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Sample records for affects patient satisfaction

  1. Patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Bhanu

    2010-09-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important and commonly used indicator for measuring the quality in health care. Patient satisfaction affects clinical outcomes, patient retention, and medical malpractice claims. It affects the timely, efficient, and patient-centered delivery of quality health care. Patient satisfaction is thus a proxy but a very effective indicator to measure the success of doctors and hospitals. This article discusses as to how to ensure patient satisfaction in dermatological practice. PMID:21430827

  2. Factors Affecting Hemodialysis Patients' Satisfaction with Their Dialysis Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Al Eissa, M.; Al Sulaiman, M.; Jondeby, M.; Karkar, A.; Barahmein, M.; Shaheen, F. A. M.; Al Sayyari, A.

    2010-01-01

    Aim. To assess the degree of satisfaction among hemodialysis patients and the factors influencing this satisfaction. Methods. Patients were recruited from 3 Saudi dialysis centers. Demographic data was collected. Using 1 to 10 Likert scale, the patients were asked to rate the overall satisfaction with, and the overall impact of, their dialysis therapy on their lives and to rate the effect of the dialysis therapy on 15 qualities of life domains. Results. 322 patients were recruited (72.6% of the total eligible patients). The mean age was 51.7 years (±15.4); 58% have been on dialysis for >3 years. The mean Charlson Comorbidity Index was 3.2 (±2), and Kt/V was 1.3 (±0.44). The mean satisfaction score was (7.41 ± 2.75) and the mean score of the impact of the dialysis on the patients' lives was 5.32 ± 2.55. Male patients reported worse effect of dialysis on family life, social life, energy, and appetite. Longer period since the commencement of dialysis was associated with adverse effect on finances and energy. Lower level of education was associated with worse dialysis effect on stress, overall health, sexual life, hobbies, and exercise ability. Conclusion. The level of satisfaction is affected by gender, duration on dialysis, educational level, and standard of care given. PMID:21152200

  3. An investigation on pharmacy functions and services affecting satisfaction of patients with prescriptions in community pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Hidehiko; Nakajima, Fumio; Tada, Yuichirou; Yoshikawa, Emi; Iwahashi, Yoshiki; Fujita, Kenji; Hayase, Yukitoshi

    2009-05-01

    Various functions expected by patient expects are needed with progress in the system for separation of dispensing and prescribing functions. In this investigation, the relationship between patient satisfaction and pharmacy function were analyzed quantitatively. A questionnaire survey was conducted in 178 community pharmacies. Questions on pharmacy functions and services totaled 87 items concerning information service, amenities, safety, personnel training, etc. The questionnaires for patients had five-grade scales and composed 11 items (observed variables). Based on the results, "the percentage of satisfied patients" was determined. Multivariate analysis was performed to investigate the relationship between patient satisfaction and pharmacy functions or services provided, to confirm patient's evaluation of the pharmacy, and how factors affected comprehensive satisfaction. In correlation analysis, "the number of pharmacists" and "comprehensive satisfaction" had a negative correlation. Other interesting results were obtained. As a results of factor analysis, three latent factors were obtained: the "human factor," "patients' convenience," and "environmental factor," Multiple regression analysis showed that the "human factor" affected "comprehensive satisfaction" the most. Various pharmacy functions and services influence patient satisfaction, and improvement in their quality increases patient satisfaction. This will result in the practice of patient-centered medicine. PMID:19420889

  4. Does Time Affect Patient Satisfaction and Health-Related Quality of Life After Reduction Mammoplasty?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Wess A.; Homel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective: A total of 62,611 patients with breast hypertrophy underwent breast reduction surgery in 2013 in the United States to improve their symptoms and health-related quality of life. While multiple studies utilizing various outcome instruments demonstrate the efficacy of reductive surgery, it is presently unknown how the postoperative course affects patient satisfaction and health-related quality of life as measured by the BREAST-Q. Our objective was to determine the temporal relationship of patient satisfaction and health-related quality of life after reduction mammoplasty. Methods: Patients prospectively completed the BREAST-Q reduction mammoplasty module at 3 time points during their treatment: preoperatively, at less than 3 months postoperatively, and at more than 3 months (<12 months) postoperatively. A single surgeon (N.P.P.) performed all of the breast reduction procedures. Results: Each time point contained 20 questionnaires. Mean preoperative BREAST-Q scores were significantly lower than scores at the less than 3-month postoperative time point for the scales Satisfaction With Breasts, Psychosocial Well-being, Sexual Well-being, and Physical Well-being (P < .001). There was no significant difference in BREAST-Q scores between the postoperative time points in these measures. Conclusion: Breast reduction surgery offers a vast improvement in patients’ satisfaction and health-related quality of life that is maintained throughout the postoperative period. These findings can assist surgeons in managing patient expectations after reduction mammoplasty and help improve the probability of obtaining prior authorization for insurance coverage. PMID:26819650

  5. Factors Affecting Patient Satisfaction With Emergency Department Care: An Italian Rural Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Gabriele; Vencia, Francesco; Mecheroni, Silvana; Dionisi, Susanna; Baragatti, Lorenzo; Nante, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the emergency department satisfaction is strictly linked to the role of the nurses, namely the first interface between patients and hospital services. Objectives: The purpose of the study was to identify areas of emergency nursing activity associated with minor or major patient satisfaction. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted from December 2010 - May 2011, in the rural hospital of Orbetello, Tuscany (Italy). Convenience sampling was used to select patients, namely patients presenting at the emergency unit in the study period. The Consumer Emergency Care Satisfaction Scale was used to collect information on two structured subscale (Caring and Teaching). Results: 259 questionnaire were collected. Analysis indicated that only two characteristics significantly influenced overall satisfaction: “receiving continuous information from personnel about delay” positively effect (OR=7.98; p=0.022) while “waiting time for examination” had a negative effect (OR 0.42; p=0.026) Conclusions: The study was the first conduced in Italy using this instrument that enabled to obtain much important information about patient satisfaction with nursing care received in the emergency department. The results showing improvements must be related to educational aspects, such as explaining patients the colour waiting list, and communication towards patients, such as informing about emergences that cause queue. PMID:25946915

  6. Physician Behaviors that Correlate with Patient Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comstock, Loretto M.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The behavior of 15 internal medicine residents was observed through a one-way mirror and ratings by the patients of satisfaction with their physicians were obtained. The teaching of caring skills and which physician caring skills affect the patients' satisfaction are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  7. Satisfaction with care in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kirchgessner, J; Perera-Chang, M; Klinkner, G; Soley, I; Marcelli, D; Arkossy, O; Stopper, A; Kimmel, P L

    2006-10-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important aspect of dialysis care, only recently evaluated in clinical studies. We developed a tool to assess peritoneal dialysis (PD) customer satisfaction, and sought to evaluate and validate the Customer Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ), quantifying PD patient satisfaction. The CSQ included questions regarding administrative issues, Delivery Service, PD Training, Handling Requests, and transportation. The study was performed using interviews in all Hungarian Fresenius Medical Care dialysis centers offering PD. CSQ results were compared with psychosocial measures to identify if patient satisfaction was associated with perception of social support and illness burden, or depression. We assessed CSQ internal consistency and validity. Factor analysis explored potential underlying dimensions of the CSQ. One hundred and thirty-three patients treated with PD for end-stage renal disease for more than 3 months were interviewed. The CSQ had high internal consistency. There was high patient satisfaction with customer service. PD patient satisfaction scores correlated with quality of life (QOL) and social support measures, but not with medical or demographic factors, or depressive affect. The CSQ is a reliable tool to assess PD customer satisfaction. PD patient satisfaction is associated with perception of QOL. Efforts to improve customer satisfaction may improve PD patients' quantity as well as QOL. PMID:16900092

  8. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients' expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved. PMID:25419410

  9. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients’ expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved. PMID:25419410

  10. Patient satisfaction with antihypertensive therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, K; Chiou, C-F; Plauschinat, C A; Frech, F; Harper, A; Dubois, R

    2005-10-01

    The objective of the study was to assess factors associated with treatment satisfaction among patients receiving antihypertensive therapy. A weighted cross-sectional online survey was conducted with hypertensive patients participating in a chronic disease panel in the US. Patients on monotherapy with medications from the following classes were identified: ACE inhibitors (ACEIs), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), beta blockers (BBs), calcium channel blockers (CCBs), and diuretics. The control group included patients without treatment. Pairwise comparisons between groups were conducted for factors that may affect patients' satisfaction. The study population had a mean age of 54.7+/-14.2 years and was 56.7% female. Participants with blood pressure (BP) controlled to JNC 7 guidelines were more satisfied with their medication than those with uncontrolled BP (90.3 vs 71.5%, P<0.05). Patients who had not experienced adverse events had higher satisfaction than patients experiencing adverse events (90.9 vs 75.8%, P<0.05). The most frequently self-reported adverse events were frequent urination, sexual dysfunction, and fatigue ranging from 7.0 to 9.6% across classes. The adverse event rates differed by class and were lowest among the ARBs. Patients on ARBs were the most likely to have switched from a previous antihypertensive class as compared to other classes (57.1% ARBs vs 49.8% ACEIs, 38.7% diuretics, 36.3% CCBs, and 31.7% BBs). Physician recommendation was the most common reason for switching. In conclusion, the ability to effectively treat hypertension depends upon a patient's satisfaction with antihypertensive therapy, which may be improved by achieving BP control and minimizing the occurrence of adverse events. PMID:15951740

  11. Resident trainees do not affect patient satisfaction in an outpatient gastroenterology clinic: A prospective study conducted in a Canadian gastroenterology clinic

    PubMed Central

    Brahmania, Mayur; Young, Madison; Muthiah, Chetty; Ilnyckyj, Alexandra; Duerksen, Donald; Moffatt, Dana C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is little literature regarding how a gastroenterology trainee affects a patient’s interpretation of care during outpatient clinic visits. Improving patient satisfaction is desirable and benefits may include enhanced patient compliance as well as providing trainees with areas for improvement. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate patient satisfaction in an outpatient gastroenterology clinic when seen by a trainee and attending physician versus an attending physician alone. The secondary objective was to evaluate physician characteristics that play a role in creating a positive clinical experience. METHODS: A randomized prospective survey study was conducted over an 11-month period (July 2012 to June 2013) at St Boniface Hospital (Winnipeg, Manitoba). Two gastroenterology fellows (postgraduate year 4 and 5) and nine internal medicine residents (postgraduate year 1 to 3) comprised the ‘trainee’ role, while three academic clinicians comprised the ‘attending’ role. Patients included individuals seen for an initial consultation and were >18 years of age. RESULTS: A total of 211 patients comprised the final study group, with 118 in the attending group and 93 in the trainee group. In univariate analysis, patients more often had a very good experience when seen by an attending physician alone versus a trainee and attending physician (73% versus 56%; P=0.016); however, on multivariate analysis, there was no significant difference in patient satisfaction (OR 0.89; P=0.931). Physician factors found to be associated with high patient satisfaction on multivariate analysis included: addressing all patient concerns (OR 27.56; P=0.021); giving the patient a preliminary diagnosis (OR 78.02; P=0.006); and feeling the physician was thorough (OR 72.53; P=0.029). CONCLUSIONS: The present study did not reveal a difference in patient satisfaction if a patient sees an attending physician alone or with a trainee. Moreover, to improve patient satisfaction in a gastroenterology

  12. Defining and Measuring Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Graham, Brent

    2016-09-01

    Reporting patient satisfaction has become an increasingly common component of studies evaluating treatment outcomes. However the construct of "patient satisfaction" is one that is complex and context dependent. While there is no question that careful, reliable, and valid measurement of this important aspect of patient care is required, tools for achieving this objective have not been fully developed. Measures of patient satisfaction that reflect the unique role of the hand in everyday life will require the same approach to instrument development as has been used to move forward the field of outcome measurement in general. PMID:27570227

  13. Creating patient satisfaction and loyalty.

    PubMed

    Fisk, T A; Brown, C J; Cannizzaro, K G; Naftal, B

    1990-06-01

    Many hospitals are considering enhanced approaches to patient satisfaction measurement and guest relations--or service management. Some are building in-house satisfaction management systems. Others are evaluating the growing number of systems commercially available for purchase. The authors review the successful design, testing, introduction, and nearly 5-year use of an in-house system. PMID:10105197

  14. Measuring patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Levin, Roger

    2005-03-01

    Many businesses use customer satisfaction surveys successfully. You may notice that you find one in almost every restaurant or hotel room. I do not think it is a coincidence that the hotel industry provides some of the finest customer service available. When it comes to providing excellent customer service, dental practices can learn from businesses that regularly assess customer satisfaction. PMID:15819351

  15. [Marital satisfaction in neurotic patients].

    PubMed

    Plháková, A; Osecká, L

    1994-06-01

    The authors compared marital satisfaction of men and women in the neurotic and the control group. The examined persons also evaluated satisfaction of their partners and in their parents' marriages. The results of the work suggest, that the neurotic patients were less satisfied in the marriage than the members of the control group. Further, it was found that men were more satisfied than women. Neurotic individuals evaluated their parents' marriages as less satisfactory than persons who had not been treated for neurosis. The results of the research provided evidence that there are some differences in an estimation of the partners' satisfaction between the neurotic and the control group. PMID:8055599

  16. Patient Satisfaction with the Family Physician Program in Sabzevar, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Alireza; Raeissi, Pouran; Saffari, Ehsan; Reissi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Patient satisfaction with the family physician program is an important factor for more favorable treatment results. Evaluation of patient satisfaction improves the services and approximates them to patient’s preferences. The family physician program has been executed since late March, 2005 in Iran. This study aimed to measure patient satisfaction with family physician services and determines factors affecting the level of satisfaction in order to propose appropriate suggestions for providing medical services based on patients’ expectations. Methods: Forty-one centers provide healthcare services in rural and urban areas. The participants in this study comprised 1263 people. The data were collected by an inventory with 11 items about demographic specifications, waiting time and the importance of physician’s sex and 40 items for assessing the level of patient satisfaction. Results: A total of 1199 patients participated in the current study, 72.1% of them were female and 19.6% waited 10-20 minutes for receiving services. About 55.72% of the participants chose high and very high for the items of the inventory. Total satisfaction with the family physician program decreased with age (p-value= 0.029).Moreover, total satisfaction did not show any significant differences in different groups in terms of sex, place of residence, education level and marital status. Also family physicians’ sex did not affect patient satisfaction significantly. Based on results of regression model, an increase in patients’ age by one year decreased their satisfaction by 0.12 and level of satisfaction in rural patients was lower than that in urban patients by 7.93. Conclusions: The level of patient satisfaction with family physician services was moderate, which mostly arose from the components of the family physician program and services such as the waiting time, costs, welfare facilities, accessibility and the service-providing team rather than patients

  17. Patients Provide Recommendations for Improving Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Moore, Angelo D; Hamilton, Jill B; Krusel, Jessica L; Moore, LeeAntoinette G; Pierre-Louis, Bosny J

    2016-04-01

    National Committee for Quality Assurance recommends patient-centered medical homes incorporate input from patient populations; however, many health care organizations do not. This qualitative study used two open-ended questions from 148 active duty Army Soldiers and their family members to illicit recommendations for primary care providers and clinic leadership that would improve their health care experiences. Content analysis and descriptive statistics were used to analyze responses. Participant responses were related to four major themes: Access to Care, Interpersonal Interaction, Satisfaction of Care, and Quality of Care. Participants were overall satisfied with their care; however, spending less time waiting for appointments and to see the provider or specialist were the most frequently requested improvements related to Access to Care. For Interpersonal Interaction, 82% of the responses recommended that providers be more attentive listeners, courteous, patient, caring, and respectful. Decreasing wait times and improving interpersonal skills would improve health care experiences and patient satisfaction. PMID:27046182

  18. Individualizing patient education for greater patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Alagheband, Sharzad J; Miller, Jeffrey J; Clarke, Jennie T

    2015-05-01

    The benefits of educational intervention on health outcomes has been widely discussed, but the most educational methods have not been addressed. We sought to assess preferred modes of education during an outpatient dermatology visit (ie, verbal instruction [VI], written instruction [WI], demonstration [DM], Internet resources [IR]). We secondarily looked at patient satisfaction with the educational methods used. The results indicate the most preferred method of education among 157 patients who completed a 12-question survey and areas where physicians may need to improve patient education. PMID:26057507

  19. Impact of patient satisfaction ratings on physicians and clinical care

    PubMed Central

    Zgierska, Aleksandra; Rabago, David; Miller, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    Background Although patient satisfaction ratings often drive positive changes, they may have unintended consequences. Objective The study reported here aimed to evaluate the clinician-perceived effects of patient satisfaction ratings on job satisfaction and clinical care. Methods A 26-item survey, developed by a state medical society in 2012 to assess the effects of patient satisfaction surveys, was administered online to physician members of a state-level medical society. Respondents remained anonymous. Results One hundred fifty five physicians provided responses (3.9% of the estimated 4,000 physician members of the state-level medical society, or approximately 16% of the state’s emergency department [ED] physicians). The respondents were predominantly male (85%) and practicing in solo or private practice (45%), hospital (43%), or academia (15%). The majority were ED (57%), followed by primary care (16%) physicians. Fifty-nine percent reported that their compensation was linked to patient satisfaction ratings. Seventy-eight percent reported that patient satisfaction surveys moderately or severely affected their job satisfaction; 28% had considered quitting their job or leaving the medical profession. Twenty percent reported their employment being threatened because of patient satisfaction data. Almost half believed that pressure to obtain better scores promoted inappropriate care, including unnecessary antibiotic and opioid prescriptions, tests, procedures, and hospital admissions. Among 52 qualitative responses, only three were positive. Conclusion These pilot-level data suggest that patient satisfaction survey utilization may promote, under certain circumstances, job dissatisfaction, attrition, and inappropriate clinical care among some physicians. This is concerning, especially in the context of the progressive incorporation of patient satisfaction ratings as a quality-of-care metric, and highlights the need for a rigorous evaluation of the optimal methods

  20. Patient satisfaction: ethnic origin or explanatory model?

    PubMed

    Callan, A; Littlewood, R

    1998-01-01

    Despite concern over their psychiatric treatment, little is known about black and ethnic minority patient satisfaction with psychiatric services and whether perceived 'ethnicity' or discrepant understanding of illness experience is most relevant. Twenty-one white British and 63 ethnic minority patients were interviewed for their opinions on psychiatric in-patient care, their treatment preferences and their explanatory models of their illness. The most significant association with satisfaction was not ethnic origin but the patient's explanatory model of their illness which showed little association with ethnicity whether patients were voluntary or involuntary. Satisfaction is most likely when there is concordance between the patient's and psychiatrist's explanatory model. PMID:9574847

  1. Patients' satisfaction with facial prostheses.

    PubMed

    Wondergem, Marloes; Lieben, George; Bouman, Shirley; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Lohuis, Peter J F M

    2016-05-01

    We assessed the "impact on wellbeing" and "satisfaction" of patients who had a facial prosthesis (of the ear, nose, or orbit) fitted in The Netherlands Cancer Institute. Patients had either an adhesive-retained or an implant-retained facial prosthesis between 1951 and 2011. We did a cross-sectional survey of 104 patients, then gave a questionnaire to the final study group of 71 (68%), a year or more later. All were satisfied with their prostheses (visual analogue scale (VAS): mean (SD) 8.1(1.5). The implant-retained group were the most satisfied (p=0.022), and the adhesive-retained group felt more self-conscious (p=0.013). Three-quarters of all patients said that the prosthesis was not painful and there were no problems with the way it functioned. A well-designed facial prosthesis has obvious benefits, but there were no appreciable differences between the two groups. Each patient must make a careful decision about which type of prosthesis to choose, taking into account the quality of their remaining tissue, the site of the defect, and their general health. PMID:26508540

  2. Patient satisfaction in Dental Healthcare Centers

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Dena A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to (1) measure the degree of patient satisfaction among the clinical and nonclinical dental services offered at specialty dental centers and (2) investigate the factors associated with the degree of overall satisfaction. Materials and Methods: Four hundred and ninety-seven participants from five dental centers were recruited for this study. Each participant completed a self-administered questionnaire to measure patient satisfaction with clinical and nonclinical dental services. Analysis of variance, t-tests, a general linear model, and stepwise regression analysis was applied. Results: The respondents were generally satisfied, but internal differences were observed. The exhibited highest satisfaction with the dentists’ performance, followed by the dental assistants’ services, and the lowest satisfaction with the center's physical appearance and accessibility. Females, participants with less than a bachelor's degree, and younger individuals were more satisfied with the clinical and nonclinical dental services. The stepwise regression analysis revealed that the coefficient of determination (R2) was 40.4%. The patient satisfaction with the performance of the dentists explained 42.6% of the overall satisfaction, whereas their satisfaction with the clinical setting explained 31.5% of the overall satisfaction. Conclusion: Additional improvements with regard to the accessibility and physical appearance of the dental centers are needed. In addition, interventions regarding accessibility, particularly when booking an appointment, are required. PMID:27403045

  3. Quality improvement techniques to improve patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Torres, E Joseph; Guo, Kristina L

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes several approaches for implementing quality improvement initiatives to improve patient satisfaction, which enables health-care organizations to position themselves for success in today's global and increasingly competitive environment. Specifically, measuring the views of patients, improving patient satisfaction through a community-wide effort, and using a Six Sigma program are discussed. Each of these programs can be an effective mechanism for quality improvement. A key component to quality improvement techniques involves collaborative efforts by all health-care professionals and managers as they seek to increase patient satisfaction. PMID:15552388

  4. Patient Satisfaction after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is one of the most successful and effective surgical options to reduce pain and restore function for patients with severe osteoarthritis. The purpose of this article was to review and summarize the recent literatures regarding patient satisfaction after TKA and to analyze the various factors associated with patient dissatisfaction after TKA. Patient satisfaction is one of the many patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). Patient satisfaction can be evaluated from two categories, determinants of satisfaction and components of satisfaction. The former have been described as all of the patient-related factors including age, gender, personality, patient expectations, medical and psychiatric comorbidity, patient's diagnosis leading to TKA and severity of arthropathy. The latter are all of the processes and technical aspects of TKA, ranging from the anesthetic and surgical factors, type of implants and postoperative rehabilitations. The surgeon- and patient-reported outcomes have been shown to be disparate occasionally. Among various factors that contribute to patient satisfaction, some factors can be managed by the surgeon, which should be improved through continuous research. Furthermore, extensive discussion and explanation before surgery will reduce patient dissatisfaction after TKA. PMID:26955608

  5. Treatment Satisfaction Among Patients Taking Antidepressant Medication.

    PubMed

    López-Torres Hidalgo, Jesús; López Gallardo, Yolanda; Párraga Martínez, Ignacio; Del Campo Del Campo, José María; Villena Ferrer, Alejandro; Morena Rayo, Susana

    2016-08-01

    This study sought to assess treatment satisfaction among patients on antidepressants, ascertaining whether there might be an association with depressive symptomatology and other variables. Cross-sectional study conducted on 564 adult patients taking antidepressant medication. Satisfaction with antidepressant treatment was assessed using the Assessment of Satisfaction with Antidepressant Treatment Questionnaire (ESTA/Evaluación de la Satisfacción con el Tratamiento Antidepresivo). A moderate negative correlation was observed between satisfaction and intensity of depressive symptoms, as assessed with the Montgomery-Asberg scale. A weak negative correlation was observed between greater satisfaction and less favourable views about taking medication. Satisfaction scale scores were higher among those who took antidepressant medication for 1 year or more versus shorter periods. Most patients reported being satisfied with the antidepressant treatment but the level of satisfaction was higher among those who presented with less marked depressive symptoms, received longer-term treatment and viewed drug treatments favourably. Treatment satisfaction is one of the patient-reported outcome measures that can serve to complement clinical evaluation of depressive disorders. PMID:25833726

  6. Understanding Patient Satisfaction Ratings for Radiology Services

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Elvira V.; Yuh, William T.C.; Kelly, Ronda; Macadam, Luke; Potts, Richard; Mayr, Nina A.

    2015-01-01

    Under the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services patient satisfaction accounts for 30% of the measures of and payments for quality of care. Understanding what drives satisfaction data, how it is obtained, converted into scores, and formulated into rankings, is increasingly critical for imaging departments. PMID:24261356

  7. Ensuring patient satisfaction in medical groups.

    PubMed

    Choong, P

    2000-01-01

    Delivering satisfaction to patients has become increasingly important among professionals in the medical community. However, administrators in medical group practices charged with the task of nurturing customer satisfaction are often required to allocate their limited funds across an array of initiatives intended to ensure the delivery of the right amount and types of services to improve satisfaction among their customers. This requires the ability to locate areas that yield the greatest response per unit of investment. This paper shows that the impact of attribute performance on satisfaction is asymmetric. Positive attribute performance is shown to have a smaller impact on satisfaction than negative attribute performance. The paper also discusses how an understanding of this asymmetry will enable administrators to allocate their resources more wisely as they decide whether to maintain or increase attribute-level performance. PMID:10787726

  8. [Patient satisfaction and geriatric care - an empirical study].

    PubMed

    Clausen, G; Borchelt, M; Janssen, C; Loos, S; Mull, L; Pfaff, H

    2006-02-01

    Patients' satisfaction has become a central concept in quality assurance. Despite progress in research in this area is still a lack of data for geriatric patients. Referring to the consumer model, satisfaction can be described as a difference between expectations and assessed performance. The aim of this study is to analyze satisfaction among geriatric patients in an in-patient setting. A personal interview was performed 1-2 days before discharge. Patients suffering for dementia or with problems to communicate were excluded. 124 of 268 geriatric patients who were discharged in 2003 were included (inclusion rate 46.3%). 119 were willing to participate (response rate 96.0%). Respondents were between 61 and 96 years old, 39% were male and 42% had serious functional limitations at time of admission. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed three significant predictors of a combined index of satisfaction and expectations: a) quality of hotel services; b) experience of neglect; c) provision of medical information and skills. In summary, standardized personal questionnaires can provide valid and reliable data of geriatric patients. Satisfaction of elderly patients is negatively affected by neglect and positively influenced by provision of medical information and a good hotel services. PMID:16502227

  9. Patient satisfaction after acute admission for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Bø, Beate; Ottesen, Øyvind H; Gjestad, Rolf; Jørgensen, Hugo A; Kroken, Rune A; Løberg, Else-Marie; Johnsen, Erik

    2016-07-01

    Background Measuring patient satisfaction in mental health care potentially provides valuable information, but studies in acutely admitted psychosis patients are scarce. Aims The aims were to assess satisfaction among patients acutely admitted with psychosis, to compare satisfaction in voluntarily versus involuntarily admitted patients, and to assess the influence of symptom load and insight. Methods The UKU Consumer Satisfaction Rating Scale (UKU-ConSat) was used. A total of 104 patients completed the UKU-ConSat at discharge/follow-up (between 6-11 weeks after admittance if not discharged earlier) (mean duration of stay 4 weeks), thus corresponding to the end of the acute treatment phase. Results A total of 88.4% had total scores above zero (satisfied). Only three of the eight single items were statistically significantly different among patients admitted voluntarily versus involuntarily, and only the information item score remained significantly different in adjusted analyses. Insight level at admittance, and an increasing level of insight during the acute phase were positively associated with patient satisfaction, whereas levels and changes in positive and negative psychosis symptoms were indirectly related to satisfaction via this process of insight. Conclusions The vast majority of the acutely admitted patients were satisfied with treatment. There were few differences between the involuntarily and voluntarily admitted patient groups, except that the involuntary care group was clearly less satisfied with the information provided. Poor insight had a major negative impact on treatment satisfaction in psychosis. The provision of sufficient and adequate information is an important target for mental health care service improvement. PMID:26750532

  10. Is patient satisfaction a unidimensional construct? Factor analysis of the Munich Patient Satisfaction Scale (MPSS-24).

    PubMed

    Möller-Leimkühler, Anne Marie; Dunkel, Ralf; Müller, Peter; Pukies, Guido; de Fazio, Sarino; Lehmann, Erlo

    2002-02-01

    Although patients' satisfaction with treatment has gained much attention, conceptual and methodological issues are not sufficiently investigated. Consequently, well-validated satisfaction scales are rare. In order to respond to methodological requirements being associated with the measurement of patient satisfaction, the Munich Patient Satisfaction Scale (MPSS-24) was developed for psychiatric in-patients. The scale was validated on the basis of three independent samples (n=85, n= 161, n=91), and the effects of moderating variables were controlled. In several steps of item selection the initial pool of 133 items was reduced to 24 items, which were subjected to factor analysis. The MPSS-24 demonstrates one major principal component with two minor factors which indicates that doctor-patient communication is the essential source for patient satisfaction. The instrument is of high internal consistency and reliability, and convergent validity is satisfactory. PMID:12056577

  11. Patient satisfaction with Mentor inflatable penile prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Whalen, R K; Merrill, D C

    1991-06-01

    Patient satisfaction with the Mentor inflatable penile prosthesis was assessed by sending a thirty-six-item questionnaire to 251 patients who had undergone implantation of the device by the senior author (D.C.M.). A total of 152 (61%) of the patients responded. Recovery time, satisfaction, reasons for dissatisfaction, perceptions of erection quality, and psychosexual parameters were evaluated. Eight-eight percent of the patients were engaging in regular sexual activity. Depending on the definition of satisfaction, 81-89 percent of the respondents reported that they were satisfied with the prosthesis. Sixty-eight percent of the survey group were satisfied with the length, width, and firmness of their prosthetic-induced erection. The majority of patients reported improvement in psychosexual functioning after implantation. Reasons for dissatisfaction included inadequate penile length, insufficient firmness, and difficulty with inflation and deflation of the penile cylinders. PMID:2038786

  12. Predictors of Patient Satisfaction With Mohs Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Maryam M.; Warton, E. Margaret; Neugebauer, Romain; Chren, Mary-Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative variables that predict higher short- and long-term patient satisfaction with Mohs surgery. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting A university-based dermatology practice and the affiliated Veterans Affairs medical center dermatology clinic. Patients A total of 339 consecutive patients treated with Mohs surgery in 1999 and 2000. Main Outcome Measures Short-term satisfaction at 1 week and long-term satisfaction at 1 year. We used directed acyclic graphs to determine appropriate confounding adjustment for preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative variables that influence satisfaction with Mohs surgery in logistic regression models. Results Better preoperative skin-related quality of life (measured using Skindex) and more intraoperative Mohs stages were the most salient predictors of higher short- and long-term satisfaction; these odds ratios (ORs) were 2.33 (95% CI, 1.01–5.35) and 5.19 (1.66–16.29), respectively, for preoperative skin-related quality of life and 7.06 (2.02–24.67) and 5.30 (1.24–22.64), respectively, for more intraoperative Mohs stages. Patients not bothered by postoperative bleeding were more likely to be satisfied short term (OR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.25–4.05), as were those who considered themselves involved in decision making about their treatment (3.05; 1.52–6.10). Higher long-term satisfaction with Mohs surgery was observed among patients who were married (2.36; 1.10–5.09). Conclusions Higher short- and long-term satisfaction with Mohs surgery is predicted by better preoperative skin-related quality of life and by more intraoperative Mohs stages. The effect of postoperative variables wanes over time, suggesting that factors influencing satisfaction can vary depending on the time frame when satisfaction is measured. Our results may help clinicians identify patients who are at higher risk of dissatisfaction following Mohs surgery. PMID:22184760

  13. Patient Satisfaction with Pain Level in Patients with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Golas, Mary; Park, Chang Gi; Wilkie, Diana J

    2016-06-01

    Interest in satisfaction with pain management as a pain-related outcome variable wavered when investigators found poor correlations with pain intensity when they measured satisfaction with pain management rather than satisfaction with pain level. The aim was to explore the relationship between satisfaction with pain level and pain intensity among patients receiving ongoing outpatient cancer care. In a comparative, secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional sample of 806 cancer patients (57% male, mean age 56 ± 13 years, 77% Caucasian), the authors measured satisfaction with pain level as a single item (yes, no, not sure) and pain intensity as an average of current, least, and worst pain intensity (all 0-10 scales) in the past 24 hours. Of the 806 participants, 447 (56%) subjects were satisfied with their pain level, 291 (36%) were not satisfied and 68 (8%) were not sure. Satisfaction was moderately correlated with API (rho = -0.43, p < .001). Patients satisfied with their pain levels reported statistically lower mean API scores (2.26 ± 1.70) than those who were not satisfied (4.68 ± 2.07) or not sure (4.21 ± 2.2.1), p < .001. With pair wise post hoc comparisons, mean API scores of satisfied patients were significantly lower than those who were not satisfied or not sure. In contrast with other researchers who have not found associations between satisfaction with pain management and pain intensity, the authors demonstrated that when satisfaction is measured specifically, patients with higher pain intensity are not satisfied. The authors recommend that researchers use "satisfaction with pain level" instead of "satisfaction with pain management" as the pain satisfaction outcome. PMID:27283267

  14. Interrelation between Patient Satisfaction and Patient-Provider Communication in Diabetes Management

    PubMed Central

    Cinar, Ayse Basak; Schou, Lone

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to assess how patient satisfaction with medical provider-patient communication can affect oral health, diabetes, and psychobehavioural measures among type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients. It is part of a prospective intervention study among randomly selected T2DM patients, in Turkey. The data analyzed were Community Periodontal Need Index (CPI), HbA1c, patient satisfaction with communication, and psychobehavioural variables. Data was collected initially and at the end of the intervention. The participants were allocated to either health coaching (HC) or health education (HE). At baseline, there were no statistical differences between the HC and the HE groups on any of the measures (P > 0.05). Patients in both the HC and the HE groups had low satisfaction with communication. At postintervention, the increase in patient satisfaction with communication in the HC group was significantly higher than that in the HE group (P = 0.001). Principal component analysis revealed that patient satisfaction with communication shared the same cluster with clinical measures (CPI and HbA1c) and quality of life in the HC group. In conclusion, the present study showed, to our knowledge for the first time, that overall patient satisfaction with medical care provider-patient communication, empowered by HC approach, was interrelated with well-being of T2DM patients, in terms of psychobehavioural and clinical measures. PMID:25614885

  15. Materialism, affective states, and life satisfaction: case of Croatia.

    PubMed

    Lipovčan, Ljiljana Kaliterna; Prizmić-Larsen, Zvjezdana; Brkljačić, Tihana

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have used Material Values Scale (MVS) to assess beliefs about importance to own material things. The aims of this study were to validate the MVS scale and to explore the relationships between materialistic values and well-being of Croatian citizens. The study was carried out on a representative sample of N = 1129 Croatian citizens. We used the short 9-item version of the MVS, life satisfaction rating, ratings of two positive (Positive affect) and four negative emotions (Negative affect) over the past month, and demographic variables (age, gender, income). The original dimensionality of the MVS was not confirmed; confirmatory factor analyses yielded two instead of three factors, Happiness and Centrality/Success. When controlled for income, gender and age, the Happiness dimension predicted Life satisfaction and both Positive and Negative affect, indicating that people who believed that the material goods in ones life leads to happiness reported to have lower life satisfaction, lower level of positive affect and higher level of negative affect over the past month. The Centrality/Success dimension was positively related to Positive affect, indicating that the belief that possessions play a central role in enjoyment leads to more frequent experiences of happiness and satisfaction over the past month. PMID:26587367

  16. Do Entry Characteristics of Online Learners Affect Their Satisfaction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yukselturk, Erman

    2009-01-01

    This study analyzed learner characteristics that affect satisfaction in an online certificate program under two main purposes. The first purpose was to examine relationships among selected variables (age, gender, educational level, and online course experience), learners' initial perceptions (online technology self-efficacy, online learning…

  17. Magnet Hospitals: Higher Rates of Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah A

    2014-06-10

    Patient satisfaction with care is an important indicator of quality of care. As of 2013-2014, 30% of the Value-Based Purchasing score Medicare is using to determine hospital reimbursement is based on patient reports of care. This study determined whether significant relationships exists between Magnet (N = 160), Magnet-in-progress (N = 99), and non-Magnet hospital (N = 1,742) status and the highest ratings on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey questions related to patient satisfaction with care. This study was a secondary analysis of data collected and compiled from three sources (the American Hospital Association, American Nurses Credentialing Center, and HCAHPS databases). Analysis revealed that Magnet and Magnet-in-progress hospitals have significantly (p < .007) higher scores than non-Magnet hospitals on six of the seven questions regarding patient-reported satisfaction with care. The implications of these results for nursing are discussed. PMID:24915864

  18. Patterns of Physician-Patient Communication Associated with Patient Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, M. Lee; Clampitt, Phillip G.

    Using data drawn from ten initial physician/patient interviews, an original category system was employed to analyze patterns of physician/patient communication. Static analysis, interaction analysis, and Markov chain analysis were used to discover the underlying communication patterns associated with patient satisfaction. Results revealed that…

  19. The Reliability of Big "Patient Satisfaction" Data.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Ajit; Greco, Michael; Powell, Helen; Coleman, Louise

    2013-09-01

    Big data in healthcare can bring significant clinical and cost benefits. Of equal but often overlooked importance is the role of patient satisfaction data in improving the quality of healthcare service and treatment, where satisfaction is measured through feedback by patients on their meetings with medical specialists and experts. One of the major problems in analyzing patient feedback data is the nonstandard research designs often used for gathering such data: the designs can be uncrossed, unbalanced, and fully nested. Traditional measures of data reliability are more difficult to calculate for such data. Also, patient data can contain significant proportions of missing values that further complicate the calculation of reliability. This paper describes a reliability approach that is robust in the face of nonstandard research designs and missing values for use with large-scale patient survey data. The dataset contains nearly 85,000 patient responses to over 2,000 healthcare practitioners in five different subtypes over a 15-year period in the United Kingdom. Reliability measures are calculated to provide benchmarks involving minimum numbers of patients and practitioners for deeper drill-down analysis. The paper concludes with a demonstration of how regression models generated from big patient feedback data can be assessed in terms of reliability at the total data level as well as drill-down levels. PMID:27442196

  20. Congruent Satisfaction: Is There Geographic Correlation Between Patient and Physician Satisfaction?

    PubMed Central

    DeVoe, Jennifer; Fryer, George E.; Straub, Alton; McCann, Jessica; Fairbrother, Gerry

    2016-01-01

    Context Satisfaction among both physicians and patients is optimal for the delivery of high-quality healthcare. Although some links have been drawn between physician and patient satisfaction, little is known about the degree of satisfaction congruence among physicians and patients living and working in geographic proximity to each other. Objective We sought to identify patients and physicians from similar geographic sites and to examine how closely patients’ satisfaction with their overall healthcare correlates with physicians’ overall career satisfaction in each selected site. Methods We undertook a cross-sectional analysis of data from 3 rounds of the Community Tracking Study (CTS) Household and Physician Surveys (1996 –1997, 1998–1999, 2000–2001), a nationally representative telephone survey of patients and physicians. We studied randomly selected participants in the 60 CTS communities for a total household population of 179,127 patients and a total physician population of 37,238. Both physicians and patients were asked a variety of questions pertaining to satisfaction. Results Satisfaction varied by region but was closely correlated between physicians and patients living in the same CTS sites. Physician career satisfaction was more strongly correlated with patient overall healthcare satisfaction than any of the other aspects of the healthcare system (Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient 0.628, P < 0.001). Patient trust in the physician was also highly correlated with physician career satisfaction (0.566, P < 0.001). Conclusions Despite geographic variation, there is a strong correlation between physician and patient satisfaction living in similar geographic locations. Further analysis of this congruence and examination of areas of incongruence between patient and physician satisfaction may aid in improving the healthcare system. PMID:17279025

  1. Evaluation of Patient Satisfaction with Tuberculosis Services in Southern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Onyeonoro, Ugochukwu U; Chukwu, Joseph N; Nwafor, Charles C; Meka, Anthony O; Omotowo, Babatunde I; Madichie, Nelson O; Ogbudebe, Chidubem; Ikebudu, Joy N; Oshi, Daniel C; Ekeke, Ngozi; Paul, Nsirimobu I; Duru, Chukwuma B

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Knowing tuberculosis (TB) patients’ satisfaction enables TB program managers to identify gaps in service delivery and institute measures to address them. This study is aimed at evaluating patients’ satisfaction with TB services in southern Nigeria. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 378 patients accessing TB care were studied using a validated Patient Satisfaction (PS-38) questionnaire on various aspects of TB services. Factor analysis was used to identify eight factors related to TB patient satisfaction. Test of association was used to study the relation between patient satisfaction scores and patient and health facility characteristics, while multilinear regression analysis was used to identify predictors of patient satisfaction. RESULTS Highest satisfaction was reported for adherence counseling and access to care. Patient characteristics were associated with overall satisfaction, registration, adherence counseling, access to care, amenities, and staff attitude, while health system factors were associated with staff attitude, amenities, and health education. Predictors of satisfaction with TB services included gender, educational status, if tested for HIV, distance, payment for TB services, and level and type of health-care facility. CONCLUSION Patient- and health system–related factors were found to influence patient satisfaction and, hence, should be taken into consideration in TB service programing. PMID:26508872

  2. The prisoner as patient - a health services satisfaction survey

    PubMed Central

    Bjørngaard, Johan Håkon; Rustad, Åse-Bente; Kjelsberg, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Background There is evidence for higher morbidity among prison inmates than in the general population. Despite this, patient satisfaction with the prison health services is scarcely investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate patient satisfaction with prison health services in Norway and to analyze possible patient and service effects. Methods The survey took part in 29 prisons in the southern and central part of Norway, representing 62% of the total prison capacity in Norway. A total of 1,150 prison inmates with prison health services experiences completed a satisfaction questionnaire (90% response rate). The patients' satisfaction was measured on a 12-item index. Multilevel analyses were used to analyze both patient and service characteristics as predictors of satisfaction. Results The study revealed high levels of dissatisfaction with prison health services. There were substantial differences between services, with between-service-variance accounting for 9% of the total variance. Satisfaction was significantly associated with a senior staff member's evaluation of the health services possessing adequate resources and the quality of drug abuse treatment. At the patient level, satisfaction was significantly associated with older age, frequent consultations and better self-perceived health. Conclusion Prison inmates' satisfaction with the health services provided are low compared with patient satisfaction measured in other health areas. The substantial differences observed between services - even when adjusting for several known factors associated with patient satisfaction - indicate a potential for quality improvement. PMID:19785736

  3. Satisfaction with Care of Patients on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Paine, Susan S.; Grobert, Megan E.; Stidley, Christine A.; Gabbay, Ezra; Harford, Antonia M.; Zager, Philip G.; Miskulin, Dana C.; Meyer, Klemens B.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Little is known about patients receiving dialysis who respond to satisfaction and experience of care surveys and those who do not respond, nor is much known about the corollaries of satisfaction. This study examined factors predicting response to Dialysis Clinic, Inc. (DCI)’s patient satisfaction survey and factors associated with higher satisfaction among responders. Design, setting, participants, & measurement A total of 10,628 patients receiving in-center hemodialysis care at 201 DCI facilities between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2011, aged ≥18 years, treated during the survey administration window, and at the facility for ≥3 months before survey administration. Primary outcome was response to at least one of the nine survey questions; secondary outcome was overall satisfaction with care. Results Response rate was 77.3%. In adjusted logistic regression (odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals), race other than black (white race, 1.23 [1.10 to 1.37]), missed treatments (1.16 [1.02 to 1.32]) or shortened treatments (≥5 treatments, 1.40 [1.22 to 1.60]), more hospital days (>3 days in the last 3 months, 1.89 [1.66 to 2.15]), and lower serum albumin (albumin level <3.5 g/dl, 1.4 [1.28 to 1.73]) all independently predicted nonresponse. In adjusted linear regression, the following were more satisfied with care: older patients (age ≥63 years, 1.84 [1.78 to 1.90]; age <63 years, 1.91 [1.86 to 1.97]; P<0.001), white patients (1.76 [1.71 to 1.81]) versus black patients (1.93 [1.88 to 1.99]) or those of other race (1.93 [1.83 to 2.03]) (P<0.001), patients with shorter duration of dialysis (≤2.5 years, 1.79 [1.73 to 1.84]; >2.5 years, 1.96 [1.91 to 2.02]; P<0.001), patients who had missed one or fewer treatments (1.83 [1.78 to 1.88]) versus those who had missed more than one treatment (1.92 [1.85 to 1.98]; P=0.002) and those who had shortened treatment (for one treatment or less, 1.84 [1.77 to 1.90]; for two to four treatments, 1

  4. A patient satisfaction survey for haemophilia treatment centres.

    PubMed

    Hacker, M R; Primeaux, J; Manco-Johnson, M J

    2006-03-01

    The importance of patient satisfaction has continued to grow such that patient satisfaction is now viewed as a vital component of health-care delivery. This is evidenced by the expanding body of research in the area and the use of measures of patient satisfaction as indicators of health-care quality. The value of patient satisfaction is particularly apparent in the setting of chronic disease where medical care utilization is high, compliance with therapy is critical and the patient-provider relationship is often long-term. Although several validated tools exist to quantify general measures of patient satisfaction, there is a recognized need for disease-specific instruments. Not only are there issues that are unique to haemophilia, but many patients receive care via a specialized comprehensive clinic model. The authors were unaware of an instrument that could adequately address patient satisfaction issues specific to haemophilia; thus, they undertook to develop one. The patient satisfaction survey presented here contains fixed-choice, Likert-scale and open-ended questions adapted from previously validated questionnaires. Assessment of face validity and internal consistency indicate that the survey is measuring one underlying construct - patient satisfaction. Information acquired through this survey will provide a quantitative assessment of patient satisfaction within a clinic population of persons with bleeding disorders and could be used to guide decisions regarding provision of health-care services. PMID:16476091

  5. The Effect of Bedside Presentations in the Emergency Department on Patient Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Schranz, Craig I.; Sobehart, Robert J.; Fallgatter, Kiva; Riffenburgh, Robert H.; Matteucci, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Due to increasing time constraints, the use of bedside presentations in resident education has declined. We examined whether patient satisfaction in the emergency department is affected when first-year residents present at the bedside with attendings. Methods We performed an observational, prospective, nonblinded study in the emergency department of a military teaching hospital. We alternately assigned first-year residents to present a convenience sample of 248 patients to the attending physician at the patient's bedside or away from the patient. We measured patient satisfaction by using the Patient Satisfaction Questionaire-18 (PSQ-18), a validated survey instrument that utilizes a Likert scale, and additional nonvalidated survey questions involving Likert and visual analog scales. Results While the median PSQ-18 score of 74 (95% confidence interval [CI], 72–76) was higher for patient satisfaction when residents made bedside presentations than that for standard presentations, 72 (95% CI, 70–74), the difference did not reach statistical significance (P  =  .33). Conclusion There was no significant difference in overall patient satisfaction between residents' bedside presentations and presentations to attendings away from the patient. Although not significant, the differences noted in PSQ-18 subscales of communication, general satisfaction, and interpersonal manner warrant further investigation. Patients did not appear to be uncomfortable with having their care discussed and with having subsequent resident education at the bedside. Future research on patient satisfaction after implementation of standardized bedside teaching techniques 5 help further elucidate this relationship. PMID:23205195

  6. Travelling for radiation cancer treatment: patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Margaret I; Gray, Ross E; Mcgowan, Tom; Brunskill, Ian; Steggles, Shawn; Sellick, Scott; Bezjak, Andrea; McLeese, Donna

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted for the purpose of describing cancer patients' satisfaction with their care when they had to travel unexpectedly away from home for treatment. Ontario initiated a rereferral program for cancer patients who needed radiation therapy when the waiting lists in southern Ontario became lengthy. Patients travelled to the United States or northern Ontario for their care. A standardized survey containing 25 items with five-point Likert scale responses was mailed to all patients who participated in the rereferral program, following completion of their treatment. Items covered patient experiences before leaving home, in preparing for travel, and staying at the cancer facilities away from home. A total of 466 (55.8%) patients returned the survey. Overall, patients were satisfied with their care. However, there were a number of areas identified by patients where improvements could be made. These areas included access to support prior to leaving home, access to information about supportive care services while away from home, and sensitivity to personal needs in making arrangements for travel. Provision of information and support are important to cancer patients having to travel for cancer treatment. PMID:15969333

  7. Appreciation and Life Satisfaction: Does Appreciation Uniquely Predict Life Satisfaction above Gender, Coping Skills, Self-Esteem, and Positive Affectivity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halle, Joshua Solomon

    2015-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research was to examine whether appreciation explains variance in life satisfaction after controlling for gender, positive affectivity, self-esteem, and coping skills. Two hundred ninety-eight undergraduates went to the informed consent page of the online survey composed of the Appreciation Scale, the Satisfaction With…

  8. Participatory storytelling online: a complementary model of patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Born, Karen; Rizo, Carlos; Seeman, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Measuring patient satisfaction is an important quality improvement technique. The World Wide Web offers new approaches to understanding patient satisfaction and stories about healthcare encounters. In this paper, we suggest that there is a wealth of patients' stories being told online, in real time, on social networking and on social rating websites. This patient-generated, publicly available information can complement existing patient satisfaction data and can provide insights into patients' values, perspectives and expectations - and can suggest ways to improve the patient's experience along the continuum of care. PMID:20057238

  9. The linkage between employee and patient satisfaction in home healthcare.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Robert J; Marren, Joan M; Davin, Denise M; Morgan, Cynthia J

    2009-01-01

    Greater accountability for patient outcomes, reduced reimbursement, and a protracted nursing shortage have made employee and patient satisfaction results central performance metrics and strategic imperatives in healthcare. Key questions are whether the two interact and if so, how can that relationship be leveraged to obtain maximum gains in both employee and patient satisfaction. This article examines the experience of a large, nonprofit home care agency in exploring these issues. The agency found that organizational commitment to patient care and customer service are fundamental to patient satisfaction. The more employees perceived that the organization is focused on quality and customers, the more patient satisfaction increased. Among nurses, work-life balance, fair compensation, and regard for employees all influenced patient satisfaction. PMID:19350879

  10. A comparison of governance types and patient satisfaction outcomes.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, L R

    2001-04-01

    Given our dynamic healthcare marketplace, it is imperative to examine the context in which nurses function. A unit level study was conducted to investigate the influence of governance type on organizational culture, nurse work satisfaction, nurse retention, and patient satisfaction. The results of the study will be of value to nurse executives wanting to redesign the context for nursing service to improve outcomes, including nurse and patient satisfaction. PMID:11324332

  11. Determinants of Patient Satisfaction During Receipt of Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Famiglietti, Robin M. Neal, Emily C.; Edwards, Timothy J.; Allen, Pamela K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the correlations and relative contributions of components of a radiation oncology-specific patient satisfaction survey to their overall satisfaction scores. Methods and Materials: From September 2006 through August 2012, we prospectively collected data from 8069 patients receiving radiation treatments with a 26-question survey. Each question was rated on a 10-point Likert scale. We analyzed the correlation between scores for each question and the overall satisfaction question. We also dichotomized the scores to reflect satisfaction versus dissatisfaction and used logistic regression to assess the relationship between items in 4 domains (the patient–provider relationship, access and environmental issues, wait times, and educational information) and overall satisfaction. Results: Scores on all questions correlated with overall patient satisfaction scores (P<.0001). Satisfaction with patient–provider relationships had the greatest influence on overall satisfaction (R{sup 2}=0.4219), followed by wait times (R{sup 2}=0.4000), access/environment (R{sup 2}=0.3837), and patient education (R{sup 2}=0.3700). The specific variables with the greatest effect on patient satisfaction were the care provided by radiation therapists (odds ratio 1.91) and pain management (odds ratio 1.29). Conclusions: We found that patients' judgment of provider relationships in an outpatient radiation oncology setting were the greatest contributors to their overall satisfaction ratings. Other measures typically associated with patient satisfaction (phone access, scheduling, and ease of the check-in process) correlated less strongly with overall satisfaction. These findings may be useful for other practices preparing to assess patient ratings of quality of care.

  12. Predictors of overall satisfaction of cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Schiebe, Martina; Pinkert, Uwe; Ahmad, Tahera; Schäfer, Christof; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Franz, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Background Reporting the experiences and satisfaction of patients, as well as their quality of care scores is an emerging recommendation in health care systems. Many aspects of patients’ experience determine their overall satisfaction. The aim of this evaluation was to define the main factors contributing to the satisfaction of patients undergoing radiotherapy in an outpatient setting. Patients and methods A total of 1,710 patients with a histologically proven cancer, who were treated in our department between 2012 and 2014, were recruited for this prospective evaluation. At the end of therapy, each patient was asked to grade the skills and the care provided by radiation therapists, physicians, and physician’s assistants, as well as the overall satisfaction during therapy. Statistical analysis was performed to determine which parameters had the greatest influence on overall satisfaction. Results Overall satisfaction with the provided care was high with a mean satisfaction score of 1.4. Significant correlations were found between overall satisfaction and each of the following survey items: courtesy, protection of privacy, professional skills and care provided by the radiation therapists and physicians, accuracy of provided information, and cleanliness. Linear regression analysis demonstrated that courteous behavior and the protection of privacy were the strongest predictors for overall satisfaction (P<0.001), followed by care and skills of physicians and radiation therapists. Patients suffering from head and neck cancer expressed lower overall satisfaction. Conclusion Based on our prospectively acquired data, we were able to identify and confirm key factors for patient satisfaction in an outpatient radiooncological cancer center. From these results, we conclude that patients want most importantly to be treated with courtesy, protection of privacy and care. PMID:26491266

  13. Does the quality of advanced prosthetic dentistry determine patient satisfaction?

    PubMed

    Hakestam, U; Karlsson, T; Söderfeldt, B; Rydén, O; Glantz, P O

    1997-12-01

    In a clinical follow-up study 42 patients were selected from an original sample of 335 individuals who had undergone extensive prosthetic treatment. The selection was done in accordance with a treatment satisfaction measure. The selected patients' appliances were classified in accordance with the California Dental Association (CDA) quality assessment system. Altogether, most of the new reconstructions were rated as satisfactory. The removable partial dentures had a somewhat higher share of non-acceptable appliances according to the CDA criteria. There was an association between the CDA categories and patient satisfaction. Using logistic regression analysis and knowing the CDA rating, we could correctly classify 67% of the patients with regard to the satisfaction measure. The satisfaction measure was modified on the basis of an interview, improving the model to 83% correctly classified. It was concluded that the technical quality of the prosthodontic treatment was associated with patient satisfaction. PMID:9477029

  14. 78 FR 53195 - Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request... patient satisfaction with VA's dental services. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the... refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0764 (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey)'' in any...

  15. Patient Satisfaction after Treatment of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Maryam M.; Bertenthal, Daniel; Sen, Saunak; Sahay, Anju; Chren, Mary-Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is an important aspect of patient-centered care, but has not been systematically studied after treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), the most prevalent cancer. Objective To compare patient satisfaction after treatment for NMSC and to determine factors associated with better satisfaction. Methods We prospectively measured patient, tumor and care characteristics in 834 consecutive patients at two centers before and after destruction, excision and Mohs surgery. We evaluated factors associated with short-term and long-term satisfaction. Results In all treatment groups, patients were more satisfied with the interpersonal manners of the staff, communication, and financial aspects of their care, than with the technical quality, time with the clinician, and accessibility of their care (p<0.05). Short-term satisfaction did not differ across treatment groups. In multivariable regression models adjusting for patient, tumor, and care characteristics, higher long-term satisfaction was independently associated with younger age, better pre-treatment mental health and skin-related quality of life, and treatment with Mohs surgery (p<0.05). Conclusions Long-term patient satisfaction after treatment of NMSC is related to pre-treatment patient characteristics (mental health, skin-related quality of life) as well as treatment type (Mohs) but not related to tumor characteristics. These results can guide informed decision-making for treatment of NMSC. PMID:19438672

  16. Chatting behavior and patient satisfaction in the outpatient encounter.

    PubMed Central

    Daaleman, Timothy P.; Mueller, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Communication studies suggest that patient sociodemographic factors are embedded within medical encounters and impact patient expectations, judgments, and outcomes, such as satisfaction. Physician chatting has been suggested as one way to enhance patient satisfaction; however, little is known about chatting within the context of the clinical encounter or of the interaction of chatting with patient sociodemographic factors and patient satisfaction. The study's purpose was to determine the prevalence and patterns of chatting, and to examine the association of chatting with patient sociodemographic factors and patient satisfaction with their physician. A convenience sample of adult outpatients from an urban family practice underwent an exit interview. A total of 105 patients participated; 63 (61%) reported chatting from their recent encounter. No sociodemographic differences were observed between patients reporting chatting and those reporting no chatting. Chatting behavior pertaining to the patient's family or friends was the predominant topic, and more nonwhite (30%) than white (13%) patients reported this activity (p<0.001). There was no significant difference in satisfaction scores between patients that reported chatting behavior and those that did not (23.73 vs. 22.79, p=0.076). In addition, there was no difference in patient satisfaction scores for physician personal manner, technical skill, visit explanation, time spent with the physician, and overall visit between the chatting and nonchatting groups. PMID:15160982

  17. Communication skills to ensure patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Shendurnikar, Niranjan; Thakkar, Pareshkumar A

    2013-11-01

    Every pediatrician would want to satisfy their patients and their parents to sustain good practice, earn name and fame and simultaneously to avoid litigation in this era of consumer protection act. This can be achieved only by use of good communication skills. Today the patients demand time, information and want their questions to be answered. They expect politeness, empathy and human touch from doctors. Time constraints, arrogance, telephone calls, language barriers and cultural insensitivity are the important barriers to good communication. Research has shown that doctor, who undergoes training to acquire good communication skills, can better satisfy his patients. Good communication skill is an art which can be acquired or improved by putting conscious efforts in day to day practice. Such skills should also be incorporated as part of medical teaching curriculum. Asking open ended questions, effective listening, appropriate praise, providing enough information as part of advice and finally checking their understanding, are the key areas of communication during medical interview. During this process pediatrician should ensure to address the parental concerns, should empathize with parents and involve parents in decision making. This will not only ensure satisfaction of parents but also their adherence to the therapy and to the pediatrician. PMID:23378053

  18. Patient satisfaction and ethnic identity among American Indian older adults.

    PubMed

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Kunovich, Robert M; Jacobsen, Clemma; Goldberg, Jack

    2004-12-01

    Work in the field of culturally competent medical care draws on studies showing that minority Americans often report lower satisfaction with care than White Americans and recommends that providers should adapt care to patients' cultural needs. However, empirical evidence in support of cultural competence models is limited by reliance upon measurements of racial rather than ethnic identity and also by a near-total neglect of American Indians. This project explored the relationship between ethnic identity and satisfaction using survey data collected from 115 chronically ill American Indian patients >or=50 years at a Cherokee Nation clinic. Satisfaction scores were high overall and comparable to those found in the general population. Nevertheless, analysis using hierarchical linear modeling showed that patients' self-rated American Indian ethnic identity was significantly associated with satisfaction. Specifically, patients who rated themselves high on the measure of American Indian ethnic identity reported reduced scores on satisfaction with health care providers' social skill and attentiveness, as compared to those who rated themselves lower. Significant associations remained after controlling for patients' sex, age, education, marital status, self-reported health, wait time, and number of previous visits. There were no significant associations between patients' American Indian ethnic identity and satisfaction with provider's technical skill and shared decision-making. Likewise, there were no significant associations between satisfaction and a separate measure of White American ethnic identity, although a suggestive trend was observed for satisfaction with provider's social skill. Our findings demonstrate the importance of including measures of ethnic identity in studies of medical satisfaction in racial minority populations. They support the importance of adapting care to patient's cultural needs, and they highlight the particular significance of interpersonal

  19. Understanding the factors that influence patient satisfaction with ambulance services.

    PubMed

    Bogomolova, Svetlana; Tan, P J; Dunn, S P; Bizjak-Mikic, M

    2016-01-01

    The quality of ambulance services has an immense impact on patients' future well-being and quality of life. Patient satisfaction is one of the key metrics for evaluating the quality of this service. Yet, the patient satisfaction measurement may be limited in its ability to accurately reflect this service quality, and even reflect factors beyond the patient experiences. We analyze 10 years of survey data to reveal a number of factors that systematically bias ambulance satisfaction ratings. Taking into account these biases provides more robust comparison of ambulance performance over time or across different jurisdictions. PMID:27295008

  20. Emotional Awareness, Relationship Quality, and Satisfaction in Patients With Parkinson's Disease and Their Spousal Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Lucia; Pomponi, Massimiliano; Demartini, Benedetta; Ricciardi, Diego; Morabito, Bruno; Bernabei, Roberto; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the relationship quality and satisfaction in couples, in which one partner had PD, obtaining the perspective of both patients and partner and to examine the impact of alexithymia, empathy, depression, and anxiety on ratings of relationship quality and satisfaction. Fifteen PD patients and partners completed the following scales: the Dyadic Adjustment Scale; Couple Satisfaction Index (CSI); the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale; the Empathy Quotient; the Hamilton Depression and the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A). We evaluated patients' motor functions by means of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and patients' quality of life by means of the PD Questionnaire. Patients were significantly less satisfied with the relationship than their partners as revealed by CSI (p = 0.031) and they were more depressed (p = 0.003) and anxious (p = 0.015). A negative correlation between measures of relationship quality and satisfaction and alexithymia was found in the patients group. No correlations were found between measures of relationship quality and satisfaction (both of patients and partners) and any other demographical and clinical variables. CSI and HAM-A were predictors of patient's social support evaluation. The presence of alexithymia in PD is an important factor affecting relationship quality and satisfaction. PMID:26226241

  1. Patient Satisfaction: What We Can Learn from Other Industries.

    PubMed

    Homisak, Lynn; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Most doctors are appreciated by their patients, and most patients are satisfied with the care they receive from their doctors. However, how many doctors are reaching out and asking, as New York's former Mayor Koch often did, "Hey, how am I doing?" This article reviews two examples of effective methods used by other industries to gather data and evaluate customer satisfaction, and provides ideas and suggestions to measure patient satisfaction in a medical practice. PMID:26223116

  2. Community health insurance schemes & patient satisfaction - evidence from India

    PubMed Central

    Devadasan, N.; Criel, Bart; Damme, Wim Van; Lefevre, Pierre; Manoharan, S.; der Stuyft, Patrick Van

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: Quality of care is an important determinant for utilizing health services. In India, the quality of care in most health services is poor. The government recognizes this and has been working on both supply and demand aspects. In particular, it is promoting community health insurance (CHI) schemes, so that patients can access quality services. This observational study was undertaken to measure the level of satisfaction among insured and uninsured patients in two CHI schemes in India. Methods: Patient satisfaction was measured, which is an outcome of good quality care. Two CHI schemes, Action for Community Organisation, Rehabilitation and Development (ACCORD) and Kadamalai Kalanjiam Vattara Sangam (KKVS), were chosen. Randomly selected, insured and uninsured households were interviewed. The household where a patient was admitted to a hospital was interviewed in depth about the health seeking behaviour, the cost of treatment and the satisfaction levels. Results: It was found that at both ACCORD and KKVS, there was no significant difference in the levels of satisfaction between the insured and uninsured patients. The main reasons for satisfaction were the availability of doctors and medicines and the recovery by the patient. Interpretation & conclusions: Our study showed that insured hospitalized patients did not have significantly higher levels of satisfaction compared to uninsured hospitalized patients. If CHI schemes want to improve the quality of care for their clients, so that they adhere to the scheme, the scheme managers need to negotiate actively for better quality of care with empanelled providers. PMID:21321418

  3. A survey on postanesthetic patient satisfaction in a university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Adel Ali; Alomar, Yasser Mohammed; Mohammed, Ghali Abdulrahman; Al-Fozan, Mazen Saud; Al-Harbi, Mohammed Saleh; Alrobai, Khalid Abduraziz; Zahoor, Haroon

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Patient satisfaction after anesthesia is an important outcome of hospital care. The aim is to evaluate the postoperative patient satisfaction during the patient stay at King Khalid University Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Patients and Methods: Three hundred and fifty-three patients who underwent surgery under general/regional anesthesia were surveyed. They were interviewed face to face on the first postoperative day. We recorded pain and pain controls in addition to some common complication of anesthesia like nausea and vomiting (postoperative nausea and vomiting) as a parameter to assess the rate of patient's satisfaction. Results: The overall level of satisfaction was high (95.2%); 17 (4.8%) patients were dissatisfied with their anesthetic care. There was a strong relation between patient dissatisfaction and: (i) Patients with poor postoperative pain control 13 (12.4%), (ii) patients with moderate nausea 8 (11.1%) and (iii) patients with static and dynamic severe pain 6 (21.4). Several factors were associated with dissatisfaction can be prevented, or better treated. Conclusion: We concluded that the patient satisfaction was high. Postoperative visit should be routinely performed in order to assess the quality and severity of postoperative pain, nausea and vomiting and the other side-effects postoperatively. PMID:26240551

  4. Patient satisfaction after total knee arthroplasty: an Asian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Thambiah, Matthew Dhanaraj; Nathan, Sahaya; Seow, Branden ZX; Liang, Shen; Lingaraj, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is an effective method for alleviating pain and restoring knee function in patients with severe osteoarthritis. However, despite the improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, it has been reported that up to 19% of patients are dissatisfied after their operations. The aim of this study was to evaluate patient satisfaction levels after TKA in an Asian cohort, as well as assess the correlation between patient satisfaction levels and the results of traditional physician-based scoring systems. METHODS The medical data of 103 Asian patients who underwent 110 TKAs between December 2008 and June 2009 were obtained from our hospital’s Joint Replacement Registry. The minimum follow-up period was one year and patient expectations were assessed before TKA. Patient satisfaction was assessed postoperatively using a 5-point Likert scale. Reasons for patient dissatisfaction were recorded. Standardised instruments (e.g. the Knee Society Score, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index [WOMAC] and the generic Short Form-36 health survey) were used to assess the patient’s functional status and the severity of symptoms pre- and postoperatively. RESULTS Among the 110 TKAs performed, 92.8% resulted in patient satisfaction. Patient satisfaction correlated with postoperative WOMAC function scores (p = 0.028), postoperative WOMAC final scores (p = 0.040) and expectations being met (p = 0.033). CONCLUSION Although there was a high level of patient satisfaction following TKA in our cohort of Asian patients, a significant minority was dissatisfied. Patient satisfaction is an important outcome measure and should be assessed in addition to traditional outcome scores. PMID:26034317

  5. Enhancing Nurses' Pain Assessment to Improve Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Diana L; Hoffman, Leslie A; Fioravanti, Marie; Medley, Deborah Poskus; Zullo, Thomas G; Tuite, Patricia K

    2016-01-01

    Patient satisfaction with pain management has increasing importance with Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores tied to reimbursement. Previous studies indicate patient satisfaction is influenced by staff interactions. This single-group pre/post design study aimed to improve satisfaction with pain management in older adults undergoing total joint replacement. This was a single-group pre-/posttest design. Nurse (knowledge assessment) and patient (American Pain Society Patient Outcomes Questionnaire Revised [APS-POQ-R], HCAHPS) responses evaluated pre- and postimplementation of the online educational program. Nurse focus group followed intervention. Nurses' knowledge improved significantly (p < .006) postintervention. HCAHPS scores (3-month average) for items reflecting patient satisfaction improved from 70.2 ± 9.5 to 73.9 ± 6.0. APS-POQ-R scores did not change. Focus group comments indicated need for education regarding linkages between pain management and patient satisfaction. Education on linkages between patient satisfaction and pain management can improve outcomes; education on strategies to further improve practice may enhance ability to achieve benchmarks. PMID:27028687

  6. Factors Affecting Teacher Satisfaction in an Urban School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpert, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to distinguish factors that influence the satisfaction levels of teachers in urban school districts. This work also distinguished factors that directly impacted teachers' level of satisfaction towards their work and their attitude towards the administration of their schools. Forty-one teachers from two kindergarten…

  7. Factors Affecting M-Learners' Course Satisfaction and Learning Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joo, Young Ju; Joung, Sunyoung; Lim, Eugene; Kim, Hae Jin

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether college students' self-efficacy, level of learning strategy use, academic burnout, and school support predict course satisfaction and learning persistence. To this end, self-efficacy, level of learning strategy use, academic burnout, and school support were used as prediction variables, and course satisfaction and…

  8. Relationship between Depression and Treatment Satisfaction among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Jon; Adelman, Alan; Gabbay, Robert; Aňel-Tiangco, Raquel M

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression has been shown to adversely affect glycemic control. The purpose of this study is to examine the association between depression and treatment satisfaction in patients with diabetes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Baseline data was collected on 545 patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes enrolled in a study that examined the effectiveness of diabetes nurse case managers. Depression was measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) questionnaire, and treatment satisfaction, using the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQ). RESULTS: The majority of participants (59%) were female, with a high percentage (41%) of Hispanic/Latino participants with a mean HbA1C of 8.4%. The prevalence of depression in this population was 35.6%. High CES-D scores were associated with elevated levels of HbA1C and LDL cholesterol (p<0.001). The relationship between depression and treatment satisfaction was significant (p<0.001), indicating that as depression increases, treatment satisfaction decreases. DISCUSSION: We identified a significant relationship between depression and treatment satisfaction in this group of poorly controlled type 2 diabetes patients. Although causation cannot be determined, it is possible that patients who are depressed are less likely to be satisfied with their treatment. This could lead to decreased patient adherence, ultimately resulting in poor glycemic control. PMID:23243556

  9. Relationship between Depression and Treatment Satisfaction among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Jon; Adelman, Alan; Gabbay, Robert; Aňel-Tiangco, Raquel M

    2012-01-01

    Background Depression has been shown to adversely affect glycemic control. The purpose of this study is to examine the association between depression and treatment satisfaction in patients with diabetes. Materials and methods Baseline data was collected on 545 patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes enrolled in a study that examined the effectiveness of diabetes nurse case managers. Depression was measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) questionnaire, and treatment satisfaction, using the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQ). Results The majority of participants (59%) were female, with a high percentage (41%) of Hispanic/Latino participants with a mean HbA1C of 8.4%. The prevalence of depression in this population was 35.6%. High CES-D scores were associated with elevated levels of HbA1C and LDL cholesterol (p<0.001). The relationship between depression and treatment satisfaction was significant (p<0.001), indicating that as depression increases, treatment satisfaction decreases. Discussion We identified a significant relationship between depression and treatment satisfaction in this group of poorly controlled type 2 diabetes patients. Although causation cannot be determined, it is possible that patients who are depressed are less likely to be satisfied with their treatment. This could lead to decreased patient adherence, ultimately resulting in poor glycemic control. PMID:23243556

  10. Long-term patient satisfaction of gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Gkolfakis, Paraskevas; Triantafyllou, Maria; Ndini, Xhoela; Melissaratou, Anastasia; Moustafa, Giannis-Aimant; Xanthopoulou, Eleni; Tziatzios, Georgios; Vlachonikolou, Georgia; Papadopoulos, Vasilios; Pantelakis, Evdoxos; Malli, Chrysoula; Dimitriadis, George D.

