Rs inhibition by 2-APB intensifies succinate-stimulated respiration. All abovementioned facts testify that Ca2+, released from stores via channels, alters functional activity of mitochondria, and undoubtedly confirm the existence of endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit in Ch. plumosus larvae salivary glands secretory cells. In steady state of endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit the spontaneous activity of IP3Rs is observed; released through IP3Rs, Ca2+ is accumulated in mitochondria via uniporter and modulates oxidative processes. Activation of RyRs induces the transition of endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit to the active state, which is required to intensify cell respiration and oxidative phosphorylation. As expected, the transition of endoplasmic-mitochondrial Ca(2+)-functional unit to inactivated state (i. e. inhibition of Ca(2+)-release channels at excessive [Ca2+]i) limits the duration of signal transduction, has protective nature and prevents apoptosis.

  10. Electron transport chain defect and inefficient respiration may underlie pulmonary hypertension syndrome (ascites)-associated mitochondrial dysfunction in broilers.

    PubMed

    Cawthon, D; Beers, K; Bottje, W G

    2001-04-01

    By using a series of chemical inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration, a site-specific defect in the electron transport chain was identified in mitochondria obtained from broilers with pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS; ascites). Located at the succinate:ubiquinone oxido-reductase (Complex II:CoQ) interface, this defect would allow electrons to leak from the respiratory chain and consume oxygen by forming reactive oxygen species at a greater rate than in control mitochondria. Lower levels of the primary antioxidants, alpha- and beta-tocopherol, and glutathione (GSH) in PHS mitochondria confirmed the presence of oxidative stress. Respiration studies of PHS liver mitochondria also revealed disease-associated decreases in the respiratory control ratio (RCR, an index of electron transport chain coupling). Differences in the RCR as well as the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) to O ratio (an index of oxidative phosphorylation) between control and PHS mitochondria were accentuated by sequential additions of ADP to isolated mitochondria. In a second experiment, similar improvements in functional indices following sequential additions of ADP and responses to respiratory chain inhibitors were observed in liver mitochondria isolated from Single Comb White Leghorn (SCWL) males (resistant to PHS) similar to that observed in control broiler mitochondria in Experiment 1. The combined results indicate the presence of a site-specific defect at either Complex II, ubiquinone, or both in liver mitochondria obtained from broilers with PHS that may be responsible for the oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction observed in this costly metabolic disease.

  11. Cardioprotection by modulation of mitochondrial respiration during ischemia–reperfusion: Role of apoptosis-inducing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Aijun; Szczepanek, Karol; Hu, Ying; Lesnefsky, Edward J.; Chen, Qun

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Blockade of electron transport prevents the loss of AIF from mitochondria during IR. •Blockade of electron transport decreases caspase-independent cell death during IR. •Mitochondrial AIF content is down-regulated in Harlequin mice. •Blockade of electron transport protects Harlequin mouse hearts during IR. •Amobarbital protection is partially dependent on mitochondrial AIF content. -- Abstract: The transient, reversible blockade of electron transport (BET) during ischemia or at the onset of reperfusion protects mitochondria and decreases cardiac injury. Apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) is located within the mitochondrial intermembrane space. A release of AIF from mitochondria into cytosol and nucleus triggers caspase-independent cell death. We asked if BET prevents the loss of AIF from mitochondria as a mechanism of protection in the buffer perfused heart. BET during ischemia with amobarbital, a rapidly reversible inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I, attenuated a release of AIF from mitochondria into cytosol, in turn decreasing the formation of cleaved and activated PARP-1. These results suggest that BET-mediated protection may occur through prevention of the loss of AIF from mitochondria during ischemia–reperfusion. In order to further clarify the role of mitochondrial AIF in BET-mediated protection, Harlequin (Hq) mice, a genetic model with mitochondrial AIF deficiency, were used to test whether BET could still decrease cell injury in Hq mouse hearts during reperfusion. BET during ischemia protected Hq mouse hearts against ischemia–reperfusion injury and improved mitochondrial function in these hearts during reperfusion. Thus, cardiac injury can still be decreased in the presence of down-regulated mitochondrial AIF content. Taken together, BET during ischemia protects both hearts with normal mitochondrial AIF content and hearts with mitochondrial AIF deficiency. Although preservation of mitochondrial AIF content plays a key role in

  12. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and decreased fatigue resistance followed by severe muscle weakness in skeletal muscle of mitochondrial DNA mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takashi; Ivarsson, Niklas; Hernández, Andrés; Fahlström, Andreas; Cheng, Arthur J; Zhang, Shi-Jin; Bruton, Joseph D; Ulfhake, Brun; Westerblad, Håkan

    2012-12-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction can drastically impair muscle function, with weakness and exercise intolerance as key symptoms. Here we examine the time course of development of muscle dysfunction in a mouse model of premature ageing induced by defective proofreading function of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymerase (mtDNA mutator mouse). Isolated fast-twitch muscles and single muscle fibres from young (3-5 months) and end-stage (11 months) mtDNA mutator mice were compared to age-matched control mice. Force and free myoplasmic [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](i)) were measured under resting conditions and during fatigue induced by repeated tetani. Muscles of young mtDNA mutator mice displayed no weakness in the rested state, but had lower force and [Ca(2+)](i) than control mice during induction of fatigue. Muscles of young mtDNA mutator mice showed decreased activities of citrate synthase and β-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, reduced expression of cytochrome c oxidase, and decreased expression of triggers of mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α, PPARα, AMPK). Muscles from end-stage mtDNA mutator mice showed weakness under resting conditions with markedly decreased tetanic [Ca(2+)](i), force per cross-sectional area and protein expression of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump (SERCA1). In conclusion, fast-twitch muscles of prematurely ageing mtDNA mutator mice display a sequence of deleterious mitochondrial-to-nucleus signalling with an initial decrease in oxidative capacity, which was not counteracted by activation of signalling to increase mitochondrial biogenesis. This was followed by severe muscle weakness in the end stage. These results have implication for normal ageing and suggest that decreased mitochondrial oxidative capacity due to a sedentary lifestyle may predispose towards muscle weakness developing later in life.

  13. Cyanide-resistant respiration in Euglena gracilis does not correlate with mitochondrial cytochrome O content

    SciTech Connect

    Devars, S.; Uribe, A.; Torres-Marquez, M.E.; Gonzalez-Halphen, D. ); Moreno-Sanchez, P. )

    1991-03-15

    Basal respiration Euglena gracilis cells grown in the dark with distinct carbon sources showed different sensitivity to KCN: 1-10% inhibition by 0.1 mM KCM for cells grown with glutamate+malate (g+m) and 40-55% for those grown with peptone+acetate (p+a). The basal respiration was stimulated 1.6 to 2.4 times by TMPD: the values reached by cells grown in g+m resembled those of p+a cells, suggesting a similar maximal cytochrome oxidase activity in both types. Dixon plots for KCM showed two components in basal and TMPD-stimulated respiration with K{sub i} values of 4-10 and 70-80 {mu}M for TMPC-stimulated respiration and 20-50 and 400-600 {mu}M for basal activity. Thus, the distinct sensitivities to KCN seems not to be due to a different content of aa{sub 3} in the cells, not to different K{sub i} for the inhibitor. Diphenyl amine, an inhibitor of alternate respiratory pathways, inhibited 85-95% basal respiration with a single K{sub i} value of 0.15-0.2 mM and 40-60% TMPD-stimulated activity. Determination of cytochrome o content, the postulated alternate oxidase, showed no differences in the cells grown with distinct carbon sources. Then the different sensitivity to cyanide is more likely related to the oxidation of different substrates.

  14. Carnosine Inhibits the Proliferation of Human Gastric Cancer SGC-7901 Cells through Both of the Mitochondrial Respiration and Glycolysis Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yao; Yang, Jianbo; Li, Juan; Shi, Xiaojie; Ouyang, Li; Tian, Yueyang; Lu, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Carnosine, a naturally occurring dipeptide, has been recently demonstrated to possess anti-tumor activity. However, its underlying mechanism is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect and mechanism of carnosine on the cell viability and proliferation of the cultured human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. Carnosine treatment did not induce cell apoptosis or necrosis, but reduced the proliferative capacity of SGC-7901 cells. Seahorse analysis showed SGC-7901 cells cultured with pyruvate have active mitochondria, and depend on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation more than glycolysis pathway for generation of ATP. Carnosine markedly decreased the absolute value of mitochondrial ATP-linked respiration, and reduced the maximal oxygen consumption and spare respiratory capacity, which may reduce mitochondrial function correlated with proliferative potential. Simultaneously, carnosine also reduced the extracellular acidification rate and glycolysis of SGC-7901 cells. Our results suggested that carnosine is a potential regulator of energy metabolism of SGC-7901 cells both in the anaerobic and aerobic pathways, and provided a clue for preclinical and clinical evaluation of carnosine for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:25115854

  15. Relationship between redox potentials, the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and the production of toxic oxygen species by flavonoids

    SciTech Connect

    Hodnick, W.F.; Milosavljevic, E.B.; Nelson, J.H.; Pardini, R.S.

    1986-05-01

    Flavonoids have been shown to inhibit mitochondrial respiration and produce oxy-radicals. They have also been shown to possess diverse biological activities, some of which have been speculated to be dependent upon their redox activity. The authors have investigated the redox behavior of a series of structurally related flavonoids employing cyclic voltammetry under physiological conditions. The flavonoids that autoxidized and produced oxygen radicals had reduction potentials (E 1/2) significantly lower (-30 to +60 mV) than those that didn't autoxidize (+130 to +340 mV). The E 1/2 values for the autoxidizable flavonoids compare to the E 1/2 range of -70 to +30 mv (le/sup -/ reduction potential) for optimum quinone induced production of superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -/) in mitochondrial NADH-CoQ reductase (complex I). The authors reported that the most potent flavonoid inhibitors of mitochondrial succinate-CoQ reductase (complex II) possessed hydroxyl configurations capable of supporting redox reactions. For a series of 3,5,7-trihydroxyflavones which differed by b-ring hydroxylation it was found that decreasing E 1/2 of the flavonoids was associated with decreasing I/sub 50/ values towards succinoxidase. These findings suggest that the electrochemical properties of the flavonoids may contribute to their biological activity.

  16. Carnosine inhibits the proliferation of human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells through both of the mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis pathways.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yao; Yang, Jianbo; Li, Juan; Shi, Xiaojie; Ouyang, Li; Tian, Yueyang; Lu, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Carnosine, a naturally occurring dipeptide, has been recently demonstrated to possess anti-tumor activity. However, its underlying mechanism is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect and mechanism of carnosine on the cell viability and proliferation of the cultured human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. Carnosine treatment did not induce cell apoptosis or necrosis, but reduced the proliferative capacity of SGC-7901 cells. Seahorse analysis showed SGC-7901 cells cultured with pyruvate have active mitochondria, and depend on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation more than glycolysis pathway for generation of ATP. Carnosine markedly decreased the absolute value of mitochondrial ATP-linked respiration, and reduced the maximal oxygen consumption and spare respiratory capacity, which may reduce mitochondrial function correlated with proliferative potential. Simultaneously, carnosine also reduced the extracellular acidification rate and glycolysis of SGC-7901 cells. Our results suggested that carnosine is a potential regulator of energy metabolism of SGC-7901 cells both in the anaerobic and aerobic pathways, and provided a clue for preclinical and clinical evaluation of carnosine for gastric cancer therapy.

  17. The affect of a clearcut environment on woody debris respiration rate dynamics, Harvard Forest, Massachusetts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderhoof, M. K.; Williams, C. L.

    2011-12-01

    At an ecosystem scale, the distribution of carbon is largely a function of stand development and disturbance processes. Clearcut logging remains a common practice both in the United States and globally and typically results in elevated storage of carbon in onsite woody debris and detritus. The residence time and decomposition rate of this woody debris and detritus will affect the rate of CO2 efflux to the atmosphere and thus affect the long term consequences of such disturbances on carbon flux and storage. The removal of a forest canopy also affects a site's microclimate including the albedo, air temperature, air humidity, as well as soil temperature and moisture, many of the same factors that affect the rate of woody debris decomposition. Thus it could be expected that differences in woody debris characteristics (e.g. size, abundance, state of decay), as well as differences in microclimate, between mature and recently clearcut forest sites, would result in differences in piece and site-level woody debris decomposition rates. Although woody debris stocks post-harvest have been well characterized, few studies have explored post-disturbance woody debris respiration rates, which directly measures carbon emissions from woody debris, distinguishing decomposition from mass loss due to fragmentation or leaching. This study addressed the question: does a clearcut environment in a temperate forest affect the rate of decomposition of coarse woody debris? The rate of respiration of downed spruce logs were repeatedly measured in-situ using an LI-6250 gas analyzer in Harvard Forest, Petersham, Massachusetts. Treatments included clear-cut, shaded clear-cut, mature spruce stand, and transfer (from clearcut to spruce stand). Gas analyzer measurements were accompanied by measurements of log temperature and percent water, soil temperature, moisture and pH, as well as light levels, air temperature and humidity to determine dominant drivers of respiration rates.

  18. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles inhibit cellular respiration.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhimin; Morrow, Matthew P; Asefa, Tewodros; Sharma, Krishna K; Duncan, Cole; Anan, Abhishek; Penefsky, Harvey S; Goodisman, Jerry; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2008-05-01

    We studied the effect of two types of mesoporous silica nanoparticles, MCM-41 and SBA-15, on mitochondrial O 2 consumption (respiration) in HL-60 (myeloid) cells, Jurkat (lymphoid) cells, and isolated mitochondria. SBA-15 inhibited cellular respiration at 25-500 microg/mL; the inhibition was concentration-dependent and time-dependent. The cellular ATP profile paralleled that of respiration. MCM-41 had no noticeable effect on respiration rate. In cells depleted of metabolic fuels, 50 microg/mL SBA-15 delayed the onset of glucose-supported respiration by 12 min and 200 microg/mL SBA-15 by 34 min; MCM-41 also delayed the onset of glucose-supported respiration. Neither SBA-15 nor MCM-41 affected cellular glutathione. Both nanoparticles inhibited respiration of isolated mitochondria and submitochondrial particles.

  19. Mitochondrial-targeted aryl hydrocarbon receptor and the impact of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on cellular respiration and the mitochondrial proteome.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hye Jin; Dornbos, Peter; Steidemann, Michelle; Dunivin, Taylor K; Rizzo, Mike; LaPres, John J

    2016-08-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor within the Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain superfamily. Exposure to the most potent AHR ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), is associated with various pathological effects including metabolic syndrome. While research over the last several years has demonstrated a role for oxidative stress and metabolic dysfunction in AHR-dependent TCDD-induced toxicity, the role of the mitochondria in this process has not been fully explored. Our previous research suggested that a portion of the cellular pool of AHR could be found in the mitochondria (mitoAHR). Using a protease protection assay with digitonin extraction, we have now shown that this mitoAHR is localized to the inter-membrane space (IMS) of the organelle. TCDD exposure induced a degradation of mitoAHR similar to that of cytosolic AHR. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown revealed that translocase of outer-mitochondrial membrane 20 (TOMM20) was involved in the import of AHR into the mitochondria. In addition, TCDD altered cellular respiration in an AHR-dependent manner to maintain respiratory efficiency as measured by oxygen consumption rate (OCR). Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) identified a battery of proteins within the mitochondrial proteome influenced by TCDD in an AHR-dependent manner. Among these, 17 proteins with fold changes≥2 are associated with various metabolic pathways, suggesting a role of mitochondrial retrograde signaling in TCDD-mediated pathologies. Collectively, these studies suggest that mitoAHR is localized to the IMS and AHR-dependent TCDD-induced toxicity, including metabolic dysfunction, wasting syndrome, and hepatic steatosis, involves mitochondrial dysfunction.

  20. In vivo effects of high dietary copper levels on hepatocellular mitochondrial respiration and electron transport chain enzymes in broilers.

    PubMed

    Cao, H; Su, R; Hu, G; Li, C; Guo, J; Pan, J; Tang, Z

    2016-01-01

    The diet of broiler chickens supplemented with increasing concentrations of copper (Cu) was assessed for the effect of Cu on liver mitochondrial function. A total of 160, 1-d-old Cobb 500 broilers (Gallus domesticus) were randomly assigned in equal numbers into 4 groups, which differed in the concentration of copper supplements in the diet; 11 (control), 110, 220 and 330 mg of Cu/kg dry matter. Liver mitochondrial function was recorded at 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 d of age. Supplementation with 110 mg Cu/kg dry matter enhanced mitochondrial function and activities of complexes I-V, and this was significant at 36 d of age compared with the other diets (P < 0.05). Supplementation with 220 mg Cu/kg dry matter and 330 mg Cu/kg dry matter enhanced mitochondrial function and activities of complexes I-V at 12, 24 and 36 d of age, but displayed reduced function (P < 0.05) at 48 and 60 d of age except in complex IV (P > 0.05). Mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production was also increased (P < 0.05) with an increase of copper supplementation in the diet. The results indicate that appropriate dietary copper supplements are sufficient for improving mitochondrial function and activities of the respiratory complexes. Higher concentrations of copper, on the other hand, lead to copper toxicity by affecting certain respiratory complexes.

  1. Decreased hydrogen peroxide production and mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle but not cardiac muscle of the green-striped burrowing frog, a natural model of muscle disuse.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Beau D; Hickey, Anthony J R; Cramp, Rebecca L; Franklin, Craig E

    2014-04-01

    Suppression of disuse-induced muscle atrophy has been associated with altered mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in mammals. However, despite extended hindlimb immobility, aestivating animals exhibit little skeletal muscle atrophy compared with artificially immobilised mammalian models. Therefore, we studied mitochondrial respiration and ROS (H2O2) production in permeabilised muscle fibres of the green-striped burrowing frog, Cyclorana alboguttata. Mitochondrial respiration within saponin-permeabilised skeletal and cardiac muscle fibres was measured concurrently with ROS production using high-resolution respirometry coupled to custom-made fluorometers. After 4 months of aestivation, C. alboguttata had significantly depressed whole-body metabolism by ~70% relative to control (active) frogs, and mitochondrial respiration in saponin-permeabilised skeletal muscle fibres decreased by almost 50% both in the absence of ADP and during oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial ROS production showed up to an 88% depression in aestivating skeletal muscle when malate, succinate and pyruvate were present at concentrations likely to reflect those in vivo. The percentage ROS released per O2 molecule consumed was also ~94% less at these concentrations, indicating an intrinsic difference in ROS production capacities during aestivation. We also examined mitochondrial respiration and ROS production in permeabilised cardiac muscle fibres and found that aestivating frogs maintained respiratory flux and ROS production at control levels. These results show that aestivating C. alboguttata has the capacity to independently regulate mitochondrial function in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Furthermore, this work indicates that ROS production can be suppressed in the disused skeletal muscle of aestivating frogs, which may in turn protect against potential oxidative damage and preserve skeletal muscle structure during aestivation and following arousal.

  2. T cell metabolism. The protein LEM promotes CD8⁺ T cell immunity through effects on mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Okoye, Isobel; Wang, Lihui; Pallmer, Katharina; Richter, Kirsten; Ichimura, Takahuru; Haas, Robert; Crouse, Josh; Choi, Onjee; Heathcote, Dean; Lovo, Elena; Mauro, Claudio; Abdi, Reza; Oxenius, Annette; Rutschmann, Sophie; Ashton-Rickardt, Philip G

    2015-05-29

    Protective CD8(+) T cell-mediated immunity requires a massive expansion in cell number and the development of long-lived memory cells. Using forward genetics in mice, we identified an orphan protein named lymphocyte expansion molecule (LEM) that promoted antigen-dependent CD8(+) T cell proliferation, effector function, and memory cell generation in response to infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Generation of LEM-deficient mice confirmed these results. Through interaction with CR6 interacting factor (CRIF1), LEM controlled the levels of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes and respiration, resulting in the production of pro-proliferative mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS). LEM provides a link between immune activation and the expansion of protective CD8(+) T cells driven by OXPHOS and represents a pathway for the restoration of long-term protective immunity based on metabolically modified cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells.

  3. Cytochrome p450nor, a novel class of mitochondrial cytochrome P450 involved in nitrate respiration in the fungus Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Takaya, N; Suzuki, S; Kuwazaki, S; Shoun, H; Maruo, F; Yamaguchi, M; Takeo, K

    1999-12-15

    Fusarium oxysporum, an imperfect filamentous fungus performs nitrate respiration under limited oxygen. In the respiratory system, Cytochrome P450nor (P450nor) is thought to catalyze the last step; reduction of nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. We examined its intracellular localization using enzymatic, spectroscopic, and immunological analyses to show that P450nor is found in both the mitochondria and the cytosol. Translational fusions between the putative mitochondrial targeting signal on the amino terminus of P450nor and Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase resulted in significant beta-galactosidase activity in the mitochondrial fraction of nitrate-respiring cells, suggesting that one of the isoforms of P450nor (P450norA) is in anaerobic mitochondrion of F. oxysporum and acts as nitric oxide reductase. Furthermore, these findings suggest the involvement of P450nor in nitrate respiration in mitochondria.

  4. Decreased carbon limitation of litter respiration in a mortality-affected piñon-juniper woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryman, E.; Marshall, J. D.; Rahn, T.; Litvak, M.; Butnor, J.

    2012-10-01

    Microbial respiration depends on microclimatic variables and carbon (C) substrate availability, all of which are altered when ecosystems experience major disturbance. Widespread tree mortality, currently affecting piñon-juniper ecosystems in Southwestern North America, may affect C substrate availability in several ways; for example, via litterfall pulses and loss of root exudation. To determine piñon mortality effects on C and water limitation of microbial respiration, we applied field amendments (sucrose and water) to two piñon-juniper sites in central New Mexico, USA: one with a recent (< 1 yr), experimentally-induced mortality event and a nearby site with live canopy. We monitored the respiration response to water and sucrose applications to the litter surface and to the underlying mineral soil surface, testing the following hypotheses: (1) soil respiration in a piñon-juniper woodland is water- and labile C-limited in both the litter layer and mineral soil; (2) water and sucrose applications increase temperature sensitivity of respiration; (3) the mortality-affected site will show a reduction in C limitation in the litter; (4) the mortality-affected site will show an enhancement of C limitation in the mineral soil. Litter respiration at both sites responded to increased water availability, yet surprisingly, mineral soil respiration was not limited by water. Temperature sensitivity was enhanced by some of the sucrose and water treatments. Consistent with hypothesis 3, C limitation of litter respiration was lower at the recent mortality site compared to the intact canopy site. Results following applications to the mineral soil suggest the presence of abiotic effects of increasing water availability, precluding our ability to measure labile C limitation in soil. Widespread piñon mortality may decrease labile C limitation of litter respiration, at least during the first growing season following mortality.

  5. The Mitochondrial Genome Impacts Respiration but Not Fermentation in Interspecific Saccharomyces Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Rigoulet, Michel; Salin, Benedicte; Masneuf-Pomarede, Isabelle; de Vienne, Dominique; Sicard, Delphine; Bely, Marina; Marullo, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has high rate of nucleotide substitution leading to different mitochondrial haplotypes called mitotypes. However, the impact of mitochondrial genetic variant on phenotypic variation has been poorly considered in microorganisms because mtDNA encodes very few genes compared to nuclear DNA, and also because mitochondrial inheritance is not uniparental. Here we propose original material to unravel mitotype impact on phenotype: we produced interspecific hybrids between S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum species, using fully homozygous diploid parental strains. For two different interspecific crosses involving different parental strains, we recovered 10 independent hybrids per cross, and allowed mtDNA fixation after around 80 generations. We developed PCR-based markers for the rapid discrimination of S. cerevisiae and S. uvarum mitochondrial DNA. For both crosses, we were able to isolate fully isogenic hybrids at the nuclear level, yet possessing either S. cerevisiae mtDNA (Sc-mtDNA) or S. uvarum mtDNA (Su-mtDNA). Under fermentative conditions, the mitotype has no phenotypic impact on fermentation kinetics and products, which was expected since mtDNA are not necessary for fermentative metabolism. Alternatively, under respiratory conditions, hybrids with Sc-mtDNA have higher population growth performance, associated with higher respiratory rate. Indeed, far from the hypothesis that mtDNA variation is neutral, our work shows that mitochondrial polymorphism can have a strong impact on fitness components and hence on the evolutionary fate of the yeast populations. We hypothesize that under fermentative conditions, hybrids may fix stochastically one or the other mt-DNA, while respiratory environments may increase the probability to fix Sc-mtDNA. PMID:24086452

  6. Calcium-regulation of mitochondrial respiration maintains ATP homeostasis and requires ARALAR/AGC1-malate aspartate shuttle in intact cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Llorente-Folch, Irene; Rueda, Carlos B; Amigo, Ignacio; del Arco, Araceli; Saheki, Takeyori; Pardo, Beatriz; Satrústegui, Jorgina

    2013-08-28

    Neuronal respiration is controlled by ATP demand and Ca2+ but the roles played by each are unknown, as any Ca2+ signal also impacts on ATP demand. Ca2+ can control mitochondrial function through Ca2+-regulated mitochondrial carriers, the aspartate-glutamate and ATP-Mg/Pi carriers, ARALAR/AGC1 and SCaMC-3, respectively, or in the matrix after Ca2+ transport through the Ca2+ uniporter. We have studied the role of Ca2+ signaling in the regulation of mitochondrial respiration in intact mouse cortical neurons in basal conditions and in response to increased workload caused by increases in [Na+]cyt (veratridine, high-K+ depolarization) and/or [Ca2+]cyt (carbachol). Respiration in nonstimulated neurons on 2.5-5 mm glucose depends on ARALAR-malate aspartate shuttle (MAS), with a 46% drop in aralar KO neurons. All stimulation conditions induced increased OCR (oxygen consumption rate) in the presence of Ca2+, which was prevented by BAPTA-AM loading (to preserve the workload), or in Ca2+-free medium (which also lowers cell workload). SCaMC-3 limits respiration only in response to high workloads and robust Ca2+ signals. In every condition tested Ca2+ activation of ARALAR-MAS was required to fully stimulate coupled respiration by promoting pyruvate entry into mitochondria. In aralar KO neurons, respiration was stimulated by veratridine, but not by KCl or carbachol, indicating that the Ca2+ uniporter pathway played a role in the first, but not in the second condition, even though KCl caused an increase in [Ca2+]mit. The results suggest a requirement for ARALAR-MAS in priming pyruvate entry in mitochondria as a step needed to activate respiration by Ca2+ in response to moderate workloads.

  7. Decreased carbon limitation of litter respiration in a mortality-affected piñon-juniper woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryman, E.; Marshall, J. D.; Rahn, T.; Litvak, M.; Butnor, J.

    2013-03-01

    Microbial respiration depends on microclimatic variables and carbon (C) substrate availability, all of which are altered when ecosystems experience major disturbance. Widespread tree mortality, currently affecting piñon-juniper ecosystems in southwestern North America, may affect C substrate availability in several ways, for example, via litterfall pulses and loss of root exudation. To determine piñon mortality effects on C and water limitation of microbial respiration, we applied field amendments (sucrose and water) to two piñon-juniper sites in central New Mexico, USA: one with a recent (< 1 yr), experimentally induced mortality event and a nearby site with live canopy. We monitored the respiration response to water and sucrose applications to the litter surface and to the underlying mineral soil surface, testing the following hypotheses: (1) soil respiration in a piñon-juniper woodland is water- and labile C-limited in both the litter layer and mineral soil; (2) piñon mortality reduces the C limitation of litter respiration; and (3) piñon mortality enhances the C limitation of mineral soil respiration. Litter respiration at both sites responded to increased water availability, yet surprisingly, mineral soil respiration was not limited by water. Consistent with hypothesis 2, C limitation of litter respiration was lower at the recent mortality site compared to the intact canopy site. Applications to the mineral soil showed evidence of reduction in CO2 flux on the girdled site and a non-significant increase on the control. We speculate that the reduction may have been driven by water-induced carbonate dissolution, which serves as a sink for CO2 and would reduce the net flux. Widespread piñon mortality may decrease labile C limitation of litter respiration, at least during the first growing season following mortality.

  8. Oncostatic-Cytoprotective Effect of Melatonin and Other Bioactive Molecules: A Common Target in Mitochondrial Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Pacini, Nicola; Borziani, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    For several years, oncostatic and antiproliferative properties, as well as thoses of cell death induction through 5-methoxy-N-acetiltryptamine or melatonin treatment, have been known. Paradoxically, its remarkable scavenger, cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic characteristics in neurodegeneration models, such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease are known too. Analogous results have been confirmed by a large literature to be associated to the use of many other bioactive molecules such as resveratrol, tocopherol derivatives or vitamin E and others. It is interesting to note that the two opposite situations, namely the neoplastic pathology and the neurodegeneration, are characterized by deep alterations of the metabolome, of mitochondrial function and of oxygen consumption, so that the oncostatic and cytoprotective action can find a potential rationalization because of the different metabolic and mitochondrial situations, and in the effect that these molecules exercise on the mitochondrial function. In this review we discuss historical and general aspects of melatonin, relations between cancers and the metabolome and between neurodegeneration and the metabolome, and the possible effects of melatonin and of other bioactive molecules on metabolic and mitochondrial dynamics. Finally, we suggest a common general mechanism as responsible for the oncostatic/cytoprotective effect of melatonin and of other molecules examined. PMID:26959015

  9. Synergism of antifungal activity between mitochondrial respiration inhibitors and kojic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Co-application of certain types of compounds with conventional antimicrobial drugs results in the enhancement of efficacy of drugs through a mechanism termed chemosensitization. We show that kojic acid (KA), a natural product, is a potent chemosensitizer to complex III inhibitors of mitochondrial re...

  10. Resveratrol Co-Treatment Attenuates the Effects of HIV Protease Inhibitors on Rat Body Weight and Enhances Cardiac Mitochondrial Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Symington, Burger; Mapanga, Rudo F.; Norton, Gavin R.

    2017-01-01

    Since the early 1990s human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) emerged as a global health pandemic, with sub-Saharan Africa the hardest hit. While the successful roll-out of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy provided significant relief to HIV-positive individuals, such treatment can also elicit damaging side-effects. Here especially HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) are implicated in the onset of cardio-metabolic complications such as type-2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. As there is a paucity of data regarding suitable co-treatments within this context, this preclinical study investigated whether resveratrol (RSV), aspirin (ASP) or vitamin C (VitC) co-treatment is able to blunt side-effects in a rat model of chronic PI exposure (Lopinavir/Ritonavir treatment for 4 months). Body weights and weight gain, blood metabolite levels (total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides), echocardiography and cardiac mitochondrial respiration were assessed in PI-treated rats ± various co-treatments. Our data reveal that PI treatment significantly lowered body weight and cardiac respiratory function while no significant changes were found for heart function and blood metabolite levels. Moreover, all co-treatments ameliorated the PI-induced decrease in body weight after 4 months of PI treatment, while RSV co-treatment enhanced cardiac mitochondrial respiratory capacity in PI-treated rats. This pilot study therefore provides novel hypotheses regarding RSV co-treatment that should be further assessed in greater detail. PMID:28107484

  11. Focal adhesion kinase-promoted tumor glucose metabolism is associated with a shift of mitochondrial respiration to glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Gao, Q; Zhou, Y; Dier, U; Hempel, N; Hochwald, S N

    2016-04-14

    Cancer cells often gains a growth advantage by taking up glucose at a high rate and undergoing aerobic glycolysis through intrinsic cellular factors that reprogram glucose metabolism. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a key transmitter of growth factor and anchorage stimulation, is aberrantly overexpressed or activated in most solid tumors, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). We determined whether FAK can act as an intrinsic driver to promote aerobic glycolysis and tumorigenesis. FAK inhibition decreases and overexpression increases intracellular glucose levels during unfavorable conditions, including growth factor deficiency and cell detachment. Amplex glucose assay, fluorescence and carbon-13 tracing studies demonstrate that FAK promotes glucose consumption and glucose-to-lactate conversion. Extracellular flux analysis indicates that FAK enhances glycolysis and decreases mitochondrial respiration. FAK increases key glycolytic proteins, including enolase, pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2), lactate dehydrogenase and monocarboxylate transporter. Furthermore, active/tyrosine-phosphorylated FAK directly binds to PKM2 and promotes PKM2-mediated glycolysis. On the other hand, FAK-decreased levels of mitochondrial complex I can result in reduced oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Attenuation of FAK-enhanced glycolysis re-sensitizes cancer cells to growth factor withdrawal, decreases cell viability and reduces growth of tumor xenografts. These observations, for the first time, establish a vital role of FAK in cancer glucose metabolism through alterations in the OXPHOS-to-glycolysis balance. Broadly targeting the common phenotype of aerobic glycolysis and more specifically FAK-reprogrammed glucose metabolism will disrupt the bioenergetic and biosynthetic supply for uncontrolled growth of tumors, particularly glycolytic PDAC.

  12. Suppression of mitochondrial respiration with auraptene inhibits the progression of renal cell carcinoma: involvement of HIF-1α degradation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yunseon; Han, Jeongsu; Kim, Soo Jeong; Kim, Jungim; Lee, Min Joung; Jeong, Soyeon; Ryu, Min Jeong; Seo, Kang-Sik; Choi, Song-Yi; Shong, Minho; Lim, Kyu; Heo, Jun Young; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) progression resulting from the uncontrolled migration and enhanced angiogenesis is an obstacle to effective therapeutic intervention. Tumor metabolism has distinctive feature called Warburg effect, which enhances the aerobic glycolysis rapidly supplying the energy for migration of tumor. To manipulate this metabolic change characteristic of aggressive tumors, we utilized the citrus extract, auraptene, known as a mitochondrial inhibitor, testing its anticancer effects against the RCC4 cell line. We found that auraptene impaired RCC4 cell motility through reduction of mitochondrial respiration and glycolytic pathway-related genes. It also strongly disrupted VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1a (HIF-1a), a key regulator of cancer metabolism, migration and angiogenesis that is stably expressed in RCCs by virtue of a genetic mutation in the von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) tumor-suppressor protein, was impeded by auraptene, which blocked HIF-1a translation initiation without causing cytotoxicity. We suggest that blockade HIF-1a and reforming energy metabolism with auraptene is an effective approach for suspension RCC progression. PMID:26474388

  13. The reduction of reactive oxygen species formation by mitochondrial alternative respiration in tomato basal defense against TMV infection.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yang-Wen-Ke; Shi, Kai; Fu, Li-Jun; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Xin; Dong, De-Kun; Jiang, Yu-Ping; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Xia, Xiao-Jian; Liang, Wu-Sheng; Yu, Jing-Quan

    2012-02-01

    The role of mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) and the relationship between systemic AOX induction, ROS formation, and systemic plant basal defense to Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) were investigated in tomato plants. The results showed that TMV inoculation significantly increased the level of AOX gene transcripts, ubiquinone reduction levels, pyruvate content, and cyanide-resistant respiration (CN-resistant R) in upper, un-inoculated leaves. Pretreatment with potassium cyanide (KCN, a cytochrome pathway inhibitor) greatly increased CN-resistant R and reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, while application of salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM, an AOX inhibitor) blocked the AOX activity and enhanced the production of ROS in the plants. Furthermore, TMV systemic infection was enhanced by SHAM and reduced by KCN pretreatment, as compared with the un-pretreated TMV counterpart. In addition, KCN application significantly diminished TMV-induced increase in antioxidant enzyme activities and dehydroascorbate/total ascorbate pool, while an opposite change was observed with SHAM-pretreated plants. These results suggest that the systemic induction of the mitochondrial AOX pathway plays a critical role in the reduction of ROS to enhance basal defenses. Additional antioxidant systems were also coordinately regulated in the maintenance of the cellular redox homeostasis.

  14. Suppression of mitochondrial respiration with auraptene inhibits the progression of renal cell carcinoma: involvement of HIF-1α degradation.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yunseon; Han, Jeongsu; Kim, Soo Jeong; Kim, Jungim; Lee, Min Joung; Jeong, Soyeon; Ryu, Min Jeong; Seo, Kang-Sik; Choi, Song-Yi; Shong, Minho; Lim, Kyu; Heo, Jun Young; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2015-11-10

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) progression resulting from the uncontrolled migration and enhanced angiogenesis is an obstacle to effective therapeutic intervention. Tumor metabolism has distinctive feature called Warburg effect, which enhances the aerobic glycolysis rapidly supplying the energy for migration of tumor. To manipulate this metabolic change characteristic of aggressive tumors, we utilized the citrus extract, auraptene, known as a mitochondrial inhibitor, testing its anticancer effects against the RCC4 cell line. We found that auraptene impaired RCC4 cell motility through reduction of mitochondrial respiration and glycolytic pathway-related genes. It also strongly disrupted VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1a (HIF-1a), a key regulator of cancer metabolism, migration and angiogenesis that is stably expressed in RCCs by virtue of a genetic mutation in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor-suppressor protein, was impeded by auraptene, which blocked HIF-1a translation initiation without causing cytotoxicity. We suggest that blockade HIF-1a and reforming energy metabolism with auraptene is an effective approach for suspension RCC progression.

  15. Mitochondrial alternative oxidase acts to dampen the generation of active oxygen species during a period of rapid respiration induced to support a high rate of nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Yip, Justine Y. H.; Vanlerberghe, Greg C.

    2001-07-01

    When wild type (wt) tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Petit Havana SR1) suspension cells were grown under phosphate (P) limitation, they contained large amounts of mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX). When these cells were resupplied with P, there was a large, immediate and sustained stimulation of respiration to support a period of rapid P uptake. Two lines of evidence suggest that the abundant level of AOX present in wt cells contributed to this stimulated rate of respiration. First, when P-limited transgenic antisense tobacco cells (AS8) lacking AOX were resupplied with P, the stimulation of respiration was much less dramatic even though these cells displayed similar rates of P uptake. Second, while the stimulated rate of respiration in AS8 cells was insensitive (as expected) to the AOX inhibitor n-propyl gallate (nPG), much of the stimulated rate of respiration in wt cells could be inhibited by nPG. Given the non-phosphorylating nature of AOX respiration, wt cells required higher rates of electron transport to O2 than AS8 cells to support similar rates of P uptake. The utilization of AOX by wt cells during P uptake was apparently not occurring because the cytochrome (Cyt) pathway alone could not fully support the rate of P uptake, as the respiration of cells lacking AOX (either untreated AS8 cells or wt cells treated with nPG) supported similar rates of P uptake as wt cells with abundant AOX. Rather, we provide in vivo evidence that the utilization of AOX during the period of high respiration supporting P uptake was to dampen the mitochondrial generation of active oxygen species (AOS).

  16. Effect of biosolid waste compost on soil respiration in salt-affected soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raya, Silvia; Gómez, Ignacio; García, Fuensanta; Navarro, José; Jordán, Manuel Miguel; Belén Almendro, María; Martín Soriano, José

    2013-04-01

    A great part of mediterranean soils are affected by salinization. This is an important problem in semiarid areas increased by the use of low quality waters, the induced salinization due to high phreatic levels and adverse climatology. Salinization affects 25% of irrigated agriculture, producing important losses on the crops. In this situation, the application of organic matter to the soil is one of the possible solutions to improve their quality. The main objective of this research was to asses the relation between the salinity level (electrical conductivity, EC) in the soil and the response of microbial activity (soil respiration rate) after compost addition. The study was conducted for a year. Soil samples were collected near to an agricultural area in Crevillente and Elche, "El Hondo" Natural Park (Comunidad de Regantes from San Felipe Neri). The experiment was developed to determine and quantify the soil respiration rate in 8 different soils differing in salinity. The assay was done in close pots -in greenhouse conditions- containing soil mixed with different doses of sewage sludge compost (2, 4 and 6%) besides the control. They were maintained at 60% of water holding capacity (WHC). Soil samples were analyzed every four months for a year. The equipment used to estimate the soil respiration was a Bac-Trac and CO2 emitted by the soil biota was measured and quantified by electrical impedance changes. It was observed that the respiration rate increases as the proportion of compost added to each sample increases as well. The EC was incremented in each sampling period from the beginning of the experiment, probably due to the fact that soils were in pots and lixiviation was prevented, so the salts couldńt be lost from soil. Over time the compost has been degraded and, it was more susceptible to be mineralized. Salts were accumulated in the soil. Also it was observed a decrease of microbial activity with the increase of salinity in the soil. Keywords: soil

  17. Anaerobic respiration sustains mitochondrial membrane potential in a prolyl hydroxylase pathway-activated cancer cell line in a hypoxic microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eiji; Sato, Michihiko

    2014-02-15

    To elucidate how tumor cells produce energy in oxygen-depleted microenvironments, we studied the possibility of mitochondrial electron transport without oxygen. We produced well-controlled oxygen gradients (ΔO2) in monolayer-cultured cells. We then visualized oxygen levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΦm) in individual cells by using the red shift of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescence and a cationic fluorescent dye, respectively. In this two-dimensional tissue model, ΔΦm was abolished in cells >500 μm from the oxygen source [the anoxic front (AF)], indicating limitations in diffusional oxygen delivery. This result perfectly matched GFP-determined ΔO2. In cells pretreated with dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG), a prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein (PHD) inhibitor, the AF was expanded to 1,500-2,000 μm from the source. In these cells, tissue ΔO2 was substantially decreased, indicating that PHD pathway activation suppressed mitochondrial respiration. The expansion of the AF and the reduction of ΔO2 were much more prominent in a cancer cell line (Hep3B) than in the equivalent fibroblast-like cell line (COS-7). Hence, the results indicate that PHD pathway-activated cells can sustain ΔΦm, despite significantly decreased electron flux to complex IV. Complex II inhibition abolished the effect of DMOG in expanding the AF, although tissue ΔO2 remained shallow. Separate experiments demonstrated that complex II plays a substantial role in sustaining ΔΦm in DMOG-pretreated Hep3B cells with complex III inhibition. From these results, we conclude that PHD pathway activation can sustain ΔΦm in an otherwise anoxic microenvironment by decreasing tissue ΔO2 while activating oxygen-independent electron transport in mitochondria.

  18. The antidiabetic drug metformin decreases mitochondrial respiration and tricarboxylic acid cycle activity in cultured primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hohnholt, Michaela C; Blumrich, Eva-Maria; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Dringen, Ralf

    2017-03-19

    Metformin is an antidiabetic drug that is used daily by millions of patients worldwide. Metformin is able to cross the blood-brain barrier and has recently been shown to increase glucose consumption and lactate release in cultured astrocytes. However, potential effects of metformin on mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolism in astrocytes are unknown. We investigated this by mapping (13) C labeling in TCA cycle intermediates and corresponding amino acids after incubation of primary rat astrocytes with [U-(13) C]glucose. The presence of metformin did not compromise the viability of cultured astrocytes during 4 hr of incubation, but almost doubled cellular glucose consumption and lactate release. Compared with control cells, the presence of metformin dramatically lowered the molecular (13) C carbon labeling (MCL) of the cellular TCA cycle intermediates citrate, α-ketoglutarate, succinate, fumarate, and malate, as well as the MCL of the TCA cycle intermediate-derived amino acids glutamate, glutamine, and aspartate. In addition to the total molecular (13) C labeling, analysis of the individual isotopomers of TCA cycle intermediates confirmed a severe decline in labeling and a significant lowering in TCA cycling ratio in metformin-treated astrocytes. Finally, the oxygen consumption of mitochondria isolated from metformin-treated astrocytes was drastically reduced in the presence of complex I substrates, but not of complex II substrates. These data demonstrate that exposure to metformin strongly impairs complex I-mediated mitochondrial respiration in astrocytes, which is likely to cause the observed decrease in labeling of mitochondrial TCA cycle intermediates and the stimulation of glycolytic lactate production. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Can plant phloem properties affect the link between ecosystem assimilation and respiration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mencuccini, M.; Hölttä, T.; Sevanto, S.; Nikinmaa, E.

    2012-04-01

    Phloem transport of carbohydrates in plants under field conditions is currently not well understood. This is largely the result of the lack of techniques suitable for measuring phloem physiological properties continuously under field conditions. This lack of knowledge is currently hampering our efforts to link ecosystem-level processes of carbon fixation, allocation and use, especially belowground. On theoretical grounds, the properties of the transport pathway from canopy to roots must be important in affecting the link between carbon assimilation and respiration, but it is unclear whether their effect is partially or entirely masked by processes occurring in other parts of the ecosystem. One can also predict the characteristic time scales over which these effects should occur and, as consequence, predict whether the transfer of turgor and osmotic signals from the site of carbon assimilation to the sites of carbon use are likely to control respiration. We will present two sources of evidence suggesting that the properties of the phloem transport system may affect processes that are dependent on the supply of carbon substrate, such as root or soil respiration. Firstly, we will summarize the results of a literature survey on soil and ecosystem respiration where the speed of transfer of photosynthetic sugars from the plant canopy to the soil surface was determined. Estimates of the transfer speed could be grouped according to whether the study employed isotopic or canopy soil flux-based techniques. These two groups provided very different estimates of transfer times likely because transport of sucrose molecules, and pressure-concentration waves, in phloem differed. Secondly, we will argue that simultaneous measurements of bark and xylem diameters provide a novel tool to determine the continuous variations of phloem turgor in vivo in the field. We will present a model that interprets these changes in xylem and live bark diameters and present data testing the model

  20. Do Mitochondrial Replacement Techniques Affect Qualitative or Numerical Identity?

    PubMed

    Liao, S Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial replacement techniques (MRTs), known in the popular media as 'three-parent' or 'three-person' IVFs, have the potential to enable women with mitochondrial diseases to have children who are genetically related to them but without such diseases. In the debate regarding whether MRTs should be made available, an issue that has garnered considerable attention is whether MRTs affect the characteristics of an existing individual or whether they result in the creation of a new individual, given that MRTs involve the genetic manipulation of the germline. In other words, do MRTs affect the qualitative identity or the numerical identity of the resulting child? For instance, a group of panelists on behalf of the UK Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) has claimed that MRTs affect only the qualitative identity of the resulting child, while the Working Group of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics (NCOB) has argued that MRTs would create a numerically distinct individual. In this article, I shall argue that MRTs do create a new and numerically distinct individual. Since my explanation is different from the NCOB's explanation, I shall also offer reasons why my explanation is preferable to the NCOB's explanation.

  1. The Ability of PAS, Acetylsalicylic Acid and Calcium Disodium EDTA to Protect Against the Toxic Effects of Manganese on Mitochondrial Respiration in Gill of Crassostrea virginica

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Sherine; Davis, Kiyya; Saddler, Claudette; Joseph, Jevaun; Catapane, Edward J.; Carroll, Margaret A.