    2016-01-01

    Background We prospectively assessed patient satisfaction in a Greek Academic endoscopy facility. Methods Consecutive outpatients filled a satisfaction questionnaire right after their endoscopy (D1), 3 days (D3) and 3 months (M3) later. Overall patient satisfaction was measured by their willingness to repeat endoscopy in our facility and to further recommend it. Participant satisfaction regarding pre-procedural, procedural and post-procedural issues was measured using a five-step Likert scale in 19 items with 4 and 5 scores indicating favorable responses. Pareto analysis was used to determine service issues requiring improvement. Late adverse events were recorded at D3 and M3 assessments. Results Over six months, 501 patients participated (89.4% and 87.8% response rate at D3 and M3 assessments, respectively). More than 97% of the participants would repeat the procedure in our facility and would recommend our endoscopy service, at all three assessments. Pareto analysis identified waiting time until the appointment and on the day of the examination, discomfort during and after the endoscopy, time to obtain the pathology report and overall management of the patient problems as the issues requiring improvement. No predictor of high satisfaction score has been identified. No serious late adverse events were reported. Conclusion Despite the overall high levels of patient satisfaction, management of patient discomfort and organizational issues need improvement. PMID:27065732

  11. Satisfaction with ambulatory care and compliance in older patients.

    PubMed

    Linn, M W; Linn, B S; Stein, S R

    1982-06-01

    Predictors of satisfaction with ambulatory care and compliance in 267 older and 581 younger patients were determined. Each patient rated a 45-item satisfaction-with-care-scale. Race, SES, marital status, distance from clinic, severity of illness (as measured by physician ratings, self-health assessment, number of medications, number of diagnoses, and number of clinic visits and hospitalizations in the prior year), and physician expectations of improvement were entered as predictors into stepwise multiple regression analyses for the elderly and the young. Predictors of better satisfaction in the young were less severe conditions, being nearer to the clinic and having fewer prior clinic visits over the year. In the elderly, having fewer visits to the clinic, more expectation of improvement by the physician and less severe conditions were associated with better satisfaction. Severity and clinic visits were predictors in each age group. The young, however, were also influenced by distance from the clinic. The elderly were influenced separately by the physician's prognosis. Thus, when the more impaired elderly are seen frequently without expecting a benefit, their satisfaction with care is poor. Further, satisfaction with care was correlated significantly with compliance in the elderly but not in the young. Findings suggest that improving satisfaction with care might also improve rates of compliance with the medical regimen in older patients. PMID:7109743

  12. [The satisfaction of personal needs in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Sukhova, E V

    2005-01-01

    The founder of humanistic psychology A. Maslow divided the needs of a personality into several levels--from the lowest to the highest ones. Higher-leveled needs rise when the lower-leveled needs are satisfied. A great deal of factors affect the origination and satisfaction of needs, but they are always interrelated with social values. The extent to which personality needs are satisfied in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis has not been studied. A special questionnaire has been drawn up to study the extent to which personality needs are met. Its suitability has been determined, by using a group of patients with bronchial asthma. The extent to which personality needs are satisfied in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis was studied in 178 patients with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis and 253 patients with fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis. The results have shown that the extent to which personality needs are satisfied in patients with tuberculosis is lower than that in apparently healthy individuals of the same social status. In females with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis, the needs for safety are satisfied to a lesser extent. In those with fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis, the extent to which the physiological, safety, and self-realization needs is decreased. In males with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis, the physiological, noetic, and self-realization needs are satisfied to a lesser extent. In those with fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis, the extent to which the physiological, safety, group decision-making, noetic and self-realization needs is decreased. PMID:15801639

  13. Acts of kindness and acts of novelty affect life satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Kathryn E; Bardi, Anat

    2010-01-01

    The present experiment was designed to establish the effects of acts of kindness and acts of novelty on life satisfaction. Participants aged 18-60 took part on a voluntary basis. They were randomly assigned to perform either acts of kindness, acts of novelty, or no acts on a daily basis for 10 days. Their life satisfaction was measured before and after the 10-day experiment. As expected, performing acts of kindness or acts of novelty resulted in an increase in life satisfaction. PMID:20575332

  14. Physician Satisfaction in Practices That Transformed Into Patient-Centered Medical Homes: A Statewide Study in New York.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Joshua E; Kern, Lisa M; Silver, Michael; Jung, Hye-Young; Kaushal, Rainu

    2016-07-01

    Patient-centered medical home (PCMH) transformation can significantly affect physicians' job satisfaction, which in turn can affect the quality of patient care. Between November 2012 and March 2013, the study team surveyed 159 community-based physicians in 159 practice sites that had experienced PCMH practice transformations in New York State. Of the 159 physicians, 121 responded (77% response rate) to the online survey. Nearly two thirds (60%) of physicians reported being somewhat or very satisfied overall with their practice after PCMH transformation. Overall satisfaction was lower than satisfaction with specific domains of practice: patient-centered care (82%), coordination of care (81%), access to care (79%), efficiency (76%), organizational culture (69%), and quality (69%). Although the physicians were moderately satisfied with care quality in their practices after PCMH transformation, their overall satisfaction was notably lower. The findings reveal a need to identify factors beyond quality for measuring physician satisfaction in PCMH transformed practices. PMID:25877964

  15. Patient Satisfaction in Malaysia's Busiest Outpatient Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Perianayagam, Wilson; Abdul Manaf, Rizal; Ali Jadoo, Saad Ahmed; Al-Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore factors associated with patient satisfaction of outpatient medical care in Malaysia. A cross-sectional exit survey was conducted among 340 outpatients aged between 13 and 80 years after successful clinical consultations and treatment acquirements using convenience sampling at the outpatient medical care of Tengku Ampuan Rahimah Hospital (HTAR), Malaysia, being the country's busiest medical outpatient facility. A survey that consisted of sociodemography, socioeconomic, and health characteristics and the validated Short-Form Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ-18) scale were used. Patient satisfaction was the highest in terms of service factors or tangible priorities, particularly “technical quality” and “accessibility and convenience,” but satisfaction was low in terms of service orientation of doctors, particularly the “time spent with doctor,” “interpersonal manners,” and “communication” during consultations. Gender, income level, and purpose of visit to the clinic were important correlates of patient satisfaction. Effort to improve service orientation among doctors through periodical professional development programs at hospital and national level is essential to boost the country's health service satisfaction. PMID:25654133

  16. Patient satisfaction in Malaysia's busiest outpatient medical care.

    PubMed

    Ganasegeran, Kurubaran; Perianayagam, Wilson; Manaf, Rizal Abdul; Jadoo, Saad Ahmed Ali; Al-Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore factors associated with patient satisfaction of outpatient medical care in Malaysia. A cross-sectional exit survey was conducted among 340 outpatients aged between 13 and 80 years after successful clinical consultations and treatment acquirements using convenience sampling at the outpatient medical care of Tengku Ampuan Rahimah Hospital (HTAR), Malaysia, being the country's busiest medical outpatient facility. A survey that consisted of sociodemography, socioeconomic, and health characteristics and the validated Short-Form Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ-18) scale were used. Patient satisfaction was the highest in terms of service factors or tangible priorities, particularly "technical quality" and "accessibility and convenience," but satisfaction was low in terms of service orientation of doctors, particularly the "time spent with doctor," "interpersonal manners," and "communication" during consultations. Gender, income level, and purpose of visit to the clinic were important correlates of patient satisfaction. Effort to improve service orientation among doctors through periodical professional development programs at hospital and national level is essential to boost the country's health service satisfaction. PMID:25654133

  17. Patient satisfaction with glaucoma therapy: reality or myth?

    PubMed

    Lemij, Hans G; Hoevenaars, Juliette Gmm; van der Windt, Cees; Baudouin, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    While safe and effective treatments for glaucoma exist, their effectiveness is compromised by poor compliance. Patients who have problems with their topical glaucoma medication are acknowledged to be at higher risk for poor compliance, frequent medication switching, and surgery. Patient satisfaction with therapy and its associated benefits have until recently taken second place to efficacy. The present study is a transverse cross-sectional epidemiological survey among glaucoma patients receiving therapy with prostaglandin analogs. The primary objective was to determine and characterize patient satisfaction with glaucoma therapy, and the secondary objective was to identify factors that may contribute to poor patient satisfaction. Ophthalmologists in the Netherlands included 199 patients and 164 were analyzed. Patients were predominantly elderly with early, primary, open angle glaucoma. Eighty-nine percent of them stated they were satisfied or very satisfied with their treatment. However, signs of ocular surface disorder on ophthalmological examination were evident in 44% of patients, corneal fluorescein staining was positive in 28% of patients, and 38% of patients were using tear substitutes. The prevalence of blepharitis/meibomian gland dysfunction and dry eye was more than twice as high after the commencement of therapy compared with before therapy. Univariate analysis revealed that patient dissatisfaction with their glaucoma therapy was statistically significantly (P<0.001) associated with the presence of ocular surface disease, hyperemia, ocular signs, symptoms upon and between instillation, and the use of tear substitutes. Apparently, patients in the present study are satisfied with their treatment; 89% expressed satisfaction compared with only 11% who professed dissatisfaction. The results suggest that even if local adverse events and ocular surface disease, in particular, contribute to glaucoma patient dissatisfaction, only a minority of patients expressed

  18. Measurement of Patient Satisfaction: The Smith-Falvo Patient-Doctor Interaction Scale

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, François; Fontaine, Denise; Bourque, André; Côté, Luc

    1988-01-01

    Patient satisfaction has been considered important for many years. This article provides a review of various methods that have been developed to measure patient satisfaction and describes the use of the Smith-Falvo scale in determining patient satisfaction with the medical services provided by residents in the Verdun Family Practice Program. In view of the limited range of scores provided by the use of this scale, the authors recommend that further research be done to develop a method of assessment of patient satisfaction that will take into account the duration of patient-physician interviews. PMID:20469488

  19. Unequally Distributed Psychological Assets: Are There Social Disparities in Optimism, Life Satisfaction, and Positive Affect?

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Julia K.; Chen, Ying; Williams, David R.; Ryff, Carol; Kubzansky, Laura D.

    2015-01-01

    Socioeconomic status is associated with health disparities, but underlying psychosocial mechanisms have not been fully identified. Dispositional optimism may be a psychosocial process linking socioeconomic status with health. We hypothesized that lower optimism would be associated with greater social disadvantage and poorer social mobility. We also investigated whether life satisfaction and positive affect showed similar patterns. Participants from the Midlife in the United States study self-reported their optimism, satisfaction, positive affect, and socioeconomic status (gender, race/ethnicity, education, occupational class and prestige, income). Social disparities in optimism were evident. Optimistic individuals tended to be white and highly educated, had an educated parent, belonged to higher occupational classes with more prestige, and had higher incomes. Findings were generally similar for satisfaction, but not positive affect. Greater optimism and satisfaction were also associated with educational achievement across generations. Optimism and life satisfaction are consistently linked with socioeconomic advantage and may be one conduit by which social disparities influence health. PMID:25671665

  20. Predicting Occupational Strain and Job Satisfaction: The Role of Stress, Coping, Personality, and Affectivity Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogarty, Gerard J.; Machin, M. Anthony; Albion, Majella J.; Sutherland, Lynette F.; Lalor, Gabrielle I.; Revitt, Susan

    1999-01-01

    Two studies showed that positive and negative affectivity influenced occupational stress, role strain, and coping. Study 3 added job satisfaction to the model, strengthening its predictive validity. Study 4's addition of personality measures did not improve prediction of job satisfaction and strain. (SK)

  1. Social-Cognitive Factors Affecting Clients' Career and Life Satisfaction after Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verbruggen, Marijke; Sels, Luc

    2010-01-01

    This study examines factors affecting clients' career and life satisfaction in the first 6 months after having participated in career counseling. In particular, we tested a large subset of the recent social-cognitive model of work satisfaction of Lent and Brown using a longitudinal data set of 195 former counseling clients. Our results showed that…

  2. How Does Sensitivity Training of Health Care Workers Impact Patient Satisfaction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Vinci, Katrina Marie

    2010-01-01

    Health care of the 21st century is undergoing major changes due to a myriad of social factors affecting every level of society. From financial desperation due to the high cost of health care to the increased awareness of a generation asking for better services, the importance of patient satisfaction is paramount. The Centers for Medicare and…

  3. The Differential Effects of Chaplain Interventions on Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vanshdeep; Marin, Deborah B; Sosunov, Eugene; Ozbay, Fatih; Goldstein, Rafael; Handzo, George F

    2016-01-01

    There is an acute need to define the specific skills that make chaplains integral to the healthcare team. This prospective study attempts to identify those skills that may be specific to chaplains, for whom no other member of the health care team has similar training, and to examine if these skills have a differential effect on patient satisfaction. A total of 59 interventions were identified and grouped into 10 categories by focus groups comprised of chaplains. Subsequently, Principal Component Analysis yielded two independent variables; Component 1 representing the "Religious/Spiritual" dimension, and Component 2 representing the "Psychosocial" dimension of chaplains' work. The two components were used in an OLS regression model to measure patient satisfaction. Interventions that comprise the "Religious/Spiritual" dimension may be considered to be specific skills that chaplains contribute to patient care and these have a slightly stronger correlation with patient satisfaction than the interventions of the "Psychosocial" dimension. PMID:27191221

  4. Acceptance of illness and satisfaction with life among malaria patients in rivers state, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health condition is one of the basic factors affecting satisfaction with life, and the level of illness acceptance. The purpose of the study was to analyse the level of illness acceptance, the level of satisfaction with life among malaria patients, and the level of trust placed in the physician and the nurse. Methods The study employs the method of diagnostic survey based on standardised AIS and SWLS scales, as well as Anderson and Dedrick’s PPTS and PNTS scales. Results The average AIS level was 12 points, while the average level of SwL at the SWLS scale was 16.5 points. The average level of trust in the physician and the nurse amounted to 50.6 points and 51.4 points, respectively. The correlation between the level of illness acceptance and self-evaluated satisfaction with life was statistically significant, with R = 0.56. The marital status influenced the level of illness acceptance with p < 0.05 and the level of satisfaction with life with p < 0.05. The employment status affected the level of satisfaction with life with p < 0.05 and the level of illness acceptance with p < 0.05. Conclusions The majority of malaria patients did not accept their illness, while the level of satisfaction with life was low. The majority of respondents trusted their physician and nurse. There is a statistically significant correlation between the level of illness acceptance and the self-evaluated satisfaction with life. The marital status had a statistically significant effect on the acceptance of illness and the satisfaction with life. The individuals who had a job demonstrated higher levels of quality of life and illness acceptance. PMID:24885562

  5. Patient satisfaction with emergency oral health care in rural Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Ntabaye, M K; Scheutz, F; Poulsen, S

    1998-10-01

    Emergency oral health care, as conceived in Tanzania, is an on-demand service provided at a rural health center or dispensary by a Rural Medical Aide. The service includes: simple tooth extraction under local anesthesia, draining of abscesses, control of acute oral infection with appropriate drug therapy, first aid for maxillo-facial trauma, and recognition of oral conditions requiring patient referral for further care at the district or regional hospital dental clinic. The objective of the present study was to describe patient satisfaction with emergency oral health care services in rural Tanzania and determine the relative importance of factors influencing patient satisfaction. The study was carried out as a cross-sectional interview survey between April 1993 and May 1994 using a patient satisfaction questionnaire in rural villages in the Rungwe district of Tanzania. It included 206 patients aged 18 years or more who had received emergency oral health care between April 1993 and March 1994. Overall, 92.7% of the respondents reported that they were satisfied with the service. Patients who were married, had no formal education and lived more than 3 km from the dispensary were more likely to be satisfied with treatment. In a logistic regression model, a good working atmosphere at the dispensary, a good relationship between care provider and patients (art of care) and absence of post-treatment complications significantly influenced patient satisfaction with odds ratios of 10.3, 17.4 and 6.2, respectively. PMID:9792119

  6. Measuring patient satisfaction in complex continuing care/rehabilitation care.

    PubMed

    Malik, Navin; Alvaro, Celeste; Kuluski, Kerry; Wilkinson, Andrea J

    2016-04-18

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to develop a psychometrically validated survey to assess satisfaction in complex continuing care (CCC)/rehabilitation patients. Design/methodology/approach - A paper or computer-based survey was administered to 252 CCC/rehabilitation patients (i.e. post-acute hospital care setting for people who require ongoing care before returning home) across two hospitals in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Findings - Using factor analysis, five domains were identified with loadings above 0.4 for all but one item. Behavioral intention and information/communication showed the lowest patient satisfaction, while patient centredness the highest. Each domain correlated positively and significantly predicted overall satisfaction, with quality and safety showing the strongest predictive power and the healing environment the weakest. Gender made a significant contribution to predicting overall satisfaction, but age did not. Research limitations/implications - Results provide evidence of the survey's psychometric properties. Owing to a small sample, supplemental testing with a larger patient group is required to confirm the five-factor structure and to assess test-retest reliability. Originality/value - Improving the health system requires integrating patient perspectives. The patient experience, however, will vary depending on the population being served. This is the first psychometrically validated survey specific to a smaller specialty patient group receiving care at a CCC/rehabilitation facility in Canada. PMID:27120509

  7. Job Satisfaction and Performance: The Moderating Effects of Value Attainment and Affective Disposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochwarter, Wayne A.; Perrewe, Pamela L.; Ferris, Gerald R.; Brymer, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    A study of 270 hotel managers found that the strongest positive relationship between job satisfaction and performance occurred when high attainment of values associated with work was coupled with high-positive or low-negative affective disposition. (SK)

  8. General life satisfaction and domain-specific quality of life in chronic schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Kemmler, G; Holzner, B; Neudorfer, C; Meise, U; Hinterhuber, H

    1997-04-01

    Subjective quality of life (QOL) has often been assessed through questionnaires or structured interviews focusing on the person's satisfaction with various life domains. In particular, most QOL instruments for psychiatric patients are based on this concept. We report on a study casting some doubts on the rationale of this approach. We investigated the QOL of 48 chronic schizophrenic outpatients with a long-term disease history (at least 20 years) using a German version of the Lancashire QOL Profile. The interrelations between general life satisfaction, satisfaction with specific life domains, psychological well-being and psychopathology were studied using correlation analysis and multiple linear regression. Of the life domains assessed, only two, namely social relations and health, contributed significantly to the patients' general life satisfaction, while the others (including work, leisure, family relations and housing) did not. The subscales on psychological well-being (self-esteem, affective state) as well as psychopathology were found to be more closely associated with general life satisfaction than almost all life domains considered. The findings are discussed with regard to the specific situation of the group of patients investigated. They give indications that the life domain approach to measuring QOL has its limitations, in particular when applied to patients having adapted to a very restricted everyday life. PMID:9226984

  9. Patient and Practice Characteristics: Impact on Career Satisfaction of Obstetrician-Gynecologists.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Alex M

    2015-01-01

    This study examined demographic and practice characteristics that affect the career satisfaction of obstetrician-gynecologists. Data were retrieved from the 2008 Health Tracking Physician Survey, conducted by the Center for Studying Health System Change. The survey consisted of a nationally representative sample of physicians belonging to the American Medical Association. A final sample of 290 obstetrician-gynecologists was obtained from the study. Results indicated more than 80% of obstetrician-gynecologists were either "somewhat satisfied" or "very satisfied" with their careers in medicine. Nearly 56% were older than 48 years; 59% of respondents were men and 77% were of white race. The average obstetrician-gynecologist worked 54 hours per week in medically related activities. Regression analysis showed a significant relationship between obstetrician-gynecologist career satisfaction and the following: adequate time with patients, perceived quality of care, income, work hours, and revenue from Medicaid. In addition, Hispanic patients and the presence of formal written guidelines had a positive impact on career satisfaction. It was concluded that quality care, time with patients, work hours, and income are the major predictors of obstetrician-gynecologist career satisfaction. Further research is needed to understand the relationship between patient demographics and career satisfaction. PMID:26506293

  10. Patient Satisfaction After Limb Lengthening With Internal and External Devices.

    PubMed

    Landge, Vikrant; Shabtai, Lior; Gesheff, Martin; Specht, Stacy C; Herzenberg, John E

    2015-01-01

    External fixation has long been used for limb lengthening but can result in many complications, such as tethering of the soft tissues, pain, decreased joint motion, scarring, and nerve injury. Recently, a controllable, telescopic, internal lengthening nail was developed to address many of these issues and hopefully improve the overall experience for the patient. The satisfaction rates of internal and external fixation for limb lengthening were compared in 16 patients, all of whom have experienced both methods. Thirteen out of 16 patients responded to a limb-lengthening questionnaire, developed by the authors for this patient population. Patients preferred the internal device with respect to overall satisfaction, reduced pain, ease of physical therapy, and better cosmetic appearance. When asked which device they would prefer if another surgery was required, all patients chose the internal device. From the patients' perspective, the internal lengthening device is an improvement over the traditional external fixator. PMID:26688988

  11. Effective pain management and improvements in patients' outcomes and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, Diane

    2015-06-01

    Adequate pain management is a compelling and universal requirement in health care. Despite considerable advancements, the adverse physiological and psychological implications of unmanaged pain remain substantially unresolved. Ineffective pain management can lead to a marked decrease in desirable clinical and psychological outcomes and patients' overall quality of life. Effective management of acute pain results in improved patient outcomes and increased patient satisfaction. Although research and advanced treatments in improved practice protocols have documented progressive improvements in management of acute and postoperative pain, little awareness of the effectiveness of best practices persists. Improved interventions can enhance patients' attitudes to and perceptions of pain. What a patient believes and understands about pain is critical in influencing the patient's reaction to the pain therapy provided. Use of interdisciplinary pain teams can lead to improvements in patients' pain management, pain education, outcomes, and satisfaction. PMID:26033099

  12. Effect of a Biopsychosocial Approach on Patient Satisfaction and Patterns of Care

    PubMed Central

    Margalit, Alon P A; Glick, Shimon M; Benbassat, Jochanan; Cohen, Ayala

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is a growing tendency to include in medical curricula teaching programs that promote a biopsychosocial (BPS) approach to patient care. However, we know of no attempts to assess their effect on patterns of care and health care expenditures. OBJECTIVE To determine whether 1) a teaching intervention aiming to promote a BPS approach to care affects the duration of the doctor-patient encounter, health expenditures, and patient satisfaction with care, and 2) the teaching method employed affects these outcomes. METHODS We compared two teaching methods. The first one (didactic) consisted of reading assignments, lectures, and group discussions. The second (interactive) consisted of reading assignments, small group discussions, Balint groups, and role-playing exercises. We videotaped patient encounters 1 month before and 6 months after the teaching interventions, and recorded the duration of the videotaped encounters and whether the doctor had prescribed medications, ordered tests, and referred the patient to consultants. Patient satisfaction was measured by a structured questionnaire. RESULTS Both teaching interventions were followed by a reduction in medications prescribed and by improved patient satisfaction. Compared to the didactic group, the interactive group prescribed even fewer medications, ordered fewer laboratory examinations, and elicited higher scores of patient satisfaction. The average duration of the encounters after the didactic and interactive teaching interventions was longer than that before by 36 and 42 seconds, respectively. CONCLUSIONS A BPS teaching intervention may reduce health care expenditures and enhance patients' satisfaction, without changing markedly the duration of the encounter. An interactive method of instruction was more effective in achieving these objectives than a didactic one. PMID:15109309

  13. Patient satisfaction after insertion of an osseointegrated implant bridge.

    PubMed

    Hoogstraten, J; Lamers, L M

    1987-09-01

    The general and specific satisfaction of patients treated with a jawbone-anchored bridge was compared with their pretreatment satisfaction with dentures (condition 1, n = 31). Patients who asked for information on the osseointegration method but did not apply for treatment (condition 2, n = 32), and a group of patients that did not ask for information (condition 3, n = 10) were also questioned on their satisfaction with dentures. The results indicated that condition 1 subjects were both socially and physically substantially more satisfied with their bridge than with their earlier dentures. On all satisfaction measures condition 3 subjects indicated more satisfaction with dentures than either condition 1 or condition 2 subjects. There were no significant differences between the three groups on several personality characteristics (neuroticism, test-taking attitudes, internal/external control). Condition 3 subjects were less extrovert (socially oriented) than the other subjects. Condition 1 subjects made several suggestions towards improvement of the pre- and post-operation phase, concerning the amount of pain involved and the cleaning of the bridge, etc. PMID:3478456

  14. Patient Race and Provider Predict Patient Satisfaction Following Post-Mastectomy Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shaterian, Ashkaun; Gandy, Jessica; Lalezari, Shadi; Smith, Sarah; Paydar, Keyianoosh

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Post-mastectomy breast reconstruction is commonly performed in the United States with numerous options available to patients and providers. This study evaluated patient race and provider in prediction of patient satisfaction following post-mastectomy breast reconstruction. METHODS The patient satisfaction for women who underwent post mastectomy breast reconstruction at University of California, Irvine Medical Center was evaluated between 2012 and 2014, randomly using Press Ganey Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) surveys. Patient demographics and surgery related variables including type of reconstruction received were determined. RESULTS Between 2012 and 2014, ninety breast reconstruction patients completed a HCAHPS satisfaction survey. Average satisfaction score was 9.67/10. Multivariate linear regression analyses revealed that 34% of the variability in satisfaction scores was accounted for by the variables included in our statistical model. Analyses revealed race/ethnicity and provider to be independent predictors of satisfaction (p<0.05). Satisfaction scores ranged from 6-10 and varied by 11.7% across different providers and 8.9% across different races. The following variables were included, but did not influence patient satisfaction: type, timing, or laterality of reconstruction, presence of post-operative complication, body mass index (BMI), age, presence of comorbidity, and insurance type. CONCLUSION Achieving patient satisfaction is an important outcome of breast reconstruction. This study is one of the first to identify provider and race/ethnicity as predictors of patient satisfaction following breast reconstruction. The information provided here can help inform providers and improve satisfaction for patients undergoing breast reconstruction. PMID:27579266

  15. The Influence of Gatekeeping and Utilization Review on Patient Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Eve A; Hays, Ron D; Mitchinson, Allison; Lee, Martin; Siu, Albert L

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the influence of utilization review and denial of specialty referrals on patient satisfaction with overall medical care, willingness to recommend one’s physician group to a friend, and desire to disenroll from the health plan. DESIGN Two cross-sectional questionnaires: one of physician groups and one of patient satisfaction. SETTING Eighty-eight capitated physician groups in California. PARTICIPANTS Participants were 11,710 patients enrolled in a large California network-model HMO in 1993 who received care in one of the 88 physician groups. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Our main measures were how groups conducted utilization review for specialty referrals and tests, patient-reported denial of specialty referrals, and patient satisfaction with overall medical care. Patients in groups that required preauthorization for access to many types of specialists were significantly (p≤ .001) less satisfied than patients in groups that had few preauthorization requirements, even after adjusting for patient and other group characteristics. Patients who had wanted to see a specialist in the previous year but did not see one were significantly less satisfied than those who had wanted to see a specialist and actually saw one (p < .001). In addition, patients who did not see a specialist when desired were more likely to want to disenroll from the health plan than patients who saw the specialist (40% vs 18%, p≤ .001) and more likely not to recommend their group to a friend (38% vs 13%, p≤ .001). CONCLUSIONS Policies that limited direct access to specialists, and especially denial of patient-desired referrals, were associated with significantly lower patient satisfaction, increased desire to disenroll, and lower likelihood of recommending the group to a friend. Health plans and physician groups need to take these factors into account when designing strategies to reduce specialty care use. PMID:10337038

  16. Factors affecting satisfaction among community-based hospice volunteer visitors.

    PubMed

    Chevrier, F; Steuer, R; MacKenzie, J

    1994-01-01

    Trained volunteers are an essential component in the delivery of care to clients and families facing a terminal and/or life-threatening illness. As the need for hospice care increases, so does the need to increase the number of volunteers available for visiting. Hospice of London, which is a community based hospice, proposed that volunteers who felt satisfied would remain with the organization longer, thereby, decreasing the costs associated with training new volunteers and enhancing the ability of the agency to provide high-quality volunteer client matches. Accordingly, a survey was conducted in August 1992 to determine which factors were related to hospice volunteer satisfaction. One hundred and five volunteer were surveyed over the telephone. Results demonstrated a positive correlation between satisfaction and feeling like a team member, receiving feedback from staff, feeling valuable and having the volunteer's expectations match the position. Differences in the factors related to satisfaction were noted when the groups were divided by age and gender. PMID:7893559

  17. Service quality, trust, and patient satisfaction in interpersonal-based medical service encounters

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    affects patient satisfaction, which represents a direct effect; and (B) service quality and patient trust are used as intervening variables to affect patient satisfaction, which represents an indirect effect. Due to differences in the scale, resources and costs among medical institutions of different levels, it is a most urgent and concerning issue of how to control customers’ demands and preferences and adopt correct marketing concepts under the circumstances of intense competition in order to satisfy the public and build up a competitive edge for medical institutions. PMID:23320786

  18. Combined effects of positive and negative affectivity and job satisfaction on job performance and turnover intentions.

    PubMed

    Bouckenooghe, Dave; Raja, Usman; Butt, Arif Nazir

    2013-01-01

    Capturing data from employee-supervisor dyads (N = 321) from eight organizations in Pakistan, including human service organizations, an electronics assembly plant, a packaging material manufacturing company, and a small food processing plant, we used moderated regression analysis to examine whether the relationships between trait affect (positive affectivity [PA] and negative affectivity [NA]) and two key work outcome variables (job performance and turnover) are contingent upon the level of job satisfaction. We applied the Trait Activation Theory to explain the moderating effect of job satisfaction on the relationship between affect and performance and between affect and turnover. Overall, the data supported our hypotheses. Positive and negative affectivity influenced performance and the intention to quit, and job satisfaction moderated these relationships. We discuss in detail the results of these findings and their implications for research and practice. PMID:23469474

  19. Improving wait times and patient satisfaction in primary care.

    PubMed

    Michael, Melanie; Schaffer, Susan D; Egan, Patricia L; Little, Barbara B; Pritchard, Patrick Scott

    2013-01-01

    A strong and inverse relationship between patient satisfaction and wait times in ambulatory care settings has been demonstrated. Despite its relevance to key medical practice outcomes, timeliness of care in primary care settings has not been widely studied. The goal of the quality improvement project described here was to increase patient satisfaction by minimizing wait times using the Dartmouth Microsystem Improvement Curriculum (DMIC) framework and the Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) improvement process. Following completion of an initial PDSA cycle, significant reductions in mean waiting room and exam room wait times (p = .001 and p = .047, respectively) were observed along with a significant increase in patient satisfaction with waiting room wait time (p = .029). The results support the hypothesis that the DMIC framework and the PDSA method can be applied to improve wait times and patient satisfaction among primary care patients. Furthermore, the pretest-posttest preexperimental study design employed provides a model for sequential repetitive tests of change that can lead to meaningful improvements in the delivery of care and practice performance in a variety of ambulatory care settings over time. PMID:23480405

  20. Use of the Satisfaction With Amplification in Daily Life Questionnaire to Assess Patient Satisfaction Following Remote Hearing Aid Adjustments (Telefitting)

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Battistella, Linamara Rizzo

    2014-01-01

    Background Hearing loss can affect approximately 15% of the pediatric population and up to 40% of the adult population. The gold standard of treatment for hearing loss is amplification of hearing thresholds by means of a hearing aid instrument. A hearing aid is an electronic device equipped with a topology of only three major components of aggregate cost. The gold standard of hearing aid fittings is face-to-face appointments in hearing aid centers, clinics, or hospitals. Telefitting encompasses the programming and adjustments of hearing aid settings remotely. Fitting hearing aids remotely is a relatively simple procedure, using minimal computer hardware and Internet access. Objective This project aimed to examine the feasibility and outcomes of remote hearing aid adjustments (telefitting) by assessing patient satisfaction via the Portuguese version of the Satisfaction With Amplification in Daily Life (SADL) questionnaire. Methods The Brazilian Portuguese version of the SADL was used in this experimental research design. Participants were randomly selected through the Rehabilitation Clinical (Espaco Reouvir) of the Otorhinolaryngology Department Medical School University of Sao Paulo. Of the 8 participants in the study, 5 were female and 3 were male, with a mean age of 71.5 years. The design consisted of two face-to-face sessions performed within 15 working days of each other. The remote assistance took place 15 days later. Results The average scores from this study are above the mean scores from the original SADL normative data. These indicate a high level of satisfaction in participants who were fitted remotely. Conclusions The use of an evaluation questionnaire is a simple yet effective method to objectively assess the success of a remote fitting. Questionnaire outcomes can help hearing stakeholders improve the National Policy on Hearing Health Care in Brazil. The results of this project indicated that patient satisfaction levels of those fitted remotely were

  1. Visual and non-visual factors associated with patient satisfaction and quality of life in LASIK

    PubMed Central

    Lazon de la Jara, P; Erickson, D; Erickson, P; Stapleton, F

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to determine how laser in situkeratomileusis (LASIK) affects quality of life (QOL) and to identify factors that may affect satisfaction after LASIK. Methods A total of 104 patients with a mean age of 29±6, treated with LASIK for myopia and astigmatism, were enrolled in a prospective study. High (90%) and low (10%) contrast visual acuity (CVA) were measured under photopic and scotopic conditions before surgery and at 3 months later. A multidimensional QOL scale (Institute for Eye Research multidimensional QOL scale), which assesses psychological characteristics, personality traits, cosmesis, frequency, and tolerance to disturbing visual and ocular symptoms, and overall satisfaction with vision correction, was also used. Paired rank tests were used to compare preoperative and postoperative vision and QOL scores. Correlations and a multiple linear regression were used to describe the relationship between CVA, QOL, and satisfaction after LASIK. Results Significant postoperative changes included increased satisfaction following LASIK (P<0.001), reduced frequency of visual and ocular symptoms (P<0.001), and change in psychological characteristics (P=0.033). The change in satisfaction with LASIK can be predicted by a combination of preoperative satisfaction, postoperative frequency of disturbing visual and ocular symptoms, postoperative mean spherical equivalent, and postoperative scotopic high CVA (R 2=0.725, P<0.05). Conclusions Satisfaction with LASIK is related to visual function, preoperative expectations, psychological characteristics, and uncorrected CVA achieved. An increased sense of subjective well-being, adaptability, and self-efficacy was evident after LASIK. Patients reported a more optimistic attitude to life and increase perceived QOL after surgery. PMID:21720417

  2. Patient satisfaction with doctor-patient interaction in a radiotherapy centre during the severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak.

    PubMed

    Tang, J I; Shakespeare, T P; Zhang, X J; Lu, J J; Liang, S; Wynne, C J; Mukherjee, R K; Back, M F

    2005-08-01

    An outpatient radiotherapy department assessed how precautions implemented during the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak affected patient satisfaction with doctor-patient interaction and explored variables potentially influencing satisfaction. The information obtained would help prepare us for future infectious disease outbreaks. Outpatients seen during the outbreak completed a validated questionnaire assessing satisfaction with doctor-patient interaction. Additional items assessed included patients' perception of SARS measures and patient demographics. Of 149 patients, 97% had heard of SARS, 92% believed SARS precautions necessary, and 54% believed contracting SARS was possible despite the precautions. Patients were satisfied with doctors wearing masks (97%), temperature checks (97%), and patients wearing masks (96%). Despite the high satisfaction levels with SARS precautions, 24% believed it had adversely affected doctor-patient interaction. With regards to doctor-patient interaction, 94% of patients were satisfied. Patients were most satisfied with the 'information exchange' domain (mean score 3.23 out of 4) compared to other domains (P < 0.0001, 100.00% confidence) and were less satisfied with the 'empathy' domain compared to other domains (P < 0.0001, 100.00% confidence). Patients were most satisfied with understanding their treatment plan (100%), doctor being honest (97%) and being understood (96%). Patients were least satisfied with information about caring for their illness (61%), that the visit could be better (59%), and the doctor showing more interest (58%). On multivariate analysis, patients who were less satisfied with SARS measures were significantly less satisfied with doctor-patient interaction (P = 0.0001). Dissatisfaction with SARS measures was associated with significant dissatisfaction for questions in all domains. Older age and non-breast cancer patients were also less satisfied with doctor-patient interaction. Most (94%) of

  3. Predictors of Patient Satisfaction with Tertiary Hospitals in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Hye-Sook; Peck, Eun Hee; Moon, Hee Soo; Yeom, Hye-A

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the general and system-related predictors of outpatient satisfaction with tertiary health care institutions in Korea. A cross-sectional descriptive study design was employed. The subjects were 1,194 outpatients recruited from 29 outpatient clinics of a university medical center in Korea. Measurements included 5 outpatient service domains (i.e., doctor service, nurse service, technician service, convenience, and physical environment of facility) and patient satisfaction. Of the five domains, nurse service was the domain with the highest mean score (M = 4.21) and convenience was the domain with the lowest mean score (M = 3.77). The most significant predictor of patient satisfaction was the constructs of convenience (β = 0.21). The results of this study suggest that the concept of patient satisfaction with health care institutions in modern hospitals reflects an integrative process that includes not only the concerned health care personnel but also improved convenience such as user-friendly reservation system and comfortable waiting areas. PMID:25722886

  4. 78 FR 79079 - Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey); Activities under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey); Activities under OMB Review... . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900- 0764 (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey)'' in any correspondence....gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-0764 (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey)'' in...

  5. 75 FR 16912 - Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment Request... measure patients' satisfaction with VA's dental services. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on..., Dental Patient Satisfaction Survey, VA Form 10-0503. OMB Control Number: 2900-New (VA Form 10-0503)....

  6. Lean Manufacturing Improves Emergency Department Throughput and Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Kane, Marlena; Chui, Kristen; Rimicci, Janet; Callagy, Patrice; Hereford, James; Shen, Sam; Norris, Robert; Pickham, David

    2015-09-01

    A multidisciplinary team led by nursing leadership and physicians developed a plan to meet increasing demand and improve the patient experience in the ED without expanding the department's current resources. The approach included Lean tools and engaged frontline staff and physicians. Applying Lean management principles resulted in quicker service, improved patient satisfaction, increased capacity, and reduced resource utilization. Incorporating continuous daily management is necessary for sustainment of continuous improvement activities. PMID:26252725

  7. Patient-related factors influencing satisfaction in the patient-doctor encounters at the general outpatient clinic of the university of calabar teaching hospital, calabar, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Udonwa, Ndifreke E; Ogbonna, Udoezuo K

    2012-01-01

    Medical consultation is at the centre of clinical practice. Satisfaction of a patient with this process is a major determinant of the clinical outcome. This study sought to determine the proportion of patients who were satisfied with their doctor-patient encounter and the patient-related factors that affected patients' satisfaction with the consultation process. A clinic-based, cross-sectional study using a modified version of the General Practice Assessment Questionnaire (GPAQ), which employed a systematic sampling technique, was used. The questionnaires were administered on 430 patients within the ages of 18 years and 65 years. Among the 430 subjects within the ages of 18 years and 65 years studied, 200 (46.5%) were males and 230 (53.5%) were females. Only 59.3% were satisfied with their patient-doctor encounter. The patient's perception of time spent in the consultation, illness understanding after the visit, ability to cope with the illness after the visit, and ability to maintain health after visit were the only factors that affected patient's satisfaction with the consultation. In our environment, nonsatisfaction with the patient-doctor encounter is high. Only few factors considered to encourage a patients satisfaction at primary care consultation contributed to end-of-consultation satisfaction. This calls for refocusing so as to improve the overall patient care in our cultural context and meet the patient needs in our environment. PMID:22675629

  8. The affective profiles in the USA: happiness, depression, life satisfaction, and happiness-increasing strategies

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Erica; Sailer, Uta; Al Nima, Ali; Rosenberg, Patricia; Andersson Arntén, Ann-Christine; Archer, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Background. The affective profiles model categorizes individuals as self-fulfilling (high positive affect, low negative affect), high affective (high positive affect, high negative affect), low affective (low positive affect, low negative affect), and self-destructive (low positive affect, high negative affect). The model has been used extensively among Swedes to discern differences between profiles regarding happiness, depression, and also life satisfaction. The aim of the present study was to investigate such differences in a sample of residents of the USA. The study also investigated differences between profiles with regard to happiness-increasing strategies. Methods. In Study I, 900 participants reported affect (Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule; PANAS) and happiness (Happiness-Depression Scale). In Study II, 500 participants self-reported affect (PANAS), life satisfaction (Satisfaction With Life Scale), and how often they used specific strategies to increase their own happiness (Happiness-Increasing Strategies Scales). Results. The results showed that, compared to the other profiles, self-fulfilling individuals were less depressed, happier, and more satisfied with their lives. Nevertheless, self-destructive individuals were more depressed, unhappier, and less satisfied than all other profiles. The self-fulfilling individuals tended to use strategies related to agentic (e.g., instrumental goal-pursuit), communal (e.g., social affiliation), and spiritual (e.g., religion) values when pursuing happiness. Conclusion. These differences suggest that promoting positive emotions can positively influence a depressive-to-happy state as well as increasing life satisfaction. Moreover, the present study shows that pursuing happiness through strategies guided by agency, communion, and spirituality is related to a self-fulfilling experience described as high positive affect and low negative affect. PMID:24058884

  9. Patient Satisfaction: A Study in Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Laura Throckmorton; And Others

    The Program in Human Sexuality (PHS), an outpatient mental health clinic in the University of Minnesota Medical School that specializes in sexuality-related dysfunctions, had received a number of patient complaints in late 1992 and early 1993 about therapeutic processes and business services. The proactive approach was to survey patients about all…

  10. Perceived Career Compromise, Affect and Work-Related Satisfaction in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaousides, Theodore; Jome, LaRae

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of career compromise on positive affect (PA), negative affect (NA), and work-related satisfaction (WRS). Career compromise refers to the modification of occupational preferences under pressing external circumstances [Gottfredson, L. S. (1981). Circumscription and compromise: A…

  11. Shared medical appointments: balancing efficiency with patient satisfaction and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shelly P; Elias, Beth L

    2016-07-01

    The shared medical appointment (SMA) is one model of care that holds promise for achieving the goal of balancing efficiency, cost, and quality. The results of recent studies of SMAs suggest that improved physiologic health, self-efficacy, and patient education and feasibility emerge as positive outcomes. In order to discover the potential applicability of the SMA format to otolaryngology, a pilot nasal symptoms SMA (NSSMA) model was implemented. The NSSMA was piloted in a private otolaryngology practice serving a metropolitan area in the Mid-Atlantic region. The Wilcoxon Signed Rank test demonstrated a significant improvement in the SNOT-20 score (T = -2.073; P = .019). Descriptive analyses for patient satisfaction results indicate high levels of patient satisfaction with the NSSMA. Also, Wilcoxon Signed Rank test for posttest knowledge scores were significantly higher than pretest scores (T = 1.667; P = .048). For busy practices managing large panels, the SMA serves as an opportunity to balance cost and quality. PMID:27442205

  12. An Integrated Model of Patient and Staff Satisfaction Using Queuing Theory

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Ali; Clarkson, P. John; Young, Terry

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the connection between patient satisfaction, waiting time, staff satisfaction, and service time. It uses a variety of models to enable improvement against experiential and operational health service goals. Patient satisfaction levels are estimated using a model based on waiting (waiting times). Staff satisfaction levels are estimated using a model based on the time spent with patients (service time). An integrated model of patient and staff satisfaction, the effective satisfaction level model, is then proposed (using queuing theory). This links patient satisfaction, waiting time, staff satisfaction, and service time, connecting two important concepts, namely, experience and efficiency in care delivery and leading to a more holistic approach in designing and managing health services. The proposed model will enable healthcare systems analysts to objectively and directly relate elements of service quality to capacity planning. Moreover, as an instrument used jointly by healthcare commissioners and providers, it affords the prospect of better resource allocation. PMID:27170899

  13. An Integrated Model of Patient and Staff Satisfaction Using Queuing Theory.

    PubMed

    Komashie, Alexander; Mousavi, Ali; Clarkson, P John; Young, Terry

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the connection between patient satisfaction, waiting time, staff satisfaction, and service time. It uses a variety of models to enable improvement against experiential and operational health service goals. Patient satisfaction levels are estimated using a model based on waiting (waiting times). Staff satisfaction levels are estimated using a model based on the time spent with patients (service time). An integrated model of patient and staff satisfaction, the effective satisfaction level model, is then proposed (using queuing theory). This links patient satisfaction, waiting time, staff satisfaction, and service time, connecting two important concepts, namely, experience and efficiency in care delivery and leading to a more holistic approach in designing and managing health services. The proposed model will enable healthcare systems analysts to objectively and directly relate elements of service quality to capacity planning. Moreover, as an instrument used jointly by healthcare commissioners and providers, it affords the prospect of better resource allocation. PMID:27170899

  14. Personal Factors Determining Patient Satisfaction with All-Ceramic Crown Treatment for Single Anterior Teeth.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yun; Zhan, DeSong

    2016-01-01

    The Eysenck Personality Questionnaire's (EPQ) N value (neuroticism) was used to evaluate information from 158 patients before ceramic crown treatment. Patient satisfaction was also evaluated using a satisfaction questionnaire 2 weeks post treatment. Patient expectations were not correlated with sex, age, or N value, and sex was not correlated with patient satisfaction other than in relation to crown shape. Total esthetic satisfaction and feature improvement were positively correlated with age, while satisfaction for five specific criteria was negatively correlated with N value and overall expectation. These observations underscore the importance of considering the physical and psychologic aspects of patient care when planning dental treatment. PMID:27611752

  15. Dental anxiety. Assessment, reduction and increasing patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Corah, N L

    1988-10-01

    A conceptual schema relating a number of patient and dentist variables to patient anxiety reduction and satisfaction was presented. Evidence was examined that indicates that patient compliance with preventive and treatment regimens can be influenced in a major fashion through variables that reduce anxiety and increase satisfaction with the dentist. An accounting of several studies that investigated behavioral strategies for reducing patient stress during dental procedures indicated that recorded relaxation instructions and the active distraction provided by playing a video game can be effective anxiety-reducing treatments. Attempts to find other useful behavioral strategies were unsuccessful--only relaxation and distraction were consistently successful in reducing stress in moderately anxious patients. Observations of dentist-patient interaction in the context of the behavioral strategy studies indicated that the doctor-patient relationship was an important dimension associated with patient anxiety reduction and satisfaction. A series of investigations were conducted to elucidate the dentist behaviors that were associated with these variables. We found that the dentist behaviors most closely associated with patient satisfaction were those portraying empathy, friendliness, and a calm, competent image to the patient. The most important behavior associated with anxiety reduction was the dentist's explicit promise to prevent pain. Other dentist behaviors--friendliness, being calm, giving moral support--were seen as providing an appropriate behavioral context in support of the pledge to prevent pain. Finally, we considered the need for the dentist to be aware of patient anxiety in order to effectively deal with it. If nothing else, asking about anxiety gives the patient permission to express concerns that are present. If the patient is not anxious, asking about anxiety will not produce it. Two types of measuring instruments were considered in relation to assessing

  16. Leveraging information technology to drive improvement in patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Nash, Mary; Pestrue, Justin; Geier, Peter; Sharp, Karen; Helder, Amy; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2010-01-01

    A healthcare organization's commitment to quality and the patient experience requires senior leader involvement in improvement strategies, and accountability for goals. Further, improvement strategies are most effective when driven by data, and in the world of patient satisfaction, evidence is growing that nurse leader rounding and discharge calls are strategic tactics that can improve patient satisfaction. This article describes how The Ohio State University Medical Center (OSUMC) leveraged health information technology (IT) to apply a data-driven strategy execution to improve the patient experience. Specifically, two IT-driven approaches were used: (1) business intelligence reporting tools were used to create a meaningful reporting system including dashboards, scorecards, and tracking reports and (2) an improvement plan was implemented that focused on two high-impact tactics and data to hardwire accountability. Targeted information from the IT systems enabled clinicians and administrators to execute these strategic tactics, and senior leaders to monitor achievement of strategic goals. As a result, OSUMC's inpatient satisfaction scores on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey improved from 56% nines and tens in 2006 to 71% in 2009. PMID:20854357

  17. Measuring the effect of patient comfort rounds on practice environment and patient satisfaction: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Glenn; Woollett, Kaylene; Daly, Naomi; Richardson, Bronwyn

    2009-08-01

    Hourly rounding in the acute hospital setting has been proposed as an intervention to increase patient satisfaction and safety, and improve the nursing practice environment, but the innovation has not been adequately tested. A quasi-experimental pretest post-test non-randomized parallel group trial design was used to test the effect of hourly patient comfort rounds on patient satisfaction and nursing perceptions of the practice environment, and to evaluate research processes and instruments for a proposed larger study. A Patient Satisfaction Survey instrument was developed and used in conjunction with the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Results on patient satisfaction showed no significant changes. Significant changes were found for three of the five practice environment subscales. Consistent with the aim of a pilot study, this research has provided important information related to design, instruments and process that will inform a larger sufficiently powered study. PMID:19703045

  18. Patient Satisfaction With Breast and Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Plans

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Brian L.; Dittus, Kim L.; Pace, Claire M.; Dulko, Dorothy; Pollack, Lori A.; Hawkins, Nikki A.; Geller, Berta M.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer survivors face several challenges following the completion of active treatment, including uncertainty about late effects of treatment and confusion about coordination of follow-up care. The authors evaluated patient satisfaction with personalized survivorship care plans designed to clarify those issues. The authors enrolled 48 patients with breast cancer and 10 patients with colorectal cancer who had completed treatment in the previous two months from an urban academic medical center and a rural community hospital. Patient satisfaction with the care plan was assessed by telephone interview. Overall, about 80% of patients were very or completely satisfied with the care plan, and 90% or more agreed that it was useful, it was easy to understand, and the length was appropriate. Most patients reported that the care plan was very or critically important to understanding an array of survivorship issues. However, only about half felt that it helped them better understand the roles of primary care providers and oncologists in survivorship care. The results provide evidence that patients with cancer find high value in personalized survivorship care plans, but the plans do not eliminate confusion regarding the coordination of follow-up care. Future efforts to improve care plans should focus on better descriptions of how survivorship care will be coordinated. PMID:23722604

  19. [The influence of affect on satisfaction with conversations and interpersonal impressions from the perspective of dyadic affective combinations].

    PubMed

    Ken, Fujiwara; Daibo, Ikuo

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the influence of affect on interpersonal relationships in a dyadic communication context. The combination of speakers' affective states was considered, as compared to previous studies which considered only the individual's affective state. The independent variables, in a between-subjects design, were affective condition (positive vs. negative) and affective combination (similar vs. dissimilar). Participants (N = 86) took a test on creative thinking and were given false feedback. Then they had a 6-minute conversation and answered questions about their satisfaction with the conversation and their impressions of their partner. Results showed that the two-factor interactions were significant for satisfaction with the conversation and interpersonal impressions (social desirability) of the partner. The scores for these variables in the positive affect condition were higher than in the negative affect condition only when the affective combination was dissimilar. These results show that individual's affect could not predict conversational outcomes. The results were discussed in terms of incorrect inferences about the partner's affective state and imbalanced conversation activity. PMID:24505979

  20. Long-Term Patient Satisfaction With Michigan Four-Wall Sacrospinous Ligament Suspension for Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    LARSON, Kindra A.; SMITH, Tovia; BERGER, Mitchell B.; ABERNETHY, Melinda; MEAD, Susan; FENNER, Dee E.; DeLANCEY, John O.L.; MORGAN, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe patient satisfaction after Michigan four-wall sacrospinous ligament suspension for prolapse and identify factors associated with satisfaction. Methods Four hundred fifty-three patients were asked to rate their satisfaction with surgery and complete validated quality-of-life instruments. Postoperative support was extracted from the medical record and assessed when possible. Factors independently associated with patients who were “highly satisfied” were identified with multivariable logistic regression. Results Sixty-two percent (242/392) reported how satisfied they were 8.0±1.7 years later. Fifty-seven percent had failed prior prolapse surgery, and 56% had a preoperative prolapse ≥4 cm beyond the hymen. Ninety percent were satisfied; 76% were “completely” or “very” satisfied and they were considered “highly satisfied” for analysis. Fourteen percent reporting being “moderately” satisfied and they were considered among those “less satisfied.” Women with lower scores on the postoperative Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-20 were more likely to be “highly satisfied.” Postoperative anatomic data was available for 67% (162/242) and vaginal support was observed at or above the hymen in 86%. Women with preoperative Baden Walker grade 3 or 4 prolapse were more likely than those with grade 2 prolapse to be “highly satisfied.” Women with advanced postoperative prolapse (Grade 3 or 4) were less likely and those with Grade 2 support were as likely to be “highly satisfied” as those with Grade 0 or 1 support. Conclusion The Michigan four-wall sacrospinous ligament suspension is an anatomically effective approach to vault suspension with a high rate of long-term patient satisfaction. Postoperative vaginal support at the hymen does not negatively affect patient’s satisfaction. PMID:24104775

  1. Disposable circumcision suture device: clinical effect and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lv, Bo-Dong; Zhang, Shi-Geng; Zhu, Xuan-Wen; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Gang; Chen, Min-Fu; Shen, Hong-Liang; Pei, Zai-Jun; Chen, Zhao-Dian

    2014-01-01

    In our experience patients undergoing circumcision are mostly concerned about pain and penile appearances. We conducted a prospective randomized trial to assess the benefits of a new disposable circumcision suture device (DCSD). A total of 942 patients were equally divided into three groups (conventional circumcision, Shang ring and disposable suture device group). Patients in the DCSD group were anesthetized with compound 5% lidocaine cream, the others with a 2% lidocaine penile block. Operation time, intra-operative blood loss, incision healing time, intra-operative and post-operative pain, the penile appearance and overall satisfaction degree were measured. Operation time and intra-operative blood loss were significantly lower in the Shang ring and suture device groups compared to the conventional group (P < 0.001). Intra-operative pain was less in the suture device group compared with the other two groups (P < 0.001); whereas post-operative pain was higher in the conventional group compared to the other two groups (P < 0.001). Patients in the suture device (80.57%) and Shang ring (73.57%) groups were more satisfied with penile appearances compared with the conventional circumcision group (20.06%, P < 0.05). Patients in suture device group also healed markedly faster than the conventional group (P < 0.01). The overall satisfaction rate was better in the suture device group (78.66%) compared with the conventional (47.13%) and Shang ring (50.00%) groups (P < 0.05). The combination of DCSD and lidocaine cream resulted in shorter operation and incision healing times, reduced intra-operative and post-operative pain and improved patient satisfaction with the cosmetic appearances. PMID:24759586

  2. Disposable circumcision suture device: clinical effect and patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Bo-Dong; Zhang, Shi-Geng; Zhu, Xuan-Wen; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Gang; Chen, Min-Fu; Shen, Hong-Liang; Pei, Zai-Jun; Chen, Zhao-Dian

    2014-01-01

    In our experience patients undergoing circumcision are mostly concerned about pain and penile appearances. We conducted a prospective randomized trial to assess the benefits of a new disposable circumcision suture device (DCSD). A total of 942 patients were equally divided into three groups (conventional circumcision, Shang ring and disposable suture device group). Patients in the DCSD group were anesthetized with compound 5% lidocaine cream, the others with a 2% lidocaine penile block. Operation time, intra-operative blood loss, incision healing time, intra-operative and post-operative pain, the penile appearance and overall satisfaction degree were measured. Operation time and intra-operative blood loss were significantly lower in the Shang ring and suture device groups compared to the conventional group (P < 0.001). Intra-operative pain was less in the suture device group compared with the other two groups (P < 0.001); whereas post-operative pain was higher in the conventional group compared to the other two groups (P < 0.001). Patients in the suture device (80.57%) and Shang ring (73.57%) groups were more satisfied with penile appearances compared with the conventional circumcision group (20.06%, P < 0.05). Patients in suture device group also healed markedly faster than the conventional group (P < 0.01). The overall satisfaction rate was better in the suture device group (78.66%) compared with the conventional (47.13%) and Shang ring (50.00%) groups (P < 0.05). The combination of DCSD and lidocaine cream resulted in shorter operation and incision healing times, reduced intra-operative and post-operative pain and improved patient satisfaction with the cosmetic appearances. PMID:24759586

  3. More than a Signature: How Advisor Choice and Advisor Behaviour Affect Doctoral Student Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Chun-Mei; Golde, Chris M.; McCormick, Alexander C.