    2011-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential metal that at excessive levels in brain causes Manganism, a condition similar to Parkinson's disease. Previously we showed that Mn had a neurotoxic effect on the dopaminergic, but not serotonergic, innervation of the lateral ciliated cells in the gill of the Eastern Oyster, Crassostrea virginica. While the mechanism of action of Mn toxicity is not completely understood, studies suggest that Mn toxicity may involve mitochondrial damage and resulting neural dysfunction in the brain’s dopaminergic system. In this study we utilized micro-batch chambers and oxygen probes to measure oyster gill mitochondrial respiration in the presence of Mn and potential Mn blockers. The addition of Mn to respiring mitochondria caused a dose dependent decrease in mitochondrial O2 consumption. Pretreating mitochondria with calcium disodium EDTA (caEDTA), p aminosalicylic acid (PAS) or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) before Mn additions, provided full protection against the toxic effects of Mn. While mitochondrial pretreatment with any of the 3 drugs effectively blocked Mn toxicity, none of the drugs tested was able to reverse the decrease in mitochondrial O2 consumption seen in Mn treated mitochondria. The study found that high levels of Mn had a toxic effect on gill mitochondrial O2 consumption and that this effect could be blocked by the drugs caEDTA, PAS and ASA. C. virginica continues to be a good model with which to investigate the mechanism that underlies manganese neurotoxcity and in the pharmacological study of drugs to treat or prevent Manganism. PMID:21977482

  2. Parkinson’s Disease: The Link Between Monoamine Oxidase and Mitochondrial Respiration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    into the carboxylic acid derivative  DOPAC .           Figure 1 shown below illustrates the critical chemical reactions that led to Dr. Cohen’s main aim...catecholamines such as  DOPAC (dopa‐acetic acid) or DOPAL (dopa‐aldehyde)  should not cause any mitochondrial inhibition if the inhibition was exclusively a...inhibit mitochondria in a dose‐dependent  fashion, the metabolites of dopamine including  DOPAC  were fairly potent inhibitors of  mitochondrial ETC activity

  3. High glucose-induced mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species in mouse cerebral pericytes is reversed by pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases: Implications for cerebral microvascular disease in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Shah, Gul N; Morofuji, Yoichi; Banks, William A; Price, Tulin O

    2013-10-18

    Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress leads to diabetes-associated damage to the microvasculature of the brain. Pericytes in close proximity to endothelial cells in the brain microvessels are vital to the integrity of the blood-brain barrier and are especially susceptible to oxidative stress. According to our recently published results, streptozotocin-diabetic mouse brain exhibits oxidative stress and loose pericytes by twelve weeks of diabetes, and cerebral pericytes cultured in high glucose media suffer intracellular oxidative stress and apoptosis. Oxidative stress in diabetes is hypothesized to be caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during hyperglycemia-induced enhanced oxidative metabolism of glucose (respiration). To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of high glucose on respiration rate and ROS production in mouse cerebral pericytes. Previously, we showed that pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases protects the brain from oxidative stress and pericyte loss. The high glucose-induced intracellular oxidative stress and apoptosis of pericytes in culture were also reversed by inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases. Therefore, we extended our current study to determine the effect of these inhibitors on high glucose-induced increases in pericyte respiration and ROS. We now report that both the respiration and ROS are significantly increased in pericytes challenged with high glucose. Furthermore, inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases significantly slowed down both the rate of respiration and ROS production. These data provide new evidence that pharmacological inhibitors of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases, already in clinical use, may prove beneficial in protecting the brain from oxidative stress caused by ROS produced as a consequence of hyperglycemia-induced enhanced respiration.

  4. Atmospheric CO2 mole fraction affects stand-scale carbon use efficiency of sunflower by stimulating respiration in light.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiao Ying; Schäufele, Rudi; Lehmeier, Christoph Andreas; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Schnyder, Hans

    2017-03-01

    Plant carbon-use-efficiency (CUE), a key parameter in carbon cycle and plant growth models, quantifies the fraction of fixed carbon that is converted into net primary production rather than respired. CUE has not been directly measured, partly because of the difficulty of measuring respiration in light. Here, we explore if CUE is affected by atmospheric CO2 . Sunflower stands were grown at low (200 μmol mol(-1) ) or high CO2 (1000 μmol mol(-1) ) in controlled environment mesocosms. CUE of stands was measured by dynamic stand-scale (13) C labelling and partitioning of photosynthesis and respiration. At the same plant age, growth at high CO2 (compared with low CO2 ) led to 91% higher rates of apparent photosynthesis, 97% higher respiration in the dark, yet 143% higher respiration in light. Thus, CUE was significantly lower at high (0.65) than at low CO2 (0.71). Compartmental analysis of isotopic tracer kinetics demonstrated a greater commitment of carbon reserves in stand-scale respiratory metabolism at high CO2 . Two main processes contributed to the reduction of CUE at high CO2 : a reduced inhibition of leaf respiration by light and a diminished leaf mass ratio. This work highlights the relevance of measuring respiration in light and assessment of the CUE response to environment conditions.

  5. Rearing Tenebrio molitor in BLSS: Dietary fiber affects larval growth, development, and respiration characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Leyuan; Stasiak, Michael; Li, Liang; Xie, Beizhen; Fu, Yuming; Gidzinski, Danuta; Dixon, Mike; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Rearing of yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor L.) will provide good animal nutrition for astronauts in a bioregenerative life support system. In this study, growth and biomass conversion data of T. molitor larvae were tested for calculating the stoichiometric equation of its growth. Result of a respiratory quotient test proved the validity of the equation. Fiber had the most reduction in mass during T. molitor‧s consumption, and thus it is speculated that fiber is an important factor affecting larval growth of T. molitor. In order to further confirm this hypothesis and find out a proper feed fiber content, T. molitor larvae were fed on diets with 4 levels of fiber. Larval growth, development and respiration in each group were compared and analyzed. Results showed that crude-fiber content of 5% had a significant promoting effect on larvae in early instars, and is beneficial for pupa eclosion. When fed on feed of 5-10% crude-fiber, larvae in later instars reached optimal levels in growth, development and respiration. Therefore, we suggest that crude fiber content in feed can be controlled within 5-10%, and with the consideration of food palatability, a crude fiber of 5% is advisable.

  6. The Responses of Tissues from the Brain, Heart, Kidney, and Liver to Resuscitation following Prolonged Cardiac Arrest by Examining Mitochondrial Respiration in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhwan; Villarroel, José Paul Perales; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Tai; Shinozaki, Koichiro; Hong, Angela; Lampe, Joshua W; Becker, Lance B

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrest induces whole-body ischemia, which causes damage to multiple organs. Understanding how each organ responds to ischemia/reperfusion is important to develop better resuscitation strategies. Because direct measurement of organ function is not practicable in most animal models, we attempt to use mitochondrial respiration to test efficacy of resuscitation on the brain, heart, kidney, and liver following prolonged cardiac arrest. Male Sprague-Dawley rats are subjected to asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest for 30 min or 45 min, or 30 min cardiac arrest followed by 60 min cardiopulmonary bypass resuscitation. Mitochondria are isolated from brain, heart, kidney, and liver tissues and examined for respiration activity. Following cardiac arrest, a time-dependent decrease in state-3 respiration is observed in mitochondria from all four tissues. Following 60 min resuscitation, the respiration activity of brain mitochondria varies greatly in different animals. The activity after resuscitation remains the same in heart mitochondria and significantly increases in kidney and liver mitochondria. The result shows that inhibition of state-3 respiration is a good marker to evaluate the efficacy of resuscitation for each organ. The resulting state-3 respiration of brain and heart mitochondria following resuscitation reenforces the need for developing better strategies to resuscitate these critical organs following prolonged cardiac arrest.

  7. Odontologic use of copper/aluminum alloys: mitochondrial respiration as sensitive parameter of biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Luiz Erlon A; Carvalho, Antônio A V F; Azevedo, Antônio L M; Cruz, Cecília B B V; Maia, Antônio Wanderley C

    2003-01-01

    Copper/aluminum alloys are largely utilized in odontological restorations because they are less expensive than gold or platinum. However, tarnishing and important corrosion in intrabuccal prostheses made with copper/aluminum alloys after 28 days of use have been reported. Several kinds of food and beverage may attack and corrode these alloys. Copper is an essential component of several important enzymes directly involved in mitochondrial respiratory metabolism. Aluminum, in contrast, is very toxic and, when absorbed, plasma values as small as 1.65 to 21.55 microg/dl can cause severe lesions to the nervous system, kidneys, and bone marrow. Because mitochondria are extremely sensitive to minimal variation of cellular physiology, the direct relationship between the mitocondrial respiratory chain and cell lesions has been used as a sensitive parameter to evaluate cellular aggression by external agents. This work consisted in the polarographic study of mitochondrial respiratory metabolism of livers and kidneys of rabbits with femoral implants of titanium or copper/aluminum alloy screws. The experimental results obtained did not show physiological modifications of hepatic or renal mitochondria isolated from animals of the three experimental groups, which indicate good biocompatibility of copper/ aluminum alloys and suggest their odontological use.

  8. Sirtuin-3 (SIRT3) Protein Attenuates Doxorubicin-induced Oxidative Stress and Improves Mitochondrial Respiration in H9c2 Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Kyle G; Cole, Laura K; Xiang, Bo; Chen, Keyun; Ma, Xiuli; Myal, Yvonne; Hatch, Grant M; Tong, Qiang; Dolinsky, Vernon W

    2015-04-24

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a chemotherapeutic agent effective in the treatment of many cancers. However, cardiac dysfunction caused by DOX limits its clinical use. DOX is believed to be harmful to cardiomyocytes by interfering with the mitochondrial phospholipid cardiolipin and causing inefficient electron transfer resulting in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Sirtuin-3 (SIRT3) is a class III lysine deacetylase that is localized to the mitochondria and regulates mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress resistance enzymes such as superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD2). The purpose of this study was to determine whether SIRT3 prevents DOX-induced mitochondrial ROS production. Administration of DOX to mice suppressed cardiac SIRT3 expression, and DOX induced a dose-dependent decrease in SIRT3 and SOD2 expression in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. SIRT3-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts produced significantly more ROS in the presence of DOX compared with wild-type cells. Overexpression of wild-type SIRT3 increased cardiolipin levels and rescued mitochondrial respiration and SOD2 expression in DOX-treated H9c2 cardiomyocytes and attenuated the amount of ROS produced following DOX treatment. These effects were absent when a deacetylase-deficient SIRT3 was expressed in H9c2 cells. Our results suggest that overexpression of SIRT3 attenuates DOX-induced ROS production, and this may involve increased SOD2 expression and improved mitochondrial bioenergetics. SIRT3 activation could be a potential therapy for DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction.

  9. Two mitochondrial alcohol dehydrogenase activities of Kluyveromyces lactis are differently expressed during respiration and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Saliola, M; Falcone, C

    1995-12-20

    The lactose-utilizing yeast Kluyveromyces lactis is an essentially aerobic organism in which both respiration and fermentation can coexist depending on the sugar concentration. Despite a low fermentative capacity as compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, four structural genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activities are present in this yeast. Two of these activities, namely K1ADH III and K1ADH IV, are located within mitochondria and their presence is dependent on the carbon sources in the medium. In this paper we demonstrate by transcription and activity analysis that KlADH3 is expressed in the presence of low glucose concentrations and in the presence of respiratory carbon sources other than ethanol. Indeed ethanol acts as a strong repressor of this gene. On the other hand, KlADH4 is induced by the presence of ethanol and not by other respiratory carbon sources. We also demonstrate that the presence of KLADH III and KLADH IV in K. lactis cells is dependent on glucose concentration, glucose uptake and the amount of ethanol produced. As a consequence, these activities can be used as markers for the onset of respiratory and fermentative metabolism in this yeast.

  10. Effects of selenium and vitamin E deficiencies in lambs on hepatic microsomal hemoproteins and mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Whanger, P D; Tripp, M J; Weswig, P H

    1977-06-01

    Microsomal hemoprotein levels and delta-amino levulinic acid dehydrase activity were determined in livers and rate of oxygen uptake, ADP:O ratios, and respiration control index were determined on mitochondria from muscle, liver, and heart of normal and white muscle diseased (WMD) lambs. WMD lambs were produced by feeding their dams either low selenium purified or alfalfa hay diets. Vitamin E and/or selenium was injected in a 2 x 2 factorial treatment in the ewes fed purified diets. Hepatic microsomal cytochrome P 450 levels and total heme content were significantly lower in WMD lambs. Cytochrome b5 content was significantly lower in lambs on the -E-Se or -E + Se treatments than those on the +E--Se treatment, but the cytochrome b5 content was not different between WMD and normal lambs from ewes fed the hay diet. No differences were found in hepatic delta-amino levulinic acid dehydrase activity, or in the rate of oxygen uptake, ADP:O ratios or respiratory control index between mitochondria from normal and WMD lamb tissue on any of the treatments.

  11. [State of mitochondrial respiration and calcium capacity in livers of rats with different resistance to hypoxia after injections of L-arginine].

    PubMed

    Kurhaliuk, N M

    2001-01-01

    In experiments on rats with different resistance to hypoxia are investigated processes of mitochondrial respiration, oxidative phosphorylation and calcium capacity in liver under precursor nitric oxide L-arginine (600 mg/kg) and blockator nitric oxide synthase L-NNA (35 mg/kg) injections. We are used next substrates of oxidation: 0.35 mM succinate, 1 mM alpha-ketoglutarate, 1 mM alpha-ketoglutarate and 2 mM malonic acid. Increasing of ADP-stimulation respiration states under exogenous L-arginine injection, decreasing efficacy of respiration processes (respiration control on Chance and ADP/O) under such substrates oxidation, testify to oxide energy support decreasing and reversing nitric oxide inhibit in such conditions. This will be used as mechanism cell regulation succinate dehydrogenase activity. It has shown that L-arginine injection increase calcium mitochondrial capacity low resistance to hypoxia rats using substrates of oxidation succinate and alpha-ketoglutarate to control meanings of high resistance rats. Effects of nitric oxide precursor influence on this processes limit NO-synthase inhibitor L-NNA.

  12. Unraveling Biochemical Pathways Affected by Mitochondrial Dysfunctions Using Metabolomic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Demine, Stéphane; Reddy, Nagabushana; Renard, Patricia; Raes, Martine; Arnould, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction(s) (MDs) can be defined as alterations in the mitochondria, including mitochondrial uncoupling, mitochondrial depolarization, inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, mitochondrial network fragmentation, mitochondrial or nuclear DNA mutations and the mitochondrial accumulation of protein aggregates. All these MDs are known to alter the capacity of ATP production and are observed in several pathological states/diseases, including cancer, obesity, muscle and neurological disorders. The induction of MDs can also alter the secretion of several metabolites, reactive oxygen species production and modify several cell-signalling pathways to resolve the mitochondrial dysfunction or ultimately trigger cell death. Many metabolites, such as fatty acids and derived compounds, could be secreted into the blood stream by cells suffering from mitochondrial alterations. In this review, we summarize how a mitochondrial uncoupling can modify metabolites, the signalling pathways and transcription factors involved in this process. We describe how to identify the causes or consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction using metabolomics (liquid and gas chromatography associated with mass spectrometry analysis, NMR spectroscopy) in the obesity and insulin resistance thematic. PMID:25257998

  13. Mitochondrial Respiration Chain Enzymatic Activities in the Human Brain: Methodological Implications for Tissue Sampling and Storage.

    PubMed

    Ronsoni, Marcelo Fernando; Remor, Aline Pertile; Lopes, Mark William; Hohl, Alexandre; Troncoso, Iris H Z; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Boos, Gustavo Luchi; Kondageski, Charles; Nunes, Jean Costa; Linhares, Marcelo Neves; Lin, Kátia; Latini, Alexandra Susana; Walz, Roger

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes enzymatic (MRCCE) activities were successfully evaluated in frozen brain samples. Epilepsy surgery offers an ethical opportunity to study human brain tissue surgically removed to treat drug resistant epilepsies. Epilepsy surgeries are done with hemodynamic and laboratory parameters to maintain physiology, but there are no studies analyzing the association among these parameters and MRCCE activities in the human brain tissue. We determined the intra-operative parameters independently associated with MRCCE activities in middle temporal neocortex (Cx), amygdala (AMY) and head of hippocampus (HIP) samples of patients (n = 23) who underwent temporal lobectomy using multiple linear regressions. MRCCE activities in Cx, AMY and HIP are differentially associated to trans-operative mean arterial blood pressure, O2 saturation, hemoglobin, and anesthesia duration to time of tissue sampling. The time-course between the last seizure occurrence and tissue sampling as well as the sample storage to biochemical assessments were also associated with enzyme activities. Linear regression models including these variables explain 13-17 % of MRCCE activities and show a moderate to strong effect (r = 0.37-0.82). Intraoperative hemodynamic and laboratory parameters as well as the time from last seizure to tissue sampling and storage time are associated with MRCCE activities in human samples from the Cx, AMYG and HIP. Careful control of these parameters is required to minimize confounding biases in studies using human brain samples collected from elective neurosurgery.

  14. Quantifying the timescales over which exogenous and endogenous conditions affect soil respiration.

    PubMed

    Barron-Gafford, Greg A; Cable, Jessica M; Bentley, Lisa Patrick; Scott, Russell L; Huxman, Travis E; Jenerette, G Darrel; Ogle, Kiona

    2014-04-01

    Understanding how exogenous and endogenous factors and above-ground-below-ground linkages modulate carbon dynamics is difficult because of the influences of antecedent conditions. For example, there are variable lags between above-ground assimilation and below-ground efflux, and the duration of antecedent periods are often arbitrarily assigned. Nonetheless, developing models linking above- and below-ground processes is crucial for estimating current and future carbon dynamics. We collected data on leaf-level photosynthesis (Asat ) and soil respiration (Rsoil ) in different microhabitats (under shrubs vs under bunchgrasses) in the Sonoran Desert. We evaluated timescales over which endogenous and exogenous factors control Rsoil by analyzing data in the context of a semimechanistic temperature-response model of Rsoil that incorporated effects of antecedent exogenous (soil water) and endogenous (Asat ) conditions. For both microhabitats, antecedent soil water and Asat significantly affected Rsoil , but Rsoil under shrubs was more sensitive to Asat than that under bunchgrasses. Photosynthetic rates 1 and 3 d before the Rsoil measurement were most important in determining current-day Rsoil under bunchgrasses and shrubs, respectively, indicating a significant lag effect. Endogenous and exogenous controls are critical drivers of Rsoil , but the relative importance and the timescale over which each factor affects Rsoil depends on above-ground vegetation and ecosystem structure characteristics.

  15. Similar nature of inhibition of mitochondrial respiration of heart tissue and malignant cells by methylglyoxal. A vital clue to understand the biochemical basis of malignancy.

    PubMed

    Ray, S; Biswas, S; Ray, M

    1997-06-01

    The effect of methylglyoxal on the oxygen consumption of mitochondria of heart and of several other organs of normal animals of different species has been tested. The results indicate that methylglyoxal (3.5 mM) strongly inhibits ADP-stimulated alpha-oxoglutarate and malate plus pyruvate-dependent respiration of exclusively heart mitochondria of normal animals of different species. Whereas, with the same substrates, but at a higher concentration of methylglyoxal (7.5 mM), the respiration of mitochondria of other organs of normal animals is not inhibited. Methylglyoxal also inhibits the respiration of slices of rat and toad hearts. But this inhibition is less pronounced. However, methylglyoxal (15 mM) fails to have any effect on perfused toad heart. Using rat heart mitochondria as a model, the effect of methylglyoxal on the oxygen consumption was also tested with different respiratory substrates, electron donors at different segments of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and site-specific inhibitors to identify the specific respiratory complex which might be involved in the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal. The results strongly suggest that methylglyoxal inhibits the electron flow through complex I of rat heart mitochondrial respiratory chain. Moreover, lactaldehyde (0.6 mM), a catabolite of methylglyoxal, can exert a protective effect on the inhibition of rat heart mitochondrial respiration by methylglyoxal (2.5 mM). The effect of methylglyoxal on heart mitochondria as described in the present paper is strikingly similar to the results of our previous work with mitochondria of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells and leukemic leukocytes. We have recently proposed a new hypothesis on cancer which suggests that excessive ATP formation in cells may lead to malignancy. The above mentioned similarity apparently provides a solid experimental foundation for the proposed hypothesis which has been discussed.

  16. Glycation inhibitors extend yeast chronological lifespan by reducing advanced glycation end products and by back regulation of proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Rubina S; Banarjee, Reema M; Deshmukh, Arati B; Patil, Gouri V; Jagadeeshaprasad, Mashanipalya G; Kulkarni, Mahesh J

    2017-03-06

    Advanced Glycation End products (AGEs) are implicated in aging process. Thus, reducing AGEs by using glycation inhibitors may help in attenuating the aging process. In this study using Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast system, we show that Aminoguanidine (AMG), a well-known glycation inhibitor, decreases the AGE modification of proteins in non-calorie restriction (NR) (2% glucose) and extends chronological lifespan (CLS) similar to that of calorie restriction (CR) condition (0.5% glucose). Proteomic analysis revealed that AMG back regulates the expression of differentially expressed proteins especially those involved in mitochondrial respiration in NR condition, suggesting that it switches metabolism from fermentation to respiration, mimicking CR. AMG induced back regulation of differentially expressed proteins could be possibly due to its chemical effect or indirectly by glycation inhibition. To delineate this, Metformin (MET), a structural analog of AMG and a mild glycation inhibitor and Hydralazine (HYD), another potent glycation inhibitor but not structural analog of AMG were used. HYD was more effective than MET in mimicking AMG suggesting that glycation inhibition was responsible for restoration of differentially expressed proteins. Thus glycation inhibitors particularly AMG, HYD and MET extend yeast CLS by reducing AGEs, modulating the expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration and possibly by scavenging glucose.

  17. COX assembly factor ccdc56 regulates mitochondrial morphology by affecting mitochondrial recruitment of Drp1.

    PubMed

    Ban-Ishihara, Reiko; Tomohiro-Takamiya, Shiho; Tani, Motohiro; Baudier, Jacques; Ishihara, Naotada; Kuge, Osamu

    2015-10-07

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that alter their morphology in response to cellular signaling and differentiation through balanced fusion and fission. In this study, we found that the mitochondrial inner membrane ATPase ATAD3A interacted with ccdc56/MITRAC12/COA3, a subunit of the cytochrome oxidase (COX)-assembly complex. Overproduction of ccdc56 in HeLa cells resulted in fragmented mitochondrial morphology, while mitochondria were highly elongated in ccdc56-repressed cells by the defective recruitment of the fission factor Drp1. We also found that mild and chronic inhibition of COX led to mitochondrial elongation, as seen in ccdc56-repressed cells. These results indicate that ccdc56 positively regulates mitochondrial fission via regulation of COX activity and the mitochondrial recruitment of Drp1, and thus, suggest a novel relationship between COX assembly and mitochondrial morphology.

  18. Investigating the role of respiration in plant salinity tolerance by analyzing mitochondrial proteomes from wheat and a salinity-tolerant Amphiploid (wheat × Lophopyrum elongatum).

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Richard P; Millar, A Harvey; Taylor, Nicolas L

    2013-11-01

    The effect of salinity on mitochondrial properties was investigated by comparing the reference wheat variety Chinese Spring (CS) to a salt-tolerant amphiploid (AMP). The octoploid AMP genotype was previously generated by combining hexaploid bread wheat (CS) with the diploid wild wheatgrass adapted to salt marshes, Lophopyrum elongatum. Here we used a combination of physiological, biochemical, and proteomic analyses to explore the mitochondrial and respiratory response to salinity in these two genotypes. The AMP showed greater growth tolerance to salinity treatments and altered respiration rate in both roots and shoots. A proteomic workflow of 2D-DIGE and MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry was used to compare the protein composition of isolated mitochondrial samples from roots and shoots of both genotypes, following control or salt treatment. A large set of mitochondrial proteins were identified as responsive to salinity in both genotypes, notably enzymes involved in detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Genotypic differences in mitochondrial composition were also identified, with AMP exhibiting a higher abundance of manganese superoxide dismutase, serine hydroxymethyltransferase, aconitase, malate dehydrogenase, and β-cyanoalanine synthase compared to CS. We present peptide fragmentation spectra derived from some of these AMP-specific protein spots, which could serve as biomarkers to track superior protein variants.

  19. Mouse somatic mutation orthologous to MELAS A3302G mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene confers respiration defects.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Akinori; Enoki, Shunkei; Ishikawa, Kaori; Mito, Takayuki; Obata, Kanae; Nagashima, Ruriko; Yonekawa, Hiromichi; Nakada, Kazuto; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-11-27

    We searched for mtDNA harboring somatic mutations in mouse B82 cells, and found an A2748G mutation orthologous to the A3302G mutation in tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene reported in a patient with MELAS, the most prevalent mitochondrial disease. We isolated subclones of B82 cells until we obtained one subclone harboring >95% A2748G mtDNA. Cytoplasmic transfer of A2748G mtDNA resulted in cotransfer of A2748G mtDNA and respiration defects into mouse ES cells. Thus, A2748G mtDNA is responsible for respiration defects, and the ES cells harboring A2748G mtDNA may be useful for generation of transmitochondrial mice harboring A2748G mtDNA as potential disease models of MELAS.

  20. Mitofusin 2 Deficiency Affects Energy Metabolism and Mitochondrial Biogenesis in MEF Cells.

    PubMed

    Kawalec, Maria; Boratyńska-Jasińska, Anna; Beręsewicz, Małgorzata; Dymkowska, Dorota; Zabłocki, Krzysztof; Zabłocka, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), mitochondrial outer membrane protein which is involved in rearrangement of these organelles, was first described in pathology of hypertension and diabetes, and more recently much attention is paid to its functions in Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2A neuropathy (CMT2A). Here, cellular energy metabolism was investigated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) differing in the presence of the Mfn2 gene; control (MEFwt) and with Mfn2 gene depleted MEFMfn2-/-. These two cell lines were compared in terms of various parameters characterizing mitochondrial bioenergetics. Here, we have shown that relative rate of proliferation of MEFMfn2-/- cells versus control fibroblasts depend on serum supplementation of the growth media. Moreover, MEFMfn2-/- cells exhibited significantly increased respiration rate in comparison to MEFwt, regardless of serum supplementation of the medium. This effect was correlated with increased level of mitochondrial markers (TOM20 and NAO) as well as mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α) protein levels and unchanged total ATP content. Interestingly, mitochondrial DNA content in MEFMfn2-/- cells was not reduced. Fundamentally, these results are in contrast to a commonly accepted belief that mitofusin 2 deficiency inevitably results in debilitation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. However, we suggest a balance between negative metabolic consequences of mitofusin 2 deficiency and adaptive processes exemplified by increased level of PGC-1α and TFAM transcription factor which prevent an excessive depletion of mtDNA and severe impairment of cell metabolism.

  1. Photoperiod Affects the Phenotype of Mitochondrial Complex I Mutants.

    PubMed

    Pétriacq, Pierre; de Bont, Linda; Genestout, Lucie; Hao, Jingfang; Laureau, Constance; Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Rzigui, Touhami; Queval, Guillaume; Gilard, Françoise; Mauve, Caroline; Guérard, Florence; Lamothe-Sibold, Marlène; Marion, Jessica; Fresneau, Chantal; Brown, Spencer; Danon, Antoine; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Berthomé, Richard; Ribas-Carbo, Miquel; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Cornic, Gabriel; Pineau, Bernard; Gakière, Bertrand; De Paepe, Rosine

    2017-01-01

    Plant mutants for genes encoding subunits of mitochondrial complex I (CI; NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase), the first enzyme of the respiratory chain, display various phenotypes depending on growth conditions. Here, we examined the impact of photoperiod, a major environmental factor controlling plant development, on two Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CI mutants: a new insertion mutant interrupted in both ndufs8.1 and ndufs8.2 genes encoding the NDUFS8 subunit and the previously characterized ndufs4 CI mutant. In the long day (LD) condition, both ndufs8.1 and ndufs8.2 single mutants were indistinguishable from Columbia-0 at phenotypic and biochemical levels, whereas the ndufs8.1 ndufs8.2 double mutant was devoid of detectable holo-CI assembly/activity, showed higher alternative oxidase content/activity, and displayed a growth retardation phenotype similar to that of the ndufs4 mutant. Although growth was more affected in ndufs4 than in ndufs8.1 ndufs8.2 under the short day (SD) condition, both mutants displayed a similar impairment of growth acceleration after transfer to LD compared with the wild type. Untargeted and targeted metabolomics showed that overall metabolism was less responsive to the SD-to-LD transition in mutants than in the wild type. The typical LD acclimation of carbon and nitrogen assimilation as well as redox-related parameters was not observed in ndufs8.1 ndufs8 Similarly, NAD(H) content, which was higher in the SD condition in both mutants than in Columbia-0, did not adjust under LD We propose that altered redox homeostasis and NAD(H) content/redox state control the phenotype of CI mutants and photoperiod acclimation in Arabidopsis.

  2. Dietary fatty acids affect mitochondrial phospholipid compositions and mitochondrial gene expression of rainbow trout liver at different ages.

    PubMed

    Almaida-Pagán, P F; De Santis, C; Rubio-Mejía, O L; Tocher, D R

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are among the first responders to various stressors that challenge the homeostasis of cells and organisms. Mitochondrial decay is generally associated with impairment in the organelle bioenergetics function and increased oxidative stress, and it appears that deterioration of mitochondrial inner membrane phospholipids (PL), particularly cardiolipin (CL), and accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are among the main mechanisms involved in this process. In the present study, liver mitochondrial membrane PL compositions, lipid peroxidation, and mtDNA gene expression were analyzed in rainbow trout fed three diets with the same base formulation but with lipid supplied either by fish oil (FO), rapeseed oil (RO), or high DHA oil (DHA) during 6 weeks. Specifically, two feeding trials were performed using fish from the same population of two ages (1 and 3 years), and PL class compositions of liver mitochondria, fatty acid composition of individual PL classes, TBARS content, and mtDNA expression were determined. Dietary fatty acid composition strongly affected mitochondrial membrane composition from trout liver but observed changes did not fully reflect the diet, particularly when it contained high DHA. The changes were PL specific, CL being particularly resistant to changes in DHA. Some significant differences observed in expression of mtDNA with diet may suggest long-term dietary effects in mitochondrial gene expression which could affect electron transport chain function. All the changes were influenced by fish age, which could be related to the different growth rates observed between 1- and 3-year-old trout but that could also indicate age-related changes in the ability to maintain structural homeostasis of mitochondrial membranes.

  3. Soil respiration as affected by long-term broiler litter application to a udult in the ozark highlands.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Richard L; Brye, Kristofor R; Gbur, Edward E

    2015-01-01

    The United States produced 8.4 billion broiler chickens () and an estimated 10.1 to 14.3 million Mg of broiler litter (BL) in 2012. Arkansas' production of 1 billion broilers in 2012 produced an estimated 1.2 to 1.7 million Mg of BL, most of which was concentrated in the Ozark Highlands region of northwest Arkansas. Increased CO release from soils associated with agricultural practices has generated concerns regarding the contribution of certain agricultural management practices to global warming. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of long-term (>6 yr) BL application to a Udult on soil respiration and annual C emissions and to determine the predictability of soil respiration based on soil temperature and moisture in the Ozark Highlands region of northwest Arkansas. Soil respiration was measured routinely between May 2009 and May 2012 in response to annual BL application rates of 0, 5.6, and 11.2 Mg dry litter ha that began in 2003. Soil respiration varied ( < 0.01) with BL rate, measurement date, and year. Additions of BL stimulated respiration after application, and rainfall events after dry-soil conditions stimulated respiration in all years. Soil temperature at the 10-cm depth, 0- to 6-cm soil volumetric water content (VWC), and annual CO-C emissions were unaffected ( > 0.05) by BL application rate but differed ( < 0.01) among study years. Multiple regression indicated that soil respiration could be reasonably predicted using 2-cm-depth soil temperature (T) and the product of T and VWC as predictors ( = 0.52; < 0.01). Results indicate that organic amendments, such as BL, can stimulate release of CO from the soil to the atmosphere, potentially negatively affecting atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations; thus, there may be application rates above which the benefits of organic amendments may be diminished by adverse environmental effects. Improved BL management strategies are needed to lessen the loss of CO from BL-amended soils.

  4. Respiration from coarse woody debris as affected by moisture and saprotroph functional diversity in Western Oregon.

    PubMed

    Progar, R A; Schowalter, T D; Freitag, C M; Morrell, J J

    2000-08-01

    Decomposing coarse woody debris (CWD) is a conspicuous and important component of forest ecosystems. Seasonal temperature and precipitation patterns influence heterotroph activity, which determines the rate of CWD decomposition. We tested the hypothesis that moisture content and heterotroph community composition influence carbon flux in freshly-cut Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) logs. To evaluate the effects of physical penetration of bark and wood and transmission of basidiomycete compared with ascomycete fungi by insects, 360 experimental logs were assigned to five replicate sites, each with 12 heterotroph×moisture treatment combinations in 1995. Half of the logs in each heterotroph treatment received normal rainfall and half were placed individually under elevated clear plastic tents to reduce water inputs. Respiration was measured every 1-3 months. In 1996 and 1997 a different log representing each treatment combination was harvested from each replicate and analyzed for the presence of inoculated and colonizing fungi. Logs inoculated with decay fungi had higher respiration than uninoculated logs but this effect only approached significance (P=0.08) during the first season. Respiration was significantly higher in sheltered than in exposed logs. Our results indicate that respiration and wood decomposition rates may be depressed by high moisture content in the wet forests of the coastal Pacific Northwest.

  5. Relationship between Liver Mitochondrial Respiration and Proton Leak in Low and High RFI Steers from Two Lineages of RFI Angus Bulls

    PubMed Central

    Acetoze, G.; Weber, K. L.; Ramsey, J. J.; Rossow, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is to evaluate liver mitochondrial oxygen consumption and proton leak kinetics in progeny from two lineages of Angus bulls with high and low residual feed intake (RFI). Two Angus bulls were selected based on results from a genetic test for RFI and were used as sires. Eight offspring at 10-11 months of age from each sire were housed in individual pens for 70–105 days following a diet adaptation period of 14 days. Progeny of the low RFI sire had 0.57 kg/d (P = 0.05) lower average RFI than progeny of the high RFI sire. There was no difference in dry matter intake between low and high RFI steers, but low RFI steers gained more body weight (P = 0.02) and tended to have higher average daily gains (P = 0.07). State 3 and State 4 respiration, RCR, and proton leak did not differ between high and low RFI steers (P = 0.96, P = 0.81, P = 0.93, and P = 0.88, resp.). Therefore, the increase in bodyweight gain which distinguished the low RFI steers from the high RFI steers may be associated with other metabolic mechanisms that are not associated with liver mitochondrial respiration and proton leak kinetics. PMID:27347504

  6. Bcl-2 family proteins as regulators of cancer cell invasion and metastasis: a review focusing on mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Um, Hong-Duck

    2016-02-02

    Although Bcl-2 family proteins were originally identified as key regulators of apoptosis, an impressive body of evidence has shown that pro-survival members of the Bcl-2 family, including Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and Bcl-w, can also promote cell migration, invasion, and cancer metastasis. Interestingly, cell invasion was recently found to be suppressed by multidomain pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family, such as Bax and Bak. While the mechanisms underlying these new functions of Bcl-2 proteins are just beginning to be studied, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have emerged as inducers of cell invasion and the production of ROS from mitochondrial respiration is known to be promoted and suppressed by the pro-survival and multidomain pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members, respectively. Here, I review the evidence supporting the ability of Bcl-2 proteins to regulate cancer cell invasion and metastasis, and discuss our current understanding of their underlying mechanisms, with a particular focus on mitochondrial respiration and ROS, which could have implications for the development of strategies to overcome tumor progression.

  7. Guava fruit extract and its triterpene constituents have osteoanabolic effect: Stimulation of osteoblast differentiation by activation of mitochondrial respiration via the Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Porwal, Konica; Pal, Subhashis; Dev, Kapil; China, Shyamsundar Pal; Kumar, Yogesh; Singh, Chandan; Barbhuyan, Tarun; Sinha, Neeraj; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Trivedi, Arun Kumar; Maurya, Rakesh; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya

    2017-03-08

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the skeletal effect of guava triterpene-enriched extract (GE) in rats and identify osteogenic compounds thereof, and determine their modes of action. In growing female rats, GE at 250 mg/kg dose increased parameters of peak bone mass including femur length, bone mineral density (BMD) and biomechanical strength, suggesting that GE promoted modeling-directed bone growth. GE also stimulated bone regeneration at the site of bone injury. In adult osteopenic rats (osteopenia induced by ovariectomy, OVX) GE completely restored the lost bones at both axial and appendicular sites, suggesting a strong osteoanabolic effect. Serum metabolomics studies showed changes in several metabolites (some of which are related to bone metabolism) in OVX compared with ovary-intact control and GE treatment to OVX rats reversed those. Out of six abundantly present triterpenes in GE, ursolic acid (UA) and 2α-hydroxy ursolic acid (2α-UA) induced osteogenic differentiation in vitro as did GE by activating Wnt/β-catenin pathway assessed by phosphorylation of GSK-3β. Over-expressing of constitutively active GSK-3β (caGSK-3β) in osteoblasts abolished the differentiation-promoting effect of GE, UA and 2α-UA. All three increased both glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration but only rotenone (inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transfer) and not 2-deoxyglucose (to block glycolysis) inhibited osteoblast differentiation. In addition, caGSK-3β over-expression attenuated the enhanced mitochondrial respiration caused by GE, UA and 2α-UA. We conclude that GE has osteoanabolic effect which is contributed by UA and 2α-UA, and involve activation of canonical Wnt signaling which in turn modulates cellular energy metabolism leading to osteoblast differentiation.

  8. Laboratory study to assess causative factors affecting temporal changes in filtering facepiece respirator fit: part I - pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Ziqing; Benson, Stacey; Lynch, Stephanie; Palmiero, Andy; Roberge, Raymond

    2011-12-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health is conducting a first-of-its-kind study that will assess respirator fit and facial dimension changes as a function of time and improve the scientific basis for decisions on the periodicity of fit testing. A representative sample of 220 subjects wearing filtering-facepiece respirators (FFR) will be evaluated to investigate factors that affect changes in respirator fit over time. The objective of this pilot study (n = 10) was to investigate the variation in fit test data collected in accordance with the study protocol. Inward leakage (IL) and filter penetration were measured for each donned respirator, permitting the calculation of face seal leakage (FSL) and fit factor (FF). The study included only subjects who (a) passed one of the first three fit tests (FF ≥ 100), and (b) demonstrated through a series of nine donnings that they achieved adequate fit (90th percentile FSL was ≤ 0.05). Following the respirator fit tests, 3-D scans of subjects were captured, and height, weight, and 13 traditional anthropometric facial dimensions were measured. The same data were collected 2 and 4 weeks after baseline. The mean change in FSL for the 10 subjects was 0.044% between Visits 1 and 2, and was 0.229% between Visits 1 and 3. Technicians achieved at least moderate reliability for all manual measurements except nose protrusion. Filter penetration was generally less than 0.03%. Geometric mean fit factors were not statistically different among the three visits. The large variability was observed with different respirator samples for the same model, between subjects (inter), and within each subject (intra). Although variability was observed, adequate fit was maintained for all 10 subjects. Pilot scans collected show subject faces remained the same over the 4 weeks. The consistent results during the pilot study indicate that the methods and procedures are appropriate for the 3-year main study. In addition, this baseline

  9. Estradiol affects liver mitochondrial function in ovariectomized and tamoxifen-treated ovariectomized female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Paula I.; Custodio, Jose B.A.; Nunes, Elsa; Moreno, Antonio; Seica, Raquel; Oliveira, Catarina R.; Santos, Maria S. . E-mail: mssantos@ci.uc.pt

    2007-05-15

    Given the tremendous importance of mitochondria to basic cellular functions as well as the critical role of mitochondrial impairment in a vast number of disorders, a compelling question is whether 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) modulates mitochondrial function. To answer this question we exposed isolated liver mitochondria to E2. Three groups of rat females were used: control, ovariectomized and ovariectomized treated with tamoxifen. Tamoxifen has antiestrogenic effects in the breast tissue and is the standard endocrine treatment for women with breast cancer. However, under certain circumstances and in certain tissues, tamoxifen can also exert estrogenic agonist properties. We observed that at basal conditions, ovariectomy and tamoxifen treatment do not induce any statistical alteration in oxidative phosphorylation system and respiratory chain parameters. Furthermore, tamoxifen treatment increases the capacity of mitochondria to accumulate Ca{sup 2+} delaying the opening of the permeability transition pore. The presence of 25 {mu}M E2 impairs respiration and oxidative phosphorylation system these effects being similar in all groups of animals studied. Curiously, E2 protects against lipid peroxidation and increases the production of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in energized mitochondria of control females. Our results indicate that E2 has in general deleterious effects that lead to mitochondrial impairment. Since mitochondrial dysfunction is a triggering event of cell degeneration and death, the use of exogenous E2 must be carefully considered.

  10. Mitochondrial Haplogroups Affect Severity But Not Prevalence of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bregman, Jana A.; Herren, David J.; Estopinal, Christopher B.; Chocron, Isaac M.; Harlow, Paula A.; Warden, Cassandra; Brantley, Milam A.; Samuels, David C.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We previously reported European mitochondrial haplogroup H to be a risk factor for and haplogroup UK to be protective against proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) among Caucasian patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR). The purpose of this study was to determine whether these haplogroups are also associated with the risk of having DR among Caucasian patients with diabetes. Methods Deidentified medical records for 637 Caucasian patients with diabetes (223 with DR) were obtained from BioVU, Vanderbilt University's electronic, deidentified DNA databank. An additional 197 Caucasian patients with diabetes (98 with DR) were enrolled from the Vanderbilt Eye Institute (VEI). We tested for an association between European mitochondrial haplogroups and DR status. Results The percentage of diabetes patients with DR did not differ across the haplogroups (P = 0.32). The percentage of patients with nonproliferative DR (NPDR; P = 0.0084) and with PDR (P = 0.027) significantly differed across the haplogroups. In logistic regressions adjusting for sex, age, diabetes type, duration of diabetes, and hemoglobin A1c, neither haplogroup H nor haplogroup UK had a significant effect on DR compared with diabetic controls. Haplogroup UK was a significant risk factor (OR = 1.72 [1.13–2.59], P = 0.010) for NPDR compared with diabetic controls in the unadjusted analysis, but not in the adjusted analysis (OR = 1.29 [0.79–2.10], P = 0.20). Conclusions Mitochondrial haplogroups H and UK were associated with severity, but not presence, of DR. These data argue that the effect of these haplogroups is related to ischemia and neovascularization, the defining features of PDR. PMID:28245487

  11. Dynamic spatial patterns of leaf traits affect total respiration on the crown scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Hongxuan; Han, Fengsen; Li, Yuanzheng; Hu, Dan

    2016-05-01

    Temporal and spatial variations of leaf traits caused conflicting conclusions and great estimating errors of total carbon budget on crown scales. However, there is no effective method to quantitatively describe and study heterogeneous patterns of crowns yet. In this study, dynamic spatial patterns of typical ecological factors on crown scales were investigated during two sky conditions, and CEZs (crown ecological zones) method was developed for spatial crown zoning, within which leaf traits were statistically unchanged. The influencing factors on hourly and spatial variations of leaf dark respiration (Rd) were analysed, and total crown respiration (Rt) was estimated based on patterns of CEZs. The results showed that dynamic spatial patterns of air temperature and light intensity changed significantly by CEZs in special periods and positions, but not continuously. The contributions of influencing factors on variations of Rd changed with crown depth and sky conditions, and total contributions of leaf structural and chemical traits were higher during sunny days than ecological factors, but lower during cloudy days. The estimated errors of Rt may be obviously reduced with CEZs. These results provided some references for scaling from leaves to crown, and technical foundations for expanding lab-control experiments to open field ones.

  12. Dynamic spatial patterns of leaf traits affect total respiration on the crown scale

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Hongxuan; Han, Fengsen; Li, Yuanzheng; Hu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Temporal and spatial variations of leaf traits caused conflicting conclusions and great estimating errors of total carbon budget on crown scales. However, there is no effective method to quantitatively describe and study heterogeneous patterns of crowns yet. In this study, dynamic spatial patterns of typical ecological factors on crown scales were investigated during two sky conditions, and CEZs (crown ecological zones) method was developed for spatial crown zoning, within which leaf traits were statistically unchanged. The influencing factors on hourly and spatial variations of leaf dark respiration (Rd) were analysed, and total crown respiration (Rt) was estimated based on patterns of CEZs. The results showed that dynamic spatial patterns of air temperature and light intensity changed significantly by CEZs in special periods and positions, but not continuously. The contributions of influencing factors on variations of Rd changed with crown depth and sky conditions, and total contributions of leaf structural and chemical traits were higher during sunny days than ecological factors, but lower during cloudy days. The estimated errors of Rt may be obviously reduced with CEZs. These results provided some references for scaling from leaves to crown, and technical foundations for expanding lab-control experiments to open field ones. PMID:27225586

  13. Similar mitochondrial activation kinetics in wild-type and creatine kinase-deficient fast-twitch muscle indicate significant Pi control of respiration.

    PubMed

    Jeneson, Jeroen A L; ter Veld, Frank; Schmitz, Joep P J; Meyer, Ronald A; Hilbers, Peter A J; Nicolay, Klaas

    2011-06-01

    Past simulations of oxidative ATP metabolism in skeletal muscle have predicted that elimination of the creatine kinase (CK) reaction should result in dramatically faster oxygen consumption dynamics during transitions in ATP turnover rate. This hypothesis was investigated. Oxygen consumption of fast-twitch (FT) muscle isolated from wild-type (WT) and transgenic mice deficient in the myoplasmic (M) and mitochondrial (Mi) CK isoforms (MiM CK(-/-)) were measured at 20°C at rest and during electrical stimulation. MiM CK(-/-) muscle oxygen consumption activation kinetics during a step change in contraction rate were 30% faster than WT (time constant 53 ± 3 vs. 69 ± 4 s, respectively; mean ± SE, n = 8 and 6, respectively). MiM CK(-/-) muscle oxygen consumption deactivation kinetics were 380% faster than WT (time constant 74 ± 4 s vs. 264 ± 4 s, respectively). Next, the experiments were simulated using a computational model of the oxidative ATP metabolic network in FT muscle featuring ADP and Pi feedback control of mitochondrial respiration (J. A. L. Jeneson, J. P. Schmitz, N. A. van den Broek, N. A. van Riel, P. A. Hilbers, K. Nicolay, J. J. Prompers. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 297: E774-E784, 2009) that was reparameterized for 20°C. Elimination of Pi control via clamping of the mitochondrial Pi concentration at 10 mM reproduced past simulation results of dramatically faster kinetics in CK(-/-) muscle, while inclusion of Pi control qualitatively explained the experimental observations. On this basis, it was concluded that previous studies of the CK-deficient FT muscle phenotype underestimated the contribution of Pi to mitochondrial respiratory control.

  14. Hexokinase II acts through UCP3 to suppress mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and maintain aerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Dumouchel, Tyler; Aguer, Céline; deKemp, Rob; Beanlands, Rob; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2011-07-15

    UCP3 (uncoupling protein-3) mitigates mitochondrial ROS (reactive oxygen species) production, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Previous studies have also examined UCP3 effects, including decreased ROS production, during metabolic states when fatty acid oxidation is high (e.g. a fasting state). However, the role of UCP3 when carbohydrate oxidation is high (e.g. fed state) has remained largely unexplored. In the present study, we show that mitochondrial-bound HK (hexokinase) II curtails oxidative stress and enhances aerobic metabolism of glucose in the fed state in a UCP3-dependent manner. Genetic knockout or inhibition of UCP3 significantly decreased mitochondrial-bound HKII. Furthermore, UCP3 was required for the HKII-mediated decrease in mitochondrial ROS emission. Intriguingly, the UCP3-mediated modulation of mitochondria-associated HKII was only observed in cells cultured under high-glucose conditions. UCP3 was required to maintain high rates of aerobic metabolism in high-glucose-treated cells and in muscle of fed mice. Deficiency in UCP3 resulted in a metabolic shift that favoured anaerobic glycolytic metabolism, increased glucose uptake and increased sensitivity to oxidative challenge. PET (positron emission tomography) of [18F]fluoro-deoxyglucose uptake confirmed these findings in UCP3-knockout and wild-type mice. Collectively, our findings link the anti-oxidative and metabolic functions of UCP3 through a surprising molecular connection with mitochondrial-bound HKII.

  15. Enhancing Mitochondrial Respiration Suppresses Tumor Promoter TPA-Induced PKM2 Expression and Cell Transformation in Skin Epidermal JB6 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wittwer, Jennifer A.; Robbins, Delira; Wang, Fei; Codarin, Sarah; Shen, Xinggui; Kevil, Christopher G.; Huang, Ting-Ting; Van Remmen, Holly; Richardson, Arlan; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Differentiated cells primarily metabolize glucose for energy via the tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation, but cancer cells thrive on a different mechanism to produce energy, characterized as the Warburg effect, which describes the increased dependence on aerobic glycolysis. The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2), which is responsible for catalyzing the final step of aerobic glycolysis, is highly expressed in cancer cells and may contribute to the Warburg effect. However, whether PKM2 plays a contributing role during early cancer development is unclear. In our studies, we have made an attempt to elucidate the effects of varying mitochondrial respiration substrates on skin cell transformation and expression of PKM2. Tumorigenicity in murine skin epidermal JB6 P+ (promotable) cells was measured in a soft agar assay using 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) as a tumor promoter. We observed a significant reduction in cell transformation upon pretreatment with the mitochondrial respiration substrate succinate or malate/pyruvate. We observed that increased expression and activity of PKM2 in TPA-treated JB6 P+ cells and pretreatment with succinate or malate/pyruvate suppressed the effects. In addition, TPA treatment also induced PKM2 whereas PKM1 expression was suppressed in mouse skin epidermal tissues in vivo. In comparison with JB6 P+ cells, the nonpromotable JB6 P− cells showed no increase in PKM2 expression or activity upon TPA treatment. Knockdown of PKM2 using a siRNA approach significantly reduced skin cell transformation. Thus, our results suggest that PKM2 activation could be an early event and play a contributing role in skin tumorigenesis. PMID:21673231

  16. Response of mitochondrial thioredoxin PsTrxo1, antioxidant enzymes, and respiration to salinity in pea (Pisum sativum L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Martí, María C; Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Camejo, Daymi; Ribas-Carbó, Miquel; Lázaro, Juan J; Sevilla, Francisca; Jiménez, Ana

    2011-07-01

    Mitochondria play an essential role in reactive oxygen species (ROS) signal transduction in plants. Redox regulation is an essential feature of mitochondrial function, with thioredoxin (Trx), involved in disulphide/dithiol interchange, playing a prominent role. To explore the participation of mitochondrial PsTrxo1, Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), peroxiredoxin (PsPrxII F), and alternative oxidase (AOX) under salt stress, their transcriptional and protein levels were analysed in pea plants growing under 150 mM NaCl for a short and a long period. The activities of mitochondrial Mn-SOD and Trx together with the in vivo activities of the alternative pathway (AP) and the cytochrome pathway (CP) were also determined, combined with the characterization of the plant physiological status as well as the mitochondrial oxidative indicators. The analysis of protein and mRNA levels and activities revealed the importance of the post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation of these proteins in the response to salt stress. Increases in AOX protein amount correlated with increases in AP capacity, whereas in vivo AP activity was maintained under salt stress. Similarly, Mn-SOD activity was also maintained. Under all the stress treatments, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and CP activity were decreased although the oxidative stress in leaves was only moderate. However, an increase in lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation was found in mitochondria isolated from leaves under the short-term salinity conditions. In addition, an increase in mitochondrial Trx activity was produced in response to the long-term NaCl treatment. The results support a role for PsTrxo1 as a component of the defence system induced by NaCl in pea mitochondria, providing the cell with a mechanism by which it can respond to changing environment protecting mitochondria from oxidative stress together with Mn-SOD, AOX, and PrxII F.

  17. High incubation temperatures enhance mitochondrial energy metabolism in reptile embryos

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bao-Jun; Li, Teng; Gao, Jing; Ma, Liang; Du, Wei-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Developmental rate increases exponentially with increasing temperature in ectothermic animals, but the biochemical basis underlying this thermal dependence is largely unexplored. We measured mitochondrial respiration and metabolic enzyme activities of turtle embryos (Pelodiscus sinensis) incubated at different temperatures to identify the metabolic basis of the rapid development occurring at high temperatures in reptile embryos. Developmental rate increased with increasing incubation temperatures in the embryos of P. sinensis. Correspondingly, in addition to the thermal dependence of mitochondrial respiration and metabolic enzyme activities, high-temperature incubation further enhanced mitochondrial respiration and COX activities in the embryos. This suggests that embryos may adjust mitochondrial respiration and metabolic enzyme activities in response to developmental temperature to achieve high developmental rates at high temperatures. Our study highlights the importance of biochemical investigations in understanding the proximate mechanisms by which temperature affects embryonic development. PMID:25749301

  18. [Comparative study of the influence of succinate-containing preparations on mitochondrial respiration in rat brain cells].

    PubMed

    Iasnetsov, V V; Prosvirova, E P; Tsublova, E G

    2012-01-01

    It has been established by polarographic measurements that preparations containing succinate, such as cytoflavin (0.85 mM succinate), mexidol, and amtizol succinate (at a concentration of 0.85 mM) but not reamberin (0.045 mM succinate), nearly equally (by 35-45%) increase oxygen consumption in rat brain mitochondria. On the other hand, malonate - inhibitor of the respiratory complex II (succinate dehydrogenase) of mitochondrial chain suppressed the stimulating effect of these drugs.

  19. Croton argenteus preparation inhibits initial growth, mitochondrial respiration and increase the oxidative stress from Senna occidentalis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Rech, Katlin S; Silva, Cristiane B; Kulik, Juliana D; Dias, Josiane F G; Zanin, Sandra M W; Kerber, Vitor A; Ocampos, Fernanda M M; Dalarmi, Luciane; Santos, Gedir O; Simionatto, Euclésio; Lima, Cristina P; Miguel, Obdúlio G; Miguel, Marilis D

    2015-01-01

    Senna ocidentalis is a weed, native to Brazil, considered to infest crops and plantations, and is responsible for yield losses of several crops, particularly soybean. The aim of this work was to evaluate if the Croton argenteus extract and fractions possess phytotoxic activity on S. ocidentalis. The crude ethanolic extract (CEE) and its hexanic (HF), chloroformic (CLF) and ethyl acetate (EAF) fractions were tested in germination, growth, oxidative stress increase, Adenosine triphosphate, L-malate and succinate synthesis. The crude extract and its fractions slowed down the germination of S. ocidentalis and decreased the final percentage of germination. Oxidative stress was also increased in the seedlings, by an increase of catalase, peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and lipid peroxidation; and it became clear that the ethyl acetate fraction was more phytotoxic. The results indicate that the crude extract and fractions of C. argenteus compromise the mitochondrial energy metabolism, by the inhibition of mitochondrial ATP production, with a decrease in the production of L-malate and succinate. The ethyl acetate fraction of C. argenteus showed high activity on germination and growth, and these effects take place by means of mitochondrial metabolism alterations and increase the oxidative stress, leading the seedling death.

  20. Mitochondrial threshold effects.

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Rodrigue; Faustin, Benjamin; Rocher, Christophe; Malgat, Monique; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Letellier, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    The study of mitochondrial diseases has revealed dramatic variability in the phenotypic presentation of mitochondrial genetic defects. To attempt to understand this variability, different authors have studied energy metabolism in transmitochondrial cell lines carrying different proportions of various pathogenic mutations in their mitochondrial DNA. The same kinds of experiments have been performed on isolated mitochondria and on tissue biopsies taken from patients with mitochondrial diseases. The results have shown that, in most cases, phenotypic manifestation of the genetic defect occurs only when a threshold level is exceeded, and this phenomenon has been named the 'phenotypic threshold effect'. Subsequently, several authors showed that it was possible to inhibit considerably the activity of a respiratory chain complex, up to a critical value, without affecting the rate of mitochondrial respiration or ATP synthesis. This phenomenon was called the 'biochemical threshold effect'. More recently, quantitative analysis of the effects of various mutations in mitochondrial DNA on the rate of mitochondrial protein synthesis has revealed the existence of a 'translational threshold effect'. In this review these different mitochondrial threshold effects are discussed, along with their molecular bases and the roles that they play in the presentation of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:12467494

  1. Sire and liveweight affect feed intake and methane emissions of sheep confined in respiration chambers.

    PubMed

    Robinson, D L; Goopy, J P; Donaldson, A J; Woodgate, R T; Oddy, V H; Hegarty, R S

    2014-12-01

    Daily methane production and feed intake were measured on 160 adult ewes, which were the progeny of 20 sires and 3 sire types (Merino, dual-purpose and terminal) from a genetically diverse flock. All animals were housed in individual pens and fed a 50/50 mix of chaffed lucerne and oaten hays at 20 g/kg liveweight (LW), with feed refusals measured for at least 10 days before the first of three 22-h measurements in respiration chambers (RC). Feed was withdrawn at 1600 h on the day before each RC test to encourage the ewes to eat the entire ration provided for them in the RC. After the first 1-day RC test, the sheep were returned to their pens for a day, then given a second 1-day RC test, followed by another day in their pens, then a third RC test. After all animals had been tested, they were ranked according to methane emissions adjusted for feed intake in the RC and on the previous day, enabling 10 low and 10 high methane animals to be chosen for repeat measurement. No variation between sires nor consistent effects of LW on feed eaten (%FE, expressed as per cent of feed offered) was evident in the 10 days before the first RC measurement. However, significant differences between sires (equivalent to an estimated heritability of 41%) were identified for %FE during the 2(nd) and 3(rd) days of RC testing (2 and 4 days after the initial RC test). The analysis of all data showed that methane emissions in the RC were related to feed intake on the day of testing and the two previous days (all P<0.0005). Before correcting for feed intake on previous days, there was some variation between sires in methane yield, equivalent to an estimated heritability of 9%. Correction for feed intake on the 2 previous days halved the residual variation, allowing other effects to be detected, including effects of LW, twins reared as singles, test batch, RC and test-day effects, but estimated sire variation fell to zero. In order to avoid potential biases, statistical models of methane

  2. Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by the flavone aglycone isovitexin causes aberrant petal and leaf morphology in Silene latifolia.

    PubMed

    Wagner, A M; van Brederode, J

    1996-05-01

    The morphological mutant "isovitexin" in Silene latifolia (the white campion) has small and up-curled petals and leaves. In this mutant the aglycone isovitexin is the only flavone present in the vacuole. In the present study it is shown that isovitexin has a strong toxic effect on mitochondria that is to a large extent abolished by glycosylation. This effect can be used to explain the aberrant morphology. Isovitexin acts at the level of the ubiquinone pool; cytochrome c - cytochrome aa3 oxidase activity was unaffected, and with either reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or succinate as a respiratory substrate, effects on respiration were found in Silene leaves-, potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber- and sweet potato (Ipomoea batata L.) tuber mitochondria. Since in sweet potato electron transport via the cyanide insensitive pathway was also inhibited, with the ubiquinone pool as the only component (besides the dehydrogenases) shared by these two pathways, the site of inhibition must be at this level.

  3. The effect of allopurinol administration on mitochondrial respiration and gene expression of xanthine oxidoreductase, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and inflammatory cytokines in selected tissues of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Settle, T; Falkenstein, E; Klandorf, H

    2015-10-01

    Birds have a remarkable longevity for their body size despite an increased body temperature, higher metabolic rate, and increased blood glucose concentrations compared to most mammals. As the end-product of purine degradation, uric acid (UA) is generated in the xanthine/hypoxanthine reactions catalyzed by xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR). In the first study, Cobb × Cobb broilers (n = 12; 4 weeks old) were separated into 2 treatments (n = 6); control (CON) and allopurinol (AL) 35 mg/kg BW (ALLO). The purpose of this study was to assess mitochondrial function in broiler chickens in response to potential oxidative stress generated from the administration of AL for 1 wk. There was a significant reduction in state 3 respiration (P = 0.01) and state 4 respiration (P = 0.007) in AL-treated birds compared to the controls. The purpose of the second study was to assess the effect of AL on gene expression of inflammatory cytokines interferon-γ (IFN)-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12p35, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase and XOR in liver tissue. Cobb × Cobb broilers were separated into two groups at 4 wk age (n = 10); CON and ALLO. After 1 wk AL treatment, half of the birds in each group (CON 1 and ALLO 1) were euthanized while the remaining birds continued on AL treatment for an additional week (CON 2 and ALLO 2). A significant increase in gene expression of XOR, IFN-γ, IL-1β, and IL-12p35 in ALLO 2 birds as compared to birds in CON 2 was detected. Liver UA content was significantly decreased in both ALLO 1(P = 0.003) and ALLO 2 (P = 0.012) birds when compared to CON 1 and CON 2, respectively. The AL reduced liver UA concentrations and increased expression of inflammatory cytokines. Additional studies are needed to determine if AL causes a direct effect on mitochondria or if mitochondrial dysfunction observed in liver mitochondria was due indirectly through increased oxidative stress or increased inflammation.

  4. FGFR4 polymorphic alleles modulate mitochondrial respiration: A novel target for somatostatin analog action in pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, Shereen; Wang, Ri; Pintilie, Melania; Asa, Sylvia L

    2017-01-10

    We reported that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at codon 388 of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4-Gly388Arg) can result in distinct proteins that alter pituitary cell growth and function. Here, we examined the differential properties of the available therapeutic somatostatin analogs, octreotide and pasireotide, in pituitary tumor cells expressing the different FGFR4 isoforms. Consistent with their enhanced growth properties, FGFR4-R388-expressing cells show higher mitochondrial STAT3 serine phosphorylation driving basal and maximal oxygen consumption rate (OCR) than pituitary cells expressing the more common FGFR4-G388 isoform. While both somatostatin analogs reduce the OCR in FGFR4-G388 cells, pasireotide was more effective in decreasing OCR in cells expressing the variant FGFR4-R388 isoform. Down-regulation of somatostatin receptor 5 (SSTR5) abrogated the effect of pasireotide, demonstrating its involvement in mediating this action. The effects on OCR were recapitulated by introducing a constitutively active serine STAT3 but not by a tyrosine-active mutant. Moreover, pharmacologic inhibition demonstrated the role for the phosphatase PP2A in mediating the dephosphorylation of STAT3-S727 by pasireotide. Our data indicate that FGFR4 polymorphic isoforms mediate signaling that yields mitochondrial therapeutic targets of relevance to the actions of different somatostatin analogs.

  5. Deletion or overexpression of mitochondrial NAD+ carriers in Saccharomyces cerevisiae alters cellular NAD and ATP contents and affects mitochondrial metabolism and the rate of glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Agrimi, Gennaro; Brambilla, Luca; Frascotti, Gianni; Pisano, Isabella; Porro, Danilo; Vai, Marina; Palmieri, Luigi

    2011-04-01

    The modification of enzyme cofactor concentrations can be used as a method for both studying and engineering metabolism. We varied Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial NAD levels by altering expression of its specific mitochondrial carriers. Changes in mitochondrial NAD levels affected the overall cellular concentration of this coenzyme and the cellular metabolism. In batch culture, a strain with a severe NAD depletion in mitochondria succeeded in growing, albeit at a low rate, on fully respiratory media. Although the strain increased the efficiency of its oxidative phosphorylation, the ATP concentration was low. Under the same growth conditions, a strain with a mitochondrial NAD concentration higher than that of the wild type similarly displayed a low cellular ATP level, but its growth rate was not affected. In chemostat cultures, when cellular metabolism was fully respiratory, both mutants showed low biomass yields, indicative of impaired energetic efficiency. The two mutants increased their glycolytic fluxes, and as a consequence, the Crabtree effect was triggered at lower dilution rates. Strikingly, the mutants switched from a fully respiratory metabolism to a respirofermentative one at the same specific glucose flux as that of the wild type. This result seems to indicate that the specific glucose uptake rate and/or glycolytic flux should be considered one of the most important independent variables for establishing the long-term Crabtree effect. In cells growing under oxidative conditions, bioenergetic efficiency was affected by both low and high mitochondrial NAD availability, which suggests the existence of a critical mitochondrial NAD concentration in order to achieve optimal mitochondrial functionality.

  6. Mitochondrial respiration in ME-CAM, PEPCK-CAM, and C₃ succulents: comparative operation of the cytochrome, alternative, and rotenone-resistant pathways.

    PubMed

    Peckmann, Klaus; von Willert, Dieter J; Martin, Craig E; Herppich, Werner B

    2012-05-01

    Mitochondria are important in the function and control of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) during organic acid accumulation at night and acid decarboxylation in the day. In plants of the malic enzyme-(ME) type and the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase- (PEPCK) type, mitochondria may exert their role in the control of the diurnal rhythm of malic and citric acids to a differential degree. In plants of both CAM types, the oxidative capacity of mitochondria, as well as the activity of CAM-linked mitochondrial enzymes, and of the alternative and the rotenone-resistant pathways of substrate oxidation were compared. Furthermore, a C₃ succulent was included, as well as both C₃ and CAM forms of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum during a salt-induced C₃-to-CAM shift. Mitochondria of PEPCK-type CAM plants exhibited a lower activity of malate oxidation, ratio of malate to succinate oxidation, and activity of mitochondrial NAD-ME. With the exception of Kalanchoë daigremontiana, leaf mitochondria of all other CAM species were highly sensitive to cyanide (80-100%), irrespective of the oxidant used. This indicates that the alternative oxidase is not of general importance in CAM. By contrast, rotenone-insensitive substrate oxidation was very high (50-90%) in all CAM species. This is the first comparison of the rotenone-insensitive pathway of respiration in plants with different CAM-types. The results of this study confirm that mitochondria are involved in the control of CAM to different degrees in the two CAM types, and they highlight the multiple roles of mitochondria in CAM.

  7. Hepatocytes Determine the Hypoxic Microenvironment and Radiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells Through Production of Nitric Oxide That Targets Mitochondrial Respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Heng; Verovski, Valeri N.; Leonard, Wim; Law, Ka Lun; Vermeersch, Marieke; Storme, Guy; Van den Berge, Dirk; Gevaert, Thierry; Sermeus, Alexandra; De Ridder, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether host hepatocytes may reverse hypoxic radioresistance through nitric oxide (NO)-induced oxygen sparing, in a model relevant to colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases. Methods and Materials: Hepatocytes and a panel of CRC cells were incubated in a tissue-mimetic coculture system with diffusion-limited oxygenation, and oxygen levels were monitored by an oxygen-sensing fluorescence probe. To activate endogenous NO production, cocultures were exposed to a cytokine mixture, and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was analyzed by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and NO/nitrite production. The mitochondrial targets of NO were examined by enzymatic activity. To assess hypoxic radioresponse, cocultures were irradiated and reseeded for colonies. Results: Resting hepatocytes consumed 10-40 times more oxygen than mouse CT26 and human DLD-1, HT29, HCT116, and SW480 CRC cells, and thus seemed to be the major effectors of hypoxic conditioning. As a result, hepatocytes caused uniform radioprotection of tumor cells at a 1:1 ratio. Conversely, NO-producing hepatocytes radiosensitized all CRC cell lines more than 1.5-fold, similar to the effect of selective mitochondrial inhibitors. The radiosensitizing effect was associated with a respiratory self-arrest of hepatocytes at the level of aconitase and complex II, which resulted in profound reoxygenation of tumor cells through oxygen sparing. Nitric oxide–producing hepatocytes were at least 10 times more active than NO-producing macrophages to reverse hypoxia-induced radioresistance. Conclusions: Hepatocytes were the major determinants of the hypoxic microenvironment and radioresponse of CRC cells in our model of metabolic hypoxia. We provide evidence that reoxygenation and radiosensitization of hypoxic CRC cells can be achieved through oxygen sparing induced by endogenous NO production in host hepatocytes.

  8. Mitochondrial-nuclear epistasis affects fitness within species but does not contribute to fixed incompatibilities between species of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Montooth, Kristi L.; Meiklejohn, Colin D.; Abt, Dawn N.; Rand, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Efficient mitochondrial function requires physical interactions between the proteins encoded by the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. Co-evolution between these genomes may result in the accumulation of incompatibilities between divergent lineages. We test whether mitochondrial-nuclear incompatibilities have accumulated within the Drosophila melanogaster species subgroup by combining divergent mitochondrial and nuclear lineages and quantifying the effects on relative fitness. Precise placement of nine mtDNAs from D. melanogaster, D. simulans and D. mauritiana into two D. melanogaster nuclear genetic backgrounds reveals significant mitochondrial-nuclear epistasis affecting fitness in females. Combining the mitochondrial genomes with three different D. melanogaster X chromosomes reveals significant epistasis for male fitness between X-linked and mitochondrial variation. However, we find no evidence that the more than 500 fixed differences between the mitochondrial genomes of D. melanogaster and the D. simulans species complex are incompatible with the D. melanogaster nuclear genome. Rather, the interactions of largest effect occur between mitochondrial and nuclear polymorphisms that segregate within species of the D. melanogaster species subgroup. We propose that a low mitochondrial substitution rate, resulting from a low mutation rate and/or efficient purifying selection, precludes the accumulation of mitochondrial-nuclear incompatibilities among these Drosophila species. PMID:20624176

  9. [Seasonal characteristics of soil respiration and affecting factors under typical vegetations in the water-wind erosion crisscross region of the Loess Plateau].

    PubMed

    Xie, Hui-Hui; Fan, Jun; Qi, Li-Bin; Hao, Ming-De

    2010-12-01

    By the soil respiration system, the characteristics of soil respiration were investigated to explore the correlations between soil respiration and soil temperature, soil water and soil nutrient under different land use patterns in the water-wind erosion crisscross region of the Loess Plateau. The results indicated that the seasonal changing characteristics of soil respiration were distinguished significantly among different vegetations, and soil water content and temperature were the main influencing factors. Soil respiration seasonal changing ranges, such as bare land, crop land, Medicago sativa land, Caragana korshinskii land, abandoned wild grass land, Stipa bungeana land, wild grass land, degraded Medicago sativa land, sloping Medicago sativa land, sloping abandoned wild grass land, sloping crop land and terraced crop land, were 0.32-0.82, 0.41-2.83, 0.74-2.81, 0.76-3.07, 0.67-2.79, 0.51-2.12, 0.56-2.05, 0.59-1.66, 0.42-2.09, 0.31-1.86, 0.32-1.93 and 0.41-3.17 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1). Comparing seasonal changing magnitudes of soil respiration, crop land was the biggest (167% - 203%), abandoned wild grass land (117% -154%), Caragana korshinskii land (134%), Stipa bungeana land (129%), Medicago sativa land (119%-120%) and bare land (94%) followed crop land. The smallest was degraded Medicago sativa land (92%). Bare land and degraded Medicago sativa land had small seasonal variation during the study period. Monthly average values of soil carbon flux (soil respiration) of Medicago sativa land and Caragana korshinskii land were maximal, but the maximum values under crop land were observed in July and August. Besides Q10 of crop land was also maximal, which reached 1.86. There were significant correlations between soil respiration and soil organic matter and available K. Moreover, soil respiration was affected by soil organic matter and total nitrogen in July and August when the water and heat condition were plentiful, but soil ammonium nitrogen had negative impact

  10. Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Upregulates the Mitochondrial Transcription and Translation Machineries

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, M. P.; Antrobus, R.; Rorbach, J.; van Haute, L.; Umrania, Y.; Smith, D. L.; Minczuk, M.; Lehner, P. J.; Sinclair, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) profoundly affects cellular metabolism. Like in tumor cells, HCMV infection increases glycolysis, and glucose carbon is shifted from the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle to the biosynthesis of fatty acids. However, unlike in many tumor cells, where aerobic glycolysis is accompanied by suppression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, HCMV induces mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration. Here, we affinity purified mitochondria and used quantitative mass spectrometry to determine how the mitochondrial proteome changes upon HCMV infection. We found that the mitochondrial transcription and translation systems are induced early during the viral replication cycle. Specifically, proteins involved in biogenesis of the mitochondrial ribosome were highly upregulated by HCMV infection. Inhibition of mitochondrial translation with chloramphenicol or knockdown of HCMV-induced ribosome biogenesis factor MRM3 abolished the HCMV-mediated increase in mitochondrially encoded proteins and significantly impaired viral growth under bioenergetically restricting conditions. Our findings demonstrate how HCMV manipulates mitochondrial biogenesis to support its replication. PMID:27025248

  11. Nuclear omnipotent suppressors of premature termination codons in mitochondrial genes affect the 37S mitoribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Boguta, M; Mieszczak, M; Zagórski, W

    1988-02-01

    nam3 and R705, yeast nuclear omnipotent suppressors of mitochondrial mit- mutations, reverse the superimposed spectrum of trans-recessive splicing defects by affecting the protein composition of the small mitoribosomal subunit. Analysis of the suppressor's interaction suggests that suppression results from mutations in the mitoribosomal polypeptides. These data indicate an obligatory connection between mitoribosome function and splicing of introns bI2, bI4 and aI1 in yeast mitochondria.

  12. Mitochondrial genetic analyses suggest selection against maternal lineages in bipolar affective disorder.

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, R; Furlong, R A; Amos, W; Cooper, G; Rubinsztein, J S; Walsh, C; Paykel, E S; Rubinsztein, D C

    1999-01-01

    Previous reports of preferential transmission of bipolar affective disorder (BP) from the maternal versus the paternal lines in families suggested that this disorder may be caused by mitochondrial DNA mutations. We have sequenced the mitochondrial genome in 25 BP patients with family histories of psychiatric disorder that suggest matrilineal inheritance. No polymorphism identified more than once in this sequencing showed any significant association with BP in association studies using 94 cases and 94 controls. To determine whether our BP sample showed evidence of selection against the maternal lineage, we determined genetic distances between all possible pairwise comparisons within the BP and control groups, based on multilocus mitochondrial polymorphism haplotypes. These analyses revealed fewer closely related haplotypes in the BP group than in the matched control group, suggesting selection against maternal lineages in this disease. Such selection is compatible with recurrent mitochondrial mutations, which are associated with slightly decreased fitness. Although such mismatch distribution comparisons have been used previously for analyses of population histories, this is, as far as we are aware, the first report of this method being used to study disease. PMID:10417293

  13. Exercise increases mitochondrial glutamate oxidation in the mouse cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Eric A F; Holloway, Graham P

    2016-07-01

    The present study investigated the impact of acute exercise on stimulating mitochondrial respiratory function in mouse cerebral cortex. Where pyruvate-stimulated respiration was not affected by acute exercise, glutamate respiration was enhanced following the exercise bout. Additional assessment revealed that this affect was dependent on the presence of malate and did not occur when substituting glutamine for glutamate. As such, our results suggest that glutamate oxidation is enhanced with acute exercise through activation of the malate-aspartate shuttle.

  14. Gem1 and ERMES do not directly affect phosphatidylserine transport from ER to mitochondria or mitochondrial inheritance.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tammy T; Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Choi, Jae-Yeon; Markgraf, Daniel F; Junker, Mirco; Bilgin, Mesut; Ejsing, Christer S; Voelker, Dennis R; Rapoport, Tom A; Shaw, Janet M

    2012-06-01

    In yeast, a protein complex termed the ER-Mitochondria Encounter Structure (ERMES) tethers mitochondria to the endoplasmic reticulum. ERMES proteins are implicated in a variety of cellular functions including phospholipid synthesis, mitochondrial protein import, mitochondrial attachment to actin, polarized mitochondrial movement into daughter cells during division, and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The mitochondrial-anchored Gem1 GTPase has been proposed to regulate ERMES functions. Here, we show that ERMES and Gem1 have no direct role in the transport of phosphatidylserine (PS) from the ER to mitochondria during the synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), as PS to PE conversion is not affected in ERMES or gem1 mutants. In addition, we report that mitochondrial inheritance defects in ERMES mutants are a secondary consequence of mitochondrial morphology defects, arguing against a primary role for ERMES in mitochondrial association with actin and mitochondrial movement. Finally, we show that ERMES complexes are long-lived, and do not depend on the presence of Gem1. Our findings suggest that the ERMES complex may have primarily a structural role in maintaining mitochondrial morphology.

  15. Thermal plasticity of skeletal muscle mitochondrial activity and whole animal respiration in a common intertidal triplefin fish, Forsterygion lapillum (Family: Tripterygiidae).

    PubMed

    Khan, J R; Iftikar, F I; Herbert, N A; Gnaiger, Erich; Hickey, A J R

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen demand generally increases in ectotherms as temperature rises in order to sustain oxidative phosphorylation by mitochondria. The thermal plasticity of ectotherm metabolism, such as that of fishes, dictates a species survival and is of importance to understand within an era of warming climates. Within this study the whole animal O2 consumption rate of a common New Zealand intertidal triplefin fish, Forsterygion lapillum, was investigated at different acclimation temperatures (15, 18, 21, 24 or 25 °C) as a commonly used indicator of metabolic performance. In addition, the mitochondria within permeabilised skeletal muscle fibres of fish acclimated to a moderate temperature (18 °C Cool acclimation group-CA) and a warm temperature (24 °C. Warm acclimation group-WA) were also tested at 18, 24 and 25 °C in different states of coupling and with different substrates. These two levels of analysis were carried out to test whether any peak in whole animal metabolism reflected the respiratory performance of mitochondria from skeletal muscle representing the bulk of metabolic tissue. While standard metabolic rate (SMR- an indicator of total maintenance metabolism) and maximal metabolic rate ([Formula: see text]O2 max) both generally increased with temperature, aerobic metabolic scope (AMS) was maximal at 24 °C, giving the impression that whole animal (metabolic) performance was optimised at a surprisingly high temperature. Mitochondrial oxygen flux also increased with increasing assay temperature but WA fish showed a lowered response to temperature in high flux states, such as those of oxidative phosphorylation and in chemically uncoupled states of respiration. The thermal stability of mitochondria from WA fish was also noticeably greater than CA fish at 25 °C. However, the predicted contribution of respirational flux to ATP synthesis remained the same in both groups and WA fish showed higher anaerobic activity as a result of high muscle lactate loads in both

  16. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation improves metabolic parameters, liver function and mitochondrial respiration in rats with high doses of atorvastatin and a cholesterol-rich diet

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the actions of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on rats with a cholesterol-rich diet (HD) and high doses of atorvastatin (ATV, 0.2, 0.56 or 1.42 mg/day). Methods Two experiments were done, the first one without coenzyme Q10 supplementation. On the second experiment all groups received coenzyme Q10 0.57 mg/day as supplement. After a 6-week treatment animals were sacrificed, blood and liver were analyzed and liver mitochondria were isolated and its oxygen consumption was evaluated in state 3 (phosphorylating state) and state 4 (resting state) in order to calculate the respiratory control (RC). Results HD increased serum and hepatic cholesterol levels in rats with or without CoQ10. ATV reduced these values but CoQ10 improved even more serum and liver cholesterol. Triacylglycerols (TAG) were also lower in blood and liver of rats with ATV + CoQ10. HDL-C decreased in HD rats. Treatment with ATV maintained HDL-C levels. However, these values were lower in HD + CoQ10 compared to control diet (CD) + CoQ10. RC was lessened in liver mitochondria of HD. The administration of ATV increased RC. All groups supplemented with CoQ10 showed an increment in RC. In conclusion, the combined administration of ATV and CoQ10 improved biochemical parameters, liver function and mitochondrial respiration in hypercholesterolemic rats. Conclusions Our results suggest a potential beneficial effect of CoQ10 supplementation in hypercholesterolemic rats that also receive atorvastatin. This beneficial effect of CoQ10 must be combined with statin treatment in patient with high levels of cholesterol. PMID:24460631

  17. An Arabidopsis Stomatin-Like Protein Affects Mitochondrial Respiratory Supercomplex Organization1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gehl, Bernadette; Lee, Chun Pong; Bota, Pedro; Blatt, Michael R.; Sweetlove, Lee J.

    2014-01-01

    Stomatins belong to the band-7 protein family, a diverse group of conserved eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane proteins involved in the formation of large protein complexes as protein-lipid scaffolds. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome contains two paralogous genes encoding stomatin-like proteins (SLPs; AtSLP1 and AtSLP2) that are phylogenetically related to human SLP2, a protein involved in mitochondrial fusion and protein complex formation in the mitochondrial inner membrane. We used reverse genetics in combination with biochemical methods to investigate the function of AtSLPs. We demonstrate that both SLPs localize to mitochondrial membranes. SLP1 migrates as a large (approximately 3 MDa) complex in blue-native gel electrophoresis. Remarkably, slp1 knockout mutants have reduced protein and activity levels of complex I and supercomplexes, indicating that SLP affects the assembly and/or stability of these complexes. These findings point to a role for SLP1 in the organization of respiratory supercomplexes in Arabidopsis. PMID:24424325

  18. Over-expression of mitochondrial ferritin affects the JAK2/STAT5 pathway in K562 cells and causes mitochondrial iron accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Santambrogio, Paolo; Erba, Benedetta Gaia; Campanella, Alessandro; Cozzi, Anna; Causarano, Vincenza; Cremonesi, Laura; Gallì, Anna; Della Porta, Matteo Giovanni; Invernizzi, Rosangela; Levi, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial ferritin is a nuclear encoded iron-storage protein localized in mitochondria. It has anti-oxidant properties related to its ferroxidase activity, and it is able to sequester iron avidly into the organelle. The protein has a tissue-specific pattern of expression and is also highly expressed in sideroblasts of patients affected by hereditary sideroblastic anemia and by refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts. The present study examined whether mitochondrial ferritin has a role in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Design and Methods We analyzed the effect of mitochondrial ferritin over-expression on the JAK2/STAT5 pathway, on iron metabolism and on heme synthesis in erythroleukemic cell lines. Furthermore its effect on apoptosis was evaluated on human erythroid progenitors. Results Data revealed that a high level of mitochondrial ferritin reduced reactive oxygen species and Stat5 phosphorylation while promoting mitochondrial iron loading and cytosolic iron starvation. The decline of Stat5 phosphorylation induced a decrease of the level of anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL transcript compared to that in control cells; however, transferrin receptor 1 transcript increased due to the activation of the iron responsive element/iron regulatory protein machinery. Also, high expression of mitochondrial ferritin increased apoptosis, limited heme synthesis and promoted the formation of Perls-positive granules, identified by electron microscopy as iron granules in mitochondria. Conclusions Our results provide evidence suggesting that Stat5-dependent transcriptional regulation is displaced by strong cytosolic iron starvation status induced by mitochondrial ferritin. The protein interferes with JAK2/STAT5 pathways and with the mechanism of mitochondrial iron accumulation. PMID:21712541

  19. Downregulation of the δ-Subunit Reduces Mitochondrial ATP Synthase Levels, Alters Respiration, and Restricts Growth and Gametophyte Development in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Daniela A.; Päpke, Carola; Obata, Toshihiro; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Matthes, Annemarie; Schneitz, Kay; Maximova, Eugenia; Araújo, Wagner L.; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Persson, Staffan

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial ATP synthase (F1Fo complex) is an evolutionary conserved multimeric protein complex that synthesizes the main bulk of cytosolic ATP, but the regulatory mechanisms of the subunits are only poorly understood in plants. In yeast, the δ-subunit links the membrane-embedded Fo part to the matrix-facing central stalk of F1. We used genetic interference and an inhibitor to investigate the molecular function and physiological impact of the δ-subunit in Arabidopsis thaliana. Delta mutants displayed both male and female gametophyte defects. RNA interference of delta resulted in growth retardation, reduced ATP synthase amounts, and increased alternative oxidase capacity and led to specific long-term increases in Ala and Gly levels. By contrast, inhibition of the complex using oligomycin triggered broad metabolic changes, affecting glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and led to a successive induction of transcripts for alternative respiratory pathways and for redox and biotic stress-related transcription factors. We conclude that (1) the δ-subunit is essential for male gametophyte development in Arabidopsis, (2) a disturbance of the ATP synthase appears to lead to an early transition phase and a long-term metabolic steady state, and (3) the observed long-term adjustments in mitochondrial metabolism are linked to reduced growth and deficiencies in gametophyte development. PMID:22805435

  20. Changes in Respiratory Mitochondrial Machinery and Cytochrome and Alternative Pathway Activities in Response to Energy Demand Underlie the Acclimation of Respiration to Elevated CO2 in the Invasive Opuntia ficus-indica1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Casanovas, Nuria; Blanc-Betes, Elena; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A.; Azcon-Bieto, Joaquim

    2007-01-01

    Studies on long-term effects of plants grown at elevated CO2 are scarce and mechanisms of such responses are largely unknown. To gain mechanistic understanding on respiratory acclimation to elevated CO2, the Crassulacean acid metabolism Mediterranean invasive Opuntia ficus-indica Miller was grown at various CO2 concentrations. Respiration rates, maximum activity of cytochrome c oxidase, and active mitochondrial number consistently decreased in plants grown at elevated CO2 during the 9 months of the study when compared to ambient plants. Plant growth at elevated CO2 also reduced cytochrome pathway activity, but increased the activity of the alternative pathway. Despite all these effects seen in plants grown at high CO2, the specific oxygen uptake rate per unit of active mitochondria was the same for plants grown at ambient and elevated CO2. Although decreases in photorespiration activity have been pointed out as a factor contributing to the long-term acclimation of plant respiration to growth at elevated CO2, the homeostatic maintenance of specific respiratory rate per unit of mitochondria in response to high CO2 suggests that photorespiratory activity may play a small role on the long-term acclimation of respiration to elevated CO2. However, despite growth enhancement and as a result of the inhibition in cytochrome pathway activity by elevated CO2, total mitochondrial ATP production was decreased by plant growth at elevated CO2 when compared to ambient-grown plants. Because plant growth at elevated CO2 increased biomass but reduced respiratory machinery, activity, and ATP yields while maintaining O2 consumption rates per unit of mitochondria, we suggest that acclimation to elevated CO2 results from physiological adjustment of respiration to tissue ATP demand, which may not be entirely driven by nitrogen metabolism as previously suggested. PMID:17660349

  1. Speech and respiration.

    PubMed

    Conrad, B; Schönle, P

    1979-04-12

    This investigation deals with the temporal aspects of air volume changes during speech. Speech respiration differs fundamentally from resting respiration. In resting respiration the duration and velocity of inspiration (air flow or lung volume change) are in a range similar to that of expiration. In speech respiration the duration of inspiration decreases and its velocity increases; conversely, the duration of expiration increases and the volume of air flow decreases dramatically. The following questions arise: are these two respiration types different entities, or do they represent the end points of a continuum from resting to speech respiration? How does articulation without the generation of speech sound affect breathing? Does (verbalized?) thinking without articulation or speech modify the breathing pattern? The main test battery included four tasks (spontaneous speech, reading, serial speech, arithmetic) performed under three conditions (speaking aloud, articulating subvocally, quiet performance by tryping to exclusively 'think' the tasks). Respiratory movements were measured with a chest pneumograph and evaluated in comparison with a phonogram and the identified spoken text. For quiet performance the resulting respiratory time ratio (relation of duration of inspiration versus expiration) showed a gradual shift in the direction of speech respiration--the least for reading, the most for arithmetic. This change was even more apparent for the subvocal tasks. It is concluded that (a) there is a gradual automatic change from resting to speech respiration and (b) the degree of internal verbalization (activation of motor speech areas) defines the degree of activation of the speech respiratory pattern.

  2. Experimental Air Warming of a Stylosanthes capitata, Vogel Dominated Tropical Pasture Affects Soil Respiration and Nitrogen Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A.; Silva, Lais B. C.; Dias-De-Oliveira, Eduardo; Flower, Charles E.; Martinez, Carlos A.

    2017-01-01

    Warming due to global climate change is predicted to reach 2°C in tropical latitudes. There is an alarming paucity of information regarding the effects of air temperature on tropical agroecosystems, including foraging pastures. Here, we investigated the effects of a 2°C increase in air temperature over ambient for 30 days on an established tropical pasture (Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil) dominated by the legume Stylosanthes capitata Vogel, using a T-FACE (temperature free-air controlled enhancement) system. We tested the effects of air warming on soil properties [carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and their stable isotopic levels (δ13C and δ15N), as well as soil respiration and soil enzymatic activity] and aboveground characteristics (foliar C, N, δ13C, δ15N, leaf area index, and aboveground biomass) under field conditions. Results show that experimental air warming moderately increased soil respiration rates compared to ambient temperature. Soil respiration was positively correlated with soil temperature and moisture during mid-day (when soil respiration was at its highest) but not at dusk. Foliar δ13C were not different between control and elevated temperature treatments, indicating that plants grown in warmed plots did not show the obvious signs of water stress often seen in warming experiments. The 15N isotopic composition of leaves from plants grown at elevated temperature was lower than in ambient plants, suggesting perhaps a higher proportion of N-fixation contributing to tissue N in warmed plants when compared to ambient ones. Soil microbial enzymatic activity decreased in response to the air warming treatment, suggesting a slower decomposition of organic matter under elevated air temperature conditions. Decreased soil enzyme capacity and increases in soil respiration and plant biomass in plots exposed to high temperature suggest that increased root activity may have caused the increase seen in soil respiration in this tropical pasture. This response

  3. An amino acid substitution in the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha} gene, affecting mitochondrial import of the precursor protein

    SciTech Connect

    Takakubo, F.; Thorburn, D.R.; Dahl, H.H.M.

    1995-10-01

    A mutation in the mitochondrial targeting sequence was characterized in a male patient with X chromosome-linked pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha} deficiency. The mutation was a base substitution of G by C at nucleotide 134 in the mitochondrial targeting sequence of the PDHA1 gene, resulting in an arginine-to-proline substitution at codon 10 (R10P). Pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in cultured skin fibroblasts was 28% of the control value, and immunoblot analysis revealed a decreased level of pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha}immunoreactivity. Chimeric constructs in which the normal and mutant pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha} targeting sequences were attached to the mitochondrial matrix protein ornithine transcarbamylase were synthesized in a cell free translation system, and mitochondrial import of normal and mutant proteins was compared in vitro. The results show that ornithine transcarbamylase targeted by the mutant pyruvate dehydrogenase E1{alpha} sequence was translocated into the mitochondrial matrix at a reduced rate, suggesting that defective import is responsible for the reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase level in mitochondria. The mutation was also present in an affected brother and the mildly affected mother. The clinical presentations of this X chromosome-linked disorder in affected family members are discussed. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an amino acid substitution in a mitochondrial targeting sequence resulting in a human genetic disease. 58 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. β-Sitosterol enhances cellular glutathione redox cycling by reactive oxygen species generated from mitochondrial respiration: protection against oxidant injury in H9c2 cells and rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hoi Shan; Chen, Na; Leong, Pou Kuan; Ko, Kam Ming

    2014-07-01

    Herba Cistanches (Cistanche deserticola Y. C. Ma) is a 'Yang-invigorating' tonic herb in Chinese medicine. Preliminary chemical analysis indicated that β-sitosterol (BS) is one of the chemical constituents in an active fraction of Herba Cistanches. To investigate whether BS is an active ingredient of Herba Cistanches, the effects of BS on H9c2 cells and rat hearts were examined. The results indicated that BS stimulated the mitochondrial ATP generation capacity in H9c2 cells, which was associated with the increased production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. BS also stimulated mitochondrial state 3 and state 4 respiration, with the resultant decrease in coupling efficiency. BS produced an up-regulation of cellular glutathione redox cycling and protected against hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells. However, the protective effect of BS against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury was seen in female but not male rats ex vivo. The cardioprotection afforded by BS was likely mediated by an up-regulation of mitochondrial glutathione redox cycling in female rat hearts. In conclusion, the ensemble of results suggests that BS is an active ingredient of Herba Cistanches. The gender-dependent effect of BS on myocardial protection will further be investigated.

  5. Respiration of Mediterranean cold-water corals is not affected by ocean acidification as projected for the end of the century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, C.; Bils, F.; Weinbauer, M. G.; Watremez, P.; Peck, M. A.; Gattuso, J.-P.

    2013-08-01

    The rise of CO2 has been identified as a major threat to life in the ocean. About one-third of the anthropogenic CO2 produced in the last 200 yr has been taken up by the ocean, leading to ocean acidification. Surface seawater pH is projected to decrease by about 0.4 units between the pre-industrial revolution and 2100. The branching cold-water corals Madrepora oculata and Lophelia pertusa are important, habitat-forming species in the deep Mediterranean Sea. Although previous research has investigated the abundance and distribution of these species, little is known regarding their ecophysiology and potential responses to global environmental change. A previous study indicated that the rate of calcification of these two species remained constant up to 1000 μatm CO2, a value that is at the upper end of changes projected to occur by 2100. We examined whether the ability to maintain calcification rates in the face of rising pCO2 affected the energetic requirements of these corals. Over the course of three months, rates of respiration were measured at a pCO2 ranging between 350 and 1100 μatm to distinguish between short-term response and longer-term acclimation. Respiration rates ranged from 0.074 to 0.266 μmol O2 (g skeletal dry weight)-1 h-1 and 0.095 to 0.725 μmol O2 (g skeletal dry weight)-1 h-1 for L. pertusa and M. oculata, respectively, and were independent of pCO2. Respiration increased with time likely due to regular feeding, which may have provided an increased energy supply to sustain coral metabolism. Future studies are needed to confirm whether the insensitivity of respiration to increasing pCO2 is a general feature of deep-sea corals in other regions.