    2007-01-01

    A satisfactory relationship between doctoral students and their advisors is an essential component of successful doctoral training. Using responses to a national survey of doctoral students in the US from 27 universities and 11 disciplines, this paper explores factors affecting students' satisfaction with the advising relationship. We find that…

  4. The Role of Perceived Autonomy Support in Principals' Affective Organizational Commitment and Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yujin; Leach, Nicole; Anderman, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relations between principals' perceived autonomy support from superintendents, affective commitment to their school districts, and job satisfaction. We also explore possible moderation effects of principals' career experiences on these relations. Data were collected from K-12 public school principals in…

  5. Investigating the Relationship among Internet Addiction, Positive and Negative Affects, and Life Satisfaction in Turkish Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telef, Bülent Baki

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the relationships between Internet addiction and the areas of life satisfaction and positive or negative affects in Turkish adolescents. The research sample comprised 358 students studying in the sixth, seventh and eighth grades at four different middle schools in Canakkale city centre during the 2012-2013 academic year, of…

  6. Change in Affect and Needs Satisfaction for Amotivated Students within the Sport Education Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Dana

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of the Sport Education Model ("SEM") on amotivated students affect and needs satisfaction. 78 amotivated students from an original pool of 1,176 students enrolled in one of 32 physical education classes. Classes were randomly assigned to either the "SEM" (N = 16)or traditional class (N = 16).…

  7. Principal Leadership Behaviors Which Teachers at Different Career Stages Perceive as Affecting Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Valari

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions of teachers as to how the leadership of their principal affects their job satisfaction. This study collected the view of teachers at different career stages and examined their perceptions and needs. The participants consisted of 12 elementary school teachers at three different…

  8. Factors Affecting Perceived Learning, Satisfaction, and Quality in the Online MBA: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sebastianelli, Rose; Swift, Caroline; Tamimi, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined how six factors related to content and interaction affect students' perceptions of learning, satisfaction, and quality in online master of business administration (MBA) courses. They developed three scale items to measure each factor. Using survey data from MBA students at a private university, the authors estimated structural…

  9. Relationships among satisfaction, treatment motivation, and expectations in orthodontic patients: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weihong; Wang, Shimei; Zhang, Yanzhen

    2016-01-01

    Background Few research projects have looked at patient satisfaction with treatment outcome and factors contributing to satisfaction. The aim of this study was to examine treatment motivation and expectation associated with treatment-outcome satisfaction in a group of adolescent nonextraction orthodontic patients. We hypothesized that there would be significant correlations among treatment-outcome satisfaction, motivation, and expectations. Subjects and methods A sample of 120 patients who received orthodontic treatment at the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine completed two questionnaires. Before treatment, questionnaire 1 was given to patients to assess treatment motivation and expectations. When treatment had been completed, questionnaire 2, concerning treatment satisfaction, was assessed. Spearman’s rank correlation and regression analyses were used to assess the relationships among treatment satisfaction, expectations, and motivation. Results A total of 110 patients completed the two questionnaires. There was a tendency toward significant correlations between treatment motivation and overall satisfaction with treatment (β-coefficient −0.264, 95% confidence interval −0.456 to 2.314; P<0.001). However, correlations among treatment motivation and satisfaction with changes made and satisfaction with one’s appearance posttreatment were more fragmented. No relationship between treatment expectation and satisfaction was found (β-coefficient −0.126; 95% confidence interval −0.024 to 0.524; P>0.05). Conclusion Motivation was correlated with satisfaction with treatment outcome. Patients’ expectations had no correlation with treatment satisfaction. PMID:27110100

  10. Factors Affecting Physician Satisfaction and Wisconsin Medical Society Strategies to Drive Change.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Michele; Dexter, Donn; Nankivil, Nancy

    2015-08-01

    Physicians' dissatisfaction in their work is increasing, which is affecting the stability of health care in America. The Wisconsin Medical Society (Society) surveyed 1016 Wisconsin physicians to determine the source of their dissatisfaction. The survey results indicate Wisconsin physicians are satisfied when it comes to practice environment, work-life balance, and income. In addition, they are extremely satisfied when it comes to rating their ability to provide high quality care, and they have identified some benefits related to the adoption of electronic health records. However, they are feeling burned out, very unsatisfied with the amount of time spent in direct patient care compared to indirect patient care, and that they are spending too much time on administrative and data entry tasks. In terms of future workforce, many physicians are either unsure or would not recommend the profession to a prospective medical student. Electronic health records serve as both a satisfier and dissatisfier and as a potential driver for future physician satisfaction interventions. Changes at the institutional, organizational, and individual levels potentially could address the identified dissatisfiers and build upon the satisfiers. The Society identifies 12 strategies to improve upon the physician experience. PMID:26436181

  11. Tolerance of intragastric balloon and patient's satisfaction in obesity treatment

    PubMed Central

    Garnysz, Karolina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The dietary management of obesity is associated with a high failure rate. Methods which enable the long-term reduction of food intake have been developed. Patients treated with an intragastric balloon may experience some unwanted symptoms during therapy. The severity of these symptoms may result in poor tolerance of treatment, while patients who do not experience these symptoms may refuse to follow dietary modifications. In these cases, weight reduction at the end of treatment may be below expectations. Aim To assess the tolerance of intragastric balloon treatment in obese patients as well as their satisfaction with this treatment. Material and methods Fifty-seven gastric balloon procedures were performed in 51 females and 6 males aged 17 to 65 years (39.5 ±10.7 years). Baseline weight was 104 ±14.5 kg (78–140 kg), body mass index 37.2 ±4.1 kg/m2 (29.8–48.1 kg/m2), mean excess body weight 41.2 ±11.5 kg (20.4–63.1 kg). The balloon was filled with 669 ±25.8 ml of saline solution (550–700 ml). Upon balloon removal 6 months later, the patients completed a 12-question survey. Results We obtained 57 surveys. The most common symptoms included vomiting, heartburn, abdominal pain and others. Twenty-two patients reported > 2 symptoms. Two patients were symptom-free. The mean duration of symptoms was 24.8 days. Patients reported better control of hypertension, diabetes and resolution of obstructive sleep apnoea and joint symptoms. Only 14 patients did not observe any significant improvement in their bodily function. Fifty-four patients expressed satisfaction after treatment, 6 patients were dissatisfied with the weight loss, and 5 patients would not opt for balloon re-treatment. Conclusions The balloon treatment is a safe and well-tolerated therapy with a low complication rate. PMID:26649094

  12. Assessment of Patient Satisfaction of the Quality of Health Care Provided by Outpatient Services of an Oncology Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Anastasia; Sarafis, Pavlos; Malliarou, Maria; Tsounis, Andreas; Igoumenidis, Michael; Bamidis, Panagiotis; Niakas, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this research is to investigate the patient’s satisfaction (patient’s satisfaction) with medical services provided in Outpatients’ Departments of a Greek Anti-Cancer Hospital in morning and afternoon clinics. The assessment of patients and identification of factors that contribute to their satisfaction will highlight the organizational and operational problems of outpatient department and assist in finding solutions to upgrade the quality of services provided. Material and Methodology: For the collection of data, a questionnaire with closed answers in a five-point scale ‘Likert’ scale was used. The questions were related to demographics, social data users, and the overall service process in the outpatient Hospital. The sample consisted of 100 patients (RR: 76%) who visited the outpatient clinic in the morning or afternoon over a month long period of time. Results: The results of our research showed that cancer patients reported a high satisfaction rate with the health services provided in outpatient department of Anti-Cancer Hospital. The highest reported levels of satisfaction were related to working with medical staff because of the special relationship of trust that patients develop with their physician. Some problems were noted during the morning shift by patients. Patients reported frustration over long waiting times to get an appointment, last minute appointments, lack of flexibility when making appointments and long waiting times before being examined by a doctor. No statistically significant relationship was found between overall satisfaction with demographics’ and other factors, although the grading services seem to be affected by the health status of patients, education and sex. Conclusion: The problems that were identified leading to less patient satisfaction were the long waiting periods to get an appointment, last minute appointments, non-flexibility in making appointments and long waiting times to be examined by the

  13. She left, he left: how employment and satisfaction affect women's and men's decisions to leave marriages.

    PubMed

    Sayer, Liana C; England, Paula; Allison, Paul D; Kangas, Nicole

    2011-05-01

    Studies examining determinants of divorce have largely ignored differences between factors that elevate wives' and husbands' initiation of divorce. The authors use longitudinal data and a latent class model embedded in a competing-risks event history model to assess distinct predictors of wives and husbands leaving marriages. They find that when men are not employed, either spouse is more likely to leave. When wives report better-than-average marital satisfaction, their employment affects neither spouse's exit. However, when wives report below-average marital satisfaction, their employment makes it more likely they will leave. The authors' findings suggest that theories of divorce require "gendering" to reflect asymmetric gender change. PMID:21932472

  14. Analysis of factors affecting satisfaction level on problem based learning approach using structural equation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Nur Farahin Mee; Zahid, Zalina

    2014-12-01

    Nowadays, in the job market demand, graduates are expected not only to have higher performance in academic but they must also be excellent in soft skill. Problem-Based Learning (PBL) has a number of distinct advantages as a learning method as it can deliver graduates that will be highly prized by industry. This study attempts to determine the satisfaction level of engineering students on the PBL Approach and to evaluate their determinant factors. The Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to investigate how the factors of Good Teaching Scale, Clear Goals, Student Assessment and Levels of Workload affected the student satisfaction towards PBL approach.

  15. Editorial Commentary: Love My Surgeon, Love My Surgery: Patient Satisfaction Matters After Hip Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Krych, Aaron J

    2016-08-01

    Patient satisfaction following hip arthroscopy is currently underreported and lacks uniformity when published. While current patient reported outcomes are important, they may not reflect overall patient satisfaction because it is complex and multifactorial. However, assessment and documentation of patient satisfaction following hip arthroscopy is critical to demonstrating value and quality. Therefore, it is of pressing importance that the hip arthroscopy community develops an accurate score that is consistent, valid, and reliable. PMID:27495866

  16. Relationship Satisfaction, Affectivity, and Gay-Specific Stressors in Same-Sex Couples Joined in Civil Unions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todosijevic, Jelica; Rothblum, Esther D.; Solomon, Sondra E.

    2005-01-01

    Relationship satisfaction, affect, and stress were examined in 313 same-sex couples who had had civil unions in Vermont during the first year of this legislation. Similarity between partners on age and on positive/negative affectivity was related to relationship satisfaction whereas there was no association with similarity in income, education,…

  17. The Multidisciplinary Hemodialysis Patient Satisfaction Scale: Reliability, Validity, and Scale Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Pamela Davis; Brantley, Philip J.; McKnight, G. Tipton; Jones, Glenn N.; Springer, Annette

    1997-01-01

    The development and preliminary reliability and validity studies are reported for the Multidisciplinary Hemodialysis Patient Satisfaction Scale, a 110-item Likert scale that assesses satisfaction with team health care services. The methods used to construct subscales may have implications for other psychometric studies of satisfaction and quality…

  18. The influence of trait-negative affect and compassion satisfaction on compassion fatigue in Australian nurses.

    PubMed

    Craigie, Mark; Osseiran-Moisson, Rebecca; Hemsworth, David; Aoun, Samar; Francis, Karen; Brown, Janie; Hegney, Desley; Rees, Clare

    2016-01-01

    For this study, we examined the nature of the unique relationships trait-negative affect and compassion satisfaction had with compassion fatigue and its components of secondary traumatic stress and burnout in 273 nurses from 1 metropolitan tertiary acute hospital in Western Australia. Participants completed the Professional Quality of Life Scale (Stamm, 2010), Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (Lovibond & Lovibond, 2004), and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Spielberger, Gorsuch, Lushene, Vagg, & Jacobs, 1983). Bivariate correlation and hierarchical regression analyses were performed to examine and investigate 4 hypotheses. The results demonstrate a clear differential pattern of relationships with secondary traumatic stress and burnout for both trait-negative affect and compassion satisfaction. Trait-negative affect was clearly the more important factor in terms of its contribution to overall compassion fatigue and secondary traumatic stress. In contrast, compassion satisfaction's unique protective relationship only related to burnout, and not secondary traumatic stress. The results are therefore consistent with the view that compassion satisfaction may be an important internal resource that protects against burnout, but is not directly influential in protecting against secondary traumatic stress for nurses working in an acute-care hospital environment. With the projected nursing workforce shortages in Australia, it is apparent that a further understanding is warranted of how such personal variables may work as protective and risk factors. PMID:25961866

  19. Knowledge of attitude toward experience and satisfaction with electroconvulsive therapy in a sample of Iranian patients.

    PubMed

    Malekian, Azadeh; Amini, Zahra; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Barekatain, Majid

    2009-06-01

    Despite the wide consensus over the safety and efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), it still faces negative publicity and unfavorable attitudes of patients and families. Little is known about how the experience with ECT affects the patients' and their families' attitude toward it. The aim of this study was to examine a sample of Iranian patients and their families regarding their experience with ECT and to compare their knowledge and attitude toward ECT before and after this experience and their satisfaction with it. We surveyed 22 patients with major depressive disorder about to undergo ECT and 1 family member of each patient for their knowledge and attitude toward ECT and then surveyed them again after the trial of ECT to compare those variables while assessing their experience and satisfaction with ECT. Patients were rated using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Mini-Mental Status Examination before and after the treatment. We found that, before ECT, family members had a more favorable attitude toward ECT than patients, but after ECT, the patients' attitude changed more positively compared with their families. Both patients and their families had a poor knowledge of ECT before the ECT trial, but their total knowledge increased afterward, although not in the areas of indications and therapeutic effects. The majority of patients and their families found ECT to be beneficial and were satisfied with it. Satisfaction with ECT was independent of treatment outcome. There was a high rate of perceived coercion to consent to ECT. Attention should be paid toward educating patients and their families about the ECT process, indications, risks, safety, and effects as well as informing them about their freedom of choice and right to refuse. PMID:18708944

  20. Minority ethnicity patient satisfaction and experience: results of the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey in England

    PubMed Central

    Pinder, Richard J; Ferguson, Jamie; Møller, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to explore the differential patient satisfaction reported by patients with cancer who are from ethnic minority backgrounds, examining patient-reported experience of interacting with medical and nursing staff. Setting As a secondary analysis, we collated data collected over two consecutive annual rounds of the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey (NCPES) from September 2012 to November 2013. Participants There were 138 878 responses from 155 hospital trusts across the National Health Service in England, representing a response rate of 63.9% based on the total identified cohort of patients receiving cancer care over those 2 years. Outcomes We used the results of the annual survey, which sought to assess overall patient satisfaction along with patient experience of interacting with clinical nurse specialists, hospital doctors and ward nurses. Results Ethnic minority patients reported lower satisfaction and less positive experiences of care overall. While some of this difference appeared related to demographic and socioeconomic variation, ethnic minority patients remained less positive than those in the White British group, after statistical adjustment. Ethnic minority patients also reported lower confidence in, and less understanding of, healthcare professionals, including clinical nurse specialists, doctors and ward nurses. Conclusions Given the diversity of the British population, as well as the clustering of ethnic minority patients in certain urban areas, a better understanding of the expectations and additional needs of ethnic minority patients is required to improve their experience of and satisfaction with cancer care. PMID:27354083

  1. Customer satisfaction in medical service encounters -- a comparison between obstetrics and gynecology patients and general medical patients.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Sheng; Weng, Hui-Ching; Chang, Hsin-Hsin; Hsu, Tsuen-Ho

    2006-03-01

    This study is concerned with the "service encounter", and seeks to describe, by use of the Service Encounter Evaluation Model, how the processes involved in the service encounter affect customer satisfaction. Its findings have implications for management practice and research directions, and recommendations are made. With the implementation of a national health insurance scheme, an ever-prospering economy and continually improving educational levels in Taiwan, demand among citizens for good health and medical care is ever increasing. Obstetrics and gynecology patients often differ greatly from general patients, in terms of their moods and emotions. This research involved an empirical study, whose subjects were 590 customers of general clinics and 339 customers of gynecology clinics, in various medical centers in southern Taiwan. By factor analysis, the study established four influencing factors, which were "Medical professionals", "Nursing professionals", "Service personnel" and "Space and facilities". Using the Linear Structural Relation Model (LISREL), it found that medical professionals, nursing professionals, service personnel and space and facilities were effective predictors of medical treatment satisfaction. We also found that the greatest positive impact on overall medical treatment satisfaction resulted from rises in satisfaction with medical professionals, but that the least impact was achieved in relation to service personnel in the general and gynecology clinics. PMID:16547902

  2. Patient-Reported Outcomes and Total Health Care Expenditure in Prediction of Patient Satisfaction: Results From a National Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiping; Chen, Wei; Bounsanga, Jerry; Cheng, Christine; Franklin, Jeremy D; Crum, Anthony B; Voss, Maren W; Hon, Shirley D

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care quality is often linked to patient satisfaction. Yet, there is a lack of national studies examining the relationship between patient satisfaction, patient-reported outcomes, and medical expenditure. Objective The aim of this study is to examine the contribution of physical health, mental health, general health, and total health care expenditures to patient satisfaction using a longitudinal, nationally representative sample. Methods Using data from the 2010-2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, analyses were conducted to predict patient satisfaction from patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditures. The study sample consisted of adult participants (N=10,157), with sampling weights representative of 233.26 million people in the United States. Results The results indicated that patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditure were associated with patient satisfaction such that higher physical and mental function, higher general health status, and higher total health care expenditure were associated with higher patient satisfaction. Conclusions We found that patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditure had a significant relationship with patient satisfaction. As more emphasis is placed on health care value and quality, this area of research will become increasingly needed and critical questions should be asked about what we value in health care and whether we can find a balance between patient satisfaction, outcomes, and expenditures. Future research should apply big data analytics to investigate whether there is a differential effect of patient-reported outcomes and medical expenditures on patient satisfaction across different medical specialties. PMID:27227131

  3. A cognitive approach to patient satisfaction with emergency department nursing care.

    PubMed

    Raper, J L

    1996-07-01

    The assessment of patient satisfaction is an integral part of any quality improvement activity. In this study, patient satisfaction with emergency department (ED) nursing care was significantly positively related to the patient's self-perceived improvement and to the patient's admission to the hospital. Patient satisfaction with ED nursing care was not significantly related to patient acuity or other individual patient differences (age, gender, marital status, length of stay, type of treatment, number of previous ED visits, race, payer source, pain, or presence of chronic health problems). Psychological safety and information giving were found to contribute significantly to patient satisfaction with the ED nurse. Patient satisfaction with ED nursing care contributed significantly to the patients' intention to return to the ED. PMID:8783545

  4. Customer care. Patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting.

    PubMed

    Doering, G T

    1998-09-01

    The focus of the study was to prioritize six emergency medical service treatment factors in terms of their impact upon patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting. The six treatment areas analyzed were: EMS response time; medical care provided on scene; explanation of care by the provider; the provider's ability to reduce patient anxiety; the provider's ability to meet the patient's non-medical needs; and the level of courtesy/politeness shown by the EMS provider toward the patient. Telephone interviews were conducted with both patients and bystanders to obtain their perception of how well the system met their needs. The study analyzed how the six issues were rated and then evaluated the impact an individual's low score in a category had on that person's overall rating of the service provided. The overall satisfaction rating is not a calculated score, but an overall score specified by the respondent. The effect each issue had on the respondent's overall rating was determined by averaging the overall ratings for a category's low scorers, averaging the overall ratings for high scorers and then measuring the difference. Results of the study indicate that the factor with the greatest negative impact on patient satisfaction came from a perceived lack of crew courtesy and politeness. Respondents who indicated a fair to poor score in this category decreased their overall score by 60.2%. Ratings in other categories yielded the following results: When respondents rated the response time as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed an 18.4% decrease. When respondents rated the quality of medical care as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed a decrease of 22.6%. When the crew's ability to explain what was happening to the patient was rated as fair to poor, the average overall score dropped 33.6%. When the EMT's and medic's ability to reduce the patient's anxiety was rated fair to poor, average overall score declined by 32.6%. Finally, when the crew

  5. A Systematic Review of Applying Patient Satisfaction Outcomes in Plastic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Clapham, Philip J.; Pushman, Allison G.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Background We performed a systematic review of patient satisfaction studies in the Plastic Surgery literature. The specific aim was to evaluate the status of satisfaction research that has been undertaken to date and to identify areas for improvement. Methods Four medical databases were searched using satisfaction and Plastic Surgery related search terms. Quality of selected articles was assessed by two trained reviewers. Results Out of the total of 2,936 articles gleaned by the search, 178 were included in the final review. The majority of the articles (58%) in our review examined patient satisfaction in breast surgery populations. Additionally, 53% of the articles were limited in scope and only measured features of care in one or two domains of satisfaction. Finally, the majority of the studies (68%) were based solely on the use of ad-hoc satisfaction measurement instruments that did not undergo a formal development. Conclusion Given the important policy implications of patient satisfaction data within Plastic Surgery, we found a need to further refine research on patient satisfaction in Plastic Surgery. The scarcity of satisfaction research in the craniofacial, hand, and other reconstructive specialties, as well as the narrow scope of satisfaction measurement and the use of unvalidated instruments are current barriers preventing Plastic Surgery patient satisfaction studies from producing meaningful results. PMID:20517109

  6. Patients' satisfaction and maintenance of fixed partial denture

    PubMed Central

    Geiballa, Ghada Hassan; Abubakr, Neamat Hassan; Ibrahim, Yahia Eltayib

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of this study were to evaluate patient satisfaction with fixed prosthesis following placement and to assess the oral health and oral hygiene practices awareness by survey questionnaire. Materials and Methods: One hundred and ninety-two questionnaires were filled by patients wearing fixed prosthesis; the questionnaire included the subjective perception of treatment with fixed prosthesis, patients' perception of clinical outcome, regarding esthetics, masticatory function, speech, and together patient's attitude toward oral hygiene measures. Results: Results showed that 84% of the patients were satisfied with their fixed prosthesis, while only 46.4% of patients were satisfied with the chewing ability. In concern, with esthetic outcome, 80% of patients showed that they were satisfied with the esthetic. The results showed that a high significantly number of patients did not use any form of interdental aids' to clean their fixed prosthesis (94%). The main reason for not using any dental aids' (91.1%) was a lack of post fixed prosthodontics instructions and not been informed by the dentist. Conclusion: High percentages of patients were satisfied with their fixed prosthesis. The most important finding of this study was that majority of patients showed a lack of knowledge regarding post fixed prosthodontics instructions and the significance of maintenance of fixed prosthesis using dental aids'. Of particular concern was the majority of dentists did not pay attention to the post treatment instructions concerning the maintenance of fixed prosthesis. PMID:27095906

  7. Patients' satisfaction with psychiatric treatment: comparison between an open and a closed ward.

    PubMed

    Müller, Matthias J; Schlösser, Ralf; Kapp-Steen, Gisela; Schanz, Benno; Benkert, Otto

    2002-01-01

    The study compared patients' satisfaction with psychiatric inpatient treatment between an open and a closed ward. During a six-month period, all voluntarily participating patients on two wards of a psychiatric University hospital were investigated anonymously at admission and/or before discharge. A self-rating questionnaire (SATQ-98) was used to assess satisfaction with several domains of psychiatric inpatient treatment. In total, 135 questionnaires were received (retrieval rate 49%). The general level of satisfaction with treatment was high. General satisfaction, satisfaction with medication, ward equipment, visiting opportunities, and regulations for going out were significantly lower at discharge on the closed ward. Dissatisfaction with medication was related to low actual mood, and to low satisfaction with the frequency of psychotherapeutic interventions, visiting opportunities, and with the treating doctor. The results thus far strongly support the need for patients' satisfaction with treatment to be taken into account in order to improve psychiatric inpatient services, particularly on closed wards. PMID:12025725

  8. Long Term Patient Satisfaction of Burch Colposuspension with or Without Concomitant Total Abdominal Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Mustafa; Keskin, Ugur; Fidan, Ulas; Firatligil, Fahri Burcin; Alanbay, Ibrahim; Yenen, Mufit Cemal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Urinary incontinence negatively affects the quality of life. Various methods are used in the treatment of stress incontinence. Burch colposuspension (BC) is the classical treatment of urinary incontinence. Aim To compare the long-term satisfaction in patients receiving BC with or without concomitant total abdominal hysterectomy. Materials and Methods One hundred and twenty patients with stress incontinence underwent burch colposuspension with or without concomitant total abdominal hysterectomy. Ninety-three (77.5%) patients were interviewed by telephone. Of these, 91(75, 8%) patients agreed to participate in the study. The patients were divided into two groups according to the type of the surgical procedure. Group 1(N=48, 52.7%) had received burch colposuspension with concomitant total abdominal hysterectomy. Group 2 (N=43, 47.3%) had received burch colposuspension without concomitant total abdominal hysterectomy. Results In Group 1, 41 patients (85%) were satisfied with the surgery and did not complain of urinary incontinence (p<0.05). In Group 2, 37 (86%) patients were satisfied with the surgery (p<0.05). Conclusion There were no difference in patient satisfaction between hysterectomy and BC and only BC to treat incontinence. PMID:26816948

  9. Assessing dysphagia via telerehabilitation: patient perceptions and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shobha; Ward, Elizabeth C; Burns, Clare; Theodoros, Deborah; Russell, Trevor

    2013-04-01

    To gain insight into factors which may influence future acceptance of dysphagia management via telerehabilitation, patients' perceptions were examined before and after a telerehabilitation assessment session. Forty adult patients with dysphagia (M =66 years, SD =16.25) completed pre- and post-session questionnaires which consisted of 14 matched questions worded to suit pre- and post-conditions. Questions explored comfort with the use of telerehabilitation, satisfaction with audio and video quality, benefits of telerehabilitation assessments and patients' preferred assessment modality. Questions were rated on a 5-point scale (1 = strongly disagree, 3 = unsure, 5 = strongly agree). Patients' comfort with assessment via telerehabilitation was high in over 80% of the group both pre- and post-assessment. Pre-assessment, patients were unsure what to expect with the auditory and visual aspects of the videoconference, however there were significant positive changes reported post-experience. In relation to perceived benefits of telerehabilitation services in general, most patients believed in the value of telerehabilitation and post-assessment this increased to 90-100% agreement. Although 92% felt they would be comfortable receiving services via telerehabilitation, 45% of patients indicated ultimate preference for a traditional face-to-face assessment. The data highlight that patients are interested in and willing to receive services via telerehabilitation; however, any concerns should be addressed pre-assessment. PMID:22663016

  10. Verbal Communication Skills and Patient Satisfaction: A Study of Doctor-Patient Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland-Morin, Pamela A.; Carroll, J. Gregory

    1990-01-01

    Five physicians were tape recorded during their initial interviews with 52 adult patients to quantify behaviors in physicians' initial interviewing style. Patients were asked to complete the Medical Interview Satisfaction Scale. Silences or reaction time latencies, reciprocity, and reflective use of interruptions were significantly correlated with…

  11. Doctors' Attachment Orientations, Emotion Regulation Strategies, and Patient Satisfaction: A Multilevel Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kafetsios, Konstantinos; Hantzara, Konstantina; Anagnostopoulos, Fotios; Niakas, Dimitrios

    2016-06-01

    Extending recent research on emotion regulation in doctor-patient interaction, the present study examined relationships between doctors' attachment orientations, their emotion regulation strategies, and patients' satisfaction with the encounter. Forty doctors completed scales of attachment orientations and emotion regulation strategies, and 160 of their patients reported on a standard measure of satisfaction with their doctor. Results from multilevel analyses showed that doctors' avoidant and anxious attachment orientations were independently associated with lower satisfaction for patients higher on serious illness perceptions. Doctors' emotion regulation strategies did not mediate insecure attachment orientation relationships with patients' satisfaction as anticipated, but these regulatory strategies were an independent factor associated with satisfaction levels of patients with higher illness severity perceptions. The study confirms predictions based on attachment theory that doctors' insecure attachment can have adverse effects for doctor-patient interaction. PMID:26529518

  12. A modified dynamic evolving neural-fuzzy approach to modeling customer satisfaction for affective design.

    PubMed

    Kwong, C K; Fung, K Y; Jiang, Huimin; Chan, K Y; Siu, Kin Wai Michael

    2013-01-01

    Affective design is an important aspect of product development to achieve a competitive edge in the marketplace. A neural-fuzzy network approach has been attempted recently to model customer satisfaction for affective design and it has been proved to be an effective one to deal with the fuzziness and non-linearity of the modeling as well as generate explicit customer satisfaction models. However, such an approach to modeling customer satisfaction has two limitations. First, it is not suitable for the modeling problems which involve a large number of inputs. Second, it cannot adapt to new data sets, given that its structure is fixed once it has been developed. In this paper, a modified dynamic evolving neural-fuzzy approach is proposed to address the above mentioned limitations. A case study on the affective design of mobile phones was conducted to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. Validation tests were conducted and the test results indicated that: (1) the conventional Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) failed to run due to a large number of inputs; (2) the proposed dynamic neural-fuzzy model outperforms the subtractive clustering-based ANFIS model and fuzzy c-means clustering-based ANFIS model in terms of their modeling accuracy and computational effort. PMID:24385884

  13. A Modified Dynamic Evolving Neural-Fuzzy Approach to Modeling Customer Satisfaction for Affective Design

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, C. K.; Fung, K. Y.; Jiang, Huimin; Chan, K. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Affective design is an important aspect of product development to achieve a competitive edge in the marketplace. A neural-fuzzy network approach has been attempted recently to model customer satisfaction for affective design and it has been proved to be an effective one to deal with the fuzziness and non-linearity of the modeling as well as generate explicit customer satisfaction models. However, such an approach to modeling customer satisfaction has two limitations. First, it is not suitable for the modeling problems which involve a large number of inputs. Second, it cannot adapt to new data sets, given that its structure is fixed once it has been developed. In this paper, a modified dynamic evolving neural-fuzzy approach is proposed to address the above mentioned limitations. A case study on the affective design of mobile phones was conducted to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. Validation tests were conducted and the test results indicated that: (1) the conventional Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) failed to run due to a large number of inputs; (2) the proposed dynamic neural-fuzzy model outperforms the subtractive clustering-based ANFIS model and fuzzy c-means clustering-based ANFIS model in terms of their modeling accuracy and computational effort. PMID:24385884

  14. Can patient-written comments help explain patient satisfaction with food quality?

    PubMed

    Tranter, Michelle A; Gregoire, Mary B; Fullam, Francis A; Lafferty, Linda J

    2009-12-01

    This study identified themes in patient-written comments about meals served in a hospital and determined the relationship of those themes to patient food-quality satisfaction ratings among medical and surgical patients. Data from 2 years of quantitative Press Ganey patient-satisfaction ratings and qualitative comments related to meals by 1,077 patients discharged from a Midwest urban medical center were reviewed retrospectively. Themes in comments were identified. Results indicated that patient satisfaction with food quality did not differ based on sex or age, but did differ based on length of stay, perceived health status, and whether a patient provided written comments or not. The most common comments focused on the temperature of hot food, receiving what was ordered, and satisfaction with foodservice staff. The tenor of comments differed by food-quality rating given. Overall food quality rating was best predicted by food-related comments rather than comments about staff, or other issues not addressed in the Press Ganey quantitative questionnaire. PMID:19942026

  15. Intercultural comparison of patient satisfaction with physiotherapy care in Australia and Korea: an exploratory factor analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hush, Julia M; Lee, Haejung; Yung, Vivian; Adams, Roger; Mackey, Martin; Wand, Benedict M; Nelson, Roger; Beattie, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to conduct a cross-cultural comparison of the factors that influence patient satisfaction with musculoskeletal physiotherapy care in Australia and Korea. Methods: Prospective studies were conducted in Australia and Korea. Patient satisfaction data were collected using the MedRisk Instrument for Measuring Patient Satisfaction with Physical Therapy Care (MRPS) from a total of 1666 patients who were attending clinics for physiotherapy treatment of a musculoskeletal condition. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted to identify factors determining patient satisfaction in each cohort. Results: A four-factor solution for the MRPS was found for the Australian and Korean data sets, explaining 61 and 55% of the variance respectively. Communication and respect, convenience and quality time and person-focused care were factors common to both countries. One factor unique to Korea was courtesy and propriety. For both cultures, global patient satisfaction was significantly but weakly correlated with the outcome of treatment. Conclusions: The interpersonal aspect of care, namely effective communication and respect from the therapist, appears to be the predominant and universal factor that influences patient satisfaction with physiotherapy care, although other culturally specific factors were identified. Physiotherapists can maximize patient satisfaction with care by addressing those features that uniquely contribute to patient satisfaction in the cultural context in which they are working. PMID:24421620

  16. The Mediation Effect of School Satisfaction in the Relationship between Teacher Support, Positive Affect and Life Satisfaction in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telef, Bülent Baki; Arslan, Gökmen; Mert, Abdullah; Kalafat, Sezai

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationships among teacher support, positive emotions, school satisfaction and life satisfaction in adolescences. The study had the participation of 344 adolescents from different socio-economic levels studying in the sixth, seventh and eighth grades of three public middle schools in the province of…

  17. Patient-reported satisfaction and cosmesis outcomes following laparoscopic adrenalectomy: Laparoendoscopic single-site adrenalectomy vs. conventional laparoscopic adrenalectomy

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Shogo; Ikeda, Kenichiro; Kobayashi, Kanao; Kajiwara, Mitsuru; Teishima, Jun; Matsubara, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluate patient-reported satisfaction and cosmesis of laparoendoscopic single-site adrenalectomy (LESS-A) in comparison with that of conventional laparoscopic adrenalectomy (CLA). Methods: A total of 19 and 104 patients who respectively underwent LESS-A and CLA between May 1996 and June 2011 were included in the study. Questionnaires inquiring about scar pain (0: not painful, 10: very painful), satisfaction (0: not satisfied, 10: very satisfied) and cosmesis (0: very unsightly, 10: very beautiful) on the basis of a visual analogue scale were sent to patients postoperatively. Results: The respondents consisted of 11 and 54 patients who underwent LESS-A and CLA, respectively. There was no significant inter-group difference in age, sex, affected side or body mass index. No significant differences were observed in operative time or estimated blood loss. There were also no significant differences in pain (0.67 vs. 0.57, p = 0.393), satisfaction (8.92 vs. 8.46, p = 0.453), or cosmesis score (8.58 vs. 8.00, p = 0.487) between the LESS-A and CLA groups overall. In female patients, the satisfaction score was significantly higher in the LESS-A group than in the CLA group (10.0 vs. 8.72, p = 0.049). In young patients (<50 years old), the satisfaction score was also significantly higher in the LESS-A group than in the CLA group (9.17 vs. 6.38, p = 0.036). Conclusions: Young patients and female patients who had received LESS-A adrenal surgery were more satisfied with the scar outcomes than were the young patients and female patients who had received CLA. We suggest that this patient subset most values the cosmetic benefits of LESS-A. PMID:24454596

  18. Maintaining Life Satisfaction in Adolescence: Affective Mediators of the Influence of Perceived Emotional Intelligence on Overall Life Satisfaction Judgments in a Two-Year Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Álvarez, Nicolás; Extremera, Natalio; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to the psychological processes underlying the improvement in mood states and human well-being, particularly during adolescence. Theoretical and empirical research suggests that emotional skills may play a role in enhancing perceived well-being; however, the mechanisms involved in during adolescence are unclear. The purpose of this study was to extend understanding by investigating the potential mediators of the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and life satisfaction in a 2-years study. Participants were 269 high school students (145 girls and 124 boys) who completed the self-report perceived emotional intelligence (PEI) Scale, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, and the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale three times at 1-year intervals. The three-step longitudinal design corroborated earlier research indicating that positive and negative affect mediate the relationships between EI and life satisfaction. Students with high PEI tended to have more positive experiences and fewer negative experiences, which contributed to their greater life satisfaction. No sex differences were found in the multi-group analyses, suggesting that the causal relationships are similar in both sexes. These findings extend our understanding of the complex network of relationships involving PEI and life satisfaction in adolescence. Implications and limitations of the findings are discussed. PMID:26834654

  19. Maintaining Life Satisfaction in Adolescence: Affective Mediators of the Influence of Perceived Emotional Intelligence on Overall Life Satisfaction Judgments in a Two-Year Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Álvarez, Nicolás; Extremera, Natalio; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to the psychological processes underlying the improvement in mood states and human well-being, particularly during adolescence. Theoretical and empirical research suggests that emotional skills may play a role in enhancing perceived well-being; however, the mechanisms involved in during adolescence are unclear. The purpose of this study was to extend understanding by investigating the potential mediators of the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and life satisfaction in a 2-years study. Participants were 269 high school students (145 girls and 124 boys) who completed the self-report perceived emotional intelligence (PEI) Scale, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, and the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale three times at 1-year intervals. The three-step longitudinal design corroborated earlier research indicating that positive and negative affect mediate the relationships between EI and life satisfaction. Students with high PEI tended to have more positive experiences and fewer negative experiences, which contributed to their greater life satisfaction. No sex differences were found in the multi-group analyses, suggesting that the causal relationships are similar in both sexes. These findings extend our understanding of the complex network of relationships involving PEI and life satisfaction in adolescence. Implications and limitations of the findings are discussed. PMID:26834654

  20. Risser patient satisfaction scale: a validation study in Greek cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The current healthcare climate is characterized by a constant battle for the provision of quality care with limited resources and with patient satisfaction receiving increased attention, there is a need for reliable and valid assessment measures. This study describes the adaptation, testing and validation of the Risser Patient satisfaction Scale in an oncology care setting in Greece. The rationale for this study lies in the scarcity of such measures in the Greek language. Methods This is a test retest validation study in Greece. Data were collected from 298 hospitalized cancer patients. The validation methodology included the assessment of the item internal consistency, using the Cronbach alpha coefficient. The test-retest reliability was tested by the Kappa correlation coefficient. Results The scale demonstrated very good psychometric properties. The internal consistency of the instrument was good, Cronbach’s alpha was found to be 0.78 (p<0.001) and Kappa coefficient for reproducibility was found to be K=0.89 (95% CI: 0.83-0.91 p<0.0001). Conclusion The findings demonstrated strong agreement of the scale, suggesting that the Greek version offers substantial reliability. This study provides a valid and reliable tool to assess patient satisfaction in oncology settings. Means to monitor patient satisfaction, a key aspect of the policy agenda for quality care remain important for nurse leaders to develop better care in oncology settings. PMID:23190625

  1. How are organisational climate models and patient satisfaction related? A competing value framework approach.

    PubMed

    Ancarani, Alessandro; Di Mauro, Carmela; Giammanco, Maria Daniela

    2009-12-01

    Patient satisfaction has become an important indicator of process quality inside hospitals. Even so, the improvement of patient satisfaction cannot simply follow from the implementation of new incentives schemes and organisational arrangements; it also depends on hospitals' cultures and climates. This paper studies the impact of alternative models of organisational climate in hospital wards on patient satisfaction. Data gathered from seven public hospitals in Italy are used to explore this relationship. The theoretical approach adopted is the Competing Value Framework which classifies organisations according to their inward or outward focus and according to the importance assigned to control vs. flexibility. Results show that both a model stressing openness, change and innovation and a model emphasising cohesion and workers' morale are positively related to patient satisfaction, while a model based on managerial control is negatively associated with patient satisfaction. PMID:19850393

  2. An alternative to satisfaction surveys: let the patients talk.

    PubMed

    Alemi, Farrokh; Jasper, Harry

    2014-01-01

    We propose to replace the standardized 27-item hospital version of the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) survey with 1-item questionnaire that asks "What worked well and what needs improvement?" Sentiment analysis can take the responses to this single question and reconstruct a report on frequency of dissatisfied customers and reasons for dissatisfaction similar to reports received from longer surveys. This article shows, by way of an example, how benchmarked and quantitative reports can be generated from patients' comments. The CAHPS survey asks more leading questions, is less granular in its feedback, has lower response rate, has costly repeated reminders, and may not be as timely as sentiment analysis of a single, open-ended question. This article also shows the implementation of the proposed approach in one critical access hospital and its affiliated clinic and calls for additional research to compare sentiment analysis and CAHPS satisfaction surveys. PMID:24368718

  3. Assessment of patient satisfaction with acute pain management service: Monitoring quality of care in clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Fizzah; Khan, Robyna; Ahmed, Aliya

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Assessment of patient satisfaction is an important tool for monitoring the quality of care in hospitals. The aim of this survey was to develop a reliable tool to assess patient satisfaction with acute pain management service (APMS) and identify variables affecting this so that care can be improved. Methods: A questionnaire was developed and administered to patients after being discharged from APMS care by an unbiased person. Data collected from record included patient demographics, surgical procedure, analgesic modality, co-analgesics and dynamic and static pain scores. Questions included pain expected and pain experienced, APMS response time, quality of pain relief with treatment, professionalism of APMS team, overall experience of pain relief and choosing/suggesting same modality for themselves/family/friends again. Five-point Likert scale was used for most of the options. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 19. Results: Frequency and percentages were computed for qualitative observation and presented on pie chart and histogram. Seventy-one per cent patients expected severe pain while 43% actually experienced it. About 79.4% would choose same analgesia modality in future for self/family/friends. Ninety-nine per cent found APMS staff courteous and professional. About 89% rated their experience of pain management as excellent to very good. Conclusion: The survey of patients’ satisfaction to monitor the quality of care provided by APMS provided positive inputs on its role. This also helps to identify areas requiring improvement in care and as a tool to gauge the quality of care. PMID:27141107

  4. Patient Satisfaction of Surgical Treatment of Clitoral Phimosis and Labial Adhesions Caused by Lichen Sclerosus

    PubMed Central

    King, Michelle; Rieff, Mollie; Krapf, Jill; Goldstein, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Lichen sclerosus (LS) is a chronic inflammatory dermatosis, usually affecting the anogenital skin in women. This chronic inflammation can cause scarring of genitalia including narrowing of the introitus and phimosis of the clitoris. These architectural changes can lead to recurrent tearing during intercourse (vulvar granuloma fissuratum) and decreased clitoral sensation. Surgical correction of vulvar granuloma fissuratum (VGF) and clitoral phimosis can be performed, but there is little data on the patient satisfaction and complications following these surgical procedures. Aim To evaluate patient experience and outcomes in women undergoing surgical correction of scarring caused by anogenital LS. Methods A retrospective chart review of patients at a vulvar disorders clinic was performed to identify women who had undergone surgical correction of clitoral phimosis or lysis of vulvar adhesions for VGF due to LS. Twenty‐eight women were contacted via telephone between 4 and 130 months postoperatively. An eight‐question survey was used to determine patient experience and outcomes. Main Outcome Measures All participants completed an eight‐question survey to evaluate patient satisfaction with the surgery, effects on clitoral sensation, orgasm and pain with intercourse, postoperative symptoms or complications, and the presence of recurrent vulvar scarring. Results Participants reported that they were either very satisfied (44%) or satisfied (40%) with the procedure. Of the women who experienced decreased clitoral sensation prior to surgery, 75% endorsed increased clitoral sensitivity postoperatively. Of the women who had dyspareunia prior to surgery, the majority of women reported having pain‐free sex (33%) or improved but not completely pain‐free sex (58%) after surgery. There were no complications or symptoms made worse by the surgical procedures. Conclusions This study shows high patient satisfaction and low complication risk associated

  5. High self-assessment of disability and the surgeon's recommendation against surgical intervention may negatively impact satisfaction scores in patients with spinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Marcus D; McEvoy, Sara; Schmidt, Meic H; Bisson, Erica F

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT Patient satisfaction scores have become a common metric for health care quality. Because satisfaction scores are right-skewed, even small differences in mean scores can have a large impact. Little information, however, is available on the specific factors that play a role in satisfaction in patients with spinal disorders. The authors investigated whether disability severity and the surgeon's recommendation for or against surgical intervention were associated with patient satisfaction scores. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective cohort study involving adult patients who were referred to a spine surgeon for an outpatient evaluation of back pain. Patients completed the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) before their clinic appointment and a Press Ganey patient satisfaction survey after their visit. Patients were grouped by self-assessed disability severity: mild to moderate (ODI < 40%) and severe (≥ 40%). Satisfaction scores were graded from 0 (very poor) to 100 (very good). Nonparametric tests were used to evaluate the association between patient satisfaction and current disability self-assessment. The authors also investigated whether the surgeon's recommendation against surgery negatively affected patient satisfaction. RESULTS One hundred thirty patients completed the ODI questionnaire before and satisfaction surveys after seeing a spine surgeon for a new outpatient back pain consultation. Of these, 68 patients had severe disability, 62 had mild to moderate disability, 67 received a recommendation for surgery, and 63 received a recommendation against surgery. Composite satisfaction scores were lower among patients who had severe disability than among those with mild to moderate disability (median [interquartile range]: 91.7 [83.7-96.4] vs 95.8 [91.0-99.3], respectively; p = 0.0040). Patients who received a recommendation against surgery reported lower satisfaction scores than those who received a recommendation for surgery (91.7 [83.5-95.8] vs 95

  6. 75 FR 62635 - Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program... needed to determine patients' satisfaction with services provided by or through the Michael E. DeBakey.... Title: Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program, VA Form 10-0476. OMB...

  7. Healthcare Provider-Patient Communication: A Satisfaction Study in the Outpatient Clinic at Hospital Kuala Lumpur

    PubMed Central

    AZIZAM, Nor Azmaniza; SHAMSUDDIN, Khadija

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is growing interest in research on patient satisfaction with healthcare provider (HCP) communication as a measure of healthcare quality and HCPs’ communication competency. This study aimed to determine the levels of patient satisfaction with healthcare provider-patient communication (HCP-PC) and its associated factors at the outpatient clinic at Hospital Kuala Lumpur. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on a convenience sample in July 2012 using self-administered questionnaires for the data collection. Both overall and domain-specific satisfaction were measured, with the three domains being exchanging information (EI), socio-emotional behaviour (SB), and communication style (CS). Results: The findings show that 92.8% of the 283 respondents were satisfied with overall HCP-PC, 89.5% with EI, 91.3% with SB, and 72.2% with CS. Satisfaction was statistically higher among Malays for CS and higher among those with low education and poor health for EI, SB and CS. EI and overall communication satisfaction were also higher among patients who reported short wait times, and patients who were in gender concordance with their HCPs showed higher SB satisfaction. Conclusion: Basic and continuous communication skills training and patient activation programs should be established to increase patient satisfaction. Health information technology use should be actively promoted to allow for structured and standardised information exchange between HCPs and patients. PMID:26715897

  8. Inability of Physicians and Nurses to Predict Patient Satisfaction in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    DeLaney, Matthew C.; Page, David B.; Kunstadt, Ethan B.; Ragan, Matt; Rodgers, Joel; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patient satisfaction is a commonly assessed dimension of emergency department (ED) care quality. The ability of ED clinicians to estimate patient satisfaction is unknown. We sought to evaluate the ability of emergency medicine resident physicians and nurses to predict patient-reported satisfaction with physician and nursing care, pain levels, and understanding of discharge instructions. Methods We studied a convenience sample of 100 patients treated at an urban academic ED. Patients rated satisfaction with nursing care, physician care, pain level at time of disposition and understanding of discharge instructions. Resident physicians and nurses estimated responses for each patient. We compared patient, physician and nursing responses using Cohen’s kappa, weighting the estimates to account for the ordinal responses. Results Overall, patients had a high degree of satisfaction with care provided by the nurses and physicians, although this was underestimated by providers. There was poor agreement between physician estimation of patient satisfaction (weighted κ=0.23, standard error: 0.078) and nursing estimates of patient satisfaction (weighted κ=0.11, standard error: 0.043); physician estimation of patient pain (weighted κ=0.43, standard error: 0.082) and nursing estimates (weighted κ=0.39, standard error: 0.081); physician estimates of patient comprehension of discharge instruction (weighted κ=0.19, standard error: 0.082) and nursing estimates (weighted κ=0.13, standard error: 0.078). Providers underestimated pain and patient comprehension of discharge instructions. Conclusion ED providers were not able to predict patient satisfaction with nurse or physician care, pain level, or understanding of discharge instructions. PMID:26759661

  9. Affective profiles in Italian high school students: life satisfaction, psychological well-being, self-esteem, and optimism

    PubMed Central

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Bucci, Ornella

    2015-01-01

    The affective profiles model distinguishes between individuals who are self-fulfilling (high positive affect, low negative affect), high affective (high positive affect, high negative affect), low affective (low positive affect, low negative affect), and self-destructive (low positive affect, high negative affect). The literature shows that the affective profiles model has been used with Swedish people in particular in order to determine differences among profiles in relation to life satisfaction, psychological well-being, self-esteem, and optimism. The present research investigated these differences in Italian high school students. Two studies were conducted: the first with 156 Italian high school students and the second with 148 Italian high school students. The first study analyzed differences among affective profiles with regard to life satisfaction and psychological well-being while the second study analyzed differences among affective profiles with regard to self-esteem and optimism. In the first study, the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), the Satisfaction with Life Scale, and the Meaningful Life Measure were administered to the participants. In the second study, the PANAS, the Self-Esteem Scale, the Life Orientation Test-revised were administered to the participants. The results of the first study showed that, with respect to the other profiles, the self-fulfilling participants had greater life satisfaction and psychological well-being. The results of the second study showed that, with respect to the other profiles, the self-fulfilling participants had higher self-esteem and optimism. These results revealed differences among affective profiles regarding life satisfaction, psychological well-being, self-esteem, and optimism in the Italian context as well thereby offering new possibilities for cross-cultural research and for enhancing self-fulfilling profiles. PMID:26388814

  10. Impact of Sequencing of Postmastectomy Radiotherapy and Breast Reconstruction on Timing and Rate of Complications and Patient Satisfaction

    SciTech Connect

    Adesiyun, Tolulope A.; Lee, Bernard T.; Yueh, Janet H.; Chen, Chen; Colakoglu, Salih; Anderson, Katarina E.M.; Nguyen, Minh-Doan T.; Recht, Abram

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: There are few long-term studies of how the sequencing of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) and breast reconstruction (BR) affects the time to development of complications or patient satisfaction with BR. We therefore studied this issue. Methods and Materials: One hundred thirteen women who underwent BR at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (Boston, MA) from 1999-2006 and also received PMRT were included. Complications requiring surgery were categorized as early (within 90 days of BR) or late. The median length of follow-up after BR was 46.5 months. Patients' general and esthetic satisfaction was assessed with a validated questionnaire. Results: Complications occurred among 32% of 57 women receiving PMRT before BR and 44% of 57 patients having BR before PMRT (p = 0.176). Early complications were more frequent in patients who had PMRT first (18%) than for those with BR first (11%) (p = 0.210); conversely, late complication rates in the two groups were 14% and 33%, respectively (p = 0.009). General satisfaction was comparable between the PMRT-first and BR-first groups (68% and 68%, respectively; p = 0.995); esthetic satisfaction rates were also similar (50% and 62%, respectively; p = 0.238). Conclusions: The sequencing of PMRT and BR did not have a substantial impact on the total risk of complications or patients' general and esthetic satisfaction. However, early complications tended to develop in patients having PMRT first, whereas patients having BR first had a higher risk of late complications. Additional study of the effects of sequencing of PMRT on particular types of reconstructions may help devise strategies for reducing these risks.

  11. Discharge Planning for Dementia Patients: Factors Influencing Caregiver Decisions and Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Carole B.

    1996-01-01

    Data on discharge process and caregiver satisfaction were collected from 179 caregivers of hospitalized dementia patients. Findings indicate that social workers are important influences in discharge decisions especially when discharge is to a nursing home. Findings from regression analyses indicate that caregiver satisfaction is dependent on the…

  12. Patient satisfaction with primary health care services in two districts in Lower and Upper Egypt.

    PubMed

    Gadallah, M; Zaki, B; Rady, M; Anwer, W; Sallam, I

    2003-05-01

    This study compares patient satisfaction with primary health care services and identifies factors associated with patient satisfaction in two health districts in Egypt where a project for upgrading primary health care services had been running for three years. An exit interview was conducted for 1108 patients using a structured questionnaire. The results revealed that most clients using primary health care services were females. Patient satisfaction was high for accessibility, waiting area conditions and performance of doctors and nurses. The main complaints centred on the availability of prescribed drugs and laboratory investigations. Additionally, level of privacy in the consultation room was described as unsatisfactory by 33% of patients. There was no association between overall patient satisfaction and age, gender, education level or type of service received. PMID:15751936

  13. Factors Contributing to Patient Satisfaction with Rehabilitation Following Stroke.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, M. S.; Smith, D. S.

    1998-01-01

    A study that investigated the satisfaction of 60 Australian stroke survivors with their rehabilitative progress over 12 months found satisfaction with progress improved with time and was influenced by the return to previous lifestyle activities, depression, family functioning, understanding of stroke, and clarity of expectations on admission to…

  14. Quality Improvement Project to Improve Patient Satisfaction With Pain Management: Using Human-Centered Design.

    PubMed

    Trail-Mahan, Tracy; Heisler, Scott; Katica, Mary

    2016-01-01

    In this quality improvement project, our health system developed a comprehensive, patient-centered approach to improving inpatient pain management and assessed its impact on patient satisfaction across 21 medical centers. Using human-centered design principles, a bundle of 6 individual and team nursing practices was developed. Patient satisfaction with pain management, as measured by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems pain composite score, increased from the 25th to just under the 75th national percentile. PMID:26447343

  15. Autonomy vs paternalism in the emergency department: the potential deleterious impact of patient satisfaction surveys.

    PubMed

    Darnall, Beth D; Schatman, Michael E

    2013-07-01

    Patient satisfaction surveys, such as Press Ganey, are flawed metrics for the emergency department setting and also in broader pain medicine. National experts discuss the pitfalls of applying such measures in pain care, and the potential unintended negative consequences to patients and providers alike. Evaluators, administrators, and payers are challenged to understand the limitations of Press Ganey and patient satisfactions in pain treatment, and the field is challenged to develop meaningful and valid metrics for best practices and competencies. PMID:23758676

  16. Association Between Patient-Reported Measures of Psychological Distress and Patient Satisfaction Scores in a Spine Surgery Patient Population

    PubMed Central

    Abtahi, A.M.; Brodke, D.S.; Lawrence, B.D.; Zhang, C.; Spiker, W.R.

    2015-01-01

    Update This article was updated on June 10, 2015, because of previous errors. The title had previously read “Association Between Patient-Reported Measures of Psychological Distress and Patient Satisfaction Scores After Spine Surgery.” It has been changed to “Association Between Patient-Reported Measures of Psychological Distress and Patient Satisfaction Scores in a Spine Surgery Patient Population” to reflect the fact that not all patients had undergone surgery when they completed their questionnaires. The last sentence in the Background paragraph of the Abstract had previously read “The goal of this study was to determine whether psychological distress influences outpatient satisfaction scores following spine surgery.” It now reads “The goal of this study was to determine whether psychological distress influences outpatient satisfaction scores in a spine surgery patient population.” The last sentence before the Materials and Methods section, which previously read “Our aim in conducting this study was to determine whether psychological distress, as measured with the Distress and Risk Assessment Method (DRAM) questionnaire, influences outpatient satisfaction scores following spine surgery,” now reads: “Our aim in conducting this study was to determine whether psychological distress, as measured with the Distress and Risk Assessment Method (DRAM) questionnaire, influences outpatient satisfaction scores in a spine surgery patient population.” Finally, the second sentence in the Materials and Methods section, “Every patient who completed both a patient satisfaction survey and a DRAM questionnaire for the same encounter at any point during the study period was included in this study,” has been changed to “Every patient who completed both a patient satisfaction survey and a DRAM questionnaire for the same encounter, before or after the surgery, at any point during the study period was included in this study.” An erratum has been published

  17. Comparison Patients and Staffs Satisfaction in General Versus Special Wards of Hospitals of Jahrom

    PubMed Central

    Taheri, Leila; Jahromi, Marzieh Kargar; Hojat, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aims: Patient satisfaction is the most important indicator of high-quality health care and is used for the assessment and planning of health care. Also, Job satisfaction is an important factor on prediction and perception of organizational manner. The aim of this study is to identify and compare patient and staff satisfaction in general versus special wards. Material and Method: In order to identify the various indicators of satisfaction and dissatisfaction, a descriptive study (cross sectional) was done to assess patients’ satisfaction with in-patient care at Jahrom University of Medical Science hospitals. The sample size was 600 patients that selected by sequential random sampling technique and are close to their discharge from the hospital. Patients were asked to indicate the scale point which best reflected their level of satisfaction with the treatment or service. Also we assess the staff satisfaction (sample size was 408 staffs) in general ward using a researcher made questionnaire. It should be noted that the participants were anonymous and there was no obligation to participation. We tried to set a secure and comfortable environment for filling out the questionnaire. Results: Among 600 patients, 239 (n = 38.67%) were men and 368 (61.33%) were female. Number of nurses was 408, of which 135 (33.08%) were men and 273 (66.92%) female. There was a significant correlation between working experience and professional factors of personnel. The mean total patient satisfaction in general and special wards is (2.75 ± .35, 3.03 ± .53) respectively. Differences of patient satisfaction in domains such respect, care and confidence in general wards versus special ward were statistically significant, but there was no difference in expect time of patients in these wards. Differences Between the mean patient and staff satisfaction in the general wards versus special wards were statistically significant using independent t-tests (p = .018, p = .029

  18. A pilot mixed methods study of patient satisfaction with chiropractic care for back pain

    PubMed Central

    Polipnick, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Objective Patient satisfaction is important to payers, clinicians, and patients. The concept of satisfaction is multifactorial and measurement is challenging. Our objective was to explore use of a mixed-methods design to examine patient satisfaction with chiropractic care for low back pain. Methods Patients were treated 3 times per week for 3 weeks. Outcomes were collected at Week 3 and Week 4. Qualitative interviews were conducted by the treating clinician and a non-treating staff member. Outcome Measures were the Roland Morris Questionnaire (RMQ), the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), and the Patient Satisfaction Scale (PSS). Interviews were recorded and transcribed, and analyzed for themes and constructs of satisfaction. We compared qualitative interview data with quantitative outcomes, and qualitative data from 2 different interviewers. Results All patients reported high levels of satisfaction. Clinical outcomes were unremarkable with little change noted on VAS and RMQ scores. We categorized patient comments into the same constructs of satisfaction as those identified for the PSS: Quality of Care, Information, Effectiveness, and Caring. An additional construct (Quality of Care) and additional subcategories were identified. Satisfaction with care is not explained by outcome alone. The qualitative data collected from 2 different interviewers had few differences. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that it is feasible to use a mixed-method design to examine patient satisfaction. We were able to refine data collection and analysis procedures for the outcome measures and qualitative interview data. We identified limitations and offer recommendations for the next step: the implementation of a larger study. PMID:18984243

  19. Patient satisfaction with eletriptan in the acute treatment of migraine in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Nett, R B; Tiseo, P J; Almas, M; Sikes, C R

    2007-01-01

    Summary Objective: The efficxacy of triptans for acute migraine has been well established in clinical trials but not in primary care, where they are most commonly prescribed. The aim of this open-label study was to evaluate the effectiveness of eletriptan 40 mg in primary care, using a patient-weighted satisfaction scale. Methods: Eligible patients met International Headache Society criteria for migraine, with 1–6 attacks per month. Patients completed questionnaires at screening and following a single eletriptan-treated attack. Treatment satisfaction was evaluated using a six-item Medication Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ). MSQ item scores were weighted, based on the important score ratings, to yield individualised satisfaction scores. The primary end-point was the difference in weighted satisfaction scores between the patient's previous treatment and eletriptan 40 mg. Secondary end-points assessed quality of life (QOL), functioning and efficacy of treatment. Results: Of 590 patients screened, 437 completed the study. Degree (95.2%), time (88.8%) and duration (83.8%) of headache pain relief were rated as most important by patients. The mean (±SD) total satisfaction score on the MSQ was higher for eletriptan than previous therapy (2.2 ± 3.0 vs. 0.6 ± 2.4; p < 0.001). The high level of satisfaction with eletriptan vs. previous treatment reflects the improvements in QOL and functioning observed, and the high headache and pain-free response rates. Conclusions: Patient-weighted satisfaction with eletriptan 40 mg was higher than with previous treatment for all items. The use of patient-weighted importance ratings of satisfaction is a promising approach for establishing effectiveness of treatment in primary care. PMID:17877653

  20. Is patient satisfaction in primary care dependent on structural and organizational characteristics among providers? Findings based on data from the national patient survey in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Glenngård, Anna H

    2013-07-01

    In parallel to market-like reforms in Swedish primary care, the gathering and compilation of comparative information about providers, for example through survey tools, has been improved. Such information is increasingly being used to guide individuals' choice of provider and payers' assessments of provider performance, often without critically reflecting about underlying factors affecting the results. The purpose of this study was to analyze variation in patient satisfaction, with respect to organizational and structural factors, including the mix of registered individuals, among primary care providers, based on information from a national patient survey in primary care and register data in three Swedish county councils. Systematic variation in patient satisfaction was found with respect to both organizational and structural factors, including characteristics of registered individuals. Smaller practices and practices where a high proportion of all visits were with a doctor were associated with higher patient satisfaction. Also practices where registered individuals had a low level of social deprivation and a high overall illness on average were associated with higher patient satisfaction. Factors that are of relevance for how well providers perform according to patient surveys are more or less possible to control for providers. This adds to the complexity for the use of such information by individuals and payers to assess provider performance. PMID:23040560

  1. Patient satisfaction surveys in dental school clinics: a review and comparison.

    PubMed

    Ebn Ahmady, Arezoo; Pakkhesal, Mina; Zafarmand, A Hamid; Lando, Harry Alan

    2015-04-01

    Health care is becoming more patient-centered and, as a result, patients' experiences of care and assessment of satisfaction are taken more seriously. Patient satisfaction influences treatment cooperation, and better cooperation leads to healthier patients in the long term. This generalization clearly applies in the dental school clinic setting. Furthermore, dental school clinics' administrators and clinicians should know about the dimensions of their patient satisfaction in order to provide the highest quality of care. The aim of this study was to review studies published between 1980 and March 2014 to identify the dimensions used to measure patients' satisfaction when they receive services in dental school clinics. The PubMed database was used to access published studies using patient satisfaction surveys in dental school clinics, and the dimensions used in these surveys were then categorized. Through several stages of searching in PubMed, the authors selected 41 articles from a total of 730; after further critical appraisal, nine articles were retained. Five dimensions included in patient surveys were identified: quality, interaction, access, environment, and cost. Determining the dimensions used in patient satisfaction surveys in dental school clinics can assist academic dental institutions in providing the highest quality of care. PMID:25838009

  2. Reducing neck incision length during thyroid surgery does not improve satisfaction in patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok-Mo; Chun, Ki Won; Chang, Ho Jin; Kim, Bup-Woo; Lee, Yong Sang; Chang, Hang-Seok; Park, Cheong Soo

    2015-09-01

    Postoperative neck cosmesis is a major concern of patients undergoing thyroid surgery. Patients will likely be more satisfied with the long-term cosmetic appearance of smaller than larger thyroidectomy scars. We, therefore, investigated the relationship between scar length following conventional thyroid surgery and patient satisfaction. An anonymous scar-assessment questionnaire was administered to patients who underwent conventional thyroid surgery. The 2,041 patients were asked to rate their satisfaction with their scars on a ten-point Likert scale, with one being very unsatisfied and ten being very satisfied. The mean satisfaction score was significantly lower in the benign condition than in malignancy (6.9 ± 2.5 vs. 7.4 ± 2.5; p = 0.021), whereas there were no differences in satisfaction score among subgroups of patients with benign condition (p = 0.837). In patients with thyroid cancer, the mean satisfaction scores were similar among subgroups according to operation type and scar length (p = 0.820). Incision length was not associated with patient satisfaction in thyroid surgery patients and therefore may not be critical in decision making for thyroid cancer surgery. PMID:24993659

  3. Dyadic Influence of Hope and Optimism on Patient Marital Satisfaction among Couples with Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Emily E.; Steiner, Jennifer L.; Rand, Kevin L.; Bigatti, Silvia M.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE An estimated 10–40% of breast cancer (BC) patients report negative changes to their partnered relationships. Literature suggests that for these patients, marital satisfaction is related to depression and other quality of life factors which are associated with survivorship and treatment response. However, existing literature does not provide a clear explanation of the factors that strengthen vs. create strain in couples facing cancer. Given the benefits of a satisfying relationship to patient quality of life, it is important to better understand factors that put patients at greater risk for marital difficulties. This study examined the differential and combined roles of hope and optimism among BC patients and their partners on patient marital satisfaction. METHOD Fifty-six breast cancer patient-partner dyads completed study questionnaires as part of a larger study. Regression analyses were used to examine the main and interaction effects of patient and partner hope and optimism on patient marital satisfaction. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION Higher patient and partner hope predicted greater patient marital satisfaction, whereas optimism did not. These results are divergent from the literature on optimism and well-being, which shows the importance of studying these two traits concurrently. Interaction effects suggest certain combinations of patient and partner hope and optimism are more beneficial than others for patient marital satisfaction and suggest a dyadic approach is important for investigation of well-being in breast cancer. PMID:24687536

  4. 76 FR 624 - Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program.... 2900-New (VA Form 10-0476).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E... their satisfaction with the quality of services/care provided by home care program staff. An agency...

  5. Organizational Effects on Patient Satisfaction in Hospital Medical-Surgical Units

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, Cynthia Thornton; Mark, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between hospital context, nursing unit structure, and patient characteristics and patients’ satisfaction with nursing care in hospitals. Background Although patient satisfaction has been widely researched, our understanding of the relationship between hospital context and nursing unit structure and their impact on patient satisfaction is limited. Methods The data source for this study was the Outcomes Research in Nursing Administration Project, a multi-site organizational study to investigate relationships among nurse staffing, organizational context and structure and patient outcomes. The sample for this study was 2720 patients and 3718 RNs in 286 medical-surgical units in 146 hospitals. Results Greater availability of nursing unit support services and higher levels of work engagement were associated with higher levels of patient satisfaction. Older age, better health status and better symptom management were also associated with higher levels of patient satisfaction. Conclusions Organizational factors in hospitals and nursing units, particularly support services on the nursing unit and mechanisms that foster nurses’ work engagement and effective symptom management, are important influences on patient satisfaction. PMID:19423987

  6. The impact of a patient education bundle on neurosurgery patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Kliot, Tamara; Zygourakis, Corinna C.; Imershein, Sarah; Lau, Catherine; Kliot, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background: As reimbursements and hospital/physician performance become ever more reliant on Hospital Consumer Assessment of Health Care Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) and other quality metrics, physicians are increasingly incentivized to improve patient satisfaction. Methods: A faculty and resident team at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Department of Neurological Surgery developed and implemented a Patient Education Bundle. This consisted of two parts: The first was preoperative expectation letters (designed to inform patients of what to expect before, during, and after their hospitalization for a neurosurgical procedure); the second was a trifold brochure with names, photographs, and specialty/training information about the attending surgeons, resident physicians, and nurse practitioners on the neurosurgical service. We assessed patient satisfaction, as measured by HCAHPS scores and a brief survey tailored to our specific intervention, both before and after our Patient Education Bundle intervention. Results: Prior to our intervention, 74.6% of patients responded that the MD always explained information in a way that was easy to understand. After our intervention, 78.7% of patients responded that the MD always explained information in a way that was easy to understand. “Neurosurgery Patient Satisfaction survey” results showed that 83% remembered receiving the preoperative letter; of those received the letter, 93% found the letter helpful; and 100% thought that the letter should be continued. Conclusion: Although effects were modest, we believe that patient education strategies, as modeled in our bundle, can improve patients’ hospital experiences and have a positive impact on physician performance scores and hospital ratings. PMID:26664909

  7. Assessing Insulin Delivery Device Satisfaction in Patients with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Snell-Bergeon, Janet K

    2015-11-01

    Over the past several decades, insulin treatment has changed drastically, not only with the development of further insulin analogs but also with the introduction of novel insulin delivery devices such as pumps and pens. In addition, adjunct devices such as continuous glucose monitors and sensor-augmented pumps have become increasingly used in clinical care, increasing the volume of information available to patients and providers. However, with the development of new devices it has become clear that along with the many benefits of these advances, the use of these devices can also present a burden to people with diabetes. For example, some patients report being overwhelmed by too much data when using continuous glucose monitors. Furthermore, there are concerns regarding the accuracy of some of these new devices, particularly for glucose monitoring. As a result, some patients may choose not to use available devices, despite the recognized benefits. Therefore, it is critical to understand how the various insulin delivery devices available currently and in the future affect patients in terms of their diabetes management and perceived burdens and to understand which patient characteristics may predict a lack of satisfaction with these devices. This critical gap in our knowledge is addressed in an article in this issue of the journal through the development of a questionnaire that allows for a better understanding of the impact of insulin delivery devices on quality of life and diabetes management among both type 1 diabetes and insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes patients. The novelty, as well as limitations, of this new instrument for the assessment of insulin delivery device satisfaction are discussed. PMID:26535926

  8. Identifying Drivers of Overall Satisfaction in Patients Receiving HIV Primary Care: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Bich N.; Westbrook, Robert A.; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Giordano, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study seeks to understand the drivers of overall patient satisfaction in a predominantly low-income, ethnic-minority population of HIV primary care patients. The study’s primary aims were to determine 1) the component experiences which contribute to patients’ evaluations of their overall satisfaction with care received, and 2) the relative contribution of each component experience in explaining patients’ evaluation of overall satisfaction. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of 489 adult patients receiving HIV primary care at two clinics in Houston, Texas, from January 13–April 21, 2011. The participation rate among eligible patients was 94%. The survey included 15 questions about various components of the care experience, 4 questions about the provider experience and 3 questions about overall care. To ensure that the survey was appropriately tailored to our clinic population and the list of component experiences reflected all aspects of the care experience salient to patients, we conducted in-depth interviews with key providers and clinic staff and pre-tested the survey instrument with patients. Results Patients’ evaluation of their provider correlated the strongest with their overall satisfaction (standardized β = 0.445, p<0.001) and accounted for almost half of the explained variance. Access and availability, like clinic hours and ease of calling the clinic, also correlated with overall satisfaction, but less strongly. Wait time and parking, despite receiving low patient ratings, did not correlate with overall satisfaction. Conclusions The patient-provider relationship far exceeds other component experiences of care in its association with overall satisfaction. Our study suggests that interventions to improve overall patient satisfaction should focus on improving patients’ evaluation of their provider. PMID:22912770

  9. A Hybrid Model for Research on Subjective Well-Being: Examining Common- and Component-Specific Sources of Variance in Life Satisfaction, Positive Affect, and Negative Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busseri, Michael; Sadava, Stanley; DeCourville, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    The primary components of subjective well-being (SWB) include life satisfaction (LS), positive affect (PA), and negative affect (NA). There is little consensus, however, concerning how these components form a model of SWB. In this paper, six longitudinal studies varying in demographic characteristics, length of time between assessment periods,…

  10. Self-Evaluation Accuracy and Satisfaction with Performance: Are there Affective Costs or Benefits of Positive Self-Evaluation Bias?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narciss, Susanne; Koerndle, Hermann; Dresel, Markus

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines how self-evaluation biases may influence satisfaction with performance. A review of theoretical positions suggests there are two views, both of which are supported by studies involving laboratory tasks. The first view predicts affective costs, and the second affective benefits of positive self-evaluation bias. We test the…

  11. Good fortune. Griffin Hospital gets outstanding grades in both employee and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Mycek, S

    2001-07-01

    While the rest of the country suffers a workforce crisis, a Connecticut hospital is turning away applicants. After adopting the Planetree model of care, Griffin Hospital's patient and employee satisfaction rates soared. PMID:11467191

  12. 78 FR 76193 - Agency Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction... Retaining Nurses at State Homes).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Care Coordination Home...