  6. Respiration of Mediterranean cold-water corals is not affected by ocean acidification as projected for the end of the century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, C.; Bils, F.; Weinbauer, M. G.; Watremez, P.; Peck, M. A.; Gattuso, J.-P.

    2013-05-01

    The rise of CO2 has been identified as a major threat to life in the ocean. About one-third of the anthropogenic CO2 produced in the last 200 yr has been taken up by the ocean, leading to ocean acidification. Surface seawater pH is projected to decrease by about 0.4 unit between the pre-industrial revolution and 2100. The branching cold-water corals Madrepora oculata and Lophelia pertusa are important, habitat-forming species in the deep Mediterranean Sea. Although previous research has investigated the abundance and distribution of these species, little is known regarding their ecophysiology and potential responses to global environmental change. A previous study indicated that the rate of calcification of these two species remained constant up to 1000 μatm CO2 a value that is at the upper end of changes projected to occur by 2100. We examined whether the ability to maintain calcification rates in the face of rising pCO2 affected the energetic requirements of these corals. Over the course of three months, rates of respiration were measured at a pCO2 ranging between 350 and 1100 μatm to distinguish between short-term response and longer-term acclimation. Respiration rates ranged from 0.074 to 0.266 μmol O2 (g skeletal dry weight)-1 h-1 and 0.095 to 0.725 μmol O2 (g skeletal dry weight)-1 h-1 for L. and M. oculata, respectively, and were independent of pCO2. Respiration increased with time likely due to regular feeding which may have provided an increased energy supply to sustain coral metabolism. Future studies are needed to confirm whether the insensitivity of respiration to increasing pCO2 is a general feature of deep-sea corals in other regions.

  7. High-throughput respirometric assay identifies predictive toxicophore of mitochondrial injury

    PubMed Central

    Wills, Lauren P.; Beeson, Gyda C.; Trager, Richard E.; Lindsey, Christopher C.; Beeson, Craig C.; Peterson, Yuri K.; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2014-01-01

    Many environmental chemicals and drugs negatively affect human health through deleterious effects on mitochondrial function. Currently there is no chemical library of mitochondrial toxicants, and no reliable methods for predicting mitochondrial toxicity. We hypothesized that discrete toxicophores defined by distinct chemical entities can identify previously unidentified mitochondrial toxicants. We used a respirometric assay to screen 1760 compounds (5 μM) from the LOPAC and ChemBridge DIVERSet libraries. Thirty-one of the assayed compounds decreased uncoupled respiration, a stress test for mitochondrial dysfunction, prior to a decrease in cell viability and reduced the oxygen consumption rate in isolated mitochondria. The mitochondrial toxicants were grouped by chemical similarity and two clusters containing four compounds each were identified. Cheminformatic analysis of one of the clusters identified previously uncharacterized mitochondrial toxicants from the ChemBridge DIVERSet. This approach will enable the identification of mitochondrial toxicants and advance the prediction of mitochondrial toxicity for both drug discovery and risk assessment. PMID:23811330

  8. High-throughput respirometric assay identifies predictive toxicophore of mitochondrial injury.

    PubMed

    Wills, Lauren P; Beeson, Gyda C; Trager, Richard E; Lindsey, Christopher C; Beeson, Craig C; Peterson, Yuri K; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2013-10-15

    Many environmental chemicals and drugs negatively affect human health through deleterious effects on mitochondrial function. Currently there is no chemical library of mitochondrial toxicants, and no reliable methods for predicting mitochondrial toxicity. We hypothesized that discrete toxicophores defined by distinct chemical entities can identify previously unidentified mitochondrial toxicants. We used a respirometric assay to screen 1760 compounds (5 μM) from the LOPAC and ChemBridge DIVERSet libraries. Thirty-one of the assayed compounds decreased uncoupled respiration, a stress test for mitochondrial dysfunction, prior to a decrease in cell viability and reduced the oxygen consumption rate in isolated mitochondria. The mitochondrial toxicants were grouped by chemical similarity and two clusters containing four compounds each were identified. Cheminformatic analysis of one of the clusters identified previously uncharacterized mitochondrial toxicants from the ChemBridge DIVERSet. This approach will enable the identification of mitochondrial toxicants and advance the prediction of mitochondrial toxicity for both drug discovery and risk assessment.

  9. Plectin isoform P1b and P1d deficiencies differentially affect mitochondrial morphology and function in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Winter, Lilli; Kuznetsov, Andrey V; Grimm, Michael; Zeöld, Anikó; Fischer, Irmgard; Wiche, Gerhard

    2015-08-15

    Plectin, a versatile 500-kDa cytolinker protein, is essential for muscle fiber integrity and function. The most common disease caused by mutations in the human plectin gene, epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy (EBS-MD), is characterized by severe skin blistering and progressive muscular dystrophy. Besides displaying pathological desmin-positive protein aggregates and degenerative changes in the myofibrillar apparatus, skeletal muscle specimens of EBS-MD patients and plectin-deficient mice are characterized by massive mitochondrial alterations. In this study, we demonstrate that structural and functional alterations of mitochondria are a primary aftermath of plectin deficiency in muscle, contributing to myofiber degeneration. We found that in skeletal muscle of conditional plectin knockout mice (MCK-Cre/cKO), mitochondrial content was reduced, and mitochondria were aggregated in sarcoplasmic and subsarcolemmal regions and were no longer associated with Z-disks. Additionally, decreased mitochondrial citrate synthase activity, respiratory function and altered adenosine diphosphate kinetics were characteristic of plectin-deficient muscles. To analyze a mechanistic link between plectin deficiency and mitochondrial alterations, we comparatively assessed mitochondrial morphology and function in whole muscle and teased muscle fibers of wild-type, MCK-Cre/cKO and plectin isoform-specific knockout mice that were lacking just one isoform (either P1b or P1d) while expressing all others. Monitoring morphological alterations of mitochondria, an isoform P1b-specific phenotype affecting the mitochondrial fusion-fission machinery and manifesting with upregulated mitochondrial fusion-associated protein mitofusin-2 could be identified. Our results show that the depletion of distinct plectin isoforms affects mitochondrial network organization and function in different ways.

  10. Oncogenic K-ras expression is associated with derangement of the cAMP/PKA pathway and forskolin-reversible alterations of mitochondrial dynamics and respiration.

    PubMed

    Palorini, R; De Rasmo, D; Gaviraghi, M; Sala Danna, L; Signorile, A; Cirulli, C; Chiaradonna, F; Alberghina, L; Papa, S

    2013-01-17

    The Warburg effect in cancer cells has been proposed to involve several mechanisms, including adaptation to hypoxia, oncogenes activation or loss of oncosuppressors and impaired mitochondrial function. In previous papers, it has been shown that K-ras transformed mouse cells are much more sensitive as compared with normal cells to glucose withdrawal (undergoing apoptosis) and present a high glycolytic rate and a strong reduction of mitochondrial complex I. Recent observations suggest that transformed cells have a derangement in the cyclic adenosine monophosphate/cAMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP/PKA) pathway, which is known to regulate several mitochondrial functions. Herein, the derangement of the cAMP/PKA pathway and its impact on transformation-linked changes of mitochondrial functions is investigated. Exogenous stimulation of PKA activity, achieved by forskolin treatment, protected K-ras-transformed cells from apoptosis induced by glucose deprivation, enhanced complex I activity, intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels, mitochondrial fusion and decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Several of these effects were almost completely prevented by inhibiting the PKA activity. Short-time treatment with compounds favoring mitochondrial fusion strongly decreased the cellular ROS levels especially in transformed cells. These findings support the notion that glucose shortage-induced apoptosis, specific of K-ras-transformed cells, is associated to a derangement of PKA signaling that leads to mitochondrial complex I decrease, reduction of ATP formation, prevalence of mitochondrial fission over fusion, and thereby opening new approaches for development of anticancer drugs.

  11. Single nucleotide polymorphisms linked to mitochondrial uncoupling protein genes UCP2 and UCP3 affect mitochondrial metabolism and healthy aging in female nonagenarians.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangkyu; Myers, Leann; Ravussin, Eric; Cherry, Katie E; Jazwinski, S Michal

    2016-08-01

    Energy expenditure decreases with age, but in the oldest-old, energy demand for maintenance of body functions increases with declining health. Uncoupling proteins have profound impact on mitochondrial metabolic processes; therefore, we focused attention on mitochondrial uncoupling protein genes. Alongside resting metabolic rate (RMR), two SNPs in the promoter region of UCP2 were associated with healthy aging. These SNPs mark potential binding sites for several transcription factors; thus, they may affect expression of the gene. A third SNP in the 3'-UTR of UCP3 interacted with RMR. This UCP3 SNP is known to impact UCP3 expression in tissue culture cells, and it has been associated with body weight and mitochondrial energy metabolism. The significant main effects of the UCP2 SNPs and the interaction effect of the UCP3 SNP were also observed after controlling for fat-free mass (FFM) and physical-activity related energy consumption. The association of UCP2/3 with healthy aging was not found in males. Thus, our study provides evidence that the genetic risk factors for healthy aging differ in males and females, as expected from the differences in the phenotypes associated with healthy aging between the two sexes. It also has implications for how mitochondrial function changes during aging.

  12. Tetramethylpyrazine Protects against Early Brain Injury after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage by Affecting Mitochondrial-Dependent Caspase-3 Apoptotic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiaolan

    2017-01-01

    This study was to test the hypothesis that tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) protected against early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by affecting the mitochondrial-dependent caspase-3 apoptotic pathway. TMP was administrated after the rats' prechiasmatic SAH mode. Animal neurobehavioral functions were assessed and the mitochondrial morphology, mitochondrial and cytoplasmic calcium, and mitochondrial membrane potential changes (Δψm) of the brain tissues were measured. The expressions of cytoplasmic cytochrome c (cyt c), second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac), and cleaved caspase-3 B-cell lymphoma 2 (bcl-2) in cells were determined and cellular apoptosis was detected. The treatment of TMP resulted in less apoptotic cells and milder mitochondrial injury and potentially performed better in the neurobehavioral outcome compared to those with saline. Also, TMP ameliorated calcium overload in mitochondria and cytoplasm and alleviated the decrease of Δψm. In addition, TMP inhibited the expression of cytoplasmic cyt c, Smac, and cleaved caspase-3, yet it upregulated the expression of bcl-2. These findings suggest that TMP exerts an antiapoptosis property in the SAH rat model and this is probably mediated by the caspase-3 apoptotic pathway triggered by mitochondrial calcium overload. The finding offers a new therapeutic candidate for early brain injury after SAH. PMID:28337226

  13. Loss of Msp1p in Schizosaccharomyces pombe induces a ROS-dependent nuclear mutator phenotype that affects mitochondrial fission genes.

    PubMed

    Delerue, Thomas; Khosrobakhsh, Farnoosh; Daloyau, Marlène; Emorine, Laurent Jean; Dedieu, Adrien; Herbert, Christopher J; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Arnauné-Pelloquin, Laetitia; Belenguer, Pascale

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondria continually fuse and divide to dynamically adapt to changes in metabolism and stress. Mitochondrial dynamics are also required for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) integrity; however, the underlying reason is not known. In this study, we examined the link between mitochondrial fusion and mtDNA maintenance in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which cannot survive without mtDNA, by screening for suppressors of the lethality induced by loss of the dynamin-related large GTPase Msp1p. Our findings reveal that inactivation of Msp1p induces a ROS-dependent nuclear mutator phenotype that affects mitochondrial fission genes involved in suppressing mitochondrial fragmentation and mtDNA depletion. This indicates that mitochondrial fusion is crucial for maintaining the integrity of both mitochondrial and nuclear genetic information. Furthermore, our study suggests that the primary roles of Msp1p are to organize mitochondrial membranes, thus making them competent for fusion, and maintain the integrity of mtDNA.

  14. Inhibition of free radical scavenging enzymes affects mitochondrial membrane permeability transition during growth and aging of yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Deryabina, Yulia; Isakova, Elena; Sekova, Varvara; Antipov, Alexey; Saris, Nils-Erik L

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the change in the antioxidant enzymes activity, cell respiration, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and impairment of membrane mitochondria permeability in the Endomyces magnusii yeasts during culture growth and aging. We showed that the transition into stationary phase is the key tool to understanding interaction of these processes. This growth stage is distinguished by two-fold increase in ROS production and respiration rate as compared to those in the logarithmic phase. It results in induction of alternative oxidase (AO) in the stationary phase, decline of the main antioxidant enzymes activities, ROS-production, and mitochondria membrane permeability. Significant increase in the share of mitochondrial isoform of superoxide dismutase (SOD2) occurred in the stationary phase from 51.8% (24 h of cultivation) to 68.6% (48 h of cultivation). Upon blocking the essential ROS-scavenging enzymes, SODs and catalases (CATs) some heterogeneity of cell population was observed: 80-90% of cells displayed evident signs of early apoptosis (such as disorientation of mitochondria cristae, mitochondrial fragmentation and deformation of nuclear chromatine). However, 10-20% of the population were definitely healthy. It allowed to draw the conclusion that a complete system of cell antioxidant protection underlies normal mitochondria functioning while the E. magnusii yeasts grow and age. Moreover, this system provides unimpaired cell physiology under oxidative stress during culture aging in the stationary phase. Failures in mitochondria functions due to inhibition of ROS-scavenging enzymes of CATs and SODs could lead to damage of the cells and some signs of early apoptosis.

  15. Mitochondrial complex I dysfunction induced by cocaine and cocaine plus morphine in brain and liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Oliveira, Teresa; Silva, Lisbeth; Silva, Ana Maria; Moreno, António J; Oliveira, Catarina R; Santos, Maria S

    2013-06-07

    Mitochondrial function and energy metabolism are affected in brains of human cocaine abusers. Cocaine is known to induce mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiac and hepatic tissues, but its effects on brain bioenergetics are less documented. Furthermore, the combination of cocaine and opioids (speedball) was also shown to induce mitochondrial dysfunction. In this work, we compared the effects of cocaine and/or morphine on the bioenergetics of isolated brain and liver mitochondria, to understand their specific effects in each tissue. Upon energization with complex I substrates, cocaine decreased state-3 respiration in brain (but not in liver) mitochondria and decreased uncoupled respiration and mitochondrial potential in both tissues, through a direct effect on complex I. Morphine presented only slight effects on brain and liver mitochondria, and the combination cocaine+morphine had similar effects to cocaine alone, except for a greater decrease in state-3 respiration. Brain and liver mitochondrial respirations were differentially affected, and liver mitochondria were more prone to proton leak caused by the drugs or their combination. This was possibly related with a different dependence on complex I in mitochondrial populations from these tissues. In summary, cocaine and cocaine+morphine induce mitochondrial complex I dysfunction in isolated brain and liver mitochondria, with specific effects in each tissue.

  16. G alpha12 is targeted to the mitochondria and affects mitochondrial morphology and motility.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, Alexandra V; Kutuzov, Mikhail A; Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Tatyana A

    2008-08-01

    G alpha12 constitutes, along with G alpha13, one of the four families of alpha subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins. We found that the N terminus of G alpha12, but not those of other G alpha subunits, contains a predicted mitochondrial targeting sequence. Using confocal microscopy and cell fractionation, we demonstrated that up to 40% of endogenous G alpha12 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells colocalize with mitochondrial markers. N-terminal sequence of G alpha12 fused to GFP efficiently targeted the fusion protein to mitochondria. G alpha12 with mutated mitochondrial targeting sequence was still located in mitochondria, suggesting the existence of additional mechanisms for mitochondrial localization. Lysophosphatidic acid, one of the known stimuli transduced by G alpha12/13, inhibited mitochondrial motility, while depletion of endogenous G alpha12 increased mitochondrial motility. G alpha12Q229L variants uncoupled from RhoGEFs (but not fully functional activated G alpha12Q229L) induced transformation of the mitochondrial network into punctate mitochondria and resulted in a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. All examined G alpha12Q229L variants reduced phosphorylation of Bcl-2 at Ser-70, while only mutants unable to bind RhoGEFs also decreased cellular levels of Bcl-2. These G alpha12 mutants were also more efficient Hsp90 interactors. These findings are the first demonstration of a heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunit specifically targeted to mitochondria and involved in the control of mitochondrial morphology and dynamics.

  17. Methionine sulfoxide reductase A affects β-amyloid solubility and mitochondrial function in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Du, Fang; Bowman, Connor F.; Yan, Shirley S.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidized proteins, and especially β-amyloid (Aβ), is thought to be one of the common causes of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The current studies determine the effect of an in vivo methionine sulfoxidation of Aβ through ablation of the methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA) in a mouse model of AD, a mouse that overexpresses amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Aβ in neurons. Lack of MsrA fosters the formation of methionine sulfoxide in proteins, and thus its ablation in the AD-mouse model will increase the formation of methionine sulfoxide in Aβ. Indeed, the novel MsrA-deficient APP mice (APP+/MsrAKO) exhibited higher levels of soluble Aβ in brain compared with APP+ mice. Furthermore, mitochondrial respiration and the activity of cytochrome c oxidase were compromised in the APP+/MsrAKO compared with control mice. These results suggest that lower MsrA activity modifies Aβ solubility properties and causes mitochondrial dysfunction, and augmenting its activity may be beneficial in delaying AD progression. PMID:26786779

  18. How mitochondrial dysfunction affects zebrafish development and cardiovascular function: an in vivo model for testing mitochondria-targeted drugs

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, Brígida R; Santos, Miguel M; Fonseca-Silva, Anabela; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B; Oliveira, Jorge M A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Mitochondria are a drug target in mitochondrial dysfunction diseases and in antiparasitic chemotherapy. While zebrafish is increasingly used as a biomedical model, its potential for mitochondrial research remains relatively unexplored. Here, we perform the first systematic analysis of how mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitors affect zebrafish development and cardiovascular function, and assess multiple quinones, including ubiquinone mimetics idebenone and decylubiquinone, and the antimalarial atovaquone. Experimental Approach Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were chronically and acutely exposed to mitochondrial inhibitors and quinone analogues. Concentration-response curves, developmental and cardiovascular phenotyping were performed together with sequence analysis of inhibitor-binding mitochondrial subunits in zebrafish versus mouse, human and parasites. Phenotype rescuing was assessed in co-exposure assays. Key Results Complex I and II inhibitors induced developmental abnormalities, but their submaximal toxicity was not additive, suggesting active alternative pathways for complex III feeding. Complex III inhibitors evoked a direct normal-to-dead transition. ATP synthase inhibition arrested gastrulation. Menadione induced hypochromic anaemia when transiently present following primitive erythropoiesis. Atovaquone was over 1000-fold less lethal in zebrafish than reported for Plasmodium falciparum, and its toxicity partly rescued by the ubiquinone precursor 4-hydroxybenzoate. Idebenone and decylubiquinone delayed rotenone- but not myxothiazol- or antimycin-evoked cardiac dysfunction. Conclusion and Implications This study characterizes pharmacologically induced mitochondrial dysfunction phenotypes in zebrafish, laying the foundation for comparison with future studies addressing mitochondrial dysfunction in this model organism. It has relevant implications for interpreting zebrafish disease models linked to complex I/II inhibition. Further

  19. Physical exercise in aging human skeletal muscle increases mitochondrial calcium uniporter expression levels and affects mitochondria dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Sandra; Mammucari, Cristina; Romanello, Vanina; Barberi, Laura; Pietrangelo, Laura; Fusella, Aurora; Mosole, Simone; Gherardi, Gaia; Höfer, Christian; Löfler, Stefan; Sarabon, Nejc; Cvecka, Jan; Krenn, Matthias; Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut; Protasi, Feliciano; Musarò, Antonio; Sandri, Marco; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2016-12-01

    Age-related sarcopenia is characterized by a progressive loss of muscle mass with decline in specific force, having dramatic consequences on mobility and quality of life in seniors. The etiology of sarcopenia is multifactorial and underlying mechanisms are currently not fully elucidated. Physical exercise is known to have beneficial effects on muscle trophism and force production. Alterations of mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis regulated by mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) have been recently shown to affect muscle trophism in vivo in mice. To understand the relevance of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in aging and to investigate the effect of physical exercise on MCU expression and mitochondria dynamics, we analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies from 70-year-old subjects 9 weeks trained with either neuromuscular electrical stimulation (ES) or leg press. Here, we demonstrate that improved muscle function and structure induced by both trainings are linked to increased protein levels of MCU Ultrastructural analyses by electron microscopy showed remodeling of mitochondrial apparatus in ES-trained muscles that is consistent with an adaptation to physical exercise, a response likely mediated by an increased expression of mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1. Altogether these results indicate that the ES-dependent physiological effects on skeletal muscle size and force are associated with changes in mitochondrial-related proteins involved in Ca(2+) homeostasis and mitochondrial shape. These original findings in aging human skeletal muscle confirm the data obtained in mice and propose MCU and mitochondria-related proteins as potential pharmacological targets to counteract age-related muscle loss.

  20. Physiological aspects of fruit ripening: the mitochondrial connection.

    PubMed

    Perotti, Valeria E; Moreno, Alejandra S; Podestá, Florencio E

    2014-07-01

    Fruit ripening is a genetically programmed process which leads to an assortment of physiological and metabolic changes that irreversibly alter its characteristics. Depending on the species, fruit maturation can be either climacteric or non-climacteric. In both cases there is a metabolic shift from normal development conditions toward the fully mature state, but climacteric fruit is characterized by a sharp increase in respiration. In non-climacteric fruit, that generally does not display this feature, respiration changes can be affected by processes related to postharvest storage. This review describes some of the many ways in which mitochondrial metabolism is implicated in this crucial reproductive stage, such as the connection between ethylene production and respiration rate, the involvement of alternative oxidase (AOX) and plant uncoupling mitochondrial protein (PUMP) during the ripening and the common alterations of this organelle in fruits affected by different stress conditions.

  1. Peroxisomal polyamine oxidase and NADPH-oxidase cross-talk for ROS homeostasis which affects respiration rate in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Andronis, Efthimios A.; Moschou, Panagiotis N.; Toumi, Imene; Roubelakis-Angelakis, Kalliopi A.

    2014-01-01

    Homeostasis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the intracellular compartments is of critical importance as ROS have been linked with nearly all cellular processes and more importantly with diseases and aging. PAs are nitrogenous molecules with an evolutionary conserved role in the regulation of metabolic and energetic status of cells. Recent evidence also suggests that polyamines (PA) are major regulators of ROS homeostasis. In Arabidopsis the backconversion of the PAs spermidine (Spd) and spermine to putrescine and Spd, respectively, is catalyzed by two peroxisomal PA oxidases (AtPAO). However, the physiological role of this pathway remains largely elusive. Here we explore the role of peroxisomal PA backconversion and in particular that catalyzed by the highly expressed AtPAO3 in the regulation of ROS homeostasis and mitochondrial respiratory burst. Exogenous PAs exert an NADPH-oxidase dependent stimulation of oxygen consumption, with Spd exerting the strongest effect. This increase is attenuated by treatment with the NADPH-oxidase blocker diphenyleneiodonium iodide (DPI). Loss-of-function of AtPAO3 gene results to increased NADPH-oxidase-dependent production of superoxide anions (O2•− ), but not H2O2, which activate the mitochondrial alternative oxidase pathway (AOX). On the contrary, overexpression of AtPAO3 results to an increased but balanced production of both H2O2 and O2•− . These results suggest that the ratio of O2•− /H2O2 regulates respiratory chain in mitochondria, with PA-dependent production of O2•− by NADPH-oxidase tilting the balance of electron transfer chain in favor of the AOX pathway. In addition, AtPAO3 seems to be an important component in the regulating module of ROS homeostasis, while a conserved role for PA backconversion and ROS across kingdoms is discussed. PMID:24765099

  2. Sirtuin-3 (SIRT3) protein attenuates doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress and improves mitochondrial respiration in H9c2 cardiomyocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a chemotherapeutic agent effective in the treatment of many cancers. However, cardiac dysfunction caused by DOX limits its clinical use. DOX is believed to be harmful to cardiomyocytes by interfering with the mitochondrial phospholipid cardiolipin and causing inefficient electro...

  3. How does breathing frequency affect the performance of an N95 filtering facepiece respirator and a surgical mask against surrogates of viral particles?

    PubMed

    He, Xinjian; Reponen, Tiina; McKay, Roy; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2014-01-01

    Breathing frequency (breaths/min) differs among individuals and levels of physical activity. Particles enter respirators through two principle penetration pathways: faceseal leakage and filter penetration. However, it is unknown how breathing frequency affects the overall performance of N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) and surgical masks (SMs) against viral particles, as well as other health-relevant submicrometer particles. A FFR and SM were tested on a breathing manikin at four mean inspiratory flows (MIFs) (15, 30, 55, and 85 L/min) and five breathing frequencies (10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 breaths/min). Filter penetration (Pfilter) and total inward leakage (TIL) were determined for the tested respiratory protection devices against sodium chloride (NaCl) aerosol particles in the size range of 20 to 500 nm. "Faceseal leakage-to-filter" (FLTF) penetration ratios were calculated. Both MIF and breathing frequency showed significant effects (p < 0.05) on Pfilter and TIL. Increasing breathing frequency increased TIL for the N95 FFR whereas no clear trends were observed for the SM. Increasing MIF increased Pfilter and decreased TIL resulting in decreasing FLTF ratio. Most of FLTF ratios were >1, suggesting that the faceseal leakage was the primary particle penetration pathway at various breathing frequencies. Breathing frequency is another factor (besides MIF) that can significantly affect the performance of N95 FFRs, with higher breathing frequencies increasing TIL. No consistent trend of increase or decrease of TIL with either MIF or breathing frequency was observed for the tested SM. To potentially extend these findings beyond the manikin/breathing system used, future studies are needed to fully understand the mechanism causing the breathing frequency effect on the performance of respiratory protection devices on human subjects.

  4. Canopy position affects the relationships between leaf respiration and associated traits in a tropical rainforest in Far North Queensland.

    PubMed

    Weerasinghe, Lasantha K; Creek, Danielle; Crous, Kristine Y; Xiang, Shuang; Liddell, Michael J; Turnbull, Matthew H; Atkin, Owen K

    2014-06-01

    We explored the impact of canopy position on leaf respiration (R) and associated traits in tree and shrub species growing in a lowland tropical rainforest in Far North Queensland, Australia. The range of traits quantified included: leaf R in darkness (RD) and in the light (RL; estimated using the Kok method); the temperature (T)-sensitivity of RD; light-saturated photosynthesis (Asat); leaf dry mass per unit area (LMA); and concentrations of leaf nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), soluble sugars and starch. We found that LMA, and area-based N, P, sugars and starch concentrations were all higher in sun-exposed/upper canopy leaves, compared with their shaded/lower canopy and deep-shade/understory counterparts; similarly, area-based rates of RD, RL and Asat (at 28 °C) were all higher in the upper canopy leaves, indicating higher metabolic capacity in the upper canopy. The extent to which light inhibited R did not differ significantly between upper and lower canopy leaves, with the overall average inhibition being 32% across both canopy levels. Log-log RD-Asat relationships differed between upper and lower canopy leaves, with upper canopy leaves exhibiting higher rates of RD for a given Asat (both on an area and mass basis), as well as higher mass-based rates of RD for a given [N] and [P]. Over the 25-45 °C range, the T-sensitivity of RD was similar in upper and lower canopy leaves, with both canopy positions exhibiting Q10 values near 2.0 (i.e., doubling for every 10 °C rise in T) and Tmax values near 60 °C (i.e., T where RD reached maximal values). Thus, while rates of RD at 28 °C decreased with increasing depth in the canopy, the T-dependence of RD remained constant; these findings have important implications for vegetation-climate models that seek to predict carbon fluxes between tropical lowland rainforests and the atmosphere.

  5. Photoperiod Affects the Phenotype of Mitochondrial Complex I Mutants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    de Bont, Linda; Hao, Jingfang; Laureau, Constance; Rzigui, Touhami; Queval, Guillaume; Gilard, Françoise; Mauve, Caroline; Guérard, Florence; Lamothe-Sibold, Marlène; Marion, Jessica; Fresneau, Chantal; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Pineau, Bernard; De Paepe, Rosine

    2017-01-01

    Plant mutants for genes encoding subunits of mitochondrial complex I (CI; NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase), the first enzyme of the respiratory chain, display various phenotypes depending on growth conditions. Here, we examined the impact of photoperiod, a major environmental factor controlling plant development, on two Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CI mutants: a new insertion mutant interrupted in both ndufs8.1 and ndufs8.2 genes encoding the NDUFS8 subunit and the previously characterized ndufs4 CI mutant. In the long day (LD) condition, both ndufs8.1 and ndufs8.2 single mutants were indistinguishable from Columbia-0 at phenotypic and biochemical levels, whereas the ndufs8.1 ndufs8.2 double mutant was devoid of detectable holo-CI assembly/activity, showed higher alternative oxidase content/activity, and displayed a growth retardation phenotype similar to that of the ndufs4 mutant. Although growth was more affected in ndufs4 than in ndufs8.1 ndufs8.2 under the short day (SD) condition, both mutants displayed a similar impairment of growth acceleration after transfer to LD compared with the wild type. Untargeted and targeted metabolomics showed that overall metabolism was less responsive to the SD-to-LD transition in mutants than in the wild type. The typical LD acclimation of carbon and nitrogen assimilation as well as redox-related parameters was not observed in ndufs8.1 ndufs8. Similarly, NAD(H) content, which was higher in the SD condition in both mutants than in Columbia-0, did not adjust under LD. We propose that altered redox homeostasis and NAD(H) content/redox state control the phenotype of CI mutants and photoperiod acclimation in Arabidopsis. PMID:27852950

  6. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Pathology in Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Hayley; Sillivan, Stephanie; Konradi, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BPD) and schizophrenia (SZ) are severe psychiatric illnesses with a combined prevalence of 4%. A disturbance of energy metabolism is frequently observed in these disorders. Several pieces of evidence point to an underlying dysfunction of mitochondria: i) decreased mitochondrial respiration; (ii) changes in mitochondrial morphology; iii) increases in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymorphisms and in levels of mtDNA mutations; iv) downregulation of nuclear mRNA molecules and proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration; v) decreased high-energy phosphates and decreased pH in the brain; and vi) psychotic and affective symptoms, and cognitive decline in mitochondrial disorders. Furthermore, transgenic mice with mutated mitochondrial DNA polymerase show mood disorder-like phenotypes. In this review, we will discuss the genetic and physiological components of mitochondria and the evidence for mitochondrial abnormalities in BPD and SZ. We will furthermore describe the role of mitochondria during brain development and the effect of current drugs for mental illness on mitochondrial function. Understanding the role of mitochondria, both developmentally as well as in the ailing brain, is of critical importance to elucidate pathophysiological mechanisms in psychiatric disorders. PMID:20833242

  7. Carbon dioxide exchange of a pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium L.) infestation: How do flowering and mowing affect canopy photosynthesis and autotrophic respiration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnentag, O.; Detto, M.; Runkle, B. R. K.; Teh, Y. A.; Silver, W. L.; Kelly, M.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2011-03-01

    The net ecosystem carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange of invasive plant infestations, such as perennial pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium L.), is not well understood. A characteristic feature of pepperweed's phenological cycle is its small white flowers during secondary inflorescence. Pepperweed flowering causes uniform reflectance over the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum, thus decreasing the amount of energy absorbed by the canopy and available for photosynthesis. Little is known about how pepperweed flowering and control measures such as mowing affect canopy photosynthesis and autotrophic respiration (FAR) and thus ecosystem respiration. To examine this question, we analyzed CO2 flux measurements made with eddy covariance over a pepperweed infestation in California, covering three growing seasons. Unmowed pepperweed caused the site to be almost CO2 neutral (2007: -28 g C m-2 period-1) or a net source (2009: 129 g C m-2 period-1), mostly because of reduced maximum photosynthetic capacity by 13 (2007) and 17 μmol m-2 s-1 (2009) due to flowering during the plant's prime photosynthetic period. Reference FAR at 10°C was reduced by 2 μmol m-2 s-1 in 2007 and 2009. Mowing during early flowering reversed the attenuating effects of pepperweed flowering, causing the site to act as a net CO2 sink (2008: -174 g C m-2 period-1) mainly due to prolonged photosynthetic CO2 uptake over the plant's early vegetative growth phase. Our results highlight the tight link between pepperweed's prominent key phenological phase and applied control measures, which together exert dominant control over the infestation's CO2 source-sink strength.

  8. High-throughput respirometric assay identifies predictive toxicophore of mitochondrial injury

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, Lauren P.; Beeson, Gyda C.; Trager, Richard E.; Lindsey, Christopher C.; Beeson, Craig C.; Peterson, Yuri K.; Schnellmann, Rick G.

    2013-10-15

    Many environmental chemicals and drugs negatively affect human health through deleterious effects on mitochondrial function. Currently there is no chemical library of mitochondrial toxicants, and no reliable methods for predicting mitochondrial toxicity. We hypothesized that discrete toxicophores defined by distinct chemical entities can identify previously unidentified mitochondrial toxicants. We used a respirometric assay to screen 1760 compounds (5 μM) from the LOPAC and ChemBridge DIVERSet libraries. Thirty-one of the assayed compounds decreased uncoupled respiration, a stress test for mitochondrial dysfunction, prior to a decrease in cell viability and reduced the oxygen consumption rate in isolated mitochondria. The mitochondrial toxicants were grouped by chemical similarity and two clusters containing four compounds each were identified. Cheminformatic analysis of one of the clusters identified previously uncharacterized mitochondrial toxicants from the ChemBridge DIVERSet. This approach will enable the identification of mitochondrial toxicants and advance the prediction of mitochondrial toxicity for both drug discovery and risk assessment. - Highlights: • Respirometric assay conducted in RPTC to create mitochondrial toxicant database. • Chemically similar mitochondrial toxicants aligned as mitochondrial toxicophores • Mitochondrial toxicophore identifies five novel mitochondrial toxicants.

  9. Exposure to zidovudine adversely affects mitochondrial turnover in primary T cells.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Zoë R; Sanderson, Sharon; Simon, Anna Katarina; Dorrell, Lucy

    2016-09-01

    Zidovudine (ZDV) is a widely used component of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings, despite its known adverse effects, which include mitochondrial toxicity in muscle, liver and adipose tissue. It has also been associated with impaired immunological recovery. We hypothesised that ZDV might impair mitochondrial health and survival of primary T cells. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of mitochondrial function, mitophagy and susceptibility to apoptosis in healthy donor primary T cells after exposure to ZDV in vitro, together with T cells from patients who were virologically suppressed on ZDV-containing ART regimens for ≥1 year and age-matched subjects receiving non-ZDV ART regimens. The proportion of T cells expressing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) was significantly higher after in vitro (CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells) and in vivo (CD4(+) T cells) exposure to ZDV than other antiretroviral agents. We did not detect any effect of ZDV on mitophagy, as indicated by change in autophagic flux. However, spontaneous apoptosis, indicated by upregulation of caspase-3 was greater in ZDV-exposed T cells. In conclusion, ZDV exposure was associated with impaired mitochondrial turnover and increased susceptibility to apoptosis in T cells. These mechanisms could contribute to sub-optimal immune reconstitution.

  10. Coenzyme Q releases the inhibitory effect of free fatty acids on mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Rauchová, Hana; Drahota, Zdenek; Rauch, Pavel; Fato, Romana; Lenaz, Giorgio

    2003-01-01

    Data presented in this paper show that the size of the endogenous coenzyme Q (CoQ) pool is not a limiting factor in the activation of mitochondrial glycerophosphate-dependent respiration by exogenous CoQ(3), since successive additions of succinate and NADH to brown adipose tissue mitochondria further increase the rate of oxygen uptake. Because the inhibition of glycerophosphate-dependent respiration by oleate was eliminated by added CoQ(3), our data indicate that the activating effect of CoQ(3) is related to the release of the inhibitory effect of endogenous free fatty acids (FFA). Both the inhibitory effect of FFA and the activating effect of CoQ(3) could be demonstrated only for glycerophosphate-dependent respiration, while succinate- or NADH-dependent respiration was not affected. The presented data suggest differences between mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase and succinate or NADH dehydrogenases in the transfer of reducing equivalents to the CoQ pool.

  11. Mitochondrial respiratory thresholds regulate yeast chronological life span and its extension by caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Ocampo, Alejandro; Liu, Jingjing; Schroeder, Elizabeth A; Shadel, Gerald S; Barrientos, Antoni

    2012-07-03

    We have explored the role of mitochondrial function in aging by genetically and pharmacologically modifying yeast cellular respiration production during the exponential and/or stationary growth phases and determining how this affects chronological life span (CLS). Our results demonstrate that respiration is essential during both growth phases for standard CLS, but that yeast have a large respiratory capacity, and only deficiencies below a threshold (~40% of wild-type) significantly curtail CLS. Extension of CLS by caloric restriction also required respiration above a similar threshold during exponential growth and completely alleviated the need for respiration in the stationary phase. Finally, we show that supplementation of media with 1% trehalose, a storage carbohydrate, restores wild-type CLS to respiratory-null cells. We conclude that mitochondrial respiratory thresholds regulate yeast CLS and its extension by caloric restriction by increasing stress resistance, an important component of which is the optimal accumulation and mobilization of nutrient stores.

  12. Mitochondrial vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Zarrouk-Mahjoub, Sinda

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are usually multisystem disorders (mitochondrial multiorgan disorder syndrome) either on from onset or starting at a point during the disease course. Most frequently affected tissues are those with a high oxygen demand such as the central nervous system, the muscle, endocrine glands, or the myocardium. Recently, it has been shown that rarely also the arteries may be affected (mitochondrial arteriopathy). This review focuses on the type, diagnosis, and treatment of mitochondrial vasculopathy in MID patients. A literature search using appropriate search terms was carried out. Mitochondrial vasculopathy manifests as either microangiopathy or macroangiopathy. Clinical manifestations of mitochondrial microangiopathy include leukoencephalopathy, migraine-like headache, stroke-like episodes, or peripheral retinopathy. Mitochondrial macroangiopathy manifests as atherosclerosis, ectasia of arteries, aneurysm formation, dissection, or spontaneous rupture of arteries. The diagnosis relies on the documentation and confirmation of the mitochondrial metabolic defect or the genetic cause after exclusion of non-MID causes. Treatment is not at variance compared to treatment of vasculopathy due to non-MID causes. Mitochondrial vasculopathy exists and manifests as micro- or macroangiopathy. Diagnosing mitochondrial vasculopathy is crucial since appropriate treatment may prevent from severe complications. PMID:27231520

  13. Forest age stands affect soil respiration and litterfall in a Black pine forest managed by a shelterwood system in the Central Spain?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedo de Santiago, Javier; Borja, Manuel Esteban Lucas; Candel, David; Viñegla Pérez, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects that stand age and forest structure generates on soil respiration and litterfall quantity. The effect of stand age on these variables was studied in a shelterwood system Spanish Black pine chronosequence in central Iberian Peninsula composed of 0-20, 20-40, 40-60, 60-80, 80-100-year-old. For each stand age, six forest stands with similar characteristics of soil type and site preparation were used. Also, a forest area ranging 80-120 years old and without forest intervention was selected and used as control. We also measured organic matter, C:N ratio, soil moisture and pH in the top 10 mineral soil at each compartment. Soil respiration measurements were carried out in three time points (3, 8 and 12 days). Results showed a clear trend in soil respiration, comparing all the experimental areas. Soil respiration showed the same trend in all stands. It initially showed higher rates, reaching stability in the middle of the measurement process and finally lightly increasing the respiration rate. The older stands had significantly higher soil respiration than the younger stands. Soil organic matter values were also higher in the more mature stands. C:N ratio showed the opposite trend, showing lower values in the less mature stands. More mature stands clearly showed more quantity of litterfall than the younger ones and there was a positive correlation between soil respiration and litterfall. Finally, the multivariate PCA analysis clearly clustered three differenced groups: Control plot; from 100 to 40 years old and from 39 to 1 years old, taking into account both soil respiration and litterfall quantity, also separately. Our results suggest that the control plot has a better soil quality and that extreme forest stand ages (100-80 and 19-1 years old) and the associated forest structure generates differences in soil respiration.

  14. Citral exerts its antifungal activity against Penicillium digitatum by affecting the mitochondrial morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shiju; Jing, Guoxing; Wang, Xiao; Ouyang, Qiuli; Jia, Lei; Tao, Nengguo

    2015-07-01

    This work investigated the effect of citral on the mitochondrial morphology and function of Penicillium digitatum. Citral at concentrations of 2.0 or 4.0 μL/mL strongly damaged mitochondria of test pathogen by causing the loss of matrix and increase of irregular mitochondria. The deformation extent of the mitochondria of P. digitatum enhanced with increasing concentrations of citral, as evidenced by a decrease in intracellular ATP content and an increase in extracellular ATP content of P. digitatum cells. Oxygen consumption showed that citral resulted in an inhibition in the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) pathway of P. digitatum cells, induced a decrease in activities of citrate synthetase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinodehydrogenase and the content of citric acid, while enhancing the activity of malic dehydrogenase in P. digitatum cells. Our present results indicated that citral could damage the mitochondrial membrane permeability and disrupt the TCA pathway of P. digitatum.

  15. Human, donkey and cow milk differently affects energy efficiency and inflammatory state by modulating mitochondrial function and gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Trinchese, Giovanna; Cavaliere, Gina; Canani, Roberto Berni; Matamoros, Sebastien; Bergamo, Paolo; De Filippo, Chiara; Aceto, Serena; Gaita, Marcello; Cerino, Pellegrino; Negri, Rossella; Greco, Luigi; Cani, Patrice D; Mollica, Maria Pina

    2015-11-01

    Different nutritional components are able, by modulating mitochondrial function and gut microbiota composition, to influence body composition, metabolic homeostasis and inflammatory state. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects produced by the supplementation of different milks on energy balance, inflammatory state, oxidative stress and antioxidant/detoxifying enzyme activities and to investigate the role of the mitochondrial efficiency and the gut microbiota in the regulation of metabolic functions in an animal model. We compared the intake of human milk, gold standard for infant nutrition, with equicaloric supplementation of donkey milk, the best substitute for newborns due to its nutritional properties, and cow milk, the primary marketed product. The results showed a hypolipidemic effect produced by donkey and human milk intake in parallel with enhanced mitochondrial activity/proton leakage. Reduced mitochondrial energy efficiency and proinflammatory signals (tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-1 and lipopolysaccharide levels) were associated with a significant increase of antioxidants (total thiols) and detoxifying enzyme activities (glutathione-S-transferase, NADH quinone oxidoreductase) in donkey- and human milk-treated animals. The beneficial effects were attributable, at least in part, to the activation of the nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor-2 pathway. Moreover, the metabolic benefits induced by human and donkey milk may be related to the modulation of gut microbiota. In fact, milk treatments uniquely affected the proportions of bacterial phyla and genera, and we hypothesized that the increased concentration of fecal butyrate in human and donkey milk-treated rats was related to the improved lipid and glucose metabolism and detoxifying activities.

  16. Arachnid relationships based on mitochondrial genomes: asymmetric nucleotide and amino acid bias affects phylogenetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Masta, Susan E; Longhorn, Stuart J; Boore, Jeffrey L

    2009-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses based on mitochondrial DNA have yielded widely differing relationships among members of the arthropod lineage Arachnida, depending on the nucleotide coding schemes and models of evolution used. We enhanced taxonomic coverage within the Arachnida greatly by sequencing seven new arachnid mitochondrial genomes from five orders. We then used all 13 mitochondrial protein-coding genes from these genomes to evaluate patterns of nucleotide and amino acid biases. Our data show that two of the six orders of arachnids (spiders and scorpions) have experienced shifts in both nucleotide and amino acid usage in all their protein-coding genes, and that these biases mislead phylogeny reconstruction. These biases are most striking for the hydrophobic amino acids isoleucine and valine, which appear to have evolved asymmetrical exchanges in response to shifts in nucleotide composition. To improve phylogenetic accuracy based on amino acid differences, we tested two recoding methods: (1) removing all isoleucine and valine sites and (2) recoding amino acids based on their physiochemical properties. We find that these methods yield phylogenetic trees that are consistent in their support of ancient intraordinal divergences within the major arachnid lineages. Further refinement of amino acid recoding methods may help us better delineate interordinal relationships among these diverse organisms.

  17. The Swi3 protein plays a unique role in regulating respiration in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Sneha; Alam, Md Maksudul; Hooda, Jagmohan; Shah, Ajit; Cao, Thai M.; Xuan, Zhenyu; Zhang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Recent experimental evidence increasingly shows that the dysregulation of cellular bioenergetics is associated with a wide array of common human diseases, including cancer, neurological diseases and diabetes. Respiration provides a vital source of cellular energy for most eukaryotic cells, particularly high energy demanding cells. However, the understanding of how respiration is globally regulated is very limited. Interestingly, recent evidence suggests that Swi3 is an important regulator of respiration genes in yeast. In this report, we performed an array of biochemical and genetic experiments and computational analysis to directly evaluate the function of Swi3 and its human homologues in regulating respiration. First, we showed, by computational analysis and measurements of oxygen consumption and promoter activities, that Swi3, not Swi2, regulates genes encoding functions involved in respiration and oxygen consumption. Biochemical analysis showed that the levels of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes were substantially increased in Δswi3 cells, compared with the parent cells. Additionally, our data showed that Swi3 strongly affects haem/oxygen-dependent activation of respiration gene promoters whereas Swi2 affects only the basal, haem-independent activities of these promoters. We found that increased expression of aerobic expression genes is correlated with increased oxygen consumption and growth rates in Δswi3 cells in air. Furthermore, using computational analysis and RNAi knockdown, we showed that the mammalian Swi3 BAF155 and BAF170 regulate respiration in HeLa cells. Together, these experimental and computational data demonstrated that Swi3 and its mammalian homologues are key regulators in regulating respiration. PMID:27190130

  18. Liver condition of Holstein cows affects mitochondrial function and fertilization ability of oocytes

    PubMed Central

    TANAKA, Hiroshi; TAKEO, Shun; ABE, Takahito; KIN, Airi; SHIRASUNA, Koumei; KUWAYAMA, Takehito; IWATA, Hisataka

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the fertilization ability and mitochondrial function of oocytes derived from cows with or without liver damage. Oocytes were collected from the ovaries of cows with damaged livers (DL) and those of cows with healthy livers (HL), subjected to in vitro maturation, and fertilized in vitro. A significantly high abnormal fertilization rate was observed for oocytes from DL cows compared to oocytes from HL cows. The time to dissolve the zona pellucida by protease before fertilization was similar between the two liver conditions, whereas after fertilization treatment this time was shorter for DL cows than for HL cows. The percentage of oocytes with equivalent cortical granule distributions underneath the membrane was greater for in vitro matured oocytes from HL cows, whereas an immature distribution pattern was observed for oocytes from DL cows. In addition, a greater percentage of oocytes derived from HL cows released cortical granules following fertilization compared with oocytes from DL cows. Mitochondrial function determined by ATP content and membrane potential were similar at the germinal vesicle stage, but post-in vitro maturation, the oocytes derived from HL cows showed higher values than DL cows. The mitochondrial DNA copy number in oocytes was similar between the two liver conditions for both the germinal vesicle and post-in vitro maturation oocytes. In conclusion, liver damage induces low fertilization, likely because of incomplete cortical granule distribution and release, and the maturation of oocytes from DL cows contain low-functioning mitochondria compared to their HL counterparts. PMID:26832309

  19. Mitochondrial gene therapy augments mitochondrial physiology in a Parkinson's disease cell model.

    PubMed

    Keeney, Paula M; Quigley, Caitlin K; Dunham, Lisa D; Papageorge, Christina M; Iyer, Shilpa; Thomas, Ravindar R; Schwarz, Kathleen M; Trimmer, Patricia A; Khan, Shaharyar M; Portell, Francisco R; Bergquist, Kristen E; Bennett, James P

    2009-08-01

    Neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD) affects mainly dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, where age-related, increasing percentages of cells lose detectable respiratory activity associated with depletion of intact mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Replenishment of mtDNA might improve neuronal bioenergetic function and prevent further cell death. We developed a technology ("ProtoFection") that uses recombinant human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) engineered with an N-terminal protein transduction domain (PTD) followed by the SOD2 mitochondrial localization signal (MLS) to deliver mtDNA cargo to the mitochondria of living cells. MTD-TFAM (MTD = PTD + MLS = "mitochondrial transduction domain") binds mtDNA and rapidly transports it across plasma membranes to mitochondria. For therapeutic proof-of-principle we tested ProtoFection technology in Parkinson's disease cybrid cells, using mtDNA generated from commercially available human genomic DNA (gDNA; Roche). Nine to 11 weeks after single exposures to MTD-TFAM + mtDNA complex, PD cybrid cells with impaired respiration and reduced mtDNA genes increased their mtDNA gene copy numbers up to 24-fold, mtDNA-derived RNAs up to 35-fold, TFAM and ETC proteins, cell respiration, and mitochondrial movement velocities. Cybrid cells with no or minimal basal mitochondrial impairments showed reduced or no responses to treatment, suggesting the possibility of therapeutic selectivity. Exposure of PD but not control cybrid cells to MTD-TFAM protein alone or MTD-TFAM + mtDNA complex increased expression of PGC-1alpha, suggesting activation of mitochondrial biogenesis. ProtoFection technology for mitochondrial gene therapy holds promise for improving bioenergetic function in impaired PD neurons and needs additional development to define its pharmacodynamics and delineate its molecular mechanisms. It also is unclear whether single-donor gDNA for generating mtDNA would be a preferred therapeutic compared with the pooled

  20. Mouse Stbd1 is N-myristoylated and affects ER-mitochondria association and mitochondrial morphology.

    PubMed

    Demetriadou, Anthi; Morales-Sanfrutos, Julia; Nearchou, Marianna; Baba, Otto; Kyriacou, Kyriacos; Tate, Edward W; Drousiotou, Anthi; Petrou, Petros P

    2017-03-01

    Starch binding domain-containing protein 1 (Stbd1) is a carbohydrate-binding protein that has been proposed to be a selective autophagy receptor for glycogen. Here, we show that mouse Stbd1 is a transmembrane endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident protein with the capacity to induce the formation of organized ER structures in HeLa cells. In addition to bulk ER, Stbd1 was found to localize to mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs), which represent regions of close apposition between the ER and mitochondria. We demonstrate that N-myristoylation and binding of Stbd1 to glycogen act as major determinants of its subcellular targeting. Moreover, overexpression of non-myristoylated Stbd1 enhanced the association between ER and mitochondria, and further induced prominent mitochondrial fragmentation and clustering. Conversely, shRNA-mediated Stbd1 silencing resulted in an increase in the spacing between ER and mitochondria, and an altered morphology of the mitochondrial network, suggesting elevated fusion and interconnectivity of mitochondria. Our data unravel the molecular mechanism underlying Stbd1 subcellular targeting, support and expand its proposed function as a selective autophagy receptor for glycogen and uncover a new role for the protein in the physical association between ER and mitochondria.

  1. Salinomycin induces activation of autophagy, mitophagy and affects mitochondrial polarity: differences between primary and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jangamreddy, Jaganmohan Reddy; Ghavami, Saeid; Grabarek, Jerzy; Kratz, Gunnar; Wiechec, Emilia; Fredriksson, Bengt-Arne; Rao Pariti, Rama Krishna; Cieślar-Pobuda, Artur; Panigrahi, Soumya; Łos, Marek J

    2013-09-01

    The molecular mechanism of Salinomycin's toxicity is not fully understood. Various studies reported that Ca(2+), cytochrome c, and caspase activation play a role in Salinomycin-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, Salinomycin may target Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway to promote differentiation and thus elimination of cancer stem cells. In this study, we show a massive autophagic response to Salinomycin (substantially stronger than to commonly used autophagic inducer Rapamycin) in prostrate-, breast cancer cells, and to lesser degree in human normal dermal fibroblasts. Interestingly, autophagy induced by Salinomycin is a cell protective mechanism in all tested cancer cell lines. Furthermore, Salinomycin induces mitophagy, mitoptosis and increased mitochondrial membrane potential (∆Ψ) in a subpopulation of cells. Salinomycin strongly, and in time-dependent manner decreases cellular ATP level. Contrastingly, human normal dermal fibroblasts treated with Salinomycin show some initial decrease in mitochondrial mass, however they are largely resistant to Salinomycin-triggered ATP-depletion. Our data provide new insight into the molecular mechanism of preferential toxicity of Salinomycin towards cancer cells, and suggest possible clinical application of Salinomycin in combination with autophagy inhibitors (i.e. clinically-used Chloroquine). Furthermore, we discuss preferential Salinomycins toxicity in the context of Warburg effect.

  2. Mouse Stbd1 is N-myristoylated and affects ER–mitochondria association and mitochondrial morphology

    PubMed Central

    Demetriadou, Anthi; Morales-Sanfrutos, Julia; Nearchou, Marianna; Baba, Otto; Kyriacou, Kyriacos; Tate, Edward W.; Drousiotou, Anthi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Starch binding domain-containing protein 1 (Stbd1) is a carbohydrate-binding protein that has been proposed to be a selective autophagy receptor for glycogen. Here, we show that mouse Stbd1 is a transmembrane endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident protein with the capacity to induce the formation of organized ER structures in HeLa cells. In addition to bulk ER, Stbd1 was found to localize to mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs), which represent regions of close apposition between the ER and mitochondria. We demonstrate that N-myristoylation and binding of Stbd1 to glycogen act as major determinants of its subcellular targeting. Moreover, overexpression of non-myristoylated Stbd1 enhanced the association between ER and mitochondria, and further induced prominent mitochondrial fragmentation and clustering. Conversely, shRNA-mediated Stbd1 silencing resulted in an increase in the spacing between ER and mitochondria, and an altered morphology of the mitochondrial network, suggesting elevated fusion and interconnectivity of mitochondria. Our data unravel the molecular mechanism underlying Stbd1 subcellular targeting, support and expand its proposed function as a selective autophagy receptor for glycogen and uncover a new role for the protein in the physical association between ER and mitochondria. PMID:28137759

  3. Alteration of Fatty-Acid-Metabolizing Enzymes Affects Mitochondrial Form and Function in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Tesson, Christelle; Nawara, Magdalena; Salih, Mustafa A.M.; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Zaki, Maha S.; Al Balwi, Mohammed; Schule, Rebecca; Mignot, Cyril; Obre, Emilie; Bouhouche, Ahmed; Santorelli, Filippo M.; Durand, Christelle M.; Oteyza, Andrés Caballero; El-Hachimi, Khalid H.; Al Drees, Abdulmajeed; Bouslam, Naima; Lamari, Foudil; Elmalik, Salah A.; Kabiraj, Mohammad M.; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.; Esteves, Typhaine; Gaussen, Marion; Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Gyapay, Gabor; Lechner, Doris; Gonzalez, Michael; Depienne, Christel; Mochel, Fanny; Lavie, Julie; Schols, Ludger; Lacombe, Didier; Yahyaoui, Mohamed; Al Abdulkareem, Ibrahim; Zuchner, Stephan; Yamashita, Atsushi; Benomar, Ali; Goizet, Cyril; Durr, Alexandra; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Darios, Frederic; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is considered one of the most heterogeneous groups of neurological disorders, both clinically and genetically. The disease comprises pure and complex forms that clinically include slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity resulting from degeneration of the corticospinal tract. At least 48 loci accounting for these diseases have been mapped to date, and mutations have been identified in 22 genes, most of which play a role in intracellular trafficking. Here, we identified mutations in two functionally related genes (DDHD1 and CYP2U1) in individuals with autosomal-recessive forms of HSP by using either the classical positional cloning or a combination of whole-genome linkage mapping and next-generation sequencing. Interestingly, three subjects with CYP2U1 mutations presented with a thin corpus callosum, white-matter abnormalities, and/or calcification of the basal ganglia. These genes code for two enzymes involved in fatty-acid metabolism, and we have demonstrated in human cells that the HSP pathophysiology includes alteration of mitochondrial architecture and bioenergetics with increased oxidative stress. Our combined results focus attention on lipid metabolism as a critical HSP pathway with a deleterious impact on mitochondrial bioenergetic function. PMID:23176821

  4. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA causing tubulointerstitial kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Mallett, Andrew; Posse, Viktor; Moreno, Pablo; Sciacovelli, Marco; Duff, Jennifer; Wiesener, Michael S.; Hudson, Gavin; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Maxwell, Patrick H.

    2017-01-01

    Tubulointerstitial kidney disease is an important cause of progressive renal failure whose aetiology is incompletely understood. We analysed a large pedigree with maternally inherited tubulointerstitial kidney disease and identified a homoplasmic substitution in the control region of the mitochondrial genome (m.547A>T). While mutations in mtDNA coding sequence are a well recognised cause of disease affecting multiple organs, mutations in the control region have never been shown to cause disease. Strikingly, our patients did not have classical features of mitochondrial disease. Patient fibroblasts showed reduced levels of mitochondrial tRNAPhe, tRNALeu1 and reduced mitochondrial protein translation and respiration. Mitochondrial transfer demonstrated mitochondrial transmission of the defect and in vitro assays showed reduced activity of the heavy strand promoter. We also identified further kindreds with the same phenotype carrying a homoplasmic mutation in mitochondrial tRNAPhe (m.616T>C). Thus mutations in mitochondrial DNA can cause maternally inherited renal disease, likely mediated through reduced function of mitochondrial tRNAPhe. PMID:28267784

  5. Paxillin mutations affect focal adhesions and lead to altered mitochondrial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Ichiro; Hasina, Rifat; Lennon, Frances E; Bindokas, Vytautas P; Usatyuk, Peter; Tan, Yi-Hung C; Krishnaswamy, Soundararajan; Arif, Qudsia; Carey, George; Hseu, Robyn D; Robinson, Matthew; Tretiakova, Maria; Brand, Toni M; Iida, Mari; Ferguson, Mark K; Wheeler, Deric L; Husain, Aliya N; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Vokes, Everett E; Singleton, Patrick A; Salgia, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Cytoskeletal and focal adhesion abnormalities are observed in several types of cancer, including lung cancer. We have previously reported that paxillin (PXN) was mutated, amplified, and overexpressed in a significant number of lung cancer patient samples, that PXN protein was upregulated in more advanced stages of lung cancer compared with lower stages, and that the PXN gene was also amplified in some pre-neoplastic lung lesions. Among the mutations investigated, we previously found that PXN variant A127T in lung cancer cells enhanced cell proliferation and focal adhesion formation and colocalized with the anti-apoptotic protein B Cell Lymphoma 2 (BCL-2), which is known to localize to the mitochondria, among other sites. To further explore the effects of activating mutations of PXN on mitochondrial function, we cloned and expressed wild-type PXN and variants containing the most commonly occurring PXN mutations (P46S, P52L, G105D, A127T, P233L, T255I, D399N, E423K, P487L, and K506R) in a GFP-tagged vector using HEK-293 human embryonic kidney cells. Utilizing live-cell imaging to systematically study the effects of wild-type PXN vs. mutants, we created a model that recapitulates the salient features of the measured dynamics and conclude that compared with wild-type, some mutant clones confer enhanced focal adhesion and lamellipodia formation (A127T, P233L, and P487L) and some confer increased association with BCL-2, Dynamin-related Protein-1 (DRP-1), and Mitofusion-2 (MFN-2) proteins (P233L and D399N). Further, PXN mutants, through their interactions with BCL-2 and DRP-1, could regulate cisplatin drug resistance in human lung cancer cells. The data reported herein suggest that mutant PXN variants play a prominent role in mitochondrial dynamics with direct implications on lung cancer progression and hence, deserve further exploration as therapeutic targets. PMID:23792636

  6. Calcium co-regulates oxidative metabolism and ATP synthase-dependent respiration in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    De Marchi, Umberto; Thevenet, Jonathan; Hermant, Aurelie; Dioum, Elhadji; Wiederkehr, Andreas

    2014-03-28

    Mitochondrial energy metabolism is essential for glucose-induced calcium signaling and, therefore, insulin granule exocytosis in pancreatic beta cells. Calcium signals are sensed by mitochondria acting in concert with mitochondrial substrates for the full activation of the organelle. Here we have studied glucose-induced calcium signaling and energy metabolism in INS-1E insulinoma cells and human islet beta cells. In insulin secreting cells a surprisingly large fraction of total respiration under resting conditions is ATP synthase-independent. We observe that ATP synthase-dependent respiration is markedly increased after glucose stimulation. Glucose also causes a very rapid elevation of oxidative metabolism as was followed by NAD(P)H autofluorescence. However, neither the rate of the glucose-induced increase nor the new steady-state NAD(P)H levels are significantly affected by calcium. Our findings challenge the current view, which has focused mainly on calcium-sensitive dehydrogenases as the target for the activation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. We propose a model of tight calcium-dependent regulation of oxidative metabolism and ATP synthase-dependent respiration in beta cell mitochondria. Coordinated activation of matrix dehydrogenases and respiratory chain activity by calcium allows the respiratory rate to change severalfold with only small or no alterations of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratio.

  7. Interaction between yeast mitochondrial and nuclear genomes: null alleles of RTG genes affect resistance to the alkaloid lycorine in rho0 petites of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, Luigi; Massardo, Domenica Rita; Pontieri, Paola; Wolf, Klaus

    2005-07-18

    Some nuclear genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) respond to signals from the mitochondria in a process called by Butow (Cell Death Differ. 9 (2002) 1043-1045) retrograde regulation. Expression of these genes is activated in cells lacking mitochondrial function by involvement of RTG1, RTG2 and RTG3 genes whose protein products bind to "R-boxes" in the promoter region; RTG2p is a cytoplasmic protein. Since S. cerevisiae rho0 strains, lacking the entire mitochondrial genome, are resistant to lycorine, an alkaloid extracted from Amaryllis plants, it could be hypothesized that in rho0 cells the dysfunctional mitochondrial status stimulates overexpression of nuclear genes very likely involved in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication. In this report we show that the resistance of rho0 cells to lycorine is affected by the deletion of RTG genes.

  8. Tissue- and Cell-Specific Mitochondrial Defect in Parkin-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bulteau, Anne-Laure; Ferrando-Miguel, Rosa; Gouarne, Caroline; Paoli, Marc Giraudon; Pruss, Rebecca; Auchère, Françoise; L'Hermitte-Stead, Caroline; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Brice, Alexis; Corti, Olga; Lombès, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Loss of Parkin, encoded by PARK2 gene, is a major cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease. In Drosophila and mammalian cell models Parkin has been shown in to play a role in various processes essential to maintenance of mitochondrial quality, including mitochondrial dynamics, biogenesis and degradation. However, the relevance of altered mitochondrial quality control mechanisms to neuronal survival in vivo is still under debate. We addressed this issue in the brain of PARK2−/− mice using an integrated mitochondrial evaluation, including analysis of respiration by polarography or by fluorescence, respiratory complexes activity by spectrophotometric assays, mitochondrial membrane potential by rhodamine 123 fluorescence, mitochondrial DNA content by real time PCR, and oxidative stress by total glutathione measurement, proteasome activity, SOD2 expression and proteins oxidative damage. Respiration rates were lowered in PARK2−/− brain with high resolution but not standard respirometry. This defect was specific to the striatum, where it was prominent in neurons but less severe in astrocytes. It was present in primary embryonic cells and did not worsen in vivo from 9 to 24 months of age. It was not associated with any respiratory complex defect, including complex I. Mitochondrial inner membrane potential in PARK2−/− mice was similar to that of wild-type mice but showed increased sensitivity to uncoupling with ageing in striatum. The presence of oxidative stress was suggested in the striatum by increased mitochondrial glutathione content and oxidative adducts but normal proteasome activity showed efficient compensation. SOD2 expression was increased only in the striatum of PARK2−/− mice at 24 months of age. Altogether our results show a tissue-specific mitochondrial defect, present early in life of PARK2−/− mice, mildly affecting respiration, without prominent impact on mitochondrial membrane potential, whose underlying mechanisms remain to be

  9. ELEVATED TEMPERATURE, SOIL MOISTURE AND SEASONALITY BUT NOT CO2 AFFECT CANOPY ASSIMILATION AND SYSTEM RESPIRATION IN SEEDLING DOUGLAS-FIR ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 and air temperature on C cycling in trees and associated soil system, focusing on canopy CO2 assimilation (Asys) and system CO2 loss through respiration (Rsys). We hypothesized that both elevated CO2 and elevated temperature...

  10. Structures and Mechanisms of Antitumor Agents - Xestoquinones Uncouple Cellular Respiration and Disrupt HIF Signaling in Human Breast Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lin; Mahdi, Fakhri; Datta, Sandipan; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G.

    2012-01-01

    The organic extract of a marine sponge Petrosia alfiani selectively inhibited iron chelator-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activation in a human breast tumor T47D cell-based reporter assay. Bioassay-guided fractionation yielded seven xestoquinones (1 – 7) including three new compounds 14-hydroxymethylxestoquinone (1), 15-hydroxymethylxestoquinone (2), and 14,15-dihydroxestoquinone (3). Compounds 1 – 7 were evaluated for their effects on HIF-1 signaling, mitochondrial respiration, and tumor cell proliferation/viability. The known metabolites adociaquinones A (5) and B (6), that possess a 3,4-dihydro-2H-1,4-thiazine-1,1-dioxide moiety, potently and selectively inhibited iron chelator-induced HIF-1 activation in T47D cells, each with an IC50 value of 0.2 μM. Mechanistic studies revealed that adociaquinones promote oxygen consumption without affecting mitochondrial membrane potential. Compound 1 both enhances respiration and decreases mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting that it acts as a protonophore that uncouples mitochondrial respiration. PMID:22938093

  11. RNA Recognition Motif-Containing Protein ORRM4 Broadly Affects Mitochondrial RNA Editing and Impacts Plant Development and Flowering1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Germain, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Plant RNA editosomes modify cytidines (C) to uridines (U) at specific sites in plastid and mitochondrial transcripts. Members of the RNA-editing factor interacting protein (RIP) family and Organelle RNA Recognition Motif-containing (ORRM) family are essential components of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) editosome. ORRM2 and ORRM3 have been recently identified as minor mitochondrial editing factors whose silencing reduces editing efficiency at ∼6% of the mitochondrial C targets. Here we report the identification of ORRM4 (for organelle RRM protein 4) as a novel, major mitochondrial editing factor that controls ∼44% of the mitochondrial editing sites. C-to-U conversion is reduced, but not eliminated completely, at the affected sites. The orrm4 mutant exhibits slower growth and delayed flowering time. ORRM4 affects editing in a site-specific way, though orrm4 mutation affects editing of the entire transcript of certain genes. ORRM4 contains an RRM domain at the N terminus and a Gly-rich domain at the C terminus. The RRM domain provides the editing activity of ORRM4, whereas the Gly-rich domain is required for its interaction with ORRM3 and with itself. The presence of ORRM4 in the editosome is further supported by its interaction with RIP1 in a bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay. The identification of ORRM4 as a major mitochondrial editing factor further expands our knowledge of the composition of the RNA editosome and reveals that adequate mitochondrial editing is necessary for normal plant development. PMID:26578708

  12. Cannabinoid-induced changes in respiration of brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Fišar, Zdeněk; Singh, Namrata; Hroudová, Jana

    2014-11-18

    Cannabinoids exert various biological effects that are either receptor-mediated or independent of receptor signaling. Mitochondrial effects of cannabinoids were interpreted either as non-receptor-mediated alteration of mitochondrial membranes, or as indirect consequences of activation of plasma membrane type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1). Recently, CB1 receptors were confirmed to be localized to the membranes of neuronal mitochondria, where their activation directly regulates respiration and energy production. Here, we performed in-depth analysis of cannabinoid-induced changes of mitochondrial respiration using both an antagonist/inverse agonist of CB1 receptors, AM251 and the cannabinoid receptor agonists, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol, anandamide, and WIN 55,212-2. Relationships were determined between cannabinoid concentration and respiratory rate driven by substrates of complex I, II or IV in pig brain mitochondria. Either full or partial inhibition of respiratory rate was found for the tested drugs, with an IC50 in the micromolar range, which verified the significant role of non-receptor-mediated mechanism in inhibiting mitochondrial respiration. Effect of stepwise application of THC and AM251 evidenced protective role of AM251 and corroborated the participation of CB1 receptor activation in the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. We proposed a model, which includes both receptor- and non-receptor-mediated mechanisms of cannabinoid action on mitochondrial respiration. This model explains both the inhibitory effect of cannabinoids and the protective effect of the CB1 receptor inverse agonist.

  13. Perinatal Protein Malnutrition Affects Mitochondrial Function in Adult and Results in a Resistance to High Fat Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Jousse, Céline; Muranishi, Yuki; Parry, Laurent; Montaurier, Christophe; Even, Patrick; Launay, Jean-Marie; Carraro, Valérie; Maurin, Anne-Catherine; Averous, Julien; Chaveroux, Cédric; Bruhat, Alain; Mallet, Jacques; Morio, Béatrice; Fafournoux, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological findings indicate that transient environmental influences during perinatal life, especially nutrition, may have deleterious heritable health effects lasting for the entire life. Indeed, the fetal organism develops specific adaptations that permanently change its physiology/metabolism and that persist even in the absence of the stimulus that initiated them. This process is termed “nutritional programming”. We previously demonstrated that mothers fed a Low-Protein-Diet (LPD) during gestation and lactation give birth to F1-LPD animals presenting metabolic consequences that are different from those observed when the nutritional stress is applied during gestation only. Compared to control mice, adult F1-LPD animals have a lower body weight and exhibit a higher food intake suggesting that maternal protein under-nutrition during gestation and lactation affects the energy metabolism of F1-LPD offspring. In this study, we investigated the origin of this apparent energy wasting process in F1-LPD and demonstrated that minimal energy expenditure is increased, due to both an increased mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle and an increased mitochondrial density in White Adipose Tissue. Importantly, F1-LPD mice are protected against high-fat-diet-induced obesity. Clearly, different paradigms of exposure to malnutrition may be associated with differences in energy expenditure, food intake, weight and different susceptibilities to various symptoms associated with metabolic syndrome. Taken together these results demonstrate that intra-uterine environment is a major contributor to the future of individuals and disturbance at a critical period of development may compromise their health. Consequently, understanding the molecular mechanisms may give access to useful knowledge regarding the onset of metabolic diseases. PMID:25118945

  14. Developmental plasticity of mitochondrial function in American alligators, Alligator mississippiensis

    PubMed Central

    Crossley, Janna; Elsey, Ruth M.; Dzialowski, Edward M.; Shiels, Holly A.; Crossley, Dane A.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of hypoxia on cellular metabolism is well documented in adult vertebrates, but information is entirely lacking for embryonic organisms. The effect of hypoxia on embryonic physiology is particularly interesting, as metabolic responses during development may have life-long consequences, due to developmental plasticity. To this end, we investigated the effects of chronic developmental hypoxia on cardiac mitochondrial function in embryonic and juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis). Alligator eggs were incubated in 21% or 10% oxygen from 20 to 90% of embryonic development. Embryos were either harvested at 90% development or allowed to hatch and then reared in 21% oxygen for 3 yr. Ventricular mitochondria were isolated from embryonic/juvenile alligator hearts. Mitochondrial respiration and enzymatic activities of electron transport chain complexes were measured with a microrespirometer and spectrophotometer, respectively. Developmental hypoxia induced growth restriction and increased relative heart mass, and this phenotype persisted into juvenile life. Embryonic mitochondrial function was not affected by developmental hypoxia, but at the juvenile life stage, animals from hypoxic incubations had lower levels of Leak respiration and higher respiratory control ratios, which is indicative of enhanced mitochondrial efficiency. Our results suggest developmental hypoxia can have life-long consequences for alligator morphology and metabolic function. Further investigations are necessary to reveal the adaptive significance of the enhanced mitochondrial efficiency in the hypoxic phenotype. PMID:27707718

  15. Mechanisms and costs of mitochondrial thermal acclimation in a eurythermal killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus).

    PubMed

    Chung, Dillon J; Schulte, Patricia M

    2015-06-01

    Processes acting at the level of the mitochondria have been suggested to affect the thermal limits of organisms. To determine whether changes in mitochondrial properties could underlie shifts in thermal limits, we examined how mitochondrial properties are affected by thermal acclimation in the eurythermal killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus - a species with substantial plasticity in whole-organism thermal limits. We hypothesized that thermal acclimation would result in functional changes in the mitochondria that could result in trade-offs in function during acute thermal shifts. We measured the mitochondrial respiration rate (V̇O2 ) through multiple complexes of the electron transport system following thermal acclimation (to 5, 15, 33°C) and assessed maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δp) and rates of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production as an estimate of costs. Acclimation to 5°C resulted in a modest compensation of mitochondrial respiration at low temperatures, but these mitochondria were able to maintain Δp with acute exposure to high temperatures, and ROS production did not differ between acclimation groups, suggesting that these increases in mitochondrial capacity do not alter mitochondrial thermal sensitivity. Acclimation to 33°C suppressed mitochondrial respiration as a result of effects on NADH dehydrogenase (complex I). These high-temperature acclimated fish nonetheless maintained levels of Δp and ROS production similar to those of the other acclimation groups. This work demonstrates that killifish mitochondria can successfully acclimate to a wide range of temperatures without incurring major functional trade-offs during acute thermal shifts and that high-temperature acclimation results in a suppression of metabolism, consistent with patterns observed at the organismal level.

  16. Low metabolic rates in salamanders are correlated with weak selective constraints on mitochondrial genes.

    PubMed

    Chong, Rebecca A; Mueller, Rachel Lockridge

    2013-03-01

    Mitochondria are the site for the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), the final steps of ATP synthesis via cellular respiration. Each mitochondrion contains its own genome; in vertebrates, this is a small, circular DNA molecule that encodes 13 subunits of the multiprotein OXPHOS electron transport complexes. Vertebrate lineages vary dramatically in metabolic rates; thus, functional constraints on mitochondrial-encoded proteins likely differ, potentially impacting mitochondrial genome evolution. Here, we examine mitochondrial genome evolution in salamanders, which have the lowest metabolic requirements among tetrapods. We show that salamanders experience weaker purifying selection on protein-coding sequences than do frogs, a comparable amphibian clade with higher metabolic rates. In contrast, we find no evidence for weaker selection against mitochondrial genome expansion in salamanders. Together, these results suggest that different aspects of mitochondrial genome evolution (i.e., nucleotide substitution, accumulation of noncoding sequences) are differently affected by metabolic variation across tetrapod lineages.

  17. Interactive effects of pH and metals on mitochondrial functions of intertidal bivalves Crassostrea virginica and Mercenaria mercenaria.

    PubMed

    Ivanina, Anna V; Sokolova, Inna M

    2013-11-15

    Intertidal bivalves experience broad fluctuations of environmental temperature, pH and oxygen content which could change their intracellular pH. They are also exposed to trace metals such as cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu) that accumulate in their tissues and may negatively affect mitochondrial functions and bioenergetics. We determined the interactive effects of pH and trace metals (25 μM Cd or Cu) on mitochondrial functions (including respiration and membrane potentials in both ADP-stimulated (state 3) and resting (state 4) states) of two common marine bivalves, the hard clams (Mercenaria mercenaria) and eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica). In the absence of the trace metals, mitochondrial functions of C. virginica and M. mercenaria were insensitive to pH in a broad physiologically relevant range (6.6-7.8). Mitochondrial respiration was generally suppressed by 25 μM Cd or Cu (with the stronger effects observed for ADP-stimulated compared to the resting respiration) while the mitochondrial membrane potential was unaffected. pH modulated the effects of Cu and Cd on mitochondrial respiration of the bivalves. In oysters, Cu suppressed ADP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration at high and low pH values (6.6 and 7.8, respectively), but had no effect in the intermediate pH range (7.0-7.4). In clams, the negative effect of Cu on ADP-stimulated respiration was only observed at extremely high pH (7.8). A decrease in pH was also protective against Cd in mitochondria of clams and oysters. In clams, 25 μM Cd suppressed ADP-stimulated respiration at all pH; however, at low pH (6.6-7.0) this suppression was paralleled by a decrease in the rates of proton leak thereby effectively restoring mitochondrial coupling. In oysters, the inhibitory effects of Cd on ADP-stimulated respiration were fully abolished at low pH (6.6-7.0). This indicates that moderate acidosis (such as occurs during exposure to air, extreme salinities or elevated CO2 levels in the intertidal zone) may have a

  18. Nosepiece respiration monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, A. L.; Long, L. E.; Rice, N. E.

    1968-01-01

    Comfortable, inexpensive nosepiece respiration monitor produces rapid response signals to most conventional high impedance medical signal conditioners. The monitor measures respiration in a manner that produces a large signal with minimum delay.

  19. Respirator Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... it last? That depends on how much filtering capacity the respirator has and the amount of hazard ... and it will vary by each respirator model's capacities. That's why your emergency plan must include some ...

  20. Thioredoxin-interacting protein and myocardial mitochondrial function in ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Jun; Lee, Richard T

    2014-02-01

    Cellular metabolism and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation are interrelated processes in mitochondria and are implicated in a variety of human diseases including ischemic heart disease. During ischemia, mitochondrial respiration rates fall. Though seemingly paradoxical, reduced respiration has been observed to be cardioprotective due in part to reduced generation of ROS. Enhanced myocardial glucose uptake is considered beneficial for the myocardium under stress, as glucose is the primary substrate to support anaerobic metabolism. Thus, inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation can protect the myocardium from irreversible ischemic damage. Growing evidence now positions the TXNIP/thioredoxin system at a nodal point linking pathways of antioxidant defense, cell survival, and energy metabolism. This emerging picture reveals TXNIP's function as a regulator of glucose homeostasis and may prove central to regulation of mitochondrial function during ischemia. In this review, we summarize how TXNIP and its binding partner thioredoxin act as regulators of mitochondrial metabolism. While the precise mechanism remains incompletely defined, the TXNIP-thioredoxin interaction has the potential to affect signaling that regulates mitochondrial bioenergetics and respiratory function with potential cardioprotection against ischemic injury.

  1. Resveratrol stimulates mitochondrial fusion by a mechanism requiring mitofusin-2.

    PubMed

    Robb, Ellen L; Moradi, Fereshteh; Maddalena, Lucas A; Valente, Andrew J F; Fonseca, Joao; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2017-04-01

    Resveratrol (RES) is a plant-derived stilbene associated with a wide range of health benefits. Mitochondria are a key downstream target of RES, and in some cell types RES promotes mitochondrial biogenesis, altered cellular redox status, and a shift toward oxidative metabolism. Mitochondria exist as a dynamic network that continually remodels via fusion and fission processes, and the extent of fusion is related to cellular redox status and metabolism. We investigated RES's effects on mitochondrial network morphology in several cell lines using a quantitative approach to measure the extent of network fusion. 48 h continuous treatment with 10-20 μM RES stimulated mitochondrial fusion in C2C12 myoblasts, PC3 cancer cells, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts stimulated significant increases in fusion in all instances, resulting in larger and more highly branched mitochondrial networks. Mitofusin-2 (Mfn2) is a key protein facilitating mitochondrial fusion, and its expression was also stimulated by RES. Using Mfn2-null cells we demonstrated that RES's effects on mitochondrial fusion, cellular respiration rates, and cell growth are all dependent upon the presence of Mfn2. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Mfn2 and mitochondrial fusion are affected by RES in ways that appear to relate to RES's known effects on cellular metabolism and growth.

  2. Effects of the Czech Propolis on Sperm Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Cedikova, Miroslava; Miklikova, Michaela; Stachova, Lenka; Grundmanova, Martina; Tuma, Zdenek; Vetvicka, Vaclav; Zech, Nicolas; Kralickova, Milena; Kuncova, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    Propolis is a natural product that honeybees collect from various plants. It is known for its beneficial pharmacological effects. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of propolis on human sperm motility, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and membrane potential. Semen samples from 10 normozoospermic donors were processed according to the World Health Organization criteria. Propolis effects on the sperm motility and mitochondrial activity parameters were tested in the fresh ejaculate and purified spermatozoa. Propolis preserved progressive motility of spermatozoa in the native semen samples. Oxygen consumption determined in purified permeabilized spermatozoa by high-resolution respirometry in the presence of adenosine diphosphate and substrates of complex I and complex II (state OXPHOSI+II) was significantly increased in the propolis-treated samples. Propolis also increased uncoupled respiration in the presence of rotenone (state ETSII) and complex IV activity, but it did not influence state LEAK induced by oligomycin. Mitochondrial membrane potential was not affected by propolis. This study demonstrates that propolis maintains sperm motility in the native ejaculates and increases activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes II and IV without affecting mitochondrial membrane potential. The data suggest that propolis improves the total mitochondrial respiratory efficiency in the human spermatozoa in vitro thereby having potential to improve sperm motility. PMID:25104965

  3. Mitochondrial DNA polymorphism in mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed

    Holt, I J; Harding, A E; Morgan-Hughes, J A

    1988-05-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that mitochondrial myopathy may be caused by mutation of the mitochondrial (mt) genome, restriction fragment length polymorphism in leucocyte mt DNA has been studied in 38 patients with mitochondrial myopathy, 44 of their unaffected matrilineal relatives, and 35 normal control subjects. Previously unreported mt DNA polymorphisms were identified in both patients and controls. No differences in restriction fragment patterns were observed between affected and unaffected individuals in the same maternal line, and there was no evidence of major deletion of mt DNA in patients. This study provides no positive evidence of mitochondrial inheritance in mitochondrial myopathy, but this has not been excluded.

  4. Modulation of mitochondrial capacity and angiogenesis by red wine polyphenols via estrogen receptor, NADPH oxidase and nitric oxide synthase pathways.

    PubMed

    Duluc, Lucie; Jacques, Caroline; Soleti, Raffaella; Iacobazzi, Francesco; Simard, Gilles; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2013-04-01

    Red wine polyphenolic compounds (RWPC) are reported to exert vasculoprotective properties on endothelial cells, involving nitric oxide (NO) release via a redox-sensitive pathway. This NO release involves the activation of the estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα). Paradoxical effects of a RWPC treatment occur in a rat model of post-ischemic neovascularization, where a low-dose is pro-angiogenic while a higher dose is anti-angiogenic. NO and ERα are key regulators of mitochondrial capacity, and angiogenesis is a highly energetic process associated with mitochondrial biogenesis. However, whether RWPC induces changes in mitochondrial capacity has never been addressed. We investigated the effects of RWPC at low (10(-4)g/l, LCP) and high concentration (10(-2)g/l, HCP) in human endothelial cells. Mitochondrial respiration, expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors and mitochondrial DNA content were assessed using oxygraphy and quantitative PCR respectively. In vitro capillary formation using ECM gel(®) was also performed. Treatment with LCP increased mitochondrial respiration, with a maximal effect achieved at 48h. LCP also increased expression of several mitochondrial biogenesis factors and mitochondrial DNA content. In contrast, HCP did not affect these parameters. Furthermore, LCP modulated both mitochondrial capacity and angiogenesis through mechanisms sensitive to ER, NADPH oxidase and NO-synthase inhibitors. Finally, the inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis abolished the pro-angiogenic capacity of LCP. These results suggest a possible association between the modulation of mitochondrial capacity by LCP and its pro-angiogenic activity. These data provide evidence for a role of mitochondria in the regulation of angiogenesis by RWPC.

  5. Improving respiration measurements with gas exchange analyzers.

    PubMed

    Montero, R; Ribas-Carbó, M; Del Saz, N F; El Aou-Ouad, H; Berry, J A; Flexas, J; Bota, J

    2016-12-01

    Dark respiration measurements with open-flow gas exchange analyzers are often questioned for their low accuracy as their low values often reach the precision limit of the instrument. Respiration was measured in five species, two hypostomatous (Vitis Vinifera L. and Acanthus mollis) and three amphistomatous, one with similar amount of stomata in both sides (Eucalyptus citriodora) and two with different stomata density (Brassica oleracea and Vicia faba). CO2 differential (ΔCO2) increased two-fold with no change in apparent Rd, when the two leaves with higher stomatal density faced outside. These results showed a clear effect of the position of stomata on ΔCO2. Therefore, it can be concluded that leaf position is important to guarantee the improvement of respiration measurements increasing ΔCO2 without affecting the respiration results by leaf or mass units. This method will help to increase the accuracy of leaf respiration measurements using gas exchange analyzers.

  6. Evidence that the major metabolites accumulating in medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency disturb mitochondrial energy homeostasis in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Ferreira, Gustavo da Costa; Tonin, Anelise Miotti; Viegas, Carolina Maso; Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Moura, Alana Pimentel; Zanatta, Angela; Klamt, Fábio; Wajner, Moacir

    2009-11-03

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is an inherited metabolic disorder of fatty acid oxidation in which the affected patients predominantly present high levels of octanoic (OA) and decanoic (DA) acids and their glycine and carnitine by-products in tissues and body fluids. It is clinically characterized by episodic encephalopathic crises with coma and seizures, as well as by progressive neurological involvement, whose pathophysiology is poorly known. In the present work, we investigated the in vitro effects of OA and DA on various parameters of energy homeostasis in mitochondrial preparations from brain of young rats. We found that OA and DA markedly increased state 4 respiration and diminished state 3 respiration as well as the respiratory control ratio, the mitochondrial membrane potential and the matrix NAD(P)H levels. In addition, DA-elicited increase in oxygen consumption in state 4 respiration was partially prevented by atractyloside, indicating the involvement of the adenine nucleotide translocator. OA and DA also reduced ADP/O ratio, CCCP-stimulated respiration and the activities of respiratory chain complexes. The data indicate that the major accumulating fatty acids in MCADD act as uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation and as metabolic inhibitors. Furthermore, DA, but not OA, provoked a marked mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release from mitochondria, reflecting a permeabilization of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Taken together, these data suggest that OA and DA impair brain mitochondrial energy homeostasis that could underlie at least in part the neuropathology of MCADD.

  7. Mitochondrial dysfunction bridges negative affective disorders and cardiomyopathy in socially isolated rats: Pros and cons of fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Sonei, Nazanin; Amiri, Shayan; Jafarian, Iman; Anoush, Mahdieh; Rahimi-Balaei, Maryam; Bergen, Hugo; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Hosseini, Mir-Jamal

    2017-02-01

    Objectives Depression is tightly associated with cardiovascular comorbidity and accounts for high financial and social burden worldwide. Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of depression and cardiovascular disorders; its contribution to depression-cardiovascular comorbidity has not yet been investigated. Methods Adolescent rats were subjected to 4 weeks of isolation (social isolation stress or SIS) or social conditions (control), and then they were divided into treatment (fluoxetine, 7.5 mg/kg/day for 21 days) and non-treatment groups. After different housing conditions and treatment, animals were evaluated by behavioural tests (n = 6-8) and mitochondrial assessments (n = 3) of brain and cardiac tissues. Results We found that juvenile SIS induced behavioural abnormalities and mitochondrial dysfunction in adulthood. We showed that juvenile SIS was associated with impaired respiratory chain complex, which leads to reactive oxygen species formation, oxidative damage and ATP abatement in both brain and heart. Administration of FLX (7.5 mg/kg/day) during the isolation period attenuated the effects of SIS on the brain mitochondria and behavioural abnormalities, but had little or no effect on SIS-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiac tissue. Conclusions This suggests that juvenile SIS predisposes the co-occurrence of depression and cardiovascular disease through mitochondrial dysfunction and that therapeutic effect of fluoxetine is partly mediated by its effect on mitochondrial function.

  8. Acute Ethanol Causes Hepatic Mitochondrial Depolarization in Mice: Role of Ethanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhi; Ramshesh, Venkat K.; Rehman, Hasibur; Liu, Qinlong; Theruvath, Tom P.; Krishnasamy, Yasodha; Lemasters, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims An increase of ethanol metabolism and hepatic mitochondrial respiration occurs in vivo after a single binge of alcohol. Here, our aim was to determine how ethanol intake affects hepatic mitochondrial polarization status in vivo in relation to ethanol metabolism and steatosis. Methods Hepatic mitochondrial polarization, permeability transition (MPT), and reduce pyridine nucleotides, and steatosis in mice were monitored by intravital confocal/multiphoton microscopy of the fluorescence of rhodamine 123 (Rh123), calcein, NAD(P)H, and BODIPY493/503, respectively, after gavage with ethanol (1–6 g/kg). Results Mitochondria depolarized in an all-or-nothing fashion in individual hepatocytes as early as 1 h after alcohol. Depolarization was dose- and time-dependent, peaked after 6 to 12 h and maximally affected 94% of hepatocytes. This mitochondrial depolarization was not due to onset of the MPT. After 24 h, mitochondria of most hepatocytes recovered normal polarization and were indistinguishable from untreated after 7 days. Cell death monitored by propidium iodide staining, histology and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was low throughout. After alcohol, mitochondrial NAD(P)H autofluorescence increased and decreased, respectively, in hepatocytes with polarized and depolarized mitochondria. Ethanol also caused steatosis mainly in hepatocytes with depolarized mitochondria. Depolarization was linked to ethanol metabolism, since deficiency of alcohol dehydrogenase and cytochrome-P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), the major ethanol-metabolizing enzymes, decreased mitochondrial depolarization by ∼70% and ∼20%, respectively. Activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase decreased depolarization, whereas inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase enhanced depolarization. Activation of aldehyde dehydrogenase also markedly decreased steatosis. Conclusions Acute ethanol causes reversible hepatic mitochondrial depolarization in vivo that may contribute to

  9. Glucocorticoid Modulation of Mitochondrial Function in Hepatoma Cells Requires the Mitochondrial Fission Protein Drp1

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Alvarez, María Isabel; Paz, José C.; Sebastián, David; Muñoz, Juan Pablo; Liesa, Marc; Segalés, Jessica; Palacín, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Glucocorticoids, such as dexamethasone, enhance hepatic energy metabolism and gluconeogenesis partly through changes in mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial function is influenced by the balance between mitochondrial fusion and fission events. However, whether glucocorticoids modulate mitochondrial function through the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics is currently unknown. Results: Here, we report that the effects of dexamethasone on mitochondrial function and gluconeogenesis in hepatoma cells are dependent on the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). Dexamethasone increased routine oxygen consumption, maximal respiratory capacity, superoxide anion, proton leak, and gluconeogenesis in hepatoma cells. Under these conditions, dexamethasone altered mitochondrial morphology, which was paralleled by a large increase in Drp1 expression, and reduced mitofusin 1 (Mfn1) and Mfn2. In vivo dexamethasone treatment also enhanced Drp1 expression in mouse liver. On the basis of these observations, we analyzed the dependence on the Drp1 function of dexamethasone effects on mitochondrial respiration and gluconeogenesis. We show that the increase in mitochondrial respiration and gluconeogenesis induced by dexamethasone are hampered by the inhibition of Drp1 function. Innovation: Our findings provide the first evidence that the effects of glucocorticoids on hepatic metabolism require the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1. Conclusion: In summary, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial effects of dexamethasone both on mitochondrial respiration and on the gluconeogenic pathway depend on Drp1. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 366–378. PMID:22703557

  10. High-mobility group box 1 is dispensable for autophagy, mitochondrial quality control, and organ function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Huebener, Peter; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Pradere, Jean-Philippe; Quinzii, Catarina M; Friedman, Richard; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Trent, Chad M; Mederacke, Ingmar; Zhao, Enpeng; Dapito, Dianne H; Lin, Yuxi; Goldberg, Ira J; Czaja, Mark J; Schwabe, Robert F

    2014-03-04

    In vitro studies have demonstrated a critical role for high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in autophagy and the autophagic clearance of dysfunctional mitochondria, resulting in severe mitochondrial fragmentation and profound disturbances of mitochondrial respiration in HMGB1-deficient cells. Here, we investigated the effects of HMGB1 deficiency on autophagy and mitochondrial function in vivo, using conditional Hmgb1 ablation in the liver and heart. Unexpectedly, deletion of Hmgb1 in hepatocytes or cardiomyocytes, two cell types with abundant mitochondria, did not alter mitochondrial structure or function, organ function, or long-term survival. Moreover, hepatic autophagy and mitophagy occurred normally in the absence of Hmgb1, and absence of Hmgb1 did not significantly affect baseline and glucocorticoid-induced hepatic gene expression. Collectively, our findings suggest that HMGB1 is dispensable for autophagy, mitochondrial quality control, the regulation of gene expression, and organ function in the adult organism.