  13. Relationships among patient satisfaction, intent to return, and intent to recommend services provided by an academic nursing center.

    PubMed

    Hill, Mary H; Doddato, Theresa

    2002-01-01

    Patient satisfaction is an indicator and component of high quality care and service and the viability of academic nursing centers is dependent on patients' return visits and new patients' visits. The major purpose of this study was to determine patients' satisfaction with the quality of health care services provided by an academic nursing center. A secondary purpose was to determine the relationships among patient satisfaction, intent to return, and intent to recommend services. The study consisted of a convenience sample of 107 adult patients who responded to an investigator generated patient satisfaction survey. Findings indicated that 94 (87.8%) of the patients were satisfied. Stepwise regression analysis identified treatment with respect, the rating of care received, and the helpfulness of the person at the front desk as the strongest predictors of patient satisfaction. Correlation analysis revealed that patient satisfaction is highly correlated with intent to return and intent to recommend services (p < .01). PMID:12674887

  14. Emotional intelligence as an indicator of satisfaction with life of patients with psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Drozdowska, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Research reports confirm the existence of a relation between emotional intelligence and various aspects of human functioning. It protects psychical and physical health of an individual, helps to adapt to new conditions and, consequently, contributes to the increase in life quality expressed in satisfaction with life. Psoriasis, a chronic skin disease, may negatively influence the psychical state of a patient and his or her social functioning, which leads to the decrease in satisfaction with life. Aim This research aimed at determining the relation between emotional intelligence and satisfaction with life in a group of patients with psoriasis. Material and methods The research group consisted of 81 people with psoriasis (40 men and 41 women) with the average age of 41.22 (SD = 14.18). The research tools used included the Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire INTE, Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS), personal questionnaire and PASI scale. Results There is a positive correlation between emotional intelligence and satisfaction with life in the group of patients with psoriasis. Especially factor I – using emotions in thinking and operating – positively correlates with satisfaction with life. Conclusions Emotional intelligence together with the percentage of body area taken by pathological changes are the indicators of satisfaction with life in patients with psoriasis. PMID:24493999

  15. A retrospective study of patient outcomes and satisfaction following pinnaplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Nicholas; Smith, Caroline P; Cullen, Jim R; McCluney, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Up to 5% of all children have prominent ears. Psychological distress and bullying adversely affect these children and can cause significant social exclusion. In times of austerity, cosmetic procedures such as surgical correction of prominent ears are felt to be an unnecessary cost to the health service. Materials and methods A retrospective case note review of all patients undergoing pinnaplasty was undertaken. Postoperative outcomes were compared against the Royal College of Surgeons of England standards. The Glasgow Benefit Inventory, a validated post-intervention questionnaire, was then posted out to all patients. Results A total of 72 patients were identified. Average age at procedure was 13 years. Eleven patients were above the age of 19 years. Twenty-eight patients were male and forty-four female. Sixty-two cases underwent bilateral pinnaplasty. No patients developed hematoma, and there were no readmissions within 30 days of surgery. Twenty-nine patients responded to the questionnaire (40%), of whom 27 reported a positive impact on their psychosocial well-being with a mean score of 36. Conclusion Pinnaplasty offers patients an opportunity to alleviate the psychological distress of bullying and harassment secondary to the appearance of prominent ears. PMID:27307775

  16. Self-esteem and patients' satisfaction after deep inferior epigastric perforator flap breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Haekens, Christel M; Enajat, Morteza; Keymeulen, Kristien; Van der Hulst, Rene R W J

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this article is to assess the impact of deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap breast reconstruction on self-esteem and to analyze the correlation between aesthetic outcome and self-esteem. Global self-esteem was evaluated using the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale in 31 patients who underwent DIEP flap breast reconstructions. A study-specific questionnaire and photographic evaluation were used by the patient, the plastic surgeon, and the oncological surgeon to measure satisfaction with the aesthetic outcome. Patients' satisfaction and self-esteem were analyzed for any existing correlation. Overall patients' satisfaction had a mean score of 6.55 (range, 0-10) on the Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire. A mean score of 32.48 (range, 10-40) was found on the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. More than 80% of patients were content with their decision to undergo this procedure and would recommend this to a friend. Surgeons tended to rate the aesthetic outcome better than patients. Patients' satisfaction and self-esteem were found to be positively correlated. Patients are generally content with the outcome of primary DIEP flap breast reconstruction. The favorable aesthetic result of this procedure has a beneficial effect on patients' self-esteem. PMID:22157606

  17. Student as Customer: Factors Affecting Satisfaction and Assessments of Institutional Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Beverly A.; Kaldenberg, Dennis O.; Browne, William G.; Brown, Daniel J.

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 736 college students investigated satisfaction with a university's business education program, with attention to ratings of services and educational quality, and their relationship to students' global satisfaction, willingness to recommend the institution, and satisfaction with educational value received. Results suggest institutions…

  18. Effects of viewing a pro-ana website: an experimental study on body satisfaction, affect, and appearance self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Delforterie, Monique J; Larsen, Junilla K; Bardone-Cone, Anna M; Scholte, Ron H J

    2014-01-01

    Pro-anorexia websites portray an extreme form of thin-ideal. This between-subjects experiment examined the effects of viewing such a website on body satisfaction, affect, and appearance self-efficacy compared to viewing control websites (fashion, home decoration, automutilation). The sample consisted of 124 normal weight, young adult, Dutch women (mean age 21.2, mean body mass index 21.4). Participants did not differ on affect and appearance self-efficacy. One body satisfaction measure showed that pro-anorexia viewers were more satisfied with their bodies than home decoration viewers. Our findings suggest that viewing a pro-anorexia website might not have detrimental effects on body satisfaction and affect among normal weight young women. PMID:24689982

  19. Influence of the prosthetic arm length (palatal position) of zygomatic implants upon patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Pellicer-Chover, Hilario; Cervera-Ballester, Juan; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Bagán, Leticia; Peñarrocha-Diago, María

    2016-01-01

    Background To assess the influence of the prosthetic arm length (palatal position) of zygomatic implants upon patient comfort and stability, speech, functionality and overall satisfaction. Material and Methods A retrospective clinical study was made of patients subjected to rehabilitation of atrophic maxilla with complete maxillary implant-supported fixed prostheses involving a minimum of two zygomatic implants (one on each side) in conjunction with premaxillary implants, and with 12 months of follow-up after implant loading. Subjects used a VAS to score general satisfaction, comfort and stability, speech and functionality, and the results were analyzed in relation to the prosthetic arm length of the zygomatic implants 12 months after prosthetic delivery. Results Twenty-two patients participated in the study, receiving 22 prostheses anchored on 148 implants (44 were zygomatic and 94 were conventional implants). The mean right and left prosthetic arm length was 5.9±2.4 mm and 6.1±2.7 mm, respectively, with no statistically significant differences between them (p=0.576). The mean scores referred to comfort/retention, speech, functionality and overall satisfaction were high - no correlation being found between prosthetic arm length and patient satisfaction (p=0.815). Conclusions No relationship could be identified between prosthetic arm length (palatal position) and patient satisfaction. Key words:Zygomatic implants, patient satisfaction, zygomatic prosthesis, prosthetic arm length. PMID:26946206

  20. Association of Nurses' Self-Reported Empathy and Mu Suppression with Patients' Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzi, Nasser; Azma, Kamran; Tavakolian, Ehsan; Peyvand, Pedram

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to explore the association between mu suppression and self-reported empathy in nurses with patients’ satisfaction. Methods: For this correlational study, 30 male nurses, as well as 30 patients took care by these nurses during the week before data gathering, were selected via accessible and random sampling method, respectively. The tools included Jefferson's Scale of Empathy-health professionals, and patient’s satisfaction scale of La Monica-Oberst. Activation of Mirror Neurons System (MNS) was investigated by mu suppression. For this purpose, electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded in three phases: 1) Watching the video of a non-moving hand, 2) Watching the video of a hand being open and closed, and 3) Opening and closing one-self's hand. EEG recordings were analyzed using Matlab R 2014a software. Data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation coefficients and multiple regression analyses. Results: There was no significant correlation between mu suppression in nurses with nurses' self-reported empathy and patients' satisfaction, however, a significant correlation was found between nurses' self-reported empathy and patients' satisfaction. Regression analysis outcomes showed that nurses' self-reported empathy could predict 18.5% (nearly one fifth) of patients' satisfaction variance while mu suppression did not forecast patients' satisfaction significantly. Conclusion: These findings suggested that mu rhythm was a good biomarker neither for nurses' self-reported empathy nor for patients' satisfaction. In addition, it was manifested that patients' satisfaction, at least partly, depended on skills that nurses could learn, since showing empathy is highly learnable. PMID:26464836

  1. An Empirical Study of the Impact of Service Quality on Patient Satisfaction in Private Hospitals, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Ehsan; Daneshkohan, Abbas; Pouragha, Behrouz; Marzban, Sima; Arab, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Perceived service quality is the most important predictor of patient satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the service quality on the overall satisfaction of patients in private hospitals of Tehran, Iran. Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the year 2010. The study’s sample consisted of 969 patients who were recruited from eight private general hospitals in Tehran, Iran using consecutive sampling. A questionnaire was used for data collection; contacting 21 items (17 items about service quality and 4 items about overall satisfaction) and its validity and reliability were confirmed. Data analysis was performed using t-test, ANOVA and multivariate regression. Result: this study found a strong relationship between service quality and patient satisfaction. About 45% of the variance in overall satisfaction was explained by four dimensions of perceived service quality. The cost of services, the quality of the process and the quality of interaction had the greatest effects on the overall satisfaction of patients, but not found a significant effect on the quality of the physical environment on patient satisfaction. Conclusions: Constructs related to costs, delivery of service and interpersonal aspect of care had the most positive impact on overall satisfaction of patients. Managers and owners of private hospitals should set reasonable prices compared to the quality of service. In terms of process quality, waiting time for visits, admissions, and surgeries must be declined and services provided at the fastest possible time. It should be emphasized to strengthen of interpersonal aspects of care and communication skills of care providers. PMID:25560338

  2. Patient Satisfaction and Quality of Life in DIEAP Flap versus Implant Breast Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sgarzani, Rossella; Negosanti, Luca; Morselli, Paolo Giovanni; Vietti Michelina, Veronica; Lapalorcia, Luigi Maria; Cipriani, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    The psychological impact of breast reconstruction has widely been described, and multiple studies show that reconstruction improves the well-being and quality of life of patients. In breast reconstruction, the goal is not only the morphological result, but mainly the patient's perception of it. The objective of our study is to compare the physical and psychosocial well-being and satisfaction concerning the body image of patients who had reconstruction with breast implants to those of patients who had reconstruction with deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flaps. Our results demonstrated a similar quality of life between the two groups, but the satisfaction level was significantly higher in patients who had reconstruction with autologous tissue. Feedback from patients who have already received breast reconstruction may be useful in the decision-making process for future patients and plastic surgeons, enabling both to choose the reconstructive technique with the best long-term satisfaction. PMID:26649331

  3. Patient Satisfaction and Quality of Life in DIEAP Flap versus Implant Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sgarzani, Rossella; Negosanti, Luca; Morselli, Paolo Giovanni; Vietti Michelina, Veronica; Lapalorcia, Luigi Maria; Cipriani, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    The psychological impact of breast reconstruction has widely been described, and multiple studies show that reconstruction improves the well-being and quality of life of patients. In breast reconstruction, the goal is not only the morphological result, but mainly the patient's perception of it. The objective of our study is to compare the physical and psychosocial well-being and satisfaction concerning the body image of patients who had reconstruction with breast implants to those of patients who had reconstruction with deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flaps. Our results demonstrated a similar quality of life between the two groups, but the satisfaction level was significantly higher in patients who had reconstruction with autologous tissue. Feedback from patients who have already received breast reconstruction may be useful in the decision-making process for future patients and plastic surgeons, enabling both to choose the reconstructive technique with the best long-term satisfaction. PMID:26649331

  4. Development and testing of a 25-item patient satisfaction scale for black South African diabetic outpatients.

    PubMed

    Westaway, M S; Rheeder, P; van Zyl, D G; Seager, J R

    2002-08-01

    Although there is general agreement that patient satisfaction is an integral component of service quality, there is a paucity of South African research on reliable and valid satisfaction measures and the effects of health status on satisfaction. A 25-item patient satisfaction scale was developed and tested for evaluating the quality of health care for black diabetic outpatients. It was hypothesised that: (1) the underlying dimensions of patient satisfaction were interpersonal and organisational; and (2) patients in poor health would be less satisfied with the quality of their care than patients in good health. The questionnaire was administered to 263 black outpatients from Pretoria Academic Hospital and Kalafong Hospital. Factor analysis was conducted on the patient satisfaction scale and three factors, accounting for 71% of the variance, were extracted. The major items on Factor I were helpfulness, communication, support and consideration, representing the interpersonal dimension. Factors II and III were mainly concerned with service logistics and technical expertise, with the emphasis on waiting time, follow-up and thoroughness of examination. The three factors had excellent reliability coefficients, ranging between 0.82 (technical), 0.85 (logistics) and 0.98 (interpersonal). Multiple analyses of co-variance showed that patients in poor general health were significantly less satisfied with the logistical (p = 0.004) and technical (p = 0.007) quality of their care than patients in good health; patients in poor mental health were significantly less satisfied with the interpersonal quality of their care (p = 0.05) than patients in good mental health. These findings provided support for both hypotheses and suggested that patients in poor health attend to different aspects of their care than patients in good health. Of more importance to clinical practice, the results endorsed the need for a multidisciplinary health team comprising nurse/social worker (Factor I

  5. Patient Satisfaction with Spanish Pain Centers: Observational Study with More than 3,000 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Puiggròs, Patricia; Tesedo Nieto, Javier; Acín Lázaro, María Pilar; Carrera González, Alfredo; Soler, Miguel José Arranz; Maldonado Vega, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is a serious problem in Spain. This multicenter, epidemiological 3-month follow-up study investigates pain management efficacy in Spanish centers using patient satisfaction criteria. 3,414 eligible adult patients (65,6% female) with moderate to severe chronic pain from 146 pain centers were included. Patient satisfaction was assessed based onto question 18 of Spanish healthcare barometer-CSI. Pain evolution (Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF) and visual analog scale (VAS)), quality of life/EuroQol-5, and pain control expectations fulfillment were also assessed. Mean age was 61.3 years. 64.4% of participating centers employed multidisciplinary pain management approach. After 3 months, mean patient satisfaction was 7.8 (1–10) on the CIS barometer. Medical staff received the highest scores, whereas waiting for tests, appointment request to appointment date time, and waiting times at the center the lowest. Mean pain decreased from 7.4 to 4.0; BPI-SF intensity decreased from 6.5 to 3.8; pain control expectations were met in 78.7% of patients; EuroQoL-5D utility index increased from 0.37 to 0.62, p < 0.001, and health status (VAS) from 40.6 to 61.9, p < 0.001. Chronic pain patients (90%) are satisfied with Spanish centers care; 80% had their pain control expectations met. Quality of life improved remarkably: 71% felt moderately to significantly better. However, waiting times need improvement. PMID:27516902

  6. A comparison of quality and satisfaction experiences of patients attending chiropractic and physician offices in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, Edward R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Improving the quality of healthcare is a common goal of consumers, providers, payer groups, and governments. There is evidence that patient satisfaction influences the perceptions of the quality of care received. Methods: This exploratory, qualitative study described and analyzed, the similarities and differences in satisfaction and dissatisfaction experiences of patients attending physicians (social justice) and chiropractors (market justice) for healthcare services in Niagara Region, Ontario. Using inductive content analysis the satisfaction and dissatisfaction experiences were themed to develop groups, categories, and sub-categories of quality judgments of care experiences. Results: Study participants experienced both satisfying and dissatisfying critical incidents in the areas of standards of practice, professional and practice attributes, time management, and treatment outcomes. Cost was not a marked source of satisfaction or dissatisfaction. Conclusion: Patients may be more capable of generating quality judgments on the technical aspects of medical and chiropractic care, particularly treatment outcomes and standards of practice, than previously thought. PMID:24587494

  7. Monitoring communication with patients: analyzing judgments of satisfaction (JOS).

    PubMed

    Wagner-Menghin, Michaela; de Bruin, Anique; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J G

    2016-08-01

    Medical students struggle to put into practice communication skills learned in medical school. In order to improve our instructional designs, better insight into the cause of this lack of transfer is foundational. We therefore explored students' cognitions by soliciting self-evaluations of their history-taking skills, coined 'judgments of satisfaction (JOSs)'. Our cognitive-psychological approach was guided by Koriat's cue-utilization framework (J Exp Psychol Gen 126:349-370. doi: 10.1037/0096-3445.126.4.349 , 1997) which rests on the assumption that internal and external cues inform learners' metacognitive judgments, which, in turn, steer their actions. Judgments based on unsuitable cues will cause ineffective behavior. Consequently, students are unable to adequately master these skills or properly apply them in similar situations. For the analysis, we had 524 medical undergraduates select scenes they were satisfied or dissatisfied with from their video-recorded simulated-patient encounters and explain why. Twenty transcripts were sampled for directed content analysis. We found that approximately one-third of students' judgments focused on content (JOS-type-a); about half on the quality of the communication skills (JOS-type-b); and about ten percent targeted the appropriateness of the skills harnessed (JOS-type-c). This lack of reflection on appropriateness may explain why students experience problems adapting to new situations. It was primarily high-performance students who formed type-c judgments; poor performers tended to give type-a and type-b judgments. Future research would benefit from the use of our modified version of Koriat's framework in order to further explore how high and poor performing medical students differ in the way they form JOSs during communications skills training. PMID:26443084

  8. A study assessing patient satisfaction in a tertiary care hospital in India: the changing healthcare scenario.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Aashima; Garg, Shalini; Pareek, Udai

    2009-06-01

    The healthcare service scenario in India is expected to evolve into a more developed stage. More emphasis has been given on patient satisfaction as this is an important consideration for the assessment of the hospital services. The concept of patient satisfaction is also rapidly changing and the hospitals are using variety of techniques to improve patient care and organizational efficiency. Patient satisfaction questionnaire is a validated instrument to assess the level of the satisfaction of adult patients. The questionnaire was administered on those patients who were admitted in hospital for at least three days. In our study 88% patients were satisfied with treatment and medical care they had received. About 86% patients found that the hospital services were excellent. However, it is felt that patient values and culture should be explored for further improving patient doctor communication. There is hence a scope for improvement in meeting patient's needs and preferences and rendering hospital services. This can be achieved by some feedback system which could be available to the patients and later worked upon by the management, to improve the patient care by bridging the gap between senior management and patients. PMID:22010498

  9. Level of Perception of Individualized Care and Satisfaction With Nursing in Orthopaedic Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Tekin, Fatma; Findik, Ummu Yildiz

    2015-01-01

    Lately, individualized nursing care and patient satisfaction are important and current issues being discussed. But there is not enough information for patients undergoing orthopaedic surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the individualized care perception and satisfaction in nursing care levels in orthopaedic surgery patients. This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted with 156 patients who underwent orthopaedic surgery. Data were collected using the personal information form, the Individualized Care Scale, and the Newcastle Satisfaction With Nursing Scale. The Spearman correlation analysis and descriptive statistics were performed. The mean individualized care and satisfaction with nursing care scores were found to be close to the preset maximum value, and it was determined that an increase in the level of awareness about nursing interventions and the level of perceived individualized care caused an increase in satisfaction levels regarding nursing care. Nurses should recognize the importance of performing individualized care in order to increase the level of satisfaction with nursing care in orthopaedic surgery patients. PMID:26575511

  10. Supportive Nursing Care and Satisfaction of Patients Receiving Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Navidian, Ali; Ebrahimi, Hossein; Keykha, Roghaieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient satisfaction is the most important criterion in evaluating the quality of care. Besides, its assessment in patients with severe mental disorder treated by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is highly appropriate. The ECT is accompanied by lower satisfaction and may exacerbate the patients’ condition. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the effect of supportive nursing care on the satisfaction of patients receiving ECT. Patients and Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted in the education center of Baharan psychiatric hospital, Zahedan, Iran. Seventy hospitalized patients receiving ECT were randomly divided into two groups of control (n = 35) and intervention (n = 35).The socio-personal and Webster Satisfaction Questionnaire were used as data collection tools. The intervention group received supportive nursing care by nurses trained in informational, emotional, and physical aspects. The control group received only regular nursing care. The levels of satisfaction were measured and compared between groups, before and after the intervention. Data were analyzed using the SPSS software, and Chi-square, independent and paired t tests, as well as covariance analysis were performed. Results: The results showed similarities in socio-personal characteristics of both groups. However, there was a significant difference (P < 0.001) between the means of satisfaction in the groups, predominantly for the intervention group. In other words, a significant difference (P < 0.001) was observed between the means of satisfaction of the intervention (54.71 ± 5.27) and control (36.28 ± 7.00) groups after intervention by controlling the effect of socio-personal variables. Conclusions: Results of the current study confirmed the effect of supportive nursing care on increasing the level of satisfaction in ECT receiving patients, recommending the use of this therapeutic method. PMID:26473077

  11. Geographic Localization of Housestaff Inpatients Improves Patient-Provider Communication, Satisfaction, and Culture of Safety.

    PubMed

    Olson, Douglas P; Fields, Barry G; Windish, Donna M

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses whether geographic localization of housestaff patients contributes to improved patient knowledge of diagnosis, patient satisfaction, provider satisfaction, and workplace culture of safety. Due to national changes to graduate medical education, housestaff patients were localized to a single general medicine ward. Ninety-three patients prelocalization, 64 patients postlocalization, 26 localized physicians, and 10 localized nurses were surveyed. Validated questionnaires assessed patients' experiences during hospitalization, and physician and nurse job satisfaction. Fifty-seven percent of patients knew their diagnosis prior to localization, compared to 80% postlocalization (p < .0001). Prior to localization, 39% of patients who reported experiencing anxieties or fears during hospitalization felt physicians frequently discussed these emotions with them compared to 85% after localization (p < .0001). Before localization, 51% of patients stated that doctors spent 4 min or more daily with them discussing care, compared to 91% after localization (p < .0001). Both physician and nurse opinion significantly improved regarding some but not all aspects of collaboration, teamwork, patient safety, appropriate handling of errors, and culture of safety. The average length of stay was unchanged and the change in 30-day readmission rate was not statistically significant. Localization of patients to a single inpatient ward improved patient knowledge and satisfaction, and some aspects of interprofessional communication and workplace culture of safety. PMID:26042748

  12. [Patient satisfaction in a laboratory test collection unit].

    PubMed

    de Moura, Gisela Maria Schebella Souto; Hilleshein, Eunice Fabiani; Schardosim, Juliana Machado; Delgado, Kátia Simone

    2008-06-01

    This exploratory descriptive study aimed at identifying customer satisfaction attributes in the field of laboratory tests. Data were collected in 2006, using 104 interviews in a laboratorial unit inside a teaching hospital, using the critical incident technique, and submitted to content analysis. Three attribute categories were identified: time spent in waiting for care, interpersonal contact, and technical skills. These results subsidize the assessment of the current satisfaction survey tool, and point to its reformulation. They also allow the identification of improvement needs in customer attention, and provide elements to be taken into account in personnel selection, training programs, personnel performance assessment. PMID:18822760

  13. Evaluation of medical staff and patient satisfaction of Chinese hospitals and measures for improvement.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Huang, Chengyu; Lu, Xiangchan; Chen, Siyuan; Zhao, Pan; Lu, Hongzhou

    2015-06-01

    Our goal is to establish criteria for evaluating satisfaction of medical staff and patients of Chinese hospitals and propose measures for improvement. A survey was conducted among medical staff and patients of infectious disease hospitals in three locations, i.e., Shanghai, Chongqing, and Nanning. The analyses included item analysis, factor analysis, reliability analysis, Pearson correlation and one-way analysis of variance. For the patient group, Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO) = 0.973, Cronbach's α = 0.962 and the Pearson correlation coefficients among the five dimensions of satisfaction ranged from 0.583 to 0.795. For the medical staff group, KMO = 0.972, Cronbach's α = 0.970, and the Pearson correlation coefficients among the five dimensions of satisfaction ranged from 0.603 to 0.854. The means on the five dimensions of satisfaction for the patient group were 0.74 to 1.34, 0.81 to 1.17, 0.78 to 1.07, 0.89 to 1.34, and 0.71 to 1.10. The means on the five dimensions of satisfaction for the medical staff group were 0.17 to 1.03, ‒ 0.16 to 0.60, ‒ 0.18 to 0.74, 0.23 to 0.72, and ‒ 0.39 to 0.37. The clinicians were less satisfied with the hospitals than the patients. Medical staff and patients in Shanghai were relatively more satisfied. Improving the evaluation criteria and survey methods with respect to medical staff and patient satisfaction with Chinese hospitals may increase clinician and patient satisfaction and improve the health care environment in China. PMID:26166371

  14. The Effect of Surgeon Empathy and Emotional Intelligence on Patient Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weng, Hui-Ching; Steed, James F.; Yu, Shang-Won; Liu, Yi-Ten; Hsu, Chia-Chang; Yu, Tsan-Jung; Chen, Wency

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the associations of surgeons' emotional intelligence and surgeons' empathy with patient-surgeon relationships, patient perceptions of their health, and patient satisfaction before and after surgical procedures. We used multi-source approaches to survey 50 surgeons and their 549 outpatients during initial and follow-up visits.…

  15. Yes, but are they happy? Effects of trait self-control on affective well-being and life satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Wilhelm; Luhmann, Maike; Fisher, Rachel R; Vohs, Kathleen D; Baumeister, Roy F

    2014-08-01

    Does trait self-control (TSC) predict affective well-being and life satisfaction--positively, negatively, or not? We conducted three studies (Study 1: N = 414, 64% female, Mage = 35.0 years; Study 2: N = 208, 66% female, Mage = 25.24 years; Study 3: N = 234, 61% female, Mage = 34.53 years). The key predictor was TSC, with affective well-being and life satisfaction ratings as key outcomes. Potential explanatory constructs including goal conflict, goal balancing, and emotional distress also were investigated. TSC is positively related to affective well-being and life satisfaction, and managing goal conflict is a key as to why. All studies, moreover, showed that the effect of TSC on life satisfaction is at least partially mediated by affect. Study 1's correlational study established the effect. Study 2's experience sampling approach demonstrated that compared to those low in TSC, those high in TSC experience higher levels of momentary affect even as they experience desire, an effect partially mediated through experiencing lower conflict and emotional distress. Study 3 found evidence for the proposed mechanism--that TSC may boost well-being by helping people avoid frequent conflict and balance vice-virtue conflicts by favoring virtues. Self-control positively contributes to happiness through avoiding and dealing with motivational conflict. PMID:23750741

  16. Percutaneous Revision of a Testicular Prosthesis is Safe, Cost-effective, and Provides Good Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Cone, Eugene B; Lentz, Aaron C

    2015-09-01

    Office-based percutaneous revision of a testicular prosthesis has never been reported. A patient received a testicular prosthesis but was dissatisfied with the firmness of the implant. In an office setting, the prosthesis was inflated with additional fluid via a percutaneous approach. Evaluated outcomes included patient satisfaction, prosthesis size, recovery time, and cost savings. The patient was satisfied, with no infection, leak, or complication after more than 1 year of follow-up, at significantly less cost than revision surgery. Percutaneous adjustment of testicular prosthesis fill-volume can be safe, inexpensive, and result in good patient satisfaction. PMID:26793527

  17. Proactive patient rounding to increase customer service and satisfaction on an orthopaedic unit.

    PubMed

    Tea, Christine; Ellison, Michael; Feghali, Fadia

    2008-01-01

    Customer service and patient satisfaction have become increasingly important in the healthcare industry. Given limited resources and a myriad of choices, on which facets of patient satisfaction should healthcare providers focus? An analysis of 40,000 observations across 4 hospitals found 1 important intervention: timely staff responsiveness. Using the Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) quality methodology, the goal was set to improve staff responsiveness to orthopaedic patient needs and requests, thus improving patient satisfaction. A model to improve staff responsiveness was systematically developed and implemented. The I Care Rounding model places the emphasis on proactively meeting patient needs through hourly rounding, rather than caregivers providing care in a reactionary mode. After full implementation, positive improvement was demonstrated. PMID:18677250

  18. Improving patient satisfaction at all points in the revenue cycle.

    PubMed

    Dee, J F

    1994-10-01

    A common expectation among consumers, whether in the market for a new automobile, a new home, or healthcare services, is that a certain level of customer service will be provided along with the product or service. And the level of customer service provided substantially influences a consumer's satisfaction with the purchase of a product or service. PMID:10138286

  19. Linking patient satisfaction with nursing care: the case of care rationing - a correlational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Implicit rationing of nursing care is the withholding of or failure to carry out all necessary nursing measures due to lack of resources. There is evidence supporting a link between rationing of nursing care, nurses’ perceptions of their professional environment, negative patient outcomes, and placing patient safety at risk. The aims of the study were: a) To explore whether patient satisfaction is linked to nurse-reported rationing of nursing care and to nurses’ perceptions of their practice environment while adjusting for patient and nurse characteristics. b) To identify the threshold score of rationing by comparing the level of patient satisfaction factors across rationing levels. Methods A descriptive, correlational design was employed. Participants in this study included 352 patients and 318 nurses from ten medical and surgical units of five general hospitals. Three measurement instruments were used: the BERNCA scale for rationing of care, the RPPE scale to explore nurses’ perceptions of their work environment and the Patient Satisfaction scale to assess the level of patient satisfaction with nursing care. The statistical analysis included the use of Kendall’s correlation coefficient to explore a possible relationship between the variables and multiple regression analysis to assess the effects of implicit rationing of nursing care together with organizational characteristics on patient satisfaction. Results The mean score of implicit rationing of nursing care was 0.83 (SD = 0.52, range = 0–3), the overall mean of RPPE was 2.76 (SD = 0.32, range = 1.28 – 3.69) and the two scales were significantly correlated (τ = −0.234, p < 0.001). The regression analysis showed that care rationing and work environment were related to patient satisfaction, even after controlling for nurse and patient characteristics. The results from the adjusted regression models showed that even at the lowest level of rationing (i.e. 0

  20. Telephone follow-up for cataract surgery: feasibility and patient satisfaction study.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jeremy J S L; Pelosini, Lucia

    2016-05-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of telephone follow-up (TFU) after uncomplicated cataract surgery in low-risk patients and patient satisfaction with this alternative clinical pathway. Design/methodology/approach - Prospective, non-randomised cohort study. A ten-point subjective ophthalmic assessment questionnaire and a six-point patient satisfaction questionnaire were administered to patients following routine cataract surgery at two to three weeks post-procedure. All patients were offered a further clinic review if required. Exclusion criteria comprised ophthalmic co-morbidities, hearing/language impairment and high risk of post-operative complications. Patient notes were retrospectively reviewed over the study period to ensure no additional emergency attendances took place. Findings - Over three months, 50 eyes of 50 patients (mean age: 80; age range 60-91; 66 per cent second eye surgery) underwent uncomplicated phacoemulsification surgery received a TFU at 12-24 days (mean: 16 days) post-operatively. Subjective visual acuity was graded as good by 92 per cent of patients; 72 per cent patients reported no pain and 20 per cent reported mild occasional grittiness. Patient satisfaction was graded 8.9 out of 10; 81.6 per cent defined TFU as convenient and 75.5 per cent of patients preferred TFU to routine outpatient review. No additional visits were required. Research limitations/implications - Non-randomised with no control group; small sample size. One patient was unable to be contacted. Practical implications - Post-operative TFU can be suitably targeted to low-risk patients following uncomplicated cataract surgery. This study demonstrated a high patient satisfaction. A larger, randomised study is in progress to assess this further. Originality/value - This is the first study reporting TFU results and patient satisfaction to the usual alternative two-week outpatient review. PMID:27142949

  1. [Satisfaction scales with health care to cardiovascular diseases: CARDIOSATIS--patient and team].

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Clareci Silva; Bandeira, Marina; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz Pinho; Oliveira, Graziella Lage; Caiaffa, Waleska Teixeira

    2011-01-01

    Satisfaction is an important measure of quality care, of adherence to the treatment and adequate use of health services. The objective here is to build two scales which evaluates team' and patients' satisfaction with cardiovascular disease treatment provided through a distance telecardiology project. The procedure followed international standards for development of measure instruments, including operational definition of satisfaction contents and its area for evaluation; item definition; pre-test and pilot study. The literature review, focal groups and discussion with specialists had delimited the domains to be included in the scales and the elaboration of its items. The CARDIOSATIS-Team included 15 items and the CARDIOSATIS-Patient included 11. Satisfaction was measured through a five-point Likert scale. The scales' items comprised satisfaction with physical structure, human resources, capacity of resolution, attention and care offered by the service and the satisfaction with the received/given care. The scales also included open questions. CARDIOSATIS scales have showed to be an easy and accessible instrument very well accepted by medical team and patients. Preliminary results presented good characteristics of validity and reliability. PMID:21503491

  2. The influence of psychologic factors on patient satisfaction with complete dentures.

    PubMed

    van Waas, M A

    1990-05-01

    This study investigated the relationship between satisfaction with complete dentures and some psychologic factors. New dentures were made for 130 patients who were investigated during their treatment. A neuroticism scale and the Health Locus of Control scale were used to investigate the patient's personality. The patient-dentist relationship was evaluated by asking patients their opinions about the treatment, and patient attitude toward dentures in general and their expectation toward the new dentures were evaluated by means of a questionnaire. No relationship was found between dissatisfaction and patient personality. A low relationship was found between dissatisfaction and the patient's opinion about the treatment, and a moderate relationship was found between dissatisfaction and the patient's attitude toward dentures. A patient's attitude toward dentures, measured by the questionnaire before new dentures were received, is a prospective tool for patient satisfaction with new dentures. PMID:2187082

  3. Procrastination, Self-Regulation Failure, Academic Life Satisfaction, and Affective Well-Being: Underregulation or Misregulation Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balkis, Murat; Duru, Erdinç

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of self-regulation failure in procrastination. In addition, it also aimed to investigate the effects of procrastination on affective well-being and academic life satisfaction. Three hundred and twenty-eight undergraduate students participated in the study. The most obvious finding emerging from this…

  4. Positive and Negative Affectivity as Mediator and Moderator of the Relationship between Optimism and Life Satisfaction in Turkish University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapikiran, Necla Acun

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to examine the mediator and moderator role of positive and negative affectivity variables on the relationship between optimism and life satisfaction in university students. 397 university students, ranging in age from 18 to 27 (M = 20.98), attending different departments of the Faculty of Education, at Pamukkale…

  5. Extension Personnel's Self-Esteem and Workplace Relationships: Implications for Job Satisfaction and Affective Organizational Commitment Foci

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladebo, Olugbenga Jelil; Olaoye, Olalekan Jacob; Adamu, Comfort Oyekale

    2008-01-01

    This study proposes relationships between job satisfaction, affective commitment (organization, supervisor and workgroup), and exchange relations with supervisor, organization and workgroup members among extension personnel. Perceived self-esteem (SE) is hypothesized to moderate relations between the social exchange foci and the corresponding…

  6. Factors Affecting Motivation and Job Satisfaction of Academic Staff of Universities in South-South Geopolitical Zone of Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osakwe, Regina N.

    2014-01-01

    This study determined the factors affecting motivation and job satisfaction of non-management academic staff of universities in South-South geopolitical zone of Nigeria. It employed an expost-facto research design. Three research questions and two hypotheses were raised for the study. A sample of four hundred and fifty non-management academic…

  7. Differences in Affect, Life Satisfaction, and Depression between Successfully and Unsuccessfully Rehabilitated Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin, Martha H.; Holbert, Donald

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed whether persons with spinal cord injuries who were successfully rehabilitated differed from those who were not with regard to positive and negative affect, life satisfaction, and depression. An ex post facto research design compared persons with spinal cord injuries who were previously employed with persons with spinal cord…

  8. Non surgical predicting factors for patient satisfaction after third molar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Balaguer-Martí, José-Carlos; Aloy-Prósper, Amparo; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David

    2016-01-01

    Background In the third molar surgery, it is important to focus not only on surgical skills, but also on patient satisfaction. Classically studies have been focused on surgery and surgeon’s empathy, but there are non-surgical factors that may influence patient satisfaction. Material and Methods A cross-sectional study was performed on 100 patients undergoing surgical extractions of impacted mandibular third molars treated from October 2013 to July 2014 in the Oral Surgery Unit of the University of Valencia. A questionnaire (20 questions) with a 10-point Likert scale was provided. The questionnaire assessed the ease to find the center, the ease to get oriented within the center, the burocratic procedures, the time from the first visit to the date of surgical intervention, waiting time in the waiting room, the comfort at the waiting room, the administrative staff (kindness and efficiency to solve formalities), medical staff (kindness, efficiency, reliability, dedication), personal data care, clarity in the information received (about the surgery, postoperative care and resolution of the doubts), available means and state of facilities. Outcome variables were overall satisfaction, and recommendation of the center. Statistical analysis was made using the multiple linear regression analysis. Results Significant correlations were found between all variables and overall satisfaction. The multiple regression model showed that the efficiency of the surgeon and the clarity of the information were statistically significant to overall satisfaction and recommendation of the center. The kindness of the administrative staff, available means, the state of facilities and the comfort at the waiting room were statistically significant to the recommendation of the center. Conclusions Patient satisfaction directly depends on the efficiency of the surgeon and clarity of the clinical information received about the procedure. Appreciation of these predictive factors may help clinicians

  9. How patient-centered do female physicians need to be? Analogue patients' satisfaction with male and female physicians' identical behaviors.

    PubMed

    Hall, Judith A; Roter, Debra L; Blanch-Hartigan, Danielle; Mast, Marianne Schmid; Pitegoff, Curtis A

    2015-01-01

    Previous research suggests that female physicians may not receive appropriate credit in patients' eyes for their patient-centered skills compared to their male counterparts. An experiment was conducted to determine whether a performance of higher (versus lower) verbal patient-centeredness would result in a greater difference in analogue patient satisfaction for male than female physicians. Two male and two female actors portrayed physicians speaking to a patient using high or low patient-centered scripts while not varying their nonverbal cues. One hundred ninety-two students served as analogue patients by assuming the patient role while watching one of the videos and rating their satisfaction and other evaluative responses to the physician. Greater verbal patient-centeredness had a stronger positive effect on satisfaction and evaluations for male than for female physicians. This pattern is consistent with the hypothesis that the different associations between patient-centeredness and patients' satisfaction for male versus female physicians occur because of the overlap between stereotypical female behavior and behaviors that comprise patient-centered medical care. If this is the case, high verbal patient-centered behavior by female physicians is not recognized as a marker of clinical competence, as it is for male physicians, but is rather seen as expected female behavior. PMID:25175277

  10. Use of the consultation satisfaction questionnaire to examine patients' satisfaction with general practitioners and community nurses: reliability, replicability and discriminant validity.

    PubMed Central

    Poulton, B C

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary health care services are the most frequently used in the health care system. Consumer feedback on these services is important. Research in this area relates mainly to doctor-patient relationships which fails to reflect the multidisciplinary nature of primary health care. AIM: A pilot study aimed to examine the feasibility of using a patient satisfaction questionnaire designed for use with general practitioner consultations as an instrument for measuring patient satisfaction with community nurses. METHOD: The questionnaire measuring patient satisfaction with general practitioner consultations was adapted for measuring satisfaction with contacts with a nurse practitioner, district nurses, practice nurses and health visitors. A total of 1575 patients in three practices consulting general practitioners or community nurses were invited to complete a questionnaire. Data were subjected to principal components analysis and the dimensions identified were tested for internal reliability and replicability. To establish discriminant validity, patients' mean satisfaction scores for consultations with general practitioners, the nurse practitioner, health visitors and nurses (district and practice nurses) were compared. RESULTS: Questionnaires were returned relating to 400 general practitioner, 54 nurse practitioner, 191 district/practice nurse and 83 health visitor consultations (overall response rate 46%). Principal components analysis demonstrated a factor structure similar to that found in an earlier study of the consultation satisfaction questionnaire. Three dimensions of patient satisfaction were identified: professional care, depth of relationship and perceived time spent with the health professional. The dimensions were found to have acceptable levels of reliability. Factor structures obtained from data relating to general practitioner and community nurse consultations were found to correlate significantly. Comparison between health professionals

  11. Coping mediates the influence of personality on life satisfaction in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Vollmann, Manja; Pukrop, Jörg; Salewski, Christel

    2016-04-01

    A rheumatic disease can severely impair a person's quality of life. The degree of impairment, however, is not closely related to objective indicators of disease severity. This study investigated the influence and the interplay of core psychological factors, i.e., personality and coping, on life satisfaction in patients with rheumatic diseases. Particularly, it was tested whether coping mediates the effects of personality on life satisfaction. In a cross-sectional design, 158 patients diagnosed with a rheumatic disease completed questionnaires assessing the Big 5 personality traits (BFI-10), several disease-related coping strategies (EFK) and life satisfaction (HSWBS). Data were analyzed using a complex multiple mediation analysis with the Big 5 personality traits as predictors, coping strategies as mediators and life satisfaction as outcome. All personality traits and seven of the nine coping strategies were associated with life satisfaction (rs > |0.16|, ps ≤ 0.05). The mediation analysis revealed that personality traits had no direct, but rather indirect effects on life satisfaction through coping. Neuroticism had a negative indirect effect on life satisfaction through less active problem solving and more depressive coping (indirect effects > -0.03, ps < 0.05). Extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness had positive indirect effects on life satisfaction through more active problem solving, less depressive coping and/or a more active search for social support (indirect effects > 0.06, ps < 0.05). Personality and coping play a role in adjustment to rheumatic diseases. The interplay of these variables should be considered in psychological interventions for patients with rheumatic diseases. PMID:26898985

  12. Perception of service satisfaction and quality of life of patients living with schizophrenia in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Afe, Taiwo Opekitan; Bello-Mojeed, Mashudat; Ogunsemi, Olawale

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess service-satisfaction and quality of life among patients with schizophrenia in a tertiary psychiatric healthcare facility in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 101 (out of 120) patients diagnosed with schizophrenia attending the outpatient clinic of the Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV diagnosis (SCID), Charleston Psychiatric Out-patient Scale (CPOSS), and the World-Health Organisation Quality of Life –Bref scale (WHOQOL-BREF) was used in assessing diagnosis, patient satisfaction and subjective quality of life respectively. Results: The ages of the patient ranged from 19-81. Males (49.5%) and females (50.5%) had almost equal distribution. Mean duration of attendance was 8.7years ± 8.50. Service satisfaction ranged between 25-60 on the CPOSS. Areas that had higher mean scores on CPOSS were with items (1) Helpfulness of the records clerk (3.70±1.1), (7) Helpfulness of services received (3.69±1.0). Subjective quality of life was high (3.65±1.8), satisfaction with health was also high (3.40±1.1). Service satisfaction correlated with Quality of life at P < 0.00. PMID:27114651

  13. Patients' satisfaction: customer relationship management as a new opportunity for quality improvement in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Gaetano; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2012-11-01

    Clinical and nonclinical indicators of performance are meant to provide the surgeon with tools to identify weaknesses to be improved. The World Health Organization's Performance Evaluation Systems represent a multidimensional approach to quality measurement based on several categories made of different indicators. Indicators for patient satisfaction may include overall perceived quality, accessibility, humanization and patient involvement, communication, and trust in health care providers. Patient satisfaction is included among nonclinical indicators of performance in thoracic surgery and is increasingly recognized as one of the outcome measures for delivered quality of care. PMID:23084619

  14. When Being Able Is Not Enough. The Combined Value of Positive Affect and Self-Efficacy for Job Satisfaction in Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Angelica; Pazzaglia, Francesca; Ronconi, Lucia

    2010-01-01

    This study examines how good strategies and praxis interplay with positive affect and self-efficacy to determine a teacher's job satisfaction, in the hypothesis that teaching effectively does not in itself guarantee satisfaction: positive affect and self-efficacy beliefs are needed. Self-assessment scales, designed to assess the use of efficient…

  15. Predictors of Patient Satisfaction With Pain Management in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Fallon, Echo; Fung, Sierra; Rubal-Peace, Georgina; Patanwala, Asad E

    2016-01-01

    To identify predictors of patient satisfaction with pain control measured after emergency department (ED) discharge. This was a prospective, cross-sectional study conducted in an academic, urban ED in the United States. Adult patients with a pain-related complaint were interviewed via telephone within 72 hr of discharge from the ED. A standardized questionnaire was used to obtain demographic and clinical information. The primary outcome of interest was patient satisfaction with pain management in the ED measured using the following question: "How often was your pain well controlled in the ED?" (0-10 scale; 0 = never, 10 = always). Linear regression analyses were used to identify predictors of pain satisfaction. The study included 75 patients. The mean age of patients was 43 ± 18 years, and the majority of patients were female (n = 47; 63%). There were 24 patients (32%) who had chronic pain conditions, 23 (31%) with depression, and 2 patients who admitted to using heroin. In the multivariate regression analysis, patient perception of enough pain medication provision (coefficient = 2.81; 95% CI [1.35, 4.26]; p < 0.001), staff helpfulness (coefficient = 0.35; 95% CI [0.10, 0.59]; p = 0.006), report of generalized pain (coefficient = -1.62; 95% CI [-2.87, -0.36]; p = 0.013), and lowest pain score achieved in the ED (coefficient = -0.30; 95% CI [-0.53, -0.04]; p = 0.021) was significantly associated with patient satisfaction (model R = 0.57). Patient perception of enough pain medication provision, staff helpfulness, lowest pain scores achieved, and patient report of generalized pain were associated with satisfaction with pain management in the ED. PMID:27139133

  16. Factors Affecting Students' Satisfaction in Engineering Disciplines: Traditional vs. Blended Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Caro, Eva; Campuzano-Bolarin, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a two-year field study was carried out to analyse how satisfaction differs across the traditional and blended learning methods. Altogether, 21 courses for graduate and postgraduate engineering students were evaluated. Several variables and their relationship with student satisfaction in the first year, with all courses delivered in…

  17. Health Care Management Courses in Greek Universities: A First Attempt to Establish Factors Affecting Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotsifos, Vangelis; Alegakis, Athanasios; Philalithis, Anastas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The object of this study is to formulate, establish and apply a suitable and reliable tool for measuring the course experience satisfaction of Master graduates. A questionnaire was formulated, based on similar tools, and adjusted to the reality of Hellenic Higher Education, in order to measure the satisfaction of graduates in three Master…

  18. Do Learning Approaches of Medical Students Affect Their Satisfaction with Problem-Based Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurpinar, Erol; Kulac, Esin; Tetik, Cihat; Akdogan, Ilgaz; Mamakli, Sumer

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the satisfaction of medical students with problem-based learning (PBL) and their approaches to learning to investigate the effect of learning approaches on their levels of satisfaction. The study group was composed of medical students from three different universities, which apply PBL at different levels…

  19. The Effect of Medical Education on Students' Patient-Satisfaction Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klamen, Debra L.; Williams, Reed G.

    1997-01-01

    A longitudinal study of 133 medical students at the University of Illinois used multiple clinical encounters with standardized patients to test student interpersonal and communication skills after the second and during the fourth year. Mean patient satisfaction improved from first to second encounter, and female students performed better than…

  20. Relationship between Improvements in Physical Measures and Patient Satisfaction in Rehabilitation after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazzal, Mahmoud I.; Bashaireh, Khaldoon H.; Alomari, Mahmoud A.; Nazzal, Mohammad S.; Maayah, Mikhled F.; Mesmar, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine patient satisfaction with rehabilitation after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Fifty-six patients, aged 45-77 years, were enrolled in a post-TKA comprehensive therapy program focusing on knee strengthening and functional activities. The program lasted 3 months and was conducted for 1 h, twice a day, 5 days per…

  1. Influence of Shared Medical Appointments on Patient Satisfaction: A Retrospective 3-Year Study

    PubMed Central

    Heyworth, Leonie; Rozenblum, Ronen; Burgess, James F.; Baker, Errol; Meterko, Mark; Prescott, Debra; Neuwirth, Zeev; Simon, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Shared medical appointments (SMAs) are becoming popular, but little is known about their association with patient experience in primary care. We performed an exploratory analysis examining overall satisfaction and patient-centered care experiences across key domains of the patient-centered medical home among patients attending SMAs vs usual care appointments. METHODS We undertook a cross-sectional study using a mailed questionnaire measuring levels of patient satisfaction and other indicators of patient-centered care among 921 SMA and 921 usual care patients between 2008 and 2010. Propensity scores adjusted for potential case mix differences between the groups. Multivariate logistic regression assessed propensity-matched patients’ ratings of care. Generalized estimating equations accounted for physician-level clustering. RESULTS A total of 40% of SMA patients and 31% of usual care patients responded. In adjusted analyses, SMA patients were more likely to rate their overall satisfaction with care as “very good” when compared with usual care counterparts (odds ratio = 1.26; 95% CI, 1.05–1.52). In the analysis of patient-centered medical home elements, SMA patients rated their care as more accessible and more sensitive to their needs, whereas usual care patients reported greater satisfaction with physician communication and time spent during their appointment. CONCLUSIONS Overall, SMA patients appear more satisfied with their care relative to patients receiving usual care. SMAs may also improve access to care and deliver care that patients find to be sensitive to their needs. Further research should focus on enhancing patient-clinician communication within an SMA as this model of care becomes more widely adopted. PMID:25024240

  2. Patients satisfaction with laboratory services at antiretroviral therapy clinics in public hospitals, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that Ethiopia has scale up antiretroviral treatment (ART) program, little is known about the patient satisfaction with ART monitoring laboratory services in health facilities. We therefore aimed to assess patient satisfaction with laboratory services at ART clinics in public hospitals. Methods Hospital based, descriptive cross sectional study was conducted from October to November 2010 among clients attending in nine public hospitals ART clinics in Addis Ababa Ethiopia. Patients’ satisfaction towards laboratory services was assessed using exit interview structured questionnaire. Data were coded and entered using EPI info 2002 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, GA) and analyzed using SPSS version 15 software (SPSS INC, Chicago, IL, USA). Results A total of 406 clients were involved in the study. Of these 255(62.8%) were females. The overall satisfaction rate for ART monitoring laboratory services was (85.5%). Patients were satisfied with measures taken by health care providers to keep confidentiality and ability of the person drawing blood to answer question (98.3% and 96.3% respectively). Moreover, the finding of this study revealed, statistical significant associations between the overall patients’ satisfaction with waiting time to get blood drawing service, availability of ordered laboratory tests and waiting time to get laboratory result with (p < 0.05). Patients receiving blood drawing service less than 30 minute were 7.59 times (95% CI AOR: 3.92–14.70) to be more satisfied with ART monitoring laboratory services compared to those who underwent for more than 30 minutes. Conclusions Overall, the satisfaction survey showed, most respondents were satisfied with ART monitoring laboratory services. However, factors such as improving accessibility and availability of latrines should be taken into consideration in order to improve the overall satisfaction. PMID:22520145

  3. Patient satisfaction surveys as a market research tool for general practices.

    PubMed Central

    Khayat, K; Salter, B

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Recent policy developments, embracing the notions of consumer choice, quality of care, and increased general practitioner control over practice budgets have resulted in a new competitive environment in primary care. General practitioners must now be more aware of how their patients feel about the services they receive, and patient satisfaction surveys can be an effective tool for general practices. AIM. A survey was undertaken to investigate the use of a patient satisfaction survey and whether aspects of patient satisfaction varied according to sociodemographic characteristics such as age, sex, social class, housing tenure and length of time in education. METHOD. A sample of 2173 adults living in Medway District Health Authority were surveyed by postal questionnaire in September 1991 in order to elicit their views on general practice services. RESULTS. Levels of satisfaction varied with age, with younger people being consistently less satisfied with general practice services than older people. Women, those in social classes 1-3N, home owners and those who left school aged 17 years or older were more critical of primary care services than men, those in social classes 3M-5, tenants and those who left school before the age of 17 years. CONCLUSION. Surveys and analyses of this kind, if conducted for a single practice, can form the basis of a marketing strategy aimed at optimizing list size, list composition, and service quality. Satisfaction surveys can be readily incorporated into medical audit and financial management. PMID:8204335

  4. Life satisfaction in patients with chronic pain – relation to pain intensity, disability, and psychological factors

    PubMed Central

    Stålnacke, Britt-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Aims To investigate pain intensity, posttraumatic stress, depression, anxiety, disability, and life satisfaction in patients with injury-related chronic pain and to analyze differences in these variables regarding gender. Methods Questionnaires addressing pain intensity (visual analogue scale [VAS]), anxiety and depression (hospital anxiety and depression [HAD] scale), posttraumatic stress (impact of event scale), disability (disability rating index, and life satisfaction [LiSat-11]) were answered by 160 patients at assessment at the Pain Rehabilitation Clinic at the Umeå University Hospital (Umeå, Sweden). Results High level of pain intensity was scored on the VAS (mean value 64.5 ± 21.1 mm) together with high levels of anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress. Activity limitations in everyday life and decreased life satisfaction were reported, especially on the items physical health and psychological health. A multivariate logistic regression model showed a statistically significant association between low scores on the overall life satisfaction on LiSat-11 and high scores on HAD-depression (odds ratio = 1.141, confidence interval 1.014–1.285). Few gender differences were found. Conclusion These findings highlight the value of a broad screening in patients with injury-related chronic pain with respect to the relationship of life satisfaction with pain intensity, anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress, and disability. In addition, these findings support the biopsychosocial approach to assess and treat these patients optimally. PMID:22128253

  5. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy with ceftriaxone for acute tonsillopharyngitis: efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety

    PubMed Central

    Al Alawi, Samah; Abdulkarim, Somaya; Elhennawy, Hazem; Al-Mansoor, Anwar; Al Ansari, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Background Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) is the administration of intravenous antimicrobial therapy to patients in an outpatient setting. It may be used for patients who have infections that require parenteral treatment but who are otherwise stable enough to not require admission as inpatients. Objective We aimed to review the treatment of patients with acute tonsillopharyngitis at the OPAT health care clinic in the Bahrain Defense Force Royal Medical Services (BDF-RMS), with regard to efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety. Methods A retrospective case notes review was conducted for all patients admitted to the OPAT clinic in the BDF-RMS with acute tonsillopharyngitis treated with ceftriaxone, between March 2012 and March 2014. Results In the period between March 2012 and March 2014, 97 patients with acute tonsillopharyngitis were treated with ceftriaxone for a minimum of 3 days at the OPAT clinic. In total, 94.8% of patients completed the prescribed course of ceftriaxone. Total cure was achieved in 89.7% of patients. Usage of the OPAT clinic led to cost savings of 10,693 BD, while total bed days saved were 301 over the 2-year period examined by this study. Participants in the program expressed high satisfaction rates, and the average (± standard deviation) score on a patient satisfaction survey was 4.41 (± 0.31) out of a total of 5. This study highlights the efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety of the OPAT clinic service for the treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis with ceftriaxone. We found a 45.5% drop in admission rate for acute tonsillopharyngitis after starting the OPAT service clinic and that 301 bed days were saved through this treatment. Conclusion This study showed that the management of acute tonsillopharyngitis with ceftriaxone in the OPAT clinic is safe, clinically effective, and cost effective, with low rates of complications/readmissions and high levels of patient

  6. Estimating the influence of life satisfaction and positive affect on later income using sibling fixed effects

    PubMed Central

    De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Oswald, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    The question of whether there is a connection between income and psychological well-being is a long-studied issue across the social, psychological, and behavioral sciences. Much research has found that richer people tend to be happier. However, relatively little attention has been paid to whether happier individuals perform better financially in the first place. This possibility of reverse causality is arguably understudied. Using data from a large US representative panel, we show that adolescents and young adults who report higher life satisfaction or positive affect grow up to earn significantly higher levels of income later in life. We focus on earnings approximately one decade after the person’s well-being is measured; we exploit the availability of sibling clusters to introduce family fixed effects; we account for the human capacity to imagine later socioeconomic outcomes and to anticipate the resulting feelings in current well-being. The study’s results are robust to the inclusion of controls such as education, intelligence quotient, physical health, height, self-esteem, and later happiness. We consider how psychological well-being may influence income. Sobel–Goodman mediation tests reveal direct and indirect effects that carry the influence from happiness to income. Significant mediating pathways include a higher probability of obtaining a college degree, getting hired and promoted, having higher degrees of optimism and extraversion, and less neuroticism. PMID:23169627

  7. [Affect processing in psychosomatic patients. I].

    PubMed

    Ahrens, S

    1984-01-01

    The present article reports the results of an empirical investigation concerned with specific characteristics of psychosomatic patients. Subjects suffering from ulcus duodeni or from colitis ulcerosa designated as psychosomatic patients. Controls were chosen from among neurotic patients and from among patients with only somatic illness. Against the background of the criticism with regard to the scientific approaches so far, our own approach was conceived as an experiment. Film episodes of two contrating (friendly versus unfriendly) interactions between physician and patient were offered to the test subjects as triggering situations. The contents of these film segments were organized in a manner calculated to produce an affective embarrassment in the psychosomatic patients. The reactions of the test subjects were inventoried on two levels. One of the levels of investigation was geared to cognitive processes by the application of Hofstätter's list of polarities (1955, 1973). In this case the psychosomatic patients distinguished themselves from the two control groups in that they misinterpreted the differences in the affective contents of both film sequences. On the other level of investigation subconscious processes were recorded by the application of Gottschalk's analysis of verbal contents. In this context all three groups in the investigation reacted in a similar manner to friendly connotations in the behaviour of the physician, namely with hidden aggressions. The results infer an affective resonance of the investigated psychosomatic patients on a subconscious level which, however, does not become evident on the conscious cognitive level. PMID:6485587

  8. THE EFFECT OF OUTPATIENT SERVICE QUALITY ON PATIENT SATISFACTION IN TEACHING HOSPITALS IN IRAN

    PubMed Central

    Pouragha, Behrouz; Zarei, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The quality of services plays a primary role in achieving patient satisfaction. The main purpose of this study was to explore the effect of outpatient service quality on patient satisfaction in teaching hospitals in Iran. Methods: this cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014. The study sample included 500 patients were selected with systematic random method from the outpatient departments (clinics) of four teaching hospitals in Tehran. The survey instrument was a questionnaire consisted of 44 items, which were confirmed its reliability and validity. The data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation, and multivariate regression methods with the SPSS.18 software. Results: According to the findings of this study, the majority of patients had a positive experience in the outpatient departments of the teaching hospitals and thus evaluated the services as good. Perceived service costs, physician consultation, physical environment, and information to patient were found to be the most important determinants of outpatient satisfaction. Conclusion: The results suggest that improving the quality of consultation, providing information to the patients during examination and consultation, creating value for patients by reducing costs or improving service quality, and enhancing the physical environment quality of the clinic can be regarded as effective strategies for the management of teaching hospitals toward increasing outpatient satisfaction. PMID:27047262

  9. Development of the NIH PROMIS® Sexual Function and Satisfaction Measures in Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Kathryn E.; Lin, Li; Cyranowski, Jill M.; Reeve, Bryce B.; Reese, Jennifer Barsky; Jeffery, Diana D.; Smith, Ashley Wilder; Porter, Laura S.; Dombeck, Carrie B.; Bruner, Deborah Watkins; Keefe, Francis J.; Weinfurt, Kevin P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We describe the development and validation of the PROMIS Sexual Function and Satisfaction (PROMIS SexFS) measures version 1.0 for cancer populations. Aim To develop a customizable self-report measure of sexual function and satisfaction as part of the U.S. National Institutes of Health PROMIS® Network. Methods Our multidisciplinary working group followed a comprehensive protocol for developing psychometrically robust patient reported outcome (PRO) measures including qualitative (scale development) and quantitative (psychometric evaluation) development. We performed an extensive literature review, conducted 16 focus groups with cancer patients and multiple discussions with clinicians, and evaluated candidate items in cognitive testing with patients. We administered items to 819 cancer patients. Items were calibrated using item response theory and evaluated for reliability and validity. Main Outcome Measures The PROMIS Sexual Function and Satisfaction (PROMIS SexFS) measures version 1.0 include 79 items in 11 domains: interest in sexual activity, lubrication, vaginal discomfort, erectile function, global satisfaction with sex life, orgasm, anal discomfort, therapeutic aids, sexual activities, interfering factors, and screener questions. Results In addition to content validity (patients indicate that items cover important aspects of their experiences) and face validity (patients indicate that items measure sexual function and satisfaction), the measure shows evidence for discriminant validity (domains discriminate between groups expected to be different), convergent validity (strong correlations between scores on PROMIS and scores on conceptually-similar older measures of sexual function), as well as favorable test-retest reliability among people not expected to change (inter-class correlations from 2 administrations of the instrument, 1 month apart). Conclusions The PROMIS SexFS offers researchers a reliable and valid set of tools to measure self

  10. Association between adherence, treatment satisfaction and illness perception in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Saarti, S; Hajj, A; Karam, L; Jabbour, H; Sarkis, A; El Osta, N; Rabbaa Khabbaz, L

    2016-05-01

    The relationship between adherence to antihypertension medications, treatment satisfaction and illness perception has not been studied so far. The primary objective of this study was to examine the association between adherence to medication, treatment satisfaction and illness perception in Lebanese hypertensive patients. The relation between medication adherence and blood pressure (BP) control was also assessed. In this cross-sectional study, patients were recruited from the physician's practice offices and community pharmacies in Beirut. Patients who had been treated for hypertension for at least 3 months were invited to participate in the study; they completed three questionnaires: the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8), the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM-4) and the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (BIPQ). BP was also measured and recorded. A total of 117 subjects were included, of whom 29.1% had poor adherence to their antihypertension treatment (MMAS-8 scores<6). The odds of having well-controlled hypertension was 3.5 times higher in patients with high adherence compared with patients with poor adherence (P=0.010). Treatment satisfaction was significantly greater in patients with good adherence (P<0.001). Neither socio-demographic, disease- nor drug-related characteristics of the participants were significantly associated with medication adherence. As for illness perception, even though the mean BIPQ score of adherent participants was lower than the mean score of non-adherent participants, this difference did not reach statistical significance. In conclusion, treatment satisfaction was found to be a predictor of adherence. Studies are needed to determine whether interventions to increase satisfaction can improve adherence and BP control. PMID:26310182

  11. Satisfaction with outpatient physiotherapy: focus groups to explore the views of patients with acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions.