  11. Soil respiration, labile carbon pools, and enzyme activities as affected by tillage practices in a tropical rice-maize-cowpea cropping system.

    PubMed

    Neogi, S; Bhattacharyya, P; Roy, K S; Panda, B B; Nayak, A K; Rao, K S; Manna, M C

    2014-07-01

    In order to identify the viable option of tillage practices in rice-maize-cowpea cropping system that could cut down soil carbon dioxide (CO2) emission, sustain grain yield, and maintain better soil quality in tropical low land rice ecology soil respiration in terms of CO2 emission, labile carbon (C) pools, water-stable aggregate C fractions, and enzymatic activities were investigated in a sandy clay loam soil. Soil respiration is the major pathway of gaseous C efflux from terrestrial systems and acts as an important index of ecosystem functioning. The CO2-C emissions were quantified in between plants and rows throughout the year in rice-maize-cowpea cropping sequence both under conventional tillage (CT) and minimum tillage (MT) practices along with soil moisture and temperature. The CO2-C emissions, as a whole, were 24 % higher in between plants than in rows, and were in the range of 23.4-78.1, 37.1-128.1, and 28.6-101.2 mg m(-2) h(-1) under CT and 10.7-60.3, 17.3-99.1, and 17.2-79.1 mg m(-2) h(-1) under MT in rice, maize, and cowpea, respectively. The CO2-C emission was found highest under maize (44 %) followed by rice (33 %) and cowpea (23 %) irrespective of CT and MT practices. In CT system, the CO2-C emission increased significantly by 37.1 % with respect to MT on cumulative annual basis including fallow. The CO2-C emission per unit yield was at par in rice and cowpea signifying the beneficial effect of MT in maintaining soil quality and reduction of CO2 emission. The microbial biomass C (MBC), readily mineralizable C (RMC), water-soluble C (WSC), and permanganate-oxidizable C (PMOC) were 19.4, 20.4, 39.5, and 15.1 % higher under MT than CT. The C contents in soil aggregate fraction were significantly higher in MT than CT. Soil enzymatic activities like, dehydrogenase, fluorescein diacetate, and β-glucosidase were significantly higher by 13.8, 15.4, and 27.4 % under MT compared to CT. The soil labile C pools, enzymatic activities, and

  12. Recurrent De Novo Dominant Mutations in SLC25A4 Cause Severe Early-Onset Mitochondrial Disease and Loss of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kyle; Majd, Homa; Dallabona, Christina; Reinson, Karit; King, Martin S; Alston, Charlotte L; He, Langping; Lodi, Tiziana; Jones, Simon A; Fattal-Valevski, Aviva; Fraenkel, Nitay D; Saada, Ann; Haham, Alon; Isohanni, Pirjo; Vara, Roshni; Barbosa, Inês A; Simpson, Michael A; Deshpande, Charu; Puusepp, Sanna; Bonnen, Penelope E; Rodenburg, Richard J; Suomalainen, Anu; Õunap, Katrin; Elpeleg, Orly; Ferrero, Ileana; McFarland, Robert; Kunji, Edmund R S; Taylor, Robert W

    2016-10-06

    Mutations in SLC25A4 encoding the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier AAC1 are well-recognized causes of mitochondrial disease. Several heterozygous SLC25A4 mutations cause adult-onset autosomal-dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia associated with multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions, whereas recessive SLC25A4 mutations cause childhood-onset mitochondrial myopathy and cardiomyopathy. Here, we describe the identification by whole-exome sequencing of seven probands harboring dominant, de novo SLC25A4 mutations. All affected individuals presented at birth, were ventilator dependent and, where tested, revealed severe combined mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiencies associated with a marked loss of mitochondrial DNA copy number in skeletal muscle. Strikingly, an identical c.239G>A (p.Arg80His) mutation was present in four of the seven subjects, and the other three case subjects harbored the same c.703C>G (p.Arg235Gly) mutation. Analysis of skeletal muscle revealed a marked decrease of AAC1 protein levels and loss of respiratory chain complexes containing mitochondrial DNA-encoded subunits. We show that both recombinant AAC1 mutant proteins are severely impaired in ADP/ATP transport, affecting most likely the substrate binding and mechanics of the carrier, respectively. This highly reduced capacity for transport probably affects mitochondrial DNA maintenance and in turn respiration, causing a severe energy crisis. The confirmation of the pathogenicity of these de novo SLC25A4 mutations highlights a third distinct clinical phenotype associated with mutation of this gene and demonstrates that early-onset mitochondrial disease can be caused by recurrent de novo mutations, which has significant implications for the application and analysis of whole-exome sequencing data in mitochondrial disease.

  13. The complete mitochondrial genome of Flustra foliacea (Ectoprocta, Cheilostomata) - compositional bias affects phylogenetic analyses of lophotrochozoan relationships

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The phylogenetic relationships of the lophophorate lineages, ectoprocts, brachiopods and phoronids, within Lophotrochozoa are still controversial. We sequenced an additional mitochondrial genome of the most species-rich lophophorate lineage, the ectoprocts. Although it is known that there are large differences in the nucleotide composition of mitochondrial sequences of different lineages as well as in the amino acid composition of the encoded proteins, this bias is often not considered in phylogenetic analyses. We applied several approaches for reducing compositional bias and saturation in the phylogenetic analyses of the mitochondrial sequences. Results The complete mitochondrial genome (16,089 bp) of Flustra foliacea (Ectoprocta, Gymnolaemata, Cheilostomata) was sequenced. All protein-encoding, rRNA and tRNA genes are transcribed from the same strand. Flustra shares long intergenic sequences with the cheilostomate ectoproct Bugula, which might be a synapomorphy of these taxa. Further synapomorphies might be the loss of the DHU arm of the tRNA L(UUR), the loss of the DHU arm of the tRNA S(UCN) and the unique anticodon sequence GAG of the tRNA L(CUN). The gene order of the mitochondrial genome of Flustra differs strongly from that of the other known ectoprocts. Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial nucleotide and amino acid data sets show that the lophophorate lineages are more closely related to trochozoan phyla than to deuterostomes or ecdysozoans confirming the Lophotrochozoa hypothesis. Furthermore, they support the monophyly of Cheilostomata and Ectoprocta. However, the relationships of the lophophorate lineages within Lophotrochozoa differ strongly depending on the data set and the used method. Different approaches for reducing heterogeneity in nucleotide and amino acid data sets and saturation did not result in a more robust resolution of lophotrochozoan relationships. Conclusion The contradictory and usually weakly supported phylogenetic

  14. ANT2-defective fibroblasts exhibit normal mitochondrial bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Dolly; Goldstein, Amy C.; El-Khoury, Riyad; Rak, Malgorzata; Edmunds, Lia; Rustin, Pierre; Vockley, Jerry; Schiff, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Adenine nucleotide translocase 2 (ANT2) transports glycolytic ATP across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Patients with ANT2 deletion were recently reported. We aimed at characterizing mitochondrial functions in ANT2-defective fibroblasts. In spite of ANT2 expression in fibroblasts, we observed no difference between ANT2-defective and control fibroblasts for mitochondrial respiration, respiratory chain activities, mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular ATP levels. This indicates that ANT2 insufficiency does not alter fibroblast basal mitochondrial bioenergetics. PMID:26000237

  15. Mutations in the passenger polypeptide can affect its partitioning between mitochondria and cytoplasm: mutations can impair the mitochondrial import of DsRed.

    PubMed

    Pastukh, Viktoriya; Shokolenko, Inna N; Wilson, Glenn L; Alexeyev, Mikhail F

    2008-06-01

    In this study, we report that the partitioning between mitochondria and cytoplasm of two variants, mCherry and DsRed Express (DRE), of the red fluorescent protein, DsRed, fused to one of the six matrix targeting sequences (MTSs) can be affected by both MTS and amino acid substitutions in DsRed. Of the six MTSs tested, MTSs from superoxide dismutase and DNA polymerase gamma failed to direct mCherry, but not DRE to mitochondria. By evaluating a series of chimeras between mCherry and DRE fused to the MTS of superoxide dismutase, we attribute the differences in the mitochondrial partitioning to differences in the primary amino acid sequence of the passenger polypeptide. The impairment of mitochondrial partitioning closely parallels the number of mCherry-specific mutations, and is not specific to mutations located in any particular region of the polypeptide. These observations suggest that both MTS and the passenger polypeptide affect the efficiency of mitochondrial import and provide a rationale for the observed diversity in the primary amino acid sequences of natural MTSs.

  16. Voluntary use of respirators.

    PubMed

    Feiner, Lynn

    2009-11-01

    Allowing voluntary use of respirators can provide workers with an added level of comfort and relief from nuisance levels of particulates, gases, or vapors. But misuse can result in illness or injury to the worker. Understanding and following OSHA's guidelines on voluntary use of respirators is one of the many ways you help provide a safe workplace and ensure your employees stay healthy.

  17. Methoxychlor causes mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in the mouse ovary

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.K.; Schuh, R.A.; Fiskum, G.; Flaws, J.A. . E-mail: jflaws@epi.umaryland.edu

    2006-11-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) is an organochlorine pesticide that reduces fertility in female rodents by causing ovarian atrophy, persistent estrous cyclicity, and antral follicle atresia (apoptotic cell death). Oxidative damage resulting from reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation has been demonstrated to lead to toxicant-induced cell death. Thus, this work tested the hypothesis that MXC causes oxidative damage to the mouse ovary and affects mitochondrial respiration in a manner that stimulates ROS production. For the in vitro experiments, mitochondria were collected from adult cycling mouse ovaries, treated with vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide; DMSO) or MXC, and subjected to polarographic measurements of respiration. For the in vivo experiments, adult cycling CD-1 mice were dosed with either vehicle (sesame oil) or MXC for 20 days. After treatment, ovarian mitochondria were isolated and subjected to measurements of respiration and fluorimetric measurements of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. Some ovaries were also fixed and processed for immunohistochemistry using antibodies for ROS production markers: nitrotyrosine and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHG). Ovaries from in vivo experiments were also used to measure the mRNA expression and activity of antioxidants such as Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and catalase (CAT). The results indicate that MXC significantly impairs mitochondrial respiration, increases production of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, causes more staining for nitrotyrosine and 8-OHG in antral follicles, and decreases the expression and activity of SOD1, GPX, and CAT as compared to controls. Collectively, these data indicate that MXC inhibits mitochondrial respiration, causes ROS production, and decreases antioxidant expression and activity in the ovary, specifically in the antral follicles. Therefore, it is possible that MXC causes atresia of ovarian antral follicles by inducing oxidative stress through mitochondrial production of ROS.

  18. Two novel pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting organelle number and protein synthesis. Is the tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene an etiologic hot spot?

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, C T; Ciacci, F; Bonilla, E; Jansen, C; Hirano, M; Rao, N; Lovelace, R E; Rowland, L P; Schon, E A; DiMauro, S

    1993-01-01

    We identified two patients with pathogenic single nucleotide changes in two different mitochondrial tRNA genes: the first mutation in the tRNA(Asn) gene, and the ninth known mutation in the tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene. The mutation in tRNA(Asn) was associated with isolated ophthalmoplegia, whereas the mutation in tRNA(Leu(UUR)) caused a neurological syndrome resembling MERRF (myoclonus epilepsy and ragged-red fibers) plus optic neuropathy, retinopathy, and diabetes. Both mutations were heteroplasmic, with higher percentages of mutant mtDNA in affected tissues, and undetectable levels in maternal relatives. Analysis of single muscle fibers indicated that morphological and biochemical alterations appeared only when the proportions of mutant mtDNA exceeded 90% of the total cellular mtDNA pool. The high incidence of mutations in the tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene suggests that this region is an "etiologic hot spot" in mitochondrial disease. Images PMID:8254046

  19. Determining the meteorological forcing that affect seasonal and diurnal dynamics of respiration and GPP in a constructed urban wetland in Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohrer, G.; Morin, T.; Naor-Azrieli, L.; Mouser, P. J.; Mitsch, W. J.; Schafer, K. V.

    2012-12-01

    Wetlands provide important ecosystem services, including CO2 sequestration, reduction of nutrient loads, flood mitigation and refuges for biodiversity, however, they also produce Methane, a very potent greenhouse gas. The sustainability of these wetlands is dependent on their potential benefits provided through their ecosystem services and their green-house gas budget. As recent concerns over green-house gas emissions are starting to conflict with the need for wetland restoration, it has become pivotal to assess the GHG budgets from temperate urban wetlands. We set up a meteorological station for continuous micro-meteorological and eddy-covariance flux measurements of CO2 and methane at the Olentangy River Wetland Research Park (ORWRP) in Ohio State University. A footprint model was used to decompose the measurement periods due to high spatial and temporal variation in carbon flux and methane emission rates across the different sub-habitats of the wetland ecosystem. We find a clear and typical seasonal pattern carbon flux with high uptake during the summer and emission during the winter. A clear daily pattern exists for carbon sequestration rates that peak in the early afternoon. However, respiration does not show strong and predictable daily patters and it is very poorly correlated with environmental drivers such as soil/water temperature. We also found that during long parts of the winter the wetland still acted as a sink for CO2, rather than as a source. We hypothesize that this is, in part, due to the anomalous warm winter, but suggest that wetlands may behave more like evergreen ecosystems.

  20. Mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitors modulate the metal-induced inner mitochondrial membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, Elena A

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the protective action of stigmatellin (an inhibitor of complex III of mitochondrial electron transport chain, mtETC) against the heavy metal-induced cytotoxicity, we tested its effectiveness against mitochondrial membrane permeabilization produced by heavy metal ions Cd²(+), Hg²(+), Cu²(+) and Zn²(+), as well as by Ca²(+) (in the presence of P(i)) or Se (in form of Na₂SeO₃) using isolated rat liver mitochondria. It was shown that stigmatellin modulated mitochondrial swelling produced by these metals/metalloids in the isotonic sucrose medium in the presence of ascorbate plus tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (complex IV substrates added for energization of the mitochondria). It was found that stigmatellin and other mtETC inhibitors enhanced the mitochondrial swelling induced by selenite. However, in the same medium, all the mtETC inhibitors tested as well as cyclosporin A and bongkrekic acid did not significantly affect Cu²(+)-induced swelling. In contrast, the high-amplitude swelling produced by Cd²(+), Hg²(+), Zn²(+), or Ca²(+) plus P(i) was significantly depressed by these inhibitors. Significant differences in the action of these metals/metalloids on the redox status of pyridine nucleotides, transmembrane potential and mitochondrial respiration were also observed. In the light of these results as well as the data from the recent literature, our hypothesis on a possible involvement of the respiratory supercomplex, formed by complex I (P-site) and complex III (S-site) in the mitochondrial permeabilization mediated by the mitochondrial transition pore, is updated.

  1. Frost Induces Respiration and Accelerates Carbon Depletion in Trees

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Or; Earles, J. Mason; Secchi, Francesca; Godfrey, Jessie; Zwieniecki, Maciej A.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular respiration depletes stored carbohydrates during extended periods of limited photosynthesis, e.g. winter dormancy or drought. As respiration rate is largely a function of temperature, the thermal conditions during such periods may affect non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) availability and, ultimately, recovery. Here, we surveyed stem responses to temperature changes in 15 woody species. For two species with divergent respirational response to frost, P. integerrima and P. trichocarpa, we also examined corresponding changes in NSC levels. Finally, we simulated respiration-induced NSC depletion using historical temperature data for the western US. We report a novel finding that tree stems significantly increase respiration in response to near freezing temperatures. We observed this excess respiration in 13 of 15 species, deviating 10% to 170% over values predicted by the Arrhenius equation. Excess respiration persisted at temperatures above 0°C during warming and reoccurred over multiple frost-warming cycles. A large adjustment of NSCs accompanied excess respiration in P. integerrima, whereas P. trichocarpa neither excessively respired nor adjusted NSCs. Over the course of the years included in our model, frost-induced respiration accelerated stem NSC consumption by 8.4 mg (glucose eq.) cm-3 yr-1 on average in the western US, a level of depletion that may continue to significantly affect spring NSC availability. This novel finding revises the current paradigm of low temperature respiration kinetics. PMID:26629819

  2. Frost Induces Respiration and Accelerates Carbon Depletion in Trees.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Or; Earles, J Mason; Secchi, Francesca; Godfrey, Jessie; Zwieniecki, Maciej A

    2015-01-01

    Cellular respiration depletes stored carbohydrates during extended periods of limited photosynthesis, e.g. winter dormancy or drought. As respiration rate is largely a function of temperature, the thermal conditions during such periods may affect non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) availability and, ultimately, recovery. Here, we surveyed stem responses to temperature changes in 15 woody species. For two species with divergent respirational response to frost, P. integerrima and P. trichocarpa, we also examined corresponding changes in NSC levels. Finally, we simulated respiration-induced NSC depletion using historical temperature data for the western US. We report a novel finding that tree stems significantly increase respiration in response to near freezing temperatures. We observed this excess respiration in 13 of 15 species, deviating 10% to 170% over values predicted by the Arrhenius equation. Excess respiration persisted at temperatures above 0 °C during warming and reoccurred over multiple frost-warming cycles. A large adjustment of NSCs accompanied excess respiration in P. integerrima, whereas P. trichocarpa neither excessively respired nor adjusted NSCs. Over the course of the years included in our model, frost-induced respiration accelerated stem NSC consumption by 8.4 mg (glucose eq.) cm(-3) yr(-1) on average in the western US, a level of depletion that may continue to significantly affect spring NSC availability. This novel finding revises the current paradigm of low temperature respiration kinetics.

  3. Clinical pulmonary function and industrial respirator wear

    SciTech Connect

    Raven, P.B.; Moss, R.F.; Page, K.; Garmon, R.; Skaggs, B.

    1981-12-01

    This investigation was the initial step in determining a clinical pulmonary test which could be used to evaluate workers as to their suitability to industrial respirator wear. Sixty subjects, 12 superior, 37 normal, and 11 moderately impaired with respect to lung function tests were evaluated with a battery of clinical pulmonary tests while wearing an industrial respirator. The respirator was a full-face mask (MSA-Ultravue) demand breathing type equipped with an inspiratory resistance of 85mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow and an expiratory resistance of 25mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow. Comparisons of these tests were made between the three groups of subjects both with and without a respirator. It appears that those lung tests which measure the flow characteristics of the lung especially those that are effort dependant are more susceptible to change as a result of respirator wear. Hence, the respirator affects the person with superior lung function to a greater degree than the moderately impaired person. It was suggested that the clinical test of 15 second maximum voluntary ventilations (MVV./sub 25/) may be the test of choice for determining worker capability in wearing an industrial respirator.

  4. Tespa1 is a novel component of mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes and affects mitochondrial calcium flux.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Shirasawa, Senji

    2013-04-12

    Regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration is critical in numerous biological processes. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) functions as the Ca(2+) release channel on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. Much attention has been dedicated to mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake via mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAM) which is involved in intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis; however, the molecular mechanisms that link the MAM to mitochondria still remain elusive. We previously reported that Tespa1 (thymocyte-expressed, positive selection-associated gene 1) expressed in lymphocytes physically interacts with IP3R. In this study, we first performed double-immunocytochemical staining of Tespa1 with a mitochondrial marker or an ER marker on an acute T lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, Jurkat cells, by using anti-ATP synthase or anti-calnexin antibody, respectively, and demonstrated that Tespa1 was localized very close to mitochondria and the Tespa1 localization was overlapped with restricted portion of ER. Next, we examined the effects of Tespa1 on the T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation-induced Ca(2+) flux by using Ca(2+) imaging in Jurkat cells. Reduction of Tespa1 protein by Tespa1-specific siRNA diminished TCR stimulation-induced Ca(2+) flux into both mitochondria and cytoplasm through the analyses of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) indicator (Rhod-2) and the cytoplasmic Ca(2+) indicator (Fluo-4), respectively. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation assay in HEK293 cells revealed that exogenous Tespa1 protein physically interacted with a MAM-associated protein, GRP75 (glucose-regulated protein 75), but not with an outer mitochondrial membrane protein, VDAC1 (voltage-dependent anion channel 1). All these results suggested that Tespa1 will participate in the molecular link between IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) release and mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in the MAM compartment.

  5. The Role of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Psychiatric Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scaglia, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorders caused by the biochemical complexity of mitochondrial respiration and the fact that two genomes, one mitochondrial and one nuclear, encode the components of the respiratory chain. These disorders can manifest at birth or present later in…

  6. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chia-Chi; Tseng, Ling-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Deregulated cellular energetics was one of the cancer hallmarks. Several underlying mechanisms of deregulated cellular energetics are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction caused by mitochondrial DNA mutations, mitochondrial enzyme defects, or altered oncogenes/tumor suppressors. In this review, we summarize the current understanding about the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer progression. Point mutations and copy number changes are the two most common mitochondrial DNA alterations in cancers, and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by chemical depletion of mitochondrial DNA or impairment of mitochondrial respiratory chain in cancer cells promotes cancer progression to a chemoresistance or invasive phenotype. Moreover, defects in mitochondrial enzymes, such as succinate dehydrogenase, fumarate hydratase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase, are associated with both familial and sporadic forms of cancer. Deregulated mitochondrial deacetylase sirtuin 3 might modulate cancer progression by regulating cellular metabolism and oxidative stress. These mitochondrial defects during oncogenesis and tumor progression activate cytosolic signaling pathways that ultimately alter nuclear gene expression, a process called retrograde signaling. Changes in the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species, Ca2+, or oncometabolites are important in the mitochondrial retrograde signaling for neoplastic transformation and cancer progression. In addition, altered oncogenes/tumor suppressors including hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and tumor suppressor p53 regulate mitochondrial respiration and cellular metabolism by modulating the expression of their target genes. We thus suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in cancer progression and that targeting mitochondrial alterations and mitochondrial retrograde signaling might be a promising strategy for the development of selective anticancer therapy. PMID:27022139

  7. Mitochondrial inheritance in a mitochondrially mediated disease.

    PubMed

    Egger, J; Wilson, J

    1983-07-21

    Mendelian inheritance involves the transmission to successive generations of DNA contained in genes in the nucleus, but DNA is also contained in mitochondria, where it is believed to be responsible for the encoding of certain mitochondrial enzymes. Since nearly all mitochondrial DNA is maternally transmitted, one might expect a nonmendelian pattern of inheritance in mitochondrial cytopathy, a syndrome in which there are abnormalities in mitochondrial structure and deficiencies in a variety of mitochondrial enzymes. We studied the pedigrees of 6 affected families whose members we had examined personally and of 24 families described in the literature. In 27 families, exclusively maternal transmission occurred; in 3 there was also paternal transmission in one generation. Altogether, 51 mothers but only 3 fathers had transmitted the condition. These results are consistent with mitochondrial transmission of mitochondrial cytopathy; the inheritance and enzyme defects of mitochondrial cytopathy can be considered in the light of recent evidence that subunits of respiratory-enzyme complexes are encoded solely by mitochondrial DNA. The occasional paternal transmission may be explained if certain enzyme subunits that are encoded by nuclear DNA are affected.

  8. Cadmium affects the mitochondrial viability and the acid soluble thiols concentration in liver, kidney, heart and gills of Ancistrus brevifilis (Eigenmann, 1920)

    PubMed Central

    Velasquez-Vottelerd, P.; Anton, Y.; Salazar-Lugo, R.

    2015-01-01

    The freshwater fish Ancistrus brevifilis, which is found in Venezuelan rivers, is considered a potential sentinel fish in ecotoxicological studies. The cadmium (Cd) effect on the mitochondrial viability (MV) and acid soluble thiols levels (AST) in A. brevifilis tissues (liver, kidney, heart, and gill) was evaluated. Forty-two fish with similar sizes and weights were randomly selected, of which 7 fish (with their respective replicate) were exposed for 7 and 30 days to a Cd sublethal concentration (0.1 mg.l-1). We determined the MV through a Janus Green B colorimetric assay and we obtained the concentration of AST by Ellman’s method. Mitochondrial viability decreased in fish exposed to Cd for 30 days with the liver being the most affected tissue. We also detected a significant decrease in AST levels was in fishes exposed to Cd for 7 days in liver and kidney tissues; these results suggests that AST levels are elevated in some tissues may act as cytoprotective and adaptive alternative mechanism related to the ROS detoxification, maintenance redox status and mitochondrial viability. Organ-specifics variations were observed in both assays. We conclude that the Cd exposure effect on AST levels and MV, vary across fish tissues and is related to the exposure duration, the molecule dynamics in different tissues, the organism and environmental conditions. PMID:26623384

  9. Correspondence regarding Ballana et al., "Mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene mutations affect RNA secondary structure and lead to variable penetrance in hearing impairment".

    PubMed

    Abreu-Silva, R S; Batissoco, A C; Lezirovitz, K; Romanos, J; Rincon, D; Auricchio, M T B M; Otto, P A; Mingroni-Netto, R C

    2006-05-12

    Ballana et al. [E. Ballana, E. Morales, R. Rabionet, B. Montserrat, M. Ventayol, O. Bravo, P. Gasparini, X. Estivill, Mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene mutations affect RNA secondary structure and lead to variable penetrance in hearing impairment, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 341 (2006) 950-957] detected a T1291C mutation segregating in a Cuban pedigree with hearing impairment. They interpreted it as probably pathogenic, based on family history, RNA conformation prediction and its absence in a control group of 95 Spanish subjects. We screened a sample of 203 deaf subjects and 300 hearing controls (110 "European-Brazilians" and 190 "African-Brazilians") for the mitochondrial mutations A1555G and T1291C. Five deaf subjects had the T1291C substitution, three isolated cases and two familial cases. In the latter, deafness was paternally inherited or segregated with the A1555G mutation. This doesn't support the hypothesis of T1291C mutation being pathogenic. Two "African-Brazilian" controls also had the T1291C substitution. Six of the seven T1291C-carriers (five deaf and two controls) had mitochondrial DNA of African origin, belonging to macrohaplogroup L1/L2. Therefore, these data point to T1291C substitution as most probably an African non-pathogenic polymorphism.

  10. Augmenter of liver regeneration, a protective factor against ROS-induced oxidative damage in muscle tissue of mitochondrial myopathy affected patients.

    PubMed

    Polimeno, Lorenzo; Rossi, Roberta; Mastrodonato, Maria; Montagnani, Monica; Piscitelli, Domenico; Pesetti, Barbara; De Benedictis, Leonarda; Girardi, Bruna; Resta, Leonardo; Napoli, Anna; Francavilla, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondria-related myopathies (MM) are a group of different diseases defined by a varying degree of dysfunctions of the mitochondrial respiratory chain which leads to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation followed by oxidative stress and cellular damage. In mitochondrial myopathy muscle tissue an overexpression of antioxidant enzymes has been documented probably as an attempt to counteract the free radical generation. We previously documented, in human non-pathological muscle fibres, the expression of the augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR), a sulfhydryl oxidase enzyme, whose presence is related to the mitochondria; indeed it has been demonstrated that ALR mainly localizes in the mitochondrial inter-membrane space. Furthermore we reported, in different experimental models, in vivo and in vitro, the anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidative capacities of ALR, achieved by up-regulating Bcl-2 anti-apoptotic family factors and the anti-apoptotic/anti-oxidative secretory isoform of clusterin (sClu). With the present study we aimed to determine ALR, Bcl-2 protein, clusterin and ROS expression in muscle tissue biopsies from MM-affected patients. Non-pathological muscle tissue was used as control. Enzymatic, histochemical, immunohistochemical and immune electron microscopy techniques were performed. The data obtained revealed in MM-derived muscle tissue, compared to non-pathological tissue, the over-expression of ROS, ALR and Bcl-2 and the induction of the nuclear, pro-apoptotic, isoform of clusterin (nCLU).

  11. Polyglutamine expansion inhibits respiration by increasing reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Puranam, Kasturi L.; Wu, Guanghong; Strittmatter, Warren J.; Burke, James R. . E-mail: james.burke@duke.edu

    2006-03-10

    Huntington's disease results from expansion of the polyglutamine (PolyQ) domain in the huntingtin protein. Although the cellular mechanism by which pathologic-length PolyQ protein causes neurodegeneration is unclear, mitochondria appear central in pathogenesis. We demonstrate in isolated mitochondria that pathologic-length PolyQ protein directly inhibits ADP-dependent (state 3) mitochondrial respiration. Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by PolyQ protein is not due to reduction in the activities of electron transport chain complexes, mitochondrial ATP synthase, or the adenine nucleotide translocase. We show that pathologic-length PolyQ protein increases the production of reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria. Impairment of state 3 mitochondrial respiration by PolyQ protein is reversed by addition of the antioxidants N-acetyl-L-cysteine or cytochrome c. We propose a model in which pathologic-length PolyQ protein directly inhibits mitochondrial function by inducing oxidative stress.

  12. Sevoflurane postconditioning affects post-ischaemic myocardial mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel function and apoptosis in ageing rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing-Jing; Li, Chao; Li, Heng; Zhang, Lei; Lin, Zong-Hang; Fu, Bao-Jun; Zeng, Yin-Ming

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of sevoflurane postconditioning on post-ischaemic cardiac function, infarct size, myocardial mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel (mitoKATP) function and apoptosis in ageing rats to determine the possible mechanism underlying the cardioprotective property of sevoflurane. Ageing rat hearts were isolated and attached to a Langendorff apparatus. The hearts were then exposed or not to sevoflurane postconditioning in the presence or absence of 100 μmol/L 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD), a selective mitoKATP inhibitor. The infarct size was measured by triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. Mitochondrial morphology was observed by electron microscopy and scored using FlaMeng semiquantitative analysis. In addition, the expression levels of Bax, Bcl-2, and cytochrome-C (Cyt-C) were determined by Western blot analysis at the end of reperfusion. Sevoflurane postconditioning increased coronary flow, improved functional recovery, reduced Bax/Bcl-2 and Cyt-C phosphorylation levels, and decreased mitochondrial lesion severity and the extent of apoptosis. The protective effects of sevoflurane postconditioning were prevented by the mitoKATP inhibitor 5-HD. Sevoflurane postconditioning significantly protected the function of ageing hearts that were subjected to ischaemia and reperfusion, and these protective effects were mediated by mitoKATP opening.

  13. Respiration in Aquatic Insects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarland, John

    1985-01-01

    This article: (1) explains the respiratory patterns of several freshwater insects; (2) describes the differences and mechanisms of spiracular cutaneous, and gill respiration; and (3) discusses behavioral aspects of selected aquatic insects. (ML)

  14. Stimulation of respiration in rat thymocytes induced by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Gudz, T I; Pandelova, I G; Novgorodov, S A

    1994-04-01

    The effect of X irradiation on the respiration of rat thymocytes was studied. An increase in the rate of O2 uptake was observed 1 h after cells were irradiated with doses of 6-10 Gy. The radiation-induced increase in respiration could be blocked by oligomycin, an inhibitor of mitochondrial ATP synthase, suggesting control by increased cytoplasmic ATP turnover. The stimulation of respiration was not associated with changes in the activity of mitochondrial electron transfer enzymes or permeability of the inner membrane. Several inhibitors of processes which used ATP were screened for their effects on the basal respiration rate and on the radiation response. In irradiated thymocytes, an enhancement of inhibition of respiration by ouabain, La3+ and cycloheximide was observed. These results indicate that the radiation-induced stimulation of respiration is due to changes in ion homeostasis and protein synthesis. The effect of X irradiation was shown to be independent of the redox status of nonprotein thiols and was not associated with detectable changes in some products of lipid peroxidation. The radiation-induced decrease in activity of superoxide dismutase suggests free radical involvement in deleterious effects of radiation.

  15. Calcineurin transgenic mice have mitochondrial dysfunction and elevated superoxide production.

    PubMed

    Sayen, M R; Gustafsson, Asa B; Sussman, Mark A; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Gottlieb, Roberta A

    2003-02-01

    Introduction of the constitutively active calcineurin gene into neonatal rat cardiomyocytes by adenovirus resulted in decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (P < 0.05). Infection of H9c2 cells with calcineurin adenovirus resulted in increased superoxide production (P < 0.001). Transgenic mice with cardiac-specific expression of a constitutively active calcineurin cDNA (CalTG mice) exhibit a two- to threefold increase in heart size that progresses to heart failure. We prepared mitochondria enriched for the subsarcolemmal population from the hearts of CalTG mice and transgene negative littermates (control). Intact, well-coupled mitochondria prepared from one to two mouse hearts at a time yielded sufficient material for functional studies. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption was measured with a Clark-type oxygen electrode with substrates for mitochondrial complex II (succinate) and complex IV [tetramethylpentadecane (TMPD)/ascorbate]. CalTG mice exhibited a maximal rate of electron transfer in heart mitochondria that was reduced by approximately 50% (P < 0.002) without a loss of respiratory control. Mitochondrial respiration was unaffected in tropomodulin-overexpressing transgenic mice, another model of cardiomyopathy. Western blotting for mitochondrial electron transfer subunits from mitochondria of CalTG mice revealed a 20-30% reduction in subunit 3 of complex I (ND3) and subunits I and IV of cytochrome oxidase (CO-I, CO-IV) when normalized to total mitochondrial protein or to the adenine nucleotide transporter (ANT) and compared with littermate controls (P < 0.002). Impaired mitochondrial electron transport was associated with high levels of superoxide production in the CalTG mice. Taken together, these data indicate that calcineurin signaling affects mitochondrial energetics and superoxide production. The excessive production of superoxide may contribute to the development of cardiac failure.

  16. Mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase regulates mitochondrial matrix pH.

    PubMed

    Ghafourifar, P; Richter, C

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide (nitrogen monoxide, NO) exerts a wide profile of its biological activities via regulation of respiration and respiration-dependent functions. The presence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in mitochondria (mtNOS) was recently reported by us (Ghafourifar and Richter, FEBS Lett. 418, 291-296, 1997) and others (Giulivi et al., J. Biol. Chem. 273, 11038-11043, 1998). Here we report that NO, provided by an NO donor as well as by mtNOS stimulation, regulates mitochondrial matrix pH, transmembrane potential and Ca2+ buffering capacity. Exogenously-added NO causes a dose-dependent matrix acidification. Also mtNOS stimulation, induced by loading mitochondria with Ca2+, causes mitochondrial matrix acidification and a drop in mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Inhibition of mtNOS's basal activity causes mitochondrial matrix alkalinization and provides a resistance to the sudden drop of mitochondrial transmembrane potential induced by mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. We conclude that mtNOS plays a critical role in regulating mitochondrial delta(pH).

  17. Effect of chronic contractile activity on SS and IMF mitochondrial apoptotic susceptibility in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Adhihetty, Peter J; Ljubicic, Vladimir; Hood, David A

    2007-03-01

    Chronic contractile activity of skeletal muscle induces an increase in mitochondria located in proximity to the sarcolemma [subsarcolemmal (SS)] and in mitochondria interspersed between the myofibrils [intermyofibrillar (IMF)]. These are energetically favorable metabolic adaptations, but because mitochondria are also involved in apoptosis, we investigated the effect of chronic contractile activity on mitochondrially mediated apoptotic signaling in muscle. We hypothesized that chronic contractile activity would provide protection against mitochondrially mediated apoptosis despite an elevation in the expression of proapoptotic proteins. To induce mitochondrial biogenesis, we chronically stimulated (10 Hz; 3 h/day) rat muscle for 7 days. Chronic contractile activity did not alter the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, an index of apoptotic susceptibility, and did not affect manganese superoxide dismutase levels. However, contractile activity increased antiapoptotic 70-kDa heat shock protein and apoptosis repressor with a caspase recruitment domain by 1.3- and 1.4-fold (P<0.05), respectively. Contractile activity elevated SS mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production 1.4- and 1.9-fold (P<0.05) during states IV and III respiration, respectively, whereas IMF mitochondrial state IV ROS production was suppressed by 28% (P<0.05) and was unaffected during state III respiration. Following stimulation, exogenous ROS treatment produced less cytochrome c release (25-40%) from SS and IMF mitochondria, and also reduced apoptosis-inducing factor release (approximately 30%) from IMF mitochondria, despite higher inherent cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor expression. Chronic contractile activity did not alter mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP) components in either subfraction. However, SS mitochondria exhibited a significant increase in the time to Vmax of mtPTP opening. Thus, chronic contractile activity induces predominantly antiapoptotic adaptations in both

  18. Catecholamine-induced cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction and mPTP opening: protective effect of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Izem-Meziane, Malika; Djerdjouri, Bahia; Rimbaud, Stephanie; Caffin, Fanny; Fortin, Dominique; Garnier, Anne; Veksler, Vladimir; Joubert, Frederic; Ventura-Clapier, Renee

    2012-02-01

    The present study was designed to characterize the mitochondrial dysfunction induced by catecholamines and to investigate whether curcumin, a natural antioxidant, induces cardioprotective effects against catecholamine-induced cardiotoxicity by preserving mitochondrial function. Because mitochondria play a central role in ischemia and oxidative stress, we hypothesized that mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in catecholamine toxicity and in the potential protective effects of curcumin. Male Wistar rats received subcutaneous injection of 150 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) isoprenaline (ISO) for two consecutive days with or without pretreatment with 60 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) curcumin. Twenty four hours after, cardiac tissues were examined for apoptosis and oxidative stress. Expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function were measured by real-time RT-PCR. Isolated mitochondria and permeabilized cardiac fibers were used for swelling and mitochondrial function experiments, respectively. Mitochondrial morphology and permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening were assessed by fluorescence in isolated cardiomyocytes. ISO treatment induced cell damage, oxidative stress, and apoptosis that were prevented by curcumin. Moreover, mitochondria seem to play an important role in these effects as respiration and mitochondrial swelling were increased following ISO treatment, these effects being again prevented by curcumin. Importantly, curcumin completely prevented the ISO-induced increase in mPTP calcium susceptibility in isolated cardiomyocytes without affecting mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial network dynamic. The results unravel the importance of mitochondrial dysfunction in isoprenaline-induced cardiotoxicity as well as a new cardioprotective effect of curcumin through prevention of mitochondrial damage and mPTP opening.

  19. Supporting Aspartate Biosynthesis Is an Essential Function of Respiration in Proliferating Cells.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Lucas B; Gui, Dan Y; Hosios, Aaron M; Bush, Lauren N; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Vander Heiden, Matthew G

    2015-07-30

    Mitochondrial respiration is important for cell proliferation; however, the specific metabolic requirements fulfilled by respiration to support proliferation have not been defined. Here, we show that a major role of respiration in proliferating cells is to provide electron acceptors for aspartate synthesis. This finding is consistent with the observation that cells lacking a functional respiratory chain are auxotrophic for pyruvate, which serves as an exogenous electron acceptor. Further, the pyruvate requirement can be fulfilled with an alternative electron acceptor, alpha-ketobutyrate, which provides cells neither carbon nor ATP. Alpha-ketobutyrate restores proliferation when respiration is inhibited, suggesting that an alternative electron acceptor can substitute for respiration to support proliferation. We find that electron acceptors are limiting for producing aspartate, and supplying aspartate enables proliferation of respiration deficient cells in the absence of exogenous electron acceptors. Together, these data argue a major function of respiration in proliferating cells is to support aspartate synthesis.

  20. Decreased Mitochondrial OGG1 Expression is Linked to Mitochondrial Defects and Delayed Hepatoma Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Kyoung; Youn, Hwang-Guem; Wang, Hee-Jung; Yoon, Gyesoon

    2013-01-01

    Many solid tumor cells exhibit mitochondrial respiratory impairment; however, the mechanisms of such impairment in cancer development remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that SNU human hepatoma cells with declined mitochondrial respiratory activity showed decreased expression of mitochondrial 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase/lyase (mtOGG1), a mitochondrial DNA repair enzyme; similar results were obtained with human hepatocellular carcinoma tissues. Among several OGG1-2 variants with a mitochondrial- targeting sequence (OGG1-2a, -2b, -2c, -2d, and -2e), OGG1-2a was the major mitochondrial isoform in all examined hepatoma cells. Interestingly, hepatoma cells with low mtOGG1 levels showed delayed cell growth and increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Knockdown of OGG1-2 isoforms in Chang-L cells, which have active mitochondrial respiration with high mtOGG1 levels, significantly decreased cellular respiration and cell growth, and increased intracellular ROS. Overexpression of OGG1-2a in SNU423 cells, which have low mtOGG1 levels, effectively recovered cellular respiration and cell growth activities, and decreased intracellular ROS. Taken together, our results suggest that mtOGG1 plays an important role in maintaining mitochondrial respiration, thereby contributing to cell growth of hepatoma cells. PMID:23677377

  1. Optical tweezers and non-ratiometric fluorescent-dye-based studies of respiration in sperm mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Timothy; Shi, Linda Z.; Zhu, Qingyuan; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Berns, Michael W.

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how the mitochondrial membrane potential affects sperm motility using laser tweezers and a non-ratiometric fluorescent probe, DiOC6(3). A 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 continuous wave laser was used to trap motile sperm at a power of 450 mW in the trap spot. Using customized tracking software, the curvilinear velocity (VCL) and the escape force from the laser tweezers were measured. Human (Homo sapiens), dog (Canis lupis familiaris) and drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) sperm were treated with DiOC6(3) to measure the membrane potential in the mitochondria-rich sperm midpieces. Sperm from all three species exhibited an increase in fluorescence when treated with the DiOC6(3). When a cyanide inhibitor (CCCP) of aerobic respiration was applied, sperm of all three species exhibited a reduction in fluorescence to pre-dye levels. With respect to VCL and escape force, the CCCP had no effect on dog or human sperm, suggesting a major reliance upon anaerobic respiration (glycolysis) for ATP in these two species. Based on the preliminary study on drill sperm, CCCP caused a drop in the VCL, suggesting potential reliance on both glycolysis and aerobic respiration for motility. The results demonstrate that optical trapping in combination with DiOC6(3) is an effective way to study sperm motility and energetics.

  2. Effects of photodynamic action on respiration in nonphosphorylating mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Salet, C; Moreno, G; Ricchelli, F

    1998-10-15

    We have studied the effects of singlet oxygen produced by photodynamic action on respiration in nonphosphorylating mitochondria (state 4). Isolated rat liver mitochondria were incubated with 3 microM hematoporphyrin and irradiated at 365 nm with a fluence rate of 25 W/m2. After short durations of irradiation, state 4 respiration with beta-hydroxybutyrate as substrate increases while respiration with succinate is negligibly affected. When mitochondria have been uncoupled with carbonylcyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl hydrazone before irradiation, no change occurs in beta-hydroxybutyrate-driven respiration, while succinate-driven respiration strongly decreases. Stimulation of state 4 NADH respiration cannot be explained by slippage of the NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase because the stoichiometry of the redox pump was found insensitive to photodynamic action. In the light of the metabolite theory for linear enzymatic chains applied to state 4 respiration (Brand et al., Biochem. J. 255, 535-539, 1988), these results suggest that stimulation of NADH respiration is simply due to an increase of membrane leaks which occurs after irradiation. In the case of succinate-driven respiration, a strong inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase activity has been demonstrated after irradiation. It can be suggested that this inhibition introduces a negative control coefficient over state 4 respiration, counterbalancing the effects due to leakage.

  3. Alternative respiration and fumaric acid production of Rhizopus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shuai; Xu, Qing; Huang, He; Li, Shuang

    2014-06-01

    Under the conditions of fumaric acid fermentation, Rhizopus oryzae ME-F14 possessed at least two respiratory systems. The respiration of mycelia was partially inhibited by the cytochrome respiration inhibitor antimycin A or the alternative respiration inhibitor salicylhydroxamic acid and was completely inhibited in the presence of both antimycin A and salicylhydroxamic acid. During fumaric acid fermentation process, the activity of alternative respiration had a great correlation with fumaric acid productivity; both of them reached peak at the same time. The alternative oxidase gene, which encoded the mitochondrial alternative oxidase responsible for alternative respiration in R. oryzae ME-F14, was cloned and characterized in Escherichia coli. The activity of alternative respiration, the alternative oxidase gene transcription level, as well as the fumaric acid titer were measured under different carbon sources and different carbon-nitrogen ratios. The activity of alternative respiration was found to be comparable to the transcription level of the alternative oxidase gene and the fumaric acid titer. These results indicated that the activity of the alternative oxidase was regulated at the transcription stage under the conditions tested for R. oryzae ME-F14.

  4. Reductive stress impairs myoblasts mitochondrial function and triggers mitochondrial hormesis.

    PubMed

    Singh, François; Charles, Anne-Laure; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Bouitbir, Jamal; Bonifacio, Annalisa; Piquard, François; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Geny, Bernard; Zoll, Joffrey

    2015-07-01

    Even though oxidative stress damage from excessive production of ROS is a well known phenomenon, the impact of reductive stress remains poorly understood. This study tested the hypothesis that cellular reductive stress could lead to mitochondrial malfunction, triggering a mitochondrial hormesis (mitohormesis) phenomenon able to protect mitochondria from the deleterious effects of statins. We performed several in vitro experiments on L6 myoblasts and studied the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) at different exposure times. Direct NAC exposure (1mM) led to reductive stress, impairing mitochondrial function by decreasing maximal mitochondrial respiration and increasing H₂O₂production. After 24h of incubation, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was increased. The resulting mitochondrial oxidation activated mitochondrial biogenesis pathways at the mRNA level. After one week of exposure, mitochondria were well-adapted as shown by the decrease of cellular ROS, the increase of mitochondrial content, as well as of the antioxidant capacities. Atorvastatin (ATO) exposure (100μM) for 24h increased ROS levels, reduced the percentage of live cells, and increased the total percentage of apoptotic cells. NAC exposure during 3days failed to protect cells from the deleterious effects of statins. On the other hand, NAC pretreatment during one week triggered mitochondrial hormesis and reduced the deleterious effect of statins. These results contribute to a better understanding of the redox-dependant pathways linked to mitochondria, showing that reductive stress could trigger mitochondrial hormesis phenomenon.

  5. Deficiency of the mitochondrial phosphate carrier presenting as myopathy and cardiomyopathy in a family with three affected children.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Johannes A; Zimmermann, Franz A; Horváth, Rita; Schneider, Hans-Christian; Schoser, Benedikt; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Czermin, Birgit; Freisinger, Peter; Sperl, Wolfgang

    2011-11-01

    In a family three children presented with severe neonatal lactic acidosis, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and generalised muscular hypotonia. One child died in infancy, two survived a clinically severe neonatal period. At an age of 9 and 17years, respectively, they present with exercise intolerance, proximal muscle weakness, non-progressive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and normal mental development. In a muscle biopsy normal activity of respiratory chain enzymes was found; however the amount of the mitochondrial phosphate carrier was decreased. This protein is expressed in two tissue-specific isoforms generated by mutually exclusive alternative splicing of the SLC25A3 gene transcript. We identified a homozygous mutation c.158-9A>G located in the 5'-intron next to exon 3A specific for heart and skeletal muscle. This creates a novel splice site resulting in a more than 95% decrease of the wild type allele.