    PubMed

    Hills, Rosemary; Kitchen, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    Patient satisfaction is generally regarded as an important component in quality health care. However, there has been little satisfaction research in physiotherapy compared with that in other clinical fields with few qualitative studies that have explored patients' perceptions and attitudes toward physiotherapy. We report on the use of focus groups, as part of a multimethod approach of qualitative data collection into patients' satisfaction with their outpatient physiotherapy within the NHS system of care in the United Kingdom. We explored the factors that affect patients' satisfaction with musculoskeletal outpatient physiotherapy. A purposeful sample of patients with acute and chronic musculoskeletal patients who had been discharged from physiotherapy within the previous 4 months was drawn from both an inner city and suburban hospital. Two acute groups (n = 4, n = 10) and two chronic groups (n = 5, n = 11) were convened. A topic guide drew on themes that had emerged from the earlier qualitative phases of the study and guided the discussion in relation to pretreatment, treatment, and outcome stages of physiotherapy care. Sessions were tape-recorded, transcribed, and content was analyzed to code and categorise the primary patterns in the data. Although subjects in both the acute and chronic groups expected that treatment would improve their symptoms and function, they differed in the degree to which they perceived that this was achieved. Both satisfactory and unsatisfactory aspects of care emerged under the principal themes of expectations, communication, perceptions of the therapist, treatment process, and outcome. Those in the acute group were optimistic of a good result, whereas those with chronic degenerative conditions were either doubtful of improvement or unrealistic in their hopes for complete resolution of their symptoms. It was also apparent that subjects could be further divided into one of three groups (positive, negative, ambivalent), depending on the

  12. Opinions and Satisfaction Regarding Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy in Adult Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Ikuko; Chujo, Masami; Ohkura, Tsuyoshi; Kataoka, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background This study examined the treatment satisfaction of type 1 diabetic patients undergoing continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy, and patients’ thoughts regarding CSII. Methods We provided a self-administered questionnaire survey over the internet. Participants were 106 individuals with type-one diabetes aged 20 years or older, undergoing CSII. The survey examined patients’ treatment satisfaction, and their thoughts regarding CSII. Descriptive statistics were calculated. We compared relationships between treatment satisfaction and other variables using the Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test, and performed content analysis on participants’ thoughts regarding CSII. Results Regarding treatment satisfaction, the response, “neither of them” was the most frequent. Comparing relationships between treatment satisfaction and other variables, significant differences were found for the variables “age,” “presence of dissatisfaction regarding doctors’ response,” and “presence of a significant medical expense burden.” Participants’ thoughts regarding CSII were classified into 10 categories. Conclusion Participants expressed positive evaluations, such as that their blood sugar control had improved due to CSII, and that they perceived improvement in their health. Participants also expressed negative evaluations, however, such as that medical expenses resulting from CSII were high, and that these expenses may cause distress and future economic insecurity. In future, patients may benefit from nursing support that allows patients to confidently continue with CSII. PMID:26538796

  13. Validation of a questionnaire measuring patient satisfaction with general practitioner services

    PubMed Central

    Grogan, S; Conner, M; Norman, P; Willits, D; Porter, I

    2000-01-01

    M Conner, senior lecturer P Norman, senior lecturer D Willits, general practitioner I Porter, research and development head Background—In order that patient satisfaction may be assessed in a meaningful way, measures that are valid and reliable are required. This study was undertaken to assess the construct validity and internal reliability of the previously developed Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ). Method—A total of 1390 patients from five practices in the North of England, the Midlands, and Scotland completed the questionnaire. Responses were checked for construct validity (including confirmatory factor analysis to check the factor structure of the scale) and internal reliability. Results—Confirmatory factor analysis showed that items loaded on the appropriate factors in a five factor model (doctors, nurses, access, appointments, and facilities). Scores on the specific subscales showed highly significant positive correlations with general satisfaction subscale scores suggesting construct validity. Also, the prediction (derived from past research) that older people would be more satisfied with the service was borne out by the results (F (4, 1312) = 57.10; p<0.0001), providing further construct validation. The five specific subscales (doctors, nurses, access, appointments, and facilities), the general satisfaction subscale, and the questionnaire as a whole were found to have high internal reliability (Cronbach's α = 0.74–0.95). Conclusion—The results suggest that the PSQ is a valid and internally reliable tool for assessing patient satisfaction with general practitioner services. (Quality in Health Care 2000;9:210–215) Key Words: patient satisfaction; general practitioner services; questionnaire construction; construct validity; reliability PMID:11101705

  14. [The multi-factorial model of satisfaction of medical care by hospital patients suffering from borderline psychic disorders].

    PubMed

    Tsigankov, B D; Maligin, Ya V

    2015-01-01

    The satisfaction of patients with medical care determines their consumer behavior. The factors of satisfaction with medical care vary depending on level of its provision and profile of medical specialty. At that, there are only sporadic studies dedicated to factors of satisfaction with psychiatric care. The study was carried out to examine factors of satisfaction with hospital psychiatric care by patients suffering from depressive and neurotic disorders. The sampling consisted of 356 hospital patients suffering from depressive and neurotic disorders. The survey in written form was carried out using originally developed questionnaire. The statistical analysis was implemented by compiling equation of multiple regression. It is established that key factors of satisfaction include functioning of medical nurses of department, functioning of attending physician, comfort of wards, proportions and quality of psychiatric care capability of physician to empathic listening. The developed mathematical model explains 81% of variation of satisfaction with treatment. PMID:26012273

  15. Becoming a leader in patient satisfaction: changing the culture of care in an academic community hospital.

    PubMed

    Deitrick, Lynn M; Capuano, Terry A; Paxton, Stuart S; Stern, Glenn; Dunleavy, Jack; Miller, William L

    2006-01-01

    In the context of the current health care payer system, quality of care standards, financial incentives and consumer choice are not well aligned, yet competition for increased admissions has become a matter of survival. Satisfaction and loyalty are two constructs that are the most meaningful measures in the context of sustaining and increasing admissions. Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network (LVHHN) launched an ambitious patient satisfaction improvement initiative in 2001. LVHHN augmented existing patient service excellence programs with an ethnographic study of a representative unit. Interview and observational data were analyzed using NVivo software. These results (four distilled domains of patient experience) can then be used to identify key components of the care environment that made meaningful differences in the perceptions of patients and their satisfaction. A designated interdepartmental task force can then develop interventions from those learnings, track outcomes through the Press Ganey scores, and ultimately yield increased admissions through unit-specific process change across the hospital. Admissions for fiscal year 2001 to fiscal year 2003 increased from 5,817 to 7,795 patients. The clear value and return on this initiative for our organization included a 34% increase in patient admissions over a four-year period. Improvements in both patient satisfaction and loyalty were demonstrated by a 24% increase for the question, "Likelihood of your recommending this hospital to others" as measured by the Press Ganey Inpatient survey. This initiative demonstrates the successful application of qualitative methods in a clinical microsystem to better understand patient perceptions that determine their satisfaction with medical care. PMID:18681198

  16. Factors affecting job satisfaction and their correlation with educational standards among dental assistants.

    PubMed

    Al Jazairy, Yousra H; Halawany, Hassan Suliman; Hussainan, Nawaf Al; Maflehi, Nassr Al; Abraham, Nimmi Biju; Jacob, Vimal

    2014-01-01

    A disparity exists in the educational qualifications of dental assistants working in various public and private institutions in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of professional and personal characteristics on job satisfaction among dental assistants. A cross-sectional survey was performed among dental assistants using a 24-item self-administered questionnaire. Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between overall job satisfaction and other variables. The overall response rate was 72.1%. Factor analysis suggested that five underlying factors were related to job satisfaction. The mean score for overall job satisfaction was 3.86 (satisfied) out of 5. Among the work environment factors, the highest mean score, 4.26 (satisfied), was obtained for quality of service, and the lowest mean score, 2.78 (neutral), was obtained for the perception of income. The income and general prospects of the profession was significantly associated with overall job satisfaction. This study suggests that for dental assistants, professional and personal life, quality of service, perception of income and prestige and self-respect are important factors for job satisfaction. Despite differences in professional formation standards, in general, the study participants were considerably satisfied with their jobs. PMID:24747371

  17. Factors Affecting Job Satisfaction and Their Correlation with Educational Standards among Dental Assistants

    PubMed Central

    JAZAIRY, Yousra H. AL; HALAWANY, Hassan Suliman; HUSSAINAN, Nawaf AL; MAFLEHI, Nassr AL; ABRAHAM, Nimmi Biju; JACOB, Vimal

    2014-01-01

    A disparity exists in the educational qualifications of dental assistants working in various public and private institutions in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of professional and personal characteristics on job satisfaction among dental assistants. A cross-sectional survey was performed among dental assistants using a 24-item self-administered questionnaire. Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between overall job satisfaction and other variables. The overall response rate was 72.1%. Factor analysis suggested that five underlying factors were related to job satisfaction. The mean score for overall job satisfaction was 3.86 (satisfied) out of 5. Among the work environment factors, the highest mean score, 4.26 (satisfied), was obtained for quality of service, and the lowest mean score, 2.78 (neutral), was obtained for the perception of income. The income and general prospects of the profession was significantly associated with overall job satisfaction. This study suggests that for dental assistants, professional and personal life, quality of service, perception of income and prestige and self-respect are important factors for job satisfaction. Despite differences in professional formation standards, in general, the study participants were considerably satisfied with their jobs. PMID:24747371

  18. 77 FR 69550 - Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program... provided by or through the Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program. DATES: Written comments and... information technology. Title: Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program, VA Form...

  19. 78 FR 6851 - Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Patient Satisfaction Survey Michael E. DeBakey Home Care Program, VA Form...

  20. Development of a questionnaire to measure patients' satisfaction with general practitioners' services.

    PubMed Central

    Grogan, S; Conner, M; Willits, D; Norman, P

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND. It is now a requirement that patients' satisfaction with the services obtained from their general practitioner should be surveyed. AIM. The aim of the study was to produce a reliable and valid multidimensional patient satisfaction questionnaire that could be used in general practice. METHOD. Items were originally derived from patients' responses to open-ended questions. The resulting 148-item Likert-scale questionnaire was completed by 1193 patients. General satisfaction items were removed from the set, and responses to remaining items underwent factor analysis. Subscales were produced from items representing each factor. Reliability and validity of each subscale were examined. RESULTS. Five subscales with a total of 40 items resulted from the factor analysis: doctors, access, nurses, appointments and facilities. Each subscale was internally reliable (Cronbach's alpha coefficient between 0.73 and 0.95), and initial tests of validity suggested that all subscales were valid. CONCLUSION. The study has resulted in a 40-item scale that has been found to be reliable and valid after initial tests. Further work to test the reliability and validity of the final version of the patient satisfaction questionnaire is described. PMID:7492421

  1. Patient satisfaction with primary medical care. Evaluation of sociodemographic and predispositional factors.

    PubMed

    Weiss, G L

    1988-04-01

    As patient satisfaction has been demonstrated to influence certain health-related behaviors (e.g., compliance with medical regimens and use of medical services), research has attempted to identify its key determinants. Although the influence of patient characteristics often has been studied, attention has been focused on sociodemographic characteristics (e.g., age and sex) rather than attitudinal or situational factors (e.g., confidence in the medical care system and feelings of internal control) that may predispose one toward satisfaction with care received. Data to test the relative importance of these types of determinants were collected in a general household survey of 400 persons. The patient satisfaction scale developed and tested by Roghmann and his colleagues using nonmetric multidimensional scaling was used. Multiple regression analysis was performed on the data. Results show that certain predispositional factors (confidence in the community's medical care system, having a regular source of care, and being satisfied with life in general) are more important predictors of patient satisfaction than patient's age, sex, race, educational attainment, or income. PMID:3352331

  2. Patient satisfaction with quality of primary health care in Benghazi, Libya

    PubMed Central

    Salam, Asharaf Abdul; Alshekteria, Amina Abdulla; Abd Alhadi, Hana; Ahmed, Mariam; Mohammed, Anees

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The Libyan National Health System (LNHS) is debated for the paradox of its performance versus impact. It has poor performance, but the national health statistics are good and competitive. There are concerted efforts to manage health care services and to regain the lost trust. A primary health care (PHC) system that focuses on preventive and promotive care is the core focus of LNHS efforts. Objectives To assess patient satisfaction with quality of PHC assessed in terms of (a) customer profile, (b) patient satisfaction, and (c) health care-seeking behavior. Methodology A sample of nine health centers and seven polyclinics from various locations in Benghazi, Libya were selected for gathering information by structured face-to-face interviews. A total of 310 beneficiaries were interviewed by using an Arabic translation of the Charleston Psychiatric Outpatient Satisfaction Scale. Results The beneficiaries appear to be quite satisfied with the quality of services. Geographical zone, marital status of beneficiary, and type of facility are satisfaction-related factors. There are preferences for facilities located within the City Centre over those located elsewhere. There is also an interaction effect of the geographical zone and the type of facility in creating differences in satisfaction. Conclusions A customer-friendly facility concept that emphasizes reception, physician interaction, and cordiality shall add value. Polyclinics require more attention as does the Al Slawy area. A few utility services might also be considered. PMID:21483587

  3. Satisfaction with outpatient physiotherapy: a survey comparing the views of patients with acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions.

    PubMed

    Hills, Rosemary; Kitchen, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    Patient satisfaction is a complex construct and is regarded as an important component in the assessment of care quality. Investigations into patient satisfaction with care have steadily increased across a range of specialties over the last three decades, but there has been a paucity of studies into satisfaction with physiotherapy. The limitations of previous instruments used to examine satisfaction with outpatient (OP) physiotherapy suggested the need for a new tool. The aim of the survey was to examine the level of satisfaction that patients with acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions have with their physiotherapy outpatient treatment within the NHS system of care in the UK. Questionnaires were mailed to 420 patients with acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions who had recently completed a course of OP physiotherapy. The 38-item self-completion questionnaire comprised six subscales; Expectation, Communication, Therapist, Organisation, Outcome, and Satisfaction, scored on a five-point Likert scale. Data were analysed by using SPSS Release 10 for Windows for frequency distribution of scores and regression analysis for factors predictive of satisfaction. The response rate was 66%. Results showed that patients were generally satisfied with the interpersonal, technical, and organisational aspects of care, although there was lower satisfaction with the clinical outcome in both groups. Organisational issues were the key determinants of satisfaction for the whole sample and the chronic group, with the therapist as key determinant for the acute group. Patient satisfaction surveys conducted as part of a continuous quality improvement programme are particularly important in providing therapists with feedback from patients about their experiences of physiotherapy services. This study has successfully used a new questionnaire to examine patients' satisfaction with outpatient physiotherapy in the United Kingdom. Further studies are now needed to validate the new

  4. Does a referral from home to hospital affect satisfaction with childbirth? A cross-national comparison

    PubMed Central

    Christiaens, Wendy; Gouwy, Anneleen; Bracke, Piet

    2007-01-01

    Background The Belgian and Dutch societies present many similarities but differ with regard to the organisation of maternity care. The Dutch way of giving birth is well known for its high percentage of home births and its low medical intervention rate. In contrast, home births in Belgium are uncommon and the medical model is taken for granted. Dutch and Belgian maternity care systems are compared with regard to the influence of being referred to specialist care during pregnancy or intrapartum while planning for a home birth. We expect that a referral will result in lower satisfaction with childbirth, especially in Belgium. Methods Two questionnaires were filled out by 605 women, one at 30 weeks of pregnancy and one within the first two weeks after childbirth, either at home or in a hospital. Of these, 563 questionnaires were usable for analysis. Women were invited to participate in the study by independent midwives and obstetricians during antenatal visits in 2004–2005. Satisfaction with childbirth was measured by the Mackey Satisfaction with Childbirth Rating Scale, which takes into account the multidimensional nature of the concept. Results Belgian women are more satisfied than Dutch women and home births are more satisfying than hospital births. Women who are referred to the hospital while planning for a home birth are less satisfied than women who planned to give birth in hospital and did. A referral has a greater negative impact on satisfaction for Dutch women. Conclusion There is no reason to believe Dutch women receive hospital care of lesser quality than Belgian women in case of a referral. Belgian and Dutch attach different meaning to being referred, resulting in a different evaluation of childbirth. In the Dutch maternity care system home births lead to higher satisfaction, but once a referral to the hospital is necessary satisfaction drops and ends up lower than satisfaction with hospital births that were planned in advance. We need to understand more

  5. Outcome and patients' satisfaction after functional treatment of acute lateral ankle injuries at emergency departments versus family doctor offices

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Patrik R; Benneker, Lorin M; Eggli, Stefan; Zimmermann, Heinz; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K

    2008-01-01

    injury grade I-II can be referred to a general practitioner for follow-up treatment without affecting patient satisfaction regarding treatment and treatment outcome. PMID:19105803

  6. Patients' Expectation Before and Satisfaction After Full-Arch Fixed Implant-Prosthesis Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Miriã Corália; Santos, Jarbas Francisco Fernandes Dos; Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes Dos; Marchini, Leonardo

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated patients' expectation before and satisfaction after full-arch fixed implant-prosthesis rehabilitation. Other variables that could influence patient satisfaction with this therapy were also evaluated. Using a visual analog scale (VAS), a sample of 28 patients assigned scores for their expectation before and satisfaction after therapy regarding chewing, esthetics, comfort, and phonetics. They also completed a questionnaire concerning their evaluation of the dentists' conduct. The average VAS scores were high for both expectation prior to treatment and satisfaction after treatment, and there was no statistical difference between them. Women presented higher expectations than men regarding esthetics (P = 0.040), phonetics (P = 0.043) and comfort (P = 0.013). Significant differences were not found between VAS scores with clinical variables (arch, radiographic bone quality, surgical bone quality, and implant inclination), educational level, and patients' evaluation of the dentists' conduct. Considering the results obtained in this study, expectation before implant-supported, full-arch fixed prosthesis therapy were met following treatment, with women having higher expectations than men. PMID:23614813

  7. Health care competition, strategic mission, and patient satisfaction: research model and propositions

    PubMed Central

    Rivers, Patrick A.; Glover, Saundra H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In all industries, competition among businesses has long been encouraged as a mechanism to increase value for patients. In other words, competition ensures the provision of better products and services to satisfy the needs of customers This paper aims to develop a model that can be used to empirically investigate a number of complex issues and relationships associated with competition in the health care industry. Design/methodology/approach A literature review was conducted. A total of 50 items of literature related to the subject were reviewed.. Various perspectives of competition, the nature of service quality, health system costs, and patient satisfaction in health care are examined Findings A model of the relationship among these variables is developed. The model depicts patient satisfaction as an outcome measure directly dependent on competition. Quality of care and health care systems costs, while also directly dependent on the strategic mission and goals, are considered as determinants of customer satisfaction as well. The model is discussed in the light of propositions for empirical research. Practical implications Empirical studies based on the model proposed in this paper should help identify areas with significant impact on patient satisfaction while maintaining high quality of service at lower costs in a competitive environment. Originality/value The authors develop a research model which included propositions to examine the complex issues of competition in the health care industry. PMID:19579575

  8. Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (Lisat-9): Reliability and Validity for Patients with Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boonstra, Anne M.; Reneman, Michiel F.; Stewart, Roy E.; Balk, Gerlof A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the reliability and discriminant validity of the Dutch version of the life satisfaction questionnaire (Lisat-9 DV) to assess patients with an acquired brain injury. The reliability study used a test-retest design, and the validity study used a cross-sectional design. The setting was the general rehabilitation…

  9. Patients' satisfaction with inpatient services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Makarem, Jalil; Larijani, Bagher; Joodaki, Kobra; Ghaderi, Sahar; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Mohammadpoor, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of patient feedback is considered as a critical part of effective and efficient management in developed countries. The main objectives of this study were to assess patient satisfaction with the services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, identify areas of patient dissatisfaction, and find ways to improve patient satisfaction with hospital services. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 3 phases. After 2 initial preparation phases, the valid instrument was applied through telephone interviews with 21476 participants from 26 hospitals during August, 2011 to February, 2013.Using the Satisfaction Survey tool, information of patient's demographic characteristics were collected and patient satisfaction with 15 areas of hospital services and the intent to return the same hospitals were assessed. The mean score of overall satisfaction with hospital services was 16.86 ± 2.72 out of 20. It was found that 58% of participants were highly satisfied with the services provided. Comparison of mean scores showed physician and medical services (17.75 ± 4.02), laboratory and radiology services (17.67 ± 3.66), and privacy and religious issues (17.55 ± 4.32) had the highest satisfaction. The patients were the most dissatisfied with the food services (15.50 ± 5.54). It was also found that 83.7% of the participants intended to return to the same hospital in case of need, which supported the measured satisfaction level. Patient satisfaction in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences was high. It seems that the present study, with its large sample size, has sufficient reliability to express the patient satisfaction status. Moreover, appropriate measures should be taken in some areas (food, cost, and etc.) to increase patient satisfaction. PMID:27471589

  10. Patients' satisfaction with inpatient services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during 2011-2013

    PubMed Central

    Makarem, Jalil; Larijani, Bagher; Joodaki, Kobra; Ghaderi, Sahar; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Mohammadpoor, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of patient feedback is considered as a critical part of effective and efficient management in developed countries. The main objectives of this study were to assess patient satisfaction with the services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, identify areas of patient dissatisfaction, and find ways to improve patient satisfaction with hospital services. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 3 phases. After 2 initial preparation phases, the valid instrument was applied through telephone interviews with 21476 participants from 26 hospitals during August, 2011 to February, 2013.Using the Satisfaction Survey tool, information of patient's demographic characteristics were collected and patient satisfaction with 15 areas of hospital services and the intent to return the same hospitals were assessed. The mean score of overall satisfaction with hospital services was 16.86 ± 2.72 out of 20. It was found that 58% of participants were highly satisfied with the services provided. Comparison of mean scores showed physician and medical services (17.75 ± 4.02), laboratory and radiology services (17.67 ± 3.66), and privacy and religious issues (17.55 ± 4.32) had the highest satisfaction. The patients were the most dissatisfied with the food services (15.50 ± 5.54). It was also found that 83.7% of the participants intended to return to the same hospital in case of need, which supported the measured satisfaction level. Patient satisfaction in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences was high. It seems that the present study, with its large sample size, has sufficient reliability to express the patient satisfaction status. Moreover, appropriate measures should be taken in some areas (food, cost, and etc.) to increase patient satisfaction. PMID:27471589

  11. Evaluation of the effect of care given by nursing students on oncology patients' satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Can, Gulbeyaz; Akin, Semiha; Aydiner, Adnan; Ozdilli, Kursat; Durna, Zehra

    2008-09-01

    Patients' satisfaction with the care given by nursing students will have a say in the development of practical nursing student education and in improving the quality of clinical training. The purpose of this study was to test whether the Turkish version of "The Oncology Patients' Perceptions of the Quality of Nursing Care Scale-Short Form (OPPQNCS-SF)" is appropriate for oncology patients done by studying the tool's validity and reliability and to evaluate the effect of care given by nursing students on oncology patients' satisfaction with the care they receive. The Turkish version of OPPQNCS-SF's item-score correlation coefficients were rs=0.38-0.85 (p<0.05). The Cronbach values were 0.91 for the total scale, 0.66-0.87 for the subscales. The results show that the scale is a valid and reliable tool for Turkish patients. The mean scores for every subscale and item were high. The patients were most pleased about the respect they were shown, with the answered to their questions, with the sincere interest shown and with the knowledge of nurses about their condition. The patients' high level of satisfaction with the care nursing students gave is important to ensure that nurses, who will have primary responsibility for patient care in the future, receive a good clinical and theoretical education. PMID:18653383

  12. Incorporating Patient Satisfaction Metrics in Assessing Multidisciplinary Breast Cancer Care Quality

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Jennifer L.; De Costa, Anna-Maria A.; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Sterba, Katherine R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The Medical University of South Carolina implemented a patient-centered multidisciplinary breast clinic program (MDBC) in August 2012. In this study, patient satisfaction with MDBC care delivery model and communication with healthcare providers was examined to inform the refinement of the MDBC program. Methods During the first 10 months of the MDBC, patients were asked to complete a 14-question postconsultation telephone survey. A statistical analysis was performed to explore potential associations between age, race, and stage with overall patient satisfaction scores. Results Overall, patients (N = 52, 56% white, 42% African American, 2% Hispanic; mean age 61 years) rated the quality of care highly (mean 4.7, range [1 = poor to 5 = excellent]) and felt comfortable with their plan of care (mean 1.63, range [1 = extremely comfortable to 5 = not at all comfortable]). No statistically significant differences in overall satisfaction were found by age, race, or stage; however, patient responses were commonly not optimal (ie, either “no” or “yes, but not as much as I would like”) when asked if the care team addressed the impact of their diagnosis on personal relationships (40.4%) or emotional health (28.9%). Conclusions Patients were highly satisfied with the care they received in the MDBC program. Findings suggest that this model is well suited to a diverse patient population and have highlighted quality improvement targets such as increased emphasis on providers’ communication about psychosocial issues. PMID:26079465

  13. Factors facilitating patient satisfaction among women with medically unexplained long-term fatigue: A relational perspective.

    PubMed

    Lian, Olaug S; Hansen, Anne Helen

    2016-05-01

    Bodily conditions that are difficult to identify, explain and treat with the aid of medical knowledge and technology appear to be particularly challenging to medical encounters. Patients are often dissatisfied with the help they receive, and they often experience that their medical needs are not met. To explore factors facilitating patient satisfaction among patients with a medically unexplained condition, we ask: what is the importance of individual versus relational factors in facilitating patient satisfaction in clinical encounters between general practitioners (GPs) and women with medically unexplained long-term fatigue? We approach this question through a statistical analysis of survey data collected from a net sample of 431 women recruited through a patient organisation for people suffering from myalgic encephalomyelitis in 2013. Participants were asked about their experiences with general practitioners in the Norwegian national health system in two different phases: shortly after illness onset, and current regular general practitioner last 12 months. The questions evolved around themes concerning shared understanding and decision making, being taken seriously, being paid due respect and being treated as an equal partner. Through descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression analyses, we explored how their experiences were related to individual and relational factors, respectively. Free-text comments from the questionnaires were used while interpreting the results. The analysis illuminates that relational aspects in medical encounters between GPs and ME patients, especially continuity, congruence in doctor-patient views and being seen by a specialist, are important catalysts of patient satisfaction. The probability of being satisfied with the initial investigation was more than six times higher in women who were referred to specialists, compared to those who were not. We conclude that continuity of care and experiences of being in a

  14. Depressive Symptoms, Patient Satisfaction, and Quality of Life Over Time in Automated and Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hee-Yeon; Jang, Hye Min; Kim, Yang Wook; Cho, Seong; Kim, Hye-Young; Kim, Sung-Ho; Bang, Kitae; Kim, Hyun Woo; Lee, So Young; Jo, Sang Kyung; Lee, Jonghyo; Choi, Ji-Young; Cho, Jang-Hee; Park, Sun-Hee; Kim, Chan-Duck; Kim, Yong-Lim

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is an important clinical outcome for dialysis patients. However, relative superiority in HRQOL between automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) are not clearly known. We compared HRQOL over time between APD and CAPD patients and evaluated factors associated with HRQOL. All 260 incident patients initiating APD or CAPD at multiple centers throughout Korea were prospectively enrolled in this study between October 2010 and February 2013. HRQOL, depressive symptoms, and renal treatment satisfaction were assessed 1 and 12 months after the start of dialysis by the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Short Form 36 (KDQOL-36), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Renal Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (RTSQ), respectively. Of 196 patients who completed all questionnaires and did not change the peritoneal dialysis (PD) modality during the 1-year follow-up period, 160 were matched. APD patients showed better baseline HRQOL than CAPD patients for the symptoms, patient satisfaction, pain, and social function domains. There were no differences in HRQOL between the 2 groups at 12 months, and CAPD patients had significantly greater improvements in symptoms (P = 0.02), the mental composite summary (P = 0.03), and health status domains (P = 0.03) than APD patients. There were similar improvements in depressive symptoms (P = 0.01) and patient satisfaction with treatment (P = 0.01) in CAPD and APD patients. Interestingly, depressive symptoms, not PD modality, was the most influential and consistent factor for HRQOL. Despite the spontaneous improvement of depressive symptoms, considerable PD patients still had depressive symptoms at the 1-year appointment. APD has no advantage over CAPD for HRQOL. Considering the substantial negative effect of depressive symptoms on HRQOL, it is important to evaluate PD patients for depression and to treat those with depression to

  15. Patient satisfaction with breast cancer follow-up care provided by family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Thind, Amardeep; Liu, Yihang; Maly, Rose

    2011-01-01

    Purpose There is little evidence to document patient satisfaction with follow up care provided by family physicians/general practitioners (FP/GP) to breast cancer patients. We aimed to identify determinants of satisfaction with such care in low-income medically underserved women with breast cancer. Methods Cross sectional study of 145 women who reported receiving follow up care from a FP/GP. Women were enrolled in California’s Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Program and were interviewed by phone 3 years after breast cancer diagnosis. Cleary and McNeil’s model, which states that patient satisfaction is a function of patient characteristics, structure of care, and processes of care, was used to understand the determinants of satisfaction. Stepwise logistic regression was used to identify significant predictors. Results 73.4% reported that they were extremely satisfied with their treatment by the family physician/general practitioner. Women who were able to ask their family physicians questions about their breast cancer had six times greater odds of being extremely satisfied compared to women who were not able to ask any questions. Women who scored the family physician higher on the ability to explain things in a way she could understand had a higher odds of being extremely satisfied compared to women who scored their family physicians lower. Conclusions FP/GPs providing follow up care for breast cancer patients should encourage patients to ask questions, and must communicate in a way that patients understand. These recommendations are congruent with the characteristics of patient centered communication for cancer patients enunciated in a recent NCI monograph. PMID:22086814

  16. Long-term outcomes and patient satisfaction following wrist ganglion aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Head, Linden; Allen, Murray; Boyd, Kirsty U

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a strong body of evidence addressing short-term outcomes following wrist ganglion aspiration; however, few studies have investigated long-term outcomes and patient satisfaction. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate patient satisfaction and the long-term rate of recurrence following wrist ganglion aspiration. METHODS: Charts of all patients with a wrist ganglion treated by a single surgeon from 2001 to 2011 were reviewed. Demographic and clinical data were retrieved from patient charts. Patients were contacted by telephone and asked to complete a questionnaire addressing recurrence, satisfaction and symptom improvement. Improvement was assessed using a Likert scale, with 1 indicating ‘significantly worse’ and 5 indicating ‘significantly improved’. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson χ2, Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon and Fisher’s exact tests. RESULTS: Forty-one consecutive patients were identified using hospital records; 21 (51%) consented to the telephone questionnaire. There were no differences in demographic or clinical data between patients who completed the telephone questionnaire and those who did not. The mean age at treatment was 45.3 years, mean time to follow-up was 6.3 years and 52.4% of ganglions recurred. Overall, 95% (20 of 21) of patients were satisfied with their treatment and would proceed again given the option; satisfaction was independent of recurrence. Following treatment, there was improvement in pain, function, range of motion and appearance; improvement in symptoms was independent of recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term recurrence of ganglions treated with aspiration appeared to be similar to the short-term rates reported in the literature. Independent of recurrence, patients remained satisfied with aspiration and reported improvement in symptoms. PMID:25821775

  17. Milestone Age Affects the Role of Health and Emotions in Life Satisfaction: A Preliminary Inquiry

    PubMed Central

    Miron-Shatz, Talya; Bhargave, Rajesh; Doniger, Glen M.

    2015-01-01

    Jill turns 40. Should this change how she evaluates her life, and would a similar change occur when she turns 41? Milestone age (e.g., 30, 40, 50)—a naturally occurring feature in personal timelines—has received much attention is popular culture, but little attention in academic inquiry. This study examines whether milestone birthdays change the way people evaluate their life. We show that life outlook is impacted by this temporal landmark, which appears to punctuate people’s mental maps of their life cycle. At these milestone junctures, people take stock of where they stand and have a more evaluative perspective towards their lives when making life satisfaction judgments. Correspondingly, they place less emphasis on daily emotional experiences. We find that milestone agers (vs. other individuals) place greater weight on health satisfaction and BMI and lesser weight on daily positive emotions in their overall life satisfaction judgments, whereas negative emotions remain influential. PMID:26244348

  18. Milestone Age Affects the Role of Health and Emotions in Life Satisfaction: A Preliminary Inquiry.

    PubMed

    Miron-Shatz, Talya; Bhargave, Rajesh; Doniger, Glen M

    2015-01-01

    Jill turns 40. Should this change how she evaluates her life, and would a similar change occur when she turns 41? Milestone age (e.g., 30, 40, 50)--a naturally occurring feature in personal timelines--has received much attention is popular culture, but little attention in academic inquiry. This study examines whether milestone birthdays change the way people evaluate their life. We show that life outlook is impacted by this temporal landmark, which appears to punctuate people's mental maps of their life cycle. At these milestone junctures, people take stock of where they stand and have a more evaluative perspective towards their lives when making life satisfaction judgments. Correspondingly, they place less emphasis on daily emotional experiences. We find that milestone agers (vs. other individuals) place greater weight on health satisfaction and BMI and lesser weight on daily positive emotions in their overall life satisfaction judgments, whereas negative emotions remain influential. PMID:26244348

  19. Patient sociodemographic characteristics as predictors of satisfaction with medical care: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hall, J A; Dornan, M C

    1990-01-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to examine the relation of patients' sociodemographic characteristics to their satisfaction with medical care. The sociodemographic characteristics were age, ethnicity, sex, socioeconomic status (three indices), marital status, and family size. Greater satisfaction was significantly associated with greater age and less education, and marginally significantly associated with being married and having higher social status (scored as a composite variable emphasizing occupational status). The average magnitudes of relations were very small, with age being the strongest correlate of satisfaction (mean r = 0.13). No overall relationship was found for ethnicity, sex, income, or family size. For all sociodemographic variables, the distribution of correlations was significantly heterogeneous, and statistical contrasts revealed the operation of several moderating variables. The meaning of the overall results and their relation to earlier reviews is discussed. PMID:2138357

  20. Two-factor theory – at the intersection of health care management and patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Bohm, Josef

    2012-01-01

    Using data obtained from the 2004 Joint Canadian/United States Survey of Health, an analytic model using principles derived from Herzberg’s motivational hygiene theory was developed for evaluating patient satisfaction with health care. The analysis sought to determine whether survey variables associated with consumer satisfaction act as Hertzberg factors and contribute to survey participants’ self-reported levels of health care satisfaction. To validate the technique, data from the survey were analyzed using logistic regression methods and then compared with results obtained from the two-factor model. The findings indicate a high degree of correlation between the two methods. The two-factor analytical methodology offers advantages due to its ability to identify whether a factor assumes a motivational or hygienic role and assesses the influence of a factor within select populations. Its ease of use makes this methodology well suited for assessment of multidimensional variables. PMID:23055755

  1. A multidisciplinary job retention vocational rehabilitation programme for patients with chronic rheumatic diseases: patients' and occupational physicians' satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    de Buck, P D M; Breedveld, J; van der Giesen, F J; Vliet, V

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate patients' and occupational physicians' satisfaction with the quality of a vocational rehabilitation programme for maintaining work ability in chronic rheumatic diseases. Methods: The vocational rehabilitation programme was developed for patients with rheumatic diseases and consisted of systematic assessment of the problems at work and the development of individual solutions. The programme was run by a multidisciplinary team comprising a rheumatologist, a social worker, a physical and occupational therapist, and a psychologist. Satisfaction ratings were measured using a multidimensional questionnaire involving a rating scale (0–10) and a structured telephone interview. Results: 59 of the 65 patients who participated in the programme (91%) completed the questionnaire. Patients were most satisfied with the interpersonal approach and professional knowledge, and least satisfied with the waiting time for the final report and the practical application of the given advice. Mean satisfaction score was 7.3 (SD 1.0). Twenty eight of the occupational physicians involved were interviewed. They were satisfied with the programme overall; 21 (75%) stated that their role in the vocational rehabilitation process could be defined more clearly, and they would appreciate more contact with the team members, preferably in the early phases. Conclusions: Patients' and occupational physicians' satisfaction with a multidisciplinary vocational rehabilitation programme was good. Areas for improvement mainly concerned the speed of the process and the communication between team members and occupational physicians. PMID:15082488

  2. Dental Implant Patients and Their Satisfaction with Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tawares, Mary; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The study developed a profile of dental implant patients from 38 private practices to document characteristics of endosseous implant recipients of the past 10 years. Data were then analyzed using multivariate techniques to examine the relationship between these characteristics and patient-reported outcomes. Patients tended to have high incomes and…

  3. Effectiveness and satisfaction evaluation of patients submitted to TMJ arthrocenthesis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Mariana Vasconcelos da Cruz; Barbalho, Jimmy Charles Melo; Pereira Júnior, Edwaldo Dourado; Nascimento, Mirella Marques das Mercês; Vasconcelos, Belmiro Cavalcanti do Egito

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and level of satisfaction of patients who underwent TMJ arthrocentesis under local anesthesia by considering the following parameters: joint pain, mouth opening, mastication, and satisfaction. Fourteen patients (13 women and one man; mean age, 37.6 years with TMJ arthralgia were selected. The patients underwent arthrocentesis under local anesthesia, and pain intensity was measured before, during, and 1 year after treatment using a visual analog pain scale (VAS 0-100 mm). A Likert scale was used to assess patients' opinion regarding the improvement of mouth opening and mastication. After treatment, patients were questioned on levels of satisfaction provided by arthrocentesis in regard to their quality of life. At the end of 1 year, patients showed a marked improvement in their pain clinical picture (p < 0.0001). Mouth opening and mastication, evaluated separately and then correlated (R2 = 0.925, p < 0.0001), also showed a marked improvement. When questioned, all patients reported being satisfied with the treatment outcome. PMID:25789507

  4. PSEUDOBULBAR AFFECT IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Vidović, Viktor; Rovazdi, Merisanda Časar; Kraml, Oto; Kes, Vanja Bašić

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of pseudobulbar affect (PBA) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and to analyze the link between PBA and patient age, sex, clinical course of MS, disease duration and degree of disability. The study was conducted on 79 MS patients that underwent inpatient rehabilitation at the Lipik Special Hospital for Medical Rehabilitation in the period from August 15, 2014 to February 15, 2015. PBA is a term used for an emotional disinhibition syndrome characterized by sudden and involuntary episodes of crying or laughing which are not in proportion to the stimulus applied or occur without stimulus. The condition can be present in patients with various neurological disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, patients having recovered from stroke, or following traumatic brain injury. The estimated prevalence in patients with MS ranges from 10% to 46.2%. As a measuring instrument in the study, we used the Center for Neurologic Study-Lability Scale (CNS-LS), where a sum 17 denoted positive finding. The total number of respondents was 79, of which 33 (41.8%) met the CNS-LS criteria for the diagnosis of PBA. There was no statistically significant correlation between PBA, age and degree of disability, although PBA was more common in women and in patients with a secondary progressive form of the disease. We found that 42.4% of respondents with positive CNS-LS criteria for PBA did not inform their neurologist on the presence of sudden mood changes. The high frequency of PBA and the fact that a significant proportion of patients did not inform the neurologist on their affective disturbances call for an active approach to diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26415311

  5. Brief Emergency Department Patient Satisfaction Scale (BEPSS); Development of a New Practical Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Atari, Mohammad; Atari, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Methodologically correct assessment of patient satisfaction (PS) plays a crucial role for quality-improvement purposes. Evaluation of Iranian literature on emergency department’s PS resulted in an emerging need for developing a new instrument with satisfactory psychometric properties. The present study, aimed to develop and initially validate a scale to measure PS in emergency departments. Methods: A sample of 301 patients was selected in 2014 from two hospitals in Tehran. A pool of 24 items was prepared for administering. An item analysis was conducted to evaluate the quality of each item. Validity and reliability of the scale were evaluated. The data were analyzed using SPSS. Results: Item analysis and exploratory factor analysis yielded in a 20-item scale in five domains named emergency department staff, emergency department environment, physician care satisfaction, general patient satisfaction, and patient’s family’s satisfaction. Validity and factor structure of the scale were reported satisfactory. Reliability coefficients of the domains ranged between 0.75 and 0.88. Conclusion: The findings of the present study provided evidence for psychometric properties of a newly developed scale for PS assessment in emergency departments. Five underlying components of PS were found in the item pool. In sum, this scale may be used in research and emergency departments to measure PS. PMID:26495394

  6. Exploring patient satisfaction with foodservice through focus groups and meal rounds.

    PubMed

    Watters, Corilee A; Sorensen, Janice; Fiala, Anna; Wismer, Wendy

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate adult patients' perceptions of hospital foodservice through focus groups with patients postdischarge and with nurses. The focus group themes included an emphasis on health, quality, freshness, and appropriateness; variety, selection, and choice; inability to provide feedback; menu errors; accessibility to food on the units; service; tray layout; and waste. The themes emerging from the focus groups were further explored through meal round interviews with patients (n=116) to determine areas for improvement. Patients thought food served in the hospital should be a model for a healthy diet. Ongoing education and communication with patients and nurses is important in improving satisfaction with foodservice. PMID:14520255

  7. Effectiveness of structured hourly nurse rounding on patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Brosey, Lisa A; March, Karen S

    2015-01-01

    Structured hourly nurse rounding is an effective method to improve patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes. This program evaluation describes outcomes related to the implementation of hourly nurse rounding in one medical-surgical unit in a large community hospital. Overall Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems domain scores increased with the exception of responsiveness of staff. Patient falls and hospital-acquired pressure ulcers decreased during the project period. PMID:25237791

  8. The Type of Breast Reconstruction May Not Influence Patient Satisfaction in the Chinese Population: A Single Institutional Experience

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiaying; Chen, Ying; Hu, Zhen; Liu, Guangyu; Shen, Zhenzhou; Shao, Zhimin; Wu, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to evaluate patient satisfaction with four common types of breast reconstruction performed at our institution: latissimus dorsi myocutaneous (LDM) flap reconstruction with or without implants, pedicled transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap reconstruction, and free deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap reconstruction. Methods A custom survey consisting of questions that assessed general and aesthetic satisfaction was sent to patients who had undergone breast reconstruction in the last 5 years. The clinical data and details of the surgery were also collected from the patients who returned the surveys. We compared satisfaction rates across the four breast reconstruction types and analyzed the effects of various factors on overall general and aesthetic satisfaction rates using a binary logistic regression model. Result A total of 207 (72%) patients completed the questionnaires. Overall, significant differences in general and aesthetic satisfaction among the four procedures were not observed. A multivariate analysis revealed that the factor “complications” (p = 0.001) played a significant role in general satisfaction and that the factors “> 2 years since reconstruction” (p = 0.043) and “age > 35 years” (p = 0.05) played significant roles in overall aesthetic satisfaction. Conclusion The present study demonstrated that the type of breast reconstruction might not influence satisfaction in Chinese patients. PMID:26562294

  9. Satisfaction of immediate or delayed switch to paliperidone palmitate in patients unsatisfied with current oral atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jun Soo; Kim, Sung Nyun; Han, Jaewook; Lee, Sang Ick; Chang, Jae Seung; Choi, Jung-Seok; Lee, Heon-Jeong; Cho, Seong Jin; Jun, Tae-Youn; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Han, Changsu; Lee, Kyoung-Uk; Lee, Kyung Kyu; Lee, EunJung

    2015-11-01

    Patient satisfaction with treatment is an important clinical index associated with the efficacy and adherence of treatment in schizophrenia. Although switching from oral antipsychotics to the long-acting injectable formulation may improve convenience, patient satisfaction has not been studied extensively. We carried out a 21-week, multicenter, randomized, open-label comparative study. A total of 154 patients with schizophrenia unsatisfied with current oral atypical antipsychotics were assigned randomly to either immediate or delayed switching to paliperidone palmitate, the long-acting injectable formulation of paliperidone. The Medication Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ) and the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM) were used to evaluate patient satisfaction with treatment, whereas the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the Personal and Social Performance (PSP) scale were used to evaluate efficacy. From baseline to the final assessment, the MSQ score increased significantly in both groups, and the increase was greatest after the first administration of paliperidone palmitate in the immediate switch group. The scores of TSQM effectiveness, convenience, and global satisfaction as well as the PSP total score increased significantly, whereas the PANSS total score decreased significantly in both groups. The immediate switch group showed a significant improvement in the TSQM convenience score compared with the delayed switch group on oral antipsychotics during the comparison period. Most adverse events were minor and tolerable. In short, switching from oral atypical antipsychotics to paliperidone palmitate because of poor satisfaction significantly improved patient satisfaction, with comparable efficacy and tolerability. PMID:26196188

  10. Satisfaction of immediate or delayed switch to paliperidone palmitate in patients unsatisfied with current oral atypical antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Nyun; Han, Jaewook; Lee, Sang Ick; Chang, Jae Seung; Choi, Jung-Seok; Lee, Heon-Jeong; Cho, Seong Jin; Jun, Tae-Youn; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Han, Changsu; Lee, Kyoung-Uk; Lee, Kyung Kyu; Lee, EunJung

    2015-01-01

    Patient satisfaction with treatment is an important clinical index associated with the efficacy and adherence of treatment in schizophrenia. Although switching from oral antipsychotics to the long-acting injectable formulation may improve convenience, patient satisfaction has not been studied extensively. We carried out a 21-week, multicenter, randomized, open-label comparative study. A total of 154 patients with schizophrenia unsatisfied with current oral atypical antipsychotics were assigned randomly to either immediate or delayed switching to paliperidone palmitate, the long-acting injectable formulation of paliperidone. The Medication Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ) and the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM) were used to evaluate patient satisfaction with treatment, whereas the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the Personal and Social Performance (PSP) scale were used to evaluate efficacy. From baseline to the final assessment, the MSQ score increased significantly in both groups, and the increase was greatest after the first administration of paliperidone palmitate in the immediate switch group. The scores of TSQM effectiveness, convenience, and global satisfaction as well as the PSP total score increased significantly, whereas the PANSS total score decreased significantly in both groups. The immediate switch group showed a significant improvement in the TSQM convenience score compared with the delayed switch group on oral antipsychotics during the comparison period. Most adverse events were minor and tolerable. In short, switching from oral atypical antipsychotics to paliperidone palmitate because of poor satisfaction significantly improved patient satisfaction, with comparable efficacy and tolerability. PMID:26196188

  11. Satisfaction Levels and Factors Influencing Satisfaction With Use of a Social App for Neonatal and Pediatric Patient Transfer Information Systems: A Questionnaire Study Among Doctors

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Iee; Kim, Sun Jun; Cho, Soo Chul; Kim, Il Nyeo

    2016-01-01

    Background The treatment of neonatal and pediatric patients is limited to certain medical institutions depending on treatment difficulty. Effective patient transfers are necessary in situations where there are limited medical resources. In South Korea, the government has made a considerable effort to establish patient transfer systems using various means, such as websites, telephone, and so forth. However, in reality, the effort has not yet been effective. Objective In this study, we ran a patient transfer information system using a social app for effective patient transfer. We analyzed the results, satisfaction levels, and the factors influencing satisfaction. Methods Naver Band is a social app and mobile community application which in Korea is more popular than Facebook. It facilitates group communication. Using Naver Band, two systems were created: one by the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and the other by the Department of Pediatrics at Chonbuk National University Children's Hospital, South Korea. The information necessary for patient transfers was provided to participating obstetricians (n=51) and pediatricians (n=90). We conducted a survey to evaluate the systems and reviewed the results retrospectively. Results The number of patients transferred was reported to increase by 65% (26/40) obstetricians and 40% (23/57) pediatricians. The time taken for transfers was reported to decrease by 72% (29/40) obstetricians and 59% (34/57) pediatricians. Satisfaction was indicated by 83% (33/40) obstetricians and 89% (51/57) pediatricians. Regarding factors influencing satisfaction, the obstetricians reported communication with doctors in charge (P=.03) and time reduction during transfers (P=.02), whereas the pediatricians indicated review of the diagnosis and treatment of transferred patients (P=.01) and the time reduction during transfers (P=.007). Conclusions The users were highly satisfied and different users indicated different factors of satisfaction. This finding

  12. Factors Affecting the Job Satisfaction of Latino/a Immigrants in the Midwest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdivia, Corinne; Flores, Lisa Y.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the job satisfaction of 253 Latino/a newcomers in three rural communities in the Midwest. Specifically, the authors explored the effects of ethnic identity, Anglo acculturation, Latino/a acculturation, perceptions of the community (social relations, discrimination/racism, and language pressures), job tenure, work hours, and…

  13. Online Course Delivery: An Empirical Investigation of Factors Affecting Student Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beqiri, Mirjeta S.; Chase, Nancy M.; Bishka, Atena

    2010-01-01

    The authors investigated potential factors impacting students' satisfaction with online course delivery using business students as participants. The findings suggest that the student who would be more satisfied with the delivery of online courses fits the following profile: graduate, married, resides more than 1 mile away from campus, and male.…

  14. How Interactive Video (ITV) Web-Enhanced Format Affects Instructional Strategy and Instructor Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Catrina V.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the quality of technology associated with interactive video (ITV) classes in distance education programs and the resulting satisfaction of the instructors teaching this format. The participants were full time instructors of a rural community college that used the ITV format. Community college ITV instructors are…

  15. Ways by Which Comparable Income Affects Life Satisfaction in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Chau-kiu; Leung, Kwan-kwok

    2008-01-01

    Proponents of social equality attribute low life satisfaction to income inequality in society, an inequality which occurs when most people have relatively low income and only a few have high income. In contrast, range-frequency theory and other social comparison theories predict that when most people have low income, they are satisfied because of…

  16. Patient satisfaction with treatment for alcohol use disorders: comparing patients with and without severe mental health symptoms

    PubMed Central

    McCallum, Stacey L; Andrews, Jane M; Gaughwin, Matthew D; Turnbull, Deborah A; Mikocka-Walus, Antonina A

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies suggest patients with co-occurring alcohol use disorders (AUDs) and severe mental health symptoms (SMHS) are less satisfied with standard AUD treatment when compared to patients with an AUD alone. This study compared patient satisfaction with standard AUD treatment among patients with and without SMHS and explored how standard treatment might be improved to better address the needs of these patients. Methods Eighty-nine patients receiving treatment for an AUD either at an inpatient hospital, outpatient clinic, inpatient detoxification, or residential/therapeutic community services were surveyed. Patient satisfaction with treatment was assessed using the Treatment Perception Questionnaire (range: 0–40). Patients were stratified according to their score on the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale. Forty patients scored in the extremely severe range of depression (score >14) and/or anxiety (score >10) (indicating SMHS) and 49 patients did not. An inductive content analysis was also conducted on qualitative data relating to areas of service improvement. Results Patients with SMHS were found to be equally satisfied with treatment (mean =25.10, standard deviation =8.12) as patients with an AUD alone (mean =25.43, standard deviation =6.91). Analysis revealed that being an inpatient in hospital was associated with reduced treatment satisfaction. Patients with SMHS were found to be significantly less satisfied with staffs’ understanding of the type of help they wanted in treatment, when compared to patients with AUDs alone. Five areas for service improvement were identified, including staff qualities, informed care, treatment access and continuity, issues relating to inpatient stay, and addressing patients’ mental health needs. Conclusion While findings suggest that AUD treatment services adequately meet the needs of patients with SMHS in treatment, patients with SMHS do feel that staff lack understanding of their treatment needs. Findings have

  17. Determinants of Patient Satisfaction in Internal Medicine Resident Continuity Clinics: Findings of the Educational Innovations Project Ambulatory Collaborative

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Maureen D.; Warm, Eric; Julian, Katherine A.; Rosenblum, Michael; Thomas, Kris; Drake, Sean; Gwisdalla, Keri Lyn; Langan, Michael; Nabors, Christopher; Pereira, Anne; Smith, Amy; Sweet, David; Varney, Andrew; Francis, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Many internal medicine programs have reorganized their resident continuity clinics to improve the ambulatory care experience for residents. The effect of this redesign on patient satisfaction is largely unknown. Methods Our multi-institutional, cross-sectional study included 569 internal medicine residents from 11 programs participating in the Educational Innovations Project Ambulatory Collaborative. An 11-item patient satisfaction survey from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems was used to assess patient satisfaction, comparing patient satisfaction in traditional models of weekly continuity clinic with 2 new clinic models. We then examined the relationship between patient satisfaction and other practice variables. Results Patient satisfaction responses related to resident listening and communication skills, knowledge of medical history, perception of adequate visit time, overall rating, and willingness to refer to family and friends were significantly better in the traditional and block continuity models than the combination model. Higher ambulatory workload was associated with reduced patient perception of respect shown by the physician. The percentage of diabetic patients with glycated hemoglobin < 8% was positively correlated with number of visits, knowledge of medical history, perception of respect, and higher scores for recommending the physician to others. The percentage of diabetic patients with low density lipoprotein < 100 mg/dL was positively correlated with the physician showing respect. Conclusions Patient satisfaction was similar in programs using block design and traditional models for continuity clinic, and both outperformed the combination model programs. There was a delicate balance between workload and patient perception of the physician showing respect. Care outcome measures for diabetic patients were associated with aspects of patient satisfaction. PMID:26279771

  18. Decomposing the gap in satisfaction with provider communication between English- and Spanish-speaking Hispanic patients.

    PubMed

    Villani, Jennifer; Mortensen, Karoline

    2014-04-01

    Disparities in patient-provider communication exist among racial/ethnic groups. Hispanics report the lowest satisfaction with provider communication compared to whites and blacks; these differences may be due to level of acculturation or patient-provider concordance according to their ability to speak English. Using data from the 2007-2009 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, this study identifies and quantifies the components that constitute the gap in satisfaction with provider communication between English- and Spanish-speaking Hispanics. English-speaking Hispanics are 7.3 percentage points more likely to be satisfied with the amount of time their providers spent with them compared to Spanish-speaking Hispanics. Differences in acculturation between the two groups account for 77% of this gap. Satisfaction with provider listening is 6.8 percentage points higher for English-speaking Hispanics. Hispanics who speak English are more satisfied with provider communication. The gap in satisfaction is largely attributable to differences in health insurance, acculturation, and education. PMID:23073732

  19. [Psychosocial Situation and Patient Satisfaction among Clients of Cancer Counselling Centers in Saxony].

    PubMed

    Götze, Heide; Röder, Heiko; Frenschkowski, Sandra; Mehnert, Anja

    2016-07-01

    Outpatient psychosocial counselling (OPC) centers for those affected by cancer fulfill 2 main purposes: (a) to offer low-threshold psychological, social and legal counselling, and (b) to refer clients to other services. Here we report findings from a user-based assessment of OPC in the state of Saxony, Germany. This study was funded in part by the Saxon State Ministry of Social Affairs and Consumer Protection. We used a paper-based questionnaire to survey 213 clients of OPC in Saxony at 2 points (t1: up to one week after first contact, t2: 4 months after t1). All participants were cancer patients. The survey assessed utilization of services, depressive symptoms (PHQ-9), anxiety (GAD-7), quality of life (SF-8) as well as clients' satisfaction with the counselling service (ZUF-8). The majority of clients (81%) were referred to the OPC from a hospital or rehabilitation center. 46% of patients only had one contact. 78% of counselling sessions treated matters of social law. Patients suffered from 13 problems on average, the most common being fatigue and exhaustion, worries, anxiety, uncertainty about the future, and pain. Half the patients (49%) reported moderate to severe anxiety and 68% showed elevated levels of depressive symptoms. Psychosocial distress did not change significantly over time (GAD-7: p=0.580, PHQ-9: p=0.101). Patients' quality of life was low overall (cut-off<50). At t2, quality of life had particularly increased in physical aspects, but overall quality of life remained lower than in the general population (all subscales: p<0.05). We identified younger age and lower income as risk factors for higher psychosocial distress and lower quality of life. Patients were very satisfied with the counselling they received, 9% reported to be dissatisfied. Our results show that psychosocial distress remains high over a longer period of time at least for some patients. This illustrates the persisting need for long-term support regarding physical, mental and social

  20. Shared medical appointments: improving access, outcomes, and satisfaction for patients with chronic cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Kelly Bauer; Haney, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Improving access to care, health outcomes, and patient satisfaction are primary objectives for healthcare practices. This article outlines benefits, concerns, and possible challenges of shared medical appointments (SMAs) for patients and providers. The SMA model was designed to support providers' demanding schedules by allowing patients with the same chronic condition to be seen in a group setting. By concentrating on patient education and disease management, interactive meetings provide an opportunity for patients to share both successes and struggles with others experiencing similar challenges. Studies demonstrated that SMAs improved patient access, enhanced outcomes, and promoted patient satisfaction. This article describes the potential benefits of SMAs for patients with chronic heart disease, which consumes a large number of healthcare dollars related to hospital admissions, acute exacerbations, and symptom management. Education for self-management of chronic disease can become repetitive and time consuming. The SMA model introduces a fresh and unique style of healthcare visits, allowing providers to devote more time and attention to patients and improve productivity. The SMA model provides an outstanding method for nurse practitioners to demonstrate their role as a primary care provider, by leading patients in group discussions and evaluating their current health status. Patient selection, preparation, and facilitation of an SMA are discussed to demonstrate the complementary nature of an SMA approach in a healthcare practice. PMID:20134280

  1. The Impact of Self-Rated Health Status on Patient Satisfaction Integration Process.

    PubMed

    Otani, Koichiro; Shen, Ye; Chumbler, Neale R; Judy, Zachary; Herrmann, Patrick A; Kurz, Richard S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how patients' self-rated health status (SRHS) is associated with their attribute reaction integration process and, in turn, their overall ratings of hospitals. We collected patient satisfaction data from 70 hospitals by means of a patient satisfaction questionnaire. The sample included patients who were 18 years or older and discharged from the hospital from July 1, 2011, through June 30, 2012. Data for 36,528 patients were available for analysis. We conducted multiple linear regression analysis with patients' SRHS and interaction effects with nursing care, physician care, staff care, and room, while controlling for age, gender, race, and education. Study findings showed an association between SRHS levels and the patient's overall rating of the hospital; they also revealed interaction effects with nursing care, physician care, and staff care variables in the model. The statistically significant interaction effects indicate that for patients whose SRHS was less than excellent, physician care became more important and nursing care and staff care became less important compared with patients whose SRHS was excellent. When we consider the nature of medical care, this transition seems reasonable. We also found that it is reasonable to categorize patients into two groups: those whose SRHS is excellent and those whose SRHS is less than excellent (i.e., very good, good, fair, or poor). As the study findings show, these two groups of patients combined their attribute reactions differently. PMID:26554265

  2. Assessment of the Correlation between Appointment Scheduling and Patient Satisfaction in a Pediatric Dental Setup

    PubMed Central

    Katre, Amar N.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The practice of modern pediatric dentistry requires delivery of quality care in combination with adherence to excellent business as well as time management principles. A definite appointment schedule should be presented to the parents on the first or second appointment. More importantly, the prescribed schedule should be followed to the best of the professional abilities of the pediatric dentist. Aims. The aim of the study was to assess the co-relation between appointment scheduling and patient satisfaction in a pediatric dental setup with the objective of understanding the parameters related to appointment scheduling to increase patient satisfaction. Method. A total of 40 patients, who visited the Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, YMT Dental College & Hospital, for dental treatment were selected on a random basis. A questionnaire with a set of 6 questions with a rating scale of 1–5 to assess the patient satisfaction related to appointment scheduling was prepared. Results. A significant number of the patients were happy with the existing appointment scheduling system barring a few exceptions. PMID:25610464

  3. Development, validation, and administration of a treatment-satisfaction questionnaire for caregivers of dependent type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    García-Aparicio, Judit; Herrero-Herrero, José-Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Background Satisfaction with treatment is considered a relevant factor for assessing results in clinical practice. However, when assessing satisfaction in dependent patients, the opinion of their caregivers becomes crucial, since implicit in satisfaction is the degree of caregiver involvement, of adherence to treatment, and lastly of better care of these patients. Purpose The purpose of this study was to develop, validate, and administer two versions of a specific questionnaire to assess satisfaction with blood glucose-lowering treatment in caregivers of dependent type 2 diabetic patients. Patients and methods This was an observational, descriptive, epidemiological study conducted in the Los Montalvos Internal Medicine Department at the University Hospital of Salamanca (Spain). Two versions of the questionnaire to assess caregivers’ satisfaction with current treatment and after introducing changes in therapy were created and validated according to model procedures. Once validated, the questionnaires were implemented in 219 cases. Results Cronbach’s α-coefficient, correlation between all the items, intraclass correlation coefficient, and correlation between the obtained scores and satisfaction with blood glucose levels all satisfied the standard for validation. Significant levels of correlation were observed between the degree of satisfaction and the number of daily administrations of the blood glucose-lowering medication (Spearman’s r=−0.21, P<0.05). Caregivers of patients receiving more frequent administration of their antidiabetic medication prior to the change were more satisfied with the change (r=0.24, P<0.001). Similarly, significant correlation was found between the number of daily administrations for blood glucose-lowering medication after the change and the degree of satisfaction (r=−0.43, P<0.001). Conclusion A useful novel instrument to assess caregivers’ satisfaction was validated. When applied to our cohort of cases, the obtained data

  4. [Hospital at home: assessment of early discharge in terms of patients mortality and satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Damiani, G; Pinnarelli, L; Ricciardi, G

    2006-01-01

    New organizational models are essentials for European Hospitals because of restraining budget and ageing of population. Hospital at home is an alternative to inpatient care, effective both in clinical and economic ground. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of Hospital at Home in terms of decreased mortality and patient satisfaction. We carried out a meta-analysis of the literature about hospital at home interventions. We searched Medline (to December 2002), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (to October 2002) and other bibliographical databases, with a supplementary handsearching of literature. We used the following keywords: hospital at home, home hospitalization, mortality, patient satisfaction, cost, acute hospital care, conventional hospitalization. We included studies respecting the following criteria: analytical or experimental studies aimed at compare early discharge to hospital at home and continued care in an acute hospital. Review Manager 4.2 software was used to collect data and perform statistical analysis. We found 2420 articles searching for the chosen keywords. Twelve studies (2048 patients) were included for death outcome and six studies (1382 patients) were included for satisfaction outcome. The selected studies indicated a greater effect size of patient satisfaction in home patients than hospitalized ones (Odds Ratio: 1.58 95% CI: 1.25, 2.00) and showed no difference in terms of mortality (Risk Difference: -0.01 95% CI: -0.03, 0.02). Our results underline the effectiveness of this organizational model, as an alternative to continued care in an acute hospital. Further useful considerations could be drawn by economic evaluation studies carried out on field. PMID:16649506

  5. Closure of oroantral communications with Bichat´s buccal fat pad. Level of patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-González, Rocío; Peñarrocha-Diago, María; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Aloy-Prósper, Amparo; Camacho-Alonso, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report the closure of oroantral communications with the pedicled buccal fat pad in a series of patients, and to determine the level of patient satisfaction after the surgery. Study Design: A prospective study of patients diagnosed of unilateral or bilateral oroantral communication (OAC) closed using the buccal fat pad between May 2012 and January 2013 was performed. Data analysis extended to: age, sex, and cause, location and size of oroantral communication. Complications and success related to buccal fat pad surgery were evaluated. Also, patient satisfaction was assessed after six months of surgery. Results: Nine patients (3 men and 6 women) with a mean age of 50.5 years and 11 OAC treated with buccal fat pads were included. The most common cause of oroantral communication was the extraction of molars. The average widest diameter of the oroantral communication was 7.1 mm. One week after the surgeries no complications were found. One month after surgery, one patient presented persistence of the oroantral communication; in this patient, the buccal fat pad technique was considered a failure, and a second intervention was performed using a buccal mucoperiosteal flap to achieve primary closure of soft tissues. After six months, patient showed closure of the communication and complete healing. All the other communications had been solved with Bichat´s ball technique, yielding a success rate of 90.9%. Mean patient overall satisfaction was 9.1 out of 10; patients were satisfied with phonetics (9.4), aesthetics (9) and chewing (9). Conclusions: The buccal fat pad technique was successful in closing 10 out of 11 oroantral communications and few complications were found. Patients were highly satisfied in overall with the treatment and with phonetics, aesthetics and chewing. Key words:Bichat’s fat pad, buccal fat pad, oroantral communication. PMID:25810838

  6. The Use of an Informational Video to Improve Patient Satisfaction, Preparedness, Mood, and Empowerment

    PubMed Central

    Baskwill, Amanda; Sumpton, Bryn

    2015-01-01

    Background Massage therapy is commonly used in Canada for the treatment of a wide range of health concerns. Massage therapy is changing to meet the health care needs of Canadians. Rapid changes to the profession may create a gap between patient expectations of massage therapy treatment based on historic views of the profession and their experience in today’s practice. This gap could lead to patient confusion, dissatisfaction, or other negative outcomes. Purpose This study sought to understand whether patient satisfaction, preparedness, mood, and patient empowerment are improved when new patients who attend a student massage therapy clinic watch an informational video, compared to those who receive the standard paper information sheet. Participants The study used a convenience sample of new patients who presented for their first massage therapy appointment to the Humber College Student Massage Therapy Clinic. Participants were randomized either to the intervention group (video and paper information) or the comparison group (paper information only). The outcomes of interest in this study were patient preparedness, satisfaction, mood, and empowerment. Data were collected using two questionnaires, one before treatment and one after. Results A total of 108 patients participated in the study (55 comparison group; 53 intervention group). Demographic and clinical characteristics were comparable between the two groups. A statistically significant difference was seen between the two groups when comparing their responses to the pre-appointment statement: “I know what will happen in my initial massage therapy appointment” (p < .001). There was no statistically significant difference seen when comparing the responses of the related post-appointment statement (p = .63). Conclusion This study found that an informational video improved perceived knowledge as patients entered the massage therapy treatment, but did not have a significant effect on satisfaction, mood, or

  7. The Evaluation of Nursing Care Satisfaction and Patient Learning Needs in day Case Surgery.

    PubMed

    Goktas, Sonay B; Yildiz, Tülin; Nargiz, Sibel Kosucu

    2015-12-01

    Patients in surgical service units have higher expectations for treatment and care. The aims of this study were to determine nursing care satisfaction and information requirements at the time of discharge of patients from a day surgery unit and to assess the effects of demographics. The study was conducted on 291 patients undergoing day case surgery. Patient perception scale for nursing care (PPSN) and the patient learning needs scale (PLNS) were used and total and sub-dimension points averages were calculated and then compared with demographic data using the Kruskal-Wallis test. The results were evaluated at the p < 0.05 significance level with 95 % confidence intervals. Of the patients, 58.8 % (n = 171) were females and the average age was 49.5 ± 15.3 years. PPSN and PLNS total point averages were 68.16 ± 10.17 and 178.53 ± 27.59, respectively. A significant difference was determined in PPSN total point average with regard to previous hospitalisations; the PPSN total point average was higher for patients with prior hospitalisations (p < 0.001). Significant differences were determined between PLNS total point average and age group, marital status, receiving discharge training, and education level (p = 0.008, 0.006, <0.001, and 0.015, respectively). Differences were found in the PLNS sub-dimension point averages between groups, especially with regard to age group and educational level. We showed that patient satisfaction and patient information requirements could change according to demographic features of the patients at a day case surgery unit. In this respect, healthcare providers should offer healthcare services by evaluating the personal characteristics of patients because this is important for their satisfaction. PMID:27011531

  8. A cross-sectional study to assess inhalation device handling and patient satisfaction in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Miravitlles, Marc; Montero-Caballero, Jéssica; Richard, Frank; Santos, Salud; Garcia-Rivero, Juan Luis; Ortega, Francisco; Ribera, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of inhaled medications via an inhaler device underpins the effectiveness of treatment for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Correct inhaler technique among patients is also a predictor of achieving treatment compliance and adherence. Reporting of patient satisfaction with inhalers is therefore gaining increasing attention and is now recognized as an important patient-reported outcome in clinical trials involving patients with COPD or asthma. In this cross-sectional study, we use the validated Patient Satisfaction and Preference Questionnaire (PASAPQ) to assess the handling and satisfaction for Respimat® Soft Mist™ Inhaler (SMI) compared with the Breezhaler® dry powder inhaler (DPI) among patients with COPD in Spain. Patients were already assigned to therapy with either SPIRIVA® (tiotropium) Respimat® or with Hirobriz®/Onbrez®/Oslif® (indacaterol) Breezhaler® for at least 3 but not more than 6 months before completing the PASAPQ at a single visit to the study site. The primary endpoint of the trial was the mean total PASAPQ score. Secondary endpoints were the performance score domain of the PASAPQ, the convenience score domain of the PASAPQ, and the overall satisfaction score of the PASAPQ. For the primary endpoint, the mean PASAPQ total score in the Respimat® and Breezhaler® groups was 80.7 and 79.9, respectively (difference of 0.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] −2.9 to 4.5; P=0.67). The mean total performance scores were 82.5 and 78.2 (difference of 4.3, 95% CI −0.3 to 8.9; P=0.06), and the mean total convenience scores were 78.6 and 81.9 (difference of −3.3, 95% CI −7.0 to 0.4; P=0.08) for the Respimat® and Breezhaler® groups, respectively. Patients gave the Respimat® SMI and the Breezhaler® DPI overall satisfaction PASAPQ scores of 6.0 and 5.9, respectively, which shows that patients were satisfied with these inhalers. PMID:27013871

  9. [Evaluation of patients' satisfaction after breast reconstruction with latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap and immediate permanent breast implant].