  6. Evidence for a Direct Effect of the NAD+ Precursor Acipimox on Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Humans

    PubMed Central

    van de Weijer, Tineke; Phielix, Esther; Bilet, Lena; Williams, Evan G.; Ropelle, Eduardo R.; Bierwagen, Alessandra; Livingstone, Roshan; Nowotny, Peter; Sparks, Lauren M.; Paglialunga, Sabina; Szendroedi, Julia; Havekes, Bas; Moullan, Norman; Pirinen, Eija; Hwang, Jong-Hee; Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B.; Hesselink, Matthijs K.C.; Auwerx, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Recent preclinical studies showed the potential of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) precursors to increase oxidative phosphorylation and improve metabolic health, but human data are lacking. We hypothesize that the nicotinic acid derivative acipimox, an NAD+ precursor, would directly affect mitochondrial function independent of reductions in nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations. In a multicenter randomized crossover trial, 21 patients with type 2 diabetes (age 57.7 ± 1.1 years, BMI 33.4 ± 0.8 kg/m2) received either placebo or acipimox 250 mg three times daily dosage for 2 weeks. Acipimox treatment increased plasma NEFA levels (759 ± 44 vs. 1,135 ± 97 μmol/L for placebo vs. acipimox, P < 0.01) owing to a previously described rebound effect. As a result, skeletal muscle lipid content increased and insulin sensitivity decreased. Despite the elevated plasma NEFA levels, ex vivo mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle increased. Subsequently, we showed that acipimox treatment resulted in a robust elevation in expression of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene sets and a mitonuclear protein imbalance, which may indicate activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Further studies in C2C12 myotubes confirmed a direct effect of acipimox on NAD+ levels, mitonuclear protein imbalance, and mitochondrial oxidative capacity. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that NAD+ boosters can also directly affect skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in humans. PMID:25352640

  7. Overexpression of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 1 and Lactate Dehydrogenase A in Nerve Cells Confers Resistance to Amyloid β and Other Toxins by Decreasing Mitochondrial Respiration and Reactive Oxygen Species Production*

    PubMed Central

    Newington, Jordan T.; Rappon, Tim; Albers, Shawn; Wong, Daisy Y.; Rylett, R. Jane; Cumming, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that nerve cell lines selected for resistance to amyloid β (Aβ) peptide exhibit elevated aerobic glycolysis in part due to increased expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA). Here, we show that overexpression of either PDK1 or LDHA in a rat CNS cell line (B12) confers resistance to Aβ and other neurotoxins. Treatment of Aβ-sensitive cells with various toxins resulted in mitochondrial hyperpolarization, immediately followed by rapid depolarization and cell death, events accompanied by increased production of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). In contrast, cells expressing either PDK1 or LDHA maintained a lower mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased ROS production with or without exposure to toxins. Additionally, PDK1- and LDHA-overexpressing cells exhibited decreased oxygen consumption but maintained levels of ATP under both normal culture conditions and following Aβ treatment. Interestingly, immunoblot analysis of wild type mouse primary cortical neurons treated with Aβ or cortical tissue extracts from 12-month-old APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice showed decreased expression of LDHA and PDK1 when compared with controls. Additionally, post-mortem brain extracts from patients with Alzheimer disease exhibited a decrease in PDK1 expression compared with nondemented patients. Collectively, these findings indicate that key Warburg effect enzymes play a central role in mediating neuronal resistance to Αβ or other neurotoxins by decreasing mitochondrial activity and subsequent ROS production. Maintenance of PDK1 or LDHA expression in certain regions of the brain may explain why some individuals tolerate high levels of Aβ deposition without developing Alzheimer disease. PMID:22948140

  8. Proinflammatory cytokines differentially regulate adipocyte mitochondrial metabolism, oxidative stress, and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Wendy S.; Kuzmicic, Jovan; Burrill, Joel S.; Donoghue, Margaret A.; Foncea, Rocio; Jensen, Michael D.; Lavandero, Sergio; Arriaga, Edgar A.

    2014-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines differentially regulate adipocyte mitochondrial metabolism, oxidative stress, and dynamics. Macrophage infiltration of adipose tissue and the chronic low-grade production of inflammatory cytokines have been mechanistically linked to the development of insulin resistance, the forerunner of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this study, we evaluated the chronic effects of TNFα, IL-6, and IL-1β on adipocyte mitochondrial metabolism and morphology using the 3T3-L1 model cell system. TNFα treatment of cultured adipocytes led to significant changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics, including increased proton leak, decreased ΔΨm, increased basal respiration, and decreased ATP turnover. In contrast, although IL-6 and IL-1β decreased maximal respiratory capacity, they had no effect on ΔΨm and varied effects on ATP turnover, proton leak, or basal respiration. Only TNFα treatment of 3T3-L1 cells led to an increase in oxidative stress (as measured by superoxide anion production and protein carbonylation) and C16 ceramide synthesis. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with cytokines led to decreased mRNA expression of key transcription factors and control proteins implicated in mitochondrial biogenesis, including PGC-1α and eNOS as well as deceased expression of COX IV and Cyt C. Whereas each cytokine led to effects on expression of mitochondrial markers, TNFα exclusively led to mitochondrial fragmentation and decreased the total level of OPA1 while increasing OPA1 cleavage, without expression of levels of mitofusin 2, DRP-1, or mitofilin being affected. In summary, these results indicate that inflammatory cytokines have unique and specialized effects on adipocyte metabolism, but each leads to decreased mitochondrial function and a reprogramming of fat cell biology. PMID:24595304

  9. Dietary saturated fat and docosahexaenoic acid differentially effect cardiac mitochondrial phospholipid fatty acyl composition and Ca(2+) uptake, without altering permeability transition or left ventricular function.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Kelly A; Dabkowski, Erinne R; de Fatima Galvao, Tatiana; Xu, Wenhong; Daneault, Caroline; de Rosiers, Christine; Stanley, William C

    2013-06-01

    High saturated fat diets improve cardiac function and survival in rodent models of heart failure, which may be mediated by changes in mitochondrial function. Dietary supplementation with the n3-polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n3) is also beneficial in heart failure and can affect mitochondrial function. Saturated fatty acids and DHA likely have opposing effects on mitochondrial phospholipid fatty acyl side chain composition and mitochondrial membrane function, though a direct comparison has not been previously reported. We fed healthy adult rats a standard low-fat diet (11% of energy intake from fat), a low-fat diet supplemented with DHA (2.3% of energy intake) or a high-fat diet comprised of long chain saturated fatty acids (45% fat) for 6 weeks. There were no differences among the three diets in cardiac mass or function, mitochondrial respiration, or Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial permeability transition. On the other hand, there were dramatic differences in mitochondrial phospholipid fatty acyl side chains. Dietary supplementation with DHA increased DHA from 7% to ∼25% of total phospholipid fatty acids in mitochondrial membranes, and caused a proportional depletion of arachidonic acid (20:4n6). The saturated fat diet increased saturated fat and DHA in mitochondria and decreased linoleate (18:2n6), which corresponded to a decrease in Ca(2+) uptake by isolated mitochondria compared to the other diet groups. In conclusion, despite dramatic changes in mitochondrial phospholipid fatty acyl side chain composition by both the DHA and high saturated fat diets, there were no effects on mitochondrial respiration, permeability transition, or cardiac function.

  10. Mitochondrial ferritin limits oxidative damage regulating mitochondrial iron availability: hypothesis for a protective role in Friedreich ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Campanella, Alessandro; Rovelli, Elisabetta; Santambrogio, Paolo; Cozzi, Anna; Taroni, Franco; Levi, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt) is a nuclear-encoded iron-sequestering protein that specifically localizes in mitochondria. In mice it is highly expressed in cells characterized by high-energy consumption, while is undetectable in iron storage tissues like liver and spleen. FtMt expression in mammalian cells was shown to cause a shift of iron from cytosol to mitochondria, and in yeast it rescued the defects associated with frataxin deficiency. To study the role of FtMt in oxidative damage, we analyzed the effect of its expression in HeLa cells after incubation with H2O2 and Antimycin A, and after a long-term growth in glucose-free media that enhances mitochondrial respiratory activity. FtMt reduced the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increased the level of adenosine 5'triphosphate and the activity of mitochondrial Fe-S enzymes, and had a positive effect on cell viability. Furthermore, FtMt expression reduces the size of cytosolic and mitochondrial labile iron pools. In cells grown in glucose-free media, FtMt level was reduced owing to faster degradation rate, however it still protected the activity of mitochondrial Fe-S enzymes without affecting the cytosolic iron status. In addition, FtMt expression in fibroblasts from Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) patients prevented the formation of ROS and partially rescued the impaired activity of mitochondrial Fe-S enzymes, caused by frataxin deficiency. These results indicate that the primary function of FtMt involves the control of ROS formation through the regulation of mitochondrial iron availability. They are consistent with the expression pattern of FtMt observed in mouse tissues, suggesting a FtMt protective role in cells characterized by defective iron homeostasis and respiration, such as in FRDA. PMID:18815198

  11. An Incompatibility between a Mitochondrial tRNA and Its Nuclear-Encoded tRNA Synthetase Compromises Development and Fitness in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Meiklejohn, Colin D.; Holmbeck, Marissa A.; Siddiq, Mohammad A.; Abt, Dawn N.; Rand, David M.; Montooth, Kristi L.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription, translation, and respiration require interactions between genes encoded in two distinct genomes, generating the potential for mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial genomes to interact epistatically and cause incompatibilities that decrease fitness. Mitochondrial-nuclear epistasis for fitness has been documented within and between populations and species of diverse taxa, but rarely has the genetic or mechanistic basis of these mitochondrial–nuclear interactions been elucidated, limiting our understanding of which genes harbor variants causing mitochondrial–nuclear disruption and of the pathways and processes that are impacted by mitochondrial–nuclear coevolution. Here we identify an amino acid polymorphism in the Drosophila melanogaster nuclear-encoded mitochondrial tyrosyl–tRNA synthetase that interacts epistatically with a polymorphism in the D. simulans mitochondrial-encoded tRNATyr to significantly delay development, compromise bristle formation, and decrease fecundity. The incompatible genotype specifically decreases the activities of oxidative phosphorylation complexes I, III, and IV that contain mitochondrial-encoded subunits. Combined with the identity of the interacting alleles, this pattern indicates that mitochondrial protein translation is affected by this interaction. Our findings suggest that interactions between mitochondrial tRNAs and their nuclear-encoded tRNA synthetases may be targets of compensatory molecular evolution. Human mitochondrial diseases are often genetically complex and variable in penetrance, and the mitochondrial–nuclear interaction we document provides a plausible mechanism to explain this complexity. PMID:23382693

  12. The Circadian Nature of Mitochondrial Biology.

    PubMed

    Manella, Gal; Asher, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks orchestrate the daily changes in physiology and behavior of light-sensitive organisms. These clocks measure about 24 h and tick in a self-sustained and cell-autonomous manner. Mounting evidence points toward a tight intertwining between circadian clocks and metabolism. Although various aspects of circadian control of metabolic functions have been extensively studied, our knowledge regarding circadian mitochondrial function is rudimentary. In this review, we will survey the current literature related to the circadian nature of mitochondrial biology: from mitochondrial omics studies (e.g., proteome, acetylome, and lipidome), through dissection of mitochondrial morphology, to analyses of mitochondrial processes such as nutrient utilization and respiration. We will describe potential mechanisms that are implicated in circadian regulation of mitochondrial functions in mammals and discuss the possibility of a mitochondrial-autonomous oscillator.

  13. The Circadian Nature of Mitochondrial Biology

    PubMed Central

    Manella, Gal; Asher, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks orchestrate the daily changes in physiology and behavior of light-sensitive organisms. These clocks measure about 24 h and tick in a self-sustained and cell-autonomous manner. Mounting evidence points toward a tight intertwining between circadian clocks and metabolism. Although various aspects of circadian control of metabolic functions have been extensively studied, our knowledge regarding circadian mitochondrial function is rudimentary. In this review, we will survey the current literature related to the circadian nature of mitochondrial biology: from mitochondrial omics studies (e.g., proteome, acetylome, and lipidome), through dissection of mitochondrial morphology, to analyses of mitochondrial processes such as nutrient utilization and respiration. We will describe potential mechanisms that are implicated in circadian regulation of mitochondrial functions in mammals and discuss the possibility of a mitochondrial-autonomous oscillator. PMID:28066327

  14. Hypoxia Strongly Affects Mitochondrial Ribosomal Proteins and Translocases, as Shown by Quantitative Proteomics of HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Paula A; Sandvik, Joe Alexander; Arntzen, Magnus Ø; Jeppesen Edin, Nina F; Christoffersen, Stine; Krengel, Ute; Pettersen, Erik O; Thiede, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important and common characteristic of many human tumors. It is a challenge clinically due to the correlation with poor prognosis and resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. Understanding the biochemical response to hypoxia would facilitate the development of novel therapeutics for cancer treatment. Here, we investigate alterations in gene expression in response to hypoxia by quantitative proteome analysis using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) in conjunction with LCMS/MS. Human HeLa cells were kept either in a hypoxic environment or under normoxic conditions. 125 proteins were found to be regulated, with maximum alteration of 18-fold. In particular, three clusters of differentially regulated proteins were identified, showing significant upregulation of glycolysis and downregulation of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and translocases. This interaction is likely orchestrated by HIF-1. We also investigated the effect of hypoxia on the cell cycle, which shows accumulation in G1 and a prolonged S phase under these conditions. Implications. This work not only improves our understanding of the response to hypoxia, but also reveals proteins important for malignant progression, which may be targeted in future therapies.

  15. Long-term fasting decreases mitochondrial avian UCP-mediated oxygen consumption in hypometabolic king penguins

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Benjamin; Halsey, Lewis G.; Dolmazon, Virginie; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Roussel, Damien; Handrich, Yves; Butler, Patrick J.; Duchamp, Claude

    2008-01-01

    In endotherms, regulation of the degree of mitochondrial coupling affects cell metabolic efficiency. Thus it may be a key contributor to minimizing metabolic rate during long periods of fasting. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether variation in mitochondrial avian uncoupling proteins (avUCP), as putative regulators of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, may contribute to the ability of king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) to withstand fasting for several weeks. After 20 days of fasting, king penguins showed a reduced rate of whole animal oxygen consumption (V̇o2; −33%) at rest, together with a reduced abundance of avUCP and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC1-α) mRNA in pectoralis muscle (−54%, −36%, respectively). These parameters were restored after the birds had been refed for 3 days. Furthermore, in recently fed, but not in fasted penguins, isolated muscle mitochondria showed a guanosine diphosphate-inhibited, fatty acid plus superoxide-activated respiration, indicating the presence of a functional UCP. It was calculated that variation in mitochondrial UCP-dependent respiration in vitro may contribute to nearly 20% of the difference in resting V̇o2 between fed or refed penguins and fasted penguins measured in vivo. These results suggest that the lowering of avUCP activity during periods of long-term energetic restriction may contribute to the reduction in metabolic rate and hence the ability of king penguins to face prolonged periods of fasting. PMID:18495832

  16. Soil respiration under different land uses in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li-Chao; Yang, Ming-Zhen; Han, Wen-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Land-use change has a crucial influence on soil respiration, which further affects soil nutrient availability and carbon stock. We monitored soil respiration rates under different land-use types (tea gardens with three production levels, adjacent woodland, and a vegetable field) in Eastern China at weekly intervals over a year using the dynamic closed chamber method. The relationship between soil respiration and environmental factors was also evaluated. The soil respiration rate exhibited a remarkable single peak that was highest in July/August and lowest in January. The annual cumulative respiration flux increased by 25.6% and 20.9% in the tea garden with high production (HP) and the vegetable field (VF), respectively, relative to woodland (WL). However, no significant differences were observed between tea gardens with medium production (MP), low production (LP), WL, and VF. Soil respiration rates were significantly and positively correlated with organic carbon, total nitrogen, and available phosphorous content. Each site displayed a significant exponential relationship between soil respiration and soil temperature measured at 5 cm depth, which explained 84-98% of the variation in soil respiration. The model with a combination of soil temperature and moisture was better at predicting the temporal variation of soil respiration rate than the single temperature model for all sites. Q10 was 2.40, 2.00, and 1.86-1.98 for VF, WL, and tea gardens, respectively, indicating that converting WL to VF increased and converting to tea gardens decreased the sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature. The equation of the multiple linear regression showed that identical factors, including soil organic carbon (SOC), soil water content (SWC), pH, and water soluble aluminum (WSAl), drove the changes in soil respiration and Q10 after conversion of land use. Temporal variations of soil respiration were mainly controlled by soil temperature, whereas spatial variations were

  17. Inherited mitochondrial DNA variants can affect complement, inflammation and apoptosis pathways: insights into mitochondrial–nuclear interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cristina Kenney, M.; Chwa, Marilyn; Atilano, Shari R.; Falatoonzadeh, Payam; Ramirez, Claudio; Malik, Deepika; Tarek, Mohamed; Cáceres-del-Carpio, Javier; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Boyer, David S.; Kuppermann, Baruch D.; Vawter, Marquis; Michal Jazwinski, S.; Miceli, Michael; Wallace, Douglas C.; Udar, Nitin

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in developed countries. While linked to genetic polymorphisms in the complement pathway, there are many individuals with high risk alleles that do not develop AMD, suggesting that other ‘modifiers’ may be involved. Mitochondrial (mt) haplogroups, defined by accumulations of specific mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) which represent population origins, may be one such modifier. J haplogroup has been associated with high risk for AMD while the H haplogroup is protective. It has been difficult to assign biological consequences for haplogroups so we created human ARPE-19 cybrids (cytoplasmic hybrids), which have identical nuclei but mitochondria of either J or H haplogroups, to investigate their effects upon bioenergetics and molecular pathways. J cybrids have altered bioenergetic profiles compared with H cybrids. Q-PCR analyses show significantly lower expression levels for seven respiratory complex genes encoded by mtDNA. J and H cybrids have significantly altered expression of eight nuclear genes of the alternative complement, inflammation and apoptosis pathways. Sequencing of the entire mtDNA was carried out for all the cybrids to identify haplogroup and non-haplogroup defining SNPs. mtDNA can mediate cellular bioenergetics and expression levels of nuclear genes related to complement, inflammation and apoptosis. Sequencing data suggest that observed effects are not due to rare mtDNA variants but rather the combination of SNPs representing the J versus H haplogroups. These findings represent a paradigm shift in our concepts of mt–nuclear interactions. PMID:24584571

  18. MOF Acetyl Transferase Regulates Transcription and Respiration in Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Aindrila; Seyfferth, Janine; Lucci, Jacopo; Gilsbach, Ralf; Preissl, Sebastian; Böttinger, Lena; Mårtensson, Christoph U; Panhale, Amol; Stehle, Thomas; Kretz, Oliver; Sahyoun, Abdullah H; Avilov, Sergiy; Eimer, Stefan; Hein, Lutz; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Becker, Thomas; Akhtar, Asifa

    2016-10-20

    A functional crosstalk between epigenetic regulators and metabolic control could provide a mechanism to adapt cellular responses to environmental cues. We report that the well-known nuclear MYST family acetyl transferase MOF and a subset of its non-specific lethal complex partners reside in mitochondria. MOF regulates oxidative phosphorylation by controlling expression of respiratory genes from both nuclear and mtDNA in aerobically respiring cells. MOF binds mtDNA, and this binding is dependent on KANSL3. The mitochondrial pool of MOF, but not a catalytically deficient mutant, rescues respiratory and mtDNA transcriptional defects triggered by the absence of MOF. Mof conditional knockout has catastrophic consequences for tissues with high-energy consumption, triggering hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and cardiac failure in murine hearts; cardiomyocytes show severe mitochondrial degeneration and deregulation of mitochondrial nutrient metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation pathways. Thus, MOF is a dual-transcriptional regulator of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes connecting epigenetics and metabolism.

  19. Submaximal ADP-stimulated respiration is impaired in ZDF rats and recovered by resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brennan K; Perry, Christopher G R; Herbst, Eric A F; Ritchie, Ian R; Beaudoin, Marie-Soleil; Smith, Jeffrey C; Neufer, P Darrell; Wright, David C; Holloway, Graham P

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the aetiology of skeletal muscle insulin resistance, although there is considerable controversy regarding these concepts. Mitochondrial function has been traditionally assessed in the presence of saturating ADP, but ATP turnover and the resultant ADP is thought to limit respiration in vivo. Therefore, we investigated the potential link between submaximal ADP-stimulated respiration rates, ROS generation and skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity in a model of type 2 diabetes mellitus, the ZDF rat. Utilizing permeabilized muscle fibres we observed that submaximal ADP-stimulated respiration rates (250-2000 μm ADP) were lower in ZDF rats than in lean controls, which coincided with decreased adenine nucleotide translocase 2 (ANT2) protein content. This decrease in submaximal ADP-stimulated respiration occurred in the absence of a decrease in electron transport chain function. Treating ZDF rats with resveratrol improved skeletal muscle insulin resistance and this was associated with elevated submaximal ADP-stimulated respiration rates as well as an increase in ANT2 protein content. These results coincided with a greater ability of ADP to attenuate mitochondrial ROS emission and an improvement in cellular redox balance. Together, these data suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction is present in skeletal muscle insulin resistance when assessed at submaximal ADP concentrations and that ADP dynamics may influence skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity through alterations in the propensity for mitochondrial ROS emission.

  20. Estimating daytime ecosystem respiration to improve estimates of gross primary production of a temperate forest.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jinwei; Wu, Jiabing; Guan, Dexin; Yao, Fuqi; Yuan, Fenghui; Wang, Anzhi; Jin, Changjie

    2014-01-01

    Leaf respiration is an important component of carbon exchange in terrestrial ecosystems, and estimates of leaf respiration directly affect the accuracy of ecosystem carbon budgets. Leaf respiration is inhibited by light; therefore, gross primary production (GPP) will be overestimated if the reduction in leaf respiration by light is ignored. However, few studies have quantified GPP overestimation with respect to the degree of light inhibition in forest ecosystems. To determine the effect of light inhibition of leaf respiration on GPP estimation, we assessed the variation in leaf respiration of seedlings of the dominant tree species in an old mixed temperate forest with different photosynthetically active radiation levels using the Laisk method. Canopy respiration was estimated by combining the effect of light inhibition on leaf respiration of these species with within-canopy radiation. Leaf respiration decreased exponentially with an increase in light intensity. Canopy respiration and GPP were overestimated by approximately 20.4% and 4.6%, respectively, when leaf respiration reduction in light was ignored compared with the values obtained when light inhibition of leaf respiration was considered. This study indicates that accurate estimates of daytime ecosystem respiration are needed for the accurate evaluation of carbon budgets in temperate forests. In addition, this study provides a valuable approach to accurately estimate GPP by considering leaf respiration reduction in light in other ecosystems.

  1. Differential Mitochondrial Adaptation in Primary Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from a Diabetic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Amy C.; Knaub, Leslie A.; McClatchey, P. Mason; Connon, Chelsea A.; Bouchard, Ron; Miller, Matthew W.; Geary, Kate E.; Walker, Lori A.; Klemm, Dwight J.; Reusch, Jane E. B.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes affects more than 330 million people worldwide and causes elevated cardiovascular disease risk. Mitochondria are critical for vascular function, generate cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and are perturbed by diabetes, representing a novel target for therapeutics. We hypothesized that adaptive mitochondrial plasticity in response to nutrient stress would be impaired in diabetes cellular physiology via a nitric oxide synthase- (NOS-) mediated decrease in mitochondrial function. Primary smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from aorta of the nonobese, insulin resistant rat diabetes model Goto-Kakizaki (GK) and the Wistar control rat were exposed to high glucose (25 mM). At baseline, significantly greater nitric oxide evolution, ROS production, and respiratory control ratio (RCR) were observed in GK SMCs. Upon exposure to high glucose, expression of phosphorylated eNOS, uncoupled respiration, and expression of mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and V were significantly decreased in GK SMCs (p < 0.05). Mitochondrial superoxide increased with high glucose in Wistar SMCs (p < 0.05) with no change in the GK beyond elevated baseline concentrations. Baseline comparisons show persistent metabolic perturbations in a diabetes phenotype. Overall, nutrient stress in GK SMCs caused a persistent decline in eNOS and mitochondrial function and disrupted mitochondrial plasticity, illustrating eNOS and mitochondria as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27034743

  2. Effect of fluoxetine treatment on mitochondrial bioenergetics in central and peripheral rat tissues.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Aline Isabel; Braz, Glauber Ruda Feitoza; Silva-Filho, Reginaldo; Pedroza, Anderson Apolonio; Ferreira, Diorginis Soares; Manhães de Castro, Raul; Lagranha, Claudia

    2015-06-01

    Recent investigations have focused on the mitochondrion as a direct drug target in the treatment of metabolic diseases (obesity, metabolic syndrome). Relatively few studies, however, have explicitly investigated whether drug therapies aimed at changing behavior by altering central nervous system (CNS) function affect mitochondrial bioenergetics, and none has explored their effect during early neonatal development. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of chronic treatment of newborn male rats with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine on the mitochondrial bioenergetics of the hypothalamus and skeletal muscle during the critical nursing period of development. Male Wistar rat pups received either fluoxetine (Fx group) or vehicle solution (Ct group) from the day of birth until 21 days of age. At 60 days of age, mitochondrial bioenergetics were evaluated. The Fx group showed increased oxygen consumption in several different respiratory states and reduced production of reactive oxygen species, but there was no change in mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening or oxidative stress in either the hypothalamus or skeletal muscle. We observed an increase in glutathione S-transferase activity only in the hypothalamus of the Fx group. Taken together, our results suggest that chronic exposure to fluoxetine during the nursing phase of early rat development results in a positive modulation of mitochondrial respiration in the hypothalamus and skeletal muscle that persists into adulthood. Such long-lasting alterations in mitochondrial activity in the CNS, especially in areas regulating appetite, may contribute to permanent changes in energy balance in treated animals.

  3. Differential Mitochondrial Adaptation in Primary Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from a Diabetic Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Keller, Amy C; Knaub, Leslie A; McClatchey, P Mason; Connon, Chelsea A; Bouchard, Ron; Miller, Matthew W; Geary, Kate E; Walker, Lori A; Klemm, Dwight J; Reusch, Jane E B

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes affects more than 330 million people worldwide and causes elevated cardiovascular disease risk. Mitochondria are critical for vascular function, generate cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and are perturbed by diabetes, representing a novel target for therapeutics. We hypothesized that adaptive mitochondrial plasticity in response to nutrient stress would be impaired in diabetes cellular physiology via a nitric oxide synthase- (NOS-) mediated decrease in mitochondrial function. Primary smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from aorta of the nonobese, insulin resistant rat diabetes model Goto-Kakizaki (GK) and the Wistar control rat were exposed to high glucose (25 mM). At baseline, significantly greater nitric oxide evolution, ROS production, and respiratory control ratio (RCR) were observed in GK SMCs. Upon exposure to high glucose, expression of phosphorylated eNOS, uncoupled respiration, and expression of mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and V were significantly decreased in GK SMCs (p < 0.05). Mitochondrial superoxide increased with high glucose in Wistar SMCs (p < 0.05) with no change in the GK beyond elevated baseline concentrations. Baseline comparisons show persistent metabolic perturbations in a diabetes phenotype. Overall, nutrient stress in GK SMCs caused a persistent decline in eNOS and mitochondrial function and disrupted mitochondrial plasticity, illustrating eNOS and mitochondria as potential therapeutic targets.

  4. Salicylic acid binding of mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase E2 affects mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and electron transport chain components and plays a role in basal defense against tobacco mosaic virus in tomato.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yangwenke; Tian, Miaoying; Zhang, Huan; Li, Xin; Wang, Yu; Xia, Xiaojian; Zhou, Jie; Zhou, Yanhong; Yu, Jingquan; Shi, Kai; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-02-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays a critical role in plant defense against pathogen invasion. SA-induced viral defense in plants is distinct from the pathways mediating bacterial and fungal defense and involves a specific pathway mediated by mitochondria; however, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. The SA-binding activity of the recombinant tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (Slα-kGDH) E2 subunit of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was characterized. The biological role of this binding in plant defenses against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was further investigated via Slα-kGDH E2 silencing and transient overexpression in plants. Slα-kGDH E2 was found to bind SA in two independent assays. SA treatment, as well as Slα-kGDH E2 silencing, increased resistance to TMV. SA did not further enhance TMV defense in Slα-kGDH E2-silenced tomato plants but did reduce TMV susceptibility in Nicotiana benthamiana plants transiently overexpressing Slα-kGDH E2. Furthermore, Slα-kGDH E2-silencing-induced TMV resistance was fully blocked by bongkrekic acid application and alternative oxidase 1a silencing. These results indicated that binding by Slα-kGDH E2 of SA acts upstream of and affects the mitochondrial electron transport chain, which plays an important role in basal defense against TMV. The findings of this study help to elucidate the mechanisms of SA-induced viral defense.

  5. Autotrophic and heterotrophic components of soil respiration in permafrost zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udovenko, Maria; Goncharova, Olga

    2016-04-01

    microbial respiration is 83%. A modified method of roots exclusion was tested during field trails in the areas of localization of "peat spots". It showed the following results: 41% of root respiration and 59% of microbial respiration. So, the contribution of root respiration in forest depending on the method varied from 5 to 17%, and on peatland root respiration varied from 41 to 56%. Thus, all methods gave positive result and are suitable for the separate determination of root and microbial respiration in permafrost-affected soils. However, for a more accurate assessment is necessary to increase the number of replications and the experiment period.

  6. Adult-onset mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Sola, J.; Casademont, J.; Grau, J. M.; Graus, F.; Cardellach, F.; Pedrol, E.; Urbano-Marquez, A.

    1992-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are polymorphic entities which may affect many organs and systems. Skeletal muscle involvement is frequent in the context of systemic mitochondrial disease, but adult-onset pure mitochondrial myopathy appears to be rare. We report 3 patients with progressive skeletal mitochondrial myopathy starting in adult age. In all cases, the proximal myopathy was the only clinical feature. Mitochondrial pathology was confirmed by evidence of ragged-red fibres in muscle histochemistry, an abnormal mitochondrial morphology in electron microscopy and by exclusion of other underlying diseases. No deletions of mitochondrial DNA were found. We emphasize the need to look for a mitochondrial disorder in some non-specific myopathies starting in adult life. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1589382

  7. Chronic alcohol exposure affects pancreatic acinar mitochondrial thiamin pyrophosphate uptake: studies with mouse 266-6 cell line and primary cells

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Padmanabhan; Nabokina, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Thiamin is essential for normal metabolic activity of all mammalian cells, including those of the pancreas. Cells obtain thiamin from their surroundings and enzymatically convert it into thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) in the cytoplasm; TPP is then taken up by mitochondria via a specific carrier the mitochondrial TPP transporter (MTPPT; product of the SLC25A19 gene). Chronic alcohol exposure negatively impacts the health of pancreatic acinar cells (PAC), but its effect on physiological/molecular parameters of MTPPT is not known. We addressed this issue using mouse pancreatic acinar tumor cell line 266-6 and primary PAC of wild-type and transgenic mice carrying the SLC25A19 promoter that were fed alcohol chronically. Chronic alcohol exposure of 266-6 cells (but not to its nonoxidative metabolites ethyl palmitate and ethyl oleate) led to a significant inhibition in mitochondrial TPP uptake, which was associated with a decreased expression of MTPPT protein, mRNA, and activity of the SLC25A19 promoter. Similarly, chronic alcohol feeding of mice led to a significant inhibition in expression of MTPPT protein, mRNA, heterogeneous nuclear RNA, as well as in activity of SLC25A19 promoter in PAC. While chronic alcohol exposure did not affect DNA methylation of the Slc25a19 promoter, a significant decrease in histone H3 euchromatin markers and an increase in H3 heterochromatin marker were observed. These findings show, for the first time, that chronic alcohol exposure negatively impacts pancreatic MTPPT, and that this effect is exerted, at least in part, at the level of Slc25a19 transcription and appears to involve epigenetic mechanism(s). PMID:26316591

  8. Hormone deprivation alters mitochondrial function and lipid profile in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zárate, Sandra; Astiz, Mariana; Magnani, Natalia; Imsen, Mercedes; Merino, Florencia; Álvarez, Silvia; Reinés, Analía; Seilicovich, Adriana

    2017-04-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common hallmark in aging. In the female, reproductive senescence is characterized by loss of ovarian hormones, many of whose neuroprotective effects converge upon mitochondria. The functional integrity of mitochondria is dependent on membrane fatty acid and phospholipid composition, which are also affected during aging. The effect of long-term ovarian hormone deprivation upon mitochondrial function and its putative association with changes in mitochondrial membrane lipid profile in the hippocampus, an area primarily affected during aging and highly responsive to ovarian hormones, is unknown. To this aim, Wistar adult female rats were ovariectomized or sham-operated. Twelve weeks later, different parameters of mitochondrial function (O2 uptake, ATP production, membrane potential and respiratory complex activities) as well as membrane phospholipid content and composition were evaluated in hippocampal mitochondria. Chronic ovariectomy reduced mitochondrial O2 uptake and ATP production rates and induced membrane depolarization during active respiration without altering the activity of respiratory complexes. Mitochondrial membrane lipid profile showed no changes in cholesterol levels but higher levels of unsaturated fatty acids and a higher peroxidizability index in mitochondria from ovariectomized rats. Interestingly, ovariectomy also reduced cardiolipin content and altered cardiolipin fatty acid profile leading to a lower peroxidizability index. In conclusion, chronic ovarian hormone deprivation induces mitochondrial dysfunction and changes in the mitochondrial membrane lipid profile comparable to an aging phenotype. Our study provides insights into ovarian hormone loss-induced early lipidomic changes with bioenergetic deficits in the hippocampus that may contribute to the increased risk of Alzheimer's disease and other age-associated disorders observed in postmenopause.

  9. Mutant alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH III) presequences that affect both in vitro mitochondrial import and in vitro processing by the matrix protease.

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, D T; Pilgrim, D B; Young, E T

    1990-01-01

    Point mutations in the presequence of the mitochondrial alcohol dehydrogerase isoenzyme (ADH III) have been shown to affect either the import of the precursor protein into yeast mitochondria in vivo or its processing within the organelle. In the present work, the behavior of these mutants during in vitro import into isolated mitochondria was investigated. All point mutants tested were imported with a slower initial rate than that of the wild-type precursor. This defect was corrected when the precursors were treated with urea prior to import. Once imported, the extent of processing to the mature form of mutant precursors varied greatly and correlated well with the defects observed in vivo. This result was not affected by prior urea treatment. When matrix extracts enriched for the processing protease were used, this defect was shown to be due to failure of the protease to efficiently recognize or cleave the presequence, rather than to a lack of access to the precursor. The rate of import of two ADH III precursors bearing internal deletions in the leader sequence was similar to those of the point mutants, whereas a deletion leading to the removal of the 15 amino-terminal amino acids was poorly imported. The mature amino terminus of wild-type ADH III was determined to be Gln-25. Mutant m01 (Ser-26 to Phe), which reduced the efficiency of cleavage in vitro by 80%, was cleaved at the correct site. Images PMID:2188098

  10. 3-Nitropropionic Acid is a Suicide Inhibitor of MitochondrialRespiration that, Upon Oxidation by Complex II, Forms a Covalent AdductWith a Catalytic Base Arginine in the Active Site of the Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Li-shar; Sun, Gang; Cobessi, David; Wang, Andy C.; Shen,John T.; Tung, Eric Y.; Anderson, Vernon E.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-12-01

    We report three new structures of mitochondrial respiratory Complex II (succinate ubiquinone oxidoreductase, E.C. 1.3.5.1) at up to 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, with various inhibitors. The structures define the conformation of the bound inhibitors and suggest the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the dicarboxylate site. In particular they support the role of Arg297 as a general base catalyst accepting a proton in the dehydrogenation of succinate. The dicarboxylate ligand in oxaloacetate-containing crystals appears to be the same as that reported for Shewanella flavocytochrome c treated with fumarate. The plant and fungal toxin 3-nitropropionic acid, an irreversible inactivator of succinate dehydrogenase, forms a covalent adduct with the side chain of Arg297. The modification eliminates a trypsin cleavage site in the flavoprotein, and tandem mass spectroscopic analysis of the new fragment shows the mass of Arg 297 to be increased by 83 Da and to have potential of losing 44 Da, consistent with decarboxylation, during fragmentation.

  11. Brain cortex mitochondrial bioenergetics in synaptosomes and non-synaptic mitochondria during aging.

    PubMed

    Lores-Arnaiz, Silvia; Lombardi, Paulina; Karadayian, Analía G; Orgambide, Federico; Cicerchia, Daniela; Bustamante, Juanita

    2016-02-01

    Alterations in mitochondrial bioenergetics have been associated with brain aging. In order to evaluate the susceptibility of brain cortex synaptosomes and non-synaptic mitochondria to aging-dependent dysfunction, male Swiss mice of 3 or 17 months old were used. Mitochondrial function was evaluated by oxygen consumption, mitochondrial membrane potential and respiratory complexes activity, together with UCP-2 protein expression. Basal respiration and respiration driving proton leak were decreased by 26 and 33 % in synaptosomes from 17-months old mice, but spare respiratory capacity was not modified by aging. Succinate supported state 3 respiratory rate was decreased by 45 % in brain cortex non-synaptic mitochondria from 17-month-old mice, as compared with young animals, but respiratory control was not affected. Synaptosomal mitochondria would be susceptible to undergo calcium-induced depolarization in 17 months-old mice, while non-synaptic mitochondria would not be affected by calcium overload. UCP-2 was significantly up-regulated in both synaptosomal and submitochondrial membranes from 17-months old mice, compared to young animals. UCP-2 upregulation seems to be a possible mechanism by which mitochondria would be resistant to suffer oxidative damage during aging.

  12. Melatonin mitigates mitochondrial malfunction.

    PubMed

    León, Josefa; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Escames, Germane; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, Russel J

    2005-01-01

    Melatonin, or N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, is a compound derived from tryptophan that is found in all organisms from unicells to vertebrates. This indoleamine may act as a protective agent in disease conditions such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, aging, sepsis and other disorders including ischemia/reperfusion. In addition, melatonin has been proposed as a drug for the treatment of cancer. These disorders have in common a dysfunction of the apoptotic program. Thus, while defects which reduce apoptotic processes can exaggerate cancer, neurodegenerative disorders and ischemic conditions are made worse by enhanced apoptosis. The mechanism by which melatonin controls cell death is not entirely known. Recently, mitochondria, which are implicated in the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, have been identified as a target for melatonin actions. It is known that melatonin scavenges oxygen and nitrogen-based reactants generated in mitochondria. This limits the loss of the intramitochondrial glutathione and lowers mitochondrial protein damage, improving electron transport chain (ETC) activity and reducing mtDNA damage. Melatonin also increases the activity of the complex I and complex IV of the ETC, thereby improving mitochondrial respiration and increasing ATP synthesis under normal and stressful conditions. These effects reflect the ability of melatonin to reduce the harmful reduction in the mitochondrial membrane potential that may trigger mitochondrial transition pore (MTP) opening and the apoptotic cascade. In addition, a reported direct action of melatonin in the control of currents through the MTP opens a new perspective in the understanding of the regulation of apoptotic cell death by the indoleamine.

  13. Mitochondrial myopathy, lactic acidosis, and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA) plus associated with a novel de novo mutation (m.8969G>A) in the mitochondrial encoded ATP6 gene.

    PubMed

    Burrage, Lindsay C; Tang, Sha; Wang, Jing; Donti, Taraka R; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Luchak, J Michael; Chen, Li-Chieh; Schmitt, Eric S; Niu, Zhiyv; Erana, Rodrigo; Hunter, Jill V; Graham, Brett H; Wong, Lee-Jun; Scaglia, Fernando

    2014-11-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy, lactic acidosis and sideroblastic anemia (MLASA) is a rare mitochondrial disorder that has previously been associated with mutations in PUS1 and YARS2. In the present report, we describe a 6-year old male with an MLASA plus phenotype. This patient had features of MLASA in the setting of developmental delay, sensorineural hearing loss, epilepsy, agenesis of the corpus callosum, failure to thrive, and stroke-like episodes. Sequencing of the mitochondrial genome identified a novel de novo, heteroplasmic mutation in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encoded ATP6 gene (m.8969G>A, p.S148N). Whole exome sequencing did not identify mutations or variants in PUS1 or YARS2 or any known nuclear genes that could affect mitochondrial function and explain this phenotype. Studies of fibroblasts derived from the patient revealed a decrease in oligomycin-sensitive respiration, a finding which is consistent with a complex V defect. Thus, this mutation in MT-ATP6 may represent the first mtDNA point mutation associated with the MLASA phenotype.

  14. EFFECT OF PERILLA FRUTESCENS EXTRACTS AND ROSMARINIC ACID ON RAT HEART MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTIONS.

    PubMed

    Raudone, Lina; Burdulis, Deividas; Raudonis, Raimondas; Janulis, Valdimaras; Jankauskiene, Laima; Viskelis, Pranas; Trumbeckaite, Sonata

    2016-01-01

    Perilla frutescens L. due to its aromatic, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant traits has been traditionally used as medicinal plant in Eastern Asia. Alterations of mitochondria are interconnected with many chronic diseases. Bioactives of herbal extracts can modulate mitochondrial effects and be beneficial in prevention of mitochondrial related chronic diseases. Direct effects of the red-leaf form P. frutescens extract (PFE) and the green-leaf form P. frutescens var. crispa f. viridis extract (PCE) were evaluated investigating activities on the oxidative phosphorylation and antioxidant activity in the rat heart mitochondria in vitro. HPLC-MS analysis was applied for the identification of phenolic compounds. Cell with a Clark-type oxygen electrode was used for mitochondrial respiration measurement. The generation of reactive oxygen species was estimated in isolated rat heart mitochondria and determined fluorimetrically. State 3 respiration rate was not affected by lower concentrations, however, it was inhibited at higher concentrations by 22-70% for PFE and by 45-55% for PCE. PFE containing anthocyanins induced the concentration-dependent stimulation (by 23-76%) of the State 4 respiration rate after addition of cytochrome c due to reducing properties. Significant reduction of H₂O₂ pro- duction was observed with investigated concentrations of rosmarinic acid and both perilla extracts. Our results demonstrate that the effect of PFE and PCE extracts on rat heart mitochondria depend on the qualitative characteristics of complex of biologically active compounds. Selective effects on mitochondrial function could enable the regulation of apoptosis or another mechanisms occurring in cells.

  15. Silencing of the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease-associated gene GDAP1 induces abnormal mitochondrial distribution and affects Ca2+ homeostasis by reducing store-operated Ca2+ entry.

    PubMed

    Pla-Martín, David; Rueda, Carlos B; Estela, Anna; Sánchez-Piris, Maribel; González-Sánchez, Paloma; Traba, Javier; de la Fuente, Sergio; Scorrano, Luca; Renau-Piqueras, Jaime; Alvarez, Javier; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Palau, Francesc

    2013-07-01

    GDAP1 is an outer mitochondrial membrane protein that acts as a regulator of mitochondrial dynamics. Mutations of the GDAP1 gene cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathy. We show that GDAP1 interacts with the vesicle-organelle trafficking proteins RAB6B and caytaxin, which suggests that GDAP1 may participate in the mitochondrial movement within the cell. GDAP1 silencing in the SH-SY5Y cell line induces abnormal distribution of the mitochondrial network, reduces the contact between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and alters the mobilization of mitochondria towards plasma membrane upon depletion of ER-Ca(2+) stores. GDAP1 silencing does not affect mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, ER-Ca(2+), or Ca(2+) flow from ER to mitochondria, but reduces Ca(2+) inflow through store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) following mobilization of ER-Ca(2+) and SOCE-driven Ca(2+) entry in mitochondria. Our studies suggest that the pathophysiology of GDAP1-related CMT neuropathies may be associated with abnormal distribution and movement of mitochondria throughout cytoskeleton towards the ER and subplasmalemmal microdomains, resulting in a decrease in SOCE activity and impaired SOCE-driven Ca(2+) uptake in mitochondria.

  16. Hyperoxia activates ATM independent from mitochondrial ROS and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Resseguie, Emily A.; Staversky, Rhonda J.; Brookes, Paul S.; O’Reilly, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    High levels of oxygen (hyperoxia) are often used to treat individuals with respiratory distress, yet prolonged hyperoxia causes mitochondrial dysfunction and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can damage molecules such as DNA. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase is activated by nuclear DNA double strand breaks and delays hyperoxia-induced cell death through downstream targets p53 and p21. Evidence for its role in regulating mitochondrial function is emerging, yet it has not been determined if mitochondrial dysfunction or ROS activates ATM. Because ATM maintains mitochondrial homeostasis, we hypothesized that hyperoxia induces both mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS that activate ATM. In A549 lung epithelial cells, hyperoxia decreased mitochondrial respiratory reserve capacity at 12 h and basal respiration by 48 h. ROS were significantly increased at 24 h, yet mitochondrial DNA double strand breaks were not detected. ATM was not required for activating p53 when mitochondrial respiration was inhibited by chronic exposure to antimycin A. Also, ATM was not further activated by mitochondrial ROS, which were enhanced by depleting manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2). In contrast, ATM dampened the accumulation of mitochondrial ROS during exposure to hyperoxia. Our findings suggest that hyperoxia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS do not activate ATM. ATM more likely carries out its canonical response to nuclear DNA damage and may function to attenuate mitochondrial ROS that contribute to oxygen toxicity. PMID:25967673

  17. Hyperoxia activates ATM independent from mitochondrial ROS and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Resseguie, Emily A; Staversky, Rhonda J; Brookes, Paul S; O'Reilly, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    High levels of oxygen (hyperoxia) are often used to treat individuals with respiratory distress, yet prolonged hyperoxia causes mitochondrial dysfunction and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can damage molecules such as DNA. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase is activated by nuclear DNA double strand breaks and delays hyperoxia-induced cell death through downstream targets p53 and p21. Evidence for its role in regulating mitochondrial function is emerging, yet it has not been determined if mitochondrial dysfunction or ROS activates ATM. Because ATM maintains mitochondrial homeostasis, we hypothesized that hyperoxia induces both mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS that activate ATM. In A549 lung epithelial cells, hyperoxia decreased mitochondrial respiratory reserve capacity at 12h and basal respiration by 48 h. ROS were significantly increased at 24h, yet mitochondrial DNA double strand breaks were not detected. ATM was not required for activating p53 when mitochondrial respiration was inhibited by chronic exposure to antimycin A. Also, ATM was not further activated by mitochondrial ROS, which were enhanced by depleting manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2). In contrast, ATM dampened the accumulation of mitochondrial ROS during exposure to hyperoxia. Our findings suggest that hyperoxia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS do not activate ATM. ATM more likely carries out its canonical response to nuclear DNA damage and may function to attenuate mitochondrial ROS that contribute to oxygen toxicity.