    PubMed

    Bognár, Gábor; Gőgh, Bettina; Novák, András; István, Gábor

    2014-04-01

    Current surgical treatment modalities for breast reconstruction include latissimus dorsi mycotaneous flap with immediate permanent breast implant (LDI). The aim of the present study was to analyze reconstruction with LDI in terms of quality of life, cosmesis and patient satisfaction. A chart analysis was carried out with the first ten patients who underwent breast reconstruction with LDI. The patients were interviewed and self-assessment quality of life was administered. They also underwent assessment of satisfaction and cosmesis. The high satisfaction and cosmesis scores in the breast reconstruction group indicate the superior results that can be achieved with breast reconstruction. PMID:24747404

  10. The Impact of Different Surgical Modalities for Hysterectomy on Satisfaction and Patient Reported Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is an ongoing debate regarding the cost-benefit of different surgical modalities for hysterectomy. Studies have relied primarily on evaluation of clinical outcomes and medical expenses. Thus, a paucity of information on patient-reported outcomes including satisfaction, recovery, and recommendations exists. Objective The objective of this study was to identify differences in patient satisfaction and recommendations by approach to a hysterectomy. Methods We recruited a large, geographically diverse group of women who were members of an online hysterectomy support community. US women who had undergone a benign hysterectomy formed this retrospective study cohort. Self-reported characteristics and experiences were compared by surgical modality using chi-square tests. Outcomes over time were assessed with the Jonkheere-Terpstra trend test. Logistic regression identified independent predictors of patient satisfaction and recommendations. Results There were 6262 women who met the study criteria; 41.74% (2614/6262) underwent an abdominal hysterectomy, 10.64% (666/6262) were vaginal, 27.42% (1717/6262) laparoscopic, 18.94% (1186/6262) robotic, and 1.26% (79/6262) single-incision laparoscopic. Most women were at least college educated (56.37%, 3530/6262), and identified as white, non-Hispanic (83.17%, 5208/6262). Abdominal hysterectomy rates decreased from 68.2% (152/223) to 24.4% (75/307), and minimally invasive surgeries increased from 31.8% (71/223) to 75.6% (232/307) between 2001 or prior years and 2013 (P<.001 all trends). Trends in overall patient satisfaction and recommendations showed significant improvement over time (P<.001).There were differences across the surgical modalities in all patient-reported experiences (ie, satisfaction, time to walking, driving and working, and whether patients would recommend or use the same technique again; P<.001). Significantly better outcomes were evident among women who had vaginal, laparoscopic, and robotic

  11. Switch from intravenous to subcutaneous immunoglobulin in CIDP and MMN: improved tolerability and patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Marreno, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) or multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) who were switched from intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) to subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG). Methods: Eight consecutive patients, four with MMN and four with CIDP, already on long-term, hospital-based IVIG were switched to home-based SCIG. These patients were selected on the basis of their requirement for relatively low treatment doses, problems experienced with IVIG, and their willingness to switch to SCIG. Results: After a mean 33 [standard deviation (SD) 19] months receiving SCIG, 7 patients remained neurologically stable and 6 remained on a similar mean weekly immunoglobulin dose relative to their original intravenous dose. A good outcome was reported by 7 of the 8 patients: there were improvements in nausea and headache (n = 4), need to travel to hospital (n = 4), venous access problems (n = 3), immunoglobulin-induced neutropenia (n = 3), treatment wearing-off fluctuations (n = 2), IVIG-induced allergy requiring antihistamine/hydrocortisone (n = 1) and time taken off work (n = 1). The eighth patient required increasing doses of immunoglobulin to maintain strength but still wanted to continue SCIG. Seven patients completed a questionnaire: there was a very high overall satisfaction level with immunoglobulin treatment [mean 96 (SD 5), visual analogue scale (VAS) where 0 = very unsatisfied, 100 = very satisfied]; and very strong preference for subcutaneous over intravenous immunoglobulin (VAS mean 93 [SD 12] where 0 = prefer IVIG, 100 = prefer SCIG). Conclusions: In seven of the eight patients, SCIG gave improved tolerability and patient satisfaction with similar efficacy compared with IVIG. PMID:25584070

  12. The nursing rounds system: effect of patient's call light use, bed sores, fall and satisfaction level.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Bassem S; Nusair, Hussam; Al Zubadi, Nariman; Al Shloul, Shams; Saleh, Usama

    2011-06-01

    The nursing round system (NRS) means checking patients on an hourly basis during the A (0700-2200 h) shift and once every 2 h during the B (2200-0700 h) by the assigned nursing staff. The overall goal of this prospective study is to implement an NRS in a major rehabilitation centre-Sultan Bin Abdulaziz Humanitarian City-in the Riyadh area of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The purposes of this study are to measure the effect of the NRS on: (i) the use of patient call light; (ii) the number of incidences of patients' fall; (iii) the number of incidences of hospital-acquired bed sores; and (iv) the level of patients' satisfaction. All patients hospitalized in the male stroke unit will be involved in this study. For the period of 8 weeks (17 December 2009-17 February 2010) All Nursing staff on the unit will record each call light and the patient's need. Implementation of the NRS would start on 18 February 2010 and last for 8 weeks, until 18 April 2010. Data collected throughout this period will be compared with data collected during the 8 weeks period immediately preceding the implementation of the NRS (17 December 2009-17 February 2010) in order to measure the impact of the call light use. The following information were collected on all subjects involved in the study: (i) the Demographic Information Form; (ii) authors' developed NRS Audit Form; (iii) Patient Call Light Audit Form; (iv) Patient Fall Audit Record; (v) Hospital-Acquired Bed Sores Audit Form; and (vi) hospital developed Patient Satisfaction Records. The findings suggested that a significant reduction on the use of call bell (P < 0.001), a significant reduction of fall incidence (P < 0.01) while pressure ulcer reduced by 50% before and after the implementation of NRS. Also, the implementation of NRS increased patient satisfaction by 7/5 (P < 0.05). PMID:21605271

  13. Patient satisfaction questionnaire and quality achievement in hospital care: the case of a Greek public university hospital.

    PubMed

    Matis, Georgios K; Birbilis, Theodossios A; Chrysou, Olga I

    2009-11-01

    The scope of this research has been to investigate the satisfaction of Greek patients hospitalized in a tertiary care university public hospital in Alexandroupolis, Greece, in order to improve medical, nursing and organizational/administrative services. It is a cross-sectional study involving 200 patients hospitalized for at least 24 h. We administered a satisfaction questionnaire previously approved by the Greek Health Ministry. Four aspects of satisfaction were employed (medical, hotel facilities/organizational, nursing, global). Using principal component analysis, summated scales were formed and tested for internal consistency with the aid of Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The non-parametric Spearman rank correlation coefficient was also used. The results reveal a relatively high degree of global satisfaction (75.125%), yet satisfaction is higher for the medical (89.721%) and nursing (86.432%) services. Moreover, satisfaction derived from the hotel facilities and the general organization was found to be more limited (76.536%). Statistically significant differences in participant satisfaction were observed (depending on age, gender, citizenship, education, number of previous admissions and self-assessment of health status at the first and last day of patients' stay) for the medical, nursing and hotel facilities/organizational dimension, but not for global satisfaction. The present study confirms the results of previously published Greek surveys. PMID:19875841

  14. Instruments to assess patient satisfaction after teleconsultation and triage: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Allemann Iseli, Martina; Kunz, Regina; Blozik, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is crucial for the acceptance, use, and adherence to recommendations from teleconsultations regarding health care requests and triage services. Objectives Our objectives are to systematically review the literature for multidimensional instruments that measure patient satisfaction after teleconsultation and triage and to compare these for content, reliability, validity, and factor analysis. Methods We searched Medline, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and PsycINFO for literature on these instruments. Two reviewers independently screened all obtained references for eligibility and extracted data from the eligible articles. The results were presented using summary tables. Results We included 31 publications, describing 16 instruments in our review. The reporting on test development and psychometric characteristics was incomplete. The development process, described by ten of 16 instruments, included a review of the literature (n=7), patient or stakeholder interviews (n=5), and expert consultations (n=3). Four instruments evaluated factor structure, reliability, and validity; two of those four demonstrated low levels of reliability for some of their subscales. Conclusion A majority of instruments on patient satisfaction after teleconsultation showed methodological limitations and lack rigorous evaluation. Users should carefully reflect on the content of the questionnaires and their relevance to the application. Future research should apply more rigorously established scientific standards for instrument development and psychometric evaluation. PMID:25028538

  15. Patient satisfaction and penile morphology changes with postoperative penile rehabilitation 2 years after Coloplast Titan prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Michael B; Carrion, Rafael; Wang, Run; Henry, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    A common complaint after inflatable penile prosthesis surgery is reduced penile length. We previously reported how using the Coloplast Titan inflatable penile prosthesis with aggressive new length measurement technique (NLMT) coupled with postoperative IPP rehabilitation of the implant for 1-year helped to improve patient satisfaction and erectile penile measurements. This is a 2 years follow-up of a prospective, three-center, study of 40 patients who underwent Titan prosthesis placement, with new length measurement technique for erectile dysfunction. Patient instructions were to inflate daily for 6 months and then inflate maximally for 1-2 h daily for 6-24 months. Fifteen penile measurements were taken before and immediately after surgery and at follow-up visits. Measurement changes were improved at 24 months as compared to immediately postoperative and at 12 months. 67.8% of subjects were satisfied with their length at 2 years, and 77% had perceived penile length that was longer (30.8%) or the same (46.2%) as prior to the surgery. 64.3% and 17.9% of subjects had increased and unchanged satisfaction, respectively, with penile length as compared to prior to penile implant surgery. All but one subject (96.5%) was satisfied with the overall function of his implant. This study suggests using the Coloplast Titan with aggressive cylinder sizing, and a postoperative penile rehabilitation inflation protocol can optimize patient satisfaction and erectile penile measurements at 2 years postimplant. PMID:26459782

  16. Caring for inpatient boarders in the emergency department: improving safety and patient and staff satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Bornemann-Shepherd, Melanie; Le-Lazar, Jamie; Makic, Mary Beth Flynn; DeVine, Deborah; McDevitt, Kelly; Paul, Marcee

    2015-01-01

    Hospital capacity constraints lead to large numbers of inpatients being held for extended periods in the emergency department. This creates concerns with safety, quality of care, and dissatisfaction of patients and staff. The aim of this quality-improvement project was to improve satisfaction and processes in which nurses provided care to inpatient boarders held in the emergency department. A quality-improvement project framework that included the use of a questionnaire was used to ascertain employee and patient dissatisfaction and identify opportunities for improvement. A task force was created to develop action plans related to holding and caring for inpatients in the emergency department. A questionnaire was sent to nursing staff in spring 2012, and responses from the questionnaire identified improvements that could be implemented to improve care for inpatient boarders. Situation-background-assessment-recommendation (SBAR) communications and direct observations were also used to identify specific improvements. Post-questionnaire results indicated improved satisfaction for both staff and patients. It was recognized early that the ED inpatient area would benefit from the supervision of an inpatient director, managers, and staff. Outcomes showed that creating an inpatient unit within the emergency department had a positive effect on staff and patient satisfaction. PMID:24985747

  17. Patient satisfaction analysis on service quality of dental health care based on empathy and responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Dewi, Fellani Danasra; Sudjana, Grita; Oesman, Yevis Marty

    2011-01-01

    Background: Transformation of health care is underway from sellers’ market to consumers’ market, where the satisfaction of the patients’ need is a primary concern while defining the service quality. Hence, commitment to provide a high-quality service and achieving patients’ satisfaction becomes an important issue for dental health care provider. The aim of this research is to investigate the quality of dental health care service based on empathy and responsiveness aspects. Methods: A total of 90 questionnaires were completed by the dental patients who came to dental polyclinic located in Government Hospital, West Java, Indonesia. The questionnaire was concerned on two dimensions of service quality model, i.e. empathy and responsiveness. The obtained data were analyzed using inferential statistics (t test) and also descriptive statistics with importance–performance analysis. Results: All the attributes tested by t test showed that perception and expectation differed significantly, except for responsiveness, i.e. ability of dental assistants in assisting the dentist (t test 0.505patient satisfaction is the response given by administration staff related to long waiting time (t test 5.377), followed by dental assistant's knowledge about the patient's need during treatment (t test 4.822) and explanation that was given by dentist (t test 4.700). Conclusion: It can be inferred from IPA that priority should be given to dentist's communication and dental assistant's knowledge toward patient's needs to enhance the service quality. PMID:22135687

  18. Patient satisfaction and penile morphology changes with postoperative penile rehabilitation 2 years after Coloplast Titan prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, Michael B; Carrion, Rafael; Wang, Run; Henry, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    A common complaint after inflatable penile prosthesis surgery is reduced penile length. We previously reported how using the Coloplast Titan inflatable penile prosthesis with aggressive new length measurement technique (NLMT) coupled with postoperative IPP rehabilitation of the implant for 1-year helped to improve patient satisfaction and erectile penile measurements. This is a 2 years follow-up of a prospective, three-center, study of 40 patients who underwent Titan prosthesis placement, with new length measurement technique for erectile dysfunction. Patient instructions were to inflate daily for 6 months and then inflate maximally for 1–2 h daily for 6–24 months. Fifteen penile measurements were taken before and immediately after surgery and at follow-up visits. Measurement changes were improved at 24 months as compared to immediately postoperative and at 12 months. 67.8% of subjects were satisfied with their length at 2 years, and 77% had perceived penile length that was longer (30.8%) or the same (46.2%) as prior to the surgery. 64.3% and 17.9% of subjects had increased and unchanged satisfaction, respectively, with penile length as compared to prior to penile implant surgery. All but one subject (96.5%) was satisfied with the overall function of his implant. This study suggests using the Coloplast Titan with aggressive cylinder sizing, and a postoperative penile rehabilitation inflation protocol can optimize patient satisfaction and erectile penile measurements at 2 years postimplant. PMID:26459782

  19. Factors affecting the job satisfaction levels and quit intentions of academic nurses.

    PubMed

    Altuntaş, Serap

    2014-04-01

    The descriptively designed study was conducted in order to determine academic nurses' job satisfaction levels, intention of leaving job and effective reasons. The study was implemented in 10 nursing schools offering postgraduate and doctoral education in Turkey, and data was collected from academics working in these schools who agreed to participate in the study. After obtaining the required approval from the ethics committees and institutional permissions, data was collected from 248 academic nurses using a personal information form and a "Job Satisfaction Scale" between June 2009 and January 2010. The data was analyzed by frequency and percentage distribution, using Cronbach's Alpha coefficient, ANOVA, Qui-Square and Tukey's HSD test for advanced analysis methods with SPSS 11.5 statistics packet software. This study concludes that academic nurses are moderately satisfied with their jobs. In addition, job satisfaction was found to be lower among research assistants, assistant professors, nurses with less than 10 years of academic experience, nurses who have completed their doctorate dissertations, or who are working on appointment or contract basis. PMID:23870689

  20. Comparison of satisfactions from mastectomy and Lump Ectome in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Tazhibi, Mehdi; Sarrafzadeh, Sheida; Mokarian, Fariborz; Babazade, Shady; Tabatabaeian, Maryam; Rezaei, Parisa; Faghihi, Mehri; Taleghani, Fariba

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The prevalence of breast cancer among women in compare to other types of cancers in all over the world and in Iran is high. Mastectomy surgery is one of the common treatments for these patients. Another method, which is less invasive, is Lumpectomy. This study comprised the satisfaction of patients under two types of surgery; Mastectomy and Lumpectomy. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, two types of patients which had either, Mastectomy or Lumpectomy, were studied. Results: From 119 patients which studied here, 80 patients (66.7%) were treated by mastectomy and 39 patients (32.5%) were treated under lumpectomy. Two groups had not significant differences in duration between diagnostic and surgery, the number of lymph nodes involved and the number of lymph nodes removed. Lumpectomy patients had higher pain and numbness in 24 h, 1 week after surgery and at the time of study than the other group. The observed difference was significant (P = 0.043). Discussion: It is implied in previous studies that patients under lumpectomy had more satisfaction than patients under mastectomy. However, no differences were observed in quality-of-life between the two groups in some other studies. The differences between various studies might be for the sake of cultural variety and time interval between surgery and filling questionnaire. PMID:24741662

  1. Gender differences in satisfaction with life in patients with coronary heart disease: physical activity as a possible mediating factor.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Lisa A; Riley, Dana L; Blanchard, Chris M; Reid, Robert D; Pipe, Andrew L; Morrin, Louise I; Beaton, Louise J; Papadakis, Sophia; Slovinec D'Angelo, Monika E

    2011-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine if time varying, mediating effect of physical activity plays an important role in the gender-satisfaction with life relationship. Six hundred four male and 197 female patients were included. Principal outcomes of interest were self-report satisfaction with life and physical activity at baseline, 6, 12 and 24 months. The Krull and MacKinnon procedure for hierarchical linear modeling showed that the change in physical activity mediated the gender-satisfaction with life over a 2 year period. Results from the current study suggest that increased physical activity partially explains why males report having increased well-being than females after hospitalization. This suggests that future interventions need to focus on reducing the gender disparity in physical activity to improve differences noted in satisfaction with life. If higher physical activity levels impact satisfaction with life positively, the importance of physical activity for female patients is warranted. PMID:20957422

  2. Long term recurrence, pain and patient satisfaction after ventral hernia mesh repair

    PubMed Central

    Langbach, Odd; Bukholm, Ida; Benth, Jūratė Šaltytė; Røkke, Ola

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare long term outcomes of laparoscopic and open ventral hernia mesh repair with respect to recurrence, pain and satisfaction. METHODS: We conducted a single-centre follow-up study of 194 consecutive patients after laparoscopic and open ventral hernia mesh repair between March 2000 and June 2010. Of these, 27 patients (13.9%) died and 12 (6.2%) failed to attend their follow-up appointment. One hundred and fifty-three (78.9%) patients attended for follow-up and two patients (1.0%) were interviewed by telephone. Of those who attended the follow-up appointment, 82 (52.9%) patients had received laparoscopic ventral hernia mesh repair (LVHR) while 73 (47.1%) patients had undergone open ventral hernia mesh repair (OVHR), including 11 conversions. The follow-up study included analyses of medical records, clinical interviews, examination of hernia recurrence and assessment of pain using a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) ruler anchored by word descriptors. Overall patient satisfaction was also determined. Patients with signs of recurrence were examined by magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography scan. RESULTS: Median time from hernia mesh repair to follow-up was 48 and 52 mo after LVHR and OVHR respectively. Overall recurrence rates were 17.1% after LVHR and 23.3% after OVHR. Recurrence after LVHR was associated with higher body mass index. Smoking was associated with recurrence after OVHR. Chronic pain (VAS > 30 mm) was reported by 23.5% in the laparoscopic cohort and by 27.8% in the open surgery cohort. Recurrence and late complications were predictors of chronic pain after LVHR. Smoking was associated with chronic pain after OVHR. Sixty point five percent were satisfied with the outcome after LVHR and 49.3% after OVHR. Predictors for satisfaction were absence of chronic pain and recurrence. Old age and short time to follow-up also predicted satisfaction after LVHR. CONCLUSION: LVHR and OVHR give similar long term results for recurrence, pain and

  3. Patient satisfaction and non-UK educated nurses: a cross-sectional observational study of English National Health Service Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Peter; Sloane, Douglas M; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Ball, Jane E; Aiken, Linda H

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether patient satisfaction with nursing care in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in England is associated with the proportion of non-UK educated nurses providing care. Design Cross-sectional analysis using data from the 2010 NHS Adult Inpatient Survey merged with data from nurse and hospital administrator surveys. Logistic regression models with corrections for clustering were used to determine whether the proportions of non-UK educated nurses were significantly related to patient satisfaction before and after taking account of other hospital, nursing and patient characteristics. Setting 31 English NHS trusts. Participants 12 506 patients 16 years of age and older with at least one overnight stay that completed a satisfaction survey; 2962 bedside care nurses who completed a nurse survey; and 31 NHS trusts. Main outcome measure Patient satisfaction. Results The percentage of non-UK educated nurses providing bedside hospital care, which ranged from 1% to 52% of nurses, was significantly associated with patient satisfaction. After controlling for potential confounding factors, each 10-point increase in the percentage of non-UK educated nurses diminished the odds of patients reporting good or excellent care by 12% (OR=0.88), and decreased the odds of patients agreeing that they always had confidence and trust in nurses by 13% (OR=0.87). Other indicators of patient satisfaction also revealed lower satisfaction in hospitals with higher percentages of non-UK educated nurses. Conclusions Use of non-UK educated nurses in English NHS hospitals is associated with lower patient satisfaction. Importing nurses from abroad to substitute for domestically educated nurses may negatively impact quality of care. PMID:26634400

  4. Patient satisfaction scores and their relationship to hospital website quality measures.

    PubMed

    Ford, Eric W; Huerta, Timothy R; Diana, Mark L; Kazley, Abby Swanson; Menachemi, Nir

    2013-01-01

    Hospitals and health systems are using web-based and social media tools to market themselves to consumers with increasingly sophisticated strategies. These efforts are designed to shape the consumers' expectations, influence their purchase decisions, and build a positive reputation in the marketplace. Little is known about how these web-based marketing efforts are taking form and if they have any relationship to consumers' satisfaction with the services they receive. The purpose of this study is to assess if a relationship exists between the quality of hospitals' public websites and their aggregated patient satisfaction ratings. Based on analyses of 1,952 U.S. hospitals, our results show that website quality is significantly and positively related to patients' overall rating of the hospital and their intention to recommend the facility to others. The potential for web-based information sources to influence consumer behavior has important implications for policymakers, third-party payers, health care providers, and consumers. PMID:24308412

  5. Follow up of patients who start treatment with antidepressants: treatment satisfaction, treatment compliance, efficacy and safety

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Measuring satisfaction with treatment has proved useful to ascertain the treatment features that are most important to the patients, and to explain increased treatment compliance. However, there are few studies that relate satisfaction to other clinical or self-perceived health status indicators. Recent studies have shown the close relationship between satisfaction with treatment, treatment compliance, and effectiveness. This study attempts to design and validate a scale to evaluate satisfaction with antidepressant drug therapy, assess treatment compliance (self-reported, validated questionnaire, drug accountability and electronic monitorization system), assess efficacy in reducing depressive symptoms and safety in patients who initiate antidepressant drug therapy, as well as to establish predictors of satisfaction, compliance and effectiveness with these drugs. Methods/design This is an observational longitudinal study with a cohort of adults initiating treatment with antidepressant drugs. A multi-centre study will be performed in which 20 Primary Care practices from Castilla-La Mancha are expected to participate. An initial interview and follow-up visits at 15 days, 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months will be conducted with all study participants. 706 subjects will be studied (95% confidence interval, precision ± 3%, expected rate of non-compliance 50%, expected non-responders and lost to follow up rate 15%). The following measurements will be performed: development and validation of a scale of satisfaction with antidepressant therapy, participant and antidepressant characteristics, treatment compliance evaluation (Haynes-Sackett Test, Morisky-Green Test, drug accountability and Medication Event Monitoring System), depression symptom reduction (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale), observation of adverse effects, and beliefs about treatment (The Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire). Discussion Antidepressant drugs are

  6. User Satisfaction Evaluation of the EHR4CR Query Builder: A Multisite Patient Count Cohort System

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Rey, Iñaki; N'Dja, Aurèle; Cunningham, James; Newe, Axel; Trinczek, Benjamin; Lafitte, Caroline; Sedlmayr, Brita; Fritz, Fleur

    2015-01-01

    The Electronic Health Records for Clinical Research (EHR4CR) project aims to develop services and technology for the leverage reuse of Electronic Health Records with the purpose of improving the efficiency of clinical research processes. A pilot program was implemented to generate evidence of the value of using the EHR4CR platform. The user acceptance of the platform is a key success factor in driving the adoption of the EHR4CR platform; thus, it was decided to evaluate the user satisfaction. In this paper, we present the results of a user satisfaction evaluation for the EHR4CR multisite patient count cohort system. This study examined the ability of testers (n = 22 and n = 16 from 5 countries) to perform three main tasks (around 20 minutes per task), after a 30-minute period of self-training. The System Usability Scale score obtained was 55.83 (SD: 15.37), indicating a moderate user satisfaction. The responses to an additional satisfaction questionnaire were positive about the design of the interface and the required procedure to design a query. Nevertheless, the most complex of the three tasks proposed in this test was rated as difficult, indicating a need to improve the system regarding complicated queries. PMID:26539525

  7. Pectus Excavatum and Pectus Carinatum: Associated Conditions, Family History, and Postoperative Patient Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Kuru, Pinar; Cakiroglu, Aylin; Er, Aynur; Ozbakir, Hincal; Cinel, Ali Emin; Cangut, Busra; Iris, Merve; Canbaz, Berkay; Pıçak, Ebru; Yuksel, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background Pectus excavatum (PE) and pectus carinatum (PC) are the most common chest wall deformities. In this study, we aimed to characterize how patients obtained information about these deformities, as well as patients’ family history, associated medical problems, and postoperative satisfaction after the Nuss and Abramson procedures. Methods This cross-sectional retrospective study included patients who were operated by a single surgeon between 2006 and 2013. Follow-up calls were made after approval of our institution’s ethics committee. We reached 207 of the 336 PE patients (61.6%) and 73 of the 96 PC patients (76%). Results The majority of the patients were male (85% of the PE patients and 91.8% of the PC patients). The age of diagnosis of PE was 14.52±0.51 years and the age at the time of operation was 17.89±0.42 years; for PC patients, the corresponding ages were 15.23±0.55 years and 16.77±0.55 years, respectively. A total of 70% of the PE patients and 63.8% of the PC patients obtained information about pectus deformities through the Internet. In 27.1% of the PE patients with an associated anomaly, 57.1% (n=13) had scoliosis, while 41.1% of the PC patients with an associated anomaly had kyphosis (n=5). Postoperative satisfaction, as evaluated on a scale from 0 to 10, was 8.17±0.15 for PE patients and 8.37±0.26 for PC patients. The postoperative pain duration was 51.93±5.18 days for PE patients and 38.5±6.88 days for PC patients. Conclusion In this study, we found that most patients with pectus deformities were male. The Internet was an important resource for patients to learn about their deformities. Family history and associated anomalies were identified as important aspects for consideration in the clinical setting. The patients reported high levels of postoperative satisfaction, and pain management was found to be one of the most important elements of postoperative care. PMID:26889443

  8. A patient satisfaction survey comparing levalbuterol with racemic albuterol in children.

    PubMed

    Berger, William E; Ames, Dale E; Harrison, Doug

    2004-01-01

    Patient preference studies provide important data on the impact of asthma symptoms and the effects of medication on patients' quality of life and functional activity levels. Such studies are lacking in the evaluation of short-acting beta2-agonist treatment for asthma, especially for racemic albuterol. The introduction in 1999 of levalbuterol, the (R)-isomer of racemic albuterol, has provided the opportunity to assess patient preference between racemic albuterol and levalbuterol. Studies with levalbuterol, 1.25 mg, indicated greater bronchodilation than and comparable beta2-mediated side effects to the standard 2.5-mg dose of racemic albuterol, while lower doses of levalbuterol (0.63 mg) provided comparable bronchodilation with reduced beta2-mediated side effects in patients with asthma. This study evaluated treatment satisfaction by the caregivers of children with asthma who currently use and/or have used either levalbuterol (n = 66) or racemic albuterol (n = 76). Twenty-minute-long telephone surveys were administered to caregivers, asking them to rate satisfaction with their child's asthma treatment and provide reasons for satisfaction and dissatisfaction. Significantly more caregivers administering levalbuterol (92%) were "extremely" or "very satisfied" with therapy versus those who currently administered racemic albuterol (51%; p = 0.001). Symptom relief was graded 8.7 (out of 10) for levalbuterol treatment versus 7.5 for racemic albuterol (p = 0.001). Although these differences, in part, may have been influenced by some of the study limitations (e.g., open-label, non-placebo-controlled and nonrandomized design, and potential caregiver recall bias), the statistically significant differences consistently favored levalbuterol and are consistent with results obtained from other clinical studies. The efficacy, dosing flexibility, and improved side effect profile of levalbuterol were the sources of greatest satisfaction for parents/ caregivers in the levalbuterol

  9. Reconstructive Osteotomy for Ankle Malunion Improves Patient Satisfaction and Function

    PubMed Central

    Tohyama, Masahiko; Yasuda, Hiroyuki; Konishi, Sadahiko; Waseda, Akeo

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of chronic symptoms caused by a malunion is a difficult problem in orthopedic surgery. We encountered a case of ankle malunion at our hospital about 1 year after the first operation. The patient had been unable to walk with weight-bearing but regained the ability to walk after reconstructive osteotomy of the fibula. Functional scores for the foot and ankle were significantly improved after intervention. Reconstructive osteotomy appears to represent a good option for ankle malunion. PMID:26064743

  10. Patient satisfaction with primary care: an observational study comparing anthroposophic and conventional care

    PubMed Central

    Esch, Barbara M; Marian, Florica; Busato, André; Heusser, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background This study is part of a cross-sectional evaluation of complementary medicine providers in primary care in Switzerland. It compares patient satisfaction with anthroposophic medicine (AM) and conventional medicine (CON). Methods We collected baseline data on structural characteristics of the physicians and their practices and health status and demographics of the patients. Four weeks later patients assessed their satisfaction with the received treatment (five items, four point rating scale) and evaluated the praxis care (validated 23-item questionnaire, five point rating scale). 1946 adult patients of 71 CON and 32 AM primary care physicians participated. Results 1. Baseline characteristics: AM patients were more likely female (75.6% vs. 59.0%, p < 0.001) and had higher education (38.6% vs. 24.7%, p < 0.001). They suffered more often from chronic illnesses (52.8% vs. 46.2%, p = 0.015) and cancer (7.4% vs. 1.1%). AM consultations lasted on average 23,3 minutes (CON: 16,8 minutes, p < 0.001). 2. Satisfaction: More AM patients expressed a general treatment satisfaction (56.1% vs. 43.4%, p < 0.001) and saw their expectations completely fulfilled at follow-up (38.7% vs. 32.6%, p < 0.001). AM patients reported significantly fewer adverse side effects (9.3% vs. 15.4%, p = 0.003), and more other positive effects from treatment (31.7% vs. 17.1%, p < 0.001). Europep: AM patients appreciated that their physicians listened to them (80.0% vs. 67.1%, p < 0.001), spent more time (76.5% vs. 61.7%, p < 0.001), had more interest in their personal situation (74.6% vs. 60.3%, p < 0.001), involved them more in decisions about their medical care (67.8% vs. 58.4%, p = 0.022), and made it easy to tell the physician about their problems (71.6% vs. 62.9%, p = 0.023). AM patients gave significantly better rating as to information and support (in 3 of 4 items p [less than or equal to] 0.044) and for thoroughness (70.4% vs. 56.5%, p < 0.001). Conclusion AM patients were significantly

  11. The Effect of Trauma Intervention on the Satisfaction of Patients Admitted to the Emergency Department: A Clinical Trial Study

    PubMed Central

    Zakerimoghadam, Masoumeh; Sadeghi, Somayeh; Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is a key determinant of the quality of medical care. Moreover, satisfaction can be used as a criterion for examining the adequacy of the care, health, and competency of personnel. Objectives This study was conducted to determine the satisfaction of patients receiving trauma care in the emergency department of a hospital affiliated with Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Patients and Methods This simple clinical trial was performed on 104 patients admitted for traumatic injury to an emergency department in Iran. Given that patients frequently enter an emergency department for care, the sampling of patients in the department was done on days that were randomly assigned to the study group. The experimental group received trauma intervention in four areas from their admission to the emergency department to their discharge from the hospital, and the control group received routine nursing care. The data were collected through a questionnaire that asked for demographic characteristics and then went on to ask about patient satisfaction. The satisfaction questionnaire was completed after the trauma intervention at the end of patients’ stay in the hospital. The data were analyzed using SPSS 22 software and descriptive statistical tests and analytical tests (independent t and Chi-square). Results The mean score for total satisfaction after trauma intervention in the experimental group (45.6 ± 3.69) was significantly different from that of the control group (32.01 ± 7.78) (P < 0.001). Therefore, the levels of total satisfaction in the experimental and control group were favorable and relatively favorable, respectively. Conclusions In this study, trauma intervention increased satisfaction in patients admitted to the emergency department. Therefore, managers and personnel of hospitals and healthcare training centers are urged to implement trauma intervention in their hospitals or healthcare training centers. PMID:27433350

  12. Health status and patient satisfaction after corneal graft: results from the corneal transplant epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Fasolo, Adriano; Capuzzo, Cristina; Fornea, Michela; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Monterosso, Cristina; Zampini, Alfonso; Avarello, Antonio; Galan, Alessandro; Sbordone, Sandro; Ragucci, Adele Elisabetta; Gorla, Claudio; Grigoletto, Francesco; Ponzin, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate effects of corneal transplantation on the health-related quality of life and patients' satisfaction. Methods. Patients scheduled for elective penetrating or anterior lamellar keratoplasty completed by telephone interview the SF-12 Health Survey, before and one year after surgery, and a 6-item questionnaire on the satisfaction for graft outcomes. Results. The two questionnaires were answered by 1,223 patients. Transplantation did not influence the PCS-12 in males (ES = -0.01) and had a negative effect in females (ES = -0.18). Both sexes improved their MCS-12 (ES = 0.18 and 0.23, resp.). The majority of patients (83.1%) were satisfied by the outcome of the graft. Conclusions. This is the first report on the use of the SF-12 and one of the few that assess quality of life in patients after corneal transplantation. We showed that grafting improves patients' health-related quality of life results of patients, influencing mental health (i.e., psychological attitude, social interaction, and emotions) with minor effects on physical health (limitation, pain, and vitality). PMID:22619701

  13. Feasibility of real-time satisfaction surveys through automated analysis of patients' unstructured comments and sentiments.

    PubMed

    Alemi, Farrokh; Torii, Manabu; Clementz, Laura; Aron, David C

    2012-01-01

    This article shows how sentiment analysis (an artificial intelligence procedure that classifies opinions expressed within the text) can be used to design real-time satisfaction surveys. To improve participation, real-time surveys must be radically short. The shortest possible survey is a comment card. Patients' comments can be found online at sites organized for rating clinical care, within e-mails, in hospital complaint registries, or through simplified satisfaction surveys such as "Minute Survey." Sentiment analysis uses patterns among words to classify a comment into a complaint, or praise. It further classifies complaints into specific reasons for dissatisfaction, similar to broad categories found in longer surveys such as Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems. In this manner, sentiment analysis allows one to re-create responses to longer satisfaction surveys from a list of comments. To demonstrate, this article provides an analysis of sentiments expressed in 995 online comments made at the RateMDs.com Web site. We focused on pediatrician and obstetrician/gynecologist physicians in District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia. We were able to classify patients' reasons for dissatisfaction and the analysis provided information on how practices can improve their care. This article reports the accuracy of classifications of comments. Accuracy will improve as the number of comments received increases. In addition, we ranked physicians using the concept of time-to-next complaint. A time-between control chart was used to assess whether time-to-next complaint exceeded historical patterns and therefore suggested a departure from norms. These findings suggest that (1) patients' comments are easily available, (2) sentiment analysis can classify these comments into complaints/praise, and (3) time-to-next complaint can turn these classifications into numerical benchmarks that can trace impact of improvements over time. The procedures described in the

  14. Patients' satisfaction with primary heath care in kuwait after electronic medical record implementation.

    PubMed

    Al-Azmi, Saadoun F; Mohammed, Aida M; Hanafi, Manal I

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing the level of patients' satisfaction with primary heath care services after implementation of the electronic medical record system (EMR). Also, to explore the relationship of some participants' characteristics with satisfaction which are of importance in planning, managing and evaluation. A descriptive cross-sectional approach was adopted. Ten primary health care centers (out of total 78) related to the five health regions in Kuwait were randomly selected. A random sample of 200 people (at age of 18 years and above) attending the two-shift periods of the chosen centers were included. Through an exit interview, a well trained investigator interviewed them about their satisfaction with the primary heath care services provided after implementation of electronic medical record system. A structured questionnaire for measuring satisfaction was used. The response rate was 93.02% of whom 47.5% were males and 52.5% were females. The mean overall satisfaction percent score as reported by subjects was 85.6% (SD 4.9). There were statistically significant associations between mean percent satisfaction score of the participants and their age, level of education visiting the center at morning shift, and waiting less than 10 minutes before the examination. The vast majority of participants indicated that overall service at the center had greatly improved after EMR implementation. The system also helped in improvement of the physician performance, arrangement of patient's turn, dispense medication from pharmacy, written guidance of medication, accuracy and easiness of follow up for health status, time spent to retrieve medical record and that for receiving medication. However, it didn't achieve much improvement in physician selection or waiting time. The majority of interviewees (96.5%) were totally satisfied with the overall quality of service at the center, location of the center (96.5%), hours when the center is open (96.5%), thoroughness of

  15. Client Preferences Affect Treatment Satisfaction, Completion, and Clinical Outcome: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lindhiem, Oliver; Bennett, Charles B.; Trentacosta, Christopher J.; McLear, Caitlin

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of client preferences on treatment satisfaction, completion, and clinical outcome. Our search of the literature resulted in 34 empirical articles describing 32 unique clinical trials that either randomized some clients to an active choice condition (shared decision making condition or choice of treatment) or assessed client preferences. Clients who were involved in shared decision making, chose a treatment condition, or otherwise received their preferred treatment evidenced higher treatment satisfaction (ESd = .34; p < .001), increased completion rates (ESOR = 1.37; ESd = .17; p < .001), and superior clinical outcome (ESd = .15; p < .0001), compared to clients who were not involved in shared decision making, did not choose a treatment condition, or otherwise did not receive their preferred treatment. Although the effect sizes are modest in magnitude, they were generally consistent across several potential moderating variables including study design (preference versus active choice), psychoeducation (informed versus uninformed), setting (inpatient versus outpatient), client diagnosis (mental health versus other), and unit of randomization (client versus provider). Our findings highlight the clinical benefit of assessing client preferences, providing treatment choices when two or more efficacious options are available, and involving clients in treatment-related decisions when treatment options are not available. PMID:25189522

  16. Reduced Postoperative Functional Length Ratio Influences Patient Satisfaction in First Metatarsophalangeal Joint Replacement.

    PubMed

    Akkurt, Mehmet Orçun; Şeşen, Hakan; Özdemir, Mahmut; Çatma, Mehmet Faruk; Demirkale, İsmail

    2016-01-01

    Complications of first metatarsophalangeal joint metallic arthroplasty are well known. However, the resulting shortening of the metatarsals can lead to transverse metatarsalgia or medial column pain at the metatarsophalangeal joints by creating Morton's toe/foot, which increases pressure on the second metatarsal head. The effect of the functional length ratio of the first and second metatarsals on pain and patient satisfaction has not been rigorously evaluated. We evaluated the effect of the first/second metatarsal ratio on patient satisfaction with first metatarsophalangeal joint metallic arthroplasty. From October 2008 to February 2010, 34 patients (median age 66.2, range 55 to 70 years) with hallux rigidus were treated surgically using the Toefit-Plus(™) prosthesis. At a mean follow-up period of 27.5 (range 17 to 35) months, 30 patients (88.24%) underwent re-evaluation. The functional length of the first and second metatarsals and the lucency around the prosthesis were evaluated. Statistically significant (p ≤ .05) improvements were found for the mean modified American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score (from 44 to 80), pain (from 7 to 3 on a 10-cm visual analog scale), and mean total range of motion (from 42.2° to 59.4°). Also, 20 patients (58.82%) were fully satisfied with the procedure (scores of 8 to 10 on a 3-point Likert scale). Shortening the first metatarsal reduced the functional length ratio (r = 0.95; p < .001) and was associated with lower patient satisfaction (r = 0.66, p = .007). Preoperative consideration of the first/second metatarsal functional length ratio could be useful in preventing medial column pain due to a relatively short first metatarsal to a long second metatarsal axis in the transverse plane. PMID:27020761

  17. A Delphi Method Analysis to Create an Emergency Medicine Educational Patient Satisfaction Survey

    PubMed Central

    London, Kory S.; Singal, Bonita; Fowler, Jennifer; Prepejchal, Rebecca; Simmons, Stefanie; Finefrock, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Feedback on patient satisfaction (PS) as a means to monitor and improve performance in patient communication is lacking in residency training. A physician’s promotion, compensation and job satisfaction may be impacted by his individual PS scores, once he is in practice. Many communication and satisfaction surveys exist but none focus on the emergency department setting for educational purposes. The goal of this project was to create an emergency medicine-based educational PS survey with strong evidence for content validity. Methods We used the Delphi Method (DM) to obtain expert opinion via an iterative process of surveying. Questions were mined from four PS surveys as well as from group suggestion. The DM analysis determined the structure, content and appropriate use of the tool. The group used four-point Likert-type scales and Lynn’s criteria for content validity to determine relevant questions from the stated goals. Results Twelve recruited experts participated in a series of seven surveys to achieve consensus. A 10-question, single-page survey with an additional page of qualitative questions and demographic questions was selected. Thirty one questions were judged to be relevant from an original 48-question list. Of these, the final 10 questions were chosen. Response rates for individual survey items was 99.5%. Conclusion The DM produced a consensus survey with content validity evidence. Future work will be needed to obtain evidence for response process, internal structure and construct validity. PMID:26759663

  18. Impact of a Script-based Communication Intervention on Patient Satisfaction with Pain Management.

    PubMed

    Alaloul, Fawwaz; Williams, Kimberly; Myers, John; Jones, Kayla Dlauren; Logsdon, M Cynthia

    2015-06-01

    Pain is a common complaint among hospitalized patients no matter the diagnosis. Pain has a negative effect on many aspects of a patient's life, including quality of life, sleep, and activities of daily living as well as increased health care expenses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention (script-based communication, use of white boards, and hourly rounding) related to pain management on patient satisfaction with nurses' management of pain. A prospective, quasi-experimental pretest-posttest design was used. Data were collected from two units that provided care for patients with a variety of medical-surgical diagnoses in a hospital located in an academic health sciences center in the southern United States. When nurses used clear and consistent communication with patients in pain, a positive effect was seen in patient satisfaction with pain management over time. This intervention was simple and effective. It could be replicated in a variety of health care organizations. PMID:25439123

  19. The effect of telehealth systems and satisfaction with health expenditure among patients with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uei, Shu-Lin; Tsai, Chung-Hung; Kuo, Yu-Ming

    2016-04-29

    Telehealth cost analysis has become a crucial issue for governments in recent years. In this study, we examined cases of metabolic syndrome in Hualien County, Taiwan. This research adopted the framework proposed by Marchand to establish a study process. In addition, descriptive statistics, a t test, analysis of variance, and regression analysis were employed to analyze 100 questionnaires. The results of the t$ test revealed significant differences in medical health expenditure, number of clinical visits for medical treatment, average amount of time spent commuting to clinics, amount of time spent undergoing medical treatment, and average number of people accompanying patients to medical care facilities or assisting with other tasks in the past one month, indicating that offering telehealth care services can reduce health expenditure. The statistical analysis results revealed that customer satisfaction has a positive effect on reducing health expenditure. Therefore, this study proves that telehealth care systems can effectively reduce health expenditure and directly improve customer satisfaction with medical treatment. PMID:27163314

  20. Comfort, satisfaction, and anxiolysis in surgical patients using a patient-adjustable comfort warming system: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Denise; Greenfield, Mary Lou V H; Anderson, Jane E; Smith, Beverly A; Morris, Michelle

    2010-04-01

    Comfort warming systems aim to produce a comfortable local environment over which the individual patient has control. We studied a patient-adjustable comfort warming system using the Bair PAWS (Patient Adjustable Warming System) (Arizant Healthcare, Inc, Eden Prairie, MN), specifically to study comfort warming rather than therapeutic warming. One-hundred thirty patients were enrolled in this prospective randomized clinical trial, with 58 patients randomized to the patient warming gown, and 72 randomized to the warm blanket group. Groups were similar for gender, age, height, weight, surgical time, body surface area, and body mass index. The patient-adjustable warming system group had perceived greater control and satisfaction at 30 minutes after treatment was initiated compared with the warmed blanket control group. However, there were no differences in satisfaction levels with thermal comfort among those patients contacted one day postoperatively. Additional research is needed to improve external validity of study findings. Further refinement of a nursing definition of thermal comfort should be explored. PMID:20359643

  1. Patient feedback in revalidation: an exploratory study using the consultation satisfaction questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Richard; Smith, Andrew; Tarrant, Carolyn; McKinley, Robert K; Taub, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Background Revalidation is the UK process forthe review of doctors to ensure they are fit to practise. Revalidation will include patient feedback. Aim To investigate the role of patient feedback on GPs' consultations in revalidation. Design and setting Cross-sectional survey of patients consulting 171 GPs. Method A total of 6433 patients aged 16 years or over completed the consultation satisfaction questionnaire (CSQ). Generalisability analysis was undertaken, scale scores calculated, and outliers identified using two and three standard deviations from the mean as control limits. Comments made by patients were categorised into positive, neutral, or negative. Results After averaging each scale for each doctor, mean scores (standard deviation), out of a possible score of 100, were: general satisfaction 78.1 (7.2); professional care 82.1 (6.1); relationship 71.2 (7.1); perceived time 65.7 (7.6). A D-study (which enables estimation of the reliability from 0-1 of the CSQ scores for different numbers of responders for each doctor), indicated that ratings by 19 patients would achieve a generalisability coefficient of 0.80 for the combined score. Fifteen GPs had one or more scale scores below two standard deviations of the mean. Comments were more often negative for GPs with scores below two standard deviations of the mean. Conclusion Most patients of most GPs are satisfied with their experience of consultations, and ways to make patient feedback formative for these doctors is required. For a few GPs, most patients report some dissatisfaction. Patient feedback may identify doctors who need educational support and possibly remediation, but agreed questionnaire score thresholds are required, and agreement is needed on the weight to be attached to patient experience in comparison with other aspects of performance. PMID:22152843

  2. The role of public relations for image creating in health services: a sample patient satisfaction survey.

    PubMed

    Kirdar, YalçIn

    2007-01-01

    This study discusses the role of public relations for image creating in health services. Hospitals require public relations activities to distinguish them from competitors, provide bidirectional communication between the society and the hospital, and assist to create of a strong hospital image and culture. A satisfaction survey was conducted on 264 patients who have received health services at Maltepe University Hospital. The research focused on how the Hospital's examination, care, catering and physical services; doctor and nurse politeness towards patients and patient relatives, their attitudes and behaviors; examination, check-in, bedding and discharge operations; public relations activities in and out of the hospital were perceived. Another subject of the study was the degree of recommendation of patients who have been served by the hospital's health services to prospective patients seeking treatment. PMID:19042527

  3. Predictors of patient satisfaction with inpatient hospital pain management across the United States: A national study.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Daniel C; Shen, Megan Johnson; Holcombe, Randall F

    2016-07-01

    Satisfactory pain management of hospitalized patients remains a national unmet need for the United States. Although prior research indicates that inpatient pain management may be improving nationally, not all populations of patients rate pain management as equally satisfactory. County-level predictors, such as demographics and population density, and hospital-level predictors (eg, hospital-bed number), are understudied determinants of pain management patient satisfaction. We created a multivariate regression model of pain management patient satisfaction scores as indicated by Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey results based on county and hospital level predictors. Number of hospital beds (β = -0.16), percent foreign-born (β = -0.16), and population density (β = -0.08) most strongly predicted unfavorable ratings, whereas African American (β = 0.23), white (β= 0.23), and younger population (β = 0.08) most strongly predicted favorable ratings. Greater attention should be placed on pain management in larger hospitals that serve foreign-born patients in population-dense areas. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:498-501. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:26970075

  4. Quality of nursing care and satisfaction of patients attended at a teaching hospital1

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Juliana Santana; Silva, Ana Elisa Bauer de Camargo; Minamisava, Ruth; Bezerra, Ana Lúcia Queiroz; de Sousa, Maiana Regina Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Objectives assess the quality of nursing care, the patients' satisfaction and the correlation between both. Method cross-sectional study, involving 275 patients hospitalized at a teaching hospital in the Central-West of Brazil. The data were collected through the simultaneous application of three instruments. Next, they were included in an electronic database and analyzed in function of the positivity, median value and Spearman's correlation coefficients. Results among the nursing care assessed, only two were considered safe - hygiene and physical comfort; nutrition and hydration - while the remainder were classified as poor. Nevertheless, the patients were satisfied with the care received in the domains assessed: technical-professional, confidence and educational. This can be justified by the weak to moderate correlation that was observed among these variables. Conclusion Despite the quality deficit, the patients' satisfaction level with the nursing care received was high. These results indicate that the institution needs to center its objectives on a continuing evaluation system of the care quality, aiming to attend to the patients' expectations. PMID:25029057

  5. [Patient satisfaction with removable implant-supported prostheses in the edentulous mandible].

    PubMed

    Zitzmann, Nicola U; Marinello, Carlo P

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate patients' satisfaction with removable implant restorations with two or four implants compared to a complete denture (CD) in the edentulous mandible. 20 patients in each group were asked to fill out a questionnaire ("Patient satisfaction related to the prosthetic restoration") before treatment, after six months and three years. With implant restorations, either implant-retained (IRET) or implant-supported (ISUP), greater improvements in prostheses retention and pain reduction were achieved in comparison to complete dentures. In addition, restrictions related to food selection were resolved for most implant patients. Despite great inter-individual differences, there was a tendency for larger improvements of almost all parameters with IRET, except chewing ability, which was rated best with ISUP. Long-term results revealed that patients with ISUP (four implants) assessed prostheses retention with the highest ratings compared to those with IRET and CD (p = 0,0147). These results indicate that an improvement in functional and psychological parameters can be achieved with two implants, whilst stabilization with four implants improves prosthesis retention, chewing ability and pain reduction in the long term. Maintenance efforts were more complex for implant restorations than for CD and imply a recall at least once a year. PMID:16610459

  6. Patient satisfaction in the outpatients' chemotherapy unit of Marmara University, Istanbul, Turkey: a staff survey

    PubMed Central

    Turhal, Nazim S; Efe, Basak; Gumus, Mahmut; Aliustaoglu, Mehmet; Karamanoglu, Ayla; Sengoz, Meric

    2002-01-01

    Background We conducted a survey to find out how patients feel about the care they receive in the outpatient chemotherapy unit of Marmara University Hospital. Methods The American College of Physicians Patient Satisfaction survey translated into Turkish was used. A meeting was held with all involved staff, before conducting the survey, to review the purpose and determine the process. The study was conducted with 100 random patients. Results Consistent with cancer frequency, most patients had either lung, colorectal or breast cancer. Their insurance was government sponsored in close to 90%. The educational levels were above Turkish median but consistent with the area the hospital is serving. They were coming to the unit on average 8.5 months. The responses were not influenced by the surveyed diagnosis, age, sex or educational status (p > 0,05). Particularly health care team's attention, trust and courtesy came forward as strong points. The weaknesses noted as difficulties in booking an outpatient doctor visit appointment because the phone line was busy or the secretary was not courteous, the excessive amount of time and effort it required to get laboratory and radiology results. Conclusion The health care system is basically a service based industry and customer satisfaction is at utmost importance just as in other service-oriented sectors. We hope this study will shed light in that area and Turkish health care providers will pay closer attention to how their patients feel about the services that they are getting. PMID:12443536

  7. Money and happiness: rank of income, not income, affects life satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Christopher J; Brown, Gordon D A; Moore, Simon C

    2010-04-01

    Does money buy happiness, or does happiness come indirectly from the higher rank in society that money brings? We tested a rank-income hypothesis, according to which people gain utility from the ranked position of their income within a comparison group. The rank hypothesis contrasts with traditional reference-income hypotheses, which suggest that utility from income depends on comparison to a social reference-group norm. We found that the ranked position of an individual's income predicts general life satisfaction, whereas absolute income and reference income have no effect. Furthermore, individuals weight upward comparisons more heavily than downward comparisons. According to the rank hypothesis, income and utility are not directly linked: Increasing an individual's income will increase his or her utility only if ranked position also increases and will necessarily reduce the utility of others who will lose rank. PMID:20424085

  8. Visual Outcomes, Patient Satisfaction and Spectacle Independence with a Trifocal Diffractive Intraocular Lens

    PubMed Central

    Kretz, Florian Tobias Alwin; Choi, Chul Young; Müller, Matthias; Gerl, Matthias; Gerl, Ralf Helmar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate visual outcomes following implantation of a trifocal diffractive intraocular lens (IOL) and to analyze their correlation with patient satisfaction and ease of performing daily tasks. Methods This was a prospective study enrolling 100 eyes of 50 patients undergoing cataract surgery with implantation of trifocal IOL AT LISA tri 839MP. Visual and refractive outcomes were evaluated during a 3-month follow-up. Postoperatively, a questionnaire was used to evaluate patient satisfaction with regard to surgical outcome, spectacle independence, perception of photic phenomena, and ease of performing some vision-related activities. Results A total of 91%, 87%, and 79% of eyes achieved a monocular uncorrected distance, near, and intermediate visual acuity of 0.1 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution or better, respectively. After the surgery, 96% of the patients could perform their daily activities without problems. The mean spectacle independence scores for reading, doing computer work, and for distance were 10.33 ± 12.47, 5.71 ± 11.90, and 3.92 ± 9.77, respectively (scale: 0 = no spectacles needed; 40 = spectacles always needed). No correlation was found between spectacle independence and visual outcome (-0.101 ≤ r ≤ 0.244, p ≥ 0.087). Mean scores (0 = no symptoms; 40 = strong symptoms) for glare at night, ghost images, and halos were 15.15 ± 12.02, 4.49 ± 7.92, and 13.34 ± 10.82, respectively. No correlation was found between photic phenomena and visual outcome (-0.199 ≤ r ≤ 0.209, p ≥ 0.150). A total of 80% of patients reported satisfaction with the surgery outcome, and 86% would recommend the surgery to friends and family. Conclusions Implantation of the AT LISA tri 839MP IOL after cataract surgery provides effective visual restoration associated with a minimal level of photic phenomena, a positive impact on the performance of vision-related daily activities, and a high level of postoperative patient satisfaction. PMID:27247517

  9. The effect of electronic package on satisfaction in multiple sclerosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Mohamadirizi, Shahla; Shaygannejad, Vahid; Mohamadirizi, Soheila; Khosrawi, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traditional teaching methods used in medical education cannot wholly respond to the rapid changes and growth of information as well as continuous changes in the educational needs of society, especially patients with chronic diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Therefore, this study was designed with the aim of examining the effect of electronic package on satisfaction in MS patients. Materials and Methods: The research was a quasi-experimental study. It was carried out at the MS Kashani Center affiliated to the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, in 2013. One hundred twenty-eight patients with MS were allocated randomly into two equal groups of 64 each for education by booklet (control) and education by multimedia software (experimental) for 2 weeks. Data were collected by processing questionnaires, which consisted of questions about satisfaction (17 items) and questions about demographic and disease characteristics (9 items), answered by both groups before and 2 weeks after education. SPSS version 14 (DARYA software, Iran) was used to conduct statistical tests such as the independent t-test and the paired t-test for analyzing the data. The statistical significance level was less than 0.05. Results: The results show that there was not any significant difference between the satisfaction scores of the electronic package and control groups before intervention, but that there was a significant difference after 2 weeks’ intervention (P = 0.010). Conclusion: The electronic programs comprised an attractive education method. So this technology can increase motivation in MS patients to study more about the disease process. PMID:27308261

  10. Construct validity of the PROMIS® sexual function and satisfaction measures in patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With data from a diverse sample of patients either in treatment for cancer or post-treatment for cancer, we examine inter-domain and cross-domain correlations among the core domains of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Sexual Function and Satisfaction measures (PROMIS® SexFS) and the corresponding domains from conceptually-similar measures of sexual function, the International Index of Erectile Function and the Female Sexual Function Index. Findings Men (N=389) and women (N=430) were recruited from a tumor registry, oncology clinics, and an internet panel. The PROMIS SexFS, International Index of Erectile Function, and Female Sexual Function Index were used to collect participants’ self-reported sexual function. The domains shared among the measures include desire/interest in sexual activity, lubrication and vaginal discomfort/pain (women), erectile function (men), orgasm, and satisfaction. We examined correlations among different domains within the same instrument (discriminant validity) and correlations among similar domains measured by different instruments (convergent validity). Correlations demonstrating discriminant validity ranged from 0.38 to 0.73 for men and 0.48 to 0.74 for women, while correlations demonstrating convergent validity ranged from 0.62 to 0.83 for men and 0.71 to 0.92 for women. As expected, correlations demonstrating convergent validity were higher than correlations demonstrating discriminant validity, with one exception (orgasm for men). Conclusions Construct validity was supported by convergent and discriminant validity in a diverse sample of patients with cancer. For patients with cancer who may or may not have sexual dysfunction, the PROMIS SexFS measures provide a comprehensive assessment of key domains of sexual function and satisfaction. PMID:23497200

  11. She Left, He Left: How Employment and Satisfaction Affect Men’s and Women’s Decisions to Leave Marriages

    PubMed Central

    Sayer, Liana C.; England, Paula; Allison, Paul; Kangas, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Most past studies examining determinants of divorce have ignored differences between the factors that elevate wives’ and husbands’ initiation of divorce. We use three waves of the National Survey of Families and Households and a latent class model embedded in a competing-risks event history model to assess distinct predictors of wives and husbands leaving marriages. We assess who left using each ex-spouse’s answer to a question that asked who had wanted the breakup more. We find that when men are not employed, either husbands or wives are more likely to leave. When wives report better than average marital satisfaction, their employment affects neither their nor their husbands’ exits. However, when wives report below average marital satisfaction, their employment makes it more likely that they will leave. We compare findings to predictions from two theories: an institutional perspective that sees divorce to result from a violation of gender-specific norms, and exchange/bargaining theory, which posits that resources allow a spouse to leave if exchange and bargaining fail to provide a satisfactory marriage. To amend the theories to better fit the data, we foreground the asymmetric nature of gender change in recent decades, with women changing more than men. PMID:21932472

  12. Life Satisfaction in Persons with Lacunar Infarction--A Comparative Analysis of Two Measures of Life Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsson, G-B.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A study of 76 Swedish patients (ages 40-86) with lacunar infarctions used a life satisfaction questionnaire to investigate whether the patients were satisfied and how their life situation was affected by the infarction. Results found that the questionnaire was not an effective instrument for measuring life satisfaction in this population. (CR)

  13. Pain experience and satisfaction with postoperative pain control among surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Pathmawathi; Ramasamy, Suguna; Ng, Kwan Hoong; Chinna, Karuthan; Rosli, Roshaslina

    2016-06-01

    Alleviating acute pain and providing pain relief are central to caring for surgical patients as pain can lead to many adverse medical consequences. This study aimed to explore patients' experience of pain and satisfaction with postoperative pain control. A cross-sectional survey was carried out among 107 respondents who had undergone abdominal surgery in the surgical ward of an urban hospital using the Revised American Pain Society's Patient Outcome and Satisfaction Survey Questionnaires (APS-POQ-R). Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and chi-square test. Chi-square test showed significant association between race (P = 0.038), education level (P ≤ 0.001), previous operation status (P = 0.032) and operation status (P ≤ 0.001). Further analysis on nominal regression, association between dissatisfaction with factors of operation status (46.09 (95% CI 7.456, 284.947)) and previous operation status (13.38 (95% CI 1.39, 128.74)) was found to be significant. Moderate to high levels of pain intensity in the last 24 h after surgery, as well as moderate to high rates of pain-related interference with care activities were most reported. Pain still remains an issue among surgical patients, and effective pain management and health education are needed to manage pain more effectively after surgery. PMID:25355297

  14. Associations of Quality of Life with Service Satisfaction in Psychotic Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Petkari, Eleni; Pietschnig, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QoL) has gained increasing attention as a desired outcome of psychosocial treatments targeting psychotic patients. Yet, the relationship between the patients’ satisfaction with services and QoL has not been clearly established, perhaps due to the multidimensionality of the QoL concept and the variability in its assessment. Aim This is the first systematic meta-analysis of all available evidence assessing the relationship between QoL and service satisfaction. Methods: In all, 19 studies reporting data of 21 independent samples (N = 5,337) were included in the present meta-analysis. In moderator analyses, effects of age, sex, diagnoses (schizophrenia vs. other psychoses), treatment context (inpatients vs. outpatients), study design (cross-sectional vs. longitudinal), and QoL domain (subjective vs. health-related) were examined. Results Analyses revealed a highly significant medium-sized effect (r = .30, p < .001) for the associations of QoL and service satisfaction. Effect sizes were significantly stronger for subjective than health-related quality of life (r = .35 vs. r = .14, respectively). Moreover, associations with subjective QoL remained largely robust when accounting for moderating variables, although there was a trend of stronger associations for outpatients compared to inpatients. In contrast, effect sizes for health-related QoL were small and only observable for samples with longitudinal designs. Conclusion Associations between QoL and service satisfaction appear to be robust but are differentiated in regard to QoL domain. Our findings suggest that agents responsible for service design and implementation need to take the patients’ perception of the service adequacy for achieving QoL enhancement into account. PMID:26275139

  15. Patient satisfaction with HIV/AIDS care at private clinics in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Miller, James S; Mhalu, Aisa; Chalamilla, Guerino; Siril, Hellen; Kaaya, Silvia; Tito, Justina; Aris, Eric; Hirschhorn, Lisa R

    2014-01-01

    Health system responsiveness (HSR) measures quality of care from the patient's perspective, an important component of ensuring adherence to medication and care among HIV patients. We examined HSR in private clinics serving HIV patients in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We surveyed 640 patients, 18 or older receiving care at one of 10 participating clinics, examining socioeconomic factors, HIV regimen, and self-reported experience with access and care at the clinic. Ordered logistic regression, adjusted for clustering of the clinic sites, was used to measure the relationships between age, gender, education, site size, and overall quality of care rating, as well as between the different HSR domains and overall rating. Overall, patients reported high levels of satisfaction with care received. Confidentiality, communication, and respect were particularly highly rated, while timeliness received lower ratings despite relatively short wait times, perhaps indicating high expectations when receiving care at a private clinic. Respect, confidentiality, and promptness were significantly associated with overall rating of health care, while provider skills and communication were not significantly associated. Patients reported that quality of service and confidentiality, rather than convenience of location, were the most important factors in their choice of a clinic. Site size (patient volume) was also positively correlated with patient satisfaction. Our findings suggest that, in the setting of urban private-sector clinics, flexible clinics hours, prompt services, and efforts to improve respect, privacy and confidentiality may prove more helpful in increasing visit adherence than geographic accessibility. While a responsive health system is valuable in its own right, more work is needed to confirm that improvements in HSR in fact lead to improved adherence to care. PMID:24499337

  16. Uterine preservation for advanced pelvic organ prolapse repair: Anatomical results and patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Keshet; Shachar, Inbar Ben; Braun, Naama Marcus

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aims of the current study were to evaluate outcomes and patient satisfaction in cases of uterine prolapse treated with vaginal mesh, while preserving the uterus. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study that included all patients operated for prolapse repair with trocar-less vaginal mesh while preserving the uterus between October 2010 and March 2013. Data included: patients pre-and post-operative symptoms, POP-Q and operative complications. Success was defined as prolapse < than stage 2. A telephone survey questionnaire was used to evaluate patient's satisfaction. Results: Sixty-six patients with pelvic organ prolapse stage 3, including uterine pro-lapse of at least stage 2 (mean point C at+1.4 (range+8-(-1)) were included. Mean follow-up was 22 months. Success rate of the vaginal mesh procedure aimed to repair uterine prolapse was 92% (61/66), with mean point C at −6.7 (range (-1) - (-9)). No major intra-or post-operative complication occurred. A telephone survey questionnaire was conducted post-operatively 28 months on average. Ninety-eight percent of women were satisfied with the decision to preserve their uterus. Eighteen patients (34%) received prior consultation elsewhere for hysterectomy due to their prolapse, and decided to have the operation at our center in order to preserve the uterus. Conclusions: Uterine preservation with vaginal mesh was found to be a safe and effective treatment, even in cases with advanced uterine prolapse. Most patients prefer to keep their uterus. Uterus preservation options should be discussed with every patient before surgery for pelvic organ prolapse. PMID:27564289

  17. Data-Driven Identification of Risk Factors of Patient Satisfaction at a Large Urban Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Lee, Nathan J.; Glicksberg, Benjamin S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey is the first publicly reported nationwide survey to evaluate and compare hospitals. Increasing patient satisfaction is an important goal as it aims to achieve a more effective and efficient healthcare delivery system. In this study, we develop and apply an integrative, data-driven approach to identify clinical risk factors that associate with patient satisfaction outcomes. Methods We included 1,771 unique adult patients who completed the HCAHPS survey and were discharged from the inpatient Medicine service from 2010 to 2012. We collected 266 clinical features including patient demographics, lab measurements, medications, disease categories, and procedures. We developed and applied a data-driven approach to identify risk factors that associate with patient satisfaction outcomes. Findings We identify 102 significant risk factors associating with 18 surveyed questions. The most significantly recurrent clinical risk factors were: self-evaluation of health, education level, Asian, White, treatment in BMT oncology division, being prescribed a new medication. Patients who were prescribed pregabalin were less satisfied particularly in relation to communication with nurses and pain management. Explanation of medication usage was associated with communication with nurses (q = 0.001); however, explanation of medication side effects was associated with communication with doctors (q = 0.003). Overall hospital rating was associated with hospital environment, communication with doctors, and communication about medicines. However, patient likelihood to recommend hospital was associated with hospital environment, communication about medicines, pain management, and communication with nurse. Conclusions Our study identified a number of putatively novel clinical risk factors for patient satisfaction that suggest new opportunities to better understand and manage patient satisfaction

  18. Mid-term Clinical Results and Patient Satisfaction After Uterine Artery Embolization in Women with Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids

    SciTech Connect

    Smeets, Albert J.; Lohle, Paul N. M. Vervest, Harry A. M.; Boekkooi, P. Focco; Lampmann, Leo E.H.

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the mid-term clinical results and patient satisfaction following uterine artery embolization (UAE) in women with symptomatic fibroids. Methods. Between August 1998 and December 2002, 135 patients had UAE for symptomatic uterine fibroids. All patients were asked to fill in a questionnaire. Questions were aimed at changes in bleeding, pain, and bulk-related symptoms. Symptoms after UAE were scored as disappeared, improved, unchanged or worsened. Adverse events were noted, such as vaginal dryness and discharge, menopausal complaints or fibroid expulsion. Patient satisfaction after UAE was assessed. Patient satisfaction of women embolized with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles was compared with satisfaction of women embolized with calibrated microspheres. Results. The questionnaire was returned by 110 of 135 women (81%) at a median time interval of 14 months following UAE. In 10 women additional embolization or hysterectomy had been performed. Of the 110 responders, 86 (78%) were satisfied with the result of UAE. The proportion of satisfied women was higher in the group embolized with calibrated microspheres than in women embolized with PVA, although this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.053). Conclusion. UAE in women with symptomatic uterine fibroids leads to improvement of symptoms and patient satisfaction is good in the vast majority after a median follow-up period of 14 months.

  19. Factors Contributing to Satisfaction with Changes in Physical Function after Orthopedic Surgery for Musculoskeletal Dysfunction in Patients with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kusumoto, Yasuaki; Nitta, Osamu; Matsuo, Atsushi; Takaki, Kenji; Matsuda, Tadamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Background The recognition of required treatments for cerebral palsy (CP) patients, including orthopedic surgery, differs according to region. This study was performed to identify factors associated with satisfactory changes in physical function after orthopedic surgery. Methods 358 patients were selected for the questionnaire survey. The following information was collected: gender, primary disease, age of initial surgery, total procedural count, operated sites, satisfaction of postoperative rehabilitation frequency, ideal amount of postoperative rehabilitation sessions per week, frequency of voluntary home training per week, satisfaction of the timing of surgery and the current satisfaction with the changes in physical function after the orthopedic surgery. We classified the patients into the satisfied and dissatisfied group according to satisfactory changes in physical function after the surgery. We performed unpaired t-tests and chi-square tests to determine the variables that differed significantly between the groups. Variables with a p value of <0.2 were included in the multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results The logistic model was revised and summed up to two potential predictors of postsurgical satisfaction with physical function: satisfaction with the frequency of postoperative rehabilitation sessions and the orthopedic surgery of the hip (distinction hit ratio, 75.4%). Conclusions This study demonstrated that the frequency of postoperative rehabilitation and history of hip surgery seemed to be related to the satisfaction with the changes in physical function after orthopedic surgery. PMID:27135609

  20. Can clinicians benefit from patient satisfaction surveys? Evaluating the NSF for Older People, 2005–2006

    PubMed Central

    lliffe, Steve; Wilcock, Jane; Manthorpe, Jill; Moriarty, Jo; Cornes, Michelle; Clough, Roger; Bright, Les

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background A transformation of healthcare is underway, from a sellers' market to a consumers' market, where the satisfaction of the patient's needs is part of the definition of quality. Patient satisfaction surveys are widely used to judge service quality, but clinicians are sceptical about them because they are too often poorly designed measures that do not lead to improvements in the quality of care. Aim To explore the use of patient satisfaction survey data in identifying problems with the provision of inpatient care for older people. Methods A case study using secondary analysis of postal survey data about older people's experiences of health and social care services, obtained during the evaluation of the National Service Framework for Older People in 2005–2006. The survey asked about experiences of inpatient care and of discharge from hospital, and sought perceptions of the avoidability of the admission. Settings and participants A total of 4170 people aged 50 years and over returned a postal questionnaire in six local authority areas of England. Responses from 584 who had experienced a recent overnight stay in hospital are reported and discussed. Findings The response rate was 35%, ranging from 26% to 44% in the six areas surveyed. The great majority of those who had recent direct experience of inpatient care reported that they had been engaged in decision-making, that staff promoted their independence and maintained their dignity. There were widespread examples, however, of the opposite experiences. Discharge from hospital was problematic for about one-third of survey respondents with this experience, and there were different accounts of poorly managed discharges from all areas. Conclusions Case studies using local survey data can be used as formative assessments of services. The response rate to the survey and the likelihood of responder bias mean that patient satisfaction survey data of this sort cannot be used to judge or compare services in a

  1. Monetary Resident Incentives: Effect on Patient Satisfaction in an Academic Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Langdorf, Mark I.; Kazzi, A. Antoine; Marwah, Rakesh S.; Bauche, John

    2005-01-01

    Patient satisfaction most be a priority in emergency departments (EDs). The care provided by residents forms much of the patient contact in academic EDs. Objective: To determine if monetary incentives for emergency medicine (EM) residents improve patient satisfaction scores on a mailed survey. Methods: The incentive program ran for nine months, 1999–2000. Press-Ganey surveys responses from ED patients in 456 hospitals; 124 form a peer group of larger, teaching hospitals. Questions relate to: 1) waiting time, 2) taking the problem seriously, 3) treatment information, 4) home care concerns, 5) doctor’s courtesy, and 6) concern with comfort. A 5-point Likert scale ranges from “very poor” (0 points) to “very good” (100). Raw score is the weighted mean, converted to a percentile vs. the peer group. Incentives were three-fold: a year-end event for the EM residents if 80th percentile results were achieved; individual incentives for educational materials of $50/resident (50th percentile), $100 (60th), $150 (70th), or $200 (80th); discount cards for the hospital’s espresso cart. These were distributed by 11 EM faculty (six cards/month) as rewards for outstanding interactions. Program cost was <$8,000, from patient-care revenue. Faculty had similar direct incentives, but nursing and staff incentives were ill defined and indirect. Results: Raw scores ranged from 66.1 (waiting time) to 84.3 (doctor’s courtesy) (n=509 or ∼7.2% of ED volume). Corresponding percentiles were 20th–43rd (mean=31st). We found no difference between the overall scores after the incentives, but three of the six questions showed improvement, with one, “doctors’ courtesy,” reaching 53rd percentile. The faculty funded the 50th percentile reward. Conclusions: Incentives are a novel idea to improve patient satisfaction, but did not foster overall Press-Ganey score improvement. We did find a trend toward improvement for doctor-patient interaction scores. Confounding variables, such

  2. Pharmaceutical care program for onco-hematologic outpatients: safety, efficiency and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Ribed, Almudena; Romero-Jiménez, Rosa María; Escudero-Vilaplana, Vicente; Iglesias-Peinado, Irene; Herranz-Alonso, Ana; Codina, Carlos; Sanjurjo-Sáez, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Background Self-administration of oral chemotherapy regimens in the home setting leading to new challenges in the health system. Objective To develop and evaluate a comprehensive pharmaceutical care program for cancer outpatients treated with oral antineoplastic agents. Setting A Spanish tertiary hospital. Methods During 2012, a comprehensive pharmaceutical care program was elaborated following the standards recommended by ASCO. It comprised a standard procedure focusing on: drug indication, dosing regimen, required laboratory tests, route of administration, interactions with other current medications and adverse events; a checklist and informational brochures. A pharmaceutical follow up was defined and structured into three clinical interviews over 6 months which focused on safety and efficiency outcomes. Patients starting treatment with oral antineoplastic agents during 2011 (control group) without pharmacist monitoring were compared to patients beginning treatment at some point in 2013 who were prospectively monitored by a pharmacist (intervention group). Statistical analysis was performed by the statistical program SPSS, 21.0 and p < 0.05 was considered significant. Main outcome measures Patient demographics and clinical data were recorded. The primary endpoint was safety outcomes: detection of drug related problems, drug interactions, and adverse events. Adherence, permanence and patient satisfaction were also collected. Results A total of 249 patients were enrolled in the study. Two hundred and seventy-five medication errors were recorded [106 in the control group and 169 in the intervention group (p = 0.008)]. The pharmacist intervened in 362 occasions being accepted 88.8 % of the time, mainly to reinforce patient education and literacy and giving information on co-administration with other drugs and herbal medicines. Adherent patients increased at the 6th month of treatment in the intervention group by 20 % (p < 0.001). High satisfaction was

  3. Satisfaction of Search in Multi-trauma Patients: Severity of Detected Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Berbaum, Kevin S.; El-Khoury, George Y.; Ohashi, Kenjirou; Schartz, Kevin M.; Caldwell, Robert T.; Madsen, Mark; Franken, Edmund A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Satisfaction of search (SOS) occurs when an abnormality is missed because another abnormality has been detected. This research studied whether the severity of a detected fracture determines whether subsequent fractures are overlooked. Materials and Methods Each of seventy simulated multi-trauma patients presented examinations of three anatomic areas. Readers evaluated each patient under two experimental conditions: when the images of the first anatomic area included a fracture (the SOS condition), and when it did not (the control condition). The SOS effect was measured on detection accuracy for subtle test fractures presented on examinations of the second and third anatomic areas. In an experiment with twelve radiology readers, the initial SOS radiographs showed non-displaced fractures of extremities, fractures associated with low morbidity. In another experiment with twelve different radiology readers, the initial examination, usually a CT, showed cervical and pelvic fractures of the type associated with high morbidity. Because of their more direct role in patient care, the experiment using high morbidity SOS fractures was repeated with seventeen orthopedic readers. Results Detection of subtle test fractures was substantially reduced when fractures of low morbidity were added (p<0.01). No similar SOS effect was observed in either experiment in which added fractures were associated with high morbidity. Conclusion The satisfaction of search effect in skeletal radiology was replicated, essentially doubling the evidence for SOS in musculoskeletal radiology, and providing an essential contrast to the absence of SOS from high morbidity fractures. PMID:17502261

  4. Dental Implants – Perceiving Patients’ Satisfaction in Relation to Clinical and Electromyography Study on Implant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Soumendra

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the satisfaction of patients with posterior implants in relation to the clinical success criteria and surface electromyography (sEMG) findings of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Total 42 subjects were investigated. Twenty one subjects with posterior dental implants were interviewed using a questionnaire and the clinical success criteria were determined based on The International Congress of Oral Implantologists. The myofunction of the masticatory muscles were assessed using sEMG (21 subjects) and compared to the control group of subjects without implants (21 subjects). Out of 21 subjects, all were satisfied with the aesthetics of their implant. Twenty of them (95.2%) were satisfied with its function and stability. As for clinical criteria, 100% (50) of the implants were successful with no pain, mobility or exudates. sEMG findings showed that patients have significantly lower (p<0.01) basal or resting median power frequency but with muscle burst. During chewing, control subjects showed faster chewing action. There was no difference in reaction and recovery time of clenching for both groups. In conclusion, the satisfaction of implant patients was high, and which was in relation to the successful clinical success criteria and sEMG findings. PMID:26465146

  5. Treatment satisfaction of patients undergoing ranibizumab therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration in a real-life setting

    PubMed Central

    Gohil, Rishma; Crosby-Nwaobi, Roxanne; Forbes, Angus; Burton, Ben J; Hykin, Philip; Sivaprasad, Sobha

    2016-01-01

    Context Treatment satisfaction with a loading phase of monthly injections for 3 months followed by a pro-re-nata regimen of ranibizumab in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) remains unclear. Aims The aim was to evaluate the treatment satisfaction of persons with nAMD treated with ranibizumab in a real-life setting. Settings and design A cross-sectional study was conducted across three eye clinics within the National Health Service in the UK, where treatment is provided free at point of contact. Materials and methods A total of 250 patients were selected randomly for the study. Treatment satisfaction was assessed using the Macular Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire. Data were collected on satisfaction of the service provided (Client Service Questionnaire-8) and the patients’ demographic and quality of life and treatment history. Factors governing treatment questionnaire were determined. Results The most important factors that determined the satisfaction were the service provided at the clinic (Client Service Questionnaire-8), health-related quality of life (EQ-5D-3L), and duration of AMD. Visual acuity changes were rated as less important than one would have expected. Conclusion The study result suggested that treatment satisfaction for nAMD was governed by the perception of being reviewed and injected regularly over a long period of time than the actual change in visual acuity from the treatment. PMID:27307715

  6. Lean-driven improvements slash wait times, drive up patient satisfaction scores.

    PubMed

    2012-07-01

    Administrators at LifePoint Hospitals, based in Brentwood, TN, used lean manufacturing techniques to slash wait times by as much as 30 minutes and achieve double-digit increases in patient satisfaction scores in the EDs at three hospitals. In each case, front-line workers took the lead on identifying opportunities for improvement and redesigning the patient-flow process. As a result of the new efficiencies, patient volume is up by about 25% at all three hospitals. At each hospital, the improvement process began with Kaizen, a lean process that involves bringing personnel together to flow-chart the current system, identify problem areas, and redesign the process. Improvement teams found big opportunities for improvement at the front end of the flow process. Key to the approach was having a plan up front to deal with non-compliance. To sustain improvements, administrators gather and disseminate key metrics on a daily basis. PMID:22838052

  7. Evaluation of the satisfaction and usefulness of a web-based educational program for breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yi, Myungsun; Kim, Jeongeun; Noh, Dong-Young; Lee, Jung-Lim; Yoo, Keun-Young; Hwang, Ki-Tae; Chung, He-Doo

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a web-based breast cancer educational program which consists of special features such as flash animations and online counseling as well as 7 different categories of information on breast cancer. The effectiveness of the program was analyzed in terms of its function and content. A total of 147 women with breast cancer who visited the website for at least 30 minutes and a minimum of 3 visits, participated in the survey.In the satisfaction evaluation of web-based educational program, usefulness of information, system efficiency, adequacy of information and convenience of use all received positive evaluation and showed even distribution of 49.14 (+/-6.05) points out of 64 points total. In the usefulness evaluation, the subcategories had following scores from the highest to the lowest; understanding of breast cancer was 3.34 (+/-0.51), life after treatment (3.21+/-0.58), early detection and examination (3.20+/-0.60), chemotherapy and hormonal therapy (3.18+/-0.55), related factors and prevention (3.16+/-0.59), treatments (3.13+/-0.53), and diagnosis (3.02+/-0.56). Factors affecting the satisfaction of the program were age, religion, income, stage of disease at diagnosis, source of health information, duration of Internet usage, and whether the patient performs breast self-examination. Factors that affect the usefulness of the program were religion, period since diagnosis, source of health information, frequency of Internet usage, recurrence of breast cancer, and family history.Although the program was evaluated as somewhat useful and satisfactory, it should be improved upon by providing in-depth and cutting edge breast health information especially for women from a higher educational and income background. PMID:19415141

  8. Physician Cross-Cultural Nonverbal Communication Skills, Patient Satisfaction and Health Outcomes in the Physician-Patient Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Ken Russell; Galan, Chardee

    2012-01-01

    Recent empirical findings document the role of nonverbal communication in cross-cultural interactions. As ethnic minority health disparities in the United States continue to persist, physician competence in this area is important. We examine physicians' abilities to decode nonverbal emotions across cultures, our hypothesis being that there is a relationship between physicians' skill in this area and their patients' satisfaction and outcomes. First part tested Caucasian and South Asian physicians' cross-cultural emotional recognition ability. Physicians completed a fully balanced forced multiple-choice test of decoding accuracy judging emotions based on facial expressions and vocal tones. In the second part, patients reported on satisfaction and health outcomes with their physicians using a survey. Scores from the patient survey were correlated with scores from the physician decoding accuracy test. Physicians, regardless of their ethnicity, were more accurate at rating Caucasian faces and vocal tones. South Asian physicians were no better at decoding the facial expressions or vocal tones of South Asian patients, who were also less likely to be satisfied with the quality of care provided by their physicians and to adhere to their physicians' recommendations. Implications include the development of cultural sensitivity training programs in medical schools, continuing medical education and public health programs. PMID:22792459

  9. Assessment of satisfaction with different dry powder inhalation devices in Greek patients with COPD and asthma: the ANASA study

    PubMed Central

    Zervas, Eleftherios; Samitas, Konstantinos; Gaga, Mina

    2016-01-01

    Background Poor adherence to inhaled therapy is common in patients with asthma and COPD. An inhaler selection based on patients’ preference could be beneficial to adherence and treatment effectiveness. Properly designed questionnaires can assess patients’ satisfaction with their medication devices. The aim of this study was to estimate, using the Feeling of Satisfaction with Inhaler (FSI-10) questionnaire, the ease of use and satisfaction of patients regarding three different marketed dry powder inhalers (DPIs): Diskus® (DK), Elpenhaler® (EH), and Turbuhaler® (TH). The FSI-10 is a self-completed questionnaire to assess patients’ opinions regarding ease of use, portability, and usability of devices, irrespective of the drug used. Patients and methods We performed a 4-week, open, noninterventional, multicenter, parallel clinical study in 560 asthmatic and 561 COPD patients. During the first visit, patients were classified into three groups according to the DPI they were already using. Patients were regularly receiving their treatments (Seretide DK, Rolenium EH, and Symbicort TH) and agreed to complete the FSI-10 questionnaire in the second visit. Results A total of 517 COPD and 523 asthma patients completed the study. All DPIs tested received satisfactory results, while the EH obtained consistently higher scores in the FSI-10 in both COPD and asthma patients (44.7 and 44.1 vs 41.5 and 43 for TH, 40.8 and 41.4 for DK, P<0.001 and P<0.01, respectively). TH was rated better than DK by asthma patients. Patients suffering with severe COPD tended to express higher feeling of satisfaction than those with moderate or mild disease, irrespective of the device used. Conclusion All DPIs tested were highly acceptable by asthma and COPD patients of different ages; nevertheless, EH received significantly higher ratings in most of the questionnaire domains. COPD patients in advanced stages of the disease generally expressed higher level of satisfaction with their devices

  10. Examining the relationship between patient orientation and job satisfaction in health care: evidence from the nursing profession.

    PubMed

    Harris, Eric G; Dearth, Richard; Paul, Shipra

    2007-01-01

    It is well-known that the United States faces a serious nursing shortage. A number of factors have contributed to the problem including an aging nursing workforce, fewer nursing job candidates, the aging of the baby boom population, and increased nurse dissatisfaction. The current work addresses one issue that is central to the problem: nursing satisfaction/dissatisfaction. Drawing from previous research in the services marketing literature, the work introduces the "patient orientation" construct and suggests that it is a critical motivational factor that is related to nursing satisfaction. Results from an empirical study reveal that the construct is positively related to overall nursing satisfaction while controlling for external factors including pay, benefits, supervisor, and reward satisfaction. Implications for healthcare managers and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:19042515

  11. Methadone maintenance treatment versus methadone maintenance treatment plus auricular acupuncture: impacts on patient satisfaction and coping mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lua, Pei Lin; Talib, Nor Samira; Ismail, Zabidah

    2013-12-01

    This study intended to (1) describe the baseline patient satisfaction level and preferred coping strategies and (2) assess patient satisfaction and coping mechanisms pre- and postintervention. Patients on methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) in Terengganu, Malaysia, were randomized into either MMT or MMT plus auricular acupuncture (MMT + AA) groups. All received the standard MMT, while participants on MMT + AA underwent concurrent AA session thrice weekly for 2 months (each session = 30 minutes). Data analysis was carried out using SPSS 16.0, employing descriptive and nonparametric statistics. Participations were received from 97 eligible male patients (median age = 36.0 years; Malay = 97.9%). After screening for dropouts, only 69 patients were considered for subsequent analysis (MMT = 40; MMT + AA = 29). At preintervention, both groups did not differ significantly in the parameters investigated. During postintervention, no significant difference was detected for satisfaction level but coping-wise, substance use was significantly and frequently adopted by MMT + AA patients compared to MMT respondents (P < .05). On separate analysis, those who received MMT alone adopted active coping, venting, and self-blame significantly more frequently postintervention (P < .05). Nevertheless, no significant difference for coping styles of MMT + AA patients was exhibited over time (P >.05). The addition of AA therapy into the standard MMT treatment did not seem to influence patient satisfaction and their coping ways. PMID:23764566

  12. Limb Differences in the Therapeutic Effects of Complex Decongestive Therapy on Edema, Quality of Life, and Satisfaction in Lymphedema Patients

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Sujin; Yoon, Tae Hee; Chang, Hyun Ju; Chu, In Ho; Kim, Jung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the changing patterns of edema, quality of life (QOL), and patient-satisfaction after complex decongestive therapy (CDT) in three trajectories: arm lymphedema (AL), secondary leg lymphedema (LL) and primary leg lymphedema (PL). Methods Candidates for AL (n=35), LL (n=35) and PL (n=14) were identified from prospective databases. The patients were treated with CDT for 2 weeks, and lymphedema volume was measured before and immediately following the therapy. Patients then self-administered home therapy for 3 months and presented for a follow-up visit. The Korean version of Short Form-36 (SF-36) was used to assess QOL, and we administered a study-specific satisfaction survey. Results There was no significant difference in the volume reductions between the 3 groups. There were no significant differences in all of the measures between PL and LL. Overall initial QOL was significantly lower in patients with LL than in patients with AL. SF-36 scores post-CDT did not differ significantly between AL and LL. Clinically significant differences were noted between AL and LL in the mean values of the satisfaction survey. Conclusion AL, LL, and PL may have different longitudinal courses. We suggest that lower extremity lymphedema patients present more favorable outcomes after CDT with respect to QOL and satisfaction than upper extremity lymphedema patients. Clinicians should approach patients with different therapeutic considerations specific to each type or region of lymphedema before using CDT in clinical practice. PMID:26161340

  13. Examining Correlates of Part-Time Faculty Affective Commitment and Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duhn, Samantha Tiffany

    2013-01-01

    Changes in a multitude of factors including the economy, student enrollment, university goals and policies, and the available talent pool have created an imbalance in the supply and demand for qualified part-time faculty. The unmet demand has prompted university leaders to seek an understanding of part-time faculty affective commitment, job…

  14. Put a Face to a Name (Part A): The Effects of Photographic Aids on Patient Satisfaction, Clinician Communication, and Quality of Care

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-04

    Effects of Photographic Aids (Photos of Faces) on Patient Recall of Their Clinical Care Team; Effects of Photographic Aids (Photos of Faces) on Clinician-patient Communication; Effects of Photographic Aids (Photos of Faces) on Overall Patient Satisfaction

  15. EHR-based Visualization Tool: Adoption Rates, Satisfaction, and Patient Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Foraker, Randi E.; Kite, Bobbie; Kelley, Marjorie M.; Lai, Albert M.; Roth, Caryn; Lopetegui, Marcelo A.; Shoben, Abigail B.; Langan, Michael; Rutledge, Nicole L.; Payne, Philip R. O.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Electronic health records (EHRs) have the potential to enhance patient-provider communication and improve patient outcomes. However, in order to impact patient care, clinical decision support (CDS) and communication tools targeting such needs must be integrated into clinical workflow and be flexible with regard to the changing health care landscape. Design: The Stroke Prevention in Healthcare Delivery Environments (SPHERE) team developed and implemented the SPHERE tool, an EHR-based CDS visualization, to enhance patient-provider communication around cardiovascular health (CVH) within an outpatient primary care setting of a large academic medical center. Implementation: We describe our successful CDS alert implementation strategy and report adoption rates. We also present results of a provider satisfaction survey showing that the SPHERE tool delivers appropriate content in a timely manner. Patient outcomes following implementation of the tool indicate one-year improvements in some CVH metrics, such as body mass index and diabetes. Discussion: Clinical decision-making and practices change rapidly and in parallel to simultaneous changes in the health care landscape and EHR usage. Based on these observations and our preliminary results, we have found that an integrated, extensible, and workflow-aware CDS tool is critical to enhancing patient-provider communications and influencing patient outcomes. PMID:26290891

  16. Treatment patterns, treatment satisfaction, severity of disease problems, and quality of life in patients with psoriasis in three Nordic countries.

    PubMed

    Ragnarson Tennvall, Gunnel; Hjortsberg, Catharina; Bjarnason, Anton; Gniadecki, Robert; Heikkilä, Hannele; Jemec, Gregor B E; Kragballe, Knud; Miller, Iben M; Svensson, Åke

    2013-07-01

    Biological drugs are expensive, but can reduce symptoms and increase quality of life for patients with psoriasis. The aim of this study was to examine quality of life, disease severity and treatment satisfaction in Danish, Finnish and Swedish patients with psoriasis. Based on 12 months' data from patient surveys and chart reviews, 3 treatment groups were identified: topical, systemic and/or biological <12 months, and biological for 12 months. Regression analyses were performed to investigate influence on treatment satisfaction, disease problems and quality of life. Patients treated with biological drugs for 12 months showed the highest treatment satisfaction and the lowest Dermatology Life Quality Index score. A number of patients with topical treatment reported low quality of life, severe or very severe disease problems, and low treatment satisfaction. Some patients with psoriasis may be under-treated and might benefit from a more aggressive treatment strategy. It is important, however, that resource utilization is optimized and patients are not treated with more advanced agents than necessary. PMID:23138500

  17. Visual Outcomes and Patient Satisfaction after Refractive Lens Exchange with a Single-Piece Diffractive Multifocal Intraocular Lens

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To report visual outcomes and patient satisfaction after unilateral or bilateral refractive lens exchange (RLE) with a single-piece bifocal diffractive multifocal intraocular lens (MIOL). Methods. All patients underwent RLE with the ZMB00 MIOL (Abbott Medical Optics). Patient charts were reviewed to evaluate the distance, intermediate, and near visual acuity (VA), contrast sensitivity, extent of visual symptoms (0–5), satisfaction (1–5), and rate of spectacle independence between unilateral and bilateral RLE group. Results. Forty-seven eyes of 28 patients were included. No intraoperative complications developed. Mean monocular uncorrected VA at distance, intermediate (67 cm), and near (30 cm) were 0.01 ± 0.12 (standard deviation), 0.27 ± 0.18, and 0.15 ± 0.11, respectively. No eyes lost >1 line of corrected distance VA. Monocular contrast sensitivity remained at normal level. Median scores of halos, night glare, and starbursts for 27 patients were 2.0, 3.0, and 0.0, respectively. Median score of satisfaction was 4.0. There were no differences in visual symptom scores or satisfaction between unilateral and bilateral group (P > 0.05). Eighty percent of 25 patients reported total spectacle freedom, with similar rate between bilateral (82%) and unilateral group (75%) (P = 1.000). Conclusions. RLE with the bifocal diffractive MIOL was safe in presbyopic patients and resulted in a high rate of spectacle independence. PMID:25505974

  18. Patient satisfaction as a predictor of return-to-provider behavior: analysis and assessment of financial implications.

    PubMed

    Garman, Andrew N; Garcia, Joanne; Hargreaves, Marcia

    2004-01-01

    Although customer loyalty is frequently cited as a benefit of patient satisfaction, an empirical link between the two has not, to our knowledge, ever been statistically established in a hospital setting. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between self-reported patient satisfaction measures and subsequent return to the provider for care at a large academic medical center. Data from all adult medical patients responding to a patient satisfaction survey distributed by a large midwestern academic medical center during fiscal year 1997 (n = 1485) were analyzed. Response patterns were examined as they related to whether patients returned to the provider during the subsequent 2-year period. Analyses suggested that return-to-provider was associated with only a minority of the satisfaction items (approx. 11%). All items showing a significant relationship measured perceptions of how well physicians and nurses attended to, and provided information to, patients and their families. Although the size of these relationships was generally small, the estimated financial implications are substantial. Other implications of these findings for planning effective service improvement initiatives as well as improving patient survey design are discussed. PMID:14976909

  19. User views of a regional secure unit--findings from a patient satisfaction survey.

    PubMed

    Ford, K; Sweeney, J; Farrington, A

    1999-05-01

    This paper includes key findings of a patient satisfaction survey, conducted within an English Medium Secure Unit, offering care and treatment for 45 male and female mentally disordered offenders. It aims to identify patients' perceptions of the quality of their care and other aspects of their lives within the secure unit. Following permission from the local Ethics Committee, two interviewers collected data within a two week period, using a semi-structured interview schedule. All but three of the respondents agreed to be interviewed. Talking to nurses was perceived as highly satisfying. However, provision for specific cultural and women's needs, facilities for visitors, opportunities to practise religious beliefs and access to care plans were highlighted as unsatisfactory. The study concludes with recommendations for improvement, some of which have already been considered and implemented. PMID:10734845

  20. Unstable embodiments: a phenomenological interpretation of patient satisfaction with treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Hudak, Pamela L; McKeever, Patricia; Wright, James G

    2007-03-01

    Many patients experience aspects of treatment and care as dehumanizing because the body is considered separate from the self and its life context. An attempt to transcend viewing persons in dualistic terms is posed by phenomenologists who focus not on "the body" as such but on what it means to be "embodied." In this paper, we review the relevance of the phenomenology of the body for health care and report the results of comparing Sally Gadow's phenomenological insights about body-self unity with a qualitative analysis of patients' accounts of satisfaction with the outcome of hand surgery. We illustrate the ways in which our findings were and were not congruent with Gadow's conceptualization of embodiment and highlight aspects that are ambiguous. We conclude that the body-self dialectical relationship should be recast as a body-self-society trialectic and discuss the implications of this new conceptualization for clinical practices. PMID:17333378

  1. The Mediator Roles of Life Satisfaction and Self-Esteem between the Affective Components of Psychological Well-Being and the Cognitive Symptoms of Problematic Internet Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senol-Durak, Emre; Durak, Mithat

    2011-01-01

    The factors associated with cognitions about problematic Internet use have been empirically tested in various studies. The aim of the present study was to examine the mediator roles of both life satisfaction and self-esteem between affective components of subjective well-being and cognitions about problematic Internet use. For this purpose, the…

  2. Associations among Overt and Relational Victimization and Adolescents' Satisfaction with Friends: The Moderating Role of the Need for Affective Relationships with Friends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gini, Gianluca

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the relationships among overt and relational victimization and adolescents' satisfaction with friends. We also tested the influence of the need for affective relationships with friends. A total of 409 Italian adolescent boys and girls (age range = 14-16, M = 15.02 years, SD = 2.58) completed a self-report measure of…

  3. An investigation into the effects of quality improvement method on patients' satisfaction: a semi experimental research in Iran.

    PubMed

    Navipour, Hasan; Nayeri, Nahid Dehghan; Hooshmand, Abbas; Zargar, Marjaneh Taghavi

    2011-01-01

    Today, to increase effectiveness is a Strategy for success of organizations and their viability. In health care organization not only service cost- effectiveness is a major problem for productivity and organizational management but also customer-centred is in first priority. Because of these reasons, most of health organization trend to patient satisfaction for their viability. If complex process implemented for viability without attention to patient satisfaction, this is no success result. The FOCUS PDCA process is a new strategy for effectiveness of service quality. To this reason, the recent research done and its objective is to assess effect of FOCUS PDCA process strategy on patient satisfaction in surgery units of hospitals affiliated to Tehran Medical University. This research is a semi experimental with non- equivalent design. The sample was all of patients who hospitalized in two selected surgery units. Self-report was method of data gathering. Patient satisfaction assessed with questionnaire in pre and posttest. Then manipulation implemented as post-operation care process selected. Modelling and opportunity statement Diagrams prepared and improvement team organized. Flow process, convergences and cause- effect charts used to prepare list of items to be improved. Executive program was written. This include personnel training, standard implementation, election and training of quality control nurses (Q.C Ns), daily QC of caring and providing appropriate feed back to personnel, forming group session for determining corrective actions. Then after 1 month patient satisfaction was assessed. Statistical analysis shows this process increase patient satisfaction and it leads to care effectiveness. The findings of the pre-intervention phase indicated that the satisfaction level had been low in both groups and it is not significantly different in the two groups (P> 0.05). There was a significant difference before and after following intervention in the case study

  4. Patient Satisfaction with Methadone Maintenance Treatment in Vietnam: A Comparison of Different Integrative-Service Delivery Models

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Bach Xuan; Nguyen, Long Hoang; Phan, Huong Thu Thi; Latkin, Carl A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is an important component of quality in healthcare delivery. To inform the expansion of Methadone Maintenance Treatment (MMT) services in Vietnam, we examined the satisfaction of patients with regards to different services delivery models and identified its associated factors. Methods We interviewed 1,016 MMT patients at 5 clinics in Hanoi and Nam Dinh province. The modified SATIS instrument, a 10-item scale, was used to measure three dimensions: “Services quality and convenience”, “Health workers’ capacity and responsiveness” and “Inter-professional care”. Results The average score was high across three SATIS dimensions. However, only one third of patients completely satisfied with general health services and treatment outcomes. Older age, higher education, having any problem in self-care and anxiety/depression were negatively associated with patient’s satisfaction. Meanwhile, patients receiving MMT at clinics, where more comprehensive HIV and general health care services were available, were more likely to report a complete satisfaction. Conclusion Patients were highly satisfied with MMT services in Vietnam. However, treatment for drug users should go beyond methadone maintenance to address complicated health demands of drug users. Integrating MMT with comprehensive HIV and general health services together with improving the capacity of health workers and efficiency of services organisation to provide interconnected health care for drug users are critical for improving the outcomes of the MMT program. PMID:26556036

  5. Safety, efficacy, and life satisfaction following epilepsy surgery in patients aged 60 years and older.

    PubMed

    Dewar, Sandra; Eliashiv, Dawn; Walshaw, Patricia D; Engel, Jerome; Fried, Itzhak; Moseley, Brian D

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT Despite its potential to offer seizure freedom, resective epilepsy surgery (RES) is seldom performed in patients 60 years of age or older. Demonstrating successful outcomes including an improved quality of life may raise awareness about the advantages of referring this underrepresented population for specialized evaluation. Accordingly, the authors investigated outcomes and life fulfillment in patients with an age ≥ 60 years who had undergone RES. METHODS All patients who, at the age of 60 years or older, had undergone RES for medically refractory focal onset seizures at the authors' center were evaluated. A modified Liverpool Life Fulfillment (LLF) tool was administered postoperatively (maximum score 32). Seizure outcomes were classified according to the Engel classification system. RESULTS Twelve patients underwent RES. The majority of patients (9 [75%] of 12) had at least 1 medical comorbidity in addition to seizures. The mean follow-up was 3.1 ± 2.1 years. At the time of the final follow-up, 11 (91.7%) of 12 patients were documented as having a good postsurgical outcome (Engel Class I-II). Half (6 of 12 patients) were completely seizure free (Engel Class IA). Liverpool Life Fulfillment (LLF) data were available for 11 patients. Following surgery, the mean LLF score was 26.7 ± 6. Eight patients (72.7%) noted excellent satisfaction with their RES, with 5 (45.5%) noting postoperative improvements in overall health. CONCLUSIONS Resective epilepsy surgery is safe and effective in patients with an age ≥ 60 years. Over 90% had a good surgical outcome, with 50% becoming completely seizure free despite 1 or more medical comorbidities in the majority. The study data indicated that an advancing age should not negatively influence consideration for RES. PMID:26381254

  6. Safety, efficacy, and life satisfaction following epilepsy surgery in patients aged 60 years and older

    PubMed Central

    Dewar, Sandra; Eliashiv, Dawn; Walshaw, Patricia D.; Engel, Jerome; Fried, Itzhak; Moseley, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Despite its potential to offer seizure freedom, resective epilepsy surgery (RES) is seldom performed in patients 60 years of age or older. Demonstrating successful outcomes including an improved quality of life may raise awareness about the advantages of referring this underrepresented population for specialized evaluation. Accordingly, the authors investigated outcomes and life fulfillment in patients with an age ≥ 60 years who had undergone RES. METHODS All patients who, at the age of 60 years or older, had undergone RES for medically refractory focal onset seizures at the authors’ center were evaluated. A modified Liverpool Life Fulfillment (LLF) tool was administered postoperatively (maximum score 32). Seizure outcomes were classified according to the Engel classification system. RESULTS Twelve patients underwent RES. The majority of patients (9 [75%] of 12) had at least 1 medical comorbidity in addition to seizures. The mean follow-up was 3.1 ± 2.1 years. At the time of the final follow-up, 11 (91.7%) of 12 patients were documented as having a good postsurgical outcome (Engel Class I–II). Half (6 of 12 patients) were completely seizure free (Engel Class IA). Liverpool Life Fulfillment (LLF) data were available for 11 patients. Following surgery, the mean LLF score was 26.7 ± 6. Eight patients (72.7%) noted excellent satisfaction with their RES, with 5 (45.5%) noting postoperative improvements in overall health. CONCLUSIONS Resective epilepsy surgery is safe and effective in patients with an age ≥ 60 years. Over 90% had a good surgical outcome, with 50% becoming completely seizure free despite 1 or more medical comorbidities in the majority. The study data indicated that an advancing age should not negatively influence consideration for RES. PMID:26381254

  7. Therapy satisfaction and adherence in patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis: the THEPA-MS survey

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Rocco; Kullmann, Jennifer S.; Ziemssen, Tjalf

    2016-01-01

    Background: Improved clinical effectiveness and therefore positive modification of multiple sclerosis (MS) with basic therapy can be achieved by long-term regular intake of drugs as prescribed but investigations have shown that a high percentage of patients do not take their medications as prescribed. Objectives: We assessed the satisfaction and adherence of patients with MS with their current disease-modifying treatment under clinical practice conditions. We compared different facets of satisfaction as well as their internal relationship and identified predictors in an exploratory manner. Methods: Therapy satisfaction in patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis (THEPA-MS) was a noninterventional, prospective cross-sectional study performed throughout Germany in 2013 and 2014, and included patients with clinically isolated syndrome or relapsing–remitting MS. We applied a standardized approach to document satisfaction and adherence by patient-reported outcomes (Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication) as well as by physician ratings. Results: Of 3312 patients with a mean age of 43.7 years, 73.3% were women and the mean level of disability according to the Expanded Disability Status Scale was 2.29; 13.3% did not receive any medication at the time of documentation, 21.3% received interferon β1a intramuscularly, 20.7% had interferon β1a subcutaneously, 17.0% had interferon β1b subcutaneously and 23.7% had glatiramer acetate. Adherence rates varied between 60% (lifetime) and 96.5% (current medication). Differences between current medications were found for side effects and convenience scores but not for effectiveness, satisfaction and adherence. Higher global satisfaction and effectiveness were associated with fewer relapses, longer duration of medication, lower disability score and the absence of several side effects. Conclusion: In a connected model of patient satisfaction, effectiveness, side effects, convenience and adherence

  8. Long-term survival and patient satisfaction with inflatable penile prosthesis for the treatment of erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yoon Seob; Ko, Young Hwii; Song, Phil Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the long-term survival and patient satisfaction with an inflatable penile prosthesis as a treatment for refractory erectile dysfunction (ED). Materials and Methods Between July 1997 and September 2014, a total of 74 patients underwent implantation of an inflatable penile prosthesis. The present mechanical status of the prosthesis was ascertained by telephone interview and review of medical records, and related clinical factors were analyzed by using Cox proportional hazard regression model. To investigate current status and satisfaction with the devices, novel questionnaires consisting of eight items were administered. Results The mean (±standard deviation) age and follow-up period were 57.0±12.2 years and 105.5±64.0 months, respectively. Sixteen patients (21.6%) experienced a mechanical failure and 4 patients (5.4%) experienced a nonmechanical failure at a median follow-up of 98.0 months. Mechanical and overall survival rates of the inflatable penile prosthesis at 5, 10, and 15 years were 93.3%, 76.5%, and 64.8% and 89.1%, 71.4%, and 60.5%, respectively, without a statistically significant correlation with host factors including age, cause of ED, and presence of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Overall, 53 patients (71.6%) completed the questionnaires. The overall patient satisfaction rate was 86.8%, and 83.0% of the patients replied that they intended to repeat the same procedure. Among the 8 items asked, satisfaction with the rigidity of the device received the highest score (90.6%). In contrast, only 60.4% of subjects experienced orgasm. Conclusions The results of our study suggest that excellent long-term reliability and high patient satisfaction rates make the implantation of an inflatable penile prosthesis a recommendable surgical treatment for refractory ED. PMID:26078844

  9. Predictive Factors of Patient Satisfaction with Pharmacy Services in South Korea: A Cross-Sectional Study of National Level Data

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sunkyung; Godwin, Onyeka Peter; Kim, Kyungah; Lee, Euni

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Patient satisfaction has emerged as a prerequisite to improving patients’ health behaviors leading to better health care outcomes. This study was to identify predictive determinants for patient satisfaction with pharmacy services using national-level data. Methods A cross-sectional evaluation was conducted using 2008 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) data. To assess the predictive factors for patient satisfaction with pharmacy services, an ordinal logistic regression model was conducted adjusting for patient characteristics, clinical comorbidities, and perception of health. Results A total of 9,744 people, a representative sample of 48.2 million Koreans, participated in the 2008 KNHANES, of whom 2,188 (23.6%) reported visits to pharmacy within the last 2 weeks prior to the survey. Of the patients who visited the pharmacy, 74.6% reported to be either “very satisfied” or “satisfied,” and 25.4% responded as being “neutral,” “dissatisfied,” or “very dissatisfied.” A multivariate ordinal logistic regression analysis with weighted observations revealed that patients with fair perception of health (adjusted OR 1.32; 95% CI 1.01–1.74; p<0.05) and those with middle to low family incomes (adjusted OR 1.34; 95% CI 1.02–1.76; p<0.05) were more likely to be satisfied with pharmacy services, and employment-based insurers were less likely to be satisfied with pharmacy services (adjusted OR 0.80; 95% CI 0.65–0.97; p<0.05). Conclusion Our findings indicated that three out of four patients expressed satisfaction toward pharmacy services. Middle to low family incomes, fair perception of health, and employee insured individuals were significant predictors of patient satisfaction with pharmacy services. PMID:26540165

  10. Quality of life, clinical effectiveness, and satisfaction in patients with beta thalassemia major and sickle cell anemia receiving deferasirox chelation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Senol, Sefika Pinar; Tiftik, Eyup Naci; Unal, Selma; Akdeniz, Aydan; Tasdelen, Bahar; Tunctan, Bahar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: There is a need to remove excess iron with iron chelation therapy (ICT) to avoid the serious clinical sequelae associated with iron overload in patients with beta thalassemia major (BTM) and sickle cell anemia (SCA). Due to the effects of the diseases and their treatments, ICT is still a major reason for unsatisfactory compliance. The aim of this single-center observational study was to evaluate the quality of life, clinical effectiveness, and satisfaction in pediatric and adult patients with BTM and SCA receiving deferasirox (DFX) chelation therapy. Methods: In this study, 37 pediatric and 35 adult patients with BTM or SCA receiving DFX for at least 6 months participated. Upon receipt of Informed Consent Form, Case Report Form, Demographic Data Collection Form, Child Health Questionnaire-Parent Form, Life Quality Survey Short Form-36, and ICT Satisfaction Survey were used to obtain data for the effectiveness of ICT and parameters that may affect compliance to treatment and life quality of the participants. Results: As a main index for the effectiveness of DFX chelation therapy, serum ferritin levels were higher than the normal values in the patients receiving DFX. The increased ferritin levels were also associated with hematological and biochemical abnormalities. Our findings regarding quality of life and satisfaction with DFX chelation therapy indicated that the patients with BTM or SCA had lower scores. Overall, problems with treatment regimen and side effects appeared to be common causes of poor compliance to DFX chelation therapy. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that health care providers should be aware of the importance of monitoring iron load with timely initiation of DFX chelation therapy and ongoing adjustments to chelation regimens and/or transfusion methods to decrease hospitalizations and improve compliance to ICT of the patients with BTM and SCA. PMID:27057126

  11. Urologists' Perceptions and Practice Patterns in Peyronie's Disease: A Korean Nationwide Survey Including Patient Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young Hwii; Moon, Ki Hak; Lee, Sung Won; Kim, Sae Woong; Yang, Dae Yul; Moon, Du Geon; Chung, Woo Sik; Oh, Kyung Jin; Hyun, Jae Seog; Ryu, Ji Kan; Park, Hyun Jun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A nationwide survey was conducted of Korean urologists to illustrate physicians' perceptions and real practical patterns regarding Peyronie disease (PD). Materials and Methods A specially designed questionnaire exploring practice characteristics and attitudes regarding PD, as well as patient satisfaction with each treatment modality, was e-mailed to 2,421 randomly selected urologists. Results Responses were received from 385 practicing urologists (15.9%) with a median time after certification as an urologist of 12 years. Regarding the natural course, 87% of respondents believed that PD is a progressive disease, and 82% replied that spontaneous healing in PD occurred in fewer than 20% of patients. Regarding diagnosis of PD, the methods used were, in order, history taking with physical examination (98%), International Index of Erectile Function questionnaires (40%), intracavernous injection and stimulation (35%), and duplex sonography (28%). Vitamin E was most preferred as an initial medical management (80.2%), followed by phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (27.4%) and Potaba (aminobenzoate potassium, 20.1%). For urologists who administered intralesional injection, the injected agent was, in order, corticosteroid (72.2%), verapamil (45.1%), and interferon (3.2%). The most frequently performed surgical procedure was plication (84.1%), followed by excision and graft (42.9%) and penile prosthesis implantation (14.2%). Among the most popular treatments in each modality, the urologists' perceptions regarding the suitability of treatment and patient satisfaction were significantly different, favoring plication surgery. Conclusions The practice pattern of urologists depicted in this survey is in line with currently available Western guidelines, which indicates the need for development of further local guidelines based on solid clinical data. PMID:24466399

  12. Patient Satisfaction with Community Health Service Centers as Gatekeepers and the Influencing Factors: A Cross-Sectional Study in Shenzhen, China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huiqing; Lin, Yingyu; Dong, Xiaoxin; Yin, Xiaoxu; Lu, Zuxun; Cao, Shiyi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Shenzhen is the first pilot city in China implementing the gatekeeper policy, with community health service (CHS) centers as the gatekeepers. We aim to investigate patient satisfaction with this policy and its influencing factors in Shenzhen. Methods 3,848 patients visiting eight CHS centers in Shenzhen of China between May 1 and July 28, 2013 were recruited. We interviewed them using a structured questionnaire to investigate their satisfaction with the gatekeeper policy of CHS. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify influencing factors. Results Of the respondents, 28.17%, 47.27% and 24.56% were satisfied with, neutral to, and not satisfied with the gatekeeper policy respectively. Patient satisfaction with this policy was found to be associated with education level, familiarity with the policy, referral experience, satisfaction with convenience of seeing a doctor, satisfaction with waiting time, satisfaction with medical facility, satisfaction with general medical practitioners’ professional skill, and proportion of expense reimbursed. Conclusions Our investigation shows that patient satisfaction with the gatekeeper policy was low. To improve patient satisfaction, efforts should be made to increase the convenience of seeing a doctor in community, shorten waiting time, improve general medical practitioners’ professional skill, and increase proportion of expense reimbursement. PMID:27552228

  13. Improving customer satisfaction and quality: hospitals recognized by J.D. power and associates share insights on meeting patient and employee needs.

    PubMed

    2003-08-01

    For 35 years, J.D. Power and Associates has presented its much-coveted awards recognizing product and service quality and customer satisfaction in a variety of industries. This year, the company added a new category: hospitals. To better understand patients' reactions to their hospital experiences, the company looked at five key drivers of customer satisfaction: dignity and respect, speed and efficiency, comfort, information and communication, and emotional support. This issue looks at five hospitals recognized by the company for their service excellence and why they emphasize employee satisfaction as well as patient satisfaction. PMID:12961834

  14. Reconstructive surgery for hypospadias: A systematic review of long-term patient satisfaction with cosmetic outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Julie; Bracka, Aivar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Research on long-term results of hypospadias has focused on surgical techniques and functional outcomes, and it is only recently that patient satisfaction with appearance and psychosocial outcomes have been considered. The aim of this study was to provide an evidence-based systematic review of adolescent and adult patient perceptions of cosmetic outcomes following childhood surgery for hypospadias. Methods: A systematic review was performed in accordance with the PRISMA and PICO guidelines, and studies assessed using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine system. MEDLINE, PsycInfo, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases were searched from 1974 to 2014 for clinical studies containing patient perceptions of appearance, deformity, and social embarrassment following hypospadias surgery. Results: A total of 495 publications were retrieved, of which 28 met the inclusion criteria. Due to study design/outcome measure, heterogeneity data were synthesized narratively. Results indicate (i) patient perceptions of penile size do not differ greatly from the norm; (ii) perceptions of appearance findings are inconsistent, partially due to improving surgical techniques; (iii) patients who are approaching, or have reached, sexual maturity hold more negative perceptions and are more critical about the cosmetic outcomes of surgery than their prepubertal counterparts; (iv) patients report high levels of perceptions of deformity and social embarrassment; and (v) there is a lack of data using validated measurement tools assessing long-term patient perceptions of cosmetic outcomes, particularly with patients who have reached genital maturity. Conclusions: Protocols for clinical postpuberty follow-up and methodologically sound studies, using validated assessment tools, are required for the accurate assessment of cosmetic and psychological outcomes of hypospadias surgery. PMID:27127350

  15. Satisfaction With Methadone Among Heroin-Dependent Patients With Current Substance Use Disorders During Methadone Maintenance Treatment.

    PubMed

    Perez de Los Cobos, Jose; Trujols, Joan; Siñol, Núria; Duran-Sindreu, Santiago; Batlle, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) has long been used to treat heroin-dependent patients. However, satisfaction with methadone in this patient population is unknown. The aim of this cross-sectional case-control study was to evaluate satisfaction with methadone in heroin-dependent patients with current substance use disorders (SUDs). Cases included 152 methadone-maintained patients with current SUD, requiring inpatient detoxification treatment, and controls included 33 methadone-maintained patients in sustained full remission for SUD. Satisfaction with methadone as a medication to treat heroin addiction was measured by using the Scale to Assess Satisfaction with Medications for Addiction Treatment-methadone for heroin addiction (SASMAT-METHER). The SASMAT-METHER subscales assess the following domains: personal functioning and well-being, antiaddictive effect on heroin, and antiaddictive effect on other substances. Compared with patients with remitted SUD, patients with current SUD scored lower on all SASMAT-METHER assessments. In such patients, overall SASMAT-METHER scores were independently and negatively associated with downward desired adjustment of methadone dose and days of heroin use during last month; although various sets of factors were independently associated with each of the SASMAT-METHER subscales, the only determinant of dissatisfaction on all subscales was the desire for downward adjustment of methadone dose. In summary, MMT patients with current SUD are less satisfied with methadone than MMT patients with remitted SUD. In patients with current SUD, downward desired adjustment of methadone dose and days of heroin use during last month are independently associated with overall dissatisfaction with methadone. PMID:26825608

  16. Nuclear cardiology patient tracking using a palm-based device: methods and clinician satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Khan M; Butcher, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    Handheld personal computers are popular, easy to use, inexpensive, portable, and can share data among different operating systems. In our institution, nuclear cardiology testing is performed in the nuclear medicine department and jointly reported by radiologists and cardiologists. The objective of this article is to describe a system for recording nuclear cardiology data and to assess clinician satisfaction using handheld computers with the Palm Operating System. We devised a Palm-based relational database/ using commercially available software (HanDBase) that requires minimal computer expertise to implement and maintain. Data are collected by the cardiologist and synchronized to a single central relational database compatible with Microsoft Access. We assessed cardiologists' satisfaction with this system. Cardiologists unanimously agreed that this system had a positive impact on patient management and cardiology fellow education. They were satisfied with ease of data input, sharing, retrieval, and clarity of data display. The cardiologist with the least experience in using the software took longer to input data and thought that it prolonged the nuclear cardiology rounds. The idea to develop this software was to ease data entry using shortcuts and lists, limiting data stored to that essential for patient management and also to transmit data easily between staff. The cardiologist with the most experience in using the software felt more comfortable and satisfied with it. This was perhaps due to his continuous involvement in the development of this system. Like any new system, there is a learning curve in using this software. The software was easy to customize, and support and tutorials were found on the manufacturer's Web site. The system of collecting data using handheld computers with the Palm Operating System is easy to use, relatively inexpensive, accurate, and secure. The user-friendly system provides prompt, complete, and accurate data, enhancing the education

  17. Developing a patient satisfaction questionnaire for services provided in Iranian community pharmacies

    PubMed Central

    Yaghoubifard, Saeed; Rashidian, Arash; Kebriaeezadeh, Abbas; Sheidaei, Ali; Varmaghani, Mehdi; Hashemi-Meshkini, Amir; Zekri, Hedieh-Sadat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop a valid and reliable instrument in the Persian language for evaluating patient satisfaction with services provided in community pharmacies. Methods: We selected a valid and reliable instrument from the literature and translated it to the Persian language. Some new items were added to the first draft based on the special characteristics of the Iranian health system. Then, the feasibility of utilizing the new instrument was assessed. In the third step, we conducted a formal content validity study to calculate content validity indices. Having completed the content validity study, the factorial structure of new instruments was determined by implementing a factorial analysis. Finally, the reliability of the instrument was assessed by assessment of Cronbach's alpha coefficient and test-retest reliability. Findings: The developed instrument demonstrated suitable validity and reliability. The final instrument showed desirable content validity, with inter-rater agreement of 94% and 97% for relevance and clarity, respectively. Scale content validity indices for relevance and clarity were calculated as 96% and 92%, respectively, and comprehensiveness was calculated as 100%. Factor analysis resulted in seven factors with a cumulative variance of 62.14%. In internal consistency reliability, Cronbach's alpha for the whole instrument was 0.912. About test-retest reliability, six items showed almost perfect agreement, 18 items showed substantial agreement, and three items showed moderate agreement. Therefore, test-retest reliability assessment too demonstrated appropriate results. Conclusion: The instrument demonstrated excellent validity and reliability for application in Iran. This instrument is useful for evaluating patient satisfaction with services provided in community pharmacies in the Persian-speaking communities. PMID:27162804

  18. Roundtable on public policy affecting patient safety.

    PubMed

    Crane, Robert M; Raymond, Brian

    2011-03-01

    On April 15, 2010, patient safety experts were assembled to discuss the adequacy of the public policy response to the Institute of Medicine report "To Err is Human" 10 years after its publication. The experts concluded that additional government actions should be considered. Actions that deserve consideration include the development of an educational campaign to improve public and provider understanding of the issue as a means to support change similar to successful public health campaigns, support the evolution of payment reform away from fee for service, create a clearer aim or goal for patient safety activities, support the development and use of better safety measures to judge status and improvement, and support for additional learning of what works particularly on implementation issues. Participants included: Moderator Robert Crane, senior advisor, Kaiser Permanente Participants Doug Bonacum, vice president, Safety Management, Kaiser Permanente Janet Corrigan, PhD, president and CEO, National Quality Forum Helen Darling, MA, president and CEO, National Business Group on Health Susan Edgman-Levitan, PA, executive director, John D. Stoeckle Center for Primary Care Innovation, Massachusetts General Hospital David M. Lawrence, MD, MPH, chairman and CEO (Retired), Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and Hospitals, Inc Lucian Leape, MD, adjunct professor of Health Policy, Harvard School of Public Health Diane C. Pinakiewicz, president, National Patient Safety Foundation Robert M. Wachter, MD, professor and associate chairman, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco. PMID:22026014

  19. Intense pulsed light for skin rejuvenation, hair removal, and vascular lesions: a patient satisfaction study and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Lucian; Carmi, Nurit; Fodor, Adriana; Ramon, Ytzhack; Ullmann, Yehuda

    2009-04-01

    There are very few studies in the English literature that evaluate the patient satisfaction after treatment using intense pulsed light (IPL) and there is no reported study comparing the results of the three major IPL applications: rejuvenation, hair removal, and treatment of small vascular lesions. This study was designed to compare results after IPL treatment for skin rejuvenation, hair removal, and vascular lesions. Three groups of 30 consecutive patients having skin rejuvenation, hair removal, and small vascular lesions were selected and treated with the same IPL system. The evaluation was performed 1 year after the last treatment for the following parameters: age, sex, skin type, satisfaction, willingness to continue the treatment, willingness to recommend the treatment, and complications. Most of the minor complications occurred in the rejuvenation group (86.6%). No complications were recorded for 67% of patients having hair removal and for 75% having vascular lesion treatment. There was no significant difference in the level of satisfaction between the 3 groups (Kruskal Wallis test; P = 0.257). No difference regarding satisfaction was recorded in this study, but complications were more frequently encountered after rejuvenation. The findings of this study are useful when discussing IPL treatments with patients considering IPL procedures. PMID:19325333

  20. The hidden competencies of healthcare: why self-esteem, accountability, and professionalism may affect hospital customer satisfaction scores.

    PubMed

    Decker, P J

    1999-01-01

    Data from 103 for-profit, nonprofit, and government-owned hospitals, spread across about half of the United States clearly show that there are common elements and several core competencies in all hospitals, some probably driven by JCAHO accreditation standards, but others coming from universal experience stemming from the changes in healthcare. The common competencies that are not, in my opinion, driven directly by the JCAHO standards include professionalism, accountability, self-esteem, customer service/focus, communication, information management/using data in decision making, and teamwork. There are several possible connections among the core competencies that suggest that the effects of accountability and possibly self-esteem on such outcomes as patient satisfaction and quality of care should be the subject of more research in healthcare settings. There are, however, several possible interventions to increase the core competency base of any hospital, which can be applied without this research. Executives and managers who attempt to measure and change these common competencies through selection, assessment, organizational system change, or reward and compensation systems will change the competence base of their workforce in critical areas needed in the future healthcare economy. Using a competence model incorporating these competencies may change the culture of the organization toward that which will be needed for survival in the twenty-first century. PMID:10847920

  1. Examining the Impact of Patient-Reported Hope for Improvement and Patient Satisfaction with Clinician/Treatment on the Outcome of Major Depressive Disorder Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Vilhauer, Jennice; Kwock, Richard; Wu, Fan; Gohar, Sherif; Collison, Katherine; Thomas, Shannon Nicole; Naghdechi, Lancer; Elashoff, David

    2016-01-01

    Aims This analysis aims at examining if patient-reported variables such as hope for improvement and patient satisfaction with clinician/treatment could influence the outcome major depressive disorder (MDD) treatment, namely depression remission, in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) trial. Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Place and Duration of Study The STAR*D study was conducted at 18 primary care and 23 psychiatric care settings in the United States from 2001–2007 and was funded by the National Institute of Mental health (NIMH). The analysis contained in this manuscript was conceptualized at the Cedars-Sinai Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences and performed at the UCLA School of Public Health. Methodology Using data from STAR*D, the current study used logistic regression and survival analyses to examine the relationship between depressive symptoms remission and two sets of self-reported factors: Hope for improvement and, Patient satisfaction with treatment/clinician. Results First, more than 90% of STAR*D patients reported having high hope for improvement (agree or strongly agree) and more than 66% endorsed high satisfaction with clinicians and more than 50% expressed high satisfaction with treatments (very or mostly satisfied). Second, hope for improvement was predictive of depression remission (p<0.05). Third, satisfaction with clinician/treatment, did not predict remission. Conclusion This study shows the impact that patients’ subjective hope for improvement can have on predicting depression remission in contrast to satisfaction with clinician/treatment. Future studies should prospectively incorporate patients’ subjective attitudes regarding hope for improvement and satisfaction with clinicians and treatments as mediators and moderators of MDD treatment success. PMID:27294164

  2. The Impact of Health Plan Delivery System Organization on Clinical Quality and Patient Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, Robin R; Chenok, Kate Eresian; Shortell, Stephen M; Pawlson, Gregory; Wimbush, Julian J

    2006-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which measures of health plan clinical performance and measures of patient perceptions of care are associated with health plan organizational characteristics, including the percentage of care provided based on a group or staff model delivery system, for-profit (tax) status, and affiliation with a national managed care firm. Data Sources Data describing health plans on region, age of health plan, for-profit status, affiliation with a national managed care firm, percentage of Medicare business, total enrollment, ratio of primary care physicians to specialists, HMO penetration, and form of health care delivery system (e.g., IPA, network, mixed, staff, group) were obtained from InterStudy. Clinical performance measures for women's health screening rates, child and adolescent immunization rates, heart disease screening rates, diabetes screening rates, and smoking cessation were developed from HEDIS® data. Measures of patient perceptions of care are obtained from CAHPS® survey data submitted as Healthplan Employer Data and Information Set, Consumer Assessment of Health Plans 2.0 H. Study Design Multivariate regression cross-sectional analysis of 272 health plans was used to evaluate the relationship of health plan characteristics with measures of clinical performance and patient perceptions of care. Principal Findings The form of delivery system, measured by percent of care delivered by staff and group model systems, is significantly related (p ≤ .05) with four of the five clinical performance indices but none of the three satisfaction performance indices. Other variables significantly associated with performance were being geographically located in the Northeast, having nonprofit status, and for patient satisfaction, not being part of a larger insurance company. Conclusions These comparative results provide evidence suggesting that the type of delivery system used by health plans is related to many

  3. Desperation and Other Affective States in Suicidal Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendin, Herbert; Maltsberger, John T.; Haas, Ann Pollinger; Szanto, Katalin; Rabinowicz, Heather

    2004-01-01

    Data collected from 26 therapists who were treating patients when they died by suicide were used to identify intense affective states in such patients preceding the suicide. Eleven therapists provided comparable data on 26 patients they had treated who were seriously depressed but not suicidal. Although the two groups had similar numbers diagnosed…

  4. Hearing and Patient Satisfaction Among 19 Patients Who Received Implants Intended for Hybrid Hearing: A Two-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Rask-Andersen, Helge

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To measure patient satisfaction and correlate to hearing results in partially deaf patients, after hearing preservation cochlear implant surgery with hybrid hearing strategy, and to evaluate the stability of residual low-frequency hearing (LFH) over time. Design: A patient satisfaction survey and a retrospective, 2-year follow-up journal study. Nineteen partially deaf patients intended for hybrid hearing responded to a questionnaire when they had used their cochlear implants for at least a year. The questionnaire consisted of the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids, EuroQol Group visual analogue scale and nine questions about hybrid hearing. Pure-tone audiometry, monosyllables, and hearing in noise test results from the patients’ medical records were evaluated and compared with the results from the patient satisfaction survey. Results: All of the patients were satisfied with their CIs. The mean International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids score was 29. The CIs provided a major contribution to the speech comprehension of these partially deaf patients. Two years after surgery, the patients’ mean binaural score on tests of monosyllables was 58%, and the mean signal to noise ratio was 4.6 dB. We observed ongoing deteriorations in the residual hearing of the operated ears that surpassed the deteriorations observed in the contralateral ears. One month after surgery, the LFH loss (125–500 Hz) was 17 dB, and after 2 years, this loss was 24 dB compared with 5 dB in the nonoperated ear. There were no significant correlations between preserved LFH and patient satisfaction or speech perception results. Conclusions: Electric stimulation provided a major contribution to speech comprehension of partially deaf patients. The gain reached in speech understanding widely exceeded the downside in losing some residual hearing. All the patients showed a high degree of satisfaction with their CIs regardless of varying hearing preservation. PMID:25932703

  5. Professionalism, patient satisfaction and quality of health care: experience during Zimbabwe's structural adjustment programme.