  18. Glucose, Lactate and Glutamine but not Glutamate Support Depolarization-Induced Increased Respiration in Isolated Nerve Terminals.

    PubMed

    Hohnholt, Michaela C; Andersen, Vibe H; Bak, Lasse K; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-01-01

    Synaptosomes prepared from various aged and gene modified experimental animals constitute a valuable model system to study pre-synaptic mechanisms. Synaptosomes were isolated from whole brain and the XFe96 extracellular flux analyzer (Seahorse Bioscience) was used to study mitochondrial respiration and glycolytic rate in presence of different substrates. Mitochondrial function was tested by sequentially exposure of the synaptosomes to the ATP synthase inhibitor, oligomycin, the uncoupler FCCP (carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone) and the electron transport chain inhibitors rotenone and antimycin A. The synaptosomes exhibited intense respiratory activity using glucose as substrate. The FCCP-dependent respiration was significantly higher with 10 mM glucose compared to 1 mM glucose. Synaptosomes also readily used pyruvate as substrate, which elevated basal respiration, activity-dependent respiration induced by veratridine and the respiratory response to uncoupling compared to that obtained with glucose as substrate. Also lactate was used as substrate by synaptosomes but in contrast to pyruvate, mitochondrial lactate mediated respiration was comparable to respiration using glucose as substrate. Synaptosomal respiration using glutamate and glutamine as substrates was significantly higher compared to basal respiration, whereas oligomycin-dependent and FCCP-induced respiration was lower compared to the responses obtained in the presence of glucose as substrate. We provide evidence that synaptosomes are able to use besides glucose and pyruvate also the substrates lactate, glutamate and glutamine to support their basal respiration. Veratridine was found to increase respiration supported by glucose, pyruvate, lactate and glutamine and FCCP was found to increase respiration supported by glucose, pyruvate and lactate. This was not the case when glutamate was the only energy substrate.

  19. Mitochondrial Morphology and Fundamental Parameters of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Are Altered in Caenorhabditis elegans Strains Deficient in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Homeostasis Processes.

    PubMed

    Luz, Anthony L; Rooney, John P; Kubik, Laura L; Gonzalez, Claudia P; Song, Dong Hoon; Meyer, Joel N

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to myriad human diseases and toxicant exposures, highlighting the need for assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial health in vivo. Here, using the Seahorse XFe24 Analyzer and the pharmacological inhibitors dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and oligomycin (ATP-synthase inhibitors), carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (mitochondrial uncoupler) and sodium azide (cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor), we measured the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial respiratory chain function: basal oxygen consumption, ATP-linked respiration, maximal respiratory capacity, spare respiratory capacity and proton leak in the model organism Caenhorhabditis elegans. Since mutations in mitochondrial homeostasis genes cause mitochondrial dysfunction and have been linked to human disease, we measured mitochondrial respiratory function in mitochondrial fission (drp-1)-, fusion (fzo-1)-, mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1)-, and electron transport chain complex III (isp-1)-deficient C. elegans. All showed altered function, but the nature of the alterations varied between the tested strains. We report increased basal oxygen consumption in drp-1; reduced maximal respiration in drp-1, fzo-1, and isp-1; reduced spare respiratory capacity in drp-1 and fzo-1; reduced proton leak in fzo-1 and isp-1; and increased proton leak in pink-1 nematodes. As mitochondrial morphology can play a role in mitochondrial energetics, we also quantified the mitochondrial aspect ratio for each mutant strain using a novel method, and for the first time report increased aspect ratios in pdr-1- and pink-1-deficient nematodes.

  20. Mitochondrial Morphology and Fundamental Parameters of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Are Altered in Caenorhabditis elegans Strains Deficient in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Homeostasis Processes

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Anthony L.; Rooney, John P.; Kubik, Laura L.; Gonzalez, Claudia P.; Song, Dong Hoon; Meyer, Joel N.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to myriad human diseases and toxicant exposures, highlighting the need for assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial health in vivo. Here, using the Seahorse XFe24 Analyzer and the pharmacological inhibitors dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and oligomycin (ATP-synthase inhibitors), carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (mitochondrial uncoupler) and sodium azide (cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor), we measured the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial respiratory chain function: basal oxygen consumption, ATP-linked respiration, maximal respiratory capacity, spare respiratory capacity and proton leak in the model organism Caenhorhabditis elegans. Since mutations in mitochondrial homeostasis genes cause mitochondrial dysfunction and have been linked to human disease, we measured mitochondrial respiratory function in mitochondrial fission (drp-1)-, fusion (fzo-1)-, mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1)-, and electron transport chain complex III (isp-1)-deficient C. elegans. All showed altered function, but the nature of the alterations varied between the tested strains. We report increased basal oxygen consumption in drp-1; reduced maximal respiration in drp-1, fzo-1, and isp-1; reduced spare respiratory capacity in drp-1 and fzo-1; reduced proton leak in fzo-1 and isp-1; and increased proton leak in pink-1 nematodes. As mitochondrial morphology can play a role in mitochondrial energetics, we also quantified the mitochondrial aspect ratio for each mutant strain using a novel method, and for the first time report increased aspect ratios in pdr-1- and pink-1-deficient nematodes. PMID:26106885

  1. Sleep and Respiration in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, John B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Prisk, G. Kim; Paiva, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Sleep is often reported to be of poor quality in microgravity, and studies on the ground have shown a strong relationship between sleep-disordered breathing and sleep disruption. During the 16-day Neurolab mission, we studied the influence of possible changes in respiratory function on sleep by performing comprehensive sleep recordings on the payload crew on four nights during the mission. In addition, we measured the changes in the ventilatory response to low oxygen and high carbon dioxide in the same subjects during the day, hypothesizing that changes in ventilatory control might affect respiration during sleep. Microgravity caused a large reduction in the ventilatory response to reduced oxygen. This is likely the result of an increase in blood pressure at the peripheral chemoreceptors in the neck that occurs when the normally present hydrostatic pressure gradient between the heart and upper body is abolished. This reduction was similar to that seen when the subjects were placed acutely in the supine position in one-G. In sharp contrast to low oxygen, the ventilatory response to elevated carbon dioxide was unaltered by microgravity or the supine position. Because of the similarities of the findings in microgravity and the supine position, it is unlikely that changes in ventilatory control alter respiration during sleep in microgravity. During sleep on the ground, there were a small number of apneas (cessation of breathing) and hypopneas (reduced breathing) in these normal subjects. During sleep in microgravity, there was a reduction in the number of apneas and hypopneas per hour compared to preflight. Obstructive apneas virtually disappeared in microgravity, suggesting that the removal of gravity prevents the collapse of upper airways during sleep. Arousals from sleep were reduced in microgravity compared to preflight, and virtually all of this reduction was as a result of a reduction in the number of arousals from apneas and hypopneas. We conclude that any sleep

  2. Decreasing the mitochondrial synthesis of malate in potato tubers does not affect plastidial starch synthesis, suggesting that the physiological regulation of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase is context dependent.

    PubMed

    Szecowka, Marek; Osorio, Sonia; Obata, Toshihiro; Araújo, Wagner L; Rohrmann, Johannes; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2012-12-01

    Modulation of the malate content of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit by altering the expression of mitochondrially localized enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle resulted in enhanced transitory starch accumulation and subsequent effects on postharvest fruit physiology. In this study, we assessed whether such a manipulation would similarly affect starch biosynthesis in an organ that displays a linear, as opposed to a transient, kinetic of starch accumulation. For this purpose, we used RNA interference to down-regulate the expression of fumarase in potato (Solanum tuberosum) under the control of the tuber-specific B33 promoter. Despite displaying similar reductions in both fumarase activity and malate content as observed in tomato fruit expressing the same construct, the resultant transformants were neither characterized by an increased flux to, or accumulation of, starch, nor by alteration in yield parameters. Since the effect in tomato was mechanistically linked to derepression of the reaction catalyzed by ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, we evaluated whether the lack of effect on starch biosynthesis was due to differences in enzymatic properties of the enzyme from potato and tomato or rather due to differential subcellular compartmentation of reductant in the different organs. The results are discussed in the context both of current models of metabolic compartmentation and engineering.

  3. Evaluation of respiration of mitochondria in cancer cells exposed to mitochondria-targeted agents.

    PubMed

    Kluckova, Katarina; Dong, Lan-Feng; Bajzikova, Martina; Rohlena, Jakub; Neuzil, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Respiration is one of the major functions of mitochondria, whereby these vital organelles use oxygen to produce energy. Many agents that may be of potential clinical relevance act by targeting mitochondria, where they may suppress mitochondrial respiration. It is therefore important to evaluate this process and understand how this is modulated by small molecules. Here, we describe the general methodology to assess respiration in cultured cells, followed by the evaluation of the effect of one anticancer agent targeted to mitochondria on this process, and also how to assess this in tumor tissue.

  4. Mitochondrial genome acquisition restores respiratory function and tumorigenic potential of cancer cells without mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Tan, An S; Baty, James W; Dong, Lan-Feng; Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Endaya, Berwini; Goodwin, Jacob; Bajzikova, Martina; Kovarova, Jaromira; Peterka, Martin; Yan, Bing; Pesdar, Elham Alizadeh; Sobol, Margarita; Filimonenko, Anatolyj; Stuart, Shani; Vondrusova, Magdalena; Kluckova, Katarina; Sachaphibulkij, Karishma; Rohlena, Jakub; Hozak, Pavel; Truksa, Jaroslav; Eccles, David; Haupt, Larisa M; Griffiths, Lyn R; Neuzil, Jiri; Berridge, Michael V

    2015-01-06

    We report that tumor cells without mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) show delayed tumor growth, and that tumor formation is associated with acquisition of mtDNA from host cells. This leads to partial recovery of mitochondrial function in cells derived from primary tumors grown from cells without mtDNA and a shorter lag in tumor growth. Cell lines from circulating tumor cells showed further recovery of mitochondrial respiration and an intermediate lag to tumor growth, while cells from lung metastases exhibited full restoration of respiratory function and no lag in tumor growth. Stepwise assembly of mitochondrial respiratory (super)complexes was correlated with acquisition of respiratory function. Our findings indicate horizontal transfer of mtDNA from host cells in the tumor microenvironment to tumor cells with compromised respiratory function to re-establish respiration and tumor-initiating efficacy. These results suggest pathophysiological processes for overcoming mtDNA damage and support the notion of high plasticity of malignant cells.

  5. The Relation between Photosynthesis, Respiration, and Crassulacean Acid Metabolism in Leaf Slices of Aloe arborescens Mill.

    PubMed

    Denius, H R; Homann, P H

    1972-06-01

    Leaves and leaf slices from Aloe arborescens Mill. were used to study the interrelations between Crassulacean acid metabolism, photosynthesis, and respiration. Oxygen exchange of leaf slices was measured polarographically. It was found that the photosynthetic utilization of stored malic acid resulted in a net evolution of oxygen. This oxygen production, and the decrease in acid content of the leaf tissue, were completely inhibited by amytal, although the rate of respiratory oxygen uptake was hardly affected by the presence of this inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport. Other poisons of respiration (cyanide) and of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (trifluoroacetate, 2-diethyl malonate) also were effective in preventing acid-dependent oxygen evolution. It is concluded that the mobilization of stored acids during light-dependent deacidification of the leaves depends on the operation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and of the electron transport of the mitochondria.A comparison of enzyme activities in extracts from Aloe leaves and from other plants and studies of leaf anatomy and chloroplast morphology revealed typical characteristics of C(3)-, as well as C(4)-, plants in Aloe.

  6. Hyperglycemia decreases mitochondrial function: The regulatory role of mitochondrial biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeira, Carlos M. Rolo, Anabela P.; Berthiaume, Jessica; Bjork, James A.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2007-12-01

    Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in 'glucose toxicity' in diabetes. However, little is known about the action of glucose on the expression of transcription factors in hepatocytes, especially those involved in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and transcription. Since mitochondrial functional capacity is dynamically regulated, we hypothesized that stressful conditions of hyperglycemia induce adaptations in the transcriptional control of cellular energy metabolism, including inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism. Cell viability, mitochondrial respiration, ROS generation and oxidized proteins were determined in HepG2 cells cultured in the presence of either 5.5 mM (control) or 30 mM glucose (high glucose) for 48 h, 96 h and 7 days. Additionally, mtDNA abundance, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcripts were evaluated by real time PCR. High glucose induced a progressive increase in ROS generation and accumulation of oxidized proteins, with no changes in cell viability. Increased expression of PAI-1 was observed as early as 96 h of exposure to high glucose. After 7 days in hyperglycemia, HepG2 cells exhibited inhibited uncoupled respiration and decreased MitoTracker Red fluorescence associated with a 25% decrease in mtDNA and 16% decrease in TFAM transcripts. These results indicate that glucose may regulate mtDNA copy number by modulating the transcriptional activity of TFAM in response to hyperglycemia-induced ROS production. The decrease of mtDNA content and inhibition of mitochondrial function may be pathogenic hallmarks in the altered metabolic status associated with diabetes.

  7. THE PRESENCE OF THE OVARY PREVENTS HEPATIC MITOCHONDRIAL OXIDATIVE STRESS IN YOUNG AND AGED FEMALE MICE THROUGH GLUTATHIONE PEROXIDASE 1

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Ana P.; Schappal, Anna E.; Morris, E. Matthew; Thyfault, John P.; Lowe, Dawn A.; Spangenburg, Espen E.

    2016-01-01

    Background For unknown reasons a woman’s risk for developing the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) increases dramatically with age and/or loss of ovarian function. The MetS is characterized by hepatic insulin resistance (IR), which is strongly associated with intrahepatic lipid (IHL) accumulation, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress. Although circumstantial evidence suggests that the endocrine function of the ovary can directly impact hepatic mitochondrial function, this hypothesis remains untested. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess the influence of age and secretory function of the ovary on mechanisms that regulate hepatic mitochondrial function. Methods Adult (10 week-old) and aged (88 week-old) female C57BL/6 mice were separated into two groups to undergo bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) or control surgery (SHAM). Eight weeks after surgery hepatic tissue was removed for measurements of total IHL and fatty acid species within hepatic triglycerides, mitochondrial function, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Results Hepatic IHL content was not affected by OVX, but was increased by age. OVX had no effect on mitochondrial respiration, however, hepatic mitochondria from aged mice had lower O2 consumption, lower complex IV and higher complex I content. Mitochondrial H2O2 production was highest in OVX groups and exacerbated by age, while mitochondrial lipid peroxidation was highest in the aged mice and exacerbated by OVX. Regardless of age, OVX resulted in lower mitochondrial content of antioxidant glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1). Isolated liver tissue from a sub-set of animals were acutely treated with conditioned ovarian media which increased Gpx1 mRNA expression compared to vehicle treated liver tissue. Conclusion Ovarian secretory function is necessary for the maintenance of hepatic ROS buffering capacity in the mitochondria, while age significantly influences mitochondrial respiration. These data suggest that when age is coupled with loss of

  8. Hybrid respiration-signal conditioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinard, G. A.; Steffen, D. A.; Sturm, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Hybrid impedance-pneumograph and respiration-rate signal conditioner element of hand-held vital signs monitor measures changes in impedance of chest during breathing cycle and generates analog respiration signal as output along with synchronous square wave that can be monitored by breath-rate processor.

  9. A method to identify and validate mitochondrial modulators using mammalian cells and the worm C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Andreux, Pénélope A.; Mouchiroud, Laurent; Wang, Xu; Jovaisaite, Virginija; Mottis, Adrienne; Bichet, Sabrina; Moullan, Norman; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Auwerx, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are semi-autonomous organelles regulated by a complex network of proteins that are vital for many cellular functions. Because mitochondrial modulators can impact many aspects of cellular homeostasis, their identification and validation has proven challenging. It requires the measurement of multiple parameters in parallel to understand the exact nature of the changes induced by such compounds. We developed a platform of assays scoring for mitochondrial function in two complementary models systems, mammalian cells and C. elegans. We first optimized cell culture conditions and established the mitochondrial signature of 1,200 FDA-approved drugs in liver cells. Using cell-based and C. elegans assays, we further defined the metabolic effects of two pharmacological classes that emerged from our hit list, i.e. imidazoles and statins. We found that these two drug classes affect respiration through different and cholesterol-independent mechanisms in both models. Our screening strategy enabled us to unequivocally identify compounds that have toxic or beneficial effects on mitochondrial activity. Furthermore, the cross-species approach provided novel mechanistic insight and allowed early validation of hits that act on mitochondrial function. PMID:24923838

  10. Mitochondrial role in cell aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miquel, J.; Fleming, J.; Economos, A. C.; Johnson, J. E., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental studies on the mitochondria of insect and mammalian cells are examined with a view to an analysis of intrinsic mitochondrial senescence, and its relation to the age-related changes in other cell organelles. The fine structural and biochemical data support the concept that the mitochondria of fixed postmitotic cells may be the site of intrinsic aging because of the attack by free radicals and lipid peroxides originating in the organelles as a by-product of oxygen reduction during respiration. Although the cells have numerous mechanisms for counteracting lipid peroxidation injury, there is a slippage in the antioxidant protection. Intrinsic mitochondrial aging could thus be considered as a specific manifestation of oxygen toxicity. It is proposed that free radical injury renders an increasing number of the mitochondria unable to divide, probably because of damage to the lipids of the inner membrane and to mitochondrial DNA.

  11. The impact of mitochondrial and thermal stress on the bioenergetics and reserve respiratory capacity of fish cell lines.

    PubMed

    Beck, Benjamin H; Fuller, S Adam

    2012-12-01

    Various stressors affect the health of wild and cultured fish and can cause metabolic disturbances that first manifest at the cellular level. Here, we sought to further our understanding of cellular metabolism in fish by examining the metabolic responses of cell lines derived from channel catfish Ictalurus puntatus (CCO), white bass Morone chrysops (WBE), and fathead minnow Pimephales promelas (EPC) to both mitochondrial and thermal stressors. Using extracellular flux (EF) technology, we simultaneously measured the oxygen consumption rate (OCR; a measure of mitochondrial function) and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR; a surrogate of glycolysis) in each cell type. We performed a mitochondrial function protocol whereby compounds modulating different components of mitochondrial respiration were sequentially exposed to cells. This provided us with basal and maximal OCR, OCR linked to ATP production, OCR from ion movement across the mitochondrial inner membrane, the reserve capacity, and OCR independent of the electron transport chain. After heat shock, EPC and CCO significantly decreased OCR and all three cell lines modestly increased ECAR. After heat shock, the reserve capacity, the mitochondrial energetic reserve used to cope with stress and increased bioenergetic demand, was unaffected in EPC and CCO and completely abrogated in WBE. These findings provide proof-of-concept experimental data that further highlight the utility of fish cell lines as tools for modeling bioenergetics.

  12. The emerging role of Nrf2 in mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Abramov, Andrey Y.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2; gene name NFE2L2) allows adaptation and survival under conditions of stress by regulating the gene expression of diverse networks of cytoprotective proteins, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and detoxification enzymes as well as proteins that assist in the repair or removal of damaged macromolecules. Nrf2 has a crucial role in the maintenance of cellular redox homeostasis by regulating the biosynthesis, utilization, and regeneration of glutathione, thioredoxin, and NADPH and by controlling the production of reactive oxygen species by mitochondria and NADPH oxidase. Under homeostatic conditions, Nrf2 affects the mitochondrial membrane potential, fatty acid oxidation, availability of substrates (NADH and FADH2/succinate) for respiration, and ATP synthesis. Under conditions of stress or growth factor stimulation, activation of Nrf2 counteracts the increased reactive oxygen species production in mitochondria via transcriptional upregulation of uncoupling protein 3 and influences mitochondrial biogenesis by maintaining the levels of nuclear respiratory factor 1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α, as well as by promoting purine nucleotide biosynthesis. Pharmacological Nrf2 activators, such as the naturally occurring isothiocyanate sulforaphane, inhibit oxidant-mediated opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and mitochondrial swelling. Curiously, a synthetic 1,4-diphenyl-1,2,3-triazole compound, originally designed as an Nrf2 activator, was found to promote mitophagy, thereby contributing to the overall mitochondrial homeostasis. Thus, Nrf2 is a prominent player in supporting the structural and functional integrity of the mitochondria, and this role is particularly crucial under conditions of stress. PMID:25975984

  13. Indirubin-3'-oxime impairs mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and prevents mitochondrial permeability transition induction

    SciTech Connect

    Varela, Ana T.; Gomes, Ana P.; Simoes, Anabela M.; Teodoro, Joao S.; Duarte, Filipe V.; Rolo, Anabela P.; Palmeira, Carlos M.

    2008-12-01

    Indirubin, a red colored 3,2'-bisindole isomer, is a component of Indigo naturalis and is an active ingredient used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of chronic diseases. The family of indirubin derivatives, such as indirubin-3'-oxime, has been suggested for various therapeutic indications. However, potential toxic interactions such as indirubin effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics are still unknown. This study evaluated the action of indirubin-3'-oxime on the function of isolated rat liver mitochondria contributing to a better understanding of the biochemical mechanisms underlying the multiple effects of indirubin. Indirubin-3'-oxime incubated with isolated rat liver mitochondria, at concentrations above 10{mu}M, significantly depresses the phosphorylation efficiency of mitochondria as inferred from the decrease in the respiratory control and ADP/O ratios, the perturbations in mitochondrial membrane potential and in the phosphorylative cycle induced by ADP. Furthermore, indirubin-3'-oxime at up to 25{mu}M stimulates the rate of state 4 respiration and inhibits state 3 respiration. The increased lag phase of repolarization was associated with a direct inhibition of the mitochondrial ATPase. Indirubin-3'-oxime significantly inhibited the activity of complex II and IV thus explaining the decreased FCCP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration. Mitochondria pre-incubated with indirubin-3'-oxime exhibits decreased susceptibility to calcium-induced mitochondrial permeability transition. This work shows for the first time multiple effects of indirubin-3'-oxime on mitochondrial bioenergetics thus indicating a potential mechanism for indirubin-3'-oxime effects on cell function.

  14. Sulfite disrupts brain mitochondrial energy homeostasis and induces mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening via thiol group modification.

    PubMed

    Grings, Mateus; Moura, Alana P; Amaral, Alexandre U; Parmeggiani, Belisa; Gasparotto, Juciano; Moreira, José C F; Gelain, Daniel P; Wyse, Angela T S; Wajner, Moacir; Leipnitz, Guilhian

    2014-09-01

    Sulfite oxidase (SO) deficiency is biochemically characterized by the accumulation of sulfite, thiosulfate and S-sulfocysteine in tissues and biological fluids of the affected patients. The main clinical symptoms include severe neurological dysfunction and brain abnormalities, whose pathophysiology is still unknown. The present study investigated the in vitro effects of sulfite and thiosulfate on mitochondrial homeostasis in rat brain mitochondria. It was verified that sulfite per se, but not thiosulfate, decreased state 3, CCCP-stimulated state and respiratory control ratio in mitochondria respiring with glutamate plus malate. In line with this, we found that sulfite inhibited the activities of glutamate and malate (MDH) dehydrogenases. In addition, sulfite decreased the activity of a commercial solution of MDH, that was prevented by antioxidants and dithiothreitol. Sulfite also induced mitochondrial swelling and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, Ca(2+) retention capacity, NAD(P)H pool and cytochrome c immunocontent when Ca(2+) was present in the medium. These alterations were prevented by ruthenium red, cyclosporine A (CsA) and ADP, supporting the involvement of mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) in these effects. We further observed that N-ethylmaleimide prevented the sulfite-elicited swelling and that sulfite decreased free thiol group content in brain mitochondria. These findings indicate that sulfite acts directly on MPT pore containing thiol groups. Finally, we verified that sulfite reduced cell viability in cerebral cortex slices and that this effect was prevented by CsA. Therefore, it may be presumed that disturbance of mitochondrial energy homeostasis and MPT induced by sulfite could be involved in the neuronal damage characteristic of SO deficiency.

  15. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform various essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), whereas more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs for various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20-40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular non-compaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, ribosomal proteins, translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia.

  16. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    El-Hattab, Ayman W.; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform various essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), whereas more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs for various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20–40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular non-compaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, ribosomal proteins, translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia. PMID:27504452

  17. A small natural molecule promotes mitochondrial fusion through inhibition of the deubiquitinase USP30

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Wen; Chen, Ziheng; Liu, Haiyang; Yan, Chen; Chen, Ming; Feng, Du; Yan, Chaojun; Wu, Hao; Du, Lei; Wang, Yueying; Liu, Jinhua; Huang, Xiaohu; Xia, Laixin; Liu, Lei; Wang, Xiaohui; Jin, Haijing; Wang, Jun; Song, Zhiyin; Hao, Xiaojiang; Chen, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial fusion is a highly coordinated process that mixes and unifies the mitochondrial compartment for normal mitochondrial functions and mitochondrial DNA inheritance. Dysregulated mitochondrial fusion causes mitochondrial fragmentation, abnormal mitochondrial physiology and inheritance, and has been causally linked with a number of neuronal diseases. Here, we identified a diterpenoid derivative 15-oxospiramilactone (S3) that potently induced mitochondrial fusion to restore the mitochondrial network and oxidative respiration in cells that are deficient in either Mfn1 or Mfn2. A mitochondria-localized deubiquitinase USP30 is a target of S3. The inhibition of USP30 by S3 leads to an increase of non-degradative ubiquitination of Mfn1/2, which enhances Mfn1 and Mfn2 activity and promotes mitochondrial fusion. Thus, through the use of an inhibitor of USP30, our study uncovers an unconventional function of non-degradative ubiquitination of Mfns in promoting mitochondrial fusion. PMID:24513856

  18. A small natural molecule promotes mitochondrial fusion through inhibition of the deubiquitinase USP30.

    PubMed

    Yue, Wen; Chen, Ziheng; Liu, Haiyang; Yan, Chen; Chen, Ming; Feng, Du; Yan, Chaojun; Wu, Hao; Du, Lei; Wang, Yueying; Liu, Jinhua; Huang, Xiaohu; Xia, Laixin; Liu, Lei; Wang, Xiaohui; Jin, Haijing; Wang, Jun; Song, Zhiyin; Hao, Xiaojiang; Chen, Quan

    2014-04-01

    Mitochondrial fusion is a highly coordinated process that mixes and unifies the mitochondrial compartment for normal mitochondrial functions and mitochondrial DNA inheritance. Dysregulated mitochondrial fusion causes mitochondrial fragmentation, abnormal mitochondrial physiology and inheritance, and has been causally linked with a number of neuronal diseases. Here, we identified a diterpenoid derivative 15-oxospiramilactone (S3) that potently induced mitochondrial fusion to restore the mitochondrial network and oxidative respiration in cells that are deficient in either Mfn1 or Mfn2. A mitochondria-localized deubiquitinase USP30 is a target of S3. The inhibition of USP30 by S3 leads to an increase of non-degradative ubiquitination of Mfn1/2, which enhances Mfn1 and Mfn2 activity and promotes mitochondrial fusion. Thus, through the use of an inhibitor of USP30, our study uncovers an unconventional function of non-degradative ubiquitination of Mfns in promoting mitochondrial fusion.

  19. Respiration in the open ocean.

    PubMed

    del Giorgio, Paul A; Duarte, Carlos M

    2002-11-28

    A key question when trying to understand the global carbon cycle is whether the oceans are net sources or sinks of carbon. This will depend on the production of organic matter relative to the decomposition due to biological respiration. Estimates of respiration are available for the top layers, the mesopelagic layer, and the abyssal waters and sediments of various ocean regions. Although the total open ocean respiration is uncertain, it is probably substantially greater than most current estimates of particulate organic matter production. Nevertheless, whether the biota act as a net source or sink of carbon remains an open question.

  20. The clinical maze of mitochondrial neurology

    PubMed Central

    DiMauro, Salvatore; Schon, Eric A.; Carelli, Valerio; Hirano, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases involve the respiratory chain, which is under the dual control of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The complexity of mitochondrial genetics provides one explanation for the clinical heterogeneity of mitochondrial diseases, but our understanding of disease pathogenesis remains limited. Classification of Mendelian mitochondrial encephalomyopathies has been laborious, but whole-exome sequencing studies have revealed unexpected molecular aetiologies for both typical and atypical mitochondrial disease phenotypes. Mendelian mitochondrial defects can affect five components of mitochondrial biology: subunits of respiratory chain complexes (direct hits); mitochondrial assembly proteins; mtDNA translation; phospholipid composition of the inner mitochondrial membrane; or mitochondrial dynamics. A sixth category—defects of mtDNA maintenance—combines features of Mendelian and mitochondrial genetics. Genetic defects in mitochondrial dynamics are especially important in neurology as they cause optic atrophy, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease. Therapy is inadequate and mostly palliative, but promising new avenues are being identified. Here, we review current knowledge on the genetics and pathogenesis of the six categories of mitochondrial disorders outlined above, focusing on their salient clinical manifestations and highlighting novel clinical entities. An outline of diagnostic clues for the various forms of mitochondrial disease, as well as potential therapeutic strategies, is also discussed. PMID:23835535

  1. Multiple mechanisms underlying troglitazone-induced mitochondrial permeability transition

    SciTech Connect

    Okuda, Takuya; Norioka, Misaki; Shitara, Yoshihisa; Horie, Toshiharu

    2010-11-01

    Troglitazone, a thiazolidinedione class antidiabetic drug, was withdrawn from the market because of its severe idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity. It causes a mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), which may in part contribute to its hepatotoxicity. In the present study, the mechanism of troglitazone mitochondrial toxicity was investigated in isolated rat liver mitochondria. Mitochondrial swelling induced by 10 {mu}M troglitazone was attenuated by bromoenol lactone (BEL), an inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+}-independent phospholipase A{sub 2} (iPLA{sub 2}). In contrast, that induced by 50 {mu}M troglitazone was exacerbated by BEL. This exacerbation was diminished by addition of 2 mM glutathione, an antioxidant. Oxygen consumption by state 3 respiration in isolated mitochondria was also decreased by troglitazone, but it was not affected by BEL. Mitochondrial swelling induced by 10 {mu}M troglitazone was completely attenuated in the absence of Ca{sup 2+} while that induced by 50 {mu}M troglitazone was not affected. Addition of 1 {mu}M cyclosporin A (CsA), an inhibitor of MPT pores, completely attenuated swelling induced by 10 {mu}M troglitazone while it only partly diminished that induced by 50 {mu}M troglitazone. Thus, the MPT induced by 10 and 50 {mu}M troglitazone are regulated by different mechanism; the MPT induced by 10 {mu}M troglitazone is regulated by the activation of iPLA{sub 2} and caused by the opening of CsA-regulating MPT pores followed by accumulation of Ca{sup 2+} in mitochondria, while that induced by 50 {mu}M troglitazone is partly regulated by reactive oxygen species and mainly caused by the opening of CsA-insensitive MPT pores.

  2. Effects of size and light on respiration and activity of walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) larvae.

    PubMed

    Porter, S M.

    2001-01-31

    The respiration rate and swimming activity of walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) larvae were measured in the laboratory to determine how these were affected by body size (measured as dry weight), and amount of light. Size influenced respiration rates, but not activity. Activity increased with increased light, and as walleye pollock larvae developed, light had an increasingly important effect on respiration rate. For older larvae, light is an important factor affecting respiration rate and this may be due to an increased sensitivity to light. Thus, in addition to size, light plays an important role in the energetics of walleye pollock larvae.

  3. From breathing to respiration.

    PubMed

    Fitting, Jean-William

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of breathing remained an enigma for a long time. The Hippocratic school described breathing patterns but did not associate breathing with the lungs. Empedocles and Plato postulated that breathing was linked to the passage of air through pores of the skin. This was refuted by Aristotle who believed that the role of breathing was to cool the heart. In Alexandria, breakthroughs were accomplished in the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system. Later, Galen proposed an accurate description of the respiratory muscles and the mechanics of breathing. However, his heart-lung model was hampered by the traditional view of two non-communicating vascular systems - veins and arteries. After a period of stagnation in the Middle Ages, knowledge progressed with the discovery of pulmonary circulation. The comprehension of the purpose of breathing progressed by steps thanks to Boyle and Mayow among others, and culminated with the contribution of Priestley and the discovery of oxygen by Lavoisier. Only then was breathing recognized as fulfilling the purpose of respiration, or gas exchange. A century later, a controversy emerged concerning the active or passive transfer of oxygen from alveoli to the blood. August and Marie Krogh settled the dispute, showing that passive diffusion was sufficient to meet the oxygen needs.

  4. Inhibition of cellular respiration by endogenously produced carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Gabriela; Lam, Francis; Hagen, Thilo; Moncada, Salvador

    2006-06-01

    Endogenously produced nitric oxide (NO) interacts with mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase, leading to inhibition of cellular respiration. This interaction has been shown to have important physiological and pathophysiological consequences. Exogenous carbon monoxide (CO) is also known to inhibit cytochrome c oxidase in vitro; however, it is not clear whether endogenously produced CO can inhibit cellular respiration and, if so, what the significance of this might be. In this study, we show that exogenous CO inhibits respiration in a moderate but persistent manner in HEK293 cells under ambient (21%) oxygen concentrations (K(i) = 1.44 microM). This effect of CO was increased (K(i) = 0.35 microM) by incubation in hypoxic conditions (1% oxygen). Endogenous CO, generated by HEK293 cells transfected with the inducible isoform of haem oxygenase (haem oxygenase-1; HO-1), also inhibited cellular respiration moderately (by 12%) and this was accompanied by inhibition (23%) of cytochrome c oxidase activity. When the cells were incubated in hypoxic conditions during HO-1 induction, the inhibitory effect of CO on cell respiration was markedly increased to 70%. Furthermore, endogenously produced CO was found to be responsible for the respiratory inhibition that occurs in RAW264.7 cells activated in hypoxic conditions with lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma, in the presence of N-(iminoethyl)-L-ornithine to prevent the synthesis of NO. Our results indicate that CO contributes significantly to the respiratory inhibition in activated cells, particularly under hypoxic conditions. Inhibition of cell respiration by endogenous CO through its interaction with cytochrome c oxidase might have an important role in inflammatory and hypoxic conditions.

  5. Tai Chi training reduced coupling between respiration and postural control

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Matthew L; Manor, Brad; Hsieh, Wan-hsin; Hu, Kun; Lipsitz, Lewis A; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    In order to maintain stable upright stance, the postural control system must account for the continuous perturbations to the body’s center-of-mass including those caused by spontaneous respiration. Both aging and disease increase “posturo-respiratory synchronization;” which reflects the degree to which respiration affects postural sway fluctuations over time. Tai Chi training emphasizes the coordination of respiration and bodily movements and may therefore optimize the functional interaction between these two systems. The purpose of the project was to examine the effect of Tai Chi training on the interaction between respiration and postural control in older adults. We hypothesized that Tai Chi training would improve the ability of the postural control system to compensate for respiratory perturbations and thus, reduce posturo-respiratory synchronization. Participants were recruited from supportive housing facilities and randomized to a 12-week Tai Chi intervention (n=28; 86±5yrs) or educational-control program (n=34, 85±6yrs). Standing postural sway and respiration were simultaneously recorded with a force plate and respiratory belt under eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions. Posturo-respiratory synchronization was determined by quantifying the variation of the phase relationship between the dominant oscillatory mode of respiration and corresponding oscillations within postural sway. Groups were similar in age, gender distribution, height, body mass, and intervention compliance. Neither intervention altered average sway speed, sway magnitude or respiratory rate. As compared to the education-control group, however, Tai Chi training reduced posturo-respiratory synchronization when standing with eyes open or closed (p<0.001). Tai Chi training did not affect traditional parameters of standing postural control or respiration, yet reduced the coupling between respiration and postural control. The beneficial effects of Tai Chi training may therefore stem in part

  6. Tai Chi training reduced coupling between respiration and postural control.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Matthew L; Manor, Brad; Hsieh, Wan-hsin; Hu, Kun; Lipsitz, Lewis A; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    In order to maintain stable upright stance, the postural control system must account for the continuous perturbations to the body's center-of-mass including those caused by spontaneous respiration. Both aging and disease increase "posturo-respiratory synchronization;" which reflects the degree to which respiration affects postural sway fluctuations over time. Tai Chi training emphasizes the coordination of respiration and bodily movements and may therefore optimize the functional interaction between these two systems. The purpose of the project was to examine the effect of Tai Chi training on the interaction between respiration and postural control in older adults. We hypothesized that Tai Chi training would improve the ability of the postural control system to compensate for respiratory perturbations and thus, reduce posturo-respiratory synchronization. Participants were recruited from supportive housing facilities and randomized to a 12-week Tai Chi intervention (n=28; 86 ± 5 yrs) or educational-control program (n=34, 85 ± 6 yrs). Standing postural sway and respiration were simultaneously recorded with a force plate and respiratory belt under eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions. Posturo-respiratory synchronization was determined by quantifying the variation of the phase relationship between the dominant oscillatory mode of respiration and corresponding oscillations within postural sway. Groups were similar in age, gender distribution, height, body mass, and intervention compliance. Neither intervention altered average sway speed, sway magnitude or respiratory rate. As compared to the education-control group, however, Tai Chi training reduced posturo-respiratory synchronization when standing with eyes open or closed (p<0.001). Tai Chi training did not affect traditional parameters of standing postural control or respiration, yet reduced the coupling between respiration and postural control. The beneficial effects of Tai Chi training may therefore stem in part

  7. Wood and foliar respiration of tropical wet forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asao, S.; Bedoya Arrieta, R.; Ryan, M. G.

    2011-12-01

    Wood and foliar respiration from tropical forests constitute major components of ecosystem respiration that may control their productivity and carbon storage. However, few estimates on tropical forests vary greatly. Furthermore, the trees in these forests respire great amounts of carbon, but impacts of individual tree species on respiration is not well known. We examined wood and foliar respiration in this environment in relation to individual tree species. The objectives of this study were to: 1) identify how respiration rates relate to scaling variables for wood and foliage, 2) examine the effects of individual tree species on these relationships, 3) extrapolate the rates to the annual fluxes of the whole stands, and 4) determine if tree species differed in these fluxes. Established on an abandoned pasture in 1988 at La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica, the monodominant stands contained four native species in a complete randomized block design. Respiration rates based on tissue surface area ranged among dominant tree species from 0.6 to 1.0 μg C m^-2 s^-1 for small diameter wood (<10cm), 1.0 to 1.8 μg C m^-2 s^-1 for large diameter wood, and 0.7 to 0.8 μg C m^-2 s^-1 for foliage. Understory species had similar wood respiration rates, but foliage respiration rates were about half of those for canopy leaves. Among surface area, volume, or biomass, respiration rates scaled best with surface area for wood with small diameter, volume or biomass for large diameter wood, and leaf area for foliage. These relationships differed slightly among tree species and between canopy trees and understory species. Foliar respiration rate was generally related to leaf nitrogen content, and this relationship differed among dominant tree species. Temperature response of foliar respiration also differed among tree species and canopy class. However, daily and annual temperature fluctuations had less than 3% effect on annual flux. Annual respiratory fluxes from wood and foliage

  8. Mitochondrial cytochrome c biogenesis: no longer an enigma.

    PubMed

    Babbitt, Shalon E; Sutherland, Molly C; San Francisco, Brian; Mendez, Deanna L; Kranz, Robert G

    2015-08-01

    Cytochromes c (cyt c) and c1 are heme proteins that are essential for aerobic respiration. Release of cyt c from mitochondria is an important signal in apoptosis initiation. Biogenesis of c-type cytochromes involves covalent attachment of heme to two cysteines (at a conserved CXXCH sequence) in the apocytochrome. Heme attachment is catalyzed in most mitochondria by holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS), which is also necessary for the import of apocytochrome c (apocyt c). Thus, HCCS affects cellular levels of cyt c, impacting mitochondrial physiology and cell death. Here, we review the mechanisms of HCCS function and the roles of heme and residues in the CXXCH motif. Additionally, we consider concepts emerging within the two prokaryotic cytochrome c biogenesis pathways.

  9. Mitochondrial cytochrome c biogenesis: no longer an enigma

    PubMed Central

    Babbitt, Shalon E.; Sutherland, Molly C.; Francisco, Brian San; Mendez, Deanna L.; Kranz, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Cytochromes c and c1are heme proteins that are essential for aerobic respiration. Release of cytochrome c from mitochondria is an important signal in apoptosis initiation. Biogenesis of c-type cytochromes involves covalent attachment of heme to two cysteines (at a conserved CXXCH sequence) in the apocytochrome. Heme attachment is catalyzed in most mitochondria by holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS), which is also necessary for import of apocytochrome c. Thus, HCCS affects cellular levels of cytochrome c, impacting mitochondrial physiology and cell death. Here, we review the mechanisms of HCCS function and the roles played by heme and residues in the CXXCH motif. Additionally, we consider concepts emerging within the two prokaryotic cytochrome c biogenesis pathways. PMID:26073510

  10. Protein Carbonylation and Adipocyte Mitochondrial Function*

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Jessica M.; Hahn, Wendy S.; Stone, Matthew D.; Inda, Jacob J.; Droullard, David J.; Kuzmicic, Jovan P.; Donoghue, Margaret A.; Long, Eric K.; Armien, Anibal G.; Lavandero, Sergio; Arriaga, Edgar; Griffin, Timothy J.; Bernlohr, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Carbonylation is the covalent, non-reversible modification of the side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues by lipid peroxidation end products such as 4-hydroxy- and 4-oxononenal. In adipose tissue the effects of such modifications are associated with increased oxidative stress and metabolic dysregulation centered on mitochondrial energy metabolism. To address the role of protein carbonylation in the pathogenesis of mitochondrial dysfunction, quantitative proteomics was employed to identify specific targets of carbonylation in GSTA4-silenced or overexpressing 3T3-L1 adipocytes. GSTA4-silenced adipocytes displayed elevated carbonylation of several key mitochondrial proteins including the phosphate carrier protein, NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 and 3, translocase of inner mitochondrial membrane 50, and valyl-tRNA synthetase. Elevated protein carbonylation is accompanied by diminished complex I activity, impaired respiration, increased superoxide production, and a reduction in membrane potential without changes in mitochondrial number, area, or density. Silencing of the phosphate carrier or NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 or 3 in 3T3-L1 cells results in decreased basal and maximal respiration. These results suggest that protein carbonylation plays a major instigating role in cytokine-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and may be linked to the development of insulin resistance in the adipocyte. PMID:22822087

  11. Rejuvenating cellular respiration for optimizing respiratory function: targeting mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anurag; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan

    2016-01-15

    Altered bioenergetics with increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and degradation of epithelial function are key aspects of pathogenesis in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This motif is not unique to obstructive airway disease, reported in related airway diseases such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia and parenchymal diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis. Similarly, mitochondrial dysfunction in vascular endothelium or skeletal muscles contributes to the development of pulmonary hypertension and systemic manifestations of lung disease. In experimental models of COPD or asthma, the use of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, such as MitoQ, has substantially improved mitochondrial health and restored respiratory function. Modulation of noncoding RNA or protein regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, or degradation has been found to be effective in models of fibrosis, emphysema, asthma, and pulmonary hypertension. Transfer of healthy mitochondria to epithelial cells has been associated with remarkable therapeutic efficacy in models of acute lung injury and asthma. Together, these form a 3R model--repair, reprogramming, and replacement--for mitochondria-targeted therapies in lung disease. This review highlights the key role of mitochondrial function in lung health and disease, with a focus on asthma and COPD, and provides an overview of mitochondria-targeted strategies for rejuvenating cellular respiration and optimizing respiratory function in lung diseases.

  12. Resting state respiration of mitochondria: Reappraisal of the role of passive ion fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Zolkiewska, A.; Zablocka, B.; Duszynski, J.; Wojtczak, L. )

    1989-12-01

    Rat liver mitochondria respiring under resting state conditions in the presence of oligomycin were rapidly blocked with cyanide and the dissipation of the membrane potential, measured with a tetraphenylphosphonium-sensitive electrode, was followed over time. The plot of the rate of membrane potential dissipation versus the actual value of the membrane potential was nonlinear and identical to the plot of resting state respiration (titrated with small amounts of a respiratory inhibitor) versus the membrane potential. The relationship between the respiratory chain activity and the proton-motive force in mitochondria oxidizing succinate with either oxygen or ferricyanide as electron acceptors was also found to be identical. These results are interpreted as an indication that the passive permeability of the inner mitochondrial membrane toward ions is far more significant in maintaining resting state respiration than is the molecular slippage of the pumps in the respiratory chain. These results also confirm the non-ohmic characteristics of the inner mitochondrial membrane.

  13. Resting state respiration of mitochondria: reappraisal of the role of passive ion fluxes.

    PubMed

    Zółkiewska, A; Zabłocka, B; Duszyński, J; Wojtczak, L

    1989-12-01

    Rat liver mitochondria respiring under resting state conditions in the presence of oligomycin were rapidly blocked with cyanide and the dissipation of the membrane potential, measured with a tetraphenylphosphonium-sensitive electrode, was followed over time. The plot of the rate of membrane potential dissipation versus the actual value of the membrane potential was nonlinear and identical to the plot of resting state respiration (titrated with small amounts of a respiratory inhibitor) versus the membrane potential. The relationship between the respiratory chain activity and the proton-motive force in mitochondria oxidizing succinate with either oxygen or ferricyanide as electron acceptors was also found to be identical. These results are interpreted as an indication that the passive permeability of the inner mitochondrial membrane toward ions is far more significant in maintaining resting state respiration than is the molecular slippage of the pumps in the respiratory chain. These results also confirm the non-ohmic characteristics of the inner mitochondrial membrane.

  14. Mitochondrial oxidative function in human saponin-skinned muscle fibres: effects of prolonged exercise

    PubMed Central

    Tonkonogi, Michail; Harris, Beorn; Sahlin, Kent

    1998-01-01

    The influence of prolonged exhaustive exercise on mitochondrial oxidative function was investigated in ten men. Muscle biopsies were taken before and after exercise and mitochondrial respiration investigated in fibre bundles made permeable by pretreatment with s