    PubMed

    Bassett, M T; Bijlmakers, L; Sanders, D M

    1997-12-01

    In 1991, Zimbabwe embarked on a structural adjustment programme. In the health sector, collection of fees was enforced and fees were later increased. Utilisation subsequently declined. This paper examines the perceptions of both government nurses and health care consumers regarding the impact of adjustment on overall quality of care, including nurse professionalism, the nurse-client relationship and patient satisfaction with care. These issues were explored in a series of focus group discussions held in December 1993, about three years after policy reforms. The discussions suggested many areas of shared concern (fees, drug availability, waiting times), but divergent views regarding the process of care. Nurses were concerned mainly with overwork and patient ingratitude, and failed to recognise nurse behaviour as a major source of patient dissatisfaction. Community women saw nurses as hardened and indifferent, especially in urban areas. These differences are rooted in the perceived class differences between nurses and the communities they serve, but appear to have sharpened during the period of structural adjustment. PMID:9447633

  6. Patients' satisfaction and spectacle independence after cataract surgery with multifocal intraocular lens implantation in a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Baig, Rashid; A Chaudhry, Tanveer; Kukreja, Saajan; Shakil, Sidra; Ahmad, Khabir

    2016-06-01

    This single group cohort study, undertaken at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from Jan 2012 to September 2013, assessed patients' satisfaction, spectacle independence and visual disturbance after implantation of multifocal IOLs. A total of 39 patients who underwent bilateral cataract surgery with multifocal IOL implantation were included for telephonic interviews. The mean age of participants was 55.5 ± 8.1 years. The mean follow up time was 9.60 ± 3.19 months. The overall satisfaction rate after surgery was found to be 84.6% and there was no statistically significant association of satisfaction with gender, age or education. In all 84.6%, 94.9% and 84.6% people had spectacle independence for far, intermediate and near, respectively. More than half of participants (59%) had some degree of visual disturbance. In this study, multifocal IOL implantation provided high levels of satisfaction and spectacle independence despite notable risk of halo or glare symptoms at night. Therefore, careful patient selection and preoperative counselling regarding possible risks and benefits is recommended. PMID:27339580

  7. Music for patients with hematological malignancies undergoing bone marrow biopsy: a randomized controlled study of anxiety, perceived pain, and patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Danhauer, Suzanne C.; Vishnevsky, Tanya; Campbell, Cassie R.; McCoy, Thomas P.; Tooze, Janet A.; Kanipe, Katherine N.; Arrington, Sheila A.; Holland, Elizabeth K.; Lynch, Mary B.; Hurd, David D.; Cruz, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the impact of random assignment to music versus usual care on anxiety, perceived pain level and patient satisfaction in patients undergoing bone marrow biopsies. Method Patients were randomized to music or usual care after completing a baseline questionnaire. All patients completed a post-procedure questionnaire. Results Study participants (N=59) had a mean age of 50.9 years (SD = 13.9; range 22–78). Post-procedure state anxiety (STAI) and pain rating (VAS) were not significantly different between groups (STAI p=0.766; VAS p=0.771). However, patient satisfaction with music was high; 66% of these patients said they very much preferred to listen to music at a future biopsy. Conclusions While there were no significant group differences for the music intervention compared to standard of care for anxiety or perceived pain, additional feedback indicated that patients found the music intervention beneficial and requested use of music during future procedures. PMID:24619452

  8. [The phenomenology and psychodynamics of affects in borderline patients].

    PubMed

    Leichsenring, Falk

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the phenomenology and psychodynamics of affects in borderline patients. The first part demonstrates that in most current conceptions of the borderline disorder affective disturbances are regarded as to be characteristic. In this context, the strong overlap between borderline disorders and affective disorders found in many empirical studies is described and different hypotheses are presented to explain this phenomenon. The second part of this review is concerned with the psychodynamics of affects in borderline patients. The role of affects in thinking, behaviour, self perception and the regulation of object relations is discussed. Borderline and other severe personality disorders are assessed from the perspective of affective disturbances. The psychodynamic functions of particularly characteristic affects such as anger, anxiety, depression and boredom are discussed. The close connection between affective and cognitive functioning in borderline patients is described and evaluated with regard to modern theories of affect and cognition. Finally, the role of affects in the treatment of borderline patients is discussed. PMID:15510348

  9. Diagnostic and treatment delay, quality of life and satisfaction with care in colorectal cancer patients: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to recent improvements in colorectal cancer survival, patient-reported outcomes, including health-related quality of life and satisfaction with care, have become well-established endpoints to determine the impact of the disease on the lives of patients. The aim of this study is to determine prospectively, in a cohort of colorectal cancer incident cases: a) health-related quality of life, b) satisfaction with hospital-based care, and c) functional status. A secondary objective is to determine whether diagnostic/therapeutic delay influence quality of life or patients’ satisfaction levels. Methods/design Single-centre prospective follow-up study of colorectal cancer patients diagnosed during the period 2011–2012 (n = 375). This project was approved by the corresponding ethics review board, and informed consent is obtained from each patient. After diagnosis, patients are interviewed by a trained nurse, obtaining information on sociodemographic characteristics, family history of cancer, first symptoms, symptom perception and reaction to early symptoms. Quality of life is assessed with the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR29 questionnaires, and patients’ satisfaction with care is determined using the EORTC IN-PATSAT32. Functional status is measured with the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale. Clinical records are also reviewed to collect information on comorbidity, tumour characteristics, treatment, hospital consultations and exploratory procedures. Symptoms-to-diagnosis interval is defined as the time from the date of first symptoms until the cytohistological confirmation of cancer. Treatment delay is defined as the time between diagnosis and surgical treatment. All the patients will be followed-up for a maximum of 2 years. For survivors, assessments will be re-evaluated at one and two years after the diagnosis. Multiple linear/logistic regression models will be used to identify variables associated with the patients’ functional status, quality of life

  10. Dispositional Affect in Unique Subgroups of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Danielle B.; Mehta, Swati; Pope, Janet E.; Harth, Manfred; Shapiro, Allan; Teasell, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis may experience increased negative outcomes if they exhibit specific patterns of dispositional affect. Objective. To identify subgroups of patients with rheumatoid arthritis based on dispositional affect. The secondary objective was to compare mood, pain catastrophizing, fear of pain, disability, and quality of life between subgroups. Methods. Outpatients from a rheumatology clinic were categorized into subgroups by a cluster analysis based on dispositional affect. Differences in outcomes were compared between clusters through multivariate analysis of covariance. Results. 227 patients were divided into two subgroups. Cluster 1 (n = 85) included patients reporting significantly higher scores on all dispositional variables (experiential avoidance, anxiety sensitivity, worry, fear of pain, and perfectionism; all p < 0.001) compared to patients in Cluster 2 (n = 142). Patients in Cluster 1 also reported significantly greater mood impairment, pain anxiety sensitivity, and pain catastrophizing (all p < 0.001). Clusters did not differ on quality of life or disability. Conclusions. The present study identifies a subgroup of rheumatoid arthritis patients who score significantly higher on dispositional affect and report increased mood impairment, pain anxiety sensitivity, and pain catastrophizing. Considering dispositional affect within subgroups of patients with RA may help health professionals tailor interventions for the specific stressors that these patients experience. PMID:27445594

  11. Edinburgh primary care depression study: treatment outcome, patient satisfaction, and cost after 16 weeks.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, A. I.; Freeman, C. P.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare the clinical efficacy, patient satisfaction, and cost of three specialist treatments for depressive illness with routine care by general practitioners in primary care. DESIGN--Prospective, randomised allocation to amitriptyline prescribed by a psychiatrist, cognitive behaviour therapy from a clinical psychologist, counselling and case work by a social worker, or routine care by a general practitioner. SUBJECTS AND SETTING--121 patients aged between 18 and 65 years suffering depressive illness (without psychotic features) meeting the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition for major depressive episode in 14 primary care practices in southern Edinburgh. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Standard observer rating of depression at outset and after four and 16 weeks. Numbers of patients recovered at four and 16 weeks. Total length and cost of therapist contact. Structured evaluation of treatment by patients at 16 weeks. RESULTS--Marked improvement in depressive symptoms occurred in all treatment groups over 16 weeks. Any clinical advantages of specialist treatments over routine general practitioner care were small, but specialist treatment involved at least four times as much therapist contact and cost at least twice as much as routine general practitioner care. Psychological treatments, especially social work counselling, were most positively evaluated by patients. CONCLUSIONS--The additional costs associated with specialist treatments of new episodes of mild to moderate depressive illness presenting in primary care were not commensurate with their clinical superiority over routine general practitioner care. A proper cost-benefit analysis requires information about the ability of specialist treatment to prevent future episodes of depression. PMID:1392754

  12. The representation of patient experience and satisfaction in physician rating sites. A criteria-based analysis of English- and German-language sites

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Information on patient experience and satisfaction with individual physicians could play an important role for performance measures, improved health care and health literacy. Physician rating sites (PRSs) bear the potential to be a widely available source for this kind of information. However, patient experience and satisfaction are complex constructs operationalized by multiple dimensions. The way in which PRSs allow users to express and rate patient experience and satisfaction could likely influence the image of doctors in society and the self-understanding of both doctors and patients. This study examines the extent to which PRSs currently represent the constructs of patient experience and satisfaction. Methods First, a systematic review of research instruments for measuring patient experience and satisfaction was conducted. The content of these instruments was analyzed qualitatively to create a comprehensive set of dimensions for patient experience and patient satisfaction. Second, PRSs were searched for systematically in English-language and German-language search engines of Google and Yahoo. Finally, we classified every structured question asked by the different PRS using the set of dimensions of patient experience and satisfaction. Results The qualitative content analysis of the measurement instruments produced 13 dimensions of patient experience and satisfaction. We identified a total of 21 PRSs. No PRSs represented all 13 dimensions of patient satisfaction and experience with its structured questions. The 3 most trafficked English-language PRS represent between 5 and 6 dimensions and the 3 most trafficked German language PRSs between 8 and 11 dimensions The dimensions for patient experience and satisfaction most frequently represented in PRSs included diversely operationalized ones such as professional competence and doctor-patient relationship/support. However, other less complex but nevertheless important dimensions such as communication

  13. Affective instability in patients with chronic pain: a diary approach.

    PubMed

    Rost, Silke; Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri M L; Koval, Peter; Sütterlin, Stefan; Vögele, Claus; Crombez, Geert

    2016-08-01

    Affective instability, conceptualized as fluctuations in mood over time, has been related to ill-health and psychopathology. In this study, we examined the role of affective instability on daily pain outcomes in 70 patients with chronic pain (Mage = 49.7 years; 46 females) using an end-of-day diary. During a baseline phase, patients completed self-reported questionnaires of pain severity, pain duration, disability, depression, and anxiety. During a subsequent diary phase, patients filled out an electronic end-of-day diary over 14 consecutive days assessing daily levels of pain severity, disability, cognitive complaints, negative affect (NA) and positive affect. Affective instability was operationalized as the mean square of successive differences in daily mood (separately for NA and positive affect), which takes into account the size of affective changes over consecutive days. Results indicated that NA instability was positively associated with daily disability, beyond the effects of daily pain severity. Furthermore, NA instability moderated the relationship between daily pain severity and daily disability and the relationship between daily pain severity and daily cognitive complaints. Positive affect instability, however, showed to be unrelated to all outcomes. Current findings extend previous results and reveal the putative role of affective instability on pain-related outcomes and may yield important clinical implications. Indeed, they suggest that targeting NA instability by improving emotion regulation skills may be a strategy to diminish disability and cognitive complaints in patients with chronic pain. PMID:27075427

  14. Treatment Satisfaction and Well-Being in Patients with Myopic Choroidal Neovascularization Treated with Ranibizumab in the REPAIR Study.

    PubMed

    Amoaku, Winfried M; Gale, Richard P; Lotery, Andrew J; Menon, Geeta; Sivaprasad, Sobha; Petrillo, Jennifer; Quinn, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The Ranibizumab for the Treatment of Choroidal Neovascularisation (CNV) Secondary to Pathological Myopia (PM): an Individualized Regimen (REPAIR) trial was a prospective study exploring the efficacy and safety of intravitreal ranibizumab 0.5 mg using an individualized treatment regimen over 12 months. The current study investigated the impact of treatment with ranibizumab as needed (pro re nata [PRN]) on individuals with myopic choroidal neovascularization (mCNV) in the REPAIR study, using patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for treatment satisfaction and well-being. This study included 65 adults with mCNV and a best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) letter score of 24-78 in the study eye. Patients completed the Macular Disease Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (MacTSQ) at months 1, 6 and 12, and the 12-item Well-Being Questionnaire (W-BQ12) at baseline and months 1, 6 and 12. Subgroup analyses investigated the relationship between PROM scores and treatment in the better- or worse-seeing eye (BSE/WSE), number of injections received, baseline BCVA, BCVA improvement and age. Pearson correlations between change in BCVA, MacTSQ scores and W-BQ12 scores were calculated. The main outcome measures were treatment satisfaction measured with the MacTSQ (score 0-72) and well-being measured with the W-BQ12 (score 0-36). Treatment satisfaction significantly increased over the study period (p = 0.0001). Mean MacTSQ scores increased by 9.7 and 10.0 in patients treated in their WSE and BSE, respectively. Treatment satisfaction was highest in individuals receiving only one injection at month 1; however, by month 12, scores were similar across injection subgroups. Patients aged 68 years or older had the highest MacTSQ scores. Well-being scores also significantly increased over the study period (p = 0.03). Mean W-BQ12 scores increased by 1.7 in patients treated in their WSE and by 2.1 in patients treated in their BSE. Individuals aged 40 years or younger had the greatest

  15. Treatment Satisfaction and Well-Being in Patients with Myopic Choroidal Neovascularization Treated with Ranibizumab in the REPAIR Study

    PubMed Central

    Amoaku, Winfried M.; Gale, Richard P.; Lotery, Andrew J.; Menon, Geeta; Sivaprasad, Sobha; Petrillo, Jennifer; Quinn, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The Ranibizumab for the Treatment of Choroidal Neovascularisation (CNV) Secondary to Pathological Myopia (PM): an Individualized Regimen (REPAIR) trial was a prospective study exploring the efficacy and safety of intravitreal ranibizumab 0.5 mg using an individualized treatment regimen over 12 months. The current study investigated the impact of treatment with ranibizumab as needed (pro re nata [PRN]) on individuals with myopic choroidal neovascularization (mCNV) in the REPAIR study, using patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for treatment satisfaction and well-being. This study included 65 adults with mCNV and a best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) letter score of 24–78 in the study eye. Patients completed the Macular Disease Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (MacTSQ) at months 1, 6 and 12, and the 12-item Well-Being Questionnaire (W-BQ12) at baseline and months 1, 6 and 12. Subgroup analyses investigated the relationship between PROM scores and treatment in the better- or worse-seeing eye (BSE/WSE), number of injections received, baseline BCVA, BCVA improvement and age. Pearson correlations between change in BCVA, MacTSQ scores and W-BQ12 scores were calculated. The main outcome measures were treatment satisfaction measured with the MacTSQ (score 0–72) and well-being measured with the W-BQ12 (score 0–36). Treatment satisfaction significantly increased over the study period (p = 0.0001). Mean MacTSQ scores increased by 9.7 and 10.0 in patients treated in their WSE and BSE, respectively. Treatment satisfaction was highest in individuals receiving only one injection at month 1; however, by month 12, scores were similar across injection subgroups. Patients aged 68 years or older had the highest MacTSQ scores. Well-being scores also significantly increased over the study period (p = 0.03). Mean W-BQ12 scores increased by 1.7 in patients treated in their WSE and by 2.1 in patients treated in their BSE. Individuals aged 40 years or younger had the greatest

  16. Suction lipoplasty: a report on complications, undesired results, and patient satisfaction based on 3511 procedures.

    PubMed

    Dillerud, E

    1991-08-01

    Suction lipoplasty comprising 3511 procedures in 2009 patients was followed up prospectively for 6 to 12 months over a 5-year period. Eighty-eight percent of the procedures led to patient satisfaction and 3.4 percent led to dissatisfaction. Males were more dissatisfied than females. No mortality, deep thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, hypotension, or respiratory distress (fat emboli syndrome) was registered. Excessive bleeding and complications from anesthesia were the most common general complications. No hematoma, skin slough, or damage to adjacent organs occurred. Hypertrophic scarring and skin problems caused by external factors were the most common local complications. Only one clinical bacterial infection occurred. Three hundred and seventy-nine undesired results were registered by the 6-month follow-up, and 213 revisions because of asymmetry, underresection, or skin problems were performed. A total of 121 procedures unexpectedly required secondary suction, skin excision, or fat grafting. Forty-five sequelae were not corrected by revisions. Medial thigh, buttock, ankle, and facial suction emerged as the most difficult locations with regard to the results and complication rate. The age group 20 to 49 years emerged as the least troublesome. PMID:1852816

  17. Health Insurance Status May Affect Cancer Patients' Survival

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160304.html Health Insurance Status May Affect Cancer Patients' Survival 2 studies ... certain cancers in America could depend on your health insurance status. Despite improvements in cancer diagnosis and treatment, ...

  18. Effects of music therapy on patient satisfaction and health-related quality of life of hospital inpatients.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Susan E; Davis, Beth A; Secic, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The matched-case control study investigated the effect of inpatient music therapy (MT), including the gift of a compact disc, on patient satisfaction and quality of life. Overall rating of the hospital and likelihood to recommend it (n = 210), and SF-12 quality of life scores (n = 160) were compared between groups. Although no significant difference in overall hospital rating was found, MT patients' recommendation scores were higher (p =.02). The MT patients had marginally better quality of life pain scores (p =.06). Integration of MT with inpatient care can improve the likelihood that patients will recommend the hospital and may impact their perception of pain. PMID:24926737

  19. Improving masticatory performance, bite force, nutritional state and patient's satisfaction with implant overdentures: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Boven, G C; Raghoebar, G M; Vissink, A; Meijer, H J A

    2015-03-01

    Oral function with removable dentures is improved when dental implants are used for support. A variety of methods is used to measure change in masticatory performance, bite force, patient's satisfaction and nutritional state. A systematic review describing the outcome of the various methods to assess patients' appreciation has not been reported. The objective is to systematically review the literature on the possible methods to measure change in masticatory performance, bite force, patient's satisfaction and nutritional state of patients with removable dentures and to describe the outcome of these. Medline, Embase and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched (last search July 1, 2014). The search was completed by hand to identify eligible studies. Two reviewers independently assessed the articles. Articles should be written in English. Study design should be prospective. The outcome should be any assessment of function/satisfaction before and at least 1 year after treatment. Study population should consist of fully edentulous subjects. Treatment should be placement of any kind of root-form implant(s) to support a mandibular and/or maxillary overdenture. Fifty-three of 920 found articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A variety of methods was used to measure oral function; mostly follow-up was 1 year. Most studies included mandibular overdentures, three studies included maxillary overdentures. Implant-supported dentures were accompanied by high patient's satisfaction with regard to denture comfort, but this high satisfaction was not always accompanied by improvement in general quality of life (QoL) and/or health-related QoL. Bite force improved, masseter thickness increased and muscle activity in rest decreased. Patients could chew better and eat more tough foods. No changes were seen in dietary intake, BMI and blood markers. Improvements reported after 1 year apparently decreased slightly with time, at least on the long run. Treating

  20. Job Satisfaction among Community College Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coll, Kenneth; Rice, Robert

    1990-01-01

    Describes a study of job satisfaction and factors influencing satisfaction among community college counselors in Oregon. Reports general dissatisfaction with leadership. Concludes that teaching load, job title, incompatible demands, unclear explanations, and conflicting resources affect counselor satisfaction. (DMM)

  1. Psychosocial Functioning in Depressive Patients: A Comparative Study between Major Depressive Disorder and Bipolar Affective Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Pankaj Kumar; Swami, Mukesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar affective disorder (BAD) are among the leading causes of disability. These are often associated with widespread impairments in all domains of functioning including relational, occupational, and social. The main aim of the study was to examine and compare nature and extent of psychosocial impairment of patients with MDD and BAD during depressive phase. Methodology. 96 patients (48 in MDD group and 48 in BAD group) were included in the study. Patients were recruited in depressive phase (moderate to severe depression). Patients having age outside 18–45 years, psychotic symptoms, mental retardation, and current comorbid medical or axis-1 psychiatric disorder were excluded. Psychosocial functioning was assessed using Range of Impaired Functioning Tool (LIFE-RIFT). Results. Domains of work, interpersonal relationship, life satisfaction, and recreation were all affected in both groups, but the groups showed significant difference in global psychosocial functioning score only (P = 0.031) with BAD group showing more severe impairment. Conclusion. Bipolar depression causes higher global psychosocial impairment than unipolar depression. PMID:24744917

  2. Satisfaction with and Perception of Pain Management among Palliative Patients with Breakthrough Pain: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Pathmawathi, Subramanian; Beng, Tan Seng; Li, Lee Mei; Rosli, Roshaslina; Sharwend, Supermanian; Kavitha, Rasaiah R; Christopher, Boey Chiong Meng

    2015-08-01

    Breakthrough pain is a significant contributor to much suffering by patients. The experience of intense pain may interfere with, and affect, daily life functioning and has major consequences on patients' well-being if it is not well managed. The area of breakthrough pain has not been fully understood. This study thus aimed to explore the experiences of breakthrough pain among palliative patients. A qualitative study based on a series of open-ended interviews among 21 palliative patients suffering from pain at an urban tertiary hospital in Malaysia was conducted. Five themes were generated: (i) pain viewed as an unbearable experience causing misery in the lives of patients, (ii) deterioration of body function and no hope of recovery, (iii) receiving of inadequate pain management for pain, (iv) insensitivity of healthcare providers toward patients' pain experience, and (v) pain coping experiences of patients. The findings revealed that nonpharmacologic approaches such as psychosocial support should be introduced to the patients. Proper guidance and information should be given to healthcare providers to improve the quality of patient care. Healthcare providers should adopt a sensitive approach in caring for patients' needs. The aim is to meet the needs of the patients who want to be pain free or to attain adequate relief of their pain for breakthrough pain. PMID:26256219

  3. WBRT vs. APBI: an interim report of patient satisfaction and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bitter, Samantha M.; Heffron-Cartwright, Patricia; Wennerstrom, Christopher; Weatherford, Jared; Einstein, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine differences in patient's reported quality of life and self-reported breast cosmesis between whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT) and accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) via single and multi-lumen high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for women with early stage breast cancer. Material and methods Patient information was retrospectively reviewed and survey data were prospectively collected for women treated between 2004 to 2014 (APBI) and 2012 to 2014 (WBRT). Criteria for APBI treatments were ER+ (after 2010), N0 (after 2010), T < 3 cm, and post-menopausal. All patients were given a survey with modified FACIT (Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy) breast quality of life questions to rate their amount of pain, self-consciousness, low energy, presence of lymphedema, and breast cosmesis. Results 242 APBI patients and 59 WBRT patients were identified. In the WBRT cohort, 34 women met departmental criteria for APBI treatment (WBRT who were APBI eligible). The FACIT survey was completed by 80 women treated with APBI (33%; mean follow-up time of 14 months), and 26 women treated with WBRT who were APBI eligible (76%; mean follow-up time of 26 months). During the first year post-treatment, low energy (p = 0.009), self-consciousness (p = 0.0004), and lymphedema (p = 0.0002) scores were significantly lower in the APBI cohort when compared to women treated with WBRT who were APBI eligible. During the second year post-treatment, women treated with APBI reported significantly better breast cosmesis (p = 0.04). The single-lumen balloon (score = 6.3/10) was found to be associated with worse cosmesis compared to the multi-lumen balloons (Mammosite ML and Contura; score = 8.2/10; p = 0.002). There were no significant differences in rates of recurrence between balloons or treatments (p > 0.05). Conclusions APBI treated patients reported higher cosmetic satisfaction than patients in the matched WBRT cohort. Quality of life scores tended to

  4. Marriage Preparation: Factors Associated with Consumer Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Mary N.; Lyster, Rosanne Farnden

    1992-01-01

    Evaluated marriage preparation program to determine overall consumer satisfaction with the program, satisfaction with specific content areas, and extent to which consumer characteristics affected satisfaction ratings. Results of survey of 196 couples revealed high overall satisfaction levels, variability in satisfaction by content area, and…

  5. Does Spanish instruction for emergency medicine resident physicians improve patient satisfaction in the emergency department and adherence to medical recommendations?

    PubMed Central

    Stoneking, LR; Waterbrook, AL; Garst Orozco, J; Johnston, D; Bellafiore, A; Davies, C; Nuño, T; Fatás-Cabeza, J; Beita, O; Ng, V; Grall, KH; Adamas-Rappaport, W

    2016-01-01

    Background After emergency department (ED) discharge, Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency are less likely than English-proficient patients to be adherent to medical recommendations and are more likely to be dissatisfied with their visit. Objectives To determine if integrating a longitudinal medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into emergency medicine residency didactics improves patient satisfaction and adherence to medical recommendations in Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency. Methods Our ED has two Emergency Medicine Residency Programs, University Campus (UC) and South Campus (SC). SC program incorporates a medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into their didactics. Real-time Spanish surveys were collected at SC ED on patients who self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking during registration and who were treated by resident physicians from both residency programs. Surveys assessed whether the treating resident physician communicated in the patient’s native Spanish language. Follow-up phone calls assessed patient satisfaction and adherence to discharge instructions. Results Sixty-three patients self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking from August 2014 to July 2015 and were initially included in this pilot study. Complete outcome data were available for 55 patients. Overall, resident physicians spoke Spanish 58% of the time. SC resident physicians spoke Spanish with 66% of the patients versus 45% for UC resident physicians. Patients rated resident physician Spanish ability as very good in 13% of encounters – 17% for SC versus 5% for UC. Patient satisfaction with their ED visit was rated as very good in 35% of encounters – 40% for SC resident physicians versus 25% for UC resident physicians. Of the 13 patients for whom Spanish was the language used during the medical encounter who followed medical recommendations, ten (77%) of these encounters were with SC resident physicians

  6. Study of patient satisfaction in a surgical unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, P.H.; Gupta, Shakti

    2012-01-01

    Background The hospitals have evolved from being an isolated sanatorium to a place with five star facilities. Patients and their relatives coming to the hospital not only expect world-class treatment, but also other facilities to make their stay comfortable in the hospital. This change in expectation has come due to tremendous growth of media and its exposure, as well as commercialization and improvement in facilities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of patient/relatives satisfaction at tertiary care teaching hospital and feedback from them for improvement of the same. Methods The study was conducted by 1. Review of available national and international literature on the subject. 2. Carrying out survey amongst 50 patients and their relatives at one of the surgical unit by using structured questionnaire. 3. By analyzing the data using appropriate statistical methods. Results Eighty two percent people were satisfied with the service at admission counter while 81% were satisfied with room preparation at the time of admission. The nursing services satisfied 80% of people while 92% were satisfied with explanation about disease and treatment by doctor. The behavior of nurses, doctors and orderlies satisfied 92, 92 and 83% of people. The cleanliness of toilets satisfied only 49% while diet services satisfied 78% of people. Conclusion The five major satisfiers were behavior of doctors, explanation about disease and treatment, courtesy of staff at admission counter, behavior and cooperation of nurses. The five major dissatisfiers were cleanliness of toilets, quality of food, explanation about rules and regulation, behavior of orderlies and sanitary attendant and room preparedness. PMID:25983455

  7. Practice Environments and Job Satisfaction in Patient-Centered Medical Homes

    PubMed Central

    Alidina, Shehnaz; Rosenthal, Meredith B.; Schneider, Eric C.; Singer, Sara J.; Friedberg, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE We undertook a study to evaluate the effects of medical home transformation on job satisfaction in the primary care setting. METHODS We collected primary data from 20 primary care practices participating in medical home pilot projects in Rhode Island and Colorado from 2009 to 2011. We surveyed clinicians and staff about the quality of their practice environments (eg, office chaos, communication, difficulties in providing safe, high-quality care) and job satisfaction at baseline and 30 months, and about stress, burnout, and intention to leave at 30 months. We interviewed practice leaders about the impact of pilot project participation. We assessed longitudinal changes in the practice environment and job satisfaction and, in the final pilot year, examined cross-sectional associations between the practice environment and job satisfaction, stress, burnout, and intention to leave. RESULTS Between baseline and 30 months, job satisfaction improved in Rhode Island (P =.03) but not in Colorado. For both pilot projects, reported difficulties in providing safe, high-quality care decreased (P <.001), but emphasis on quality and the level of office chaos did not change significantly. In cross-sectional analyses, fewer difficulties in providing safe, high-quality care and more open communication were associated with greater job satisfaction. Greater office chaos and an emphasis on electronic information were associated with greater stress and burnout. CONCLUSIONS Medical home transformations that emphasize quality and open communication while minimizing office chaos may offer the best chances of improving job satisfaction. PMID:25024241

  8. New aspects on patients affected by dysferlin deficient muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Klinge, Lars; Aboumousa, Ahmed; Eagle, Michelle; Hudson, Judith; Sarkozy, Anna; Vita, Gianluca; Charlton, Richard; Roberts, Mark; Straub, Volker; Barresi, Rita; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the dysferlin gene lead to limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B, Miyoshi myopathy and distal anterior compartment myopathy. A cohort of 36 patients affected by dysferlinopathy is described, in the first UK study of clinical, genetic, pathological and biochemical data. The diagnosis was established by reduction of dysferlin in the muscle biopsy and subsequent mutational analysis of the dysferlin gene. Seventeen mutations were novel; the majority of mutations were small deletions/insertions, and no mutational hotspots were identified. Sixty-one per cent of patients (22 patients) initially presented with limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B, 31% (11 patients) with a Miyoshi phenotype, one patient with proximodistal mode of onset, one patient with muscle stiffness after exercise and one patient as a symptomatic carrier. A wider range of age of onset was noted than previously reported, with 25% of patients having first symptoms before the age of 13 years. Independent of the initial mode of presentation, in our cohort of patients the gastrocnemius muscle was the most severely affected muscle leading to an inability to stand on tiptoes, and lower limbs were affected more severely than upper limbs. As previous anecdotal evidence on patients affected by dysferlinopathy suggests good muscle prowess before onset of symptoms, we also investigated pre-symptomatic fitness levels of the patients. Fifty-three per cent of the patients were very active and sporty before the onset of symptoms which makes the clinical course of dysferlinopathy unusual within the different forms of muscular dystrophy and provides a challenge to understanding the underlying pathomechanisms in this disease. PMID:19528035

  9. [Effect of using an instrument for continuous evaluation of nursing quality in terms of employment satisfaction and of their affective implications].

    PubMed

    Maes, Blandine; Fontanaud, Nelly; Pronost, Anne-Marie

    2010-09-01

    Medical staff are directly concerned by improving the quality of care. The goal of this study is to assess qualitatively the effects of the application of a Global Assessment Instrument for the Quality of Care on thirty nurses divided in two groups: an experimental group--who participated in the IGE-QSI--and another "witness" group--who participated in another project. The theory developed with the research involves the affective implication and satisfaction at work. Affective implication is the emotional attachment of the employee vis-a-vis the hospital. Satisfaction at work is a positive answer of the worker to their professional environment. The results of the research show that satisfaction in the workplace could be the result of professional experience and maturity. Hence, there could be a link between personal values and attitude that could encourage the implication of the staff in management. Responsibilities, recognition and the feeling of belonging to a group are part of the positive incentives and help develop management objectives. PMID:20957802

  10. Factors that shape the patient's hospital experience and satisfaction with lower limb arthroplasty: an exploratory thematic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lane, J V; Hamilton, D F; MacDonald, D J; Ellis, C; Howie, C R

    2016-01-01

    Objective It is generally accepted that the patients’ hospital experience can influence their overall satisfaction with the outcome of lower limb arthroplasty; however, little is known about the factors that shape the hospital experience. The aim of this study was to develop an understanding of what patients like and do not like about their hospital experience with a view to providing insight into where service improvements could have the potential to improve the patient experience and their satisfaction, and whether they would recommend the procedure. Design A mixed methods (quan-QUAL) approach. Setting Large regional teaching hospital. Participants 216 patients who had completed a postoperative postal questionnaire at 12 months following total knee or total hip arthroplasty. Outcome measures Overall satisfaction with the outcome of surgery, whether to recommend the procedure to another and the rating of patient hospital experience. Free text comments on the best and worst aspects of their hospital stay were evaluated using qualitative thematic analysis. Results Overall, 77% of patients were satisfied with their surgery, 79% reported a good–excellent hospital experience and 85% would recommend the surgery to another. Qualitative analysis revealed clear themes relating to communication, pain relief and the process experience. Comments on positive aspects of the hospital experience were related to feeling well informed and consulted about their care. Comments on the worst aspects of care were related to being made to wait without explanation, moved to different wards and when they felt invisible to the healthcare staff caring for them. Conclusions Positive patient experiences were closely linked to effective patient–health professional interactions and logistics of the hospital processes. Within arthroplasty services, the patient experience of healthcare could be enhanced by further attention to concepts of patient-centred care. Practical examples of this

  11. Are physicians' ratings of pain affected by patients' physical attractiveness?

    PubMed

    Hadjistavropoulos, H D; Ross, M A; von Baeyer, C L

    1990-01-01

    The degree to which physical attractiveness and nonverbal expressions of pain influence physicians' perceptions of pain was investigated. Photographs of eight female university students were represented in four experimental conditions created by the manipulation of cosmetics, hairstyles, and facial expressions: (a) attractive-no pain, (b) attractive-pain, (c) unattractive-no pain, and (d) unattractive-pain. Each photograph was accompanied by a brief description of the patient's pain problem that was standard across conditions. Medical residents (N = 60) viewed the photographs and rated each patient's pain, distress, negative affective experience, health, personality, blame for the situation, and the physician's own solicitude for the patient. The results showed that physicians' ratings of pain were influenced both by attractiveness of patients and by nonverbal expressions of pain. Unattractive patients, and patients who were expressing pain, were perceived as experiencing more pain, distress, and negative affective experiences than attractive patients and patients who were not expressing pain. Unattractive patients also received higher ratings of solicitude on the doctor's part and lower ratings of health than attractive patients. Physician's assessments of pain appear to be influenced by the physical attractiveness of the patient. PMID:2367884

  12. A Structural Equation Model of the Factors Affecting Filipino University Students' Shadow Education Satisfaction and Behavioural Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Castro, Belinda V.; de Guzman, Allan B.

    2014-01-01

    The overall intent of this exploratory study is to test a model that considers demographic characteristics, attitudes toward shadow education and shadow education institutions' service attributes as antecedents of satisfaction level and behavioural intentions among a select group of Filipino university students. To test the seven hypotheses…

  13. Teacher Satisfaction with School and Psychological Well-Being Affects Their Readiness to Help Children with Mental Health Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisask, Merike; Värnik, Peeter; Värnik, Airi; Apter, Alan; Balazs, Judit; Balint, Maria; Bobes, Julio; Brunner, Romuald; Corcoran, Paul; Cosman, Doina; Feldman, Dana; Haring, Christian; Kahn, Jean-Pierre; Poštuvan, Vita; Tubiana, Alexandra; Sarchiapone, Marco; Wasserman, Camilla; Carli, Vladimir; Hoven, Christina W.; Wasserman, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In support of a whole-school approach to mental health promotion, this study was conducted to find out whether and how significantly teachers' satisfaction with school and their subjective psychological well-being are related to the belief that they can help pupils with mental health problems. Design: Cross-sectional data were…

  14. Importance Has Been Considered in Satisfaction Evaluation: An Experimental Examination of Locke's Range-of-Affect Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Chia-huei; Yao, Grace

    2007-01-01

    Importance weighting is a common practice in quality of life (QOL) measurement research. Based on the widespread idea that important domains should make a greater contribution to individuals' QOL total score, the weighting procedure of multiplying item satisfaction by an item's importance has been adopted in many QOL instruments. Locke's [1969,…

  15. Multinational development of a questionnaire assessing patient satisfaction with anticoagulant treatment: the 'Perception of Anticoagulant Treatment Questionnaire' (PACT-Q©)

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Martin H; Marrel, Alexia; Carita, Paulo; Anderson, David; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Crijns, Harry; Consoli, Silla; Arnould, Benoit

    2009-01-01

    Background The side effects and burden of anticoagulant treatments may contribute to poor compliance and consequently to treatment failure. A specific questionnaire is necessary to assess patients' needs and their perceptions of anticoagulant treatment. Methods A conceptual model of expectation and satisfaction with anticoagulant treatment was designed by an advisory board and used to guide patient (n = 31) and clinician (n = 17) interviews in French, US English and Dutch. Patients had either atrial fibrillation (AF), deep venous thrombosis (DVT), or pulmonary embolism (PE). Following interviews, three PACT-Q language versions were developed simultaneously and further pilot-tested by 19 patients. Linguistic validations were performed for additional language versions. Results Initial concepts were developed to cover three areas of interest: 'Treatment', 'Disease and Complications' and 'Information about disease and anticoagulant treatment'. After clinician and patient interviews, concepts were further refined into four domains and 17 concepts; test versions of the PACT-Q were then created simultaneously in three languages, each containing 27 items grouped into four domains: "Treatment Expectations" (7 items), "Convenience" (11 items), "Burden of Disease and Treatment" (2 items) and "Anticoagulant Treatment Satisfaction" (7 items). No item was deleted or added after pilot testing as patients found the PACT-Q easy to understand and appropriate in length in all languages. The PACT-Q was divided into two parts: the first part to measure the expectations and the second to measure the convenience, burden and treatment satisfaction, for evaluation prior to and after anticoagulant treatment, respectively. Eleven additional language versions were linguistically validated. Conclusion The PACT-Q has been rigorously developed and linguistically validated. It is available in 14 languages for use with thromboembolic patients, including AF, PE and DVT patients. Its validation and

  16. Carbon dioxide laser ablation of dermatosis papulosa nigra: high satisfaction and few complications in patients with pigmented skin.

    PubMed

    Ali, Faisal R; Bakkour, Waseem; Ferguson, Janice E; Madan, Vishal

    2016-04-01

    Dermatosis papulosa nigra (DPN) is a common condition of pigmented skin. Whilst lesions are benign, they may be symptomatic or cosmetically disfiguring. Ablative lasers have previously been reported as a useful therapeutic modality in DPN. We report the largest case series to date of patients with DPN ablated with the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser. A retrospective case note review was conducted of all patients with DPN treated in our laser clinic in the last five years, and a post-treatment telephone survey was undertaken to assess patient satisfaction. Forty-five patients were identified, with a median age of 41 years (range 25-74 years), of whom 37 (82 %) were female. The median number of treatments undertaken was three (range 1-10). Of the 18 respondents to the telephone survey, when asked to grade their satisfaction with the procedure out of 10, median response was 9.5 (range 6-10) with nine patients citing the maximum score of 10. All patients replied that their confidence had improved following the procedure and that they would recommend the treatment to other patients. Five respondents (28 %) reported recurrence of a few lesions following CO2 laser ablation; the remaining 13 respondents (72 %) reported no recurrence of DPN. No respondents reported any other post-procedural complications (including scarring, hypopigmentation and hyperpigmentation). We advocate use of the CO2 laser as a safe, convenient means of treating DPN, with a high degree of patient satisfaction, low recurrence rate and few complications. PMID:26868030

  17. Rapidly disintegrating vagina retentive cream suppositories of progesterone: development, patient satisfaction and in vitro/in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Bendas, Ehab Rasmy; Basalious, Emad B

    2016-05-01

    Our objective was to develop novel vagina retentive cream suppositories (VRCS) of progesterone having rapid disintegration and good vaginal retention. VRCS of progesterone were prepared using oil in water (o/w) emulsion of mineral oil or theobroma oil in hard fat and compared with conventional vaginal suppositories (CVS) prepared by hard fat. VRCS formulations were tested for content uniformity, disintegration, melting range, in vitro release and stability studies. The most stable formulation (VRCS I) was subjected to scaling-up manufacturing and patients' satisfaction test. The rapid disintegration, good retentive properties are applicable through the inclusion of emulsified theobroma oil rather than hydrophilic surfactant into the hard fat bases. The release profile of progesterone from VRCS I showed a biphasic pattern due to the formation of progesterone reservoir in the emulsified theobroma oil. All volunteers involved in patients' satisfaction test showed high satisfactory response to the tested formulation (VRCS). The in vivo pharmacokinetic study suggests that VRCS of progesterone provided higher rate and extent of absorption compared to hard fat based suppositories. Our results proposed that emulsified theobroma oil could be promising to solve the problems of poor patients' satisfaction and variability of drug absorption associated with hard fat suppositories. PMID:25567033

  18. Determinants of patient satisfaction with outpatient health services at public and private hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Woldie, Mirkuzie; Ololo, Shimeles

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Patients have explicit desires or requests for services when they visit hospitals. However, inadequate discovery of their needs may result in patient dissatisfaction. This study aimed to determine the levels and determinants of patient satisfaction with outpatient health services provided at public and private hospitals in Addis Ababa, Central Ethiopia. Methods A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted from 27 March to 30 April 2010. The study included 5 private and 5 public hospitals. Participants were selected using systematic random sampling. A pre-tested and contextually prepared structured questionnaire was used to conduct interviews. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, factor analysis and multiple linear regressions were performed using computer software (SPSS 16.0). Results About 18.0% of the patients at the public hospitals were very satisfied whilst 47.9% were just satisfied with the corresponding proportions a bit higher at private hospitals. Self-judged health status, expectation about the services, perceived adequacy of consultation duration, perceived providers’ technical competency, perceived welcoming approach and perceived body signalling were determinants of satisfaction at both public and private hospitals. Conclusions Although patients at the private hospitals were more satisfied than those at the public hospitals with the health care they received, five of the predictors of patient satisfaction in this study were common to both settings. Thus, hospitals in both categories should work to improve the competencies of their employees, particularly health professionals, to win the interests of the clients and have a physical structure that better fits the expectations of the patients.

  19. Clinical Trial on the Incidence of Wound Infection and Patient Satisfaction After Stoma Closure: Comparison of Two Skin Closure Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Il; Bae, Sun Mi; Park, Dong Guk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Surgical site infection (SSI) is one of the most common complications that can occur after stoma closure. Reports have described differences in the incidence of wound infection depending on the skin closure technique, but there is no consensus on the ideal closure technique for a stoma wound. The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of SSI and the patient satisfaction between a circumferential purse-string approximation (CPA) and a primary linear closure (PC) of a stoma wound. Methods This prospective nonrandomized trial enrolled 48 patients who underwent a stoma closure from February 2010 to October 2013. Patients were divided into two groups according to the stoma closing technique: the CPA group (n = 34) and the PC group (n = 14). The incidences of SSI for the two groups were compared, and the patients' satisfaction with the stoma closure was determined by using a questionnaire. Results SSI occurred in 3 of 48 patients (6.3%) and was more frequent in the PC group than in the CPA group (3/14 [21.4%] vs. 0/34 [0%], P = 0.021). Time to complete healing after stoma closure in the CPA group was 32 days (range, 14-61 days). Patients in the CPA group were more satisfied with the resulting wound scar (P = 0.043). Conclusion After stoma closure, CPA was associated with a significantly lower incidence of wound infection and greater patient satisfaction compared to PC. However, with the CPA technique, the time to heal is longer than it is with PC. PMID:25745624

  20. The effect of laser epilation on recurrence and satisfaction in patients with sacrococcygeal pilonidal disease: a prospective randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Demircan, Firat; Akbulut, Sami; Yavuz, Ridvan; Agtas, Huseyin; Karabulut, Koray; Yagmur, Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    Background: The primary aim of this prospective study was to investigate the effects of laser epilation on patient satisfaction and recurrence in patients who underwent pilonidal sinus surgery. Method: Sixty patients scheduled for pilonidal sinus surgery in our clinic between 2011 and 2012 were enrolled in this prospective randomized controlled study. Patients were divided in two groups of 30 patients each. Only the Karydakis flap reconstruction technique was performed in the first group. Two sessions of laser epilation were applied in the second group in addition to Karydakis flap reconstruction. The patients in the second group underwent laser epilation 2 weeks before and 3 weeks after the surgery for a total of 2 times in a private office. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of age, gender, smoking usage, ASA Score, duration of patient’s complaints, BMI and hospital stay. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of surgical site infection, wound separation, abscess formation at the any time postoperatively. There were statistically significant differences between the two groups in the first week post operation considering the VAS pain score (P<0.03) and VAS satisfaction score (P<0.01). While there were statistically significant differences between the two groups in the first month post operation considering the VAS pain score (P<0.0001), there were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of VAS satisfaction score in the first and three month postoperatively. In the telephone interviews done 1 year after the surgery, recurrence were detected in 4% of first group and in 20% of second group. Recurrence rates were significantly higher in the second group (P=0.045). Conclusion: Our results show that laser epilation does not reduce the relapse rates in pilonidal sinus surgery, as expected. It is obvious that prospective randomized studies need to

  1. Satisfaction with Life in Orofacial Pain Disorders: Associations and Theoretical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Boggero, Ian A.; Rojas-Ramirez, Marcia V.; de Leeuw, Reny; Carlson, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To test if patients with masticatory myofascial pain, local myalgia, centrally mediated myalgia, disc displacement, capsulitis/synovitis, or continuous neuropathic pain differed in self-reported satisfaction with life. The study also tested if satisfaction with life was similarly predicted by measures of physical, emotional, and social functioning across disorders. Methods Satisfaction with life, fatigue, affective distress, social support, and pain data were extracted from the medical records of 343 patients seeking treatment for chronic orofacial pain. Patients were grouped by primary diagnosis assigned following their initial appointment. Satisfaction with life was compared between disorders, with and without pain intensity entered as a covariate. Disorder-specific linear regression models using physical, emotional, and social predictors of satisfaction with life were computed. Results Patients with centrally mediated myalgia reported significantly lower satisfaction with life than did patients with any of the other five disorders. Inclusion of pain intensity as a covariate weakened but did not eliminate the effect. Satisfaction with life was predicted by measures of physical, emotional, and social functioning, but these associations were not consistent across disorders. Conclusions Results suggest that reduced satisfaction with life in patients with centrally mediated myalgia is not due only to pain intensity. There may be other factors that predispose people to both reduced satisfaction with life and centrally mediated myalgia. Furthermore, the results suggest that satisfaction with life is differentially influenced by physical, emotional, and social functioning in different orofacial pain disorders. PMID:27128473

  2. Perceived need for information among patients with a haematological malignancy: associations with information satisfaction and treatment decision-making preferences.

    PubMed

    Rood, Janneke A J; van Zuuren, Florence J; Stam, Frank; van der Ploeg, Tjeerd; Eeltink, Corien; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M; Huijgens, Peter C

    2015-06-01

    For patients with haematological malignancies, information on disease, prognosis, treatment and impact on quality of life is of the utmost importance. To gain insight into the perceived need for information in relation to sociodemographic and clinical parameters, comorbidity, quality of life (QoL) and information satisfaction, we compiled a questionnaire based on existing validated questionnaires. A total of 458 patients diagnosed with a haematological malignancy participated. The perceived need for information was moderate to high (40-70%). Multivariate regression analyses showed that a higher need for information was related to younger age, worse QoL, being member of a patient society and moderate comorbidity. The need for disease and treatment-related information was higher than the need for psychosocial information. A higher need for disease and treatment-related information was associated to being diagnosed with multiple myeloma. A higher need for psychosocial information was related to a lower educational level. The information provision could be improved according to 41% of the patients. Higher satisfaction with provided information was associated with better QoL. Most patients (62%) reported that they wanted to be fully informed about their illness and actively involved in treatment decision-making. The results contribute to improving patient-tailored information provision and shared decision-making in clinical practice. PMID:24811073

  3. The applicability of the tetraclass model to the management of the patient satisfaction in the pharmacies

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Guenka; Clerfeuille, Fabrice; Vakrilova, Milena; Mitkov, Cvetomir; Poubanne, Yannick

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study the possibilities of the tetraclass model for the evaluation of the changes in the consumer satisfaction from the provided pharmacy services during the time. Methods Within the same 4 months period in 2004 and 2006 were questioned at approximately 10 pharmacy consumers per working day. Every consumer evaluated the 34 service elements on a 5 points semantic-differential scale. The technique of the correspondence data analysis was used for the categorisation of the services. Results Most of the services have been categorized as basic ones. For the age group up to 40 years the access to pharmacy became a key element and external aspects became a secondary element in 2006 year. For the group of patients that are using the services of the pharmacy for more than 2 years, availability of phone connection, quality of answers and product prices move from plus to secondary element. The ratio quality/price moves from the group of basic to key services, visibility of the prices and hygiene became basic elements from secondary ones. During the two years period, all the service elements connected with the staff as availability, identification, good looking, confidence, dressing, advices, technical competence, explanation, and time spent with clients remain basic services. The confidentiality of the staff remains always a key element. Conclusion Our study shows that the tetraclass model allows taking more informed managerial decisions in the pharmacies, as well as, is providing information for the concrete area of services and possible measures. In case of a development of a simple statistical program for quick processing of the inquiry data, the method will became applicable and affordable even for small pharmacies. PMID:25147588

  4. Evaluating aesthetics of the nasolabial region in children with cleft lip and palate: professional analysis and patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Tatiana Saito; Andre, Marcia

    2012-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate is one of the most common deformities of the craniofacial region, and treatment of this deformity is essential for social reintegration. One of the major goals of surgery and treatment of craniofacial deformities is to improve the aesthetic appearance of the face, and thereby improve the patient’s social acceptability. Here, we present a critical review of the criteria for aesthetic evaluation of the nasolabial region in cleft patients by assessing publications with the highest level of evidence, including professional evaluation, and patient satisfaction. The findings indicate treatment of this condition represents a major challenge for multidisciplinary team care. PMID:23152672

  5. Patient satisfaction and perceived quality of care: evidence from a cross-sectional national exit survey of HIV and non-HIV service users in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Dansereau, Emily; Masiye, Felix; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Masters, Samuel H; Burstein, Roy; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations between perceived quality of care and patient satisfaction among HIV and non-HIV patients in Zambia. Setting Patient exit survey conducted at 104 primary, secondary and tertiary health clinics across 16 Zambian districts. Participants 2789 exiting patients. Primary independent variables Five dimensions of perceived quality of care (health personnel practice and conduct, adequacy of resources and services, healthcare delivery, accessibility of care, and cost of care). Secondary independent variables Respondent, visit-related, and facility characteristics. Primary outcome measure Patient satisfaction measured on a 1–10 scale. Methods Indices of perceived quality of care were modelled using principal component analysis. Statistical associations between perceived quality of care and patient satisfaction were examined using random-effect ordered logistic regression models, adjusting for demographic, socioeconomic, visit and facility characteristics. Results Average satisfaction was 6.9 on a 10-point scale for non-HIV services and 7.3 for HIV services. Favourable perceptions of health personnel conduct were associated with higher odds of overall satisfaction for non-HIV (OR=3.53, 95% CI 2.34 to 5.33) and HIV (OR=11.00, 95% CI 3.97 to 30.51) visits. Better perceptions of resources and services were also associated with higher odds of satisfaction for both non-HIV (OR=1.66, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.55) and HIV (OR=4.68, 95% CI 1.81 to 12.10) visits. Two additional dimensions of perceived quality of care—healthcare delivery and accessibility of care—were positively associated with higher satisfaction for non-HIV patients. The odds of overall satisfaction were lower in rural facilities for non-HIV patients (OR 0.69; 95% CI 0.48 to 0.99) and HIV patients (OR=0.26, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.41). For non-HIV patients, the odds of satisfaction were greater in hospitals compared with health centres/posts (OR 1.78; 95% CI 1.27 to 2.48) and lower at

  6. Comparison of marginal bone loss and patient satisfaction in single and double-implant assisted mandibular overdenture by immediate loading

    PubMed Central

    Khoshhal, Masume; Ebrahimzadeh, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to compare the coronal bone level and patient satisfaction in 1-implant and 2-implant assisted mandibular overdentures. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty patients who had maladaptive mandibular dentures were treated in this study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups. The first group received 1 implant (Simple line II, Implantium, South Korea) in their mandibular midline and the second group received 2 implants in their B and D regions (according to Misch's category). If the primary stability of each implant was at least 60 ISQ, ball attachment was placed and denture relined with soft liner. After 6 weeks, retentive cap incorporated with hard acrylic resin. In the 6 and 12 months recalls, periapical digital radiograph were made and visual analogue scale questionnaires were used to record patient satisfaction. The Friedman test was done for comparing the presurgical and postsurgical parameters in each group and the U-Mann Whitney test (P<.05) was done for comparison of post-treatment results between the two groups. RESULTS All implants achieved sufficient primary stability to be immediately loaded. Patient satisfaction was high, and there were no significant differences between two groups (P>.05). In addition, mean marginal bone loss was 0.6 ± 0.67 mm in the first group and 0.6 ± 0.51 mm in the second group, after 12 month. Mean marginal bone loss showed no significant differences between two groups. CONCLUSION This preliminary one-year result indicated that mandibular overdentures anchored to a single implant can be a safe and cost-effective method as a starting step for implant-overdenture treatment. PMID:26140170

  7. The psychometric validation of a US English satisfaction measure for patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and lower urinary tract symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Black, Libby; Grove, Alyson; Morrill, Betsy

    2009-01-01

    Background The purpose of the current study was to validate the US English Patient Perception of Study Medication (PPSM) questionnaire, which measures patient satisfaction with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) treatment and was administered to men with BPH lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) enrolled in a multi-national clinical trial. Methods Patients with moderate to severe BPH symptoms completed three disease-specific measures: The International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), the BPH Impact Index (BII) and the PPSM, at baseline (after completion of the placebo run-in period) and at every 13-week clinic visit thereafter for the duration of the study treatment period. The PPSM was analysed to assess its variability, reliability and validity. Results There were 879 patients included in the analyses, with a mean age of 66.7 years. The PPSM was found to comprise two factors – PPSM-Global and PPSM-Pain, with a Total Score ranging from 7 to 49. It demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha ranged from .95 to .97) and also demonstrated convergent validity through significant correlations with the IPSS (.48 to .58), IPSS Quality of Life (QoL) item (.41 to .63) and BII (.31 to .45) and known-groups validity against the IPSS, IPSS QoL item and BII. Conclusion Results support the use of the PPSM as a measure of satisfaction in BPH patient groups. PMID:19545384

  8. 2015 Arte Poster Competition First Place Winner: Assessing the Correlation Between Patient Anxiety and Satisfaction for Mohs Surgery.

    PubMed

    Locke, Maren C; Wilkerson, Eric C; Mistur, Rachel L; Nisar, Mahrukh; Love, W Elliot

    2015-09-01

    Skin cancer and the surgical treatment thereof have the potential to be sources of great anxiety for patients. Examination of patient satisfaction, anxiety, and contributing factors has the potential to provide information surgeons can use to implement practices that have an impact on patient anxiety and satisfaction regarding dermatologic surgery. This study used a prospective interview to catalog patients' anxiety and experiences before and during the surgical process. Our results indicate that several pre- and perioperative factors have the potential to decrease a patient's overall anxiety. Notably, 33% of surgical patients reported a decrease in anxiety from the time of diagnosis until the day of surgery. Factors that contributed to this included a call discussing the diagnosis and what to expect on the day of surgery as well as reading written material or searching the internet for more information regarding the procedure. Furthermore, a call from the physician compared to a call from a nurse or other team member showed a greater effect on decreasing anxiety. During the surgical procedure, our results highlight several factors that can decrease a patient's anxiety. Most notably, eating, watching TV, bringing a guest, and engaging in small talk with surgeon and staff during the procedure subjectively decreased patients' anxiety. In summary, our results suggest that patients respond to a variety of factors to reduce anxiety and that each patient derives relief from anxiety in different manners. Therefore, offering a spectrum of comforting or distracting activities during the Mohs procedure is ideal and may reduce the need for pharmacologic anxiolytics. PMID:26355630

  9. Preference, satisfaction and critical errors with Genuair and Breezhaler inhalers in patients with COPD: a randomised, cross-over, multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Sergi; Feimer, Jan; De Soyza, Anthony; Sauleda Roig, Jaume; Haughney, John; Padullés, Laura; Seoane, Beatriz; Rekeda, Ludmyla; Ribera, Anna; Chrystyn, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Background: The specific attributes of inhaler devices can influence patient use, satisfaction and treatment compliance, and may ultimately impact on clinical outcomes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Aims: To assess patient preference, satisfaction and critical inhaler technique errors with Genuair (a multidose inhaler) and Breezhaler (a single-dose inhaler) after 2 weeks of daily use. Methods: Patients with COPD and moderate to severe airflow obstruction were randomised in a cross-over, open-label, multicentre study to consecutive once-daily inhalations of placebo via Genuair and Breezhaler, in addition to current COPD medication. The primary end point was the proportion of patients who preferred Genuair versus Breezhaler after 2 weeks (Patient Satisfaction and Preference Questionnaire). Other end points included overall satisfaction and correct use of the inhalers after 2 weeks, and willingness to continue with each device. Results: Of the 128 patients enrolled, 127 were included in the safety population (male n=91; mean age 67.6 years). Of the 110 of the 123 patients in the intent-to-treat population who indicated an inhaler preference, statistically significantly more patients preferred Genuair than Breezhaler (72.7 vs. 27.3%; P<0.001). Mean overall satisfaction scores were also greater for Genuair than for Breezhaler (5.9 vs. 5.3, respectively; P<0.001). After 2 weeks, there was no statistically significant difference in the number of patients who made ⩾1 critical inhaler technique error with Breezhaler than with Genuair (7.3 vs. 3.3%, respectively). Conclusions: Patient overall preference and satisfaction was significantly higher with Genuair compared with Breezhaler. The proportion of patients making critical inhaler technique errors was low with Genuair and Breezhaler. PMID:25927321

  10. Efficacy, Safety, and Subject Satisfaction of a Specified Skin Care Regimen to Cleanse, Medicate, Moisturize, and Protect the Skin of Patients Under Treatment for Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, James Q.; Gold, Michael; Rueda, Maria José; Brandt, Staci; Winkelman, Warren J.

    2015-01-01

    Optimal management of acne vulgaris requires incorporation of several components including patient education, selection of a rational therapeutic regimen, dedicated adherence with the program by the patient, and integration of proper skin care. Unfortunately, the latter component is often overlooked or not emphasized strongly enough to the patient. Proper skin care may reduce potential irritation that can be associated with topical acne medications and prevents the patient from unknowingly using skin care products that can actually sabotage their treatment. This article reviews the effectiveness, skin tolerability, safety, and patient satisfaction of an open label study in which a specified skin care regimen is used in combination with topical therapy. The study was designed to mirror “real world” management of facial acne vulgaris clinical practice. The skin care regimen used in this study included a brand foam wash and a brand moisturizer with SPF 30 photoprotection, both of which contain ingredients that are included to provide benefits for acne-prone and acne-affected skin. PMID:25610521

  11. Efficacy, safety, and subject satisfaction of a specified skin care regimen to cleanse, medicate, moisturize, and protect the skin of patients under treatment for acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Gold, Michael; Rueda, Maria José; Brandt, Staci; Winkelman, Warren J

    2015-01-01

    Optimal management of acne vulgaris requires incorporation of several components including patient education, selection of a rational therapeutic regimen, dedicated adherence with the program by the patient, and integration of proper skin care. Unfortunately, the latter component is often overlooked or not emphasized strongly enough to the patient. Proper skin care may reduce potential irritation that can be associated with topical acne medications and prevents the patient from unknowingly using skin care products that can actually sabotage their treatment. This article reviews the effectiveness, skin tolerability, safety, and patient satisfaction of an open label study in which a specified skin care regimen is used in combination with topical therapy. The study was designed to mirror "real world" management of facial acne vulgaris clinical practice. The skin care regimen used in this study included a brand foam wash and a brand moisturizer with SPF 30 photoprotection, both of which contain ingredients that are included to provide benefits for acne-prone and acne-affected skin. PMID:25610521

  12. Patient and family satisfaction levels in the intensive care unit after elective cardiac surgery: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial of a preoperative patient education intervention

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Patricia; Chiu, Chun Hung; Ho, Ka Man; Gomersall, Charles David; Underwood, Malcolm John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patients and their families are understandably anxious about the risk of complications and unfamiliar experiences following cardiac surgery. Providing information about postoperative care in the intensive care unit (ICU) to patients and families may lead to lower anxiety levels, and increased satisfaction with healthcare. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the effectiveness of preoperative patient education provided for patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. Methods and analysis 100 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass graft, with or without valve replacement surgery, will be recruited into a 2-group, parallel, superiority, double-blinded randomised controlled trial. Participants will be randomised to either preoperative patient education comprising of a video and ICU tour with standard care (intervention) or standard education (control). The primary outcome measures are the satisfaction levels of patients and family members with ICU care and decision-making in the ICU. The secondary outcome measures are patient anxiety and depression levels before and after surgery. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from the Joint Chinese University of Hong Kong—New Territories East Cluster Clinical Research Ethics Committee (reference number CREC 2015.308). The findings will be presented at conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. Study participants will receive a 1-page plain language summary of results. Trial registration number ChiCTR-IOR-15006971. PMID:27334883

  13. Effect of Intravenous (IV) Assistive Device (VeinViewer) on IV Access Attempts, Procedural Time, and Patient and Nurse Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Ramer, Lois; Hunt, Pauline; Ortega, Erin; Knowlton, Jessica; Briggs, Raymond; Hirokawa, Shinichi

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of VeinViewer for peripheral vascular accessing a pediatric hematology oncology clinic. After obtaining consent, 53 patients were randomly assigned to either the VeinViewer group (n = 27) or standard methods group (n = 26). Data on number of attempts, procedural time, access complications, and patient and nurse satisfaction were collected. Patients randomized to the VeinViewer group required significantly less time to access a vein as compared with the standard methods group (P ≤ .05). Additionally, these patients rated nurses as having significantly more skill than nurses who did not use VeinViewer (P ≤ .05) and assigned significantly higher scores for "overall experience"(P ≤ .05). Responses by nurses using VeinViewer overall saw the device in a positive light. PMID:26510643

  14. Patient and healthcare professional satisfaction with a new, high accuracy blood glucose meter with color range indicator and wireless connectivity.

    PubMed

    Katz, Laurence B; Grady, Mike; Stewart, Lorna; Cameron, Hilary

    2016-07-01

    Accurate self-monitoring of blood glucose is a key component of effective self-management of glycemic control. The OneTouch VerioFlex(™) (OTVF) blood glucose monitoring system (BGMS) was evaluated for accuracy in a clinical setting. Patients also used OTVF for a 1-wk trial period and reported their level of satisfaction with meter features. In a separate study, healthcare professionals used an on-line simulator of the BGMS and answered questions about its potential utility to their patients. OTVF was accurate over a wide glucose range and met lay user and system accuracy blood glucose standards described in ISO15197:2013 as well as the accuracy requirements to fulfill US FDA expectations for 510(k) clearance of BGMS. Patients and healthcare professionals felt the features of OTVF, which has the capability to connect wirelessly to mobile devices and interact wirelessly with diabetes management software, could provide significant benefits to them or their patients. PMID:27232211

  15. The Influence of Changing Nurse Documentation Practices Have on Patient Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaney, Charon D.

    2012-01-01

    Health care leaders in the 21st century face challenges that stem from issues concerning quality care in a cost efficient environment while maintaining customer satisfaction. Technology has played a vital part in offering more advanced diagnostic and surgical equipment. The proliferation of technology has resulted in documentation at the…

  16. Factors affecting job satisfaction and retention of medical laboratory professionals in seven countries of Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Marinucci, Francesco; Majigo, Mtebe; Wattleworth, Matthew; Paterniti, Antonio Damiano; Hossain, Mian Bazle; Redfield, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Effective implementation and sustainability of quality laboratory programmes in Sub-Saharan Africa relies on the development of appropriate staff retention strategies. Assessing the factors responsible for job satisfaction and retention is key for tailoring specific interventions aiming at improving the overall impact of health programmes. A survey was developed to assess these factors among 224 laboratorians working in the laboratory programme the University of Maryland implemented in seven Sub-Saharan African countries. Lack of professional development was the major reason for leaving the previous job for 28% of interviewees who changed jobs in the past five years. Professional development/training opportunities was indicated by almost 90% (195/224) of total interviewees as the most important or a very important factor for satisfaction at their current job. Similarly, regular prof